<%BANNER%>
HIDE
 Title Page
 January 1875
 February 1875
 Report of Comptroller Cowgill,...
 Treasurer's report for the year...
 Report of the Secretary of State...
 Report of the Attorney General,...
 Six annual report of the commissioner...
 Appendix
 Report of the Secretary of the...
 Report of the sales of lands, for...
 Report of the Treasure of I. I....


FHR UFLAW



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!-- Journal of the proceedings Assembly State Florida, at its ... session ( Serial ) --
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Journal of the proceedings of the House of Representatives of the ... session of the Legislature of the State of Florida
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METS:structMap STRUCT1 physical
METS:div DMDID ORDER 0 main
PDIV1 Title Page
PAGE1
METS:fptr FILEID
PAGE2
PDIV2 January Chapter
PDIV3 Thursday, SUB1
PAGE3
PAGE4 4
PAGE5
PDIV4 Wednesday, 6
PAGE6
PAGE7 7
PDIV5
PAGE8 8
PAGE9 9
PDIV6 Friday,
PAGE10 10
PAGE11 11
PAGE12 12
PAGE13 13
PAGE14 14
PAGE15 15
PAGE16 16
PAGE17 17
PAGE18 18
PAGE19 19
PAGE20 20
PAGE21 21
PDIV7 Monday,
PAGE22 22
PAGE23 23
PDIV8 Tuesday,
PAGE24 24
PAGE25 25
PAGE26 26
PAGE27 27
PAGE28 28
PAGE29 29
PDIV9
PAGE30 30
PAGE31 31
PDIV10
PAGE32 32
PAGE33 33
PDIV11
PAGE34 34
PAGE35 35
PDIV12 Saturday,
PAGE36 36
PAGE37 37
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PDIV13
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PDIV14
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PDIV15
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PDIV16
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PDIV17
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PDIV18
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PDIV19
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PDIV20
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PDIV21
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PDIV22 February
PDIV23
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PDIV24
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PDIV25
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PDIV26
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PDIV27
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PDIV28
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PDIV29
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PDIV30
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PAGE215 215
PAGE216 216
PAGE217 217
PAGE218 218
PDIV31
PAGE219 219
PAGE220 220
PAGE221 221
PAGE222 222
PAGE223 223
PAGE224 224
PAGE225 225
PAGE226 226
PAGE227 227
PAGE228 228
PAGE229 229
PAGE230 230
PDIV32
PAGE231 231
PAGE232 232
PAGE233 233
PAGE234 234
PAGE235 235
PAGE236 236
PAGE237 237
PAGE238 238
PAGE239 239
PDIV33
PAGE240 240
PAGE241 241
PAGE242 242
PAGE243 243
PAGE244 244
PAGE245 245
PAGE246 246
PAGE247 247
PAGE248 248
PAGE249 249
PAGE250 250
PAGE251 251
PAGE252 252
PDIV34
PAGE253 253
PAGE254 254
PAGE255 255
PAGE256 256
PAGE257 257
PAGE258 258
PDIV35
PAGE259 259
PAGE260 260
PAGE261 261
PAGE262 262
PAGE263 263
PAGE264 264
PAGE265 265
PAGE266 266
PAGE267 267
PAGE268 268
PAGE269 269
PAGE270 270
PDIV36
PAGE271 271
PAGE272 272
PAGE273 273
PAGE274 274
PAGE275 275
PAGE276 276
PAGE277 277
PAGE278 278
PAGE279 279
PAGE280 280
PAGE281 281
PAGE282 282
PAGE283 283
PAGE284 284
PAGE285 285
PAGE286 286
PAGE287 287
PAGE288 288
PAGE289 289
PAGE290 290
PAGE291 291
PAGE292 292
PAGE293 293
PDIV37
PAGE294 294
PAGE295 295
PAGE296 296
PAGE297 297
PAGE298 298
PAGE299 299
PAGE300 300
PAGE301 301
PAGE302 302
PAGE303 303
PAGE304 304
PAGE305 305
PAGE306 306
PAGE307 307
PAGE308 308
PAGE309 309
PDIV38
PAGE310 310
PAGE311 311
PAGE312 312
PAGE313 313
PAGE314 314
PAGE315 315
PAGE316 316
PAGE317 317
PAGE318 318
PAGE319 319
PAGE320 320
PAGE321 321
PAGE322 322
PAGE323 323
PAGE324 324
PDIV39
PAGE325 325
PAGE326 326
PAGE327 327
PAGE328 328
PAGE329 329
PAGE330 330
PAGE331 331
PAGE332 332
PAGE333 333
PAGE334 334
PAGE335 335
PAGE336 336
PAGE337 337
PAGE338 338
PAGE339 339
PAGE340 340
PDIV40
PAGE341 341
PAGE342 342
PAGE343 343
PAGE344 344
PAGE345 345
PAGE346 346
PAGE347 347
PAGE348 348
PAGE349 349
PAGE350 350
PAGE351 351
PAGE352 352
PAGE353 353
PAGE354 354
PAGE355 355
PDIV41
PAGE356 356
PAGE357 357
PAGE358 358
PAGE359 359
PAGE360 360
PAGE361 361
PAGE362 362
PAGE363 363
PAGE364 364
PAGE365 365
PAGE366 366
PAGE367
PAGE368
PAGE369 369
PAGE370 370
PAGE371 371
PAGE372 372
PDIV42
PAGE373
PAGE374 374
PAGE375 375
PAGE376 376
PAGE377 377
PAGE378 378
PAGE379 379
PAGE380 380
PAGE381 381
PAGE382 382
PAGE383 383
PAGE384 384
PAGE385 385
PDIV43
PAGE386 386
PAGE387 387
PAGE388 388
PAGE389 389
PAGE390 390
PAGE391 391
PAGE392 392
PAGE393 393
PAGE394 394
PAGE395 395
PAGE396 396
PAGE397 397
PAGE398 398
PDIV44
PAGE399 399
PAGE400 400
PAGE401 401
PAGE402 402
PAGE403 403
PAGE404 404
PAGE405 405
PAGE406 406
PAGE407 407
PAGE408 408
PAGE409 409
PDIV45
PAGE410 410
PAGE411 411
PAGE412 412
PAGE413 413
PAGE414 414
PAGE415 415
PAGE416 416
PDIV46 Report Comptroller Cowgill, for year ending December 31, 1874
PAGE417
PAGE418
PAGE419
PAGE420
PAGE421
PAGE422
PAGE423
PAGE424
PAGE425
PAGE426
PAGE427
PAGE428
PAGE429
PAGE430
PAGE431
PAGE432
PDIV47 Treasurer's report
PAGE433
PAGE434
PAGE435
PAGE436
PAGE437
PAGE438
PAGE439
PAGE440
PAGE441
PAGE442
PAGE443
PAGE444
PDIV48 Secretary
PAGE445
PAGE446
PAGE447
PAGE448
PAGE449 33-70
PDIV49 Attorney General,
PAGE450
PAGE451
PAGE452
PAGE453
PAGE454
PAGE455
PAGE456
PAGE457
PAGE458
PAGE459
PAGE460
PAGE461
PAGE462
PAGE463
PAGE464
PAGE465
PAGE466
PAGE467
PAGE468
PAGE469
PAGE470
PAGE471
PAGE472
PAGE473
PAGE474
PAGE475
PAGE476
PAGE477
PAGE478
PAGE479
PAGE480
PAGE481
PAGE482
PAGE483
PAGE484
PAGE485
PAGE486
PAGE487
PAGE488
PAGE489
PAGE490
PAGE491
PDIV50 Six annual commissioner lands and immigration state
PAGE492
PAGE493
PAGE494
PAGE495
PAGE496
PAGE497
PAGE498
PAGE499
PAGE500
PAGE501
PAGE502
PAGE503
PAGE504
PAGE505
PAGE506
PAGE507
PAGE508
PAGE509
PAGE510
PAGE511
PAGE512
PAGE513
PAGE514
PAGE515
PAGE516
PAGE517
PDIV51 Appendix
PAGE518
PAGE519
PAGE520
PAGE521
PAGE522
PAGE523
PAGE524
PAGE525
PAGE526
PAGE527
PAGE528
PAGE529
PAGE530
PAGE531
PAGE532
PAGE533
PAGE534
PAGE535
PAGE536
PAGE537
PAGE538
PAGE539
PAGE540
PAGE541
PAGE542
PAGE543
PAGE544
PAGE545
PAGE546
PAGE547
PAGE548
PAGE549
PAGE550
PAGE551
PAGE552
PAGE553
PAGE554
PAGE555
PAGE556
PAGE557
PAGE558
PAGE559
PAGE560
PAGE561
PAGE562
PAGE563
PAGE564
PAGE565
PAGE566
PAGE567
PAGE568
PAGE569
PAGE570
PAGE571
PAGE572
PAGE573
PAGE574
PAGE575
PAGE576
PAGE577
PAGE578
PAGE579
PAGE580
PAGE581
PAGE582
PAGE583
PAGE584
PAGE585
PAGE586
PAGE587
PAGE588
PAGE589
PAGE590
PAGE591
PAGE592
PAGE593
PAGE594
PAGE595
PAGE596
PAGE597
PAGE598
PAGE599
PAGE600
PAGE601
PAGE602
PAGE603
PAGE604
PAGE605
PAGE606
PAGE607
PAGE608
PAGE609
PAGE610
PAGE611
PAGE612
PAGE613
PAGE614
PAGE615
PAGE616
PAGE617
PAGE618
PAGE619
PAGE620
PAGE621
PAGE622
PAGE623
PAGE624
PAGE625
PAGE626
PAGE627
PAGE628
PAGE629
PAGE630
PAGE631
PAGE632
PAGE633
PAGE634
PAGE635
PAGE636
PAGE637
PAGE638
PAGE639
PAGE640
PAGE641
PAGE642
PAGE643
PAGE644
PAGE645
PAGE646
PAGE647
PAGE648
PAGE649
PAGE650
PAGE651
PAGE652
PAGE653
PAGE654
PAGE655
PAGE656
PAGE657
PAGE658
PAGE659
PAGE660
PAGE661
PAGE662
PAGE663
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PAGE665
PAGE666
PAGE667
PAGE668
PAGE669
PAGE670
PAGE671
PAGE672
PAGE673
PAGE674
PAGE675
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PAGE680
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PAGE685
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PAGE688
PAGE689
PAGE690
PAGE691
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PAGE693
PAGE694
PAGE695
PAGE696
PAGE697
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PAGE699
PAGE700
PAGE701
PAGE702
PAGE703
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PAGE709
PAGE710
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PAGE712
PAGE713
PAGE714
PAGE715
PAGE716
PAGE717
PAGE718
PAGE719
PAGE720
PAGE721
PAGE722
PAGE723
PAGE724
PAGE725
PAGE726
PAGE727
PAGE728
PAGE729
PAGE730
PAGE731
PAGE732
PAGE733
PAGE734
PAGE735
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PAGE737
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PAGE750
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PAGE760
PAGE761
PAGE762
PAGE763
PDIV52 Board Trustees Internal Improvement Fund,
PAGE764
PAGE765
PAGE766
PAGE767
PAGE768
PAGE769
PAGE770
PAGE771
PDIV53 sales lands,
PAGE772
PAGE773
PAGE774
PAGE775
PDIV54 Treasure I. Fund
PAGE776
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A Journal of the proceedings of the Assembly of the State of Florida, at its ... session
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00027833/00012
 Material Information
Title: A Journal of the proceedings of the Assembly of the State of Florida, at its ... session
Alternate Title: Assembly journal
Caption title: Journal of the Assembly of the State of Florida, at the ... session of the Legislature
Physical Description: v. : ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Legislature. -- House of Representatives
Publisher: State Printer
Place of Publication: Tallahassee
Creation Date: January 5, 1875
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Legislative journals -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Politics and government -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
General Note: At head of title: Assembly journal.
General Note: Description based on: 4th session (1871).
Funding: Digitized for the Florida House of Representatives, the Office of the Clerk.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Florida House of Representatives. Office of the Clerk.
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 003417931
oclc - 12901205
lccn - sn 85065605
System ID: UF00027833:00012
 Related Items
Preceded by: Journal of the proceedings of the House of Representatives of the ... General Assembly of the State of the State of Florida, at its ... session
Succeeded by: Journal of the proceedings of the House of Representatives of the ... session of the Legislature of the State of Florida

Table of Contents
    Title Page
        Page 1
        Page 2
    January 1875
        Thursday, January 5
            Page 3
            Page 4
            Page 5
        Wednesday, January 6
            Page 6
            Page 7
        Thursday, January 7
            Page 8
            Page 9
        Friday, January 8
            Page 10
            Page 11
            Page 12
            Page 13
            Page 14
            Page 15
            Page 16
            Page 17
            Page 18
            Page 19
            Page 20
            Page 21
        Monday, January 11
            Page 22
            Page 23
        Tuesday, January 12
            Page 24
            Page 25
            Page 26
            Page 27
            Page 28
            Page 29
        Wednesday, January 13
            Page 30
            Page 31
        Thursday, January 14
            Page 32
            Page 33
        Friday, January 15
            Page 34
            Page 35
        Saturday, January 16
            Page 36
            Page 37
            Page 38
            Page 39
            Page 40
            Page 41
            Page 42
            Page 43
            Page 44
            Page 45
            Page 46
            Page 47
            Page 48
            Page 49
            Page 50
            Page 51
            Page 52
            Page 53
            Page 54
            Page 55
            Page 56
            Page 57
            Page 58
            Page 59
            Page 60
            Page 61
            Page 62
            Page 63
            Page 64
            Page 65
            Page 66
            Page 67
            Page 68
            Page 69
            Page 70
            Page 71
            Page 72
            Page 73
            Page 74
            Page 75
            Page 76
            Page 77
            Page 78
            Page 79
        Monday, January 18
            Page 80
            Page 81
            Page 82
        Wednesday, January 20
            Page 83
            Page 84
            Page 85
            Page 86
            Page 87
            Page 88
            Page 89
        Thursday, January 21
            Page 90
            Page 91
            Page 92
            Page 93
        Monday, January 25
            Page 94
            Page 95
            Page 96
            Page 97
            Page 98
            Page 99
            Page 100
            Page 101
            Page 102
            Page 103
        Tuesday, January 26
            Page 104
            Page 105
            Page 106
            Page 107
            Page 108
            Page 109
            Page 110
        Wednesday, January 27
            Page 111
            Page 112
            Page 113
            Page 114
            Page 115
            Page 116
            Page 117
            Page 118
            Page 119
            Page 120
            Page 121
            Page 122
        Thursday, January 28
            Page 123
            Page 124
            Page 125
            Page 126
            Page 127
            Page 128
            Page 129
            Page 130
            Page 131
            Page 132
        Friday, January 29
            Page 133
            Page 134
            Page 135
            Page 136
            Page 137
            Page 138
            Page 139
            Page 140
            Page 141
            Page 142
            Page 143
        Saturday, January 30
            Page 144
            Page 145
            Page 146
            Page 147
            Page 148
            Page 149
            Page 150
            Page 151
            Page 152
            Page 153
            Page 154
            Page 155
    February 1875
        Monday, February 1
            Page 156
            Page 157
            Page 158
            Page 159
            Page 160
            Page 161
        Tuesday, February 2
            Page 162
            Page 163
            Page 164
            Page 165
            Page 166
            Page 167
            Page 168
            Page 169
            Page 170
        Wednesday, February 3
            Page 171
            Page 172
            Page 173
            Page 174
            Page 175
            Page 176
            Page 177
            Page 178
            Page 179
            Page 180
        Thursday, February 4
            Page 181
            Page 182
            Page 183
            Page 184
            Page 185
            Page 186
            Page 187
        Friday, February 5
            Page 188
            Page 189
            Page 190
            Page 191
            Page 192
            Page 193
            Page 194
            Page 195
        Saturday, February 6
            Page 196
            Page 197
            Page 198
            Page 199
            Page 200
            Page 201
            Page 202
            Page 203
            Page 204
        Monday, February 8
            Page 205
            Page 206
            Page 207
            Page 208
            Page 209
            Page 210
            Page 211
            Page 212
        Tuesday, February 9
            Page 213
            Page 214
            Page 215
            Page 216
            Page 217
            Page 218
        Wednesday, February 10
            Page 219
            Page 220
            Page 221
            Page 222
            Page 223
            Page 224
            Page 225
            Page 226
            Page 227
            Page 228
            Page 229
            Page 230
        Thursday, February 11
            Page 231
            Page 232
            Page 233
            Page 234
            Page 235
            Page 236
            Page 237
            Page 238
            Page 239
        Friday, February 12
            Page 240
            Page 241
            Page 242
            Page 243
            Page 244
            Page 245
            Page 246
            Page 247
            Page 248
            Page 249
            Page 250
            Page 251
            Page 252
        Saturday, February 13
            Page 253
            Page 254
            Page 255
            Page 256
            Page 257
            Page 258
        Monday, February 15
            Page 259
            Page 260
            Page 261
            Page 262
            Page 263
            Page 264
            Page 265
            Page 266
            Page 267
            Page 268
            Page 269
            Page 270
        Tuesday, February 16
            Page 271
            Page 272
            Page 273
            Page 274
            Page 275
            Page 276
            Page 277
            Page 278
            Page 279
            Page 280
            Page 281
            Page 282
            Page 283
            Page 284
            Page 285
            Page 286
            Page 287
            Page 288
            Page 289
            Page 290
            Page 291
            Page 292
            Page 293
        Wednesday, February 17
            Page 294
            Page 295
            Page 296
            Page 297
            Page 298
            Page 299
            Page 300
            Page 301
            Page 302
            Page 303
            Page 304
            Page 305
            Page 306
            Page 307
            Page 308
            Page 309
        Thursday, February 18
            Page 310
            Page 311
            Page 312
            Page 313
            Page 314
            Page 315
            Page 316
            Page 317
            Page 318
            Page 319
            Page 320
            Page 321
            Page 322
            Page 323
            Page 324
        Friday, February 19
            Page 325
            Page 326
            Page 327
            Page 328
            Page 329
            Page 330
            Page 331
            Page 332
            Page 333
            Page 334
            Page 335
            Page 336
            Page 337
            Page 338
            Page 339
            Page 340
        Saturday, February 20
            Page 341
            Page 342
            Page 343
            Page 344
            Page 345
            Page 346
            Page 347
            Page 348
            Page 349
            Page 350
            Page 351
            Page 352
            Page 353
            Page 354
            Page 355
        Monday, February 22
            Page 356
            Page 357
            Page 358
            Page 359
            Page 360
            Page 361
            Page 362
            Page 363
            Page 364
            Page 365
            Page 366
            Page 367
            Page 368
            Page 369
            Page 370
            Page 371
            Page 372
        Tuesday, February 23
            Page 373
            Page 374
            Page 375
            Page 376
            Page 377
            Page 378
            Page 379
            Page 380
            Page 381
            Page 382
            Page 383
            Page 384
            Page 385
        Wednesday, February 24
            Page 386
            Page 387
            Page 388
            Page 389
            Page 390
            Page 391
            Page 392
            Page 393
            Page 394
            Page 395
            Page 396
            Page 397
            Page 398
        Thursday, February 25
            Page 399
            Page 400
            Page 401
            Page 402
            Page 403
            Page 404
            Page 405
            Page 406
            Page 407
            Page 408
            Page 409
        Friday, February 26
            Page 410
            Page 411
            Page 412
            Page 413
            Page 414
            Page 415
            Page 416
    Report of Comptroller Cowgill, for the year ending December 31, 1874
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
    Treasurer's report for the year ending December 31, 1874
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
    Report of the Secretary of State for the year ending December 31, 1874
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33-70
    Report of the Attorney General, for the year ending December 31, 1874
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    Six annual report of the commissioner of lands and immigration of the state of Florida, for the year ending December 31, 1874
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    Report of the Secretary of the Board of Trustees of the Internal Improvement Fund, for the year ending December 31, 1874
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    Report of the Treasure of I. I. Fund
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Full Text


ASSEMBLY JOURNAL.


IlDA ST A LIUAARY

A JOURNAL OF THE PROCEEDINGS

OF THE


.ASSEMBLY

OF TIIE


STATE OF FLORIDA,

AT ITS

EIGHTH SESSION,

EQGUN AND HELD IN THE CAPITOL, IN THE CITY OF TALLAHASSEE
ON TUESDAY, JANUARY 6, 1876.




THOSE. HANNAH (of Washington), SPEAKER.
H. S. HARMON (of Alachua), CHIEF CLERK.




TALLAHASSEE, FLA.:
P 'RIkTED AT THE OFFICE OF THE FLORIDIAN.
1875.
















JOURNAL

Of the Assembly of the State of Florida, at the Eighth'Session
of the Legislature, bequn and held at the Capitol, in the city
of Tallahassee, in the State of Florida, on Tuesday, the 5th
day of January, A. D. 1875, being the day fixed by the Con-
stitution of the State of Florida for the meeting of the
Legislature.

The Assembly was called to order at 12 o'clock M., by H. S..
Harmon, Chief Clerk.
The roll of counties being called, the following members ap-
peared, presented their credentials and were sworn as members
of the Assembly of the State of Florida by Samuel Walker,
County Judge of Leon county:
Alachua-T. C. Gass and George Washington.
Baker-F. P. Pons. F. J ,;ns
Bradford-Charles E. Jones.
Brevard-Quinn Bass.
Calhoun-James Stanfill.
Clay-Benj. Frisbee.
Columbia-J. H. Armstrong and Charles Thompson.
Dade-W. W. Hicks.
Duval-Alfred Grant and Joseph E. Lee.
Escambia-Charles W. Jones and J. J. McGuire.
Franklin-W. T. Orman.
Gadsden-George Nixon and M. Martin.
Hernando-Newton A. Carter.'
Hillsborough-H. L. Mitchell.
Holmes-Malcom Gillis.
Jackson-B. F. Livingston and R. H. Dennis.
Jefferson-G. W. Witherspoon, Chas. Harris and Augustus
Tilghman.
Lafayette-Redden B. Hill.
Leon-John E. Proctor, Z. H. Morehead, C. F. Avery and.
Lucien Fisher.
Levy-W. J. Jones.
Liberty-Theo. H. Jackson.
Madison-David Montgomery and 0. J. Coleman.
Marion-W. J. Tucker and Samuel Small.
Monroe-Joseph B. Browne.






4



Nassau-Samuel Petty.
Orange-John M. Bryan.
Polk-Sherwood E. Roberts.
Putnam-E. R. Chadwick.
St. Johns-Thomas T. Russell.
Sumter-Hugh A. Corley.
Suwannee-Daniel' M. McAlpin.
Taylor-John H. Sutton.
Volusia-B. R. Wilson.
Wakulla-John S. Ferrell.
Walton-G. H. Berry.
Washington-Thomas Hannah.
Mr. Mitchell moved that Mr. Judge, of Santa Rosa county,
come forward and be sworn in as a member of the Assembly.
The Clerk refused to entertain the motion.
Mr. Montgomery moved that the Assembly proceed to the
election of Speaker of the Assembly;
"Which was agreed to.
Mr. Mitchell nominated Mr. H. A. Corley, of Sumter.
Mr. Washington nominated Mr. D. Montgomery, of Madison.
Mr; Armstrong nominated Mr. W. W. Hicks, of Dade.
Mr. Dennis nominated Mr. M. Martin, of Gadsden.
The vote was:
FOR CORLEY-Messrs. Berry, Browne, Bryan, Carter, Fer-
rell, Frisbee, Gillis, Hannah, Jackson, Jones of Escambia,
Jones of Bradford, Jones of Levy, McAlpin, McGuire, Mitchell,
Orman, Pons, Roberts, Russell, Stanfill and Wilson-21.
Fon MONTGOMERY-Messrs. Coleman, Grant, Harris, Lee,
Martin, Small, Tilghman, Thompson, Tucker, Washington and
Witherspoon-11.
FOR HICKS-Messrs. Armstrong, Avery, Bass, Fisher, Gass,
Hill, Morehead, Petty, Proctor and Sutton-10.
FOR MARTIN-Messrs. Chadwick, Dennis, Livingston and
Nixon-4.
FOR AVERY-Mr. Hick-1. *
FoR CHADWICK-Mr. Montgomery-i.
BLANK-Mr. Corley-l.
No one of the candidates having received a majority of all
the votes cast, the Clerk declared that there was no election.
On mdtjon of Mr. Montgomery, the Assembly proceeded to
a second ballot for Speaker, which resulted as follows:
FOR CORLEY-Messrs. Berry, Browne, Bryan, Carter, Fer-
rell. Frisbee, Gillis, Hannah, Jackson, Jones of Escambia,
Jones of Bradford, Jones of Levy, McAlpin, McGuire, Mitchell,
Orman, Pons, Roberts, Russell, Stanfill and Wilson-21.
FOR MONTGOMERY-Messrs. Coleman, Grant, Small, Tilgh-
man, Thompson,.Tucker, Washington and Witherspoon-8..







5



FOR HICKs-Messrs. Armstrong, Avery, Bass, Fisher, Gass,
Harris, Hill, Morehead, Proctor and Sutton-10.
FOR MARTIN-Messrs. Chadwick, Dennis, Livingston, Nixon
and Petty-5.
FOR CHADWICK-Messrs. Martin and Montgomery-2.
FOR BERRY-Mr. Corley-1.
FOR HILL-Mr. Hicks-1.
No one of the candidates having received a majority of the
votes, there was no election.
Mr. Hannah moved that the Assembly adjourn until to-mor-
row at 10 o'clock.
. The yeas and nays were called for on the motion, and the
vote was:
Yeas-Messrs. Berry, Browne, Bryan, Carter, Corley, Fer-
rell, Frisbee, Gillis, Hannah, Hill, Jackson, Jones of Escambia,
Jones of Bradford, Jones of Levy, McAlpin, McGuire, Mitchell,
Orman, Pons, Roberts, Russell, Stanfill and Wilson-23.
Nays-Messrs. Armstrong, Bass, Chadwick, Coleman, Den-
nis, Fisher, Gass, Grant, Harris, Hicks, Lee, Livingston, Mar-
tin, Morehead, Montgomery, Nixon, Petty, Proctor, Small,
Sutton, Tilghman, Thompson, Tucker, Washington and With-
erspoon-26.
So the motion was not agreed to.
On motion of Mr. Gass, the. Assembly proceeded to the third
ballot for Speaker.
The vote was:
FOR CORLEY-Messrs. Berry, Browne, Bryan, Carter, Fer-
rell, Frisbee, Gillis, Hannah, Jackson, Jones of Escambia,
Jones of Bradford, Jones of Levy, McAlpin, McGuire, Mitchell,
Orman, Pons, Roberts, Russell, Stanfill and' Wilson-21.
FOR MONTGOMERY-Messrs. Coleman, Grant, Lee, Small,
Tilghman, Thompson, Tucker, Washington and Witherspoon
-9.
FOR HICKS-Messrs. Armstrong, Avery, Bass, Fisher, Gass,
Harris, Hill, Morehead, Proctor and Sutton-10.
.FOR MARTIN-Messrs. Chadwick, Dennis, Livingston Nixon
and Petty-5.
FOR AVERY-Mr. Hicks-1.
FOR CHADWICK-Mr. Martin-1.
FOR BERRY-Mr. Corley-1.
FOR LEE-Mr. Montgomery-1.
No one of the candidates having received a majority of the
votes cast, there was no election.
Mr. Hicks moved that the Assembly adjourn until. to-mor-
row at 12 o'clock M., upon which the yeas and nays were called
for.
The vote was:



*











6



Yeas-Messrs. Avery, Bass, Berry, Browne, Bryan, Carter,
Corley, Ferrell, Frisbee, Gillis, Hannah, Hicks, Hill, Jackson,
-Jones of Escambia, Jones of Bradford, Jones of Levy, Martin,
McAlpin, McGuire, Mitchell, Orman, Pons, Roberts, Russell,
Stanfill, Sutton and Wilson-28.
Nays-Messrs. Armstrong, Chadwick, Coleman, Dennis,
Fisher, Gass, Grant, Harris, Lee, Livingston, Morehead, Mont-
gomery, Nixon, Petty, Proctor, Small, Tilghman, Thompson,
Tucker, Washington and Witherspoon-21.
The motion prevailed, and the Assembly adjourned.








WEDNESDAY, January 6, 1875.

The Assembly met pursuant to adjournment.
The roll being called, the following members answered to
their names:
MeSsrs. Armstrong, Avery, Bass, Berry, Browne, Bryan,
Carter, Chadwick, Coleman, Corley, Dennis, Ferrell Fisher,
Frisbee, Gass, Gillis, Grant, Hannah, Harris, Hicks, Hill,
Jackson, Jones of Escambia, Jones of Bradford, Jones
of Levy, Lee, Livingston, Martin, McAlpin, McGuire,
Mitchell, Morehead, Montgomery, Nixon, Orman, Petty, Pons,
Proctor, Roberts, Russell, Small, Stanfill, Sutton, Tilghman,
Thompson, Tucker, Washington, Wilson and Witherspoon-51.
A quorum present.
On motion of Mr. Gass, the reading of yesterday's journal
was dispensed with.
On motion of Mr. C6oley, Messrs. Duncan of Hamilton and
Hagan of Manatee came forward, presented their credentials
and were sworn as members of the Assembly.
On motion of Mr. Montgomery, the Assembly proceeded to
the election of Speaker.
The vote was:
FOR HICKs-Messrs. Armstrong, Avery, Bass, Fisher, Gass,
Hill, Morehead, Proctor and Thompson-9.
"FOR DUNCAN-Messrs. Berry, Carter, Corley, Gillis, 'Han-
nah, Hagan, Jackson, Jones of Escambia, Jones of Bradford,
Jones of Levy, McGuire, Mitchell, Orman, Pons, Russell and
Sutton-16.







7



SFOR MARTIN-Messrs. Chadwick, Dennis, Hicks, Living-
ston, Nixon and Washington-6.
FOn HANNAH-Messrs. Browne, Bryan, Duncan, Ferrell,
Frisbee, McAlpin, Roberts, Stanfill and Wilson-9.
FOR MONTGOMERY-Messrs. Coleman, Grant, Harris, Lee,
Petty, Small, Tilghman, Tucker and Witherspoon-9.
For. CHADWICK-M1essrs. Martin and Montgomery-2.
No one of the candidate's having received a majority of the
votes cast, there was no election.
Mr. Berry moved that Mr. Martin take the chair as tempo-
rary Speaker of the Assembly.
Mr. Lee offered the following as a substitute:
That the Assembly proceed to the election of a permanent
Speaker of the Assembly;
Which was agreed to, and the Assembly proceeded to
another ballot with the following result:
FOR DUNCAN-Messrs. Berry, Browne, pryan, Carter, Cor-
ley, Ferrell, Frisbee, Gillis, Hannah, Hagan, Hill, Jackson,
Jones of Escambia, Jones of Bradford, Jones of Levy, McAl-
pin, McGuire, Mitchell, Orman, Pons, Roberts, Russell, Stan-
fill, Sutton and Wilson-25.
FOR HIcKs-Messrs. Armstrong, Avery, Bass, Fisher, Gass,
Harris, Morehead, Proctor, Tilghman, Thompson, Washing-
ton and Witherspoon-12.
FOR MARTIN-Messrs. Chadwick, Coleman. Dennis, Hicks,
Livingston, Nixon and Petty-7.
FOR CHADWICK-Messrs. Grant, Lee, Martin, Montgomery,
Small and Tucker-6.
BLANK-Mr. Duncan--1.
No one of the candidates having received a majority of the
votes cast, there was no election.
On motion of Mr. Washington, the Assemhbly proceeded to
a third ballot for Speaker, which resulted as follows:
FOR DUNCAN-Messrs. Berry, Browne, Bryan, Carter, Cor-
ley, Duncan, Ferrell, Frisbee, Gillis, Hannah, Hagan, Hill,
Jackson, Jones of Escambia, Jones. of Bradford, Jones of
Levy, McAlpin, McGuire, Mitchell, Orman, Pons, Roberts,
Russell, Stanfill and Wilson-25.
FOR HIcKs-Messrs. Armstrong, Avery, Bass, Coleman,
Dennis, Fisher, Gass, Grant, Harris, Lee, Livingston, More-
head, Montgomery. Petty, Proctor, Small, Sutton, Tilghman,
Thompson, Tucker, Washington and Witherspoon-22.
FOR MARTIN-Messrs. Chadwick, Hicks and Nixon-3.
FOR CHADWICK-Mr. Martin-1.
No one of the candidates having received a majority of the
votes cast, there was no election.
On motion of Mr. Washington, the Assembly proceeded to
a fourth ballot for Speaker, with the following result:






8



FOR DUNCAN-Messrs. Berry, Browne, Bryan, Carter, Cor-
ley, Ferrill, Frisbee, Gillis, Hannah, Hagan, Jackson, Jones of
Escambia, Jones of Bradford, Jones of Levy, McAlpin, Mc-
Guire, Mitchell, Orman, Pons, Roberts, Russell, Stanfill and
Wilson-23.
FOR HICKs-Messrs. Arnistrong, Avery, Bass, Dennis, Fish-
er, Gass, Harris, Hill, Morehead, Montgomery, Petty, Proc-
tor, Small, Sutton, Tilghman, Thompson, Tucker, Washing-
ton and Witherspoon-19.
FOR MARTIN-Messrs. Chadwick and Nixon-2.,
FOR CIADWICK-Messrs. Coleman, Grant, Lee, Livingston
and Martin-5.
BLANK-Messrs. Duncan ind Hicks-2.
No one of the candidates having received a majority of the
votes cast, there was no election.
Mr. Montgomery moved that the Assembly adjourn until
to-morrow 12 o'clock, M.:
Upon which the yeas and nays were called for and the vote
was:
Yeas-Messrs. Avery, Berry Browne, Bryan, Carter, Chad-
wick, Corley, Duncan, Ferrell, Frisbee, Gillis, Hannah, Ha-
gan, Jackson, Jones of Escambia, Jones of Bradford, Jones of
Levy, Livingston, Martin, McAlpin, McGuire, Mitchell, Mont-
gomery, Orman, Pons, Roberts, Russell, Stanfill, Sutton and
Wilson-30.
Nays-Messrs. Armstrong, Bass, Coleman, Dennis, Fisher,
Gass, Grant, Harris, Hicks, Hill, Lee, Morehead, Nixon, Petty,
Proctor, Small, Tilghman, Thompson, Tucker, Washington and
Witherspoon-21.
So the motion prevailed and the Assembly adjourned.








THURSDAY, January ', 1875.

The Assembly met pursuant to adjournment.
The roll being called, the following members answered'to
their names:
Messrs. Armstrong, Avery, Bass, Berry, Browne, Bryan,
Carter, Ohadwick, Coleman, Corley, Dennis, Ferrell, Fisher,
Frisbee, Gass, Gillis, Grant, Hannah, Harris, Hagan, Hicks,







9

Hill, Jackson, Jones of Escambia, Jones of Bradford, Jones of
Levy, Lee, Livingston, Martin, McAlpin, McGuire, Mitchell,
Morehead, Montgomery, Nixon, Orman, Petty, Pons, Proctor,
Roberts, Russell, Small, Stanfill, Sutton, Tilghman, Thompson,
Tucker, Washington, Wilson and Witherspoon-50.
A quorum present.
On motion of Mr. Gass, the reading of yesterday's journal
was dispensed with and the journal approved.
Mr. Montgomery moved that the Assembly proceed to the
election of Speaker;
Which was agreed to.
Mr. Hicks nominated Mr. Hannah, of Washington.
The vote was:
.FoR HANNAH-Messrs. Avery, Bass, Berry, Browne, Bryan,
Carter, Corley, Duncan, Ferrell, Frisbee, Gillis, Hagan, Hicks,
Hill, Jackson, Jones of Esoambia, Jones of Bradford, Jones
of Levy, McAlpin, McGuire, Mitchell, Morehead, Orman,
Pons, Proctor, Roberts, Russell, Stanfill, Sutton and Wilson
-30.
FOR MONTGOMERY-Messrs. Armstrong, Chadwick, Coleman,
Dennis, Fisher, Gass, Grant, Harris, Lee, Livingston, Martin,
Nixon, Petty, Small, Tilghman, Thompson, Tucker, Washing-
ton and Witherspoon-19.
FOR HICKS-Mr. Hannah-1.
FOR HILL-Mr. Montgomery-1.
Mr'. Hannah, having received a majority of-the votes cast,
was declared Speaker of the Assembly.
On motion of Mr. Proctor, Messrs. Proctor, Hicks and
Mitchell were appointed a Committee to escort Mr. Hannah to
the chair.
On taking the chair, Mr. Hannah said:
Gentlemen of the Assembly:
I thank you most heartily for the confidence Avidently re-
posed in me by this election; and in entering upon the duties
of the responsible position to which by your kindness I have
been elevated, it is perhaps expected that I should say some-
thing by way of defining my course as your presiding officer.
In doing this, gentlemen, I propose to be plain and brief.
While acting as your Speaker I shall try to be impartial in the
discharge of my duties, and endeavor to recognize no party,.
section or class, and shall exert every means in my power to
reconcile differences and promote the general good of all. And
as it is highly important that we should strictly adhere to the
rules by which we are to be governed, I shall look to you for
aid, and earnestly desire your co-operation in enforcing them,
to the end that order may be preserved and business despatched,






10



with a due regard to perfection in our work and a speedy ter-
mination of the session. Let us also enter upon a policy of
retrenchment, and by reducing the expenses of government as
far as practicable, afford relief to our people.
In conclusion, gentlemen, permit me again to thank you for
the distinguished honor conferred upon me by this election,
and to express the hope that your expectations will not be.
disappointed.
On motion of Mr. Mitchell, the Assembly adjourned until
12 o'clock M. to-morrow.




FRIDAY, January. 8, 1875

The Assembly met pursuant to adjournment.
The roll being called, the following members answered to
their names:
Mr. Speaker, Messrs. Armstrong, Avery, Bass, Berry, Browne,
Bryan, Carter, Chadwick, Coleman, Corley, Dennis, Duncan,
Ferrell, Fisher, Frisbee, Gass, Gillis, Grant, Harris, Hagan,
Hicks, Hill, Jackson, Jones of Escambia, Jones of Bradford,
Jones of Levy, Lee, Livingston, McAlpin, McGuire, Mitchell,
Montgomery, Nixon, Orman, Petty, Pons, Proctor, Rdberts,
Russell, Small, Stanfill, Sutton, Tilghman, Thompson, Tucker,
Washington, Wilson and Witherspoon'-49.
A quorum present.
By request of the Speaker, prayer' was offered by the Rev.
W. W. Hicks, of Dade.
On motion of Mr. Gass, the reading of. yesterday's journal
was dispensed with and the journal approved.
On motion of. Mr. Gass, the Assembly proceeded to the
election of Chief Clerk.
The vote was:
FoB HABMON-Mr. Speaker, Messrs. Armstrong, Avery,
Bass, Berry, Browne, Bryan, Carter, Chadwick, Coleman,
Corley, Dennis, Duncan, Ferrell, Fisher, Frisbee, Gass, Gillis,
Grant, Harris, Hagan, Hicks, Hill, Jackson, Jones of Escam-
bia, Jones of Bradford, Jones of Levy, Lee, Livingston, Mc-
Alpin, McGuire, Mitchell, Montgomery, Nixon, Orman, Petty,
Pons, Proctor, Roberts, Russell, Small, Stanfill, Sutton, Tilgh-
man, Thompson, Tucker, Washington, Wilson and' Wither-
spoon-49.
Mr. Harmon, having received all the votes cast, was declared
elected Chief Clerk of the Assembly.







11



On motion, the Assembly proceeded to the election of As-
sistant Clerk.
The vote was:
Fon C. A. BRYAN-Mr. Speaker, Messrs. Bass, Berry, Browne
Bryan, Carter, Corley, Duncan, Ferrell, Frisbee, Gillis, Hagan,
Hicks, Hill, Jackson, Jones of Escambia, Jones of Bradford,
Jones of Levy, McAlpin, McGuire, Micthell, Orman, Pons,
Roberts, Russell, Stanfill, Sutton and Wilson-28.
FOR- J. W. TOMPKINS Messrs. Armstrong, Chadwick,
Coleman, Dennis, Fisher, Gass, Grant, Harris, Lee, Living-
ston, Montgomery, Nixon, Petty, Proctor,. Small, Tilghman,
Thompson, Tucker,Washington and Witherspoon- 20,
BLANK-Mr. Avery-1.
Mr..Bryant, having received a majority of the votes cast,
was declared elected Assistant Clerk of the Assembly.
Mr. Lee moved that the Chief Clerk have authority to ap-
point such Assistant Clerks as he may find necessary, with
the approval of the Speaker, and that said Assistants be paid
a reasonable compensation, and m6ved the previous question.
Upon the question, Shall the main question be now put? the
vote was:
Yeas-Messrs. Armstong, Avery, Chadwick, Coleman, Den-
nis, Fisher, Gass, Grant, Harris, Lee, Livingston, Montgom-
ery, Nixon, Petty, Small, Tilghman, Thompson, Tucker, Wash-
ington and Witherspoon-20.
Nays-Mr. Speaker, Messrs. Bass, Berry, Browne, Bryan,
Carter, Corley, Duican, Ferrell, Frisbee, Gillis, Hagan, Hicks,
Hill, Jackson, Jones of Escambia, Jones of Bradford, Jones
of Levy, McAlpin, McGuire, Mitchell, Orman, Pons, Roberts,
Russell, Stanfill, Sutton and Wilson-28.
So the Assembly refused to order the main question.
Mr. Mitchell moved to lay Mr. Lee's motion on the table;
Upon which the yeas and nays were called, and the vote was:
Yeas-Mr. Speaker, Messrs. Avery, Bass, Berry, Browne,
Bryan, Carter, Corley, Duncan, Ferrell, Frisbee, Gillis, Hagan,
Hicks, Hill, Jackson, Jones of Escambia, Jones of Bradford,
Jones of Levy, McAlpin, McGuire, Mitchell, Orman, Pons,
Roberts, Russell, Stanfill, Sutton and Wilson-29.
Nays-Messrs. Armstrong, Chadwick, Coleman, Dennis,
Fisher, Gass, Grant, Harris, Lee, Livingston, Montgomery,
Nixon, Petty, Proctor, Small, Tilghman, Thompson, Tucker,
Washington and Witherspoon-20.
So the motion to lay on the table prevailed.
Mr. Chadwick moved that the officers of the Assembly con-
sist of the following:
A Chief Clerk. *
An Assistant Clerk.







12



A Reading Clerk.
An Engrossing Clerk.
An Enrolling Clerk.
A Recording Clerk.
A Sergeant-at-Arms.
.A Door-Keeper.
A Janitor.
A Chaplain.
Three Pages.
SMr. Hicks moved to lay the motion of Mr. Chadwick on the
table;
Which was, agreed to.
On motion of Mr. Hicks, the Assembly proceeded .to the
S election of Reading Clerk.
The vote was:
FOR W. F. BYNUM-Mr. Speaker, Messrs. Armstrong, Avery,
Bass, Berry, Browne, Bryan, Carter, Corley, Duncan, Ferrell,
Fisher, Frisbee, Gass, Gfllis, Grant, Harris, Hagan, Hicks,'
Hill, Jackson, Jones of Escambia, Jones of Bradford, Jones
of Levy, McAlpin, McGuire, Mitchell, Orman, Petty, Pons,
Proctor, Roberts, Russell, Stanfill, Sutton, Tilghman, Thomp-
son, Tucker, Washington, Wilson and Witherspoon-41.
FoA J. C.'GAMBIA-Meqsrs. Coleman, Dennis, Lee, Living-
ston, Montgomery and Nixon-6.
Mr. Bynum, having received a majority of the votes cast,'
was declared elected Reading Clerk of the Assembly.
On motion of Mr. Jones of Escambia, the Assembly pro-
ceeded to the election of Recording Clerk.
The vote was:
Fon D. G. McLEOD-Mr. Speaker, Messrs. Avery, Bass,
Berry, Browne, Bryan, Carter, Corley, Duncan, Ferrell, Fisher,
Frisbee, Gillis, Hagan, Hicks, Hill, Jackson, Jones of Escam-
bia, Jones of Bradford, Jones of Levy, McAlpin, McGuire,
Mitchell, Orman, Pons, Proctor, Roberts, Russell, Stanfill,
Sutton and Wilson-31.
FoR FRANK MOKEEI,-Messrs.-Dennis, Gass, Harris, Lee,
Livingston, Montgomery, Nixon, Petty, Small, Tilghman,
Thompson,: Tucker, Washington and Witherspoon--14.
Mr. McLeod, having received a majority of the votes cast,
was declared elected Recording Clerk of the Assembly.
On motion of Mr. Jones of Levy, the Assembly proceeded
.to the election of an Engrossing Clerk.
The vote was:
FOR J. I. GORE-Mr. Speaker, Messrs. Bass, Berry, Browne,
Bryan, Cartr, Corley, Duncan, Ferrell, Frisbee, Gillis, Hagan,
Hicks, Hill, Jackson, Jones of Escambia, Jones of Bradford,
Jones of Levy, McAlpin, McGuire, Mitchell, Orman, Pons,








13

Roberts, Russell, Small, Stanfill, Sutton, Tucker and Wilson
-29.
FOR FRANK MKEE---Messrs. Dennis, Livingston, Petty
and Proctor-4.
FOR J. D. THOMPSON-Messrs. Armstrong, Avery, Coleman,
Grant, Lee, Nixon, Tilghman, Thompson, Washington and
Witherspoon-10.
Mr. Gore, having received a majority of the votes cast, was
declared elected Engrossing Clerk.
On motion, the Assembly proceeded to the election of an
Enrolling Clerk.
The vote was:
FOR M. W. HODGEs-Mr. Speaker, Messrs. Avery, Bass,
Berry, Browne, Bryan, Carter, Corley, Duncan, Ferrell, Frisbee,
Gillis, Harris, Hagan, Hicks, Hill, Jackson, Jones of Escam-
bia, Jones of Bradford, Jones of Levy, McAlpin, McGuire,
Mitchell, Nixon, Orman, Pons, Proctor, Roberts, Russell,
Stanfill, Sutton and Wilson-33.
FOR J. D. THOMPSON-Messrs. Coleman, Dennis, Livingston,
Thompson and Washington-5.
FOR EMORY BROOKs-Messrs. Tilghman and Witherspoon-2.
FOR CHAPPLE-Mr. Lee-1.
FOR DAVIS-Mr. Grant-1.
Mr. Hodges having received a majority of the *votes cast,
wss declared elected Enrolling Clerk.
The Assembly proceeded to the election of Sergeant-at-
Arms.
The vote was:
FOR J. D. THOMPSON-Mr. Speaker, Messrs. Avery, Bass,
Berry, Browne, Bryan, Carter, Corley, Duncan, Ferrell, Fisher,
Gillis, Hagan, Hicks, Hill, Jackson, Jones of Bradford, Jones
of Escambia, Jones of Levy, McAlpin, McGuire, Mitchell, Or-
man, Procter, Roberts, Russell, Stanfill, Sutton, Thompson
and Wileon--30.
FOR W. K. ROBINsoN-Messrs. Livingston, Petty, Small and
Tucker-4.
FOR SMITH-Messrs. Grant and Lee-2.
Fon BRooKs-Messrs. Dennis, Harris, Tilghman; Washing-
ton and Witherspoon-5.
FOR DuKE.-Messrs. Chadwick, Montgomery, Nixon and
Pons-4.
FOR CHILDS-Mr. Coleman--L.
FOR TRENT-Mr. Gass-1.
Mr. Thompson having received a majority of the vgtes cast
was declared elected Sergeant-at-Arms.
SThe Assembly next proceeded to the election of Assistant
Sergeant-at-Arms.







14



The vote was:
FOR FAULKNER-Mr. Speaker, Messrs. Avery, Bass, Berry,
Browne, Bryan, Carter, Corley, Duncan, Ferrell, Frisbee, Gil-
lis, Hagan, Hicks, Hill, Jackson, Jones of Escambia, Jones of
Bradford, Jones of Levy, McAlpin, McGuire, Mitchell, Or-
man, Pons, Roberts, Russell, Stanfill, Sutton and Wilson-29.
FoR MATHEW--Messrs. Harris, Tilghman and Wither-
spoon-3.
FOR BELL-Messrs. Deninis, Livinston, Lee and Petty-4.
FOR TRENT-Messrs. Fisher and Gass-2.
FOR DENT-Mr. Proctor-1.
Mr. Faulkner having received a majority of the votes cast,
was declared elected Assistant Sergeant-at-Arms.
The Assembly, proceeded to the election of Door-Keeper.
The Vote was:
FoB SPARROW-Mr. Speaker, Messrs. Avery, Bass, Berry,
Browne, Bryan, Carter, Corley, Duncan, Ferrell, Fisher, Fris-
bee, Gillis, Hagan, Hicks, Hill, Jackson, Jones of Escambia,
Jones of Bradford, Jones of Levy, McAlpin, McGuire, Mitch
ell, Nixon, Orman, Pons, Proctor, Roberts, Russell, Stanfll
Sutton and Wilson-32.
FOR CIPLIN-Messrs. Harris, Tilghman and Witherspoon-3.
FOR DEAN-Messrs. Dennis, Livingston and Washington-3.
FOR SMITH-Messrs. Coleman, Gass, Grant, Lee, Mont-
gomery, Petty, Small, Thompson and Tucker-9.
Mr. Sparrow having received a majority of the votes cast,
was declared duly elected Door-Keeper.
The Assembly next proceeded to the election of Janitor.
The vote was:
FOR DENT-Mr. Speaker, Messrs. Armstrong, Avery, Bass,
Berry, Browne, Bryan, Carter, Corley, Duncan, Ferrell, Fisher,
Frisbee, Gillis, Grant, Harris, Hagan, Hicks, Hill, Jackson,
Jones of Escambia, Jones of Bradford, Jones of Levy, Lee,
Livingston, McAlpin, McGuire, Mitchell, Nixon, Orman, Pons,
Proctor, Roberts, Russell, Stanfill, Sutton, Tilghman, Thomp-
son, Washington, Wilson and Witherspoon-41.
Fon CaooMS--Mr. Small-1.
Mr. Dent having received a majority of the votes cast, was
declared elected Janitor.
Mr. Corley offered the following:
Resolved, That the Speaker appoint two Pages for the As-
sembly.
Which was adopted.
The Speaker appointed as Pages, SR W. Crichlow and Thorn-
ton Ross.
The Assembly proceeded to elect a Chaplain.
Mr. Hicks nominated Rev. Josephus Anderson, D. D.








15



Mr. Washington nominated Rev. Wm. Coal.,
Mr. Armstrong nominated Rev. C. H. Pearce.
Mr. Witherspoon nominated Rev. J. Dt Haynes.
The vote was:
FOR ANDERSON-Mr. Speaker, Messrs. Bass, Berry, Browne,
Bryan, Carter, Corley, Ferrell, Frisbee, Gillis, Hagan, Hicks,
Hill, Jackson, Jones of Levy, McAlpin, McGuire, Mitchell,
Orman, Pons, Roberts, Russell, Stanfill, Sutton and Wil-
son-25..
FOR PEARcE-Messrs. Armstrong, Gass, Grant, Lee and
Petty-5.
Fo HAYNEzs-Messrs. Avery, Dennis, Fisher, Harris, Liv-
ingston, Nixon, Proctor, Tilghman, Thoinpson, Tucker and
Witherspoon-11.
FOR CoAL-Mr. Washington-1.
Mr. Anderson having received a majority of the votes cast,
was declared elected Chaplain.
On motion, a committee consisting of Messrs. Jones of Es-
cambia, Hicks and Chadwick, was appointed to inform the
Rev. Mr. Anderson of his election as Chaplain of the As-
sembly.
On motion of Mr. Russell, the rules of last session were
adopted as the rules to govern the present session.
On motion of Mr. Montgomery, the Assembly adjourned
until next Monday, 12 o'clock, M.



STANDING RULES OF THE ASSEMBLY.
OF THE DUTIES AND POWERS OF THE SPEAKER..
RULE 1. The Speaker shall take the Chair every day at
the hour to which the Assembly shall'have adjourned; shall
call the members to order, and on the appearance of a quo-
rum, shall proceed to business.
RULE 2. He shall preserve decorum and., order;, may
speak to points of order in preference to other members;
and shall decide all questions of order, subject to an appeal
to the Assembly by motion regularly seconded; and no
other business shall be in order till the question on the ap-
peal shall have been decided.
RULE 8. He shall declare all votes; but if any member
rises to doubt a vote, the Speaker shall order a return of the
number voting in the affirmative and in the negative, with-
out any further debate upon the question.







16



RULE 4. He shall rise to put a question, or to address the
Assembly, but may read sitting.
RULE 5. In all cases the Speaker may vote.
RULE 6. When the Assembly shall -determine to go into
a committee of the whole Assembly, the Speaker shall ap-
point the member vho shall take the Chair.
RULE 7. On all questions and motions whatsoever, the
.Speaker shall take the sense of the Assembly by yeas and
nays, provided two of the members present shall so require.
When the yeas and nays are taken, the roll of the Assem-
bly shall be called in alphabetical order, and no member
shall be allowed to vote who.shall not be upon the floor of
the Assembly at the time his name is called, or before -the
roll-call is finished.
RULE 8 He shall propound all questions in the order in
which they are moved, unless the subsequent motion be pre-
.vious in its nature, except that, in naming sums and fixing
times, the largest sum and the longest time shall be put
first.
RULE 9. After a motion is stated or read by the Speaker,
it shall be deemed to be in possession of the Assembly, and
shall be disposed of by vote of the Assembly; but the mover-
may withdraw it at any time before a decision or amend-
ment, except a motion to reconsider, which shall not be with-
. drawn after the time has elapsed within which it could be
originally made.
RULE 10. When a question is under debate, the Speaker
shall receive no motion but to adjourn, to lay on the table,
for the previous question, to postpone to a day certain, to
commit, to amend, or to postpone indefinitely ; which sev-
eral motions shall have precedence in the order in which they
stand arranged; and a notion to strike out the enabling
clause of a bill shall be equivalent to a motion to postpone
indefinitely. If an .amendment to any subject under con-
sideration be laid on the table, or postponed, such action
shall not carry the subject-matter with it.
RULE'11. He shall consider a motion to adjourn as always
first in order; and that motion, and the motions to lay on
the table, to take up from the table, and for yeas and nays,
shall be decided without debate.
RULE 12. He shall put the previous question in the fol-
lowing form : -" Skall the mnan question be now t ?" and
all debateanpon the main question and pending amendments
shall be suspended until the -previous question shall be de-







17

cided. After the adoption of the previous question, the
sense of the Assembly shall forthwith be taken on pending
amendments in their regular order, and then upon the main
question.
RULE 13. On the previous question there shall be no de-
bate.
RULE 14. When two or more members happen to rise at
once, the Speaker shall name the member who is first to
speak.
RULE 15. All committees shall be appointed and an-
nounced by the Speaker, unless otherwise specially directed
by the Assembly.
RULE 16. The Speaker shall have the right to name any
member to perform the duties of the Chair; but such sub-
stitution shall not extend beyond an adjournment.
OF THE DUTIES, RIGHTS AND DECORUM OF THE MEMBERS.
RULE 17. Every member, when about to speak, shall rise
and. respectfully address the Speaker; shall confine himself
to the question under debate, and avoid personality, and
shall sit down when lie has finished. No member shall
speak out of his place without leave of the Speaker.
RULE 18. NO member speaking shall be interrupted by
another, but by rising to call to order.
RULE 19. No member shall speak more than twice on one
question, without first obtaining leave of the Assembly; nor
more than once, until the other members who have not
"spoken shall speak, if they desire it.
RULE 20. When a vote has passed, it shall be in order for
any member of the majority to move ftr a reconsideration
thereof on thie same or the succeeding day; and such mo-
tion (except in the last week of the session) shall be placed
first in the orders of the day for the day succeeding that on
which the motion is made; and when a motion for recon-
si !eration is decided, that decision shall not be reconsidered,
and no question shall be twice reconsidered; Provided,
however, That ; motion to reconsider a vote, upon any collat-
teral matter, shall not remove the main subject under con-
sideration from before the Assembly, but shall be considered
at the time when it is made.
RULE 21. Bills, resolves, and other papers, except orders
of notice, in reference to which any member has a right to
move a reconsideration, shall remain in the possession of the
Clerk until the right of reconsideration has expired'; Pro-
2j









vided; That the operation of this rule shall be suspended
during the last week of the session.
RULE 22. No member shall be obliged to be on more than
two committees at the same time, nor Chairman of more
than one.
RuLE 23. No minpber shall be permitted to stand up to
the interruption of another while any member is speaking,
or to'pass unnecessarily between the Speaker of the Assem-
bly and the person speaking ; nor shall any member be per-
mitted in the alleys, or in the area in front of the Chair, dur-
ing the session of the A. embly.
RULE 24. All proceedings of the Assembly with closed
doors,.and every matter relating to the same, shall be kept
secret until after the Assembly shall remove the injection ot
secresy.
*RULE 25. Every member who shall neglect to give his at-
tendance in the Assembly for more than six days after the
session commences, shall, on making his appearance therein,
be held to render the reason of such neglect; and in case
the reason assigned shall be deemed by the Assembly suffi-
cient, such member shall be entitled to receive pay for his
travel and not otherwise; and no member shall be absent
more than one day without leave of the Assembly, and a
vote of leave of absence shall be inoperative unless the mem-
ber obtaining it shall avail himself of it within five days.
RULE 26. When any member shall be guilty of a breach
of either of the rules and orders of the Assembly, he may
be required by the Assembly, on motion, to make satisfac-
tion therefore, and shall not be allowed to vote or speak, ex-
cept by way of excuse, till he has done so.
ULE 27.. No member shall be permitted to vote, or serve
on any committee, in any question where his private right
is immediately concerned, distinct from the public interest.
RULE 28. Every member who -shall be in the Assembly
"when a question is put, where he is not excluded by interest,
shall give his vote, unless the Assembly, for special reasons,
shall excuse him. Any member desiring to be so excused
-on any question, shall make application to that effect before
the calling of the yeas and nays ; and such application shall
be accompanied by a brief statement of reasons, and shall be
decided without debate.
RULE 29. Every motion shall be reduced' to writing, if
the .Spaker shall so direct.





I'



RULE 30. Any member may call for the division. of a
question when the sense will admit of it. A motion 'tb
*strike out and insert shall be deemed indivisible; but a mo-
tion to strike out being lost, shall neither preclude amend-
ment nor.a motion to strike out and insert.
RULE 31. Motions and reports may be committed. or re-
committed, at the pleasure of the Assembly.
RULE 32. No motion or proposition of a subject different
from that under consideration shall be admitted under color
of amendment.
RULE 33. The unfinished business in which the Assembly
was engaged at the time of the last adjournment shall have
the preference in the orders of the day, next after motions
for reconsideration. :
RULE 34. No rule or order of the Assembly shall be dis-
pensed with, or repealed, unless a majority of the members
present shall consent thereto.
RULE 35. When a vote is doubted, the members for or
against the question, when called on by the'Speaker: shall
rise and stand uncovered till they are counted.
.RULE 36. All questions relating to the priority of business
to be acted upon shall be decided without debate.
RULE 37. When a motion is made to refer any subject,
and different committees shall be proposed, the question
shall.be taken in the following order: A Standing Commnit-
tee of the Assembly; a Joint Standing Committee: a Se-
lect Committee; a Joint Select Copmmittee.
RULE 38. It shall be the duty of each member of the
Assembly who moves that any Standing Committee be in-
structed to inquire-into the expediency of amendingan ex-
isting law or laws, to point out the* amendment which lie
deems expedient, in writing, to accompany his motion, or to
furnish a written statement thereof to such committee,if by
them required.
RuLE 39. No stranger shall be admitted to' the seats df
members, or upon the floor of the Assembly, without leavei
of the Speakeri or consent of the Assembly. '
OF PETITIONS, MEMORIALS, ETC.-
RULE 40. All papers'addressed to the Assembly, except
petitions, memorials and remonstrances, shall be presented'
by the-Speaker, or a member in his place, and shall be read
by the Speaker, Clerk, or such other'person as-the i 6j'k6r-
may request, and shall be taken up in the order in which







S20

they were presented, unless where the Assembly shall other-
wise direct.
RULE 41. Every member presenting to the Assembly a pe-
tition, memorial, or remonstrance, shall endorse his name
thereon, with a brief statement of the nature and object of
the instrument, and the reading of thesame from the Chair
shall, in all instances, be dispensed with, unless specially
ordered by the Assembly.
S RULE 42. All reports, petitions, memorials, remonstrances,
and papers of a like nature, shall be presented during the
first hour of each session of the Assembly, and at no other
time; and the Speaker shall call on theseveral divisions, in
"regular succession, for such paper.
SULE 43. All applications for the use of the Assembly
Chamber shall be made to and decided upon by the Com-
mittee on Public Buildings, subject, however, to the control
and order of the Assembly.
ON BILLS, RESOLUTIONS AND GRANTS.
RULE 44. Every bill, and all resolutions of a public na-
ture, or for the appropriation of the public money, shall re-
ceive three readings previously to the final passage of such
bill or resolution; and the Clerk shall give notice of each,
whether it be the first, second or third readings, which read-
ings shall be on three different days, unless two-thirds of
the members present shall decide otherwise.
RULE 45. All bills and resolves shall be written in a fair,
round hand, without interlineations, on not less than one
sheet of paper, with suitable margins and spaces between
the several sections, or resolves.
"RULE 46. At the second reading of any bill or resolution
it shall be in order for any member to move its commitment
to a Cominittee of the Whole House; that it lay on the
table; for its indefinite postponement; for its postponement
to a day certain not beyond the session; for its commitment
to a Standing Committee; to a Select Committee; or to
amend; which motions shall have precedence in the order
above stated.
RULE 47. It shall not be in order to amend the title of
*any bill or resolution until it shall have passed. its third
reading.
RULE 48. All bills or resolutions to be engrossed shall be
executed in a fair, round hand, and without erasure or in-
terlinea'tions.








21



RULE 49. Before a bill or resolution requiring three read-
ings shall be read the third time, it shall be carefully en-
grossed, under the direction of the Committee on Engrossed
Bills, and upon the third reading of the bill or resolution it
shall not be committed or amended without the consent of
a majority of the members present.
RULE 50. When a bill or resolution shall have passed its
third reading, it shall be certified by the Clerk, endorsing
thereon the day of its passage, and be transmitted to the
Senate, accompanied with a message stating the title of the
bill or resolution, and asking the concurrence of that body,
and the date of its transmission entered upon the journal.
COMMITTEES-THEIR POWERS AND DUTIES.
RULE 51. .Bills committed to a committee of the whole
Assembly shall be read and debated, or amended by clauses
or sections, leaving the title or preamble to be last consid-
ered.' The body of said bill shall not be interlined or de-
faced, but all amendments, noting the page and line, shall
be duly entered by the Clerk on separate paper, as the same
shall be agreed to by the committee, and so reported to the
Assembly. After report, the bill shall again be subject to
be debated and amended by clauses or sections.
RULE 52. It shall be the duty of the Committee on En-
rolled Bills to report at any time.
OF COMMITTEES, THEIR POWERS AND 'DUTIES.
RULE 53. The following Standing Committees shall be
appointed at the commencement of the political yea', viz.
Judiciary, Claims,
Finance and Taxation, City and County Organization,
Incorporation, Education,
Militia, Legislative Expenditures,
Agricultural, Public Printing,
Enrolled Bills, Engrossed Bills,
Privileges and Elections, State 'Institutions,
Railroads, Public Lands,
Indian Affairs, Commerce and Navigation,
and each of these cominittees shall consist of five members.
RULE 54. All papers relative to any business before-the
Assembly shall be left with-the Clerk, by any member who
may obtain leave of absence, and may have any such-papers
in his possession.
g






22

RULE 55. The chairman of any committee, except the
Standing Committees, who shall have business referred to
them, shall make report of their doings therein within four
-days after such reference.
R ULE 56. All committees may report. by bill, resolve, or
otherwise.
RULE 57. Messages shall be transmitted to the Governor
or Senate by the Clerk or Sergeant-at-Arms.
RrL,'58. Order of Business:
1st. Motions.
2d. Petitions, memorials and other papers addressed to
either the Assembly or the Speaker thereof.
3d. Resolutions.
4th. Reports of Standing Committees..
5th. Reports of Select Committees.
6th. Messages lying on the table.
7th. Orders.of the day.
RULE 59. The rule of Parliamentary practice, comprised
in Jefferson's Manual, shall govern the Assembly in all cases
to which they are applicable, and in which they are not in-
consistent with the Standing Rules, order of the Assembly,
or the Joint Rules of the two branches of the Legislature.






MONDAY, January 11, 1875.
The Assembly met pursuant to adjournment.
The roll being called, the following members answered to
their names:
Mr. Speaker, Messrs. Armstrong,, Avery, Berry, Browne,
Bryan, Carter, Chadwick, Coleman, Corley, Dennis, Duncan,
Ferrell, Fisher, Frisbee, Gass, Gillis, Grant, Harris, Hagan,
Hicks, Hill, Jackson, Jones of Bradford, Jones of Levy, Lee,
Livingston, Martin, McAlpin, McGuire, Mitchell, Morehead,
Montgomery, Nixon, Orman, Petty, Proctor, Roberts, Small,
Stanfill, Sutton, Tilghman, Thompson, Washington, Wilson
and Witherspoon--46.
A quorum present.
Prayer by the Rev. Dr. Anderson, Chaplain.








28



On motion of Mr. Witherspoon, the reading of Friday's
journal was dispensed with and the journal corrected and ap-
proved.
The officers elect of the Assembly came forward and were
sworn in by C. H. Edwards, Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Leon county.
Mr. Gass moved that the member elect from Jackson county
come forward and be sworn in as member of the Assembly.
Mr. Hicks offered the following as a substitute:
WHEREAS, Most important questions are now pending in
the Congress of the United States; questions vital to the pros-
perity of the Southern States of this Union; and
WHEREAS, Hon. W. J. Purman, a meniber of the present
Congress and member elect of the next Congress of the United
States from the First District of Florida, is before this House
with a certificate df election to a seat with this body as a mem-
ber elect from Jackson county; and
WHEREAS, It is impossible for the Honorable gentleman to
represent the First District of Florida in the Congress of the
United States and the county of Jackson in this Assembly at
one and the same time.; and
WHEREAS, It is competent for this body to decide upon the
qualifications of its members; therefore,
Resolved, That the case of Hon. W. J. Purman, member of
Congress from the First District and member elect of this
body from Jackson county, be referred to a special committee
of-three, to be appointed by the Speaker.
Mr. Gass moved to lay the substitute on the table;
Upon which the yeas and nays were called for.
The vote was:
Yeas-Messrs. Armstrong, Avery, Chadwick, Coleman, Den-
nis, Fisher, Gass, Grant, Harris, Livington, Martin, Morehead,
Montgomery, Nixon, Petty, Proctor, Small, Tilghman, Thomp-
son, Tucker, Washington and Witherspoon-22.
Nays-Mr. Speaker, Messrs. Berry, Browne, Bryan, Carter,
Corley, Duncan,. Frisbee, Gillis, Hagan, Hicks, Hill, Jackson,
Jones of Escambia, Jones of Bradford, Jones of Levy, McAlpin,
McGuire, Mitchell, Orman, Roberts, Stanfill, Sutton and Wil-
son-24.
So the motion was not agreed to.
Mr. Gass moved to make the substitute the special order for
to-morrow at 12 o'clock M.;
Upon which'the yeas and nays were called for..
The vote was :
Yeas-Messrs. Armstrong, Avery, Chadwick, Coleman, Den-
nis, Fisher, Gass, Grant, Harris, Lee, Livingston, Martin,







24



Morehead, Montgomery, Nixon, Petty, Proctor, Small, Tilgh-
man, Thompson, Tucker, Washington and Witherspoon-23.
Nays-Mr. Speaker, Messrs. Berry, Browne, Bryaq, Carter,
Corley, Duncan, Frisbee, Gillis, Hagan, Hicks, Hill, Jackson,
Jones of Escambia, Jones of Bradford, Jones of Levy, McAl-
pin, McGuire, Mitchell, Orman, Roberts, Stanfill and Wil-
son-23.
So the motion was not agreed to.
Mr. Gass moved that the Assembly adjourn until to-morrow,
12 o'clock, M;
Upon which the yeas and nays were called for.
The vote was:
Yeas-Messrs. Armstrong, Avery, Chadwick, Coleman, Den-
nis, Fisher, Gass, Grant, Harris, Lee, Livingston, t Martin,
Morehead, Montgomery, Nixon, Petty, Proctor, Small, Tilgh-
man, Thompson, Tucker, Washington and 'Witherspoon-23.
Nays-Mr. Speaker, Messrs. Berry, Browne, Bryan, Carter,
Corley, Duncan, Frisbee, Gillis, Hagan, Hicks, Hill, Jackson,
Jones of Escambia, Jones of Bradford, Jones of Levy, McAlpin,
McGuire, Mitchell, Orman, Roberts, Stanfill and Wilson-23.
So the motion was not agreed to.
On motion of Mr. Orman, the Assembly adjourned until to-
morrow morning, 10 o'clock.






TUESDAY, January 12, 1875.

The Assembly met plrsuant to adjournment.
The roll being called, the following members answered to
their names:
Mr. Speaker, Messrs. Armstrong, Avery, Berry,- Bryan, Car-
ter, Chadwick, Coleman, Corley, Dennis, Duncan, Fisher,
Frisbee, Gass, Gillis, Grant, Harris, Hagan, Hicks, Hill,
Jackson, Jones of Escambia, Jones of Bradford, Jones of
Levy, Lee, Martin, McAlpin, McGuire, Mitchell, Morehead,
Montgomery, Nixon, Orman, Petty, Pons, Roberts, Russell,
Small, Stanfill, Tilghman, Thompson, Tucker, Washington,
Wilson and Witherspoon-45.
A quorum-present.
Prayer by the Chaplain.
On motion of Mr. Petty, the reading of yesterday's journal
was dispensed'with, and the journal approved.








25



Mr. Chadwick presented the following:
TALLAHASSEE, FLA., January 11, 1875.
To the Honorable Speaker
of the Assembly of Florida:
Sm: We hereby notify you and the members of the General
Assembly, that we contest the seats of Messrs. C. W. Jones an'd
John Mcquire of Escambia county.
Very Respectfully,
WM. H. DIFFIN,
P. H. DAVIDSON, JR.
Which was read.
The Assenibly then proceeded to the consideration of the
substitute offered on yesterday by Mr. Hicks.
Mr. Mlitchell moved the adoption of the substitute and called
for the previous question, which was seconded and the main
question ordered.
Upon the adoption of the substitute the vote was:
Yeas-Mr. Speaker, Messrs. Berry, Browne, Bryan, Carter,
Corley, Duncan, Frisbee, Gass, 6-illis, Hagan, Hicks, Hill,
Jackson, Jones of Escambia, Jones of Bradford, Jones of
Levy, McAlpin, McGuire, Mitchell, Orman, Pons, Roberts,
Russell, Stanfill, Washington and Wilson-27.
Nays-Messrs. Armstrong, Avery, Chadwick, Coleman,
Dennis, Fisher, Grant, Harris, Lee, Livingston, Martin, More-
head, Montgomery, Nixon, Petty, Proctor, Small, Tilghman,
Thompson, Tucker and Witherspoon-21.
So the substitute was adopted.
Mr. Gass gave notice that he would move a reconsideration
of the vote just taken on to-morrow.
Mr. Hicks offered the following resolution:
Resolved, That General J. B. Gordon, United States Senator
for the State of Georgia, and the Honorable Alexander H.
Stephens, member of Congress from the same, our said sister
State, be and are hereby requested by this Assembly to repre-
sent the State of Florida in the Congress of the United States
until our absent representatives find it convenient to return to
their grave and responsible duties at Washington.
Mr. Gass moved to lay the resolution upon the table;
Upon which the yeas and nays were called for.
The vote was:
Yeas-Messrs. Armstrong, Avery, Bass, Coleman, Dennis,
Fisher, Gass, Harris, Lee, Livingston, Morehead, Nixon, Petty,
Proctor, Small, Tilghman, Thompson, Tueker, Washington and
Witherspoon-20.
Nays-Mr. Speaker, Messrs. Berry, Browne, Bryan, Garter,






26



Corley, Duncan, Frisbee, Gillis, Hagan, Hicks, Hill, Jackson,
Jones of Escambia, Jones of Bradford, Jones of Levy, Martin,
McAlpin, McGuire, Mitchell, Orman, Pons, Roberts, Russell,
Stanfill and Wilson-26.
So the motion was not agreed to.
Mr. Gass moved that the resolution be referred to a com-
mittee of three;
"Upon which the yeas and nays were called for.
The vote was: *
SYeas-Messrs. Armstrong, Bass, Coleman, Dennis, Fisher,
Gass, Grant, Harris, Lee, Livingston, Morehead, Petty, Proc-
tor, Small, Tilghman, Thompson, Tucker and Wither-
spoon-18.
Nays-Mr. Speaker, Messrs. Berry, Browne, Bryan,, Carter,
Corley, Duncan, Frisbee, Gillis, Hagan, Hicks, Hill, Jackson,
Jones of Escambia, Jones of Bradford, Jones of Levy, McAl-
,pin, McGuire, Mitchell, Orman, Pons, Roberts, Russell, Stan-
fill and Wilson-25.
So the motion was not agreed to.
Mr. Gass moved that the resolution be indefinitely post-
poned;
Upon which the yeas and nays were called for.
The vote was:
Yeas-Messrs. Avery, Coleman, Dennis, Fisher, Gass, Grant,
Harris, Lee, Livingston, Morehead, Nixon, Petty, Proctor,
Small, Tilghman, Thompson, Tucker, Washington ai:d Wither-
spoon-19.
Nays-Mr. Speaker, Messrs. Bass, Berry, Browne, Bryan,
Carter, Corley, Duncan, Frisbee, Gillis, Hagan, Hicks, Hill,
Jackson, Jones of Escambia, Jones of Bradford, Jones of
Levy, McAlpin, McGuire, Mitchell, Orman, Pons, Roberts,
Russell, Stanfill and Wilson-26.
So the motion was not agreed to.
Mr. Mitchell moved the adoption of the resolution and called
for the previous question.
Upon the question, Shall the main question be now put? the
yeas and nays were called for and were:
Yeas-Messrs. Bass, Berry, Browne, Bryan, Carter, Corley,
Duncan, Frisbee, Gillis, Grant, Hagan, Hicks, Hill, Jackson,
Jones of Escambia, Jones of Bradford, Jones of Levy, Mc-
Alpin, McGuire, Mitchell, Orman, Pons, Roberts, Russell,
Stanfill, Washington and Wilson-28.
Nay$-Messrs. Coleman, Dennis, Fisher, Gass, Harris, Lee,
Livingston, Morehead, Nixon, Petty; Small, Tilghman, Thomp-
son, Tucker and Witherspoon-15.
SSo the main question was ordered.
Upon the adoption of the resolution the vote was:










Yeas-Mr. Speaker, Messrs. Berry,' Browne, Bryan, Carter,
Corley, Dimncan, Frisbee, Gass, Gillis, Hagan, Hicks,I Hill,
Jackson, Jones bf Escambia, Jones of Bradford, Jones of
Levy, McAlpin, McGuire, Mitchell, Orman, Pons, Roberts,
Russell, Stanfill and Wilson-26.
Nays-Messrs. Bass, Coleman, Dennis, Fisher, Livingston,
Morehead, Nixon, Petty, Proctor, Small, Tilghman, Thomp-
son, Washington and Witherspoon-14.
So the resolution was adopted.
Mr. Gass gave notice that he would move to reconsider the
vote taken on the resolution just adopted on to-morrow.
Mr. Mitchell moved that the Spealtr forward to Messrs.
Gordon and Stephens a copy each of the resolution just
passed;
Which was agreed to.
Mr. Chadwick moved that Senator Conover and Representa-
.tive Purman convey a copy of the resolution to the gentlemen
named therein.
The Speaker announced the. following Standing Committees:

STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE ASSEMBLY.


Judiciary:
Mr. MITCHELL, Chairman.
Messrs. PURMAN, JONES of Escambia,
LEE, CHADWICK..

Privileges and Elections:.
Mr. HICKS, Chairman.
Messrs. JONES of Escambia, MONTGOMERY,
MITCHELL, BERRY.

State Institutions:
Mr. MARTIN, Chairman.
Messrs. STANFILL, WASHINGTON,
McALPIN, NIXON:

Commerce and Navigation :
Mr. McGUIRE, Chairman.
Messrs. GRANT, ORMAN,
PETTY, RUSSELL.



*







98



Public Printi'ng:
Mr. MONTGOMERY, Chairman.
Messrs. CORLEY, PROCTOR,
HAGAN, LIVINGSTON.,
Claims:
Mr. WILSON, Chaiiman.
Messrs. HILL, ORMAN,
DENNIS, PONS. .
Education:
Mr. TUCKER, Chairman.
Messrs. JONES of Levy, ARMSTRONG,
JACKSON, MOREHEAD.
"Public Lands:'
Mr. CORLEY,.Chairman.
Messrs. GASS, FERRELL,
COLEMAN, CARTER,
Finance and Taxation:
Mr. CHADWICK, Chairman.
Messrs. NIXON, WITHERSPOON
JONES of Bradford; SUTTON.
Enrolled Bills:
Mr. BROWNE, Chairman.
Messrs. LEE, GILLIS,
FISHER, ROBERTS.
Engrossed Bill :
Mr. AVERY, Chairman.
Messrs. McALPIN, TILGHMAN,
PONS, SMALL.

",City and County Organization:
M...r Mr. ItUSSELL, Chairman.
Messrs. THOMPSON, BRYAN,
"' HARRIS, FRISBEE.
"Fisheries :
Mr. PETTY, Chairman.
Messrs. BROWNE, BASS,
CARTER, GRANT.








29



Agriculture:
Mr. DUNCAN, Chairman.
Messrs. WASHINGTON, FERRELL,
GASS, JACKSON.



Legislative Expenses:



Mr. PROCTOR, C
Messrs. JONES of Levy,
JONES of Bradford,

Militia:
Mr. ROBERTS, (
Messrs. MONTGOMERY,
MORE.HEAD,



chairman.
TUCKER,
ARMSTRONG.


Chairman.
STANFILL,
DUNCAN.



Corporations:



Mr.
Messrs. McGUIRE,
BERRY,



PURMAN,



Chairman.
MARTIN,
HILL.



Mr.
Messrs. SUTTON,
COLEMAN,



Indian Affairs:
HAGAN, Chairman.
SLIVINGSTON,
DENNIS.

"Railroads:



Mr. JONES of Escambia, Chairman.
Messrs. HICKS, CORLEY,
MONTGOMERY, ORMAN.

Mr. Mitchell moved that one hundred copies of the Stand-
'ing Committees be printed for the use of the Assembly;
Which was agreed to.
Mr. Orman offered the following resolution:
Resolved, That one hundred copies of the Rules adopted by
this Assembly be printed and distributed for the use of the
members.
Mr. Armstrong moved as a substitute that a copy of the
journal of the last Assembly be furnished each member;
Which was agreed to.
On motion, the Assembly adjourned until to-morrow 't 12
o'clock. M.







30



WEDNESDAY, January 13, 1875.

SThe Assembly met pursuant to adjournment.
The roll being called, the following members answered to
their names:
Mr. Speaker, Messrs. Armstrong, Avery, Berry, Browne,
Bryan, Carter, Chadwick, Coleman, Corley, Dennis, Duncan,
Fisher, Frisbee, Gass, Gillis, Grant, Harris, Hagan, Hicks, Hill,
Jackson, Jones of Escambia, Jones of Bradford, Jones of Levy,
Lee, Livingston, Martin, McAlpin, McGuire, Mitchell, More-
head, Nixon. Orman, Petty, Pons, Proctor, Roberts, Russell,
Small, Stanfill, Sutton, Tilghman, Thompson. Tucker, Wash-
ington, Wilson and Witherspoon-48.
A quorum present.
Prayer by the Chaplain.
On motion of Mr. Proctor, the reading of yesterday's journal
was dispensed with and the journal corrected and approved.
Mr. Hicks moved that James Roach be appointed Keeper of
the Committee Rooms.
Mr. Chadwick moved as a substitute that the Committee
Rooms be placed in charge of the Assistant Sergeant-at-Arms;
Which was agreed to.
MAr. Montgomery moved that the Assembly adjourn till to-
morrow at 12 o'clock, M.;
Upon which the yeas and 'ays were called for.
The vote was:
.Yeas-Mr. Speaker, Messrs. Armstrong, Avery, Coleman,
Dennis, Fisher, Grant, Harris, Livingston, Martin, Montgom-
ery, Nixon, Petty and Thompson-14.
Nays-Messrs. Berry, Browne, Bryan, Carter, Corley, Dun-
can, Frisbee, Gass, Gillis, Hagan, Hicks, Hill, Jackson, Jones
of Escambia, Jones of Bradford, Jones of Levy, Lee, Mc-
Alpin, McGuire, Mitchell, Morehead, Orman, Pons, Roberts,
Russell, Stanfill, Sutton, Tilghman, Tucker, Washington, Wil-
son and Witherspoon-32.
So the Assembly refused to adjourn.
Mr. Corley presented the petition of Samuel E. Timmons,
claiming to be'elected member of this Assembly from Putnam
county, and contesting the seat of Hon. E. R. Chadwick, sit-
ting member, and also the petition of William Judge, claim-
ing to be elected member of the Assembly from Santa Rosa
county;
Which were referred to the Committee on Privileges and
Elections.
. Mr. Martin offered the following resolution:








31



Resolved, That a committee of three be appointed by the
Speaker to notify the Senate that the Assembly is organized
and ready to proceed to business;
SWhich was adopted, and Messrs. Martin, Browne and Chad-
wick appointed as said committee.
Mr. Lee offered the following resolution:
Resolved, That the resolution of the gentleman from Dade
in relation to the Hon. J. B. Gordon, United States Senator
for the State of Georgia, and the Hon. Alexander H. Stephens,
member of Congress from the same, be expunged from the
journal of yesterday;
Which was not adopted.
Mr. Corley offered the following resolution:
Resolved, That thd Chief Clerk, under the direction of the
Speaker, be authorized to purchase the stationery necessary
for the use of the Clerks of the Assembly, and that each mem-
ber be authorized to purchase stationery for his own use to the
amount of five dollars.
Mr. Mitchell offered the following substitute:
Resolved, That the Adjutant General furnish all stationery
necessary for the Assembly; the Chief Clerk to draw for the
Clerks and each member for himself to the amount of not ex-
ceeding five dollars.
Mr. Montgomery offered the following as a substitute for the
whole matter:
Resolved, That the Adjutant General be empowered to pui'-
chase stationery for the use of the Assembly, and that each
member be entitled to draw to the amount of two dollars and
a half, and the Clerks be entitled to draw stationery under the
requisition of the Speaker.
Pending which,
Mr. Montgomery offered the following resolution:
Resolved, That each member furnish his own stationery;
Which was adopted.
Mr. Corley offered the following resolution:
Resolved, That.the Adjutant General be empowered to fur-
nish stationery for the use of the Clerks of the Assembly, and
the Clerks be entitled to draw stationery on requisition ap-
proved by the Speaker;
Which was adopted.
Mr. Chadwick moved to reconsider the vote upon the resort
lution of Mr. Montgomery;







32



Which was not agreed to.
Mr. Corley moved to reconsider the vote upon the resolution
offered by himself;
Which was agreed to.
Mr. Fisher moved that the Assembly adjourn until 12 M.
to-morrow.
Which was not agreed to.
Mr. Jones of Escambia offered the following resolution:
Resolved, That the Adjutant General be empowered to pur-
chase stationery for the use of the Clerks of the Assembly,
and the Clerks be entitled to draw stationery on requisition
approved by the Speaker, the amount not to exceed thirty
dollars;
Which was adopted.
Mr. Montgomery presented the following:
I am requested to notify this Assembly that John W. But-
ler, of Santa Rosa county, claims to be the legally elected rep-
resentative from that county in the Assembly of this State."
Mr. Gass offered the following resolution:
Resolved, That the Assembly do reconsider the vote taken
yesterday op the resolution in relation to W. J. Purman.
Pending which, on motion of Mr. Hicks, the Assembly ad-
journed until 12 M. to-morrow.






THURSDAY, January 14, 1875.

The Assembly met pursuant to adjournment.
' The roll being called, the following members answered to
their names:
Mr. Speaker, Messrs. Armstrong, Avery, Bass. Berry,
Browne, Bryan, Carter, Chadwick, Coleman, Corley, Dennis,
Duncan, Ferrell, Fisher, Frisbee, Gillis, Grant, Harris, Hagan,
Hicks, Hill, Jackson, Jones of Escambia, Jones of Bradford,
Jones of Levy, Lee, Livingston, Martin,. McAlpin, McGuire,
Mitchell, Morehead, Nixon, Orman, Petty, Pons, Proctor,
Roberts, Russell, Small, Stanfill, Sutton, Thompson, Tucker,
"Wilson and Witherspoon--46.
A quorum present.








33



Prayer by the Chaplain.
On motion of Mr. Witherspoon, the reading of yesterday's
journal was dispensed with and the journal approved.
The resolution offered by Mr. Gass on yesterday to recon-
sider the vote on the resolution in relation to Mr. Purman,
was taken up for consideration.
The resolution'to reconsider was not agreed to.
The Speaker appointed Messrs. Hicks, Martin and Orman
on the special committee to whom was referred' the matters
connected with the seat of Mr. Purman.
Mr. Corley moved that the Speaker designate some one of
the officers or pages to receive from the post office the mail
matter addressed to members of this Assembly;
Which was agreed to, and the Speaker designated the Ser-
geant-at-Arms.
Mr. Hicks moved that the Committee on Privileges and
(Elections be authorized to employ a clerk;
Which was agreed to.
Mr. Corley presented the petition of D. N. Cone and K. D.
Edge, claiming to have been duly elected members of this
Assembly from Columbia county, and contesting the seats of
Ron. Charles Thompson and 'Hon. J. H. Armstong, sitting
members from that county;
Which was read and referred to the Committee on Privile-
ges and Elections.
Mr. Martin offered the following resolution:
Resolved, That the special committee to whom was referred
the case of W. J. Purman, be instructed to report to this As-
sembly at 12 M. on the 15th Inst., and that the subject be made
the special order of the day for that hour.
Mr. Mitchell moved to lay the resolution on the table ;
Which was agreed to.
Mr. Jones of Bradford offered the following resolution:
Resolved, That no one be allowed inside the bar of the As-
sembly except the members and officers of. the same,' without'
the consent of the body.
Mr. Petty moved that the resolution,be laid:upon the table,;
Which was not agreed to.
The resolution was then adopted.
Mr. Russell offered the following-resolution:
ResOlved, That the Committee on Legislative Expenses b:
instructed to ascertain how much and what stationery has:
already been purchased for the use of the officers,anddmembers.
of the Assembly, by whom purchased and by what authority,
3j







34



and what disposition has been made of the articles so pur-
chased ;
Which was adopted.
On motion of Mr. Montgomery, the Assembly adjourned
until to-morrow, 12 o'clock, M.







FRIDAY, January 15. 1875.

The Assembly met pursuant to adjournment.
.The roll being called, the following members answered to
their names:
Mr. Speaker, Messrs. Armstrong, Berry, Browne, Bryan,
Carter, Chadwick, Coleman, Corley, Dennis, Duncan, Ferrell,
Fisher, Frisbee, Gillis, Grant, Harris, Hagan, Hicks, Hill,
Jackson, Jones of Escambia,-Jones of Bradford, Jones of
Levy, Lee, Livingston, McAlpin, McGuire, Mitchell, Nixon,
Orman, Petty, Pons, Roberts, Russell, Small, Stanfill, Sutton,
Tilghman, Thompson, Tucker, Washington, Wilson and With-
erspoon-44.
A quorum present.
Prayer by the Chaplain.
On motion of Mr. Petty, the reading of the journal of yes-
terday was dispensed with, and the journal approved.
Mr. Hicks moved that the members of the Senate, State of-
ficers and members of both houses of Congress who may be
present, be and are hereby invited to seats within the bar of
this Assenibly;
Which was agreed to.
Mr. Jones of Bradford moved that the regular hour for the
meeting of the Assembly be.10 o'clock, A. M.;
Which was agreed to.
Mr. Hicks, from the Committee on Privileges and Elections,
made the following report:
To THE HON. THOMAS HANNAH,
Speaker of the Assembly.
SIR: The Committee on Privileges and Elections beg leave
to report that the law governing contests of elections is very
explicit and unmistakable, and- is as follows, (see Thomp-
son's Digest, p. 78, sec. 10, Art. Contesting Elections):








35



"If any candidate of the proper county or district contest
the election of any Assemblyman, he shall give notice thereof, in
writing, to the person whose election he contests, or leave
written notice thereof at the house where such person last re-
"sided, within ten days after the canvass by the Judge of Probate,
expressing in such notice the. points on which the same will
be contested and the name of the Judge of Probate or Clerk
of the Circuit Court who will attend at the taking of the de-
positions, and where and when such depositions will be
taken."
Should doubt arise in relation to the present force of the
plain law above quoted, your Committee beg to refer to Arti-
cle XV., Section 2, of the Constitution of the State of Florida,
which is as follows, to wit:
SECTION 2. That all acts arid resolutions of the General
Assembly, and all official acts of the civil officers of the State,
not inconsistent with the provisions of the Constitution and
statutes of the United States, or with this Constitution, or
with any ordinance or resolution adopted by this Convention,
and which have not been and are not by this Constitution an-
nulled, are in force, and shall be considered and esteemed as
the laws of the State until such acts or resolutions shall be re-
pealed by the Legislature of the State or this Convention."
Your Committee further report that no repealing act has
ever passed the Legislature under the present Constitution.
Respectfully,
WM. WATKIN HICKS, Chm'n;.
H. L. MITCHELL,
GEO. H. BERRY,
D. MONTGOMERY.
Which was received and adopted.
Mr. Montgomery offered the following resolution:
Resolved, That the use of the Assembly Hall be granted to
A. A. Ellenwood on Monday night, the 18th inst., for the pur-
pose of delivering a free lecture on Phrenology, Physiology
"knd the Health Laws.
Mr. Witherspoon moved to lay the resolution on the table.
Which was agreed to.
On motion of Mr. Chadwick, the Assembly adjourned until
10 o'clock to-morrow morning.







36



SATURDAY, January 16, 1875.

The Assembly met pursuant to adjournment.
The roll being called, the following members answered to
their names:
Mr. Speaker, Messrs. Armstrong, Avery, Bass, Berry, Bryan,
Carter, Chadwick, Coleman, Corley, Dennis, Duncan, Ferrell,
Fisher, Frisbee, Gass, Gillis, Grant, Harris, Hagan, Hicks, Hill,
Jackson, Jones of Escambia, Jones of Bradford, Jones of
Levy, Lee, Livingston, Martin, McAlpin, McGuire, Mitchell,
Orman, Petty, Pons, Proctor, Roberts, Russell, Small, Stanfill,
Sutton, Tilghman, Thompson, Tucker, Wilson and Wither-
spoon-46.
A quorum present.
Prayer by the Chaplain.
On motion of Mr. Witherspoon, the reading of yesterday's
journal was dispensed with, and the journal corrected and ap-
proved.
The committee appointed to notify the Senate that the As-
sembly was organized reported that they had performed the
duty, and were discharged.
Mr. Chadwick offered the following resolution:
Resolved, That the Chief Clerk of the Assembly be, and he
is hereby directed to prepare each day a correct copy of the
aaily journal, in writing, to be kept on file at his desk; and
that hereafter no daily journal be printed, except by express
order of the Assembly.
Which was read and adopted.
A committee from the Senate was announced, and reported
the Senate organized and ready to proceed to business.
Mr. Avery offered the following resolution:
WHEREAS, The Hon. W. Watkin Hicks, ex-Gov. Bigler, of
Pennsylvania, and ex-Gov. Hawley, of Connecticut, have been
invited to deliver addresses in this city on next Tuesday, the
19th instant, on the National Exposition of 1876, in. Philadel-
phia, which said exposition is to be commemorative of the one
:hundredth anniversary of American independence; And
Whereas, Said National Exhibition is to be held under the
auspices of the government of the United States, and is there-
.fdre national in its character;
Resolved, That the use of this hall be, and the same is hereby,
tendered for the use of the speakers on the 19th instant at the
hour of 11 o'clock, a. m.
Which was read and adopted.
The following communication was received from the Senate:








37



HON. THOMAS HANNAH,
Speaker of the Assembly :
SIR : I have been instructed to inform your honorable body
that the Senate has appointed Messrs. Dennis and McKinnon,
on the part of the Senate, to act with a similar committee on the
part of the Assembly, to inform his excellency that both branches
are organized and ready to proceed to business.
Very respectfully,
JOSEPH BOWES,
Secretary Senate.
On -motion of Mr. Martin, the Speaker appointed Messrs,
Martin, Chadwick and Jones of Escambia said committee.
After a brief absence the coinmittee returned and reported
that-they had discharged their duty, and were discharged.
Under a suspension of the rule, the following bills were in-
troduced :
By Mr. Hicks :
Assembly bill No. 1:
To be entitled an act to regulate the eligibility to office in
the State of Florida ;
Which was read and referred to the Judiciary Committee.
By Mr. Martin:
Assembly bill No. 2:
To be entitled an act to repeal Section 27 of Chapter 1987,
Laws of Florida;
Which was read and referred to the Judiciary Committee.
By Mr. Orman:
Assembly bill No. 3:
To be entitled an act to amend an act entitled an act to pro-
vide a general law for the incorporation of railroads and canals,
passed February 19, 1874;
SWhich was read and referred to the Committee on Corpora-
tions.
S Mr. Chadwick introduced the following bill:
Assembly bill No. 4:
To be entitled an act fixing the times for Holding the Cir-
cuit Courts in the Fifth Judicial Circuit;
Which was referred to the Committee on Judiciary.
Mr. Gass introduced the following bill:
Assembly bill No. 5:
To be entitled an act authorizing Geo. B. Thomas and Joseph
M. Thomas, minors, to manage their own estates;
Which was read and referred to the Judiciary Committee.
Mr. Gass introduced the following bill:
Assembly bill No. 0:
To be entitled an act to repeal section 27 of an act entitled







38



an act to provide a General Law for the Incorporation of Rail-
roads and Canals;
Which was read and referred to the Committee on Railroads.
On motion of Mr. Hicks, the Assembly took a recess until
11:30 o'clock.

HALF-PAST ELEVEN O'CLOCK, A. M.

The Assembly resumed its session.
The roll being called, the following members answered to
their names:
Mr. Speaker, Messrs. Armstrong, Avery, Bass, 'Berry.
Browne, Bryan, Carter, Chad.wick, Coleman, Corley, Dennis.
Duncan, Ferrell, Fisher, Frisbee, Gass, Gillis, Grant, Harris.
Hagan, Hill, Jackson, Jones of Escambia, Jones of Bradford.
Jones of Levy, Lee, Livingston, McAlpin, McGuire, Mitchell,
Nixon, Orman, Pons, Proctor, Roberts, Russell, Small, Stan-
fill, Sutton, Tilghman, Thompson, Tucker, Washington, Wilson
and Witherspoon-46.
A quorum present.
Mr. Witherspoon asked leave to introduce the following bill
without previous notice:
Assembly bill No. 7 :
To be entitled an act to repeal the 27th section of an act to
provide a General Law for the incorporation of Railroads and
Canals, approved February 19, 1874;
Which was referred to the Committee on Railroads.
Mr. Jones of Escambia asked leave to introduce the follow-
ing bill:
Assembly bill No. 8:
To be entitled an act to repeal the 11th section of an act to
provide for the Collection of Revenue, approved February 17.
1874;
Which was read and referred to the Committee on the Ju-
diciary.
Mr. Proctor moved that Mr. Morehead be excused from at-
tendance in the Assembly on account of sickness;
Which was agreed to..
The following message was received from the Senate:
SENATE CHAMBER, January 16, 1875.
HON. THoMAs HANNAH,
Speaker of the Assembly:
SIR: I have been directed by the Senate to inform your
Honorable body that the Senate has agreed to meet the As-







39



sembly in joint session at 12 o'clock, M., to hear the message
pf His Excellency the Governor.
Respectfully submitted,
JOSEPH BOWES,
Secretary of the Senate.
Mr. Chadwick moved that the Senate be invited to meet the
Assembly in joint session to hear the Governor's message;
Which was agreed to.
The Senate entered the Assembly Hall, and the President
pro tern. took the chair.
Mr. Hicks moved -that a joint committee be appointed to
wait on His Excellency the Governor and escort him into the
Assembly Hall;
Which was agreed to.
The joint committee was as follows: Senators Dennis and
Crawford and Messrs. Hicks, Jones of Escambia and Corley.
His Excellency, Marcellus L. Stears, Governor of.the State
of Florida, escorted by the committee and accompanied with
his Cabinet officers, appeared before the Joint Assembly and
delivered his annual message, as follows:



/






40



GOVERNOR'S MESSAGE.


Gentlemen qf the Senate and Assembly:
Since the adjournment of the last session of the Legislature
a beloved Chief Magistrate, Florida's first native Governor, has
been removed -from the scenes of earth by the hand of an All-
wise Providence, and by Constitutional provision the power.
and duties of the office have devolved upon me. It becohies
my duty, therefore, to communicate to you the present condi-
tion of public affairs, and recommend such measures as I deem
expedient for the public welfare.
GOVERNOR OSSIAN B. IART.
Before proceeding with the questions of the hour, I deem it
not inappropriate that I should officially call your attention to
the death of Ossian B. Hart. He expired at his residence in
the city of Jacksonville, on the 18th day of March, 1874, being
at the time of his death the Governor of the State of.Florida.
The high character and long and honorable identification of
Governor Hart with the public history of the State suggest that
the Legislature should take such action as will assure the peo-
ple, whose confidence and affection he enjoyed in no small de-
gree, and especially the surviving members of his bereaved
family, that his upright public services are held in grateful
remembrance.
In this connection I desire to bring to your attention the fact
that the State does not possess a portrait of a single one of its
deceased Chief Magistrates. Many of the States have consid-
ered this subject not unworthy their attention, and have, by this
means, not only graced their public halls with enduring orna-
ments and interesting mementoes of their past history, but have
also thereby fostered in the hearts of their people a commend-
able feeling of State pride and patriotism. It seems to me that
this matter is worthy of your consideration, and that the halls
of our Capitol could receive no more appropriate adornment
than would be afforded by the likenesses of the early Gover-
nors of the State, who have passed from the scenes of time.







41

GENERAL CONDITION OF THE STATE.
During the past year peace, the offspring of contentment and
harbinger of prosperity, has prevailed throughout the State.
The laws have generally been well executed. Crime has percep-
tibly diminished, especially offences of the higher grades. The
election last November was passed with unprecedented order
and quiet, and it is believed that a fair expression of the people's
will was had. I have yet to learn of a single collision or disturb-
ance at the polls between races or opposing parties,'rowing out
of that exciting contest.
Freedom of political opinion and action has been accorded
alike to all, and recognized as an essential principle of free gov-
ernment. Equal civil and political rights are denied to none,
and the most cordial good will prevails among all classes of our
people. We need no Congressional enactment or other inter-
ference to secure to any class of our citizens the full enjoyment
of their just Constitutional rights.
Since slavery and secession are things of the past, buried be-
yond the possibility of resurrection; since all the States are
restored to their Constitutional relations with the General Gov-
ernment, and a true and lasting peace has come; since equal
civil rights and political privileges are guaranteed to all, irre
spective of race, color, or previous condition of servitude-has
not the time come when we may safely recur to fundamental
principles which underlie our system of government as estab-
lished by our fathers, and base our political action upon them?
It is a sound political maxim that "a frequent recurrence to
ithe fundamental principles of government is essential to civil
Libertyy" I believe there is a strong feeling among all classes
of our citizens for a radical reform in governmental affairs and
a more economical expenditure of the public moneys. I believe
there is a crue desire for a more perfect restoration of friendly
and fraternal relations and mutual confidence between all sec-
tions of. our common country. The citizens of Florida are loyal
to the Government, and would cheerfully render any assistance
in their power to uphold and defend it. A patriotism as broad
and comprehensive as the American Union possesses their
hearts, and I doubt if any State has a more loyal and patriotic
class of citizens than the people of Florida are to-day.







42



The returning patriotism throughout the South, and the gen-
eral acquiescence in the results of the late war, have met with a
hearty response from the people of the North ; and the strong-
est guarantee is thereby given of that mutual good faith and
good will which, it is earnestly hoped, may henceforth save our
country from the untold evils of sectional strife. It would
seem that the extreme necessities entailed upon the General
Government on the emerging of the country from a bitter and
exhausting conflict, are at length passing away, and that a bet-
ter state of affairs is dawning upon us. Recent events have
given evidence of a great change of public sentiment through-
out the country, which gives rise to the hope that the time has
now come when the power to control and regulate their inter-
nal and domestic affairs may safely be remitted "to the States,
subject only to the constitutional requirement that their, gov-
ernments shall be republican in form, while the General Gov-
ernment takes the care and control of all matters pertaining to
the common interest and general welfare of all the States. The
true friends of a republican form of government will find abun-
dant cause for rejoicing in the manifestation of the conservative
feeling of the American people. It gives renewed confidence
in the stability and permanency of bur institutions.
We shall, however, still be held rigidly responsible for our
fidelity to every constitutional trust. The Thirteenth, Four-
teenth and Fifteenth amendments to the Federal Constitution
are as binding as any part of the original instrument, and will
stand unaltered as an integral part of the organic law of the
land. The love of justice and equal rights is deeply implanted
in the American breast, and will eventually rise triumphant
over all party or sectional considerations. Let none construe
the recent developments into a license for oppressing or tramp-
ling upon the rights of any. They spring from a higher source,
and if interpreted aright and acted upon with wisdom, in the
spirit of an enlightened statesmanship, will light up the fires of
patriotism all over the land, bringing all sections of our once
distracted country into friendly and fraternal relations, binding
all with indissoluble ties in one inseparable Union.
I congratulate you, fellow-citizeqs, upon the favorable cir-
cumstances under which you are now assembled; upon the im-







43

proved and improving condition of our public affairs, and the
prospect of a greater degree of prosperity for our beloved State.
Under the Providence of God our State has been spared the
prevalence of any serious epidemic, and the general health has
been good. The labors of the husbandman have been rewarded
by an abundant harvest; while our commercial and mechanical
industries are steadily reviving from the depression into which
they were thrown by the monetary convulsion of last year.
An honest and economical administration of the General Gov-
ernment, and the sound financial policy of President Grant, are
surely contributing to a return of.confidence and a revival of
business activity, not only in our own State but throughout our
land.
Upon you devolves the high and responsible duty of legisla-
ting for the welfare of the State, to devise ways and means for
the support of the government, to reduce expenditures, and, if
possible, to lessen the burdens of the people. I cordially wel-
come you to the legislative halls of the State, and am now
ready to co-operate with you in the prosecution of any measures
which will tend to secure these desirable results.
UNITED STATES SENATOR.
It will become your duty on the second Tuesday after your
organization, to proceed, in accordance with an act of Congress
and the Constitution of the State, to the choice of a United
States Senator for the term commencing the fourth of March
next. While I am aware of the great interest felt upon this
subject, and fully appreciate the importance of securing an able
and upright representative in the councils of the nation, yet I
venture the suggestion that the people of the State have a
greater interest in the home government, and I confidently
trust that you will not allow this subject to engross an undue
share of your valuable time to the exclusion of those salutary
measures so much needed for the benefit and relief of the
people.
FINANCES AND TAXATION.
The finances of the State, though in a more prosperous bon-
dition than for many years, past, are yet far from satisfactory.
I respectfully refer you to the report of the financial officers







44



for a detailed statement of the finances, and the receipts and
disbursements during the fiscal year ending December 31, 1874.
The following is a carefully-prepared statement of the in-
debtedness of the State on the first day of January inst.:
Bonds outstanding................................ $1,894,867.58
Add one year's interest on $312,522.50, old bonds yet
to be exchanged................................. 20,626.48
Add six months' interest on old bonds held by School
and Seminary Funds .......................... 9,960.01
Add interest due on bonds of 1871 .................. 7,286.00
Add interest due on bonds of 1873.................. 16,833.12
$1,469,573.19
Deduct amount in treasury applicable to this debt.. 52,871.68
Total bonded debt and interest, less funds in the
treasury applicable to its reduction .............. $1,416,701.51
Warrants outstanding............................ $185,646.14
Deduct funds in treasury applicable thereto......... 2,868.93
Total floating debt, less funds in treasury applicable
thereto ......................................... 182,777.21
Total bonded and floating debt outstanding ......... $1,599,478.72
The total bonded and floating debt January 1, 1874,
was......................... ... .... .......... 1,620,809.27
Showing a reduction of the State debt during past
year............................ ........ $21,330.55
It is thus highly gratifying and encouraging that, while for
many years the interest remained unpaid, and the volume of the
debt was annually increased, during the last two years we
have not only paid all our interest promptly, but have made an
actual reduction of the principal. But while the wise provis-
ions of the law of 1873, providing for the consolidation of all
the bonded debt, except -the seven per cent. bonds of 1871 and
those belonging to the School and Seminary Funds, are being
carried faithfully into execution, and have created an interest
and sinking fund sufficient to secure the prompt payment of
the interest and the gradual liquidation of the principal, and
while the floating debt has been reduced during the past year
from $190,585.79 to $185,646.14, yet the outstanding warrants
on the treasury still remain at a large discount. And this de-
preciation, as shown in the Comptroller's report, so increases
our current expenditures as to be equivalent to the payment by
the State of an interest of two and a half per cent. per month on
its floating debt. And yet the amount of these warrants is less
than three-fourths of the State tax proper in one year. Why,
then, are they so far below par? The answer is found in the







45



fact that our current expenses annually exceed the revenue pro-
vided to meet them. It will be seen by the reports of the finan-
cial officers for the present year that while our current expenses
have been $280,837.37 the receipts applicable thereto are only
$254,328.58, leaving a deficiency on current account of
$26,508.79, by which amount the floating debt would have been
increased had not a portion of it been funded into the bonds of
1873. Had the Legislature confined the expenses within the
revenue, the actual reduction of the public debt for the year,
instead of $21,330.55, would have been $47,839.34.
It is a self-evident principle that "the creation of a debt
should always be accompanied with the means of: extinguish-
ment," and the taxation necessary to this end ought to be
cheerfully borne by a patriotic people.
.Section two, article twelve, of the Constitution requires
that the Legislature shall provide for raising revenue sufficient
to defray the expenses of the State for each fiscal year, and also
a sufficient sum to defray the principal and interest of the exist-
ing indebtedness of the State."
Here is a plain and positive constitutional mandate which
your oaths of office will not permit you to disregard. The lat-
ter part of this constitutional requirement was by the last Legis-
lature faithfully complied with, and I hope that you will see
that the former is no longer disregarded.
We sometimes hear it said that our taxes are too high. But as
I view it, taxes can never be said to be too high as long as they
fail to meet the ordinary public expenditures. And if the people
would look as closely'after the expenditures as they do after
,the taxes, they would find it easier to reduce both. The entire
assessed valuation of taxable property within the State is
$31,991,717, and it is obvious that in order to meet the nec-
essary current expenses and to provide for the interest on the
debt and for its payment at maturity, with this sum only as a
basis the strictest economy is required. Without such economy,
taxation must continue to be burdensome in the future, as in
the past.
Is it good policy to continue to issue warrants upon 'the
Treasury when no funds have been provided for the payment
thereof? I submit whether it would not be advisable to pro-






46



hibit the Comptroller from auditing any account and issuing
his warrant therefore, until funds are in the Treasury to meet it.
Every time a warrants presented at the Treasury and not paid,
the State's paper is dishonored by itself, and its credit impaired
both at home and abroad.
If'this suggestion is acted upon the effect will be two-fold.
No increase of the volume of warrants outstanding would be
possible, and those already out would at once he absorbed by
the taxes now due, and thus the State would be brought al-
most immediately to a cash basis. But should'you deem this-
heroic treatment at present unadvisable, I would earnestly com-
mend to your careful attention and consideration the'plan pro-
posed by the Comptroller one year ago, and adhered to in his
present report.
I recommend that the Legislature authorize the Comptroller
to dispose of the unsold remainder of the bonds of 1873, upon
the terms specified in the act authorizing their issue, after re-
serving a sufficient number to exchange for old bonds as pro-
vided in said act.
I make the same recommendation that many of my predeces-
sors have made respecting the expense of jurors and witnesses,
namely, that it be transferred from the State to the counties.
In the language of the Comptroller's report of last year,:
"If the counties paid these expenses the direct interest that each
tax-payer would have in lessening the expenses of his county
would tend greatly to diminish the costs of the circuit courts.",
Heretofore opposition has arisen to this measure from counties
where crime is more frequent, on the ground that it would in-
crease their burdens; but, leaving out of view the injustice of
compelling the orderly people of one county to pay for the dis-
orders of another, this objection could be easily obviated by
allowing the county commissioners of each county to fix the
compensation of jurors and witnesses not to exceed present
allowances.
SI here express the hope that you will adopt such measures as
will assure the discharge of all our obligations, and maintain the
good faith of the State. For, as has been well said by one of
the founders of the Government, "While the observance of that
good faith, which is the basis of public credit, is recommended







47

by the strongest inducements of political expediency, it is en-
forced by considerations of still greater authority. There are
arguments for it which rest on the immutable principles of moral
obligation. And in proportion as the mind is disposed to con-
template, in the order of Providence, an intimate connection
between public virtue and public happiness, will be its repug-
nancy to a violation of those principles."
RAILROAD BONDS.
In addition to the debt already treated of, there were issued
by authority of an act of the Legislature approved January 28,
1870, bonds of the State of Florida in aid of the Jacksonville,
Pensacola & Mobile Railroad Company, to the amount of four
million dollars, as security for which the State took a mort-
gage on the whole extent of the road. For the reason that the
State has held this security which has been.regarded as ample
protection against the bonds, they have never been considered
as part of the State debt proper. The suit brought by the State
in the Supreme Court of the United States for the purpose of
protecting and enforcing its statutory and mortgage lien upon
the railroad property has not reached a final decision, but has
so far progressed as to give hope of a decision favorable to the
State. On the fourth day of April last this whole property,
from Jacksonville to Chattahoochee, was taken possession of by -
the court and placed under the management of Major Robert
Walker, as Receiver. This officer is held by the court to the
strictest accountability, and under his skillful management the
credit of the road has been redeemed, and the road materially
improved in every respect. The State is now receiving the
benefits of the income of the road in new iron and rolling-stock,
and in the improved condition of the road-bed, whereby the
security of the State is enhanced, and the inducement to the
holders to exchange with us the bonds for the security is.greatly
increased. I am fully confident that as soon as the State shall
have demonstrated the validity of its security, and its undisputed
title to the property, the. holders will surrender the $4,000,000
of bonds, with accrued interest, to the State, in exchange
for the property or the proceeds of its sale, thus relieving
as of the greatest incubus that now weighs down our credit. It
was to relieve the State and the people of the burden of this debt







48



that this suit was begun in the highest court in the land-whose,
judicial character is such as to give the highest assurance of the
justice and equity of its decisions-and all good citizens will
patiently await its final action. In the interest of private
schemes a partisan press has sometimes represented that the
purpose of the State in bringing this suit was to fasten upon the
people the burden of this four million bond debt, while the
very opposite is its purpose and will be its effect.
PROPOSED AMENDMENTS TO THE CONSTITUTION.
The last Legislature proposed, in the manner prescribed by
the Constitution, eleven articles of amendments thereto, which
are referred to'you for your action. If you, in your wisdom,'
shall agree to the proposed amemenments by a two-thirds vote
of all the members elected to each house, then it will become
your duty to prescribe the time and manner of submitting them
to the people for ratification. I feel it is hardly my province
to express an opinion as to the merits or demerits of these
amendments, as I am not unmindful that I have no voice on this
question save through the ballot-box. But a desire to see our,
Constitutional fabric perfected, and our governmental machinery
reduced to a scale commensurate with the limited resources of
the State, impels me to allude to some of the changes proposed.
The amendments were well considered by the last Legislature,
and have generally been pronounced wise and prudent measures.
The first in importance, perhaps, is that which provides for
biennial sessions of the Legislature after the year 1877. This
policy has been adopted by several States more populous and
wealthy than ours, and has been foumd to work well. It is be-
lieved it will insure more careful legislation, and directly and
indirectly reduce the burdens of the people $40,000 annually.
In the Judiciary Department, also, the changes proposed
are important and radical. The amendments, if adopted and
ratified, will abolish the county court as a trial-court at
cominon law, distributing its present common law jurisdic-
tion to the justice and circuit courts. The thus increased
jurisdiction of the justices of the peace will readily sug-
gest the necessity of a higher qualification for these officers
than we have thus far, in all cases, been able to obtaill.
And, in any event, I here express the hope that members of the








S49



legislature will cordially second my efforts to improve this
ranch of the public service.
The abolition of the county courts will do away with the
costs of jurors and witnesses in those courts which are now
aid by the counties, but will increase to some extent this heavy
tem of expense in the circuit courts, which is paid by the State,
hus reducing the expenses of the .counties and increasing those
f the State. This will finish an additional reason for what
have already recommended, namely, the transferring the costs
f jurors and witnesses in the circuit courts to the counties.
Upon a careful examination I am fully of the opinion that
he proposed amendments should be adopted as a whole.
But I would call, to your attention the fact that there have
,een already adopted and ratified five articles of amendments
o the Constitution, and would suggest the propriety of num-
,cring these eleven amendments from six to sixteen inclusive.
ADDITIONAL AMENDMENTS.
Further amendments to the Constitution might be made
vhich would materially assist in bringing the expenses of the
government within the revenue. However desirable a laige
orps of administrative officers may be, it is plain that the re-
ources of the State cannot support the present number with-
it imposing excessive burdens of taxation upon the people. I
therefore recommend additional amendments abolishing the
office of Adjutant-General as a Cabinet and salaried office, leav-
ng its duties and pay to be fixed by law, abolishing the office
of Superintendent of Public Instruction, devolving the duties
of this office upon the Secretary of State, and abolishing the
office of Commissioner of Lands and Immigration, distributing
he duties of that office as follows: Those pertaining to immi-
rration, to the Attorney-General; those pertaining to the sale,
if lands, to the Comptroller; those pertaining to the receipt
nd custody of funds, to the Treasurer.
As Constitutional amendments require the action of two
successive Legislatures, it will be impossible to carry these into
effect during the present administration. But I would suggest
hat it is practicable for you at once to relieve the State of an
expense equal to the salary of a Cabinet officer, by devolving
4*j






50



ies of Warden of the State Prison upon the Adjutant-

STATE PRISON.
generous donation by the United States to the.State of
of all the arsenal buildings at Chattahoochee rendered
ole for the State to establish this penal institution. This
ie in 1868. These buildings were erected in 1834 by the
I Government at great cost. and in the most permanent
. It is our interest and it should be our pride to pre-
iem from decay. -The Board of Commissioners of State,
ions have, during the past year, twice officially visited;
pected this public institution, as required by law. There.
e repairs needed on the buildings, and the wood-work'
Spainting.at once in order to its proper preservation
.t of material is all that it will be necessary for the
Provide for by appropriation, as the labor can be per-
by the prisoners. There are fine workshops which
be put in operation as soon as the finances of the State
4ble it to provide the necessary machinery at its cash
Phe proper use of these shops would go far towards rena
the prison self-supporting. The prison and grounds
en kept in a high state, of cleanliness, which will ae-
)r the remarkable good health of the. prisoners during

discipline of the prison is excellent, and the officers i
are entitled to great credit for their, skillful manage.

>rison is under the general supervision of the Adjutani
,and under the immediate oversight of the Warde
ese officers have shown commendable zeal for accord#
: in the internal management of this institution the pen4
ormatory objects of its establishment, and have done
most with the means at hand to render the prison labor
le, and thus lighten the burden necessarily imposed upoO
ple of the State. The reports of these officers, herewith
ad, will give the details of the- management, receipS
ienditures of this institution during the past year.
r careful consideration of the various recommendation
ad therein.







51



I would especially ask your attention to that portion of these
reports referring to the utilization of the magnificent water-
power upon the prison lands. Several attempts have heretofore
been made to accomplish this purpose which have as often
failed for want of necessary means. But this work has now
been carried to such a point and under such favorable auspices
as to afford the strongest hopes of ultimate success. This
water-power offers a ready solution of the problem which all
States have experienced and but few solved, namely, how to
"make institutions of this character self-supporting.
Before leaving this subject,'I desire to lay before you, an-
nexed hereto, letters received from the President and Secretary
of the National Prison Association of the United States, on the
subject of prison reform. This subject is attracting the earnest
attention of the ablest and best men of the country, and is of
such importance that I ask for it your careful and earnest con-
sideration.
But I know of no better way of preventing crime than to
remove the most fruitful cause of it-ignorance. .And this
leads me to my next topic,
COMMON SCHOOLS.
The education of the masses is the great safeguard of society
and the sheet anchor of free government. The experience -of
all civilized nations has demonstrated that this is a necessary
measure of self-preservation, and that the cost of it is a positive
economy in the prevention of crime and pauperism. The com-
mon school system is the result of long experience, and is the
best means yet devised of accomplishing this end. The work-
ings of our own school system and the condition of our schools
are shown in the report of the acting Superintendent of Public
Instruction, the honorable S. B. McLin, whom I appointed on
the first day of October last to take charge of the department
left vacant by the sudden decease of its former zealous and able
head, the honorable Jonathan C. Gibbs, in whom the State
lost a faithful and valuable public servant, whose plAce it is:
not easy to fill. It will be seen that our public schools are
generally in a flourishing condition, and are engaging the
active interest of all classes of our people. Their benefit to the
community is heartily appreciated, and the taxes necessary to-








52

their support are cheerfully paid.' While our school system is
young in years it is a giant in strength, -and although by no
means perfected, is so rapidly extending as to give the hope
that the day is not far distant when its benefits will be brought
within reach of every child in the State.
Liberal provision .has been made by the State for the sup-
port of a system which shall be second to none. The Constitu-
tional provision tor a Common School Fund, the interest of which
is to be applied solely to the maintenance of such school;
are as follows: The proceeds of all lands that have been dr
may hereafter be granted to the State by the United States for
educational purposes; appropriations by the State; the proS
ceeds of lands or other property which may accrue to the State
by escheat or forfeiture ; the proceeds of all property granted to
the State, when the purpose of such grant shall not be speci.
fled; all moneys which may be paid as an exemption from mil
itary duty; all fines collected under the penal laws of thi
State ; such portion of the'aper capital tax as may be prescribed
by law for educational purposes; twenty-five per centum of the
sales of public lands which are now or may hereafter be owned
by the State."
SIn addition to the interest on this fund there is a special ta
of one mill on the dollar levied on all the taxable property in
the State, which is apportioned annually for the support and
maintenance of comnuon schools.
The School Fund has principally been derived from a grantol
land by the General Government of the sixteenth section,
-every township.in the State, or its equivalent, which originally
amounted to 704,092 acres, of which 115,184 acres have bed
sold for the sum of $144,388.77, leaving 589,508 acres d
!unsold, which may be estimated to be worth a quarter ofi
-million dollars. According to the report of the Treasurer th
School Fund now amounts to *216,821.72, and is invested4i
follows:
Bonds of State of Florida, 7 per cents., series 1871...... $11,500.00
Bonds of State ofFlorida, 6 per cents., series 1873..... 2,000.00
Sundry Florida bonds, various rates and dates........ 190,752.63
Bonds of Florida Railroad Company, 7 per cent., 1857.. 9,000.00
Cash on hand uninvested............................. ,569.09-$216,821
The above item of sundry bonds for $190,752.63, consists
various Florida bonds of different amounts, different rates








interest, falling due at different times, and some past due, with
io provision made by the State for paying or reinvesting them.
Some of these bonds are printed and others in manuscript-
nere slips of paper. This is not only inconvenient but unbusi-
iess-like. In view of these facts I recommend the consolidation
)f these "sundry bonds into one bond, bearing six per cent.
.terest, and that the Governor be authorized to execute such
bond, and the Board of Education to receive the same in lieu
of the bonds for which it shall be substituted, and that said
bonds be by them cancelled and destroyed.
SEMINARIES.
The two seminaries of learning established in this State, one
east of the Suwannee river, at Gainesville, Alachua county, and
the other west, at Tallahassee, Leon county, were endowed by
Congress with four entire townships of land, amounting to 85,714
acres,, of which 47,000 acres have been sold for the sum of
$97,204.58, leaving 38,714 acres yet unsold, having an estimated
value of $76,000. According'to the report of the Treasurer, the
Seminary Fund now amounts to $83,736.29. This fund is in-
vested as follows:
Bonds of State of Florida, seven per cents., series 1871... $9,200.00
Bonds of State of Florida, six per cents., series 1873...... 2,000.00
One Florida Railroad bond, seven per cent............... 1,000.00
Sundry Florida bonds, various rates and dates........... 71,232.45
Cash on hand uninvested............................ 243.84-883,786.29 *
The above item. of sundry bonds for $71,292.45. is of a similar
character with the parallel item under the School Fund, and I
make the same recommendation in regard to them.
The act of the Legislature establishing the seminaries declares
the objects to be as follows: The instruction of persons, bot.i
male and female, in the art of teaching all the various braimhes.
that pertain to a good common school education, and next to.:
give instruction in the mechanic arts, in husbandry and agricul--
tural chemistry, in the fundamental laws, and in what regards
the rights and duties of citizens." Each county is entitled by-
law to send as many pupils to one or the other of these semi
naries, free of charge, as it has representatives in the Legisla-
ture, said pupils to be selected by the Board of County Com-
missioners in each county. The objects of these institutions
have never been carried into effect, nor have the counties availed







54

themselves of the privilege of sending students, or taken the
benefit of their scholarships. These seminaries are State institu-
tions, and the Seminary Fund, from the interest of which they
are supported, belongs to the people of the entire State. It
would seem, however, that the people of the State have forgot-
ten their interest in, and the object of, these seminaries, and have
allowed them to fall into disuse as State institutions. The in-
terest on this fund now amounts annually to $6,353.39, which is
paid over to, and expended by, two boards of education, who
have never been held to any accountability whatever.
As far as I am able to learn, the board of the West Florida
Seminary has never made a report, and the board of the East
Florida Seminary not since 1860. As these seminaries have been
therto conducted, their benefits have not extended beyond the
two communities in which they are located, and as those comma
nities receive, besides their full share of the Common School Fund
the annual expenditure ofthis interest of the Seminary Fund is:
clear bonus to them at the expense of the rest of the State. I
it just, is it right, that the interest of a fund designed for thi
benefit of the whole State should be longer expended upon mer
local interests ? I commend to your careful consideration thi
propriety of stopping the expenditure of the interest on thi
"fund, and the investing of it annually with the principal, until
such time as the people of the various counties shall be bette
able- to avail themselves of the benefits of theseinstitutions, an,
the institutions themselves can be put upon a footing to carr
out the full intent of the law; unless indeed it be found pract
cable to make a different disposition of it to the immediate bei
efit of the educational interests of the State.
AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE.
By an act approved July 2, 1862, the Congress of the Unite
States donated to the several States and Territories which ma
provide colleges for the benefit of agriculture and the mechan
arts, 30,000 acres of land for each Senator and Representatii
in Congress at the time of the passage of the act. This gral
was made upon the express condition that any State acceptir
it "shall provide, within five years, not less than one college
as described in the fourth section of this'act, or the grant to sui
State shall cease, and said State shall be bound to pay tl







55

United States the amount received." The. time herein pre-
scribed for establishing the college was extended by act of Con-
gress, approved January 23, 1873, so that the States which
have not complied with the provision of said act in establishing
colleges, shall have the period of two years after the 1st day of
July, 1872, within which to provide at least one college."
On the 30th day of January, 1869, the State of Florida, by
joint resolution of its Legislature, accepted the terms of this
grant in the following language: "That the State of Flor-
ida hereby accedes to and agrees to comply with the terms of
said act." Under the provisions of the grant the State received
land scrip for 90,000 acres of land, which was sold, according
to the report of the Trustees of the Agricultural College Fund,
for about $81,000, and the proceeds invested in $100,000 of
bonds of the State of Florida. For information as to the pres-
ent condition of the fund, I refer you to the report of the said
trustees accompanying the report of the Superintendent of Pub-
lic Instruction for this year. If will be seen by the report that
the trustees have made. no progress toward locating and estab-
lishing a college, as required by law. I have to call your at-
tention to the fact that, under existing laws, the time allowed
the State within which to establish not less than one such col-
lege, as is required by section four of the original act, expired
on the 1st day of July last, and the grant ceased. The State
is now liable to be called on at any time to refund to the
United States the amount received for the land scrip. I
urge upon you the necessity of making an effort .to save to the
State this valuable grant, and recommend that you memorialize
Congress for a reasonable extension of the time. But the State
must, without delay, comply with the terms of the grant by
establishing at least one agricultural college, or else surren-
der the fund. The principal of this fund is to remain inviolate
forever, nor can the interest be used for the purpose of con-
structmg the college buildings. These must be furnished by
the State. It is evident that this cannot now be done out of
the general resources of the State; but special means, which
may be devoted to the purpose, are fortunately at hand. The
declared objects of the two seminaries now established by law
are substantially identical with those of the agricultural col-





q



56

lege. I submit to your consideration the propriety of consoli
dating the Seminary and Agricultural College Funds, so as to
establish one or more institutions which shall carry out the ob-
jects of both, and prove an honor and a blessing to the State.
INSANE ASYLUM.
The Legislature at its last session passed an act requiring the
Governor to set apart a portion of the public buildings of the
State at Chattahoochee, in Gadsden county, for the purposes of
an indigent lunatic asylum, to which all indigent persons who
may be found to be insane, lunatic or non compos mentis by the
courts of this State having jurisdiction of the subject, may be
confined for safe keeping and treatment." This is a step in the
right direction, but the Legislsture made no appropriation for
carrying it into execution. In May last I made a personal in-
spection of the public buildings at Chattahoochee for the pur-
pose of carrying out this law, but found none of them suitable
for the purposes of an insane asylum.
It is clearly the duty of the State to care for its unfortunate
citizens who are deprived of the power of caring for themselves,
and to provide for the safe and humane treatment of this class
of sufferers. At present the State is maintaining, at large ex-
pense, six of its insane at asylums outside the State, and sixteen
at private houses within the State, whilee two of these unfortu-
nates are confined for safe keeping in the State Prison, thus
placing their misfortune on a footing with crime..
The building formerly used as a magazine is located upon a
most favorable site for an institution of this character, and is in
an excellent state of preservation. This building is one hundred
feet long by thirty-fiveand a half feet wide, with solid brick
walls four feet thick and twelve feet high. Around this build-
ing is an outer wall one hundred and forty-five and one-half
feet by eighty and one-half feet, two feet thick and twelve feet
high. This wall is also of brick, built in the most substantial
and permanent manner. These walls are in perfect condition to
serve as the foundation and first story of a large building. If
the State should adopt this site for the asylum, and these walls
for its foundation, it would have at the start what is equivalent
to the completion of the first story of a magnificent structure
one .hundred and forty-five and one-half feet long by eighty
*







57



and one-half feet wide, and what would have cost the 'State
at least ten thousand dollars to have built from the begin-
ning. The location is upon a side hill, so that an abundant
supply of water, so necessary in an institution of this kind, could
easily be conducted into the third story of the building. Now,
by using the convict labor of the State Prison, the State could
here construct a building, at a comparatively small cost, which'
would furnish ample accommodation for this unfortunate class
of our people for many years to come. If this suggestion is
adopted, brick and lumber sufficient for the purpose can be sup-
plied by the convict labor, and air appropriation of five or ten
thousand dollars will be required this year to purchase the other
necessary materials, all the labor of construction being per-
formed, as suggested above, by the convicts. This would be util-
izing our prison labor for the best interests of the State, as well
as inaugurating a more enlightened and far-seeing policy re-
garding those whose helplessness gives them the strongest claims
upon -our charity. I earnestly recommend this matter to your
most careful consideration.
MILITIA.
The accompanying report of the Adjutant-General will show
the present condition of the militia of the State. It will be seen
that only twenty-one dollars have been spent under this head
during the past year, which speaks well for the peaceful condi-
tion of the State.
IMMIGRATION.
I refer with much satisfaction to the general increase in popu-
lation and in prosperity which has marked our State during
the past year. The future of Florida is full of hope. It is
not improbable that the dawn of the twentieth century will
find the population of our State one million, and its aggregate
wealth five hundred million dollars. The material resources of
Florida are almost incalculable, and, with her unequalled cli-
mate, grateful alike to the strong and to the invalid; her pro-
ductive soil, yielding abundantly of all the staple products;
her tropical fruits; her exhaustless stores of magnificent tim-
ber; the wealth of her fisheries, on her long line of sea-coast
and her numerous rivers; her commercial advantages, and her
millions of rich and yet unoccupied acres, she offers stronger
..







58



inducements to industrious immigrants than almost any other
State in the Union can offer. Yet nearly all of our sister States
have surpassed, us in the volume of immigration which- has
poured into their domains, simply because, while they have
been active in publishing to the world their advantages, we
have neglected to make our greater advantages properly
known, and to show that here are to be found, not only the
sure avenues to natural wealth, but also the certain protection
to that wealth which a good State government and the efficient
execution of wise laws always gives. I respectfully submit the
propriety of taking such action as will attract to our State the
attention of that better class of immigrants which will make
for us industrious and profitable citizens. And to secure this
end it is not only necessary that our material advantages of
soil and climate should be properly made known, but it is also
necessary that our credit be restored, and the reputation of
Florida for good laws and good government be established and
sustained. Such a reputation as this will be the best adver-
tisement which Florida can secure, and upon the wisdom and
the patriotism of the present Legislature such a reputation will,
.in a great measure, depend.
The Bureau of Immigration has done much during the past
year to make known the advantages which the State offers, and
*to induce immigration. The able and energetic Commissioner
of. Lands and Immigration has made the most of the limited
means at his disposal. I call your attention -to his very inter-
esting report upon the workings and needs of his Department,
and ask your favorable consideration of the various recom-
mendations therein made.'
PROTECTION TO FARMERS.
One of the most serious drawbacks upon the agricultural
interests of the State, is the depredation upon stock and farm
products, committed by those who would rather steal than
work, and who are encouraged by a class of dishonest traffickers
who are a curse to the community.
I recommend the most stringent laws that can be passed to
protect the laborer and the capitalist from the depredations
alluded to.







59



INCORPORATION OF RAILROADS AND CANALS.
An act to provide a general law for the incorporation of
railroads and canals was passed at the last session of the Legis-
lature. This act is in accordance with the letter and spirit of
the Constitution, which requires that in all cases where a gen-
eral law can be made applicable, all laws shall be general and'
of uniform operation throughout the State.'' It is to be hoped
that this act will take the place of all special legislation on this
subject, and that hereafter no private act of incorporation will
be granted in this State. Special legislation is the bane of any
government. It is anti-republican in its tendency, and danger-
ous to:the liberties of the people. It is usually asked for the
purpose of obtaining extraordinary powers and privileges, thus
creating unjust monopolies, and confining to a few those rights
and facilities which should remain accessible to all. General
laws are not only safer in all cases where they can be made ap-
plicable, but they are more economical, saving much valuable
time and expense in legislation. I hope this requirement of the
Constitution will be adhered to.
But in the act above referred to, there are some defects
which should be cured at this session. I especially recommend
the repeal of section twenty-seven; the provisions of which are
uncalled for by any principles of public policy, and extremely
unjust to the people. I am satisfied this part of the law was
passed through inadvertence, otherwise it would never have
received the. sanction of a legislative body. It is certainly evi-
dent that so long as railroad companies do not' fence in their
roads they should be held strictly responsible to owners of
stock for any damages caused by their neglect so to do.
TERMS OF THE SUPREME COURT.
The original Constitution of 1868 provided that the Supreme
Court should- hold three terms each year, and that such terms
should commence on the second Tuesday of October, January,
and April, respectively. It was found impracticable, however,
so to arrange the terms of the Circuit Courts as not to be more
or less in conflict with these terms of 'the Supreme Court,
greatly to the inconvenience of the bar and the public. An
amendment to the Constitution was, therefore, effected.in 1871,
which provides as follows: "The number of terms of. the Su-
*







60



preme Court, and the time of holding the same, shall be fxed
by law." The Legislature has thus far failed to act upon this
subject. I recommend such action, in accordance with this
amendment, as will best subserve the public interests.
CENSUS AND APPORTIONMENT.
-Section one, article thirteen of the Constitution, reads as fol-
lows: The Legislature shall, in the year one thousand eight hun-
dred and seventy-five, and every tenth year thereafter, cause an
enumeration to be inade of all the inhabitants of the State, and
they shall then proceed to apportion the representation among
the different counties, giving to each county one representative
at large, and one additional to every one thousand registered
voters therein; but no county shall be entitled to more than
four representatives. The Legislature shall also, after every
such enumeration, proceed to fix by law the number of Senators
which shall constitute the Senate of Florida, and which shall
never be less than one-fourth, nor more than one-half, of the
whole number of the Assembly."
It becomes your official duty, therefore, to provide at this
session for taking the census of all the inhabitants of the State
during the present year. This will involve an extra expense
upon the State government, which it can illy afford under the
present condition of the finances. I therefore hope you will de-
vise the most economical means of discharging this duty. I
suggest that the assessors of taxesbe required to take the cen-
sus of the population in each county at'the same time they take
the census and valuation of property for the purpose of taxa-
tion. The census can thus be taken by these officers for'a
smaller capital fee, and at a much less expense than by any
other persons. In this way we shall secure a more complete
census, both of the population and property of the State, than
by any other means at hand. Then, by making a Cabinet offi-
cer superintendent of the census, without extra pay except for
the necessary clerical assistance, the whole expense attendant
upon this work need not exceed $10,000. Again, under exist-.
ing laws the assessors are required to take the census of all the
school children every four years, commencing in 1876, for which
they receive three cents for each child reported. They are also
required to make a list of all persons subject to military duty







* "61

every five years, commencing in 1876, for which they receive(
five cents for each name on said list.
It is estimated that the sum of $4,000 will be required next
year to carry into effect these laws. Now, I submit for youi
consideration the expediency of so amending these laws thai
the duties therein imposed may be performed this year in con.
section with the general census. The plan.here proposed will
save this expense of $4,000 next year, and practically reduce
the extra expense of carrying out this constitutional provision
to $6,000.
You will.observe, moreover, that the constitutional provision
above quoted directs that the apportionment shall be made aftei
the enumeration; therefore it is impracticable to make it at this
session. When done, however, the representation in the Senate
is to be fixed by law, while in the Assembly the representation
is fixed by the Constitution, being based upon the registered
voters in the different counties after the said enumeration
This would seem to imply that .4 new registration of all th(
legally-qualified voters in each county was also necessary be
fore the apportionment could be made. I ask for this subject
your careful consideration C B a r 1J A

I am informed that there is no law providing for an apple
in civil cases in Justice courts. The importance of providing
for an appeal from these courts without further delay will read
ily suggest itself to all. I therefore recommend suitable legis-
lation to accomplish this end.
I further suggest that in criminal cases where the party ac-
cused is bound over to either county or Circuit court, the jus.
tices should require the witnesses to enter into a personal
recognizance to appear at the court in which the case is returned,
and not depart the same without leave of the prosecuting
officer, and to appear from term to term until the case is finally
disposed of. This would save the large expense now incurred
for clerks and sheriffs' fees in re-summoning these. witnesses tc
appear before-first, the grand jury, and then the trial court, and
all the witnesses would be in attendance on the first day of the
court, -thereby preventing much delay'and expense at 'each









term. The expenses of criminal prosecutions are intolerable
and demand your most serious attention.
CONSTABLES.
Section twenty of article six of the Constitution provides
as follows: "A constable shall be elected by the registered
voters in each county for every two hundred (200) registered
voters, but each county shall be entitled to at least two con-
stables, and no county shall have more than twelve constables.
They shall perform such duties and under such instructions as
shall be provided by law." The term of these officers is limited
by law to two years from the day of the canvass of the votes
by the county canvassers, and until their successors are elected*
and qualified. *The law further requires that they give bond
before entering upon.the duties of- their office.
As many constables elect never qualify, and as none of them
are ever voted for as the successor to any particular constable
then in office, it is impossible to determine which of the old
constables are displaced by the newly-elected constables who do
qualify, and which of them hold over. This produces much confu-
sion in the counties, and embarrasses the due execution of the
laws. To illustrate: Leon county is entitled to twelve con-
stables, to be-eleCted atevery general election. Now, suppose
.'th of the twelve thus elected, eleven only qualify. Each one
-of the old twelve might, with equal right, claim that the non-
qualifying constable elect was his successor, and continue to
hold his office, thus giving the county twenty-three constables,
while limited by the Constitution to twelve., I have, moreover,
to call your attention to the fact that in many of the counties
constables are acting without bond, and without having taken
any oath of office. This is wrong, and should be corrected
without delay. The duties of these officers are too important
to be discharged by irresponsible persons, and the rights of
parties litigant should not be thus jeopardized. Experience
has demonstrated that the laws concerning the qualification of
these officers, and the manner in which they should perform
their duties, are very indefinite and defective. I recommend
the passage of a law regulating this whole subject, and espe-
cially a definite time when the term of office shall commence
and expire. I would suggest the thirty-first day of December



62



4







* 63



next after any general election as a convenient time for the ex-
piration of the old and the beginning of the new term. It is
sufficiently removed from the day of election to allow the out-
going officer to close up his business and be prepared to turn
over his books and papers to his successor, and the newly-
elected to secure his bond and take all necessary steps to
qualify. And any constable not qualified and ready to enter
upon the discharge of his duties by that date should be deemed
as declining the office, and provision should be made by law
for filling the vacancy. Many applications are made upon the
Executive to fill these vacancies by appointment. This has
been frequently done in the past, but I am convinced that there
is not law to warrant such appointments, and I shall in future
decline to make them unless you otherwise direct.
AUCTIONEERS.
The law in regard to these officers is also defective. It is
now provided by law that there shall be appointed and com-
missioned by the Governor and General Assembly of this State,
in each and every county within the State, a suitable number of
fit and discreet persons to act as auctioneers at all public sales
by auction, with certain exceptions, and all auctioners, when so
appointed, shall hold their office during the period of six years
from the date of their appointment: Provided, That all auc-
tioneers appointed by the Governor during the recess of the
General Assembly shall hold their office only until the end of
the session of the General Assembly next after the date of their
appointment." It will be observed that the law contemplates a
confirmation of these officers; not, however, by the Senate as in
the case of all other confirmations, but by the General Assem-
bly, styled by the present Constitution the Legislature of the
State of Florida," thus conferring a higher dignity upon these
appointments than appertains to those of judges or Cabinet offi-
cers. The law is also in conflict with section fourteen, article
sixteen, of the Constitution, which provides that the Legisla-
ture shall not create any office the term of which shall be longer
than four years."
I recommend your early consideration of this subject, and
that the law in reference to these appointments be made to








64



harmonize with the present Constitution, or repealed altogether.
as you may deem most conducive to the public interests.
PUBLIC PRINTING.
One of the retrenchments which can be made at this session
is in the cost of public printing.
You will see by the reports of the financial officers that the
State has, during the past year, expended the-enormous sum of
831,738.08 for printing. Of this amount, $20,033.11 was for the
legislative printing of last session, and $11,704.97 for general
printing and advertising. This expenditure can and must
be reduced one-half at least.
Public printing should be ordered with sole reference to
the interests of the State. I trust this session will avoid the
recklessness which has marked the past in this respect, and
that you will be on your guard against the seductive wiles
of the printer. I recommend a careful revision of all laws on
this subject, with the view of eliminating 'all unnecessary ex-
penditures on this account.
Furthermore, existing laws not unfrequently require public
printing and advertising far in excess of the actual necessi-
ties' of the case. For example, the election law requires
the sheriff of each county to cause to be published in his
county a copy of the entire notice of any general election
issued by the Secretary of State and by him published for
the information of the whole State. It is obvious that only so
much of the general notice should be published in each county
as effects that county, thereby reducing this expense full ninety
per cent.
LEGAL ADVERTISING.
In 1871 an act entitled "An Act to Provide tor the Publication
of Official and Legal Advertisements in the several Judicial Cir-
cuits of this State," was passed by the Legislature and approved
by the Governor. This act, which is still in force, provides that
the Secretary of State shall designate one or more newspapers in
each judicial district in the State, in which all official and legal
advertisements shall be published, and fixes the rate of compen-
sation to be paid for the same. Considerable dissatisfaction with
this law has arisen on the ground that it creates a monopoly of
legal advertising for the benefit of a few papers, and enables the








65



publishers to charge exorbitant fees to the injury of those who
are compelled to advertise in these papers.
The object of the law is not to benefit the newspapers so se-
lected, but it is to benefit the people; to accomplish with greater
certainty the object of legal advertisements by designating
officially the papers in which all persons interested may find all
notices required by law, and preventing thereby any practical
evasion of the law by the insertion of such notices in obscure
or unknown jourrials. This law is not peculiar to this State,
but the same course is pursued by the United States Govern-
ment, and has been adopted by nearly all our sister States.
The rates for advertising fixed by law are, however, in my
opinion, much too high. I recommend that the law, so far as
the general principle is concerned, be continued in force, but
that such modifications in the charges be made as will place this
class of advertising on a par with other'business notices, so that
while affording fair remuneration to the official papers, it will
not prove burdensome to the advertisers.
THE LAWS.
I refer to the accompanying report of the Attorney-General
as to the effect and operation of the laws and the decisions of
the courts thereon, and ask your attention to the suggestions
therein made.
In this connection I would further recommend that the law
should be so amended as to make the County Judge ex officio
clerk of the Circuit court, to act during a vtacancy of that
office from any cause.
I also recommend a careful revision of the jury laws, and
especially that provision be made authorizing a special venirt
iii cases, where no.jury has been legally drawn or summoned, as
doubts have arisen whether such authority now exists.
TAX ON COMMISSIONS.
Chapter 1936, Laws of Florida, imposes a tax on commissions,
and prescribes the mode of payment thereof. I submit to your
better judgment whether the necessity and ,propriety of this
law have not ceased to exist. I know of no rule of justice or
sound policy which will justify the continuance of this tax upon
our public servants, who, as a rule, are required to make a sacri-
fice when they consent to serve the Government. Moreover,
.5j









66

the law requires the officer to pay this tax to the State in
United States currency, while the State discharges its pledge
to the officer by "promises to pay," largely depreciated in
value, thereby committing an act of bad faith to the officer,
from whom strict fidelity is expected. In some of the smaller
counties this tax has proved almost a barrier to organization,
While there were patriotic men who were willing to serve the
public without pay, they were unwilling to pay for the privilege
I recommend the repeal of the law.
PARDONS.
In obedience to a requirement of the Constitution, I herewith
communicate to the Legislature a list (annexed) of pardog
granted during the past year, by the Pardoning Board. AM
unusually large number of applications has been made. Whi
the board, impressed with the weighty responsibility of the pa
doing power, has endeavored to exercise it with great caution,
yet it is possible, under the present system of ex parte represent
nations, that some of these pardons may have been unworthily
granted, through the misrepresentations of relatives, friends, and
other interested parties. In this connection I desire to call your
attention to the provision of section twelve, article five, of the
Constitution, which confers on the Legislature the power
regulate by law the manner of applying for pardons. In order
that justice may be done alike to the community and to thb
convict, I recommend the passage of an act prescribing the maw4
ner of'applying for pardons, and requiring public, notice!
such application to be given for a stated time in the conatj
Where the crime was committed, before it shall be considered
by the board.
FREEDMAN'S SAVINGS AND TRUST COMPANY.
I cannot but regard the failure of this institution in J ul,
last as a great public calamity. The Freedman's Savings and
Trust Company was chartered by Congress, and, in connectiOi
with the Freedman's 1ureau, was made a part of the CongrM
sional reconstruction policy. While the parent institution w
located in Washington under the immediate eye of the Natiol
Government, branches were established in every part of tl
South, and our industrious colored citizens were induced to d&
posit their savings therein to the amount of over three millions






67



of dollars, under the belief and most positive assurances that
the United States Government was responsible for the money
and would guarantee its safety. In fact, they regarded this in-
stitution not as an ordinary savings bank, but as a Bureau of
the National Government, established for their benefit and pro-
tection, and they placed the same implicit confidence in its
good faith and its stability which they placed in the good'faith
and stability of the Government, itself.
Whether this unfortunate failure was caused simply by the
bad management of incompetent officials, or by the frauds and
impositions of dishonest speculators, the evil effects of the
failure are the same, and the United States Government is
*equally bound by every principle of honor, of equity, and of
sound public policy to assume the liabilities of the bank, and
* to mpke good to its depositors the full amount of the deposits.
t recommend that the Legislature memorialize Congress to do
This act of justice, and instruct our Senators and Representa-
tives to urge the measure.
THE CENTENNIAL.
Governor Hart, in his last annual message, called the attention
of the Legislature to the importance of having the Varied pro-
ducts of Florida properly represented at the great International
Exhibition of 1876, and recommended the passage of a joint.
resolution authorizing the appointment of a Board of State
Commissioners to take charge of the interests of the State and
of its citizens in all matters relating to the exhibition. The
Legislature, however, toek no action, and as the matter could
not be longer deferred, I assumed the responsibility, in April
last, of appointing the following board, viz.: Judge Charles.H.
DuPont, of Quincy; Hon. T. W. Osborn, of Jacksonville; Dr.
Arthur V. Conover; of St. Augustine; Hon. George E. Went-
worth, of Pensacola, and Hon. Edward C. Howe, of Key West.
These gentlemen accepted the trust, except the first named,
who declined, and in his place I have appointed Hon. D. S.
Walker, who ha signifies his acceptance. I submit this action
to your honorable body for approval, and ask that you clothe
them with the necessary authority t6 carry into full effect the
objects of their appointment.






68



I cannot but express my surprise and regret at the indiffer-
ence with which the people of Florida seem to regard this im-
portant exhibition. It offers an opportunity never before
presented, and-which may perhaps never be presented again,
of displaying before our sister States and the world our abun-
dant, but as yet undeveloped, agricultural and industrial re-
sources, and of placing Florida in her proper position as one of
the most favored States in the Union. The women of Florida,
under the direction of Mrs. Ellen Call Long, Commissioner for
Florida of the Women's United States Centennial Auxiliary
Association, whose eloquent appeal, issued in October last,
should have found a ready echo in every patriotic heart, have
already set to work, and I sincerely trust that the men of Flor-
ida will not be long behind them in seeking, to uphold the dig-
nity and adva g e the fame of their beautiful State.
CUBA.
I take the liberty of directing your attention to a matter in
which this State is deeply interested. I refer to the condition
of affairs in Cuba. For over six years the people of-that island
have been heroically struggling against a foreign government,
relentless in its extortions and merciless in its oppression&
Their history since the 10th day of October, 1868, has been
written in blood, and their cries of anguish, their appeals for
succor, have been wafted across the narrow channel that divides
them from our own peaceful State, even to our very doors. In
this struggle for liberty, many of our own .people-ever ready
to espouse the cause of the down-trodden and the oppressed-
have become involved, and even citizens of this State hpve fal-
len victims to Spanish vengeance. Not only does a comfon0
love of liberty and justice bind us-to the patriots of Cuba, butO
still closer tie-the fellowship of a common citizenship-leadsBs
to sympathize with their wrongs and to encourage them in their
struggle. Thousands of their ottlawedband outcast people
have sought refuge upon our shores, and, protected beneath tle
stars and stripes in the full enjoyment of life, liberty and prop
erty, have become industrious and valuable citizens of tht
State. At nearly every previous session of the Legislatu
resolutions have been passed sympathizing with the cause of







69



the Cuban patriots and favoring the recognition of their repub-
lic by the United States Government. As we love liberty for
ourselves, so let us love it for others, and let the voice of our
people, through their representatives in the Legislature, again
be heard calling upon our representatives in Congress to make
the cause of Cuba the cause of Florida.
INTERNAL IMPROVEMENT FUND.
The report of the trustees of this fund is not yet complete,
but will be laid before you, as required by law, at an early day.
CONCLUSION.
Allow me, in conclusion, to -say that all power of retrench-
ment is with the Legislature. No tax can be levied and no ex-
penditure made without first being specifically authorized by
act of the Legislature. To you the people look for such action
as will lessen expenses of the government.
They have conferred upon you an important trust, and clothed
you with the power to execute it. -The laws you enact at this ,
session are to govern the people of Florida for the next twelve
months, and I trust they may be such as to stand the'test of
time, and govern the people for many years to come. It will
be your duty to examine closely into the transactions of every
department, and correct all abuses, if any shall be found to
exist.
All the Departments have made able and exhaustive reports
of their official doings, which accompany this message, and to
which I again earnestly invite your attention. If in'any of these
reports there is anything not fully understood, I desire you to,
investigate and inquire, so that when you return to our com-
mon constituency you may each and all be able to inform them
of the exact condition of the government,, and of the reforms
which you have established.
Your first and highest duty will be to reduce the expenditures
within the revenue, and to provide for the taking up and retire-
ment of the present floating indebtedness. This can only b.e
accomplished by the enforcement of the strictest economy in
every department, and I hope you will set the example by short-
ening the session of the Legislature, by dispensing with all un-
necessary subordinate officers and attaches in both Houses, and'






70.



by reducing the enormous expense of the legislative printing.
You should cut off all gratuities and fees to officers whose
compensation is fixed by the Constitution, and abolish every
clerkship in the several departments, which, in your judgment,
is not absolutely required by the exigencies of the public ser-
vice.
The power of restoring the public credit and lightening .the
burdens of the people is in the hands of the Legislature, and
ther6 the responsibility must rest.
With a firm reliance on the patriotism and loyalty, of our
people, a jealous care for the honor and integrity of our State,
and a determined purpose to raise her to the highest possible
point of moral and material development, let us be true to our-
selves and to posterity, and use with wisdom the munificent
gifts bestowed upon us by a kind Providence, and we shall as-
suredly reap the rich reward of onr efforts in the prosperity,
and happiness of our people, and the greatness and glory of
Florida. *
M. L. STEARNS, Governor.











TABOLAR STATEMENT showing fines or forfeitures remitted or reprieved, pardons or commutations granted, and number of death-warrants issued
for the year-1874.

NAo Name. Crime. Were convicted. Whenc'vict'd Sentence. Wl7en par'd. Terme of pardon.
1 George Witherspoon Adultery.......... .............. ....Jefferson co..... May, 1873... Not sentenced......... Jan'y 6, 1874 Free and fil pardon
2 George Washington Lewdness....................... Gadsden co..... July, 1869... Fine and costs......... Feb'y 5, 1874 Free and ful pardon
3 Washington Nelson Horse-stealing........................ Columbia co.... Fallt'm, 1873 year in State prison.. Feb'y 5,1874 Free'and ful pardon
4 Jesse Merchant..... Assault with intent to kill ......... Madison co..... April 27,1873 6 years in State prison.. Feb. 16, 1874 Free and fu pardon
5 Gideon Brown...... Assault with intent to kill........... Madison co..... April27,1873 6 yearsin State prison.. Feb. 16, 1874 Free and fu pardon
6 William Morgan.... Murder ................... ....... Alachuaco...... Fall t'm, 1868 Imprisonment for life. Feb. 16, 1874 Free and fu pardon
7 Andrew Norwood.. Larceny............................. Gadsden co..... J'ry t'm, '873 Fined $50 and costs... M'ch 28,1874 Free and fu pardon
8 Littleton Braxton... Adultery............................ Manatee co..... Fall t'm, 1873 3 yearsin Stateprison.. May 14, 1874 Free and fu pardon
9 Henry Clay......... Fraudulently altering marks....... Hillsborough co. Sp'gt'm,1873 3 mo's in State prison. May 14, 1874 Free and fu pardon
10 Robert Brown...... Larceny........... ...........:..... Leon co......... Leon Co. C't. 60 days in county jail.. May 14, 874 Free and fu pardon
11 Robert Long........ Larceny......................... Jackson co...... J'k'n Co. C't. Fine and $50 costs.... May 14, 874 Free and fu pardon
12 Allsop Bellamy..... Larceny ........................... Jackson co...... J'k'n Co. C't. Fine and imprisonment May 14, 874 Free and fu pardon
13 Andrew Russ....... Larceny.. ...................... ... Jacksonco... J'k'nCo.C't. Fine4 $50 and costs... May 14, 874 Free and fu pardon
14 Morgan Finley..... Felony............................... Marion co..... Fall t'm, 1870 1 year in State prison.. May 14,874 Free and fu pardon
15 Frank Williams.... Felony.............................. Marion co....... Fallt'm, 1870 1 year in State prison.. M 14, 1874 Free and fu pardon
16 Robert Long........ Larceny... ................... .. Jacksonco...... Fallt'm, 1872 Fined $50 and costs... May 14, 1874 Free and f pardon
17 Leon Simmons..... Larceny ............... ........ Suwannee co... M'ht'm, 1874 Fined $25 and costs... May 1874 Free and fu pardon
18 William Lucas...... Larceny............................ Duval co........ Sp'gt'm,1871 1 year in State prison.. July 21, 1874 Free and fu pardon
19 H. N. Martin...... Larceny-two indictments ........... Leon co......... 1873......... 3 months in county jail July 21, 1874 Free and fu pardon
20 John Wesley....... Receiving stolen goods ............. Gadsden co.... M'y t'm,1874 8 mo's in State prison. July 21, 1874 Free and fu pardon
21 Moody Baker....... Assault with intent to kill........... Duval co........ Fallt'm, 1873 Fined $100 and imp'm't July 21, 1874 Free and ful pardon
22 Harrison Jacobs.... Forgery.............................. Marionco....... Sp'g tm,1873 3 years in State prison. July 21, 1874 Free and ful pardon
23 Prince Delegall..... Fraudulent altering marks.......... Suwannee co... Oct. tm, 1873 1 year in State prison.. July 21. 1874 Free and fl pardon
24 J. J. Parker......... Assaultwith intent to kill............. Levy co........Sp'g t'm,1874 4 years in State prison. Sept. 22, 1874 Free and ful pardon
25 James H. Fulford.. Manslaughter..................... Monroe co...... Fa t'm,1871 5 years in State prison. Sept. 22, 1874 Free and ful pardon
26 Vincet White....... Riot............................... Santa Rosa co... Nov, t'm, '73 Not sentenced......... Sept. 22, 1874 Free and full pardon
27 Edward Porter...... Larceny............................... Franklin co..... Sp'gt'm,1874 3 mo's in State prison. Sept. 22, 1874 Free and full pardon
28 John Edwards...... Volunt'ly allowing prisoners to escape Hillsborough co. Oct. t'm, 1873 2 years in State prison. Sept. 22, 1874 Free and full pardon
29 James H. Stephens. Manslaughter....................... Columbia co.... Sp'gt'm,1874 4 years in State prison. Oct. 7, 1874 Relieved from fur-
ther imprisonment.
DEATH-WARRANTS.

No Name. Crime. Where convicted.. Thene'vict'd Sentence. rrt When executed.



M. L. STEARNS, Governor.



1 William Keene..... Murder....................... ........ Duval county... Oct.27, / Execution by hanging. Jan. 20, 1874 Friday, Feb. 27, 1874







72



NATIONAL PRISON ASSOCIATION OF THE UNITED
STATES.

OFFICERS :
President-Hon. Horatio Seymour, New York.
Vice-Presidents-Hon. James G. Blaine, Maine; Theodore D.
Woolsey, D. D., LL. D., Connecticut ; Hon. John W. Steven-
son, Kentucky; -Hon. James A. Garfield, Ohio; Hon. Daniel
Haines, New Jersey; Henry W. Bellows, D. D., New York;
William G. Eliot, D. D., LL. D., Missouri; Hon. Conrad Baker,
Indiana; Hon. Richard Vaux, Pennsylvania; Hon. C. I.
Walker, Michigan; Hon. Robert Gilmor, Maryland.
Treasurer-Hon. Salem H. Wales, 250 Fifth avenue, N. Y.
Secretary-E. C. Wines, D. D., LL. D., 320 Broadway, N. Y.
With a Board of Directors composed of leading citizens in
each State; of which all Governors of States and Territories are
members, ex-fficio.

The National Prison Association has for its chief aim the
prevention and repression of crime. This supreme end it seeks
through reforms in criminal law; reforms in police organization
and action; reforms in prison discipline; reforms in the modes
of dealing with discharged convicts; and reforms, or, rather,
more extended action, in the department of preventive and re-
formatory work as related to children and youths.
The work of the Association, stated in general terms, is: To
study and solve all the problems-many of them profound,
complex, obscure, and difficult to the last degree-connected
with the prevention and repression, or, at least the minimization
of crime, and to bring its solutions to the test of experience ; in
other words, to reduce them to a practical application. More
particularly: The aim is to secure such reforms in our penal.
codes as will make the administration of criminal justice more
prompt, humane, and efficacious, and such improvements in our
police systems as will make the commission of crime more diffi-
cult, its detection more certain, and its punishment more speedy;
to give stability and permanence to the administration of our
prisons, by eliminating partisan politics, as a controlling force,
from their government; to impress a reformatory character on
the prison discipline of the whole country; to organize, in such
manner as to render effective, the work of saving discharged
convicts; to multiply preventive agencies in the form both of
industrial and reformatory schools; to visit, inspect, and ex-
amine penal, reformatory, and preventive institutions in all
parts'of the country; and to afford all possible aid in founding
and improving such establishments; to keep up, in this and







73



other ways, a perpetual study of the condition of American
prisons, and to spread before the public both their excellences
and defects; to arouse by public meetings and through the
press a general interest in this question; to educate and
strengthen public opinion, so that it shall act efficiently in the
direction of needed reTorms; and to collect, arrange, publish,
and circulate the most complete penitentiary and reformatory
statistics, and other information relating to the penitentiary
question, that can be obtained from all parts of the country and
the world.
Though only in the fourth year of its existence, the Associ-
ation has already impressed itself profoundly on the public
opinion and public action of the world. It has held three
National Prison Reform Congresses in the United States, viz.:
at Cincinnati, Baltimore, and St. Louis. It did the whole work
of preliminary organization for the great International Peniten-
tiary Congress of London in 1872. It has issued two thick
octavo volumes of Transactions, and a third is now through the
press, and will be ready for distribution in a few days.
These publications have been widely circulated in our own
and other countries, and their influence has been .marked and
conspicuous. On the appearance of the first, Mr. Stevens, In-
spector-General of Prisons in Belgium, proposed that his Gov-
ernment should have the entire work translated into French,
and issued as a public document. Declining the proposition in
that form, the Belgian Government, nevertheless, caused con-
siderable portions of the volume to be translated and published
as proposed by Mr. Stevens. Of the second volume Mr. Pols,
a distinguished jurist of Holland, who holds a high position in
the government, who has made the study of prison discipline a
specialty, and who represented his country in the London
Congress, says: "This volume will remain a standard work
on penitentiary reform, and ought to be carefully studied by
all legislators." Speaking of the same, the M[elbourne Argus,
published at Melbourne, Australia, the ablest, and most influen-
tial journal in all the British possessions of the East, remarks:
"The work is the most comprehensive encyclopedia of the
penitentiary question ever compiled, and quite supersedes all
other works of the same kind. It is full to overflowing with in-
formation, and forms a perfect storehouse of facts and princi-
ples. The book is simply invaluable in its department, and
takes the place of whole libraries of theoretical discussion on
the subject of crime And its treatment. But the most impor-
tant testimony to the'utility and value of the labors of the Asso-
ciation is that borne by members of the International Peniten-
tiary Commission, at its late meeting in Brussels, who declared
that the prison question is, to-day, in Europe, twenty years in
advance of what it would have been but for those labors.



4









74

The third volume in the series of Annual Transactions or
Reports is every way equal, if not, indeed, superior, to either of
the two preceding ones, in the grasp and vigor of its discus-
sions, both written and oral, and in the breath and interest of
the information embodied in it. In the latter of these respects
it is particularly rich. There are no less than sixteen reports
giving full details on the present state of the prison question,
in Europe, in British India, in Australia, &c., &c. These pa-
pers, prepared with but one or two exceptions by competent
specialists, resident in the countries to which they relate, show
the world to be, to-day, a busy intellectual workshop on all
questions relating to the great and vital interest of penitentiary
reform. The above reports, with essays from abroad on special
questions, make over twenty papers in the volume, contributed
by some of the ablest specialists in England, France, Spain,
Belgium, Holland, Norway, Sweden, Russia, Germany, Switzer-
land, Italy, India, Australia, and New Zealand.
It has already been stated that the Association seeks not only
to solve all the problems that enter into the question of prison
organization and prison administration, but also to bring its so-
lutions to the test of experiment, and apply them in measures of
actual reform. In this view it has undertaken labor which, if
pushed to a successful issue, will accomplish reforms of an im-
mense breadth and value; reforms which will make the penal,
penitentiary, preventive and reformatory system of the United
States a model for the world. At its late meeting in St. Louis,
the Association instructed the proper standing committees to
prepare and submit to the next Congress drafts or projects of
law for- 1. A complete'penitentiary system for a State. 2. A
complete system of preventive and reformatory institutions. 3.
A revised code of penal law suited to the present needs of so-
ciety. These several schemes of law, accompanied by explan-
atory reports, after having been adopted by the Congress, are
to be laid before the Legislatures of the several States, and rec-
ommended to their favorable consideration and action. It is
hoped that, in this way, there maybe effected a gradual approxi-
mation, throughout the Union, to uniform system of criminal
law, of prison discipline, and of preventive and reformatory
work. But the labor involved in this undertaking will be im-
mense. First, there will be the labor of preparing the codes;
and then the greater and longer labor of securing their adoption
by the Legislatures.
Such is the object of the Association; such its record; and
such the work before it-a work as vast in its reach, as it is
beneficient in its aim; a work absolutely essential to the best
progress and highest improvement of all systems and institu-











tions, whose 'im is to minimize crime, and thereby promote
public virtue and order.
The question is, shall this work live or die? That question
must be answered-and can only be answered-by the Amer
can people, whose generosity in the support of all agencies an,
organizations which have in view the progress and elevation
of man and society, has won a world-wide fame. There are n
people in the world who give so freely when the occasion i
worthy. Not doubting that the present is a worthy occasior
we ask their aid without hesitation and without misgiving.
A paper strongly endorsing the object and work of the Ns
tional Prison Association, and signed by the late Chief-Justic
Chase, Dr. McCosh, Governor Dix, Charles O'Conor, Bisho]
Potter, Bishop Janes, Dr. Crosby, Dr. Adams, Dr. Prentiss
William E. Dodge, Peter Cooper, A. A. Low, William C. Br3
ant, and others, closes with these words: The undersigned, i
giving their personal approval to the objects and labors of th
Association, commend it to the generous support of enlightene.
and humane citizens in every part of the county ."
A contribution of $5 makes the donor a member of the Assc
ciation for one year; of $100, a life member; of $200, a li
director.
By order of Board of Directors.
HORATIO SEYMOUR, President.
E. C. WINES, Secretary, 320 Broadway, New York.
OCTOBER, 1874.

NATIONAL PRIsoN AssOCIATION,
320 BRoADWAY, NEW YORK, October 31, 1874.
To his Excellency, .M. L. Stearns, the Governor of Florida:
SIR: I have the honor to- forward to your Excellency, unde
instructions, a copy of certain resolutions adopted by the Priso:
Congress of St. Louis in May last. The occasion of these rest
lutions was the following:
The Executive Committee of the National Prison Associatio:
replaces the Board of Directors whenever the said board is no
in session, and, in particular, is charged with the duty of lool
ing after its finances. At the annual meeting of the Associatio
in St. Louis, designated a Prison Congress," the Executiv
Committee, in their annual report, went into a somewhat ei
tended exposition of the financial situation." After rapidly;
sketching the scope and character of the work undertaken b:
the Association, the committee say:
"ft will be seen at a glance that this is a vast work, but on
* absolutely essential to the best progress and highest improve
mentW all systems and institutions whose aim is to minimize
crime, angthereby promote public virtue and order. Fror







76



the organization of the Association to the present time, but one
salaried agent has been employed-the Secretary; whereas, to
fully accomplish its appropriate objects, there would be needed
a bureau of workers, all busily engaged in their several depart-
ments of labor, from the first of January to the end of Decem-
ber. The National Prison Association proposes to do for peni-
tentiary reform the same work that is done for educational
reform by the National Bureau of Education, established by
the General Government, and maintained by it at an annual cost
of $40,000 to $50,000. If there were a Government Prison
Bureau, our Association might disband. The committee earn-
estly wish that such a department in the public service might
be instituted; but it is not likely to be, at least within any
brief period. It is readily granted that our work, economically
pursued, need not cost as much as that which looks to educa-
tional reform, since the former is not so ramified, nor does it
embrace so many subjects as the latter. Still, no thoughtful
person, surveying carefully our field of labor, and wisely weigh-
ing its demands, could deny that $20,000 would be a moderate
sum for its adequai cultivation. *
We have reached a point in this work where it has become
necessary to take our soundings and our bearings; to look the
situation squarely in the face; and to come to a deliberate de-
termination whether we will fill the sails and move on, or
reverse our course and seek the port, or leave the ship to drift
feebly about, the mere sport of wind and wave and current.
Shall the work live or die ? And if it live, shall its life be
fresh, warm and vigorous, or shall it be a sickly, feeble, dying
life? The last is not to be thought of, and may be dismissed
as unworthy of consideration. There are three courses between
which the choice lies: 1. Disband and perish. 2. Give to the
work its due proportions, and the necessary sustenance to
maintain those proportions. 3. Restrict it to narrower limits,
but within those limits keep it in the healthy performance of
its. functions. If the first course be preferred, the committee
has not a word to say; but until that proposition be adopted
we assume its rejection. In that case, the choice is narrowed
down to a full or a restricted life. By this latter expression
we mean simply an annual congress and an annual report.
Even so, no doubt, much good might be done, and of course at
a comparatively moderate cost. But on the assumption that
the work of minimizing crime is to be carried to its utmost lim-
its, and pushed with the necessary vigor, the question arises,
how are the means to be provided ? It is plain that your Sec-
retary cannot possibly do this, and at the same time perform
the other work expected of him; 'work, too, which is essential
to the efficiency and usefulness of the Association. Nor is
VI









there much encouragement from past experience to adopt the
plan of employing financial agents, the strong probability being
that their salaries and expenses will absorb the greater part,
if not the whole, of what they collect. The question recurs,
therefore, how are the necessary funds to be raised? The dis-
tinguished gentleman, Hon. Conrad Baker, of Indiana, with
whom the proposition for a National Prison Association origi-
nated, himself at that time Governor of one of the largest of our
States, expressed the opinion that the Legislatures of the sev-
eral States, seeing that our work was national, and .that it was
yielding the best results for the whole country, would each
readily make a moderate annual appropriation to sustain it."
The Committee express a doubt whether it would be possible
to obtain from the Legislatures the required aid in the form of
direct grants or subsidies, and then go on to suggest what
seems to them a more practicable method. They say:
The Association issues an annual report, under the title of
' Transactions of the National Prison Congress,' replete with
information touching the progress of penal, reformatory, and
preventive work in all parts of the country, and the world, and
containing able and exhaustive reports and essays on all the
problems, so various and so difficult, connected with this work;
together with viva voce discussions on the many and important
questions treated in these papers by ladies and gentleman, who
rank among the foremost thinkers and workers in this field of
social.science and reform. Q
"The annual publications of this society ought to be widely
circulated in all the States, irrespective of any revenue thence
derived to our treasury, and consequent pecuniary help in our
work. They ought to be in the hands of all members of each
successive Legislature in the several States; of all heads of
prisons and reformatories (of whatever grade); of all members
of managing boards of the same; and on the shelves of all the
considerable libraries of the country-school and otherwise.
Governor Bagley, of Michigan, has declared that there are at
least three hundred libraries in that State that ought to be sup-
plied with these publications on each successive issue; adding
to this declaration the remark that, though the volume-would
not be sought for like the last sensational novel, yet there are
thoughtful persons in every community who would read the
book, and that the number of such would increase year by year.
All this would require at least an annual average distributionn
of the transactions in each State to the number of 500 to 600
copies. Suppose the lower of these numbers, the aggregate
needed for the States and Territories would be (say) 20,000.
Now the proposition, or at least the suggestion that we make
is,.that the State and Territorial Legislatures, together (some






78



more, some less), purchase annually of the Association that
number of copies of its reports or transactions. It is a volume
that book-publishers, issuing a moderate edition, would sell at
(say) three dollars. But, owing to the large number printed,
it might be afforded to the State for two dollars, at which price,
for the same reason, the sale would net to the society a consid-
erable aggregate profit. Thts the States would get a quid pro
quo, and, at the same time, do not simply a benevolent work,
but a work of high moral and material benefit to themselves.
"Now, in what way could a State expend more fruitfully
$1,000 or $1,200 a year, even on the low consideration of an
ultimate return in dollars and cents, which indeed sinks into
absolute insignificance and almost disappears from the field of
vision, -when compared with the vast moral results that could
not fail to flow from such a policy? For how else can those
benign reforms, which, to-day, the whole civilized world is in
pursuit of, be so speedily realized for our own country, as by
such an education of public opinion as would thus, in compara-
tively few years, be accomplished throughout the length and.
breadth of the land? These reforms are: Penal laws and in-
stitutions brought into fuller accord with reason and humin-
ity; police systems rendered so efficient that few criminals can
escape detection and punishment; crime-capitalists hunted, dis-
persed, crushed, extinguished; preventive agencies made so
comprehensive and perfect as to diminish immensely the num-
ber of those who fall into crime; the careers of much the greater
part of those who might still fall arrested and brought to an
end by reform schools; and the mass of adult criminals-few,
.however, as compared with the numbers that now crowd our
prisons and waste our resources-brought to a better mind and
habit, and restored to the walks of useful industry. Does this
seem an ideal picture, the dream of a weak or a heated imagin-
ation? We are convinced that it may be made a reality by a
combined, honest, persistent effort to that end-an effort that
will not accept defeat, and that refuses all rest, till it has
reached the goal and wears the crown."
Your Excellency will perceive from the enclosed Action of
the Prison Congress on the Finances of the National Prison
Association," that the several Penal and Reformatory Institu-
tions and Boards of State Charities throughout the country are
to be asked to make, each, a moderate annual appropriation
from their funds in aid of the work of the Association.. With
a favorable response to this application from any considerable
number of Legislatures and institutions, these two sources of
income will go far towards meeting the necessary expenses of
the Association in the prosecution of its great work; and any
little deficiency of means still remaining, might readily be
made up from private benefactions.






79



Something has already been said, in a general way, as to
the value of the annual publications of the Association. These
publications have been widely circulated abroad as well as at
home; and the most decisive testimony has been borne to their
worth in various foreign countries. Mr. Stevens, the eminent
Inspector-General of Prisons in Belgium, was so impressed with
the value of the transactions of the Cincinnati Congress (the
first of the series), that he requested his government to cause
the entire volume to be translated into French, and issued as a
public document. The government, declining the proposition
in that form, because of the heavy expense it would involve,
nevertheless had considerable portions of the work translated
and published, agreeably to the suggestion of .the Inspector-
General.
Of the second volume, containing the Transactions of the
Baltimore Congress, and also a report by the Secretary on the
Congress of London, Mr. Pols, an eminent jurist of Holland,
who represented the Netherlands Government at London, says:
"The volume will remain a standard wdrk on prison reform,
and ought to be carefully studied by all legislators. Of the
same work, the Melbourne Argus, published at Melbourne, Aus-
tralia, the ablest and most influential journal in all the British
possessions in the East, declares: 'This volume is the most
comprehensive encyclopedia of the penitentiary question ever
compiled, and quite supersedes all other works of the same kind.
It is full to overflowing with information, and forms a perfect
storehouse of facts and principles. It is a model of condensed
and careful writing. The book is simply invaluable in its de-
partment, and takes the place of whole libraries of theoretical
discussion on the subject of crime and its treatment.'"
The forthcoming volume, certainly inferior in no respect to
either of its predecessors, is, in some points, superior to both-
particularly in the grasp and vigor of its discussions both writ-
ten and oral, and in the breadth and interest of the information
embodied in it.
We can only hope that your Excellency will have been favor-
ably impressed with the character and importance of the work
which the National Prison Association has in hand, as above set
forth, and that you will be thereby moved to a compliance with
the request contained in the fourth resolution of the series,
which is in the words following, to wit:
Resolved, That the Governors of the several States be and
are hereby earnestly requested to recommend, in their next an-
nual messages, an appropriation to be made by their respective
Legislaturesto carry out the objects of these resolutions."
Begging pardon for troubling you with so long a communi-
cation, I have the honor to be, your Excellency's most obedient
servant, E. C. WnrEs, Secretary.







80

On motion of Senator Dennis, the Joint Assembly adjourned.
On motion of Mr. Gass, the Assembly adjourned.





MONDAY, January 18, 1875.
The Assembly met pursuant to adjournment.
The roll being called, the following members answered to'
their names:
Mr. Speaker, Messrs. Armstrong, Avery, Berry, Bryan,
Carter, Chadwick, Corley, Dennis, Duncan, Ferrell Frisbee,
Gillis, Grant, Harris, Hagan, Jones of Bradford, McAlpin, Mc-
Guire, Montgomery, Petty, Pons, Roberts, Russell, Small,
Stanfill, Thompson, Wilson and Witherspoon--29.
A quorutn present.
Prayer by the Chaplain.
The journal of Saturday, 16th instant, was read, corrected
,and approved.
Mr. Corley moved that 500 copies of the Governor's inessage,
with accompanying documents, be printed for the use of the
Assembly.
Mr. Montgomery moved to amend by inserting 100 instead
of 500 ;
Which was not agreed to.
The original motion, by Mr. Corley, was then'agreed to.
Mr. Avery introduced the following resolution :
WHEREAS, Manifest inconvenience arises from the action of
the Assembly discontinuing the printing of daily slips 'of the
proceedings of the Assembly, one copy of which is insufficient
to advise the Governor, Senate and Cabinet officers of the acts
and doings of the Assembly, and for a necessary reference by
the members; therefore,
Be it resolved, That a special committee of three be appointed
by the Speaker to ascertain from the different printers the low-
est amount that they will furnish daily (from one to two hun-
dred copies, as may be deemed necessary,) of the proceedings of
this Assembly, and said committee to report at their earliest
convenience.
Mr. Chadwick moved to amend by striking out special
committee of three" and insert the Committee on Public
Printing."
Mr. Mitchell moved to lay the amendment upon the table;
Which was agreed to.
The original resolution, by Mr. Avery, was then adopted.








81



The Speaker appointed Messrs. Avery, Chadwick and Rus
sell said committee.
Mr. Mitchell offered the following resolution:
Resolved, That a committee -of three be appointed by the
Speaker to inquire into the printing of the last session of the
Legislature, and to report to the Assembly the amount paid
for such printing, to whom paid, by whom paid, and by what
authority.
Which was adopted.
The Speaker appointed Messrs. Mitchell, Armstrong and
Livingston said committee.
Mr. Hicks offered the following resolution:
Resolved, That a committee of three be appointed by the
Speaker to inquire whether, through incompetency or for other
reasons and causes, the Judiciary of the State, particularly in
the Circuit Courts, is wanting in efficiency, dignity and honor,
and that the committee be, and hereby is, instructed to sug-
gest action in conformity with its findings.
Which was adopted.
The Speaker appointed Messrs. Hicks, Jones of Escambia
and Grant said committee.
Mr. Jones of Escambia offered the following resolution:
Resolved, That the Comptroller be, and is hereby, requested
to furnish to this Assembly the names- of all tax-collectors who
have failed or neglected to render proper accounts in regard to
the collection of the public revenue in the manner required by
law, and a statement of all taxes heretofore assessed and re-
maining uncollected in the several counties of this State; that
he also furnish this Assembly with a statement showing the
amounts of the several official bonds accepted from the tax-collec-
tors in this State, and the names of the sureties on said bonds.
SWhich was adopted.
Mr. Witherspoon moved that Mr. Tilghman be excused for
non-attendance on the Assembly by reason of sickness;
Which was agreed to.
Mr. Bryan presented a memorial to Copgress for the estab-
lishment of a mail route from Hawkinsville, Orange county,
to Fort Mason, Orange county, Florida;
Which was read and referred to the Committeee on Mail
Routes.
Mr. Corley moved that a Standing Committee on Mail
Routes be appointed, to whom all memorials be referred, and
who shall be required to report a resolution embracing therein
all mail routes recommended for consideration;
Which was agreed to.
The Speaker appointed Messrs. Gass, Thompson, Corley,
Montgomery aifd Orman said committee.
6j








82



Mr. Carter presented a petition relative to the navigation of
the Withlacoochee river;
Which was read and referred to the Committee on Com-
merce and Navigation.
Mr. Small presented a petition relative to the navigation of
the Withlacoochee river;
Which was read and referred to the Committee on Com-
merce and Navigation.
Mr. Corley presented a memorial asking of Congress an ap-
propriation to remove the obstruction to the navigation of the
Withlacoochee river;
Which was read and referred to the Committee on Com-
merce and Navigation.
Mr. Avery offered the following resolution:
Resolved, That the Assembly take up a bill which passed
the Assembly at its last session and failed to reach the Senate.
said bill having been enrolled and'entitled, Assembly bill No.
86, now lying in the Secretary of State's office. Said bill was
for the relief of Richard Lounds, and its object a reissue of two
certain bonds having been destroyed by fire;
Which was read and referred to the Committee of Claims.
Mr. Corley offered the following resolution:
Resolved by the Assembly, the Senate concurring, That a
Joint Select Committee on Census and Apportionment be ap-
pointed, to consist of five members of the Assembly and three
Senators, and that so much of the Governor's message as re-'
lates to census and apportionment be referred to said com-
mittee ;
Which was read and adopted.
Ordered that the same be be certified to the Senate.
Under a suspension of the rule, the following bills were in-
troduced:
By Mr. Jones of Bradford:
Assembly bill No. 9:
To be entitled an act to enable Nathaniel E. Roberts, of the
county of Bradford, to take charge of and manage his own es-
tate-; also,
Assembly bill No. 10:
To be entitled an act to repeal an act entitled an act to pro-
vide for the publication of official and legal advertisements in
the several judicial circuits in this State;
Which were read and referred to the Judiciary Committee.
By Mr. Bryan:
Assembly bill No. 11:
To be entitled an act to enable Bernard Hughey and Mary
Hughey to take charge of and manage their own estates;
Which was read and referred to the Judiciary Committee."










By Mr. Corley:
Assembly bill No 12:
To be entitled an act to amend section 8 of an act to provide
for the creation of corporations, and to prescribe their general
powers and liabilities, approved August 8, 1868;
Which was read and referred to the Committee on Corpora-
tions.
Mr. Chadwick moved that bills on their first reading be read
by their title and referred to the appropriate committees;
Which was agreed to.
By Mr. Chadwick:
Assembly bill No. 13:
To be entitled an act relating to the bonds of State and
county officers;
Which was read and referred to the Committee on Finance
and Taxation.
By Mr. Jones of Escambia :
Assembly bill No. 14:
To be entitled an act to prohibit the attachment of moneys
due for wages; also,
Assembly bill No. 15:
To be entitled an act to regulate appeals from Justices'
Courts ; also,
Assembly bill No. 16:
To be entitled an act to amend the 23d section of an act en-
titled an act to provide for the incorporation of cities and
towns, and to establish a uniform system of municipal govern-
ment in this State, approved February 4, 1869 ;
Which were read and referred to the Judiciary Committee.
Mr. Hicks, as Chairman of the Special Committee in the case
of W. J. Purman, asked for further time to make their report;
Which was granted.
On motion of Mr. Mitchell, the Assembly adjourned until
Wednesday morning, 10 o'clock.





WEDNESDAY, January 20, 1875.-

The Assembly met pursuant to adjournment.
The roll being called, the following members answered to
their names!
Mr. Speaker, Messrs. Armstrong, Avery, Berry, Browa
"Bryan, Carter, Chadwick, Coleman, Corley, Dennis, Duncan,
Perrell, Fisher, Frisbee, Gillis, Grant, Harris, Hagan, Hicks.







84



Jackson, Jones of Escambia, Jones of Bradford, Jones of Levy,
Lee, Livingston, Martin, McAlpin, McGuire, Mitchell, Nixon,
Orman, Petty, Pons, Proctor, Roberts, Russell, Small, Stanfill,
Sutton, Tilghman, Thompson, Washington, Wilson and With-
erspoon-45.
A quorum present.
Prayer by the Chaplain.
The journal of Monday, January 18th inst., was read, correc-
ted and approved.
Mr. Small presented a memorial to Congress to establish a
Postal Route from Ocala in Marion county, to Clay Landing in
Levy county;
Which was read and referred to the Committee on Mail
Routes.
Mr. Wilson presented a memorial to Congress asking an ap-
propriation to construct a Canal connecting the waters of Indian
river and Mosquito Lagoon;
Which was read and referred to the Committee on Commerce
and Navigation.
Mr. Hill presented a memorial for increase of service on mail
route between Live Oak and New Troy, Florida;
Which was read and referred to the Committee on Mail
Routes.
Mr. Tucker presented a memorial for the establishment of a
Mail Route from Ocala, Florida, to Archer, in the county of
Alachua, Florida;
Which was read and referred to the Committee on Mail
Routes.
Mr. Mitchell, from the Judiciary Committee, made the folF
lowing report:
ion. THOMAs HA-NNAR,
Speaker of the Assembly :
SIR: Your Committee on the Judiciary beg leave to report
that they have carefully examined-
Assembly bill No. 1:
To be entitled an act .to regulate the eligibility to office in the
State of Florida;
Assembly bill No: 2:
To be entitled an act to repeal Section 27 of Chapter 1,987,
Laws of Florida; and
Assembly bill No. 4:
To be entitled an act fixing the times for holding the Circuit
Courts in the Fifth Judicial Circuit,
And recommend that they do pass.
H. L. MITCHELL, Ch'n.
C. W. JONES.








85



Which was read and the accompanying bills placed among the
orders of the day.
Mr. Orman introduced a concurrent resolution in reference to
the Louisiana outrage;
Which was read and placed among the orders of the day.
Mr. Jackson offered a concurrent preamble and resolution in
reference to Louisiana;
Which was read and placed among the orders of the day.
Mr. Corley offered a concurrent resolution to appoint a joint
committee to examine the offices df the Comptroller and
Treasurer.;
Which was read and placed among the orders of the day.,
The following message was received from the Senate: .
SENATE CHAMBER, January 19, 1875.
Ihon. TIoMAs HANNAH,
Speaker of the assembly :
SIR: I have been instructed by the Senate to inform your
honorable body that the Senate has this day passed-
Senate concurrent resolution No. 1, with reference to the ad-
journment of the Legislature for a certain time,
And respectfully ask the concurrence of the Assembly to the
same. Respectfully submitted,
JOSEPH BOWES, Secretary.
Which was read and the accompanying resolution placed
among the orders of the day.
Mr. Hicks, chairman of the select committee upon the case of
W. J. Purman, asked that the time be indefinitely extended in
which to make their report.
Mr. Bryan offered the following amendment:
That whenever said Purman shall -demand a hearing, the
committee shall report as soon as possible;
Which was adopted.
Mr. Mitchell moved to reconsider the vote just taken;,
Which was agreed to.
Mr. Lee moved as a substitute that the committee be dis-
charged and a new committee appointed.
Mr. Hicks moved to lay the substitute upon the table;
Which was agreed to.
Mr. Witherspoon moved that the original motion be laid-upon
the table ;
Which was not agreed to.
Mr. Gass moved to adjourn;
Which was not agreed to,
The motion offered by Mr. Hicks was then agreed to.
Mr. Avery offered the following resolution:
resolved, That the committee authorize the Sergeant-at-Artms







S6



to bring the Hou. W. J. Purman before them that they may be
able to make their report at an early day.
Mr. Montgomery offered as a substitute the following reso-
lution :
Resolved, That the special committee in case of W. J. Pur-
man be empowered to send for persons and papers.
Mr. Jackson offered as a substitute for the whole matter, the
following resolution:
Resolved, That the committee to whom was referred the case
of W. J. Purman be requested to summon W. J. Purman to
meet them this evening at 4 o'clock, in order that said committee
may be thereby enabled to report to this House at their earliest
convenience thereafter;
Which-was adopted.

ORDERS OF THE DAY.

The following Senate concurrent resolution was taken up:
Resolved by the Senate, the Assembly concurring, That the
Legislature adjourn until Monday, the 25th instant, at 12 o'clock,
M., in order that the members thereof may attend the Fruit
Grower's Convention, now in session in Jacksonville.
Mr. Hicks moved its adoption.
Upon which the yeas and nays were called for.
The vote was:
Yeas--Messrs. Armstrong, Avery, Chadwick, Coleman,
Dennis, Fisher, Gass, Grant, Harris, Hicks, Lee, Livingston,
Martin, Montgomery, Nixon, Petty, Proctor, Small, Sutton,
Tilghman,-Thompson, Tucker, Washington and Witherspoon
-24.
Nays-Mr. Speaker, Messrs. Berry, Browne, Bryan, Car-
ter, Corley, Duncan, 'Ferrell, Frisbee, Gillis, Hagan, Hill,
Jackson, Jones of Escambia, Jones of Bradford, Jones of Levy,
McAlpin, McGuire, Mitchell, Orman, Pons, Roberts, Russell,
Stanfill and Wilson-25.
So the resolution did not pass.
Mr. Corley offered the following resolution:
Resolved by the Assembly, the Senate concurring, That a joint
committee be appointed, consisting of three members from each
house, to examine the offices of the Comptroller and Treasurer
and i-eport thereon;
Which was read and adopted.
By Mr. Lee:
Joint resolution asking the Congress of the United States to
grant some relief to the Depositors of the Freedman's Savings
Bank and Trust Company, and to have the transactions of said
Bank thoroughly investigated;







87



Which was read and not adopted.
Preamble and resolution in reference to the Louisiana Out-
rage,
"Was read, and, on motion of. Mr. Jones of Escambia, made
the special order of the day for to-morrow at 11 o'clock.
Preamble and resolution with regard to the State of Louisiana,
Wa:s read and made the special order of the day for to-mor-
row at II o'clock.
Mr. Corley introduced the following bill:
Assembly bill No. 17:
To be entitled an act authorizing Courts to issue Commissions
to take Testimony, prescribing the instances in which they may
be issued, and defining the duties of Commissioners and others
appointed to examine Witnesses;
Which was read and referred to the Judiciary Committee.
The following bills were introduced and read the first time:
By Mr. Lee:
Assembly bill No. 18:
To be entitled an act to incorporate the Workingmen's Aid
Association of the county of Duval, State of Florida;
Which was read and referred to the Committee on Commerce
and Navigation.
By Mr. Lee:
Assembly bill No. 19:
To be entitled an act to authorize John Lloyd to establish a
Ferry across Trout creek, in Duval county;
Which was read and referred to the Committee on Commerce
and Navigation.
By Mr. Lee:
Assembly bill No. 20:
To be entitled an act to repeal an act entitled an act to amend
an act entitled an act to regulate the Pilotage of the-St. Johns
bar and river;
Which was road and referred to the Committee on the Judi-
ciary.
By Mr. Mitchell:
Assembly bill No. 21:
To be entitled an act fixing the pay of members of the Legis-
lature at the present Session ;
Which was read and referred to the Committee on Legislative
Expenses.
By Mr. Bryan :
Assembly bill No. 22 :
To be entitled an act to alter and amend section 2 of an act
entitled an act to keep in good repair the Public Highways in
this State, approved February 19, 1874;
Which was read and referred to the Judiciary Committee.







88



By Mr. Jones of Bradford:
Assembly bill No. 23:
To be entitled an act for the better protection of Cattle-
owners;
Which was read and referred to the Committee on Agricul-
ture.
By Mr. Witherspoon:
Assembly bill No. 24:
To be entitled an act to amend section 15 of Public Road
Laws, approved February 19, 1874;
Which was read and referred to the Judiciary Committee.
By Mr. Hill:
Assembly bill No. 25:
To be entitled an act fixing the time for holding the Circuit
Courts in the Third Judicial District;
Which was read and referred to the Judiciary Committee.
By Mr. Grant.:
Assembly bill No. 26:
To be entitled an act extending the jurisdiction of Justices of
the Peace;
Which was read and referred to the Judiciary Committee.
By Mr. Chadwick:
Assembly bill No. 27 :
To be entitled an act to amend an act to provide for the pub-
lication of Official and Legal Advertisements;
Which was read and referred to the Judiciary Committee.
The rules being waived, Mr. Mitchell offered a concurrent.
resolution appointing a committee to visit and inspect the State
Prison;
Which was read and adopted.
Assembly bill No. 1:
To be entitled an act to regulate the Eligibility to Office in
the State of Florida,
Was read the second time.
Mr. Martin moved to strike out "100 and insert "1,000" in
section 1;
Which was not agreed to.
Mr. Lee moved to amend section 1 by adding, That no per-
son who now holds or shall hereafter hold a seat in the Legisla-
ture shall fill any other position under the State Government
whatever."
Mr. Hicks moved to lay the amendment on the table;
Upon which the yeas and nays were called for.
The vote was:
Yeas-Mr. Speaker, Messrs. Berry, Browne, Carter, Coleman,
Corley, Ferrell, Frisbee, Gillis, Grant, Hicks, Hill, Jackson,
Jones of Escambia, Jones of Bradford, Jones of Levy, McAlpin,







89

McGuire, Mitchell, Montgomery, Orman, Pons, Roberts, Rus-
sell, Small, Stanfill, Sutton, Thompson and Wilson-29.
Nays-Messrs. Armstrong, Avery, Chadwick, Dennis, Fisher,
Gass, Hagan, Lee, Livingston, Martin, Nixon, Petty, Proctor,
Tilghman, Tucker, Washington and Witherspoon-17.
So the motion was agreed to.
Mr. Gass moved the indefinite postponement of Assembly bill
No. 1;
Upon which the yeas and nays were called for.
The vote was:
Yeas-Messrs. Avery, Coleman, Dennis, Fisher, Gass, Grant,
Lee, Livingston, Montgomery, Nixon, Petty, Proctor, Snall,
Tilghinan, Thompson, Tucker, Washington and Witherspoon
-]18.
. Nays-Mr. Speaker, Messrs. Armsti ong, Berry, Browne, Car-
ter, Chadwick, Corley, Duncan, Ferrell, Frisbee, Gillis, Hagan,
Hicks, Hill, Jackson, Jones of-Escambia, Jones of Bradford,
Jones of Levy, Martin, McAlpin, McGuire, Mitchell, Orman,
Pons, Roberts, Russell, Stanfill, Sutton and Wilson-29.
So the motion was not agreed to.
The bill was then ordered to be engrossed for a third reading
on to-morrow.
Assembly bill No. 2:
To be entitled an act to repeal section 27 ot chapter 1,987,
Laws of Florida,
Was read the second time and ordered to be engrossed for a
third reading on tc-morrow.
Assembly bill No. 4:
To be entitled an act fixing the time for holding the Circuit
Courts in the Fifth Judicial Circuit,
Was read the second time and ordered to be engrossed for a
third reading on to-morrow.
Mr. Corley offered the following resolution
Resolved, That the Secretary of State be requested to certify
to this Assembly the Constitutional Amendments adopted by the
last Legislature;
Which was read and adopted.
Mr. Hill gave notice that he would on to-morrow move to re-
consider the vote taken upon Senate concurrent resolution rela-
tive to adjournment on to-morrow.
On motion of Mr. Livingston, the Assembly adjourned.







90



THURSDAY, January 21, 1875.

The Assembly met pursuant t(d adjournment.
The roll being called, the following members answered to
their nanms :
Mr. Speaker, Messrs, Armnstrong, Avery, Bass, Berry, Browne,
Bryan, Carter, Chadwick, Coleman, Corley, Dennis, Duncan,
Ferrull, Fisher, Frisbee, Gass, Gillis, Grant, Harris, Hagan,
Hicks, Hill, Jackson, Jones of Escambia, Jones of Bradford,
Jones of Levy, Lee, Livingston, Martin, McAlpin, McGuire,
Mitchell, Morehead, Montgomery, Nixon, Orman, Petty, Pons,
Pr;ctor, Roberts, Russell, Small, Stanfill, Sutton, Tilglman,
Thompson, Tucker, Washington, Wilson and Witherspoon-49.
A quorum present.
Prayer.by tlh chaplain.
The rules being waived, Mr. Hicks, from the committee on the
case of W. J. Pnrman, made the following report:
Hox. TuHOMAS HANNAI,
ASpeaker of the Assembly :
SIr.: The special committee, to whom was referred the case of
W. J. Pnrman, member of Congress from the First District of
Florida, and member elect from Jackson county to this Assem-
bly, present the following report :
After a tfll conference with W. J. Purman, your committee
failed to agree with the Hon. gentleman in that he was not dis-
qualified for a seat in this body as a member from Jackson
county, I y virtue of his position under the Federal government
as member of Congress from the First Disti'ict of Florida.
Thereupon Mr. Purnman resigned his seat in Congress, which
resignation was accepted by his excellence,. M. L. Stearns, Gov-
ernor of the State of Florida. The disability being thereby re-
moved, your committee report W. J. Purman qualified to take
his seat with this body as a representative from Jackson county,
and recommend that he be duly sworn and admitted.
Very respectfully,
Wm. WATKIN HICKS, Chm'n.
M. MARTIN,
W. T. ORMAN.
Which was read and adopted.
On motion of Mr. Montgomdry, W. J. Purman came forward
and was sworn in as theRepresentative fiom Jacksol county,
State of Florida.
Mr. Montgomery moved that the rules be waived and Senate
concurrent resolution be.taken up;
Upon which the yeas and nays were called for.
The vote was:







91



Yeas--Mr.' Speaker, Messrl Armstrong, Avery, Chadwick,
Coleman, Dennis, Fisher, Gass, Grant, Harris, Hicks, Hill, Lee,
Livingston, Martin, Morehead, Montgomery, Nixon, Petty,
Proctor, Small, Sutton, .Tilghman, Thompson, Tucker, Wash-
ington and Witherspooni-27.
"Nays-Messrs. Berry, Browne, Bryan, Carter. Corley, Dun-
can, Ferrell, Frisbee, Gillis, IIagan, Jackson, Jones of Escambia.
Jones of Bradf'ord, Jones of Levy, McAlpin, MeGuire, Mitchell,
Orman, Pons, Roberts, Russell, Stanfill and Wilson-23..
So the rules were waived and Senate concurrent resolution ta-
ken up.
Mr. Hill moved to reconsider the vote taken on yesterday on
Senate concurrent resolution in relation to adjournment;
Upon which the yeas and nays were.called for.
The vAte was:
Yeas-Messrs. Armstrong, Avery, Bass, Chadwick, Coleman,
Dennis, Fisher, Gass, Grant, Harris, Hicks, Hill, Lee, Living-
ston, Martin, Morehead, Montgomery, Nixon, Petty, Small, Snt-
ton, Tilghman, Thompson, Tucker, Washington and Wither-
spoon-26.
Nays-Messrs. Berry, Browne, Bryan, Carter, Corley, Dun-
can, Ferrell, Frisbee, Gillis, Hagan, Jackson, Jones'of Escambia,
Jones of Bradford, Jones of Levy, McAlpin, McGuire, Mitchell,
Orman, Pons, Roberts, Russell, Stanfill and Wilson-23.
So the motion to reconsider was agreed to.
The resolution was then taken up.
Mr. Mitchell moved to amend the resolution by inserting 12
o'clock, m., Tuesday," instead of" Monday."
Mr. Witherspoon moved that the amendment be laid upon the
table;
Upon which the yeas and nays were called for.
The vote was:
Yeas-Messrs. Armstrong, Avery, Bass, Chadwick, Coleman,
Dennis, Fisher, Gass, Grant, Harris, Hicks, Lee, Livingston,
Martin, Morehead, Montgomery, Nixon, Petty, Proctor, Small,
Sutton, Tilghman, Thompson, Tucker, Washington and With-
erspoon-26.
Nays-Messrs. Berry, Browne, Bryan, Carter, Corley, Dun-
can, Ferrell, Frisbee, Gillis, Hagan, Hill, Jackson, Jones of Es-
cambia, Jones of Bradford, Jones of Levy, McAlpin, McGuire,
Mitchell, Orman, Pons, Roberts, Russell, Stanfill and Wil
son-24.
So the amendment was laid upon the table.
Upon the call for the previous question, the yeas and nays
were called for.
The vote was:
Yeas-Mesgrs. Armstrong, Avery, Bass, Chadwick, Coleman,








92

Dennis, Fisher, Gass, Grant, Harris, Hicks, Hill, Lee, Livingston,
Martin, Morehead, Montgomery, Nixon, Petty, Proctor, Small,
Sutton, Tilghman, Thompson, Tucker, Washington and Wither-
spoon-28.
Nays-Messrs. Berry, Browne, Bryan, Carter, Corley, Dun-
can, Ferrell, Frisbee, Gillis, Hagan, Jackson, Jones of Escambia,
Jones of Bradford, Jones of Levy, McAlpin, McGuire, Mitchell,
Orman, Pons, Roberts, Russell, Stanfill and Wilson-22.
So the previous question was ordered.
The rules being waived, the following message was. received
from his Excellency, the Governor:
EXECUTIVE OFFICE,
Tallahassee, Fla., Jan. 21, '75.
To THE ASSEMBLY :
GENTLEMEN: I have the honor to transmit herewith a copy
ef a telegram received by me last evening from the President of
the Florida Fruit Growers' Association, now assembled in Jack-
ville, for your information and consideration.
This invitation comes from a large and influential class of our
fellow-citizens, assembled for the purpose of considering one of.
the most important interests of our State, and I submit whether
or not you might not, with propriety, accept the invitation with-
out detriment to other interests committed to your charge.
The importance of encouraging every effort to develop the ag-
ricultural resources of the State is so apparent that it is hardly-
necessary for me to remind you of this fact. Other States have
fostered these interests by careful legislation and by large ap-
propriations, and while it is not in our power-to make appropri-
ations, we may yet judiciously legislate in this interest, to facili-.
tate which you may deem it wise to accept this invitation.
Very respectfully,
M. L. STEARNS, Governor.

[COPY OF TELEGRAM.]
JACKSONVILLE, 20, 1875.
To Gov. M. L. STEARNS:
"Resolution passed inviting Governor, Cabinet and members of
Legislature to attend this convention, and requesting you to
communicate to Cabinet and Legislature.
P. P. BISHOP,
President Florida Fruit Growers' Association.
Which was read.
Mr. Hill moved to amend the resolution as follows: After the
word members insert officers and attaches."
Mr. Mitchell moved to further amend as follows:
That the resolution be amended so as to prohibit all members







93

of the Senate and Assembly from drawing any pay from the
time they leave to attend the Fruit Growers' Convention until
they return to the capital.
Mr. Montgomery moved that the amendment offered by Mr.
Hill be laid upon the table;
Upon which the yeas and nays were called for.
The vote was:
Yeas-Mr. Speaker, Messrs. Armstrong, Avery, Bass, Chad-
wick, Coleman, Dennis, Fisher, Gass, Grant, Harris, Hicks, Hill,
Lee, Livingston, Martin, Morehead, Montgomery, Nixon, Petty,
Proctor, Small, Sutton, Tilghman, Thompson, Tucker, Washing-
ton and Witherspoon-28.
Nays-Messrs. Berry, Browne, Bryan, Carter, Corley, Dun-
can, Ferrell, Frisbee, Gillis, Hagan, Jackson, Jones of Escambia,
Jones of Bradford, Jones of Levy, McAlpin, McGuire, Mitchell,
Orman, Pons, Roberts, Russell, Stanfill and Wilson-23.
So the amendment was laid upon the table.
Mr. Montgomery moved that Mr. Mitchell's amendment be
laid upon the table;
Upon which the yeas and nays were called for.
The vote w>:s:
Yeas-Messrs. Armstrong, Avery, Bass, Chadwick, Coleman,
Dennis, Fisher, Gass, Grant, Harris, Hicks, Hill, Lee, Living-
ston, Martin, Morehead, Montgomery, Nixon, Petty, Proctor,
Small, Sutton, Tilghman, Thompson, Tucker, Washington and
Witherspoon-27.
Nays-Messrs. Berry, Browne, Bryan, Carter, Corley, Dun-
can, Ferrell, Frisbee, Gillis, Hagan, Jackson, Jones of Escambia;
Jones of Bradford, Jones of Levy, McAlpin, McGuire, Mitchell,
Orman, Pons, Roberts, Russell, Stanfill and Wilson-23.
So the amendment was laid upon tlie table.
Upon the adoption of the concurrent resolution, the vote
was:
Yeas-Messrs. Armstrong, Avery, Bass, Chadwick, Coleman,
Dennis, Fisher, Gass, Grant, Harris, Hicks, Hill, Lee, Living-
ston, Martin, Morehead, Montgomery, Nixon, Petty, Proctor,
Small, Sutton, Tilghman, Thompson, Tucker, Washington and
Witherspoon-27.
Nays-Mr. Speaker, Messrs. Berry, Browne, Bryan, Carter,
Corley, Duncan, Ferrell, Frisbee, Gillis, Hagan, Jackson, Jones
of Escambia, Jones of Bradford, Jones of Levy, McAlpin, Mc-
Guire, Mitchell, Orman, Pons, Roberts, Russell, Stanfill and Wil-
son-24.
So the concurrent resolution was adopted.
On motion of Mr. Orman, the Assembly adjourned.








94



MONDAY, January 25, 1875.

The Assembly met pursuant to adjournment.
The roll being called, the following members answered to
their names:
Mr. Speaker, Messrs. Armstrong, Avery, Bass, Berry,
Browne, Bryan, Carter, Chadwick, Coleman, Corley, Ferrell,
Fisher, Frisbee, Gass, Gillis, Grant, Harris, Hagan, Hicks,'
Hill, Jones of Escambia, Jones of Bradford, Jones of Levy,
Lees Martin, McAlpin, McGuire, Mitchell, Morehead, Pons,
Proctor, Roberts, Russell, Small, Stanfill, Tilghman, Thomp-
son, Tucker, Washington, Wilson and Witherspoon-42.
A quorum present.
Prayer by the Chaplain.
The journal of Thursday, January 21st inst., was read, cor-
rected and approved.
Mr. Hicks moved that the special committee to whom were
referred the resolution of inquiry into the competency, &c., of
the Judiciary, be and is hereby authorized to send for per-
sons aid papers, and that time indefinite be granted the com-
mittee ;
Which was agreed to.
The following bills were introduced, read by their titles and
ordered to be placed among the orders of the day:
By Mr. Corley:
Assembly bill No. 28:
To be entitled an act making Certificates of the Commission-
er of Lands and Immigration receivable in evidence; also,
Assembly bill No. 29:
To be entitled an act for the relief of the estate of Joseph
C. Bannerman, late Tax Collector for Jackson county, and
the sureties on his bond.
By Mr. Mitchell:
Assembly bill No. 30:
To be entitled an act to legalize the town government of
Tampa, Florida; also,
Assembly bill No. 31:
To be entitled an act requiring Railroad Companies to make
Annual Reports.
By Mr. Chadwick:
Assembly bill No. 32 :
To be entitled an act to incorporate the Co-operative Colo-
nization Bank of Florida ; also,
Assembly bill No. 33:
To be entitled an act for the surrender of Corporate Fran-








95



chise of Cities and Towns, and for the organization of the
same.
By Mr. Pons:
Assembly bill No. 34:
To be entitled an act to establish Precincts and Districts
in Counties, and requiring all persons to vote in their own-
precinct.
By Mr. Hagan:
Assembly bill No. 35:
To be entitled an act to amend Section four of an act allow-
ing the voters of the several counties in this State to locate
their respective county sites, approved February 27, 1872;
also,
Assembly bill No. 37:
To be entitled an act for the relief of G. H. Johnson.
By Mr. Proctor:
Assembly bill No. 36:
To be entitled an act to repeal ani act to provide a general
law for the incorporation of Railroads and Canals, approved
February 19, 1874.
By Mr. Mitchell:
Assembly bill No. 38:
To be entitled an act to amend Section 5, Chapter 1,628,
Laws of Florida, reducing the number of Grand and Petit
Jurors.
Mr. Jones of Escambia offered the following joint resolu-
tion:
WHEREAS, His Excellency, M. L. Stearns. Governor of this
State, in his late message to the Legislature, has brought to
the attention of the representatives of the people of Florida
the existence of a very important suit in equity in the Su-
preme Court of the United States, in which the State of Florida
is complainant, and the legal consequences of which may af-
fect very materially the rights and interests of the people of
this State; and
WHEREAS, The object of said suit is to enforce and make
effectual a statutory lien or mortgage created by an act of the
Legislature of this State, approved January 28th, 1870, and
the amendments thereto, to secure the people of the State in
the sum of four millions of dollars, for which amount, with
the interest thereon, the State is supposed to be liable, in con-
sequence of the delivery of certain bonds to a corporation
known as the Jacksonville, Pensacola and Mobile Railroad
Company. And as great doubts are entertained touching the
liability of the State for the said bonds and the necessity and
wisdom of spending any part of the public money in litigation
with the persons claiming adverse rights and interests in and







96



to the property and franchises embraced in said mortgage or
subject to said lien,
Be it therefore resolved, the Senate concurring, That a se-
lect committee of five members of the Legislature of this
State, three from this Assembly and two from the Senate, be ap-
pointed for the purpose of ascertaining the present condition
of the said suit in equity in the Supreme Court of the United
States; the cost and expense of carrying it to a final decree;
what effect, favorable or adverse, judgment therein will have
upon the rights and interests of the people of this State; and
whether or not the State is liable for the bonds delivered to
the Jacksonville, Pensacola and Mobile Railroad Company by
a former Governor of this State; and what, if any, steps are
necessary to be taken in order to perfect the interest of the
people and the credit of the State in consequence of the exist-
ence and negotiation of said bonds, and that said committee
be and is hereby empowered to send for persons and papers.
"Which was adopted and ordered to be certified to the Senate.
SMr. Wilson presented a memorial to Congress to establish a
mail route from Volusia, on the St. Johns river, to Halifax
and Dayton, on the Halifax river;
Which was read and referred to the Committee on Mail
Routes.
The following communication was received from the Comp-
troller:
OFFICE OF COMPTROLLER,
TALLAHASSEE, FLA., January 21, 1875.
HON. THOMAS HANNAH.
Speaker of the Assembly :
SIR: In answer to the resolution passed by the Assembly
on the 18th instant, I have the honor to state that a very large
proportion of the collectors of revenue have complied in every
respect with the provisions of the act entitled an act to pro-
vide for the more efficient Collection of the Revenue, passed
February 14, 1873.
From the collector of Brevard county, who was appointed'
in September last, no report has been received.
From the collector of Dade county one report, dated No-
vember 30, 1874, has been received and $101.10 paid into the'
Treasury.
The collector of Escambia county made reports through hisi
deputies up to August last, since which time no reports have
been received from this county.
The collector of Hernando county has made no report since;
last July, but wrote explaining the difficulty of transmitting









funds, and promised to send his collections the first of the
year or to bring them.
The collector of Sumter county has made no report since
November, but has paid into the Treasury, without making a
formal report, nearly one-half of the taxes of 1874.
The collector of Santa Rosa county has made no report since
September.
I regret that I am unable to comply with the request to fur-
nish a sitement of all taxes heretofore assessed and remaih-
ing uncollected.
I had intended to append such a statement to the annual re-
port of the Comptroller, but the ordinary current business of
the office has occupied all the time of myself and clerk during
the past two months, and no leisure could be had to make out
a balance sheet.
I design to do this ap early after the adjournment of the
Legislature as is possible, transferring all unsettled accounts to
a new ledger.
If this information is now considered necessary, I shall have
to request to be furnished with additional clerical assistance.
A statement accompanies this communication, showing the
amount of the several official bonds accepted from the col-
lectors of revenue in the State who are now in office, with the
names of their sureties.
Very respectfully, your obed't servant,
C. A. COWGILL, Comptroller.
Which was read.
Mr. McAlpin moved that the special report of the Comp-
troller, stating the name of the tax-collector and sureties in
each county, be referred to a special committee of three, with
instructions to inquire, by reference to the tax books, the finan-
cial standing of each surety, and report at their earliest conve-
nience;
Which was agreed to.
The Speaker appointed Messrs. McAlpin, Jones of Escambia
and Washington said committee.
The following communication was received from the Secre-
tary of State:
STATE OF FLORIDA,
OFFICE OF SECRETARY OF STATE,
Tallahassee, January 25, 1875.
HON. THOMAS HANNAH,
Speaker of the Assembly:
Sm: I have the honor, in response to the resolution passed
by the Assembly on the 20th instant, to transmit herewith a
Ij






98



certified copy of the proposed Constitutional Amendments as
passed by the Legislature of Florida at the session of 1874.
Very respectfully,
SAMUEL B. McLIN,
Secretary of State.
Which was read.
On motion of Mr. Corley, the certified copy of the amend-
ments to the constitution accompanying the communication
were ordered to be placed among'the orders of the day,
Mr. Avery, from the committee on-Engrossed Bills,; ade the
following report:
HON. THOMAS HANNAh,
Speaker of the Assembly :
SmI: 'The Committee on Engrossed Bills ask leave to report
that they have examined the following bills, and find them to
be correctly engrossed:
Assembly bill No. 1, An act to regulate the eligibility to
office in the State of Florida;
Assembly bill No. 4, An act fixing the time for holding the
Circuit Courts in the Fifth Judicial Circuit Court.
Very respectfully,
C. F. AVERY, Chairman.
DAN. M. McALPIN,
F. J. PONS,
AUGUSTUS TILGHMAN,
SAMUEL SMALL.
Committee on Engrossed Bills.
Which was read, and the accompanying bills placed among
the orders of the day.
Mr. Mitchell, from the Judiciary Committee, made the fol-
lowing report:
HON. THOMAS HANNAH,
Speaker of the Assembly :
Smi: Your Committee" on Judiciary beg leave to report that
they have carefully examined the following Assembly bills,
and recommend that they dopass, to-wit:
Assembly bill No. 5, to be entitled an act to authorize Geo.
B. Thomas and Joseph M. Thomas to take charge of and man-
age their own estate;
Assembly bill No. 9, tb be entitled an act to enable Nathan-
iel E. Roderts, of th'e county of Bradford, to take charge of and
manage his own estate;
Assembly bill No. 14, to be entitled an act to prohibit the
attachment of money due for wages;
Assembly bill No. 15, to be entitled an act to regulate ap-
peals from Justices' Courts;.







99



Assembly bill No. 16, to be entitled an act-to amend the 23d
section of an act entitled an act to provide for the incorpora-
tion of cities and towns, and to establish a uniform system of
municipal government in this State, approved February 4, 1869;
Assembly bill No. 25, to be entitled an act fixing the time
for holding the terms of the Circuit Courts in the Third Judi-
cial Circuit.
Your committee report back Assembly bill No. 8, and recom-
mend that the same be referred to the Committee on Finance
and Taxation.
The committee have also examined the following Assembly
bill, and recommend that it do not pass, as it is seriously,
in conflict with the Constitution of this State. and othwise de-
fective, to-wit:
Assembly bill No. 24, to be entitled an act to amend section
15 oipages 80 and 81, Public Road Law. approved February
19th, 1874.
H. L. MITCIIELL, Chairman-
E. R. CHADWICK.
JOSEPH E. IEE.
C. W. JONES.
Which was read, and the accompanying bills placed among
the orders of the day.
Mr. Wilson, from the Committee on Claims, made the fol-
lowing report:
Hon. TIIOMAs HANNAH,
Speaker of the Assembly :
SI : Your Committee on Claims to whom was referred a.
resolution to take up a bill passed by the Assembly last ses-
sion, have had the same under consideration and beg leave to
report the same back to the Assembly with the request that
Mr. Avery introduce a new bill..
"B. R. WILSON, Chairman..
F. J. PONS,
R. H. DENNIS..
Which was read.
Mr. Hicks, from the Committee on Privileges and Elections,-
made the following report:
HON. TIOMAS HANNAH,
Speaker of the Assembly :
Smn: The Committee on'Privileges and Elections begs leave
to report:
1. That the petition of Samuel E. Timmons, to be declared
"the representative of Putnain county in tie" House of Repre-
sentatives for 1875," and referred to" your Committee, raises;.






100



no contest-the provisions of the law on contesting elections
(already reported) not having been complied with.
2. That the petition of Daniel N. Cone and Kinney D. Edge,
to be seated as representatives of Columbia county, and re-
ferred to your Committee, is excluded by the same law, which
requires that notice of such contest shall in all cases be served
upon the- person whose election is to be contested within ten
days after the canvass by the Judge of Probate, expressing in
such notice the points on which the same will be contested.
(Thompson Dig. p. 78, sec. 10.) This law is statutory, and
your Committee agrees to further say that it is a principle in
law not contrary to the spirit of the Constitution of the Uni-
ted States and of the State of Florida, that nothing short of a
statute can repeal a statute.
3. Your Committee offers also the following report in the
case from Santa Rosa county, Judge vs. Butler:
After careful consideration, the conclusion is reached hat
the whole matter rests upon a question of law, namely, whether
a Board of County Canvassers can legally refuse to count
returns sent up from one or more precincts.
Your Committee does not find that the Board of County
Canvassers have the right to throw out or exclude the re-
turn of precincts or any number of the votes thereof returned.
The law regulating county canvass, approved August 6, 1868,
is conclusive and unmistakable, part of which is as follows,
after enumerating the proper officers, they shall publicly pro-
ceed to canvass the votes given for the several offices and per-
sons as shown by the returns on file in the office," etc., etc.
For no cause can a.Board of Canvassers throw out returns
or parts of returns on file to be canvassed according to law.
If it were necessary or expedient, your Committee could
readily support this position by extracts from standard au-
thorities and decisions of the Supreme Court. (See Cooley on
Constitutional Limitations.) Boards of Canvassers act minis-
terially unless otherwise ordained by -law, and not judicially.
In this connection, your Committee herewith presents the
full and proper returns of election according to "a correct
canvass of the votes polled at an election held in that county
on the 3d day of November, A. D. 1874," signed and sealed by
the proper officers :
Precincts-1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Total.
For Wm. Judge, 22 207 41 54 99 87 40 25 28-603
For J. W. Butler, 348 *68 3 2 7 2 37 15 00-482

Majority for Wm, Judge .. .. 121
It was offered in proof before your Committee that votes
were illegally cast at certain precincts, but not at the precincts,