Title: Proper disposal of pesticide wastes
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00027964/00001
 Material Information
Title: Proper disposal of pesticide wastes
Physical Description: Book
Creator: Nesheim, O. Norman.
Publisher: Florida Cooperative Extension Service,
Publication Date: 1989
Copyright Date: 1989
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00027964
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: electronic_aleph - 003323383
electronic_oclc - 61109093

Full Text


Circular 840


Central Science
Library

MAY 31 1989

University of Florida
-i ----
Proper Disposal
of
Pesticide Wastes


O. Norman Nesheim
Susan P. Whitney


Florida Cooperative Extension Service
Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
University of Florida, Gainesville
John T. Woeste, Dean


March 1989







Proper Disposal
of
Pesticide Wastes
Proper pesticide waste disposal is an important
part of responsible pesticide use by the certified
pesticide applicator. Improper disposal can lead to
contamination of soil and water, causing serious
liability problems for the pesticide user, as well as
a poor public image. Improper disposal can result
in fines for the pesticide applicator. Everyone who
handles pesticides has more than enough reasons
to read this circular carefully and follow all direc-
tions.
Pesticide waste disposal is regulated by the
Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act
(FIFRA), the Florida Pesticide Law (Ch. 487 F.S.)
and other regulations. IT IS POSSIBLE TO
DISPOSE OF THESE WASTES LEGALLY,
RESPONSIBLY AND ECONOMICALLY. This
pamphlet will tell you how.
There are four types of pesticide wastes:
EMPTY CONTAINERS
EXCESS MIXTURE
EXCESS PRODUCT
RINSE WATER FROM CONTAINERS AND
APPLICATION EQUIPMENT
There are two categories this waste might fall into
that will affect disposal:
HAZARDOUS WASTE
SOLID WASTE
Pesticides not regulated as hazardous wastes:
May be disposed of as regular SOLID
WASTE or trash;
Are regulated under STATE LAW;
Must be disposed of according to LA-
BEL INSTRUCTIONS;
Must be disposed of in a CAREFUL MAN-
NER.







Pesticides regulated as hazardous wastes:
Are regulated by the Federal Resource
Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA);
Are listed in a section of federal regu-
lations;
Must be disposed of PROPERLY, usual-
ly by a licensed hazardous waste con-
tractor.
The label will not tell you if the product is reg-
ulated as a hazardous waste. Consult the lists (Tables
1 and 2) at the end of this circular BEFORE you
dispose of any pesticide wastes. A complete list of
pesticides regulated as hazardous wastes is available
from the Florida Department of Environmental
Regulation (FDER), (904) 488-0300.
Farmer's Exemption
Farmers are exempt from complying with most
of RCRA; commercial applicators are not. Under
state law, a farmer may dispose of wastes and triple
rinsed containers on the farmer's property if:
The wastes were generated ON THAT
FARMER'S PROPERTY;
The disposal does not cause GROUND
or SURFACE WATER CONTAMINATION;
The disposal is consistent with LABEL
INSTRUCTIONS.
County or local regulations may affect disposal.
You must check with local officials when consider-
ing a disposal option.
Ground Water
Sometimes the label will be in direct conflict with
current regulations, especially here in Florida. Some
of the older labels might instruct you to bury waste.
That's not a good idea in Florida. Never dispose of
a pesticide in a manner that might cause ground
water contamination. If you have a question about
possible ground water contamination, call your
agricultural agencies. They can tell you what kind
of soil is in the area and the likely location of the
groundwater.







Proper Disposal
Now keeping this in mind, let's discuss each of
the four types of wastes and how to properly dis-
pose of them.

Empty Containers
Empty BAGS should be shaken clean. They may
be buried in a sanitary landfill (if the operator
allows).
Empty DRUMS, BOTTLES, or CANS must be
triple rinsed. Empty the containers into your spray
tank and drain in a vertical position for 30 seconds.
Refill the pesticide container about 1/4 1/5 full
with water and rinse thoroughly. Add this rinse
water to your tank, unless the product is to be
applied without dilution. Be sure to let the pesticide
container drain for a few seconds. Repeat rinsing
and draining two more times. Now add water to
your tank to bring it up to the needed level.
After TRIPLE RINSING, punch holes in the
pesticide containers to prevent reuse. They may then
be buried in a sanitary landfill, if the operator allows
and local regulations allow.
OPEN BURNING of triple rinsed containers and
bags that have been shaken clean is allowed on your
own property if:
the LABEL allows;
you are the OWNER of the crop;
containers are from spray operations ON
THAT PROPERTY;
you have a BURN PERMIT from the
Division of Forestry;
LOCAL REGULATIONS allow.
But you may burn:
a only one day's accumulation at a time;
a no more than 500 pounds at a time;
no closer than 200 feet from buildings
or workers.







Pesticide Contaminated Clothing

CLOTHING contaminated by pesticides regu-
lated as solid waste (most pesticides) can be dis-
posed of as solid waste (trash). Clothing con-
taminated by pesticides regulated as hazardous
waste must be disposed of as hazardoul waste.

Excess Mixture

EXCESS MIXTURE is the diluted pesticide that
is left over in your spray tank after a pesticide
application. The way to "dispose" of EXCESS
MIXTURE is to use it on a labeled site. It usually
cannot be stored. Avoid the problem of excess
mixture; measure and calibrate carefully. Fill your
spray tank with only the amount required to do the
job. Don't generate excess mixture.

Excess Product

EXCESS PRODUCT is unused pesticide that
you no longer need because you have stopped pro-
ducing a particular commodity or because you no
longer have a particular pest control problem. The
best way to "dispose" of EXCESS PRODUCT is to
find someone who can use it. You may ask the
supplier or manufacturer if they will take it back.
If you can't use it or give it away, you must arrange
for a hazardous waste contractor to dispose of it.
Call the FDER for a list of contractors. Avoid the
problem of excess product; buy only what you can
use in one season.

Amnesty Days
You may be able to get rid of labeled excess
product during AMNESTY DAYS. When in op-
eration, this program allows you to dispose of up
to 100 lbs. at no cost (or more for a fee). Call 1-
800-342-0184 to find out when the next one will be
held in your area.







Rinse Water


Improperly disposed RINSE WATER from
application equipment has great potential for cau-
sing ground and surface water contamination.
Don't discharge rinse water to the ground.
Don't discharge rinse water to septic systems
you're increasing the chance that it will get
into the ground water.
a Don't discharge rinse water to ditches or
streams it is illegal and may cause damage
to neighbor's crops or trees. It may be a
serious hazard to fish and other wildlife.
Don't bury rinse water it may contaminate
ground water.
a Do minimize rinse water wash out equip-
ment only when necessary.
Do re-apply rinse water to a labeled site this
is allowed under federal law and will not result
in an applied concentration above the label
recommendation.
Do re-use rinse water to dilute the next batch
of formulation, as long as the site to which
the rinse water is applied is a labeled site.
Five percent of the water for dilution may be
rinse water.

Other Solutions and Options
Some new technologies have been and are being
developed that may provide other means of pesticide
waste disposal.
The FDER has worked with the Institute of
Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) at the
University of Florida to develop a system that
permits the treatment of rinse water from
pesticide application equipment in above-
ground degradation tanks. These tanks allow
rinse water to be evaporated on site. An
FDER permit is required to use such a tank.
More information is in IFAS Agricultural
Engineering Extension Report 87-21, Evapora-
tion/Degradation System for Pesticide Equip-








ment Rinse Water, available from the IFAS
Agricultural Engineering Department, Rogers
Hall, University of Florida, Gainesville 32611.
Spray systems that keep the pesticide product
and water separate until they meet at the
nozzle are new developments. Injection of the
pesticide at the nozzle eliminates the need to
rinse the spray tank because the pesticide is
never inside the tank.
Publicly Owned Waste Water Treatment Works
(POTW) can accept rinse water and treat it.
If you have the permission of a POTW you
may be able to dispose of rinse water to the
sewer system. Make sure you have permission
or you may be liable for a sewer system
cleanup.
Table 1. Common Pesticides Regulated as Toxic Hazardous
Wastes.
Common Chemical Name Trade Name
amitrole Weedazol, others
cacodylic acid Phytar, others
chlorobenzilate Acaraben
chlordane Chlordane, others
diallate Avadex
DBCP Nemagon, others
1, 2-D DD, others
1, 3-D Telone, Vorlex
2, 4-D Weedone, others
DDT DDT
ethylene dibromide EDB, Soilbrom, others
lindane Isotox, others
maleic hyrazide MH-30, others
methyl bromide Brom-o-gas, others
methoxychlor Marlate, others
pronamide Kerb
thiram Terson, others
warfarin (3% or less) Coumadene, others
zinc phosphide (10% or less) ZP, others
For a complete listing of pesticides regulated as
hazardous wastes contact FDER at (904) 488-0300.
Regulations on disposal of Toxic Hazardous
Wastes (Table 1) differ from those for Acutely
Toxic Hazardous Wastes (Table 2). Contact
FDER for further information.








Table 2.Common Pesticides Regulated As Acutely
Toxic Hazardous Wastes


Common Chemical Name


aldicarb
aldrin
aluminum phosphide
aminopyridine
dimethoate
dinoseb
disulfoton
endosulfan
endothall
famphur
heptachlor
methomyl
methyl parathion
parathion
phorate
toxaphene
warfarin (more than 3%)
zinc phosphide (more than 10%)


Trade Name


Temik
Aldrex, others
Phostoxin
Avitrol
Cygon, others
Dinitro, other
Di-syston
Thiodan
Aquathol, others
Warbex
Gold Crest H60, others
Lannate, Nudrin
Metaphos, others
Ethyl Parathion, others
Thimet
Toxakil, others
Coumafene
ZP, others


O. Norman Nesheim is the Pesticide Information
Coordinator and Susan P. Whitney is the Pesticide
Education Specialist, Pesticide Informtion Office,
Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, Univer-
sity of Florida.
We would like to thank Steve .Dwinell, Environmental
Specialist, Florida Department of Environmental
Regulation for reviewing this circular.

This publication was produced at a cost of $374.00, or 7.5 cents
per copy, to provide information on the safe and legal methods of
disposing of pesticide wastes. 4-5M-89

COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA. INSTI-
TUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES, G.L. Zachariah, director.
In cooperation with the United States Department of Agriculture, publishes this
information to further the purpose of the May 8 and June 30, 1914 Acts of
Information on bulk rates or copies for out-of-state purchasers is a ilab-ie f rom C.M H on,
Information on bulk rates or copies for out-of-state purchasers is available from C M Mliton,




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