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Group Title: Aunt Louisa's London toy books
Title: The Zoological gardens
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028219/00001
 Material Information
Title: The Zoological gardens hyænas, stag, jaguar, fox, otter, camel
Series Title: Aunt Louisa's London toy books
Physical Description: 6 leaves : ;
Language: English
Creator: Frederick Warne and Co ( Publisher )
Kronheim & Co ( Printer )
Publisher: Frederick Warne & Co.
Place of Publication: London
Manufacturer: Kronheim & Co.
Publication Date: c. 1875
Copyright Date: 1875
 Subjects
Subject: Animals -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1875   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1875
Genre: non-fiction   ( marcgt )
Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
 Notes
General Note: Cover title.
General Note: Includes publisher's advertisement.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028219
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: notis - AJE8902
oclc - 26099766
alephbibnum - 001736213

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
    Main
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
    Back Cover
        Page 14
Full Text
iWt SAY'S LONDON TOY BOOKS, l/.or Mounted 2/


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HYENAS,


STAG, JAGUAR,


FOX, OTTER,


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THE HYAENAS.


T HERE are two kinds of Hyaenas, the Striped and the Spotted.
They are found both in As-a and Africa, and live in woods and
caves, and come out chiefly at night in search of prey. They will eat
anything-dead bodies, garbage, or living creatures; and they are of
great use in the towns of savage nations, where they act as scavengers,
and eat up all remains of dead or putrid flesh.
The Hyaena has strong teeth, intended rather for grinding than
cutting, and very powerful jaws, by means of which it can lift a prey
of great weight. Its tongue is rough, like the leopard's, and its claws
are short and strong, meant rather for digging than for tearing its food.
The Hyena is a very cowardly animal, and never attacks man
willingly. It prefers flesh in a state of decomposition to that which is
fresh and good; but when it cannot find dead animals, it attacks living
ones, and often carries off the cattle of the natives in African villages.
The cry of the Hyaena is singularly disagreeable.
The Spotted Hyaena is found in Barbary, as well as in all South
Africa. It can be tamed by kind treatment, and made as useful as a
dog; but ill usage renders it dangerous.
The Striped Hyana is so named from the black lines which run
across its yellowish-grey coat. It is found in Asia, as well as in North
Africa.
There are specimens of both these animals in the Zoological
Gardens.
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THE STAG.


T HE Stag is the most beautiful of European animals. It is about
the size of a small horse. The Stag has every year a new set
of horns; it is very timid and gentle, and flies when it hears or sees
any one coming towards it.
The Stag loves to be alone, lying in the thickest parts of forests and
woods, under the great old trees. Its food is grass, leaves, fruits, and
buds; when winter comes, and it can get none of these, it eats lichens,
moss, and heath, or, when these are covered in snow, the bark of
trees.
Stags are bold with any animal except man. Many years ago,
George the Fourth's brother, the Duke of Cumberland, caused a tiger
and a Stag to be shut up in one place; and the Stag, when attacked
by the tiger, made such a brave defence with his horns and hoofs, that
the tiger was beaten, and crouched at a distance; but it was a very
cruel trial of the Stag's strength.
The Doe is very fond of her young one, called a "Fawn," but takes
care- to hide it away in very secret places, for the Stag is a cruel father,
and would kill it if he found it.
The flesh of the Deer.is called "venison," and is a very nice food.
The skin is useful, and the horns make knife-handles, &c.
Stags are hunted for sport in England, but are not killed (generally)
at the end of the chase, but reserved to be hunted again, for the
amusement of those who keep them.
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THE FOX.


T HE Fox is an animal well known to us all. He makes his
home in a burrow in the ground: it is called his earth," and
is divided into three rooms. Out of the first he slyly peeps to watch
his prey or his enemies; in the second he keeps his food; in the third
or farthest one he lives, and here his mate rears her young.
The Fox is a very cunning, clever animal. He goes out at night
to seek for prey, and steals fowls from the hen-roost if he can get in;
he digs rabbits out of their burrows, and robs the nests of partridges
and other game birds of eggs, eating the birds too if he can catch them.
He is also very fond of grapes and honey. He robs the poor bees of
their honest earnings, and when they fly on him to sting him, he rolls
on the ground, and thus crushes them. In fact, he is a sad thief. He
has been seen hunting hares, and springing at an otter to seize its fish.
The Fox is hunted every year, and the hunt is a favourite sport of
Englishmen.
He is a playful animal, and is often seen running after his own tail,
-which is called a brush,"-like a kitten. In cold weather he wraps
it about his nose. The female is a very good mother.
The Fox is not easily tamed, and can never be cured of his habit
of stealing.
"Cunning as a Fox" is a proverb you have heard. The Fox has
been the type of cunning and knavery from very early times.
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THE JAGUAR.


T HE Jaguar is the Leopard of America, and is nearly as strong
and bold as a tiger. It can both climb and swim, and as it feeds
on flesh and fish, it kills both monkeys in the trees, and fish in the
rivers. It is a terrible animal to meet in the forests. One might get
out of the reach of a lion by climbing a tree; but a Jaguar will come
after one. It can break a horse's back by a single blow of its great
and powerful paw.
I have read a story, told by Humboldt, the great traveller, of two
little children being seated at play out of doors in an Indian village
near a forest, when a Jaguar came out of it and joined them. It began
to jump about and play like a cat; till suddenly it scratched the face
of one of them, a little boy: he began to cry, and the other child-a
tiny girl-struck the Jaguar with a stick she held; but it did not mind
the blow, luckily; and before it grew cross, or became angry, and recol-
lected that its little playmates were good to eat, the Indian hunters
came home; and as soon as it heard them it ran off into the woods.
The good GOD thus kept the helpless children safe from the anger
of this ravenous creature.
We ought to be very thankful that there are no wild beasts in our
country, except in the Zoological Gardens, in London, where it is a
pleasure, to look at them, as we know that they cannot get at us to
hurt us.
At sunrise and at sunset the Jaguar utters two cries, well known to
the hunters, and by which they can find his haunt, where they attack
and kill him for his valuable skin.






































































































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THE OTTER.


OTTERS were created by GoD for seeking their prey in water,
therefore He has given them webbed feet, with which they can
swim like a fish, flattened heads, and nostrils furnished with a valve or
covering, which opens and shuts, so that they can keep out the water
when beneath the surface. The tail is flat and moveable, and serves
as a rudder to steer them, and they have strong nails, with which they
burrow in the banks of rivers. Their fur is valuable, and they are
hunted for it by men with dogs. They live in deep holes in the banks
of rivers, and feed on fish.
Otters are found in every part of the world, but are most common
in Europe and America.
They can be tamed, if taken when quite young, and can be made
to fish for their masters. A tame Otter has been known to catch
eight or nine salmon a day. It is rewarded with part of the fish it
catches.
It is a pity this animal has not been made use of for the purpose;
but the cases of its being employed by men in fishing are very few-
only enough to show that it was intended for the use of man. But its
fur is so valuable that the animal is being gradually destroyed, and will
doubtless be at length exterminated.-
Otters destroy a great many fish, as they kill more than they eat,
for they only bite a mouthful or two from the back of each fish taken.
The Sea-Otter has a bright, smooth, black coat, which is one of
the most valuable furs. It is found on the coast of the North Pacific
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THE CAMEL.


T HE Camel is the gift of GOD to the poor people who live on
the hot barren sands of Asia and Africa, where there are no
trees and grass, and where the springs of water are far apart. GOD
has formed the Camel for the work he is wanted to do in these
lands. He is provided with four stomachs, in the first of which are a
number of hollow places called cells, where he can store up enough
water to last him for several days. Then his feet are covered with
hard wide soles, so that he can walk on sand easily; his eyes have
double eyelids, to screen them from the sand; and he can see and
hear at a great distance. He is content with very little food: a few
balls of meal, or the sharp prickly thorns of the desert, fully satisfy
him. He is very patient, and will carry great weights of merchandise
or baggage. In order to allow the drivers to load him, he will kneel
down on the sand; but he will not let them put a heavier burden on
his back than he can well bear: he strikes with his head and utters
sad cries if such a wrong is intended him. The Camel is sometimes
very savage, and he never forgives an injury till he has punished his
enemy. When he is kindly treated, however, he is a good and faithful
servant.
The Bactrian Camel-this is one in the picture-has two humps;
the Arabian Camel, or Dromedary, only one.
The Camel would be quite useless in any other country but its
native land. Its broad feet, cushioned for walking on sand, slip about
on muddy ground, and are hurt by rocks or stones.
6










WARNED'S NURSERY LITERATURE.


AUNT LOUISA'S LONDON TOY BOOKS.
With Large Original Pag: Plates by the First Artists, in the very
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In De.n.t 4/, 19. pAict ar, covers ; or, Mon dtr,/ ul L,.iu 2s.
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G. TilHE LIFI i .\ 111if..
.. EDITIH $NII MIII.LY' Iili )'SEKIV'IENG
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29. THE BIRTIIlA1Y P.IIrY
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