• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Half Title
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Content
 Advertising
 Back Cover






Title: The robber kitten
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028207/00001
 Material Information
Title: The robber kitten
Physical Description: 69, 2 p., 1 leaf of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 17 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Ballantyne, R. M ( Robert Michael ), 1825-1894
Thomas Nelson & Sons ( Publisher )
Publisher: T. Nelson and Sons
Place of Publication: London ;
Edinburgh ;
New York
Publication Date: 1875
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Good and evil -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Cats -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Dogs -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Owls -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Mothers and sons -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Children's songs   ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1875   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1875
Genre: Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
Scotland -- Edinburgh
United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by R.M. Ballantyne.
General Note: A vocal score, a children's duet, precedes Ballantyne's prose retelling of song.
General Note: Frontispiece printed in colors.
General Note: Publisher's advertisements follow text.
General Note: Baldwin Library copy lacks cover onlay.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028207
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002221803
notis - ALG2033
oclc - 60820628

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Page 1
    Half Title
        Page 2
    Frontispiece
        Page 3
    Title Page
        Page 4
    Content
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
    Advertising
        Page 70
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text




















THE ROBBER KITTEN.


--t~sfrfct~-K


























'I
ql.





k$p


THE KITTEN PR-EPARS TO BE-COE A ROBBER
THE KITTEN PREPARES TO BECOME A ROBBER


Lk:
.
r


:i:ii, I
.i~YI E

~,i; i '


~~.L


















THE ROBBER KITTEN.




BY

R. M. BALLANTYNE,
AUTHOR OF "THE THREE LITTLE KITTENS," ETO.





A kitten once to its mother said,
"I'll never more be good,
But I'll go and be a robber fierce,
And live in a dreary wood !
Wood, wood, wood,
And live in a dreary wood !"





LONDON:
T. NELSON AND SONS, PATERNOSTER ROW;
EDINBURGH; AND NEW YORK.

1875.
















THE ROBBER KITTEN.

DUET FOR CHILDREN.


FIRST IFD__



A kit ten once to its

SECOND 0|-y -- r----------

-








moth er said, "I'll nev er more be




-t







good; But I'll go and be a

O I I






THE ROBBER KITTEN.


rob ber fierce, And live in a drear y



0 t


wood! Wood, wood, wood I And








live nad--L ----- y o
live in a dreai y wood "


i,, "


I
















THE ROBBER KITTEN.




A KITTEN once to its mother said.
"I'll never more be good;
But I'll go and be a robber fierce,
And live in a dreary wood!
Wood, wood, wood,
And live in a dreary wood !"


So off it went to the dreary wood,
And there it met a cock,
And blew its head, with a pistol, off,
Which gave it an awful shock!
Shock, shock, shock,
Which gave it an awful shock !





THE ROBBER KITTEN.


Soon after that it met a cat:
"Now, give to me your purse;
Or I'll shoot you through, and stab you too,
And kill you, which is worse !
Worse, worse, worse,
And kill you, which is worse !"

It climbed a tree to rob a nest
Of young and tender owls;
But the branch broke off and the kitten fell,
With two tremendous howls !
Howls, howls, howls
With two tremendous howls!

One day it met a Robber Dog,
And they sat down to drink;
The dog did joke, and laugh, and sing,
Which made the kitten wink!
Wink, wink, wink,
Which made the kitten wink !

At last they quarrelled; then they fought,
Beneath the greenwood tree,
Till puss was felled with an awful club,
Most terrible to see!
See, see, see,
Most terrible to see !






THE ROBBER KITTEN.


When puss got up, its eye was shut,
And swelled, and black, and blue;
Moreover, all its bones were sore,
So it began to mew!
Mew, mew, mew,
So it began to mew!

Then up it rose, and scral ched its nose,
And went home very sad;
"Oh! mother dear, behold me here,
I'll never more be bad !
Bad, bad, bad,
I'll never more be bad!"







W)













THE ROBBER KITTEN.


S A kitten once to its mother said,
"I'll never more be good;
But I'll go and be a robber fierce,
And live in a dreary wood!
Wood, wood, wood,
And live in a dreary wood!"

HE kitten's mother was
Stemming a pocket-hand-
kerchief when her wild
little son said this, and she
looked up in surprise.




12 DETERMINED TO BE A ROBBER.
"Be a robber, my kitten?
fuff-- nonsense, mew hold
your tongue."
Yes, mother," said the kit-
ten. "I'm determined to be
a robber; I have not got every-
thing that I want, and I feel
that I must have everything
that I want. I've been good
so long that I am tired of it,
so I've made up my mind to
be bad now--fuff!"
The kitten knitted its brows
and looked fierce as it spoke.
"My child," said its mother,
"alas! you know not what





A NAUGHTY KITTEN.


you say. It is wrong and un-
kind of you to speak in such
a way to your mother. You
will be wretched and miserable
if you are bad, and you will
come at last to wish that you
had never been born;"
The kitten made no answer,
but soon after retired to its
own room.
Now, this kitten had never
been a naughty kitten before.
It had always been good, and
its mother was very fond of it
-so fond of it, indeed, that
she gave it too much of its




THE MOTHER'S GRIEF.


own way, and was not careful
enough to keep it out of bad
company. So the little kitten
was made to behave ill by some
bad companions; and when. at
length it told its mother what
it was going to do, she burst
into a flood of tears and groaned
for sorrow. Having cried till
no more tears would come, she
dried her eyes with the hand-
kerchief she was hemming,
and in doing so, pricked her
nose with the needle. Then
she went to her kitten's roonr
and opened the door and looked





A FIERCE-LOOKING FELLOW.


in. Great was her astonish-
ment at what she saw. The
kitten had put on a belt, in
which were stuck two large
horse pistols. A sword hung
by its side; and a hat, with a
feather in it, was stuck on one
side of its head. Standing up
before a large looking-glass,
the kitten frowned savagely at
its own image, and drawing
its sword, cried out in a loud,
angry voice,-
"Come on, villain! draw
and defend yourself! Your
money or your life !-hurrah !




PRACTISING.


me-a-ow-s-k-fuff! and, mak-
ing a plunge with the point of
its sword, it almost broke the
glass to pieces.
"My child! exclaimed the
astonished and terrified mother,
' what means this?"
Practice, mother. I'm just
practising a little before I be-
gin. You see, when I come
to stab people and beasts,
and to cut off their heads, I
must know how to do it, so
that I may soon put them
out of pain. I don't wish to
be cruel, you know, although
(419)





SAYING GOOD-BYE.


I'm determined to kill and rob
them all. And now, farewell,
dear mother. I shall look in
on you sometimes, to see how
you get on. Adieu."
The .kitten planted its hat
firmly over its brows, sheathed
its sword with a bang, sprang
over the window, and disap-
peared; whereupon the cat sat
down on its hind legs and
roared aloud in anguish of
spirit.


So off it went to the dreary wood,
And there it met a cock,





FEELING SAD.


And blew its head, with a, pistol, off,
Which gave it an awful shock!
Shock, shock, shock,
Which gave it an awful shock!

The distance from the kit-
ten's house to the wood was
not great, but the wood was
very large, and the poor mother
knew that it would be of no
use to try to find her little one
there.
At first the kitten felt very
sad, and had almost turned
back; but the thought that its
companions would laugh at it
induced it to go on. Foolish
thing how much better it




IN THE WOOD.


would have been to have braved
the laughter of a few bad kit-
tens, than to be hated, as a
robber, by all the good kittens
and cats in the country.
The sun was setting when it
entered the wood, which looked
very dark, dismal, and dreary;
but the Robber Kitten was abold
fellow. It knew that darkness
could not hurt it, and that light
could not save it from danger.
Then it slapped the handles of
its two pistols, and shook the
sword in its scabbard, and strode
like a lion into the gloomy




STRANGE SIGHTS.


shades of the forest. Here the
kitten was greatly taken up with
the new and wonderful things
it saw: the blooming flowers
and the bright green sward;
the immense trees, and brooks,
and ponds with water-lilies in
them; the singing birds, and
the curious insects that crawled
about in all directions. Every-
thing was most beautiful. Sud-
denly a sound was heard, as if
of approaching footsteps. The
kitten forgot all the beauties of
nature; sprang behind a tree
and drew a pistol from its belt.





A ROBBER FIERCE.


In a few minutes a large game-
cock strutted past.
Stand and deliver," cried
the kitten, pointing the pistol
at its breast.
Deliver what?" inquired
the cock in much surprise.
Your money, of course,"
replied the kitten; quick,
sir, or you're a dead cock in
two seconds."
"Ho! ho! ho! cock-a-doodle-
doo," laughed the cock. "I
haven't got a farthing-doodle-
doo-doo-doo!"
The kitten frowned in anger.




A GOOD HIT.


"You're going home, I sup-
pose ?"
Yes; cock-a-doo!"
"Fuff! It's a long way, I
fancy ?"
Rather; doodle-doo! re-
plied the cock.
Then I'll show you a shorter
road," said the kitten; and,
pulling the trigger, it blew
the cock's head entirely off its
body!
"That was rather a good
hit," remarked the naughty
kitten, as it lifted the body of
the poor cock on to its shoulder





LOOKING FOR LODGINGS.


and continued its journey. "I'll
have a nice roast for supper to-


A GOOD SHOT.

night; but I must look for a
cave to sleep in. Dear me-
mew!-how heavy that creature
is. Fuff! how dark it's getting."




A GREAT LOSS.


Talking to itself in this way,
the kitten trudged on for half
an hour. At length it found
a small cave, with a low, nar-
row entrance, into which it
went and prepared to spend
the night. Here it discovered,
to its sorrow, that it had for-
gotten to pick up its pistol and
powder-horn after firing at the
cock. This was a great loss.
However, it consoled itself by
thinking that it' still had one
loaded pistol left, and also its
good sword.





THE MORNING AFTER.


Soon after that it met a cat:
"Now, give to me your purse,
Or I'll shoot you through, and stab you too,
And kill you, which is worse !
Worse, worse, worse,
And kill you, which is worse!"

Next morning the kitten a-
woke from a sound sleep and
rubbed its eyes once or twice,
and tried to remember where
it was. For a few seconds it
was quite bewildered as it gazed
around at the dark stone walls
and roof of the cave; but when
its eye fell on the bones and
feathers' of the cock, all that
had passed the night before
came into its mind again.




TO BUSINESS.


I'm a robber now,-ha!
ha! ha! very good, ho! capi-
tal it cried, springing up
and buckling on its sword.
" Where is my pistol? ah!
here it is; all right. Now,
then, to business! hurrah!
fuff!"
Speaking thus, it put on its
hat, very much over one eye,
and sallied forth; and, as it
went swaggering through the
wood, with its naked sword
in one hand and the pistol
in the other, it sang as fol-
lows:-





HEAVY AT HEART.


Oh! a life for me in the wild woods free,
And a good blade sharp and true;
To rob and fight both day and night,
And to laugh, sing, dance, and mew-oo !
And to laugh, sing, dance, and mew.

But although the Robber
Kitten sang lustily it felt heavy
at heart, for it knew that it
was doing wrong, and could not
forget the wretched look of its
poor mother when it bade her
farewell.
Now, as it walked along it
heard a sound like purring in
the distance, and in a few mo-
ments a large cat came saunter-
ing along. The kitten instantly




28 A THREATENING ATTITUDE.


sprang forward
and held the
point of the
sword to the
IA,' '
', ,' *v


A THREATENING ATTITUDE.
cat's mouth, and the point of
the pistol to its nose.
Hallo me-a-ow! fuff! "





YOUR MONEY, OR YOUR LIFE.


cried the cat, bristling up,
starting back, and gazing with
terror down the pistol barrel.
" What do you mean ? eh ?
fuff! Turn that pistol aside,
will you ? It'll go off of its
own accord."
"Just so, my good lady,"
said the kitten; "it will go off
entirely of its own accord, un-
less you give me your purse."
My purse !" replied the cat,
trembling with terror. I have
no purse, no money, no no-
thing. Now do point that pis-
tol away from my nose. It's




" YOU'RE A VILLAIN !


sure to go off in a minute. I
see it smoking already."
The kitten stopped the cat
short by giving it a poke on
the chin with its sword, which
caused it to caterwaul fearfully,
and beg, with tears in its eyes,
that it might be spared and
not killed.
"Not killed!" replied the
kitten with a frown; "listen
to me, cat: you're a villain! "
Yes, I know that," said the
cat, meekly; "but villains
don't like to be killed, please."
"You deserve to be killed,"





A TERRIBLE SHOCK.


continued the kitten, "because
-because-I want to kill you;
but first I'll shoot, and then
stab you, so look out." Say-
ing these words, the kitten
pulled the trigger, the cat gave
an awful yell, and the pistol
exploded with a sound like a
cannon-shot in the silent wood.
The kitten was knocked over
by the shock, but its aim had
been bad, for it missed the cat,
which sprang three times its
own height off the ground,
scratched the air wildly, shrieked
with terror, and then fled with




DEAD SILENCE.


glaring eye- balls from the
spot.
For at least five minutes, the
sound of the cat's voice filled
thewoods,while it darted madly
through bush and brake; then
it died away in the distance,
and a dead silence reigned a-
round.


It climbed a tree to rob a nest
Of young and tender owls;
But the branch broke off and the kitten fell,
With two tremendous howls!
Howls, howls, howls!
With two tremendous howls!

After the cat was gone, the





BEMOANING ITS FATE.


kitten sat down at the foot of
a tree and bemoaned itself
thus:-
"Oh dear! mew! alas! fuff!
me! I've missed that wicked cat;
and if I hadn't been bad and
disobedient to my dear mother,
I wouldn't have tried to hit it.
And the worst of it is that
I have lost my powder-horn,
and won't be able to do any
more murders except with the
sword. Oh! mew, alas! what
a bother!"
Ho! ho! ho!" laughed a
very small voice, high up in
(419) 3\





NOT MUCH OF A SHOT.


the tree. The kitten started and
looked up, and there it saw two
little round heads and four big
round black eyes peeping down
at it through the leaves.
"What are you laughing at?"
cried the kitten angrily.
"At your shooting," answered
one of the young owls. Ho!
ho! ho! capital. You're not
much of a shot, it would seem.
Ho! ho! here's a chance for
you." As the owlet spoke it
thrust its head over the side of
its nest and winked with solemn
gravity at the kitten.




THE OWLS AND THE KITTEN.


Where's your mother ?" in-
quired the kitten.
"Gone out. Not at home.
She doesn't want to see you, I
think, ho ho!"
Do you know," said the
kitten, that I can climb ?"
You don't mean it, do
you?" answered the owlets,
winking to each other. "That's
very surprising. We don't think
it would improve your appear-
ance to climb. It's not a grace-
ful thing to do."
"Perhaps not, but I'll do it,
and eat you up." Hereupon





AN ATTACK.


the kitten sprang up the trunk
of the tree and soon came near
to where the nest was built.
Now, it chanced that the mother
of the owlets returned to her
nest at this moment, and while
the kitten was climbing up the
tree, it sat down on a branch
and hid itself among the leaves.
When the kitten reached the
nest, the two owlets gave a
squeal, and the mother owl
thrust her large face and her
enormous black eyes suddenly
before the kitten.
"Hallo! me-a-ow-s-k-fuff!"





ITS RESULTS.


cried the kitten, as it shrank
back in terror on beholding
this wonderful sight.
Oo-oo-oo-boo-hoo !"
said the owl.
The kitten slipped its foot
and fell backwards. It caught
at a branch in falling, but the
branch was decayed. It broke
off, and down went the kitten,
head foremost,-down with a
terrible crash, through leaves
and branches, until it came to
the ground with a heart-rend-
ing bump!
Ho! ho! ho laughed the





A DREADFUL FALL.
owlets with
their little
voices.
"Ho! ho!
ho!"echoed
S their moth-
er in a deep
bass.
For an
hour and
a half the
Robber
K itten
lay on the
F A ground
A DREADFUL FALL. quite mo-





NOT KILLED.


tionless; then it began to re-
cover, and, looking up, it saw
the owls on the tree still
laughing at it.
If I had a shot in my pistol
I would kill you," said the kit-
ten.
"Ho! ho! ho !" said the old
owl, "you've run away, have
you ? And you're determined
to be bad and won't be good.
Ha! very well, my friend; but
depend upon it that you'll
never be happy and always be
wretched. Bad and wretched,
bad and wretched, ho! ho!





40 IN SEARCH OF PLUNDER.


good-bye- and
slunk away while
warning voice was
its ears.


the kitten
the owl's
ringing in


One day it met a Robber Dog,
And they sat down to drink;
The dog did joke, and laugh, and sing,
Which made the kitten wink!
Wink, wink, wink,
Which made the kitten wink!

For many days after this the
Robber Kitten wandered about
in the woods in search of ani-
mals to plunder; but it did
not find many, and the few





A FIERCE FIGHT.


that it found never had any
money. Sometimes it was all
but starved for want of food.
At other times it caught a little
bird or a mouse and fared well.
Once it met a very large rat
and fought with it for more
than an hour, and was very
nearly killed, for the rat was
fierce and strong. However,
the kitten ran its sword right
through the rat's heart at last,
and so killed it.
One day, as the kitten was
walking along in a very sad
frame of mind, it met a dog





42 "STAND AND DELIVER "


which carried a small round
bottle at his side and an enor-
mous club over his shoulder.
"Stand and deliver!" cried
the dog.
Your money or your life! "
shouted the kitten.
Each looked at the other in
great surprise.
Why, you're a robber," said
the dog.
"And so are you," replied
the kitten.
Hereupon the dog burst into
a loud fit of laughter.
Come, now," said he, that





A NEW FRIEND.


is very funny, to think that you
and I should meet and threaten
to rob each other. Capital!
ha! ha! ha! excellent! Give
us your paw, old boy; you and
I shall be good friends, and
we'll hunt and rob in com-
pany."
The kitten did not at first
feel at ease in the presence of
this new friend, but he was
such a gay, laughing, hearty,
and altogether funny dog, that
it could not help shaking paws
with him; so they sat down
under a tree to talk.





" YOUR GOOD HEALTH."


"Here you are," cried the
dog, as he swaggered towards
a tree. "Here's a fine shady
spot. Now then, Mister Kitten,
sit down and tell me your his-
tory. But first wet your mouth
with a drop of this. It's only
milk, and won't hurt you."
After you," said the kitten,
with a wink, as it sat down on
the root of the tree and folded
its paws across its breast.
Your good health, bow,
wow! said the dog, nodding.
" Ha! ha! ain't it jolly to meet
a friend in the wood ? eh ?





GOOD FRIENDS.


Now then, take a good pull at
the bottle and go on."


GOOD FRIENDS.

The kitten took so good a
pull that it finished the milk,





46 TELLING THEIR STORIES.


every drop; and then it related
all its history to the dog, who
sat laughing and winking and
rubbing his paws with glee all
the time. After that the dog
told his story to the kitten,
but it was very short, for he
had only run away from his
master that morning, and had
seen no one till he met the
kitten.
"And now, tell me, kitten,
have you got any money about
you ?"
The kitten winked slily.
"Yes, I have, and I've hid it





A STRANGE HIDING-PLACE.


in the barrel of my pistol; for
if I should be overcome at any
time, no one would look there
for it, as every one is so much
afraid that the pistol will go
off!"
"Oh, capital! bow, wow,
wow! most amusing!" said the
dog, rolling himself about in
the strength of his delight.
"Yes, mew! fuff isn't it
funny?" said the kitten, with
a smile of satisfaction.


At last they quarrelled; then they fought,
Beneath the greenwood tree,





A DEMAND.


Till puss was felled with an awful club,
Most terrible to see !
See, see, see,
Most terrible to see!

After they had talked to-
gether for a little longer, the
dog turned to the kitten and
said,-
"My friend, I very much
wish that you would give me
all your money."
The kitten looked surprised
and felt very uneasy, for the
dog spoke in a grave deter-
mined tone of voice.
"And," continued the dog,
"if you don't give it to me,





WAR DECLARED.


I'll take it from you by force!
bow! wow! wow!"
On hearing this, the kitten
sprang to its feet, and drawing
its sword, cried, "Mee-a-ow!
fuff! come on, you traitor, and
fight if you dare."
"Bow, wow, wow!" roared
the dog, as he leaped up and
flourished his awful club in the
air. I am no traitor, but you
are a bad, wicked creature. I
only ran away from my master,
but you ran away from your
mother. Bad thing. Come on
and die. Bow,wow,wow! roar!"
(419) 4





AN AWFUL SIGHT.


Mee-a-ow fuff! squeal!
Defend yourself! fuff! mee-a-
ow!"
It was an awful sight, to be-
hold that Robber Dog and that
Robber Kitten as they stood
facing each other in the wood,
under that green tree. Their
eyes blazed like balls of fire.
The hair bristled on their backs.
Their teeth glittered, and the
breath came hissing through
between them.
"Bow, wow! growl!" Down
came the huge club; the kit-
ten sprang nimbly aside, and





THE STRUGGLE.


it fell with a crash upon the
turf; while the kitten's sword
went like lightning through
the dog's tail. A dreadful yell
followed, and again the heavy
club descended and felled the
kitten's hat to the ground.
This enraged the kitten so
much that it uttered a yell
mingled with a fuff of the
most awful description, and
made a plunge at the dog's
face, but only thrust the sword
through his ear. The two rob-
bers now lost all command of
themselves. They found that





52 THE STRUGGLE CONTINUES.


when they tried to hit they
always missed, therefore they
both shut their eyes and struck
and stabbed everywhere and
anywhere, each hoping that by
chance he might succeed in
killing the other. The awful
club went banging and crash-
ing against trees and bushes,
and the sharp sword went
gleaming and glancing through
them, while yells and fuffs,
growls and roars, mingled in
horrid confusion. Once the
sword cut a deep slice into the
dog's nose, and once the club




ITS CLOSE.


knocked the kitten head over
heels. But the kitten rose
again and rushed to renew the
fight with greater fury than
ever. Oh! it was awful! Sud-
denly the club fell with a stun-
ning blow on something soft.
The dog opened his eyes to see
what it was, and beheld the
kitten lying flat on its back
upon the ground, and quite in-
sensible !
Lowering the awful club, the
dog gazed for a few seconds at
his fallen enemy.
"It's all well that ends well,"





THE SPOIL.


he said with a sigh; and then,
taking up the pistol, he drew

,,-w. ",-.. ~.


THE RESULTS OF FIGHTING.
all the money out of it and put
it into his milk bottle. Having





AFTER THE BATTLE.


done this, he threw the pistol
down, and shouldering his club,
walked away.


When puss got up, its eye was shut,
And swelled, and black, and blue;
Moreover, all its bones were sore,
So it began to mew !
Mew, -mew, mew,
So it began to mew !

No wonder that it mewed,
poor thing, for its left eye was
black and quite shut, and its
cheek was swelled to twice its
usual size.
"Oh! mew oh me mee-a-
ow! fuff! oh dear, what a busi-





56 BAD AND WRETCHED.
ness! Only think My eye!
Mother wouldn't know me if
she saw me. Dear, dear. Oh!
fuff!"
Ho! ho! ho !" laughed the
old owl, who had watched the
fight from the tree top. "So
you've got a thrashing, have
you ? Serves you right. Bad
and wretched! bad and wretch-
ed! Very good, ho ho ho !"
"Pray don't laugh at me,"
said the kitten, beginning to
sob.
"0 ho!" said the owl.
"Your spirit is broken, is it ?





SORROW AND REGRET.


Would you kill me now if you
had a shot in your pistol?"
"No, I wouldn't," answered
the kitten. "I'm sorry I said
that. And I'm sorry I ever ran
away from my dear mother."
Then why don't you go
back ?" said the owl. "Better
late than never, you know,
eh ? late than never! late than
never! ho! ho! ho!"
I don't know the way back,"
sobbed the kitten. "It must
be a long, long way,-oh dear!
mew! and I've only got one
eye to see with, and my bones




A SAD CONDITION.


feel as if they were all broken,
and I'm sure my heart is-for
I feel so miserable inside."


A SAD CONDITION.


Here the kitten sobbed aloud,
and the owl opened her eyes





A FRIENDLY OFFER.


remarkably wide and looked
dreadfully solemn.
After a little the owl gave a
cough, and said! "Kitten, I
am sorry for you, ho! I see
that you must have been led
away and made to do wrong
by bad companions; but that
does not excuse you, ho! ho!
You have been very naughty,
and deserve to be whipped, if
not hanged. However, ho! I'll
see what I can do for you. If
you promise to do what I
bid you, I will conduct you
home."




CONDITIONAL HELP.


What am I to promise, dear
owl ?"
"That you will never run
away again; that you will never
steal milk or cream; that you
will be a robber no longer;
that you will not again be
naughty in any way whatever;
that you will love your mother
more than anybody else in the
world,-I do not say obey her,
because if you really love her
you cannot help obeying her."
The owl looked so tremendously
wise at this point that the
kitten was quite awe-struck.





CONDITIONAL HELP.


"Then," continued the owl,
"you must promise to remem-
ber that those who are bad
are, always wretched, and you
must write the words BAD AND
WRETCHED in large letters over
your door when you get home.
I had almost said you must
write them in your heart, but
that would be difficult."
"Yes," sobbed the kitten,
"and rather painful, don't you
think ?"
"Now," said the owl, "look
me straight in the face and
promise, ho!"





ON THE WAY.


The kitten turned its swelled
visage towards the owl, and
sobbed violently as it said, I
promise, mew! fuff!"


Then up it rose, and scratched its nose,
And went home very sad;
"Oh, mother dear, behold me here !
I'll never more be bad !
Bad, bad, bad,
I'll never more be bad!"

Slowly and sadly did the
Robber Kitten walk along
through that dreary, dismal
wood. The owl flew a short
distance in advance and a-
lighted on the branch of a





ON THE WAY.


tree, where she waited till the
kitten came up to her; then
she flew farther on and again
waited; and so they went along
for that day. At night the kit-
ten and the owl sat down to
supper under a tree, and after
they had finished, the kitten
slept at the foot of the tree-
the owl on the top of it.
Their supper usually con-
sisted of mice and birds, which
they caught during the day's
march. Thus they went along
till they came to the edge of
the wood.





64 A FRIEND IN NEED.
Now," said the owl, point-
ing across a field, "yonder is
your mother's house. Go home,
and don't forget your promise,
ho! ho!"
"Good-bye, fuff! mew! dear
owl," replied the kitten, and
thank you very much for all
your kindness to me. A friend
in need is a friend indeed. I
will never forget you, and I
will do all that you have com-
manded." So saying, the kit-
ten kissed the owl on its chin,
not being able to get at its
mouth on account of the beak.





THE PENITENT'S RETURN.


The owl stared in silence at the
kitten and then winked slowly
with both eyes; which wink
squeezed two tears out of them.
At sight of this tenderness the
kitten burst into tears, and
hurriedly saying farewell, it
turned away and ran home.
The kitten's mother hap-
pened to be at home when her
penitent son arrived.
Bad boy," she said, with a
frown, "what brings you here ?
fuff!"
Oh, mother! mew I am
so sorry. I'll never be bad





ASKING FORGIVENESS.


again. Whip me, mother; dar-
ling mother, do whip me, and
perhaps it will make me
good."
The kitten came forward with
its head hanging down and the
tears streaming from its eyes,
Flinging its pistol and sword
on the ground, it said: "Take
them, mother, and put them
into the fire. Mew! oh forgive
me, mother!"
The kitten's mother felt her
heart grow soft; the frown
went away, and tears filled her
eyes.





PENITENCE. 67

"Darling child!" she cried,


PENITENCE.


"my son!
my kitten


my dear good son!
! come to me!" and





RECONCILED.


in another moment they were
locked in a loving embrace.
Oh! happy hour! The Rob-
ber Kitten was good once
more.
"And did it come home to
its mother ? dear pet!" said the
cat, "and was it miserable?
And did it get a nasty black
eye, poor dear ? Kiss its
mother, mew! And give it
another, fuff !"
Happy, happy were the
mother and kitten now, and
happy did they continue; for
the kitten kept its promise to





ALWAYS GOOD. 69

the owl, and never was naughty
any more after that, but always
was good, good, good.








RICHLY ILLUSTRATED AND ELEGANTLY BOUND.


At Five Shillings each. Crown So.
THE TRIUMPH OVER MIDIAN. With 28 Engravings.
RESCUED FROM EGYPT. With 27 Engravings.
THE SHEPHERD OF BETHLEHEM. With 40 Engravings
EXILES IN BABYLON. With 34 Engravings.
PRIDE AND HIS PRISONERS. With 40 Engravings.
HEBREW HEROES. With 40 Engravings.
At Four Shillings and Sixpence each. Crown 8vo, gilt edges.
PRECEPTS IN PRACTICE. With 40 Engravings.
THE GIANT-KILLER. With 40 Engravings.
THE YOUNG PILGRIM. With 27 Engravings.
FAIRY KNOW-A-BIT. With 34 Engravings.
At Three Shillings and Sixpence each. Post 8vo.
THE CITY OF NOCROSS, AND ITS FAMOUS PHYSICIAN.
THE LADY OF PROVENCE; or, Humbled and Healed.
CYRIL ASHLEY. A Tale.
CLAUDIA. A Tale.
ON THE WAY; or, Places Passed by Pilgrims.
HOUSE BEAUTIFUL; or, The Bible Museum.
THE ROBBERS' CAVE. Gilt edges, illuminated side.
IDOLS IN THE HEART. A Tale.
At Three Shillings each. Post 8vo.
THE MINE; or, Darkness and Light. Gilt edges, illuminated side
THE SILVER CASKET.
WAR AND PEACE.
THE HOLIDAY CHAPLET.
THE SUNDAY CHAPLET.
THE ROBY FAMILY. Gilt edges.
FLORA ; or, Self-Deception. Gilt edges.
RAMBLES OF A RAT. Gilt edges.
WHISPERING UNSEEN.
MIRACLES OF HEAVENLY LOVE IN DAILY LIFE
THE CROWN OF SUCCESS; or, Four Heads to Furnish.
PARLIAMENT IN THE PLAY-ROOM. Gilt edges.
At Two Shillings and Sixpence each. Post 8io.
THE GOLDEN FLEECE. Gilt edges, illuminated side.
OLD FRIENDS WITH NEW FACES. Gilt edges, ilium, side.
STORY OF A NEEDLE. Gilt edges, illuminated side.
MY NEIGHBOUR'S SHOES. Gilt edges, illuminated side.
WINGS AND STINGS. Gilt edges, illuminated side.
At One Shilling and Sixpence each. Coloured Frontispiece and
Vignette. Royal 18mo.
STORIES FROM THE HISTORY OF THE JEWS.
WINGS AND STINGS.

T. NELSON AND SONS, LONDON, EDINBURGH, AND NEW YORK




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs