• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Half Title
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 List of Illustrations
 A Visit to the Lambs
 I Like Little Pussy
 Come Here, Little Robin
 Morning and Evening
 Annie's Garden
 Which Way Does the Wind Blow?
 Butterflies are Pretty Things
 The Robins
 Dear Papa
 "Little Children, Love One...
 Mary's Little Lamb
 The Blind Boy
 The Little Sister Left in...
 Leaving Home
 Little Pink
 Written by a Young Girl to Her...
 A May Song
 Charley and His Father
 The Robin
 The Frost
 Blind Johnny
 A Merry-Go-Round for May
 The Little Beggars
 All Have a Work to Do
 The Dormouse
 Shooting at a Mark
 The Little Spring
 Guess What I Have Heard
 The Lark
 Billy Rabbit to Mary
 A Playful Duel
 The Honest Bird
 Little Lillie
 A Walk in Spring
 The Old Castle
 The Heroic Boy
 The Little Girl's Address to the...
 The Merry Milkmaid
 The Spring Walk
 Early Rising
 The Butterfly's Ball
 Fishing
 The Summer
 Faithful Annie
 Sunday Morning
 We are Seven
 A Nursery Song
 Spring Time
 A Wind in a Frolic
 Father is Coming
 The Spider and Tie Fly
 What I Hate
 Baby Brother
 Cradle Song
 The Wind
 Robin Redbreast
 Youthful Piety
 Mother's Portrait
 Contentment
 The Skylark
 A Father's Advice to His Child...
 Philosophy of Life
 The Country Chair-Mender
 There's No Such Word as "Fail"
 Signs of Prosperity
 May
 An Ox Cart
 Christmas Carols
 Be Active
 Beautiful May
 A Good Rule
 Christmas Chimes
 Advertisement of a Lost Day
 Noon
 Fairy Effie
 Renovation
 Life's Guiding Star
 Lads on the Ladder
 The Voice of Labour
 The Star Child
 All Things Speak of God
 Trifles
 Bear On
 When I'm a Man
 Common Weeds
 On Seeing Children at Play
 A Good Name
 Back Cover
 Spine






Group Title: Songs for the little ones at home : illustrated with sixteen coloured and sixteen tinted pictures from designs by eminent artists.
Title: Songs for the little ones at home
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00027907/00001
 Material Information
Title: Songs for the little ones at home illustrated with sixteen coloured and sixteen tinted pictures from designs by eminent artists
Physical Description: viii, 4, 148 p., 32 leaves of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 19 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Ward, Mary O ( Compiler )
Wade, Jas ( Printer )
Ward, Lock, & Tyler ( Publisher )
Leighton Bros ( Lithographer )
Publisher: Ward, Lock, and Tyler
Place of Publication: London
Manufacturer: Jas. Wade
Publication Date: [1874]
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Natural history -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Family -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Animals -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Christian life -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1874   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1874
Genre: Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
poetry   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
 Notes
Citation/Reference: cf. Shaw, J.M. Childhood in poetry,
General Note: Date of publication from inscription.
General Note: Poems by various authors, compiled by Mary O. Ward according to NUC and Shaw, cited below.
General Note: Added title page and frontispiece printed in colors; lithographed by Leighton Brothers.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00027907
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002237729
notis - ALH8221
oclc - 60551132

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Half Title
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Frontispiece
        Page 6
    Title Page
        Page 7
        Page 8
    Table of Contents
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
    List of Illustrations
        Page 13
        Page 14
    A Visit to the Lambs
        Page 15
    I Like Little Pussy
        Page 16
    Come Here, Little Robin
        Page 17
    Morning and Evening
        Page 18
        Page 19
    Annie's Garden
        Page 20
    Which Way Does the Wind Blow?
        Page 21
    Butterflies are Pretty Things
        Page 22
        Page 23
    The Robins
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
    Dear Papa
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
    "Little Children, Love One Another"
        Page 31
        Page 32
    Mary's Little Lamb
        Page 33
        Page 34
    The Blind Boy
        Page 35
        Page 36
    The Little Sister Left in Charge
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
    Leaving Home
        Page 40
    Little Pink
        Page 41
        Page 42
    Written by a Young Girl to Her Little Brother
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
    A May Song
        Page 48
        Page 49
    Charley and His Father
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
    The Robin
        Page 53
    The Frost
        Page 54
        Page 55
    Blind Johnny
        Page 56
    A Merry-Go-Round for May
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
    The Little Beggars
        Page 60
        Page 61
    All Have a Work to Do
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
    The Dormouse
        Page 65
        Page 66
    Shooting at a Mark
        Page 67
        Page 68
    The Little Spring
        Page 69
    Guess What I Have Heard
        Page 70
        Page 71
    The Lark
        Page 72
        Page 73
    Billy Rabbit to Mary
        Page 74
        Page 75
    A Playful Duel
        Page 76
        Page 77
    The Honest Bird
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
    Little Lillie
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
    A Walk in Spring
        Page 84
        Page 85
    The Old Castle
        Page 86
        Page 87
    The Heroic Boy
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
    The Little Girl's Address to the River
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
    The Merry Milkmaid
        Page 96
        Page 97
    The Spring Walk
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
    Early Rising
        Page 102
        Page 103
    The Butterfly's Ball
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
    Fishing
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
    The Summer
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
    Faithful Annie
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
    Sunday Morning
        Page 117
    We are Seven
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
    A Nursery Song
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
    Spring Time
        Page 127
        Page 128
    A Wind in a Frolic
        Page 129
        Page 130
        Page 131
    Father is Coming
        Page 132
        Page 133
        Page 134
        Page 135
    The Spider and Tie Fly
        Page 136
        Page 137
        Page 138
        Page 139
    What I Hate
        Page 140
    Baby Brother
        Page 141
        Page 142
    Cradle Song
        Page 143
    The Wind
        Page 144
        Page 145
    Robin Redbreast
        Page 146
    Youthful Piety
        Page 147
    Mother's Portrait
        Page 148
    Contentment
        Page 149
    The Skylark
        Page 150
        Page 151
        Page 152
    A Father's Advice to His Children
        Page 153
    Philosophy of Life
        Page 154
    The Country Chair-Mender
        Page 155
    There's No Such Word as "Fail"
        Page 156
    Signs of Prosperity
        Page 157
    May
        Page 158
    An Ox Cart
        Page 159
        Page 160
    Christmas Carols
        Page 161
    Be Active
        Page 162
    Beautiful May
        Page 163
    A Good Rule
        Page 164
    Christmas Chimes
        Page 165
    Advertisement of a Lost Day
        Page 166
        Page 167
    Noon
        Page 168
        Page 169
    Fairy Effie
        Page 170
        Page 171
    Renovation
        Page 172
    Life's Guiding Star
        Page 173
    Lads on the Ladder
        Page 174
    The Voice of Labour
        Page 175
        Page 176
    The Star Child
        Page 177
        Page 178
    All Things Speak of God
        Page 179
        Page 180
    Trifles
        Page 181
    Bear On
        Page 182
        Page 183
    When I'm a Man
        Page 184
        Page 185
        Page 186
        Page 187
    Common Weeds
        Page 188
    On Seeing Children at Play
        Page 189
        Page 190
    A Good Name
        Page 191
        Page 192
        Page 193
    Back Cover
        Page 194
        Page 195
    Spine
        Page 196
Full Text
.. . .. . .. . .. . .. . .. .. .. S ........ .....................G-')FORTS............ . . .. . . .ITL ON.. .. .. . . ..... .. ... .... .. . . ... .. .... .. .. .... .. .. .. ... ... ..


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SONGSTORTHE LITTLE ONES AT HOME.


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.'- e 4L ~..*S : r~EIMTYBRSI LIK TO SE TH DA;IISILY J AN H UTRCPOC OE


WAL MU,< -&* -""__S iOCK:, -It.',S -Z i-F1WVAnm LOOIK, ANDf TYLEWE~


-""- 'F .JI',F .; 'j ..SONGSFOR THELITTLE ONES AT HOME.ILLUSTRATED WITHSixtren Colouab an Sixteen gintrb ittaus,FROM DESIGNS BY EMINENT ARTISTS.LONDON:WARD, LOCK, AND TYLER, WARWICK HOUSE,PATERNOSTER ROW, E.C.


CONTENTS.PAGEA VISIT TO THE LAMBS 1I LIKE LITTLE PUSSY 2COME HERE, LITTLE ROBIN 3MORNING AND EVENING 4ANNIE'S GARDEN .. 5WHICH WAY DOES THE WIND BLOW? .. 6BUTTERFLIES ARE PRETTY THINGS .. 7THE DAISY 7THE ROBINS. 9DEAR PAPA 12THE ROBIN 12"LITTLE CHILDREN, LOVE ONE ANOTHER" 14MARY'S LITTLE LAMB 10THE BLIND BOY .. 17THE LITTLE SISTER LEFT IN CHARGE 19LEAVING HOME .. 21LITTLE PINK 22WRITTEN BY A YOUNG GIRL TO HER LITTLE BROTHER 24A MAY SONG 28CHARLEY AND HIS FATHER. 29THE ROBIN . 32


Vi CONTENTS.PAGETHE FROST 33BLIND JOHNNY 385A MERRY-GO-ROUND FOR MAY .. 36THE LITTLE BEGGARS 38ALL HAVE A WORK TO DO 40THE DORMOUSE 42SHOOTING AT A MARK .. 44THE LITTLE SPRING 45GUESS WHAT I HAVE HEARD 46THE LARK 48BILLY RABBIT TO MARY .. 50A PLAYFUL DUEL 52THE HONEST BIRD 53LITTLE LILLIE .. 56A WALK IN SPRING 58THE OLD CASTLE .. 60THE HEROIC BOY .. 61THE LITTLE GIRL'S ADDRESS TO TIE RIVER 64THE MERRY MILKMAID .. 68THE SPRING WALK . 69EARLY RISING . 72THE BUTTERFLY'S BALL 73FISHING 76THE SUMMER . 78FAITIFUL ANNIE 81SUNDAY MORNING .. 84WE ARE SEVEN 85A NURSERY SONG .88


CONTENTS. viiPAGESPRING TIME .. 92THE WIND IN A FROLIC 93FATHER IS COMING 96THE SPIDER AND THE FLY 99WHAT I HATE 103BABY BROTHER . 104CRADLE SONG 105THE WIND 106ROBIN REDBREAST 108YOUTHFUL PIETY 109MOTHER'S PORTRAIT 110CONTENTMENT 111THE SKYLARK 112A FATHER'S ADVICE TO IIIS CHILDREN 114PHILOSOPHY OF LIFE 115THE COUNTRY CHAIR-MENDER 116THERE'S NO SUCH WORD AS "FAIL" 117SIGNS OF PROSPERITY 118MAY 119AN O CART 120CHRISTMAS CAROLS 121BE ACTIVE 122BEAUTIFUL MAY 123A GOOD RULE .124CHRISTMAS CHIMES 125ADVERTISEMENT OF A LOST DAY 126NOON 128FAIRY EFFIE 129


viii CONTENTS.PAGO'RENOVATION 131LIFE'S GUIDING STAR. 132LADS ON THE LADDER 133THE VOICE OF LABOUR 134THE STAR CHILD 136ALL THINGS SPEAK OF GOD 137TRIFLES .. 139BEAR ON .. 140WHEN I'M A MAN 142IN THE WOODLAND 145COMMON WEEDS. 145ON SEEING CHILDREN AT PLAY 146A GOOD NAME .. 148%-- 0,17-;_


LIST OF COLOURED ILLUSTRATIONS."I LIKE TO SEE THE DAISY AND THE BUTTERCUP ONCE MORE" FrontispieceSONGS FOR THE LITTLE ONES V.. . ignette" THE FATHER ROBIN LOOKS FOR FOOD" To face page 10" MARY HAD A LITTLE LAMB" .. 16" MY PRETTY BABY BROTHER" 24" STOP, LITTLE STREAM" 40"I SAW ON THE TREE A MOST BEAUTIFUL BIRD" .. 56" LOOKING FOR THE SPRING FLOWERS WILD" ,, 65" WE SAW FOUR EGGS WITHIN A NEST" 70"GET UP, LITTLE SISTER, THE MORNING IS BRIGHT" ,, 72" SEE WHAT A PARCEL OF FLOWERS I'VE FOUND" 81"I MET A LITTLE COTTAGE GIRL". 86"MY LITTLE CHICK NESTLES HERE ON MY AnMS" ,, 91" SEE HOW HE LAUGHS, AND CROWS, AND STARES !" ,, 98" GOOD MORNING, SHINING SUN" 112"THE BEAUTIFUL ANGEL THAT'S WATCHING ME" 136


LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.PAGE"AND BALMY BREEZES SOFTLY BLOW" 4" O PAPA, WE LOVE YOU DEARLY" 12" GOOD-BYE, OLD HOME" .. 21" AND DANCE WE AWAY" 28" COME TO THE MEADOWS, AWAY, AWAY!" 36" BUT WHO SHALL HIT THE POPINJAY " 44"A SPORTFUL DUEL, NOT TO DEATH" 52"AT THE OLD CASTLE ON THE HEIGHT" 60" ALTHOUGH I AM A MILKMAID LASS". 68" WHAT IF I TAKE NO FISH TO-DAY ?" 76"A DAY OF JOY AND PRAISE" ." AMONG THE TENDER GRASS TO SPORT" 92" PRETTY BABY, MOTHER'S PET" 104" MEN ARE CARTING HAY" 120"THE SHEEP NOW GATHER NEATHH THE AMPLE SHADE" 128" I WANDERED IN THE WOODLAND" .. 145


A VISIT TO THE LAMBS.OTHER, let's go and see the lambs;This warm and sunny dayI think must make them very glad,SAnd full of fun and play.Ah, there they are. You pretty things!Now, don't you run away;I'm come on purpose, that I am,To see you this fine day.What pretty little heads you've got,And such good-natured eyes!And ruff of wool all round your necks-How nicely curl'd it lies!Come here, my little lambkin, come,And lick my hand-now do!How silly to be so afraid 1Indeed I won't hurt you.B


2 I LIKE LITTLE PUSSY.Just put your hand upon its back,Mother, how nice and warm!There, pretty lamb, you see I don'tIntend to do you harm."SIMPLE VERSES."I LIKE LITTLE PUSSY.LIKE little pussy,Her coat is so warm,And if I don't hurt her,She'll do me no harm.So I'll not pull her tail,Or drive her away,But pussy and ITogether will play.She will sit by my side,And I'll give her some food,And she'll like me becauseI am gentle and good."A AMUSING SONGS."


COME HERE, LITTLE ROBIN. 3COME HERE, LITTLE ROBIN.OME here, little Robin, and don't beafraid,I would not hurt even a feather;Come here, little Robin, and pick upsome bread,To feed you this very cold weather.I don't mean to hurt you, you poor little thing,And pussy-cat is not behind me;So hop about pretty, and put down your wing,And pick up the crumbs, and don't mind me!Cold Winter is come, but it will not last long,And Summer we soon shall be greeting;Then remember, sweet Robin, to sing me a song,In return for the breakfast you're eating!" EASY POETRY."


4 MORNING AND EVENING.MORNING AND EVENING.S I HEN first the glorious god of dayFlings wide his orient gates of gold,And striding on his kingly wayBids earth her varied charms unfold;When flower-cups brim with fairy wine,And dew-pearls catch a ruddy glow,And song-birds wake their notes divine,And balmy breezes softly blow-Mead, wood, and dell I love to pace,And greet dear Nature face to face.When western skies are royal red,And even spreads her dusky veil,When love-lorn Luna over-headBrings forth the tuneful nightingale;When shepherds fold their fleecy care,And gaily chirp the green-grass choirs,When bat and moth whirl through the air,And glowworms light their elfin fires-I love to roam o'er mead, o'er hill,And let my fancy sport at will.J. G. WATTS.


2-. .-_,_"AND BALLMY BREEZES SOFTLY BLOW."


ANNIE'S GARDEN.ANNIE'S GARDEN.S N little Annie's garden'. Grew all sorts of posies;.ji t There were pinks, and mignonette,- And tulips, and roses.Sweet peas, and climbing roses,A bed of violets blue,And marigolds, and asters,In Annie's garden grew.There the bees went for honey;There the birds sipp'd the dew,And there the pretty butterflies,And the lady-birds flew.And there among her flowers,Every bright and pleasant day,In her own pretty garden,Little Annie went to play.ELIZA FOLLEN.


6 WHICI WAY DOES THE WIND BLOW?WHICH WAY DOES THE WIND BLOW?10 aHICH way does the wind blow,Which way does he go?He rides over the water,He rides over snow;O'er wood and o'er valley,And o'er rocky heightWhich the goat cannot traverse,He taketh his flight.He rages and tossesIn every bare tree,As, if you look upwards,You plainly may see.But whence he now cometh,And whither he goes,There's never a scholarIn England that knows.LucY AIIN.


BUTTERFLIES ARE PRETTY THINGS.BUTTERFLIES ARE PRETTY THINGS.SUTTERFLIES are pretty things,Prettier than you or I;See the colours on his wings,-Who would hurt a butterfly?Softly, softly, girls and boys;He'll come near us by-and-by;Here he is, don't make a noise,-We'll not hurt you, butterfly.Not to hurt a living thing,Let all little children try;See, again he's on the wing;Good-bye! pretty butterfly!ELIZA FOLLEN.THE DAISY.HE daisy is the meekest flowerThat grows in wood or field;To wind and rain, and footstep rude,Its slender stem will yield.


8 THE DAISY.And when they're passed away, againAs cheerfully it springs,As if a playful butterflyHad bent it with its wings.The daisy is a hardy plant,And in the winter timeWe find it in the sheltered nooks,Unhurt by snow and rime.In spring it dots the green with white;It blossoms all the year;And so it is a favorite flowerTo little children dear.Before the stars are in the skyThe daisy goes to rest,And folds its little shining leavesUpon its golden breast.And so it sleeps in dewy nightUntil the morning breaks,Then, with the songs of early birds,So joyously awakes.


THE ROBINS. 9And children, when they go to bed,Should fold their hands in prayer,And place themselves, and all they love,In God's almighty care.Then they may sleep secure and still,Through hours of darksome night,And with the pretty daisy wakeIn cheerful morning light.M. S. C.THE ROBINS.OME out into the lane with me,And see what I have found;It is a little robin's nest,That's built upon the ground.Look! there it is, close by the tree,Half hidden in the grass;I see the robin's scarlet breastAs often as I pass.


1 THE ROBINS.The nest is made of tender moss,And lined with hair and hay;And you may see the robin's eggsWhen she has flown away.The robin sits for many days,And warms them with her breast;How glad she is when first she hearsA chirping in the nest!Each little bird comes creeping out,And leaves the speckled shell;The gentle mother keeps them warm,And loves and tends them well.The father robin looks for food,And feeds them one by one;He never stops to rest himselfUntil his work is done.But when his young ones are asleepBeneath their mother's wing,He comes and perches near the nest,And soon begins to sing.


"I-.---.LEIGHTON 10"THE FATHER ROBIN LOOKS FOR FOOD."


THE ROBINS. 11At last the little birds are grown,And old enough to fly,And then they leave the parent birds,And bid the nest good-bye.The robins stay all year with us,And when it's very cold,They come and chirp about the house,For hunger makes them bold.And when we see them hopping near,And waiting to be fed,We'll go and watch them quietly,And give them crumbs of bread.In summer time, with tender care,They feed their helpless brood,And now I think deserve our help,When they can find no food.M. S. C.


12 DEAR PAPA.DEAR PAPA.ZV1 C? PAPA, we love you dearly,.'- You are good and kind,Li And we always hope to show it,All your words to mind.And when we're men both tall and strong,Your words shall keep us from the wrong.When an evil thought arises,Or a wicked word,We will say-'twould shock our fatherIf he ever heard,So when we're men both tall and strong,Your words shall keep us from the wrong.THE ROBIN.HO would fancy this December,Now the sun is shining bright,For last year I well rememberHow the snow lay smooth and white;


I '"11, K -.""0 'PAPA, W LOVE YOU DEADLY."


THE ROBIN. 13All around 'twas lying coldly,And so silently it fell,That poor Robin ventured boldlyOn the sill his wants to tell.Now I hear him in the laurelsChant his morning hymn so sweet,Whilst the holly shows its coralsFor his promised Christmas treat.Now I see him slyly peepingWith his quick and glancing eye,Still his cheerful carol keepingChristmas by its minstrelsy.Look now! he is venturing nearer-Half afraid he starts away-As if to make his visits dearer,Like a little child at play.I am sure he still remembersAll the crumbs we gave last year,And will many more DecembersAsk from us his Christmas cheer."AMUSING SONGS."


14 "LITTLE CHILDREN, LOVE ONE ANOTHER.""LITTLE CHILDREN, LOVE ONEANOTHER."LITTLE girl with a happy look,Sat slowly reading a ponderous book,All bound with velvet and edgedwith gold,And its weight was more than the child could hold ;Yet dearly she loved to ponder it o'er,And every day she prized it more;For it said,-and she look'd at her smilingmother,-It said, "Little children, love one another."She thought it was beautiful in the book,And the lesson home to her heart she took;She walk'd on her way with a trusting grace,And a dove-like look in her meek young face,Which said, just as plain as words could say,"The Holy Bible I must obey;


"LITTLE CHILDREN, LOVE ONE ANOTHER." 15So, mother, I'll be kind to my darling brother,For little children must love each other."I'm sorry he's naughty, and will not play,But I'll love him still, for I think the wayTo make him gentle and kind to meWill be better shown, if I let him seeI strive to do what I think is right;And thus, when I kneel in prayer to-night,I will clasp my hands around my brother,And say, Little children, love one another.'"The little girl did as her Bible taught,And pleasant indeed was the change it wrought;For the boy look'd up in glad surprise,To meet the light of her loving eyes:His heart was full, he could not speak,But he press'd a kiss on his sister's cheek;And God looked down on that happy mother,Whose little children loved each other.AUNT MARY.


16 MARY'S LITTLE LAMB.MARY'S LITTLE LAMB.ARY had a little lamb,Its fleece was white as snow;And everywhere that Mary went,The lamb was sure to go.He followed her to school one day-That was against the rule;It made the children laugh and play,To see a lamb at school.So the teacher turned him out,But still he lingered near,And waited patiently aboutTill Mary did appear.Then he ran to her, and laidHis head upon her arm,As if he said-I'm not afraid,You'll keep me from all harm.


-i .-' -- Wo,,"MAE"LEIGHroN, UEUr ."MARY HAD A LITTLE LAMB."


THE BLIND BOY. 17" What makes the lamb love Mary so?"The eager children cry."Oh, Mary loves the lamb, you know,"The teacher did reply."And you each gentle animalIn confidence may bind,And make them follow at your will,If you are only kind.""SONGS FOR CHILDREN."THE BLIND BOY.EAR Mary," said the poor blind boy,"That little bird sings very long;Say, do you see him in his joy,And is he pretty as his song?"" Yes, Edward, yes," replied the maid,"I see the bird on yonder tree;"The poor boy sigh'd, and gently said,"Sister, I wish that I could see.B*


18 THE BLIND BOY."The flowers, you say, are very fair,And bright green leaves are on the trees,And pretty birds are singing there-How beautiful for one who sees!"Yet I the fragrant flowers can smell,And I can feel the green leaf's shade,And I can hear the notes that swellFrom those dear birds that God has made." So, sister, God to me is kind,Though sight to me He has not given;But tell me, are there any blindAmong the children up in heaven ?"Ere long, disease its hand had laidOn that dear boy, so meek and mild:His widow'd mother wept, and pray'dThat God would spare her sightless child.He felt her warm tears on his face,And said-" Oh, never weep for me;I'm going to a bright, bright place,Where God my Saviour I shall see.


TIE LITTLE SISTER LEFT IN CHARGE. 19"And you'll be there, kind Mary, too;But, mother, when you get up there,Tell me, dear mother, that 'tis you:You know I never saw you here."He spoke no more, but sweetly smiled,Until the final blow was given,When God took up that poor blind child,And open'd first his eyes in heaven.THE LITTLE SISTER LEFT IN CHARGE.6F l' LEEP, little brother, you must notAwaken.Till mother comes back to her baby" again:Weary and long is the way she has takenOver the common, and through the green glen,Up the steep hill, by the path that is nearest,Thinking of you as she hurries along,


20 THE LITTLE SISTER LEFT IN CHARGE.Sleep then, and dream that she's watching you,dearest,Rocking your cradle, and singing her song.In the still room there's no sound to disquiet,Only the clock ticking even and low,Only the bird in his cage hanging by it,Chirping a note as he hops to and fro.Out in the sunlight the woodbine is stirring,Filling the air with its fragrance so sweet;On the low window-seat pussy sits purring,Washing her face with her little white feet.Far down the lane merry voices are ringing,Comrades have beckon'd me out to their play.Why did you start? it is I that am singing:Why did you frown? I'm not going away.Could I forsake you for play, or for pleasure,Lying alone in your helplessness here?[low could I leave you, my own little treasure,No one to rock you, and no one to cheer?In the room corners I watch the dark shadowsDeepening and lengthening as evening comes on:CD ~ "" """ "


"" OD ME~ 14i~ 'GSFYR' ,."GO-YE L HM.


LEAVING HOME. 21Soon will the mowers return from the meadows;Far to the westward the red sun is gone.By the green hedge-row I see her now coming,Where the last sunbeam is just on her track.Still I sit by you, love, drowsily humming;Sleep, little baby, till mother comes back."MORAL SONGS."LEAVING HOME.- -,:OME, home, we are going from home,SAnd all is busy around us;SHome, home, to find a new home," " ^"S- As happy a one as this found us.But it seems so strange this going away,Perhaps never again to return,That it seems almost hard to the dear old place,As if we were heartless and stern.Good-bye, old home! we are going away,And busy as bees are we all,And I'll remember the dear old home,With its trellis and sunny wall.


22 LITTLE PINK.LITTLE PINK.S' N a swinging little shelf*. Were some pretty little books;i.. ,i-. f', And I reckoned from their looks,.. "" That the darling little elf,Whose they were,Was the careful little girl,With her auburn hair a-curl.In a little chest of drawersEverything was nice and prim,And was always kept so trim,That her childish little stores,Books or toys,In good order could be found,-Never careless thrown around.


LITTLE PINK. 23And she laid her bonnet by,When she hastened home from school;For it was her constant rule,-And she was resolved to try,School or home,How to prove the saying true,-"Order in all things you do."When she put away her shawl,Nicely laying by her book,She had only once to lookIn its place to find her dollSnugly there:She could shut her smiling eyes,Sure to find her pretty prize.See her books;-how clean they are!Corners not turn'd down, I know,There's a marker, made to showIn her lessons just how far.Dog-ear'd booksAre a certain sign to meThat the girl must careless be.


24 WRITTEN BY A YOUNG GIRLShe's as tidy as a pink;Clean and neat, and gentle too;If you take her actions through,Just the same, I know, you'll think,School or home,Tasks or play,Books or toys,Every way,Order keeps this loving girl,With her auburn hair a-curl.W. O. BouRE.WRITTEN BY A YOUNG GIRL TO HERLITTLE BROTHER.Y pretty baby-brotherIs six months old to-day;And though he cannot speak,He knows whatever I say.


a I" IY PR TTY BABY BROT E R."


TO HER LITTLE BROTHER.Whenever I come near,He crows for very joy;And dearly do I love him,The darling baby-boy.My brother's cheek is blooming,And his bright laughing eyesAre like the pure spring violets,Or the summer cloudless skies.His mouth is like the rosebud,So delicate and red;And his hair is soft as silk,And curls all round his head.When he laughs, upon his faceSo many dimples play,They seem like little sunbeamsWhich o'er his features stray.I am sure we all must love him.He is so full of glee;Just like a ray of sunshineMy brother is to me.


26 WRITTEN BY A YOUNG GIRLWhen in his pretty cradleHe lies in quiet sleep,'Tis joy to sit beside him,A faithful watch to keep;And when his sleep is over,I love to see him lie,And lift the silken fringesThat veil his sweet blue eye.Oh! my dear, dear baby-brother,Our darling and our pet;The very sweetest playthingI ever have had yet.The pretty little creature,He grows so every day,That, when the summer comes,In the garden he will play.How cunning he will lookAmong the grass and flowers!No blossom is so fairAs this precious one of ours.


TO HER LITTLE BROTHER. 27Every night before I sleep,When I kneel to say my prayer,I ask my heavenly FatherOf my brother to take care.For I know that God is good,And whatever He does is right;And our darling little treasureIs precious in His sight.And if He thinks it best,He will listen to my prayer,And what we love so dearlyStill longer to us spare.I know it was in loveThat the little babe was given;And, if He calls him hence,It will be to live in Heaven.AUNT MARY.


28 A MAY SONG.A MAY SONG.7-:1, P up! let us greetThis season so sweet,"~ y TiFor winter is gone,' And the flowers are springing,And little birds singing,Their soft notes ringing,And bright is the sun !Where all was dress'dIn a snowy vest,There grass is growing,With dewdrops glowing,And flowers are seenOn beds of green.All down in the grove,Around, above,Sweet music floats.Up, maidens, repairTo the meadows so fair,And dance we awayThis merry May,And who but on May doats?FROM THE GERMAN.


"A A-.- --. -. -- _S1I-I"AND DANCE WE AWAY."


CHARLEY AND HIS FATHER. 29CHARLEY AND HIS FATHER..HE birds are flown away,The flowers are dead and gone,The clouds look cold and gray,Around the setting sun.The trees with solemn sighsTheir naked branches swing;The winter winds arise,And mournfully they sing.Upon his father's kneeWas Charley's happy place,And very thoughtfullyHe look'd up in his face;And these his simple words:" Father, how cold it blows!What comes of all the birdsAmidst the storms and snows?"


30 CHARLEY AND HIS FATHER."They fly far, far awayFrom storms, and snows, and rain;But Charley dear, next MayThey'll all come back again."" And will my flowers come too ?"The little fellow said," And all be bright and new,That now looks cold and dead ?"" 0, yes, dear; in the springThe flowers will all revive,The birds return and sing,And all be made alive.""Who shows the birds the way,Father, that they must go ?And brings them back in May,When there is no more snow?"And when no flower is seenUpon the hill and plain,Who'll make it all so green,And bring the flowers again ?"*


CHARLEY AND HIS FATHER. 31" My son, there is a Power,That none of us can see,Takes care of every flower,Gives life to every tree."He through the pathless airShows little birds their way;And we, too, are His care,-He guards us day by day.""Father, when people die,Will they come back in May ?"Tears were in Charley's eye,-"Will they, dear father, say ?""No! they will never come,We go to them, my boy,There in our heavenly home,To meet in endless joy."Upon his father's kneeStill Charley kept his place,And very thoughtfullyHe look'd up in his face.ELIZA FOLLEN.


32 TIE ROBIN.THE ROBIN.POOR little robin, so cold and so wet,Say, what are you doing to-day?i ., The winter has come, and now whatwill you eat,And where are you going to stay?Your nest is so open, so cold, and so poor,You never can live there again;O come, pretty robin, come into our door,And hide from the snow and the rain.We've clean beds to sleep on, and water to drink,And things very nice for your food;Come, come, pretty robin, 0 how can you thinkTo fly off again in the wood ?The bird will not listen; but you that are young,That are cold, or hungry, or wet,May share in my cottage, and join in my song,And you shall have plenty to eat.HASTINGS' "NURSERY SONGS."


THE FROST. 33THE FROST.HE FROST look'd forth, one still clearnight,And whisper'd, "Now I shall be outof sight;So through the valley and over the height,In silence I'll take my way;I will not go on like that blustering train,The wind and the snow, the hail and the rain,Who make so much bustle and noise in vain;-But I'll be as busy as they."Then he flew to the mountain, and powder'd its crest,Hle lit on the trees, and their boughs he dress'dIn diamond beads-and over the breastOf the quivering lake he spreadA coat of mail, that it need not fearThe downward point of many a spearThat he hung on its margin, far and near,Where a rock could rear its head.c


34 THE FROST.He went to the windows of those who slept,And over each pane, like a fairy, crept;Wherever he breathed, wherever he stept,By the light of the moon were seenMost beautiful things;-there were flowers and trees,There were Devies of birds and swarms of bees;There were cities with temples and towers, and theseAll pictured in silver sheen!But he did one thing that was hardly fair;He peep'd in the cupboard, and finding thereThat all had forgotten for him to prepare-"Now just to set them a-thinking,I'll bite this basket of fruit," said he,"This costly pitcher I'll burst in three,And the glass of water they've left for me"Shall tchick!' to tell them I'm drinking.MISS GOULD.


BLIND JOHNNY. 35BLIND JOHNNY.E kind to little Johnny Bell,Whene'er you see him, little boys;Relate to him some pretty tale,And tell him all about your toys.For he is blind, poor Johnny Bell!The pleasant sky he cannot see,Nor brilliant sun, nor lovely flowers,Nor verdant grass, nor lofty tree.IIe never saw his mother's face,Nor little sister's sweet blue eye;He cannot play at ball or top,Nor hoop can drive, nor kite can fly.He cannot go to school and learn,No pretty books can Johnny read;Oh, then be kind to Johnny Bell,For his is a sad lot indeed.


S A MERRY-GO-ROUND FOR MAY.Ie'll sing to you some little song,His voice is very clear and sweet;And on his little flute he plays,To please the children in the street.He's very gentle, kind, and mild,Blind Johnny all the children love;He's in the holy keeping, too,Of the good God who reigns above.A MERRY-GO-ROUND FOR MAY.OME to the meadows-away, away !Oh! the sun shines bright, and themorn is fair;The hawthorn's bloom yields sweetperfumeTo gentlest touch of the breezes there.


~~~~ " ..".."'r'. ;- ,' ii 'i '" :"-~ ~ ...:--_' t ~1, ~~c -_ ,", ,,'- " " -or 7I:~"CM T ;.( ,_' I5-.' l .:: : : '= _: '"CO IE+ TOTI IAO S-A;,A A!


A MERRY-GO-ROUND FOR MAY. 37In healthful sports our time we'll pass,The fairest shall Queen of the May be crown'd,"While, hand in hand, our youthful bandAll join in a merry-go-round, go-round.Come to the meadows-away, away!Where skyward tower the emerald hills;Where Summer dowres with sweet wild flowersThe sloping banks of the rippling rills.In healthful sports our time we'll pass,The fairest shall Queen of the May be crown'd,While, hand in hand, our youthful bandAll join in a merry-go-round, go-round.Come to the meadows-away, away!The laureate lark from the young green corn,Soaring on high to the cloudless sky,Pours forth an anthem of love to the morn.A blossom-chaplet we will weave,The fairest shall Queen of the May be crown'd.While, hand in hand, our youthful bandAll join in a merry-go-round, go-round.J. G. WATTS.


38 THE LITTLE BEGGARS.THE LITTLE BEGGARS."WO 1 i_. .r are at the door, mamma,Two beggars are at the door,A beggar-boy and a beggar-girl,And the wind is biting, at every whirl,Their feet all naked and sore.Oh, hasten and bring them in, mamma,Oh, hasten and bring them in,And let them sit by this fire so warm,For they have been out in the cold, cold storm,And their clothes are tattered and thin.And tell them this is their home, mamma,Oh, tell them this is their home;And give them something to eat that's nice,Of bread and butter a good large slice,And bid them no more to roam.


THE LITTLE BEGGARS. 39For isn't it all too bad, mamma,Oh, isn't it all too bad,That they must starve, or beg in the street,No cloak to their backs, or shoes to their feet,While I am so finely clad?It may be God sent them here, mamma,It may be God sent them here,And now looks down from his home in the skyTo watch them and see whether you and IAre kind to his children dear,And will he not angry be, mamma,And will he not angry be,If we let them go on in the storm so rough,To perish with want, while more than enoughFor them and for us have we?


40 ALL HAVE A WORK TO DO.ALL HAVE A WORK TO DO.TOP, little stream, and tell me whyThou'rt running on so fast,For ever gliding swiftly by,And yet thou'rt never past.I love to look into thy face,Although I'm but a child,And watch thy dimpling eddies play,And hear thy music wild.Thou must be very happy here,With nothing else to doBut running by these mossy banks,Beneath the green wood too.The pretty robin sings to theeHis cheerful matin-song,While 'mid the leaves the squirrel peepsAnd frolics all day long.


"STOP LITTLE STREA M."C..,~ )'~~i~E c N~\.."STOP LITTLE STRAIN."


ALL HAVE A WORK TO DO. 41The little streamlet heeded notThe prattling child's request,But, while it still ran swiftly on,The laughing boy addressed:-"'Tis true I've squirrels, birds, and lowers,To cheer me on my way;And very pleasant is my lot:But, still, I must not stay.Like Truth, I have my work to do,My errand to fulfil:I cool the weary traveller's lips,And help the sea to fill.If I should stop and idly lieUpon my pebbly bed,Soon all my freshness would be gone,My verdant banks be dead.Our heavenly Father gives to allHis blessing most profuse,And, not the least, in wisdom givesThe kindly law of use.


42 THE DORMOUSE.So, little child, your duty do,In cheerfulness all day;And you, like me, shall then be blessedWith flowers upon your way."AUNT MARY.THE DORMOUSE.HE little Dormouse is tawny red;IIe makes against winter a nice snug bed,He makes his bed in a mossy bank,Where the plants in the summer growtall and rank.Away from the daylight, far underground,His sleep through the winter is quiet and sound.And when all above him it freezes and snows,What is it to him, for he nought of it knows ?And till the cold time of the winter is gone,The little Dormouse keeps sleeping on.


TIHE DORMOUSE. 43But at last, in the fresh breezy days of the 1pli1I'i,When the green leaves bud, and the merry birds sing,And the dread of the winter is over and past,The little Dormouse peeps out at last.Out of his snug quiet .burrow he wends,And looks all about for his neighbours and friends;Then he says, as he sits at the foot of a larch," 'Tis a beautiful day, for the first day of March !The violet is blowing, the blue sky is clear;The lark is up-.lji i.ii,:_-, his carol I hear;And in the green fields are the lamb and the foal;I am glad I'm not sleeping now down in my hole !"Then away he runs, in his merry mood,Over the fields and into the wood,To find any grain there may chance to be,Or any small berry that hangs on the tree;So, from early morning, till late at night,Has the poor little creature its own delight,Looking down to the earth and up to the sky,Thinking, " 0 what a happy Dormouse am I!"MARY IIowrrr.


44 SHOOTING AT A MARK.SHOOTING AT A MARK.i--'TT HE crossbowmen are right merry,- As they shoot at the popinjay,, And those who look on are merry,- 1 For all mean to stop and stay,For a well-spread board,Which my lord can afford;And they're all in their best array.But who shall hit the popinjay ?And who is it shall win the prize?All eagerly watch and hold their breath,As the bolts from the bows arise,For the prize is rare:Award will be fairFor each one of the men who tries." But who shall win the prize to-day?"'Tis asked in castle and court,When the jester comes in mysterious way,Says he knows and he thinks he ought,"Now listen and hark,Who hits the mark,The prize will have faithfully bought!"J. T.


_ ... ..,. r '.,\ -"BU T" -T T'I"piT'T WTTO SIIALL ITIT TIIE POPINJAY?"


TIE LITTLE SPRING. 4,THE LITTLE SPRING.SENEATH a green and mossy bankThere flows a clear and fairy stream;N There the pert squirrel oft has drank,And thought, perhaps, 'twas madefor him.Their pitchers there the labourers fill,As drop by drop the crystals flow,Singing their silvery welcome stillTo all who to the fountain go.Then to the river on it glides,Its tributary drop to bear,Its modest head a moment hides,Then rises up and sparkles there.


46 GUESS WHAT I HAVE HEARD.The touching lesson on my heartFalls like the gentle dews of heaven,Bids me with humble love impartThe little treasure God has given.For from a source as small as thisFull many a cup of joy may flow,And on the stream of human blissIts little ray of gladness throw.GUESS WHAT I HAVE HEARD.EAR mother, guess what I have heard!0 it will soon be spring !I'm sure it was a little bird,-Mother, I heard him sing.Look at this little piece of greenThat peeps out from the snow,As if it wanted to be seen,-'Twill soon be spring, I know.


GUESS WHAT I HAVE HEARD. 47And 0, come here, come here and look !How fast it runs along !-Here is a cunning little brook;O, hear its pretty song !I know 'tis glad the winter's goneThat kept it all so still,For now it merrily runs on,And goes just where it will.I feel just like the brook, I know;It says, it seems to me,-" Good-bye, cold weather, ice, and snow;Now girls and brooks are free."I love to think of what you said,Mother, to me last night,Of this great world that God has made,So beautiful and bright.And now it is the happy springNo naughty thing I'll do;I would not be the only thingThat is not happy too.


48 THE LARK.THE LARK.HEAR a pretty bird, but hark !I cannot see it anywhere.Oh, it is a little lark,Singing in the morning air.Little lark, do tell me whyYou are singing in the sky ?Other little birds at rest,Have not yet begun to sing;Every one is in its nest,With its head behind its wing.Little lark, then tell me whyYou're so early in the sky ?You look no bigger than a bee,In the middle of the blue,Up above the poplar-tree;I can hardly look at you.Little lark, do tell me whyYou are mounted up so high?


THE LARK. 49'Tis to watch the silver star,Sinking slowly in the skies;And beyond the mountain far,See the glorious sun arise:Little lady, this is whyI am mounted up so high.'Tis to sing a merry song,To the pleasant morning light;Why stay in my nest so long,When the sun is shining bright ?Little lady, this is whyI sing so early in the sky.To the little birds below,I now sing a merry tune;And I let the ploughman know,He must come to labour soon.Little lady, this is whyI am singing in the sky."SONGS FOR CHILDREN."c*


50 BILLY RABBIT TO MARY.BILLY RABBIT TO MARY.Artichoke Woods.- OU thought, my dear Mary, you hadBilly fast,But I tried very hard, and escapedyou at last;The chance was so tempting, I thought I wouldnab it,-It was not very naughty, I'm sure, in a rabbit.O, let not your kind heart be angry with me;But think what a joy it is to be free,To see the green woods, to feel the fresh air,To skip, and to play, and to run everywhere.The food that you gave me was pleasant and sweet,But I'd rather be free, though with nothing to eat.0, how glad they all were to see me come back,And every one wanted to give me a smack.


BILLY RABBIT TO MARY. .1Dick knocked over Brownie, and jumped over Bun,And the neighbours came in to witness the fun.My father said something, but could not be heard;My mother looked at me, but spoke not a word;And while she was looking, her eyes became pink,And she shed a few tears, I verily think.To him who a hole or a palace inhabits,To all sorts of beings, to men, and to rabbits,Ah! dear to us all is sweet Liberty,Especially, Mary, to you and to me.So I hope you'll forgive me for sending this letter,To tell you I'm safe, and feel so much better,Cut all sorts of capers, and act very silly,And am your devoted, affectionateBILLY.[Billy Rabbit was a little rabbit which a boy caught in the woodsand gave to a little girl of the name of Mary. She was veryattentive to the little prisoner, gave him an abundance of goodthings to cat, and tried her best to make him happy; but all invain. After many attempts, he at last succeeded in making hisescape, and instantly disappeared in the woods. In the course ofthe day, the above letter, sealed with a sharp thorn, was receivedby his friend Mary.]


52 A PLAYFUL DUEL.A PLAYFUL DUEL., OW who shall win the fight to-day ?A A sportful duel not to death,But to find out the skill of bothWithout a chance of stopping breath;For, as you know, in mortal strife,A sword let in lets out the life.A goodly company arrangeThemselves around the castle court,And watch, as on some mimic stage,All things prepared, the battle fought,Each man so true of eye and hand,Each sword obedient to command."A hit !" The elder of the twoHas caught a scratch and lost the day.And why ? because his temper rose,Too eager he to end the fray.His face is flushed as he looks round,And casts his sword upon the ground.


I 71Aii""ASP1IfU DUL iO TO D XIIi~ i ..._. .- ,,-' ,,,: ._. _S. / --"A SP I ''I U OI O II I.


TIE HONEST BIRD. 53" You've lost, good friend," the master speaks," And surely all the fault is thine;Impatience is the worst of moodsFor those who in the world would shine.Thus of great merit there is waste,When merit is in too much haste."J. T.TIE HONEST BIRD.NCE on a time, a little birdWithin a wicker cage was heard,In mournful tones, these words tosing :-"In vain I stretch my useless wing;Still round and round I vainly fly,And strive in vain for liberty.Dear Liberty, how sweet thou art !"The prisoner sings, with breaking heart:-"All other things I'd give for thee,Nor ask one joy but liberty."


54 THE HONEST BIRD.He sang so sweet, a little mouse,Who often ran about the house,Came to his cage; her cunning earShe turned, the mournful bird to hear.Soon as he ceased,-" Suppose," said she," I could contrive to set you free;Would you those pretty wings give me ?"The cage was in the window-seat,The sky was blue, the air was sweet.The bird with eagerness replied,-"0, yes my wings, and see, beside,These seeds and apples, sugar, too,All, pretty mouse, I'll give to you,If you will only set me free;For, O, I pant for liberty !"The mouse soon gnawed a hole; the bird,In ecstasy, forgot his word;Swift as an arrow, see, he flies,Far up, far up, towards the skies;But see, he stops, now he descends,Towards the cage his course he bends."Kind mouse," said he, "behold me nowReturned to keep my foolish vow;


THE HONEST BIRD. 55I only longed for freedom then,Nor thought to want my wings again.Better with life itself to part,Than, living, have a faithless heart;Do with me, therefore, as you will,An honest bird I will be still."His heart seemed full, no more he said,He dropped his wings and hung his head.The mouse, though very pert and smart,Had yet a very tender heart;She minced a little, twirled about,Then thus her sentiments threw out:-" I don't care much about your wings,-Apples and cakes are better things;You love the clouds, I choose the house;Wings would look queer upon a mouse.My nice long tail is better far,So keep your wings just where they are."She munched some apple, gave a smack,And ran into her little crack.The bird spread out his wings and flew,And vanished in the sky's deep blue;Far up his joyful song he poured,And sang of freedom as he soared.


56 LITTLE LILLIE.LITTLE LILLIE.HAVE been to school, father, and triedto be good;And when I came home, as I walkedthrough the wood,I saw on the tree a most beautiful bird,And his song was the sweetest that ever I heard.He looked in my face with his little round eye;I was sorry for that, for I thought *he would fly;But he still kept singing the same sweet song,And it made me glad as I walked along.And, father, the air was so fresh and so sweet,The green grass and moss so soft to my feet,And the ground was so bright with the beautifulflowers,That I wanted to stay there a great many hours.


rI ~ Cr --. _- &-,,I SAW ON THE TREE A MOST BEAUTIFUL BIRD.


LITTLE LILLIE. 57But I thought it was wrong any longer to stay,For you told me never to stop by the way;So I came straight home, and brother and IHave been to the fields to make his kite fly.And I worked in my garden, and planted some seeds,And watered the fields, and pulled up the weeds;And I tried to help mother all that I could :I am sure she will tell you that I have been good."I am glad, little Lillie," the father replied,As lie kissed his dear girl, " I am glad you have triedTo be a good child; so now come with me,And sit by my side or climb on my knee;And I'll tell you why all looked so happy and gay,As you walked home from school through thegreenwood to-day;And why the glad song of that beautiful birdSeemed sweeter than any you ever have heard.The Lord keeps around us, by day and by night,Kind angels to guard us, and lead us aright:


58 A WALK IN SPRING.When you try to be useful and pleasant and mild,I know that the angels are leading my child.For the good thoughts and feelings which theywill impart,When you try to do right, will gladden your heart;And this is why all looked so happy and gay,As you walked home from school through thegreenwood to-day."ArNT MARY.A WALK IN SPRING.'M very glad the spring is come: thesun shines out so bright,The little birds upon the trees aresinging for delight;The young grass looks so fresh and green, thelambkins sport and play,And I can skip and run about as merrily as they.


A WALK IN SPRING. 59I like to see the daisy and the buttercups oncemore,The primrose, and the cowslip too, and every prettyflower;I like to see the butterfly extend her painted wing,And all things seem, just like myself, so pleased tosee the spring.The fishes in the little brook are jumping up sohigh,The lark is singing sweetly as she mounts into thesky;The rooks are building up their nests upon thegreat oak-tree,And everything's as busy and as happy as can be.There's not a cloud upon the sky, there's nothingdark or sad;I jump, and scarce know what to do, I feel so veryglad.God must be very good, indeed, who made eachpretty thing;I'm sure we ought to love Him much for bringingback the spring.M. A. STODART.


60 THE OLD CASTLE.THE OLD CASTLE.OMETIMES I look half frightenedAt the castle on the height,For there's a sad, sad storyOf an ancient man of might:A baron there who cruel was to all the people round.It looks out on the water,And o'er miles and miles of land,And dark against the evening skyIt standeth bold and grand;There's not a nobler in the land can anywhere befound.But when I look upon it,I recall the old, old taleOf the baron, fierce, and rough, and rude,Whose voice made men turn pale.They knew his dungeon, dark and deep, andunderneath the ground.


AMA." AT THE OLD CASTLE ON TE-. ~.. -- ,-"r 1~I~ OID ""F ON TE I-'


THE HEROIC BOY. 61No matter, for the baronHas long been dead and gone,And people shun the darkened pile,And leave it all alone,And now within the castle keep there is no humansound.And thus it often may beA sad and solemn truth-An old age may neglected beBecause of ill-spent youth:A wilful, daring spirit that has never known a bound.THE HEROIC BOY.TIE boy stood on the burning deck,Whence all but he had fled;The flames that lit the battle's wreckShone round him o'er the dead.


62 THE HEROIC BOY.Yet beautiful and bright he stood,As born to rule the storm;A creature of heroic blood,A brave, though childlike form.The flames rolled on-he would not goWithout his father's word;That father, faint in death below,His voice no longer heard.He called aloud-" Say, father, sayIf yet my task is done!"He knew not that the chieftain layUnconscious of his son." Speak, father!" once again he cried,"If I may yet be gone;"And but the booming shots replied,And fast the flames rolled on.Upon his brow he felt their breath,And in his waving hair,And looked from that lone post of deathIn still, yet brave despair.


THE HEROIC BOY. 63And shouted but once more aloud," My father, must I stay?"While o'er him fast, through sail and shroud,The wreathing fires made way.They wrapped the ship in splendour wild,They caught the flag on high,And streamed above the gallant child,Like banners in the sky.There came a burst of thunder-sound-The boy-O, where was he ?Ask of the winds, that far aroundWith fragments strewed the sea,With mast, and helm, and pennon fair,That well had borne their part-But the noblest thing that perished thereWas that young, faithful heart.HEMANS.


64 THE LITTLE GIRL'S ADDRESS TO THE RIVER.THE LITTLE GIRL'S ADDRESS TO THERIVER.ENTLE river, gentle river!Tell us, whither do you glide,Through the green and sunny meadows,With your sweetly murmuring tide ?You for many a mile must wander,Many a lovely prospect see:Gentle river, gentle river !Oh, how happy you must be !Tell us, if you can rememberWhere your happy life began;When at first, from some high mountain,Like a silver thread you ran.


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LITTLE GIRL'S ADDRESS TO THE RIVER. 65Say, how many little streamletsGave their mite your depth to swell;Coming each from different sources,Had they each a tale to tell?When a playful brook you gambolled,And the sunshine o'er you smiled,On your banks did children loiter,Looking for the spring-flowers wild?Gentle river, gentle river,Do you hear a word we say?I am sure you ought to love us,For we come here every day.Oh I pray you, wait a moment,And a message bear from meTo a darling little cousinWe should dearly love to see.You will know her, if you see her,By her clear and laughing eyes;For they sparkle like your waters'Neath the bright blue summer skies.D


66 LITTLE GIRL'S ADDRESS TO THE RIVER.She's a pretty, playful creature,Light of heart, and footstep too:I am sure you must have seen her,For she often speaks of you.Oh, do tell her, gentle river,That we think of her each day;That we have not ceased to miss her,Ever since she went away.Say to her that brother Willie,Who is sitting by my side,That sweet rose she gave at partingCherished fondly till it died.Tell her, too, that mother wishesShe could hear her voice once more,See her eyes as bright as sunshine,Peeping at the parlour-door.Say we will a token send her,Which upon thy waves we'll fling;Flowers from out our little garden,Fragrant with the breath of Spring.


LITTLE GIRL'S ADDRESS TO TIE RIVER. ,67Gentle river, gentle river!Though you stop not to reply,Yet you seem to smile upon usAs you quickly pass us by.Soon will come the lovely twilight,Lingering brightly in the west;And each little bird, for shelter,Soon will seek its shady nest.And the stars will rise above you,Shining all the live-long night;Yet you ask not rest nor slumber,Singing still with free delight.Year by year, the same sweet storyYou to other years will tell:Now we leave you, yet we love you;Gentle river, fare ye well.AUNT MARY.


8 THE MERRY MILKMAID.THE MERRY MILKMAID.LTHOUGH I am a milkmaid lass,A lofty mind I bear,I think myself as good as thoseThat gay apparel wear.What though I milk my father's cows,I know it must be done,And the shelving roof of our old barn.Shall shade me from the sun.In every season of the yearI do my daily labour,No shower nor wind at all I fear,And dainties I ne'er favour.Your city dames in coaches rideAbout for recreation,We country lasses use our feet,And keep the country fashion.


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TIE SPRING WALK. 69I dearly love the lowing kine,And sure I think they love me,And all my heart I try to keepAs pure as heaven above me.TIHE SPRING WALK.E had a pleasant walk to-dayOver the meadows and far away,Across the bridge by the water-mill,By the woodside, and up the hill ;And if you listen to what I say,I'll tell you what we saw to day.Amid a hedge, where the first leavesWere peeping from their sheaths so sly,We saw four eggs within a nest,And they were blue as a summer sky.An elder-branch dipp'd in the brook;We wondered why it moved, and foundA silken-hair'd smooth water-ratNibbling and swirn ingi round and round.


7 THE SPRING WALK.Where daisies open'd to the sun,In a broad meadow, green and white,The lambs were racing eagerly-We never saw a prettier sight.We saw upon the shady banksLong rows of golden flowers shine,And first mistook for buttercupsThe star-shaped yellow celandine.Anemones and primroses,And the blue violets of spring,We found, while listening by a hedgeTo hear a merry ploughman sing.And from the earth the plough turn'd upThere came a sweet refreshing smell,Such as the lily of the valeSends forth from many a woodland dell.We saw the yellow wallflowers waveUpon a mouldering castle wall;And then we watched the busy rooksAmong the ancient elm-trees tall.


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