Wild Rose and other tales

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Material Information

Title:
Wild Rose and other tales
Physical Description:
384, 32 p., 8 leaves of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 17 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Mackarness, Henry S., 1826-1881
George Routledge and Sons ( Publisher )
Woodfall and Kinder ( Printer )
Dalziel Brothers ( Engraver )
Publisher:
George Routledge and Sons
Place of Publication:
London ;
New York
Manufacturer:
Woodfall and Kinder
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1874   ( lcsh )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1874   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1874
Genre:
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Publishers' catalogues   ( rbgenr )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
United States -- New York -- New York

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
by Mrs. Mackarness.
General Note:
Frontispiece printed in colors and illustrations engraved by Dalziel.
General Note:
Publisher's catalogue follows text.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 002233573
notis - ALH3982
oclc - 60551823
System ID:
UF00027876:00001


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Full Text




178 The Lily of the Valley.

singing, and had only caught the last words.
"She is an odd one; sometimes I feel angry
with her for being so queer, but when I see her
I'm as big a silly about her as the rest-old and
young, men, women, and children, we're all
alike, we'd do anything for her. It's too bad she
won't come to-day. Come on, we're late, look
at Master Arden beckoning to us."' And away
they ran into the school playground, soon sur-
rounded by the workers at the pole, who had
beenAnxiously waiting for more material.
Yes, Lily Mayburn was a mystery to all.
She had come suddenly to the little village and
awoke curiosity at once from her strange beauty
-a beauty not so much of feature but expres-
sion-her quiet dignity, her refinement and
purity. Without pride, without affectation, she
impressed all who saw her with a sense of su-
periority. She said and did nothing remark-
able, nothing exactly to particularize, but there
was a nameless charm and grace about her
which made her admired, respected, and be-










30 George Routledge & Sons' Juvenile Books.


The following Volumes are formed from the foregoing Series:-



. d.
5 OThe Henny-Penny Picture Book. Containing
Henny-Penny," Sleeping Beauty," Baby," and The Pea-
cock at Hpme." With 24 Pages of Coloured Plates.
Routledge's nursery Book. Containing "Nursery
Rhymes," "Mother Hubbard," "Alphabet of Pretty Names,"
and Cinderella." With 24 Pages of Coloured Plates.
The Poll Parrot Picture Book. Containing
"Tittums and Fido," "Reynard the Fox," "Anne and her
Mamma," and "The Cats' TeaParty."
Routledge's Coloured A B 0 Book. Containing
"The Alphabet of Fairy Tales," "The Farm-Yard Alphabet,"
"Alphabet of Flowers," and "Tom Thumb's Alphabet."

My Mother's Picture Book. Containing "My
Mother," "The Dogs' Dinner-Party," Little Dog Trusty," and
"The White Cat." Large 4to, cloth.
The Red Riding-Hood Picture Book. Containing
"Red Riding-Hood," "Three Bears," "Three Kittens," and
"Dash and the Ducklings." Large 4to, cloth.
Our Nurse's Picture Book. Containing "Tom
Thumb," Babes in the Wood," "Jack and the Beanstalk," and
"Puss in Boots." Large 4to, cloth.
The Child's Picture Book of Domestic Animals.
Containing Tame Animals, First, Second, Third, and Fourth
Series. With 12 large Plates, printed in Colours by KRONHEIM.
Large oblong, cloth.
The Child's Picture Book of Wild Animals.
Containing Wild Animals, First, Second, Third, and Fourth
Series. 12 large Plates, printed in Colours by KRONHEIM. Large
oblong, cloth.

Pictures from English History. Containing "Pic-
tures from English History," First, Second, Third, and Fourth
Series. 93 Coloured Plates by KRONHEIM. Demy 4to, cloth.

Routledge's Scripture Gift-Book. Containing "The
Old Testament Alphabet," "The New T'estament Alphabet,"
"The History of Moses," and "The History of Joseph." Demy
4to, cloth.








S16 Poppies.

in vain, till at length the dreadful weight on his
chest lifted, the strange grasp seemed gone, the
room seemed filled with light, and he heard
Nurse Penny say, "There, he's all right now,
Anna, I told you he was only dreaming," and
he opened his large blue eyes, and at his bedside
stood Nurse Penny, holding a candle, and Anna
kneeling close to him, with the tears streaming
down her face.
"Oh! my pretty boy, what was the matter?
you have been a-screaming and a-going on."
He won't take me to be hanged, will he ?"
asked the child, still with a scared, terrified look
in his eyes.
"No, no, dear, no one shall take you away,
you have been dreaming," said Anna.
"Dear, bless the poor child, said good old
Nurse Penny, "he is in a heat this cold night.
Take and wrap him up in a blanket, Anna, and
bring him in the nursery, and I'll give him
something to quiet him; and then we'll wash
him in some warm water, and send down to









Eglantinie. 137

been quite a sermon to her. Her hard-working
life had given her but little time for such
thoughts; neither she nor Philip had ever
dreamt of praying for that blessing which
"maketh rich, and adds no sorrow." "Was that
why he lay sick?" she thought, as his hollow
cough broke on her ear.
She had worked hard all her young life, been
patient with her mother, whose affliction had
so embittered her that it needed great patience
to bear with her. She had done all this through
the bright, cheerful, energetic nature which
God had given her, but she had never been
taught to thank Him for the gift-had lain
down night after night so weary, and closed
her eyes without once thinking who would
watch her or keep her safe while she slept
-gone to her daily toil without one prayer
breathed to keep her safe that day from evil-
she, with her beautiful face, exposed to so much!
And yet the great enduring Love, which has
such infinite patience with its creatures, had








Wild Rose. 13

as Mrs. Delacorn had no feeling of great affection
for her, and only asked her to satisfy her con-
science that she was looking after the orphan
child of her friend according to her promise-
so long as the girl herself was contented, she
gave herself no further trouble. Mrs. Grantley,
the housekeeper, was a dear, good, kindly crea-
ture who had lived many years in the family,
and was kindness itself to the orphan girl; but
she was also a great puzzle and anxiety to her.
So unlike our dear young ladies," she would
say, "who always like to be dressed so nice
and sit in the drawing-room like real gentry,
a-doing of nothing but their fancy work or
their piany; and here little Miss will go from
year's end to year's end in an old frock, and
her beautiful hair with ne'er a brush nor a
comb through it, as it seems. And a needle I
why, bless me! if her life depended on it, I
don't believe she could sew a string or a hook
on-she's that wild."
And now, when she had fed her doves, dipped











London and New York. 17




In square 16mo, cloth, with Illustrations by GILBERT, ABSOLON, &c.
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Peasant and Prince. By Accidents of Childhood; or, 6
Harriet Martineau. Stories for Heedless Children.
Crofton Boys. By ditto. Annie Aaitland; or, The
Feats on the Fiord. By do. Lesson of Life; ByD. Rich-
Settlers at Home. By ditto. mond.
Holiday Rambles; or, The ucy Elton ; or, Home and
holiday ambles; or, The School. By the Author of
School Vacation. "The Twins."
Little Drummer: A Tale Daily Thoughtsfor Children.
of the Russian War. By Mrs. Geldart.
Frank. By Maria .Edge- Emilie the Peacemaker. By
-worth. Mrs. Geldart.
Rosamond. By Maria Truth is Everything. By
Edgeworth. Mrs. Geldart.
Harry and Lucy, Little Christmas Holidays. By
Dog Trusty, The Cherry Miss Jane Strickland.
Orchard, &-c. Rose and Kate; or, The
A Hero; or, Philip's Book. Little Howards.
By the Author of "John Hali- Aunt Emma. By the
fax." Author of "Rose and Kate."
Story of an Apple. By The Island of the Rainbow.
Lady Campbell. By Mrs. Newton Crossland.
The Cabin by the Wayside. Alax Frere; or, Return
Alemoirs of a Doll. By Good for Evil.
Mrs. Bisset. Rainbows in Springtide.
Black Princess. The Child's First Book of
Laura and Ellen; or, Natural History. By A. L.
Time Works Wonders. Bond.
S'..:'.s Lost Son. By Florence the Orphan.
R. H.ay ( and te heCastle and Cottage. By
Runaways (The) d t Perring.
GipDsies. Fabulous Histories. By
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Mrs. Hall. School Days at Harrow.
Bitish W f Hunters. By Mrs. Barbauld's Lessons.
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Old Testament Lessons. By Traditions of Palestine. By
Maria Wright. Martineau.
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Naturalist. Athletic Sports.








London and New York. 13




In post 8vo, toned paper, green cloth, 8s. 6d. each.
s. d
The Arabian Nights. Ten Thousand Wonderful3 6
Don Quixote. Things.
Gil Blas. Sterne's Works.
Curiosities of Literature. By Extraordinary Popular
Isaac D'Israeli. Delusions.
1,oo Gems ofBritishPoetry. Bartlett's Familiar Quota-
.TheBlackfriars Shakspeare. tions.
Cruden's Concordance. The Spectator.
Boswell's Life of 7ohnson. Routledge's ModernSpeaker.
The Works of Oliver Gold. IooI, Gems of Prose.
horks of Oliver Gold- Pope's Homer's Iliad and
Routledge's Pronouncing dy de r nectes.
Dictionary. Book of Modern Anecdotes.
The Family Doctor. Josephus.



Under the above title Messrs. G. ROUTLEDGE & SONS are about
to issue a New Series of Juvenile Books, all well Illustrated and
well bound in a New and Elegant Binding.
List of the Series.
Boys at Home. By C. Play Hours and Half Holi- 3 6
Adams. days.
Cecil Raye. Walks and Talks of Two
Dogs and their Ways. Schoolboys.
Our Holiday Camp. By Hildred the Daughter.
St. John Corbet. Hardy and Hunter.
Helen Mordaunt. By the Fred and the Gorillas.
Author of Naomi." Guizot's Kloral Tales.
Romance of Adventure. Frank Wildman.
The Island Home.



By MARY GODOLPHIN.
In i6mo, cloth gilt, with Coloured Plates, price 2s. 6d. each.
Bunyan's Pilgrim's Pro- Swiss Family Robinson, 2 6
gress. Robinson Crusoe.
Evenings at Home. Child's First Lesson Book.











Wild Rose. 7

Seymour will notice her. I can't think why
mamma has her here so incessantly."
"Who is she ?"
"Oh, an orphan child of some early friend
of mamma's, in whom nobody seems to take
the smallest interest. She's a little horror, I
think; but mamma calls her beautiful, and is
always asking her to come and stay. She's
at school somewhere, and has no home to go to
in the holidays, poor little animal! so she comes
here. She's frightfully shy, and so wild."
As she finished speaking, a figure dashed
through the bushes near, and fled past them
with the speed of an antelope, followed rapidly
by the man spoken of as Seymour Lisle.
Little mad thing! there she goes, and that
stupid fellow after her," continued the girl.
"She is very lovely, though," said the other.
Do you think so ? I can't see it, and I don't
think you would if you were close to her; she's
as brown as a gipsy. Let us walk the way they
went, and if we catch them, I will introduce her."









Tulip. 37

something very much like his last speech.
However, Ethel guessed, so it's her turn."
Oh, no, I shan't play any more humbugging
games," said Tom; I'm going to read."
Read, oh! I say-a fine lot you'll read," said
George.
Don't you be cheeky, young man, or I'll just
give you something," said Tom, fiercely.
Don't be cross, Tom, dear," said Isabel.
"Hark! there's the tea bell-that is a good
thing-now there's something to do we all like."
"And away they ran downstairs to the long,
low-pitched, old-fashioned room, which they
used as a dining-room, where the table was laid
for the young people's tea.
Doctor and Mrs. Hartley did not dine until
half-past seven o'clock-the doctor, as a rule,
having finished his work by then, and having a
better chance to enjoy it quietly.
When the children entered the room, seated
in the old-fashioned wide window-seat was a
very fair and beautiful young girl, her head

































































































































I*










26 George Routledge & Sons' Juvenile Books.




Beautifully printed in Colours by Messrs. LEIGHTON BROTHERS,
VINCENT BROOKS, DALZIEL BROTHERS, and EDMUND
"EVANS. In super-royal 8vo, Fancy Wrappers.
s.d. -
o 6 Cherry Orchard. The Farm- Yard Alphabet.
Bible Alphabet. Our Puss and her Kittens.
Cinderella. Hop o' my Thumb.
Three Bears. Jack the Giant Killer.
Nursery Alphabet. Little Red Riding-Hood.
Little Totty. Beauty and the Beast.
The Dogs' Dinner-Party. Mother Hubbard.
Puck and Pea-Blossom. Happy Days of Childhood.
Puss in Boots. Little Dog Trusty.
Whittington and his Cat. The Cats' Tea-Party.
Punch and Judy. The Babes in the Wood.
John Gilpin. Wild Animals.
Blue Beard. British Animals.
Sindbad the Sailor. The Frog who would a-
Jack and the Bean-Stalk. Wooing Go.
House that Jack Built. The Faithless Parrot.
Old Woman and her Pig. The Farm- Yard.
A, Apple Pie. Horses.
Tom Thumb's Alphabet. Old Dame Trot.
Baron Munchausen. Sing a Song of Sixpence.
Butterfy's Ball. The Waddling Frog.
Picture Alphabet. The Old Courtier.
The White Cat. Multiplication Table.
Valentine and Orson. Chattering Jack.
"Arthur's Alphabet. King Cole.
Dorothy Frump. Prince Long Nose.
Singing Birds. The Enraged Miller.
Parrots and Talking Birds. The Hunchback.
Dogs. How Jessie was Lost.
Birds. Grammar in Rhyme.
Cock Robin. Baby's Birthday.
Railroad Alphabet. Pictures from the Streets.
"Alphabetfor Good Boys and Lost on the Sea-Shore.
Girls. Animals and Birds.
The Sea-Side Alphabet. A Child's Fancy Dress Ball.
Greedy Jem and his Little A Child's Evening Party.
Brothers. Annie and Jack in London.








190 The Lily of the Valley.

regularly, I will keep your father in my employ,
and tell no one of his crime.' That has been
my work; how could I tell Maurice my father's
shame ? and so he left me because I could not
tell him the sad secret which has been such a
heavy burden to bear."
Maurice was always so impetuous," said
the old lady, stroking fondly the little hand
still lying in hers; "but I say to you, my child,
many daughters have done excellently, but
thou excellent them all."
"My uncle," continued Lily, "was at one
time so fond of my father; and when this all
happened, it grieved him so bitterly, he would
not help him with money. Nothing would
induce him, he said, to pay one farthing back
of the money he had taken-he is so odd, you
know, my uncle-and he was so angry with
me for promising to do so, but he said all he
would do would be to release my father of
any expense so far as I was concerned. I
might live with him, and he would leave all





















" OUR cap's all awry-you're an ugly fright,
that's what you are-you've got a beard
like my papa. I wonder why there are any old
women; they're not a bit of use. I wish a big
roaring lion would come in this room and eat
some one in it, eat her up every bit-scrunch
her up, crooked old cap and all."
"Oh, Freddy, you should not say such
dreadful things, it is wicked. Nursey, dear, he
does not mean it."
And the last speaker, a little girl about,
seven years old, went up to an elderly woman,
seated by the fire, nursing a child a few weeks
old.











104 Poppics.

"Oh! Anna, I am glad you are come; she's
been and set me up here for nothing."
"Why, Mrs. Penny, what is it?" said Anna,
setting down the child, who came immediately
to her brother, and began to try violently
to lug him out of the chair, scolding all the
time.
Master Freddy has been very tiresome
all the time you have been out; and as
at last he took to hitting Miss Jessie, I sat
him up."
"Dear, dear! I am sorry; but you will be
good now, won't you? Come, dear, and beg
Nurse's pardon."
"No, I shan't."
"Oh, yes, do, there's a dear."
"I shan't; go away, baby, do," and pushing
the little thing, who was still clinging to his feet
with the desire to get him out of the chair, she
fell back against the drawers and knocked her
head. This, of course, occasioned a loud cry
from the poor little thing, which caused the









182 The Lily of the Valley.

pieces of the heather and ling, and to look at the
splendid view of the distant landscape, lying in
a purple mist, bordered by a ruddy golden light
left by the setting sun; and whilst she stood thus
gazing, a voice pronounced her name. She had
heard no footfall on the soft turf behind her.
"Ah, Maurice! is that you? What alovely
evening! is it not ?" she said, holding out her
hand to the young man.
"Yes, lovely. I am glad to see you out. The
girls told me they could not coax you to join
them at their feast."
No, I was busy."
"Which way are you walking ?" he asked.
Oh, home again now, I think. I only came
to breathe the fresh air for a few minutes, and
now I must go back to work."
"May I come a little way with you ?"
"Oh, yes, if you will," she said, quietly. Her
manner was in strange contrast to his: he was
so eai,:r and excited, she so calm, looking at
him so steadily with her sweet, dreamy eyes,









24 George Routledge & Sons' Juvenile Books.




In royal 32mo, 6d. each, with Illustrations, boards.

0 6 Swimningand Skating. By BrotherSam'sConundrums.
the Rev. J. G. Wood. Manly Exercises: Boxing;
Gymnastics. Running, Walking, Training,
Chess. With Diagrams. By &c. By Stonehenge, &c.
G. F. Pardon. Croquet. By Edmund Rout-
Whrist. ledge.
Billiards and Bagatelle. By Fishing.
G. F. Pardon. Ball Games.
DraughtsandBackgammon. Football.
By G. F. Pardon. Conjuring.
Cricket. Quoits and Bowls.
The Cardplayer. By G. F. Shooting.
Pardon. Fireworks.
Rowing and Sailing. Skating.
Riding and Driving. Swimming.
Archery.





For List see Sixpenny Juveniles, on page 2r.





Each Illustrated with 125 Woodcuts by JoHN GILBERT, HARRISON
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o 6 Things In-doors. Rural Scenes.
What we Eat and Drink.. Country Enjoyments.
Animals and their Uses. How Things are Made.
Birds and Birds' Nests. Soldiers and Sailors.
Fishes, Butterflies, &' Frogs. Science and Art.
Trees, Shrubs, and Flowers. Geography and Costume.
City Scenes.








Eglantiine. 1335

and seat himself in the worn cane chair beside
his bed, and ask kindly about his health, and
then know no more what to say to him, only
that he really was awfully sorry, and he hoped
he'd soon get well." But they really cheered
Philip, these visits; it was so kind, he thought.
He knew his master so well, with his fasti-
dious tastes, his intense refinement, his horror of
coarseness, ugliness, and vulgarity; and to come
down such a street, into such a house, to see him !
-it was too kind. He sent him in fruit, wine,
money, but Philip lay still "sick unto death."
Muriel took him the bird; he thanked her
more with looks than words, and asked her if
she had time to sing to him herself once before
she went. Yes, she was only in the second
piece-she thought she had; and so the fine
notes of her pure clear voice rang through the
little room, and the lodgers came out to listen,
as they did often when she sang, and at the
end the bird, who had been so silent, burst into
a loud song, as though he would not be out-








126 Egflanti e.

to everything and everybody, patient with his
lodgers when they could not pay, charitable to
the utm6st extent of his means to his poorer
neighbours, so that all who knew him said what
a good true heart lived in that ungainly body.
He had names for all his birds, and seemed
to love them, and positively regret selling them,
though to do so was his only hope of living.
He had never married, never had young
children about him to love and care for, and
the birds seemed, somehow, to have taken their
place, and filled the void. Whether in the old
days long gone there had been some one whom
he might have wished to call wife, and be the
mother of his children, no one knew now; in
that old heart there might live some tender
romance, none the less true and tender because
the man was only an ignorant unlettered being,
earning his bread by his daily labour-it was
impossible now to say; at any rate, he did not
speak of it to any one, but only showed how
possible it was that it might have been by his








The Lily of the Valley. 183

which, when she raised them to his, seemed to
make him start-soft and gentle as their gaze
was. And so they walked on silently for a little
while. Then she asked him some simple ques-
tion about the heather; but he did not answer
her, and then, suddenly turning to her, he said,-
"Lily, I am glad to have met you thus alone.
Have you any different answer to give me than
that you gave me last ?"
"No, Maurice, none," she said, quietly, and
with a slight tone of astonishment in her voice,
as though she wondered at his question.
"Then you decide my fate for me. On
Monday I leave England for Australia, never,
in all probability, to return."
The smallest possible start and change of
colour was perceptible as he said this; but he
saw it not, he was looking straight away into
the distance, as if he dared not face the calm
glance of those blue eyes again.
I am sorry for your mother, Maurice, but I
think it is better for you."








IIo Poppies.

will have to have some, too, to drink baby's
health."
"At the christening? Oh, yes, dear baby!
Mayn't Freddy get up to the christening,
papa ?"
"If he will say he is sorry, and be a good
boy, of course he shall."
When Jessie went up from dessert, she
peeped into Freddy's little room, he was asleep,
one side of the "tent" lying down on his
flushed face, a smile parting his lips and show-
ing his little pearly white teeth, as though he
was dreaming some pleasant dream, and his
punishment was quite forgotten. Jessie sighed,
and turned away; child as she was, she felt
that not to care, not to be sorry, must be
wrong, must lead to a bad end; she could not
have argued on it, or said "why," but she
had an instinctive feeling that penitence
must be the first step to amendment. It was
a bright, though cold, morning; the snow
lay on the ground, but the sun shone out








164 Heartsease.

rhe boots was thin ladies' boots, and had been
a good deal wore. Well, you see, ma'am, it
happened all that week to be awful wet, and
she had her feet drowned every day. Why,
they boots literally dropped to pieces. She got
a dreadful cold, and I couldn't send her. Miss
Tremaine, she came down here that angry, and
said her ma had done with us, as we wouldn't
keep Lottie to school. And then her father he
bought her a pair of strong shoes, and when
Mrs. Trowhurst, the butcher's wife, wanted a
help with the children, why Lottie went, so as
she might get a little to pay her father back
for the shoes. Now that is the real truth, you
see, ma'am. We've got right down-my hus-
band's small pay and my poor health has made
us get behind every way, and to pay the rent
and pay the shop, we've sold almost everything.
People say I'm so dirty-can I, could you, be
clean without a broom, or a brush, or a pail,
or a basin, or a towel, or cloth of any descrip-
tion ? My coarse apron, the last I had, as you








162 Heartsease.

The subscription had amounted to three
pounds, and Mrs. Osborne thought now she
should have enough to get such things as were
most important for the comfort of the unfortu-
nate family, and went one afternoon to see Mrs.
Thomson to tell her what success she had had,
and see what her own ideas were of what she
most wanted.
She found them at tea; but they begged
her to come in, and her first little child sprang
from her chair and offered it to her, her big
eyes lighting up with pleasure at sight of her.
"Jenny will never forget you, ma'am," said
Mrs. Thomson; "she knows your step, and
hears it afore any of us."
"Poor little girl, I came to bring help, didn't
I, dear, when it seemed very far off ?"
"Don't nod your 'ead, Jeanie. Answer the
lady pretty. You see, ma'am, I 'av'n't been
able to send them to school nor look after
them myself so long, they've forgot how to
behave, and everything."





A j'
cN J V gjA^A'XO|














WILD ROSE









34 72uip.
They were right; and so it was Ethel's turn.
"A Dandelion," she said, laughing.
"You can't like that," said Isabel.
"Yes I do, very much."
Where would you put it ?" asked Tom.
Oh! I don't know that," she said, still laugh-
ing, for it's very ugly, Tom; out of sight some-
where, so I will say in my heart, as I really do
love the person."
"Papa ?" asked Minnie.
"No. Papa! he isn't a dandy at all, I'm sure."
Oh that's the tack, Dandy-lion-eh, you're
making puns-then it's- oh, I don't know."
"You, Tom," said Isabel; "I knew it; is it
not, Ethel?"
"Yes, that's right. Who was cross all day
because mamma wouldn't let him have a new
pair of gloves tp go to church ? Oh, Master
Tom!-now it's your turn."
"Well, better be a dandy than a sloven, Miss
Ethel. Who goes about with her gathers torn
out, and her fingers out of her gloves-eh ?"








The Lily of the Valley. 179

loved by all the little community amongst
whom she led her quiet, blameless life. She
watched now, from the window beneath the
clematis, the girls go out of the garden carry-
ing their fragrant burden of flowers, till they
had closed the little wicket-gate behind them,
and then, with a slight sigh, returned to her
work. It was some very exquisite embroidery.
On the little table by the window lay some
primroses, coltsfoot, and wild hyacinths, ar-
ranged in a little group, and they were living
again beneath her fingers on the rich piece
of black satin she was thus ornamenting. A
basket, filled with the rich coloured silks she
used, was beside her, and a book lay open on
the table filled with beautiful coloured plates of
flowers. She worked on for a long while, stop-
ping once with a smile and going to the window
to listen to the sound which broke on her ear,
childish voices singing as they bore past the
end of the lane the May-pole. Then presently
the door opened, and her uncle entered.








Orange Blossom. 93

the crocuses, in pretty rows of yellow and
white; the snowdrops, the violets, the apple
blossoms and cherry, in the orchard beyond;
and then the sun began to grow warm, the soft
white fleecy clouds to float over the blue sky, and
I knew that summer had come, and I began to
sing my sweetest songs again.
One day my mistress came into the room,
bringing a beautiful ripe strawberry for me, gave
me my bath, and talked to me more than she
had done for a long while-
"Now, dear Dickie," she said, "don't sing so,
but just listen to me. I've something to tell
you; to-morrow you are going to have a white
bow tied to your cage, and have a beautiful
piece of cake, and you must sing all the morn-
ing-and then we are going away together."
"Going away!" I did not much like that,
but still, if she must go, of course I would rather
go too.
Well, the next day, after breakfast, some one
came into the room all in white, I did not know







44 Tulip.

Playing about."
Playing about; is that all-no lessons ?"
Oh, yes in the morning I did lessons, but
this is a half-holiday."
I see. A very lazy invention is a half-holiday,
I never have one; and what lessons did you do?"
Geography, and writing, and reading, and
sums."
Good gracious me! what a lot for a scrap like
you; and now, Master'Georgie, what about you?"
"I've done lessons, pa; and been with Mr.
Egremont to Fairden, to see his hounds-he
promised me he would take me-and oh, pa,
they are just beauties! He says, if you'll let
me, he'll mount me on a little pony and take me
to the meet some day. I may go, mayn't I, pa ?"
ye ne sais pas-and I wish you would not
say pa."
"Oh I say, that's too bad," shouted Tom;
going off in an ecstasy of laughing, running
the most frightful risk of choking himself with
bread-and-butter.









180 Thze Lily of the Valley.

"Why not out with the rest, lass ?" he asked,
taking his accustomed seat, a large leather arm-
chair, which stood by the window in summer
and in the chimney-corner in the cold winter.
My headache put me back with my work,
uncle, so I must not play to-day," she answered,
pleasantly; "these chair-covers are promised
to Lady Marwood on Monday."
"Ah!" he said, with something between a
sigh and a groan, "you might as well try to
empty the sea with a teaspoon."
She made no answer to that; they had ar-
gued so often, and it only made him angry.
Her set purpose-undertaken in faith that the
earnest prayer for its accomplishment would be
fulfilled-nothing could shake, all improbable
as it seemed; still she did not doubt that it
would be achieved-it only wanted endless per-
severance-and that her health and strength
should last, and this was her daily prayer.
She worked on till the daylight failed, and
the old servant, who had been housekeeper until







14 Wild Rose.

her face and head into a large basin of water,
wetting all the long thick masses of brown hair,
and shaking it as a dog does coming out of
the water, pulled off her boots, and slipped
her feet into some thin shoes, she came down-
stairs four at a time, rapidly, but noiselessly,
with an eager, anxious look in her eyes, appa-
rently fearful of being met by any one, and
came into the housekeeper's room, where the
table was laid for tea.
"Here I am, Mrs. Grantley," she said, fling-
ing herself on the large old-fashioned sofa,
and nearly upsetting a large basketful of work
which was placed on it.
"So I see, my dear," said the old lady,
looking through the silver-rimmed spectacles
at the graceful wild creature she had so much
interest in and affection for, and yet whom she
could neither control nor manage. Never
mind my work, and come and sit pretty at
the table like a young lady."
"Don't call me that, because I am not cae,









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Holly. 67

found it out and told Mrs. Clayton, then, per-
haps, Lucy had been forbidden to come. She
felt very lonely again as she sat one morning
under her tree, with her doll in her lap. Dolly
was doing her lessons. Annie always taught
her what her mother had been teaching her;
she had to be careful not to forget what
she had learnt, or else Dolly would not
know how to read or write. Sometimes
Dolly was naughty, and then she had to kneel
with her face pressed close against the tree
till she promised to be good. They had just
finished lessons one morning after Lucy had
ceased her visits, when Annie saw Lucy's
mother come to the back door. She looked
pale and sad, and when Susan came, in
answer to her knock, she began to cry, and
Annie heard her say, She is very bad; the
doctor says she cannot live." Annie waited
to hear no more; she felt sure the dear little
laughing, rosy Baby was ill, and perhaps it
would die, and she should never see it again.








Heartsease. 155

for the hope and help that seemed to dawn for
her, and then slowly mounted a dark, crooked.
staircase, up which Mrs. Osborne followed her,
into a room-or more properly, loft. There was
no door, the stairs came up into it as to a
landing. The plaster on the wall was falling
in many places; the boards, on which was no
trace of carpet or covering, were black with
dirt; the small window would not open, and the
closeness of the room was so dreadful that Mrs.
Osborne for a moment started back. And now
a sensation of terror, too, seized her, when the
child, going up to a bedstead (which, besides
a box, was the only article of furniture in the
room), and shaking a form lying on it, it slowly
rose and sat up, staring at her.
Oh! the face. Never should she forget it;
the ghastly death hue which seemed over it-
the thinness, the dirt, the wild, rough hair, and
hollow strange eyes; but for the child's pre-
sence, she felt she must have turned and fled
from a sight of such horror, but humanity made
























































SOLLY.

" He had been an old soldier, and he would tell her of al the fearful fights
he had been in.'










































II















THEL LIL- UF 'TH VALLEY.
"You should see her with children. Oh, dear, they are just fond of her "













THE LILY
OF THE VALLEY














WILD ROSE


AND OTHER TALES





BY
MRS. MACKARNESS
AUTHOR OF "A TRAP TO CATCH A SUNBEAM"













LONDON AND NEW YORK
GEORGE ROUTLEDGE AND SONS
1874











46 Tulip.

the richest and poorest, can all be of use to some
one, if they try; besides, if you have worked
well and hard at school, and brought away a
grain of information, your day has not been
utterly lost; and now, Miss Hetty, for you."
With a bright flush over her sweet face she
said,-" I've done nothing at all. I never can find
anything I like to do."
She tidied her wardrobe and gave me a heap
of ribbons and laces for my dollies, so she's been
good, I'm sure," said her little champion, Minnie;
but the Doctor made no answer-only sighed-
and when the children all went back to their
playroom, Tom whispered to Isabel,-
"Wasn't I right about the Tulip-beautiful
and gaudy, and no use."
Not gaudy, Tom-I'm sure her dress is lovely
this evening," said Isabel; the children all
championed her. Hetty loved the doctor, he
had been so good, so gentle, and patient with
her; so that little sigh, and his silence, somehow
touched her more than she could say, and when








Heartsease. 151

warned me of them, the former incumbent's
wife."
"I know, mum, I know; they'll tell you
they've given the children boots and sent them
to school, but schooling won't fill their poor
little hungry insides, and boots won't wear for
ever, and don't stand in place of petticoats and
frocks ; the poor critters have got right down
to the ground, as you may say, and they want
a kindly hand to lift 'em up and give 'em a
chance."
"But does not the woman spend all her hus-
band earns in the most reckless, extravagant
manner ?" asked the lady.
"Well, mum," answered the woman, with a
smile, "she ain't got much to show for it, any-
how. Why, there ain't no morsel thing in the
place as I can see; and as to his earnings, why
he only gets boy's pay-he ain't what they
calls, you see, marm, a able-bodied man. Bless
you, they're objects, that's what they are."
Whatever state of destitution that might be,








1o8 Poppies.

again, hence his indifference to Nurse Penny's
threat to take him to "papa," and his bold assu-
rance that he didn't care," which statement he
maintained even when Jessie-pitying little
Jessie-went to see him before she went down to
dessert (another promotion at which the two
eldest had arrived), and assured him that
she would bring him something nice in her
pocket.
"I don't want anything," he said; "I'm as
jolly as jolly-being in bed is fun-look here!
I pretend I'm an Arab in his tent, and all
the bed is the desert; see, these two pillows
are my tent, I stick 'em up like that-it is fun,
Jessie."
"Oh! but you oughtn't to be funny in bed
when you've been naughty," said conscientious
Jessie, "you ought to be sorry."
"I can't make myself sorry, stupid, can I ?
I ain't a bit sorry, not a bit. I don't care a
farthing for old Penny," and, having delivered
himself of this joke, he buried his tumbled sunny








Tuhip. 35

"Never mind, Ethie," said little Minnie; "I
love you all the same."
I know you do. I don't mind what old Tom
says. Now go on, sir-think of a flower."
"Well, a Tulip."
"A Tulip-let's see," said Isabel, "a Tulip is
very handsome and very gaudy."
"And no use," said Ethel; "who can it be ?
Do you love it very much ?"
"Yes-no-yes-very well."
Only very well-it's not a common person.
I mean it must be genptry; it's a garden flower."
"Yes-it's a lady."
A lady! gaudy!-no use!-and you like only
very well."
I know," exclaimed Ethel, "it's Hetty."
"Right. It's Hetty."
"But is she audy and useless ? poor Hetty !"
said Isabel, "I don t think that."
"She's very beautiful," said George, "and very
nice besides."
"Yes, crams you with sugar-plums, we know."















T was lovely August weather, but in the
grounds of Holleston Manor the lawn was
shaded from the hot sun by the fine old trees
and shrubs, and a group of ladies and gentlemen
were assembled there, some drinking tea, others
eating ices, laughing and talking, complaining
of the heat, and yet not by any means seeming
in the least distressed by it. The sweet soft
summer breeze came sighing over the lawn,
shaking gently down on the velvet turf the
petals of the guelder roses, and fanning the
faces of the ladies, and fluttering amongst their
ribbons and laces, carrying the soft pieces of
down from the swans' neck up the little stream
which flowed at the bottom of the lawn, where
they tangled themselves amongst the water-
lilies, and laid on the large shining green leaves
like flakes of snow.








London and New York. 19





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Orange Blossom. 85

would take me with her, and hang me in a rose
tree, while she worked, and we used to sing
together, and she would try to sing as high as
I did, but, of course, she never succeeded; then
she would say,-
"Ah, Dickie, I give it up; if I were to go as
high as that I should never come down again."
I was sorry to notice now how ill-mannered
some birds are, sparrows particularly, but I
tried to remember that they had not had the
same advantages which I had had, and so I tried
to be patient with them; but they would come
in flocks to stare at me, when I was out in the
garden, and say unkind things to me; jeer me
about my golden cage, and tell of their bright
happy lives. I own it sometimes made me
envious to hear them talk. I used to think how
delightful it would be to soar up into that
beautiful blue sky, or sit singing in the waving
branches of the trees; but my mistress used to
tell me that if I had my freedom I should not
know what to do with it, and that having been








Po pies. 117

papa to know if he maybe dressed, and have tea
in the nursery. Shall we, Freddy ?"
Freddy murmured assent, but the horror of
his dream still possessed him, and he sat
trembling in Anna's lap, asking again and
again if it was really a dream only. When he
was a little calmer, and the impression was
somewhat shaken off, Nurse went for his papa,
to inquire if he might be allowed to take his
tea in the nursery, and to tell of the poor
child's fright. Mr. Morley came up to him at
once.
Master Freddy's so sorry, sir," Anna began.
Let him speak for himself," said his father,
sternly. What have you to say, Freddy?"
The hard tone, the unsympathizing look in
his father's face, roused again the spirit which
as yet he had so little strength to keep in
control, and he had trouble to help saying, I
don't want to say nothing," bad grammar and
bad temper mingling in his little heart together.
But suddenly the memory of his dream came








152 Heat sease.

at any rate it seemed to sum up the whole in
Mrs. Smith's estimation.
"Well, I will see what can be done," said the
lady; I will talk to Mr. Osborne about it."
There ain't much time to lose, marm, if
you'll help 'em at all; for it's my belief if
nourishment ain't sent to that poor woman
to-day she won't be here to want it to-morrow."
So bad as that ?-I'll go at once."
"Do, there's a good creature," said the
woman, earnestly; "you'll never rue it."
"I will go certainly, now-good day, Mrs.
Smith ;" and the young lady, for she was very
young, not long married, went quickly in the
direction of the court indicated.
Mrs. Smith stood still, looking after her for
a minute or two, and then she said as she turned
away,-
"I think she'll do, though she's but a bit of
a child; but she has a kindly, comely face, and
if she don't get took in, she'll do," and with
this comment on the incumbent's wife, she hur-








12 Wild Rose.

person ?" asked Mr. Lisle, turning to her with-
out answering Miss Delacorn.
"No, this is my first visit here, and I only
arrived yesterday."
"She's an interesting study," he said, and
with a slight inclination of his head he moved
away, and returned to his place under the tree,
from which he had moved to follow Rose.
And Rose ran into the house up the back
stairs to a room at the top, which was hers
in the holidays, the window of which looked
out on the lawn. It opened on to a kind
of leads, which had a balustrade round it, and
which she had filled with plants the gardener
had given her, with whom, in spite of all her
wild ways, she was a great favourite. A pair of
doves in a large wicker cage cooed amongst the
flowers, also a present from the gardener, and
much of her time was passed up there playing
with the birds and tending the plants. By her
own wish, when company was in the house, she
took her meals in the housekeeper's room ; and,






















CONTENTS.



PAGE
WILD ROSE .. .

TULIP ... 25

HOLLY .. 49

ORANGE BLOSSOM .... 73

POPPIES . . 97

EGLANTINE .. 121

HEARTSEASE. .. . 145

THE LILY OF THE VALLEY. 169









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Lost among the Wild Men. Hollowdell Grange.
Percy's Tales of the Kings Mayhem's Wonders of
ofEngland. Science.
Boys of Beechwood. By Peasant Boy
Mrs. Eiloart. Philosopher.
Papa's Wise Dogs. Barford Bridge. By the
Disby Heathcote. By King- Rev. H. C. Adams.
N ston. The White Brunswickers.
Hawthorne's Wonder Book. By Rev. H. C. Adams.
The Doctor's Ward. By the A Boy's Adventures in the
Author of The Four Sisters." Wilds of Australia. By W.
Will Adams. By Dalton. Ta How tr's ool
itte T o Learnin.Tales of Walter's Schol
Little Ladders to Learning. Days. By Rev. H C. Adams.
Ist senresser. The Path She Chose. By
Ditto. 2nd series. F. M. S
The Child's Country Book. Little Women. By L.
SByT.Miller. ColouredPlates. Alcott.
_____________________- _








Holly. 6

Yes, she would go, she thought at last; there
could be no harm, and she would be so good at
lessons, and then dear mamma would be so
pleased, and directly she got home she would
say where she had been-of course it would
be so unkind to disappoint Lucy, which it
would if mamma said "No." How easy it is
to flatter ourselves, you see, that we are doing
some kindly action to another when we want
some excuse to follow our own inclination.
One other thing rather troubled her; what
time, she wondered, should she get back. She
must be home to dinner, but this difficulty,
unhappily for the little girl, was done away by
mamma telling her, when she went down, that she
was going out on some business for the whole
day, and she should not have time for lessons,
so she might have a whole holiday.
This was delightful-she should be home
anyhow long before mamma was, and all could
be managed delightfully; the servants would
give her something to eat when she came in if








72 Holly.

learn to make clothes for it-she had begun
already, and on Christmas Day it was to wear a
frock she was making for it. With a little help,
for she was too weak to work long, the frock was
finished in time; and when the joy bells rocked
the old church tower in honour of the birth of
the Holy Babe, Annie's little favourite sat crow-
ing beside her, in the frock of her own making,
and Mrs. Clayton could not help the tears rising
to her eyes to see the two innocent children, so
lately snatched from death, sitting there together,
each affording such pleasure to the other. What
a bright, happy Christmas it was!-and often
after Annie said, though she lay there weak and
helpless on her sofa, no Christmas was ever like
it again, for it was the dawning of a new life to
her, full of brighter hope and joy-and as she
lay twining, with her thin, white fingers, the
holly into wreaths to dress the house, she laid
aside one small piece to keep for ever in memory
of this turning point in her life.











120 Poppies.

words, think of the corn-field and the scarlet
poppies gleaming amongst it, and remember
that, gay and beautiful as they look, poison
lurks in their radiant petals, as folly enfolds
itself in the large-sounding words-

I Don't Care."








Heartsease. 163

"We must try and set all to rights now,
then," said Mrs. Osborne; "and my object in
coming to-day is to know what you think you
stand in the greatest need of."
"Oh, dear me, ma'am, that's more than I
can tell you: this poor old rag, with a petticoat
under it, is all the clothing I've got, and a old
shawl. You see poor Jeanie, that's all she's
a-got; and Lottie-she's out now a-nursing Mrs.
Martin's baby, and I cut up the only gown I
had as was the least decent to make her tidy
to go; she goes every day, and they give her
ninepence a week and her keep."
Mrs. Tremaine clothed her, I was told, and
sent her to school; and in a week her clothes
were filthy and you took her from school."
The woman smiled sadly as she answered,
" Ah! ma'am, that's what is said, I know.
Mrs. Tremaine was very kind, I will not be
so ungrateful as to deny; she gave Lottie a
light grey-barege, I think you call it-frock,
of her little girl's, a hat, and a pair of boots.









London and New York. 9

s.d.
Album for Children. With I8o page Plates by3 6
MILLAIS, Sir JOHN GILBERT, and others. Imp. 16mo, cloth.
Popular Nursery Tales. With 180 Illustrations by
J. D. WATSON and others. Imp. z6mo, cloth.
Child's Picture Story Book. With i80 Plates.
Imp. x6mo, cloth.
A Picture Story Book. Containing "King Nut-
cracker," and other Tales. 300 Illustrations. Imp. 16mo, cloth.

Mixing in Society. A Complete Manual of Manners.
The Children's Bible Book. With 1oo Illustrations,
engraved by DALZIEL.
A Handy History of England for the Young.
With 12o Illustrations, engraved by DALZIEL.
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edges.
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With 50 Illustrations by OSCAR PLETSCH, and others.
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HANS ANDERSEN. With 16 Coloured Plates. Cloth.
The Nursery Picture Book. With 630 Illustrations.
Folio, boards.



With Plates, fcap. 8vo, cloth-gilt.

The Boy Voyagers.. The Young Exiles. 3 6
The Castawavs. The Bear Hunters.
The Young Nile Voyagers. The Kangaroo Hunters.
The Boy Pilgrims. Young Yachtsman.
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Esteranza. Hfow to make the Best of It.





































LONDON:

PRINTED BY J. OGDEN AND CO.,
g72, ST. IOHN STREET, E.C.









Wild Rose. 21

Bob," said Rose, I can't get on a bit without
you. I believe this paste is too soft, or it is not
the right bait; they dance all round the line, and
nibble it, and away they go."
"Give us hold, I'll see to it," said the boy,
taking the line from her, and then together they
talked of their fishing, paying no heed to him
who stood quietly watching them. At length
he said,-
"Well, good-bye, Rose, the dog-cart is wait-
ing for me in the road. The man will think
I'm lost."
Oh, yes, good-bye I" she said, busily putting
the bait on her line.
"Won't you shake hands with me ?" he said.
"I'm all sticky with paste and stuff," she
answered, with that sweet, bright, pleasant
laugh which pleased Lisle so much to hear.
"Never mind. God bless you, little girl!
We shall meet again some day."
Oh yes, perhaps. I say, Bob, there was a
bouncer; make haste, you throw the line, old








London and New York. 21




Fcap. 8vo, boards, Is. each, with fancy covers.
s.d.
New CharadesfortheDraw- Acting Proverbs for the o
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Trap to Catch a Sunbeam." Fly Notes on Conjuring.
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The Dream Book and For- 2nd series.
tune Teller. A Shilling's Worth of Fun.




With Coloured Plates, i8mo, cloth, gilt.

Ally and her Schoolfellow. Cobwebs to Catch Flies. o 9
Loyal Charlie Bentham. Barbauld'sHymns in Prose.
Simple Stories for Children. Prince Arthur.
A Child's First Book. A Winter's Wreath.
Story of Henrietta. Twelve Links.
StoriesfromEnglishHistory. Easy Talks.
Life of Robinson Crusoe. Susan and the Doll.
Little Paul and the Moss Yuvenile Tales.
Wreaths. Six Short Stories.
Watts'Divine MoralSongs. The Captive Skylark.




Royal 32mo, with Illustrations.
These are also kept in Pager Covers, price 4d. each.

History of My Pets. Egerton Roscoe. o 6
Hubert Lee. Flora Mortimer.
Ellen Leslie. Charles Hamilton.
Jessie Graham. Story ofa Drop of Water.
Florence Arnott. The False Key.
Blind Alice. The Bracelets.
Grace and Clara. Waste Not, Want Not.
Recollections of My Child- Tarlton; or, Forgive and
hood. Forget.








82 Orange Blossom.

would take care of me, too, so I kept as still
as I could for the fearful jolting, and won-
dered what would happen next.
I felt very miserable at leaving all my
friends, and could not help feeling anxious to
know if there would be any birds where I was
going. All in a moment the jolting ceased,
and I was carried what appeared to me a long
way; then my cage was uncovered, and my little
mistress said,-
Poor, dear Dicki now you are at home."
For a short time I was so dazzled by the
light I could see nothing, but, when I recovered
sufficiently to look round, how bright and beau-
tiful everything was; what a contrast to the
old cobbler's !
I was standing on a little table, in front of a
window which looked into such a garden; the
air blew in so gently, and the sun shone so
warmly, that I broke into a loud song of
joy.
My little mistress clapped her hands, I suppose









London and New York. 23




In 64mo, 6d. each, cloth gilt, with Coloured Frontispiece.
s.d.
Language of Flowers. Ball Room Manual. o 6
Etiquette for Gentlemen. Handbook of Carving.
Etiquette of Courtship and Toasts and Sentiments.
Matrimony. How to Dress well.
Etiquettefor Ladies.






EDITED BY J. E. CARPENTER. Fcap. 48mo, fancy covers.

Fireside Songster. Family Song Book. o 6
Home Songster. Amusing Songster.
British Song Book. The Social Songster.
The Select Songster. Songs for all Seasons.
The Convivial Songster. The DrollDitty SongBook.
Merry Songs for Merry The Whimsical Songster.
Meetings. Highland Songster.
The Funny Man's Song Blue Bell Songster.
ThFashinaeSongBook Samrock Songster.
Bhe FasionaeSongBok. Mavourneen Songster.
Drawing-Room Song Book. The Sacred Song Book.
The Laughable Song Book. The Devout Songster.
The Sensation Songster. Songs for the Righteous.
Everybody's Song Book. Songs of Grace.
The Social Songster.

-~B~h~









24 Wild Rose.

and placed it in my garden to add to its native
beauty the graces of cultivation. I am proud
of my Rose, it has surpassed my expectations."
"You know now the secret, then," said a
lady who entered the room as he ceased speak-
ing. "You know to whom you have been so
many years indebted. Ah! Seymour Lisle is
indeed, as he is called, a strange man, for he
has forgotten himself entirely, and- "
"Hush! hush!" he said, rising; "not another
word. I have been a very fortunate man, for
I have realized a bright dream."
Till she mourned him dead years after, the
Wild Rose never knew that he had wrestled
with a love for her, that he thought a folly-
and abandoning all selfish consideration, acted
only for her good, leaving her, at his death, all
his property, as he would have done had she
been his wife.








22 George Routledge & Sons' Juvenile. Books.

SIXPENNY STORY BOOKs--continued.
s. d
o 6Lazy Lawrence, and the Parley's Thomas Titmouse.
Whiteigeon. Arthur's Christmas Story.
The Barring Out. The Lost Lamb.
The Orphans and Old Poz. Arthur's Stories for Little
The Mimic. Boys.
The Purple J ar, and other Arthur's Book about Boys.
Tales. Arthur's Organ Boy.
The Birthday Present, and Margaret ones.
the Basket Woman. The Two School Girls.
Simple Susan. Widow and her Daughter.
The Little Merchants. The Rose in the Desert.
Tale of the Universe. The Little Black Hen.
Robert Dawson. Martha and Rachel.
Kate Campbell. The Carpenter's Daughter
Basket of Flowers. The Prince in Disguise.
Babes in the Basket. Gertrude and her Bible.
The Jewish Twins. Bright-eyed Bessie.
Children on the Plains. The Contrast. By Miss
Little Henry and his Bearer. Edgeworth.
.Learning better than Houses The Grateful Negro. By
and Lands. Miss Edgeworth.
Maud's First Visit to her jane Hudson.
Aunt. A Kiss for a Blow.
Easy Poems. Plain edges. Young Negr Servaht.
The Boy Captive. By Peter Lina and her Cousins.
Parley.
Stories of Child Life. TheGatesAjar. Plainedges.
The Dairyman's Daughter. Sunday School Reader.
Arthur's Tales for the Hearty Staves.
Young. Contentment better than
Hawthorne's Gentle Boy. Wealth.
Pleasant and Proftable. Robinson Crusoe.
SParley's Poetry and Prose. Patient Working no Loss.
Arthur's Stories for Little No such Word as Fail.
Girls. Tales of Truth &- Kindness.
Arthur's Last Penny. Edward Howard.
The Young Cottager.








78 Orange L'lossonm.

one to his taste. But how any one can sup-
pose, because we are small, that we don't know
as much, and far more, than those large, inferior
animals, I cannot for a moment think.
But this is not the way to prove to you
that we do. I will sing you a little of my
history, and then you will see that, anyway,
we are wise enough to know our friends, and
to love and be grateful to those who are kind
to us; and you wonderful, wise human beings
cannot do much more than that, and some-
times, I have heard, you do not do as much.
Where I came from, or who were my father
and mother, I can't say. The first thing I re-
member was hanging in a small cage, in a
room, with about thirty more poor little cap-
tives like myself. Oh, the ignorance of man-
kind fancy hanging us in a dark, close room,
when our little lives are made unbearable unless
we have plenty of air and sunshine. Our
master was a little old man who used to mend
boots and shoes (what people wear such things








32 Tulip.

us, and play them all in turn," suggested
Isabel. "I'm eldest, I'll begin."
"Oh, yes, jolly! cried the others.
"Now we must all sit down and think
-make them up, you know-not old games."
"Very well. I've thought of a beauty now,"
said Ethel, the second girl.
"Well, don't speak till it's your turn; we'll
all sit in a row."
But to sit silent and think was too much for
Master Tom, and soon little bursts of laughter
disturbed the silence, and at length he was
discovered rolled up in the table-cover, going
over and over like a ball, which was thought
such a joke by little Minnie, that she could
do nothing but laugh. However Isabel at
last restored order by announcing that she
had thought of a game.
It was rather a peculiar one, and rather
difficult; so, as Tom had got into a wild mood,
there was no getting them to play properly,
and it was voted to try Ethel's.

















-4-


OLD Job Tweedie was a bird-fancier. He
lived in a narrow, dark, dirty street in
London, letting all his house except the shop
and the little back room which served him for
bedroom, parlour, kitchen, and all.
How the birds existed, or ever sang, or ate,
or plumed their wings in the dull, dark shop,
was a mystery; but perhaps they had been
captured so long that they had forgotten the
sunshine, the sweet air, the green trees, the
chase after the butterflies, the long flights under
the blue sky-all that must make the hap-
piness of the pretty winged inhabitants of the
world. Any way, they did exist; and Job
was very kind to his birds. He was very kind








I8 Wild Rose.

my apologies to Mr. Delacorn, and wish him
good-bye for me-I understand he is out."
"Yes, he doesn't care for this sort of thing.
Your deserting us will dreadfully disappoint the
young ladies."
He made no answer, but repeated his fare-
wells, and quietly walked away, calling to his
servant, as he entered, to get his portmanteau
ready, he was going to town by the next train.
On a shady bank at the edge of a pretty
stream, which turned a mill near Holleston, sat
Miss Rose Fairfax, fishing-the same short torn
frock, the large, old brown hat covering her
rough hair, and yet looking very pretty and
picturesque too, sitting there holding her line, a
can beside her for her bait, and fishing-basket
with long fresh grass laid in it to put her fish in,
a scarlet shawl, half on and half off her shoulder,
on one end of which lay curled up a little black-
and-tan terrier. The noise of the mill-wheel,
mingled with the singing of the birds, was all
that disturbed the silence, save the occasional

























































ORANGE BLOSSOM.
" She carried me into the greenhouse full of flowers, and there stood a
tall gentleman whom I ihad never seen before."









The Lily of the Valley. 181

she came, brought the tea in. Her uncle had
read his paper and smoked his pipe, the while
her deft fingers had put semblances of the
sweet spring flowers on to the satin.
After tea he went out to look at the mill, and
see all was right before the night fell, and she,
fetching her hat and cloak, went out too, to
breathe the air, and stretch the young limbs that
grew cramped with such close sitting to her work.
It was a beautiful evening; the air somewhat
fresh, but still and clear, and she bent her steps
towards the wild downs covered with heather
which encircled the little valley in which the
village lay. She could hear in the silence the
far-off shouts of the merry children coming
home from their May-day feast, and .her face
brightened with the thought of how happy they
had been.
It was colder on the high ground, but it was
very refreshing to her, who had sat in the small
room so hard at work all day, and she stepped
along quickly, stopping now and then to pick








Wild Rose. IS

and never shall be. I'm going out to the
war to be a cantiniere. Do you know what
that is ?-a woman who looks after the soldiers,
and all that. I hate young ladies. Tell me
what's the name of a man staying here."
"A gentleman, dear," corrected the old lady.
"He'd rather be called a man, if he's worth
anything, I should think." And a smile, which
was so inexpressibly sweet, broke over her
face-so sweet and tender, that perhaps that
was the nameless charm which made her a
favourite with those who were accustomed to
see it light her face; for it spoke of the womanly
nature, the love and devotion which only
wanted calling forth, buried beneath a wild
and reckless manner, a mistaken idea of inde-
pendence and originality, which had been born
of a neglected, unloved childhood, and asso-
ciation with meaner natures than her own.
Well, who is this gentleman, then ?" she
continued; "one who speaks slowly, as though
it was such a trouble, and has a handsome










4 George Routledge & Sons' Juvenile Books.


d. SEVEN-AND-SIXPENNY BOOKS-continued.
7 6 Dante's Divine Comedy. Translated by H. W.
LONGFELLOW. I vol., crown 8vo, cloth.
The Poetical Works of Lord Lytton. With Fron-
tispiece and Vignette. Fcap. 8vo, cloth.
Hogg on the Microscope. With 500 Illustrations and
"8 Coloured Plates.
Andersen's Stories for the Household. 8vo, cloth,
gilt edges, with 240 Illustrations.
Robinson Crusoe. With Ino Plates byJ. D. WAT-
SON.


In cloth, gilt edges, 6s. each.
6 oRoutledge's Every Boy's Annual. Edited by EDMUND
ROUTLEDGE. With many Illustrations, and beaut ul Coloured
Plates.
Shipwrecks; or, Disasters at Sea. By W. H. G.
KINGSTON. With more than zoo Illustrations.
The Adventures of Robinson Playfellow, a Young
French Marine. With 24 Plates, and many Woodcuts.
More Bab Ballads. By W. S. GILBERT. With Il-
lustrations by the Author.
Travelling About. By Lady BARKER. With 6 Plates
and 5 Maps.
Ridiculous Rhymes. Drawn 'by H. S. MARKS.
Printed in Colours by VINCENT BROOKS. 4to, fancy cover.
Pepper's Boy's Play-book of Science. 400 Plates.
Lj Aulnoy's Fairy Tales. Translated by PLANCHE.
Planche's Fairy Tales. By PERRAULT, &C.
Pepper's Play-book of Mines, Minerals, and
Metals. With 300 Illustrations. Post 8vo, gilt.
Motley's Rise of the Dutch Republic. Crown
8vo, cloth, gilt.
An Illustrated Natural History. By the Rev. J. G.
WooD, M.A. With 500 Illustrations by WILLIAM HARVEY, and
8 full-page Plates by WOLF and HARRISON WEIR. Post 8vo,
cloth, gilt edges.'
Lord Lytton's Dramatic Works. Crown 8vo, cloth,
gilt edges.








92 Orange Blossom.

him, for her sweet sake-be content to serve him
in my poor little way, satisfied that she was
happy. Here she comes, to cover me up. Good
night. "Twit, twit."






CHAPTER III.

SOMETIME after this I was very unhappy. My
dear little mistress (you must not blame her)
seemed to forget me altogether; sometimes she
did not feed me till late in the day, and some-
times not at all, poor little me! I had never
been forgotten before, and I felt it very deeply-
the cold east winds blew over the garden, and the
sun seemed to have no warmth, and I sat all
huddled up on my perch, like a bunch of untidy
feathers. It was a gloomy time-the only thing
that gave me pleasure was to watch the flowers
springing up in the garden; the blue Hepaticas,









96 Orange Blossom.

is he? where is my pet ?" Oh, how glad I was!
" He knows me," she said. Know her, the beauty!
I should think I did and she looked so bright
and happy, that I felt happy too.
I have little more to tell; my life is very
peaceful and happy now. I have a beautiful
window to live in, in which are ferns and creep-
ing plants, and a tiny fountain that makes a
sweet, pleasant sound, like an accompaniment
to my songs, and my mistress is kind as ever;
and he, too, who once made her forget me, he is
kind in his way, and comes and whistles to me,
dreadfully out of tune. But he means it kindly,
and I like him, because he is so good to her
whom I love so dearly. I am old now, so old
that all my singing is over, and many of my
feathers are gone. I have lived a long and
happy life, and I have only one wish-to lie in
her hand, and see her sweet face bending over
me, when I close my eyes for the last time.

-4--- .








London and New York. 15




Illustrated by ABSOLON, GILBERT, HARRISON WEIR, &C.,
square royal, gilt, 28. each.
s.d.
Amusing Tales for Young A Visit to the Zoological2 o
People. By Mrs. Myrtle. Gardens.
The Donkey's Shadow, and The Richmonds' Tour in
other Stories. Europe.
The Broken Pitcher, and Aunt Bessie's Picture Book.
other Stories. With 96 Pages of Plates.
The Little Lychetts. By Little Lily's Picture Book.
the Author of Olive," &c. With 96 Pages of Plates.
The Great Wonders of the The Story of a Nutcracker.
World. With 234 Pictures.
My First Picture Book. 36 Old Mother Hubbard's Pic-
Pages of Coloured Plates. ture Book. 36 Pages of
x6mo, cloth. Coloured Plates.




With Illustrations, strongly bound in cloth.

Ten Moral Tales. By Hester and I; or, Beware 2 o
Guizot. of Worldliness. By Mrs.
JcuvenileTalesfor allSeasons Manners.
ConquestandSelf-Conquest. The Cherry Stones. By
Evenings at Donaldson Rev. H. C. Adams.
Manor. The Firstof 7une. By Rev.,
Praise and Principle. H. C. Adams.
Grace & Isabel(M'Intosh). Rosa A Story for Girls.
Charms and Counter- May Dundas ; or, The
Force of Example. By Mrs.
Charms. Geldart.
Gertrude and Eulalie. GlimpsesofOurlslandHome.
Robert and Harold. By Mrs. Geldart.
Robinson the Younger. The Indian Boy. By Rev.
Amy Carlton. H. C. Adams.
Robinson Crusoe. Ernie Elton at Home.
Laura Temple. The Standard Poetry Book
Harry and his Homes. for Schools.
Our Native Land. Tryand Trust. By Author
Our Native of "Arthur Morland."
Bundle of Sticks. Swiss Family Robinson.
Family Pictures from the Evenings at Home.
Bible.








86 Orange Blossom.

born and bred in a cage, my wings would soon
grow weary, and I should be pecked to death by
larger wild birds. She meant it to comfort me,
pretty little dear, and so I tried to believe her.
These wretched, saucy little sparrows used often
to come and steal my food, the cherries, and
sugar, which my little darling used to put in my
cage. Then she would wave her handkerchief
to frighten them away, but they came again
when she was gone, which was a great draw-
back to my pleasure in the garden. One day
she had left me alone there, having given me a
nice piece of egg, and my bath, and laid some
green leaves over the top of my cage, and I was
singing to myself softly, wishing she would
come back to send away the sparrows, whom I
expected every moment to eat my nice egg.
I could hear them among the trees, arguing and
quarrelling, as they nearly always were, when,
suddenly looking round, I saw a huge cat just
going to spring on to my cage. Oh, how
frightened I was! I clung to the wires; I flut-









io6 Poppies.
love which made him feel he was indebted to
her for so much of his comforts, and because-she
denied him nothing he asked for; but he had
not the smallest respect for her, and would do
nothing he did not like to please her, or obey
the smallest order that did not jump with his
inclination. The mother, a very delicate and
indolent woman, had left always the care of the
children to her nurses, and seldom saw them,
save when they were brought down dressed in
the drawing-room for an hour before dinner.
They always looked very nice and well, she
thought, and all visitors admired them, and they
seemed quite happy and fond of Anna, and so
she saw no reason to interfere. To be trouble-
some, she imagined, was the normal condition
of children, and when, as occasionally happened,
Master Freddy became tiresome in the drawing-
room, she only sent for Anna to fetch him away,
and concerned herself no more. But as he grew
older, and, through the unwise management
of his too devoted nurse, more naughty, it








192 The Lily of the Valley.

benefit by his daughter's loving work: the
distress of mind had so told on him, that he
gradually fell into a rapid decline. Lily went
to nurse him, and then came back, ather uncle's
request, to live with him-the same sweet,
gentle, pale, patient girl, like the flower she
was named after-and all lovingly welcomed
her back, and save for the absence of the
endless work, and of one face, that-little as
she would own it, even to herself, she pined
to see again-the old quiet life seemed to have
returned and fallen into the old ways.
And then one day, long after, Maurice came
home. He had had a letter from his mother
by the last mail, and he came at once to
England and to Thorndale. One kiss of his
mother, and he was away to the mill, where
he gathered, to keep for his own for life,-

"The Lily of the Valley."



Woodfall and Kinder Printers, Milford Lane, Strand, London, W.C.








16 Wild Rose.

face, but with an indifferent expression, as
though he had lost interest in everything, or
never had any."
"I don't know, my dear, they've so many
new friends lately; perhaps he's a suitor for
one of my ladies."
"Oh dear, no, he loves himself too well.
I shall go now to my corner on the stairs, and
see them all go in to dinner, and I can watch
who he takes in. I'll tell you in the morning.
Good night, Mrs. Grantley."

"What a strange fancy this is of Mr. Lisle's,
now, Isabel," said Mrs. Delacorn to her daughter.
"He has somehow met with Rose about the
gardens, and has been making it quite a per-
sonal favour that we take her to the picnic to-
morrow. I don't like to refuse: it won't do."
Why not, mamma ? Who is he ? I don't see
why she should go if you would rather not."
I don't mind, my dear, in the least, if the
child likes to go; but she never has anything to








Orange Blossom. 91

show you to some one you must love very,
very much, because I do; and you must sing
your prettiest song, and be altogether charm-
ing." So I shook out my feathers and began
at once to sing my very best song, as well as
I could, at least, while she ran so fast with
me, that I nearly fell off my perch.
She carried me into a green-house, full o.
flowers, in which she often used to hang my
cage up now that the garden was too cold,
and there stood a tall gentleman, whom I
had never seen before.
"There, now, look at my Dickie; is he not a
beauty ?" she said.
Would you believe it, he never so much as
looked at me, but taking her hand, said,-
"My darling, I can only see one beauty."
I must say I thought it was rude, and made up
my mind that I could not like him, even to please
her; but, somehow, when I found that it was he
who had brought back the bright smiles to the
face I loved, I felt I must forgive him, and love







68 Holly.

In a moment her promises to her mother, never
to go out again without leave, were forgotten,
and throwing down her doll, she ran through
the garden into the lane, and did not pause
till she stood in front of the little cottage
where the Joneses lived. The door was half
open, she pushed it and entered. Lucy was
sitting on the floor with her back to the
door, rocking the cradle in which lay the
Baby, but so changed that Annie scarcely
knew it; all the colour was gone from its little
face, and an expression of great pain was on
its features. Annie crept softly up to the cradle
and, stooping down, pressed her lips to the
poor little pale face.
Lucy started up, exclaiming, "Oh, Miss,
you'll get the fever! Jenny, and Sam, and the
Baby have all got it, and mother has gone up
to the parson's to ask for something for them."
"Lucy, the Baby won't die. Oh! tell me it
won't die. I heard your mother tell Susan
the doctor said so."







Tulip. 43

Kind and indulgent as the doctor was to her,
she was ashamed to ask for a larger allowance;
to own that she spent it all on herself, for it was
a very handsome one, which should have amply
covered all expenses, and given her that purest
of all pleasures-the pleasure of helping others.
She looked very lovely, as I have described
her, sitting in the fading light, and little Minnie,
with whom she was a great favourite, ran to her
and clambered into her lap. With the child
clinging about her, she rose and came to the
table as Doctor Hartley entered.
It was the time he always came to have a
chat with his children, his arduous profession
leaving him little time to see them, and he knew
at this time they would all assemble.
"Now, young ones, give me an account of
your day's work," he said, drawing his chair
nearer Minnie, whom Hetty had at length dis-
entangled from her neck and placed in her chair.
" I shall begin with the youngest; what have
you been doing, Titmouse ?"









London and New York. 25.





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K __

















- II Ii*
R . . ..

















-- III'









'' t -

WILD ROSE.
"Much of her time was spent there playing with the birds and tending
the plants."








20 George Routledge & Sons' Juvenile Books.


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Heartsease. 157

hand in hers; "you shall have food, and doctor,
and nurse, in less than ten minutes." The
woman murmured "Thank you," and flying
down the crazy stairs and out of the door, Mrs.
Osborne hurried to the next cottage. She
knew the woman there.
Mrs. Jones, why is that woman alone next
door ?" she said; "she is dying without help
or comforts."
"Well, mum, I know it's very sad; but you
see every one is out in the hop-garden-you
can't get a soul for love nor money this time
o' year. I'm home because I takes washing,
and I can't leave my work to go to her, you
see, ma'am-that would not pay me and keep
my children."
Pray go to her, or find some one. I will pay
you anything you ask; it is too shocking."
"Well, mum, if you takes such a interest,
to oblige you, I'll go; but raly she's that
filthy."
"She is, I know," answered Mrs. Osborne;









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POPPIES S,

"Don't care !"
-- _

_~-~=~=== ====---37












L ~ ~ it -~


~i- --->II~









128 Eglantine.

come to buy birds so late; but presently, as.
he sat there, smoking his pipe, a girl stopped,
looked in at the window at the rows of little
green cages, with their pretty feathered occu-
pants roosting on their perches, and then, turn-
ing to Job, she said timidly,-
"What is the price of these birds ?"
"Depends on the sort, my dear," said old
Job, looking up into the very pretty face of the
girl who addressed him.
"I wanted a little singing bird of some kind;
but I can't afford a very dear one."
Come in, my dear, and look at them. I'll
let you have one as reasonable as I can," he
said, getting up and moving his stool for her
to enter the shop.
Now this," he said, taking down a cage, "is
the sweetest little songster-a linnet; he isn't
gaudy, like the golden canary, but his pipe is
beautiful. I will let you have Bobby a bargain."
I think I would rather have a canary. It is
for a present, and it looks prettier."











GEORGE ROUTLEDGE & SONS'

CATALOGUE
OF
JUVENILE BOOKS
AND

POETICAL WORKS,








LONDON: THEP BROADWAY, LUDGATE.
NEW YORK : 416, BROOME STREET.
Lbp----








Tulip. 33

"Well, we are all to think in turn of some
one, and call them by some flower, and then
we are to guess who it is."
This was voted capital; even wild Tom
approved, and Isabel started first.
Cyclamen."
"Oh, I know, old Braithwaite; he's a very
sickly man," said Tom.
"No; now that's nonsense, Tom. Guess
properly; a Cyclamen is a beautiful flower-
now you must all ask her questions-' if she
loves it very much; better than any other
flower?' 'Where she would like to put it?'
In that way, you know," said Ethel.
"Do you love it very much, then ?" asked
Minnie.
"Yes, VERY much."
"Where would you like to put it ?" asked
George, who was a very romantic, tender little
fellow, and thought that a very pretty question.
"In my heart," replied Isabel, warmly.
Then it's mamma," exclaimed all.
2*








Tke Lily of the Valley. 189

sad story, for you to tell Maurice, that he may
think better of me."
"My dear, he could not-he could not; you
are to him as an angel," said the old woman,
pressing her hand ; "but go on, dear; go on."
Tempted by our sore need-for my mother's
long illness had been such a sad expense-my
father took for his own use, at various times,
sums of money entrusted to him by his em-
ployer, whose suspicion became aroused, and
inquiries were made. Shall I ever forget that
night, when he came home and told me! My
mother had onl been dead a few months, and
there was only me to tell his sorrow to. I
asked him to let me go to Mr. Aikin and tell
him all, and plead for him. I did, and oh! he
was so strange-he said very little ; but when I,
with tears-I was so silly, I could not help
crying-said I would pay it all, if he would
spare him the exposure and still employ him,
he laughed and said, 'Well, pay it by instal-
ments; so long as you pay once a quarter








8 Wild Rose.

Beneath some willows, their graceful branches
dripping into the water, stood the little fugitive
and her pursuer. Her face flushed with her long
run, and, panting for breath, she stood hold-
ing in her hand a coarse brown straw hat; her
long hair was rough and tangled, and her dress,
which was much too short for her, was torn in
several places, and the rents pinned up. Her
small feet were encased in the roughest, com-
monest boots, and her stockings hung loose
about her well-shaped limbs; in short, a more
untidy-looking young lady it would have been
difficult to find. Her pursuer had laid a firm
grasp on her arm, and was looking down on her
with an air of mingled pity and admiration,
at her beautiful defiant face, at her graceful
form, and at her strange and unladylike attire.
I have caught you at last," he said; "I've
long had a desire to talk with you. Now, who
are you ?-what are you ?"
"Why do you want to know ?-let go of me!"
she said, sharply; and then she burst into a








The Lily of the Valley. 187

wrapped up exactly in the same manner, and
on each was written "Lilian Mayburn," with
the dates when received. As he locked the box
and put it into a bureau which stood at one
end of the room, the door opened, and a man
entered, bringing some letters.
By this post ?" asked the little man.
"Yes, sir," he answered, putting them down
on the desk.
"I had another instalment from Thorndale
this morning."
"You have, sir ?-God bless her! I hope she
is not working herself ill."
"Ah! I don't know; that's nothing to do with
me. She promised to pay me, and so long as
she continues to do so, so long you shall re-
main here, with the secret faithfully kept; when
she stops, you know the result."
The man passed his hand over his forehead,
pushing back the long rough hair hanging over
it, with a weary sigh, and left the office, care-
fully closing the door behind him; and his





Full Text

PAGE 1

120 Poppies. words, think of the corn-field and the scarlet poppies gleaming amongst it, and remember that, gay and beautiful as they look, poison lurks in their radiant petals, as folly enfolds itself in the large-sounding words" I Don't Care."



PAGE 1

The Baldwin Library Rm (m



PAGE 1

14 Wild Rose. her face and head into a large basin of water, wetting all the long thick masses of brown hair, and shaking it as a dog does coming out of the water, pulled off her boots, and slipped her feet into some thin shoes, she came downstairs four at a time, rapidly, but noiselessly, with an eager, anxious look in her eyes, apparently fearful of being met by any one, and came into the housekeeper's room, where the table was laid for tea. "Here I am, Mrs. Grantley," she said, flinging herself on the large old-fashioned sofa, and nearly upsetting a large basketful of work which was placed on it. "So I see, my dear," said the old lady, looking through the silver-rimmed spectacles at the graceful wild creature she had so much interest in and affection for, and yet whom she could neither control nor manage. Never mind my work, and come and sit pretty at the table like a young lady." "Don't call me that, because I am not cae,



PAGE 1

London and New York. 9 s.d. Album for Children. With I8o page Plates by3 6 MILLAIS, Sir JOHN GILBERT, and others. Imp. 16mo, cloth. Popular Nursery Tales. With 180 Illustrations by J. D. WATSON and others. Imp. z6mo, cloth. Child's Picture Story Book. With i80 Plates. Imp. x6mo, cloth. A Picture Story Book. Containing "King Nutcracker," and other Tales. 300 Illustrations. Imp. 16mo, cloth. Mixing in Society. A Complete Manual of Manners. The Children's Bible Book. With 1oo Illustrations, engraved by DALZIEL. A Handy History of England for the Young. With 12o Illustrations, engraved by DALZIEL. Child Life. With Plates by OSCAR PLETSCH. Gilt edges. Petsetilla's Posy. By TOM HOOD. Plates by F. BARNARD. Gilt edges. One by One. A Child's Book of Tales and Fables. With 50 Illustrations by OSCAR PLETSCH, and others. Rhyme and Reason. A Picture. Book of Verses for Little Folks. With Illustrations by WOLF, and others. The Golden Harp. Hymns, Rhymes, and Songs for the Young. With 50 Illustrations. Griset's Grotesques. With Rhymes by Tosm HOOD. Fancy boards. The Children's Poetry Book. With 16 Coloured Plates. Square, cloth. Out of the.Heart: Spoken to the Little Ones. By HANS ANDERSEN. With 16 Coloured Plates. Cloth. The Nursery Picture Book. With 630 Illustrations. Folio, boards. With Plates, fcap. 8vo, cloth-gilt. The Boy Voyagers.. The Young Exiles. 3 6 The Castawavs. The Bear Hunters. The Young Nile Voyagers. The Kangaroo Hunters. The Boy Pilgrims. Young Yachtsman. The Boy Foresters. Among the Tartar Tents. Tom and the Crocodiles. Clarissa. Esteranza. Hfow to make the Best of It.



PAGE 1

144 Eglantine. there, after a quiet wedding, he took his happy wife. And on this especial afternoon they had assembled a small party of friends to celebrate the first anniversary of their wedding. Now it was not Tiny Tim who sang so loudly; he could not, try as he would, outdo that goldenplumaged little fellow. Before Muriel left, she had paid another visit to Job, and bought the splendid songster she had first wished to purchase-as company to Tim, she said, but more as a sort of thanksgiving, as it were, to Job, for she felt how much she owed him; and often and often, when the two little birds sang their bright songs to her, she would lift her sweet eyes to the blue sky, through the frame of roses round the window of her pretty home, and say from the bottom of her grateful heart, "God bless us, every one!" -4----



PAGE 1

60 Holly. get home, and then you can say you won't do it no more; and p'raps you won't never, 'cause it's only held here once in three years-sometimes it's at Berylands, and sometimes at Empthill." "Well, I'll come, then; and can you bring me a flag too ?" Yes, I dessay I can. I must go now, give us Baby." Annie kissed the little sleeping child, gave it back to its small nurse, and, taking Dolly in her lap as Lucy moved slowly away with her burden, she thought that after all she would not change places with Lucy; her dull life was after all better than Lucy's hard one, and Dolly was so much lighter than Baby, and she might put her down whenever she liked without the chance of her crying. She was awake very early the next morning, her thoughts full of the club, half wishing, though, that she had not promised to go, and thinking she would not, but Lucy would be so disappointed,



TITLE: Wild Rose and other tales

PROJECT: JUV



Front Cover

Front Matter

Frontispiece

Title Page

Table of Contents

Frontispiece

Wild Rose

Tulip

Holly

Orange Blossom

Poppies

Eglantine

Heartsease

The Lily of the Valley

Advertising

Back Cover

Spine



PAGE 1

Wild Rose. IS and never shall be. I'm going out to the war to be a cantiniere. Do you know what that is ?-a woman who looks after the soldiers, and all that. I hate young ladies. Tell me what's the name of a man staying here." "A gentleman, dear," corrected the old lady. "He'd rather be called a man, if he's worth anything, I should think." And a smile, which was so inexpressibly sweet, broke over her face-so sweet and tender, that perhaps that was the nameless charm which made her a favourite with those who were accustomed to see it light her face; for it spoke of the womanly nature, the love and devotion which only wanted calling forth, buried beneath a wild and reckless manner, a mistaken idea of independence and originality, which had been born of a neglected, unloved childhood, and association with meaner natures than her own. Well, who is this gentleman, then ?" she continued; "one who speaks slowly, as though it was such a trouble, and has a handsome



PAGE 1

56 Holly. whom he had seen in hospitals tending the sick -and Annie would stand with her big blue eyes, full of wonderment, fixed on the old man's face, listening to him, and then, beneath her favourite tree in the orchard, tell it all to Dolly again. Poor Dolly looked herself rather like an old soldier, for her nose was broken, one foot was off, and one arm, and nearly all her hair, but Annie loved her all the same, and would have felt very indignant if any one had called her ugly. Besides these two friends of hers, James and Dolly, Annie had a white kitten, called Snow, and a little dog named Frisk, but still, with all that, her heart pined for the companionship of a little child. It was, therefore, with great joy she looked forward to seeing Lucy in the morning bringing Baby to nurse. In consequence of this anxious desire to get out as soon as possible, Annie's lessons were by no means so well done as usual, which greatly astonished her mother; but Annie was afraid to say what caused her inattention, as she felt sure Mrs.



PAGE 1

London and New York. II THREE-AND-SIXPENNY JUVENILES-continued. .d. Schoolboy Honour. By Rev. The Child's Story Book. By 3 6 H. C. Adams. T. Miller. Coloured Plates. Red Eric. By R. M. BalUncle Tom's Cabin. lantyne. Tom Dunstone's Troubles. Louis' School Days. By Mrs. Eiloart. Ifild Man of the West. By The Young Marooners. Ballantyne. Influence. By the Author Dashwood Priory. By E. of "A Trap to Catch a SunJ. May. beam." Preaks on the Fells. By R. Jack of the Mill. By W. M. Ballantyne. Howitt. Lamb's Tales from ShakPattence Strong. By the speare. Authorof"TheGayworthys." Balderscourt; or, Holiday Dick Rodney. By J. Grapt. Tales. By Rev. H. C. Adams. Jack Manly. By J. Grant. Rob Roy. By James Grant. Don Quixote. (Family EdiThe Girl ofthe Family. By tion.) the Author of "A Trap to Our Domestic Pets. By Catch a Sunbeam." Rev. J. G. Wood. PaulGerrard,the CabinBoy. Historyfor Boys. By J. G. By Kingston. Edgar. Johnny yordan. By Mrs. Through Life and for Lie. Eiloart. Saxelford. By E. J. May. Ernie Elton, at Home and Old Talesfor the Young. at School.' The Village Idol. By the Harry Hopes Holiday. Author of "A Trap to Catch BoyLife among the Indians. a Sunbeam." Old Saws new Set. By the Children of Blessing. By Author of "A Trap to Catch Author of "The Four Sisters." a Sunbeam." Lost among the Wild Men. Hollowdell Grange. Percy's Tales of the Kings Mayhem's Wonders of ofEngland. Science. Boys of Beechwood. By Peasant -Boy Mrs. Eiloart. Philosopher. Papa's Wise Dogs. Barford Bridge. By the Disby Heathcote. By KingRev. H. C. Adams. N ston. The White Brunswickers. Hawthorne's Wonder Book. By Rev. H. C. Adams. The Doctor's Ward. By the A Boy's Adventures in the Author of The Four Sisters." Wilds of Australia. By W. Will Adams. By Dalton. Ta How tr's ool itte .T o Learnin.Tales of Walter's Schol Little Ladders to Learning. Days. By Rev. H C. Adams. Ist senresser. The Path She Chose. By Ditto. 2nd series. F. M. S The Child's Country Book. Little Women. By L. SByT.Miller. ColouredPlates. Alcott. ______________________



PAGE 1

London and New York. 23 In 64mo, 6d. each, cloth gilt, with Coloured Frontispiece. s.d. Language of Flowers. Ball Room Manual. o 6 Etiquette for Gentlemen. Handbook of Carving. Etiquette of Courtship and Toasts and Sentiments. Matrimony. How to Dress well. Etiquettefor Ladies. EDITED BY J. E. CARPENTER. Fcap. 48mo, fancy covers. Fireside Songster. Family Song Book. o 6 Home Songster. Amusing Songster. British Song Book. The Social Songster. The Select Songster. Songs for all Seasons. The Convivial Songster. The DrollDitty SongBook. Merry Songs for Merry The Whimsical Songster. Meetings. Highland Songster. The Funny Man's Song Blue Bell Songster. ThFashinaeSongBook Samrock Songster. Bhe FasionaeSongBok. Mavourneen Songster. Drawing-Room Song Book. The Sacred Song Book. The Laughable Song Book. The Devout Songster. The Sensation Songster. Songs for the Righteous. Everybody's Song Book. Songs of Grace. The Social Songster. -~B~h~



PAGE 1

126 Egflanti e. to everything and everybody, patient with his lodgers when they could not pay, charitable to the utm6st extent of his means to his poorer neighbours, so that all who knew him said what a good true heart lived in that ungainly body. He had names for all his birds, and seemed to love them, and positively regret selling them, though to do so was his only hope of living. He had never married, never had young children about him to love and care for, and the birds seemed, somehow, to have taken their place, and filled the void. Whether in the old days long gone there had been some one whom he might have wished to call wife, and be the mother of his children, no one knew now; in that old heart there might live some tender romance, none the less true and tender because the man was only an ignorant unlettered being, earning his bread by his daily labour-it was impossible now to say; at any rate, he did not speak of it to any one, but only showed how possible it was that it might have been by his



PAGE 1

12 Wild Rose. derson ?" asked Mr. Lisle, turning to her without answering Miss Delacorn. "No, this is my first visit here, and I only arrived yesterday." "She's an interesting study," he said, and with a slight inclination of his head he moved away, and returned to his place under the tree, from which he had moved to follow Rose. And Rose ran into the house up the back stairs to a room at the top, which was hers in the holidays, the window of which looked out on the lawn. It opened on to a kind of leads, which had a balustrade round it, and which she had filled with plants the gardener had given her, with whom, in spite of all her wild ways, she was a great favourite. A pair of doves in a large wicker cage cooed amongst the flowers, also a present from the gardener, and much of her time was passed up there playing with the birds and tending the plants. By her own wish, when company was in the house, she took her meals in the housekeeper's room ; and,



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The Lily of the Valley. 185 course; and it would be better you should say so. Tell me the truth, that you love this being, and that is why you will have nothing to do with me." "I could not tell you so-it would not be the truth." "Is it a woman, then ?" he said, eagerly, looking at her now. "No, Maurice." "A man ? And you are toiling your life out to serve him, without loving him." "I cannot say that either. And is it quite kind or noble to try thus to draw my confidence out of me?" He turned his face away again, and made no answer; then suddenly he held his hand out to her, and said, Shake hands, Lily, and bid me God speed. Your cottage is in sight, and my shortest road is this way." "Shall I not see you again ?"' she said, very slowly, as in an almost painful grasp he held her hand, still with his head turned from her pale face.





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Wild Rose. 17 wear, and never cares to go anywhere with us. You had better ask her. I don't want to offend Mr. Lisle." Oh! pray, mamma, put all that out of your head. Mr. Lisle is not a marrying man, and if he were, I am sure I hate him, and so we all do, conceited, lazy fellow!" Mrs. Delacorn only laughed, and said, "Go and see if that child likes to go ; and see that she has something decent to put on." It was a bright sunny morning, quite made for a picnic. When all were ready to go, and the carriages were at the door, Mr. Lisle came to Mrs. Delacorn and said, I am so sorry to be unable to join your party, but business takes me suddenly to town." Oh, Mr. Lisle! and we have really had so much trouble to persuade your little favourite to join us to-day, but in vain." "I see she is not amongst you," he answered, coldly. I hope your picnic will be agreeable, and the day continue fine. Good-bye! make



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Tulip. 45 "What did I say now, George ?" asked Doctor Hartley. "It was French, I know-I haven't begun that yet." You haven't, lazy boy begin at once. Now, Isabel and Ethie, account for yourselves." "Lessons, papa-and we finished the baby things for Mrs. Elton, and took them to her." "Ah! ha! good girls! that's the best I've heard yet-something useful, 'something accomplished, something done'-for others beside yourselves. There's a medal for each of you," and he was nearly 'smothered immediately with kisses, for the medals were half-crowns. "Tom, go on." "Oh! I've done nothing much-been to school, about all I can say for myself. I don't know how a boy is to do anything for anybody," said Tom, a little sulkily, feeling that his day's work would not probably merit a medal. "Oh, heaps of ways, my son. Keep your eyes open, and find out; the oldest and youngest,



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Eglanline. 143 and a very great many people in a very small room. And above the numerous voices and merry laughter, louder than all, may be heard the clear, bright notes of a canary; how he is singing, to be sure! No wonder he sings, he is hanging at an open window, through which he can see such a park such trees! such flowers in the garden beneath the window! such roses round it! Why, it would have made any bird sing, especially when eight or ten people were all talking and laughing as these were, and another bird was trying to outdo him. The doctor had earned his pipe of port. He had been called just in time, and though he said* Philip would never be a strong man, there was no reason why, with care and prudence, he should not live a long and useful life. And so his master, hearing that his scheme was to take a house for the purpose of letting lodgings with his little wife, he had finished his good work by letting him, at a peppercorn rent, a house on his own estate, looking into his park; and I



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T was lovely August weather, but in the grounds of Holleston Manor the lawn was shaded from the hot sun by the fine old trees and shrubs, and a group of ladies and gentlemen were assembled there, some drinking tea, others eating ices, laughing and talking, complaining of the heat, and yet not by any means seeming in the least distressed by it. The sweet soft summer breeze came sighing over the lawn, shaking gently down on the velvet turf the petals of the guelder roses, and fanning the faces of the ladies, and fluttering amongst their ribbons and laces, carrying the soft pieces of down from the swans' neck up the little stream which flowed at the bottom of the lawn, where they tangled themselves amongst the waterlilies, and laid on the large shining green leaves like flakes of snow.



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I*



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184 The Lily of the Valley. "And for you; you will be rid of me," he answered, bitterly. "Maurice, that is not kind," she said. "You know, if you would be contented here, I would much rather; but you will not be my friend only." "No, I cannot," he answered; "you will not alter your decision-I can't alter mine. Be my wife-at least my promised wife-and I, will stay here and work quietly, and wait patiently. But if you will not consent to that, I will not stay in the village-in the land-where you are. What is this self-imposed task," he went on, eagerly, "that I may neither know it, nor share it, nor take it from you ?" It is a labour of love, Maurice, as I told you; until it is finished, I will be no man's wife -nor promise to be, lest I fail." "Why will you not say what it is ?" "Because it is a secret in which another is involved besides myself." "How you must love him !-it is him, of



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HEARTSEASE '>--



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Wild Rose. I by water, and all that, as keep answering you. Ah! they're coming, good-bye!" and suddenly starting from his hold, which he had loosened as he talked to her, she sprang away and was out of sight in a moment. "Oh, Mr. Lisle! were you making acquaintance with that little mad-cap ?" asked Miss Delacorn; "I should have thought, with your fastidious taste, you would not have liked to speak to such a little object." "Is my taste fastidious, Miss Delacorn ?" "Every one says so, Mr. Lisle." "Then, on the principle that what every one says must be true, I must perforce acknowledge it. Anyway, it has been gratified by the sight of that very handsome wayward child." Rose, do you mean ?-we were looking for her. I wanted to show our wild Indian to Miss Henderson," said Miss Delacorn. "Is it possible you admire her? I shall begin to think you are not fastidious." Have you never seen her, then, Miss Hen-



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TULIP. "Dress was a passion ; it occupied all her time and thouglit."



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Holly. 63 Before it was gathered a large crowd, consisting chiefly of working-men, all, as Lucy had described, gaily adorned with ribbons and scarfs. She was rather alarmed at first, but when the band struck up, and they fell into marching order, she ran eagerly forward, and brandishing her little flag on high (a blue pocket-handkerchief of Mr. Jones's, tied to a piece of stick), she marched forward as proud and contented with herself as any there. The squire had kindly lent them his park, and when they had paraded the village they walked along the high road about a mile to the entrance of the park, and then down the carriage drive to the group of trees where the tent was placed in which they were to dine. By the time they reached it poor little Annie was tired and hungry, and she began to wonder how Dolly felt under the apple-tree where she had left her, for she knew she could not carry her all the time. She looked round for Lucy, who had started just behind her, but whom now



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I8 Wild Rose. my apologies to Mr. Delacorn, and wish him good-bye for me-I understand he is out." "Yes, he doesn't care for this sort of thing. Your deserting us will dreadfully disappoint the young ladies." He made no answer, but repeated his farewells, and quietly walked away, calling to his servant, as he entered, to get his portmanteau ready, he was going to town by the next train. On a shady bank at the edge of a pretty stream, which turned a mill near Holleston, sat Miss Rose Fairfax, fishing-the same short torn frock, the large, old brown hat covering her rough hair, and yet looking very pretty and picturesque too, sitting there holding her line, a can beside her for her bait, and fishing-basket with long fresh grass laid in it to put her fish in, a scarlet shawl, half on and half off her shoulder, on one end of which lay curled up a little blackand-tan terrier. The noise of the mill-wheel, mingled with the singing of the birds, was all that disturbed the silence, save the occasional



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TtZli. 41 trimmingherdresses, taking her things out to look at them, and putting them away, growing often. utterly weary of even this, her sole amusement. There was not much gaiety going in the quiet old city, but there were occasional parties given, and Mr. Hartley thought it was time for Hetty to be allowed to join them, which pleased her immensely-not so much for the pleasure of the balls and parties themselves, as the fresh opportunities to exercise her taste in dress. Mrs. Hartley, having exhausted all her ideas on the subject of the purposeless, idle life Hetty was leading, had determined to leave her now alone, in the hope that she must at last see her mistake, and learn for what much higher purpose we were placed here than to pass all the precious hours in the mere adornment of one's person, or in listless idleness. In a small narrow court, turning out of the High Street, lived the old nurse who had had the care of Hetty's childhood, and of her she was very fond, and often going to see her,



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Holly. 67 found it out and told Mrs. Clayton, then, perhaps, Lucy had been forbidden to come. She felt very lonely again as she sat one morning under her tree, with her doll in her lap. Dolly was doing her lessons. Annie always taught her what her mother had been teaching her; she had to be careful not to forget what she had learnt, or else Dolly would not know how to read or write. Sometimes Dolly was naughty, and then she had to kneel with her face pressed close against the tree till she promised to be good. They had just finished lessons one morning after Lucy had ceased her visits, when Annie saw Lucy's mother come to the back door. She looked pale and sad, and when Susan came, in answer to her knock, she began to cry, and Annie heard her say, She is very bad; the doctor says she cannot live." Annie waited to hear no more; she felt sure the dear little laughing, rosy Baby was ill, and perhaps it would die, and she should never see it again.



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Wild Rose. 7 Seymour will notice her. I can't think why mamma has her here so incessantly." "Who is she ?" "Oh, an orphan child of some early friend of mamma's, in whom nobody seems to take the smallest interest. She's a little horror, I think; but mamma calls her beautiful, and is always asking her to come and stay. She's at school somewhere, and has no home to go to in the holidays, poor little animal! so she comes here. She's frightfully shy, and so wild." As she finished speaking, a figure dashed through the bushes near, and fled past them with the speed of an antelope, followed rapidly by the man spoken of as Seymour Lisle. Little mad thing! there she goes, and that stupid fellow after her," continued the girl. "She is very lovely, though," said the other. Do you think so ? I can't see it, and I don't think you would if you were close to her; she's as brown as a gipsy. Let us walk the way they went, and if we catch them, I will introduce her."



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The Lily of the Valley. 191 he had to me at his death. I objected at first to leave my father, but on reflection I felt it would be so much better for him, and so here I have been working myself almost blind; but the debt is paid, and I have saved my father from public shame. Will you, when you write, Mrs. Weston, tell Maurice just this-that my work was to save my father from a heavy sorrow, and that it is finished-nothing more?" Mrs. Weston pressed her lips on the little hand she held, and said only "Yes." A day or two after, a letter came to the mill, addressed to Lilian Mayburn, in it was a cheque for double the amount she had paid for her father, with "Mr. Aikin's best wishes." This had been the quaint old man's scheme. Fascinated by the girl's beauty, and love for her father, and curious to know if she would keep her promise to work and pay him, he determined to take the money, and if she sent the whole sum, return it, as he had done. The poor penitent father did not live to



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CONTENTS. PAGE WILD ROSE .. ..... TULIP .... ..25 HOLLY ....... ....49 ORANGE BLOSSOM .... ....73 POPPIES ...........97 EGLANTINE .... ..121 HEARTSEASE. .... .....145 THE LILY OF THE VALLEY. ......169



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io6 Poppies. love which made him feel he was indebted to her for so much of his comforts, and because-she denied him nothing he asked for; but he had not the smallest respect for her, and would do nothing he did not like to please her, or obey the smallest order that did not jump with his inclination. The mother, a very delicate and indolent woman, had left always the care of the children to her nurses, and seldom saw them, save when they were brought down dressed in the drawing-room for an hour before dinner. They always looked very nice and well, she thought, and all visitors admired them, and they seemed quite happy and fond of Anna, and so she saw no reason to interfere. To be troublesome, she imagined, was the normal condition of children, and when, as occasionally happened, Master Freddy became tiresome in the drawingroom, she only sent for Anna to fetch him away, and concerned herself no more. But as he grew older, and, through the unwise management of his too devoted nurse, more naughty, it



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The Lily of the Valley. 175 come and see our May-day f&te; why, it will be better than ever." "Such buns and cakes and ginger beer!" said another girl. That's just like you, little greedy. The food is the best fun, you think," said the first speaker. They all laughed at this, and again the inmate of the cottage said, "Do not waste your time then, dears, go and help to dress the pole; and see, here are more ribbons I have saved for it," and she handed them through the window to one of the girls. "It is in vain to ask me more; go and enjoy yourselves, good-bye." The girls, feeling entreaties were vain, left the cottage and hurried towards the school playground, where, under the direction of the schoolmaster, they were dressing the pole. What can make Lily work so everlastingly ?" asked one of them; "she cannot be obliged. Old Mayburn is rich, and has no one but her to care for. There is something strange about Liliansome mystery which I should like to find out."



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-4-+ IT was a cheerless, cold November evening, when two or three children, belonging to a doctor of some considerable practice in a cathedral city, stood together looking out of window, for lack, it appeared, of something else to do. Their nursery window looked out, on to the precincts of the cathedral, and they could see into the dean's garden, at this time of year at least, when the leafy screen of the trees was destroyed by the cold frosts and winds of winter, and only their naked branches swung in the breeze; see the east end of the grand old edifie itself, and hear the peal of the organ, and the voices of the choir, at the daily morning and evening service. When tired of play, it was some amusement to stand, therefore, looking out of this window at the children,



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130 Eglantine. your mother, who is blind, and you want to buy a present for a poor sick friend. Stay; Tiny Tim shall be yours for-let me see, how much can you afford, eh ?" he said, and a kindly smile lighted his face as he spoke. "I have only been able to save three shillings," she answered. He's worth five," he said, looking at the little thing, who hopped about his cage, saying "Sweet! sweet 1" as if he was striving by honeyed words of flattery to curry favour with the stranger; "but you shall have him, for the blind mother's sake. Take him, and think how his little namesake said, 'God bless us, every one!'-those in dark streets and poor homes, passing toilsome lives, as well as the rich and noble-and bid Him bless the old birdseller amongst the rest; for His blessing 'maketh rich, and addeth no sorrow with it.' There, good-bye, my Tim; be a good boy, and sing away till you bring into the dull sick-room memories of shady woods and flowers, and all





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---II Ii* R ...... -III' '' t WILD ROSE. "Much of her time was spent there playing with the birds and tending the plants."



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152 Heat sease. at any rate it seemed to sum up the whole in Mrs. Smith's estimation. "Well, I will see what can be done," said the lady; I will talk to Mr. Osborne about it." There ain't much time to lose, marm, if you'll help 'em at all; for it's my belief if nourishment ain't sent to that poor woman to-day she won't be here to want it to-morrow." So bad as that ?-I'll go at once." "Do, there's a good creature," said the woman, earnestly; "you'll never rue it." "I will go certainly, now-good day, Mrs. Smith ;" and the young lady, for she was very young, not long married, went quickly in the direction of the court indicated. Mrs. Smith stood still, looking after her for a minute or two, and then she said as she turned away,"I think she'll do, though she's but a bit of a child; but she has a kindly, comely face, and if she don't get took in, she'll do," and with this comment on the incumbent's wife, she hur-



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WILD ROSE



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THE LILY OF THE VALLEY



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30 Tulip. who often came to play in the deanery garden, or the people going into the cathedal. The names of some of the regular attendants they knew, those they did not they invented, to distinguish them, and be able to speak of them to one another; so there was Mr. "Hoppy," a man with one leg shorter than the other; "Tr,.., r..lma'n," another, whose distinguishing mark was the unusual size of these garments; Mrs. "Piggy," an unfortunate lady, whose face they declared strongly resembled this animal; Miss "Stuck-up," a young lady who walked with a very dignified air and measured step, as if, as Tommy declared, "the ground was not good enough for her to walk on;" and several others in like manner. The choir-boys, too, they loved to watch, and had names for them, too, but this amusement had, some how, on this particular November day, failed to be as entertaining as usual, and they began to wonder how they should pass this hour before tea, which nurse used to dcli iate



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Holly. 59 "Club! what's a club?" asked Annie. "Why, a lot of men all dressed in their best clothes, with ribbons pinned on them, and scarfs and things, and flags, and a band of music goes before them, and they all marches along, and has dinner in a meadow, and play cricket, and all manner of things. And mother's a-going to make me a flag, and I'm to run aside of father." "How I should like to come too! said little Annie; "I do so love music." "Well, I'll come and fetch you." "But I'm afraid mamma won't let me go," said Annie, ruefully. "Don't say nothing about it; you can come and play out here, and I'll call you t'other side of the hedge." I wonder if that would be wicked, though ?" said Annie, doubtingly. No-if your ma didn't say you weren't to go, where's the harm ?" answered the little temptress; "you can tell her you've been when you



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HE A T SEAS E. Very well little wife," lhe said smiling, "you .shall do s ou lik



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The Lily of the Valley. 177 been quite glad of this visit to her cottage to get a peep at her. "I don't know, but I suppose not, as she lives with her uncle. She has only been here two years, but she was not in black when she came. No one can make her out, but all love her; and, somehow, in the few times she comes amongst us rough girls-and that's only at haying and hopping-she seems so far above us, more, as mother says, like an angel fluttered down, and we all seem at once to stop our rough words and boisterous play when she is by, just as though she really was one." "How odd! I shall be afraid of her." "No, you won't-she's so gentle; and you should see her with children. Oh, dear, they are just fond of her; I've seen her coming along with one in each arm, and two or three more hanging to her skirts." Are you two talking of Lilian ?" said another of the girls who had been walking a little apart with the rest of the group, laughing and 8*



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180 Thze Lily of the Valley. "Why not out with the rest, lass ?" he asked, taking his accustomed seat, a large leather armchair, which stood by the window in summer and in the chimney-corner in the cold winter. My headache put me back with my work, uncle, so I must not play to-day," she answered, pleasantly; "these chair-covers are promised to Lady Marwood on Monday." "Ah!" he said, with something between a sigh and a groan, "you might as well try to empty the sea with a teaspoon." She made no answer to that; they had argued so often, and it only made him angry. Her set purpose-undertaken in faith that the earnest prayer for its accomplishment would be fulfilled-nothing could shake, all improbable as it seemed; still she did not doubt that it would be achieved-it only wanted endless perseverance-and that her health and strength should last, and this was her daily prayer. She worked on till the daylight failed, and the old servant, who had been housekeeper until



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38 Tulip. leaning back against the dark oak windowframe, and her very white hands folded idly in her lap, her eyes half closed, and one small foot placed on the back of a dog of the Dandie Dinmont tribe, who lay quite still, either not feeling or not objecting to the slight encumbrance she had compelled him to bear. This. was Hetty! and Hetty was an orphan girl left to the charge of Doctor Hartley by her father, who had been a patient of the doctor's for many years. Esther, or, as she was more commonly called, Hetty, had been his only child; and as he was a man of good property he was able to leave his daughter handsomely provided for. Guardian to his orphan child, protector of her and her property, Mr. Staveley asked his old friend to become, when he should be no more; and so, since her eighth year, she had been a resident beneath the doctor's roof, treated in every way like their own children, and loved nearly as much-spoilt more, Mrs. Hartley declared, by the doctor, who could not help



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Orange Blossom. 95 those horrid things called servants came, and, seizing my cage, said,"I nearly forgot this nasty bird, and it would be as much as my place was worth;" and putting my cover over my cage, off she carried me. I heard, to my great relief, at last, my mistress's voice asking if I was in the carriage. Then came a great jolting-the same dreadful jolting I remembered so well when I was first taken from the old cobbler's. I was knocked from side to side, and I saw a great light shining through my cover, and there was such a dreadful noise, and then came such a jerk, that I was nearly swung off my perch. Oh dear, what a dreadful journey that was! and I could not see my mistress, or hear her voice to encourage me. However, she said I was to go with her, and so I believed her, for she never had deceived me. I did not see her, though, for a long while; but I lived in a sweet little room they said was her boudoir, whatever that was; and to my joy, one bright morning I heard her dear voice saying, "Where



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i *;



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73 Holly. fleecy clouds to the home of the angels. They were sad thoughts for a little child to have, but Annie was ill, and had been naughty and disobedient to the good mother who trusted her. She tried to get up, but with great difficulty she did so, and at the first attempt to walk the orchard, the trees, the fence, and hedge all seemed moving round her, and with a little cry of terror and pain she fell forward on the ground. There they found her, and carried her to bed. Poor child! sad fruits had her disobedience brought-she had taken the fever which was killing the little Baby, and days and weeks of suffering to herself, and bitter sorrow and anxiety to her parents, had her wilfulness caused. Through all their anxiety for their child, Mr. and Mrs. Clayton had to visit and help others in like trouble, for the epidemic fell heavily on the children, and in nearly every house were sounds of mourning and woe; but it helped them to bear their own sorrow better, and, perhaps, for the love of compassion they



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Eglantine. 139 flinging herself on her bed, she cried herself to sleep, with Tiny Tim's prayer on her lips, "God bless us, every one !" the bent figure of the old bird-fancier rising before her as she uttered the words; and he, too, was included in her petition for the Divine blessing, as he had asked to be. "It's up a confoundedly queer staircase, old fellow," said a voice the next morning, sounding on the lower landing of Muriel's house-" up to the very top; but I suppose you're used to this sort of thing." "I should rather think I was," said another very cheery voice in reply; "this is a palatial dwelling to some I visit at." And upstairs they came, the two young men to whom the voices belonged, and knocked at Philip's door. At his low-voiced "Come in," they entered. By his bedside sat Mrs. Raynor. "Who is it, Philip ?" she whispered. "My good master and a friend."



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84 Orange Blossom. she was the only child of the old gentleman with the pleasant smile, and the lady with the pretty hair; they loved her better than anything in the world. I was glad there were no more children, they are generally so barbarous to birds, pressing their faces against the cage, and uttering such dreadful noises. My mistress was always so gentle and kind, I was never afraid of her, even when she put her little white hand into my cage, to give me my bath. She always waited on me herself. Once when she went away on a visit, and would not take me with her, a horrid creature used to feed me; she let my cage get very dirty, and never gave me a bath, and used to leave my cage so late in the evening by the open window, that I thought I should lose my-upper notes, of which I am so proud. I think cats, servants, and children are deadly enemies to birds. I was so thankful when my dear mistress came home again. We had such happy days together; when she went to sit in the garden she



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I02 Poppies. "Yes, I do, every word," said the boy, stamping his little feet on the foot-board of the high chair on which he was seated, at the farther end of the room. "You don't, Freddy, and it is so naughty to tell stories." S"Don't take any notice of him, my dear," said Nurse; "he's a very foolish little boy. Unless he sends away that naughty monkey that's got on his shoulder before long, he will not go down to dessert." "I don't care, old-old fogey, you. I'll tell Anna when she comes in, I will; you're not my nurse; and I'll get down out of this chair, I will." "I don't think you will, Master Freddy; so sure as you do I will take you down to your papa, and he will put you in the coal cellar." "Don't care if he does; coals don't hurt, I ain't afraid of coals. 'Old King Coal was a jolly old soul.'"



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156 Heartsease. her master her terror, and approaching the bed (if the wooden settle with some old rags on it could be so called), she said gently," You are ill, Mrs. Thomson ; can I do anything for you." "I'm a-dying," said the woman, falling back heavily. "No-no, I hope not; has the doctor seen you ?" "No," she answered, speaking with difficulty; "he won't come. I ain't paid him for the last job." "Oh, I will see about that; what have you had to take ?" "A cup .of tea at four o'clock, when my mate went to work," she gasped; "and I'm, that thirsty." Good Heaven!" exclaimed Mrs. Osborne, perfectly horrified ; why, it's twelve hours since you have had anything-in your weak state, too. I will see about you at once. Cheer up, poor thing!" she said, taking the thin dirty



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Heartscase. 53 ried on to the house, where she was bound for "half a day's work." And Mrs. Osborne turned down the wretched court with its few tumble-down houses, with a beating heart. It was all so new to her, this work. And as she walked along, she tried to picture to herself what this trouble could be like, which she was going to see-these people who were down on the ground," "objects," "who had not a morsel of anything in the house;" but all she could paint of most sad, came far short of the reality. The door opened to her knock, and before her stood something which, in the dim light given by the very small window crusted with dirt, she could not make out. When her eyes grew accustomed to the darkness, she saw it was a wan, weird-looking child, whose poor, pinched face looked as though it was a piece of yellow paper, in which two holes had been cut for the large, lustrous, black eyes to be put in. The hair of the child was long and thick 7*



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oW tk/Ž21C 2' '1



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Heartsease. 161 nearly everywhere she received the same answer -they were always being helped, and it was no use. Mrs. Tremaine had been so good, she had taken the eldest girl, clothed her, and sent her to school. In a week the clothes were all spoilt and filthy, and the girl was sent out to work, and never came *near the school-who could help such people? However, Mrs. Osborne pleaded so, that to please her, each person she asked gave a trifle, and the more willingly, when she assured them that she herself was going to lay the money out for them, not trust it to their bad management. In the meanwhile, the constant supply of nourishment and careful nursing had restored the poor wretched woman to life, and at the end of a fortnight she was able to crawl downstairs and sit at the door of the cottage to breathe the air. Mrs. Osborne had been frequently to see her, and cheered her with assurances that brighter days were in store, and that she would soon be well.



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86 Orange Blossom. born and bred in a cage, my wings would soon grow weary, and I should be pecked to death by larger wild birds. She meant it to comfort me, pretty little dear, and so I tried to believe her. These wretched, saucy little sparrows used often to come and steal my food, the cherries, and sugar, which my little darling used to put in my cage. Then she would wave her handkerchief to frighten them away, but they came again when she was gone, which was a great drawback to my pleasure in the garden. One day she had left me alone there, having given me a nice piece of egg, and my bath, and laid some green leaves over the top of my cage, and I was singing to myself softly, wishing she would come back to send away the sparrows, whom I expected every moment to eat my nice egg. I could hear them among the trees, arguing and quarrelling, as they nearly always were, when, suddenly looking round, I saw a huge cat just going to spring on to my cage. Oh, how frightened I was! I clung to the wires; I flut-



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E8 Orange Blossom. in my cage, which was soon mended, and carried into a dark room. I tried to sleep, but kept waking up in a fright, thinking the cat's terrible eyes were still looking at me. For a long time I was so ill I could only sit on my perch with one leg drawn up under me, with no spirit to dress my feathers, or go in my bath, or sing one single note. My mistress was most kind-feeding me on sponge cake, and all the delicate food she could think of, to tempt my fastidious appetite. After a bit I was able to thank her with a few notes of song, and when, after what seemed to me a long time, I felt well again and hopped about my cage as usual, I heard that the horrid cat had been sent away. A long time passed without any event worth recording taking place. My sweet little mistress grew daily prettier and prettier, but at last I noticed she looked pale and seemed sad, and would sit sometimes for hours without taking the slightest notice of me. Then



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142 Eglantine. "I'm hanged if I wouldn't get wql, if I'd such a wife waiting for me 1" "Ah! poor little girl," said Philip, "for her sake I do wish I were well, sir." "All right, old fellow," answered his master, "we shall manage it. Good day." "You must come and discuss some port with me to-night, Woodward," he said, as they reached his house; if you cure that fellow, I'll give you a pipe." I can't come this evening, thank you," said the doctor, laughing, I'm frightfully busy. But if I do cure this fellow it won't help you; he'll marry that little beauty directly." "Yes, but still I want him cured, don't you know ? "Well, well, I'll do my best, if it was only to dry the tears in those eyes." And shaking hands with his friend, the doctor called a passing cab, and drove rapidly to his own home. Well, there certainly is a very great noise,



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78 Orange L'lossonm. one to his taste. But how any one can suppose, because we are small, that we don't know as much, and far more, than those large, inferior animals, I cannot for a moment think. But this is not the way to prove to you that we do. I will sing you a little of my history, and then you will see that, anyway, we are wise enough to know our friends, and to love and be grateful to those who are kind to us; and you wonderful, wise human beings cannot do much more than that, and sometimes, I have heard, you do not do as much. Where I came from, or who were my father and mother, I can't say. The first thing I remember was hanging in a small cage, in a room, with about thirty more poor little captives like myself. Oh, the ignorance of mankind fancy hanging us in a dark, close room, when our little lives are made unbearable unless we have plenty of air and sunshine. Our master was a little old man who used to mend boots and shoes (what people wear such things



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118 Poppies. back to him, and he said in a low voice, and in a somewhat unwilling manner," I'm sorry." I hope you are, Freddy, in the right way; not only sorry for the inconvenience you have been put to, but for your troublesome conduct; sorry for the constant vexation you are giving every one, and--" "And he may have tea here to-night, sir, mayn't he ? and then go to bed, and get up in the morning quite a good boy," interrupted Nurse Penny, whose knowledge of the management of children made her feel how ill-advised was any lecture just then. Mr. Morley, having a great respect for this autocrat of the nursery, quietly said,--. Very well, -then; good night, Freddy, and I sincerely hope this will be the last of these exhibitions of temper for a lonwhile." And Mr. Morley rejoined 'his friends in the drawingroom, feeling he had perfectly fulfilled his duty.



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40 Tulz. expostlated with her, she only wound her arms round her neck, and, calling her by the pet name she had adopted for her, said," M'amie, you will not, you cannot expect me to like all this horrid work on a morning like this; it's so cold, I feel stupefied." Or it is so hot, you feel head-achey, Hetty; always some excuse, is there not?" said the poor governess, with a sigh; and then she took the opportunity of stating the case to Mrs. Hartley, and begging to be allowed to give up teaching Miss Staveley, it was only robbing them," she said, nobody would ever make her learn." After a long and serious talk with Hetty, it was finally decided that she was to have no more instruction, but she promised to read, herself, steadily for two hours a day at least. For the first few days after the governess had given her up, she did, but day by day the time for reading was shortened, and at length utterly abandoned, and Hetty amused herself her own way, inventing fresh toilets, trimming and re-



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Wild Rose. 19 gentle little sound of the line as Rose threw it in the water, or the hum of some bee heavily laden with his luscious burden from the mill garden, rich with honeyed flowers, amongst which the bees loved to revel. It was so still that Rose started when a voice behind her said,"So you wouldn't go to the picnic ?" She looked up-Mr. Lisle stood there. "No; you weren't sent to fetch me, were you ?" she asked. "No, I'm going away to town." Oh! that's right, I don't care, then." And she returned to her fishing. Don't talk; this is such a good place. I've had no end of bites." "You don't care !" said Mr. Lisle, answering the first part of her speech ; that is rude." "Is it ? Why is truth always rude ?" "It should never be." "But it always is, it seems to me," she answered, tossing back a tiny fish into the water she had just caught.



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166 Heartsease. house is a very miserable one; but I think if I send you a pretty bright paper, your husband might manage to paper it, and, in short, we will make a great difference here shortly, if you will help me to help you." "You shall see, ma'am," was all the woman said. Oh! that box that arrived on Saturday night. Jeanie's bright eyes did sparkle, as one by one the things were taken out-the brown tweed frocks and capes, both alike, for the girls, with hats trimmed with blue, the nice strong grey stockings, and stout boots: the dress and shawl and bonnet for mother, with a complete suit of under-clothing for them all three ; halfa-dozen strong' towels, and two: pair of sheets. Jeanie could say nothing but "Oh!" as one after another the wondrous box revealed its treasures, and when it was quite empty, she threw her arms round it and kissed it, knowing not how else to express her gratitude. About a quarter of an hour before service



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6 George" Routledge & Sons' Juvenile Books. EDITED BY THE REV. R. A. WILLMOTT. Illustrated by FOSTER, GILBERT, CORBOULD, FRANKLIN, and HARVEY, elegantly printed on good paper, fcap. 8vo, .jd. gilt edges, bevelled boards. 5 o r. Spenser's Faerie Queen. Illustrated by CORBOULD. 2. Chaucer's Canterbury Tales. Illustrated by CORBOULD. 3. Kirke White. By SOUTHEY. Illustrated by BIRKET FOSTER. 4. Southey's Joan of Arc, and Minor Poems. 6. Pope's Poetical Works. Edited by CARY. 7. Milton's Poetical Works. Illustrated by HARVEY. 8. Thomson, Beattie, and West. Illustrated by BIRKET FOSTER. Io. Herbert. With Life and Notes by the Rev. R. A. WILLMOTT. 12. Cowper. Illustrated by BIRKET FOSTER. Edited by WILLMOTT. 13. Longfellow's Complete Poetical Works. With Illustrations. Fcap. 8vo. 14. Longfellow's Prose Works. Fcap. 8vo. 16. Burns' Poetical Works. Illustrated by JOHN GILBERT. 17. Fairfax's Tasso's Jerusalem Delivered. Illustrated by CORBOULD. 18. Percy's Reliques of Ancient English Poetry. 19. Scott's Poetical Works. Illustrated by CORBOULD. 21. Wordsworth. Illustrated by BIRKET FOSTER. 22. Orabbe. Illustrated by BIRKET FOSTER. 25. Moore's Poems. Illustrated by CORBOULD, &C. 26. Byron's Poems. Illustrated by GILBERT, WOLF, FOSTER, &C. 29. Bennett's Poetical Works. Portrait and Illustrations.



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i2 George Routledge & Sons' Juvenile Books. (3s. 6d. Editions.) Elegantly printed on tinted paper, fcap. 8vo, gilt edges, with Illustrations. .d. 3 6Longfellow.* Complete. Golden Gleanings. Cowper.* Choice Poems. Milton.* Shakspeare Gems. Wordsworth.* Wit and Humour. Southey. Wise Sayings. Goldsmith. Longfellow's Dante-Para. Kirke White. diso. Burns.* -Purgatorio. Moore. -Inferno. Byron.* Lover's Poems.* Pofe. Book of Familiar Quota. ames Montgomery. Bei arte. Scott.* Bret Harte. Herert. Leigh Hunt.* Campbell. Dryden.* Bloomfield. insworth. Shakslea re. Spenser.* Chaucer. Roges. s. Willis. -rs. Hemans.* Volumes marked are kept in Morocco and Ivory Bindings, price 7s. 6d. In fcap. 8vo, cloth gilt, with Illustrations. 3 6 Bruin. The Young Voyagers. The Boy Tar. The Plant Hunters. The Desert Home. The Quadroon. Odd People. The War Trail. Ran away to Sea. The Bush Boys. The Forest Exiles. The Boy Hunters. The Young Yagers





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Tke Lily of the Valley. 189 sad story, for you to tell Maurice, that he may think better of me." "My dear, he could not-he could not; you are to him as an angel," said the old woman, pressing her hand ; "but go on, dear; go on." Tempted by our sore need-for my mother's long illness had been such a sad expense-my father took for his own use, at various times, sums of money entrusted to him by his employer, whose suspicion became aroused, and inquiries were made. Shall I ever forget that night, when he came home and told me! My mother had onl been dead a few months, and there was only me to tell his sorrow to. I asked him to let me go to Mr. Aikin and tell him all, and plead for him. I did, and oh! he was so strange-he said very little ; but when I, with tears-I was so silly, I could not help crying-said I would pay it all, if he would spare him the exposure and still employ him, he laughed and said, 'Well, pay it by instalments; so long as you pay once a quarter



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London and New York. 17 In square 16mo, cloth, with Illustrations by GILBERT, ABSOLON, &c. s.d. Peasant and Prince. By Accidents of Childhood; or, 6 Harriet Martineau. Stories for Heedless Children. Crofton Boys. By ditto. Annie Aaitland; or, The Feats on the Fiord. By do. Lesson of Life; ByD. RichSettlers at Home. By ditto. mond. Holiday Rambles; or, The ucy Elton ; or, Home and holiday ambles; or, The School. By the Author of School Vacation. "The Twins." Little Drummer: A Tale Daily Thoughtsfor Children. of the Russian War. By Mrs. Geldart. Frank. By Maria .EdgeEmilie the Peacemaker. By -worth. Mrs. Geldart. Rosamond. By Maria Truth is Everything. By Edgeworth. Mrs. Geldart. Harry and Lucy, Little Christmas Holidays. By Dog Trusty, The Cherry Miss Jane Strickland. Orchard, &-c. Rose and Kate; or, The A Hero; or, Philip's Book. Little Howards. By the Author of "John HaliAunt Emma. By the fax." Author of "Rose and Kate." Story of an Apple. By The Island of the Rainbow. Lady Campbell. By Mrs. Newton Crossland. The Cabin by the Wayside. Alax Frere; or, Return Alemoirs of a Doll. By Good for Evil. Mrs. Bisset. Rainbows in Springtide. Black Princess. The Child's First Book of Laura and Ellen; or, Natural History. By A. L. Time Works Wonders. Bond. S'..:'.s Lost Son. By Florence the Orphan. R. H.ay ( and te heCastle and Cottage. By Runaways (The) d t Perring. GipDsies. Fabulous Histories. By Daddy Dacres School. By Mrs. Trimmer. Mrs. Hall. School Days at Harrow. Bitish W f Hunters. By Mrs. Barbauld's Lessons. Thomas Miller. Bow of Faith (The) ; or, Holidays at Limewood. Old Testament Lessons. By Traditions of Palestine. By Maria Wright. Martineau. Anchor of Hope; or, New On the Sea. By Miss CampTestament Lessons. By Maria bell. Wright. Games and Sports. Mrs. London's Young The Young Angler. Naturalist. Athletic Sports.



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Poppies. I19 The dream lasted poor Freddy some time, but a few outbreaks still called for papa's interference, and at length it was decided to send him to school, and there, under proper discipline, and away from the weak indulgence of his nurse, the evil temper was mastered, and as he grew older and wiser, he often thought of his dream on the day of baby's christening, and though he kept those thoughts to himself, they had a great influence on all his school life, and it was curious and interesting to hear him lecturing the little boys smaller than himself, and telling them that foolish daring, and pretending not to care was .not real bravery, and was only laughed at by older and wiser people. Freddy was right; true courage, and the foolish daring which apes it, are like the wheat and the poppies which grow amongst it. The poppies make the greatest show, with their gorgeous colour, amongst the sober brown corn, but who would exchange the one for the other ? So when you little ones hear foolish, boastful



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32. Eglantine. over some sticks, giving a little brightness and cheer to the poorly furnished room; some mignonette and a few sweet peas stood in a mug on the table, and the room was scrupulously neat and clean. By the window sat a woman somewhat past the middle age, her hands folded in her lap in the painful idleness enforced by her misfortune; this was Muriel Raynor's blind mother. "I've got it, mother," she said, as she entered the room; "he's too frightened to sing, but he will when I begin, I daresay-and when the door is open, you can hear him as well as poor Philip." And a tender sad tone seemed to linger on the name as she spoke it. "Yes, yes, my dear, I can hear it-he can see it and hear it too," answered the mother. "Yes, mother, for a little while," and she turned away and put the bird on the table, forgetting, as she often did, she had no reason to hide the tears from those poor sightless eyes. "I will take it him," she said, after a pause, "when I have laid-your supper, and then I



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Orange Blossom. 93 the crocuses, in pretty rows of yellow and white; the snowdrops, the violets, the apple blossoms and cherry, in the orchard beyond; and then the sun began to grow warm, the soft white fleecy clouds to float over the blue sky, and I knew that summer had come, and I began to sing my sweetest songs again. One day my mistress came into the room, bringing a beautiful ripe strawberry for me, gave me my bath, and talked to me more than she had done for a long while"Now, dear Dickie," she said, "don't sing so, but just listen to me. I've something to tell you; to-morrow you are going to have a white bow tied to your cage, and have a beautiful piece of cake, and you must sing all the morning-and then we are going away together." "Going away!" I did not much like that, but still, if she must go, of course I would rather go too. Well, the next day, after breakfast, some one came into the room all in white, I did not know



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-c-^ LITTLE girl, where are you going ?" "Up there," answered the child, staring hard at the little person who addressed her-a small, delicate-looking girl, standing beneath a large apple-tree, loaded with ruddy fruit, in the orchard belonging to the Vicarage House. What for ?" "For soup. Parson told mother she could have some." He's my papa. My name's Annie Clayton. What's yours ?" Lucy Jones. I live there down the lane, at that 'ere little 'ouse aside Mr. Green's." Have you any sisters ? I haven't, only two brothers, Frank and Willie, and they're both at school." "Oh, I just have, ever such a lot," said Lucy,



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R G;70-1i~iallhl



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Heartsease. 159 She scarcely knew how she got home, stopping only to ring the doctor's bell and implore him to go at once-that his bill should be paid, and he must attend to her; and was soon back with the nourishment which the doctor said was the only hope of saving her. Whilst Mrs. Osborne talked to Mrs. Jones, she said that she could not leave her children at night, and that certainly some one ought to sit up with her. If Mrs. Smith was paid she would, she thought. "If she could take her, ma'am, of a night I would manage in the day, yer see ; being so handy home, I could run to and fro, but I must be with my baby a night," said the woman. Mrs. Osborne undertook, therefore, to try and get Mrs. Smith to come, and she very readily consented, at least for two or three nights ; and though there was still very very much to do before night, things had wonderfully changed for the better in the miserable hut. Of course, on her return home, Mrs. Osborne related their history to her husband.



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36 Tulip. And calls you a rough school-boy, we know," retorted George. But do say, Tom, what you mean by saying she is gaudy and useless." "Well, I ask you, isn't she always dressed up to her eyes-isn't mother always telling her that dress is her one idea, that her life is passed in thinking about it and arranging it? And what does she ever do but sit about the room and look pretty? She doesn't work or see to the house." "Because she isn't mistress," said Ethel. "Mamma wouldn't like her to interfere in her business." "She might find something to do if she wanted to, or knew how to do anything," said Tom, with a very decided grown-up manner, which made Isabel laugh. If we were comparing people to animals," she said, "I know what we should say Master Tom was like-a monkey !-because he mimics oo well. I fancy I've heard grandmamma say



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44 Tulip. Playing about." Playing about; is that all-no lessons ?" Oh, yes in the morning I did lessons, but this is a half-holiday." I see. A very lazy invention is a half-holiday, I never have one; and what lessons did you do?" Geography, and writing, and reading, and sums." Good gracious me! what a lot for a scrap like you; and now, Master'Georgie, what about you?" "I've done lessons, pa; and been with Mr. Egremont to Fairden, to see his hounds-he promised me he would take me-and oh, pa, they are just beauties! He says, if you'll let me, he'll mount me on a little pony and take me to the meet some day. I may go, mayn't I, pa ?" ye ne sais pas-and I wish you would not say pa." "Oh I say, that's too bad," shouted Tom; going off in an ecstasy of laughing, running the most frightful risk of choking himself with bread-and-butter.



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42 Tulip. and finding the poor old dame partaking of a dinner of tea without milk, and some bread and dripping, she made sundry resolutions to give her some money, the very next time she took her allowance, to enable her to obtain more tasty and nourishing diet. But, alas! the passionate love of dress drew other faults in its train, as all ungoverned tastes, and pleasures will; her allowance was seldom enough to pay the milliner's, draper's, and dressmaker's bills, and each quarter poor old Betty Hawkes fared no better than on her weak tea and dripping, for Hetty could barely pay the bills sent in to her. Loving and affectionate as I have said she was, this was a great trouble to her, and each time she determined that it should not happen again; that she would put aside a little sum each quarter for the comfort of the old nurse who had been so good to her. But, alas some fete, some picnic, ball, or concert necessitated, in her opinion, a new dress, and it was the old story over again.



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IIo Poppies. will have to have some, too, to drink baby's health." "At the christening? Oh, yes, dear baby! Mayn't Freddy get up to the christening, papa ?" "If he will say he is sorry, and be a good boy, of course he shall." When Jessie went up from dessert, she peeped into Freddy's little room, he was asleep, one side of the "tent" lying down on his flushed face, a smile parting his lips and showing his little pearly white teeth, as though he was dreaming some pleasant dream, and his punishment was quite forgotten. Jessie sighed, and turned away; child as she was, she felt that not to care, not to be sorry, must be wrong, must lead to a bad end; she could not have argued on it, or said "why," but she had an instinctive feeling that penitence must be the first step to amendment. It was a bright, though cold, morning; the snow lay on the ground, but the sun shone out



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POPPIE S, "Don't care !" -_ _~-~=~=== ====---37 L ~ ~ it -~ ~i--->II~



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16 Wild Rose. face, but with an indifferent expression, as though he had lost interest in everything, or never had any." "I don't know, my dear, they've so many new friends lately; perhaps he's a suitor for one of my ladies." "Oh dear, no, he loves himself too well. I shall go now to my corner on the stairs, and see them all go in to dinner, and I can watch who he takes in. I'll tell you in the morning. Good night, Mrs. Grantley." "What a strange fancy this is of Mr. Lisle's, now, Isabel," said Mrs. Delacorn to her daughter. "He has somehow met with Rose about the gardens, and has been making it quite a personal favour that we take her to the picnic tomorrow. I don't like to refuse: it won't do." Why not, mamma ? Who is he ? I don't see why she should go if you would rather not." I don't mind, my dear, in the least, if the child likes to go; but she never has anything to





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Wild Rose. 23 "Indeed, indeed I am; and I know not what I have done to merit all these years of care and love." "My child, you were poor and alone. I was rich and alone. What could I do better than give the wealth I only valued for its power, to make you and myself less lonely? I have kept from you this knowledge from the fear that gratitude might make you mistake your feelings. Now that you are about to become a happy wife, I can tell you fearlessly that I was the strange 'old friend' who removed you from that common school to the care of my gentle sister-in-law; and that, in short, I have been" "My guardian angel," answered the girl, holding out both her hands to him, which he took in his and kissed fervently; "how much Dudley has to thank you for, too !" "Yes, little woman," he said, fondly placing his hands on her head, as she knelt down before him, I gathered for him a sweet Wild Rose,



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Tulip. 33 "Well, we are all to think in turn of some one, and call them by some flower, and then we are to guess who it is." This was voted capital; even wild Tom approved, and Isabel started first. Cyclamen." "Oh, I know, old Braithwaite; he's a very sickly man," said Tom. "No; now that's nonsense, Tom. Guess properly; a Cyclamen is a beautiful flowernow you must all ask her questions-' if she loves it very much; better than any other flower?' 'Where she would like to put it?' In that way, you know," said Ethel. "Do you love it very much, then ?" asked Minnie. "Yes, VERY much." "Where would you like to put it ?" asked George, who was a very romantic, tender little fellow, and thought that a very pretty question. "In my heart," replied Isabel, warmly. Then it's mamma," exclaimed all. 2*



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174 The Lily of the Valley. roses, violets, anemones, and waving grasses, long pieces of bright ribbon gleaming amongst them, the sunshine streaming down on them, the birds singing loud songs as if of welcome to the spring on this glad May-day. The May-pole was to be raised in the squire's park-they were dressing it now-and the schoolboys were to carry it through the village, the girls following, decked with flowers, singing. Oh, Lilian must come," again the girls urged. Then from out the clematis looked forth a sweet, gentle, pale face, and the girls gave a loud shout of noisy welcome. The girl put up her hand to silence them, and smiling, said, when they would let her speak,"I cannot come with you indeed. I have not been well for some days, and my work has got so behindhand." "Work, nonsense !" said one girl, "every one has a holiday to-day-the children of both schools, and the squire has invited all the children and old folks from the workhouse to



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(t-r-



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178 The Lily of the Valley. singing, and had only caught the last words. "She is an odd one; sometimes I feel angry with her for being so queer, but when I see her I'm as big a silly about her as the rest-old and young, men, women, and children, we're all alike, we'd do anything for her. It's too bad she won't come to-day. Come on, we're late, look at Master Arden beckoning to us."' And away they ran into the school playground, soon surrounded by the workers at the pole, who had beenAnxiously waiting for more material. Yes, Lily Mayburn was a mystery to all. She had come suddenly to the little village and awoke curiosity at once from her strange beauty -a beauty not so much of feature but expression-her quiet dignity, her refinement and purity. Without pride, without affectation, she impressed all who saw her with a sense of superiority. She said and did nothing remarkable, nothing exactly to particularize, but there was a nameless charm and grace about her which made her admired, respected, and be-



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72 Holly. learn to make clothes for it-she had begun already, and on Christmas Day it was to wear a frock she was making for it. With a little help, for she was too weak to work long, the frock was finished in time; and when the joy bells rocked the old church tower in honour of the birth of the Holy Babe, Annie's little favourite sat crowing beside her, in the frock of her own making, and Mrs. Clayton could not help the tears rising to her eyes to see the two innocent children, so lately snatched from death, sitting there together, each affording such pleasure to the other. What a bright, happy Christmas it was!-and often after Annie said, though she lay there weak and helpless on her sofa, no Christmas was ever like it again, for it was the dawning of a new life to her, full of brighter hope and joy-and as she lay twining, with her thin, white fingers, the holly into wreaths to dress the house, she laid aside one small piece to keep for ever in memory of this turning point in her life.



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32 Tulip. us, and play them all in turn," suggested Isabel. "I'm eldest, I'll begin." "Oh, yes, jolly! cried the others. "Now we must all sit down and think -make them up, you know-not old games." "Very well. I've thought of a beauty now," said Ethel, the second girl. "Well, don't speak till it's your turn; we'll all sit in a row." But to sit silent and think was too much for Master Tom, and soon little bursts of laughter disturbed the silence, and at length he was discovered rolled up in the table-cover, going over and over like a ball, which was thought such a joke by little Minnie, that she could do nothing but laugh. However Isabel at last restored order by announcing that she had thought of a game. It was rather a peculiar one, and rather difficult; so, as Tom had got into a wild mood, there was no getting them to play properly, and it was voted to try Ethel's.



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18 George Routledge & Sons' Juvenile Books. ..EIGHTEENPENNY JUVENILES-continued. I 6 Games ofSkill. The Picture Book of AniScientific Amusements. mats and Birds. Miriam and Rosette. Boy Life on the Water. Ruth Hall. By FannyFern. Original Poems. Complete. By A. and J. Taylor. EDITED AND COMPILED BY J. E. CARPENTER. Fcap. 24mo, boards, with fancy covers. I 0 Modern. New Standard. Popular. The Entertainer's. Universal. The Comic Vocalist. Comic. New Scotch. National. New Irish. Humorous. The Moral. New British. The Religious. In small 4to, fancy cover, each with 48 pages of Plates. So Master ack. -The Enchanted Horse. Mamma's Return. Dame Mitchell and her Cat. Nellie and Bertha. Nursery Rhymes. The Cousins. The Tiger Lily. Tales of the Genii. The Lent Jewels. Sindbad the Voyager. Bible Stories. Robin Hood. My Best Frock. Prince Hemiseed.



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Wild Rose. 13 as Mrs. Delacorn had no feeling of great affection for her, and only asked her to satisfy her conscience that she was looking after the orphan child of her friend according to her promiseso long as the girl herself was contented, she gave herself no further trouble. Mrs. Grantley, the housekeeper, was a dear, good, kindly creature who had lived many years in the family, and was kindness itself to the orphan girl; but she was also a great puzzle and anxiety to her. So unlike our dear young ladies," she would say, "who always like to be dressed so nice and sit in the drawing-room like real gentry, a-doing of nothing but their fancy work or their piany; and here little Miss will go from year's end to year's end in an old frock, and her beautiful hair with ne'er a brush nor a comb through it, as it seems. And a needle I why, bless me! if her life depended on it, I don't believe she could sew a string or a hook on-she's that wild." And now, when she had fed her doves, dipped



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66 Holly. mother; and Mrs. Clayton, thanking her warmly, and desiring her to go into the kitchen and get some tea, led the weary penitent child into her own room, and placing her on the sofa with a kindness and tenderness which touched her more than any blame, gave her food and pitied her for her weariness, till at length Annie burst into a passion of tears and promised never to do so again. Well, the days went on, the weather grew hotter and hotter, and Mr. and Mrs. Clayton were seldom at home; there was a great deal of illness in the village, and their time was fully taken up with trying to help their poorer neighbours. Annie saw no one all day, except Lucy, who came in for a few moments every morning to show Annie the Baby; it knew her quite well by this time, and would stretch out its little arms to go to her. At last, one morning, Lucy and the Baby never came, and the day after, and the next day, there was no sign of them. Annie wondered if Susan had



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64 Holly. she could not see. And as the child's only resource in difficulties, she began to cry. "What's the matter?" said Lucy, suddenly appearing beside her. "Whatever are you crying for? We're a-going to have something to eat presently, but you shan't have none if you cry." And away she went again, and poor bewildered, weary Annie sat down under a large tree, trying to stop her tears with the hope of food held out to her, and fell asleep. When she awoke the men had left the tent, and were all scattered over the park, some smoking under the trees, some at cricket, but no Lucy -no dinner. Presently she heard a voice behind her say,"Why, surely, this is Mr. Clayton's child; however did she come here?" And, looking round, she saw the comely, good-natured face of a woman who often came to the vicarage to help Susan in a general clean. "Oh! Mrs. Dawson


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1o8 Poppies. again, hence his indifference to Nurse Penny's threat to take him to "papa," and his bold assurance that he didn't care," which statement he maintained even when Jessie-pitying little Jessie-went to see him before she went down to dessert (another promotion at which the two eldest had arrived), and assured him that she would bring him something nice in her pocket. "I don't want anything," he said; "I'm as jolly as jolly-being in bed is fun-look here! I pretend I'm an Arab in his tent, and all the bed is the desert; see, these two pillows are my tent, I stick 'em up like that-it is fun, Jessie." "Oh! but you oughtn't to be funny in bed when you've been naughty," said conscientious Jessie, "you ought to be sorry." "I can't make myself sorry, stupid, can I ? I ain't a bit sorry, not a bit. I don't care a farthing for old Penny," and, having delivered himself of this joke, he buried his tumbled sunny



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28 George Routledge & Sons' Juvenile Books. COLOURED PICTURE-BOOKS-continued. s.d. SIXTH SERIES, containing 3 6 The Fancy Dress Ball. The Enraged Miller Annie and7ack in London. Old King Cole. SEVENTH SERIES, containing The Yuvenile Party. History of Our Pets. One, Two, Buckle my Shoe. The Cats' Tea-Party. EIGHTH SERIES, containing King Grisly Beard. Rumpelstiltsken. The Fairy Ship. The Adventures of Puffy. ANIMALS AND BIRDS, containing Wild Animals. British Animals. Parrots. Singing Birds. BOOK OF ALPHABETS, containing The Railroad Alphabet. The Sea-Side Alphabet. The Good Boys' and Girls' The FarmYard Alphabet. Alphabet. KING LUCKIEBOY'S PICTURE-BOOK, containing King Luckieboy's Party. The Old Coutrtier. This Little Pig went to Picture Book of Horses. Market. OUR PETS' PICTURE-BOOK, containing The History of Our Pets. I Aladdin. Nursery Rhymes. Noah's Ark A B C. In super-royal 8vo, cloth gilt, price 5s. Walter Crane's Picture-Book. Containing 64 Pages of Pictures, designed by WALTER CRANE, viz.:5 o King Luckieboy's Party. Chattering 7ack. The Old Courtier. Annie and Jack in London. How Yessie was Lost. Grammar in Rhyme. The Faily Ship. The Multiplication Table in Verse.



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Holly. 65 the poor child, so glad to see a friendly face. I am so tired!" "Poor child! what, have you been and lost yourself? I'll take you home; I'm a-going by the vicarage ; come along." As she gladly got up and took Mrs. Dawson's hand she told her what had brought her there, but begged Mrs. Dawson not to tell, or she should be forbidden ever to see Lucy or her baby-sister again. When they reached the vicarage, Susan, the maid, who opened the door, exclaimed," Oh, Missie, where have you been ? Mamma is just in a way about you;" but before she could answer her mother rushed into the hall and caught the child in her arms. "Mamma, mamma, I'm so sorry!" sobbed Annie. "Do forgive me! I wanted to hear the music and carry a flag, and I lost myself. Oh, I'm so sorry!" Mrs. Dawson now came forward and tried to explain the circumstance to the anxious



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London and New York. 5 s. d. Grimm's Household Stories. With 240 Illustra-5 o tions by WEHNERT. Crown 8vo, gilt. Hans Andersen's Stories and Tales. 80 Illustrations, and Coloured Plates. Walter Crane's Picture Book. With 64 pages of Coloured Plates. Cloth, gilt edges. Country Life. Illustrated by Poetry, and 40 Pictures by BIRKET FOSTER. Sage Stuffing for Green Goslings; or, Saws for the Goose and Saws for the Gander. By the Hon. HUGH ROWLEY. With Illustrations by the Author. What the Moon Saw, and other Tales. By HANS C. ANDERSEN. With 80 Illustrations, and Coloured Plates. Chimes and Rhymes for Youthful Times. With Coloured Plates. (Uniform with Schnick-Schnack.") Buds and Flowers, A New Coloured Book for Children. (Uniform with Schnick-Schnack.") Small 4to, cloth. Schnick-Schnack. Trifles for the Little Ones. With Coloured Plates. Small 4to, cloth. Watts' Divine and Moral Songs. With io8 Woodcuts, engraved by COOPER. Original Poems for Infant Minds. By JANE and "A. TAYLOR. With Original Illustrations by the Best Artists, engraved by J. D. COOPER. Little Lays for Little Folk. Selected by J. G. WATTS. With Original Illustrations by the best living Artists, engraved by J. D. COOPER. 4to, cloth, gilt edges. Sing-Song. A Nursery Rhyme-Book. By CHRISTINA G. ROSSETTI. With 120 Illustrations by ARTHUR HUGHES, engraved by the Brothers DALZIEL. The Picture Book of Reptiles, Fishes, and Insects. By the Rev. J. G. WOOD, M.A. With 250 Illustrations. 4to, cloth. Birds. By the Rev. J. G. "WOOD, M.A. With 242 Illustrations. 4to, cloth. S---Mammalia. By the Rev. J. G. VooD, M.A. With 250 Illustrations. 4to, cloth.



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Eglantine. 127 tenderness to the little birds, and the way in which he spoke of them as sentient beings. Poor little Tommy," Dear little Nell," My nice old boy, Bob," Clever Joe." By such names they were designated, and a strangercould but imagine that he spoke of children of his own. One hot summer's evening, he had taken his little wooden stool, on which it was his fancy generally to sit, and placed it outside his door, to get what little air was moving in the dark crowded street. It was Saturday night, and there was much traffic going on-women with baskets on their arms, dragging along weary children, marketing for Sunday; men reeling home from the public-house, where they had spent their week's earnings; all poor working people-few of a better class passed through the street in the evening. Many of the inhabitants stood at their doors, the weather was so warm, and they could scarcely breathe in their close rooms. Job had given up any idea of selling more that day-people did not usually



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96 Orange Blossom. is he? where is my pet ?" Oh, how glad I was! He knows me," she said. Know her, the beauty! I should think I did and she looked so bfight and happy, that I felt happy too. I have little more to tell; my life is very peaceful and happy now. I have a beautiful window to live in, in which are ferns and creeping plants, and a tiny fountain that makes a sweet, pleasant sound, like an accompaniment to my songs, and my mistress is kind as ever; and he, too, who once made her forget me, he is kind in his way, and comes and whistles to me, dreadfully out of tune. But he means it kindly, and I like him, because he is so good to her whom I love so dearly. I am old now, so old that all my singing is over, and many of my feathers are gone. I have lived a long and happy life, and I have only one wish-to lie in her hand, and see her sweet face bending over me, when I close my eyes for the last time. -4--.



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Tulip. 43 Kind and indulgent as the doctor was to her, she was ashamed to ask for a larger allowance; to own that she spent it all on herself, for it was a very handsome one, which should have amply covered all expenses, and given her that purest of all pleasures-the pleasure of helping others. She looked very lovely, as I have described her, sitting in the fading light, and little Minnie, with whom she was a great favourite, ran to her and clambered into her lap. With the child clinging about her, she rose and came to the table as Doctor Hartley entered. It was the time he always came to have a chat with his children, his arduous profession leaving him little time to see them, and he knew at this time they would all assemble. "Now, young ones, give me an account of your day's work," he said, drawing his chair nearer Minnie, whom Hetty had at length disentangled from her neck and placed in her chair. I shall begin with the youngest; what have you been doing, Titmouse ?"



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34 72uip. They were right; and so it was Ethel's turn. "A Dandelion," she said, laughing. "You can't like that," said Isabel. "Yes I do, very much." Where would you put it ?" asked Tom. Oh! I don't know that," she said, still laughing, for it's very ugly, Tom; out of sight somewhere, so I will say in my heart, as I really do love the person." "Papa ?" asked Minnie. "No. Papa! he isn't a dandy at all, I'm sure." Oh that's the tack, Dandy-lion-eh, you're making puns-then it'soh, I don't know." "You, Tom," said Isabel; "I knew it; is it not, Ethel?" "Yes, that's right. Who was cross all day because mamma wouldn't let him have a new pair of gloves tp go to church ? Oh, Master Tom!-now it's your turn." "Well, better be a dandy than a sloven, Miss Ethel. Who goes about with her gathers torn out, and her fingers out of her gloves-eh ?"



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Poppies. II brightly, too, and glistened on the icicles hanging to the windows, and soon, like gentle, tender words on frozen angry hearts, melted them to tears. Papa had been up to Freddy's room early, to ask him if he was sorry for his conduct of the day before, if so, he might get up and go to the christening, if not, he must stop in bed all day. Freddy had felt very bright when he woke, very much inclined to get up and be good; but this visit from his father brought back all the angry daring of his nature. It would have been better to let the new day speak for itself, to bury in the oblivion of sleep, as he had done himself, the fault of yesterday-have turned over a clean page and forgotten the old blot. But Mr. Morley knew very little of children or their ways. He was roused to interfere with his boy because he saw him going utterly wrong, and beyond the management of his nurse; and he



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The Lily of the Valley. 181 she came, brought the tea in. Her uncle had read his paper and smoked his pipe, the while her deft fingers had put semblances of the sweet spring flowers on to the satin. After tea he went out to look at the mill, and see all was right before the night fell, and she, fetching her hat and cloak, went out too, to breathe the air, and stretch the young limbs that grew cramped with such close sitting to her work. It was a beautiful evening; the air somewhat fresh, but still and clear, and she bent her steps towards the wild downs covered with heather which encircled the little valley in which the village lay. She could hear in the silence the far-off shouts of the merry children coming home from their May-day feast, and .her face brightened with the thought of how happy they had been. It was colder on the high ground, but it was very refreshing to her, who had sat in the small room so hard at work all day, and she stepped along quickly, stopping now and then to pick



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S16 Poppies. in vain, till at length the dreadful weight on his chest lifted, the strange grasp seemed gone, the room seemed filled with light, and he heard Nurse Penny say, "There, he's all right now, Anna, I told you he was only dreaming," and he opened his large blue eyes, and at his bedside stood Nurse Penny, holding a candle, and Anna kneeling close to him, with the tears streaming down her face. "Oh! my pretty boy, what was the matter? you have been a-screaming and a-going on." He won't take me to be hanged, will he ?" asked the child, still with a scared, terrified look in his eyes. "No, no, dear, no one shall take you away, you have been dreaming," said Anna. "Dear, bless the poor child, said good old Nurse Penny, "he is in a heat this cold night. Take and wrap him up in a blanket, Anna, and bring him in the nursery, and I'll give him something to quiet him; and then we'll wash him in some warm water, and send down to



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192 The Lily of the Valley. benefit by his daughter's loving work: the distress of mind had so told on him, that he gradually fell into a rapid decline. Lily went to nurse him, and then came back, ather uncle's request, to live with him-the same sweet, gentle, pale, patient girl, like the flower she was named after-and all lovingly welcomed her back, and save for the absence of the endless work, and of one face, that-little as she would own it, even to herself, she pined to see again-the old quiet life seemed to have returned and fallen into the old ways. And then one day, long after, Maurice came home. He had had a letter from his mother by the last mail, and he came at once to England and to Thorndale. One kiss of his mother, and he was away to the mill, where he gathered, to keep for his own for life,"The Lily of the Valley." Woodfall and Kinder Printers, Milford Lane, Strand, London, W.C.





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WILD ROSE AND OTHER TALES BY MRS. MACKARNESS AUTHOR OF "A TRAP TO CATCH A SUNBEAM" LONDON AND NEW YORK GEORGE ROUTLEDGE AND SONS 1874



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Thliip. 47 the children ran off, she followed him into his study, and, kneeling down by the chair in which he had thrown himself, she said,"Tell me what to do; I will try to do it. What is there for girls, young ladies, to do ?" My child," he said placing his hand tenderly on her head, "we are one large family, the children of one Father, once realize this and you will find plenty to do; some give their minds to study-to -.: ict.if.: or artistic pursuits, and benefit their fellow-creatures out of their knowledge. Others, without talent like this, can minister to each other still, in some way. Oh! my dear girl, there is so muck to do, not so little. If you went with me into the homes of want, and misery, and sin, and suffering, you would tremble to see what work there is for us, if we would only do it. It is right that you should dress yourself like the little lady that you are-right, with means at your command, that you should employ people to make pretty things for younatural that you should be pleased to wear



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16 George Routledge & Sons' Juvenile Books. TWo-SIILLING GIFT-BOOKS-continued. 2 oSandford ed Mferton. Northanger Abbey. By Ernie Elton at School. Jane Austen. Yohn Hartley. Pride and Prejudice. By ac ofall Trades. By T. Jane Austen siity. By Miller. Sense and Sensibility. By The WVonder Book. Jane Austen. e Village Sketches. By the angeIood Tales. Rev. C. T. Whitehead. Archie Blake. The Boy's Reader. Inez and Emmeline. The Girl's Reader. The Orphan of Waterloo. Spider Spinnings. Alaum Guinea. Stories for Sundays. By AdvenluresofqosephHawsethe Rev. H. C. Adams. ist jiSe. series. Todd'sLectures to Children. Stories for Sundays. By Alarooner's Island. Rev. H. C. Adams. 2nd series. The Mayflower. By Mrs. Adventures among the In,Stowe. dians. Anecdotes of Dogs. Cousin Aleck. S Mr. Rutherford's Children. The Doctor's Birthday. By The Play-Day Book. By the Rev. H. C. Adams. Fanny Fern. With Coloured Walter's Friend. By the Plates. Rev. H. C. Adams. Emma. By Jane Austen. Little Women. Ist series. Mansfield Park. ByAusten. Little Women. 2nd series. In 13 Books, fcap. 8vo, gilt, Is. 6d, each. I 6 The Red Shoes. Everything -in its Right The Silver Shilling. Place. The Little Match-Girl. Under the Willow Tree. The Darning Needle. The Old Church Bell The Tinder Box. The Ice Maiden. The Goloshes of Fortune. The Will o' the Wisp. TheMarshKing'sDaughter. Poultry Meg's Family. The Will Swans. Put Off is Not Done with. Each Volume contains a variety of Tales, a Frontispiece in colours, and an average of 16 other Pictures, engraved by the Brothers DALZIEL.



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54 Holly. with a sigh. There's Maggie, and Phcenice, and Polly, and the baby, and oh, ever so many boys." Do you ever nurse your little baby-sister ?" said Annie. "Why, I don't never do nothing else. I should have brought her along now, only mother thought I couldn't carry her and the soup too." "Oh, how I should like to help you nurse her, Lucy! Bring her with you to-morrow. I come in this orchard every day with a piece of cake, and I'll give you my piece to-morrow if you'll bring your baby." Lucy promised to do so, and went her way to the house, and Annie sat down beneath the tree with a fresh joy in her heart-something to look forward to-a little baby to nurse, a little girl to talk to-for she was so lonely when Frank and Willie were at school, with only Dolly to play with. Hurstdale was a very small village, with only a few poor inhabitants. No nice families, with bright, merry children for little Annie to have



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190 The Lily of the Valley. regularly, I will keep your father in my employ, and tell no one of his crime.' That has been my work; how could I tell Maurice my father's shame ? and so he left me because I could not tell him the sad secret which has been such a heavy burden to bear." Maurice was always so impetuous," said the old lady, stroking fondly the little hand still lying in hers; "but I say to you, my child, many daughters have done excellently, but thou excellest them all." "My uncle," continued Lily, "was at one time so fond of my father; and when this all happened, it grieved him so bitterly, he would not help him with money. Nothing would induce him, he said, to pay one farthing back of the money he had taken-he is so odd, you know, my uncle-and he was so angry with me for promising to do so, but he said all he would do would be to release my father of any expense so far as I was concerned. I might live with him, and he would leave all



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Heartsease. 157 hand in hers; "you shall have food, and doctor, and nurse, in less than ten minutes." The woman murmured "Thank you," and flying down the crazy stairs and out of the door, Mrs. Osborne hurried to the next cottage. She knew the woman there. Mrs. Jones, why is that woman alone next door ?" she said; "she is dying without help or comforts." "Well, mum, I know it's very sad; but you see every one is out in the hop-garden-you can't get a soul for love nor money this time o' year. I'm home because I takes washing, and I can't leave my work to go to her, you see, ma'am-that would not pay me and keep my children." Pray go to her, or find some one. I will pay you anything you ask; it is too shocking." "Well, mum, if you takes such a interest, to oblige you, I'll go; but raly she's that filthy." "She is, I know," answered Mrs. Osborne;



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Holly. 7 showed to the neighbours-that love and mercy which never faileth was more especially shown to them. Many little graves had been added to the pretty churchyard when their darling was able to be laid on the sofa, in the pleasant sittingroom, which looked out into the garden, where brown leaves of autumn strewed the paths now. Christmas came, and the boys arrived for their holidays. Little Annie was very weak, and had a cough; but she was happier than she had ever been in her life. She had told her mother all her troubles, who had freely forgiven her. Poor mother! only too glad to have her there to forgive; and she had said that Mr. Clayton and herself had long thought Annie wanted a little girl companion, and immediately after the holidays a little girl was coming to be educated with Annie, "who would pay mamma too," she told the boys, "so it would be good for mamma as well as her." The little Baby did not die, though two of the children did, and mamma had given her leave to see it very often, and to



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./ -s r *;*' ^^. ...-V ^ .~i -., i ..A .*; *:< -"Ar iriF ;L4tii^Z '< -* L .-. ~ ~J~4, A 4* WI -4 -a 4 .4 4,. t' K' S *t t



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138 Eglantine. preserved her, all unthinking as she was. Philip had been permitted to guard her from much of danger; and now the simple words of an old unlettered man had awoke in her heart the first sentiments of dependence on, and gratitude for, the care which had watched over her from childhood. "Would He spare his life if I asked it ?" she thought, as the hollow cough again sounded; and an old far-off memory of childish days in the village school came back to her, "Whatsoever ye shall ask in my name, I will give you." She could see in fancy these words again on the old school wall. How often had she read them over and over, without their deqp and holy meaning coming near her heart! Oh! would He grant her this great gift, the life that was dearer than her own? She fell on her knees beside her bed-the piteous sound in the next room keeping a sad accompaniment to her prayer, and with bitter tears of penitence, she besought that that life might be spared, so precious to her. And then,



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24 Wild Rose. and placed it in my garden to add to its native beauty the graces of cultivation. I am proud of my Rose, it has surpassed my expectations." "You know now the secret, then," said a lady who entered the room as he ceased speaking. "You know to whom you have been so many years indebted. Ah! Seymour Lisle is indeed, as he is called, a strange man, for he has forgotten himself entirely, and" "Hush! hush!" he said, rising; "not another word. I have been a very fortunate man, for I have realized a bright dream." Till she mourned him dead years after, the Wild Rose never knew that he had wrestled with a love for her, that he thought a follyand abandoning all selfish consideration, acted only for her good, leaving her, at his death, all his property, as he would have done had she been his wife.



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ORANGE BLOSSOM. She carried me into the greenhouse full of flowers, and there stood a tall gcentleman whom I ihad never seen before."



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186 The Lily of the Valley. "No, no, I can't. God bless you!" "God bless you, Maurice!" she answered. And so they parted. "The third instalment! Good, very good! I believe she'll do it now. Dear, dear! it's very curious, very. I didn't believe any woman had such perseverance." It was a strange-looking, little old man who was thus talking to himself in a very dark small office, at the back of some large warehouses in the City. He was thin and small, with an odd face, a sort of cross between a Dutch nut-cracker and "a street-door knocker, bright, small eyes, like "a cunning little bird's ; but withal a kindly look in the face, which redeemed its ugliness, and was strangely at variance with an assumption of great strictness and severity. As he had spoken the words recorded above, he had placed in an iron box a sum of money done up in paper, beside two others



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Orange Blossom. 85 would take me with her, and hang me in a rose tree, while she worked, and we used to sing together, and she would try to sing as high as I did, but, of course, she never succeeded; then she would say,"Ah, Dickie, I give it up; if I were to go as high as that I should never come down again." I was sorry to notice now how ill-mannered some birds are, sparrows particularly, but I tried to remember that they had not had the same advantages which I had had, and so I tried to be patient with them; but they would come in flocks to stare at me, when I was out in the garden, and say unkind things to me; jeer me about my golden cage, and tell of their bright happy lives. I own it sometimes made me envious to hear them talk. I used to think how delightful it would be to soar up into that beautiful blue sky, or sit singing in the waving branches of the trees; but my mistress used to tell me that if I had my freedom I should not know what to do with it, and that having been





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8 Wild Rose. Beneath some willows, their graceful branches dripping into the water, stood the little fugitive and her pursuer. Her face flushed with her long run, and, panting for breath, she stood holding in her hand a coarse brown straw hat; her long hair was rough and tangled, and her dress, which was much too short for her, was torn in several places, and the rents pinned up. Her small feet were encased in the roughest, commonest boots, and her stockings hung loose about her well-shaped limbs; in short, a more untidy-looking young lady it would have been difficult to find. Her pursuer had laid a firm grasp on her arm, and was looking down on her with an air of mingled pity and admiration, at her beautiful defiant face, at her graceful form, and at her strange and unladylike attire. I have caught you at last," he said; "I've long had a desire to talk with you. Now, who are you ?-what are you ?" "Why do you want to know ?-let go of me!" she said, sharply; and then she burst into a



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90 Orange Blossom. well fed, my food always ready without seeking it, the cold, biting winds did not come near me. In the dark stormy nights, now, I could hear the winds roaring amongst the leafless branches of the trees outside, and I was curled up on my perch, in my mistress's warm bedroom, covered with a piece of green baize, snug and comfortable; and thus, in those long winter nights I learned the grand lesson of content; and in whatsoever state we are there is much to be thankful for, much to make us feel how even the smallest and most insignificant beings in creation are taken care of, and that the life they live, whatever it is, is the best for them. One day, at the beginning of the new year, when we were looking forward to the bright days of spring, my mistress came dancing into the room where I was, with such a bright face, such a bright colour and glad smile lighting it all up, and, seizing my cage, said,"Now, you little pet, you, I am going to



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92 Orange Blossom. him, for her sweet sake-be content to serve him in my poor little way, satisfied that she was happy. Here she comes, to cover me up. Good night. "Twit, twit." CHAPTER III. SOMETIME after this I was very unhappy. My dear little mistress (you must not blame her) seemed to forget me altogether; sometimes she did not feed me till late in the day, and sometimes not at all, poor little me! I had never been forgotten before, and I felt it very deeplythe cold east winds blew over the garden, and the sun seemed to have no warmth, and I sat all huddled up on my perch, like a bunch of untidy feathers. It was a gloomy time-the only thing that gave me pleasure was to watch the flowers springing up in the garden; the blue Hepaticas,



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Heartsease. 165 see, ma'am, a-hanging on the back of the chair, is all we've had to wipe our hands and faces on, I can't tell you how long. Clean, indeed I don't know Sundays from week-a-days. Here we sits with tea for all our meals, and never a bit of clean clothes on, nor nothing to make us remember it's the Lord's Day. We've no things to come to church in, and we're just like lost creatures." Poor thing!" said Mrs. Osborne, kindly. The tears were coursing down the poor woman's cheeks, and her own eyes were full, too, at this touching picture of desolation. "I hope I shall be able to save you, and I shall have the pleasure of seeing you come to church with your children, I am sure, and let them, or at least my little friend, come to school regularly next week. This is Monday-on Saturday you shall all have 'Sunday clothes,' and to-night you shall have things to clean your house and yourselves, and I know you will reward me by seeing you keep yourselves decent. Your



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Heartsease. 167 the next morning, Mrs. Thomson and the two girls presented themselves at the Vicarage door, to thank Mrs. Osborne and let her see them in their clothes. They were shown into the room in which she always saw her pensioners, and she could, on her entrance, scarcely believe the three comfortably-dressed bright-faced people before her were really the poor things who had so interested her. "Oh! dear, ma'am, I do feel so different. I don't know how to thank you; somehow the clean decent clothes have made me feel better: it Is like Sunday to-day-it seems like as though I'd put aside all as I'd done wrong with the old dirty things, and had begun a fresh life to-day." "God help you to do so, Mrs. Thomson," said Mrs. Osborne, fervently. "He will, I believe, ma'am, for I've asked Him," said the woman, softly. It was truly the turning point in her life.



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22 George Routledge & Sons' Juvenile. Books. SIXPENNY STORY BOOKs--continued. s. d o 6Lazy Lawrence, and the Parley's Thomas Titmouse. White£igeon. Arthur's Christmas Story. The Barring Out. The Lost Lamb. The Orphans and Old Poz. Arthur's Stories for Little The Mimic. Boys. The Purple J ar, and other Arthur's Book about Boys. Tales. Arthur's Organ Boy. The Birthday Present, and Margaret yones. the Basket Woman. The Two School Girls. Simple Susan. Widow and her Daughter. The Little Merchants. The Rose in the Desert. Tale of the Universe. The Little Black Hen. Robert Dawson. Martha and Rachel. Kate Campbell. The Carpenter's Daughter Basket of Flowers. The Prince in Disguise. Babes in the Basket. Gertrude and her Bible. The Jewish Twins. Bright-eyed Bessie. Children on the Plains. The Contrast. By Miss Little Henry and his Bearer. Edgeworth. .Learning better than Houses The Grateful Negro. By and Lands. Miss Edgeworth. Maud's First Visit to her jane Hudson. Aunt. A Kiss for a Blow. Easy Poems. Plain edges. Young Negr Servaht. The Boy Captive. By Peter Lina and her Cousins. Parley. Stories of Child Life. TheGatesAjar. Plainedges. The Dairyman's Daughter. Sunday School Reader. Arthur's Tales for the Hearty Staves. Young. Contentment better than Hawthorne's Gentle Boy. Wealth. Pleasant and Proftable. Robinson Crusoe. SParley's Poetry and Prose. Patient Working no Loss. Arthur's Stories for Little No such Word as Fail. Girls. Tales of Truth &Kindness. Arthur's Last Penny. Edward Howard. The Young Cottager.



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The Lily of the Valley. 187 wrapped up exactly in the same manner, and on each was written "Lilian Mayburn," with the dates when received. As he locked the box and put it into a bureau which stood at one end of the room, the door opened, and a man entered, bringing some letters. By this post ?" asked the little man. "Yes, sir," he answered, putting them down on the desk. "I had another instalment from Thorndale this morning." "You have, sir ?-God bless her! I hope she is not working herself ill." "Ah! I don't know; that's nothing to do with me. She promised to pay me, and so long as she continues to do so, so long you shall remain here, with the secret faithfully kept; when she stops, you know the result." The man passed his hand over his forehead, pushing back the long rough hair hanging over it, with a weary sigh, and left the office, carefully closing the door behind him; and his



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114 Poppies. And then he laid down, and heard the healths drunk, and the laughter, and footsteps past his door, but no one coming to him-but "I don't care," he kept muttering-" I don't care." Silence, now; the short winter day is drawing to a close, the room grows dark, and Freddy's eyes are heavy and dim. What's that standing by the wardrobe ? "Anna, is that you ?" No answer. Anna," he cries again, and sits up in his bed, his sunny locks all tangled, his blue eyes wide open, glaring at the figure-" Anna, who is it ?" "It is me, Don't care.'" "What do you say-' Don't care'? But who is he ? I don't know him." "Never mind," said the voice, and the strange, dark, shapeless thing came nearer and nearer to the bed. "Never mind, you don't like cake with baby's name on it-you're always calling me-now I'm come-do you know I've been hanged? all of us have been hanged, and you'll



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24 George Routledge & Sons' Juvenile Books. In royal 32mo, 6d. each, with Illustrations, boards. 0 6 Swimningand Skating. By BrotherSam'sConundrums. the Rev. J. G. Wood. Manly Exercises: Boxing; Gymnastics. Running, Walking, Training, Chess. With Diagrams. By &c. By Stonehenge, &c. G. F. Pardon. Croquet. By Edmund RoutWhrist. ledge. Billiards and Bagatelle. By Fishing. G. F. Pardon. Ball Games. DraughtsandBackgammon. Football. By G. F. Pardon. Conjuring. Cricket. Quoits and Bowls. The Cardplayer. By G. F. Shooting. Pardon. Fireworks. Rowing and Sailing. Skating. Riding and Driving. Swimming. Archery. For List see Sixpenny Juveniles, on page 2r. Each Illustrated with 125 Woodcuts by JoHN GILBERT, HARRISON WEIR, and others. Crown 8vo, sewed, in fancy covers, 6d. each. o 6 Things In-doors. Rural Scenes. What we Eat and Drink.. Country Enjoyments. Animals and their Uses. How Things are Made. Birds and Birds' Nests. Soldiers and Sailors. Fishes, Butterflies, &' Frogs. Science and Art. Trees, Shrubs, and Flowers. Geography and Costume. City Scenes.



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Poppies. 115 be hanged, and then your head will hang down on your chest like mine. I'd better take you with me now, you can take hold of the rope, I always wear it round my neck. I've had it there ever since I was christened, that it might be ready. Come along; Nurse Penny and Anna will be there." "There, where?" said the child, with his dry lips and parched throat, almost unable to utter a sound. "To be hanged." And closer came the dark form, and Freddy could feel a heavy pressure on his chest, and a sensation of being lifted from the bed. He tried to scream, but in vain, no sound could be uttered ; and then he heard a low wailing sob, and his mother's voice calling him, and little Jessie saying "do say you're sorry, Freddy"-and little Lucy he could feel pulling his leg to get him away from the fatal grasp which seemed to hold him tighter and tighter; and he thought if he could only speak he would say he was sorry, but he tried and tried



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168 Heartsease. From that day no house was cleaner in the village, no woman cleaner or more decent. Taken up thus by Mrs. Osborne, others helped her, and Lottie was hired by the Squire's wife as a kitchen-maid, Jeanie keeping steadily to school for some years, when she was made happy by being engaged by Mrs. Osborne as nursery-maid to her two sweet little children, to whom she often and often told the story of their mother's first visit to their cottage, and the box of Sunday Clothes.



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GEORGE ROUTLEDGE & SONS' CATALOGUE OF JUVENILE BOOKS AND POETICAL MWORKS, LONDON: THEP BROADWAY, LUDGATE. NEW YORK : 416, BROOME STREET. Lbp----



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Tulip. 31 the "grizzling" hour, for she declared that in all nurseries it was the same, just at twilight, when it was too light for candles and yet too dark to see from the window, the children all began to be fretful and discontented. They had grown out of nurse's care now, all of them, and she had left them for some time. The nursery had become the play-room, although they could never remember to give it any other name than the old familiar one of their childhood; and still, at that especial hour, somehow, work or play became wearisome, and they grew i riLiL. and discontented, too often ending in loud, angry words, which caused mamma's interference. Of course the boys were the principal disturbing element; they were the most restless, the most difficult to amuse, but, as Tommy was at school all day until this time, the girls were told that they must give up a little to him, and play at what he liked. "Let's think of a new game, every one of



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Wild Rose. 9 bright joyous laugh, quite out of keeping with her former sharp tone. "What a dance I led you!" she said; "you fashionable gentlemen don't often run like that. It will do you good." "Perhaps; but answer my first question-Who are you ?" "Answer mine-Why do you want to know ?" "Because you interest me. Why are you not on the lawn with the other ladies ? why do I never see you, save like a 'will-o'-the-wisp,' flying through the shrubs and peeping amongst the bushes, alone always ?" "Because I belong to no one," said the child, bitterly. I've got used to my own company, and I like it better than any one else's." How do you mean you belong to no one ?" continued her companion, his curiosity more and more roused by the strange answers he received. "Are you not one of Mrs. Delacorn's daughters ?" "Ha! ha! do I look like them? Where is mny muslin dress, with all its ribbons and I*



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The Lily of the Valley. 183 which, when she raised them to his, seemed to make him start-soft and gentle as their gaze was. And so they walked on silently for a little while. Then she asked him some simple question about the heather; but he did not answer her, and then, suddenly turning to her, he said,"Lily, I am glad to have met you thus alone. Have you any different answer to give me than that you gave me last ?" "No, Maurice, none," she said, quietly, and with a slight tone of astonishment in her voice, as though she wondered at his question. "Then you decide my fate for me. On Monday I leave England for Australia, never, in all probability, to return." The smallest possible start and change of colour was perceptible as he said this; but he saw it not, he was looking straight away into the distance, as if he dared not face the calm glance of those blue eyes again. I am sorry for your mother, Maurice, but I think it is better for you."





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Heartsease. 163 "We must try and set all to rights now, then," said Mrs. Osborne; "and my object in coming to-day is to know what you think you stand in the greatest need of." "Oh, dear me, ma'am, that's more than I can tell you: this poor old rag, with a petticoat under it, is all the clothing I've got, and a old shawl. You see poor Jeanie, that's all she's a-got; and Lottie-she's out now a-nursing Mrs. Martin's baby, and I cut up the only gown I had as was the least decent to make her tidy to go; she goes every day, and they give her ninepence a week and her keep." Mrs. Tremaine clothed her, I was told, and sent her to school; and in a week her clothes were filthy and you took her from school." The woman smiled sadly as she answered, Ah! ma'am, that's what is said, I know. Mrs. Tremaine was very kind, I will not be so ungrateful as to deny; she gave Lottie a light grey-barege, I think you call it-frock, of her little girl's, a hat, and a pair of boots.



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O'ange BlosisOM. 89 I would sing as loud as ever I could, wishing my song would convey to her how anxious I felt about her; but my singing worried her, did not comfort her, as I hoped, for she only threw something over my cage to keep me quiet, and so at last I gave up singing, and only sat silent, watching her; then she would come to the cage, with her sweet eyes full of tears, and say,"Ah! Dickie, dear, I know you are sorry for me, and would help me if you could." Help her! I would willingly have gone without my bath for a whole week, and never tasted groundsel more, if I could have done the smallest thing to help her. For a long time we were both very miserable. The cold winter came, the snow covered the ground, and the poor little robins, and the saucy sparrows, came hopping on the lawn, to look for the crumbs my kind mistress threw out to them every morning after breakfast. I could laugh at them now. I was warm, and



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Orange Blossom. 83 with pleasure, and ran away as fast as she could, returning in a few moments with a lady, with pretty bright hair, like her own. Look, dear mamma," she said, this is the bird papa has bought me, is not he a beauty ?" He is, indeed, darling; you must be careful the cat does not get him." The cat! Oh, horror! all the bright things swam before me; even now I remember the misery of that moment. Ah! here comes my little mistress to cover me up for the night. Little! I say; she is grown so tall since she took me from my dingy home with the old cobbler; but I say little" only in love; I will sing to you again to-morrow; good night, "twit, twit." CHAPTER II. I CANNOT express to you how dear my mistress had now become to me, or how I had learnt to know her step, her voice. I found out



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* i -.1 .9.



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Poppies. 105 sudden appearance of papa, who, learning the reason of the disturbance, ordered Master Freddy at once to bed. Poor Freddy was labouring under a mistaken idea of "spirit;" he thought that to assert he "did not care," and persuade himself he did not, evidenced the greatest possible bravery, and so, unfortunately, it was his continual cry, and the continual battle with his father to make him care. Unluckily for Freddy, he was a remarkably beautiful child, and very fascinating when he was good; but, alas! that was seldom. Anna had much to blame herself for in this matter; she had been with the child from his birth, and loved him with that unreasoning, ill-judging love which nurses too often do the little thing who has so long been their care. I could not love one of my own better," she said; nor could she have certainly spoiled him more, and she was now beginning to reap the fruits of the mischief she had sown. He loved her with the selfish 5*



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182 The Lily of the Valley. pieces of the heather and ling, and to look at the splendid view of the distant landscape, lying in a purple mist, bordered by a ruddy golden light left by the setting sun; and whilst she stood thus gazing, a voice pronounced her name. She had heard no footfall on the soft turf behind her. "Ah, Maurice! is that you? What alovely evening! is it not ?" she said, holding out her hand to the young man. "Yes, lovely. I am glad to see you out. The girls told me they could not coax you to join them at their feast." No, I was busy." "Which way are you walking ?" he asked. Oh, home again now, I think. I only came to breathe the fresh air for a few minutes, and now I must go back to work." "May I come a little way with you ?" "Oh, yes, if you will," she said, quietly. Her manner was in strange contrast to his: he was so eai,:r and excited, she so calm, looking at him so steadily with her sweet, dreamy eyes,





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Tuhip. 35 "Never mind, Ethie," said little Minnie; "I love you all the same." I know you do. I don't mind what old Tom says. Now go on, sir-think of a flower." "Well, a Tulip." "A Tulip-let's see," said Isabel, "a Tulip is very handsome and very gaudy." "And no use," said Ethel; "who can it be ? Do you love it very much ?" "Yes-no-yes-very well." Only very well-it's not a common person. I mean it must be genptry; it's a garden flower." "Yes-it's a lady." A lady! gaudy!-no use!-and you like only very well." I know," exclaimed Ethel, "it's Hetty." "Right. It's Hetty." "But is she audy and useless ? poor Hetty !" said Isabel, "I don t think that." "She's very beautiful," said George, "and very nice besides." "Yes, crams you with sugar-plums, we know."



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T-POPPIES p~3~-T--'sz



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HOLLY



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Tulip. 37 something very much like his last speech. However, Ethel guessed, so it's her turn." Oh, no, I shan't play any more humbugging games," said Tom; I'm going to read." Read, oh! I say-a fine lot you'll read," said George. Don't you be cheeky, young man, or I'll just give you something," said Tom, fiercely. Don't be cross, Tom, dear," said Isabel. "Hark! there's the tea bell-that is a good thing-now there's something to do we all like." "And away they ran downstairs to the long, low-pitched, old-fashioned room, which they used as a dining-room, where the table was laid for the young people's tea. Doctor and Mrs. Hartley did not dine until half-past seven o'clock-the doctor, as a rule, having finished his work by then, and having a better chance to enjoy it quietly. When the children entered the room, seated in the old-fashioned wide window-seat was a very fair and beautiful young girl, her head



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ORANGE BLOSSOM



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104 Poppics. "Oh! Anna, I am glad you are come; she's been and set me up here for nothing." "Why, Mrs. Penny, what is it?" said Anna, setting down the child, who came immediately to her brother, and began to try violently to lug him out of the chair, scolding all the time. Master Freddy has been very tiresome all the time you have been out; and as at last he took to hitting Miss Jessie, I sat him up." "Dear, dear! I am sorry; but you will be good now, won't you? Come, dear, and beg Nurse's pardon." "No, I shan't." "Oh, yes, do, there's a dear." "I shan't; go away, baby, do," and pushing the little thing, who was still clinging to his feet with the desire to get him out of the chair, she fell back against the drawers and knocked her head. This, of course, occasioned a loud cry from the poor little thing, which caused the



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Orange Blossom. 87 tered, and cried aloud; in another moment the fearful creature was close to me, gazing at me with her fierce green eyes, and shaking my cage with her paw; at last one paw, with all its fearful claws extended, entered between the wires of my cage. I heard a loud cry, felt an agonizing pain, and remember no more. I must pause awhile; I am not so young as I was, and the remembrance of that night makes me shiver. When I came to myself I was lying in my dear little mistress's hand. I felt better directly I saw her sweet face gazing so pityingly in mine, but I was too ill to thank her, so I only opened and shut my eyes to show her I was alive. She called me all the sweet names she could think of, and gave me something that was very hot, and seemed to take my breath away, but it did me good, for I was soon able to stretch myself and see if any bones were broken. I found I was all right, and that I was only ill from the fright. I was put back



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S6o Heartsease. "You were quite right, of course, dear, to help them in such extremity, but you must not do too much for one family, and that family by no means highly meritorious." No, I know; but Herbert, dear, I just want to put them to rights, and then see if they will keep themselves so, you know." "Very well, little wife, this is the first severe case you have had in your ministry among my poor," he said, smiling; "you shall do as you like." "Thank you, dear; I shall try to get a subscription for them, and I shan't give them the money, you know, but lay it out in useful things; why, now, there's not a solitary thing in the house that I can see." "All pawned or sold for drink, I should fear. However, you shall try to redeem them. I will head your subscription with ten shillings." He was rewarded by a very loving kiss, and with her husband's approval and encouragement, Mrs. Osborne began her task hopefully. She had more difficulty than she thought, for



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o1 George Routledge & Sons' Juvenile Books. ROUTLEDGE'S With 8 Illustrations, fcap. 8vo, bevelled boards, gilt sides. d. 3 6 Ancient Cities of the World. The Wide, Wide World. Great Cities of the Middle The Travels of Rolando. Ages. ist Series. Robinson Crusoe. Coloured Celebrated Children. Plates. Edgar Clifton. Sandford and Merton. The LampliShter. Coloured Plates. Melbourne House. Eve satome.Coo Seven Wonders ofthe World. Swiss Family Robinson. Queechy. Coloured Plates. Ellen Montgomery s BookEdgeworth's Popular Tales. shetf. Coloured Plates. The Two Schoolgirls. ---Moral 7ales. The Pilgrim's Progress. Coloured Plates. With Coloured Plates. Parents' AsThe Girl's Birthday Book. sistant. Coloured Plates. With many Illustrations. ---Early Lessons. The Word; or, Walks from Coloured Plates. Eden. The Old Helmet. By the Glen Luna Family. Author of "The Wide, Wide Mabel Vaughan. World." ROUTLEDGE'S Foolscap 8vo, with Engravings, gilt. 3 6 Hans Andersen's Tales. The four Sisters. Heroines of History. The Golden Rule. Sketches and Anecdotes of Boyhood of Great Men. Animnal Life. By Rev. J. G. Footprints of Famous Men. Wood. By J. G. Edgar. Grimm's Home Stories. Rev. 7. G. Wood's Boy's Animal Traits and CharacOwn Natural Hisfory Book. teristics. By Rev. J. G. Wood. Lillieslea. By Mary Howitt. Wood's My Feathered Heroines of Domestic Life. Friends. Tales of Chariton School. White's Selborne. 200 cuts. By the Rev. H. C. Adams.





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Orange Blossom. 81 "Oh, papa, dear," exclaimed the little girl, in a voice as musical as the sweetest thrush, "I will have this little fellow-you shall be my little bird, and I will be so kind to you." While I was feeling rather vexed with her for being taken with my little coquettish ways rather than my singing, the old gentleman placed something shiny in my master's hand, and, before I could say farewell to any of my friends, who were anxiously waiting to know what would happen, something was thrown all over my cage, and I was carried into the air. In a few moments there came such a fearful jerk; I was flung off my perch, and lay panting and frightened at the bottom of my cage in the sand. My little mistress lifted the corner of the thing I was covered over with and said, "Do not be frightened, dear Dickie; I don't suppose you ever drove in a carriage before." And then she laughed heartily. I was angry with her for laughing when I was so frightened, but I felt sure she 4*



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Orange Blossom. 91 show you to some one you must love very, very much, because I do; and you must sing your prettiest song, and be altogether charming." So I shook out my feathers and began at once to sing my very best song, as well as I could, at least, while she ran so fast with me, that I nearly fell off my perch. She carried me into a green-house, full o. flowers, in which she often used to hang my cage up now that the garden was too cold, and there stood a tall gentleman, whom I had never seen before. "There, now, look at my Dickie; is he not a beauty ?" she said. Would you believe it, he never so much as looked at me, but taking her hand, said,"My darling, I can only see one beauty." I must say I thought it was rude, and made up my mind that I could not like him, even to please her; but, somehow, when I found that it was he who had brought back the bright smiles to the face I loved, I felt I must forgive him, and love



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94 Orange Blossom. who she was till she spoke, and then I found it was my dear mistress; she had a white thing all over her pretty hair, so I did not know her; she tied something.white on my cage, which frightened me very much, but I liked it when I got used to it, for some sweet-scented flowers were with it, like some that were gleaming in her hair, and she said,"Now Dickie, sing away as loud as you can." I always did what she told me, so I sang, and sang, and sang as loud as I can, till I was quite tired; but no one came near me for a long time. I heard a great deal of noise-laughing, and talking, and shouting, and carriage-wheels-and at last the church bells, ringing out such a merry peal. I love the bells; I left off singing a little to listen to them, and then, though my throat ached, I was obliged to begin again for joy at the sound I loved so much. Presently, just as I was beginning to feel inclined to put my head under my wing and have a doze, one of



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Holly. 69 I don't know, she is very bad. But you must not stay here; if mother comes in she will be in a way." "Yes, I am going, but I did want to see Baby once more; dear, dear Baby, you must not die, I love you so very much." And stooping down she kissed the little one's face again and again; then without looking back she ran out of the cottage, and never stopped till she was once more on the grass beneath the old apple-tree-where, flinging herself on the ground, the poor little child burst into a passion of tears. It did seem so hard, she had been so happy with Baby, and now she was to die, and the old lonely life was to come back. She cried till her head began to ache and throb so terribly that she thought she would go and tell mamma how bad she felt, and all about Baby, and everything naughty and disobedient she had done, and then she would like to lie down and die too, and go with the little creature she had learnt to love so muchgo away beyond the blue sky and the white



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Heartsease. 151 warned me of them, the former incumbent's wife." "I know, mum, I know; they'll tell you they've given the children boots and sent them to school, but schooling won't fill their poor little hungry insides, and boots won't wear for ever, and don't stand in place of petticoats and frocks ; the poor critters have got right down to the ground, as you may say, and they want a kindly hand to lift 'em up and give 'em a chance." "But does not the woman spend all her husband earns in the most reckless, extravagant manner ?" asked the lady. "Well, mum," answered the woman, with a smile, "she ain't got much to show for it, anyhow. Why, there ain't no morsel thing in the place as I can see; and as to his earnings, why he only gets boy's pay-he ain't what they calls, you see, marm, a able-bodied man. Bless you, they're objects, that's what they are." Whatever state of destitution that might be,



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" BEG your pardon, ma'am, for a-stopping on you, but I know you'll excuse it -you don't know me, I daresay, ma'am-my name is Smith." The lady the woman addressed smiled slightly as she answered," I think I have seen you in the village." "Yes, ma'am, it's little I'm out of it; but I thought it my duty to speak to you about some neighbours of mine-leastways, not next-door neighbours I don't mean, for my little place is at the corner, not down that there dirty court, but there we mostly calls them as lives nigh



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Holly. 6 Yes, she would go, she thought at last; there could be no harm, and she would be so good at lessons, and then dear mamma would be so pleased, and directly she got home she would say where she had been-of course it would be so unkind to disappoint Lucy, which it would if mamma said "No." How easy it is to flatter ourselves, you see, that we are doing some kindly action to another when we want some excuse to follow our own inclination. One other thing rather troubled her; what time, she wondered, should she get back. She must be home to dinner, but this difficulty, unhappily for the little girl, was done away by mamma telling her, when she went down, that she was going out on some business for the whole day, and she should not have time for lessons, so she might have a whole holiday. This was delightful-she should be home anyhow long before mamma was, and all could be managed delightfully; the servants would give her something to eat when she came in if



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Eglantinie. 137 been quite a sermon to her. Her hard-working life had given her but little time for such thoughts; neither she nor Philip had ever dreamt of praying for that blessing which "maketh rich, and adds no sorrow." "Was that why he lay sick?" she thought, as his hollow cough broke on her ear. She had worked hard all her young life, been patient with her mother, whose affliction had so embittered her that it needed great patience to bear with her. She had done all this through the bright, cheerful, energetic nature which God had given her, but she had never been taught to thank Him for the gift-had lain down night after night so weary, and closed her eyes without once thinking who would watch her or keep her safe while she slept -gone to her daily toil without one prayer breathed to keep her safe that day from evilshe, with her beautiful face, exposed to so much! And yet the great enduring Love, which has such infinite patience with its creatures, had



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IT2 Poppies. knew not how to remedy the evil, except by severe punishment, and so, finding him still daring, and unwilling to say "sorry," he told him he must stay where he was. Anna was very indignant, the more so as her master said it was her fault, she was giving the boy this punishment, not he. And poor little Freddy lay in his little bed, hearing the carriages arrive with the company, the laughter and the greetings, and the exclamations of admiration of the baby, and then silence. They were all gone to church, and he was alone in the house. Well, "he didn't care," he could do as he liked; he was an Arab again; then a white bear amongst the icebergs, parading up and down the room in a sheet; then an acrobat, standing on his head.. These antics amused him until the sounds of carriages and buzz of voices warned him of the return of the company, and the probable entrance of "papa." No, only Anna bringing baby.



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Eglantine. 129 "Well, true. But for a very good singer I should have to charge you a long price. Now Tibs, here, is a first-rate fellow, but, what with his voice and his plumage, I could not let him go under half-a-guinea." "Oh, dear, dear!" said the girl. "Well, I can't do that. Have you no canary cheaper ?" "Yes, I have one here, my little Tiny Tim. Did you ever read about him, my dear? He said, 'God bless us, every one!' Ah! that ,was so pretty. I got this little fellow just as I read that, and so I called it after him." I haven't much time to read, sir," answered the girl; I work for my mother, who is blind." "Blind! blind! dear, dear I Is the bird for her ?" No," said the girl, and a flush mounted over her face; it is for some one who is ill, who lies alone all day. He had one once, and it died, and I thought he must miss it so, as a bird must be a kind of company." "So it is, my dear, so it is. You work for 6*



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London and New York. 15 Illustrated by ABSOLON, GILBERT, HARRISON WEIR, &C., square royal, gilt, 28. each. s.d. Amusing Tales for Young A Visit to the Zoological2 o People. By Mrs. Myrtle. Gardens. The Donkey's Shadow, and The Richmonds' Tour in other Stories. Europe. The Broken Pitcher, and Aunt Bessie's Picture Book. other Stories. With 96 Pages of Plates. The Little Lychetts. By Little Lily's Picture Book. the Author of Olive," &c. With 96 Pages of Plates. The Great Wonders of the The Story of a Nutcracker. World. With 234 Pictures. My First Picture Book. 36 Old Mother Hubbard's PicPages of Coloured Plates. ture Book. 36 Pages of x6mo, cloth. Coloured Plates. With Illustrations, strongly bound in cloth. Ten Moral Tales. By Hester and I; or, Beware 2 o Guizot. of Worldliness. By Mrs. JcuvenileTalesfor allSeasons Manners. ConquestandSelf-Conquest. The Cherry Stones. By Eveings at Donaldson Rev. H. C. Adams. Manor. The Firstof 7une. By Rev., Praise and Principle. H. C. Adams. Grace & Isabel(M'Intosh). Rosa A Story for Girls. Charms and CounterMay Dundas ; or, The Force of Example. By Mrs. Charms. Geldart. Gertrude and Eulalie. GlimpsesofOurlslandHome. Robert and Harold. By Mrs. Geldart. Robinson the Younger. The Indian Boy. By Rev. Amy Carlton. H. C. Adams. Robinson Crusoe. Ernie Elton at Home. Laura Temple. The Standard Poetry Book Harry and his Homes. for Schools. Our Native Land. Tryand Trust. By Author Our Native of "Arthur Morland." Bundle of Sticks. Swiss Family Robinson. Family Pictures from the Evenings at Home. Bible.



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Tulip. 39 acknowledging that it was difficult to deny any request from those pretty lips, those deep blue pleading eyes. Like all of us, she had her faults though, even if the doctor was blind to them. Tom, in his severe judgment of her, was right; dress was a passion, it occupied all her time and thought, and, being naturally extremely indolent, beyond attention to this engrossing object, she really did nothing, and this was a matter that disturbed Mrs. Hartley seriously. Hetty was now nearly seventeen; she had had instruction from a daily governess since her seventh year, but little proof did she give of it, for her indolence had prevented her from really working at anything sufficiently to be thoroughly conversant with it. She was, very affectionate, and had pretty, soft, winning ways, which, added to her really beautiful face, made her a favourite with her governess, although her disappointment was great at the little progress she made with her studies. In vain she





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58 Holly. one who would take her, so she crowed and laughed, and patted Annie's face, and pulled her hair-till at length she grew weary and she fell asleep in her lap, to Annie's intense delight. She said she must be a good nurse to get Baby to sleep, and she sat watching its little peaceful face, its tiny fingers, talking so softly for fear she would wake her, keeping the flies from settling on her, and caring for her far more than she was cared for in her cottage home. And Lucy ate her cake, happy in her way, hardly listening to or understanding Annie's assertion that she should be quite happy if she had a baby-sister like that. Happiness in Lucy's mind was by no means associated with a "baby-sister;" to her it represented only no play, very tired arms and legs, with an anxious unchildlike wish for night to come, when she could lie down in bed, and know for some hours she was released from "Baby." "It's our club to-morrow," at length said Lucy; "father's a-going."



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30 George Routledge & Sons' Juvenile Books. The following Volumes are formed from the foregoing Series:.d. 5 OThe Henny-Penny Picture Book. Containing Henny-Penny," Sleeping Beauty," Baby," and The Peacock at Hpme." With 24 Pages of Coloured Plates. Routledge's iursery Book. Containing "Nursery Rhymes," "Mother Hubbard," "Alphabet of Pretty Names," and Cinderella." With 24 Pages of Coloured Plates. The Poll Parrot Picture Book. Containing "Tittums and Fido," "Reynard the Fox," "Anne and her Mamma," and "The Cats' TeaParty." Routledge's Coloured A B 0 Book. Containing "The Alphabet of Fairy Tales," "The Farm-Yard Alphabet," "Alphabet of Flowers," and "Tom Thumb's Alphabet." My Mother's Picture Book. Containing "My Mother," "The Dogs' Dinner-Party," Little Dog Trusty," and "The White Cat." Large 4to, cloth. The Red Riding-Hood Picture Book. Containing "Red Riding-Hood," "Three Bears," "Three Kittens," and "Dash and the Ducklings." Large 4to, cloth. Our Nurse's Picture Book. Containing "Tom Thumb," Babes in the Wood," "Jack and the Beanstalk," and "Puss in Boots." Large 4to, cloth. The Child's Picture Book of Domestic Animals. Containing Tame Animals, First, Second, Third, and Fourth Series. With 12 large Plates, printed in Colours by KRONHEIM. Large oblong, cloth. The Child's Picture Book of Wild Animals. Containing Wild Animals, First, Second, Third, and Fourth Series. 12 large Plates, printed in Colours by KRONHEIM. Large oblong, cloth. Pictures from English History. Containing "Pictures from English History," First, Second, Third, and Fourth Series. 93 Coloured Plates by KRONHEIM. Demy 4to, cloth. Routledge's Scripture Gift-Book. Containing "The Old Testament Alphabet," "The New T'estament Alphabet," "The History of Moses," and "The History of Joseph." Demy 4to, cloth.



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14 George Routledge & Sons' Juvenile Books. Fcap. 8vo, Illustrated by the Best Artists, gilt, 2s. 6d. each. s. d. 2 6 Arbell. The First Lieutenant's Eda Morton and her Story. Cousins. By M. M. Bell. AMelbourne House. By Miss Gilbert the Adventurer. Wetherell. TheLucky Penny, and other The Word; or, Walks from Tales. By Mrs. S. C. Hall. Eden. Minna Raymond. IllusRough Diamonds. By J. trated by B. Foster. Hollingshead. Helena Bertram. By the The Afedwins of Wykeham. Authorof"The Four Sisters." By the Author of Marian." Heroes ofthe Workshop, &-c. 7he.Young Artists. By E. L. Brightwell. The Boy Cavalier. By the Sunshiwte and Cloud. By Rev. H. C. Adams. "Miss Bowman. Gilderoy, the Hero of ScotThe Maze of Life. By the land. Author of "The Four Sisters." Lamb's Tales. The Twins; or, Sisterly Stories of Old Daniel. Love. Extraordinary Men. The Wide, Wide World. Extraordinary Women. The Lamlighter. By Life of Napoleon. Cummins. PopularAstronomy. The Rector's Daughter. By Orbs ofeaveronomy. The Old Helmet. By Miss FPgrilgrim's Preress. By Wetherell. Offor. Deeds, Not Words. Friend or Foe: A Tale of The Secret of a Life. Sedgmoor. By the Rev. H. C. Adams. Queechy. ByMissWetherell. Tales of Naval Adventure. Sir Roland Ashton. By MatildaLonsdale. Lady C. Long. The Life 0t Wellington. Sir Wizlfred's Seven Flights. The Glen Luna Family. By Madame de Chatelaine. Ellen .i..'s BookUncle Tom's Cabin. Shelf. ...'..,red IlhlsMabel Vaughan. trations. Christian Melville. The Two School Girls. With The Letter of Marque. Coloured Illustrations.



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Eglantine. 131 that the good Giver sends us to brighten our lives." "Thank you, sir, very much," said the girl; "will you put him in this cage ?" and she took out from a blue cotton handkerchief, in which it was tied, a little brass cage. "Oh, that I will. Why, Tiny, you will have a fine home! Take care of yourself, my dear," he continued, looking at the beautiful face of the girl, as, taking a poor little purse from her pocket, she handed him three shillings. "Have you far to go ?" "No, sir; only a short distance, thank you. Good evening." He watched her down the street; men turned to look at her; one spoke to her, but she never turned or noticed them, but hurried on with her bird. The street she lived in was little better than that in which Job resided. The room she rented in one of the houses was at the very top, and in the window were two scarlet geraniums and a convolvulus, carefully trained with string





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CHAPTER I. I AM going to write my own history; and I am a little bird! I daresay you think that is not possible. Well, you shall see; though some of us poor little birds are shut up in cages all day, still we keep our sharp little eyes and ears open, and perhaps see, and hear, and understand a great deal more than you think. I have often heard it remarked how sagacious those large things called "dogs" are. I, myself, cannot see it; that great gruff noise they make is so unmusical and they run about in such an awkward, ungraceful way; but every



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Heartsease. 155 for the hope and help that seemed to dawn for her, and then slowly mounted a dark, crooked. staircase, up which Mrs. Osborne followed her, into a room-or more properly, loft. There was no door, the stairs came up into it as to a landing. The plaster on the wall was falling in many places; the boards, on which was no trace of carpet or covering, were black with dirt; the small window would not open, and the closeness of the room was so dreadful that Mrs. Osborne for a moment started back. And now a sensation of terror, too, seized her, when the child, going up to a bedstead (which, besides a box, was the only article of furniture in the room), and shaking a form lying on it, it slowly rose and sat up, staring at her. Oh! the face. Never should she forget it; the ghastly death hue which seemed over itthe thinness, the dirt, the wild, rough hair, and hollow strange eyes; but for the child's presence, she felt she must have turned and fled from a sight of such horror, but humanity made



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Poplies. 109 curls in the pillow, and screamed and kicked with laughing. Poor Jessie, unable to make anything of so jovial a prisoner, went down to dessert alone, only begging of him to remember the story Anna so often told them, that Don't care was hanged. "Well, my little maid," said her father, "is Freddy sorry now ?" "Not very, I think," said Jessie, timidly. "Well, he must stay there until he is. Now let me give you some French plums, or almonds and raisins; which do you like best? Some of both-what do you think of that? and a drop of wine, eh, mamma?" "Yes, I think so-a little, I suppose, won't hurt her. Does Anna let you have wine, dear?" asked the mother. "We never have it up in the nursery, mamma." "Oh, no, of course not. How silly I am! but you may have a little, to-morrow you



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II THEL LILUF 'TH VALLEY. "You should see her with children. Oh, dear, they are just fond of her



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Holly. 55 long rambles with, or pleasant tea-parties, or merry days in the shady woods; and as she was a rather delicate child, too, she was really to be pitied, and forgiven for a little fretfulness at times. She and her two brothers had little gardens of their own, which amused them very much in the summer holidays; but Annie could not manage to garden much without their help, for she was not strong enough to dig, and the water-can was too heavy for her to lift; but this summer Annie had found some one who could help her better than her brothers, a poor old man whom her father had to help the regular gardener. There was not much for him to do, so he had plenty of time to help Annie, and this had for the last week been a pleasant change for her, for whilst old James worked he talked to her. He had been an old soldier, and he would tell her of all the fearful fights he had been in, and the bravery and self-sacrifice of the soldiers-beautiful stories of gentle lady nurses,





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I i L. -i i ,i ii EGLANTN,E She fell on her knoes beside her bed.'



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LONDON: rRINTED BY J. OGDEN AND CO., g72, ST. IOHN STREET, E.C.



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TE BEST MAGAZINE FOR BOYS IS THE YOUNG GENTLEMAN'S MAGAZINE Edited by EDMOTIND ROUTLEDGE. MONTHLY, 6d. The Parts contain 64,royal 8vo pages, from Eight to Twelve Illustrations, and either a Coloured Plate or a Full-page Illustration on plate paper. Each Month about FIFTY PRIZES are offered for the Solution of Pu::'.:: and TEN GUINEA, and TEN HALFGUINEA I -, i E for Essays, Stories,.Poems, Maps, Models, Paintings, &c., &c. The Anfidal Subscription for the Parts is 7s., on receipt of which sum the Parts for Twelve Months will be sent, post free, as they appear. Part XII., the First Eart of-the New Volume, appeared on the 28th oT November, 1872. All the Stories are Completein the Volume in which they are commenced. The following Stories commence iv early Numbers of the Volume :With a Stout Heart: A Story of a Boy's Adventures in India. By Mrs. SAiE BARKER. .The'Man-o'-War's Bell: A Tale of the Sea, in Ten Chapters. By Lieut. C. R. Low,.(late) I.N. The English at the North Pole: A -aval Story, with 250 Illustrations. A New Story of School Life. By the Rev. H. C. ADAMS, M.A., Author of "The Cherry Stones," &c., &c. CONTRIBUTORS. Rev. H. C. ADAMS. HENRY KINGSLEY. THOMAS ARCHER. W. H. G. KINGSTON. R. M. BALLANTYNE. Lieut. C. R. Low. Lady BARKER. Professor PEPPER. Mrs. SALE BARKER. CHARLES H. Ross. J. T. BURGESS. Major Gen. Sir THOMAS Colonel DRAYSON R.A. SEATON, K.C.B. W. W. FENN. BARBARA SEMPLE. SAMUEL HIGHLEY, F.G.S. DOUGLAS STRAIGHT, M.P. TOM HOOD. Rev. J. G. WOOD. And others. London: G. ROUTLEDGE & SONS, The Broadway, Ludgate. New York: THE WILsLMER & ROGERS NEWS Co., 47, Nassau St., And of ali'respectable Booksellers. J. OGDEN AND CO., PRINTERS, 172, ST. JOHN STREET, LONDON, E.C.



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26 George Routledge & Sons' Juvenile Books. Beautifully printed in Colours by Messrs. LEIGHTON BROTHERS, VINCENT BROOKS, DALZIEL BROTHERS, and EDMUND "EVANS. In super-royal 8vo, Fancy Wrappers. s.d. o 6 Cherry Orchard. The FarmYard Alphabet. Bible Alphabet. Our Puss and her Kittens. Cinderella. Hop o' my Thumb. Three Bears. Jack the Giant Killer. Nursery Alphabet. Little Red Riding-Hood. Little Totty. Beauty and the Beast. The Dogs' Dinner-Party. Mother Hubbard. Puck and Pea-Blossom. Happy Days of Childhood. Puss in Boots. Little Dog Trusty. Whittington and his Cat. The Cats' Tea-Party. Punch and Judy. The Babes in the Wood. John Gilpin. Wild Animals. Blue Beard. British Animals. Sindbad the Sailor. The Frog who would aJack and the Bean-Stalk. Wooing Go. House that Jack Built. The Faithless Parrot. Old Woman and her Pig. The FarmYard. A, Apple Pie. Horses. Tom Thumb's Alphabet. Old Dame Trot. Baron Munchausen. Sing a Song of Sixpence. Butterfy's Ball. The Waddling Frog. Picture Alphabet. The Old Courtier. The White Cat. Multiplication Table. Valentine and Orson. Chattering Jack. "Arthur's Alphabet. King Cole. Dorothy Frump. Prince Long Nose. Singing Birds. The Enraged Miller. Parrots and Talking Birds. The Hunchback. Dogs. How Jessie was Lost. Birds. Grammar in Rhyme. Cock Robin. Baby's Birthday. Railroad Alphabet. Pictures from the Streets. "Alphabetfor Good Boys and Lost on the Sea-Shore. Girls. Animals and Birds. The Sea-Side Alphabet. A Child's Fancy Dress Ball. Greedy Jem and his Little A Child's Evening Party. Brothers. Annie and Jack in London.



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London and New York. 29 ROUTLEDGE'S' 'w $#Io #f ^ ^ ^a-l| With large Original Illustrations by H. S. MARKS, J. D. WATSON, HARRISON WEIR, and KEYL, beautifully printed in Colours. Demy 4to, in stiff wrapper; or Mounted on Linen, 2s. s. d. Nursery Rhymes. Tom Thumb. I 0 Alphabet of Trades. Babes in the Wood. Cinderella. Jack and the Beanstalk. Alphabet of Pretty Names. The Laughable A B C. Old Testament Alphabet. Wild Animals. Ist series. The Three Little Iittens. Ditto. 2nd series. SThe History of Five Little Ditto. 3rd series. Pigs. Ditto. 4th series. Tom Thumb's Atphabet. Tame Animals. Ist series. Nursery Songs. Ditto. 2nd series. New Testament Alphabet. Ditto. 3rd series. Our FarmYard Alphabet. Ditto. 4th series. The History of Moses. Miy Mother. The History of foseph. The Dogs' Dinner-Party. The Alphabet of Flowers. Little Dog Trusty. Nursery Rhymes. The White Cat. The Life of Our Lord. The Ugly Duckling. The Three Bears. Dash and the Ducklings. Little Red Riding-Hood. Reynard the Fox. New Tale ofa Tub. Alphabet of Fairy Tales. Nursery Tales. Tittums and Fido. Old Mother Hubbard. Anne and her Mamma. Pictures from English HisThe Cats' Tea-Party. tory. xst Period. Baby. Ditto. 2nd Period. Henny-Penny. Ditto. 3rd Period. Peacock at Home. Ditto. 4th Period. Sleeping Beauty. Puss in Boots. K __



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136 Eglantine. done, and felt, if they thought her singing good, pray what of his ? And Philip lay with his eyes fixed on her beautiful face as she stood there, leaning on the little table where she had placed the bird; and as she ended, with a sigh he said,"Thank you, sweet Eglantine,"-it was his fancy to call her so sometimes. "Good night, you must go now. And I can never take you from this life !" he continued, as, pressing her lips on his forehead, she said, "Yes, good night, for I shall be late-too late to see you again," and she was away in a moment. When she returned at night, her mother was, as usual, sitting up for her. She had been to Philip two or three times, and Mr. Seymour had sent him some jelly, which he had liked so much, and he would have the bird close beside him, and had said, God bless her! it was such a kind thought to bring me a singing-bird." God bless her !-God bless us, every one !" Job had bid her think of that. Poor little Muriel, those few words spoken by Job Tweedie had



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London and New York. 19 In post 8vo, price Is., well printed, with Illustrations. s.d. Grace Greenwood's Stories The Birthday Visit. By I o for her Nephews and Nieces. Miss Wetherell.Helen's Fault. By the Stories for Week Days and Author of "Adelaide Lindsay." Sundays. The Cousins. By Miss Maggie and Emma. By M'Intosh. Miss M'Intosh. Ben Howard; or, Truth Charley and Georgie; or, and Honesty. By C. Adams. The Children at Gibraltar. Bessie and Tom ; A Book Story of a Penny. By Mrs. for Boys and Girls. Perring. Beechnut: A Franconian Aunt Maddy's Diamonds. Story. By Jacob Abbott. By Harriet Myrtle. Wallace: A Francinian Two School Girls. By Miss Story. By Jacob Abbott. Wetherell. Madeline. ByJacob Abbott. The Widow andher DaughMary Erskine. By Jacob ter. By Miss Wetherell. Abbott. Gertrude and her Bible. By Mary Bell. By Jacob AbMiss Wetherell. bott. The Rose in the Desert. Visit to my Birth-place. By By Miss Wetherell. Miss Bunbury. The Little Black Hen. By Carl ICrinken; or, The Miss Wetherell. Christmas Stocking. By Miss Martha and Rachel. By Wetherell. Miss Wetherell. Mr. Rutherford's Children. The Carpenter's Daughter. By Miss Wetherell. By Miss Wetherell. Mr. Rutherford's Children. The Prince in Disguise. By and series. By Miss Wetherell. Miss Wetherell. Emily Herbert. By Miss The Story of a Cat. By M'Intosh. Mrs. Perring. Rose and Lillie Stanhope. Easy Poetry for Children. By Miss M'Intosh. With a Coloured Frontispiece Casper. ByMissWetherell. and Vignette. The Brave Boy; or, ChrisThe Basket of Flowers. tian Heroism. With a Coloured Frontispiece Magdalene and Raphael. and Vignette. The Story of a Mouse. By Ashgrove Farm. By Mrs. MIrs. Perring. Myrtle. Our Charlie. By Mrs. The Story of a Dog. By Stowe. Mrs. Perring. Village School-feast. By Rills from the Fountain: Mrs. Perrineg A Lesson for the Young. By Nelly, the Gipsy Girl. Rev. Richard Newton.



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London and New York. 27 SIXPENNY TOY-BooKs-continued. One, Two, Buckle my Shoe. Rumpelstiltsken. o 6 Mary's New Doll. The Fairy Ship. When the Cat's Away. Adventures of Puffy. Naughty Puppy. This Little Pig went to Children's Favourites. Market. Little Minnie's Child Life. King Luckieboy's Party. King Nutcracker. Aladdin. British Soldiers. Noah's Ark Alphabet. British Sailors. Our Pets. British Volunteers. Nursery Rhymes. King Grisly Beard. Most of the above may also be had, strongly Mounted on Cloth, Is. The following Volumes are formed from the above Series, in superroyal 8vo, cloth gilt, price 3s. 6d. each; or mounted on linen, 5s. each. FIRST SERIES, containing The Little Hunchback. Little Red Riding-Hood. 3 6 Old Dame Trot and herI Beauty and the Beast. Wondeo7ul Cat. SECOND SERIES, containing The FarmYard. Puss and her Kittens. Greedy Jem and his Six The Frog who would aBrothers. Wooing Go. THIRD SERIES, containing Happy Days of Childhood. Hop o' my Thumb. Sing a Song of Sixpence. Gaping, Wide-Mouthed, Waddling Frog. FOURTH SERIES, containing Chattering f/ack. The Multiplication Table. The Faithless Parrot. Prince with the Long Nose. FIFTH SERIES, containing How _essie was Lost. The Babes in the Wood. Grammar in Rhyme. Little Dog Trusty.



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158 Heartsease. "but if you will take cleaning apparatus and make the room a little decent, and take care of her every day till she is better or at rest, I will pay you handsomely, indeed. I scarcely know what is best to be done first," she continued, with a pained and puzzled expression. "She is so destitute-she wants everything. I will order the doctor to come at once, and send bed-clothes and everything I can think of that is necessary from the Vicarage : it is too horrid." Yes, really, mum, you looks quite white and scared like; it is a bad case, but she's one of them as will allays be in a muddle. She's had a power of kindness shown her-a deal more give her than I earn, I know, with my eight children." "Well, we must not waste time in talking," answered Mrs. Osborne; "run in to her, and take her some cool fresh water; she says she is so thirsty. I will send milk and brandy and beef-tea."



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62 Holly. she were a little late. And so away she went, kissing her mamma, dressing Dolly in her best things, and wishing she could do the same to herself; but they were locked up, and she could not ask mamma for them, of course, or she would have wanted to know what great event required them to be put on; and so away she went in the old hat, forgetting that and all that troubled her when she saw Lucy making signs to her over the hedge, and heard the band in the distance, and in a few moments the two little girls were running down the lane which led to the high road going to the village. They passed Lucy's house, where they stopped to get the flags, and Annie ran in and kissed Baby. The mother said she thought it was about its teeth -for -it seemed hot and heavy, and could not keep its little head up. Annie was very sorry, but too excited to stop long; and away she flew after Lucy, never stopping till they reached the "Nun's Head," a large inn which stood at the entrance to the village.



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Eglantine. 141 Involuntarily, as it were, the two gentlemen took off their hats as the beautiful tearful face met theirs, and then Mr. Seymour said,"Look here, Moore, I have brought you a new doctor; he's no end of a clever fellow. I'll back him to set you on your legs." Muriel sprang forward with clasped hands and eager eyes fixed on the physician's face, as he sat down by Philip, and carefully examined him; listened to his breathing with his ear on his chest, on his back; held his pulse, looking earnestly, fixedly at him, as though he could see through him; and then, calmly turning round, with a kind smile, to the poor girl, he said," It is not hopeless; he needs care. He will get it, I fancy. I will talk to Mr. Seymour about you, my man," he said to Philip. Keep a good heart about yourself-there is much in that. Make up your mind to get well. Good day." "Why, Moore, this is fine; we shall have you about again," said his master, and bending over him, he said, in a low voice,-



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22 Wild Rose. fellow, over there. That's it, hush we shall get a bite now." With a look of mingled sorrow, pity, and amusement, Seymour Lisle turned away, walked back to the high road where the dog-cart awaited him, and drove off to the station. Many years have come and gone; and in an elegantly furnished room there sits a tall graceful woman, beautifully though simply dressed, and a man some ten or twelve years older. They are talking gravely: she with eager, flushed face; he calm and tranquil, as in the days when he lay beneath the trees on the lawn at Holleston Manor. Their conversation had been long, but it was ending now. "How am I to thank you ?" she said; "all this time you have been my good genius and I have not known it." "You thank me with your grace, with your gentle bearing, your intelligence, your happiness-for you are happy ?"





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London and New York. 25. ROUTLEDGE'8 NURSERY LITERATURE. "No firm surpasses Messrs. Routledge in Sixpenny and Shilling Picture Story-Books. Could not be better drawn, printed, or coloured, if they cost twenty shillings instead of twelve pence."Standard, December 23, 1870. In fancy covers, with Pictures printed in Colours. s.d. Cinderella, Old Woman who Lived in ao 3 Little Red Riding-Hood. Shoe. House that fack Built. Little Bo-Peep. Cock Robin. Nursery Rhymes. My First Alphabet. FarmYard A B C. Old Mother Goose. Jack and the Bean-Stalk. Babes in the Wood. fohfn GilPin. This Little Pig went to Old Mother Hubbard. Market. -Three Bears. The following Volumes are formed from the above Series:In small 4to, cloth gilt, price 2s. each. OJd Mother Hubbard's Picture ,Book. With 362 o Pages of Coloured Plates. My First Picture Book. With 36 Pages of Coloured Plates. In cloth gilt, price Ss. 6d. The Coloured Album for Children. With 723 6 Pages of Coloured Plates.



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*80 Orange Blossom. do9 not think me conceited; but my feathers were certainly very bright and pretty, and the upper notes in my voice were clear and sweet-at least so my friends used to tell me; but if I did not like the look of the people to whom I was shown I used to sit on my perch, all in a heap, and would not utter a sound. However, one day I heard my master speaking in his cracked voice (it was always dreadfully flat), and saying,"I have something here, sir, I think will suit; he is a beautiful bird, and sings splendidly." He snatched me off my peg, slopping the water out of my little can all over the bottom of my house, and showed me to an old gentleman, with a little girl. In a moment I felt "This will do," for the old man had such a pleasant smile, and the little girl's hair was so bright, it was almost as nice to look at as the sun. I shook out my feathers, and, putting my head the least little on one side, I sang the sweetest tune in the world.



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London and New York. 13 In post 8vo, toned paper, green cloth, 8s. 6d. each. s. d The Arabian Nights. Ten Thousand Wonderful3 6 Don Quixote. Things. Gil Blas. Sterne's Works. Curiosities of Literature. By Extraordinary Popular Isaac D'Israeli. Delusions. 1,ooI Gems ofBritishPoetry. Bartlett's Familiar Quota.TheBlackfriars Shakspeare. tions. Cruden's Concordance. The Spectator. Boswell's Life of 7ohnson. Routledge's ModernSpeaker. The Works of Oliver Gold. IooI, Gems of Prose. horks of Oliver GoldPope's Homer's Iliad and Routledge's Pronouncing Oy de r nectes. Dictionary. Book of Modern Anecdotes. The Family Doctor. Josephus. Under the above title Messrs. G. ROUTLEDGE & SONS are about to issue a New Series of Juvenile Books, all well Illustrated and well bound in a New and Elegant Binding. List of the Series. Boys at Home. By C. Play Hours and Half Holi3 6 Adams. days. Cecil Raye. Walks and Talks of Two Dogs and their Ways. Schoolboys. Our Holiday Camp. By Hildred the Daughter. St. John Corbet. Hardy and Hunter. Helen Mordaunt. By the Fred and the Gorillas. Author of Naomi." Guizot's Kloral Tales. Romance of Adventure. Frank Wildman. The Island Home. By MARY GODOLPHIN. In i6mo, cloth gilt, with Coloured Plates, price 2s. 6d. each. Bunyan's .Pilgrim's ProSwiss Family Robinson, 2 6 gress. Robinson Crusoe. Evenings at Home. Child's First Lesson Book.



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London and New York. 21 Fcap. 8vo, boards, Is. each, with fancy covers. s.d. New CharadesfortheDrawActing Proverbs for the o ing Roam. By Author of A Drawing Room. Trap to Catch a Sunbeam." Fly Notes on Conjuring. Riddles and Jokes. Original Double Acrostics. The Dream Book and For2nd series. tune Teller. A Shilling's Worth of Fun. With Coloured Plates, i8mo, cloth, gilt. Ally and her Schoolfellow. Cobwebs to Catch Flies. o 9 Loyal Charlie Bentham. Barbauld'sHymns in Prose. Simple Stories for Children. Prince Arthur. A Child's First Book. A Winter's Wreath. Story of Henrietta. Twelve Links. StoriesfromEnglishHistory. Easy Talks. Life of Robinson Crusoe. Susan and the Doll. Little Paul and the Moss Yuvenile Tales. Wreaths. Six Short Stories. Watts'Divine MoralSongs. The Captive Skylark. Royal 32mo, with Illustrations. These are also kept in Pager Covers, price 4d. each. History of My Pets. Egerton Roscoe. o 6 Hubert Lee. Flora Mortimer. Ellen Leslie. Charles Hamilton. Jessie Graham. Story ofa Drop of Water. Florence Arnott. The False Key. Blind Alice. The Bracelets. Grace and Clara. Waste Not, Want Not. Recollections of My ChildTarlton; or, Forgive and hood. Forget.



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IO Wild Rose. flowers; and my hat and feathers ? No, thank you, I am not, and I do not wish to be; I'd rather clamber up into a tree in this old frock and sit singing amongst the branches, imitating the birds, than sit simpering on the lawn amongst that company." "You are a very odd child. I suppose you are a child ?" he said, looking at her. She laughed again as she answered, "It depends on how long you think childhood lasts." "How old are you ?" "What a rude question! Do you ask those finely-dressed ladies such things ?-but I don't mind, I'm fifteen; there, is that a child ?" and again she laughed the merry heart-laugh which somehow charmed this weary man of the world more than any sound he had heard for long. "Do you live here always ?" again he asked. "Oh, dear! oh, dear! you are worse than Pinnock's Catechism, or Murray's Grammar, or Mangnall's Questions. I would as soon have to say that an island is a piece of land surrounded



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82 Orange Blossom. would take care of me, too, so I kept as still as I could for the fearful jolting, and wondered what would happen next. I felt very miserable at leaving all my friends, and could not help feeling anxious to know if there would be any birds where I was going. All in a moment the jolting ceased, and I was carried what appeared to me a long way; then my cage was uncovered, and my little mistress said," Poor, dear Dicki now you are at home." For a short time I was so dazzled by the light I could see nothing, but, when I recovered sufficiently to look round, how bright and beautiful everything was; what a contrast to the old cobbler's I was standing on a little table, in front of a window which looked into such a garden; the air blew in so gently, and the sun shone so warmly, that I broke into a loud song of joy. My little mistress clapped her hands, I suppose



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Holly. 57 Clayton would not approve of her new acquaintance. She objected to her mixing with the village children, as they were most of them very dirty, and at the present time there was a great deal of sickness about; but Annie consoled herself by thinking that Lucy did not actually live in the village street, and was a particularly clean little girl. The orchard was some distance from the house, and could not be seen from the windows of the sitting-room; so Annie knew that she and her little visitor would be safe from observation. As soon as her lessons were ended and she had got her cake, she ran for Dolly, and seeking her favourite apple-tree, sat watching anxiously for Lucy. She had not to wait long. Singing and talking to her baby charge, Lucy came-and soon Baby was in Annie's lap, and Lucy had the piece of cake in exchange which Annie had promised her. Oh, how happy she was Baby was quite at home with her directly, poor little thing; it was accustomed to be dragged about by children, and nursed by any 3*



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128 Eglantine. come to buy birds so late; but presently, as. he sat there, smoking his pipe, a girl stopped, looked in at the window at the rows of little green cages, with their pretty feathered occupants roosting on their perches, and then, turning to Job, she said timidly,"What is the price of these birds ?" "Depends on the sort, my dear," said old Job, looking up into the very pretty face of the girl who addressed him. "I wanted a little singing bird of some kind; but I can't afford a very dear one." Come in, my dear, and look at them. I'll let you have one as reasonable as I can," he said, getting up and moving his stool for her to enter the shop. Now this," he said, taking down a cage, "is the sweetest little songster-a linnet; he isn't gaudy, like the golden canary, but his pipe is beautiful. I will let you have Bobby a bargain." I think I would rather have a canary. It is for a present, and it looks prettier."



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S Gaorge Routl3dge & Sons' Juvenile Books. A NEW SERIES OF JUVENILE WORKS. All well Illustrated, and bound in an entirely New Binding, expressly designed for them. s. d. List of the Series. 4 6 The Orville College Boys. Tales upon Texts. By the By Mrs. Henry Wood. Rev. H. C. Adams. Wonderful Inventions. By Pictures from Nature. By John Timbs. Mary Howitt. .Es4p's Fables. With Plates Stephen Scudamore the by H. Weir. Younrer. By A. Locker. The Illustrated Girl's Own Hunting Grounds of the Treasury. Old World. The Boy's Own Country Watch the End. By Book. By Miller. Thomas Miller. The Forest Ranger. By Last Hours of Great Men. Major Campbell. Robinson Crusoe. With Pleasures of Old Age. 300 Plates. In fcap. 8vo, cloth, gilt edges, price 4s. each. 4 o Every Girl's Book. By Miss LAWFORD. With many Illustrations. Every Little Boy's Book. By EDMUND ROUTLEDGE. With many Illustrations. In cloth gilt, price 3s. 6d., beautifully printed on toned paper. 3 6 Otto Speckter's Fables. With loo Coloured Plates. A New Edition. 4to, cloth, gilt edges. Routledge's Sunday Album for Children. With 80 Plates by J. D. WATSON, Sir JOHN GILBERT, and others. The Boys' and Girls' Illustrated Gift-Book. With many Illustrations by MCCONNELL, WEIR, and others. The Child's Picture Fable Book. With 6o Plates by HARRISON WEIR. The Coloured Album for Children. With 72 pages of Coloured Plates. The Picture Book of the Sagacity of Animals. With 60 Plates by HARRISON WEIR. The Boys' Own Story Book. Many Illustrations.



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-4OLD Job Tweedie was a bird-fancier. He lived in a narrow, dark, dirty street in London, letting all his house except the shop and the little back room which served him for bedroom, parlour, kitchen, and all. How the birds existed, or ever sang, or ate, or plumed their wings in the dull, dark shop, was a mystery; but perhaps they had been captured so long that they had forgotten the sunshine, the sweet air, the green trees, the chase after the butterflies, the long flights under the blue sky-all that must make the happiness of the pretty winged inhabitants of the world. Any way, they did exist; and Job was very kind to his birds. He was very kind



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68 Holly. In a moment her promises to her mother, never to go out again without leave, were forgotten, and throwing down her doll, she ran through the garden into the lane, and did not pause till she stood in front of the little cottage where the Joneses lived. The door was half open, she pushed it and entered. Lucy was sitting on the floor with her back to the door, rocking the cradle in which lay the Baby, but so changed that Annie scarcely knew it; all the colour was gone from its little face, and an expression of great pain was on its features. Annie crept softly up to the cradle and, stooping down, pressed her lips to the poor little pale face. Lucy started up, exclaiming, "Oh, Miss, you'll get the fever! Jenny, and Sam, and the Baby have all got it, and mother has gone up to the parson's to ask for something for them." "Lucy, the Baby won't die. Oh! tell me it won't die. I heard your mother tell Susan the doctor said so."



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176 The Lily of the Valley. "Do you call her pretty, Ruth?" said the girl she spoke to. I should think I did, and so does my brother. Poor Joe !-he's right down miserable; he declares he'll go for a soldier if she won't listen to him." "And won't she ?" asked Alice. No, not a bit of it, nor to any of the fellows -and they're all after her; what with her face and her ladified ways, and the money she'll have-for old Mayburn will leave her every farthing-she's quite a catch." "I suppose it's pride," said Alice. "No, bless you Pride! she hasn't an ounce; she's as gentle, and humble, and as kind as she can be. There is something curious about her, and, as I said, I should like to find it out." Has she no father nor mother ?" asked Alice again. She was a new-comer in the village, and knew but little of her whom they called-" The Lily of the Valley," save this poetical name given her by common consent; and she had



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Wild Rose. 21 Bob," said Rose, I can't get on a bit without you. I believe this paste is too soft, or it is not the right bait; they dance all round the line, and nibble it, and away they go." "Give us hold, I'll see to it," said the boy, taking the line from her, and then together they talked of their fishing, paying no heed to him who stood quietly watching them. At length he said,"Well, good-bye, Rose, the dog-cart is waiting for me in the road. The man will think I'm lost." Oh, yes, good-bye I" she said, busily putting the bait on her line. "Won't you shake hands with me ?" he said. "I'm all sticky with paste and stuff," she answered, with that sweet, bright, pleasant laugh which pleased Lisle so much to hear. "Never mind. God bless you, little girl! We shall meet again some day." Oh yes, perhaps. I say, Bob, there was a bouncer; make haste, you throw the line, old



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Poppies. 113 "I thought you would like to kiss her," she said ; "little sister Florence." "Oh! I don't mind-yes, come on! Where's old Penny-farthing ?" Don't be rude, dear. Nurse is in the nursery, and she is so sorry you're in disgrace; she's been asking master to let you go down to dine." "Well, I don't want to, then, there, so she needn't bother herself." "Oh, but Freddy, dear, there's such a many nice things, and such a cake, with baby's name on it !" I don't care. I hate cake." With a sigh Anna went away. He wasn't sorry. What was she to do? He had some cold meat sent up to him and some rice pudding-he eat it, and told the under-nurse, who brought it him, it was capital, and that he was having such jolly fun-she must shut the door, nobody must come in,"



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154 Heartsease. and matted, and on its thin-ghastly thin form, hung .one tattered brown garment, nothing more ; the legs, feet, and arms were bare, and filthily dirty, and in one poor little claw-like hand it held a piece of a raw turnip. "Can I see your mother?" Mrs. Osborne ventured to ask. The child nodded. "Where is she ? Upstairs ?" The little creature made some reply, which Mrs. Osborne completely failed to understand, for the poor little thing appeared to have some difficulty of utterance. "She is ill, do you say?" she suggested. Again the child nodded and muttered something which sounded like Upstairs." "If you will show me the way, I will go and see her, and try to make her better. Go first, and I'll follow you." She raised her large wild eyes to Mrs. Osborne's face, and smiled a piteous little smile, in which there seemed a 'world of gratitude





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Poppies. 103 "Freddy! he wasn't spelt like coals," said Jessie; and good old Nurse Penny bent over her baby to hide the efforts she was making to prevent herself from laughing. "I don't care what he was spelt like; I don't know spelling, I don't want to know spelling; I know what I do want, and that is for some old woman to be sent home." Baby woke at this juncture, and announced its intention of dining; and, to Jessie's great delight, as Anna was out, she was permitted to hold it, whilst nurse prepared its food. And now a new idea occurred to Freddy to inflict punishment upon Nurse. "It's the hugliest," aspirating the word to produce more effect, "the very hugliest baby that ever was seen, and a little squalling dirty thing, too, there !" The door opened as he uttered this fearful malediction, and Anna entered, carrying a sweet little rosy girl, about a year and a half old.



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London and New York. 31 Price 3s. 6d. each. d. For a Good Child.. Containing "The Alphabet of3 6 Trades," "The Cats' Tea-Party," and Cinderella." With 8i Pages of Coloured Plates. Routledge's Picture Book. Containing "The Farm Yard Alphabet," The Alphabet of Flowers," and The Pretty Name Alphabet." With 18 Pages of ColQured Plates. A Present for My Darling. Containin'g "This Little Pig went to Market," "Nursery Tales," and "TomThumb's Alphabet." With 18 Pages of Coloured Plates. The Good Child's Album. Containing Red RidingHood," Mother Hubbard and Cock Robin," and "The Three Kittens." With 18 Pages of Coloured Plates. Nursery Rhymes. With Plates by H. S. MARKS. Nursery Songs. With Plates by H. S. MARKS.



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"(OH, do come, Lilian-for half an hour!" For a quarter !" Ten minutes!" "Just to show yourself!" With earnest voices these entreaties were uttered by a group of girls standing outside a white cottage, which, like a dove in a nest, lay hidden amongst green trees and shrubs, beside a rustic bridge that crossed the mill stream. It was the miller's house, and the girl they were calling to was his niece, Lilian Mayburn. They stood beside the open window with the clematis resting its sweet blossoms on their heads-baskets in their hands filled with prim-



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Eglantine. 133 must be off. Oh! dear, I must be quick too, it only wants a quarter to eight." "I will have nothing till you come home," the mother answered, querulously. I have had my tea, I want nothing more." "Are you sure, mother?" "Yes, of course I'm sure." "Well, then, I'll go and take this to Phil." He lodged in the same house, in the next room to them, the invalid she was so anxious about. They were to have been married when the spring came, but now the spring flowers were to bloom over his grave. They said he could never live another winter through. Muriel bore it with the strange patience with which those whose lives of toil and suffering are brightened so seldom do bear things, which those more gently nurtured and less acquainted with sorrow would not know how to bear. Muriel had a beautiful voice, which had secured for her an engagement in the chorus at one of the large London theatres, under the



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" OUR cap's all awry-you're an ugly fright, that's what you are-you've got a beard like my papa. I wonder why there are any old women; they're not a bit of use. I wish a big roaring lion would come in this room and eat some one in it, eat her up every bit-scrunch her up, crooked old cap and all." "Oh, Freddy, you should not say such dreadful things, it is wicked. Nursey, dear, he does not mean it." And the last speaker, a little girl about, seven years old, went up to an elderly woman, seated by the fire, nursing a child a few weeks old.



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162 Heartsease. The subscription had amounted to three pounds, and Mrs. Osborne thought now she should have enough to get such things as were most important for the comfort of the unfortunate family, and went one afternoon to see Mrs. Thomson to tell her what success she had had, and see what her own ideas were of what she most wanted. She found them at tea; but they begged her to come in, and her first little child sprang from her chair and offered it to her, her big eyes lighting up with pleasure at sight of her. "Jenny will never forget you, ma'am," said Mrs. Thomson; "she knows your step, and hears it afore any of us." "Poor little girl, I came to bring help, didn't I, dear, when it seemed very far off ?" "Don't nod your 'ead, Jeanie. Answer the lady pretty. You see, ma'am, I 'av'n't been able to send them to school nor look after them myself so long, they've forgot how to behave, and everything."



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134 Eglantine. name of Miss Eglantine Ray, and on that salary she supported herself and her blind mother. Mrs. Moore and Mrs. Raynor had been friends in youth, and when they met in London after many years, they were glad for their children to be friends. They had been thrown much together, and the girl sang Philip's heart away, and all was going brightly until this sad illness, which had quickly followed the death of his mother. Unable to fulfil his duty (that of valet to a Mr. Hartley Seymour), Philip gave up his situation, and came to lodge in the house, where Muriel and her mother could wait on him and care for him. His master missed him sorely, and could not supply his place. He came often to see him, little as any one would have given the elegant Hartley Seymour credit for such kindness; and it certainly was strange to see him pick his way up that dark narrow stair, and enter the room where lay his sick servant, dressed in the height of the fashion,



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London and New York. 7 s.d. 31. Oampbell's Poetical Works. Illustrated by W.-5 o HARVEY. 32. Lover's Poetical Works. With a Portrait. 33. Rogers' Poetical Works. With a Portrait. 36. Dryden's Poetical Works. With a Portrait, &c. 37. Mrs. Hemans' Poems. In fcap. 8vo and post 8vo, Illustrated by GILBERT, HARVEY, FOSTER, and ZWECKER, gilt. Marryat's Children of the The Winborough Boys. By 5 o New Forest. the Rev. H. C. Adams. Marryat's Little Savage. The Prairie Bird. By the Lilian's Golden Hours. By Hon. C. Murray. Silverpen. The Great Sieges of History. Boy's Treasury of Sports With Coloured Plates. and Pastimes. Cooper's Leatherstocking The Queens of Society. Tales. The Wits and Beaux of Great Battles of the British Society. Navy. With Coloured Plates. Entertaining Knowledge. Memoirs of Great CornPleasant Tales. manders. With Coloured Men and Plates. Extraordinary Men and The Playfellow. By HarDo nd her PrietM artineau. WithColoured Dora and her Papa. By Plates. the Authorof" Lilian'sGolden TheFamilyArabianNights. With Coloured Plates. Great Battles of the British The Adoures o Robin Ary. Hood. With Coloured Plates. The Prince of-the House of Holiday Stories. By Lady David. Barker. The Pillar of Fire. Half Hours with the Best The Throne of David. Letter Writers. By Charles TheStory of theReformnation. Knight. By D'Aubigne. Characteristics of Women. Popular Astronomy and By Mrs. Jameson. Orbs of Heaven. Royal Princesses of EngOnce upon a Time. By land. Charles Knight. What Men have Said about White'sHistory of England. Women. The Spectator. Gilt edges. I-lJ





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EGLANTINE



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I 'V~ // 4 \i4K.



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6 Wild Rose. A large party were staying in the house-the gentlemen enjoying the grouse-shooting which abounded in the adjoining moors, and the ladies taking delight in the rest and pure air after the whirl and excitement of a London season. "Look at Seymour Lisle," said one girl to another, as they stood at the edge of the little lake, throwing bread-crumbs to the swans. He has been lying under that tree, doing and saying nothing all the evening. Isn't he odd ?" "Yes, very. I hate odd people. I never notice them." "Do you ? I like them. I like him." "Oh, my dear Eva, what taste!" See, he has suddenly jumped up, and hurried off somewhere. A figure is flying along the shrubberies, and he is in pursuit. Who can it be ? He has caught her up; look !" said Eva. It's that child-Rose," answered her friend, "I think they call her-little wild rough thing; she's so fond of coming and peeping like that when people are here, and flying away; and



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SOLLY. He had been an old soldier, and he would tell her of al the fearful fights he had been in.'



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164 Heartsease. rhe boots was thin ladies' boots, and had been a good deal wore. Well, you see, ma'am, it happened all that week to be awful wet, and she had her feet drownded every day. Why, they boots literally dropped to pieces. She got a dreadful cold, and I couldn't send her. Miss Tremaine, she came down here that angry, and said her ma had done with us, as we wouldn't keep Lottie to school. And then her father he bought her a pair of strong shoes, and when Mrs. Trowhurst, the butcher's wife, wanted a help with the children, why Lottie went, so as she might get a little to pay her father back for the shoes. Now that is the real truth, you see, ma'am. We've got right down-my husband's small pay and my poor health has made us get behind every way, and to pay the rent and pay the shop, we've sold a'most everything. People say I'm so dirty-can I, could you, be clean without a broom, or a brush, or a pail, or a basin, or a towel, or cloth of any description ? My coarse apron, the last I had, as you



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4 George Routledge & Sons' Juvenile Books. Sd. SEVEN-AND-SIXPENNY BOOKS-continued. 7 6 Dante's Divine Comedy. Translated by H. W. LONGFELLOW. I vol., crown 8vo, cloth. The Poetical Works of Lord Lytton. With Frontispiece and Vignette. Fcap. 8vo, cloth. .Hogg on the Microscope. With 500 Illustrations and "8 Coloured Plates. Andersen's Stories for the Household. 8vo, cloth, gilt edges, with 240 Illustrations. Robinson Crusoe. With Ino Plates byJ. D. WATSON. In cloth, gilt edges, 6s. each. 6 oRoutledge's Every Boy's Annual. Edited by EDMUND ROUTLEDGE. With many Illustrations, and beautiul Coloured Plates. Shipwrecks; or, Disasters at Sea. By W. H. G. KINGSTON. With more than zoo Illustrations. The Adventures of Robinson Playfellow, a Young French Marine. With 24 Plates, and many Woodcuts. More Bab Ballads. By W. S. GILBERT. With Illustrations by the Author. Travelling About. By Lady BARKER. With 6 Plates and 5 Maps. Ridiculous Rhymes. Drawn 'by H. S. MARKS. Printed in Colours by VINCENT BROOKS. 4to, fancy cover. Pepper's Boy's Play-book of Science. 400 Plates. Lj Aulnoy's Fairy Tales. Translated by PLANCHE. Planche's Fairy Tales. By PERRAULT, &C. Pepper's Play-book of Mines, Minerals, and Metals. With 300 Illustrations. Post 8vo, gilt. Motley's Rise of the Dutch Republic. Crown 8vo, cloth, gilt. An Illustrated Natural History. By the Rev. J. G. WooD, M.A. With 500 Illustrations by WILLIAM HARVEY, and 8 full-page Plates by WOLF and HARRISON WEIR. Post 8vo, cloth, gilt edges.' Lord Lytton's Dramatic Works. Crown 8vo, cloth, gilt edges.



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140 Eglantine. "She is blind, sir," he said, softly, as he placed in his master's extended hand his own thin white one. "Don't move, my good lady," said Mr. Seymour, not knowing exactly how to address her, his kind heart touched with compassion for her infirmity. Is she your mother, Moore ?" "No, sir," said poor Philip, with a sigh; "she was to have been. Hush Muriel, hush !" he said, as a sudden sharp sound, half cry, half sob, was heard. The two gentlemen turned to where the sound came from-by the window stood Muriel. She had been trying to keep cheerful so hard, but' he was evidently worse-weaker, much; and the prayer on which she had so relied seemed to have been in vain. These simple words of his struck to her heart, and broke down the feeble barrier she had raised against her tears. "She was to have been !" Yes, but never now-never now!



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Poppies. Io7 attracted "papa's attention, and he asked a few questions about the young gentleman, and when one day during luncheon, at which meal the two elder children had lately been allowed to take their dinner, Freddy took a fancy to some dish on the table which was not intended for the children, and announced his intention of eating that and nothing else, he suddenly found that the dining-room, with papa at the head of the table, and the nursery with Anna, were very different places, and passing an hour in one of the remote corners of the large room, without any dinner at all, made him privately determine henceforth to eat what was given him, when "papa" was there, and also to stand in such awe of him that he could be managed by a threat to fetch him, better than any other way. But, unfortunately, "papa" went abroad for a month, and the wholesome fear of him had begun to wear out, and the arrival of a new baby, and consequent excitement of the event, left Master Freddy at liberty to do pretty much as he liked



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Eglantiine. 1335 and seat himself in the worn cane chair beside his bed, and ask kindly about his health, and then know no more what to say to him, only that he really was awfully sorry, and he hoped he'd soon get well." But they really cheered Philip, these visits; it was so kind, he thought. He knew his master so well, with his fastidious tastes, his intense refinement, his horror of coarseness, ugliness, and vulgarity; and to come down such a street, into such a house, to see him -it was too kind. He sent him in fruit, wine, money, but Philip lay still "sick unto death." Muriel took him the bird; he thanked her more with looks than words, and asked her if she had time to sing to him herself once before she went. Yes, she was only in the second piece-she thought she had; and so the fine notes of her pure clear voice rang through the little room, and the lodgers came out to listen, as they did often when she sang, and at the end the bird, who had been so silent, burst into a loud song, as though he would not be out-



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20 Wild Rose. "Well, never mind that now. Do you go to school at Anchester House, Camden Town -Mrs. Primrose's?" "Yes-why ?" I wanted to know, that's all. Are you going to stay here alone all day ?" "No, I'm waiting for Bob; he'll be here presently." "Bob! who's Bob ?" The miller's son." The miller's son An odd associate for you." Why odd ? he's the best fisherman anywhere about; knows the best baits for all the fish that swim, and his flies are lovely; he's showing me how to make them, but I shall never do them like Bob. Oh! he's a wonderful fellow-and here he comes, that's jolly! Ahyou know your master, don't you, Snap ?" she said, turning to the little dog, who, at the approach of a tall, rough-looking fellow, about eighteen or nineteen years old, had put up its little sharp ears and uttered a little yelp of satisfaction. Come on,



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188 The Lily of the Valley. employer, who had closely watched him all the time out of his little sharp eyes, began to rub his hands as if in great glee, and then his knees, and to nod his head vigorously, saying over and over again to himself, "Well done, Bob-well done!" And finally jumping up on to his high stool like a bird on to its perch, he burst into a loud and continuous shout of laughter. Lilian Mayburn is seated in a cottage a short distance from the mill, near which we first saw her. A year has passed away, and Lily's face, though still sweet and gentle, has a somewhat sadder look, and yet she has accomplished her task-the last instalment to make up the required sum has that day been sent to London. In this cottage-room, seated in an arm-chair, is a bright, pleasant-looking old woman, holding Lily's hand in hers, and listening with tearful eyes to the touching tale she is telling. I tell you," she began, "in confidence, my



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20 George Routledge & Sons' Juvenile Books. s. d ONE-SHILLING JUVENILES-continued. I o The Angel of the Iceberg. Child's Illustrated Poetry By the Rev. John Todd. Book. Todd's Lectures for ChilThe New Book of One Syldren. ist series. lable. -2nd series. Blanche and Agnes. Little Poems for Little The Lost Chamois Hunter. Readers. The Gates Ajar. Minnie's Legacy. The Sunday Book of One SNeighbourly Love. Syllable. Kitty's Victory. Mrs. Sedgwick's Pleasant Elise and her Rabbits. Tales. Happy Charlie. Uncle Frank's lomeStories. Annie Price. Village Sketches. 1st series. The Little Oxleys. By Mrs. --2nd series. W. Denzey Burton. Our Poor Neighbours. Book of One Syllable. With Tales in Short Words. Coloured Plates. Watts's Songs. LittleHelps. With Coloured /Esofs Fables. Plates. Language and Poetry bf Uncle Tom's Cabin, for Flowers. ,Children. Stuyvesant. Aunt Margaret's Visit. Susan Ga. his avs Search Original Poems. istseries. Richmond's Annals of the --2nd series. Poor. Nursery Rhymes. Price Is. each. I QDance Album. With Rules and Music. Cloth, gilt edges. The Nursery Library. 12 Books in a Packet. Ist and 2nd series. Stories for Sundays. By Rev. H. C. Adams. Two series. 12 Books in Packet. Routledge's British Reading-Book. Plate on every page, demy 8vo, cloth. Routledge's British Spelling-Book. Demy 8vo, cloth. A Coloured Picture-Book for the Little Ones. Small 4to, fancy cover. Routledge's Comic Reciter. Fcap. 8vo, boards. _Popular Reciter. Fcap. 8vo, boards. Ready-Made Speeches. Feap. 8vo, boards. The Nursery Library. 12 Books in a Packet.



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The Lily of the Valley. 179 loved by all the little community amongst whom she led her quiet, blameless life. She watched now, from the window beneath the clematis, the girls go out of the garden carrying their fragrant burden of flowers, till they had closed the little wicket-gate behind them, and then, with a slight sigh, returned to her work. It was some very exquisite embroidery. On the little table by the window lay some primroses, coltsfoot, and wild hyacinths, arranged in a little group, and they were living again beneath her fingers on the rich piece of black satin she was thus ornamenting. A basket, filled with the rich coloured silks she used, was beside her, and a book lay open on the table filled with beautiful coloured plates of flowers. She worked on for a long while, stopping once with a smile and going to the window to listen to the sound which broke on her ear, childish voices singing as they bore past the end of the lane the May-pole. Then presently the door opened, and her uncle entered.



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TULIP



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46 Tulip. the richest and poorest, can all be of use to some one, if they try; besides, if you have worked well and hard at school, and brought away a grain of information, your day has not been utterly lost; and now, Miss Hetty, for you." With a bright flush over her sweet face she said,-" I've done nothing at all. I never can find anything I like to do." She tidied her wardrobe and gave me a heap of ribbons and laces for my dollies, so she's been good, I'm sure," said her little champion, Minnie; but the Doctor made no answer-only sighedand when the children all went back to their playroom, Tom whispered to Isabel,"Wasn't I right about the Tulip-beautiful and gaudy, and no use." Not gaudy, Tom-I'm sure her dress is lovely this evening," said Isabel; the children all championed her. Hetty loved the doctor, he had been so good, so gentle, and patient with her; so that little sigh, and his silence, somehow touched her more than she could say, and when



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Po pies. 117 papa to know if he maybe dressed, and have tea in the nursery. Shall we, Freddy ?" Freddy murmured assent, but the horror of his dream still possessed him, and he sat trembling in Anna's lap, asking again and again if it was really a dream only. When he was a little calmer, and the impression was somewhat shaken off, Nurse went for his papa, to inquire if he might be allowed to take his tea in the nursery, and to tell of the poor child's fright. Mr. Morley came up to him at once. Master Freddy's so sorry, sir," Anna began. Let him speak for himself," said his father, sternly. What have you to say, Freddy?" The hard tone, the unsympathizing look in his father's face, roused again the spirit which as yet he had so little strength to keep in control, and he had trouble to help saying, I don't want to say nothing," bad grammar and bad temper mingling in his little heart together. But suddenly the memory of his dream came



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48 Tulip. them ; but, my little girl, there is a life beyond, which we must keep in sight-a judgment which we must not forget. To clothe the naked, feed the hungry, visit the sick, console the sad, is each one's duty, and the glorious words, 'Inasmuch as ye have done it to the least of these, ye have done it unto me,' is an encouragement which ought to be so great as to master every idle, selfindulgent inclination." She said nothing, made no answer, but rose up quietly and kissed him, and went away. How often had like words been said to her. Why did these seem to strike her more ? The soil had been so well worked, perhaps, that the seed could now take root. Old Betty Hawkes had no more tea dinners," and in a little cottage of her own, bought her, she proudly tells, by "her dear young lady," she passes peaceably the remainder of her days; and Tom, a sixth-form boy now, owns that Hetty deserves no longer to be called a gaudy, useless Tulip.



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Orange Blossont. 9 on their feet for I can't think, I should be sorry to put mine in them). How we all hated him! he had such a nasty face, such a cross, harsh voice, and the room was so dingy, and had such a strange smell. I think it killed one poor little linnet, who had only just come from a leafy home in the sweet wild wood, for it was always talking to me of its once happy home; it was in the next cage to me, and it often made me long to burst my prison bars and fly into the fragrant woods, and live amongst the green leaves. I think if that old man had been lost in a wood, I am sure no birds would come to cover him up with leaves. People used often to come and look at us, and almost every day one of our friends was taken from us, and we used to grieve, and be very miserable, because we felt almost sure we should never see them again. I was often taken down from my peg and shown to people. I think my master was rather proud of me-



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150 Heartsease. neighbours, and we'd ought to consider all on us neighbours one to the other if we minded our catechisms; but lor' bless me, it's such a muddle to get on with living at all, that as to minding all them things too, why, it's a'most onpossible. But that's neither here nor there, I've no call to hinder you with that kind of talk now. My reasons for stopping of you, mum, was just to ask you to take a look at them poor creatures the Thomsons, as lives at the end house down Tinker's Court, as we calls it; they are in a state, sure. The gentry, them as calls themselves so," said the woman, with a short laugh, they say as they're past helping, and it ain't no good, and all that; but you see, mum, I'm but a poor iggorant woman, but I can read my Bible, praise the Lord! and I don't see nothing there about us helping only the good ones; as a rule they don't want no help, it's them as gets wrong that wants help." "I have heard of the Thomsons, Mrs. Smith," interrupted the lady; "Mrs. Tremaine



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