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The Calhoun-Liberty journal ( July 24, 2013 )

UF00027796 UFPKY National Endowment for the Humanities LSTA SLAF
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Material Information

Title:
The Calhoun-Liberty journal
Portion of title:
Calhoun Liberty journal
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
The Liberty Journal, Inc.
Place of Publication:
Bristol Fla
Creation Date:
July 24, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bristol (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Liberty County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Calhoun County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Liberty -- Bristol
Coordinates:
30.426944 x -84.979167 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in Sept. 1991.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 11, no. 38 (Sept. 18, 1991).
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 002046630
oclc - 33425067
notis - AKN4565
lccn - sn 95047245
System ID:
UF00027796:00439

Related Items

Preceded by:
Weekly journal (Bristol, Fla.)

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Calhoun-Liberty journal
Portion of title:
Calhoun Liberty journal
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
The Liberty Journal, Inc.
Place of Publication:
Bristol Fla
Creation Date:
July 24, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Bristol (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Liberty County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Calhoun County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Liberty -- Bristol
Coordinates:
30.426944 x -84.979167 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in Sept. 1991.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 11, no. 38 (Sept. 18, 1991).
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 002046630
oclc - 33425067
notis - AKN4565
lccn - sn 95047245
System ID:
UF00027796:00439

Related Items

Preceded by:
Weekly journal (Bristol, Fla.)


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

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J OURNAL W ednesday AUGUST 28, 2013 Vol. 33 No. 35 50 includes tax CLJNews.co m Some stuck cash in collections jars, others wrote checks and many took part in a spirited auction in which one unique item brought in $525 alone a pair of pink boxer shorts signed by former Graham County, Arizona Sher iff Richard Mack, Bay County Sheriff Frank McKeithen and suspended Lib erty County Sheriff Nick Finch. Law states gathered at The Palms Confer ence Center in Panama City Saturday to support the embattled lawman, a complaint against him for allegedly freed a man who had just been taken into custody for carrying a concealed weapon. The unusual shorts represent Panama City event raises over $15,000 for Finch legal defense FROM LEFT: Sussex County, Delaware Sheriff Jeff Christopher; Nick Finch, former Sheriff Richard Mack of Arizona, Bay County Sheriff Frank McKeithen and Brad Rodgers, of Elkhart County Indiana are shown at Saturdays fundraiser. Former Sheriff Richard Mack of Arizona displays a pair of pink shorts that brought in a tidy sum at Saturdays auction. action taken by Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio, who had inmates' underwear dyed pink after he found they were stealing their jail-issued white underwear. Sheriff's Log............2 Arrest Reports............2 Death by Chocolate raises around $6,000 .......3 The Arts at Chipola....4 Sr. Citizen schedule...4 Make-A-Wish Foundation sends Bristol girl and family to Jonas Brothers concert in California....7 Business News....9 Outdoors Down South....11 FOOT BALL ABOVE: Blount stown Tiger Justin Mayorga (#34) charg Fridays pre-season Jamboree in Blount stown. See more on page 18. LEFT: Maze Holmes (#54) and Jarrod Beckwith (#4) work together to wrangle their op ponent to the ground when the LCHS Bull dogs traveled to Chi pley last week. For more on the game, see page 16. TONY SHOEMAKE PHOTO DANIEL WILLIAMS PHOTO Reece Parramore looks over a dazzling array of goodies at last weeks Death by Chocolate fundraiser. PAGE 3 Pre-season VOLLEYBALL CLASSIC PAGE 12 ed to numerous reports of mailbox bashings in the Clarksville and Red Oak Communities over the past two weekends. Suspects have caused more than $1,000 in damages. A reward is being offered through Crimestoppers for any information leading to the arrest of those involved. Call Crimestoppers (850) 674-5049. Callers can remain anonymous. Reward offered for info on mailbox marauders Finch supporter gives FDLE tape to Gov. Rick Scott by Teresa Eubanks, Journal Editor Talk radio host Burnie Thompson told lis day morning when he asked him to appoint a special prosecutor in the case of suspended dicates the lawman was targeted for arrest. nor's attorney and press secretary. Thompson said he expects a response behind his arrest. Finch said he got the tape as part of the which is now set to go to trial Oct. 29. Thompson, who hosts a radio show in conduct and falsifying public records after he stepped in to stop the arrest of a man charged with carrying a concealed weapon. Finch said the recording was made when shortly before a meeting he had scheduled to he was going to threaten employees who spoke with them. The purpose of the meet ing was to bring in an attorney to represent his agency's employees, he said. After mak ing introductions, he excused himself from the meeting to allow them to speak freely. He said the recording began about an hour before the meeting and caught employees making comments indicating he would not by FDLE at that point, Finch said. But they were absolutely aware that I was going THE CALHOUNLIBERTY

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Page 2 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL AUGUST 28, 2013 CALHOUN COUNTY Aug. 19 Billy Ray, VOP (x2), CCSO. CCSO. CCSO. CCSO. CCSO. CCSO. Aug. 20 CCSO. VOCR, CCSO. CCSO. CCSO. CCSO. CCSO. Aug. 21 CCSO. CCSO. Aug. 22 CCSO. (x2), BPD. BPD. Aug. 23 CCSO. CCSO. CCSO. CCSO. CCSO. CCSO. Aug. 24 CCSO. LIBERTY COUNTY Aug. 20 CCSO. LCSO. VOCR, CCSO. LCSO. LCSO. Aug. 21 CCSO. Aug. 22 CCSO. LCSO. CCSO. Aug. 23 LCSO. LCSO. LCSO. Aug. 24 LCSO. LCSO. Aug. 25 LCSO. LCSO. VOP, LCSO. SHERIFFS LOG Accidents Special details Business alarms Residential alarms ARREST REPORTS During the early morning hours of Aug. 25, Deputy Shepard and Deputy Eikeland of the Liberty County Sher Upon arrival the deputies, they made She alleged she had been in a physi Earnest, 41, of Hosford. $1,000. Deputy Shepard of the Liberty County ning of Aug. 24. Upon the arrival of Deputy Shepard he plainant and Amanda Loretta ant. The deputy repeatedly in disturbing the neighborhood. The deputy erty County Jail. rested and booked into the Liberty County Jail for felony On the night of Aug. 25, Deputy Thomas of son. Liberty County Jail and given no bond. at $2,500. A 29-year-old man of Wewahitchka was wanted after allegedly dragging a deputy with his car while fleeing a During the late evening was wanted on a violation of his eluding a law enforcement yielded methamphetamine and items used to ingest the drug. ed/revoked, possession of a session of drug paraphernalia. Gulf County Sheriff Mike deputies from Gulf County and County until being transferred to Gulf County Monday after noon. TOP NOTCH (850) 447-3490 Licensed Electrician CUSTOM CONCEPTS Call or Text (850) 674-6363 OWNER MATHEW LAYFIELD Car Stereo and Navigation System Installation Even small ads get a lot of ATTENTION in The Journal! Call 643-3333 for information. ADOPT A PET ...FROM THE JOURNAL CLASSFIEDS!

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AUGUST 28, 2013 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 3 Calhoun Liberty Primary Care Clinic New patient applications can be picked up at the front desk of the Primary Care Clinic Call 237-3000 20370 NE Burns Ave. Blountstown, FL NOW ACCEPTING CHP, Medicare and Medicaid Patients Death by CHOC LATE Chocolate treats cook up over $6,000 at annual senior citizen fundraiser The irresistible lure of chocolate and lots of it drew more than 240 people to the annual Death by Chocolate fundraiser for the Calhoun County Senior Citizens Association at the W.T. Neal Civic Center in Blountstown Thursday evening. The organization cleared about $6,000, with funds coming from ticket sales and an auction, which included a big rocking chair, kids chairs and porch swings. More than 40 local cooks donated their most tempting desserts to keep diners mov ing through the line as they selected one sweet treat after the other. The chocolate eclairs were a big hit and guests enjoyed creating their own delicacies at the chocolate fountain. SHELBY RODDENBERRY PHOTOS RIGHT: Johnny Skipper reaches for a chocolate covered cherry to give his granddaughter Clara Webb, 3. Heather Sullivan and Kristen Adams take it all in as they try to ABOVE: Jasmine Penna, who was celebrating her 9th birthday, en joyed the great selection of good ies. RIGHT: Eight-year-old Jake Lytle.

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Page 4 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL AUGUST 28, 2013 To our Liberty County and City of Bristol WASTE PRO CUSTOMERS There will be no changes to your solid waste collection for the Labor Day Holiday on Monday, Sept. 2. ALL SERVICES WILL BE COMPLETED ON YOUR NORMAL SCHEDULED DAY. Waste Pro would like to thank you and wish you all a happy and safe holiday. Hwy. 20 West Blountstown 674-8784 CITY TIRE CO. MV5496 It is labor indeed that puts the difference on everything. ~John Locke, 1690 We will be closed Monday, Sept. 2 in observance of Labor Day ACCEPTING NEW PA TIENTS Laban Bontrager, DMD 12761 NW Pea Ridge Rd., Bristol, FL 32321 TELEPHONE 643-5417 www.bristoldentalclinic.com DENTURE LAB ON PREMISES Same-Day Service on Repairs & Relines Bristol Dental Clinic Monica Bontrager, DMD The Liberty County Senior Citizens Association has scheduled the following events for the month of Sept.: Monday, Sept. 2 The Bristol and Hosford Senior Centers and Liberty County Transit will be closed. Thursday, Sept. 5 Shopping at the Tallahassee Wal-Mart. Call Liberty Transit at 643-2524 no later than 3 p.m. Monday, Sept. 2 to reserve your Transit Ride. Tuesday, Sept. 10 A trip to the Tallahassee Mall movies and lunch has been scheduled. Call Liberty Transit no later than 3 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 5 to reserve your transit ride. Thursday, Sept. 12 at 11 a.m. Bristol Senior Center: Cindy Grantham will be here for another ex citing hour of Bingo and prizes. Call Liberty Transit at 643-2524 no later than 3 p.m. Monday, Sept. 9 to arrange transportation to the Center. Thursday, Sept. 12 This weeks shopping trip is at the Bristol Piggly Wiggly. For transportation call Liberty Transit no later than 3 p.m. Monday, Sept. 9 to reserve your Transit pick up. Monday, Sept. 16 at 7 p.m. Bristol Senior Center, The Liberty County Senior Citizens Board of Directors will meet. The public is welcome to attend. Tuesday, Sept. 17 at 11 a.m. Bristol Senior Center: A Humana representative will be here to discuss and educate you on their Medicare Plans. Call Liberty Transit at 643-2524 no later than 3 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 12 to arrange for your transportation to the center. Please call 643-5690 so that we will know about how many people to expect. Wednesday, Sept. 18 Liberty County Senior Citizens will host a Bingo game at the Hosford Senior Center. Call Liberty Transit at 643-2524 no later than 3 p.m. Friday, Sept. 13 to arrange for Transit to pick you up. Thursday, Sept. 19 The Bristol Craft Class will meet at 11 a.m. We welcome seniors of Liberty County to join us. We will also have Senior Friendly Exercises. Call Liberty Transit at 643-2524 no later than 3 p.m. Monday, Sept. 16 to arrange transporta tion to the center. Thursday, Sept. 19 Marianna Wal-Mart is the location for shopping. Call Liberty Transit at 6432524 no later than 3 p.m. Monday, Sept. 16 to reserve your Transit ride. Tuesday, Sept. 24 at 11 a.m. Heidi from Gen tivia will be at the Hosford Senior Center for more fun and games. Call Liberty Transit at 643-2524 no later than 3 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 19 to reserve your Transit ride. Wednesday, Sept. 25 from 10:30 a.m. until 12:00 p.m. A Representative will be at Veterans Memorial Civic Center to discuss with and inform Seniors of Liberty County about the services that are provided by and through Liberty County Senior Citizens. Thursday, Sept. 26 The Hosford Craft Class will meet at 11 a.m. We welcome Seniors of Liberty County to join us. We will also have Senior Friendly Exercises. Call Liberty Transit at 643-2524 no later than 3 p.m. Monday, Sept. 23 to arrange transporta tion to the center. Thursday, Sept. 26 This weeks shopping trip is at the Bristol Piggly Wiggly. Call Liberty Transit at 643-2524 no later than 3 p.m. Monday, Sept. 23 to arrange for your pick up. The Bristol Senior Center is open Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. The Hosford Center is open Monday through Thursday from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Seniors are welcome to come for a hot meal served at noon and to enjoy socialization with others. Call 643-5690 to make a meal reservation the day before you plan to attend. If you need transportation to either center, you will need to call Liberty Transit at 643-2524 three (3) working days before. Liberty Senior Citizens Sept. activities include movies at the Tallahassee Mall, arts and crafts, shopping and bingo CORLETTS ROOFING LLC FREE ESTIMA TES Michael Corlett (850) 643-7062 M USIC Come out and hear our band One More Time playing at the American Legion Hall on Aug. 31 Bring your instruments! Open jam night will be on 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. & W We carry electric & acoustic electric For the marching band students, we have Rico reeds in stock! GRAND OPENING 9 a.m.-noon Art show of re-purposed theatre set to open at Chipola Aug. 29 MARIANNAArtist and wood worker Ethan Sawyer is taking used scenery material from Chipola Col leges last theatre season and creating an inspired art collection. The opening for Ethan Sawyers After the Fly Loft, is Thursday, Aug. 29, at 6 p.m., in the Chipola Center for the Arts Gallery. The opening is Chipola Artist Series event, Sweet Po tato Pie, the same night at 7 p.m. Artist Series tickets are available for purchase at (850) 718-2277 or online at www. Sawyers project is a collaboration of the Center for the Arts Gallery and Chipola Theatre. He is creating his art from used materials while working with Chipola students and Technical Theatre Director Connie Smith in the technical theatre shop. Together, they recently re moved the last set pieces that had been the season ended in May. Sawyer learned cabinetry and fur niture-making at Wallace College in Dothan. He studied Industrial Design at Auburn University and earned a BA in Environmental Studies from Maryville College in Tennessee. Sawyer operates a production/fabrication shop in Mont gomery specializing in custom wood work and the creative reuse of recycled materials. In addition to other projects, Saw yer has created a shelter and various sculptures for EAT Souths downtown Montgomery urban farm. The project includes recycled barn tin for the roof, a structure designed to catch rainwa ter to water an orchard, and a partially timber-framed, partially traditionallyframed pergola. Evelyn Ward, Chipola Director of Fine and Performing Arts, says, This project is especially important in our quest for green uses of resources. Many parts of a theatre set are often discarded. Ethan is showing our stu dents a way to take what would have been waste and repurposing the mate rials into beautiful pieces of art to be enjoyed by all. The exhibit will be on display through Oct. 31. The gallery is open weekdays, by appointment. Call (850) 718-2277. Information about Sawyers work is available at www.forestfroma tree.tumblr.com. The Artists Guild of Northwest Florida is joined by Chipola College and the Chipola Regional Arts As sociation in proudly announcing the ninth annual Sunday Afternoon with the Arts exhibit and reception, Nov. 3 at the Chipola College Cultural Center, 3056 College St., Marianna, FL, from 1 4 p.m. The non-juried art exhibition is open to all exhibitors of both visual and liter ary art forms free of charge. Exhibitors will have the opportunity to share in cash awards of almost $1,000, the largest of which is the Kathy J. Wycoff Memorial Award of $500. The winner of this award is voted on by exhibiting artists. Other awards include a Peoples' Choice Grand Prize award, and two Peoples' Choice runners up awards, a Peoples' Choice Student Grand Prize, and two runners up in this category. Exhibitors and visi tors alike will have the opportunity to meet and chat with regional known professional artist, Keith Martin Johns and his torian and writer, Dale Cox, who are this year's special guest artist and writer. It is a family friendly event, open to everyone free of charge. In addition to hundreds of pieces of beautiful art, visitors will be treated to great music and tasty food. And door prizes will be given away periodically throughout the afternoon. Entry forms are available on the from Sam Carnley at samcarnley@ gmail.com, or by mail at The Artists Guild of Northwest Florida, P. O. Box 1605, Marianna, FL 32447. The entry deadline is Tuesday, Oct. 1. For more information, please contact Sam Carnley at samcarnley@gmail. com, Larry Conley at mattie_pond@ yahoo.com, or Michele Tabor Kim brough at mtk4art@embarqmail.com. Sunday Afternoon exhibit Artist and woodworker Ethan Sawyer (left) is pictured here with Chipola Technical Theatre student Aaron Black of Hosford. THE ARTS AT CHIPOLA

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The Calhoun-Liberty Journal is published each Wednesday by the Liberty Journal Inc., Summers Road, P.O. Box 536, Bristol, FL 32321. Annual subscriptions are $18. Periodicals postage paid at Bristol, FL POSTMASTER: Send address corrections to: P.O. Box 536, Bristol, FL 32321. (USPS 012367) Summers Road Located at 11493 NW Summers Road in Bristol MAILING ADDRESS: P.O. Box 536, Bristol, FL 32321 TELEPHONE (850) 643-3333 Fax (888) 400-5810 EMAIL: thejournal@fairpoint.net ADS: cljads@fairpoint.net JOURNAL STAFF J ohnny Eubanks...................Publisher Teresa Eubanks........................ Editor Sandra Brown...................Bookkeeper OFFICE HOURS: 9 a.m. 6 p.m. M-F THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Visit us on Facebook at CLJNews Thats how many copies of The Calhoun-Liberty Journal were distributed last week, ensuring plenty of coverage for your announcements and great response for our business advertisers! 5,298 Wednesday, Aug. 28 Saturday, Aug. 31 Thursday Aug. 29 Friday, Aug. 30 TODAYS MEETINGS noon, CalhounLiberty Hospital 7 p.m., Calhoun County Old Ag Bldg. east door, in front of jail TODAYS MEETINGS AA 7 p.m., basement of Calhoun Courthouse Bristol Girl Scout Troop #303, 6:30 p.m., The Club, Bristol. Monday, Sept. 2 Tuesday, Sept. 3 Sunday, Sept. 1 TODAYS MEETINGS 2 p.m., Ag. Bldg., Confer ence Room, across from Courthouse 6 p.m., Fire House 7 p.m. (CT), Dixie Lodge in Btown 6 p.m., St. Paul AME Church in Blountstown 7 p.m., Apalachee Restaurant 7-8 p.m., Grace United Methodist Church, Hosford TODAYS MEETING 2 p.m., Legion Hall in Blountstown Tools to Quit Smoking classes, FL Dept. of Health, Liberty Co., 2 p.m. (ET) and Calhoun Liberty Hospital, 4 p.m. (CT) TODAYS MEETING 6 p.m. (CT), Gazebo Cafe Shop and Deli BIRTHDAYS Cheryl Lynn Rowe, Stacey Sand ers, Carol Varnum, Charles Gatlin BIRTHDAY Holli Revell BIRTHDAYS Dennis Revell & Kristin Yon Farm Share food distribution to local churches, Hosford Fire Dept., 10:30 a.m. (ET) Liberty Senior Citizens travel to hear the Purvis Brothers in concert, 7 p.m. (ET) THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL 5 Many Americans see Labor Day on the calen dar and immediately feel some mixed emotions. Though Labor Day is often a time to celebrate at a backyard barbecue with family and friends, to summer. But Labor Day is more than just barbecues and a sendoff for summer. Labor Day actually dates back to the 19th century, though its origins are still open for debate. According to the Unit ed States Department of Labor, recent research supports the contention that Labor Day was the brainchild of machinist Matthew Maguire, who supposedly devised the idea in 1882 while serving as secretary of the Central Labor Union in New York. But some still feel it was Peter J. McGuire, a cofounder of the American Federation of La bor and general secretary of the Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners, who founded the holiday. Though the debate as to who founded Labor tem ber 5, 1882, in New York. This was in accordance with plans from Maguire's Central Labor Union, which would go on to encourage other states and Labor Day, and celebrate it accordingly just as it was being celebrated in New York. As labor unions grew, more and more cities started celebrating Labor Day, which McGuire suggested should be a day to honor those "who from rude nature have delved and carved all the grandeur we behold." As the popularity of Labor Day grew, govern mental recognition was not far behind. By 1885, municipal ordinances recognizing Labor Day had been passed, and from those eventually sprouted a movement to inspire state legislation. Though tember as Labor Day. New York, along with Col orado, Massachusetts and New Jersey, followed suit that same year. As the 1880s drew to a close, Connecticut, Nebraska and Pennsylvania were recognizing Labor Day, and by 1894, 23 other states had adopted the holiday to honor workers. But it wasn't until June 28, 1894 that Congress Monday in September of each year a legal holi day. This applied to all states as well as the Dis trict of Columbia. Though Labor Day is now a time to gather with family and friends and possibly enjoy some time at the beach or at a barbecue, it's important and the history of this special day in September. BIRTHDAYS Mitch Larkins, Joanne Rankin, Stephanie Doran BIRTHDAYS Carmen Nguyen, Karen Dudley, Joey Peacock, Jimmy Kelly BIRTHDAYS Scott Copeland, Brad Bailey, Toby Garnett The Blountstown Public Library is pleased to announce that we will have the presentation of a commemorative bust of Apalachicola and Principle Chief John Blount on Tuesday, Sept. 10 at 2 p.m. Florida Artist and Sculptor Cliff Leonard created the bust of Chief Blount to recognize and commemo Blount to this area. Chief John Blount served in the War of 1812, the Creek War 1814-15 and the First Seminole War. He rose to the rank of Colonel and was awarded a silver medal from President Andrew Jackson. The bust will remain in the Blountstown Pub lic Library for display. County and City Leaders Thomas Flowers, Tony Shoemake and Kristy Terry will take part in the program along with musi cians Joan and Amy Alderman, Anna Layton, and exhibiting artists Tom Stratton, Joan Alderman, Anna Layton and Jeffrey Watt. Selena Stone, 5th Generation Creek Indian and 8th Grade Carr Elementary School Student will accept this generous gift on behalf of the Blountstown Public Library. Please join the library in honoring of Chief Blount and the Apalachicola Band of Creek Indians at the Blount stown Public Library, in the Heritage Room; light refreshments will be served. This program is a family friendly event. For more information call Rita Maupin, Library Director, at 674-1903. Bust of Chief Blount to be presented on Sept. 10 at Library Buddys Smiths annual Bluegrass Sheriffs Youth Ranches, will be held on Saturday, Sept. 21 at 6:30 p.m. (CT) at the Blountstown Middle School. The concert will feature the Rivertown Girls and Big Bend Bluegrass. Tickets are on sale for $8 if pur chased in advance and are available at Hinson Insurance, Marianna, Blount Insurance, Blountstown and Coastal Insurance, Port St. Joe. Tickets will also be available at the door the night of the concert for $10; children 8 years of age and younger are admitted free of charge. For further information, call Buddy at (850) 674-5793. Please come out and support these efforts on behalf of the Florida Sheriffs Youth Ranges by attending this night of music and fun! Buddy Smiths annual Bluegrass Gospel Concert Sept. 21 at BMS The Apalachee Regional Planning Council announces a public hearing and quarterly meeting to which all persons are invited. The Liberty County Transportation Disadvantaged Coordinating Board will meet on Tuesday, Sept. 10 at 2 p.m. (ET) at Veterans Memorial Park Civic Center, 10405 NW Theo Jacobs Way in Bristol. The public hearing will be held prior to the business meeting. In addition to its regular business, the agenda will include reorganizational functions of the Board, a review of the Actual Expenditure Report, a review of the Annual Operating Report, the adop tion of the Bylaws and the adoption of the Grievance Procedures. If any person decides to appeal any decision made by the Board with re spect to any matter considered at this meeting, he/she will need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceed ing is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence from which the appeal is to be issued. For additional information, a copy of the agenda, or if you require spe cial accommodations at the meeting because of a disability or physical impairment, contact Vanita Anderson at the Apalachee Regional Planning Council, 20776 Central Avenue East, Suite 1, Blountstown, FL 32424 at meeting date. A moment of appreciation for all ment and rescue squads will be held on Wednesday, Sept. 11 at 5 p.m. (CT) at the front steps of the Calhoun County Courthouse. This special group of people will be dedicated in an expres sion of appreciation for those who give so much in helping to keep Calhoun County safe and secure. Everyone is invited and encourage to attend this patriotic event. Dedication planned Sept. 11 at Calhoun County Courthouse

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J AIL and BAI L Page 6 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL AUGUST 28, 2013 Blountstown HEALTH & REHAB ACROSS FROM RAMSEYS PIGGLY WIGGLY C ome Home to Rehab New private rooms now available. Visit our new therapy wing. HAVE A SAFE AND HAPPY LABOR DAY WPHK Radio K-102.7 FM WYBT Radio Y-1000 AM Phone 674-4474 Kids Kingdom Open Enrollment FOR VPK Cataracts? Smart Lenses SM Close-up, Far away & In-between CALL TODAY for a Smart Lens Evaluation Mullis Eye Institute 4320 5th Ave. Marianna (2 Blks from Jackson Hospital) 1(800)769-3429 Swap Shop Best of the Latest Country Charted songs, mixed in with your favorite oldies. W.R. Tolar School held a Jail and Bail fund raiser on Friday, Aug. 16 for their parent-spon sored 8th grade trip to Washington D.C. While the money is still coming in and the funds are not yet tallied, the parents, students and in mates reported plenty of community support. Among those helping at the Liberty County uty Darrell Johnson, Reggie Etheridge, Deputy Josh Briggs and Lisa Smith. bail included Captain Wes Harsey, Captain cer, Bubba Branch, Kyle Peddie, Tina Tharpe, Kathy Nobles, Donnie Read, Tony Anderson, Eddie Joe White, Calhoun-Liberty Employees Carson. Community members pitch in to raise funds for Tolars 8th grade trip to Washington, D.C.

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AUGUST 28, 2013 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 7 DYLAN WILLIS CHESTER Dylan Chester will celebrate his sixth birthday on Wednesday, Aug. 28. He is the son of Matthew and Lanet Chester and little brother to Sara-Kate, all of Bristol. His grandparents include Stan and Debbie Brannan and Sue Chester, all of Bristol, Randy Weeks of Chattahoochee and the late Wayne Chester of Sycamore. His great-grandparents are Catherine and the late Gene Shelton, Eleanor and the late M.W. Weeks, all of Chattahoochee, Merle Brannan of Carrabelle, Katie and the late Willis Chester of Quincy and the late Evelyn Smith of Greensboro. He enjoys swimming and riding in the woods with his daddy. DYLAN GUNN Wednesday, Aug. 28. He is the son of Justin and Katy Gunn of Bristol. His grandparents are Jack and Cathy Brock-Revell of Bristol and Debra Gunn of Tallahassee. His great-grandparents include Horace and Joyce Cushing of Tallahassee, Nelle Brock of Havana, Sonny and Zella Howard of Anthony and Jessie Baker of Quitman, GA. He playing baseball and soccer, watching his favorite TV shows like, Rescue Heroes, and chasing his theme party with family and friends. EVERETT BEAU LEWIS Justin Lewis and Marissa Coleman of Blountstown are proud to announce the birth of their son, Everett Beau Lewis. He was born on Saturday, June 29, 2013 at Gulf Coast Medical Center weighing 7 lbs. and measured 20 inches long. His grandparents are Rob and Chasity Wilks and Jim Coleman, all of Altha, and the late Charles Hoppy Lewis and Joann Lewis of Blountstown. TATUM NICOLE BILBO Joey and Lacy Bilbo are pleased to announce the birth of their daughter, Tatum Nicole Bilbo, born on Wednesday, July 17, 2013. She was born at Capital Regional Medical Center weighing 7 lbs. 7 ozs. and measured 19 1/4 inches long. She has one sister, Reagan. Her grandparents include Phil and Bonita Deck and Jimmy and Clare Bilbo, all of Bristol and Wayne and Carol Sutton of Blountstown. ROSALINA MARIA BARBER Rosalina Maria Barber celebrated her fifth birthday on Tuesday, Aug. 27. She celebrated her birthday with a Tangled Princess Birthday Party on Sunday Aug. 25 in Tallahassee. She is the daughter of the late Zac Barber and Miguelina Barber of Tallahassee. Her grandparents are Rene and Mary Solano of Tallahassee, Kathy Shepard of Tallahassee and Jackie Barber of Rock Bluff. She enjoys dancing, dressing up, reading books, spending time with her grandparents, aunts, uncles, cousins and learning new things in school. She loves learning about her daddy, hearing all the funny stories about when he was little like her and looking at all his pictures. Make-A-Wish Foundation sends Bristol girl to Jonas Bros. concert Souvenirs from a dream come true: Ashleys mom, Angela Finch, holds up a tour t-shirt her daughter will treasure after their recent visit to California. The Finch family met the Jonas Brothers before their Aug. 15 con cert in San Diego. Ashley and her sister, Amber, are shown at cen ter with the Jonas Brothers. Dad Nick is at far left; at far right is their mother, Angela. by Teresa Eubanks, Journal Editor A recommendation from her neuro-oncologist that the Make-A-Wish Founda tion do something special for Ashley Finch resulted in the trip of a lifetime for the 14-year-old Bristol girl. Ashley, who has cere bral palsy, also has a tumor on her brain stem which remains stable at this time but is considered a lifethreatening condition. And thats where the Make-A-Wish Foundation comes in. Although known for granting the wishes of terminally ill children, the foundation also plays a role in helping kids in her situation. Their goal is to enrich the human experi ence with hope, strength and joy. She and her family were treated to a trip to San Di ego, CA, where they en joyed a concert by Ashleys favorite group, The Jonas Brothers. She got to meet the three young per formers during a sound check before the show and stayed to enjoy the concert from the front row with her family. This was her second trip with the Make-AWish Foundation. In June 2006, the Finch family went to a dude ranch in Montana. Ashley was just three years old when she was diagnosed with a brain tumor. It was surgically removed but recurred removed once more. b i r t h s birthdays

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Page 8 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL AUGUST 28, 2013 Political parties, particularly the Republican Party, have a generational gap with America's youth. By and large, America's young people pay little, if any, atten tion to the pronouncements of politicians and political pundits. Three of our granddaughters, ages 18, 19 and 22, are in college, one in a graduate program. Because of a broken home, my wife and I helped raise the 19-year-old. She was al ways a good source for what high school kids think, feel, believe and do. No matter how timid and de mure a teenager may appear when in the presence of Mom and Dad, they all have "street smarts." Yes, they know all the curse words and invent a few of their own. Nothing new, it's always been like that. Today's teens and college youths are largely color blind. Friends are friends without regard to their color or race. The ex ception is largely the result of racism learned from parents. They know who among them is homeless. They drinking and drugs. They know who gets free meals at school because parents don't have money to pay for lunches. They know who the "backpack" kids are. Kids that won't have anything to eat over the weekend can pick up a backpack with food without drawing attention to their plight because all kids carry a backpack. They know who eats at the 34 school sites that offer free food during the summer months. But it's OK. They aren't judgmental about their friends and classmates. The food for the Backpack Program comes from volunteers. My wife and I contribute to that program, and the 19-year-old worked in that program during compassion for those less fortunate than her. For the the 19-year-old while her mother was at work. We had "school" every day at our house. When she was old enough, I took her to pre-K and Kindergarten. She went through 12 years of school with the same group of kids who eventually became teenagers and then young adults. Almost all of her group were, and still are, from broken homes, including her. So, be mother, attended every school event for all 12 years plus pre-K and Kindergarten events. Through all this, what is now about 15 years, this young woman and I have had many conversations. I used these conversations not to talk but to listen to what she had to say, which was plenty. I was never judgmental. If she wanted advice, I would tell her how I would handle the situation. If I had botched some event in my life, I would admit to it and say that is how not to handle a situation. The point of this soliloquy about growing up in America is to point out that politicians don't get it. They think that children are going to follow in the footsteps of their parents. To some extent, the answer is yes, but convincing a young adult that people who are on food stamps are leeches on society, as is the preaching of conservatives, particularly Tea Partiers, falls on deaf ears when that young adult was a "back pack" kid in high school, or knew others who took that backpack home on Friday in order to be able to eat on Saturday and Sunday. Republicans are waging a war on America's poor. The Republican controlled House, read that as Tea Party controlled House, refused to fund the food stamps program as part of the Farm Bill. Instead, the House Republicans state that they will fund the food stamp program in their own way. Read that as, they will gut the program. Fortunately, their proposal will never get through the Senate. Politicians fail to recognize that America's public schools are per fect examples of America's "melt ing pot." The groups of kids, teen agers, young adults that wend their high school are a mix of many eth nic backgrounds. A class of high school seniors is the perfect exam ple of America's diversity. A senior class in Texas may have more Hispanics and a senior class in Harlem may have more Afro Americans, a se nior class in Montana may have an American Indian as president of the class, but without fail, most high school graduating classes are a mix of "Americans." In spite of the obvious mix of black, brown, yellow, tan and white faces that comprise the American mon tage, the Republican Party singles out minorities for "special attention." Black people can vote, but only if they can meet "Republican muster." The North Carolina Republican effort to suppress voting rights of minorities is "modern day Jim Crow law." Fortunately, the judicial system recognizes the blatant effort to suppress the voting rights of minori ties and has put a hold on this law for the interim. There are millions of Hispanics in the U.S. who came here illegally. Millions of them have established lives here, established families, have children born here and now the question is what to do about all the millions of "illegals" in the U.S. Punish those sinners must lurk in the minds of Re rapped and waiting about a kazillion years, then the illegal can achieve some form of limited citizenship. It's all for naught. The average illegal will die before he or she can jump through all the Republican hoops. We, particularly Republicans and more particularly Tea Partiers, are so sanctimonious about this being "our America." How many of us have proof that our ancestors weren't illegals? I don't. My ancestors al legedly came to the Carolinas in the early 1700s or 1800s, but no one is sure. But, I'll bet my truck that hundreds of others arriving from Europe. They hit the docks, had a beer and beat feet into the hinterlands. So, when the sanctimonious claim their heritage to the colonial elite, I say.prove it. It is a shame to watch the Republican Party morph into the party of old white men with swollen pros tates, squinty eyes and drawers too tight, hating any and everything not made in their image. What America needs is another President Ronald Reagan, President George H. W. Bush, Senator Bob Dole, Senator Barry Goldwater, Representative Jack Kemp and Senator Everett Dirksen. These men represented the Grand Old Party at its best, but now the Grand Old Party is populated with mental midgets. The political generation gap C ORNER Jerry Cox is a retired military OXS New York mayoral candidate Anthony Weiner got in a car wreck over the weekend not to be confused with his campaign. Thats a train wreck. And today he tweeted the insurance com pany the wrong photo. DAVID LETTERMAN The former San Diego mayor accused of sex ually harassing 14 women, Bob Filner, was of fered a new job as a TSA agent at the airport. JAY LENO A couple of days ago they found a great white shark dead on a subway car in New York, and today hes chowder at Red Lobster. Yep, they found him on surveillance tape going down the stairs and through the turnstile. He seemed per fectly healthy. DAVID LETTERMAN A shark in the subway. This is what happens when you dont have stop-and-frisk. The police had an autopsy done on the shark, and they found a tourist from Cincinnati. The shark was apparently in town for shark week. DAVID LETTERMAN A new study came out that found the very worst drivers drive a Prius. Apparently, its very back. CONAN OBRIEN Some park rangers in California found a plot on which someone grew 500,000 pounds of marijuana. They assume this pot was grown by humans, but I wouldnt rule out bears. Think about it: They sleep three months a year, all you ever see them doing is rummaging through the is Smoky. JIMMY KIMMEL The makers of drones want the media to stop calling their unmanned aircrafts drones. They dont like the name drones. The manufacturers said, we prefer the term surprise visitor. CONAN OBRIEN So New York City comptroller candidate Eliot Spitzer says if he wins, he will work for only $1 a year. Which is pretty smart, because at that rate, he wont be able to afford another $5,000 an hour hooker until the year 7013. JAY LENO Justin Bieber did something nice yesterday and he wants to make sure you know about it. He was driving through L.A. and happened upon a woman who asked him for money. So he stopped and handed her money and posted a picture of himself on Instagram. Always give back: a good message. Maybe we can give him back to Canada. JIMMY KIMMEL According to a new study, most men would like women to occasionally pick up the check. The study also found most women would occa sionally like to be paid as much as men for doing the same job. CONAN OBRIEN So you have your regular Oreos and they have Double Stuf Oreos. Somebody measured the things, and it turns out there is not twice the amount of stuff as in the regular Oreos. No dou ble ammonium bicarbonate, no double thiamine mononitrate, no double calcium phosphate. DAVID LETTERMAN Now if you are at home measuring stuff in an Oreo, you should take a long, hard look at your life. Ill tell you something else right now, we wouldnt have to worry about stuff like this if New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie was president. DAVID LETTERMAN The NFL is now cracking down on what they call excessive celebration, like when a player is found not guilty and does that little dance in the courtroom. OK, thats 15 yards now. JAY LENO ever smartphone, just like an iPhone. But if you ask Siri any questions, she reports you to the police. JIMMY KIMMEL It is widely believed these phones were se cretly built in China and shipped to North Korea. Its hard to believe they built a smartphone, be there. You cant even have friends and family in North Korea. JIMMY KIMMEL to be the new Batman, they went crazy and peti do something! Nothing, however, about getting rid of the goon running the show in Syria. But DAVID LETTERMAN Late Night Laughs A RECAP OF RECENT OBSERVATIONS BY LATE NIGHT TV HOSTS. COMMENTARY

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AUGUST 28, 2013 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 9 BUSINESS Floridas seasonally adjusted unemployment rate was 7.1 percent in July 2013, holding steady over the month, but down 1.6 percentage points from 8.7 per cent a year ago. The states May, June and July rates were the low est since September 2008 when it was 7.0 percent. There were 665,000 jobless Floridians out of a labor force of 9,404,000. Floridas seasonally adjusted total nonagricultural employment was 7,549,660 in July 2013, an increase of 27,600 jobs over the month. The unemployment rate for the Chipola Workforce Board Region (Calhoun,Holmes,Jackson,Liberty, Washington) was 6.7 percent in July 2013, holding steady from June 2013. ---UNEMPLOYMENT RATES ---July-13 Jun-13 July-12 Liberty.................6.7 6.5 7.7 Calhoun...............7.1 6.8 8.9 Holmes.................6.5 6.4 7.7 Jackson.................6.1 6.1 7.8 Washington...........8.3 8.3 9.9 Chipola Region.....6.7 6.7 8.3 Rates better than a year ago July unemployment rates show slight increase in Liberty & Calhoun counties A family-owned business that began opera tions in Bonifay is spreading its wings with a move to a larger facility at the Calhoun County Airport. Michael and Linda Hall of Panama City start ed Sunset Eagle Aviation in January at the Tri County Airport in Holmes County before coming to the Blountstown area. The couple's two sons work with them. Both Michael and his son, Matthew, are Air Force veterans. Dad served in Desert Storm; Matthew was in Afghanistan. Another son, Mitchell, served in the U.S. Army. "Between the three of them, they've got over 40 years of experience," said Linda. Michael previously worked with Sowell Aviation in Pan ama City and Miracle Strip Aviation in Destin before retiring to start Sunset Eagle Aviation. The family is excited about the move to the 100' x 100' hanger. The company does annual inspections for air craft as well as maintenance and repairs. The couple and their sons are shown in the photo above. Linda is pictured holding her fourmonth-old grandchild, Macklin, but she says it's her seven-year-old granddaughter, Morgan (not pictured) who runs the show. "She's the C.E.O," according to Linda, who explains, "If we don't do all the time!" The business is open Monday through Satur day from around 9 a.m. until 1 p.m. and will ex tend hours once they get established. A ribbon-cutting ceremony was held last week to FSU College of Nursing offers accelerated degree program in anticipation of national shortage TALLAHASSEE Florida State Universitys College of Nursing is offering an accelerated bachelors of science in nursing degree program for students who have earned undergraduate and advanced degrees in other disciplines to address a looming national nursing shortage. The College of Nurs ings accelerated bacca laureate program offers the most expedient path to licensure as a regis tered nurse for those who completed bachelors or graduate degrees in other disciplines, leading to an earned bachelors degree in nursing in as soon as twelve months. The accelerated bac calaureate program builds on previous learning ex periences to accomplish program objectives within a short period of time. The accelerated pro gram at Florida State, established in 2009, has received support from outside organizations, including Capital Health Plan. The U.S. Department of Labor projects the na tion will need more than a million new and replace ment registered nurses by 2020, said Dianne Speake, interim dean and professor in the College of Nursing. The challenge is to produce competent nurses in an expedited manner while maintaining the integrity and quality of the nursing education provided, which our ac celerated program most certainly accomplishes. ment is located in the Harveys rant seats 60 and offers a variety Ribeyes on their lunch and dinner

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Page 10 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL AUGUST 28, 2013 OPEN Mon. Fri. from 7:30 a.m. 6 p.m. Saturdays from 7:30 a.m. 4 p.m. Back Corner Florist & Stricklands Hardware Open on Labor Day, Monday, Sept. 2. THE Liberty County Courthouse will be CLOSED Monday, Sept. 2 in observance of LABOR DAY Kathy Brown, Clerk of the Court *Lifetime Warranty on Repairs *Will pay up to $500 of your deductible *Over 75 years combined experience TNT TOBY GARNETT, OWNER Collision Center Its 5 a.m. and Lt. Eric Hall is driving around the wooded grounds of the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) training center at the Florida Public Safety Institute, just outside of Tallahassee. Hes checking to make sure the running trail is in good condition. group of FWC recruits lined up in formation. Though the sun has yet to rise, its already steamy and their matching gray T-shirts stick to their backs. He parks his truck and gets out, calls Right face and takes off at a trot. The recruits fall in behind the ex-Navy SEAL for their morning run, the sound of their shoes and their musical cadence calls the only sounds echoing through the quiet campus. After the four-mile jaunt, they quickly shower and head to the chow hall for breakfast. The rest of the day is spent in the classroom going over boating laws and boat maintenance, but later in the week they will board a bus and head to the coast for some hands-on practice behind the wheel of one of their many vessels. sible for patrolling all of Floridas woods, including public and pri vate lands, as well as its waters, they must be well-versed on a wide variety of information. Protecting our valuable natural resources calls for a broad knowledge of Floridas a variety of technical skills both physical and mental. Also, due to their jurisdiction and specialized equipment, FWC to respond to boating accidents, missing boaters and lost campers, hikers and hunters. Each year, they save around 1,000 people during search-and-rescue missions. To prepare for all of that, after obtaining their law enforcement 19-week basic law enforcement training conducted by staff. For their law enforcement credentials elsewhere, the FWC periodically conducts academies consisting logging many hours on the range both day and night; meet some face, including alligators and snakes, and learn how to handle them. They practice loading and unloading boats with a trailer and operating boats in many different weather conditions. Training in tactics for operating all-terrain vehicles and practicing with them in the woods of the academy campus. They also don protective gear and engage in specialized defensive tactic training drills to keep themselves and others safe. They practice detecting when people are boating and and learn how to follow a track left by someone in the woods. Additionally, the classroom time includes a focus on state and federal If that seems like a lot it is! most highly trained law enforce ment professionals in the country. During their time at the academy, they eat, sleep, work out and study onsite, soaking up as much infor mation as they can from staff and bonding with fellow recruits. To make it through this rigorous training and become an FWC of hard-working individual who is passionate about protecting Floridas outdoor paradise and the people in it. Before being selected to attend the academy applicants complete a state of Florida application and supplemental FWC application, session, must pass a background check and psychological evalu ation and complete an interview. It takes a special kind of person and it takes a special kind of law takes? The FWC is always looking for enthusiastic new members, espe cially in south Florida where high population rates make for some increased enforcement challenges. There are recruiters across the state to help you through the process. To learn more, visit MyFWC.com/ Get-Involved and click on Law Protecting Paradise by Katie Purcell OUTDOORS The Oaks Restaurant LL THE OAK STATION SHOPPING CENTER Jumbo Shrimp Angus Beef 850-526-1114 Delicious Southern Home Cooking FULL MENU AVAILABLE all of Floridas woods, private lands, as well as its waters, they must be well-versed on a wide variety of information. natural resources calls wildlife and a mastery of a variety of technical skills both physical and mental. Training on land, water and in the classroom Tell em you saw it in The JOURNAL! Saltwater license-free TALLAHASSEE Governor Rick Scott and the Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission announced On this day, Florida residents and visitors can experi on Sept. 1 is a great way for families to enjoy Floridas Labor Day holiday. Florida is the Fishing Capital of the World and this license-free weekend is a great op portunity to introduce friends and family who may have communities. were held earlier this year on April 13 and June 8 for freshwater and June 1 for saltwater. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) will to the calendar at the Sept. 5 meeting in Pensacola. If approved, there will be two more saltwater and two end of 2013. All other regulations still apply. An annual license for residents can be purchased at 1-888-FISH-Florida or at License.MyFWC.com. All wildlife conservation and help attain additional fund ing for Federal Aid in Sport Fish Restoration projects. All bag limits, seasons and size restrictions apply on MyFWC.com/Fishing. Panama City Beach Sept. 7 Learn the skills to successfully cast your line into the sea by attending the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) Womens Fishing Clinic in Panama City Beach on Saturday, Sept. 7. Participants will not only take home a lifelong hobby, they will leave with a new appreciation for the marine environment. They will learn the basics skills, safety and the vulnerability of Floridas marine ecosystems in a fun, laid-back atmosphere. The free, day-long clinic is from 9 a.m. until 5 p.m. at St. Andrews State Park, 4607 State Park Lane, in Panama City Beach. Advance registration is required, and the event is capped at 20 participants. Lessons include knot tying, cast netting, rod-and-reel rigging, boating safety, how to be a responsible marine catch-and-release techniques and more. If conditions allow, women will have the opportunity a pier. This event is a catch-and-release activity. All participants must have a valid recreational saltwater can be purchased at your local tackle shop or online. Learn more by visiting MyFWC.com/License. Fishing equipment and bait will be provided dur ing the clinic, but participants are encouraged to bring their own gear. To register or get more information, please email Jennifer Saranzak at Jennifer.Saranzak@MyFWC.com, or call (352) 543-9219, ext. 216.

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AUGUST 28, 2013 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 11 OUTDOORS Notice is hereby given that the City of Bristol will hold its biennial election on Tuesday, November 12, 2013 from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Mayor Two-year term City Clerk Two-year term Three Council Members Two-year terms with Robin M. Hatcher, City Clerk, at City Hall, 12444 NW Virginia G. Weaver St.,Bristol, Florida, beginning Monday, August 26 and ending Thursday, August 29, 2013 during regular business hours. Those wishing to vote, please register with the Supervisor of Elections in the Liberty County Courthouse, Bristol, FL. The books will close on October 14, 2013 for registering to vote in the November 12, 2013 City of Bristol Election. CITY OF BRISTOL NOTICE OF ELECTION NOTICE OF QUALIFYING DATES If Trailers, trailer parts, hitches, storage sheds and truck accessories (850) 4824442 RENTALS AND SERVICE Heating & Air Conditioning FL LIC. # CMC1249570 (850) 674-4777 Whaley Whaley A large selection of new and used cars are now available at Chipola Ford in Marianna! Questions? Give him a call at (850)482-4043. HE IS WAITING FOR YOUR CALL! Chipola Liberty Post and Barn Pole Inc. DEMPSEY BARRON ROAD, BRISTOL (OFF HWY. 12 N) Phone (850) 643-5995 Ever wonder what you would do if you met a bear in the woods? I dont. Not anymore. I found out once on a backpacking trip in Idahos Sawtooth Moun tains. It wasnt something I really wanted to know, but now that I do, I feel the need to share the lesson with others. The adventure began when my friend Lee sug gested that we take a trip to mark his 40th birthday. I always assumed either the Marine Patrol or the grim reaper would take both of us before age 30, so living free and keeping a pulse ebrating. Especially in a place Id always wanted to see in person. Lee and our friend Steve had made several trips out west before, but all my backpacking had been east of the Mississippi. I was look ing forward to the higher eleva tions, beautiful vistas and a chance ters of the northern Rockies. tions, though, I started wonder ing what we would do if we met a grizzly bear. Should we take a no idea, but I felt like we needed a plan. I posed the question in a chain of emails among the four of us who man that he is, responded with a painfully truthful non-answer. Bears will usually run from four grown men, he said. If you want something to worry about, just remember that were out-ofshape old guys with years of ba con fat running through our veins. Were about to tackle a fairly tough hike at high elevation. At this point, a massive coronary is a lot more likely than a bear attack. He was right, of course. There was also the fact that mouth-toout of the question. If CPR was needed, it was most likely going to be performed with the heel of a boot (provided somebody had enough energy). Still, I couldnt help but think about that hypothet ical bear. What I came up with was a es cape strategy based on the knowl edge that Steve and Lee each had more knee surgeries than Joe Na math. Mine was the classic I-justhave-to-outrun-you theory. Later, I learned their plan hinged on my into cardiac arrest. In short, a bear attack would boil down to a battle of the body systems: My cardio vs. their skeletal winner take all. I liked my odds in that scenario. As it turned out, however, I was all nally came. * On the third day in, we reached Arrowhead Lake, an ice-blue diamond in a green valley below snow-capped peaks. The sight took my breath away. Or maybe the el evation did. Regardless, it was an is, Im told). So, while the other three were doing trivial stuff like pitching the ing supper, I volunteered to go As I worked my way around the lake, I was hypnotized by the music of nature playing to the rhythm of my casts. Birds sang. Fish jumped. And a platoon of chipmunks was at my back, frantically doing whatev er chipmunks do. (Munking chips? Chipping munks?) When I was as far away from the campsite as possible, I noticed the birds had stopped their singing and the chipmunks had stopped their chipmunkery. I was feeling a little ill at ease, but I shrugged it off because who knows, maybe they clock out at four or something. A couple of minutes later though, I got the distinct and eerie feeling something was watch ing me from behind. So I turned around slowly ing directly into the glassy eyes of death itself. What I remember most vividly is the late afternoon sun glistening on its brown fur and its menacing snout only a few feet in front of me. It was so close, I could all but feel its hot breath in my face. My very soul was frozen as I stared at its . slender legs . with hooves instead of claws. Also, the ears of death were a bit been in my nightmares. And it was chewing on a branch in a decidedly non-death-like way. I should probably point out here that I had never seen a mule deer in person before, much less one standing on small rise less than 10 feet away. In my defense, if you brought that damn thing to Florida, I guarantee that somebody would put a saddle on it. A couple of seconds later, the grizzly deer trotted away. And nally breathed again. * It occurred to me that I now met an actual bear in the woods die painfully, paralyzed by fear as my body got eaten piece by piece. In fact, if I ever meet a grizzly face to face, Im pretty sure my last hike will be on the trail through his digestive tract. If that happens, my only wish is that age-old question: Does a bear %$&# in the woods? The Sawtooth Grizzly Breakdown Calhoun County native Jim McClellan grew of his family has enjoyed. He lives in Pensacola. His columns can also be found on his blog, outdoorsdownsouth.com. JIM McCLELLANS OUTDOORS Down South catch & release only beginning on Sept. 1 DID YOU KNOW? A trolling motor is a propulsion system that is used in place of a vessels primary source of propulsion in slow-moving situations. If you need to move a boat into a different po needs to precisely maneuver the boat to an exact loca ent types of trolling motors, including ones that are either electric or gas-powered. Electric trolling motors are useful in situations where gasoline-powered engines are prohib ited, such as on lakes or in close proximity to vacation and swimming areas. The trolling motor may be controlled by a hand control, foot pedal or even wireless remote on boats stern or bow. When the primary engine is in opera tion, the trolling motor is customarily lifted out of the water to reduce drag.

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Page 12 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL AUGUST 28, 2013 ABOVE RIGHT: Josie Hall #2 leaps to block the shot. ABOVE: Althas Carly Schwartz (#1) stretches to make the play. BELOW: Ashtin McMullian (#15 ) prepares to set the ball. Pre-season volleyball classic held Aug. 20 at BHS The girls volleyball preseason classic was held at Blountstown High School on Aug. 20 with Marianna, LCHS and Altha teams in at tendance. It was a series of four matches, best of three games. Marianna was victori match up. In the second set, Marianna fell to Altha. BHS took the next win against LCHS. BHS won over Altha. RIGHT: Tiger fans show their spirit during the game. BE LOW RIGHT: Karleigh Sellers (#11) watches as Leslie Wil liams jumps to make the hit. DANIEL WILLIAMS PHOTOS Madison Peddie (#12) jumps toward the ball.

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AUGUST 28, 2013 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 13 Whaley Heating & Air Conditioning (850) 674-4777 FL LIC. # CMC1249570 Accepting: William's Home Improvements No Job Too Big or Small" Concrete work, landscape, pressure cleaning, renovations, seamless gutter, painting, vinyl, & screen enclosure Call 674-8092 Licensed & Insured, contractor & roofer FOR FREE ESTIMATES Call Chris Nissley at 674-8081 or 643-8561 (Cell) STUMP GRINDING Reasonable Rates & FREE Estimates! That Darn Pump There is never a convenient time to be without water. WELLS (850)643-HELP Thats 643-4357 or Home 643-3857 For friendly service and never any overtime charges call, Clint Hatcher, Owner Electrical Lic. # ER13014037 Building Lic. # RB29003511 New Homes H Garages H Additions H Electrical Remodeling Foundations Screenrooms Sunrooms VINYL SIDING RESIDENTAL & COMMERCIAL FREE Estimates Serving Calhoun, Liberty & Jackson Counties JEMISON Heating & Cooling, Lic# RM1416924 Carrier Equipment Masters Farm Supply LS Tractor Equipment Committed To Quality Since 1973 (850) 762-3222 fax masters7@fairpoint.net Dozer and Excavation work Ponds Road Building Demolition Pine Tree Planting Herbicide Spraying Fire Line Plowing Burning mail to: clayslandclearing@gmail.com Land Clearing and Forestry Services Hwy 71 South on J.P. Peacock Rd, Altha. Check out our prices. For ALL Your One STOP Florist Margies Florist W.R. Tolar continues to offer its incentive program that allows students with good behavior to have the last 30 minutes of their day every Friday to enjoy special activities. Each Friday the staff plan some thing different. This past Friday, Tolar held a Growl Out. Pictured are students enjoying their free time dancing in the gym. DANIEL WILLIAMS PHOTOS Tolars kids dance for GROWL OUT Pea Ridge Road in Bristol, Phone (850) 643-5417 SCHOOL LUNCH MENU Laban Bontrager, DMD, Monica Bontrager, DMD Bristol Dental Clinic Each breakfast includes a choice of assorted cereal, whole wheat buttered toast, milk and juice. CALHOUN LIBERTY MENUS SPONSORED BY: Service Directory

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Page 14 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL AUGUST 28, 2013 SCHEDULE ESSENTIAL FUNCTIONS KNOWLEDGE/EDUCATION AND EXPERIENCE REQUIRED SKILLS REQUIRED/DESIRED ABILITIES REQUIRED (work characteristics, behaviors, leadership abilities, etc.) PHYSICAL DEMANDS (physical demands under which the job is performed) Starting Pay $9.90 per hour EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER POSITION AVAILABLE Liberty County Water Department WATER TREATMENT PLANT OPERATOR TRAINEE The School Board of Liberty County JOB OPENING Three (3) Professional References Resume Resume AVID TUTOR QUALIFICATIONS: KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS, AND ABILITIES: MUST be a college student with a minimum 2.5 G.P.A. COMPENSATION: Applications will be received from: August 22, 2013 September 5, 2013 Employment opportunities are offered without regard to race, religion, sex, national origin, age, handicap or marital status. JOB MKT Program Manager Take Stock in Children Grant (Limited term employment Aug. 2013 May 2014) and Coordinator of Patient Simulation APPLICATION DEADLINE IS OPEN UNTIL FILLED. EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER CHIPOLA COLLEGE Dakoda Berg photos David Manning, Adronna Kombrinck and Tony Anderson, known as The Lake Mystic Trio, perform for those who came to Saturday nights Second Annual Big Bend Hospice Fam ily Reunion Gospel Sing. Appreciative listeners gathered at Hosford School to enjoy a selection of gospel songs. GOSPEL SING

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AUGUST 28, 2013 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 15 PUBLIC AND LEGAL NOTICES IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR LIB ERTY COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO. 39-2009-CA000103 DIVISION: BAC HOME LOANS SERVIC ING, LP F/K/A COUNTRY WIDE HOME LOANS SER VICING, LP, Plaintiff, vs. RONALD L. WATERMAN, et al, Defendant(s). ______________________/ NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated June 20, 2013 and entered in Case No. 39-2009-CA-000103 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for LIB ERTY County, Florida wherein BAC HOME LOANS SERVIC ING, LP F/K/A COUNTRY WIDE HOME LOANS SER VICING, L.P. is the Plaintiff and RONALD L. WATERMAN; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF RONALD L. WATERMAN N/K/A JANE DOE; JACILA M. WATERMAN; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JACILA M. WA TERMAN N/K/A JOHN DOE; TENANT #1 N/K/A JOHN DOE, and TENANT #2 N/K/A JANE DOE are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the FRONT DOOR OF THE LIBERTY COUNTY COURTHOUSE at 11:00 AM on the 17th day of September, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Fi nal Judgment: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTH WEST CORNER OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4 OF SEC TION 6, TOWNSHIP 1 SOUTH, RANGE 7 WEST, IN LIBERTY COUNTY FLORIDA; THENCE RUN EAST 125.70 FEET ALONG THE 1/4 SECTION LINE; THENCE RUN NORTH 03 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST, 10.02 FEET ALONG THE EAST RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF STATE ROAD NO. 12 TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUE TO RUN NORTH 03 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST, 135.24 FEET ALONG THE EAST RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF SAID STATE ROAD NO. 12; THENCE RUN EAST 256.00 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 135.00 FEET; THENCE RUN WEST 264.10 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. ALSO, COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF THE NORTHWEST 1/4 OF SECTION 6, TOWNSHIP 1 SOUTH, RANGE 7 WEST; LIBERTY COUNTY, FLORI DA; THENCE RUN EAST TO THE EAST SIDE OF STATE ROAD NO. 67 (A/K/A STATE ROAD NO. 12) RIGHT OF WAY FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE RUN NORTH 10.02 FEET; THENCE RUN EAST 264.10 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 10.02 FEET OR TO A POINT DUE EAST OF THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE RUN WEST 264.10 FEET; MORE OR LESS, TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. A/K/A 13077 NW COUNTY ROAD 12, BRISTOL, FL 32321. Any person claiming an in terest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of the Court on July 17, 2013. Kathleen E. Brown Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Vanell Summers Deputy Clerk Published in The Calhoun-Lib erty Journal Invoice to: Ronald R. Wolfe & Associates, P.L. P.O. Box 25018 Tampa, Florida 33622-5018 F09055364 8-28, 9-4 ----------------------------------------IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CALHOUN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 12-259-CA FARM CREDIT OF NORTH WEST FLORIDA, ACA, Plaintiff, vs. WATERFRONT GROUP FLORIDA, LLC, CHRIS JOHN SON, UNKNOWN TENANT(S) I, UNKNOWN TENANT(S) II, UNKNOWN TENANT(S) III, UNKNOWN TENANT(S) IV, UNKNOWN TENANT(S) V, UNKNOWN TENANT(S) VI AND UNKNOWN TENANT(S) VII, Defendants. ______________________/ NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE is given pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure and Reformation of Mortgage, Assignment of Rents and Se curity Agreement dated July 25, 2013, in Case No. 12-259CA of the Circuit Court of the Fourteenth Judicial Circuit, in and for Calhoun County, Flor ida, in which Farm Credit of Northwest Florida, ACA is the Plaintiff and Waterfront Group Florida, LLC, Chris John son, Unknown Tenant(s) I, Unknown Tenant(s) II, Unknown Tenant(s) III, Un known Tenant(s) IV, Un known Tenant(s) V, Unknown Tenant(s) VI and Unknown Tenant(s) VII are the Defen dants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Front Steps of the Calhoun County Courthouse, 20859 Central Avenue E., Blount stown, Florida at 11:00 a.m. CST on September 12, 2013 the property set forth in the Fi nal Judgment of Foreclosure and Reformation of Mortgage, Assignment of Rents and Se curity Agreement and more particularly described as fol lows: Parcel One: Original Lot Two (2), accord ing to U.S. Government Survey in Section Four (4), Township Two (2) South, Range Eight (8) West. Also: Original Lots Two (2) and Four (4), according to U.S. Govern ment Survey in Section Five (5), Township Two (2) South, Range Eight (8) West. More particularly described as follows: Beginning at Northwest comer of Southeast Quarter (SE 1/4) of said Section 5, thence East to the channel of Apalachicola River; thence Southeasterly down the channel of the Apala chicola River to its intersection with the South line (extended) of Lot Two (2) Original in Sec tion Four (4) Township 2 South, Range 8 West, thence West along South line of Lot 2, Origi nal, Section 4 and Lots 2 and 4 Original of said Section 5 to the Southwest comer of the Northwest Quarter (NW 1/4) of Southeast Quarter (SE 1/4) of said Section 5, thence North along center line of said Sec tion 5, to the Point of Begin ning. Parcel Two: The Northwest Quarter (NW 1/4) of Section 5, Township 2 South, Range 8 West, less and except that portion of said NW 1/4 lying North of Woods Cemetery Creek previously conveyed by deed dated Sep tember 17, 1959 and recorded in Calhoun County Deed Book 71, at Page 483 all located in Section 5, Township 2 South, Range 8 West. Also: All that portion of East Half of Northeast Quarter (E 1/2 of NE 1/4) of Section 6, Township 2 South, Range 8 West, lying East of County Road. Parcel Three: All that portion of the N 1/2 of the NW 1/4 of NW 1/4, the N 1/2 of NE 1/4 of NW 1/4 and N 1/2 of NW 1/4 of NE 1/4 of Section 5, Township 2 South, Range 8 West, lying adjacent to and contiguous to the Woods Cemetery being bounded on the South by a creek nearest said Cemetery; on the East by a slew com monly known as Mud-Slew; on the West by a County road and on the North by the North line of said Section 5. It is the in part to convey all of the land ly ing within said boundaries, less and except the area known as Woods Cemetery. Parcel Four: Original Lot 1, Section 4, Town ship 2 South, Range 8 West, also Original Lots 1 and 5 of fractional NW 1/4, Section 5, Township 2 South, Range 8 West. This land is bounded on the North by Township line between Township 1 and Town ship 2. On West by 1/2 Section line in Section 5 North and South. South by 1/2 Section line running East and West and on East by Apalachicola River. Parcel Five: That part of the North Half of the NE 1/4 of the SE 1/4 lying East of County Road in Section 6, Township 2 South, Range 8 West: Also the N 1/2 of the N 1/2 of the SW 1/4 of Section 5: The N 1/2 of Government Lots 2 and 4 in Section 5 also a portion of Lot 2 in Section 4 described as follows: Begin ning at the intersection of the West bank of the Apalachicola River and the North line of Government Lot 2 in Section 4, thence West to NW comer of said Lot 2, thence South along the West line of said Lot 2, 660 feet more or less to the East and West centerline of said Lot 2, thence East to the West Bank of Apalachicola River; thence Northwesterly following the meanderings of the river to Point of Beginning. All in Town ship 2 South, Range 8 West. LESS AND EXCEPT The North Half (N 1/2) of the Northwest Quarter (NW 1/4) of the Northwest Quarter (NW 1/4) of Section 5 and that part of the Northeast Quarter (NE 1/4) of the Northeast Quar ter (NE 1/4) of the Northeast Quarter (NE 1/4) of Section 6 which lies East of the County Road, all in Township 2 South of Range 8 West. Less and ex cept that part of Woods Ceme tery which lies within said N 1/2 of NW 1/4 of NW 1/4 of said Section 5. Also, less and except the fol lowing: A strip of land 20 feet wide across and parallel to the North boundary of the NW 1/4 of NW 1/4 of Section 5, Township 2 South, Range 8 West, AND A strip of land 20 feet wide across the East side of the NW 1/4 of the NW 1/4 Section 5, Township 2 South, Range 8 West to a point designated as the Woods Cemetery, being approximately 210 yards. ALSO LESS AND EXCEPT: North 1/2 of the Northwest 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4 of Section 5, Township 2 South, Range 8 West and also that portion of the North 1/2 of the Northeast 1/4 of the Southeast 1/4 of Section 6, Township 2 South, Range 8 West lying East of State Road 69. ALSO LESS AND EXCEPT: Any portion of that property conveyed to David Corbin as Book 54, Page 357, of the Pub lic Records of Calhoun County, Florida. THE FOREGOING LANDS ALL BEING MORE PARTICU LARLY DESCRIBED AS FOL LOWS: Original Government Lot 1 of Fractional Section 4, Township 2 South, Range 8 West, and Original Government Lots 1 and 5 of Section 5, Township 2 South, Range 8 West, Calhoun County, Florida. ALSO East Half (E 1/2) of the North west Quarter (NW 1/4) and the South Half (S 1/2) of the Northwest Quarter (NW 1/4) of the Northwest Quarter (NW 1/4) and the Southwest Quar ter (SW 1/4) of the Northwest Quarter (NW 1/4) of Section 5, Township 2 South, Range 8 West, Calhoun County, Florida. SUBJECT TO that portion lying within Woods Cemetery Road. LESS AND EXCEPT that por tion lying within Woods Cem etery. ALSO All that portion of the South Half (S 1/2) of the Northeast Quarter (NE 1/4) of the North east Quarter (NE 1/4) and the Southeast Quarter (SE 1/4) of the Northeast Quarter (NE 1/4) of Section 6, Township 2 South, Range 8 West, Calhoun County, Florida lying East of County Road S-69 (formerly State Road S-69). ALSO All that portion of Original Gov ernment Lot 2 in Fractional Section 4, Township 2 South, Range 8 West, Calhoun Coun ty, Florida, and all that portion of the Northeast Quarter (NE 1/4) of the Southwest Quarter (SW 1/4) and all that portion of Original Government Lot 2 and Original Government Lot 4 of Section 5, Township 2 South, Range 8 West, Calhoun County, Florida, lying North of that certain property previously conveyed to David Corbin as Book 54 Page 357 of the Pub lic Records of Calhoun County, Florida. Any person claiming an inter est in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis in sixty (60) days after the sale. Dated this June 25, 2013. Carla Hand Clerk of The Circuit Court Michael P. Bist Gardner, Bist, Wiener, Wad sworth, Bowden, Bush, Dee, LaVia & Wright, P.A. 1300 Thomaswood Drive Tallahassee, Florida 32308 8-28, 9-4 ----------------------------------------IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR LIBERTY COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 39-2010-CA000114 CITIFINANCIAL SERVICES, INC., D/B/A CITIFINANCIAL EQUITY SERVICES, INC., AN OKLAHOMA CORPORA TION, Plaintiff, vs. MIKE YON; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF MIKE YON; SARAH YON; THE UN KNOWN SPOUSE OF SARAH YON; IF LIVING, INCLUDING ANY UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SAID DEFENDANT(S), IF REMARRIED, AND IF DE CEASED, THE RESPECTIVE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVI SEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGN EES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND TRUSTEES, AND ALL OTHER PERSONS CLAIM ING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE NAMED DEFENDANT(S); UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2; Defendant(s) ______________________/ NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-styled cause, in the Circuit Court of Liberty County, Florida, I will sell the property situate in Lib erty County, Florida, described as: ALL THAT CERTAIN LAND SITUATE IN LIBERTY COUN TY, STATE OF FLORIDA VIZ: PARCEL 1: COMMENCE AT THE NORTH EAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 19, TOWNSHIP 1 SOUTH, RANGE 7 WEST, LIBERTY COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN; THENCE SOUTH 01 DEGREES 22 MINUTES 42 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE WESTERLY BOUND ARY OF SAID SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTH EAST QUARTER A DIS TANCE OF 377.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BE GINNING THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 04 SECONDS EAST 38.63 FEET TO A POINT ON A FENCE; THENCE SOUTH 01 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 09 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID FENCE A DISTANCE OF 150.01 FEET; THE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 04 SECONDS WEST 38.39 FEET TO SAID WESTER LY BOUNDARY; THENCE NORTH 01 DEGREES 22 MIN UTES 42 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID EASTERLY BOUNDARY A DISTANCE OF 150.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. CONTAIN ING 0.13 ACRES, MORE OR LESS. PARCEL 2: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUAR TER OF SECTION 19, TOWN SHIP 1 SOUTH, RANGE 7 WEST, LIBERTY COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN THENCE SOUTH 01 DEGREE 22 MINUTES 42 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE WEST ERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUAR TER A DISTANCE OF 377.00 FEET; THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 04 SECONDS EAST 38.63 FEET TO A POINT ON A FENCE FOR THE POINT OF BEGIN NING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE CON TINUE NORTH 89 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 04 SECONDS EAST 145.24 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 01 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 09 SECONDS WEST 150.01 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 04 SECONDS WEST 145.24 FEET TO SAID FENCE; THENCE NORTH 01 DEGREE 28 MINUTES 09 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID FENCE A DISTANCE OF 150.01 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. CON TAINING 0.50 ACRE, MORE OR LESS. PARCEL 3: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUAR TER OF SECTION 19, TOWN SHIP 1 SOUTH, RANGE 7 WEST, LIBERTY COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN THENCE SOUTH 01 DEGREES 22 MINUTES 42 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE WEST ERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUAR TER A DISTANCE OF 377.00 FEET; THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 04 SECONDS EAST 183.87 FEET TO THE POINT OF BE GINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE CONTINUE NORTH 89 DE GREES 57 MINUTES 04 SEC ONDS EAST 372.12 FEET TO THE SOUTHWESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUND ARY OF COUNTY ROAD NO. 379 (80 FOOT RIGHT OF WAY); THENCE SOUTH 15 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 25 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID SOUTHWESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUND ARY A DISTANCE OF 159.95 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 04 SECONDS WEST 418.92 FEET; THENCE NORTH 01 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 09 SECONDS EAST 150.01 FEET TO THE POINT OF BE GINNING CONTAINING 1.36 ACRES, MORE OR LESS. LESS AND EXCEPT ALL THAT CERTAIN LAND SITU ATE IN LIBERTY COUNTY, STATE OF FLORIDA, VIZ: PARCEL 2: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUAR TER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 19, TOWNSHIP 1 SOUTH, RANGE 7 WEST, LIBERTY COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN THENCE SOUTH 01 DEGREE 22 MINUTES 42 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE WEST ERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUAR TER A DISTANCE OF 377.00 FEET; THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 04 SECONDS EAST 38.63 FEET TO A POINT ON A FENCE FOR THE POINT OF BEGIN NING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE CON TINUE NORTH 89 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 04 SECONDS EAST 145.24 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 01 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 09 SECONDS WEST 150.01 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 04 SECONDS WEST 145.24 FEET TO SAID FENCE; THENCE NORTH 01 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 09 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID FENCE A DISTANCE OF 150.01 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. CONTAINING 0.05 ACRE, MORE OR LESS. BEING A PART OF THE PROPERTY CONVEYED BY FEE SIMPLE DEED FROM MARGARET J. HOCH AS SET FORTH IN OR BOOK 107, PAGE 543 DATED 09/22/1998 AND RECORDED 09/28/1998, LIBERTY COUN TY RECORDS, STATE OF FLORIDA. at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, At the front door of the Liberty County Courthouse, Bristol, Florida at 11:00 a.m., on Sep tember 10, 2013. Any person claiming an inter est in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis in 60 days after the sale. Witness, my hand and seal of this court on the 8th day of Au gust, 2013. Kathleen E. Brown Clerk of The Circuit Court by: Vanell Summers Deputy Clerk 9204 King Palm Drive Tampa, FL 33619-1328 Attorneys for Plaintiff If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court pro ceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provi sion of certain assistance. Please contact: Administration, 301 South Monroe Street, Room 225, Tallahassee, FL 32303 850-577-4401 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appear ance, or immediately upon time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. 8-28, 9-4 ----------------------------------------NOTICE FOR BID The Calhoun Liberty Em ployees Credit Union will be accepting sealed bids on the following: 2002 Chevrolet Tahoe V8, 4Dr, 2WD, Mileage 161,190 NADA Retail Value $7,275 May be seen at Calhoun Lib erty Employees Credit Union, Blountstown Branch. Only serious bidders inquire! Only reasonable bids will be accepted. The Credit Union reserves the right to reject any and all bids. Last day to submit bid is Au gust 30, 2013 8-21, 8-28 ----------------------------------------NOTICE FOR BID The Calhoun Liberty Em ployees Credit Union will be accepting sealed bids on the following: A 2005 Kawasaki Ninja NADA Retail Value $14,500 May be seen at Calhoun Lib erty Employees Credit Union, Blountstown Branch. Only serious bidders inquire! Only reasonable bids will be accepted. The Credit Union reserves the right to reject any and all bids. Last day to submit bid is September 6, 2013 8-28, 9-4 ----------------------------------------NOTICE OF VOTE IN QUESTION NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN: JULIE D. SMITH Last known address of: 13705 NW COUNTY ROAD 12 BRISTOL, FL 32321 eligibility to vote is in question. You are required to contact the Supervisor of Elections, in Bris tol, Florida, no later than thirty (30) days after the date of this publishing. Failure to respond will result in a determination of ineligibility by the Supervisor and your name will be removed from the statewide voter registration system. Published one time in the Calhoun-Liberty Journal Gina McDowell Liberty County Supervisor of Elections P.O. Box 597 Bristol, FL 32321 Dated: Aug. 28, 2013 8-27-13 ITS VERY WISE TO ADVERTISE in the Calhoun-Liberty Journal and... CLJ N ews .COM

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Page 16 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL AUGUST 28, 2013 LCHS BULLDOGS LCHS loses preseason contest in Chipley TOP: J.J. House (#11) faces off with his opponent. LEFT: Ben Beckwith (#10) heads for the goal as a Chipley player dives into his path. BELOW: Jarrod Beck with (#4) pursues a Chipley opponent. DANIEL WILLIAMS PHOTOS by Richard Williams, Journal sports writer The seventh Liberty County fumble of the night was the most costly as a Chipley defender scooped up the rain-soaked ball and ran 41 yards for a game winning touchdown with less than 30 seconds remaining in the game. The Bulldogs lost their preseason contest at Chipley 22-16. Jordan Chaney ran for a touchdown and then caught a two-point conversion pass from LCHS quarterback Micah McCaskill. Libertys defense found themselves with their backs dogs stopped the Tigers inside the 20 several times, to tie the game at 8. Chipley took the lead in the third quarter after another Bulldog fumble once again gave the Tigers LCHS Head Coach Grant Grantham was unhappy with the fumbles, but said the mistakes did give his seven possessions and the other team only gets two offensive touchdowns, your defense was probably playing really well, Grantham said. We had a lot of backups in there playing defense and they may not be backups any longer as well as they played. It was the and there were some people that really impressed us . and there are some that really need to step up. McCaskill tied the game by tossing a two-point conversion pass to freshman J.J. House. The twopointer came after McCaskill scored a touchdown on a quarterback sneak from just outside the one yard line with just over a minute and a half left to play in the game. Grant said the team came back and played like Bulldog teams of old, We didnt put our heads down when we got behind and that was a good thing because you never know how your younger players are going to react. Sometimes our sophomores played like sopho mores and for us to be good, they have got to play like juniors and seniors. I know they can because theyve had a lot of playing time and theyve worked really hard since last season ended. I just have to hope they realize they can step up and then make it happen. The Bulldogs stopped Chipley on their last posses sion of the game, but then the Bulldog fumble gave the Tigers the win. Liberty will host Maclay in Bristol at 7:30 p.m.(ET) Grantham said Maclay likes to spread the ball out, but they are a lot more physical than most spread teams the Bulldogs have faced. Grantham said, They are a well-coached team and a really good team that should challenge our defense. If we dont step up and play solid it could be a long night. The Liberty County Junior Varsity squad will also in an Aug. 29 game that starts at 7 p.m. (ET). ABOVE: Lando Brown (#32) makes the grab. LEFT: Liberty County fans show their support.

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AUGUST 28, 2013 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 17 OBITUARIES SAM LAYMON WHITE ALTHA Sam Laymon White, 70, of Altha, passed away Tuesday, Aug. 20, 2013. He was born in Altha Sept. 4, 1942 to the late Sam and Elon Bracewell White. He retired on Aug. 30, 2004 from the City of Blountstown after 43 years of service. He was a dedicated member of Victory Hill Pentecostal Holiness Church where he served as a deacon for more than 20 years. He was preceded in death by his parents, Sam and Elon White; two brothers, Barney Travis and Broze White; one sister, Vernell White Trickey. Survivors include his wife of 53 years, Linda White of Altha; two sons, Sam White, Jr. and his wife, Kandi and Gary White and his wife, Sonya Lee, all of Altha; husband, Addis, Ruth Attaway, Luzetta Curry and her husband, Bill and Peggy Russ and her husband, Ricky; one brother, Nick White and his wife, Shirley; eight fany White, Christopher White and his wife, Jennifer, Christa White, Hunter Bown, Cody Bown, Landon Hill Pentecostal Holiness Church in Altha with Robert Cemetery. of the arrangements. Online condolences may be made at adamsfh.com. WENDY DEANN BURCH passed away Thursday, Aug. 22, 2013 in Tallahassee. She was born in Charleston, SC but lived most of her life in Liberty County. She was a homemaker, wife and mother who thoroughly enjoyed being around her grandchildren and spending time with her family. Survivors include her husband, Clevie Lee Burch of Bristol; her parents, Ricky and Laura Spikes of Hos four step-grandchildren, Brandon, Emma, Jordyn and Sarah Ward; three brothers, Brian Spikes of Hosford, Tim Hicks of Alabama and Roger Hicks of Colorado. Graveside services will be held on Sunday, Aug. 24 at 2 p.m. (ET) in Hosford Cemetery with Kyle Peddie Online condolences may be made at adamsfh.com. RUBY MCPHERSON BENTLEY River Chase Care Center in Quincy. She was born July 29, 1918 in Greensboro to Henry and Lillie Gatlin ful keepsakes for her children and grandchildren. She people in the community. She was preceded in death by her husband of 59 years, Charlie Bentley. Survivors include one son, Alan Bentley and his wife, Janie of Tallahassee; two daughters, Janet Kever and her husband, Terry of Greensboro and Nancy Pope her husband, Alex, Nathan Kever and his wife, Renee, eight great-grandchildren, Elizabeth and Jacob Kever, lowed in Sycamore Cemetery. charge of the arrangements. GEORGE R. OBRYAN ALTHA George R. OBryan, 93, of Altha, passed away Saturday, Aug. 24, 2013 in Blountstown. He was born Jan. 24, 1920 in Altha to the late John Alexander and Sally Adonnia Hamilton OBryan. He was the youngest of nine children. He was a graduate of Altha High School and Tulane University in New Orleans, LA. He served in the United States Navy for 31 years and retired as a commander. He was a pilot during He was preceded in death by his parents, John Alex Sharon Ann OBryan. Survivors include his wife, Billie Guy OBryan stepdaughters, Patsy Williams and her husband, Hugh, and her husband, Chris, all of Tallahassee and Linda wife, Lisa, Patrick Strawn and his wife, Jennifer, Jen nifer Agerton, Tiffany Slick and her husband, Paul, OBryan and his wife, Lauren, and Trevor OBryan; great-great grandchildren. from 6 8 p.m. at the funeral home. Services will be held on Tuesday, Aug. 27 at 10 a.m. Sunny Hill Cemetery in Altha with military honors. ments. Online condolences may be made at adamsfh. com. Telephone (850) 674-2266 Your hometown funeral home since 1994 A Hometown Funeral Director You Can Trust and Depend On! Funeral Services with Dignity, Caring and Professionalism. Marlon Peavy Peavy Funeral Home & Crematory Todd Wahlquist and Rocky Bevis Licensed Funeral Directors ...Because the greatest gift you can give your loved one is peace of mind. Call Todd today for a free pre-planning consultation. We accept pre-arranged contracts from any funeral home, lock in todays prices forever. Affordable payment plans for both cremations and burials. Transferable if you move. www.bevisfh.com TELEPHONE (850) 643-3636 & Crematory evis Funeral Home Bristol B We salute the hard-working men and women whose tireless dedication and effort has played such an important part in keeping our countrys economy strong and growing. We appreciate and applaud your efforts, and join with you in celebrating Labor Day. Serving Calhoun, Liberty & surrounding counties 674-5449 or 643-5410 Looking for a way to get your message across? Its easy when you place your ads and announcements in The JOURNAL EMAIL: thejournal @fairpoint.net FAX: 1-888-400-5810 Childrens Home Society of Florida hosts 10th Annual Compassionate Chefs for Kids The 10th Annual Compassionate Chefs for Kids is the premier fundrais ing event that helps support the Panama City areas most vulnerable children and families. Guests will experience an elegant evening featuring culinary delights from many of the Panama City areas best restaurants and a silent auc tion. Prior to the tasting, guests can check out The Kerry Vin cent Cake Art Competition as Kerry Vincent, the Queen of Sugar and Tickets are $40 for the main event and $20 for The Kerry Vincent Cake Art Competition. Chefs for kids will be held on Saturday, Sept. 7 at Wyndham Bay Panama City. The Kerry Vincent Cake Art Competition: will be held at 3 p.m. from 6:30 9 p.m. Each year, Childrens Home Society dren and family members in the Panama City area. As the community enjoys an elegant evening, their support will help continue to protect more kids from the tragedies of abuse and neglect, heal the pain of those who have suffered, and create and strengthen families in our community. On the front lines since 1902, Chil drens Home Society of Florida is the oldest and largest statewide organization devoted to helping children and families. Childrens Home Society of Florida of fers services that help break the cycles of abuse in more families, heal the pain for traumatized children, guide teens to successfully transition into adulthood and create strong, loving families through adoption. Childrens Home Society of Florida serves approximately 100,000 children and families throughout the state

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Page 18 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL AUGUST 28, 2013 BHS TIGERS by Michael DeVuyst, contributing writer BLOUNTSTOWN The Blount stown Tigers shook the rust off last week in a preseason jamboree with the St. Joe Tiger Sharks and the Vernon Yellow Jackets. The Tigers opened the night playing a half of football with the visiting Tiger Sharks. Blountstowns defense set the tone for the night with a quick three and out on St. offense quickly found themselves in Tiger Shark territory but a botched handoff led to a scoop and score fumble recovery by Natron Lane. Lane raced down the middle of the and only score of the night. The extra point pushed the score to 7-0 After that it was all Blountstown. Blountstown took their next pos session and drove 70 yards in 4 plays capped by Shon Petersons 28 yard touchdown run. Andrew Bennetts extra point tied the game at 7. Another 3 and out by the Tiger defense and the offense was back in business. The Tiger offense reeled off another scoring drive of 70 yards this time in 10 plays capped by a one yard run by JaVakiel Brigham. The extra point was no good but the Tigers pulled ahead 13-0 three minutes into the 2nd quarter. A Corin Peterson interception got the ball back for the Tiger offense and they took advantage of the turnover quickly. Three plays later, QB Dylan Lee scored on a one yard plunge and scoring for the half at 20-7 Blount stown. Shontavious Peterson led the in four carries. Brighams 7 tackles led the Tiger defense. Blountstown watched the next half of play between St. Joe and Vernon then took on Vernon for the last half of the night. The Tigers welcomed back former coach Bobby Johns with a physical game and a 14-0 victory. Blountstowns offense started of game. QB Hunter Jordan found a wide open Shontavious Peterson Bennetts extra point made the score 7-0 just 11 seconds into the game. Blountstowns defense continued their domination on the night with another 3 and out and the Tiger of fense was back in business. The Tigers drove down to the Yellow drive. Another stop by the Tiger defense and the Tigers were set up with great yard line. Six plays later QB Jordan scored on a 1 yard QB sneak and Bennetts extra point extended the Tiger lead to 14-0 just one minute into the second quarter. Following a Tiger fumble, the Yellow Jackets started a drive inside Tiger territory at the 42. Vernon drove down to the Tigers 10 yard line but a failed 4th down conversion stopped the scoring threat. Brigham led the Tiger offense dan was 1-1 passing with the big Peterson. The Tiger defense played lights out again led by Brighams The Tigers will begin the regular season Friday night Aug. 30 at 7 p.m. CDT in Defuniak Springs against the Class 4A Walton Braves. After going 20-7 over Sharks and beating Vernon 14-0 in Jamboree Blountstown ready for season opener TONY SHOEMAKE PHOTOS

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AUGUST 28, 2013 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 19 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL CLASSIFIEDS To place your ad, call 643-3333 by noon Eastern Time on Monday. Non-business ads run FREE for 2 weeks. REAL ESTATE WANTED: Will buy 10 to 1,000 acres, reasonably priced. Immediate closing. Phone (850) 544-5441 or (850) 570-0222 For Rent in ALTHA 762-9555, 447-0871 or 762-8597 Very NICE *2 & 3 BD trailers. With lawn service 5 x 10 ..... $ 27 10 x 10 .... $ 43 10 x 20 .... $ 70 10 x 25 .... $ 90 M & W SELF STORAGE RENTALS Call 762-9555, 447-0871 or 762-8597 7 days a week service UFN 1 1/2 BA Townhouses BRISTOL Mobile homes 643-7740 FOR RENT BLOUNTSTOWN TRI-LAND INC, BRKR (813) 253-3258 OWNER FINANCED GOOGLE COORDINATES 30 25 20.82 N 84 54 46.18 W Liberty Co. Property Located, but not limited to, Lake Mystic Ochlockonee River Estif fanulga & Sumatra areas. 10 to 500 acre tracts $2,500 + per acre Small partials $5,000 + per acre Financing available Call (850) 447-2372 *Properties also available in sur rounding counties* 7-10-13 UNF New Home for sale in Altha 1,300 square feet 3 BR, 2 BA at $112,500 Built in 2013 Metal roof Hardi siding City water. Call 762-8185 of 447-2025 4BR, 2BA BRICK HOME in Altha 762-8185 447-2025 FOR SALE covered porch $123,500 reduced to 1 & 2 bedroom mobile homes in Blountstown and Bristol. $105 to $155 weekly. Deposit required. All utilities included. NO PETS. Perfect for Singles or Couples. Call 674-2258 FOR RENT ITEMS Sportsman cabinet style incubator, like new, only used 4 times, sets up to 200 eggs. Paid $600, asking $400 OBO. Call 762-1990. 8-28, 9-4 Old 7 x 45 farm trailer, steel frames, wood sides wheels, normal auto trailer hitch. Farrowing pen, all steel, rusted but still func tional. Loaded on the trailer. Asking $300 for both but negotiable. Call 643-2372. 8-28, 9-4 Bikes, two three-wheel bikes, $50 each. Womens twin bike, new, adult train ing wheels. $175. Call 4473046 or 674-6022. 8-28, 9-4 Horizontal log splitter, 1 year old. 200 amp breaker box with breakers. Bass guitar with amp. Call 6433429. 8-21, 8-28 Available at the Calhoun Liberty Ministry Center: rooftop air vents new, in box, several couches, wall unit oven w/ microwave on top, new gas drop-in stove, and new range hood. Come shop for back o school items. Located at Hwy. 20 East in Blountstown. Call 674-1818. UFN FURNITURE Vintage wood and glass china cabinet with lights, 76x55x20. Matching dining table with 4 side chairs, 2 arm chairs and 2 table ex tensions. $1,000. Call 6438159. 8-28 9-18 Gun cabinet, with light, glass doors, deer design, 68x31x18. $125 OBO. Call 674-1617 or 447-1023. 8-28, 9-4 Black dining table, seats four. $100. Twin XL adjust able electric bed. $325. Call 447-3046 or 674-6022. 8-28, 9-4 Lots of good used fur niture for sale at the Calhoun-Liberty Ministry Center thrift store. Come check us out. Located on Hwy. 20 East of Blount stown. Call 674-1818 UFN APPLIANCES Washer and dryer, Ken more heavy duty washer and Whirlpool 5 cycle dryer, heavy duty. $250 OBO for both. Call 674-2025 or 6437031. 8-28, 9-4 Portable dishwasher, $150 OBO. Call (850) 5664178. 8-28, 9-4 Chest freezer, like new, $100 OBO. Call 447-3046 or 674-6022. 8-28, 9-4 ELECTRONICS Playstation Move, with camera and controllers. Cabellas Dangerous Hunts 2013 PS3 game, includes sensors and gun. $100 for both. Call 674-2025 or 6437031. 8-28, 9-4 HP Copier, $20. Call 7623455. 8-28, 9-4 Nokia cell phone, $100 OBO. Call (850) 566-4178. 8-28, 9-4 Available at the Calhoun Liberty Ministry Center: cell phone accessories at bargain prices. Located at Hwy. 20 East in Blount stown. Call 674-1818. UFN PETS/SUPPLIES Puppies, free to a good home, had shots and wormed, hurry! Mother is beagle, dad is black and tan. Come see them at 24877 NW CR 333 in Bris tol. Call 567-8015 after 5 p.m. 8-28, 9-4 Part Australian Shepard puppies, very cute, free to a good home. Call 7628533. 8-28, 9-4 Kittens, 2 male and 1 fe male, all grey with blue eyes, 7-8 weeks old, has had 1st set of shots. Very sweet, affectionate and sociable. Free to a good home. Call 691-9275. 8-28, 9-4 Puppy, female, all black, part Jack Russell, 4 or 5 months old. Free to a good home with children. Call 570-3806. 8-28, 9-4 Part Rat Terrier puppy, approx. 7 months old. Free to a good home, Call 4474733. 8-21, 8-28 Chickens, $10 each or 5 or more, $8 each. New Zea land rabbits, $10 each. 2 or more, $8 each. Call 6434265 or 447-4854. 8-21, 8-28 Laying Hens. Call 4917380. 8-21, 8-28 Palomino Gelding, 1 1/2 years old. Call 491-7380. 8-21, 8-28 Stallion, Little Peppy breed, cutting horse, has papers. Call 491-7380. 8-21, 8-28 Rednose Pit/Black Lab mix puppies, seven to choose from, six males and one female, free to a good home. Call 643-3330 or 491-7380. 8-21, 8-28 White rooster, $5. Call 643-1959. 8-21, 8-28 HUNTING & FISHING 13 1/2 ft. wooden boat, Mercury motor, $1,800. Call 850-491-8634 or 447-2354. 8-28, 9-4 Ruger 10/22, blue with wood stock. $225. Call 6741617 or 447-1023. 8-28, 9-4 Still hunting lease has openings for two members. Call 850-718-6369. 8-21, 8-28 1995 16 ft. Pan Fisher, 40 hp Mercury motor, 55 lb. thrust Minn Kota troll ing motor, Lowrance LMStrailer, garage kept. Ready 0322. 8-21, 8-28 VEHICLES 2000 Honda Odyssey, gold, $3,500. Call 6432330. 8-28, 9-4 2002 4WD Toyota Ta coma, 4 door, automatic, 8,000 lb warren wench, rear bed has Rhino liner. $7,000 OBO. Call 643-3662 or 447-3211. 8-28, 9-4 1996 Nissan pick-up, 4 cyl, automatic, cold AC, 8634 or 447-2354. 8-28, 9-4 1999 Suzuki GSX 600, 33,000 miles. $1,750 OBO. Call 850-447-0586. 8-28, 9-4 3 Motor Scooters, Altha Motor and Pump liquidated inventory. Three Kait Veloc ity scooters in black and sil ver. Never used, 2008 mod els, new. Sells for $1,800. Selling these for $750 each. Call 762-8189. 8-29, 9-4 2001 Ford Excursion V8, Call (850) 447-1963 or (850) 591-2481. 8-28, 9-4 1994 Acura Integra, 4 cyl, 2 door, $1,000 OBO. Call (850) 447-1963 or (850) 591-2481. 8-28, 9-4 AUTO PARTS & ACCESSORIES Four Ford factory 17 steel wheels, with lugs and center caps. $100 OBO. Cragar Soft rims 8s black, like new, 15x7, 5x4.5, will $195 OBO. Call 674-1617 or 447-1023. 8-28, 9-4 CAMPERS/RVS 1998 40 ft. Gulfstream Tourmaster, diesel pusher, 1 slide-out, under 100,000 miles, good tires, beautiful interior with white cabinets, 3 tvs, washer/dryer combo, separate ice maker, extra plied with everything except clothes and food. Includes 2002 PT Cruiser tow car. Ev erything works. $50,000, ne gotiable. Call 850-557-3455. 8-28 9-25 WANTED Pictures of German POW camp in Telogia. I already have the photo of the soldier with guitar in his lap. Call 850-865-2683. 8-28, 9-4 2008 automatic pickup truck, model. Call 674-3264. 8-21, 8-28 LOST/FOUND Lost Cat: Male, name is Sammy, in area at Bristol 66 Towing on Hoecake Rd. on Hwy 20 East. Not afraid of dogs, grey and black mixed, knows his name well. If you have seen him, dead or alive, please call 228-4558. 8-28, 9-4 Lost Dog: female, white, brown and black, Walker hunting dog with name tags, says Don nie Bodiford. Lost in NW Freeman Rd. area. Please call 643-2758, leave mes sage. 8-21, 8-28 HOMES & LAND 2 acres of land with well, septic tank and power pole. Located on 71 South. $20,000 OBO. Call 850272-6543. 8-28, 9-4 YARD SALES BRISTOL Yard Sale, Saturday, Au gust 31, 8 a.m. to 7:30 p.m.. School supplies, ste Located at 13233 NW SR 20, across from Joe Cha son Cir. 8-28, 9-4 Buy, sell and trade with an ad in The Journal Clas thejournal@fairpoint.net. APT FOR RENT IN BLOUNTSTOWN location 22.4 Acres For SALE Call 674-6329 or 447-0662 in Calhoun County 8-28, 9-4 Sept. 7 at 7 p.m. (First Saturday of every month) Public is invited. 18098 NW County Rd. 12 AUCTION 643-7740 Col. James W. Copeland AB1226/AU0001722 FREE SETUP FOR YARD SALE EVERY SATURDAY. STARSCOPE Week of August 25 ~ August 31, 2013 ARIES Mar 21/Apr 20 Aries, you have some shopping to do, but it is better if you space out your purchases and conserve your funds. A surprise bill may pop up and catch you off guard. TAURUS Apr 21/May 21 Taurus, recreational plans may have to take a back seat to responsibilities at work this week. Just when you thought you were done with all of your assignments, GEMINI May 22/Jun 21 you are alone this week. All it takes is a phone call or email to have some company if you feel the need. Dont hesitate to make a connection. CANCER Jun 22/Jul 22 heart of a matter that has monopo things will come to light soon enough if you remain patient. LEO Jul 23/Aug 23 There is no easy way out of a tricky situation involving some friends. You will end up in hot water if you take ones side over the other. The best thing to do is remain neutral. VIRGO Aug 24/Sept 22 There is no easy way out of a tricky situation involving some friends. You will end up in hot water if you take ones side over the other. The best thing to do is remain neutral. LIBRA Sept 23/Oct 23 Libra, you are expected to lead the way for others, even though you do not have all of the answers. Dont worry, you work well under pressure and others will follow your lead. SCORPIO Oct 24/Nov 22 Your career could be coming to a crossroads, Scorpio. Start net working now as much as possible so you are in a better position should you need to make a move. SAGITTARIUS Nov 23/Dec 21 Sagittarius, jump into something new if you feel like taking chances. Even if your leap of faith doesnt reap any rewards, you will feel better for having tried. CAPRICORN Dec 22/Jan 20 Capricorn, you may end up getting blamed for something that isnt your fault. Bide your time and the truth will come out. Accept the apologies of those who were quick to blame. AQUARIUS Jan 21/Feb 18 Aquarius, try not to overdo things when you are met with a burst of creative energy this week. You may start more projects than you can possibly handle. PISCES Feb 19/Mar 20 Pisces, so much is going on this week that you will need to orga your time effectively. Youre up to the task. SUBSCRIBE TO Name________________________________________________________________________ Address______________________________________________________________________ City___________________________________________________________________________ State________________ Zip____________________ EMAIL___________________________ Phone_____________________________________________ Subscription Form THE CALHOUNLIBERTY J OUR NAL

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Page 20 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL AUGUST 28, 2013