• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Title Page
 January 1883
 February 1883
 March 1883
 Members of the house and their...
 Officers and attaches
 Appendix






Group Title: Journal of the proceedings of the Assembly of the State of Florida.
Title: A Journal of the proceedings of the Assembly of the State of Florida, at its ... session
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00027833/00016
 Material Information
Title: A Journal of the proceedings of the Assembly of the State of Florida, at its ... session
Alternate Title: Assembly journal
Journal of the Assembly of the State of Florida, at the ... session of the Legislature
Physical Description: v. : ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Legislature. -- House of Representatives
Publisher: State Printer
Place of Publication: Tallahassee
 Subjects
Subject: Legislative journals -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Politics and government -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
General Note: At head of title: Assembly journal.
General Note: Description based on: 4th session (1871).
Funding: Digitized for the Florida House of Representatives, the Office of the Clerk.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00027833
Volume ID: VID00016
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Florida House of Representatives. Office of the Clerk.
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 003417931
oclc - 12901205
lccn - sn 85065605
 Related Items
Preceded by: Journal of the proceedings of the House of Representatives of the ... General Assembly of the State of the State of Florida, at its ... session
Succeeded by: Journal of the proceedings of the House of Representatives of the ... session of the Legislature of the State of Florida

Table of Contents
    Title Page
        Page 1
        Page 2
    January 1883
        Tuesday, January 2
            Page 3
            Page 4
            Page 5
            Page 6
            Page 7
        Wednesday, January 3
            Page 8
            Page 9
            Page 10
            Page 11
            Page 12
            Page 13
            Page 14
            Page 15
            Page 16
            Page 17
            Page 18
            Page 19
            Page 20
            Page 21
            Page 22
            Page 23
            Page 24
            Page 25
            Page 26
            Page 27
            Page 28
            Page 29
            Page 30
            Page 31
            Page 32
            Page 33
            Page 34
            Page 35
            Page 36
            Page 37
            Page 38
            Page 39
            Page 40
        Thursday, January 4
            Page 41
            Page 42
            Page 43
            Page 44
            Page 45
            Page 46
            Page 47
            Page 48
        Friday, January 5
            Page 49
            Page 50
            Page 51
            Page 52
            Page 53
            Page 54
            Page 55
            Page 56
            Page 57
            Page 58
            Page 59
        Saturday, January 6
            Page 60
            Page 61
            Page 62
            Page 63
            Page 64
            Page 65
            Page 66
        Monday, January 8
            Page 67
            Page 68
            Page 69
            Page 70
            Page 71
            Page 72
            Page 73
            Page 74
            Page 75
        Tuesday, January 9
            Page 76
            Page 77
            Page 78
            Page 79
            Page 80
            Page 81
        Wednesday, January 10
            Page 82
            Page 83
            Page 84
            Page 85
            Page 86
            Page 87
            Page 88
            Page 89
            Page 90
            Page 91
        Thursday, January 11
            Page 92
            Page 93
            Page 94
            Page 95
            Page 96
            Page 97
            Page 98
            Page 99
            Page 100
            Page 101
            Page 102
            Page 103
            Page 104
            Page 105
            Page 106
        Friday, January 12
            Page 107
            Page 108
            Page 109
            Page 110
            Page 111
            Page 112
            Page 113
            Page 114
            Page 115
        Monday, January 15
            Page 116
            Page 117
            Page 118
            Page 119
            Page 120
            Page 121
            Page 122
            Page 123
            Page 124
            Page 125
            Page 126
        Tuesday, January 16
            Page 127
            Page 128
            Page 129
            Page 130
            Page 131
            Page 132
            Page 133
            Page 134
            Page 135
            Page 136
            Page 137
            Page 138
            Page 139
            Page 140
            Page 141
            Page 142
            Page 143
            Page 144
            Page 145
        Wednesday, January 17
            Page 146
            Page 147
            Page 148
            Page 149
            Page 150
            Page 151
            Page 152
        Thursday, January 18
            Page 153
            Page 154
            Page 155
            Page 156
            Page 157
            Page 158
            Page 159
            Page 160
            Page 161
            Page 162
        Friday, January 19
            Page 163
            Page 164
            Page 165
            Page 166
            Page 167
            Page 168
            Page 169
            Page 170
            Page 171
            Page 172
            Page 173
            Page 174
            Page 175
            Page 176
            Page 177
        Monday, January 22
            Page 178
            Page 179
            Page 180
            Page 181
            Page 182
            Page 183
            Page 184
            Page 185
            Page 186
            Page 187
        Tuesday, January 23
            Page 188
            Page 189
            Page 190
            Page 191
            Page 192
            Page 193
            Page 194
            Page 195
            Page 196
            Page 197
        Wednesday, January 24
            Page 198
            Page 199
            Page 200
            Page 201
            Page 202
            Page 203
            Page 204
            Page 205
        Thursday, January 25
            Page 206
            Page 207
            Page 208
            Page 209
            Page 210
            Page 211
            Page 212
            Page 213
            Page 214
        Friday, January 26
            Page 215
            Page 216
            Page 217
            Page 218
            Page 219
            Page 220
            Page 221
            Page 222
            Page 223
            Page 224
            Page 225
        Saturday, January 27
            Page 226
            Page 227
            Page 228
            Page 229
            Page 230
            Page 231
            Page 232
            Page 233
        Monday, January 29
            Page 234
            Page 235
            Page 236
            Page 237
            Page 238
            Page 239
            Page 240
            Page 241
            Page 242
            Page 243
            Page 244
            Page 245
            Page 246
        Tuesday, January 30
            Page 247
            Page 248
            Page 249
            Page 250
            Page 251
            Page 252
            Page 253
            Page 254
            Page 255
            Page 256
            Page 257
            Page 258
            Page 259
            Page 260
            Page 261
            Page 262
        Wednesday, January 31
            Page 263
            Page 264
            Page 265
            Page 266
            Page 267
            Page 268
            Page 269
            Page 270
            Page 271
            Page 272
    February 1883
        Thursday, February 1
            Page 273
            Page 274
            Page 275
            Page 276
            Page 277
            Page 278
            Page 279
            Page 280
            Page 281
            Page 282
            Page 283
            Page 284
            Page 285
            Page 286
            Page 287
            Page 288
            Page 289
        Friday, February 2
            Page 290
            Page 291
            Page 292
            Page 293
            Page 294
            Page 295
            Page 296
            Page 297
            Page 298
            Page 299
            Page 300
            Page 301
        Monday, February 5
            Page 302
            Page 303
            Page 304
            Page 305
            Page 306
            Page 307
            Page 308
            Page 309
            Page 310
            Page 311
        Tuesday, February 6
            Page 312
            Page 313
            Page 314
            Page 315
            Page 316
            Page 317
            Page 318
            Page 319
            Page 320
            Page 321
            Page 322
            Page 323
            Page 324
            Page 325
            Page 326
            Page 327
        Wednesday. February 7
            Page 328
            Page 329
            Page 330
            Page 331
            Page 332
            Page 333
            Page 334
            Page 335
            Page 336
            Page 337
            Page 338
            Page 339
            Page 340
            Page 341
        Thursday, February 8
            Page 342
            Page 343
            Page 344
            Page 345
            Page 346
            Page 347
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            Page 360
        Friday, February 9
            Page 361
            Page 362
            Page 363
            Page 364
            Page 365
            Page 366
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            Page 368
            Page 369
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            Page 371
            Page 372
            Page 373
            Page 374
        Saturday, February 10
            Page 375
            Page 376
            Page 377
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        Monday, February 12
            Page 388
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            Page 390
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        Tuesday, February 13
            Page 398
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        Wednesday, February 14
            Page 419
            Page 420
            Page 421
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        Friday, February 16
            Page 427
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            Page 432
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        Saturday, February 17
            Page 436
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        Monday, February 19
            Page 449
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            Page 451
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        Tuesday, February 20
            Page 465
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        Wednesday, February 21
            Page 480
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        Thursday, February 22
            Page 493
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        Friday, February 23
            Page 509
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        Saturday, February 24
            Page 529
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        Monday, February 26
            Page 547
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            Page 569
            Page 570
        Tuesday, February 27
            Page 571
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        Wednesday, February 28
            Page 604
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    March 1883
        Thursday, March 1
            Page 630
            Page 631
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        Friday, March 2
            Page 674
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            Page 680
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            Page 690
            Page 691
            Page 692
    Members of the house and their post office addresses
        Page 693
    Officers and attaches
        Page 694
    Appendix
        Report of the comptoller of the state of Florida, for the fiscal year 1881
            Page 1
            Page 2
            Page 3
            Page 4
            Page 5
            Page 6
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Full Text

ASSEMBLY



JOURNAL.



A JOURNAL

OF THE
4


PROCEDING OF THE ASSEMBLY


OF TIHE



STATE



OF FLORIDA,



AT THE



TWELFTH SESSION OF THE LEGISLATURE,

BEGUN AND:-HELD AT THE CAPITOL, IN THE CITY OF TALLA-
HASSEE, ON TUESDAY, JANUARY 2, 1883.



CHAS. DOUGHERTY (of Volusia), SPEAKER.
WM. F. BYNUM (of Suwannee), CHIEF CLERK.



TALLAHASSEE, FLA.:
CHARLES E. DYKE, STATE PRINTER,



1883.


























a















JOURNAL

Of the Assembly of the State of Florida, at the Twelfth Ses-
sion of the Legislature, begun and held at the Capitol, in
the city of Tallahassee, in the State of Florida, on Tuesday,
the 2d day of January, A. D. 1883, being the day fixed by
the Constitution of the State of Florida for the meeting of
the Legislature.


TUESDAY, January 2, 1883.
The Assembly was called to order by Wm. Forsyth Bynum,
former Chief Clerk.
The roll of members furnished by the Secretary of State
was called, and the following members came forward and were
sworn in by His Honor James D. Westcott, Associate Justice
of the Supreme Court:
Alachua--M. M. Lewey, Wm. Trapp and L. G. Dennis.
Baker-G. P. Canova.
Brevard-Francis W. Platt.
Bradford-J. L. Gaskins arid W. H. Edwards.
Calhoun-Lawrence Baker.
C(lay-L. W. Kickliter.
Columbia-Thos. W. Gctzen, Walter R. Moore and Jno. W.
Tompkins.
Dade-John H. Brelsford.
Du)al-Geo. W; Whitmore, Richard L. Brown, Lemuel H.
Thompson and W. H. McCormick.
.Ecambia-S. C. Cobb, Royal Putnam and M. S. White.
Franklin-John E. Grady.
Gadsden-Thos. L. Ward, G. A. Hendry and Claiborn Mun-
roe.
Hamilton-B. B. Blackwell and Robert J. Bevill.
Hernando--C. C. Keathly and Francis M. Townsend.
Holme--J. S. Calk.
Iillsborough-Calfrey L. Wilder and John J. M. McMullen.






4



Jackson-J. F. McClellan, W. H. Milton and James A. Rob-
inson.
Jefferson-Geo. W. Witherspoon, Geo. W. Proctor, Wm. A.
Bird and Moses W. C. McCardy.
Lafayette-Thos. S. Goodbread.
Leuy-N. A. Blitch and W. W. Clyatt.
Leon-Charles Rollins, Isaac Jenkins, Wallace S. Weeks
and Mack Davis.
Liberty--Wm. H. Neal.
31adison-Thos. A. Hall, Joseph N. Stripling and Alfred B.
Osgood.
Manatee-John W. Hidden.
Marion-W. A. Wilkerson and Hugh E. Miller.
Monroe-James P. Perkins and Win. Bethel.
Nassau--Riley E. Robinson and Jno. Wilkinson.
Orange-J. J. Harris and Jno. M. Bryan.
Polk-John W. Bryant.
Putnam-Clayton A. Cowgill and George W. Lyle.
Santa Rosa-John McLellan and H. W. Sindorf.
St. Johns--James L. Colee and H. H. Floyd.
Sumter-M. H. Mabry and Wilson W. Cassady.
Suwannee--Robert F. Allison and Andrew McLeod.
Taylor-Samuel A. Wilcox.
Volusia-Charles Dougherty.
Wakulla-George W. Tully.
Walton-John P. Vaughn and John L. Campbell.
Washington-E, P. Melvin.
A quorum present.
On motion of Mr. Harris, Mr. McClellan was elected Speaker
pro tern.
On motion of Mr. Getzen, the Assembly proceeded to the
election of Permanent Speaker.
Nominations being in order, Mr. Getzen nominated the Hon.
Charles Dougherty, of Volusia.
Mr. Hall nominated the Hon. Joseph N. Stripling, of Madi-
son.
Mr. Dennis nominated the Hon. S. C. Cobb, of Escambia.
The vote was:
For DOUGHERTY-Messrs. Allison, Bethel, Blackwell, Blitch,
Bryan, Bryant, Calk, Campbell, Canova, Cassady, Clyatt, Co-
lee, Edwards, Floyd, Gaskins,.Getzen, Goodbread, Grady, Har-
ris, Keathly, Kickliter, Mabry, Milton, Moore, McClellan, Mc-
Leod, McLellan, McMullen, Neal, Perkins, Platt, Robinson
of Jackson, Sindorf, Townsend, Tully, Vaughn, Whidden,
Wilcox and Wilder-39.
For STRIPLING-Messrs. Baker, Bevill, Bird, Brelsford,






5



Brown, Cobb, Hall, Hendry, Melvin, Munroe, Osgood, Proctor,
Robinson of Nassau, Thompson, Tompkins, Ward,White, Whit-
more, Wilkinson and Witherspoon-21.
For COBB-Messrs. Cowgill, Davis, Dennis, Jenkins, Lewey,
Lyle, Miller, McCormick, Putnam, Rollins, Trapp, Weeks and
Wilkerson-13.
Mr. Dougherty having received a majority of all the votes,
was declared elected Speaker of the Assembly.
Mr. Moore moved that a committee of three be appointed to
escort Mr. Dougherty, Speaker, to the Chair;
Which was agreed to, and Messrs. Moore, Gaskins and Cobb
appointed such committee.
Upon taking the Chair, Mr. Dougherty, Speaker elect, deliv-
ered the following address:
Gentlemen of the Assembly :
At this time it seems useless to make any extended remarks
to you, as there is business of more importance before you.
You have seen fit to elect me your presiding officer, and it is
necessary that order be preserved, that the business may be
expeditiously conducted.
There is nothing in the position of a legislator incompatible
with the dignity of a gentleman, and in that behalf I venture
the hope that all will so conduct themselves that there shall
be no necessity for the exertion of any authority of the Speaker
in the direction of a quiet, orderly session.
I shall treat each and every member fairly and impartially,
and, asking your cordial support, I assure you that with that
support any rules which you shall lay down for your govern-
ance shall be strictly enforced, and if you will place the means
at my disposal, order shall be preserved.
If at any time I shall overstep the bounds of my authority
in this hall, it is for you to correct me, and I desire that you
do so without any favor to myself or to the position which I
am to occupy.
Thanking you profoundly for the honor which you have
conferred upon me, I am now ready in your presence to take
"the solemn obligation to perform the duties of Speaker of this
Assembly to the best of my ability.
Mr. McClellan moved that the Assembly proceed to the
election of Chief Clerk;
Which was agreed to.
Nominations being in order-
Mr. Getzen nominated Mr. William Forsyth Bynum, of Su-
wannee;
Mr. Jenkins nominated Mr. H. S. Harmon, of Leon;






6



The vote was:
For BYNUM-Mr. Speaker, Messrs. Allison, Baker, Bethel,
Bevill, Bird, Blackwell, Blitch, Brelsford, Brown, Bryan, Bry-
ant, Calk, Campbell, Canova, Cassady, Cobb, Clyatt, Colee,
Cowgill, Davis, Edwards, Floyd, Gaskins, Getzen, Goodbread,
Grady, Hall, Harris, Hendry, Keathly, Kickliter, Lyle, Mabry,
Melvin, Miller, Milton, Moore, Munroe, McClellan, McCor-
mick. McLeod, McLellan, McMullen, Neal, Perkins, Platt,
Proctor, Putnam, Robinson of Nassau, Robinson of Jackson,
Sindorf, Stripling, Thompson, Tompkins, Townsend, Tully,
Vaughn, Ward, Whidden, White, Whitmore, Wilcox, Wilder,
Wilkerson, Wilkinson-66.
For HARMON-Messrs. Dennis, Jenkins, Lewey, McCardy,
Osgood, Rollins, Trapp, Weeks, Witherspoon-9.
William Forsyth Bynum, having received a majority of the
votes, was declared by the Speaker elected Chief Clerk.
Mr. Milton moved to proceed to the election of Sergeant-at-
Arms.
Mr. Osgood moved to proceed to the election of Assistant-
Clerk.
Mr. Wilkerson moved to adjourn until 12 o'clock, noon, to-
morrow;
Upon which the yeas and nays were called for by Messrs.
Whitmore, Miller and Brown, and were:
Yeas-Messrs. Miller, Whitmore and Wilkerson-3.
"Nays-Mr. Speaker, Messrs. Allison, Baker, Bethel, Bevill,
Bird, Blackwell, Blitch, Brelsford, Brown, Bryan, Bryant, Calk,
Campbell, Canova, Cassady, Cobb, Clyatt, Colee, Cowgill, Da-
vis, Dennis, Edwards, Floyd, Gaskins, Getzen, Goodbread,
Grady, Hall, Harris, Hendry, Jenkins, Keathly, Kickliter,
Lewey, Lyle, Mabry, Melvin, Milton, Moore, Munroe, McCar-
dy, McClellan of Jackson, McCormick, McLeod, McLellan,
of Santa Rosa, McMullen, Neal, Osgood, Perkins, Platt, Proc-
tor, Putnam, Rollins, Robinson of Nassau, Robinson of Jack-
son, Sindorf, Stripling, Thompson, Tompkins, Towns-
end, Trapp, Tully, Vaughn, Ward, Weeks, Whidden, White,
Wilcox, Wilder, Wilkinson, Witherspoon-- 2.
The motion to adjourn did not prevail.
The motion of Mr. Milton to proceed to the election of Ser-
geant-at-Arms was agreed to.
Nominations being in order-
Mr. Robinson, of Jackson, nominated Mr. John R. Moseley,
of Jackson.
Mr. Tompkins nominated Mr. J. M. Tolbert. of Columbia.
Mr. Jenkins nominated Mr. Armstrong, of Leon.
Mr. Bevill nominated Mr. Sampson Altman, of Hamilton.






7



Mr. Osgood nominated Mr. McKnight, of Madison.
SMr. Hendry nominated Mr. Sylvester, of Gadsden.
The vote was:
For SYLVESTER-Messrs. Baker, Hendry, Munroe, Proctor,
Ward and Witherspoon-6.
For McKNiGHT-Messrs. Osgood, Trapp and White-3.
For ALTMAN-Messrs. Bevill, Brown, Cobb, Cowgill, Hall,
Lyle, Miller, McCormick, Putnam, Robinson of Nassau, Strip-
ling, Thompson, Whitmore, Wilkerson and Wilkinson-15.
FoR MOSELEY-Mr. Speaker, Messrs. Allison, Bethel, Black-
well, Blitch, Bryan of Orange, Bryant of Polk, Calk, Camp-
bell, Canova, Cassady, Clyatt, Colee, Edwards, Floyd, Gas-
kins, Getzen, Goodbread, Grady, Harris, Keathly, Kickliter,
Mabry, Melvin, Milton, Moore, McClellan of Jackson, McLeod,
McLellan of Santa Rosa, McMullen, Neal, Perkins, Platt, Rob-
inson of Jackson, Sindorf, Townsend, Tully, Vaughn, Whidden,
Wilcox and Wilder-41.
For TOLBERT-Mr. Tompkins-1.
For AnRIsTRNG-Messrs. Bird, Davis, Jenkins, Lewey, Mc-
Cardy, Rollins and Weeks-7.
For BLANK-Mr. Brelsford-1.
Mr. J. R. Moseley having received a majority of the votes
was declared elected Sergeant-at-Arms.
Mr. McClellan moved that the Assembly proceed to the elec-
tion of Door-keeper;
Which was agreed to.
Mr. Getzen nominated John Craft, of Bradford.
Mr. Brown nominated Wm. Glenn, of Duval.
Mr. Bevill nominated Geo. Dice, of Madison.
Mr. Stripling nominated Mr. Lanier, of Madison.
Mr. Jenkins nominated Robert Smith, of Leon.
Mr. Munroe nominated Everette Wilcox, of Gadsden.
The vote was :
For EVERETTE WTLCox-Messrs. Hendry, Ward, Munroe,
-3.
For ROBERT SMITI'-Messrs. Davis, Jenkins, McCardy, Mc-
Cormick, Proctor, Rollins, Weeks, Wilkinson-8.
For CRAFT-Mr. Speaker, Messrs. Allison, Baker, Bethel,
Bird, Blackwell, Blitch, Brelsford, Bryan, Bryant, Calk, Camp-
bell, Canova, Cassady, Cobb, Clyatt, Colee, Edwards, Floyd,
Gaskins, Getzen, Goodbread, Grady, Harris, Keathly, Kick-
liter, Lyle, Mabry, Melvin, Milton, Moore, McClellan, McLeod,
McLellan, McMullen, Neal, Perkins, Platt, Putnam, Robinson
of Jackson, Sindorf, Tompkins, Townsend, Tully, Taughn,
Whidden, Wilcox, Wilder-49.
For JOHN W. HALL-Witherspoon-1.









For W. W. GLENN-Messrs. Brown, Lewey, Miller, Robin-
son, of Nassau, Trapp, White, Wilkerson-7.
For GEO. DICE-Messrs. Bevill, Hall-2.
For LANIER-Messrs. Osgood, Stripling-2.
Blank-3.
Mr. Craft having received a majority of the votes, was de-
cleared elected Door-keeper.
The Sergean-at-Arms and Door-keeper elect were sworn
in by the Speaker.
On motion, the Assembly adjourned until 10 o'clock A. M.
to-morrow.

-o-



WEDNESDAY, January 3, 1883.

The Assembly met pursuant to adjournment.
The roll being called the following members answered to
their names:
Mr. Speaker, Messrs. Allison, Baker Bethel, Bevill, Bird,
Blackwell, Blitch, Brelsford, Brown, Bryan. of Orange, Bry-
ant, of Polk, Calk, Campbell, Canova, Cassady, Cobb, (Clyatt,
Colee, Cowgill, Davis, Edwards, Floyd, askings, Getzen: Good-
bread, Grady, Hall, Harris, Hendry, Jenkins, Keathly, Kick-
liter. Lewey. Lyle, Mabry, Melvin, Miller, Milton, Moore,
Munroe, McCardy, McClellan, of Jackson, McCormick, Mc-
Leod, McLellan, of Santa Rosa, McMullen, Neal, Osgood,
Perkins, Platt, Proctor, Putnam, Rollins, Robinson. ol' Nas-
sau, Robinson, of Jackson, Sindorf, Stripling, Thompson,
Tompkins, Townsend, Trapp, Tully, Vaughn, Ward, Weeks,
Whidden, White, Whitmore, Wilcox, Wilder, Wilkerson and
\ ilkinson-73.
A quorum present.
Prayer by Hon. Mr. Kickliter.
On motion of Mr. Whitmore, the reading of yesterday's
Journal was dispensed with, and the Journal corrected and ap-
proved.
A committee of three, composed of Senators Crill, Hatch-
er and Greeley appeared at the bar of the Assembly and an-
nounced that the Senate was organized and ready to proceed
to business.
A committee of three, composed of Senators Polhill, Mc-
Kinne and Baker, appeared at the bar of the Assembly and an-
nounced that the Senate had appointed a committee to act





9



with a similar committee on the part of the Assembly to in-
form the Governor that the Legisislature is organized and
ready to receive any communication he may see proper to
make.
Mr. Osgood moved that a committee be appointed to inform
the Senate that the Assembly is organized and ready to proceed
to business;
Which was agreed to.
Messrs. Bryan of Orange, Osgood and Mabry were appointed
said committee, who, after a brief absence from the Hall, re-
turned and reported that they had discharged their duty and
were discharged.
Mr. Bryant, of Polk, moved that a committee of three be
appointed to act with a similar committee on the part of the
Senate to inform the Governor that the Legislature is organ-
ized and ready to receive any communication he may see
proper to make;
"Which was agreed to.
Messrs. Bryant of Polk, McClellan of Jackson and Dennis
were appointed said committee, who, after a brief absence
from the Hall, returned and -announced that they had per-
formed their duty and were discharged.
Mr. Milton moved that the rules of the Assembly in force
at the close of the last session be adopted as the rules of this
Assembly until further ordered, and that the Chief Clerk be
instructed to have 100 copies printed for the use of the Assem-
bly ;
Which was agreed to.
Mr. Brown moved that the Assembly proceed to the election
of Assistant Clerk ;
Which was agreed to.
Mr. Getzen nominated D. G. McLeod, of Walton.
Mr. Miller nominated W. R. Boyd, of Madison.
The vote was:
For McLEOD-Mr. Speaker, Messrs. Allison, Bethel,'Black-
well, Blitch, Bryan, of Orange, Bryant, of Polk, Calk, Camp-
bell, Canova, Cassady, Clyatt, Colee, Edwards, Floyd, Gas-
kins, Getzen, Goodbread, Grady, Harris, Keathly, Kickliter,
Mabry, Milton, Moore, McClellan, of Jackson, McLellan, of
Santa Rosa, McLeod, McMullen, Neal, Perkins, Platt, Sindorf,
Robinson, of Jackson, Townsend, Tully, Vaughn, Whidden,
Wilcox and Wilder-40.
For BoYD-Messrs. Baker, Bevill, Bird,' Brelsford, Brown,
Cobb, Cowgill, Davis, Dennis, Hall. Hendry, Jenkins, Lewey,
Lyle, Melvin, Miller, Munroe, McCardy, McCormick, Osgood,
Proctor, Putnam, Rollins, Robinson, of Nassau, Stripling,
Thompson. Tompkins, Trapp, Ward, Weeks, White, Wet-
more, Wilkerson and Wilkinson-34.






* 10



D. G. McLeod having received a majority of all the votes,
was declared elected Assistant Clerk of the Assembly.
Mr. Bryant moved that the Assembly proceed to the elec-
tion of Reading Clerk ;
Which was agreed to.
Mr. Getzen nominated W. H. Reynolds.
Mr. Tompkins nominated W. M. Dukes.
Mr. Whitmore nominated J. H. Sherman.
Mr. Proctor nominated H. S. Harmon.
The vote was:
For REYNOLDS-Mr. Speaker, Messrs. Allison, Bethel, Bev-
ill, Blackwell, Blitch, Brelsford, Bryan of Orange, Bryant
of Polk, Calk, Campbell, Canova, Cassady, Cobb, Clyatt,
Colee, Edwards, Floyd, Gaskins, Getzen, Goodbread, Grady,
Hall, Harris, Keathly, Kickliter, Mabry, Milton, Moore, Mun-
roe, McClellan of Jackson, McLellan of Santa Rosa, McCor-
mick, McLeod, McMullen, Neal, Perkins, Platt, Putnam, Rob-
inson of Jackson, Stripling, Townsend, Tully, Vaughn, Ward,
Whidden, Wilcox and Wilder-48.
For THoMsowN-Messrs. Bird, Davis, Jenkins, Miller, Mc-
Cardy, Proctor, Rollins, Thompson, Whitmore, Wilkerson
and Wilkinson-11.
For DUKES- Messrs. Dennis, Osgood, Sindorf, Tompkins,
Trapp and Weeks-6.
For BLANK-MIessrs. Baker, Brown, Cowgill, Lewey, Lyle,
Melvin, Robinson of Nassau and White-8.
Mr. Reynolds having received a majority of all the votes
was declared elected Reading Clerk of the Assembly.
Mr. Osgood moved that the Assembly proceed to the elec-
tion of Recording Clerk;
Which was agreed to.
Mr. Getzen nominated Hardee Bryant.
Mfr. Osgood nominated J. H. Sherman.
Mr. Jenkins nominated H. S. Harmon.
The vote was:
For BRYANT-Mr. Speaker, Messrs. Allison, Bethel, Bevill,
Blackwell, Blitch, Brown, Bryan, of Orange, Bryant, of Polk,
Calk, Campbell, Canova, Cassady, Cobb, Clyatt, Colee, Ed-
wards, Floyd, Gaskins, Getzen, Goodbread, Grady, Hall, IIar-
ris, Hendry, Keathly, Kickliter, Mabay, Milton, Moore, Mc-
Clellan, of' Jackson, McLellan, of Santa Rosa, McCormick,
McLeod, McMullen, Neal, Perkins, Platt, Robinson, of Jack-
son, Sindorf, Townsend, Tully, Vaughn, Whidden, Wilcox and
Wilder-46.
For SHERMAX-Messrs. Bird, Cowgill, Lewey, Lyle, Miller,
Munroe, McCardy, Osgood, Proctor, Putnam, Robinson of






11



Nassau, Thompson, Trapp,Ward, White,Whitmore and Wilkin-
son-17.
For HARMloN-Messrs. Davis, Jenkins, Rollins, Tompkins
and Wilkerson.-5.
For BLANK-Messrs. Baker, Brelsford, Melvin and Weeks
-4.
Mr. Bryant, having received a majority of the votes, was de-
clared elected Recording Clerk.
On motion of Mr. Melvin, the Assembly proceeded to the
election of Engrossing Clerk.
Mr. Melvin nominated Mr. J. A. Colson, of Franklin.
Mr. Whitmore nominated Mr. D. H. Spearing.
The vote was:
For COLSON-Mr. Speaker, Messrs. Allison, Baker, Bethel,
Bevill, Blackwell, Blitch, Brelsford, Bryan of Orange, Bryant
of Polk, Calk, Campbell, Canova, Cassady, Clyatt, Colee, Ed-
wards, Floyd, Gaskins, Getzen, Goodbread, Grady, Hall, Har-
ris, Keathly, Kickliter, Mabry, Melvin, Milton, Moore, McClel-
lan of Jackson, McLellan of Santa Rosa, McLeod, McMullen,
Neal, Osgood, Perkins, Platt, Robinson of Jackson, Sindorf,
Stripling, Tompkins, Townsend, Trapp, Tully, Vaughn, Ward,
Whidden, Wilcox, Wilder-49.
For SPEARING-Messrs. Brown, Davis, Jenkins, McCardy,
McCormick, Proctor, Rollins, Robinson of Nassau, Thompson,
Whitmore, Wilkerson, Wilkinson-12.
BLANK-Messrs. Bird, Cobb, Cowgill, Hendry, Lewey, Lyle,
Putnam, Weeks, White-9.
Mr. Colson having received a majority of the votes was de-
clared elected Engrossing Clerk.
Mr. Miller moved that the Speaker appoint a Chaplain, two
Pages, two Janitors and one Assistant Sergeant-at-Arms.
Mr. Stripling moved to amend by appointing two Pages,
one Janitor and Chaplain;
Upon which the yeas and nays were called for by Messrs.
Stripling, Osgood and White.
The vote was:
Yeas-Messrs. Bird, Blackwell, Canova, Hall, Neal, Osgood,
Sindorf, Stripling, Ward, Weeks and White-11.
Nays-Mr. Speaker, Messrs. Baker, Bethel, Bevill, Blitch,
Brelsford, Bryan of Orange, Bryant of Polk, Calk, Campbell,
Cassady, Cobb, Clyatt, Colee, Cowgill, Davis, Dennis, Ed-
wards, Floyd, Gaskins, Getzen, Goodbread, Grady, Harris,
Hendry, Jenkins, Keathly, Kickliter, Lewey, Lyle, Mabry,
Melvin, Miller, Milton, Moore, Munroe, McCardy, McClellan
Jackson, McLellan of Santa Rosa, McCormick, McLeod, Mc-
Mullen, Perkins, Platt, Proctor, Rollins, Robinson of Nassau,






12



Robinson of Jackson, Thompson, Tompkins, Townsend, Trapp,
Tully, Vaughn, Whidden, Whitmore, Wilcox, .Wilder, Wilker-
son and Wilkinson-60.
So the amendment was lost.
The original motion of Mr. Miller was agreed to.
The following message was received from His Excellency,
Governor William D. Bloxham:

GOVERNOR'S MESSAGE.

EXECUTIVE OFFICE,
TALLAHASSEE, FLA., January 2, 1883.
Gentlemen of the Senate and Assembly :
In welcoming you to the Capitol in the dischargs of your
Constitutional duties, I can but congratulate you upon the
auspicious circumstances under which you have met. Never
before in the history of our State have Floridians had so much
to be congratulated upon, or such a brilliant outlook for the
future. No State in the South is receiving more attention.
Population and capital are continually entering her borders,
her lands are being eagerly sought for, and her genial and
semi-tropical climate invites the pleasure-seeker as well as the
immigrant. Her finances are upon the most solid foundation;
her securities in good demand and far above their par value,
and her Comptroller's Warrants passing current in the banking
institutions and moneyed marts of the country. She has no
floating debt, and her taxable resources in the last two years
have increased over ten million dollars-so much so as to war-
rant a large reduction in State taxation, and at the same time
maintain a cash basis. Her Internal Improvement Fund,
which has been shackled and rendered unavailable for so many
years, has been practically released, and thus the fetters thrown
off that have so long retarded her development. As a conse-
quence, the gratifying fact can be announced that more miles
of railroad have been constructed in her limits during the
past two years than in her entire former history. The signifi-
cance of such a fact cannot go unmarked. Millions of acres
of her extreme southern territory are being reclaimed, which
will in the future add immensely to her productive capacity,






13



and furnish a field for tropical productiveness without a rival
in our entire sisterhood of States. But to these and other
topics, so fruitful of thought, I invite your attention more in
detail.
FINANCES.
It will be seen from the reports of the Comptroller and
Treasurer that the total amount of warrants issued for 1881
were $281,201.03-and for 1882 $170,302.08. For the first
time in the history of the State we have ample funds in the
Treasury to pay all drafts for current expenses-no floating
debt, and no deficiencies asked for. This simple announce-
ment is a sufficient commentary upon our financial status.
The bonded debt is as follows:
Seven per cent bonds 1871................... $350,000 00
Six per cent. bonds 1873................... 925,000 00
Eight per cent. Convention bonds............ 1,500 00-81.276,500 00
Of these bonds there are in School Fund .... 8285600 00
Seminary Fund ............................ 87,400 00
Agricultural College Fund ................ 134,200 00
Sinking Fund Bond 1871 .................. 59,500 00
Sinking Fund Bond 1873.................. 100,000 00 -$666,700 00
Leaving in hands of individuals............ $609.800 00
Showing a decrease of amount in hands of In-
dividuals during the past two years........ $62,500 00
Decrease of public debt during past two years :
Bought Sinking Fund Bonds 1871..........$. .$8,800 00
For Sinking Fund Bonds 1873, $17,550 00 U.
S. 4 per cent. bonds equivalent to 6 per cent.
SFlorida Bonds at $1.10................... $19,100 00- $27,900 00
The laws of Florida, Chapter 1,833, under which was issued
the seven per cent. bonds, and Chapter 1,737, under which
was issued the six per cent. bonds, provide that the Treasurer
cannot pay over their par value, in the purchase of any of said
bonds for the sinking fund. The bonds of the State have ad-
vanced so much in value since that time, that the Treasurer
cannot purchase the same at their par value. Indeed our
seven per cent. bonds are now quoted at 130, with none in the
market. The last Legislature amended in this particular
Chapter 1833, relating to the seven per cent. bonds, but by






14



an oversight, omitted to amend Chapter 1,937 relating to the
six per cent. securities, which precludes .the Treasurer from
purchasing them for the sinking fund. I therefore recommend
that section 8 of Chapter 1,939 be so amended as to allow the
Treasurer to purchase said bonds at their market value.
TAXATION.
There is no subject of greater moment to the people than
that of taxation. In order to secure a proper appreciation of
the question it is necessary to refer back a few years.
At the change of administrations in January, .1877, the
State tax was twelve and a half mills. The Legislature was
desirous of reducing the same, but a difference of opinion ex-
isted as to the proper reduction to be made, and that body ad-
journed leaving the law as they found it. In October of that
year, Governor Drew, ascertaining that a reduction could be
made, directed the collectors, through the Comptroller, to col-
lect ten mills in place of the twelve and a half authorized by
law. In August, 1878, he directed a further reduction of one
mill, and the collectors were directed to collect nine mills for
that year. Thus the matter stood, with a nine-mill tax, when
the Legislature assembled in January, 1879.
The question of a reduction of taxes again occupied the at-
tention of that body. Governor Drew, then Governor of the
State, pressed upon the committee the necessity of having
eight mills, and requested them not to go below that figure
if they desired the State kept upon a cash basis and the inter-
est upon the public debt punctually met. They thought, how-
ever, that by suspending the Sinking Fund tax for two years,
seven mills would be sufficient to carry the State through on
a cash basis. Hence a seven-mill tax was passed and the
Sinking Fund tax suspended for two years. This was the
rate assessed and collected for the years 1879 and 1880.
When the Legislature met in January, 1881, and I entered
upon the discharge of the duties of Governor, we found, not-
withstanding the most rigid economy, that the State was be-
hind over one hundred thousand dollars. The deficiencies for
1880 and previous years which had to be met amounted to
$35,685.19-(see acts of 1881, Chapter 3225,)-floating debt,






15



$5,335.25; jurors' and witnesses' certificates outstanding,
$25,951.68; interest on bonded debt due January 1, 1881,
$52,250.00; salaries for the last quarter of 1880, $13,068.00,
making a total of $132,290.12 that was due, with only $29,-
683.18 in the treasury to meet the same. In other words,
after trying a seven-mill tax for two years, with the Sinking
Fund suspended, and $22,727.38 of the Sinking Fund of former
years used for general expenses, the State was unable by $102.-
606.94 to meet its obligations past due. It may be said that
we had the taxes of 1880 to apply to the expenses of 1881,
but every one familiar with the practical financial operations
of the Government for years, knows that the expenses of each
currnet year are really met with the occupational taxes of that
year and the property taxes of the preceding year; and, more-
over, it will be remembered that the Legislature was in ses-
sion in 1881 and its expenses had to be, and were met, out of
the taxes of the previous year. Are we surprised, then, that
Governor Drew on January 3, 1881, the day before he left the
Executive office, addressed the following language to the Leg-
islature:
These deficiencies were anticipated, and the necessity of in-
creasing the assessment urged upon the last Legislature, but
they failed to carry out the suggestions then made, and to this
fact, as well as to the increased demand on the several appro-
priations, is due the scarcity of funds in the treasury. In pri-
vate interviews with prominent members of the last Legisla-
ture I urged the fixing of a sliding scale rate of taxation upon
the ground that if the assessment was increased largely, as antic-
ipated, the rate could be diminished ; or, if it failed to be in-
creased as much as expected a rate high enough to raise
sufficient money to meet the interest and pay all appropria-
trons could be fixed. But this they failed to do, and fixed the
rate at seven mills, expecting the assessment to run up to
$35,000,000 or 840,000,000 ; but instead of this it reached only
$30,382,209, rendering it absolutely necessary for myself and
Cabinet, in order to maintain the credit and keep the State at
a cash basis, to borrow on our own responsibility enough
money in part to meet the interest on the State bonds for Jan-






16



uary, 1880, and for the interest, $490.76 on the amount bor-
rowed, which will require an appropriation. *
At the present valuation of property and rate of taxation, the
State cannot be kept at a cash basis and the interest on the pub-
lic debt paid."
Such was the condition of our finances when the present ad-
ministration entered upon its duties, and the Legislature in
session, with the increased expenses necessary to the meeting
ot that body. The State was compelled, under Legislative
sanction, to go into the market to borrow a large amount, in
order to preserve her credit.
The question was then, should the Legislature allow the
State to go back to a scrip basis, and its credit depend upon
scrip speculators, and its expenses be necessarily increased
thereby-or should they place an additional mill for one year
and keep the State on a cash basis ? The Legislature wisely
concluded that it was much better for a tax-payer to pay an
additional ten cents upon his hundred dollars of property for
one year, and thus maintain the State upon a cash basis, than
to allow its credit to depreciate, with all the attendant evils of
an over issue of scrip. To pay as you go is a homely ad-
age, but one equally applicable and beneficial to States as to in-
dividuals. I will not discuss the evils of the credit system, as
illustrated by a scrip issue beyond the income of the State.
The $80,000 which we are called upon yearly to pay in the
shape of interest upon our State debt is the legitimate and ne-
cessary offspring of such a policy, and should be a warning
that the most thoughtless should heed.
REDUCTION OF TAXES.
The act of March, 1881, to secure an equal and uniform rate
of taxation, and to pay the current expenses of the State for
the years 1881 and 1882, and for the General School Fund, and
for the interest on the bonded debt for said years, levied a tax
of eight mills with the following pr oviso : That if the Gover-
nor should discover from the aggregate assessment of the pro-
perty of the State, and from other sources of revenue, the re-
duction of the eight mills State tax of 1882 will be justified,
he is hereby authorized to direct the Collectors of Revenue to






17



collect only seven mills State tax for 1882." Owing to the
increased development of the State the assessment showed a
considerable increase for the year 1881, and I felt warranted
in exercising the authority given me by the Legislature, and
directed the tax to be reduced to seven mills for 1882.
The sale to disencumber our Internal Improvement Fund
has necessarily placed a large amount of lands upon the tax
books, and the great impetus thus given to railroad building
has largely increased that source of revenue. The natural in-
crease of wealth and population growing out of these great
enterprises, as well as from other sources, has increased the
revenue of the State so largely, that I am more than gratified
in being able to recommend a large reduction in taxation. To
reduce the taxes to the lowest estimate commensurate with
keeping the State on a cash basis, is not only a duty but a
pleasure. To go below that, is financial suicide. But to secure
a proper reduction it is necessary not only to have our re-
sources augmented, but to curtail expenses to the minimum
figures. The best scheme of finance is to spend as little as
possible, and the best tax is always the lightest." Believing
that the Legislature is actuated by such a desire, and that the
present license tax will not be materially altered, I recom-
mend a reduction of taxes to meet the necessary appropriations
for the current expenses of the State for 1883, and to pay the
interest on her bonded indebtedness to four mills. I recom-
mend the same tax for 1884, with a proviso similar to that
adopted by the last Legislature, of allowing the Governor to
reduce it to three mills, if the aggregate assessment of the
property of the State will permit."
The Constitution requires, in addition to this, a tax of one
mill for school purposes, making an aggregate of five mjlls for
all purposes. The reduction of taxes from twelve and a half
mills in 1877 to five mills, shows not only a gratifying increase
in our resources, but a commendable economy in the opera-
tions of the Government.
TAXING IMPROVEMENTS ON PUBLIC LANDS.
The last Legislature passed an act to provide for the as-
sessment and collection of taxes upon improvements on the
2A






18



public lands, and for the protection of occupying claimants of
said lands. The object and intention of the law was to pro-
tect actual settlers, and furnish them some guarantee of secur-
ing the land upon which they had made improvements. The
operation of the law, however, has not been satisfactory, and
in some instances has led to results foreign to those for which
it was intended. Parties have been compelled to pay taxes
upon their improvements on United States lands, and on lands
previously granted by the Legislature to Railroads, without
any prospect of being protected by the State. Other cases of
hardship have occurred, and unless the law can be materially
amended, I recommend its repeal.
TAXES ON RAILROAD PROPERTY.
The last Legislature, by Joint Resolution, directed the Gov-
ernor and Comptroller to employ counsel to institute legal
proceedings against those Railroad Companies constructed
under the provisions of the Internal Improvement act of 1855,
and who refused to pay taxes on their property.
In conformity to the requirements of said Resolution, Gen-
eral E. A. Perry, of Pensacola, was employed, who associated
with him J. W. Malone, Esq., of Quincy. The case was car-
ried forward as rapidly as the law permitted, and in June last
was argued before the Supreme Court of this State. The de-
cision of that court sustained the claim of the State to its
right to tax the roads constructed under the act of 1855. An
appeal has been taken to the United States Supreme Court,
and it is hoped that a decision will be reached this year.
The assessed value of the Railroad-property embraced in the
principles of this suit amounts to about 3,700,000.
Until a decision is had, however, by the United States Su-
preme Court, it will not be safe to take this valuation into
consideration as a safe basis of revenue.
LANDS SOLD FOR TAXES.
In view of the fact that only a few of the certificates of
lands sold for taxes prior to January 1st, 1877, have been ap-
proved by the County Commissioners, and returned to the
Land office as required by the act of 1881, Chapter 3234, and






19



the County Commissioners of some of the counties having de-
stroyed all of said certificates sent to them under said act,
thus demonstrating that a large proportion of the certificates
were erroneous, and the valuations and taxes thereon excessive,
I would suggest the passage of a law requiring that all such
certificates, whether in the hands of the County Commis-
sioners, or Commissioner of Lands and Immigration, be sub-
mitted to a commission composed of the Comptroller, Attor-
ney-General and Commissioner of Lands, and that said Com-
missioners have plenary powers to cancel the same, or settle
with the owners of the lands upon such equitable terms as
may be reasonable and just, to the end that the property may
be restored to the owners, and again become a source of rev-
enue to the State.
As the law now stands, the certificates for lands assessed
since January 1st, 1877, and sold prior to March 11, 1879, are
in the hands of the Commissioner of Lands and Immigration,
subject to redemption by the owners, but not to sale, while the
certificates for lands sold for taxes since March 11, 1879, are in
the hands of the Comptroller subject to redemption or sale
as the law directs. This is manifestly unjust, as all lands sold
for taxes should be placed upon the same footing. The hold-
ing of these certificates by two different departments of the
government also creates confusion and is unsatisfactory. I
therefore recommend that all the certificates for lands sold for
taxes assessed since January 1, 1877, be placed in the Comp-
troller's office for redemption or sale, under proper restrictions
as to time of sale, and that the Comptroller be authorized to
correct certificates where proof is made of taxes having been
paid, and to make such other settlement in respect to the
same. with the tax-payer, as may appear to be equitable and
proper.
INTERNAL IMPROVEMENT FUND.
The United States Congress granted to Florida by an act of
September 4, 1841, which took effect upon the admission of
the State into the Union, March 3, 1845, five hundred thout.and
acres of land. The lands were granted for internal improve-
ments." and are consequently known as Internal Improve-
ment Lands proper."







20



There was a much larger grant made on September 20, 1850,
consisting of all the swamp and overflowed lands in the
State, belonging to the United States. The chief object of
this grant was for the purposes of reclamation and drainage."
Under the first grant, of Internal Improvement Lands
proper, there are on hand, as reported by the Commissioner of
Lands and Immigration, 175,970 acres.
Under the second grant of swamp and overflowed lands,
the State has received patents for 14,831,739 acres, of which
255,273 acres were patented in 1881, and 75,516 52-100 acres in
1882.
There had been disposed of, up to January 1, 1881, 1,684,-
729 42-100 acres, and since then $503,122 82-100 acres, exclusive
of the four million acres sold to Mr. Disston.
The Internal Improvement Act of 1855, vested all of the
Internal Improvement lands proper, then unsold, as well as all
the swamp and overflowed lands on hand, with all the proceeds
that had accumulated, in the Governor, Comptroller, Treasurer,
Attorney-General and Commissioner of Lands, as a Board of
Trustees, to carry out the provisions of said act.
The act designated a road from Jacksonville to Pensacola,
with extensions to St. Marks and Crooked rivers, and St.
Andrews bay-a road from Fernandina to Tampa, with an ex-
tension to Cedar Key-a road from Pensacola north to the
State line, and a canal from the waters of the St. Johns river
on Lake Harney to Indian river, as proper works to be assist-
ed by the fund. It further authorized coupon bonds to be is-
sued upon the several roads, at the rate of ten thousand dol-
lars per mile of completed road, and additional bonds for va-
rious bridges, &c. The trustees were authorized to guarantee
the seven per cent. interest on these bonds, out of the land
fund, and did endorse bonds to the amount of $3,597,000, as fol-
lows:
Pensacola and Georgia Railroad Company..................81.220.000
Tallahassee Railroad Company ............................ 206.000
Florida Railroad Company ................. ............... 1,616,000
Florida, Atlantic and Gulf Central Railroad Company....... 555.000
Total......................................... $3,597,000






21



After the war, the companies operating the roads, having
failed to pay the sinking fund were seized and sold by the trus-
tees-the Florida Railroad in 1867, the Florida, Atlantic &
Gulf Central in 1868, and the Pensacola and Georgia and Tal-
lahassee railroads in 1869. The effect of these sales was to
relieve the railroads of the bonds or coupons, except the half
of one per cent. semi-annually, to meet the principal of the
bonds. Thus, the land fund, held by the Trustees, in addition
to paying large sums before the war for interest, now became
alone responsible for all the interest upon the bonds, not re-
tired and cancelled by the sales.
Thus briefly have I stated the origin of the indebtedness
against the Fund, which has been a topic fruitful of discus-
sion. Space will not permit me to enter into a history, much
less a discussion, of the various litigations connected with
these sales, or those between the Trustees and the holders of
the coupon indebtedness. Had the entire price bid for the P.,
& G. and Tallahassee roads been promptly paid, much loss
would have been saved to the Fund. There was a balance,
however, of $412,400 for the P. & G. and a balance of $50,775
for the Tallahassee road, that was not paid. The balance due
on the P. & G. road with interest, was paid only last July, and
then after much litigation. That upon the Tallahassee road
has not yet been paid, and the Trustees have been compelled to
offer it for resale for the principal with a large accumulation
of interest. Should the proceeds of the sale be inadequate to
pay both principal and interest, the fund will be liable for any
balance of the interest left unpaid.
DISSTON SALE.
When I entered upon the discharge of my official duties,
the prospects of relieving our Internal Improvement Fund,
and thus promoting the development of the State by securing
proper Railroad facilities, were of the most gloomy character.
Two Administrations had evinced their appreciation of the
situation by an earnest effort to sell off a large body of the
lands at a reduced rate, as the only means of saving anything
to the fund. Governor Stearns' Administration had appointed
the eminent statesman and diplomat, Reverdy Johnson, who







22



had represented in the capacity of Minister Plenipotentiary
our Government at the Court of St. James, as the agent of the
State to visit Europe, for the purpose of selling a large body
of these lands at twenty-five cents per acre, in order to relieve
the fund.
Soon after my immediate predecessor, Governor Drew, came
into office, he recognized the absolute necessity of such a sale
as the only means of relieving the fund and developing the
State. Mr. S. A. Swann, of our State, was appointed the
agent of the Internal Improvement Board. In this capacity
he visited Europe, in addition to making several trips North,
in the hope of selling a sufficient quantity of these lands at a
reduced price, in order to save the fund from utter wreck. (See
Reports of Secretary of Trustees Journals, 1875 to 1881, in-
clusive.) The Board had long advertised to sell, even in
blocks as small as five thousand acres, at fifty cents per acre,
and there had been no time, for years past, that a sale of a suffi-
cient quantity to relieve the fund would not have been cheer-
fully made at twenty-five cents per acre. All of these efforts
had been published to the world, through the Legislative
Journals, without a dissenting note as to the price, so far as I
am-aware, from any source. Legislature after legislature had
met, and in response to the inquiry what was to be done to
relieve the lands from this inheritance of seemingly necessary
spoliation, no cheering answer could be given. The right of
the State to its equity of redemption was freely and carelessly
voted away, as insolvency seemed the inevitable doom of the
entire fund.
The political organization that placed my name before the
people of the State, as its candidate for Governor, in full view
of these efforts, not only endorsed Governor Drew's action in
the matter, but gave expression to the desire of the people
in the platform by declaring, that we favor the disencumber-
meht of the Internal Improvement Fund of the State at the
earliest practical moment."
These were positive indications, from the leading minds of
both political organizations, that a sale of a.large block of the
lands at a reduced price was the only possible means of saving







23



anything to the fund. And were they not correct? Here were
some fourteen millions of "swamp and overflowed lands"
resting under a burthen of 'over one million of dollars. It
bore an interest of over seventy thousand dollars per year,
which interest fell due semi-annually and was rendered interest
bearing as fast as it fell due. The litigations, and necessary
expenses of administering the fund, consumed the larger pro-
portion of the annual sales, and left but little to apply to the
rapidly accumulating delt. Delay .would have been a not
distant, but inevitable ruin. Even this short respite was not
to be granted. It was well known that the creditors had in-
voked the powers of the United States Court, and becoming
restive from long delay, had determined to force a sale for their
protection. This would have been immediate destruction of
the fund, and a withering blight upon our hopes of develop-
ment by our anticipated Railroads. A sale was the only alter-
native-a necessity that could not be avoided without irrepar-
able ruin to the entire fund. Under such circumstances, the
Board of Trustees were fortunate in securing a purchaser, and
on June 1, 1881, a sale was consummated to Hamilton Disston,
of Philadelphia, of four million acres for one million of dol-
lars. Successive Legislatures had granted away every acre of
the swamp and overflowed lands to various corporations.
Had there been no debt, the lands were already granted away,
or had the Board have sold one acre even for a million dollars
and cancelled this debt, the fund would have been no better
off, for all the lands of the character sold were already granted
to these corporations. They Were of no practical value to
the corporations, however, until relieved of the debt that con-
stituted a first lien. When the debt was relieved by a sale of
a portion of the lands, the remaining portion became operative
for the purposes for which it was granted. The rights of the
creditors were acknowledged by every grant of land made by
the various Legislatures since 1876, and affirmed by a general
act (Laws of Florida, Chapter 3326) passed by the last Legis-
lature. The entire fund was in the hands of the United States
Court and under its control for the protection of said credi-








24



tors. The Trustees acted under the direction of said tribunal,
and the sale was confirmed by the Court.
No other transaction, certainly since the war, has been of
greater service to the State. The debt that rested upon the
fund has been relieved-an impetus to Railroad building never
before realized in the State was secured-a large amount of
capital, both from Europe and America, has been invested in
our limits, necessarily bringing with it an influx of popula-
tion-an advertisement snch as we ever had, and which has
called public attention not only in this country but in Europe,
to our resources and climatic advantages, and a large amount
of property placed upon the tax books, thus aiding in a
reduction of taxation, are some of the advantages accruing
from the sale.
SETTLERS ON PUBLIC LANDS.
In making the sale for the relief of the Internal Improve-
ment Fund, the Trustees were not unmindful of the settlers
upon those lands. Provision was made, allowing them from
June 1st, 1881, until January 1st, 1883, to pay for their lands
at State prices, and many have availed themselves of it, antd
entered their homesteads.
I take pleasure in stating also, that Mr. Disston has shown
a most commendable desire in the protection of that portion
of our population, and although the time for the payment has
now passed, those who are bona fide settlers, and have not
been able to avail themselves of the opportunity, will, I am in-
formed, not be molested, but allowed further time to complete
their payments.
RECLAMATION OF LANDS.
The reclamation of lands in the southern portion of the
peninsula, by affording an outlet for the waters of that vast
inland sea, known as Lake Okeechobee, has been a mooted
question for years, but no decisive step was taken in that di-
rection until January, 1881, a few weeks after the present ad-
ministration came in. At that date, Colonel I. Coryell ap-
peared before the Board of Trustees of the Internal Improve-
ment Fund, as the representative of Philadelphia capitalists,
and negotiated a' contract with said Board for the drainage







25



and reclamation of the lands lying south of township 24, in
consideration of receiving one-half of the lands so reclaimed.
The last Legislature chartered the Atlantic and Gulf Coast
Canal and Okeechoobee Land Company," who have succeeded
to all the rights under said contract.
This company immediately had a series of surveys made to
test the practicability of the proposed undertaking, and from
their surveys, as well as those made by the United States, un-
der the direction of General Gilmore, it was shown that Lake
Okeechobee has an elevation of twenty-two feet above the Gulf
of Mexico, and that Lake Tahopekaliga, the head waters of the
Kissimmee river, has an elevation of sixty-five feet above the
waters of the Gulf. These facts being ascertained, the com-
pany assumed the entire practicability of reclaiming this vast
area, amounting to many million acres, by drawing off the
waters, and preventing the periodical overflows. The work
was commenced by building powerful steam dredges on the
Caloosahatchee river and Tahopekaliga lake, the plan of opera-
tions being to open a canal from the Caloosahatchee river to
Lake Okeechobee, and the cutting of a canal from Lake Taho-
pekaliga through to Kissimmee Lake, then straightening the
Kissimmee river, and the cutting of one or more canals from
Okeechobee to the Atlantic Coast, as well as the construction
of subsidiary canals. The dredge upon the Caloosahatchee
entered Lake Okeechoobee on the 21st of December last. This
marks an important event in the history of the State.
The work has been quietly but steadily pushed forward-
one of the conditions of the contract being that the work
should be continuous and with a force equal, at least, to the
labor of one hundred men. Up to December 1st, 1882, the
company report that they had expended $93,7177.40, and had con-
structed over twelve miles of canal, twenty-two to thirty-five
feet wide and five to six feet deep.
The early completion of the first series of canals is already
assured, which, in addition to the reclamation of the lands,
will afford a great inland system of steamboat navigation from
Kissimmee Citytthrough the Caloosatchee to the Gulf of Mex-
ico, a distance of 180 miles. The magnitude of this enter-






26



prise and its destined influence upon the future of the State,
can scarcely be realized. The reclamation of many millions
of acres, containing some of the most valuable sugar lands in
the United States, with suitable climatic conditions for the
successful growth of all tropical fruits, is the harbinger of an
era of population, wealth and property unthought of in our
past history.
EAST COAST CANAL.
The feasibility of forming an inland water communication
from the mouth of the St. Johns river to Biscayne Bay, in the
extreme southern portion of our State, a distance of some 270
miles, by utilizing the waters of Pablo creek and North,
Matanzas, Halifax, and Indian rivers, has long been conceded.
It took practical shape when Colonel I. Coryell and Hon. John
Westcott organized under the general incorporation act, the
"Florida Coast Line Canal and Transportation Company," with
a capital of $500,000. Active operations were commenced in
November last, by the construction of a suitable steam dredge,
which was carried from St. Augustine to the South end of Ma-
tanzas river, where it commenced operations, and has already
cut a canal 30 feet wide and averaging over 6 feet deep, from
near the line of township 9 S., R. 10 E, to the mouth of Matta
Compra creek, a distance of some four miles. A cut through
the marsh borders of Matta Compra creek for a distance of
three and a half miles due south, and a distance from that
point of one mile in an easterly direction, makes the connec-
tion with Smith's Creek, which flows south into Halifax river,
and forms the connection which gives steamboat navigation at
the lower end of the lagoon to the Haulover," where a cut of
less" than a mile gives the desired entrance into Indian river.
The importance of this great improvement has long been ac-
knowledged and cannot well be overrated. The Trustees of the
Internal Improvement Fund appreciating this, withdrew the
lands belonging to the Fund along the route, for the benefit of
the enterprise. If the evidences of earnestness and vigor
manifested by the company having the work in charge are
omens of the future, it will not be long before that entire trop-
ical section of our State will be supplied with transportation,






27



and a large population gladden and render productive the
splendid lands adjoining those various water courses. Even
in its isolated condition, the number of thriving settlements
along the route attest the value of the various locations. And
thus another great enterprise has been inaugurated, as illus-
trative of the great progress and development made in the last
two years.
RAILROADS.
Nothing tends with more certainty to show the increased pros-
perity and development of a State than the increase in her rail-
road facilities. As I have before remarked, Florida has every
cause of congratulation in having more miles of railroad con-
struction in her limits, in the last two years, than in her entire
former history. West Florida, that has for so many years
been cut off' from direct communication with the remaining
portion of the State, has now practically rail connection with
our system of roads; and Pensacola, the Queen of all Gulf
ports, as well as the interior western counties, will in a few
weeks have direct communication with our Atlantic sea ports.
The rapidity with which the Pensacola and Atlantic Road has
been built, connected with its superior structure and equip-
ments, speaks well for the company, as well as for the efficient
Superintendent. The time is not far distant when through
trains of freight and passenger travel from the golden gate of
the Pacific will find their exit by this line through the ports
of Jacksonville and Fernandina. The Florida Southern has
also completed, and has in operation, one hundred miles of
road, and I am informed has made arrangements for a further
and greatly increased extension. The road chartered from Live
Oak to Rowland's Bluff has been finished to the latter point,
and is vigorously pushing forward in the direction of South
Florida. The roads from Waycross to Jacksonville, and from
Fernandina to Jacksonville, have been completed. Jacksonville
and St. Augustine will, in a short time, have a new road complet-
ed, and thus be furnished with direct rail connection. The
road from Waldo has been pushed on to Silver Spring and Oca-
la, connecting there with the Tropical, which has been built
and is in operation as far south as Wildwood, in Sumter coun-







28



ty, with a branch graded and cross-tied from Wildwood to
Leesburg. The South Florida road has been built from Or-
lando to Kissimmee City, thus giving the Kissimmee valley
direct communication with the St. Johns. The St. Johns and
Halifax, Palatka and Indian River, Green Cove and Melrose,
and the Jacksonville, Tampa and Key West roads, all have
portions graded, and the former, some eight miles of iron laid.
While these improvements are unparalleled in the history of
the State, yet it is a source of deep regret that neither of the
several lines leading to Tampa and further south, have yet
reached that desirable section. The Trustees of the Internal
Improvement Fund, appreciating the great advantages of that
highly favored section, and with an earnest desire to secure to
it railroad facilities, reserved lands for five different lines run-
ning to Tampa and some further south, through the counties
of Hernando, Polk, Hillsborough and Manatee. From infor-
mation received, however, I can but believe that the time is
near at hand when these facilities, so long need, will be secured.
EDUCATION.
There is no subject of more importance than popular educa-
tion, which is being fully recognized by all enlightened coun-
tries. In our Republican form of Government, where public
questions are settled by the popular will, that will must be
educated or the Government will sooner or later prove a fail-
ure. Free Government and ignorant suffrage are not in har-
mony. Universal suffrage demands universal education as its
protector, for while the ballot is a most potent weapon, when
wielded by ignorance, there is none more dangerous to free
Government. The Government which we enjoy to-day can
be transmitted only to the rising generation, which must be
educated to perpetuate it, or ignorance with her handmaids-
corruption and vice-will cause it to lapse into despotism.
Education commends itself to us also in an economical sense.
,Actual experience demonstrates that intelligent labor is worth
at least fifty per cent. more than illiterate, while the illiterates
furnish fifty times their proportion of paupers and many times
more than their proper proportion of criminals. Ignorance is
the fruitful mother of public burthens, but contributes little to






29



the public wealth or weal. Hence every commonwealth should
encourage the education' of her youth as the best safeguard
for the future. Florida is particularly interested in this ques-
tion, as the census reveals the fact that there were in 1880,
23,319 illiterate voters in the State. The large increase in
our school facilities, and in the attendance of pupils, are there-
fore subjects of congratulation. The number of schools in
1877 was 656, with an attendance of 29,678 pupils. In 1880
there were 1,131 schools with 39,315 pupils, and for the scho-
lastic year beginning October 1, 1882, we have 1,326 schools,
with 51,945 pupils.
The principal of our common school fund has also increased
in a most satisfactory manner. Indeed, the increase in the
last two years has been unprecedented in the history of the
fund. From a fund of $246,900 in January, 1881, we have
now $323,535.42,. showing an increase of $76,635.42 in the
principal of the fund in the last two years. This fund is
chiefly derived from the sale of lands known as the six-
teenth sections," granted the State by Congress for educational
purposes.
The Board of Education, learning that there was still due
the State of Florida for school lands under the provisions of
the acts of Congress approved May 26, 1826, June 15, 1874,
and February 26, 1859, nearly 80,000 acres, employed the
Hon. Walter Gwynn to make selections from the United
States lands within the State to supply the deficiency. Mr.
Gwynn did his work efficiently and made most excellent se-
lections. The lists were forwarded to the United States Inte-
rior Department for approval, and selections amounting to
43,745 99-100 acres have already been approved. The remain-
der, it is hoped, will be in a short time. We have 561,728 acres
of land belonging to the school fund yet unsold, and 33,820
acres belonging to the seminary fund.
In this connection, I may add, that while popular education
is a duty belonging to the respective States, and a matter of
local policy which should be under the management of local
Government, yet owing to the peculiar condition of the South,
our resources are insufficient to furnish all the assistance re-







30



quired for the education of our large illiterate population.
The right of Congress to contribute to general education in
the several States has not been questioned, and the public do-
main, amounting to over one billion of acres, furnishes ample
means to secure so desirable a result. It is to be hoped, there-
fore, that the general Government, appreciating the great
necessity for such a course, will still further add to the educa-
tional resources of the country, to be applied through the
agency of the various State organizations.
DEAF MUTES.
I cannot forbear in this connection calling your attention
to the entire absence of any legislation for the education of
that unfortunate class of our population known as deaf mutes.
There are in the State, as shown by the last census, 119 ; of
these 58 are white and 6i colored. There are under the age
of 25, and now urgently requiring educational facilities, 78.
Of this number 32 are white and 46 colored. I can imagine
of no class of our citizens who are so entirely dependent upon
education, and I sincerely trust that the subject may receive
your careful and favorable consideration. Some portion of
the common school fund should be set apart, under the direc-
tion of the State Board of Education, for this praiseworthy
object.
AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE FUND.
Under the act of Congress of July 2, 18G2, there was granted
to each State thirty thousand acres of land for each Senator
and Representative of said State under the census of 1860.
The conditions of the grant were that the interest shall be
inviolably appropriated to the endowment, support and main-
tenance of at least one college where the leading object shall
be, without excluding other scientific and classical studies, and
including military tactics, to teach such branches of learning
as aie related to agriculture and the mechanic arts, in such
manner as the Legislatures of the States may respectively pre-
scribe.". The act also provided that no portion of said fund,
nor the interest thereon, shall be applied directly or indirectly,
under any pretense whatever, to the purchase, erection, pres-
ervation, or repair of any building or buildings."






31



Under this grant Florida received ninety thousand acres,
which was sold for $81,000. The proceeds of the sale were
invested in $100,000 of Florida bonds. The interest has since
been invested, and the fund now has an income of about $9,000
per annum. As no portion of the fund, nor the interest, can
be applied to building purposes, no Institution has been estab-
lished.
In view of the fact that the Trustees of this fund will
meet in Tallahassee on the 9th of January, to take into consid-
eration the best means of utilizing the income of this fund for
Educational purposes, I deem it proper to withhold my recom-
mendations until their report is received. I will then take
pleasure in laying it before the Legislature, with such sugges-
tions as may be deemed advisable.
IMMIGRATION.
The Bureau of Immigration, upon accepting the resignation
of Hon. Seth French, as Commissioner, appointed Hon. A. A.
Robinson to the position, with head quarters at the Capitol.
A branch was established at Jacksonville under the direction
of Mr. Samuel Fairbanks. Upon the death of this efficient
officer and honored citizen, the Hon. Columbus Drew was ap-
pointed by the Commissioner, with the sanction of the mem-
bers of the Bureau, to fill the vacancy. The Commissioner, in
addition to his efficient work in other respects, has prepared
and had published 20,000 copies of an immigration pamphlet,
treating upon the resources, advantages, climatic condition,
&c., of the State. For full information reg.u-ding the details
of the work connected with the position I respectfully refer
you to his report.
Public lands and climate are useless without population.
People constitute the State, and as the tide of immigration is be-
ing turned to Florida, from her varied resources being published
to the world, it would be a misfortune to slacken any of our
efforts in that direction. Rather let them be invigorated. The
Commissioner of Agriculture calls a convention of the agri-
culturists of the United States, and Florida is not represented--
Congresses of Forestry are held and we have no representation
-Cotton Planters' Associations meet, and when Florida is






32



called, there is no response. Why is this ? Because the means
at the disposal of the Bureau are 'so scant that we have no
surplus with which to send delegates. We have citizens fully
capacitated for the various positions, but individuals cannot be
expected to give their time and talents, and at the same time
pay their own expenses. Another cotton exposition, upon a
gigantic scale, will be held during the present year-shall
Florida be represented at these various associations ? It is for
the Legislature to answer.
ATLANTA EXPOSITION.
During the fall and winter of 1881, the Cotton Exposition
of Atlanta was opened for visitors. It was not only an exhi-
bition of all the improved machinery for the cultivation, hand-
ling and manufacturing of cotton, but embraced a wide field in
everything tending to the development and wealth of the
country. It was, in the full sense of the term, a World's
Fair"-the first ever held in the South. Feeling the impor-
tance of Florida's being represented, and at the same time fet-
tered by having no appropriation for such a purpose, I ap-
pealed to the Immigration Convention that met in Jackson-
ville in the summer of 1881 to take the matter in charge, and
have our State properly represented. A committee was ap-
pointed who did most efficient work. Contributions were
asked for, and liberally responded to, by some of our generous
citizens. Florida had a separate building and her display of
agricultural productions and tropical and semi-tropical fruits,
attracted the attention of the vast throng of visitors who daily
visited the exposition grounds. Her success was fully demon-
strated in the fact of her securing the first premiums for sisal
hemp, sugar cane, rice, sea-island cotton, oranges and lemons.
For the best collection of agricultural productions, in competi-
tion with the vast number of States there represented, but one
State surpassed her, and she was awarded the second pre-
mium.
Having nothing but voluntary contributions to rely upon,
the managers were involved in pecuniary embarassments, and at
one time the building itself was in danger of being taken for these
obligations. To prevent such a stigma falling upon our State, a






33



number of leading gentlemen borrowed, upon their own responsi-
bility, a sum, including interest up to March 1st, 1883, of $725,
to liquidate the claim. As the State was vastly benefitted by
the exhibit there made, and advertised in a more practical
manner than by any other possible process, I respectfully re-
commend that that amount be appropriated to meet the
claim. In the midst of her triumphs, however, with her gen-
erous rivals, Florida was called upon to mourn the loss of one
of her most active and enterprising citizens. Mr. D. S. Place,
who was in charge of the State exhibit, fell at his post in the
discharge of his arduous duties-respected and honored by
all.
INDIAN WAR CLAIMS.
What is known as the Indian Trust Fund of the United
States holds $132,000 of our bonds, with a large amount of in-
terest due thereon. It.has been properly excluded from the
interest bearing debt of the State, for the satisfactory reason
that the State holds valid and legitimate claims against the
General Government for necessary expenses incurred in sup-
pressing Indian hostilities. The claim of the State is much
larger than the amount due the Indian Trust Fund, if the
United States Government allows the State the same interest
claimed against her. With the exception of an effort made in
1860, no step was taken to settle this important matter until
Governor Drew appointed Colonel S. I. Wailes, of Washing-
ton City, who associated with him the late Col. W. K. Beard,
of Tallahassee, as agents of the State, to settle the claims, with
the understanding that their fee was to be a contingent one of
fifteen per cent. of the amount collected.
When the matter was presented to the Treasury Department,
the objection was made that no State claim could be adjusted
without the authority of Congress. A resolution was intro-
duced by our Senators and Representatives to carry out this
decision, and after a considerable delay passed both houses, re-
ferring the matter to the Secretary of War. A report from
that official has been made, allowing the State $225,648.09. If
the State is allowed interest, as the General Government
charges against her, she will be entitled to a considerable sum
3A






34



above her indebtedness. It is hoped that Congress at an
early day will take action upon this long deferred, but just and
equitable claim.
STATE WEATHER SERVICE.
My attention was called, as far back as June, 1881, by the
chief signal officer of the U. S. army, to the importance of each
State establishing a weather signal service. I am convinced
that great good will result from a united effort on the part of
the several States to organize such a service; and that it will
prove of great benefit to the people interested in various
branches of industry,-as well as serve the interests of science
in determining the accurate climatic conditions of each section.
It will utilize every feature of the weather that affects the pros-
perity of the inhabitants of the State as to crops, health, life,
etc., and utilize all local climatic data by which we will event-
ually be able to define precisely the localities most favorable
or unfavorable to special crops, diseases, &c.
It may be entirely volunteer and under the charge of some
appointee, or it may be made a part of the duties of some offi-
cer, or the president or professor of some of our literary insti-
tutions. In this manner it need not cost the State anything,
and by each county having a voluntary observer or making it the
duty of some county official to perform the duty, the cause of sci-
ence will not only be advanced, but a fund of climatic informa-
tion be secured of great benefit to our State. The instruments,
which are few, need not at first cost over $15 or $20. The
chief signal officer at Washington will, I am informed, cheer-
fully furnish all information, and transmit through our service
any information of importance regarding storms, frosts, floods,
etc. Many of the States are acting upon the suggestion, and
I commend it to your favorable consideration.
INSANE ASYLUM.
During the past two years this institution has been under
the immediate charge and supervision of Dr. James H. Ran-
dolph as Superintendent, assisted by Dr. W. B. Foreman, the
Commissioners of Public Institutions having a general direc-
tion, as the law requires. The management of the institution






35



has been excellent, and the treatment of the patients tending
to their restoration as well as their comfort and contentment.
A neat chapel has been fitted up and supplied with the neces-
sary furniture, as well as an organ. Ministers have been en-
gaged, who hold at regular intervals Divine service. An ad-
dition that was greatly needed has been made, by erecting a
substantial brick building containing fourteen rooms. Regu-
lar monthly reports and abstracts of all expenditures, accom-
panied by proper vouchers, are made to the Board. Consider-
ing the number of patients, and the cost to the State of deliv-
ering them at the asylum, the expenditures have been not only
judicious but economical.
On January 1, 1881, there were 95 inmates in the institution.
During the last two years there have been admitted 112 ; dis-
charged, 50 ; died, 26 ; escaped, 8; re-admitted, 5 ; leaving on
hand January 1, 1883, 128. Of this number there are 36
white males, 44 white females, 27 colored males, and 21 colored
females.
STATE CONVICTS.
From being a large expense to the State under the former sys-
tem the convicts have become a source of revenue, while their
improved condition shows that they have been properly cared
for. The East Florida Railway Company has had them in
charge for the last two years, and I take pleasure in stating,
has complied with the contract in furnishing proper food,
clothing, etc. The company received the convicts at the sev-
eral jails, and paid all expenses after conviction, and in addi-
tion has paid into the State Treasury over six thousand dollars
for their services for the last two years.
As the lease expired on the 31st of December, 1882, the Ad-
jutant-General, under the direction of the Commissioners of
State Institutions, advertised for bids for the hire of said con-
victs for the years 1883 and 1884. Mr. F. AI. Wood, agent for
Mr. C. K. Dutton, offering the highest bid, it was accepted.
He is to receive the prisoners at the jails, paying all expenses
after conviction, furnish them proper food, clothing, etc., and
pay to the State $9,200 for their services for the next two
years.







36

The following tabulated statement of convicts for 1881 and
1882 may be of interest:
1881.
Number of convicts on hand December 31, 1880, and deliv-
ered to the Ea-t Florida Railway Company............... 129
Number of convicts delivered to E lss Florida Railway Com-
p;ny during 1881 .......................... .. ........... 101
Of this number there were discharged in 1881 ............... 49
Pardoned....................... 4
Escaped ........................ 13
Died ........................... 14
Se nteuce commuted............. 1
Number on haun January 1, 1882........................ 149
230 230
1882.
Number of convicts on hand January 1,1882 ............... 149
Delivered to East Florida R tilway Com-
pany during lie year 1882............ 69
Of this number there were in 1882 discharged............... 55
Pardoned ................ 3
Escaped ................. 5
D ied..................... 10
N umber on hand ........................................ 135
208 208
The number of convicts sentenced in 1882, as compared with
1881, shows a very large decrease, and speaks well for the
proper enforcement of the law, and a better moral condition.
ARREST OF CRIMINALS.

There are criminal cases of urgent moment, that require
proper rewards to insure the ends of justice, and the arrest
and return of criminals, who have escaped to other States, at
times necessitates some public expenditure. The last Legisla-
ture omitted to make any appropriation for these purposes.
I have had to use a portion of the contingent fund in such
cases, but it would have proven entirely inadequate had many
of the rewards been called for. It is due to the cause of jus-
tice that an appropriation for this purpose be made. In this
connection, it is proper to state, that criminals from counties
having no jails, are frequently ordered by the Circuit Judges,
for safe keeping, to be delivered over to the sheriffs of coun-







37



ties having jails. The sheriffs have no power to refuse the
prisoners, but they have no power to collect their proper fees
for feeding and keeping them. It should be made obligatory
upon the counties furnishing the Criminals to provide the
means of paying for their support, before the sheriffs of other
counties are compelled to receive them.
SETTLERS IN ST. JOHNS COUNTY.
A former Board of Trustees sold to certain settlers in the
county of St. Johns for cash, lands which said Trustees sup-
posed they held valid titles to. The settlers in .many instances
improved and cultivated said lands at considerable expense.
After the sale and improvements, the courts decided that these
lands belonged to the St. Johns Railway Company in con-
formity to a land grant made by the State to said Company.
The last Legislature passed an act (Chapter 3321) directing
the Trustees to make a settlement with the Railroad Com-
pany in order to protect the settlers in their improvements.
At that time the entire fund was deeply involved in debt, and
the United States Court had assumed practical control of the
fund to protect the creditors. Every dollar received from the
sale of land by the Trustees had to be reported to the Court,
and all the surplus, after paying certain specified expenses in
the management of the fund, had to be turned over monthly
to the Receiver of the Court. It was thus rendered impracti-
cable to carry out the intention of the Legislature in its praise-
worthy act. As soon, however, as the Disston sale was made,
and money sufficient to practically relieve the fund had been
received, the Board of Trustees opened negotiations with said
Railroad Company to secure the settlers in their claims and
carry out the intention of the Legislature.
I am happy .to state that it is confidently expected that
these negotiations will be closed at an early day. The Trus-
tees have agreed to pay over to the Railroad Company the
same amount of money they received for the lands, in consid-
eratiol of which the company has agreed to relinquish all
claims to the lands in question. Thus a matter, pregnant with
evil forebodings to a considerable number of our citizens will
be equitably and satisfactorily settled.







38



CONSTITUTIONAL CONVENTION.
The last Legislature passed a resolution looking to the call-
ing of a Constitutional Convention for an entire revision of
the organic law of the State. That the Constitution needs
revision in many important particulars, is, I believe, conceded
by all. Indeed, in all its departments, Legislative, Executive
and Judicial, important changes are required in the interest of
economy, and to more properly conform it to the requirements
of the people and the true principles of Republican Govern-
ment.
As this is a subject, which, under the Constitution, appertains
largely to your department of the Government, the people,
"whose interests you have the deepest solicitude for, look to
you to give it the most serious consideration, and I feel that
I have not exceeded my duty in thus referring to it, and ex-
pressing the hope that moderation, sound judgment, as well
as a due regard for differences of opinion, may characterize your
action.
DIGEST OF THE LAWS.
Under the laws of Florida, Chapter 3240, the Governor and
Comptroller were authorized to secure, on just and reasonable
terms, the publication of the Digest prepared by the Hon.
James F. McClellan, after the said McClellan embodied in the
same all laws of a general or public nature passed by the
eleventh session of the Legislature, and after its revision by
the Hon. C. C. Yonge. In accordance with said.act the Comp-
troller received bids from Boston, Philadelphia, Chicago,
Charleston, Atlanta, Savannah and Tallahassee. The bid
from Tallahassee being the lowest and best bid, the contract
was awarded to C. E. Dyke. Three thousand five hundred
copies were printed, and fifteen hundred copies bound in
good law sheep," as the statute required. The Secretary of
State has distributed to the various counties, in accordance
with law, a sufficient number for the county officers, and paid
over to the Treasurer $798 for volumes sold.
CAPITOL FURNITURE, &C.
The last Assembly passed a Resolution directing the Adju-
tant-General to purchase suitable desks for the Assembly Hall.







39



In pursuance of said Resolution seventy-six desks for mem-
bers and one Secretary's desk have been purchased, with
chairs suitable for the same. As the last Legislature made
no appropriation to carry out the Resolution of the Assembly,
it is proper that the amount be placed in the appropriation
bill.
The Capitol is in need of repairs. The roof is in poor con-
dition-floors are required for some of the basement rooms,
and the entire building needs painting. I hope that an ap-
propriation sufficient for the purpose will be made.
REPORTS OF DEPARTMENTS.
I have the honor of transmitting herewith full reports from
the various departments, treating more fully of all the details
connected with the operations of the State Government, for the
last two years. I ask for these reports a careful examination,
as they treat upon many important questions and give a vari-
ety of information that is impossible as well as unnecessary
to embrace in this communication.
CONCLUSION.
To relieve our Internal Improvement Fund from a debt that
has paralyzed our energies for over half a generation-to
greatly invigorate our railroad system and thus furnish trans-
portation to portions of the State long needing the same-to
secure a constant and growing tide of immigration and capital
from all sections-to largely reduce taxes and relieve the peo-
ple, while maintaining the credit of the State-to increase our
school facilities and furnish the opportunities of education to
a much larger portion of the youth of the State-to set in op-
eration the capital and machinery to reclaim from a wilderness
of water a large proportion of our extreme Southern territory
-are some of the results of the last two years.
Trusting that your actions may, under the guidance of an
All-wise Providence, further tend to the development and pros-
phrity of the State, I have the honor to remain,
Very respectfully,
W. D. BLOXHAM, Governor.
Which was read.






40



On motion of Mr. Bryan of Orange, the Assembly ordered
one thousand copies printed for the use of the Assembly.
Mr. Bryan, of Orange, moved that the Assembly proceed to
the election of Enrolling Clerk;
Which was agreed to.
Mr. Getzen nominated Mr. Fred. L. Robertson, of Her-
nando.
Mr. Robinson, of Nassau, nominated Mr. Fred. Hunt, of Nas-
sau.
Mr. Byrd nominated Mr. O. B. Armstrong, of Leon.
Mr. Whetmore nominated Mr. W. W. Woodward, of Leon.
The vote was:
For BLANK-Messrs. Baker, Cobb, Cowgill, Hendry, Lewey,
Lyle, Melvin, McCormick, Trapp and Wilkerson-10.
For WooDWARD-Messrs. Osgood, Stripling and Whetmore
-3.
For ROBERTSON-Mr. Speaker, Messrs. Allison, Bethel,
Bevill, Blackwell, Blitch, Brelsford. Bryan of Orange, Bry-
ant of Polk, Calk, Campbell, Canova. Cassady, Clyatt, Colee,
Edwards, Floyd, Gaskins, Getzen, Goodbread, Grady, Harris,
Keathly, Kickliter, Mabry, Milton, Moore, McClellan of Jack-
son, McLellan of Santa Rosa, McLeol, McMullen, Neal, Per-
kins, Platt, Robinson of Jackson, Sindorf. Tompkins, Town-
send, Tully, Vaughn, Ward, Whidden, Wilcox and Wilde--
44
For ARMlSTRONG-Messrs. Bird, Davis, Jenkins, Munroe,
McCardy, Proctor and Rollins-7.
For HUNT-- Messrs. Brown, Robinson of Nassau, Thompson,
White and Wilkinson-5.
Mr. Robertson having received a majority of all the votes
was declared elected Enrolling Clerk of the Assembly.
The following clerks' elect, D. G. McLeod, Assistant Clerk,
W. H. Reynolds, Reading Clerk, Hardee Bryant, Recording
Clerk, J. A. Colson, Engrossing Clerk, and. F. L. Robertson,
Recording Clerk, came forward and were sworn in by the
Speaker.
On motion of Mr. Neal, the Assembly adjourned until to-
morrow 10 o'clock A. M.






41



THURSDAY, January 4, 1883.

The Assembly met pursuant to adjournment.
The roll being called the following members answered to
their names:
Mr. Speaker, Messrs. Allison, Bethel, Bevill, Bird, Black-
well, Blitch, Brelsford, Brown, Bryan of Orange, Bryant of
Polk, Calk, Campbell, Canova, Cassady, Cobb, Clyatt, Colee,
Cowgill, Davis, Dennis, Edwards, Floyd, Gaskins, Getzen,
Goodbread, Grady, Hall, Harris, Hendry, Keathly, Kickliter,
Lyle, Mabry, Melvin, Miller,. Milton, Moore, Munroe, Mc-
Cardy, McClellan of Jackson, McLellan of Santa Rosa, Mc-
Cormick, McLeod, McMullen, Neal, Osgood, Perkins, Platt,
Proctor, Putnam, Rollins, Robinson of Jackson, Robinson of
Nassau, Sindorf, Stripling, Thompson, Tompkins, Townsend,
Trapp, Tully, Vaughn, Ward, Weeks, Whidden, White, Wet-
more, Wilcox, Wilder, Wilkerson and Wilkinson-71.
A quorum present.
Prayer by the Chaplain.
On motion of Mr. Neal, the reading of yesterday's Journal
was dispensed with and the Journal approved.
The Speaker announced the following Standing Commit-
tees:
STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE ASSEMBLY.

On Judiciary:
Mr. McCLELLAN, Chairman.
Messrs. BLACKWELL, MILTON,
MABRY, STRIPLING,
MILLER, LEWEY.
On Finance and Taxation:
Mr. GETZEN, Chairman.
Messrs. BRYAN, GRADY,
CANOVA, GASKINS,
HALL, COWGILL.
LEWEY,
On Commerce and Navigation :
Mr. BETHEL, Chairman.
Messrs. FLOYD, GRADY,
McMULLEN, PERKINS,
MELVIN, McCORMICK,
COBB, ROLLINS.







42



On Public Printing:



Mr. HARRIS,
Messrs. McCLELLAN,
McMULLEN,
WILKERSON,



Chairman.
GASKINS,
BEVILL,
BROWN.



On Engrossed Bills:
Mr. CASSADY, Chairman.
Messrs. COLEE, WILCOX,
ALLISON, TOMPKINS,
PROCTOR, PUTNAM.
On Enrolled Bills:
Mr. MILTON, Chairman.
Messrs. GRADY, WILCOX,
McLEOD, HALL,
BROWN, COWGILL.
On State Institutions:
Mr. NEAL, Chairman.
Messrs. WILDER, FLOYD,
CALK, WARD,
OSGOOD, THOMPSON.
On Public Lands:
Mr. BRYANT, Chairman.
Messrs. GETZEN, BLITCH,
TULLY, SINDORF,
WHITE, RUSH.
On Militia :
Mr. WHIDDEN, Chairman.
Messrs. KICKLITER, VAUGHN,
MELVIN, JENKINS.
On Privileges and Elections:
Mr. BLACKWELL, Chairman.
Messrs. ROBINSON, of Jackson, BRYANT,
EDWARDS, HALL,
DENNIS, OSGOOD.
On Education :
Mr. HARRIS, Chairman.
Messrs. MOORE, WILCOX,
CASSADY, HENRY,
LEWEY, WILKERSON.







43



On Legislative Expenses :
Mr. WILCOX, Chairman.
Messrs. NEAL, BRYANT,
MoLEOD, HALL,
WITHERSPOON, BROWN.
On Claims:
Mr. CANOVA, Chairman.
Messrs. CAMPBELL, GETZEN,
WILDER, BAKER,
PUTNAM, TRAPP.
On City and County Organization:
Mr. EDWARDS, Chairman.
Messrs. McLEOD, BLITCH,
CASSADY, TOWNSEND,
BEVILL, WILKERSON,
COBB.

On Agriculture:
Mr. MOORE, Chairman.
Messrs. CAMPBELL, KICKLITER,
CLYATT, SINDORF,
WETMORE, DAVIS.

On Railroads and Canals:



Mr. GASKINS,



Messrs. MOORE,
KEATHLY,
STRIPLING,
COBB,



Chairman.
McLELLAN,
GRADY,
MILLER,
DENNIS.



On Immigration :
Mr. KEATHLY, Chairman.
Messrs. ROBINSON, of Jackson, EDWARDS,
PLATT, BEVILL,
WEEKS, ROBINSON, of Nassau.
On Indian Affairs:
Mr. BRYANT, Chairman.
M6ssrs. PLATT, PERKINS,
LYLE, WILKINSON.







44



On Corporations:
Mr. MABRY, Chairman.
Messrs. MOORE, MILTON,
GASKINS, MUNROE,
DENNIS, McCARDY.
On Post Routes:
Mr. FLOYD, Chairman.
Messrs. CALK, GOODBREAD,
McMULLEN, HENDRY,
PROCTOR, BIRD.
On Appropriations :
Mr. BRYAN, Chairman.
Messrs. CAMPBELL, McCLELLAN,
CANONA, BAKER,
WITHERSPOON, BRELSFORD.

The Speaker, in accordance and pursuance of resolution
adopted yesterday, made the following appointments:
Assistant Sergeant-at-Arms and Messenger--A. W. Mc-
Leran;
Pages-Robert Kidd, Geo. E. Bryson;
Janitors-Buck Floyd, Geo. Dice;
Chaplain-Rev. Mr. Allison.
Mr. Miller moved to have one thousand copies of the ac-
companying documents to the Governor's Message printed
with the message.
Mr. Bryan, of Orange, moved to refer the motion to the
Committee on Printing;
Which was agreed to.
Mr. Bryant, of Polk, moved that five hundred copies of
the daily journal be printed for the use of the Assembly.
Mr. Miller moved to amend by striking out 500 and insert-
ing 1,000;
Which was not agreed to.
Mr. Dennis moved to amend by striking out 500 and insert-
ing 900;
Upon which the yeas and nays were called for.
The vote was:
Yeas-Messrs. Baker, Bird, Blackwell, Brelsford, Brown,
Cassady, Cobb, Davis, Dennis, Edwards, Hall, Harris. Jenkins,
Kickliter, Lewey, Mabry, Melvin, Miller, Milton, McCardcy,
McCormick, McLeod, Osgood, Proctor, Putnam, Rollins, Rob-
inson of Nassau, Robinson of Jackson, Stripling, Thompson,







45



Tompkins, Townsend, Trapp, Vaughn, Ward, Weeks, White,
Wetmore, Wilder, Wilkerson, Wilkinson and Witherspoon-
42.
Nays-Mr. Speaker, Messrs. Allison, Bethel, Blitch, Bryan
of Orange, Bryant of Polk, Calk, Campbell, Canova, Clyatt,
Colee, Cowgill, Floyd, Gaskins, Getzen, Goodbread, Grady,
Hendry, Keathly, Lyle, Moore, Munroe, McLellan of Santa
Rosa, McMullen, Neal, Perkins, Platt, Sindorf, Tully, Whid-
den and Wilcox-31.
So the motion was agreed to, and the motion as amended
adopted.
Mr. Edwards moved that a committee of three from the As-
sembly be appointed to act with a similar committee to be ap-
pointed by the Senate to examine the Comptroller's and Treas-
urer's books, and employ such clerical aid as may be neces-
sary ;
Which was agreed to, and Messrs. Edwards, Whidden and
Bryant of Polk, appointed such committee.
Mr. Bryan of Orange, Recording Clerk, elected on yester-
day, and Mr. McLeran, Assistant Sergeant-at-Arms and Mes-
senger, came forward and were sworn in by the Speaker.
Mr. Milton moved that the Sergeant-at-Arms be instructed
to select a seat for Hon. J. J. Harris, former Speaker of this
Assembly, nearer to the Speaker's stand, in consideration of
his health and former honorable position in this body;
Which was agreed to.
Mr. Bryant of Polk offered the following joint resolution:
WHEREAS, The present Constitution of the State of Florida
needs a general revision ; and whereas, frequent attempts have
been made by previous Legislatures to effect the necessary
changes by amendment to said Constitution, by and in the
manner directed by the present Constitution, and in every in-
stance, said attempts, since 1876, have been signal failures, I
therefore move the appointment of a joint committee of nine,
for the purpose of specially considering the convention ques-
tion, and to make a report as to the best remedy to be adopted
to meet the present exigency. Said committee to report at
the earliest practicable moment.
Mr. Mabrv moved as a substitute that the Speaker appoint
a select committee, to be composed of seven members, to whom
shall be referred the subject as to the necessity of a revision
of the Constitution of the State of Florida; and also whether
or not the Constitution can be revised by a convention called
in pursuance of an act of the Legislature in any other modes
than those provided in the Constitution; and that they make






46



a report of their acts in the premises to this House on Mon-
day the 8th day of January, 1883.
Mr. Harris offered the following as a substitute for the
whole matter:
WHEREAS, We believe that the highest interests of the State
of Florida, as well as the principles of free government, de-
mand the holding of a convention of the people ; and
TVhereas, The people themselves should have an opportunity
of expressing their will on the subject, unembarrassed by other
issues; therefore be it
Resolved, That the Judiciary Committee.of the Assembly
be, and they are hereby instructed to report, at the earliest
practicable moment, a bill for the calling of a convention, and
election of delegates thereto, providing in said bill thtt the
electors voting for delegates to such convention shall, by a
vote fbr or against a convention, express their wishes as. to
the holding of the same, the convention to be held in the event
that a majority of the electors voting on the question shall, by
their votes, signify a desire to have it held, otherwise not.
Mr. Bryan, of Orange, moved to lay the whole matter upon
the table;
Which was agreed to.
Mr. Harris moved,that a committee of seven be appointed,
to whom shall be referred all matters relating to a Convention,
Constitutional amendments and cognate subjects, unless other-
wise specially ordered by the Asssembly;
Which was agreed to.
Mr. Tompkins offered the following as an amendment to
Rule 58, in tle Rules of the Assembly:

RULE 58-ORDER OF BUSINESS.
1. Reading of the Journal.
2. Correction of the Journal.
3. Introduction of memorials, petitions or other papers ad-
dressed to the Assembly or to the Speaker thereof.
4. Introduction of resolutions and consideration of all reso-
lutions other than joint or concurrent resolutions.
5. Introduction of bills by call of counties.
6. Reports of Standing Committees
7. Reports of Select Committees.
ORDERS OF THE DAY.
1. Select orders of the day.
2. Consideration of bills and resolutions on their third read-
"ing.






47



3. Consideration of bills and resolutions on their second
reading.
4. Consideration of messages from the Senate.
5. Consideration of bills and resolutions on their first read-
ing.
6. Consideration of communications from the Governor and
other papers addressed to the Assembly or the Speaker
thereof;
Which was agreed to.
Mr. Weeks moved that the Sergeant-at-Arms be instructed
to pi.ocure one copy of McClellan's Digest of the Laws of
Florida for each member of the Assembly as early as possible.
Mr. Milton moved to amend by striking out each member
and inserting the Chairman of each Standing Committee of
the Assembly;"
Which was agreed to.
Mr. Miller moved that the Sergeant-at-Arms place one copy
of McClellan's Digest at some place in the hall where it shall
be accessible to all the members ;
Which was agreed to.
Mr. Getzen moved that the Governor's message be referred
by the Speaker to appropriate committees;
Which was agreed to.
The roll of counties being called the following bills were in-
troduced and read the first time and referred:
By Mr. Dennis:
Assembly bill No. 1:
To be entitled An act to Change the Name of an Adopted
Child;
Which was referred to the Committee on Judiciary.
By Mr. Wilkinson :
Assembly bill No. 2:
To be entitled An act for the Relief of Nick Howell, of Ma-
rion county;
Which was referred to the Judiciary Committee.
Also,
Assembly bill No. 3:
To be entitled An act to Change the Boundary Line be-
tween the Counties of Marion and Levy;
Which was referred to the Committee on City and County
Organizations.
Also,
Assembly bill No. 4:
To be entitled An act to Limit the Jurisdiction of Justices
of the Peace in Civil Cases to S50 ;
Which was referred to the Judiciary Committee.







48



By Mr. Miller:
Assembly bill No. 5:
To be entitled An act to Require the Judge of the Fifth Ju-
dicial Circuit to hold a Term of Court for Jail Delivery at the
Times and Places herein named;
-Which was referred to the Judiciary Committee.
Mr. Wetmore moved that a committee of fifteen on the part
of the Assembly, be appointed to act with like committee of
the Senate, to visit and investigate the condition of the In-
sane Asylum, and report to this body at as early a day as pos-
sible.
Mr. Stripling moved to amend by striking out 15" and in-
serting "5";
Which was agreed to, and motion as amended agreedto.
Mr. Stripling offered the following resolution:
Resolved, That a committee of seven, four upon the part of
the Assembly and three on the part of the Senate, be appoint-
ed to investigate and report the condition of the State con-
victs.
Resolved, That the Senate be requested to concur in this
resolution ;
Which was adopted.
Mr. Gaskins offered the following resolution:
Resolved, That a committee of three be appointed by the
Speaker to co-operate with a similar committee to be appointed
upon the part of the Senate, to investigate and report the con-
dition of the Internal Improvement Fund;
Which was adopted.
Mr. Bryan of Orange moved that representatives of the
press be invited to seats upon the floor, and that the Sergeant-
at-Arms be instructed to furnish them seats at the reporter's
table ;
Which was ageeed to.
Mr. Bryan of Orange moved that the Assembly adjourn un-
til 10 o'clock A. M. to-morrow;
Which was agreed to.





49



FRIDAY, January 5, 1883.

The Assembly met pursuant to adjournment.
The roll being called the following members answered to
their names:
Mr. Speaker, Messrs. Allison, Baker, Bethel, Bevill, Bird,
Blackwell, Blitch, Brelsford, Brown, Bryan of Orange, Bry-
ant of Polk, Calk, Campbell, Canova, Cassady, Cobb, Colee,
Cowgill, Davis, Edwards, Floyd, (Gaskins, Getzen, Good-
bread, Hall, Harris, Hendry, Jenkins, Keathly, Kickliter,
Lewey, Lyle, Mabry, Melvin, Miller, Milton, Moore, Mun-
roe, McCardy, McLellan of Santa Rosa, McCormick, McLeod,
McMullen, Osgood, Perkins, Platt, Proctor, Putnam, Rollins,
Robinson of Nassau, Robinson of Jackson, Sindorf, Strip-
ling, Thompson, Tompkins, Townsend, Trapp, Tully, Vaughn,
Ward, Weeks, Whidden, White, Wetmore, Wilcox, Wilder,
Wilkerson, Wilkinson and Witherspoon-70.
A quorum present.
Prayer by the Chaplain.
On motion of Mr. Osgood the reading of yesterday's journal
was dispensed with and the journal corrected and approved.
The Speaker announced the following committees:
Committee on Constitutional Amendments, &c.-Messrs.
Harris, Bryant of Polk, Whidden, Sindorf, Wilcox, Ward and
Lyle.
Committee to investigate Internal Improvement Fund-
Messrs. Gaskins, Getzen and Witherspoon.
On motion of Mr. Milton, Mr. McClellan of Jackson was
excused from attendance on the Assembly to-day on account
of sickness.
Mr. Wetmore moved that a committee of five be appointed
as a Standing Committee on Temperance;
Which was agreed to.
Mr. Bryan of Orange moved that Mr. Brelsford be added to
the Committee on Education;
Which was agreed to.
Mr Ward moved that a special committee of five be ap-
pointed by the Chair to draft a bill entitled an act to establish
a Railroad Commission for the State of Florida to prevent un-
just extortion and discrimination in rates charged for transpor-
tation of passengers and freight.
Mr. Miller moved to postpone the matter until to-morrow at
12 o'clock noon.
Mr. Lewey moved to postpone until Monday at 12 o'clock
noon. and be made the special order for that hour;
Which was agreed to.
4A






50



Mr. Hall moved that the Chair appoint a committee of
five to draft a bill for the purpose of establishing a system of
weather service for this State;
Which was not agreed to.
Mr. Harris moved that a committee of five be appointed to
draw up and present to this Assembly suitable resolutions
with reference to the death of the late Jasper N. Gonzalez,
Sergeant-at-Arms of the Assembly at its last session;
Which was agreed to.
Mr. Mabry offered a memorialof the fruit growers of Sum-
ter county in reference to the appointment of a Commissioner
of Agriculture, and to analyze commercial fertilizers intro-
duced for sale in the State of Florida;
Which was read and referred to the Committee on Agri-
culture.
Mr. Bryan of Orange moved that all memorials and resolu-
tions be real by their titles and referred to their appropriate
committees ;
Which was ageed to.
Mr. Bryant of Polk moved to take from the table resolutions
relative to Constitutional Convention and refer them to the
Special Committee on Constitutional Convention;
Which was agreed to.
Mr. Cowgill offered the following resolution:
Resolved, That the State Treasurer is hereby requested to
inform this Assembly what amount of money has been bor-
rowed under the provision of Chapter 3231, Laws of Florida,
approved January 29th, 1881, and the rate of interest paid
thereon, and the date of the repayment of the sum borrowed;
Which was adopted.
Mr. Miller offered a joint resolution asking that the surviv-
ing soldiers of 1835 and 1836 be placed upon the pension roll
of the United States, and that the soldiers of 1856 and 1857
be given bounty land;
Which was read and referred to the Committee on Militia.
Mr. Grady introduced a memorial asking Congress to appro-
priate forty thousand dollars to rebuild the lighthouse at Dog
Island, and forty thousand dollars to rebuild the lighthouse at
Cape San Bias, district of Apalachicola;
Which was read and referred to the Committee on Com-
merce and Navigation.
Mr. Grady also introduced a memorial asking Congress to
appropriate one hundred thousand dollars for the improvement
of Apalachicola bay channel, and fifty -thousand dollars for
Crooked River, Franklin county, Florida;






51



Which was read and referred to the Committee on Com-
merce and Navigation.
Mr. Cobb offered the following joint resolution:
Resolved, That a committee of five on the part of the As-
sembly be appointed to consider the matter of public health,
and that the Senate be requested to concur by the appoint-
ment of a similar committee, said committee to report by bill
or otherwise ;
Which was adopted.
Mr. Blackwell moved that two hundred copies of the rules of
the Assembly, with amendments thereto, be printed in pam-
phlet form for the use of the Assembly;
Which was agreed to.
The roll of counties being called, the following bils were in-
troduced, read and referred:
By Mr. Platt:
Assembly bill No. 6 :
To be entitled An act to amend An act for the assessment
and collection of Revenue.
Referred to committee on Finance and Taxation.
By Mr. Miller:
Assembly bill No. 7 :
To be entitled An act in reference to suits against corpora-
tions, (other than municipal) for abuse or non use of their cor-
porate franchises and powers.
Referred to the Judiciary committee.
By Mr. Whidden:
Assembly Bill no 8:
To be entitled An act to repeal Chapter 3151, Laws of Flor-
ida, being An act entitled An act to establish a Bureau of Im-
migration for the State of Florida, and to promote the rapid
settlement of the State lands.
Referred to the committee on Immigration.
Also,
Assembly bill No. 9 :
To be entitled An act for the adoption of Mattie Mizina and
Frederick Lee Messer
Referred to the Judiciary committee.
Also,
Assembly bill No. 10:
To be entitled An act for a minor to take charge of and
manage his own estate and enforce performance of contracts.
Referred to the Judiciary committee.
By Mr. Mabry:
Assembly bill No. 11:
To be entitled An act to amend An act to keep in good or-






52



der the public roads of this State, approved March 7, 1881.
Referred to Judiciary committee.
By Mr. Miller :
Assembly bill No. 12:
To be entitled An act relative to the treatment and dis-
cipline of prisoners in the several county jails of this State.
Referred to the committee on Judiciary.
Mr. Harris moved that the regular hour of meeting of the
Assembly be 10 o'clock A.M., until otherwise ordered;
Which was agreed to.
On motion of Mr. Harris, the Assembly adjourned.


STANDING RULES OF THE ASSEMBLY.


OF THE DUTIES AND POWERS OF THE SPEAKER.
RULE 1. The Speaker shall take the chair every day at the
hour to which the Assembly shall have adjourned, shall call
the members to order, and on the appearance of a quorum shall
proceed to business.
RULE 2. He shall preserve decorum and order, may speak to
points of order in preference to other members, and shall de-
cide all questions of order, subject to an appeal to the Assem-
bly by motion regularly seconded, and no other business shall
be in order till the question on the appeal shall have been de-
cided.
RULE 3. He shall declare all votes, but if any member rises
to doubt a vote the Speaker shall order a return of the number
voting in the affirmative and in the negative, without any fur-
*ther debate upon the question.
RULE 4. He shall rise to put a question or to address the
Assembly, but may read sitting.
RULE 5. In all cases the Speaker may vote.
RULE 6. When the Assembly shall determine to go into a
committee of tle whole Assembly, the Speaker shall appoint
the member who shall take the chair.
RULE 7. On all questions and motions whatsoever, the
Speaker shall take the sense of the Assembly by yeas and nays,
provided two of the members present shall so require. When
the yeas and nays are taker, the roll of the Assembly shall be
called in alphabetical order, and no member shall be allowed
to vote who shall not be upon the floor of the Assembly at the
time his name is called, or before the roll-call is finished.
RULE 8. He shall propound all questions in the order in







53



which they are moved, unless the subsequent motion be pre-
vious in its nature, except that in naming sums and fixing
times the largest sums and the longest time shall be put first.
RULE 9. After a motion is stated or read by the Speaker it
shall be deemed to be in possession of the Assembly, and shall
be disposed of by vote of the Assembly, but the mover may
withdraw it at any time before a decision or amendment, ex-
cept a motion to reconsider, which shall not be withdrawn
after the time has elapsed within which it could be originally
made.
RULE 10. When a question is under debate the Speaker shall
receive no motion but to adjourn, to lay on the table, for the
previous question, to postpone to a day certain, to commit, to
amend, or to postpone indefinitely, which several motions shall
have precedence in the order in which they stand arranged,
and a motion to strike out the enabling clause of a bill shall be
equivalent to a motion to postpone indefinitely. If an amend-
ment to any subject under consideration be laid on the table,
or postponed, such action shall not carry the subject-matter
with it.
RULE 11. He shall consider a motion to adjourn as always
first in order; and that motion, and the motions to lay on the
table, to take up from the table, and for yeas and nays, shall
be decided without debate.
RULE 12. He shall put the previous question in the following
form: Shall the main question be now put?" and all debate
upon the main question and pending amendments shall be sus-
pended until the previous question shall be decided. After the
adoption of the previous question, the sense. of the Assembly
shall forthwith be taken on pending amendments in their regu-
lar order, and then upon the main question.
RULE 13. On the previous question there shall be no debate.
RULE 14. When two or more members happen to rise at
once, the Speaker shall name the member who is first to speak.
RULE 15. All committees shall be appointed and announced
by the Speaker, unless otherwise specially directed by the As-
sembly.
RULE 16. The Speaker shall have the right to name any
member to perform the duties of the chair; but such substitu-
tion shall not extend beyond an adjournment.

OF THE DUTIES, RIGHTS AND DECORUM OF THE MEMBERS.

RULE 17. Every member, when about to speak, shall rise
and respectfully address the Speaker; shall confine himself to
the question under debate, and avoid personality, and shall sit








54



down when he has finished. No member shall speak out of his
place without leave of the Speaker.
RULE 18. No member speaking shall be interrupted by an-
other but by rising to call to order.
RULE 19. No member shall speak more than twice on one
question, without first obtaining leave of the Assembly ; nor
more than once, until the other members who have not spoken
shall speak, if they desire it.
RULE 20. When a vote has passed, it shall be in order for
any member of the majority to move for a consideration there-
of on the same or the succeeding day; and such motion (ex-
cept in the last week of the session) shall be placed first in the
orders of the day for the day succeeding that on which the
motion is made; and when a motion for reconsideration is de-
cided, that decision shall not be reconsidered, and no question
shall be twice reconsidered: Provided, howe ver, That a mo-
tion to reconsider a vote, upon any collateral matter, shall not
removeathe main subject under consideration from before the
Assembly, but shall be considered at the time when it is made.
RULE 21. Bills, resolves and other papers, except orders of
notice, in reference to which any member has a right to move
a reconsideration, shall remain in the possession of the Clerk
until the right of reconsideration has expired : Provided, That
the operation of this rule shall be suspended during the last
week of the session.
RULE 22. No member shall be obliged to be on more than
two committees at the same time; nor chairman of more than
one.
RULE 23. No member shall be permitted to stand up to the
interruption of another while any member is speaking, or to
pass unnecessarily between the Speaker of the Assembly and
the person speaking; nor shall any members be permitted in the
alleys, or in the area in front of the Chair, during the session
of the Assembly.
RULE 24. All proceedings of the Assembly, with closed
doors, and every matter rel:iting to the same, shall be kept
secret until after time Assembly shall remove the injunction
of secrecy.
RULE 25. Every member who shall neglect to give his at-
tendance in the Assembly for more than six days after tile
session commences, shall, on making his appearance therein,
be held to render tie reason of such neglect; and in case
the reason assigned shall be deemed by the Assembly sufi-
cient, such member shall be entitled to receive pay for his trav-
el, and not otherwise; and no member shall be absent more
than one day without leave of the Assembly, and a vote of leave







55



of absence shall be inoperative unless the member obtaining
it shall avail himself of it within five days.
RULE 26. When any member shall be guilty of a breach of
either of the.rules and orders of the Assembly, he may be re-
quired by the Assembly, on motion,to make satisfaction there-
for, and shall not be allowed to vote or speak, except by way
of excuse, till he has done so.
RULE 27. No member shall be permitted to vote, or serve
on any committee, in any question where his private right is
immediately concerned, distinct from the public interest.
RULE 28. Every member, who shall be in the Assembly
when a question is put, when he is not excluded by interest,
shall give his vote, unless the Assembly, lor special reasons,
shall excuse him. Any member desiring to be so excused on
any question shall make application to that effect before the
calling of the yeas and nays; and such application shall be
accompanied by a brief statement of reasons, and shall be de-
cided without debate.
RULE 29. Every motion shall be reduced to writing if the
Speaker shall so direct.
RULE 30. Any member may call for the division of a ques-
tion when the'sense will admit of it. A motion to strike out
and insert shall be deemed indivisible; but a motion to strike
out, being lost, shall neither preclude amendment nor a motion
to strike out and insert.
RULE 31. Motions and reports may be committed or re-
committed, at the pleasure of the Assembly.
RU.L.E 32. No motion or proposition of a subject different
from that under consideration shall be admitted under color
of amendment.
RUL:E .33. The unfinished business in which the Assembly
was engaged at tile time of the last adjourtment shall have the
preference in the orders of the day, next after motions for re-
consideration.
RIULE 34. No rule or order of the Assembly shall be dis-
pensed with or repealed unless a majority of the members
present shall consent thereto.
RULE 35. When a vote is doubted, the members for or
against the question, when called on by the Speaker, shall rise
and stand uncovered until they are counted.
RITULE :3;. All questions relating to the priority of business
to be acted upon shall be decided without debate.
RULE 37. When a motion is made to refer any subject. and
different committees' shall be proposed, the question shall be
taken in the following order: A Standing Committee of the
Assembly, a Joint Standing Committee, a Select Committee,
a Joint Select Committee.








56



RULE 38. It shall be the duty of each member of the As-
sembly who moves that any Standing Committee be instructed
to inquire into the expediency of amending any existing law
or laws, to point out the amendment which he -deems expe-
dient, in writing, to accompany his motion, or to furnish a
written statement thereof to such committee, if by them re-
quired.
RULE 39. No stranger shall be admitted to the seats of mem-
bers, or upon the floor of the Assembly, without leave of the
Speaker of consent of the Assembly.
OF PETITIONS, MEMORIALS, ETC.
RULE 40. All papers addressed to the Assembly. except
petitions, memorials and remonstrances, shall be presented by
the Speaker, or a member in his place, and shall be read by
the Speaker, Clerk or such other person as the Speaker may
request, and shall be taken up in the order in which they were
presented, unless where the Assembly shall otherwise direct.
RULE 41. Every member presenting to the Assembly a peti-
tion, memorial or remonstrance, shall endorse his name there-
on, with a brief statement of the nature and object of the iin-
strument, and the reading of the same from the Chair shall, in
all instances, be dispensed with, unless specially ordered by the
Assembly.
RULE 42. All reports, petitions, memorials, remonstrances,
and papers of a like nature, shall be presented during the first
hour oF each session of the Assembly, and at no other time;
and the Speaker shall call on the several divisions, in regular
succession, for such paper.
RULE 43. All applications for the use of the Assembly
Chamber shall be made, to and decided upon by, the Committee
on Public Building, subject, however, to the control and order
of the Assembly.
ON BILLS, RESOLUTIONS AND GRANTS.
RULE 44. Every bill, and all resolutions of a public nature,
or for the appropriation of the public money, shall receive
three readings previously to the final passage of such bill or
resolution; and the Clerk shall give notice of each, whether it
be the first, second or third readings, which readings shall be
on three different days, unless two-thirds of the members pres-
ent shall decide otherwise.
RULE 45. All bills and resolves shall be written in a fair,
round hand, without interlineations, on not less than one sheet
of paper, with suitable margins, and spaces between the several
sections or resolves.







57



RULE 46. At the second reading of any bill or resolution it
shall be in order for any member to move its commitment to a
Committee of the Whole House; that it lay on the table; for
its indefinite postponement; for its postponement to a day cer-
tain not beyond the session; for its commitment to a Stand-
ing Committee; to a Select Committee; or to amend; which
motion shall have precedence in the order above stated.
RULE 47. It shall not be in order to amend the title of any
bill or resolution until it shall have passed its third reading.
RULE 48. All bills or resolutions to be engrossed shall be ex-
ecuted in a fair, round hand, and without erasure or interlinea-
tions.
RULE 49. Before a bill or resolution requiring three readings
shall be read the third time, it shall be carefully engrossed,
under the direction of the Committee on Engrossed Bills, and
upon the third reading of the bill or resolution it shall not be
committed or amended without the consent of a majority of
the members present.
RULE 50. When a bill or resolution shall have passed its
third reading, it shall be certified by the Clerk, endorsing
thereon the day of its passage and be transmitted to the Sen-
ate, accompanied with a message stating the title of the bill or
resolution, and asking the concurrence of that body, and the
date of its transmission entered upon the journal.
COMMITTEES-THEIR POWERS AND DUTIES.
RULE 51. Bills committed to a committee of the whole As-
sembly shall be read and debated, or amended by clauses or
sections, leaving the title or preamble to be last considered.
The body of said bill shall not be interlined or defaced, but all
amendments, noting the page and line shall be duly entered by
the Clerk on separate paper, as the same shall be agreed to by
the committee, and so reported to the Assembly. After re-
port the bill shall again be subject to be debated and amended
by clauses or sections.
RULE 52. It shall be the duty of the Committee on Enrolled
Bills to report at any time.
OF COMMITTEES, THEIR POWERS AND DUTIES.
RUEE 53. The following Standing Committees shall be ap-
pointcd at the commencement of the political year, viz:
Judiciary, Claims,
Finance and Taxation, City and County Organization,
Inorporation, Education,
Militia, Legislative Expenditures,
Agricultural, Public Printing,







58



Enrolled Bills, Engrossed Bills,
Privileges and Elections, State Institutions,
Railroads, Public Lands,
Indian Affairs, Commerce and Navigation,
and each of these committees shall consist of five members.
RULE 54. All papers relative to any business before the
Assembly shall be left with the Clerk, by any member who
shall obtain leave of absence and may have any such papers in
his possession.
RULE 55. The chairman of any committee, except the stand-
ing committees, who shall have business referred to them, shall
make report of their doings therein within four days after
such reference.
RULE 56. All committees may report by bill, resolve or oth-
erwise.
RULE 57. Messages shall be transmitted to the Governor or
Senate by the Clerk or Sergeant-at-Arms.

RULE 58---ORDER. OF BUSINESS.

.1. Reading ot the Journal.
2. Correction of the Journal.
3. Introduction of memorials, petitions or other papers ad-
dressed to the Assembly or to the Speaker thereof.
4. Introduction of resolutions and consideration of all reso-
lutions other than joint or concurrent resolutions.
5. Introduction of bills by call of counties.
6. Reports of Standing Committees.
7. Reports of Select ; committees.

ORDERS OF THE D)AY.
I. Select orders of the day.
2. Consideration of bills and resolutions on their third read-
ing.
'. Consideration of biills and resolutions on their second
rei: ling.
4. Consideration of messages from the Senate.
5. Consideralion ot bills and resolutions on their first read-
ing.
Gi. Consideration of' communications from the Governor and
others papers addressed to the Assembly or the Speaker
thereof.
:ULE 59. The rule of Parliamentary practice comprised in
Jefferson's Manual shall govern the Assembly in all cases to
which they are applicable, and in which they are not incon-









sistent with the Standing Rules, order of the Assembly, or
the Joint Rules of the two branches of the Legislature.

JOINT RULES.
RULE 1. While bills are on their passage between the two
houses, they shall be on paper, and under signature of the Sec-
retary or Clerk of each house respectively.
RULE 2. After a bill shall have passed both houses it shall
be duly enrolled on parchment by the Clerk of the Assembly
or Secretary of the Senate, as the bill may have originated in
one or the other house, before it shall be presented to the (ov-
ernor of the State.
RULE 3. When bills are thus enrolled they shall be exam-
ined by a joint committee of two from the Senate and two
from the Assembly, appointed as a Standing Committee for
that purpose, who shall carefully compare the enrollment with
the engrossed bill as passed in the two houses, and correcting
any errors that may be discovered in the enrolled bills, make
their reports forthwith to their respective houses.
RULE 4. After examination and report, each bill shall be
signed in the respective houses, first, by the Speaker of tlhe
Assembly, then by the President of the Senate.
RULE 5. After a bill shall have been thus signed in each
house it shall be presented by the said committee to the Gov-
ernor of the State for his approbation, it being lirst endorsed
on the back of the roll, certifying in which house the same
originated, which endorsement shall be signed by the Secretary
of the Senate or Clerk (as the case may-be) of the Houses, in
which it did originate, and shall be entered on the journal of
each house. The said committee shall report the day of pre-
sentation to the Governor, which time shall also be carefully
entered on the journal of each house.
IULE 6. All orders, resolutions and votes which are to be
presented to the governorr of the State for his approbation,
shall. in the same manner, be previously enrolled, examined
and signed, and shall be presented in the same manner and by
the same committee as provided in cases of bills.







60



SATURDAY, January 6, 1883.
The Assembly met pursuant to adjournment.
The roll being called the following members answered to
their names:
Mr. Speaker, Messrs. Allison, Baker, Bethel, IBevill, Bird,
Blitch, Brelsford, Brown, Bryan of Orange, Bryant of Polk,
Calk, Campbell, Canova, Cassady, Cobb, Clyatt, Colee, Cow-
gill, Davis, Dennis, Edwards, Floyd, Gaskins, Getzen, Good-
bread, Grady, Hall, Harris, Hendry, Jenkins, Keathly, Kickliter,
Lewey, Lyle, Mabry, Melvin, Miller, Milton, Moore, McLellan of
Santa Rosa, McLeod, McMdllen, Neal, Osgood, Perkins, Platt,
Proctor, Putnam, Rollins, Robinson of Jackson, Robinson of
Nassau, Sindorf, Thompson, Tompkins, Townsend, Trapp,
Tully, Vaughn, Weeks, Whidden, White, Wetmore, Wilcox,
Wilder, Wilkerson, Wilkinson and Witherspoon-68.
A quorum present.
Prayer by the Chaplain, Rev. J. Y. Allison.
On motion of Mr. Neal the reading of yesterday's journal
was dispensed with and journal approved.
Mr. McClellan of Jackson, Mr. McCormick, Mr. Stripling,
and Mr. McCardy were excused from attendance on the session
to-day on account of sickness.
On motion of Mr. Moore, Mr. Allison was excused until
Monday on account of sickness in his family.
The following communication was received from the Treas-
urer:
TREASURER'S OFFICE,
TALLAHASSEE, Florida, Jan. 5, 1883.
HON. CHARLES DOUIIERTY,
Speaker of the Assembly :
SIR: Replying to a resolution of the Assembly, of even
date, inquiring amount of money borrowed under Chapter
3231, I have to report:
That the sum of ($40,000.00) forty thous ,nd dollars was bor-
rowed March 3, 1881, at the rate of ten per cent. per annum,
and that the whole sum was repaid in sixty days from date of
loan out of the taxes of the current year.
The amount paid for interest was seven hundred dollars
($700.00), and the whole amount borrowed was used to pay
the expenses of the Legislature of 1881.
Very respectfully,
HENRY A. L'ENGLE, Treasurer.
Which was read and ordered spread upon the journal.
Mr. Townsend introduced memorial No. 8, asking an appro-






61



priation to clear out and make navigable the Withlacoochee
river;
Which was read and placed among the orders of the day.
Mr. Bryant of Polk introduced Assembly memorial No. 9,
praying for an appropriation of fifty thousand dollars to clear
out and make navigable Peace Creek, in the State of Florida,
to Bartow, in the county of Polk;
Which was read and placed among the orders of the day.
Mr. Wilkerson offered a joint resolution relative to the elec-
tion of State Printer;
Which was read and placed among the orders of the day.
Mr. Colee offered the following resolution:
Resolved, That a Standing Committee on Public Roads and
Highways be appointed by the Speaker, to whom all matters
relating to Public Roads and Highways is to be referred;
Which, on motion of Mr. Dennis, was adopted.
Mr. Lewey offered the following preamble and resolutions:
WHEREAS, The members of the Assembly at the Twelfth
Session of the Legislature of the State-of Florida, have wit-
nessed with shame and regret the growing evils of intemper-
ance which are daily destroying and annihilating all hopes and
prospects of the youth of the State, thereby endangering the
progress and development of the better institutions of Florida;
and, whereas, the dangerous effects of spirituous liquors have
become so alarming within the limits of this State that legisla-
tion ought to be had restraining its traffic in order that the
commonwealth of Florida might be rescued from an impend-
ing ruin; therefore,
Resolved, That it is the sense of the Assembly that the
present session of this Legislature deem it wise and prudent
to take some steps, as in their judgment may be proper, to re-
strain the sale of intoxicating liquors;
Which was read, and on motion of Mr. Harris, referred to
the Committee on Temperance.
Mr. Getzen moved that the Chief Clerk be authorized to
have printed and furnished the chairmen of committees blank
committee reports;
Which was agreed to.
Mr. Tompkins gave notice that at an early day he would
ask leave to introduce-
A bill to be entitled an act reducing the pay of members of
this Legislature; also,
A bill to be entitled an act reducing the license tax on spir-
ituous liquors;
Mr. Blackwell moved that the Sergeant-at-Arms be instruc-
ted to procure for the use of the Chairman of each Standing






62



Committee one copy each of the acts of the last Legislature.
Mr. Osgood moved to amend by inserting also one copy
each for the members of the Assembly;"
Which was agreed to, and the motion as amended adopted.
The roll of counties being called, the following bills were
introduced, read and placed among the orders of the day.
By Mr. Getzen:
Assembly bill No. 13:
To be entitled an act to declare William C. Collins a citizen
of Columbia county.
By Mr. Tompkins:
Assembly bill No. 14:
To be entitled an act to amend an act for the Assessment
and Collection of Revenue.
By Mr. Moore:
Assembly bill No. 15 :
To be entitled an act to give the Circuit Courts and Justices
of the Peace concurrent Jurisdiction in certain cases.
By Mr. Edwards:
Assembly bill No. 16:
To be entitled an act to incorporate a Literary Institute in
the town of Starke, Bradford county, known as the Starke In-
stitute, and to authorize the same to confer Collegiate Degrees.
By Mr. Dennis:
Assembly bill No. 17 :
To be entitled an act relating to Public Records.
By Mr. Platt:
Assembly bill No. 18:
To be entitled an act to amend an act for the Assessment
and Collection of Revenue.
By Mr. Baker:
Assembly bill No. 19:
To be entitled an act to enable actual settlers to procure
homes.
By Mr. Keathly :
Assembly hill No. 20:
To be entitled an act to prohibit the sale of intoxicating liq-
uors within the limits of any incorporated city or town in the
State of Florida.
By Mr. Keathly :
Assembly bill No. 21:
To be entitled an act to change the name of Luella Pippins
and John Waters Witley to Luella Roberts and John Waters
Roberts and for other purposes.
By Mr. Milton:
Assembly Bill No. 22:





63



To be entitled an act to change the name of an adopted
child.
By Mr. Weeks:
Assembly Bill No. 23:
To be entitled an act to amend Chapter 3285 of the Laws of
Florida, approved February 4, 1881.
By Mr. Weeks:
Asssmbly Bill No. 24:
To be entitled an act to repeal Chapter 3143, Laws of Flori-
da, approved March 8, 1879.
By Mr. Clyatt:
Assembly bill No. 25:
To be entitled an act in reference to the advertisement of
tax-sales and other official notices.
By Mr. Bethel:
Assembly bill No. 26:
To be entitled An act to establish boundary lines for the
moorage and anchorage of vessels in the harbors of the State
-of Florida.
By Mr. Perkins:
Assembly bill No. 27:
To be entitled An act to establish lost papers in Justices'
Courts.
By Mr. Bryan of Orange:
Assembly bill No. 28:
To be entitled An act for levying a tax for the years 1883
and 1884.
By Mr. Bryant of Polk:
Assembly bill No. 29:
To be entitled An act for the relief of John Davidson, Tax
Assessor for Polk county for the year 1871.
ORDERS OF THE DAY.
Assembly bill No. 13:
To be entitled An act to declare William C. Collins a citizen
of Columbia county,
Was read the tirst time and referred to Committee on
County Organization.
Assembly bill No. 14:
To be entitled An act to amend An act for the assessment
and collection of revenue,
Was read the first time and referred to Committee on Fi-
nance and Taxation.
Assembly bill No. 15 :
To be entitled An act to give the Circuit Courts and Jus-
tices of the Peace concurrent jurisdiction in certain cases,






64



Was read the first time and referred to Committee on Ju-
diciary.
Assembly bill No. 16:
To be entitled An act to incorporate a Literary Institution
in the town of Starke, Bradford county, known as Starke In-
stitute, and to authorize the same to confer Collegiate degrees,
Was read the first time and referred to Committee on Cor-
porations.
Assembly bill No. 17:
To be entitled an act relating to public records,
Was read the first time and referred to the Committee on
Judiciary.
Assembly bill No. 18:
To be entitled an act to amend an act for the assessment
and collection of revenue,
Was read the first time and referred to the Committee on
Finance and Taxation.
Assembly bill No. 19:
To be entitled an act to enable actual settlers to procure
homes,
Was read the first time and referred to the Committee on
Public Lands.
Assembly bill No. 20:
To be entitled an act to prohibit the sale of intoxicating
liquors within the limits of any incorporated city or town in
the State of Florida,
Was read the first time and referred to the Committee on
Judiciary.
Assembly bill No. 21:
To to be entitled an act to change the names of Luella Pip-
pins and John Waters Widley, and for other purposes,
Was read the first time and referred to the Committee on
Judiciary.
Assembly bill No. 22:
To be entitled an act to change the name of an adopted
child,
Was read the first time and referred to the Committee on
Judiciary.
Assembly bill No. 23:
To be entitled an act to amend Chapter 3285 of the Laws of
Florida, approved February 4, 1881,
Was read the first time and referred to the Committee on
Judiciary.
Assembly bill No. 24:
To be entitled an act to repeal Chapter 3143 of the Laws of
Florida, approved March 8, 1879,







Was read the first time and referred to the Committee on
Judiciary.
Assembly bill No. 25:
To be entitled an act in reference to the advertisement of
tax sales and other official notices,
Was read the first time and referred to the Committee on
J udiciary.
Assembly bill No. 26:
To be entitled an act to establish boundary lines for the
moorage and anchorage of vessels in the harbors of the State
of Florida,
Was read the first time and referred to the Committee on
Commerce and Navigation.
Assembly bill No. 27 :
To be entitled an act to establish lost papers in Justices'
Courts,
Was read the first time and referred to the Committee on
Judiciary.
Assembly bill No. 28:
To be entitled and act for levying taxes for the years 1883
and 1884,
Was read the first time and referred to the Committee on
Finance and Taxation.
Assembly bill No. 29:
To be entitled an act for the relief of John Davidson, Tax
Assessor for Polk county for the year 1871,
Was read the first time and referred to the Committee on
Claims.
Assembly v memorial No. 8 :
Asking for an appropriation to clear out and make navigable
the Withlacoochee river,
Was read the first time and referred to the Committee on
Commerce and Navigation.
Assembly memorial No. 9:
Praying for an appropriation of fifty thousand dollars to
clear out and make navigable Peace Creek, in the State of
Florida, to Bartow, in Polk county,
Was read the first time and referred to the Committee on
Commerce and Navigation.
Assembly joint resolution relative to the election of State
Printer,
Was read the first time and referred to the Committee on
Printing.
Under a suspension of the Rules Mr. Harris, Chairman of
the committee on Printing, made the following report:



5A






66



ASSEMBLY HALL, Jan'y 6th, 1883.
Hon. CHARLES DOUGHERTY, Speaker :
Your committee on Publie Printing respectfully ask for in-
structions as to the publication of public documents. The ac-
tion of the Assembly on the 4th inst. was to refer a mere
" motion to print to this committee, without indicating its
will on the subject, or clothing the committee with power to
act. The committee is ready to carry out the will of this body
as soon as such will shall have been made known.
Respectfully,
J. J. HARRIs,
Chairman.
Which was read.
Mr. Blackwell moved that one thousand copies of the docu-
ment accompanying the Governor's Message be printed for
the use of the Assembly.
Mr. Cobb moved to amend by striking out "one thousand "
and inserting five thousand."
Mr. Blackwell moved as a substitute that one thousand cop-
ies of the Governor's Message, together with the accompany-
ing documents, be printed together in pamphlet form for the
use of the Assembly.
Mr. Bryan of Orange moved that the entire matter be re-
committed to the committee on Printing;
Which was agreed to.
Under a suspension of the Rules, Mr. Miller offered a joint
resolution empowering the Clerk of the Supreme Court to
have reprinted the first, seventh, eighth and tenth volumes of
the Reports of the Supreme Court of the State of Florida ;
Which was read the first time and referred to the Judiciary
committee.
The Speaker announced the appointment of the following
Special Committees :
To visit the Convict Camps:
Messrs. Keathly, McLeod, Hall, Goodbread, Wilkerson.
Brown and McCardy.
To visit the Insane Asylum:
Messrs. Gaskins, Neal, Vaughn, Wilder, Bryan of Orange,
Wilcox, Bryant of Polk, Canova, Dennis and Ward.
On Temperance:
Messrs. Clyatt, McLellan of Santa Rosa, Townsend, Hen-
dry and Wetmore.
On motion of Mr. Osgood, Mr. Lewey was added to the
committee on Temperance.
On motion of Mr. Harris, the Assembly adjourned until
Monday, 10 o'clock, A. M.






67



MONDAY, January 8, 1883.
The Assembly met pursuant to adjournment.
The roll being called the following members answered to
their names:
Mr. Speaker, Messrs. Allison, Baker, Bethel, Bevill, Bird,
Blackwell, Blitch, Brelsford, Brown, Bryan of Orange, Bryant
of Polk, Calk, Campbell, Canova, Cassady, Cobb, Clyatt, Co-
lee, Cowgill, Dennis, Edwards, Floyd, Gaskins, Getzen, Good-
bread, Grady, Hall, Harris, Hendry, Jenkins, Keathly, Kick-
liter, Lewey, Lyle, Mabry, Melvin, Miller, Milton, Moore,
Munroe, McCardy, McClellan of Jackson, McCormick, McLeod,
McMullen, Neal. Osgood, Perkins, Platt, Putnam, Rollins,
Robinson of Nassau, Robinson of Jackson, Sindorf, Stripling,
Thompson, Tompkins, Townsend, Trapp, Tully, Vaughn, Ward,
Weeks, Whidden, White, Wetmore, Wilcox, Wilder, Wilker-
son, Wilkinson and Witherspoon-74
A quorum present.
Prayer by the Chaplain, Ilev. J. Y. Allison.
On motion of Mr. Brown, the reading of Saturday's journal
was dispensed with and the journal approved.
On motion of Mr. Cobb, Mr. McLellan of Santa Rosa was ex-
cused from attendance on the Assembly to-day on account of
"sickness.
Mr. Wetmore moved that the Speaker appoint one more Page
for the Assembly ;
Which was not agreed to.
Mr. Thompson moved that the names of Mr. Wetmore and
Mr. Melvin be added to the Committee to visit the Insane
Asylum.
Mlr. Osgood moved as an amendment that Mr. Cowgill be
added to the Committee.
Mr. Milton moved as an amendment to the amendment that
one member from each county be added to the Committee.
Mr. Neal moved as a substitute to the whole that the whole
Assembly visit the Asylum.
.Mr. Miller moved as an amendment to the substitute for the
whole, that this Assembly on next Saturday resolve itself into
a committee of tin whole and visit the Asylum.
Mr. Neal accepted the amendment.
Mr. Stripling moved to strike out Saturday and insert Tues-
day ;
Which was not agreed to.
The original substitute that the Assembly resolve itself into
a Committee of the Whole and visit the Insane Asylum on
Saturday next, was agreed to.







68



Mr. Tompkins moved that Messrs. Blackwell and Moore be
added to the Committee to visit the Convict Camp.
Mr. Cowgill moved that Mr. Lyle be added to the Commit-
ted to visit the Convict Camp.
Mr. McClellan moved that Mr. Calk be added to the Com-
mittee to visit the Convict Camp.
Mr. Witherspoon moved that Mr. Ward be added to the
Committee to visit the Convict Camp.
Mr. Harris moved that Mr. Munroe be added to the Com-
mittee to visit the Convict Camp.
Mr. Cowgill moved as a substitute that the Assembly resolve
itself into a Committee of the Wtiole upon a day hereafter to
be designated and visit the Convict Camp.
Mr. Bryan moved to lay the motion on the table;
Which was agreed to.
Mr. Milton moved that a Committee of one from each coun-
ty be appointed to visit the Convict Camp.
Mr. Neal moved as an amendment that the Committee to
visit the Convict Camp consist of the entire Assembly.
Mr. Keathly moved, as a substitute for th whole, that the
Committee appointed by the Speaker to visit the Convict
Camp, and all other members wishing to visit said camp, be
added to form such Committee.
Mr. Miller moved to amend by making the subject matter.
the special order for 12 o'clock on Friday next.
Mr. Harris moved that a committee of fifteen be appointed
to visit the Convict Camp.
Mr. Grady moved to lay the whole subject matter on the
table;
Which was :greed to.
Mr. Wilder offered the following resolution:
R-solved, That after the Legislature has been in session ten
days only four hundred copies of the Assembly Journal shall
be printed daily ;
Which was not adopted.
Mr. Brown moved that a special committee of five be ap-
pointed to examine McClellan's Digest of the Laws of Florida,
and report to this Assembly, as soon as practicable, conflicting
and contradictory clauses in the said Digest;
Which was not agreed to.
Mr. Canova moved that Mr Hall be added to the Committee
on Agriculture, and that Mr. Tompkins be added to the Com-
mittee on Railroads;
Which was not agreed to.
Mr. Lewey offered the following resolution:
Resolved, That one hundred and fifty copies of the Standing






69



Committees of the Assembly be printed for the use of the
members of the Assembly;
Which was not adopted.
Mr. Baker offered a memorial asking that obstructions of
Lee's Creek, on the Chipola River, be removed;
Which was placed among the orders of the day.
Mr. Robinson of Jackson offered the following resolution:
Resolved, That each member of the Assembly be required to
make out and deliver to the Sergeant-at-Arms a requisition
specifying the amount of stationery requisite for his use, and
receipt thereon upon reception of such stationery, and that
the Sergeant-at-Arms have printed the necessary blanks for
the use of the members in making such requisition;
Which was read and adopted.
Mr. Bevill offered the following resolution:
Resolved, That all joint resolutions proposing amendments
to the Constitution, and in reference to the calling of a Con-
vention for the revision of the Constitution, which have been
or may hereafter be presented to the Assembly, be spread upon
the journals in full;
Which was read and adopted.
Mr. Grady offered a concurrent resolution asking for a joint
committee to examine the work of assessors in 1878 done on
Agricultural Statistics;
Which was read and adopted.
Mr. Mabry offered a joint resolution in reference to the
present Legislature agreeing to the necessity of an entire re-
vision of the Constitution of Florida;
Which was read the first time and referred to the Commit-
tee on Constitutional Convention.
Mr. Baker offered a memorial that the obstructions of Lee's
cut, on the Chipola river, be removed;
Which was read and referred to the Committee on Com-
merce and Navigation.
The following message was received from the Senate:
SENATE CHAMBER, Tallahassee, January 8, 1883.
HON. CHASE. DOUGHERTY,
Speaker of the Assembly:
SIR: I am directed by'the Senate to inform the Assembly
that the Senate has adopted-
Assembly joint resolution appointing a committee of three on
the part of the Senate to act with a similar committee on the part
of the Assembly to examine the Comptroller's and Treasurer's







70



books, and that Messrs. Mann, Allen and Swearingen were ap-
pointed such committee.
Very respectfully,
W. H. BABCOCK,
Secretary of the Senate.
Which was read and ordered spread upon the journal.
The following communication was received:
FLORIDA LAND AND IMPROVEMENT COMPANY, )
JACKSONVILLE, FLA., January 5, 1883.
Hon. Chas. Doutgherty, Speaker of the Assembly, Tallahassee,
Fla.:
DEAR SIR-Governor Bloxham's message is the most con-
vincing document in favor of immigration to Florida that has
ever appeared, and I suggest that the best $500 appropriation
the Legislature could make would be to order at least 50,000
copies printed in pamphlet form for the Bureau of Immigra-
tion. Ashmead tells me it can be done for $500, or even less.
If the Bureau will then send me 25,000 copies I will guarantee
to distribute them all to none but probable immigrants to this
State. Very respectfully,
W. T. FORBES.
Which was read and ordered spread upon the journal.
Mr. Ward offered the following resolution in lieu of his reso-
lution offered on Thursday, having withdrawn the original:
Resolved, That a special committee of seven be appointed by
the Chair to inquire into the abuses' alleged to exist in the
management of the railroads chartered in this State, and to in-
quire into their contracts and obligations, with power to send
for persons aud papers, employ clerical aid, and report by bill
or otherwise, what, if any, legislation is necessary.
Which was read and adopted.
The Speaker announced the following committees :
Committee to draw up and present to this Assembly suitable
resolutions with reference to the death of the late Jasper S.
Gonzalez, Sergeant-at-Arms of the Assembly at its last session
-Mr. Harris, Chairman, Messrs. McMullen, Colee, Cobh and
Lyle.
Committee of five on the part of the Assembly to consider
the matter of public health-Mr. Hidden, Chairman, Messrs.
Grady, Floyd, Cobb and Lyle.
Committee on Fisheries-Mr. Grady, Chairman, Messrs.
Colee, Blitch, Bethel, Sindorf, McCormick and Cobb.
Committee on Public Roads and Highways-Mr. Colee,
Chairman, Messrs. Clyatt, Perkins, Ward -and Lyle.
Which was ordered spread upon the Journal.







71

Under a suspension of the rule Mr. Harris, Chairman of the
Committee on Printing, made the following report:
ASSEMBLY HALL, Tallahassee, January 8, 1883.
Hon. CHARLES DOUGHERTY,
Speaker of the Assnbly :
SiR-The Committee on Public Printing, to whom was re-
ferred the matter of printing the documents accompanying the
Governor's Message, respectfully recommend that 500 copies
of a pamphlet combining the several reports of the Heads of
Departments be printed for general distribution; also, that 500
copies of the Report of the Superintendent of Public Instruc-
tion, 150 copies of the State Treasurer's Report, and 100 copies
of the Comptroller's Report, each be printed for use in their
respective offices.
Very respectfully,
J.. HARRIS, Chairman.
Which was read and adopted.
The roll of counties being called, the following bills were
introduced and placed among the orders of the day:
By Mr. Lewey:
Assembly bill No. 30:
To be entitled an act to legalize the town government of
Newnansville, Alachua county, Florida.
By Mr. Cobb:
Assembly bill No. 31:
To be entitled an act to repeal Chapter 3315 of the Laws of
Florida, relative to municipal corporations.
By Mr. Kickliter:
Assembly bill No. 32:
To be entitled an act relating to the duties of Clerks of the
Circuit Courts.
By Mr. Bevill:
Assembly bill No. 33:
To be entitled an act to provide for an election to enable the
people of Florida to declare whether they will meet in conven-
tion to revise the existing Constitution, to elect delegates
thereto, to fix the time and place of such convention and the
compensation of its delegates and officers, and also for a sub-
sequent election to ratify or reject such revised Constitution.
By Mr. Townsend:
Assembly bill No. 34:
To be entitled an act to authorize Evins P. Graham, a mi-
nor, of Hernando county, to take charge of and control his
estate.
By Mr. Wilder:



a







72



Assembly bill No. 35:
To be entitled an act relative to Tax Collectors.
By Mr. Witherspoon:
Assembly bill No. 36:
To be entitled an act to amend Section 2, of Chapter 52, of
McClellan's Digest of the Laws of Florida.
By Mr. Goodbread:
Assembly bill No. 37:
To be entitled an act to change the names of Samanthe Sears
and Raymon Sears to Samanthe Starling and Raymon Star-
ling.
By Mr. Jenkins:
Assembly bill No. 38:
To be entitled an act to amend an act entitled an act for fees
of witnesses and jurors in trials before courts of Justices of
the Peace.
By Mr. Rollins:
Assembly bill No. 319:
To be entitled an act for the adoption of a child hy Henry
S. Harmon and Nat cy R. Harmon.
By Mr. Jenkins:
Assembly bill No. 40:
To be entitled an act to repeal Chapter 3314. Laws of Flor-
ida, approved February 1 Ith, 1881.
By Mr. t lyatt:
Assembly bill No. 41:
To be entitled an act to prevent the sale of spirituous liql-
uors in the State of Florida.
By Mr. Whidden:
Assembly bill No. 42:
To be entitled an act to amend Section 39, Chapter 174, Mc-
Clellan's Digest, for the assessment and collection of revenue.
By Mr. Miller:
Assembly bill No. 43:
To be entitled an act to prescribe a mode whereby counties
may erect court-houses and other public buildings.
By Mr. Miller:
Assembly bill No. 44 :
To be entitled an act to secure the attendance and pay of
witnesses for the defence in criminal cases.
By Mr. Miller:
Assembly bill No. 45:
To be entitled an act in relation to property held in trust
By Mr. Miller:
Assembly bill No. 46:
To be entitled an act in relation to dower, and the election
of dower or a child's part.







73



By Mr. Wilkerson:
Assembly bill No. 47 :
To be entitled an act to require Justices of the Peace to
give a bond of one thousand dollars and to enable persons to
recover all damages they may sustain on the part of the Jus-
tice to fail to perform any duties of his office.
By Mr. Perkins:
Assembly bill No. 48 :
To be entitled an act to amend Chapter 254 of an act passed
January 13, 1849, in relation to Deputy Clerks of the Circuit
Courts.
By Mr. Robinson of Nassau:
Assembly bill No. 49:
To be entitled an act to repeal Chapter 3231 of the Laws of
Florida.
By MMr. Bryan of Orange:
Assembly bill No. 50:
To be entitled an act making appropriation for the expenses
of collecting revenue for the year 1883.
By Mr. Colee:
Assembly bill No. 51:
To be entitled aln act in regard to public bridges, roads and
highways in this State.
ORIDEIS OF THE DAY.
Assembly bill No. 30:
An act to legalize the town government of Newnansville,
Alachua county, Florida,
Read first time and referred to Judiciary Committee.
Assembly bill No 31:
To be entitled an act to repeal chapter 3315 of the Laws of
Florida relating to municipal corporations,
Read first time and referred to the Judiciary Committee.
Assembly bill No. 32:
To be entitled an act relating to Clerks of Circuit Courts,
Read first time and referred to Judiciary Committee.
Assembly bill No. 33:
To be entitled an act to provide for an election to enable
the people of Florida to declare whether they will meet in
convention to revise the existing Constitution, to elect dele-
gates thereto, to fix the time and place of such Convention,
and the compensation of its delegates and officers, and also for
a subsequent election to ratify or reject such revised Constitu-
tion,
Read first time and referred to Committee on Constitutional
Convention.







74



Assembly bill No. 34:
To be entitled an act to authorize Evans "P. Graham, a
minor of Hernando county, to take charge of and control his
estate,
Read first time and referred to Judiciary Committee.
Assembly bill No. 35:
To be entitled an act relative to Tax Collectors,
Read first time and referred to Committee on Finance and
Taxation.
Assembly bill No. 36:
To be entitled an act to amend section 2, of chapter 52, of
McClellan's Digest of the Laws'of Florida,
Read first time and referred to Committee on Judiciary.
Assembly bill No. 37 :
To be entitled an act to change the names of Samantha
Sears and Raymon Sears, to Samantha Starling and Raymon
Starling,
Read first time and referred to Judiciary Committee.
Assembly bill No..38:
To be entitled an act to amend an act entitled an act for
fees of witnesses and jurors in trials before Courts of Justices
of the Peace,
Read first time and referred to Judiciary Committee.
Assembly bill No. 39:
To be entitled an act for the adoption of a child by Henry
S. Harmon and Nancy R. Harmon,
Read first time and referred to Judiciary Committee.
Assembly bill No. 40 :
To be entitled an act to repeal chapter 3314, Laws of Florida,
approved February 11, 1881,
Assembly bill No. 41:
To be entitled an act to prevent the sale of spirituous
liquors in this State,
Read first time and referred to Committee on Temperance.
Assembly bill No. 42:
To be entitled an act to amend section 39, chapter 174, Mc-
Clellan's Digest, for the assessment and collection of revenue,
Read first time and referred to Committee on Finance and
Taxation.
Assembly bill No. 43:
To be entitled an act to prescribe the mode by which coun-
ties may erect Court houses and other public buildings,
Read first time and referred to Committee on City and
County Organization.
Assembly bill No. 44:
To be entitled an act to secure the attendance and pay of
witnesses for the defense in criminal cases,







75



Read first time and referred to Judiciary Committee.
Assembly bill No. 45:
To be entitled An act in relation to property held in trust;
Was read the first time and referred to the Committee on
Judiciary.
Assembly bill No. 46:
To be entitled An act in relation to dower and the election
of dower or a child's part;
Was read the first time and referred to the Judiciary Com-
mittee.
Senate bill No. 47:
To be entitled An act to require Justices of the Peace to
give bond of one thousand dollars, and enable persons to re-
cover all damages they may sustain on the part of the Justice
to fail tj perform the duties of his office;
Was read the first time and referred to the Committee on Ju-
diciary.
Assembly bill No. 48 :
To be entitled An act to amend Chapter 254 of An act
passed Jan. 13, 1849, relative to Deputy Clerks of the Circuit
Courts ;
Was read the first time and referred to the Judiciary Com-
mittee.
Assembly bill No. 49:
To be entitled An act to repeal Chapter 3231, of the Laws
of Florida;
Was read the first time and referred to the Judiciary Com-
mittee.
Assembly bill No. 50:
To be entitled An act making appropriation for the expense;
of collection of Revenue for 1883;
Was read the first time and referred to the Commi.tee on.
Appropriations.
Assembly bill No. 51:
To be entitled An act in regard to public roads and bridges
in this State ;
Was read first time and referred to the Committee on Pub-
lic Roads.
On motion of Mr. Wetmore, the Assembly adjourned.



't







76



TUESDAY, January 9, 1883.

The Assembly met pursuant to adjournment.
The roll being called the following members answered to
their names:
Mr. Speaker, Messrs. Allison, Baker, Bethel, Bevill, Bird,
Blackwell, Blitch, Brelsford, Brown, Bryan of Orange, Bryant
of Polk, Calk, Campbell, Canova, Cassady, Clyatt, Cobb, Colee,
Cowgill, Davis, Dennis, Floyd, Gaskins, Getzen, Goodbread,
Grady, Hall, Harris, Hendry, Jenkins, Keathly, Kickliter,
Lewey, Lyle, Mabry, Melvin, Miller, Milton, Moore, McClel-
lan of Jackson, McCormick, McLeod, McMullen, Neal, Osgood,
Perkins, Platt, Proctor, Putnam, Rollins, Robinson of Nassau,
Robinson of Jackson, Sindorf, Stripling, Thompson, Tomp-
kins, Townsend, Trapp, Tully, Vaughn, Ward, Weeks, Whid-
den, White, Wetmore, Wilcox, Wilder, Wilkerson, Wilkinson
and Witherspoon-71.
A quorum present.
Prayer by the Chaplain.
On motion of Mr. McMullen, the reading of yesterday's jour-
nal was dispensed with and the journal corrected and approved.
Mr. Harris gave notice that on to-morrow, January 10, he
will move to reconsider so much of the action of the Assembly
on yesterday as created a committee of seven to inquire into
the abuses alleged to exist in the management of railroads,
etc., pursuaut to resolution introduced by Mr. Ward, of
Gadsden;
Which was placed among the orders of the day.
Mr. Cobb moved that Mr. McLellan, of Santa Rosa, be ex-
cused from attendance on the Assembly to-day, on account of
sickness;'
Which was agreed to.
Mr. Bevill offered the following resolution:
Resolved, That the Judiciary Committee be and are hereby
instructed to report a bill regulating the fees of the several
State and county officers, making such fees uniform and regu-
lar, as there seems to he a conflict on the laws fixing said fees
as said laws are now construed;
Which was not adopted.
Mr. Harris offered a concurrent resolution recommending
the electors at the next general election to vote for or against
a Convention;
Which was placed among the orders of the day.
Mr. Wilkerson moved that the Sergeant-at-Arms be in-
structed to have the Messenger of the Assembly deliver the






77



mail of the members at.their respective places of residence as
early as possible on Sunday mornings.
Mr. Bryan of Orange moved to lay the motion on the table;
Which was agreed to.
Mr. Bryant, of Polk, moved that Judge J. Wofford Tucker,
of Orange county, be invited to a seat within the bar of the
Assembly;
Which was agreed to.
Mr. McClellan, of Jackson, moved that tile Judiciary Com-
mittee have leave to employ a clerk;
Which was agreed to.
Mr. Perkins offered the following joint resolution, that the
U. S. Congress be requested to correct certain irregularities
in the mail service between Tampa and Key West;
Which was placed among the orders of the day.
The following Senate message was received:
SENATE CHAMBER, Tallahassee, Fla., January 9, 1883.
HON. CHARLES DOUGHERTY,
Speaker of the Assembly:
Srt-I am directed by the Senate to inform the Assembly
that the Senate has passed-
Senate bill No. 8, to be entitled an act to repeal Chapter
3143, Laws of Florida, being an act entitled an act to amend
sections 1 and 2 of an act entitled an act to regulate the sale
of certain agricultural products in this State, being Chapter
3014 of the Laws of Florida; also,
Senate hill No. 9, to be entitled an act to repeal Chapter
3014, Laws of Florida, being an act to regulate the sale of cer-
tain agricultural products in this State, approved March 2,
1877 ; also, that it has adopted-
Assembly joint resolution appointing a committee to inves-
gate the Internal Improvement Fund, and appointed Messrs.
Mallory and( Cole as such committee on the part of the
Senate.
Very respectfully.
W. H. BABCOCK,
S,:cr-tary of the Snate.
Which was read and the accompanying bills paced among
the orders of the day.
Mr. Milton offered the following resolution:
Resolved, That the Sergeant-at-Arms be authorized to confer
with the railroad authorities and arrange for transportation
for the Committee to visit the Insane Asylum on Saturday
next and report the cost of the same to the Assembly;
Which was adopted.







78



On motion of Mr. Witherspoon, Mr. Wetmore was added to
the Committee to visit the Asylum.
Mr. Miller moved that all Special Committees heretofore
appointed, remain as appointed unless changed by a two-thirds
vote of the Assembly;
Which was agreed to.
Mr. Blackwell offered a concurrent resolution relative to the
appointment of a Joint Committee to examine McClellan's' Di-
gest, &c.;
mWhich was read and adopted, and Messrs. Blackwell, Mabry
and Stripling appointed such Committee.
The Speaker announced the following Special Committee
relative to Agricultural Statistics of 1878:
Messrs. Grady, McMullen, Floyd, Baker and Putnam.
Mr. Harris offered a resolution relative to tenants and their
dispossession ;
Which was read and referred to the Judiciary Committee.
Mr. Harris, Chairman of the Committee on Printing, made
the following report:
ASSE.MBLY HALL, Tallahassee, Fla., Jan. 9, 1883.
H1on. CHARLES DOUGHERTY,
Speaker of the Assembly :
SIR-The Committe on Public Printing, to whom was re-
ferred-
Concurrent Resolution relative of State Printer,
Respectfully report the same back with the recommendation
that it do pass.
J. J. HARRIS,
Chairman.
Which was read awl the resolution placed among the orders
of the day.
The roll oft counties being called, the following bills were
introduced, read and placed among the orders of the day.
By Mr. Moore:
Assembly bill No. 52:
T'o be entitled an act to amend Chapter 3275 of the Laws
of Florida, being an act for the punishment of crimes and mis-
demeanors.
By Mr. Hall:
Assembly bill No. 53:
To be entitled an act to prohibit county officers from buying
at a discount or speculating in State, county or school scrip,
and to provide a penalty therefore.
By Mr. Robinson of Nassau:
Assembly bill No. 54 :
To be entitled an act to repeal Chapter 3025, Laws of Flor-






79



ida, entitled an act to amend an act entitled an act to provide
for the incorporation of cities and towns, and to establish a
uniform system of municipal government in this State.
By Mr. Cassady:
Assembly bill No. 55:
To be entitled an act to repeal Chapter 2055 of the Laws of
Florida in relation to non-residents hunting in this State.
By Mr. Wilcox:
Assembly bill No. 56:
To be entitled an act to define the boundary line between
Lafayette and Taylor counties in this State.
Also,
Assembly bill No. 57:
To be entitled an act requiring the several County Judges
of this State to be examined as to qualifications hy a legal at-
torney.
Also,
Assembly bill No. 58:
To be entitled an act as to grand jurors in this State, and
the manner in which they shall be drawn.
By Mr. Wilcox:
Assembly bill No. 59 :
To be entitled an act requiring the County Judges of the
several counties in this State to give bond for their official
duty.
Also,
Assembly bill No. 60 :
To be entitled an act requiring Justices of tlh Peace in this
State to give bond.
Also,
Assembly bill No. ( :
To be entitled an act requiring the State of Florida to pay
all costs and fees in criminal cases from this date.
By Mr. Tully:
Assembly bill No. 62:
To be entitled an act to authorize T. B. Ferrell to take
charge of and control his own estate.

ORDI)EIS OF THE DAY.

Assembly bill No. 52:
To be entitled an act to amend Chapter 3275 of the Laws of
Florida, being an act for the punishment of crimes and mis-
demeanors,
Was read the first time and referred to the Committee on
Judiciary.





80



Assembly bill No. 53:
To be entitled an act to prohibit county officers from buy-
ing at a discount, or speculating in State, County or School
scrip, and to provide a penalty therefore,
Was read the first time and referred to Committee on Ju-
diciary.
Assembly bill No. 54:
To be entitled an act to repeal Chapter 3025, Laws of Flor-
ida, entitled an act to provide for the incorporation of cities
and towns, and to establish a uniform system of municipal
government in this State,
Was read the first time and referred to Committee on Cor-
porations.
Assembly bill No. 55 :
To be entitled an act to repeal Chapter 2055 of the Laws of
Florida in relation to non-residents hunting in this State,
Was read the first time and referred to the Committee on
Judiciary.
Assembly bill No. 56 :
To be entitled an act to define the boundary line between
Lafayette and Taylor counties in this State.
Read the first time and referred to the Committee on City
and County Organization.
Assembly bill No. 57:
To be entitled an act requiring the several County Judges
of this State to be examined as to qualifications by a legal
attorney,
Was read the first time and referred to the Committee on
Judiciary.
Assembly bill No. 58 :
To be entitled an act as to Grand Jurors in this State, and
the manner in which they shall be drawn.
Was read the first time and referred to the Committee on
Judiciary.
Assembly bill No. .9:
To be entitled an act requiring the County Judges of the
several counties in this State to give bond for their official
dluty,
Was read the first time and referred to the Committee on
.Judiciary.
Assembly bill No. 60:
To be entitled an act requiring Justices of the Peace in this
State to give bond,
Was read the first time and referred to the Committee on
Judiciary.
Senate bill No. 8:
To be entitled an act to repeal Chapter 3143, Laws of Flor-





81

ida, being an act entitled an act to amend Sections 1 and 2 of
an act entitled an act to regulate the sale of certain agricul-
tural products in this State, being Chapter 3014 of the Laws of
Florida,
Was read the first time and referred to the Committee on
Judiciary.
Senate bill No. 9:
To be entitled an act to repeal Chapter 3014, Laws of Flor-
ida, being an act entitled an act to regulate the sale of certain
agricultural products in this State, approved March 2, 1877,
Was read the first time and referred to the Committee on
Judiciary
Assembly Concurrent Resolution No. 14:
Recommending the Electors at the next General Election to
vo vote for or against a Convention,
Was read the first time and referred to the Committee on
Constitutional Convention.
Assembly Bill No. 61 :
To be entitled an act requiring the State of Florida to pay
all cost and fees in criminal cases from this date,
Was read the first time and referred to the Committee on
Judiciary.
Assembly bill No. 62:
To be entitled an act to authorize T. B. Ferrell to take
charge of and control his estate,
Was read the first time and referred to Committee on
Judiciary.
Assembly joint resolution that the United States Congress
be requested to correct certain irregularities in the mail service
between Tampa and Key West,
Was read and referred to the Committee on Postal Routes.
On motion of Mr. Lewey, the Assembly adjourned until to-
morrow morning 11 o'clock.







82



WEDNESDAY, January 10, 1883.

The Assembly met pursuant to adjournment.
The roll being called the following members answered to
their names:
Mr. Speaker, Messrs. Allison, Baker, Bethel, LBevill, Bird,
Blackwell, Blitch, Brelsford, Brown, Bryan of Orange, Bryant of
Polk, Calk, Campbell, Canova, Cassady, Cobb, Clyatt, Colee,
Cowgill, Davis, Dennis, Edwards, Floyd, Gaskins, Getzen, Good-
bread, Grady. Hall, Harris, Hendry, Keathly, Kickliter, Lewey,
Lyle, Melvin, Miller, Milton, Moore, Monroe, McCardy, McClel-
lan of Jackson, McCormick, McLeod, McMullen, Neal, Osgood,
Perkins, Platt, Proctor, Putnam. Rollins, Robinson of Jackson,
Robinson of Nassau, Rush, Sindorf, Stripling, Thompson,
Tompkins, Townsend, trapp, Tully, Vaughn, Ward, Weeks,
Whidden, White, Wetmore, Wilcox, Wilder, Wilkerson, Wilk-
inson and Witherspoon-72.
A quorum present.
Prayer by the Chaplain, Rev. .1. Y. Allison.
On motion of Mr. Canova, the reading of yesterday's jour-
nal was dispensed with and journal approved.
On motion of Mr. Dennis, Mr. Rush, member-elect from
Alachua county, came forward and was sworn by the Speaker.
On motion of Mr. Sindorf, Mr. McLellan of Santa Rosa,
was excused on account of sickness.
On motion of Mr. Cassady, Mr. Mabry was excused on ac-
count of having to attend upon the Supreme Court.
Mr. Lewey moved that Mr. Rush be added to the Commit-
tee on Legislative Expenses;
Which was agreed to.
Pursuant to Rule 25, Mr. Rush gave his excuse lor non-at-
tendance upon the Assembly, which was on account of severe
sickness.
Mr. Harris moved that in the opinion of the Assembly, the
excuse rendered by Mr. Rush for his absence up to this date
be deemed sufficient;
Which was agreed to.
Mr. McClellan of Jackson, Chairman of the Judiciary Com-
mittee, made the following report:
ASSEMBLY HALL, Tallahassee, Fla., Jan. 10, 1883.
HON. CHARLES DOUGHERTY,
Speaker of the Assembly :
SIR-Your Committee on Judiciary, to whom was referred-
Assembly bills Nos. 1, 21, 22 and 37, to change the names of







83



certain persons therein named and adopt them as heirs of cer-
tain other persons therein named-
Beg leave to report that they do not pass, because they are
in conflict with Section 17, Article 4, of the Constitution.
Very respectfully,
J. F. McCLELLAN, Chairman.
Which was read and the accompanying bills placed among
the orders of the day.
Also the following:
ASSEMBLY HALL, Tallahassee. Fla., Jan. 10. 1883.
HON. CHARLES DOUGIIERTY,
Speak, r of the A.isembly:
SIR-Your Committee on Judiciary, to whom was referred-
Assembly bill No. 5, being a bill entitled an act to require
the Judge of the Fifth Judicial Circuit to hold a term of court
for jail delivery, etc.,
Beg leave to report that said bill norjoint resolution do not
pass. Very respectfully,
J. F. MCCLELLAN, Chairman.
Which was read and the accompanying bill placed among
the orders of the day.
Also the following:
ASSEMBLY HALL, Tallahassee, Fla., Jan. 10, 1883.
HON. CHARLES DOUGIIERTY,
Speaker of the Assembly :
Si--Your Committee on Judiciary to whom was referred-
Assembly bill No. 4, entitled an act to limit the jurisdiction
of Justices of the Peace in civil cases to fifty dollars; Also
Assembly bill No. 10, entitled an act for a minor to take
charge of and manage his own estate; and
Assembly bill No. 34, entitled an act to authorize Evan P.
Graham, a minor of Hernando county, to take charge of and
control his estate,
Beg leave to report that said bills do not pass.
Very respectfully,
J. F. MCCLELLAN, Chairman.
Which was read and the accompanying bills placed among
the orders of the day.
Also the following:
ASSEMBLY HALL. Tallahassee, Fla., Jan. 10, 1883.
HON. CHARLES DOUGHERTY,
Speaker of the Assembly:
Sin-Your Committee on the Judiciary to whom was re-
ferred-






84



Assembly bill No. 15, entitled an act to give the Circuit
Courts and Justices of the Peace concurrent jurisdiction in
certain cases; Also Assembly bill No. 31, entitled an act to
repeal Chapter 3115, Laws of Florida, relating to municipal
corporations; Also Assembly bill No. 32, entitled an act re-
lating to the duties of Clerks of the Circuit Courts ; Also,
Assembly bill No. 48, entitled an act to amend Chapter 254 of
act passed Jan. 13, 1849, in relation to Deputy Clerks of Cir-
cuit Courts; Also, Assembly bill No. 36, entitled an act to
amend Section 2 of Chapter 52, of McClellan's Digest, Laws
of Florida,
Beg leave to report that none of said bills do pass.
Very respectfully,
J. F. MCCLELLAN,
Chairman Judiciary Committee.
Which was read and the accompanying bills placed among
the orders of the day.
Also the following:
ASSEMBLY HALL, Tallahassee, Fla., January 10, 1883.
Hon. CHARLES DOUGHERTY,
Speaker of the Assembly:
Si--Your Committee on the Judiciary to whom was re-
ferred-
Assembly bill No. 17, to be entitled an act relating to public
records, do pass after being amended as the offices of Sheriffs
and County Judge;
Also that Assembly bills Nos. 24 and 27 do pass.
They also beg leave to report back to the Assembly Assem-
bly bills Nos. 49, 20 and 11, and ask to be discharged from
their further consideration.
Respectfully submitted,
J. F. MCCLELLAN,
Chairman Judiciary Committee.
Which was read and the accompanying bills placed among
the orders of the day.
Mr. Whidden, Chairman of the Committee on Militia, made
the following report:
ASSEMBLY HALL, Tallahassee, Fla., January 10, 1883.
Hon. CHARLES DOUGHERTY,
Speaker of the Assembly :
SIB-Your Committee on Militia to whom was referred-
Joint resolution that the surviving soldiers of 1835 and 1836
be placed upon the pension rolls of the United States, and that
the soldiers of 1856 and 1857 be given bounty lands,






85



Have had the same under consideration and recommend that
it do pass.
Very respectfully,
J. W. HIDDEN,
Chairman Committee.
Which was read and the accompanying bill placed among
the orders of the day.
Mr. Bryan of Orange, Chairman of the Committee on Ap-
propriations, made the following report:
ASSEMBLY HALL, Tallahassee, Fla., Jan. 10, 1883.
HON. CHAS. DOUGHERTY,
,Speaker of the Assembly :
SiR: Your Committee on Appropriations to whom was re-
ferred-
Assembly bill No. 50, to be entitled an act making appropri-
ations for the expense for collecting revenue for the year 1883,
Beg leave to report that they have had the same under con-
sideration and recommend that it do pass.
Very respectfully,
J. M. BRYAN, Chairman.
Which was read and the bill placed among the orders of the
day.
Mr. Bryant of Polk, Chairman of the Committee on Public
Lands, made the following report:
ASSEMBLY HALL, Tallahassee. Fla., Jan. 10, 1883.
HON. CHAS. DOUGHERTY,
Speaker of the Assembly:
SiR: Your Committee on Public Lands to whom was re-
ferred-
Assembly bill No. 19, to be entitled an act to enable actual
settlers to procure homes,
Beg leave to report that they have carefully examined the
same and recommend that it do not pass.
Very respectfully,
JNO. W. BRYANT, Chairman.
Which was read and the bill placed among the orders of the
day.
Mr. Getzen. Chairman of the Committee on Finance and
Taxation, made the following report:
ASSEMBLY HALL, Tallahassee, Fla., January 10, 1883.
Hon. CHAS. DOUGHERTY,
Speaker of the Assembly:
SIR-Your Committee on Finance and Taxation, to whom
was referred-






86

Assembly bill No. 42, to be entitled an act to amend section
39, chapter 174, McClellan's Digest, for the assessment and
collection of revenue; also,
Assembly bill No. 6, to be entitled an act to amend an act
for the assessment and collection of revenue,
Recommend that they do not pass.
Very respectfully,
T. W. GETZEN, Chairman.
Also the following :
ASSEMBLY HALL, Tallahassee, Fla., January 10, 1883.
HON. CHASE. DOUGHERTY,
Speaker of the Assembly :
SIR-Your Committee on Finance and Taxation, to whom
was referred-
Assembly bill No. 14, to be entitled an act to amend an act
for the assessment and collection of revenue,
Return the same and .request it be referred to Judiciary
Committee ; also,
Assembly bill No..35, to be entitled an act relative to Tax
Collectors,
Return the same without recommendation;
Very respectfully,
T. W. GETZEN, Chairman.
Which were read and the bills placed among the orders of the
day.
Mr. Bethel, Chairman of the Committee on Commerce and
Navigation, made the following report:
ASSEM1BLY HALL, Tallahassee, Fla., January 10, 1883.
HON. CHASE. DOUGIIERTY,
Spraker of the Assembly :
SIn-Your Committee on Commerce and Navigation, to
whom was referred Assembly bill No. 26, respectfully report
that we have examined said bill, and recommend that it be
adopted.
Your Committee respectfully refer back Assembly memorial
No. 4.
We respectfully state that we have examined Assembly
memorial No. 5, and recommend its adoption.
Your Committee recommend the adoption of Assembly
memorial No. 6.
We respectfully recommend the adoption of Assembly
memorial No. 12.
We recommend that Assembly memorial No. 10 be adopted.






87



With regard to Assembly memorial No. 8, your Committee
ask further time.
Very respectfully,
WAl. BETHEL, Chairman.
Which was read and the bill and memorials placed among
the orders of the day.
Mr. Mabry, Chairman of the Committee on Corporations,
made the following report:
ASSEMBLY HALL, Tallahassee, Fla., January 10, 1883.
Hon. CHARLES DOUGHERTY,
Npeaklcr of the Assmbly :
SIR-Your Committee on Incorporations', to whom was re-
ferred-
Assembly bill No. 16, to be entitled an act to incorporate a
Literary Institution in the town of Starke, Bradford county,
known as Starke Institute, and to authorize the same to confer
Collegiate degrees,
Respectfully report said bill with a recommendation that the
same do not pass. Your committee, in making this report,
desire to say that they do not wish to obstruct in any manner
the establishment and growth of such institutions, but they
find that :ll the rights and benefits, and even more, which the
parties applying for said charter desire can be obtained undei
the general incorporation act now in force in this State; that
such special legislation, if encouraged and participated in, will
to a considerable extent encumber the labors of this Assembly
without good results, as full, ample and complete relief exists
under the general law now in force on such subjects.
Very respectfully,
W. H. MABRY, Chairman.
Which was read and the accompanying bill placed among
the orders of the day.
Mr. Edwards, Chairman of the Committee on City and
County Organization, made the following report:
ASSEMBLY HALL, Tallahassee, Fla., Jan. 10, 1883.
HON. CHAS. DOUGHERTY,
Speaker of the Assemblq :
SIR: Your Committee on City on City and County Organi-
zation to whom was referred-
Assembly bill No. 13, to be entitled an act to declare Wil-
liam C. Collins a citizen of Columbia county,
Beg leave to report that they have examined the same and
recommend tlat it do pass.
Very respectfully,
W. H. EDWARDS, Chairman.







88



Which was read and the bill placed among the orders of the
day.
The roll of counties being called the following bills were
introduced and placed among the orders of the day :
By Mr. Kickliter:
Assembly bill No. 63:
To be entitled an act to amend Sections 17 and 18, of Chap-
ter 175, of the Laws of Florida, entitled public roads, and to
add another Chapter, No. 22.
By Mr. Getzen:
Assembly bill No. 64:
To be entitled *an act to limit the time in which a widow
may apply for dower.
By Mr. Brown:
Assembly bill No. 65:
To be entitled an act to repeal an act relating to the inter-
marriage of white persons with persons of color; also Sec-
tions 5, 7, 8, 10 and 11, Chapter 72, McClellan's Digest.
By Mr. Brown:
Assembly bill No. 66:
To be entitled an act to compel owners andl other persons to
bury dead horses, cows. hogs, dogs, &c.
By Mr. Cobb:
Assembly bill No. 67 :
To be entitled an act to repeal Chapter 3312, Laws of Flor-
ida, relating to appointments of boards of health.
By Mr. Keathly :
Assembly bill No. 6, :
To be entitled an act to amend that part of Section 1, Chlap-
ter 3253, Laws of Florida, approved Febru ry 2Stth. 188 1. rela-
tive to the pay of witnesses and jurors.
By Mr. McClellan of Jackson:
Assembly bill No. 69:
To be entitled an act in relation to the assessment. levy and
collection of taxes by municipal corporations.
By Mr. McCardy:
Assembly bill No. 70:
To be entitled an act to amend Section 3, Chapter 150, of
McClellan's Digest of the Laws of Florida.
By Mr. Bird :
Assembly bill No. 71:
To be entitled an act to prevent unjust discrimination in se-
lecting and drawing jurors.
By Mr. Rollins:
Assembly bill No. 72:
To be entitled an act directing the Boards of Education of







89



the East and West Florida Seminaries to establish branch in-
stitutions for the use of the children of colored persons.
By Mr. Stripling:
Assembly Bill No. 73:
To be entitled an act to regulate appeals from the Circuit to
the Supreme Court in cases pertaining to the Probate jurisdic-
tion as to the estate of minors or of deceased persons.
By Mr. Bethel:
Assembly bill No. 74:
To be entitled an act to remedy any irregularity in the pro-
ceedings of the Board of Aldermen of the city of Key West.
By Mr. Robinson of Nassau:
"Assembly bill No. 75:
To be entitled an act to amend Section 25, Chapter 176, of
McClellan's Digest of the Laws of Florida.
By Mr. Cowgill:
Assembly bill No. 76:
To be entitled an act to authorize the Board of Education
to compromise and settle with counties indebted to the School
and Seminary Fund.
Mr. Robinson'of Jackson offered a concurrent resolution for
the appointment of a Joint Committee to examine the State
Laud Office.
Mr. Bryant otlered a memorial to Congress asking the estab-
lishment of a mail route from Sumterville, in Sumter county,
to Bartow by the way of Fox Town, in Polk county.
Also,
A memorial to Congress asking the establishment of a mail
route from Fort Dade, in Hernando county, to Bartow, in Polk
county, Fla.
Mr. Perkins offered a nimuorial to Congress to establish a
mail ronte between Myers and Leonardi, Monroe county. Fla.
Also,
Memorial asking Congress to appropriate ten thousand dol-.
lars to render navigable vTwelve-miil Creek, in Monroe county,
Florida.
SPECIAL ORDERS OF THE DAY.
Notice of Mr. Harris to reconsider the resolution for ap-
pointment of a committee to enquire into the abuses alleged
to exist in the management of railroads, &c., being the special
order, was, on motion, passed over informally until to-morrow.
The following message was received from the Senate:
SENATE CHAMBER, Tallahassee, January 10, 1883.
HON. CHASE. DOUGHERTY,
,pf-a ker of the Assembly :
SIR-- am directed by the Senate to inform the Assembly
that the Senate has adopted-






90



The following Assembly concurrent resolution asking for a
joint committee to examine work of Assessors in 1878 done on
agricultural statistics, and appointed the following committee:
Messrs. Dell, Crill and Speer.
Very respectfully,
W. H. BABCOOK,
secretary y of the Senate.
Which was read.
Also the following:
SENATE CHAMBER, Tallahassee, January 10, 1883.
HON. CHAs. DOUGHERTY,
Speaker of the Assembly:
SIR-I am directed by the Senate to inform the Assembly
that the Senate has adopted-
Concurrent resolution relative to appointing a joint commit-
tee to examine McClellan's Digest, and appointed Messrs. Mal-
lory, Pope and McKinne as such committee on the part of the
Senate. Very respectfully,
W. H. BABCOCK,
Secretary of the Senate.
Which was read.
Also the following :
SENATE CHAMBER, Tallahassee, Fla., January 10, 1883.
HON. CHASE. DOUGHERTY,
Speaker of the Assembly :
SIR-1 am directed by the Senate to inform the Assembly
that the Senate has adopted-
The following Assembly joint resolution relative to the ap-
pointment of a joint committee to take into consideration the
public health of this State, and appointed the following com-
mittee on the part of the Senate: Messrs. Crill, Mountien,
Swearingen, McClellan and Baker.
Very respectfully,
W. H1. BABCOCK,
Secretary of the Senate.
Which was read.
ORDERS OF THE DAY.
Assembly bill No. 13:
To be entitled an act to declare William C. Collins a citizen
of Columbia county,
Was read a second time, and on motion, was recommitted to
the Committee on County Organization.
Assembly bill No. 35:
To be entitled an act relative to tax collectors,






91



Was read a second time, and on motion, Mr. Wilder had
leave to withdraw the bill.
Assembly bill No. 42 :
To be entitled an act to amend Section 39, Chapter 174,
McClellan's Digest, for the assessment and collection of reve-
nue,
Was read a second time, and on motion, recommitted to the
Committee on Finance and Taxation.
Assembly bill No. I :
To be entitled an act to change the name of an adopted
child,
Was read a second time.
Mr. Stripling moved to lay the bill on the table;
Which was not agreed to.
Mr. Harris moved to amend by striking out of section 1 the
words, and shall bear the name of Nancy Ann Patterson;"
Which was agreed to.
Mr. Blackwell moved to indefinitely postpone the bill.
Mr. Brown moved to lay tle mot:on on the table;
Upon which the yeas and nays were called for by Messrs.
Brown and Rollins:
The vote was:
Yeas-Messrs. Baker, Blitch, I relsford, Brown, Bryant of
Polk. Calk. Canova, Cobb, Clyatt, Colee. Cowgill, Davis, Den-
nis, Flo, G e. oodbred, Grad l, arris, Hlo Getz. (o Gad. Hlendry,
Jenkins, Keathly, Kickliter, Lewey, Lyle. Mabry, Melvin, Mil-
ler, Milton, Moore, McCardy, McClellan of Jackson, .\cLeod,
McMullen, Osgood. 'Perkins, Platt, Proctor, Putnam, Rollins,
Robinson of Nassau, Robinson of Jackson, Rush, Sindorf,
Thompson. Tompkins, Townsend. Trapp. Tully, Vaughn,
Weeks, \\Vhidden, White, Wetmore, Wilcox, Wilder, Wilker-
son, Wilkinson and Witherspoon-59.
Nays-Messrs. Betlel, Bird, Blackwell, Bryan of Orange,
Cassady, Edwards, Gaskins, Munroe, Neal and Stripling-10.
So the motion was adopted, and the bill as amended ordered
to be engrossed for a third reading on to-morrow.
Assembly bill No. 5:
To be entitled an act to require the Judge of the Fifth Judi-
cial Circuit to hold a term of court for jail delivery at the times
and places herein named,
Was read the second time.
Mr. McClellan of Jackson moved to indefinitely postpone
the bill.
On motion of Mr. Miller, the Assembly resolved itself into a
committee of the whole for the consideration of the bill.
Mr. Harris in the chair.







92



After some time spent therein the committee arose, and
through the chairman, reported that it having had Assembly
bill No. 5 under consideration and beg leave to report the bill
back to the Assembly without recommendation.
Pending the motion to indefinitely postpone the bill, on mo-
tion of Mr. Stripling, the Assembly adjourned.


-0
------------_.. -----


THURSDAY, January 11, 1883.

The Assembly met pursuant to adjournment.
The roll being called the following members answered to
their names:
Mr. Speaker, Messrs. Allison, Baker, Bethel, Bird, Black-
well, Blitch, Brelsford, Brown, Bryan of Orange, Bryant of
Polk, Calk, Campbell, Canova. Cassady, Cobb, Clyatt, Colee,
Cowgill, Davis, Edwards, Floyd, Gaskins, Getzen, Good-
bread, Grady, Hall, Harris, Hendry, Jenkins, Keathly, Kick-
liter, Lewey, Lyle, Mabry, Melvin, Miller, Milton, Moore,
Munroe, McCardy, McClellan of Jackson, McLellan of Santa
Rosa, McCormick, McLeod, McMullen, Neal, Osgood, Perkins,
Platt, Proctor, Putnam, Rollins, Robinson of Nassau, Robin-
son of Jackson, Rush, Sindorf, Stripling, Thompson, Tomp-
kins, Townsend, Trapp, Tully, Vaughn, Ward, Weeks, Whid-
den, White, Wetmore, Wilcox, Wilder, Wilkerson, Wilkinson
and Witherspoon-74.
A quorum present.
Prayer by the Chaplain, Rev. J. Y. Allison.
On motion of Mr. Osgood, the reading of yesterday's journal
was dispensed with and the journal corrected and approved.
On motion of Mr. Harris, Mr. Bevill was excused on account
of sickness.
Mr. Baker of Calhoun offered a memorial to Congress asking
for a mail route from Blount's Town, Calhoun county, Florida,
via Abe Springs to Vernon, Washington county, Florida;
Which was read and placed among the orders of the day.
Mr. Cassady offered a memorial to Congress asking the re-
establishment of the mail route from Sumterville, in Sumter
county, Fla., to Leesburg, in said county and State;
Which was placed among the orders of the day.
Mr. Cobb offered the following resolution :
Resolved, That Assembly Rule 58. and Section (i be amend-







93



ed so as to read Reports of Standing Committees by call in
the order in which they are appointed ;"
Which was read and adopted.
Mr. Harris moved that a Committee be appointed to prepare
suitable resolutions relative to the death of Mr. R. B. Whit-
field, late Reading Clerk of the Assembly;
"Which was agreed to.
The Speaker appointed Messrs. Harris, Whidden, Robinson
of Jackson, Bevill and Brown, such Committee.
Mr. Harris moved that the Committee appointed to draft
resolutions relative to tle death of Mr. Jasper S. Gonzalez,
late Sergeant-at-Arms, and Mr. IR. B. Whitfield, late Reading
Clerk of the Assembly, be consolidated, and that the reports
be consolidated;
Which was agreed to.
Mr. Harris moved that the Hon. R. L. Summerlin of Orange
county, be invited to a seat within the bar of the Assembly;
Which was agreed to.
REPORTS OF STANDING COMMITTEES.
Mr. McClellan of Jackson, Chairman of the Judiciary Com-
mittee, made the following report:
ASSEMBLrY HALL, Tallahassee, Fla., Jan. llth, 1883.
HON. CHARLES DOUGIIERTY,
Speaker of the Assembly:
SIR-Your Committee on the Judiciary to whom was re-
ferred-
Senate bills No. 8 and 9, entitled an act to repeal Chapter 3143,
Laws of Florida, entitled an act to amend Sections 1 and 2 of
an act entitled an act to regulate the sale of certain agricul-
tural products in this State, being Chapter 3014, of the Laws
of Florida; and an act to repeal Chapter 3014, Laws of Flor-
ida, entitled an act to regulate the sale of certain agricultural
products in this State, approved March 2, 1877, that said bills
do pass; also,
Assembly bill No. 2, entitled an act for the relief of Nick
Howell of Marion county, do pass; also
Assembly bill No. 55, entitled an act to repeal Chapter 2055
of the Laws of Florida, in relation to non-residents hunting
in this State, do pass; also,
Assembly bill No. 53, entitled an act to prohibit county of-
ficers from buying at a discount, or speculating in State, county
or school scrip, and to provide a penalty therefore, do pass.
Very respectfully,
J. F. MCCLELLAN,
Chairman of Committee.







94



Which was read and the accompanying bills placed among
the orders of the day.
Also the following:
ASSEMBLY HALL, Tallahassee, Fla., Jan. 11, 1883.
Hon. CHARLES DOUGHERTY,
Speaker of the Assembly:
SiR-Your Committee on the Judiciary to whom was refer-
red-
Assembly joint resolution No. 9, asking that the Clerk of the
Supreme Court to have reprinted the first, seventh, eighth
and tenth volumes of the Supreme Court Reports, r.,port the
same back to ihe Assembly without expression of opinion
upon the same ; also,
Assembly bill No. 52, entitled an act to amend Chapter 3275
of the Laws of Florida, being an act for the punishment of
crimes and misdemeanors, do not pa s ; also,
Assembly bill No. 46, entitled an act in relation to dower
and the election of dower or a child's part, do not pass ; also,
Assembly bill No. 57, entitled an act requiring county
judges of this State to be examined as to qualifications by a
legal attorney, do not pass ; also
Assembly bill No. 58 entitled an act as to grand jurors in
this State and the manner in which they shall be drawn, do
not pass; also, %
Assembly bill No. 62, entitled an act to authorize '. B.
Farrell to take charge of and control his estate, do not pass.
Very respectfully,
J. F. McCLELLAN, Chairman.
Which was read and the accompanying bills placed among
the orders of the day.
Mr. Harris, Chairman of the Committee on Constitutional
Amendments, made the following report:
ASSEMBLY HALL, Tallahassee, January 11, 1883.
Hon. CHARLES DOUGHERTY.
i'Spealcrr of the Assembly :
SIR: A majority of the Committee on Convention and cog-
nate matter, to which was referred-
Assembly joint resolution No. 1, Assembly resolution No. 2,
Assembly resolution No. 3, also Assembly joint resolution No.
13, Assembly concurrent resolution No. 14, and Assembly bill
No. 33, these being all the matter referred to us up to this
time,
Beg leave to report the following recommendations, to-wit:
1st. That the Judiciary Committee be instructed to
frame and report to the Assembly, at the earliest practi-







95



cable moment, a bill for calling a Convention of the peo-
ple, and the election of delegates thereto, providing- in
said bill that the electors voting for delegates to said
Convention shall, by a vote for or against a Conven-
tion, express their wishes as to the holding of the same,
the Convention to be held in the event that a majority of the
electors voting on the question shall, by their votes, signify a
desire to have it held, otherwise not.
That such election shall be held on the first Tuesday in May,
and the Convention, if called, shall be held on the first Tues-
day in July;
That there shall be chosen at such election by the several
counties as many delegates as each county now has Represen-
tatives in the Assembly, and, in addition thereto, there shall
be elected for the State at large seven (7) delegates, making
eighty-three (83) in all;
That the qualifications of said electors shall be the same as
those of Representatives in the Assembly ;
That said bill shall contain'no provisions as to the per diem
or mileage of the delegates to the Convention, nor shall it un-
dertake to prescribe the length of its session;
That said bill shall appropriate the sum of twenty-five thou-
sand dollars, or so much thereof as may be necessary, to defray
the expenses of the Convention, if held.
We further recommend, and in this recommendation the
whole committee concur, the passage of Assembly joint reso-
lution No. 13, which is consecutive to the one passed by the
Legislature of 1881, both agreeing that an entire revision of
the Constitution is necessary ; and, also, the passage of As-
sembly concurrent resolution No. 14, which recommends the
electors at the next general election to vote for or against a
Convention.
The views of a majority of the committee, upon which are
based the foregoing recommendations, are: That, as it is be-
lieved by many of the members of the present Legislature that
the people desire the opportunity of calling a- convention at an
earlier day than is possible according to the mode suggested
by the present Constitution, the immediate testing of the sense
of this Legislature on that subject by a process that is simple
and direct is advisable; and hence, that a bill that is the pro-
duct of the legal wisdom of this House, designed and calcu-
lated to carry out that object, if a majority of the Legislature
so think, will test the question without delay and without cir-
cumlocution.
The recommendation as to the passage of the two resolu-
tions, Nos. 13 and 14,.is made in the belief that there is, prac-






96



tically, no objection to, but, on the contrary, an almost univer-
sal desire for, a convention of the people of the State, the only
difference being as to the manner of the call and the time' of
its assembling; and, therefore, that the necessary steps to per-
fect the plan inaugurated by the Legislature two years ago
should be taken, so that, in the event of a decision by this Leg-
islature adverse to the short-cut," so-called, or by the people,
if submitted to them, the opportunity of carrying out the
Constitutional mode in 1884 will still exist.
We further recommend immediate action by the Legislature
on the matter of the early submission of the question of a
Convention to the people, so that, should it be determined to
submit it, we may, at once, after the preliminary and indispen-
sable legislation, adjourn, thereby avoiding the profitless waste
of time in such legislation as may be rendered inutile by the new
Constitution, and greatly lessening the expenses incident to
the inauguration of the new era.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
J. J. HARRIS, Chairman.
THos. L. WARD,
JOHN W. HIDDEN,
SAMUEL A. WiLCOX,
H. W. SINDORF,
J. W. BRYANT,
Committee.
Which was read and the report ordered spread upon the
journal.
Mr. Harris asked leave to withdraw a notice made to recon-
sider the resolution relative to the appointment of a committee
to investigate the management of the several railroads;
Which was granted.
The roll of counties being called, the following bills were
introduced and placed among the orders of the day:
By Mr. Trapp:
Assembly bill No. 77:
To be entitled an act for the erection and maintenance of an
institution for the education of deaf mutes.
By Mr. Cobb:
Assembly bill No. 78:
To be entitled an act to provide for the public health by a
uniform system of quarantine.
By Mr. Putnam :
Assembly bill No. 79:
To be entitled an act to amend Section b, Chapter 3219
of the Laws of Florida, relating to license tax on commercial
agents.






97



By Mr. Wilkerson of Marion:
Assembly bill No. 80:
To be entitled an act to compel parents and guardians to
send all able-bodied children to the public schools between
the ages of six and twelve years two-thirds of the time the
schools are in operation, when the distance to and from schools
do not exceed five miles.
By Mr. Perkins:
Assembly bill No. 81:
To be entitled an act to amend an act passed December 15,
1855, in relation to County Surveyors.
By Mr. Harris :
Assembly bill No. 82:
To be entitled an act to amend Section 7, Chapter 3219,
Laws of Florida, for the assessment and collection of revenue,
approved March 5, 1881.
By Mr. Bryant of Polk:
Assembly bill No. 83:
To be entitled an act for the relief of John Davidson, late
Assessor of Revenue for Polk county.

ORDERS OF THE DAY.
Assembly bill No. 5:
To be entitled an act to require the Judge of the Fifth Ju-
dicial Circuit to hold a term of Court for jail delivery at the
times and places herein named;
The consideration of which was pending upon adjournment
on yesterday, was taken up upon the second reading.
Mr. McClellan renewed the motion to indefinitely postpone
the bill.
Mr. Wilkerson moved to lay the motion on the table;
Upon which the yeas and nays were called for by Messrs.
Wilkerson, Cobb and Miller.
The vote was:
Yeas-Messrs. Baker, Bird, Brown, Canova, Cobb, Cowgill,
Davis, Jenkins, Lewey, Lyle, Miller, Moore, Munroe, McCardy,
McCormick, Perkins, Proctor, Putnam, Rollins, Robinson of
Nassau, IRush, Thompson, Tompkins, Trapp, Ward, Weeks,
Wetmore, Wilkerson, Wilkinson and Witherspoon-30.
Nays-Mr. Speaker, Messrs. Allison, Bethel, Blackwell,
Blitch,'Brelsford, Bryan of Orange, Bryant of Polk, Calk,
Campbell, Cassady, Clyatt, Colee, Edwards, Floyd, Gaskins,
Getzen, Goodbread, Grady, Hendry, Keathly, Kickliter, Mabry,
Melvin, Milton, McClellan of Jackson, McLellan of Santa
Rosa, McMullen, McLeod, Neal, Platt, Robinson of Jackson,
7A






98



Sindorf, Townsend, Tully, Vaughn, Whidden, Wilcox and
Wilder-39.
So the- motion was not agreed to.
On motion, leave was granted Mr. Miller to withdraw the
bill.
On motion, Mr. Miller was granted leave of absence for to-
day.
Assembly bill No. 4:
To be entitled an act to limit the jurisdiction of Justices of
the Peace in civil cases to fifty dollars,
Was read the second time, and, on motion of Mr. Stripling,
indefinitely postponed.
Assembly bill No. 6:
To be entitled an act to amend an act for the assessment and
collection of revenue,
Was read the second time, and, on motion of Mr. Wither-
spoon, was indefinitely postponed.
Assembly bill No. 10:
To be entitled an act for a minor to take charge of and man-
age his own estate and to enforce performance of contracts,
Was read the second time.
Mr. Stripling moved to indefinitely postpone the bill;
Upon which the yeas and nays were called for by Messrs.
Stripling and Brown.
The vote was:
Yeas-Messrs. Blackwell, Brelsford, Brown, Cobb, Cowgill,
Davis, Dennis, Edwards, Gaskins, Getzen, Hall, Jenkins, Kick-
liter, Lewey, Lyle, Mabry, Milton, Moore, McCardy, McClel-
lan of Jackson, McLellan of Santa Rosa, McCormick, McLeod,
Osgood, Putnam, Rollins, Robinson of Nassau, Robinson of
Jackson, Rush, Sindorf, Stripling, Thompson, Townsend,
Trapp, Weeks, Wetmore and Wilkinson-37.
Nays-Mr. Speaker, Messrs. Allison, Baker, Bethel, Bird,
Blitch, Bryan of Orange, Bryant of Polk, Calk, Campbell, Ca-
nova, Cassady, Clyatt, Colee, Floyd, Goodbread, Grady, Har-
ris, Hendry, Keathly, Melvin, Munroe, Neal, Perkins, Platt,
Proctor, Tompkins, Tully, Vaughn, Ward, Whidden, White,
Wilcox, Wilder, Wilkerson and Witherspoon-36.
So the motion was agreed to, and the bill indefinitely post-
poned.
Assembly bill No. 11:
To be entitled an act to amend an act to keep in good repair
the public roads and highways of this State, approved March
7, 1881;
Was read the second time and on motion of Mr. Mabry re-
committed to the Committee on Public Roads and Highways.






99



Assembly bill No. 14:
To be entitled an act to amend an act for the assessment
and collection of revenue;
Was read the second time and on motion of Mr. Getzen re-
committed to Judiciary Committee.
Assembly bill No. 15:
To be entitled an act to give the Circuit Courts and Justices
of the Peace concurrent jurisdiction in certain cases;
Was read the second time.
On motion, leave was granted to Mr. Moore to withdraw
the bill.
Assembly bill No. 17 :
To be entitled an act relating to Public Records,
Was read the second time.
On motion of Mr. McClellan of Jackson, the words Sher-
iffs and County Judges were added after the word Clerks,"
in the second and seventeenth lines, and the bill ordered to be
engrossed as amended.
Assembly bill No. 21:
To'be entitled an act to change the names of Luella Pippins
and John Waters Widley, and for other purposes,
Was read the second time.
Mr. Blackwell moved to indefinitely postpone the bill;
Which was not agreed to.
Mr. Blackwell moved to lay the bill upon the table;
Which was not agreed to.
Mr. Osgood moved to make the bill the special order for
Thursday next;
Which was not agreed to.
Mr. McClellan of Jackson moved to strike out that part of
bill referring to change the names;
Which was agreed to, and the bill ordered engrossed as
amended.
Assembly bill No. 19:
To be entitled an act to, enable actual settlers to procure
homes;
Was read the second time.
On motion of Mr. McClellan of Jackson, the further con-
sideration of the bill was postponed until Tuesday next, and
be made the special order for 11 o'clock of that day.
Assembly bill No. 20 :
To be entitled an act to prohibit the sale of intoxicating li-
quors within the limit of any incorporated city or town in the
State of Florida;
Was read the second time.
Mr. Mabry moved to recommit to the Judiciary Committee.







100



M. Osgood moved to amend by recommending to the Com-
mittee on Temperance;
Which was agreed to and the bill committed to the Com-
mittee on Temperance.
The Sergeant-at-Arms made the following report:
ASSEMBLY HALL, Tallahassee, Fla., Jan. 11, 1883.
Hon. CHARLES DOUGHERTY,
Speaker of the Assembly :
Sli-In pursuance of the resolution of the Assembly, I
have conferred with the management of the Florida Central
& Western Railway, and have the honor to report that a
special train for the use of this body in visiting the Asylum
at Chattahoochee next Saturday, will be furnished free by said
road.
Very respectfully,
J. R. MOZLEY,
Sergeant-at-Arms.
Which was read and ordered spread upon the journal, and
the Assembly appointed the hour of eight o'clock A. M. Sat-
urday for leaving the depot for the Asylum.
.On.motion, Mr. Sindorf was excused from attendance on the
Assembly on account of sickness.
On motion of Mr. Getzen, Mr. Fildes, of Alachua, an ex-
member of the Assembly, was invited to a seat within the bar
of the Assembly.
The Speaker announced the following committee on the reso-
lution of Mr. Ward, to inquire into certain railroad irregulari-
ties, viz.: Messrs. Harris, Getzen, Ward, Gaskins, Miller, Den-
nis. McLellan of Santa Rosa.
On motion of Mr. Blackwell, the Assembly took a recess
until 3 o'clock.


THREE O'CLOCK P. M.

The Assembly resumed its session.
The Speaker in the chair.
The roll being called the following members answered to
their names:
Mr. Speaker, Messrs. Allison, Baker, Bethel, Bird, Black-
well, Blitch, Brelsford, Brown, Bryan of Orange, Bryant of
Polk, Calk, Campbell, Canova, Cassady, Cobb, Clyatt, Colee,
Cowgill, Davis, Edwards, Floyd, Gaskins, Getzen, Goodbread,
Grady, Hall, Harris, Hendry, Jenkins, Keathly, Kickliter,





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