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UFPKY NEH LSTA



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OCLC 58471795
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mods:location
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mods:name personal
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Brevard Junior College
mods:note dates or sequential designation Vol. 1, no. 1 (8-28-68)-
Ceased with Feb. 1969?
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Copies donated for digitization by Canney family.
funding Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
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mods:caption 1969
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February
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1
1
mods:subject SUBJ650_1
mods:topic College students' writings, American
mods:geographic Florida
Brevard Country
Periodicals
SUBJ650_2
High school students' writings, American
Florida
Brevard County
Periodicals
SUBJ650_3
Counterculture
Florida
Brevard County
Periodicals
SUBJ650_4
Nineteen sixties
Periodicals
SUBJ650_5
High schools
Florida
Periodicals
SUBJ650_6
Junior colleges
Florida
Periodicals
SUBJ650_7
Education
Florida
Periodicals
SUBJ651_1
Brevard County (Fla.)
Periodicals
SUBJ651_2
United States
Politics and government
mods:temporal 1963-1969
Periodicals
SUBJ655_1
Underground newspapers
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mods:country United States
mods:state Florida
mods:county Brevard
mods:city Cocoa
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A different drummer
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00027953/00002
 Material Information
Title: A different drummer
Uniform Title: Different drummer (Cocoa, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Canney family ( lon )
Brevard Junior College
Publisher: Different Drummer
Place of Publication: Cocoa Fla.
Creation Date: February 1, 1969
Publication Date: 1968-1969
Frequency: irregular
completely irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: College students' writings, American -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Brevard Country   ( lcsh )
High school students' writings, American -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Brevard County   ( lcsh )
Counterculture -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Brevard County   ( lcsh )
Nineteen sixties -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
High schools -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Junior colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Education -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Periodicals -- Brevard County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Periodicals -- United States -- Politics and government -- 1963-1969   ( lcsh )
Genre: Underground newspapers   ( lcsh )
Underground newspapers   ( lcsh )
serial   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Brevard -- Cocoa
Coordinates: 28.369444 x -80.743889 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Summary: Underground newspaper created by students in Brevard County, Fla. high schools and Brevard Junior College.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (8-28-68)-
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased with Feb. 1969?
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for Feb. 1969 lacks numbering.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Copies donated for digitization by Canney family.
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 003174298
oclc - 58471795
lccn - 2005229013
System ID: UF00027953:00002

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
    Main
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
Full Text


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A dramatic portrayalof the conditions Editors (mana- John. and Debbie
of migrant workers in the United States going and other- Teichert, Beverly
was presented in the "Grapes of Wrath" wise), contribu- Stiggins, The
shown January 25 at BJC. The scene was tors, artists, Plastic People,
set in the depression and reviews of the typists, printers, Henry White, Mary
book and movie describe it as a moving and staff: Thompson, Carol
portrayal of the way life was. Easterling,
How life was for whom? Thousands of B. Frank Brown,
poor white families mho were hit hard by Mike Allen, Grant
the Depression and the Dust Bowl Blues. McVicker, Robby
Iut the film is just as relevant now as Johnson, Mike Can-
it was then: Many of the scenes of con- ney, and the people.
editions in the '30's could easily be mis-
taken for conditions today,
Mexican Americans do the majority of A DIFFERENT DRUMMER IS PUBLISHED FROM
picking in California and have formed a Tfl'E TO TIME AS AN INDEPENDENT SUB-
union, the United Farm Workers Organizing PROFIT NEWSPA ER. SUPPCRTING SUB-
Committee (UFWOC) to help the magrant SCRIPTIONS ARE $5 FOR A NUMBER OF ISSUES
workers to maintain a living instead of ($1 TO BREVARD SERVICEMEN). PLEASE.
an existence. There are only a few prob- ADDRESS ALL CORRESFCNDENCE TOs
lems confronting them. One is that the
National Labor Relations Act (NLRA) does A DFFEIE DRO
not cover agricultural laborers. Two, COCOA, LORIDA, 32922
the growers have only to get the Immigra- COCOA, FLORIDA, 32922
tion Bureau to allow Mexican workers in
to pick their crops and neatly avoid a holidays and vacations with pay, nor the
labor shortage created by the striking necessities of clean toilet facilities
Mexican-Americans. and sanitary drinking water. In short
Why is coverage by the NLRA so impor- they are denied the right to.live and
tant? Under this act, workers would have are handed a bare existence.
the right to have an election to deter- What UF4OC is asking for is help.
mine whether or not they wish to be rep- If they are to be effective they must be
resented by a union. aith a union be- able to exert pressure against the ;
hind them they could engage in collective growers. They are asking the consumer
bargaining, giving them enough power to public, you and me, to boycott Cali-
protect themselves from intimidation, fornia Table Grapes, in order to bring
UFPWC grew out of the terrible con- the growers to the bargaining table.
editions of migrant life. Infant mortal- If the growers will not allow the
ity and maternal mortality rates are 125% workers a living, how is poverty to be
higher than the national rates. Influenza ended for them?
and pneumonia rates are 200% higher. Tu- BOYCOTT CALIFORNIA GRAPESI
berculosis and other infectious diseases:
260% higher than the national average.
Migrants are excluded from unemployment
insurance and collective bargaining laws.
Their minimum wage is lower than that for
other workers: $1.15 compared to $1.60.
CHILDREN WORKING IN AGRICULTURE ARE EX-
CLUDED FRDM CHILD LABOR AD SCHOOL AT-
TENDANCE LA 5.
Seasonal laborers do not have the U
benefits of job securi-y, .vertirme pay,





February, D 969





"BRDWN HITS SDS DRIVE IN SCHOOLS"
MINISTRY OF TRUTH
1969 reprinted from TODAY, Wednesday,
By Mike Allen January 22, 1967
They took away my name today and for Some Brevard students are following
reasons beyond my control I am now E-1191. the Students for Democratic Society pat-
I am on my way to becoming no more than terns, School bupt. B. Frank Brown said
another part of the educational machinery Tuesday night, but he added he knew of
of our secondary schools. To put it no formal units of the ultra-liberal
bluntly my mind, my body, even my very student group in Brevard.
soul are now property of Brevard's Board Brown told the American Association
of Education. of University Women in Melbourne Beach
Is this a scene out of some Orwellian the student group is selling 35-cent
novel?--not to those who have attended pamphlets that tell students how to take
Brevard's high schools. Classes are over high schools,
strictly regimented "FREE" thought is In South Brevard, "Satellite High
considered to be a Communist plot to be School suspended a bunch of students
avoided at an cost. We are taught the because of an underground newspaper,"
Amerindian an the Afro-American, with 'Brown said* He couldn't remember how
few exceptions, held back advances-- many students were involved,
cultural, scientific, and moral--of the SDE recommends students start an
great Christian nation known as W;ASPS underground newspaper, disdain student
America the beautiful, governments, and contact the local
Any deviation from the norm is punished Civil Liberties Union for help, if need-
through bad grades or detention in mild ed, Brown said.
cases. In the severe cases physical vio- SDS has moved from colleges into high
lence is carried forth by a few select schools with different aims, Brown said.
athletes, often through orders from one In college the effort is aimed at anti-
or more of the coaching staff, war demonstrations and similar efforts.
School publications must always present SDS in high schools concentrates more on
a polished ultra conservative image to the school conditions, Brown said.
outside world. Speaking out against the Brown described SDS as a group that
administration is somewhat less than high wants to tear down all Democratic /*el*c
treason, institutions without replacing them ,ith
In a few days I will leave Eau Gallie anything of-value.
High School, and somehow I have managed
to escape with at least some small amount OR--IT ALL DEPENDS ON WHICH
of free thought and will. In conscience, SIDE OF THE MOUTH IT'S COMING OUT OF
I am forced to ask why do so few escape?
To those who are still trapped in the "The history of intellectual freedom
educational "PRISONS" of Brevard I can for students is shameful. Never in the
only say--fight back for if you don't you entire history of human events has the
will be a mature cabbage head with just individual been allowed options as to
about as much reasoning ability. when or what he will learn. The archi-
val record of individual learning is at
best a saga of rigidity. The only or-
ganization which has surpassed the .c
schools in regimentation, standardiza-
tion, and control, is the military. And
may I add that the schools have given
the military an extremely close contest.'
Education b Appointment, p. 20
I e by Dr<0 B. Frank Brown





Sage e February, 1969


NNov. 21, 1968
THE PRE1 t'SES f EIU DearEditor,
By Carol Easterling I would like to commend you on your
great article about Cocoa High School.
The purpose of a school newspaper is Finally, someone has had enough guts to
At to "do good and save the' world," stand up and tell the truth about our
it to inspire students to clean up fearless leader. It's about time some-
leir echoolo That, at least, is the one has exposed the good "General." I
ew of Robert E, Bruton, principal of also agree with your views on student
*rritt Island High School. rights. I think it's about time some-
After censoring two editorials from one stands up and yells, bub loud, for
recent issue of The Pony Expressp the them. We're getting tired of being W W
ES newspaper, the--Llustrious Mr. Bru- spoon fed. I would like to give you a
,n dragged us all out of class and led summary of the new rule "Gen. Stevens"
into the cafeteria to observe the has issued.
rty trays left on the tables. He then "There are to be no groups, of either
led us all through a girls' bathroom race, gathering on this campus. If
look at the cigarette butts on the after one warning you persist in gather-
.oor, ing, you and the rest of the group will
Then, having already told us how asha- be suspended from school."
*d he was of us, he said, "You have tre- This, to me, is the most ridiculous
3ndous influence, tiese are the kind of rule that man could think up. I say,
tings you could help correct." we must break away from our dictatorial
Now, that may not mean much to you, school system. We must stop them some-
.t to those of us on the staff it's time, and I say stop it now...before
etty damn funny. In a previous lecture, it comes to uniforms, guns, and Vietnam
ven after censoring two stories (inclu- at 1l.
ng one about A Different Drimner) and A Cocoa High Sophomore
.e editorial (n book burning), Mr
uton had told us we had so little in-
uence that we might as well give up. A DIFFEBRENT DRUTdiM
We wrote replacements: an editorial NEM.SL2TTEBR
social cliques and one criticizing
'achers for not coming to pep rallies. is now being mailed out bi-
ese were censored by Bruton's front weoklyo if you wish to ro-
'fice cohort, assistant principal optvo, sand some stamps to
esser, because we "might hurt someone's
elingso" A DIFFERENT DRUPI4ER
We should have known better. After P pO. BOX 1692
1, Mr. Bruton said we could write any- COCUA, FLa.., 32922
ing we wanted as long as we didn't
fend any one, which makes for some
rd hitting editorials.
This wasn't the first time Chesser has who read it thought it was quite good.
ne the dirty work. During lunch, all I guess Chesser means to tell us that
throoms except two for girls and two there is literary merit in those "lit-
r boys are locked /I--Ed =. This tle biographies" Bruton wants in the
atly herds all the smokers into one paner that nobody reads.
ace so they can be caught easier (great Our mistake was trying to make a
,r the administration, but what about the school newspaper into something decent,
-udents?). One of the Pony Express in which people could express their o-
,affers wrote a humorous story about the pinions. In today's education system,
ithroom situation which Chesser censored, as one staff member dared to tell Mr.
aiming it had "no literary value." Fun- Bruton, "You're not allowed to think
- thing, but most of the English teachers until you are 21."






February, i496,9 Page 5





Dear Editor, A Different Drummer,

I go to Cocoa High and I hate it and I have read all the issues you have
the majority of the people that go there, put forth and I find them all mildly
The school if filthy and hot, and the disgustingI Basically I guess you are
people are a bunch of shallow-minded heading in the right direction but there
hypoocrites. I could write pages and are some things that will most likely
pages of why I hate this school, but it cause your end,
would be too long to print. Your newspaper makes to many referen-
That school is against me because I ces to drugs. I am not on drugs, and I
have my own opinion about things and I'm don't care is you are hep. I would much
not afraid to state them. And believe rather read what'sti ing destroyed and
me, they've made it pretty hard for me re-built for the better than read all the
to go there, "grovey" slang concerning the use of
Most everyone there is so plastic that drugs. Drugs are an issue--why don't you
it's nauseating to look at them. They're write articles on them instead of leaving
so concerned about their outward appear- hints that you are hep; who cares? no
ance that their true selves aren't worth other head does. Don't advertise drugs,
shit. Everyone of the rules there are a it may be good business now but in the
bunch of bull, long run you may loose.
If really made me feel great to read It seems your main attack is on the
the article you wrote cutting down Cocoa draft and Viet-Nam-along with everything
High. Keep it up, and if there's any- else. I don't like the draft or Viet
thing I can do to help out, don't hesi- Nam either and after awile I get tired
tate to ask. of hearing about them. Is there anything
Cocoa High Hater the "drummer" likes? I would be inter-
ested to hear-what are the "drummers"
.Everybody gets caught and screwed in values?
an oppressive system, but it affects dif- Why don't you get a reporter and find
ferent people in different ways. If we out what's being done. to help college
who are being oppressed turn against each students and draftees once in awile. Try
other because our methods of rebellion are to offer solutions--if you care enough to
different, we only help the school to attack things, why don't you say how they
divide and conquer, and make any change should be, or how you think they should
impossible.--Ed7 be. Are you going to leave that subject
up to the people who were too near-
sighted to find the answer the first time?
I realize, as I am sure do many others
the establishment our fathers and grand-
High School Students fathers created is inappropriate for now,
as will our establishment be for the
LIBERAL RiELIGIOUS YOUTH future, unless our changes show wisdom.
When we make our changes, let's not think
meet about ourselves but those that must follow-
insuring peace for a little while.
Sunday 10:30 a.m. A Different "Bummer"

U.U. Hall 1260 Range Rd, Cocoa





Page 6 February, 1969

T MATCH S OUP
By Grant McVicker
9\ / "- There is a program being broadcast ev-
ery weekday on a South Brevard radio sta-
tion that is guaranteed to make intelli-
S) gent listeners sick to their stomachs.
Sf The name of the program is "Lifeline,"
and its purpose is to grossly misinform
the public on such subjects as Vietnam,
campus disorders,, etc.
Alice's Restaurant, Brevard's The commentator on Lifeline, Melvin
hippest Head Shop is closingupl Mundt, is either grossly misinformed, or
he is sadly mentally incompetent. The
You have just over one short sponsor is HLH products, owned by billion-
week left to buy the heavy stuff aire HL. Hunt. I am not a billionaire
still in stock some reduced in and therefore cannot afford $200 a week
price before Alice's Restaurant for radio broadcasts to refute Lifeline's
heads for that big Hoad Shop in lies, so I will try to exposethem in
the sky. print.
SBUY NOW OR FOREVE3 5B 93 3s On today's program (12-9-68), Lifeline
HOLD YOUR LEACE I I "Go Ovi1' contended that the U.S. had pulled all of
/ 1;v its troops out of Vietnam in 1954.
Knd remomber---- ? f This is a lieL
UYou c-n Tet any-o ,- 141 Only weeks after the Geneva Peace
thing you n,.nt at ).- Agreements had been signed, which prohib-
Alice's Restaurant_ 'i ited an outside military aid to Vietnam,
W the UTS. began escalating military and
One Block South OF financial support to Vietnam. One-third
BJC At 1441 cloar~ke Road. of the total foreign aid for 1954 was
spent in Vietnam..
$"MM. 41 ....9.3. M..UM Also on today's program, it was insin-
uated that "ohn Kennedy was a Red sympa-
DON'T MISS *^ Y MARCH 7-9 thizer (a"soft-liner") because he chose
.a blockade instead of a nuclear attack
"A Different Drummer" County-Wide on Cuba during the 1962 missile crisis.
Conference Lifeline has, on different occasions,
stated or implied that the following
There'll Be o were Communists or Red sympathizers:
Eugene McCarthy, Martin Luther King, Lyn-
Singing III Food II Lots of Fun it don Johnson, John Kennedy, Mark Rudd,
Eldridge Cleaver, Averill Harriman, ever-
Workshops on z The Delano Grape yone under 25, anyone who might criticize
Strike/Farm Workers of America, the Lifeline propaganda.
Black Power, Woman's Liberation, Lifeline is the most totalitarian pro-
Viet nam, Our. Civil Liberties, paganda I have heard since Adolf Hitler.
Underground News oapors, Labor & It comes every weekday at 12:15. Listen
Poor Whites, Organtzing High in, and if you don't blow lunch,, you
School & Collogos. might get a good laugh from it.:
Anything you want let us know, A IF YLU iiUST ..... THEN
got together for anyone who wants
to participate WiSRE IT'S AT 3 ( -
UNITARIAN CHURCH, RAiiGE ROAD,COCOA ,- -> 7 -\
For info. -- contact "A Different -
Drummer* P.O.Box 1692, Cocoa, Fla.
32922
EAT WHAT YOU KILL Ii11





February, 1969 Page 7

Sii / the second tried to put the handcuffs

2 ci 5 They disappeared from view for a
moment,' then all of a sudden the cop was
I might have spent last night, Decem- running and the Black guy was swinging--
ber 20, 1968, in the Cincinnati jail if that's what you can call the motions
along with all the other "common crimin- he went through in his impaired physical
als." Assaulting a policeman or something condition--swinging the billy club at
like that. I wish I had. I would have the cop. I felt a surge inside myself
felt a lot better and a lot freer than as if I wanted to cheer him on and maybe
I did by letting myself be calmed down. give him a little help. I did neither.
As it was I couldn't sleep most of the I didn't have a chance though, be-
way to Chicago, cause there was no contest. In a moment
I first noticed something happening it was over, the second cop having push-
when I saw this big fat cop jabbing his ed the guy to the ground. Or at least
night stick into a Black guy's back. I it should have been over then. Suddenly
had noticed the cop about 40 minutes I saw a flash as the light gleamed on a
earlier. He wasn't bothering anyone then, pistol. My God, I thought, the bastard's
but he still looked like a bastard, and going to shoot him. Instead, he grabbed
a racist. one at that. the pistol by the barrel and very delib-
The second time I noticed the cop was erately whacked the guy on the head 3 or
when he had decided to remove a Black 4 times,
dide from the bus station, which was open Carla Riggs, a traveling companion
to the public. The man's crime consisted also from Cocoa, pointed to my camera,
of being drunk in a public place-the and I swore at myself for not having any
Greyhound Bus Station. film. Now I swear at myself for not
The cop was trying to get him to leave having faked it. I was half way across
the building, and he chose to do it by the station and I could hear the horrible
prodding him along with the end of his crack of metal on a man's skull. I could
night-stick. feel the horror, hate, disgust, anger'
The guy resisted. Not violently. Not welling up in me. I heard Carla say
even effectively. That was not his pur- "Pigsi" and heard myself muttering obscen-
pose. He was quite willing to go. He ities as we walked over.
just wanted to hold onto the few scraps The cop got up with a look os grim
of dignity that we--white America-have satisfaction. He felt his own forehead
left him. by moving at his own speed in- where he had been touched by the night.
stead of the cop's. But this particular stick, as if to justify his actions to
policeman either could not understand that, himself and the crowd. The black man was
or, more likely, he understood it complete- crumpled on the floor, conscious, quiet,
ly and took it as a challenge which could with two golfball lumps on his head and
not be tolerated. This nigger was getting blood streaming down on his face.
uppity and you know what that leads to, The two policemen dragged him over to
so.*..** the doorway where he tried to gain con-
So, he started pushing harder, and he trol of himself. Somebody mopped up the
grabbed one of the guy's arms and pushed pool of blood on the floor, but no one
on that too. The guy--he looked'55, but offered to help the man wipe it off his
25 of those years belong to white capital- face. I knew I should, but somehow I
ist America, and only 30 I guessed were was so immobilized by the rush of my own
ones he had lived-was determined not to conflicting emotions that I couldn't move.
be pushed around, so he stopped. Then The mants hat had been knocked off in
the cop really got rough. He alternately the scuffle, and now, as once again he
dragged the guy along and bumped him along reached for a few scraps of dignity, he
with his billy club. At this point .a asked the cops for his hat. They didn't
similarly proprotioned white fellow came move. I. felt a surge of respect as he
up to help the cop. I suppose the hand- looked them in the eye. and asked again.
cuffs on his belt made him a plaincloths- One of them sneered ever so slightly,
man. In any case while the first gently picked it up, slammed it on the man's
wp.ped hhe guy-on the back and shoulders, bleeding head. It didn't stay, (cont,p 8)





Page '8: February, 1969

BUS STOP BLUES (cont. from p. 7) DRUMMER WELCOMES

so he picked it up and stuffed it in the /o
Black man's stomach. T e 5 co
The man kicked his hat away from
himself and asked for it again. Some- We, the Plastic People of the Plastic
thing pushed me out of my paralysis and People do not intend to upset the grounds
I cried at the cops, "For God's sake of a college that we intend to continue
treat the man with some dignity." The one to study and learn in, nor do we intend
in the uniform whirled around and I could to cause pain or disruption to an admin-
aear "nigger lover" racing through his istration whose defined purpose is to
lead as a startled and incredulous voice run (manage) the same college we talk
snapped "aahat l" of os..
Somehow everything else was blocked We intend to bring about the neces-
out for a moment. My fear was gone, sary changes due at the Florida Insti-
ly self-consciousness disappeared. I tute of Technology--not by violent re-
faced that 300 pounds hulking over me volt and demonstration, but by our con-
and repeated, "Treat the man with a lit- tinuing pleas for freedoms that we do,
Ule human dignity." in fact deserve.
I don't think he knew what I was talk- Any protest (or possible protest) re-
Lng about, but it didn't matter for in a suiting from the publication of this pa-
flash the scene changed. A middle aged per is, at most, indirectly caused by
4hite woman had quietly picked up the hat our standpoint, and we do not intend to
and very gently handed it to the man. encourage anything more violent than to
Right then I knew I loved that woman, demand..that students fight for their
For a minute my attention went elpe- rights. This fight for freedom is en-
vhbre and when I turned back he was gone courage, for we feel that suppression of
larla was back at the bench, and I saw the true individuality is an action which
that she had been crying. Inside I was inhibits the natural learning process-
arying, too. And I was boiling with -a violation by any institution of learn-
anger, with hatred, with frustration at ing, cannot; be long-standing in an insti-
ny impotence. I guess I was visibly tuition or go ernment,
shaking. I paced around some, stared a History shows us that.. .dedicated men
few times at the cops, and started run- and women do not allow infringement upon
ning through my mind what I might have their freedom, and that they will remain
done. I thought about the camera dedicated to these beliefs until the last
mainly, though, I wished I had grabbed breath of life. The Plastic People is
the cop's arm when he started to pistol such a group of dedicated persons, and
#hip the guy. I still wish I had. we intend to attack your /FIT administra-
That's easy to say now, but not so tiog own attacks against all students'-
easy to do at the moment if you're not freedom, until a noticeable change has
accustomed to reacting to violence, been realized at this school, or until
:t',s easy to think now hbw OwAgeous le we are completely crushed.
night have been. I don't consider my-printed from The Plastic
3elf a person who is easily pushed around, reprinted from The plastic People,
3ut it is appalling how easily we can be a new underground paper at FIT, Letters,
persuadedd to avoid involvement at times -money, etc., ay be sent to:
then a few seconds may mean the differ- The Plastic -People
3nce between life and .death. P.O. Box 428
Somebody was taking my arm gently. Palm Bay, Florida, 32901
'Don't get too upset." I didn't. I --Ed.
4ish I had.
--Traveler
tTraveler" is a frequent contributor ANCE
to A Different Drummer.--Ed,7 DRAF R E SISf 7 C

AT rLoRIA/ A IV
ACA DEIV-r" ??














THERE ARE FC.TR TYPES OF DEFERmENTS AVAILABLE TO STUDENTS. NONE OF THEM IS
AUTOMATIC. YOTT MUST TAKE THE INITIATIVE AND MEET CERTAIN REQUIREMENTS. IF YOU
HAVE ANY QUETONS OR PIBLEIMS, CONTACT A DRAFT COUNSELOR AT THE DRAFT INPFORA-
TION CENTER, P.O. BOX 1692, COCOA, 305-452-2832.


II-S
A) Undergraduate Deferment: This deferment is mandatory IF the following
SIX conditions are met each year:
1) The student specifically requests, in writing, the II-S deferment.
A special form,' SSS Form 0l is sent to coll eges and universities to give
students to sign if they desire a II-S. A letter from the student will also
suffice.
2) The university or school sends a Student Certificate (Form 109),
or equivalent, to the local draft board of the student. One of.the most
frequent factors in students failing to receive a II-S is the failure of
the college to send in this form. If you have any trouble, be sure to
check this out.
3) The student must be receiving credit for his courses toward
a degree.
4) The student must maintain a full-time course load. This load
is defined by the school and may not legally be challenged by the draft
board.
5) The student must make satisfactory progress toward his degree.
The law defines this to mean that (a) if you are enrolled in a four year
program, that you have completed 25% of the credits necessary to graduate
by the end of the first year, 55% by the end of the second year, etc.;
(b) if you are enrolled in a five year program you have completed 20%
of the credits necessary to graduate by the end of the first year, 4U% by
the end of the second year, etc.; (c) if you are enrolled in a two year
program (junior college) as the first step in a four year programs you
have completed 50% at the end of the first year, 100% at the end of the
second year.
NOTE: The school year is now defined as the twelve month period
begin'-ng with enrollment. That is, you have three semesters, or four
quarters in which to fulfill the requirements,
6) The student has not reached his 24th birthday. No student
deferments will be given to undergraduates 24 or -lder.

B) Discretionary II-S
Draft boards can sometimes be persuaded to give II-S deferments
even if all of these requirements are not met. "The board may...take
into consideration information a registrant submits which may justify
his failure to make normal progress, such as illness or other factors
beyond his control." (General Information Bulletin No. 49, SSS)

C) Graduate Deferments
A II-S is available to graduate students in certain fields. Check
with a draft counselor for more information.

NOTE WELL: Any person who accepts a II-S deferment after June 30, 1967
Is ot eligible for the mandatory fatherhood defemnnent. He _is still
eligible for a di-sretionary "hardahip- deferment.








II-A
The II-A is an occupational deferment. However, it applies to certain stu-
dents who do not qualify for II-S, but are "preparing for critical skills
and other essential occupations."

Students in business and trade or vocational schools are eligible for a
II-A deferment. "Local boards may consider for. Class II-A those regis-
trants who are pursuing a full-time course of study that will not lead to
a baccalaureate degree." (Operations Bulletin 309)

NOTE VELLt There is a distinct advantage in junior college students re-
questing a II-A rather than a II-S. Unlike the student who receives a
II-S, the student who receives a II-A deferment is still eligible for the
mandatory fatherhood .deferment..

I.S (C)
This deferment is mandatory for any undergraduate who is pursuing a full-
time program and who receives an induction notice, whether or not he is
making "satisfactory" progress toward his degree ("in phase"). It is
good until the academic year ends or the student leaves school, whichever
comes first. It may not be renewed.

I-S (H) High School Deferment
The I-S (H) is available to any full time high school student who has
reached 18. It lasts as long as he is in high school.unless he reaches
his 20th birthday before graduation


It is well to note that the fact that a deferment is mandatory does not mean
that it is automatic* A student should always take the initiative to protect his
rights.

This is a brief outline of the major deferments which are available to stu-
dents. If you have any problem at all, or if your case is unusual, we suggest that
yon contact a draft counselor immediately. Remember, SOUR LI!E IS BEING FLAYED.
WITH BY A DEADLY MACHINE, KNOW HOV IT WORKS.

Cocoa Draft Information Center
Po0. Box 1692
Cocoa, Florida, 32922
3C,5-452-2832








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