• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Half Title
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Chapter I
 Chapter II
 Chapter III
 Chapter IV
 Chapter V
 Chapter VI
 Chapter VII
 Chapter VIII
 Chapter IX
 Chapter X
 Chapter XI
 Chapter XII
 Advertising
 Advertising
 Back Cover
 Spine






Group Title: Golden ladder series
Title: Willow Brook
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00027894/00001
 Material Information
Title: Willow Brook a sequel to "The little champ of Eagle Hill"
Series Title: Golden ladder series
Alternate Title: Little Champ
Physical Description: 311, 16 p., 6 leaf of plates : col. ill. ; 17 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Warner, Susan, 1819-1885
Evans, Edmund, 1826-1905 ( Engraver )
James Nisbet and Co. (London, England) ( Publisher )
James Ballantyne and Co ( Printer )
Publisher: James Nisbet & Co.
Place of Publication: London
Manufacturer: Ballantyne and Company
Publication Date: 1874
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Uncles -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Sabbath -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Family -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Jews -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Christian life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1874   ( rbgenr )
Family stories -- 1874   ( local )
Bldn -- 1874
Genre: Publishers' catalogues   ( rbgenr )
Family stories   ( local )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
Scotland -- Edinburgh
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by the author of "The wide wide world," "Queechy," "Melbourne house," etc.
General Note: Publisher's catalogue follows text.
General Note: Frontispiece illustrated in colors; illustrations engraved by E. Evans.
General Note: Illustrations are hand-colored.
Funding: Golden ladder series (London, England)
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00027894
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002239474
notis - ALJ0004
oclc - 60551120

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Half Title
        Page i
        Page ii
    Frontispiece
        Page iii
    Title Page
        Page iv
    Chapter I
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
    Chapter II
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
    Chapter III
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
    Chapter IV
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Plate
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
    Chapter V
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
    Chapter VI
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Plate
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
    Chapter VII
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
        Page 131
        Page 132
        Page 133
        Page 134
        Page 135
        Page 136
        Page 137
        Page 138
        Page 139
        Page 140
        Page 141
        Page 142
        Page 143
        Page 144
        Page 145
        Page 146
        Page 147
        Page 148
        Page 149
        Page 150
        Page 151
        Page 152
        Page 153
    Chapter VIII
        Page 154
        Page 155
        Page 156
        Page 157
        Page 158
        Page 159
        Page 160
        Page 161
        Page 162
        Page 163
        Page 164
        Page 165
        Page 166
        Page 167
        Page 168
        Page 169
        Page 170
        Page 171
        Page 172
        Page 173
        Page 174
        Page 175
        Page 176
        Page 177
        Page 178
        Page 179
        Page 180
        Page 181
        Page 182
        Page 183
    Chapter IX
        Page 184
        Page 185
        Page 186
        Page 187
        Page 188
        Page 189
        Page 190
        Page 191
        Page 192
        Page 193
        Page 194
        Page 195
        Page 196
        Page 197
        Page 198
        Page 199
        Page 200
        Page 201
        Page 202
        Page 203
        Page 204
        Page 205
        Page 206
        Plate
        Page 207
        Page 208
        Page 209
        Page 210
        Page 211
        Page 212
    Chapter X
        Page 213
        Page 214
        Page 215
        Page 216
        Page 217
        Page 218
        Page 219
        Page 220
        Page 221
        Page 222
        Page 223
        Page 224
        Page 225
        Page 226
        Page 227
        Page 228
        Page 229
        Page 230
        Page 231
        Page 232
        Page 233
        Page 234
        Page 235
        Page 236
        Page 237
        Page 238
        Page 239
        Page 240
        Page 241
        Page 242
        Page 243
        Page 244
        Page 245
        Page 246
    Chapter XI
        Page 247
        Page 248
        Page 249
        Page 250
        Page 251
        Page 252
        Page 253
        Page 254
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        Page 266
        Page 267
        Page 268
        Page 269
        Page 270
        Page 271
        Page 272
    Chapter XII
        Page 273
        Page 274
        Page 275
        Page 276
        Page 277
        Page 278
        Page 279
        Page 280
        Page 281
        Page 282
        Page 283
        Page 284
        Page 285
        Page 286
        Page 287
        Page 288
        Plate
        Page 289
        Page 290
        Page 291
        Page 292
        Page 293
        Page 294
        Page 295
        Page 296
        Plate
        Page 297
        Page 298
        Page 299
        Page 300
        Page 301
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        Page 304
        Page 305
        Page 306
        Page 307
        Page 308
        Page 309
        Page 310
        Page 311
    Advertising
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Advertising
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
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    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
Full Text
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WILLOW BROOK.





































PRINTED BY BALLANTYNE AND COMPANY
EDINBURGH AND LONDON








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WILLOW BROOK.



A SE Q UEL


TO


"THE LITTLE


CAMP ON


EAGLE HILL."





BY THE AUTHOR OF


" THE


WIDE


WIDE WORLD," "QQUEECHY,"


"MELBOURNE HO USE," ETC.









LONDON:


JAMES NISBET


& CO.,


21 BERNERS


STREET.


MDCCCLXXIV.










WILLOW BROOK.



CHAPTER I.

IT happened that business or pleasure took Mr
Murray away from Mosswood immediately
after the return of the party from the mountain.
Mr Candlish was coming and going-not a fix-
ture by any means, and Miss Eldon waited for
Mr Murray. So for some weeks it fell out that
there were no more talks on the Lord's Prayer.
Towards the end of September the children
were greatly rejoiced by their uncle's return. Of
course there was a great deal to be told him; and
the children seized the first opportunity, when
they could have him to themselves, to discourse
of what had been done and enjoyed in the mean-
time. Esther and Maggie were the chief news-
mongers.







WILL W BROOK.


"And


Josie M'Allister has gone away," Esther


said in the course of this talk.


" That


has to be borne,"


said Mr Murray.


'I suppose she was bound to go some time."


Ras Saulmain


is here almost all


time," added Maggie.
Is he much of an acquisition to society ? "


the


"I don't know what that


isI"


said Maggie.


"' He is with Fenton constantly.
Eden! what do you think? he
to a grand children's party! "
"At West Point ?"


And oh!
has invited


uncle
us all


"Oh no, not at all;


they are going home very


soon now.


Not


at West Point at all;


at Willow Brook-their


beautiful


it is to be


place


up


the


river."


"Willow


Brook


sounds


said Mr


Murray.


"There are


to be a good


many children


young people got together for the party; it is for
Rachel's birthday."
"Who is Rachel ?"
Rachel! why she is the sister of Rasselas and
Zachary. Won't it be delightful, uncle Eden ? "


"And


and


__ ___


pleasant,"




WILLO W BROOK.


"Then you are going ?"


"Oh yes.


Mamma says


last two or three days; and


we may go.
we are to do


It is to
all sorts


of things-nice things."
"When is it to be ?"
The first week in October-we are to be there


on the seventh,


and to stay


till the tenth


eleventh, and do everything
you can think of."


that is


pleasant that


"The ninth


is Sunday,"


Mr Murray


served.


" Yes, and


thought that was queer,"


Esther


said;


"but the


birthday comes on the


"And that is their


Sunday;


that is,


eighth."
it is their


Sabbath,
do not."


if they keep it, which


" Saturday,


uncle Eden ?"


am afraid they


said Maggie.


" Yes.


They are


Jews,


you know.


Saturday


is their Sabbath."


" Rasselas


comes


here


Saturday


just as much


as any day," said Maggie.


" Well,"


said Mr Murray,


" I don't care, if only


you are


able to pray the Lord's Prayer while you


are there."


or


ob-


r __ ___







WILLOW BROOK.


" Uncle


Eden,


what


do you mean ?"


Maggie wonderingly.


"Why should we not? "


"You have learned to say Our Father which


art in heaven.'


The next thing is,' Hallowed be


Thy name.'


Will


you hallow it


while you


gone ?"


" Uncle


Eden,"


said the little


girl,


( IJ


don't


think I know just what that means."


Mr Murray smiled.


"I thought


coming to such a confession,"


he said.


we were
" Don't


you know


what


the word


means,


pet ?"


"I thought,


uncle


Eden,"


said


Esther,


means, to make holy."
It does."


"But


how can we hallow' that


name,


then ?


It is holy already, uncle Eden
it more holy."


; we cannot make


" No.


But you


can treat it as if it was holy,


or as if it were not."


" Then


think we always


do hallow it,"


Esther ;


"we never speak it carelessly."


"There are a great many ways of hallowing,
or not hallowing, the Lord's name."


said


are


my


"it


said


_ ___ ~I ~ __ __ ~_ __


'hallow'




WILL W BROOK.


"Are


there ?"


said


Maggie.


" What


ways,


uncle Eden ?"
I am going


to


set you and


Esther to finding


out.


Lord's


But first,
'name '


my pet,


stands


you


must


for everything


know, the


by which


He has


made Himself known."


" You


mean, the name of


Jesus ?


said Mag-


wistfully.


mean


all His names, that we call


names,


more.


Could


you truly


honour


my name,


and dishonour anything that belongs


to me ? "


" No,


uncle


Eden !-oh


no "


cried


Maggie.


" I wouldn't


let anybody ill-treat your dog.


wouldn't let anybody hang


up your


coat in any


but a good place.


If I could


Mr Murray smiled.


help it,


"Thank you,"


mean."
he said.


"Now


run


away


and


see, you


and Essie, how


many ways you can find of hallowing the Lord's
name, or of showing that you do."


"But


uncle Eden," said


Maggie,


"how many


names has


God ?"


" I do not know whether I can remember them


all at this minute,


Maggie.


First,


there was


him; that was the name by which He was known


gie


" I


and


Elo-


_ __ ~ _I_





WILLOW BROOK.


to the Jews as the God of creation and providence;


the Power


all,


whom


that does


all the


everything


world


fears.


and rules over
We translate


that name,


God.


Then


by the name of


eo ovayk


He was


known


promise-keeping,


God of His people,


as their own covenant


faithful,


whom


wonderful
the world


God,


One;
does


know.


Those


are the


two principal


names


the Old


Testament.


The Jews were


so afraid


not honouring


this last beautiful


name


Jehovah, that


they


would


hardly ever


speak it,


until


at last the pronunciation of it was


gotten."


"Don't


they


know


how


to


pronounce


said Esther.


"No one knows
e pronounce it


now,
after


for hundreds
our fashion;


of


years.


but the


sound


of the Hebrew


word


is lost.


Now


Maggie, do you call that
"I don't know, uncle


hallowing His name ? "


Eden;-I think I


you ?


Must


they


not have


forgotten


that it was


their Father's name ?"


" Oh yes, uncle
"Could that be


Eden;


of


the right


course


they must."


sort of hallowing ?"


the
the
not


of


of


of


for-


it ?"


"Do


~iVr


do!)




WIILLOW BROOK.


The children


were


silent,


and Mr Murray


bade


them


run away


and think


about


it at


their leisure.


The leisure did not come immediately;


not in


fact till the


next


day,


when Esther


and Maggie


took their nuts after dinner to the


beloved shade


of the ash-leaved maple.


" Have


you thought


much


about


it,


Essie ?"


said Maggie.
"About what ?"


"' Hallowed be


Thy name.'"


"I haven't thought at all about it yet."


"I have


tried," said Maggie,


"but


it is very


hard.


can't


think


what


' ways'


uncle


Eden


meant.


Of course,


I think people ought


always


to think when they speak that name."


" Why,


they do," said


Esther.


"I don't think they do,


always,"


said the little


one, eating her nuts with a face of great gravity.
I do."


"Yes, and I do.


But I


mean other people."


"Who ?"
"People


in church,"


said Maggie


mysteri-


ously.





8 WILLOW BROOK.

"What people?"
People I hear there," said Maggie. "People
I see there. People-ever so many-that I
know are not good people; and they say that
name out very loud."
"Swearing ?" said Esther looking horrified.
"No, no, they don't mean it for swearing;
but they say,-don't you know ?--'Good Lord,
deliver us!' and 'We beseech thee to hear us,
good Lord!' and 'Christ, have mercy on us!'
Oh, I don't like to hear them !"
"Why, Maggie, why not?" said Esther.
"They are only praying."
"I don't believe they think when they say it,"
insisted Maggie, shaking her head. "I am sure
I don't believe they think."
"Why ? You have no right to say so."
"If they know what they are saying, they
must be making believe," said Maggie.
"0 Maggie, that isn't right! That's
naughty. How can you tell? You shouldn't
speak so."
"Now, Essie," said the little one, leaning for-
ward and speaking under her breath, though




WILLOW BROOK. 9

there was nothing but the maple leaves to hear,
"you know Major Lang-you know whenever
he wants to say something funny, he swears;
do you suppose he means it when he asks God
to write all those laws on his heart ? And old
Colonel Bell, that father says gets half tipsy
three days in the week; do you think he means it ?
And they both speak the words out so loud!"
"Why shouldn't they mean it ?" said Esther.
"Perhaps when they are in church they are sorry
for all that."
"They don't speak as if they were," said Maggie
dubiously. "And besides, Essie, if they were in
earnest and meant it, God would write all those
laws on their hearts."
Esther quite stopped her nut-picking, to look
at this statement of the case.
There are plenty of other people too," said
Maggie comprehensively. "Those two aren't
all."
Esther seemed very much 'mazed. Maggie,
having delivered herself of these remarks, gave
herself to picking out her nuts with great enjoy-
ment.






WILLOW BROOK.


"I wonder if that is what uncle Eden means?"
said Esther.
Don't you think it is ?"


then,"


said Esther,


"I wonder


if it is


right to sing hymns ?"


"Sing hymns ?"


" Yes.


said Maggie looking up.


There are loads of things in the hymns


that people don't mean when they sing them."


"Are there ?


What?"


"Loads of things !


I can't remember.


I know


I sing them without meaning them."


"Do you ?


What,


Essie ?"


"So do other people.


to be very


good


Why they would


to mean all the hymns


have
say,


Now that one-

'Thine earthly Sabbaths, Lord, we love'-

I don't love them."


"I guess I do,"


said Maggie.


" Then-
'How tedious and tasteless the hours
When Jesus no longer I see.'-


People
And-


don't


feel


so except


uncle


Eden.


"But


IO




WILL W BROOK.


SI would not live alway'-


I would like to, I


am sure."


Then
Maggie.


you


'd


"But


never
there's


go to heaven,"


nothing


said


in that about


hallowingg'


the name."


"Well,"


said Essie,


"there


's plenty of


others.


There is-
'Sun of my soul, thou Saviour dear,'


-I forget


how it


goes


on.


People


sing


that in


church; and I


don't believe many of them


mean


it."


" Oh that',


s just what


mean, Essie,"


said the


little one.


"I do


not


know how


mean


Jesus can


it,"


said Esther.


be the


'sun


" I do not


of anybody's


soul.
don't


And i
know


am sure a
it either.


great many other people


Yet they


sing


the


hymn."


" That


can't


be hallowing


His


name,


then,"


said Maggie


like it if
things to


decidedly.


"Why, you


somebody were to come and


you and not


wouldn't
say sweet


mean it ?"


" Then what are we to do ? "


said Essie.


"Are


people to stop singing hymns ?"


_ __ I~ F


II







WILLOW BROOK.


Whatever


Maggie


might


have said was cut


short by the hearing of some sounds which found
their way just then to the shade of the ash-leaved


maple.


They were not loud


sounds,


as heard


there,


yet they


made


the two little


girls


prick


up their ears, stop their


nut-work to


listen,


finally
dessert


throw


down


all that


and rush off towards


remained
the river.


of their


It was


but a few hundred yards;


and as they ran along


down
heard


the path


the sounds


that led to the boat-house they


more


and


more


plainly;


sounds


of breathless, angry voices,


and then


scuffling.


The girls


flew on


light


feet, one


lowing the


other in a swift


race for the boat-


house


dock.


Before


they got


there


they could


see, what


each knew she should see, two boys in


angry struggle, at


close


fisticuffs, giving and re-


ceiving
Fenton


blows with


eager ill-will.


They


were


and his new crony, Rasselas Saulmain.


No voices now; not a word; it was sheer fight-
ing; and the faces of the two combatants ex-


pressed all, and


more than all


that words could


Wrath,


revenge,


pride,


and


spite.


The two were pretty


equally matched


in phy-


and


of


fol-


have


said.


__ ~


12




WILL W BROOK.


power,


and it seemed,


in mental


little girls


expended


all their


remaining


breath


stop


in exhortations


fighting;


Maggie


and prayers


added


to them


a few tears.


to
It


was doubtful if


certainly


not


a word


a word


was heard


was


listened


of it all;


to.


Seeing


Maggie


set off


on a run


again


homeward,


as fas
room


as she had


where


come,


her uncle


and dashed


and her mother


into the
.r were,


but quite


breathless


from


her speed


and her


errand.


"Maggie what is it ?"
"Fighting! "-Maggie


said her uncle.
got out with one great


sob and strangle in her throat.


"Who is fighting ?"


said Mr Murray, rising.


"Down a
"Oh, make


.t the dock! "


said Maggie panting-


haste !-oh, make haste !


came-


as quick-as I
Mr Murray


could."


threw


on his hat and went


and Maggie turned


steady


quick


tread,


and ran after him;


the other


with


one with
hurried,


eager, little feet.


Things at the dock were pretty


much


as she


had left


them;


Fenton


pushed


sical
will.


13


The


ill s


this,


off,


_~







WILL W BROOK.


little more into a corner;


the fury of the


nowise


diminished.


Mr Murray came between


the combatants


and thrust


them apart


each other.


Holding


them


so, with


a strong


arm, he looked from one to another.


" What


is this ?"


said he.


"To your guest,


Fenton!"


Fenton was in too
any answer, panting


great


a fluster


with rage and


Mr Murray looked to the other


boy, and


to make
exertion.


asked


in his usual calm tones, "What was the matter ?"
He struck me !" said Rasselas.
"What for ?"


"Yes !


cried


Fenton,


" and


I 'd do it


again!
away,


I would! I would!


uncle


Eden.


I wish you had kept


I'd ha' pounded


him!


I'd ha' licked


him!"


" You 'd


have taken a pounding


first,"


young Saulmain.


"Why


should


you pound


each


other ?


there any reason ?"


" Yes!'


said Fenton-" yes!


I '11 tell


uncle Eden;


I'll tell you I"


" Be quiet, and tell me then," said Mr Murray.


14


fray


from


said


Is


you,




WILLO W BROOK.


" Take breath, and don't be in a hurry.


time enough.


There 's


Now, what is it all about ? "


" We were sailing ships,


" We weren't !"


sir,"


said Fenton.


said Rasselas.
We were go-


ing to.


"Be quiet,
a gentleman


Fenton, and


as you


behave


can after


as much


what you


like


have


done.


Now,


Saulmain, go on.


"We


we were


Fenton
of mine.


were


just


sailing
going


was angry


I had


ships


yesterday,


sir,


out to do it again,


at the


a right


name


gave


and
and
one


to name it anything


liked."


" What


is


your


statement


of the


cause


trouble,


Fenton ?"


"He hadn't


any right!"


said Fenton


hotly.


" He called


one of his ships--and


it was a mean


little


one too, with


a mast


broke-he


called


'The Candlish;


' and I


said he shouldn't."


Mr Murray's eyes went


from one


to the other


and back.
What was your objection ? "
"I wasn't going to stand him insulting papa!"
said Fenton fiercely.


I5


of






WILLOW BROOK.


think


your


father's


honour would


have been hurt ? "


" Yes !-No,


sir, it wouldn't


have


been


hurt;


but I wasn't going to let Ras Saulmain use his


name in that way.


"The


And I won't! "


best way to make other people honour


father's


name


is to honour it


yourself.


Hush !-yes-I know what you would say; but,
my boy, the best way of honouring it is to be an


honour to it,


and


you


can't


do that when you


forget yourself."
"And am I not to make other people honour


it ?" cried


Fenton, tears


of pride and


vexation


fairly dimming his eyes.


"The


best way


is the way I


told you.


best way remaining,


yourself, is to
self like your


after you


make apology, an


father's


have forgotten
d behave your-


son for the rest of your


life."


" I didn't


mean


any harm,


sir,"


said


young


Saulmain.


That
Murray.


is sufficient on your


part,"


said Mr


" Fenton forgot you were his guest and


his friend."


16


"Do


you


your


The


_ __ I I




WILL W BROOK.


was plain


Fenton


had forgotten


more, he was
remembrance.


nowise


disposed


Mr Murray sat


to call back the
down on a rock,


and for
with the


some
boy;


time


it took


longer


debated


the matter


all that while for Fenton


to cool and come to reason.


Finally, however, it


was done.


Rasselas volunteered


to change the


ship's name;


Fenton


shook hands, and


said he


was sorry, quite as much, it must


be owned, like


a person


giving


and Mr Murray and


as like one asking


the girls went


forgiveness,
back to the


house.


There


was not much


else talked


of by


children that afternoon.


But after tea, when Mr


Murray was


sitting


on the terrace in the moon-


light,
him.


they brought camp-chairs to either side


" Uncle Eden,'


you a queer


Maggie began,


question.


You


" I want to ask


know all that


fuss


this afternoon ?"
Yes."


"Was that


hallowingg'


papa's name ?"


" What ?"


said


Mr Murray, coming out of his


own thoughts.


It


17


it;


and


the


of


__ I





WILL W BROOK.


"Fenton's behaviour and fighting.


It was very


wrong, I know; but was it because he hallowed'
papa's name ?"


" I should


not give it just that word, Maggie;


it was rather that he loved and respected it.


hallow-to hold


not only


dear but sacred-is


something more deep and tender still.
may help you understand the other."


One thing


" Then,


uncle


Eden," said Maggie


pause,


" does


it make you feel


bad when


hear somebody speak


that doesn't


hallow God's


name ?"


"When


a way that


hear anybody


speak


His


name


shows want of thought or want


in
of


feeling,


goes


through


me like the stab of


knife, Maggie."
a It hurts you so ?"


said the little one looking


up. And then there was a long pause.


" Uncle


trying


Eden,"


to think


said Esther,


of


ways
V


" we have


of hallowing


been


His


name.
"What have you found ?"


"We didn't find much.
much, uncle Eden."


We couldn't think of


To


after


you




WILL W BRO0 K.


"We


thought


it would


be


one way


to


never


speak
mean."


it without


thinking,-that


name,


" Uncle


Eden,


said Esther,


" wouldn't


it be


a good plan to have


one of those pretty illumi-


nated cards hung up in our room, with 'Hallowed


be Thy name'


upon it ?"


"Why?"
"To help us remember."


" What would


" Wouldn't


it help you


it help


us ? "


remember ?"
said Esther


doubt-


fully.


" If making a courtesy would


be obedience, or


crossing


yourself,


as the Papists


do,


would be


faith.


Some


people


think


that bowing


at the


name is honouring it."


"Well,


isn't


it ?" said Esther


and Maggie


both.


"I have


read


of a man who always,


when he


passed a church, took off his hat; but he never
by any chance was found inside of one. Do you
think he hallowed the Lord's name ?"
The children were silent, pondering these new
views of things.


19


_ I __






WILL W BROOK.


"But a church isn't God's name, uncle Eden,"
Maggie objected.


" No.


But hallowingg


His name'


includes


holding


in honour


whatever is


known


name, doesn't it?


If you love me very much,


you would not


let anybody make


a football of


my hat, would you ?"


" No,


indeed !"


said Maggie


energetically.


" Nor


having


up


your coat in


the


wrong


place.


said so.


I guess I wouldn't!


Not if I could


help it.
Eden ?


But what is known by His name, uncle
I don't think I quite understand."


" Think.


There is


God's Word-there


is the


Lord's day-there are His works."
"His works! the things He has made !" cried


Esther.


"Must one hallow those, uncle Eden ?-


the sky and the trees and the animals ?"
How do you feel about your mother's paint-
ings? "
Esther was silent.
How do you feel about your father's singing ?
And about the plantations he has made, and the
walks he has laid out ?"
But "-- said Esther.


by


His


20




WILLOW BROOK.


"No,


there


is


no 'but'


about


it.


All this


singing


and planting


and painting


just makes


known to you some things about your father and


mother th
they seem


.at you would


in


a sort


not know else;


anc


a part of themselves;


I so
and


quite right.


And just so, the Lord's works show


us things about Him,


and are a part of His name


-that


by which


He has made Himself known."


" And we are to honour them ? "


"If you love Him.
"But then, uncle


You cannot help it."


Eden,"


said Maggie,


"there


are a great many ways of hallowing


" So I was thinking,


" There's


His name ?"


my pet.


Sunday-and the Bible.


Fenton was passing near them at this moment,


and his uncle called to him.


" Where away ?"


Fenton came.


said Mr Murray.


"Ras


and I


were


going


down


to set our


pots."
"Any imminent cause of haste?"


SNo


sir."


' Do you want to join


here.


our talk ?


Come round


What do you mean when you say,


'Hal-


lowed be


Thy name '-in your prayers ? "


eel


~ j_ L____


21







WILL W BROOK.


" I don't mean anything at all," said Fenton.


you like


to do


what your


father calls


'parrot-work ?'"


" It's


a fact I


don't,


uncle


Eden said the


" I do despise it.


It makes me feel small."


" Go along and


set your eel


pots ;


and when


you come back, come into


be ready
minutes."


for


"What are


you


there.


you going


the library.


give


you


to do, uncle


We '11
fifteen


Eden ?"


said Maggie.
"Just have a little bit of a talk and a reading,


my pet.


Get your Bibles, and I '11 see


that the


library lamp is lit."


"Do


boy.


22




WILL 0 W BROOK.


23


CHAPTER II.


HE lamp


in the library was


hardly lit and


- the two little girls ready at the table, when
Fenton came bounding in.


"Tide so low, couldn't get the


boat out!"


exclaimed


panting -


"couldn't


do anything.


Ras is outside, uncle Eden-he wants to know if
he may come in ?"


"Come in? certainly.


outside,


Never leave your friends


Fenton."


"Not outside of your room, uncle Eden ?"
Fenton with his hand on the door.


Outside of
Ask him in."


nothing,


that can


do them good.


Rasselas


came


had a great respect


in, with


the air of


for Mr Murray.


a boy who
The girls


looked


at each


other, as


much as to say,


" It'll


spoil


our reading;"


but it didn't.


Mr Mur-


found


Rasselas


a Bible


and a place at the


he


said


ray


_ _CI___ ill____






WILL W BROOK.


library table, while he explained in a


few words


what was the matter in hand;


and then


bade


the whole<
Leviticus


party find


and read


the


tenth


chapter


the three first verses.


of


Fen-


ton read.
"What has this to do with the Lord's Prayer?"


said he when he had finished.


"You


" I don't see."


see, the Lord says, 'I will be sanctified


in them that come nigh me.' "
"But I don't know what that means."


"It


means,


that we are to hallow


name."


"I don't


know what


all of it means, uncle


Eden," Maggie said in a perplexed voice.
is strangefire?


"What


"You remember,


don't you, that


it was


of the priests' duty to burn incense morning and
evening upon the golden altar which stood before
the vail in the Holy Place ?"


" Yes, uncle Eden; I remember that."


officiating priest took with


him a little


gold dish of incense and another dish-or censer


-of coals


from off the brazen altar of sacrifice,


where fire was always burning.


These two young


His


part


SThe


I __


24




WILLOW BROOK.


25


men, it


seems, in


a fit of drunken recklessness,


took coals from some other common fire."
"Well," said Fenton, "what difference ?


Coals


are coals."


"It is at least equally true,"


dryly,


said Mr Murray


"that commands are commands."


"But what difference could it make ?"


"It made


the difference


of life or death to


Nadab and Abihu."
I don't see why."


"For


showed
Lord."


this
they


reason,


Fenton,


did not hallow the


that their


name


action
of the


"They did not do


anything


to


His name."


" Yes,


they did.


For they showed


that they


considered


the Lord's


incense a common thing,


and His command a movable thing."
How was it the Lord's incense, uncle Eden ?"
Esther asked.


"It was


compounded


and prepared


for using


in His service;


portions


of most


carefully


made


precious


of certain


materials.


pro-
Any


one making


or using


it for any other


purpose,


cut himself off


from all the privileges and hopes


_ I __ ____





' -


WILL W BROOK.


of God's
Lord.'"


people


for


ever.


It was


'holy to


"But


if the incense


was all right,


what


signified the coals it was burnt on ?"


said Fenton


again.


" You


think


there


was no reason


in the


command ? "
"I don't see it."
"Is it likely that settles the question ?"
"Well, sir, if you see it, won't you tell us ?"


"The


Lord


wanted


to teach


the people


hallow His name.


Do you think,


honestly, you


would respect your father quite as much if he


allowed you to call him 'William,'


you to see him


'good


morning,'


and permitted


in the morning without saying
or to speak to him at any time


without saying 'sir' ?"


" No, sir,"


said Fenton, half laughing.


"But besides that, children, there was another
very deep, sweet reason for that command. The


tabernacle and its


service


pattern of heavenly things.


were built on the
The fragrant cloud


of incense
presenting


was a representation


Himself


and


His prayers


of Christ's


for His


26


the


to


_ __




WILL W BROOK.


27


people before the throne of God ;


and the Lord


would


have


them


and


us know that


even


sweet presentation depended
of Himself which was daily fi


brazen altar.


upon that sacrifice
oured forth upon the


A coal from that altar must kindle


the incense, or its odorous cloud


could not please


the Lord."
I never thought all those old things had any


meaning,"


observed Rasselas.


" God


does


nothing without a meaning,"


Mr Murray.


"But if


Nadab


and Abihu


were


drunk,


they


did not know what


they were doing,"


said Fen-


ton.


" Well ?"


said his uncle.


"Why, Fenton 1I"
just the same thing."


exclaimed


Esther,


"that


If they had hallowed
wouldn't have been drunk


the Lord's name, they
" said Maggie.


"Now


turn


to the twenty-sixth


chapter


Second


Chronicles, children, and read that."


The leaves


eagerly;


any


of the Bibles fluttered


the chapter was read


comment.


Mr Murray


over quite


through without


explained


then


to


that


said


is


of


_ I_ __






28


WILLOW BROOK.


the children the sort of plague that leprosy was,
and how it rendered a man what was called "' un-


clean;" so that Uzzia
disease, but rendered


Lh was not only struck with


unable ever to come


into


the temple


again-a miserable,


sickly


outcast,


separated even from his own family, living alone


in a house which his
the rest of his life.


disease made his prison for


" Well, what had


Uzziah done ?"


asked


ton.


" Offered incense-or prepared to offer it."
"Well--wasn't that worship ?"
" Was it ?"
Fenton pondered.


0 Fenton! said Esther;
than that."


"Well, it was worship," said


"you know better


Fenton, "for


all


I see."


" To do what was expressly forbidden ?


Only


the priests might approach the temple to do the


work of the


most holy things; it was death


any other, and


Uzziah


knew


to the sixteenth


of Numbers,


and let


read that."


Fen-


back


that.


to


Now


turn


us




WILL OW BROO K.


Rasselas


grew


interested,


and followed


reading carefully,
You see, Uzzi
said Mr Murray.


tender


towards


though he made no remarks.
iah was very gently dealt with,"


"Very


likely,


one who had long


the Lord


sought


was
and


trusted Him,


though


pride


had got


hold


of the


man.


"But


have


don't


burnt


see why


any


incense, as well as the


one shouldn't


priests,"


said


Fenton.
That


"They had as much right."


is precisely


Korah's


reasoning,"


Mr Murray.


"Why


shouldn't


they ?"


said Fenton,


stand-


ing his ground.
"Because the Lord would have people hallow


His


name.


remember


He would


have


His holiness.


them


know


The priests


and
were


specially set


apart


and consecrated


to the


vice of


God, and performed it with most solemn


and sweet observance.


None other might come


near.
We don't have any priests now."


SOne,r))


said Mr Murray smiling.


"One great


Priest,


always


in the


presence


of God-for


29


the


said


ser-


us;


__






WILLOW BROOK.


30


offering


the real incense,


of which


the sweet


cloud


in the temple was only a picture.


He has offered
His own blood


the true


sacrifice, and presented


for us before God ; and now, the


open


for the smallest and


to come himself and offer and pray.


the meanest


His blood


makes us clean."
"Offer what, uncle Eden?" said Maggie.
"Ourselves-our thanks-our service-our love
-all we have got, Maggie."
"And is that instead of incense ?"


" In the vision


which


John the


apostle


Maggie, it is told that he saw an angel standing
with a golden censer--' And there was given


unto him much


incense, that he


should


mingle


it with the prayers of all saints upon the golden


altar which


was before


the throne.'


We


come


in the name of


Jesus ;


and


that name makes


sweet all


we do-' His


name


as ointment


poured forth.'"


" Then


the incense


is always


there,"


Esther.


"And


there


is nothing


to be afraid


of any


more," added Maggie.


way


And


saw,


said


__




WILLOW BROOK.


"Nothing


whatever.


We


are told


to


come


boldly.


But


suppose


anybody chose to come in


some other way-not
"Does anybody?"


by


esus ?"


inquired Maggie.


c Fenton would like to come by himself."


"What then, uncle Eden ?"


said Esther.


" Nothing, my


dear,


except that


his offering


would not be sweet before
"But, uncle Eden "


God."


said Esther.


"What, my dear?"


"All this we


have


been


reading


don't tell us


exactly


how


we are to


hallow


His


name


now ?


There is no incense to bring now in this world."


" But what


we have


been


reading shows you,


doesn't


it,


that


the Lord's


name


is to be hal-


lowed


in other


ways


besides


speech ?


You see


everything


that is called


by


His


name


to be honoured and held sacred ?"


see," said Maggie.


"Sundays,


Bible, and church."


" Now about


bringing incense.-See the


chapter of Malachi-eleventh verse."
Fenton found and read.
From the rising of the sun even to the going


31


that


"I


is


and


the


first






VWILLO W BROOK.


down of the same, My name shall be great among
the Gentiles; and in every place incense shall be


offered unto my name, and a pure offering:


for


my name shall


be great among


the heathen,


saith the Lord of hosts.'"


"But we are not heathen, sir."
"Yes, we are."
"Heathen, uncle Eden ?"
"We are not Jews, except Rasselas here."
" I ain't a Jew put in the boy hastily.


" I wouldn't


disown my


ancestry, if


I had


Abraham's


blood


in me,"


said Mr Murray.


" You had better make the most of it.


The rest


of us come from the Gentiles, who in Malachi's
day were all heathen."
"' In every place,'" Maggie repeated reading.


" Then


this is incense that we are to offer, uncle


Eden ?"


" Yes.


A pure offering."


"What is it, uncle Eden ?"


"-David


says in


the Psalms,


'Let


my prayer


be set forth before Thee as incense.'"


"But


incense


is sweet,


isn't it, uncle


Eden ?


Our prayers are not."


12




WILLOW BROOK. 33

"Yes, they are."
"Sweet, uncle Eden ?"
"If they are true prayers."
"What is true prayer ?" said Maggie,
"It is the speech of a heart that loves God,
and that comes to Him in the name of Jesus.
Do you think papa doesn't find it sweet to have
you come into his arms, and tell him all sorts
of things ? "
"But God does not feel like that ?"
"Yes He does. Don't you know, Jesus said
to His disciples, 'The Father himself loveth
you, because ye have loved me.' Never any-
thing comes to Him in the name of Jesus that
is not sweet to Him."
"Then He likes to have us pray to Him ?"
Certainly, as He likes to have us love
Him. But that is only one sort of the incense
that we may offer. Find the twelfth of Romans,
Esther, and read the first verse."
"' I beseech you, therefore, brethren, by the
mercies of God, that ye present your bodies a
living sacrifice, holy, acceptable unto God, which
C






WILLOW BROOK.


is your reasonable service.'


What


mean, uncle Eden ?"
You know, in old time the worshipper brought


a whole burnt-offering,


as it was called,


animal which was burnt entire on the altar.


That


signified that the worshipper gave himself wholly
to God, to be all His, even as the whole sacrifice


went


up in smoke and


flame to heaven.


So we


are to give ourselves now, to


a living sacrifice;
as much."


living, but


be not a burnt but
all the Lord's just


" How, uncle Eden ?" asked


Maggie, looking


puzzled.
Give the Lord all you have got, my pet, and
reckon it His and not yours."


" What


have I got?" said


Maggie.


"I have


only a very few dollars, uncle Eden."
"You have got a heart; that the Lord wants,


above


all the rest.


Let Him have that, and


the rest will follow."
What is all the rest ?"


"Two


hands to work with-two


where


the Lord


sends


them-two eyes to see


34


does


that


of


an


all


feet


to


go


___




WILL W BROOK.


what


He wants


done-a


tongue


to speak with


-time to use-power over other people."


" That


is a great


deal,


uncle


Eden,"


Esther.
Mr Murray was silent.


" It is


think


a great


deal,"


anybody really


Esther repeated.


gives


all that,


"Do
uncle


Eden ?"


" Everybody


gives


it all,"


said


Mr Murray.


SThe
Some
band.


only question is, to whom it shall be given.
give it all to a child, or to a wife, or a hus-


Many a one gives it all to himself.


That


is the general way of the world."
I understand that the Lord likes


that sort of


incense,"


said Maggie gravely.


"It is only the


the love in their heart burns."


Mr Murray


stooped


and kissed


the little


speaker.


" But


I think it


is


very


hard,"


remarked


Esther.
It is


Mr Murray.


either impossible, or it is very


"Maggie has given you


Now for another sort


fourth


chapter


and


still: look
eighteenth


easy," said
the secret.


at Philippians,


verse.


Paul


is


35


said


you


way


_ ~~_






WILLOW BROOK.


speaking


of help,


in


money


or things,


which


the Christians


of Philippi had


lately


sent him.


Read, Maggie."


" 'But I have all, and abound: I am full,


received of Epaph--


having


'Uncle Eden, what is it?"


"Epaphroditus."
"' Having received of Epaphroditus the things


which were sent


from you, an


odour of


a sweet


smell,
God.' "


a sacrifice


acceptable,


well-pleasing


"And Hebrews xiii.


"'But to do good


and to communicate


forget


not;


for with such sacrifices


God is well


pleased.'"


" Psalm 1.


14 and 23."


"' Offer unto
vows unto the


God thanksgiving, and


Most


High.' -


pay thy


' Whoso offereth


praise, glorifieth me. "
Well, little people, will that


do ?"


said Mr


Murray,


closing his Bible.


"Thank you, uncle Eden," said


Maggie,


tent still over some one of the passages they had
been reading.
"But, uncle Eden," said Esther, "there is one
i


36


to


in-


L_ ~


16e))




WILL W BROOK.


thing


yel


can't we


t that I
'hallow'


want
that


to ask.
name


Is it-I


without


mean,


doing all


this ?"


Mr Murray paused, and


Maggie looked


up at


him.


"Ask
"For


Maggie what she thinks."


instance,"


said Esther,


"if I


do not give


all, like the burnt-offering, can I not hallow
name ?"


"What,


in that


supposed


case,


do


you keep


back ?"
Esther hesitated.


your heart."


No, uncle Eden; need I
If you give your heart,
the rest, and only wishes it


? I don't mean that."
Esther, that gives all


was more."


" Well,


if I don't


give


all my heart,


can't


hallow


His name ?"


"You cannot give half


a heart, my child;


who would


accept


it if you could ?


Something


must


love


best;


either God, or yourself, or


some other."


" Then


if I don't


give


my whole


heart, uncle


Eden, can


I not hallow


His name ?"


37


His


" First,


you


and


__ ___ ~ ~_






WILL W BROOK.


" You


can curtsey when you pass a church--


or when you hear the name of Jesus spoken."
"No, uncle Eden, but I mean, really?"


"How will you


to-morrow to think
enough for to-night."


do it, Essie?


of it;


for we


give you till
have talked


38


_ ~~~




WILLOW BROOK.


CHAPTER III.


SOME
any


engagement of


talk the


next


uncle Eden's


day;


hindered


and it so fell


out


one thing


after


another


came


in the way,


and the subject


was not taken


up again


week


or two,


fore the


not indeed


children's


until


journey


the evening


to Willow


be-


Brook.


Mr Murray had been away;


at Mosswood,


cause of


but


he was not always


just now more than usual be-


Mr Candlish's absence in Europe.


On


his coming


this


evening, the


children


informed


him with


great


glee that all was ready for them


to set off the next day.


"And


Betsey is going to take care of


Esther.
Mr Murray looked grave.


" How long


do you propose to stay at


Willow


Brook ?"


" To-morrow we


go, you know, and get there,


39


that


for


us,)


said


- --~~-L ---- ------- -------l-V----~-~ Cb-- ~






WILLOW BROOK.


and all that.


Next


day


is Rachel's


birthday.


Then


comes


Sunday.


Monday


there


is to be


everything


done


out of doors.


suppose


shall not come home till Tuesday."
"Everytking done out of doors,"


repeated Mr


Murray.


" Everything you can think of," said


"And


oh,


uncle Eden I


Maggie.


they are going to act


plays."
Who ?"


" Oh! the children.


" What sort


Won't it be a great thing ? "


of plays ?"


"Why,
seen 'em.


we can't


One is to be


tell, you know, till


we have


'Little Red Ridinghood;'


and a boy is -to be the wolf."
I should like to know how he '11 manage it,"


said Mr Murray.


" I have heard of a boy being


an elephant's


leg-but


a whole


wolf


would


more difficult to personate-for a boy."


" How


could


boy


be


an elephant's


leg ? "


said Maggie.
"Stand in the skin."
"Well, I suppose this boy will get into a wolf's


Oh won't it be


fun to see ?


And then,


we


be


skin.


- --~--- -- 7


40




WILL W BROOK. 41

uncle Eden, they are going to play 'Cinderella.'
You know Cinderella ?"
I have heard of it."
"And Rasselas says they are going to have
dresses and paintings and everything, to make
the players look like the thing, you know. And
Rasselas says his father has built a theatre for
them. What is a theatre ?"
I suppose it is something like the old Roman
theatres. A level space of ground, called the
arena, round which benches or seats were built,
one rising behind another, so that the highest
could have as clear a view as the lowest. In
the centre the games used to be played. But
we make the seats round only half or two-
thirds the space, and give the other side to the
players."
"What sort of games did they play in those
old theatres, uncle Eden?"
Races of men with one another, on foot and
in chariots; wrestling matches, boxing, throwing
the disc; fights of men with one another and
with wild beasts; fights of lions and tigers and
bears and elephants and bulls. One of the best






WILL W BROOK.


games of all was to see how the Christians would
meet the wild beasts."
What for ? to fight ?"
No; to die."
"Why, uncle Eden?"


c" Because


they


would


that


name


that they loved."
"How, uncle Eden ?"
"They had been commanded to disown Christ


somehow-to


dress


the altar of Jupiter


flowers, or to do sacrifice


to Apollo,


and they


chose rather to meet the lions."
Was there no other way ? said Esther.


" There was no other way.


There never is any


middle way between truth and falsehood."
There was a short silence.


" Uncle


Eden,"


began


Esther,


don't you know, that one could not
name without loving it ?"


"Do you


hallow that


think anything but love would con-


sent to the lions rather than betray Christ?"
"Betray ?" said Esther.


"Yes.


Betray the trust of His truth and His


honour, which was in their hands."


with


Syou


said,


. 1
42


I hallow'




WILLOW BROOK.


"But,


uncle


Eden,


aren't


there


43

other ways of


hallowing that name ?"


" Besides


going


to the


lions ?


Oh yes.


need not do that now, not in this country."


"But


mean-aren't


there ways


of doing


without love?"
Can you think of any ?"


" I've


been


trying


to think.


Going


church ?-and reading the Bible ?"
"What is the use of going to church?"


Esther's


eyes


opened.


"Why,


uncle


Eden,


all good
What


people


do they


go


for?


what


do they


go to


mean ?"


But Esther did not answer.


" They


go


to meet


God-to


speak


to Him


and hear
to do it.


Him
And


speak to them
to praise Him


and they


together


love


and in


public;


"But


they love to do


isn't


right


that too."


for


everybody


go ?"


" Good


themselves,


for


themselves.


and help


to put


It is right


others, in


to put
the way


of hearing the


truth.


Is it any honour to God,


We


it


to


do,


to


goo))






W1LLO W BROOK.


do you


think,


to carry their


bodies


to church,


while their hearts go dancing ?"
Esther was silent.
How would your father and


kisses that had
respectful ? "


no love


in them ?


mother like
Think them


"I don't think they would,"


said Maggie.


shouldn't."


don't


know yet, Essie, what


of God is to His children.


the name


It is the


most


precious
mother's


of all things.


diamonds ?


You have seen your


you know


how greatly


she values them ?


Many a woman has


her diamonds away that


God's


name


thrown
might


be hallowed."


"I don't


see how throwing


her diamonds


away would hallow His name,"


said Esther with


a very astonished face.


"It might.


If she knew that


His service


needed


the money they would bring; or if


thought she could


she


do the Lord's work better in


a plainer dress."
Do you mean it is wrong to wear diamonds,


uncle


Eden ?"


said Esther,


whose


brow was


44


"You


" I


_I __ _




WILL W BROOK.


getting


puckered


with the


perplexity


of her


thoughts.
To any one who feels so."


" But do you think


it is wrong ? "


"The


persuaded in


Bible says,


' Let every


his own mind'


man


You can


be fully
see that


it would be wrong in


such a case as I have sup.


posed.
judge."


But of that each


one must be


" Then


things


are only


wrong


if


you


think


they are wrong ?" said


Esther.


"That won't do, Essie,


so long


as God


told us what He thinks about them.


" Then


I don't understand you, uncle Eden."


"Suppose a faithful


child of


God does not


know his Father's will about certain


things?


"How can he help it ?"


" Habit


and prejudice


may


have


closed


eyes."
"But ought they ?"
No."


" I should think he would


get


them


open,


then."
"That is apt to be the case, Maggie, when the


45


his


own


has


his






WILL W BROOK.


person


has


a very single


eye, and


looks very


steadily to see only what the


Lord


would


him do."


" About


what,


uncle


Eden, can habit and


prejudice close people's eyes


so ?"


said Esther.


Almost
upon."
"I wish


anything,


you


would


that society


is agreed


tell me one thing, for


instance."
"Drinking wine."
There was a pause.
"Do you mean having champagne and claret,
as we do at dinner ?"


"I mean


that, and


having it any way, except


as medicine."
"Why, uncle Eden ?"
"Because, my pet, it ruins so many people."
"It don't hurt papa ?"


"No.


But somebody to


whom


he offers


may be destroyed by it."
"Papa don't think so."
"He is so accustomed to seeing it on the table


that he sees it as a matter


of course.


He does


not think there is the least harm in his having it.


46


have


_ _




WILL W BROOK.


If he did, he would si
leave the question of j
know your mother hole
cious as her children.
many of them, who
children that God's n
Long since men and
in Roman arenas. S(


top it immediately. But
ewels and of wine. You
Is nothing on earth so pre-
There have been women,
have given even their
ame might be hallowed.
women went to the lions
cottish men and women


suffered the loss of all things and met death in
other forms, for the same reason. And French
and English and Spanish and Dutch, and people
from among the heathen, have done the same."
"Then they loved that name better than
everything," said Maggie.
"It comes round to what I told you, children,
--only love can hallow His name."
"But, uncle Eden," said Esther, "all this is
very far from us. We have no diamonds, and
we don't drink wine; there are no altars of
Jupiter to dress with flowers; what can we do ?"
"Love will find out," said Mr Murray. "But
it is well to think about it. Meanwhile I will
tell you a bit of a story..
"Oh do, uncle Eden !" cried the children; and


47






WILL W BROOK.


Fenton, hearing


the exclamation,


came


what it was about.


"Not


Murray.


very much


"On


of


a story, either,"


the sixth of


September,


said Mr


1620, a


called


the Mayflower,


set sail from


the old


country


to bring


a set of pilgrims


America."
"I know!" said Fenton.
"Why were they pilgrims ?"


Esther inquired.


The3
friends,


were


in search


wanderers


of


a place


from
where


home


and


they could


serve God freely according to their consciences."
"Couldn't they do it in England ? "
"No, not in those times."


"Well,


uncle


Eden,"


said Maggie,


"what's


the rest ?"
"They had a voyage of sixty-five days."


" Two months,"


said Fenton.


"Which
November,


brought them


to the early


part


of


and the harbour of Cape Cod."


"I know


"Do


you


where
know


Cape
what


Cod is,"


Cape


said Maggie.


Cod was


at that


time?


What


would the


pilgrims


find there?


Not Boston and Lynn and Nahant."


48


to


see


little


ship,


to


_ __




WILL W BROOK.


"What then?"


said Maggie.


"Why


all!


there


were


said Fenton ;


no white


people


"there never had


there


been.


was all wild, and nothing but red Indians."


"And


Murray;


the ninth
"and that,


of November,"


at


Cape


Cod,


said Mr


means


raw,


cold weather and winter very near."


" No houses ?"


said Maggie.


" No, my pet."
"Then what would the people do ?"


"How


many


people


were


there ?"


Esther


asked.


"About a hundred.


But not men only; there


were women


and little children;


whole families.


see, they were very much in want of a home


a shelter


before winter


and winter


snows


should


burst


upon


them.


And


they


did not


know where to go."


"Why?"


said Maggie.


( Why,"


said Fenton,


" they


had


never


been


there


before ;


how


should


they


know ?


strange


land.


Do


you know, when


you go


down
place


the river


for


a pic-nic,


where


is the


to make the fire ? "


D


49


at
It


You
and


all


It


was


best


_ ___






WILL W BROOK.


50


" And in the pilgrims'


case,"


said Mr Murray,


question


was terribly


important.


Where


they landed, they would


make


their first settle-


ment.


They


wanted


a sheltered


place,


place with


good land about it, and conveniently


near the shore ;


some


spots


would


unhappy for


them,


difficult


and unhealthy;


would be difficult enough."
"What did they do ?"


"Sent


out


a party in


the ship's


boat


to ex-


plore.
place;
them,


But the boat wanted


and before


more


than


the


another


repairs in the first


carpenter


fortnight


could


had


finish
gone.


then it was


near December;


and the first


party that went in the boat had a hard time.
one day and night the weather was freezing,


wind, and snow falling;


and snow lay six inches


deep
never


on the land.


got


Some


of that


boat's


crew


over the exposure, but died the next


winter.


"The


first expedition


determined


nothing;


they had not found what would do.


So another


party went out in the boat, to coast along shore


and look for a place to disembark.


By this time


"the


and


be


very


all


And


All
with


~ ___




WILL W BROOK. 5

it was the sixth of December; it had grown very
cold; so cold that the spray which fell on them
froze hard and made their clothes stiff with ice.
They went down into the bottom of Cape Cod
bay and landed some of their number, to see
what they could find."
"Were there no houses at all, uncle Eden ? "
said Maggie.
"No white people. Indeed they could see
no people of any colour. They found a few
empty Indian wigwams, and Indian graves; but
no place that would do for them to set up a
home. Those who walked and those who sailed
met at night on the shore and camped there.
Next morning they were up before dawn; but
with break of day came an Indian war-cry and
a shower of arrows to greet them. It did them
no great harm, however, and they got into their
boat again and pushed on. But difficulties were
before them. They sailed a long distance with-
out finding what they were in search of. The
pilot, who had been in that region before, pro-
mised them a good harbour further on; and on
they went. But by and by a storm of sleet






WILL W BROOK.


began; the sea rose; the rudder broke, and they
had to use oars to steer with; the day was wear-
ing on, and in order that they might reach their


landing


place before night they carried


sail they could,


and more than


all the


they could;


for


their mast broke and the sail went


overboard.


By the help of the tide they were carried on and
carried in, over the surf at the entrance of an inlet,


and got at last into safe waters.


It was raining


then;


and, wet


and weary and


cold,


they


obliged to run the risk of being discovered


by the


Indians,


and with great


pains managed


to light


a fire.


So they


passed


that night,


hardly knowing where they were."


"I should


think they would have given it up


as a bad job," said Fenton.
" Gone back to England?"
"Yes, sir."


"But


in England they


could


not be


serve God as they felt they ought."


"If they


couldn't, then they couldn't, sir; and


it wouldn't be their fault."
But though they could not in England, they
could in America."


hard
were


free


to


52




WILL W BROOK.


" I shouldn't think it


would pay,"


53

said Fenton.


" They thought differently.


were hard days.


However,-those


They found, the next morning,


they


were


upon


an island,


in


harbour.


They were in the greatest


possible


haste ;


their


friends, their wives and children, were waiting for


them anxiously in


and rest on


the ship;


dry ground.


longing


But weary


for a
men


home
must


recruit, and repairs must have time to


be made,


so that


day


unwillingly


went.


And


day was Saturday.


Then
Maggie.
"What


the


next


day


was Sunday,"


said


should they do ?"


"What did they want to do ? "


said Fenton.


" You


know the


business


they


had


come


They wanted to land on the shore of the harbour,


and see if that would


be a good


place


for them


to build


houses


and make a home.


They


were


out to look for such a place.


" Then


I should think they would do it,"


Fenton.


"It was
" Well!


Sunday."


they couldn't


go to church,


or any-


that


and


that


on.


said


_ ___







WILL W BROOK.


thing;
boat ?
thing."


what was the use of sitting still


They


might as well


be doing


in their


some-


I fancy they were busy, that day.
did not land in the harbour.""


But they


" What


did they


do,


uncle


Eden ?"


Maggie


asked.


" Fenton


thinks there was nothing they could


" What was there ? "


said Fenton defiantly.


" I fancy


they


rested.


fancy they sought


God's guidance and His care, and thanked Him
for all He had given them already."


" I don't see much


they


had to thank Him


said Fenton.


" They


had had


an awful


time."


" They


had come over the sea safely;


had got to their


desired


land ;


they were


And it was


the beginning of all this country's


happiness and greatness, Fenton, God's blessing


upon those men and their prayers.


However,-


they were


Sunday,
nam e."


determined


and they


to do


did it;


they


one thing


allowed


54


do.


for,"


they
free.


that
His


_ ~_~




WILL W BROOK.


" But


do


you


think it would


have


been any


harm,


uncle


Eden, at


such


a time, if


they


not kept Sunday ?"


Esther asked.


" I know


this,


Essie ;


the Lord


says, 'Them


that honour me,


I will honour.'"


" Then did they land


Monday? "


"They landed


Monday.


And


they called the


place
ship's


Plymouth.
company


They brought the rest of


there,


and there


builded


the


their


first houses.


Some day


perhaps we will go there,


and I will show


you the rock where they set foot


first."


"The


rock ?


Is it there yet ?"


said Esther;


and Fenton laughed at her.


"Rocks


don't melt away in the sea," said


Murray.
I thought-it seemed like a story you were
telling us, uncle Eden."


"It is


a true story, my dear;


lasting as the


rock itself."


"Uncle Eden,


" said Maggie,


"doesn't the story


go on ?"


" It goes on,


my dear;


but I


don't think I can


go on much longer this


morning.


Do you know


55


had


Mr


_ I__r_ __ ____ ___I_






WILL W BROOK.


now what


meant


by


" Hallowed


be thy


name' ?
"I think I know, a little," said Maggie.
"You see that nothing but love can do it ?"


" But can't a person keep


Sunday


because he


thinks


he


ought


to,"


said Esther, "even


if he


does not love God ?"
"In a certain way he can."
Isn't that hallowing His name ? "


"It looks like


it,' said Mr


Murray.


"But I


don't know, Essie, my dear.


The service of fear-


or the service of custom-it is not much like the


Scripture
delight, t


ideal-' If thou call


he holy of the


the Sabbath


Lord, honourable;


and


shalt honour Him,


not doing


thy own ways.'


Besides; that is only one form in which the Lord's


name may be


hallowed;


and nothing


but love


will meet them all."
But isn't it better to do that than nothing ?"
said Esther again.


"Much


better.


Always


put yourself


in the


way to what is
what is wrong."


right,


rather than in the way to


56


_ ~-9---313-~-----




WILL W BROOK.


CHAPTER


IV*


HE seventh


of October.


"Essie,


is


your


handbag


all ready ?"


asked


Maggie, who was very


busy.


"All ready."
" Have you got your nightgown in ? "


Of course I have I
nightgown wasn't ?"


" Well, I


remembered


What should be


got mine almost packed, and


in if


my


then


I hadn't got any nightgown."


"You have got more in the trunk, child."
" Is the trunk locked ?"


"Yes, and


Maggie,


I put in


strapped.


What


do


that illuminated


you


card,"


want ?
Esther


added with lowered voice.
What one ? "
"You know,-' Hallowed be Thy name.' "


" What


for?


Uncle Eden said


it wouldn't


any use, didn't he? "


57


be






WILL W BROOK.


"Well-I thought I'd put it in," said Esther.
Mid-morning and the calmest of October days,


and the children


were in


the little boat going


up to the
round by


station.
the cart.


The baggage had been sent
For at Mosswood you had


your choice between land


and water if


wanted


to go anywhere;


the choice of


the family


and in
was very


quiet weather


apt to be


for


the river.


The river was like glass to-day


they rowed


up round


the point of


Mosswood;


and in it, as if it had been a great looking-glass,


the parti-coloured hills were seen doubled.


Two


shores of


beauty; two lines of changing woods,


with spots of red maple and yellow hickory and


brown cak and


green


hemlocks; one line above


water, the other


beneath, and


both alike


showy


and bright.


"I don't believe


Willow


Brook is as pretty as


this place," said Esther.
Of course it isn't 1 said Fentori.


they said it


was very magnificent," said


Maggie.
Who said so ?"
Mother, and people."


58


you


as


"But




WILLOW BROOK.


" I'm


glad


it is,"


said Fenton,


"but it


like this,


can tell you."


It was


October all along the


line of


the river


however; and when the three Candlishes got out


of the cars at Tunneltown, the station for


Willow


Brook,
deeper


October was all around


them; in


reds and yellows than they had


even


left be-


hind them further south.
Brook was in waiting.
"What a mean little


A carriage from Willow


village! "


said Fenton,


as they


drove


through the Irish


settlement


the station.


" Our


village at home is ugly too,'


remarked


Esther.


" Undercliff is a village, at any


rate,"


returned


Fenton;


"and the upper part of


it is very good.


This is miserable.


It was soon passed, however;


and then came


a stretch
anything.


of country road,


Pretty


with


not remarkable


glimpses of the


for


river ;


pretty with


October's colours in the trees;


the children voted it very tame, till the carriage
turned in at the gate of the grounds.


"No lodge 1 "


said Fenton.


59


isn't


at


but


_ _






WILL W BROOK.


"Hush I


there's the house,"


said Esther.


As the


carriage


swept


round


in front


of the


great steps, a sudden burst of colour and beauty


took away


Maggie's


breath.


Flowers, flowers,


right
betwe


and left of her;
en the flowers; i


green,
n front


bright,
a wide


soft turf
outlook


over low-lying meadows, miles of beautiful river,


and miles of bordering hilly shores.


There was


no' chance


then to exchange sentiments,


for it


was necessary to


go in and be welcomed;


then it was needful to have luncheon; and after


Esther


privately


informed


Maggie, it


obligatory to


go


and be dressed.


So the girls


found their room, where


Betsey was waiting for


them.
bound


And


then it took a great


while, I am


to say, to unpack dresses, and to choose


what to put on, and


to get properly curled


brushed and befrilled and beruffled and be-sashed.
At last it was done; and joyfully Maggie escaped


the house, and


got out upon the green turf


to make acquaintance


with the


flowers.


They


were in small beds or patches, scattered


about that part of the grounds;


standing


thickly


and notwith-


the lateness of the season, they


were


6o


that,


and


was


from


and




WILLOW BROOK.


very


splendid.


Roses


and


geraniums


tuberoses and colens and asters and


dahlias, that


Maggie knew, with a host of others that she did


not know.


From one to another flower-bed


went delighted and absorbed.


she


So Mrs Saulmain


found her.


This


lady was both


stately


and brilliant ;


at least she seemed


in her own mother's
black eyes, large and


to Maggie; and


style. I
sparkling,


lere


not at all
were keen


but that


could


look soft as well; and


there was colour in the


cheeks, and a wealth of black hair crowning the


head.


And


hands


glittering


with jewels,


silk draperies
altogether this


that


were


lady seemed


very


rich in hue;


like a living flower


of larger


size,


something


between


a dahlia and


a geranium.
"Busy with the flowers, my dear, and nothing
else ?"
Oh, I don't want anything else, ma'am, thank
you."


"Has


Rachel lost


sight
Z>


of you ?


Where


they all, that they have left you alone ?"


"I don't know where


they are," said


Maggie.


6i


and


so


and


are






62


WILL W BROOK.


"Esther and I came out here a little while ago,
and I don't know where Esther went."
And then Mrs Saulmain sat down on the turf


by the


flower-bed which


and making her
talk together.


Maggie was admiring,


sit down too, they had
Mrs Saulmain wanted t


a long
o ,know


about the camp on Eagle hill; and listened with
an amused face to all she could get Maggie to
tell her. And then she asked about,Mosswood;
and she told the little girl she hoped she would


happy


at Willow


Brook,


and it was


great pleasure to have her there.
Do you know the children are going to have


plays-Little Red Ridinghood,


and Cinderella ?"


"Yes, ma'am-Rasselas told us."


"Would you like to play ?


make


I think you would


the best Little Red Ridinghood we


have


got. Would you like to play, Maggie ?"
"Yes, ma'am.-I don't care."
You would just as lieve look on ?


don't


know


but that


it is as good


fun; but


seem to like to play.


Zach, come here."


Zachary was


passing


at the


moment,


came


at her bidding over the grass to where


be


very


they


all


and




WILLOW BROOK.


his mother was sitting.


Maggie


him before.
,the family w


The black hair
ere repeated in


and black eyes


him, with an


(


pression


of great


life and


activity.


Maggie


liked his looks.


"Zach, I want you


to give


Maggie


Candlish


a ride on Don Giovanni."
< Now ?"


"Oh


no, not now; she


wouldn't


like it, and


it's too late.


But to-morrow sometime.


morrow


morning.


I think


she would


like it.


The others will be


busy preparing


for the play,


and she might


be neglected.


They


have


her all alone now."


" Oh no,


ma'am,"


said Maggie;


"nobody left


me, except Esther, that I know of."
Somebody must have been with


Esther,


think.


Now,


Zachary, I want you


to look after


Maggie.


make her your charge."


What shall I
Rachel about?"


do for her, mamma ?


What's


"Rachel


is busy


arranging
0~ 9


for the plays,


suppose.


And


as Maggie is not in them, that


would not interest her.


Do you play,


Zach ?"


63


had


not


seen


of
ex-


To-


left


_ __ _L






WILLOW BROOK.


"I 'm the Wolf, mamma!"


"What a fierce wolf you will make! "


said his


mother, laughing at him.


"Wait


till


you


see.


Do you want


anything


of me now, mamma ?"
"Where are you going ?"


" Over


to sew it


to the lodge.
and fix it for


Judy has


me;


got my skin,


and I want


to


over and see if it's all right."


"Very well.


Take Maggie with you."


Zach


looked


at his


charge


somewhat


doubt-


fully.


However, the instinct of good nature and


the habit of


obeying


his mother prevailed.


asked Maggie if she would go; and Maggie,


would have declined if she had been


left to her-


self, was pushed into accepting by Mrs Saulmain's


words.
the stable


So the two went off toge
Les. Here Zachary called


their down to
for Don, and


presently


was brought


out


a little


Shetland


pony, brown and shaggy, with a wonderful know-


ing look in his brown eyes.


Him


Zachary soon


harnessed


to a little


phaeton


that seemed as if


must


have


been


low hung, and easy,


built


to match


but very light.


the


pony;


Then Zach


64


go


He


who


it


_ ~




WILL W BROOK.


turned


and


very


politely


offered


his


hand


Maggie to help her in.


Maggie was


fast getting into


the spirit of


occasion


and forgetting


her shyness.


Such


pony


and such


a carriage


were


enough


to put


everything else


out of


a little girl's


head.


even found her tongue.


" Is that Don


Jo- ? she asked as they set off.


" Don Giovanni,-Don,
" What does it mean ? "


for short.


said


Maggie.


" Mean ?


just a name.


a-days.


My


It doesn't


Names


name


mean


anything ;


don't mean anything,


don't


mean


anything,


only
now-
only


me; and your
Margaret


name don't mean anything."


means a


pearl," said the little girl


sedately.


" Well,


"and


so it does,"


said Zachary


Zachary means something too.


names always did, in old times.


laughing;
I suppose


But now nobody


thinks of them."
"What does Zachary mean ?"
"It's the short for Zacharias."


" That's a Bible name.


Don't it mean some-


thing ?"


65


to


the


She






WILL W BROOK.


"All those old names did," said the boy.
" I can't think why people made them so queer.


How would


it sound


if everybody


called


' Pearl' instead of Margaret ? "


" Why,


I think it would sound very nice," said


Maggie; "1


but nobody


does call me Margaret.


then, if names meant


something,


I should


want to be like my name.


Shouldn't you ?"


" Depends on


the name,


I guess," said


Zach-


ary.


"Does your name have a


meaning ? "


"It's old enough," s;
means something; and


aid the


boy.


then you will


" Yes,
want


know what. It means,'remembered of Jehovah.'"


" Does


it ?" exclaimed


Maggie.


"Really !


Oh, but I


should


like to


have such


a name


It's beautiful."


"Nobody ever said so


before," said


the boy,


laughing again.


But I fancy he was a little flat-


tered by


the compliment, for


he was


more and


more kind to his little companion.


They had b(
neighbourhood


een slowly walking
of the stables, a


out from t
nd through


light screen of wood coming out upon the road.


66


you


And


it
to


that.


as


he




WILLOW BROOK.


High upon


an eminence


just behind this point,


they saw the


glittering glass of the greenhouses


and conservatories, grouped


there at some little


distance


from


high flight of


the house;
steps which


and on the wide and


led up


to them, were


scattered


the


young


people


of Rachel's


party.


They looked like
spilt out of the g


moving


reenhouses


flowers


themselves,


somehow;


such a


show of


white and


yellow was there.


pink and blue and green and
Maggie looked back at them;


she was


glad she


was not among them ;


nobody


could be


doing


anything


so nice


as she


doing.


Soon
the road


the greenhouses were lost to view;


I


and


brought them in sight of a lovely little


lake, stretching along right and left before them.


Long,


but not wide;


a bridge


spanned


the bridge
might look.


" There


Zach


drew up the pony that


are boats! "


said Maggie.


Maggie


"And oh,


what a pretty summer house "


"That 's just a


boathouse,"


explained Zach.


" And do you go out on the lake in the


boats


sometimes ?"


67


was


it ;


on







WILL W BROOK.


"Sometimes."
"We go on the river very often."
"That's much better," said Zach.


is stupid.


"The lake


It is always flat, you know.


"Why the river is flat," said Maggie.


"'Tisn't sometimes.


was all up and


I've


gone


with


down ;


a shad


I 've been on it when it
and then it's good fun.


boat, when


they


were


pulling up fish, and the wind blowing fresh; and


I tell you it was lively!


Get on, Don !"


" I never saw anything so nice as Don in


said Maggie.


"We


have only a


donkey


our house.


Fenton


wants


a pony very


much."
"Don is ever so strong," Zach added, "though


he is


so little.


He would carry


you


for miles


and miles, and think nothing of it."
"On his back, you mean ?"


" Yes,


I mean on his back."


"I should like that," said Maggie.


"Well, to-morrow, or


go.


But don't


any time


you like,


tell anybody;


for I


not going


to have 'em all riding and


hectoring


him round; and if one does, another will.


68


life,"


at


my


shall


you
am


I'm


_ I ___ ___









- ~- .---1


,lie



ve, eW I5
jPo
-4, r
6,*, 1,P~~BIYI[~i;ll.~











UA
'7f4



`?I -icif


aotpi~ ; taicr~ ed`''




WILLOW BROOK.


not going to have it.


But you shall ride him


as much as you've a mind to.


Crossing


through


the bridge,


a woodland;


the road


up


and down


now


wound


and round


about ;


a dressed


woodland,


with


no unsightly


rubbish or uncomely growth allowed in it.


summer


sun played


through


the branches


made


lovely


the branches


light and shade


and through


below;


the light


and under
and shade


the pony phaeton went.


" This


is


a nice place,"


said Maggie.


" Does


all this belong to


Willow Brook ? "


" Of course."


"It must


be


a large


place,


said Maggie.


" But where is the


brook ?"


" It goes out


from that


end of the lake,


goes


wandering


there, with lots of


about


in the meadows


silver willows


growing


down
along-


side."


"I think it is
said Maggie,
nice Don is "


the prettiest place


except


Mosswood.


ever saw,"
And how


" Never wants to


be touched with a whip,


Zach ;


"he just


knows his business and does it."


69


just


The
and


and


said


_ I ___ __ _C _






WILLOW BROOK.


70


"And where are we going now? "


"To the Lodge.
the place-on the


That's


at the other side


Merryville road."


"Who is at the Lodge?"


"Oh,


nobody


lodge keeper, you know."
What does she do there ?"


but Judy Prynne.


She is the


"Opens the gate," said


Zach,


with a


his little companion.
opener somewhere ?"
"We haven't got


Maggie,


"and


there's


"Don't you have a


any gates


nobody


but one,"


to


open


Only the people that come."
"We should have a precious run through our


place," said Zach,


"if we didn't


keep somebody


to look after it."
"Oh well," returned Maggie, there's nobody


comes to our gate but


our friends,


you


know.


It's different."


By this time the phaeton


had worked its way


out of the woods,


winding


hither and


thither;


and now they were come out upon a broad level
planted with young trees in groups and all along


on both sides of the road.


One day this would


of


look


at


gate


said
that.


- ---I II-- .




WILLOW BROOK. 71

become a beautiful drive; just now the young
foliage was too thin to be a screen from the heat
of the sun. However, it was late in the day, and
Maggie only thought how beautiful it all was.
The light of the sun in the various leafage of
different young trees, and upon the wide level
turf, was very inspiriting. For a long distance
the drive was between these young trees and
over this plain. At last a fence, or a wall more
properly, appeared; a gate also between two
huge pillars; and close beside it the prettiest
sort of a cottage. Brown, and low, and built
with heavy timbers, massive gables and open
lattice windows, it was unlike any house Maggie
had ever seen. And when they went in, she
thought it still more unlike. But first came out
the figure of the gate opener.
This was a tall, finely proportioned, fine
looking coloured woman. She was not young;
but her skin was smooth, black, and glossy, her
eye was bright, and her carriage was stately.
On her head was a marvel of a turban, made
of a gay-coloured bandana, imposing enough to
have shaded the brows of the Shah of Persia.






WILLOW BROOK.


Maggie could look at nothing else of


her dress


but that.


" No, Judy,"


cried Zach;


Swe


are not going


out.


I've come to see you."


jumped from the


little


carriage and


Therewith


offered


hand to help Maggie.


"I 'clar,


your


Massa


wild beast


an' tell me ef


Zach,
here ;


it's right.


you '11


ain't you ?


be looking'


Come


I don't know how


arter
in-
you


want it fixed-ef it ain't so."


Zach


floor


lay


and Maggie


the wolf skin,


followed


which


her in.
Judy


On the
had been


tailoring


prehended


in some extraordinary


only


by


Zachary.


fashion,
He went


com-
into


careful examinations.
"All right, Judy, I believe."


" Now, Mass'


Zach, what


you goin'


to do


dat creetur' ?"
"Get into it, Judy, and be a wolf."


"Get into it!"
you get in ?"


said Judy laughing.


" Whar '11


Haven't you left a place ? See here, Judy-
I can't get in if it's all sewed up. You must rip


he
his


wid


I _


72




WILLOW BROOK. 73

me a piece here-along here. Rip away, and
I'11 try, and see when it's big enough."
Judy ripped away, and Maggie's eyes went
round the room. It was very pretty and very
odd, she thought. Heavy timbers, like the out-
side show of the house; large beams running
across the ceiling and framing the windows, the
little windows, with diamond panes of glass, set
in deep recesses of the thick wall; the chimney
piece massive oak. All brown, of the wood's
own colour. Then those pretty windows stood
open, and roses and Virginia creeper wreathed
around them; one or two late roses were
blossoming yet; and the October sunshine which
came golden in found the contrasting light of a
little blazing fire in the deep chimney place.
Over the blaze hung a black tea-kettle. Maggie
surveyed this arrangement with much admiration.
Then her thoughts came back to the wolf skin.
"That'll do, I believe, Judy," said Zach, put.
ting his head through the opening which had
been made in the under part of the skin.
"Do you expect you '11 get all of you inside o'
dat t'ing?" said Judy with considerable disgust.






WILL W BROOK.


" Must,


you


know, Judy.


Wouldn't


leave any of myself out.


a wolf,


That wouldn't be like


or like any other creature that ever lived."


"And what for do ye want to be like a wolf ?"


"In the play, you know.


Little Red Riding-


hood.


You've


heard of that, Judy.


I'm to


the wolf, to eat Little Red Ridinghood up.


Good


set of teeth," said


Zach, displaying the


grinning


tusks of the whilome wolf.


" And you goin' to put your head


in dar ?"


Zachary nodded.


" Hard


times


expect, Judy.
girls squeal."


The only


fun '11


be to hear


"Whar 'll your arms be
"Here-in the legs.


, den ? "
My arms are to be the


wolf's fore legs."
And will ye get your own legs in dem oder?"


"Of course.


The wolf '11


stand a little


in his hind quarters-but it 's a new kind of wolf ;


that 's


to be considered.


The boy's


species.


Canus knabes."


"Massa Zach, when
" To-morrow, Judy.


is dat play coming' ? "
Mind, you don't let any-


body in through the gate but those that show the


74


do


to


be


for


me


the


high


"Z




WILLOW BROOK.


right


blue


tickets.


There '11


be all the world


here, if we'd let 'em.


You


must be very careful.


Keep the gate locked."


"I done got my


orders,"


said the


woman


quietly.


"What '11 I say to de oders, Mass'


Zach


-what hasn't got
Say anything


no blue ticket ?"


you like.


But keep the


fast."


"'Spects dere '11


be a heap


of 'em?"


" Would


be,


if they


were


piled up,"


said


Zach.
"But, Mass' Zach, what if suppos'n you didn't
hab a clar day; how den ?"


"A clear day?


Yes, we shall have it clear."


"Donno,


Mass' Zach-when


it clar up


in de


night, like it did last night, dar ain't no insurance.
Suppose it rain ?"


" Then


the play 'll be put


off -that 's


Have it next day."
"De next day am de Sabba' day, Mass' Zach?"
said the woman anxiously.


" Sabbath ? well, what then ?


To-morrow is the


right Sabbath, for that matter."


75


gate


all.


_ __ __ __ __ 1~I~C







76


WILL W BROOK.


"But Massa Saulmain, he don't keep de Sabba'
day ob his people.


" No, nor any other, Judy, you


bet."


" Mus gib de Lord one day,"


she said.


" He


say one


day


is His day,


sure,


Mass'


Zach.


allays gib de Lord His own.


Judy mus'."


" Well nobody hinders you," said Zach.
" Den don't let de play come next day,


Mass'


Zach!"


" What's


the matter ?


Why not ?


It must


come that day, Judy, if it don't come to-morrow."


"Dere '11


be nobody


to


open


de gate,


I tell


you."


"There '11


be you.


What ails you ?"


" Mus'


Couldn't


gib


open


de Lord


and shut no


His day,


gates


Mass'
on de


Zach.
Sabba'


I couldn't, nohow.


" You


don't have


to, generally.


Don't


Judy.


You know, when


my father says a


thing, it must be done."


de Lord,


when


He


says


a t'ing,-how


den ?"


" Well,


you


ve


got


to choose.


You know


day.


fool,


" But


be




WILL W BROOK.


what will happen if


you


don't


do what


papa


says.


" Mebbe


she said


de Lord will


meditatively;-


well-how folks do
cost 'em nothing "


keep


de


storm


" and mebbe no!


hallow His


name


'way,"
Well,


wid what


Then


catching


Maggie's


wistful


eager


eyes,


changed.


She looked


down


at the


child with a smile.


"Who's dis, Mass' Zach?"
" Somebody you 'd better be good to, Judy."


"Come here, dear,"


said she,


" come here and


see my cat.
One glimpse Maggie had, of


a great soft mass


of grey and


white


fur;


one touch of the


fluffy


pile; and Zach called her away.


"Maggie,


we must


go


home.


There's


to ride,


you know,


and


supper


'11 be


ready."
"May I come again to see her?" said Maggie,
appealing to the cat's mistress.


" Judy


's mighty


glad


to


see you !"


was the


hearty answer.


"I 'se got bees, too, little missus,


and honey.


Mass'


Zach, he knows."


77


her


tone


mile


__







WILLOW BROOK.


"' Come


send


Tom


away,


down for


Maggie,"


cried


Zach.


the wolf skin, Judy.


" I'11
And


don't you be a fool for nothing."


"If I 'se


a fool,"


said the black


woman


steadily, it'll be for de name ob de Lord."


7y


_ __ __ ___I_




WILLOW BROOK.


CHAPTER


V.


DECLARE


weather


hope


to-morrow! "


it will


be good


said Zach as


they


drove away.
Do you think it will ? "


"Never


thought


anything


else,


till Judy


gan to talk; but I don't like the


look of those


clouds."
"Why


they


're all


bright,"


said Maggie.


" Yes,


but


they 've


no business


to be there at


this time;


and they


'll be


grey enough


as soon


as the sun gets down.
very good weather for


You see, we must


the plays;


'have


it won't do to


have


the least


possible danger of


rain;


not the


least in the world."


"I want


to


see how


you '11


manage


in the


wolf skin,"


said Maggie.


" Yes,


I want to see myself.


It's going to


rather fun, I


expect,


to somebody.


Couldn't


79


"I


be-


be


-






WILL W BROOK.


stand


it in summer,


you know;


it would be so


stifling


stand it.


hot;


but in this weather I guess I could


I hope Judy won't play fool while I'm


playing wolf !"
What would she do ?"


"Keep the gate locked, and make everybody
drive round to the other entrance; or leave it
wide open and let all the canaille come in."
"What's that ?"


"People that


have


no business


to be


where."


" Then,


if it rains


send some one else


to-morrow,


to attend


couldn't


the


gate


day ?"


"I could -and
wouldn't."
"Why not?"


would ;


but


my


father


" Because it's Judy's business.


and father


She's paid for


's been very good to her, too;


he


built that house for her, and made everything in


it just as she wanted
neglect their duties."


"What would


it.


He don't


he do, Zachary, if


let people


Judy would


not open the gate on Sunday? "


8o


any-


you
next


it;




WILL OW BROOK.


" Send


her about


one else there to
sorry, too, for hc


her business, and


mind


Think


that business.
s all the world


put


some


He'd


be


of Judy;


but he'd do it."
"And what would she do, then ?"


"I don't


know.


She'd


be terribly


cut up.;


because, you see, she thinks all the world of him


and of


mamma,


and of


us.


But I


shouldn't


wonder if


she'd do it."


After


this Maggie


was in


constant


concern


about the sky and the weather.


very fair.


To her it looked


There was a dense fog, however, when


she got up next morning.


"0 Esther!"


she cried,


"do


you


think


going to rain?"
"Rain ? no; nonsense I it is nothing but fog."
"It is very thick!"


" That's


you know ?


the


they


way


often with


begin in a fog.


hot days,


Those


don't


are the


hottest."


"I don't know, Miss Esther,"


said Betsey, who


was dressing them.


"I'm


afeard


there's


some


clouds ahint all that mist."


" Oh,


hope


not !"


said


Maggie


earnestly.


8I


it is


___ _






WILLOW BROOK.


"I hope not!


Esther, do


you know what


will do,


if the weather


hinders


the plays to-day


in the theatre ?"
"No!"
They will have them to-morrow.


Maggie


spoke


under


her breath.


Esther


stopped


in her hair brushing


and looked


her.


" How do you know ?"
" Zachary said so."


"Well," said Esther,


brush;


beginning again with her


"I can't help it."


we can't


help it;


but what


"I don't


know,"


said Esther.


"I shall


and


see.


Maybe the sun will come out by and


z. I think it will."
Maggie looked round the room.
SWhere's your card, Esther ?"
"Card ?" said Esther, facing about again.


"Yes your illuminated


card, you know,


-' Hallowed be-'


said Esther


interrupting


her,


"that's


in the trunk, safe,"


82


they


at


' No,


shall


we


by


wait


--ft


do- ?)


" Ohyo




WILL W BROOK.


" I thought


you wanted to have it somewhere


in sight."


"It's safer there,.


what it is,
"That's
what will


said Esther;


without seeing it all the


what


uncle


you do,


Eden


if the


said;


plays


"and I know
time."


but,


Esther,


are to-mor-


row ? "


" I don't know anything about it,"


said Esther.


"I shall wait and see.


"What


about


it,


Miss


Maggie


inquired


Betsey.


"Why
"And


Sunday is to-morrow,


certainly


Miss


Esther


Betsey."
cannot


prevent


them, if


ments


they


like to make


on the wrong


day.


their


They must


h'entertain-


do their


pleasure.


"They will,


I suppose;


but,


Betsey,


we ought


to do-the Lord's pleasure."


think


it's


not His pleasure


parcel of


children shouldn't take their


h'amuse-


ment any peaceable way, and h'especially in the
sunshine He has made for them ? "


" But Sunday is His day,


Betsey."


"Well, what


for,


Miss


Maggie ?


Isn't it that


83


"Do


you


that


___






WILLOW BROOK.


everybody


should


ave all the good he


can ?


Don't it please


Him to have you pleased ?"


I think," said Maggie slowly, "it would please
me best, to please Him."


Betsey


speech,


looked in


which she did


some


amazement


not comprehend.


at this
Esther


went on


brushing her hair assiduously.


" Don't you think, Betsey," said Maggie, meet-


her look,


" don't you think God wants us to


hallow His name on His day ? "


"And what 'arm
Miss Maggie ?"
"I should like


would there be in the plays,


the plays


very


much."


Maggie, her eyes
" if they could be


going wistfully to the window,
. on one of the other days; but


that is the Lord's day."
Betsey had got something to think of, perhaps,
for she dropped the argument.


Very


anxiously


Maggie


watched


the misty


atmosphere


that morning.


At breakfast every-


body was very


gay, for it was expected that the


sun would shine out presently.


people
did not


became
appear.


very


grumpy,


A doubtful grey


After breakfast
for the sunshine


fog, with un-


84


ing


said


_ ___ __




WILL W BROOK.


doubtedly clouds


behind it,


kept


even


a yellow


gleam
great
which


from


cheering


confusion, of


might


not come


their


eyes.


preparations


off,


There


was a


for the plays


and preparations for


the contingency of their not coming off. At last,
about luncheon time, the mist did yield; yellow


gleams


came


through ;


rolls


of cloud


vapour


could be seen parting, moving, scattering


away;


a bit of blue


and with


here and there


unbounded


glee


was unquestioned;


the


announcement


was received, that the plays
of them, at any rate. Two


would go on.


One


o'clock was the hour


appointed,


usual to


and luncheon had


be out of


the


way.


been


And


earlier


now the


than
gay


little


groups


flocked


to the theatre.


dainty place, arranged in


a little


round hollow


of ground,


surrounded


and sheltered with a


of trees.


Round three sides of the hollow benches


had been constructed, rising one behind another;


the fourth


side and the space in the centre was


prepared


for the actors.


A level green


floor at


the bottom; a green


rising bank


behind it; and


not too


high


up on


the bank,


a screen of


green


baize with doors that hid whatever and


whomso-


85


It


was


belt


_I ~I_ ~~ ~I_ __ ~_ ~_I __ _






WILLOW BROOK.


ever clustered


beyond


it.


As the parties


children trooped down to this little wild theatre,


met other


parties


flocking thitherward;


waggons and carriages


were fast driving in;


benches


were


half filled already.


But the very


front and best places, it was found, were reserved


for Rachel's


little party of home guests.


Here


Maggie, to her great satisfaction, got comfortably


seated without any difficulty.


She took breath.


The yellow


gleams


and brighter; the


the mist looked


from the


patches


more


and


sky were


of blue


more


were


broader
larger;


like a rolling


away veil.


Maggie was very content.


Next she


looked to see the people.


How many there were!


Ladies and gentlemen and children.


were getting full of


happy and


Sthe sober


eager.


The benches


a gaily-dressed crowd ;


It


green crown of


of the hollow.


was a pretty


rees around
Maggie


Suddenly


sight,


very
with


d the edge
found that


Zachary was speaking to her.
"'Taint going to last," he whispered.
What ? said Maggie.


-"The


fine weather.


Papa


says


it won't


out but


an hour


or two;


and he


knows.


86


they


of


the


hold


So




WILL 0 W BROOK.


there won't be but one play to-day. Papa says
we must be done in an hour or so."
Which play will it be ?"
"'Twon't be my play; that takes a good deal
of time, you know. The wolf has some dressing
to do that ain't exactly easy; and it won't do to
be hurried. Cinderella takes time, too, but
they've got it all ready. And mamma is the
fairy godmother, you know; so that will all go
off like smoke."
"Then you won't be the wolf at all?" said
Maggie, much disappointed.
"To-morrow-we'll have the rest to-morrow.
As many of the people as can stay will stay, and
sleep anywhere; and the rest will come again
to-morrow."
"But, Judy ? "said Maggie.
"Judy won't be a fool. Or if she does, we'll
have to set somebody else to open the gate.
Worse for her!-There!"
"Who's that? whispered Maggie, as a door
in the green screen opened, and a little unkempt,
ragged, forlorn girl came out, and began to
build a fire with some sticks she had brought in






WILL W BROOK.


her arms.


"How came that poor girl


Don't she know she mustn't stay there


there ?
What


is she doing ? "


"She


is going


to make


a fire," said Zachary


soberly.


"But


don't


she know


where


she is?


Don't


she see ?


What


does


she mean ?"


inquired


Maggie anxiously.


" Good "


"If that


said Zachary,


isn't first-rate !


greatly


Did


you


delighted.
ever see a


play before ? "


" Never!"


said Maggie.


Their


conversation


went on, it must be noted, in soft whispers.


"That's


Cinderella,"


said Zachary.


"It's


Jane Horton."
"Cinderella!"


said Maggie,


in mighty sur-


prise.


"Is that the girl who had on a pink silk


with


ever so many flounces ? "


" I don't know what


Zach ;


you call flounces said


"she was as red as a rose yesterday."


" I shouldn't know her a


bit."


"You wouldn't know me in my skin, would
you ?"


88


_ _




WILL W BROOK.


89


"I wish you were going to play that to-day,"
said Maggie. "What is she doing ?"
"Cinderella is making a fire, to cook her
supper, I suppose. There comes Cinderella's
sister."
A sufficiently dressed-up young lady came out
next and stood by the fire.
"I thought Jane Horton hadn't any sister
here," whispered Maggie.
Nor she hasn't," returned Zach. "It is only
Cinderella's sister. Hear how she goes on I "
Maggie listened in extreme astonishment to
the dialogue between the supposed sisters,
wherein Cinderella was berated and scolded
and ordered about, and finally left in tears.
Then came in another dressed-up young lady
and did some more scolding and hectoring.
Then came a little old man in a flowery dress-
ing-gown, with a tasselled cap upon his head,
who shuffled about and asked questions in a
cracked voice, and was very sharp, and at last
caught up one of the sticks lying by the fire


and laid
ended in


it about Cinderella's
Cinderella's jumping


shoulders. That
up and running





WILL W BROOK.


away,


and the old man following


her with


dressing-gown flying.


One after the other van-


ished through the door.
"Who was that ?" Maggie whispered.


Zachary burst into a laugh.


" Rasselas ?


" That was Ras."


your brother ?"


Zachary nodded, and laughed again.
"But how did he make himself look so ?
looked like an old man."


"That's


dressing,


and painting,


and


a wig.


Hush !"


Cinderella


came


out again;


sat down


in the


ashes and began to cry.


"She's


a poor-spirited


creature !"


Zachary.
there's ,


"That's


something


the way girls


the


matter;


do when


sit down


and


yell."


"What do boys do ?"


said Maggie.


" Something


else,


you


bet!"


said Zach.


"There, n
Maggie


instant


low!


see that."


looked with charmed eyes, for


there


sailed out upon the scene a


at this
figure


so extraordinary that


she had not breath to do


anything


but look.


A little


old woman,


his


He


said


bent


90




WILLOW BROOK. 91

over upon her stick, with a long cloak and a long
peaked cap upon her head. And such a crooked
nose and hboked chin as Maggie had never
known before to exist.
"That's mother," whispered Zachary.
"Mrs Saulmain ?-but it isn't, Zachary-she
don't look like that."
"I think I know how she looks," said Zach, in
supreme delight. No, she don't look like that
exactly. But it's she, sure enough. Ain't she
splendid!"
They were both hushed again, to listen to the
talk which went on between Cinderella and the
old woman. Cinderella told her grievances, and
explained how she would like to be dressed up
for once and go to a party, as her sisters were
going in the evening. They were going to a
ball given by the king's son; they would have
such a good time while she was all over ashes
and tears.
"Don't cry, my child," said the old woman;
"we can mend that. What sort of a dress do
you want to wear ?"
Cinderella, amid much sobbing, expressed






WILL W BROOK.


her liking for blue spangled with silver.


Where-


upon


the old woman hobbled up


nearer to her


and began


a furious muttering,


at the


same


time striking or seeming to


strike


the girl


the head


and shoulders


several times.


Maggie


rubbed her eyes, for at this treatment, suddenly,


she could


not tell how,


the ragged


gown


from


Cinderella's shoulders and an elegant robe


of blue and silver appeared in its stead; and at


same


instant


the unkempt mop of hair was


gone, and
the neck


ringlets nicely dressed fell down upon


of the young


lady.


The assembly


broke out into a great burst


of applause,


nicely the change had been wrought.
"Wasn't that neat ? said Zach.


"But what became of the


old clothes ? said


Maggie,


who hardly


knew


whether


dreaming or using her eyes.


"Changed


into a ball-dress!


don't you see ?"


said Zach.


"But'


it couldn't be really changed, could it ?"


said Maggie.


"Ah! "


said Zach,


" it 's


difficult to say what


on


the


fell


so


she


was


_ I


92




WILL W BROOK.


couldn't be.
changed ? "


Didn't you see,


Maggie,


that it was


" Yes,


said Maggie,


not believe


that blue


"it was


dress


changed;
was ever,


but I
that


ragged one.


You
" What
of it ? "


bet !"


do


said Zachary,


you suppose, then,


intensely amused,


Maggie,


became


"Oh, hush !-wait--look "


said Maggie.


Cinderella


had been


complaining


could


not walk


comfortably to the party.


one want


brings


another,"


said the old woman.


out into the garden


and bring


in-ea


pumpkin."
"I wish


I had


known


wThat


you


wanted


before,"
however,


said the blue


and silver


she did go out by


young


one of the


lady


screen


doors


and presently


came


in again


moderate


sized


squash


in her hands,


which


she immediately


deposited


just


within


door.


"If


should


you


have


had brought me


had a grander


a bigger
carriage,"


one, you
said the


old fairy;


" as it is."


93


do


"Run


that


she


"So


with


the


_ _____ ___




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