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UF00027796 UFPKY NEH LSTA SLAF
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00027796/00326
 Material Information
Title: The Calhoun-Liberty journal
Portion of title: Calhoun Liberty journal
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: The Liberty Journal, Inc.
Place of Publication: Bristol Fla
Publication Date: 02-13-2013
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Bristol (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Liberty County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Calhoun County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Liberty -- Bristol
Coordinates: 30.426944 x -84.979167 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in Sept. 1991.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 11, no. 38 (Sept. 18, 1991).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002046630
oclc - 33425067
notis - AKN4565
lccn - sn 95047245
System ID: UF00027796:00361
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly journal (Bristol, Fla.)


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CALHOUNLIBERTY J OURNAL THE W ednesday FEB. 13, 2013 Vol. 33, No. 7 50 includes tax Sheriff's Log............2 Arrest Reports............2 Visitors come to Bristol to ride the train.......3 Community Calendar and Events....................5 PEOPLE: Birthdays, 50th anniversary...........8 Black History Month Pageant held..............14 Outdoors Down South: The homing mule....10 Sharlyn Smith of Altha & Jaren Bannerman of Marianna were crowned Homecoming Queen and Mr. Chipola at the Chipola College Homecoming game on Saturday, by Teresa Eubanks, Journal Editor A three-member location scouting group from the Animal Planet program Finding Bigfoot is visiting four counties in the Florida Panhandle this week, including Liberty County, to make The upcoming program is expected to feature footage from a Crawfordville father and son team who have long been searching for the fabled brief video convinced the folks at Animal Planet A producer with the show has met twice with and conducting interviews, but details about their producer, who asked that her name not be used, But they hope anyone who thinks they might have had an encounter with Bigfoot wont be as about the fabled creature being seen in the panhandle is urged to contact them via The producer said they were aware of sightings in Washington County, Leon County and Gadsden County, as well as the one report last year at the four members of the Bigfoot Field Researchers Organization, who travel the country talking with people who say they have seen the legendary creature and looking episodes include Badlands Bigfoot, Animal Planet crew visits Torreya Park to prepare for lming Schools honor their outstanding teachers, school-related employees Samantha Newsome is named Liberty Co. Teacher of the Year Acting runs in the blood of this Liberty County family ...... PAGE 15 Pitcher Lexie Brown throws a Tolar runner out DANIEL WILLIAMS PHOTO by Teresa Eubanks, Journal Editor Long before the state began limiting class size, math teacher Karen Tomlinson had already discovered how effective it was to deal with In 29 years of teaching, shes learned what from teaching at the elementary school level Class members are given a topic and put into small table groups, where they work on turn being table leader and they show a sense See CALHOUN TEACHER on page 11 by Teresa Eubanks, Journal Editor learned a lot of lessons from her "Each student brings a makes each day different," she by that I do not learn something is not taking a situation too seriously, the selflessness of helping someone else, or simply But above all, the most important lesson has been slow down, put something aside And, besides math, what has she taught them? "The most challenging part of my job is making sure students feel like they have ownership in their need a sense of control, and See LIBERTY TEACHER continued on page 11 Calhoun County selects Karen Tomlinson this years top teacher Calhoun County Superintendent Ralph Yoder presents Karen Tomlinson with an award recognizing her honor. SCHOOLS HONOR TOP EMPLOYEES Debra Clark, a paraprofessional with Tolar School, is shown above second from left as she is recognized as School-Related Employ ee of the Year for Liberty County. Assistant the top School-Related Employee of the Year for the Calhoun County School District. Read more about them on page 11.

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Page 2 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL FEBRUARY 13, 2013 CALHOUN COUNTY February 4 Nigean Bromday, failure to appear, CCSO. William Broadshire, failure to appear (out of county), CCSO. Lahendrick Gibb, failure to appear (out of county), CCSO. Constance Hatten, failure to appear, CCSO. February 5 William Baxter, disorderly conduct, CCSO. Andrea Fountain, VOP, CCSO. Brad Phillips, VOP, CCSO. Robert Tibbets, non-support, CCSO. Felicity Middlebrooks, false report to law enforcement, BPD. Jessica Brown, VOP, CCSO. Carla Causey, VOCR, CCSO. February 7 Amos Milton, Jr, criminal mischief over $1,000 (warrant arrest), CCSO. LIBERTY COUNTY February 4 Michael L. Jones assault (warrant) LCSO February 5 Constance Hatten holding for CCSO, CCSO Felicity Middlebrooks holding for CCSO, CCSO Richard Kyle grand theft (warrant), LCSO Jessica Brown, holding for CCSO, CCSO. Juse Migel Duran-Rosa, VOP (warrant), LCSO. Lea Carla Causey, holding for CCSO, CCSO. Aaron Everett, VOP (warrant), LCSO. February 6 Brodrick J. Alls, escape, driving with license suspended or revoked with knowledge, resist with high speed vehicle pursuit, LCSO. February 8 Van Kent trespassing of an occupied struc ture, resist without violence, LCSO Barbara Dawson trespassing, LCSO John Henry Ammons Calhoun County war rant, LCSO Danny Richards failure to register as a sex offender, LCSO Michael Harvell battery, LCSO February 10 Dylan Rogers no valid drivers license, LCSO Kalen Burke VOP (warrant), LCSO Listings include name followed by charge and arresting agency. The names above represent those charged. We remind our readers that all are presumed inno cent until proven guilty. CITATIONS ISSUED: Accidents ............................................................03 ................................................................03 Special details Business alarms .............................................................03 Residential alarms .......................................................01 Feb. 4 through Feb. 10, 2013 SHERIFFS LOG ACCEPTING NEW PA TIENTS Laban Bontrager, DMD www.bristoldentalclinic.com Bristol Dental Clinic Monica Bontrager, DMD ARREST REPORTS compiled by Journal Editor Teresa Eubanks charged in burglary A warrant has been issued for a Greenville man believed to be responsible for a Jan. 25 burglary on NW Baggett Loop in Altha, according to a re Household items were removed from a travel trailer and a pole barn while the elderly victims were out of town. A neighbor gave a sworn statement that Chad Michael Kinsey had been seen carrying some of the stolen items into the woods near the victims residence. Investigators Jared Nichols and Todd Wheetley went Kinseys home in Greenville but he jumped residence, where he barricaded himself inside. After family members talked him into coming out, Kinsey was taken into custody by Madison County deputies. It was found that he was wanted by Bay Coun ty on several outstanding warrants including bur glary, felony criminal mischief and petty theft. Investigators said Kinsey admitted being in the Altha area at the time of the burglary but denied having anything to do with it. He is awaiting pickup by Calhoun County at the Madison County Jail. Man charged with failing to re-register as offender A former Nashville, GA man now living in Telogia was arrested Feb. 2 after he failed to re-register his sta tus as a sex offender with the Liberty County Sher Charged was 43-yearold Danny Richards. According to the arrest report, Richards, who was required to re-register dur until Feb. 4. His late attempt to register did not satisfy the requirements for re-registration of a sexual of fender and a warrant was issued for his arrest. He was later released on $5,000 bond. DANNY RICHARDS Attorney General Pam Bon di urges Floridians to use cau to be aware of identity theft and tax-related scams. Any signs of tax fraud or identity theft, such as receiv ing a letter that your tax return should be reported to my of SCAM, stated Attorney Gen eral Pam Bondi. Below are tips to avoid iden tity theft and tax fraud: File tax returns early. The IRS will reject a return if one security number; Ask for credentials of the tax preparer, and ask if he or she belongs to a state board or bar association which requires continuing education; Do not provide your social security number unless it is re quired; Do not carry your social security card or write it on checks; and papers before discarding them; Be wary of providing sensi tive information via the Inter net ; Do not respond to e-mails asking for information relating to tax refunds. The IRS web site is the legitimate source for checking on refund status; and Check credit report every 12 months. plaints about tax-related scams and any other types of fraud by calling the Attorney Generals MyFloridaLegal.com. ports that several area senior citizens have been the target of scammers trying to talk them into giving out information over the nances. Most of the calls are coming from over seas and try to trick them into believing theyve won something, or claiming a family member is in trouble and needs money, ac cording to Lt. Jared Nichols. Citizens are warned not to give out per phone. And especially, do not send money to anyone claiming you have won a vehicle or monetary prize, Nichols warns. He cautions residents to remember, If it sound too good to be true, it probably is! Identity theft scam targets area seniors son County residents (850) 849-3925, (850) 482-9127 or (850) 638FROM LEFT: Melinda Campbell, Luke Shores, Amanda Shores, Judge William L. Wright, Patrick McKinstry and Cindy Fender.

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FEBRUARY 13, 2013 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 3 PHONE (850) 762-3228 Waldorff Ace Hardware Story and photos by Liliane Parbot, contributing writer Bristol hides a big secret from many newcomers, but once uncovered, it generates many a Whoa of admiration. Perhaps, the Veterans Memorial Railroad would not come as a surprise in the area of Disney World, but in a community of the size of Bristol, it really brings words of admiration and thanks for the many people behind its creation and its operation. This Railroad began with a residents love for trains, and the concept grew with the help of volunteers, the Liberty County Board of County Commissioners, a half-million-dollar-grant from the Department of Transportation (DOT), and to the labor of inmates from the Liberty County Department of Corrections. They laid out the tracks and maintain them. Veterans Memorial Railroad is located in Veterans Memorial Park, behind the Liberty County Civic Center at 10561 N.W. Theo Jacobs Way (CR 12), South of Highway 20. The land belongs to the county, which also owns the Red, White and Blue Train, greatly enjoyed by visitors of all ages, as they move throughout a great expanse of county land and pines. the backyard of Tom Keenan. He explained how he developed an interest and love for railroad: I was working with other railroad people over in the Atlantic Coast. His wife Gloria, recalls looking at this relic next to her home and telling her husband, I dont know how to lay tracks. Gloria is a member of the board of directors. Tom can be seen on the Red, White and Blue train as it makes its runs. He is seated at the rear, behind the last row of passengers. He blows the horn. Veterans Memorial Railroad started with these two original mentors in 2002, and soon they were joined by a third, Babs Moran, who is the current president of the group. She is one of our biggest helpers, says Gloria who recalls how, at the original meeting, Babs said, Yes, lets do it! The attraction started with a small depot and a short track constructed by a work crew from the prison, according to Gloria, who noted, They (Corrections) have been extremely helpful. We could not have done it without them. Also making the project possible are the volunteers now 15 of them who donate their time in various areas. One of the volunteer conductors, who was driving the Red, White and Blue train, this month, was Ed Petry. Asked how he came to be a driver, he replied, We are down visiting from Minnesota, and we are enjoying warm weather. The Railroad is open on the second Saturday of the month, from February to November. There is no admission fee, except on certain days such as Christmas, St. Patricks Day or Halloween. Donations are greatly appreciated at all times, however, to help with the cost of maintaining the attraction. Veterans Memorial Railroad is also available for private events, birthday, anniversaries, business parties and over private events. The train ride is $35 in those cases. For information or bookings, call either Babs Moran at (850) 643-5491; or Gloria Keenan at (850) 643-6646. The attraction started with a much shorter railroad track and a small depot. A DOT grant of $500,000 allowed the construction of a new 35-by-50-foot depot, to display many items used by railroad people in the past, such as a Transit. Volunteer Louis Smith explained this was used to lay out railroad tracks. It people, but it was used in the 1800s. Also seen are a conductors hat, a lantern, a coal shovel much worn out at the edge and other items. Not to be missed is a G-Gauge train running the 170-foot perimeter of the building at a height of 7.5 feet. Smith operates his own train, there, and he plans to bring two more. Other model trains of various gauges are also set up. This is also the room where local artists can display their work, according to Smith, who lives in Tallahassee. I heard about, and I volunteered. I love trains, he said to explain the long commute. I was searching for a place that had a steam train. I have had (model) trains for more than 50 years. The DOT grant allowed to accomplish may improvements. In addition to the much bigger depot building, a childrens playground was created, a walking trail added, and the railroad track was greatly lengthened. We are very proud of it, Gloria said of these accomplishments. It takes lots of team work. Many visitors come from as far as Tallahassee and Panama City, according to Moran. On the second Saturday of this month, at least one couple came from the state capital. We came especially from Tallahassee after someone at the daycare recommended it, said Yuko Hori, who was accompanied by her husband, Atakemichi Okui and their 30-month-old son, Kai Okui. It was great...he especially liked the horn, the mother said of her childs reaction. brings inmates to work on the track. That day, she was accompanied by two young great-grandchildren. When asked what they thought about the train ride, she said, Oh my Lord, this is awesome. They loved it. They do not want to go home. Heating & Air Conditioning FL LIC. # CMC1249570 (850) 674-4777 Whaley Whaley Visitors come from all over to enjoy a ride on Bristols Veterans Memorial Railroad LEFT: Babs Moran points out the depot during a tour of the grounds. RIGHT: Yuko Hori, husband, Atakemichi Okui and their son, Kai Okui, came from Tallahassee to enjoy a train ride.

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Page 4 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL FEBRUARY 13, 2013 Gods Will will be holding a FREE Baseball Camp for Boys and Girls Saturday February 16 10 a.m 1 p.m. Veterans Memorial Park Lunch will be provided, please call so that we may know how many kids to prepare for. There will also be sign ups for Tee Ball and Coach Pitch that same day. Call by Friday, Feb. 15 Contact Ray Glisson at (850) 510-1372 Pre-kindergarten to 12th grade Yearly registration: $35 Monthly fee: $55 CHEER GYMNASTICS SCHOOL IN BLOUNTSTOWN Hwy. 20 W (The old J&N Sports) Monday-Thursday 4-7 p.m. (CT) NEW SEASON REGISTRATION (850) 272-3331 TERMS: Cash or Check (10% B.P.) All items sold AS IS where IS CONSIGNMENTS WELCOME Sat., Feb. 23 9 a.m. (ET) #AU-4266 #AB2769 F&L Call Felton Hall at (850) 566-6646 or (850) 379-8410 Farm Equipment NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours or responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. Cataracts? Freedom from Eye Glasses, Now a reality for many. In Memory of Lee Mullis M.D. Smart Lenses SM Dr. Mulliss Smart Lens SM procedure can produce clear vision without eyeglasses. Close-up, Far away & In-between CALL TODAY for a Smart Lens Evaluation Mullis Eye Institute 4320 5th Ave. Marianna (2 Blks from Jackson Hospital) (850) 526-7775 or 1(800)769-3429 CORLETTS ROOFING LLC FREE ESTIMATES Michael Corlett (850) 643-7062 EVENTS An organizational meeting of the 2013 Chat tahoochee Red Bird Base ball Club is scheduled for Saturday, Feb. 16, 2013 at 10 a.m. (EST) at Therrell Field in Chattahoochee. All who are interested in playing, managing or coaching for the Red Birds should make a spe cial effort to attend this important meeting. This program is for adults, ages 18 and over. For more information contact Lee Garner, Chat tahooce City Manager. Chattahoochee Red Birds to meet Feb. 16 HIDE TANNING A class will be offered to those interested in a chance to get a more hands on experience in tanning hides on Feb. 16. Participants will meet with Eric starting at 10 a.m. and work through the process. For this workshop we advise participants to wear clothes they dont mind getting dirty; an apron and rubber gloves are a must. Also a good knife and a drawknife are recommended. The fee for the work shop is $10. Registration is required and can be made at (334) 794-3452. Registration is limited to 15 participants. BEESWAX Join the Wiregrass Beekeepers Association and Landmark Park for an introductory work shop on how to make soap and bath and body products with beeswax. Class participants will enjoy interactive hands on instruction and will take their own handmade products home. Instruc tor Roslyn Horton has been making all natural bath and body products chemical free beehives. Cost is $15 per par ticipant for supplies plus normal gate admission and will be held Febru ary 16 at 10 a.m. in the Interpretive Center Audi torium. The class is limited to 50 people. Registration is re quired and can be made at (334) 794-3452. Hide tanning & beeswax bath products workshops at Landmark Park Feb. 16 Small Business Seminars set at Chipola beginning Feb. MARIANNAChipola College will offer a series of small business seminars in the coming months. All seminars meet Fridays, from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., in Room M-108 of the Chipola Business and Technology building. Feb. 15. The seminar will help participants discover which business type is best suited for their personality, and how to create a working business create a successful business. Veterans Business Outreach March 22. The VBOC helps create, develop, and retain veteran-owned small business enterprises. The VBOC provides train ing through workshops, counseling, assistance, and resource uti lization services to Veterans, Service-Disabled Veterans, Reservists, National Guard, and Active Duty business own ers and entrepreneurs. will meet Friday, Apr. 19. Cost of each seminar is $30. to sign up for any seminar will receive free admission. Stu dents should contact Elissa Se verson at 718-2441 or sign up 208. Participants may register com. For more information, contact Elissa Severson at (850) 718-2441 or email sever sone@chipola.edu. Waste Management Sponsors state tournament at Chipola March 6-9 Waste Management is continuing its longstanding partnership with Chipola College by once again sponsoring the Mens and Womens State Community Col lege Basketball Tourna ment, set for March 6-9 in the Milton H. Johnson Health Center. Pictured from left, are: Tournament Administra tor Alice Pendergrass, Chipola College presi dent Dr. Gene Prough, Waste Management District Manager Kevin Hinson and Tournament Coordinator Dr. Steve Givens. Since opening its operations in Jackson County, Waste Manage ment has contributed more than $170,000 to Chipolas academic and athletic programs. CITIZEN OF THE YEAR NOMI NATIONS DUE FEB. 13 Do you know someone who deserves to be recognized for their contributions to our commu nity? If so, nominate them for Calhoun County Citizen of the Year. The process is simple call or email the Chamber form. Complete and return the form to the kristy@calhounco.org or call 674-4519. MONTHLY MEETING, SOCIAL MEDIA FOR SMALL BUSINESSES Join us for our February meeting as we discuss social media and how it can and will offer handouts on how to make The meeting will be Tuesday, Feb. 19 at 12 noon at the Calhoun County Senior Center. Please email or call to make your res ervation no later than Friday, Feb. 15 to kristy@calhounco.org or call 674-4519. CHAMBER PLANS ANNUAL MEMBERSHIP BANQUET MARCH 1 The 66th Annual Chamber Member ship Banquet is set for Friday, Mar. 1 at the W.T. Neal Civic Center. This year, the Chamber will change up the annual meeting to include live music, social, as well as dinner and dancing! email Kristy at Kristy@calhounco.org to reserve tickets, or buy online and have them mailed to you at www.calhounco. org/store. Tickets are $25 each. Because of ob ligations to the caterer, tickets must be bought it advance. Deadline for ticket sales is Friday, Feb. 22. NO TICKETS WILL BE SOLD AT THE DOOR. Calhoun Chamber of Commerce events for February and March Blountstown Library plans an evening of Art & Music Feb. 23 The Blountstown Public Library invites you to come enjoy an evening of art and music with Tom Stratton on Saturday, Feb. 23 from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. in the Heritage Room on the back side of the library. and talk. Tom will produce a free hand pin striping design reminiscent of the hand painted designs done on autos in the 1950's and 1970's. These symmetrical designs are all one of a kind improvisa tional works of art. After an intermission and light re freshments Tom will give a musical performance and educational talk on and with some of the electronic equipment used by today's musicians. Sit back and experience the electric processors to create big band sounds as a solo performer. And yes...dancing is allowed! These Cultural Events are free, family-friendly, and open to the public. CLJ N ews .COM

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FEBRUARY 13, 2013 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 5 The Calhoun-Liberty Journal is published each Wednesday by the Liberty Journal Inc., Summers Road, P.O. Box 536, Bristol, FL 32321. Annual subscriptions are $18. Periodicals postage paid at Bristol, FL POSTMASTER: Send address corrections to: P.O. Box 536, Bristol, FL 32321. (USPS 012367) Summers Road Located at 11493 NW Summers Road in Bristol MAILING ADDRESS: P.O. Box 536, Bristol, FL 32321 TELEPHONE (850) 643-3333 Fax (888) 400-5810 EMAIL: thejournal@fairpoint.net ADS: cljads@fairpoint.net JOURNAL STAFF Johnny Eubanks...................Publisher Teresa Eubanks........................ Editor Sandra Brown...................Bookkeeper Deven Lewis......Production Asssistant Debbie Duggar...................Advertising OFFICE HOURS: 9 a.m. 6 p.m. M-F THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Visit us on Facebook at CLJNews Train Day Veterans Memorial Park 11 a.m.3 p.m. Thats how many copies of The Calhoun-Liberty Journal were distributed last week, ensuring plenty of coverage for your announcements and great response for our business advertisers! 5,376 Wednesday, February 13 Saturday, February 16 Thursday February 14 Friday, February 15 TODAYS MEETINGS noon, 7 p.m., Calhoun Old Ag Bldg. east door, in front of jail TODAYS MEETINGS AA 7 p.m., basement of Calhoun Courthouse Bristol Girl Scout Troop #303, 6 p.m. in Court room 7 p.m. at Fire House 11 a.m., Apalachee Rest. 5 p.m. Calhoun Monday, February 18 Tuesday, February 19 Sunday, February 17 TODAYS MEETINGS 7 p.m., Altha VFD AA 6 p.m., Altha Community Center 6 p.m., City Hall 7 p.m., Bristol City Hall 7 p.m., 6 p.m., City Council Room on Angle St. 7 p.m., Dixie Lodge in Blountstown 7 p.m., LC School Board Meeting Room 7-8 p.m., Grace United Methodist Church, Hosford 6 p.m., Page Pond Assembly of God Church in Altha. TODAYS MEETINGS 7 p.m., 6:30 p.m., City Hall 5-8 p.m. (CT), WT Neal Civic Center, Blountstown Ladies Night Dance 8 p.m.-1 a.m. at the Legion Hall in Blountstown Attend the Church of your choice this Sunday Train Day Veterans Memorial Park 11 a.m.3 p.m. BIRTHDAYS Jessica Thomas Tot Butler Timmy Cardinale BIRTHDAYS ~ Schelbie Anders, Colton Thomas, Nikki Thomas, Ken King, Angela Read, Jon Mark Plummer BIRTHDAYS ~ Mary Sue Stephens Tom Aycock, Shane Eagleston ANNIVERSARY ~ Sonny & Karen Sykes ANNIVERSARY ~ Sonya & Lindell McLain FREE Go Red 6 p.m. (ET) at Donations sought for rummage sale The Panhandle Pioneer Settlement will be having its annual Rummage Sale fundraiser on March 2 and 5-9. We are asking for donations of your slightly used and unwanted items. We will be taking donations until February 26 in the gym. For more information, contact the Settlement at 674-2777. Booth rentals available for 4-H Spring Clean, Go Green Giant yard Liberty County 4-H will have their second annual Spring Clean, Go Green Giant Yard Sale on Saturday, Mar. 16th, from 8 a.m. 1 p.m. on the front lawn at the Veterans Memorial Civic Center. Booth rental fee is $10. Pre-reg istration is required and due by Mar. 8th. For more information or for an application you may call 643-2229 or All proceeds will go towards help ing youth attend 4-H Summer Camp Timpoochee in Niceville for a week. 4-Hers and $230.00 for non-4-Hers. The Calhoun County Senior Citi zens Association will be sponsoring a grilled chicken cookout Friday, Apr. 5. We will begin serving at 10 a.m. Cost will be just $6 per plate (ad vance orders only) or $7 per plate (on the corner). We will be serving grilled chicken leg quarters, green beans, cole slaw, bread and dessert. To place an order call 674-4163, or fax 6748384. We will deliver three or more! Make sure you indicate what time to deliver your order, or stop by the cor ner of Hwy. 71 and 20 on the old Po lice Department lot in Blountstown. houn County Senior Citizens. Calhoun Sr. Citizens chicken cookout to be held on April 5th Astronomy nights DOTHAN, AL Join Landmark Park for an evening of stargazing Friday, Feb. 15 from 6 9 p.m. As tronomy Night is an exciting and in formative program that gives visitors a view of several stars, Uranus, Jupi ter and the Orion nebula through tele scopes and binoculars on the Gazebo lawn. Staff members will help point out winter constellations and visitors will even get the chance to experience a starry hayride and star stories by pretive Center after stargazing and enjoy snacks and a program in the planetarium where you will get the chance to learn more about the night sky. Planetarium programs are not Space is limited; reservations are required. Admission is $2 for mem bers, $3 for scouts and their leaders in uniform and $5 for nonmembers and (334) 794-3452 to reserve your spot. Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts are welcome either night. Astronomy Night meets several requirements for the Astronomy Badge. Landmark Park is a 135-acre historical and natural science park located on U.S. Highway 431 North in Dothan, AL. For more information, con tact the park at (334) 794-3452. Teams, sponsors needed for April 5 Relay for Life The journey to end can cer starts with a single step. The American Cancer So ciety invites you to take that step with by joining the global Relay For Life movement. When you walk to end cancer at a Relay event, its your opportunity to not only honor cancer survivors and re member loved ones lost, but also to raise awareness about what we can do to stay well from cancer and raise money to help fuel the worlds largest walk to end cancer. The Calhoun/Liberty event will begin Friday, Apr. 5 at 6 p.m. at Sam At kins Park. For more information on the Calhoun County event, visit www. relayforlife.org or email Shannon. Rodriguez@cancer.org The traditional Sacred Harp Sing will be held on Saturday, Feb. 16 at 9:30 a.m. at the Panhandle Pioneer Settlement. Sacred Harp Singing (also called Sacred Harp Sing this Saturday FaSoLa or shape note singing), dates back to colonial times and has been preserved in the rural south. The singing is not accompanied by harp or other instrument but is an old style of singing a cappella from shape notes. munity musical event that emphasizes participation. Attendees will be welcomed to a pot luck lunch being asked to bring a dish of their choice. Donations will be ment will have their General Store open from 10 a.m. 2 p.m. (CST) with tours available. Admission is free to this event. The Panhandle Pioneer Settlement is located in Sam Atkins Park, about 1 mile west of the intersection of Hwy 71 and Hwy 20. Follow Hwy. 20 West out of Blountstown. Look for signs for Sam Atkins Park. Turn North at Lindys Fried Chicken, Silas Green St. (between 18th & 20th St.). Plenty of parking! BIRTHDAYS Ruth Attaway, Daisy Holliday, Aaron Carter, Lisa Britt BIRTHDAYS Stormy Wise, Wayne Sutton, Scott Holcomb, Justin Faircloth BIRTHDAYS Renee Moore, Nick Keller Rep. Southerland to host Liberty mobile Rep. Steve Southerland will be erty County on Friday, Feb. 15 at the Liberty County Courthouse from 1-3 p.m. (EST) Residents of Liberty County and the surrounding area are invited to join Rep. Southerlands staff to provide input on legislation, ask questions or request assistance with a federal agency on issues including: Social Security, Medicare, Housing and Urban Devel For questions, please contact Lori Hutto at (850) 561-3979 or email Lori. Hutto@mail.house.gov. Chipola College Theatre will present the hit musical, Hairspray, Wednesday, Mar. 13-17. Pictured are the Corny Collins Kids from left: Terrence Shanks, Cayce Shayli Tharp, Tyler Landry and Austin Pettis. Tickets go on sale two weeks prior to the performance and will be to be announced. For more information contact Charles Sirmon, Director of Theatre sirmonc@chipola.edu (850) 718-2277. Hairspray at Chipola

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Is there anything that politicians and the American people arent an guishing over? Most every day, the dictions of doom and damnation. About 99 percent of this national anxiety is self-imposed. We do it to ourselves. to drastically reduce government spending. If you done to the British economy. Who thought up this sequestration idea? As ex pected, Republicans blame it on President Obama, but to force themselves to do something about Americas to blame? The American people. They elected these dunces. Unless there is some action on the part of the Congress, seques prospect of a cut in their annual budget of billions of dollars. economy in my part of the Florida Panhandle. If se reducing the size of the federal government and cur tailing out-of-control government spending. But the and spending is the one being cut. Republicans, in their mindless allegiance and not discuss any sensible approach to revamping the tax code or increasing taxes. Clearly, America doesnt If sequestration occurs, the White House Fact Sheet if it occurs, is that those preaching er nosedive. The county I live in is ground They hate anything government government retirement pay, Social Security payment, Medicare and the local military bases that support most of the local economic activity. Welcome to austerity. and became part of the al Qaeda organization has the that plan? As a part of lets get our arms around this drone program, the telligence Agency to have more CIA is a spy organization, and the Representatives? We need to recognize that the spy business is not vile people. So, give them their ROE and leave them Page 6 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL FEBRUARY 13, 2013 C ORNER Jerry Cox is a retired military OXS COMMENTARY WASHINGTON MERRY-GO-ROUND by Douglas Cohn and Eleanor Clift Americas angst is unending reform as a matter of practical politics, the question that conservative Republicans. McCain prided himself on his strength of character, a lasting enmity. Instead, after losing the nomination, he campaigned for Bush, changed his colors and ac chameleon. issues. So, in exercising the most important decision a accepted that she cost him the election. Bushs nasty politics. But once again his chameleon nature prevailed, and he has seemingly fostered a thing, the surge, instead of the initial invasion of Iraq. Hagel refused to give McCain a simple yes or no on Iran in the region. a senator and did nothing to advance understanding corrected at one point by the committee chairman, heroism despite the hostile questioning from his old Watching McCain in the hearing made us long for respectful of the institution, treated others in a digni are capable of extraordinary change. Angry Chameleon

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FEBRUARY 13, 2013 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 7 Pre-order your Valentines early because we have what a woman and what a man wants.... Buy Rite Drugs Call Us at 6435454 Jewelry Valentines candy and Much, Much More. DELIVERING TO SCHOOLS ROSES $ 59 95 $ 39 95 SPECIAL $ 4 95 How are droughts by global warming? I thought warming mostly brought on -David Mossman, Albuquerque, NM By throwing the planets climate regula tion systems out of whack, global warm ing is likely to cause more extreme weather events of every kind, including additional and more drying and drought in others sometimes within the same region. According to the Union of Concerned creased temperatures on the Earths surface due to global warming accelerates evapo transpiration, an otherwise natural process that takes moisture from land, plants and water bodies and moves it skyward into the atmosphere. In drier regions, evapotranspiration as below-normal levels of rivers, lakes and groundwater, and lack of enough soil mois ture in agricultural areas, reports UCS. Precipitation has declined in the trop ics and subtropics since 1970. Southern Africa, the Sahel region of Africa, south ern Asia, the Mediterranean, and the U.S. Southwest, for example, are getting drier. Even areas that are typically wet, says the group, can experience long, dry spells be tween extreme rainy periods. This drying trend is expected to continue through mid-century as the amount of land Water resources in affected areas are pre dicted to decline by as much as 30 percent. These changes occur partly because of an expanding atmospheric circulation pat tern known as the Hadley Cellin which warm air in the tropics rises, loses moisture to tropical thunderstorms, and descends in the sub tropics as dry air, adds UCS. As jet streams con tinue to shift to higher latitudes, and storm patterns shift along with them, semi-arid and desert areas are expected to expand. The National Wildlife Federation (NWF) adds that the sea level rise expected to accompany global warming (as the po lar ice caps melt) could further complicate matters for water-constrained areas by contaminating critical inland underground freshwater reserves with salt (so-called saltwater intrusion). Another effect of unmitigated global warming will be a increased frequency of much of the Western U.S. NWF reports that researchers there are already noticing lon later into the year, and an increased fre quency of lightning as thunderstorms are becoming more frequent and severe. The burn over twice as much of todays affected areas across 11 western states by later this century if conservative predictions about warming come true. So what can be done? NWF stresses that every one of us can play a role by cutting back on our fossil fuel use (less driving and help is to take into account our own water use and making a concerted effort to cut back and conserve this most vital of all nat ural resources. NWF also wants land man agers and policymakers to consider global warming when choosing water manage ment strategies to meet multiple demands and to work to protect natural forest and

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Page 8 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL FEBRUARY 13, 2013 Phone (850) 643-1112 Neldian: Nail technician Phone (850) 272-2023 Teristia: Cosmetologist Phone (850) 566-5752 Tammy: Owner, Cosmetologist Phone (850) 643-6698 CALL FOR YOUR NAIL APPOINTMENT CALL FOR YOUR HAIR APPOINTMENT NEW HOURS FOR NAIL CARE SPRING SPECIALS Located at 20634 E. Central in Blountstown (850) 674-8801 "Fine Jewelry & Gifts" The Diamond Corner A GIFT FROM THE HEART Pandora Gift Sets LOVE OF MY LIFE *BRACELET GIFT SET $ 200 *ORIGINAL RETIAL PRICE $230 COMES WITH CERAMIC GIFT BOX WHILE SUPPLIES LAST Friday, Feb. 22 at 7 p.m. ET Kick off service with live praise & worship Saturday, Feb. 23 at 10 a.m. ET Testimonies, Dramas, Worship, Breakout Sessions VETERANS CIVIC CENTER 10405 NW Theo Jacobs Lane Bristol Reserve your spot now Registration is FREE http://swankybabyvintage-efbevent.eventbrite.com CALL FOR MORE INFORMATION (850) 643-4313 Sponsored by Swanky Baby Vintage & Mission 180 DEADLINE TO REGISTER MONDAY, FEB. 18 Wow what a Valentine you must have been! Happy 60 TH Birthday Jackie Barber Feb. 14 We wish you the best birthday ever, With Love Deanne & Ken Birth days KELTON DANIEL MOON Kelton Daniel Moon celebrated his seventh birthday on Saturday, Feb. 9. He is the son of Jordy Moon of Bristol and Gonzo and Danae Verduzco of Blue Creek. His grandparents are Jay and Teresa Moon of Bristol and Wade and Joyce Beth Stoutamire of Blue Creek. He celebrated with a party at the Funstation with family and friends. CHIQUITA SANDERS RUDD Chiquita Sanders Rudd celebrated her 83rd birthday Tuesday, Feb. 12. She is the wife of the late Jack Rudd and mother of Sharon, John, Karen and James (Bo). She has one brother, Jimmy Johnson, six grandchildren, 13 great-grandchildren and two greatgreat-grandchildren. She is retired and enjoys going to church and Bible study and playing with her grandchildren. She celebrated with a party held at her home on Sunday, Feb. 10 with family and friends. Anniversary Earl and Marlene Ellis, married on February 8, 1963, will be celebrating their 50th wedding anniversary. They plan to celebrate with a re ception to be held at the Faith Baptist Church fellowship hall in Marianna on Saturday, Feb. 16 from 2-4 p.m. All family and friends are invited to attend. Please, no presents, but cards are appreciated. Earl & Marlene Ellis celebrate 50 TH wedding anniversary CORINTH BAPTIST CHURCH Corinth Baptist Church of Hosford and Telogia Baptist Church of Telogia will hold a celebration of the ministry of Rev. Gordon Adank and his wife Sue, this Sunday, Feb. 17, at 6 p.m. (EST), at the Corinth Baptist Church in Hosford. Rev. Adank recently retired from the pas torate af ter over 40 years in ministry. He pas tored both Corinth and Telo gia during his minis try. Every one in the county is invited to share in this special occasion as we remember and honor this man of God and his precious wife. the service, so please be our guest. For more information, please call Rev. Kyle Peddie at 556-1881 or Rev. Eric Durham at 209-7116. NEWS FROM THE PEWS CONNECTIONS FELLOWSHIP As we study Gods Whispers, this week we will look at people who have been hurt by life. Maybe you or someone you know has been hurt, and it might have even been by church. Join us as we examine what God has to say to those who are hurting or whove been hurt. God hasnt abandoned you. We will also have a special guest sharing her faith journey from pain to healing. Connections Fellow ship meets at the Ft. Braden Community Cen ter on SR 20 Sunday mornings at 10:30 a.m. To the editor: Many pastors and leaders of our Christian churches either dont know the word of God or they are afraid to preach the word. Judgement be gins at the pulpit. Some of the truths that a lot of preachers dont preach about are: ing about the rapture the ory. What does the Bible say about adding to or tak ing away from the Bible? (The rapture theory was added in the year 1830 by a half-crazed woman, Margaret McDonald). Some preachers heard her dream and took it to ride, creating the lie about the rapture theory. The way I understand the rapture theory is that people believe they will into heaven. (That is what Anti-Christ says he will do.) Anti-Christ comes at the sixth trump and will be 9:5). If you are still in this earthly body, it wont be Jesus Christ, it will be Anti-Christ. Jesus Christ comes at the seventh trump and all who are living will be changed instantly into a spiritual body and then the thousand year millennium begins. in the garden? ther? and Eve made? come from? when the Bible says to keep your head covered? about the three earth ages. I really dont see how we can understand some parts of the Bible without knowing about the three earth ages. Morrell Baily, Altha SPEAK UP! Write: The Calhoun-Liberty Journal P.O. Box 536, Bristol 32321 WITH A LETTER TO THE EDITOR

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FEBRUARY 13, 2013 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 9 LOTS OF FUN ACTIVITIES PLANNED Heart Healthy Meal Door Prizes Nutrition Education Bone Density Scan Personal trainer giving exercise demonstrations Cardiovascular Education Tobacco Cessation Education Light n Healthy Dessert Cooking Contest Blood Pressure Checks Dessert Contest For Churches interested in participating in the contest at the GO Red Day Event Make a dessert that is light and heart healthy, to feed 20 people (Bring recipe) FREE Go Red for Women Feb. 19 at 6 p.m. (ET) (850) 643-2415 Susan at ext. 245 For questions, call Liberty County Health Department Tolar overcomes Hosford 17-1 at Feb. 12 game Hosfords softball team pulls out an 11-10 win against Tolar The Hosford girls softball team played a great game Tuesday. After trailing Tolar the entire game, the girls won by one run with a score of 11-10. LEFT: Hosfords MaryBeth Rog ers catches a throw for BELOW: Hosfords Brook Kent con centrates as she scoopes up the hit from Tolar. DANIEL WILLIAMS PHOTOS Hosfords boys baseball team played a tough game Tuesday in Hosford against Tolars Hosfords second baseman Jace White (#5) tags Tolars base runner J.J. House (#7) out. BELOW RIGHT: Tolars Todd Polver (#27) drives the ball after the pitch. Hosfords Third baseman Brady Peddie rears back to throw down a Tolar runner. DANIEL WILLIAMS PHOTOS Give Beth Eubanks a call NEW CrystalWave Meal Solutions REHEAT AND EAT Great for Microwave reheating and enjoying T upper ware Chipola Nursing program is granted candidacy for National Accreditation MARIANNA Chipola Colleges Nursing programs have moved one step closer to na tional accredita tion. The National League for Nurs ing Accrediting Commission, Inc., (NLNAC) recently announced that candidacy status has been granted for Chipolas Bach elor of Science in Nursing (BSN) program and the Associate Degree Nursing (ADN) program. Chipolas candidate status is valid for two years through January 2015. initial accreditation visit later this year. According to NLNAC policy, Chipolas Nursing programs will be added to the listing of colleges and schools who have achieved candi dacy status on the NLNAC website. Dr. Vickie Stephens, Dean of the School of Health Sciences at Chi pola College, says, Our NLNAC candidacy is a testament to the professionalism of our educational team. We embrace the opportunity to provide quality health education through innovative teaching and partnerships with our community. Dr. Jason Hurst, Chipola Vice President of Baccalaureate and Oc cupational Education, says, Our nursing program has been fully accredited by the Southern Asso ciation of Colleges and Schools for many years. This national accredita tion by NLNAC will greatly expand the career and educational opportu nities for our graduates. Chipola offers the RN to BSN Degree with all upper level class es available online. The Associate Degree Nursing program provides training to prepare students for cer college also offers two bridge pro grams: LPN to RN and Paramedic to RN. For information about Chipolas Nursing programs, call (850) 7182316 or visit www.chipola.edu. Pictured from left, are: Dr. Jason Hurst, Vice President of Baccalaureate and Occupational Education; Dr. Vickie Stephens, Dean of the School of Health Sciences; Dr. Karen Lipford, Professor; Tina Dorsey, Instructor; Dr. Chastity Duke, Associate Professor; Amber Bruner, Instructor; Amy Sampson, Patient Simulation Coordinator; and Jennifer Ham, Staff Assistant.

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Page 10 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL FEBRUARY 13, 2013 CITY TIRE CO. We're your one-stop "Volkswagens to semi's, we handle them all" Why wear out your new tires (and waste time) CITY TIRE IS YOUR ONE-STOP TIRE SHOP! TIRE STORE! TOYO TIRES "Authorized Dealer" Brakes SPECIALTY POSTS FACTORY SECONDS ITEMS SUBJECT TO AVAILABILITY Liberty Post & Barn Pole Inc. Phone (850) 643-5995 WE'VE GOT THE FENCE POSTS TO MEET YOUR NEEDS. Home of the All-U-Can-Eat menu Phone (850) 670-8441 Happy Valentines Day from Family Coastal Seafood Restaurant $ 29 95 Steak & Seafood DINNER FEBRUARY 14-16 Seafood Plater for 2 OR $ 25 95 GOLDEN DRUGS Valentines Day Gifts Whitmans and more! Cards 50% Everyday Best of the Latest Country Charted songs, mixed in with your favorite oldies. WPHK Radio K-102.7 FM WYBT Radio Y-1000 AM Liberty County Tigers and the JIM McCLELLANS OUTDOORS Down South Daddy and the homing mule OUTDOORS One day as I was riding with my father through McClellan Swamp, just south of Blountstown, he explained to me why people down there used to let their hogs run free. He told me that if they werent raising them for market, most folks couldnt af ford to feed them every day. And not everybody wanted them penned up by the house because of So, many rural families, including his uncles, aunts and cousins, would mark their hogs by cut ting a distinctive notch in their ears and then turn them loose in the woods to mostly fend for them selves. This worked out well because hogs are smart, resourceful animals that will eat just about anything and can thrive in most any circumstance. Every so often, their owners would take cracked corn and dump it out near their hog pens, which were really wooden traps. This was to make sure the hogs always stayed fairly close by. When the weather turned cool, people would set the traps and catch as many hogs as they need ed for the coming year. They might also trap them at other times to mark the new pigs and cut some of the young boars. When Daddy stayed with one particular set of relatives, they would often get him to ride a mule through the swamp with a bag of corn that was split and draped across the mules back (like saddlebags). The old mule had made the journey many times and dutifully took him to each hog pen where he would dump out some of the corn. Daddy said he enjoyed the chore because most of the time it was pretty easy. Except for once, when he was only about eight or nine years old. On that trip, things were going pretty well until the mule spooked, threw him on the ground and took off at full speed through the swamp. I bet I ran a mile, just as hard as I could go, trying to catch that mule, Daddy said. Some times, I could barely see him, he was so far away. Finally, he slowed down enough that I could grab his bridle. Ive never been so happy to see an ani mal. I thought about the story for a minute and something didnt add up. I asked him, If the mule remembered where all the hog pens were, dont you think he could have found his way back home without you? Sure he could, Daddy said. Problem was, mule. Fourth annual Kid's Wildlife Habitat Contest announced The Florida Wildlife Federation is proud to an nounce the 4th Kid's Wildlife Habitat Contest! We will award a prize of a gardening book and a commemorative plaque to the Floridian 12 or under with the best wildlife habitat. It's easy to enter. Just tell us how your habitat provides food, water, cover, and a place to raise young. Teachers, please note that schoolyard habitats are eligible. The winning habitat will be featured on our website and in our newsletter. We will send an announcement of the winning child or school to your local newspapers, and, if it can be arranged, an FWF representative will come to the winning habitat to present the award on Earth Day 2013, April 22. There is currently great concern among health care specialists, educators, environmentalists, and parents about the shrinking amount of time todays children spend outdoors. It is believed that this is increasing obesity in children as well as other health and causing a sad disconnect with nature among our youngsters. Many programs are being started on the local, state, and national levels to get kids to leave computer games indoors and get outside for healthy activities. The Florida Wildlife Federation is committed to fauna. We think there is a way to tie them together promoting health for both kids and animals by en couraging youngsters to start and maintain a wildlife habitat. This is an excellent activity for children 12 and under. It gets them outdoors, keeps them active digging and pulling the inevitable weeds, sparks an interest in gardening, teaches them something about identifying both plants and animals in the natural world, and (important to all parents), keeps them at home and from wandering to places where they might not be so safe. Schoolyard habitats are included as long as they tion by National Wildlife Federation it is not neces sary for this contest. Just tell us how this habitat provides water, food, cover, and a place to raise young. We will send an announcement of winning kids or schools to your local newspapers (with your permission, of course). We wont use last names or exact addresses, in order to keep the young winners safe from unwanted intrusions. Go to www.fwfonline.org and look at the Habitat PowerPoint there for help and ideas. Entries close March 31. Email patricia@fwfonline.org for more informa tion and start sending in those pictures. Researchers with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conserva tion Commission (FWC) docu mented fewer manatee deaths in 2012 than in the previous three years, as milder winter temper cold-related mortality. The FWC recorded 392 manatee carcasses in state waters last year, of which a quarter were determined to be from human-related causes. FWC researchers, managers and law enforcement staff work closely together to evaluate mor tality data and identify necessary actions. Actions may include steps to protect vital habitat or special patrols to ensure compli ance with manatee speed zones. The FWC is committed to conservation actions that reduce human-caused manatee deaths, including those related to wa tercraft. The FWCs Division of Law Enforcement, in coopera tion with partner agencies, uses knowledge of local boating con ditions and habits, well-posted speed regulatory zones and upto-date manatee information as part of its on-the-water enforce ment operations. Researchers documented 81 watercraft-related deaths in 2012, slightly below the yearly Protecting manatees is a pri ority, said Maj. Jack Daugherty, FWCs Boating and Waterways time to patrol manatee zones, identify areas that have present ed problems, and generally work with the public to educate them on how to boat safely and in a way that doesnt harm the envi ronment. To help prevent cold-related deaths, the FWC continues to work with partners to enhance availability of warm-water sites important to manatee survival. Among recent efforts was the restoration of Fanning Springs by the FWC and partners, which improves manatee access to a natural warm-water habitat off the Suwannee River. To view preliminary 2012 manatee mortality data, visit MyFWC.com/Research/Mana tee and click on Manatee Mor tality Statistics. To learn more about manatee conservation, go to MyFWC. com/Manatee. As part of its conservation efforts, the FWC rescues dis tressed manatees throughout the state. The FWC and partners rescued 81 manatees in 2012, in many cases as a result of citizens contacting the agency. To report a dead or distressed manatee, call the FWCs Wildlife Alert Hotline at (888) 404-FWCC (3922). Florida residents can also help manatees by purchasing the manatee specialty license plate, available at county tax collec for these plates go directly to manatee research and conserva tion. To help prevent coldrelated deaths, the FWC continues to work with partners to enhance availability of warmwater sites important to manatee survival. Among recent efforts was the restoration of Fanning Springs by the FWC and partners, which improves mana tee access to a natural warm-water habitat off the Suwannee River.

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by Teresa Eubanks, Journal Editor Students begin their day with a smile from Debra Clark. She greets the buses each morning at W.R. Tolar School in Bristol and sets the tone for the day. "I love the students and I think it's important to smile at them and call them by name," she says. After the kids get settled in their classes, Clark turns her attention to her many other duties. She oversees the inschool suspension and PE detention department, during which she has to rein in that smile and be the disciplinarian. When a teacher is absent, chances are Clark will turn up in the classroom. If a staff member is out sick, she could wind up at the front helps when the school nurse gets busy. She doesn't miss a beat if called on to help in the media center, where she previously worked for two years. She enjoys guiding children toward books she feels will mean something to them, like her favorite, A Child Called "It." "It's by far the best library book we have at Tolar," she says. "I enjoy reading and I encourage kids to get The end of the school day doesn't mean the end of her workday. After school, she helps with the 21st Century CCLC tutoring program. She gives kids a hand with their homework, shows them how to do an arts and crafts project or perhaps helps them write a letter to a soldier serving overseas. "I love my job and having so much to do makes the day go by fast," she says. When a child is sent to her for detention, she works with them about their attitude and teaches them to take ownership of their actions. Students are required to write the "code of conduct" for the rule they broke, she explains. She says she's found that you have a child's respect when you show them you're here for them. "Then, they thrive on proving to you they can be better." The 40-yearold has worked as a paraprofessional with the eight years ago, she was a stay-athome mom. But when her daughter, Destiny started school, she decided she wanted to stay close to her little girl. She got a job as a school bus driver and filled in as a school custodian and worked in the cafeteria. Next, she became a health aide, working with disabled students. After that, she became a full time paraprofessional. Not only is she able to stay close to her daughter, "now all 670 of them are my babies," she says of the students. Clark's selection as School-Related Employee of the Year was no surprise to Tolar teacher Samantha Newsome, who summed up Clark's impact at the school: "She is everywhere sometimes I think there is more than one of her!" Debra Clark, who turned 40 yesterday, lives in Bristol with her husband, Frankie Clark. They have two children, Colby, 20, and 14-yearold Destiny. The daughter of Thomas and Sally Hopkins, Debra is a 1991 graduate of LCHS. by Teresa Eubanks, Journal Editor attention to detail and willingness to take on added work while keeping updated on new state requirements made her a natural Related Employee of the Year. She began her duties with the school district as a part-time student worker and has since moved up to her current position seen a few changes. Smaller class size and new regulations have resulted in more and more paperwork. Her biggest challenge? Keeping up with the state and federal regulations, she one who often has to explain those changes to others. can cut costs, she said, explaining that a study is being done to determine how to best save money by making facilities more energy efficient. That effort is already underway with the recent upgrades at Carr School. looking forward to seeing some changes in the school Her numerous duties include preparing budgets and relating to keeping track of the school neighboring counties. Earlier this year, she spent a few weeks working with the Liberty County School District, and is She credits her ability to handle so many things to the fact that there are several other long-term employees in experienced people here, she said, noting that at least three of her coworkers have between 25 and 27 years with the school system. Her supervisor, School District to her skill in her job. In a letter recommending her for Shelia work for the school system, she has been involved with school activities due to her sons, one who graduated from Altha School and the other who is a senior at Blountstown High School. This involvement is a result of her strong family ties and values. FEBRUARY 13, 2013 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 11 Debra Clark recognized for her many roles at Tolar Sheila Hall honored as Calhoun District Employee of the Year CALHOUN TEACHER continued from the front page of pride as different leaders emerge and take on their leadership role, she explains. While the lesson continues, she moves from table to table. If a group is struggling I sit with that group and teach a mini lesson to reinforce the topic, she says. The goal is to overwhelmed and have the chance to ask questions and discuss ideas. I give my students small chunks of information to work on, and I test often. She monitors their progress through frequent testing and says, I am convinced that the method I am using with my students is working because 86% of the students I teach showed growth from the Fall Benchmark test to the Winter Benchmark test. important to share that knowledge and support each other in the process. She found her role models in other teachers, who inspired her to uphold their standards of professionalism. I do not teach because it is my job, I teach because it is my privilege to make a difference in our community, she says. Tomlinson is known for being an innovative and compassionate teacher, according to BHS Principal Dr. Debbie Williams, who actively encouraged her to take a position at the high school. I spent a whole school year recruiting Karen to come teach at BHS, says Williams. I teaching ability to work with our struggling math students. Williams says that effort has paid off because, Karen is the type of teacher that does not teach a subject; she teaches students. Karen Tomlinson, 51, lives in Blountstown with her husband, David, and Caroline Tomlinson, 18. She is a 1980 graduate of Liberty County High School. She received her want to know that they can make choices that will be heard and respected." She's aware that math is a challenge for many children. "At this age, a lot of them have the stereotype that it's hard and they can't do it," she says. "The challenge is to get past their perception, and show them there's easier ways to do it and more than one way to do it." She does that by breaking down the information they already know and then tells them, "We're going to build on what you've already learned." Newsome is a 1977 Blountstown High School graduate who went on to Chipola College and then to psychology. Her goal was to work with children. She took a job as a case worker and later became a child abuse investigator, which she believes gave her a solid start as an educator. "That experience helps me as a teacher," she says, explaining, "I'm more aware of their feelings. I realize if a student is having a bad day, it might be because they had a bad night at home." She says Tolar is a special school because of its family atmosphere. "The students, staff and administrations all make up one huge family. Staff and administrators work together to do what is needed and best for the students," she says, explaining, "Everyone pitches instudents look out for one another. The older students prove to be role models for the younger students and all ages can be seen helping each other, whether it is with school work, extracurricular activities, or simply picking up dropped books." She has shared a special part of her family life with her classes; the adoption of one of her pets, a pit bull she calls Frankie. The class followed her through the adoption process, which included a home visit from an animal rescue agency in Panama City. Frankie joined the household that included another pit bull named Rebel. "They are my babies," she says. When she leaves her home between Altha and Blountstown each morning, she drops the two dogs off with her mother, Polly Newsome, who babysits them for her. "The students think it's just hilarious that when I come to work, they go to grannie's house," she says. Newsome says she was caught by surprise when she was named Teacher of the Year,. "Six people were nominated and we have an awesome group of teachers down here," she says of her co-workers at Tolar. "We all work together and do what's necessary for the kids." LIBERTY TEACHER continued from the front page

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Page 12 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL FEBRUARY 13, 2013 The 4th Annual Pre-season Baseball/Softball Clas sic was held at Hosford School on Saturday, Feb. 2. The Hosford Panther Booster Club would like to take this opportunity to say thank you to the follow ing individuals who helped in making the event such a huge success: Doobie Hayes, Charles Barber, Dexter Barber, Kyle Peddie, Ginger Watson, Emily Todd, Jeri Flowers and countless others. We are so appreciative of everyone who came out to support the children and our community. We truly are blessed to live in such a devoted community. The Hosford 8th grade class is having a Chicken Pilau dinner on Friday, Feb. 15 beginning at 11 a.m. This event will be held at the Hosford Fire Department. Cost is $6 a plate. Please come and support our 8th grade class fund raiser for our Orlando trip. We would like to thank the Liberty CountySheriff's all the citizens of Liberty County who contributed to our fundraising endeavor. Chicken Pilau for Hosford school to be held Feb. 15 Hosford celebrates 100 TH day of school on Friday, Feb. 1. To start the day off students came in dressed up as though they read the story 100th Day Worries by Margery Cuyler Later that day students participated in several activities where they had to ei snack food. We would like to thank Harveys Grocery store in Blountstown for donating us day of school. Night last week. It was a fabulous opportunity to show parents and students that math can be FUN while snacking on some homemade cookies! Students used their math skills to master games using differ ent types of technology including: iPads, iPods, LeapFrog Leap other students using the SumDog website. grades are: cookie.com, coolmath.com, sumdog. com,multiplication.com, and starfall.com. will be held Feb. 25 with Valentine's Day themed activites. National Signing Day on Feb. 6 led a group of family and friends to the Liberty County High School sign a letter of intent to play football at Clark Atlanta University. The Division 2 School from At lanta is a member of the Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Conference. The Panthers signed 23 players dur ing the opening day of recruiting with only three from out of state. We are very pleased with the qual ity of recruits we have signed and are equally enthusiastic about the number of student-athletes from the Atlanta area, said Coach Kevin Weston. All of these players have a special talent and the local impact will set the tone for a great game day experience within the community. Alex was recruited to play wing back and defensive back for the Panthers. Liberty Countys Coach over which side of the ball he will play because they know they have a great football player in Alex. Alex told the coaches at Clark Atlanta during his visit that he doesnt care which side of the ball he plays on as long as he plays. He was told if they signed someone from out of state, We expect them to play early. During Alexs senior year he col lected many honors as he helped lead the Bulldogs to district and regional championships. He was selected as the Channel 13 student-athlete of the week, played in the FACA All Star Game, GA/FL Border War All Star Game, All District 1st team, All Big Bend First Team Utility Player on the offensive side, and All State First Team Utility Player on the defensive side. At Liberty County High School he scored 18 touchdowns, rushed for ing, returned punts and kickoffs, played quarterback, cornerback, and safety for the Bulldogs. When interviewed at the signing, Alex talked about how great it was to play for Liberty County and all the hard work he had put in over the years and challenged the underclass men to work hard. We are looking forward to watch ing Alex continue his athletic and academic career at Clark Atlanta University and we wish him the best. Liberty Countys Alex Marlowe signs with Clark Atlanta University Feb. 6 A great turnout at Family Math Night MAKE A NOTE... to get your in by noon Call (850) 643-3333 Fax (888) 400-5810 Email: thejournal@fairpoint.net SCHOOL NEWS

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FEBRUARY 13, 2013 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 13 WEDNESDAY BREAKFAST: Grits with ham cubes and banana LUNCH: Pork roast or chicken burger or chick en Caesar salad served with mashed potatoes with gravy, turnip greens, THURSDAY with syrup and turkey LUNCH: Meatball sub or cheese burger or chef salad served with french fries, Caesar salad and FRIDAY BREAKFAST: Sausage and egg biscuit and po LUNCH: Cheese burger or cheese pizza or taco salad served with baked potato wedges, sliced tomatoes and lettuce MONDAY BREAKFAST: Egg and cheese biscuit with po LUNCH: Corn dog nug gets or buffalo chicken wrap or Caesar salad served with baked beans, carrot sticks with TUESDAY BREAKFAST: Ham and cheese biscuit and po tato tots LUNCH: Parmesan chicken with pasta or meatball sub or taco sal ad served with broccoli polonaise, garden salad, WEDNESDAY BREAKFAST: Scrambled eggs and grits LUNCH: Country style steak with white gravy and corn chef salad with tortilla shells served with mixed vegeta bles and Caesar side salad THURSDAY BREAKFAST: Whole wheat cinnamon toast and turkey sausage patty LUNCH: Sloppy Joe sandwich or hamburger on bun or buffalo chicken salad with crackers and croutons served with steamed broccoli and 2nd & 3rd grade cheese pizza FRIDAY BREAKFAST: Whole wheat pancakes with syrup and mozzarella cheese stick LUNCH: Chuck waggon chicken with rice and gravy or meatball sub or ham, turkey and cheese or chef salad with croutons and crackers served with whole kernel corn and tossed sal ad with tomatoes and light MONDAY BREAKFAST: Breakfast pizza LUNCH: Meatloaf with dinner roll or turkey club sandwich or chicken ranch wrap served with baked sweet potato and Kg & 1st grade cheese pizza TUESDAY BREAKFAST: Ham and cheese biscuit LUNCH: Glazed ham with corn bread or hamburger on bun or baby turkey, ham and cheese sub served with steamed broccoli and whole Pea Ridge Rd in Bristol, Phone (850) 643-5417 SCHOOL LUNCH MENU Feb. 13 Feb. 19 Laban Bontrager, DMD, Monica Bontrager, DMD Bristol Dental Clinic Each breakfast includes a choice of assorted cereal, whole wheat buttered toast and juice. CALHOUN LIBERTY MENUS SPONSORED BY: Blountstowns FFA competes at Horse Evaluation held in Tampa This past weekend, members of the Blountstown FFA traveled to Tampa to compete in Horse Evaluation. This was the state qualifying competi tion. Although the team did not qualify for the state contest, they did improve on their test scores from last year and this again next year. Team members included Katelyn Bozeman, Caitlyn Holland, Kyle Smith, and Benjamin Walden. Alternates were Lesley Clemmons and Jessie West. While at the Florida State Fair, the team met and mingled with the National FFA President Clay Sapp from Madison. We are very proud of our team mem bers! Blountstown FFA would like to & Concrete and the Florida Panhandle Saddle Club for graciously donating money to the Blountstown FFA chapter to help send these students to the State Fair. From LEFT: Lesley Clemmons, Katelyn Bozeman, Jessie West, National FFA President Clay Sapp, Caitlyn Holland, Blountstown High to take part in Take Stock In Children Hat day on Feb. 20 Wednesday, Feb. 20, has been approved by the district as Take Stock In Children Hat Day! On this day, students are allowed to wear hats to school to raise aware ness and money for the Calhoun County Take Stock In Children Schol arship Fund. Students who have purchased a hat permit will be allowed to wear hats on this day. Monday, Feb. 11 marked a very special day in the lives of two of our 9th graders in the district as they both re ceived a two year schol arship given by Calhoun County Take Stock In Children. Mr. Yoder will be noti fying these two students about this award. The Blountstown FFA Chapter is packages in plastic clamshell contain collected by Feb. 19. The strawberries will arrive either week of March. please call Blountstown High School at 674-5724 and ask for Joanna Everett. Btown Elementary reminds parents of importatnt dates *February 14 Valentine's Day *February 21 1st Grade Field Trip *February 26 28 FCAT Writing Test Six of the Senior Beta members and the Senior Beta Sponsor, LeAnna Hall, traveled to south Florida to attend the Senior Beta State Convention last week. Albert Varnum competed in Science, Justin Walt man competed in English, Ryan Wood competed in Social Studies and Porter Smith competed in Math. Haley Chason entered a photo in the digitally en hanced category. Carly Schwartz entered photos in black and white-still and color-action. Senior Beta also entered a banner into the ban ner competition. The banner was created by Carly Schwartz with the help of Haley Chason. The theme for this year was "The Heart of Beta." Haley Chason placed second with her digital ly enhanced photo and our banner, designed by da. Althas Sr. Beta will represent Florida in the banner competition at the National Convention in Mobile, AL in June. Altha Schools Senior Beta attends state convention Principal Ladonna Kelley proudly announces Altha Schools Kids of Character for the month of January demonstrating the character trait of Punctuality: Front row from left, Brandon Pringle, Matthew Rodgers, Mason Young, Christopher McClain, Parker Willis, Caleb Detweiler and Baylee Rowe. On second row, Jacob Cauley, Kylie Mazzarese, Kerrigan Hollis, Addison O'Bryan, Nikki Richards and Stone Taylor. Not pictured, Kayla Gonsalez. Altha FFA had a good showing at the 2013 Florida State Fair FFA Horse Judg ing Career Development Event, Saturday, Feb. 9. The purpose of the Horse Judging CDE is to stimulate the study of, and interest in, equine science selection while providing recognition for those who have demonstrated skill and competency in this area. Congratulations to the Altha FFA team for qualifying to attend the State Finals event in April. Morgan Lewis, Brooke Coleman and Carly Schwartz quali Students had to take a test on equine knowledge, evaluate eight classes of horses and answer a set of questions on one of those classes. These students will continue to study, in hopes of winning a State Title in the Finals Event in April. Advisors are Tyler Stoutamire and Erin Stou tamire Walker. Great job Altha FFA. Althas FFA participates at State Horse Judging ish in our area. She also broke the school bench press record with a 160 bench press. lifting from Altha in 11 years. SCHOOL NEWS CountyAway @ 6:00; Senior Trip Payment Due Home @ 6:00; Sadie Hawkins Dance @ 8:00; Senior Trip Pay ment Due val in Panama City @ 11:00 Home @ 4:00 Walton-Away @ 5:00; Softball Deadline for Junior Class T-shirts orders BHS Calendar of Events Althas Kids of Character for January Althas Calendar of Events Altha girls weighlifting team placed in state competition BECOME A VOLUNTEER HELP AN ABUSED, NEGLECTED OR OTHERWISE AT-RISK CHILD BY BECOMING FLORIDA GUARDIAN AD LITEM FOUNDATION PHONE (850) 410-4642 DISCOVER HOW YOU CAN MAKE A DIFFERENCE IN A CHILDS LIFE.

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Page 14 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL FEBRUARY 13, 2013 The annual Miss Black History Pageant was held on Saturday, Feb. 9, at the Blountstown Middle School Au ditorum. The following ladies were crowned: Tiny Miss Black History: Monica Adkins, Blount stown Little Miss Black History: Kariyah Jackson, Sneads Young Miss Black History: Jherico Jones, Blount stown Teen Miss Black History: Christian Hogue, Blount stown Ms. Black History: Crystal Thomas, Blounstown Miss Black History Lifetime Queen: Shankia Robin son, Blounstown Miss Black History Lifetime Ambassador: Jahnice Jones, Blounstown Also held on that day were the Black History Fashion Show and Band Concert, which took place at the W. T. Neal Civic Center. All four events were a big success. Thanks to all who came out to help make these programs a success. The Annual Black History Parade and Festival are scheduled for Saturday, Feb. 16. The parade beings at 10 a.m. and the festival begins immediately after the pa rade, ending at the Mayhaw Historical site. Queens crowned in Miss Black Hi s t ory Pageant

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Page 15 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL FEBRUARY 13, 2013 OBITUARIES DOLLIE BELL SUTTON MANNING DAWSON BLOUNTSTOWN Dollie Bell Sutton Manning Dawson, 86, of Blountstown, passed away Monday, Feb. 4, 2013 in Tallahassee. She was born Aug. 17, 1926 in Holmes County and had lived in Blountstown for most of her life. She was a retired restaurant cook and was a member of the Holiness faith. She was preceded in death by her husbands, John Henry Manning and Lawrence Dawson; one son, Charles Ray Dawson; three sisters, Charlie Etta, May Nell and Rossie. Survivors include two daughters, Johnnie Dawson and June Uhrick, both of Blountstown; one brother, William Sutton and his wife, Gloria of Virginia Beach, VA; one sister, Jeannie Wright and her husband, grandchildren. Graveside services were held Saturday, Feb. 9 at Pine Memorial Cemetery with Reverend Dwayne Peavy Funeral Home in Blountstown is in charge of the arrangements. GEORGE FRANK WALDEN passed away Wednesday, Feb. 6, 2013 at his home after a lengthy illness. He was born June 28, 1929 in Jackson County. He served in the United States life and retired as a construction superintendent. He grandfather. He was preceded in death by his parents, John Rob and Mattie Lee Walden; his wife and mother of his children, Barbara Jesse Walden; his second wife, Shirley Gable Walden and one brother, J.W.(Dick) Walden. Survivors include one son, George L. Walden and his wife, Jodi of Sneads; two daughters, Deb bie Turner of Sneads and Barbara Smith and her husband, Randy of Sycamore; one brother, Ches Paul of Tallahassee, Paula Ward of Bainbridge, GA, Dorothy Purcell and her husband, Dave of Oldsmar, Janice Herndon and her husband, Billy and Brenda Maries and her husband, David, all of Odessa; nine Graveside services were held Sunday, Feb. 10 at Dykes Cemetery in Sneads with Rev. Jack Howell of Emerald Coast Hospice, 4374 Layfaette Street, Mari anna, FL 32446. charge of arrangements. JESSE TALMADGE WRIGHT Wright, 82, of Bristol, passed away Friday, Feb. 8, 2013 at his home. He was born in Al ford on Jan. 11, 1931 to the late Wright. He served in the US Navy and retired from Civil Service in 1964. After his retirement he ran a grocery store in Port St. Joe. He was an avid hunter and Marie (Haddock) Wright; one brother, Homer Survivors include his loving wife, Elouise Wright of Bristol; one stepson, Danny Neel of Sumatra; two daughters, Debra Duron Wright of Vida, TX and Brenda Moulder and her husband, David of Auburn, Graveside services were held Sunday, Feb. 10 at Salem Cemetery in Cottondale with Reverend Wayne Adams Funeral Home was in charge of the ar rangements. Online condolences may be made at ad amsfh.com. Telephone (850) 674-2266 Your hometown funeral home since 1994 A Hometown Funeral Director You Can Trust and Depend On! Funeral Services with Dignity, Caring and Professionalism. Marlon Peavy Peavy Funeral Home & Crematory All existing pre-need and at need contracts are now handled by the Bevis family and staff. All operations of the funeral process will be handled on location at 12008 NW State Road 20. CALL 643-3636 Todd Wahlquist, Rocky Bevis & Ed Peacock Licensed Funeral Directors & Crematory evis Funeral H ome B of Bristol of Bristol DAVID WILLIAM MCINTOSH Saturday, Feb. 9, 2013 in Blount stown. He was born on Jan.11, 1948 in Haddix, KY and had lived in Altha for the past four welder by trade and a veteran of 1969 until 1971in the United States Marine Corp. He was a member of Rivertown Community Church in Blountstown and a member of the American Legion. Survivors include his wife, San and stepmother James Hershel Mc Ashley Eaton and her husband, Daniel of Lake City, PA and Cindy Goodpaster and her husband, Bobby of and her husband, Forrest of Florence, KY; six grand children, Kipp, Cera, Cassie and Caitlyn Goodpaster, Zoey Elizabeth Eaton and Raiden Xavier Eaton. Memorial services will be held at a later date. Me morialization will be by cremation. Peavy Funeral Home in Blountstown is in charge of the arrangements. FRED T. JOHNSON Blountstown, passed away Tuesday, Feb. 12, 2013 in Blountstown. He was born on June 18, 1933 in Knox ville, TN and had lived in Blountstown since 1993, coming from Pensacola. He was retired from Mon santo Chemical Company with 37 years of service. the United States Air Force. He always enjoyed and saw the good side of life, truly loved people and was a very fun person to be with. He was a member of the Blountstown Lions Club and a member of the Blount stown United Methodist Church. Survivors include his wife, Jo Johnson of Blount stown; two sons, Berry Pugh and his wife, Lisa of Huntsville, AL and Jeff Johnson of Boynton Beach; two daughters, Laurie Holland of Milton and Sherry Howes and her husband, Chris; one brother, Dick Johnson and his wife, Sarah of Nichols, SC; three sis ters, Pat Osborne and Sarah Haynes both of Pensaco la and Cynthia Barton of Tennessee; 20 grandchildren Family will receive friends one hour prior to ser vice time at the church. Memorial services will be held Saturday, Feb. 16, 2013 at 2 p.m. (CST) at Blountstown United Method morialization will be by cremation. Peavy Funeral Home in Blountstown is in charge of the arrangements. ITS VERY WISE TO ADVERTISE in the Calhoun-Liberty Journal and... CLJ N ews .COM by Liliane Parbot, contributing writer when he was not much older that a toddler. recently. Show business was not to be his career, however. While he still sings and acts on stage as a hobby, his day job has him as the branch manager and lender at Centennial Bank in Bristol; but when not at work if not on a stage he is most likely to be found standing backstage or in the audience, because one of his three children will be performing. performing has been passed on from the father to all of his three children: Benjamin, 21; Aaron, 18; and The Journal caught up with Black during a recent Liberty County Art Council, supported by the Lib erty County Board of County Commissioners. Olivia Black will have one of the four leading roles, Miss Adelaide, who is described as a psychosomatic Her father added: We were both in that one, and also His daughters eyes sparkle when she talks about the added. According to Black, the Liberty County Art Coun cil is trying to provide art opportunities for the countys school children because funding cuts have resulted in the loss of many art programs. Hugh Black and daughter Olivia look over her costume. show will be for students only, Friday, March 1, at a time to be announced. For the public, show time is Saturday, March 2, at 7 p.m. Both performances will be at Veter ans Memorial Civic Center on Hwy. 12, south of Bristol. Shop, Bristol Buy Rite Drug Store and the Centennial Bank. Man, three years ago. Black said it brought back some feels to his children. Olivia was in that play. so much and the boys as well. Aaron was also in the performed as part of a hardcore music group and he trav Presently, Aaron is at Chipola College on a theater scholarship, and he is to perform in the musical Hair issue.) Meanwhile, what about the childrens mother? Af ter being a teacher, Beckie is now guidance counselor in Hosford, and she also encourages her children to pursue their dreams. Her husband added, She enjoys singing, but she is not as singing out front as we are but she enjoys it. We always felt, whatever they are interested in, whether it is sports, arts, or any other interest, we en There is no doubt the Swiss psychiatrist, Carl Gus tave Jung, would approve of this kind of parenting, see whether it is not something that could be changed interrupted. Club, FCA (Fellowship of Christian Athletes), Student Olivia already knows what she wants in her future. Actually, what Olivia does today is nothing short of a miracle. father recalled. She was born with an extra piece of her spine curve outward. For 11 hours, Olivia was in surgery in Philadelphia. her to be able to dance and move like she does, its a blessing from God to be able to do what she is doing. Acting runs in the blood of this Liberty Co. family

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FEBRUARY 13, 2013 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 16 Minutes from the Jan. 10 Liberty Commission meeting The meeting was called to order by Chairman Jim Johnson. Present at the meeting were Commissioners Scott Phillips, Davis Stoutamire, Dexter Barber, Dewayne Branch, Attorney Shalene Grover, Clerk Kathleen Brown, and Deputy Clerk Charla Kearce. Prayer was led by Tommy Duggar. Pledge of allegiance was led by Commissioner Davis Stoutamire. Motion to approve the minutes of the regular meeting held Dec. 6 and special meeting Dec. 11, 2012 was made by Stoutamire, seconded by Phillips and carried. Motion by Phillips to add to agenda to talk about Hosford Park and Estiffanulga Park, seconded by Branch and carried. Motion by Barber to add to agenda to request a FL Rural Water rate study at no expense to the county, seconded by Stoutamire and carried. Bill Clackley with North West Florida Water Management discussed the Florida River Island road repair and maintenance agreement. It was agreed to set a meeting up with Warden Ed Mercer and try to work something out to use inmate labor to maintain the road, boat ramp, picnic area and camp site. Ralph Mills with Waste Pro Garbage Service discussed with the Board doing their own billing for garbage service. A workshop will be set up to continue discussion. Motion to approve running water line to hook Tom Evans up to the Water System in Estiffanulga was made by Phillips, seconded by Stoutamire and carried by Barber and Johnson. Branch voted No. Aaron Elkins with the Water Department discussed the need of a roof replacement on the Sumatra water tank at an estimated cost of $30,000. Aaron Elkins recommended Wennon Arnold be hired in the Water Department position. within the two year period. Motion to hire Wennon Arnold was made by Branch, seconded by Barber and carried. Phillips abstained. Arnold will start Monday and will the Prison to work inmates. Road Superintendent J.T. Hathaway discussed with the Board the cost of dirt and equipment fees. Hathaway would like to purchase a log grinder. Motion to go out for bids was made by Phillips, seconded by Stoutamire and carried. Danny Earnest discussed his contract with the county and amending the contract to three days a week so he can oversee the grant. Motion to approve was made by Stoutamire, seconded by Barber and carried. Motion to advertise a change of be opened Tuesday through Saturday and closed Sunday and Monday was made by Barber, seconded by Phillips and carried. This will run in the paper for two weeks. Danny Earnest recommends Bobby Ray Summers for the attendant position. Motion to approve was made by Stoutamire, seconded by Branch and carried. Michael Richter discussed his phone issue at the Civic Center. Motion to table was made by Barber, seconded by Phillips and carried. Rachel Manspeaker gave an update on the Health Department. She told the Board that there are doctors who will be replacing the doctors that are leaving until April 30, 2013. Sheriff Nick Finch and Gay Uzzell discussed the Board positions. No decision was made. The Board will have a workshop with the Sheriff. Motion to approve Resolution #13-04 in support of the Legislature giving school funding Branch, seconded by Phillips and carried. Monica Welles with Liberty Transit presented DOT Grant 5310 and 5311. Motion to approve Resolution # 13-01 for DOT Grant 5310 was made by Phillips, seconded by Barber and carried. Motion to approve Resolution #13-02 for DOT Grant 5311 was made by Stoutamire, seconded by Branch and carried. Motion to appoint Davis Stoutamire to continue to serve on the Apalachee Regional Planning Council was made by Branch, seconded by Barber and carried. A letter from Risk Management was read concerning the safety program. Motion to approve Resolution #13-03 recognizing Liberty County as a Capital Purple Heart County was made by Stoutamire, seconded by Barber and carried. Motion to advertise letter to water customers with ordinance was made by Branch, seconded by Phillips and carried. The Board requested that the County Attorney draw up a resolution concerning synthetic drugs. The Board gave Clerk Brown instructions for the work squad on where they wanted the gate for the Hosford Park. The County will pay for the material. There was discussion about the Hosford Park. Motion to approve Shannon Daub use of the Civic Center for motorcycle training was made by Branch, seconded by Stoutamire and carried. Motion to ban alcoholic beverages at the Civic Center was made by Stoutamire. Motion died. Motion to approve Florida Rural Water performing a free water rate study for the county was made by Phillips, seconded by Branch and carried. Motion to pay the bills was made by Phillips, seconded by Barber and carried. Motion to adjourn was made by Phillips, seconded by Barber and carried. Warrant List & Numbers Payroll Fund...33910 33989 Operating Fund...6304 6477 SHIP Grant...4013 4017 Weatherization Grant .....4711 4719 The meeting was called to order by Chairman Jim Johnson. Present at the meeting were Commissioner Davis Stoutamire, Scott Phillips, Dewayne Branch, Dexter Barber, Attorney Shalene Grover, Clerk Kathleen Brown and Deputy Clerk Lisa Shuler. Motion to amend Sheriffs Budget for $6,671.15 was made by Branch, seconded by Barber and carried. Motion to enter into an emergency contract with Calhoun Liberty Hospital for Inmate Health Care at the Liberty County Jail was made by Phillips, seconded by Stoutamire and carried. Motion to advertise change of road name from O.Z. Revell Road to Dolly Revell Road, was made by Stoutamire, seconded by Phillips and carried. Motion to send a letter to Senator Montford requesting funds for Hosford Sports Complex was made by Stoutamire, seconded by Phillips, and carried. Motions to commence construction on concession stand and restrooms, using inmate labor, at the Hosford Sports Complex was made by Stoutamire, seconded by Barber and carried. Civic Center to Michael Richter for $350 per month made by Stoutamire, seconded by Branch and carried. Motion to charge $400 hook-up fee to connect to the Liberty County Water System was made by Branch, seconded by Stoutamire, and carried. Motion for all Elected their Personnel Policy with by Phillips, seconded by Branch and carried. Motion to enter into an agreement with the Liberty County Correction Institution to alternate cleaning of the Florida River Island Park with the Road Department, made by Stoutamire, seconded by Branch, and carried. Motion to give Phillip Hill with the Calhoun Liberty Hospital permission to access ambulance billing detail for the purpose of giving a quote for the operation of the Ambulance Service made by Stoutamire, seconded by Branch, and carried. Motion to send letters to water and garbage customers regarding utility accounts made by Branch, seconded by Stoutamire, and carried. Motion by Phillips to have a meeting with Department of Homeland Security, Liberty County Sheriffs seconded by Branch, and carried. Motion to adjourn was made by Branch, seconded by Barber, and carried. Special commission meeting held Jan. 24

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Page 17 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL FEBRUARY 13, 2013 THE JOURNAL JOB MARKET Class A CDL Flatbed Drivers 7 positions Temporary/seasonal work planting, grown balled and burlap (B&B) trees and tree-size shrubs, operation of 50+ HP nursery equipment. from 2/25/2013 to 5/31/2013 at Sunleaf Nursery, LLP Madison, OH. This job requires a minimum experience working in a balled and burlap tree HP nursery equipment. Must be able to operate 50+ HP nursery equipment. Employer-paid drug testing required. Saturday work required. Must be able to lift/carry 100 pounds. $11.74/hr or current applicable AEWR. Workers are guaranteed of work hours of total period. Work tools, supplies, equipment supplied by employer without charge to worker. Housing with kitchen facilities provided at no cost to only those workers who are not rea sonably able to return same day to their place of residence at time of recruitment. Transportation and subsistence expenses to work site will be paid to nonresident workers not later than upon completion of 50% of the job contract. Interviews required. Apply for this job at nearest State Work force Agency in state in which this ad appears, or One Stop Career Center 16908 Northeast Pear Street, Suite 2, Blountstown, FL 32424. Provide copy of this ad. OH Job Order #OH553382. 105 positions Temporary/seasonal work, plant ing, cultivating and harvesting nursery stock in wholesale nursery. from 2/25/2013 to 7/15/2013 at Willoway Nurseries, Inc., Lorain and Erie coun wholesale nursery experience required. Saturday worked required. Must be able to lift/carry 60 lbs. Employer is a U.S. Department of Agricultureer-paid post-hire drug testing required. Prefer bilingual (English/Spanish) with ability to read work orders and manuals in English and write reports. $11.74/hr or current applicable AEWR. Workers are guaranteed of work hours of total period. Work tools, supplies, equipment supplied by employer without charge to worker. Housing with kitchen facilities provided at no cost to only those workers who are not reasonably able to re turn same day to their place of residence at time of recruitment. Transportation and subsistence expenses to work site will be paid to nonresident workers not later than upon completion of 50% of the job contract. Interviews required. Apply for this job at nearest State Workforce Agency in state in which this ad appears, or One Stop Ca reer Center 16908 Northeast Pear Street, Suite 2, Blountstown, FL 32424. Provide copy of this ad. OH Job Order #OH553415. 12 positions Temporary/seasonal work planting, cultivating and harvest shrubs. from 2/25/2013 to 12/16/2013 at Barton Nursery Enterprises, Inc. Edison and Cranbury, NJ. Three ence required in the job described. Saturday work required. Must be able to lift/carry 75 lbs. $10.87/hr or current applicable AEWR. Workers are guar anteed of work hours of total period. Work tools, supplies, equipment sup plied by employer without charge to worker. Housing with kitchen facilities provided at no cost to only those work ers who are not reasonably able to return same day to their place of resi dence at time of recruitment. Trans portation and subsistence expenses to work site will be paid to nonresident workers not later than upon comple tion of 50% of the job contract. In terviews required. Apply for this job at nearest State Workforce Agency in state in which this ad appears, or One Stop Career Center 16908 Northeast Pear Street, Suite 2, Blountstown, FL 32424. Provide copy of this ad. NJ Job Order #NJ0840623. PUBLIC AND LEGAL NOTICES STATE OF FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION NOTICE OF INTENT TO ISSUE PERMIT The Department of Environmental Protection gives notice of its intent to issue an environmental resource permit for Apalachicola River 0129424-008-EI, to the US Army Corps of Engineers, Mobile District, at P.O. Box 2288, Mobile, Alabama 366280001. The purpose of the permit is to authorize maintenance snagging (relocation of tree snags out of the navigation channel) in the Florida portion of the Apalachicola, Chattahoochee, and Flint Rivers (ACF) Federal Navigation Project. The project will be located in the Apalachicola River between River Mile 0.0 and River Mile 106.4 in Class III, Outstanding Florida Waters (entire Florida portion of river), and Apalachicola Bay Aquatic Preserve (River Miles 0.0 4.5) in Jackson, Gadsden, Calhoun, Liberty, Gulf, and Franklin Counties. Based on all the above, and with the application of general of the permit, the Department has reasonable assurance the project, s proposed, fully meets the environmental resources permitting requirements of Chapter 62-346, Florida Administrative Code, and will not harm the environment. A person whose substantial interests are affected by the Departments action may petition for an administrative proceeding (hearing) under Sections 120.569 and 120.57 of the Florida Statute. The petition must contain the information set forth below and Counsel of the Department at 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida 323993000. Because the administrative hearing process is designed action on the application, administrative hearing may permit, or even a denial of the application. Accordingly, the applicant will not commence construction or other activities under this permit until the petition for an administrative hearing, or request for an extension of time, have expired. Under subsection 62110.106(4) of the Florida Administrative Code, a person whose substantial interests are affected by the Departments action may also request an petition for an administrative hearing. The Department may, for good cause shown, grant the request for an extension of time. Requests for extension of the Department at 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-3000, before the applicable deadline. A timely request for extension of time shall toll the running until the request is acted late, the Department may still grant it upon a motion by the requesting party showing that an extension of time before the deadline was the result of excusable neglect. In the event that a timely an administrative hearing is substantial interest will be affected by the outcome of the administrative process have the right to petition to intervene in the proceeding. Intervention will be only at the discretion of with Rule 28-106.205 of the Florida Administrative Code. In accordance with subsection 28-106.111(2) and subparagraph 62-110.106(3).4, Florida Administrative Code, petitions for an administrative hearing by the applicant must by any persons other than the applicant, and other than those entitled to written notice under Section 120.60(3) of the within 14 days of publication of the notice. Under Section 120.60 (3) of the Florida Statutes, however, any person who has asked the Department for notice petition within 14 days of such notice, regardless of the date of publication. The petitioner shall mail a copy of the petition to the applicant at the address indicated above for an administrative hearing within the appropriate time period shall constitute a waiver of those rights. A petition that disputes the material facts on which the Departments action is based must contain the following information: (a) The name and address of each agency affected (b) The name, address, and telephone number of the petitioner; the name, address, and telephone of the petitioners representative, if any, which shall be the address for service purposes during the course of the proceeding; and an explanation of how the petitioners substantial interests are or will be affected by the agency determination (c) A statement of when and how the petitioner received notice of the agency decision; (d) A statement of all disputed issues of material fact. If there are none, the petition must so indicate; (e) A concise statement of the ultimate facts alleged, the petitioner contends warrant agencys proposed action; (f) A statement of the the petitioner contends require agencys proposed action; and (g) A statement of the relief sought by the petitioner, stating precisely the action that the petitioner wishes the agency to take with respect to the agencys proposed action. A petition that does not dispute the material facts on which the Departments action is based shall state that no such facts are in dispute and otherwise shall contain the same information as set forth above, as required by Rule 28-106.301, Florida Administrative Code. Under Sections 120.569(2)(c) and (d) of the Florida Statute, a petition for administrative hearing must be dismissed by the agency if the petition does not substantially comply with the above requirements or is of the Department unless a with the above. Upon the will not be effective until further order of the Department. This permit, when issued, constitutes an order of the Department. The applicant has the right to seek judicial review of the order under Section 120.68 of the Florida Statute, appeal under Rule 9.110 of the Florida Rules of Appellate Procedure with the Clerk of of General Counsel, 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida, 32399-3000; and by the appeal accompanied by the appropriate district court of appeal. The notice of appeal the Department. Requests for review before the Land and Water Adjudicatory with the Secretary of the Commission and served on the Department within 20 days the Department. The application for this permit is available for public inspection during normal business hours, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, except for legal holidays, at 160 W. Government Street, Pensacola, Florida. ________________________ IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND OR LIBERTY COUN TY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case #: 2009-CA-000102 BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP Plaintiff, -vs.Harry James Lewis a/k/a Har ry Lewis and Rebecca Ann Lewis a/k/a Rebecca Lewis f/k/a Rebecca Cook; Unknown Parties in Possession #1; Un known Parties in Possessio #2; If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants Defendant(s) _________________ NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order of Final Judgment of Foreclosure dat ed January 3, 2013, entered in Civil Case No. 2009-CA000102 of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Liberty County, Florida, wherein BAC Home Loans Ser vicing, LP, Plaintiff and Harry James Lewis a/k/a Harry Lewis and Rebecca Ann Lewis a/k/a Rebecca Lewis f/k/a Rebecca Cook are defendant(s), I, will sell to the highest and best bid der for cash AT THE FRONT DOOR OF THE LIBERTY COUNTY COURTHOUSE, HWY 20, BRISTOL, FLORIDA, AT 11:00 A.M. on February 19, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Fi nal Judgment, to-wit: BEGIN AT A POINT WHERE THE NORTH LINE OF HIGH WAY NO. 270 INTERSECTS THE EAST BOUNDARY OF NE 1/4 OF NW 1/4, OF SECTION 12, TOWNSHIP 2 NORTH, RANGE 7 WEST AND RUN NORTH ALONG THE EAST BOUNDARY OF THE NE 1/4 OF SW 1/4, A DIS TANCE OF 420 FEET, FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING, THENCE CONTINUE TO RUN NORTH A DISTANCE OF 420 FEET, THENCE RUN WEST 210 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 420 FEET, MORE OR LESS TO A POINT WEST OF THE POINT OF BEGINNING, THENCE RUN EAST A DIS TANCE OF 210 FEET, MORE OR LESS TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. CONTAINING 2,000 ACRES, MORE OR LESS. TOGETHER WITH A 15 FOOT INGRESS, EGRESS AND UTILITY EASEMENT ALONG THE WEST BOUND ARY LINE OF THE FOLLOW ING DESCRIBED LANDS: BEGIN AT A POINT WHERE THE NORTH LINE OF HIGH WAY NO. 270 INTERSECTS THE EAST BOUNDARY OF NE 1/4 OF NW 1/4, OF SECTION 12, TOWNSHIP 2 NORTH, RANGE 7 WEST AND RUN NORTH ALONG THE EAST BOUNDARY OF THE NE 1/4 OF SW 1/4, A DISTANCE OF 420 FEET, FOR THE POINT OF BEGIN NING, THENCE CONTINUE TO RUN NORTH A DISTANCE OF 420 FEET, THENCE RUN WEST 210 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 420 FEET, MORE OR LESS TO A POINT WEST OF THE POINT OF BEGINNING, THENCE RUN EAST A DIS TANCE OF 210 FEET, MORE OR LESS TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN YEAR: 2007, MAKE: CAVALIER, VIN#:CV07AL0270148A AND VIN#:CV07AL0270148B, MANUFACTURED HOME, WHICH IS PERMANENTLY AFFIXED TO THE ABOVE DESCRIBED LANDS. AS SUCH IT IS DEEMED TO BE A FIXTURE AND A PART OF THE REAL ESTATE. ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROP ERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYSAFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any ac commodation in order to par ticipate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain as sistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32301; (850) 577-4430 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving before the scheduled appear ance is less than 7 days. Ifyou are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT Liberty County, Florida KATHLEEN E. BROWN Vanell B. Summers DEPUTY CLERK OF COURT Submitted By: ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACHE, LLP 2424 North Federal Highway, Suite 360 Boca Raton, Florida 33431 (561) 998-6700 (561) 998-6707 2-6, 2-13 ________________________ NOTICE OF VOTE IN QUESTION NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN: EDWARD N. YOUNG Last known address of: 18456 NW LORA MINTON LN BRISTOL, FL 32321 eligibility to vote is in question. You are required to contact the Supervisor of Elections, in Bris tol, Florida, no later than thirty (30) days after the date of this publishing. Failure to respond will result in a determination of ineligibility by the Supervisor and your name will be removed from the statewide voter registration system. Published one time in the Cal houn-Liberty Journal 2-13-2013 Gina McDowell Liberty County Supervisor of Elections P.O. Box 597, Bristol, FL 32321 Dated: Feb. 13, 2013 2-13 ________________________ NOTICE OF DECISION USDA Forest Service Apalachicola National Forest Wakulla and Apalachicola Ranger Districts Wakulla, Liberty, and Franklin Counties, Florida Progress Energy, CPS Line Phase III, Pole Replacements and CPS 1 and 2 Line Recon struction On February 14, 2013, Deputy District Ranger, Harold Shenk will authorize an amendment to the Special Use Authoriza tion issued to Progress Energy. This amendment will allow re placement of 22 existing wood en poles and reconstruction of CPS line 1 and 2. The project area is located within an exist ing utility corridor that parallels Forest Road (FR) 164, State Road 22, and crosses the Ochlocknee River. The cor ridor then crosses forest land in a Northeastern direction and ends at FR 365. The purpose and need for the project is gen eral maintenance of an exist ing Special Use Authorization. This project meets all require ments under applicable laws, regulations, and policies. The associated Categorical Exclu sion and Decision Memo will be available upon request. This decision is not subject to appeal pursuant to 36 CFR 215.12 (f). Implementation of this decision may occur after February 14, 2013. For further information regard ing this project, contact Sherry Gaston at (850) 926-3561, Ext. 6511. 160 positions Temporary/seasonal work, planting, cultivating and harvesting nursery stock in whole sale nursery, from 2/22/2013 to 11/25/2013 at Wil loway Nurseries, Inc., Lorain and Erie Counties, nursery experience required. Saturday worked re quired. Must be able to lift/carry 60 lbs. Employer Free Workplace employer. Employer-paid posthire drug testing required. Prefer bilingual (Eng lish/Spanish) with ability to read work orders and manuals in English and write reports. $11.74/hr or current applicable AEWR. Workers are guaran teed of work hours of total period. Work tools, supplies, equipment supplied by employer without charge to worker. Housing with kitchen facilities provided at no cost to only those workers who are not reasonably able to return same day to their place of residence at time of recruitment. Trans portation and subsistence expenses to work site will be paid to nonresident workers not later than upon completion of 50% of the job contract. Inter views required. Apply for this job at nearest State Workforce Agency in state in which this ad appears, or One Stop Career Center 16908 Northeast Pear Street, Suite 2, Blountstown, FL 32424. Provide copy of this ad. OH Job Order #OH553411.

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FEBRUARY 13, 2013 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 18 SERVICE DIRECTORY Whaley Heating & Air Conditioning (850) 674-4777 FL LIC. # CMC1249570 Accepting: 4433 NW C.R. 274 Altha, Fl 32421 (850) 762-9402 Cell (850) 832-5055 Dozer and Excavation work Over 20 years experience Clay ONeals Land Clearing, Inc. William's Home Improvements No Job Too Big or Small" Concrete work, landscape, pressure & screen enclosure Call 674-8092 Licensed & Insured, contractor & roofer FOR FREE ESTIMATES at 674-8081 or 643-8561 (Cell) STUMP GRINDING Reasonable Rates & FREE Estimates! That Darn Pump There is never a convenient time to be without water. WELLS For friendly service and never any overtime charges call, Clint Hatcher, Owner Electrical Lic. # ER13014037 New Homes H Garages H Additions H Electrical Remodeling Foundations Screenrooms Sunrooms VINYL SIDING RESIDENTAL & COMMERCIAL FREE Estimates Serving Calhoun, Liberty & Jackson Counties LIBERTY TIRE COMPANY 10781 NW SR 20 Bristol, Fl 32321 Call 643-2939 MV84845 Hours: Monday thru Friday 7 5 & Saturday 7 12 We specialize in sales and repair of tires for: Commercial Trucks and Trailers, OTR Equipment, Farm Equipment, JEMISON Heating & Cooling, Lic# RM1416924 Carrier Equipment Masters Farm Supply LS Tractor Equipment Committed To Quality Since 1973 (850) 762-3222 fax masters7@fairpoint.net Hwy 71 South on J.P. Peacock Rd, Altha. Day or night, Check out our prices before Margies Florist To place your ad call us at 643-3333 Gary Richards, EA MBA Phone: (850) 643-6925 Guitar Lesson TO GO! I will drive to you ERIK ALFORD Guitar Instructor (850) 524-6057 or (850) 674-5399 All levels of Guitar & Bass The Calhoun/Liberty County Health Departments painted the town red in conjunction with the National Go Red for Women Day on February 1. Heart Disease is the number one killer of women so staff set out to educate our community about the risks, symptoms and means of prevention. If you were out and about in Blountstown or Bristol you were greeted by health department employees waving and giving out many heart health related items including; Go Red for Women bracelets, buttons and magnets at Magnolia Square in Blountstown and at the red light in Bristol. Signs were also posted with heart health facts at these locations. Ladies received either a red carnation with a heart health fact attached to it, or a magnet at the local grocery stores in both communities. Local businesses joined our crusade by dressing in red to show their support of building a healthier commu nity. Additionally, Health Depart ment staff set-up blood pressure check stations at the Calhoun Lib erty Credit Union and the Apalachee Restaurant. There were a total of 2000 Go Red but tons, 300 carnations, 1000 bracelets and 800 magnets passed out in Calhoun and Lib erty County. We would like to thank the following businesses for go ing red and helping us spread the word about cardiovascular disease in women. Join us for our next event as we continue to promote Heart Disease Awareness with a FREE Go Red for Women Seminar on Feb. 19 at 6 p.m. (ET) at Veter ans Memorial Civic Center in Bristol. We will have a heart healthy meal, speakers, and health sta tions which will include free bone density tests, along with door prizes and a heart healthy desert contest. Painting the town red to raise awareness about womens heart disease Through With Chew Week highlights tobacco health risks TALLAHASSEE Tobacco products like chew, dip and snuff are not harmless. But because theyre smokeless, youth and adults may underestimate the serious health risks associated with these products. In fact, while cigarette use continues to decline, smoke less tobacco use has remained steady among youth for more than a decade. To help raise awareness about the dangers of smokeless tobacco, the Calhoun County Health Department and the Florida Department of Healths Bureau of Tobacco Free Florida will observe Through With Chew Week from February 17-23. the Through with Chew week to educate their peers about not only the dangers of the smokeless tobacco products but also on how the Tobacco Industry is tar geting them, the youth. HEALTH RISKS Constant exposure to tobacco juices from these smokeless products can cause oral cancers, which can form within can cause cancer of the esophagus, pharynx, larynx, stomach and pan creas. Smokeless tobacco use can increase the risk of oral cancers by 80 percent and the risk of pancre atic and esophageal cancer by 60 percent, according to a 2008 study from the World Health Organization (WHO) International Agency for Research on Cancer. Aside from the increased risk of cancer, using smokeless tobacco can increase the risk of heart attack and stroke. It can lead to other oral problems such as mouth sores, gum recession, tooth decay, and permanent discoloration of teeth. Smokeless tobacco use can also increase the risk of reproductive health problems such as reduced sperm count and abnormal sperm cells for men. Women who use smokeless tobacco may be at an increased risk of preeclampsia (a condition that may include high blood and low birth weight. ADDICTION Like cigarettes, smokeless tobacco products contain nicotine, a highly addictive and dangerous chemical. Smokeless tobacco users and cigarette smokers have comparable levels of nicotine in the blood, according to the National Cancer Institute. Smokeless tobacco is not a safe alternative to smok ing and the rate at which youth continue to use these products is alarming, said State Surgeon General and Secretary of Health Dr. John Armstrong. Many of these young people may be substituting cigarettes with smokeless tobacco in places where they cant smoke, leading to a stronger nicotine addiction that makes it harder for them to quit. Tobacco Free Florida has three ways to help smoke less tobacco users quit. Those who want to quit can double their chances at success by using one of these free and convenient quit services. For more informa SWAT members at Altha, Carr, Blountstown Middle and Blountstown anti-tobacco activities on campus Feb. 17-23

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Page 19 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL FEBRUARY 13, 2013 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL CLASSIFIEDS To place your ad, call 643-3333 by noon Eastern Time on Monday. Non-business ads run FREE for 2 weeks. APPLIANCES Toaster oven $8. Call 674-8376. 2-13, 2-20 Air conditioner, 5,000 BTU, less than a year old. Two AC units be tween two to three years old, both are 5,000 BTU. Call for more infor mation, serious calls only. Call 8990792. 2-6, 2-13 Kirby vaccum with all attachments, $50. Call 447-2284. 2-6, 2-13 CARS 1990 Mercedes 300SEL, runs great, $3,500 OBO. Call 674-5611. 2-6, 2-13 BMW Z3 Roadster blue convert ible, well cared for, low mileage, $13,500. Call (850) 607-0061. 2-6, 2-13 1995 Lincoln Town Car needs overhaul or new engine. Body and interior in good condition. Many valuable Town Car parts, $1,500 OBO. Call 447-4234. 2-6, 2-13 TRUCKS 1993 Toyota pickup 2.2RE, 4 cyl. 2WD, regular cab, 2 door, needs following body parts: front fender, bond frame, headlight and hood. call Lisa at 643-5205. 2-6, 2-13 MOTORCYCLE & ATVs 2005 Arctic Cat 650 4-wheeler, has spacers and a snorkle on it, $3,300 OBO. Located in Blountstown. Call Clay at 643-6559 or Mandy at 4472735. 2-13, 2-20 VEHICLE ACCESSORIES 18 Chrome wheels 6 lug., will take $75 OBO for the set. Call 4470438. 2-13, 2-20 Three mud grip 17 tires make of pickup, make offer. 13 tires at $10 each. 1987 F150 tires with center caps, $100. Turf tires, size 18.4x16, will mount on 8N tractor or Fergu son tractor, $150 OBO. Four 17 aluminum wheels with tires mount Call 674-4753. 2-13, 2-20 PETS/SUPPLIES Three full blooded Chihuahua puppies blonde, 10-11 weeks old. $75 each. Call 237-1447. 2-13, 2-20 Dogs and cats looking for a good home, free. Call (850) 631-2189. 2-13, 2-20 Three dogs free to a good home, Blue Heeler, male, 3 years old. Mixed breed large dog with black spots 1 1/2 years old, female. Dachshund, black/tan, female, 5-6 years old. All raised around chil dren. Need more room to run. Call 447-2564. 2-13, 2-20 Palamino yearling gelding 1 year old, not ready to ride. 16 ft. closedin horse stock trailer with tack room. Boston Terrier with papers, 16 weeks old. Call 491-7380. 2-13, 2-20 Terrier and Beagle mixed pup pies free to a good home. Born Oct. 31, 2012. One male and one female. Call 379-8725. 2-13, 2-20 Chihuahua 8 months old, $50. Call 674-1012. 2-6, 2-13 Lab mixed dog male, 2 years old, white with black spots on eye, very gentle, shots up-to-date. White English bulldog mix, male, about 2 years old, very gentle, shots up to date. Both free to a good home. Call 674-8850. 2-6, 2-13 WANTED Looking for a welder for small jobs and someone to break a horse. Also looking for an acre or more of land and a vehicle reasonable, around a 2008 model. Call 674-3264. 2-13, 2-20 Looking for a car or truck in good shape, reasonably priced. Call 6431495. 2-13, 2-20 Looking for a vehicle dependable and reasonably priced. Call (850) 631-2189. 2-13, 2-20 ITEMS FOR SALE Blue overnight satchels with shoulder straps, (2 new), large and small, $6 and $4. Antique butter churn crock, it works, $50. Two antique whiskey crock jugs, $25 each. One antique whiskey jug with handle, $25. Antique cookie jar Cow jumped over the moon, $30. Full size ironing board with cover, $20. Beauti ful glassware (crystal glasses, plates, platters and bowls), best offer. Glass cake stand with cover, $20. Many other items for sale. Call 674-8376. 2-13, 2-20 Black tuxedo jacket with satin lapel, 41 short. Black pants, size 34, not hemmed. Off white tuxedo jacket, 34 short, all very good quality, $50 for all. Call 348-3554. 2-13, 2-20 Protech treadmill, incline and speed options, heart monitor and pulse meter. Older but in great condition. $100 OBO. Ab loung er, new, paid $99, asking $30 OBO. Call 447-0438. 2-13, 2-20 Wedding dress, full length, size 18-20, must see to appreciate, $65. Call 237-2644. 2-13, 2-20 Exerciser for $10. Cook pot for $20. Call 674-3264. 2-6, 2-13 Bathroom lavatory cabinet $25. One bath tub, $25. Call 674-1012. 2-6, 2-13 Brand new shallow well 1 hp pump. Call 674-4554. 2-6, 2-13 Ladies scrub tops and pants for sale, sizes include medium, large and a few Xlarge. Many colors to choose from, in good condition, $1 each. Call 4473435. 2-6, 2-13 Area rug, 8x5, teal and tan, $50. Oak jewelry armoire, 42 high with eight drawers and two side doors, $100. Call 447-2284. 2-6, 2-13 Vintage Pictures : Oil, water color, prints, old advertisements, framed or ready to frame. Prices vary. For further info, call 6437567 or 674-5257. 2-6, 2-13 Two Wooden Artist Easels : Table Top Easel is approx 2 ft tall $10; Standing Floor Easel adjusts from 4 1/2 ft to over 6 ft tall, $18, all reasonable offers considered. Call 643-7567 or 674-5257. 2-6, 2-13 Small Display Case in shape of antique bow front china cabinet w/curved glass door & shelves; dark wood, free standing or hang on wall. 22 1/2 high, 13 wide, 6 rines, tea sets, jewelry, miniature collections, etc. $28. Call Call 643-7567 or 674-5257. 2-6, 2-13 Last Supper Religious Scene beautifully & uniquely ac complished with a raised metal & antique wash technique. Out standing wooden frame. Perfect for home or church. $45 OBO. Call 643-7567 or 674-5257. 2-6, 2-13 Large Match Book collection Bagged match books & match covers from all over the U.S. & world! 1920 to 1990s. Two lg. book Close Cover Before Strik ing gives history & art of col lecting Match Covers. Come take a look Make an offer. Call 6437567 or 674-5257. 2-6, 2-13 All coats 50% off and many other great deals Everyone is invited to shop at the Calhoun-Lib erty Ministry Center store on Hwy. 20 E. in Blountstown. Phone 6741818. UFN FURNITURE Rocker recliner, lime green, very comfortable, $80 OBO. Call 674-8376. 2-13, 2-20 Oval coffee table wood with adirondack legs, $50 OBO. Call 447-0438. 2-13, 2-20 Wooden crib/toddler bed with mattress in excellent condition, seat, $60. Call (850) 372-3573 or 643-5665. 2-13, 2-20 Good used furniture and appli ances needed at Calhoun-Liberty Ministry Center. Call 674-1818 UFN An electric stove. A 3 BD mobile home. A shower stall and sink. Call 674-3264. 2-6, 2-13 Kayak either a two person or two one person, in good condi tion and reasonably priced. Call 674-7854 or 643-1519. 2-6, 2-13 ELECTRONICS Madcatz II Professional gam ers series steering wheel and foot pedals, was used with Xbox, $50 OBO. Call 447-0438. 2-13, 2-20 PSP and PS2 games, $5 each or will sell all for a reasonable price. Call 237-2644. 2-13, 2-20 HEAVY EQUIPMENT Garden grading blade with a 3 point hitch, never used. Lawn mower big wheel with mulcher, hardly used. Backyard compos ter, hardly used. Call 762-8941. 2-6, 2-13 John Deer riding mower, 48 inch cut with pull-behind trailer, $1,250 OBO. Call 447-4620. 2-6, 2-13 16LT Snapper yard tractor with fair tires, selling for parts but does run, $50. Call 762-9762. 2-6, 2-13 HUNTING & FISHING 21 ft. Chris Craft ski boat, with trailer, 5.7 liter V8 260 hp motor, three tops, $7,000 OBO or pos sible trade. 16 ft. Astro Glass bass boat with 85 hp motor and trailer, $1,500 or possible trade. Call 237-1791. 2-13, 2-20 Guns: 88 Mossberg 12 gauge 2 3/4 & 3 inch shells, black syn thetic stock, 28 VR barrell, $250 Higgins LR, wood stock, nice, Breakdown, 23 barrell, wood stock with scope 3x9x50, 8 point, $250. Rossi 38 special 5-shot revolver, 3 barrell, wood grip, $175. Call 443-2422 in Bristol. 2-13, 2-20 Johnson outboard motor 140 hp V4 with all controls, electric start, tilt and trim steering, in good condition, $595. Call 4432422 in Bristol. 2-13, 2-20 300 Weatherbee mag with sling, 3x9x50 Bushnell banner scope, $500. Call 447-4620. 2-6, 2-13 HOMES & LAND Small one bedroom house for sale in Hosford, must be moved. This is not a mobile home. $10,000 but will consider a rea sonable offer. Motivated seller. Call 447-3435. 2-6, 2-13 CAMPERS/RVS Camper shell, wheel base pickup. Like new, smoky gray. Price negotiable. Call 674-4554. 2-13, 2-20 2002 motor home, less than 7,000 miles, 36 ft., two slide outs, hydraulic leveling system, one owner, well maintained. Call (850) 627-6148 for more information. 1-23 to 2-13 LOST & FOUND FOUND: Puppy in Turkey Creek area, a couple of months old, fe male, no collar. Call to identify. Call 643-3411 or 631-2189. 2-13, 2-20 YARD SALE ALTHA Estate sale, Saturday, Feb. 16 from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. Located 4 miles E of Altha on Hwy. 274 at 19782 NE CR 274. Books, ture, linens, etc., sold as is. Items must be taken the day of sale, no holding items. Phone 447-1518. BLOUNTSTOWN Yard sale, Saturday, Feb. 16 beginning at 7 a.m. Located at 17854 NE Charlie Johns Street, Chipola Mannor Apt. H1. Clothes, purses, shoes, furniture and more. Phone 674-3033. For Rent in ALTHA 762-9555, 447-0581 or 762-8597 Very NICE *2 & 3 BD trailers. With lawn service 5 x 10 ..... $ 27 10 x 10 .... $ 43 10 x 20 .... $ 70 10 x 25 .... $ 90 M & W SELF STORAGE RENTALS Call 762-9555, 447-0871 or 762-8597 7 days a week service UFN BD, 1 1/2 BA Townhouses BRISTOL 643-7740 FOR RENT BLOUNTSTOWN Buy, sell and trade in the JOURNAL Call us at 643-3333. New Home for sale in Altha $ 115,000 Call 762-8185 1-23 T 2-13 $280 month (850) 762-3706 FOR RENT Tri-Land Inc. Broker (813) 253-3258 OWNER FINANCING NO QUALIFYING House, 3 BD, 1 BA Central H/AC MOBILE HOMES Very nice, 2BD, 2 BA, Landscaped private lots ~ NO PETS PLEASE ~ House For Rent I B Call 643-6646 $185,000 (850) 962-7894 House FOR Sale IN SMITH CREEK CALL IN EVENING HOURS REAL ESTATE WANTED: Will buy 10 to 1,000 acres, reasonably priced. Immediate closing. Phone (850) 544-5441 or (850) 570-0222 STAR SCOPE Week of Feb. 10 ~ Feb. 16, 2013

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FEBRUARY 13, 2013 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 20 *All prices plus $299.50 P&H, tax, tag & title. All incentives applied. Incentives good thru April 1, 2013 Pictures for illustration purposes only. Prices good thru Feb. 20, 2013 W.A.C.



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CALHOUNLIBERTY J OURNALTHE W ednesday FEB. 13, 2013Vol. 33, No. 7 50includes tax Sheriff's Log............2 Arrest Reports............2 Visitors come to Bristol to ride the train.......3 Community Calendar and Events....................5 PEOPLE: Birthdays, 50th anniversary...........8 Black History Month Pageant held..............14 Outdoors Down South: The homing mule....10 Sharlyn Smith of Altha & Jaren Bannerman of Marianna were crowned Homecoming Queen and Mr. Chipola at the Chipola College Homecoming game on Saturday, by Teresa Eubanks, Journal EditorA three-member location scouting group from the Animal Planet program Finding Bigfoot is visiting four counties in the Florida Panhandle this week, including Liberty County, to make The upcoming program is expected to feature footage from a Crawfordville father and son team who have long been searching for the fabled brief video convinced the folks at Animal Planet A producer with the show has met twice with and conducting interviews, but details about their producer, who asked that her name not be used, But they hope anyone who thinks they might have had an encounter with Bigfoot wont be as about the fabled creature being seen in the panhandle is urged to contact them via The producer said they were aware of sightings in Washington County, Leon County and Gadsden County, as well as the one report last year at the four members of the Bigfoot Field Researchers Organization, who travel the country talking with people who say they have seen the legendary creature and looking episodes include Badlands Bigfoot, Animal Planet crew visits Torreya Park to prepare for lming Schools honor their outstanding teachers, school-related employeesSamantha Newsome is named Liberty Co. Teacher of the Year Acting runs in the blood of this Liberty County family...... PAGE 15Pitcher Lexie Brown throws a Tolar runner out DANIEL WILLIAMS PHOTO by Teresa Eubanks, Journal EditorLong before the state began limiting class size, math teacher Karen Tomlinson had already discovered how effective it was to deal with In 29 years of teaching, shes learned what from teaching at the elementary school level Class members are given a topic and put into small table groups, where they work on turn being table leader and they show a senseSee CALHOUN TEACHER on page 11 by Teresa Eubanks, Journal Editor learned a lot of lessons from her "Each student brings a makes each day different," she by that I do not learn something is not taking a situation too seriously, the selflessness of helping someone else, or simply But above all, the most important lesson has been slow down, put something aside And, besides math, what has she taught them? "The most challenging part of my job is making sure students feel like they have ownership in their need a sense of control, and See LIBERTY TEACHER continued on page 11 Calhoun County selects Karen Tomlinson this years top teacherCalhoun County Superintendent Ralph Yoder presents Karen Tomlinson with an award recognizing her honor. SCHOOLS HONOR TOP EMPLOYEES Debra Clark, a paraprofessional with Tolar School, is shown above second from left as she is recognized as School-Related Employ ee of the Year for Liberty County. Assistant the top School-Related Employee of the Year for the Calhoun County School District. Read more about them on page 11.

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Page 2 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL FEBRUARY 13, 2013 CALHOUN COUNTY February 4 Nigean Bromday, failure to appear, CCSO. William Broadshire, failure to appear (out of county), CCSO. Lahendrick Gibb, failure to appear (out of county), CCSO. Constance Hatten, failure to appear, CCSO. February 5 William Baxter, disorderly conduct, CCSO. Andrea Fountain, VOP, CCSO. Brad Phillips, VOP, CCSO. Robert Tibbets, non-support, CCSO. Felicity Middlebrooks, false report to law enforcement, BPD. Jessica Brown, VOP, CCSO. Carla Causey, VOCR, CCSO. February 7 Amos Milton, Jr, criminal mischief over $1,000 (warrant arrest), CCSO.LIBERTY COUNTYFebruary 4 Michael L. Jones assault (warrant) LCSO. February 5 Constance Hatten holding for CCSO, CCSO Felicity Middlebrooks holding for CCSO, CCSO. Richard Kyle grand theft (warrant), LCSO. Jessica Brown, holding for CCSO, CCSO. Juse Migel Duran-Rosa, VOP (warrant), LCSO. Lea Carla Causey, holding for CCSO, CCSO. Aaron Everett, VOP (warrant), LCSO. February 6 Brodrick J. Alls, escape, driving with license suspended or revoked with knowledge, resist with high speed vehicle pursuit, LCSO. February 8 Van Kent, trespassing of an occupied structure, resist without violence, LCSO Barbara Dawson trespassing, LCSO. John Henry Ammons Calhoun County war rant, LCSO. Danny Richards, failure to register as a sex offender, LCSO. Michael Harvell battery, LCSO. February 10 Dylan Rogers no valid drivers license, LCSO. Kalen Burke VOP (warrant), LCSO. Listings include name followed by charge and arresting agency. The names above represent those charged. We remind our readers that all are presumed inno cent until proven guilty.CITATIONS ISSUED: Accidents ............................................................03 ................................................................03 Special details Business alarms .............................................................03 Residential alarms .......................................................01 Feb. 4 through Feb. 10, 2013 SHERIFFS LOG ACCEPTING NNEW PPaA TIENTS Laban Bontrager, DMD www.bristoldentalclinic.com Bristol Dental ClinicMonica Bontrager, DMD ARREST REPORTS compiled by Journal Editor Teresa Eubanks charged in burglary A warrant has been issued for a Greenville man believed to be responsible for a Jan. 25 burglary on NW Baggett Loop in Altha, according to a re Household items were removed from a travel trailer and a pole barn while the elderly victims were out of town. A neighbor gave a sworn statement that Chad Michael Kinsey had been seen carrying some of the stolen items into the woods near the victims residence. Investigators Jared Nichols and Todd Wheetley went Kinseys home in Greenville but he jumped residence, where he barricaded himself inside. After family members talked him into coming out, Kinsey was taken into custody by Madison County deputies. It was found that he was wanted by Bay County on several outstanding warrants including bur glary, felony criminal mischief and petty theft. Investigators said Kinsey admitted being in the Altha area at the time of the burglary but denied having anything to do with it. He is awaiting pickup by Calhoun County at the Madison County Jail.Man charged with failing to re-register as offenderA former Nashville, GA man now living in Telogia was arrested Feb. 2 after he failed to re-register his sta tus as a sex offender with the Liberty County Sher Charged was 43-yearold Danny Richards. According to the arrest report, Richards, who was required to re-register dur until Feb. 4. His late attempt to register did not satisfy the requirements for re-registration of a sexual of fender and a warrant was issued for his arrest. He was later released on $5,000 bond.DANNY RICHARDS Attorney General Pam Bon di urges Floridians to use cau to be aware of identity theft and tax-related scams. Any signs of tax fraud or identity theft, such as receiv ing a letter that your tax return should be reported to my of SCAM, stated Attorney Gen eral Pam Bondi. Below are tips to avoid iden tity theft and tax fraud: File tax returns early. The IRS will reject a return if one security number; Ask for credentials of the tax preparer, and ask if he or she belongs to a state board or bar association which requires continuing education; Do not provide your social security number unless it is re quired; Do not carry your social security card or write it on checks; and papers before discarding them; Be wary of providing sensi tive information via the Inter net ; Do not respond to e-mails asking for information relating to tax refunds. The IRS web site is the legitimate source for checking on refund status; and Check credit report every 12 months. plaints about tax-related scams and any other types of fraud by calling the Attorney Generals MyFloridaLegal.com. ports that several area senior citizens have been the target of scammers trying to talk them into giving out information over the nances. Most of the calls are coming from over seas and try to trick them into believing theyve won something, or claiming a family member is in trouble and needs money, according to Lt. Jared Nichols. Citizens are warned not to give out per phone. And especially, do not send money to anyone claiming you have won a vehicle or monetary prize, Nichols warns. He cautions residents to remember, If it sound too good to be true, it probably is!Identity theft scam targets area seniors son County residents (850) 849-3925, (850) 482-9127 or (850) 638FROM LEFT: Melinda Campbell, Luke Shores, Amanda Shores, Judge William L. Wright, Patrick McKinstry and Cindy Fender.

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FEBRUARY 13, 2013 / THE CALHOUN-LIBER TY JOURNAL Page 3 PHONE (850) 762-3228 Waldorff Ace Hardware Story and photos by Liliane Parbot, contributing writerBristol hides a big secret from many newcomers, but once uncovered, it generates many a Whoa of admiration. Perhaps, the Veterans Memorial Railroad would not come as a surprise in the area of Disney World, but in a community of the size of Bristol, it really brings words of admiration and thanks for the many people behind its creation and its operation. This Railroad began with a residents love for trains, and the concept grew with the help of volunteers, the Liberty County Board of County Commissioners, a half-million-dollar-grant from the Department of Transportation (DOT), and to the labor of inmates from the Liberty County Department of Corrections. They laid out the tracks and maintain them. Veterans Memorial Railroad is located in Veterans Memorial Park, behind the Liberty County Civic Center at 10561 N.W. Theo Jacobs Way (CR 12), South of Highway 20. The land belongs to the county, which also owns the Red, White and Blue Train, greatly enjoyed by visitors of all ages, as they move throughout a great expanse of county land and pines. the backyard of Tom Keenan. He explained how he developed an interest and love for railroad: I was working with other railroad people over in the Atlantic Coast. His wife Gloria, recalls looking at this relic next to her home and telling her husband, I dont know how to lay tracks. Gloria is a member of the board of directors. Tom can be seen on the Red, White and Blue train as it makes its runs. He is seated at the rear, behind the last row of passengers. He blows the horn. Veterans Memorial Railroad started with these two original mentors in 2002, and soon they were joined by a third, Babs Moran, who is the current president of the group. She is one of our biggest helpers, says Gloria who recalls how, at the original meeting, Babs said, Yes, lets do it! The attraction started with a small depot and a short track constructed by a work crew from the prison, according to Gloria, who noted, They (Corrections) have been extremely helpful. We could not have done it without them. Also making the project possible are the volunteers now 15 of them who donate their time in various areas. One of the volunteer conductors, who was driving the Red, White and Blue train, this month, was Ed Petry. Asked how he came to be a driver, he replied, We are down visiting from Minnesota, and we are enjoying warm weather. The Railroad is open on the second Saturday of the month, from February to November. There is no admission fee, except on certain days such as Christmas, St. Patricks Day or Halloween. Donations are greatly appreciated at all times, however, to help with the cost of maintaining the attraction. Veterans Memorial Railroad is also available for private events, birthday, anniversaries, business parties and over private events. The train ride is $35 in those cases. For information or bookings, call either Babs Moran at (850) 643-5491; or Gloria Keenan at (850) 643-6646. The attraction started with a much shorter railroad track and a small depot. A DOT grant of $500,000 allowed the construction of a new 35-by-50-foot depot, to display many items used by railroad people in the past, such as a Transit. Volunteer Louis Smith explained this was used to lay out railroad tracks. It people, but it was used in the 1800s. Also seen are a conductors hat, a lantern, a coal shovel much worn out at the edge and other items. Not to be missed is a G-Gauge train running the 170-foot perimeter of the building at a height of 7.5 feet. Smith operates his own train, there, and he plans to bring two more. Other model trains of various gauges are also set up. This is also the room where local artists can display their work, according to Smith, who lives in Tallahassee. I heard about, and I volunteered. I love trains, he said to explain the long commute. I was searching for a place that had a steam train. I have had (model) trains for more than 50 years. The DOT grant allowed to accomplish may improvements. In addition to the much bigger depot building, a childrens playground was created, a walking trail added, and the railroad track was greatly lengthened. We are very proud of it, Gloria said of these accomplishments. It takes lots of team work. Many visitors come from as far as Tallahassee and Panama City, according to Moran. On the second Saturday of this month, at least one couple came from the state capital. We came especially from Tallahassee after someone at the daycare recommended it, said Yuko Hori, who was accompanied by her husband, Atakemichi Okui and their 30-month-old son, Kai Okui. It was great...he especially liked the horn, the mother said of her childs reaction. brings inmates to work on the track. That day, she was accompanied by two young great-grandchildren. When asked what they thought about the train ride, she said, Oh my Lord, this is awesome. They loved it. They do not want to go home. Heating & Air Conditioning FL LIC. # CMC1249570 R ssCCs (850) 674-4777 Whaley Whaley Visitors come from all over to enjoy a ride on Bristols Veterans Memorial Railroad LEFT: Babs Moran points out the depot during a tour of the grounds. RIGHT: Yuko Hori, husband, Atakemichi Okui and their son, Kai Okui, came from Tallahassee to enjoy a train ride.

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Page 4 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL FEBRUARY 13, 2013 Gods Will will be holding a FREE Baseball Camp for Boys and GirlsSaturday February 1610 a.m 1 p.m.Veterans Memorial ParkLunch will be provided, please call so that we may know how many kids to prepare for. There will also be sign ups for Tee Ball and Coach Pitch that same day.Call by Friday, Feb. 15Contact Ray Glisson at (850) 510-1372 Pre-kindergarten to 12th gradeYearly registration: $35 Monthly fee: $55 CHEER GYMNASTIcCS SScCHOOL IN BLOUNTSTOWN Hwy. 20 W (The old J&N Sports) Monday-Thursday 4-7 p.m. (CT)NEW SEASON REGISTRATION (850) 272-3331 TERMS: Cash or Check (10% B.P.) All items sold AS IS where IS CONSIGNMENTS WELcCOME Sat., Feb. 23 9 a.m. (ET) #AU-4266 #AB2769 F&L Call Felton Hall at (850) 566-6646 or (850) 379-8410Farm Equipment NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours or responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment.Cataracts?Freedom from Eye Glasses, Now a reality for many.In Memory of Lee Mullis M.D.Smart Lenses SMDr. Mulliss Smart LensSM procedure can produce clear vision without eyeglasses.Close-up, Far away & In-between CALL TODAY for a Smart Lens Evaluation Mullis Eye Institute 4320 5th Ave. Marianna(2 Blks from Jackson Hospital)(850) 526-7775 or 1(800)769-3429 CORLETTS ROOFING LLC LR FREE EESTIMATES Michael Corlett (850) 643-7062 EVENTS An organizational meeting of the 2013 Chat tahoochee Red Bird Base ball Club is scheduled for Saturday, Feb. 16, 2013 at 10 a.m. (EST) at Therrell Field in Chattahoochee. All who are interested in playing, managing or coaching for the Red Birds should make a spe cial effort to attend this important meeting. This program is for adults, ages 18 and over. For more information contact Lee Garner, Chat tahooce City Manager. Chattahoochee Red Birds to meet Feb. 16HIDE TANNING A class will be offered to those interested in a chance to get a more hands on experience in tanning hides on Feb. 16. Participants will meet with Eric starting at 10 a.m. and work through the process. For this workshop we advise participants to wear clothes they dont mind getting dirty; an apron and rubber gloves are a must. Also a good knife and a drawknife are recommended. The fee for the workshop is $10. Registration is required and can be made at (334) 794-3452. Registration is limited to 15 participants. BEESWAX Join the Wiregrass Beekeepers Association and Landmark Park for an introductory workshop on how to make soap and bath and body products with beeswax. Class participants will enjoy interactive hands on instruction and will take their own handmade products home. Instructor Roslyn Horton has been making all natural bath and body products chemical free beehives. Cost is $15 per par ticipant for supplies plus normal gate admission and will be held February 16 at 10 a.m. in the Interpretive Center Auditorium. The class is limited to 50 people. Registration is required and can be made at (334) 794-3452.Hide tanning & beeswax bath products workshops at Landmark Park Feb. 16Small Business Seminars set at Chipola beginning Feb. MARIANNAChipola College will offer a series of small business seminars in the coming months. All seminars meet Fridays, from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., in Room M-108 of the Chipola Business and Technology building. Feb. 15. The seminar will help participants discover which business type is best suited for their personality, and how to create a working business create a successful business. Veterans Business Outreach March 22. The VBOC helps create, develop, and retain veteran-owned small business enterprises. The VBOC provides train ing through workshops, counseling, assistance, and resource uti lization services to Veterans, Service-Disabled Veterans, Reservists, National Guard, and Active Duty business own ers and entrepreneurs. will meet Friday, Apr. 19. Cost of each seminar is $30. to sign up for any seminar will receive free admission. Stu dents should contact Elissa Severson at 718-2441 or sign up 208. Participants may register com. For more information, contact Elissa Severson at (850) 718-2441 or email sever sone@chipola.edu.Waste Management Sponsors state tournament at Chipola March 6-9Waste Management is continuing its longstanding partnership with Chipola College by once again sponsoring the Mens and Womens State Community College Basketball Tournament, set for March 6-9 in the Milton H. Johnson Health Center. Pictured from left, are: Tournament Administra tor Alice Pendergrass, Chipola College president Dr. Gene Prough, Waste Management District Manager Kevin Hinson and Tournament Coordinator Dr. Steve Givens. Since opening its operations in Jackson County, Waste Management has contributed more than $170,000 to Chipolas academic and athletic programs. CITIZEN OF THE YEAR NOMI NATIONS DUE FEB. 13 Do you know someone who deserves to be recognized for their contributions to our commu nity? If so, nominate them for Calhoun County Citizen of the Year. The process is simple call or email the Chamber form. Complete and return the form to the kristy@calhounco.org or call 674-4519. MONTHLY MEETING, SOCIAL MEDIA FOR SMALL BUSINESSES Join us for our February meeting as we discuss social media and how it can and will offer handouts on how to make The meeting will be Tuesday, Feb. 19 at 12 noon at the Calhoun County Senior Center. Please email or call to make your reservation no later than Friday, Feb. 15 to kristy@calhounco.org or call 674-4519. CHAMBER PLANS ANNUAL MEMBERSHIP BANQUET MARCH 1 The 66th Annual Chamber Member ship Banquet is set for Friday, Mar. 1 at the W.T. Neal Civic Center. This year, the Chamber will change up the annual meeting to include live music, social, as well as dinner and dancing! email Kristy at Kristy@calhounco.org to reserve tickets, or buy online and have them mailed to you at www.calhounco. org/store. Tickets are $25 each. Because of ob ligations to the caterer, tickets must be bought it advance. Deadline for ticket sales is Friday, Feb. 22. NO TICKETS WILL BE SOLD AT THE DOOR.Calhoun Chamber of Commerce events for February and MarchBlountstown Library plans an evening of Art & Music Feb. 23The Blountstown Public Library invites you to come enjoy an evening of art and music with Tom Stratton on Saturday, Feb. 23 from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. in the Heritage Room on the back side of the library. and talk. Tom will produce a free hand pin striping design reminiscent of the hand painted designs done on autos in the 1950's and 1970's. These symmetrical designs are all one of a kind improvisa tional works of art. After an intermission and light re freshments Tom will give a musical performance and educational talk on and with some of the electronic equipment used by today's musicians. Sit back and experience the electric processors to create big band sounds as a solo performer. And yes...dancing is allowed! These Cultural Events are free, family-friendly, and open to the public. CLJ N ews.COM

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FEBRUAR Y 13, 2013 / THE CALHOUN-LIBER TY JOURNAL Page 5 The Calhoun-Liberty Journal is published each Wednesday by the Liberty Journal Inc., Summers Road, P.O. Box 536, Bristol, FL 32321. Annual subscriptions are $18. Periodicals postage paid at Bristol, FLPOSTMASTER: Send address corrections to: P.O. Box 536, Bristol, FL 32321. (USPS 012367) Summers RoadLocated at 11493 NW Summers Road in Bristol MAILING ADDRESS: P.O. Box 536, Bristol, FL 32321 TELEPHONE (850) 643-3333 Fax (888) 400-5810 EMAIL: thejournal@fairpoint.net ADS: cljads@fairpoint.net JOURNAL STAFFJohnny Eubanks...................Publisher Teresa Eubanks........................ Editor Sandra Brown...................Bookkeeper Deven Lewis......Production Asssistant Debbie Duggar...................AdvertisingOFFICE HOURS: 9 a.m. 6 p.m. M-FTHE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Visit us on Facebook at CLJNews Train DayVeterans Memorial Park 11 a.m.3 p.m. Thats how many copies of The Calhoun-Liberty Journal were distributed last week, ensuring plenty of coverage for your announcements and great response for our business advertisers! 5,376 Wednesday, February 13 Saturday, February 16 Thursday February 14 Friday, February 15TODAYS MEETINGS, noon, 7 p.m., Calhoun Old Ag Bldg. east door, in front of jailTODAYS MEETINGSAA, 7 p.m., basement of Calhoun Courthouse Bristol Girl Scout Troop #303, 6 p.m. in Court room 7 p.m. at Fire House 11 a.m., Apalachee Rest. 5 p.m. Calhoun Monday, February 18 Tuesday, February 19 Sunday, February 17 TODAYS MEETINGS 7 p.m., Altha VFD AA, 6 p.m., Altha Community Center 6 p.m., City Hall 7 p.m., Bristol City Hall 7 p.m., 6 p.m., City Council Room on Angle St. 7 p.m., Dixie Lodge in Blountstown 7 p.m., LC School Board Meeting Room 7-8 p.m., Grace United Methodist Church, Hosford 6 p.m., Page Pond Assembly of God Church in Altha.TODAYS MEETINGS7 p.m., 6:30 p.m., City Hall 5-8 p.m. (CT), WT Neal Civic Center, Blountstown Ladies Night Dance, 8 p.m.-1 a.m. at the Legion Hall in BlountstownAttend the Church of your choice this Sunday Train Day Veterans Memorial Park 11 a.m.3 p.m. BIRTHDAYS Jessica Thomas Tot Butler Timmy CardinaleBIRTHDAYS ~ Schelbie Anders, Colton Thomas, Nikki Thomas, Ken King, Angela Read, Jon Mark PlummerBIRTHDAYS ~ Mary Sue Stephens Tom Aycock, Shane Eagleston ANNIVERSARY ~ Sonny & Karen Sykes ANNIVERSARY ~ Sonya & Lindell McLain FREE Go Red 6 p.m. (ET) atDonations sought for rummage saleThe Panhandle Pioneer Settlement will be having its annual Rummage Sale fundraiser on March 2 and 5-9. We are asking for donations of your slightly used and unwanted items. We will be taking donations until February 26 in the gym. For more information, contact the Settlement at 674-2777.Booth rentals available for 4-H Spring Clean, Go Green Giant yardLiberty County 4-H will have their second annual Spring Clean, Go Green Giant Yard Sale on Saturday, Mar. 16th, from 8 a.m. 1 p.m. on the front lawn at the Veterans Memorial Civic Center. Booth rental fee is $10. Pre-reg istration is required and due by Mar. 8th. For more information or for an application you may call 643-2229 or All proceeds will go towards helping youth attend 4-H Summer Camp Timpoochee in Niceville for a week. 4-Hers and $230.00 for non-4-Hers. The Calhoun County Senior Citi zens Association will be sponsoring a grilled chicken cookout Friday, Apr. 5. We will begin serving at 10 a.m. Cost will be just $6 per plate (advance orders only) or $7 per plate (on the corner). We will be serving grilled chicken leg quarters, green beans, cole slaw, bread and dessert. To place an order call 674-4163, or fax 6748384. We will deliver three or more! Make sure you indicate what time to deliver your order, or stop by the cor ner of Hwy. 71 and 20 on the old Po lice Department lot in Blountstown. houn County Senior Citizens.Calhoun Sr. Citizens chicken cookout to be held on April 5thAstronomy nightsDOTHAN, AL Join Landmark Park for an evening of stargazing Friday, Feb. 15 from 6 9 p.m. As tronomy Night is an exciting and in formative program that gives visitors a view of several stars, Uranus, Jupi ter and the Orion nebula through tele scopes and binoculars on the Gazebo lawn. Staff members will help point out winter constellations and visitors will even get the chance to experience a starry hayride and star stories by pretive Center after stargazing and enjoy snacks and a program in the planetarium where you will get the chance to learn more about the night sky. Planetarium programs are not Space is limited; reservations are required. Admission is $2 for mem bers, $3 for scouts and their leaders in uniform and $5 for nonmembers and (334) 794-3452 to reserve your spot. Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts are welcome either night. Astronomy Night meets several requirements for the Astronomy Badge. Landmark Park is a 135-acre historical and natural science park located on U.S. Highway 431 North in Dothan, AL. For more information, con tact the park at (334) 794-3452.Teams, sponsors needed for April 5 Relay for LifeThe journey to end can cer starts with a single step. The American Cancer Society invites you to take that step with by joining the global Relay For Life movement. When you walk to end cancer at a Relay event, its your opportunity to not only honor cancer survivors and re member loved ones lost, but also to raise awareness about what we can do to stay well from cancer and raise money to help fuel the worlds largest walk to end cancer. The Calhoun/Liberty event will begin Friday, Apr. 5 at 6 p.m. at Sam At kins Park. For more information on the Calhoun County event, visit www. relayforlife.org or email Shannon. Rodriguez@cancer.org. The traditional Sacred Harp Sing will be held on Saturday, Feb. 16 at 9:30 a.m. at the Panhandle Pioneer Settlement. Sacred Harp Singing (also called Sacred Harp Sing this SaturdayFaSoLa or shape note singing), dates back to colonial times and has been preserved in the rural south. The singing is not accompanied by harp or other instrument but is an old style of singing a cappella from shape notes. munity musical event that emphasizes participation. Attendees will be welcomed to a pot luck lunch being asked to bring a dish of their choice. Donations will be ment will have their General Store open from 10 a.m. 2 p.m. (CST) with tours available. Admission is free to this event. The Panhandle Pioneer Settlement is located in Sam Atkins Park, about 1 mile west of the intersection of Hwy 71 and Hwy 20. Follow Hwy. 20 West out of Blountstown. Look for signs for Sam Atkins Park. Turn North at Lindys Fried Chicken, Silas Green St. (between 18th & 20th St.). Plenty of parking!BIRTHDAYS Ruth Attaway, Daisy Holliday, Aaron Carter, Lisa Britt BIRTHDAYS Stormy Wise, Wayne Sutton, Scott Holcomb, Justin Faircloth BIRTHDAYS Renee Moore, Nick KellerRep. Southerland to host Liberty mobile Rep. Steve Southerland will be erty County on Friday, Feb. 15 at the Liberty County Courthouse from 1-3 p.m. (EST) Residents of Liberty County and the surrounding area are invited to join Rep. Southerlands staff to provide input on legislation, ask questions or request assistance with a federal agency on issues including: Social Security, Medicare, Housing and Urban Devel For questions, please contact Lori Hutto at (850) 561-3979 or email Lori. Hutto@mail.house.gov. Chipola College Theatre will present the hit musical, Hairspray, Wednesday, Mar. 13-17. Pictured are the Corny Collins Kids from left: Terrence Shanks, Cayce Shayli Tharp, Tyler Landry and Austin Pettis. Tickets go on sale two weeks prior to the performance and will be to be announced. For more information contact Charles Sirmon, Director of Theatre sirmonc@chipola.edu (850) 718-2277. Hairspray at Chipola

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Is there anything that politicians and the American people arent an guishing over? Most every day, the dictions of doom and damnation. About 99 percent of this national anxiety is self-imposed. We do it to ourselves. to drastically reduce government spending. If you done to the British economy. Who thought up this sequestration idea? As ex pected, Republicans blame it on President Obama, but to force themselves to do something about Americas to blame? The American people. They elected these dunces. Unless there is some action on the part of the Congress, seques prospect of a cut in their annual budget of billions of dollars. economy in my part of the Florida Panhandle. If se reducing the size of the federal government and cur tailing out-of-control government spending. But the and spending is the one being cut. Republicans, in their mindless allegiance and not discuss any sensible approach to revamping the tax code or increasing taxes. Clearly, America doesnt If sequestration occurs, the White House Fact Sheet if it occurs, is that those preaching er nosedive. The county I live in is ground They hate anything government government retirement pay, Social Security payment, Medicare and the local military bases that support most of the local economic activity. Welcome to austerity. and became part of the al Qaeda organization has the that plan? As a part of lets get our arms around this drone program, the telligence Agency to have more CIA is a spy organization, and the Representatives? We need to recognize that the spy business is not vile people. So, give them their ROE and leave them Page 6 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL FEBRUARY 13, 2013 C ORNERJerry Cox is a retired military OXS COMMENTARY WASHINGTONMERRY-GO-ROUNDby Douglas Cohn and Eleanor Clift Americas angst is unending reform as a matter of practical politics, the question that conservative Republicans. McCain prided himself on his strength of character, a lasting enmity. Instead, after losing the nomination, he campaigned for Bush, changed his colors and acchameleon. issues. So, in exercising the most important decision a accepted that she cost him the election. Bushs nasty politics. But once again his chameleon nature prevailed, and he has seemingly fostered a thing, the surge, instead of the initial invasion of Iraq. Hagel refused to give McCain a simple yes or no on Iran in the region. a senator and did nothing to advance understanding corrected at one point by the committee chairman, heroism despite the hostile questioning from his old Watching McCain in the hearing made us long for respectful of the institution, treated others in a digni are capable of extraordinary change.Angry Chameleon

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FEBRUAR Y 13, 2013 / THE CALHOUN-LIBER TY JOURNAL Page 7 Pre-order your Valentines early because we have what a woman and what a man wants.... Buy Rite Drugs Call Us at 6435454 Jewelry Valentines candy and Much, Much More. DELIVERING TO SCHOOLsS ROSES $5995$3995 SPECIAL $ 4 95 How are droughts by global warming? I thought warming mostly brought on -David Mossman, Albuquerque, NMBy throwing the planets climate regulation systems out of whack, global warm ing is likely to cause more extreme weather events of every kind, including additional and more drying and drought in others sometimes within the same region. According to the Union of Concerned creased temperatures on the Earths surface due to global warming accelerates evapo transpiration, an otherwise natural process that takes moisture from land, plants and water bodies and moves it skyward into the atmosphere. In drier regions, evapotranspiration as below-normal levels of rivers, lakes and groundwater, and lack of enough soil moisture in agricultural areas, reports UCS. Precipitation has declined in the trop ics and subtropics since 1970. Southern Africa, the Sahel region of Africa, south ern Asia, the Mediterranean, and the U.S. Southwest, for example, are getting drier. Even areas that are typically wet, says the group, can experience long, dry spells be tween extreme rainy periods. This drying trend is expected to continue through mid-century as the amount of land Water resources in affected areas are predicted to decline by as much as 30 percent. These changes occur partly because of an expanding atmospheric circulation pat tern known as the Hadley Cellin which warm air in the tropics rises, loses moisture to tropical thunderstorms, and descends in the subtropics as dry air, adds UCS. As jet streams continue to shift to higher latitudes, and storm patterns shift along with them, semi-arid and desert areas are expected to expand. The National Wildlife Federation (NWF) adds that the sea level rise expected to accompany global warming (as the po lar ice caps melt) could further complicate matters for water-constrained areas by contaminating critical inland underground freshwater reserves with salt (so-called saltwater intrusion). Another effect of unmitigated global warming will be a increased frequency of much of the Western U.S. NWF reports that researchers there are already noticing lonlater into the year, and an increased fre quency of lightning as thunderstorms are becoming more frequent and severe. The burn over twice as much of todays affected areas across 11 western states by later this century if conservative predictions about warming come true. So what can be done? NWF stresses that every one of us can play a role by cutting back on our fossil fuel use (less driving and help is to take into account our own water use and making a concerted effort to cut back and conserve this most vital of all natural resources. NWF also wants land managers and policymakers to consider global warming when choosing water manage ment strategies to meet multiple demands and to work to protect natural forest and

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Page 8 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL FEBRUARY 13, 2013 Phone (850) 643-1112 rs Neldian: Nail technician Phone (850) 272-2023 Teristia: Cosmetologist Phone (850) 566-5752 Tammy: Owner, Cosmetologist Phone (850) 643-6698 CALL FOR YOUR NAIL A APPOInNTMEnNT CALL FOR YOUR HAIR A APPOInNTMEnNT NEW HOURS FOR NAIL CARE SPRING SPECIALS F Located at 20634 E. Central in Blountstown (850) 674-8801 "Fine Jewelry & Gifts"The Diamond Corner A GIFT FROM THE HEART Pandora Gift Sets LOVE OF MY LIFE *BRACELET GIFT SET $ 200 *ORIGINAL RETIAL PRICE $230 CCOMES WITH CCERAMIC GGIFT BBOX WHILE SUPPLIES LAST Friday, Feb. 22 at 7 p.m. ETKick off service with live praise & worshipSaturday, Feb. 23 at 10 a.m. ETTestimonies, Dramas, Worship, Breakout Sessions VETERANS CIVIC CENTER 10405 NW Theo Jacobs Lane Bristol Reserve your spot now Registration is FREE http://swankybabyvintage-efbevent.eventbrite.com CALL FOR MORE InNFORMATIOnN (850) 643-4313 Sponsored by Swanky Baby Vintage & Mission 180 DEAdDLInNE TO RREGISTER MMOndNDAY, FFEB. 18 Wow what a Valentine you must have been!Happy 60TH BirthdayJackie BarberFeb. 14We wish you the best birthday ever, With Love Deanne & Ken Birth daysKELTON DANIEL MOON Kelton Daniel Moon celebrated his seventh birthday on Saturday, Feb. 9. He is the son of Jordy Moon of Bristol and Gonzo and Danae Verduzco of Blue Creek. His grandparents are Jay and Teresa Moon of Bristol and Wade and Joyce Beth Stoutamire of Blue Creek. He celebrated with a party at the Funstation with family and friends. CHIQUITA SANDERS RUDD Chiquita Sanders Rudd celebrated her 83rd birthday Tuesday, Feb. 12. She is the wife of the late Jack Rudd and mother of Sharon, John, Karen and James (Bo). She has one brother, Jimmy Johnson, six grandchildren, 13 great-grandchildren and two greatgreat-grandchildren. She is retired and enjoys going to church and Bible study and playing with her grandchildren. She celebrated with a party held at her home on Sunday, Feb. 10 with family and friends. Anniversary Earl and Marlene Ellis, married on February 8, 1963, will be celebrating their 50th wedding anniversary. They plan to celebrate with a re ception to be held at the Faith Baptist Church fellowship hall in Marianna on Saturday, Feb. 16 from 2-4 p.m. All family and friends are invited to attend. Please, no presents, but cards are appreciated. Earl & Marlene Ellis celebrate 50TH wedding anniversaryCORINTH BAPTIST CHURCH Corinth Baptist Church of Hosford and Telogia Baptist Church of Telogia will hold a celebration of the ministry of Rev. Gordon Adank and his wife Sue, this Sunday, Feb. 17, at 6 p.m. (EST), at the Corinth Baptist Church in Hosford. Rev. Adank recently retired from the pastorate after over 40 years in ministry. He pastored both Corinth and Telo gia during his minis try. Every one in the county is invited to share in this special occasion as we remember and honor this man of God and his precious wife. the service, so please be our guest. For more information, please call Rev. Kyle Peddie at 556-1881 or Rev. Eric Durham at 209-7116. NEWS FROM THE PEWS CONNECTIONS FELLOWSHIP As we study Gods Whispers, this week we will look at people who have been hurt by life. Maybe you or someone you know has been hurt, and it might have even been by church. Join us as we examine what God has to say to those who are hurting or whove been hurt. God hasnt abandoned you. We will also have a special guest sharing her faith journey from pain to healing. Connections Fellow ship meets at the Ft. Braden Community Center on SR 20 Sunday mornings at 10:30 a.m. To the editor: Many pastors and leaders of our Christian churches either dont know the word of God or they are afraid to preach the word. Judgement begins at the pulpit. Some of the truths that a lot of preachers dont preach about are: ing about the rapture theory. What does the Bible say about adding to or tak ing away from the Bible? (The rapture theory was added in the year 1830 by a half-crazed woman, Margaret McDonald). Some preachers heard her dream and took it to ride, creating the lie about the rapture theory. The way I understand the rapture theory is that people believe they will into heaven. (That is what Anti-Christ says he will do.) Anti-Christ comes at the sixth trump and will be 9:5). If you are still in this earthly body, it wont be Jesus Christ, it will be Anti-Christ. Jesus Christ comes at the seventh trump and all who are living will be changed instantly into a spiritual body and then the thousand year millennium begins. in the garden? ther? and Eve made? come from? when the Bible says to keep your head covered? about the three earth ages. I really dont see how we can understand some parts of the Bible without knowing about the three earth ages. Morrell Baily, Altha SPEAK UP!Write: The Calhoun-Liberty Journal P.O. Box 536, Bristol 32321 WITH A LETTER TO THE EDITOR

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FEBRUAR Y 13, 2013 / THE CALHOUN-LIBER TY JOURNAL Page 9 LOTS OF FUN ACTIVITIES PLANNEDHeart Healthy Meal Door Prizes Nutrition Education Bone Density Scan Personal trainer giving exercise demonstrations Cardiovascular Education Tobacco Cessation Education Light n Healthy Dessert Cooking Contest Blood Pressure Checks Dessert Contest For Churches interested in participating in the contest at the GO Red Day Event Make a dessert that is light and heart healthy, to feed 20 people (Bring recipe) FREE Go Red for Women Feb. 19 at 6 p.m. (ET)(850) 643-2415Susan at ext. 245For questions, call Liberty County Health Department Tolar overcomes Hosford 17-1 at Feb. 12 gameHosfords softball team pulls out an 11-10 win against Tolar The Hosford girls softball team played a great game Tuesday. After trailing Tolar the entire game, the girls won by one run with a score of 11-10. LEFT: Hosfords MaryBeth Rogers catches a throw for BELOW: Hosfords Brook Kent con centrates as she scoopes up the hit from Tolar.DANIEL WILLIAMS PHOTOSHosfords boys baseball team played a tough game Tuesday in Hosford against Tolars Hosfords second baseman Jace White (#5) tags Tolars base runner J.J. House (#7) out. BELOW RIGHT: Tolars Todd Polver (#27) drives the ball after the pitch.Hosfords Third baseman Brady Peddie rears back to throw down a Tolar runner.DANIEL WILLIAMS PHOTOS Give Beth Eubanks a callNEW CrystalWave Meal Solutions REHEAT AND EEAT Great for Microwave reheating and enjoying T upper ware Chipola Nursing program is granted candidacy for National AccreditationMARIANNA Chipola Colleges Nursing programs have moved one step closer to national accredita tion. The National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission, Inc., (NLNAC) recently announced that candidacy status has been granted for Chipolas Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) program and the Associate Degree Nursing (ADN) program. Chipolas candidate status is valid for two years through January 2015. initial accreditation visit later this year. According to NLNAC policy, Chipolas Nursing programs will be added to the listing of colleges and schools who have achieved candi dacy status on the NLNAC website. Dr. Vickie Stephens, Dean of the School of Health Sciences at Chi pola College, says, Our NLNAC candidacy is a testament to the professionalism of our educational team. We embrace the opportunity to provide quality health education through innovative teaching and partnerships with our community. Dr. Jason Hurst, Chipola Vice President of Baccalaureate and Oc cupational Education, says, Our nursing program has been fully accredited by the Southern Asso ciation of Colleges and Schools for many years. This national accredita tion by NLNAC will greatly expand the career and educational opportu nities for our graduates. Chipola offers the RN to BSN Degree with all upper level classes available online. The Associate Degree Nursing program provides training to prepare students for cer college also offers two bridge programs: LPN to RN and Paramedic to RN. For information about Chipolas Nursing programs, call (850) 7182316 or visit www.chipola.edu. Pictured from left, are: Dr. Jason Hurst, Vice President of Baccalaureate and Occupational Education; Dr. Vickie Stephens, Dean of the School of Health Sciences; Dr. Karen Lipford, Professor; Tina Dorsey, Instructor; Dr. Chastity Duke, Associate Professor; Amber Bruner, Instructor; Amy Sampson, Patient Simulation Coordinator; and Jennifer Ham, Staff Assistant.

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Page 10 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL FEBRUARY 13, 2013 CITY TIRE CO. We're your one-stop"Volkswagens to semi's, we handle them all"Why wear out your new tires (and waste time) CITY TIRE IS YOUR ONE-STOP TIRE SHOP! TIRE STORE! TOYO TIRES "Authorized Dealer" Brakes SPECIALTY POSTS FACTORY SECONDS ITEMS SUBJECT TO AVAILABILITY Liberty Post & Barn Pole Inc.Phone (850) 643-5995WE'VE GOT THE FENCE POSTS TO MEET YOUR NEEDS. Home of the All-U-Can-Eat menu Phone (850) 670-8441 Happy Valentines Day from Family Coastal Seafood Restaurant $ 2995 Steak & Seafood DINNER FEBRUARY 14-16 Seafood Plater for 2 OR $ 2595 GOLDEN DRUGS Valentines Day Gifts Whitmans and more! Cards 50% Everyday Best of the Latest Country Charted songs, mixed in with your favorite oldies.WPHK Radio K-102.7 FMWYBT Radio Y-1000 AM Liberty County Tigers and the JIM McCLELLANS OUTDOORS Down South Daddy and the homing mule OUTDOORS One day as I was riding with my father through McClellan Swamp, just south of Blountstown, he explained to me why people down there used to let their hogs run free. He told me that if they werent raising them for market, most folks couldnt afford to feed them every day. And not everybody wanted them penned up by the house because of So, many rural families, including his uncles, aunts and cousins, would mark their hogs by cut ting a distinctive notch in their ears and then turn them loose in the woods to mostly fend for them selves. This worked out well because hogs are smart, resourceful animals that will eat just about anything and can thrive in most any circumstance. Every so often, their owners would take cracked corn and dump it out near their hog pens, which were really wooden traps. This was to make sure the hogs always stayed fairly close by. When the weather turned cool, people would set the traps and catch as many hogs as they need ed for the coming year. They might also trap them at other times to mark the new pigs and cut some of the young boars. When Daddy stayed with one particular set of relatives, they would often get him to ride a mule through the swamp with a bag of corn that was split and draped across the mules back (like saddlebags). The old mule had made the journey many times and dutifully took him to each hog pen where he would dump out some of the corn. Daddy said he enjoyed the chore because most of the time it was pretty easy. Except for once, when he was only about eight or nine years old. On that trip, things were going pretty well until the mule spooked, threw him on the ground and took off at full speed through the swamp. I bet I ran a mile, just as hard as I could go, trying to catch that mule, Daddy said. Some times, I could barely see him, he was so far away. Finally, he slowed down enough that I could grab his bridle. Ive never been so happy to see an ani mal. I thought about the story for a minute and something didnt add up. I asked him, If the mule remembered where all the hog pens were, dont you think he could have found his way back home without you? Sure he could, Daddy said. Problem was, mule. Fourth annual Kid's Wildlife Habitat Contest announcedThe Florida Wildlife Federation is proud to an nounce the 4th Kid's Wildlife Habitat Contest! We will award a prize of a gardening book and a commemorative plaque to the Floridian 12 or under with the best wildlife habitat. It's easy to enter. Just tell us how your habitat provides food, water, cover, and a place to raise young. Teachers, please note that schoolyard habitats are eligible. The winning habitat will be featured on our website and in our newsletter. We will send an announcement of the winning child or school to your local newspapers, and, if it can be arranged, an FWF representative will come to the winning habitat to present the award on Earth Day 2013, April 22. There is currently great concern among health care specialists, educators, environmentalists, and parents about the shrinking amount of time todays children spend outdoors. It is believed that this is increasing obesity in children as well as other health and causing a sad disconnect with nature among our youngsters. Many programs are being started on the local, state, and national levels to get kids to leave computer games indoors and get outside for healthy activities. The Florida Wildlife Federation is committed to fauna. We think there is a way to tie them together promoting health for both kids and animals by encouraging youngsters to start and maintain a wildlife habitat. This is an excellent activity for children 12 and under. It gets them outdoors, keeps them active digging and pulling the inevitable weeds, sparks an interest in gardening, teaches them something about identifying both plants and animals in the natural world, and (important to all parents), keeps them at home and from wandering to places where they might not be so safe. Schoolyard habitats are included as long as they tion by National Wildlife Federation it is not necessary for this contest. Just tell us how this habitat provides water, food, cover, and a place to raise young. We will send an announcement of winning kids or schools to your local newspapers (with your permission, of course). We wont use last names or exact addresses, in order to keep the young winners safe from unwanted intrusions. Go to www.fwfonline.org and look at the Habitat PowerPoint there for help and ideas. Entries close March 31. Email patricia@fwfonline.org for more informa tion and start sending in those pictures. Researchers with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) docu mented fewer manatee deaths in 2012 than in the previous three years, as milder winter temper cold-related mortality. The FWC recorded 392 manatee carcasses in state waters last year, of which a quarter were determined to be from human-related causes. FWC researchers, managers and law enforcement staff work closely together to evaluate mor tality data and identify necessary actions. Actions may include steps to protect vital habitat or special patrols to ensure compli ance with manatee speed zones. The FWC is committed to conservation actions that reduce human-caused manatee deaths, including those related to wa tercraft. The FWCs Division of Law Enforcement, in coopera tion with partner agencies, uses knowledge of local boating con ditions and habits, well-posted speed regulatory zones and upto-date manatee information as part of its on-the-water enforcement operations. Researchers documented 81 watercraft-related deaths in 2012, slightly below the yearly Protecting manatees is a priority, said Maj. Jack Daugherty, FWCs Boating and Waterways time to patrol manatee zones, identify areas that have present ed problems, and generally work with the public to educate them on how to boat safely and in a way that doesnt harm the envi ronment. To help prevent cold-related deaths, the FWC continues to work with partners to enhance availability of warm-water sites important to manatee survival. Among recent efforts was the restoration of Fanning Springs by the FWC and partners, which improves manatee access to a natural warm-water habitat off the Suwannee River. To view preliminary 2012 manatee mortality data, visit MyFWC.com/Research/Mana tee and click on Manatee Mor tality Statistics. To learn more about manatee conservation, go to MyFWC. com/Manatee. As part of its conservation efforts, the FWC rescues dis tressed manatees throughout the state. The FWC and partners rescued 81 manatees in 2012, in many cases as a result of citizens contacting the agency. To report a dead or distressed manatee, call the FWCs Wildlife Alert Hotline at (888) 404-FWCC (3922). Florida residents can also help manatees by purchasing the manatee specialty license plate, available at county tax collec for these plates go directly to manatee research and conservation. To help prevent coldrelated deaths, the FWC continues to work with partners to enhance availability of warmwater sites important to manatee survival. Among recent efforts was the restoration of Fanning Springs by the FWC and partners, which improves mana tee access to a natural warm-water habitat off the Suwannee River.

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by Teresa Eubanks, Journal EditorStudents begin their day with a smile from Debra Clark. She greets the buses each morning at W.R. Tolar School in Bristol and sets the tone for the day. "I love the students and I think it's important to smile at them and call them by name," she says. After the kids get settled in their classes, Clark turns her attention to her many other duties. She oversees the inschool suspension and PE detention department, during which she has to rein in that smile and be the disciplinarian. When a teacher is absent, chances are Clark will turn up in the classroom. If a staff member is out sick, she could wind up at the front helps when the school nurse gets busy. She doesn't miss a beat if called on to help in the media center, where she previously worked for two years. She enjoys guiding children toward books she feels will mean something to them, like her favorite, A Child Called "It." "It's by far the best library book we have at Tolar," she says. "I enjoy reading and I encourage kids to get The end of the school day doesn't mean the end of her workday. After school, she helps with the 21st Century CCLC tutoring program. She gives kids a hand with their homework, shows them how to do an arts and crafts project or perhaps helps them write a letter to a soldier serving overseas. "I love my job and having so much to do makes the day go by fast," she says. When a child is sent to her for detention, she works with them about their attitude and teaches them to take ownership of their actions. Students are required to write the "code of conduct" for the rule they broke, she explains. She says she's found that you have a child's respect when you show them you're here for them. "Then, they thrive on proving to you they can be better." The 40-yearold has worked as a paraprofessional with the eight years ago, she was a stay-athome mom. But when her daughter, Destiny started school, she decided she wanted to stay close to her little girl. She got a job as a school bus driver and filled in as a school custodian and worked in the cafeteria. Next, she became a health aide, working with disabled students. After that, she became a full time paraprofessional. Not only is she able to stay close to her daughter, "now all 670 of them are my babies," she says of the students. Clark's selection as School-Related Employee of the Year was no surprise to Tolar teacher Samantha Newsome, who summed up Clark's impact at the school: "She is everywhere sometimes I think there is more than one of her!" Debra Clark, who turned 40 yesterday, lives in Bristol with her husband, Frankie Clark. They have two children, Colby, 20, and 14-yearold Destiny. The daughter of Thomas and Sally Hopkins, Debra is a 1991 graduate of LCHS.by Teresa Eubanks, Journal Editor attention to detail and willingness to take on added work while keeping updated on new state requirements made her a natural Related Employee of the Year. She began her duties with the school district as a part-time student worker and has since moved up to her current position seen a few changes. Smaller class size and new regulations have resulted in more and more paperwork. Her biggest challenge? Keeping up with the state and federal regulations, she one who often has to explain those changes to others. can cut costs, she said, explaining that a study is being done to determine how to best save money by making facilities more energy efficient. That effort is already underway with the recent upgrades at Carr School. looking forward to seeing some changes in the school Her numerous duties include preparing budgets and relating to keeping track of the school neighboring counties. Earlier this year, she spent a few weeks working with the Liberty County School District, and is She credits her ability to handle so many things to the fact that there are several other long-term employees in experienced people here, she said, noting that at least three of her coworkers have between 25 and 27 years with the school system. Her supervisor, School District to her skill in her job. In a letter recommending her for Shelia work for the school system, she has been involved with school activities due to her sons, one who graduated from Altha School and the other who is a senior at Blountstown High School. This involvement is a result of her strong family ties and values. FEBRUAR Y 13, 2013 / THE CALHOUN-LIBER TY JOURNAL Page 11 Debra Clark recognized for her many roles at TolarSheila Hall honored as Calhoun District Employee of the Year CALHOUN TEACHER continued from the front page of pride as different leaders emerge and take on their leadership role, she explains. While the lesson continues, she moves from table to table. If a group is struggling I sit with that group and teach a mini lesson to reinforce the topic, she says. The goal is to overwhelmed and have the chance to ask questions and discuss ideas. I give my students small chunks of information to work on, and I test often. She monitors their progress through frequent testing and says, I am convinced that the method I am using with my students is working because 86% of the students I teach showed growth from the Fall Benchmark test to the Winter Benchmark test. important to share that knowledge and support each other in the process. She found her role models in other teachers, who inspired her to uphold their standards of professionalism. I do not teach because it is my job, I teach because it is my privilege to make a difference in our community, she says. Tomlinson is known for being an innovative and compassionate teacher, according to BHS Principal Dr. Debbie Williams, who actively encouraged her to take a position at the high school. I spent a whole school year recruiting Karen to come teach at BHS, says Williams. I teaching ability to work with our struggling math students. Williams says that effort has paid off because, Karen is the type of teacher that does not teach a subject; she teaches students. Karen Tomlinson, 51, lives in Blountstown with her husband, David, and Caroline Tomlinson, 18. She is a 1980 graduate of Liberty County High School. She received her want to know that they can make choices that will be heard and respected." She's aware that math is a challenge for many children. "At this age, a lot of them have the stereotype that it's hard and they can't do it," she says. "The challenge is to get past their perception, and show them there's easier ways to do it and more than one way to do it." She does that by breaking down the information they already know and then tells them, "We're going to build on what you've already learned." Newsome is a 1977 Blountstown High School graduate who went on to Chipola College and then to psychology. Her goal was to work with children. She took a job as a case worker and later became a child abuse investigator, which she believes gave her a solid start as an educator. "That experience helps me as a teacher," she says, explaining, "I'm more aware of their feelings. I realize if a student is having a bad day, it might be because they had a bad night at home." She says Tolar is a special school because of its family atmosphere. "The students, staff and administrations all make up one huge family. Staff and administrators work together to do what is needed and best for the students," she says, explaining, "Everyone pitches instudents look out for one another. The older students prove to be role models for the younger students and all ages can be seen helping each other, whether it is with school work, extracurricular activities, or simply picking up dropped books." She has shared a special part of her family life with her classes; the adoption of one of her pets, a pit bull she calls Frankie. The class followed her through the adoption process, which included a home visit from an animal rescue agency in Panama City. Frankie joined the household that included another pit bull named Rebel. "They are my babies," she says. When she leaves her home between Altha and Blountstown each morning, she drops the two dogs off with her mother, Polly Newsome, who babysits them for her. "The students think it's just hilarious that when I come to work, they go to grannie's house," she says. Newsome says she was caught by surprise when she was named Teacher of the Year,. "Six people were nominated and we have an awesome group of teachers down here," she says of her co-workers at Tolar. "We all work together and do what's necessary for the kids." LIBERTY TEACHER continued from the front page

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Page 12 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL FEBRUARY 13, 2013 The 4th Annual Pre-season Baseball/Softball Clas sic was held at Hosford School on Saturday, Feb. 2. The Hosford Panther Booster Club would like to take this opportunity to say thank you to the follow ing individuals who helped in making the event such a huge success: Doobie Hayes, Charles Barber, Dexter Barber, Kyle Peddie, Ginger Watson, Emily Todd, Jeri Flowers and countless others. We are so appreciative of everyone who came out to support the children and our community. We truly are blessed to live in such a devoted community. The Hosford 8th grade class is having a Chicken Pilau dinner on Friday, Feb. 15 beginning at 11 a.m. This event will be held at the Hosford Fire Department. Cost is $6 a plate. Please come and support our 8th grade class fundraiser for our Orlando trip. We would like to thank the Liberty CountySheriff's all the citizens of Liberty County who contributed to our fundraising endeavor.Chicken Pilau for Hosford school to be held Feb. 15Hosford celebrates 100TH day of school on Friday, Feb. 1. To start the day off students came in dressed up as though they read the story 100th Day Worries by Margery Cuyler. Later that day students participated in several activities where they had to ei snack food. We would like to thank Harveys Grocery store in Blountstown for donating us day of school. Night last week. It was a fabulous opportunity to show parents and students that math can be FUN while snacking on some homemade cookies! Students used their math skills to master games using differ ent types of technology including: iPads, iPods, LeapFrog Leap other students using the SumDog website. grades are: cookie.com, coolmath.com, sumdog. com,multiplication.com, and starfall.com. will be held Feb. 25 with Valentine's Day themed activites. National Signing Day on Feb. 6 led a group of family and friends to the Liberty County High School sign a letter of intent to play football at Clark Atlanta University. The Division 2 School from At lanta is a member of the Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Conference. The Panthers signed 23 players dur ing the opening day of recruiting with only three from out of state. We are very pleased with the qual ity of recruits we have signed and are equally enthusiastic about the number of student-athletes from the Atlanta area, said Coach Kevin Weston. All of these players have a special talent and the local impact will set the tone for a great game day experience within the community. Alex was recruited to play wing back and defensive back for the Panthers. Liberty Countys Coach over which side of the ball he will play because they know they have a great football player in Alex. Alex told the coaches at Clark Atlanta during his visit that he doesnt care which side of the ball he plays on as long as he plays. He was told if they signed someone from out of state, We expect them to play early. During Alexs senior year he collected many honors as he helped lead the Bulldogs to district and regional championships. He was selected as the Channel 13 student-athlete of the week, played in the FACA All Star Game, GA/FL Border War All Star Game, All District 1st team, All Big Bend First Team Utility Player on the offensive side, and All State First Team Utility Player on the defensive side. At Liberty County High School he scored 18 touchdowns, rushed for ing, returned punts and kickoffs, played quarterback, cornerback, and safety for the Bulldogs. When interviewed at the signing, Alex talked about how great it was to play for Liberty County and all the hard work he had put in over the years and challenged the underclass men to work hard. We are looking forward to watch ing Alex continue his athletic and academic career at Clark Atlanta University and we wish him the best. Liberty Countys Alex Marlowe signs with Clark Atlanta University Feb. 6 A great turnout at Family Math Night MAKE A NOTE... to get your in by noon Call (850) 643-3333 Fax (888) 400-5810Email: thejournal@fairpoint.net SCHOOL NEWS

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FEBRUAR Y 13, 2013 / THE CALHOUN-LIBER TY JOURNAL Page 13 WEDNESDAYBREAKFAST: Grits with ham cubes and banana LUNCH: Pork roast or chicken burger or chick en Caesar salad served with mashed potatoes with gravy, turnip greens, THURSDAY with syrup and turkey LUNCH: Meatball sub or cheese burger or chef salad served with french fries, Caesar salad and FRIDAYBREAKFAST: Sausage and egg biscuit and po LUNCH: Cheese burger or cheese pizza or taco salad served with baked potato wedges, sliced tomatoes and lettuce MONDAYBREAKFAST: Egg and cheese biscuit with po LUNCH: Corn dog nug gets or buffalo chicken wrap or Caesar salad served with baked beans, carrot sticks with TUESDAYBREAKFAST: Ham and cheese biscuit and po tato totsLUNCH: Parmesan chicken with pasta or meatball sub or taco sal ad served with broccoli polonaise, garden salad, WEDNESDAY BREAKFAST: Scrambled eggs and grits LUNCH: Country style steak with white gravy and corn chef salad with tortilla shells served with mixed vegeta bles and Caesar side salad THURSDAYBREAKFAST: Whole wheat cinnamon toast and turkey sausage patty LUNCH: Sloppy Joe sandwich or hamburger on bun or buffalo chicken salad with crackers and croutons served with steamed broccoli and 2nd & 3rd grade cheese pizza FRIDAY BREAKFAST: Whole wheat pancakes with syrup and mozzarella cheese stick LUNCH: Chuck waggon chicken with rice and gravy or meatball sub or ham, turkey and cheese or chef salad with croutons and crackers served with whole kernel corn and tossed sal ad with tomatoes and light MONDAYBREAKFAST: Breakfast pizzaLUNCH: Meatloaf with dinner roll or turkey club sandwich or chicken ranch wrap served with baked sweet potato and Kg & 1st grade cheese pizza TUESDAY BREAKFAST: Ham and cheese biscuit LUNCH: Glazed ham with corn bread or hamburger on bun or baby turkey, ham and cheese sub served with steamed broccoli and whole Pea Ridge Rd in Bristol, Phone (850) 643-5417 SCHOOL LLUNCH MENU Feb. 13 Feb. 19Laban Bontrager, DMD, Monica Bontrager, DMD Bristol Dental Clinic Each breakfast includes a choice of assorted cereal, whole wheat buttered toast and juice. CALHOUN LLIBERTY MENUS SPONSORED BY:Blountstowns FFA competes at Horse Evaluation held in TampaThis past weekend, members of the Blountstown FFA traveled to Tampa to compete in Horse Evaluation. This was the state qualifying competi tion. Although the team did not qualify for the state contest, they did improve on their test scores from last year and this again next year. Team members included Katelyn Bozeman, Caitlyn Holland, Kyle Smith, and Benjamin Walden. Alternates were Lesley Clemmons and Jessie West. While at the Florida State Fair, the team met and mingled with the National FFA President Clay Sapp from Madison. We are very proud of our team mem bers! Blountstown FFA would like to & Concrete and the Florida Panhandle Saddle Club for graciously donating money to the Blountstown FFA chapter to help send these students to the State Fair. From LEFT: Lesley Clemmons, Katelyn Bozeman, Jessie West, National FFA President Clay Sapp, Caitlyn Holland, Blountstown High to take part in Take Stock In Children Hat day on Feb. 20Wednesday, Feb. 20, has been approved by the district as Take Stock In Children Hat Day! On this day, students are allowed to wear hats to school to raise awareness and money for the Calhoun County Take Stock In Children Schol arship Fund. Students who have purchased a hat permit will be allowed to wear hats on this day. Monday, Feb. 11 marked a very special day in the lives of two of our 9th graders in the district as they both re ceived a two year scholarship given by Calhoun County Take Stock In Children. Mr. Yoder will be noti fying these two students about this award. The Blountstown FFA Chapter is packages in plastic clamshell contain collected by Feb. 19. The strawberries will arrive either week of March. please call Blountstown High School at 674-5724 and ask for Joanna Everett.Btown Elementary reminds parents of importatnt dates*February 14 Valentine's Day *February 21 1st Grade Field Trip *February 26 28 FCAT Writing TestSix of the Senior Beta members and the Senior Beta Sponsor, LeAnna Hall, traveled to south Florida to attend the Senior Beta State Convention last week. Albert Varnum competed in Science, Justin Walt man competed in English, Ryan Wood competed in Social Studies and Porter Smith competed in Math. Haley Chason entered a photo in the digitally en hanced category. Carly Schwartz entered photos in black and white-still and color-action. Senior Beta also entered a banner into the ban ner competition. The banner was created by Carly Schwartz with the help of Haley Chason. The theme for this year was "The Heart of Beta."Haley Chason placed second with her digital ly enhanced photo and our banner, designed by da. Althas Sr. Beta will represent Florida in the banner competition at the National Convention in Mobile, AL in June.Altha Schools Senior Beta attends state convention Principal Ladonna Kelley proudly announces Altha Schools Kids of Character for the month of January demonstrating the character trait of Punctuality: Front row from left, Brandon Pringle, Matthew Rodgers, Mason Young, Christopher McClain, Parker Willis, Caleb Detweiler and Baylee Rowe. On second row, Jacob Cauley, Kylie Mazzarese, Kerrigan Hollis, Addison O'Bryan, Nikki Richards and Stone Taylor. Not pictured, Kayla Gonsalez. Altha FFA had a good showing at the 2013 Florida State Fair FFA Horse Judging Career Development Event, Saturday, Feb. 9. The purpose of the Horse Judging CDE is to stimulate the study of, and interest in, equine science selection while providing recognition for those who have demonstrated skill and competency in this area. Congratulations to the Altha FFA team for qualifying to attend the State Finals event in April. Morgan Lewis, Brooke Coleman and Carly Schwartz quali Students had to take a test on equine knowledge, evaluate eight classes of horses and answer a set of questions on one of those classes. These students will continue to study, in hopes of winning a State Title in the Finals Event in April. Advisors are Tyler Stoutamire and Erin Stou tamire Walker. Great job Altha FFA.Althas FFA participates at State Horse Judging ish in our area. She also broke the school bench press record with a 160 bench press. lifting from Altha in 11 years. SCHOOL NEWS CountyAway @ 6:00; Senior Trip Payment Due Home @ 6:00; Sadie Hawkins Dance @ 8:00; Senior Trip Payment Due val in Panama City @ 11:00 Home @ 4:00 Walton-Away @ 5:00; Softball Deadline for Junior Class T-shirts ordersBHS Calendar of EventsAlthas Kids of Character for January Althas Calendar of EventsAltha girls weighlifting team placed in state competitionBECOME A VOLUNTEER HELP AN ABUSED, NEGLECTED OR OTHERWISE AT-RISK CHILD BY BECOMING FLORIDA GUARDIAN AD LITEM FOUNDATIONPHONE (850) 410-4642DISCOVER HOW YOU CAN MAKE A DIFFERENCE IN A CHILDS LIFE.

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Page 14 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL FEBRUARY 13, 2013 The annual Miss Black History Pageant was held on Saturday, Feb. 9, at the Blountstown Middle School Auditorum. The following ladies were crowned: Tiny Miss Black History: Monica Adkins, Blount stown Little Miss Black History: Kariyah Jackson, Sneads Young Miss Black History: Jherico Jones, Blountstown Teen Miss Black History: Christian Hogue, Blountstown Ms. Black History: Crystal Thomas, Blounstown Miss Black History Lifetime Queen: Shankia Robinson, Blounstown Miss Black History Lifetime Ambassador: Jahnice Jones, Blounstown Also held on that day were the Black History Fashion Show and Band Concert, which took place at the W. T. Neal Civic Center. All four events were a big success. Thanks to all who came out to help make these programs a success. The Annual Black History Parade and Festival are scheduled for Saturday, Feb. 16. The parade beings at 10 a.m. and the festival begins immediately after the pa rade, ending at the Mayhaw Historical site. Queens crowned in Miss Black Hi s t ory Pageant

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Page 15 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL FEBRUARY 13, 2013 OBITUARIES DOLLIE BELL SUTTON MANNING DAWSON BLOUNTSTOWN Dollie Bell Sutton Manning Dawson, 86, of Blountstown, passed away Monday, Feb. 4, 2013 in Tallahassee. She was born Aug. 17, 1926 in Holmes County and had lived in Blountstown for most of her life. She was a retired restaurant cook and was a member of the Holiness faith. She was preceded in death by her husbands, John Henry Manning and Lawrence Dawson; one son, Charles Ray Dawson; three sisters, Charlie Etta, May Nell and Rossie. Survivors include two daughters, Johnnie Dawson and June Uhrick, both of Blountstown; one brother, William Sutton and his wife, Gloria of Virginia Beach, VA; one sister, Jeannie Wright and her husband, grandchildren. Graveside services were held Saturday, Feb. 9 at Pine Memorial Cemetery with Reverend Dwayne Peavy Funeral Home in Blountstown is in charge of the arrangements. GEORGE FRANK WALDEN passed away Wednesday, Feb. 6, 2013 at his home after a lengthy illness. He was born June 28, 1929 in Jackson County. He served in the United States life and retired as a construction superintendent. He grandfather. He was preceded in death by his parents, John Rob and Mattie Lee Walden; his wife and mother of his children, Barbara Jesse Walden; his second wife, Shirley Gable Walden and one brother, J.W.(Dick) Walden. Survivors include one son, George L. Walden and his wife, Jodi of Sneads; two daughters, Deb bie Turner of Sneads and Barbara Smith and her husband, Randy of Sycamore; one brother, Ches Paul of Tallahassee, Paula Ward of Bainbridge, GA, Dorothy Purcell and her husband, Dave of Oldsmar, Janice Herndon and her husband, Billy and Brenda Maries and her husband, David, all of Odessa; nine Graveside services were held Sunday, Feb. 10 at Dykes Cemetery in Sneads with Rev. Jack Howell of Emerald Coast Hospice, 4374 Layfaette Street, Mari anna, FL 32446. charge of arrangements. JESSE TALMADGE WRIGHT Wright, 82, of Bristol, passed away Friday, Feb. 8, 2013 at his home. He was born in Al ford on Jan. 11, 1931 to the late Wright. He served in the US Navy and retired from Civil Service in 1964. After his retirement he ran a grocery store in Port St. Joe. He was an avid hunter and Marie (Haddock) Wright; one brother, Homer Survivors include his loving wife, Elouise Wright of Bristol; one stepson, Danny Neel of Sumatra; two daughters, Debra Duron Wright of Vida, TX and Brenda Moulder and her husband, David of Auburn, Graveside services were held Sunday, Feb. 10 at Salem Cemetery in Cottondale with Reverend Wayne Adams Funeral Home was in charge of the ar rangements. Online condolences may be made at ad amsfh.com. Telephone (850) 674-2266 Your hometown funeral home since 1994A Hometown Funeral Director You Can Trust and Depend On!Funeral Services with Dignity, Caring and Professionalism. Marlon Peavy Peavy Funeral Home& Crematory All existing pre-need and at need contracts are now handled by the Bevis family and staff.All operations of the funeral process will be handled on location at 12008 NW State Road 20.CALL 643-3636Todd Wahlquist, Rocky Bevis & Ed PeacockLicensed Funeral Directors & Crematoryevis FuneralHome B of Bristol of Bristol DAVID WILLIAM MCINTOSH Saturday, Feb. 9, 2013 in Blount stown. He was born on Jan.11, 1948 in Haddix, KY and had lived in Altha for the past four welder by trade and a veteran of 1969 until 1971in the United States Marine Corp. He was a member of Rivertown Community Church in Blountstown and a member of the American Legion. Survivors include his wife, San and stepmother James Hershel Mc Ashley Eaton and her husband, Daniel of Lake City, PA and Cindy Goodpaster and her husband, Bobby of and her husband, Forrest of Florence, KY; six grand children, Kipp, Cera, Cassie and Caitlyn Goodpaster, Zoey Elizabeth Eaton and Raiden Xavier Eaton. Memorial services will be held at a later date. Me morialization will be by cremation. Peavy Funeral Home in Blountstown is in charge of the arrangements. FRED T. JOHNSON Blountstown, passed away Tuesday, Feb. 12, 2013 in Blountstown. He was born on June 18, 1933 in Knox ville, TN and had lived in Blountstown since 1993, coming from Pensacola. He was retired from Mon santo Chemical Company with 37 years of service. the United States Air Force. He always enjoyed and saw the good side of life, truly loved people and was a very fun person to be with. He was a member of the Blountstown Lions Club and a member of the Blount stown United Methodist Church. Survivors include his wife, Jo Johnson of Blount stown; two sons, Berry Pugh and his wife, Lisa of Huntsville, AL and Jeff Johnson of Boynton Beach; two daughters, Laurie Holland of Milton and Sherry Howes and her husband, Chris; one brother, Dick Johnson and his wife, Sarah of Nichols, SC; three sis ters, Pat Osborne and Sarah Haynes both of Pensaco la and Cynthia Barton of Tennessee; 20 grandchildren Family will receive friends one hour prior to ser vice time at the church. Memorial services will be held Saturday, Feb. 16, 2013 at 2 p.m. (CST) at Blountstown United Method morialization will be by cremation. Peavy Funeral Home in Blountstown is in charge of the arrangements.ITS VERY WISE TO ADVERTISE in the Calhoun-Liberty Journal and... CLJ N ews.COM by Liliane Parbot, contributing writer when he was not much older that a toddler. recently. Show business was not to be his career, however. While he still sings and acts on stage as a hobby, his day job has him as the branch manager and lender at Centennial Bank in Bristol; but when not at work if not on a stage he is most likely to be found standing backstage or in the audience, because one of his three children will be performing. performing has been passed on from the father to all of his three children: Benjamin, 21; Aaron, 18; and The Journal caught up with Black during a recent Liberty County Art Council, supported by the Lib erty County Board of County Commissioners. Olivia Black will have one of the four leading roles, Miss Adelaide, who is described as a psychosomatic Her father added: We were both in that one, and also His daughters eyes sparkle when she talks about the added. According to Black, the Liberty County Art Coun cil is trying to provide art opportunities for the countys school children because funding cuts have resulted in the loss of many art programs. Hugh Black and daughter Olivia look over her costume. show will be for students only, Friday, March 1, at a time to be announced. For the public, show time is Saturday, March 2, at 7 p.m. Both performances will be at Veter ans Memorial Civic Center on Hwy. 12, south of Bristol. Shop, Bristol Buy Rite Drug Store and the Centennial Bank. Man, three years ago. Black said it brought back some feels to his children. Olivia was in that play. so much and the boys as well. Aaron was also in the performed as part of a hardcore music group and he trav Presently, Aaron is at Chipola College on a theater scholarship, and he is to perform in the musical Hair issue.) Meanwhile, what about the childrens mother? Af ter being a teacher, Beckie is now guidance counselor in Hosford, and she also encourages her children to pursue their dreams. Her husband added, She enjoys singing, but she is not as singing out front as we are but she enjoys it. We always felt, whatever they are interested in, whether it is sports, arts, or any other interest, we en There is no doubt the Swiss psychiatrist, Carl Gus tave Jung, would approve of this kind of parenting, see whether it is not something that could be changed interrupted. Club, FCA (Fellowship of Christian Athletes), Student Olivia already knows what she wants in her future. Actually, what Olivia does today is nothing short of a miracle. father recalled. She was born with an extra piece of her spine curve outward. For 11 hours, Olivia was in surgery in Philadelphia. her to be able to dance and move like she does, its a blessing from God to be able to do what she is doing.Acting runs in the blood of this Liberty Co. family

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FEBRUAR Y 13, 2013 / THE CALHOUN-LIBER TY JOURNAL Page 16 Minutes from the Jan. 10 Liberty Commission meeting The meeting was called to order by Chairman Jim Johnson. Present at the meeting were Commissioners Scott Phillips, Davis Stoutamire, Dexter Barber, Dewayne Branch, Attorney Shalene Grover, Clerk Kathleen Brown, and Deputy Clerk Charla Kearce. Prayer was led by Tommy Duggar. Pledge of allegiance was led by Commissioner Davis Stoutamire. Motion to approve the minutes of the regular meeting held Dec. 6 and special meeting Dec. 11, 2012 was made by Stoutamire, seconded by Phillips and carried. Motion by Phillips to add to agenda to talk about Hosford Park and Estiffanulga Park, seconded by Branch and carried. Motion by Barber to add to agenda to request a FL Rural Water rate study at no expense to the county, seconded by Stoutamire and carried. Bill Clackley with North West Florida Water Management discussed the Florida River Island road repair and maintenance agreement. It was agreed to set a meeting up with Warden Ed Mercer and try to work something out to use inmate labor to maintain the road, boat ramp, picnic area and camp site. Ralph Mills with Waste Pro Garbage Service discussed with the Board doing their own billing for garbage service. A workshop will be set up to continue discussion. Motion to approve running water line to hook Tom Evans up to the Water System in Estiffanulga was made by Phillips, seconded by Stoutamire and carried by Barber and Johnson. Branch voted No. Aaron Elkins with the Water Department discussed the need of a roof replacement on the Sumatra water tank at an estimated cost of $30,000. Aaron Elkins recommended Wennon Arnold be hired in the Water Department position. within the two year period. Motion to hire Wennon Arnold was made by Branch, seconded by Barber and carried. Phillips abstained. Arnold will start Monday and will the Prison to work inmates. Road Superintendent J.T. Hathaway discussed with the Board the cost of dirt and equipment fees. Hathaway would like to purchase a log grinder. Motion to go out for bids was made by Phillips, seconded by Stoutamire and carried. Danny Earnest discussed his contract with the county and amending the contract to three days a week so he can oversee the grant. Motion to approve was made by Stoutamire, seconded by Barber and carried. Motion to advertise a change of be opened Tuesday through Saturday and closed Sunday and Monday was made by Barber, seconded by Phillips and carried. This will run in the paper for two weeks. Danny Earnest recommends Bobby Ray Summers for the attendant position. Motion to approve was made by Stoutamire, seconded by Branch and carried. Michael Richter discussed his phone issue at the Civic Center. Motion to table was made by Barber, seconded by Phillips and carried. Rachel Manspeaker gave an update on the Health Department. She told the Board that there are doctors who will be replacing the doctors that are leaving until April 30, 2013. Sheriff Nick Finch and Gay Uzzell discussed the Board positions. No decision was made. The Board will have a workshop with the Sheriff. Motion to approve Resolution #13-04 in support of the Legislature giving school funding Branch, seconded by Phillips and carried. Monica Welles with Liberty Transit presented DOT Grant 5310 and 5311. Motion to approve Resolution # 13-01 for DOT Grant 5310 was made by Phillips, seconded by Barber and carried. Motion to approve Resolution #13-02 for DOT Grant 5311 was made by Stoutamire, seconded by Branch and carried. Motion to appoint Davis Stoutamire to continue to serve on the Apalachee Regional Planning Council was made by Branch, seconded by Barber and carried. A letter from Risk Management was read concerning the safety program. Motion to approve Resolution #13-03 recognizing Liberty County as a Capital Purple Heart County was made by Stoutamire, seconded by Barber and carried. Motion to advertise letter to water customers with ordinance was made by Branch, seconded by Phillips and carried. The Board requested that the County Attorney draw up a resolution concerning synthetic drugs. The Board gave Clerk Brown instructions for the work squad on where they wanted the gate for the Hosford Park. The County will pay for the material. There was discussion about the Hosford Park. Motion to approve Shannon Daub use of the Civic Center for motorcycle training was made by Branch, seconded by Stoutamire and carried. Motion to ban alcoholic beverages at the Civic Center was made by Stoutamire. Motion died. Motion to approve Florida Rural Water performing a free water rate study for the county was made by Phillips, seconded by Branch and carried. Motion to pay the bills was made by Phillips, seconded by Barber and carried. Motion to adjourn was made by Phillips, seconded by Barber and carried. Warrant List & Numbers Payroll Fund...33910 33989 Operating Fund...6304 6477 SHIP Grant...4013 4017 Weatherization Grant .....4711 4719 The meeting was called to order by Chairman Jim Johnson. Present at the meeting were Commissioner Davis Stoutamire, Scott Phillips, Dewayne Branch, Dexter Barber, Attorney Shalene Grover, Clerk Kathleen Brown and Deputy Clerk Lisa Shuler. Motion to amend Sheriffs Budget for $6,671.15 was made by Branch, seconded by Barber and carried. Motion to enter into an emergency contract with Calhoun Liberty Hospital for Inmate Health Care at the Liberty County Jail was made by Phillips, seconded by Stoutamire and carried. Motion to advertise change of road name from O.Z. Revell Road to Dolly Revell Road, was made by Stoutamire, seconded by Phillips and carried. Motion to send a letter to Senator Montford requesting funds for Hosford Sports Complex was made by Stoutamire, seconded by Phillips, and carried. Motions to commence construction on concession stand and restrooms, using inmate labor, at the Hosford Sports Complex was made by Stoutamire, seconded by Barber and carried. Civic Center to Michael Richter for $350 per month made by Stoutamire, seconded by Branch and carried. Motion to charge $400 hook-up fee to connect to the Liberty County Water System was made by Branch, seconded by Stoutamire, and carried. Motion for all Elected their Personnel Policy with by Phillips, seconded by Branch and carried. Motion to enter into an agreement with the Liberty County Correction Institution to alternate cleaning of the Florida River Island Park with the Road Department, made by Stoutamire, seconded by Branch, and carried. Motion to give Phillip Hill with the Calhoun Liberty Hospital permission to access ambulance billing detail for the purpose of giving a quote for the operation of the Ambulance Service made by Stoutamire, seconded by Branch, and carried. Motion to send letters to water and garbage customers regarding utility accounts made by Branch, seconded by Stoutamire, and carried. Motion by Phillips to have a meeting with Department of Homeland Security, Liberty County Sheriffs seconded by Branch, and carried. Motion to adjourn was made by Branch, seconded by Barber, and carried.Special commission meeting held Jan. 24

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Page 17 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL FEBRUARY 13, 2013 THE JOURNAL JOB MARKET Class A CDL Flatbed Drivers 7 positions Temporary/seasonal work planting, grown balled and burlap (B&B) trees and tree-size shrubs, operation of 50+ HP nursery equipment. from 2/25/2013 to 5/31/2013 at Sunleaf Nursery, LLP Madison, OH. This job requires a minimum experience working in a balled and burlap tree HP nursery equipment. Must be able to operate 50+ HP nursery equipment. Employer-paid drug testing required. Saturday work required. Must be able to lift/carry 100 pounds. $11.74/hr or current applicable AEWR. Workers are guaranteed of work hours of total period. Work tools, supplies, equipment supplied by employer without charge to worker. Housing with kitchen facilities provided at no cost to only those workers who are not rea sonably able to return same day to their place of residence at time of recruitment. Transportation and subsistence expenses to work site will be paid to nonresident workers not later than upon completion of 50% of the job contract. Interviews required. Apply for this job at nearest State Workforce Agency in state in which this ad appears, or One Stop Career Center 16908 Northeast Pear Street, Suite 2, Blountstown, FL 32424. Provide copy of this ad. OH Job Order #OH553382. 105 positions Temporary/seasonal work, plant ing, cultivating and harvesting nursery stock in wholesale nursery. from 2/25/2013 to 7/15/2013 at Willoway Nurseries, Inc., Lorain and Erie coun wholesale nursery experience required. Saturday worked required. Must be able to lift/carry 60 lbs. Employer is a U.S. Department of Agricultureer-paid post-hire drug testing required. Prefer bilingual (English/Spanish) with ability to read work orders and manuals in English and write reports. $11.74/hr or current applicable AEWR. Workers are guaranteed of work hours of total period. Work tools, supplies, equipment supplied by employer without charge to worker. Housing with kitchen facilities provided at no cost to only those workers who are not reasonably able to re turn same day to their place of residence at time of recruitment. Transportation and subsistence expenses to work site will be paid to nonresident workers not later than upon completion of 50% of the job contract. Interviews required. Apply for this job at nearest State Workforce Agency in state in which this ad appears, or One Stop Ca reer Center 16908 Northeast Pear Street, Suite 2, Blountstown, FL 32424. Provide copy of this ad. OH Job Order #OH553415. 12 positions Temporary/seasonal work planting, cultivating and harvest shrubs. from 2/25/2013 to 12/16/2013 at Barton Nursery Enterprises, Inc. Edison and Cranbury, NJ. Three ence required in the job described. Saturday work required. Must be able to lift/carry 75 lbs. $10.87/hr or current applicable AEWR. Workers are guaranteed of work hours of total period. Work tools, supplies, equipment sup plied by employer without charge to worker. Housing with kitchen facilities provided at no cost to only those work ers who are not reasonably able to return same day to their place of residence at time of recruitment. Trans portation and subsistence expenses to work site will be paid to nonresident workers not later than upon comple tion of 50% of the job contract. In terviews required. Apply for this job at nearest State Workforce Agency in state in which this ad appears, or One Stop Career Center 16908 Northeast Pear Street, Suite 2, Blountstown, FL 32424. Provide copy of this ad. NJ Job Order #NJ0840623. PUBLIC AND LEGAL NOTICES STATE OF FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION NOTICE OF INTENT TO ISSUE PERMIT The Department of Environmental Protection gives notice of its intent to issue an environmental resource permit for Apalachicola River 0129424-008-EI, to the US Army Corps of Engineers, Mobile District, at P.O. Box 2288, Mobile, Alabama 366280001. The purpose of the permit is to authorize maintenance snagging (relocation of tree snags out of the navigation channel) in the Florida portion of the Apalachicola, Chattahoochee, and Flint Rivers (ACF) Federal Navigation Project. The project will be located in the Apalachicola River between River Mile 0.0 and River Mile 106.4 in Class III, Outstanding Florida Waters (entire Florida portion of river), and Apalachicola Bay Aquatic Preserve (River Miles 0.0 4.5) in Jackson, Gadsden, Calhoun, Liberty, Gulf, and Franklin Counties. Based on all the above, and with the application of general of the permit, the Department has reasonable assurance the project, s proposed, fully meets the environmental resources permitting requirements of Chapter 62-346, Florida Administrative Code, and will not harm the environment. A person whose substantial interests are affected by the Departments action may petition for an administrative proceeding (hearing) under Sections 120.569 and 120.57 of the Florida Statute. The petition must contain the information set forth below and Counsel of the Department at 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida 323993000. Because the administrative hearing process is designed action on the application, administrative hearing may permit, or even a denial of the application. Accordingly, the applicant will not commence construction or other activities under this permit until the petition for an administrative hearing, or request for an extension of time, have expired. Under subsection 62110.106(4) of the Florida Administrative Code, a person whose substantial interests are affected by the Departments action may also request an petition for an administrative hearing. The Department may, for good cause shown, grant the request for an extension of time. Requests for extension of the Department at 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-3000, before the applicable deadline. A timely request for extension of time shall toll the running until the request is acted late, the Department may still grant it upon a motion by the requesting party showing that an extension of time before the deadline was the result of excusable neglect. In the event that a timely an administrative hearing is substantial interest will be affected by the outcome of the administrative process have the right to petition to intervene in the proceeding. Intervention will be only at the discretion of with Rule 28-106.205 of the Florida Administrative Code. In accordance with subsection 28-106.111(2) and subparagraph 62-110.106(3).4, Florida Administrative Code, petitions for an administrative hearing by the applicant must by any persons other than the applicant, and other than those entitled to written notice under Section 120.60(3) of the within 14 days of publication of the notice. Under Section 120.60 (3) of the Florida Statutes, however, any person who has asked the Department for notice petition within 14 days of such notice, regardless of the date of publication. The petitioner shall mail a copy of the petition to the applicant at the address indicated above for an administrative hearing within the appropriate time period shall constitute a waiver of those rights. A petition that disputes the material facts on which the Departments action is based must contain the following information: (a) The name and address of each agency affected (b) The name, address, and telephone number of the petitioner; the name, address, and telephone of the petitioners representative, if any, which shall be the address for service purposes during the course of the proceeding; and an explanation of how the petitioners substantial interests are or will be affected by the agency determination (c) A statement of when and how the petitioner received notice of the agency decision; (d) A statement of all disputed issues of material fact. If there are none, the petition must so indicate; (e) A concise statement of the ultimate facts alleged, the petitioner contends warrant agencys proposed action; (f) A statement of the the petitioner contends require agencys proposed action; and (g) A statement of the relief sought by the petitioner, stating precisely the action that the petitioner wishes the agency to take with respect to the agencys proposed action. A petition that does not dispute the material facts on which the Departments action is based shall state that no such facts are in dispute and otherwise shall contain the same information as set forth above, as required by Rule 28-106.301, Florida Administrative Code. Under Sections 120.569(2)(c) and (d) of the Florida Statute, a petition for administrative hearing must be dismissed by the agency if the petition does not substantially comply with the above requirements or is of the Department unless a with the above. Upon the will not be effective until further order of the Department. This permit, when issued, constitutes an order of the Department. The applicant has the right to seek judicial review of the order under Section 120.68 of the Florida Statute, appeal under Rule 9.110 of the Florida Rules of Appellate Procedure with the Clerk of of General Counsel, 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida, 32399-3000; and by the appeal accompanied by the appropriate district court of appeal. The notice of appeal the Department. Requests for review before the Land and Water Adjudicatory with the Secretary of the Commission and served on the Department within 20 days the Department. The application for this permit is available for public inspection during normal business hours, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, except for legal holidays, at 160 W. Government Street, Pensacola, Florida. ________________________ IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND OR LIBERTY COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case #: 2009-CA-000102 BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP Plaintiff, -vs.Harry James Lewis a/k/a Harry Lewis and Rebecca Ann Lewis a/k/a Rebecca Lewis f/k/a Rebecca Cook; Unknown Parties in Possession #1; Unknown Parties in Possessio #2; If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants Defendant(s) _________________NOTICE OF SALENOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order of Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated January 3, 2013, entered in Civil Case No. 2009-CA000102 of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Liberty County, Florida, wherein BAC Home Loans Ser vicing, LP, Plaintiff and Harry James Lewis a/k/a Harry Lewis and Rebecca Ann Lewis a/k/a Rebecca Lewis f/k/a Rebecca Cook are defendant(s), I, will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash AT THE FRONT DOOR OF THE LIBERTY COUNTY COURTHOUSE, HWY 20, BRISTOL, FLORIDA, AT 11:00 A.M. on February 19, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Fi nal Judgment, to-wit: BEGIN AT A POINT WHERE THE NORTH LINE OF HIGHWAY NO. 270 INTERSECTS THE EAST BOUNDARY OF NE 1/4 OF NW 1/4, OF SECTION 12, TOWNSHIP 2 NORTH, RANGE 7 WEST AND RUN NORTH ALONG THE EAST BOUNDARY OF THE NE 1/4 OF SW 1/4, A DISTANCE OF 420 FEET, FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING, THENCE CONTINUE TO RUN NORTH A DISTANCE OF 420 FEET, THENCE RUN WEST 210 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 420 FEET, MORE OR LESS TO A POINT WEST OF THE POINT OF BEGINNING, THENCE RUN EAST A DISTANCE OF 210 FEET, MORE OR LESS TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. CONTAINING 2,000 ACRES, MORE OR LESS. TOGETHER WITH A 15 FOOT INGRESS, EGRESS AND UTILITY EASEMENT ALONG THE WEST BOUNDARY LINE OF THE FOLLOW ING DESCRIBED LANDS: BEGIN AT A POINT WHERE THE NORTH LINE OF HIGHWAY NO. 270 INTERSECTS THE EAST BOUNDARY OF NE 1/4 OF NW 1/4, OF SECTION 12, TOWNSHIP 2 NORTH, RANGE 7 WEST AND RUN NORTH ALONG THE EAST BOUNDARY OF THE NE 1/4 OF SW 1/4, A DISTANCE OF 420 FEET, FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING, THENCE CONTINUE TO RUN NORTH A DISTANCE OF 420 FEET, THENCE RUN WEST 210 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 420 FEET, MORE OR LESS TO A POINT WEST OF THE POINT OF BEGINNING, THENCE RUN EAST A DISTANCE OF 210 FEET, MORE OR LESS TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN YEAR: 2007, MAKE: CAVALIER, VIN#:CV07AL0270148A AND VIN#:CV07AL0270148B, MANUFACTURED HOME, WHICH IS PERMANENTLY AFFIXED TO THE ABOVE DESCRIBED LANDS. AS SUCH IT IS DEEMED TO BE A FIXTURE AND A PART OF THE REAL ESTATE. ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYSAFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any ac commodation in order to par ticipate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32301; (850) 577-4430 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving before the scheduled appear ance is less than 7 days. Ifyou are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT Liberty County, Florida KATHLEEN E. BROWN Vanell B. Summers DEPUTY CLERK OF COURT Submitted By: ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACHE, LLP 2424 North Federal Highway, Suite 360 Boca Raton, Florida 33431 (561) 998-6700 (561) 998-6707 2-6, 2-13 ________________________NOTICE OF VOTE IN QUESTIONNOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN: EDWARD N. YOUNG Last known address of: 18456 NW LORA MINTON LN BRISTOL, FL 32321 eligibility to vote is in question. You are required to contact the Supervisor of Elections, in Bristol, Florida, no later than thirty (30) days after the date of this publishing. Failure to respond will result in a determination of ineligibility by the Supervisor and your name will be removed from the statewide voter registration system. Published one time in the Calhoun-Liberty Journal 2-13-2013 Gina McDowell Liberty County Supervisor of Elections P.O. Box 597, Bristol, FL 32321 Dated: Feb. 13, 2013 2-13 ________________________NOTICE OF DECISIONUSDA Forest Service Apalachicola National Forest Wakulla and Apalachicola Ranger Districts Wakulla, Liberty, and Franklin Counties, Florida Progress Energy, CPS Line Phase III, Pole Replacements and CPS 1 and 2 Line Recon struction On February 14, 2013, Deputy District Ranger, Harold Shenk will authorize an amendment to the Special Use Authorization issued to Progress Energy. This amendment will allow re placement of 22 existing wood en poles and reconstruction of CPS line 1 and 2. The project area is located within an existing utility corridor that parallels Forest Road (FR) 164, State Road 22, and crosses the Ochlocknee River. The corridor then crosses forest land in a Northeastern direction and ends at FR 365. The purpose and need for the project is general maintenance of an exist ing Special Use Authorization. This project meets all require ments under applicable laws, regulations, and policies. The associated Categorical Exclu sion and Decision Memo will be available upon request. This decision is not subject to appeal pursuant to 36 CFR 215.12 (f). Implementation of this decision may occur after February 14, 2013. For further information regarding this project, contact Sherry Gaston at (850) 926-3561, Ext. 6511. 160 positions Temporary/seasonal work, planting, cultivating and harvesting nursery stock in whole sale nursery, from 2/22/2013 to 11/25/2013 at Wil loway Nurseries, Inc., Lorain and Erie Counties, nursery experience required. Saturday worked re quired. Must be able to lift/carry 60 lbs. Employer Free Workplace employer. Employer-paid posthire drug testing required. Prefer bilingual (Eng lish/Spanish) with ability to read work orders and manuals in English and write reports. $11.74/hr or current applicable AEWR. Workers are guaran teed of work hours of total period. Work tools, supplies, equipment supplied by employer without charge to worker. Housing with kitchen facilities provided at no cost to only those workers who are not reasonably able to return same day to their place of residence at time of recruitment. Trans portation and subsistence expenses to work site will be paid to nonresident workers not later than upon completion of 50% of the job contract. Inter views required. Apply for this job at nearest State Workforce Agency in state in which this ad appears, or One Stop Career Center 16908 Northeast Pear Street, Suite 2, Blountstown, FL 32424. Provide copy of this ad. OH Job Order #OH553411.

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FEBRUAR Y 13, 2013 / THE CALHOUN-LIBER TY JOURNAL Page 18 SERVICE DIRECTORY Whaley Heating & Air Conditioning (850) 674-4777FL LIC. # CMC1249570 Accepting: R Is ss 4433 NW C.R. 274 Altha, Fl 32421 (850) 762-9402 Cell (850) 832-5055Dozer and Excavation work Over 20 years experienceClay ONealsLand Clearing, Inc. William's HomeImprovements No Job Too Big or Small"Concrete work, landscape, pressure & screen enclosure Call 674-8092Licensed & Insured, contractor & rooferFOR FREE ESTIMATES at 674-8081 or 643-8561 (Cell) STUMP GRINDINGReasonable Rates & FREE Estimates! That Darn PumpThere is never a convenient time to be without water.WELLS For friendly service and never any overtime charges call, Clint Hatcher, OwnerElectrical Lic. # ER13014037 New Homes H Garages H Additions H Electrical Remodeling Foundations Screenrooms Sunrooms VINYL SIDING RESIDENTAL & COMMERCIAL FREE Estimates Serving Calhoun, Liberty & Jackson Counties LIBERTY TIRE COMPANY 10781 NW SR 20 Bristol, Fl 32321 Call 643-2939 MV84845 Hours: Monday thru Friday 7 5 & Saturday 7 12 We specialize in sales and repair of tires for:Commercial Trucks and Trailers, OTR Equipment, Farm Equipment, JEMISON Heating & Cooling, Lic# RM1416924Carrier Equipment Masters Farm Supply LS Tractor Equipment Committed To Quality Since 1973 (850) 762-3222 faxmasters7@fairpoint.net Hwy 71 South on J.P. Peacock Rd, Altha. Day or night,Check out our prices before Margies Florist To place your ad call us at 643-3333 Gary Richards, EA MBA Phone: (850) 643-6925 Guitar Lesson TO GO! I will drive to you ERIK ALFORD Guitar Instructor(850) 524-6057 or (850) 674-5399 All levels of Guitar & BassThe Calhoun/Liberty County Health Departments painted the town red in conjunction with the National Go Red for Women Day on February 1. Heart Disease is the number one killer of women so staff set out to educate our community about the risks, symptoms and means of prevention. If you were out and about in Blountstown or Bristol you were greeted by health department employees waving and giving out many heart health related items including; Go Red for Women bracelets, buttons and magnets at Magnolia Square in Blountstown and at the red light in Bristol. Signs were also posted with heart health facts at these locations. Ladies received either a red carnation with a heart health fact attached to it, or a magnet at the local grocery stores in both communities. Local businesses joined our crusade by dressing in red to show their support of building a healthier commu nity. Additionally, Health Depart ment staff set-up blood pressure check stations at the Calhoun Liberty Credit Union and the Apalachee Restaurant. There were a total of 2000 Go Red but tons, 300 carnations, 1000 bracelets and 800 magnets passed out in Calhoun and Liberty County. We would like to thank the following businesses for go ing red and helping us spread the word about cardiovascular disease in women. Join us for our next event as we continue to promote Heart Disease Awareness with a FREE Go Red for Women Seminar on Feb. 19 at 6 p.m. (ET) at Veter ans Memorial Civic Center in Bristol. We will have a heart healthy meal, speakers, and health stations which will include free bone density tests, along with door prizes and a heart healthy desert contest. Painting the town red to raise awareness about womens heart diseaseThrough With Chew Week highlights tobacco health risksTALLAHASSEE Tobacco products like chew, dip and snuff are not harmless. But because theyre smokeless, youth and adults may underestimate the serious health risks associated with these products. In fact, while cigarette use continues to decline, smoke less tobacco use has remained steady among youth for more than a decade. To help raise awareness about the dangers of smokeless tobacco, the Calhoun County Health Department and the Florida Department of Healths Bureau of Tobacco Free Florida will observe Through With Chew Week from February 17-23. the Through with Chew week to educate their peers about not only the dangers of the smokeless tobacco products but also on how the Tobacco Industry is tar geting them, the youth. HEALTH RISKS Constant exposure to tobacco juices from these smokeless products can cause oral cancers, which can form within can cause cancer of the esophagus, pharynx, larynx, stomach and pan creas. Smokeless tobacco use can increase the risk of oral cancers by 80 percent and the risk of pancre atic and esophageal cancer by 60 percent, according to a 2008 study from the World Health Organization (WHO) International Agency for Research on Cancer. Aside from the increased risk of cancer, using smokeless tobacco can increase the risk of heart attack and stroke. It can lead to other oral problems such as mouth sores, gum recession, tooth decay, and permanent discoloration of teeth. Smokeless tobacco use can also increase the risk of reproductive health problems such as reduced sperm count and abnormal sperm cells for men. Women who use smokeless tobacco may be at an increased risk of preeclampsia (a condition that may include high blood and low birth weight. ADDICTION Like cigarettes, smokeless tobacco products contain nicotine, a highly addictive and dangerous chemical. Smokeless tobacco users and cigarette smokers have comparable levels of nicotine in the blood, according to the National Cancer Institute. Smokeless tobacco is not a safe alternative to smok ing and the rate at which youth continue to use these products is alarming, said State Surgeon General and Secretary of Health Dr. John Armstrong. Many of these young people may be substituting cigarettes with smokeless tobacco in places where they cant smoke, leading to a stronger nicotine addiction that makes it harder for them to quit. Tobacco Free Florida has three ways to help smoke less tobacco users quit. Those who want to quit can double their chances at success by using one of these free and convenient quit services. For more informa SWAT members at Altha, Carr, Blountstown Middle and Blountstown anti-tobacco activities on campus Feb. 17-23

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Page 19 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL FEBRUARY 13, 2013 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL CLASSIFIEDSTo place your ad, call 643-3333 by noon Eastern Time on Monday. Non-business ads run FREE for 2 weeks. APPLIANCES Toaster oven, $8. Call 674-8376. 2-13, 2-20Air conditioner, 5,000 BTU, less than a year old. Two AC units be tween two to three years old, both are 5,000 BTU. Call for more infor mation, serious calls only. Call 8990792. 2-6, 2-13Kirby vaccum with all attachments, $50. Call 447-2284. 2-6, 2-13 CARS 1990 Mercedes 300SEL, runs great, $3,500 OBO. Call 674-5611. 2-6, 2-13BMW Z3 Roadster, blue convert ible, well cared for, low mileage, $13,500. Call (850) 607-0061.2-6, 2-131995 Lincoln Town Car, needs overhaul or new engine. Body and interior in good condition. Many valuable Town Car parts, $1,500 OBO. Call 447-4234. 2-6, 2-13 TRUCKS 1993 Toyota pickup 2.2RE, 4 cyl. 2WD, regular cab, 2 door, needs following body parts: front fender, bond frame, headlight and hood. call Lisa at 643-5205. 2-6, 2-13 MOTORCYCLE & ATVs 2005 Arctic Cat 650 4-wheeler, has spacers and a snorkle on it, $3,300 OBO. Located in Blountstown. Call Clay at 643-6559 or Mandy at 4472735. 2-13, 2-20 VEHICLE ACCESSORIES 18 Chrome wheels 6 lug., will take $75 OBO for the set. Call 4470438. 2-13, 2-20Three mud grip 17 tires, make ofpickup, make offer. 13 tires at $10 each. 1987 F150 tires with center caps, $100. Turf tires, size 18.4x16, will mount on 8N tractor or Fergu son tractor, $150 OBO. Four 17 aluminum wheels with tires mount Call 674-4753. 2-13, 2-20 PETS/SUPPLIES Three full blooded Chihuahua puppies blonde, 10-11 weeks old. $75 each. Call 237-1447. 2-13, 2-20Dogs and cats looking for a good home, free. Call (850) 631-2189.2-13, 2-20Three dogs free to a good home, Blue Heeler, male, 3 years old. Mixed breed large dog with black spots 1 1/2 years old, female. Dachshund, black/tan, female, 5-6 years old. All raised around children. Need more room to run. Call 447-2564. 2-13, 2-20Palamino yearling gelding 1 year old, not ready to ride. 16 ft. closedin horse stock trailer with tack room. Boston Terrier with papers, 16 weeks old. Call 491-7380. 2-13, 2-20Terrier and Beagle mixed puppies, free to a good home. Born Oct. 31, 2012. One male and one female. Call 379-8725. 2-13, 2-20Chihuahua 8 months old, $50. Call 674-1012. 2-6, 2-13Lab mixed dog, male, 2 years old, white with black spots on eye, very gentle, shots up-to-date. White English bulldog mix, male, about 2 years old, very gentle, shots up to date. Both free to a good home. Call 674-8850. 2-6, 2-13 WANTED Looking for a welder for small jobs and someone to break a horse. Also looking for an acre or more of land and a vehicle reasonable, around a 2008 model. Call 674-3264. 2-13, 2-20Looking for a car or truck in good shape, reasonably priced. Call 6431495. 2-13, 2-20Looking for a vehicle, dependable and reasonably priced. Call (850) 631-2189. 2-13, 2-20 ITEMS FOR SALE Blue overnight satchels with shoulder straps, (2 new), large and small, $6 and $4. Antique butter churn crock, it works, $50. Two antique whiskey crock jugs, $25 each. One antique whiskey jug with handle, $25. Antique cookie jar Cow jumped over the moon, $30. Full size ironing board with cover, $20. Beauti ful glassware (crystal glasses, plates, platters and bowls), best offer. Glass cake stand with cover, $20. Many other items for sale. Call 674-8376. 2-13, 2-20Black tuxedo jacket with satin lapel, 41 short. Black pants, size 34, not hemmed. Off white tuxedo jacket, 34 short, all very good quality, $50 for all. Call 348-3554. 2-13, 2-20Protech treadmill, incline and speed options, heart monitor and pulse meter. Older but in great condition. $100 OBO. Ab loung er, new, paid $99, asking $30 OBO. Call 447-0438. 2-13, 2-20Wedding dress, full length, size 18-20, must see to appreciate, $65. Call 237-2644. 2-13, 2-20Exerciser for $10. Cook pot for $20. Call 674-3264. 2-6, 2-13Bathroom lavatory cabinet $25. One bath tub, $25. Call 674-1012. 2-6, 2-13Brand new shallow well 1 hp pump. Call 674-4554. 2-6, 2-13Ladies scrub tops and pants for sale, sizes include medium, large and a few Xlarge. Many colors to choose from, in good condition, $1 each. Call 4473435. 2-6, 2-13Area rug, 8x5, teal and tan, $50. Oak jewelry armoire, 42 high with eight drawers and two side doors, $100. Call 447-2284. 2-6, 2-13Vintage Pictures: Oil, watercolor, prints, old advertisements, framed or ready to frame. Prices vary. For further info, call 6437567 or 674-5257. 2-6, 2-13Two Wooden Artist Easels: Table Top Easel is approx 2 ft tall $10; Standing Floor Easel adjusts from 4 1/2 ft to over 6 ft tall, $18, all reasonable offers considered. Call 643-7567 or 674-5257. 2-6, 2-13 Small Display Case in shape of antique bow front china cabinet w/curved glass door & shelves; dark wood, free standing or hang on wall. 22 1/2 high, 13 wide, 6 rines, tea sets, jewelry, miniature collections, etc. $28. Call Call 643-7567 or 674-5257. 2-6, 2-13 Last Supper Religious Scene beautifully & uniquely ac complished with a raised metal & antique wash technique. Outstanding wooden frame. Perfect for home or church. $45 OBO. Call 643-7567 or 674-5257. 2-6, 2-13Large Match Book collection Bagged match books & match covers from all over the U.S. & world! 1920 to 1990s. Two lg. book Close Cover Before Striking gives history & art of col lecting Match Covers. Come take a look Make an offer. Call 6437567 or 674-5257. 2-6, 2-13All coats 50% off and many other great deals Everyone is invited to shop at the Calhoun-Lib erty Ministry Center store on Hwy. 20 E. in Blountstown. Phone 6741818. UFN FURNITURE Rocker recliner, lime green, very comfortable, $80 OBO. Call 674-8376. 2-13, 2-20Oval coffee table, wood with adirondack legs, $50 OBO. Call 447-0438. 2-13, 2-20Wooden crib/toddler bed with mattress in excellent condition, seat, $60. Call (850) 372-3573 or 643-5665. 2-13, 2-20Good used furniture and appli ances needed at Calhoun-Liberty Ministry Center. Call 674-1818. UFNAn electric stove. A 3 BD mobile home. A shower stall and sink. Call 674-3264. 2-6, 2-13Kayak either a two person or two one person, in good condi tion and reasonably priced. Call 674-7854 or 643-1519. 2-6, 2-13 ELECTRONICS Madcatz II Professional gamers series steering wheel and foot pedals, was used with Xbox, $50 OBO. Call 447-0438. 2-13, 2-20PSP and PS2 games, $5 each or will sell all for a reasonable price. Call 237-2644. 2-13, 2-20 HEAVY EQUIPMENT Garden grading blade with a 3 point hitch, never used. Lawnmower big wheel with mulcher, hardly used. Backyard compos ter, hardly used. Call 762-8941.2-6, 2-13John Deer riding mower, 48 inch cut with pull-behind trailer, $1,250 OBO. Call 447-4620. 2-6, 2-1316LT Snapper yard tractor with fair tires, selling for parts but does run, $50. Call 762-9762. 2-6, 2-13 HUNTING & FISHING 21 ft. Chris Craft ski boat, with trailer, 5.7 liter V8 260 hp motor, three tops, $7,000 OBO or pos sible trade. 16 ft. Astro Glass bass boat with 85 hp motor and trailer, $1,500 or possible trade. Call 237-1791. 2-13, 2-20Guns: 88 Mossberg 12 gauge 2 3/4 & 3 inch shells, black syn thetic stock, 28 VR barrell, $250 Higgins LR, wood stock, nice, Breakdown, 23 barrell, wood stock with scope 3x9x50, 8 point, $250. Rossi 38 special 5-shot revolver, 3 barrell, wood grip, $175. Call 443-2422 in Bristol. 2-13, 2-20Johnson outboard motor 140 hp V4 with all controls, electric start, tilt and trim steering, in good condition, $595. Call 4432422 in Bristol. 2-13, 2-20300 Weatherbee mag with sling, 3x9x50 Bushnell banner scope, $500. Call 447-4620. 2-6, 2-13 HOMES & LAND Small one bedroom house for sale in Hosford, must be moved. This is not a mobile home. $10,000 but will consider a rea sonable offer. Motivated seller. Call 447-3435. 2-6, 2-13 CAMPERS/RVS Camper shell, wheel base pickup. Like new, smoky gray. Price negotiable. Call 674-4554. 2-13, 2-202002 motor home, less than 7,000 miles, 36 ft., two slide outs, hydraulic leveling system, one owner, well maintained. Call (850) 627-6148 for more information. 1-23 to 2-13 LOST & FOUND FOUND: Puppy in Turkey Creek area, a couple of months old, fe male, no collar. Call to identify. Call 643-3411 or 631-2189. 2-13, 2-20 YARD SALE ALTHA Estate sale, Saturday, Feb. 16 from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. Located 4 miles E of Altha on Hwy. 274 at 19782 NE CR 274. Books, ture, linens, etc., sold as is. Items must be taken the day of sale, no holding items. Phone 447-1518. BLOUNTSTOWN Yard sale, Saturday, Feb. 16 beginning at 7 a.m. Located at 17854 NE Charlie Johns Street, Chipola Mannor Apt. H1. Clothes, purses, shoes, furniture and more. Phone 674-3033. For Rent in ALTHA762-9555, 447-0581 or 762-8597 Very NICE *2 & 3 BD trailers.With lawn service 5 x 10 .....$27 10 x 10 ....$43 10 x 20 ....$70 10 x 25 ....$90 M & W SELF STORAGE RRENTALsS Call 762-9555, 447-0871 or 762-8597 7 days a week service UFN BD, 1 1/2 BA Townhouses BRISTOL 643-7740 FOR RENT BLOUNTSTOWN Buy, sell and trade in the JOURNAL Call us at 643-3333. New Home for sale in Altha $115,000 Call 762-81851-23 T 2-13 $280 month (850) 762-3706 FOR RENT Tri-Land Inc. Broker(813) 253-3258 OWNER FINANCINGNO QUALIFYING House, 3 BD, 1 BA Central H/AC MOBILE HOmMES Very nice, 2BD, 2 BA, Landscaped private lots~ NO PETS PLEASE ~House For Rent I B Call 643-6646 $185,000(850) 962-7894House FOR Sale IN SMITH CREEKCALL IN EVENING HOURS REAL ESTATE WANTED: Will buy 10 to 1,000 acres, reasonably priced. Immediate closing. Phone (850) 544-5441 or (850) 570-0222 STARSCOPE Week of Feb. 10 ~ Feb. 16, 2013

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FEBRUAR Y 13, 2013 / THE CALHOUN-LIBER TY JOURNAL Page 20 *All prices plus $299.50 P&H, tax, tag & title. All incentives applied. Incentives good thru April 1, 2013 Pictures for illustration purposes only. Prices good thru Feb. 20, 2013 W.A.C.