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 Title Page
 The authors
 Introduction
 Definition of terms
 Program operation






Title: Range management
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028025/00001
 Material Information
Title: Range management
Series Title: Florida Cooperative Extension Service Circular 634
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Wood, John R.
Affiliation: University of Florida -- Florida Cooperative Extension Service -- Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
Publisher: Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida,
Publication Date: 1985
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: North America -- United States of America -- Florida
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028025
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: Marston Science Library, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Holding Location: Florida Agricultural Experiment Station, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, and the Engineering and Industrial Experiment Station; Institute for Food and Agricultural Services (IFAS), University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Table of Contents
    Title Page
        Page 1
    The authors
        Page 2
    Introduction
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Definition of terms
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
    Program operation
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
Full Text

IRES TR Y NFORMA TION SYSTEM
8"RANGE MANAGEMENT ,ro,
John Wood, George Tanner, and Duane Dippon













aSo-oe









Florida Cooperative E tension Service n
Init f Food and Agricultural Sciences University of Florida John T. Woe Dean










John Wood is a Biologist with the Florida Game and Freshwater Fish
Commission, Okeechobee, Florida, George Tanner and Duane Dippon are
Assistant Professors, School of Forest Resources and Conservation, IFAS,
University of Florida, Gainesville.












Range Management



INTRODUCTION



The question often is asked, "How many cows can graze on this
pasture?" Since cattle are plant eaters and require a given amount of
forage to remain alive, healthy, and productive, it is best to answer
this question based on the inherent forage production ability of the
pasture.
The Range Management Grazing Capacity program computes stocking
rates for Florida native range pasture supporting cow/calf operations.
Determination of stocking rates is approached from two directions. The
user will be asked to select the approach that is appropriate to his
situation:

1) The user has, for example, 1000 acres of land and wants to
determine how many head of cattle the land will support.

2) The user has, for example, 100 cows and wants to determine how
many acres of land will be needed to support them.

The user will be required to know the average weight (pounds) of
the cows and the number of months the animals will be grazing the
rangeland. Certain types of Florida range will support more animals per
acre than others. For this reason, the user will be required to
identify the major vegetation type(s) on the land which are called
"range sites."

The user should know the average forage production (dry weight) on
each range site and the proportion of this forage production that is
wiregrass(Aristida spp., Sporobolus spp., Rhynchoseora spp.). The
computer will accept an estimate of the forage production on each range
site, but stocking rates based on these estimates may be very
inaccurate. In either case, the stocking rates derived from this
program should be used only as guidelines for maximizing forage
uitlization.

Use of aerial photographs is the best way to determine the acreage
of your pasture or its various range sites. Local USDA Soil
Conservation Service or county Agricultural Extension Service offices
usually have photographs on hand. Personnel within these offices are
trained and willing to assist land managers in identifying vegetation
types and determining their respective acreages.

Forage production capability ideally is estimated by on-site
determination of the dry weight of vegetation samples clipped within a
known area. A 2-ft by 2-ft frame is an appropriate size to use in most
range sites. In order to reduce bias that may lead to inaccurate forage
production estimates, establish a line of sight across the range site
and place the frame on the ground at an arbitrarily set number of paces.





3











In general, the more frames that can be clipped, the better the
estimate. County Extension agents and Soil Conservation Service
personnel are trained in methods of determining forage production that
will reduce the number of frames that need to be clipped and weighed.
Forage production should be determined each year prior to the start of
grazing.

It is important to utilize the rangeland properly in order to
assure the health and long-term productivity of the forage plants. An
accepted rule of thumb is to use half of the annual forage production
and leave the other half. However, the half of the forage that is
utilized is not totally consumed by the grazing animal, since
utilization includes forage lost due to trampling, dropage, excrement
contamination, insect damage, and cattle consumption. A second accepted
rule of thumb is that consumption equals one-half of utilization. Thus,
the actual amount of forage that is available within the pasture for
cattle consumption (which is what this program calls "LBS OF CONSUMABLE
FORAGE") is determined by multiplying the total forage production by 25%
(50% utilization x 50% consumption).

Overstocking a pasture is damaging to the productivity of your
forages and to the productivity of the cattle on it. Since most of
Florida's range pastures have been overgrazed in the past, often
unknowingly by the land manager, proper stocking now will lead to
increased forage production capability of these pastures in the future.
As forage production capability increases, beef production potential
will increase.

The operation and logic of this program is shown in Figure 1. The
instructions on how to use the program are included under the section
Program Operation. The material that appears on the terminal screen is
highlighted with double lines in this manual.

Question or comments regarding the program should be directed to:

George Tanner Mitch Flinchum Duane Dippon
(904) 392-5420 (904) 392-5420 (904) 392-1850

School of Forest Resources and Conservation
118 Newins-Ziegler Hall
University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611

















4








WANT DESCRIPTION?
YES NO

DESCRIPTION


ENTER OBJECTIVE:
0. EXIT
1. DETERMINE # COWS
GIVEN ACRES, SITE,
FORAGE PRODUCTION,
% WIREGRASS,
AVERAGE WT. OF COWS,
MONTHS GRAZING
2. DETERMINE # ACRES
GIVEN # COWS,
AVERAGE WT. OF COWS,
SITE, FORAGE PRODUCTION,
% WIREGRASS,
MONTHS GRAZING
1 o0 0



HOW MANY RANGE SITES?
ENTER SITE CODE NUMBERS
HOW MANY COWS? INPUT
AVG. WT. OF COWS?
HOW MANY MONTHS?
HOW MANY RANGE SITES?
INPUT ENTER SITE CODE NUMBERS

TABLE2A OUTPUT


KNOW AVERAGE KNOW AVERAGE
FORAGE PRODUCTION? FORAGE PRODUCTION?
YES NO NO YES

CONTINUE? 0--+ OUT CONTINUE?
[NO NO
YES YES

FOR EACH SITE: FOR EACH SITE:
HOW MANY ACRES? AVG. FORAGE PRODUCTION? INPUT
INPUT AVG. FORAGE PRODUCTION? % WIREGRASS?
% WIREGRASS?

STABLE 2B | OUTPUT
OUTPUT TABLE1A

KNOW HOW MANY ACRES?
INPUT HOW MANY MONTHS? YES NO
AVG. WT. OF COWS?
FIND OUT!

OUTPUT TABLE 1B
FOR EACH SITE: INPUT
HOW MANY ACRES?


TABLE2C OUTPUT


NO
RUN PROGRAM AGAIN?
SYES


Figure 1. Flow chart for Range Management Crazing Capacity Program.


5











DEFINITION OF TERMS

A few words and phrases used in this program that may be unfamiliar
to some users are listed below.

1) AUM (animal unit month): the amount of forage required by an animal
unit (AU) for one month. Thus, an AUM is equal to 780 pounds of dry
forage, since it is assumed this cow consumes 26 pounds of forage
per day.

2) AU (animal unit): a mature cow weighing 1000 pounds with unweaned
calf.

3). AUE (animal unit equivalent): a numerical value used to express the
forage consumption requirements of a cow not weighing 1000 pounds
relative to the requirements of an AU. In other words, a cow
weighing less than 1000 pounds will consume less than 26 pounds of
forage per day, whereas a cow weighing more than 1000 pounds will
consume more.

4) Forage: refers only to grasses (Pocaceae) and grasslike
(Cyperaceae) plants in the context of this program.

5) Dry weight: The weight of forage that has been dried at a
temperature of at least 65 degrees F for at least 24 hours, or that
has been air-dried sufficiently long to remove the moisture from the
forage.

RANGE SITE DESCRIPTION

These descriptions were taken from the Soil Conservation Service
Technical Guide, Section 11-E, "Range Site Interpretations for
Rangeland," last updated in May 1983. Unless otherwise noted, the range
site occurs throughout Florida.

Sand Pine Scrub (code number 3):

The sand pine scrub site generally consists of rolling, moderately
to excessively drained, coarse-textured soil areas with a limited
potential for producing native forage. This range site supports a fairly
dense stand of sand pine (Pinus clausa) trees with a dense woody
understory. Livestock do not use this site if other range sites are
available. It does furnish winter protection.

Lon2leaf Pine-Turkey Oak (code number 4):

Nearly level to steep, well to excessively well-drained,
coarse-textured soil areas with a moderately low potential for
production of important forage species. This range site supports open
to dense stands of longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) and turkey oak
(Quercus laevis) trees. Cattle do not readily utilize this site if
other range sites are available.





6











South Florida Flatwoods (code number 6):

Nearly level,poorly drained, coarse-textured soil areas with a
potential for producing significant amounts of creeping bluestem
(Schilachyrium stoloniferum), chalky bluestem (Androgogon caillieg! ),
and indiangrass (Sorghastrum spp.). The northern limit of this range
site is approximately on a line from Levy County on the west to St.
Johns County on the east. The natural vegetation is typically scattered
pine trees with an understory of saw palmetto (Serenoa repens) and
grasses.

North Florida Flatwoods (code number 7):

Nearly level, poorly drained, coarse-textured soil areas with a
potential for producing significant amounts of chalky bluestem,
indiangrass, and several Panicum species. This site occurs north of a
line from Levy County on the west to St. Johns County on the east, and
in the northwest portion of the state. More trees, particularly pine
trees, occur on this site than the South Florida Flatwoods site, and
forage production differs due to a shorter growing season and lower
winter temperatures.

Cabbae _Palm Flatwoods (code number 8):

Nearly level, poorly drained, coarse-textured soil areas
characterized by cabbage palm (Sabal palmetto) and scattered pine trees,
with an understory of saw palmetto and grasses. The northern limit of
its occurrence is approximately on a line from Levy County on the west
to St. Johns County on the east, although small isolated areas are found
north of this line. Locally, it usually occurs adjacent to coastal
areas, major drainageways, and lakes. This site is a preferred grazing
area for cattle due to high quality and quantity of forage.

EverJlades Flatwoods (code number 9):

This range site occurs only in the Everglades region in South
Florida. The soil often is very thin and coarse-textured over porous
pinnacle limestone rock. The natural vegetation is commonly a slash
pine (Pinus elliottii) overstory and an understory of saw palmetto and
grasses. There is considerable uniformity and openness. This range
site occasionally is used for livestock grazing, but forage production
is low due to the soil limitation.

Cutthroat Seep (code number 10):

Nearly level or depressed, poorly drained, deep areas adjacent to
Sand Pine Scrub and Longleaf Pine Turkey Oak sites, mostly in Polk and
Highlands Counties. The appearance of this site is distinctive;
scattered pine trees, isolated saw palmetto and wax myrtle (Myrlca
cerifera), and a dense cover of cutthroat grass (Panicum abscissum) that
stays green year-round.






7











Upland Hardwood Hammocks (code number 11):

Nearly level to steep, well-drained soil areas, often with
coarse-textured surface soils and fine-textured subsoils. This site
occurs commonly in north-central Florida and sparingly in north and west
Florida. It can be readily identified by its thick stands of hardwoods,
including magnolia (Magnolia grandiflora), laurel oak (Quercus
laurifolia), live oak (Q.virginiana), pignut hickory (Carya glabra),
American holly (llex ooaca), American beech (Fagus grandifolia),
flowering dogwood (Cornus florida), American hornbeam (Carjnus
caroliniana), and others, with few pines. This site is preferred for
grazing by livestock, but tree canopy cover can become excessive and
drastically reduce forage quantity and quality.

Cabbage Palm Hammock (code number 13):

Poorly drained, coarse-textured soil areas with a low potential for
producing forage due to the dense canopy of palm trees. This site
occurs predominantly in south Florida, particularly in Highlands,
Okeechobee, and surrounding counties, along the St. Johns River, and
just inland from the coast in Volusia County. It is easily identified
by the presence of thick stands of cabbage palm with a few scattered
live oaks and laurel oaks. This is preferred shading and resting area
for cattle and as such is usually overgrazed.

Oak Hammock (code number 15):

Nearly level to rolling, moderately well-drained, coarse-textured
soil areas with limestone rocks often occurring in, or near the surface.
This site generally is not found in or south of, the Everglades or west
of Tallahassee. It is readily identified by the usually dense canopy of
large live oak trees. Cattle use these areas primarily for shade and
resting.

Salt Marsh (code number 18):

Level, tidal marsh areas with a potential for producing significant
amounts of cordgrass (Spartina spp.) and other grasses. Salt marshes
occur along the Atlantic and Gulf coasts and inland along tidal rivers.
This site appears as an open expanse of grasses, sedges, and rushes,
with numerous, interconnected tidal channels.

Fresh Water Marsh and Ponds (code number 25):

Nearly level, very poorly drained, coarse-textured to organic soil
areas with a potential for producing significant amounts of maidencane
(Panicum hemitomon) and cutgrass (Leersia spp.). This site appears as
an open expanse of grasses, sedges, rushes, and other herbaceous plants
in an area where the soil usually is saturated or covered with surface
water for two or more months during the year.







8













Slou2h (code number 26):

Nearly level, poorly drained, coarse-textured soil areas with a
potential for producing significant amounts of blue maidencane
(Amp h mcarum muhlenbergianum), chalky bluestem, and bluejoint panicum
(Panicum tenerum). These sites occur throughout central and south
Florida, and serve as drainageways for water during periods of heavy and
prolonged rainfall. Most sloughs appear as relatively long and narrow,
open expanses of grasses, sedges, and rushes in an area where the soil
is saturated during the rainy season. They are slightly lower in
elevation than the surrounding flatwoods or hammocks.























































9












PROGRAM OPERATION



Sinin.s on the the Computer

The program is designed for the VAX computing system manufactured
by the Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC) but is not limited to DEC
equipment. A computer terminal with telephone hookup (acoustic coupler)
is required. If peripheral equipment such as hard copy printer are
used, then the signal transmission type between terminal and printer
must be compatible (serial or parallel.)

Before using the terminal an account must be established with the
Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) Extension Computer
Network in Gainesville.

Use the following procedure to access the VAX computer:

1. Set the terminal to FULL DUPLEX.

2. Set the acoustic coupler to FULL DUPLEX.

3. Dial (904) 392-5750 (for high-speed or 1200 baud terminals) or
392-5760 (for low-speed or 300 baud terminals) to access the IFAS
VAX computer.

4. When the "READY" light appears ib the coupler, press the terminal's
carriage return (CR). The computer will respond "USERNAME" to which
you will type your User's name (usually 3 letters) and press (CR).

5. The computer will respond "PASSWORD" to which you will type your
password and press (CR).

6. When you see the message "WELCOME TO VAX/VMS..." you are signed on
to the IFAS VAX system successfully.

7. You should now see a "$" at the left margin of the bottom line on
the terminal screen or printer. To the right of the "$" is a
blinking cursor character. You now type "MENU" to access the IFAS
Computer Network Menu System.

8. The Forestry Information System (FORINSY) is listed as program #9
on the main IFAS menu. after the instruction "PROGRAM NUMBER:"
appears on your terminal type in "9". The Range Management
program is one portion of FORINSY.

9. The computer responds to your selection by listing 5 options as
illustrated below to assist you with the program. You should type
in "102" after the prompt "PROGRAM OPTION" to execute the Forestry
Information System. You will be ready to select the program after
proceeding through the preliminary menu.






10











The programs you can run are:

100) DONE Goes back to program name

101) HELP Prints this message

102) EXECUTE Run the program

103) ABSTRACT A short abstract will be typed

104) INSTRUCTIONS How to run the program

ENTER a CTRL/Y to go back to the main menu

Program option:




Preliminary Menu

The preliminary menu aids the School of Forest Resources and
Conservation (SFRC) in identifying the users of the programs. The
preliminary menu is described by the following:


Forestry Information System V1.L1
(FORINSY)



Have you used FORINSY before?

1.--First-time FORINSY user.
2.--Used FORINSY before.

Enter choice =




If you have used FORINSY before type "2" but if this is your first
experience then type "1" which will request the following information:




Forestry Information System (FORINSY)

Please introduce yourself by typing in the following information

LAST NAME:
FIRST NAME (OR INITIALS):
STREET (OR MAILING) ADDRESS:
CITY:
STATE:
ZIP CODE:




11











The user should supply the requested information on each line. By
pressing (CR), the computer moves to the next line until the "ZIP CODE"
is supplied. The computer then reprints your input along with the date
and asks if everything is correct.




TODAY'S DATE:

Is all information correct?

(1 = Yes 2 = No 3 = Exit):




The user chooses the appropriate response: "1" to continue
processing, "2" to retype the information correctly and "3" to exit the
program. After successfully supplying this information the user will be
provided an explanation of why these facts are collected after which
the user will press (CR) to call up the main FORINSY menu.

The Main Menu Forestry Information System

The main menu offers a selection of different programs relating to
forestry. The following information will be displayed on the screen:




Forestry Information System V1.L1
(FORINSY)

Choose:
1. -- Exit.
2. -- Forestry Investment.
3. -- Volumes and Yields.
4. -- Products, Markets, and Prices.
5. -- Forestry Management Assistance.
6. -- Silvicultural Practices.
7. -- Wildlife Management.
8. -- Range Management.
9. -- Forest Pest Management.
10. -- Forest Water Management.
11. -- Identification of Pines.
12. -- Wood for Energy.

Enter Choice:




The user must select an option by typing in the menu number of the
desired program followed by a carriage return. To begin the Range
Management program, enter the number "8" and press carriage return (CR).





12












Grazing Capacity currently is the only program available in the Range
Management Menu.


**** GRAZING CAPACITY ****

Would you like to see a brief description of this program?
(Type yes or no)

YES



A response of "Yes" displays the following description. A response of
"No" bypasses it.


Program Title: Crazing Capacity
Date: June 1.983

Authors: John M. Wood and George W. Tanner
School of Forest Resources and Conservation
University of Florida

This program computes stocking rates for Florida native range
pasture supporting cow/calf operation. You will be asked to select the
approach that is appropriate to your situation:
For example:
1) You have 1000 acres of land and you want to
determine how many head of cattle the land will support.
,
2) You have 100 cows and you want to determine
how many acres of land will be needed to support them.

Please hit RETURN



At this point press CR to continue.


You will be required to know the average weight (pounds) of the
animals that will be grazing the rangeland and the number of months that
the animals will be grazing. Certain types of Florida range will
support more animals per acre than others. For this reason, you will be
required to identify the major vegetation type(s) on your land, called
"range sites."

You should know the average forage production (dry weight) on each
range site and the proportion of this forage production that is
wiregrass. The computer will accept an estimate of the forage
production on each range site, but stocking rates based on these
estimates will only be as accurate as your estimates. In either case,
the stocking rates derived from this program should be used only as
guidelines for maximizing forage utilization.
Please hit RETURN

13











You should watch your cows closely for signs of illness or
distress. Take careful records of where and for how long the cows are
grazing in your pasture. They may be over-utilizing it in some areas
and under-utilizing it in others.

If you are having problems determining the range site(s) or the
number of acres, ask your county Extension agent for assistance.

See the User's Manual for more information.

Please hit RETURN.

Enter CR one more time and the execution of the program begins.


What is your objective?

1) You know how many acres you own or lease, and you want to
know how many cows it will support.

2) You know how many cattle you own, and you want to know how
many acres of land are needed to support this herd.

(Type the number or 0 to leave the program.)

1


This example uses objective "1". The computer stores this response
for later use, then lists the Florida range sites.


There are 13 range sites in Florida recognized by this program.
See the User's Manual for description of each site.

***** RANGE SITE *****

3) Sand Pine Scrub
4) Longleaf Pine Turkey Oak Hills
6) South Florida Flatwoods
7) North Florida Flatwoods
8) Cabbage Palm Flatwoods
9) Everglades Flatwoods
10) Cutthroat Seeps
11) Upland Hardwood Hammock
13) Cabbage Palm Hammock
15) Oak Hammock
18) Salt Marsh
25) Fresh Water Marsh and Ponds
26) Slough

Please hit RETURN


Enter CR to continue

14












How many different range sites do you have on your land?
(Enter the number or 0 to leave the program)

2

Now enter your range sites. They should be entered like this:
Enter the number and then press the return key.
Continue like this until all your range sites are entered.
3
4

The two range sites on the land in this example are Sand Pine Scrub
(code number 3) and Longleaf Pine Turkey Oak Hills (code number 4).
Thus, "3", CR, "4", and CR were entered in that order.


Do you know the average forage production (dry weight) of the range
site(s)? (Type yes or no)

NO


Determination of grazing capacity is only as accurate as your
knowledge of the amount of forage that is available. Forage production
estimates will vary from year to year depending upon site conditions.
It will be relatively lower during years of drought or flooded
conditions, or after a fire, than during years of optimum rainfall.
Overgrazing a pasture also can reduce forage production in subsequent
years. Refer to the User's Manual for instructions on determination of
forage production.

Even though you do not know the average forage production on your
land, the computer will accept a rough estimate. Knowing full well that
this estimate may be inaccurate, do you wish to continue this program?
(Type yes or no)

YES


Continuing, the program asks three questions about each range site
(below) and prints the first of two tables. See the User's Manual for
definitions of terms.


SAND PINE SCRUB

How many acres do you have of this range site?
100
Enter the average forage production of this range site in pounds
per acre.
1200
Of the existing forage, what proportion (by weight) is wiregrass?
Enter a number between 0 and 100.
25


15













LONCLEAF PINE TURKEY OAK

How many acres do you have of this range site?
300
Enter the average forage production of this range site in pounds
per acre.
2500
Of the existing .forage, what proportion (by weight) is wiregrass?
Enter a number between 0 and 100.
30


RANGE LBS OF
SITE CONSUMABLE TOTAL
CODE DESCRIPTION ACRES FORAGE AUM'S




3 SAND PINE SCRUB 100 26250 33
4 LONGLEAF PINE TURKEY OAK 300 159375 204




TOTAL 400 185625 237

The user must respond to two more quesiton to get an estimate of
stocking rate (below).


How many months per year do you intend to graze cows on this
rangeland? Enter a number from 1 to 12.
7.5
What is the average weight (pounds) of your cows?
900


The final results are summarized in the second table and the
sentence printed below it.


TOTAL STOCKING
AUM'S MONTHS WEIGHT AVE RATE




237 7.5 900 0.9 34




Your land will support a maximum of 34 cows, weighing 900 pounds, for
7.5 months.


Would you like to run the program again?
(Type yes or no)
YES
16











The user may leave the program by typing "No", but in this example
the program continues.


Would you like to see a brief description of this program?
(Type yes or no)
NO
What is your objective?



1) You know how many acres you own or lease, and you want to
know how many cows it will support.

2) You know how many cattle you own, and you want to know how
many acres of land are needed to support herd.
(Type the number or 0 to leave the program).
2


There are 13 range sites in Florida recognized by this program.
See the user's manual for descriptions of each site.

***** RANGE SITE *****

3) Sand Pine Scrub
4) Longleaf Pine Turkey Oak Hills
6) South Florida Flatwoods
7) North Florida Flatwoods
8) Cabbage Palm Flatwoods
9) Everglades Flatwoods
10) Cutthroat Seeps
11) Upland Hardwood Hammock
13) Cabbage Palm Hammock
15) Oak Hammock
18) Salt Marsh
25) Fresh Water Marsh and Ponds
26) Slough

Please hit RETURN





















17











The program requires the user to enter CR to continue (above), then
enter the number of range sites on his land and their code numbers
(below) just as before. The user must answer several questions about
the cow herd (below). The program uses the information concerning the
cows to print the first of three tables (below).



How many different range sites do you have on your land?
(Enter the number or 0 to leave the program)
2
Now enter your range sites. They should be entered like this:
Enter the number and then press the return key.
Continue like this until all your range sites are entered.
3
4
How many cows do you own?
30
What is the average weight (pounds) of your cows?
900
How many months per year do you intend to graze cows on this
rangeland? Enter a number from 1 to 12.
8.5


AVERAGE NEEDED
COWS WEIGHT AVE AU MONTH AUM'S




30 900 0.9 27 8.5 233




NOTE:
"NEEDED AUM'S" is "AU" times "MONTHS."

Do you know the average forage production (dry weight) of the range
site(s)?
(Type yes or no)
YES


We still do not know the forage production on our two range sites,
but we answered "YES" (above) anyway to skip the (message) we got last
time when we answered "NO" to the same question. We plan to determine
the forage production on our range sites tomorrow so that we can run
this program again next week.

The user needs to enter the numbers for forage production and
percentage of wiregrass for each range site (below) and the program
prints the second table.






18











SAND PINE SCRUB

Enter the average forage production of this range site in pounds
per acre.
1200
Of the existing forage, what proportion (by weight) is wiregrass?
Enter a number between 0 and 100.
20
LONGLEAF PINE-TURKEY OAK

Enter the average forage production of this range site in pounds
per acre.
2500
Of the existing forage, what proportion (by weight) is wiregrass?
Enter a number between 0 and 100.
30



RANGE LBS/AC
SITE CONSUMABLE ACRES
CODE DESCRIPTION FORAGE NEEDED




3 SAND PINE SCRUB 270 675
4 LONCLEAF PINE-TURKEY OAK 531 343




NOTE:
"ACRES NEEDED" is "NEEDED AUM'S" divided by "LBS/AC
CONSUMABLE FORAGE" times 780 lbs (one AUM).

Do you know how many acres of land that you own or have the
opportunity to lease?
(Type yes or no)
NO


Then I suggest you find out! There may not be enough rangeland
available to support the number of cows that you have.

However, assume that you do know how many acres you own or can
lease. Now answer the following questionss.



See the User's Manual for information on determining the size
(acreage) of range sites.


The user must input the size of his range sites or an estimate
thereof.





19











SAND PINE SCRUB

How many acres do you have of this range site?
50
LONGLEAF PINE-TURKEY OAK
How many acres do you have of this range site?
50



RANGE % OF TOTAL
SITE ACRES ACRES
CODE DESCRIPTION ACRES NEEDED NEEDED




3 SAND PINE SCRUB 50 675 7.4
4 LONGLEAF PINE-TURKEY OAK 50 343 14.6




PERCENT TOTAL 22.0

NOTE:

"ACRES NEEDED" represents the number of acres of each range
site required to support your cows for the length of your
grazing period.

"PERCENTAGE OF TOTAL ACRES NEEDED" is "ACRES" divided by
"ACRES NEEDED."

Please hit RETURN to continue



Enter CR to continue.


The combined grazing capacity of each of the range sites on your
land is 78 percent less then you need to support 30 cows for 8.5 months.

Therfore, you either need to supply additional forage (lease more
land, supplemental feed, etc.) or reduce your herd size and/or your
grazing duration.

If you are interested in how many cows your land will support, try
running objective 1 of this program.


In this example with 50 acres of each range site, the combined
acreage is only 22 percent of what is needed to support the herd of 30
cows for the 8.5 month grazing (above).






20












To exit, enter "NO" and return to the FORINSY Menu.



Would you like to run the program again?
(Type yes or no)
NO

A "no" response or a "0" response at any point in the program will
return the user to the main FORINSY menu. At this point, any other
program in the FORINSY can be accessed or an exit can be accomplished by
entering "1" and pressing the carriage return.



Forestry Information System V1.L1
(FORINSY)

Choose:

1 -- Exit.
2 -- Forestry Investment.
3 -- Volumes and Yields.
4 -- Products, Markets, and Prices.
5 -- Forestry Management Assistance.
6 -- Silvicultural Practices.
7 -- Wildlife Management.
8 -- Range Management.
9 -- Forest Pest Management.
10 --.Forest Water Management.
11 -- Identification of Pines.
12 -- Wood for Energy.

Enter choice =



If an exit is chosen by entering a "1", an exit from the FORINSY
subsystem begins. The exit is completed when the IFAS VAX computer
system asks for a program number. This number refers to the original
VAX main menu seen earlier, which provided the access to FORINSY and
several other options. If no other option is desired, entering "0" will
cause the user to leave the main menu and go directly into the operating
system. This is signified by a "$" on the left side of the screen or
page.



Program number:



$




The user can either go to other programs within the IFAS VAX
operating system or enter "Lo" to log off the host computer. At this
point the signal is lost and the equipment can be turned off.



21



















































































COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURAL
SCIENCES, K. R. Tefertlller, director, In cooperation with the United States Department of Agriculture, publishes this Infor-
mation to further the purpose of the May 8 and June 30, 1914 Acts of Congress; and is authorized to provide research, educa-
tional Information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function without regard to race, color, sex or
national origin. Single copies of Extension publications (excluding 4-H and Youth publications) are available free to Florida
residents from County Extension Offices. Information on bulk rates or copies for out-of-state purchasers Is available from
C. M. Hinton, Publications Distribution Center, IFAS Building 664, University of Florida, Gainesvllle, Florida 32611. Before publicizing this
publication, editors should contact this address to determine availability.




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