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UF00027796 UFPKY NEH LSTA SLAF



The Calhoun-Liberty journal
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00027796/00326
 Material Information
Title: The Calhoun-Liberty journal
Portion of title: Calhoun Liberty journal
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: The Liberty Journal, Inc.
Place of Publication: Bristol Fla
Publication Date: 09-19-2012
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Bristol (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Liberty County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Calhoun County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Liberty -- Bristol
Coordinates: 30.426944 x -84.979167 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in Sept. 1991.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 11, no. 38 (Sept. 18, 1991).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002046630
oclc - 33425067
notis - AKN4565
lccn - sn 95047245
System ID: UF00027796:00340
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly journal (Bristol, Fla.)

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CLJNews.com WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2012 Vol. 32, No. 38JOURNAL THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY 50INCLUDES TAX ROBER T MILLER STANDISH CROLEY THOMAS MCCOUR T KATHR YN MURPHY by T eresa Eubanks, Journal EditorA Hosford man is being held without bond in the Liberty County Jail after he allegedly abducted his estranged wife night, according to a report from the Conley Richard Burke, 26, is charged with kidnapping and false imprisonment, burglary of a dwelling while armed and His cousin, Freddie Burke, 25, was charged with being a principal in the domestic battery, burglary of a dwelling account: with her boyfriend, Lance Durden, at a Durden said Burke jumped him, Burke grabbed Amanda Burke by the hair and dragged her out of the house, forcing her and their child into a truck Durden jumped out the window and said it was likely they were heading to When deputies caught up with Freddie Burke at his home, he said Conley had dropped him off and left with the truck, child were taken back to her residence, Amanda Burke said after Burke threw her in the truck, he hit her in the face started kicking and screaming for help, his cousin grabbed her legs as Burke Hosford men charged with kidnapping woman and ve-year-old FREDDIE BURKE CONLEY BURKE Birthdays, engagement...13 Jim McClellans Outdoors Down South...25 Classieds...26 & 27 Obituaries...23 & 31 Sheriff's Log...2 T wo charged with ATV theft...3 Meth & Mojo lead to disorderly intoxication arrest...3 Local artists work to be showcased at Veterans Civic Center PAGE 9 Bristol Church of God celebrates Pastor Appreciation Day PAGE 8 Calhoun County family named Agricultural Innovators of the Year PAGE 20A win for the BHS Tigers, a loss for LCHSPAGE 16 & 17Archaeology Day held at Panhandle Pioneer SettlementPAGE 21 Three Alco employees, ve others charged with stealing store inventory by T eresa Eubanks, Journal Editor Three of those charged were current employees while one still in their shipping box with the store label were being sold cases, each containing 10 MP3 players, were missing from a he and three other employees had keys to the room, including The man selling the merchandise was identified as Merchandise had been disappearing from the store for two See ALCO THEFTS continued on page 11 See KIDNAPPING continued on page 11

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Page 2 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 19, 2012 ARREST REPORTS compiled by Journal Editor Teresa Eubanks Listings include name followed by charge and agency. The names above represent those charged. We remind our readers that all are presumed innocent until proven guilty.Blountstown Police Dept.Sept. 10 through Sept. 16, 2012 Citations issued: Accidents...............00 ..................15 Special details Business alarms.....04 Residential alarms...........00 ................................................................36September 7 Tari Lawson, failure to appear, CCSO. September 10 Chuck Simmons, grand theft over $300 less than $5,000, CCSO. Charles Barbee, VOP, CCSO. Bradley John Terry, grand theft over $300 less than $1,000, conspiracy grand theft over $300 less than $1,000, BPD. September 11 Gregory Allen Couch, battery (domestic violence), CCSO. September 12 Kathryn Murphy, grand theft, BPD. Robert Miller, grand theft, BPD. Standish Croley, grand theft, BPD. Jeremiah Grzegorczyk, grand theft, BPD. Charles Swearington, grand theft, BPD. Blair Coe, VOP, CCSO. Felicia Bontrager, VOP, CCSO. September 13 Jessica Matlock, disorderly intoxication, CCSO. Thomas Franklin McCourt, 1st degree grand theft over $5,000 less than $10,000, conspiracy to commit grand theft over $5,000 less than $10,000, CCSO. Brandon Carpenter, VOP, grand theft, criminal mischief, CCSO. Gregory Cooper, VOP, CCSO. Jamer Mosley, child abuse, CCSO. September 14 Littleton Bramblett, resist arrest without violence, CCSO. Chuck Simmons, grand theft over $300 less than $1,000, criminal mischief, CCSO. September 15 James Musgrove, aggravated battery with a deadly weapon, non support, CCSO. Crystal Reed, driving with license suspended or revoked habitual, FHP. Annette Nichole Recker, child abuse, neglect, contribute to neglect of a minor, CCSO. Tina Louise Morrow, warrant for Mobile County, AL, CCSO. September 11 Johnny McClendon, VOSP, LCSO. September 12 Acey Abbott, VOSP, LCSO. Katherin Murphy, holding for CCSO, CCSO. Felicia Bontrager, holding for CCSO, CCSO. September 13 Jessie Matlock, holding for CCSO, CCSO. September 14 Brian Williams, VOP, LCSO. James Tipton, battery, VOSP, LCSO. September 16 Freddie O. Burke, kidnapping, false imprisonment, VOSP, LCSO. September 17 Annette Recker, holding for CCSO, CCSO. Tina Morrow, holding for CCSO, CCSO. Man charged with battery for spitting in face of 16-year-oldA Bristol man was charged with battery of a child after he allegedly spit in the face of a 16-year-old who was sitting in a truck parked at a convenience store. James S. Tipton, 20, was arrested Sept. 10. He is being held without bond since he was on probation at the time of his arrest. According to the complaint toward the Exxon Station in Bristol around 6 p.m. on Sept. 9 and approached the passengers side of the truck, where a 16-year-old was sitting. He reportedly stated, I got you little b****, and then spit in the teenagers face. Tipton then walked to the BP Station, got in a vehicle and left. Tipton stated that he approached the teen to have a one-on-one conversation, but when he got to the truck, there was an exchange of words between him, the teen and another person. He said the passengers grandfather came around the truck, called him an SOB and clinched his hand and raised it as though he was about to hit him. Tipton said he left after his uncle, who was waiting at the BP and watching the incident, yelled at him to come back.JAMES TIPTON Altha man charged with battery for punching woman in face when deputies responded to a 911 call at his house was later arrested and charged with domestic battery. being held without bond Jail. According to the arrest report, deputies arrived outside the residence. When he saw them, he ran into the woods near the home. He was detained after a short pursuit. had an abusive relationship and she had had enough. She said no longer wanted to be with him, an argument started and escalated struck the right side of her face A witness said he had been sleeping on the couch when he was awakened by the couples argument The witness then intervened and pulled deputies he couldnt believe the woman said he hit her, explaining that he only pushed her around a few times.GREGORY COUCH A woman who called the report that a man living at the same residence had poked her children with hypodermic needles she said was found around their home was taken into custody on outstanding warrants. Arrested Sept. 15 was Annette Recker, She was taken into custody on charges of child abuse, neglect and contributing to the neglect of a minor. When Recker called 911, she reported that Matt Nichols, 45, had threatened her children and refused to leave when she asked him to. Deputies spoke with Nichols, who denied the accusations and said he had not been asked to leave. He then willingly gathered his belongings and moved out, the report stated.Man who couldnt stay off the phone during Deputies reported that a man refused to stay off his stop was taken into custody on a charge of resisting arrest Thursday. Jody Hoagland was on clocked a pick-up truck going 55 mph in a 45 mph zone at 9:40 p.m. of Altha, had an open container of alcohol in his lap. He also saw an open front of another passenger, James Grissett. Sgt. Jared Nichols and Deputy and his two passengers were asked to exit the truck and while doing so, Bramblett was heard on his phone urging others to come join him at the scene. Bramblett was told to end the call and stand by the passengers door. Instead, Bramblett walked behind Nichols and then away from the truck, still talking on the phone. Again, Bramblett was told to hang up. The three occupants of the truck were moved to the shoulder of the road as a canine was used to conduct a sniff test of the vehicle. While Nichols was explaining what they were about to do with the dog, Bramblett answered his ringing phone and was heard stating that he was being harassed by law enforcement. Nichols told him to hang up the phone again, to which Bramblett replied, I dont have to hang up my phone. The arrest report cited the multiple calls as creating both a distraction and a safety concern as others were being summoned to the area. When he was told once more to end the call, Bramblett refused to do so. Hoagland reached for the phone and Bramblett pulled away from him and tried to shove the phone in his pants pocket. The deputies then took Bramblett to the ground, handcuffed him and put him in a patrol car. He was charged with resisting arrest. Both he and Grissett were issued a citation for having an open container.Woman arrested on warrants after accusing man of child abuse ANNETTE RECKER

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Two men were charged with grand theft and criminal mischief for taking a 2011 Honda ATV from an Altha home early last month. The vehicle was stolen from a residence between the hours of 5:45 a.m. and noon on Aug. 10, according to the owner. Deputies found tire tracks from the four-wheeler along with shoe tracks, indicating that someone had pushed the ATV down Malone Road to Watson Road, where the tracks ended. A witness later contacted the owner after the ATV was found hidden in the woods at Christiansted Road and Hwy. 167 in Marianna. The ignition had been damaged and a compass and a gun rack had been removed from the vehicle. The witness stated that Chuck Simmons, 22, of Marianna and Brandon C. Carpenter, 21, of Altha, showed him where the ATV had been stashed. Both men denied having anything to do with the theft. They said they were helping find the missing vehicle in hopes of getting a reward from the owner for its return. Another witness came forward and stated that Carpenter had told her he and Simmons had taken the ATV and put it in the woods. Simmons later said that he, Carpenter and a third person were involved in the theft. He said he and another man, who has not been charged, walked to the home where the ATV was and took it, pushing it down Malone Road until they met with Carpenter, who was waiting with a truck. Simmons said they took it thinking they would ride it but never went back to the vehicle until a reward was posted. Simmons was given a conditional release following his arrest. Carpenter is being held on $5,000 bond. SEPTEMBER 19, 2012 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 3 ARREST REPORTS compiled by Journal Editor Teresa Eubanks T wo men charged with Altha A TV theft last month CHUCK SIMMONS Woman who admitted smoking meth and mojo charged with disorderly intoxicationA woman whose erratic actions alarmed neighbors was taken away in restraints and given a medical examination before being charged with disorderly intoxication last week. Deputies responding to a call at 6:45 p.m. on Sept. 12 arrived 27, of Clarksville standing outside with a leather whip in her hand. She ignored orders to put the whip down and told me. Deputies then forcibly put her on the ground to physically restrain her. When her whip was taken away, she began screaming in demonic voices, according to the arrest report. As two deputies attempted to take her to a patrol car, she became more upset and began kicking, screaming and yelling obscenities. Deputies then placed her in restraints so they could get her into the car. Hospital, Matlock stated that she had smoked both methamphetamine and synthetic marijuana known as Mojo. After being cleared medically, she was arrested and charged with disorderly intoxication0p-9 and endangering the safety of other persons or property while causing a disturbance. She was later given a JESSIE MATLOCK Man arrested for threatening and hitting woman with a gunA woman upset by a photograph she found on her boyfriends phone was knocked out after she confronted him early Saturday morning. of Altha had been out alligator hunting when he returned to his Musgrove Road residence in Altha and was met by his unhappy girlfriend. When the two began arguing, a friend who was also at the home stepped outside. The girlfriend said the argument escalated and she was pushed against the wall. She said Musgrove went to his bedroom, came out with a shotgun and told her to leave. When she refused, she said he pushed the muzzle of the gun into her stomach. He then turned the gun around and hit her over the head with the butt, causing her to pass out. The altercation left her with a purplish lump on the left side of her head. Her friend, who came back inside when the argument got louder, stated that she saw Musgrove push the gun into his girlfriends stomach. She said he then raised up the gun before hitting the woman on the head. The two women met a deputy at a convenience store at 3:55 a.m. to report the attack. Musgrove was charged with aggravated battery with a deadly weapon. His bond was set at $7,500.JAMES MUSGROVE Owner reports missing motor after being foundThe discovery of a missing boat motor led to the arrest of a Marianna man on a grand theft charge. The owner contacted the Calhoun County Sheriffs because a boat motor she said had been stolen from her home had just been located in the woods nearby and she had information about a suspect. The woman told a deputy that she had been out of town for three days last month. Four days after her return, she realized the motor was missing. She said she had been approached by a man who said he heard Chuck Simmons telling someone he needed to get rid of a stolen boat motor, which he said was behind the owners house in the woods. The witness checked, found the Evinrude motor and called the owner. The owner stated that a relative had also been approached by Simmons, who offered to sell him the motor. No physical evidence of value was found at the scene due to recent rains. Simmons, 22, was given a conditional release following his arrest Sept. 10. A Blountstown man was charged with child abuse Sept. 13 after a youngster he was playing with went home with a burn on his back, according to a report from the Blountstown Police Department. Moseley. The childs father contacted the police department after the youngster returned from a night at his mothers home complaining of back pain. When asked what was wrong, the child showed him an injury on his lower back that appeared to be a small circular burn mark. The little boy a cigarette at me and it went down my shirt and burned me. When asked who replied, Mommys friend. Moseley denied hurting the boy and said an unlit cigar fell out of his mouth and down the boys back. After repeated questioning, Moseley admitted he had thrown a cigar at the boy, but said it was not lit. The boys mother said the child asked Moseley throw it at me, meaning the cigar he was smoking. She said Moseley threw the lit cigar at the boy and it went down his back. The mother said she bathed the youngster and applied burn ointment when he complained about the pain.JAMES MOSELEY 18831 SR 20 W Blountstown Phone (850) 674-5253 ( LAKE )AT The Lake House Restaurant JOIN US FORLunch & Dinner HOURS Thursday thru Saturday 10:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. Sunday 10:30 a.m to 7 p.m. CenturionT ACTICAL SOLUTIONS & CONSULTING LLCConcealed Weapon & Advanced T actical T raining Classes If you knew you would have to fight to protect your life or the life of a loved one...would you be prepared for it? MAURICIO GONZALEZ AND LEE KEITH 18831 SR 20 W, Blountstown (850) 665-2101at THE LAKE HOUSE RESTAURANTTHREE HOURConcealed Weapons Class $70 starts at 10 a.m. (CT)SATURDAY AUG. 29

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The Calhoun-Liberty Journal is published each Wednesday by the Liberty Journal Inc., Summers Road, P.O. Box 536, Bristol, FL 32321. Annual subscriptions are $18. Periodicals postage paid at Bristol, FLPOSTMASTER: Send address corrections to: P.O. Box 536, Bristol, FL 32321. (USPS 012367) Summers RoadLocated at 11493 NW Summers Road in Bristol MAILING ADDRESS: P.O. Box 536, Bristol, FL 32321 TELEPHONE (850) 643-3333 Fax (888) 400-5810 EMAIL: thejournal@fairpoint.net ADS: cljads@fairpoint.net JOURNAL STAFFJohnny Eubanks...................Publisher Teresa Eubanks........................ Editor Sandra Brown...................Bookkeeper Deven Lewis......Production Asssistant Debbie Duggar...................AdvertisingOFFICE HOURS: 9 a.m. 6 p.m. M-FTHE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Visit us on Facebook at CLJNews Page 4 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 19, 2012Thats how many copies of The Calhoun-Liberty Journal were distributed last week, ensuring plenty of coverage for your community announcements and great response for our business advertisers! 5,298 Wednesday, September 19 Monday, September 24 Tuesday, September 25 Sunday, September 23 Saturday, September 22 Thursday September 20 Friday, September 21TODAYS MEETINGS 7 p.m., Altha VFD AA, 6 p.m., Altha Community Center Sit-n-Sew meeting, 6 pm., First United Methodist Church Youth Hall on Clinton St. Bristol Lions Club 7 p.m., Apalachee Restaurant Blountstown Chapter #179 O.E.S., 7 p.m., Dixie Lodge in Blountstown.TODAYS MEETINGS7 p.m., Veterans Civic Center 9 a.m., WT Neal Civic Center Blountstown Lions Club, 6 p.m., Apalachee Rest. 5-8 p.m. (CT), WT Neal Civic Center, Blountstown 7 p.m., Voting house in Rock Bluff 7 p.m., Field HouseTODAYS MEETINGS, noon, Calhoun-Liberty Hospital 7 p.m., Calhoun County Old Ag Bldg. east door, in front of jail 11:30 p.m., First Baptist Church of BristolTODAYS MEETINGSAA, 7 p.m., basement of Calhoun County Courthouse 7 p.m., Fire House 4 p.m., Calhoun Liberty Hospital 6 p.m., Emergency Management Building on Spring St., Bristol 7 p.m., Apalachee RestaurantLCHS Dawgs vs. Franklin Home at 7:30 p.m. (ET) B-town Tigers vs. Port St. Joe Away at 6:30 p.m. (CT) Attend the Church of your choice this Sunday Daffodil workshop Sept. 29 in MariannaThe Jackson County Master Gardeners 2012 Daffodil Workshop and Bulb sale will be held Saturday, September 29 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Workshop leader will be Linda M. Van Beck, President of the Florida Daffodil Society (FDS) and author of Daffodils in Florida, A Field Guide to the Coastal South. A $15 preregistration fee is required by Thursday, September 27 for eligibility for bonus door prizes. The seating is limited. Registration includes snacks and lunch. At the door registration begins at 9:30 a.m. For more information, please call (850) 482-9620.Jelly & Jam making class set October 6A Jelly and Jam Making Class will be held at the Panhandle Pioneer Settlement Saturday, October 6 from 8 a.m. to 11 a.m. (CT) in the Club House. There will be a $20 charge for this class. All items needed for this class will be supplied. Come join us in the art of making jelly and jams. Homemade jams and jellies make appreciated gifts from friends and family who have learned basic skills in the art of canning and food preservation. You will learn step-by-step beginners recipe for a simple, fun process that will work like a charm. Learn how your grandmothers use to make jelly and jam. Share the experience with a loved one and make that lasting memory. There are limited slots available so call or email now to reserve yours. The Panhandle Pioneer Settlement is a living museum documenting rural life in NW Florida since the early 1800s. It is located in Sam Atkins Park, about one mile west of the intersection of Hwy 71 and Hwy 20. Follow HWY 20 West out of Blountstown. Look for signs for Sam Atkins Park. Turn North at Lindys Fried Chicken (Silas Green St.). Follow the signs. For more information, call 674-2777 or email info@panhandlepioneer.org. For more information on the Panhandle Pioneer Settlements historical Buildings, please view www. panhandlepioneer.org.Free hunter safety Internet-completion course in Liberty Co.The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) is offering a free hunter safety Internet-completion course in Liberty County. The course is Saturday, September 22 from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Woodmen of the World Camp, 22459 N.E. Woodmen of the World Road in Hosford. Students must complete the Internet course before coming to class and bring does not have to be notarized. An adult must accompany children under the age of 16 at all times. Students are encouraged to bring a pencil and paper with them to take notes. The hunter safety course is required for people born on or after June 1, 1975, to purchase a Florida hunting license. The ing requirements for all other states and Canadian provinces. People interested in attending this course can register online and obtain information about future hunter safety classes at www. myfwc.com, or by calling hunter safety coordinator George Warthen at the FWCs 265-3676. 8 p.m., Grace United Methodist Church, Hosford BIRTHDAYS Ashley Small & Tera Eden LCHS class of 2002 plans ten year reunionThe LCHS Class of 2002 will be celebrating their 10 year reunion during the Bristol/Blountstown football game on Oct. 9. Saturday, Oct. 20 activities will include dinner on the Lady Anderson. Deadline for payment for the Lady Anderson is Oct. 6. If you would like to attend or have any further questions, please email Leann Nobles Summers at threesummers10@yahoo.com.Volunteer Fire Fighters embark on NicevilleThe seventh Annual Volunteer Fire Fighters weekend was just held in Niceville. Liberty County volunteers were among representation from Bristol Fire Department, Estiffanulga Fire Department and Rock Bluff Fire Department. The weekend consisted of different training classes portunities to learn the new technical ways Trauma First Response, Meth Lab AwareWriting. erty County were treated to a recognition banquet Saturday night where there were special guest speakers and entertainment. The group had a great weekend, learned a lot and now plan to share this with our Liberty County for your continued support Pioneer SettlementBlacksmith CLASS8 a.m. (CT)Donations needed for Terry Sanders surgeryTerry Sanders needs help with expenses associated with getting to and from Jacksonville to the Mayo Clinic for high risk gall bladder surgery. Donation jars have been placed around the community and monetary contributions are now being accepted. For more information about how you can help please call Reverend Kyle Peddie at (850) 379-8412.

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SEPTEMBER 19, 2012 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 5 THE ARTS Contributions to Bill Montford for State Senate are limited to $500 per person or organization and are not deductible as charitable contributions for Federal income tax purposes. Political advertisement paid for and approved by Bill Montford, Democrat, for State Senate, District 3. Chipola College Gala A Grand Night this ThursdayMARIANNAThe new $16 million Chipola College Center for the Arts opens Thursday, Sept. 20 with A Grand Night featuring two-time Emmy Award-winning actress Sally Struthers and Broadway star Tony Yazbeck. The event includes an after party with live music and heavy hors doeuvres. Dress is semi-formal. General admission tickets$50are available at the Chipola Center for the Arts, The Marianna Fitness Center and the Gazebo Caf. Call (850) 718-2220 for credit card orders, or contact sirmonc@ chipola.edu Charles Sirmon, Director of Theatre at Chipola, says, Everyone is going to love Sally. Shes a hoot and a great talent. Struthers will perform her one-woman show which includes tales from her days as Gloria on All in the Family, and also about her real life romance with Elvis Presley. In between, shell sing a couple of numbers, likely Little Girls from her role as Miss Hannigan in Annie and maybe even a John Prine song Hello in There, made popular by Bette Midler. Struthers is also expected to mix with the crowd at the after-party immediately following the show. Tony Yazbeck will sing and tap dance his way across the brand new Chipola stage and into the hearts of the Yazbeck most recently played the role of Billy Flynn in the Broadway production of Chicago. Other Broadway credits include: White Christmas (Phil Davis), Gypsy (Tulsa), A Chorus Line (Al), Never Gonna Dance, Oklahoma and Gypsy with Tyne Daly. Tony has performed at Carnegie Hall and many of the top nightclub and concert venues in New York City. On Television, Tony has been featured on As The World season of the new NBC hit series Smash about the creation of a Broadway musical. For more information about the gala, call (850) 718-2227. Sally Struthers T ony YazbeckPanama City artist Paul Brent coming to Sunday Afternoon with the ArtsPanama City artist Paul Brent will be a guest artist at the eighth annual Sunday Afternoon with the Arts exhibit and reception coming up Nov. 4 from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. at the Chipola Arts Center in Marianna. Bay County in 1969 and his paintings in watercolor and oil have deftly portrayed the many aspects of the area capturing the innate beauty on paper and canvas. Often he is referred to as Americas best know coastal artist and he is best known for his idyllic watercolors of coastal life. In 1982, after some experimentation, he launched a new style that featured a painted wash background with drips and splashes of watercolor that ran off the image area. He would and depth through the chemical reaction of the disbackground, Paul Brent would paint detailed, almost triangles, circles and sometimes three dimensional shapes. His work later become more realistic with less and less splashes and geometries. The white edge of paper remained but instead of a drip edge he moved to a where the irregular edge of an inner image was border. He called this style a Structured Vignette. He began to paint scenic coastal landscapes and seaartists to portray the new town of Seaside Florida when it began to be built. His work of early Seaside became well known as he entered the print publishing business in 1986. In a recent trade publication advertisement Paul Brent used the quote one artist many visions and a retrospective of his professional work would validate the claim. (For more about Paul, go to his website at www.paulbrent.com). There is still time for artists wishing to exhibit their work at Sunday Afternoon with the Arts to get their entry forms in, but they must hurry as the deadline is Oct. 8. Entry forms are available on the Artists Guild samcarnley@gmail.com. Please contact Michele Tabor Kimbrough for more information at mtk4art@ embarqmail.com. Paul Brent

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Are we better off today than four years ago? Like it or not, the answer Wall Street was in free fall seriously crisis never seen before. ties were, and still are, derelict in their Wall Street which prevented banks from getting into the investthat Republicans further loosened restrictions on smart enough to realize that he, the U.S. and all of stopped sucking their political thumb and supported the Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008, was a subset. Americas economically ignorant are still fuming Wall Street. Whether you like Wall Street and big tions on Wall Street to prevent a replay of this event, but Republicans squealed like pigs stuck in a fence. The result is that the U.S. will probably have another The August 2012 jobs report was positive, but the market did not provide hundreds of thousands of jobs the news media. If people would look at the charts, they would recognize that during were lost. Jobs continued to be lost of the Obama administration. Since then, a small number of jobs have been added each month. There is ample historical data on predictable based on the severity of the recession. Recovery from the 2008 collapse of the U.S economy is occurring. The news media and Obama opponomic ignorance at its worst. The collapse of the housing market carved out precipitated the housing crash along with unfunded The only solution to recovery from a recession is an initial stimulus of cash, lots of it in the short term. nomic theory but it works. With the markets primed with government spending, then work on the longterm solution to the problem. Thats the rub. The Republican long-term solution nomic policies? Hey, I have a solution. Republicans and Democrats should stop their partisan thumb sucking and cooperate on scrubbing down the federal budget to the required government spending plus a percentage of revenue for debt reduction. Page 6 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 19, 2012 COMMENTARYCORNERJerry Cox is a retired military OXS Late Night LaughsA RECAP OF RECENT OBSER V ATIONS BY LATE NIGHT TV HOSTS.Are we better off today than four years ago? McDonalds announced theyre going to start announced they will start announcing their death toll. CONAN OBRIEN JAY LENO JIMMY F ALLON CONAN OBRIEN JIMMY F ALLON JAY LENO CRAIG FERGUSON JAY LENO CONAN OBRIEN JAY LENOThe CEO of IKEA announced that he will repieces of a gold watch with instructions on how to put it together. JIMMY F ALLONtaxes. JIMMY KIMMEL

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SEPTEMBER 19, 2012 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 7 COMMENTARY WASHINGTONMERRY-GO-ROUNDby Douglas Cohn and Eleanor Clift Romney and your mortgage interest deductionWASHINGTON There is a strong suspicion among policy analysts and voters alike that Mitt Romneys reluctance to spell out which loopholes he would close in the tax code, stems from the same motivation as his refusal to release more of his tax has concluded its better to take the heat from the media than to Topping the list of likely loopholes that if closed could yield interest paid on home mortgages. Take a look at your mortgage statement the interest paid each month is typically far greater than the amount applied to principle. Tampering with that deduction is like tampering with Social Security, its the economic lifeblood for middle-income Americans. Its another third rail in politics touch it and you die. Romney and running mate Paul Ryan understand the political danger, which is why theyre being coy. They want voters to think theyre only targeting loopholes that the super rich use. But independent analysts say theres not enough money at the very top to make up for the tax cuts Romney proposes while also leaving defense spending untouched. Romney would have to dig deeper into the pockets of the middle class and according to the non-partisan Tax Policy Center, his plan would cost middle class families an average $2,000 more a year in taxes. That would amount to a massive tax increase on the middle class at a time when politicians in both parties say thats the last thing they want. It would also impose a huge burden on the housing industry, a sector of the economy that has been slow to recover from the Great Recession. Even if its just in the talking ery, or in the political team of Romney-Ryan that is behind the ill-conceived measure. In fairness, we should point out that cutting back or even eliminating the home mortgage deduction is part of the Simpsonidea because of the political peril it brings. Other loopholes that Romney and Ryan likely have in mind would also run into a buzz saw of opposition. They include the deduction for health insurance, which employers get when they and executives with high-end health coverage do not pay taxes on the cost of those policies. Curbing the tax deduction for charitable contributions is another time-honored loophole that most people consider part of charitable giving in America and not some loophole or problem that must be eliminated. The Simpson Bowles commission acknowledged the political risk involved with its proposals and offered various paths that politicians could take short of outright striking popular loopholes. Home mortgage interest deductions for example could be limited and exclude second homes and vacation homes. Investment properties or rental properties raise questions as well. Once you start down the path of limiting loopholes, it bespirit and slow new investment if such time-honored write-offs were suddenly withdrawn. Its a great applause line for a politician to promise to close tax loopholes. But woe to the politician who wants to eliminate or pare down popular deductions. The value of a tax loophole is in the eye of the beholder and most voters have no idea how much they take advantage of Uncle Sams largesse through the tax code.

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Page 8 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 19, 2012 Pastor Appreciation Day at Bristol Church of God Pastor Terry Blackburn digs into a gift bag in his favorite colors orange and blue. Although most of the congregation are FSU Seminole fans, they tolerate his support of the Florida Gators. dollar bills falling like raindrops, a gift from the children of the church. The congregation of the Bristol Church of God made sure their pastor Terry Blackburn and his wife, Cathy, know theyre glad to have them around during their annual Pastor Appreciation Day on Sunday, Sept. 9. The couple have served the church for the past 17 years. The two are shown seated above as they hear from David Smith as he speaks on behalf of the church youth group while John Ritter looks on. ASHLEE COPELAND PHOTOS OPEN ARMS ASSEMBLY OF GOD Pastor Bill Mayo invites everyone to come join us at Open Arms Assembly of God in Kinard for revival with Evangelist Jason Steege for the following dates: CRAFT AND BAKE SALE Open Arms Assembly of God of Kinard will Handmade crafts and baked goods will ST MARY MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH The Usher Ministry of Blountstown will be celebrating our Annual Usher Day We are praying for a ST PAUL A.M.E. CHURCH There will be a Gospel Musical Explosion Georgia and Alabama at this great event Notes of Thanks like to thank everyone for the prayers and love shown to them during his illWe would especially like to thank Hospital; Chaplain Ronnie Wright and the nursing staff of Covenant Hospice; the memorial service; Kathy Bridges and Jeanie Rogers for the beautiful singing; the Relief Society sisters from the Church the food provided after the service and the sisters from Blountstown community A big thanks goes to Marlon Peavy he helped us arrange our loved ones Terry Armstrong for being an anchor in May God bless each and everyone Patti Shell, Jeanne Shell Kever, Mickey and Mariah Kever, Alexander James Shell, Stacy and Michelle Brown and children and Carol and Patrick Wilson Departments would like to express a thank you to all the businesses that photographers and a special thank you for all participants that rode in the rain to help make the second Annual Poker We hope that you will continue to Thanks again, Calhoun County Volunteer Fire Departments NEWS FROM THE PEWS

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SEPTEMBER 19, 2012 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 9 The Ninth Annual Art Alive show will open Tuesday, Sept. 25 from 6 p.m. until 8 p.m. It is held at the Veterans Memorial Park Civic Center in Bristol. This year there will be a large and varied assortment of artwork and exhibits, including some childrens artwork. This is a good chance to see how tal ented our friends and neighbors are. Many artists are coming from surrounding counties. A reception will be held on Tuesday and everyone will have a chance to meet the artists. The last day of the Art Show will be Saturday, Oct. 6. There is no charge for admission. For additional informa 643-5491 This show is sponsored by the Liberty County Arts Council and the Board of County Commissioners. Alive...showcases work by local artists for the 9th year in BristolrtsPieces by Polina Vollkova, above; Irvin L. Brunson, center; and Minnie Shuler, below, will be featured. from Darlene V. EarhartThe next Writers Guild meeting will be on Saturday, Sept. 22 at 1 p.m. at the Calhoun County Library. What are you working on lately? Have you started, completed or just considered your submission to the No-Local Writers Guild meeting set Saturday at library in Blountstown vember Saturday Afternoon with the Arts exhibit? Considering that until recently, visual arts have been the only submissions allowed, authors of all levels are being given the opportunity to show their creativity with the English language. Remembering that reading with comprehension takes a bit of time, written submissions can be whatever length, form or medium you prefer short-short, short story, chapter, poem, limerick or whatever you imagine. The exhibit runs from Nov. 4 -16. Entries must be postmarked by Oct. 8. Art must be delivered to Chipola Art Center on Nov. 1 and must be picked up on Nov. 16. If you are in need of help of any kind with your creative endeavors, bring your ideas or works-in-progress to the next Writers Guild meeting on Saturday, Sept. 22. Maybe we can all help one another. Contact me at the Library at 674-5200 on weekday afternoons if you have any questions. THE ARTS

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Page 10 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 19, 2012 Fish FrySept. 22 located at Lake House Rest., Hwy. 20 West, in BlountstownPaid for by James Jimmy Baggett, NPA, for Calhoun Co. Sheriff Come Meet & Greet Candidate James Jimmy Baggett for Calhoun County Sheriff SPECIAL TY POSTS Flat Face FACT OR Y SECONDS ITEMS SUBJECT TO A V AILABILITY Liberty Post & Barn Pole Inc.Phone (850) 643-5995WE'VE GOT THE FENCE POSTS TO MEET YOUR NEEDS. by Ann Hosford Smith, Bristol Lions Club PresidentDarlene Laible-Crowe, her guide dog, Pam and her assistant Byron Hardy, were guests of the Bristol Lions Club at their monthly August meeting at the Apalachee Restaurant. Darlene was born with normal vision and hearing, but over the past 20 years, several diseases robbed her of these two key senses. Most of us are born with touch, taste and smell. Loss of any one of these senses causes a person to drastically change how they experience the world around them. Imagine just trying to cook a meal or use the bathroom with only your senses of touch, taste and smell! Over 10.6 million Americans are both deaf and blind. One of the main causes is Ushers Syndrome, also known as retinitis pigmen tosa. What is it like for a deafblind person? Darlene explained that 10% of all deaf-blind people cannot see or hear anything at all, while 90% have varying degrees of shadowy eyesight or crackling-buzzing noises. It is a feeling of being totally alone. Blind people carry a white cane so they can tap out the ground before them, or they have a guide dog to lead the way. Darlenes guide dog, Pam, is a yellow Labrador Retriever and was trained by the Southeastern Guide Dogs Association. Pam goes with Darlene everywhere. Darlene has become a spokesperson for the Flor ida Deaf-Blind Association (FDBA) and for the new Support Service Provider (SSP) program that trains people to accompany deaf-blind persons and interpret the environment around them so they can remain as indepen dent as possible. Florida has lagged behind other states in deaf-blind services and only recently set up a Task Force The Florida Division of Blind Services is housed under the Department of Educa tion and is in the process of developing a database that will match deaf-blind people with an appropriately trained Service Provider. Many Floridians are unaware of these services. Each year, Bristol Lions Club raises money to support blind and deaf people Liberty County High School Homecom ing Game. When you see a member of the local club, consider helping them in this important cause.FDBS member, accompanied by guide dog, speaks to Lions Club with guest speaker Darlene Laible-Crowe and her guide dog Pam.

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SEPTEMBER 19, 2012 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 11 ACCEPTING NEW PA TIENTSLaban Bontrager, DMD12761 NW Pea Ridge Rd., Bristol, FL 32321TELEPHONE 643-5417 www.bristoldentalclinic.com DENTURE LAB ON PREMISESSame-Day Service on R epairs & R elinesBristol Dental ClinicMonica Bontrager, DMD LOGGERS! Dont get stopped in your tracks. Call us!Premium namebrand tires CORLETTS ROOFING LLC FREE ESTIM A TESMichael Corlett (850) 643-7062 18831 State Road 20 West H 2 O Wellness Center CELEBRATING OURJoin us for a celebrationMonday, October 1FROM 4 TO 7 P.M. (CT) Tell em you saw it in the Journal They were targeting large dollar items that could be sold easily, said Phillips. Tuesday he said nothing has been recovered and the companys Loss Prevention Department is just beginning to sort through hours of security video and examining receipts. In addition to stealing inventory from the store, numerous fraudulent returns were made sometimes using the same item over and over, according to the BPD report. Were still trying to tell which are the legitimate returns, Phillips said. How did they do it? One of those arrested knew exactly where the security cameras were and how to conceal stuff out of range, said Phillips. When BPD Lt. Timothy Partridge contacted the acting store manager, they began going through the returns that the former manager, Charles Allen Swearington, had signed off on. that had been returned numerous times by Swearingtons brother-inlaw, Robert Lee Miller, who was arrested, and another relative who was not charged. Swearington admitted to Partridge that he would give Miller items around the camera. He said he and Kathryn Murphy, Jeremiah Grzegorczyk and Bradley Terry were at the cash registers when Miller would come through. A woman told the police department she drove Austin Lee Scott to the store after he got a call from Terry that plastic totes were on sale for $6.99. Scott is shown on store video checking out at the cash register, holding a big plastic tote and wearing a hat he had just picked up. Partridge said the price tag was shown dangling from the hat in the store video. Scott paid only for the tote. She said that Scott and some of the others joked about how this box must weigh 50 pounds because it was packed with merchandise they snuck out of the store. Troubled by what she saw, she went to see Phillips the next day and told him about the theft. She also reported hearing Scott and Terry cameras they had previously stolen from Alco. Grzegorczyk admitted to Partridge that he served as a lookout numerous times so Swearington could remove items unnoticed and Miller could take them out the back door of the store. Because his truck was used to transport some of the stolen goods, the police department seized Millers vehicle. Phillips, who has been with Alco for about three years and previously worked as a manager with Wal-Mart for 15 years in Missouri and Kansas, has dealt with employee theft before. Still, he said what happened at the Blountstown store, really surprised me. Co-workers at the store were shocked to learn of the thefts, he said. Well just assess the damage and continue forward. He said the jobs vacated by those back to full staff, he said. The Blountstown store receives about 400 job applications a month, he said, but since news of the arrests has become known, We got 250 applications in the last week. went home, her husband drove to the Sunshine State Cypress Mill. There, she said, he struck her several mores times and threatened to kill her. Soon after he got back on the road, a deputy caught up with the truck but Burke managed to elude arrest at that time. to give a statement. He said he had been told that his wife and Durden were cooking methamphetamine at the residence they shared on SR 65 and was worried about his daughter being there. He and his cousin went to the house, parking at a nearby residence. Burke approached the home on foot. He said he entered through a window and grabbed his daughter. He said Durden then came at him and they wifes wrist and took her to his cousins truck, placing his daughter in the back seat and putting Amanda in the front seat between him and Freddie. When he was asked to explain the injuries to his wifes face, Burke said it must have happened when she was getting into the truck. He said after he dropped off his cousin, he and Amanda just talked. He did admit Burke, who is on state probation, was taken into custody on charges relating to Saturdays event as well as other outstanding warrants. His cousin also violated his probation and is being held without bond. Reward offered for info on vandalismVandals have struck at Liberty Countys newest business and owner Herbert Pitts is offering a reward for information on the person who knocked out the windows Pitts arrived at Cazs Bait & Tackle at 8 a.m. Tuesday in the front door. He said he hadnt noticed anything suspicious the previous day or evening. The shop opened Aug. 1 at the old Slip and Slide location on CR 333. Anyone with information about the incident can contact Pitts at 643-2248. Several windows were shattered at Cazs Bait and Tackle Monday night in Liberty County.In order to improve our services the CalhounLiberty Journal has a new nationwide, toll-free FAX NUMBER : (888) 400-5810 same at (850) 643-3333. If you should have ALCO THEFTS continued from the front pageKIDNAPPING continued from the front page

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Page 12 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 19, 2012BRISTOL The Veterans Memo rial Railroad (VMR) committee is currently in the process of planning for its annual Halloween Event. This years theme will be Creature from the Black Lagoon. We are very excited and hope to provide a frightfully fun experience for everyone this year. Train rides are scheduled to leave the depot for the spooky swamps of Veterans Memorial Park on Friday, Oct. 26, Saturday, Oct. 27 and Wednesday, Oct. 31. The VMR committee has planned for a lot of new and exciting props and scenes this Halloween. The Halloween and Christmas events are extremely critical to the survival of Veterans Memorial Railroad. These two events are the primary fundraisers for the railroad and all proceeds go to paying the liability insurance and to keeping the railroad running safely and on schedule. We are reaching out to any individual, organization or business that would be willing support this worthy cause by volunteering a little of their time or resources. We need help with light carpentry, painting, designing and decorating from volunteers and imagineers. Were also looking for some spirited people who would enjoy dressing up and having a little fun spooking the riders. Veterans Memorial Railroad and Park is a wonderful resource to this community and the surrounding area. Please volunteer a little time of your time and come out and join us in supporting Liberty Countys Little Railroad! If your organization that would interested in providing concessions for this event, or if you would like more information, please contact David Deck at (850) 643-5016 or Melissa Durham at (850)-6438388. Volunteers sought to help with Halloween train ride at Veterans Memorial RRRelay for Life to kick off Oct. 11 in BlountstownBLOUNTSTOWN Please join us this year in the American Cancer Societys Our kick off is going to be at the United Methodist Church of Blountstown Thursday, October 11 at 7 p.m. (ET). Come join us for fun and food and to learn how you can join the 2013 Calhoun/Liberty Relay celebrate survivors, remember those who have lost the battle For more information, please call Dana Burns at (850) 556-5414 or Sammy Singletary at (850) 643-7815. Pony rides, bounce house & much more2nd annual arts and crafts sale in Bristol Oct. 6Liberty County 4-H would like to invite everyone out October 6, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. (ET) to their second Annual Arts and Crafts Sale at Veterans Memorial Civic Center. We have tables selling fall decorations, needlecrafts, stained glass, handbags and much more, with vendors coming from Tallahassee to Panama City. Also included will be baked goods, chili and beverages. Face painting, pony rides, bounce house are just a few things that children will enjoy. Plus, you can enjoy the art show and train rides with the Liberty County Arts Council and Veterans Memorial Railroad. If you are a vendor and would like to join us, please give us a call at 643-2229 for an application. Come on out with the family and enjoy Wiregrass Antique and Collector Car Show Oct. 6DOTHAN The annual Wiregrass Antique and Collector Car Show, hosted by the Wiregrass Antique and Collector Car Club, will be held at Landmark Park October 6 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. More than 150 collector cars, trucks and motorcycles will be on display for one of the areas biggest car shows. AModels, muscle cars, mini-trucks, street rods and more will comprise the classes that will be on display. The featured car this year will be Orphaned Cars, or cars that are no longer in production. and third places in each class, plus club with the most participation, longest distance driven and oldest vehicle registered. Registration is from 8 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. on the day of the event. No early registration will be accepted. Admission is $5 for adults, $3 for kids and free for park members. For rules and entry forms, visit www.landmarkpark.com. The Car Show is sponsored by WDHN TV and The Joy FM 94.3. The winner of Landmark Parks annual drawing for $500 will also be announced at the Car Show. By now, all members should have received 12 drawing tickets in the mail. Complete the ticket stubs with your name and address and mail the stubs, along with your check for $2 per ticket, in the return envelope. If you would like to purchase additional tickets, please call the park at (334) 794-3452. Thanks to all who have already purchased tickets. Landmark Park is a 135-acre historical and natural science park located on U.S. Highway 431 North in Dothan, AL. For more information, contact the park at (334) 794-3452. Care with Flare 5K scheduled in Marianna Saturday, Nov. 3MARIANNA The City of Marianna Fire Department and Covenant Hospice will hold the Care with Flare 5K Run/Walk Saturday, November 3. We are excited to announce the addition of a Post-Race Celebration and Family Fun Day Formerly known as the Ladder Scatter 5K, the 2011 event boasted almost 150 runners and walkers. We are very excited to announce the additional activities to this years event, said Angela Jackson, Development Specialist for Covenant Hospice. Entries made by October 8 will be $20, receive a race packet and T-shirt. After October 8, the cost will increase to $25 and T-shirt and Registration will start at 7:30 a.m. the day of the event and the race will begin at 9 a.m. The student entry fee will be $10. There will also be a free kids one mile fun run for children under the age of 14. Captain George Gay and the Marianna Fire Department will be serving their famous barbecue lunch plates for $5. And you can carnival games and exhibits for $5 per person until 2 p.m. Awards will be given in the following categories: Overall Male; Overall Female; all age groups, top three male and top three female, age groups: 14 years old and under, 15-19 years old, 20-24 years old, 25-29 years old, 30-34 years old, 35-39 years old, 40-44 years old, 45-49 years old, 50-54 years old, 55-59 years old, 60 years old and up wheeled division. Register online at www.event www.active.com. For more info, call (850) 482-8520 or (850) 209-8008.Covenant Hospice to offer free grief camp for childrenMARIANNA The Childrens Support Services Department of Covenant Hospice is sponsoring a one-day grief support camp. Camp Monarch will be held from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 13 at Seacrest Wolf Preserve located at 3449 Bonnett Pond Road. This is a unique through 15 that have recently experienced the loss of a loved one or have a loved one with a terminal illness. The camp will feature activities and games tailored for a variety of age groups, including crafts, Native American music, storytelling, close encounters with the beautiful Seacrest Wolves and much more. The camp is free to all participants and will include breakfast, lunch and snacks. The deadline for registration is Oct. 1. To register or for more informa tion, please call Riley Henderson at 482-8520. organization dedicated to providing comprehensive, compassionate services to patients and loved ones during times of life-limiting illnesses. The focus of Covenant Hospice is to enable its patients to live as fully and comfortably as posto assist patients loved ones in coping with end-of-life issues and the eventual death of the patient, and to improve care for all patients at the end of their lives by example and education.

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SEPTEMBER 19, 2012 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 13 Willis, Stephens to exchange vows Oct. 20 at Four Oaks FarmhouseMr. and Mrs. Har rell Willis of Iron City, GA announce the engagement and upcoming marriage of their daughter, Gail to Jason Edward Stephens, son of Becca and the late Wayne Stephens, all of Marianna. The bride-elect is the granddaughter of the late Edgar and Beulah Willis and the late Merle Richardson, all of Donalsonville, GA and the late Collie Kirkland of Tallahassee. She is a 1994 graduate of Seminole County High School and a 2002 graduate of Bainbridge College. She is now employed with the GA Department of Corrections as an Accountant Parapro. The future groom is the grandson of Mr. and Mrs. Lester Williams of Marianna and Barbara Cox of Clarksville and the late Ed Stephens of Blountstown. Upon graduating Altha High School in 1999, he enlisted in the Marines, serving eight with WG Yates Construction. The wedding is set for October 20 at 4 p.m. (ET) at Four Oaks Farmhouse at Tom and Brandi Trawick Rd. No local invitations will be sent. All family and friends are invited to attend. birthdaysROSALINA MARIA BARBERRosalina Maria Barber celebrated her fourth birthday August 27. She is the daughter of Miguelina and the late Zac Barber of Tallahassee. Her grand parents are Kathy Shepard, Rene and Mary Solano, all of Tallahassee, and Jackie Barber of Rock Bluff. She celebrated with a Hello Kitty theme party at her house. She enjoys dancing, dressing up, reading books, spending time with grandparents, aunts and uncles and learning things not to do with her cousins. She loves learning about her daddy, hearing all the funny stories about when he was little like her and looking at his pictures. CHAMIYA DENAYSHA WILLIAMSChamiya Denaysha Williams will celebrate her daughter of Dallas and Chivas Williams of Bristol. Her grandparents are Dallas and Patricia Hogans and Jackie Williams, all of Bristol, and Jerome Oliver of Greensboro. Her great-grandparents are Nancy Bacon, Geraldine and the late Charlie Williams and the late Dallas Hogans, all of Bristol, Charles Wright of New York and Bernice Glover of Blountstown. Her siblings are Javis Davis and Aaliyah, Chivas, Jr. and Chivar Williams. She enjoys going to Pre-K, attending the 21st Century After School Program, going shopping with her mommy, helping out with her little brothers, C.J. and Var, and staying in P.C. to swim in the pool. She will be celebrating with a two day trip to Panama City. LILLIAN LILY JANE BAGGETTEverett and Danielle Baggett of Marianna are proud to announce the birth of their daughter, Lillian Lily Jane Baggett, born Tuesday, September 4, 2012. She weighed 9 lbs., 1 oz. and measured 21 inches long. Maternal grandparents are Dussia and Jennifer Shuler of Bristol and Michelle Furr of Hosford. Paternal grandparents are Ferlon and Robbin Baggett of Clarksville and Scott and Stacy Davis of Compass Lake. She was welcomed home by her big brother, Brody Baggett and a host of family and friends. birth wedding Ralph and Olivia Whitfield celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary Saturday, Sept. 8 at the Veterans Memorial Civic Center. They had a wonderful time with family and many friends who attended. celebrate 50th anniversary anniversary ITS VERY WISE TO ADVERTISE in the Calhoun-Liberty JOURNAL and CLJN ews.COM Call us at (850) 643-3333Email: thejournal@fairpoint.net

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Page 14 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 19, 2012 CASH BALANCE BROUGHT FOR WARD ESTIMA TED REVENUES: Taxes Millage Per $1000 Ad Valorem Taxes 3.46 Mills 695,598 695,598 Ad Valorem Taxes 6.54 Mills 1,329,597 1,329,597 Sales & Use Taxes 237,964 237,964 Charges for Services 23,798 704,355 141,400 869,553 Intergovernmental Revenue 2,500,070 4,092,863 975,382 588,490 8,156,805 Licenses & Permits 13,828 13,828 Fines & Forfeitures 54,992 5,951 52,500 113,443 Interest Earned/Other 16,545 34,232 50,777 TOT AL REVENUES 3,542,795 6,166,998 1,116,782 588,490 52,500 11,467,565 OTHER FINANCING SOURCES Other Financing Sources Operating Transfers In 73,855 1,104,945 1,178,800Transfers from Board of County Commissioners 2,223,263 2,223,26311,000 11,000 TOT AL OTHER FINANCING SOURCES 84,855 1,104,945 2,223,263 3,413,063 TOT AL ESTIMA TED REVENUE & FINANCING SOURCES 3,627,650 7,271,943 3,340,045 588,490 52,500 14,880,628 EXPENDITURES General Governmental 1,062,916 1,489,457 41,000 2,593,373 Public Safety 249,956 1,320,152 1,850,588 11,500 3,432,196 Physical Environment 85,214 1,493,284 1,578,498 Transportation 2,665,468 2,665,468 Debt Services Human Services 203,513 203,513 Economic Environment 12,819 12,819 Culture and Recreation 595,414 25,637 621,051 Contingency 34,780 34,780 TOT AL EXPENDITURES 2,244,612 5,504,540 3,340,045 52,500 11,141,697 OTHER FINANCING USES Operating Transfers Out 493,607 431,855 588,490 1,513,952 Reserves 1,716 1,716 TOT AL OTHER FINANCING USES 1,383,038 1,767,403 588,490 3,738,931 TOT AL APPROPRIA TED EXPENDITURES AND RESER VES 3,627,650 7,271,943 3,340,045 588,490 52,500 14,880,628T otalCOUNTY OF LIBERTY FISCAL YEAR 2011-2012 Constitutional Capital Fund Revenue Fund Fund Debt Expendable THE TENT A TIVE, ADOPTED, AND/OR FINAL BUDGETS ARE ON FILE IN THE OFFICE OF THE ABOVE-MENTIONED T AXING AUTHORITY AS A PUBLIC RECORD. BUDGET SUMMARY S U P P L E M E N T A L NOTICE OF SUPPLEMENT AL BUDGET HEARING FOR THE YEAR 2011-2012 FOR THE LIBERTY COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS Robert Hill, Clerk of Court Clerk to the Board of County Commissioners

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SEPTEMBER 19, 2012 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 15 CASH BALANCE BROUGHT FOR WARD 52,439 52,439 ESTIMA TED REVENUES: Taxes Millage Per $1000 Ad Valorem Taxes 3.11 Mills 607,249 607,249 Ad Valorem Taxes 6.89 Mills 1,345,318 1,345,318 Sales & Use Taxes 152,325 152,325 Charges for Services 17,797 565,246 313,668 896,711 Intergovernmental Revenue 2,243,479 2,231,008 146,111 565,002 5,185,600 Licenses & Permits 17,780 17,780 Fines & Forfeitures 10,959 8,708 15,933 35,600 Interest Earned/Other 35,063 17,477 52,540 TOT AL REVENUES 3,084,652 4,167,757 459,779 565,002 15,933 8,293,123 OTHER FINANCING SOURCES Other Financing Sources Operating Transfers In 88,855 1,084,688 1,173,543Transfers from Board of County Commissioners 2,263,085 2,263,085TOT AL OTHER FINANCING SOURCES 88,855 1,084,688 2,263,085 3,436,628 TOT AL ESTIMA TED REVENUE & FINANCING SOURCES 3,225,946 5,252,445 2,722,864 565,002 15,933 11,782,190 EXPENDITURES General Governmental 857,635 1,198,018 13,551 2,069,204 Public Safety 216,487 501,478 1,524,846 2,382 2,245,193 Physical Environment 74,137 1,136,636 1,210,773 Transportation 1,982,867 1,982,867 Debt Services Human Services 169,433 169,433 Economic Environment 10,627 10,627 Culture and Recreation 493,542 493,542 Contingency TOT AL EXPENDITURES 1,821,860 3,620,981 2,722,864 15,933 8,181,638 OTHER FINANCING USES Operating Transfers Out 494,199 1,631,464 565,002 2,690,665 Reserves TOT AL OTHER FINANCING USES 1,404,086 1,631,464 565,002 3,600,552 TOT AL APPROPRIA TED EXPENDITURES AND RESER VES 3,225,946 5,252,445 2,722,864 565,002 15,933 11,782,190T otal COUNTY OF LIBERTY FISCAL YEAR 2012-2013 Constitutional Capital Fund Revenue Fund Fund Debt Expendable THE TENT A TIVE, ADOPTED, AND/OR FINAL BUDGETS ARE ON FILE IN THE OFFICE OF THE ABOVE MENTIONED T AXING AUTHORITY AS A PUBLIC RECORD. BUDGET SUMMARY NOTICE OF BUDGET HEARINGThe Liberty County Board of County Commissioners has A public hearing to make a FINAL DECISION on the budget AND T AXES will be held on .Robert Hill, Clerk of Court Clerk to the Board of County Commissioners

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Page 16 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 19, 2012 SPORTSby Michael DeVuyst, CONTRIBUTING WRITERFREEPORT The Blountstown Tigers raced out to a 23-0 lead and coasted to a 15 point victory against the Freeport Bulldogs last Friday night. Blountstown scored early and often, starting on drew Bennett. 80 yards out when Josh Taylor scored on a 20-yard put the Tigers with 2:38 left in the ter. pushed the score to 23-0. trailed 23-7 at the half. pushed the lead to 15 points 30-15 Freeport cut the lead again on found ee yards 22 with 10-play drive. Blountstown pulled ahead for good 37PHIL COALE PHOT OS Blountstown cruises to victory over Freeport 37-22

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SEPTEMBER 19, 2012 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 17 SPORTSby Richard Williams, Journal sports writerClass 4A Marianna proved to be too much for visiting Class 1A Liberty County as the home team took a 26-7 non-district win. Liberty dropped to 1-2 with the loss and Marianna moved to 3-0. but after being ruled just short of the end zone on second Marianna followed with a short gain and then a quick sideline warning followed by a second sideline warning moved the home team 15 yards from the shadow of their end zone. and after Liberty stopped an 11 minute second quarter drive by Marianna it looked like the game would remain tied at erty fumbled the ball away. Marianna capitalized on the LCHS mistake with a 51-yard touchdown pass with 40.8 seconds left in the half. Marianna led at the half 7-0. The home team scored twice more in the second half before Liberty answered in the fourth quarter on a short run by Dusty Young. Marianna responded with anothnight. LCHS Head Coach Grant Grantham gave added he felt his team simply missed too many assignments and auto Grantham said. The Bulldogs host Franklin in a district contest next. also said he felt Franklin probably had the best athlete the team will face all year in Dwayne Griggs. Grantham said Griggs has the potential to score every time he touches the football. The Liberty County and Franklin game will be played in Bristol September 21 and starts at 7:30 p.m. Liberty falls to Marianna 26-7 Liberty Bulldogs move in on a Marianna player running the ball. LEFT: Libertys Chance Peterson (#1) and a teammate move in on the Marianna Bulldog running the ball. ABOVE: Libertys Dustin Watson (#6) runs the ball. RIGHT: Libertys Jordan Chaney (#11) tries to dodge a Marianna player. ABOVE: Libertys Harold Armstrong (#34) and a teammate tackle a Marianna player with the ball. ABOVE: Libertys Alex Marlowe (#5) tries to quick step past a Marianna player. RIGHT: Libertys offense gets ready for the snap at Fridays game.DANIEL WILLIAMS PHOT OS

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Page 18 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 19, 2012 In 2006, the Florida Legislature created a Business Community (ABC) School Program to promote partnerships in education and to address shortage of space in overcrowded school systems. An ABC school is a public school that offers instruction to students in kindergarten through third grade levels or any single or multiple grade levels within this range at facilities provided by a local business. agreeing to provide the appropriate types of space on their site for such a school, including the associated operating and upkeep expenses. Liberty County School District will provide an educational program, including the appropriate instructional supports, administration and staff, teachers, textbooks, materials, supplies, and curriculum for the school. First priority for admission of students to an ABC school will be given to the children of the owners and employees of the business. If additional capacity remains after children of the owners and employ ees are admitted, the host business may designate other neighboring businesses whose owners or employees may also participate in order to generate a reasonable number of students for the school. To be considered, the ABC school must comply with the constitutional class size requirements and have enough students in attendance to support the educational program. Parents of the enrolled students would be responsible for providing transportation to and from the school for their children. Within an ABC school, parents have the oppor tunity to spend more time with their children during the commute together to school each day and some parents may choose to serve as volunteers in the classroom based on its proximity to their work area. If you know of a business interested in submitting about this program, please contact Gay Lewis, District ABC Program Liaison, at 643-2275 ext. 233.Businesses can provide facilities for ABC Schools NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours or responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment.Cataracts?Freedom from Eye Glasses, Now a reality for many.Lee Mullis M.D. and Cataract SpecialistSmart Lenses SMDr. Mulliss Smart LensSM procedure can produce clear vision without eyeglasses.Close-up, Far away & In-between CALL TODAY for a Smart Lens Evaluation Mullis Eye Institute 1600 Jenks Ave., Panama City(850)763-6666 The Florida Gators play Kentucky in the Swamp, this Saturday, 9-22-12. Air time on K-102.7 and Y-1000 is at 10:51 a.m. (CT).RADIO FOOTBALL ON WYBT AND WPHKListen to football on WYBT and WPHK. This week.. BES treats grandparents with goodies Sept. 14BES hosted the annual Goodies for Grandparents breakfast on Friday, September 14. grade students were invited to come eat goodies for breakfast with their grandchildren. Samantha Taylor and the BHS Culinary Arts class prepared and served a fabulous cupcakes, fruit, strawberry shortcake, cookies, sausage balls and other wonderful goodies! Thanks to Samantha Taylor and her students for a truly spectacular breakfast and to all of the Grandparents who joined us for this event!Blountstown Elementary collecting box tops for educationBES is collecting Box Tops for Education. Look for products with the Box Top coupon on it, clip out the Box Top from these packages and send the Box Tops to school with your child. BES gets 10 cents for every Box Top collected. It really adds up very quickly. We appreciated your support and willingness to help make BES the BEST.DATES TO REMEMBER*Monday, Oct. 1 Individual Picture Retakes. *Friday, Oct. 5 Family Breakfast. *Friday, Oct. 12 Donuts for dads for Principal Ladona Kelley proudly announces Altha Schools Kids of Character for the month of August, demonstrating the character trait of Attentiveness. Brooks, Chelsie Lynn Showalter and David Jemison. planned September 27by Brianna YonThis year the Altha school culinary classes have been researching menus of popular restaurants that can be featured in Cats Cuisine. The upcoming meals will consist of an entre and dessert off the menu of a well known restaurant. The Longhorn Steakhouse. The menu will consist of a wheat roll, Caesar salad, Parmesan crusted chicken, a loaded baked potato and key Reservations can be made by calling the school. Please The Altha School Senior Class will be selling Coupon Books with great deals! coupons for several restaurants from the Bay area or from the Dothan area. The coupons will not expire unand they have been a great success. Remember, the sooner you buy the sooner youll start to save! btown elementary school altha wildcatsAugust Kids of CharacterAltha Senior class selling coupon books for $20 Calendar of Events

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MARIANNAAs school begins, Chipola College Teacher Education graduates are also going back to school, but this time they are in the K schools throughout the been a reality for the graduates of Chipolas School of Education, Science Education and Mathematics Education programs who sought positions were hired by the begin trend that has been consistent since Chipola graduated its Education and Exceptional Student Education, followed In addition to high placement rates, Chipola Teacher many new teachers do not return to the classroom after ates returned were rehired by their principals and returned The teachers coming from Chipolas education program Chipola offers the Bachelor of Science Degree, the Associate in Arts Degree, the Associate in Science De School Math or Science, English Education, Exceptional SEPTEMBER 19, 2012 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 19 SCHOOL LUNCHMENUSeptember 19-25 Laban Bontrager, DMD, Monica Bontrager, DMD Bristol Dental Clinic* Each breakfast includes a choice of assorted cereal, whole wheat buttered toast and juice. CALHOUN LIBERTY Pea Ridge Rd in Bristol, Phone (850) 643-5417 MENUS SPONSORED BY:Altha FFA members celebrate successes of Calhoun County Farm Bureau September 15 spent their Thursday night celebrating the successes of plates and passed out door Raymond Russell and the members of the Calhoun Wednesday, September 19 Thursday, September 20 JV Friday, September 21 Varsity Saturday, September 22 District Monday, September 2 Tuesday, September 25 Vol Blountstown High Calendar of EventsChipola education graduates teaching in area schoolsTenisha Henderson, Character Education teacher at Golson Elementary School, reads to students Christina Pendleton and Camden Bruner. Henderson is one of the many Chipola education graduates working in area schools this Fall. All 2012 graduates from Chipolas Elementary Education, Science Education and Mathematics Education programs who sought positions within area school systems were hired. Chipola Cosmetology open for business to publicMARIANNAThe Chipola College Cosmetology program salon is now nominal fees including: shampoo, blow dry styles, haircuts, color, highlights, waxing, manicures, pedicures, relaxers, currently on Wednesday and Thursday The cosmetology program has a new home and a new online learning to access information at any time and from anywhere as they pursue their studies and prepare to take state board ronment, Cosmetology students also also includes a facial room, a manicure/ gram which takes approximately one based program is designed to prepare accepted into the program in January

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Page 20 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 19, 2012by Judy Ludlow, Calhoun County Extension ServiceThirteen innovative farmers and ranchers were recognized by University of Florida IFAS Extension and Farm Credit of northwest Florida Aug. 17 at the Jay Community Center in Santa Rosa County. This is the second year these two organizations have teamed up to honor a selection of the top innovative farmers in the Florida Panhandle. The purpose of the Agriculture Innovator Recognition Program is to annually recognize innovative farmers and ranchers from 16 Florida Panhandle counties. UF/IFAS County Agriculture Extension Agents recognize one honoree from each county. Bringing these top-notch farmers together for the event furthers new inno vations and collaboration. Highlighting these creative and successful farmers and ranchers helps increase aware ness of the diversity and innovation of todays modern agriculture. It is our goal, also, that the general public gains a deeper appreciation for the business of agriculture in their community. From the distinguished group of 13 farmers, an Innovator of the Year was selected to represent northwest Florida. This year Larry Ford, of Malone, who represented Jackson County, was selected as the Farm Credit of Northwest Florida Agriculture Innovator of the Year. Ford is well known as an excellent cotton, peanut, corn and cattle farmer. testing of conservation strip tillage and is still working is also a collaborator with the University of Floridas 10 year, sod-based crop rotation research project, that utilizes bahia grass in rotation with peanuts and cotton to reduce nematodes, diseases and other pests and increase crop yields. He has worked extensively with faculty of the UF/IFAS North Florida Research and Education Center and UF/IFAS Jackson County Extension Agents to develop innovative, practical solutions to farming challenges. Rodger and Marcia of Harmony Farm were recognized as the Calhoun County Agriculture Innovator of the Year by Calhoun County Extension. Throughout their 52-year marriage, Rodger and Marcia have had diverse and interesting agricultural ventures. From each experience they learned different farming skills and into each endeavor they integrated their own innovations. In Calhoun County, between 1993 and 2006, the Prices grew a muscadine vineyard (using seven varimiles total length) a fruit orchard (pear, plum, nectar ine, peach, persimmon and apple) and Vertigro System strawberries. Currently, they grow 24 acres of perennial peanuts. Many of their innovations include building For example, some of these improvised tools included a boom-mounted hedge trimmer to prune the vineyard at ground level, a custom tractor-mounted rake to groom the vineyard rows, a blower/mister directed-spray pesticide applicator, a custom grape sorting/packing device, the use of Vertigro components to grow strawberries and a computer controlled, 12-zone, automated irrigation system. All were designed and built by Rodger and Marcia and each piece of grow their crops, manage pests and disease and make harvesting, storing and marketing cost-effective. Their produce was marketed via wholesale, u-pick and local farmer markets. Currently the 24 acres of perennial peanuts are meticulously managed by Rodger and Marcia and baled for hay by a neighboring farmer. In 2003 the Prices were honored as Calhoun County Extensions Outstanding Farm Family and they continue to eagerly promote awareness and appreciation of agriculture via their many hours of community service. When their vineyard was operational, they coordinated, taught and participated in educational workshops with both Calhoun County Extension and Florida A & M Universitys Center for Viticulture. Currently they volunteer with UF/IFAS Extension, USDA Farm Service Agency and the Natural Resources Conservation Service, as Master Gardeners, High School Envirothon Team Competition leaders and committee members. Calhoun County citizens and surrounding producers have gained knowledge about the diversity of agriculture by seeing the various crops grown by the Price Family over the years. Calhoun Countys Price family honored as Agriculture INNOV A TORS OF THE YEAR aMany of the Prices innovations include building needed tools by customizing equipment they already had. They created the following: trimmer to prune the vineyard at ground level rake to groom the vineyard rows spray pesticide applicator packing device nents to grow strawberries 12-zone, automated irrigation system. Tortoise Management Plan, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) approved a revised plan intended to guide continued recovery of the gopher tortoise through 2022. The plan includes conservation of both the gopher tortoise and species inhabiting its burrows, including the indigo snake, Florida pine snake, gopher frog and Florida mouse. We must consider the whole gopher tortoise community. Gopher tortoise burrows are extensive, typically six feet deep and 15 feet long and more than 350 other animals depend on them for food and shelter, said Deborah Burr, the FWCs gopher tortoise plan coordinator. Florida plans to focus on conserving both the gopher tor toise and other wildlife living in its burrows. The overall goal of the revised Gopher Tortoise Management Plan, available at MyFWC.com/ GopherTortoise, is to restore and maintain secure, viable populations throughout Florida so the species no longer warrants listing. Now a state-threatened species, the gopher tor toise is also a candidate for listing as a federally threatened species. The FWC will use the new plan to collaborate with numerous partners and work toward achieving a level of gopher tortoise conservation that would assist in precluding the need to list the species under the federal Endangered Species Act. The revised Gopher Tortoise Management Plan shifts the emphasis from the relocation guidelines and permitting implemented under the original 2007 plan to long-term, nonregulatory conservation actions and incentives. The new plan underwent three drafts and was shaped by extensive input from a core group of diverse stakeholders, several public comment periods and meetings and outreach with stakeholders, the public and scientists. It builds upon achievements online permitting, relocation of 13,385 tortoises from development sites and managing 92,500 acres of tortoise habitat. The conservation objectives of the revised plan are: keystone species. The FWC plans to work with private and public landowners and managers to get them the incentives they need to achieve gopher tortoise conservation, whether the issue is preserving habitat or relocat ing tortoises. It is illegal to harm gopher tortoises or their burrows in Florida. The major threat to the gopher tortoise is the destruction, fragmentation and degradation of its habitat. Factors contributing to habitat loss include urbanization, suppression of To identify a gopher tortoise, look for its stumpy, forelimbs that are adapted for digging. The adults oblong shell is generally tan, brown or gray. Goago by naturalist William Bartram as he explored Florida. Gopher tortoise conservation plan updated, FWC adds burrow inhabitants

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SEPTEMBER 19, 2012 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 21 Tom Detrick holds a knife made from the bones of a white-tailed deer. ABOVE: Sheilia Young, representing the Sons of the American Revolution, shows artifacts to visitors. RIGHT: Robert Dunaway and Lionel Young, from the Sons of the American Revolution, prepare their exhibit. ABOVE: Tom Detrick of Cottondale displays his work and collection at Archeology Day held at the Pioneer Settlement. The large item is a war club made from a Bison jaw bone. RIGHT: Detrick shows the visitors the his technique to making an arrowhead. LEFT: Tristan Tyer of Tallahassee looks at a display of artifacts and crafts. RIGHT: A young visitor at Archeology Day eyes an antique compass held by exhibitor Lionel Young, who is a member of the Sons of the American Revolution. PHIL COALE PHOT OS Organizations throughout the panhandle teamed up for a funthe public about archaeological and historical resources on Saturday, Sept. 8. The Florida Public Archaeological Network, University of West Florida, the Panhandle Pioneer Settlement and the Panhandle Archaeological Society in Tallahassee hosted a Public Archaeology Day at the Panhandle Pioneer Settlement in Blountstown. Archaeologists were on hand to help the public identify artifacts from their personal collections. Information about archaeology, historic preservation and heritage tourism were also available. Archaeology Day at the Settlement

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Page 22 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 19, 2012 If you're looking for a copy of The Calhoun-Liberty Journal you shouldn't have to look too far!...and, if the racks are empty by the time you get to the store, we invite you to subscribe and make sure you receive a copy every week! Just send us your name and mailing address, along with a check for $18 per year, to: Journal Subscriptions P.O. Box 536, Bristol 32321.The Calhoun-Liberty Journalis delivered every Wednesday morning to news racks in Calhoun & Liberty counties at these locations: CALHOUN COUNTY LIBERTY COUNTY

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SEPTEMBER 19, 2012 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 23 Happy Birthday MotherIN LOVING MEMORYMary Jane SumnerAlthough you have been gone 61 years, we love and miss you very much. We think about you every day and you are always in our hearts. Happy Birthday on Sept. 19.Love from your daughter and son, Martha Jane and Rudy Sumner OBITUARIESRAYMOND LLOYD SMOKER NORTH FLORIDARaymond Lloyd Smoker, 87, of Chipley, passed away Friday, September 14, 2012 in Dothan, AL. He was born April 8, 1925 to the late Joshua Hanna and Hannah (Beiler) Smoker in Lancaster, P A. He lived in north Florida since 1988. He was a farmer and was a member of Red Oak Mennonite Church. Survivors include two sisters, Thelma Grace Smith and Edna Ruth Miller, both of Umatilla; special friends, Ben and Carol Yoder of Grand Ridge and several nieces and nephews. Services were held Sunday, September 16 at Red Oak Mennonite Church. Interment followed in Red Oak Mennonite Cemetery. Adams Funeral Home in Blountstown was in charge of the arrangements. Online condolences may be made at www.adamsfh.com. KARIN CARTWRIGHT BLOUNTSTOWNKarin Cartwright, 57, of Blountstown, passed away W ednesday, September 12, 2012. She was a homemaker and was of the Baptist faith. She was preceded in death by her husband, Lander Cartwright. No services are planned at this time. Memorialization was by cremation. Adams Funeral Home in Blountstown was in charge of the arrangements. WILLIAM J. FESTUS EUBANKS GREENWOODW illiam J. Festus Eubanks, 58, of Greenwood, passed away Saturday, September 15, 2012. He had lived in Jackson County most of his life and was a tugboat captain for 31 years. He loved his ing, wrestling, Spongebob and good-heartedly arguing with his granddaughters. H e was preceded in death by his father, James Eubanks; one daughter, Karen Annette Hamm; one grandson, Jarid Kutchey. Survivors include his mother, Vena V. Eubanks of Chattahoochee; his loving wife of 37 years, Sharon Eubanks of Greenwood; one son, Cody Eubanks and his wife, T amela of Marianna; one son-in-law and sidekick, Peanut Hamm of Dellwood; two daughters, Pam W illis and her husband, Paul of Marianna and Melynda Kutchey and her husband, W esley of Cypress; two brothers, Jim Eubanks of Chattahoochee and Mike Eubanks of Ocala; one sister, Frances Ball of Sneads; nine grandchildren, Brittney Hamm, Whitney, Kurt and Blaise W illis, T iara Kutchey, T iffany, T .J., Michael and Nicholas Eubanks; two great-grandchildren, Shiley and Gabe Couliette and numerous nieces, nephews and adoptive grandchildren. Family will receive friends T uesday, September 18 from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. in the Chapel. Services will be held W ednesday, September 19 at 10 a.m. at Marianna Chapel Funeral Home with Reverend Interment will follow in Dykes Cemetery. Marianna Chapel Funeral Home in Marianna is in charge of the arrangements. Expressions of sympathy may be posted online at www.mariannachapelfb.com. REVEREND WILLIE E. DAWSON JAMIESON Reverend W illie E. Dawson, 76, of Jamieson, passed away W ednesday, September 12, 2012 at his home. He was born in Clarksville December 5, 1953. He was a retired Freewill Baptist Minister and a carpenter. He was preceded in death by his wife, Joan McMillan Dawson; his father, Nease Dawson; his mother, Edith Shiver D awson Cook; four brothers, Buel, Jackie, H arold and Johnny Dawson. Survivors include three brothers, Franklin Dawson of Quincy, Bobby Dawson and his wife, Odine of Oklahoma City, OK and W inifred Dawson and his wife, Audra of Alliance Community; three sisters, Sandra D. Payne and her husband, Eddie of Nashville, TN, Yvonne D. Swint of Murphreesboro, TN and Beverly D. Clark and her husband, Bobby of Blountstown; a very special nephew, Gary Dawson and his wife, Lisa of Jamieson and numerous nieces and nephews. Services were held Saturday, September 15 at Mt. Glory Freewill Baptist Church. Interment followed in Cool Springs Cemetery in Faceville, GA. Charles McClellan Funeral Home in Quincy was in charge of the arrangements. VIRGINIA IRENE OAKLEY CL YDE T OWNSHIP MIVirginia Irene Oakley, 89, of Clyde T ownship, M I passed away Sunday, September 16, 2012 in Mercy Hospital. She was born February 10, 1923 in Port Huron, MI. She married Arthur F. Oakley September 19, 1942 in Bowling Green, V A ; he passed A pril 30, 2005. She retired from Prestolite with 45 years of service in the Coil Division. She had also worked at J.C. Penneys and served as secretary of W adhams Baptist Church, where she was an active member and Sunday school teacher. She hosted many child evangelism fellowship events at her home and was a member of the Council on travel, wintering in Florida and spending summers in W yoming for several years. She was preceded in death by her husband, Arthur F. Oakley. Survivors include three children, T erry L Fischer and her husband, Stephen, Larry E. Oakley, all of Port Huron T ownship, and Michael Oakley and his wife, Brenda of Jeddo; her beloved grandchildren, Kim Hudy and her husband, T im, Shellie Fischer, Julie Delaney, Lisa Scheunmann, Holly Beaudry and her husband, Fred and Jason Oakley and Lori Solgot; six great-grandchildren, Austin Delaney, Whitney Hudy, Nathan, Nicole and Adam Beaudry and Koda Oakley. Memorial services will be held Saturday, September 29 at 11 a.m. at W adhams Baptist Church in Clyde, MI Pollock-Randall Funeral Home in Michigan is in charge of the arrangements. Memorial contributions may be made to W adhams Baptist or Child Evangelism Fellowship. T o send condolences, visit www.pollock randall.com. EDWIN M. SKAGGS BLOUNTSTOWNEdwin M. Skaggs, 79, of Blountstown, passed away W ednesday, September 5, 2012 in Blountstown. He was born March 16, 1933 in Edmond, WV and had lived in Blountstown since 2007, coming from T itusville. He worked as a coal miner and also was a machinist with the McDonald Douglas Corporation. He was a member of Christian Home Church at Nettle Ridge in Blountstown. Survivors include his wife, Shirley Skaggs of Blountstown; one son, Edwin W Skaggs and his wife, Susie of Charleston, WV; two daughters, Beverly Morris and her husband, Roger of Blountstown and Cathy Davis of Oak Hill, WV; two brothers, Leo Skaggs and his wife, Bonnie of Huntington, WV and Nyle Skaggs and his wife, Jan of Fredericksburg, OH; one sister, Karon Johnson and her husband, Karl of Alvin, TX, six grandchildren and six great-grandchildren. Memorial services were held Sunday, September 9 at Christian Home Church at Nettle Ridge in Blountstown was by cremation. Peavy Funeral Home in Blountstown was in charge of the arrangements. Charles McClellan Funeral HomeButler-Morgan/Morgan-McClellan Funeral Home Building at 15 S. Jackson St., Quincy, 32351Phone: (850) 627-7677 or 643-2277Charles K. McClellanLicensed Funeral Director 42 years experience Call us Let us explain how we can conveniently handle arrangements in Liberty County. T elephone (850) 674-2266 Y our hometown funeral home since 1994A Hometown Funeral Director You Can Trust and Depend On!Funeral Services with Dignity, Caring and Professionalism. Marlon PeavyPeavy Funeral Home& CrematoryOBITUARIES continued on page 31GARY A. W ATTERSON BLOUNT STOW NGary A W atterson, 80, of Blountstown, passed away Monday, September 17, 2012 in Blountstown. He was T allahassee for 50 years. He was born in Jacksonville and lived for many years in T allahassee before moving to Blountstown. He was a member of Blountstown First Baptist Church and was a retired Lieutenant Colonel in the Army National Guard. Gary enjoyed playing his guitar and singing at the Panhandle Pioneer Settlement. He was preceded in death by his parents, Edgar and Shirley (Prescott) W atterson; one brother, Gerald; one sister, Jacqueline; one daughter, Selena W illiams Burke; one daughter-in-law, Linda W atterson. Survivors include his wife of 36 years, Imogene W atterson of Blountstown; four sons, Bruce W at terson of T allahassee, Sean W atterson and his wife, Bridget of New York, NY, Steve W illiams and his wife, W endy of Altha and Dillon Burke of Blountstown; four daughters, Stephanie W illiams of Blountstown, Sheila Shelton and her husband, Greg and Shelly Smith and her husband, Ronnie, all of Altha and Kayla Burke of Blountstown; one brother, Eddy W atterson and his wife, Edie of Hobe Sound, 17 grandchildren and nine great-grandchildren. Memorial services will be held Saturday, September 22 at 10 a.m. at the Blountstown First Baptist Church Adams Funeral Home in Blountstown is in charge of the arrangements. Contributions may be made to the Panhandle Pioneer Settlement, P. O Box 215, Blountstown, FL 32424; Florida National Guard, 1225 Easterwood Drive, T allahassee, FL 32311; or Florida Baptist Childrens Home, P. O. Box 8190, Lakeland, FL 33802-9963.

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Page 24 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 19, 2012 FISHINGBass tagging study revealingThis past spring, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) biologists tagged 136 trophy largemouth bass greater than eight pounds in Floridas public waters. Each trophy bass had a yellow plastic dart tag inserted into the back of the Each tag has a unique number that and information on how to report catches. Tagged bass came from 41 lakes and rivers that varied in size, water tions and angler demographics. Angler catch and harvest rates vary between lakes and rivers, so this approach allows for a more informed statewide estimate. After six months, results are already revealing. So far, 21 percent of tagged trophy bass have been caught and reported and 83 percent of them were released alive. Anglers for 22 percent of reports. Thirty caught on live shiners. Interestingly, 28 percent of tagged bass heavier than 10 pounds have been caught, of those were released. This shows bigger bass are equally susceptible to capture but suffer increased harvest. Most anglers harvested trophy bass to have a skin-mount made, rather than for food. but weighed more than 10 pounds when it was caught and released in Lake Talquin. Another recent tagging study by the FWC and University of Florida revealed that 20 percent to 35 percent of all largemouth bass longer than 14 inches were caught annually by anglers. Since trophy bass typically take six to 10 years to reach that size, its evident that recycling plays an important role. Although catch rates of individual trophy bass may be This information will provide an important baseline for when TrophyCatch (see below) launches in October. The FWC will continue the statewide tagging study for the in catch-and-release rates of trophy Anglers should look for tagged yellow streamers with Trophy printed on them, followed by a number, reward value and contact information. Over time, tags may get covered by algae, which can be rubbed off to reveal tag information. the tag as close to the skin of the to the FWC. Anglers may release or harvest tagged bass as they normally would, depending upon local harvest regulations; however, only released bass are eligible for separate TrophyCatch recognition and rewards. For research biologist Jason Dotson at (850) 363-6037. This tagging study was initiated partially to implement the Black Bass Management Plan that was developed with input from biologists, anglers and stakeholders (MyFWC. com/Fishing) and which the FWC approved in June 2011. Anglers indicated that greater opportunities portant component of the plan. So the FWC made trophy largemouth bass management a priority and plans to launch a trophy bass documentation program called TrophyCatch in October (www.TrophyCatchFlorida. com). The Liberty County Board of County Commissioners hereby requests REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS Ronnie Coley personally invites you to visit him any time Monday thru Saturday from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Chipola Heating & Air Conditioning (850) 674-4777Whaley Whaley SERIOUS SHERIFF Please consider Ken Futch on Nov. 6th.

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SEPTEMBER 19, 2012 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 25 *Lifetime Warranty on Repairs *Will pay up to $500 of your deductible *Over 75 years combined experienceTNTTOBY GARNETT, OWNER Collision Center SA TURDAY, SEPT 29, 2012 Registration and Voting 8:30-10 a.m. Business Meeting at 10:00 a.m. 100 VALUABLE PRIZES ANNUAL MEETINGT alquin Electric Cooperative, Inc. ENTERTAINMENT : 9:00 9:45 a.m. Country Connections LOCATION: A Panhandle native on Long Island SoundOther than a Lady Gaga concert or a PETA convention, probably the last place you would be on New Yorks Long Island. But thats exactly where I was on 8. And I have to say best-kept secrets. Granted, all I really knew about Long Island was what I had seen on television. Until I got to see stagnant water with trash and the quaint town with a New Cow Harbor Wounded Warrior Weekend. Basically, the town, its citizens, and visitors who lives in Northport and who spearheaded Our boss, CEO Michael Murdoch, invited As luck would have it, we landed on the partner, Frank Nieskens, still play together the rich-even-by-New-York-standards and Norwalk, Connecticut. trolling out in Long Island Sound. All three Michaels and Marys Mine spit the hook, and Frank are cardclub. Even though they the grill within about the water. behind us, nearly the In addition to excellent country. eye patches. There were also those whose wounds werent visible, but whose pain is every bit as real. bring us together. Jim McClellans OUTDOORS Down South come parade. supper. Home of the All-U-Can-Eat menuPhone (850) 670-8441Family Coastal Seafood Restaurant SUNDAYSnow Crab ClawsLUNCH BUFFET11 A.M. TO 2 P.M. OPEN Seafood Platter

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Page 26 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 19, 2012 clothes. Many items for the home. New items arriving daily. Everyone is invited to shop at the CalhounLiberty Ministry Center store on Hwy. 20 E. in Blountstown. Phone 674-1818. UFN APPLIANCESFreezer $40. 20 gallon hot water heater, $30. Call 491-3660.9-19, 9-26Electric stove, needs one burner, $50. Call 762-3924. 9-19, 9-26Jack LaLannes power juicer with juice book, $75. Call 5575065. 9-19, 9-26Stove, $50, GE drop-in glass top stove, never used, $50. Call 7623924 during the evening or early in the morning. 9-12, 9-19 Gas heaters, four wall-mounted styles. Call (850) 557-9391. 9-12, 9-19Electric stove, works great, $100 OBO. Call 447-3110 leave message. 9-12, 9-193-T on AC unit, air/heat split system air handler, recently ran, $300 OBO. Call 643-8607. 9-12, 9-19Frigidaire freezer, upright 4 shelf, works wonderful, just too big for me. Used one year, $650 OBO. Call (850) 258-3719. 9-12, 9-19 FURNITUREComputer desk, $15. Glass top table, $40. Chair, $35. Three wicker back chairs, $10 each. Call 674-3264. 9-19, 9-26T win beds, two in good condition, $40 each. Couch with matching THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNALCLASSIFIEDSTo place your ad, call 643-3333 by noon Eastern Time on Monday UFN. Non-business ads run FREE for 2 weeks. ITEMS FOR SALEHead snow skis, $60. Call 5575065. 9-19, 9-26120 amp breaker box, $130, storm door 36x80, $25. Call 7623924 during the evening or early in the morning. 9-12, 9-19Gas tank, 150 gallon with 60% gas in tank. Call (850) 557-9391. 9-12, 9-19Moving sale: Computer desk and chair, $50. Oak buffet and hutch, $50. Antique chifferobe, $200. Green and white plaid sofa, $75. Navy blue plaid sofa, 96, $175. Dark walnut TV/entertainment stand, $50. Dark oak half hexagon wood and glass 3 shelf display, $50. Cherry oval coffee table, square end table and round end table, $20. Elephant motif $5 each. Numerous small appliances, pots and pans, bakeware, cookware and dishes. Call (850) 591-9873. 9-12, 9-19Moving sale everything must be gone by October 15. Some furniture, good solid wood entertainment center, computer desk, dining room table, much more. Located at 13365 NW Dogwood Lane, Hwy. 20 E, between Opal Owens Road and White Springs Road, brick house. Can call 6434618 or 272-4425 or come by any day until 7 p.m. 9-19Brunswick Billiards table, regulation size, one inch marble slate. Leather pockets. Medium oak in color. Ball and claw legs. Paid $6,000, asking $2,500. Call (850) 674-5026. 9-12, 9-19Boys shoes sizes 8 and up, $1.50 a pair. Crocheted bed spread, $30. Big cooking kettle, $25. Outdoor BBQ grill, $145. Call 6743264. 9-12, 9-19Jazzy power chair, brand new with new battery, never used, $800. Call (850) 258-3719.9-12, 9-19Bedding material: Sheets, comforters, mattress pads, cotton blankets, mattress covers and more. Everyone is invited to shop at the Calhoun-Liberty Ministry Center store on Hwy. 20 E. in Blountstown. Phone 6741818. UFNMens, ladies and childrens For Rent in ALTHA762-9555 or 762-8597Very NICE *2 & 3 BD trailers.With lawn service 5 x 10 .....$27 10 x 10 ....$43 10 x 20 ....$70 10 x 25 ....$90M & W SELFSTORAGE RENTAL SCall 573-5255, 762-9555, 762-8807 or 762-8597 7 days a week service UFN BD, 1 1/2 BA TownhousesBRISTOL Mobile Homes643-7740 FOR RENT BLOUNTSTOWN chair. Call (850) 557-9391. 9-12, 9-19T wo chairs, overstuffed, $75 each. Call 674-5093. 9-12, 9-19Oak bedroom set, 5-piece, reduced price to $600, listed at $750. Call 643-8309. 9-12, 9-19Good used furniture and appliances needed at Calhoun Liberty Ministry Center. Call 674-1818. UFN TRUCKS2005 Chevy T rail Blazer, 139,000 or 447-5027. 9-19, 9-261997 Dodge Ram, 4x4, 360 engine, tool box on back, excellent overall good condition. Call 4472010 or 447-2011. 9-12, 9-19 CARS1992 Chrysler LeBaron, 4 new tires, new battery, new alternator, runs good, $1,000 OBO. Call (912) 424-4819. 9-19, 9-26 VEHICLE ACCESSORIESOriginal Mercedes chrome hubcaps, seven of them, $100 each. Mercedes power steering gear box, $500. Call 557-5065. 9-19, 9-2617 Aluminum T oyota wheels with lug nuts, $200 OBO. Call 643-8607. 9-12, 9-19T wo Kumho all terrain tires 26575-16 with aluminum rims, $800. Call (850) 870-1574 or 447-3670.9-12, 9-19 New Home for sale in Altha3 BD, 2 BA, 1,200 sq ft with carport, 1/2 acre lot, Hardi siding, metal roof, vaulted great room, oak cabinets with granite tops.$110,000Call 762-8185 or 447-20257-18 T 8-8 Two story, 2 BD old block house. Completely furnished. Rail fenced yard.$35,000(850) 447-1533House FOR Sale IN Blountstown (813) 253-3258 10 to 15 ACRE TRACTSFrom $600 downOWNER FINANCINGNO QUALIFYING 1 & 2 bedroom mobile homes in Blountstown and Bristol. $105 to $155 weekly. Deposit required. All utilities included. NO PETS. Singles or Couples preferred. Call 674-7616FOR RENT Call (850) 627-8287 House FOR Rent IN HOSFORD2 BD, 1 BA House in Lowry For more information9-19 T 10-10 For Rent in ALTHA (850) 643-88182 BD, 2 BA Mobile home, large yard, covered front and back porch. Lawn care and garbage provided. Available Oct. 1.$450 monthwith 1st month, last month and security deposit Call 539-7848 or 570-3431 $500 month$500 depositFor Rent in BRINKLEY REAL TY FLORIDA RIVER AREA, very nice 10 acre tract, partially fenced with gate, large pole barn, well and electricity, build you a house or bring your travel trailer, hook it up and hunt HWY 379 48 ACRES, 3 BD, 2 BA doublewide, sheds, pond, backs up to Fenn Slough, good huntAPALACHICOLA RIVER, 1.35 acre lot over looking the river with a 3 BD, 1 BA Cypress house like new. DOWNT OWN BRIST OL, Two commercial buildings, PEA RIDGE ROAD, 5 BD, 3 BA, amenities galore REDUCED. BRIST OL, 3 BD, 2 BA houses (5 to choose from) call for more information. LAKE MYSTIC, 4 BD, 2 BA, Big RV storage building, 122 ft on water with dock, etc. Lot has a GREAT view Several lots and land tracts available. Call 643-3289 to buy or sell CHECK OUR PRICEnapaonline.com Apt. for Rent in ALTHA762-9555 or 762-8597 $550 month TINY TEACUP male, long haired. All shots and dewormed.Call 6743532

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SEPTEMBER 19, 2012 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 27 NO OWNER FINANCINGCall 674-5026 or 643-1723 Located at Jack Lake off the Chipola River off Hwy. 275 S. Consists of a 2 BD, 1 BA cabin. Property sold as is.NO OWNER FINANCINGCall 674-5026 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNALCLASSIFIEDSTo place your ad, call 643-3333 by noon Eastern Monday UFN. Non-business ads run FREE for 2 weeks. Goodyear Wrangler tires 2659-12, 9-19 MOTORCYCLES and ATVs2001 Honda Rancher ES 350, new battery, new rear basket, in 2390. 9-19, 9-26 HUNTING/FISHING12 ft. welded semi-v boat and pedestals, new carpet, 30 9-19, 9-26Deck boat, 19 foot with 110 John9-12, 9-19CVA Staghorn .50 caliber muzzle loader, black, synthetic stock, stainless barrel with lots of acces9-12, 9-19Remington 270 9-12, 9-19, T-hull with UFN WATER WELL SUPPLIESDo you need parts for That Darn Pump? We have capacisure switches, check valves, foot STARSCOPEFAMOUS BIRTHDAYSARIES Mar 21/Apr 20 achieved this week. All you really T AURUS Apr 21/May 21 by outside pressures, but it really is up to you to set your GEMINI May 22/Jun 21 Those closest to you need a little space and respect, CANCER Jun 22/Jul 22 direction. You have to take LEO Jul 23/Aug 23 Leo, you can have fun VIRGO Aug 24/Sept 22 no reason to be disappointed. back on track. LIBRA Sept 23/Oct 23 Libra, this week you have the in one-on-one conversation. Start one particular relationship. SCORPIO Oct 24/Nov 22 SAGITT ARIUS Nov 23/Dec 21 CAPRICORN Dec 22/Jan 20 can only tackle one set of conone is a priority and set your AQUARIUS Jan 21/Feb 18 PISCES Feb 19/Mar 20 this week. Others can provide backup if you need it.Week of Sept. 16 ~ Sept. 22SEPTEMBER 16 SEPTEMBER 17 SEPTEMBER 19 SEPTEMBER 20 SEPTEMBER 21 SEPTEMBER 22 late Labrador Retriever reya Park Road. Call 643-2799 if he is yours. 9-12, 9-19FOUND: Black & T an dog uptown Bristol on Hwy. 20. Call 9-12, 9-19 TOOLS & HEAVY EQUIPMENT Concrete Mixer, towable, concubic ft. Powered by 7.1/5 HP Hon9-12, 9-19Generator, 5,000-7,000 watts, 1519. 9-12, 9-19 WANTEDNeed to rent horse trailer for several hours. Call 674-3264.9-19, 9-26T win set of bunk beds. Call 4913660. 9-19, 9-26Fold up single bed,tress or a sleeper sofa, reasonable. Call 674-3264. 9-19, 9-26Generator, 5,000-7,000 watts, 1519. 9-19, 9-26Stove 674-3264. 9-12, 9-19 YARD SALE BRIST OL Yard sale Saturday, every day, located on Third street, Neal Subdivision. Red and Blue tent, BPA/UFN PETS/SUPPLIESChihuahua puppies. Call 6743011. 9-19, 9-26Mother cat 9-19, 9-26Pre-teen kittens 9-12, 9-19Jack Russell T errier dogs, fe9-12, 9-19T wo cats 9-12, 9-19Hamster 643-4559. 9-12, 9-19Golden Retriever/Hound dog 643-4559. 9-12, 9-19Free kittens, born on the Fourth 447-0443. UFN LOST/FOUNDFOUND: Mans ringway near Altha. Call and describe it, 762-3366. 9-19, 9-26LOST : Cat purple collar, neutered. Last seen 9-19, 9-26FOUND: Beautiful ChocoSmall Town T om A CARTOON BY MIKE BARNHOUSE

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Page 28 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 19, 2012 HEALTH Calhoun Liberty HOSPITALCalhoun-Liberty Hospital will be offering *Free Mammography screenings October 1-15 (1ST 50 women to register) *If you have insurance, CLH will bill your insurance. Patients will not be responsible for deductible or co-pay. See your doctor for your order today! We are dedicated to womens health.New digital mammography machine. T upperwareCall Beth EubanksYOUR Tupperware Consultant at (850) 643-2498 or (850) 570-0235Brighten any serving setting with these bold, beautifully simple solutions. Now in vibrant new colors. email at beth-seubanks41 @aol.com SIMPLY SEN S ATIONALQ: I know sausage and other processed meats are linked with colon cancer risk. Is it true that theyre linked with risk of diabetes, too?A: Yes, several large population studies now link greater consumption of processed meats with increased risk of type 2 diabetes. Processed meats are those that are salted, cured or smoked or contain preservatives (such as nitriteor nitrate-based products). Common examples of processed meat in the United States are bacon, sausage, hot dogs, processed canned meats, ham several potential mechanisms that could explain the convincing link between processed meats and greater risk of colorectal cancer. Risk of type 2 diabetes increases with overweight, so processed meats high content of fat (and therefore calories) could explain part of the link to diabetes risk. However, even after adjusting for weight and some other aspects of eating habits, people who consume the most processed meat show at least 45 to 60 percent greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Researchers hypothesize that nitritebased preservatives form nitrosamine compounds within our gut increase cancer risk, and these nitrosamines also damage the cells of the pancreas responsible for producing insulin. Another potential explanation for the diabetes link involves formation during meat processing of compounds called advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) that seem to increase low-grade conditions promote a metabolic environment that can lead to type 2 diabetes.Q: Does the link between alcohol and breast cancer risk refer to all alcohol consumption or only excessive amounts?A: Alcohols link to increased risk of breast cancer begins at modest intake. If a woman has only one or two drinks a week, the actual increase in breast cancer risk is small but research shows that as consumption increases, so does risk. In fact for each standard drink a day there is about a 10 percent increase in breast cancer risk compared to women who drink zero or extremely little of wine, 12 ounces of beer, or one-and-a-half ounces of 80-proof liquor. Larger portions count as more than one drink.) Women who dont meet their need for the B vitamin folate are especially vulnerable to alcoholrelated breast cancer risk. However, meeting folate needs does not remove risk, and adding more folate than needed does not add additional protection. Alcohol is related to both preand post-menopausal breast cancer. A report of over 105,000 women in the Nurses Health Study suggests that cumulative alcohol consumption throughout life is important to post-menopausal breast Q&Aby Karen Collins, MS, RD, CDNAMERICAN INSTITUTE FOR CANCER RESEARCH cancer. This adds support to theories that harmful exposures earlier in life can damage breast cells in ways that increase later risk of cancer.Q: Is bottled ready-to-drink tea as high in antioxidants as the tea I brew at home?A: No, bottled tea is much lower in the polyphenol compounds that give black and green tea their antioxidant power. Commercial teas do seem to vary somewhat, but even those reportedly highest in polyphenols, and the compound called EGCG in particular, dont contain anywhere near the amounts documented in standard brewed tea. The unsweetened versions are still excellent zero-calorie alternatives to sugar-laden soft drinks when you are not able to brew your own. However, brewing tea at home is both less expensive and higher in antioxidant polyphenols. Although population studies show inconsistent evidence for tea reducing cancer risk, laboratory research suggests polyphenol compounds may act through pathways other than as antioxidants to reduce development of cancer, though more research is needed. Brew up a pitcher and refrigerate to have a cool zero-calorie drink handy on hot summer days. Heres how: for concentrate, bring one quart of cold water to a rolling boil. Remove from heat and add 8-10 teabags for each quart of brewed iced tea. Steep 3-5 minutes. To serve, add to cold water and/or ice cubes. If it seems too hot even to boil water, you can brew tea overnight in the refrigerator by steeping a few tea bags in a pitcher of cold water.Processed meat and diabetes

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SEPTEMBER 19, 2012 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 29 SPORTS Lady Tigers take Lady Wildcats in 3 straightABOVE: Blountstowns Lexi Devuyst guides the ball over the net while teammate Anna Hassig stands ready to assist. RIGHT: Althas Josie Hall passes the ball.LEFT: Althas Kinsey Register is passing while teammate Jenny Moore looks on. RIGHT: Blountstowns Kristen Jenkins hits the ball over the net, teammate Jackie Dudley stands ready to assist and Hope Jerkins looks on.Blountstown and Altha met Sept. 17 on the Wildcats turf for an intense afternoon volleyball game that was full of action. BHS took Altha in all three matches, scoring 25-18, 25-20 and 25-17. Brittany Graham led the Lady Varsity Wildcats with 6 kills, 1 block and 6 assists. Hannah Register had 4 kills, 1 block and 1 assist. Morgan Lewis had 4 kills while Mary Sewell had 3 kills, 1 block, 10 assists and 4 digs. Carly Schwartz had 2 kills and McKenzie Tanner had 1 kill. Brooke Boggs had 1 ace and 6 assists and Brianna Yon had 5 digs. We tried some new things which I can Altha Coach LeAnne Hall. These girls are improving with each game and working hard to compete. I am proud of their DANIEL WILLIAMS PHOT OSBELOW LEFT: Blountstowns Dharma Lee gets low and ready for the ball coming her way. BELOW: Althas Hannah Register passes the ball.

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Page 30 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 19, 2012 JOB MARKET MAC TECH NEEDEDPart time to help maintain, upgrade & in Bristol. teresae@fairpoint.net. Class A CDL Flatbed Drivers PHARMACY TECHNICIAN Computer skills are a must! STORE HOURS: Monday through Friday 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Contact Christie Husband at (850) 639-5065 for an interview. IN WEWA PUBLIC AND LEG AL N OTICESNOTICE OF APPLICA TION FOR T AX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that LABAN OR LINDA BONTRAGER the holder of the folRange 7 West, Liberty County, Florida, said point also lying a point lying on the Southerly feet to a point lying on the from said Point of Beginning to the Point of Beginning. LEE W. GLASSER Said property being in the County of Liberty, State of Florida. highest bidder at the Front Door of the Liberty County A.M., E.S.T. ROBERT HILL, CLERK OF COURT _______________________________ST A TEMENT OF NON-DISCRIMINA TION and the rules and regulations of the U.S. Department of Agperson in the United States on tional origin, age, disability, reder any of this organizations ordinating this organizations tain further information about the statutes and regulations or the Administrator, Rural tained to the extent possible. ________________________________IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR LIBERTY COUNTY, FLORIDA JP MORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO CHASE HOME FINANCE, LLC Plaintiff, TERRY BRENT BLACKOF TERRY BRENT BLACKSPOUSE OF MICHELLE LEE by, through and under any dants, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE of the Liberty County CourtLot 4, Block A, Unit No. 2, of SHULER HEIGHTS SUB-DIVISION, according to the Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book A, Page 5A, of the Public Records of Liberty County, Florida. pusuant to the Final Judgment an interest in the surplus, if any, resulting from the foreWITNESS my hand and ofIf you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Danny Davis, 301 S. Monroe St., Rm 225, T allahassee, FL 32303, (850) 577-4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Robert Hill, Attorney for Plaintiff Elizabeth K. Baird Altha Girl Scout T roop 39 holds Bridging Ceremony Sept. 15Altha Girl Scout Troop 39 celebrated their Bridging Ceremony Saturday, September 15 at Four Mile Creek Park. Three troop members Madison Bland, Ada LudyjanYbarra and Madison McClain bridged from Daisy to Brownie. This is an important milestone in their Girl Scout journey. The leaders are very proud of the girls that bridged and they are also proud of all of the girls in the troop. Following the ceremony, there was a luncheon with the families of the troop. The troop would like to thank all who participated. The troop is always looking for more girls to join. The meetings are of the month at the Page Pond Assembly of God Church. For other members of the community that would like to help, donations are always welcome to help buy supplies, books and the alike. Please feel free to contact troop leaders Delicia McClain at 209-0370 or, Tracey Ybarra at 447-5405 for more information.

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SEPTEMBER 19, 2012 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 31 To place your ad call us at 643-3333 SERVICE DIRECTORY Whaley Heating & Air Conditioning (850) 674-4777FL LIC. # CMC1249570 Accepting: Phone: (850) 643-6925 Fax: (850) 643-2064 email: grich0656@aol.com10536-B NW SR 20 Bristol, FL 32321 Located in the Apalachee RestaurantGary Richards, EA MBAEnrolled Agent Enrolled to Practice Before the IRS Business & Accounting Solutions Inc. 4433 NW C.R. 274 Altha, Fl 32421 (850) 762-9402 Cell (850) 832-5055Dozer and Excavation work Over 20 years experienceClay ONealsLand Clearing, Inc. William's HomeImprovements "No Job Too Big or Small"Concrete work, landscape, pressure cleaning, renovations, seamless gutter, painting, vinyl, & screen enclosure Call 674-8092Licensed & Insured, contractor & rooferFOR FREE ESTIMA TES Call Chris Nissley at 674-8081 or 643-8561 (Cell) STUMP GRINDINGReasonable Rates & FREE Estimates! That Darn PumpThere is never a convenient time to be without water.WELLS (850)643-HELP Thats 643-4357 or Home 643-3857For friendly service and never any overtime charges call, Clint Hatcher, OwnerElectrical Lic. # ER13014037 Building Lic. # RB29003511New Homes Garages Additions Electrical Remodeling Foundations Screenrooms Sunrooms VINYL SIDING RESIDENTAL & COMMERCIAL FREE EstimatesServing Calhoun, Liberty & Jackson Counties LIBERTY TIRE COMPANY 10781 NW SR 20 Bristol, Fl 32321Call 643-2939 MV84845Hours: Monday thru Friday 7 5 & Saturday 7 12Come see us for all your tire needs or give us a call for roadside service, oil changes & tire rotation. We specialize in sales and repair of tires for:Commercial Trucks and Trailers, OTR Equipment, Farm Equipment, Passenger Car & Light Truck Tires JEMISON Heating & Cooling, Lic# RM1416924Carrier Equipment Masters Farm Supply LS Tractor Equipment Committed To Quality Since 1973 (850) 762-3222 faxmasters7@fairpoint.net Catherine Corbins moving sale was a great success but items still need to go: Call (850) 674-8916 OBITUARIES ALTHARocky Jay Lane, 58, of Altha, passed away Wednesday morning, September 12, 2012 at his home. He was born August 19, 1954 in Cairo, IL and had lived in Altha for past six months coming from Citrus County. He was a retired air boat mechanic and served in the United States Army and the Army National Guard for several years. He was preceded in death by his granddaughter, Janice. Survivors include his wife, Edna Lane of Altha; his mother, Nancy C. Lane of New Market, AL; two sons, Shawn Lane of Perry and Micheal Guiden of North Carolina; three daughters, Heather Quattlebaum and her husband, Wes of Altha, Nicole Gieraltowski and her husband, Paul of Interlachen and Karen Null and her husband, Ricki of Floral City; two brothers, Randal Lane of New Market, AL and Ronald Lane and his wife, Sandy of Flintville, TN; two sisters, Nanci Deason and her husband, T roy of Charleston, SC and Patty Lane of New Market, A L ; 11 grandchildren, Michaela, Kenneth, Nathaniel, Rebecca, William, Ariana, Morgan, H arrison, Payton, Kyle and Fayth. Memorial services were held Saturday, September 15 at Hillcrest Baptist Church in Altha with Reverend Peavy Funeral Home in Blountstown was in charge of the arrangements. JAMES THOMAS SHELL BRISTOLJames Thomas Shell, 65, of Bristol, passed away early Saturday morning, September 8, 2012 at his home. He was born January 26, 1947 in St. Louis, MO and had lived in Bristol since 1985, coming from Germany. He was a retired Sergeant First Class in the United States Army and served for 23 years. He was a was a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints in Bristol. He was preceded in death by his parents, Thomas and Imogene Shell. Survivors include his wife, Patricia Shell of Bristol, one daughter, Jeanne Kever of Bristol and her children, Mariah and Mitchell Kever and Alexander James Shell; one son, Stacy Brown and his wife, Michelle and their eight children of Bristol; one sister, Carol Wilson and her husband, Patrick of Clarksville and three greatgrandchildren. Memorial services were held Thursday, September 13 from the graveside at Shell Family Cemetery with Peavy Funeral Home in Blountstown was in charge of the arrangements. TAMPA H elen Eloise Shiver, 73, of T ampa, passed away Thursday, September 6, 2012 in T ampa. She was born in Alabama and had lived in T ampa for the past three years, coming from Bainbridge. She was a retired operating room nurse and a member of the Protestant faith. She was preceded in death by her husband, Oliver Shiver. Survivors include one daughter, Melinda Shiver of T ampa; one grandson, Garrett B. T idwell of T ampa; one aunt, Carrie Lou Gilmore and several nieces and nephews. Services were held Friday, September 14 at Peavy Funeral Home Chapel with Wyatt Shiver and Andy lowed in Victory Hill Cemetery. Peavy Funeral Home in Blountstown was in charge of the arrangements. WETUMPKADorothy Owens Carr, 88, of Wetumpka, passed away Thursday, September 13, 2012 in T allahassee. She was born in Wetumpka to Linton and Vassie Parramore Owens on January 27, 1924. Survivors include one daughter, Virginia Brantley and her husband, Jim of Wetumpka; one son, Luther McKnight and his wife, Mary Ann of T allahassee, four grandchildren and six great-grandchildren. Services were held Saturday, September 15 at 4 p.m. at New Philadelphia Presbyterian Church in Quincy. Interment followed in Antioch Cemetery. Charles McClellan Funeral Home in Quincy was in charge of the arrangements. ALFORDClarence Matthews T ynes, 90, of Alford, passed away T uesday, September 11, 2012 at his home. He was born December 29, 1921 in Norfolk, VA and had lived in Alford for the past several years. He was a retired real estate agent. Survivors include one son, Robert T ynes and his wife, Pam of Newport News, VA. No services are planned at this time. Memorialization will be by cremation. Peavy Funeral Home in Blountstown is in charge of the arrangements. continued from page 23 NEW TOLL FREE FAX NUMBER: (888) 400-5810

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Page 32 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 19, 2012 Prices good thru 9/27/2012 W.A.C.



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CLJNews.com WEDnNESDAY, SSEPTEMBER 19, 2012 Vol. 32, No. 38JOURRNAAL TTHE CAlLHounOUN-LIBERTY 50INCLUDES TAX g ROBErR T MILLErR STANDIsSH CrROLEY TTHOmMAsS McCCOUrR T KATHrR YN MUrRPHY CSg by T T eresa EEubanks, Journal EditorA Hosford man is being held without bond in the Liberty County Jail after he allegedly abducted his estranged wife night, according to a report from the Conley Richard Burke, 26, is charged with kidnapping and false imprisonment, burglary of a dwelling while armed and His cousin, Freddie Burke, 25, was charged with being a principal in the domestic battery, burglary of a dwelling account: with her boyfriend, Lance Durden, at a Durden said Burke jumped him, Burke grabbed Amanda Burke by the hair and dragged her out of the house, forcing her and their child into a truck Durden jumped out the window and said it was likely they were heading to When deputies caught up with Freddie Burke at his home, he said Conley had dropped him off and left with the truck, child were taken back to her residence, Amanda Burke said after Burke threw her in the truck, he hit her in the face started kicking and screaming for help, his cousin grabbed her legs as Burke HHosford men charged with kidnapping woman and ve-year-old FrREDDIE BBUrkRKE CONLEY BBUrkRKE BBirthdays, engagement...13 Jim MMcClellans Outdoors DDown SSouth...25 Classieds...26 & 27 Obituaries...23 & 31 SSheriff's Log...2 TT wo charged with ATATV theft...3 MMeth & MMojo lead to disorderly intoxication arrest...3 Local artists work to be showcased at Veterans Civic Center PAGE 9 Bristol Church of God celebrates Pastor Appreciation Day PAGE 8 Calhoun County family named Agricultural Innovators of the Year PAGE 20A win for the BHS Tigers, a loss for LCHSPAGE 16 & 17Archaeology Day held at Panhandle Pioneer SettlementPAGE 21 TThree AAlco employees, ve others charged with stealing store inventoryARRESTED A C A S R L M S A T C A L S A TM C A AC C S A C A K O Mby T T eresa EEubanks, Journal Editor Three of those charged were current employees while one still in their shipping box with the store label were being sold cases, each containing 10 MP3 players, were missing from a he and three other employees had keys to the room, including The man selling the merchandise was identified as Merchandise had been disappearing from the store for two See ALCO THEFTS continued on page 11 See KIDNAPPING continued on page 11

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Page 2 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEpPTEMBER 19, 2012 ARREST REPORTS compiled by Journal Editor Teresa Eubanks Listings include name followed by charge and agency. The names above represent those charged. We remind our readers that all are presumed innocent until proven guilty.BBlountstown Police Dept.Sept. 10 through Sept. 16, 2012 Citations issued: Accidents...............00 ..................15 Special details B Business alarms.....04 RResidential alarms...........00 ................................................................36tSeptember 7 Tari Lawson, failure to appear, CCSO. September 10 Chuck Simmons, grand theft over $300 less than $5,000, CCSO. Charles Barbee, VOP, CCSO. Bradley John Terry, grand theft over $300 less than $1,000, conspiracy grand theft over $300 less than $1,000, BPD. September 11 Gregory Allen Couch, battery (domestic violence), CCSO. September 12 Kathryn Murphy, grand theft, BPD. Robert Miller, grand theft, BPD. Standish Croley, grand theft, BPD. Jeremiah Grzegorczyk, grand theft, BPD. Charles Swearington, grand theft, BPD. Blair Coe, VOP, CCSO. Felicia Bontrager, VOP, CCSO. September 13 Jessica Matlock, disorderly intoxication, CCSO. Thomas Franklin McCourt, 1st degree grand theft over $5,000 less than $10,000, conspiracy to commit grand theft over $5,000 less than $10,000, CCSO. Brandon Carpenter, VOP, grand theft, criminal mischief, CCSO. Gregory Cooper, VOP, CCSO. Jamer Mosley, child abuse, CCSO. September 14 Littleton Bramblett, resist arrest without violence, CCSO. Chuck Simmons, grand theft over $300 less than $1,000, criminal mischief, CCSO. September 15 James Musgrove, aggravated battery with a deadly weapon, non support, CCSO. Crystal Reed, driving with license suspended or revoked habitual, FHP. Annette Nichole Recker, child abuse, neglect, contribute to neglect of a minor, CCSO. Tina Louise Morrow, warrant for Mobile County, AL, CCSO.LY tSeptember 11 Johnny McClendon, VOSP, LCSO. September 12 Acey Abbott, VOSP, LCSO. Katherin Murphy, holding for CCSO, CCSO. Felicia Bontrager, holding for CCSO, CCSO. September 13 Jessie Matlock, holding for CCSO, CCSO. September 14 Brian Williams, VOP, LCSO. James Tipton, battery, VOSP, LCSO. September 16 Freddie O. Burke, kidnapping, false imprisonment, VOSP, LCSO. September 17 Annette Recker, holding for CCSO, CCSO. Tina Morrow, holding for CCSO, CCSO. H LO Man charged with battery for spitting in face of 16-year-oldA Bristol man was charged with battery of a child after he allegedly spit in the face of a 16-year-old who was sitting in a truck parked at a convenience store. James S. Tipton, 20, was arrested Sept. 10. He is being held without bond since he was on probation at the time of his arrest. According to the complaint toward the Exxon Station in Bristol around 6 p.m. on Sept. 9 and approached the passengers side of the truck, where a 16-year-old was sitting. He reportedly stated, I got you little b****, and then spit in the teenagers face. Tipton then walked to the BP Station, got in a vehicle and left. Tipton stated that he approached the teen to have a one-on-one conversation, but when he got to the truck, there was an exchange of words between him, the teen and another person. He said the passengers grandfather came around the truck, called him an SOB and clinched his hand and raised it as though he was about to hit him. Tipton said he left after his uncle, who was waiting at the BP and watching the incident, yelled at him to come back.JAMES TIPTON Altha man charged with battery for punching woman in face when deputies responded to a 911 call at his house was later arrested and charged with domestic battery. being held without bond Jail. According to the arrest report, deputies arrived outside the residence. When he saw them, he ran into the woods near the home. He was detained after a short pursuit. had an abusive relationship and she had had enough. She said no longer wanted to be with him, an argument started and escalated struck the right side of her face A witness said he had been sleeping on the couch when he was awakened by the couples argument The witness then intervened and pulled deputies he couldnt believe the woman said he hit her, explaining that he only pushed her around a few times.GregoryREGORY CouchOUCH A woman who called the report that a man living at the same residence had poked her children with hypodermic needles she said was found around their home was taken into custody on outstanding warrants. Arrested Sept. 15 was Annette Recker, She was taken into custody on charges of child abuse, neglect and contributing to the neglect of a minor. When Recker called 911, she reported that Matt Nichols, 45, had threatened her children and refused to leave when she asked him to. Deputies spoke with Nichols, who denied the accusations and said he had not been asked to leave. He then willingly gathered his belongings and moved out, the report stated.Man who couldnt stay off the phone during Deputies reported that a man refused to stay off his stop was taken into custody on a charge of resisting arrest Thursday. Jody Hoagland was on clocked a pick-up truck going 55 mph in a 45 mph zone at 9:40 p.m. of Altha, had an open container of alcohol in his lap. He also saw an open front of another passenger, James Grissett. Sgt. Jared Nichols and Deputy and his two passengers were asked to exit the truck and while doing so, Bramblett was heard on his phone urging others to come join him at the scene. Bramblett was told to end the call and stand by the passengers door. Instead, Bramblett walked behind Nichols and then away from the truck, still talking on the phone. Again, Bramblett was told to hang up. The three occupants of the truck were moved to the shoulder of the road as a canine was used to conduct a sniff test of the vehicle. While Nichols was explaining what they were about to do with the dog, Bramblett answered his ringing phone and was heard stating that he was being harassed by law enforcement. Nichols told him to hang up the phone again, to which Bramblett replied, I dont have to hang up my phone. The arrest report cited the multiple calls as creating both a distraction and a safety concern as others were being summoned to the area. When he was told once more to end the call, Bramblett refused to do so. Hoagland reached for the phone and Bramblett pulled away from him and tried to shove the phone in his pants pocket. The deputies then took Bramblett to the ground, handcuffed him and put him in a patrol car. He was charged with resisting arrest. Both he and Grissett were issued a citation for having an open container.Woman arrested on warrants after accusing man of child abuselbl AnnetteNNETTE reckerRECKER

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Two men were charged with grand theft and criminal mischief for taking a 2011 Honda ATV from an Altha home early last month. The vehicle was stolen from a residence between the hours of 5:45 a.m. and noon on Aug. 10, according to the owner. Deputies found tire tracks from the four-wheeler along with shoe tracks, indicating that someone had pushed the ATV down Malone Road to Watson Road, where the tracks ended. A witness later contacted the owner after the ATV was found hidden in the woods at Christiansted Road and Hwy. 167 in Marianna. The ignition had been damaged and a compass and a gun rack had been removed from the vehicle. The witness stated that Chuck Simmons, 22, of Marianna and Brandon C. Carpenter, 21, of Altha, showed him where the ATV had been stashed. Both men denied having anything to do with the theft. They said they were helping find the missing vehicle in hopes of getting a reward from the owner for its return. Another witness came forward and stated that Carpenter had told her he and Simmons had taken the ATV and put it in the woods. Simmons later said that he, Carpenter and a third person were involved in the theft. He said he and another man, who has not been charged, walked to the home where the ATV was and took it, pushing it down Malone Road until they met with Carpenter, who was waiting with a truck. Simmons said they took it thinking they would ride it but never went back to the vehicle until a reward was posted. Simmons was given a conditional release following his arrest. Carpenter is being held on $5,000 bond. SEPTEMBER 19, 2012 / THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL PPage 3 ARREST REPORTS compiled by Journal Editor Teresa Eubanks TT wo men charged with Altha AT TV theft last month ChucHUCK SiIMMonsONS Woman who admitted smoking meth and mojo charged with disorderly intoxicationA woman whose erratic actions alarmed neighbors was taken away in restraints and given a medical examination before being charged with disorderly intoxication last week. Deputies responding to a call at 6:45 p.m. on Sept. 12 arrived 27, of Clarksville standing outside with a leather whip in her hand. She ignored orders to put the whip down and told me. Deputies then forcibly put her on the ground to physically restrain her. When her whip was taken away, she began screaming in demonic voices, according to the arrest report. As two deputies attempted to take her to a patrol car, she became more upset and began kicking, screaming and yelling obscenities. Deputies then placed her in restraints so they could get her into the car. Hospital, Matlock stated that she had smoked both methamphetamine and synthetic marijuana known as Mojo. After being cleared medically, she was arrested and charged with disorderly intoxication0p-9 and endangering the safety of other persons or property while causing a disturbance. She was later given a JessieESSIE MatlocMATLOCK Man arrested for threatening and hitting woman with a gunA woman upset by a photograph she found on her boyfriends phone was knocked out after she confronted him early Saturday morning. of Altha had been out alligator hunting when he returned to his Musgrove Road residence in Altha and was met by his unhappy girlfriend. When the two began arguing, a friend who was also at the home stepped outside. The girlfriend said the argument escalated and she was pushed against the wall. She said Musgrove went to his bedroom, came out with a shotgun and told her to leave. When she refused, she said he pushed the muzzle of the gun into her stomach. He then turned the gun around and hit her over the head with the butt, causing her to pass out. The altercation left her with a purplish lump on the left side of her head. Her friend, who came back inside when the argument got louder, stated that she saw Musgrove push the gun into his girlfriends stomach. She said he then raised up the gun before hitting the woman on the head. The two women met a deputy at a convenience store at 3:55 a.m. to report the attack. Musgrove was charged with aggravated battery with a deadly weapon. His bond was set at $7,500.JaAMesES MusMUSGroROVeE Owner reports missing motor after being foundThe discovery of a missing boat motor led to the arrest of a Marianna man on a grand theft charge. The owner contacted the Calhoun County Sheriffs because a boat motor she said had been stolen from her home had just been located in the woods nearby and she had information about a suspect. The woman told a deputy that she had been out of town for three days last month. Four days after her return, she realized the motor was missing. She said she had been approached by a man who said he heard Chuck Simmons telling someone he needed to get rid of a stolen boat motor, which he said was behind the owners house in the woods. The witness checked, found the Evinrude motor and called the owner. The owner stated that a relative had also been approached by Simmons, who offered to sell him the motor. No physical evidence of value was found at the scene due to recent rains. Simmons, 22, was given a conditional release following his arrest Sept. 10. A Blountstown man was charged with child abuse Sept. 13 after a youngster he was playing with went home with a burn on his back, according to a report from the Blountstown Police Department. Moseley. The childs father contacted the police department after the youngster returned from a night at his mothers home complaining of back pain. When asked what was wrong, the child showed him an injury on his lower back that appeared to be a small circular burn mark. The little boy a cigarette at me and it went down my shirt and burned me. When asked who replied, Mommys friend. Moseley denied hurting the boy and said an unlit cigar fell out of his mouth and down the boys back. After repeated questioning, Moseley admitted he had thrown a cigar at the boy, but said it was not lit. The boys mother said the child asked Moseley throw it at me, meaning the cigar he was smoking. She said Moseley threw the lit cigar at the boy and it went down his back. The mother said she bathed the youngster and applied burn ointment when he complained about the pain.JaAMesES MoseleyMOSELEY 18831 SRR 20 W BBlountstown PPhone (850) 674-5253 ( LAKE )AT TThe Lake House Restaurant JoinOIN usUS ForORLunch & Dinner HOURS Thursday thru Saturday 10:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. Sunday 10:30 a.m to 7 p.m. CenturionTactical ACTICAL SolutionsOLUTIONS & ConsultinONSULTING LLCConcealed Weapon & Advanced TT actical TT raining Classes If you knew you would have to fight to protect your life or the life of a loved one...would you be prepared for it? MauricioMAURICIO GonGONZaleALEZ anAND LeeEE KeithKEITH 18831 SR 20 W, Blountstown (850) 665-2101at THE LAKKE HOUSE RESTAURANTTHREE HOURConcealed Weapons Class $70 starts at 10 a.m. (CT)SaturATURDayAY AuUG. 29

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The Calhoun-Liberty Journal is published each Wednesday by the Liberty Journal Inc., Summers Road, P.O. Box 536, Bristol, FL 32321. Annual subscriptions are $18. Periodicals postage paid at Bristol, FLPOSTMASTER: Send address corrections to: P.O. Box 536, Bristol, FL 32321. (USPS 012367) Summers RoadLocated at 11493 NW Summers Road in Bristol MAILING ADDRESS: P.O. Box 536, Bristol, FL 32321 TELEPHONE (850) 643-3333 Fax (888) 400-5810 EMAIL: thejournal@fairpoint.net ADS: cljads@fairpoint.net JOURNAL STAFFJohnny Eubanks...................Publisher Teresa Eubanks........................ Editor Sandra Brown...................Bookkeeper Deven Lewis......Production Asssistant Debbie Duggar...................AdvertisingOFFICE HOURS: 9 a.m. 6 p.m. M-FTHE CALHOUN-LLIBERtTY JOURNAL Visit us on Facebook at CLJNews Page 4 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SeptemEPTEMBerER 19, 2012Thats how many copies of The Calhoun-Liberty Journal were distributed last week, ensuring plenty of coverage for your community announcements and great response for our business advertisers! 5,298 Wednesday, September 19 Monday, September 24 Tuesday, September 25 Sunday, September 23 Saturday, September 22 Thursday, September 20 Friday, September 21TODAYS MEETINGS7 p.m., Altha VFD AA, 6 p.m., Altha Community Center Sit-n-Sew meeting, 6 pm., First United Methodist Church Youth Hall on Clinton St. BBristol Lions Club 7 p.m., Apalachee Restaurant BBlountstown Chapter #179 O.E.S., 7 p.m., Dixie Lodge in Blountstown.TODAYS MEETINGS7 p.m., Veterans Civic Center 9 a.m., WT Neal Civic Center BBlountstown Lions Club, 6 p.m., Apalachee Rest. 5-8 p.m. (CT), WT Neal Civic Center, Blountstown 7 p.m., Voting house in Rock Bluff 7 p.m., Field HouseTODAYS MEETINGS, noon, Calhoun-Liberty Hospital 7 p.m., Calhoun County Old Ag Bldg. east door, in front of jail 11:30 p.m., First Baptist Church of BristolTODAYS MEETINGSAA, 7 p.m., basement of Calhoun County Courthouse 7 p.m., Fire House 4 p.m., Calhoun Liberty Hospital 6 p.m., Emergency Management Building on Spring St., Bristol 7 p.m., Apalachee RestaurantLCHS Dawgs vs. Franklin Home at 7:30 p.m. (ET) B-town Tigers vs. Port St. Joe Away at 6:30 p.m. (CT) Attend the Church of your choice this Sunday Daffodil workshop Sept. 29 in MariannaThe Jackson County Master Gardeners 2012 Daffodil Workshop and Bulb sale will be held Saturday, September 29 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Workshop leader will be Linda M. Van Beck, President of the Florida Daffodil Society (FDS) and author of Daffodils in Florida, A Field Guide to the Coastal South. A $15 preregistration fee is required by Thursday, September 27 for eligibility for bonus door prizes. The seating is limited. Registration includes snacks and lunch. At the door registration begins at 9:30 a.m. For more information, please call (850) 482-9620.Jelly & Jam making class set October 6A Jelly and Jam Making Class will be held at the Panhandle Pioneer Settlement Saturday, October 6 from 8 a.m. to 11 a.m. (CT) in the Club House. There will be a $20 charge for this class. All items needed for this class will be supplied. Come join us in the art of making jelly and jams. Homemade jams and jellies make appreciated gifts from friends and family who have learned basic skills in the art of canning and food preservation. You will learn step-by-step beginners recipe for a simple, fun process that will work like a charm. Learn how your grandmothers use to make jelly and jam. Share the experience with a loved one and make that lasting memory. There are limited slots available so call or email now to reserve yours. The Panhandle Pioneer Settlement is a living museum documenting rural life in NW Florida since the early 1800s. It is located in Sam Atkins Park, about one mile west of the intersection of Hwy 71 and Hwy 20. Follow HWY 20 West out of Blountstown. Look for signs for Sam Atkins Park. Turn North at Lindys Fried Chicken (Silas Green St.). Follow the signs. For more information, call 674-2777 or email info@panhandlepioneer.org. For more information on the Panhandle Pioneer Settlements historical Buildings, please view www. panhandlepioneer.org.Free hunter safety Internet-completion course in Liberty Co.The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) is offering a free hunter safety Internet-completion course in Liberty County. The course is Saturday, September 22 from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Woodmen of the World Camp, 22459 N.E. Woodmen of the World Road in Hosford. Students must complete the Internet course before coming to class and bring does not have to be notarized. An adult must accompany children under the age of 16 at all times. Students are encouraged to bring a pencil and paper with them to take notes. The hunter safety course is required for people born on or after June 1, 1975, to purchase a Florida hunting license. The ing requirements for all other states and Canadian provinces. People interested in attending this course can register online and obtain information about future hunter safety classes at www. myfwc.com, or by calling hunter safety coordinator George Warthen at the FWCs 265-3676. 8 p.m., Grace United Methodist Church, Hosford BIRTHDAYS Ashley Small & Tera Eden LCHS class of 2002 plans ten year reunionThe LCHS Class of 2002 will be celebrating their 10 year reunion during the Bristol/Blountstown football game on Oct. 9. Saturday, Oct. 20 activities will include dinner on the Lady Anderson. Deadline for payment for the Lady Anderson is Oct. 6. If you would like to attend or have any further questions, please email Leann Nobles Summers at threesummers10@yahoo.com.Volunteer Fire Fighters embark on NicevilleThe seventh Annual Volunteer Fire Fighters weekend was just held in Niceville. Liberty County volunteers were among representation from Bristol Fire Department, Estiffanulga Fire Department and Rock Bluff Fire Department. The weekend consisted of different training classes portunities to learn the new technical ways Trauma First Response, Meth Lab AwareWriting. erty County were treated to a recognition banquet Saturday night where there were special guest speakers and entertainment. The group had a great weekend, learned a lot and now plan to share this with our Liberty County for your continued support Pioneer SettlementBlacksmith CLASS8 a.m. (CT)Donations needed for Terry Sanders surgeryTerry Sanders needs help with expenses associated with getting to and from Jacksonville to the Mayo Clinic for high risk gall bladder surgery. Donation jars have been placed around the community and monetary contributions are now being accepted. For more information about how you can help please call Reverend Kyle Peddie at (850) 379-8412.

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SEPTEMBER 19, 2012 / THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL PPage 5 THE ARTS Contributions to Bill Montford for State Senate are limited to $500 per person or organization and are not deductible as charitable contributions for Federal income tax purposes. Political advertisement paid for and approved by Bill Montford, Democrat, for State Senate, District 3. Chipola College Gala A Grand Night this TThursdayMARIANNAThe new $16 million Chipola College Center for the Arts opens Thursday, Sept. 20 with A Grand Night featuring two-time Emmy Award-winning actress Sally Struthers and Broadway star Tony Yazbeck. The event includes an after party with live music and heavy hors doeuvres. Dress is semi-formal. General admission tickets$50are available at the Chipola Center for the Arts, The Marianna Fitness Center and the Gazebo Caf. Call (850) 718-2220 for credit card orders, or contact sirmonc@ chipola.edu Charles Sirmon, Director of Theatre at Chipola, says, Everyone is going to love Sally. Shes a hoot and a great talent. Struthers will perform her one-woman show which includes tales from her days as Gloria on All in the Family, and also about her real life romance with Elvis Presley. In between, shell sing a couple of numbers, likely Little Girls from her role as Miss Hannigan in Annie and maybe even a John Prine song Hello in There, made popular by Bette Midler. Struthers is also expected to mix with the crowd at the after-party immediately following the show. Tony Yazbeck will sing and tap dance his way across the brand new Chipola stage and into the hearts of the Yazbeck most recently played the role of Billy Flynn in the Broadway production of Chicago. Other Broadway credits include: White Christmas (Phil Davis), Gypsy (Tulsa), A Chorus Line (Al), Never Gonna Dance, Oklahoma and Gypsy with Tyne Daly. Tony has performed at Carnegie Hall and many of the top nightclub and concert venues in New York City. On Television, Tony has been featured on As The World season of the new NBC hit series Smash about the creation of a Broadway musical. For more information about the gala, call (850) 718-2227. Sally Struthers TT ony YazbeckPanama City artist Paul Brent coming to Sunday Afternoon with the ArtsPanama City artist Paul Brent will be a guest artist at the eighth annual Sunday Afternoon with the Arts exhibit and reception coming up Nov. 4 from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. at the Chipola Arts Center in Marianna. Bay County in 1969 and his paintings in watercolor and oil have deftly portrayed the many aspects of the area capturing the innate beauty on paper and canvas. Often he is referred to as Americas best know coastal artist and he is best known for his idyllic watercolors of coastal life. In 1982, after some experimentation, he launched a new style that featured a painted wash background with drips and splashes of watercolor that ran off the image area. He would and depth through the chemical reaction of the disbackground, Paul Brent would paint detailed, almost triangles, circles and sometimes three dimensional shapes. His work later become more realistic with less and less splashes and geometries. The white edge of paper remained but instead of a drip edge he moved to a where the irregular edge of an inner image was border. He called this style a Structured Vignette. He began to paint scenic coastal landscapes and seaartists to portray the new town of Seaside Florida when it began to be built. His work of early Seaside became well known as he entered the print publishing business in 1986. In a recent trade publication advertisement Paul Brent used the quote one artist many visions and a retrospective of his professional work would validate the claim. (For more about Paul, go to his website at www.paulbrent.com). There is still time for artists wishing to exhibit their work at Sunday Afternoon with the Arts to get their entry forms in, but they must hurry as the deadline is Oct. 8. Entry forms are available on the Artists Guild samcarnley@gmail.com. Please contact Michele Tabor Kimbrough for more information at mtk4art@ embarqmail.com. PPaulB Brent

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Are we better off today than four years ago? Like it or not, the answer Wall Street was in free fall seriously crisis never seen before. ties were, and still are, derelict in their Wall Street which prevented banks from getting into the investthat Republicans further loosened restrictions on smart enough to realize that he, the U.S. and all of stopped sucking their political thumb and supported the Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008, was a subset. Americas economically ignorant are still fuming Wall Street. Whether you like Wall Street and big tions on Wall Street to prevent a replay of this event, but Republicans squealed like pigs stuck in a fence. The result is that the U.S. will probably have another The August 2012 jobs report was positive, but the market did not provide hundreds of thousands of jobs the news media. If people would look at the charts, they would recognize that during were lost. Jobs continued to be lost of the Obama administration. Since then, a small number of jobs have been added each month. There is ample historical data on predictable based on the severity of the recession. Recovery from the 2008 collapse of the U.S economy is occurring. The news media and Obama opponomic ignorance at its worst. The collapse of the housing market carved out precipitated the housing crash along with unfunded The only solution to recovery from a recession is an initial stimulus of cash, lots of it in the short term. nomic theory but it works. With the markets primed with government spending, then work on the longterm solution to the problem. Thats the rub. The Republican long-term solution nomic policies? Hey, I have a solution. Republicans and Democrats should stop their partisan thumb sucking and cooperate on scrubbing down the federal budget to the required government spending plus a percentage of revenue for debt reduction. Page 6 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEpPTEMBER 19, 2012 COMMENTARYCORNERJerry Cox is a retired military OXS Late Night LaughsA recaRECAP oOF recentRECENT obOBSerER Vation ATIONS by BY lateLATE niNIGhtHT tV TV hoHOStTS.Are we better off today than four years ago? McDonalds announced theyre going to start announced they will start announcing their death toll. ConanONAN OBrienRIEN JAY LENO JIMMY FF ALLON ConanONAN OBrienRIEN JIMMY F F ALLON JAY LENO CRAIGG FFERGGUSSON JAY LENO ConanONAN OBrienRIEN JAY LENOThe CEO of IKEA announced that he will repieces of a gold watch with instructions on how to put it together. JIMMY FF ALLONtaxes. JIMMY KIMMEL

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SEPTEMBER 19, 2012 / THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL PPage 7 COMMENTARY WASHINGTONMERRY-GO-ROUNDby Douglas Cohn and Eleanor Clift Romney and your mortgage interest deductionWASHINGTON There is a strong suspicion among policy analysts and voters alike that Mitt Romneys reluctance to spell out which loopholes he would close in the tax code, stems from the same motivation as his refusal to release more of his tax has concluded its better to take the heat from the media than to Topping the list of likely loopholes that if closed could yield interest paid on home mortgages. Take a look at your mortgage statement the interest paid each month is typically far greater than the amount applied to principle. Tampering with that deduction is like tampering with Social Security, its the economic lifeblood for middle-income Americans. Its another third rail in politics touch it and you die. Romney and running mate Paul Ryan understand the political danger, which is why theyre being coy. They want voters to think theyre only targeting loopholes that the super rich use. But independent analysts say theres not enough money at the very top to make up for the tax cuts Romney proposes while also leaving defense spending untouched. Romney would have to dig deeper into the pockets of the middle class and according to the non-partisan Tax Policy Center, his plan would cost middle class families an average $2,000 more a year in taxes. That would amount to a massive tax increase on the middle class at a time when politicians in both parties say thats the last thing they want. It would also impose a huge burden on the housing industry, a sector of the economy that has been slow to recover from the Great Recession. Even if its just in the talking ery, or in the political team of Romney-Ryan that is behind the ill-conceived measure. In fairness, we should point out that cutting back or even eliminating the home mortgage deduction is part of the Simpsonidea because of the political peril it brings. Other loopholes that Romney and Ryan likely have in mind would also run into a buzz saw of opposition. They include the deduction for health insurance, which employers get when they and executives with high-end health coverage do not pay taxes on the cost of those policies. Curbing the tax deduction for charitable contributions is another time-honored loophole that most people consider part of charitable giving in America and not some loophole or problem that must be eliminated. The Simpson Bowles commission acknowledged the political risk involved with its proposals and offered various paths that politicians could take short of outright striking popular loopholes. Home mortgage interest deductions for example could be limited and exclude second homes and vacation homes. Investment properties or rental properties raise questions as well. Once you start down the path of limiting loopholes, it bespirit and slow new investment if such time-honored write-offs were suddenly withdrawn. Its a great applause line for a politician to promise to close tax loopholes. But woe to the politician who wants to eliminate or pare down popular deductions. The value of a tax loophole is in the eye of the beholder and most voters have no idea how much they take advantage of Uncle Sams largesse through the tax code.

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Page 8 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEpPTEMBER 19, 2012 Pastor Appreciation Day at Bristol Church of God Pastor Terry Blackburn digs into a gift bag in his favorite colors orange and blue. Although most of the congregation are FSU Seminole fans, they tolerate his support of the Florida Gators. dollar bills falling like raindrops, a gift from the children of the church. The congregation of the Bristol Church of God made sure their pastor Terry Blackburn and his wife, Cathy, know theyre glad to have them around during their annual Pastor Appreciation Day on Sunday, Sept. 9. The couple have served the church for the past 17 years. The two are shown seated above as they hear from David Smith as he speaks on behalf of the church youth group while John Ritter looks on. ASHLEE COPELAND PHOTOS OPEN ARMS ASSEMBLY OF GOD Pastor Bill Mayo invites everyone to come join us at Open Arms Assembly of God in Kinard for revival with Evangelist Jason Steege for the following dates: CrafRAFT and AND BaAKeE SaleALE Open Arms Assembly of God of Kinard will Handmade crafts and baked goods will STT MARY MISSIONARY BAP-T TISTT CHURCH The Usher Ministry of Blountstown will be celebrating our Annual Usher Day We are praying for a STT PAUL A.M.E. CHURCH There will be a Gospel Musical Explosion Georgia and Alabama at this great event Notes of Thanks like to thank everyone for the prayers and love shown to them during his illWe would especially like to thank Hospital; Chaplain Ronnie Wright and the nursing staff of Covenant Hospice; the memorial service; Kathy Bridges and Jeanie Rogers for the beautiful singing; the Relief Society sisters from the Church the food provided after the service and the sisters from Blountstown community A big thanks goes to Marlon Peavy he helped us arrange our loved ones Terry Armstrong for being an anchor in May God bless each and everyone Patti Shell, Jeanne Shell Kever, Mickey and Mariah Kever, Alexander James Shell, Stacy and Michelle Brown and children and Carol and Patrick Wilson Departments would like to express a thank you to all the businesses that photographers and a special thank you for all participants that rode in the rain to help make the second Annual Poker We hope that you will continue to Thanks again, Calhoun County Volunteer Fire Departments NEWS FROM THE PEWS

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SEPTEMBER 19, 2012 / THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL PPage 9 The Ninth Annual Art Alive show will open Tuesday, Sept. 25 from 6 p.m. until 8 p.m. It is held at the Veterans Memorial Park Civic Center in Bristol. This year there will be a large and varied assortment of artwork and exhibits, including some childrens artwork. This is a good chance to see how talented our friends and neighbors are. Many artists are coming from surrounding counties. A reception will be held on Tuesday and everyone will have a chance to meet the artists. The last day of the Art Show will be Saturday, Oct. 6. There is no charge for admission. For additional informa643-5491 This show is sponsored by the Liberty County Arts Council and the Board of County Commissioners. Alive...showcases work by local artists for the 9th year in BristolrtsPieces by Polina Vollkova, above; Irvin L. Brunson, center; and Minnie Shuler, below, will be featured. from Darlene V. EarhartThe next Writers Guild meeting will be on Saturday, Sept. 22 at 1 p.m. at the Calhoun County Library. What are you working on lately? Have you started, completed or just considered your submission to the No-Local Writers Guild meeting set Saturday at library in Blountstown vember Saturday Afternoon with the Arts exhibit? Considering that until recently, visual arts have been the only submissions allowed, authors of all levels are being given the opportunity to show their creativity with the English language. Remembering that reading with comprehension takes a bit of time, written submissions can be whatever length, form or medium you prefer short-short, short story, chapter, poem, limerick or whatever you imagine. The exhibit runs from Nov. 4 -16. Entries must be postmarked by Oct. 8. Art must be delivered to Chipola Art Center on Nov. 1 and must be picked up on Nov. 16. If you are in need of help of any kind with your creative endeavors, bring your ideas or works-in-progress to the next Writers Guild meeting on Saturday, Sept. 22. Maybe we can all help one another. Contact me at the Library at 674-5200 on weekday afternoons if you have any questions. THE ARTS

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Page 10 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEpPTEMBER 19, 2012 Fish FrySept. 22 located at Lake House Rest., Hwy. 20 West, in BlountstownPaid for by James Jimmy Baggett, NPA, for Calhoun Co. Sheriff Come Meet & Greet Candidate James Jimmy Baggett for Calhoun County Sheriff SPEECIALT TY POSTTS Flat Face FACTT ORR Y SEECONDS IteTEMS SubjectUBJECT to TO a A Vailability AILABILITY Liberty Post & Barn Pole Inc.Phone (850) 643-5995WE'VE GOT ThHE FEncNCE pPOsSTsS TO MEET YOUrR nNEEDsS. by Ann Hosford SSmith, Bristol Lions Club PresidentDarlene Laible-Crowe, her guide dog, Pam and her assistant Byron Hardy, were guests of the Bristol Lions Club at their monthly August meeting at the Apalachee Restaurant. Darlene was born with normal vision and hearing, but over the past 20 years, several diseases robbed her of these two key senses. Most of us are born with touch, taste and smell. Loss of any one of these senses causes a person to drastically change how they experience the world around them. Imagine just trying to cook a meal or use the bathroom with only your senses of touch, taste and smell! Over 10.6 million Americans are both deaf and blind. One of the main causes is Ushers Syndrome, also known as retinitis pigmentosa. What is it like for a deafblind person? Darlene explained that 10% of all deaf-blind people cannot see or hear anything at all, while 90% have varying degrees of shadowy eyesight or crackling-buzzing noises. It is a feeling of being totally alone. Blind people carry a white cane so they can tap out the ground before them, or they have a guide dog to lead the way. Darlenes guide dog, Pam, is a yellow Labrador Retriever and was trained by the Southeastern Guide Dogs Association. Pam goes with Darlene everywhere. Darlene has become a spokesperson for the Florida Deaf-Blind Association (FDBA) and for the new Support Service Provider (SSP) program that trains people to accompany deaf-blind persons and interpret the environment around them so they can remain as independent as possible. Florida has lagged behind other states in deaf-blind services and only recently set up a Task Force The Florida Division of Blind Services is housed under the Department of Education and is in the process of developing a database that will match deaf-blind people with an appropriately trained Service Provider. Many Floridians are unaware of these services. Each year, Bristol Lions Club raises money to support blind and deaf people Liberty County High School Homecoming Game. When you see a member of the local club, consider helping them in this important cause.FDBSS member, accompanied by guide dog, speaks to Lions Club with guest speaker Darlene Laible-Crowe and her guide dog Pam.

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SEPTEMBER 19, 2012 / THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL PPage 11 ACCEPTING NNEW PPaA TIENTSLaban Bontrager, DMD12761 NW Pea Ridge Rd., Bristol, FL 32321TELEPHONE 643-5417 www.bristoldentalclinic.com DEENTTURERE LABB ON PREMPREMISEESSame-Day Service on RR epairs & R R elinesBristol Dental ClinicMonica Bontrager, DMD LOGGERS! Dont get stopped in your tracks. Call us!Premium namebrand tires CORRLETTETTS R ROOFING LLCLR FREE EESTIMa A TESMMichael Corlett (850) 643-7062 18831 State RRoad 20 West H 2 O Wellness Center CELEBRATING OURJoin us for a celebrationMMonday, October 1FROM 4 TO 7 P.M. (CT) Tell em you saw it in the Journal They were targeting large dollar items that could be sold easily, said Phillips. Tuesday he said nothing has been recovered and the companys Loss Prevention Department is just beginning to sort through hours of security video and examining receipts. In addition to stealing inventory from the store, numerous fraudulent returns were made sometimes using the same item over and over, according to the BPD report. Were still trying to tell which are the legitimate returns, Phillips said. How did they do it? One of those arrested knew exactly where the security cameras were and how to conceal stuff out of range, said Phillips. When BPD Lt. Timothy Partridge contacted the acting store manager, they began going through the returns that the former manager, Charles Allen Swearington, had signed off on. that had been returned numerous times by Swearingtons brother-inlaw, Robert Lee Miller, who was arrested, and another relative who was not charged. Swearington admitted to Partridge that he would give Miller items around the camera. He said he and Kathryn Murphy, Jeremiah Grzegorczyk and Bradley Terry were at the cash registers when Miller would come through. A woman told the police department she drove Austin Lee Scott to the store after he got a call from Terry that plastic totes were on sale for $6.99. Scott is shown on store video checking out at the cash register, holding a big plastic tote and wearing a hat he had just picked up. Partridge said the price tag was shown dangling from the hat in the store video. Scott paid only for the tote. She said that Scott and some of the others joked about how this box must weigh 50 pounds because it was packed with merchandise they snuck out of the store. Troubled by what she saw, she went to see Phillips the next day and told him about the theft. She also reported hearing Scott and Terry cameras they had previously stolen from Alco. Grzegorczyk admitted to Partridge that he served as a lookout numerous times so Swearington could remove items unnoticed and Miller could take them out the back door of the store. Because his truck was used to transport some of the stolen goods, the police department seized Millers vehicle. Phillips, who has been with Alco for about three years and previously worked as a manager with Wal-Mart for 15 years in Missouri and Kansas, has dealt with employee theft before. Still, he said what happened at the Blountstown store, really surprised me. Co-workers at the store were shocked to learn of the thefts, he said. Well just assess the damage and continue forward. He said the jobs vacated by those back to full staff, he said. The Blountstown store receives about 400 job applications a month, he said, but since news of the arrests has become known, We got 250 applications in the last week. went home, her husband drove to the Sunshine State Cypress Mill. There, she said, he struck her several mores times and threatened to kill her. Soon after he got back on the road, a deputy caught up with the truck but Burke managed to elude arrest at that time. to give a statement. He said he had been told that his wife and Durden were cooking methamphetamine at the residence they shared on SR 65 and was worried about his daughter being there. He and his cousin went to the house, parking at a nearby residence. Burke approached the home on foot. He said he entered through a window and grabbed his daughter. He said Durden then came at him and they wifes wrist and took her to his cousins truck, placing his daughter in the back seat and putting Amanda in the front seat between him and Freddie. When he was asked to explain the injuries to his wifes face, Burke said it must have happened when she was getting into the truck. He said after he dropped off his cousin, he and Amanda just talked. He did admit Burke, who is on state probation, was taken into custody on charges relating to Saturdays event as well as other outstanding warrants. His cousin also violated his probation and is being held without bond. RReward offered for info on vandalismVandals have struck at Liberty Countys newest business and owner Herbert Pitts is offering a reward for information on the person who knocked out the windows Pitts arrived at Cazs Bait & Tackle at 8 a.m. Tuesday in the front door. He said he hadnt noticed anything suspicious the previous day or evening. The shop opened Aug. 1 at the old Slip and Slide location on CR 333. Anyone with information about the incident can contact Pitts at 643-2248. Several windows were shattered at Cazs Bait and Tackle Monday night in Liberty County.In order to improve our services the CalhounLiberty Journal has a new nationwide, toll-free faFAX nuNUMBER: (888) 400-5810 same at (850) 643-3333. If you should have ALCO THEFTS continued from the front pageKIDNAPPING continued from the front page

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Page 12 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEpPTEMBER 19, 2012BRISTOL The Veterans Memo rial Railroad (VMR) committee is currently in the process of planning for its annual Halloween Event. This years theme will be Creature from the Black Lagoon. We are very excited and hope to provide a frightfully fun experience for everyone this year. Train rides are scheduled to leave the depot for the spooky swamps of Veterans Memorial Park on Friday, Oct. 26, Saturday, Oct. 27 and Wednesday, Oct. 31. The VMR committee has planned for a lot of new and exciting props and scenes this Halloween. The Halloween and Christmas events are extremely critical to the survival of Veterans Memorial Railroad. These two events are the primary fundraisers for the railroad and all proceeds go to paying the liability insurance and to keeping the railroad running safely and on schedule. We are reaching out to any individual, organization or business that would be willing support this worthy cause by volunteering a little of their time or resources. We need help with light carpentry, painting, designing and decorating from volunteers and imagineers. Were also looking for some spirited people who would enjoy dressing up and having a little fun spooking the riders. Veterans Memorial Railroad and Park is a wonderful resource to this community and the surrounding area. Please volunteer a little time of your time and come out and join us in supporting Liberty Countys Little Railroad! If your organization that would interested in providing concessions for this event, or if you would like more information, please contact David Deck at (850) 643-5016 or Melissa Durham at (850)-6438388. Volunteers sought to help with Halloween train ride at Veterans Memorial RRRRelay for Life to kick off Oct. 11 in BBlountstownBLOUNTSTOWN Please join us this year in the American Cancer Societys Our kick off is going to be at the United Methodist Church of Blountstown Thursday, October 11 at 7 p.m. (ET). Come join us for fun and food and to learn how you can join the 2013 Calhoun/Liberty Relay celebrate survivors, remember those who have lost the battle For more information, please call Dana Burns at (850) 556-5414 or Sammy Singletary at (850) 643-7815. Pony rides, bounce house & much more2nd annual arts and crafts sale in Bristol Oct. 6Liberty County 4-H would like to invite everyone out October 6, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. (ET) to their second Annual Arts and Crafts Sale at Veterans Memorial Civic Center. We have tables selling fall decorations, needlecrafts, stained glass, handbags and much more, with vendors coming from Tallahassee to Panama City. Also included will be baked goods, chili and beverages. Face painting, pony rides, bounce house are just a few things that children will enjoy. Plus, you can enjoy the art show and train rides with the Liberty County Arts Council and Veterans Memorial Railroad. If you are a vendor and would like to join us, please give us a call at 643-2229 for an application. Come on out with the family and enjoy Wiregrass Antique and Collector Car Show Oct. 6DOTHAN The annual Wiregrass Antique and Collector Car Show, hosted by the Wiregrass Antique and Collector Car Club, will be held at Landmark Park October 6 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. More than 150 collector cars, trucks and motorcycles will be on display for one of the areas biggest car shows. AModels, muscle cars, mini-trucks, street rods and more will comprise the classes that will be on display. The featured car this year will be Orphaned Cars, or cars that are no longer in production. and third places in each class, plus club with the most participation, longest distance driven and oldest vehicle registered. Registration is from 8 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. on the day of the event. No early registration will be accepted. Admission is $5 for adults, $3 for kids and free for park members. For rules and entry forms, visit www.landmarkpark.com. The Car Show is sponsored by WDHN TV and The Joy FM 94.3. The winner of Landmark Parks annual drawing for $500 will also be announced at the Car Show. By now, all members should have received 12 drawing tickets in the mail. Complete the ticket stubs with your name and address and mail the stubs, along with your check for $2 per ticket, in the return envelope. If you would like to purchase additional tickets, please call the park at (334) 794-3452. Thanks to all who have already purchased tickets. Landmark Park is a 135-acre historical and natural science park located on U.S. Highway 431 North in Dothan, AL. For more information, contact the park at (334) 794-3452. Care with Flare 5K scheduled in MMarianna Saturday, Nov. 3MariannaARIANNA The City of Marianna Fire Department and Covenant Hospice will hold the Care with Flare 5K Run/Walk Saturday, November 3. We are excited to announce the addition of a Post-Race Celebration and Family Fun Day Formerly known as the Ladder Scatter 5K, the 2011 event boasted almost 150 runners and walkers. We are very excited to announce the additional activities to this years event, said Angela Jackson, Development Specialist for Covenant Hospice. Entries made by October 8 will be $20, receive a race packet and T-shirt. After October 8, the cost will increase to $25 and T-shirt and Registration will start at 7:30 a.m. the day of the event and the race will begin at 9 a.m. The student entry fee will be $10. There will also be a free kids one mile fun run for children under the age of 14. Captain George Gay and the Marianna Fire Department will be serving their famous barbecue lunch plates for $5. And you can carnival games and exhibits for $5 per person until 2 p.m. Awards will be given in the following categories: Overall Male; Overall Female; all age groups, top three male and top three female, age groups: 14 years old and under, 15-19 years old, 20-24 years old, 25-29 years old, 30-34 years old, 35-39 years old, 40-44 years old, 45-49 years old, 50-54 years old, 55-59 years old, 60 years old and up wheeled division. Register online at www.eventwww.active.com. For more info, call (850) 482-8520 or (850) 209-8008.Covenant Hospice to offer free grief camp for childrenMARIANNA The Childrens Support Services Department of Covenant Hospice is sponsoring a one-day grief support camp. Camp Monarch will be held from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 13 at Seacrest Wolf Preserve located at 3449 Bonnett Pond Road. This is a unique through 15 that have recently experienced the loss of a loved one or have a loved one with a terminal illness. The camp will feature activities and games tailored for a variety of age groups, including crafts, Native American music, storytelling, close encounters with the beautiful Seacrest Wolves and much more. The camp is free to all participants and will include breakfast, lunch and snacks. The deadline for registration is Oct. 1. To register or for more information, please call Riley Henderson at 482-8520. organization dedicated to providing comprehensive, compassionate services to patients and loved ones during times of life-limiting illnesses. The focus of Covenant Hospice is to enable its patients to live as fully and comfortably as posto assist patients loved ones in coping with end-of-life issues and the eventual death of the patient, and to improve care for all patients at the end of their lives by example and education.

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SEPTEMBER 19, 2012 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL PPage 13 Willis, Stephens to exchange vows Oct. 20 at Four Oaks FarmhouseMr. and Mrs. Har rell Willis of Iron City, GA announce the engagement and upcoming marriage of their daughter, Gail to Jason Edward Stephens, son of Becca and the late Wayne Stephens, all of Marianna. The bride-elect is the granddaughter of the late Edgar and Beulah Willis and the late Merle Richardson, all of Donalsonville, GA and the late Collie Kirkland of Tallahassee. She is a 1994 graduate of Seminole County High School and a 2002 graduate of Bainbridge College. She is now employed with the GA Department of Corrections as an Accountant Parapro. The future groom is the grandson of Mr. and Mrs. Lester Williams of Marianna and Barbara Cox of Clarksville and the late Ed Stephens of Blountstown. Upon graduating Altha High School in 1999, he enlisted in the Marines, serving eight with WG Yates Construction. The wedding is set for October 20 at 4 p.m. (ET) at Four Oaks Farmhouse at Tom and Brandi Trawick Rd. No local invitations will be sent. All family and friends are invited to attend. birthdaysRROsSALINA MMARIA BBARBERRosalina Maria Barber celebrated her fourth birthday August 27. She is the daughter of Miguelina and the late Zac Barber of Tallahassee. Her grandparents are Kathy Shepard, Rene and Mary Solano, all of Tallahassee, and Jackie Barber of Rock Bluff. She celebrated with a Hello Kitty theme party at her house. She enjoys dancing, dressing up, reading books, spending time with grandparents, aunts and uncles and learning things not to do with her cousins. She loves learning about her daddy, hearing all the funny stories about when he was little like her and looking at his pictures. CHAMIYA DENAYsSHA WILLIAMsSChamiya Denaysha Williams will celebrate her daughter of Dallas and Chivas Williams of Bristol. Her grandparents are Dallas and Patricia Hogans and Jackie Williams, all of Bristol, and Jerome Oliver of Greensboro. Her great-grandparents are Nancy Bacon, Geraldine and the late Charlie Williams and the late Dallas Hogans, all of Bristol, Charles Wright of New York and Bernice Glover of Blountstown. Her siblings are Javis Davis and Aaliyah, Chivas, Jr. and Chivar Williams. She enjoys going to Pre-K, attending the 21st Century After School Program, going shopping with her mommy, helping out with her little brothers, C.J. and Var, and staying in P.C. to swim in the pool. She will be celebrating with a two day trip to Panama City. LLILLIAN LLILY JANE B BAGGETTEverett and Danielle Baggett of Marianna are proud to announce the birth of their daughter, Lillian Lily Jane Baggett, born Tuesday, September 4, 2012. She weighed 9 lbs., 1 oz. and measured 21 inches long. Maternal grandparents are Dussia and Jennifer Shuler of Bristol and Michelle Furr of Hosford. Paternal grandparents are Ferlon and Robbin Baggett of Clarksville and Scott and Stacy Davis of Compass Lake. She was welcomed home by her big brother, Brody Baggett and a host of family and friends. birth wedding Ralph and Olivia Whitfield celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary Saturday, Sept. 8 at the Veterans Memorial Civic Center. They had a wonderful time with family and many friends who attended. celebrate 50th anniversary anniversary ITS VERY WiISE TO ADVERTiISE in the Calhoun-Liberty JOURNAL and CLJNews.cCOM Call us at (850) 643-3333Email: thejournal@fairpoint.net

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Page 14 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEpPTEMBER 19, 2012 CASH BBALANCEE BR BROUGHTT FORR WARRD E ESTTIMMATE TED REREVEENUEES: Taxes Millage Per $1000 Ad Valorem Taxes 3.46 Mills 695,598 - - 695,598 Ad Valorem Taxes 6.54 Mills 1,329,597 - - 1,329,597 Sales & Use Taxes 237,964 237,964 Charges for Services 23,798 704,355 141,400 869,553 Intergovernmental Revenue 2,500,070 4,092,863 975,382 588,490 8,156,805 Licenses & Permits 13,828 - 13,828 Fines & Forfeitures 54,992 5,951 52,500 113,443 Interest Earned/Other 16,545 34,232 - 50,777To TOTal AL RREvVEnuNUES 3,542,795 6,166,998 1,116,782 588,490 52,500 11,467,565 OTTHERER FINANCING SOURRCEES Other Financing Sources Operating Transfers In 73,855 1,104,945 - 1,178,800Transfers from Board of County Commissioners 2,223,263 2,223,26311,000 11,000To TOTal AL oOThHER financingFINANCING souSOURcCEsS 84,855 1,104,945 2,223,263 - 3,413,063To TOTal AL EsESTiIMaA TEdD RREvVEnuNUE & FinancingINANCING souSOURcCEsS 3,627,650 7,271,943 3,340,045 588,490 52,500 14,880,628E EXPEENDITTURERES General Governmental 1,062,916 1,489,457 41,000 2,593,373 Public Safety 249,956 1,320,152 1,850,588 11,500 3,432,196 Physical Environment 85,214 1,493,284 1,578,498 Transportation 2,665,468 2,665,468 Debt Services Human Services 203,513 203,513 Economic Environment 12,819 12,819 Culture and Recreation 595,414 25,637 621,051 Contingency 34,780 34,780To TOTal AL ExpEXPEndiNDITuUREsS 2,244,612 5,504,540 3,340,045 - 52,500 11,141,697 OTTHERER FINANCING USEES Operating Transfers Out 493,607 431,855 588,490 1,513,952 Reserves 1,716 - - 1,716To TOTal AL OThHER financingFINANCING usUSEsS 1,383,038 1,767,403 588,490 - 3,738,931To TOTal AL appAPP RopOPRiaIA TEdD ExpXPEndiNDITuUREsS AND RERESERER VEES 3,627,650 7,271,943 3,340,045 588,490 52,500 14,880,628TT otalcounCOUNTY ofOF liLIBERTY fiscalFISCAL YEaAR 2011-2012 Constitutional Capital Fund R Revenue Fund Fund Debt E Expendable TTHEE TETENTT AT TIVEE, ADOPTETED, AND/ORR FINAL BBUDGETETS ARERE ON FILEE IN TTHEE OFFICEE OF TTHEE ABBOVEE-MEMENTTIONEED TT AXING AUTTHORRITYTY AS A PUBBLIC RERECORRD. BBUDGETET SUMMMMARYRY S uU pP pP lL E M E nN T A L NOTTICEE OF SUPPLEMEEMENTT AL BBUDGETET HEEARRING FORR TTHEE YE YEARR 2011-2012 FORR TTHEE LIBERTYBERTY COUNTYTY BBOARRD OF COUNTYTY COMMMMISSIONERERS Robert Hill, Clerk of Court Clerk to the Board of County Commissioners

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SEPTEMBER 19, 2012 / THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL PPage 15 CASH BBALANCEE BR BROUGHTT FORR WARRD 52,439 52,439 E ESTTIMMATE TED REREVEENUEES: Taxes Millage Per $1000 Ad Valorem Taxes 3.11 Mills 607,249 - - 607,249 Ad Valorem Taxes 6.89 Mills 1,345,318 - 1,345,318 Sales & Use Taxes 152,325 - - 152,325 Charges for Services 17,797 565,246 313,668 - 896,711 Intergovernmental Revenue 2,243,479 2,231,008 146,111 565,002 - 5,185,600 Licenses & Permits 17,780 - - 17,780 Fines & Forfeitures 10,959 8,708 - 15,933 35,600 Interest Earned/Other 35,063 17,477 - - 52,540To TOTal AL RREvVEnuNUES 3,084,652 4,167,757 459,779 565,002 15,933 8,293,123 OTTHERER FINANCING SOURRCEES Other Financing Sources Operating Transfers In 88,855 1,084,688 - - 1,173,543Transfers from Board of County Commissioners 2,263,085 - 2,263,085- - - -To TOTal AL oOThHER financingFINANCING souSOURcCEsS 88,855 1,084,688 2,263,085 - 3,436,628To TOTal AL EsESTiIMaA TEdD RREvVEnuNUE & FinancingINANCING souSOURcCEsS 3,225,946 5,252,445 2,722,864 565,002 15,933 11,782,190E EXPEPENDITTURERES General Governmental 857,635 1,198,018 - 13,551 2,069,204 Public Safety 216,487 501,478 1,524,846 - 2,382 2,245,193 Physical Environment 74,137 1,136,636 - - 1,210,773 Transportation 1,982,867 - - 1,982,867 Debt Services - - Human Services 169,433 - - 169,433 Economic Environment 10,627 - - 10,627 Culture and Recreation 493,542 - - 493,542 Contingency - - - -To TOTal AL ExEXPEndiNDITuUREsS 1,821,860 3,620,981 2,722,864 - 15,933 8,181,638 OTTHERER FINANCING USEES Operating Transfers Out 494,199 1,631,464 565,002 - 2,690,665 Reserves - - - -To TOTal AL OThHER financingFINANCING usUSEsS 1,404,086 1,631,464 565,002 - 3,600,552To TOTal AL a APPRoOPRiaIA TEdD ExXPEndiNDITuUREsS AND RERESERER VEES 3,225,946 5,252,445 2,722,864 565,002 15,933 11,782,190TT otal counCOUNTY ofOF liLIBERTY fiscalFISCAL YEaAR 2012-2013 Constitutional Capital Fund R Revenue Fund Fund Debt E Expendable TTHEE TETENTT AT TIVEE, ADOPTEPTED, AND/ORR FINAL BBUDGETETS ARERE ON FILEE IN TTHEE OFFICEE OF TTHEE ABBOVEE MEMENTTIONEED TT AXING AUTTHORRITYTY AS A PPUBBLIC RERECORRD. BBUDGETET SUMMMMARYRY NOTTICEE OF BBUDGETET HEEARRINGThe Liberty County Board of County Commissioners has A public hearing to make a FINAL DEECISION on the budget AND TT AXEES will be held on .Robert Hill, Clerk of Court Clerk to the Board of County Commissioners

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Page 16 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEpPTEMBER 19, 2012 SPORTSby Michael DeVuyst, contributinCONTRIBUTING WriterRITERFREEPORT The Blountstown Tigers raced out to a 23-0 lead and coasted to a 15 point victory against the Freeport Bulldogs last Friday night. Blountstown scored early and often, starting on drew Bennett. 80 yards out when Josh Taylor scored on a 20-yard put the Tigers with 2:38 left in the ter. pushed the score to 23-0. trailed 23-7 at the half. pushed the lead to 15 points 30-15 Freeport cut the lead again on found ee yards 22 with 10-play drive. Blountstown pulled ahead for good 37 PHIL COALEE PHOTT OS Blountstown cruises to victory over Freeport 37-22

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SEPTEMBER 19, 2012 / THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL PPage 17 SPORTSby Richard Williams, Journal sports writerClass 4A Marianna proved to be too much for visiting Class 1A Liberty County as the home team took a 26-7 non-district win. Liberty dropped to 1-2 with the loss and Marianna moved to 3-0. but after being ruled just short of the end zone on second Marianna followed with a short gain and then a quick sideline warning followed by a second sideline warning moved the home team 15 yards from the shadow of their end zone. and after Liberty stopped an 11 minute second quarter drive by Marianna it looked like the game would remain tied at erty fumbled the ball away. Marianna capitalized on the LCHS mistake with a 51-yard touchdown pass with 40.8 seconds left in the half. Marianna led at the half 7-0. The home team scored twice more in the second half before Liberty answered in the fourth quarter on a short run by Dusty Young. Marianna responded with anothnight. LCHS Head Coach Grant Grantham gave added he felt his team simply missed too many assignments and auto Grantham said. The Bulldogs host Franklin in a district contest next. also said he felt Franklin probably had the best athlete the team will face all year in Dwayne Griggs. Grantham said Griggs has the potential to score every time he touches the football. The Liberty County and Franklin game will be played in Bristol September 21 and starts at 7:30 p.m. Liberty falls to Marianna 26-7 Liberty Bulldogs move in on a Marianna player running the ball. LEFT: Libertys Chance Peterson (#1) and a teammate move in on the Marianna Bulldog running the ball. ABOVE: Libertys Dustin Watson (#6) runs the ball. RIGHT: Libertys Jordan Chaney (#11) tries to dodge a Marianna player. ABOVE: Libertys Harold Armstrong (#34) and a teammate tackle a Marianna player with the ball. ABOVE: Libertys Alex Marlowe (#5) tries to quick step past a Marianna player. RIGHT: Libertys offense gets ready for the snap at Fridays game.DANIEEL WILLIAMMS P PHOTT OS

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Page 18 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEpPTEMBER 19, 2012 In 2006, the Florida Legislature created a Business Community (ABC) School Program to promote partnerships in education and to address shortage of space in overcrowded school systems. An ABC school is a public school that offers instruction to students in kindergarten through third grade levels or any single or multiple grade levels within this range at facilities provided by a local business. agreeing to provide the appropriate types of space on their site for such a school, including the associated operating and upkeep expenses. Liberty County School District will provide an educational program, including the appropriate instructional supports, administration and staff, teachers, textbooks, materials, supplies, and curriculum for the school. First priority for admission of students to an ABC school will be given to the children of the owners and employees of the business. If additional capacity remains after children of the owners and employees are admitted, the host business may designate other neighboring businesses whose owners or employees may also participate in order to generate a reasonable number of students for the school. To be considered, the ABC school must comply with the constitutional class size requirements and have enough students in attendance to support the educational program. Parents of the enrolled students would be responsible for providing transportation to and from the school for their children. Within an ABC school, parents have the opportunity to spend more time with their children during the commute together to school each day and some parents may choose to serve as volunteers in the classroom based on its proximity to their work area. If you know of a business interested in submitting about this program, please contact Gay Lewis, District ABC Program Liaison, at 643-2275 ext. 233.Businesses can provide facilities for ABC Schools NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours or responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment.Cataracts?Freedom from Eye Glasses, Now a reality for many.Lee MMullis MM.D. and Cataract SpecialistSmart Lenses SMDr. Mulliss Smart LensSM procedure can produce clear vision without eyeglasses.Close-up, Far away & In-between CALL TODAY for a Smart Lens Evaluation MMullis EEye Institute 1600 Jenks Ave., Panama City(850)763-6666 The Florida Gators play Kentucky in the Swamp, this Saturday, 9-22-12. Air time on K-102.7 and Y-1000 is at 10:51 a.m. (CT).RRADIO FOOTBTBALL ON WYBTBT AND WPHKListen to football on WYBT and WPHK. This week.. BEBES treats grandparents with goodies Sept. 14BES hosted the annual Goodies for Grandparents breakfast on Friday, September 14. grade students were invited to come eat goodies for breakfast with their grandchildren. Samantha Taylor and the BHS Culinary Arts class prepared and served a fabulous cupcakes, fruit, strawberry shortcake, cookies, sausage balls and other wonderful goodies! Thanks to Samantha Taylor and her students for a truly spectacular breakfast and to all of the Grandparents who joined us for this event!Blountstown Elementary collecting box tops for educationBES is collecting Box Tops for Education. Look for products with the Box Top coupon on it, clip out the Box Top from these packages and send the Box Tops to school with your child. BES gets 10 cents for every Box Top collected. It really adds up very quickly. We appreciated your support and willingness to help make BES the BEST.DATES TO REMEMBER*Monday, Oct. 1 Individual Picture Retakes. *Friday, Oct. 5 Family Breakfast. *Friday, Oct. 12 Donuts for dads for Principal Ladona Kelley proudly announces Altha Schools Kids of Character for the month of August, demonstrating the character trait of Attentiveness. Brooks, Chelsie Lynn Showalter and David Jemison. planned September 27by Brianna YonThis year the Altha school culinary classes have been researching menus of popular restaurants that can be featured in Cats Cuisine. The upcoming meals will consist of an entre and dessert off the menu of a well known restaurant. The Longhorn Steakhouse. The menu will consist of a wheat roll, Caesar salad, Parmesan crusted chicken, a loaded baked potato and key Reservations can be made by calling the school. Please The Altha School Senior Class will be selling Coupon Books with great deals! coupons for several restaurants from the Bay area or from the Dothan area. The coupons will not expire unand they have been a great success. Remember, the sooner you buy the sooner youll start to save! btown elementary school altha wildcatsAugust Kids of CharacterAltha Senior class selling coupon books for $20 Calendar of Events

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MARIANNAAs school begins, Chipola College Teacher Education graduates are also going back to school, but this time they are in the K schools throughout the been a reality for the graduates of Chipolas School of Education, Science Education and Mathematics Education programs who sought positions were hired by the begin trend that has been consistent since Chipola graduated its Education and Exceptional Student Education, followed In addition to high placement rates, Chipola Teacher many new teachers do not return to the classroom after ates returned were rehired by their principals and returned The teachers coming from Chipolas education program Chipola offers the Bachelor of Science Degree, the Associate in Arts Degree, the Associate in Science De School Math or Science, English Education, Exceptional SEPTEMBER 19, 2012 / THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL PPage 19 NDAY SCHOOL LLUNCHMENUSeptember 19-25 NDAY Laban BBontrager, DMMD, M Monica BBontrager, DMMD Bristol Dental Clinic* Each breakfast includes a choice of assorted cereal, whole wheat buttered toast and juice. CALHOUN LLIBERTY Pea Ridge Rd in Bristol, Phone (850) 643-5417 MenuENUS SSPONSSORED BY:Altha FFA members celebrate successes of Calhoun County Farm Bureau September 15 spent their Thursday night celebrating the successes of plates and passed out door Raymond Russell and the members of the Calhoun Wednesday, September 19 Thursday, September 20 JV Friday, September 21 Varsity Saturday, September 22 District Monday, September 2 Tuesday, September 25 Vol Blountstown High Calendar of EventsChipola education graduates teaching in area schoolsTenisha Henderson, Character Education teacher at Golson Elementary School, reads to students Christina Pendleton and Camden Bruner. Henderson is one of the many Chipola education graduates working in area schools this Fall. All 2012 graduates from Chipolas Elementary Education, Science Education and Mathematics Education programs who sought positions within area school systems were hired. Chipola Cosmetology open for business to publicMARIANNAThe Chipola College Cosmetology program salon is now nominal fees including: shampoo, blow dry styles, haircuts, color, highlights, waxing, manicures, pedicures, relaxers, currently on Wednesday and Thursday The cosmetology program has a new home and a new online learning to access information at any time and from anywhere as they pursue their studies and prepare to take state board ronment, Cosmetology students also also includes a facial room, a manicure/ gram which takes approximately one based program is designed to prepare accepted into the program in January

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Page 20 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEpPTEMBER 19, 2012by Judy Ludlow, Calhoun County Extension ServiceThirteen innovative farmers and ranchers were recognized by University of Florida IFAS Extension and Farm Credit of northwest Florida Aug. 17 at the Jay Community Center in Santa Rosa County. This is the second year these two organizations have teamed up to honor a selection of the top innovative farmers in the Florida Panhandle. The purpose of the Agriculture Innovator Recognition Program is to annually recognize innovative farmers and ranchers from 16 Florida Panhandle counties. UF/IFAS County Agriculture Extension Agents recognize one honoree from each county. Bringing these top-notch farmers together for the event furthers new inno vations and collaboration. Highlighting these creative and successful farmers and ranchers helps increase aware ness of the diversity and innovation of todays modern agriculture. It is our goal, also, that the general public gains a deeper appreciation for the business of agriculture in their community. From the distinguished group of 13 farmers, an Innovator of the Year was selected to represent northwest Florida. This year Larry Ford, of Malone, who represented Jackson County, was selected as the Farm Credit of Northwest Florida Agriculture Innovator of the Year. Ford is well known as an excellent cotton, peanut, corn and cattle farmer. testing of conservation strip tillage and is still working is also a collaborator with the University of Floridas 10 year, sod-based crop rotation research project, that utilizes bahia grass in rotation with peanuts and cotton to reduce nematodes, diseases and other pests and increase crop yields. He has worked extensively with faculty of the UF/IFAS North Florida Research and Education Center and UF/IFAS Jackson County Extension Agents to develop innovative, practical solutions to farming challenges. Rodger and Marcia of Harmony Farm were recognized as the Calhoun County Agriculture Innovator of the Year by Calhoun County Extension. Throughout their 52-year marriage, Rodger and Marcia have had diverse and interesting agricultural ventures. From each experience they learned different farming skills and into each endeavor they integrated their own innovations. In Calhoun County, between 1993 and 2006, the Prices grew a muscadine vineyard (using seven varimiles total length) a fruit orchard (pear, plum, nectarine, peach, persimmon and apple) and Vertigro System strawberries. Currently, they grow 24 acres of perennial peanuts. Many of their innovations include building For example, some of these improvised tools included a boom-mounted hedge trimmer to prune the vineyard at ground level, a custom tractor-mounted rake to groom the vineyard rows, a blower/mister directed-spray pesticide applicator, a custom grape sorting/packing device, the use of Vertigro components to grow strawberries and a computer controlled, 12-zone, automated irrigation system. All were designed and built by Rodger and Marcia and each piece of grow their crops, manage pests and disease and make harvesting, storing and marketing cost-effective. Their produce was marketed via wholesale, u-pick and local farmer markets. Currently the 24 acres of perennial peanuts are meticulously managed by Rodger and Marcia and baled for hay by a neighboring farmer. In 2003 the Prices were honored as Calhoun County Extensions Outstanding Farm Family and they continue to eagerly promote awareness and appreciation of agriculture via their many hours of community service. When their vineyard was operational, they coordinated, taught and participated in educational workshops with both Calhoun County Extension and Florida A & M Universitys Center for Viticulture. Currently they volunteer with UF/IFAS Extension, USDA Farm Service Agency and the Natural Resources Conservation Service, as Master Gardeners, High School Envirothon Team Competition leaders and committee members. Calhoun County citizens and surrounding producers have gained knowledge about the diversity of agriculture by seeing the various crops grown by the Price Family over the years. Calhoun Countys Price family honored as Agriculture INNOVa A TORS OF TTHE YEaAR aMany of the Prices innovations include building needed tools by customizing equipment they already had. They created the following: trimmer to prune the vineyard at ground level rake to groom the vineyard rows spray pesticide applicator packing device nents to grow strawberries 12-zone, automated irrigation system. Tortoise Management Plan, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) approved a revised plan intended to guide continued recovery of the gopher tortoise through 2022. The plan includes conservation of both the gopher tortoise and species inhabiting its burrows, including the indigo snake, Florida pine snake, gopher frog and Florida mouse. We must consider the whole gopher tortoise community. Gopher tortoise burrows are extensive, typically six feet deep and 15 feet long and more than 350 other animals depend on them for food and shelter, said Deborah Burr, the FWCs gopher tortoise plan coordinator. Florida plans to focus on conserving both the gopher tortoise and other wildlife living in its burrows. The overall goal of the revised Gopher Tortoise Management Plan, available at MyFWC.com/ GopherTortoise, is to restore and maintain secure, viable populations throughout Florida so the species no longer warrants listing. Now a state-threatened species, the gopher tortoise is also a candidate for listing as a federally threatened species. The FWC will use the new plan to collaborate with numerous partners and work toward achieving a level of gopher tortoise conservation that would assist in precluding the need to list the species under the federal Endangered Species Act. The revised Gopher Tortoise Management Plan shifts the emphasis from the relocation guidelines and permitting implemented under the original 2007 plan to long-term, nonregulatory conservation actions and incentives. The new plan underwent three drafts and was shaped by extensive input from a core group of diverse stakeholders, several public comment periods and meetings and outreach with stakeholders, the public and scientists. It builds upon achievements online permitting, relocation of 13,385 tortoises from development sites and managing 92,500 acres of tortoise habitat. The conservation objectives of the revised plan are: keystone species. The FWC plans to work with private and public landowners and managers to get them the incentives they need to achieve gopher tortoise conservation, whether the issue is preserving habitat or relocating tortoises. It is illegal to harm gopher tortoises or their burrows in Florida. The major threat to the gopher tortoise is the destruction, fragmentation and degradation of its habitat. Factors contributing to habitat loss include urbanization, suppression of To identify a gopher tortoise, look for its stumpy, forelimbs that are adapted for digging. The adults oblong shell is generally tan, brown or gray. Goago by naturalist William Bartram as he explored Florida. Gopher tortoise conservation plan updated, FWC adds burrow inhabitants

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SEPTEMBER 19, 2012 / THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL PPage 21 Tom Detrick holds a knife made from the bones of a white-tailed deer. ABOVE: Sheilia Young, representing the Sons of the American Revolution, shows artifacts to visitors. RIGHT: Robert Dunaway and Lionel Young, from the Sons of the American Revolution, prepare their exhibit. ABOVE: Tom Detrick of Cottondale displays his work and collection at Archeology Day held at the Pioneer Settlement. The large item is a war club made from a Bison jaw bone. RIGHT: Detrick shows the visitors the his technique to making an arrowhead. LEFT: Tristan Tyer of Tallahassee looks at a display of artifacts and crafts. RIGHT: A young visitor at Archeology Day eyes an antique compass held by exhibitor Lionel Young, who is a member of the Sons of the American Revolution. P PHIL COALEE PPHOTT OS Organizations throughout the panhandle teamed up for a funthe public about archaeological and historical resources on Saturday, Sept. 8. The Florida Public Archaeological Network, University of West Florida, the Panhandle Pioneer Settlement and the Panhandle Archaeological Society in Tallahassee hosted a Public Archaeology Day at the Panhandle Pioneer Settlement in Blountstown. Archaeologists were on hand to help the public identify artifacts from their personal collections. Information about archaeology, historic preservation and heritage tourism were also available. Archaeology Day at the Settlement

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Page 22 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEpPTEMBER 19, 2012 If you're looking for a copy of TThe Calhoun-Liberty Journal you shouldn't have to look too far!...and, if the racks are empty by the time you get to the store, we invite you to subscribe and make sure you receive a copy every week! Just send us your name and mailing address, along with a check for $18 per year, to: Journal Subscriptions P.O. Box 536, Bristol 32321.TThe Calhoun-Liberty Journalis delivered every Wednesday morning to news racks in Calhoun & Liberty counties at these locations: CALHOUN COUNTTY LIBERTBERTY COUNTTY

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SEPTEMBER 19, 2012 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL PPage 23 Happy Birthday MotherInN LoOVinING MemoryEMORYMMary Jane SumnerAlthough you have been gone 61 years, we love and miss you very much. We think about you every day and you are always in our hearts. Happy Birthday on Sept. 19.Love from your daughter and son, Martha Jane and Rudy Sumner OBITUARIESRRAYMOND LlLOYD SMOKER NORTH FLORIDARRaymond L Lloyd Smoker, 87, of Chipley, passed away Friday, September 14, 2012 in D Dothan, AL AL. H He was born A April 8, 1925 to the late Joshua H Hanna and H Hannah (Beiler) Smoker in L Lancaster, PA A. H He lived in north Florida since 1988. H He was a farmer and was a member of RRed OOak Mennonite Church. Survivors include two sisters, T Thelma Grace Smith and Edna R Ruth Miller, both of Umatilla; special friends, Ben and Carol Yoder of Grand R Ridge and several nieces and nephews. Services were held Sunday, September 16 at R Red O Oak Mennonite Church. I Interment followed in R Red O Oak Mennonite Cemetery. A Adams Funeral H Home in Blountstown was in charge of the arrangements. O Online condolences may be made at www.adamsfh.com.K KARIN CARTWRIGHT BLOunUNTsSTOWnNKarin Cartwright, 57, of Blountstown, passed away W W ednesday, September 12, 2012. She was a homemaker and was of the Baptist faith. She was preceded in death by her husband, L Lander Cartwright. No services are planned at this time. Memorialization was by cremation. A Adams Funeral H Home in Blountstown was in charge of the arrangements. W WIllLLIAM J. FEsSTUsS EEUBANKsS GReenEENWOODWW illiam J. Festus Eubanks, 58, of Greenwood, passed away Saturday, September 15, 2012. H He had lived in Jackson County most of his life and was a tugboat captain for 31 years. H He loved his ing, wrestling, Spongebob and good-heartedly arguing with his granddaughters. H H e was preceded in death by his father, James Eubanks; one daughter, Karen A Annette H Hamm; one grandson, Jarid Kutchey. Survivors include his mother, Vena V. Eubanks of Chattahoochee; his loving wife of 37 years, Sharon Eubanks of Greenwood; one son, Cody Eubanks and his wife, T T amela of Marianna; one son-in-law and sidekick, Peanut H Hamm of D Dellwood; two daughters, Pam W W illis and her husband, Paul of Marianna and Melynda Kutchey and her husband, W W esley of Cypress; two brothers, Jim Eubanks of Chattahoochee and Mike Eubanks of O Ocala; one sister, Frances Ball of Sneads; nine grandchildren, Brittney H Hamm, W Whitney, Kurt and Blaise W W illis, T T iara Kutchey, T T iffany, T T .J., Michael and Nicholas Eubanks; two great-grandchildren, Shiley and Gabe Couliette and numerous nieces, nephews and adoptive grandchildren. Family will receive friends T T uesday, September 18 from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. in the Chapel. Services will be held W W ednesday, September 19 at 10 a.m. at Marianna Chapel Funeral H Home with R Reverend I Interment will follow in DDykes Cemetery. Marianna Chapel Funeral H Home in Marianna is in charge of the arrangements. Expressions of sympathy may be posted online at www.mariannachapelfb.com.R REVEREND WWIllLLIE EE. DDAWsSON JAmMIesESOnN RReverend W W illie E. D Dawson, 76, of Jamieson, passed away W W ednesday, September 12, 2012 at his home. H He was born in Clarksville D December 5, 1953. H He was a retired Freewill Baptist Minister and a carpenter. H He was preceded in death by his wife, Joan McMillan D Dawson; his father, Nease D Dawson; his mother, Edith Shiver D D awson Cook; four brothers, Buel, Jackie, H H arold and Johnny DDawson. Survivors include three brothers, Franklin D Dawson of Quincy, Bobby D Dawson and his wife, O Odine of O Oklahoma City, O OK and W W inifred D Dawson and his wife, A Audra of A Alliance Community; three sisters, Sandra D D. Payne and her husband, Eddie of Nashville, T T N, Yvonne D D. Swint of Murphreesboro, T TN and Beverly DD. Clark and her husband, Bobby of Blountstown; a very special nephew, Gary D Dawson and his wife, L Lisa of Jamieson and numerous nieces and nephews. Services were held Saturday, September 15 at Mt. Glory Freewill Baptist Church. I Interment followed in Cool Springs Cemetery in Faceville, GAA. Charles McClellan Funeral HHome in Quincy was in charge of the arrangements. V VIRGINIA IIRENE O OAKlLEY CLy YDeE T T OWnsNSHIpP MIIVirginia I Irene O Oakley, 89, of Clyde T T ownship, MI I passed away Sunday, September 16, 2012 in Mercy H Hospital. She was born February 10, 1923 in Port H Huron, MII. She married A Arthur F. O Oakley September 19, 1942 in Bowling Green, VA A ; he passed A A pril 30, 2005. She retired from Prestolite with 45 years of service in the Coil D Division. She had also worked at J.C. Penneys and served as secretary of W W adhams Baptist Church, where she was an active member and Sunday school teacher. She hosted many child evangelism fellowship events at her home and was a member of the Council on travel, wintering in Florida and spending summers in W W yoming for several years. She was preceded in death by her husband, A Arthur F. OOakley. Survivors include three children, T T erry L L Fischer and her husband, Stephen, L Larry E. O Oakley, all of Port H Huron T T ownship, and Michael O Oakley and his wife, Brenda of Jeddo; her beloved grandchildren, Kim H Hudy and her husband, T T im, Shellie Fischer, Julie D Delaney, L Lisa Scheunmann, H Holly Beaudry and her husband, Fred and Jason O Oakley and L Lori Solgot; six great-grandchildren, A Austin D Delaney, W Whitney H Hudy, Nathan, Nicole and A Adam Beaudry and Koda OOakley. Memorial services will be held Saturday, September 29 at 11 a.m. at W W adhams Baptist Church in Clyde, MII Pollock-RRandall Funeral H Home in Michigan is in charge of the arrangements. Memorial contributions may be made to W W adhams Baptist or Child Evangelism Fellowship. T T o send condolences, visit www.pollockrandall.com. EEDWIN MM. SKAGGsS BLOunUNTsSTOWnNEdwin M. Skaggs, 79, of Blountstown, passed away W W ednesday, September 5, 2012 in Blountstown. H He was born March 16, 1933 in Edmond, W WV and had lived in Blountstown since 2007, coming from T T itusville. H He worked as a coal miner and also was a machinist with the McDDonald D Douglas Corporation. H He was a member of Christian H Home Church at Nettle R Ridge in Blountstown. Survivors include his wife, Shirley Skaggs of Blountstown; one son, Edwin W W Skaggs and his wife, Susie of Charleston, W WV; two daughters, Beverly Morris and her husband, R Roger of Blountstown and Cathy D Davis of O Oak H Hill, W WV; two brothers, L Leo Skaggs and his wife, Bonnie of H Huntington, W WV and Nyle Skaggs and his wife, Jan of Fredericksburg, OH OH; one sister, Karon Johnson and her husband, Karl of A Alvin, T TX, six grandchildren and six great-grandchildren. Memorial services were held Sunday, September 9 at Christian H Home Church at Nettle R Ridge in Blountstown was by cremation. Peavy Funeral H Home in Blountstown was in charge of the arrangements. Charles MMcClellan Funeral HHomeButler-Morgan/Morgan-McClellan Funeral Home Building at 15 S. Jackson St., Quincy, 32351Phone: (850) 627-7677 or 643-2277Charles K. McClellanLicensed Funeral Director 42 years experience Call us Let us explain how we can conveniently handle arrangements in Liberty County. TT elephone (850) 674-2266 YY our hometown funeral home since 1994A Hometown Funeral Director You Can Trust and Depend On!Funeral Services with Dignity, Caring and Professionalism. MMarlon PPeavyPPeavy Funeral HHome& CrematoryOOBITUARIEsS continued on page 31GGARY A A. W W ATTERsSON BLOunUNTs STOWn NGary A A W W atterson, 80, of Blountstown, passed away Monday, September 17, 2012 in Blountstown. H He was T T allahassee for 50 years. H He was born in Jacksonville and lived for many years in T T allahassee before moving to Blountstown. H He was a member of Blountstown First Baptist Church and was a retired L Lieutenant Colonel in the A Army National Guard. Gary enjoyed playing his guitar and singing at the Panhandle Pioneer Settlement. H He was preceded in death by his parents, Edgar and Shirley (Prescott) W W atterson; one brother, Gerald; one sister, Jacqueline; one daughter, Selena W W illiams Burke; one daughter-in-law, LLinda W W atterson. Survivors include his wife of 36 years, I Imogene W W atterson of Blountstown; four sons, Bruce W W atterson of T T allahassee, Sean W W atterson and his wife, Bridget of New York, NY, Steve W W illiams and his wife, W W endy of A Altha and D Dillon Burke of Blountstown; four daughters, Stephanie W W illiams of Blountstown, Sheila Shelton and her husband, Greg and Shelly Smith and her husband, R Ronnie, all of A Altha and Kayla Burke of Blountstown; one brother, Eddy W W atterson and his wife, Edie of H Hobe Sound, 17 grandchildren and nine great-grandchildren. Memorial services will be held Saturday, September 22 at 10 a.m. at the Blountstown First Baptist Church A Adams Funeral H Home in Blountstown is in charge of the arrangements. Contributions may be made to the Panhandle Pioneer Settlement, P. O O Box 215, Blountstown, FLL 32424; Florida National Guard, 1225 Easterwood D Drive, T T allahassee, FLL 32311; or Florida Baptist Childrens H Home, P. O O. Box 8190, L Lakeland, FLL 33802-9963.

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Page 24 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEpPTEMBER 19, 2012 FISHINGBBass tagging study revealingThis past spring, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) biologists tagged 136 trophy largemouth bass greater than eight pounds in Floridas public waters. Each trophy bass had a yellow plastic dart tag inserted into the back of the Each tag has a unique number that and information on how to report catches. Tagged bass came from 41 lakes and rivers that varied in size, water tions and angler demographics. Angler catch and harvest rates vary between lakes and rivers, so this approach allows for a more informed statewide estimate. After six months, results are already revealing. So far, 21 percent of tagged trophy bass have been caught and reported and 83 percent of them were released alive. Anglers for 22 percent of reports. Thirty caught on live shiners. Interestingly, 28 percent of tagged bass heavier than 10 pounds have been caught, of those were released. This shows bigger bass are equally susceptible to capture but suffer increased harvest. Most anglers harvested trophy bass to have a skin-mount made, rather than for food. but weighed more than 10 pounds when it was caught and released in Lake Talquin. Another recent tagging study by the FWC and University of Florida revealed that 20 percent to 35 percent of all largemouth bass longer than 14 inches were caught annually by anglers. Since trophy bass typically take six to 10 years to reach that size, its evident that recycling plays an important role. Although catch rates of individual trophy bass may be This information will provide an important baseline for when TrophyCatch (see below) launches in October. The FWC will continue the statewide tagging study for the in catch-and-release rates of trophy Anglers should look for tagged yellow streamers with Trophy printed on them, followed by a number, reward value and contact information. Over time, tags may get covered by algae, which can be rubbed off to reveal tag information. the tag as close to the skin of the to the FWC. Anglers may release or harvest tagged bass as they normally would, depending upon local harvest regulations; however, only released bass are eligible for separate TrophyCatch recognition and rewards. For research biologist Jason Dotson at (850) 363-6037. This tagging study was initiated partially to implement the Black Bass Management Plan that was developed with input from biologists, anglers and stakeholders (MyFWC. com/Fishing) and which the FWC approved in June 2011. Anglers indicated that greater opportunities portant component of the plan. So the FWC made trophy largemouth bass management a priority and plans to launch a trophy bass documentation program called TrophyCatch in October (www.TrophyCatchFlorida. com). The Liberty County Board of County Commissioners hereby requests REREQUEESTT FORR PRROPOSALS bobatten or Ronnie Coley personally invites you to visit him any time Monday thru Saturday from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. eswatngfororcall Chipola Heating & Air Conditioning cR s s CCs (850) 674-4777Whaley Whaley D SERIousOUS SHERIffFFI I I I Please consider Ken Futch on Nov. 6th.

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SEPTEMBER 19, 2012 / THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL PPage 25 *Lifetime Warranty on Repairs *Will pay up to $500 of your deductible *Over 75 years combined experienceTNTTOBY GARNETT, OWNER Collision Center SAT TURRDAY, SEPTEPT 29, 2012 Registration and Voting 8:30-10 a.m. Business Meeting at 10:00 a.m. 100 VALUABBLEE PRPRIZEES ANNUAL MEETMEETINGTT alquin EElectric Cooperative, Inc. EntertainmentNTERTAINMENT : 9:00 9:45 a.m. Country Connections LocationOCATION: A Panhandle native on Long Island SoundOther than a Lady Gaga concert or a PETA convention, probably the last place you would be on New Yorks Long Island. But thats exactly where I was on 8. And I have to say best-kept secrets. Granted, all I really knew about Long Island was what I had seen on television. Until I got to see stagnant water with trash and the quaint town with a New Cow Harbor Wounded Warrior Weekend. Basically, the town, its citizens, and visitors who lives in Northport and who spearheaded Our boss, CEO Michael Murdoch, invited As luck would have it, we landed on the partner, Frank Nieskens, still play together the rich-even-by-New-York-standards and Norwalk, Connecticut. trolling out in Long Island Sound. All three Michaels and Marys Mine spit the hook, and Frank are cardclub. Even though they the grill within about the water. behind us, nearly the In addition to excellent country. eye patches. There were also those whose wounds werent visible, but whose pain is every bit as real. bring us together. Jim McClellans OUTDooOORS Down South come parade. supper. Home of the All-U-Can-Eat menuPPhone (850) 670-8441Family Coastal Seafood Restaurant SUNDAYSnow Crab ClawsLUNCH BUFFET11 a A.M. TO 2 P.M. OPEN Seafood PPlatter

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Page 26 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEpPTEMBER 19, 2012 clothes. Many items for the home. New items arriving daily. Everyone is invited to shop at the CalhounLiberty Ministry Center store on Hwy. 20 E. in Blountstown. Phone 674-1818. UFN APPLIANCESFreezer $40. 20 gallon hot water heater, $30. Call 491-3660.9-19, 9-26EElectric stove, needs one burner, $50. Call 762-3924. 9-19, 9-26Jack LaLannes power juicer with juice book, $75. Call 5575065. 9-19, 9-26Stove, $50, GE drop-in glass top stove, never used, $50. Call 7623924 during the evening or early in the morning. 9-12, 9-19 Gas heaters, four wall-mounted styles. Call (850) 557-9391. 9-12, 9-19EElectric stove, works great, $100 OBO. Call 447-3110 leave message. 9-12, 9-193-TT on AC unit, air/heat split system air handler, recently ran, $300 OBO. Call 643-8607. 9-12, 9-19Frigidaire freezer, upright 4 shelf, works wonderful, just too big for me. Used one year, $650 OBO. Call (850) 258-3719. 9-12, 9-19 FURNITUREComputer desk, $15. Glass top table, $40. Chair, $35. Three wicker back chairs, $10 each. Call 674-3264. 9-19, 9-26TT win beds, two in good condition, $40 each. Couch with matching THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNALCLASSIFIEDSTo place your ad, call 643-3333 by noon Eastern Time on Monday UFN. Non-business ads run FREE for 2 weeks. ITEMS FOR SALEHead snow skis, $60. Call 5575065. 9-19, 9-26120 amp breaker box, $130, storm door 36x80, $25. Call 7623924 during the evening or early in the morning. 9-12, 9-19Gas tank, 150 gallon with 60% gas in tank. Call (850) 557-9391. 9-12, 9-19MMoving sale: Computer desk and chair, $50. Oak buffet and hutch, $50. Antique chifferobe, $200. Green and white plaid sofa, $75. Navy blue plaid sofa, 96, $175. Dark walnut TV/entertainment stand, $50. Dark oak half hexagon wood and glass 3 shelf display, $50. Cherry oval coffee table, square end table and round end table, $20. Elephant motif $5 each. Numerous small appliances, pots and pans, bakeware, cookware and dishes. Call (850) 591-9873. 9-12, 9-19MMoving sale everything must be gone by October 15. Some furniture, good solid wood entertainment center, computer desk, dining room table, much more. Located at 13365 NW Dogwood Lane, Hwy. 20 E, between Opal Owens Road and White Springs Road, brick house. Can call 6434618 or 272-4425 or come by any day until 7 p.m. 9-19BBrunswick B Billiards table, regulation size, one inch marble slate. Leather pockets. Medium oak in color. Ball and claw legs. Paid $6,000, asking $2,500. Call (850) 674-5026. 9-12, 9-19BBoys shoes sizes 8 and up, $1.50 a pair. Crocheted bed spread, $30. Big cooking kettle, $25. Outdoor BBQ grill, $145. Call 6743264. 9-12, 9-19Jazzy power chair, brand new with new battery, never used, $800. Call (850) 258-3719.9-12, 9-19BBedding material: Sheets, comforters, mattress pads, cotton blankets, mattress covers and more. Everyone is invited to shop at the Calhoun-Liberty Ministry Center store on Hwy. 20 E. in Blountstown. Phone 6741818. UFNMMens, ladies and childrens For Rent in ALTHaA762-9555 or 762-8597Very NICE *2 & 3 BD trailers.With lawn service 5 x 10 .....$27 10 x 10 ....$43 10 x 20 ....$70 10 x 25 ....$90M & W SELFSTORAGE RRENTALs SCall 573-5255, 762-9555, 762-8807 or 762-8597 7 days a week service UFN BD, 1 1/2 BA TownhousesBRISTOL Mobile Homes643-7740 FOR RENT BLOUNTSTOWN chair. Call (850) 557-9391. 9-12, 9-19TT wo chairs, overstuffed, $75 each. Call 674-5093. 9-12, 9-19Oak bedroom set, 5-piece, reduced price to $600, listed at $750. Call 643-8309. 9-12, 9-19Good used furniture and appliances needed at Calhoun Liberty Ministry Center. Call 674-1818. UFN TRUCKS2005 Chevy T T rail B Blazer, 139,000 or 447-5027. 9-19, 9-261997 Dodge R Ram, 4x4, 360 engine, tool box on back, excellent overall good condition. Call 4472010 or 447-2011. 9-12, 9-19 CARS1992 Chrysler LeBBaron, 4 new tires, new battery, new alternator, runs good, $1,000 OBO. Call (912) 424-4819. 9-19, 9-26 VeEHicleICLE AccessoriesCCESSORIESOriginal M Mercedes chrome hubcaps, seven of them, $100 each. Mercedes power steering gear box, $500. Call 557-5065. 9-19, 9-2617 Aluminum T T oyota wheels with lug nuts, $200 OBO. Call 643-8607. 9-12, 9-19TT wo Kumho all terrain tires 26575-16 with aluminum rims, $800. Call (850) 870-1574 or 447-3670.9-12, 9-19 New Home for sale in Altha3 BD, 2 BA, 1,200 sq ft with carport, 1/2 acre lot, Hardi siding, metal roof, vaulted great room, oak cabinets with granite tops.$110,000Call 762-8185 or 447-20257-18 T 8-8 Two story, 2 BD old block house. Completely furnished. Rail fenced yard.$35,000(850) 447-1533House FOR Sale IN Blountstown (813) 253-3258l 10 to 15 ACRE TRaACtTSFrom $600 downOWNER FINANCINGNoNO QUALIfFYING 1 & 2 bedroom mobile homes in Blountstown and Bristol. $105 to $155 weekly. Deposit required. All utilities included. NO PETS. Singles or Couples preferred. Call 674-7616FOR RENT Call (850) 627-8287 House FOR RRent InN HosfoOSFORdD2 BD, 1 BAA House in LLowry For more information9-19 T 10-10 For Rent in ALTHLTHA (850) 643-88182 BD, 2 BA Mobile home, large yard, covered front and back porch. Lawn care and garbage provided. Available Oct. 1.$450 monthwith 1st month, last month and security deposit CCall 539-7848 or 570-3431 $500 month$500 depositFor RRent in ontston BRIBRINKLEEY REREALT TY FloLORIdaDA R RIVER AREaA, very nice 10 acre tract, partially fenced with gate, large pole barn, well and electricity, build you a house or bring your travel trailer, hook it up and hunt HWY 379 48 ACRERES, 3 BD, 2 BA doublewide, sheds, pond, backs up to Fenn Slough, good huntAPALACHIICOLA RIVER RIVER, 1.35 acre lot over looking the river with a 3 BD, 1 BA Cypress house like new. DOWNTT OWN BRI BRISTT OL, Two commercial buildings, PEEA RI RIDGEE R ROAD, 5 BD, 3 BA, amenities galore REDUCED.BRI BRISTT OL, 3 BD, 2 BA houses (5 to choose from) call for more information. LAKEE M MYSTITIC, 4 BD, 2 BA, Big RV storage building, 122 ft on water with dock, etc. Lot has a GREAT view Several lots and land tracts available. CCall 643-3289 to buy or sell eAdieCHEECK OURR PRIRICEEnapaonline.com Apt. for Rent in ALTHaA762-9555 or 762-8597 $550 month TINY TEACUP male, long haired. All shots and dewormed.Call 6743532

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SEPTEMBER 19, 2012 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL PPage 27 NO OWNER FINANCINGCall 674-5026 or 643-1723 Located at Jack Lake off the Chipola River off Hwy. 275 S. Consists of a 2 BD, 1 BA cabin. Property sold as is.NO OWNER FINANCINGCall 674-5026 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNALCLASSIFIEDSTo place your ad, call 643-3333 by noon Eastern Monday UFN. Non-business ads run FREE for 2 weeks. Goodyear Wrangler tires 2659-12, 9-19 MOTORCYCLES and ATVs2001 Honda R Rancher E ES 350, new battery, new rear basket, in 2390. 9-19, 9-26 HUNTING/FISHING12 ft. welded semi-v boat and pedestals, new carpet, 30 9-19, 9-26Deck boat, 19 foot with 110 John9-12, 9-19CVA Staghorn .50 caliber muzzle loader, black, synthetic stock, stainless barrel with lots of acces9-12, 9-19RRemington 270 9-12, 9-19, T-hull with UFN WATER WELL SUPPLIESDo you need parts for TThat Darn P Pump? We have capacisure switches, check valves, foot STARSCOPEFAMMOUS BBIRTRTHDAYSARRIEES MMar 21/Apr 20 achieved this week. All you really T T AURRUS Apr 21/MMay 21 by outside pressures, but it really is up to you to set your GEMEMINI MMay 22/Jun 21 Those closest to you need a little space and respect, CANCERER Jun 22/Jul 22 direction. You have to take LEEO Jul 23/Aug 23 Leo, you can have fun VIRRGO Aug 24/Sept 22 no reason to be disappointed. back on track. LIBRBRA Sept 23/Oct 23 Libra, this week you have the in one-on-one conversation. Start one particular relationship. SCORPRPIO Oct 24/Nov 22 SAGITTTT ARRIUS Nov 23/Dec 21 CAPRPRICORRN Dec 22/Jan 20 can only tackle one set of conone is a priority and set your AQUARRIUS Jan 21/Feb 18 P PISCEES Feb 19/MMar 20 this week. Others can provide backup if you need it.Week of Sept. 16 ~ Sept. 22SEPTEMBER 16 SEPTEMBER 17 SEPTEMBER 19 SEPTEMBER 20 SEPTEMBER 21 SEPTEMBER 22 late Labrador R Retriever reya Park Road. Call 643-2799 if he is yours. 9-12, 9-19FOUND: B Black & T T an dog uptown Bristol on Hwy. 20. Call 9-12, 9-19 TOOLS & HEAVY EQUIPMENT Concrete M Mixer, towable, concubic ft. Powered by 7.1/5 HP Hon9-12, 9-19Generator, 5,000-7,000 watts, 1519. 9-12, 9-19 WANTEDNeed to rent horse trailer for several hours. Call 674-3264.9-19, 9-26TT win set of bunk beds. Call 4913660. 9-19, 9-26Fold up single bed,tress or a sleeper sofa, reasonable. Call 674-3264. 9-19, 9-26Generator, 5,000-7,000 watts, 1519. 9-19, 9-26Stove 674-3264. 9-12, 9-19 YARD SALE BRBRISTT OL Yard sale Saturday, every day, located on Third street, Neal Subdivision. Red and Blue tent, BPA/UFN PETS/SUPPLIESChihuahua puppies. Call 6743011. 9-19, 9-26MMother cat 9-19, 9-26PPre-teen kittens 9-12, 9-19Jack R Russell T T errier dogs, fe9-12, 9-19TT wo cats 9-12, 9-19Hamster 643-4559. 9-12, 9-19Golden R Retriever/Hound dog 643-4559. 9-12, 9-19Free kittens, born on the Fourth 447-0443. UFN LOST/FOUNDFOUND: M Mans ringway near Altha. Call and describe it, 762-3366. 9-19, 9-26LOSTT : Cat purple collar, neutered. Last seen 9-19, 9-26FOUND: B Beautiful ChocoSmall Town T om A CaARTOON BY MIKE BaBARNHOUSE

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Page 28 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEpPTEMBER 19, 2012 HEALTH Calhoun Liberty HOSPITAlLCalhoun-Liberty Hospital will be offering *Free Mammography screenings October 1-15 (1sST 50 women to register) *If you have insurance, CLH will bill your insurance. Patients will not be responsible for deductible or co-pay. See your doctor for your order today! We are dedicated to womens health.New digital mammography machine. T upperwareCall BBeth EEubanksYOUR Tupperware Consultant at (850) 643-2498 or (850) 570-0235Brighten any serving setting with these bold, beautifully simple solutions. Now in vibrant new colors. email at bethseubanks41 @aol.com SIMPLY SENs S ATIONALQ: I know sausage and other processed meats are linked with colon cancer risk. Is it true that theyre linked with risk of diabetes, too?A: Yes, several large population studies now link greater consumption of processed meats with increased risk of type 2 diabetes. Processed meats are those that are salted, cured or smoked or contain preservatives (such as nitriteor nitrate-based products). Common examples of processed meat in the United States are bacon, sausage, hot dogs, processed canned meats, ham several potential mechanisms that could explain the convincing link between processed meats and greater risk of colorectal cancer. Risk of type 2 diabetes increases with overweight, so processed meats high content of fat (and therefore calories) could explain part of the link to diabetes risk. However, even after adjusting for weight and some other aspects of eating habits, people who consume the most processed meat show at least 45 to 60 percent greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Researchers hypothesize that nitritebased preservatives form nitrosamine compounds within our gut increase cancer risk, and these nitrosamines also damage the cells of the pancreas responsible for producing insulin. Another potential explanation for the diabetes link involves formation during meat processing of compounds called advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) that seem to increase low-grade conditions promote a metabolic environment that can lead to type 2 diabetes.Q: Does the link between alcohol and breast cancer risk refer to all alcohol consumption or only excessive amounts?A: Alcohols link to increased risk of breast cancer begins at modest intake. If a woman has only one or two drinks a week, the actual increase in breast cancer risk is small but research shows that as consumption increases, so does risk. In fact for each standard drink a day there is about a 10 percent increase in breast cancer risk compared to women who drink zero or extremely little of wine, 12 ounces of beer, or one-and-a-half ounces of 80-proof liquor. Larger portions count as more than one drink.) Women who dont meet their need for the B vitamin folate are especially vulnerable to alcoholrelated breast cancer risk. However, meeting folate needs does not remove risk, and adding more folate than needed does not add additional protection. Alcohol is related to both preand post-menopausal breast cancer. A report of over 105,000 women in the Nurses Health Study suggests that cumulative alcohol consumption throughout life is important to post-menopausal breast Q&Aby Karen Collins, MS, RD, CDNAmericanMERICAN InstituteNSTITUTE ForOR CancerANCER ResearchESEARCH cancer. This adds support to theories that harmful exposures earlier in life can damage breast cells in ways that increase later risk of cancer.Q: Is bottled ready-to-drink tea as high in antioxidants as the tea I brew at home?A: No, bottled tea is much lower in the polyphenol compounds that give black and green tea their antioxidant power. Commercial teas do seem to vary somewhat, but even those reportedly highest in polyphenols, and the compound called EGCG in particular, dont contain anywhere near the amounts documented in standard brewed tea. The unsweetened versions are still excellent zero-calorie alternatives to sugar-laden soft drinks when you are not able to brew your own. However, brewing tea at home is both less expensive and higher in antioxidant polyphenols. Although population studies show inconsistent evidence for tea reducing cancer risk, laboratory research suggests polyphenol compounds may act through pathways other than as antioxidants to reduce development of cancer, though more research is needed. Brew up a pitcher and refrigerate to have a cool zero-calorie drink handy on hot summer days. Heres how: for concentrate, bring one quart of cold water to a rolling boil. Remove from heat and add 8-10 teabags for each quart of brewed iced tea. Steep 3-5 minutes. To serve, add to cold water and/or ice cubes. If it seems too hot even to boil water, you can brew tea overnight in the refrigerator by steeping a few tea bags in a pitcher of cold water.Processed meat and diabetes

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SEPTEMBER 19, 2012 / THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL PPage 29 SPORTS Lady Tigers take Lady Wildcats in 3 straightABOVE: Blountstowns Lexi Devuyst guides the ball over the net while teammate Anna Hassig stands ready to assist. RIGHT: Althas Josie Hall passes the ball.LEFT: Althas Kinsey Register is passing while teammate Jenny Moore looks on. RIGHT: Blountstowns Kristen Jenkins hits the ball over the net, teammate Jackie Dudley stands ready to assist and Hope Jerkins looks on.Blountstown and Altha met Sept. 17 on the Wildcats turf for an intense afternoon volleyball game that was full of action. BHS took Altha in all three matches, scoring 25-18, 25-20 and 25-17. Brittany Graham led the Lady Varsity Wildcats with 6 kills, 1 block and 6 assists. Hannah Register had 4 kills, 1 block and 1 assist. Morgan Lewis had 4 kills while Mary Sewell had 3 kills, 1 block, 10 assists and 4 digs. Carly Schwartz had 2 kills and McKenzie Tanner had 1 kill. Brooke Boggs had 1 ace and 6 assists and Brianna Yon had 5 digs. We tried some new things which I can Altha Coach LeAnne Hall. These girls are improving with each game and working hard to compete. I am proud of their DANIEEL WILLIAMMS PPHOTT OSBELOW LEFT: Blountstowns Dharma Lee gets low and ready for the ball coming her way. BELOW: Althas Hannah Register passes the ball.

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Page 30 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEpPTEMBER 19, 2012 JOB MARKET MMAC TETECH NEEDEDPart time to help maintain, upgrade & in Bristol. teresae@fairpoint.net. Class A CDDL Flatbed DDrivers PHARMACY TECHNICIAN Computer skills are a must! STORE hHOURsS: Monday through Friday 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Contact Christie Husband at (850) 639-5065 for an interview. InN WEwaWA PUbBLIC aAND LeEGa AL Not OTICeESNOTIOTICEE OOF APPLIICATIO TION FOROR TT AX DEEDDEED NOTIOTICEE I IS HEREBEREBY GIIVEEN, that LABBAN OR OR LIINDDA BO BON-TR TRAGERER the holder of the folRange 7 West, Liberty County, Florida, said point also lying a point lying on the Southerly feet to a point lying on the from said Point of Beginning to the Point of Beginning. LEEEE W. GLASSERER Said property being in the County of Liberty, State of Florida. highest bidder at the Front Door of the Liberty County A.M., E.S.T. ROBERT HILL, CLERK OF COURT _______________________________STT ATEME TEMENTT OOF NOON-DIDISCRIMIRIMINATIO TION and the rules and regulations of the U.S. Department of Agperson in the United States on tional origin, age, disability, reder any of this organizations ordinating this organizations tain further information about the statutes and regulations or the Administrator, Rural tained to the extent possible. ________________________________IIN TTHEE CIRIRCUITUIT COURTOURT I IN ANDD FOROR LIBERTIBERTY COUOUNTTY, FLORIDORIDA JP MORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO CHASE HOME FINANCE, LLC Plaintiff, TERRY BRENT BLACKOF TERRY BRENT BLACKSPOUSE OF MICHELLE LEE by, through and under any dants, Defendants. NOTIOTICEE OOF FOREORECLOOSUREURE SALEE of the Liberty County CourtLot 4, BBlock A, UUnit No. 2, of SHUULERER HEIEIGHTTS SUBUB-DIDIVIISIOION, according to the Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat BBook A, Page 5A, of the Public R Records of Liberty County, Florida. pusuant to the Final Judgment an interest in the surplus, if any, resulting from the foreWITNESS my hand and ofI If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: D Danny D Davis, 301 S. M Monroe St., R Rm 225, T T allahassee, FL 32303, (850) 577-4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Robert Hill, Attorney for Plaintiff Elizabeth K. Baird Altha Girl Scout TT roop 39 holds BBridging Ceremony Sept. 15Altha Girl Scout Troop 39 celebrated their Bridging Ceremony Saturday, September 15 at Four Mile Creek Park. Three troop members Madison Bland, Ada LudyjanYbarra and Madison McClain bridged from Daisy to Brownie. This is an important milestone in their Girl Scout journey. The leaders are very proud of the girls that bridged and they are also proud of all of the girls in the troop. Following the ceremony, there was a luncheon with the families of the troop. The troop would like to thank all who participated. The troop is always looking for more girls to join. The meetings are of the month at the Page Pond Assembly of God Church. For other members of the community that would like to help, donations are always welcome to help buy supplies, books and the alike. Please feel free to contact troop leaders Delicia McClain at 209-0370 or, Tracey Ybarra at 447-5405 for more information.

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SEPTEMBER 19, 2012 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL PPage 31 To place your ad call us at 643-3333 SERVICE DIRECTORY Whaley Heating & Air Conditioning (850) 674-4777FL LicIC. # CMC1249570 Accepting:R Is s s Phone: (850) 643-6925 Fax: (850) 643-2064 email: grich0656@aol.com10536-B NW SR 20 Bristol, FL 32321 Located in the Apalachee RestaurantGary RRichards, EEA MBMBAEnrolled Agent Enrolled to Practice Before the IRS BBusiness & Accounting Solutions Inc. 4433 NW C.R. 274 Altha, Fl 32421 (850) 762-9402 Cell (850) 832-5055Dozer and Excavation work Over 20 years experienceClay ONealsLand Clearing, Inc. William's HomeImprovements "No Job Too Big or Small"Concrete work, landscape, pressure cleaning, renovations, seamless gutter, painting, vinyl, & screen enclosure Call 674-8092Licensed & Insured, contractor & rooferFORR FREEREE EESTTIMMATE TES Call Chris Nissley at 674-8081 or 643-8561 (Cell) STUMP GRINDINGReasonable Rates & FreeREE Estimates! That Darn PumpThere is never a convenient time to be without water.WELLsS psa s(850)643-HELP Thats 643-4357 or Home 643-3857For friendly service and never any overtime charges call, Clint Hatcher, OwnerElectrical Lic. # ER13014037 Building Lic. # RB29003511New Homes Garages Additions Electrical Remodeling Foundations Screenrooms Sunrooms VIVINYYL SIIDIING RESIDENTAL & COMMERCIAL FREE EstimatesServing Calhoun, LLiberty & Jackson Counties LIBERTY TTIRE COMPANY 10781 NW SR 20 Bristol, Fl 32321Call 643-2939 MV84845Hours: Monday thru Friday 7 5 & Saturday 7 12Come see us for all your tire needs or give us a call for roadside service, oil changes & tire rotation. We specialize in sales and repair of tires for:Commercial Trucks and Trailers, OTR Equipment, Farm Equipment, Passenger Car & Light Truck Tires JEMISON Heating & Cooling, C Lic# RM1416924Carrier EEquipment MMasters Farm Supply LS Tractor Equipment Committed To Quality Since 1973 (850) 762-3222 faxmasters7@fairpoint.net Catherine Corbins moving sale was a great success but items still need to go: Call (850) 674-8916 OBITUARIESoa ae ALTHaARocky Jay L Lane, 58, of Altha, passed away Wednesday morning, September 12, 2012 at his home. H He was born August 19, 1954 in Cairo, ILL and had lived in Altha for past six months coming from Citrus County. H He was a retired air boat mechanic and served in the United States Army and the Army National Guard for several years. H He was preceded in death by his granddaughter, Janice. Survivors include his wife, Edna L Lane of Altha; his mother, Nancy C. L Lane of New Market, ALL; two sons, Shawn L Lane of Perry and Micheal Guiden of North Carolina; three daughters, H Heather Quattlebaum and her husband, Wes of Altha, Nicole Gieraltowski and her husband, Paul of Interlachen and Karen Null and her husband, Ricki of Floral City; two brothers, Randal L Lane of New Market, ALL and Ronald L Lane and his wife, Sandy of Flintville, T TN; two sisters, Nanci Deason and her husband, T T roy of Charleston, SC and Patty L Lane of New Market, AL L ; 11 grandchildren, Michaela, Kenneth, Nathaniel, Rebecca, William, Ariana, Morgan, H H arrison, Payton, Kyle and Fayth. Memorial services were held Saturday, September 15 at H Hillcrest Baptist Church in Altha with Reverend Peavy Funeral H Home in Blountstown was in charge of the arrangements. JaAMEsS ThoTHOMasAS ShHELL BrisRISTOLJames T Thomas Shell, 65, of Bristol, passed away early Saturday morning, September 8, 2012 at his home. H He was born January 26, 1947 in St. L Louis, MOO and had lived in Bristol since 1985, coming from Germany. H He was a retired Sergeant First Class in the United States Army and served for 23 years. H He was a was a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of L Latter Day Saints in Bristol.H He was preceded in death by his parents, T Thomas and Imogene Shell. Survivors include his wife, Patricia Shell of Bristol, one daughter, Jeanne Kever of Bristol and her children, Mariah and Mitchell Kever and Alexander James Shell; one son, Stacy Brown and his wife, Michelle and their eight children of Bristol; one sister, Carol Wilson and her husband, Patrick of Clarksville and three greatgrandchildren. Memorial services were held T Thursday, September 13 from the graveside at Shell Family Cemetery with Peavy Funeral H Home in Blountstown was in charge of the arrangements. TampaTAMPAH H elen Eloise Shiver, 73, of T T ampa, passed away T Thursday, September 6, 2012 in T T ampa. She was born in Alabama and had lived in T T ampa for the past three years, coming from Bainbridge. She was a retired operating room nurse and a member of the Protestant faith. She was preceded in death by her husband, OOliver Shiver. Survivors include one daughter, Melinda Shiver of T T ampa; one grandson, Garrett B. T T idwell of T T ampa; one aunt, Carrie L Lou Gilmore and several nieces and nephews. Services were held Friday, September 14 at Peavy Funeral H Home Chapel with Wyatt Shiver and Andy lowed in Victory HHill Cemetery. Peavy Funeral H Home in Blountstown was in charge of the arrangements. orotesCarr WeETumpkaUMPKADorothy O Owens Carr, 88, of Wetumpka, passed away T Thursday, September 13, 2012 in T T allahassee. She was born in Wetumpka to L Linton and Vassie Parramore OOwens on January 27, 1924. Survivors include one daughter, Virginia Brantley and her husband, Jim of Wetumpka; one son, L Luther McKnight and his wife, Mary Ann of T T allahassee, four grandchildren and six great-grandchildren. Services were held Saturday, September 15 at 4 p.m. at New Philadelphia Presbyterian Church in Quincy. Interment followed in Antioch Cemetery. Charles McClellan Funeral HHome in Quincy was in charge of the arrangements. Clare eMatteses ALfFOrdRDClarence Matthews T T ynes, 90, of Alford, passed away T T uesday, September 11, 2012 at his home. H He was born December 29, 1921 in Norfolk, VA and had lived in Alford for the past several years. H He was a retired real estate agent. Survivors include one son, Robert T T ynes and his wife, Pam of Newport News, VA. No services are planned at this time. Memorialization will be by cremation. Peavy Funeral H Home in Blountstown is in charge of the arrangements. continued from page 23Heleloiseier NEW TOLL FREE FAX NUMBER: (888) 400-5810

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Page 32 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEpPTEMBER 19, 2012 Prices good thru 9/27/2012 W.A.C.