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 Copyright
 Cover
 Membership Information
 Table of Contents
 Editor's Page
 Excavations at the Ruth Smith Mound...
 A Spanish Olive Jar From the Florida...
 Proton Induced X-Ray Emission Analysis...
 Our Past, Our Present: An Overview...
 FAS Publication: Author Index
 Back Issue Information
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Group Title: Florida anthropologist
Title: The Florida anthropologist
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00027829/00019
 Material Information
Title: The Florida anthropologist
Abbreviated Title: Fla. anthropol.
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida Anthropological Society
Conference on Historic Site Archaeology
Publisher: Florida Anthropological Society.
Place of Publication: Gainesville
Frequency: quarterly[]
two no. a year[ former 1948-]
quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Indians of North America -- Antiquities -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Antiquities -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Summary: Contains papers of the Annual Conference on Historic Site Archeology.
Dates or Sequential Designation: v. 1- May 1948-
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00027829
Volume ID: VID00019
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
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Resource Identifier: oclc - 01569447
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Table of Contents
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Cover
        Cover
    Membership Information
        Unnumbered ( 3 )
    Table of Contents
        Table of Contents
    Editor's Page
        Page 98
        Page 99
    Excavations at the Ruth Smith Mound (8Ci200)
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
    A Spanish Olive Jar From the Florida Panhandle
        Page 113
        Page 114
    Proton Induced X-Ray Emission Analysis of Preshitoric Florida Ceramics
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
    Our Past, Our Present: An Overview and Index of Publications of The Florida Anthropological Society
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
        Page 131
        Page 132
        Page 133
        Page 134
    FAS Publication: Author Index
        Page 135
        Page 136
        Page 137
        Page 138
        Page 139
        Page 140
        Page 141
        Page 142
        Page 143
        Page 144
        Page 145
        Page 146
        Page 147
        Page 148
        Page 149
        Page 150
    Back Issue Information
        Page 151
    Book Review/Current Research
        Page 152
    Information for Authors
        Page 153
    FAS Chapter Information and Map
        Page 154
Full Text





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THE FLORIDA


ANTHROPOLOGIST



VOLUME 37 NUMBER 3

SEPTEMBER 1984



CONTENTS PAGE

Editor's Page ........... .......... ........ 98
Excavations at the Ruth Smith Mound (8Ci200) by Jeffrey M. Mitchem
and Brent R. Weisman .................... . ....100
A Spanish Olive Jar from the Florida Panhandle by Anne L. Dilworth .. 113
Proton Induced X-Ray Emission Analysis of Prehistoric Florida Ceramics
by Glen H. Doran. .......... ....... .115
Our Past, Our Present: An Overview and Index of Publications of the
Florida Anthropological Society. by Louis D. Tesar . .. 120
BOOK REVIEW ................ ....... ........ 152
CURRENT RESEARCH .............. .. .......... .... 152


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In accordance with U.S. Postal Regulatios No. 132.622, the following
statement of OWNERSHIP, MANAGEMENT AND CIRCULATION for THE FLORIDA ANTHROPOLOGIST
is included in this issue.
OWNERSHIP MANAGEMENT
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545 Bayberry Drive addresses.
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CIRCULATION
Total no. copies printed Average no. copies Sept., 1984 issue
Varies from 1000 each issue Vol. 37, no. 3
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Sold, U of F Library-Foreign 220 220
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- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -




EDITOR'S PAGE


Volume 37 Number 3 is my third
issue since becoming Editor of The
Florida Anthropologist. My primary
initial goals have been to assure that
it is published and distributed on
time, and to make quality improvements
by establishing guidelines (see FA
37(1)) and by changing to a magazine
format to make the journal easier to
read as well as to reduce unused space
(see FA 37(1) to present).

There are other planned changes,
such as periodically publishing color
plates and expanding its size and
scope, but these are not now finan-
cially feasible. We will need to
increase our membership to accomplish
such improvements. To that end, as
part of the comprehensive index
included in this issue, I have included
a brief presentation on our Society
and a membership application form (see
page 150 ) which may be copied and
the completed form or a letter con-
taining the requested information sent
to our Membership Secretary (see
inside front cover).

If you join before December 31,
1984, we will give you the opportunity
to retroactively join for 1984 as well
as 1985 if you mention the offer in
this issue and remit double the annual
membership fee. If you are joining as
an individual member, you would remit
$24 and receive all of the Volume 37
issues plus all of the 1985 issues.
If you purchase Volume 37 as back
issues you would pay $22; by joining
for both 1984 and 1985 you save $10 in
back issue costs.

For those of you who are already
members, I encourage you to get your
friends to join. For those of you who
are not already members, but who are
reading this issue at a friend's home
or in the.-library of one of the over
300 institutions receiving our jour-
nal, I encourage you to consider
joining our organization. You do not
have to a Florida resident to belong
to our Society. In addition to
receiving a useful, informative
publication, you will be joining with


hundreds of others in an effort to
study, protect and preserve Florida's
and the Nation's valuable, non-renewable
archaeological and historical re-
sources. Your participation is
important.

The first of the four articles
included in this issue is a report by
Jeffrey M. Mitchem and Brent R.
Weisman on belated archaeological
salvage excavation at the Ruth Smith
Mound (8Ci200) in the Cove of the
Withlacoochee area. Jeff and Brent
are graduate students in the Anthro-
pology Department at the University of
Florida. They were assisted in this
project by volunteers from the With-
lacoochee River Archaeological Coun-
cil, a recently formed organization
currently seeking Chapter affiliation
with the Society. The project serves
as another example of cooperation
between amateurs and professionals in
the study and preservation of
Florida's prehistoric and historic
sites. The information reported as a
result of this project contributes
further to our understanding of the
historic contact period in an area of
the state in which only limited
research has been conducted. For
those of us searching for de Soto's
trail, the Ruth Smith Mound and the
Weeki Wachee Mound have produced
Spanish artifacts which may have
originated with that historically
important expedition.

The Second article, "A Spanish
Olive Jar from the Florida Panhandle",
was prepared by a non-professional
archaeologist, Ms. Anne L. Dilworth,
at the City of Fort Walton Temple
Mound Museum. The olive jar sherds,
which are the subject of this report,
are a variant on the Early Style
(1500-1575) described by Goggin
(1864), and are reported to bring them
to the attention of interested re-
searchers.

Before proceeding to the next
paper, it is worth noting that the
Temple Mound Museum is an excellent
example of a local historical preser-




EDITOR' PAGE


vation effort where interested citi-
zens, amateurs and professional
archaeologists were successful in
demonstrating to the City of Fort
Walton the value of preserving an
important archaeological resource.
(Elsewhere other significant archae-
ological sites and historic structures
have been similarly preserved). Over
20 years ago, a small museum was
opened near the Mound's Base, and that
museum and its modern much larger
replacement have served (along with
the mound) as a research and educa-
tional resource and tourist attrac-
tion. Indeed, in 1963-64 while I was
a Freshman in college, Col. William
Lazarus, then the Museum's curator,
assisted me in identifying the lithic
remains recovered during my first
formal archaeological study "An
Archaeological Survey of the West
Peninsula of St. Andrews Bay" (1965)
in Bay County, Florida.

Citizen involvement and public
outreach and cooperation are the key
to successful historic preservation,
and a goal of the Florida Anthropo-
logical Society and its affiliated
chapters. Working together we can
make other members of the public and
our elected political leaders aware of
our concerns and encourage them to
join with us in achieving our goals.

Glen Doran's paper on Proton
Induced X-Ray Emission Analysis
details efforts being undertaken at
the Florida State University to make
this useful research technique most
cost effective. It is an example of
one of the tools available to archae-
ologists investigating exchange
networks, in determining whether, for
instance, a ceramic vessel was made
elsewhere and obtained through trade
or is an example of an idea being bor-
rowed and a similar object made
locally.

Finally, my article on "Our Past,
Our Present: An Overview and Index of
Publications of the Florida Anthropo-
logical Society" was produced partily


in self defense. Since becoming the
Editor, I have received many inquiries
requesting an index or simply asking
if we have available so-and-so's
article on such-and-such with no idea
as to in which issue it occurs. After
repeated searches of tables of con-
tents, I gave-up and chose what I
thought would be an easier course of
action produce a reference index.
Well, over 50 person hours later
(composition, typing, proofing,
reduction, paste-up) here it is, and I
have determined that, for me at least,
it is easier to write research papers
than compile an index.

As earlier noted, the Index
article also contains background
information on our Society. This
information was pirated from our
brochure and some newsletters. If,
after reading about our goals and
publication, you would like to join
our Society and receive your own
copies of The Florida Anthropologist
then please copy and complete the
membership application form presented
on page 150 of this index, or you may
simply include the necessary informa-
tion in a letter to our membership
secretary (see inside front cover)
along with a check or money order made
payable to the Florida Anthropological
Society. Also, for those of you who
may wish to purchase back issues, I
have included an order form for you to
copy and complete or you may simply
include requested information in a
letter to the Editor, along with a
check or money order made payable to
the Society. Don't forget to include
the $2.00 for postage and handling,
nor to subtract any appropriate
discounts.

I hope that you enjoy this and
future issues and join with use in
helping to preserve Florida's and our
Nations archaeological and historical
heritage for the study, enjoyment and
benefit of the present and future
generations.

Louis D. Tesar, Editor
The Florida Anthropologist





EXCAVATIONS AT THE RUTH SMITH MOUND (8Ci200)

Jeffrey M. Mitchem and Brent R. Weisman


INTRODUCTION

The Ruth Smith Mound (8Ci200) is
located about 1.2 km southwest of the
Withlacoochee River and 0.7 km east of
Lake Tsala Apopka in Citrus County
(Figure 1). Before the land con-
taining the mound was cleared for
pasture, it was covered in dense oak
scrub. The soil in the site area
consists of excessively drained, very
sandy soils of the Candler-Adamsville-
Pompano association (Bureau of Comprehen-
sive Planning 1975:11). The site
derives its name from the owner of the
land upon which it is located, Mrs.
Ruth Smith. The mound was discovered
around 1955 by two of Mrs. Smith's
sons. They came upon the mound, which
was then located in an area of dense
scrub and live oaks, while searching
for stray cattle.

In the late 1950s and 1960s, many
local collectors dug in the mound and
removed human skeletal remains,
aboriginal artifacts, and a number of
artifacts of early Spanish origin. In
the late 1970s, the mound was de-
stroyed with a bulldozer during
clearing of the land for pasture.

Various people who have artifacts
from the mound were contacted and have
loaned collections to the Florida
State Museum for study. These collec-
tions include several types of
aboriginal pottery, such as
sand-tempered plain, Pasco Plain, St.
Johns Plain, St. Johns Check Stamped,
Safety Harbor Incised, Pinellas
Incised, Fort Walton Incised (Willey
1949), and a cord marked sherd. Also
included are a large number of shell
beads, a steatite bead, and two shark
teeth (from Odontapsis taurus, a sand
tiger).

European materials in the collec-
tions consist of 19 Nueva Cadiz glass


beads, 3 chevron glass beads, 7 silver
disc beads, 1 rolled silver bead, and
1 rolled gold bead. A large iron
chizel or celt was also recovered from
the mound (see Fairbanks 1983:19).

The Nueva Cadiz beads are espe-
cially important for dating, because
they were only made and used from A.D.
1500 to 1560 (Smith and Good
1982:10-11). The chevron beads were
produced and traded over a much longer
period, and are found in early sites
as well as in many post-1565 contexts
(Smith and Good 1982:56). A detailed
report, focusing on the European
materials in the amateur collections,
is in preparation (Mitchem et al.
1984).

CULTURAL AFFILIATIONS

On the basis of the artifacts
mentioned above, the site appears to
be a burial mound of the Safety Harbor
culture. The Safety Harbor culture
lasted from at least A.D. 1300 until
approximately A.D. 1700 (Milanich and
Fairbanks 1980:23), and is the archae-
ological manifestation of the
aboriginal groups (Tocobaga and
possibly others) who were present in
the Central Gulf Coast area when early
Spanish explorers, such as Panfilo de
Narvaez and Hernando de Soto, landed
along the Florida Gulf coast in the
early 1500s.

Bullen (1978:50) suggested that
the Tocobaga resided along the coast
from about Sarasota to Tarpon Springs
at the time of European contact.
Recent research, however, has demon-
strated that sites with predominately
Safety Harbor artifacts occur as far
south as Lee County (see Widmer
1983:150; William H. Marquardt,
personal communication 1983), and at
least as far north as Crystal River.
Further, Willey's (1949) Safety Harbor


THE FLORIDA ANTHROPOLOGIST


100


Volume 37 Number 3


September 1984





THE FLORIDA ANTHROPOLOGIST


culture area, which is included in his
"Manatee region", places Safety Harbor
sites much farther inland than the
Tocobaga area.
LEVY y
This distribution of sites may repre-
sent changes in the geographical I NHLACOOCHEE
extent of the sociopolitical influence
of various Safety Harbor polities '
through time. 1 -

THE 1984 EXCAVATIONS

Examination of the collections CITRUS BC;00
from the Ruth Smith Mound demonstrate A
that the site is significant primarily 0 ,
for two reasons: 1) the mound has
yielded evidence of Spanish contact
that can be tightly dated to the Figure 1. Location of 8Ci200 in Citrus Co.
period of A.D. 1500-1560 based on the
Nueva Cadiz beads (assuming they were
acquired and deposited during that
period), and 2) its possible identi-
fication as the northernmost single
component Safety Harbor site iden- *B...
tified to date, with the possible
exception of Buzzard's Island (8Ci2)
in the Crystal River (Rainey 1935;
Willey 1949:323-324).

The site is of special interest
because of its geographical location
and temporal placement. Geographically, so..
the site is in the area known as the ..
Cove of the Withlacoochee. A .
long-term University of Florida
project studying the past cultures in
the Cove is being conducted by one of
the authors (BRW). The other two
ongoing projects are a long-term study
of various aspects of the Safety
Harbor culture, and an attempt to
identify and correlate archaeological
sites with Indian settlements men-
tioned in narratives of the de Soto
expedition. One of the authors (JMM) L,,.t, ,,n
is involved in these two projects. "Lm.. o
Eacavatson

Although the site has been the
subject of many uncontrolled exca-
vations and had been bulldozed, the 4-
Figure 2. Areas excavated and location
(shaded) of possible cache of
Pinellas points.


(37(3), 1984)





MITCHEM AND WEISMAN


present authors believed that it would
be worthwhile to conduct controlled
excavations to determine whether any
undisturbed features remained and to
salvage any associated data. Arrange-
ments were made to accomplish these
tasks.

Fortunately, a large and active
group of amateur archaeologists, the
Withlacoochee River Archaeology
Council (WRAC), had formed in the area
in 1983. Members of this group
assisted in locating a number of the
private collections from the site,
and also contacted Mrs. Smith about
the location and recent history of the
mound. After receiving permission
from Mrs. Smith to excavate at the
site, WRAC members were enlisted to
conduct excavations, under the direc-
tion of the authors.

Because of the extensive site
destruction, the most pressing exca-
vation problem was to locate units
where the recovery of intact artifacts
and subsurface features would be
likely. To this end, the pasture was
intensively surface-collected on three
occasions and concentrations of
artifacts noted. All three collection
efforts revealed that pottery, bone,
and lithic debris were clustered
within an area approximately 10 m in
diameter. This area was identified as
the mound site.

Once the location of the mound
was determined, plans were made to
excavate at the site on Saturday, June
2, 1984. An open invitation was
extended to all WRAC members who
wished to assist in the effort. A
total of 43 WRAC members participated,
along with the authors and Ms. Donna
Ruhl of the Florida State Museum.

A northeast-southwest baseline,
21 m in length, was established near
the eastern edge of the apparent mound
site and was tied in by angle and
distance to a permanent concrete


section marker 72 m to the southeast.
Since it was expected that the site
would have little remaining archae-
ological potential after we completed
our fieldwork, no permanent benchmark
was erected. Several parallel 1 m x 5
m trenches were laid in from the
baseline (Figure 2), and excavation
was begun with teams of workers moving
toward each other from opposite ends
of the grid trenches.

Excavation proceeded in 10 cm
levels, and all soil was handscreened
through 0.6 cm ( inch) mesh station-
ary screens. Four teams, of 5 persons
each, worked different units
simultaneously, with three people
excavating and carrying soil to the
screens, and two people screening and
bagging. In addition, four other
teams were occupied with surveying and
mapping, performing another surface
collection, note taking and record
keeping, and excavating a 1 m x 1 m
test unit in an attempt to define the
western margin of the mound. Mean-
while, the authors coordinated all
efforts, and were delighted with the
enthusiasm and effectiveness shown by
the WRAC volunteers in the performance
of their various duties. By the end
of the day, some 7 m of soil had been
excavated and surface collections were
complete. A total of 811 aboriginal
ceramic sherds, 11 Pinellas projectile
points, 5 shell beads, 1,344 human
skeletal fragments, and 2 iron arti-
facts, possibly of Spanish origin,
were recovered (Table 1).

Most of the artifacts were con-
centrated within 5 cm of the surface.
Consequently many of the units were
terminated at 10 cm; although several
were taken to 20 cm when it was indi-
cated that artifacts might be reco-
vered at this depth, and a 50 cm x 50
cm unit was excavated to 40 cm below
surface near the center of the exca-
vation area in order to record stra-
tigraphy. However, this unit proved
to be sterile below about 15 cm.


RUTH SMITH MOUND


102





THE FLORIDA ANTHROPOLOGIST


Although it may never be known
for certain, we believe that our
excavation intersected most of the
area once covered by the mound. At
best, what we excavated may have
included the lower 20 cm of the mound
fill. The original mound was allegedly
once 2 m high. Clearly, archaeology
at the Ruth Smith Mound was conducted
twenty or thirty years too late.

While no discernible subsurface
features were recognized, excavation
suggests an association between 10
Pinellas projectile points and over
400 human bone fragments found at
depths of 5 to 20 cm within a 3 m
diameter area (Figure 2). This might
represent a disturbed burial cache.
However, while caches of intentionally
broken pottery interred with or in
close proximity to burials may be
considered typical of Safety Harbor
burial practices (Willey 1949:141,
148, 478), caches of projectile points
appear to be atypical.

ARTIFACT DESCRIPTION AND DISCUSSION


The 1984 excavations and surface
collections at the Ruth Smith Mound
produced a number of artifacts typical
of Safety Harbor sites, as well as
some that may reflect specific regional
variations. Although the original
contexts of many of the artifacts were
destroyed by the previous disturbances
of the mound, the types of artifacts
found provide some information about
the lifeways of Safety Harbor people
in the Cove of the Withlacoochee
around the time of European contact.
The recovered artifacts are summarized
in Table 1 and are discussed below.

Human Remains

A total of 1,344 skeletal frag-
ments were recovered, of which 25 are
tooth fragments. Almost all of the
bones were broken and eroded beyond
identification, and methods of inter-
ment could not be reconstructed. The
excessively drained sandy soil of the
area is not a good medium for the


A B C D E







/ G H J K
F G H J K


L



I
Ii


^- *
r ** 'r
.


0


A~5' I~- I


cm


Figure 3.


Some of the artifacts recovered
in 1984 excavations at 8Ci200.
A-K: Pinellas projectile points;
L: Rolled iron object (bead ?);
M-N: Shell disc beads; 0: St.
Johns Check Stamped sherd;
P: Safety Harbor Incised sherd;
Q: Cord marked sherd; R: Fabric
marked sherd; S: Net impressed
sherd.


(37(3), 1984)





MITCHEM AND WEISMAN


preservation of bone. Also, the
clearing and bulldozing of the mound
exposed many of the skeletal remains
to the elements, hastening deterio-
ration.

Shell

The shell artifacts from the
mound consist of beads and shell
fragments. Five disc type beads were
obtained (Figure 3). Many similar
beads are in the private collections
from the mound. Shell beads are found
in large quantities in some Safety
Harbor sites, especially in burial
mounds (Simpson 1939:60; Willey
1949:486; Bullen 1952:49; 54, 65;
Mitchem et al. 1983).

Three fragments of whelk (Busycon
sp.) and one fragment of a mussel
shell (presumably freshwater) were
identified. Two unidentified shell
fragments were also recovered. It was
not possible to determine whether any
of these fragments had been worked or
utilized as tools.

Lithic Remains

A total of 116 pieces of debitage
and stone tools were recovered from
the mound and its immediate vicinity.

Examination of edge wear on the
chert debitage revealed only three
utilized flakes, two of which had been
used for scraping tasks, and the other
for cutting. Five decortication
flakes were identified. They were
classified as primary if the dorsal
surface of the flake was entirely
covered with cortex. Those with both
cortex and flake scars present on the
dorsal surface were assigned to the
secondary decorticiation category.

Eleven triangular chert pro-
jectile points of the Pinellas type
(Bullen 1975:8) were recovered (Figure
3). These exhibit considerable
variation in size and workmanship,
varying in length from 1.9 to 3.6 cm,
and representing all four of Bullen's


subtypes (1975:8). The cherts from
which the points are made are also
quite varied, suggesting exploitation
of several chert sources (or possibly
trade of points or raw materials with
neighboring groups). However, it has
been noted by at least one researcher
(Barbara A. Purdy, personal communica-
tion 1982) that samples obtained just
a few centimeters from each other in
Florida chert outcrops often exhibit
marked variation in appearance.

Two miscellaneous worked chert
implements were also found. One of
these resembles a broken or unfinished
Pinellas point. The other appears to
be a microlith similar to specimens
found at Maximo Point, Silver Springs,
and other Florida sites (Purdy
1981:45). In addition, one basal
fragment of an Archaic Stemmed point
was collected from the surface of the
mound site.

Possible European Artifacts

Though we had hoped to recover
additional glass beads or other
Spanish artifacts from the mound, only
two artifacts of possible European
origin were found. One of these is a
rolled tube of iron, which may have
been worn as a bead (Figure 3). It
was constructed from a small sheet of
iron approximately 0.3 cm thick, 2.4
cm wide, and about 5.3 cm long. This
sheet was rolled on the long axis to
form a tube 2.4 cm long with a dia-
meter of approximately 1.4 cm. The
interpretation of this object as a
bead is tenuous; however, we can offer
no better suggestion of its function.
We assume that the object was made by
Indians from iron obtained from the
Spaniards.

The other possible European
artifact is a badly corroded piece of
encrusted iron. The original form of
the object can not be determined.

A large iron chisel or celt was
previously recovered from the mound
(Fairbanks 1983:19; Mitchem et al.


RUTH SMITH MOUND


104





THE FLORIDA ANTHROPOLOGIST


1984), and is presently undergoing
conservation at the University of
South Carolina. This artifact was in
the same general state of deterio-
ration as the rolled tube. On the
basis of this fact and the knowledge
that other European artifacts have
been removed from the mound, we
cautiously suggest that the tube and
other object were obtained from
Europeans by the Native Americans
buried in the Ruth Smith Mound.


Ceramics

The most abundant pottery type
from the Ruth Smith Mound is Pasco
Plain, characterized by heavy in-
clusions of limestone in the paste
(see Goggin 1948:8-9). Sand-tempered
plain is the second most abundant kind
of pottery. Together, these two kinds
of pottery make up 92% of the total
number of sherds recovered in the 1984
excavations.

St. Johns Series ceramics make up
the third most abundant category (4%).
Sherds of this ware are easily recogniz-
able due to their soft chalky texture,
apparently the result of the presence
of sponge spicules in the paste (Thanz
and Shaak 1977). The excavation
produced St. Johns Plain, St. Johns
Check Stamped, and Dunn's Creek Red.

Pasco Plain, sand-tempered plain,
and St. Johns ceramics are apparently
neither temporarily or culturally
diagnostic in the Cove of the Withla-
coochee area. Collection from the
other sites in the area has indicated
that St. Johns, Pasco and sand tem-
pered plain ceramics were utilitarian
wares (with the possible exception of
the Dunn's Creek Red), exhibiting
little change in popularity or manu-
facturing technology through time.

One sherd of Safety Harbor
Incised was recovered (Figure 3),
along with a punctated sherd on
spiculite paste. This latter sherd
resembles Papys Bayou Punctated


(Willey 1949:443), but is too small to
identify confidently One laminated
paste sherd similar to Pinellas Plain
(Willey 1949:482) was also found,
though the authors would hesitate to
classify the sherd as this type, since
Pinellas Plain has not been reported
from the area.

Three sherds of incised
sand-tempered pottery and four sand-
and limestone- tempered sherds with
very fine incised lines were re-
covered. Because of their very small
size and lack of diagnostic traits,
these sherds, along with one
sand-tempered check stamped or punc-
tated sherd, are not assignable to
existing types.

Several sherds recovered from the
site are atypical of Safety Harbor
sites, and appear to reflect some sort
of contact or interaction with
non-local groups. The sand-tempered
cord-marked and net-impressed sherds
(Figure 3) may represent variants of
Prairie Cord Marked and Alachua Net
Impressed, respectively (Milanich
1971:33, 36). Alachua tradition
ceramics were recovered from the Weeki
Wachee Mound, a contact period Safety
Harbor mound in Hernando County
(Mitchem
et al. 1983, 1984), and cord marked
sherds have recently been recorded at
two late sites in the Withlacoochee
area by one of the present authors
(BRW).

Three other sherds from the exca-
vation are anomalous, possibly repre-
senting contact with other groups. One
of these is a fragment which contains
inclusions of quartzite, unlike any of
the other sherds from the excavation
or in the collections. These in-
clusions range from 0.1 to 0.25 cm in
diameter, falling within the very
coarse and granule particle size
categories of Wentworth's Size Classi-
fication (Shepard 1956:118). Such
grit tempered ware is commonly found
in sites along the Georgia coast
(Caldwell and Waring 1977) and in the


(37(3), 1984)






MITCHEM AND WEISMAN


Apalachicola River Valley in northwest
Florida, but there is no evidence
other than a superficial resemblance
to suggest that the sherd is of
Georgia or northwest Florida origin.
Alternatively, the sherd could be from
the Glades area in southern Florida,
as some of the wares from that area
contain large inclusions as well
(Goggin 1944).

The second anomalous sherd bears
surface decoration produced by im-
pressing the wet clay with some type
of fabric (Figure 3). There is an
Alachua tradition pottery type called
Prairie Fabric Impressed (Milanich
1971:35-36), but this particular sherd
more closely resembles Dunlap Fabric
Marked, an Early Woodland pottery type
most commonly encountered in central
and northern Georgia (Sears and
Griffin 1950:1-3). Dunlap Fabric
Marked pottery has only been reported
at two peninsular Florida sites.
Sears (1982:26, 28) recovered one
sherd of the ware at the Fort Center
site. Another sherd was surface
collected at a site near Lakeland in
Polk County (Mitchem 1984). The fact
that Dunlap Fabric Marked is an Early
Woodland (ca. 700 B.C. A.D. 1) type
argues against assigning the Ruth
Smith sherd to this category unless it
is intrusive. It most likely repre-
sents a variant of Prairie Fabric
Impressed.

The third anomalous sherd is
sandtempered with an eroded exterior
surface. The faint decorations on the
sherd are from either fabric marking
or stamping with a carved paddle.

Modern Artifacts

The nine modern artifacts from
the excavations are listed in Table 1.
All of these were found on the surface
of the site.

INTERPRETATIONS

Examination of the pre-1984
collections from the Ruth Smith Mound


revealed that the site is a Safety
Harbor burial mound which was in use
during or shortly after the period of
initial European contact (A.D.
1500-1560). The 1984 excavation
produced no evidence to contradict
this interpretation, and provided data
which permit broader inferences to be
made about the site and its original
occupants.

Differences are evident in the
ceramic assemblages present at Ruth
Smith and those recovered from Safety
Harbor sites in the Tampa Bay area.
One major difference is in the types
of utilitarian wares recovered.
Around Tampa Bay, Pinellas Plain is
often found in large quantities in
mound and habitation areas (Willey
1949:482; Griffin and Bullen 1950;
Bullen 1951:28; Sears 1971:55;
Milanich 1972:29; Luer and Almy
1980:211; Widmer 1983:150). At the
Ruth Smith Mound, however, the primary
wares found are Pasco Plain and
sand-tempered plain. These two types
are the main utilitarian wares found
in the Cove of the Withlacoochee area
at earlier, prehistoric sites. Pasco
Plain is rarely found from Tampa Bay
southward. As noted earlier, one
sherd with laminated paste similar to
Pinellas Plain was recovered at Ruth
Smith, but this is not "typical"
Pinellas Plain like that found at
sites around Tampa Bay (Willey
1949:482).

In addition to paste composition,
vessel forms also exhibit some varia-
tion. The bottle and collared jar
vessels characteristic of many Safety
Harbor sites (Willey 1948:481; Sears
1967) are entirely absent at Ruth
Smith. Most of the vessels and sherds
examined in the collections and
recovered during the excavation
represent hemispherical open bowls or
variations on globular bowl forms.
Rim forms vary from incurved to
outflaring (Mitchem et al. 1984).

It appears that most of the
vessels interred in the mound are


RUTH SMITH MOUND


106





THE FLORIDA ANTHROPOLOGIST


utilitarian bowls rather than specially
made mortuary vessels. The mound at
Weeki Wachee in Hernando County, which
is at least partly contemporaneous
with the Ruth Smith Mound, also
yielded large numbers of utilitarian
vessels, though a substantial number
of (apparently) specialized mortuary
vessels were also present (Mitchem et
al. 1983, 1984). This preponderance
of utilitarian vessels may be a
characteristic of northern Safety
Harbor mortuary practices, or could be
due to a decline in the frequency of
manufacture of decorated wares,
perhaps as a result of European
contact. At present, data from
northern Safety Harbor sites are
inadequate to allow confident gener-
alizations.

In the section on ceramics above,
some mention was made of possibly
nonlocal pottery from the Ruth Smith
Mound. Two of these types resemble
the Alachua tradition types Prairie
Cord Marked and Alachua Net Impressed
(Milanich 1971:33, 36). Vessels of
Prairie Cord Marked and Alachua Cob
Marked have been recovered from Weeki
Wachee (Mitchem et al. 1984), and
cord- marked sherds have been recently
recorded from late contexts in the
Withlacoochee area. These data
suggest interaction between northern
Safety Harbor peoples and Alachua
tradition peoples during the Alachua
period, A.D. 1250-1633 (Milanich
1971:47).

The presence of the fabric marked
sherd at Ruth Smith is most likely
also the result of contact with
Alachua tradition groups. It is
probably not Dunlap Fabric Marked,
because this type is found in Georgia
in Early Woodland contexts (Sears and
Griffin 1950:1-3). The vessel was
presumably locally-made, an extreme
variant of Prairie Fabric Impressed
(Milanich 1971:35-36), though this
type is normally not found in
north-central Florida after about A.D.
1250.


The 10 Pinellas projectile points
found in a small (3 m in diameter)
area of the mound may represent a
cache (Figure 2). There are no
definite reports of such caches with
other Safety Harbor burials, although
Simpson (1939:59) does mention that
many small triangular points were
found in one part of the Jones Mound
in Hillsborough County. A review of
Alachua tradition burial mound exca-
vations likewise reveals no evidence
of projectile point caches Bullen
1949:57; Loucks (1976:84). The
possible Ruth Smith cache may be a
unique occurrence of this trait.

The two excavated iron objects
increase the total count of early
European items recorded from the
mound. Unfortunately, they add very
little information about the nature of
early European contact in peninsular
Florida. At present, there is little
we can say about the objects except
that the iron from which they are made
was probably obtained from Spaniards.
Luckily, the previously examined
collections of Spanish materials from
the site were diagnostic of the A.D.
1500-1560 time period.

Based on the above information,
some hypotheses can be proposed about
the nature of the Safety Harbor
culture in the Withlacoochee area at
the time of initial European contact.
These are tentative due to the small
data base, but they can be easily
tested by future work in the region.

First, we propose that the
Withlacoochee River acted as a
boundary, with Alachua tradition
people to the north and east of the
river, and Safety Harbor people to the
south and west. This pertains only to
the period around initial European
contact.

Little work has been done on
inland areas along the north and east
sides of the river, particularly in
terms of large scale surveys. Never-


(37(3), 1984)


107






MITCHEM AND WEISMAN


theless, it is believed that dis-
tributions of sites will reflect this
boundary, if contemporaneity can be
established for sites in the region.

The second hypothesis relates to
the activities of the Safety Harbor
groups in this northern area. It is
proposed that members of these groups
were acting as "entrepreneurs" at the
time of initial European contact,
functioning as middlemen in two-way
trade between Safety Harbor chiefdoms
and groups in north Florida. We would
assume that this was part of a much
larger exchange network extending into
the Glades area and throughout the
Southeast. The primary commodity
being traded out by the Safety Harbor
people was probably marine shell or
shell products such as beads. Exca-
vations at the Weeki Wachee site
produced very large quantities of
whelk (Busycon sp.) and conch
(Pleuroploca sp.) shells, as well as
dippers and beads made from them
(Mitchem et al. 1983, 1984). Large
numbers of shell artifacts were also
recovered from the Crystal River site
in Citrus County (Willey 1949:319).

These shell products may have
been exchanged for exotic vessels
(such as the Alachua tradition types
present at both Ruth Smith and Weeki
Wachee), exotic stone celts or other
implements (or raw materials for
producing these). Alternatively,
further research may reveal that wares
similar to Alachua tradition pottery
are typical of Safety Harbor sites in
the Cove of the Withlacoochee area.
Maize or other food-stuffs were also
probably exchanged, but excavations
and floral/faunal analyses of habita-
tion areas will have to be conducted
before this can be tested.

Further support for a trade
network is implied by the very similar
assemblages of
Spanish materials present at Weeki
Wachee and Ruth Smith. The
assemblages are so similar that they


probably represent contact with the
same expedition (Mitchem et al. 1983).
It is now clear that the European
assemblage from Weeki Wachee is much
larger than that from Ruth Smith. It
is possible that the Ruth Smith
Spanish materials were obtained from
the residents at Weeki Wachee, and
that no actual Spanish/Indian contact
occurred at Ruth Smith.

Study of the de Soto narratives,
however, especially that of Rodrigo
Ranjel (Bourne 1973:II, 65) has
indicated that an Indian settlement
(called Tocaste) in the vicinity of a
large lake (probably Lake Tsala
Apopka), was visited by de Soto on his
way northward. If one assumes that de
Soto landed at the southern end of
Tampa Bay (a theory with which many
researchers strongly disagree), this
would put him in the general vicinity
of the Ruth Smith site when he stayed
at Tocaste. The Ruth Smith Mound may
have been a burial mound used by the
Tocaste residents, in which case the
settlement should be in the vicinity
(so far, no definitely associated
habitation site has been located).
Another Safety Harbor burial mound,
the Tatham Mound, has recently been
discovered about 10-15 km from the
Ruth Smith site. The Tatham Mound may
also be associated with Tocaste,
though excavations have not yet been
conducted to determine whether it was
used during protohistoric times. The
resolution of this question awaits
further archaeological research in the
area. Other possible origins of the
Spanish artifacts from Weeki Wachee
and Ruth Smith are discussed in detail
elsewhere (Mitchem et al. 1983, 1984).

We now have a clearer picture of
the material assemblage recovered from
the Ruth Smith Mound. Unfortunately,
we have no data on forms of burial or
deposition patterns of grave goods in
the mound (other than the possible
cache of projectile points). The 1984
excavations raised more questions than
they answered. As noted above, our


RUTH SMITH MOUND





THE FLORIDA ANTHROPOLOGIST


investigations at the site were twenty
or thirty years too late.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

The authors would like to thank
Mrs. Ruth Smith for graciously allow-
ing us to conduct excavations on her
land. We also acknowledge the untir-
ing enthusiasm and work of Don
Sheppard, who handled many of the
organizational and logistical details
of the project. Larry Hartman is
thanked for providing much information
about the past history and original
condition of the site. We are espe-
cially indebted to the many members of
the Withlacoochee River Archaeology
Council (WRAC), who eagerly volun-
teered their time and much equipment
to aid us in conducting the excava-
tions. Theadore E. Davis deserves
special thanks for surveying and
producing an accurate map of the
excavation site. We appreciate the
logistical support provided by the
Anthropology Department of the Florida
State Museum. This paper also bene-
fited greatly from the suggestions of
Louis D. Tesar and four anonymous
reviewers.

REFERENCES CITED

Bourne, Edward Gaylord, ed. and
transl.

1973 A Narrative of De Soto's Expe-
dition Based on-the Diary of
Rodrigo Ranjel, His Private
Secretary, by Gonzalo Fernandez
de Ovido y Valdes. In
Narratives of the Career
of Hernando de Soto in the
Conquest of Florida, Vol. II.
Buckingham Smith, original
transl. pp. 41-149. AMS Press,
New York. (1st ed. Allerton
1922).

Bullen, Ripley P.

1949 The Woodward Site. Florida
Anthropologist 2:49-64.


1951 The Terra Ceia Site, Manatee
County, Florida. Florida
Anthropological Society
Publication No. 3.

1952 Eleven Archaeological Sites in
Hillsborough County, Florida.
Florida Geological Survey
Report of Investigations
No. 8. Tallahassee.

1975 A Guide to the Identifi-
cation of Florida Projectile
Points. Revised ed. Kendall
Books, Gainesville.

1978 Tocobaga Indians and the Safety
Harbor Culture. In Tacachale:
Essays on the Indians of
Florida and Southeastern Georgia
During the Historic Period.
Jerald T. Milanich and Samuel
Proctor, eds. pp. 50-58. University
Presses of Florida, Gainesville.


Bureau of Comprehensive Planning

1975 The Florida General Soils Atlas
with Interpretations for Reg-
ional Planning Districts V
& VI. Florida Department of
Administration, Division of
State Planning, Tallahassee.

Caldwell, Joseph R. and Antonio J.
Waring, Jr.

1977 Some Chatham County Pottery
Types and Their Sequence. A:
Some Chatham County Pottery
Types. In The Waring Papers:
The Collected Works of Antonio
J. Waring, Jr., Stephen
Williams, ed. pp. 110-133.
Papers of the Peabody
Museum of Archaeology and
Ethnology, Vol. 58. Harvard
University, Cambridge.

Fairbanks, Charles H.

1983 Historical Archaeological Impli-
cations of Recent Investiga-


(37(3), 1984)





MITCHEM AND WEISMAN


tions. In Historical Archaeo-
logy of the Eastern United
States: Papers from the R.J.
Russell Symposium. Robert
W. Neuman, ed. pp. 17-26.
Geoscience and Man, Vol. 23.
School of Geoscience, Louisiana
State University, Baton Rouge.

Goggin, John M.

1944 A Tentative Formulation of
Pottery Types for the Glades
Area, Florida. Ms. on file,
Ford Library, Florida
State Museum, Gainesville.

1948 Some Pottery Types from Central
Florida. Gainesville Anthro-
pological Association Bulletin
No. 1.

Griffin, John W. and Ripley P. Bullen

1950 The Safety Harbor Site, Pinellas
County, Florida. Florida Anthro-
pological Society Publication
No. 2.

Loucks, L. Jill

1976 Early Alachua Tradition Burial
Ceremonialism: The Henderson
Mound, Alachua County, Florida.
Unpublished Master's thesis,
Department of Anthropology,
University of Florida,
Gainesville.

Luer, George M. and Marion M. Almy

1980 The Development of Some
Aboriginal Pottery of the
Central Peninsular Gulf Coast of
Florida. Florida Anthropologist
33:207-225.

Milanich, Jerald T.

1971 The Alachua Tradition of
North-Central Florida.
Contributions of the Florida


State Museum Anthropology
and History No. 17.

1972 Excavations at the Yellow
Bluffs-Whitaker Mound. Florida
Anthropologist 25:21-41.

Milanich, Jerald T. and Charles H.
Fairbanks

1980 Florida Archaeology. Academic
Press, New York.

Mitchem, Jeffrey M.

1981 Preliminary Results of Salvage
Excavations at the Briarwoods
Site, Pasco County, Florida.
Paper presented at the 45th
Annual Meeting of the Florida
Academy of Sciences, Orlando.

1984 Analysis of Surface Collections
from the Beerman Site, Polk
County, Florida. Ms. in
preparation, Florida State
Museum, Gainesville.

Mitchem, Jeffrey M., Marvin T. Smith
and Robert Allen

1983 Analysis of Artifacts from the
Weeki Wachee Burial Mound,
Hernando County, Florida. Paper
presented at the 40th
Southeastern Archaeological
Conference, Columbia, South
Carolina.

Mitchem, Jeffrey M., Marvin T. Smith,
Albert C. Goodyear, Curtiss Peterson,
and Robert Allen

1984 Early Spanish Contact on the
Florida Gulf Coast: The Weeki
Wachee and Ruth Smith Mounds.
Ms. in preparation, Florida
State Museum, Gainesville.

Purdy, Barbara A.

1981 Florida's Prehistoric Stone


RUTH SMITH MOUND





THE FLORIDA ANTHROPOLOGIST


Technology. University Presses
of Florida, Gainesville.

Rainey, F.G.

1935 An Indian Burial Site at Crystal
River, Florida. Florida His-
torical Quarterly 13:185-192.


Sears, William H.

1967 The Tierra Burial Mound.
Florida Anthropologist 20:25-73.

1971 The Weeden Island Site, St.
Petersburg, Florida. Florida
Anthropologist 24:51-60.

1982 Fort Center: An Archaeo-
logical Site in the Lake
Okeechobee Basin. University
Presses of Florida, Gainesville.

Sears, William H. and James B. Griffin

1950 Fabric-Marked Pottery in Eastern
United States. In Prehistoric
Pottery of the Eastern United
States. James B. Griffin, ed.
pp. (1-1)-(1-3). Museum of
Anthropology, University of
Michigan, Ann Arbor.

Shepard, Anna O.

1956 Ceramics for the Archaeologist.
Carnegie Institution of
Washington Publication No. 609.
Washington, D.C.

Simpson, J. Clarence

1939 Notes on Two Interesting Mounds
Excavated in Hillsborough
County. In Florida State Board
of Conservation Third
Biennial Report Biennium
Ending Dec. 31, 1938. pp.
56-62. Tallahassee.

Smith, Marvin T. and Mary Elizabeth
Good

1982 Early Sixteenth Century Glass
Beads in the Spanish Colonial


Trade. Cottonlandia Museum
Publications, Greenwood,
Mississippi,

Thanz, Nina R. and Craig D. Shaak

1977 Significance of a Sponge Spicule
Temper in Florida Chalky Paste
Pottery. Paper Presented at the
29th Annual Meeting of the
Florida Anthropological Society,
Tampa.

Widmer, Randolph J.

1983 The Evolution of the Calusa,a
Non-Agricultural Chiefdom on the
Southwest Florida Coast.
Unpublished PhD. dissertation,
Department of Anthropology,
Pennsylvania State University.

Willey, Gordon R.

1949 Archeology of the Florida Gulf
Coast. Smithsonian Miscella
neous Collections, Vol. 113.







HUMAN REMAINS


Bone Fragments
Tooth Fragments


1,319
25


SHELL


Beads
Busycon Fragments
Mussel Shell Fragments
Miscellaneous Fragments


LITHIC ARTIFACTS


Chert Flakes (Unutilized)
Utlized Flakes (Scraping)
Utilized Flakes (Cutting)
Decortication Flakes (Primary)
Decortication Flakes (Secondary)
Pinellas Projectile Points
Worked Flakes or Tool Fragments


(37(3), 1984)






MITCHEM AND WEISMAN



Projectile Point Fragments
(Archaic)

POSSIBLE EUROPEAN ARTIFACTS

Rolled Iron tube (Bead?)
Encrusted Iron Fragment


CERAMICS (Total # Sherds/# Rim Sherds)

Pasco Plain (limestone-
tempered) 511/25
Sand-tempered Plain 235/19
St. Johns Plain 24/1
St. Johns Check Stamped 2/1
Dunn's Creek Red 3/0
Safety Harbor Incised 1/0
Miscellaneous Punctate
(spiculite paste) 1/0
Pinellas Plain-like 1/0
Miscellaneous Incised
(sand-tempered) 4/0
Very Fine Incised
(sand- & limestone-tempered) 4/0
Miscellaneous Check Stamped
or Punctated (sand-tempered) 1/0
Prairie Cord Marked 17/0
Alachua Net Impressed 5/1
Grit-tempered Plain 1/0
Fabric Marked (like Dunlap
Fabric Marked) 1/0
Miscellaneous Fabric Impressed
or Stamped (sand-tempered) 1/0


MODERN ARTIFACTS


RUTH SMITH MOUND 112




1


I spell relief:
"I-T-N-O-E-A-T-M-E"
(by an unknown artist)


Clear Glass Fragments
Wire Nails
Tin Can Fragments
Bottle Caps
Coins: Lincoln Penny (1964)
Roosevelt Dime (1959)


Table 1. Artifacts recovered from
1984 ecavations at 8Ci200.


Jeffrey M. Mitchem and Brent R. Weisman
Department of Anthropology
The Florida State Museum
Museum Road, University of Florida
Gainesville, Florida 32611


Warning! Flint knapping may be
hazardous to your health.
(by an unknown artist).





A SPANISH OLIVE JAR FROM THE FLORIDA PANHANDLE


Anne L. Dilworth


In the collection of the Temple Mound
Museum are three fragments of Spanish
olive jar donated by volunteer Joyce
Nunnery. The sherds came from a site
(8Ho67) by a pond (Fig. 1) near Caryville
in the Florida Panhandle. The tract is a
part of a proposed location for a Gulf
Power Company plant. Ten prehistoric
Indian middens within an 800 meter radius
of the pond were found.during a 1975
survey by William D. Browning, an archaeo-
logist then with the Florida Division of
Archives, History and Records Management.
Browning (1975) found no Spanish artifacts
or Aboriginal artifacts dating to the
Spanish period.

The largest sherd measures 16.4 cm by
16.8 cm and has a protruding handle attached.
A search of available literature (notably
that of J.M. Goggin [1960, 1964])
concerning Spanish olive jars in Florida
and the Gulf Coast region revealed that
jars with handles appear to be relatively
rare.

While there is no complete rim on any
of the sherds, the largest is suitable for
projecting the form of the whole jar (Fig.
2). The vessel fits most of the criteria
set by Goggin (1964) for the Early Style
(1500-1575). Examples of this style have
been found mainly in the Caribbean Islands
but a few sherds have been reported from
Florida at Mound Key in Lee County and at
Safety Harbor in Pinellas County (Goggin
1964:262-263). Vessels of this kind were
probably manufactured in Spain, most
likely in Andalusia (Goggin 1964:256-262).

The paste of the sherds is compacted
and of medium coarseness, and is medium
hard (4.0-4.5 on the Moh's Scale).
Covering the outside of the jar is a light
buffred slip, but there is no evidence of
glazing. The finish shows "throwing marks"
on the inside and outside.


Judging by the slope above the handle
(Fig. 3), the mouth of the jar is probably


everted, but this is not certain as this
portion is missing. The diameter of the
jar is approximately 37 cm and the wall
thickness of the section is 7 mm. The
handle (12.5 cm in length) is protruding
and is shaped like most of the handles
illustrated by Goggin. However, as Smith
noted in 1976 (personal communication) the
handle on this jar is placed over the
largest curve rather than at the neck.
The handles on most jars were placed near
the rims (Goggin 1964:258-260; Lister
1971:85).

The uses for most jars are varied and
open to speculation. According to Goggin
(1964:256), the "major function of these
vessels seems to have been for the
transport of liquids. Their widespread
occurrence and their many secondary uses
have led modern commentators to call olive
jars 'the five-gallon oil can of Colonial
times'". The unglazed jars were probably
used for the transport of condiments and
vegetables such as beans and peas (Goggin
1964:256).

Most jars appear to have been
stoppered with a wad of cloth, leaves, or
grass (Lister 1971:85). However, in the
museum collection is an olive jar stopper
of stone (Fig. 4) found in the Destin area
(Smith 1965, personal communication). It
is possibly made of tufa from the Azores.

REFERENCES CITED

Browning, William D.

1975 "An Archaeological and Historical
Survey of the Gulf Power Company
Caryville Plant Site". Bureau of
Historic Sites and Properties,
Miscellaneous Project Reports
Series, No. 25, Division of
Archives, History and Records
Management, Tallahassee.

Goggin, John M.

1960 "The Spanish Olive Jar: An


THE FLORIDA ANTHROPOLOGIST


Volume 37 Number 3


September 1984





SPANISH OLIVE JAR


Introductory Study:. Yale
University Publications in
Anthropology, No. 62. Department

New Haven.

1964 Indian and Spanish Selected
Writing. Univeristy of Miami
Press, Coral Gables.

Lazarus, William C.

1963 Notes: Memoranda on Holmes County,
Florida Sites. Unpublished.
Temple Mound Museum, Fort Walton Beach.

Lister, Florence C. and Robert H.
Figure 2. Whole jar projection.
1971 "A descriptive Dictionary for 500
years of Spanish-Tradition Ceramics
(13th through 18th Centuries)".
Society for Historical Archaeology,
Special Publication Series, No. 1,
John C. Combes, ed.

Nunnery, Joyce

1982 Personal communication unpub-
lished material on Gulf Power
property archaeological sites,
Caryville.

Smith, Hale G.

1965 Personal communication. Figure 3. Photograph of facing and
side views of olive jar sherd.










Figure 4. Tufa stopper for olive jar (?).



Anne L. Dilworth
City of Fort Walton Beach Museum
Post Office Box 1449
Fort Walton Beach, FL 32548



Figure 1, View across pond toward
site 8Ho67.


DILWORTH


114





PROTON INDUCED X-RAY EMISSION ANALYSIS
OF PREHISTORIC FLORIDA CERAMICS


Glen H. Doran


INTRODUCTION

Archaeologists are interested in
understanding the social and political
relationships among societies/social
groups, and identification of prehistoric
trade routes is one method of studying
such relationships. In some contexts,
trade items are easily identified as
"exotic" material, such as Gulf coast
shell and Yellowstone obsidian in
Hopewellian contexts (Willey 1966), or
copper breastplates in Florida (Jones
1982:12-18). Evidence of ceramic trade is
more difficult to conclusively demon-
strate, as design motifs as well as new
decorative and manufacturing techniques
can be transmitted between individuals
without vessels being traded. By ident-
ifying trade wares, and thus the direction
and sources of trade, societal relation-
ships can be better understood.

One approach to identification of
trade ceramics is elemental analysis.
This approach is most effective if there
are significant chemical differences
between the clays of the areas studied.
Chemical analysis is generally restricted
to a few sherds because of the high cost
of x-ray spectrometry, neuton activation
or mineralogical analysis. These
traditional techniques can cost as much as
$475.00 a sherd (General Activation
Analysis 1984).

Proton induced x-ray emission (PIXE)
analysis, an elemental analysis technique
employed in air pollution studies
(Winchester, et al. 1980), has seldom
been used in the study of southeastern
ceramics though it has been used in other
areas of the world. Advantages of PIXE
analysis include its low cost (less than
$10.00 a sample at some research institu-
tions, such as at Florida State
University) and the ability to analyze
extremely small samples.

PIXE analysis involves focusing a
proton beam generated by a neutron


accelerator on a sample generally housed
in a vacuum chamber. The proton beam
excites electrons in the sample and a
cascade of x-rays is emitted and monitored
by a silicon x-ray detector. Each element
emits x-rays of different frequencies.
The resulting record of the x-ray
spectrum's intensity at specific
frequencies is fitted to standards and a
list of elements and their relative
concentrations is produced (Cullity 1978).
These values can then be expressed as
percentages.

Many southeastern sherds have high
concentrations of calcium due to shell
temper. The abundance of calcium obscures
differences in less abundant elements such
as nickel, manganese, or potassium. This
phenomenon is statistically remedied by
recomputing the percentages without
including the amount of calcium. The
values for individual elements are also
converted to ratios of each elements to
the amount of aluminum, and the amount of
silicon. The aluminum-silicon ratio is
also determined. Cost minimization in
this initial study necessitated reliance
on the percentages and ratios of the
elements; however, more precise quanti-
fications procedures are available.

Two sample preparation techniques are
generally used in PIXE analysis: 1) the
non-destructive placement of the entire
artifact in the analysis chamber
(Demortier and Hackens 1982; Swann
1982:239-241); and, 2) pelletization.
Pelletization is destructive and involves
pulverization of the sample in a ball
mill. The resulting powder is then
pelletized in a high pressure press
(Baijot-Stroobants and Bodart 1977:293)
and submitted for analysis.

Whole artifact analysis introduces
greater variation due to different surface
morphologies and variable deflection
angles. Pelletization eliminates this
problem and results in a homogeneous,
uniformly dense sample. One assumption of


THE FLORIDA ANTHROPOLOGIST


September 1984


Volume 37 Number 3





PIXE ANALYSIS OF PREHISTORIC FLORIDA CERAMICS


the pelletization process is that
homogenization of the sherd is desirable
given the basic inhomogeneity of many
prehistoric ceramics. Hypothtically, a
homogenized, uniformly dense pellet
produces more reliable and consistent
results. Pelletization also dramatically
increases alaysis costs ($50).

As a cost saving measure, a third
sample preparation techique was used in
this study. Sample sherds were broken and
a freshly exposed section of each sherd
core was scored with a stainless steel
blade. The resultant powder (less than a
tenth of a gram) adhered to the adhesive
surface of a PIXE sample ring. This
sample preparation procedure is simple and
more efficient than traditional approaches
which were discussed above.

In our initial studies three separate
samples were prepared from each sherd and
differences between analysis results for
each were sufficiently small as to suggest
that the preparation technique effectively
compensated for sherd inhomogeneity.
Having demonstrated the reliability of the
sample preparation techiquie, the
reliability of the PIXE program in the
analysis of Florida ceramics was next
tested.

It was hypothesized that if sherds
from different geographic areas could be
identified from the analysis results, then
the suitability of the preparation
technique is supported. Furthermore,
successful geographic separation employing
this simplified preparation procedures
would suggest that more elaborate
preparation techniques may be unwarranted
for some archaeological applications.
However, if different geographic areas
could not be separated, then greater
attention to sample preparation techniques
would be necessary, and use of other
techniques recommended.

Data on 16 elements were obtained
(sodium, magnesium, aluminum, silicon,
phosphorus, sulphur, chlorine, potassium,
calcium, titanium, vanadiumn, chromium,
manganese, nickel, copper and zinc).


Relatively few specimens contained copper,
vanadium, or zinc). Relatively few
specimens contained copper, vanadium, or
zinc, and these elements were not included
in the analysis. The calculation of the
percentages and ratios yielded 80
variables for analysis.


SAMPLE COMPOSITION AND STATISTICAL ANALYSIS

While nearly 200 sherds from Florida,
Alabama, Georgia, Texas and other areas
have been analyzed, this study focuses
only on the results of the analysis of
Florida sherds, which are from sites in
the Gulf Islands National Seashore, near
Pensacola in north Florida and from the
Big Cypress and the Everglades Swamps in
south Florida. Sherd sources and types
are presented in Table I.

The north Florida sherds are
primarily Santa Rosa-Swift Creek and
Weeden Island II types. A broad spectrum
of types was selected to represent a
sample which might be encountered in a
typical excavation. As a result of this
sampling strategy several sherds from the
Gulf Islands sample probably represent
materials manufactured in adjacent areas
of Georgia, Alabama or Florida, which may
be trade wares. This increases the
heterogeneity of the sample and would
reduce rather than improve the accuracy of
geographic ascription.

The Florida sherds present several
natural comparative groups. One of the
most obvious comparisons is between north
and south Florida. Differences between
less diverse geographic samples and
chronological grouping are also present.

Univariate analysis of a descriptive
nature revealed no clear diagnostic
differences in the elemental composition
of the sherds. Statistical separation of
such groups requires multivariate
techniques which focus on small
differences between elements. The
technique selected for this analysis is
discriminate function analysis (Nie, et
al. 1975:434-462).


DORAN


116





THE FLORIDA ANTHROPOLOGIST


Total PIXE variable set (elemental
percentages and ratios) selects variables
sequentially, and combines them with other
variables until a satisfactory level of
separation is achieved. This produces an
equation, the discriminant function, which
assigns each sherd to one group or the
other. The discriminant assignment and
the actual group membership is used as an
indicator of the discriminant function's
accuracy. Eighty percent accuracy
indicates that 80% of the cases are
assigned to the correct group and 20% to
an incorrect group. With small sample
sizes like those used in this study it is
statistically unwise to incorporate very
many variables in the discriminant
function. The minimum number of elements
should be used which will provide the
maximum separation. Here more than three
variables is felt to be statistically
unsound.

RESULTS

The discriminant analysis of north
and south Florida sherds was 96.6%
accurate using only the chromium/aluminum
ratio (Table II). The inclusion of the
suphur percent, excluding the calcium
amount, resulted in an accuracy rate of
98.3%. With the addition of the normal
sulphur percentage (percentage calculated
with the calcium fraction included) the
ascription was 100% accurate. Significant
differences between the chemical
composition of north and south Florida
sherds do exist, and given a collection of
north Florida and south Florida sherds,
PIXE analysis would be effective in
ascribing a suspected trade ware to its
area of origin.

An additional test of this excellent
separation ability was provided by
randomly excluding 60% of the sherds,
recalculating the discriminant function,
and reassigning the excluded 60%. While
the classification accuracy dropped to
91.6% for north Florida, 100% of the south
Florida sherds are accurately assigned
using only the chronmium-aluminum ratio.
An accuracy rate of 96.8% was achieved


when the chromium percentage and the
chromium percentage calculated without the
calcium amount are used.


The next comparison focused on sherds
in the two subsamples making up the south
Florida collection from the Everglades
Swamp and the Big Cypress Swamp. The
subsamples from these two areas can be
separated geographically by a line
extending from Miami following the Tamiami
Trail west to the Gulf coast. This line
describes the physical separation of the
samples but no cultural historical
differences are suggested here.

Chemical analysis indicated that the
differences between the two regional areas
are even more apparent than in the
previous comparison. The Everglades
sherds can be separated from the Big
Cypress sherds with 100% accuracy using
only the iron-aluminum ratio. The ceramic
differences appear to reflect the
geological differences in the soils of the
two areas (Ehrenhard 1983, personal
communication).

PIXE analysis was also applied to
adjacent sites in the comparison of
ceramics from the Weeden Island II period
Butcherpen Mound Site (8Sr29) and the
Santa Rosa-Swift Creek Period, the Third
Gulf Breeze Site (8Sr8) which are only two
miles apart. Relying on the magnesium-
aluminum ratio only 71.3% of the
sherds could be accurately separated.
Increasing the number of elements or
element ratios improved separation, but
not as dramaticly as that observed in
other comparisons. Inclusion of the
titanium percentage, the magnesium-
aluminum ratio and the titanium percent
calculated without the calcium fraction
provides only 80.9% accuracy. In contrast
to the previous comparisons, this
separation was less effective and
demonstrates the greater similarity
between the ceramics from these two sites.
Nevertheless, over 70% of the sherds from
these two sites could be accurately
separated, indicating that even on


(37(3), 1984)





PIXE ANALYSIS OF PREHISTORIC FLORIDA CERAMICS


this limited scale differences in the
ceramic composition do exist.

The majority of the Gulf Islands
sherds were either Santa Rosa-Swift Creek
or Weeden Island II types (Table I). The
sherds from these two periods were
separated with 91.3% accuracy using the
chlorine and chromium percentages and the
magnesium-aluminum ratio. Three
variables, however, are required to attain
this degree of separation, and, as in the
previous analysis, a greater similarity is
indicated by the larger number of
variables required for separation accuracy
over 90%. The ability to separate these
sherds, however, indicates that
substantial differences in the elemental
composition of the sherds from these two
periods exist. Different clay sources may
have been used in the two periods, or
manufacture techniques or tempers may have
varied.

CONCLUSIONS

The preliminary study of Florida
sherds demonstrates that PIXE analysis is
promising. Clear elemental differences
between north and south Florida sherds
exist. Elemental differences between
sherds from the Everglades and Big Cypress
Swamp are even more clear cut. Smaller
differences in sherd chemistry, though
still of archaeological interest, are
observed between two north Florida sites
located less than 2 mils apart and dating
from different periods.

This preliminary analysis strongly
suggests that significant elemental
differences in Florida clays (or temper
additives) exist. The differences are
striking enough that correct
identification of the source of trade
wares found in archaeological sites should
be possible. An obvious next step, which
is being taken, is to submit source clays
to PIXE analysis.

This study also suggests that the
simplified technique of sample preparation
may be adequate for some ceramic analysis
studies. Work on the suitability of the


sample preparation technique is
continuing. The low cost and apparent
reliability of PIXE analysis of
archaeological ceramics makes it an
extremely promising analytical technique.

Future research will focus on more
detailed study of different sample
preparation techniques, sources of
contamination and possible mineral build
up, and leaching. Additionally, study
samples from other geographic areas and
other materials (e.g., historic brick,
trade ware, and skeletal material) are
planned. In expensive, reliable chemical
analysis of thousands, not dozens, of
artifact, should provide excellent
opportunities for further archaeological
research.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

PIXE analysis by the Department of
Physics, Florida State University was
funded by a Committee for Faculty Research
Award, No. 195001281 without which the
project would not have been possible.

REFERENCES CITED

Baijot-Stroobants and F. Bodart

1977 Ancient pottery analysis by proton
bombardment and Mossbauer
spectroscopy. Nuclear Instruments
and Methods 142:293-300.

Cullity, B.D.

1978 Elements of X-Ray Diffraction.
Second edition. Addison-Wesley
Publishing Co., Inc.

Demortier, C. and T. Hackens

1982 Milliprobe and microprobe analysis
of gold items of ancient jewelry.
Nuclear Instruments and Methods
197:223-236.

Ehrenhard, John

1983 Personal Communication, Dec. 14,
1983.


DORAN







11.9


THE FLORIDA ANTHROPOLOGIST


General Activation Analysis, Inc.


1984 Price Schedule.


Jones, B. Calvin


1982 Southern Cult Manifestations at the
Lake Jackson Site, Leon County,
Florida: Salvage Excavation of Mound
3. Midcontinental Journal of
Archaeology, Vol. 7, No. 1, 3-44.


Nie, Norman H., C. Hadlai Hull, Jean G.
Jenkins, Karin Steinbrenner, and Dale H.
Brent


1975 Statistical Package for the Social
Sciences. McGraw-Hill, Inc.


Swann, C.P.


1982 The study of archaeological
artifacts using proton inducing
x-rays. Nuclear Instruments and
Methods 197:237-242.


SHERD TYPES


(37(3), 1984)


COUNT PERCENT


Unidentified Plain 19
Swift Creek Complicated Stamped 7
Alligator Bayou 4
Basin Bayou 1
Franklin Plain 1
Santa Rosa Punctated 1
Wakulla Check Stamped 5
Carabelle Incised 2
Glades Plain 7
Coles Creek-like 2
Weeden Island Decorated Rim 6
Unidentified Decorated 3
Mississippian Plain 1
TOTAL 59

SAMPLE ORIGIN COUNT

8SR8, Third Gulf Breeze 18
Everglades, various sites 4
Big Cypress, various sites 8
8SR29, Butcherpen Mound 24
BSR67, Plantation Hill West 5
TOTAL 59


GEOGRAPHICAL DISTRIBUTION


32.2
11.9
6.8
1.7
1.7
1.7
8.5
3.4
11.9
3.4
10.2
5.1
1.7

100.0

PERCENT

30.5
6.8
13.6
40.7
8.5
100.0


Willey, Gordon R.


COMPARATIVE SAMPLES


ELEMENTAL VALUES USED ACCURACY
RATE


1966 Introduction to American
Archaeology, Vol. 1, North and
Middle America. Prentice-Hall, Inc.


Winchester, J.W., J.W. Nelson, A.C.D.
Leslie, M. Darzi, L.C.S. Boueres and S.E.
Bauman


1980 Atmospheric Pollution 1980,
Proceedings of the 14th
International Colloquium, Paris,
France, Studies in Environmental
Sciences, Vol. 8, Elsevier
Scientific Publishing Company,
Amsterdam, Netherlands.


North and South Florida Chromium-aluminum ratio 96.6%


Everglades vs
Big Cypress Sherds Iron-aluminum ratio
Santa Rosa-Swift Creek Chlorine, chromium
vs Weeden Island magnesium-aluminum


8SR8 vs 8SR29 sherds


100.0%
% and
ratio 92.3%


Magnesium-aluminum ratio 71.4%


Table II. Sample results from PIXE
analysis of Florida ceramics.



Glen Doran
Department of Anthropology
G-24 Bellamy Building
Florida State University
Tallahassee, FL 32306


COUNT PERCENT


SHERDS FROM NORTH FLORIDA 47 79.7
SHERDS FROM SOUTH FLORIDA 12 20.3
TOTAL 59 100.0

Table I. PIXE sample composition.




OUR PAST, OUR PRESENT:
AN OVERVIEW AND INDEX OF PUBLICATIONS OF

THE FLORIDA ANTHROPOLIGICAL SOCIETY

Louis D. Tesar


The Florida Anthropological Society
is a non-profit organization which was
founded early in 1948. Its Organizing
Committee consisted of: Chairman, W.W.
Ehrmann, Department of Sociology, Univer-
sity of Florida, Gainesville; Secre-
tary-Treasurer, Donald E. Worchester,
Department of History, University of
Florida; Editor, John W. Griffin, Florida
Park Service; Raymond F. Bellamy, Florida
State University, Tallahassee; John M.
Goggin, Miami; Robert F. Greenlee, Daytona
Beach; Albert C. Holt, Jacksonville;
Bevode C. McCall, University of Florida;
O.F. Quackenbush, University of Florida;
Frederick W. Sleight, Rollins College;
and, Hale G. Smith, Ann Arbor, Michigan
(subsequently at Florida State Univer-
sity).

By May of 1948, when the first issue
of The Florida Anthropologist (Volume I
Numbers 1-2) was published, the Society
had grown to over seventy members, repre-
senting every major section of the state
(Ehrmann 1948:16). From the very begin-
ning the Society's membership has been
made up of professional anthropologists,
amateur archaeologists and concerned
citizens interested in learning about and
preserving Florida's, and surrounding
areas', prehistoric and historic heritage.
Indeed, the only real qualification for
membership in the Society is an avowed
interest in these matters and an agreement
to help achieve the objectives and ideals
set forth in the Constitution of the
Society.


The Goals of the Florida Anthro-
pological Society are:

To provide a formal means by which
individuals interested in archaeological
and anthropological studies in the State


of Florida and related areas may come
together for mutual benefits;

To promote the continuing study of
the peoples of Florida from ancient times
to the present;

To establish and promulgate to its
members and to the general public, rules
of conduct, a code of ethics, and stan-
dards of quality to govern anthropological
work;

To effect harmony and cooperation
between the amateur and the professional
anthropologists and archaeologists so that
the work of all will permanently enrich
our knowledge of human history;

To bring to the attention of the
general public and of appropriate govern-
mental agencies the need for preservation
of archaeological and historical sites
within the State of Florida (and else-
where) as well as for the recording of the
ways of life of extant groups in Florida
and related areas;

To disseminate information on anthro-
pology and archaeology and in particular
on the work of Society members through
periodic, regularly scheduled meetings of
the Society, through a program of pub-
lications by the Society, and through such
special events and other activities as the
Society may consider proper to further its
objectives;

To assist in establishing archaeolog-
ical museums through contributions or gift
of materials or money;

To encourage the scientific collec-
tion, preservation, classification, study
and publication of ethnological materials
and archaeological remains; and,


THE FLORIDA ANTHROPOLOGIST


120


September 1984


Volume 37 Number 3




THE FLORIDA ANTHROPOLOGIST


To initiate and maintain appropriate
By-Laws, Rules, and Regulations in the
best interest of all its members.

Unquestionably, a major attraction to
prospective FAS members is the Journal of
the Society, The Florida Anthropologist.
The Journal, which is now in its 36th year
of publication, is published quarterly and
contains articles primarily on
anthropological (particularly archaeolog-
ical) studies in Florida and in adjacent
geographic areas of the Southeastern
United States and Circum-Caribbean region.
A brief review of the accompanying index
will provide an understanding of the wide
range of topics published in The Florida
Anthropologist, and the occasional
series, the Florida Anthropological
Society Publications. In addition, the
Society also periodically publishes a
Newspaper. Society members receive all
publications published during each year of
membership. A Style Guide for prospective
authors is contained in The Florida
Anthropologist, Volume 37 Number 1, while
an updated content index and author index
for The Florida Anthropologist and Florida
Anthropological Society Publications may
be found in this issue.

In addition to its publications, the
Society has fourteen local chapters (see
back cover) scattered throughout the
State. The chapters have always been an
important part of the Florida
Anthropological Society. They work at the
local level and in concert with the state
organization to preserve the fragile
remnants of Florida's past. Most chapters
have regular meetings, newsletters, and
projects to keep their members current on
Florida Anthropology. Some of the many
accomplishments of the individual chapters
include altering authorities to the
vandalism, looting, or potential destruc-
tion of archaeological sites, conducting
archaeological site surveys and completing
Florida Master Site File site forms,
preparing exhibits and type collections,
establishing a museum, and working with
local organizations to educate the public.


Each spring the Florida Anthro-
pological Society holds an Annual Meeting,
which is hosted by one or more local
chapters. The meeting includes a day of
presented papers, a banquet and speaker,
and in recent years, a final half-day of
workshops. Meetings are open to FAS
members and the general public. There is
a registration fee to cover meeting costs.


From our beginning in 1948, we have
grown to around 700 members throughout the
United States, Canada, England and
Australia. I am the 12th Editor. The
average term of office has been three
years. Ripley P. Bullen has the record
for the longest continuous service seven
years (1970-1976), while Charles H.
Fairbanks has the record for the longest
total service nine years (1957-1959 and
1961-1966).


The Florida Anthropological Society
has continuously used a metal ceremonial
tablet design for its logo. The original
design appears to have been taken from the
obverse of the "Douglas Table" (MT #1 in
FA 37(1), Figure 1.I this issue). A
Photograph of this table, which was found
in July 1878 on an island in the Kissimme
River, near Fort Bassinger, Brevard
County, Florida, was featured on the cove
of The Florida Anthropologist Volume 37
Number 1, which analysed all of the known
ceremonial tablets found in Florida.

The logo has been modified eight
times since its introduction on the cover
of the first issue of The Florida Anthro
pologist in May of 1948. This original
logo (Figure l.A), which appeared on the
center front cover, was used by John W.
Griffin (1948) and John M. Goggin
(1949-1951). The original logo was
reduced in size (Figure l.B) and continued
on the center front cover during the
editorships of Robert Anderson
(1952-mid1954) and Adelaide K. Bullen
(mid1954-1956). Mrs. Bullen was also the
First Editor to illustrate the front covel


(37(3), 1984)




TESAR


2~~



5'sx ;-

6ss~f~P~';;~3.'ru*~;- r
r;r
.1
~i L~ ~et~i~
c~
r -r:
"i


C F


I J


Figure 1. FAS logos through time. A. 1948-51, B. 1952-56, C.
D. 1960-66, E. 1967-69, F. 1970-79, G. 1980-83, H.
I. MT1, "Douglas Tablet," J. MT4.


1957-59,
1984-


OVERVIEW AND INDEX OF FAS PUBLICATIONS


122


G






THE FLORIDA ANTHROPOLOGIST


with more than the logo. She added
skeletons to the cover of the FA 7(3)
issue (Figure 2) which was devoted to
physical anthropology. In 1957, when
Charles H. Fairbanks first became Editor,
the logo, which continued as a center
front cover illustration, was returned to
it original size and reillustrated to
correct the original errors (Figure l.C).

The logo was again changed in 1960
when Mrs. William Massey became Editor.
She introduced a new much enlarged
cross-hatched version, which was centered
on the Journal's spine (Figure 1.D). It
resembles our present logo (see discussion
below) which is an unpublished and un-
signed sketch in the National Archives.
Charles H. Fairbanks continued using this
logo and format during his second term as
Editor (1961-1966).

In 1967, when David S. Phelphs became
Editor, he changed the publication size
from its original 15mm x 23mm (6"x9")
format to its present 23mm x 28mm (9"xll")
format. He also prepared a new logo
illustration (Figure 1.E), which is a
smaller, more stylized version of that
introduced by Mrs. Massey. This logo
occurs in the upper left on the front page
of the Phelp's issues (1967-1969).

Coming full circle, the original 1948
logo with bolder lines (Figure l.F) was
reintroduced as a center front cover
illustration by Ripley P. Bullen
(1970-1976) and continued by Jerald T.
Milanich (1977-1979). However, since
Robert S. Carr became Editor in 1980 the
front cover has been devoted to photo-
graphs and illustrations which represent
the theme or main article or topic in each
issue. Bob used a redrawn, reduced logo
similar to the original (Figure 1.G) which
he placed in the upper right corner of the
title page. Beginning with my editorship
in 1984, I have continued the illustrated
covers, but have once again changed the
logo illustration (Figure l.H). The
current is the original sketch taken from
an unpublished plate (National Anthro-
pological Archives, Smithsonian Institution


Bi~" ;~": f



(7~E C7/1 r /
T/-OZcda


(::-4ntfi7ooioai[i



















^a^^il 4, r4
9lorida Antkropo/ogical Society


VOL. VII


SEPTEMBER, 1954


NO. 3
N.-_. ^ .. a -


Figure 2. FA 7(3) illustrated cover.



Photo Number FLA-35) and reproduced
with permission. George Luer (1984:1)
has suggested that sketch was prepared
around 85 years ago at the Bureau of
(American) Ethnology, possibly by Wells
M. Sawyer or De Lacy Gills. The artist
apparently combined the distinctive
features of two tablets, MT 1 and MT 4
(Figures 1.I and l.J) in order to create
the cross-hatched tablet sketch.


Over the years, we have periodically
published content indexes. The last such
index appeared in Volume 32 Number 4 in


*'-~


123


(37(3), 1984)







OVERVIEW AND INDEX OF FAS PUBLICATIONS


1979. Unfortunately, a number of articles
were omitted from that index, and titles
and authors' names were sometimes abbrevi-
ated. Also, we often receive requests
concerning the availability of
such-and-such articles or articles, as
well as inquires concerning the content of
the back issues listed on the inside back
cover of each issue.


The present index varies from previ-
ous indexes. It contains a complete
content index and an author index. The
content index also contains a listing of
whether the subject issue is out of print,
or if available, its price. There is also
a notation indicating the number of copies
of each issue remaining in our stock (** =
less than 10 copies, = 10-20 copies, no
asterisk = more than 20 copies). The


abbreviation FA is used for The Florida
Anthropologist, and FASP for Florida
Anthropological Society Publications.
Information, on ordering back issues is
contained on the inside back cover.


In addition to the formal index, a
brief, non-comprehensive geographical and
subject index by issue intended for
cross-reference to the content index is
included. Time and space preclude a more
detailed listing.


REFERENCE CITED

Ehrmann, W.W.
1948 A Note to Members. FA 1(1-2):16.


Luer, George
1984 (Untitled). FA 37(1):1.


CONTENT INDEX


FA 1 (1-2) 1948 OUT OF PRINT
Smith, Hale G. Results of an Archaeological
Investigation of a Spanish Mission Site in
Jefferson County, Florida. pp. 1-10.
VSimpson, J. Clarence Folsom-like Points from
Florida. pp. 11-16.
Allen, Ross The Big Circle Mounds. pp. 17-21.
Griffin, John W. Weeden Island Zoned Red. p.,22.
Sleight, Frederick W. Man Enters America. pp.
23-27.
Griffin, John W. An Unusual Shell Pendant. p. 28.

FA 1 (3-4) 1948 OUT OF PRINT
Spellman, Charles W. The Agriculture of the Early
North Florida Indians. pp. 37-48.
Griffin, John W. Toward Chronology in Coastal
Volusia County. pp. 49-56.
Goggin, John M. A Revised Temporal Chart of Florida
Archaeology. pp.57-60.
Krogman, Wilton Marion The Racial Type of the
Seminole Indians of Florida and Oklahoma. pp.
61-73.

FA 2 (1-2) 1949 ($10.-)**
/Bullen, Ripley P. Indian Sites at Florida Caverns
State Park. pp. 1-9.
Goggin, John M., Mary E. Godwin, Earl Hester, David
Prange, and Robert Spangenberg An Historic Indian
Burial, Alachua County, Florida. pp. 10-25.
/ Sleight, Frederick W. Notes Concerning an Historic
Site of Central Florida. pp. 26-30.
Voss, Gilbert L. An Indian Mound at Hypoluxo, Palm
Beach County. pp. 31-33.
Sleight, Frederick W. Recent Discoveries of Early
Man. pp. 34-35.
Goggin, John M. A Southern Cult Specimen from
Florida. pp. 36-37.

FA 2 (3-4) 1949 OUT OF PRINT
Willey, Gordon R. Crystal River, Florida: A 1949
Visit. pp. 41-46.
Armistead, W.J. An Indian Stone Saw. pp. 47-48.
Bullen, Ripley P. The Woodward Site. pp. 49-64.
Goggin, John M. Cultural Occupation at Goodland
Point, Florida. pp.65-91.
Griffin, John W. Notes on the Archeology of Useppa
Island. pp. 92-93.


FASP No. 1 1949 OUT OF PRINT
Smith, Hale G. Two Archeological Sites in Brevard
County, Florida. 32 pages, 4 plates.

FA 3 (1-2) 1950 ($10.-)*
Schmitt, Karl wo Creek Pottery Vessels from
Oklahoma. pp. 1-8.
Goggin, John M. Florida Archeology: 1950. pp. 9-20.
Bullen, Ripley P. Tests at the Whittaker Site,
Sarasota, Florida. pp. 21-30.

FA 3 (3-4) 1950 ($10.-)
Martin, Fletcher Two Field Trips. pp. 35-39.
Bullen, Ripley P. Perico Island: 1950. pp. 40-44.
MacDonald, Robert A New Interpretation of the
Carrabelle Site. pp. 45-49.
Goqgin, John M. The Snapper Creek Site. pp. 50-64.

FASP No. 2 1950 OUT OF PRINT
Griffin, John W. and Ripley P. Bullen The Safety
Harbor Site, Pinellas County, Florida. 42
pages, 4 plates.
FA 4 (1-2) 1951 ($10.-)*
Goggin, John M. Beaded Shoulder Pouches of the
Florida Seminole. pp. 3-17.
Smith, Hale G. and William Watson Experiments in
Raw Materials Utilized by the Florida Indians in
Ceramic Construction. pp. 18-26.
Sullen, Ripley P. The Gard Site, Homosassa Springs,
Florida. pp. 27-31.
Bullen, Ripley P. Review Excavations at Kolomoki,
Season I 1948 by William H. Sears. pp. 32-34.

FA 4 (3-4) 1951 ($10.-)
Porter, Kenneth W. Origins of the St. John's River
Seminole: Were they Mikasuki? pp. 39-45.
Bullen, Ripley P. S.T. Walker, An Early Florida
Archeologist. pp. 46-49.
Goggin, John M. Archeological Notes in Lower
Fisheating Creek. pp. 50-66.
Porter, Rita Krestensen An Analysis of Belle Glade
Plain Rim Sherds from Two Fisheating Creek
Sites. pp. 67-75.
Bullen, Ripley P. (Review-) Excavations at
Kolomoki, Season II 1950 by William H. Sears.
p. 76.
Goggin, John M. (Review-) A Survey of Indian River


TESAR







125


THE FLORIDA ANTHROPOLOGIST


Archeology, Florida by Irving Rousej Chronology
at South Indian Field, Florida by Vera Masius
Ferguson. pp. 77-78.

FASP No. 3 1951 OUT OF PRINT
Bullen, Ripley P. The Terra Ceia Site, Manatee
County, Florida. 48 pages, 7 plates.


FA 5 (1-2) 1952 OUT OF PRINT
Sears, William H. An Archaeological Manifestation
of a Natchez-Type Burial Ceremony. pp. 1-7.
Griffin, John W. J. Clarence Simpson: 1910-1952. p.
8.
Neill, Wilfred T. The Manufacture of Fluted Points.
pp. 9-16.
Bullen, Adelaide K. Some Problems in the Practical
Application of Somatotyping. pp. 17-20.
Bullen, Ripley P., Graham R. Reeder, Bonnie Bell, and
Blake Whisenant The Harbor Key Site, Manatee
County, Florida. pp. 21-33.

FA 5 (3-4) 1952 OUT OF PRINT
Greenlee, Robert F. Aspects of Social Organization
and Material Culture of the Seminole of Big
Cypress Swamp. pp. 25-31.
Neill, Wilfred T. Unusual Rattles from Silver
Springs, Florida. pp. 33-35.
Griffin, John W. A Stone Spud from Florida. p. 36.
Bullen, Ripley P. and John W. Griffin An
Archaeological Survey of Amelia Island, Florida.
pp. 37-64.

FA 6 (1) 1953 OUT OF PRINT
Laxson, D.D. Stratigraphy at a Hialeah Midden. pp.
1-8.
Bullen, Ripley P. The Famous Crystal River
Site. pp. 9-37.

FA 6 (2) 1953 ($5.-)*
Sleight, Frederick W. Kunti, A Food Staple of
Florida Indians. pp. 46-52.
Bullen, Ripley P. Excavations at Manatee Springs,
Florida. pp. 53-68.
Anderson, Robert (Review-) Red Man's America: A
History of Indians in the United States, by Ruth
Murray Underhill. pp. 69-72.
Anderson, Robert (Review-) The New Dictionary of
American History, by Michael Martin and Leonard
Gelber. pp. 73-75.

FA 6 (3) 1953 ($5.-)**
Neill, Wilfred T. Dugouts of the Mikasuki Seminole.
pp. 77-84.
Bullen, Adelaide K. and Ripley P. Bullen The
Battery Point Site, Bayport, Hernando County,
Florida. pp. 85-92.
Gut, H. James and Wilfred T. Neill Bone Artifacts,
Resembling Projectile Points, From Preceramic
Sites in Volusia County, Florida. pp. 93-94.
Laxson, D.D. Further Excavations at Hialeah,
Florida. pp. 95-99.

FA 6 (4) 1953 OUT OF PRINT
(Symposium Number: Development of High Civilizations
in Hot Climates)
Bullen, Adelaide K., Guest Editor Introduction. p.
101-102.
Wulsin, Frederick R. Hot Weather and High
Achievement. pp. 103-120.
Smith, Hale G. Development of Cultures in Nuclear
America. pp. 121-122.
Dyer, Donald R. A Geographic Interpretation of
Civilizations in Tropical America. pp. 123-128.
Anderson, Robert Some Relations of Geography and
Cultural Anthropology. pp. 129-137.
Fearney, Edward M. Building in Florida. pp. 139-
144.


(37(3), 1984)


Arnett, William T. Seminole Indian Clues for
Contemporary House Form in Florida. pp. 145-148.

FA 7 (1) 1954 OUT OF PRINT
Solien, Nancie L. A Cultural Explanation of Geo-
phagy. pp. 1-9.
Neill, Wilfred T. Artifacts from the Bluffton
Midden, Volusia County, Florida. pp. 11-17.
Smith, Hale G. Excavations at La Finca de Dos
Marias,, Camaguey, Cuba. pp. 19-21.
Bullen, Ripley P. and D.D. Laxson Some Incised
Pottery from Cuba and Florida. pp. 23-25.
Goggin, John M. Historic Metal Plummet Pendants.
p. 27.

FA 7 (2) 1954 OUT OF PRINT
Sturtevant, William C. The Medicine Bundles and
Busks of the Florida Seminole. pp. 31-70.
Bullen, Ripley P. A Unique St. Johns Punctuated
Vessel. pp. 72-73.
Neill, Wilfred T. Graters of the Mikasuki Seminole.
pp. 74-75.

FA 7 (3) 1954 OUT OF PRINT
willey, Gordon R. Burial Patterns in the Burns and
Fuller Mounds, Cape Canaveral, Florida. pp.
78-90.
Laxson, D.D. A Small Hialeah Midden. pp. 91-96.
Bullen, Ripley P. The Davis Mound, Hardee County,
Florida. pp. 97-102.
Bullen, Adelaide K. and Ripley P. Bullen Further
Notes on the Battery Point Site, Bayport,
Hernando County, Florida. pp. 103-108.

FA 7 (4) 1954 OUT OF PRINT
Laxson, D.D. An Historic Seminole Burial in an
Hialeah Midden. pp. 111-118.
Neill, Wilfred T. Coracles or Skin Boats of the
Southeastern Indians. pp. 119-126.
Anonymous Index, Volumes I-VII. pp. 127-131.

FA 8 (1) 1955 OUT OF PRINT
Bullen, Ripley P. Stratigraphic Tests at Bluffton,
Volusia County, Florida. pp. 1-16.
Plowden, William W., Jr. Archaeology on Rocky
Point, Florida. pp. 17-21
Cabeen, Paul and Grace Cabeen The Horseshoe Island
Site, Lake County, Florida. pp. 23-25.
Coates, Gordon C. Recent Tests at the Battery Point
Site, Bayport, Hernando County, Florida. pp.
27-30.

FA 8 (2) 1955 OUT OF PRINT
Bryant, William J. Program in Spain, William L.
Bryant Archaeological Foundation. pp. 33-41.
Neill, Wilfred T. The Identity of Florida's
"Spanish Indians". pp. 43-57.

FA 8 (3) 1955 OUT OF PRINT
Bullen, Ripley P. Carved Owl Totem, DeLand,
Florida. pp. 61-73.
Larson, Lewis H., Jr. Unusual Figurine from the
Georgia Coast. pp. 75-81.
Neill, Wilfred T. The Calumet Ceremony of the
Seminole Indians. pp. 83-88.

FA 8 (4) 1955 OUT OF PRINT
Aga-Oglu, Kamer Late Ming and Early Ch'ing
Porcelain Fragments from Archaeological Sites in
Florida. pp. 91-110.
Smith, Hale G. Archaeological Significance of
Oriental Porcelain in Florida Sites. pp.
111-116.

FA 9 (1) 1956 OUT OF PRINT
Sturtevant, William C, Presentor and Annotator R.H.
Pratt's Report on the Seminole in 1879. pp.
1-24.







OVERVIEW AND INDEX OF FAS PUBLICATIONS


Neill, Wilfred T. Preparation of Rubber by the
Florida Seminole. pp. 25-28.

FA 9 (2) 1956 OUT OF PRINT
Bullen, Ripley P. Some Florida Radiocarbon Dates
and Their Significance. pp. 31-36.
Brooks, Marvin J., Jr. Excavations at Grossman
Hammock, Dade County, Florida. pp. 37-46.
Sears, William H. The Turner River Site, Collier
County, Florida. pp. 47-60.
Benson, Carl A. Test Results at the Paw Paw Mound,
Brevard County, Florida. pp. 61-65.

FA 9 (3-4) 1956 OUT OF PRINT
Capron, Louis Notes on the Hunting Dance of the Cow
Creek Seminole. pp. 67-78.
Neill, Wilfred T. Sailing Vessels of the Florida
Seminole. pp. 79-86.
Sears, William H. Melton Mound Number 3. pp.
87-100.
Nero, Robert The Surface Collector. pp. 101-103.

FASP No. 4 1956 OUT OF PRINT
Smith, Hale G. The European and the Indian:
European-Indian Contacts in Georgia and Florida.
150 pages, Frontispiece, 6 maps.

FA 10 (1-2) 1957 OUT OF PRINT
Laxson, D.D. The Madden Site. pp. 1-16.
Laxson, D.D. Three Small Dade County Sites. pp.
17-22.
Bullen, Ripley P. The Barnhill Mound, Palm Beach
County, Florida. pp. 23-36.
Larson, Lewis H., Jr. The Norman Mound, McIntosh
County, Georgia. pp. 37-52.

FA 10 (3-4) 1957 OUT OF PRINT
Laxson, D.D. The Arch Creek Site. pp. 1-10.
Neill, Wilfred T. A note on the Seminole Burial
From Hialeah, Florida. pp. 11-13.
DuBois, Bessie Wilson Celt and Pendant from Jupiter
Inlet Mound. pp. 15-16.
DeBoyrie Moya, Emile, Marguerita K. Krestensen and
John M. Goggin Zamia Starch in Santo Domingo: A
Contribution to the Ethnobotany of the Dominican
Republic. pp. 17-40.
Griffin, John W., Editor Some Comments on the
Seminole in 1818. (by an anonymous Englishman)
pp. 41-49.
Adams, Richard B. Investigation of a Northwest
Florida Gulf Coast Site. pp. 50-56.

FA 11 (1) 1958 OUT OF PRINT
Sears, William H. The Maximo Point Site. pp. 1-10.
Larson, Lewis H., Jr. Cultural Relationships
between the Northern St. Johns Area and the
Georgia Coast. pp. 11-21.
Lazarus, William C. A Poverty Point Complex in
Florida. pp. 22-32.

FA 11 (2) 1958 OUT OF PRINT
Neill, Wilfred T. A Stratified Early Site at Silver
Springs, Florida. pp. 33-52.
Fairbanks, Charles H. Some Problems of the Origin
of Creek Pottery. pp. 53-64.

FA 11 (3) 1958 OUT OF PRINT
Boyd, Mark F. Horatio S. Dexter and Events Leading
to the Treaty of Moultrie Creek with the
Seminole Indians. pp. 65-95.
Fairbanks, Charles H. Obituary, John R. Swanton:
1873-1958. p. 96.

FA 11 (4) 1958 OUT OF PRINT
Bullen, Ripley P. More Florida Radiocarbon Dates
and Their Significance. pp. 97-110.


126


Bullen, Ripley P. and William M. Sackett Dates of
Busycon Gouges at the Bluffton Site, Florida.
pp. 111-113.
Sears, William H. The Grant Site BR56. pp.
114-124.
Bullen, Ripley P. A Unique Vessel from Murphy
Island, Putnam County, Florida. pp. 125-127.
Index, Vol XI, 1958. p. 128.

FASP No. 5 1958 OUT OF PRINT
Fairbanks, Charles H., Editor Florida Anthropology.
Summary and Comments. pp. 61-70.
Fairbanks, Charles H. Archaeological Bibliography,
1949-1957. pp. 71-81.
Sears, William H. Highway Salvage Archaeology. pp.
57-60.

FA 12 (1) 1959 OUT OF PRINT
Laxson, D.D. Excavations in Dade County During
1957. pp. 1-8.
Campbell, T.N. Choctaw Subsistence: Ethnographic
Notes from the Lincecum Manuscript. pp. 9-24.
V Sears, William H. A-296 A Seminole Site in
Alachua County. pp. 25-30.

FA 12 (2) 1959 OUT OF PRINT
Laxson D.D. Excavations in Dade and Broward County,
1958. pp. 33-40.
Schley, Robert An Aboriginal Shell Mound at Drum
Point, Alligator Harbor, Franklin County,
Florida. pp. 41-46.
Howard, James H. Some Chickasaw Fetishes. pp.
47-56.

FA 12 (3) 1959 OUT OF PRINT
Laxson, D.D. Three Salvaged Tequesta Sites in
Dade County, Florida. pp. 57-64.
Benson, Carl A. Some Pottery Contributions to Early
Fabric Techniques. pp. 65-70.
Irwin, Carol Dating English Pipe Stems. pp. 71-72.
Weigel, Robert D. Bird Remains from South Indian
Field, Florida. pp. 73-74.
Bullen, Ripley P. What was It? pp. 75-76.

FA 12 (4) 1959 ($5.-)**
Bullen, Ripley P. and Edward M. Dolan The Johnson
Lake Site, Marion County, Florida. pp. 77-94.
t/ Fairbanks, Charles H. Additional Elliot's Point
Complex Sites. pp. 95-100.
Neuman, Robert W. Two Unrecorded Pottery Vessels
from the Purcell Landing Site, Henry County,
Alabama. pp. 101-104.
Armstead, W.J. An Unusual Shell Gorget from Terra
Ceia Island. pp. 105-107.
Index, Vol. XII, 1959. p. 108.

FA 13 (1) 1960 OUT OF PRINT
Keel, Bennie C. The Money's Bend Site, CE 3. pp.
1-16.
/ Bullen, Ripley P. and Edward M. Dolan Shell Mound,
Levy County, Florida. pp. 17-23.
Bushnell, Francis F. The Harris Creek Site, Tick
Island, Volusia County. pp. 25-31.

FA 13 (2-3) 1960 ($10.-)**
Griffin, William G. The Stetson Collection. pp.
33-36.
Van Der Schalie, Henry and Paul W. Parmalee Animal
Remains from the Etowah Site Mound C., Bartow
County, Georgia. pp. 37-54.
/ Sears, William H. The Bluffton Burial Hound. pp.
55-60.
Lazarus, William Human Figurines from the Coast of
N.W. Florida. pp. 61-70.
Covington, James English Gifts to the Indians. pp.
71-75.


TESAR






127


THE FLORIDA ANTHROPOLOGIST


Massey, William C. (Review-) The Archeology of the
Childersburg Site, Alabama by David L.
DeJarnette and Asael T. Hansen, p.76.
Ostrander, Ozzie The Johns Pass Mound. pp. 77-78.

FA 13 (4) 1960 ($5.-)
Morse, Dan and Phyllis Morse A Preliminary Report
on 9-GO-507: The Williams Site, Gordon County,
Georgia. pp. 81-91 and 109-114.
Adams, Grey L. and William C. Lazarus Two Skulls
from a Fort Walton Period Cemetary Site (OK-35),
Okaloosa County, Florida. pp. 91-99.
Morrell, L. Ross Oakland Mound (Je53), Florida. pp.
101-108.
/-Porter, Kenneth Wiggins Thlonoto-sassa: A Note on
an Obscure Seminole Village of the Early 1820's.
pp. 115-119.

FA 14 (1-2) 1961 ($10.-)**
Bullen Adelaide K. and Ripley P. Bullen The Summer
Haven Site, St. Johns County, Florida pp.
1-15.
Ltazarus, William C. The Morrison Spring Site
(WL-43) FL. pp. 17-20.
Kurjack, Edward B. Clay Pipes at the Childersburg
Site in Alabama. pp. 21-22.
Freeman, Ethel C. The Happy Life in the City of
Ghosts: An Analysis of a Mikasuki Myth. pp.
23-26.
Aten, Lawrence E. Excavation and Salvage at Starks
Hammock, Volusia County, Florida. pp. 37-45.
Keel, Bennie C. A Radiocarbon Date for the Money's
Bend Site, CE 3, Cherokee County, Alabama. pp.
47-48.

FA 14 (3-4) 1961 ($10.-)*
Lazarus, William C. Ten Middens on the Navy Live
Oak Reservation, Santa Rosa County, Florida. pp.
49-64.
Laxson, D.D. Two Worked Shell Objects from a Uleta
River Shell Midden. pp. 65-68.
/ Bullen, Adelaide K. and Ripley P. Bullen Wash
Island in Crystal River. pp. 69-73.
Neuman, Robert W. Domesticated Corn from a Fort
Walton Mound Site in Houston County, Alabama.
pp. 75-80.
/ Carlson, Charlie, Jr. The Marshall Bluff Site. pp.
81-83.

FA 15 (1) 1962 ($5.-)*
Laxson, D.D. Excavation in Dade and Broward
Counties: 1959-61. pp. 1-10.
Bullen, Ripley P. A Human Head Adorno from the
Vance Site. pp. 11-12.
Fairbanks, Charles H. The Contribution of the
Amateur. pp. 13-20.
Olsen, Stanley J. Artillery Projectiles from the
Civil War Engagement at Newport, Florida. pp.
21-26.

FA 15 (2) 1962 ($5.-)*
Olds, Dorris L. Some Highlights in the History of
Fort St. Marks. pp. 33-40.
Fairbanks, Charles H. Excavations at Horseshoe
Bend, Alabama. pp. 41-56.
Eaton, John Pipe Stem Dating and the Date for
Silver Bluff, S.C. pp. 57-62.

FA 15 (3) 1962 ($5.-)**
Lazarus, William C. Temple Mound Museum at Ft.
Walton Beach, Florida. pp. 65-70.
Warren, Lyman O. Early Pottery in the Tampa Bay
Area. pp. 71-72.
Sturtuvant, William C. A Newly Discovered 1838
Drawing of a Seminole Dance. pp. 73-82.
/ Bullen, Ripley P. Suwannee Points in the Simpson
Collection. pp. 83-88.


(37(3) 1984)


FA 15 (4) 1962 ($5.-)**
"Bushnell, Frank The Maximo Point Site. pp. 89-101.
Fairbanks, Charles H. A Colono-Indian Ware Milk
Pitcher. pp. 103-106.
Lazarus, William C. and Gerald S. Spence Pasco
Series Sherds from the Bayport Mound. pp.
107-110.
Bullen, Ripley P. Perforated Deer Phalanges in the
Simpson Collection. pp. 111-112.
Benson, Carl A. and Howard Bruce Green, II The
Kimball Midden, Lake County. pp. 113-114.
Eaton, John W. The Preservation of Wood by the Alum
Process. pp. 115-117.

FA 16 (1) 1963 OUT OF PRINT
Bushnell, Frank A Duck Effigy from Lundgren Island,
Astor, Florida. pp. 1-2.
Lazarus, William C. A Potter's Tool of the Safety
Harbor Period. pp. 3-4.
Fifteen-Year Index, Volumes 1-15, 1948-1962. pp.
5-8.
Smith Hale G. St. Augustine Colonial Archaeology:
Florida State University, Summer Field Session,
1962. pp. 9-28.
Gustafson, Glenn Mulberry Midden Test Site. pp.
29-32.
FA 16 (2) 1963 ($5.-)**
Laumer, Frank J. The Fort Dade Site. pp. 33-42.
Arnade, Charles W. A Discussion of Florida
Anthropology from a Historian's Point of View.
pp. 43-47.
Warren, Lyman 0. and Francis Bushnell A Bone Hand
Pendant from Boca Ciega Bay. pp. 49-50.
Bullen, Ripley P. and Adelaide K. Bullen The Lemon
Bay School Mound. pp. 51-56.
Covington, James W. Apalachicola Seminole
Leadership: 1820-1833. pp. 57-62.
Bullen, Ripley P. Shell Pendants in the Simpson
Collection. pp. 63-64.

FA 16 (3) 1963 OUT OF PRINT
Mason, Carol L. Eighteenth Century Culture Change
Among Lower Creeks. pp. 65-80.
Bullen, Adelaide K. and Ripley P. Bullen The Wash
Island Site. Crystal River, Florida. pp. 81-92.
Wing, Elizabeth S. Vertebrate Remains from the Wash
Island Site. pp. 93-96.

FA 16 (4) 1963 ($5.-)**
c/Neill, Wilfred T. Three New Florida Projectile
Point Types, Believed Early. pp. 99-104.
Gagliano, Sherwood M. A Survey of Preceramic
Occupations in Portions of South Louisiana and
South Mississippi:'pp. 105-132.
Warren, Lyman 0. "Horse's Hoof" Core-Planes from
Pinellas and Pasco Counties, Florida and the
Oaxaca Valley, Mexico. pp. 133-136.

FA 17 (1) 1964 OUT OF PRINT
Lazarus, William C. The Postl's Lake II Site, Eglin
Air Force Base, Florida (OK-71). pp. 1-16.
I Neill, Wilfred T. The Association of Suwannee
Points and Extinct Animals in Florida. pp.
17-32.

FA 17 (2) 1964 ($5.-)**
(Goggin Memorial Issue)
(The Third Annual Conference on Historic Site
Archaeology)
Dunton, John W.N. The Conservation of Excavated
Metals in the Small Laboratory. pp. 37-43.
Fairbanks, Charles H. Underwater Historic Sites on
St. Marks River. pp. 44-48.
Hume, Ivor Noel Historic Archaeology in Virginia,
1961-1962. pp. 50-55.
South, Stanley A. Interpreting the Brunswick Town
Ruins. pp. 56-62.






OVERVIEW AND INDEX OF FAS PUBLICATIONS


Neitzel, Robert S. The Natchez Grand Village. pp.
63-66.
South, Stanley A. Some Notes on Bricks. pp. 67-74.
Morrell, L. Ross Two Historic Island Sites in the
Coosa River. pp. 75-76.
Green,-Deef and Larry Bowles Excavation of the
Mormon Temple Remains at Nauvoo, Illinois: First
Season. pp. 77-81.
Larrabee, Edward Industrial Archaeology in Great
Britain. pp. 82-93.
(The Fourth Annual Conference on Historic Site
Archaeology).
Hudson, J. Paul Seventeenth Century Glass Excavated
at Jamestown. pp. 95-103.
Long, George Excavations at Panama Vieja. pp.
104-108.
Fairbanks, Charles The Trial Ethnohistory Project
at the University of Florida. pp. 110-112.
South, Stanley Analysis of the Buttons from
Brunswick Town and Fort Fisher. pp. 113-133.
Lazarus, William A Sixteenth Century Spanish Coin
from a Fort Walton Burial. pp. 134-138.

FA 17 (3) 1964 ($5.-)**
Freeman, Ethel Cutler The Least Known of the Five
Civilized Tribes, The Seminoles of Oklahoma. pp.
139-152.
Bullen, Ripley P. and Carl A. Benson Dixie Lime
Caves Numbers 1 and 2, A Preliminary Report. pp.
153-164.
Morse, Dan F. and Phyllis A. Morse The Brake Site:
A Possible Early 19th Century Log Cabin in
Stewart County, Tennessee. pp. 165-176.
Laxson, D.D. Excavations in Southeast Florida,
1962-1963. pp. 177-181.
Messing, Simon D. The Little Community in Applied
Anthropology a Case in Medical Research. pp.
182-186.

FA 17 (4) 1964 ($5.-)**
Neill, Wilfred T. Trilish Pond, An Early Site in
Marion County, Florida. pp. 187-200.
SBartlett, Marion C. Collections from Disturbed
Sites on IR-75 in Alachua and Marion Counties.
pp. 201-214.
Laxson, D.D. Strombus Lip Shell Tools of the
Tequesta Sub-Area. pp. 215-220.
Covington, James W. The Apalachee Indians Move
West. pp. 221-225.
Warren, Lyman 0. Possibly Submerged Oyster Shell
Middens of Upper Tampa Bay. pp. 227-230.
Small, James F. An Unusual Incised Vessel. pp.
231-232.

FA 18 (1) 1965 OUT OF PRINT
Van Beck, John C. and Linda M. Van Beck The Marco
Midden, Marco Island, Florida. pp. 1-20.
Wing, Elizabeth Animal Bones from Marco Island. pp.
21-28.
v' Warren, Lyman O. and Ripley P. Bullen A Dalton
Complex from Florida. pp. 29-32.
Harnett, Charles B. Preliminary Report: Discovery
and Excavation of a 17th Century Wreck off Cape
Canaveral. pp. 33-48.
Lazarus, William C. Land Subsidence on the Gulf
Coast. pp. 49-58.
Williams, John and Eunice Williams Atypical Man in
South Florida: Primitive or Specialized? pp.
59-62.
Fairbanks, Charles H. Proposed Antiquities Law. pp.
63-64.

FA 18 (2) 1965 (SS.-)**
/ Symes, M.I. and M.E. Stephens A 272: The Fox Pond
Site. pp. 65-76.
Yarnell, Richard A. Early Woodland Plant Remains
and the Questions of Cultivation. pp. 77-82.
/ Lazarus, William C. Alligator Lake, A Ceramic
Horizon Site on the Northwest Florida Coast. pp.
83-124.


128


Pierson, Lloyd M. Tabby Ruin Test Excavation: De
Soto National Memorial, Florida. pp. 125-1J6.

FA 18 (3, Part 1) 1965 ($5.-)**
Covington, James W. White Control of Seminole
Leadership. pp. 137-146.
Crook, Victor Lord Raglan's Hero A Cross Cultural
Critique. pp. 147-154.
Fairbanks, Charles H. Florida's New Antiquities
Law. pp. 155-160.
McKenzie, Douglas H. The Burial Complex of the
Moundville Phase, Alabama. pp. 161-174.
Murphree, Alice H. Folk Medicine in Florida:
Remedies Using Plants. pp. 175-185.
t/ Lazarus, William C. Significance of Dimensions of
Big Sandy I-like Projectile Points in Northwest
Florida. pp. 187-199.



FA 18 (3, Part 2) 1965 ($5.-)**
(Papers of the 5th Annual Historic Sites Conference)
Hume, I. Noel Excavations at the Amelung Glass
Factory in Maryland. pp. 2-7.
Hume, I. Noel An Interior Report on Excavations at
Denbigh Plantation in Virginia. pp. 8-14.
Gregory, Hiram A. and Clarence H. Webb European
Trade Beads from Six Sites in Natchitochee
Parish, Louisiana. pp. 15-44.
South, Stanley Excavating the 18th Century Moravian
Towp of Bethabara, North Carolina. pp. 45-48.
South, Stanley Anthropomorphic Pipes from the Kiln
Waster Dump of Gottfried Aust 1755 to 1771.
pp. 48-60.
Foley, Vincent P. Historic Sites Investigations in
Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. pp. 61-64.
Foley, Vincent P. Another Method for the Treatment
of Ferrous Artifacts. pp. 65-68.
Lazarus, William C. A Study of Dated Bricks in the
Vicinity of Pensacola, Fla. pp. 69-84.
Fontana, Bernard L. The Tale of a Nail: On the
Ethnological Interpretation of Historic
Artifacts. pp. 85-102.
Wilson, Rex L. The Search for Jackson's Mud
Rampart. pp. 103-111.


FA 18 (4) 1965 ($5.-)**
Bullen, Ripley P. and Walter Askew Tests at the
Askew Site, Citrus County, Florida. pp. 201-217.
Anonymous Annual Index. pp. 218-220.
Lazarus, William C. Coin Dating in the Fort Walton
Period. pp. 221-224.
Partridge, William L. An Analysis of Crow
Enculturation (as compared to Sioux
Enculturation) 1868 to 1880. pp. 225-234.
Warren, Lyman, Francis Bushnell and Gerard Spence -
Six Contributions to the Hand Motif from the
Safety Harbor Burial Mound on Cabbage Key,
Pinellas County, Florida. pp. 235-238.
Fairbanks, Charles H. Excavations at the Fort
Walton Temple Mound, 1960. pp. 239-264.

FA 19 (1) 1966 ($5.-)**
Neill, Wilfred T. Westo Bluff, A Site of the Old
Quartz Culture in Georgia. pp. 1-10.
/ Phelps, David Sutton Early and Late Components of
the Tucker Site. pp. 11-38.
Warren, Lyman O. A Possible Paleo-Indian Site in
Pinellas County. pp. 39-41.

FA 19 (2-3) 1966 ($10.-)**
V/Gardner, William M. The Waddells Mill Pond Site.
pp. 43-64.
Small, James F. Poverty Point Baked Clay Objects.
pp. 65-76.
Clausen, Carl J. The Proton Magnetometer. pp.
77-84.
Covington, James W. Ybor City: A Cuban Enclave in
Tampa. pp. 85-90.


TESAR






129


THE FLORIDA ANTHROPOLOGIST


Chase, David W. A Stratified Archaic Site in
Lowndes County, Alabama. pp. 91-114.
Bushnell, Frank A Preliminary Excavation of the
Narvaez Midden. pp. 115-124.


FA 19 (4) 1966 ($5.-)*
Laxson, Dan D. The Turner River Jungle Gardens
Site. pp. 125-140.
Carter, William E., Reviewer Culture in American
Education, by Ruth Landes. pp. 141-142.
Neill, Wilfred T. An Eden-like Projectile Point
from South Carolina. pp. 143-144.
Verity, William E.-- Solo Trans-Gulf Crossing in
the "Nonoalca". pp. 145-153.
Gamble, Roger and Lyman Warren Possible Stylized
Hand Motif, Incised in Bone, Narvaez Midden,
Safety Harbor Period, Saint Petersburg. p. 154.
Fairbanks, Charles H., Reviewer An Introduction to
American Archaeology, by Gordon R. Willey. p.
155.
Anonymous Annual Index. p. 156.

FA 20 (1-2) 1967 OUT OF PRINT
/ Bullen, Ripley P. A Florida Folsom (7) Point. p. 2.
Gagliano, Sherwood M. Kirk Serrated: An Early
Archaic Index Point in Louisiana. pp. 3-9.
Covington, James W. Some Observations Concerning
the Florida-Carolina Indian Slave Trade. pp.
10-18.
Dailey, Robert C. A Remarkable Cure for Rabies
Among the Plains Indians. pp. 19-24.
Sears, William H. The Tierra Verde Burial Mound.
pp. 25-73.
Murphree, Clyde E. The Deer Tongue Industry in
Florida. pp. 75-78.
Craig, Alan K. Some Observations on the Manufacture
and Utilization of Fishhooks Among Indians of
North America. pp. 79-88.
Freeman, Ethel Cutler An Early Mikasuki Mortar.
pp. 89-91.

FA 20 (3-4) 1967 ($10.-)**
Sears, William H. Archaeological Survey in the Cape
Coral Area at the Mouth of the Caloosahatchee
River. pp. 93-102.
Lazarus, Yulee W., W.C. Lazarus and Donald W. Sharon-
The Navy Liveoak Reservation Cemetary Site,
8Sa36. pp. 103-117.
/ Benson, Carl A. The Philip Mound: A Historic Site.
pp. 118-132.
Atkins, Steve and Jeannie MacMahan The Zabski Site,
Merritt Island, Florida. pp. 133-145.
Warren, Lyman O., William Thompson, and Ripley P.
Bullen The Culbreath Bayou Site, Hillsborough
County, Florida. pp. 146-163.
Karklins, Karlis European Trade Beads in Florida.
pp. 164-169.
k Warren, Lyman 0. Two Dredged Sites on Bear Creek.
pp. 170-174.
,Bullen, Ripley P. and Carl A. Benson Cut Wolf Jaws
from Tick Island, Florida. pp. 175-177.
Benson, Carl A. A Unique Wood Carving from Tick
Island. pp. 178-180.

FA 21 (1) 1968 OUT OF PRINT
Campbell, Robert G. Dating Prehistoric Rock Art of
Southeastern Colorado. pp. 1-7.
Covington, James W. Stuart's Town, The Yamasee
Indians, and Spanish Florida. pp. 8-13.
Bullen, Ripley P., Adelaide K. Bullen, and Carl J.
Clausen The Cato Site near Sebastian Inlet,
Florida. pp. 14-16.
Phelps, David Sutton Thor's Creek Ceramics in the
Central Savannah River Locality. pp. 17-30.
Haag, William G. James Alfred Ford, 1911-1968. pp.
31-33.
Bullen, Ripley P. Unfinished Bolen Points from
Hillsborough County. pp. 34-35.


(37(3), 1984)


/ Goodyear, Albert C. A Human Effigy from Levy 2,
Cedar Keys, Florida. p. 35.
Bullen, Ripley P. A Silver Ornament from St. Cloud,
Florida. pp. 36-38.
Askew, Walter H. A Unique Weeden Island Punctated
Sherd from the Bayport Burial Mound. pp. 38-39.

FA 21 (2-3) 1968 OUT OF PRINT
Neill, Wilfred T. The Galphin Trading Post at
Silver Bluff, South Carolina. pp. 42-54.
Laxson, D.D. The DuPont Plaza Site. pp. 55-60.
Holliman, Rhodes B. Bird Hammock, Mound B,
Revisited. pp. 61-66.
Karkins, Karlis The Palm River Midden, Hillsborough
County, Florida. pp. 67-73.
Goodyear, Albert C. Pinellas Point: A Possible
Site of Continuous Indian Habitation. pp. 74-82.
Warren, Lyman 0. The Apollo Beach Site,
Hillsborough County. pp. 83-88.
Sharon, Donald W. A Lithic Dagger From
Choctawhatchee Bay. p. 89.
Bullen, Ripley P. Beveled Stemmed Points from Tampa
Bay. pp. 89-90.
Goodyear, Albert C., William Thompson, and Lyman 0.
Warren Suwannee Style End Scrapers from
Pinellas County. p. 91.
/ Warren, Lyman O. Caladesi Causeway: A Possible
Inundated Paleo-Indian Workshop. pp. 92-94.
Bullen, Ripley P. and Marjorie Winz A Scraper with
Graver Spurs from Florida. pp. 94-95.

FA 21 (4) 1968 OUT OF PRINT
Charlton, Thomas H. Post-Conquest Aztec Ceramics:
Implications for Archaeological Interpretation.
pp. 96-101.
Fairbanks, Charles H. Florida Coin Beads. pp.
102-105.
Neill, Wilfred T. An Indian and Spanish Site on
Tampa Bay, Florida. pp. 106-116.
Olsen, Stanley J. Examples of Colonial Spanish
Hoes. pp. 117-120.
Covington, James W. A Seminole Census: 1847. pp.
120-122.
/ Neill, Wilfred T. and James C. McKay A Supposed
"Florida Folsom" Point: a Reflutation. pp.
122-124.
Bullen, Ripley P. A Composite Bone Fishhook. p.
124.
Dailey, Robert C. Two Indian Crania fror Peru. pp.
124-125.

FA 22 (1-4) 1969 ($10.-)*
Gardner, William M. An Example of the Association
of Archaeological Complexes with Tribal and
linguistic Grouping: The Fort Walton Complex of
Northwest Florida. pp. 1-11.
Heidecker, Lorraine and Michael I. Siegel -
Preliminary Excavation of the Hendriquez I Site,
Tanki Flip, Aruba, Netherlands Antilles. pp.
12-16.
Milanich, Jerald T. The Alachua Tradition:
Extension of Wilmington-Savannah Peoples into
Central Florida. pp. 17-23.
Tyagi, Deepak A Study of Bilateral Variation:
Handedness, Hand Clasping and Arm Folding
among the Muslims of Uttar Pradesh. pp.
24-29.
Trager, George L. and M. Estellie Smith A note on
the Tigua Indians (Ysleta del Sur) of Ysleta, El
Paso, Texas. pp. 30-33.
Goodyear, Albert C. A Deptford Vessel from Pinellas
County, Florida. p. 34.
Clausen, Carl J. Utilization of Bear Grass in
Rural North Florida. p. 35.
/ Bullen, Ripley P. A Clovis Fluted Point from the
Santa Fe River, Florida. p. 36.
V/Waller, Ben I. Paleo-Indian and Other Artifacts
from a Florida Stream Bed. pp. 37-39.







OVERVIEW AND INDEX OF FAS PUBLICATIONS


FA 23 (1) 1970 (S5.-)*
Webster, William J. A New Concept for the Busycon
Shell Receptacle. pp. 1-7.
Bullen, Ripley P. and H. Bruce Greene Stratigraphic
Tests at Stalling's Island, Georgia. pp. 8-28.
Lazarus, Yulee W. Salvage Archaeology at Fort
Walton Beach, Florida. pp. 29-42.

FA 23 (2) 1970 ($5.-)**
Cumbaa, Stephen L. and Thomas H. Gouchnour The
Colby Site, Marion County, Florida. pp. 43-56.
Bullen, Ripley P. Regionalism in Florida during the
Christian Era. pp. 52-61.
Karkins, Karlis The Fish Creek Site, Hillsborough
County, Floria. pp. 62-80.

FA 23 (3) 1970 (S5.-)**
Bullen, Ripley P., William L. Partridge, and Donald
A. Harris The Safford Burial Mound, Tarpon
Springs, Florida. pp. 81-118.
Covington, James W. The Yamassee Indians in
Florida: 1715-1763. pp. 119-128.

FA 23 (4) 1970 ($5.-)**
Waller, Ben I. Some Occurrences of Paleo-Indian
Projectile Points in Florida Waters. pp. 129-134.
Williams, Wilma B. The Coral Springs Site,
Southeast Florida. pp. 135-150.
Laxson, D.D. Seven Sawgrass Middens in Dade and
Broward Counties, Florida. pp. 151-158.
Walker, lain C. Dating Clay Pipes from the Galphin
Trading Post at Silver Bluff, South Carolina.
pp. 159-162.
Warren, Lyman 0. The Kellogg Fill from Boca Ciega
Bay, Pinellas County, Florida. pp. 163-167.

FA 24 (1) 1971 OUT OF PRINT
Bullen, Ripley P. The Sarasota County Mound,
Englewood, Florida. pp. 1-30.
Crusoe, Donald L. A Study of Aboriginal Trade: A
Petrographic Analysis of Certain Ceramic Types
from Florida and Georgia. pp. 31-43.
Black, Dale A. An Extremely Long Celt. p. 44.


FA 24 (2) 1971 ($5.-)**
Craig, Alan and David McJunkin Stranahan: Last
Seminole Trader. pp. 45-50;
Sears, William H. The Weeden Island Site, St.
Petersburg. pp. 51-60.
/ Neill, Wilfred T. A Florida Paleo-Indian Implement.
pp. 61-70.
Warren, Lyman O. Bird Effigy Dredged from Tampa
Bay. pp. 71-72
Allen, Gary A Leister Point from the Itchetucknee
River. pp. 73-74.
Coleman, Wesley F. Carved Bone Artifacts from Dade
County. pp. 75-76.
Sharon, D.W. and T.C. Watson The Two Egg Quarry
Site. pp. 77-80.
Warren, Lyman O. The Fletcher Davis Site, Florida.
pp. 81-90.

FA 24 (3) 1971 ($5.-)**
Hester, Thomas Roy Loyola Beach: An Example of
Aboriginal Adaptation to the Maritime
Environment of the Lower Texas Coast. pp.
91-106.
Smith, Samuel D. Excavations at the Hope Mound with
an ADDENDUM to the Safford Mound Report. pp.
107-134.

FA 24 (4) 1971 ($5.-)**
Hardman, Clark, Jr. The Primitive Solar Observatory
at Crystal River and its implications. pp.
135-168.
Bunn, Jennings W., Jr. Excavation of a Deptford
Midden Burial, Destin, Florida. pp. 169-172.
Waller, Ben I. Hafted Flake Knives. pp. 173-174.


130


FA 25 (1) 1972 ($5.-)**
Mowers, Bert and Wilma B. Williams The Peace Camp
Site, Broward County, Florida. pp. 1-20.
Milanich, Jerald T. Excavations at the Yellow
Bluffs Whitaker Mound, Sarasota, Florida. pp.
21-41.
Pittman, Robert H. and William D. Lipe A
Prehistoric Dugout Canoe from Southeastern North
Carolina. pp. 42-44.
Wesley, William H. A Jacksonian Period Sword Handle
from South Walton County. pp. 45-46.
Webb, Raymond A Here-to-fore Unclassified Stone
Tool. pp. 47-48.

FA 25 (2, Part 1) 1972 ($5.-)*
Warren, Lyman O. Commerical Oyster Shell of Tampa
Bay: 1966 Progress Report. pp. 49-51.
Goodyear, Albert C. and Lyman O. Warren Further
Observations on the Submarine Oyster Shell
Deposits of Tampa Bay. pp. 52-66.
Johnson, Byron A. The Suwannee-Shawnee Debate.
pp. 67-72.
von Burger, D.L. A Supplemental Note on the Busycon
Receptacle. pp. 73-76.
Coleman, Wesley F. Site DA-140 in Dade County,
Florida. pp. 77-80.
LaFond, Arthur A. A Unique Zoomorphic Effigy From
the Queen Mound Jacksonville, Florida. pp.
81-86.
Hranicky, William Jack The Thermoluminescent Method
of Pottery Dating. pp. 87-91.
Bullen, Ripley P. A Stone Bird Head Plummet from
Kissimmee, Florida. p. 92.

FASP No. 6/FA 25 (2, Part 2) 1972 ($7.00)
Bullen, Ripley P. and James B. Stoltman, Editors -
Fiber-Tempered Pottery in Southeastern United
States and Northern Colombia: Its Origins,
Context, and Significance. 72 pages.

FA 25 (3) 1972 OUT OF PRINT
Warren, Lyman O. Clear Fork Gouge and Greenbrier
Point. pp. 93-96.
von Burger, D.L. Coleman Site, Dade County,
Florida. pp. 97-100.
Knoderer, Charles F. The Duda Ranch Shell Mound,
Brevard County, Florida. pp. 101-106.
Coleman, Wesley F. Artifacts from the Trail Site,
Dade County, Florida. pp. 107-108.
Brandt, Deborah Panamanian Duhos. pp. 109-116.
von Burger, D.L. Early Historical Period Canoe. pp.
117-118.
Wingate, R.J. and T.R. Hester Burials from Green
Lake, Texas. pp. 119-127.
V Waller, Ben I. Notes on the Meadowbrook Farms No. 2
Site. p. 128.
Mowers, Bert Concentrations Associated with Glades
Prehistoric Sites. pp. 129-131.
Bullen, Ripley P. and M.T. Wallace An Engraving
Tool. pp. 131-132.

FA 25 (4) 1972 OUT OF PRINT
Bullen, Adelaide K. Paleoepidemiology and
Distribution of Prehistoric Treponemiasis
(Syphilis) in Florida. pp. 133-174.
Warren, Lyman 0. Treponematosis. pp. 175-188.

FA 26 (1) 1973 OUT OF PRINT
Bullen, Ripley P. and Laurence E. Bellman The
Nalcrest Site, Lake Weohyakapa, Florida. pp.
1-22.
Morse, Dan F. Dalton Culture in Northeastern
Arkansas. pp. 23-38.
Goodyear, Albert C. Archaic Hafted Spokeshaves with
Graver Spurs from the Southeast. pp. 39-44.

FA 26 (2) 1973 ($5.-)*
Paredes, J. Anthony and Kaye Lenihan Native
American Population in the Southeastern States:


TESAR







THE FLORIDA ANTHROPOLOGIST


1960-70. pp. 45-56.
Crusoe, Donald L. Effects of a Wage-Earning
Subsistence Pattern on Backland Choco, Panama.
pp. 57-66.
Keel, Bennie C. An Analysis of Muskogee Kinship.
pp. 67-78.
Hunter, Donald G. The Settlement Pattern and
Toponymy of the Koasati Indians of Bayou Blue.
(Louisiana). pp. 79-88.

FA 26 (3) 1973 ($5.-)**
Morgan, John R. The Parker Mound Site, Fort Walton
Beach. pp. 89-98.
Covington, James W. The Seminole Indians in 1908.
pp. 99-104.
Milanich, Jerald T. A Deptford Phase House
Structure, Cumberland Island, Georgia. pp.
105-118.
Warren, Lyman O. Unique Knife or Chisel,
Piper-Fuller Airfield, St. Petersburg. pp.
119-120.
Purdy, Barbara A. and Frank N. Blanchard -
Petrography as a Means of Tracing Stone Tools
from Florida. pp. 121-125.
Coleman, Wesley F. Site DA-141, Dade County,
Florida. pp. 126-128.

FA 26 (4) 1973 ($5.-)**
Jones, William M. A Late Eighteenth Century Work
Camp, St. Johns Bluff, Duval County, Florida.
pp. 129-142.
Purdy, Barbara A. The Temporal and Spatial
Distribution of Bone Points in the State of
Florida. pp. 143-152.
Sharon, Donald W. and Jennings W. Bunn, Jr. A Swift
Creek Midden at the Wheeler Springs Site,
Wynnhaven Beach, Florida. pp. 153-156.
Wesley, W.H. A "Marked" Historic Site. pp.
157-161.
Laxson, D.D. Amateur and Professional
Archaeologists. pp. 162-164.
t^Reichelt, David C. Clovis From Northwest Florida.
pp. 165-168.


FA 27 (1) 1974 ($5.-)**
Karklins, Karlis Additional Notes on the Philip
Mound, Polk County, Florida. pp. 1-8.
Fornard, Robert J. A Conecuh River Site (Cv.30),
Alabama. pp. 9-20.
Gluckman, Stephen J. and Christopher S. Peebles -
Oven Hill (Di-15), A Refuge Site in the Suwannee
River. pp. 21-30.
Holland, C.G. A Mid-Eighteenth Century Indian
Village on the Chattahoochee River. pp. 31-46.
Bunn, Jennings, W., Jr. Clay Balls: Ceremonial or
Utilitarian? pp. 47-48.

FA 27 (2) 1974 ($5.-)**
Kersey, Harry A., Jr. The Seminole "Uprising" of
1907. pp. 49-58.
Morse, Dan F., G. Daniel Morse, and Daniel A. Morse -
A Biconcave Pottery Discoidal from Northwest
Florida. pp. 59-61.
Bullen, Ripley P., Otto Jahn, and Mark J. Brooks -
Some Tests at the Zellwood Site, Lake Apopka,
Florida. pp. 62-66.
Dreves, Rick Archaeological Investigation of
8-OR-17: An Early Aboriginal Campsite, Lake
Apopka, Florida. pp. 67-76.
Bullen, Ripley P. The Origins of the Gulf Tradition
as seen from Florida. pp. 77-88.


FA 27 (3) 1974 (55.-)**
; Morse, Dan F. and Louis D. Tesar A Microlithic Tool
Assemblage from a Northwest Florida Site. pp.
89-106.
SWatson, Thonas C. The Microlithic West Bay Site,
Florida. pp. 107-118.


(37(3), 1984)


Bullen, Ripley P. and Adelaide K. Bullen Further
Notes on the West Bay Site. p. 119.
Reichelt, David C. Microliths of South Walton
County. pp. 120-124.
Haisten, James M. Two Crooked Creek Nonceramic
Sites. pp. 125-132.

FA 27 (4) 1974 ($5.-)**
Tesar, Louis Daniel A Valiente Guaymi Cayuho (sic,
Cayuco) Hauling Junta (Panama). pp. 133-144.
Crus6e, D.L. and J.H. Felton La Alvina de Parita:
A Paleo-Indian Camp in Pamama. pp. 145-148.
Bullen, Ripley P. Were there Pre-Columbian Cultural
Contacts Between Florida and the West Indies:
The Archaeological Evidence. pp. 149-160.
Wesley, William H. Pieces Esquillees in the
Southeast. pp. 161-164.
Lien, Paul M., Ripley P. Bullen, and Clarence H.
Webb A Poverty Point Owl Amulet Found in
Florida. pp. 165-168.
Bullen, Ripley P. and Adelaide K. Bullen Stone
Mortars in Florida. pp. 169-170.
Mowers, Bert and Wilma B. Williams, Preparers -
Cagles Hammock, Coral Springs Site No. 5 pp.
171-179.

FA 28 (1) 1975 ($5.-)**
Williams, Wilma, Mark Greene, and Wesley Coleman,
Preparers The Arch Creek Site, Dade County.
pp. 1-13.
Hemmings, E. Thomas and Don L. vonBurger An Orange
Plain Vessel from Enterprise, Florida. pp.
14-16.
Jenkins, Ned J. The Wheeler Series and Southeastern
Prehistory. pp. 17-26.
Hunter, Donald G. Coushatta Basketry in the Rand
Collection. pp. 27-37.
vonBurger, D.L. Carved Fossil Bone from Volusia
County, Florida. pp. 38-40.

FA 28 (2) 1975 ($5.-)**
SHemmings, E. Thomas An Archaeological Survey of the
South Prong of the Alafia River, Florida. pp.
41-51.
Bullen, Ripley P. Suwannee-like Points from
Southwestern Georgia. pp. 52.
Wilkerson, S. Jeffrey K. (Book Review) The
Sculpture of El Tajin, Veracruz, Mexico by
Michael Edwin Kampen. pp. 53-56.
Hunter, Donald G. Functional Analyses of Poverty
Point Clay Objects. pp. 57-71.
Hunt, Ron Problematical Stone Find. p. 72.
Bullen, Ripley P. Implications from some Florida
Deposits and their Archaeological Contents. pp.
73-84.

FA 28 (3, Part 1) 1975 ($5.-)*'
Recourt, Peter Final Notes on the Goodman Mound.
pp. 85-95.
Gallagher, John C. and Lyman 0. Warren The Bay
Pines Site, Pinellas County, Florida. pp.
96-116.
Fradkin, Arlene Christian Science: A Religion and
a Way of Life. pp. 117-122.
Lazarus, Yulee W. Another Ceramic Chungke from the
Florida Panhandle. pp. 123-124.
Walthall, John A. Ceramic Figurines, Porter
Hopewell, and Middle Woodland Interaction. pp.
125-140.

FASP No. 7/FA 28 (3, Part 2) 1975 ($7.-)**
Clausen, Carl J., H.K. Brooks, and A.B. Wesolowsky -
Florida Springs Confirmed as 10,000 Year Old
Early Man Site. 38 pages.

FA 28 (4) 1975 ($5.-)**
Hemmings, E. Thomas The Silver Springs Site,
Prehistory in the Silver Springs Valley. pp. 141-158.
Lazarus, Yulee W. and Robert J. Fornaro Fort Waltor.
Temple Mound, Further Test Excavations, DePaux






OVERVIEW AND INDEX OF FAS PUBLICATIONS


1973. pp 159-177.
Purdy, Barbara A. The Senator Edwards Stone
Workshop, Marion County. pp. 178-189.
Reichelt, David C. Paint Rocks of Northwest
Florida. pp. 190-191.

FA 29 (1) 1976 ($5.-)**
Crusoe, Donald L. and Chester B. De Pratter A New
Look at the Georgia Coastal Shell Midden
Archaic. pp. 1-23.
Percy, George W. Use of a Mechanical Earth Auger at
the Torreya Site, Liberty County, Florida. pp. 24-32.
Bullen, Ripley P. Some Thoughts on Florida
Projectile Points. pp. 33-38.
Padgett, Thomas J. Hinterland Exploitation in the
Central Gulf Coast-Manatee Region During the
Safety Harbor Period. pp. 39-48.

FA 29 (2, Part 1) 1976 (SS.-)**
Cumbaa, Stephen L. A Reconsideration of Freshwater
Shellfish Expoitation in the Florida Archaic.
pp. 49-59.
Pandey, Nisha and V.K. Tandon A Comparative Study
of Palmar Dermatoglyphics on Pasi and Chamar.
pp. 60-63.
Murphree, Alice H. Where Has All The Deer Tongue
Gone? pp. 64-68.
Ferguson, George R. The Weekiwachee Site, Hernando
County, Florida. pp. 69-83.
Knight, James D. Manufacturing Techniques of
Maximo Point Microliths. pp. 84-92.

FASP No. 8/FA 29 (2, Part 2) 1976 ($7.-)*
S< Bullen, Ripley P., and Adelaide K. Bullen The
Palmer site. 55 pages, plus 23 plates.

FA 29 (3) 1976 (S5.-)**
Johnson, Byron A. Florida Seminole Silver Work.
pp. 93-104.
Percy, George W. and M. Katherine Jones An -
Archaeological Survey of Upland Locales in
Gadsden and Liberty Counties, Florida. pp.
105-126.
Neill, Wilfred T. and George R. Ferguson Spanish
Trade Pipes from Marion County, Florida. pp.
126-128
Neill, Wilfred T. The Seminole Pumpkin. pp.
129-132.

FA 29 (4) 1976 ($5.-)*
Maples, W.R., A.B. Brown, and P.M. Hutchens -
Introduced Monkey Populations at Silver Springs,
Florida. pp. 133-136.
Covington, James W. Dania Reservation: 1911-1927.
pp. 137-144.
Jaffee, Howard Preliminary Report on a Midden Mound
and Burial Mound of the Boynton Mound Complex.
pp. 145-152.
Neill, Wilfred T. Ecological Data Bearing on the
Age of Kirk Serrated Points in Florida. pp.
153-159.

FA 30 (1) 1977 OUT OF PRINT
Purdy, Barbara A. The York Site (8-A1-480), Alachua
County, Florida: Observations on Aboriginal Use
of Chert. pp. 3-8.
Bostwick, John A. The Use of Ceramics in the
Construction of the Castillo de San Marcos. pp.
9-13.
,Neill, Wilfred T. Knapping in Florida During the
Historic Period. pp. 14-17.
SFerguson, George R. and Wilfred T. Neill The age of
the Santa Fe Projectile.Point Type. pp. 18-21.
Remington, Richard R. A Spider Gorget from Levy
County, Florida. pp. 22-23.
Palmer, Jay and J. Raymond Williams The Formation
of Goethite and Calcareous Lenses in Shell
Middens in Florida. pp. 24-27.
Deagan, Kathleen A. An Early Seminole Cane Basket.
pp. 28-33.


132


FA 30 (2) 1977 ($5.-)*
(Ripley, P. Bullen Memorial Issue)
Anonymous Ripley Pierce Bullen, 1902-1976. pp.
34-35.
Luer, George M. Excavations at the Old Oak Site,
Sarasota, Florida: A Late Weeden Island-Safety
Harbor Period Site. pp. 37-55.
Williams, Wilma B. and Bert Mowers, preparers -
Markham Park Mound No. 2, Broward County,
Florida. pp. 56-78.
Waller, Ben I. and James Dunbar Distribution of
Paleo-Indian Projectiles in Florida. pp. 79-80.
Wing, Elizabeth S. Subsistence Systems in the
Southeast, pp. 81-87.

FA 30 (3) 1977 ($5.-)*
Furey, John F. An Analysis of Shark Tooth Tools
from the Boca Weir Site in South Florida. pp.
89-102.
Henderson, Joseph N. An Anglo Sucking Cure from
Rural North Florida. pp. 103-109.
Jones, William M. A Second Spanish Period Log Water
Pump, Duval County, Flordia. pp. 110-120.
Luer, George M. The Roberts Bay Site, Sarasota,
Florida. pp. 121-133.
Milanich, Jerald T. A Chronology for the Aboriginal
Cultures of Northern St. Simon's Island,
Georgia. pp. 134-142.

FA 30 (4) 1977 ($5.-)*
Thurman, Melburn D. Seminoles, Creeks, Delawares
and Shawnees: Indian Auxiliaries in the Second
Seminole War. pp. 144-165.
Fradkin, Arlene and Jerald T. Milanich Salvage
Excavations at the Law School Mound, Alachua
County, Florida. pp. 166-178.
McMichael, Alan E. A Model for Barrier Island
Settlement Pattern. pp. 179-195.
Kuna, Ralph R. Hoodoo: The Indigenous Medicine and
Psychiatry of the Black American. pp. 196-211.

FA 31 (1) 1977 ($5.-)*
Wing, Elizabeth S. Subsistence at the McLarty Site.
pp. 3-7.
Covington, James W. The Agreement of 1842 and its
Effect upon Seminole History. pp. 8-11.
Reitz, Elizabeth J. Tisher Pond Mound, Ocala
National Forest, Florida. pp. 12-20.
Crook, Morgan R., Jr. Spatial Associations, and
Distribution of Aggregate Village Sites in a
Southeastern Atlantic Coastal Area. pp. 21-34.

FA 31 (2, Part 1) 1978 ($5.-)
Fradkin, Arlene Archaeologicl Evidence of Snake
Consumption among the Aborigines of Florida.
pp. 36-43.
Parades, J. Anthony Hurricanes and Anthropologists
in Florida. pp. 44-51.
Hudson, Charles "Sociosomatic" Illness. pp. 52-63.
Trinkley, Michael and H. Trawick Ward The Use of
Soil Science at a South Carolina Thom's Creek
Culture Shell Ring. pp. 64-73.

FASP No. 9/FA 31 (2, Part 2) 1978 ($5.-)
Bullen, Ripley P., Walter Askew, Lee M. Feder, and
Richard L. McDonald The Canton Street Site,
St. Petersburg, Florida. 28 pages.

FA 31 (3) 1978 ($5.-)
Almy, Marion M. The Archaeological Potential of
Soil Survey Reports. pp. 75-91.
Bullen, Ripley P. Pre-Columbian Trade in Eastern
United States as Viewed from Florida. pp. 92-106.
Stockdale, Mabel K. and Sally E. Bryenton Indian
Plant Foods of the Florida Panhandle. pp.
109-116.
Goodwin, Larry, Jolee Pearson, and John Fioroni -
Salvage Excavations at the Brothers Site,
Sarasota County, Florida. pp. 117-127.
Purdy, Barbara A. A Progress Report on the Florida
Wooden Artifact Project. pp. 128-129.


TESAR









FA 31 (4, Part 1) 1978 ($5.-)
Milanich, Jerald T. Indians of North Central
Florida. pp. 131-140.
Hemmings, E. Thomas Cades Pond Subsistence,
Settlement, and Cermonialism. pp. 141-150.
Milanich, Jerald T. Two Cades Pond Sites in
North-Central Florida-The Occupational Nexus as
a Model of Settlement. pp. 151-173.

FASP No. 10/FA 31 (4, Part 2) 1978 ($7.-)
Jahn, Otto L. and Ripley P. Bullen The Tick Island
Site, St. Johns River, Florida. 25 pages, plus
60 figures.

FA 32 (1) 1979 ($5.-)
Kohler, Tim A. Corn, Indians, and Spaniards in
North-Central Florida: A Technique for
Measuring Evolutionary Changes in Corn. pp.
1-7.
Posey, Darrell A. Social Name and Mixed-Blood
Places: The Freejacks of the Fifth Ward
Settlement, Louisiana. pp. 8-16.
Williams, Wilma B. and Bert Mowers Bishops Hammock,
Broward County, Florida. pp. 17-32.

FA 32 (2) 1979 ($5.-)
Luer, George M. and Marion H. Almy Three Aboriginal
Shell Middens on Longboat Key, Florida:
Manasota Period Sites of Barrier Island
Exploitation. pp. 34-45.
Covington, James W. The Seminoles and Selective
Service in World War II. pp. 46-51.
Stewart, Marilyn C. Subsistence in the St. John's
Region: The Alderman Site. pp. 52-74.
Fradkin, Arlene Faunal Remains from the Alderman
Site, Volusia County, Florida. pp. 75-83.

FA 32 (3) 1979 ($5.-)
Brooks, Mark J., D.J. Colquhoun, Richard R. Pardi,
Walter Newman, and W.J. Abbott Preliminary
Archaeological and Geological Evidence for
Holocene Sea Level Fluctuations in the Lower
Cooper River Valley, S.C. pp. 85-103.
Purdy, Barbara A. An Evaluation of Wet Site
Resources of Florida. pp. 104-113.
Dreves, Arthur F. An Aboriginal Canoe from Lake
Apopka, Florida. pp. 114-121.
Wallace, Ronald L. and Susan Jacquith Determination
of Site Functions through the Analysis of
Modified Bone. pp. 122-127.

FA 32 (4) 1979 ($5.-)
Reiger, John F. The Making of Aboriginal Shell
Tools: Clues from South Florida. pp. 130-138.
Dilworth, Anne L. Aboriginal Pipes of the Northern
Gulf Coast. pp. 139-146.
Atkins, Stephen C., Compiler A Content Listing of
the Publications of The Florida Anthropological
Society, 1948-1949. pp. 147-155.

FA 33 (1) 1980 ($5.-)
Miller, James J. Coquina Middens on the Florida
East Coast. pp. 2-16.
Austin, Daniel F. Historically Important Plants of
Southeastern Florida. pp. 17-31.
Bonath, Shawn Archaeological Research Strategy for
the Granada Site. pp. 32-44.

FA 33 (2) 1980 ($5.-)
Downs, Dorothy British Influence on Creek and
Seminole Men's Clothing 1733-1858. pp. 46-65.
Carr, Robert S. and John F. Reiger Strombus Celt
Caches of Southeast Florida. pp. 66-74.
Ball, Donald B., Reviewer Koster: Americans in
Search of Their Prehistoric Past. pp. 75-78.

FA 33 (3) 1980 (S5.-)
(Proceedings of the Second Bahamas Conference on
Archeology).
Cranberry, Julian A Brief History of Bahamian
Archaeology. pp. 83-93.


(37(3), 1984)


Rouse, Irving The Concept of Series in Bahamian
Archaeology. pp. 94-98.
Carbone, Victor A. The Paleoecology of the
Caribbean Area. pp. 99-119.
Sullivan, Shaun D. An Overview of the 1976 to 1978
Archaeological Investigations in the Caicos
Islands. pp. 120-142.
Daggett, Richard E. The Trade Process and the
Implications of Trade in the Bahamas. pp.
143-151.
Glazier, Stephen D. Aboriginal Trinidad in the
Sixteenth Century. pp. 151-159.

FA 33 (4) 1980 ($5.-)
Carr, Robert S. Florida Anthropologist Interview
with Calvin Jones: Part I. pp. 161-171.
Brose, David S. and Duncan C. Wilkie A Fort Walton
Campsite (8Ja20l) at the Scholz Steam Plant
Parking Lot, Jackson County, Florida. pp.
172-206.
Luer, George M. and Marion M. Almy The Development
of Some Aboriginal Pottery of the Central
Peninsular Gulf Coast of Florida. pp. 207-225.
Griffin, John W., Reviewer Florida Archaeology by
Jerald T. Milanich and Charles H. Fairbanks.
pp. 226-229.

FA 34 (1) 1981 ($5.-)
Apalachee Anthropological Society The Reagan
Bulldozer Takes Aim at Preservation. pp. 2-3.
Reiger, John F. An Analysis of Four Types of Shell
Artifacts from South Florida. pp. 4-20.
Ritchie, Thomas, Frank Morrison and Clivia Morrison -
Salvage Excavations of the Patrician Shell
Mound. pp. 21-37.

FA 34 (2) 1981 ($5.-)
Beriault, John, Robert Carr, Jerry Stipp, Richard
Johnson and Jack Meeder The Archeological
Salvage of the Bay West Site, Collier County,
Florida. pp. 39-58.
Wharton, Barry R., George R. Ballo, and Mitchell E.
Hope The Republic Groves Site, Hardee County,
Florida. pp. 59-80.
Carr, Robert S. Florida Anthropologist Interview
with Calvin Jones, Part II: Excavations of an
Archaic Cemetery in Cocoa Beach, Florida. pp.
81-89.
Purdy, Barbara A. Investigations Into the Use of
Chert Outcrops by Prehistoric Floridians: The
Container Corporation of America Site. pp.
90-108.
Chance, Marsha A. Whetherington Island: An Archaic
Lithic Procurement Site in Hillsborough County.
pp. 109-119.
Smith, Brent W. The Late Archaic-Poverty Point
Steatite Trade Network in the Lower Mississippi
Valley: Some Preliminary Observations. pp.
120-125.

FA 34 (3) 1981 ($5.-)
Luer, George M. and Marion M. Almy Temple Mounds of
the Tampa Bay Area. pp. 127-155.
King, John M. A Qualitative field Method for
Determining the Presence of Phosphorus in Soils.
pp. 156.163.
Wilder, Leon W. A Unidentified Shell Artifact from
Grenada, West Indies. p. 164.

FA 34 (4) 1981 ($5.-)
Dunbar, James S. The Kaskaskia Projectile Point: A
Seminole Indian Metal Arrow Point Type Recently
Recognized in Florida. pp. 166-168.
Kersey, Harry A., Jr. The Seminole Negroes of
Andros Island Revisited: Some New Pieces to an
Old-Puzzle. pp. 169-176.
Piper array and Jacquelyn Piper Suary Interim
Report of Excavations at the Quad Block Site
(8iH998), Tampa, Florida. pp. 177-178.
Carr, Robert S. The Brickell Store and Seminole
Indian Trade. pp. 180-199.


133


THE FLORIDA ANTHROPOLOGIST






OVERVIEW AND INDEX OF FAS PUBLICATIONS


West, Patsy The Miami Indian Tourist Attractions:
A History and Analysis of a Transitional
Mikasuki Seminole Environment. pp. 200-224.
Downs, Dorothy Coppinger's Tropical Gardens: The
First Commerical Indian Village in Florida. pp.
225-231.
Covington, James W. The Seminoles and the Civilian
Conservation Corps. pp. 232-237.
Ammidown, Margot The Seminole Tribe, Inc.: Winning
and Losing at the White Man's Game. pp. 238-242.


FA 35 (1) 1982 ($5.-)
Crook, Morgan R., Jr. Mitigation Excavations at the
Chestatee Site, North Georgia. pp. 3-33.
Luer, George M., and Almy, Marion M. A Definition
of the Manasota Culture. pp. 34-58.
Jones, B. Calvin and Louis D. Tesar An Update on
the Highway Salvage Program in Florida. pp.
59-62.


FA 35 (2) 1982 (S5.-,
Carr, Robert S. An Interview with Elizabeth S.
Wing. pp. 65-75.
Keegan, William F. A Biological Introduction to the
Prehistoric Procurement of the Strombus gigas.
pp. 76-88.
Hirschhorn, Howard H. The Salvage of John M.
Goggin's Panamanian Collection: A Personal
Tribute. pp. 89-90.


FA 35 (3) 1982 ($5.-)
Gluckman, Stephen J. Underwater Sites in South
Florida: A Preliminary Predictive Model. pp.
93-99.
Baker, Henry The Archeology of Indian Key: An
Overview. pp. 100-104.
Carr, Robert S. The Archaeology of the Florida
Keys: An Interview with Irving Eyster. pp.
105-114.
Carr, Robert S. A Stone "Pendant" from Key Largo.
pp. 115-117.
Williams, Wilma B. and Bert Mowers Archaeological
Excavations at the Rolling Oaks II Site, Broward
County. pp. 118-126.


FA 35 (4) 1982 OUT OF PRINT
(Bahamas Conference on Archeology)
Rose, Richard The Pigeon Creek Site, San Salvador,
Bahamas., pp. 129-145.
Keegan, William F. Lucayan Fishing Practices: An
Experimental Approach. pp. 146-161.
Olson, Storrs L. Biological Archeology in the West
Indies. pp. 162-168.
Rouse, Irving The Olsen Collection from Ile A
Vache, Haiti. pp. 169-185.
Moore, Clark Investigation of Preceramic Sites on
Ile A Vache, Haiti. pp. 186-199.
Carr, Robert S. and Sandra Riley An Effigy Ceramic
Bottle from Green Turtle Cay, Abaco. pp. 200-202.
Durlacher-Wolper, Ruth G. Columbus' Landfall and
the Indian Settlements of San Salvador. pp.
203-207.
Glazier, Stephen D. The St. Joseph and Mayo
Collections from Trinidad, West Indies. pp.
208-215.
Gerace, Kathy Three Loyalist Plantations on San
Salvador Island, Bahamas. pp. 216-222.
Watters, David R. and Desmond V. Nicholson Highland
House, Barbuda: An 18th Century Retreat. pp.
223-242.
Pulsipher, Lydian Pihelic Resource Management
Strategies on an Eighteenth Century Sugar
Plantation: Interpreting the Archaeological and
Archival Records. pp. 243-250.
Goodwin, Conrad M. Archaeology on the Galways
Plantation. pp. 251-258.


FA 36 (1-2) 1983 ($10.-)
(Paleo-Indian Issue)
Carbone, Victor A. Late Quaternary Environments in
Florida and the Southeast. pp. 3-17.
Dunbar, James S. and Ben I Waller A Distribution
Analysis of the Clovis/Suwannee Paleo-Indian
Sites of Florida-A Geographic Approach. pp.
18-30.
Anonymous Florida Anthropologist Interview with Ben
Waller. pp. 31-39.
Goodyear, Albert C., Sam B. Upchurch, Mark J. Brooks,
and Nancy N. Goodyear Paleo-Indian
Manifestations in the Tampa Bay Region, Florida.
pp. 40-66.
Daniel, Randy and Michael Wisenbaker A Preliminary
Report on the Excavations at Harney Flats,
Hillsborough County. pp. 67-80.
Webb, S. David, Jerald T. Milanich, Rober Alexon, and
James Dunbar An Extinct Bison Kill Site,
Jefferson County, Florida. pp. 81-82.
Hoffman, Charles A. A Mammoth Kill Site in the
Silver Springs Run. pp. 83-87.
Serbousek, Don Explorations of a Paleo-Indian site
on the Aucilla River. pp. 88-97.
Hazeltine, Dan A Late Paleo-Indian Site, Cape Haze
Peninsula, Charlotte County, Florida. pp.
98-100.
Clayton, Danny H. Unusual Marks Found on Giant Land
Tortoise Remains in Hillsborough River. pp. 101-104
Sellards, E.J. An Engraved Mammoth Tusk from Vero
Beach. p. 105.
Lien, Paul M. Amino Acid Raceminzation Dates from
Paleo-Indian Sites in Florida. pp. 106-107.

FA 36 (3-4) 1983 ($10-)
(35th Anniversary Issue)
Griffin, John W. F.A.S. Anniversary notes. pp.
110-113.
Iscan, M. Yasar and Patricia Miller-Schaivitz A
Review of physical Anthropology in The Florida
Anthropologist. pp. 114-123.
Austin, Robert J. The Cypress Creek Site: Lithic
Analysis and Site Function. pp. 124-139.
Coleman, Wesley, James McCullin and Jeanie McGuire -
A Carved Shell Pendant from Dade County,
Florida. pp. 140-141.
Williams, Wilma B. Bridge to the Past: Excavations
at the Margate-Blount Site. pp. 142-153.
Iscan, M. Yasar Skeletal Biology of the
Margate-Blount Population. pp. 154-166.
Halberstein, R.A. The Use of Medicinal Plants to
Control High Blood Pressure in the Caribbean.
pp. 167-176.
Wayne, Lucy B. The Bailey House: Interpretation of
Trash Disposal at an Urban Site. pp. 177-185.
Carr, Deborah Brownfield "Test Pit 4NE/Burial
Feature I." p. 186.
Carr, Robert S. "Ghost Village". p. 187.

FA 37 (1) 1984 ($5.-)
Allerton, David, George M. Luer and Robert S. Carr -
Ceremonial Tablets and Related Objects from
Florida. pp. 5-54.
Editorial Policy and Style Guide for The Florida
Anthropologist and Florida Anthroplogical
Society Publications. pp. 55-60.

FA 37 (2) 1984 (SS.-)
Dickinson, M.F. and G.W. Edwardson The Salt Works
of Salt Island Florida (8Lv133): A Site Survey
and Historical Perspective. pp. 63-74.
Benson, Larry and Richard Allen Preliminary
Investigations at the Hornsville Site (8Ja387)
in Jackson County, Florida. pp. 75-82.
McLellan, James Two Platform Pipes from Southern
Florida. p. 83.
Tesar, Louis D. A Guide to Surface Survey
Techniques, Artifact Recording and Curation, and
Type Collection Preparation for the Amateur
Archaeologist. pp. 84-96.


TESAR


134







THE FLORIDA ANTHROPOLOGIST


(37(3), 1984)


AUTHOR INDEX


Adams, Grey L. and William C. Lazarus
1960 Two Skulls from a Fort Walton Period Cemetery
Site (OK-35), Okaloosa County, Florida. FA
13(4):91-99.

Adams, Richard B.
1957 Investigation of a Northwest Florida Gulf Coast
Site. FA 10(3-4):50-56.

Aga-Oglu, Kamer
1955 Late Ming and Early Ch'ing Porcelain Fragments
from Archaeological Sites in Florida. FA
8(4):91-100.

Allen, Gary
1971 A Leister Point from the Itchetucknee River. FA
24(2):73-74.

Allen, Ross
1948 The Big Circle Mounds. FA 1(1-2):17-21.

Allerton, David, George M. Luer and Robert S. Carr
1984 Ceremonial Tablets and Related Objects from
Florida. FA 37(1):5-54.

Almy, Marion M.
1978 The Archaeological Potential of Soil Survey
Reports. FA 31(3):75-91.

Ammidown, Margot
1981 The Seminole Tribe, Inc.: Winning and Losing at
the White Man's Game. FA 34(4):238-242.

Anderson, Robert
1953a (Review) Red Man's America: A History of the
United States, by Ruth Murray Underhill. FA
6(2):69-72.

1953b (Review) The New Dictionary of American History,
by Michael Martin and Leonard Gelber. FA
6(2):73-75.

1953c Some Relations of Geography and Cultural
Anthropology. FA 6(4):129-137.

Anonymous
1983 Florida Anthropologist Interview with Ben
Waller. FA 36(1-2):31-39.

1984 Editorial Policy and Style Guide for The Florida
Anthropologist and Florida Anthropological
Society Publications. FA 37(1):55-60.

Apalachee Anthropological Society
1981 The Reagan Bulldozer Takes Aim at Preservation.
FA 34(1):2-3.

Armistead, W.J.
1949 An Indian Stone Saw. FA 2(3-4):47-48.

1959 An Unusual Shell Gorget from Terra Ceia Island.
FA 12(4):105-107.


Arnade, Charles W.
1963 A Discussion of Florida Anthropology from a
Historian's Point of View. FA 16(2):43-47.

Arnett, William T.
1953 Seminole Indian Clues for Contemporary House
Form in Florida. FA 6(4):145-148.

Askew, Walter H.
1968 A Unique Weeden Island Punctated Sherd from the
Bayport Burial Mound. FA 21(1):38-39.


Aten, Lawrence E.
1961 Excavation and Salvage at Starks Hammock,
Volusia County, Florida. FA 14(1-2):37-45.

Atkins, Stephen C., Compiler
1979 A Content Listing of the Publications of the
Florida Anthropological Society, 1948-1979. FA
32(4):147-155.

Atkins, Steve and Jeannie MacMahan
1967 The Zabski Site, Merritt Island, Florida. FA
20(3-4):133-145.

Austin, Daniel F.
1980 Historically Important Plants of Southeastern
Florida. FA 33(1):17-31.

Baker, Henry
1982 The Archeology of Indian Key: An Overview. PA
35(3):100-104.

Ball, Donald B., Reviewer
1980 Koster: Americans in Search of Their
Prehistoric Past. FA 33(2):75-78.

Bartlett, Marion C.
1964 Collections from Disturbed Sites on 1R-75 in
Alachua and Marion Counties. FA 17(4):201-214.

Benson, Carl A.
1956 Test Results at the Paw Paw Mound, Brevard
County, Florida. FA 9(2):61-65.

1959 Some Pottery Contributions to Early Fabric
Techniques. FA 12(3):65-70.

1967a The Philip Mound: A Historic Site. FA
20(3-4):118-132.

1967b A Unique Wood Carving from Tick Island. FA
20(3-4:178-180.

Benson, Carl A. and Howard Bruce Green, II
1962 The Kimball Midden, Lake County. FA
15(4):113-114,

Benson, Larry and Richard Allen
1984 Preliminary Investigations at the Hornsville
Site (8Ja387) in Jackson County, Florida. FA
37(2):75-82.

Beriault, John, Robert Carr, Jerry Stipp, Richard Johnson
and Jack Meeder
1981 The Archaeological Salvage of the Bay West Site,
Collier County, Florida. FA 34(2):39-58.

Black, Dale A.
1971 An Extremely Long Celt. FA 24(1):44.

Bonath, Shawn
1980 Archaeological Research Strategy for the Granada
Site. FA 33(1):32-44.


Bostwich, John A.
1977 The Use of Ceramics in the Construction of the
Castillo de San Marcos. FA 30(1):9-13.

Boyd, Mark F.
1958 Horatio S. Dexter and Events Leading to the
Treaty of Moultrie Creek with the Seminole
Indians. FA 11(3):65-95.


Brandt, Deborah
1972 Panamanian Duhos. FA 25(3):109-116.


135






OVERVIEW AND INDEX OF FAS PUBLICATIONS


Brooks, Mark J., D.J. Coloquhoun, Richard P. Pardi, Walter
Newman and W.H. Abbott.
1979 Preliminary Archaeological and Geological
Evidence for Holocene Sea Level Fluctuations in
the Lower Cooper River Valley, S.C. FA
32(3):85-103.

Brooks, Marvin J., Jr.
1956 Excavations at Grossman Hammock, Dade County,
Florida. PA 9(2):37-46.

Brose, David S. and Duncan C. Wilkie
1980 A Fort Walton Campsite (8Ja201) at the Scholz
Steam Plant Parking lot, Jackson County, Floria.
FA 33(4):172-206.

Bryant, William J.
1955 Program in Spain, William L. Bryant
Archaeological Foundation. FA 8(2):33-41.

Bullen, Adelaide K.
1952 Some Problems in the Practical Application of
Somatotyping. FA 5(1-2):17-20.

1972 Paleoepidemiology and Distribution of
Prehistoric Treponemiasis (Syphilis) in Florida.
FA 25(4):133-174.

Bullen, Adelaide K. and Ripley P. Bullen
1953 The Battery Point Site, Bayport, Hernando
County, Florida. FA 6(3):85-92.

1954 Further Notes on the Battery Point Site,
Bayport, Hernando County, Florida. PA 7(3):
103-108.

1961a The Summer Haven Site, St. Johns County,
Florida. FA 14(1-2):1-15.

1961b Wash Island in Crystal River. FA 14(3-4):69-73.

1963 The Wash Island Site. Crystal River, Florida.
FA 16(3):81-92.

Bullen, Ripley, P.
1949a Indian Sites at Florida Caverns State Park. FA
2(1-2):1-9.

1949b The Woodward Site. FA 2(3-4):49-64.

1950a Tests at the Whittaker Site, Sarasota, Florida.
FA3(l-2):21-30.

1950b Perico Island: 1950. FA 3(3-4):40-44.

1951a The Card Site, Homosassa Springs, Florida. FA
4(1-2):27-31.

1951b (Review) Excavations at Kolomoki, Season 1-1948
by William H. Sears. FA 4(1-2):32-34.

1951c S.T. Walker, An Early Florida Archeologist; FA
4(3-4):46-49.

1951d (Review) Excavations at Kolomoki, Season
11-1950 by William H. Sears. FA 4(3-4):76.

1951e The Terra Ceia Site, Manatee County, Florida.
FASP No. 3, 48 pages, 7 plates.

1953a The Famous Crystal River Site. FA 6(1):9-37.

1953b Excavations at Manatee Springs, Florida. PA
6(2):53-68.

1954a A Unique St. Johns Punctated Vessel. PA
7(2):72-73.

1954b The Davis Mound, Hardee County, Florida. FA
(3):97-102.


1955a Stratigraphic Tests at Bluffton, Volusia County,
Florida. FA 8(1):1-16.

1955b Carved Owl Totem, DeLand, Florida. FA
8(3):61-73.

1956 Some Florida Radiocarbon Dates and Their
Significance. FA 9(2):31-36.

1957 The Barnhill Mound, Palm Beach County, Florida.
FA 10(1-2):23-36.

1958a More Florida Radiocarbon Dates and Their
Significance. FA 11(4):97-110.

1958b A Unique Vessel from Murphy Island, Putnam
County, Florida. FA 11(4):125-127.

1959 What Was It? FA 12(3):75-76.

1962a A Human Head Adorno From the Vance Site. FA
15(1):11-12.

1962b Suwannee Points in the Simpson Collection. FA
15(3):83-88.

1962c Perforated Deer Phalanges in the Simpson
Collection. FA 15(4):111-112.

1963 Shell Pendants in the Simpson Collection. PA
16(2):63-64.

1967 A Florida Folsom (7) Point. FA 20(1-2):2.

1968a Unfinished Bolen Points from Hillsborough
County. FA 21(1)234-35.


1968b A Silver Ornament from St. Cloud, Florida. FA
21(1):36-38.

1968c Beveled Stemmed Points from Tampa Bay. PA
22(2-3):89-90.

1968d A Composite Bone Fishhook. FA 21(4):124.

1969 A Clovis Fluted Point from the Santa Fe River,
Florida. FA 22(1-4):36.

1970 Regionalism in Florida During the Christian Era.
FA 23(2):52-61.
1971 The Sarasota County Mound, Englewood, Florida.
FA 24(1):1-30.

1972 A Stone Bird Head Plummet from Kissimmee,
Florida. FA 25(2, Part 1):92.

1974a The Origins of the Gulf Tradition as seen from
Florida. FA 27(2):77-88.

1974b Were there Pre-Columbian Cultural Contacts
Between Florida and the West Indies: The
Archaeological Evidence. FA 27(4):149-160.

1975a Suwannee-like Points from Southwestern Georgia.
FA 28(2):52.

1975b Implications from some Florida Deposits and
their Archaeological Contents. PA 28(2)t73-84.

1976 Some Thoughts on Florida Projectile Points. FA
29(1) 33-38.

1978 Pre-Columbian Trade in Eastern United States as
Viewed from Florida. FA 31(3):92-108.

Bullen, Ripley P. and Walter Askew
1965 Tests at the Askew Site, Citrus County, Florida.
FA 18(4):218-220.


TESAR


136







137


THE FLORIDA ANTHROPOLOGIST


Bullen, Ripley P., Walter Askew, Lee M. Feder, and Richard
L. McDonnell
1978 The Canton Street Site, St. Petersburg, Florida.
FASP No.9/FA 31(2, Part 2). 28 pages.

Bullen, Ripley P. and Laurence E. Bellman
1973 The Nalcrest Site, Lake Weohyakapa, Florida. FA
26(1):1-22.

Bullen, Ripley P. and Carl A. Benson
1964 Dixie Lime Caves Numbers 1 and 2, A Preliminary
Report. FA 17(3):153-164.

1967 Cut Wolf Jaws from Tick Island, Florida. FA
20(3-4):175-177.

Bullen, Ripley P. and Adelaide K. Bullen
1963 The Lemon Bay School Mound. FA 16(2):51-56.

1974a Further Notes on the West Bay Site. FA
27(3):119.

1974b Stone Mortars in Florida. FA 27(4):169-170.

1976 The Palmer Site. FASP No. 8/FA 29(2, Part 2).
55 pages, plus 23 plates.

Bullen, Ripley P., Adelaide K. Bullen and Carl J. Clausen
1968 The Cato Site near Sebastian Inlet, Florida. FA
21(1):14-16.

Bullen, Ripley P. and Edward M. Dolan
1959 The Johnson Lake Site, Marion County, Florida.
FA 12(4):77-94.

1960 Shell Mound, Levy County, Florida. FA
13(1):17-23.

Bullen, Ripley P. and H. Bruce Greene
1970 Stratigraphic Tests at Stalling's Island,
Georgia. FA 23(1):8-28.
Bullen, Ripley P. and John W. Griffin
1952 An Archaeological Survey of Amelia Island,
Florida. FA 5(3-4):37-64.

Bullen, Ripley P. and D.D. Laxson
1954 Some Incised Pottery from Cuba and Florida. FA
7(1) :23-25.

Bullen, Ripley P., Otto Jahn and Mark J. Brooks
1974 Some Tests at the Zellwood Site, Lake Apopka,
Florida. FA 27(2):62-66.

Bullen, Ripley P., William L. Partridge and Donald A.
Harris
1970 The Safford Burial Mound, Tarpon Springs,
Florida. FA 23(3):81-118.

Bullen, Ripley P., Graham R. Reeder, Bonnie Bell and Blake
Whisenant
1952 The Harbor Key Site, Manatee County, Florida.
FA 5(1-2):21-33.

Bullen, Ripley P. and William M. Sackett
1958 Dates of Busycon Gouges'at the Bluffton Site,
Florida. Fa 11(4):111-113.

Bullen, Ripley P. and James B. Stoltman, Editors
1972 Fiber-Tempered Pottery in Southeastern United
States and Northern Columbia: Its Origins,
Context, and Significane. FASP No. 6/FA 25(2,
Part 2). 72 pages.

Bullen, Ripley P. and M.T. Wallace
1972 An Engraving Tool. FA 25(3):131-132.

Bullen, Ripley P. and Marjorie Winz
1968 A Scraper with Graver Spurs from Florida. FA
21(2-3):94-95.


(37(3), 1984)


Bunn, Jennings W., Jr.
1971 Excavation of a Deptford Midden Burial, Destin,
Florida. FA 24(4):169-172.

1974 Clay Balls: Ceremonial or Utilitarian? FA
27(1):47-48.

Bushnell, Francis F.
1960 The Harris Creek Site, Tick Island, Volusia
County. FA 13(1):25-31.

Bushnell, Frank
1962 The Maximo Point Site. FA 15(4):89-101.

1963 A Duck Effigy from Lundgren Island, Astor,
Florida. FA 16(1):1-2.

1966 A Preliminary Excavation of the Narvaez Midden.
FA 19(2-3):115-124.

Cabeen, Paul and Grace Cabeen
1955 The Horseshoe Island Site, Lake County, Florida.
FA 8(1):23-25.

Campbell, Robert G.
1968 Dating Prehistoric Rock Art of Southeastern
Colorado. FA 21(1):1-7.

Campbell, T.N.
1959 Choctaw Subsistence: Ethnographic Notes from
the Lincecum Manuscript. FA 12(1):9-24.

Capron, Louis
1956 Notes on the Hunting Dance of the Cow Creek
Seminole. FA 9(3-4):67-78.

Carbone, Victor A.
1980 The Paleoecology of the Caribbean Area. FA
33(3) :99-119.

1983 Late Quaternary Environments in Florida and the
Southeast. FA 36(1-2):3-17.

Carlson, Charlie, Jr.
1961 The Marshall Bluff Site. FA 14 (3-4):81-83.

Carr, Deborah Brownfield
1983 "Test Pit 4NE/Burial Features I." FA
36(3-4):186.

Carr, Robert S.
1980 Florida Anthropologist Interview with Calvin
Jones: Part 1. FA 33(4):161-171.

1981a Florida Anthropologist Interview with Calvin
Jones: Part II: Excavations of an Archaic
Cemetery in Cocoa Beach, Florida. FA
34(2):81-89.

1981b The Brickell Store and Seminole Indian Trade.
PA 34(4):180-199.

1982a An Interview with Elizabeth S. Wing. FA
35(2):65-75.

1982b The Archaeology of the Florida Keys: An
Interview with Irving Eyster. FA 35(3):105-114.

1982c A Stone "Pendant" from Key Largo. FA
35(3):115-117.

1983 "Ghost Village". Pa 36(3-4):187.

Carr, Robert S. and John F. Reiger
1980 Strombus Celt Caches of Southeast Florida. FA
33(2):66-74.

Carr, Robert S. and Sandra Riley
1982 An Effigy Ceramic Bottle from Green Turtle Cay,
Abaco. FA 35(4):200-202.






OVERVIEW AND INDEX OF FAS PUBLICATIONS


Carter, William E., Reviewer
1966 Culture in An Education, by Ruth Landes. FA
19(4)141-142.

Chance, Marsha A.
1981 Whetherington Island: An Archaic Lithic
Procurement Site in Hillsborough County. PA
34(2):109-119.

Charlton, Thomas H.
1968 Post-Conquest Aztec Ceramics: Implications for
Archaeological Interpretation. FA 21(4):96-101.

Chase, David W.
1966 A Stratified Archaic Site in Lowndes County,
Alabama. FA 19(2-3):91-114.

Clausen, Carl J.
1966 The Proton Magnetometer. FA 19(2-3):77-84.

1969 Utilization of Bear Grass in Rural North
Florida. FA 21(4):35.

Clausen, Carl J., H.K. Brooks, and A.B. Wesolowsky
1975 Florida Springs Confirmed as 10,000 Year Old
Early Man Site. FASP No. 7/FA 28(3, Part 2).
38 pages.

Clayton, Danny H.
1983 Unusual Marks Found on Giant Land Tortoise
Remains in Hillsborough River. FA
36(1-2):101-104.

Coates, Gordon C.
1955 Recent Tests at the Battery Point Site, Bayport,
Hernando County, Florida. FA 8(1):27-30.

Coleman, Wesley P.
1971 Carved Bone Artifacts from Dade County. FA
24(2):75-76.

1972a Site DA-140 in Dade County, Florida. FA 25(2,
Part 1):77-80.

1972b Artifacts frm the Trail Site, Dade County,
Florida. FA 25(3):107-108.

1973 Site DA-141, Dade County, Florida.
FA26(3):126-128.

Covington, James W.
1960 English Gifts to the Indians. Fa 13(2-3):71-75.

1963 Apalachicola Seminole Leadership: 1820-1833.
FA 16(2):57-62.

1964 The Apalachee Indians Move West. FA
17(4):221-225.

1965 White Control of Seminole Leadership. PA 18(3,
Part 1):137-146.

1966 Ybor City: A Cuban Enclave in Tampa. FA
19(2-3):85-90.

1967 Some Observations Concerning the Florida-
Carolina Indian Slave Trade. FA 20(1-2):10-18.

1968a Stuart's Town, the Yamasee Indians, and Spanish
Florida. FA 21(1):8-13.

1968b A Seminole Census: 1847. FA 21(4):120-122.

1970 The Yamassee Indians in Florida: 1715-1763. PA
23(3):119-128.

1973 The Seminole Indians in 1908. FA 26(3):99-104.

1976 Dania Reservation: 1911-1927. FA 29(4):137-144.


1977 The Agreement of 1842 and its Effect upon
Seminole History. FA 31(1):8-11.

1979 The Seminoles and Selective Service in World War
II. FA 32(2):46-51.

1981 The Seminoles and the Civilian Conservation
Corps. FA 34(4):232-237.

Craig, Alan K.
1967 Some Observations on the Manufacture and
Utilization of Fishhooks Among Indians of North
America. FA 20(1-2):79-88.

Craig, Alan and David McJunkin
1971 Stranahan: Last Seminole Trader. FA
24(2):45-50.

Crook, Morgan R., Jr.
1977 Spatial Associations and Distribution of
Aggregate Village Sites in a Southeastern
Atlantic Coastal Area. FA 31(1):21-34.

1982 Mitigation Excavations at the Chestatee Site,
North Georgia. FA 35(1):3-33.

Crook, Victor
1965 Lord Raglan's Hero A Cross Cultural Critique.
FA 18(3, Part 1):147-154.

Crusoe, Donald L.
1971 A Study of Aboriginal Trade: A Petrographic
Analysis of Certain Ceramic Types from Florida
and Georgia. FA 24(l):31-43.

1973 Effects of a Wage-Earning Subsistence Pattern on
Backland Choc6, Panama. FA 26(2):57-66.

Crusoe, Donald L. and Chester B. DePratter
1976 A New Look at the Georgia Coastal Shell Midden
Archaic. FA 29(1)21-23.

Crusoe, D. (Donald) L. and J.H. Felton
1974 La Alvina De Parita: A Paleo-Indian Camp in
Panama. FA 27(4):145-148.

Cumbaa, Stephen L.
1976 A Reconsideration of Freshwater Shellfish
Exploitation in the Florida Archaic. PA 29(2,
Part 1):49-59.

Cumbaa, Stephen L. and Thomas H. Gouchnour
1970 The Colby Site, Marion County, Florida. PA
23(2):43-56.

Daggett, Richard E.
1980 The Trade Process and the Implications of Trade
in the Bahamas. FA 33(3):143-151,


Dailey, Robert C.
1967 A Remarkable Cure for Rabies Among the Plains
Indians. FA 20(1-2):19-24.

1968 Two Indian Crania From Peru. FA 21(4):124-125.

Daniel, Randy and Michael Wisenbaker
1983 A Preliminary Report on the Excavation at Harney
Flats, Hillsborough County. FA 36(1-2)s67-80.

Deagan, Kathleen A.
1977 An Early Seminole Cane Basket. FA 30(l):28-33.


DeBoyrie Moya, Emile, Marguerita K. Krestensen and John M.
Goggin
1957 Zamia Starch in Santo Domingot A Contribution
to the Ethnobotany of the Dominican Republic.
FA 10(3-4)1tl7-40.


TESAR










Dickinson, M.F. and G.W. Edwardson
1984 The Salt Works of Salt Island Florida (8Lv133):
A Site Survey and Historical Perspective. FA
37(2):63-74.

Dilworth, Anne L.
1979 Aboriginal Pipes of the Northern Gulf Coast. FA
32(4):139-146.

Downs, Dorothy
1980 British Influence on Creek and Seminole Men's
Clothing, 1733-1858. FA 33(2):46-65.

1981 Coppinger's Tropical Gardens: The First
Commerical Indian Village in Florida. FA
34(4):225-231.

Dreves, Arthur F.
1979 An Aboriginal Canoe from Lake Apopka, Florida.
FA 32(3):114-121.

Dreves, Rick
1974 Archaeological Investigation of 8-OR-17: An
Early Aboriginal Campsite, Lake Apopka, Florida.
FA 27(2):67-76.

DuBois, Bessie Wilson
1957 Celt and Pendant from Jupiter Inlet Mound. FA
10(3-4):15-16.

Dunbar, James S.
1981 The Kaskaskia Projectile Point: A Seminole
Indian Metal Arrow Point Type Recently
Recognized in Florida. FA 34(4):166-168.

Dunbar, James S. and Ben I. Waller
1983 A Distribution Analysis of the Clovis/Suwannee
Paleo-Indian Sites in Florida-A Geographic
Approach. FA 36(1-2):18-30.

Dunton, John W.N.
1964 The Conservation of Excavated Metals in the
Small Laboratory. FA 17(2):37-43.

Durlacher-Wolper Ruth G.
1982 Columbus' Landfall and the Indian Settlements of
San Salvador. FA 35(4):203-207.

Dyer, Donald R.
1953 A Geographic Interpretation of Civilizations in
Tropical America. FA 6(4):123-128.

Eaton, John W.
1962a Pipe Stem Dating and the Date for Silver Bluff,
S.C. FA 15(2):57-62.

1962b The Preservation of Wood by the Alum Process.
FA 15(4):115-117.

Fairbanks, Charles H.
1958a Some Problems of the Origin of Creek Pottery.
FA 11(2):53-64.

1958b Obituary, John R. Swanton: 1873-1958. FA
11(3):96.

1958c (Editor) Florida Anthropology: Summary and
Comments. FASP No. 5. pp. 61-70.

1958d Archaeological Bibliography, 1949-1957. FASP
No.5. pp. 71-81.

1959 Additional Elliot's Point Complex Sites. FA
12(4):95-100.

1962a The Contribution of the Amateur. FA
15(1):13-20.

1962b Excavations at Horseshoe Bend, Alabama. FA
15(2):41-56.


(37(3), 1984)


1962C A Colono-Indian Ware Milk Pitcher.
PA 15(4):103-106.

1964a Underwater Historic Sites on St. Marks River.
FA 17(2):44-48.

1964b The Trail Ethnohistory Project at the University
of Florida. FA 17(2):110-112.

1965a Proposed Antiquities Law. FA 18(2):63-64.

1965b Florida's New Antiquities Law. FA
18(3):155-160.

1966 (Reviewer)-An Introduction to American
Archaeology, by Gordon R. Willey. FA 19(4):155.

1968 Florida Coin Beads. FA 21(4):102-105.

Fearney, Edward M.
1953 Building in Florida. FA 6(4):139-144.

Ferguson, George R.
1976 The Weekiwachee Site, Hernando County, Florida.
FA 29(2, Part 1):69-83.

Ferguson, George R. and Wilfred T. Neill
1977 The Age of the Santa Fe Projectile Point Type.
FA 30(l):18-21.

Foley, Vincent P.
1965a Historic Sites Investigations in Bethlehem,
Pennsylvania. FA 18(3, Part 2):61-64.

1965b Another Method for the Treatment of Ferrous
Artifacts. FA 18 (3, Part2):65-68.

Fontana, Bernard L.
1965 The Tale of a Nail: On the Ethnological
Interpretation of Historic Artifacts. FA 18(3,
Part 2):85-102.

Fornard, Robert J.
1974 A Conecuh River Site (Cv.30), Alabama. FA
27(1):9-20.

Fradkin, Arlene
1975 Christian Science: A Religion and a Way of
Life. FA 28(3, Part 1):117-172.

1978 Archeologicl Evidence of Snake Consumption
Among the Aborigines of Florida. FA 31 (2, Part
1):36-43.

1979 Faunal Remains from the Alderman Site, Volusia
County, Florida. FA 32(2):75-83.

Fradkin, Arlene and Jerald T. Milanich
1977 Salvage Excavation at the Law School Hound,
Alachua County, Florida. FA 30(4):166-178.

Freeman, Ethel Cutler
1961 The Happy Life in the City of Ghosts: An
Analysis of a Mikasuki Myth. FA 14(1-2):23-26.

1964 The Least Known of the Five Civilized Tribes,
the Seminole of Oklahoma. FA 17(2):139-152.

1967 An Early Mikasuki Mortar. FA 20(1-2)89-91.

Furey, John F.
1977 An Analysis of Shark Tooth Tools from the Boca
Weir Site in South Florida. FA 30(3):89-102.

Gagliano, Sherwood M.
1963 A Survey of Preceramic Occupations in Portions
of South Louisiana and South Mississippi. FA
16(4) :105-132.

1967 Kirk Serrated: An Early Archaic Index Point in
Louisiana. FA 20(1-2):3-9.


139


THE FLORIDA ANTHROPOLOGIST






OVERVIEW AND INDEX OF FAS PUBLICATIONS


Gallagher, John C. and Lyman O. Warren
1975 The Bay Pines Site, Pinellas County, Florida.
PA 28(3, Part 1):96-116.

Gamble, Roger and Lyman Warren
1966 Possible Stylized Hand Motif, Incised in Bone,
Narvaez Midden, Safety Harbor Period, Saint
Petersburg. PA 19(4):154.

Gardner, William M.
1966 The Waddells Mill Pond Site. FA 19(2-3):43-64.

1968 An Example of the Association of Archaeological
Complexes with Tribal and Linguistic Grouping:
The Fort Walton Complex of Northwest Florida.
PA 22(1-4):1-11.

Gerace, Kathy
1982 Three Loyalist Plantations on San Salvador
Island, Bahamas. FA 35(4):216-222.

Glazier, Stephen D.
1980 Aboriginal Trinidad in the Sixteenth Century.
FA 33(3):151-159.

1982 The St. Joseph and Mayo Collections from
Trinidad, West Indies. FA 35(4):208-215.

Gluckman, Stephen J.
1982 Underwater Sites in South Florida: A
Preliminary Predictive Model. FA 35(3):93-99.

Gluckman, Stephen J. and Christopher S. Peebles
1974 Oven Hill (Di-15), A Refuge Site in the Suwannee
River. FA 27(1):21-30.

Goggin, John M.
1948 A Revised Temporal Chart of Florida Archaeology.
FA 1(3-4):57-60.

1949a A Southern Cult Specimen from Florida. FA
2(1-2):36-37.

1949b Cultural Occupation at Goodland Point, Florida.
FA 2(3-4):65-91.

1950a Florida Archeology:1950. FA 3(1-2):9-20.

1950b The Snapper Creek Site. FA 3(3-4):50-64.

1951a Beaded Shoulder Pouches of the Florida Seminole.
FA 4(1-2):3-17.

1951b Archeological Notes in Lower Fisheating Creek.
PA 4(3-4):50-66.

1951c (Review) A Survey of Indian River Archeology,
Florida By Irving Rouse; Chronology at South
Indian Field, Florida by Vera Masius Ferguson.
FA 4(3-4):77-78.

1954 Historic Metal Plummet Pendants. FA 7(1):27.

Goggin, John M., Mary E. Godwin, Earl Hester, David
Prange, and Robert Spangenberg
1949 An Historic Indian Burial, Alachua County,
Florida. FA 2(1-2):10-25.

Goodwin, Conrad M.
1982 Archaeology on the Galways Plantation. FA
35(4):251-258.

Goodwin, Larry, Jolee Pearson, and John Fioroni
1978 Salvage Excavations at the Brothers Site,
Sarasota County, Florida. FA 31(3):117-127.

Goodyear, Albert C.
1968a A Human Effigy from Levy 2, Cedar Keys, Florida.
FA 21(1):35.


140


1968b Pinellas Point: A Possible Site of Continuous
Indian Habitation. FA 21(2-3):74-82.

1969 A Deptford Vessel from Pinellas County, Florida.
FA 22(1-4):34.

1973 Archaic Hafted Spokeshaves with Graver Spurs
from the Southeast. PA 26(1):39-44.

Goodyear, Albert C., William Thompson, and Lyman 0. Warren
1968 Suwannee Style End Scrapers from Pinellas
County. FA 21(2-3):91.

Goodyear, Albert C., Sam B. Upchurch, Mark J. Brooks, and
Nancy N. Goodyear
1983 Paleo-Indian Manifestation in the Tampa Bay
Region, Florida. FA 36(1-2):40-66.

Goodyear, Albert C. and Lyman O. Warren
1972 Further Observations on the Submarine Oyster
Shell Deposits of Tampa Bay. FA 25(2, Part
1):52-66.

Cranberry, Julian
1980 A Brief History of Bahamian Archaeology. FA
33(3):83-93.

Green, Deef and Larry Bowles
1964 Excavation of the Mormon Temple Remains at
Nauvoo, Illinois: First Season. FA
17(2):77-81.

Greenlee, Robert F.
1952 Aspects of Social Organization and Material
Culture of the Seminole of Big Cypress Swamp.
FA 5(3-4):25-31.

Gregory, Hiram A. and Clarence H. Webb
1965 European Trade Beads from Six Sites in
Natchitochee Parish, Louisiana. FA 18(3, Part
2):15-44.

Griffin, John w.
1948a Weeden Island Zoned Red. PA 1(1-2):22.

1948b An Unusual Shell Pendant. PA 1(1-2) 28.

1948c Toward Chronology in Coastal Volusia County. FA
2(3-4):49-56.

1949 Notes on the Archeology of Useppa Island. FA
2(3-4):92-93.

1952a J. Clarence Simpson: 1910-1952. FA 5(1-2):8.

1952b A Stone Spud from Florida. FA 5(3-4):36.

1957 (Editor) Some Comments on the Seminole in 1818.
(By An Anonymous Englishman). FA 10(3-4):41-49.
1980 (Reviewer) Florida Archaeology by Jerald T.
Milanich and Charles H. Fairbanks. FA
33(4):226-229.

1983 F.A.S. Anniversary Notes. FA 36(3-4):110-113.

Griffin, John W. and Ripley P. Bullen
1950 The Safety Harbor Site, Pinellas County,
Florida. FASP No. 2. 42 pages, 4 plates.

Griffin, William G.
1960 The Stetson Collection. FA 13(2-3):33-36.

Gustafson, Glenn
1963 Mulberry Hidden Test Site. FA 16(1):29-32.

Gut, H. James and Wilfred T. Neill
1953 Bone Artifacts Resembling Projectile Points,
From Prehistoric Sites in Volusia County,
Florida. FA 6(3):93-94.


TESAR






THE FLORIDA ANTHROPOLOGIST


Haag, William G.
1968 James Alfred Ford, 1911-1968. FA 21(1):31-33.

Haisten, James M.
1974 Two Crooked Creek Nonceramic Sites. FA
27(3):125-132.

Halberstein, R.A.
1983 The Use of Medicinal Plants to Control High
Blood Pressure in the Caribbean. FA
36(3-4):167-176.

Hardman, Clark, Jr.
1971 The Primitive Solar Observatory at Crystal River
and its implications. FA 24(4):135-168.

Harnett, Charles B.
1965 Preliminary Report: Discovery and Excavation
of a 17th Century Wreck off Cape Canaveral. FA
18(1):33-48.

Hazeltine, Dan
1983 A Late Paleo-Indian Site, Cape Haze Peninsula,
Charlotte County, Florida. FA 36(1-2):98-100.

Heidecker, Lorraine and Michael I. Siegel
1969 Preliminary Excavation of the Henriquez I Site,
Tanki Flip, Aruba, Netherlands Antilles. FA
22(1-4):12-16.

Hemmings, E. Thomas
1975a An Archaeological Survey of the South Prong of
the Alafia River, Florida. Fa 28(2):41-51.

1975b The Silver Springs Site, Prehistory in the
Silver Springs Valley. FA 28(4):141-158.

1978 Cades Pond Subsistence, Settlement, and
Ceremonialism. FA 31(4, Part 1):141-150.

Hemmings, E. Thomas and Don L. vonBurger
1975 An Orange Plain Vessel from Enterprise, Florida.
FA 28(1):14-16.

Henderson, Joseph N.
1977 An Anglo Sucking Cure from Rural North Florida.
FA 30(3):103-109.

Hester, Thomas Roy
1971 Loyola Beach: An Example of Aboriginal
Adaptation to the Maritime Environment of the
Lower Texas Coast. TA 24(3):91-106.

Hoffman, Charles A.
1983 A Mammoth Kill Site in the Silver Springs Run.
FA 36(1-2):83-87.

Holland, C.G.
1974 A Mid-Eighteenth Century Indian Village on the
Chattahoochee River. FA 27(1):31-46.

Holliman, Rhodes B.
1968 Bird Hammock, Mound B, Revisited. FA
21(2-3):61-66.

Howard, James H.
1959 Some Chickasaw Fetishes. FA 12(2):47-56.

Hranicky, William Jack
1972 The Thermoluminescent Method of Pottery Dating.
FA 25(2, Part 1):87-91.

Hudson, Charles
1978 "Sociosomatic" Illness. FA 31(2, Part 1):52-63.

Hudson, J. Paul
1964 Seventeenth Century Glass Excavated at
Jamestown. FA 17(2):95-103.


(37(3), 1984)


Hume, Ivor N6el
1964 Historic Archaeology in Virginia, 1961-1962. Fa
17(2):50-55.

1965a Excavations at the Amelung Glass Factory in
Maryland. FA 18(3, Part 2):2-7.

1965b An Interior Report on Excavations at Denbigh
Plantation in Virginia. Fa 18(3, Part 2)t8-14.

Hunt, Ron
1975 Problematical Stone Find. Fa 28(2):72.

Hunter, Donald G.
1973 The Settlement Pattern and Toponymy of
the Koasati Indians of Bayou Blue (Louisiana).
FA 26(2):79-88.

1975a Coushatta Basketry in the Rand Collection. Fa
28(1):27-37.

1975b Functional Analyses of Poverty Point Clay
Objects. FA 28(2):57-71.

Irwin, Carol
1959 Dating English Pipe Stems. FA 12(3):71-72.

Iscan, M. Yapar
1983 Skeletal Biology of the Margate-Blount
Population. FA 36(3-4):154-166.

Iscan, M. Yasar and Patricia Miller-Schaivitz
1984 A Review of Physical Anthropology in The Florida
Anthropologist. FA 36(3-4):114-123.

Jaffee, Howard
1976 Preliminary Report on a Midden Mound and Burial
Mound of the Boynton Mound Complex. FA
29(4):145-152.

Jahn, Otto L. and Ripley P. Bullen
1978 The Tick Island Site, St. Johns River, Florida.
FASP No. 10/FA 31(4, Part 2). 25 pages, plus 60
figures.

Jenkins, Ned J.
1975 The Wheeler Series and Southeastern Prehistory.
FA 28(1):17-26.

Johnson, Byron A.
1972 The Suwannee-Shawnee Debate. FA 25(2, Part
1):67-72.

1976 Florida Seminole Silver Work. Fa 29(3):93-104.

Jones, B. Calvin and Louis D. Tesar
1982 An Update on the Highway Salvage Program in
Florida. FA 35(1):59-62.

Jones, William M.
1973 A Late Eighteenth Century Work Camp, St. 'ohns
Bluff, Duval County, Florida. FA 26(4):129-142.

1977 A Second Spanish Period Log Water Pump, Duval
County, Florida. FA 30(3):110-120.

Karklins, Karlia
1967 European Trade Beads in Florida. FA
20(3-4):164-169.

1968 The Palm River Midden, Hillsborough County,
Florida. FA 21(3-4):67-73.

1970 The Fish Creek Site, Hillsborough County,
Florida. PA 23(2):62-80.

1974 Additional Notes on the Philip Mound, Polk
County, Florida. Fa 27(1) 1-8.






OVERVIEW AND INDEX OF FAS PUBLICATIONS


Keegan, William F.
1982a A Biological Introduction to the Prehistoric
Procurement of the Strombus gigas. FA
35(2):76-88.

1982b Lucayan Fishing Practicess An Experimental
Approach. PA 35(4):146-161.

Keel, Bennie C.
1960 The Money's Bend Site, CeV3. FA 13(1):1-6.

1961 A Radiocarbon Date for the Honey's Bend Site,
CeV3, Cherokee County, Alabama. FA
14(1-2):47-48.

1973 An Analysis of Muskogee Kinship. FA
26(2):67-78.

Kersey, Harry A., Jr.
1974 The Seminole "Uprising" of 1907. FA
27(2):49-58.

1981 The Seminole Negroes of Andros Island Revisited:
Some New Pieces to an Old Puzzle. FA
34(4):169-176.

King, John M.
1981 A Qualitative Field Method for Determining the
Presence of Phosphorus in Soils. FA
34(3):156-163.

Knight, James D.
1976 Manufacturing Techniques of Haximo Point
Microliths. FA 29(2, Part 1):84-92.

Knoderer, Charles F.
1972 The Duda Ranch Shell Mound, Brevard County,
Florida. FA 25(3):101-106.

Kohler, Tim A.
1979 Corn, Indians, and Spaniards in North-Central
Florida: A Technique for Measuring Evolutionary
Changes in Corn. FA 32(1):1-7.

Krogman, Wilton Marion
1948 The Racial Type of the Seminole Indians of
Florida and Okalhoma. FA 1(3-4):61-73.

Kuna, Ralph R.
1977 Hoodoo: The Indigenous Medicine and Psychiatry
of the Black American. FA 30(4):196-211.

Kurjack, Edward B.
1961 Clay Pipes at the Childersburg Site in Alabama.
FA 14(1-2) 21-22.

La Fond, Arthur A.
1972 A Unique Zoomorphic Effigy from the Queen
Mound-Jacksonville, Florida. FA 25(2, Part
1):81-86.

Larrabee, Edward
1964 Industrial Archaeology in Great Britain. PA
17(2):82-93.

Larson, Lewis H., Jr.
1955 Unusual Figurine from the Georgia Coast. FA
8(3):75-81.

1957 The Norman Mound, McIntosh County, Georgia. FA
10(1-2):37-52.

1958 Cultural Relationships between the Northern St.
Johns Area and the Georgia Coast. FA
11(1):11-21.

Laumer, Frank J.
1963 The Fort Dade Site. FA 16(2):33-42.


Laxson, Dan D.
1953a Stratigraphy at a Hialeah Midden. FA 6(1):1-8.

1953b Further Excavations at Hialeah, Florida FA
6(3):95-99.

1954a A Small Hialeah Midden. FA 7(3):91-96

1954b A Historic Seminole Burial in an Hialeah Midden.
FA 7(4):111-118.

1957a The Madden Site. FA 10(1-2):1-16.

1957b Three Small Dade County Sites. FA
10(1-2):17-22.

1957c The Arch Creek Site. FA 10(3-4):1-10.

1959a Excavations in Dade County During 1957. FA
12(1):1-8.

1959b Excavations in Dade and Broward County, 1958.
FA 12(2):33-40.

1959c Three Salvaged Tequesta Sites in Dade County,
Florida. FA 12(3) :57-64.

1961 Two Worked Shell Objects from a Uleta River
Shell Midden. 'FA 14(3-4):65-68.

1962 Excavation in Dade and Broward Counties:
1959-61. FA 15(1):1-10.

1964a Excavations in Southeast Florida, 1962-1963. FA
17(3):177-181.

1964b Strombus Lip Shell Tools of the Tequesta
Sub-Area. FA 17(4):215-220.

1966 The Turner River Jungle Gardens Sites. FA
19(4):125-140.

1968 The DuPont Plaza Site. FA 21(2-3):55-60.

1970 Seven Sawgrass Middens in Dade and Broward
Counties, Florida. FA 23(4):151-158.

1973 Amateur and Professional Archaeologists. FA
26(4):162-164.

Lazarus, William C.
1958 A Poverty Point Complex in Florida. FA
11(1):22-32.

1960 Human Figurines from the Coast of N.W. Florida.
FA 13(2-3):61-70.

1961a The Morrison Spring Site (WL-43) FL. FA
14(1-2):17-20.

1961b Ten Middens on the Navy Live Oak Reservation,
Santa Rosa County, Florida. FA 14(3-4):49-64.

1962 Temple Mound Museum at Ft. Walton Beach,
Florida. FA 15(3):65-70.

1963 A Potter's Tool of the Safety Harbor Period. FA
16(1):3-4.

1964a The Postl's Lake II Site, Eglin Air Force Base,
Florida. (OK-71). FA 17(1):1-16.

1964b A Sixteenth Century Spanish Coin from a Fort
Walton Burial. FA 17(2):134-138.

1965a Land Subsidence on the Gulf Coast. PA
18(1):49-58.


TESAR


142






1


(37(3), 1984)


43 THE FLORIDA ANTHROPOLOGIST


1965b Alligator Lake, A Ceramic Horizon Site on the Massey, Willi
Northwest Florida Coast. FA 18(2):83-124. 1960 (Re'
Sit
1965c Significance of Dimensions of Big Sandy I-like T.
Projectile Points in Northwest Florida. FA
18(3, Part 1):187-199. McKenzie, Dou
1965 The
1965d A Study of Dated Bricks in the Vicinity of Ala
Pensacola, Fla. FA 18(3, Part 2):69-84.
McLellan, Jame
1965e Coin Dating in the Fort Walton Period. FA 1984 Two
18(4):221-224. 37(;

Lazarus, William C. and Gerald S. Spence McMichael, Ali
1962 Pasco Series Sherds from the Bayport Mound. FA 1977 A Mc
15(4):107-110. FA

Lazarus, Yulee, W. Messing, Simon
1970 Salvage Archaeology at Fort Walton Beach, 1964 The
Florida. FA 23(1):29-42. Case

1975 Anonther Ceramic Chungke from the Florida Milanich, Jera
Panhandle. FA 28(3, Part 1):123-124. 1969 The
Wilm
Lazarus, Yulee W., and Robert J. Fornaro Flor
1975 Fort Walton Temple Mound, Futher Test
Excavations, DePaux 1973. FA 28(4):159-177. 1972 Exca
Sara
Lazarus, Yulee W., W.C. Lazarus and Donald W. Sharon
1967 The Navy Liveoak Reservation Cemetery Site, 1973 A De
8Sa36. FA 20(3-4):103-117. Isla

Lien, Paul M. 1977 A Ch
1983 Amino Acid Raceminzation Dates from Paleo-Indian Nort
Sites in Florida. PA 36(1-2):106-107. 30(3

Lien, Paul M., Ripley P. Bullen, and Clarence H. Webb 1978a Indi
1974 A Poverty Point Owl Amulet Found in Florida. FA Part
27(4):165-168. 1978b Two
Flor
Long, George Sett
1964 Excavations at Panama Vieja. FA 17(2):104-108.
Miller, James
Luer, George M. 1980 Coqu
1977a Excavations at the Old Oak Site, Sarasota, 33(1
Florida: A Late Weeden Island-Safety Harbor
Period Site. FA 30(2):37-55. Moore, Clark
1982 Inve
1977b The Roberts Bay Site, Sarasota, Florida. PA Vach
30(3):121-133.
Morgan, John R
Luer, George M. and Marion H. Almy 1973 The
1979 Three Aboriginal Shell Middens on Longboat Key, 26(3
Florida: Manasota Period Sites of Barrier
Island Exploitation. FA 32(2):34-45. Morrell, L. Ro

1980 The Development of Some Aboriginal Pottery of 1960 Oa
the Central Pensular Gulf Coast of Florida. FA 13(4
33(4):207-225. 1964 Two
FA 1
1981 Temple Mounds of the Tampa Bay Area. FAA
34(3):127-155. Morse, Dan F.
1973 Dalt
1982 A Definition of the Manasota Culture. FA 1973 Dat
35(1):34-58. 26(1
Morse, Dan F.,
MacDonald, Robert Morse, Dan F.,
1950 A New Interpretation of the Carrabell Site. FA974 A Bi
3(3-4):45-49.
Horse, Dan F.
Maples, W.R., A.B. Brown, and P.M. Hutchens o1960 A Pr
1976 Introduced Monkey Populations at Silver Springs, Site
Florida. FA 29(4):133-136. and
and
Martin, Fletcher 1964 The
1950 Two Field Trips. FA 3(3-4):35-39. Log

Mason, Carol L. 17(3
1963 Eighteenth Century Culture Change Among Lower Morse, Dan F.
Creeks. FA 16(3):65-80. 1974 A Mi!
Flor:


am C.
view) The Archeology of the Childersburg
e, Alabama by David L. DeJarnette and Asael
Hansen. FA 13(2-3):76.

glas H.
Burial Complex of the Moundville Phase,
bama. FA 18(3, Part 1):161-174.

is
Platform Pipes from Southern Florida. FA
!):83.

in E.
del For Barrier Island Settlement Pattern.
)0(4):179-195.

D.
Little Community in Applied Anthropology-A
Sin Medical Research, PA 17(3):182-186.

id T.
Alachua Tradition: Extension of
ington-Savannah Peoples into Central
ida. FA 21(4):17-23.

vations at the Yellow Bluff-Whitaker Mound,
sota, Florida. FA 25(1):21-41.

ptford Phase House Structure, Cumberland
nd, Georgia. FA 26(3):105-118.

ronology for the Aboriginal Cultures of
hern St. Simon's Island, Georgia. FA
):134-142.

ans of North-Central Florida. PA 31(4,
1):131-140.
Cades Pond Sites in North-Central
ida-TheOccupational Nexus as a Model of
element. FA 31(4, Part 1):151-173.

J.
ina Middens of the Florida East Coast. FA
):2-16.


stigation of Preceramic Sites on Ile A
e, Haiti. FA 35(4):186-199.


Parker Mound Site, Fort Walton Beach. FA
):89-98.

ss
and Mound (Je53), Florida. FA
) 101-108.

Historic Island Sites in the Coosa River.
7(2):75-76.


on Culture in Northeastern Arkansas. FA
):23-38.

G. Daniel Morse, and Daniel A. Morse
concave Pottery Discoidal from Northwest
ida. FA 27(2):59-61.

and Phyllis Morse
eliminary Report on 9-GO-507: The Williams
, Gordon County, Georgia. PA 13(4):81-91
109-114.

Brake Sites A Possible Early 19th Century
Cabin in Stewart County, Tennessee. FA
):165-176.

and Louis D. Tesar
crolithic Tool Assemblage from A Northwest
ida Site. FA 27(3):89-106.





OVERVIEW AND INDEX OF FAS PUBLICATIONS


Mowers, Bert
1972 Concentrations Associated with Glades
Prehistoric Sites. FA 25(3):129-131.

Mowers, Bert and Wilma B. Williams
1972 The Peach Camp Site, Broward County, Florida.
FA 25(1):1-20.

1974 (Preparers) Cagles Harmnock, Coral Springs Site
No. 5. FA 27(4):171-179.

Murphree, Alice H.
1965 Folk Medicine in Florida: Remedies Using Plants.
FA 18(3, Part 1):175-185.

1976 Where Has All the Deer Tongue Gone? FA 29(2,
Part 1): 64-68.

Murphree, Clyde E.
1967 The Deer Tongue Industry in Florida. FA
20(1-2):75-78.

Neill, Wilfred T.
1952a The Manufacture of Fluted Points. FA
5(1-2):9-16.

1952b Unusual Rattles from Silver Springs, Florida.
FA 5(3-4):33-35.

1953 Dugouts of the Mikasuki Seminole. FA
6(3):77-84.

1954a Artifacts from the Bluffton Midden, Volusia
County, Florida. FA 7(1)r11-17.

1954b Graters of the Mikasuki Seminole. FA 7(2)74-75.

1954c Coracles or Skin Boats of the Southeastern
Indians. FA 7(4):119-126.

1955a The Identity of Florida's "Spanish Indians." FA
8(2):43-57.

1955b The Calumet Ceremony of the Seminole Indians.
FA 8(3):83-88.

1956a Preparation of Rubber by the Florida Seminole.
FA 9(1):25-28.

1956b Sailing Vessels fo the Florida Seminole. FA
9(3-4):79-86.

1957 A Note on the Seminole Burial from Hialeah,
Florida. FA 10(3-4):11-13.

1958 A Stratified Early Site At Silver Springs,
Florida. FA 11(2):33-52.

1963 Three New Florida Projectile Point Types,
Believed Early. FA 16(4):99-104.

1964a The Association of Suwannee Points and Extinct
Animals in Florida. FA 17(1):17-32.

1964b Trilish Pond, An Early Site in Marion County,
Florida. FA 17(4):187-200.

1966a Westo Bluff, A Site of the Old Quartz Culture in
Georgia. FA 19(1):1-10.

1966b An Eden-like Projectile Point From South
Carolina. FA 19(4):143-144.

1968a The Galphin Trading Post at Silver Bluff, South
Carolina. FA 21(2-3):42-54.

1968b An Indian and Spanish Site on Tampa Bay,
Florida. FA 21(4):106-116.

1971 A Florida Paleo-Indian Implement. FA
24(2):61-70.


144


1976a The Seminole Pumpkin. FA 29(3):129-132.

1976b Ecological Data Bearing on the Age of Kirk
Serrated Points in Florida. FA 29(4):153-159.

1977 Knapping in Florida During the Historic Period.
FA 30(1):14-17.

Neill, Wilfred T. and George R. Ferguson
1976 Spanish Trade Pipes from Marion County, Florida.
FA 29(3)126-128.

Neill, Wilfred T. and James C. McKay
1968 A Supposed "Florida Folsom" Point: A
Reflutation. FA 21(4):122-124.

Neitzel, Robert S.
1964 The Natchez Grand Village. FA 17(2):63-66.

Nero, Robert
1956 The Surface Collector. FA 9(3-4):101-103.

Neuman, Robert W.
1959 Two Unrecorded Pottery Vessels from the Purcell
Landing Site, Henry County, Alabama. FA
12(4):101-104.

1961 Domesticated Corn from a Fort Walton Mound Site
in Houston County, Alabama. FA 14(3-4):75-80.

Olds, Dorris L.
1962 Some Highlights in the History of Fort St.
Marks. FA 15(2):33-40.

Olsen, Stanley J.
1962 Artillery Projectiles from the Civil War
Engagement at Newport, Florida. FA 15(1) 21-26.

1968 Examples of Colonial Spanish Hoes. FA
21(4):117-120.

Olson, Storrs L.
1982 Biological Archeology in the West Indies. FA
35(4):162-168.

Ostrander, Ozzie
1960 The Johns Pass Mound. FA 13(2-3):77-78.

Padgett, Thomas J.
1976 Hinterland Exploitation in the Central Gulf
Coast-Manatee Region During the Safety Harbor
Period. FA 29(1):39-48.

Palmer, Jay and J. Raymond Williams
1977 The Formation of Goethite and Calcareous Lenses
in Shell Middens in Florida. FA 30(1)z24-27.

Pandey, Nisha and V.X. Tandon
1976 A Comparative Study of Palmer Dermatoglyphics
on Pasi and Charmar. FA 29(2, Part 1):60-63.

Parades, J. Anthony
1978 Hurricanes and Anthropologists in Florida. FA
31(2, Part 1):44-51.

Paredes, J. Anthony and Kaye Lenihan
1973 Native American Population in the Southeastern
States: 1960-70. FA 26(2):45-56.

Partridge, William L.
1965 An Analysis of Crow Enculturation (as compared
to Sioux Enculturation) 1868 to 1880. FA
18(4):225-234.

Percy, George W.
1976 Use of a Mechanical Earth Auger at the Torreya
Site, Liberty County, Florida. FA 29(1):24-32.

Percy, George W. and M. Katherine Jones
1976 An Archaeological Survey of Upland Locales in
Gadsden and Liberty Counties, Florida. FA
29(3):105-126.


TESAR






THE FLORIDA ANTHROPOLOGIST


Phelps, David Sutton
1966 Early and Late Components of the Tucker Site.
FA 19(1):11-38.

1-968 Thom's Creek Ceramics in the Central Savannah
River Locality. FA 21(1):17-30.

Pierson, Lloyd M.
1965 Tabby Ruin Test Excavations: DeSoto National
Memorial, Florida. FA 18(2):125-136.

Piper, Harry and Jacquelyn Piper
1981 Summary Interim Report of Excavations at the
Quad Block Site (8Hi998), Tampa, Florida. FA
34(4):177-179.

Pittman, Robert H. and William D. Lipe
1972 A Prehistoric Dugout Canoe from Southeastern
North-Carolina. FA 25(1):42-44.

Plowden, William W., Jr.
1955 Archaeology on Rocky Point, Florida. FA
8(1):17-21.

Porter, Kenneth Wiggins
1951 Origins of the St. John's River Seminole: Were
They Mikasuki? FA 4(3-4):39-45.

1960 Thlonoto-sassa: A note on an Obscure Seminole
Village of The Early 1820's. FA 13(4):115-119.

Porter, Rita Krestensen
1951 An Analysis of Belle Glade Plain Rim Sherds from
Two Fisheating Creek Sites. FA 4(3-4):67-75.

Posey, Darrell A.
1979 Social Name and Mixed-Blood Places: The
Freejacks of the Fifth Ward Settlement,
Louisisana. FA 32(1):8-16.

Pulsipher, Lydia Mihelic
1982 Resource Managment Strategies on an Eighteenth
Century Sugar Plantation: Interpreting the
Archaeological and Archival Records. FA
35(4):243-250.

Purdy, Barbara A.
1973 Temporal and Spatial Distribution of Bone Points
in the State of Florida. FA 26(4):143-152.

1975 The Senator Edwards Stone Workshop, Marion
County. FA 28(4):178-189.

1977 The York Site (8-Al-480), Alachua County,
Florida: Observations on Aboriginal Use of
Chert. FA 30(1):3-8.
1978 A Progress Report on the Florida Wooden Artifact
Project. FA 31(3):128-129.

1979 An Evaluation of Wet Site Resources of Florida.
FA 32(3):104-113.

1981 Investigations Into the Use of Chert Outcrops by
Prehistoric Floridians: The Container
Corporation of America Site. FA 34(2):90-108.

Purdy, Barbara A. and Frank N. Blanchard
1973 Petrography as a Means of Tracing Stone Tools
from Florida. FA 26(3):121-125.

Recort, Peter
1975 Final Notes on the Goodman Mound. FA 28(3, Part
1):85-95.

Reichelt, David C.
1973 Clovis from Northwest Florida. FA
26(4):165-168.

1974 Microliths of South Walton County. FA
27(3):120-124.


(37(3) 1984)


1975 Paint Rocks of Northwest Florida. FA
28(4):190-191.

Reiger, John F.
1979 The Making of Aboriginal Shell Tools: Clues
from South Florida. FA 32(4):130-138.

1981 An Analysis of Four Types of Shell Artifacts
from South Florida. FA 34(1):4-20.

Reitz, Elizabeth J.
1977 Tisher Pond Mound, Ocala National Forest,
Florida. FA 31(1):12-20.

Remington, Richard R.
1977 A Spider Gorget from Levy County, Florida. FA
30(1):22-23.

Ritchie, Thomas, Frank Morrison and Clivia Morrison
1981 Salvage Excavations of the Patrician Shell
Mound. FA 34(1):21-37.

Rose, Richard
1982 The Pigeon Creek Site, San Salvador, Bahamas.
FA 35(4):129-145.

Rouse, Irving
1980 The Concept of Series in Bahamian Archaeology.
FA 33(3):94-98.

1982 The Olsen Collection from Ile A Vache, Haiti.
FA 35(4):169-185.

Schley, Robert
1959 An Aboriginal Shell Mound at Drum Point,
Alligator Harbor, Franklin County, Florida. FA
12(2):41-46.

Schmitt, Karl
1950 Two Creek Pottery Vessels from Oklahoma. FA
3(1-2):1-8.


Sears, William H.
1952 An Archaeological Manifestation of a
Natchez-type Burial Ceremony. FA 5(1-2):107.

1956a The Turner River Site, Collier County, Florida.
FA 9(2):47-60.

1956b Melton Mound Number 3. FA 9(3-4):87-100.

1958a The Maximo Point Site. FA 11(1):1-10.

1958b The Grant Site-Br56. FA 11(4):114-124

1958c Highway Salvage Archaeology. FASP No. 5. pp.
57-60.

1959 A-296-A Seminole Site in Alachua County. FA
12(1):25-30.

1960 The Bluffton Burial Mound. FA 13(2-3):55-60.

1967a The Tierra Verde Burial Mound. FA
20(1-2):25-73.

1967b Archaeological Survey in the Cape Coral Area at
the Mouth of the Caloosahatchee River. FA
20(3-4):93-102.

1971 The Weeden Island Site, St. Petersburg. FA
24(2):51-60.

Sellards, E.H.
1983 (Reprint) An Engraved Mammoth Tusk from Vero
Beach. PA 36(1-2):105.

Serbousek, Don
1983 Explorations of a Paleo-Indian Site on the
Aucilla River. FA 36(1-2):88-97.





OVERVIEW AND INDEX OF FAS PUBLICATIONS


Sharon, Donald W.
1968 A Lithic Dagger from Choctawhatchee Bay. FA
21(2-3):89.

Sharon, Donald W. and Jennings W. Bunn, Jr.
1973 A Swift Creek Midden at the Wheeler Springs
Sites, Wynnhaven Beach, Florida. FA
26(4):153-156.

Sharon, D.W. and T.C. Watson
1971 The Two Egg Quarry Site. FA 24(2):77-80.

Simpson, J. Clarence
1948 Folsom-like Points from Florida. FA
1(1-2):11-16.

Sleight, Frederick W.
1948 Man Enters America. PA 1(-2):23-27.

1949a Notes Concerning an Historic Site of Central
Florida. FA 2(1-2):26-30.

1949b Recent Discoveries of Early Man. PA
2(1-2):34-35.

1953 Kunti, A Food Staple of Florida Indians. FA
6(2):46-52.

Small, James F.
1964 An Unusual Incised Vessel. FA 17(4):231-232.

1966 Poverty Point Baked Clay Objects. FA
19(2-3):65-76.

Smith, Brent W.
1981 The Late Archaic-Poverty Point Steatite Trade
Network in the Lover Mississippi Valley: Some
Preliminary Observations. FA 34(2):120-125.

Smith, Hale G.
1948 Results of an Archaeological Investigation of a
Spanish Mission Site in Jefferson County,
Florida. FA 1(1-2):1-10.

1949 Two Archaeological Sites in Brevard County,
Florida. FASP No. 1. 32 pages, 4 plates.

1953 Development of Cultures in Nuclear America. FA
6(4):121-122.

1954 Excavations at La Finca de Dos Marias, Camaguey,
Cuba. FA 7(1):19-21.

1955 Archaeological Significance of Oriental
Porcelain in Florida Sites. FA 8(4):111-116.

1956 The European and the Indians European-Indian
Contacts in Georgia and Florida. FASP No. 4.
150 pages, Frontispiece, 6 maps.

Smith, Hale G.
1963 St. Augustine Colonial Archaeology: Florida
State University Summer Field Session, 1962. FA
16(1):9-28.

Smith, Hale G. and William Watson
1951 Experiments in Raw Materials Utilized by the
Florida Indians in Ceramic Construction. PA
4(1-2):18-26.

Smith, Samuel D.
1971 Excavations at the Hope Mound with an ADDENDUM
to the Safford Mound Report. FA 24(3):107-134.

Solien, Nancie L.
1954 A Cultural Explanation of Geophagy. FA
7(1):1-9.


South, Stanley A.
1964a Interpreting the Brunswick Town Ruins. PA
17(2):56-62.

1964b Some Notes on Bricks. FA 17(2):67-74.

1964c Analysis of the Buttons from Brunswick Town and
Fort Fisher. FA 17(2):113-133.

1965a Excavating the 18th Century Moravian Town of
Bethabara, North Carolina. FA 18(3, Part 2):45-48.

1965b Anthropomorphic Pipes from the Kiln Waster Dump
of Gottried Aust-1755 to 1771. FA 18(3, Part
2):48-60.

Spellman, Charles W.
1948 The Agriculture of the Early North Florida
Indians. FA 1(3-4):37-48.

Stewart, Marilyn C.
1979 Subsistence in the St. Johns Region: The
Alderman Site. FA 32(2):52-74.

Stockdale, Mabel K. and Sally E. Bryenton
1978 Indian Plant Foods of the Florida Panhandle. FA
31(3):109-116.

Sturtevant, William C.
1954 The Medicine Bundles and Busks of the Florida
Seminole. FA 7(2):31-70.

1956 (Presentor and Annotator) R.H. Pratt's Report on
the Seminole in 1879. FA 9(1):1-24.

1962 A Newly-Discovered 1838 Drawing of a Seminole
Dance. FA 15(3):73-82.

Sullivan, Shaun D.
1980 An Overview of the 1976 to 1978 Archeological
Investigations in the Caicos Islands. rA
33(3):120-142.

Symes, M.I. and M.E. Stephens
1965 A272: The Fox Pond Site. PA 18(2):65-76.

Tesar, Louis D.
1974 A Valiente Guaymi Cayuho (Sic, Cayuco) hauling
Junta (Panama). FA 27(4):133-144.

1984 A Guide to Surface Survey Techniques, Artifact
Recording and Curation, and Type Collection
Preparation for the Amateur Archaeologist. PA
37(2):84-96.

Thurman, Melburn D.
1977 Seminoles, Creeks, Delawares and Shawnees:
Indian Auxiliaries in the Second Seminole War.
PA 30(4):144-165.

Trager, George L. and M. Estellie Smith
1968 A Note on the Tigua Indians (Ysleta del Sur) of
Ysleta, El Paso, Texas. FA 22(1-4):30-33.

Trinkley, Michael and H. Trawick Ward
1978 The Use of Soil Science at a South Carolina
Thom's Creek Culture Shell Ring. FA 31(2, Part
1):64-73.

Tyagi, Deepak
1968 A Study of Bilateral Variation: Handedness,
Hand Clasping and Arm Folding Among Muslim of
Uttar Pradesh. FA 21(4):24-29.

Van Beck, John C. and Linda M. Van Beck
1965 The Marco Midden, Marco Island, Florida. FA
18(1):1-20.


TESAR


146





THE FLORIDA ANTHROPOLOGIST


Van Der Schalie, Henry and Paul W. Parmalee
1960 Animal Remains from the Etowah Site Mound C.,
Bartow County, Georgia. FA 13(2-3):37-54.

Verity, William E.
1966 Solo Trans-Gulf Crossing in the "Nonoalca." FA
19(4):145-153.

von Burger, D.L.
1972a A Supplemental Note on the Busycon Receptacle.
FA 25(2, Part 1):73-76.

1972b Coleman Site, Dade County, Florida. FA
25(3):97-100.

1972c Early Historical Period Canoe. FA 25(3):117-118.

1975 Carved Fossil Bone from Volusia County, Florida.
FA 28(1):38-40.

Voss, Gilbert L.
1949 An Indian Mound at Hypoluxo, Palm Beach County.
FA 2(1-2):31-33.

Walker, lain C.
1970 Dating Clay Pipes from the Galphin Trading Post
at Silver Bluff, South Carolina. FA 23(4):159-162.

Wallace, Ronald L. and Susan Jacquith
1979 Determination of Site Functions through the
Analysis of Modified Bone. FA 32(3):122-127.

Waller, Ben I.
1969 Paleo-Indian and Other Artifacts from a Florida
Stream Bed. FA 22(1-4):37-39.

1970 Some Occurrences of Paleo-Indian Projectile
Points in Florida Waters. FA 23(4):129-134.

1971 Hafted Flake Knives. FA 24(4):173-174.

1972 Notes on the Meadowbrook Farms No. 2 Site. FA
25(3):128.

Waller, Ben I. and James Dunbar
1977 Distribution of Paleo-Indian Projectiles in
Florida. FA 30(2):79-80.

Walthall, John A.
1975 Ceramic Figurines, Porter Hopewell, and Middle
Woodland Interaction. FA 28(3, Part 1):125-140.

Warren, Lyman O.
1962 Early Pottery in the Tampa Bay Area. FA
15(3):71-72.

1963 "Horse's Hoof" Core-Planes from Pinellas and
Pasco Counties, Florida and the Oaxaca Valley
Mexico. FA 16(4):133-136.

1964 Possibly Sumberged Oyster Shell Middens of Upper
Tampa Bay. FA 17(4):227-230.

1966 A Possible Paleo-Indian Site in Pinellas County.
FA 19(l):38-41.

1967 Two Dredged Sites on Bear Creek. FA
20(3-4):170-174.

1968a The Apollo Beach Site, Hillsborough County. FA
21 (2-3):83-88.

1968b Caladesi Causeway: A Possible Inundated
Paleo-Indian Workshop. FA 21(2-3):92-94.

1970 The Kellogg Fill from Boca Ciega Bay, Pinellas
County, Florida. FA 23(4):163-167.

1971a Bird Effigy Dredged from Tampa Bay. FA
24(2):71-72.


(37(3), 1984)


1971b The Fletcher Davis Site, Florida. FA
24(2):81-90.

1972a Commerical Oyster Shell of Tampa Bay: 1966
Progress Report. FA 25 (2, Part 1): 49-51.

1972b Clear Fork Gouge and Greenbrier Point. FA
25(3):93-96.

1972: TrIponema.tcsis. FA 25(4):175-188.

1973 Unique Knife or Chisel, Piper-Fuller Airfield.
St. Petersburg. FA 26(3):119-120.

Warren, Lyman 0. and Ripley P. Bullen
1965 A Dalton Complex from Florida. FA 18(1):29-32.

Warren, Lyman O. and Francis Bushnell
1963 A Bone Hand Pendant From Boca Ciega Bay. FA
16(2):49-50.

Warren, Lyman O., Francis Bushnell and Gerard Spence
1965 Six Contributions to the Hand Motif from the
Safety Harbor Burial Mound on Cabbage Key,
Pinellas County, Florida. FA 18(4):235-238.

Warren, Lyman O., William Thompson, and Ripley P. Bullen
1967 The Culbreath Bayou Site, Hillsborough County,
Florida. FA 20(3-4):146-163.

Watson, Thomas C.
1974 The Microlithic West Bay Site, Florida. FA
27(3):107-118.

Watters, David R. and Desmond V. Nicholson
1982 Highland House, Barbuda: An 18th Century
Retreat. FA 35(4):223-242.

Wayne, Lucy B.
1983 The Bailey House: Interpretation of Trash
Disposal at an Urban Site. FA 36(3-4):177-185.

Webb, Raymond
1972 A Here-to-Fore Unclassified Stone Tool. FA
25(1):47-48.

Webb, S. David, Jerald T. Milanich, Roger Alexon, and
James Dunbar
1983 An Extinct Bison Kill Site, Jefferson County,
Florida. FA 36(1-2):81-82.

Webster, William J.
1970 A New Concept for the Busycon Shell Receptacle.
FA 23(1):1-7.

Weigel, Robert D.
1959 Bird Remains from South Indian Field, Florida.
FA 12(3):73-74.

Wesley, William H.
1972 A Jacksonian Period Sword Handle from South
Walton County. Fa 25(1):45-46.

1973 A "Marked" Historic Site. FA 26(4):157-161.

1974 Pieces Esquille&s in the Southeast. FA
27(4):161-164.

West, Patsy
1981 The Miami Indian Tourist Attraction: A History
and Analysis of a Transitional Mikasuki Seminole
Environment. F 34(4):200-224.

Wharton, Barry R., George R. Ballo, and Mitchell E. Hope
1981 The Republic Groves Site, Hardee County,
Florida. PA 34(2):59-80.

Wilder, Leon W.
1981 A Unidentified Shell Artifact from Grenada, West
Indies. PA 34(3):164.





OVERVIEW AND INDEX OF FAS PUBLICATIONS


wilkerson, S. Jeffrey K.
1975 (Review) The Sculpture of El Tajin, Veracruz,
Mexico by Michael Edwin Kampen. FA 28(2):53-56.

Wrilley, Gordon R.
1949 Crystal River, Florida: A 1949 Visit. FA
2(3-4):41-46.

1954 Burial Patterns in the Burns and Fuller Mounds,.
Cape Canaveral, Florida. FA 7(3):78-90.

Williams, John and Eunice Williams
1965 Atypical Man in South Florida: Primitive or
Specialized? FA 18(1):59-62.

Williams, Wilma B.
1970 The Coral Springs Site, Southeast Florida. FA
23(4):135-150.

1983 Bridge to the Past: Excavations at the
Margate-Blount Site. FA 36(3-4):142-153.

Williams, Wilma, Mark Greene, and Wesley Coleman -
Preparers
1975 The Arch Creek Site, Dade County. PA
28(1):1-13.

Williams, Wilma B. and Bert Mowers
1977 (Preparers) Markham Park Mound No. 2, Broward
County, Florida. FA 30(2):56-78.


148


1979 Bishops Hammock, Broward County, Florida. FA
32(1):17-32.

1982 Archaeological Excavations at the Rolling Oaks
II Site, Broward County. FA 35(3):118-126.

Wilson, Rex L.
1965 The Search for Jackson's Mud Rampart. FA 18(3,
Part 2):103-111.

Wing, Elizabeth S.
1963 Vertebrate Remains from the Wash Island Site. FA
16(3):93-96.
1965 Animal Bones from Marco Island. FA l~(1):21-28.

1977a Subsistence Systems in the Southeast. FA
30(2):81-87.

1977b Subsistence at the McLarty Site. FA 31(1):3-7.

Wingate, R.J. and T.R. Hester
1972 Burials from Green Lake, Texas. FA
25(3):119-127.

Wulsin, Frederick R.
1953 Hot Weather and High Achievement. FA
6(4):103-120.

Yarnell, Richard A.
1965 Early Woodland Plant Removal and the Questions
of Cultivation. FA 18(2):77-82.


GENERAL GEOGRAPHICAL DISTRIBUTION INDEX BY ISSUE


Florida:
General: FA 1(3-4), FA 3(1-2), FA 8(4), FA 9(2), FASP No.
4, FASP No. 5, FA 17(2), FA 18(1), FA 18(3), FA
20(1-2), FA 21(4), FA 23(2), FA 23(4), FA 24(1), FA
25(4), FA 26(4), FA 27(2), FA 29,(1), FA 30(2), FA
31(2, Part 1), FA 33(4), FA 36(1-2), FA 36(3-4),
Northwest: FA 1(1-2), FA 2(1-2), FA 3(3-4), FA 10(3-4),
FA 11(1), FA 12(2), FA 12(4), FA 13(2-3), FA 13(4),
PA 14(1-2), FA 14(3-4), FA 15(1), FA 15(2), FA 15(3),
FA 16(2); rA 17(1), PA 17(2), FA 18(2), FA 18(3, Part
1), PA 18(3, Part 2), FA 18(4), -A 19(1), FA 19(2-3),
FA 20(3-4), FA 21(1), FA 21(2-3), FA 22(1-4), FA
23(1), FA 24(2), FA 24(4), FA 25(1), FA 26(3), FA
26(4), FA 27(1), FA 27(2), FA 27(3), FA 38(3 Part 1),
FA 28(4), FA 29(1), FA 29(3), FA 31(3), FA 32(4), FA
33(4), FA 37(2),
North Central: PA 1(1-2), FA 1(3-4), FA 2(1-2), FA
4(1-2), FA 5(3-4), FA 6(2), FA 8(1), FA 11(2), FA
12(1), FA 12(4), FA 13(1), FA 15(4), FA 17(1), FA
17(3), FA 17(4), FA 18(4), FA 21(1), FA 22(1-4), FA
23(2), FA 23(3), FA 24(2), FA 25(3), FA 27(1), FA
28(4), FA 29(3), FA 30(1), FA 30(3), FA 30(4), FA
31(1), FA 31(3), FA 31(4, Part 1), FA 32(1), FA
32(3), FA 34(2), FA 34(3), FA 35(1), PA 36(1-2), FA
37(2),
Northeast: FA 4(3-4), FA 5(3-4), FA 11(1), FA 14(1-2), PA
16(1), FA 20(3-4), FA 22(1-4), FA 23(1), FA 25(2,
Part 2), FA 26(4), FA 29(2, Part 1), FA 30(1), FA
30(3), FASP No. 10/FA 31(4, Part 2), FA 32(2), FA
33(1), FA 34(2), FA 36(1-2),
Central/Central Gulf Coast: FA 2(1-2), FA 2(3-4), PA
3(1-2), FA 3(3-4), FASP No. 2, FASP No. 3, FA 5(1-2),
FA 6(1), PA6(3), FA 7(3), PA 8(1), FA 8(3), FA 11(1),
FA 12(4), FA 13(4), FA 14(3-4), FA 15(3), FA 15(4),
FA 16(2), FA 16(3), FA 16(4), FA 17(4), FA 18(2), FA
18(4), FA 19(1), FA 19(2-3), FA 19(4), FA 20(1-2), PA
20(3-4), FA 21(1), FA 21(2-3), FA 21(4), FA 22(1-4),
FA 23(2), FA 23(3), FA 23(4), FA 24(1), FA 24(2), FA
24(4), FA 25(1), FA 25(2, Part 1), FA 26(1), FA
26(3), FA 27(1), FA 27(2), FA 28(2), FA 28(3, Part
1), FA 29(1), FA 29(2, Part 1), FASP No. 8/FA
29(2 Part 2). FA 29(4), FA 30(2), FA 30(3), FASP No.
9/FA 31(2, Part 2), FA 31(3), FA 33(4), FA 34(2), FA
34(4), FA 36(1-2),


South: FA 1(1-2), PA 1(3-4), FA 2(1-2), PA 2(3-4), FASP
No. 1, PA 3(3-4), FA 4(3-4), PA 5(3-4), FA 6(1), FA
6(3), FA 6(4), FA 7(1), FA 7(2), FA 7(3), FA 7(4), FA
8(1), FA 8(3), FA 9(1), FA 9(2), FA 9(3-4), FA
10(1-2), FA 10(3-4), FA 11(4), FA 12(1), FA 12(2), FA
12(3), FA 13(1), FA 14(1-2), FA 14(3-4), PA 15(1), FA
17(3), FA 17(4), FA 18(1), FA 19(4), FA 20(3-4), FA
21(1), FA 21(3-4), FA 23(4), FA 24(2), FA 25(1), FA
25(2, Part 1), PA 25(3), FA 26(3), FA 27(2), FA
27(4), FA 28(1), FA 28(3, Part 1), FASP No. 7/FA
28(3, Part 2), FA 29(4), FA 30(2), FA 30(3), FA
32(1), PA 32(2), FA 32(4), FA 33(1), FA 33(2), FA
34(1), FA 34(1), FA 34(2), FA 34(2), FA 35(2), FA
35(3), FA 36(3-4), FA 37(1), FA 37(2),


Other States:
Alabama: PA 12(4), FA 13(1), FA 13(2-3), FA 14(1-2), FA
14(3-4), FA 15(2), FA 17(2), FA 18(3, Part 1), FA
19(2-3), FA 27(1),
Arkansas: FA 26(1),
Colorado: FA 21(1),
Georgia: PA 4(1-2), FA 4(3-4), FA 8(3), FASP No. 4, FA
10(1-2), FA 11(1), FA 13(2-3), FA 13(4), FA 19(1), FA
21(1), FA 24(1), FA 26(3), PA 28(2), FA 29(1), FA
30(3). FA 35(1).
Illinois: FA 17(2), FA 33(2),
Louisiana: FA 16(4), FA 17(2), FA 18(3, Part 2), FA
20(1-2), FA 26(2), FA 28(2), FA 32(1), FA 34(2),
Maryland: FA 18(3, Part 2),
Mississippi: FA 12(1), FA 16(2), FA 17(2), FA 34(2),
Missouri: FA 20(1-2)
North Carolina: FA 18(3, Part 2), FA 25(1),
Oklahoma: FA 1(3-4), FA 3(1-2), FA 17(3),
Pennsylvania: Fa 18(3, Part 2),
South Carolina: PA 15(2), FA 19(4), FA 21(1), FA 21(2-3),
PA 23(4), FA 31(2, Part 1), FA 32(3),
Tennessee: FA 17(3),
Texas: PA 22(1-4), FA 24(3), FA 25(3),
Virginia: FA 17(2), FA 18(3, Part 2)

General, Southeastern U.S.t FA 17(4), FA 18(4), PA
20(1-2), FASP No. 5/FA 25(2 Part 2), FA 26(2), FA
b7(2), PA 27(4), PA 28(1), FA 28(3, Part 1), FA
30(2), PA 31(1), PA 31(3), FA 36(1-2),


TESAR






THE FLORIDA ANTHROPOLOGIST


New World Prehistory, General: FA 1(1-2), FA 2(1-2), FA
6(2), FA 19(4), FA 20(1-2),

Mexico: FA 16(4), FA 21(4), FA 28(2),

Central America, General: FA 6(4),

Republic of Panama: FA 17(2), FA 25(3), FA 26(2), FA
27(4), FA 35(2),


(37(3), 1984)


South America, General: FA 6(4), FA 21(4), PASP No. 5/FA
25(2 Part 2), FA 26(1), FA 26(2),

Caribbean: FA 7(1), FA 10(3-4), FA 22(1-4), FA 27(4), FA
33(3), FA 34(3), FA 34(4), FA 35(4), FA 36(3-4),

Spain: FA 8(2),

Great Britain: FA 17(2),


Near East: FA 22(1-4),



GENERAL TOPICAL INDEX BY ISSUE


Paleo-Indian/Archaic: FA 1(1-2), FA 2(1-2), FA 5(1-2), FA
11(2), FA 12(4), FA 15(3), FA 15(4), FA 16(4), FA
17(1), FA (4), FA 18(1), FA 18(3, Part 1), FA 19(1),
FA 19(4), FA 20(1-2), FA 21(1), FA 21(2-3), FA 21(4),
FA 22(1-2), FA 23(1), FA 23(4), FA 24(2), FASP No.
6/FA 25(2, Part 2), FA 25(3), FA 26(1), FA 26(4), FA
27(2), FA 27(3), FA 28(2), FASP No. 7/FA 28(3, Part
2), FA 28(4), FA 29(2, Part 1), F 30(1), FA 30(2), FA
30(2), FASP No. 10/FA 31(4, Part 2), 33(4), FA 34(2),
FA 36(1-2),
Post-Archaic Prehistoric Florida: FA 1(1-2), FA 1(3-4),
FA 2(1-2), FA 2(3-4), FA 3(1-2), FA 3(3-4), FASP No.
2, FA 4(1-2), FA 4(3-4), FASP No. 3, FA 5(1-2), FA
5(3-4), FA 6(1), FA 6(2), FA 6(3), FA 7(1), FA 7(3),
FA 8(1), FA 9(2), FA 10(1-2), FA 13(4), FA 13(4), FA
14(1-2), FA 14(3-4), FA 15(1), FA 15(3), FA 15(4), FA
16(1), FA 16(2), FA 16(3), FA 17(2), FA 17(3), FA
18(1), FA 18(2), FA 18(2), FA 18(4), FA 19(1), FA
19(2-3), FA 19(4), FA 20(3-4), FA 21(1), FA 21(2-3),
FA 1-A 22(1-4 FA 23(), A 23(2), A 23(3) FA 23(4),
FA 24(1), FA 24(2), FA 24(3), FA 24(4), FA 25(1), FA
25(2 Part 1), FA 25(3), PA 26(3), FA 27(1), FA 27(2),
FA 27(3), FA 27(4), FA 28(1), FA 28(3, Part 1), FA
28(4), FA 29(1), FASP No. 8/FA29(2, Part 2), FA
29(3), FA 29(4), FA 30(2), FA 30(3), FA 30(4),.FA
31(1), FA 31(2, Part 1), FASP No. 9/FA 3(2, Part 2), FA
31(3), FA 32(1), FA 32(2), FA 33(1), FA 33(4), FA 34(1),
FA 35(3), FA 36(3-4),
Seminole/Mickasukee: FA 1(3-4), FA 4(3-4), FA 5(3-4), FA
6(3), FA 6(4), FA 7(2), FA 7(4), FA 8(2), FA 8(3), FA
9(1), FA 9(3-4), FA 10(3-4), FA 11(3), FA 12(1), FA
12(2), PA 12(3), FA 12(4), FA 13(1), FA 3(4), FA
14(1-2), FA 15(3), FA 16(2), FA 16(3), FA 17(3), FA
20(1-2), FA 21(4), FA 24(2), FA 26(2), FA 26(3), FA
27(1), FA 27(2), FA 29(3), FA 29(4), FA 30(1), FA
30(4), FA 31(1), FA 32(2). FA 33(2), FA 34(4),
Other Native American Historic:
Florida: FA 1(1-2), FA 1(3-4), FA 2(1-2), FASP No. 1,
FASP No. 4, FA 13(2-3), FA 15(4), FA 17(2), FA 17(4),
FA 20(1-2), FA 20(3-4), PA 21(1), FA 21(4), FA 23(3),
FA 27(1), FA 37(1).

Other: FASP No. 4, FA 12(2), PA 16(3), FA 20(1-2)

European Historic:
Florida: FASP No. 4, FA 13(2-3), FA 16(1), FA 15(2), FA
16(1), FA 17(2), FA 18(3, Part 2), FA 19(2-3), FA
26(4), PA 30(1), FA 30(3), FA 34(4), PA 35(3), FA
37(2),

Other: FA 13(203), FA 18(3 Part 3), FA 21(203), PA 33(3),
FA 35(4),

Subsistance Datat FA 1(3-4), FA 6(2), FA 10(3-4), FA
12(1), FA 12(3), FA 14(3-4), FA 16(3), FA 18(1), FA
18(2), PA 22(1-4), FA 24(3), FASP No. 7/FA 28(3, Part
2), PA 29(2, Part 1), FASP No. 8/FA 29(2, Part 2), FA
29(3), FA 30(2), FA 31(1), FA 31(2 Part 1), FA 31(3),
FA 31(4, Part 1), 32(1), PA 32(2), FA 32(3), FA
33(1), PA 33(2), FA 35(2), FA 36(1-2),
Folk Medicine: FA 7(2), FA 12(3), FA 18(3, Part 1), FA
20(1-2), FA 29(2, Part 1), FA 30(3), FA 30(4), FA
33(1), FA 36(3-4),


Burial Sites/Physical Anthropology: FA 1(3-4), FA 2(1-2),
FA 2(3-4), FA 3(1-2), FA 4(1-2), FASP No. 3, FA
5(1-2), FA 7(1-3), FA 7(4), FA 8(1), FA 9(2), FA
9(3-4), FA 10(1-2), FA 10(3-4), FA 11(4), FA 13(2-3),
FA 13(4), FA 14(3-4), FA 16(2), FA 18(1), FA 18(3,
Part 1), FA 18(4), FA 20(1-2), FA 20(3-4), FA 21(1),
FA 21(2-3), FA 21(4), FA 23(3), FA 24(1), FA 24(2),
FA 4(3), FA 24(4), FA 25(1), FA 25(2, Part 1), FA
25(3), FA 25(4), FA 26(3), FA 27(1), FA 28(3, Part
1), FASP No. 7/FA 28(3 Part 2), FA 30(4), FA 31(1),

FA 31(3), FA 33(4), FA 34(2), FA 34(2), FA 34(4), FA
36(3-4), FA 37(1),
House Types: FA 6(4), FA 26(3),

Settlement Patterns: FA 1(1-2), FA 26(2), FA 29(1), FA
39(4), FA 31(1), FA 31(3), FA 31(4, Part 1), FA
34(3), FA 36(1-2),

Non-Material Culture/History:
Florida: FA 5(3-4), FA 6(4), FA 8(2), FA 10(3-4),,FA
11(3), FA 14(1-2). FA 15(3), FA 17(4), FA 20(1-2), FA
22(1-4), FA 27(2), FA 31(1), FA 31(4 Part 1), FA
32(2), FA 34(4),

Other: FA 18(4), FA 20(1-2), FA 22(1-4), FA 27(4),


Artifact Type Data:
Native American:
Lithics: FA 1(1-2), FA 2(3-4), FA 5(1-2), FA 5(3-4),
FA 6(1), FA 7(1), FA 8(1), FA 10(3-4), FA 11(1),
FA 12(4), FA 13(1), FA 15(3), FA 16(4), FA 17(1),
FA 17(4), FA 18(1), FA 18(3, Part 1), FA 19(1),
FA 19(4), FA 20(1-2), FA 20(3-4), FA 21(1), FA
21(2-3), FA 21(4), FA 22(1-2), FA 23(4), FA 24(1), FA
24(2), FA 24(4), FA 25(1), FA 25(2, Part 1), FA
25(3), FA 26(1), FA 26(3), FA 26(4), FA 27(1), FA
27(2), FA 27(3), FA 28(4), FA 28(2), FASP No. 7/FA
28(3, Part 2), FA(4), FA 29(1), FA 29(2, Part 1), FASP
No. 8/FA 29(2, Part 2), FA 29(4), FA 30(1), FA 30(2), FASP
No. 10/FA 31(4, Part 2), FA 34(2), FA 35(3), FA 36(1-2),
FA 36(3-4), FA 37(1), FA 37(2),
Ceramics (vessels, clay balls, pipes, effigies): FA
1(1-2), FA 2(3-4), FA 3(1-2), FA 3(3-4), FASP No. 2,
FA 4(3-4), FASP No. 3, FA 6(1), FA (3), FA 7(1), FA
7(2), FA 8(3), PA 9(2), FA 10(1-2), PA 11(1), FA
11(1), FA 11(2), FA 11(4), FA 12(2), FA 12(3), FA
12(4), FA 13(1), FA 13(2-3), FA 14(1-2), FA 14(3-4),
FA 15(3), FA 15(4), FA 16(1), FA 18(1), FA 22(1-4),
FA 23(4), FA 24(1), FA 4(2), FA 24(4), FA 25(2, Part
1), FASP No. 6/FA 25(2, Part 2), FA 25(3), FA 26(4),
FA 27(1), FA 27(2), FA 28(1), FA 28(2), PA 28(3, Part
1), FASP No. 8/FA 29(2, Part 2), FA 30(2), FA 30(3),
FA 31(4, Part 1), FASP No.10 FA 31(4, Part 2), FA
32(1), FA 32(4), FA 33(4), FA 35(1), FA 36(3-4), FA
37(2),
Shell: FA 1(1-2), FA 2(3-4), FA 6(3), FA 9(2), FA
10(1-2), FA 11(4), FA 12(4), FA 14(3-4), FA 16(2), FA
17(4), FA 18(1), FA 23(1), FA 23(4), FA 25(2, Part
1), PASP No. 8/FA 29(2, Part 1), FA 30(1), FASP No.
10/FA 31(4 Part 2), FA 32(1), FA 32(4), FA 33(2), PA
34(1), FA 34(3), FA 35(2), PA 36(3-4)


149





I


( ) Institutional ($15.00)


---1P=3'==========f=====================


'"~~~~rr


T'SAR OVERVIEW AND INDEX 150


Bone/Teeth: FA 6(3), FA 13(1), FA 15(4), FA 16(2), FA
19(4), FA 20(1-2), PA 20(3-4), FA 21(4), PA 23(4), FA
24(2), FA 26(2), FA 26(4), FA 28(1), FA 30(3), FASP
'o.10/FA31(4, Part 2), FA 36(1-2)
Wood/Fiber: FA 5(3-4), FA 6(3), FA 8(3), FA 20(1-2), PA
20(3-4), FA 24(2), FA 25(1), FA 25(3), FA 28(1), FA
30(1), FA 31(3). FA 32(3), FA 37(1)
Leather/Skin: FA 7(4), FA 15(4)
Metal: FA 7(1), FA 21(1), FA 21(4), FA 25(2 Part 1), FA
29(3), FA 34(4), FA 37(1)
Beads: FA 4(1-2), FA 21(4)
European/Asiatic:
General: PA (1-2), PA 13(2-3), PA 16(1), FA 16(2), FA
17(2), FA 18(1), FA 18(3, Part 2), FA 21(2-3), FA
35(3), FA 37(2)
Ceramics: FA 8(4)
Pipes: FASP No. 4, FA 12(3), FA 15(3), FA 23(4), FA
29(3),
Beads: FASP No. 4, FA 20(3-4), FA 21(4),
Coins: FA 17(2), FA 18(4), FA 21(4)
Tools: FASP No. 4, FA 21(4)
Wood: FA 30(3)
weapons/Ordinance: FASP No. 4, FA 15(1), FA 25(1)


******** *** **** ***** ******* **** *** ******* *************************

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FA 12(4)** $5 x 1 =
FA 13(1) OUT OP PRINT
FA 13(2-3)** $10 x 1 =
FA 13(4) $5 x =
PA 14(1-2)** $10 x 1 =
FA 14(3-4) $10 x 1 =
FA 15(1) $5 x 1 =
FA 15(2) $5 x 1 =
FA 15(3) ** $5 x 1 =
FA 15(4) ** $5 x 1 =
FA 16(1) OUT OF PRINT
FA 16(2) ** $5 x 1 =
FA 16(3) OUT OF PRINT
FA 16(4) ** $5 x 1 =
FA 17(1) OUT OF PRINT
FA 17(2) ** $5 x 1 =
FA 17(3) ** $5 x 1 =
FA 17(4) ** $5 x 1 =
FA 18(1) OUT OF PRINT
FA 18(2) ** $5 x 1 =
FA 18(3,Pt. 1)** $5x1 =
FA 18(3,Pt. 2)** $5x1 =
FA 18(4) ** $5 x 1 =
FA 19(1) ** $5 x =
FA 19(2-3)** $10 x 1 =
FA 19(4) $5 X 1 =
FA 20(1-2) OUT OF PRINT
FA 20(3-4)** $10 x 1 =
FA 21(1)-21(4) OUT OF PRINT


FA 22(1-4) $10 x 1 =
FA 23(1) $5 x 1 =
FA 23(2) ** $5 x 1 =
FA 23(3) ** $5 x 1=
FA 23(4) ** $5 x 1 =
FA 24(1) OUT OF PRINT
FA 24(2) ** $5 x 1 =
FA 24(3) ** $5 x 1 =
FA 24(4) ** $5 x 1=
FA 25(1) ** $5 x 1 =
PA 25(2,Pt. 1)** $5x1 =
FASP No. 6/FA 25(2,Pt. 2)
$7 x =
FA 25(3)-26(1) OUT OF PRINT
FA 26(2) $5 x 1=
FA 26(3) ** $5 x 1 =
FA 26(4) ** $5 x 1 =
FA 27(1) ** $5 x 1 =
FA 27(2) ** $5 x 1 =
FA 27(3) ** $5 x 1 =
FA 27(4) ** $5 x 1 =
FA 28(1) ** $5 x 1 =
FA 28(2) ** $5 x 1 =
FA 28(3,Pt. 1)** $5x1 =
FASP No. 7/FA 28(3,Pt. 2)**
$7 x 1 =
FA 28(4) ** $5 x 1 =
FA 29(1) ** $5 x 1 =
FA 29(2,Pt. 1)** $5xl =
FASP No. 8/PA 29(2,Pt. 2) *
$7 x 1 =
FA 29(3) ** $5 x 1 =
FA 29(4) ** $5 x 1 =
FA 30(1) OUT OF PRINT
FA 30(2) $5 x =
FA 30(3) $5 x 1 =
FA 30(4) $5 x 1 =
FA 31(1) $5 x 1 =
FA 31(2,Pt. 1)* $5x 1 =
FASP No. 10/FA 31(4,Pt. 2)
$7 x 1
FA 32(1) $5 x =
FA 32(2) $5 X =
FA 32(3) $5 x =
FA 32(4) $5 x =
FA 33(1) $5 x =
FA 33(2) $5 x =


FA 33(3)
PA 33(4)
FA 34(1)
FA 34(2)
FA 34(3)
FA 34(4)
FA 35(1)
FA 35(2)
FA 35(3)
FA 35(4)
FA 36(1-2)
FA 36(3-4)
FA 37(1)
FA 37(2)
FA 37(3)


$5 x =
$5 x =
$5 x =
$5 x =
$5 x =
$5 x =
$5 x = _
$5 x =
$5 x =
OUT OF PRINT
$10 x =
$10 x =
$5 x =
$5 x =
$5 x =


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(less 10% members discount)
PLUS postage and handling $2.00

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THE FLORIDA ANTHROPOLOGIST


BOOK REVIEW

More Muskogee Words and Ways: A
Southeastern Reader (1983) Compiled by
C. Randall Daniels (Sakim) has been
recently published by The Muskogee
Press, 100 Wakulla Springs Drive,
Wakulla Springs, Florida 32305. This
is Book Two in a series of teaching
workbooks. It is available at the
Wakulla Springs Museum and some
bookstores where it retails for
$14.85.

The text is in several styles,
reflecting the many published and
unpublished sources and original
presentations used in its compila-
tions. From an academic standpoint it
will likely be criticised for its
failure to adequately cite sources and
its intermixing of fact and personal
belief as if they were one and the
same. Perhaps they are to an indi-
vidual's belief system for we each
have our own, and to us valid, concept
of reality. However, Sakim does not
offer this patchwork compilation as a
definitive scholarly work, but rather
as a freeflowing, somewhat
comprehensive document to be used
(with Book One) to learn the MVSKOKE
language, as well as to gain an
insight into what it means to be
Creek/Muskogee. This book is of
particular interest as a personal
statement by Sakim and other members
of the Pine Arbor Community on what
being MVSKOKE means to them and how
they enact that lifestyle.

I recommend More Muskogee Words
and Ways to anyone interested in a
broad overview of Creek/Muskogee,
presented in a free-flowing person-
alized style. While it will serve as
a useful personal reference, it will,
unfortunately, prove difficult for use
by scholars.

Reviewed by Louis D. Tesar,
Editor, The Florida Anthropologist


CURRENT RESEARCH

In future issues I plan (on a space
available basis) to routinely include
information on current research. I urge
our readers to contribute short summaries
of their work for that purpose. We will
also include summaries of current research
in our Newsletter.

* *

PLANS FOR EXCAVATION AT THE WINDOVER SITE,
BREVARD COUNTY, FLORIDA
By Glen H. Doran
Dept. of Anthropology
Florida State University
Tallahassee, FL 32306

During the summer of 1982 road con-
struction on a housing development near
Titusville, Florida uncovered human
skeletal material in a small muck filled
pond. Construction was diverted from the
area and no further modification to the
site area and associated hammock has
taken place.

Drs. Robert C. Dailey and Glen H. Doran,
Department of Anthropology, collected par-
tial skeletal remains of five additional
individuals. No artifacts other than a cut
and drilled antler tool were found in the
spoil banks.

Skeletal material from an adult male
was sacrificed and provided a radiocarbon
date of 7330*100 B.P. (Beta-5803). A
second date on skeletal material of an
18 month old infant produced a date of
721080 B.P. (Beta-7186). The Early Archaic
context of the material seems clear. The
similarity between the Windover site and
the Bay West site (Beriault et al 1981) is
striking.

Excavation of the site and hammock will
begin in September and will continue till
mid December, 1984. Excavation goals include
location of a suspected Archaic component
on the hammock, determination of the magni-
tude of the charnel pond deposit and re-
covery of as much skeletal material as
possible.


(37(3), 1984)


152










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