• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 The march of humanity
 From "A tract for the times"
 Humanity
 Extraordinary sagacity of...
 A noble little pony
 The power of habit
 A horse’s petition to his...
 The horse had three fits sir
 Dr. Parrish and his horse,...
 A story of provincial times in...
 Intelligence of a horse
 Sagacity of a donkey
 A shipwrecked donkey
 "Jimmy," the horse, and "Jack,"...
 How to manage a donkey
 Revenge of a horse?
 From the contemporary review, London,...
 Despise not the donkey
 Easily avoided injuries to the...
 Cattle car
 It Pays, to keep the "Sabbath...
 The horse
 Singular sagacity of a bull
 Lesson from cows
 Gratitude of a cow
 Providential escape
 The philosopher and the sheep
 Sagacity of a sheep
 Following a leader
 The drovers and their sheep
 The drovers
 Gratitude of a goat
 Attachment of a goat
 The happy escape
 The drunkard and the goat
 A sportive elephant
 Brute intelligence
 Sly Reynard
 Timely warning of a cat
 Effects of cruelty
 Drowning a squirrel
 Thoughtless cruelty
 The toad
 Usefulness of toads
 Blind men and dogs
 A dog's affection
 "Well done, Pont!"
 Pathetic incident
 Dog and lost child
 A providence
 "Bill," the fire-escape dog
 A friend in need
 A dog's punisment
 The use of remembering
 Neptune at Will’s hospital
 Brave Bobby
 Cappie and the eagle
 The dogs of the mountain monas...
 On a faithful dog
 Cruelty
 There is a God
 God great in all things
 The oven bird
 Robbing a bird's nest
 Anecdote of two birds
 Parental care
 The poor nightingale
 Bird sympathy
 Shooting for sport
 Beware of the gun
 Bird's nests
 A sweet thought
 Cultivate kindness
 God made all things
 Hymn to the Creator
 Back Cover






Group Title: Plea for the dumb creation. From 'The Band of Hope Review," and other sources
Title: A plea for the dumb creation
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00027955/00001
 Material Information
Title: A plea for the dumb creation
Uniform Title: British workman
Band of hope review
Physical Description: 93, 92 p., 7 leaves of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 18 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Richardson, Hannah White, 1811?-1882 ( Compiler )
Pennsylvania Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals ( Publisher )
Publisher: The Pennsylvania Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals
Place of Publication: Philadelphia
Publication Date: 1873
 Subjects
Subject: Animals -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Animal welfare -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Natural history -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Christian life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1873
Genre: non-fiction   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia
 Notes
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
General Note: Pt. 1 compiled by Hannah W. Richardson.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00027955
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002236073
notis - ALH6542
oclc - 33821138

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Frontispiece
        Plate
    Title Page
        Page i
        Page ii
    Table of Contents
        Page iii
        Page iv
    The march of humanity
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
    From "A tract for the times"
        Page 10
        Page 11
    Humanity
        Page 12
    Extraordinary sagacity of a pony
        Page 13
    A noble little pony
        Page 14
    The power of habit
        Page 15
    A horse’s petition to his driver?
        Page 16
    The horse had three fits sir
        Page 16
        Page 17
    Dr. Parrish and his horse, Lion
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
    A story of provincial times in Pennsylvania
        Page 21
    Intelligence of a horse
        Page 22
    Sagacity of a donkey
        Page 23
    A shipwrecked donkey
        Page 24
    "Jimmy," the horse, and "Jack," the pig
        Page 25
    How to manage a donkey
        Page 26
    Revenge of a horse?
        Page 27
        Page 28
    From the contemporary review, London, 1868
        Page 29
    Despise not the donkey
        Page 30
    Easily avoided injuries to the horse
        Page 30
    Cattle car
        Page 31
    It Pays, to keep the "Sabbath day"
        Page 32
    The horse
        Page 32
        Page 33
    Singular sagacity of a bull
        Page 34
    Lesson from cows
        Page 35
    Gratitude of a cow
        Page 35
    Providential escape
        Page 36
    The philosopher and the sheep
        Page 37
    Sagacity of a sheep
        Page 38
    Following a leader
        Page 39
    The drovers and their sheep
        Page 39
    The drovers
        Page 40
        Page 41
    Gratitude of a goat
        Page 42
    Attachment of a goat
        Page 43
    The happy escape
        Page 44
    The drunkard and the goat
        Page 45
    A sportive elephant
        Page 46
    Brute intelligence
        Page 47
    Sly Reynard
        Page 48
    Timely warning of a cat
        Page 49
    Effects of cruelty
        Page 50
    Drowning a squirrel
        Page 50
        Page 51
    Thoughtless cruelty
        Page 52
    The toad
        Page 53
    Usefulness of toads
        Page 54
        Page 55
    Blind men and dogs
        Page 56
        Page 57
    A dog's affection
        Page 58
    "Well done, Pont!"
        Page 59
    Pathetic incident
        Page 60
        Page 61
    Dog and lost child
        Page 62
        Page 63
    A providence
        Page 64
    "Bill," the fire-escape dog
        Page 65
        Page 66
    A friend in need
        Page 67
    A dog's punisment
        Page 68
    The use of remembering
        Page 69
    Neptune at Will’s hospital
        Page 70
    Brave Bobby
        Page 70
        Page 71
    Cappie and the eagle
        Page 72
    The dogs of the mountain monastery
        Page 73
        Page 74
    On a faithful dog
        Page 75
    Cruelty
        Page 75
        Page 76
    There is a God
        Page 77
    God great in all things
        Page 78
        Page 78a
    The oven bird
        Page 79
    Robbing a bird's nest
        Page 80
        Page 81
    Anecdote of two birds
        Page 82
    Parental care
        Page 83
        Page 84
    The poor nightingale
        Page 85
        Page 86
    Bird sympathy
        Page 87
    Shooting for sport
        Page 88
    Beware of the gun
        Page 88
    Bird's nests
        Page 89
    A sweet thought
        Page 90
    Cultivate kindness
        Page 90
    God made all things
        Page 91
    Hymn to the Creator
        Page 92
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text













FOr e


DUMB CREATION.


FROM


t"t an4 of Iapt :iiru'."

AND

OTHER SOURCES.



-godth,whch th- waters brft- hU= orhbund.nUy, ae tlr kind,
" ond God bleOdd Ohdh.'ki d yi, 22
Thus he, Ilmgshty appeal s a have fr blessed thO portion of Whs



PHILADELPBIA:
THE PENNSYLVANIA SOCIETY
PREVENTION OF CRUELTY TO ANIMALS.
OFFICE, To 1320 CLEISIUT Si.
1873.









PART II.



FROM

"~1h iud af glai gaui,"

AND

OTHER SOURCES.










TABLE OF CONTENTS.-PART II.


or e P on ............... ............. ..............




A og A o ...................... .........................o A I ..................



A Swee T.hought .. ... ... .. ............
Brute tln lgenee .......................................................................


















rom .. A T.. .. ..t .......... .......... ..... .... .... ......





God M .d All T ..hing ..... ......... .......... 1
(iii)









iv TABLE OF CONTENTS.


a Fat....... ..................................................... ...................... T
B o o gat ........................ ...................... .3




Sagma ty of a oShe .......... ...... ... ..................................... 8.......
t ..................... ..... ... .......... ..................






a ae .... .................... .. .................. ..................


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. ...................................................................







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W0 2o3 P. h ..............- ......... . ... ..
.l d ......................... ......... ............... ...............................
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hh orseh thr ee ..................................... ................ I .





t l o e ................................................ 3
U.. .. ...ss .. ........................................................................










ith4 Thrfh of 3llfnllinlin
SrIve the commencement of the now year, 1869,
in tho Academy o-i. r" ii ,
audience listene 11 r
citizens, pleading for humane treatment to the
Dumb Creation.
The Mayor of the City was present, and Judge
Porter opened the meeting, a portion of whose
remarks follows:-
" LoDIES AND GENTLBEN :
" This meeting has been called by the Pennsyl-
vania Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to
Animals, witl whose history you are somewhat
acquainted. The plan and purpose of the Society
are not now. Such institutions have existed for
mnny years on the Continent of Europe. In
En land they have been conducted with an energy,
skili and success worthy of the Anglo-Saxon
character. In their meetings, I observe that the
most important men in the kingdom, including the
most eminent divines, take part; and even the
Sovereign does not fail to give them her patron-
age. Why should it not be so? The dumb
brutes are essential to us.
" The horse is as necessary as the ship. Step
out into one of your streets by day or by night,
PART II.--* (5)







6 A PLEA FOR T-o

and see what the horse is to commerce, to labor,
and even to fashion. As the dumb animals are
necessary to us, w are necessary to them. Provi-
dence has made us their guardians. The mute
appeals tley make to us, when injured or op-
pressed, must, I think, be felt by every man who
has a spark of generosity, or even sensibility, in
his heart. But there is a higher motive for treat-
ing them kindly. Familiarity with cruelty begets
cruelty.
"In reading the other day an article in one of
our most influential journals, I found some such
remark as this, that it was as important to the
cruel man as to the cruelly treated beast, that such
practices should cease. This remark was well
founded. There is an intimate connection bo-
tweon cruelty and vice. I do not know how you
can better train a child to violence and blood, than
to teach him to torture the insects and domestic
animals about him.
There is, I say, a connection, and a very close
connection, between cruelty and crime; and
there is just as close a one between kindness
and virtue. I do not know how you can
better train a child to be gentle and kind,
to be humane and forgiving, to respect the rights
of others, and thus to make him a true gentleman,
than to inspire him with an affection for the dumb
creatures about him. Teach him that his dog






DUMB CREATION. T

is to be caressed and fondled, not scolded or
whipped. When you put himi on horseback-
where every boy ought to go if you want to give
him courage, quickness and self-possession-teach
him that the horse and the man were intended to be
friends, and that the whip and the spur are not to
be used except in an emergency. Let him never
mount or dismount without passing his hand
gently over the face of tile animal; and by the
way, ladies, the softer the hand which does that
the better. The horse will repay such tender-
ness with something very much like human affec-
tion. I have known a vicious horse reclaimed by
it, as a vicious man may be by the arms of an af-
fectionate ehild thrown about his neck.
" Mr. Burke onae went into a field to see the
horse of a deceased relative. The animal came up
and placed his head on the statesman's shoulder,
and the man whose bitter denunciation of Hastings
and the French Revolution had startled the world,
threw his arms around the neck of the horse and
wept like an infant. I tell you, my friends, we
have much to learn in these matters. If kindness
to animals cannot be secured otherwise, it must be
enfbrecd. This Society has done something, and
is doing more."
Henry Bergh, the exertivo and efficient Presi-
dent of the New York Society for the Prevention
of Cruelty to Animals, also addressed the assembly.







8 A PLEA FOR THE

He expressed profound gratification at the
spectacle before him. He had been invited to
visit the city of Brotherly Love, and to see tie
condition in it of those creatures which an eminent
French divine had described as our brothers de-
prived of speech. Civilization has been likened to
a rare diamond, polished by each succeeding gone-
ration, and this social gem of ours can never be
perfect until the angle representing humanity to
the brute creation is as perfect as the rest.
For what are we not indebted to the horse ?
Without him our commerce could not be carried
on; yet from the age in which he is broken to
harness, lie is doomed to torment in some degree
or other. There are men, and women, too, who
would not soil their consciences with a sin, who
yet part in old age with faithful animals who have
long served them, or see them consigned to a des-
tiny of anguish. What would be the feelings of
such a person, seeing their docile and submissive
animal in his decrepitude drawing the dirt-cart or
the peddler's wagon. What would be the ultimate
fate of Dexter, the noblest race-horse in the world,
were he in less considerate hands than those of his
present owner ?
The pagans of old not only protected their
favorite horses in old age, but reared monuments
to them after they were dead. The object of the
speaker, however, was to speak practically upon







iDUl cnEATION. 9

the operations of the society in New York. That
society had first sought the powerful aid of the
press, and next the efficient good-will and co-ope-
ration of the police.
At first the work of the society was merely
tolerated, but ultimately legislation was had that
proved effectual, and redounded to the benefit of
the cause. From being a nine-days' wonder, the
institution is now looked upon by a just and gener-
ous public, which has rendered permanent its
establishment.

The speaker concluded by urging that Phila-
delphia should persevere as it has begun, and
predicted that at no distant day the practice of
cruelty to mau's faithful servitors, as well as to
those that yield him food, will become at least op-
probrious, if not penal. In Boston the society has
achieve an immense success. That in the city of
Brotherly Love the same benevolent cause would
prosper, he was very certain.-Late paper.







10 A PLrC FOR Tlll


,Srom "A gEatd foq thq gime ."
EXTRACTS from "A Plea in behalf of our Domes-
tic Animals, against the Cruelties of Alan." By a
Clergyman:-
"In our thanksgiving to God for our daily
bread-daily blessing-it behooves us to bear in
mind our deep indebtedness to the domestic ani-
mals, as the chosen means of many of the good
and perfect gifts which Providence unceasingly
bestows upon us. Behold, some of them clothe us,
feed us, carry us. Some guard our property, and
while, in fond tones of pleasure and unbounded
confidence, they announce the arrival of tie guest
or the friend, they fiercely keep at bay the doubt-
ful or the stealthy intruder. Others, ever alert,
respond to the silent watches of the night, and in
clarion notes proclaim the passing hour. Ah,
the crowing of the cock is one of the most genial
and charming incidents in our domestic establish-
ment. Let no rough touch ever give needless
pain to this winged herald of over-waning, ever-
coming time I

SAlas, that so many of these creatures, so
closely allied to us in weal and woe, should so
often all into the hands of misers who only half
feed or house them, or wretches that cannot use







DU-M CarEsTON. 11

them without abusing them I Tus, some are re-
quired to carry burdens whicl they cannot sustain
without pain and misery; others, to draw loads
which exceed tlhe just measure of their strength,
and when nature gives way, crying-' It is more
than I can bearI have pity, I pray thee!' foul
epithets are often heaped upon the poor, ex-
hausted creature; the scourge is applied, and
wounds and bruises are added to insult and out-
rage. Such conduct is not only cruel and highly
reprehensible, as well as exceedingly criminal, but
a sure means of aggravating and fixing self-degra-
dation. God is very far from demanding any-
thing of man which he is incapable of performing.
How, then, can man dare ask more of his beast
than its strength or its intelligence will warrant ?

"It is matter for sincere rejoicing that the
domestic animals, and the inferior animals gener-
ally, have at length found sympathizing and cou-
rageous friends, who kindly and collectively inter-
est themselves in their biealf, and who, governed
by the lofty principles of humanity and the true
interests of society, have united themselves into
societies to stay the hand of violence, in its
wicked and unmanly practices to subject dumb
brutes to wilful abuse and suffering, animals
which, in sagacity, memory, and sensibility, often
not only border closely on the confines of our own







12 A PLnA fOR THE

mental faculties, but, as it were, here and there
interlock with them or pass into tchmi, thus plainly
denoting affinity of structure, and similarity of
the mental functions. Under-fed, over-worked,
shamefully neglected, cruelly beaten, or otherwise
ill treated animals, especially the horse, the mule,
the ox, constitute the more prominent objects of
their most seasonable Christian benevolence.
J. B. GRoss.
"Easton, Pa., Dec. 1, 1868."




I HAnV ever thought that there is a certain de-
gree of justice due from man to the creatures, as
from man to man; and that an excessive use of
the creature's labor, is an injustice for which lie
must account. I have, therefore, always esteemed
it as part of my duty, and it has always been my
practice, to be merciful to my beasts; and, upon
the same account, I have declined any cruelty to
any of God's creatures, and, as much as I could,
prevented it in others, as tyranny. I have ab-
horred those sports that consist in torturing them,
and if any noxious creature must be destroyed, or
the lives of creatures for food must be taken, it
has been my practice to do it in a manner that
may be with the least torture or cruelty, ever
remembering, that though God has given us a







IDUMB CI:ATION. 13

dominion over his creatures, yet it is under a law
of justice, prudence and moderation; otherwise we
should become tyrants, not lords, over God's crea-
tures ; and, therefore, some of those things which
others have practised as recreations, I have
avoided as sins.-Sir Mf. Hale.


(i ih jillill Ii ,, agatifu oj j onu.
IT has frequently fallen to our lot to record
instances of animal sagacity, but we never remem-
ber anything more remarkable than the following,
which was related to us by an eye-witness:-
As Henry Carr, of Shaw Wood Gardens, and
two or three friends, were coming through a field,
their attention was attracted to a pony belonging
to Carr, which came up to them, and on their at-
tempting to stroke it, as they had often done on pre-
vious occasions, it threw up its head, gave several
loud snorts, and instantly scampered across tie
field in the direction of the viaduct, and after pro-
ceeding some distance, returned and made a simi-
lar demonstration, evidently wishing to attract
their attention, and then again immediately ran
off. It occurred to the party that there might be
something amiss. and they therefore followed the
pony, which betrayed evident symptoms of delight,
and in a short time it brought them to the edge of
PART II.-2







14 A PLEA FOR THE

a largo pool of water, immediately adjoining the
viaduct, when it again commenced snorting and
jumping about. On looking into tie water, they
fancied they saw something on the surface, and
also heard a gurgling sond, as of some one drown-
ing. A man instantly jumped into the water, and
soon succeeded in bringing out tlh apparently liro-
less body of a shoemaker, from Sunderland, who
was evidently under the influence of liquor,
and had probably lost his wAy and fallen into the
pool. Eflciont aid was at once rendered, but it
was nearly three hours before he showed ny signs
of life; he, however, eventually recovered.
The above remarkable fact, from the Durham
advertiser shows:-
1. The value of kindness to animals.
2. The danger of drinking.
3. The value of perseverance.
If the effort made for the poor man's recovery
had been given up, even at tie end of two hours
and a half, his life would have been sacri!icdA.-
Anon.



4o0lq Sittle Voni.
A LTTrrL girl, the daughter ofa wealthy gentle-
man in Warwickshire, was once playing too near
the banks of the canal which ran through the







DUMB Ca lTlox. 15

pleasure-grounds of his beautiful mansion, and in
the midst of her merriment, had the misfortune to
fall into the water. l or playmate screamed, and
ran o!f to the houi to give le alarml ; but in all
probability the chil I ait have boon drowned,
ha' not a little pony, which had long been a fa-
vorito in the family, plunge into the stream and
brought her safely as'ore, without the slightest
injury.--Jnon.


Eihe P.[ I of 111 1i
Ta colebrated Polish General, Kosciusko,
once wishli to send somO bottles of good wine to
a clerymna at Solothuiin, ad as lio hesitated to
senl them by his serv-nt, lost le should smuggle
a part, he giL, the com:niion to a young mall by
the nama of Z ltner, all ldeiiral hinio to take tie
liorso he usa illy role. Young Zltner, on return-
i:na, said that lie would never ride his horse again,
without he gave hin hlis purse at the same time.
Kosciuisko asking him what le meant, he an-
swvre I-'As soon as a poor mnn on the road tales
off his hat, and asi for charity, tl horse imme-
diately stands still, and will not stir till ome-
tlhia is given to the petitioner; and as I had no
money about me, I was obliged to make a motion
as if I Ihl 'aiv u smothling, in order to satisfy the






16 A PLEA FOR THE

horse.' Did not this seem like divulging his mas-
ter's secret charities ?"


S ii :. Pettioi to ihis Mrirer?
UP thbe hill, whip me not; down the hill, hurry
me not; in the stable, forget me not; of hay and
corn, rob me not; of clean water, stint me not;
with sponge and brush, neglect me not; of soft,
dry bed, deprive me not; if sick or cold, chill me
not; with bit and reins, oh! jerk me not; and
when you are angry, strike me not.-Our Dumb
.Jnimals.


", he Vorse had Shree fit~, Sir."
Those who injure their horses rob themselves.
THERE is an independent old gentleman in Hull,
who takes great interest in the prevention of
cruelty to animals. He has had many parties be-
fore the magistrates, and his presence is said to
have a misic influence upon the hard-hearted
drivers. None of them will dare to be cruel when
he is in sight. We are told by a friend, that not
long ago, this humane man had a poor dog
with the distemper, and had fits, of which it dic1I.
The servant-boy had never seen a dog in a fit I;e-






16 A PLEA FOR THE

horse.' Did not this seem like divulging his mas-
ter's secret charities ?"


S ii :. Pettioi to ihis Mrirer?
UP thbe hill, whip me not; down the hill, hurry
me not; in the stable, forget me not; of hay and
corn, rob me not; of clean water, stint me not;
with sponge and brush, neglect me not; of soft,
dry bed, deprive me not; if sick or cold, chill me
not; with bit and reins, oh! jerk me not; and
when you are angry, strike me not.-Our Dumb
.Jnimals.


", he Vorse had Shree fit~, Sir."
Those who injure their horses rob themselves.
THERE is an independent old gentleman in Hull,
who takes great interest in the prevention of
cruelty to animals. He has had many parties be-
fore the magistrates, and his presence is said to
have a misic influence upon the hard-hearted
drivers. None of them will dare to be cruel when
he is in sight. We are told by a friend, that not
long ago, this humane man had a poor dog
with the distemper, and had fits, of which it dic1I.
The servant-boy had never seen a dog in a fit I;e-







DWin cii7 TIOi 17

fore. Not long after this, a poor, half starved
horse was vainly endeavoring to drag aong the
heavy cartload to which it was attached. The
driver was remonstrated with, but he said that the
horse was done for," it would soon die. The
man was very willing to sell the horse for five
pounds; it was four years old, and fifteen hands
high. The gentleman bought it, in the hope of
lengthening out its days a little, and to prevent
its being any longer forced by the lash to drag its
weighty burden. The horse was speedily unhar.
nessed, and led away to the premises of its new
owner. Poor thing I it was so weak that it could
only walk slowly; and when it got to the stable,
it fell down. Some corn was brought in a shallow
hasket, and if you had seen it put its mouth in the
basket, as it lay, being unable to hold up its head,
you would have said-- Oh, how thankful it
seems" The corn was now placed a few inches
out of its reach, in order to tempt the horse to
stand up. Poor thing it could not do this. It
tried several times to rise, but it always fell down
again. Oatmeal and water were given to it, and
whenever it was patted on the neck, it looked up,
and seemed to say-- Thank you." In a few days
it was able to move about in the stable; and very
soon he began to prick up I ns ars and look cheer-
fully when his master came near him. When
turned loose into the field, the horse seemed to be







18 A PLEA FOR THE

reminded of its younger days. No sooner was it
free froitthe halter than off it ran; down it went;
up rose its legs-now rolling on its right side, then
on its left. It was so pleased, that it did this
three times. It was telling, as well as it could,
its joys. The lad stood alarmed. IIe remem-
bered the poor dog, and away he went as fast as
he could, and exclaimed to his master-" The
horse had three fits, sir !"
The fits" happily continue; the horse daily
improves, and has been pronounced, by a compe-
tent judge, as likely to be, in the ensuing Spring,
worth not less than thirty pounds. Do not those
who ill treat and starve their horses, rob them-
selves ?--non.


Dr. Parrish and his mame, Jion
TaHonuH the kindness of a son of this eminent
and highly estimable physician of Philadelphia,
the compiler has been furnished with the follow-
ing interesting narrative:-
"Dr. Joseph Parrish, late of this city, was the
owner of a valuable horse, whose fidelity and
sagacity were very remarkable. For more than
twenty years he accompanied the Doctor in his
daily rounds among the sick, and exhibited some
traits of character which almost entitled him to







DUMB CREATION. 19

rank above the beasts that perish. Though a
horse of very high spirit, his master never hitched
him at tile doors of his patients, as Lion seemed to
lol Ihis honor was compromised by so doing, and
it is believed he never violated the confidence re-
posed in him. When alarmed, or disposed to be
frolicsome, the lines thrown loosely on his back,
and a word of gentle reproof, were generally suf-
ficient to bring him into order. In the beat of
summer, it was his habit to walk into the shade,
sometimes crossing the street for that purpose; and
in the winter, he would seek the sun, taking care
to place himself in a position best adapted to his
comfort, in doing which he was careful not to
endanger the safety of the vehicle. There seemed
to be a bond of more than common sympathy be-
tween master and horse, and when the Doctor's
visits were unusually long (particularly if the
weather was inclement), Lion would sometimes
manifest his impatience by unmistakable signs,
when his kind master would playfully expostulate,
and explain the cause of his long absence.
"After Lion had retired to enjoy the repose of
the country, he delighted to hear the voice and
receive the caresses of his old and long-tried
friend, and would give evidences of affection that
could not be misunderstood. Although far be-
yond the average age of his species, his noble
mien and lofty hearing in old age impressed the
PART lI.-







20 A PLEA FOR THe

observer with his superiority. He died aged about
thirty-seven years.
" '1 his old and faithful servant is thus remem-
bored in the will of Dr. Parrish, and enjoyed the
benefit of his legacy for nearly five years:
"' ly son, Joseph, now on Oxmead Farm, N.
J., where my faithful horse, once so well known
in Philadelphia, has for several years found a com-
fortable asylum in his old age, I do hereby commit
over my said horse Lion to the particular care of
my son Joseph, desiring that he may be daily
curried and rubbed down. and kept warm and
well covered in the winter season, having a blanket
for stable use, and also a neat, well-fitted and
warm covering, when taken out in the neighbor-
hoodl for the benefit of fresh air and exercise; and
if his teeth should fail, I desire that soft and nu-
tritious food shall be carefully provided for him,
an I that in his stable every proper attention shall
be paid to cleanliness, with an abundant supply of
clean straw for litter.
"' And I do hereby direct my executors and
trustees to pay over to my son Joseph, one hun-
dred and fifty dollars per annum, in half-yearly
payments of seventy-five dollars, as a compensation
for the board and safe keeping of my old and
faithful horse during the continuance of his lihf.' "







DUMB CREATION. 21


% $torg of Proindial iimPe in
Pgennqirania.

THE following anecdote illustrates the primi-
tive simplicity of early times in Philadelphia,
when it was governed by the immediate successors
of Wm. Penn:-
Thomas Chandler, a farmer of Chester county,
was a member of the Provincial Legislature of
Pennsylvania for many years. He was a fine,
portly oil Friend, with a very white head of hair.
For several years he was not returned by his con-
stituents, in consequence of having voted for raise
ing the wages of Assemblymen from 4s. 6d. to
5s. per day. On his visits to the city, he rode
upon his faithful horse Wagg. Now, Wagg was
regarded as an honorable horse in those days, and
it was the custom of his master, on his way up to
the city, to pay for a return mess of oats for his
faithful Waig at Chester. After being comforta-
bly provided with a night's lodging in the city,
and a good breakfast, Wagg was dispatched
homeward alone. He stopped on the way at the
tavern at Chester, obtained his oats, and pro-
ceeled at his leisure to Brandywine. It was the
practice of the old gentlemen to affix to his mane
the following request:-







22 A PLE.t FOR TOn

"Pry, good stranger, lot me pae,
And do not ml detdin


It is worthy of remark that this valuable
horse lived to a good old age, and was specially
provided for by the will of his master.-D. P.



l1111(1,,il, of a Jorqc.

A nATrHEn remarkable occurrence transpired a
short distance from this town. While two young
men, apprentices with D. Lee, a grocer and tea-
dealer in Drewsbury, were taking a short walk
down the side of the river Calder, their master's
warehouse dog, which was accompanying them,
strayed into an adjoining field, and on seeing an
ass, which was grazing, suddenly fell upon it, wor-
rying it in a most ferocious manner. A number of
men being at a short distance, and seeing the dog
likely in a short time to worry the poor ass to
death, went and commenced a fierce attack upon
the dog with hedge stakes, but without succeeding
in getting him off the ass, which he was mutilating
in a shocking manner. A horse belonring to
George Fell, of Earlsheaton, had witnessed these
proceedings, evidently under most agitated feel-
ings, and, as if conscious the poor ass must perish







DUMB CREATION. 23

unless he interfered, made a rush through the
hedge, cleared off the men who were trying to
liberate the ass, ald in a most furious manner,
seized the dog with his teeth and dragged him off;
it is supposed ihe would have dispatched hin in a
few minutes. When the horse had accomplished
his feat, he, with head and tail erect, scampered
about the ass in a no'le and most dignified man-
nor, as if proud of having effected a mighty con-
quest, and manifested evident tokens of pleasure,
as if sen-ibly feeling that he had performed an act
of benevolence. All who beheld this wonderful
deed of G. Fell's horse, were powerfully struck
with his evident intelligence and sympathy for his
fellow-brute.-Wake/ied Journal.


$agatip of a Ponheg.
SonE years ago a donkey was employed at Oar-
isbrooko Castle, in tile Isle of Wight, in drawing
water by a large wheel from a very deep well,
supposed to have been sunk by tie Romans.
When his keeper wanted water, he would say to
the donkey-" Tom, my boy, I want water; get
into the wheel, my good lad," which Thomas
immediately performed, witl an alacrity and
sagacity that would have done credit to a nobler
animal; and no doubt lie knw the precise number







24 A PLEA FOR THE

of times necessary for the wheel to revolve upon
its axis to complete his labor, because every time
he brought the bucket to the surface of the well,
he constantly stopped. He turned round his
honest head to observe the moment when his mas-
ter laid hold of the bucket to draw it towards him,
because he had then either to recede or advance a
little. It was pleasing to observe with what
steadiness and regularity the poor animal per-
formed his labor.-.dnon.


% Shiptnreded glonkg.
IN March of 1816, a donkey belonging to Cap-
tain Dundas, R. N., then at Malta, was shipped
on board the Ister frigate, Captain Forrest, bound
from Gibraltar for that island. The vessel struck
on some sands off the Point do Gat, and the don-
key was thrown overboard, in hope that it might
possibly he able to swim to land, of which, how-
ever, there seemed but little chance, for the sea
was running so high, that a boat which left the
ship was lost. A few days after, when the gates
of Gibraltar were opened in the morning, the
guard was surprised by Valiant," as the donkey
was called, presenting himself for admittance. On
entering, he proceeded immediately to the stable
which he had formerly occupied. The poor







DUMB CREATION. 25

animal had not only swum safely to tile shore, but
had found his way fiom Point do Gat to Gibraltar,
a distance of more than two hundred miles,
through a moontiunous and intricate country,
intersected by streams, whicl hie had never tra-
versed before, and in so sh4rt a period, that he
could not have made one false turn.-P. A.


"Jillmn ," the ajore, and "iud," the


I HAva a favorite old horse, says a correspon-
dent, that I have ridden and driven for years,
known almost to every child in the parish, and
which I once kept in an orchard close to my
house. He is called "Jimmy." To record all the
mnooeuvres of this faithful beast would fill a
pamphlet. One day, however, I saw him in the
orchard, in company with a large pic, called
" Jack," which I had bred up from a little one.
The pig was rubbing the old horse's head, and at
the same time making a peculiar kind of noise,
which seemed to say- Come with me, Jimmy."
The pig proceeded in advance, and the horse
followed, until both arrived under a large apple-
tree, a branch of which the horse actually shook,
and down fell a lot of apples. The pig grunted
with evident satisfaction, whilst eating the fine
PA-r 11.-3







26 A PLEA FOR THE

apples whichlayscatteredou theground. "Jimmy'
then helped himself from the branches until I
thought he had had enough. The most remarka-
ble part of this story is, that the horse never
attempted to shake the limbs a second time after
the pig had been satisfied. This is tie same ani-
mal which some months since fractured his fetlock-
joint at Long Ashton, in Somersetshire, through
stopping instantly, while going very swiftly, to
save te lile of a child.-F.




joul to o manage a onheg.

A GEos LENAN was walking down a lane near
when he found himself in company
with the following personages:--A donkey,
with a great awkward boy of seventeen or
eighteen years upon his back, beating the poor
animal most unmercifully with a stick on the
head and neck; an old man, armed with a
hedge-stake, striking at the hocks and hind quar-
ters, and a boy of eleven or twelve, also with a
stick, cutting here and there as opportunity offered.
Tihe animal was kicking, turning around, and
throwing his foot on the raised footpath, at the
same time resolutely refusing to stir one step in
advance.







DUMB CREATION. 27

"Isn't this a nice brute we have got here, sir?"
said the old man to our informant. "We have
been trying these three quarters of an hour to get
him on, and we can't."
The gentleman said he would try what he could
do, and having disarmed the three of their sticks,
and laid them on the path, commenced a milder
course of treatment, by patting the donkey on the
neck, rubbing his nose, and speaking kindly to
him. The poor animal evilently understood this
tone of kindness, for hardly two minutes had
elapsed, before, on the word of command, and a
farewell pat on the neck, he cantered off as gayly
as possible,with the lout on his back, in the proper
direction.-A.non.



tmcs ofa n aorse ?
TE, following instance of recent occurrence,
for which we have a credible voucher, will servo
to show the impolicy of the wickedness too often
practiced towards animals:-
A hack-driver, familiarly known to many of our
citizens, waited daily for custom at one of the
principal depots of Philadelphia. He was of a
hard, cruel disposition, the effects of which were
painfully felt by the dumb, but not senseless, crea-







28 A PLEr FOR TH

tures upon whom he depended for his daily bread.
When the throng of newly arrived travellers had
all passed from tlse trains without his securing a
job," his disappointment irritated his temper, and
he would vent his rage by beating his horses in
the public street, responding only by oaths to the
remonstrances of humane spectators. Our infor-
mant, a respectable citizen, before whose place of
business those revolting scenes occurred, having
for a considerable time missed this driver from Iis
usual stand, found, after inquiries, that he went
at night into his stable, and one of the horses who
had so often felt his unmerited cruelty seized him
with his mouth, by his long bare neck, and thus
held him till he was choked to death. Thus did
justice adapt the punishment to the crime. As lie
had sown, he reaped. The name rw suppress-
theo anecdote we tell, for the lesson it conveys.
This horse was susceptible of gratitude and love.
He was capable, also, of me!nory and revenge.
By many deeds of gentle obedience, he had served
his reasoning but unreasonable master, but re-
ceiving no good requital, he was at length ac-
tuated by despair and the instinct of self-preserva-
tion.-Ed.of The Friend's Review."







DUMB CREATION. 29

from the (ontcmporarg mlniem, 3on-
don, 1868.

J. RoUTLEDGo testifies, that so far as his experi-
ence went, he had found the costard-mongers of
London generally kind to their animals. "A few
days," says he, prior to writing these lines, I saw
a costard monger lad with a donkey, which had
made a dead stop, in a street whore there were no
lookers-on save myself. When the donkey stopped,
the driver did the same, looking at it a minute
or so, intently and kindly, as one would look at a
friend in distress. Then he went nearer, and said
in a coaxing tone, which I regret I have no power
of committing in any way to paper:- What's
the matter with you? Give's a kiss At this,
the donkey rubbed its nose against its master's
cheek, as if it quite understood the tone and the
words. The day was very hot; that was the
'matter' with the donkey; and the poor lad felt
a good deal of sympathy for it. Perhaps each was
the only friend the other had in the world. I,
somehow, wished I had had the power to obtain
from the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to
Animals, some small recognition of that noble
act, but as I had not, I trust the record of it here
may be the germ of a few kind thoughts for his
class."
PART I1.--3







30 A PLEA F1O TII

geIpise not the golaeg.
ZcH aRt H, centuries before the personal appear-
ance of our Holy Rt3lomear upon earth, prophe-
sied thus:-" Rqjoice greatly, 0 daughter of
Zion; shout, O daughter of Jerusalem; behold,
t'6y King cometh unto thee: he isjust, and having
salvation; lowly, ant riding upon an ass, and upon
a colt, the foal of an ass."
Witness the won lorfl fulfilment of this pre-
diction, in Christ's triumphal entry into Jerusalem,
as related, Mark xi. 7, 8, 9, 10.
Anul they brought the colt to Jesus, and east
their garments on him; and he sat upon him.
And many spread their garments in the way; an I
others cut down branches off the trees, and strewed
them in the way. And they that went before, anl
they that ifllowel, cried, saying,- Hosannna;
blessed is he that cometh in the name of the Lord :
bletsd be the king loin of our father David, that
cooeth in the name ot the Lord: Hosanna in the
highest.'"


fasil, voided jnjturhs to the jorse.
MA-r horses are made vicious from cruel treat-
me,t.
-Mh-e hor,'i fdl from weariness, than from any
other cause.







30 A PLEA F1O TII

geIpise not the golaeg.
ZcH aRt H, centuries before the personal appear-
ance of our Holy Rt3lomear upon earth, prophe-
sied thus:-" Rqjoice greatly, 0 daughter of
Zion; shout, O daughter of Jerusalem; behold,
t'6y King cometh unto thee: he isjust, and having
salvation; lowly, ant riding upon an ass, and upon
a colt, the foal of an ass."
Witness the won lorfl fulfilment of this pre-
diction, in Christ's triumphal entry into Jerusalem,
as related, Mark xi. 7, 8, 9, 10.
Anul they brought the colt to Jesus, and east
their garments on him; and he sat upon him.
And many spread their garments in the way; an I
others cut down branches off the trees, and strewed
them in the way. And they that went before, anl
they that ifllowel, cried, saying,- Hosannna;
blessed is he that cometh in the name of the Lord :
bletsd be the king loin of our father David, that
cooeth in the name ot the Lord: Hosanna in the
highest.'"


fasil, voided jnjturhs to the jorse.
MA-r horses are made vicious from cruel treat-
me,t.
-Mh-e hor,'i fdl from weariness, than from any
other cause.







DUMB CnEATIO. 31

When a horse falls, he is more frightened than
his rider.
A frightened animal cannot use its senses
aright; it must first be reassured by gentle treat-
ment.
It is speed that kills the horse.
Never strike an animal upon the head.
Careless application of the whip has blinded
many horses.
More horses are lame from bad shoeing, than
from all other causes together.
Never kick nor scream at a horse, nor jerk the
bit in his mouth.-London Horse-Book.




fatlts Gar.

A NEW patented cattle car has arrived in Provi-
dence from Albany. It has made one previous
trip from Chicago to Boston. It is forty feet long,
divided into fourteen stalls, each thirty-lour inches
wide, intended for one head of cattle each. They
thus have room to lie down at pleasure. Each
stall is provided with a trough to feed and water
the animal on the way. Under the centre of the
car is a large box for carrying feed.-Late paper.







32 A PLEA FOR THE

Jt (ags, to i ge the "Nabbath gag."
".1 righteous man regardeth the life of his beast."
"AT the meeting of the British Association in
Dublin, in 1857, Charles Bianconi, of Cashel, read
a paper relative to his extensive car establishment,
after which, a gentleman stated that at Pickford's,
the great English carriers, they could not work a
horse economically more than ten miles a day, and
wished to hear Bianconi's opinion on the subject.
Bianeoni stated, he found by experience, he could
better work a horse eight miles a day for six days
in the week, than six miles a day for seven days in
the week. By not working on Sunday, he effected
a saving of twelve per cent. This statement
elicited loud applause. Bianconi's opinion on this
point is of the highest authority, for, although the
extension of railways in the land has thrown
thirty-seven of his vehicles out of employ, which
daily ran 2,246 miles, still, he had over nine hun-
dred horses, working sixty-seven conveyances,
which daily travel 4,244 miles. It is also founded
on the result of forty-three years' experience."


6he sorsr.
THns animal is often abused through wanton-
ness or carelessness; but still more often injured,







32 A PLEA FOR THE

Jt (ags, to i ge the "Nabbath gag."
".1 righteous man regardeth the life of his beast."
"AT the meeting of the British Association in
Dublin, in 1857, Charles Bianconi, of Cashel, read
a paper relative to his extensive car establishment,
after which, a gentleman stated that at Pickford's,
the great English carriers, they could not work a
horse economically more than ten miles a day, and
wished to hear Bianconi's opinion on the subject.
Bianeoni stated, he found by experience, he could
better work a horse eight miles a day for six days
in the week, than six miles a day for seven days in
the week. By not working on Sunday, he effected
a saving of twelve per cent. This statement
elicited loud applause. Bianconi's opinion on this
point is of the highest authority, for, although the
extension of railways in the land has thrown
thirty-seven of his vehicles out of employ, which
daily ran 2,246 miles, still, he had over nine hun-
dred horses, working sixty-seven conveyances,
which daily travel 4,244 miles. It is also founded
on the result of forty-three years' experience."


6he sorsr.
THns animal is often abused through wanton-
ness or carelessness; but still more often injured,







DUMB CREATION. 33

for want of due consideration of the proper mode
of treating him.
Within a few years, it has been customary for
drivers of stages in our neighborhood, to give their
horses meal in their water, wlen they only stopped
for a short time in the middle of the day. It was
then not uncommon for horses, when driven no
faster than at present, to fall suddenly dead in the
harness. On opening the animal, the meal would
be found undigested, and formed into a hard cake
in the stomach.
It is hard driving immediately after eating
grain, that kills the horse; and, we venture to
assert, that not an instance can be shown,in which
he lihas sustained injury, from eating grain merely
because he was warm.
But we have known many men, prudent in most
matters, yet guilty of stuffing their horses with grain
in the morning, just before starting on a journey I
They gave no grain the night before, reserving for
the starting hour, the heartiest food for the beast.
On a journey, we have long been in the habit of
giving our horse his grain at night. We give it as
soon as he is rubbed down and put to the stable,
and we have never found it injured him.
How absurd to let your horse stand for hours,
after a day of violent exercise, to chop up his own
fodder, and attempt to appease his hunger on hay,
often poor hay, notfit to be fel out to young cat-
tle.-Buckminsler's Practical Farmer.











lisaelltantous animal.


"For every beat of the forest is mine, and the cattle pon
a thousand hills. I know all the fowls of the mountain ;
and the wld beasts of the field are mlue."--Psa L. 10, 11.


Uingufar agatif of a gull.
A Frw weeks ago, a little boy while herding
cattle on a farm near Balbeggie, Perthshire, was
suddenly attacked by a bull, and tossed to the dis-
tance of some yards. The bull was following up
the attack, when it suddenly desisted. The
screams of the boy at once were the cause, and
the animal went up and licked him all over, with
marks of kindness and recognition of an old ac-
quaintance. The boy had put on a strange upper
garment, to protect him from the rain, and the bull,
thus mistaking him for a stranger, a fatal result
had nearly taken place, but for the animal recognize.
ing the well-known voice of the boy. We need
scarcely indicate the practical hint here given, to
those in charge of such animals.-Dundee Add-
vertiser
(34)







A PLEA FOR THe DUMB CREATION. 35

teson from omws.
How many lessons of love and kindnesswe may
learn from the dumb creation! I was recently in
the country, and observed two cows alternately
licking each other's faces. On expressing my
wonder as to what they were doing, my fanner
friend smiled, and said: Oh, it's a common
thing; the poor cows help one another. They
lick and comfort one another when teased by the
flies, this hot weather I"
Well, thought I, here's a lesson for me. If
cows have the good sense to help one another,
surely man should help his fellow-man.-J. K.
:*:a----

iratitude of a (cuj.

I LATELY read an interesting anecdote of a cow.
A gentleman psusing through a field, observed
a cow showing many symptoms of uneasiness,
stamping with her feet, and looking earnestly at
him. At first he feared to approach her, but
afterwards went towards her, which seemed to
please her much. She then guided him to a ditch,
where her calf was lying, helpless; an I he was
just in time to save it from death, to the no small
delight of the cow. Some days after, when pss-







A PLEA FOR THe DUMB CREATION. 35

teson from omws.
How many lessons of love and kindnesswe may
learn from the dumb creation! I was recently in
the country, and observed two cows alternately
licking each other's faces. On expressing my
wonder as to what they were doing, my fanner
friend smiled, and said: Oh, it's a common
thing; the poor cows help one another. They
lick and comfort one another when teased by the
flies, this hot weather I"
Well, thought I, here's a lesson for me. If
cows have the good sense to help one another,
surely man should help his fellow-man.-J. K.
:*:a----

iratitude of a (cuj.

I LATELY read an interesting anecdote of a cow.
A gentleman psusing through a field, observed
a cow showing many symptoms of uneasiness,
stamping with her feet, and looking earnestly at
him. At first he feared to approach her, but
afterwards went towards her, which seemed to
please her much. She then guided him to a ditch,
where her calf was lying, helpless; an I he was
just in time to save it from death, to the no small
delight of the cow. Some days after, when pss-







38 A PLEA FOR THE

ing through the same field, the cow came up to
him, as if to thank him for his kindness.-W.
.fowels.


frouidential Estace.
As the late Macdonnell, of Glengary, was walk-
ing in the vicinity of Elinburgh, accompanied by
one of her daughters, then about five years old,
they were overtaken by a drove of cattle. On a
sudden, one of the cows mounted on the footpath,
and stooping down behind the little girl, caught
her up between its horns, and ran off with her.
Though abundantly frightened, the child had suf-
ficient presence of mind to grasp a horn in each
hand, and thus preserved her balance, while the
cow ran on, followed by the mother, in a state of
great alarm, anl the scarcely less terrified drover.
At length the animal, apparently tired of its
freak, set the child down on the footpath,perfectly
free from injury, and so utterly unconscious of the
nature of the accident, that when her mamma came
up (pale with terror and breathless with running),
she addressed her, with great simplicity, in these
terms:-- Mamma, don't put me to ride on a cow's
horns again, for I don't like it."
Now, I have no doubt that every little boy and
girl who reads this story, will be ready to ex-







DUMB CREATION. 37

claim:-" What a narrow escape I How provi-
dential that the child was not killed." Yes, my
young reader, you are always ready to recognize
the hand of God in things that are unusual or
striking; and yet, the kind and watchful care he
continually takes of you, is still more remarkable,
inasmuch as it never ceases, even for a moment.-
Dr. Huie.



4hq ghilopsoher and the heep.

ONE fine summer's day, a celebrated natural
philosopher was walking over Salisbury Plain,
when he approached a flock of sheep. They were
bleating much louder than usual, and seemed to
be calling each other to assemble together.
" You had better make haste, sir, or you will
have a wet jacket," cried an old shepherd.
The philosopher looked up, and seeing a beau-
tiful, cloudless sky, took no heed of the shepherd's
warning, but pursued his way as leisurely as
before. Shortly afterwards, however, his ears
were saluted with a heavy clap of thunder, the
clouds gathered blackness, and amidst the light-
ning's flash they poured forth a heavy shower.
The next day, the philosopher sought out the
shepherd, and asked him how he was able to fore-
tell a storm.
PARn IT.-4







38 A PLEA FOR THE

The old man replied, Why, sir, whenever it is
about to rain heavily, the flock collect together
for mutual shelter, and I never yet found them
wrong."
" How wonderful," responded the philosopher,
"that man, with all his science, and the many
instruments at his command, should be beaten
in his knowledge of the weather by a flock of
sheep I"- .non.


Magaritu of n shep.
A CARmra of Ayr was, sometime ago, aroused
from his sleep by a loud knocking at the back
door. As the noise was repeated several times,
he arose, and cautiously opened the door. There
stood a fine pet sheep, which was usually allowed
to run about the court-yard. The animal looked
in the carrier's face,but was unable to express tie
reason for summoning its master from his warm
bed. The man chased the sheep to its shed, and
retired again to repose. Scarcely had he covered
himself with the warm blankets, before the knock-
ing was repeated. He sprang from his bed, angry
at the pertinacity of the sheep, and he determined
to punish it. Just as he opened the door, how-
ever, he heard a noise in his stable, on the oppo-
site side of the yard. On opening the stable door,







DUMB CREATION. 39

he found that a horse had broken loose, and would
probably soon have done serious injury. The man
now thanked and patted the poor, quiet sheep.
He felt sure that the prettyereature, hearing that
all was not right, had taken the best means in its
power of reporting the matter to head-quarters.
The carrier went to bed, and the sheep went
quietly to its shed.B. S.


following a Seader.
Tirs incident is said to have taken place in
England, where a farmer and his two boys at-
tempted to stop a flock of sheep, as they were
rushing down a street. The leader, with quick
sagacity, observing that the way of escape was cut
off, gave a tremendous leap over the farmer's head,
and scampered on ahead. Strange to say, the en-
tire flock followed,jumping over the farmer's head,
and astonishing him with an unusual exhibition of
sheep nature.-- on.


ghe gr crs and their $heep.
Two neighbors in the State of New York,
each with a drove of sheep, started on the same
day for a distant market; one of them, several
hours before the other, travelled uniformly every







DUMB CREATION. 39

he found that a horse had broken loose, and would
probably soon have done serious injury. The man
now thanked and patted the poor, quiet sheep.
He felt sure that the prettyereature, hearing that
all was not right, had taken the best means in its
power of reporting the matter to head-quarters.
The carrier went to bed, and the sheep went
quietly to its shed.B. S.


following a Seader.
Tirs incident is said to have taken place in
England, where a farmer and his two boys at-
tempted to stop a flock of sheep, as they were
rushing down a street. The leader, with quick
sagacity, observing that the way of escape was cut
off, gave a tremendous leap over the farmer's head,
and scampered on ahead. Strange to say, the en-
tire flock followed,jumping over the farmer's head,
and astonishing him with an unusual exhibition of
sheep nature.-- on.


ghe gr crs and their $heep.
Two neighbors in the State of New York,
each with a drove of sheep, started on the same
day for a distant market; one of them, several
hours before the other, travelled uniformly every







40 A PLEA FOR THE

day; the other rested every Sabbath, yet he
arrived at the market first, with his flock in a
better condition than that of his friend. In giving
an account of it, he said that he drove his sheep
on Monday, about seventeen miles; on Tuesday,
not over sixteen; and so lessening each day, till on
Saturday, he drove them only about eleven miles.
But on Monday, after resting on the Sabbath, they
would travel again seventeen miles, and, so on,
each week. But his neighbor's sheep, which were
not allowed to rest on the Sabbath, before they
arrived at the market, could not travel without
injury more than six or eight miles in a day.-
Anon.


She grouers.
A mnBB, manlier life than ous,

Still onward cheerly driving.
Day after day oura y y has been
O'er many a hill and hollow;
By lake and stream, by wood and glan,
Our stately drovee follow.
Through doste-lods rising thick and tdn,
As smoke of Battle o'er s,
Their white horns glisten in the son,
Like plumes and reste before s.
We see them slowly limb the hill,
As slow behind it sinking;








DUMB CREATION. 41

Or, thronging close, from roadside rill
Or sanny bkelet drinking.


7-

Anon, with tos of horn and tail,
And paw of hoo, and bellow,
They leap some farmer's broken pale,
O er meadow, dose or fallow.
r ,"r, ,


The baffled truants rally.



Like those who grind their noses dow,
On patures bare and stony-


Disputing feebly with the frogs,
The cop of saw-grss meadows.

In our good droves, so leek and fair,
No bones of leanness rattle;
No tottering, hide-bound gbost are there,
Of Pharaoh'evil cattle.
Eah stately beeve bapeahk the hand
That fed him unreplning,
T ,- .

We've sought them, where, in warmnt nooks,
The sweetest feed is growing,
And pried them by the clearest brooks,
Through honeysuckle flowing;
PART II.--4







42 1 PLEA FOR THE

Wherever hlillidea, sloping south,
Are bright with early grarses,
Or, tracking green the lowland' drouth,
The mountain streamleot pees.
-7. G. WhAuier.



gratitude of a oat

A GENTLEMAN who had taken an active share in
the rebellion of 1715, escaped after the battle of
Preston, and sought refuge at a lady's house. She
caused him to be conducted to a cave, and sup-
plied him with provisions. When he reached the
centre of the cave, he found an obstacle; he drew
his dirk, but unwilling to strike, lest he might
take the life of a companion, he stooped down
and discovered a goat with her kid, stretched on
the ground. He perceived that the animal was
in pain, and ascertained that her leg was fractured.
He bound it up, and offered her a share of the
bread beside him; but she stretched out her tongue
to apprise him that her mouth was parched with
thirst; he gave her water,which she took readily,
and then ate some bread. After midnight he ven-
tured out of the cave; all was still; he plucked
an armful of gras, and cut tender twigs, which the
goat accepted with joy and thankfulness. The
prisoner derived much comfort from having a







DMB CREATION. 43

living creature in this dungeon, and he caressed
and fed her tenderly.
The man who was intrusted to bring him sup-
plies fell sick; and when another attempted to
penetrate into the cavern, the goat furiously op-
posed him, presenting her horns in all directions,
till the fugitive, hearing a disturbance, came for-
ward. This newattendant giving the watchword,
removed every doubt of his good intentions, and
the Amazon of the recess obeyed her benefactor in
permitting him to advance. The gentleman was
convinced, that, had a band of military attacked
the cavern, his grateful patient would have died
in his defence.


Attbahmrnt of a foat.
THo following affecting incident is worthy of
record:--A seafaring lad named Morfee, who re-
sided with his parents, near the Croft, Hastings,
and who was very fond of keeping and rearing
dumb animals, expired, after a short illness, a few
weeks ago. Amongst his other pets, he kept a
young goat, which has frequently been seen gam-
bolling in St. Clement's upper burial ground. This
animal seems to have become instinctively ac-
quainted with the death of its friend and master.
It appeared to be in great distress, and butted







44 A PLEA FOR THE

against the house with great energy, as if deter-
mined to effect an entrance. The attention of the
boy's relatives was excited; they admitted the
affectionate little animal, when, strange to tell, it
made its way to the room where the corpse lay,
and leaped upon the coffin, uttering loud cries of
distress, and licking the deceased's iace. The poor
little sorrowing goat had to be removed byforce.-






IN Kohl's Travels in Austria," a very touch-
ing incident is narrated of the escape of a goat,
and her little kids from the shots of a hunter.
The three animals were happily eating the sweet,
juicy grass, when the report of a gun was heard.
Tie goat turned round, and eying the hunter,
who was just reloading his gun, the poor creature
had instinct enough to know that danger was at
Ihe. She suddenly leaped to the top of a steep
rock, and with a peculiar cry of alarm, seemed to
say to her little kids, Follow me." The pretty
things tried, but they had not strength to jump so
far.
The poor mother goat was in the greatest dis-
tress as she saw the hunter drawing nearer and
nearer. The faithful creature suddenly jumped







DUMB CREATION. 45

down by the side of her little ones, and raising her
fore feet against the side of the rock, she made
another strange noise, which seemed to say, "Jump
on my back, my little ones." In a moment one of
the kids was on its mother's back, and then easily
jumped to the top of the rok I The goat and
kids had all reached a place of safety, far away
from the reach of the cruel sportsman I
Who taught the mother goat thus to care for and
protect its young? God



Ehq runhalrd and th q (ot.
A WELSHMAN, who was much addicted to in-
temperance, had a favorite goat, which on one oc-
casion followed him to the public house.
The Welshman succeeded, after much coaxing,
in getting the goat to swallow some liquor. In a
short time, the poor creature was completely in-
toxicated, and tumbling over and over, played
such curious antics, that the old topers set up
roars of laughter, and begged that "Nanny"
might be brought the next time for more fun."
When the next evening came, the goat was
called by her thoughtless master, to accompany
him to his nightly resort. Nanny walked very
quietly until they arrived at the door of the public
house,when she stood still,and neither kind words







46 A PLEA FOR THE

or blows could induce the animal to move a step
further.
The landlord brought out some oat-cake, and
tried to entice the goat to follow him; but no, she
was not to be caught in the publican's trap a
second time. Nanny, of course, could not speak,
but her conduct proved one of the best temper-
ance lectures ever given in the village. The mas-
ter was so impressed that he was never known to
enter the public house again. He became a
pledged abstainer, and ultimately proved one of
the most eloquent advocates that the temperance
cause has ever known.--Anon.



% ~S ortiwe Icghant.
TaE Elephant of the Jardin des Plantes, at
Paris, used to play his visitors a trick which could
not have been thought of but by an animal of in-
telligence. His house opened upo an inclosure
called the elephant's park, containing a pond, in
which he would lay himself under the water, con-
cealing every part of him except the very end of
his trunk, a mere speck, that would hardly be
noticed by a stranger to the animals habits. A
crowd would often assemble around the inclosure,
and not seeing him in it, would watch, in expecta-
tion that he would soon issue from his house. But






DUMB CoEATION. 47
whilst they were gazing about, a copious sprink-
ling of water would fall upon them, and ladies and
gentlemen, with their fine bonnets and coats, would
run for shelter under the trees, looking up at the
clear sky, and wondering whence such a shower
should come. Immediately afterwards,'however,
they would see the elephant rising slowly from
his bath, evnining, as it seemed, an awkward joy
at the trick that he had played. In the course of
time, his amusement became generally known, and
the moment the water began to rise from his trunk,
the spectators would take flight, at which lie ap-
peared exceedingly delighted, getting up as fast
as he could to see the bustle that he had caused.-
Lee, .necdotes of .dnimals.


grute Jntelligenre.
Is the Garden of Plants, in London, the keep-
ers were recently engaged in destroying a great
number of rats, when one of them escaped and
ran to the spot allotted to the elephant. Seeing no
other refuge, in the twinkling of an eye the rat
snugly ensconced himself in the trunk of the ele-
phant,. very much to the elephant's dissatisfaction.
He stamped his foot and twisted his trunk around
like the sail of a windmill, and then stood sud-
denly still, apparently reflecting on what it was







48 A PLEA FOR THE

best to do. Presently he ran to the water trough
where he was accustomed to drink, plunged in his
trunk and filled it, and then raising it, dashed out
the rat in a torrent like that which issues from the
hose of a fire-engine. When the rat struck the
ground, the elephant seized him, and made him
undergo the immersion and projection four times.
The fourth time the rat fell dead. The cle-
phant, with a quiet but majestic air, crushed
it under his foot, and, then went round to
the spectators, to make his usual collection of
dainties.-The Jforavian.




SIg Ikgnard.
THE fox often makes sad havoc amongst the
poultry in farm yards, and is one of the most con-
ning animals known. In that interesting book,
"Anecdotes of Natural History," there are several
curious anecdotes of foxes, and amongst them is
the following:-
" At the parsonage of Kilmorae, in Inverness-
shire, there was a well-built poultry-house, from
which the worthy clergyman's family had their
supply of fine fresh eggs. One morning, the ser-
vant entered the poultry-house, when to her dis-
may, she found the floor strewed with dead hens,







DUMB CREATION. 49

and in the midst, a large fox was laid, apparently
dead. There was no question in the maid's mind
as tothe foxbeing lifeless. She concluded that he
had so gorged himself with the poultry, that he had
died. With a feeling of anger, she took up the fbx
by the tail, and threw him out of the chicken-house.
No sooner, however, did Reynard fall on his solt
bed, than he darted on his feet and scampered off
to his cover in the woods, leaving the servant
maid in a state of extraordinary consternational




gimeg W airing of a (at.
A rOLIEANa was passing down College Street,
Camdentown, London, a few nights ago, when he
heard a cat making a curious noise against the
door of a cellar-kitchen. Thinking that some one
was ill-treating the cat, he knelt down upon the
I irised, however, to
:1. -. ,'timber. Hesoon
perceived that the back part of the house was on
fire. The engines were quickly on the spot, and
the flames were extinguished; but had it not been
for poor pussy's timely warning, the house, in
all probability, would have been burned to the
ground.--Inon.
PAar 1.-5






50 A P- FOE THE

gJezts orf Orueitg.
A MAN was lately teasing some cats in a barn,
near Westbourne, by pulling their tails, when one
of them turned round upon him and bit his
thumb. Such were the effects of the violent in-
flammation ensuing therefrom, that he died within
eight hours.


grotning a Jquirrpl.
WaEN I was about six years old, one morning,
going to school, a ground squirrel ran into its
hole in the road before me, as they like todig holes
in some open place, where they can put out their
heads to see if any danger is near. I thought,
now I will have fine fn. As there was a stream
of water just at hand, I determined to pour
water into the hole till it should be fall, and
force the little animal up, so that I might kill it.
I got a trough from beside a sugar maple tree,
used for catching the sweet sap, and was soon
pouring the water in on the poor squirrel. Could
hear it struggling to get up, and said, Ah, my
fine fellow, I will soon have you out now."
Just then I heard a voice behind me, Well,
my boy, what have you got in there ?"
I turned and saw one of my neighbors, a good






50 A P- FOE THE

gJezts orf Orueitg.
A MAN was lately teasing some cats in a barn,
near Westbourne, by pulling their tails, when one
of them turned round upon him and bit his
thumb. Such were the effects of the violent in-
flammation ensuing therefrom, that he died within
eight hours.


grotning a Jquirrpl.
WaEN I was about six years old, one morning,
going to school, a ground squirrel ran into its
hole in the road before me, as they like todig holes
in some open place, where they can put out their
heads to see if any danger is near. I thought,
now I will have fine fn. As there was a stream
of water just at hand, I determined to pour
water into the hole till it should be fall, and
force the little animal up, so that I might kill it.
I got a trough from beside a sugar maple tree,
used for catching the sweet sap, and was soon
pouring the water in on the poor squirrel. Could
hear it struggling to get up, and said, Ah, my
fine fellow, I will soon have you out now."
Just then I heard a voice behind me, Well,
my boy, what have you got in there ?"
I turned and saw one of my neighbors, a good







DUMB CREATION. 51

old man, with long white locks, that had seen sixty
winters. Why,"saidl," I have aground squirrel
in here, and am going to drown him out."
Said he, Jonathan, when I was a little boy,
more than fifty years ago, I was engaged one day
just as you are, drowning a ground squirrel; and
an old man like me came along, and said to
me, You are a little boy; now, if you were down
in a narrow hole like that, and I should come along
and pour water on you, and try to drown you,
would you not think I was cruel? God made
that little squirrel, and life is as sweet to it
as it is to you; and why will you torture to
death a little innocent creature that God has
made ?'" He said, I have never forgotten that,
and never shall. I never have killed any harm.
less creature for fun since.
", Now, my dear boy, I want you to remember
this while you live, and when tempted to kill any
poor little innocent animal or bird, think of this;
and mind, God don't allow us to kill his pretty
little creatures for fun."
More than forty years have since passed, and I
never forgot what the good man said, nor have I
ever killed the least animal, for fun, since. It was
ninety years since this advice was first given, and
I believe my whole lile has been influenced by
it.-F. C.







52 A PLEA FOR TBH

houghtless (mreltu.

IT was a beautiful, calm evening, the loveliest of
the autumnal season, when, after the toils and
cares of the day, I set out to refresh my body and
mind by inhaling the gentle breeze.
The sun was declining; the feathered tribes
seemed to be responding to each other in pouring
out their hymns of gratitude to their beneficent
Creator, and the flocks were following the tink-
ling bell of their leader to the fold. Presently,
I saw a man at some little distance, who appeared
to be agitated by passion, and was lifting, and
throwing with force, stone after stone at some ob-
ject beneath him. This made me approach him,
and inquire what was the matter.
" Oh, sir," said he, "a great, nasty toad," and
down went another stone, with vehemence.
"And, pray," said I, why do you kill that
poor creature-has it done yon any harm ?"
Why," said he, they don't do no good, do
they ?"
"My friend," said I, "supposing they do no
good, is that any reason why you should put it to
death ? Only consider, if everything were to be
destroyed which does no good, what would become
of you and me? The Almighty, who sees our
actions, and who knows the wickedness of our
hearts, does not destroy us; but those poor animals







DUMB CREATION. 53

are more harmless than we, and not only do no
hurt, but do a great deal of good, in feeding on
and destroying quantities of snails and insects,
which would destroy our vegetables."
Well," said the man, throwing away the
stone which he had ready for another fling, then
let him live; but I didn't know they did any good."
Nay, my friend," I replied, your leaving the
poor, crippled animal todie a lingeringdeath,would
now be more cruel than killing it outright; don't
you see that you have broken every bone in its body,
and so covered it with stones, that it is impossible
for it to get away; and it may have to suffer for
many days ? The most merciful tiing now, is to
put it out of its misery; but let me entreat you,
never again to put to death, or torment, any of
God's creatures. In wisdom hathhe made them all
and pronounced them good.-Children's Friend.


gte goad.

IT is delightful to see the young show a pro-
teoting kindness to such harmless creatures as are
often harshly treated. Some children are so silly
as to be afraid of the toad, and say they are poi-
sonous, but the gardener knows better; he will
tell you that they do good instead of harm, and
that they are very useful in clearing his garden
PART II.-5*







54 A PLEA FOR TMH

of slugs, worms and flies, that would spoil the
flowers and eat the fruit.
A benevolent English gentleman once took
pains to reclaim a toad from its timid habits. It
improved by his attentions, grew to a large size,
and at his approach, came regularly from its hole,
to meet him and receive his food.
Ladies who visited the garden sometimes de-
sired to see this singular favorite. It lived to be
forty years old. What age it might have attained,
had it met with no accident, it would be difficult
to say. For it was in perfect health when
wounded by a fierce raven, as it one day was
coming from its house, under the steps of the
door, which fronted the garden. The poor crea-
ture languished awhile, and then died, and the
benevolent man who had so long protected it, took
pleasure in relating its history, and in reemmber,
ing that he had made its life happy.-Sigouney.


Tesfulnles of Wads.
I WILL take the liberty of stating to you some
facts relative to the protection of garden vegeta-
bles from the attacks of the cut-worm and some
others of the same tribe. Some years ago, when
dressing my garden, I discovered a toad nestled
under a plant, and shortly after hoed up a cut-







DUMB CREATION. 55

worm, which I shoved near the toad, who snapped
it up as soon as he got sight of it. The thought
occurred to me, as the toads and worms both came
out at night in search of food, it would be good
policy to gather up the toads and put them in my
garden to catch the worms. I did so, by catching
all I could find about my door-yards, hopping
about at nightfall, put them in my garden, and
was not troubled with the worms that season. I
have repeated the experiment, with the same suc-
cess, ever since. I consider it also an act of hu-
manity to keep them out of the boys' way, who
are apt to torment the poor creatures when hop-
ping about in search of food. If the heads of
families would prevent their small children from
destroying the toads, and larger boys from shoot-
ing and pelting with stones the birds which feed
on worms and insects, they would come around
our premises, and do a great deal in relieving us
from their depredations on our fruit and gardens.-
S. M'Coy.










lnechtes of Po.




Slind Pten and sogs.
RAY, in his Synopsis of Quadrupeds," informs
ns of a blind beggar who was thus led through the
streets of Rome by a middle-sized dog. Besides
leading him in such a manner as to protect him
from all danger, he had learned to distinguish both
the streets and houses where he was accustomed
to receive alms twice or thrice a week. When-
ever the animal came to any one of these streets,
he would not leave it till a call had been made at
every house where his master was usually success-
ful In his petitions. When the beggar began to
ask alms, the dog lay down to rest; but the man
was no sooner served or refused, than the dog
rose spontaneously, and without either order or
sign, proceeded to the other houses, where the
beggar generally received some gratuity. I ob-
served," says he, not without pleasure and sur
prise, that when a half-penny was thrown from a
window, such was the attention and sagacity of
this dog, that he went about in quest of it, took
(56)







A PLEA FOR THE DUMB CREATION. 57

it from the ground with his mouth, and put it into
the blind man's hat; even when bread was thrown
down, the animal would not taste it, unless he re-
ceived it from the hands of his master."
On behalf of the poor dogs generally, and par-
ticularly those who are such valuable guides to tie
blind, we wish to plead for the erection of more
water troughs in the public streets. Whilst re-
joicing at the erection of drinking fountains, let
us not forget that the poor panting dogs also want
water.
A touching scene occurred in Regent Street,
London, last summer. A blind man was slowly
pacing along, led by his dog. The day was hot,
and the little animal was evidently parched with
thirst. When opposite one of the fine shops, a
servant accidentally spilt some water on the stones.
The poor dog darted towards the moistened pave-
ment, and began to lap a few drops from the
ground. Scarcely, however, had the animal's
tongue touched the wet stone, before the blind
man, thinking that his companion was not attend-
ing to his duty, gave the string a sudden jerk, and
pulled the dog away. A most piteous yell was
uttered by the poor, distracted creature, as it left
the dirty, though much coveted drops of water.
A friend, who witnessed the occurrence, states that
it was a most touching scene. Reader what was
the duty of this witness?-.-non.







58 A PLEA FOR THE



IN the city of London, a poor tailor, dying, left
a small cur dog inconsolable for his loss. The
little animal would not leave his dead master even
for food, and whatever he ate was put in the same
room with the coffin. When the body was re.
moved for burial, this faithful attendant followed
his master's remains. After the funeral, he was
driven out of the churchyard by the sexton. The
next day he again found the animal, which had
made its way by some unknown means into the
inlosure, and had dug himself a bed on the grave
of his master.
Once more he was driven out, but was found in
the same situation on the following day. The
minister of the parish hearing of the circumstan-
ces, had him caught, taken home to his own house
and fed, and used every endeavor to win the ani-
mal's affections; but they were inseparably wedded
to his late master, and he took the first opportu-
nity to escape and regain his lonely situation.
With true benevolence, the worthy clergyman
permitted him to follow the bent of his inclina-
tion, but, to soften the rigor of his fate, he caused
a small kennel to be builton the grave,which was
replenished once a day with food and water. Two
years did this pattern of fidelity pass in this man-
ner, till death put an end to his grief.-Jacob Post.







DUMB CREATION. 59


"WIM I one, gontl"
OR, THE SINGULAR RESCUE OF MAIL-BAGS.

LAST winter, the communication by ferry, be-
tween Prudhoe station and the north of the Tyne,
having been cut off by the breaking up of the ice,
the letter-bags of Ovingham and the neighbor-
hood were conveyed on horseback. One day, as
the carrier was crossing the Whittle Dean Burn,
his horse became restive, plunged, and speedily
throw his rider and the two sacks, containing the
mailbags, into the water. The former scrambled
out, but the bags were carried rapidly down to
the Tyne, and would soon have been beyond re-
covery. Fortunately, however, a powerful New-
foundland dog, called Pont," belonging to U. T.
Shields, of the parsonage close by, saw the affair,
and the noble and sagacious creature dashed into
the river, and in a few moments returned to the
shore with one of the bags of letters; no sooner
had he landed the same, than he swam back for the
second bag. To complete his work, he breasted
the flood a third time, and brought out the rider's
hat. Noble fellow I well might he wag his fine,
bushy tail, as he was warmed, patted, and received
the well-earned praise. Well done, Pont well
done, Pont I" The first letter delivered after this
accident contained a considerable amount of







O0 A PLEA FOR THE

money, the owner of which, in gratitude for Pont's
gallant conduct, presented him with a smart col-
lar.--Jnon.


pathetic ntident.
A FRENCH merchant set out on horseback, ac-
companied by his dog, on purpose to receive
some money. Having settled the business, he tied
the bag of money before him, and began to return
home, while his faithful dog frisked around the
horse, barked and jumped, and seemed to partici-
pate in his master's joy.
The merchant, after riding some miles, alighted
to repose himself under an agreeable shade, and,
taking the bag of money in his hand, laid it down
by his side, under a hedge, and on remounting,
forgot it. The dog perceived this, and ran to
fetch the bag; but it was too heavy for him to
drag along. He then ran after his master, and by
crying, barking and howling, tried to remind him
of his mistake. The merchant understood not his
language, but the assiduous creature persevered in
its efforts, and after trying in vain to stop the
horse, at last began to bite his heels.
The merchant at length began to fear that the
dog had gone mad, and in crossing a brook, he
turned back to look if he would drink; but the







DUMB CREATION.


animal continued to bark and bite with greater
violence than before.
"Oh, dear 1" cried the afflicted merchant; it
must be so; my poor dog is certainly mad. I must
kill him. Oh, could I find any onie to perform
this sad office for me But there is no time to
lose; I, myself, may become the victim if I spare
him."
With these words, he drew a pistol from his
pocket, and with a trembling hand, took aim at
his faithful servant. He turned away in agony as
he fired; but his aim was to be sure. The poor
animal fell wounded, and weltering in his blood,
still endeavored to crawl toward his master, as if
to tax him with ingratitude. The merchant could
not bear the sight; he spurred on his horse with
a heart full of sorrow. Suddenly he missed his
money. Ah," he thought, wretch that I am I
I alone am to blame 1 I could not comprehend my
faithful friend, and I have sacrificed him. He
only wished to inform me of my loss."
Instantly he turned his horse, and went off at
full gallop to the place where he had stopped. He
saw with half-turned eyes the scene where the
tragedy was acted; he perceived the traces of
blood as he proceeded; he was oppressed and dis-
tracted; but in vain did he look for his dog; he
was not to be seen on the road. At last he
arrived at the spot where he had alighted. But
PART II.-6







A PLEA FOR THE


what were his sensations I His heart was ready
to bleed; he was in the madness of despair. The
poor dog, unable any longer to follow his master,
had determined to consecrate his last moments to
his service. He had crawled, all bloody as he
Swas, to the forgotten bag, and in the agonies of
death he lay watching beside it I When he saw
his master, he still testified his joy by the wagging
of his tail. He could do no more; he tried to
rise, but his strength failed him; the vital tide
was ebbing fast. Even the caresses of his master
could not prolong his life for a few moments. He
stretched out his tongue to lick the hand that was
now fondling him in the agonies of regret, as if
to seal forgiveness of the deed that had deprived
him of life. He then cast a look of kindness on
his master, and closed his eyes in death.-Uncle
John.
-..--. :oo e.....--


Dog and Sost (hild.
A GREAT while ago there was a poor woman
wandering about the mountains, in the vicinity of
the convent of St. Bernard, in company with her
son, a very small boy. They were overtaken by a
snow-storm, when the mother was buried beneath
an avalanche, and the child saw her no more.
Poor boy The storm increased; the wind






DUMB CREATION.


howled, whirling the snow into huge heaps. In
the hope that he might possibly meet a traveller,
the child forced his way for a while through the
snow; but at last, exhausted, benumbed with the
cold, and discouraged, he fell upon his knees,
joined his hands devoutly together, and cried, as
he raised his face, bathed in tears, towards heaven:
" Oh, God I have mercy on a poor child, who has
nobody in the world to care for him I"
As he lay in the place where he fell down,
which was sheltered a little by a rock, he grew
colder and colder, and he thought he must die.
But still, from time to time he prayed, Have
mercy, oh, God I on a poor child who has nobody
in the world to care for him I"
At last he fell asleep, but was awakened by
feeling a warm paw on his face. As he opened
his eyes, he saw with terror an enormous dog-the
celebrated and noble Barry"-holding his head
near his own. He uttered a cry of fear, and
started back a little way from the dog. The dog
approached the boy again, and tried after his own
fashion, to make the little fellow understand that
he came there to do him good, and not to hurt
him. Then he licked the face and hands of the
child. By-and-by the child confided in his visitor,
and began to entertain a hope that he might yet
be saved. When Barry saw that his errand was
understood, he lifted his head, and showed the child






A PLEA FOR THE


a bottle covered with willow, which was hanging
around his neck. Of this bottle the little fellow
drank, and felt refreshed. Then the dog lay down
by the side of the child, and gave him the benefit
of the heat of his own body for a long time.
After this, the dog made a sign for the boy to get
upon his back. It was some time before he
could understand what the sign meant; but it was
repeated again and again, and at last, the child
mounted the back of the kind animal, who carried
him safely to the convent."



% Proidente.

ONE evening, after the late Robert Newton had
been preaching at Cheetham Hill, and was about
to return to Manchester, a person in the vestry of
the chapel, kindly offered to accompany him along
the lonely part of the road. He declined the
favor, alleging that his friend would have to re-
turn alone. He had not gone far on his way be-
fore a large dog came to him, and followed him
very closely. Soon after, he saw two suspicious-
looking men standing upon the footpath. The
dog eyed them both with great care, and the men,
seeing the formidable animal, divided right and
left, so as to allow the preacher and his faithful







DUMB CREATION.


attendant to pass unmolested. He resolved that
if his canine friend should follow him home, he
would reward him with a good supper; but as he
entered into Manchester, the animal disappeared,
and he saw him no more I Newton, who believed,
on the authority of his Saviour, that the very
hairs of his head were all numbered, could not
ascribe this occurrence to a blind chance, but to
the providence of God. He therefore recognized
in it a motive to gratitude for the past, anl of
trust for the future.-From Life of Dr. .Jewton.


"aIl' tt Si, ire-feap Dag.
THERE is a noble band of heroic men in London,
who have charge of the fire-escapes. Samuel
Wood, one of the bravest of these brave men, has
saved nearly one hundred men, women and chil-
dren from the flames! Much of Wood's success,
however, is justly due to his wonderful little dog,
Bill,' around whose neck the parishioners of
Whitechapel have placed a silver collar, in token
of his valuable services during the.nine years that
he has filled the important post of Fire-escape
Dog.'
,' Bill,' like his master, has to be very wakeful,
and at his post of duty during the whole of the
night, and therefore he sleeps during the day,
PART II.--6







A PLEA FOB THE


close to his master's bed. He, never attempts to
run out-of doors until the hour approaches for
them to go to the station.' Bill' does not allow
his master to sleep too long. He is sure to wake
him if he is likely to be late I How the dog
knows the time is a puzzle, but know it he does I
When the fire-escape is wheeled out of the White-
chapel churchyard, at nine o'clock, Bill' is
promptly at his post. When an alarm of fire is
heard,' Bill,' who is at other times very quiet, now
begins to bark most furiously. Wood has no oc-
casion to sound his rattle, for the policemen all
around know Bill's' bark so well, that they at once
come up to render their valuable help. If the alarm
of fire takes place when but few people are in the
streets, Bill' runs around to the coffee-houses near,
and pushing open the doors, gives his well-known
bark, as much as to say, Come and help, men;
come and help.' He has not to bark in vain; his
call is cheerfully obeyed.
"In dark nights the lantern has to be lit, when
'Bill' at once seizes hold of it, and like a
' herald,' runs on before his master. When the
ladder is erected, Bill' is at the top before his
active master has reached half way I He jumps
into the rooms, and amid thick smoke and the ap-
proaching flames, runs from room to room, helping
his master to find and bring out the poor inmates.
On one occasion, the fire burned so rapidly, and







DUMB CREATION.


the smoke in the room became so dense, that Wood
and another man were unable to find their way
out. They feared that escape was now hopeless.
' Bill' seemed at once to comprehend the danger
in which his kind master was placed, and the
faithful creature began to bark. Half suffocated,
Wood and his comrade, knowing this to be the
signal, Follow me,' at once crawled after Bill,'
and in a few moments they were providentially led
to the window, and their lives were saved.
On another occasion, a poor little kitten was
found on the stairs of a house that was on fire.
' Bill' immediately drove the kitten down from
stair to stair, until it reached the door."



S(riendf in Aeed.
A GENTLEMAN in Sussex, England, has a very
vicious house-dog, which is chained up. He has
also another dog, of a very docile character, a sort
of shepherd's dog, which regularly brings home
the cows or sheep, when required. Having per-
formed his usual duty one evening, he quietly laid
himself down, not far from the house-dog's kennel.
Almost at the same moment, a little girl passed
by, when the house-dog flew at her most furiously,
and in doing so snapped his chain in two. Just
as the savage creature was in the act of seizing







A PLEA FOR THE


the poor child, the shepherd's dog rushed upon
him, and with extraordinary tact, held him down to
the ground, until the frightened child had time to
escape. This is a fact which can be vouched for
by an eye-witness.-M. A.. C. W., Forest Row.



L 3o0' 5P auishment.
"IN the town of Honiton, in Devonshire, a fine
Newfoundland dog (named Lion'), belonging to
the Golden Lion Inn, used quietly to spend hours
every day at the entrance of the house. There
passed by, several times in the day, a little, bark-
ing cur. This little impudent dog never passed
Without insulting Lion,' who, after bearing the
annoyance several months, apparently with per-
fect indifference, one day rose up very deliberately,
and seizing the little barker by the neck, carried
him across the street, and then ducked him in a pond
of water. He kept him, head and tail, fairly im
mersed for a few seconds. Generous Lion' then
took him out, laid him on the curb of the footpath,
there to drain and there to repent. He then
walked back, with becoming dignity, to his usual
lounging place. An eye-witness communicates
the fact."







DUMB CREATION.


he tr oJf *3m kmbrinl,

WHT'S the use of' remembering all this ?"
pettishly cried a boy, after his father, who had
been giving him some instructions, left the room.
I'll tell you what, remembering is of great
service sometimes," said his cousin. Let me
read to you now from the Living .Jge. Please
hear:-
"' My dog Dash was once stolen from me.
After being absent thirteen months, he one day
entered my office in town, with a long string tied
round his neck. He had broken away from the
follow who had held him prisoner. Our meeting
was a very joyful one. I found out the thief, had
him apprehended, and took him before a magis-
trate, who, addressing me, Can you give any
satisfactory proof of this dog's being your prop-
erty ?" Placing my mouth to the dog's ear, first
giving him a knowing look, and whispering a little
communication, known only to us two, Dash im-
mediately reared up on his hind legs, and went
through a series of manoeuvres with a stick,
guided meanwhile by my eye, which set the whole
court in a roar of laughter. My evidence needed
nothing stronger. The thief stood convicted.
Dash was liberated, and among the cheers of the
multitude, we merrily bounded homeward.'"







A PLEA FOR TIIE


;IePtunm at tWill'% gopital.
"A FAVORITE dog recently belonging to the
'Will's Hospital for the Indigent Blind and
Lame,' seemed to be endowed with unusual saga-
city. He generally, during the day, laid near the
steps leading to the yard, and when one of the
blind patients would come out, he would gently
take his hand in his capacious mouth, and lead
him through the garden, waiting, if he rested, to
take him back to the house.
There would be buckets filled with water, but
Nep. was rarely known to drink, except when the
hydrant was running, before which, he would stand
and bark to have it turned. Being of the St.
Bernard and Newfoundland stock, cold weather.
suited him; he enjoyed lying on the snow and ice.
A little black dog (that they had at the same time),
finding a warm bed on his back, would lie there
with apparent satisfaction to both."
-----oo~o~----



SOME years ago, an American ship, called the
' Washington," bound for China, had on board,
among other passengers, an officer, with his wife
and child, a little boy five years old, and a large
Newfoundland dog called Bobby."







A PLEA FOR TIIE


;IePtunm at tWill'% gopital.
"A FAVORITE dog recently belonging to the
'Will's Hospital for the Indigent Blind and
Lame,' seemed to be endowed with unusual saga-
city. He generally, during the day, laid near the
steps leading to the yard, and when one of the
blind patients would come out, he would gently
take his hand in his capacious mouth, and lead
him through the garden, waiting, if he rested, to
take him back to the house.
There would be buckets filled with water, but
Nep. was rarely known to drink, except when the
hydrant was running, before which, he would stand
and bark to have it turned. Being of the St.
Bernard and Newfoundland stock, cold weather.
suited him; he enjoyed lying on the snow and ice.
A little black dog (that they had at the same time),
finding a warm bed on his back, would lie there
with apparent satisfaction to both."
-----oo~o~----



SOME years ago, an American ship, called the
' Washington," bound for China, had on board,
among other passengers, an officer, with his wife
and child, a little boy five years old, and a large
Newfoundland dog called Bobby."







DUMB CREATION.


Everybody in the ship liked Bobby, he was so
gool-tempered and frolicsome, but the little boy
was the dog's constant playmate. He was a merry
little fellow, and as fond of Bobby as Bobby was
of him.
One evening, when it was growing dark, the lit-
tle boy and the dog were romping together; the
ship gave a sudden roll, and splash went the child
into the ocean. A cry was raised, A hand over I
a hand over." Bobby sprang over the side of the
ship, and swam towards the stern.
The little boy's father, half frantic, leaped with
others, into the jolly-boat, but it was too dark to
see far before them. All gave the child up for
lost. At last they heard a splash to the larboard.
" Pull on quick!" cried the father. The helmsman
turned the tiller, the men pulled with redoubled
force, and in a moment, brave Bobby, holding up
the child in his mouth, was alongside. Joy I joy
joy!
The boat was rowed back to the ship, the half-
drowned boy was recovered, the parents were
overpowered with thankfulness, and the brave dog
was patted and caressed by all.
The little boy hugged his favorite in his aims,
and every man on board the ship loved the dog.
W. H. H.







A PLEA FOR THE


Happit and the aglf.

MANY years ago, a young shepherd boy might
be seen in the glens and straths of Sutherlandshire,
always accompanied by a favorite dog. Many
boys, judging from the rough, shaggy coat, and
uncomely figure of the dog, might be disposed to
say that it was unworthy of attention or kind
regard. We are certain, however, that their
opinion would undergo an entire change on be-
coming acquainted with the heroic character and
noble qualities of Cappie. Take the following as
an instance of his sagacity and courage:-
His master was one day sitting on a hillside, in
Shaetiel, looking over the cattle under his care in
the hollow below. With alarm, he saw the weak-
est of the herd attacked by an eagle, which, fail-
ing to overturn the animal by its first assault, rose
again to the sky. The experience of the boy
taught him that no time was to be lost, as the
eagle would renew the attack, and descend with
redoubled force. "Cappie, Cappie," he cried,
" the poor beast will be killed," at the same time
taking the dog, and directing his eye to the eagle
as it soared aloft. Away darted Cappie from his
master, down to the hollow. As soon as he
got sight of the eagle, he took his place beside the
trembling animal he was instructed to defend.







DUMB CREATION.


lHo had only a few moments to wait, not sufficient
for breathing time, when the eagle pounced again
upon its victim. With a leap, Cappie sprang at
the assailant, who, not liking the encounter,
sought refuge in his airy heights. Cappie's re-
ward was a mouthful of the eagle's feathers, at
which, when his master came up, he ruefully
looked, as much as to say, "I conquered the foe,
but I wish I had made him prisoner."



he fiop of the Wlountain onas.ter.
ONE of the most remarkable passes of the
mountains which separate Switzerland and Italy,
is that called St. Bernard. Many thousands of
persons traverse this road every year, and were it
not for the monastery at the summit of the moun-
tain, it would be impassable in the winter. From
November to May, a trusty servant accompanied
by a monk goes half-way down the mountain every
day, in search of travellers. They have with them
one or two large dogs, trained for the purpose,
who will scent a man at a great distance, and find
out the road in the thickest fogs and heaviest falls
of snow. Suspended from the necks of these saga-
cious dogs are little caskets, with meat and drink
to refresh the weary traveller.
Many are the interesting facts which are re-
PART II.-7







A PLEA FOR THE


corded of the brave dogs of St. Bernard, of whom
there are but very few left. One of the most re-
markable of these faithful animals was called
Barry. This faithful dog is known to have saved
the lives of forty unfortunate travellers, who, but
for his assistance, must have perished in the snow.
If Barry was in time with his succors, the unfor-
tunates were relieved, not only from his bottle, but
also by means of the warm garment which his
masters tied round his body for this purpose; if
he could not, by his warm tongue and breath,
restore sufficient animation, he returned to the
convent and brought, with the utmost expedition,
the assistance of one of the inmates.
One day, in his vigilant excursions, Barry found
a poor boy asleep and almost frozen to death in
the celebrated Glacier of Balsore. He warmed
the boy, licked him, awoke him, presented him
with his restorative bottle, and carried him on his
back to the convent. The boy was restored to
his rejoicing parents.
When age had diminished the strength of this
sagacious animal, he was sent to Berne, in thehope
that he might tranquilly end his usefully employed
days. His old age was by kind treatment ren-
dered as comfortable as possible, and after his
death, his body was carefully buried, and his skin
stuffed to imitate nature; and thus he stands in a
position resembling life, decorated with his collar.







DUMB CREATION.


(In a Aaithful Dog.

YES, proof was plain, that since that day,
When this ill-fated traveller died,
The dog had watched about the spot,
Or by his master's side.
How nourish'd here through such long time,
HE knows who gave that love sublime,
And gave that strength of feeling, great,
Above all human estimate.
-Wordsworth.




SruteIf .

WILL none befriend that poor dumb brute,
Will no man rescue him ?-
With weaker effort, gasping, mute,
He strains in every limb.

Spare him, oh, spare:-he feels,-he feels I
Big tears roll from his eyes ;
Another crushing blow -he reels,
Staggers-and falls-and dies.

Poor jaded horse, the blood runs cold
Thy guiltless wrongs to see;
To heav'n, oh, starved one, lame and old,
Thy dim eye pleads for thee.

Thou, too, oh, dog whose faithful zeal
Fawns on some ruffian grim;
He stripes thy skin with many a weal,
And yet-thou lovest him.







DUMB CREATION.


(In a Aaithful Dog.

YES, proof was plain, that since that day,
When this ill-fated traveller died,
The dog had watched about the spot,
Or by his master's side.
How nourish'd here through such long time,
HE knows who gave that love sublime,
And gave that strength of feeling, great,
Above all human estimate.
-Wordsworth.




SruteIf .

WILL none befriend that poor dumb brute,
Will no man rescue him ?-
With weaker effort, gasping, mute,
He strains in every limb.

Spare him, oh, spare:-he feels,-he feels I
Big tears roll from his eyes ;
Another crushing blow -he reels,
Staggers-and falls-and dies.

Poor jaded horse, the blood runs cold
Thy guiltless wrongs to see;
To heav'n, oh, starved one, lame and old,
Thy dim eye pleads for thee.

Thou, too, oh, dog whose faithful zeal
Fawns on some ruffian grim;
He stripes thy skin with many a weal,
And yet-thou lovest him.








A PLEA FOR THE


Shame! that of all the living chain
That links creation's plan,
There is but one delights in pain,
The savage monarch-man l

Oh, cruelty,-who could rehearse
Thy million dismal deeds,
Or track the workings of the curse
By which all nature bleeds ?

Thou meanest crime-thou coward sin,
Thou base, flint-hearted vice-
Scorpion! to sting thy heart within
Thyself shalt all suffice.

The merciless is doubly curst,
As mercy is twice blest;"
Vengeance, though slow, shall come-but first
The vengeance of the breast.

Why add another woe to life,
Man-are there not enough ?
Why lay thy weapon to the strife ?
Why make the road more rough?

Faint, hunger-sick, old, blind and ill,
The poor, or man or beast,
Can battle on with life uphill,
And bear its griefs at least.

Truly, their cup of gall o'erflows I
But, when the spite of men
Adds poison to the draught of woes,
Who, who can drink it then?








DUMB CREATION.


Oppression's victim, weak and mild,
Scarce shrinking from the blow,
And the poor wearied factory child,
Join in the dirge of woe.

Oh, cruel world I oh, sickening fear
Of goad, or knife, or thong,
Oh, load of evils ill to bear I
-How long, good God, how long?
-M. F. Tupper.

---o~oco--


there is a cod.

"THEBE is a God," all nature cries,
I see it painted on the skies,
I see it in the flow'ring spring,
I hear it where the birdlings sing;
I see it in the flowing main,
I see it on the fruitful plain,
I see it stamped on hail and snow,
I see it where the streamlets flow.
I see it in the clouds that soar,
I hear it when the thunders roar,
I see it when the morning shines,
I see it when the day declines;
I see it in the mountain's height,
I see it in the smallest mite,
I see it everywhere abroad,
I feel!-I know there is a God.


-Anon.


PART II.-7*








78 A PLEA FOR THE DUMB CREATION.


(God rcat in 1911 hins.

[From the German.]
GOLDEN evening, rosy morning,
Gracious One have their adorning
From thy hand, which frameth all.
Nothing is despised before thee,
E'en the least is touched with glory-
Thou regardest great and small.

To the lion food thou sendeth,
And thy gracious ear attendeth,
When the raven nestlings cry;
Thou the flow'ret's grace bestoweth,
E'en thy humblest working showeth,
Boundless might and majesty!

"By all knowledge unincumbered,
Thou our sighs and tears hast numbered,
Guard of childhood's weak estate;
Widows, orphans hast thou cherished,
Heard the bondmen when they perished,
Thus art thou in all things great."










































OVEN BIRD.













These are God's little choristers,
Performing service all day long;
Till nature's old cathedral aisles,
Are deluged with a flood of song."


^a @m gird
AMONG the building birds there is one species
which is pre-eminently superior. This is the oven
bird, (Furnarius fuliginosus,) which derives its
popular name from the shape and material of its
nest. It is allied to the creeper, and is about as large
as a lark. Its color is brown; it is very active,
flitting from bush to bush in search of insects. It
generally haunts the banks of South American
rivers. The material of which its nest is made is
principally mud or clay, obtained from the river
banks, but is strengthened and stiffened by the
admixture of grass, vegetable fibres, and stems of
various plants. The heat of the sun is sufficient
to harden it, and when it has been thoroughly
dried, it is so strong, that it seems more like the
handiwork of some novice at pottery, than a veri-
table nest, constructed by a bird; the fierce heat
(79)







A PLEA FOR THE


of the tropical sun baking the clay nearly as hard
as brick. It is domed, and has the entrance in the
side. Its walls are an inch in thickness. Both
sexes work at its construction; the bird some-
times building on a branch of a tree, now and
then on the top of palings, generally in the bushes
without any attempt at concealment. In the in-
terior, crossing the nest from side to side, is a wall
or partition, made of the same materials as the
outer shell, and reaching nearly to the top of the
dome, thus dividing it into two chambers, and
having also the effect of strengthening the whole
structure. In the inner chamber is a soft bed of
feathers, on which the eggs are placed, generally
four in number. The female sits upon them in the
dark. The outer room is probably used by her
mate.-Compiled from "Homes without Hands.".




^Qbb Q H 9ird's sft.
MANY years ago, a lady was taking a country
walk with her daughter, when they met a boy who
had in his hand a pretty-nest, containing five beau-
tiful speckled eggs. This nest the naughty boy
had just stolen from a tree close by, and it was in-
deed sad to hear the distressing cries of the poor
little birds.







DUMB CREATION.


The lady remonstrated with the boy, and urged
him to return the stolen nest; the little girl
pleaded, and even the dog seemed as if he would
have said, "I should have been ashamed to use
the poor birds so cruelly."
I am sorry to say that the boy was a hard-
hearted fellow, and refused to replace the nest
The poor little sorrowing birds never got their
pretty eggs back again
What became of the boy ? Many years after,
a young man stood in the criminal's dock, before
the Judge, in York Castle. He was found guilty
of burglary, and was sentenced to be transported
for life. Who was that young man ? It was he,
who, when a boy, stole the bird's nest
When I was a very little boy, I was walking
one summer's day by the hedge of a field, when a
pretty bird flew out, and I began to search for its
nest. Just at this moment a kind-hearted lady
came up, when she placed her hand very gently
on my shoulder, and sweetly said, My little boy,
the same God who made you made the birds. He
cares for the birds and feeds them every day. He
wants both them and you to be happy-don't be a
robber of God's pretty birds."
I thank God that I did not steal the bird's nest.
If I had done so, I should now, perhaps, have been
like the other boy, a poor convict in chains.-
Uncle John.







A PLEA FOR THE


nacdoat o|f uito irds.
THE Black-capped Titeuse or Chick-a-dee-dee,
is known in Irelandas the bluee bonnet.-' O a
cold day, in th month of March one of thlcs
birds hopped ?nto the house of a friend of mine,
near Belfasa and commenced picking crumbs
about the fo and tables, when, after remaining
for several ours, it took its leave. Next day it
returned, ana alighted on the top of a cage, where
it seemed t form an acquaintance with a gold-
finch. It sta edian the room all night.. The next
morning, while the girl was, opening the window-
shutters, she u onsciously set her foot on the poor
bird and killed it It was afterwards thrown out,
and its. untimely deth soon forgotten. But
during the course of th day, the attention of
some one was drawn to an a acting scene outside,
before: the. parlor windows. T e mate of the blue-
bonnet was standing beside it, mourning its loss in
plaintive tones. It then street hed out its neck,
and putting its beak below the head of its com-
panion, raised it up, and then ang as- before.
Afterwards it attempted to rem e the body, but
was unable. At length it fle away, and after
some time returned, carrying grain of corn,
which it dropped before its dead partner. Then
it fluttered with its, wings, and endeavored to call
the attention of the dead bird to the corn. Find-







DUMB CREATION.


ing this useless also, it flew away again, and re-
turned with another grain, which it deposited in
the same manner. It then lifted the grain and
dropped it upon its mate's beak, continuing to do
this for several minutes. Then it resumed its
plaintive notes; but the sight was too affecting,
and a person was sent out to remove the dead bird.
At that moment," said a spectator, I would
have given anything in my possession to have
seen the poor little blue-bonnet restored to life."-
J.non.


Sarental are.
ONE evening last summer, I sat by an open win-
dow, rocking my infant to sleep and watching the
declining glories of the sun. As the shades of
twilight deepened upon the landscape, a fresh
breeze sprung up, waving and swaying the branches
of a silver maple near the window, until they
almost touched the panes.
Several times I had noticed a flashing of wings
and twittering of little throats among its leaves;
but they attracted little attention, so familiar are
our feathered friends; until at last I became con-
vinced something unusual was going on; and look-
inst more carefully, saw a family of birds under
the care of their mother, arranging themselves for







A PLEA FOR THE


i night. They were so young that I thought
.ey had never before lodged out of the nest.
Two or three were already perched in a row upon
a slender brancfrand the aniious-mother, with a
very bustli air, was encouraging the o rs to
take the places beside them, flying occasion ly
to the wer end of the pendulous bough, and try-
ing it ith her own weight, lest it should not be
quite safe. At last the whole five were induced
to se tle together in a close file, although they
chatt red and chirped all the while, and appeared
to m e many objections. One, crowding the
other, hd to be moved along, and the ambitious
youngste ho had perched himself at the head of
the line, was made to cha to the foot, though
he loudly protested at the humiliation The
mother bird then, after viewing thm from various
stand-points, finished by walking twi e over their
backs, from end to end, and, finally ent to her
own rest, on a neighboring twig, tho h she still
kept her eye upon them, and often see ed to ad-
minister an admonition as they were restless or
noisy.
When first I saw them, an old bird I supposed
to be her mate, was near her, and seemed inter-
ested; but, perhaps growing weary of family
cares, soon flew away to join some comrades in
the cherry-tree close by, and I saw no more of
him.--L. R. T., Del.







DUMB CREATION.


Jhe goor lightinale.

HENRY W. DIXoN writes: I went on agri-
cultural business last May (1859), to visit Mr.
Jonas Webb, of Babraham, a large sheep farmer
in Cambridgeshire. Whilst at dinner, I heard the
'jug-jug' of a nightingale close outside the win-
dow. On asking about it, they said,' Poor thing,
she's only taunting the house-dog.'
," It seems that the large dog (a Newfoundland, I
think), had been following its master down the
drive, past a laurel-bush, where the nightingale
had built her nest; he snapped at it, and just miss-
ing the old bird as she flew off, devoured all the
young ones. From that moment the bird never
left the dog. She followed him when he walked,
and sat, either upon his kennel-top, or on a bush
hard by, with its plaintive note, asking for its
young ones. Actually, if the dog followed his
master into the house, the bird would accompany
him to the very door-step, and wait till he came
out, just like an avenging spirit. I was told that
the poor bird had done this for three weeks, at the
time I was there."
By the courtesy of the lady, we are enabled
fully to confirm the above affecting incident.
She states, Our sympathy was deeply called forth
and we earnestly desired that it were in our
PART II.-8







A PLEA FOR THE


power to replace the nest and little ones, and re-
store comfort to the disconsolate mourner. Our
surprise was great that the poor bird could keep
up her mournful song so long. It seemed as
if her little throat must be sore, through her
screaming for hours together. So long as' Pilot'
was in sight, she continued upbraiding him night
and day. Sometimes Pilot' was allowed to join
us when we took our work or tea on the lawn.
He would ascend the front steps and seat himself
by the door in the hall. Even then the poor bird
would come and actually hop on the steps after
the dog. The young persons would sometimes
walk close to the bird, and see if it would not fly
away; but no, the bird would still hop after the
destroyer of her little brood. For three weeks
or a month, we could always tell whereabouts
, Pilot' was, by the wearisome wail of the poor
bird. At length the sorrowful note ceased to-be
heard, and we concluded that the bird was gone;
but suddenly it was again heard. My husband
looked out, and there was our poor bird on a high
birch-tree across the lawn, and almost at the same
moment' Pilot' was seen, passing under the tree.
As it is believed that birds which migrate, return
again to the same locality, we look forward with
much interest to watch if we shall hear any more
of the one in question, and whether Pilot' will
be remembered."-A-non.







DUMB CREATION.


gird gmtnptha .
WHETHER brutes sympathize with the happi-
ness and sorrows of others, might at first sight
seem doubtful; but facts like the following com-
pel us to decide the question in the affirmative.
The story is taken by Brougham from an appar-
ently trustworthy French authority:-
"A swallow had slipped its foot into the noose
of a cord attached to a spout in the College des
Quatre Nations, at Paris, and by endeavoring to
escape, had drawn the knot tight. Its strength
being exhausted in vain attempts to fly, it uttered
piteous cries, which assembled a vast flock of other
swallows. They seemed to crowd and
consult together for a little while, and, then, one
of them darted at the string and struck at it with
his beak as he flew past, and others following in
quick succession did the same, striking at the same
part, till, after continuing this combined opposition
for half an hour, they succeeded in severing the
cord and freeing their companion. They all con-
tinued flocking and hovering till night; only, in-
stead of the tumult and agitation, in which they
had been at their first assembling, they were
chattering as if without any anxiety at all, but
conscious of having succeeded."--The .Moravian.






A PLEA FOR THE


Shooting for $port
LINDLEY MURRAY was, in early life, fond of
shooting; but after some years he became dissatis-
fied with it from a conviction, not only that it con-
sumes too much precious time, but also that it is
improper to take life for the sake of amusement.
He believed that of the birds which are shot at,
many more are wounded than are actually killed,
and obtained, and consequently they gradually
pine away and die through want of food. He had
seen birds so much hurt as to be incapable of per-
forming their natural functions, and he had reason
to believe that instances of this kind are very nu-
merous. These reflections made such an impression
on his mind, that he determined never again to
indulge himself in a sport, which produced so
much distress to the objects of his amusement.



&tinare of the (un.
MERIAM, of Brooklyn, made a list of the num-
ber of persons killed and wounded within two
years, while engaged in shooting or hunting harm-
less animals and little birds. One hundred and
five persons were killed, besides thirty-two who
were wounded-far outnumbering the deaths by
lightning recorded by him during the same time.




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