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UF00027796 UFPKY NEH LSTA SLAF



The Calhoun-Liberty journal
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00027796/00326
 Material Information
Title: The Calhoun-Liberty journal
Portion of title: Calhoun Liberty journal
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: The Liberty Journal, Inc.
Place of Publication: Bristol Fla
Publication Date: 07-11-2012
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Bristol (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Liberty County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Calhoun County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Liberty -- Bristol
Coordinates: 30.426944 x -84.979167 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in Sept. 1991.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 11, no. 38 (Sept. 18, 1991).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002046630
oclc - 33425067
notis - AKN4565
lccn - sn 95047245
System ID: UF00027796:00330
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly journal (Bristol, Fla.)

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School News...18, 19, 21 Cooling off at the Bluff...20 Classieds.....26, 27 Obituaries...29 Jobs and Legals...30 Sheriff's Log...2 Commentary...6, 7 News from the Pews...10 Birthdays...12 Outdoors with Ranger Steve ... 14 J OURNAL 50includes tax THE CalALHounOUN-LIbBErtRTY CLJNews.com WEDnNEsSDaA Y, JulUL Y 11, 2012 Vol. 32, No. 28 He recalls as a young man seeing newsreels that showed a plane dropping a bomb on a target, blowing it to pieces. Right away, Davis said, I wanted to make sure I was the one dropping the bombs.-Tuskegee Airman Sgt. Cornelius Davis We got shot up a lot but never shot down...We crashed landed three times with mechanical problems but the enemy never shot us down. Senior Master Sgt. James Ayers Veteransshare wartimeMemoriesPAGEE 9by Teresa Eubanks, Journal EditorA 14-year-old from Bristol was discharged from Shands Hospital Monday night and is recuperating at home after sustaining incapacitating injuries when he drove an ATV into a tree Saturday night. Stanford Josiah Dawson is a bit sore but doing well, according to his brother, Stafford. Stanford and some friends were riding ATVs July 7 when one ran out of gas. A chain was used to connect the ATV used by Christopher Donnell Dilworth, 19, of Bristol to the 2000 Honda Foreman ATV Stanford was driving. Stanford was towing the second ATV along Harry Donar Road around 8:30 p.m. when Christopher, who was on the second ATV, called out several times to get his attention. When Stanford turned to look over his right shoulder at Christopher, he accidently steered to the right. The ATV went off the dirt road and slammed into a tree. The boys left side and his head hit the tree before he was ejected from the vehicle. He was not wearing a helmet. The ATV rotated in a counter-clockwise direction, dragging the second ATV with it. Christopher and his passenger, Chartisha Samone Hill, 19, of Wewahitchka were thrown from the four-wheeler. The injured boy was moved away from the crash site while waiting for the ambulance to arrive. He was transported to a Tallahassee hospital and then sent to Shands for further treatment. Charges are pending in the accident, which happened just west of Martin Luther King Road. Damages to the ATV were estimated at $2,500. The collision was investigated by FHP Trooper Jason King.ATV rider injured after hitting treeBand members recall meeting PAGE 11After PAGE 29Journal wins PAGE 24PAGE 2 in parking lot incident ----Bristol man arrested for domestic battery ----Handyman takes $2,000 but leaves PAGE 3 Two DUI arrests are made ----PAGE 12 Pioneer Settlement PAGE 23 Journey Stories: MCDOuUGALsS iIN Ame AMERiICA PAGE 32 Woman struck by car is OOK;C Close call on road leaves man driver side mirror II N S II DD EE to start at last July celebration. eemoreph PHOtT OGRAGRAPHS iINsideSIDE!

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Page 2 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JULY 11, 2012 ARREST REPORTS compiled by Journal Editor Teresa Eubanks CALHOUN COUNTYJuly 2 Yolonder Scott, VOP, CCSO. Kimberly Hall, VOP (times 2), CCSO. Justin Pare, failure to appear, CCSO. Steven Eaford, VOSP, CCSO. July 3 Jimmy Tucker, failure to appear, CCSO. July 6 Allen McCullough, exploitation of the elderly, CCSO. July 7 Gary Gazzier, possession of scheduled III narcotic, possession of cocaine, attempt to manufacture meth, BPD. Jodie Willis, criminal mischief under $500, battery, CCSO. Hilda Willis, battery, CCSO. July 8 Tim Keys III, driving with license suspended or revoked, BPD. Christopher Todd, felony failure to appear (violation drivers license restriction), CCSO. Danielle Gray, driving with license suspended or revoked (2 times), CCSO.LLIBERTYTY COUNTYJuly 2 Christopher Laster, VOSP, LCSO. Kimberly Hall, holding for CCSO, CCSO. July 3 Jo Jean Kirkpatrick, VOP, LCSO. July 6 Daniel Brunson, III, writ of attachment, LCSO. Zechariah Allen Tackett, felony driving with license suspended or revoked, FHP. Ronnie Allen Davis, VOSP, CCSO. Jeffrey M. Strait, DUI (alcohol or drugs) 2nd or 3rd conviction, LCSO. July 7 Jodie Willis, holding for CCSO, CCSO. Hilda Willis, holding for CCSO, CCSO. July 8 Ivan C. Wagoner, Jr., domestic battery, damage to property over $1,000, damage to property over $200, LCSO. Andre Tribue, DUI (alcohol or drugs), LCSO. Blountstown Police Dept.July 2 through July 8, 2012 Citations issued:A Accidents...............03 .................18 Special details Business alarms.....01 Residential alarms..........00 Complaints..............................................................36SH H ERIFFS LOLOG Handyman takes $2,000; leaves little work behindA Blountstown man who received $2,000 in checks from an 88-year-old woman for doing some work around her home has been charged with exploitation of the elderly after it was determined that he did little in return for the money, according to a report from the Blountstown Police Department. Allen McCullough, 60, was arrested Friday after an investigation found he cleaned out a freezer but did a poor job on repairs to a bathroom. He also broke the sink when he was supposed to do some work in the kitchen of the home on SE Houston Street. Luethel Boyd notified the BPD May 31 that her aunt, Johnnie Mae Whitley, who is ill, had given several checks to McCullough but little work had been done. She said he was also given $175.95 in cash to pay for materials purchased at Tatums Hardware. Whitley later told an officer she did not even place but felt obligated to pay when he approached her. According to the complaint: on the back porch bathroom completely unaccounted for, according to Boyd Tim Partridge at the police department the same day the complaint was made. He was accompanied by his wife and his attorney. He stated that his work was worth the $2,000 he was paid and said he never asked for any money. When Whitley asked what she owed him after he did work on the bathroom, he said he replied that she owed $1,200. He said he told her to give $200 of that amount to the church. He also got three other checks, one for $800 and two for $100 each. Following his arrest, McCullough was given a conditional release.allenALLEN mMcCculloughCULLOUGH Bristol man charged with domestic battery, two counts criminal mischiefA 22-year-old Bristol man is facing a domestic battery charge and two counts of criminal mischief for repeatedly shoving his girlfriend to the ground, tearing up the rental home they share and damaging her sisters car. Ivan Charles Wagoner, Jr. was intoxicated when he left a party and returned to their residence on NW Lake Mystic Church Road early Saturday morning, according to his girlfriend. She said they argued at the party and she was afraid of him. His girlfriend, her sister and a 23-year-old male friend left the party together. The sister had gone to bed and the other two were in the living room when Wagoner got home. Witnesses gave the following account to Deputy Jonathan Gentry: When he found the front door was locked, Wagoner pulled it open forcefully enough to damage the frame and came inside. He yelled at his girlfriend, pushed her down several times and started throwing things around. When the male friend tried to get between the couple, Wagoner pushed him to the ground. Wagoner went through the house, throwing items, punching the walls and breaking a window and a light fixture. He kicked in the bedroom door where his girlfriends sister was calling their father for help. He continued knocking over and throwing things as he exited the house and once outside, he broke off part of the decking from the front porch and pulled an air conditioner out of a window, causing it to fall six feet. When his girlfriend followed him outside to try to get him to leave, he pushed her down again. Wagoner punched the sisters car, leaving several scratches to the right passenger door, knocking out the right taillight and leaving a large dent on the side of the trunk. He then started throwing a table, chairs and food off the back porch. He snatched the back door open and left it damaged before leaving the premises on foot. The male witness, who was pushed to the ground, declined to press battery charges against Wagoner. Wagoners girlfriend told a deputy what had happened but was too frightened to give a written account, according to the deputy. charge was for property valued at over $200 but under $1,000. The second charge was for property worth $1,000 or more. Wagoners bond was set at $3,500. He was released from custody Monday.IVan AN Wagoner AGONER Mom & daughter charged with A woman and her daughter are both facing charges after they reportedly started an altercation with a woman outside El Jalisco restaurant in Blountstown. According to the report from the Blountstown Police Department, the victim said she came out of the restaurant around midday June 27 and saw Jodie Willis, 19, and her mother, Hilda Willis, 52, both of Blountstown, pull up in the parking lot and start arguing with Willis husband, Albert Willis. She gave the following account of what happened next: As the woman approached her own vehicle, she saw that Jodie Willis had used a car key to scratch an H on the side. The woman then started walking toward the police department, located across the street, to report the vandalism when Jodie came up, put her hands on her and threatened her. Her mother then joined her and both jumped on the woman. Albert Willis came and pulled them apart and the mother and daughter left the parking lot. While the victim was talking returned without her mother. She stated that she had keyed an H in the vehicle, an admission according to the report. She said she was going to get her mother and would then return to the police station to give a statement but never returned. The two were arrested July 7. Hilda Willis was charged with battery. Jodie Willis was charged with battery and criminal mischief with less than $500 in damages.HildaILDA WillisILLIS ll

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JULY 11, 2012 / THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 3 I would greatly appreciate your vote on August 14. GINA McDOWELL Electfor Liberty County Supervisor of Elections Let 15 years of experience work for you! CITY TIRE cCO. "Volkswagens to semi's, we handle them all" ity ireisyour onestop tire shop TIRE StT ORE! TOYOTOYO TIRETIRES "Authorized Dealer" A Chipley man who wouldnt take a roadside sobriety test and refused to give a breath sample to determine his level of intoxication was charged with DUI Friday, according to a report from the Liberty Arrested was Jeffrey Martin Strait was pulled over just County Deputy Jonathan Gentry responded to a report of a black Ford Mustang, traveling recklessly and Gentry, who was southbound, saw the car on the road ahead of him as After going around the other vehicle, the car swerved erratically back into the westbound lane, crossing the white fog line and traveling off the 3-to-4-foot continued onto the north grass shoulder before swerving back into the westbound lane in an erratic and reckless manner, appearing to almost around and pulled up behind Strait to conduct a traffic As he spoke with Strait, the deputy noted the odor of an alcoholic beverage coming Straits license three times before it was When asked if he had consumed any alcohol, Strait stated: I drank one at the Strait refused to attempt a roadside sobriety exercises and, despite being advised it would result in an automatic license suspension, would not submit to resulted in a DUI arrest in Liberty County Sunday Deputy Bobby Revell was on patrol along SR 12 N and the Garden of Eden Road when he noticed a two-door car with no tag light and an inoperable left He pulled over the car and while talking with the driver, reported that he noticed the strong odor of Bristol, stated, I took a shot of vodka around 10 consumed any other While attempting roadside sobriety exercises, maintain his balance for more than three seconds, had to hold on to his vehicle to keep from falling and was unable to keep count when told to take nine breath test to determine his level of intoxication, which resulted in readings effrey trait ndreribue DUI ARRESTScompiled by Journal Editor Teresa Eubanks

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Page 10 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JULY 11, 2012 Call George Ross or Tim Flanders at(850) 674-2482 or (850) 447-0898Licensed ~~ BLOUNTSTOWN ~~ Insured *Air Condition *Furnaces *Water Heaters *Electrical *Refrigerators *Rubber Roofs *Hitches *Awnings *Slide-out Repair *Floor Repair RV COLLLLISION CENTER Big River RV LLIBERTYY COUUNTYY ELLECTION NOTICESBOOK CLLOSING July 16, 2012. I Primary Election August 14, 2012 SAMPLLE BALLLLOT/VOTER INFORMATION CARD ABSENTEE BALLLLOTS L LOGIC & ACCUURACYY TEST July 26, 2012 9:00 a.m. EARLYLY VOTING Saturday, August 4 Saturday, August 11, 2012 8:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. on Monday through Friday 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. on two Saturdays and Sunday CARR CHAPEL Carr Chapel in Clarksville held a weekend VBS June 22 and 23 using the Rocky Point Lighthouse materials from Group Publishing which encouraged doing an outreach project for the community. Director Janice Harris chose to do a soup mix that could be donated to the Calhoun Liberty County Ministry Center. They were also targeted as our mission for the weekend. The children, though small in number but not in heart, raised funds for the ministry center. We appreciate the opportunity to serve our community using our servants heart for the Lord. the church served breakfast to the ladies for winning the annual Penny Crusade, which is used to raise funds for missions in sharing Christ to the world. This was also a Sunday that we joined other churches across the USA in the Call2Prayer to pray for our country. Check our church out at carrchapelac. com or contact Pastor Harris at (850) 209-6746. HOlL Y HOOp P STerERS T he First Baptist Church of Bristol will be hosting a Holy Hoopsters Childrens Basketball Camp from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. (ET) on the following dates: grade. grade. grade. You may sign up before or on the day of camp. Come early to sign up. Camp will be $5 a child and will include a pizza lunch. Scholarships are available and both girls and boys are welcome. For more information, please contact Troy Brady at (850) 272-0455, or call the church at (850) 643-5400. AMAZING WOO NDERSS AVIAT TIOON Come we do Amazing Wonders Aviation VBS from 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. We will have Bible lessons about Gods power over nature, Gods power over circumstances and Gods power over sin with a closing program and refreshments Wednesday night. Come for a fun time of games, food, crafts, missions and music! Hillcrest Baptist is located on CR 274 5 miles W. of Sheltons Corner. Awesome God! Amazing Power! See you there! HOOMECOOMING S SERVICESS All are invited to the annual Homecoming Service at the Wesleyan Methodist Church in Hosford, hosted by Grace United Methodist Church. The service will be Sunday, July 15 at 11 a.m. at the Wesleyan Methodist Church, followed by lunch at Grace United Methodist Church in Hosford. Fortress will be the musical guests and the message will be brought For more information, please call Grace United Methodist Church at (850) 379-8595, or visit the website at www. graceumchosford.org. LAT TINOO FOOOO D FESTSTIVAL St. Francis of Assisi Church on Gaskin Street in Blountstown will be having a Latino food festival Saturday, July 14 from 5 p.m. ethnic food, games, music and community enjoyment. Admission is free. NEWS FROM THE PEWSThe Calhoun-Liberty Journal Classieds EMAIL: thejournal@fairpoint.net wallet by listing your unused items in

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JULY 11, 2012 / THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 11 PLEASE VOTEMichaelWRIGHT FOR LLIBERTYY COUUNTYY SCHOOLL BOARD DISTRICT 1Hard Working Accountable Committed To The Continuous Improvement Of Our SchoolsYOU WILL NOT BE DISAPPOINTED!Paid by Michael Wright for Liberty County School Board District 1Dear Citizens of Liberty County, My name is Michael Wright and I am a candidate for School Board, District One. I am married to Joan Johnson Wright and we have two children, Madison and Mason. Joan has been a school teacher in the Liberty County school system for the past 14 years and currently teaches at Tolar School. Both of our children are students at Tolar School. My family is involved with our school system on a daily basis either by teaching our kids, playing sports or being involved in school activities. This makes the best interest of our schools personally important to me. Heating & Air Conditioning FL LicIC. # CMC1249570R s s CCs (850) 674-4777Whaley Whaley Band members from Wewa and Port St. Joe remember Billy Blackman, a former columnist for The Calhoun-Liberty Journal and a longtime member of the band Southern Satisfaction, while on tour in 1977. He was inspired to dig the photo out for the age of 86. The Wewahitchka native is the author of Seasons in Beulah Land, available in paperback or as a download for Kindle on Amazon.com.A this one. in Manteo, North Carolina. Buddy, Stewart Boddye, Wayne Neel and Charles Gaskin and I were playing a Holiday Inn in Nags Head and heard that Andy lived nearby in Manteo. So Buddy and I decided to stake out his house in hopes of meeting him. We hid in the bushes across the road from his driveway and waited for a chance to climb the huge gate. From there we would decide the next step. across the road and climb the fence when Buddy said, Wait, someones coming up the driveway, so we ducked down again. A car pulled out. Thats him, thats him, Buddy said. We jumped into our getaway car and followed Andy and the driver (which turned out to be his daughter, Dixie, I think was her name) and followed them into a small grocery store. happily agreed, which is the photo shown here, taken by his daughter. I couldnt get up the nerve to say anything, so Andy spoke Yes, he was barefooted. Billy Blackman is shown at far right; his bandmate, Buddy Hamm of Port St. Joe is pictured at left and the object that days search is shown in the middle If you have an interest in history, Landmark Park is the place to be each Sunday afternoon during the month of July. Our annual Heritage Forum series will feature guest speakers presenting programs on state and local history. The forums will be presented in the Interpretive Center Auditorium at 3 p.m. and are free with paid gate admission (adults, $4; kids, $3; members, free). Continuing Education/ Professional Development credits will be granted. ploring Big Mama ThornWiregrass Presented by Queen Ali, student and Dr. Jeneve Brooks professor of Sociology at Troy University Dothan. This presentation explores the unique contributions of Willie Mae Big Mama Thornton, the Ariton-born blues singer who (made famous by Elvis) and later wrote and recorded Ball n Chain, (popularized by Janis Joplin). It will include a discussion of Big Mamas noted self-taught virtuosity on various instruments and will also feature performance video clips of this famous blues legend of the Wiregrass. Confederate Alabama Women and Religion will be presented by Dr. Jennifer Trevino July 22 and After RemovalThe Creek Nation Today, presented by Walter Gowan, will take Landmark Parkis a 135-acre historical and natural science park in Dothan, Ala. Heritage forums at Landmark Park

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Page 12 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JULY 11, 2012 birthdays KUYLEE STEpPHENsS birthday Tuesday, July 17. He is the Quincy. His grandparents are the and Beverly and the late Cuy Stewill enjoy a super water-slide with a pool attached, swimming pool, kiddie water sprinklers Saturday, July 14. His parents are turning their back yard into a Water Park! He enjoys going to Grannys, playing with his cousins, riding and driving anything with wheels and swimming. GRAYCELYNN MARIE L LIpPFORDHer grandparents are Becky Pickron Clarksville. Her great-grandparents She enjoys beating up her three brothers, Danny, Colton and Jayce Morgan and giving Daddy kisses and going on Sunday river trips. She also loves to talk and laugh.HHORACE mMCCCORmMICkKHorace McCormick celebrated his 55th birthday Monday, July 9. His his sister is Sue Ammons. He enjoys JERRY LLEmIMIUX, JR.Jerry Lemix, Jr. celebrated his 15th birthday Saturday, July 7. He Greensboro and Charlene Baskins and mud-riding. Lynda Grzegorczyk and her daughter, Danyelle, of Clarksville, were named 2011-12 Volunteers of the Year during the Panhandle Pioneer Settlements annual Volunteer Appreciation Banquet held June 7. Settlement Co-founder Linda Smith praised the Grzegorczyks for their dependability and good humor. Lynda and Danyelle are always bubbly and energetic and ready to tackle any task, said Settlement Co-founder Linda Smith. They have put in countless hours to help us set up and operate our annual rummage sale as well as other events. They are simply here for us with whatever task we ask them to help out with. During the banquet, nearly 80 volunteers enjoyed a complimentary smoked chicken dinner with mashed potatoes and green beans and a tasty as sortment of cakes for dessert. We appreciate all of our volunteers tremendously, Smith said. This small army of dedicated people brings the Settlement to life. They staff events, they give tours and they work in the store. They are great folks and we truly treasure them. Local band Swiftwater provided the evenings entertainment, performing an outstanding selection of bluegrass and gospel songs. Swiftwater is made up of the husband-and-wife team of Al Webb (vocals and guitar) and Wretha Webb (vocals and guitar), sisters Sharlyn Marie Smith (vocals and mandolin) and Mary Catherine Smithand Larry Strickland (bass). To learn more, visit www. swiftwater.us.Panhandle Pioneer Settlement names LL ynda & DDanyelle Grzegorczyk Volunteers of the Y Y ear DOTHAN Music by Moonlight, the annual concert series will continue Thursday, July 12 and 26. Bring a lawn chair and picnic and enjoy music under the stars on the Gazebo lawn at Landmark Park. Concerts are free for everyone. No pets or alcohol allowed. Contact Landmark Park at (334) 794-3452 for more info. Thursday, July 12 will feature local favorite the Troy Dothan Community Band. The concert series will come to a close on July 26 with the Fort Rucker 98th Army Band. Landmark Park is a 135-acre historical and natural science park located on U.S. Highway 431 North in Dothan, Ala. For more information, contact the park at (334) 794-3452.Music by moonlight July 12 and July 26

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JULY 11, 2012 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 13 PROBLEM #6:School Resource Deputies SOLUTION:As your elected Sheriff, I will always look for ways to improve the School Resource Deputys Program so as to provide for a safe school environment. Under my leadership, School Resource Deputies will be trained and effects of alcohol, drugs and tobacco use, as well as the importance of being honest and accepting responsibility for ones actions versus blaming others. Training will also focus on helping students identify and understand how to handle bullying and sexual harassment, safe and unsafe places and child abuse. Cyber safety, challenges facing teen drivers and an overview of DUI laws would also be covered. Our children are our future, and these educational programs are important to reducing crime and violence and keeping them safe in our schools. See next weeks Journal for PROBLEM #7. Elect FOR LIBERTY COUNTY There is no substitute for EXPERIENCE SHeriERIFFEEFFEcCTIVE BBUT FF AIR LAW EENFORc CEMENT FOR OF UUS!Paid for by Henry Hamlin, Democrat for Liberty County Sheriff All HenrHENR YHHAmlinMLINSixty-seven people lost their lives in Florida last year in boating accidents and there have already been 28 deaths so far this year, according to the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC), which has released its 2011 Boating Accident Statistical Report. The FWC is responsible for reviewing, analyzing and compiling boating accident data for the state. Its statistical report details boating accidents and their causes. The frequency of boating accidents in Florida and their causes would probably shock most people, said Investigator Andy Bickel, of the FWCs Division of Law Enforcement. We want to reduce the number of accidents, injuries and deaths on Florida waters, Bickel said. Statistics show that drowning is the leading cause of death in boating accidents. jacket, Bickel said. There are several styles of life jackets available to boaters that wont interfere with your boating experience and may save your life. Todays boaters can choose from several models of light and comfortthe-shoulder life jackets that can be sun and they do not interfere with boating activities. Accidents can occur without warning and if for some reason someone ends up in the water, quite often its too late to put on a life jacket. The leading type of accident continues to be boaters colliding with other boats or objects, Bickel said. With the number of boaters in our beautiful state, its important to pay close attention to everything thats going on around your boat. Statistics repeatedly show that boaters who have taken a basic boating safety class are less likely to be involved in a serious boating accident.port is now available online at MyFWC.com/ Boating accidents cost 77 lives in Florida in 2011; Twenty-eight deaths so far for 2012 $975 Ford F-150 Ex-Cab0% interestDaylight Auto Financing2816 Hwy 98 West Panama City, FL 32401(850) 215-1769Hours 9 a.m.-9 p.m.You are automatically approved if you can make your payments on time $1,500 Chevy Silverado Ex-Cab0% interestDaylight Auto Financing2816 Hwy 98 West Panama City, FL 32401(850) 215-1769Hours 9 a.m.-9 p.m.You are automatically approved if you can make your payments on time Celebratingthe FourthIN DOWNTOWN BLOUNTSTOWN in Blountstown, which was sponsored by Rivertown Community Church, the Blountstown Rotary Club and Ramsey Piggly Wiggly. JeanEAN E. WeeEEKsS photosPHOTOS

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Page 14 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JULY 11, 2012 SPECIALL TYYPOSTS1/4 rounds 1/2 rounds Flat Face FACTORY SECONDS6'6" Posts, Top Size, under 2" 2-3" 3-4" 4-5" 5"+ IteTEMsS subjectSUBJECT to TO a A Vailability AILABILITYLiberty Post and Barn Pole Inc.DeEMpseyPSEY BarronARRON RoadOAD, BristolRISTOL (offOFF HWyY 12 N) Phone (850) 643-5995WeE'VeE GotOT tTHeE FeENceCE postsPOSTS to TO MeetEET YoOUR NeeEEDsS.NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours or responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment.Cataracts?Freedom from Eye Glasses, Now a reality for many.LLee MMullis MM.DD. and Cataract SpecialistSmart Lenses SMDr. M Mulliss Smart LensSMM procedure can produce clear vision without eyeglasses.Close-up, Far away & In-between CALL TODAY for a Smart Lens Evaluation MMullis Eye Institute 1600 Jenks Ave., Panama City(850)763-6666 Best of the Latest Country Charted songs, mixed in with your favorite oldies.WPHHK RRadio K-102.7 FMWYYBT RRadio Y-1000 AM K102.7 FMM Hometown News, weather and river readings at 8 a.m. ET. Our daily newscast also airs at 1 p.m. and again at 5 p.m. ET.Swap Shopfrom 9-10 a.m. ET Buy, Sell, Trade or Give Stuff Away.TALLAHASSEE As Floridians continue to recover from the affects of Tropical Storm Debby, the Florida Department of Health (DOH) urges the public to take precautionary measures when cleaning and repairing to avoid indoor air quality problems. Moisture that enters buildings from growth. Molds can cause disease, trigger asthma symptoms and allergic reactions and continue to damage materials in homes and buildings long after the storm, said State Surgeon General Dr. John Armstrong. Failure to control moisture and mold can present short and long-term health risks. Mold growth in homes and buildings can often be seen or smelled. It often appears as a staining or fuzzy growth on furniture or building materials (it may look cottony, velvety, rough, or leathery and have different colors like white, gray, brown, black, yellow, or green). If you can smell an earthy or musty odor, you may have a mold problem. To protect against health risks associated with mold: moldy material is not easily cleanable, such as drywall, carpet padding and insulation, then removal and replacement may be necessary. tive equipment when cleaning or removing mold cleaning gloves, safety goggles and an N-95 half-face most local hardware stores). before wearing a respirator. Do not use a respirator if you have heart disease or chronic lung disease such as asthma or emphysema. allergies or asthma should not clean or remove moldy materials. If you have concerns regarding your health before starting the cleanup, consult your healthcare provider. If mold growth has already occurred, carefully remove or clean the moldy material in a well-ventilated area. If the moldy area is less than about 10 square feet (less than roughly a three ft. by three ft. patch), in most cases, individuals may clean up the mold using a detergent/soapy water or a commercial mildew or mold cleaner. The cleaned area should then be thoroughly dried. Throw away any sponges or rags used to clean mold. If the mold returns quickly or spreads, it may mean the building materials are still wet enough to support mold growth. Additional drying of these materials may be needed. After working in a mold affected area, shower and launder work clothes separate from the other laundry. Keep shoes and work clothes away from the unaffected living area. Never mix cleaners (such as a cleaner with ammonia) and disinfectants (such as bleach), as chemical reactions between these ingredients are likely to result in the release of hazardous gases (such as chlorine). cleaners and disinfectants carefully. Open windows and doors to provide plenty of fresh air.Floridians warned of health dangers of mold in water-damaged buildingsI now reflect on the excitement 11 years ago. It was July 2001 and steamy hot in central Florida. My wife Fran, our son Heath and I prepared for a camping trip to Torreya State Park and dreamed of the possibilities yet to play out. I was the Assistant Park Manager at Wekiwa Springs State Park; a large, very busy Florida State Park. I was on a mission to learn every detail about Torreya State Park. I was preparing for the most important interview of my Florida Park Service career. As history would tell, the trip was successful. I interviewed for the Park Managers position and accepted the subsequent offer. During my investigations I remember a character that was most interesting. This tor known as Dr. Hentz. his life adventures. He rented a room in the Gregory House in the late 1800s from the plantation owner Jason Gregory. after his birth, the family moved three times before settling in Tuscaloosa, AL. It was here, in November 1845, that he began his diary. cial transitional period in its history when it was slowly being transformed from a craft into a science. Because of the difroutine health problems and failures in combating epidemics, the profession was under strong attack from a host of irregular practitioners. Dr. Hentz chose to pursue a traditional practice. His training sheds important light on antebellum medical education, student behavior and the role that shared experiences played in preparing students for practice. nati, Ohio, after schooling in Kentucky. The young doctor experienced a great deal while interning during the frigid winter of 1849. He tells a tragic but common tale of young death, when he writes, Wednesday, January 3, 1849: Betsys baby had convulsions before supper, unexpected, I thot twas beginning to improve& so twas apparently it commenced sinking almost immediately after & died at about after 10just about the time Pa left. I felt deep emotions of sadness on losing this little patientmy weighty the responsibilities connected with the practice of medicine. Works Cited: Steven M. Stowe, ed. A Southern Practice: The Diary and AuProject MUSE. Web. July. 2012, www. muse.jhu.edu.A memorable character: Pa ARtT 1 OUTDooOORS WiITH R RANGER SSTEVEBy Steve Cutshaw, Torreya Park MManager

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JULY 11, 2012 / THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 15 AFTER THE STORM A large selection of new and used cars are now available at Chipola Ford in Marianna!Ronnie Coley personally invites you to visit him any time Monday thru Saturday from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Questions? Give him a call at (850)482-4043. HeE iIS Waiting AITING forFOR your YOUR callCALL! Chipola CORLLETTS ROOFING LLLLCLR FREE EESTIMATESMichael Corlett (850) 643-7062 *Lifetime Warranty on Repairs *Will pay up to $500 of your deductible *Over 75 years combined experienceTNTTOBY GARNETT, OWNER Collision Center THE JOURNALThe Journal Classieds Email:thejournal@fairpoint.net wallet by listing your unused items in TALLAHASSEE The federal government approved Public Assistance for 20 counties that requested to be included in the federal disaster declaration, due to the impacts of Tropical Storm Debby across Florida. Three additional counties were approved for Individual Assistance, including Duval, Nassau and Union counties. Public Assistance provides grant assistance for debris removal and emergency protective measures. Costs for repair, replacement, or restoration of disaster-damaged, publicly-owned facilities can also be covered under Public Assistance. The counties approved to receive Public Assistance include: Liberty, Baker, Charlotte, Citrus, Clay, Columbia, Dixie, Franklin, Gulf, Hamilton, Hernando, Jefferson, Lafayette, Manatee, Nassau, Pasco, Sarasota, Suwannee, Union and Wakulla. Public Assistance from the federal declaration comes in conjunction with the earlier approval of Individual Assistance for 11 Florida counties. State, tribal, local governments and certain types of private ties should visit www.FloridaPA.org to create an account within 30 days of a presidential declaration to apply for Public Assistance. Federal Individual Assistance makes federal and state assistance available to individuals and families. Residents and business owners who sustained losses in the designated county can begin applying for individual assistance starting today by registering online at www.disasterassistance.gov, by web enabled mobile device at m.fema.gov or by calling 1-800-621-FEMA(3362) or 1-800-462-7585 (TTY) for the hearing and speech impaired. The toll-free telephone numbers will operate from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. (local time) seven days a week until further notice. Tropical Storm Debby made landfall June 27 in Steinhatchee. Impacts from the storm were felt statewide. The primary concern from Tropical the Sopchoppy and the St. Marys, reached record breaking crests.The Atlantic Hurricane Season runs from June 1 November 30. To Get a Plan!, visit www.FloridaDisaster.org. For the latest information on the 2012 Hurricane Season, follow us on Twitter at www.Twitter. LLiberty Co. among additional communities approved for assistance for damage from Tropical Storm DebbyTALLAHASSEE In an effort to expedite the recovery process for businesses damaged by Tropical Storm Debby, Governor Rick Scott today activated Floridas Small Business Emergency Bridge Loan Program. The program will provide emergency, shortterm, interest-free loans to small businesses in 36 eligible counties to assist in reestablishing business during the interim period before other aid and insurance claims are processed. nancial assistance to businesses impacted by Tropical Storm Debby will aid them and their employees in getting back to work, said Governor Scott. So many of Floridas small businesses are the lifeblood of their communities and this program will help assist them in returning to business as usual as soon as possible. The Florida Small Business Emergency Bridge Loan Program provides an expedient cally damaged by a disaster. The short-term loans help bridge the gap between the time damage is incurred and when a resources, including regular longer-term loans. Governor Scott has allocated up to $10 million from the states General Revenue fund for the program, of which $5 million will be made available immediately. The additional $5 million will be used as necessary. Owners of small businesses with two to 100 employees in counties impacted by Tropical Storm Debby (see attached map) may apply for short-term loans for $1,000 to $25,000 from Thursday, July 5 to Wednesday, August 15. Loans are granted in terms of 90 or 180 days and are interest-free for that time period. To be eligible a business must have been established prior to the issue of Executive Order 12-140, signed by Governor Scott on June 25, 2012 and demonstrate physical damage as a result of Tropical Storm Debby.Floridas Small Business Emergency Bridge Loan Proaftermath of Hurricane Andrew in an effort to provide short-term emergency funding to businesses in need of immediate cash impacts of the Winter Storm of 1993, the Northwest Florida Floods of 1994, tornadoes in 2007 and Hurricanes Opal, Georges, Charley, Frances, Ivan, Jeanne, Dennis and Wilma.Emergency Bridge Loan Program activated for small businesses hit by storm

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Page 16 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JULY 11, 2012 JUULY 11, 2012 / THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 17 A Fourth of July Celebration The community gathered for a good old-fashioned Fourth of July Celebration last week in Blountstown, with the areas Independence Day Parade followed by topped off with a crowd-pleasing Folks from all walks of life took part, with a few donning some red, white and blue to make the most WEEKS, DANIELL WILLLLIAMS and THE CALLHOUUN CHAMBER A Fourth of July Celebration

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Page 18 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JULY 11, 2012 Hosfords 21st CCLC summer program celebrates the science of sportsIve missed more than 9000 shots in my career. Ive lost almost 300 games. Twenty-six times, Ive been trusted to take the game winning shot and missed. Ive failed over and over and over again in my life. And that is why I succeed. MichaelICHAEL JorORDanAN Hosfords summer camp celebrated the Fourth of July week with the science of sports. From basketball to roller skating, win or lose, we love sports! We studied our favorite athletes and what they say is the key to their success. We practiced our swings and shots and learned how to make them better. To show our patriotism for the Fourth of time having them twirl in the wind. We ended our week with a visit to Rock It Lanes in Panama City and had a great day roller skating and bowling. We are currently enrolling students in Hosfords 21st CCLC program for the 2012-13 school year. Students who are preregistered will be able to start the program email alice.mansell@lcsbonline.org.BELOW LEFT: Emily King and Hayven Bunkley are all smiles as they pause for a picture while bowling. BELOW: Mary Finuff and her patriotic pinwheel. RIGHT: Hunter Ammons, Kelsey Nobles and Nathan Hodge take a breather from roller skating. The LCHS varsity cheerleaders will be hosting a pup camp Friday, July 13 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the LCHS gym. Come out and support our cheerleaders and have some fun. For more information, please contact Donna Hiers at 643-2241, ext. 221.LLCHS cheerleaders to host pup camp We have been busy this summer learning how to dance, practicing our sidewalk chalk art, supporting our troops and playing with Chuck E. Cheese. All summer the (LEAC) Liberty Educational Administration Pre-K and Kindergarten students have been having fun while also keeping up on their academic skills. Our campers have been working on their alphabet, learning shapes, colors and numbers. We have completed a service learning project and have partnered with the local library for weekly educational educational activities. Our summer campers chose to show their USA pride with the completion of a service learning project by making a troops for the Fourth of July. We mailed it to Joey Bilbo who is the father of one of our campers, Reagan Bilbo. ABOVE: The campers shown here had a very exciting visit with Chuck E. Cheese. LEFT: Music and art teacher Sarah Carpenter teaches the very energetic campers how to do the Macarena. RIGHT: Christopher Clark is having fun drawing Spider-Man with his sidewalk chalk.Liberty Pre-k and kindergarten learning dance and more during camp

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Students at W.R. Tolars 21st Century Community Learning Center are having fun with amazing activities! During the six week program, students focus on academic improvement in Math, Reading and Science. In addition, students enjoy a variety of enrichment activities. Students participate in art through a partnership with the Liberty County Arts Council. Art Teacher Sarah Carpenter provides weekly art classes to participating students. This week, students studied a form of art called abstract expressionism. Stuabout Jackson Pollock, an abstract expressionist movement. He was well known for drip painting. Student The 21st Century Community Learning Center program is made possible by ten by Dr. Sue Summers, Superintendent of Liberty County Schools. The program provides after-school tutoring, art and music enrichment and physical education activities, just to name a few. Thanks to our partners, parents and students for helping W.R. Tolars 21st Century CLC program! JULY 11, 2012 / THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 19 Sue Summersfor Superintendent of Liberty Co. SchoolsLET EXPERIENCE WORK FOR YOU! To continue my commitment to advance Liberty County Schools I am asking for your vote on August 14.ELECTHello Liberty County Citizens, Fine Arts Programs Athletic Programs Clubs and other extracurricular activities TALLAHASSEE The Florida State University College of Social week summer camp for middleschool children that served as the pilot project for CSW Arts & Athletics, a new program focusing on positive youth development. The program brought together 20 young people from June 18-29 for athletics and college preparatory activities. of research, I have no doubt that the arts and athletics change lives and help prepare young people for a wide range of educational and career opportunities, but most of all to Social Work Dean Nick Mazza, an internationally recognized scholar in arts therapies. The College of Social Work is unique in offering an integrated community outreach program drawing upon the common ground found in sports and arts housed within a university setting that offers resources to promote academic development and The brainchild of Mazza, CSW Arts & Athletics is an initiative designed to reach out to Big Bend-area youth, including those with limited social and economic resources. Using the combined strengths of arts and athletics exercises and activities, the program focuses on cultivating leadership development, academic achievement and social and life skills in the young people it serves. CSW Arts & Athletics also is part of the colleges larger mission to create collaboration between Florida State and the greater Tallahassee community. FSU students were involved in the camp as a servicelearning experience, serving as camp counselors and working closely with the young people enrolled in port of Guy Spearman, a legislative lobbyist and 1975 graduate of the Masters in Social Work program and his wife, Delores and the collaboration of several FSU entities. The Florida State team included Lorne Sam and Monk Bonasorte from FSU Athletics; Russell Williams from FSUs College ReachOut Program (CROP), which is administered by the Center for Academic Retention and Enhancement (CARE); Marcia Rosal, professor and director of the art therapy program from the College of Visual Arts, Theatre and Dance; Mazza; and L. Shuntel Fuller, event coordinator from the College of Social Work. With continued support, Mazza said he hopes CSW Arts & Athletics will become one of the College of Social Works premier community projects to help preteens and teenagers in the Big Bend. The College is considering expanding the program to include after-school programs with artists and athletes serving as role models.Arts & Athletics: Winning combination for the new FSU College of Social Work camp MARIANNATwo Chipola College athletes have been honored for Exemplary Academic Achievement by the National Junior College Athletic Association. Kristine Brance, a member of the Chipola womens basketball team, earned a 3.62 GPA during her freshman year. Brance, a native of Riga, Latvia, is a point guard for the Lady Indians and will return for her sophomore season. Rebekah Wiltse, a member of the Chipola womens Cross Country team, earned a 3.62 GPA during her sophomore year. Wiltse ran Cross Country for two years at Chipola and plans to transfer to the University of Florida.Althas Rebekah Wiltse honored for The CalhounL Liberty JOURNaALServing two counties that make up one great community!PHONONE (850) 643-3333 or FAX

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Page 20 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JULY 11, 2012 T upperwareCall Beth EubanksYOUR Tupperware Consultant at (850) 643-2498 or (850) 570-0235 Host a Party Today, Play all SummerHost a qualifying party and receive this exclusive Clear Impressions Picnic Set ITS VERY WiISE TO ADVERTiISE in the Calhoun-Liberty JOURNALand CLJNews.cCOM Call us at (850) 6433333Email: the journal @fair point. netTHE BOYS OF BENTLEY BLUFF: A group of boys take advantage of high water to cool off one recent afternoon in Telogia Creek in Bentley Bluff Park.PHIL COALE PHOTOS Cooling off at the BluffSummertime weather brings thunderstorms and lightningIn the coming weeks we should start to see a more consistent rain pattern forming in our area. Thunderstorms may appear daily in the early and late afternoon. With this pattern more lightning strikes are common. If you witness a lightning strike please report it by calling 911. When can be managed and suppressed. Otherwise, they may burn intensely underground for days until they blow harder to manage and contain. Thunderstorms can produce downed trees and increase the collection of yard debris (limbs, sticks, twigs, pine needles). Yard debris from storms when left to collect on the ground and rooftops becomes a tinderbox when times turn dry. Keeping your yard clean and your rooftops and risk to your home. Dont invite a wild Keep the areas near your home clear of storm blow-down and excessive yard debris. If your cleanup involves burning the debris there are some requirements that must be followed under Florida law and they are as follows: *Piles should be 8 or less in diameter. Larger piles will require an authorization before lighting. *Piles must be located at least 50 from the road, 25 from your house and any forest land, and 150 from other homes or structures. *Burning must not start before 9 a.m. (ET) and must be extinguished one hour before sunset. *Your smoke must not create a hazard or a nuisance. For more information, please con tact the number above or the Florida VOTE FOR & ELLECTRAYHOWELLClerk of Circuit Court Vote and Support Ray Howell for your next Clerk of CourtThunderstorms With this pattern more lightning

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JULY 11, 2012 / THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 21 When the last school bell rang this summer, thousands of Florida high school students headed for fun in the sun, summer jobs, or maybe just lazy days relaxing after a hard year of academics. But for a group of highly motivated ninth and 10th graders in Floridas small, rural school districts, the end of the school year signaled the beginning of summer learning challenges staged by the FloridaLearns STEM Scholars gifted and academically talented students three regions of the state, the Northwest, Northeast and South Central, to take part in collaborative, hands-on experiences in the areas of Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM), explore STEM career paths never imagined in many of their limited world experiences and to develop leadership skills. FloridaLearns STEM Scholars is a three-year long project, funded through Floridas Race to the Top initiative from the Florida Department of Education. The FloridaLearns STEM Scholars a vision to help Florida address its urgent and important STEM talent development challenge by focusing on some of Floridas most gifted and talented under served students in the rural regions of the state. The Panhandle Area Educational Consortium (PAEC) located in Chipley, the Heartland Educational Consortium (HEC) in Lake Placid and the North Florida Educational Consortium (NEFEC) in Palatka are working in partnership to help transform teaching, learning and leadership in the areas of STEM. The $4.5 million dollar project addresses a serious gap in STEM education for gifted and talented students in the states small, rural school districts served by their three rural-based regional educational service STEM Education Initiative. During June and July, a series of regional Summer Challenge programs are providing opportunities for students to become immersed in STEMMING. GADSDEN, LIBERTY and WAKULLAThe series of Summer Challenges were launched the week of June 1114. Students from Gadsden, Liberty and Wakulla Counties came together at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory in Tallahassee, to take part in the D3(Dream, Design and Do) NanoChallenge where students designed determine the characteristics of the materials. Students were then challenged to use the tools they tasks. As a team, they explored a novel ethical issue in nanotechnology and designed and constructed a device to simulate the manner in which the electron force microscope works. Jose Sanchez, Assistant Director of the Center for Integrating Research and Learning at the NHMFL, treated students to a tour of the facility. Participants also had the opportunity to interact with scientists Dr. Maitri Warusawithana, who showed the equipment used in molecular beam epitaxy and Bob Goddard, and Jonathan Ludwig, who demonstrated how scanning electron and atomic force microscopes work, respectively. In a series of career presentations, Darrel Tremaine, a geochemist and Angela Sutton, a chemical engineer and Safety Director at the NHMFL described their workplace and academic preparation for their careers and Dr. Matt Eby, a nanobioscientist, shared cutting edge developments in his occupational area nanobiology. STEM Mentor teachers Angela Sapp (Gadsden County), David Shuler (Liberty County) and Suzanne Fielder (Wakulla County) accompanied the students and assisted Dr. Mabry Gaboardi and Jesse Smithyman throughout the weeks activities.JACKSON, CALHOUN and WASHINGTON ninth and 10th grade students from Jackson, Calhoun and Washington Counties studied at Chipola College in Marianna to learn and practice the STEM skills needed for crime scene investigations. introduced to the science of crime scene investigations by Shawn Yao, a crime scene analyst from the Florida Department of Law Enforcement. As part of their challenge, students learned about methods used to process evidence collected at crime scenes and then, gained important laboratory skills as they implemented each of the methods they learned about. During the week they analyzed hair and completed forgery detections and drug tests, extracted and analyzed DNA using gel electrophoresis, conducted ballistics comparisons, examined blood spatters, carried out a forensic entomology examination, and did a forensic odontology comparison. Throughout the week they prepared to become expert witnesses and to defend the results of their analyses when questioned by a prosecutor in court during the weeks culminating activity which was a trial. Chipola faculty members Dr. Jocelyn Wahlgren, Dr. Jeff Bodart, Terolyn Lay and Denise Freeman were assisted by STEM Mentor teachers Jackie Watts (Jackson County), Kevin Shull (Washington County) and Sara Waldorff (Calhoun County) with the weeks activities. Preparing these students for the next phase of the FloridaLearns STEM Scholars project in the of the three-year funding initiative is an important goal of the Summer Challenges. By stimulating excitement, encouraging deeper understanding of the STEM disciplines and motivating greater inquiry and learning, STEM stakeholders from business and industry, economic development, workforce agencies and educational leaders are looking forward with excitement to Floridas ability to help produce the STEM talent needed to sustain and advance Floridas critical economic future by tapping the states gifted and talented under served small and rural students potential home grown. Summer challenges stimulate learning for rural high school students in Liberty, Calhoun & other counties ABOVE: Students from Gadsden, Liberty and Wakulla counties. LEFT: Students from Washington, Calhoun and Jackson counties.Some students study crime scene investigations, others take on challenge at National Mag Lab VISIT THE JOURNALS ONLINE SITE AT CLLJNENEWS S.COMTAND CHECK IN wWITH US ON FACEBOOK AT CLjJNEwWS

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Page 22 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JULY 11, 2012Minutes from the June 7 LLiberty Commission meeting The meeting was called to order by Chairman Dexter Barber. Present at the meeting were Commissioners Kevin Williams, Davis Stoutamire, Albert Butcher, Jim Johnson, Attorney Shalene Grover, Clerk Robert Hill and Deputy Clerk Charla Kearce. Prayer was led by Dick Stanley. Pledge of allegiance was led by Commissioner Kevin Williams. Motion to approve the minutes of the regular meeting held May 10th and special meeting May 23rd, 2012 was made by Stoutamire, seconded by Williams and carried. Motion by Johnson to add Rhonda Lewis to the agenda, seconded by Stoutamire and carried. Craig Brinkley discussed the Dog Ordinance with the Board. He requested that the ordinance by updated. A committee will be formed to come up with a stricter ordinance. Kristin Brown with Preble-Rish Engineers discussed the SCRAP and CIGP grants. She recommends CR 379 (just the loop to the pole mill) and Hoecake Road. Kristin Brown told the Board that she is working on a grant for problems at the Estiffanulga Boat Ramp. Kristin Brown will check on striping Danny Black Road. Ambulance Director Melissa Brown presented the EMS Consultant contract. Motion to approve a one year contract was made by Johnson, seconded by Butcher and carried. Stephen Ford presented the mosquito control budget for 2012-13. Motion to approve was made by Williams, seconded by Butcher and carried. Monica Welles with Liberty Transit presented Resolution #12-06 for the Trip and Equipment Grant in the amount of $222,162.00. County match is $22,216.00. Motion to approve was made by Stoutamire, seconded by Butcher and carried. Rachel Manspeaker gave an update on the Health Department. We will have a dentist beginning July 1, 2012. Motion by Butcher, seconded by Johnson and carried to place two speed bumps on Phillips Road in Rock Bluff. Attorney Grover presented Resolution #12-07 to sell the old Frazer Bilt ambulance box to Gadsden County Board of County Commissioners for an amount of $5,000.00. Motion to approve was made by Stoutamire, seconded by Williams and carried. Attorney Grover presented Resolution # 12-08 authorizing the sale of the former Liberty County Emergency Management Building to the Liberty County School Board. Motion to approve was made by Johnson, seconded by Williams and carried. Motion to approve the lease between BBB&L Partnership and Liberty County house in Sumatra was made by Johnson, seconded by Butcher and carried. Motion to approve payment of $1,000.00 to join the Medicaid lawsuit was made by Johnson, seconded by Butcher and carried. Motion to approve the Memorandum of Agreement for Limited County Access to Florida System Data was made by Williams, seconded by Johnson and carried. Motion to re-appoint Johnny Eubanks to serve on the Chipola Workforce Development Board was made by Butcher, seconded by Williams and carried. Motion to approve disposal of old records was made by Stoutamire, seconded by Butcher and carried. Motion to approve advance payment to Weatherization of $41,987.79 was made by Butcher, seconded by Johnson and carried. Motion to accept the resignation of Stephanie McCroskey effective June 6, 2012 was made by Stoutamire, seconded by Butcher and carried. Rhonda Lewis presented the EMPA Grant. Motion to approve the Federal Program agreement was made by Johnson, seconded by Williams and carried. Motion to approve the EMPA State Program agreement was made by Williams, seconded by Stoutamire and carried. Motion to approve Emergency Management advertising for concrete was made by Williams, seconded by Stoutamire and carried. Motion to pay the bills was made by Johnson, seconded by Williams and carried. Motion to adjourn was made by Stoutamire, seconded by Williams and carried. Warrant LList & Numbers Payroll Fund 33485 33586 Operating Fund 5086 5294 SHIP Grant 3954 3972 Weatherization Grant 4694 4702 ________________________________ Robert Hill, Clerk of Court Dexter Barber, Chairman The meeting was called to order by Chairman Dexter Barber. Present at the meeting were Commissioners Kevin Williams, Davis Stoutamire, Jim Johnson, Albert Butcher, Clerk Robert Hill and Deputy Clerk Charla Kearce. Emergency Management Director Rhonda Lewis presented Resolution #12-09 declaring a State of Emergency due to Tropical Storm Debby. Motion to approve was made by Johnson, seconded by Williams and carried. Dick Stanley discussed public building disaster with the Board. Motion to adjourn was made by Williams, seconded by Stoutamire and carried.________________________________ Robert Hill, Clerk of Court Dexter Barber, ChairmanJune 25 emergency meeting minutes The meeting was called to order by Chairman Dexter Barber. Present at the meeting were Commissioners Davis Stoutamire, Albert Butcher, Jim Johnson, Clerk Robert Hill and Deputy Clerk Charla Kearce. Emergency Management Director Rhonda Lewis discussed the emergency repair that is needed on Highway 67 and 22. Motion to hire C.W. Roberts Contracting to do the repairs on 67 and 22 was made by Johnson, seconded by Butcher and carried. Commissioner Butcher told the Board that Tonia Williams needs work on her house. She already has two mortgages and if the county will take a third mortgage she can have the work done. The Board said that they would need to get legal advice. Motion to adjourn was made by Butcher, seconded by Stoutamire and carried. ________________________________ Robert Hill, Clerk of Court Dexter Barber, ChairmanRepairs to Hwy. 67 & 22 addressed in emergency meeting held June 29 ACCEPTING NNEW PPaA TIENTSLaban Bontrager, DMD12761 NW Pea Ridge Rd., Bristol, FL 32321 DENTUURE LLAB ON PREMISESSame-Day Service on Repairs & Relines Bristol Dental ClinicMonica Bontrager, DMD OPEN Family Coastal Seafood RestaurantFRIDAY NIGHTAll U Can Eat SEAFOOD PLATTER OR CRAB CLAWs S LLocated in BristolLandLAND CLearinEARING-Private drives and roads -Food plots -Home sites -Small acreageCall Eddie Nobles at (850) 447-0449 or Chas (850) 447-0849Eddie NoblesacleaINa oot ao Attention Candidates: There are only four FOUR weeksWEEKS left to get your ad in before the Aug. 14 Primary. Early voting will be held Aug.4-11.

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William Walter Morehead moved to Blountstown with his wife, Mary Ann Yon and children Thomas Francis, Flora Elizabeth and George Walter between 1873 and 1879. His fourth child, Margaret Morehead, was born in Blountstown in 1879. She grew up on the homestead located on Chipola Road just southwest of Blountstown. William valued a quality education and sent his daughter, Margaret, to college to be an educator. Before she married into the McDougald family at the age of 24 in 1903, Margaret returned to Blountstown where she would teach school for a number of years. She left Blountstown for about 13 years with her husband, James Bertelle McDougald, Sr. She returned to Blountstown for what was supposed to be a brief time to take care of her ailing parents. When her stay was prolonged, she again took a job teaching in Blountstown before retuning to Columbia. After Bert died in 1916, Margaret, with her son James, moved back to the homestead in Blountstown and she would never leave again. Margaret returned to her teaching career once again teaching in Blountstown schools. Pictures are available of her seen with her son James among the students at the T shaped school building that was built in 1904. Margaret lived on the homestead in Blountstown until she died September 29, 1960 at the age of 81. She is buried in the McDougald family plot at the Nettle Ridge Cemetery located on Hwy 69 North.History of education in Blountstown and Margaret Morehead McDougaldMargaret Moorehead McDougald McDougald is a well established name that goes back many generations. Its origins dates back to medieval Scotland. McDougald, meaning son of a black stranger, was a byname used to distinguish darker-haired Danes from the fair-haired Norwegians, says the Dictionary of American Family Names. The name has been Anglicized from the Gaelic language and although there are many variant spellings, the name McDougald has been associated with the modern day Clan MacDougall, which traces its roots back to the MacDougalls of Lorn in Scotland. The MacDougalls of Lorn were the senior branch of the royal house of Somerled, King of the Hebrides and Regulus of Argyll. They are a Highland clan and one of the three oldest in existence, dating from 1164. Mac means son of while Dougall is derived from the Gaelic word Dubh meaning Black or Dark. The Gaelic word Gall means Stranger. The coat of arms, registered in Burkes General Armory, records the family motto To Conquer or Die. Our ancestors in Scotland were a prominent family of the Christian faith during the 13th and 14th centuries, but we dont know much about our direct ancestors between that time and the 18th century. What we do know from stories handed down by generations is that two McDougald brothers left Scotland in the mid 1700s and landed in North Carolina. Alexander McDougald was born to one of those brothers May 10, 1794. Alexander moved to Washington County, GA where it is believed that he married a young 1822. Alexander married again to Elizabeth Holloman and moved to Gadsden County in 1824, just two years after the U.S. purchased Florida from Spain and one year after the state government was established. Alexander purchased about 80 acres of land along Telogia Creek just south of Greensboro. Alexander had nine children with Elizabeth in Gadsden County. He became a charter member of Providence Baptist Church in 1843, which presently remains active. Alexanders daughter, Mary Ann later European descent born in Gadsden County. The July 23, 1922 issue of The Gadsden County Times says that Alexander moved into new country inhabited by on the Forbes Purchase. When Florida was under Spanish rule in 1804, 1,200,000 acres between the Apalachicola and St. Marks rivers were given in payment to John Forbes by indebted Indians. Alexander built a home three miles from the site of an important skirmish of the Second Seminole War. April 23, 1840, the McLains were attacked by a raiding party of Indians led by the son of a chief. John McLains mother, 20, his sister and two small siblings were brutally murdered while trying to escape to their nearest neighbor, Alexander McDougald. John barricaded himself in the house and shot the chiefs son as he attempted to burn the house. After wailing and chanting for their fallen leader, the raiding party disappeared and was never found. The old chief later said If the white boy on Telogia Creek had not killed my son, the war would still be going on. October 8, 1844, Daniel Fountain McDougald became the ninth child born to Alexander and Elizabeth. Daniel grew up at the family home and served faithfully as a deacon in Providence Baptist Church. Daniel left in January 1863 to United States in May 1865 after the war. He married Jane children over the next 11 years. Jane passed away November 12, 1882, less than two years after giving birth to their Colombia, AL January 17, 1883 where his wifes sister, Mary Ann Stringer, helped him raise his children. Upon his departure, The Quincy Herald reported, Columbia county will lose a good citizen. Meanwhile, William Walter Morehead married Mary Ann Yon December 19, 1867 and was living with his mother in-law on a farm in River in Bristol. The year 1873 found William with toddler Thomas Francis and infant Florah Elizabeth. That year again destroying his crops. A very discouraged William wrote, I want to get away from here so bad that I dont know what to do.... I am perfectly disgusted with the whole country. William didnt have to travel far to begin enjoying Gods blessings. By 1876, William was living in Blountstown and saw the birth of his third child, George Walter. By 1885, William had two more children, Margaret and Mary. William became a prominent citizen. The August 8, 1996 issue of The County Record reports that in 1886, William was instrumental in establishing the requirements of the Homestead Act of 1862 and was awarded a deed to 160 acres of land located at the current address, 16152 SW Chipola Road. Margaret Morehead was born January 12, 1879 in Blountstown, where she lived until she attended college. Sometime before she married at the age of 24, Margaret returned home to teach school in a two story building that was erected in 1888 before the Calcohi School. The August 8, 1996 issue of The County Record lists her among a group of consecrated and capable teachers under which, the Blountstown School grew. James Bertelle McDouglad, Sr. lived in Columbia, AL becoming an upstanding member of the community. By his early 20s, Bert was already well established. He owned a hotel and traveled a great deal conducting business. Young Bert married Martha Strickland, who is assumed to have died with her infant during childbirth. After mourning his devastating loss, Bert later learned from his sisters, who were attending college, about an attractive young classmate named Margaret Morehead. Bert contacted the local banker and other business owners in Columbia to obtain character references. He sent these along with a personal letter to William Morehead asking permission to courtship, the couple agreed to marry. Bert came to Blountstown with his two sisters and a preacher to marry Maggie May 10, 1903. Afterwards, Bert took Maggie to Columbia where the new bride managed their hotel while Bert traveled. Maggie had a son, James Bertelle McDougald, Jr. August 26, 1904. Shortly after, Maggie had her second son, George Alma. years after George Alma was born, tragedy struck. George Alma passed away unexpectedly due to an unknown illness. Tragedy struck again when Bert contracted hepatitis and lost his life January 30, 1916, one day after his 37th birthday. Maggie never remarried. After the death of her son and her husband, Maggie and son, James, came back to the homestead in Blountstown, where she continued her teaching career for a number of years. James Bertelle McDougald, Jr. lived out his teen years with his mother, Maggie, on his grandfathers homestead on Chipola River. James attended school in Blountstown before taking a job guarding patients at the Florida State Hospital in Chattahoochee. At the same time, a young girl named Myra Elnita Herring completed high school in Brinson, GA. Elnita wanted to pursue a career in nursing. Since Georgia schools had only 11 grades, she needed more course work before entering nursing school. In 1923, Elnita moved to Blountstown to live with her aunt, Rena Fields and complete the 12th grade at Calcohi. She was among the second graduating class from the newly completed school. From there, Elnita entered RN training at the Florida State Hospital in Chattahoochee. It wasnt long before James and Elnita met at the hospital and fell in love. On October 8, 1928, just three months before graduating, Elnita married James. Realizing that there is no place like home, James moved Elnita to the homestead in Blountstown. James farmed the land and was a carpenter by trade. He worked on several jobs over his lifetime. The most notable was building forms for the construction of the Apalachicola River bridge. Elnita worked as a private nurse for a few years with Dr. M.W. Eldridge in Blountstown. She worked with Dr. Eldridge for 18 years, was named Calhoun Countys Citizen of the Year. Elnita and James had four children, Sarah Margaret, James Bertelle, III, Billy Bascom and Myra Grace, who was stillborn. A few years after the death of James, December 28, 1956, Elnita retired and married Wesley E. Langford and moved to Brinson, GA. Elnita returned to Blountstown following the death of Mr. Langford and lived on the homestead until her death May 31, 1997. Today, James Bertelle, III and his wife, Dollene, along with Gary Bertelle and his wife, Delores, make up two generations of McDougalds living on 80 acres that remain of the homestead on Chipola Road. There are approximately 31 living descendents of James Bertelle, Jr., 16 of which still live in Blountstown. JULY 11, 2012 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 23 McDougalds in America: From Scotland to BlountstownThe Panhandle Pioneer Settlement presents the Smithsonian Institution and Florida Humanities Council Museum on Main Street --Journey Stories. The Panhandle Pioneer Settlement has been awarded the privilege of exhibiting the MOMS -Journey Stories, July 14 August 25, 2012. This is the only facility located in North Florida that has been selected for the exhibit. All other locations are in South Central and South Florida. In preparation for the exhibit, we are in need of volunteers to serve on various committees. Committees needed are for: Planning, Local exhibit planning, Exhibit installation, Program Development, School/teacher, Volunteer and docent training, and Publicity. Individuals are needed to present north Florida family journey stories, industry stories for the region, demonstrators, docents, assistance in creating an exhibit of local journey stories that support the MOMS Journey Stories. For additional information, call (850) 447-0298 or (850) 447-0964 or send email JOURNEY STORIEsS Elnita Herring McDougald

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Page 24 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JULY 11, 2012The Calhoun-Liberty Journal received three awards in the Florida Press Association (FPA) Annual Better Weekly Newspaper Contest during last weeks Southeastern Press Convention in Destin. and Environmental category with the story, Erosion: Landowners losing property about how the banks along the Apalachicola River are receding. One property owner who put his home 90 feet from the river bank said he expected to lose between a half foot and a foot of his lot each year. Instead, he discovered that he lost 15 to 20 feet in 2010. The story was featured on the front page of the June 1, 2011 issue. Journal sports writer Richard Williams earned a second place nod in the Sports Feature Story category with his article, Former players honor LCHS Coach Richard Kennedy. That article appeared in the Sept. 21, 2011 issue and included comments from players who talked about the impact the coach had on them. We didnt realize it at the time, but Coach Kennedy was a life coach that instilled in his players the characteristics to be productive citizens, said former player Grant Conyers. Practice was tough and the games were fun, but it was the discipline, the respect he demanded his players show, the way he treated everyone by having no favorites regardless if you were blessed with talent or not, that really stays with you. The newspaper also took second place in the Community History category, with an article by Teresa Eubanks and photographs by Beth Eubanks and Daniel Williams, Mural depicts long-gone buildings, about the artwork in downtown Blountstown by Jeff Vickery. The mural, sponsored by the Blountstown Main Street program, features realistic enlargements of several old postcards of the towns landmarks, including the high school, the C.C. Corbin Hardware store and a Texaco station as well as several other businesses. The full page story and photo feature was published Aug. 17, 2011. The Journal competed with other publications with circulations under 7,000. The winners were announced at an awards luncheon on Saturday. SEPTEMBER 21, 2011 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 7 by Richard Williams, Journal sports writerFormer LCHS Head Football Coach Richard Kennedy was honored by former players Sept. 16 in recognition of his contributions to the team as well as his up coming induction into the Florida Athletic Coaches Association Hall of Fame. As the gathering crowd waited, Kennedy was asked to give a speech, and in typical Ken nedy fashion the speech was short and gave credit to others. This isnt about me, it is about all of you. Thank you very much, was all that Kennedy said to the group. It was exactly what everyone expected. While the crowd enjoyed the meal pro vided by Liberty County Sheriff Donnie Conyers and crew, Kennedy took time to go around the crowd and talk to his former players and staff. He would laugh as players reminded him of drills or plays in a game, and almost without fail, he would be pulled in close as former players told the coach how much he meant to them. Kennedy was also recognized at half time of Fridays football game between Marianna and Liberty County, receiving a standing ovation from the fans. In sports, there is a tendency to report the scores, the stats and tell who scored the game-winning points. Often overlooked are the real lessons being taught and the people who do that teaching. Those who came to see Kennedy Friday spoke more about the teacher and the lessons than the wins and the losses. When asked what Kennedy meant to them, the former play ers almost all said the exact same thing: Kennedy wasnt really a football coach; he was a life coach that used football to teach young men the lessons they would need later in life. Grant Conyers, who helped put the event to gether, said Kennedy was his life. We didnt realize it at the time, but Coach Ken nedy was a life coach that instilled in his players the characteristics to be productive citizens, Co nyers said. Practice was tough and the games were fun, but it was the discipline, the respect he demanded his players show, the way he treated everyone by having no favorites regardless if you were blessed with tal ent or not, that really stays with you. Now that Im older, having been a part of Coach Kennedys program has given me the ability to realize I can do more than I think I can, that I can push through when things arent going right. Perhaps the biggest thing I learned from Coach Kennedy is that the more you put into things, the more you are going to get out of them and it doesnt matter if it is football, work or life in general. That is a great lesson to have learned. Former player Thorton Davis said it was a huge honor to play for Kennedy. When he was a teenager, he didnt realize the lessons Kennedy was teaching him. I wont lie about it, he said. When you are 16 or 17 and out there doing those drills, going through all of the practices, you think you know everything and you sometimes wonder if it is worth it, Davis said, and at the time you think about the pride you feel in being a Liberty County Bulldog, and the pride you feel in being a part of the community, or when you walk through the halls of the school and hearing the fans on Friday night and you think that is what makes it all worthwhile. But then you get to be 35 or 36 (years old) and it hits you like a brick. You realize that it is the lessons you learned about life, the things he taught you about yourself and about how to overcome adversity that are the real things that make what you went through worthwhile. I wish we could take what Richard Kennedy brought to each of us and bottle it up because we could all be millionaires off of that stuff. Several of Kennedys family members were in attendance. Daughter Julie Kenne dy, an assistant softball coach with South eastern Louisiana University, said growing up, life was about Friday nights and she enjoyed that. She said as she got older she realized that Friday nights were the fun times and that the real lessons, the teaching, was done during the week. Now, as a coach herself, she realizes the teaching is about more than sports. Julie Kennedy said the event put together by former players warmed her heart. To see how much my father meant to these peo ple here tonight, to feel the embrace of the com munity and to know that my father had an impact on so many people is wonderful, she said. I really do believe that God led us here and Im so happy that dad made that decision to come to Liberty County. I really believe this community means a lot to him and Im glad to see that he meant so much to this community. In 1989 Richard Kennedy told the Or lando Sentinel he was leaving his position as head football coach at Class 4A Lees burg High School because he wanted to be in a small town. The article quotes him as saying, I dont have any aspirations for the big time. I just want something small town, where the school and its sports are at the center of the community. That is really what I want to do, get back into a small school. I feel it is what we are looking for as a family. Kennedy said coming to Liberty County was a dream come true for him. To be in a community that wanted to do things the right way, and to have coaches, players and a booster club that would buy into what we were doing was tremendous, he said. Looking back I dont think I realized what we had, but Ive got to tell you that was special, he said. In small town football you are just a lit tle closer to everything, the community, the support I dont know how to describe it but in a smaller community you just get more of a core of support it seems to mean more to the community, and in Lib erty County we were just blessed through the years with good players, good fans, and good support from the school and the community. Kennedy said he couldnt name a game or team that really was the one that stood out above all the others, but he said he had erty County. We started out with about 80 kids coming out for football and ended up with about 20 kids on the team at the end of the year, he said. We went 2-8 and we were lucky to win those two. We were young and inexperienced, but that was a very special group that helped lay the groundwork for years to come. Im glad the program has continued to be successful, but looking dont regret my decision as much as I hated to leave that group of kids that was there. I felt like it was my time to move on. Kennedy said he was humbled, truly humbled by the event. I would have never dreamed of such a thing in a million years, he said. The former LCHS head coach said the induction into the FACA Hall of Fame was an honor, but he noted, Plaques and honors dont mean as much as your memories and associations with your players, your coaches, your support groups and the friends you had in the community dont get me wrong Im honored to be going in the Hall of Fame, but it is the special times, the memories that mean more than any thing else. Kennedy was known as a tough, disciplined football coach and while many play ers pointed to those traits as being the very on their lives, Kennedy knows that some might not be as appreciative of his toughness. I tell you what, it is something Gayle and I will remember for the rest of our lives. Most of them should have probably come at me with an axe. They didnt and Im glad of it, but Im really glad to hear that some of them feel like those times are important to who they are today. I made some mis takes, I handled some kids wrong, and I got to talk with a few of them, but if some of on them then Im really I really dont know what to say, Im just glad that at least some of them feel that way about me. It re ally does leave me without words. Kennedy said he always felt that if you did things the right way, instilled discipline in your team, if you made them work to the point they came to expect more from them selves it would make the individual better and at the same time, make the team better. Former player Travis Anderson said Kennedy did things the right way. Look around here, he said pointing to the crowd of former players. He made a difference in peoples lives, he taught us things we could have never learned in the classroom. He is such a caring guy and a lot of people dont get that about him because he can come off as harsh and he was known as a very tough coach. But he was that way because he cares more than anyone really can realize. DANIEL WILLIAMS PHOTOSFormer players honor LCHS Coach Richard Kennedy Farmers Almanac...11 Birthdays...12 Mayhaw Reunion...15 Obituaries...17 Tolar Kindergarten grads...19 Sheriff's Log...2 Community Calendar...4 Commentary...6, 7 Speak Up!...8 News from the Pews...10 50includes tax THE CALHOUN-LIBERT Y J OURNAL Volume 31, Number 22 Wednesday, June 1, 2011 CLJ News.com EROSION Chelsea Sanders gives the thumbs up as she takes part in Friday nights graduation ceremony at Liberty County High School. See more photos from the evening on page 13.by Teresa Eubanks, Journal EditorWhen Donnie Gene Tharpe set up a doublewide mobile home on the banks of the Apalachicola River four years ago, he knew that erosion would be a concern. People said it was eroding probably a half foot to spot he and his brother, Butch Tharpe, bought near the Estiffanulga Boat Landing. I set my home out about 90 feet from the river bank, he said. Last year, I got worried, he said. We lost 15 to 20 feet just from the erosion. He and several other homeowners along the Liberty County side of the river are seeing big changes along the bluffs. All that water, as swift as it is, eats away from the bottom, he explained. Its like breaking off a piece of hoecake. Its crumbling in fast. The banks are just falling off. Liberty County Commissioners have been looking for a way to slow down the erosion but have had no success. Just last month, Commission Chairman Jim Johnson and Commissioner Davis Stoutamire took two representatives from the Corps of Engineers on a tour Estiffanulga Park. Johnson said the engineers agreed there was a serious problem but couldnt offer a solution on their own. They said the only way we can get help is if we get grant money to pay for it, he said. Johnson said the county has applied for grants without success to deal with the erosion problem. Engineers feet a year along that area just on the Liberty County Landowners losing property as erosion eats away at Apalachicola River banks side, he said. The commission chairman believes building a series of pilings in the river would help. The rock jetties would turn the current away from the wall, Johnson said. You would need to start above Outside Lake and Project engineer George Sanders is shown next to the historic marker at the Wesleyan Church in Hosford. The church restoration project recently won an Award of Excellence from the Tallahassee Trust for Historic Preservation. See page 9.Church restoration receives historic preservation awardABOVE: Continuing erosion could undermine the boat ramp at Estiffanulga Park. TOP: The view of the water gets a little closer every day for this home overlooking the Apalachicola River. JOHNNY EUBANKS PHOTOSSee EROSION continued inside on page 2Pair of Liberty County road projects to get $260,000 in funding...3 Improvements planned for water system in Pine Island ................3 Coley, Montford both respond to layoffs at FSH and closing of Dozier School............3 Ronald Earnest wins Big River Roundup...22 AUGUST 17, 2011 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 7 by Teresa Eubanks, Journal EditorLocal artist Jeff Vickery has done what many people dream of. He quit his full time job to pursue his passion. Hes always enjoyed art but longed to do something bigger than life by painting murals. Last year, he made the wall of the Snowden Land Surveying building on North Pear Street fanciful lettering, a dark background of trees and reproduced a series of black and white photos that prompted passers by to stop for a few minutes just to take it all in. showcase his work. Rather than tell people about it, I thought Id show them, he said. It worked. Members of the Blountstown Main Street program took notice, along with just about everybody else who drives along North Pear Street. Main Street allotted money from past fundraisers to pay for his latest effort, which just went up on the west wall of The Diamond Corner at S.R. 71 and S.R. 20. Vickery began putting the 10 x 35-foot mural in place on Monday, drawing plenty of curious looks as he installed it in sections. He returned Tuesday to touch up a few spots and make sure everything was in place. After over it with a clear, protective coating. He estimates that he put over 180 hours of work into the mural. He got plenty of reaction as he worked early this week, with motorists honking their horns and giving him the thumbs up as they drove by. The centerpiece of the mural is from an old colorized postcard, Vickery explained. Main Street members helped select a series of landmark buildings to be included in the mural. We went though all the old pictures we had and I picked out the ones I thought the design, he said. Vickery, along with the Main Street members, went through three or layout. Main Street President Edwin Strawn said that after the group approved the design, he and his wife, Lynn as owners of the business the mural would be displayed on had a request. They asked that the image of the 1952 Dodge truck that Strawns father once drove, loaded with the boats he had built, be included. It was. As business owners, we hope it will attract people and make them want to stop, said Strawn. He believes the murals will show those passing through the area that the people of Blountstown remember and treasure their heritage. He hopes the artwork will spark some interest and encourage visitors to take their time and perhaps stop, eat at one of the local restaurants and do a little shopping. Vickery recently did a mural for the Calhoun County Elections Office after a private citizen donated the funds for the project. The patriotic design features the Honor of a Veteran theme. The next mural will be for a new restaurant set to open west of Blountstown in the former J&N Building. When funding is found and a location is secured, Vickery will begin working on his next project for Main Street, according to Strawn.Mural depicts long-gone buildings and historic views of Blountstown BETH EUBANKS PHOTO I want to be your next Clerk of Court. I believe that my variety of experiences in both life and work are such that Calhoun County I have experience in the court system; I have practiced the citizens of Calhoun County for the past 12 years. Rene Attaway CRAWFORD for CALHOUN COUNTYClerkCo OUrRT ofPOLITICAL AD PAID FOR BY ReneENE ATTAWAY for YoOU caCAN coCOUNT oON RENE ATTawayAWAY CrawfordRAWFORD. I am a leader with a heart of service and a love for Calhoun County.The June Guardian ad Litem training class for Jackson, Holmes, Calhoun and Washington counties was recently sworn in during a ceremony with Circuit Judge William L. Wright. The next class is scheduled for September. For more information and an application, please call 482-9127. class sworn in Did you know?Assistance Dogs of America evaluates each dog for two to four weeks before placing it in a foster home to begin formal training. Evaluation includes a variety of tests to gauge the dogs potential as an assistance dog. These evaluations test dogs for food aggression, social interest and sound sensitivity among other things. Once a dog passes those basic evaluations, it is then evaluated more extensively as trainers attempt to learn more about the dogs temperament and personality. Basic obedience exercises are performed to see how dogs respond in different environments, and dogs that pass each stage of the evaluation process are then examined by a veterinarian to determine if they are physically able to handle the considerable tasks required of assistance dogs. If the dog is given a clean bill of health, it is then placed in a foster home to begin in its training. Unlike the relatively short evaluation period, the training period for a potential assistance dog takes a minimum of six months and can last as long as 22 months.The Little League World Series began in 1947 as a national tournament for all known Little League programs across the United States. Initially known as the National Little League Tournament, the inaugural tournament featured just 11 teams, all of which were from Pennsylvania or New Jersey. However, more than 2,500 spectators were on hand in Williamsport, Pennsylvania to witness Maynard Little League defeat the Lock Haven All Stars in the title game by a score of 16-7. That result was printed in newspapers around the country, and the resulting publicity helped spread Little League nationwide. Within a few years of the inaugural tournament, every state had its own Little League program.

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JULY 11, 2012 / THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 25 Summer StormDark clouds are shown as they gather and swirl over Calhoun County during one of the storms erupting across the panhandle in recent weeks in these photos taken by weatherwatcher Jean JEAN E. WEEKS PHOTOSPENSACOLA A A new scam is sweeping the nation by claiming that President O Obama will pay your utility bills through a new federal stimulus program. C Customers nationwide, including some in northwest Florida have reported the scam, and several energy companies across the country have issued warnings to their customers about it.HOW ThHE SSCAM W WORKS:CC onsumers have been contacted in person and dia, phone calls and text messages with claims that President O Obama is providing credits or applying payments to utility bills.S S cammers claim they need the consumers' social security and bank routing numbers in order for them to receive the money. In return, customers are given a phony bank routing number that will supposedly pay their utility bills. In reality, there is no money, customers believe they have paid their bills when in fact they have not, and they have now put themselves at risk of identity fraud.TipTIPS TO A A VOiID FALLiING f FOR ThiHIS SSCAM: social security number, credit card number or banking information to anyone requesting it over the phone or at your home unless you initiated the contact and you are speaking. claiming to be your utility company and feel pressured for immediate payment or personal information, hang up the phone and call the customer service number on your utility bill. into your home to check electrical wiring, natural gas pipes or appliances unless you have scheduled an appointment or have reported a utility problem. If you have reported a problem, ask utility employees pressure tactics over the phone for information or in-person to get into your home. For more information about scams in your area, check out BBB's complete scam directory.Utility bill payment scam warningTT he 2012 G G ulf of M Mexico red snapper recreational harvest season will close T T uesday, July 17 in state and federal waters; the last day of harvest is M Monday, July 16.T T his years 46-day state season, which is the same as the 2012 federal recreational red snapper season in the G Gulf of M M exico, was set in M May at a meeting of the Florida Fish and W W ildlife C Conservation C Commission (FWCWC). T The season was extended at the end of June, because bad weather led to decreased season started June 1. Florida state waters in the G Gulf extend from shore to nine nautical miles; federal waters extend beyond that line to 200 nautical miles. More information ing is available online (click on Saltwater, Recreational RegulaRed Snapper).

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Page 26 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JULY 11, 2012 make a great gift! Call or text 6438383. 7-4, 7-11Gem stones: Rubies, garnets, sapphires, Sassett jewelry machine plus accessories. Call 6743006. 7-4, 7-11Bedding material: Sheets, comforters, mattress pads, cotton blankets, mattress covers and more. Everyone is invited to shop at the Calhoun-Liberty Ministry Center store. Located on Hwy. 20 E. in Blountstown, 6741818. UFNMens, ladies and childrens clothes. Many items for the home. New items arriving daily. Everyone is invited to shop at the Calhoun-Liberty Ministry Center store. Located on Hwy. 20 E. in Blountstown, 6741818. UFN APPLIANCES2007 Fisher & Paykel dishwasher, the drawer type. Works good. Free. Call 674-8830. 7-4, 7-11 FURNITUREChilds safety bed rail (age 2 or older) 48 long, deters falling from standard width mattress, sturdy, like new, $28. Call 643-7567 or 674-5257. 7-11, 7-18Twin bed frame, headboard and mattress set, $65. Sofa and matching chair, tan, $150. Call 643-6488. 7-11, 7-1896 sofa, navy blue in excellent condition, $250. Call 591-9873.7-11, 7-18Waterbed, $40; table, $35. Call 674-3264. 7-11, 7-18Four antique ladder back chairs with brand new bottoms, $150 for THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNALCLASSIFIEDSTo place your ad, call 643-3333 by noon Eastern Time on Monday UFN. Non-business ads run FREE for 2 weeks. ITEMS FOR SALEBox of shirts, $1 each. Box of quilt pieces, $5 a box. Call 6743264. 7-11, 7-18Elliptical exercise machine, $50. Call 379-3505. 7-11, 7-18Hand pull golf bag carrier great condition, $25. Golf clubs, irons, woods, putters, etc. Sets or separate, pick and choose, $3 each. Call 643-7567 or 674-5257.7-11, 7-181968 Jim Bean political donkey decanter, very collectible, Regal China, 13 tall, $15. Call 643-7567 or 674-5257. 7-11, 7-18Wall mount pot rack hand forged attached hooks, $24. Wall mirror, stain washed pine frame, brackets for hanging two ways, 22 1/2x18 1/2 like new $13. Retro beveled wall mirror, heavy, very sturdy, wired for hanging, stain washed wood frame, 27 1/4x17 1/4, $18. Call 643-7567 or 674-5257. 7-11, 7-18Childrens books, all types/ages, Big and Little Golden books, Rand McNally, etc. prices vary. Wooden teaching puzzle for 3 years and older, non-toxic, was special ordered, never used, $3. Crib set, sweet teddy bear design with comforter and matching bumper crib pads, seldom used, $14. Various childrens toys, too many to list. Call 643-7567 or 674-5257. 7-11, 7-18Girls bicycle, $10. Call 6436488. 7-11, 7-18American Idol tickets in Orlando, August 2. Selling at $192 each, Will sell for $82 each. Call 896-0333 or 674-8071. 7-11, 7-18Swimming pool 15x42 above ground with pump and ladder. Works great, $65. Call 643-6260.7-11, 7-18Shoesens/girls size 7, $30. Call 6436260. 7-11, 7-18Exercising pedal walker machine, $50. 1960 antique baby stroller, $40. Call 570-3806.7-11, 7-18Solid sterling silver necklace with real gemstones, paid $300, asking $150. Call 899-0792, no calls after 9 p.m. (CT). 7-11, 7-18Fiery Opal earrings surrounded by 5 diamonds, beautiful. Would For Rent in ALTHaA762-9555 or 762-8597Very NICE *2 & 3 BD trailers.With lawn service 5 x 10 .....$27 10 x 10 ....$43 10 x 20 ....$70 10 x 25 ....$90M & W SELFSTORAGE RRENTALs SCall 573-5255, 762-9555, 762-8807 or 762-8597 7 days a week service UFN Find a bargain in the Journal CLASSIFIEDS! BD, 1 1/2 BA TownhousesBRISTOL Phone 643-7740 FOR RENT BLOUNTSTOWN $350 month + deposit(850) 674-3694after 5 p.m. or leave messageFOR RENT B Call David at (850) 674-1000 or (850) 674-1706 Apartment FOR Rent IN BlountstownGood downtown location. Walk to everything.all. Antique dressing vanity with wooden rollers in excellent condition, $100. Call 899-0792. No calls after 9 p.m. (CT). 7-11, 7-18Beige recliner, $20 OBO. Love seat, burgundy and navy, $30 OBO. Wing chair, royal blue, like new, $40 OBO. Call 209-0163.7-11, 7-18TV entertainment center, $25. Call 643-5011. 7-4, 7-11LLarge display cabinet, $2,000 OBO. Call 674-3264. 7-4, 7-11Good used furniture and appliances needed at Calhoun Liberty Ministry Center. Call 674-1818. UFN ELECTRONICSSony Playstation1 with two controllers and Frogger game, $20. Call or text 643-8383. 7-4, 7-11 MOTORCYLES & ATVsUUTV, red, low miles, two seater, wipers, winch, brush guard, lights, a dump bed, trailer hitch and knobby tires, $2,900. Call 643-5650.7-11, 7-18Motorcycle wheel chocks, mounts to trailer and holds front tire for hauling. Set of 2, never used, $30. Call or text 643-8383. 7-4, 7-11 TRUCKS2003 Dodge custom van, very low mileage, one owner, bucket seats, bed/couch, TV & VCR. Call Mike at 643-8099 or Marie at 6745321. 7-11, 7-181978 Ford longwheel base truck, 4 speed, granny-low, big V8 enNew Home for sale in Altha3 BD, 2 BA, 1,200 sq ft with carport, 1/2 acre lot, Hardi siding, metal roof, vaulted great room, oak cabinets with granite tops.$122,000Call 762-8185 or 447-20256-20, 7-11 Two story, 2 BD old block house. Completely Furnished. Rail fenced yard.$40,000(850) 447-1533House FOR Sale IN Blountstown OWNER FINANCING, NO QUALIFYING WANTED: REALL ESTATE Will buy 10 to 1,000 acres, reasonably priced. Immediate closing. Call (850) 544-5441 or (850) 570-0222 For Rent inHHOSFORDCall (850) 627-8287 2 BD House (Lowry) NO SMOKING NO PETS6-20, 7-11 *Local Graft Cutting *Basic Yard Maintenance *No Contract Necessary Call (850) 899-0269Grass Cutting Services For RentIN BLOUNTSTOWNCall 643-64882BD, 1 BA Home NO PETS, City Utilities, Hud Vouchers Accepted$500 month$300 deposit HHouse for Rent in Bristol $400 month + $300 depositNO Pets(239) 336-9165

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JULY 11, 2012 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 27 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNALCLASSIFIEDSTo place your ad, call 643-3333 by noon Eastern Time on Monday UFN. Non-business ads run FREE for 2 weeks. NICE CAR of Forgotten Coast, LL LLC, for inventory of our great trucks selection log on to www. nicecarofforgottencoastllc.com. BC/UUFN/$12 CARS2005 Chevy Malibu, 130,000 miles in good condition, $4,000. Call 575-8194. 7-11, 7-18 VEHICLE ACCESSORIESAuto radio with cassette player, removed from a Chrysler to upgrade the system. Still works great, free. Call 643-7567 or 6745257. 7-11, 7-18 HUNTING/FISHING, T-hull with a 50 hp Mercury motor, trolling motor, trailer in good condition, $2,000 OBO. Call 643-8263 after 6 p.m. weekdays. 7-11, 7-18Deep Sea reel & rods, 7 Sea Eagle rod holds 20-50# line w/Shakespeare Tidewater 50LA reel $125. Shore Master 7 rod holds 3080# line w/Penn Senator 910 reel, heavy duty for BIG FISH $300. 8 Heavy duty rod w/Penn 9500ss saltwater reel open cast $175. 15x17 stainless steel propeller, no dents or dings, $100. Call or text 643-8383. 7-4, 7-11 WATER WELL SUPPLIESDo you need parts for That Darn Pump? We have capacitors, relays, control boxes, pressure switches, check valves, foot valves, air volume control valves, wire, pumps, tanks and much more. Available 7 days a week until 9 p.m. Repair questions are welcomed, call us at That Darn Pump 643-4357. BPA/UFN PETS/SUPPLIESKittens, kittens and a side of more kittens! We are looking for a good loving home. We are female, healthy, bursting with energy and bundles of joy. We are 12 weeks old and have had our kitten check up and a second vaccination. Can you provide us with love and a good home? If so, well give you hours of enjoyment and great companionship. For more information about us or to meet us and see how loveable we are, please call our Foster Mom, Ruth at (850) 237-2740. 7-11, 7-18New Zealand rabbit, male, approximately 12 weeks old, $10. Call 447-0189. 7-11, 7-18Shih tzu Poodle two years old, $50. Call 674-3264. 7-11, 7-18Free to a good home, eightSTARSCOPEFAMOUUS BIRTHDAY YSARIES Mar 21/Apr 20 Aries, the week may begin a by Wednesday or Thursday, A couple of opportunities for socialization arise. TAUURUUS Apr 21/May 21 Take inventory of your life this week, Taurus, and make the necessary tweaks to align you with your primary goals. Take a cue from someone organized. GEMINI May 22/Jun 21 Gemini, youre inspired to do something creative. Narrow down the possibilities. Maybe you want to paint indoors or take on a new craft hobby. EiCANCER Jun 22/Jul 22 Even the most organized people can get tripped up once in a while, Cancer. This week you may be unable to keep track of things. Keep your cool, and you will get it under control.L LEO Jul 23/Aug 23 Take control of a situation that arises, Leo, because right now it seems no one else is capable of handling the situation. You may prove to be an excellent leader. VIRGO Aug 24/Sept 22 in your social circles, Virgo. Failure to introduce yourself and network could lead to setbacks in your employment goals.L LIBRA Sept 23/Oct 23 Once the excitement of an event wears off, Libra, you may while. Dont wallow in boredom. Get started on a new project. SCORPIO Oct 24/Nov 22 Sometimes much more can be said by remaining quiet that actually speaking, Scorpio. Keep this in mind when you are socializing with new people. SAGITTARIUUS Nov 23/Dec 21 It can sometimes feel lonely at the top, Sagittarius. Now that youve acquired many of the things you wanted, the resulting feelings may not be what you thought. CAPRICORN Dec 22/Jan 20 Now may be the time to get serious about your efforts to Start doing the legwork and get your name out to new people as much as you can. AQUUARIUUS Jan 21/Feb 18 Although youre a do-it-yourself person by nature, Aquarius, sometimes letting someone get the job done frees you up for more important projects. You also get a needed break. PISCES Feb 19/Mar 20 Pisces, you cant seem to keep your mind on the thing at hand. Your wandering thoughts may put you in tune with a better idea.Week of July 8 ~ July 14JULY 8 Anjelica Huston, Actress (61) JULY 9 Courtney Love, Singer (48) JULY 10 JULY 11 Richie Sambora, Musician (52) JULY 12 Richard Simmons, Fitness guru (64) JULY 13 Cheech Marin, Actor (66) JULY 14 Tommy Mottola, CEO Sony (62) Refrigerator Call 674-3264. 7-11, 7-18 HOMES & LAND2008 custom built home, 1 BD, 1 BA, 576 sq. ft. Must be moved, $20,000 cash. Call 591-9873, only serious inquiries please.7-11, 7-18LLand for sale, 4 acres in Telogia with county water and highway frontage. Call 445-5002. 6-27 T 7-251994 Mobile home, 16x80, 2 BD, 2 BA, in great condition, handicapped accessible, $14,500. Call (317) 682-8625 or (601) 9264095. 6-27 T 7-18 YARD SALESALL THA Moving sale, everything must go. Beginning July 11 until everything sells. Located on Dell Wood Road off of 274 by Mulehead Pond. Call 762-2223 for more information. BRISTOLL Moving sale, Friday, July 13 all day and Saturday, July 14 from 8 a.m. to noon. Located at 13490 NW Joe Chason Circle. Everyand camping equipment, guns, collectibles, antiques, deep freezer, washer and more. Rain or shine. Call 447-3200.month-old puppy. Mother is White English mix. Call 447-2339. 7-4, 7-11Collie & Bulldog mix puppies, seven, free to a good home. Call 643-4134. 7-4, 7-11Possibly Terrier mix, small short haired, brown male, six months old, sweet, has been microchipped, all shots up-to-date, free to a good loving home. Call 3636363 or 510-0736. 7-4, 7-11Applehead Chihuahua puppies, seven weeks old, $50 each. Call 237-1447. 7-4, 7-11Hens, $6 each. Call 643-1959.7-4, 7-11Rabbits, one year old female, a 9-month-old male and some 8 weeks old little ones (sex unsure), $10 each or all for $80. Call 3799400 or 570-2894. 7-4, 7-11 LOST & FOUNDFOUUND: Dachshund, black male on Glory Hill Road in Altha. Showed up on front porch about two weeks ago. Call 762-4168.7-11, 7-18 WANTEDAC unit, one large or two small units in good condition reasonably priced. Call 674-6940. 7-11, 7-18Standard transmission with overdrive for late 70s or mid 90s Volvo. Call 693-0898. 7-11, 7-18Pigmy goat, female, reasonable priced. Call 209-0910. 7-11, 7-18 Small Town TOMA cartoon by Mike Barnhouse

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Page 28 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JULY 11, 2012 To the editor: Your president, not mine, in less than four years has doubled the food stamp recipients to approximately 45 million. In the mid-1960s, shortly after JFK was assassinated, in an attempt to control the black vote, LBJ let them know if there was no head of household, the government would take care of them. Today everyone agrees that the biggest problem is that there is no father dropout rates in schools, increase in juvenile delinquency, increase in crime and drug use and high incarceration rate among young black males. The normal rabble rousers (Jesse Jackson/Al Sharpto the fact that blacks who comprise approximately 14 percent of the population are approximately 75 percent of the prison population. Well, that tells me something else that 14 percent of the population are committing 75 percent of the crimes. Keep in mind that without racial tension, they dont have a job. There are now 45 million Americans on food stamps and the FDA is running ads encouraging more to apply for them. This is more of the same Democrat ploy of keeping people dependent on government handouts so they are more apt to vote for you.. This pretender has been years and everything is still President Bushs fault. I hope and pray that Michelle doesnt get pregnant because somehow they will try to blame President Bush for that too. As soon as the anointed that there would be no cost of living increase for military retirees or Social Security recipients for two years, which is my entire income. I am not arguing about that, because Im well aware that hes the smartest man to ever walk the earth All I know for sure is when I more, when I buy groceries it costs me more, when I pay my utilities it costs me more. What I do know is this Great Pretender has personally cost me more than $300 per month that I will never be able to recoup. Operation Fast and Furious complete idiocy, much worse than Watergate no one died in Watergate. What really infuriates me is that the Dems (Holder and Pelosi) dont even know the name of the Border Patrol agent killed because of this amateurish operation. A couple more facts to ponder about the great pretender: He was raised as a Muslim/Socialist/Communist, his father was a complete dirt bag and his mother is an admitted hippie who attended a church in Hawaii, which the locals called the Little Red Church, because of the membership who were communist sympathizers. Michael Goodwin, a liberal syndicated columnist, says he voted for Obama in 2008 but cant in good conscience vote for him now. He claims that he researched every aspect of Obamas book, Sins was a fabrication. It appears that your idol is nothing but a pathological LIAR. You decide. P.S. Why is it when other politicians change anointed one changes his mind (Same-Sex marriage) he EVOLVES? Len Wheetley, SMSgt., USAF (Retired)Notes to Jerry Cox & the other Kool Aid drinkers from a reader in Quincy $575 Pontiac Grand Am0% interestDaylight Auto Financing2816 Hwy 98 West Panama City, FL 32401(850) 215-1769Hours 9 a.m.-9 p.m.You are automatically approved if you can make your payments on time $775 Chevy Blazer 4-Door0% interestDaylight Auto Financing2816 Hwy 98 West Panama City, FL 32401(850) 215-1769Hours 9 a.m.-9 p.m.You are automatically approved if you can make your payments on time SPEAK UP! TO THeE eEDITOREMAIL: thejournal@fairpoint.net WITH aA LeETTeER I hope and pray that Michelle doesnt get pregnant because somehow they will try to blame President Bush for that too.

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JULY 11, 2012 / THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 29 Charles McClellan Funeral HomeButler-Morgan/Morgan-McClellan Funeral Home Building at 15 S. Jackson St., Quincy, 32351Phone: (850) 627-7677 or 643-2277Charles K. McClellanLicensed Funeral Director 42 years experience Call us Let us explain how we can conveniently handle arrangements in Liberty County. OBITUARIES Telephone (850) 674-2266 YY our hometown funeral home since 1994A Hometown Funeral Director You Can Trust and Depend On!Funeral Services with Dignity, Caring and Professionalism. Marlon PeavyPeavy Funeral Home& CrematoryJOhHNNY chCHARLES WhHItTEhHEAD ALTHaAJohnny Charles Whitehead, 81, of Altha, passed away Wednesday, July 4, 2012 at his home. H He was born in Jackson County and had lived and worked in Altha all of his life. H He served our country proudly United States Army. H He was self-employed as a repairman. H He was a member of the Altha Church of God and was a member of the Gideon Society. H He was preceded in death by his parents, Chester and L Lucille Varnum Whitehead, and his sister, Gladys Dennis. Survivors include his wife of 52 years, Alene Ray Whitehead of Altha; two daughters, Debra Guyler and her husband, Steve of Dunnellon and Charlene Yon and her husband, Anthony of Altha; one sister, Mildred Edenseven grandchildren, Sara and Vinny Milotta, Jennifer Goodson, Ashton and Richard Chancey, Brianna and Jay Yon; two great-grandchildren, Dominic Milotta and Cambreigh Chancey and several nieces and nephews. Services were held Saturday, July 7 at 10 a.m. (CTT) at Peavy Funeral H Home in Blountstown was in charge of the arrangements. TAmMI LL YNN MONK T T ALLLL AHHASSEE T T ami L L ynn Monk, 47, of T T allahassee, passed away T Thursday, July 5, 2012 in T T allahassee. Survivors include two sons, Michael Wayne Johnson of T T allahassee and Phillip Monk-Mueller of L Lakeland; her mother, Mary Whittle Monk of T T allahassee; one sister, Paula Furr of Quincy; one brother, John H Harold Monk of Quincy; one grandchild, H Henry Johnson of T T allahassee; Services will be held Wednesday, July 11 at 10 a.m. in J. C. Whittle Cemetery at H Hawkins L Lane in L Liberty County. Charles McClellan Funeral H Home in Quincy is in charge of the arrangements. As each of us is born into this world we are all given a hand of cards to play. Sometimes our hand is good, sometimes challenging and sometimes we are left wondering how we are going to play them. As you grow up and become an adult, we are sometimes left wondering and questioning things became an adult and pondered some of the questions carry faith in our prayers, they will be answered in the way God intended them to be. times in my life. During those times there were may introduced to an angel, his friend T T imothy Rose. T T imothy would later change my life and allow for so many unanswered questions to be answered. life was not my biological father. T This man was playing one of the most important and greatest roles in my life. While he was a wonderful father, my biological father was still out there somewhere. took it upon himself to begin researching and not all the names of my siblings. Another prayer was answered for me by God; that he would deliver me peace and guidance. T That sister Diane. want me to be part of their lives. T The conversation went so well, as if there was no time missed in between. We made an agreement to meet during my honeymoon. other sisters, Shirley and L Linda, along with their families. T They knew about me by my biological father a mistake, but his daughter as well. talking with them and contributed to how well we connected. During the time with my newlydiscovered family members in husband, L Louie, who was our tour guide for South Florida. After we left there, we received a call from Shirley that her husband was in a tragic accident and now in a coma. H He is now making progress but is still in need of prayer and rehabilitation. I now speak with my sisters every day and we continue to pray for my brother in-law as a complete family. T The comfort and connection makes life so much easier to breathe and view. T This tragedy with my brother in-law, however unfortunate, has brought us much closer, as we have something with which to build a closer relationship. So the moral of my story is, there is always hope... God is always good... and everything happens for a we can always play them. Sometimes our cards may be good, sometimes bad, but if we all have faith in God he will lead us in the direction we are meant to in our life unanswered or left unspoken. H Have faith in God for him to direct you to the paths that lead to answered prayers. As we live each day we create chapters in our life that lead to opportunities for us to grow, learn and achieve goals. T These opportunities allow doors to open up in our life that lead us down different paths. As one door closes a chapter in our life, another door is sure to open. As we live our life each day we need to remember to treat every day like it is our last. We are not promised tomorrow and we need to make every day count wonderful chapters in my life. blessed we are. children, grandchildren and generations to come will cherish, learn and grow from. Linda walking hand in hand.As we live each day we create chapters in our life that lead to opportunities for us to grow, learn and achieve goals.

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Page 30 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JULY 11, 2012 Class A CDLL Flatbed Drivers Twin Oaks Juvenile Development, Inc. For more phone 643-1090.Teacher Needed $ AVON$ CallALL to TODayAY : EarnARN40% STARTERKITONLY $I0 JOB MARKET PUBLIC AND LEGAL NOTICESNOTICE OF APPLLICATION FOR TAX DEED PATRICK BRY YCE WARD Description of Property: L Lot 3, Block G, Orange Park Subdivision, as per Plat recorded of LLiberty County, Florida. Olin Dalton 11:00 A.M. E.S.T. 2012. ROBERT HILL CLERK OF COURT ______________________________________IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FLORIDDA IN RE: ESTATE OF NOTICE TO CREDITORS 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 D DAYS OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. AFTER THE D D ATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. IN THE TIME PERIODDS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDDA PROBATE BARREDD. YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE IS BARREDD. PARRISH ______________________________________IN THE CIRCUUIT COUURT OF THE SECOND JUUDICIALL CIRCUUIT, IN AND FOR LLIBERTYY COUUNTYY FLLORIDA Case No.: 12-14-DR PAULUL ANTHONYY GREGORY Y Petitioner and STEPHANIE NICOLLE JOHNSON, Respondent. NOTICE OF ACTION FOR DISSOLULUTION OF MARRIAGE [NO CHILLD OR FINANCIALL SUUPPORT] Y YOUU ARE NOTIFIED If you fail to do so, a default may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the petition. Copies of all court documents in this case, including orders, are available at the Clerk of may review these documents upon request.Y Y ou must keep the Clerk of the of your current address. (YY ou dress, Florida Supreme Court Approved Family L Law Form 12.915.) Future papers in this lawsuit will be mailed to the address on record at the WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida Family L Law Rules of Procedure, requires certain automatic disclosure of documents and information. Failure to comply can result in sanctions, including dismissal or striking of pleadings. CLERK OF Florida Supreme Court Approved Family Law Form 12.913(a)(2), Notice of Action For Family Cases With Minor Child(ren) (01/12).______________________________________IN THE CIRCUUIT COUURT OF THE SECOND JUUDICIALL CIRCUUIT, IN AND FOR LLIBERTYY COUUNTYY FLLORIDA CENTENNIALL BANK MICHAELL ETTINGER NOTICE OF FORECLLOSUURE SALLE NOTICE IS GIVENPARCELL B PARCELL D ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF:

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JULY 11, 2012 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 31 To place your ad call us at 643-3333 SERVICE Directory Whaley Heating & Air Conditioning (850) 674-4777FL LicIC. # CMC1249570 Accepting:R Is s s Phone: (850) 643-6925 Fax: (850) 643-2064 email: grich0656@aol.com10536-B NW SR 20 Bristol, FL 32321 Located in the Apalachee RestaurantGary Richards, EA MBAEnrolled Agent Enrolled to Practice Before the IRS Business & Accounting Solutions Inc. 4433 NW C.R. 274 Altha, Fl 32421 (850) 762-9402 Cell (850) 832-5055Dozer and Excavation work Over 20 years experienceClay ONealsLand Clearing, Inc. William's HomeImprovements "No Job Too Big or Small"Concrete work, landscape, pressure cleaning, renovations, seamless gutter, painting, vinyl, & screen enclosure Call 674-8092Licensed & Insured, contractor & rooferFOR FREE ESTIMATES Call Chris Nissley at 674-8081 or 643-8561 (Cell) STUMP GRINDINGReasonable Rates & FreeREE Estimates! That Darn PumpThere is never a convenient time to be without water.WeELLsS psa s(850)643-HELP Thats 643-4357 or Home 643-3857For friendly service and never any overtime charges call, Hwy 71 South on J.P. Peacock Rd, Altha. Day or night,Check out our prices before buying from somewhere else. For Weddings, Birthdays and all Holidays, come in or call us. Margies Florist Clint Hatcher, OwnerElectrical Lic. # ER13014037 Building Lic. # RB29003511New Homes Garages Additions Electrical Remodeling Foundations Screenrooms Sunrooms VINYL SIDING RESIDENTAL & COMMERCIAL FREE EstimatesServing Calhoun, LLiberty & Jackson Counties LIBERTY TTIRE COMPANY 10781 NW SR 20 Bristol, Fl 32321Call 643-2939 MV84845Hours: Monday thru Friday 7 5 & Saturday 7 12Come see us for all your tire needs or give us a call for roadside service, oil changes & tire rotation. We specialize in sales and repair of tires for:Commercial Trucks and Trailers, OTR Equipment, Farm Equipment, Passenger Car & Light Truck Tires JEMISON Heating & Cooling, C Lic# RM1416924Carrier Equipment MMasters Farm Supply LS Tractor Equipment Committed To Quality Since 1973 (850) 762-3222 faxmasters7@fairpoint.net CLJNEWS.COM TSummertime is here! As you prepare for summertime fun, whether traveling or just enjoying the weather outdoors, the Florida/USVI Poison Information Center Jacksonville urges you to remain aware that summer poisoning hazards can threaten your familys health. As children are out of school for the summer, they may be spending more time unsupervised in or out of doors with ready access to potentially dangerous plants and home products, cautions Dr. Jay Schauben, director of the Florida/USVI Poison Information Center-Jacksonville. Poison proof your home and outdoor areas by following a few simple tips to reduce the chance of accidental poisoning emergencies. However, if a poisoning emergency does occur, call the Poison Help line at 1 (800) 222-1222. Barbecues are a summertime staple. Every summer the Poison Center has to deal with accidents involving often aspirated in to the lungs. This can damage. Keep these products in their original containers and prevent access to them by children. If ingested, call the Poison Help line immediately at 1 (800) 222-1222. DO NOT induce vomiting as this can make it worse. Food poisoning, a common occurrence during this typically warm weather, is caused by bacterial growth in certain foods, such as mayonnaise-containing products or uncooked foods, when they are not handled, cooked or stored properly. Symptoms of the most common types of food poisoning may include nausea, vomiting, stomach cramps, diarrhea and fever. One or more of these symptoms usually develop within a few hours to a few days after eating the spoiled food. To stay safe, the Florida/USVI Poison Information Center Jacksonville recommends washing all counter tops, utensils and hands with warm, soapy water prior to and after food preparation; thawing meat and poultry in the refrigerator; and, avoiding leaving perishable food out of the refrigerator for more than two hours. When traveling, store medications, personal products, insect repellent or sunscreen, in locked suitcases away from children. Avoid bringing along a few pills in unmarked containers as these may not be child-resistant and they are unlabeled as to content or quantity. For visitors who are not used to the activity of children, remind them to properly store all personal products, especially prescription items, out of the reach and sight of children. Always follow directions carefully when using insect repellents as some products are not meant to be applied to the skin. Only apply insect repellents face, spray on the hands and rub onto face, being careful to avoid the eyes and mouth. DO NOT spray on childrens hands as they tend to rub their eyes and/ outdoors because the repellent is no longer necessary. Repeated applications may be dangerous; wash skin with soap and water before reapplying repellent. If camping, be careful of the underbrush, as it could contain poison ivy or stinging/biting animals. Remember, Leaves of three, let it be. If someone touches poison ivy, immediately rinse with plenty of running water for at least 15 minutes. For poisonous plant and animal contact, call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222 for treatment information. For any poisoning emergencies or for poison-related questions, call the Poison Help line toll free, 24 hours a day, at 1-800-222-1222, and a uniquely Information will immediately respond. Program the number into your phone for quick access or download the free iPhone App at www.aapcc.org. The Florida/USVI Poison Information Center Jacksonville is available 365 days a year, 24 hours a day. Call the Center at 1 (800) 222-1222 (Voice/ TTY) for poisoning emergencies or to ask for information. The Center is staffed with skilled healthcare professionals who provide rapid life-saving information, promote cost-effective treatment and prevention, and personal service, often going the next step to ensure peace of mind during a poisoning emergency.Celebrate the summer safely and poison free Check us out in Print or online atCCLJNews .com

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Page 32 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JULY 11, 2012 ARREST REPORT continued from page 2A driver described as going 23 miles over the speed limit on East Central Avenue and swerving in his lane was arrested on drug charges Blountstown. Gazzier, Jr., 36, had slurred speech and noted there was a slight odor of an alcoholic beverage emitting from the Gazzier had a small dog sitting in his lap and another little dog on the passengers seat, sitting next to a small cooler spotted a large red bottle of Liquid Heat, some clear plastic tubing, a methamphetamine. When Gazzier stepped out of the car drivers seat. weapons, the officer found a lighter and another one of the pills in his front Xanax and said he had a prescription for the medication, but not with him. leg stand, Gazzier was arrested for suspicion of DUI and possession of a Schedule III narcotic. Before putting him in a patrol car, the officer did another more thorough search and found two gram bags of in his wallet which was later Other items collected from the vehicle included ammonia nitrate, two pairs of pliers, a small funnel, two lithium batteries and a pill arrest report as materials used the one-pot method. A friend came to the scene of the to the police department. During an interview with BPD Investigator Tim Partridge, Gazzier in Bristol who was going use them to he was on Xanax and said he had been to determine his level of intoxication resulted in a reading of .000 and it was determined that his impairment was due to the pills instead of alcohol. He was charged with possession of a Schedule III narcotic (Xanax), possession of cocaine and attempt to manufacture methamphetamine.Man stopped for going over speed limit arrested on cocaine & meth chargesGaryARY GaAZZierIER Ruth Martin of Blountstown. She was transported from the scene to Calhoun She was released after being treated for minor injuries. The driver of the car, Melvin for failure to use due care near a pedestrian. He was traveling across the front of to the store.Woman hit by car at Harveys PlazaRear view mirror shattered by hit and run driver on CR 69A Sunday to his face when an oncoming vehicle came too close and shattered his drivers side mirror, according to traveling north on CR 69A sometime center line, causing both drivers side mirrors to hit. Lees mirror was shattered and sent glass into his vehicle. An ambulance responded to the He declined treatment. and continued south. An alert was issued for a mid-1990s red and silver 674-5049. ACCIDENTS It was a BOOMiING Fourth! DANIELL WILLLLIAMS PHOTOS

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The Calhoun-Liberty Journal is published each Wednesday by the Liberty Journal Inc., Summers Road, P.O. Box 536, Bristol, FL 32321. Annual subscriptions are $18. Periodicals postage paid at Bristol, FLPOSTMASTER: Send address corrections to: P.O. Box 536, Bristol, FL 32321. (USPS 012367) Summers RoadLocated at 11493 NW Summers Road in Bristol MAILING ADDRESS: P.O. Box 536, Bristol, FL 32321 TELEPHONE (850) 643-3333 Fax (850) 643-3334 EMAIL: thejournal@fairpoint.net ADS: cljads@fairpoint.net JOURNAL STAFFJohnny Eubanks...................Publisher Teresa Eubanks........................ Editor Sandra Brown...................Bookkeeper Deven Lewis......Production Asssistant Debbie Duggar...................AdvertisingOFFICE HOURS: 9 a.m. 6 p.m. M-FTHE CALHOUN-LLIBERtTY JOURNAL Visit us on Facebook at CLJNews Page 4 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL julJUL Y 11, 2012Thats how many copies of The Calhoun-Liberty Journal were distributed last week, ensuring plenty of coverage for your community announcements and great response for our business advertisers! 5,305 Wednesday, July 11 Monday, July 16 Tuesday, July 17 Sunday, July 15 Saturday, July 14 Thursday, July 12 Friday, July 13 TODAYS MEETINGS7 p.m., Altha VFD AA, 6 p.m., Altha Community Center noon, Senior Citizens Center 5 p.m., Ag. Bldg., Conference Room across from Courthouse 6 p.m., Fire House 7 p.m., Dixie Lodge in Blountstown Calhoun Childrens Coalition/ Calhoun Juvenile Justice Council, 1:30 p.m., W.T. Neal Civic Center, Blountstown.TODAYS MEETINGS7 p.m., Veterans Civic Center 6 p.m., Altha Community CenterTODAYS MEETINGS, noon, Calhoun-Liberty Hospital 7 p.m., Calhoun County Old Ag Bldg. east door, in front of jailTODAYS MEETINGSAA, 7 p.m., basement of Calhoun Courthouse 5 p.m. Calhoun ExAttend the Church of your choice this SundayTrain DayVeterans Memorial Park 11 a.m.3 p.m. BIRTHDAY Kizzy Peterson BIRTHDAY Katheyn G. Baker ANNIVERSARY Godfrey Pete & Sarah Jean Peterson The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) is offering a free hunter safety Internet-completion course in Liberty County. Instruction is Saturday, July 21 from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Locations are as follows: Liberty County: The course is at the Woodmen of the World Camp, 22459 N.E. Woodmen of the World Road in Hosford. Gulf County: The course is at the Gulf Correctional Institution, 500 Ike Steele Road in Wewahitchka. Students must complete the internet course before coming to class and bring does not have to be notarized. An adult must accompany children under the age of 16 at all times. Students are encouraged to bring a pencil and paper with them to take notes. In order to purchase a Florida hunting license, the hunter safety course is required for people born on or after June 1, 1975. training requirements for all other states and Canadian provinces. People interested in attending this course can register online and obtain information about future hunter safety classes at www.myfwc.com/huntersafetyMyFWC. com/HunterSafety or by calling hunter safety coordinator George Warthen at the (850) 265-3676.Free hunter course set for In an effort to help raise money for The Childrens Burn Camp of North Florida Camp Amigo and the Jackson County there will be a golf tournament Saturday, Aug. 25 starting at 8 a.m. (CT) and with tee off by 9 a.m. (CT) at Indian Springs Golf course in Marianna. The cost is $65 per golfer and $250 per four man team with a shotgun start (including 18 holes, cart, driving range, lunch and two entries into the drawing). Hole in one sponsors will be providing a new Chevrolet by Rahal Miller and $10,000 by Perry and Young Attorneys at law. There will also be a 2000 golf ball drop with a chance to win $40,000 ($5 a ball). Tickets will be available to buy up to the event. To help us properly plan, please preregister by contacting Ricky Winget at (850) 557-2652 or email rwinget03@ gmail.com by August 10.Golf tournament in Marianna to raise funds for kids burn campCabin Patch Day Camp: The Panhandle Pioneer Settlement will be hosting a kids camp for grades third through sixth on the week of July 30-Aug. 3 from 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. daily. The cost is $65 per child, unless their family has a PPS membership which will reduce the cost to $60. Students will explore a wide variety of art, sewing, upcycling, outdoor and cooking activities under the supervision There will be a mix of pioneer days and modern ways that will promote students creative thinking and team work skills. Many activities introduced will be things students can take home and keep working on for the rest of the summer! serve basis. Please call 674-2777 to make your reservation today!Panhandle Pioneer Settlement to host Cabin Patch camp on July 30 Aug. 3 Chipola College will offer programs for children of all ages this summer. Childrens swimming lessons for ages four and up are scheduled: Session three is July 30-Aug. 9 with a registration deadline of July 23. Classes are available at 9 a.m., 10 a.m. or 7 p.m. Sessions include eight 45 minute classes which meet Monday through Thursday for two weeks. Cost of regular swimming lessons is $45. Pre-registration is required, with a $5 late registration fee. For information, call pool manager Rance Massengill at 718-2473.Summer programs offered at ChipolaThe Panhandle Pioneer Settlement will be the host of Journey Stories, an exhibition of the Smithsonian Institutions Museum on Main Street series. The exhibition, sponsored by the Florida Humanities Council, will be on display from July 14 to August 25 at the Settlements Club House. The Panhandle Pioneer Settlement is the only North Florida location to be selected to host Journey Stories. All other Florida locations are in south central and southern portions of the state. Therefore, we are excited to encourage students throughout the Florida Panhandle to attend the exhibit. July 14 August 25 Pioneer Settlement

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JULY 11, 2012 / THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 5 EVENTSMARIANNAChipola Chipola Center for the Arts ribbon cutting set July 17 Political EndorsementsThe Florida Sheriffs Association (FSA) is a   FSA does not engage in political activity or endorse political candidates in accordance   From the Florida Sheriffs Association website Paid for by Henry Hamlin, Democrat for LLiberty County SheriffA candidate in the Liberty County Sheriffs race falsely states he has the endorsement of the Florida Sheriffs Association (FSA) in his campaign ad and campaign materials. The FSA clearly does not make endorsements, as evidenced by this information listed on their website: Is this credibility?YOU BE THE JUDGE. Landmark Park is a 135-acre historical and natural science park located on U.S. Highway 431 North in Dothan, Ala. For more information, contact the park at (334) 794-3452. July animal adventures each Friday at Dothans Landmark Park You have known me for the past 29 years. Now let me introduce you to my family. Angie Smith Wood is my wife of 26 years and is a physical therapist at BHRC. We have 2 sons, Bryson and Tristen Wood. Bryson will be a junior at BHS and Tristen a freshman. They love this community as I do and also have a servants heart.

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Page 6 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JULY 11, 2012 COMMENTARYCORNERJerry Cox is a retired military OXS Late Night LaughsA recaRECAP oOF recentRECENT obOBSerER Vation ATIONS by BY lateLATE niNIGhtHT tV TV hoHOStTS.It happens. If you have children, one or more of them might be a problem child. Why? We dont know, or least I dont know the answer to that question. Ive told my children more than once that we dont pick our kids and they dont pick their parents. Like it or not, we have each other, so lets make the best of it. As parents know, making the best of it may or may not occur. While we attempt to give all our children the same opportuniciety, our efforts may or may not work. Sometimes children turn out to be the square peg in the round hole of society. There is an analogy here. Some 225 years ago a Republic with representative government was born. The Founding Fathers believed that this newborn nation could govern itself through representative government. The Founders came together, debated the issues and decided what was best for this newborn called America. If they could do it, then surely future descendants, Americas grandchildren and great grandchildren, could do the same. Yikes, did the Founders ever get that one wrong. If the Founders could see their dysfunctional offspring pretending to represent their fellow man, the Founders would spin in their graves. The irony is that the representation is not for Americas man on the street. No surprise here. With the Supreme Courts ruling on Citizens United, politicians represent dollar signs. As long as we collectively believe and agree that political donations represent free speech, then representative government means little to the basic American citizen and everything to corporate America. Americas problem children are its politicians. I think that the Founders had an altruistic view of representative government, particularly of the men and women who would represent their fellow man in resolving issues that affect all of us. Political parties and individual self-interest of Americans are main factors in the evolution of what I would term as our non-representative form of government. Yes, we elect people who represent the narrow interest of the individual and the more narrow interest of the political parties. Add to the mix conservaand you have a representative political system that is at war with itself. The collective good for most Americans is lost in the political fray. Little, if anything, is accomplished in Washington or the street. However, having said that, the narrow views of political parties are achieved. The Republicans are on an anti-abortion campaign, and they have succeeded in restricting a womans reproductive rights and healthcare in many states. It doesnt matter that the abortion issue was settled with Roe v. Wade and Americans, at least most Americans, have moved on, Republicans in state legislatures are foisting their views on all state citizens, like it or not. Restrictive Republican laws are not in sync with opinions of the American people. Abortion is not a major issue with a man or woman looking for a job. The basic problem for America is that we are not able to govern ourselves. The Congress is not able to cope with issues that affect all Americans. In fact, the political parties use the issues as a basis of doing battle. ObamaCare, the Affordable Care Act, is a claspublican voted for the law, and Republicans have seized on the law as a mantra for ousting President Obama. concerned about healthcare for Americans to work with Democrats to craft healthcare legislation that would be good for the American people? Now that Affordable Health Care is law, why are Republicans determined to repeal the law? Why not rework the Affordable Health Care law in a non-partisan manner for the best interest of the American people? Ill-informed citizens who seem to believe anything they hear is one reason that the Affordable Health Care law will not be rewritten in the best interest of the people. Why cant people read the document and draw their own conclusions? It wont happen because most Americans have the attention span of a gnat, and they wait for the television to tell them what to believe. So, with the dominance of big money, self-serving politicians and a public who cannot think for themselves, our representative government is skewed beyond anything that the Founders would recognize.PoliticiansAmericas problem childrenI am exhausted. I spent all weekend helping Tom Cruise move all his stuff. JAY LENOCongratulations to Courtney Kardashian, who has a brand-new baby girl. I was worried that there was going to be a shortage of Kardashians. DAV VID LETTERMANKatie Holmes has divorced Tom Cruise. I didnt think Rock of Ages was THAT bad. JAY LENOAfter signing a new three-year contract with the Knicks, Jason Kidd could betory. Which explains his new name: Jason Adult. JIMMY FF ALLONThe Katie Holmes-Tom Cruise divorce JAY LENOday with some friends in prison, and they had a nice little party for him. Out of habit, after he cut the cake he hid the knife. DAV VID LETTERMANlion more than P President Obama for the month of June. Out of force of habit, Mitt stashed it all in the Cayman Islands. JAY LENOComic-Con starts this week in S San Diego and get this: itll actually feature a blood drive. Because thats what comic book fans need a way to look even more pale. JIMMY FF ALLONIts so hot that Katie Holmes demanded custody of the air conditioner. DAV VID LETTERMANThe White House is telling Americans not to read too much into F Fridays bad had me at dont read too much. JIMMY FF ALLONMitt Romney is now promising conservatives that if he is elected, he will put Anderson Cooper back in the closet. DAV VID LETTERMANgressman to enter a same-sex marriage. As opposed to most congressmen, who riage. JIMMY FF ALLON

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JULY 11, 2012 / THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 7 COMMENTARY WASHINGTONMERRY-GO-ROUNDby Douglas Cohn and Eleanor Clift WASHINGTON Four Republican governors say they will turn down federal money to expand Medicaid and another half dozen states indicate they may do the same. The remainder of the 26 Republican-led states that challenged the constitutionality of the Affordable CareAct are dragging their feet in adopting the insurance exchanges that are part of the law, waiting to see if Mitt Romney can win the White House and keep his promise to repeal Obamacare. The dissenters are being led by Florida Governor Rick million. Scott was not implicated (he had left the company by then), but he is not humbled by the outcome. He insists that bad things happen when the government gets involved in health care and that the law signed by Obama will lead to rationing. Scotts statement was rated false by PolitiFact Florida, which said: The health care law rations care no more or less than the current health care system. The current health care system whether its private insurance, Medicare or Medicaid does not allow people to have all the health care they want. Under the new law, people still cant have all the health care they want. Along with the Republican governors of South Carolina, Louisiana and Iowa, Scott is wrapping himself in the noble tradition of civil disobedience. But he and his fellow resisters have less in common with Henry David Thoreau, the 19thcentury abolitionist, naturalist and tax resister, than they do with Governor Orval Faubus whose refusal to integrate Central High School in Little Rock, AR in 1954 prompted President Eisenhower to send federal troops to quell the rebellion. Thoreau is best known for his book, On Walden Pond, an account of the simple life he led in the woods, but his essay, Resistance to Civil Government, inspired the concept of civil disobedience that arose during the civil rights era. Rosa Parks, a seamstress and a housekeeper in Montgomery, AL, refused to sit in the back of the bus, exercising classic nonviolent civil disobedience. knew that they risked going to jail, or worse and that they might pay a penalty. They only spoke for themselves; they didnt compel others to join them, though many did. Parks of the world did and what Rick Scott is doing. Scott is acting like hes a private citizen and can defy the government at will if he doesnt like a particular law, or Supreme Court ruling. But Scott is not just speaking for himself; he represents millions of people who would be covered when Medicaid is expanded to reach people who make 133 percent of the federal poverty level. Currently 18 percent of Floridas population is on Medicaid; that number would jump to 34.7 percent according the Kaiser Family Foundation. President Obama is not going to send in federal troops, but what Scott and the others are doing is not civil disobedience; its rebellion. The likelihood is that once tempers cool and the in-state lobbying starts from hospitals stressed to the breaking point by having to provide uncompensated care to uninsured people, Republican governors who are talking big now will see how impractical it is and how unpopular they will be if they turn down free money from the federal government to cover the working poor in their states. dont trust that federal money will always be there, but can their constituents trust them? Denying millions of people health coverage is not an act of civil courage; its political malpractice to put the well-being of millions at riskRRebellion, not civil disobedience

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Page 8 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JULY 11, 2012 Political Advertisement Paid for and Approved by Donnie Conyers, Democrat for Liberty County SheriffKEEP OUR LLiberty County SHERIFF Donnie ConyersSafest county in the State of Florida (537.6 crime rate) Lowest crime rate in the State* Highest Crime Clearance State (73.3%), State Average is (24.2%)* 188 People arrested for illegal narcotics offenses over last 3.5 years Aggressive enforcement on sex offenders Dedicated school on and off campus to insure safety of students Only Candidate endorsed by The (FPBA) Florida Police Benevolent Association and a member of The Florida Sheriffs Association program and web site Strong and proud supporter of Liberty County Search and Rescue Unmatched Supporter of Community Organizations and Fundraising Activities Sheriff Conyers LLeadership AccomplishmentsThe Right Man For A Tough JobCharles McClellan, past District Chairman and former Quincy Lions Club President, recently installed Bristol Lions Lion Tamer Wilbur Moran, Tail Twister Joyce Hosford, one year Directors John Summers and Billy Don Smith, two year Directors Billy Faircloth and Wilford Deason. The Bristol Lions Club has more than also active in national and international activities to help the needy. TALLAHASSEE Commissioner of A Agriculture A Adam Putnam announced the top three complaints received in June through the Florida Department of A Agriculture and Consumer S Services 1 (800) HEL HELPFLALA consumer hotline: Do Not Call, S Solicitors of Contributions and LLandlord/Tenant. consumers in June and the department received 39,394 calls and 11,641 emails for consumer assistance and information. In the last month, the department has responded several individuals or businesses operating outside of Florida law. During the month of June 2012, the department: *Registered 4,504 businesses (both initial or renewal business registrations). *Received 3,312 complaints. The top three areas of consumers complaints include: *Initiated 345 investigations (336 administrative and nine criminal). *AArrested three individuals in violation of Florida state law and four individuals in connection with the *Recovered $416,231.02 on behalf of Florida consumers. *AAdded 54,755 numbers (25,907 individuals) to Floridas Do Not Call L List in the month of June. These are 304,920 numbers and 172,637 subscribers on the The Florida Department of A Agriculture and Consumer S Services is the states clearinghouse for consumer complaints, protection and information. The respond to questions about programs and regulations under the departments purview, provide informabusiness industries operating in Florida. can contact the departments consumer protection and information hotline at 1 (800) HEL HELP-FLALA (435(352-9832). For more information about the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, visit www.FreshFromFlorida.com.Do Not Call list and contribution solicitors consumer complaints

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JULY 11, 2012 / THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 9 At age 90 & 91, these two veterans have a few stories to tell about their wartime experiences ABOVE: Senior Master Sgt. James Ayers (retired) speaks during the Journey Stories event at Blountstowns Panhandle Pioneer Settlement. BELOW: Ayers points to himself in a photo of a Blountstown football team he once played on. STORY Y AND PHOTOS BYY PHILL COALLEThe Panhandle Pioneer Settlement opened its doors Friday night, July 6 to two American Heroes as the Settlement hosted Senior Master Sgt. James Ayers and Tuskegee Airman Sgt. Cornelius Davis, both retired, to tell stories of their lives including military service to their country. Ayers, 90 and Davis, 91, both from Calhoun County and part of the Smithsonian exhibit, Journey Stories, shared their experiences with an audience of 30 of what it was like to be soldiers in both World War II and Vietnam. The Museum on Main Street program is the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Services key initiative that directly engages small town audiences and brings attention to under served rural communities through their own Main Street museums, historical societies and other cultural venues. The Museum on Main Street circulates Smithsonian exhibitions focusing on broad topics of American history and culture, such as Ayers and Davis experiences. Exhibitions are organized around elements of our shared American experience, helping to host organizations who explore cultural attributes that bind us as a nation. All exhibitions display original artifacts that hold historical value to the area chosen to host. Small town participants add hard work, ambition and a sense of fun to the events. Calhoun Countys contribution to the Journey Stories began as Ayers and Davis were introduced. Their animated tales hold great historical value for our country. of his experience as one of the famous Tuskegee Airmen. The group was the U. S. War Departments experiment to prove African Americans were capable of being military pilots. At a young age, Davis watched newsreels of war planes in action and was hooked on aviation. Davis recalled that one of the newsreels showed a plane dropping a bomb on a target, blowing it to pieces. Right away, Davis said, I wanted to make sure I was the one dropping the bombs. So, ahead of being drafted, Davis joined up and found himself on the way to Tuskegee, AL and basic training. After a stint in an armament school in Colorado, he returned to Tuskegee. He was assigned to teach pilots weaponry and how to shoot down enemy planes as well as drop bombs on their targets. He was especially proud that the Tuskegee Airmen never lost a single bomber they were to protect while on their missions, a testament to his teaching the pilots how to shoot. After his military service, Davis became politically active in Michigan, helping various candidates get elected. He worked for a newspaper as a photojournalist and was active in the Tuskegee Airmens annual career week which introduced students to aviation. Ayers followed Davis to the podium to share his experiences in the military, including 17 the B-25 bomber with the 11th bomber squadron. His squadron with the 14th Air Japanese-occupied China, bombing various targets. His duties while on missions over the target were as a waist gunner. I never got a had some probable kills but those dont count. He added, We got shot up a lot but never shot down... We crashed landed three times with mechanical problems but the enemy never shot us down. Ayers began his military career Jan. 19, 1942 when he enlisted in the Air Force and was sent to Jackson, Mississippi for basic training. He left the service in 1945 but re-enlisted in 1948. The last four years of his time in service he spent as a crew member C-133 cargo plane out of Dover, DE to South Vietnam. Ayers ended his career May 1, 1967 when he retired for good. Upon retirement Ayers returned to Tallahassee and went into the construction business and eventually, the long-haul trucking business with his wife of 66 years, Dorothy. In 1977, the Ayers moved to Blountstown where he still resides today. The exhibit is promoted by the Florida Humanities Council which chose the Settlement to host the event. Along with their stories, Ayers and Davis brought artifacts they have collected through the years. They will be on display from July 14 through August 25.



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School News...18, 19, 21 Cooling off at the Bluff...20 Classieds.....26, 27 Obituaries...29 Jobs and Legals...30 Sheriff's Log...2 Commentary...6, 7 News from the Pews...10 Birthdays...12 Outdoors with Ranger Steve ... 14 J OURNAL 50includes tax THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY CLJNews.com WEDNESDA Y, JUL Y 11, 2012 Vol. 32, No. 28 He recalls as a young man seeing newsreels that showed a plane dropping a bomb on a tar get, blowing it to pieces. Right away, Davis said, I wanted to make sure I was the one dropping the bombs.-Tuskegee Airman Sgt. Cornelius Davis We got shot up a lot but never shot down...We crashed landed three times with mechanical problems but the enemy never shot us down. Senior Master Sgt. James Ayers Veteransshare wartimeMemoriesPAGE 9by Teresa Eubanks, Journal EditorA 14-year-old from Bristol was discharged from Shands Hospital Monday night and is recuperating at home after sustaining incapacitating injuries when he drove an ATV into a tree Saturday night. Stanford Josiah Dawson is a bit sore but doing well, according to his brother, Stafford. Stanford and some friends were riding ATVs July 7 when one ran out of gas. A chain was used to connect the ATV used by Christopher Donnell Dilworth, 19, of Bristol to the 2000 Honda Foreman ATV Stanford was driving. Stanford was towing the second ATV along Harry Donar Road around 8:30 p.m. when Christopher, who was on the second ATV, called out several times to get his attention. When Stanford turned to look over his right shoulder at Christopher, he accidently steered to the right. The ATV went off the dirt road and slammed into a tree. The boys left side and his head hit the tree before he was ejected from the vehicle. He was not wearing a helmet. The ATV rotated in a counter-clockwise direction, dragging the second ATV with it. Christopher and his passenger, Chartisha Samone Hill, 19, of Wewahitch ka were thrown from the four-wheeler. The injured boy was moved away from the crash site while waiting for the ambulance to arrive. He was transported to a Tallahassee hospital and then sent to Shands for further treatment. Charges are pending in the accident, which happened just west of Martin Luther King Road. Damages to the ATV were estimated at $2,500. The collision was investigated by FHP Trooper Jason King.ATV rider injured after hitting treeBand members recall meeting PAGE 11After PAGE 29Journal wins PAGE 24PAGE 2 in parking lot incident ----Bristol man arrested for domestic battery ----Handyman takes $2,000 but leaves PAGE 3 Two DUI arrests are made ----PAGE 12 Pioneer Settlement PAGE 23 Journey Stories: MCDOUGALS IN AMERICA PAGE 32 Woman struck by car is OK; Close call on road leaves man driver side mirror I N S I D E to start at last July celebration. PHOT OGRAPHS INSIDE!

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Page 2 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JULY 11, 2012 ARREST REPORTS compiled by Journal Editor Teresa Eubanks CALHOUN COUNTYJuly 2 Yolonder Scott, VOP, CCSO. Kimberly Hall, VOP (times 2), CCSO. Justin Pare, failure to appear, CCSO. Steven Eaford, VOSP, CCSO. July 3 Jimmy Tucker, failure to appear, CCSO. July 6 Allen McCullough, exploitation of the elderly, CCSO. July 7 Gary Gazzier, possession of scheduled III narcotic, possession of cocaine, attempt to manufacture meth, BPD. Jodie Willis, criminal mischief under $500, battery, CCSO. Hilda Willis, battery, CCSO. July 8 Tim Keys III, driving with license suspended or revoked, BPD. Christopher Todd, felony failure to appear (violation drivers license restriction), CCSO. Danielle Gray, driving with license suspended or revoked (2 times), CCSO.LIBERTY COUNTYJuly 2 Christopher Laster, VOSP, LCSO. Kimberly Hall, holding for CCSO, CCSO. July 3 Jo Jean Kirkpatrick, VOP, LCSO. July 6 Daniel Brunson, III, writ of attachment, LCSO. Zechariah Allen Tackett, felony driving with license suspended or revoked, FHP. Ronnie Allen Davis, VOSP, CCSO. Jeffrey M. Strait, DUI (alcohol or drugs) 2nd or 3rd conviction, LCSO. July 7 Jodie Willis, holding for CCSO, CCSO. Hilda Willis, holding for CCSO, CCSO. July 8 Ivan C. Wagoner, Jr., domestic battery, damage to property over $1,000, damage to property over $200, LCSO. Andre Tribue, DUI (alcohol or drugs), LCSO. Blountstown Police Dept.July 2 through July 8, 2012 Citations issued: Accidents...............03 .................18 Special details Business alarms.....01 Residential alarms..........00 Complaints..............................................................36S H ERIFFS LO G Handyman takes $2,000; leaves little work behindA Blountstown man who received $2,000 in checks from an 88-year-old woman for doing some work around her home has been charged with exploitation of the elderly after it was determined that he did little in return for the money, according to a report from the Blountstown Police Department. Allen McCullough, 60, was arrested Friday after an investigation found he cleaned out a freezer but did a poor job on repairs to a bathroom. He also broke the sink when he was supposed to do some work in the kitchen of the home on SE Houston Street. Luethel Boyd notified the BPD May 31 that her aunt, Johnnie Mae Whitley, who is ill, had given several checks to McCullough but little work had been done. She said he was also given $175.95 in cash to pay for materials purchased at Tatums Hardware. Whitley later told an officer she did not even place but felt obligated to pay when he approached her. According to the complaint: on the back porch bathroom completely unaccounted for, according to Boyd Tim Partridge at the police department the same day the complaint was made. He was accompanied by his wife and his attorney. He stated that his work was worth the $2,000 he was paid and said he never asked for any money. When Whitley asked what she owed him after he did work on the bathroom, he said he replied that she owed $1,200. He said he told her to give $200 of that amount to the church. He also got three other checks, one for $800 and two for $100 each. Following his arrest, McCullough was given a conditional release.ALLEN MCCULLOUGH Bristol man charged with domestic battery, two counts criminal mischiefA 22-year-old Bristol man is facing a domestic battery charge and two counts of criminal mischief for repeatedly shoving his girlfriend to the ground, tearing up the rental home they share and damaging her sisters car. Ivan Charles Wagoner, Jr. was intoxicated when he left a party and returned to their residence on NW Lake Mystic Church Road early Saturday morning, according to his girlfriend. She said they argued at the party and she was afraid of him. His girlfriend, her sister and a 23-year-old male friend left the party together. The sister had gone to bed and the other two were in the living room when Wagoner got home. Witnesses gave the following account to Deputy Jonathan Gentry: When he found the front door was locked, Wagoner pulled it open forcefully enough to damage the frame and came inside. He yelled at his girlfriend, pushed her down several times and started throwing things around. When the male friend tried to get between the couple, Wagoner pushed him to the ground. Wagoner went through the house, throwing items, punching the walls and breaking a window and a light fixture. He kicked in the bedroom door where his girlfriends sister was calling their father for help. He continued knocking over and throwing things as he exited the house and once outside, he broke off part of the decking from the front porch and pulled an air conditioner out of a window, causing it to fall six feet. When his girlfriend followed him outside to try to get him to leave, he pushed her down again. Wagoner punched the sisters car, leaving several scratches to the right passenger door, knocking out the right taillight and leaving a large dent on the side of the trunk. He then started throwing a table, chairs and food off the back porch. He snatched the back door open and left it damaged before leaving the premises on foot. The male witness, who was pushed to the ground, declined to press battery charges against Wagoner. Wagoners girlfriend told a deputy what had happened but was too frightened to give a written account, according to the deputy. charge was for property valued at over $200 but under $1,000. The second charge was for property worth $1,000 or more. Wagoners bond was set at $3,500. He was released from custody Monday.IV AN W AGONER Mom & daughter charged with A woman and her daughter are both facing charges after they reportedly started an altercation with a woman outside El Jalisco restaurant in Blountstown. According to the report from the Blountstown Police Department, the victim said she came out of the restaurant around midday June 27 and saw Jodie Willis, 19, and her mother, Hilda Willis, 52, both of Blountstown, pull up in the parking lot and start arguing with Willis husband, Albert Willis. She gave the following account of what happened next: As the woman approached her own vehicle, she saw that Jodie Willis had used a car key to scratch an H on the side. The woman then started walking toward the police department, located across the street, to report the vandalism when Jodie came up, put her hands on her and threatened her. Her mother then joined her and both jumped on the woman. Albert Willis came and pulled them apart and the mother and daughter left the parking lot. While the victim was talking returned without her mother. She stated that she had keyed an H in the vehicle, an admission according to the report. She said she was going to get her mother and would then return to the police station to give a statement but never returned. The two were arrested July 7. Hilda Willis was charged with battery. Jodie Willis was charged with battery and criminal mischief with less than $500 in damages.HILDA WILLIS

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JULY 11, 2012 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 3 I would greatly appreciate your vote on August 14. GINA McDOWELL Electfor Liberty County Supervisor of Elections Let 15 years of experience work for you! CITY TIRE CO. "Volkswagens to semi's, we handle them all" TIRE ST ORE! TOYO TIRES "Authorized Dealer" A Chipley man who wouldnt take a roadside sobriety test and refused to give a breath sample to determine his level of intoxication was charged with DUI Friday, according to a report from the Liberty Arrested was Jeffrey Martin Strait was pulled over just County Deputy Jonathan Gentry responded to a report of a black Ford Mustang, traveling recklessly and Gentry, who was southbound, saw the car on the road ahead of him as After going around the other vehicle, the car swerved erratically back into the westbound lane, crossing the white fog line and traveling off the 3-to-4-foot continued onto the north grass shoulder before swerving back into the westbound lane in an erratic and reckless manner, appearing to almost around and pulled up behind Strait to conduct a traffic As he spoke with Strait, the deputy noted the odor of an alcoholic beverage coming Straits license three times before it was When asked if he had consumed any alcohol, Strait stated: I drank one at the Strait refused to attempt a roadside sobriety exercises and, despite being advised it would result in an automatic license suspension, would not submit to resulted in a DUI arrest in Liberty County Sunday Deputy Bobby Revell was on patrol along SR 12 N and the Garden of Eden Road when he noticed a two-door car with no tag light and an inoperable left He pulled over the car and while talking with the driver, reported that he noticed the strong odor of Bristol, stated, I took a shot of vodka around 10 consumed any other While attempting roadside sobriety exercises, maintain his balance for more than three seconds, had to hold on to his vehicle to keep from falling and was unable to keep count when told to take nine breath test to determine his level of intoxication, which resulted in readings DUI ARRESTScompiled by Journal Editor Teresa Eubanks

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Page 10 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JULY 11, 2012 Call George Ross or Tim Flanders at(850) 674-2482 or (850) 447-0898Licensed ~~ BLOUNTSTOWN ~~ Insured *Air Condition *Furnaces *Water Heaters *Electrical *Refrigerators *Rubber Roofs *Hitches *Awnings *Slide-out Repair *Floor Repair RV COLLISION CENTER Big River RV LIBERTY COUNTY ELECTION NOTICESBOOK CLOSING July 16, 2012. I Primary Election August 14, 2012 SAMPLE BALLOT/VOTER INFORMATION CARD ABSENTEE BALLOTS LOGIC & ACCURACY TEST July 26, 2012 9:00 a.m. EARLY VOTING Saturday, August 4 Saturday, August 11, 2012 8:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. on Monday through Friday 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. on two Saturdays and Sunday CARR CHAPEL Carr Chapel in Clarksville held a weekend VBS June 22 and 23 using the Rocky Point Light house materials from Group Publishing which encouraged doing an outreach project for the community. Director Janice Harris chose to do a soup mix that could be donated to the Calhoun Liberty County Ministry Center. They were also targeted as our mission for the weekend. The children, though small in number but not in heart, raised funds for the ministry center. We appreciate the opportunity to serve our community using our servants heart for the Lord. the church served breakfast to the ladies for winning the annual Penny Crusade, which is used to raise funds for missions in sharing Christ to the world. This was also a Sunday that we joined other churches across the USA in the Call2Prayer to pray for our country. Check our church out at carrchapelac. com or contact Pastor Harris at (850) 209-6746. HO L Y HOO P STERS T he First Baptist Church of Bristol will be hosting a Holy Hoopsters Childrens Basketball Camp from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. (ET) on the following dates: grade. grade. grade. You may sign up before or on the day of camp. Come early to sign up. Camp will be $5 a child and will include a pizza lunch. Scholarships are available and both girls and boys are welcome. For more information, please contact Troy Brady at (850) 272-0455, or call the church at (850) 643-5400. AMAZING WO NDERS AVIA TION Come we do Amazing Wonders Aviation VBS from 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. We will have Bible lessons about Gods power over nature, Gods power over circumstances and Gods power over sin with a closing program and refreshments Wednesday night. Come for a fun time of games, food, crafts, missions and music! Hillcrest Baptist is located on CR 274 5 miles W. of Sheltons Corner. Awesome God! Amazing Power! See you there! HOMECOMING SERVICES All are invited to the annual Homecoming Service at the Wesleyan Methodist Church in Hosford, hosted by Grace United Methodist Church. The service will be Sunday, July 15 at 11 a.m. at the Wesleyan Methodist Church, followed by lunch at Grace United Methodist Church in Hosford. Fortress will be the musical guests and the message will be brought For more information, please call Grace United Methodist Church at (850) 379-8595, or visit the website at www. graceumchosford.org. LA TINO FOO D FESTIVAL St. Francis of Assisi Church on Gaskin Street in Blountstown will be having a Latino food festival Saturday, July 14 from 5 p.m. ethnic food, games, music and community enjoyment. Admission is free. NEWS FROM THE PEWSThe Calhoun-Liberty Journal Classieds EMAIL: thejournal@fairpoint.net wallet by listing your unused items in

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JULY 11, 2012 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 11 PLEASE VOTEMichaelWRIGHT FOR LIBERTY COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD DISTRICT 1Hard Working Accountable Committed To The Continuous Improvement Of Our SchoolsYOU WILL NOT BE DISAPPOINTED!Paid by Michael Wright for Liberty County School Board District 1Dear Citizens of Liberty County, My name is Michael Wright and I am a candidate for School Board, District One. I am married to Joan Johnson Wright and we have two children, Madison and Mason. Joan has been a school teacher in the Liberty County school system for the past 14 years and currently teaches at Tolar School. Both of our children are students at Tolar School. My family is involved with our school system on a daily basis either by teaching our kids, playing sports or being involved in school activities. This makes the best interest of our schools personally important to me. Heating & Air Conditioning FL LIC. # CMC1249570 (850) 674-4777Whaley Whaley Band members from Wewa and Port St. Joe remember Billy Blackman, a former columnist for The Calhoun-Liberty J ournal and a longtime member of the band Southern Satisfaction, while on tour in 1977. He was inspired to dig the photo out for the age of 86. The Wewahitchka native is the author of Seasons in Beulah Land, available in paperback or as a download for Kindle on Amazon.com.A this one. in Manteo, North Carolina. Buddy, Stewart Boddye, Wayne Neel and Charles Gaskin and I were playing a Holiday Inn in Nags Head and heard that Andy lived nearby in Manteo. So Buddy and I decided to stake out his house in hopes of meeting him. We hid in the bushes across the road from his driveway and waited for a chance to climb the huge gate. From there we would decide the next step. across the road and climb the fence when Buddy said, Wait, someones coming up the driveway, so we ducked down again. A car pulled out. Thats him, thats him, Buddy said. We jumped into our getaway car and followed Andy and the driver (which turned out to be his daughter, Dixie, I think was her name) and followed them into a small grocery store. happily agreed, which is the photo shown here, taken by his daughter. I couldnt get up the nerve to say anything, so Andy spoke Yes, he was barefooted. Billy Blackman is shown at far right; his bandmate, Buddy Hamm of Port St. Joe is pictured at left and the object that days search is shown in the middle If you have an interest in history, Landmark Park is the place to be each Sunday afternoon during the month of July. Our annual Heritage Forum series will feature guest speakers presenting programs on state and local history. The forums will be presented in the Interpretive Center Auditorium at 3 p.m. and are free with paid gate admission (adults, $4; kids, $3; members, free). Continuing Education/ Professional Development credits will be granted. ploring Big Mama ThornWiregrass Presented by Queen Ali, student and Dr. Jeneve Brooks professor of Sociology at Troy University Dothan. This presentation explores the unique contri butions of Willie Mae Big Mama Thornton, the Ariton-born blues singer who (made famous by Elvis) and later wrote and recorded Ball n Chain, (popular ized by Janis Joplin). It will include a discussion of Big Mamas noted self-taught virtuosity on various instruments and will also feature performance video clips of this famous blues legend of the Wiregrass. Confederate Alabama Women and Religion will be presented by Dr. Jennifer Trevino July 22 and After RemovalThe Creek Nation Today, presented by Walter Gowan, will take Landmark Parkis a 135-acre historical and natural science park in Dothan, Ala. Heritage forums at Landmark Park

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Page 12 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JULY 11, 2012 birthdays KUYLEE STEPHENS birthday Tuesday, July 17. He is the Quincy. His grandparents are the and Beverly and the late Cuy Stewill enjoy a super water-slide with a pool attached, swimming pool, kiddie water sprinklers Saturday, July 14. His parents are turning their back yard into a Water Park! He enjoys going to Grannys, playing with his cousins, riding and driving anything with wheels and swimming. GRAYCELYNN MARIE LIPFORDHer grandparents are Becky Pickron Clarksville. Her great-grandparents She enjoys beating up her three brothers, Danny, Colton and Jayce Morgan and giving Daddy kisses and going on Sunday river trips. She also loves to talk and laugh.HORACE MCCORMICKHorace McCormick celebrated his 55th birthday Monday, July 9. His his sister is Sue Ammons. He enjoys JERRY LEMIUX, JR.Jerry Lemix, Jr. celebrated his 15th birthday Saturday, July 7. He Greensboro and Charlene Baskins and mud-riding. Lynda Grzegorczyk and her daughter, Danyelle, of Clarksville, were named 2011-12 Volunteers of the Year during the Panhandle Pioneer Settlements annual Volunteer Appreciation Banquet held June 7. Settlement Co-founder Linda Smith praised the Grzegorczyks for their dependability and good humor. Lynda and Danyelle are always bubbly and energetic and ready to tackle any task, said Settlement Co-founder Linda Smith. They have put in countless hours to help us set up and operate our annual rummage sale as well as other events. They are simply here for us with whatever task we ask them to help out with. During the banquet, nearly 80 volunteers enjoyed a complimentary smoked chicken dinner with mashed potatoes and green beans and a tasty as sortment of cakes for dessert. We appreciate all of our volunteers tremendously, Smith said. This small army of dedicated people brings the Settlement to life. They staff events, they give tours and they work in the store. They are great folks and we truly treasure them. Local band Swiftwater provided the evenings entertainment, performing an outstanding selection of bluegrass and gospel songs. Swiftwater is made up of the husband-and-wife team of Al Webb (vocals and guitar) and Wretha Webb (vocals and guitar), sisters Sharlyn Marie Smith (vocals and mandolin) and Mary Catherine Smithand Larry Strickland (bass). To learn more, visit www. swiftwater.us.Panhandle Pioneer Settlement names L ynda & Danyelle Grzegorczyk Volunteers of the Y ear DOTHAN Music by Moonlight, the annual concert series will continue Thursday, July 12 and 26. Bring a lawn chair and picnic and enjoy music under the stars on the Gazebo lawn at Landmark Park. Concerts are free for everyone. No pets or alcohol allowed. Contact Landmark Park at (334) 794-3452 for more info. Thursday, July 12 will feature local favorite the Troy Dothan Community Band. The concert series will come to a close on July 26 with the Fort Rucker 98th Army Band. Landmark Park is a 135-acre historical and natural science park located on U.S. Highway 431 North in Dothan, Ala. For more information, contact the park at (334) 794-3452.Music by moonlight July 12 and July 26

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JULY 11, 2012 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 13 PROBLEM #6:School Resource Deputies SOLUTION:As your elected Sheriff, I will always look for ways to improve the School Resource Deputys Program so as to provide for a safe school environment. Under my leadership, School Resource Deputies will be trained and effects of alcohol, drugs and tobacco use, as well as the importance of being honest and accepting responsibility for ones actions versus blaming others. Training will also focus on helping students identify and understand how to handle bullying and sexual harassment, safe and unsafe places and child abuse. Cyber safety, challenges facing teen drivers and an overview of DUI laws would also be covered. Our children are our future, and these educational programs are important to reducing crime and violence and keeping them safe in our schools. See next weeks Journal for PROBLEM #7. Elect FOR LIBERTY COUNTY There is no substitute for EXPERIENCE SHERIFFEFFECTIVE BUT F AIR LAW ENFOR CEMENT FOR OF US!Paid for by Henry Hamlin, Democrat for Liberty County Sheriff All HENR YHAMLINSixty-seven people lost their lives in Florida last year in boating acci dents and there have already been 28 deaths so far this year, according to the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC), which has released its 2011 Boating Accident Statistical Report. The FWC is responsible for reviewing, analyzing and compiling boating accident data for the state. Its statistical report details boating accidents and their causes. The frequency of boating accidents in Florida and their causes would probably shock most people, said Investigator Andy Bickel, of the FWCs Division of Law Enforcement. We want to reduce the number of accidents, injuries and deaths on Florida waters, Bickel said. Statistics show that drowning is the leading cause of death in boating accidents. jacket, Bickel said. There are several styles of life jackets available to boaters that wont interfere with your boating experience and may save your life. Todays boaters can choose from several models of light and comfortthe-shoulder life jackets that can be sun and they do not interfere with boating activities. Accidents can occur without warning and if for some reason someone ends up in the water, quite often its too late to put on a life jacket. The leading type of accident continues to be boaters colliding with other boats or objects, Bickel said. With the number of boaters in our beautiful state, its important to pay close attention to everything thats going on around your boat. Statistics repeatedly show that boaters who have taken a basic boating safety class are less likely to be involved in a serious boating accident.port is now available online at MyFWC.com/ Boating accidents cost 77 lives in Florida in 2011; Twenty-eight deaths so far for 2012 $975 Ford F-150 Ex-Cab0% interestDaylight Auto Financing2816 Hwy 98 West Panama City, FL 32401(850) 215-1769Hours 9 a.m.-9 p.m.You are automatically approved if you can make your payments on time $1,500 Chevy Silverado Ex-Cab0% interestDaylight Auto Financing2816 Hwy 98 West Panama City, FL 32401(850) 215-1769Hours 9 a.m.-9 p.m.You are automatically approved if you can make your payments on time Celebratingthe FourthIN DOWNTOWN BLOUNTSTOWN in Blountstown, which was sponsored by Rivertown Community Church, the Blountstown Rotary Club and Ramsey Piggly Wiggly. JEAN E. WEEKS PHOTOS

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Page 14 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JULY 11, 2012 SPECIAL TYPOSTS1/4 rounds 1/2 rounds Flat Face FACTORY SECONDS6'6" Posts, Top Size, under 2" 2-3" 3-4" 4-5" 5"+ ITEMS SUBJECT TO A V AILABILITYLiberty Post and Barn Pole Inc.DEMPSEY BARRON ROAD, BRISTOL (OFF HWY 12 N) Phone (850) 643-5995WE'VE GOT THE FENCE POSTS TO MEET YOUR NEEDS.NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours or responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment.Cataracts?Freedom from Eye Glasses, Now a reality for many.Lee Mullis M.D. and Cataract SpecialistSmart Lenses SMDr. Mulliss Smart LensSM procedure can produce clear vision without eyeglasses.Close-up, Far away & In-between CALL TODAY for a Smart Lens Evaluation Mullis Eye Institute 1600 Jenks Ave., Panama City(850)763-6666 Best of the Latest Country Charted songs, mixed in with your favorite oldies.WPHK Radio K-102.7 FMWYBT Radio Y-1000 AM K102.7 FM Hometown News, weather and river readings at 8 a.m. ET. Our daily newscast also airs at 1 p.m. and again at 5 p.m. ET.Swap Shopfrom 9-10 a.m. ET Buy, Sell, Trade or Give Stuff Away.TALLAHASSEE As Floridians continue to recover from the affects of Tropical Storm Debby, the Florida Department of Health (DOH) urges the public to take precautionary mea sures when cleaning and repairing to avoid indoor air quality problems. Moisture that enters buildings from growth. Molds can cause disease, trigger asthma symptoms and allergic reactions and continue to damage materials in homes and buildings long after the storm, said State Surgeon General Dr. John Armstrong. Failure to control moisture and mold can present short and long-term health risks. Mold growth in homes and buildings can often be seen or smelled. It often appears as a staining or fuzzy growth on furniture or building materials (it may look cottony, velvety, rough, or leathery and have different colors like white, gray, brown, black, yellow, or green). If you can smell an earthy or musty odor, you may have a mold problem. To protect against health risks associated with mold: moldy material is not easily cleanable, such as drywall, carpet padding and insulation, then removal and replace ment may be necessary. tive equipment when cleaning or removing mold cleaning gloves, safety goggles and an N-95 half-face most local hardware stores). before wearing a respirator. Do not use a respirator if you have heart disease or chronic lung disease such as asthma or emphysema. allergies or asthma should not clean or remove moldy materials. If you have concerns regarding your health before starting the cleanup, consult your healthcare provider. If mold growth has already occurred, carefully remove or clean the moldy material in a well-ventilated area. If the moldy area is less than about 10 square feet (less than roughly a three ft. by three ft. patch), in most cases, individuals may clean up the mold using a detergent/soapy water or a commercial mildew or mold cleaner. The cleaned area should then be thoroughly dried. Throw away any sponges or rags used to clean mold. If the mold returns quickly or spreads, it may mean the building materials are still wet enough to support mold growth. Additional drying of these materials may be needed. After working in a mold affected area, shower and launder work clothes separate from the other laundry. Keep shoes and work clothes away from the unaffected living area. Never mix cleaners (such as a cleaner with ammonia) and disinfectants (such as bleach), as chemical reactions between these ingredients are likely to result in the release of hazardous gases (such as chlorine). cleaners and disinfectants carefully. Open windows and doors to provide plenty of fresh air.Floridians warned of health dangers of mold in water-damaged buildingsI now reflect on the excitement 11 years ago. It was July 2001 and steamy hot in central Florida. My wife Fran, our son Heath and I prepared for a camping trip to Torreya State Park and dreamed of the possibilities yet to play out. I was the Assistant Park Manager at Wekiwa Springs State Park; a large, very busy Florida State Park. I was on a mission to learn every detail about Torreya State Park. I was preparing for the most important interview of my Florida Park Service career. As history would tell, the trip was successful. I interviewed for the Park Managers position and accepted the subsequent offer. During my investigations I remember a character that was most interesting. This tor known as Dr. Hentz. his life adventures. He rented a room in the Gregory House in the late 1800s from the plantation owner Jason Gregory. after his birth, the family moved three times before settling in Tuscaloosa, AL. It was here, in November 1845, that he began his diary. cial transitional period in its history when it was slowly being transformed from a craft into a science. Because of the difroutine health problems and failures in combating epidemics, the profession was under strong attack from a host of irregular practitioners. Dr. Hentz chose to pursue a traditional practice. His training sheds important light on antebellum medical education, student behavior and the role that shared experiences played in preparing students for practice. nati, Ohio, after schooling in Kentucky. The young doctor experienced a great deal while interning during the frigid winter of 1849. He tells a tragic but common tale of young death, when he writes, Wednesday, January 3, 1849: Betsys baby had convul sions before supper, unexpected, I thot twas beginning to improve& so twas apparently it commenced sinking almost immediately after & died at about after 10just about the time Pa left. I felt deep emotions of sadness on losing this little patientmy weighty the responsibilities connected with the practice of medicine. Works Cited: Steven M. Stowe, ed. A Southern Practice: The Diary and AuProject MUSE. Web. July. 2012, www. muse.jhu.edu.A memorable character: P ART 1 OUTDOORS WITH RANGER STEVEBy Steve Cutshaw, Torreya Park Manager

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JULY 11, 2012 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 15 AFTER THE STORM A large selection of new and used cars are now available at Chipola Ford in Marianna!Ronnie Coley personally invites you to visit him any time Monday thru Saturday from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Questions? Give him a call at (850)482-4043. HE IS W AITING FOR YOUR CALL! Chipola CORLETTS ROOFING LLC FREE ESTIMATESMichael Corlett (850) 643-7062 *Lifetime Warranty on Repairs *Will pay up to $500 of your deductible *Over 75 years combined experienceTNTTOBY GARNETT, OWNER Collision Center THE JOURNALThe Journal Classieds Email:thejournal@fairpoint.net wallet by listing your unused items in TALLAHASSEE The federal government approved Public Assistance for 20 counties that requested to be included in the federal disaster declaration, due to the impacts of Tropical Storm Debby across Florida. Three additional counties were approved for Individual Assistance, including Duval, Nassau and Union counties. Public Assistance provides grant assistance for debris removal and emergency protective measures. Costs for repair, replacement, or restoration of disaster-damaged, publicly-owned facilities can also be covered under Public Assistance. The counties approved to receive Public Assistance include: Liberty, Baker, Charlotte, Citrus, Clay, Columbia, Dixie, Franklin, Gulf, Hamilton, Hernando, Jeffer son, Lafayette, Manatee, Nassau, Pasco, Sarasota, Suwannee, Union and Wakulla. Public Assistance from the federal declaration comes in conjunction with the earlier approval of Individual Assistance for 11 Florida counties. State, tribal, local governments and certain types of private ties should visit www.FloridaPA.org to create an account within 30 days of a presidential declaration to apply for Public Assistance. Federal Individual Assistance makes federal and state assistance available to individuals and families. Residents and business owners who sustained losses in the designated county can begin applying for individual assistance starting today by register ing online at www.disasterassistance.gov, by web enabled mobile device at m.fema.gov or by calling 1-800-621-FEMA(3362) or 1-800-462-7585 (TTY) for the hearing and speech impaired. The toll-free telephone numbers will operate from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. (local time) seven days a week until further notice. Tropical Storm Debby made landfall June 27 in Steinhatchee. Impacts from the storm were felt statewide. The primary concern from Tropical the Sopchoppy and the St. Marys, reached record breaking crests.The Atlantic Hurricane Season runs from June 1 November 30. To Get a Plan!, visit www.FloridaDisaster.org. For the latest information on the 2012 Hurricane Season, follow us on Twitter at www.Twitter. Liberty Co. among additional communities approved for assistance for damage from Tropical Storm DebbyTALLAHASSEE In an effort to expedite the recovery process for businesses damaged by Tropical Storm Debby, Governor Rick Scott today activated Floridas Small Business Emergency Bridge Loan Program. The program will provide emergency, shortterm, interest-free loans to small businesses in 36 eligible counties to assist in reestablishing business during the interim period before other aid and insurance claims are processed. nancial assistance to businesses impacted by Tropical Storm Debby will aid them and their employees in getting back to work, said Governor Scott. So many of Floridas small businesses are the lifeblood of their communities and this program will help assist them in returning to business as usual as soon as possible. The Florida Small Business Emergency Bridge Loan Program provides an expedient cally damaged by a disaster. The short-term loans help bridge the gap between the time damage is incurred and when a resources, including regular longer-term loans. Governor Scott has allocated up to $10 million from the states General Revenue fund for the program, of which $5 million will be made available immediately. The additional $5 million will be used as necessary. Owners of small businesses with two to 100 employees in counties impacted by Tropical Storm Debby (see attached map) may apply for short-term loans for $1,000 to $25,000 from Thursday, July 5 to Wednesday, August 15. Loans are granted in terms of 90 or 180 days and are interest-free for that time period. To be eligible a business must have been established prior to the issue of Executive Order 12-140, signed by Governor Scott on June 25, 2012 and demonstrate physical damage as a result of Tropical Storm Debby.Floridas Small Business Emergency Bridge Loan Proaftermath of Hurricane Andrew in an effort to provide short-term emergency funding to businesses in need of immediate cash impacts of the Winter Storm of 1993, the Northwest Florida Floods of 1994, tornadoes in 2007 and Hurricanes Opal, Georges, Charley, Frances, Ivan, Jeanne, Dennis and Wilma.Emergency Bridge Loan Program activated for small businesses hit by storm

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Page 16 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JULY 11, 2012 JULY 11, 2012 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 17 A Fourth of July Celebration The community gathered for a good old-fashioned Fourth of July Celebration last week in Blountstown, with the areas Independence Day Parade followed by topped off with a crowd-pleasing Folks from all walks of life took part, with a few donning some red, white and blue to make the most WEEKS, DANIEL WILLIAMS and THE CALHOUN CHAMBER A Fourth of July Celebration

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Page 18 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JULY 11, 2012 Hosfords 21st CCLC summer program celebrates the science of sportsIve missed more than 9000 shots in my career. Ive lost almost 300 games. Twenty-six times, Ive been trusted to take the game winning shot and missed. Ive failed over and over and over again in my life. And that is why I succeed. MICHAEL JORDAN Hosfords summer camp celebrated the Fourth of July week with the science of sports. From basketball to roller skating, win or lose, we love sports! We studied our favorite athletes and what they say is the key to their success. We practiced our swings and shots and learned how to make them better. To show our patriotism for the Fourth of time having them twirl in the wind. We ended our week with a visit to Rock It Lanes in Panama City and had a great day roller skating and bowling. We are currently enrolling students in Hosfords 21st CCLC program for the 2012-13 school year. Students who are preregistered will be able to start the program email alice.mansell@lcsbonline.org.BELOW LEFT: Emily King and Hayven Bunkley are all smiles as they pause for a picture while bowling. BELOW: Mary Finuff and her patriotic pinwheel. RIGHT: Hunter Ammons, Kelsey Nobles and Nathan Hodge take a breather from roller skating. The LCHS varsity cheerleaders will be hosting a pup camp Friday, July 13 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the LCHS gym. Come out and support our cheerleaders and have some fun. For more information, please contact Donna Hiers at 643-2241, ext. 221.LCHS cheerleaders to host pup camp We have been busy this summer learn ing how to dance, practicing our sidewalk chalk art, supporting our troops and playing with Chuck E. Cheese. All summer the (LEAC) Liberty Educational Administration Pre-K and Kindergarten students have been having fun while also keeping up on their aca demic skills. Our campers have been working on their alphabet, learning shapes, colors and numbers. We have completed a service learning project and have partnered with the local library for weekly educational educational activities. Our summer campers chose to show their USA pride with the completion of a service learning project by making a troops for the Fourth of July. We mailed it to Joey Bilbo who is the father of one of our campers, Reagan Bilbo. ABOVE: The campers shown here had a very exciting visit with Chuck E. Cheese. LEFT: Music and art teacher Sarah Carpenter teaches the very energetic campers how to do the Macarena. RIGHT: Christopher Clark is having fun drawing Spider-Man with his sidewalk chalk.Liberty Pre-k and kindergarten learning dance and more during camp

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Students at W.R. Tolars 21st Century Community Learning Center are having fun with amazing activities! During the six week program, students focus on academic improvement in Math, Reading and Science. In addition, students enjoy a variety of enrichment activities. Students participate in art through a partnership with the Liberty County Arts Council. Art Teacher Sarah Carpenter provides weekly art classes to participating students. This week, students studied a form of art called abstract expressionism. Stuabout Jackson Pollock, an abstract expressionist movement. He was well known for drip painting. Student The 21st Century Community Learning Center program is made possible by ten by Dr. Sue Summers, Superintendent of Liberty County Schools. The program provides after-school tutoring, art and music enrichment and physical education activities, just to name a few. Thanks to our partners, parents and students for helping W.R. Tolars 21st Century CLC program! JULY 11, 2012 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 19 Sue Summersfor Superintendent of Liberty Co. SchoolsLET EXPERIENCE WORK FOR YOU! To continue my commitment to advance Liberty County Schools I am asking for your vote on August 14.ELECTHello Liberty County Citizens, Fine Arts Programs Athletic Programs Clubs and other extracurricular activities TALLAHASSEE The Florida State University College of Social week summer camp for middleschool children that served as the pilot project for CSW Arts & Athletics, a new program focusing on positive youth development. The program brought together 20 young people from June 18-29 for athletics and college preparatory activities. of research, I have no doubt that the arts and athletics change lives and help prepare young people for a wide range of educational and career opportunities, but most of all to Social Work Dean Nick Mazza, an internationally recognized scholar in arts therapies. The College of Social Work is unique in offering an integrated community outreach program drawing upon the common ground found in sports and arts housed within a university setting that offers resources to promote academic development and The brainchild of Mazza, CSW Arts & Athletics is an initiative designed to reach out to Big Bend-area youth, including those with limited social and economic resources. Using the combined strengths of arts and athletics exercises and activi ties, the program focuses on cultivating leadership development, academic achievement and social and life skills in the young people it serves. CSW Arts & Athletics also is part of the colleges larger mission to create collaboration between Florida State and the greater Tallahassee community. FSU students were involved in the camp as a servicelearning experience, serving as camp counselors and working closely with the young people enrolled in port of Guy Spearman, a legislative lobbyist and 1975 graduate of the Masters in Social Work program and his wife, Delores and the collaboration of several FSU entities. The Florida State team included Lorne Sam and Monk Bonasorte from FSU Athletics; Russell Williams from FSUs College ReachOut Program (CROP), which is administered by the Center for Academic Retention and Enhancement (CARE); Marcia Rosal, professor and director of the art therapy program from the College of Visual Arts, Theatre and Dance; Mazza; and L. Shuntel Fuller, event coor dinator from the College of Social Work. With continued support, Mazza said he hopes CSW Arts & Athletics will become one of the College of Social Works premier community projects to help preteens and teenag ers in the Big Bend. The College is considering expanding the program to include after-school programs with artists and athletes serving as role models.Arts & Athletics: Winning combination for the new FSU College of Social Work camp MARIANNATwo Chipola College athletes have been honored for Exemplary Academic Achievement by the National Junior College Athletic Association. Kristine Brance, a member of the Chipola womens basketball team, earned a 3.62 GPA during her freshman year. Brance, a native of Riga, Latvia, is a point guard for the Lady Indians and will return for her sophomore season. Rebekah Wiltse, a member of the Chipola womens Cross Country team, earned a 3.62 GPA during her sophomore year. Wiltse ran Cross Country for two years at Chipola and plans to transfer to the University of Florida.Althas Rebekah Wiltse honored for The Calhoun Liberty JOURNALServing two counties that make up one great community!PHONE (850) 643-3333 or FAX

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Page 20 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JULY 11, 2012 T upperwareCall Beth EubanksYOUR Tupperware Consultant at (850) 643-2498 or (850) 570-0235 Host a Party Today, Play all SummerHost a qualifying party and receive this exclusive Clear Impressions Picnic Set ITS VERY WISE TO ADVERTISE in the Calhoun-Liberty JOURNALand CLJN ews.COM Call us at (850) 6433333Email: the journal @fair point. netTHE BOYS OF BENTLEY BLUFF: A group of boys take advantage of high water to cool off one recent afternoon in Telogia Creek in Bentley Bluff Park.PHIL COALE PHOTOS Cooling off at the BluffSummertime weather brings thunderstorms and lightningIn the coming weeks we should start to see a more consistent rain pattern forming in our area. Thunderstorms may appear daily in the early and late afternoon. With this pattern more lightning strikes are common. If you witness a lightning strike please report it by calling 911. When can be managed and suppressed. Otherwise, they may burn intensely underground for days until they blow harder to manage and contain. Thunderstorms can produce downed trees and increase the collection of yard debris (limbs, sticks, twigs, pine needles). Yard debris from storms when left to collect on the ground and rooftops becomes a tinderbox when times turn dry. Keeping your yard clean and your rooftops and risk to your home. Dont invite a wild Keep the areas near your home clear of storm blow-down and excessive yard debris. If your cleanup involves burning the debris there are some requirements that must be followed under Florida law and they are as follows: *Piles should be 8 or less in diameter. Larger piles will require an authorization before lighting. *Piles must be located at least 50 from the road, 25 from your house and any forest land, and 150 from other homes or structures. *Burning must not start before 9 a.m. (ET) and must be extinguished one hour before sunset. *Your smoke must not create a hazard or a nuisance. For more information, please con tact the number above or the Florida VOTE FOR & ELECTRAYHOWELLClerk of Circuit Court Vote and Support Ray Howell for your next Clerk of CourtThunderstorms With this pattern more lightning

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JULY 11, 2012 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 21 When the last school bell rang this summer, thousands of Florida high school students headed for fun in the sun, summer jobs, or maybe just lazy days relaxing after a hard year of academics. But for a group of highly motivated ninth and 10th graders in Floridas small, rural school districts, the end of the school year signaled the beginning of summer learning challenges staged by the FloridaLearns STEM Scholars gifted and academically talented students three regions of the state, the Northwest, Northeast and South Central, to take part in collaborative, hands-on experiences in the areas of Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM), explore STEM career paths never imagined in many of their limited world experiences and to develop leadership skills. FloridaLearns STEM Scholars is a three-year long project, funded through Floridas Race to the Top initiative from the Florida Department of Education. The FloridaLearns STEM Scholars a vision to help Florida address its urgent and important STEM talent development challenge by focusing on some of Floridas most gifted and talented under served students in the rural regions of the state. The Panhandle Area Educational Consortium (PAEC) located in Chipley, the Heartland Educational Consortium (HEC) in Lake Placid and the North Florida Educational Consortium (NEFEC) in Palatka are working in partnership to help transform teaching, learning and leadership in the areas of STEM. The $4.5 million dollar project addresses a serious gap in STEM education for gifted and talented students in the states small, rural school districts served by their three rural-based regional educational service STEM Education Initiative. During June and July, a series of regional Summer Challenge programs are providing opportunities for students to become immersed in STEMMING. GADSDEN, LIBERTY and WAKULLAThe series of Summer Challenges were launched the week of June 1114. Students from Gadsden, Liberty and Wakulla Counties came together at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory in Tallahassee, to take part in the D3(Dream, Design and Do) NanoChallenge where students designed determine the characteristics of the materials. Students were then challenged to use the tools they tasks. As a team, they explored a novel ethical issue in nanotechnology and designed and constructed a device to simulate the manner in which the electron force microscope works. Jose Sanchez, Assistant Director of the Center for Integrating Research and Learning at the NHMFL, treated students to a tour of the facility. Participants also had the opportunity to interact with scientists Dr. Maitri Warusawithana, who showed the equipment used in molecular beam epitaxy and Bob Goddard, and Jonathan Ludwig, who demonstrated how scanning electron and atomic force microscopes work, respectively. In a series of career presentations, Darrel Tremaine, a geochemist and Angela Sutton, a chemical engineer and Safety Director at the NHMFL described their workplace and academic preparation for their careers and Dr. Matt Eby, a nanobioscientist, shared cutting edge developments in his occupational area nanobiology. STEM Mentor teachers Angela Sapp (Gadsden County), David Shuler (Liberty County) and Suzanne Fielder (Wakulla County) accompanied the students and assisted Dr. Mabry Gaboardi and Jesse Smithyman throughout the weeks activities.JACKSON, CALHOUN and WASHINGTON ninth and 10th grade students from Jackson, Calhoun and Washington Counties studied at Chipola College in Marianna to learn and practice the STEM skills needed for crime scene investigations. introduced to the science of crime scene investigations by Shawn Yao, a crime scene analyst from the Florida Department of Law Enforcement. As part of their challenge, students learned about methods used to process evidence collected at crime scenes and then, gained important laboratory skills as they implemented each of the methods they learned about. Dur ing the week they analyzed hair and completed forgery detections and drug tests, extracted and analyzed DNA using gel electrophoresis, conducted ballistics comparisons, examined blood spatters, carried out a forensic entomology examination, and did a forensic odontology comparison. Throughout the week they prepared to become expert witnesses and to defend the results of their analyses when questioned by a prosecutor in court during the weeks culminating activity which was a trial. Chipola faculty members Dr. Jocelyn Wahlgren, Dr. Jeff Bodart, Terolyn Lay and Denise Freeman were assisted by STEM Mentor teachers Jackie Watts (Jackson County), Kevin Shull (Washington County) and Sara Waldorff (Calhoun County) with the weeks activities. Preparing these students for the next phase of the FloridaLearns STEM Scholars project in the of the three-year funding initiative is an important goal of the Summer Challenges. By stimulating excitement, encouraging deeper understanding of the STEM disciplines and motivating greater inquiry and learning, STEM stakeholders from business and industry, economic development, workforce agencies and educational leaders are looking forward with excitement to Floridas ability to help produce the STEM talent needed to sustain and advance Floridas critical economic future by tapping the states gifted and talented under served small and rural students potential home grown. Summer challenges stimulate learning for rural high school students in Liberty, Calhoun & other counties ABOVE: Students from Gadsden, Liberty and Wakulla counties. LEFT: Students from Washington, Calhoun and Jackson counties.Some students study crime scene investigations, others take on challenge at National Mag Lab VISIT THE JOURNALS ONLINE SITE AT CLJNEW S.COMTAND CHECK IN WITH US ON FACEBOOK AT CLJNEWS

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Page 22 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JULY 11, 2012Minutes from the June 7 Liberty Commission meeting The meeting was called to order by Chair man Dexter Barber. Present at the meeting were Commissioners Kevin Williams, Davis Stoutamire, Albert Butcher, Jim Johnson, Attorney Shalene Grover, Clerk Robert Hill and Deputy Clerk Charla Kearce. Prayer was led by Dick Stanley. Pledge of allegiance was led by Commissioner Kevin Williams. Motion to approve the minutes of the regular meeting held May 10th and special meeting May 23rd, 2012 was made by Stoutamire, seconded by Williams and carried. Motion by Johnson to add Rhonda Lewis to the agenda, seconded by Stoutamire and carried. Craig Brinkley discussed the Dog Ordinance with the Board. He requested that the ordinance by updated. A committee will be formed to come up with a stricter ordinance. Kristin Brown with Preble-Rish Engineers discussed the SCRAP and CIGP grants. She recommends CR 379 (just the loop to the pole mill) and Hoecake Road. Kristin Brown told the Board that she is working on a grant for problems at the Estiffanulga Boat Ramp. Kristin Brown will check on striping Danny Black Road. Ambulance Director Melissa Brown presented the EMS Consultant contract. Motion to approve a one year contract was made by Johnson, seconded by Butcher and carried. Stephen Ford presented the mosquito control budget for 2012-13. Motion to approve was made by Williams, seconded by Butcher and carried. Monica Welles with Liberty Transit presented Resolution #12-06 for the Trip and Equipment Grant in the amount of $222,162.00. County match is $22,216.00. Motion to approve was made by Stoutamire, seconded by Butcher and carried. Rachel Manspeaker gave an update on the Health Department. We will have a dentist beginning July 1, 2012. Motion by Butcher, seconded by Johnson and carried to place two speed bumps on Phillips Road in Rock Bluff. Attorney Grover presented Resolution #12-07 to sell the old Frazer Bilt ambulance box to Gadsden County Board of County Commissioners for an amount of $5,000.00. Motion to approve was made by Stoutamire, seconded by Williams and carried. Attorney Grover presented Resolution # 12-08 authorizing the sale of the former Liberty County Emergency Management Build ing to the Liberty County School Board. Motion to approve was made by Johnson, seconded by Williams and carried. Motion to approve the lease between BBB&L Partnership and Liberty County house in Sumatra was made by Johnson, seconded by Butcher and carried. Motion to approve payment of $1,000.00 to join the Medicaid lawsuit was made by Johnson, seconded by Butcher and carried. Motion to approve the Memorandum of Agreement for Limited County Access to Florida System Data was made by Williams, seconded by Johnson and carried. Motion to re-appoint Johnny Eubanks to serve on the Chipola Workforce Devel opment Board was made by Butcher, seconded by Williams and carried. Motion to approve disposal of old records was made by Stoutamire, seconded by Butcher and carried. Motion to approve advance payment to Weatherization of $41,987.79 was made by Butcher, seconded by Johnson and carried. Motion to accept the resignation of Stephanie McCroskey effective June 6, 2012 was made by Stoutamire, seconded by Butcher and carried. Rhonda Lewis presented the EMPA Grant. Motion to approve the Federal Program agreement was made by Johnson, seconded by Williams and carried. Motion to approve the EMPA State Program agreement was made by Williams, seconded by Stoutamire and carried. Motion to approve Emergency Manage ment advertising for concrete was made by Williams, seconded by Stoutamire and carried. Motion to pay the bills was made by Johnson, seconded by Williams and carried. Motion to adjourn was made by Stoutamire, seconded by Williams and carried. Warrant List & Numbers Payroll Fund 33485 33586 Operating Fund 5086 5294 SHIP Grant 3954 3972 Weatherization Grant 4694 4702 ________________________________ Robert Hill, Clerk of Court Dexter Barber, Chairman The meeting was called to order by Chair man Dexter Barber. Present at the meeting were Commissioners Kevin Williams, Davis Stoutamire, Jim Johnson, Albert Butcher, Clerk Robert Hill and Deputy Clerk Charla Kearce. Emergency Management Director Rhon da Lewis presented Resolution #12-09 declaring a State of Emergency due to Tropical Storm Debby. Motion to approve was made by Johnson, seconded by Williams and carried. Dick Stanley discussed public building disaster with the Board. Motion to adjourn was made by Williams, seconded by Stoutamire and carried.________________________________ Robert Hill, Clerk of Court Dexter Barber, ChairmanJune 25 emergency meeting minutes The meeting was called to order by Chairman Dexter Barber. Present at the meeting were Commissioners Davis Stoutamire, Albert Butcher, Jim Johnson, Clerk Robert Hill and Deputy Clerk Charla Kearce. Emergency Management Director Rhonda Lewis discussed the emergency repair that is needed on Highway 67 and 22. Motion to hire C.W. Roberts Contracting to do the repairs on 67 and 22 was made by Johnson, seconded by Butcher and carried. Commissioner Butcher told the Board that Tonia Williams needs work on her house. She already has two mortgages and if the county will take a third mortgage she can have the work done. The Board said that they would need to get legal advice. Motion to adjourn was made by Butcher, seconded by Stoutamire and carried. ________________________________ Robert Hill, Clerk of Court Dexter Barber, ChairmanRepairs to Hwy. 67 & 22 addressed in emergency meeting held June 29 ACCEPTING NEW PA TIENTSLaban Bontrager, DMD12761 NW Pea Ridge Rd., Bristol, FL 32321 DENTURE LAB ON PREMISESSame-Day Service on Repairs & Relines Bristol Dental ClinicMonica Bontrager, DMD OPEN Family Coastal Seafood RestaurantFRIDAY NIGHTAll U Can Eat SEAFOOD PLATTER OR CRAB CLAW S Located in BristolLAND CLEARING-Private drives and roads -Food plots -Home sites -Small acreageCall Eddie Nobles at (850) 447-0449 or Chas (850) 447-0849Eddie Nobles Attention Candidates: There are only FOUR WEEKS left to get your ad in before the Aug. 14 Primary. Early voting will be held Aug.4-11.

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William Walter Morehead moved to Blountstown with his wife, Mary Ann Yon and children Thomas Francis, Flora Elizabeth and George Walter between 1873 and 1879. His fourth child, Mar garet Morehead, was born in Blountstown in 1879. She grew up on the homestead located on Chipola Road just southwest of Blountstown. William valued a quality education and sent his daughter, Margaret, to college to be an educator. Before she married into the McDougald family at the age of 24 in 1903, Margaret returned to Blountstown where she would teach school for a number of years. She left Blountstown for about 13 years with her husband, James Bertelle McDougald, Sr. She returned to Blountstown for what was supposed to be a brief time to take care of her ailing parents. When her stay was prolonged, she again took a job teaching in Blountstown before retuning to Columbia. After Bert died in 1916, Margaret, with her son James, moved back to the homestead in Blountstown and she would never leave again. Margaret returned to her teaching career once again teaching in Blountstown schools. Pictures are available of her seen with her son James among the students at the T shaped school building that was built in 1904. Margaret lived on the homestead in Blountstown until she died September 29, 1960 at the age of 81. She is buried in the McDougald family plot at the Nettle Ridge Cemetery located on Hwy 69 North.History of education in Blountstown and Margaret Morehead McDougaldMargaret Moorehead McDougald McDougald is a well established name that goes back many generations. Its origins dates back to medieval Scotland. McDougald, meaning son of a black stranger, was a byname used to distinguish darker-haired Danes from the fair-haired Norwegians, says the Dictionary of American Family Names. The name has been Anglicized from the Gaelic language and although there are many variant spellings, the name McDougald has been associated with the modern day Clan MacDougall, which traces its roots back to the MacDougalls of Lorn in Scotland. The MacDougalls of Lorn were the senior branch of the royal house of Somerled, King of the Hebrides and Regulus of Argyll. They are a Highland clan and one of the three oldest in existence, dating from 1164. Mac means son of while Dougall is derived from the Gaelic word Dubh meaning Black or Dark. The Gaelic word Gall means Stranger. The coat of arms, registered in Burkes General Armory records the family motto To Conquer or Die. Our ancestors in Scotland were a prominent family of the Christian faith during the 13th and 14th centuries, but we dont know much about our direct ancestors between that time and the 18th century. What we do know from stories handed down by generations is that two McDougald brothers left Scotland in the mid 1700s and landed in North Carolina. Alexander McDougald was born to one of those brothers May 10, 1794. Alexander moved to Washington County, GA where it is believed that he married a young 1822. Alexander married again to Elizabeth Holloman and moved to Gadsden County in 1824, just two years after the U.S. purchased Florida from Spain and one year after the state government was established. Alexander purchased about 80 acres of land along Telogia Creek just south of Greensboro. Alexander had nine children with Elizabeth in Gadsden County. He became a charter member of Providence Baptist Church in 1843, which presently remains active. Alexanders daughter, Mary Ann later European descent born in Gadsden County. The July 23, 1922 issue of The Gadsden County Times says that Alexander moved into new country inhabited by on the Forbes Purchase. When Florida was under Spanish rule in 1804, 1,200,000 acres between the Apalachicola and St. Marks rivers were given in payment to John Forbes by indebted Indians. Alexander built a home three miles from the site of an important skirmish of the Second Seminole War. April 23, 1840, the McLains were attacked by a raiding party of Indians led by the son of a chief. John McLains mother, 20, his sister and two small siblings were brutally murdered while trying to escape to their nearest neighbor, Alexander McDougald. John barricaded himself in the house and shot the chiefs son as he attempted to burn the house. After wailing and chanting for their fallen leader, the raiding party disappeared and was never found. The old chief later said If the white boy on Telogia Creek had not killed my son, the war would still be going on. October 8, 1844, Daniel Fountain McDougald became the ninth child born to Alexander and Elizabeth. Daniel grew up at the family home and served faithfully as a deacon in Providence Baptist Church. Daniel left in January 1863 to United States in May 1865 after the war. He married Jane children over the next 11 years. Jane passed away November 12, 1882, less than two years after giving birth to their Colombia, AL January 17, 1883 where his wifes sister, Mary Ann Stringer, helped him raise his children. Upon his departure, The Quincy Herald reported, Columbia county will lose a good citizen. Meanwhile, William Walter Morehead married Mary Ann Yon December 19, 1867 and was living with his mother in-law on a farm in River in Bristol. The year 1873 found William with toddler Thomas Francis and infant Florah Elizabeth. That year again destroying his crops. A very discouraged William wrote, I want to get away from here so bad that I dont know what to do.... I am perfectly disgusted with the whole country. William didnt have to travel far to begin enjoying Gods blessings. By 1876, William was living in Blountstown and saw the birth of his third child, George Walter. By 1885, William had two more children, Margaret and Mary. William became a prominent citizen. The August 8, 1996 issue of The County Record reports that in 1886, William was instrumental in establishing the requirements of the Homestead Act of 1862 and was awarded a deed to 160 acres of land located at the current address, 16152 SW Chipola Road. Margaret Morehead was born January 12, 1879 in Blountstown, where she lived until she attended college. Sometime before she married at the age of 24, Margaret returned home to teach school in a two story building that was erected in 1888 before the Calcohi School. The August 8, 1996 issue of The County Record lists her among a group of consecrated and capable teachers under which, the Blountstown School grew. James Bertelle McDouglad, Sr. lived in Columbia, AL becoming an upstanding member of the community. By his early 20s, Bert was already well established. He owned a hotel and traveled a great deal conducting business. Young Bert married Martha Strickland, who is assumed to have died with her infant during child birth. After mourning his devastating loss, Bert later learned from his sisters, who were attending college, about an attractive young classmate named Margaret Morehead. Bert contacted the local banker and other business owners in Columbia to obtain character references. He sent these along with a personal letter to William Morehead asking permission to courtship, the couple agreed to marry. Bert came to Blountstown with his two sisters and a preacher to marry Maggie May 10, 1903. Afterwards, Bert took Maggie to Columbia where the new bride managed their hotel while Bert traveled. Maggie had a son, James Bertelle McDougald, Jr. August 26, 1904. Shortly after, Maggie had her second son, George Alma. years after George Alma was born, tragedy struck. George Alma passed away unexpectedly due to an unknown illness. Tragedy struck again when Bert contracted hepatitis and lost his life January 30, 1916, one day after his 37th birthday. Maggie never remarried. After the death of her son and her husband, Maggie and son, James, came back to the homestead in Blountstown, where she continued her teaching career for a number of years. James Bertelle McDougald, Jr. lived out his teen years with his mother, Maggie, on his grandfathers homestead on Chipola River. James attended school in Blountstown before taking a job guarding patients at the Florida State Hospital in Chattahoochee. At the same time, a young girl named Myra Elnita Herring completed high school in Brinson, GA. Elnita wanted to pursue a career in nursing. Since Georgia schools had only 11 grades, she needed more course work before entering nursing school. In 1923, Elnita moved to Blountstown to live with her aunt, Rena Fields and complete the 12th grade at Calcohi. She was among the second graduating class from the newly completed school. From there, Elnita entered RN training at the Florida State Hospital in Chattahoochee. It wasnt long before James and Elnita met at the hospital and fell in love. On October 8, 1928, just three months before graduating, Elnita married James. Realizing that there is no place like home, James moved Elnita to the homestead in Blountstown. James farmed the land and was a carpenter by trade. He worked on several jobs over his lifetime. The most notable was building forms for the construction of the Apalachicola River bridge. Elnita worked as a private nurse for a few years with Dr. M.W. Eldridge in Blountstown. She worked with Dr. Eldridge for 18 years, was named Calhoun Countys Citizen of the Year. Elnita and James had four children, Sarah Margaret, James Bertelle, III, Billy Bascom and Myra Grace, who was stillborn. A few years after the death of James, December 28, 1956, Elnita retired and married Wesley E. Langford and moved to Brinson, GA. Elnita returned to Blountstown following the death of Mr. Langford and lived on the homestead until her death May 31, 1997. Today, James Bertelle, III and his wife, Dollene, along with Gary Bertelle and his wife, Delores, make up two generations of McDougalds living on 80 acres that remain of the homestead on Chipola Road. There are approximately 31 living descendents of James Bertelle, Jr., 16 of which still live in Blountstown. JULY 11, 2012 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 23 McDougalds in America: From Scotland to BlountstownThe Panhandle Pioneer Settlement presents the Smithsonian Institution and Florida Humanities Council Museum on Main Street --Journey Stories. The Panhandle Pioneer Settlement has been awarded the privilege of exhibiting the MOMS -Journey Stories, July 14 August 25, 2012. This is the only facility located in North Florida that has been selected for the exhibit. All other locations are in South Central and South Florida. In preparation for the exhibit, we are in need of volunteers to serve on various committees. Committees needed are for: Planning, Local exhibit planning, Exhibit installation, Program Development, School/teacher, Volunteer and docent training, and Publicity. Individuals are needed to present north Florida family journey stories, industry stories for the region, demonstrators, docents, assistance in creating an exhibit of local journey stories that support the MOMS Journey Stories. For additional information, call (850) 447-0298 or (850) 447-0964 or send email JOURNEY STORIES Elnita Herring McDougald

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Page 24 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JULY 11, 2012The Calhoun-Liberty Journal received three awards in the Florida Press Association (FPA) Annual Better Weekly Newspaper Contest during last weeks Southeastern Press Convention in Destin. and Environmental category with the story, Erosion: Landowners losing property about how the banks along the Apalachicola River are receding. One property owner who put his home 90 feet from the river bank said he expected to lose between a half foot and a foot of his lot each year. Instead, he discovered that he lost 15 to 20 feet in 2010. The story was featured on the front page of the June 1, 2011 issue. Journal sports writer Richard Williams earned a second place nod in the Sports Feature Story category with his article, Former players honor LCHS Coach Richard Kennedy. That article appeared in the Sept. 21, 2011 issue and included comments from players who talked about the impact the coach had on them. We didnt realize it at the time, but Coach Kennedy was a life coach that instilled in his players the characteristics to be productive citizens, said former player Grant Conyers. Practice was tough and the games were fun, but it was the discipline, the respect he demanded his players show, the way he treated everyone by having no favorites regardless if you were blessed with talent or not, that really stays with you. The newspaper also took second place in the Community History category, with an article by Teresa Eubanks and photographs by Beth Eubanks and Daniel Williams, Mural depicts long-gone buildings, about the artwork in downtown Blountstown by Jeff Vickery. The mural, sponsored by the Blountstown Main Street program, features realistic enlargements of several old postcards of the towns landmarks, including the high school, the C.C. Corbin Hardware store and a Texaco station as well as several other businesses. The full page story and photo feature was published Aug. 17, 2011. The Journal competed with other publications with circulations under 7,000. The winners were announced at an awards luncheon on Saturday. SEPTEMBER 21, 2011 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 7 by Richard Williams, Journal sports writerFormer LCHS Head Football Coach Richard Kennedy was honored by former players Sept. 16 in recognition of his contributions to the team as well as his up coming induction into the Florida Athletic Coaches Association Hall of Fame. As the gathering crowd waited, Kennedy was asked to give a speech, and in typical Ken nedy fashion the speech was short and gave credit to others. This isnt about me, it is about all of you. Thank you very much, was all that Kennedy said to the group. It was exactly what everyone expected. While the crowd enjoyed the meal pro vided by Liberty County Sheriff Donnie Conyers and crew, Kennedy took time to go around the crowd and talk to his for mer players and staff. He would laugh as players reminded him of drills or plays in a game, and almost without fail, he would be pulled in close as former players told the coach how much he meant to them. Kennedy was also recognized at half time of Fridays football game between Marianna and Liberty County, receiving a standing ovation from the fans. In sports, there is a tendency to report the scores, the stats and tell who scored the game-winning points. Often overlooked are the real lessons being taught and the people who do that teaching. Those who came to see Kennedy Friday spoke more about the teacher and the lessons than the wins and the losses. When asked what Kennedy meant to them, the former play ers almost all said the exact same thing: Kennedy wasnt really a football coach; he was a life coach that used football to teach young men the lessons they would need later in life. Grant Conyers, who helped put the event to gether, said Kennedy was his life. We didnt realize it at the time, but Coach Ken nedy was a life coach that instilled in his players the characteristics to be productive citizens, Co nyers said. Practice was tough and the games were fun, but it was the discipline, the respect he demanded his players show, the way he treated everyone by having no favorites regardless if you were blessed with tal ent or not, that really stays with you. Now that Im older, having been a part of Coach Kennedys program has given me the ability to realize I can do more than I think I can, that I can push through when things arent going right. Perhaps the biggest thing I learned from Coach Kennedy is that the more you put into things, the more you are going to get out of them and it doesnt matter if it is football, work or life in general. That is a great lesson to have learned. Former player Thorton Davis said it was a huge honor to play for Kennedy. When he was a teenager, he didnt realize the lessons Kennedy was teaching him. I wont lie about it, he said. When you are 16 or 17 and out there doing those drills, going through all of the practices, you think you know everything and you sometimes wonder if it is worth it, Davis said, and at the time you think about the pride you feel in being a Liberty County Bulldog, and the pride you feel in being a part of the community, or when you walk through the halls of the school and hearing the fans on Friday night and you think that is what makes it all worthwhile. But then you get to be 35 or 36 (years old) and it hits you like a brick. You realize that it is the lessons you learned about life, the things he taught you about yourself and about how to overcome adversity that are the real things that make what you went through worthwhile. I wish we could take what Richard Kennedy brought to each of us and bottle it up because we could all be millionaires off of that stuff. Several of Kennedys family members were in attendance. Daughter Julie Kenne dy, an assistant softball coach with South eastern Louisiana University, said growing up, life was about Friday nights and she enjoyed that. She said as she got older she realized that Friday nights were the fun times and that the real lessons, the teaching, was done during the week. Now, as a coach herself, she realizes the teaching is about more than sports. Julie Kennedy said the event put together by for mer players warmed her heart. To see how much my father meant to these peo ple here tonight, to feel the embrace of the com munity and to know that my father had an impact on so many people is wonderful, she said. I really do believe that God led us here and Im so happy that dad made that decision to come to Liberty County. I really believe this community means a lot to him and Im glad to see that he meant so much to this community. In 1989 Richard Kennedy told the Or lando Sentinel he was leaving his position as head football coach at Class 4A Lees burg High School because he wanted to be in a small town. The article quotes him as saying, I dont have any aspirations for the big time. I just want something small town, where the school and its sports are at the center of the community. That is really what I want to do, get back into a small school. I feel it is what we are looking for as a family. Kennedy said coming to Liberty County was a dream come true for him. To be in a community that wanted to do things the right way, and to have coaches, players and a booster club that would buy into what we were doing was tremendous, he said. Looking back I dont think I realized what we had, but Ive got to tell you that was special, he said. In small town football you are just a lit tle closer to everything, the community, the support I dont know how to describe it but in a smaller community you just get more of a core of support it seems to mean more to the community, and in Lib erty County we were just blessed through the years with good players, good fans, and good support from the school and the community. Kennedy said he couldnt name a game or team that really was the one that stood out above all the others, but he said he had erty County. We started out with about 80 kids coming out for football and ended up with about 20 kids on the team at the end of the year, he said. We went 2-8 and we were lucky to win those two. We were young and inexperienced, but that was a very special group that helped lay the groundwork for years to come. Im glad the program has continued to be successful, but looking dont regret my decision as much as I hated to leave that group of kids that was there. I felt like it was my time to move on. Kennedy said he was humbled, truly humbled by the event. I would have never dreamed of such a thing in a million years, he said. The former LCHS head coach said the induction into the FACA Hall of Fame was an honor, but he noted, Plaques and honors dont mean as much as your memories and associations with your players, your coaches, your support groups and the friends you had in the community dont get me wrong Im honored to be going in the Hall of Fame, but it is the special times, the memories that mean more than any thing else. Kennedy was known as a tough, disciplined football coach and while many play ers pointed to those traits as being the very on their lives, Kennedy knows that some might not be as appreciative of his toughness. I tell you what, it is something Gayle and I will remember for the rest of our lives. Most of them should have probably come at me with an axe. They didnt and Im glad of it, but Im really glad to hear that some of them feel like those times are important to who they are today. I made some mis takes, I handled some kids wrong, and I got to talk with a few of them, but if some of on them then Im really I really dont know what to say, Im just glad that at least some of them feel that way about me. It re ally does leave me without words. Kennedy said he always felt that if you did things the right way, instilled discipline in your team, if you made them work to the point they came to expect more from them selves it would make the individual better and at the same time, make the team better. Former player Travis Anderson said Kennedy did things the right way. Look around here, he said pointing to the crowd of former players. He made a difference in peoples lives, he taught us things we could have never learned in the classroom. He is such a caring guy and a lot of people dont get that about him because he can come off as harsh and he was known as a very tough coach. But he was that way because he cares more than anyone really can realize. DANIEL WILLIAMS PHOTOSFormer players honor LCHS Coach Richard Kennedy Farmers Almanac...11 Birthdays...12 Mayhaw Reunion...15 Obituaries...17 Tolar Kindergarten grads...19 Sheriff's Log...2 Community Calendar...4 Commentary...6, 7 Speak Up!...8 News from the Pews...10 50includes tax THE CALHOUN-LIBERT Y J OURNAL Volume 31, Number 22 Wednesday, June 1, 2011 CLJ News.com EROSION Chelsea Sanders gives the thumbs up as she takes part in Friday nights graduation ceremony at Liberty County High School. See more photos from the evening on page 13.by Teresa Eubanks, Journal EditorWhen Donnie Gene Tharpe set up a doublewide mobile home on the banks of the Apalachicola River four years ago, he knew that erosion would be a concern. People said it was eroding probably a half foot to spot he and his brother, Butch Tharpe, bought near the Estiffanulga Boat Landing. I set my home out about 90 feet from the river bank, he said. Last year, I got worried, he said. We lost 15 to 20 feet just from the erosion. He and several other homeowners along the Liberty County side of the river are seeing big changes along the bluffs. All that water, as swift as it is, eats away from the bottom, he explained. Its like breaking off a piece of hoecake. Its crumbling in fast. The banks are just falling off. Liberty County Commissioners have been looking for a way to slow down the erosion but have had no success. Just last month, Commission Chairman Jim Johnson and Commissioner Davis Stoutamire took two representatives from the Corps of Engineers on a tour Estiffanulga Park. Johnson said the engineers agreed there was a serious problem but couldnt offer a solution on their own. They said the only way we can get help is if we get grant money to pay for it, he said. Johnson said the county has applied for grants without success to deal with the erosion problem. Engineers feet a year along that area just on the Liberty County Landowners losing property as erosion eats away at Apalachicola River banks side, he said. The commission chairman believes building a series of pilings in the river would help. The rock jetties would turn the current away from the wall, Johnson said. You would need to start above Outside Lake and Project engineer George Sanders is shown next to the historic marker at the Wesleyan Church in Hosford. The church restoration project recently won an Award of Excellence from the Tallahassee Trust for Historic Preservation. See page 9.Church restoration receives historic preservation awardABOVE: Continuing erosion could undermine the boat ramp at Estiffanulga Park. TOP: The view of the water gets a little closer every day for this home overlooking the Apalachicola River. JOHNNY EUBANKS PHOTOSSee EROSION continued inside on page 2Pair of Liberty County road projects to get $260,000 in funding...3 Improvements planned for water system in Pine Island ................3 Coley, Montford both respond to layoffs at FSH and closing of Dozier School............3 Ronald Earnest wins Big River Roundup...22 AUGUST 17, 2011 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 7 by Teresa Eubanks, Journal EditorLocal artist Jeff Vickery has done what many people dream of. He quit his full time job to pursue his passion. Hes always enjoyed art but longed to do something bigger than life by painting murals. Last year, he made the wall of the Snowden Land Surveying building on North Pear Street fanciful lettering, a dark background of trees and reproduced a series of black and white photos that prompted passers by to stop for a few minutes just to take it all in. showcase his work. Rather than tell people about it, I thought Id show them, he said. It worked. Members of the Blountstown Main Street program took notice, along with just about everybody else who drives along North Pear Street. Main Street allotted money from past fundraisers to pay for his latest effort, which just went up on the west wall of The Diamond Corner at S.R. 71 and S.R. 20. Vickery began putting the 10 x 35-foot mural in place on Monday, drawing plenty of curious looks as he installed it in sections. He returned Tuesday to touch up a few spots and make sure everything was in place. After over it with a clear, protective coating. He estimates that he put over 180 hours of work into the mural. He got plenty of reaction as he worked early this week, with motorists honking their horns and giving him the thumbs up as they drove by. The centerpiece of the mural is from an old colorized postcard, Vickery explained. Main Street members helped select a series of landmark buildings to be included in the mural. We went though all the old pictures we had and I picked out the ones I thought the design, he said. Vickery, along with the Main Street members, went through three or layout. Main Street President Edwin Strawn said that after the group approved the design, he and his wife, Lynn as owners of the business the mural would be displayed on had a request. They asked that the image of the 1952 Dodge truck that Strawns father once drove, loaded with the boats he had built, be included. It was. As business owners, we hope it will attract people and make them want to stop, said Strawn. He believes the murals will show those passing through the area that the people of Blountstown remember and treasure their heritage. He hopes the artwork will spark some interest and encourage visitors to take their time and perhaps stop, eat at one of the local restaurants and do a little shopping. Vickery recently did a mural for the Calhoun County Elections Office after a private citizen donated the funds for the project. The patriotic design features the Honor of a Veteran theme. The next mural will be for a new restaurant set to open west of Blountstown in the former J&N Building. When funding is found and a location is secured, Vickery will begin working on his next project for Main Street, according to Strawn.Mural depicts long-gone buildings and historic views of Blountstown BETH EUBANKS PHOTO I want to be your next Clerk of Court. I believe that my variety of experiences in both life and work are such that Calhoun County I have experience in the court system; I have practiced the citizens of Calhoun County for the past 12 years. Rene Attaway CRAWFORD for CALHOUN COUNTYClerkC O URT ofPOLITICAL AD PAID FOR BY RENE ATTAWAY YOU CAN COUNT ON RENE ATTAWAY CRAWFORD. I am a leader with a heart of service and a love for Calhoun County.The June Guardian ad Litem training class for Jackson, Holmes, Calhoun and Washington counties was recently sworn in during a ceremony with Circuit Judge William L. Wright. The next class is scheduled for September. For more information and an application, please call 482-9127. class sworn in Did you know?Assistance Dogs of America evaluates each dog for two to four weeks before placing it in a foster home to begin formal training. Evaluation includes a variety of tests to gauge the dogs potential as an assistance dog. These evalua tions test dogs for food aggression, social interest and sound sensitivity among other things. Once a dog passes those basic evaluations, it is then evaluated more extensively as trainers attempt to learn more about the dogs temperament and personality. Basic obedience exercises are performed to see how dogs respond in different environments, and dogs that pass each stage of the evaluation process are then examined by a veterinarian to determine if they are physically able to handle the considerable tasks required of assistance dogs. If the dog is given a clean bill of health, it is then placed in a foster home to begin in its training. Unlike the relatively short evaluation period, the training period for a potential assistance dog takes a minimum of six months and can last as long as 22 months.The Little League World Series began in 1947 as a national tournament for all known Little League programs across the United States. Initially known as the National Little League Tournament, the inaugural tournament featured just 11 teams, all of which were from Pennsylvania or New Jersey. However, more than 2,500 spectators were on hand in Williamsport, Pennsylvania to witness Maynard Little League defeat the Lock Haven All Stars in the title game by a score of 16-7. That result was printed in newspapers around the country, and the resulting publicity helped spread Little League nationwide. Within a few years of the inaugural tournament, every state had its own Little League program.

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JULY 11, 2012 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 25 Summer StormDark clouds are shown as they gather and swirl over Calhoun County during one of the storms erupting across the panhandle in recent weeks in these photos taken by weatherwatcher Jean JEAN E. WEEKS PHOTOSPENSACOLA A new scam is sweeping the nation by claiming that President Obama will pay your utility bills through a new federal stimulus program. Customers nationwide, including some in northwest Florida have reported the scam, and several energy companies across the country have issued warnings to their customers about it.HOW THE SCAM WORKS:C onsumers have been contacted in person and dia, phone calls and text messages with claims that President Obama is providing credits or applying payments to utility bills. S cammers claim they need the consumers' social security and bank routing numbers in order for them to receive the money. In return, customers are given a phony bank routing number that will supposedly pay their utility bills. In reality, there is no money, customers believe they have paid their bills when in fact they have not, and they have now put them selves at risk of identity fraud.TIPS TO A VOID FALLING FOR THIS SCAM: social security number, credit card number or banking information to anyone requesting it over the phone or at your home unless you initiated the contact and you are speaking. claiming to be your utility company and feel pressured for immediate payment or personal information, hang up the phone and call the customer service number on your utility bill. into your home to check electrical wiring, natural gas pipes or appliances unless you have scheduled an appointment or have reported a utility problem. If you have reported a problem, ask utility employees pressure tactics over the phone for information or in-person to get into your home. For more information about scams in your area, check out BBB's complete scam directory.Utility bill payment scam warningT he 2012 G ulf of Mexico red snapper recreational harvest season will close T uesday, July 17 in state and federal waters; the last day of harvest is Monday, July 16. T his years 46-day state season, which is the same as the 2012 federal recreational red snapper season in the Gulf of M exico, was set in May at a meeting of the Florida Fish and W ildlife Conservation Commission (FWC). The season was extended at the end of June, because bad weather led to decreased season started June 1. Florida state waters in the Gulf extend from shore to nine nautical miles; federal waters extend beyond that line to 200 nautical miles. More information ing is available online (click on Saltwater, Recreational RegulaRed Snapper).

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Page 26 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JULY 11, 2012 make a great gift! Call or text 6438383. 7-4, 7-11Gem stones: Rubies, garnets, sapphires, Sassett jewelry machine plus accessories. Call 6743006. 7-4, 7-11Bedding material: Sheets, comforters, mattress pads, cotton blankets, mattress covers and more. Everyone is invited to shop at the Calhoun-Liberty Ministry Center store. Located on Hwy. 20 E. in Blountstown, 6741818. UFNMens, ladies and childrens clothes. Many items for the home. New items arriving daily. Everyone is invited to shop at the Calhoun-Liberty Ministry Center store. Located on Hwy. 20 E. in Blountstown, 6741818. UFN APPLIANCES2007 Fisher & Paykel dishwasher, the drawer type. Works good. Free. Call 674-8830. 7-4, 7-11 FURNITUREChilds safety bed rail (age 2 or older) 48 long, deters falling from standard width mattress, sturdy, like new, $28. Call 643-7567 or 674-5257. 7-11, 7-18Twin bed frame, headboard and mattress set, $65. Sofa and matching chair, tan, $150. Call 643-6488. 7-11, 7-1896 sofa, navy blue in excellent condition, $250. Call 591-9873.7-11, 7-18Waterbed, $40; table, $35. Call 674-3264. 7-11, 7-18Four antique ladder back chairs with brand new bottoms, $150 for THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNALCLASSIFIEDSTo place your ad, call 643-3333 by noon Eastern Time on Monday UFN. Non-business ads run FREE for 2 weeks. ITEMS FOR SALEBox of shirts, $1 each. Box of quilt pieces, $5 a box. Call 6743264. 7-11, 7-18Elliptical exercise machine, $50. Call 379-3505. 7-11, 7-18Hand pull golf bag carrier great condition, $25. Golf clubs, irons, woods, putters, etc. Sets or separate, pick and choose, $3 each. Call 643-7567 or 674-5257.7-11, 7-181968 Jim Bean political donkey decanter, very collectible, Regal China, 13 tall, $15. Call 643-7567 or 674-5257. 7-11, 7-18Wall mount pot rack hand forged attached hooks, $24. Wall mirror, stain washed pine frame, brackets for hanging two ways, 22 1/2x18 1/2 like new $13. Retro beveled wall mirror, heavy, very sturdy, wired for hanging, stain washed wood frame, 27 1/4x17 1/4, $18. Call 643-7567 or 674-5257. 7-11, 7-18Childrens books, all types/ages, Big and Little Golden books, Rand McNally, etc. prices vary. Wooden teaching puzzle for 3 years and older, non-toxic, was special ordered, never used, $3. Crib set, sweet teddy bear design with comforter and matching bumper crib pads, seldom used, $14. Various childrens toys, too many to list. Call 643-7567 or 674-5257. 7-11, 7-18Girls bicycle, $10. Call 6436488. 7-11, 7-18American Idol tickets in Orlando, August 2. Selling at $192 each, Will sell for $82 each. Call 896-0333 or 674-8071. 7-11, 7-18Swimming pool 15x42 above ground with pump and ladder. Works great, $65. Call 643-6260.7-11, 7-18Shoesens/girls size 7, $30. Call 6436260. 7-11, 7-18Exercising pedal walker machine, $50. 1960 antique baby stroller, $40. Call 570-3806.7-11, 7-18Solid sterling silver necklace with real gemstones, paid $300, asking $150. Call 899-0792, no calls after 9 p.m. (CT). 7-11, 7-18Fiery Opal earrings surrounded by 5 diamonds, beautiful. Would For Rent in ALTHA762-9555 or 762-8597Very NICE *2 & 3 BD trailers.With lawn service 5 x 10 .....$27 10 x 10 ....$43 10 x 20 ....$70 10 x 25 ....$90M & W SELFSTORAGE RENTAL SCall 573-5255, 762-9555, 762-8807 or 762-8597 7 days a week service UFN Find a bargain in the Journal CLASSIFIEDS! BD, 1 1/2 BA TownhousesBRISTOL Phone 643-7740 FOR RENT BLOUNTSTOWN $350 month + deposit(850) 674-3694after 5 p.m. or leave messageFOR RENT B Call David at (850) 674-1000 or (850) 674-1706 Apartment FOR Rent IN BlountstownGood downtown location. Walk to everything.all. Antique dressing vanity with wooden rollers in excellent condition, $100. Call 899-0792. No calls after 9 p.m. (CT). 7-11, 7-18Beige recliner, $20 OBO. Love seat, burgundy and navy, $30 OBO. Wing chair, royal blue, like new, $40 OBO. Call 209-0163.7-11, 7-18TV entertainment center, $25. Call 643-5011. 7-4, 7-11Large display cabinet, $2,000 OBO. Call 674-3264. 7-4, 7-11Good used furniture and appliances needed at Calhoun Liberty Ministry Center. Call 674-1818. UFN ELECTRONICSSony Playstation1 with two controllers and Frogger game, $20. Call or text 643-8383. 7-4, 7-11 MOTORCYLES & ATVsUTV, red, low miles, two seater, wipers, winch, brush guard, lights, a dump bed, trailer hitch and knobby tires, $2,900. Call 643-5650.7-11, 7-18Motorcycle wheel chocks, mounts to trailer and holds front tire for hauling. Set of 2, never used, $30. Call or text 643-8383. 7-4, 7-11 TRUCKS2003 Dodge custom van, very low mileage, one owner, bucket seats, bed/couch, TV & VCR. Call Mike at 643-8099 or Marie at 6745321. 7-11, 7-181978 Ford longwheel base truck, 4 speed, granny-low, big V8 enNew Home for sale in Altha3 BD, 2 BA, 1,200 sq ft with carport, 1/2 acre lot, Hardi siding, metal roof, vaulted great room, oak cabinets with granite tops.$122,000Call 762-8185 or 447-20256-20, 7-11 Two story, 2 BD old block house. Completely Furnished. Rail fenced yard.$40,000(850) 447-1533House FOR Sale IN Blountstown OWNER FINANCING, NO QUALIFYING WANTED: REAL ESTATE Will buy 10 to 1,000 acres, reasonably priced. Immediate closing. Call (850) 544-5441 or (850) 570-0222 For Rent inHOSFORDCall (850) 627-8287 2 BD House (Lowry) NO SMOKING NO PETS6-20, 7-11 *Local Graft Cutting *Basic Yard Maintenance *No Contract Necessary Call (850) 899-0269Grass Cutting Services For RentIN BLOUNTSTOWNCall 643-64882BD, 1 BA Home NO PETS, City Utilities, Hud Vouchers Accepted$500 month$300 deposit House for Rent in Bristol $400 month + $300 depositNO Pets(239) 336-9165

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JULY 11, 2012 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 27 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNALCLASSIFIEDSTo place your ad, call 643-3333 by noon Eastern Time on Monday UFN. Non-business ads run FREE for 2 weeks. NICE CAR of Forgotten Coast, LLC, for inventory of our great trucks selection log on to www. nicecarofforgottencoastllc.com. BC/UFN/$12 CARS2005 Chevy Malibu 130,000 miles in good condition, $4,000. Call 575-8194. 7-11, 7-18 VEHICLE ACCESSORIESAuto radio with cassette player, removed from a Chrysler to upgrade the system. Still works great, free. Call 643-7567 or 6745257. 7-11, 7-18 HUNTING/FISHING, T-hull with a 50 hp Mercury motor, trolling motor, trailer in good condition, $2,000 OBO. Call 643-8263 after 6 p.m. weekdays. 7-11, 7-18Deep Sea reel & rods, 7 Sea Eagle rod holds 20-50# line w/Shakespeare Tidewater 50LA reel $125. Shore Master 7 rod holds 3080# line w/Penn Senator 910 reel, heavy duty for BIG FISH $300. 8 Heavy duty rod w/Penn 9500ss saltwater reel open cast $175. 15x17 stainless steel propeller, no dents or dings, $100. Call or text 643-8383. 7-4, 7-11 WATER WELL SUPPLIESDo you need parts for That Darn Pump? We have capacitors, relays, control boxes, pressure switches, check valves, foot valves, air volume control valves, wire, pumps, tanks and much more. Available 7 days a week until 9 p.m. Repair questions are welcomed, call us at That Darn Pump 643-4357. BPA/UFN PETS/SUPPLIESKittens, kittens and a side of more kittens! We are looking for a good loving home. We are female, healthy, bursting with energy and bundles of joy. We are 12 weeks old and have had our kitten check up and a second vaccination. Can you provide us with love and a good home? If so, well give you hours of enjoyment and great companionship. For more information about us or to meet us and see how loveable we are, please call our Foster Mom, Ruth at (850) 237-2740. 7-11, 7-18New Zealand rabbit, male, approximately 12 weeks old, $10. Call 447-0189. 7-11, 7-18Shih tzu Poodle two years old, $50. Call 674-3264. 7-11, 7-18Free to a good home, eightSTARSCOPEFAMOUS BIRTHDA YSARIES Mar 21/Apr 20 Aries, the week may begin a by Wednesday or Thursday, A couple of opportunities for socialization arise. TAURUS Apr 21/May 21 Take inventory of your life this week, Taurus, and make the necessary tweaks to align you with your primary goals. Take a cue from someone organized. GEMINI May 22/Jun 21 Gemini, youre inspired to do something creative. Narrow down the possibilities. Maybe you want to paint indoors or take on a new craft hobby. EiCANCER Jun 22/Jul 22 Even the most organized people can get tripped up once in a while, Cancer. This week you may be unable to keep track of things. Keep your cool, and you will get it under control. LEO Jul 23/Aug 23 Take control of a situation that arises, Leo, because right now it seems no one else is capable of handling the situation. You may prove to be an excellent leader. VIRGO Aug 24/Sept 22 in your social circles, Virgo. Failure to introduce yourself and network could lead to setbacks in your employment goals. LIBRA Sept 23/Oct 23 Once the excitement of an event wears off, Libra, you may while. Dont wallow in boredom. Get started on a new project. SCORPIO Oct 24/Nov 22 Sometimes much more can be said by remaining quiet that actually speaking, Scorpio. Keep this in mind when you are socializing with new people. SAGITTARIUS Nov 23/Dec 21 It can sometimes feel lonely at the top, Sagittarius. Now that youve acquired many of the things you wanted, the resulting feelings may not be what you thought. CAPRICORN Dec 22/Jan 20 Now may be the time to get serious about your efforts to Start doing the legwork and get your name out to new people as much as you can. AQUARIUS Jan 21/Feb 18 Although youre a do-it-yourself person by nature, Aquarius, sometimes letting someone get the job done frees you up for more important projects. You also get a needed break. PISCES Feb 19/Mar 20 Pisces, you cant seem to keep your mind on the thing at hand. Your wandering thoughts may put you in tune with a better idea.Week of July 8 ~ July 14JULY 8 Anjelica Huston, Actress (61) JULY 9 Courtney Love, Singer (48) JULY 10 JULY 11 Richie Sambora, Musician (52) JULY 12 Richard Simmons, Fitness guru (64) JULY 13 Cheech Marin, Actor (66) JULY 14 Tommy Mottola, CEO Sony (62) Refrigerator Call 674-3264. 7-11, 7-18 HOMES & LAND2008 custom built home, 1 BD, 1 BA, 576 sq. ft. Must be moved, $20,000 cash. Call 591-9873, only serious inquiries please.7-11, 7-18Land for sale, 4 acres in Telogia with county water and highway frontage. Call 445-5002. 6-27 T 7-251994 Mobile home, 16x80, 2 BD, 2 BA, in great condition, handicapped accessible, $14,500. Call (317) 682-8625 or (601) 9264095. 6-27 T 7-18 YARD SALESAL THA Moving sale, everything must go. Beginning July 11 until everything sells. Located on Dell Wood Road off of 274 by Mulehead Pond. Call 762-2223 for more information. BRISTOL Moving sale, Friday, July 13 all day and Saturday, July 14 from 8 a.m. to noon. Located at 13490 NW Joe Chason Circle. Everyand camping equipment, guns, collectibles, antiques, deep freezer, washer and more. Rain or shine. Call 447-3200.month-old puppy. Mother is White English mix. Call 447-2339. 7-4, 7-11Collie & Bulldog mix puppies, seven, free to a good home. Call 643-4134. 7-4, 7-11Possibly Terrier mix, small short haired, brown male, six months old, sweet, has been microchipped, all shots up-to-date, free to a good loving home. Call 3636363 or 510-0736. 7-4, 7-11Applehead Chihuahua puppies, seven weeks old, $50 each. Call 237-1447. 7-4, 7-11Hens, $6 each. Call 643-1959.7-4, 7-11Rabbits, one year old female, a 9-month-old male and some 8 weeks old little ones (sex unsure), $10 each or all for $80. Call 3799400 or 570-2894. 7-4, 7-11 LOST & FOUNDFOUND: Dachshund black male on Glory Hill Road in Altha. Showed up on front porch about two weeks ago. Call 762-4168.7-11, 7-18 WANTEDAC unit one large or two small units in good condition reasonably priced. Call 674-6940. 7-11, 7-18Standard transmission with overdrive for late 70s or mid 90s Volvo. Call 693-0898. 7-11, 7-18Pigmy goat, female, reasonable priced. Call 209-0910. 7-11, 7-18 Small Town TOMA cartoon by Mike Barnhouse

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Page 28 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JULY 11, 2012 To the editor: Your president, not mine, in less than four years has doubled the food stamp recipients to approximately 45 million. In the mid-1960s, shortly after JFK was assassinated, in an attempt to control the black vote, LBJ let them know if there was no head of household, the government would take care of them. Today everyone agrees that the biggest problem is that there is no father dropout rates in schools, increase in juvenile delinquency, increase in crime and drug use and high incarceration rate among young black males. The normal rabble rousers (Jesse Jackson/Al Sharpto the fact that blacks who comprise approximately 14 percent of the population are approximately 75 percent of the prison population. Well, that tells me something else that 14 percent of the population are committing 75 percent of the crimes. Keep in mind that without racial tension, they dont have a job. There are now 45 million Americans on food stamps and the FDA is running ads encouraging more to apply for them. This is more of the same Democrat ploy of keeping people dependent on government handouts so they are more apt to vote for you.. This pretender has been years and everything is still President Bushs fault. I hope and pray that Michelle doesnt get pregnant because somehow they will try to blame President Bush for that too. As soon as the anointed that there would be no cost of living increase for military retirees or Social Security recipients for two years, which is my entire income. I am not arguing about that, because Im well aware that hes the smartest man to ever walk the earth All I know for sure is when I more, when I buy groceries it costs me more, when I pay my utilities it costs me more. What I do know is this Great Pretender has personally cost me more than $300 per month that I will never be able to recoup. Operation Fast and Furious complete idiocy, much worse than Watergate no one died in Watergate. What really infuriates me is that the Dems (Holder and Pelosi) dont even know the name of the Border Patrol agent killed because of this amateurish operation. A couple more facts to ponder about the great pretender: He was raised as a Muslim/Socialist/Communist, his father was a complete dirt bag and his mother is an admitted hippie who attended a church in Hawaii, which the locals called the Little Red Church, because of the membership who were communist sympathizers. Michael Goodwin, a liberal syndicated columnist, says he voted for Obama in 2008 but cant in good conscience vote for him now. He claims that he researched every aspect of Obamas book, Sins was a fabrication. It appears that your idol is nothing but a pathological LIAR. You decide. P.S. Why is it when other politicians change anointed one changes his mind (Same-Sex marriage) he EVOLVES? Len Wheetley, SMSgt., USAF (Retired)Notes to Jerry Cox & the other Kool Aid drinkers from a reader in Quincy $575 Pontiac Grand Am0% interestDaylight Auto Financing2816 Hwy 98 West Panama City, FL 32401(850) 215-1769Hours 9 a.m.-9 p.m.You are automatically approved if you can make your payments on time $775 Chevy Blazer 4-Door0% interestDaylight Auto Financing2816 Hwy 98 West Panama City, FL 32401(850) 215-1769Hours 9 a.m.-9 p.m.You are automatically approved if you can make your payments on time SPEAK UP! TO THE EDITOREMAIL: thejournal@fairpoint.net WITH A LETTER I hope and pray that Michelle doesnt get pregnant because somehow they will try to blame President Bush for that too.

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JULY 11, 2012 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 29 Charles McClellan Funeral HomeButler-Morgan/Morgan-McClellan Funeral Home Building at 15 S. Jackson St., Quincy, 32351Phone: (850) 627-7677 or 643-2277Charles K. McClellanLicensed Funeral Director 42 years experience Call us Let us explain how we can conveniently handle arrangements in Liberty County. OBITUARIES Telephone (850) 674-2266 Y our hometown funeral home since 1994A Hometown Funeral Director You Can Trust and Depend On!Funeral Services with Dignity, Caring and Professionalism. Marlon PeavyPeavy Funeral Home& CrematoryJOHNNY CHARLES WHITEHEAD ALTHAJohnny Charles Whitehead, 81, of Altha, passed away Wednesday, July 4, 2012 at his home. He was born in Jackson County and had lived and worked in Altha all of his life. He served our country proudly United States Army. He was self-employed as a repair man. He was a member of the Altha Church of God and was a member of the Gideon Society. He was preceded in death by his parents, Chester and Lucille Varnum Whitehead, and his sister, Gladys Dennis. Survivors include his wife of 52 years, Alene Ray Whitehead of Altha; two daughters, Debra Guyler and her husband, Steve of Dunnellon and Charlene Yon and her husband, Anthony of Altha; one sister, Mildred Edenseven grandchildren, Sara and Vinny Milotta, Jennifer Goodson, Ashton and Richard Chancey, Brianna and Jay Yon; two great-grandchildren, Dominic Milotta and Cambreigh Chancey and several nieces and nephews. Services were held Saturday, July 7 at 10 a.m. (CT) at Peavy Funeral Home in Blountstown was in charge of the arrangements. TAMI L YNN MONK T ALL AHASSEE T ami L ynn Monk, 47, of T al lahassee, passed away Thursday, July 5, 2012 in T allahassee. Survivors include two sons, Michael Wayne Johnson of T allahassee and Phillip Monk-Mueller of Lakeland; her mother, Mary Whittle Monk of T allahassee; one sister, Paula Furr of Quincy; one brother, John Harold Monk of Quincy; one grandchild, Henry Johnson of T allahassee; Services will be held Wednesday, July 11 at 10 a.m. in J. C. Whittle Cemetery at Hawkins Lane in Liberty County. Charles McClellan Funeral Home in Quincy is in charge of the arrangements. As each of us is born into this world we are all given a hand of cards to play. Sometimes our hand is good, sometimes challenging and sometimes we are left wondering how we are going to play them. As you grow up and become an adult, we are sometimes left wondering and questioning things became an adult and pondered some of the questions carry faith in our prayers, they will be answered in the way God intended them to be. times in my life. During those times there were may introduced to an angel, his friend T imothy Rose. T imothy would later change my life and allow for so many unanswered questions to be answered. life was not my biological father. This man was playing one of the most important and greatest roles in my life. While he was a wonderful father, my biological father was still out there somewhere. took it upon himself to begin researching and not all the names of my siblings. Another prayer was answered for me by God; that he would deliver me peace and guidance. That sister Diane. want me to be part of their lives. The conversation went so well, as if there was no time missed in between. We made an agreement to meet during my honeymoon. other sisters, Shirley and Linda, along with their families. They knew about me by my biological father a mistake, but his daughter as well. talking with them and contributed to how well we connected. During the time with my newlydiscovered family members in husband, Louie, who was our tour guide for South Florida. After we left there, we received a call from Shirley that her husband was in a tragic accident and now in a coma. He is now making progress but is still in need of prayer and rehabilitation. I now speak with my sisters every day and we continue to pray for my brother in-law as a complete family. The comfort and connection makes life so much easier to breathe and view. This tragedy with my brother in-law, however unfortunate, has brought us much closer, as we have something with which to build a closer relationship. So the moral of my story is, there is always hope... God is always good... and everything happens for a we can always play them. Sometimes our cards may be good, sometimes bad, but if we all have faith in God he will lead us in the direction we are meant to in our life unanswered or left unspoken. Have faith in God for him to direct you to the paths that lead to answered prayers. As we live each day we create chapters in our life that lead to opportunities for us to grow, learn and achieve goals. These opportunities allow doors to open up in our life that lead us down different paths. As one door closes a chapter in our life, another door is sure to open. As we live our life each day we need to remember to treat every day like it is our last. We are not promised tomorrow and we need to make every day count wonderful chapters in my life. blessed we are. children, grandchildren and generations to come will cherish, learn and grow from. Linda walking hand in hand.As we live each day we create chapters in our life that lead to opportunities for us to grow, learn and achieve goals.

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Page 30 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JULY 11, 2012 Class A CDL Flatbed Drivers Twin Oaks Juvenile Development, Inc. For more phone 643-1090.Teacher Needed $ AVON$ CALL TODAY : EARN40% STARTERKITONLY $I0 JOB MARKET PUBLIC AND LEGAL NOTICESNOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED PATRICK BR YCE WARD Description of Property: Lot 3, Block G, Orange Park Subdivision, as per Plat recorded of Liberty County, Florida. Olin Dalton 11:00 A.M. E.S.T. 2012. ROBERT HILL CLERK OF COURT ______________________________________IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FLORIDA IN RE: ESTATE OF NOTICE TO CREDITORS 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. AFTER THE D ATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. IN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE BARRED. YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE IS BARRED. PARRISH ______________________________________IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR LIBERTY COUNTY FLORIDA Case No.: 12-14-DR PAUL ANTHONY GREGOR Y Petitioner and STEPHANIE NICOLE JOHNSON, Respondent. NOTICE OF ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE [NO CHILD OR FINANCIAL SUPPORT] YOU ARE NOTIFIED If you fail to do so, a default may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the petition. Copies of all court documents in this case, including orders, are available at the Clerk of may review these documents upon request. Y ou must keep the Clerk of the of your current address. (Y ou dress, Florida Supreme Court Approved Family Law Form 12.915.) Future papers in this lawsuit will be mailed to the address on record at the WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida Family Law Rules of Procedure, requires certain automatic disclosure of documents and information. Failure to comply can result in sanctions, including dismissal or striking of pleadings. CLERK OF Florida Supreme Court Approved Family Law Form 12.913(a)(2), Notice of Action For Family Cases With Minor Child(ren) (01/12).______________________________________IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR LIBERTY COUNTY FLORIDA CENTENNIAL BANK MICHAEL ETTINGER NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS GIVENPARCEL B PARCEL D ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF:

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JULY 11, 2012 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 31 To place your ad call us at 643-3333 SERVICE Directory Whaley Heating & Air Conditioning (850) 674-4777FL LIC. # CMC1249570 Accepting: Phone: (850) 643-6925 Fax: (850) 643-2064 email: grich0656@aol.com10536-B NW SR 20 Bristol, FL 32321 Located in the Apalachee RestaurantGary Richards, EA MBAEnrolled Agent Enrolled to Practice Before the IRS Business & Accounting Solutions Inc. 4433 NW C.R. 274 Altha, Fl 32421 (850) 762-9402 Cell (850) 832-5055Dozer and Excavation work Over 20 years experienceClay ONealsLand Clearing, Inc. William's HomeImprovements "No Job Too Big or Small"Concrete work, landscape, pressure cleaning, renovations, seamless gutter, painting, vinyl, & screen enclosure Call 674-8092Licensed & Insured, contractor & rooferFOR FREE ESTIMATES Call Chris Nissley at 674-8081 or 643-8561 (Cell) STUMP GRINDINGReasonable Rates & FREE Estimates! That Darn PumpThere is never a convenient time to be without water.WELLS (850)643-HELP Thats 643-4357 or Home 643-3857For friendly service and never any overtime charges call, Hwy 71 South on J.P. Peacock Rd, Altha. Day or night,Check out our prices before buying from somewhere else. For Weddings, Birthdays and all Holidays, come in or call us. Margies Florist Clint Hatcher, OwnerElectrical Lic. # ER13014037 Building Lic. # RB29003511New Homes Garages Additions Electrical Remodeling Foundations Screenrooms Sunrooms VINYL SIDING RESIDENTAL & COMMERCIAL FREE EstimatesServing Calhoun, Liberty & Jackson Counties LIBERTY TIRE COMPANY 10781 NW SR 20 Bristol, Fl 32321Call 643-2939 MV84845Hours: Monday thru Friday 7 5 & Saturday 7 12Come see us for all your tire needs or give us a call for roadside service, oil changes & tire rotation. We specialize in sales and repair of tires for:Commercial Trucks and Trailers, OTR Equipment, Farm Equipment, Passenger Car & Light Truck Tires JEMISON Heating & Cooling, Lic# RM1416924Carrier Equipment Masters Farm Supply LS Tractor Equipment Committed To Quality Since 1973 (850) 762-3222 faxmasters7@fairpoint.net CLJNEWS.COM TSummertime is here! As you prepare for summertime fun, whether traveling or just enjoying the weather outdoors, the Florida/USVI Poison Information Center Jacksonville urges you to remain aware that summer poisoning hazards can threaten your familys health. As children are out of school for the summer, they may be spending more time unsupervised in or out of doors with ready access to potentially dangerous plants and home products, cautions Dr. Jay Schauben, director of the Florida/USVI Poison Information Center-Jacksonville. Poison proof your home and outdoor areas by following a few simple tips to reduce the chance of accidental poisoning emergencies. However, if a poisoning emergency does occur, call the Poison Help line at 1 (800) 222-1222. Barbecues are a summertime staple. Every summer the Poison Center has to deal with accidents involving often aspirated in to the lungs. This can damage. Keep these products in their original containers and prevent access to them by children. If ingested, call the Poison Help line immediately at 1 (800) 222-1222. DO NOT induce vomiting as this can make it worse. Food poisoning, a common occurrence during this typically warm weather, is caused by bacterial growth in certain foods, such as mayonnaise-containing products or uncooked foods, when they are not handled, cooked or stored properly. Symptoms of the most common types of food poisoning may include nausea, vomiting, stomach cramps, diarrhea and fever. One or more of these symptoms usually develop within a few hours to a few days after eating the spoiled food. To stay safe, the Florida/USVI Poison Information Center Jacksonville recommends washing all counter tops, utensils and hands with warm, soapy water prior to and after food preparation; thawing meat and poultry in the refrigerator; and, avoiding leaving perishable food out of the refrigerator for more than two hours. When traveling, store medications, personal products, insect repellent or sunscreen, in locked suitcases away from children. Avoid bringing along a few pills in unmarked containers as these may not be child-resistant and they are unlabeled as to content or quantity. For visitors who are not used to the activity of children, remind them to properly store all personal products, especially prescription items, out of the reach and sight of children. Always follow directions carefully when using insect repellents as some products are not meant to be applied to the skin. Only apply insect repellents face, spray on the hands and rub onto face, being careful to avoid the eyes and mouth. DO NOT spray on childrens hands as they tend to rub their eyes and/ outdoors because the repellent is no longer necessary. Repeated applications may be dangerous; wash skin with soap and water before reapplying repellent. If camping, be careful of the underbrush, as it could contain poison ivy or stinging/biting animals. Remember, Leaves of three, let it be. If someone touches poison ivy, immediately rinse with plenty of running water for at least 15 minutes. For poisonous plant and animal contact, call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222 for treatment information. For any poisoning emergencies or for poison-related questions, call the Poison Help line toll free, 24 hours a day, at 1-800-222-1222, and a uniquely Information will immediately respond. Program the number into your phone for quick access or download the free iPhone App at www.aapcc.org. The Florida/USVI Poison Information Center Jacksonville is available 365 days a year, 24 hours a day. Call the Center at 1 (800) 222-1222 (Voice/ TTY) for poisoning emergencies or to ask for information. The Center is staffed with skilled healthcare professionals who provide rapid life-saving information, promote cost-effective treatment and prevention, and personal service, often going the next step to ensure peace of mind during a poisoning emergency.Celebrate the summer safely and poison free Check us out in Print or online atCLJNews .com

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Page 32 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JULY 11, 2012 ARREST REPORT continued from page 2A driver described as going 23 miles over the speed limit on East Central Avenue and swerving in his lane was arrested on drug charges Blountstown. Gazzier, Jr., 36, had slurred speech and noted there was a slight odor of an alcoholic beverage emitting from the Gazzier had a small dog sitting in his lap and another little dog on the passengers seat, sitting next to a small cooler spotted a large red bottle of Liquid Heat, some clear plastic tubing, a methamphetamine. When Gazzier stepped out of the car drivers seat. weapons, the officer found a lighter and another one of the pills in his front Xanax and said he had a prescription for the medication, but not with him. leg stand, Gazzier was arrested for suspicion of DUI and possession of a Schedule III narcotic. Before putting him in a patrol car, the officer did another more thorough search and found two gram bags of in his wallet which was later Other items collected from the vehicle included ammonia nitrate, two pairs of pliers, a small funnel, two lithium batteries and a pill arrest report as materials used the one-pot method. A friend came to the scene of the to the police department. During an interview with BPD Investigator Tim Partridge, Gazzier in Bristol who was going use them to he was on Xanax and said he had been to determine his level of intoxication resulted in a reading of .000 and it was determined that his impairment was due to the pills instead of alcohol. He was charged with possession of a Schedule III narcotic (Xanax), possession of cocaine and attempt to manufacture methamphetamine.Man stopped for going over speed limit arrested on cocaine & meth chargesGARY GAZZIER Ruth Martin of Blountstown. She was transported from the scene to Calhoun She was released after being treated for minor injuries. The driver of the car, Melvin for failure to use due care near a pedestrian. He was traveling across the front of to the store.Woman hit by car at Harveys PlazaRear view mirror shattered by hit and run driver on CR 69A Sunday to his face when an oncoming vehicle came too close and shattered his drivers side mirror, according to traveling north on CR 69A sometime center line, causing both drivers side mirrors to hit. Lees mirror was shattered and sent glass into his vehicle. An ambulance responded to the He declined treatment. and continued south. An alert was issued for a mid-1990s red and silver 674-5049. ACCIDENTS It was a BOOMING Fourth! DANIEL WILLIAMS PHOTOS

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The Calhoun-Liberty Journal is published each Wednesday by the Liberty Journal Inc., Summers Road, P.O. Box 536, Bristol, FL 32321. Annual subscriptions are $18. Periodicals postage paid at Bristol, FLPOSTMASTER: Send address corrections to: P.O. Box 536, Bristol, FL 32321. (USPS 012367) Summers RoadLocated at 11493 NW Summers Road in Bristol MAILING ADDRESS: P.O. Box 536, Bristol, FL 32321 TELEPHONE (850) 643-3333 Fax (850) 643-3334 EMAIL: thejournal@fairpoint.net ADS: cljads@fairpoint.net JOURNAL STAFFJohnny Eubanks...................Publisher Teresa Eubanks........................ Editor Sandra Brown...................Bookkeeper Deven Lewis......Production Asssistant Debbie Duggar...................AdvertisingOFFICE HOURS: 9 a.m. 6 p.m. M-FTHE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Visit us on Facebook at CLJNews Page 4 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JUL Y 11, 2012Thats how many copies of The Calhoun-Liberty Journal were distributed last week, ensuring plenty of coverage for your community announcements and great response for our business advertisers! 5,305 Wednesday, July 11 Monday, July 16 Tuesday, July 17 Sunday, July 15 Saturday, July 14 Thursday July 12 Friday, July 13 TODAYS MEETINGS 7 p.m., Altha VFD AA, 6 p.m., Altha Community Center noon, Senior Citizens Center 5 p.m., Ag. Bldg., Conference Room across from Courthouse 6 p.m., Fire House 7 p.m., Dixie Lodge in Blountstown Calhoun Childrens Coalition/ Calhoun Juvenile Justice Council, 1:30 p.m., W.T. Neal Civic Center, Blountstown.TODAYS MEETINGS7 p.m., Veterans Civic Center 6 p.m., Altha Community CenterTODAYS MEETINGS, noon, Calhoun-Liberty Hospital 7 p.m., Calhoun County Old Ag Bldg. east door, in front of jailTODAYS MEETINGSAA, 7 p.m., basement of Calhoun Courthouse 5 p.m. Calhoun Ex Attend the Church of your choice this SundayTrain DayVeterans Memorial Park 11 a.m.3 p.m. BIRTHDAY Kizzy Peterson BIRTHDAY Katheyn G. Baker ANNIVERSARY Godfrey Pete & Sarah Jean Peterson The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) is offering a free hunter safety Internet-completion course in Liberty County. Instruction is Saturday, July 21 from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Locations are as follows: Liberty County: The course is at the Woodmen of the World Camp, 22459 N.E. Woodmen of the World Road in Hosford. Gulf County: The course is at the Gulf Correctional Institution, 500 Ike Steele Road in Wewahitchka. Students must complete the internet course before coming to class and bring does not have to be notarized. An adult must accompany children under the age of 16 at all times. Students are encouraged to bring a pencil and paper with them to take notes. In order to purchase a Florida hunting license, the hunter safety course is required for people born on or after June 1, 1975. training requirements for all other states and Canadian provinces. People interested in attending this course can register online and obtain information about future hunter safety classes at www.myfwc.com/huntersafetyMyFWC. com/HunterSafety or by calling hunter safety coordinator George Warthen at the (850) 265-3676.Free hunter course set for In an effort to help raise money for The Childrens Burn Camp of North Florida Camp Amigo and the Jackson County there will be a golf tournament Saturday, Aug. 25 starting at 8 a.m. (CT) and with tee off by 9 a.m. (CT) at Indian Springs Golf course in Marianna. The cost is $65 per golfer and $250 per four man team with a shotgun start (includ ing 18 holes, cart, driving range, lunch and two entries into the drawing). Hole in one sponsors will be providing a new Chevrolet by Rahal Miller and $10,000 by Perry and Young Attorneys at law. There will also be a 2000 golf ball drop with a chance to win $40,000 ($5 a ball). Tickets will be available to buy up to the event. To help us properly plan, please preregister by contacting Ricky Winget at (850) 557-2652 or email rwinget03@ gmail.com by August 10.Golf tournament in Marianna to raise funds for kids burn campCabin Patch Day Camp: The Panhandle Pioneer Settlement will be hosting a kids camp for grades third through sixth on the week of July 30-Aug. 3 from 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. daily. The cost is $65 per child, unless their family has a PPS membership which will reduce the cost to $60. Students will explore a wide variety of art, sewing, upcycling, outdoor and cooking activities under the supervision There will be a mix of pioneer days and modern ways that will promote students creative thinking and team work skills. Many activities introduced will be things students can take home and keep working on for the rest of the summer! serve basis. Please call 674-2777 to make your reservation today!Panhandle Pioneer Settlement to host Cabin Patch camp on July 30 Aug. 3 Chipola College will offer programs for children of all ages this summer. Childrens swimming lessons for ages four and up are scheduled: Session three is July 30-Aug. 9 with a registration deadline of July 23. Classes are available at 9 a.m., 10 a.m. or 7 p.m. Sessions include eight 45 minute classes which meet Monday through Thursday for two weeks. Cost of regular swimming lessons is $45. Pre-registration is required, with a $5 late registration fee. For information, call pool manager Rance Massengill at 718-2473.Summer programs offered at ChipolaThe Panhandle Pioneer Settlement will be the host of Journey Stories, an exhibition of the Smithsonian Institutions Museum on Main Street series. The exhibition, sponsored by the Florida Humanities Council, will be on display from July 14 to August 25 at the Settlements Club House. The Panhandle Pioneer Settlement is the only North Florida location to be selected to host Journey Stories. All other Florida locations are in south central and southern portions of the state. Therefore, we are excited to encourage students throughout the Florida Panhandle to attend the exhibit. July 14 August 25 Pioneer Settlement

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JULY 11, 2012 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 5 EVENTSMARIANNAChipola Chipola Center for the Arts ribbon cutting set July 17 Political EndorsementsThe Florida Sheriffs Association (FSA) is a FSA does not engage in political activity or endorse political candidates in accordance From the Florida Sheriffs Association website Paid for by Henry Hamlin, Democrat for Liberty County SheriffA candidate in the Liberty County Sheriffs race falsely states he has the endorsement of the Florida Sheriffs Association (FSA) in his campaign ad and campaign materials. The FSA clearly does not make endorsements, as evidenced by this information listed on their website: Is this credibility?YOU BE THE JUDGE. Landmark Park is a 135-acre historical and natural science park located on U.S. Highway 431 North in Dothan, Ala. For more information, contact the park at (334) 794-3452. July animal adventures each Friday at Dothans Landmark Park You have known me for the past 29 years. Now let me introduce you to my family. Angie Smith Wood is my wife of 26 years and is a physical therapist at BHRC. We have 2 sons, Bryson and Tristen Wood. Bryson will be a junior at BHS and Tristen a freshman. They love this community as I do and also have a servants heart.

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Page 6 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JULY 11, 2012 COMMENTARYCORNERJerry Cox is a retired military OXS Late Night LaughsA RECAP OF RECENT OBSER V ATIONS BY LATE NIGHT TV HOSTS.It happens. If you have children, one or more of them might be a problem child. Why? We dont know, or least I dont know the answer to that question. Ive told my children more than once that we dont pick our kids and they dont pick their parents. Like it or not, we have each other, so lets make the best of it. As parents know, making the best of it may or may not occur. While we attempt to give all our children the same opportuniciety, our efforts may or may not work. Sometimes children turn out to be the square peg in the round hole of society. There is an analogy here. Some 225 years ago a Republic with representative government was born. The Founding Fathers believed that this newborn nation could govern itself through representative government. The Founders came together, debated the issues and decided what was best for this newborn called America. If they could do it, then surely future descendants, Americas grandchildren and great grandchildren, could do the same. Yikes, did the Founders ever get that one wrong. If the Founders could see their dysfunctional offspring pretending to represent their fellow man, the Founders would spin in their graves. The irony is that the representation is not for Americas man on the street. No surprise here. With the Supreme Courts ruling on Citizens United, politicians represent dollar signs. As long as we collectively believe and agree that political donations represent free speech, then representative government means little to the basic American citizen and everything to corporate America. Americas problem children are its politicians. I think that the Founders had an altruistic view of representative government, particularly of the men and women who would represent their fellow man in resolving issues that affect all of us. Political parties and individual self-interest of Americans are main factors in the evolution of what I would term as our non-representative form of government. Yes, we elect people who represent the narrow interest of the individual and the more narrow inter est of the political parties. Add to the mix conservaand you have a representative political system that is at war with itself. The collective good for most Americans is lost in the political fray. Little, if anything, is accomplished in Washington or the street. However, having said that, the narrow views of political parties are achieved. The Republicans are on an anti-abortion campaign, and they have succeeded in restricting a womans reproductive rights and healthcare in many states. It doesnt matter that the abortion issue was settled with Roe v. Wade and Americans, at least most Americans, have moved on, Republicans in state legislatures are foisting their views on all state citizens, like it or not. Restrictive Republican laws are not in sync with opinions of the American people. Abortion is not a major issue with a man or woman looking for a job. The basic problem for America is that we are not able to govern ourselves. The Congress is not able to cope with issues that affect all Americans. In fact, the political parties use the issues as a basis of doing battle. ObamaCare, the Affordable Care Act, is a claspublican voted for the law, and Republicans have seized on the law as a mantra for ousting President Obama. concerned about healthcare for Americans to work with Democrats to craft healthcare legislation that would be good for the American people? Now that Affordable Health Care is law, why are Republicans determined to repeal the law? Why not rework the Affordable Health Care law in a non-par tisan manner for the best interest of the American people? Ill-informed citizens who seem to believe anything they hear is one reason that the Affordable Health Care law will not be rewritten in the best interest of the people. Why cant people read the document and draw their own conclusions? It wont happen because most Americans have the attention span of a gnat, and they wait for the television to tell them what to believe. So, with the dominance of big money, self-serving politicians and a public who cannot think for them selves, our representative government is skewed beyond anything that the Founders would recognize.PoliticiansAmericas problem childrenI am exhausted. I spent all weekend helping Tom Cruise move all his stuff. JAY LENOCongratulations to Courtney Kardashian, who has a brand-new baby girl. I was worried that there was going to be a shortage of Kardashians. DA VID LETTERMANKatie Holmes has divorced Tom Cruise. I didnt think Rock of Ages was THAT bad. JAY LENOAfter signing a new three-year contract with the Knicks, Jason Kidd could betory. Which explains his new name: Jason Adult. JIMMY F ALLONThe Katie Holmes-Tom Cruise divorce JAY LENOday with some friends in prison, and they had a nice little party for him. Out of habit, after he cut the cake he hid the knife. DA VID LETTERMANlion more than President Obama for the month of June. Out of force of habit, Mitt stashed it all in the Cayman Islands. JAY LENOComic-Con starts this week in San Diego and get this: itll actually feature a blood drive. Because thats what comic book fans need a way to look even more pale. JIMMY F ALLONIts so hot that Katie Holmes demanded custody of the air conditioner. DA VID LETTERMANThe White House is telling Americans not to read too much into Fridays bad had me at dont read too much. JIMMY F ALLONMitt Romney is now promising conservatives that if he is elected, he will put Anderson Cooper back in the closet. DA VID LETTERMANgressman to enter a same-sex marriage. As opposed to most congressmen, who riage. JIMMY F ALLON

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JULY 11, 2012 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 7 COMMENTARY WASHINGTONMERRY-GO-ROUNDby Douglas Cohn and Eleanor Clift WASHINGTON Four Republican governors say they will turn down federal money to expand Medicaid and another half dozen states indicate they may do the same. The remainder of the 26 Republican-led states that challenged the constitutionality of the Affordable CareAct are dragging their feet in adopting the insurance exchanges that are part of the law, waiting to see if Mitt Romney can win the White House and keep his promise to repeal Obamacare. The dissenters are being led by Florida Governor Rick million. Scott was not implicated (he had left the company by then), but he is not humbled by the outcome. He insists that bad things happen when the government gets involved in health care and that the law signed by Obama will lead to rationing. Scotts statement was rated false by PolitiFact Florida, which said: The health care law rations care no more or less than the current health care system. The current health care system whether its private insurance, Medicare or Medicaid does not allow people to have all the health care they want. Under the new law, people still cant have all the health care they want. Along with the Republican governors of South Carolina, Louisiana and Iowa, Scott is wrapping himself in the noble tradition of civil disobedience. But he and his fellow resisters have less in common with Henry David Thoreau, the 19thcentury abolitionist, naturalist and tax resister, than they do with Governor Orval Faubus whose refusal to integrate Central High School in Little Rock, AR in 1954 prompted President Eisenhower to send federal troops to quell the rebellion. Thoreau is best known for his book, On Walden Pond, an account of the simple life he led in the woods, but his essay, Resistance to Civil Government, inspired the concept of civil disobedience that arose during the civil rights era. Rosa Parks, a seamstress and a housekeeper in Montgomery, AL, refused to sit in the back of the bus, exercising classic nonviolent civil disobedience. knew that they risked going to jail, or worse and that they might pay a penalty. They only spoke for themselves; they didnt compel others to join them, though many did. Parks of the world did and what Rick Scott is doing. Scott is acting like hes a private citizen and can defy the government at will if he doesnt like a particular law, or Supreme Court ruling. But Scott is not just speaking for himself; he represents millions of people who would be covered when Medicaid is expanded to reach people who make 133 percent of the federal poverty level. Currently 18 percent of Floridas population is on Medicaid; that number would jump to 34.7 percent according the Kaiser Family Foundation. President Obama is not going to send in federal troops, but what Scott and the others are doing is not civil disobedience; its rebellion. The likelihood is that once tempers cool and the in-state lobbying starts from hospitals stressed to the breaking point by having to provide uncompensated care to uninsured people, Republican governors who are talking big now will see how impractical it is and how unpopular they will be if they turn down free money from the federal government to cover the working poor in their states. dont trust that federal money will always be there, but can their constituents trust them? Denying millions of people health coverage is not an act of civil courage; its political malpractice to put the well-being of millions at riskRebellion, not civil disobedience

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Page 8 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JULY 11, 2012 Political Advertisement Paid for and Approved by Donnie Conyers, Democrat for Liberty County SheriffKEEP OUR Liberty County SHERIFF Donnie ConyersSafest county in the State of Florida (537.6 crime rate) Lowest crime rate in the State* Highest Crime Clearance State (73.3%), State Average is (24.2%)* 188 People arrested for illegal narcotics offenses over last 3.5 years Aggressive enforcement on sex offenders Dedicated school on and off campus to insure safety of students Only Candidate endorsed by The (FPBA) Florida Police Benevolent Association and a member of The Florida Sheriffs Association program and web site Strong and proud supporter of Liberty County Search and Rescue Unmatched Supporter of Community Organizations and Fundraising Activities Sheriff Conyers Leadership AccomplishmentsThe Right Man For A Tough JobCharles McClellan, past District Chairman and former Quincy Lions Club President, recently installed Bristol Lions Lion Tamer Wilbur Moran, Tail Twister Joyce Hosford, one year Directors John Summers and Billy Don Smith, two year Directors Billy Faircloth and Wilford Deason. The Bristol Lions Club has more than also active in national and international activities to help the needy. TALLAHASSEE Commissioner of Agriculture Adam Putnam announced the top three complaints received in June through the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services 1 (800) HELPFLA consumer hotline: Do Not Call, Solicitors of Contributions and Landlord/Tenant. consumers in June and the department received 39,394 calls and 11,641 emails for consumer assistance and information. In the last month, the department has responded several individuals or businesses operating outside of Florida law. During the month of June 2012, the department: *Registered 4,504 businesses (both initial or renewal business registrations). *Received 3,312 complaints. The top three areas of consumers complaints include: *Initiated 345 investigations (336 administrative and nine criminal). *Arrested three individuals in violation of Florida state law and four individuals in connection with the *Recovered $416,231.02 on behalf of Florida consumers. *Added 54,755 numbers (25,907 individuals) to Floridas Do Not Call List in the month of June. These are 304,920 numbers and 172,637 subscribers on the The Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services is the states clearinghouse for consumer complaints, protection and information. The respond to questions about programs and regulations under the departments purview, provide informa business industries operating in Florida. can contact the departments consumer protection and information hotline at 1 (800) HELP-FLA (435(352-9832). For more information about the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, visit www.FreshFromFlorida.com.Do Not Call list and contribution solicitors consumer complaints

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JULY 11, 2012 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 9 At age 90 & 91, these two veterans have a few stories to tell about their wartime experiences ABOVE: Senior Master Sgt. James Ayers (retired) speaks during the Journey Stories event at Blountstowns Panhandle Pioneer Settlement. BELOW: Ayers points to himself in a photo of a Blountstown football team he once played on. STOR Y AND PHOTOS BY PHIL COALEThe Panhandle Pioneer Settlement opened its doors Friday night, July 6 to two American Heroes as the Settlement hosted Senior Master Sgt. James Ayers and Tuskegee Airman Sgt. Cornelius Davis, both retired, to tell stories of their lives including military service to their country. Ayers, 90 and Davis, 91, both from Calhoun County and part of the Smithsonian exhibit, Journey Stories, shared their experiences with an audience of 30 of what it was like to be soldiers in both World War II and Vietnam. The Museum on Main Street program is the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Services key initiative that directly engages small town audiences and brings attention to under served rural communities through their own Main Street museums, historical societies and other cultural venues. The Museum on Main Street circulates Smithsonian exhibitions focusing on broad topics of American history and culture, such as Ayers and Davis experiences. Exhibitions are organized around elements of our shared American experience, helping to host organizations who explore cultural attributes that bind us as a nation. All exhibitions display original artifacts that hold historical value to the area chosen to host. Small town participants add hard work, ambition and a sense of fun to the events. Calhoun Countys contribution to the Journey Stories began as Ayers and Davis were introduced. Their animated tales hold great historical value for our country. of his experience as one of the famous Tuskegee Airmen. The group was the U. S. War Departments experiment to prove African Americans were capable of being military pilots. At a young age, Davis watched newsreels of war planes in action and was hooked on aviation. Davis recalled that one of the newsreels showed a plane dropping a bomb on a target, blowing it to pieces. Right away, Davis said, I wanted to make sure I was the one dropping the bombs. So, ahead of being drafted, Davis joined up and found himself on the way to Tuskegee, AL and basic training. After a stint in an armament school in Colorado, he returned to Tuskegee. He was assigned to teach pilots weaponry and how to shoot down enemy planes as well as drop bombs on their targets. He was especially proud that the Tuskegee Airmen never lost a single bomber they were to protect while on their missions, a testament to his teaching the pilots how to shoot. After his military service, Davis became politically active in Michigan, helping various candidates get elected. He worked for a newspaper as a photojournalist and was active in the Tuskegee Airmens annual career week which introduced students to aviation. Ayers followed Davis to the podium to share his experiences in the military, including 17 the B-25 bomber with the 11th bomber squadron. His squadron with the 14th Air Japanese-occupied China, bombing various targets. His duties while on missions over the target were as a waist gunner. I never got a had some probable kills but those dont count. He added, We got shot up a lot but never shot down... We crashed landed three times with mechanical problems but the enemy never shot us down. Ayers began his military career Jan. 19, 1942 when he enlisted in the Air Force and was sent to Jackson, Mississippi for basic training. He left the service in 1945 but re-enlisted in 1948. The last four years of his time in service he spent as a crew member C-133 cargo plane out of Dover, DE to South Vietnam. Ayers ended his career May 1, 1967 when he retired for good. Upon retirement Ayers returned to Tallahassee and went into the construction business and eventually, the long-haul trucking business with his wife of 66 years, Dorothy. In 1977, the Ayers moved to Blountstown where he still resides today. The exhibit is promoted by the Florida Humanities Council which chose the Settlement to host the event. Along with their stories, Ayers and Davis brought artifacts they have collected through the years. They will be on display from July 14 through August 25.