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UFPKY NEH LSTA



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OCLC 58471795
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mods:languageTerm text English
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mods:name personal
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Brevard Junior College
mods:note dates or sequential designation Vol. 1, no. 1 (8-28-68)-
Ceased with Feb. 1969?
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Copies donated for digitization by Canney family.
funding Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
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mods:caption 1968
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October
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17
mods:subject SUBJ650_1
mods:topic College students' writings, American
mods:geographic Florida
Brevard Country
Periodicals
SUBJ650_2
High school students' writings, American
Florida
Brevard County
Periodicals
SUBJ650_3
Counterculture
Florida
Brevard County
Periodicals
SUBJ650_4
Nineteen sixties
Periodicals
SUBJ650_5
High schools
Florida
Periodicals
SUBJ650_6
Junior colleges
Florida
Periodicals
SUBJ650_7
Education
Florida
Periodicals
SUBJ651_1
Brevard County (Fla.)
Periodicals
SUBJ651_2
United States
Politics and government
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Periodicals
SUBJ655_1
Underground newspapers
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A different drummer
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00027953/00004
 Material Information
Title: A different drummer
Uniform Title: Different drummer (Cocoa, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Canney family ( lon )
Brevard Junior College
Publisher: Different Drummer
Place of Publication: Cocoa Fla.
Creation Date: October 17, 1968
Publication Date: 1968-1969
Frequency: irregular
completely irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: College students' writings, American -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Brevard Country   ( lcsh )
High school students' writings, American -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Brevard County   ( lcsh )
Counterculture -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Brevard County   ( lcsh )
Nineteen sixties -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
High schools -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Junior colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Education -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Periodicals -- Brevard County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Periodicals -- United States -- Politics and government -- 1963-1969   ( lcsh )
Genre: Underground newspapers   ( lcsh )
Underground newspapers   ( lcsh )
serial   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Brevard -- Cocoa
Coordinates: 28.369444 x -80.743889 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Summary: Underground newspaper created by students in Brevard County, Fla. high schools and Brevard Junior College.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (8-28-68)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased with Feb. 1969?
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for Feb. 1969 lacks numbering.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Copies donated for digitization by Canney family.
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 003174298
oclc - 58471795
lccn - 2005229013
System ID: UF00027953:00004

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
    Main
        Page 3
        Page 5
        Page 7
        Page 9
        Page 11
        Page 14
        Page 16
Full Text




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9--.,.-Hubi. Blasts King LL TIC\ BOPARD SEE MOW *E Ra
SAnd ands Maddo cL CAMPAIGN


1: m 7"T INLm

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POLICE.MMl' b~ WEA \ F v
CONVEtON 3 C.ouRSON o ',
,NGTLI.KS PAGE





October 17, 1968 Page 3

us from harassment, he said, "By screen-
JL ^VJ r WAS^C AI$Wg j ing your publication, we are protecting
by David ,i'en you -from harassment by some people who
by Davi len would like to eliminate you physically.I'
Bureaucracy is, at best, a necessary By lt30 a decision had still not been
evil It is slow, cumbersome, stifling, reached, and Courson didn't think it
and weighted towards the status quo. At would be possible to have it before noon
its worst, the facelessness of bureau- the next day. "These are all busy
cracy conceals a conscious attempt to bog men...."
down anti-establishment ideas and expres- Well, had he notified the members of
sion in the morass of "channels." the committee last Thursday that an is-
Faithful readers of A Different Drum- sue was forthcoming? "I don't deal with
mer will remember that we indicated in the entire committee. I just pass
our second issue a fear that this might things onto the chairman.- That's Mr.
happen. We never guessed how far it Patrick Smith, Director of Information
might go. Services."
The first issue of the Drummer took "As sogn as I pass the material on to
four hours for approval for caus dis- Mr.-Smith, the problem is out of ;my,hands,
tribution. The second took 27 hours. I don't want to be in a position of dic-
This was due to lack of advance notice stating your editorial policy (1) but
to the Student Publications Committee, maybe you have a story for your next
we were told by Dean Clifford Courson. issue."
We were also informed that the process We thanked him and decided that it
could be expedited by producing five co- was time to see the president. Coinci-
pies of the paper--one for each of the dentally, Dr. King was not in his office
five members of the committee, then, nor had he been in all seek. We
These requests seemed legitimate, so made an appointment for the next morn-
on Thursday, Sept. 26 we warned Dean ing.
Courson that publication of issue No. 3 We then went to find out from Mr.
was due Monday. That gave him four hours Smith what happened in the bureaucratic
notic-e. process after the paper was passed to
f'y 10 am Monday, five copies of Drum- him. We found his office fifty feet
mer No. 3 had been delivered. Dean domn the hall from Courson's.
Covrson said then that he would try to It was then about ten minutes after
have an answer by 1 pm the next day, but we had talked with Courson. We knocked,
he could not promise anything, and were invited in. hho should be sit-
That was our first surprise--we would ting there but the inimitable Cliifc'd
have to wait at least as long for the Courson hir-self, talking with Mr. adni.h,
third issue as the second, prior notice A Djffernft Drummer in hand. We ,quii,kl
or none. Courson explained that coxrmu- retreiate,"then returned ten minutes la-
nications were very slow on campus, so ter when Smith was alone.
it would take time for all the Commmittee From 3rith we learned that he had re-
members to get the papers In addition, ceived no nwrd at all concerning a t.ird
they were "very busy people, with many issue of th, Dr;mmer uhtil 'T" ,1; ..
other responsibilities, who could not be noon, five hours after we delivered -'he
expected to drop everything in order to paper to Dean Courson.. .fifty fee. down
read your paper." the hall
At 9:30 am Tuesday, we again approach- We learned that Mr. Smith had mada
ed Dean Courson for an answer. No, he the d decision to approve the first i3s:ue
didn't have one. And he didn't know how on his o'-t.ha-t he did not have to .-ll.
long it would take. "I've pushed these the entire C(rni-ttee to discuss mat.',
people as harr an I can. You push some- but had thei authority to make a dec.Luion
body too much0, jou know, and they start on his own.
reacting, 1hese are all busy men." We learned that the Publications Com-
We pointed cut that, considering the mittee land Smith had already made their
circumstances, it seemed like harassment decision, and the paper was appro';ed..
that approval should take so long. Dean No, we couldn't take that as author.. ;a
Courson objected. Far from harassing us, tion to start distributing,. But S.iT-.'h
the Adndnisiraticn has been protecting -(cont; on p. o)






October 17, 1968 Page 5

MR. LEIGH WILSON, DEMOCRAT

The next Sheriff's going to be me.
QUALIFICATIONS?
There!s a gradual.-change in law enforcement., The preparation of cases for
prosecuting is a much more involved process. A case whereby a law enforcement
officer makes an arrest today,- .it is almost anticipated by the arresting officer
that that arrest will wind up and be reviewed by the Supreme Court in about three
years. That definitely means more training of police officers. I'm a member of
the state wide Police Standards Council. I.guess you know about that.
CIVIL DISOBEDIENCE? .
5irummer referred Wilson to his position last Christmas that he would allow
Christmas pageants alone to be held in public schools despite the recent Supreme
Court ruling .
If there were a law that allowed for equal time for Hanukah and Christmas plays
and one of the schools had one without the other, that's different. But there is
no law. Supreme Court decisions are not law. As I remember they decided then
there would be no Christmas plays, Christmas trees. As far as I'm concerned,
that's an American tradition. I hope it lasts forever.
CIVIL DISOBEDIENT GONE LIMP2
We're trained for that. I don't think it's necessary to pick them up and carry
them. If he can walk, he'll walk... He'll walk.
LAW AND O DE.-
Naturally people don't want to see their cities burned down; they don't want to
see their women raped; they don't want to see their stores looted. People, don't
you kid yourself, will take just so much, they won't take anymore. hereby, it
won't be by the KKK and all that, .but it will be by a certain reaction in-the
ballot box. Now I don't say Wallace is right, I don't say he is wrong. I'm not
going for any one of the three on that level. That's my own private business.
CHICAGOS?
WIRE SENT TO ALL POLICE STATIONS BY WILSON
THE ABOVE /quoted editorial from Melbourne Daily Times, 9/3/68 7 IS BROUGHT TO
THE ATTENTION OF EVERY POLICE CHI-EF WITHIN BHEVARD COUNTY. I INTEND TO WRITE
A LETTER OF PROTEST TO THE EDITOR OF THIS NEWSPAPER, WHO I BELIEVE TO BE MRS.
PEARl:LEECH. I INTEND TO WRITE THIS LETFEl PROTESTING SUCH RUBBISH IN AN
EDITORIAL.
I didn't commend the Chicago police, I criticized a newspaper editor who was
against the handling of the police when she, being a lady, was nowhere near
Chicago, as a matter of fact, 1,500 miles away. I did not take sides, I just
said that I don't criticize anything until after I've investigated it.
I'm against all kinds of police brutality in riots and any other situation. I
am also against brutality against the police.
WALK THE STREETS OR SHOOT TC KILL?.
My orders would be this: If you witnessed a felony such as a looting or an
aggravated assault, something serious, my orders wouldbe to arrest the perpetra-
tor. You don't have to have him in physical custody. You can say over a loud-
speaker, "You are under arrest," If the perpetrator runs after being put under
arrest--shoot him. Not just open season on looters, but by the same token don't
look the other way because he has a color T.V. and he never had one before. If
you don't take some action, we are neglectful of our duties.
LOCAL RIOT CONTROL?
In addition to regular proticol, or riot control,, we have an arrangement with
the National Guard if and when,.God forbid, we have a civil disturbance. Person-
ally I don't think it will happen here, but you never can tell about outside
people coming in here and possibly causing a situation. The reaction to King's
death was just as inflamable as-when Senator Kennedy was killed, and his brother
before him. (cont. on p. 7)





October 17, 1968 Page 7

(WILSON, cont. from p. 5)

You expect me to go into the ghettoes to try to calm people? If someone else
wants to do that, I'm all for it. It's much better to prevent than to have a riot.
We all agree on that. But if prevention fails, we got a riot.
RACIAL PROBLEMS?
I am for integration if it's done sensibly. But let's not go gung ho here all at
once. Civil rights--I don't have to tell'you, you're college kids-was originated
in 1791 wasn't it? The Bill of Rights, the first ten amendments? 1791. What hap-
pened in 173 years? Since 1964 we ve been trying to put in four years what should
have been done in 173.'
Having segregated public facilities is wrong. But it's also wrong for a Negro,
because of that, to say OK you kept me down for a hundred years, so I'm going to
loot, I'm going to shoot. So two wrongs don't make a right.
ENTRAPMENT?
There's one writer in the county who uses that word, and he came this close to
being sued by this guy right here. If anyone in this department used entrapment,
he wouldn't be in this department very-long. However there's a very thin line as
to what entrapment is and what it isn't. I can't define it, because it's different
in most cases.
If you're going to sell a guy marijuana and we give you the marijuana to sell him,
this is a little entrapment. If you sell your own marijuana and tell us' you're going
to do it, and we arrest him when you do, this is not entrapment. If a member of the
department comes to....I would advise a manber of the department not to come to you
and try to buy from you. We always have legal advice before we get into any involved
cases.
In certain incidents, if they don't break the law, it is justified for police
undercover agents to provoke demonstrators to riot or otherwise break the law.
The thing that I would not condone is the undercover agent taking the initiative.
If you're a rioter and hand him a rock and he doesn't throw it, you're going to
be kind of suspicious, aren't you?
(cont. on page 9)

A VERY THIN LINE...
by Wayne A. Barksdale
In October of 1966, one Tony Saldano, head of the Sheriff's Depart-
ment Vice Squad did in fact use entrapment to arrest two students of
Cocoa High School.,
According to TODAY newspaper, October 9, 1966, Sgt. Saldano was in-
troduced to the two boys by a "friend" whom he laterlreferred to as a
"confidential informant." He offered to sell the boys a kilo of mari-
Juana for two television sets he knew were hot. One of the boys, Pat
Rehm, told reporters that, "If Saldano had not told us he could get
the grass, I would have gone on home and gone to bed that night."
Saldano drove the boys to the Crossway.Inn on Cocoa Beach and gave
them "pointers" on how to steal the sets. While they stole the TVs,
he waited for them with his car, then drove them to a local drive-in
theater where he was supposed to deliver the marijuana to them.
Instead, when they got there, the boys were arrested by officers
of the Sheriff's Department. They were charged with breaking and
entering with intent to commit grand larceny. Saldano later changed
the charge to "malicious trespassing and petit larceny" when the
story became known. Eventually the county solicitor dropped the
trespassing charge, and the judge withheld a verdict of guilty on the
petit larceny charge.
On the 18th of October, Sheriff Wilson said that he had tried to
keep the story out of the papers because he was on the trail of a nar-
cotics ring.





October 14, 1968 .. Page 9

(WILSON, cont. from p. 7) ... ...

MARIJUANA?
I accept the theory that use of marijuana leads to the use of heroin. It is a
cause /of the use of heroin but you can kick it, too. You're asking a law enforce-
ment officer's opinion' about kicking one habit ahd gradiatingto another. It's
our job to arrest people in- possession cf l uarij ga because' it says so in the law
books.
RECENT. GRAND JURY NAkCOTICS INVESTIGATION?
I don't know anything abcut that Ethat many kids. indicted never went to tria2g.
We only.made the arrests on warrants handed out of the solicitor's office. .'What hap-
pens in court'I don't:really-know. -
I think that a lot of'publicity in that direction did more harm than good, just
the same as bomb scares in school. You put it in the paper and there'll be three
abre the next day.
NARCOTICS SQUAD?
We don't just pull a person out of a hat to arrest them. There's-a lot of infor-
mation we get overthat telephone. Some pays off. Some doesn't. Those that we find
are breaking a narcotics law we arrest.
CUTTING HAI R?
'We don't shave hair, we cut it. For sanitary reasons. We cut a female's hair,
too. Most females don't have long hair. It's a pretty bad situation in a jail like
this. We don't invite these people here. They're not gentlemen, you know. I'd
like to invite you to ccme down here some Saturday night and see how they behave.
The ones arrested on misdemeanors are worse than the,..,.We'll .have less trouble with
a man charged with a serious offense. I mean itt The traffic offenders will end
up rolling all over the street with a deputy, and wind up being charged with a felony
for driving 10 miles per hour over the speed limit.

.The Sheriff Department's idea
of a haircut is a cut all over
to about one-quarter $ndh fuzz7
i In certain felonies a man should be pardoned for the first time around after he
has paid his sentence. It is difficult for a man to adjust to society with this fol-
-lowing him for the rest of his life. If he is a repeater ,commits a crime a second,
time, shame on him. Applications for jobs should read, "Have you ever been convic-
ted for a crime for which you were not pardoned?" It should not read, "Have you
ever been arrested" Each case would be individually reviewed for pardon, not auto-
matically pardoned. The man who has paid his debt to society can't vote. Society
puts these people back in crime by not forgiving the first time. We've been punish-
ing people for crimes since before Christ, if you believe in Him, and what.good has
it done? It's about time we stood back and took a look at ourselves.

I think the streets should be safe to walk on. WT'e shouldn't postpone football
games from Friday night to Saturday afternoon because we're afraid of Friday nights.
We'll break it rioting7 down some way. Today it's law enforcement, tomorrow riding
bicycles on sidewalks. You haven't heard about glue sniffing in a long time, have
you?
(HARASSMENT, cont. from p. 8)': whom Carrier knew to be on the Committee.
have had some ;meetings this year, but I Some meetings had been held, she thought,
haven't been to any of them. They drew maybe while she was out of town. She
up some rules at one of the meetings, but didn't know who other members of the Com-
they never gave me a copy of them." We, mittee were. Courson had appointed her.
asked him if he had ever been asked to About 4:30--two hours after Smith had
screen" A Different Drummer., On the con- told us he was on his way to Courson's
trary, he-had never seen -te paper until office--we discovered from Dean Dourson
It was available for sale on campus, that he had not yet received the verdict
,We got the same story from Sally Larson (cont. on p. 15)









.Iby Mrs Faye HenderTon ai piece of candy, and the mother agpes
the goo from her mouth to taste a rare
Today was day five. treat. A young man finally accepts the
The house was in the ghetto. .The; of- job collecting garbage. A father kills
fice was in the house, and we were in another rat in his child's bed.
the living room. I was new yet. "And she'd giggle whitely."
Joe Waller paced in the center, sur- .. My voice cracked.
rounded by about 40 young Black militants.. "I have to think Black to understand,
He was tall, thin and moved with control- and I agree."
led strides. Joe and the brothers were
talking about "crackers;" He drew verbal To my white brothers and sisters who
hatred and fiery anger from them. They fear Black militancy, put understanding
were loose amd free, eager to release before yourself. Don't cry out defen-
their curses. They gave reasons-damn sively or with anger, because you can
good reasons. I, invisible, listened, only be wrong. Let's face it. If you
Until--"Sister Faye, what do you haven't lived it, you just can't evalu&
think about that?" I could not have been ate it. Fear for ourselves is a vi-
whiter under a spot light. My mind cious eyele' that comes between us and
flashed back on memories. I quickly re- our consciences, our moral decisions.
called that I had come to St. Pete!s Don't talk of civil rights in your
Black Community four days before to get middle class home and think you've
started on an office system, but-had to cleansed your conscience. If you are *
be hope- --days threeand four fo.r my first an exception, don't call yourself one,
wedding anniversary--a social affair at Your Black brother or sister will know.
my parents home. That soon I had exper- He will decide. He alone can measure...
ienced guilt. I knew what I would need when he has seen your deeds. If you-do
to say.. no deedp, your concern is lacking; and
"I can't answer that question as a he,impatient,; will not wait. He will--
white person. As a white person-I would and maybe already- has-take his trust
be defensive. I would say, 'But there: from you, apd then you have earned -our
are some white people who...'. I may as fear.
well lie, for you don't know any 'wMite
people, who...' Put white people know a -
'Negro t who 'isn't like the other "Ne- '
groes."' He1s one of their, best friends. STUDENT $UBSCRIPTIONS
I have to think Black to understand." THE GUARDIAN
My voice was shaking. I. npenet Radi ewswed
-T'When I-left-St. Pete two days ago it '7 E '
was on a Greyhound Bus. I was ashamed six months: .$2,00 one year: $3.50
at the ease with which I could turn a- -EVERY DJTGETH'IGEVERYODgSTETH:GH
round and ride out of the ghetto and into EVS IUSGE
white suburbia. I watched Qut the.windo ir- 0.--NE AGP1.-.v ---
thinking. We, the bus and I, passed a ARL' A .NJIN "
pretty fancy restaurant. A white man. in
a-white dinner jacket ushered his white (I)-' O t o a0(
date, I supposed, through the door, She .
was elegantly dressed. I thought of how ., _oJO 96 R:Ne'fO
the7 had built such an elaborate wall Co0 .c C:/ Af..
of protection around themselves., They
would dine, securely, with voided con- T
science. No poverty, no Black indigna- .
tion, no guilt would rudely interrupt
them. She'd smile, maybe blush, andhe'd Are You A Student Who Got A
confidently, impress her. I-A From the Draft Board???
"And elsewhere, I thought, a mother DBAFT COUNSELING
- tends an old dress with the thread from
a rag m d a-bent needle. A child accepts Call 632-2242 Anytime




October 17, 1968 Page 14
HENDE&SON NEEDS BAIL (LETTERS, coit, from p. 2)
Walter Henderson was found guilty Mon"' Dear Drummer and Students and anyone else
day, Oct. 14, of refusing induction into who Cares:
the Army. Henderson is a religious cop- October 8, 1968 was The Day They (The
scientious objector whose application ias District Board of Trustees for Brevard
ignoredby the Cocoa draft board a year Junior College) Gave Freedom Away.
and a.half ago. At his personal appear- BJC has just earned its first blackeye
ance he was asked one question-and then by accepting a school policy which gives
given a thirty minute lecture on "respons- "the Administration the power to disci-
ibility." pline students. who give the college's
Walter's lawyer, ACLU attorney Stanley image a: blackeye by getting into trouble
Wolfman, was defeated in his attempt to off-campus." BJC also has "some leeway
get testimony from the Draft Board members to act on off-campus activities that might
concerning the standards they used'to de- be detrimental to the reputation of the
cide on Walter's Conscientious Objectcr institution."
application. But the Board members Yisely, It is none of BJC's business what it's
-Parks, and Hudson did testify long enough students do after hours, off campus.
to state that they could not remember And anyone who is willing to go along
Wolter Henderson or his case. with this policy., is at least a fool.
If they can't remember the person who To demonstrate means to perform or to
has given Local Board #35 more trouble do. BJC now has a policy against "doing'
that any other man...if they didn't consid- Actually,'demonstrate*is a pretty nebu-
er his case long enough to remember it.,, lous word. So until the Board of Trust-
how much do they think about the other ePe. comes; up-with a mote exact descrip-
thousands of guys whom they condemn to tion of "doing, then anyone who cares to,
kill and to be killed? should.,
(cont. p. 17) When student policy is formed shouldn't
students be on hand? The meeting was opal
Regretfully, VIETN.',: MItAL OR IMMORAL by but no one came. --It is only the' fault of
William Arthur will be in next issue, the students that this licy survives.
^ The APE






















The above is a sample' of the "literature which A Diffe rent DrummTer
fetQ Drmer



















has' received recently, from the Ku Klux Klan It is the iubjec. lI- Selrch 'f
Reality" on page 12 (i.e., the second page 11, with apologies)
C-





October 17, 1968 Page 16

TEST YOUR VIETNAM I.Q.
by Mrs. Faye Henderson

Some answers you will not be expected to know exactly,
but possibilities are varied so that your guess will
indicate your assimilated impression of the war sit-
uation. (Answers are on page 1).)

1. For 1000 years before Vietnam suffered colonization under France, Vietnam
and China developed a tradition of alliance. TRUE OR FALSE
2. Vice President Ky was (A) A FIGHTER PILOT FOR THE FRENCH (B) A SOLDIER WITH
THE VIETMINH (C) TOO YOUNG TO PARTICIPATE (D) IN THE U.S. during the Viet-
nam revolution for independence from France.
3. In June, 1954 the Gallup Poll showed that (A) 10% (B) 32% (C) 57% (D) 72%
opposed sending U.S. troops to Indochina.
4. In.1954 shortly before the French were defeated at Dienbienphu John Foster
Dulles offered French Foreign Minister George Bidault atomic bombs to defeat
efforts by Nationalist Ho Chi Minh and the Vietminh to throw off French col-
inization. TRUE OR FALSE
5. The U.S. has violated (A) THE GENEVA AMfEM S (B) THE UN CHARTER (C) US
CONSTITUTION (D) NUREKBURG TRIALS (PRECEDENTS) (E) ALL OF-THESE.
6. "I have never talked or corresponded with a person knowledgeable in Indo-
chinese affairs who did not agree that had elections been held as of the
time of the fighting (1954), possibly 80 per cent of the population would
have voted for Ho Chi Minh." TRUE OR FALSE.
7. South Vietnam Vice President Ky said, "People ask me who my heroes are; "I
have but only one--(A) LINCOLN (B) DE GAULLE (C) HITLER (D)POPE JOHN (E) DIEM.,
8. The NLF (Vietcong) consists of (A) COMMUNISTS (B) SOCIALISTS (C) LIBERAL
INTELLECTUALS (D) PEASANT ORGANIZATIONS & HILL MINORITY GROUPS (E) BUDDHISTS
(F) CATHOLICS (G) ALL OF THESE.
9. Although Diem was unpopular with the Buddhists he allowed reasonable reli-
gious and political freedom. TRUE OR FALSE
10. "Far from being 'invited' into South Vietnam by its legal government, the
Americans created this government am d have used it for their own purposes
ever since," quote from (A) RAMPARTS (B) PLAYBOY (C) INTERNATIONAL CONTROLS
CO MISSION (D) UNITED SOVIET SOCIALISTS REPUBLIC.
11. "The Americane can destroy but they cannot pacify. They may 'win' the war
but it will be a victory of the graveyard," (A) HO CHI MJNH (B) VIETNAM
AUTHORITY BERNA7D FALL (C) DR. BEN SPOCK (D) UN SEC. G. UTHANT.
12. The South Vietnamese army has approximately (A) 1% (B) 2% (C) 5% (D) 10%
(E) 20% desertion,
13. There are Chinese troops in Vietnam, TRUE OR FALSE.
14. (A) NO (B) ONE-(C) T6D (D) FOUR (E) SIX Oa MORE U.S. GENERALS AitE against
the Vietnam war.
15. According to the Department of Defense (1967) the NLF have killed 10,000
civilians. According to the International Contrcl Commission US bciobings
are responsible for approximately (A) 1$% POUJRTH1.R ,t( '(B5) N HALF AS
MANY (C) AS MANY (D) FIVE TI:-ES AS iNY (EL ) 50 TIMES AS MANY in the past five
years.
16. More bombs by tonnage have been dropped on the little country of N.V. than in
(A) WORLDD AAR I (B) WRLD Ah- II (C) KOGREN WkR (D) ALL OF THESE.
1?. It costs the U.S. approximately (A) ;5,000 (B) $50,000 (C) $500,000 (D) $5,O000,Oc
to kill one Viet Cong. PART TWO (A) 20% (B) 40% (C) 60% (D) 80% of the people
killed, burned or permanently' j formed by NapIlm are. civilians.