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UF00027796 UFPKY NEH LSTA SLAF



The Calhoun-Liberty journal
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00027796/00321
 Material Information
Title: The Calhoun-Liberty journal
Portion of title: Calhoun Liberty journal
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: The Liberty Journal, Inc.
Place of Publication: Bristol Fla
Publication Date: 05-09-2012
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Bristol (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Liberty County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Calhoun County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Liberty -- Bristol
Coordinates: 30.426944 x -84.979167 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in Sept. 1991.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 11, no. 38 (Sept. 18, 1991).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002046630
oclc - 33425067
notis - AKN4565
lccn - sn 95047245
System ID: UF00027796:00321
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly journal (Bristol, Fla.)

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THE CALHOUN-LIBER TY J OURNAL CLJNews.com WEDNESDAY, MAY 9, 2012 Vol. 32, No. 1950includes tax A wedding, an anniversary and birthdays.....13 Relay for Life.....17 Tropicana Speech winners....20 Obituaries.....23 Sheriff's Log...2 Two VFDs to hold carnivals...4 Blountstown gallery to host new event...5 News from the Pews...10 DARIN SUMMERLIN by Teresa Eubanks, Journal EditorA 25-year-old Altha man was arrested for battery after witnesses called the Calhoun County Grocery Sunday afternoon. Witnesses said Summerlin had the woman by held without bond. Altha man charged with battery in parking lot altercation FDLE to open new investigation into McLemore death in Bristolby Teresa Eubanks, Journal Editor body was found on the bedroom three bullet wounds, one in his County Sheriff Donnie Conyers is adamant that the the sheriff said about the said he met with the Director of case. at her and said, You better run fast because you dont As she ran from him, she said she heard two shots Candidate list updated after deadline to le by petition run in Calhoun County include Carla Wood has withdrawn his name from the County Commission District 5 race. seat on the school board. CALHOUN COUNTY CLERK OF COURT SHERIFF PROPERTY APPRAISER the only one in the race so far. TAX COLLECTOR SCHOOL SUPERINTENDENT Yoder. ELECTIONS SUPERVISOR COUNTY COMMISSION, DISTRICT 1 Lee See CANDIDATES on page 3 place in Robotics contestPAGE 16Liberty County Communications Director Junior Lolley named national companys DISPA TCHER OF THE MONTHPAGE 9A redneck country girl goes to Russia Calhoun Countys Ruth Attaway shares her experiences from mission trip to Russia; will go to Trinidad next yearPAGE 8JOURNEY STORIESA preview of two families histories to be included in upcoming Smithsonian Exhibit in BlountstownPAGE 29

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A Bristol man was Oxycodone pills after a buy was arranged with a confidential source working with the CalhounLiberty Drug Task Force. Arrested was Lawrence Dawson, 50. According to the arrest report, the informant was $120 in cash to buy the 30-milligram pills, which are Schedule II controlled narcotics. Task Force members were looking on as Dawson Blazer to meet with the with serial numbers that had been documented earlier in exchange for the pills. Dawson was later stop near the intersection of Chipola Road and SR 71. After he was placed in was searched. The cash used in the buy was found hidden in a KFC box. His cell phone, which showed the number used by the confidential informant to contact him, was confiscated. Also found was a partially smoked marijuana cigarette and a prescription for Oxycodone that had been Dawson told deputies he made a wrong turn at a residence and stopped and spoke with someone but denied selling any pills. Deputies later contacted the office of the doctor who had prescribed the pills for Dawson and he was taken off their patient list. He was released after posting $1,500 bond.LAWRENCE DAWSON Bristol man is charged with selling Oxycodone Page 2 THE CALHOUN-LIBER TY JOURNAL MAY 9, 2012 ARREST REPORTS compiled by Journal Editor Teresa Eubanks Blountstown Police Dept.April 30 through May 6, 2012 Citations issued: Accidents...............03 .................16 Special details Business alarms.....04 Residential alarms..........00 ..............................................................35April 30 VOSP, CCSO. Richard S mith, S r., non-payment (warrant), CCSO. May 1 Joseph McDonald, VOCR, CCSO. Joshua Best, battery, retail theft, CCSO. Charles Basford, VOCR, CCSO. Joseph Baker, sale of marijuana within 1000 ft. of a church, CCSO. Jimmie Lewis, driving with license suspended or revoked, BPD. Charles Eddie Varnadore, Jr., grand theft auto, CCSO. Michael C. Mayo, VOSP, CCSO. Nathaniel Hall, sale of cocaine within 1000 ft. of a park (times 2), CCSO. May 2 Rashawn Dawson, sale of cocaine within 1000 ft. of a park (times 2), CCSO. Angela Tindall, failure to appear, CCSO. Marcus Williams, non-support, BPD. Robin French, petty theft, BPD. May 3 Laurie Pegaz, VOP (warrant), CCSO. May 4 Lawrence Lorenzo Dawson, sale of a scheduled II controlled substance (Oxycodone), CCSO. May 5 Joseph Baker, VOP (2 times), CCSO. May 6 Darin Summerlin, domestic battery, CCSO. April 30 holding for CCSO, CCSO. May 2 Angela Kay Tindall, holding for CCSO, CCSO. Kaleb M. Clark, domestic battery, resisting arrest with violence, LCSO. May 4 Servando Ortuno, VOSP, LCSO. Woman injured trying to keep man from A Hosford man was taken to a Tallahassee facility for a psychological an altercation with a woman who tried to keep him from harming himself, according to a report from Kaleb Clark, 21, was later charged with domestic battery and resisting responded to a report Sunday night that an intoxicated man was walking along CR 67, carrying a shotgun and threatening to kill himself. account: his ex-girlfriend to ask for a ride. She described him as intoxicated and upset when she found him on Burlington Road, carrying a .12-gauge shotgun. The woman said Clark made him anymore and he had nothing to Clark grabbed the gear shifter, put it in neutral and jumped out. The woman stopped the truck, got out and checked to see that he was not injured and then told him to get back in then became upset and grabbed her and she tried to wrestle away from him. He threatened to grabbed the shotgun and pointed the barrel at his head. The woman tried to grab the gun but he held on to it and then hit her on Both then returned to the truck upset once more, grabbed the gun and pointed the barrel at his head and started to pull the trigger. The woman was hit in the mouth by the guns stock when she tried to take it her with a busted lip. get Clark to his mothers home but when they and ran into the woods with the shotgun. Deputies were called to the scene at 11:22 p.m., where they set up a perimeter and began a search for Clark. Deputies found him on Dewiber Lane. When approached by Liberty the loaded gun on a post and placed his hands on his head. Deputy Adam Walker secured the gun as Trooper Clark became agitated and began yelling at the officers. After he and King, he was forcibly put on the ground and handcuffed. He is being held on $7,500 bond.KALEB M. CLARK NA THANIEL HALL RASHAWN DAWSON JOSEPH BAKER Three men were taken into custody last week on outstanding warrants was picked up on a charge of sale of a controlled substance within 1,000 feet of a daycare. Joseph Daniel Baker was arrested on a charge of selling marijuana within 1,000 feet of a church after a deputy spotted him riding a bicycle on Sherry was arrested on two counts of sale of a controlled substance within 1,000 feet of a daycare. Bond was set at $10,000 for each man. A Blountstown man who told police to go ahead and arrest me after he refused to let his girlfriend enter their home to get her possessions was charged with petty theft, according to the offense report from the Blountstown Police Department. After his girlfriend learned that the locks had been changed at the Lambert Street residence, she contacted the police department. She then called Robyn Lawayne French, 38, who told her to come get her things. had accompanied her left. He remained and was joined at the scene by a considered theft if he kept the woman from getting French again stated that she couldnt enter the to take him into custody. They did. He was taken to the county jail that morning ROBIN FRENCH Man arrested after refusing to let woman collect possessions from their homeThree facing drug charges

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MAY 9, 2012 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 3 BLOUNTSTOWN DRUGS20370 Central Ave. W. OFF During the Calhoun Chamber of Commerces Business Bounce on Thursday, May 10OFF A great time to shop for mom for Sunday, May 13 OFFPersonalized Graduation Items FREE FREE $75 Let us help you choose that Perfect gift for Mom!Erma Jeans Antiques & Gifts VISA/MC/DISCOVER/DEBIT21539 Chester Street in Hosford $775 Monte Carlo0% interestDaylight Auto Financing (850) 215-1769You are automatically approved if you can make your payments on time 3 Rows0% interestDaylight Auto Financing (850) 215-1769You are automatically approved if you can make your payments on time Calhoun County is ranked number two in the state for lowest crime with neighboring Liberty County boasting the lowest crime rate in the state. The Uniform Crime Reports (UCR) are a standard of measure crime in a community and are based upon the statistics of seven categories. The ranking system is factored on a scale of the number of crimes per 100,000 people to provide a number that can be compared to all of the 67 counties in Florida. In the year 2011, Liberty Countys crime rate was at 537.60 and Calhoun Countys was 837.60 Number one and number two respectively in the statewide ranking. In Liberty County, the Sheriffs so they are the sole source for reporting. In Calhoun County, the Altha Police Department reported two crimes, the Blountstown Police Department reported 33 and the bers are combined for the overall score. I wish to commend Chief Rodney Smith for his department reducing crime by 13.7% during partment, said Calhoun County Sheriff David Tatum. And again this year I would like to thank the folks here for behaving themselves and helping to keep our quality of life here good and of course the men and are committed to protecting this community. Nathan Goodman. REPUBLICAN: Jerry Guilford. NPA: James Grover. COUNTY COMMISSION, DISTRICT 3 NPA: Nick Stone. DEMOCRATS: Don Miller, Lee Shelton, Jeral R. Hall Sr. and Craig Lipford. COUNTY COMMISSION, DISTRICT 5 D EMOCRATS: Incumbent Harold Pickron and Thomas Flowers. Charles Chic Wood withdrew from the race. SCHOOL BOARD, DISTRICT 1 (nonpartisan) Danny Ryals and Edward Holley. SCHOOL BOARD, DISTRICT 4 (nonpartisan) Katrina O. Hatchett and Kenneth F. Speights. LIBERTY COUNTY CLERK OF COURT DEMOCRAT: Kathy Brown. SHERIFF DE MOCRATS: Donnie Conyers, Henry Hamlin and Eddie Joe White. NPA: Nick Finch. PROPERTY APPRAISER DE MOCRAT : Incumbent TAX COLLECTOR DE MOCRAT : Incumbent Marie Goodman. NPA: Teddy Eubanks. SCHOOL SUPERINTENDENT D EMOCRATS: Incumbent Sue Summers and Gay Johnson Uzzell. ELECTIONS SUPERVISOR DEMOCRATS: Gina McDowell and Sharon Revell Mackey. COUNTY COMMISSION, DISTRICT 1 DE MOCRAT : Incumbent Albert Butcher. COUNTY COMMISSION, DISTRICT 3 DE MOCRAT : incumbent Jim Johnson. COUNTY COMMISSION, DISTRICT 5 D EMOCRATS: Incumbent Kevin Williams and Scott Phillips. SCHOOL BOARD, DISTRICT 1 (Nonpartisan) Incumbent Logan Kever and Sidney S. Beckwith. SCHOOL BOARD, DISTRICT 2 (Nonpartisan) Tina Tharpe, Ken Sumner and Steve Cutshaw. The Primary Election is set for Aug. 14. The General Election will be held Nov. 6. The City of Bristol Election is scheduled for Nov. 13.CANDIDATES continued from the front page PERR Y Don Curtis has announced his candidacy for the Florida Legislature, House of Representatives, District 7, Republican. Don and his family are long-time residents of Taylor County. He and his wife of 32 years, Michele, live on a farm at Lake Bird where theyve raised their two sons, Ray and Clayton. Now theyve been blessed with a grandson and theres another one on the way! Don is a forester and President of The Forestry Company in Perry. He has served the people of North Florida in many ways during his career from being appointed to be the Assistant State Forester for Florida, to serving on the Board of the Suwannee River Water Management District, to being elected onto the School Board at Aucilla Christian Academy, and starting the Shady Grove Volunteer Fire Department. Now he seeks to give the rural counties of North Florida a strong voice in Tallahassee. Dons focus is, and has been for many years, bringing jobs to this area. According to Don We all want a better future for our children and grandchildren we want them to be able to have good jobs here as they become adults and start their own families. Currently many of them have to go elsewhere for employment and that needs to change. Because of his strong stance on private property rights, Don has been endorsed by the Florida Forestry Association. He also serves on the Leadership Council for the National Federation of Independent Businesses, Florida Chapter. Hes also a lifetime member of the ber of the Florida Farm Bureau.Curtis becomes candidate for Florida House District 7

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Thats how many copies of The Calhoun-Liberty Journal were distributed last week, ensuring plenty of coverage for your community announcements and great response for our business advertisers! 5,349 The Calhoun-Liberty Journal is published each Wednesday by the Liberty Journal Inc., Summers Road, P.O. Box 536, Bristol, FL 32321. Annual subscriptions are $18. Periodicals postage paid at Bristol, FLPOSTMASTER: Send address corrections to: P.O. Box 536, Bristol, FL 32321. (USPS 012367) Summers Road Located at 11493 NW Summers Road in Bristol MAILING ADDRESS: P.O. Box 536, Bristol, FL 32321 TELEPHONE (850) 643-3333 Fax (850) 643-3334 EMAIL: thejournal@fairpoint.net ADS: cljads@fairpoint.net JOURNAL STAFFJohnny Eubanks...................Publisher Teresa Eubanks........................ Editor Sandra Brown...................Bookkeeper Deven Lewis......Production Asssistant Debbie Duggar...................AdvertisingOFFICE HOURS: 9 a.m. 6 p.m. M-F Page 4 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL MA Y 9, 2012THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Wednesday, May 9 Monday, May 14 Tuesday, May 15 Sunday, May 13 Saturday, May 12 Thursday May 10 Friday, May 11TODAYS MEETINGS 7 p.m., Altha Vol. Fire Dept AA, 6 p.m., Altha Community Center noon, Senior Citizens Center 5 p.m., Ag. Bldg., Conference Room across from Courthouse 6 p.m., Fire House 7 p.m., Dixie Lodge in Blountstown 1:30 p.m., W.T. Neal Civic Center, Blountstown.TODAYS MEETINGS7 p.m., Veterans Memorial Park Civic Center 6 p.m., Log Cabin Club House at TODAYS MEETINGS, noon, Calhoun-Liberty Hospital 7 p.m., Calhoun County Old Ag Bldg. east door, in front of jail 6:30 p.m., Mormon Church, BristolTODAYS MEETINGSAA, 7 p.m., basement of Calhoun County Courthouse 11 a.m., Apalachee Rest. 5 p.m. Calhoun Extension Adult Dance, 8-12 p.m. at the Legion Hall in BlountstownAttend the Church of your choice this Sunday Train DayVeterans Memorial Park 11 a.m.3 p.m. BIRTHDAY Adronna Kombrinck & Susan McCormick Ammons BIRTHDAY Debbie Duggar BIRTHDAYS Shirley Segers, Misty Sizemore & Jered Kyle Garry Futch BIRTHDAYS Karen Joiner Moran, Morgen Brown, Kitte Hosford Carter & Sarah Carpenter BIRTHDAYS Miriam Ritter & Lindsey Anders BIRTHDAY Janet Tomlinson Come and join us for Bat Night at the Panhandle Pioneer Settlement on Friday, May 11 at 6:30 p.m. Bring your lawn chairs and help us count the bats as they come out of their house for their nightly feeding. It is a very unusual site. Judy Ludlow. Agriculture and Natural Resources Agent from the Calhoun County Extension Service will have an educational presentation on bats in the gym at 6 p.m. Ice cream, other refreshments and bat houses will be available. Bring blankets or lawn chairs. Come and enjoy the evening. Its enough to drive you batty!The Panhandle Pioneer Settlement is a living museum documenting rural life in NW Florida since the early 1800s. It is located in Sam Atkins Park, about 1 mile west of the intersection of Hwy 71 and Hwy 20. Follow HWY 20 West out of Blountstown. Look for signs of Sam Atkins Park. Turn North at Lindys Fried Chicken. Silas Green St. (between 18th and 20th St.) follow the signs. For more information, contact the Settlement at 674-2777 or email: info@ panhandlepioneer.org For further directions and information on the historic buildings at the Settlement go to: www.panhandlepioneer.org Big Bend Area Health Education Center will pilot a Health Careers Summer Camp in Calhoun /Liberty counties this summer. The day camp will be held from June 18 22, from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., for upcoming 10th, 11th and 12th grade high school students. Students interested in health career professions are encouraged to apply through Big Bend AHEC or through their school counselors. This is not just for students interested in being a doctor or nurse, all aspects of the The week-long Day Camp will be held at Veterans Memorial Civic Center in Bristol. 15 Calhoun/Liberty students will be selected to participate. The camp will include an ACT Review course, health careers overview, an entire day of shadowing at Calhoun/Liberty hospital, a half-day interactive dental proences related to health careers. As part of the Application Process, students are required to provide their High School transcript, two teacher recommenda tions and evaluations, a personal essay with photograph and parent signature.Applications are available at Big Bend AHEC, 325 John Knox Road, Building M, Suite 200, Tallahassee, FL 32303, or through their school guidance counselors. Call Angelika Parker at (850) 224-1177 for more information. applications for Mossy Pond Volunteer Fire Department is hosting a carnival May 19 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. to kick off the summer. This will be held at the Mossy Pond Fire Department. There will be food, drinks, prizes and lots of games (including water games) for all. MPVFD invites everyone to come out and join us in the fun. schedule May 12 eventMossy Pond VFD plans day of fun for May 19The Creamer family will be having their family reunion May 12 beginning at 12 noon at Victory Hill Pentecostal Holiness Church located at 15947 NW Ashley Shiver Road in Altha. There will be food and fun as well as Creamers. Be prepared to: Bring a covered dish Tell favorite family stories Bring family pictures Make memories in 2012 For more information you can contact Carla Creamer Higginbottam at (904) 5533259 or Julie Creamer Douglas at (904) 583-9911. The Blountstown Torreya Garden Club will meet Monday, May 14, 6 p.m. (CT), at the Log Cabin Club House at the Pioneer Settlement. We will have our Spring covered dish Blountstown Torreya Garden Club meetingThe Estiffanulga Volunteer Fire Department will be putting on a Carnival Saturday, May 12 at the Veterans Memorial Park on HWY 12 South in Bristol from 10 a.m. to department in an effort to help mend many of due to lack of adequate funding. There will be games of chance, such as: Balloon booth, lollipop booth, archery booth, duck pond, bubble gum guess, footladder booth, basketball toss, bean bag toss and ball in basket. Hotdogs and hamburgers with chips, soda and water will be served. Bring your kids and a friend to see Smoky hat for your kids. include: Reel-n-rod, Browning thermos, Tool Students of the Tolar School, come dunk your principal and assistant principal in the dunking booth! Everyone come show your support for our local heros and join the fun! 10 a.m.4 p.m.Veterans Memorial Park 2 5 p.m. BMS Auditorium Settlement in Frink Gym

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MAY 9, 2012 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 5 EVENTS SALE Join us for the Calhoun Co. Chambers Business Bounce Thursday, May 10JEANS $20O F F Located at 20634 E. Central in Blountstown (850) 674-8801 "Fine Jewelry & Gifts"The Diamond Corner 25%New Colors OFF 10%OFF P ANDORABuy $100 or more & get FREE Gift while supplies lastShop all day for great sales or during our extended hours 5 -7 p.m. (CT) for extra savings 20% OFF For questions please call Richard Armstong at 674-5411 ext 207 Some of the services offered:*Womens health education. *Blood pressure screenings, services FREE of charge. *Lipid Panel (Cholesterol) $5, Hemoglobin A1C (which require fasting after midnight) $5, fasting glucose $1 and PSAs $5 at a reduced rate by the Calhoun-Liberty Hospital lab. No need to bring orders, and we will be happy to forward the results to your primary physician. *Display of new County Ambulance with Emergency Medical *SWAT/Youth Tobacco Prevention by Calhoun County Health Department. *and much more3rd Annual Community HEAL TH FAIRCome join us for a day filled with, fun and education for you and your family. Friday, May 11 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.We hope you take advantage of this opportunity to enjoy an event with your family and possibly even save your life. AND Many other vendors will be available to answer your questions and assist you with what ever need you have. HOPE TO SEE YOU THERE.... Calhoun-Liberty Hospital20370 NE Burns Ave., Blountstown Telephone (850) 674-5411BLOUNTSTOWN The Calhoun County Chamber of Commerce is launching a new series of events titled Brush Up / Wine Down which a hands-on art experience in the casual setting of the gallery. The sessions will be led by local watercolor artist Anna Layton. A launch of this new concept is set for Friday, May 25th at the gallery from 5:30 to 8 p.m. Dur ing the event, guests will have the opportunity to brush up on their art skills while enjoying music, refreshments, and socializing. Following the launch, Anna Layton will coordinate watercolor classes at the gallery, gener ally every other Thursday evening from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. The classes will incorporate a brief lesson and instruction on how to recreate an inspiration image created by Anna. The events are limited to ten people per session, and are ideal for a girls night out, baby showers, wedding showers, or even birthday parties. Guests are free to bring refreshments, and are encouraged to take their artwork home to be framed and showcased. Sign up for upcoming events will be offered at the May 25th event. Tickets for the kickoff event are $10 each for adults, $5 for children, and include the reception. Tickets can be purchased online at www. calhounco.org/store or at Blountstown Drugs. The event will be held in the space which features a portion of the gallerys permanent exhibit, Apalachicola River: An American Treasure by Clyde Butcher.___________________________The Preble-Rish Gallery is the result of a partnership between the Calhoun County Chamber of Commerce and PreRish graciously donated space for the gallery which hosts the Apalachicola River: An American Treasure exhibit, featuring 30 photography images by Clyde Butcher, and Calhoun County Chamber of Commerce is currently the proprietor of the exhibit.Kickoff event featuring hands-on art experiences set for Friday, May 25thChamber launches Brush Up series at Preble-Rish Gallery ABOVE: Anna Layton is shown above center with a

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Page 6 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL MAY 9, 2012 COMMENTARY Late Night LaughsA RECAP OF RECENT OBSER V ATIONS BY LATE NIGHT TV HOSTS. JIMMY KIMMEL JAY LENO DA VID LETTERMAN DA VID LETTERMAN JIMMY KIMMEL JAY LENO JIMMY KIMMEL JAY LENO JIMMY F ALLON JIMMY KIMMEL JIMMY KIMMEL WASHINGTON First, let it be said that vice presidential candidates can have a negative effect on the ticket, but not since John F. Kennedy picked Lyndon Johnson, who brought the Texas electoral votes with him, has a running mate had a positive effect. So the Republican vice presidential dance currently playing out will follow the doctors mantra: First, do no harm. Florida Senator Marco Rubio is the GOPs goto guy on immigration. Young and charismatic, he represents the partys future whether or not he gets tapped as Mitt Romneys running mate. The two men campaigned together this week in Pennsylvania, and there was an awkward moment when Romney was asked if he supported Rubios compromise version of the DREAM Act, which sets out conditions by which young people who were brought to the U.S. illegally by their parents can become citizens. President Obama supports the DREAM Act as does the Democratic Party, but it was one of those bright lines drawn between Republicans and Democrats during the GOP primary debates. the debates for supporting the DREAM Act and for granting illegal students in-state tuition rates to attend public universities. Romney and the other candidates assailed Perry for essentially frittering away taxpayer money on illegal aliens. Rubio to the rescue: Born in the U.S. of Cuban expatriots, Rubios life experiences allow him to empathize with those like himself who have grown up American, but who arent as fortunate as he was to gain citizenship. Rubio tweaks the original DREAM Act to make it a bit tougher for illegal immigrants to become citizens, but he does create a legal path. He would allow these young people to apply for a student visa, and then once they graduate, they would be allowed to work legally in the U.S. The good news for these young people is that they would be free from harassment by immigration they were in the U.S. legally. They would then be able to apply for residency, and once they get a green card, they would then have to wait another three to would be eligible for citizenship. Its a more grueling path than the Democrats DREAM Act envisions, but its likely still more than the Tea Party wing of the GOP will accept. With Hispanics the fastest growing bloc of voters and a key constituency in battleground states like Nevada, Florida and even Colorado, Romney will demographic reality and Rubio is his ticket. While it appears as though Obama has a lock on the Hispanic vote, the reality is more complicated. Obama promised immigration reform that would acknowledge the presence of more than 12 million people in the U.S. illegally, and provide them a path to citizenship. Republicans denounced that as amnesty, and Obama backed away from any broad legislative effort, focusing instead on increased border control and more targeted deportations, sparing families and singling out those who had any kind of record, even for the most minor offense. The Hispanic community feels like they were asked to go to the back of the bus when it comes to Obamas agenda, and theyre not sure that anything would change for the better in a second Obama term. That gives Romney an opening, and with Rubio as his advance man, the presumptive Republican nominee has a chance to change the tone of the debate about immigration, if not the substance. A recent Pew Research Center survey found that immigration from Mexico has come to a standstill in part because of the weak U.S. economy, and in part because of improved economic conditions in Mexico. The birth rate has fallen dramatically. In 1970, the average Mexican woman had 7 children; today it mirrors the U.S. with the average slightly more than 2 children. The immigration issue may solve itself over the long run, but in the short run, Romney needs Rubios help to make the GOP palatable to enough Hispanic voters to even out WASHIN GTONMERRY-GO-ROUNDby Douglas Cohn and Eleanor Clift Will Rubio be Romneys go-to guy?

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MAY 9, 2012 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 7 COMMENTARY SPEAK UP!WITH A LETTER TO THE EDITORemail Thejournal@fairpoint.net To the editor: The term weird uncle caught my eye on your April 25 Compipeline.. munity. Reader responds to Weird Uncle column

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Page 8 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL MAY 9, 2012 ACCEPTING NEW PA TIENTSLaban Bontrager, DMD12761 NW Pea Ridge Rd., Bristol, FL 32321TELEPHONE 643-5417 www.bristoldentalclinic.com DENTURE LAB ON PREMISESSame-Day Service on Repairs & Relines Bristol Dental ClinicMonica Bontrager, DMD JUST IN1st Quality Carpeting, Factory Overstocks Originally $189/SF Originally $339/SFNOW 99/SF NOW $125/SFNEW SHIPMENT OF AREA RUGS2 x 4 $5002 x 6 $12502 x 8 $15503 x 5 $12504 x 6 $19905 x 8 $39906 x 9 $4990Shags $7550Loose Lay Fiber Back Vinyl 13 Wide 99/SF Heavy Fiber Back Closeouts Reg. $250/SF NOW 99/SFWE NOW SELL CONCRETE P A VERSBEAUTIFUL & DURABLE For Pools, Deck, Patio & Driveways 6 x 6, 6 x 12, 8 x 8, 12 x 12 Hexagon, Cobbles, Bishops Hat and Interlocking in a variety of colorsStarting at $295/SF BY RUTH ATTAW AY When I told Joel Hathaway that I was going to Russia on a mission trip, he grinned and said, Well our little redneck country girl goes to Russia. arrested in the airport in Tallahassee while trying Lady, I think you have a weapon in your carry on. I assured him that I did not. He told me to unzip the bag which I did and lo and behold there was a knife that Fred had given me to use in peeling fruit. Things went well until I got to Dsseldorf, Germany. At that point, I needed to get another boarding pass. I went to the counter to get it and the lady at the counter said that I would have to pay for my bags. I told her that, in Florida, I had checked my bags all the way through and paid the necessary fees. She asked for documentation and I gave her all that I had. She said that what I had was to pay. I thought, Oh whatever, and asked how much I owed. She told me how much in Marks and in Euros. I said How much is that in American dollars? She said, Six hundred dollars. I threw up my hand and said, Oh, My God! She looked at me! I looked at her! Then she shoved the boarding pass across the counter and said, Go! Go! I do not see. I went! You should have seen me go. I slung my back pack across my shoulder and ran to the gate. I stopped in Prague, Czechoslovakia and took a small plane over to Estonia where I was met by the Miningers who are the missionaries who were to be my hosts while I was there. On the border of Russia and Estonia, we met with a little group of people in the midst of a building project. You could see that they were struggling and the project was moving slowly. As the sanctuary crowded room. My interpreter was a big guy with a head full of wild curly hair and he had a tooth missing in the front. He, for all the world, reminded me of a teddy I had ever spoken through an interpreter so I knew this was going to be interesting. What I did not know, was that as Erikea interpreted my English into Estonian a young woman in the back of the room would interpret the Estonian into Russian. It was like trying to speak with a weird echo. Sometimes Erikea would not understand what I was trying to say so we would negotiate. Finally I would say the same thing enough different ways until he found a way to convey my message. The people were wonderful. They made me a (The coffee was just for me as everyone else was drinking tea). All of them wanted to talk with me and ask me questions. I left there with an Estonian a pair of hand knitted booties. An underground radio and internet television station was my next stop. The Miningers dropped me off at the house and I went in alone so as not to draw attention to the location. The missionaries told me that the interview would last an hour and that the talk show host might possibly ask off the wall questions. Needless to say, I was very nervous. The interviewer first gave me talk. He said, Do not use American slang and speak slowly with simple words. You must talk like this,... I LOVE YOU! he said. Then we were live. He would ask me a question or two, I would answer, and then he would interpret. Toward the end of the interview, the session went like this: He asked, Has the crime rate increased in your area because of the bad economic conditions? I said no, that my job was to handle all criminal case was down. He asked, Are there a lot of gangs in your area? I said that I did not know of any gang activity in our area. (He commented at that point that maybe he watched too much television.) He asked if a Christian would be allowed to and I am elected county wide for my position. He asked me why I thought anyone would want to that the people of my county felt that a Christian He said, I think you live Paradise, no? And I said, I think you are right! We have more problems than we want, but we do live in Paradise. Calhoun County, for all our troubles, this is Paradise! Watch for my sequel to this article in the next few weeks. I have titled it, Detained by the KGB. EDITORS NOTE: Ruth Attaway is the Calhoun County Clerk of Court. She made this trip in Sept. 2010 after meeting a missionary family, the Miningers, when they visited her church, Victory Hill Pentacostal Holiness, on Hwy. 71. She is planning to travel to Trinidad early next year on another mission trip.Our little redneck country girl goes to RussiaMissionary from Calhoun County shares her travel experiences on trip to RussiaRuth Attaway of Altha is shown here with her interpreter, Erikea, in Kivioli, Estoniania. Our annual graduation features are coming soon. Call The Journal at (850) 643-3333 to reserve a sponsor block on the page or to have us set up a congratulatory ad for your new graduate! RUTH ATTAW AY

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MAY 9, 2012 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 9 TEMECULA, CA Cassidian Communications, an EADS North America company, is pleased to recognize Junior Lolley from Liberty County, FL, 9-1-1 Communications Center, as the Cassidian Communications Dispatcher of the Month. One of the reasons Liberty County 9-1-1 is unique is the fact that its lead call taker has been on the job since 1980 and has been blind since the age of 12. Today, Lolley processes more than 300 emergency and administrative calls a day, which is more than three times the amount he processed in his earlier days at the center. said Brandon Hoquist, product line manager, Cassidian Communications. As technology advances entered the 9-1-1 center, Lolleys job became more complicated as additional programs and monitors were introduced. Today, Lolley uses new technology designed to assist the visually impaired. He never sends a responder to the wrong place and can tell someone where to turn by landmarks, said Stephen Ford, 9-1-1 coordinator, Liberty County 9-1-1 Communications Center. He has only asked me where an address is located three or four times since I have worked with him. He does a better job than any sighted call takers I know. A renowned professional, Lolley says that no single call stands out among the thousands he has taken from natural disasters such as hurricanes, tornadoes and lightening storms, to emergencies related to house Im not in this for the money, Lolley states. This is not a job where you get rich. I do it to help people and to be there for the community. Its a calling. Its a desire I was born with. The Liberty County 9-1-1 Center recently completed testing of the latest version of the Sentinel Patriot call processing solution, release 3.2. Built to support up to 100 call taking positions, the Sentinel Patriot 3.2 solution is designed to handle up to two million calls per year, is fault tolerant with no single point of failure and delivers scalable, redundant, remote survivable systems with ultra-high reliability. This feature rich solution provides call centers such as Liberty County with a clear path to next generation 9-1-1 (NG9-1-1) services as they become available industry-wide. Hoquist continued, Cassidian Communications recognizes usability as one of the utmost needs for a key differentiator when comparing our products to those of other solution providers. Liberty County 9-11 has been a Cassidian Communications customer since 2005 and currently is operating the latest Sentinel Patriot solution on its three call taking positions. The 9-11 center is responsible for taking emergency and administrative calls for services from the approximately 8,000 county residents. The center also is responsible for dispatching calls for all law enforcement, emergency medical for the county. The Sentinel Patriot solution supports singleand multiple-site 9-11 centers as well as geographically diverse, centralized and hosted solutions. The solution is NENA-compliant and is an IETF standardsbased IPcentric call management suite designed to handle all calls seamlessly from a single switch. Cassidian Communications continues to serve clients ranging from public safety operations to Fortune 1000 corporations to federal agencies. Collectively, the company has more than 40 years of experience networks. ABOUT CASSIDIAN COMMUNICATIONSAs the largest and most trusted source of mission critical communications solutions, Cassidian Communications, an EADS North America company, is leading the way in standards-based NG9-1-1 call and P25 land mobile radio systems. Headquartered in Temecula, CA. Junior Lolley named Dispatcher of the Month by Cassidian Communications Liberty County Dispatcher Junior Lolley Chipola Nursing Program graduates WANTS YOU!!!SW A T SW A T Calhoun County SW A T program SW A T If you have any questions, please contact Pamela McDaniel (850) 674-5645, ext 236. Saturday, May 19 Wewa The Employees Club of Wewahitchka, FL www.VisitGulfCounty.comArts & Crafts, Food and Live Entertainment plus Fun for the Kids Lots of Tupelo Honey ...BEE THERE! TUPELO FESTIVAL CORLETTS ROOFING LLC FREE ESTIMATESMichael Corlett (850) 643-7062 Owner (813) 253-3258LIBERTY COUNTY $600 Down

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Page 10 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL MAY 9, 2012 HOURS: MON, TUES., THURS. & FRI: 11 a.m.-6 p.m. & WED: 11 a.m.-5 p.m. 17343 Main Street N Blountstown (850) 674-1311 @ Herbal Roots Come in today and out more at... WE ALSO OFFER UNIQUE GIFTS INCLUDING WE CAN CUSTOM DESIGN A GIFT BAG FOR Call ahead to have everything waiting Make sure Mom feels her best with the right mix of herbs and out what all-natural ingredients can help keep your mother healthy. Natures Approach to Health DID YOU KNOW: Home of the All-U-Can-Eat menuPhone (850) 670-8441Family Coastal Seafood Restaurant A little out of the way, a lot less to pay! Come in and check out our 22 item Salad Bar. PRIME RIB OR SNOW CRAB CLAW S$1599INCLUDES CHO I CE OF 2 S I DES. All politicians are invited to the Hope Peacock BenBlountstown Lions Club to sell Boston Butts on FridayHOLY HOOPSTERS HILLCREST BAPTIST CHURCH EVENTS Courageous Fireproof Courageous 100 MEN AND WOMEN I N BL AC K A ND WHITE BAKE SALENEWS FROM THE PEWS The Chason brothers and sisters --------------------The Fred Pelling Family MESSAGES OF THANKS Meeting Notice Tuesday, May 22 For more information call (850) 222-2043. 18831 State Road 20 West Is offering KARATE classes 3 nights a week.$20MONTH H 2 O Wellness CenterThe Calhoun-Liberty Journal Miss Calhoun County/Miss Blountstown Pageant set Saturday at Middle Schoolscience park located on

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MAY 9, 2012 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 11 ASK THEO L D F A R M E R SA L M A N A C Heating & Air Conditioning FL LIC. # CMC1249570 (850) 674-4777Whaley WhaleyIs there any way to mend a wire screen that has a puncture hole in it? W. M., Glen Burnie, Md.Sure, its just like darning a sock, only on a much larger scale. If the puncture is near an edge or corner of the window or door, it can be tricky, but if its surrounded by screen, youre in luck. or other sharp, pointed tool. You want something that you can use to restore the individual pieces of wire to their rightful positions in the some additional wire of approximately the same size (or similarly colored nylon thread) and sew in these pieces, as needed, to restore the mesh pattern.Have you heard of the superstitions about the signifi cance of sneezing on various days of the week? N. K., Cherokee, Ok.Of course, superstitions are nothing to sneeze at. Whether you believe in them or not, the rhymes are fun. Sneeze on Monday, sneeze for danger. Sneeze on Tuesday, kiss a stranger. Sneeze on Wednesday, receive a letter. Sneeze on Thursday, receive something better. Sneeze on Friday, sneeze for sorrow. Sneeze on Saturday, see your lover tomorrow. Sneeze on Sunday, your safety seek, or the Devil will have you the rest of the week. There are also many sneeze sayings that dont apply to the days of the week. Sneeze at bedtime and youll have good luck. Sneezing to your right is considered more fortunate than sneezing toward the left. Bless yourself or others after a sneeze so demons wont rush in or so that your soul wont leak out. Gesundheit is just another version of Good Health. For those who still use these expressions, its clear just how strong a grip superstitions still have.What sort of planes F. L., Ferry Pass, Fl. service operated largely with the help of the U.S. Army Signal Corps and their planes and pilots, although other experi made as early as 1911. Six Jenny training planes (NJ-4Hs) were used, among others. In May of 1918, after Congress had appropriated $100,000 to Almanac.com FOR RECIPES, GARDENING TIPS, AND WEATHER FORECASTS, VISIT:The Old Farmers Almanac This year, (May 13) comes at the tail end of the Three Chilly Saints Days, May 11, 12, and 13, named for Mammertus, Pancras, and Gervais. Their feast days traditionally bring a bout of chilly weather, giving rise to weather lore such as Who shears his sheep before St. Gervais Day loves his wool more than his sheep. Perhaps some fleece slippers would be in order, so Mother keeps her sense of humor through this final cold nip. If her demeanor is still frosty, however, remind her that the ancient spring festival to honor the mother goddess, Cybele, may have been the precursor to Mothers Day. It was held much earlier, just after the Spring Equinox, but nevertheless, it was called Hilaria, from the Latin for cheerful. Istarch, and raspberries. Bring to a boil and stir until the sauce is smooth and thickened. Strain through a sieve to remove the seeds. Serve warm over pound cake, pear halves, or ice cream. If desired, 1/4 cup of brandy can be added to the sauce to be flamed when served. Best days to prune to discourage growthBest days to begin logging Moon runs lowTruman Day (Mo.) A gray sky in the morning presages fine weather. To avoid tough cookies, do not overmix the dough. On May 11, 1968, Linda McCartney became the first woman photographer to shoot a Rolling Stone cover. FOR RECIPES, GARDENING TIPS, AND WEATHER FORECASTS, VISIT: MAY 7, MONDAY -Moon at ascending node. American Medical Association founded, 1847. First exhibit by Group of Seven artists, 1920. MAY 8, TUESDAY -St. Julian of Norwich. Moon runs low. Director Roberto Rossellini born, 1906. The Beatles album Let It Be released in the U.K., 1970. MAY 9, WEDNESDAY -St. Gregory of Nazianzus. Truman Day (Missouri). Conjunction of Pluto and the Moon. First American political cartoon debuted in The Pennsylvania Gazette, 1754. MAY 10, THURSDAY -First submerged voyage around the world completed by submarine USS Triton, 1960. Poet Shel Silverstein died, 1999. All is not gold that glitters. MAY 11, FRIDAY -Pullman strike ended in defeat for organized labor, 1894. Waco Tornado (registered F5) hit downtown Waco, Texas, 1953. MAY 12, SATURDAY -Manitoba Act passed, approving Manitoba to become Canadian province, 1870. Alcoholics Anonymous founded, 1935. MAY 13, SUNDAY -Rogation Sunday. Mothers Day. Conjunction of Neptune and the Moon. Grissom Air Force Base near Peru, Indiana, reported wind gusts of 136 mph, 1995. Invitation to Bid Liberty County Board of County Commissioners, Emergency Management, will be accepting bids for a 32 X 72 X 12 Pole Barn with 6 Bays, installed. If more information is needed, please contact Rhonda Lewis at (850) 643-2339. All bidders should submit a sealed bid Bids will be accepted until 4:30 p.m. (ET) on May 10, 2012 at the Liberty County regularly scheduled Liberty County Board of County Commissioners Meeting that evening on May 10, 2012 at 6 p.m. (ET) at the Liberty County Courthouse, HWY 20 Bristol, FL 32321. The public is invited to attend. Please indicate on the outside of the sealed envelope that this bid is for a Pole Barn for Emergency Management. The Board of County Commissioners reserve the right to waive informalities in any bid and to accept or reject any or all bids and to accept the bid in their judgment that will be in the best interest of Liberty Coun ty. SPECIALTY POSTS Flat Face FACTORY SECONDS6'6" Posts, Top Size, under 2" 2-3" 3-4" 4-5" 5"+ ITEMS SUBJECT TO A V AILABILITY Liberty Post & Barn Pole Inc.Dempsey Barron Road, Bristol (Off Hwy. 12 N) Phone (850) 643-5995WE'VE GOT THE FENCE POSTS T O MEET YOUR NEEDS. establish experimen tal airmail routes, two simultaneous initial one from Washington, D.C., and the other from Long Island in New York, both headed to Philadelphia. President Woodrow Wilson and his wife stood by to watch the takeoff at Washington, D.C. The army pilot, Lt. George L. Boyle, who had only recently earned his wings, had trouble starting his Curtiss JN6H Jenny until his ground crew thought to check the fuel supply empty! The plane was refueled and Boyle took off, only to head off in the wrong direction. He eventually landed, low on fuel again, in a farmers east of Washington, D.C. The mail had to be picked up by automobile and returned to Washington, D.C.! Even when the postal service took over the reins from the army, in August of 1918, the planes they used were war-surplus De Havilland DH-4s, many of pilots who were now civilians looking for jobs in the air. Later, some custom-built mail planes were constructed by the Standard Aircraft Corporation. By 1959, the U.S. postal system was fooling around with missile mail sent on guided missiles launched from the navy submarine U.S.S. Barbero. The CalhounLiberty JOURNALServing two counties that make up one great community!HOURS: 9 a.m. 6 p.m. Monday thru Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Saturday (ET)PHONE (850) 643-333 FAX (850) 643-3334OFFICE DIRECTIONS: From State Road 20 in Bristol, turn south onto Pea Ridge Road, go one mile, turn east onto Summers Road and look for sign.

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Page 12 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL MAY 9, 2012 T upperwareSAVE MORE, SPEND LE SSEnjoy farm-fresh fruits, veggies and more, right from your fridge. With our Call Beth EubanksYOUR Tupperware Consultant at (850) 643-2498 or (850) 570-0235email at bethseubanks41 @aol.comFridgeSmart 7-Pc Get it All Set or FridgeSmart Large Round. New & Improvedstorage solutions, youll save more at home and spend less at the market.This past Saturday, Robert Davis visited the Blountstown Public Library to introduce his new book Out of Savannah. He autographed his works for patrons and did a wonderful and ter. The emotional times of war and the dangers around every corner make this researched account of history a very strong read. The Blountstown Public Library has purchased several books for check out. Library has copies of Out of Savannah ready for check outGRACEVILLE West Florida Electric Cooperative (WFEC) held its 75th Annual Meeting/Member Appreciation Day on Saturday, April 28 in Graceville. The event took place at the Graceville Civic Center from 8:00 a.m. until noon. Some of the activities taking place throughout the day included an expanded health fair with vendors from Northwest Florida Community Hospital, Audibel Hearing, Covenant Hospice, Eye Center South and Southeastern Chiropractic, blacksmithing & safety demonstrations, face painting, pony rides and more. Musical entertain ment was provided by Big Bend Bluegrass of Chipley. Member-owners registered for door prizes and enjoyed a great meal. In addition to these events, members of the coopera tive heard a keynote address from Congressman Steve Southerland, comments from Rep. Marti Coley, Rep. Brad Drake and Senator Don Gaetz. WFEC President & CEO, Bill Rimes also delivered his annual state of the cooperative address. As part of the cooperatives year-long 75th anniversary celebration, relatives of founding members were recognized and presented with commemorative gifts. Those recognized were: Annette Adams, daughter of the late W.R. Powell who surer of the board of trustees; Arthur & Tootsie Williams, son and daughter-in-law to the late A.L. Williams, Sr. who worked to solicit members and to secure right-ofway-easements for the new cooperative. Williams also had the distinction of colfrom Dock Peel who operated a small grocery outside of Graceville; Andy Andreasen, grandson of the late A.M. Andreasen who served on the coopas Vice President on that board; James Efurd, grandson of the late W.W. Henley who served as WFECs second president of the board of trustees from 1946 until distant cousins to the late Andrew Jackson president of the board of trustees and played an instrumental role in the establishment of West Florida Electric; Jim Baxley, nephew to the late Henry Sharon who also worked to help establish the cooperative during its early years. During the meeting, member-owners also had the opportunity to win a variety of prizes such as electric grills, small appliances, electronics and more. WFEC member, MaLinda Ragan of Graceville won the grand prize, a 4 kW portable generator. Members Paul Day and Rachel Cutchin also took home gift baskets from the event. Complimentary sandwiches were served for lunch by Southern Country Barbeque and drinks were provided throughout the day by cheerleaders from Sneads High School.West Florida Electric holds 78th annual meeting April 28 at the Graceville Civic Center WFEC member Annette Adams, receives a gift commemorating her late fathers work to organize West Florida Electric Cooperative during the 1930s from Terry Mullen, WFEC Manager, Marketing and Communications. FROM LEFT: Bill Rimes, WFEC President and CEO, Congressman Steve Southerland, Representative Brad Drake, Representative Marti Coley and Senator Don Gaetz. gathering at the library in Blountstown.

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MAY 9, 2012 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 13 Wedding Robyn Brannan and Bobby Gar rett, Jr. are pleased to announce their upcoming wedding July 7 at 3 p.m. (ET) at Lake Mystic Baptist Church. The reception will follow the ceremony at Veterans Memorial Civic Center. The brides parents are Stan and Debbie Brannan of Bristol. Her grandparents are Catherine Shelton and the late Gene Shelton of Chattahoochee and Merle Brannan and the late Parma Lee Brannan of Carrabelle. The grooms parents are Bobby Garrett, Sr. and Angela Garrett of Eastpoint. His grandparents are the late Pauline Garrett and Rita and Johnny McGough of Fort Deposit, AL. The bride is a 2010 Liberty County graduate and is currently attending Gulf Coast State College in Panama City. The groom is a 2009 Franklin County graduate and is selfemployed. All family and friends are invited to attend.Brannan, Garret will exchange wedding vows in Bristol July 7 BIRTHDAYSCHANNING ALAN CROSBYChanning celebrated his second birthday May 9. He is the son of Alan and Mandie Crosby of Bristol. His grandparents are Bubby and Melissa Shuler of Bristol and Mark and Charlotte Crosby of Sumatra. He loves tractors and enjoys swimming in the pool, being outside and being a big brother to Grayson. STRICKLANDS HARDW ARE 10898 NW SR 20 in Bristol (850) 643-2336 Mothers Day May 13$999 Assorted varieties. 7286701, 7286719 Plant material may vary by store.$2499(7302656)(7204639) $1499 $3999 $2499 $799Potting Mix w/Fertilizer........... Wild Bird Food..................... Garden Soil........................ BRAND$999 $699 $499 Flex-Tech 5/8 x 125 Hose $3499 Mobile Hose Reel Cart(7205271) holds 175 of 5/8 hose. Sturdy resin construction. Fully assembled$2999 FREE Pool Water Testing Available Tiki Torch $399 PRICES good May 1 May 31 $1699 bird. Wireless, transmits up to 100 to base station (8302655) or (8319964) Adirondack Lawn Chairs Folding Armchair 10% COUPONOFFAlene Ray Whitehead will be celebrating her 75th birthday Tuesday, May 22. To celebrate, a drop-in reception will be held Saturday, May 19 from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. at the Altha Church of God Fellowship Hall. The church is located on Fuqua Circle in Dollar General. All family, friends, former students, fellow teachers and acquaintances are invited to attend. Please no gifts, only your friendship and fellowship is requested.Reception May 19 to celebrate 75th birthday for Alene Ray Whitehead They exchanged vows May 4, 2005 at the Veterans Memorial Park in the Gazebo and are now celebrating their anniversary seven years later. Dallas was a graduate of Liberty County High School in 2002 and is currently enrolled at North Florida Cosmetology Institute to achieve her Cosmetology License. Chivas graduated from Liberty County High School in 2001 and has been employed with C.W. Roberts Construction Company for the past 10 years.LARRY DA WSONLarry Dawson will be celebrat ing his 56th birthday Saturday, May 12. He works with the Liberty County School System. He enjoys hunting and being around people. Dallas Hogans, Chivas Williams celebrate their 7th wedding anniversary

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Page 14 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL MAY 9, 2012The Florida Guides Association and Florida Keys Commercial Fishing Association on Wednesday honored three employees of the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) for their efforts to conserve marine life. Bill Kelly, executive director of the Florida Keys Commercial Fishing Association, recognized Jackie Fauls and the FWC partnered with the Keys group, Organized Fishermen of Florida, Monroe County States Attorney, House and Senate sponsors and to develop solutions. Capt. Pat Kelly, Florida Guides Association Year award. standing. Hart recently exceeded his required vessel patrol ing accidents. proud, Kelly said. Hes one of the Also at the meeting, the Florida Conservation Award. are vital to the resources of the state of Florida. Muller started the stock assessment group for the research arm of the agency more than 20 years ago. His work on assessments of snook, spotted Mike Murphy, Mullers supervisor. His inquisitive nature and willingness to share his knowledge with Fishing associations honor three employees of FWC or the similar-looking and onceThe Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) voted Wednesday to allow harvest of the species in Florida state waters at its Commission meeting. This change includes adding and the creation of a 66-inch mini mum size limit when measured from the lower jaw to the fork of the tail. comes into Florida waters. State waters are from shore to three miles in the Atlantic and from shore to nine miles in the Gulf. Federal with white marlin. Genetic testing of tournament entries along the 19 percent of tournament-winning white marlin were actually roundin federal waters off the coast of NOAA Highly Migratory Species Division, the group that makes federal management plans for spesuch. These federal and state changes will increase the amount of data understand the species and its role in our waters. a white marlin and a roundscale vent. As shown in the photograph a white marlin. The scales in the middle of the two species, with the roundscales of a white marlin.FWC Commissioners open roundscale The 2012 recreational red snapper season in Gulf 10, a total of 40 days. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) set the 2012 season Wednesday, May The state season is the same as the recently announced federal recreational red snapper season. The Commission also voted to keep a 40-day, June 1 through July 10 season regardless of whether the federal season is further shortened. Florida state waters in the Gulf extend out to nine nautical miles from snapper produce more eggs than younger females. and going consistent with the federal season will at the recovery, we are going in the right direction The Lake House Restaurant Phone (850) 674-5253 ( LAKE ) kids menu BUMBLE BEE TRAPS Become a Volunteer Help an abused, Florida Guardian ad Litem FoundationPHONE Discover how you can make a difference in a childs life.

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MAY 9, 2012 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 15 643-4247 (Hair)Nancys Hair DesignATCome see Nancy & Shaula 12154 Hwy. 20 W Dont let summer arrive without being prepared. Check out our TANNING Give her a special gift...We have a lot of ideas to choose from, come see us and plan that special surprise for your mom Not sure what Mom would want? Remember Mom Liberty County. Where dreams come true. This is the place they call Gods country. A place where you can still walk in a store and people say hello. A place where you are greeted with a warm welcome after years of being gone and there is always someone to pick you up and people really care. On that note, we, the Kent family would like to say thank you to the Liberty County Board of Commissioners, Kevin Brown, Katie Phillips, as well as William Manning of Chariot Construction and staff for taking such great pride in their work with the SHIP program. Again, thanks from The Kent Family Totes, handbags, cards, frames, wind chimes, fragrances, & more.Golden Pharmacy 17324 Main Street N. in Blountstown TELEPHONE 674-4557 CARDS 50% offall the time Its VerY Wise to Advertise Make the most of your business with an ad in The Calhoun-Liberty JOURNALPHONE (850) 643-3333 thejournal@fairpoint.net Fisheries biologists often refer to To develop and sustain high quality ponents need to be addressed. Most biologists stress that habitat from water quality and quantity, to the amount of structure, including aquatic plants and resulting forage may be the most critical. However, managing the people aspect, which includes engaging the public in resource stewardship, outdoor recreation and harvest regulations, is often the most visible approach. Lake Talquin, an 8,800-acre reservoir near Tallahassee, is an excel lent example of the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commissions (FWCs) three-tier approach. The res ervoir, which was formed by damming the Ochlockonee River for hydroelectric generation, is known as a crapsteep embankments provided a limited zone for bass to spawn and where submerged aquatic plants could grow. Those plants help currents and provide hide and feed. Consequently, FWC biologists implemented a three-phased approach to manage largemouth bass there, beginning in 2000 by planting shoreline implementing an 18-inch minimum size limit on black bass. Today, native bulrush, much of which was transplanted by FWC programs, comprises 5 percent of the shoreline. The goal is 7 percent to 10 percent. Since then, the FWC has stocked more than 700,000 advanced-sized (3large numbers at hatcheries because of their cannibal istic nature and the pond space and time required. However, these stockings, using fish from the two FWC freshwater hatcheries (Blackwater in Santa Rosa County and the Florida Bass Conservation Center in Sumter County) proved immensely successful. Timely releases of 2to 3-inch hatchery bass, reared in ponds on natural food, resulted in 17 percent to in Lake Talquin from October 2000comprised about 25 percent of the angler catch from bass tournaments on determine the presence of a codedwire tag that biologists implanted in before stocking. (See MyFWC.com/ Fishing, and click on Freshwater then Stocking for a video of the tagging process.) Since 2010, at least 15 hatchery bass weighing 8 to 11.5 pounds have been recaptured from Lake Talquin. harvested, or caught-and-released, by anglers who didnt know they were holding a hatchery-spawned bass. Supplemental stocking and aquatic plant management activities, as well as the 18-inch minimum length limit may have contributed to the trophy Talquin. Previous stocking efforts typically which were pond-reared in hatcheries on zooplankton to a size of about 1 to able to predators. Unfortunately, raising enough 3to 4-inch bass in hatchery ponds to lakes in Florida is cost-prohibitive. As a result, the FWC is experiment ing with two alternate approaches. and a method the FWC developed to rather than each other, so they can be grown in intensive tank management systems more cost effectively. The other involves tricking adult bass in hatcheries using light and temperature to spawn earlier (or later) than they would in nature. This allows pondreared, Phase-I bass to be stocked when there is abundant forage, such Charlie Mesing, the FWC Habitat and Species Conservation biologist responsible for helping manage Lake Talquin, and other FWC scientists experimented with the latter approach cation concluded that stocking low numbers of 3to 4-inch pond-reared which occurs around mid-May in Largemouth bass are not the only ters by the FWC. Anglers can learn more about the species and locations stocked by visiting MyFWC.com/ Fishing. Recently, signs have been posted at boat ramps where stockings have taken place. The signs have a QR code, which anglers with smart phones can scan to learn more about stockings that took place at their locale. During 2010-11, more than 4 milpublic waters. The FWC is on schedule to meet or exceed that goal for 201112 and continues to study ways to make stocking more successful, while enhancing habitat and using appropriate regulations to ensure Florida the world.Lake Talquin hatchery bass making a difference in Florida For the Kids! Call for details...Classes 18831 State Road 20 West Blountstown (850) 674-2070H 2 O Wellness Center 18831 SR 20 W Blountstown Phone (850) 6745253 ( LAKE )$595 The Lake House Restaurant 1/2 sandwich & soup or salad Eastern chipmunks are thought to live in only a few locations in Northwest Florida but researchers with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) are asking anyone who has spotted one to report the sighting. Wildlife biologist Chris Winchester said information may be recorded at public.myfwc.com/hsc/chipmunk/ getlatlong.aspx. Smaller than a gray squirrel, the Eastern chipmunk is slightly reddish in color and has white and black stripes running down its back and light stripes above its eyes. Winchester said researchers are especially interested in new sighting data, but would like information on older sightings as well. He said chipmunks appear to be rare in Florida but historically have been found along the Escambia, Blackwater, Yellow and Choctawhatchee rivers. There are also reports of chipmunks observed in back yards, and in forested lots within urban areas. The species is more common in forested areas in the eastern half of the United States from Alabama north to Canada. Chipmunks are a species of special concern in Florida. He said the sighting study will be useful for a look at the species distribution, abundance and preferred habitat.FWC seeks help in chipmunk researchSince 2010, at least 15 hatchery bass weighing 8 to 11.5 pounds have been recaptured from Lake Talquin.

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Page 16 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL MAY 9, 2012 R OBOTICS COMPETITIONABOVE: Altha High School took 1st and 3rd place in the Log Book Competition. BELOW: Liberty County students Toren Guthrie, Brandon Jenkins and Ethan Foran work with their robot. LEFT: Liberty Countys Brandon Jenkins and Ethan Foran tinker with their robot before the competition. BELOW: Liberty County students Jessica Read, Tyler Myers, Brandon Jenkins, Tyler Sikes, Travis Beasley watch anxiously as the robots compete. DANIEL WILLIAMS PHOTOSAltha teams take one rst place win and place third in two events

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MAY 9, 2012 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 17 The Lake House Restaurant A vailable on any day or time. Call or come by and visit us to schedule your next event. MON TUE-SA T WED-THURS FRI-SA T SUNCLOSEDLunch 10:30 a.m. to 8 p.m.10:30 a.m. to 9 p.m.10:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. (850) 674-5253 (LAKE)CHECK OUT OUR WEBSITE AT Serving lunch and dinner Make a memory this Mother's Day Mom can enjoy a glass of wine and admire the view while her steak is cooking! DELIVERY AVAILABLE DURING THESE HOURS, AS WELL Mom eats free with party of four or more! The Beau Turner Youth Conservation Center in Jefferson County is offering weekly day-camp sessions this summer for youth ages 10-15 who are interested in hunting and related outdoor activities. During hunt camp, participants will learn about Floridas great hunting heritage and be taught such tree-stand safety. Campers also will learn conservation, land stewardship and about hunting laws and ethics. Participants will spend extensive time on several gun while theyre at camp, if they choose to do so. There will be four weeks of camp, all during the month of June, and the sessions are June 4-8, June 1115, June 18-22 and June 25-29. Hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday and 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Fridays. The cost for each weekly session is $175 and parents may register their children at BTYCC.org. For more information, contact Kelly Langston at Kelly.Langston@ MyFWC.com. MARIANNAThe family of the late Tracy Williams Wierman has established a memorial scholarship at Chipola College in her honor. Wierman was a teacher at Golson Elementary School at the time of her death in 2011. The partial scholarship is available to an elementary education major who is a senior in Chipolas four-year Teacher Education program. The scholarship may be used for tuition or books. Application deadline is June 7. Applicants must have a minimum 2.5 GPA at Chipola and must exhibit good moral character. Applicants also must write a letter describing Applications are available in the Chipola College edu or phone (850) 718-2404.Tracy Williams Wierman memorial scholarshipTeams come together for annual Relay for Life

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Page 18 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL MAY 9, 2012SCHOOL LUNCH MENU May 9-15, 2012 LIBERTY Wednesday BREAKFAST: Sausage and gravy biscuit. LUNCH: Chicken alfredo with pasta or cheeseburger on bun or taco chef salad with tortilla shells with mixed vegetables, caesar side salad with dressing and petite banana. (2nd & 3rd grade pizza) Thursday BREAKFAST: French toast sticks with ham. LUNCH: Sloppy joe sandwich or PB&J on autumn grain or buffalo chicken salad and crackers with dirty rice, steamed broccoli, green beans and orange wedges. Friday BREAKFAST: Grilled cheese on whole wheat. LUNCH: Chuck wagon chicken and gravy or meatball sub or turkey and cheese chef salad with potato wedges, seasoned corn, salad with dressing and grape juice. (4th grade pizza) Monday BREAKFAST: Breakfast burrito. LUNCH: Meatloaf or turkey club sandwich or grilled chicken wrap with baked sweet potato, whole kernel corn, dinner roll and orange wedges. (Kg & 1st grade pizza). Tuesday ham. LUNCH: Glazed ham or cheeseburger on bun or baby turkey, ham & cheese sub with steamed broccoli, green peas, biscuit, tossed salad with dressing and chilled pears.*Each breakfast includes a choice of assorted cereal with whole wheat buttered toast and assorted fruit or fruit juice. CA L HOUN Wednesday BREAKFAST: Ham and egg biscuit with potato tots. LUNCH: Chicken nuggets with mashed potatoes, whole kernel corn, mixed fruit and whole wheat roll.Thursday BREAKFAST: Cheese toast with grits and ham cubes.LUNCH: Lemon butter chicken with buttered rice, green beans, whole wheat roll and diced peaches.Friday BREAKFAST: French toast sticks and syrup with sausage patty.LUNCH: Cheese pizza with garden salad, fresh fruit and home baked cookie.Monday BREAKFAST: Ham and scrambled eggs with buttered toast. LUNCH: Chicken BBQ sandwich with baked potato wedges and mixed fruit.Tuesday BREAKFAST: Pancakes and syrup with sausage patty. LUNCH: Beef-a-roni with steamed broccoli and cheese, mixed fruit and bread stick. Laban Bontrager, DMD, Monica Bontrager, DMDPea Ridge Rd in Bristol, Phone (850) 643-5417MENUS SPONSORED BY: Bristol Dental Clinic blountstown high school Business Education students at BHS have been working hard all year to achieve their Microsoft Specialist Several other students have passed the tests for MiSuperintendent McClellan wished to congratulate Wednesday, May 9: Cap and Gown Pictures; Friday, May 11: and Seniors Saturday, May 12: FCMonday, May 14: Tuesday, May 15: BHS Calendar of Events traveled to Chipola College to attend the annual Brain representing schools in surrounding counties partici BHS students place second in the Chipola Brain Bowl to participation in sports and current BHS students talked about the Clubs active on BHS host freshmen-to-be orientation for BMS and Carr students May 3 FROM LEFT: Tommy McClellan Superintendent, Chloe McCleod, Olivia Atkins, Destiny Boutwell, Neel Hampton, Sarah McCausland, Audrey Ryals, Jessie West, Haileigh Pippin, Drew Bryant, Kaycee Yon, MeShae Hall and Business Ed. Teacher, Debra Perdue. FROM LEFT: Mrs. Allyson Howell, Harrison Coley, Saad Farooqi, Mitchell Darnell and Caitlyn Stewart. Btown elementary school Be sure to purchase your yearbook *Friday, May 11 *Friday, May 18 Calhoun County Wide events included were the Calhoun County wide track meet May 3 HOURS: 9 a.m. 6 p.m. Monday thru Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. OFFICE DIRECTIONS: From State Road 20 in Bristol, turn south onto Pea Ridge Road, go one mile, turn east onto Summers Road and look for sign.PHONE (850) 643-3333 FAX (850) 643-3334The Calhoun-LibertyJOURNALServing two counties that make up one great community!

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MARIANNAThe Community Foundation of Sarasota County, Inc., from the Edward K. Roberts Fund established a scholarship at Chipola College for the upcoming Summer Session II and Fall 2012. The scholarship fund was created with a $50,000 donation from the Community Foundation of Sarasota County with funds from the estate of the late Edward K. Roberts. The scholarship will be available for the Summer II Session at Chipola College and the application deadline is May 16. Deadline for Fall 2012 is June 7. Preference will be given to part-time students who may aid. Applicants must maintain a minimum 2.0 GPA each semester at Chipola, must have a minimum 2.0 high school GPA, and must follow standard college requirements. A description of the scholarship and application are available online at www.chipola.edu/ foundation To contact the Chipola Foundation, call (850) 7182445. MAY 9, 2012 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 19 by Cortney HarrisThere will be a 5K run sponsored by FCCLA beginning at 8 a.m. Saturday, May 12 at the Train Depot in Blountstown. This is a fundraiser to help send 10 Calhoun County students to compete at the FCCLA National Conference in July. Registration is from 6:40-7:40 a.m. The pre-registra tion fee for the 5K is $15 and if you register the morning of the event it is $20. T-shirts will be given out to all those who participate. There will be a one mile fun run and walk following the 5K run. Those who are interested in participating in this event will be charged $10 for early registration and $15 if you register Saturday morning. Anyone can run in either or both of these events. The students who will be attending the national conference from Altha School are Cortney Harris, Alicia Collin Mears, Caylynn Reeder and Katie Detweiler. Sky Pickron will be attending from Carr School. Blountstown High School is sending Justin Terry to nationals as well. All of these students are working very hard to raise the money they need for nationals this year.FCCLA fundraiser 5K/fun run mile planned SaturdayABOVE: Fifth grader Austin Roberts with his project on Pennsylvania. LEFT: Morgan Lewis showing her project on Guatemala. Last Friday, Altha Schools High School World History and American History this years Worlds Fair. Students worked with their team to create displays based on their assigned country or state. The 10th and 11th graders were judged and graded based on their overall display and what they know about their country. The winners were Morgan Lewis and Crystal Finuff. ects some students stood out as engaging their audience. Those with Honorable Mention were Madison Boggs (Hawaii), Bethany Griswell (Mississippi), James Boatwright (Ohio), Austin Roberts (Pennsylvania) and Braeden Raper (Washington D.C.).Altha students travel around the world with this years World Fair Altha school competed May 1 in the annual Robotics competition hosted by the Chipola Regional Workforce Development Board in Marianna. This is the schools third year of competition. We had two teams to compete. The Leadership Class robot The Shoal team, which consisted of Hunter Baggett, Christina Watson, Chelsey Jones, Madison placed First in the Log Book Competition which consisted of a Log Book document ing the design process, the challenges faced during robot construction and how the team met those challenges as well as an Interview the day of competition. The Ag team Team Optimus, with Brooke Coleman, Jacob OBryan and Tyler Bramblett, placed third in the Log Book Competition as well as third in actual Head to Head Competition using their robot.Altha competes in annual Robotics competition May 1The Leadership class and the Ag class show off their plaques and trophies. altha wildcats Childrens Show Finale at Chipola ThursdayThe Chipola College Theater is in rehearsal for the childrens show, Finale, which will be presented to hundreds of elementary school children in May. A public performance is set for Thursday, May 10 at 7 p.m. Many scholarships available for Summer Session II and Fall 2012 at Chipola College

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Page 20 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL MAY 9, 2012 The annual county-wide 4-H/ Tropicana Public Speaking Contest was held Wednesday, May 2 at Veterans Memorial Civic Center. The school administrators, principals, teachers, parents, students and friends who came to hear the outstanding speeches delivered by students from Tolar and Hosford Schools. The program is designed to give delivery of a speech. Each student writes a two to three minute speech on a topic of their choice to present to their classmates. They are judged on composition and presentation. The classroom winner then competes at their school to establish school winners. The school winners compete with other school winners in the school district. It is important for all students to have an opportunity to take pride in All winners receive plaques. First place winners also receive a 4-H camp scholarship, compliments of Tropicana Beverage Company. Second place winners receive a 4-H day camp scholarship, compliments of the Elementary Division winners: Brady Peddie, Taryn Kirkland and Abbott. ger will compete in a multicounty contest Thursday, May 10 in Tallahassee. BACK ROW, from left: Brady Peddie, Jonathan Day, Mary Beth Brown, Caroline Carson, Blake Tharpe, Marinda Geiger. FRONT ROW: Jakob Abbott, Taryn Kirkland, Justin Day, Luke Johnson Lindsey Marotta and Tucker Singletary.Day, Geiger win County Tropicana Speech contestOn Friday, April 13 Tolar students celebrated their academic achievements and being an A school with a special Liberty Idol skit put on by the teachers and staff, followed by a day of fun in the sun! The Liberty Idol skit, a spoof of American Idol, consisted of a variety of performances by teachers and staff singing songs of encouragement to the students. Our host was Ryan Seacrest played Lopez played by Misty Sizemore and Steven Tyler played by Link Barber. After the staff performances students were rewarded with cash for achieving high levels on the FCAT assessment last year. After the skit, students rotated through stations that had games, water slides, obstacle courses and much more. Tolar students and staff would like to thank Doobie Andy Bodiford and his wife and many others for cooking lunch for all the students and staff. It was delicious! This entire event would have not been possible without the planning committee and Tolars teachers and staff to keep things running smoothly. We are very proud of our students and are looking forward to the academic achievements we are making this year!Tolars A Celebration Chris Summers, Misty Sizemore and Link Barber dress up as American Idol judges. TOLAR SCHOOLMARIANNAInstructors from the Chipola College Automotive Technology program are featured in a Video Training Series released by BBB Industries and now available on the web. series: Meters and Test Equipment for Automotive Troubleshooting is available at www.youtube.com/watch?v=aDy9lGNeQM The video offers an overview, and shows proper use of common meters like the DVOM, VAT 40, VAT 45, MT3750 and more. The training videos were Service Technology Program and are Gardner and Chase Vlieg who are both The new video training series was developed with BBB Industries, the leading remanufacturer of automotive rotating electrical equipment (alternators and starters). BBB representatives visited the Chipola Automotive program in March to shoot three programs in the series. assistant instructor Chase Vlieg wrote the scripts for the series and are featured on Electrical Fundamentals, Meters and Test Equipment, and Magnetism were produced during the Chipola shoot. BBB also donated alternators and starters valued at $5,000 to be used for training in the Chipola program. BBB is a major supplier to Auto Value/Bum per to Bumper, Carquest, OReillys, Parts Plus and NAPA, all of which have representatives on the Chipola Automotive Technology Advisory Committee. The videos will be available to parts stores, shops, technicians and the do-ityourselfers. Chipola and other NATEF Tri-States Automotive representatives Walter Spence, Bill Stevens and Ronnie Stevens also assisted with the program. Ricky Miller of Rahal-Miller Chevrolet, Cadillac, representing General Motors, provided a new Electric Chevy Volt for the production. Chipola automotive program training video is releasedInstructors from the Chipola College Automotive Technology program are featured in a Video Training Series released by BBB Industries and now available on the web. Chipola instructors John Gardner (center) and assistant instructor Chase Vlieg (right) wrote the scripts for the series and are featured as the on-screen talent.

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MAY 9, 2012 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 21 TOLAR SCHOOL TOP: Liberty County School Superintendent School Summers reads Curious George Makes Pancakes to a group of Tolar School Caryl Marotta presented books to the kids. BELOW: Tolar Assistant Principal Jeff Sewell United Way donates books to rst graders at Tolar School SIXTH GRADE DIVISION Third place, Caroline place, Blake Tharpe. FOURTH AND FIFTH GRADE DIVISION First place, Lindsey Marotta; second place, Luke Johnson; third place, Taryn Kirkland. place winners in the annual Tropicana Speech Contest held at Tolar School Friday, April 6. to write a speech and present it to their class. Three winners are chosen from each homeroom class and then those students compete to place as a winner for their wide competition. were Coleby Hall, Taryn Kirkland, Shaylynn Pleasant, Luke Johnson, Lindsey Marotta and Kelsey Nobles. In Blake Tharpe and Kaylee Wheetley. Johnson came in second place and Taryn Kirkland came place and Caroline Carson came in third place. We would like to thank Mr. Barber, Mr. Sewell and Our winners went on to the district competition on proud to announce : sionTolar Tropicana Speech winnersBlake Tharpe, Lindsey Marotta take top honors in schoolwide competition & place in districtTolar School youngsters who are learning the basics of reading received a special gift last week to encourage their efforts. The were each given their own copy of the childrens book, Curious George Makes Pancakes by Margrett and H.A. Rey, courtesy of the United Ways Read United campaign. School Superintendent Sue Summers, School Marotta, Tolar Assistant Principal Jeff Sewell, Mentor Teacher Jill Davis and Director of Instruction Gay Lewis visited with the kids and read the book to them last week. More than 70 book. The program provided books for approximately in several Big Bend counties, including Liberty, Leon, Franklin, Gadsden, Jefferson, Madison, Taylor and Wakulla.

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Page 22 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL MAY 9, 2012 Dear EarthTalk: Why is Greenpeace upset with some leading tech companies for so-called dirty cloud computing? Can you explain? -Jeremy Wilkins, Waco, TX Leading tech companies like Google, Apple and Microsoft are now offering unprecedented amounts of data storage and access to apps on huge Internet-connected servers, saving consumers and businesses the hassle of installing and running programs and storing information on their own local computers. This emerging trend, dubbed cloud computing, means that these providers have had to scale up their power consumption considerably, as they are increasingly responsible for providing more and more of the computing horsepower required by the worlds two billion Internet users. No doubt, sharing such resources on centralized servers is dantix estimates that companies off-loading data and ser vices to cloud servers could save $12 billion off their energy bills and reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 85 million metric tons within the next decade. But for the greenhouse gas savings to be realized, the companies offering cloud computing services need to make the right energy choices. Greenpeace has been tracking sustainability among tech companies for over a decade, and recently released a report, How Green is Your Cloud? assessing the green footprint of the move to cloud computing. According to the analysis, some of the major players (Google, Facebook and Yahoo) have gone to great lengths to ensure need come from clean, green sources like wind and solar. But Greenpeace chastises others (Apple, Amazon and Microsoft) for relying on so-called dirtier sources of power, such as coal and nuclear, to run their huge data centers. When people around the world share their music or photos on the cloud, they want to know that the cloud is powered by clean, safe energy, says Gary Cook, a Senior Policy Analyst with Greenpeace. panies like Apple, Amazon and Microsoft are building data centers powered by coal and acting like their customers wont know or wont care. Theyre wrong. Greenpeaces report evaluates 14 machains in use across more than 80 differ ent data centers that power cloud-based services. Some of the largest data centers are in buildings so big they are visible from space and use as much power as 250,000 European homes. If the cloud were its own country, says Greenpeace, it would rank 5th in the world in electricity consumption. Companies like Google, Yahoo and Facebook are beginning to lead the sector down a clean energy pathway through ing renewable energy access when siting their data centers, and demanding better energy options from utilities and government decision-makers, reports Greenpeace. But unfortunately the majority of the industry is not marching in step. As such, Greenpeace is calling on all tech companies with cloud services to develop siting policies based on access to clean energy sources, invest in or directly purchase renewable energy, be transparent about their energy usage, share innovative solutions so the sector as a whole can improve, and demand that governments and utilities increase the percentage of clean, green power available on the grid.Dear EarthTalk: I understand there is to be another Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil in June 2012, 20 years since the last one was held in the same city. Whats on the agenda this time?-Janet Grayson, Albuquerque, NM According to the United Nations, the so-called Rio+20 able Developmentis a new attempt in a new millen nium to lay the foundations of a world of prosperity, peace and sustainability. The event will take place June 20-22, the 20th anniversary of 1992s United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development (UNCSD) the Rio Earth Summitand the 10th anniversary of the 2002 World Summit on Sustainable Development in Johannesburg. The main agenda items will be reviewing the progress tainability, assessing responses to the newly emerging challenges faced by our societies, and strengthening political commitments to sustainable development. the green economy to foster sustainable development and poverty eradication, and setting up an effective institutional framework for future global sustainable development initiatives. Delegates from the 200+ nations will focus on sustainable cities, decent jobs, food security and sustainable agriculture, energy, oceans, and disaster readiness. To the World Resources Institute (WRI), a Washington, DC-based think tank devoted to sustainability issues, Rio+20 is important as it forces the worlds nations to to the policies designed to foster economic growth that is both inclusive and respects the planets limited carrying capacity. WRI adds that amid a global recession, a widening gap between rich and poor and heightened competition for energy, food and other natural resources, the confer ence couldnt be timelier but unfor tunately, no clear vision for Rio+20 has emerged, and expectations... remain low. But confer ence participants are busy preparing. The Stakeholder Forum for a Sustainable Future (SFSF), a network of non-governmental participants, is busy developing the Global Transition 2012 culled from organizations and thought leaders around the world. A goal of the initiative is to achieve an outcome from Rio+20 that catalyses a Global Transition to an economy that maximizes well-being, operates within environmental limits and is capable of coping and adapting to global environmental change, reports the SFSF. The Global Transition 2012 initiative will propose focused and accessible goals, targets and policy interventions that will chart a clear route towards the greening of the global economy, and the achievement of social and economic justice. Rio+20 participants hope this event will be remembered as an historic occasion when nations of the world aligned behind the cause of staving off global environmental catastrophe. But the more likely outcome is a few non-binding agreements that will soon be forgotten by constituents, the media and even many of the participat ing countries. Not since 1987s Montreal Protocol to phase out ozone-depleting chemicals have nations of the world been without any binding agreements already on the table, Rio+20 doesnt look to dazzle either. ADOPT A PET through the JOURNAL CLASSIFIEDS! Guardian ad Litem volunteers are powerful voices in the lives of abused and neglected children in our community. Join us and speak up for a child! Call the Guardian ad Litem Program at (850) 482-9127 or (850) 638-60433.

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MAY 9, 2012 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 23 All existing pre-need and at need contracts are now handled by the Bevis family and staff.All operations of the funeral process will be handled on location at 12008 NW State Road 20.CALL 643-3636Todd Wahlquist, Rocky Bevis & Ed PeacockLicensed Funeral Directors & Crematoryevis FuneralHome Bof Bristol of Bristol Two locations to serve youBlountstown and Bristol Adams Funeral Home674-5449 or 643-5410Visit us online: www.adamsfh.com OBITUARIES Telephone (850) 674-2266 Y our hometown funeral home since 1994A Hometown Funeral Director You Can Trust and Depend On!Funeral Services with Dignity, Caring and Professionalism. Marlon PeavyPeavy Funeral Home& CrematoryPA TRICIA ANN HOOKS BLOUNTSTOWN Patricia Ann Hooks, 69, of Blountstown, passed away April 30, 2012 at her home. She was born on February 1, 1943 in Blountstown and had lived in Blountstown for most of her life. She was retired from Florida State Hospital with over 20 years of service as a UTC specialist. Patricia was of the Baptist faith. Survivors include one daughter, Regina Hooks of Blountstown; one brother, Doug Pelt and his wife, Janie of Clarksville; two sisters, Flora Kepser of W arrington and Betty Morris of T allahassee; one granddaughter, T yT iana Hooks of Blountstown. Services were held Thursday, May 3 at Peavy Funeral followed in Pine Memorial Cemetery. Peavy Funeral Home in Blountstown was in charge of the arrangements. SUSIE MAE (WOOD) MAYO HOSFORD S usie Mae ( W ood) Mayo, 82, of Hosford and a former resident of Blountstown, passed away Monday, May 1, 2012 in T allahassee. She was born in Douglas, GA and had lived in Hosford since 2004, coming from Blountstown. She worked in a Cigar Factory and Russells Sewing Factory for a number of years. She was a member of Corinth Baptist Church in Hosford, where she was a member of the Older W iser Leaders (OWL) and a former member of Blountstown Assembly of God Church. She truly enjoyed attending the Hosford Senior Citizens Association. She was preceded in death by her husbands, W .R. W ood and Ransom J. Mayo; a daughter, Marie Mayo Dykes; a grandson, Danny Langston and a brother, George T aft. S urvivors include two sons, James Mayo and his wife, Lucretia of Bristol and Mike Mayo and his wife, Bonnie of Altha; one daughter, Helen L angston and her husband, Joe of Hosford; a step-brother, Richard Bradford and his wife, L ynn of Homerville, GA; two sisters, Carolyn S mith Holloway, all of Homerville, GA; six grandchildren, Steve Langston and his wife, Heidi, David Langston and his wife, Diane, W ayne, Ricky and T erry Mayo and Dianne Dykes; great-grandchildren, Alisha Sadler, Kalan Langston and several other great-grandchildren; great-great-grandchildren, Makenna and Gabe Patton and several other great-great-grandchildren. Services were held Friday, May 4 at Corinth Baptist ment followed in Pine Memorial Cemetery. Peavy Funeral Home in Blountstown was in charge of the arrangements. JOHN W. (PETE) BAGGETT ALTHAJohn W (Pete) Baggett, 89, of Altha, passed away Monday, May 1, 2012 in Marianna. He was born February 10, 1923 in Altha and had lived in Jackson County for several years. He was a retired cattle farm manager and worked with the State of Florida as a mechanic for a number of years. Pete was a member of Cypress Grove Assembly of God Church in the Dellwood Community in Jackson County. He was preceded in death by his parents, W illiam King and Maude Baggett; two brothers, Bill and Ellis Baggett; four sisters, Nancy Pierce, Sis Sewell, Fronie Adkins and Kansas Burke and his wife of 65 years, Alma. Survivors include his wife, Mary Baggett of Altha, four sons, Carlton Baggett and his wife, Marie of Altha, James Henderson and his wife, Regina of Dothan, AL, Rodney Henderson and his wife, Lisa of Cottonwood, AL, Kem Henderson and his wife, Cynthia of Gordon, AL; brothers, L.N. Baggett of Altha and Bobby BagNenver Grooms, Dorothy Bethel and Sue Baggett, all of Altha; grandchildren, Farlon Baggett, Ronda Pumphrey, Brent Baggett, Matthew, Justin and Lacy Henderson; great-grandchildren, Amy Kitchen, Sherry McCrone, Levi and W rangler Baggett and Zack Henderson; greatgreat-grandchildren, K L eigh and L ogan Kitchen, T arrin and Raylee McCrone. Services were held Friday, May 4 at 6 p.m. (CT) at Cypress Grove Assembly of God Church with Rever end Dr. Charlie Fowler and Reverend W ayne Fussell Cemetery. Peavy Funeral Home in Blountstown is in charge of the arrangements. GEORGE PEL T SR. BLOUNTSTOWNGeorge Pelt, Sr., 94, of Blountstown, passed away Saturday, May 5, 2012 in Blountstown. He was born February 26, 1918 in Calhoun County and had lived there all of his life. He, along with his wife, Jeanette were owners and operators of Pelts Department Store in Blountstown from 1936 until 1972. Army. He was an avid golfer and a member of the First Baptist Church in Blountstown. He was preceded in death by his wife, Jeanette Pelt Survivors include one son, Mark Pelt and his wife, Denise of Perry; two daughters, Patricia Pelt Hodges and her husband, Jack of Fanning Spring and Phyllis Bailey and her husband, Greg of Blountstown, nine grandchildren, six great-grandchildren and one greatgreat-grandchild. Services were held May 6 at Peavy Funeral Home Pine Memorial Cemetery. Peavy Funeral Home in Blountstown was in charge of the arrangements. In Loving Memory of our MamaQ E. B M S 11/19/26 3/30/94 JOYCE LOVIE BROWN BLOUNTSTOWN Joyce L ovie Brown, 73, of Blountstown, passed away Sunday, May 6, 2012 in Blountstown. She was born March 6, 1939 in Frink and had lived in Calhoun County all of her life. She worked for the Calhoun County Recycling Center as manager for 10 years. She was a member of Sunny Hill Pentecostal Holiness Church in Altha. She was preceded in death by her husbands, Johnny Faircloth and Buddy Brown; a son, Henry Faircloth and a sister, Linda Nichols. his wife, Vaneisa of Bristol, W ayne Brown and his wife, Nikki of Altha, Floyd Brown and his wife, Pam of Blountstown, Jerry Brown and his wife, Julie of Clarksville, Edward Squirrel Hill of Blountstown; four daughters, Faye Skaggs and her husband, Doug of L ynn Haven, Marie Kammerdiener and her husband, Robert of Pensacola, Patsy Guzman and her husband, Andres of Altha and Denise Exum of Blountstown; two Liberty County, Shirley Faye Brown of Scotts Ferry, 20 grandchildren and 30 great-grandchildren. Family will receive friends W ednesday, May 9 from 5 p.m. (CT) to 7 p.m. at Peavy Funeral Home. Services will be held Thursday, May 10 at 11 a.m. (CT) at Peavy Funeral Home Chapel with Reverend will follow in Pine Memorial Cemetery. Peavy Funeral Home in Blountstown is in charge of the arrangements. ERNEST LEE HARDEE Ernest Lee Hardee, 99, of Quincy, passed away Saturday, April 21, 2012 in T allahassee. He was born March 18, 1913 in Marianna to Leila Richbourg and Andrew G. Hardee. On July 10, 1935 he married Ora Chason of Greensboro. He was a member of the Faith Heritage Church where he served as a deacon and on the building committee for two renovation projects. He was also on the board of trustees. He was a hard worker, having several years after it closed to make sure the building was secure and as overseer of the sales of the companys inventory. He was preceded in death by his wife, Ora Chason; and a sister, Nizie Hardee Sykes. Survivors include his daughter, Annette and her husband Philip R. Eckstadt of Quincy; one sister, Myrlene H. Chason of Hosford; a very special niece who grew up with him like a sister, Marion Mercer of Hosford and many other nieces and nephews. Services were held Monday, April 23 at the Faith Cemetery. Charles McClellan Funeral Home in Quincy was in charge of the arrangements.

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Since Im connected with the PanSaddleback caterpillar Puss caterpillar Io moth caterpillar Hag caterpillar Page 24 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL MAY 9, 2012 GARDENING by Theresa Friday, Horticulture Extension Agent, Santa Rosa County Best of the Latest Country Charted songs, mixed in with your favorite oldies. K102.7 FM Hometown News, weather and river readings at 8 a.m. ET. Our daily newscast also airs at 1 p.m. and again at 5 p.m. ET. Swap Shop with Ruth from 9-10 a.m. ET (sometimes even longer!) Buy, Sell, Trade or Give Stuff Away.K102.7 is the voice of the Liberty County Bulldogs, the Blountstown High Tigers, Florida Gators and the Miami Dolphins WPHK Radio K-102.7 FM WYBT Radio Y-1000 AM EDDIE NOBLES LAND CLEARING Call Eddie Nobles at (850) 447-0449 or Chas at 447-0849Located in Bristol Land clearing, excavation and root raking: CITY TIRE CO.Make her day special on May 13, the day we honor her kindness, love and everything she does for us, right from beginning to end. Remember Mom on Sunday! NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours or responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment.Cataracts?Freedom from Eye Glasses, Now a reality for many. and Cataract SpecialistSmart Lenses SMDr. Mulliss Smart LensSM procedure can produce clear vision without eyeglasses.Close-up, Far away & In-between CALL TODAY for a Smart Lens Evaluation NICE CARof Forgotten Coast LLC Why shop with us? We beat major city prices! Carrabelle, Florida Call us at (850) 697-4383

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MAY 9, 2012 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 25 Students write in their civics notebook as the representatives explain their job responsibilities Hosford School hosted Government Day on Thursday, April 26. Many of Floridas elected officials came and spoke with civics students from Hosford and Tolar Schools about their role and responsibilities in their elected positions. Students were given the opportunity to meet each of them and ask questions after the presentations. We are so grateful for their willingness to take the time and come speak with our students. We believe our kids have a greater appreciation for our government leaders and the jobs they do to make our lives a little easier. We thank each of the following for participating in our Government Day activities: U.S. Senator Bill Nelson represented by Lynn Bannister U.S. Representative Steve Southerland represented by Jonathan Hayes State Senator Bill Montford represented by Melissa Durham State Representative Marti Coley Superintendent of Schools Sue Summers Liberty County School Board Member Kyle Peddie County Commissioner Davis Stoutamire Clerk of Court Robert Hill represented by Kathy Brown Liberty County Sheriff Donnie Conyers Supervisor of Elections Marcia Wood Judge Ken Hosford Mayor, Paul Kern represented by Betty Brantley, Former Mayor Bristol City Council Member Steve Cutshaw Governor Rick Scott, U.S. Senator Bill Nelson and U.S. Representative Steve Southerland were unable to attend, but did send a letter to students wishing them the best and encouraging them to take an active role in government. Hosford School hosts GOVERNMENT DAY Liberty County Commissioner Davis Stoutamire speaks to Hosford students, FROM LEFT: Angel Banks, Shanna Phillips and Katelynn Shiver ABOVE: Melissa Durham explains the duties of State Senator Bill Montford. LEFT: Marti Coley speaks to the crowd of Hosford and W.R. Tolar students. OPEN ENROLLMENT/ SCHOOL CHOICELIBERTY COUNTY SCHOOL SYSTEM2012-2013The Liberty County School District is currently holding Open Enrollment/School Choice for the 2012-2013 school year. Packets are being sent home with all students via back-packs during the week of May 7, 2012. Complete the necessary form and return to your childs school by May 14, 2012.MARIANNAThe 2012 edition of Whos Who Among Students in American Junior Colleges will include the names of 76 students from Chipola College who have been selected as national outstanding campus leaders. Chipola students named this year are: Alford Kaylee Toole. Altha Katrina Messer, Rebekah Wiltse. Bascom Karlee Floyd. Blountstow n Travis Pittman. Bonifay Jessica Bean, Jonathon Carrell, Macy Miles, Cathy Riddle, Brittany Riley, Caleb Whitaker, John Brown, Charles Dinkins. Campbellton Fredrick Beachum. Chipley Mariah Carter, Allyson Gainer, Adriane Guettler, Cecil Mathis, Alyssa Munns, Jeffery Pitts, Hillary Saunders, Erin Solger, Emily Stewart, Meghan Wilder, Alicia Rhodes, Kevin Russell, Haley Worley. Clarksville Patrick Jones. Cottondale Kaitlyn Baxley. Graceville AnneMarie Nichols, Jessica OKeefe, Cody Sikora. Grand Ridge Caroline Peacock, Rachel Pelt, Ryan Pilcher, Anita Halling, Ariel White. Marianna Mayra Akamine, Jaren Bannerman, Chelsea Blanton, Travis Bontrager, Kristine Brance, Danaya Brazzle, Shanay Cor bett, Edgar Delgado, Sara Djassi, Brett Floyd, Stephanie Garrels, Forrest Garrett, Zachary las Harris, Leonard Hollins, Stefani Jackson, Jeniece Johnson, Paul Kelson, Trantell Knight, Alexandre LaGarde, Elizabeth Mathis, Eron Milton, Brittany Peacock, Jordan Poole, Jelleah Sidney, Austin Southall, Chelsey Steedley, Luther Thomas, Lindsay West, John Whittington, Ashton Williams. Sneads Jordan Coley, Nathan Walden. Sunny Hills Elise Kirk. Westville James Lewis. Out of District Adrian Carr of Chattahochee and Sierra Hill of Donalsonville, GA. Inclusion in the directory is based on academic achievement, service to the community, leadership in extracurricular activities and potential for continued success. They join an elite group of students from more than 1,400 institutions of higher learning in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and several foreign nations. Outstanding students have been honored in Whos Chipola students are named to Whos Who ApalacheeTheRestaurantMoms the center of the family so treat her to a special dinner celebration. CELEBRATE WITH YOUR MO M ON SUNDAY FOR MOTHERS DAY AT...

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Page 26 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL MAY 9, 2012Baby girl clothes, three four boxes, ages 0 9 months, brand new with tags, includes some silk dress and Winnie the Pooh bassinet, all for $75. Call 693-9728. 5-2, 5-9Utility pole, $250. Call 6744656. 5-2, 5-9Eureka vacuum, Rubbermaid ice chest. Call 674-3033 for more information. 5-2, 5-9Air conditioning unit 15,000 BTU, used only one month, $600; Kobe Bryant basketball shoes, size 11, worn only once, $100. Call 524-0605. 5-2, 5-9Good selection of items: Mens, ladies and childrens clothes. Many items for the home. New items arriving daily. Everyone is invited to shop at the Calhoun-Liberty Ministry Center store. Located on Hwy. 20 E. in Blountstown, 674-1818. UFN APPLIANCESMicrowave, der cabinet, like new, $150. Call 643-2859. 5-9, 5-16Full size gas stove in good condition, $150. Full size refrigerator in good condition, $150. Call 5261753. 5-9, 5-16Ecowater water softener, Model ERR300, includes paperwork with all instructions, $195. Call 6748385 or 294-4389. 5-2, 5-9Gas range, uses natural gas. Everyone is invited to shop at the Calhoun-Liberty Ministry Center store. Located on Hwy. 20 E. in Blountstown, 6741818. UFN FURNITUREQueen size bed, rustic look, footboard and headboard, high quality pillow top mattress, $300. Call 643-5011. 5-9, 5-16Childs Wooden Table 18 X 24, height 18, sturdy, good shape $8.50. Call 643-7567 or 6745257. 5-9, 5-16Childs Cosco bed rail to deter falling from standard mattress and box springs (age 2 & older) rail, to deter falling from standard mattress and box springs (age 2 & older) 48 long, $36. Call 6437567 or 674-5257. 5-9, 5-16Black leather couch, $250, new queen size mattress with box springs, $300, antique piano, $50. Call 643-2859. 5-9, 5-16Victorian couch and chair, a full size mattress and box springs in plastic. Call 762-8471. 5-9, 5-16Wicker bed headboard, queen size, $70. Computer desk, $15. Call 674-3264. 5-9, 5-16 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNALCLASSIFIEDSTo place your ad, call 643-3333 by noon Eastern Time on Saturday. Non-business ads run FREE for 2 weeks. ITEMS FOR SALEMassage table with carrying case with sheets, heating pads, neck and face pieces, $100. Call 6435696. 5-9, 5-16Worm casting fertilizer for your garden, Two truck loads, $25 each. Call 674-4656 please leave message.5-9, 5-16Pull Golf Cart, great shape. Full set of golf clubs including bag, balls & tees. Will sell together or separately. Take a look make an offer. Call 643-7567 or 6745257. 5-9, 5-16Wall Mirror with a nice green wash pine frame, 22 1/2 X 18 1/2 like new, $13. Beautiful antique mirror, ornate gold frame, wired for hanging, 22 1/2x26 1/2, $45. Call 643-7567 or 674-5257.5-9, 5-16Four senior picture booklets, In Appreciation. Graduate presents to parents, grandparents, etc. Tan w/gold lettering. Thank You verse inside w/graduates picture, $5 each. Call 643-7567 or 7645257. 5-9, 5-16Vintage Kitchen Items: Red handled rolling pin, $7.50; retro egg slicer, $2.50; retro aprons, $7$14; Prices vary on wood handled potato mashers; ladles w/bakelite handles; souvenir & retro bottle openers; bone handle tableware; and much more. Come look, make offer if not priced. Call 6437567 or 674-5257. 5-9, 5-16Nurse scrubs, sizes 2x-3x, hardly 4084 or 762-2041 after 4 p.m.5-9, 5-16Baby bouncy, $30, baby swing like new, $60. Call 643-2859.5-9, 5-16Large A VON collection old Singer sewing machine, round 4 ft. plywood circles. Call 762-8471. 5-9, 5-16Chain saw and air tank. No calls after 9 p.m. Call 899-0792. 5-9, 5-16Quilt $30. Asking $15. Two small lamps $4 & $8. Call 674-3264. 5-9, 5-1620 ft. Aluminum ladder, like new. Call 899-0792. 5-9, 5-16Scotts lawn spreader, $5; Cultured marble bath vanity sink top, 31 x 19, $12; Incline sliding exerciser with pulleys, $15; Old type kerosene heater with two burners, $15; Heavy, homemade wooden teeter-totter, $5; two 20 girls bicycles, includes a box of parts, $25 for all. Call 674-8385 or 2944389. 5-2, 5-9Electric scooter, in excellent condition, with batteries, $1,500 or make an offer. Need to sell. Call 890-8004 to make an appointment to try it out. 5-2, 5-9 For Rent in ALTHA762-9555 or 762-8597Very NICE *2 & 3 BD trailers.With lawn service 5 x 10 .....$27 10 x 10 ....$43 10 x 20 ....$70 10 x 25 ....$90M & W SELFSTORAGE RENTAL SCall 573-5255, 762-9555, 762-8807 or 762-8597 7 days a week service UFN Find a bargain in the Journal CLASSIFIEDS! BD, 1 1/2 BA TownhousesBRISTOL Phone 643-7740 FOR RENT BLOUNTSTOWN Owner (813) 253-3258LIBERTY COUNTY Owner Financing No Qualifying Acreage --All$600 Down BECOME A VOLUNTEER FLORIDA GUARDIAN AD LITEM FOUNDATIONPHONE (850) 410-4642 3 BD, 2 BA mobile home. (Available May 1). Located six miles N of Blountstown on Hwy. 69 N. Water, sewer and grass mowing provided. Deposit Required. No Pets.(850) 556-3173FOR RENT B REAL EST A TEWANTED: Will buy 10 to 1,000 acres, reasonably priced. Immediate closing. Call (850) 544-5441 or (850) 570-0222 Directly across from Altha School. Priced to sale. Call (850) 762-4592 Business Opportunity Antique furniture in perfect condition. Similar to an armoire with wooden rollers. Must see to appreciate. Call for more information, 899-0792. No calls after 9 p.m. please. 5-9, 5-16Kitchen table with two chairs, night stand and end table. Call 674-3033 for more information. 5-2, 5-9Headboard white, with extra storage, $5. Call 674-8385 or 294-4389. 5-2, 5-9Bunk beds, includes mattress; antique table, $450; lounge chair, dark red, $60. Call 674-3264. 5-2, 5-9Good used furniture and appliances needed at Calhoun Liberty Ministry Center. Call 674-1818. UFN TRUCKS1995 Dodge Dakota, 4 cyl., red, bedliner, standard, $3,200 negotiable or will trade for an automatic truck. Call 674-3264. 5-9, 5-161993 Ford Explorer, new tires, runs good, $1,100. Call 228-2820 after 5 p.m. (CT). 5-2, 5-9 CARS2005 Chevy Malibu, white. Call 575-8194 for more information. 5-2, 5-9 AUTO ACCESSORIESCenter seat, two person, blue, for older Dodge van, in good shape, $10. Call 674-8385 or 294-4389. 5-2, 5-9 MOTORCYCLE & ATVSA TV rims and tires, four each 26x12x12 ITP mud tires with rims, chrome lug nuts and ITP chrome center caps. Two each 26x9x12 ITP mud tires with rims, chrome lug nuts and ITP chrome center caps. $550 for all six tires and rims like new. Call (850) 3224190. 5-9, 5-16 WATER WELL SUPPLIESDo you need parts for That Darn Pump? We have Capacitors, relays, control boxes, pressure switches, check valves, foot valves, air volume control valves, wire, pumps, tanks and much more. Available 7 days a week until 9 p.m. Repair questions are welcomed, call us at That Darn Pump 643-4357. BPA/UFN PETS/SUPPLIESDog box, aluminum, double compartment, $375 OBO. Call 6434028. 5-9, 5-16

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MAY 9, 2012 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 27 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNALCLASSIFIEDSTo place your ad, call 643-3333 by noon Eastern Time on Saturday. Non-business ads run FREE for 2 weeks. STARSCOPEF AMOUS BIRTHDAYSARIES Mar 21/Apr 20 Aries, although you may have your mind set on one out come, it might be good to expect the unexpected this week. Keep your eyes and ears open. T AURUS Apr 21/May 21 Think of this week as the opportunity to rest and recharge, Taurus. Schedule a family movie night or lounge in the yard instead of packing your schedule. GEMINI May 22/Jun 21 Gemini, you have been thinking about getting into something creative, and your plans just may come to fruition some of the details. CANCER Jun 22/Jul 22 Cancer, keeping secrets doesnt often turn out well because sooner or later those secrets are revealed. Honesty usually is the best way to go in most situations. LEO Jul 23/Aug 23 Beating the doldrums could involve some creative thinking, Leo. If youre fresh out of ideas, you can ask someone you are close to for some suggestions. VIRGO Aug 24/Sept 22 Virgo, you are on the road to recovery from an issue thats been bothersome. This recovery is long overdue, but you will be stronger for having gone through these trials. LIBRA Sept 23/Oct 23 but speak up for yourself from time to time, especially when something is important to you. Your opinions count, too. SCORPIO Oct 24/Nov 22 Sometimes there is no shortcut to success, Scorpio. You just have to trudge through and hope that all the effort will be worth it in the long run. SAGITT ARIUS Nov 23/Dec 21 Sagittarius, someone is worried about you and this concerns. Maybe the worry is because you have been out of touch for so long. CAPRICORN Dec 22/Jan 20 Capricorn, when a new career path is presented to decide whether you should make a move. Go with your gut and trust your instincts. AQUARIUS Jan 21/Feb 18 Those close to you are accommodating nature very appealing, Aquarius. This new attitude is bound to paint you in a new light. PISCES Feb 19/Mar 20 Pisces, you have a huge sup port system in the way of family and friends. Expect them to rally behind you when needed.Week of May 6 ~ May 12MAY 6 Bob Seeger, Singer (67) MAY 7 Taylor Abrahamse, Actor (21) MAY 8 Melissa Gilbert, Actress (48) MAY 9 Rosario Dawson, Actress (33) MAY 10 Kenan Thompson, Comic (34) MAY 11 Corey Monteith, Actor (30) MAY 12 Kim Fields, Actress (43)Call 643-1514 or 643-1459. 5-9, 5-161995 mobile home, must be moved, 3 BD, 1 BA, new carpet, $4,500. Call 643-5172 or 6434630. 5-2, 5-9 YARD SALESBRISTOL Saturday, May 12 beginning at 8 a.m. located on CR 379, on Hwy. 12 S, turn in front of Rex Lumber, look for signs. Cancel if rain, no early birds please. Call 6435011or 643-6757. Moving sale, beginning Thursday, May 10 ending Saturday, May 12 weather permitting. Located 3 miles south on Hwy. 12, right on Lake Mystic/Lee Duggar Road, look for signs. 17 aluminum boat with 85 hp Yamaha motor, $3,500, don reel, 15x17 stainless steel propellar no dents or dings, $150, couch, tables and chairs, large Igloo ice chest and much more. Call 643-8383. ALTHA Saturday, May 12, Hillcrest Baptist Church yard sale/bake sale, beginning at 8 a.m. Located 5 miles west of Sheltons Corner on CR 274. Six baby rabbits, 5 weeks old, all white, $10 each. Call 379-9400 leave message please. 5-9, 5-16Kittens, free to a good home. Call 573-4084 or 762-2041 after 4 p.m. 5-9, 5-16Dog house $50. Call 643-2859.5-9, 5-16Seven kittens, (sex not determined) and mom. Some have bob-tail. Free to a good home. Call 209-4922. 5-9, 5-16Kittens, free to a good home. Call 643-4559. 5-9, 5-16Jack Russell/Beagle mixed puppies, six weeks old, free to a good home. Call 570-3806. 5-2, 5-9Puppies, Rottweiler/White English Bulldog mixed, 6-8 weeks old, cute and adorable, have had shots and been wormed. Free to a good home Call 4474586. UFN LOST & FOUNDLOST: Female Curr, tall, brownish red with white markings, answers to Lucy, has a collar but no tag, she is gentle and sweet. Call 379-8222. 5-9, 5-16FOUND: Rednose Pit mixed female, 5 or 6 months old, showed up on 69A about a week ago. Call 209-8808. 5-9, 5-16LOST: Bassett Hound she dug out of the yard while I was at work. Last seen on Turkey Creek, answers to Freckles. Shy around strangers and may bite if approached. She has OCD, current on her shots. I love Freckles very much. If you see her, please call 643-2208 (cell), 643-4657 (home) or 643-2247 (work Monday-Thursday). 5-9, 5-16 WANTEDLarge bird cage, reasonably priced. Call 273-0404. 5-2, 5-9Looking to rent a home or pasture in the Hosford/Telogia area, at least 3 BD, 2 BA. Needs place suitable for horses and an outside dog. I am interested in renting a fenced pasture with water. Call 510-6647. 5-2, 5-9Large bird cage, reasonably priced. Call 273-0404. 5-2, 5-9 HOMES & LAND1982 Mobile home, 2 BD, 1 BA has an extra roof built over trailer. A whole industry has grown up around freeing diabetics to lead less restricted lives. New on the market, or on the verge of being introduced, are three frozen foods. With the number of diabetics growing worldwide 246 million at last count, according to the World Health Organization businesses are motivated. In 2011, diabetes therapeutic products were a $23.7 billion dollar industry feeding a growing population thats starving for a better quality of life, says Chef cookbooks for people with the metabolic disorder. It wasnt long ago that Type 1 diabetics had to be sure they packed ample sterile syringes and insulin, whether they were going to work for the day or on a which is crucial to keeping vital organs healthy, was And food? Thats been the hardest. A diabetes diagnosis can feel like a life sentence of bland eat themselves shots around the clock to control their blood sugar levels. In some cases, diabetics were hospitalized to ensure they got the insulin necessary to prevent ketoacidosis, a condition that can lead to coma and death. In 1983, the insulin pump was introduced. It attaches to the body and provides con tinuous insulin injections. But while it was a major breakthrough, it can be bulky and awkward, with a dangling catheter. The most recent innovation is a streamlined version called the OmniPad. It has no tubes, its smaller and it attaches anywhere on the monitoring system. sugar levels, which will free people from the painful pricks needed to get a small blood sample for testing multiple times a day. The device, which attaches with adhesive to the body, continuously tracks glucose levels day and night and can send the readings to your smart phone. Under development for more necessary to win regulatory approval. roll out across the country through the end of the year. Theyre low on the glycemic index, low in high in lean protein and low in sodium, Lewis says. varieties two vegan and three vegetarian include exciting because, while there have been advances in equipment that makes life easier for diabetics, there Diabetics who do not watch what they eat may wind up suffering kidney damage, stomach problems, heart disease, pneumonia, gum disease, blindness, stroke, nerve damage, complications during pregnancy, loss of limb and other health problems, according to the CDC. But many Americans are trending toward healthier diets, eating less meat, gluten, salt and sugar, Lewis says. Tasty foods developed for diabetics will be excel lent choices for them, too. he says. And you dont have to give up one tea The Happy Diabetic; I have discovered the joy of Diabetes on the go: Growing industry helps diabetics maintain active lifestyles

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Page 28 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL MAY 9, 2012 Just in time for Mothers Day, the Chamber is coordinating their Spring Business Bounce on Thursday, May 10 from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. The Chamber initiated business bounces in 2010 and has continued the events with much support from the community. The concept encourages shoppers to visit local retailers dur ing a scheduled time to receive extreme savings and discounts. The events are win/win for the business and the shopper! Merle Norman, The Diamond Corner and Blountstown ticipate. Spring business bounce Thursday Ribbon-cutting held for opening of NorthFlorida Womens Care in Blountstown Women will now be able to receive obstetrical and gynecological services locally with the opening of North Florida Womens Care at Calhoun-Liberty Hospital. Community members and the staff were joined by hospital board members for the April 19 ribbon-cutting ceremony. Marianna native Dr. Alex Sinclair Franz will be at the hospital once a month to provide services. JOHNNY EUBANKS PHOTO BUSINESS NEWS & NOTES Mens Health SeminarThe Calhoun/Liberty Health Department hosted the annual Mens Health Seminar May 1 at the Altha Church of God. The event focused on a variety of health-related topics. This years guest speaker was Roger Dutremble, former Los Angeles Lakers Basketball Coach. Those attending this event enjoyed a great dinner and lots of giveaways. DANIEL WILLIAMS PHOTO

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MAY 9, 2012 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 29 BY FRANCIS PRICEThe year was 1886 when 20-year-old Ben Pitts shivered in the early morning chill of late Autumn. Gently nudging his horse into a slow canter and cracking his long whip over his head, he circled behind a young steer who had found a few bites of grass that was still green. The older cows stepped smartly along, seeming to have a vague recollection of where they were headed. Open range in the Chipola River Basin in Calhoun County was a land of plenty. They would grow fat as they wintered there, eating acorns from the myriads of oak trees and the belly deep wiregrass. They would be joined with other cattle as well, identi ears called markings. It was Bens job to lodge nearby and keep watch on the cattle, should a cow have trouble birthing a calf, as well as marking them for into steers. Afterwords, he would return the cattle to Washington County in the spring. He had arranged to lodge with his Uncle John Pitts, who was an old Civil War Veteran and had proved up a homestead in the area after the war. Another thing of interest to young Ben was the fact that in the area was a family of Lintons, from the infamous Richards Clan, who had some beautiful daughters of an age to marry. Within two years, Ben, who was a gentle giant of a man, had staked out a homestead on the southwest edge of the Chipola River Basin where any livestock Ben had or would acquire could enjoy the abundance of the basin year round. He dug a well on his property, built a cabin, privey and smokehouse and took a wife, Frances, from the Linton clan. He cleared the required land for farming and hand split the rails with which to fence it from livestock which roamed on open range. Barns, cribs and other related farm buildings would come as time and energy allowed. The cabin was eventually replaced by a large, better than average house with wide, welcoming porches. Ben and Frances would raise nine of the 13 children they birthed and one grandchild. Ben could read as well as write with a good hand, so he served as community letter reader/writer until his daughters took over the job. He was interested in world events and subscribed to several news papers on a weekly basis: The New York Times, The Miami News Herald and the Jacksonville Tribune. Also the National Geographic. Though they came through the mail and the news was about a week old when it got to him, it was news all the same. Ben served as school trustee for his provide free text books for their students. He was gifted in healing so he served his community, both white and colored, as doctor, dentist and veterinarian. He was especially good at setting broken bones and kept a supply of splints on hand. He was a skilled carpenter and one of his Frances carded the cotton with which to pad them and lined them with unbleached muslin which she bought by the bolt. There was no charge for this service. Their home burned to the ground in 1925 but Ben rebuilt it in the same spot. With some upgrades, it is still being used today. His barn and several farm related farm buildings were relocated to the Tallahassee Junior Museum around 1949 and are part of their Pioneer Farmstead Exhibit to this day. About three fourth of a mile from the Pitts homestead was a large turpentine workers. Over several years, Frances sold enough farm produce to those workers 1915. While they were not ones to travel (there was always too much to be done on the farm) they did drive to Miami to visit their daughter Gertie, who had married and moved there. Her children were privileged to spend every summer on the farm playing with all the cousins who lived nearby, eating watermelon and swimming in Juniper Creek. Six generations of Pitts descendents have lived in this area and for the most part, have continued the traditions and values established by Ben and Frances. Side by side, they rest in the Clarksville Cemetery, about half a mile from where Most of the home place is still in the family.From Cracker Cowboy in 1886 to Country Gentlemanby Beverly Veress, BlountstownIn the late 1800s my Grandfather, John Kashay, born in Austria, left for America. He arrived in New York before Ellis Island existed. He headed to West Virginia with a friend that came with him. My Grandmother, Veronica Kashay, born in Czecho slavakia, (that had its borders shifted and was Hungary when she arrived at Ellis Island), left for America in 1900 with a daughter. Mary and 16 American dollars in her pocket. She came by a vessel called the Konigin Luise, that was built in Germany in 1897. It held 2400 pasthird class. Im thinking Grandma traveled third class, since she only had $16 in her pocket when she arrived at Ellis Island. Grandfather out of work and not doing too well. She found work for them in a coal mine in West Virginia, for the next three years to save money for land. Her dream was to own land in America. They moved to Pennsylvania, bought farm land and, since she was a farmers daughter, she dug right in. Grandpa began to work in a nearby galvanized pipe factory and together their life began and began well. They had ten children. Since Grandma did not believe in banks she added to her lands by buying more land during the Depression. She opened her large home to room-and-boarders and was doing just wonderfully when Grandpa came home one day and said he wanted to go back to see the family in the Old World. While visiting there, he was killed by a train. When Grandma got photos of him in his casket (very common in Europe those days), she was down and out for a couple of weeks, but pulled up her boot straps, because she had more children to raise. Life continued on and she got all of the girls graduated from school and learned to speak, write and count in English. The only word that she never could get was absolutely which she always pronounced Hopsatutely, Never did get that word down. Her family grew as the daughters married and had children. They all went every Sunday to her house and that was when I noticed what a big family I came from. After Grandma died she had grandchildren that graduated from college and I am sure that would have made her proud. Her daughter, my Mom, married a farmer and when Dad died we moved to South Florida. I was a nurse for a good many years and soon my family (Grandmas great-grandchildren) were doing their own thing. I followed my son to Blountstown and when I got here I realized my life had done a 180. I was now in a small town again, where people were friendly and full of community spirit and just knew I was back to my roots. Grandma would have been proud! Hopsatutely!!The Journey from Czechoslovakia to the United States in 1900The Panhandle Pioneer Settlement Presents the Smithsonian Institution and Florida Humanities Council Museum on Main Street --Journey Stories. The Panhandle Pioneer Settlement has been awarded the privilege of exhibiting the MOMS -Journey Stories, July 14 August 25, 2012. This is the only facility located in North Florida that has been selected for the exhibit. All other locations are in South Central and South Florida. In preparation for the exhibit, we are in need of volunteers to serve on various committees. Committees needed are for: Planning, Local exhibit planning, Exhibit installation, Program Development, School/teacher, Volunteer and docent training, and Publicity. Individuals are needed to present north Florida family journey stories, industry stories for the region, demonstrators, docents, assistance in creating an exhibit of local journey stories that support the MOMS Journey Stories. For additional information, call (850) 447-0298 or (850) 447-0964 or send email JOURNEY STORIES John Kashay Veronica Kashay ABOVE: Konigin Luise built in Germany in 1897, accommodating 2,400 passengers. This was Veronicas transportation to the states in 1900. She was a third class passenger with $16 in her pocket. BELOW: The whole family after settling in Pennsylvania.

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Page 30 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL MAY 9, 2012 $ A VON$www.youravon.com/tdaviesCALL TODAY : (850) 570-1499 EARN40%STARTERKITONLY $I0 JOB MARKET 8 positions Temporary/seasonal work planting, cultivating, and harvesting vegetables, from 6/5/2012 to 8/20/2012 at Written Produce Patch, Lowell, OH. Three months of previous experience required in the job described. Saturday work required. Must be able to lift/carry 60 lbs. Post-hire employer-paid background check required. $11.10/hr or current applica ble AEWR, plus applicable piece rates. Workers are guaranteed of work hours of total period. Work tools, supplies, equipment supplied by employer without charge to worker. Housing with kitchen facilities provided at no cost to only those workers who are not reasonably able to return same day to their place of residence at time of recruitment. Transpor tation and subsistence expenses to work site will be paid to nonresident workers not later than upon completion of 50% of the job contract. Interviews required. Apply for this job at nearest State Workforce Agency in state in which this ad appears, or One Stop Career Center 16908 Northeast Pear Street, Suite 2, Blountstown, FL 32424. Provide copy of this ad. Job Order #OH542140. Twin Oaks Juvenile Development, Inc. CorporationFor more information phone 643-1090.Positions A vailableRegistered Nurse and a Social Studies or English/Reading Teacher (additional ESE south Liberty County campus. Nurse position at the Liberty-JUST program. Contact Donald Lasseter at (850) 379-8344 or donald.lasseter@libertywilder ness.org. Teacher position is at Apalachicola Forest Youth Camp. Contact Carla Greene at (850) JOB OPENING Liberty Community Health Care/Liberty County Health Department Position number 64004465 Salary is commensurate with experience Closing date: 05/16/2012 If you have any questions, please contact Lisa Taylor at (850) 643-2292 PUBLIC AND LEGAL N OTICESIN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR LIBERTY COUNTY FLORIDA PROBA TE DIVISION File No. 12-07CP IN RE: ESTATE OF NAOMI SMITH SUMMERS Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Naomi Smith Summers, deceased, whose date of death was March 19, 2012, is pending in the Circuit Court for Liberty County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is P. O. Box 399, Bristol, Florida 32321. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against declaims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTAN D ING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. this notice is May 9, 2012. Attorney for Personal Representative: Kimberly L. King Attorney for Donald E. Summers Florida Bar Number 0593011 KING & WOOD P.A. 1701 Hermitage Blvd. Suite 104 Tallahassee, FL 32308 Telephone: (850) 580-7711 Fax: (850) 205-4501 E-Mail: kimking@kingand woodlaw.com Personal Representative: Donald E. Summers 21075 NW County Road 333 Bristol, FL 32321 5-9, 5-16________________________NOTICE OF VOTE IN QUESTIONNOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN: WENDEE M. W ALDEN 12489 NW Old Post Road eligibility to vote is in question. You are required to contact the Supervisor of Elections, in Bristol, Florida, no later than thirty (30) days after the date of this publishing. Failure to respond will result in a determination of ineligibility by the Supervisor and your name will be removed from the statewide voter registration system. Published one time in the Calhoun-Liberty Journal 5-9-12 Marcia A. Wood Liberty County Supervisor of Elections P.O. Box 597, Bristol, FL 32321 Dated May 9, 2012 5-9-12________________________NOTICE OF VOTE IN QUESTIONNOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN: KIM M. LEWIS 25539 NW County Road 12 eligibility to vote is in question. You are required to contact the Supervisor of Elections, in Bristol, Florida, no later than thirty (30) days after the date of this publishing. Failure to respond will result in a determination of ineligibility by the Supervisor and your name will be removed from the statewide voter registration system. Published one time in the Calhoun-Liberty Journal 5-9-12 Marcia A. Wood Liberty County Supervisor of Elections P.O. Box 597, Bristol, FL 32321 Dated May 9, 2012 5-9-12If you havent been seeing the quantity or quality of game youd like, you may want to consider applying for a special-opportunity hunt. For the past 15 years, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) has offered these unique fall-season hunts for deer, wild hog and released quail on the states arguably best public hunting lands. Maybe its time you look into getting in on the action and experience the hunt of a lifetime. These extraordinary hunts offer large tracts of land with an abundance of game and low hunting pressure. All deer hunts enable you to take only mature bucks with at least one antler having four or more points, one inch or longer. Hunters can take does during archery hunts and, if they draw an antlerless deer permit, also during general gun hunts. This practice of deer management offers hunters excellent chances of taking quality bucks and the opportunity to take a doe on public land. Wild hogs also are legal to take, and there is no size or bag limit on them. These specialopportunity deer and wild hog hunts take place on Fort Drum (Indian River County), Lake Panasoffkee (Sumter County), Triple N Ranch (Osceola County) and Green Swamp West Unit (Pasco County) wildlife management areas. Fort Drum has 20 permits available for its seven-day general-gun deer and hog hunt on 20,858 acres; they cost $50, should you get drawn. Lake Panasoffkee offers eight four-day archery hunts on the 8,676-acre tract, which cost $100 each. Triple N Ranch has two seven-day general-gun deer and hog hunts on its 15,391 acres, and each permit costs $175. Green Swamp West Unit is where James Stovall took the states highestscoring deer on record a 25-point, nontypical that netted a 206 Booneand-Crockett score. He took the trophy buck in 1999 after getting drawn for the specialopportunity archery hunt. The area offers archery and gun hunts on 34,335 acres, and permits cost $100 each. The FWC also has week-long released-quail hunts on the Blackwater Carr Unit in Santa Rosa County. With these hunts, you must bring and release your own pen-raised quail. Theres just one $100 permit available for each of the 16 weeks, and if youre lucky enough to draw one, you and up to three of your friends will have the entire 590 acres to yourselves. If youd like to apply for any of these do is get a 2012-2013 Special-Oppor tunity Fall Hunt Worksheet available at MyFWC.com/License. Beginning at 10 a.m. (EDT) on May 1, you can submit your completed application at MyFWC.com/License or license agent. The application period runs through June 5. These coveted permits are issued by random drawing, and you may apply for as many hunts and dates as you like to increase your chances of being selected. You must include a $5 nonrefundable fee for each hunt you apply for, though hunters are limited to drawing only one permit per hunt. If youre selected in the random drawing, you have until the deadline hunt. You can do this online at MyFWC. com/License or at any license agent or it, and itll go to the next applicant selected in the random drawing. Whether still hunting by yourself or hunting with family and friends for deer, hogs or released quail, the FWCs special-opportunity fall hunts are just what the doctor ordered for a premium hunting experience.Outta the Woods

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MAY 9, 2012 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 31 To place your ad call us at 643-3333 SERVICE DIRECTORY Whaley Heating & Air Conditioning (850) 674-4777FL LIC. # CMC1249570 Accepting: Phone: (850) 643-6925 Fax: (850) 643-2064 email: grich0656@aol.com10536-B NW SR 20 Bristol, FL 32321 Located in the Apalachee RestaurantGary Richards, EA MBAEnrolled Agent Enrolled to Practice Before the IRS Business & Accounting Solutions Inc. 4433 NW C.R. 274 Altha, Fl 32421 (850) 762-9402 Cell (850) 832-5055Dozer and Excavation work Over 20 years experienceClay ONealsLand Clearing, Inc. William's HomeImprovements "No Job Too Big or Small"Concrete work, landscape, pressure cleaning, renovations, seamless gutter, painting, vinyl, & screen enclosure Call 674-8092Licensed & Insured, contractor & rooferFOR FREE ESTIMA TES Call Chris Nissley at 674-8081 or 643-8561 (Cell) STUMP GRINDINGReasonable Rates & FREE Estimates! That Darn PumpThere is never a convenient time to be without water.WELLS (850)643-HELP Thats 643-4357 or Home 643-3857For friendly service and never any overtime charges call, Hwy 71 South on J.P. Peacock Rd, Altha. Day or night,Check out our prices before buying from somewhere else. For Weddings, Birthdays and all Holidays, come in or call us. Margies Florist Clint Hatcher, OwnerElectrical Lic. # ER13014037 Building Lic. # RB29003511New Homes Garages Additions Electrical Remodeling Foundations Screenrooms Sunrooms VINYL SIDING RESIDENTAL & COMMERCIAL FREE EstimatesServing Calhoun, Liberty & Jackson Counties LIBERTY TIRE COMPANY 10781 NW SR 20 Bristol, Fl 32321Call 643-2939 MV84845Hours: Monday thru Friday 7 5 & Saturday 7 12Come see us for all your tire needs or give us a call for roadside service, oil changes & tire rotation. We specialize in sales and repair of tires for:Commercial Trucks and Trailers, OTR Equipment, Farm Equipment, Passenger Car & Light Truck Tires JEMISON Heating & Cooling, Lic# RM1416924Carrier Equipment Masters Farm Supply LS Tractor Equipment Committed To Quality Since 1973 (850) 762-3222 faxmasters7@fairpoint.net CLJNEWS.COM TThe Apalachicola National Forest is accepting applications for volunteer camp hosts at various recreation sites throughout the forest. Forest Service camp host volunteers are needed for the Apalachicola National Forest Camp hosts on the Apalachicola National For est are unpaid volunteer positions. The hosts camp for free on one of our beautiful camping or day use recreation areas in exchange for 30 hours of service per week. This time requirement may be divided up when there is more than one individual occupying the host site. Some of the duties that camp hosts are required to perform include welcoming visitors and providing them with information about the forest, performing general site maintenance, and assisting the Recreation Technicians. Camp hosts are valued members of the Apalachi cola National Forest. Their contributions are vital to the operation of the forest. With over 570,000 acres can enjoy a multitude of recreational opportunities dling, OHV trail riding and hunting. Situated in the Florida Panhandle southwest of Tallahassee, the Apalachicola National Forest is the largest National Forest in Florida and is surrounded by an abundance of educational and cultural opportunities. Camp hosts must have their own self-contained wheel trailer. Full hookups are available at most host sites. To apply for a camp host position on the Apalachicola National Forest, contact Anna Servay at (850) 575-9064 ext. 6626 or amservay@fs.fed.us for more information. camp hosts for Spring, Summer and Fall 2012 The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) is offering a free hunter safety course in Leon County. The will be held in the secondBryant Building, 620 S. Meridian St., Tallahassee. Instruction is from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. May 15, 18, 22 and 24. The range portion of the class is May 26. An adult must accompany children under the age of 16 at all times. Students are encouraged to bring a pencil and paper with them to take notes. The hunter safety course is required for people born on or after June 1, 1975, to purchase a Florida hunting license. The FWC course satisfies hunter-safety training requirements for all other states and Canadian provinces. People interested in attending this course can register online and obtain information about future hunter safety classes at www.myfwc.com/huntersafetyMyFWC. com/HunterSafety or by calling the City at (850) 265-3676.Hunter safety course offered in Leon County this month

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Page 32 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL MAY 9, 2012 The Calhoun-Liberty Community Baby Dedica tion held on April 28 was sponsored and hosted by Chipola Healthy Start for area families with young children or who are expecting babies. About 100 participants were provided a venue to access many community organizations and resources for with a wealth of information. Some of the organizations present were Liberty & Calhoun County Health Departments, the FQHC in Liberty County, Dr. Franz of North Florida Womens Care, Big Bend Community-Based Care, Healthy Families, Big Bend AHECs Quit Smoking Now Program, Magellan Health Services, Department of Children & FamiliesACCESS program, the Refuge House, and of course, our local CalhounLiberty Healthy Start program. Vendors all provided a fun activity for kids. These activities ranged from face painting to making beaded bracelets. Children by the FQHC in Liberty County. There was also an also brought door prizes and 12 were given out to lucky visitors. Mid-morning a formal non-religious ceremony was led by Pastor Roger Phillips of First Baptist Church of Bristol. Parents and/or guardians were able to participate in our parents pledge and community members and those representing organiza tions took part in reciting the Community Pledge. Two Healthy Start participants, Margaret Linton and Jackline Pinedam spoke on their experiences as mothers and working with Healthy Start in Calhoun-Liberty. Community members Donnie Read and Cathy Revell of Liberty County were invited to share their testimonials and give advice to the par ents in the room. Educational components were addressed during the event, including safe sleep for babies, bicycle safety, mental health, smoking cessation, and child abuse. Through the United Way of Northwest Florida, Chipola Healthy Start was able to host a drawing for those who completed the safe sleep education for a chance to win one of four These two speakers were Donnie Read and Cathy Revell of Liberty County. Pack n Play cribs. Chipola Healthy Start Coalition also solicited losor the event. Under the direction of Pastor Phillips, the First Baptist Church of Bristol hosted the event and provided the food for all participants. Cadence Bank, Rivertown Community Church, Dr. Franz of North Florida Womens Care, Veterans Memorial Railroad and Piggly Wiggly Supermarket all served as event sponsors. The Coalition would like to thank them. The Piggly Wiggly matched funds with the Coalition to be able to provide $10 Piggly Wiggly ABOVE: Margaret Linton holds Bella, who is enjoying her new bike helmet RIGHT: Mothers in line to sign up for information and free products.ABOVE: Community Liaison for Big Bend Community Based-Care Mary Helen Barnes making bead bracelets with the kids. RIGHT: A little one Guest speakers Donnie Read and Cathy Revell of Liberty County. Chipola Healthy Start hosts Baby Dedication



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THE CALHOUN-LLIBERt TY J OURNALOURNAL CLLJNNews.com WEDNESDAY, MAY 9, 2012 Vol. 32, NNo. 1950includes tax AA wedding, an anniversary and birthdays.....13 RRelay for LLife.....17 Tropicana SSpeech winners....20 OObituaries.....23 SSheriff's LLog...2 Two VFDDs to hold carnivals...4 BBlountstown gallery to host new event...5 NNews from the Pews...10 DARIN SUMMERLIN by Teresa EEubanks, Journal EditorA 25-year-old Altha man was arrested for battery after witnesses called the Calhoun County Grocery Sunday afternoon. Witnesses said Summerlin had the woman by held without bond. Altha man charged with battery in parking lot altercation FDLEDLE to open new investigation into McLLemore death in BBristolby Teresa EEubanks, Journal Editor body was found on the bedroom three bullet wounds, one in his County Sheriff Donnie Conyers is adamant that the the sheriff said about the said he met with the Director of case. at her and said, You better run fast because you dont As she ran from him, she said she heard two shots Candidate list updated after deadline to le by petition run in Calhoun County include Carla Wood has withdrawn his name from the County Commission District 5 race. seat on the school board. CALHOUNALHOUN COUNOUNTYY CLERK OF COURT SHERIFF PROPERTY APPRAISER the only one in the race so far. TAX COLLECTOR SCHOOL SUPERINTENDENT Yoder. ELECTIONS SUPERVISOR emocrats COUNTY COMMISSION, DISTRICT 1 emocrats Lee SSee CANDIDATES on page 3 place in RRobotics contestPAGE 16LLiberty County CommunicationsD Director Junior L Lolley named national companysD DISPAtc TCHER OF t THE MMONtTHPAGE 9A redneck country girl goes to Russia Calhoun CountysR Ruth A Attaway shares her experiences from mission trip toR Russia; will go to Trinidad next yearPAGE 8JOURNEY STORIEsSAA preview of two families histories to be included in upcoming S Smithsonian EExhibit in BlountstownPAGE 29

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A Bristol man was Oxycodone pills after a buy was arranged with a confidential source working with the CalhounLiberty Drug Task Force. Arrested was Lawrence Dawson, 50. According to the arrest report, the informant was $120 in cash to buy the 30-milligram pills, which are Schedule II controlled narcotics. Task Force members were looking on as Dawson Blazer to meet with the with serial numbers that had been documented earlier in exchange for the pills. Dawson was later stop near the intersection of Chipola Road and SR 71. After he was placed in was searched. The cash used in the buy was found hidden in a KFC box. His cell phone, which showed the number used by the confidential informant to contact him, was confiscated. Also found was a partially smoked marijuana cigarette and a prescription for Oxycodone that had been Dawson told deputies he made a wrong turn at a residence and stopped and spoke with someone but denied selling any pills. Deputies later contacted the office of the doctor who had prescribed the pills for Dawson and he was taken off their patient list. He was released after posting $1,500 bond.LAWRENCE DAWSON Bristol man is charged with selling OOxycodone Page 2 THEE CALCALHOOUNN-LLIBERER TY JOOURNALRNAL MAY 9, 2012 ARREST REPORTS compiled by Journal Editor Teresa Eubanks Blountstown Police Dept.AApril 30 through May 6, 2012 CCitations issued:A Accidents...............03 .................16 Special details Business alarms.....04 Residential alarms..........00 ..............................................................35tAApril 30 VOSP, CCSO. R Richard S S mith, S S r., non-payment (warrant), CCSO. May 1 Joseph McDDonald, VOCR, CCSO. Joshua Best, battery, retail theft, CCSO. CCharles Basford, VOCR, CCSO. Joseph Baker, sale of marijuana within 1000 ft. of a church, CCSO. Jimmie L Lewis, driving with license suspended or revoked, BPD. CCharles E Eddie Varnadore, Jr., grand theft auto, CCSO. Michael CC. Mayo, VOSP, CCSO. N Nathaniel Hall, sale of cocaine within 1000 ft. of a park (times 2), CCSO. May 2 R Rashawn D Dawson, sale of cocaine within 1000 ft. of a park (times 2), CCSO. A Angela Tindall, failure to appear, CCSO. Marcus W Williams, non-support, BPD. RRobin French, petty theft, BPD. May 3 L Laurie Pegaz, VOP (warrant), CCSO. May 4 L Lawrence L Lorenzo D Dawson, sale of a scheduled II controlled substance (Oxycodone), CCSO. May 5 Joseph Baker, VOP (2 times), CCSO. May 6 DDarin S Summerlin, domestic battery, CCSO.LY tAApril 30 holding for CCSO, CCSO. May 2 A Angela Kay Tindall, holding for CCSO, CCSO. Kaleb M. C Clark, domestic battery, resisting arrest with violence, LCSO. May 4 SServando OOrtuno, VOSP, LCSO.H LOWoman injured trying to keep man from A Hosford man was taken to a Tallahassee facility for a psychological an altercation with a woman who tried to keep him from harming himself, according to a report from Kaleb Clark, 21, was later charged with domestic battery and resisting responded to a report Sunday night that an intoxicated man was walking along CR 67, carrying a shotgun and threatening to kill himself. account: his ex-girlfriend to ask for a ride. She described him as intoxicated and upset when she found him on Burlington Road, carrying a .12-gauge shotgun. The woman said Clark made him anymore and he had nothing to Clark grabbed the gear shifter, put it in neutral and jumped out. The woman stopped the truck, got out and checked to see that he was not injured and then told him to get back in then became upset and grabbed her and she tried to wrestle away from him. He threatened to grabbed the shotgun and pointed the barrel at his head. The woman tried to grab the gun but he held on to it and then hit her on Both then returned to the truck upset once more, grabbed the gun and pointed the barrel at his head and started to pull the trigger. The woman was hit in the mouth by the guns stock when she tried to take it her with a busted lip. get Clark to his mothers home but when they and ran into the woods with the shotgun. Deputies were called to the scene at 11:22 p.m., where they set up a perimeter and began a search for Clark. Deputies found him on Dewiber Lane. When approached by Liberty the loaded gun on a post and placed his hands on his head. Deputy Adam Walker secured the gun as Trooper Clark became agitated and began yelling at the officers. After he and King, he was forcibly put on the ground and handcuffed. He is being held on $7,500 bond.KALEbB mM. CLARkK NAth THANiIEL hHALL RAShHAWN DAWSON jJOSEphPH bBAkKER Three men were taken into custody last week on outstanding warrants was picked up on a charge of sale of a controlled substance within 1,000 feet of a daycare. Joseph Daniel Baker was arrested on a charge of selling marijuana within 1,000 feet of a church after a deputy spotted him riding a bicycle on Sherry was arrested on two counts of sale of a controlled substance within 1,000 feet of a daycare. Bond was set at $10,000 for each man. A Blountstown man who told police to go ahead and arrest me after he refused to let his girlfriend enter their home to get her possessions was charged with petty theft, according to the offense report from the Blountstown Police Department. After his girlfriend learned that the locks had been changed at the Lambert Street residence, she contacted the police department. She then called Robyn Lawayne French, 38, who told her to come get her things. had accompanied her left. He remained and was joined at the scene by a considered theft if he kept the woman from getting French again stated that she couldnt enter the to take him into custody. They did. He was taken to the county jail that morning RRObiBIN FRENChH Man arrested after refusing to let woman collect possessions from their homeThree facing drug charges

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MAY 9, 2012 / THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 3 BLOUNTSTOWN DRUGS20370 Central Ave. W. OFF During the Calhoun Chamber of Commerces Business Bounce on Thursday, May 10OFF A great time to shop for mom for Sunday, May 13 OFFPersonalizedG Graduation Items FREE FREE $75 Let us help you choose that Perfect gift for Mom!Erma Jeans Antiques & Gifts VISA/MC/DISCOVER/DEBIT21539 Chester Street in Hosford $775 Monte Carlo0% interestDaylight A Auto Financing (850) 215-1769You are automatically approved if you can make your payments on time 3 Rows0% interestDaylight A Auto Financing (850) 215-1769You are automatically approved if you can make your payments on time Calhoun County is ranked number two in the state for lowest crime with neighboring Liberty County boasting the lowest crime rate in the state. The Uniform Crime Reports (UCR) are a standard of measure crime in a community and are based upon the statistics of seven categories. The ranking system is factored on a scale of the number of crimes per 100,000 people to provide a number that can be compared to all of the 67 counties in Florida. In the year 2011, Liberty Countys crime rate was at 537.60 and Calhoun Countys was 837.60 Number one and number two respectively in the statewide ranking. In Liberty County, the Sheriffs so they are the sole source for reporting. In Calhoun County, the Altha Police Department reported two crimes, the Blountstown Police Department reported 33 and the bers are combined for the overall score. I wish to commend Chief Rodney Smith for his department reducing crime by 13.7% during partment, said Calhoun County Sheriff David Tatum. And again this year I would like to thank the folks here for behaving themselves and helping to keep our quality of life here good and of course the men and are committed to protecting this community. Nathan Goodman. REpublicanPUBLICAN: Jerry Guilford. NPA: James Grover. COUNTY COMMISSION, DISTRICT 3 NPA: Nick Stone. DEEMOCRATS: Don Miller, Lee Shelton, Jeral R. Hall Sr. and Craig Lipford. COUNTY COMMISSION, DISTRICT 5 DE EMOCRATS: Incumbent Harold Pickron and Thomas Flowers. Charles Chic Wood withdrew from the race. SCHOOL BOARD, DISTRICT 1 (nonpartisan) Danny Ryals and E Edward Holley. SCHOOL BOARD, DISTRICT 4 (nonpartisan) Katrina O. Hatchett and Kenneth F. Speights. LIBERTY COUNTY CLERK OF COURT DEEMOCRAT: Kathy Brown. SHERIFF DEE MOCRATS: Donnie Conyers, Henry Hamlin and E Eddie Joe White. NPA: Nick Finch. PROPERTY APPRAISER DEmocrat MOCRAT : Incumbent TAX COLLECTOR DEmocrat MOCRAT : Incumbent Marie Goodman. NPA: Teddy EEubanks. SCHOOL SUPERINTENDENT DE EMOCRATS: Incumbent Sue Summers and Gay Johnson Uzzell. ELECTIONS SUPERVISOR DEEMOCRATS: Gina McDowell and Sharon Revell Mackey. COUNTY COMMISSION, DISTRICT 1 DEmocrat MOCRAT : Incumbent Albert Butcher. COUNTY COMMISSION, DISTRICT 3 DEmocrat MOCRAT : incumbent Jim Johnson. COUNTY COMMISSION, DISTRICT 5 DE EMOCRATS: Incumbent Kevin Williams and Scott Phillips. SCHOOL BOARD, DISTRICT 1 (Nonpartisan) Incumbent Logan Kever and Sidney S. Beckwith. SCHOOL BOARD, DISTRICT 2 (Nonpartisan) Tina Tharpe, Ken Sumner and Steve Cutshaw. The Primary E Election is set for Aug. 14. The General E Election will be held Nov. 6. The City of Bristol E Election is scheduled for Nov. 13.CANDIDATES continued from the front page PErrRR Y Don Curtis has announced his candidacy for the Florida Legislature, House of Representatives, District 7, Republican. Don and his family are long-time residents of Taylor County. He and his wife of 32 years, Michele, live on a farm at Lake Bird where theyve raised their two sons, Ray and Clayton. Now theyve been blessed with a grandson and theres another one on the way! Don is a forester and President of The Forestry Company in Perry. He has served the people of North Florida in many ways during his career from being appointed to be the Assistant State Forester for Florida, to serving on the Board of the Suwannee River Water Management District, to being elected onto the School Board at Aucilla Christian Academy, and starting the Shady Grove Volunteer Fire Department. Now he seeks to give the rural counties of North Florida a strong voice in Tallahassee. Dons focus is, and has been for many years, bringing jobs to this area. According to Don We all want a better future for our children and grandchildren we want them to be able to have good jobs here as they become adults and start their own families. Currently many of them have to go elsewhere for employment and that needs to change. Because of his strong stance on private property rights, Don has been endorsed by the Florida Forestry Association. He also serves on the Leadership Council for the National Federation of Independent Businesses, Florida Chapter. Hes also a lifetime member of the ber of the Florida Farm Bureau.Curtis becomes candidate for Florida House District 7

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Thats how many copies of The Calhoun-Liberty Journal were distributed last week, ensuring plenty of coverage for your community announcements and great response for our business advertisers! 5,349 The Calhoun-Liberty Journal is published each Wednesday by the Liberty Journal Inc., Summers Road, P.O. Box 536, Bristol, FL 32321. Annual subscriptions are $18. Periodicals postage paid at Bristol, FLPOSTMASTER: Send address corrections to: P.O. Box 536, Bristol, FL 32321. (USPS 012367) Summers Road Located at 11493 NW Summers Road in Bristol MAILING ADDRESS: P.O. Box 536, Bristol, FL 32321 TELEPHONE (850) 643-3333 Fax (850) 643-3334 EMAIL: thejournal@fairpoint.net ADS: cljads@fairpoint.net JOURNAL STAFFJohnny Eubanks...................Publisher Teresa Eubanks........................ Editor Sandra Brown...................Bookkeeper Deven Lewis......Production Asssistant Debbie Duggar...................AdvertisingOFFICE HOURS: 9 a.m. 6 p.m. M-F Page 4 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL MaA Y 9, 2012THE CALHOUN-LLIBERtTY JOURNAL Wednesday, May 9 Monday, May 14 Tuesday, May 15 Sunday, May 13 Saturday, May 12 Thursday, May 10 Friday, May 11TODAYS MEETINGS7 p.m., Altha Vol. Fire Dept AA, 6 p.m., Altha Community Center noon, Senior Citizens Center 5 p.m., Ag. Bldg., Conference Room across from Courthouse 6 p.m., Fire House 7 p.m., Dixie Lodge in Blountstown 1:30 p.m., W.T. Neal Civic Center, Blountstown.TODAYS MEETINGS7 p.m., Veterans Memorial Park Civic Center 6 p.m., Log Cabin Club House at TODAYS MEETINGS, noon, Calhoun-Liberty Hospital 7 p.m., Calhoun County Old Ag Bldg. east door, in front of jail 6:30 p.m., Mormon Church, BristolTODAYS MEETINGSAA, 7 p.m., basement of Calhoun County Courthouse 11 a.m., Apalachee Rest. 5 p.m. Calhoun Extension Adult Dance, 8-12 p.m. at the Legion Hall in BlountstownAttend the Church of your choice this Sunday Train DayVeterans Memorial Park 11 a.m.3 p.m. BIRTHDAY Adronna Kombrinck & Susan McCormick Ammons BIRTHDAY Debbie Duggar BIRTHDAYS Shirley Segers, Misty Sizemore & Jered Kyle Garry Futch BIRTHDAYS Karen Joiner Moran, Morgen Brown, Kitte Hosford Carter & Sarah Carpenter BIRTHDAYS Miriam Ritter & Lindsey Anders BIRTHDAY Janet Tomlinson Come and join us for Bat Night at the Panhandle Pioneer Settlement on Friday, May 11 at 6:30 p.m. Bring your lawn chairs and help us count the bats as they come out of their house for their nightly feeding. It is a very unusual site. Judy Ludlow. Agriculture and Natural Resources Agent from the Calhoun County Extension Service will have an educational presentation on bats in the gym at 6 p.m. Ice cream, other refreshments and bat houses will be available. Bring blankets or lawn chairs. Come and enjoy the evening. Its enough to drive you batty!The Panhandle Pioneer Settlement is a living museum documenting rural life in NW Florida since the early 1800s. It is located in Sam Atkins Park, about 1 mile west of the intersection of Hwy 71 and Hwy 20. Follow HWY 20 West out of Blountstown. Look for signs of Sam Atkins Park. Turn North at Lindys Fried Chicken. Silas Green St. (between 18th and 20th St.) follow the signs. For more information, contact the Settlement at 674-2777 or email: info@ panhandlepioneer.org For further directions and information on the historic buildings at the Settlement go to: www.panhandlepioneer.org Big Bend Area Health Education Center will pilot a Health Careers Summer Camp in Calhoun /Liberty counties this summer. The day camp will be held from June 18 22, from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., for upcoming 10th, 11th and 12th grade high school students. Students interested in health career professions are encouraged to apply through Big Bend AHEC or through their school counselors. This is not just for students interested in being a doctor or nurse, all aspects of the The week-long Day Camp will be held at Veterans Memorial Civic Center in Bristol. 15 Calhoun/Liberty students will be selected to participate. The camp will include an ACT Review course, health careers overview, an entire day of shadowing at Calhoun/Liberty hospital, a half-day interactive dental proences related to health careers. As part of the Application Process, students are required to provide their High School transcript, two teacher recommendations and evaluations, a personal essay with photograph and parent signature.Applications are available at Big Bend AHEC, 325 John Knox Road, Building M, Suite 200, Tallahassee, FL 32303, or through their school guidance counselors. Call Angelika Parker at (850) 224-1177 for more information. applications for Mossy Pond Volunteer Fire Department is hosting a carnival May 19 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. to kick off the summer. This will be held at the Mossy Pond Fire Department. There will be food, drinks, prizes and lots of games (including water games) for all. MPVFD invites everyone to come out and join us in the fun. schedule May 12 eventMossy Pond VFD plans day of fun for May 19The Creamer family will be having their family reunion May 12 beginning at 12 noon at Victory Hill Pentecostal Holiness Church located at 15947 NW Ashley Shiver Road in Altha. There will be food and fun as well as Creamers. Be prepared to: Bring a covered dish Tell favorite family stories Bring family pictures Make memories in 2012 For more information you can contact Carla Creamer Higginbottam at (904) 5533259 or Julie Creamer Douglas at (904) 583-9911. The Blountstown Torreya Garden Club will meet Monday, May 14, 6 p.m. (CT), at the Log Cabin Club House at the Pioneer Settlement. We will have our Spring covered dish Blountstown Torreya Garden Club meetingThe Estiffanulga Volunteer Fire Department will be putting on a Carnival Saturday, May 12 at the Veterans Memorial Park on HWY 12 South in Bristol from 10 a.m. to department in an effort to help mend many of due to lack of adequate funding. There will be games of chance, such as: Balloon booth, lollipop booth, archery booth, duck pond, bubble gum guess, footladder booth, basketball toss, bean bag toss and ball in basket. Hotdogs and hamburgers with chips, soda and water will be served. Bring your kids and a friend to see Smoky hat for your kids. include: Reel-n-rod, Browning thermos, Tool Students of the Tolar School, come dunk your principal and assistant principal in the dunking booth! Everyone come show your support for our local heros and join the fun! 10 a.m.4 p.m.Veterans Memorial Park agea t2 5 p.m. BMS Auditorium Settlement in Frink Gym

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MAY 9, 2012 / THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 5 EVENTS SALE Join us for the Calhoun Co. Chambers Business Bounce Thursday, May 10JEAANS $20O F F Located at 20634 E. Central in Blountstown (850) 674-8801 "Fine Jewelry & Gifts"RLAYAWAYSThe Diamond Corner 25%New Colors OFF 10%OFF PA ANDORAABuy $100 or more & get FREE Gift while supplies lastShop all day for great sales or during our extended hours 5 -7 p.m. (CT) for extra savings 20% OFF For questions please call Richard Armstong at 674-5411 ext 207 Some of the services offered:*Womens health education. *Blood pressure screenings, services FREE of charge. *Lipid Panel (Cholesterol) $5, Hemoglobin A1C (which require fasting after midnight) $5, fasting glucose $1 and PSAs $5 at a reduced rate by the Calhoun-Liberty Hospital lab. No need to bring orders, and we will be happy to forward the results to your primary physician. *Display of new County Ambulance with Emergency Medical *SWAT/Youth Tobacco Prevention by Calhoun County Health Department. *and much more3rd A Annual Community HeEALth TH FAIrRCome join us for a day filled with, fun and education for you and your family. Friday, May 11 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.We hope you take advantage of this opportunity to enjoy an event with your family and possibly even save your life. AND Many other vendors will be available to answer your questions and assist you with what ever need you have. HOPE TO SEE YOU ThHERE.... Calhoun-Liberty Hospital20370 NE Burns Ave., Blountstown Telephone (850) 674-5411BLOUNTSTOWN The Calhoun County Chamber of Commerce is launching a new series of events titled Brush Up / Wine Down which a hands-on art experience in the casual setting of the gallery. The sessions will be led by local watercolor artist Anna Layton. A launch of this new concept is set for Friday, May 25th at the gallery from 5:30 to 8 p.m. During the event, guests will have the opportunity to brush up on their art skills while enjoying music, refreshments, and socializing. Following the launch, Anna Layton will coordinate watercolor classes at the gallery, generally every other Thursday evening from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. The classes will incorporate a brief lesson and instruction on how to recreate an inspiration image created by Anna. The events are limited to ten people per session, and are ideal for a girls night out, baby showers, wedding showers, or even birthday parties. Guests are free to bring refreshments, and are encouraged to take their artwork home to be framed and showcased. Sign up for upcoming events will be offered at the May 25th event. Tickets for the kickoff event are $10 each for adults, $5 for children, and include the reception. Tickets can be purchased online at www. calhounco.org/store or at Blountstown Drugs. The event will be held in the space which features a portion of the gallerys permanent exhibit, Apalachicola River: An American Treasure by Clyde Butcher.___________________________The Preble-Rish Gallery is the result of a partnership between the Calhoun County Chamber of Commerce and PreRish graciously donated space for the gallery which hosts the Apalachicola River: An American Treasure exhibit, featuring 30 photography images by Clyde Butcher, and Calhoun County Chamber of Commerce is currently the proprietor of the exhibit.Kickoff event featuring hands-on art experiences set for Friday, May 25thChamber launches Brush Up series at Preble-Rish Gallery ABOVE: Anna Layton is shown above center with a

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Page 6 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL MAY 9, 2012 COMMENTARY Late Night LaughsA recaRECAP oOF recentRECENT obOBSerER Vation ATIONS by BY lateLATE niNIGhtHT tV TV hoHOStTS. JIMMY KIMMEL JAY LENO DAV VID LETTERMAN onanrin DAV VID LETTERMAN JIMMY KIMMEL JAY LENO JIMMY KIMMEL JAY LENO JIMMY FF ALLON JIMMY KIMMEL JIMMY KIMMEL onanrinWASHINGTON First, let it be said that vice presidential candidates can have a negative effect on the ticket, but not since John F. Kennedy picked Lyndon Johnson, who brought the Texas electoral votes with him, has a running mate had a positive effect. So the Republican vice presidential dance currently playing out will follow the doctors mantra: First, do no harm. Florida Senator Marco Rubio is the GOPs goto guy on immigration. Young and charismatic, he represents the partys future whether or not he gets tapped as Mitt Romneys running mate. The two men campaigned together this week in Pennsylvania, and there was an awkward moment when Romney was asked if he supported Rubios compromise version of the DREAM Act, which sets out conditions by which young people who were brought to the U.S. illegally by their parents can become citizens. President Obama supports the DREAM Act as does the Democratic Party, but it was one of those bright lines drawn between Republicans and Democrats during the GOP primary debates. the debates for supporting the DREAM Act and for granting illegal students in-state tuition rates to attend public universities. Romney and the other candidates assailed Perry for essentially frittering away taxpayer money on illegal aliens. Rubio to the rescue: Born in the U.S. of Cuban expatriots, Rubios life experiences allow him to empathize with those like himself who have grown up American, but who arent as fortunate as he was to gain citizenship. Rubio tweaks the original DREAM Act to make it a bit tougher for illegal immigrants to become citizens, but he does create a legal path. He would allow these young people to apply for a student visa, and then once they graduate, they would be allowed to work legally in the U.S. The good news for these young people is that they would be free from harassment by immigration they were in the U.S. legally. They would then be able to apply for residency, and once they get a green card, they would then have to wait another three to would be eligible for citizenship. Its a more grueling path than the Democrats DREAM Act envisions, but its likely still more than the Tea Party wing of the GOP will accept. With Hispanics the fastest growing bloc of voters and a key constituency in battleground states like Nevada, Florida and even Colorado, Romney will demographic reality and Rubio is his ticket. While it appears as though Obama has a lock on the Hispanic vote, the reality is more complicated. Obama promised immigration reform that would acknowledge the presence of more than 12 million people in the U.S. illegally, and provide them a path to citizenship. Republicans denounced that as amnesty, and Obama backed away from any broad legislative effort, focusing instead on increased border control and more targeted deportations, sparing families and singling out those who had any kind of record, even for the most minor offense. The Hispanic community feels like they were asked to go to the back of the bus when it comes to Obamas agenda, and theyre not sure that anything would change for the better in a second Obama term. That gives Romney an opening, and with Rubio as his advance man, the presumptive Republican nominee has a chance to change the tone of the debate about immigration, if not the substance. A recent Pew Research Center survey found that immigration from Mexico has come to a standstill in part because of the weak U.S. economy, and in part because of improved economic conditions in Mexico. The birth rate has fallen dramatically. In 1970, the average Mexican woman had 7 children; today it mirrors the U.S. with the average slightly more than 2 children. The immigration issue may solve itself over the long run, but in the short run, Romney needs Rubios help to make the GOP palatable to enough Hispanic voters to even out WASHInN GTOnNMERRY-GO-ROUnNDby Douglas Cohn and Eleanor Clift Will Rubio be Romneys go-to guy?

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MAY 9, 2012 / THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 7 COMMENTARY SPEAK UP!WITH aA LeETTeER TO THeE eEDITORemail Thejournal@fairpoint.net To the editor: The term weird uncle caught my eye on your April 25 Compipeline.. munity. Reader responds to Weird Uncle column

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Page 8 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL MAY 9, 2012 ACCEPTING NNEW PPaA TIENTSLaban Bontrager, DMD12761 NW Pea Ridge Rd., Bristol, FL 32321TELEPHONE 643-5417 www.bristoldentalclinic.com DENTURE LAAB ON PREMISESSame-Day Service on Repairs & Relines Bristol Dental ClinicMonica Bontrager, DMD JUST IN1st Quality Carpeting, Factory Overstocks Originally $189/SF Originally $339/SFNOW 99/SF NOW $125/SFNEW SHIPMENT OF AREA RUGS2 x 4 $5002 x 6 $12502 x 8 $15503 x 5 $12504 x 6 $19905 x 8 $39906 x 9 $4990Shags $7550Loose Lay Fiber Back Vinyl 13 Wide 99/SF Heavy Fiber Back Closeouts Reg. $250/SF NOW 99/SFWE NOW SELL CONCRETE PA A VERSBeautifulEAUTIFUL & DurableURABLE For Pools, Deck, Patio & Driveways 6 x 6, 6 x 12, 8 x 8, 12 x 12 Hexagon, Cobbles, Bishops Hat and Interlocking in a variety of colorsStarting at $295/SF bBY RutUTH AttAw ATTAW AY When I told Joel Hathaway that I was going to Russia on a mission trip, he grinned and said, Well our little redneck country girl goes to Russia. arrested in the airport in Tallahassee while trying Lady, I think you have a weapon in your carry on. I assured him that I did not. He told me to unzip the bag which I did and lo and behold there was a knife that Fred had given me to use in peeling fruit. Things went well until I got to Dsseldorf, Germany. At that point, I needed to get another boarding pass. I went to the counter to get it and the lady at the counter said that I would have to pay for my bags. I told her that, in Florida, I had checked my bags all the way through and paid the necessary fees. She asked for documentation and I gave her all that I had. She said that what I had was to pay. I thought, Oh whatever, and asked how much I owed. She told me how much in Marks and in Euros. I said How much is that in American dollars? She said, Six hundred dollars. I threw up my hand and said, Oh, My God! She looked at me! I looked at her! Then she shoved the boarding pass across the counter and said, Go! Go! I do not see. I went! You should have seen me go. I slung my back pack across my shoulder and ran to the gate. I stopped in Prague, Czechoslovakia and took a small plane over to Estonia where I was met by the Miningers who are the missionaries who were to be my hosts while I was there. On the border of Russia and Estonia, we met with a little group of people in the midst of a building project. You could see that they were struggling and the project was moving slowly. As the sanctuary crowded room. My interpreter was a big guy with a head full of wild curly hair and he had a tooth missing in the front. He, for all the world, reminded me of a teddy I had ever spoken through an interpreter so I knew this was going to be interesting. What I did not know, was that as Erikea interpreted my English into Estonian a young woman in the back of the room would interpret the Estonian into Russian. It was like trying to speak with a weird echo. Sometimes Erikea would not understand what I was trying to say so we would negotiate. Finally I would say the same thing enough different ways until he found a way to convey my message. The people were wonderful. They made me a (The coffee was just for me as everyone else was drinking tea). All of them wanted to talk with me and ask me questions. I left there with an Estonian a pair of hand knitted booties. An underground radio and internet television station was my next stop. The Miningers dropped me off at the house and I went in alone so as not to draw attention to the location. The missionaries told me that the interview would last an hour and that the talk show host might possibly ask off the wall questions. Needless to say, I was very nervous. The interviewer first gave me talk. He said, Do not use American slang and speak slowly with simple words. You must talk like this,... I LOVE YOU! he said. Then we were live. He would ask me a question or two, I would answer, and then he would interpret. Toward the end of the interview, the session went like this: He asked, Has the crime rate increased in your area because of the bad economic conditions? I said no, that my job was to handle all criminal case was down. He asked, Are there a lot of gangs in your area? I said that I did not know of any gang activity in our area. (He commented at that point that maybe he watched too much television.) He asked if a Christian would be allowed to and I am elected county wide for my position. He asked me why I thought anyone would want to that the people of my county felt that a Christian He said, I think you live Paradise, no? And I said, I think you are right! We have more problems than we want, but we do live in Paradise. Calhoun County, for all our troubles, this is Paradise! Watch for my sequel to this article in the next few weeks. I have titled it, Detained by the KGB. EDITORS NOTE: Ruth Attaway is the Calhoun County Clerk of Court. She made this trip in Sept. 2010 after meeting a missionary family, the Miningers, when they visited her church, Victory Hill Pentacostal Holiness, on Hwy. 71. She is planning to travel to Trinidad early next year on another mission trip.Our little redneck country girl goes to RussiaMissionary from Calhoun County shares her travel experiences on trip to RussiaRuth Attaway of Altha is shown here with her interpreter, Erikea, in Kivioli, Estoniania. Our annual graduation features are coming soon. Call The Journal at (850) 643-3333 to reserve a sponsor block on the page or to have us set up a congratulatory ad for your new graduate! RutUTH AttAw ATTAW AY

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MAY 9, 2012 / THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 9 TEMECULA, CA Cassidian Communications, an EADS North America company, is pleased to recognize Junior Lolley from Liberty County, FL, 9-1-1 Communications Center, as the Cassidian Communications Dispatcher of the Month. One of the reasons Liberty County 9-1-1 is unique is the fact that its lead call taker has been on the job since 1980 and has been blind since the age of 12. Today, Lolley processes more than 300 emergency and administrative calls a day, which is more than three times the amount he processed in his earlier days at the center. said Brandon Hoquist, product line manager, Cassidian Communications. As technology advances entered the 9-1-1 center, Lolleys job became more complicated as additional programs and monitors were introduced. Today, Lolley uses new technology designed to assist the visually impaired. He never sends a responder to the wrong place and can tell someone where to turn by landmarks, said Stephen Ford, 9-1-1 coordinator, Liberty County 9-1-1 Communications Center. He has only asked me where an address is located three or four times since I have worked with him. He does a better job than any sighted call takers I know. A renowned professional, Lolley says that no single call stands out among the thousands he has taken from natural disasters such as hurricanes, tornadoes and lightening storms, to emergencies related to house Im not in this for the money, Lolley states. This is not a job where you get rich. I do it to help people and to be there for the community. Its a calling. Its a desire I was born with. The Liberty County 9-1-1 Center recently completed testing of the latest version of the Sentinel Patriot call processing solution, release 3.2. Built to support up to 100 call taking positions, the Sentinel Patriot 3.2 solution is designed to handle up to two million calls per year, is fault tolerant with no single point of failure and delivers scalable, redundant, remote survivable systems with ultra-high reliability. This feature rich solution provides call centers such as Liberty County with a clear path to next generation 9-1-1 (NG9-1-1) services as they become available industry-wide. Hoquist continued, Cassidian Communications recognizes usability as one of the utmost needs for a key differentiator when comparing our products to those of other solution providers. Liberty County 9-11 has been a Cassidian Communications customer since 2005 and currently is operating the latest Sentinel Patriot solution on its three call taking positions. The 9-11 center is responsible for taking emergency and administrative calls for services from the approximately 8,000 county residents. The center also is responsible for dispatching calls for all law enforcement, emergency medical for the county. The Sentinel Patriot solution supports singleand multiple-site 9-11 centers as well as geographically diverse, centralized and hosted solutions. The solution is NENA-compliant and is an IETF standardsbased IPcentric call management suite designed to handle all calls seamlessly from a single switch. Cassidian Communications continues to serve clients ranging from public safety operations to Fortune 1000 corporations to federal agencies. Collectively, the company has more than 40 years of experience networks. AboutBOUT CassidianASSIDIAN CommunicationsOMMUNICATIONSAs the largest and most trusted source of mission critical communications solutions, Cassidian Communications, an EADS North America company, is leading the way in standards-based NG9-1-1 call and P25 land mobile radio systems. Headquartered in Temecula, CA. Junior Lolley named Dispatcher of the Month by Cassidian Communications Liberty County Dispatcher Junior Lolley Chipola Nursing Program graduates WANTS YOU!!!SWA A T SWA A T Calhoun County SWA A T program SWA A T If you have any questions, please contact Pamela McDaniel (850) 674-5645, ext 236. Saturday, May 19 Wewaormorinformationcontact The Employees Club of Wewahitchka, FL EE hisprojct rcivdfinancial assistanc from hlfonto rist vlopmnt oncilwww.VisitGulfCounty.comAArts & Crafts, Food and Live Entertainment plus Fun for the Kids Lots of Tupelo Honey ...BEE ThHERE! TUPELO FESTIVAL CORLETTS ROOFING LLCLR FREE EESTIMATESMichael Corlett (850) 643-7062 Owner (813) 253-3258LiIBertERTY CoOUntNTY $600 Down

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Page 10 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL MAY 9, 2012 HOURS: MON, TUES., THURS. & FRI: 11 a.m.-6 p.m. & WED: 11 a.m.-5 p.m. 17343 Main Street N Blountstown (850) 674-1311 @ Herbal Roots Come in today and out more at... WeE al ALSoO oOFFerER uniUNIQueUE GiIFtTS incluINCLUDinING WeE canCAN cuCUStoTOM DeESiIGnN a A GiIFtT baBAG ForOR MCall ahead to have everything waiting Make sure Mom feels her best with the right mix of herbs and out what all-natural ingredients can help keep your mother healthy. Natures Approach to Health DID Y YOU KNOW:T T T Home of the All-U-Can-Eat menuHSSPhone (850) 670-8441Family Coastal Seafood Restaurant A little out of the way, a lot less to pay! Come in and check out our 22 item Salad Bar. A UCE PRIME RRIB OR SNOW CRAB CLAWs S$1599INCLUDES CHOi I CE OF 2 Si I DES. All politicians are invited to the Hope Peacock BenBlountstown Lions Club to sell Boston Butts on FridayHOLY HOOPSTERS HIllLLCrestREST BAptPTIstST Ch CHUrRChH EVENTS Courageous Fireproof Courageous 100 MEN A AND WOMEN I I N BLAC AC K A A ND WHIITE BAAKE SAALENEWS FROM THE PEWS The Chason brothers and sisters --------------------The Fred Pelling Family MMESSAGES OF THAnNKS Meeting NoticeCA CA A ITuesday, May 22CA CA A OPT FL For more information call (850) 222-2043. 18831 State Road 20 West Is offering KARATE classes 3 nights a week.$20MONTH H 2 O Wellness CenterThe Calhoun-Liberty Journal Miss Calhoun County/Miss Blountstown Pageant set Saturday at Middle SchoolA R MMLP science park located on

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MAY 9, 2012 / THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 11 ASK THEO L D F A R M E R SA L M A N A C Heating & Air Conditioning FL LicIC. # CMC1249570R s s CCs (850) 674-4777Whaley WhaleyIs there any way to mend a wire screen that has a puncture hole in it? W. M., Glen Burnie, Md.Sure, its just like darning a sock, only on a much larger scale. If the puncture is near an edge or corner of the window or door, it can be tricky, but if its surrounded by screen, youre in luck. or other sharp, pointed tool. You want something that you can use to restore the individual pieces of wire to their rightful positions in the some additional wire of approximately the same size (or similarly colored nylon thread) and sew in these pieces, as needed, to restore the mesh pattern.Have you heard of the superstitions about the signifi cance of sneezing on various days of the week? N. K., Cherokee, Ok.Of course, superstitions are nothing to sneeze at. Whether you believe in them or not, the rhymes are fun. Sneeze on Monday, sneeze for danger. Sneeze on Tuesday, kiss a stranger. Sneeze on Wednesday, receive a letter. Sneeze on Thursday, receive something better. Sneeze on Friday, sneeze for sorrow. Sneeze on Saturday, see your lover tomorrow. Sneeze on Sunday, your safety seek, or the Devil will have you the rest of the week. There are also many sneeze sayings that dont apply to the days of the week. Sneeze at bedtime and youll have good luck. Sneezing to your right is considered more fortunate than sneezing toward the left. Bless yourself or others after a sneeze so demons wont rush in or so that your soul wont leak out. Gesundheit is just another version of Good Health. For those who still use these expressions, its clear just how strong a grip superstitions still have.What sort of planes F. L., Ferry Pass, Fl. service operated largely with the help of the U.S. Army Signal Corps and their planes and pilots, although other experimade as early as 1911. Six Jenny training planes (NJ-4Hs) were used, among others. In May of 1918, after Congress had appropriated $100,000 to Almanac.com FOR RECIPES, GARDENING TIPS, AND WEATHER FORECASTS, VISIT:The Old Farmers Almanac This year, (May 13) comes at the tail end of the Three Chilly Saints Days, May 11, 12, and 13, named for Mammertus, Pancras, and Gervais. Their feast days traditionally bring a bout of chilly weather, giving rise to weather lore such as Who shears his sheep before St. Gervais Day loves his wool more than his sheep. Perhaps some fleece slippers would be in order, so Mother keeps her sense of humor through this final cold nip. If her demeanor is still frosty, however, remind her that the ancient spring festival to honor the mother goddess, Cybele, may have been the precursor to Mothers Day. It was held much earlier, just after the Spring Equinox, but nevertheless, it was called Hilaria, from the Latin for cheerful. Istarch, and raspberries. Bring to a boil and stir until the sauce is smooth and thickened. Strain through a sieve to remove the seeds. Serve warm over pound cake, pear halves, or ice cream. If desired, 1/4 cup of brandy can be added to the sauce to be flamed when served. Best days to prune to discourage growthBest days to begin logging Moon runs lowTruman Day (Mo.) A gray sky in the morning presages fine weather. To avoid tough cookies, do not overmix the dough. On May 11, 1968, Linda McCartney became the first woman photographer to shoot a Rolling Stone cover. FOR RECIPES, GARDENING TIPS, AND WEATHER FORECASTS, VISIT: MAY 7, MONDAY -Moon at ascending node. American Medical Association founded, 1847. First exhibit by Group of Seven artists, 1920. MAY 8, TUESDAY -St. Julian of Norwich. Moon runs low. Director Roberto Rossellini born, 1906. The Beatles album Let It Be released in the U.K., 1970. MAY 9, WEDNESDAY -St. Gregory of Nazianzus. Truman Day (Missouri). Conjunction of Pluto and the Moon. First American political cartoon debuted in The Pennsylvania Gazette, 1754. MAY 10, THURSDAY -First submerged voyage around the world completed by submarine USS Triton, 1960. Poet Shel Silverstein died, 1999. All is not gold that glitters. MAY 11, FRIDAY -Pullman strike ended in defeat for organized labor, 1894. Waco Tornado (registered F5) hit downtown Waco, Texas, 1953. MAY 12, SATURDAY -Manitoba Act passed, approving Manitoba to become Canadian province, 1870. Alcoholics Anonymous founded, 1935. MAY 13, SUNDAY -Rogation Sunday. Mothers Day. Conjunction of Neptune and the Moon. Grissom Air Force Base near Peru, Indiana, reported wind gusts of 136 mph, 1995. Invitation to Bid Liberty County Board of County Commissioners, Emergency Management, will be accepting bids for a 32 X 72 X 12 Pole Barn with 6 Bays, installed. If more information is needed, please contact Rhonda Lewis at (850) 643-2339. All bidders should submit a sealed bid Bids will be accepted until 4:30 p.m. (ET) on May 10, 2012 at the Liberty County regularly scheduled Liberty County Board of County Commissioners Meeting that evening on May 10, 2012 at 6 p.m. (ET) at the Liberty County Courthouse, HWY 20 Bristol, FL 32321. The public is invited to attend. Please indicate on the outside of the sealed envelope that this bid is for a Pole Barn for Emergency Management. The Board of County Commissioners reserve the right to waive informalities in any bid and to accept or reject any or all bids and to accept the bid in their judgment that will be in the best interest of Liberty County. SPECIALTY POSTS Flat Face FACTORY SECONDS6'6" Posts, Top Size, under 2" 2-3" 3-4" 4-5" 5"+ ItemsTEMS subjectSUBJECT to TO a A Vailability AILABILITY Liberty Post & Barn Pole Inc.Dempsey Barron Road, Bristol (Off Hwy. 12 N) Phone (850) 643-5995WE'VE GOtT t THE FENCE POStTS t T O MEEtT YOUR NEEDS. establish experimen tal airmail routes, two simultaneous initial one from Washington, D.C., and the other from Long Island in New York, both headed to Philadelphia. President Woodrow Wilson and his wife stood by to watch the takeoff at Washington, D.C. The army pilot, Lt. George L. Boyle, who had only recently earned his wings, had trouble starting his Curtiss JN6H Jenny until his ground crew thought to check the fuel supply empty! The plane was refueled and Boyle took off, only to head off in the wrong direction. He eventually landed, low on fuel again, in a farmers east of Washington, D.C. The mail had to be picked up by automobile and returned to Washington, D.C.! Even when the postal service took over the reins from the army, in August of 1918, the planes they used were war-surplus De Havilland DH-4s, many of pilots who were now civilians looking for jobs in the air. Later, some custom-built mail planes were constructed by the Standard Aircraft Corporation. By 1959, the U.S. postal system was fooling around with missile mail sent on guided missiles launched from the navy submarine U.S.S. Barbero. The CalhounLiberty JoOUrnalRNALServing two counties that make up one great community!HOUURS: 9 a.m. 6 p.m. Monday thru Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Saturday (ET)PHONE (850) 643-333 FAX (850) 643-3334OFFICE DIRECTIONS: From State Road 20 in Bristol, turn south onto Pea Ridge Road, go one mile, turn east onto Summers Road and look for sign.

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Page 12 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL MAY 9, 2012 T upperwareSAVE MORE, SPEND LEss SSEnjoy farm-fresh fruits, veggies and more, right from your fridge. With our Call Beth EubanksYOUR Tupperware Consultant at (850) 643-2498 or (850) 570-0235email at bethseubanks41 @aol.comFridgeSmart 7-Pc Get it All Set or FridgeSmart Large RRound. New & Improvedstorage solutions, youll save more at home and spend less at the market.This past Saturday, Robert Davis visited the Blountstown Public Library to introduce his new book Out of Savannah. He autographed his works for patrons and did a wonderful and ter. The emotional times of war and the dangers around every corner make this researched account of history a very strong read. The Blountstown Public Library has purchased several books for check out. Library has copies of Out of Savannah ready for check outGRACEVILLE West Florida Electric Cooperative (WFEC) held its 75th Annual Meeting/Member Appreciation Day on Saturday, April 28 in Graceville. The event took place at the Graceville Civic Center from 8:00 a.m. until noon. Some of the activities taking place throughout the day included an expanded health fair with vendors from Northwest Florida Community Hospital, Audibel Hearing, Covenant Hospice, Eye Center South and Southeastern Chiropractic, blacksmithing & safety demonstrations, face painting, pony rides and more. Musical entertainment was provided by Big Bend Bluegrass of Chipley. Member-owners registered for door prizes and enjoyed a great meal. In addition to these events, members of the cooperative heard a keynote address from Congressman Steve Southerland, comments from Rep. Marti Coley, Rep. Brad Drake and Senator Don Gaetz. WFEC President & CEO, Bill Rimes also delivered his annual state of the cooperative address. As part of the cooperatives year-long 75th anniversary celebration, relatives of founding members were recognized and presented with commemorative gifts. Those recognized were: Annette Adams, daughter of the late W.R. Powell who surer of the board of trustees; Arthur & Tootsie Williams, son and daughter-in-law to the late A.L. Williams, Sr. who worked to solicit members and to secure right-ofway-easements for the new cooperative. Williams also had the distinction of colfrom Dock Peel who operated a small grocery outside of Graceville; Andy Andreasen, grandson of the late A.M. Andreasen who served on the coopas Vice President on that board; James Efurd, grandson of the late W.W. Henley who served as WFECs second president of the board of trustees from 1946 until distant cousins to the late Andrew Jackson president of the board of trustees and played an instrumental role in the establishment of West Florida Electric; Jim Baxley, nephew to the late Henry Sharon who also worked to help establish the cooperative during its early years. During the meeting, member-owners also had the opportunity to win a variety of prizes such as electric grills, small appliances, electronics and more. WFEC member, MaLinda Ragan of Graceville won the grand prize, a 4 kW portable generator. Members Paul Day and Rachel Cutchin also took home gift baskets from the event. Complimentary sandwiches were served for lunch by Southern Country Barbeque and drinks were provided throughout the day by cheerleaders from Sneads High School.West Florida Electric holds 78th annual meeting A April 28 at the Graceville Civic Center WFEC member Annette Adams, receives a gift commemorating her late fathers work to organize West Florida Electric Cooperative during the 1930s from Terry Mullen, WFEC Manager, Marketing and Communications. FROM LEFT: Bill Rimes, WFEC President and CEO, Congressman Steve Southerland, Representative Brad Drake, Representative Marti Coley and Senator Don Gaetz. gathering at the library in Blountstown.

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MAY 9, 2012 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 13 Wedding Robyn Brannan and Bobby Garrett, Jr. are pleased to announce their upcoming wedding July 7 at 3 p.m. (ET) at Lake Mystic Baptist Church. The reception will follow the ceremony at Veterans Memorial Civic Center. The brides parents are Stan and Debbie Brannan of Bristol. Her grandparents are Catherine Shelton and the late Gene Shelton of Chattahoochee and Merle Brannan and the late Parma Lee Brannan of Carrabelle. The grooms parents are Bobby Garrett, Sr. and Angela Garrett of Eastpoint. His grandparents are the late Pauline Garrett and Rita and Johnny McGough of Fort Deposit, AL. The bride is a 2010 Liberty County graduate and is currently attending Gulf Coast State College in Panama City. The groom is a 2009 Franklin County graduate and is selfemployed. All family and friends are invited to attend.Brannan, Garret will exchange wedding vows in Bristol July 7 BIRTHDAYSCHANNINGA ALAN CROSBYChanning celebrated his second birthday May 9. He is the son of Alan and Mandie Crosby of Bristol. His grandparents are Bubby and Melissa Shuler of Bristol and Mark and Charlotte Crosby of Sumatra. He loves tractors and enjoys swimming in the pool, being outside and being a big brother to Grayson. SSTRIRICKLANLANDSS HARHARDWAR ARE 10898 NW SR 20 in Bristol (850) 643-2336 Mothers Day May 13$999 Assorted varieties. 7286701, 7286719 Plant material may vary by store.$2499(7302656)(7204639) $1499 $3999 $2499 $799Potting Mix w/Fertilizer........... Wild BBird Food.....................G Garden S Soil........................ BRAND$999 $699 $499 Flex-Tech 5/8 x 125 H Hose $3499 Mobile HHose RReel Cart(7205271) holds 175 of 5/8 hose. Sturdy resin construction. Fully assembled$2999 FREE Pool Water Testing Available Tiki Torch $399 PRICES good May 1 May 31 $1699 bird. Wireless, transmits up to 100 to base station (8302655) or (8319964) A Adirondack LLawn Chairs Folding A Armchair 10% COUPONOFFAlene Ray Whitehead will be celebrating her 75th birthday Tuesday, May 22. To celebrate, a drop-in reception will be held Saturday, May 19 from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. at the Altha Church of God Fellowship Hall. The church is located on Fuqua Circle in Dollar General. All family, friends, former students, fellow teachers and acquaintances are invited to attend. Please no gifts, only your friendship and fellowship is requested.Reception May 19 to celebrate 75th birthday for Alene Ray Whitehead They exchanged vows May 4, 2005 at the Veterans Memorial Park in the Gazebo and are now celebrating their anniversary seven years later. Dallas was a graduate of Liberty County High School in 2002 and is currently enrolled at North Florida Cosmetology Institute to achieve her Cosmetology License. Chivas graduated from Liberty County High School in 2001 and has been employed with C.W. Roberts Construction Company for the past 10 years.LLARRY DAw WSONLarry Dawson will be celebrating his 56th birthday Saturday, May 12. He works with the Liberty County School System. He enjoys hunting and being around people. Dallas Hogans, Chivas Williams celebrate their 7th wedding anniversary

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Page 14 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL MAY 9, 2012The Florida Guides Association and Florida Keys Commercial Fishing Association on Wednesday honored three employees of the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) for their efforts to conserve marine life. Bill Kelly, executive director of the Florida Keys Commercial Fishing Association, recognized Jackie Fauls and the FWC partnered with the Keys group, Organized Fishermen of Florida, Monroe County States Attorney, House and Senate sponsors and to develop solutions. Capt. Pat Kelly, Florida Guides Association Year award. standing. Hart recently exceeded his required vessel patrol ing accidents. proud, Kelly said. Hes one of the Also at the meeting, the Florida Conservation Award. are vital to the resources of the state of Florida. Muller started the stock assessment group for the research arm of the agency more than 20 years ago. His work on assessments of snook, spotted Mike Murphy, Mullers supervisor. His inquisitive nature and willingness to share his knowledge with Fishing associations honor three employees of FWC or the similar-looking and onceThe Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) voted Wednesday to allow harvest of the species in Florida state waters at its Commission meeting. This change includes adding and the creation of a 66-inch minimum size limit when measured from the lower jaw to the fork of the tail. comes into Florida waters. State waters are from shore to three miles in the Atlantic and from shore to nine miles in the Gulf. Federal with white marlin. Genetic testing of tournament entries along the 19 percent of tournament-winning white marlin were actually roundin federal waters off the coast of NOAA Highly Migratory Species Division, the group that makes federal management plans for spesuch. These federal and state changes will increase the amount of data understand the species and its role in our waters. a white marlin and a roundscale vent. As shown in the photograph a white marlin. The scales in the middle of the two species, with the roundscales of a white marlin.FWC Commissioners open roundscale The 2012 recreational red snapper season in Gulf 10, a total of 40 days. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) set the 2012 season Wednesday, May The state season is the same as the recently announced federal recreational red snapper season. The Commission also voted to keep a 40-day, June 1 through July 10 season regardless of whether the federal season is further shortened. Florida state waters in the Gulf extend out to nine nautical miles from snapper produce more eggs than younger females. and going consistent with the federal season will at the recovery, we are going in the right direction The Lake House Restaurant Phone (850) 674-5253 ( LAKE ) kids menu BUMbBLE BEE TRAPS Become a Volunteer Help an abused, Florida Guardian ad Litem FoundationPHONE Discover how you can make a difference in a childs life.

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MAY 9, 2012 / THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 15 643-4247 (Hair)Nancys Hair DesignATCome see Nancy & Shaula 12154 Hwy. 20 W Dont let summer arrive without being prepared. Check out our TANNING Give her a special gift...We have a lot of ideas to choose from, come see us and plan that special surprise for your mom Not sure what Mom would want? Remember Mom Liberty County. Where dreams come true. This is the place they call Gods country. A place where you can still walk in a store and people say hello. A place where you are greeted with a warm welcome after years of being gone and there is always someone to pick you up and people really care. On that note, we, the Kent family would like to say thank you to the Liberty County Board of Commissioners, Kevin Brown, Katie Phillips, as well as William Manning of Chariot Construction and staff for taking such great pride in their work with the SHIP program. Again, thanks from The Kent Family Totes, handbags, cards, frames, wind chimes, fragrances, & more.Golden Pharmacy 17324 Main Street N. in Blountstown TeleELEPhoneHONE 674-4557 CAARDS 50% offall the time Its VerY Wise to Advertise Make the most of your business with an ad in The Calhoun-Liberty JOURNALPPHONE (850) 643-3333 thejournal@fairpoint.net Fisheries biologists often refer to To develop and sustain high quality ponents need to be addressed. Most biologists stress that habitat from water quality and quantity, to the amount of structure, including aquatic plants and resulting forage may be the most critical. However, managing the people aspect, which includes engaging the public in resource stewardship, outdoor recreation and harvest regulations, is often the most visible approach. Lake Talquin, an 8,800-acre reservoir near Tallahassee, is an excellent example of the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commissions (FWCs) three-tier approach. The res ervoir, which was formed by damming the Ochlockonee River for hydroelectric generation, is known as a crapsteep embankments provided a limited zone for bass to spawn and where submerged aquatic plants could grow. Those plants help currents and provide hide and feed. Consequently, FWC biologists implemented a three-phased approach to manage largemouth bass there, beginning in 2000 by planting shoreline implementing an 18-inch minimum size limit on black bass. Today, native bulrush, much of which was transplanted by FWC programs, comprises 5 percent of the shoreline. The goal is 7 percent to 10 percent. Since then, the FWC has stocked more than 700,000 advanced-sized (3large numbers at hatcheries because of their cannibalistic nature and the pond space and time required. However, these stockings, using fish from the two FWC freshwater hatcheries (Blackwater in Santa Rosa County and the Florida Bass Conservation Center in Sumter County) proved immensely successful. Timely releases of 2to 3-inch hatchery bass, reared in ponds on natural food, resulted in 17 percent to in Lake Talquin from October 2000comprised about 25 percent of the angler catch from bass tournaments on determine the presence of a codedwire tag that biologists implanted in before stocking. (See MyFWC.com/ Fishing, and click on Freshwater then Stocking for a video of the tagging process.) Since 2010, at least 15 hatchery bass weighing 8 to 11.5 pounds have been recaptured from Lake Talquin. harvested, or caught-and-released, by anglers who didnt know they were holding a hatchery-spawned bass. Supplemental stocking and aquatic plant management activities, as well as the 18-inch minimum length limit may have contributed to the trophy Talquin. Previous stocking efforts typically which were pond-reared in hatcheries on zooplankton to a size of about 1 to able to predators. Unfortunately, raising enough 3to 4-inch bass in hatchery ponds to lakes in Florida is cost-prohibitive. As a result, the FWC is experimenting with two alternate approaches. and a method the FWC developed to rather than each other, so they can be grown in intensive tank management systems more cost effectively. The other involves tricking adult bass in hatcheries using light and temperature to spawn earlier (or later) than they would in nature. This allows pondreared, Phase-I bass to be stocked when there is abundant forage, such Charlie Mesing, the FWC Habitat and Species Conservation biologist responsible for helping manage Lake Talquin, and other FWC scientists experimented with the latter approach cation concluded that stocking low numbers of 3to 4-inch pond-reared which occurs around mid-May in Largemouth bass are not the only ters by the FWC. Anglers can learn more about the species and locations stocked by visiting MyFWC.com/ Fishing. Recently, signs have been posted at boat ramps where stockings have taken place. The signs have a QR code, which anglers with smart phones can scan to learn more about stockings that took place at their locale. During 2010-11, more than 4 milpublic waters. The FWC is on schedule to meet or exceed that goal for 201112 and continues to study ways to make stocking more successful, while enhancing habitat and using appropriate regulations to ensure Florida the world.Lake Talquin hatchery bass making a difference in Florida For the Kids! Call for details...Classes 18831 State Road 20 West Blountstown (850) 674-2070H 2 O Wellness Center 18831 SR 20 W Blountstown Phone (850) 6745253 ( LAKE )$595 The Lake House Restaurant 1/2 sandwich & soup or salad Eastern chipmunks are thought to live in only a few locations in Northwest Florida but researchers with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) are asking anyone who has spotted one to report the sighting. Wildlife biologist Chris Winchester said information may be recorded at public.myfwc.com/hsc/chipmunk/ getlatlong.aspx. Smaller than a gray squirrel, the Eastern chipmunk is slightly reddish in color and has white and black stripes running down its back and light stripes above its eyes. Winchester said researchers are especially interested in new sighting data, but would like information on older sightings as well. He said chipmunks appear to be rare in Florida but historically have been found along the Escambia, Blackwater, Yellow and Choctawhatchee rivers. There are also reports of chipmunks observed in back yards, and in forested lots within urban areas. The species is more common in forested areas in the eastern half of the United States from Alabama north to Canada. Chipmunks are a species of special concern in Florida. He said the sighting study will be useful for a look at the species distribution, abundance and preferred habitat.FWC seeks help in chipmunk researchSince 2010, at least 15 hatchery bass weighing 8 to 11.5 pounds have been recaptured from Lake Talquin.

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Page 16 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL MAY 9, 2012 R OBOTICS COMPETITIONABOVE: Altha High School took 1st and 3rd place in the Log Book Competition. BELOW: Liberty County students Toren Guthrie, Brandon Jenkins and Ethan Foran work with their robot. LEFT: Liberty Countys Brandon Jenkins and Ethan Foran tinker with their robot before the competition. BELOW: Liberty County students Jessica Read, Tyler Myers, Brandon Jenkins, Tyler Sikes, Travis Beasley watch anxiously as the robots compete. DANIEL WILLIAMS PHOTOSAltha teams take one rst place win and place third in two events

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MAY 9, 2012 / THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 17 The Lake House Restaurant AA vailable on any day or time. Call or come by and visit us to schedule your next event. MONTUE-SAA TWED-THURSFRI-SAA TSUNCLOSEDLunch 10:30 a.m. to 8 p.m.10:30 a.m. to 9 p.m.10:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. (850) 674-5253 (LAKE)ChecHECK outOUT ourOUR WebEBSiteITE at AT Serving lunch and dinner Make a memory this Mother's Day Mom can enjoy a glass of wine and admire the view while her steak is cooking! DELIVERY AVAILABLE DURING THESE HOURS, AS WELL Mom eats free with party of four or more! The Beau Turner Youth Conservation Center in Jefferson County is offering weekly day-camp sessions this summer for youth ages 10-15 who are interested in hunting and related outdoor activities. During hunt camp, participants will learn about Floridas great hunting heritage and be taught such tree-stand safety. Campers also will learn conservation, land stewardship and about hunting laws and ethics. Participants will spend extensive time on several gun while theyre at camp, if they choose to do so. There will be four weeks of camp, all during the month of June, and the sessions are June 4-8, June 1115, June 18-22 and June 25-29. Hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday and 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Fridays. The cost for each weekly session is $175 and parents may register their children at BTYCC.org. For more information, contact Kelly Langston at Kelly.Langston@ MyFWC.com. MARIANNAThe family of the late Tracy Williams Wierman has established a memorial scholarship at Chipola College in her honor. Wierman was a teacher at Golson Elementary School at the time of her death in 2011. The partial scholarship is available to an elementary education major who is a senior in Chipolas four-year Teacher Education program. The scholarship may be used for tuition or books. Application deadline is June 7. Applicants must have a minimum 2.5 GPA at Chipola and must exhibit good moral character. Applicants also must write a letter describing Applications are available in the Chipola College edu or phone (850) 718-2404.Tracy Williams Wierman memorial scholarshipTeams come together for annual Relay for Life

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Page 18 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL MAY 9, 2012SCHOOL LLUNCH MENU May 9-15, 2012 LIBERTY Wednesday BREAKFAST: Sausage and gravy biscuit. LUNCH: Chicken alfredo with pasta or cheeseburger on bun or taco chef salad with tortilla shells with mixed vegetables, caesar side salad with dressing and petite banana. (2nd & 3rd grade pizza) Thursday BREAKFAST: French toast sticks with ham. LUNCH: Sloppy joe sandwich or PB&J on autumn grain or buffalo chicken salad and crackers with dirty rice, steamed broccoli, green beans and orange wedges. Friday BREAKFAST: Grilled cheese on whole wheat. LUNCH: Chuck wagon chicken and gravy or meatball sub or turkey and cheese chef salad with potato wedges, seasoned corn, salad with dressing and grape juice. (4th grade pizza) Monday BREAKFAST: Breakfast burrito. LUNCH: Meatloaf or turkey club sandwich or grilled chicken wrap with baked sweet potato, whole kernel corn, dinner roll and orange wedges. (Kg & 1st grade pizza). Tuesday ham. LUNCH: Glazed ham or cheeseburger on bun or baby turkey, ham & cheese sub with steamed broccoli, green peas, biscuit, tossed salad with dressing and chilled pears.*Each breakfast includes a choice of assorted cereal with whole wheat buttered toast and assorted fruit or fruit juice. CAl L HOUN Wednesday BREAKFAST: Ham and egg biscuit with potato tots. LUNCH: Chicken nuggets with mashed potatoes, whole kernel corn, mixed fruit and whole wheat roll.Thursday BREAKFAST: Cheese toast with grits and ham cubes.LUNCH: Lemon butter chicken with buttered rice, green beans, whole wheat roll and diced peaches.Friday BREAKFAST: French toast sticks and syrup with sausage patty.LUNCH: Cheese pizza with garden salad, fresh fruit and home baked cookie.Monday BREAKFAST: Ham and scrambled eggs with buttered toast. LUNCH: Chicken BBQ sandwich with baked potato wedges and mixed fruit.Tuesday BREAKFAST: Pancakes and syrup with sausage patty. LUNCH: Beef-a-roni with steamed broccoli and cheese, mixed fruit and bread stick. Laban Bontrager, DMD, Monica Bontrager, DMDPea Ridge Rd in Bristol, Phone (850) 643-5417MenusENUS SPONSORED BY: Bristol Dental Clinic blountstown high school Business Education students at BHS have been working hard all year to achieve their Microsoft Specialist Several other students have passed the tests for MiSuperintendent McClellan wished to congratulate Wednesday, May 9: Cap and Gown Pictures; Friday, May 11: and Seniors Saturday, May 12: FCMonday, May 14: Tuesday, May 15: BHS Calendar of Events traveled to Chipola College to attend the annual Brain representing schools in surrounding counties particiBHS students place second in the Chipola Brain Bowl to participation in sports and current BHS students talked about the Clubs active on BHS host freshmen-to-be orientation for BMS and Carr students May 3 FROM LEFT: Tommy McClellan Superintendent, Chloe McCleod, Olivia Atkins, Destiny Boutwell, Neel Hampton, Sarah McCausland, Audrey Ryals, Jessie West, Haileigh Pippin, Drew Bryant, Kaycee Yon, MeShae Hall and Business Ed. Teacher, Debra Perdue. FROM LEFT: Mrs. Allyson Howell, Harrison Coley, Saad Farooqi, Mitchell Darnell and Caitlyn Stewart. Btown elementary school Be sure to purchase your yearbook *Friday, May 11 *Friday, May 18 Calhoun County Wide events included were the Calhoun County wide track meet May 3 HOURS: 9 a.m. 6 p.m. Monday thru Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. OFFICE DIRECTIONS: From State Road 20 in Bristol, turn south onto Pea Ridge Road, go one mile, turn east onto Summers Road and look for sign.PHONE (850) 643-3333 FAX (850) 643-3334The Calhoun-LibertyJournOURNAlLServing two counties that make up one great community!

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MARIANNAThe Community Foundation of Sarasota County, Inc., from the Edward K. Roberts Fund established a scholarship at Chipola College for the upcoming Summer Session II and Fall 2012. The scholarship fund was created with a $50,000 donation from the Community Foundation of Sarasota County with funds from the estate of the late Edward K. Roberts. The scholarship will be available for the Summer II Session at Chipola College and the application deadline is May 16. Deadline for Fall 2012 is June 7. Preference will be given to part-time students who may aid. Applicants must maintain a minimum 2.0 GPA each semester at Chipola, must have a minimum 2.0 high school GPA, and must follow standard college requirements. A description of the scholarship and application are available online at www.chipola.edu/ foundation To contact the Chipola Foundation, call (850) 7182445. MAY 9, 2012 / THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 19 by Cortney HarrisThere will be a 5K run sponsored by FCCLA beginning at 8 a.m. Saturday, May 12 at the Train Depot in Blountstown. This is a fundraiser to help send 10 Calhoun County students to compete at the FCCLA National Conference in July. Registration is from 6:40-7:40 a.m. The pre-registration fee for the 5K is $15 and if you register the morning of the event it is $20. T-shirts will be given out to all those who participate. There will be a one mile fun run and walk following the 5K run. Those who are interested in participating in this event will be charged $10 for early registration and $15 if you register Saturday morning. Anyone can run in either or both of these events. The students who will be attending the national conference from Altha School are Cortney Harris, Alicia Collin Mears, Caylynn Reeder and Katie Detweiler. Sky Pickron will be attending from Carr School. Blountstown High School is sending Justin Terry to nationals as well. All of these students are working very hard to raise the money they need for nationals this year.FCCLA fundraiser 5K/fun run mile planned SaturdayABOVE: Fifth grader Austin Roberts with his project on Pennsylvania. LEFT: Morgan Lewis showing her project on Guatemala. Last Friday, Altha Schools High School World History and American History this years Worlds Fair. Students worked with their team to create displays based on their assigned country or state. The 10th and 11th graders were judged and graded based on their overall display and what they know about their country. The winners were Morgan Lewis and Crystal Finuff. ects some students stood out as engaging their audience. Those with Honorable Mention were Madison Boggs (Hawaii), Bethany Griswell (Mississippi), James Boatwright (Ohio), Austin Roberts (Pennsylvania) and Braeden Raper (Washington D.C.).AAltha students travel around the world with this years World Fair Altha school competed May 1 in the annual Robotics competition hosted by the Chipola Regional Workforce Development Board in Marianna. This is the schools third year of competition. We had two teams to compete. The Leadership Class robot The Shoal team, which consisted of Hunter Baggett, Christina Watson, Chelsey Jones, Madison placed First in the Log Book Competition which consisted of a Log Book documenting the design process, the challenges faced during robot construction and how the team met those challenges as well as an Interview the day of competition. The Ag team Team Optimus, with Brooke Coleman, Jacob OBryan and Tyler Bramblett, placed third in the Log Book Competition as well as third in actual Head to Head Competition using their robot.Altha competes in annual Robotics competition May 1The Leadership class and the Ag class show off their plaques and trophies. altha wildcats Childrens Show Finale at Chipola ThursdayThe Chipola College Theater is in rehearsal for the childrens show, Finale, which will be presented to hundreds of elementary school children in May. A public performance is set for Thursday, May 10 at 7 p.m. Many scholarships available for Summer Session II and Fall 2012 at Chipola College

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Page 20 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL MAY 9, 2012 The annual county-wide 4-H/ Tropicana Public Speaking Contest was held Wednesday, May 2 at Veterans Memorial Civic Center. The school administrators, principals, teachers, parents, students and friends who came to hear the outstanding speeches delivered by students from Tolar and Hosford Schools. The program is designed to give delivery of a speech. Each student writes a two to three minute speech on a topic of their choice to present to their classmates. They are judged on composition and presentation. The classroom winner then competes at their school to establish school winners. The school winners compete with other school winners in the school district. It is important for all students to have an opportunity to take pride in All winners receive plaques. First place winners also receive a 4-H camp scholarship, compliments of Tropicana Beverage Company. Second place winners receive a 4-H day camp scholarship, compliments of the Elementary Division winners: Brady Peddie, Taryn Kirkland and Abbott. ger will compete in a multicounty contest Thursday, May 10 in Tallahassee. BACK ROW, from left: Brady Peddie, Jonathan Day, Mary Beth Brown, Caroline Carson, Blake Tharpe, Marinda Geiger. FRONT ROW: Jakob Abbott, Taryn Kirkland, Justin Day, Luke Johnson Lindsey Marotta and Tucker Singletary.Day, Geiger win County Tropicana Speech contestOn Friday, April 13 Tolar students celebrated their academic achievements and being an A school with a special Liberty Idol skit put on by the teachers and staff, followed by a day of fun in the sun! The Liberty Idol skit, a spoof of American Idol, consisted of a variety of performances by teachers and staff singing songs of encouragement to the students. Our host was Ryan Seacrest played Lopez played by Misty Sizemore and Steven Tyler played by Link Barber. After the staff performances students were rewarded with cash for achieving high levels on the FCAT assessment last year. After the skit, students rotated through stations that had games, water slides, obstacle courses and much more. Tolar students and staff would like to thank Doobie Andy Bodiford and his wife and many others for cooking lunch for all the students and staff. It was delicious! This entire event would have not been possible without the planning committee and Tolars teachers and staff to keep things running smoothly. We are very proud of our students and are looking forward to the academic achievements we are making this year!Tolars A Celebration Chris Summers, Misty Sizemore and Link Barber dress up as American Idol judges. TOLAR SCHOOLMARIANNAInstructors from the Chipola College Automotive Technology program are featured in a Video Training Series released by BBB Industries and now available on the web. series: Meters and Test Equipment for Automotive Troubleshooting is available at www.youtube.com/watch?v=aDy9lGNeQM The video offers an overview, and shows proper use of common meters like the DVOM, VAT 40, VAT 45, MT3750 and more. The training videos were Service Technology Program and are Gardner and Chase Vlieg who are both The new video training series was developed with BBB Industries, the leading remanufacturer of automotive rotating electrical equipment (alternators and starters). BBB representatives visited the Chipola Automotive program in March to shoot three programs in the series. assistant instructor Chase Vlieg wrote the scripts for the series and are featured on Electrical Fundamentals, Meters and Test Equipment, and Magnetism were produced during the Chipola shoot. BBB also donated alternators and starters valued at $5,000 to be used for training in the Chipola program. BBB is a major supplier to Auto Value/Bumper to Bumper, Carquest, OReillys, Parts Plus and NAPA, all of which have representatives on the Chipola Automotive Technology Advisory Committee. The videos will be available to parts stores, shops, technicians and the do-ityourselfers. Chipola and other NATEF Tri-States Automotive representatives Walter Spence, Bill Stevens and Ronnie Stevens also assisted with the program. Ricky Miller of Rahal-Miller Chevrolet, Cadillac, representing General Motors, provided a new Electric Chevy Volt for the production. Chipola automotive program training video is releasedInstructors from the Chipola College Automotive Technology program are featured in a Video Training Series released by BBB Industries and now available on the web. Chipola instructors John Gardner (center) and assistant instructor Chase Vlieg (right) wrote the scripts for the series and are featured as the on-screen talent.

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MAY 9, 2012 / THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 21 TOLAR SCHOOL TOP: Liberty County School Superintendent School Summers reads Curious George Makes Pancakes to a group of Tolar School Caryl Marotta presented books to the kids. BELOW: Tolar Assistant Principal Jeff Sewell United Way donates books to rst graders at Tolar School SiIXthTH gra GRADeE DiIVisionISION Third place, Caroline place, Blake Tharpe. FourthOURTH an AND fifth FIFTH gra GRADeE DiIVisionISION First place, Lindsey Marotta; second place, Luke Johnson; third place, Taryn Kirkland. place winners in the annual Tropicana Speech Contest held at Tolar School Friday, April 6. to write a speech and present it to their class. Three winners are chosen from each homeroom class and then those students compete to place as a winner for their wide competition. were Coleby Hall, Taryn Kirkland, Shaylynn Pleasant, Luke Johnson, Lindsey Marotta and Kelsey Nobles. In Blake Tharpe and Kaylee Wheetley. Johnson came in second place and Taryn Kirkland came place and Caroline Carson came in third place. We would like to thank Mr. Barber, Mr. Sewell and Our winners went on to the district competition on proud to announce : sionTolar Tropicana Speech winnersBlake Tharpe, Lindsey Marotta take top honors in schoolwide competition & place in districtTolar School youngsters who are learning the basics of reading received a special gift last week to encourage their efforts. The were each given their own copy of the childrens book, Curious George Makes Pancakes by Margrett and H.A. Rey, courtesy of the United Ways Read United campaign. School Superintendent Sue Summers, School Marotta, Tolar Assistant Principal Jeff Sewell, Mentor Teacher Jill D Davis and D Director of Instruction Gay Lewis visited with the kids and read the book to them last week. More than 70 book. The program provided books for approximately in several Big Bend counties, including Liberty, Leon, Franklin, Gadsden, Jefferson, Madison, Taylor and Wakulla.

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Page 22 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL MAY 9, 2012 Dear EarthTalk: Why is Greenpeace upset with some leading tech companies for so-called dirty cloud computing? Can you explain? -Jeremy Wilkins, Waco, TX Leading tech companies like Google, Apple and Microsoft are now offering unprecedented amounts of data storage and access to apps on huge Internet-connected servers, saving consumers and businesses the hassle of installing and running programs and storing information on their own local computers. This emerging trend, dubbed cloud computing, means that these providers have had to scale up their power consumption considerably, as they are increasingly responsible for providing more and more of the computing horsepower required by the worlds two billion Internet users. No doubt, sharing such resources on centralized servers is dantix estimates that companies off-loading data and services to cloud servers could save $12 billion off their energy bills and reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 85 million metric tons within the next decade. But for the greenhouse gas savings to be realized, the companies offering cloud computing services need to make the right energy choices. Greenpeace has been tracking sustainability among tech companies for over a decade, and recently released a report, How Green is Your Cloud? assessing the green footprint of the move to cloud computing. According to the analysis, some of the major players (Google, Facebook and Yahoo) have gone to great lengths to ensure need come from clean, green sources like wind and solar. But Greenpeace chastises others (Apple, Amazon and Microsoft) for relying on so-called dirtier sources of power, such as coal and nuclear, to run their huge data centers. When people around the world share their music or photos on the cloud, they want to know that the cloud is powered by clean, safe energy, says Gary Cook, a Senior Policy Analyst with Greenpeace. panies like Apple, Amazon and Microsoft are building data centers powered by coal and acting like their customers wont know or wont care. Theyre wrong. Greenpeaces report evaluates 14 machains in use across more than 80 different data centers that power cloud-based services. Some of the largest data centers are in buildings so big they are visible from space and use as much power as 250,000 European homes. If the cloud were its own country, says Greenpeace, it would rank 5th in the world in electricity consumption. Companies like Google, Yahoo and Facebook are beginning to lead the sector down a clean energy pathway through ing renewable energy access when siting their data centers, and demanding better energy options from utilities and government decision-makers, reports Greenpeace. But unfortunately the majority of the industry is not marching in step. As such, Greenpeace is calling on all tech companies with cloud services to develop siting policies based on access to clean energy sources, invest in or directly purchase renewable energy, be transparent about their energy usage, share innovative solutions so the sector as a whole can improve, and demand that governments and utilities increase the percentage of clean, green power available on the grid.Dear EarthTalk: I understand there is to be another Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil in June 2012, 20 years since the last one was held in the same city. Whats on the agenda this time?-Janet Grayson, Albuquerque, NM According to the United Nations, the so-called Rio+20 able Developmentis a new attempt in a new millennium to lay the foundations of a world of prosperity, peace and sustainability. The event will take place June 20-22, the 20th anniversary of 1992s United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development (UNCSD) the Rio Earth Summitand the 10th anniversary of the 2002 World Summit on Sustainable Development in Johannesburg. The main agenda items will be reviewing the progress tainability, assessing responses to the newly emerging challenges faced by our societies, and strengthening political commitments to sustainable development. the green economy to foster sustainable development and poverty eradication, and setting up an effective institutional framework for future global sustainable development initiatives. Delegates from the 200+ nations will focus on sustainable cities, decent jobs, food security and sustainable agriculture, energy, oceans, and disaster readiness. To the World Resources Institute (WRI), a Washington, DC-based think tank devoted to sustainability issues, Rio+20 is important as it forces the worlds nations to to the policies designed to foster economic growth that is both inclusive and respects the planets limited carrying capacity. WRI adds that amid a global recession, a widening gap between rich and poor and heightened competition for energy, food and other natural resources, the confer ence couldnt be timelier but unfor tunately, no clear vision for Rio+20 has emerged, and expectations... remain low. But conference participants are busy preparing. The Stakeholder Forum for a Sustainable Future (SFSF), a network of non-governmental participants, is busy developing the Global Transition 2012 culled from organizations and thought leaders around the world. A goal of the initiative is to achieve an outcome from Rio+20 that catalyses a Global Transition to an economy that maximizes well-being, operates within environmental limits and is capable of coping and adapting to global environmental change, reports the SFSF. The Global Transition 2012 initiative will propose focused and accessible goals, targets and policy interventions that will chart a clear route towards the greening of the global economy, and the achievement of social and economic justice. Rio+20 participants hope this event will be remembered as an historic occasion when nations of the world aligned behind the cause of staving off global environmental catastrophe. But the more likely outcome is a few non-binding agreements that will soon be forgotten by constituents, the media and even many of the participating countries. Not since 1987s Montreal Protocol to phase out ozone-depleting chemicals have nations of the world been without any binding agreements already on the table, Rio+20 doesnt look to dazzle either. ADOPT A PET through the JOURNAL CLALASSIFIEDS! Guardian ad Litem volunteers are powerful voices in the lives of abused and neglected children in our community. Join us and speak up for a child! Call the Guardian ad Litem Program at (850) 482-9127 or (850) 638-60433.

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MAY 9, 2012 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 23 All existing pre-need and at need contracts are now handled by the Bevis family and staff.All operations of the funeral process will be handled on location at 12008 NW State Road 20.CALL 643-3636Todd Wahlquist, Rocky Bevis & Ed PeacockLicensed Funeral Directors & Crematoryevis FuneralHome Bof Bristolof Bristol Two locations to serve youBlountstown and Bristol Adams Funeral Home674-5449 or 643-5410Visit us online: www.adamsfh.com OBITUARIES Telephone (850) 674-2266 YY our hometown funeral home since 1994A Hometown Funeral Director You Can Trust and Depend On!Funeral Services with Dignity, Caring and Professionalism. Marlon PeavyPeavy Funeral Home& CrematoryPAt TRIcCIA A ANN HOOKS BLOUNTSTOWNPatricia Ann Hooks, 69, of Blountstown, passed away April 30, 2012 at her home. S She was born on February 1, 1943 in Blountstown and had lived in Blountstown for most of her life. S She was retired from Florida S State Hospital with over 20 years of service as a UT UTC specialist. Patricia was of the Baptist faith. S Survivors include one daughter, Regina Hooks of Blountstown; one brother, Doug Pelt and his wife, Janie of Clarksville; two sisters, Flora Kepser of W W arrington and Betty Morris of T T allahassee; one granddaughter, T T yTT iana Hooks of Blountstown.S Services were held T Thursday, May 3 at Peavy Funeral followed in Pine Memorial Cemetery. Peavy Funeral Home in Blountstown was in charge of the arrangements. S SUSIE MAE (WOOD) MAYO HOSfFOrdRDS S usie Mae (W W ood) Mayo, 82, of Hosford and a former resident of Blountstown, passed away Monday, May 1, 2012 in T T allahassee. S She was born in Douglas, GA and had lived in Hosford since 2004, coming from Blountstown. S She worked in a Cigar Factory and Russells S Sewing Factory for a number of years. S She was a member of Corinth Baptist Church in Hosford, where she was a member of the O Older W W iser L Leaders (OWLOWL) and a former member of Blountstown Assembly of God Church. S She truly enjoyed attending the Hosford SSenior Citizens Association. S She was preceded in death by her husbands, W W .R. W W ood and Ransom J. Mayo; a daughter, Marie Mayo Dykes; a grandson, Danny L Langston and a brother, George T T aft.S S urvivors include two sons, James Mayo and his wife, L Lucretia of Bristol and Mike Mayo and his wife, Bonnie of Altha; one daughter, Helen L L angston and her husband, Joe of Hosford; a step-brother, Richard Bradford and his wife, L L ynn of Homerville, GA; two sisters, Carolyn S S mith Holloway, all of Homerville, GA; six grandchildren, S Steve L Langston and his wife, Heidi, David L Langston and his wife, Diane, W W ayne, Ricky and T T erry Mayo and Dianne Dykes; great-grandchildren, Alisha S Sadler, Kalan L Langston and several other great-grandchildren; great-great-grandchildren, Makenna and Gabe Patton and several other great-great-grandchildren.S Services were held Friday, May 4 at Corinth Baptist ment followed in Pine Memorial Cemetery. Peavy Funeral Home in Blountstown was in charge of the arrangements. JOhHN W. (PEtTE) BAGGEttTT ALThaHAJohn W W (Pete) Baggett, 89, of Altha, passed away Monday, May 1, 2012 in Marianna. He was born February 10, 1923 in Altha and had lived in Jackson County for several years. He was a retired cattle farm manager and worked with the S State of Florida as a mechanic for a number of years. Pete was a member of Cypress Grove Assembly of God Church in the Dellwood Community in Jackson County. He was preceded in death by his parents, W W illiam King and Maude Baggett; two brothers, Bill and Ellis Baggett; four sisters, N Nancy Pierce, S Sis S Sewell, Fronie Adkins and Kansas Burke and his wife of 65 years, Alma. S Survivors include his wife, Mary Baggett of Altha, four sons, Carlton Baggett and his wife, Marie of Altha, James Henderson and his wife, Regina of Dothan, ALL, Rodney Henderson and his wife, L Lisa of Cottonwood, ALL, Kem Henderson and his wife, Cynthia of Gordon, ALL; brothers, L L.NN. Baggett of Altha and Bobby BagN Nenver Grooms, Dorothy Bethel and S Sue Baggett, all of Altha; grandchildren, Farlon Baggett, Ronda Pumphrey, Brent Baggett, Matthew, Justin and L Lacy Henderson; great-grandchildren, Amy Kitchen, S Sherry McCrone, L Levi and W W rangler Baggett and Zack Henderson; greatgreat-grandchildren, KL L eigh and L L ogan Kitchen, T T arrin and Raylee McCrone.S Services were held Friday, May 4 at 6 p.m. (CTT) at Cypress Grove Assembly of God Church with Reverend Dr. Charlie Fowler and Reverend W W ayne Fussell Cemetery. Peavy Funeral Home in Blountstown is in charge of the arrangements. G GEORGE PELt T SSR. BLOUNTSTOWNGeorge Pelt, S Sr., 94, of Blountstown, passed away S Saturday, May 5, 2012 in Blountstown. He was born February 26, 1918 in Calhoun County and had lived there all of his life. He, along with his wife, Jeanette were owners and operators of Pelts Department S Store in Blountstown from 1936 until 1972. Army. He was an avid golfer and a member of the First Baptist Church in Blountstown. He was preceded in death by his wife, Jeanette Pelt S Survivors include one son, Mark Pelt and his wife, Denise of Perry; two daughters, Patricia Pelt Hodges and her husband, Jack of Fanning S Spring and Phyllis Bailey and her husband, Greg of Blountstown, nine grandchildren, six great-grandchildren and one greatgreat-grandchild.S Services were held May 6 at Peavy Funeral Home Pine Memorial Cemetery. Peavy Funeral Home in Blountstown was in charge of the arrangements. In Loving Memory of our MamaQ E. B M S 11/19/26 3/30/94 JOYcCE LLOVIE BROwWN BLOUNTSTOWNJoyce L L ovie Brown, 73, of Blountstown, passed away S Sunday, May 6, 2012 in Blountstown. S She was born March 6, 1939 in Frink and had lived in Calhoun County all of her life. S She worked for the Calhoun County Recycling Center as manager for 10 years. S She was a member of S Sunny Hill Pentecostal Holiness Church in Altha. S She was preceded in death by her husbands, Johnny Faircloth and Buddy Brown; a son, Henry Faircloth and a sister, LLinda NNichols. his wife, Vaneisa of Bristol, W W ayne Brown and his wife, N Nikki of Altha, Floyd Brown and his wife, Pam of Blountstown, Jerry Brown and his wife, Julie of Clarksville, Edward SSquirrel Hill of Blountstown; four daughters, Faye S Skaggs and her husband, Doug of L L ynn Haven, Marie Kammerdiener and her husband, Robert of Pensacola, Patsy Guzman and her husband, Andres of Altha and Denise Exum of Blountstown; two L Liberty County, S Shirley Faye Brown of S Scotts Ferry, 20 grandchildren and 30 great-grandchildren. Family will receive friends W W ednesday, May 9 from 5 p.m. (CTT) to 7 p.m. at Peavy Funeral Home.S Services will be held T Thursday, May 10 at 11 a.m. (CTT) at Peavy Funeral Home Chapel with Reverend will follow in Pine Memorial Cemetery. Peavy Funeral Home in Blountstown is in charge of the arrangements. E ERNEStT LLEE HARDEE uicy Ernest L Lee Hardee, 99, of Quincy, passed away S Saturday, April 21, 2012 in T T allahassee. He was born March 18, 1913 in Marianna to L Leila Richbourg and Andrew G. Hardee. O On July 10, 1935 he married O Ora Chason of Greensboro. He was a member of the Faith Heritage Church where he served as a deacon and on the building committee for two renovation projects. He was also on the board of trustees. He was a hard worker, having several years after it closed to make sure the building was secure and as overseer of the sales of the companys inventory. He was preceded in death by his wife, O Ora Chason; N and a sister, NNizie Hardee SSykes.S Survivors include his daughter, Annette and her husband Philip R. Eckstadt of Quincy; one sister, Myrlene H. Chason of Hosford; a very special niece who grew up with him like a sister, Marion Mercer of Hosford and many other nieces and nephews.S Services were held Monday, April 23 at the Faith Cemetery. Charles McClellan Funeral Home in Quincy was in charge of the arrangements.

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Since Im connected with the PanSaddleback caterpillar Puss caterpillar Io moth caterpillar Hag caterpillar Page 24 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL MAY 9, 2012 GARDENING by Theresa Friday, Horticulture Extension Agent, Santa Rosa County Best of the Latest Country Charted songs, mixed in with your favorite oldies. K102.7 FM Hometown News, weather and river readings at 8 a.m. ET. Our daily newscast also airs at 1 p.m. and again at 5 p.m. ET. Swap Shop with Ruth from 9-10 a.m. ET (sometimes even longer!) Buy, Sell, Trade or Give Stuff Away.K102.7 is the voice of the Liberty County Bulldogs, the Blountstown High Tigers, Florida Gators and the Miami Dolphins WPHK Radio K-102.7 FM WYYBT Radio Y-1000 AM EDDIE NOBLES LAndND CleLEARinING Call Eddie Nobles at (850) 447-0449 or Chas at 447-0849Located in Bristol Land clearing, excavation and root raking: CITY TIRE cCO.Make her day special on May 13, the day we honor her kindness, love and everything she does for us, right from beginning to end. Remember Mom on Sunday! NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours or responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment.Cataracts?Freedom from Eye Glasses, Now a reality for many. and Cataract SpecialistSmart Lenses SMDr. Mulliss Smart LensSM procedure can produce clear vision without eyeglasses.Close-up, Far away & In-between CALL TODAY for a Smart Lens Evaluation NICE CARof Forgotten Coast LLC Why shop with us? We beat major city prices! Carrabelle, Florida Call us at (850) 697-4383

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MAY 9, 2012 / THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 25 Students write in their civics notebook as the representatives explain their job responsibilities Hosford School hosted Government Day on Thursday, April 26. Many of Floridas elected officials came and spoke with civics students from Hosford and Tolar Schools about their role and responsibilities in their elected positions. Students were given the opportunity to meet each of them and ask questions after the presentations. We are so grateful for their willingness to take the time and come speak with our students. We believe our kids have a greater appreciation for our government leaders and the jobs they do to make our lives a little easier. We thank each of the following for participating in our Government Day activities: U.S. Senator Bill Nelson represented by Lynn Bannister U.S. Representative Steve Southerland represented by Jonathan Hayes State Senator Bill Montford represented by Melissa Durham State Representative Marti Coley Superintendent of Schools Sue Summers Liberty County School Board Member Kyle Peddie County Commissioner Davis Stoutamire Clerk of Court Robert Hill represented by Kathy Brown Liberty County Sheriff Donnie Conyers Supervisor of Elections Marcia Wood Judge Ken Hosford Mayor, Paul Kern represented by Betty Brantley, Former Mayor Bristol City Council Member Steve Cutshaw Governor Rick Scott, U.S. Senator Bill Nelson and U.S. Representative Steve Southerland were unable to attend, but did send a letter to students wishing them the best and encouraging them to take an active role in government. Hosford School hosts GOVERNMENT DAY Liberty County Commissioner Davis Stoutamire speaks to Hosford students, FROM LEFT: Angel Banks, Shanna Phillips and Katelynn Shiver ABOVE: Melissa Durham explains the duties of State Senator Bill Montford. LEFT: Marti Coley speaks to the crowd of Hosford and W.R. Tolar students. OPEN ENROLLMENT/ SCHOOL CHOICELIBERTYY COUNTYY SCHOOL SYYSTEM2012-2013The Liberty County School District is currently holding Open Enrollment/School Choice for the 2012-2013 school year. Packets are being sent home with all students via back-packs during the week of May 7, 2012. Complete the necessary form and return to your childs school by May 14, 2012.MARIANNAThe 2012 edition of Whos Who Among Students in American Junior Colleges will include the names of 76 students from Chipola College who have been selected as national outstanding campus leaders. Chipola students named this year are: Alford Kaylee Toole. Altha Katrina Messer, Rebekah Wiltse. Bascom Karlee Floyd. Blountstow n Travis Pittman. Bonifay Jessica Bean, Jonathon Carrell, Macy Miles, Cathy Riddle, Brittany Riley, Caleb Whitaker, John Brown, Charles Dinkins. Campbellton Fredrick Beachum. Chipley Mariah Carter, Allyson Gainer, Adriane Guettler, Cecil Mathis, Alyssa Munns, Jeffery Pitts, Hillary Saunders, Erin Solger, Emily Stewart, Meghan Wilder, Alicia Rhodes, Kevin Russell, Haley Worley. Clarksville Patrick Jones. Cottondale Kaitlyn Baxley. Graceville AnneMarie Nichols, Jessica OKeefe, Cody Sikora. Grand Ridge Caroline Peacock, Rachel Pelt, Ryan Pilcher, Anita Halling, Ariel White. Marianna Mayra Akamine, Jaren Bannerman, Chelsea Blanton, Travis Bontrager, Kristine Brance, Danaya Brazzle, Shanay Corbett, Edgar Delgado, Sara Djassi, Brett Floyd, Stephanie Garrels, Forrest Garrett, Zachary las Harris, Leonard Hollins, Stefani Jackson, Jeniece Johnson, Paul Kelson, Trantell Knight, Alexandre LaGarde, Elizabeth Mathis, Eron Milton, Brittany Peacock, Jordan Poole, Jelleah Sidney, Austin Southall, Chelsey Steedley, Luther Thomas, Lindsay West, John Whittington, Ashton Williams. Sneads Jordan Coley, Nathan Walden. Sunny Hills Elise Kirk. Westville James Lewis. Out of District Adrian Carr of Chattahochee and Sierra Hill of Donalsonville, GA. Inclusion in the directory is based on academic achievement, service to the community, leadership in extracurricular activities and potential for continued success. They join an elite group of students from more than 1,400 institutions of higher learning in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and several foreign nations. Outstanding students have been honored in Whos Chipola students are named to Whos Who ApalacheeTheRestaurantMoms the center of the family so treat her to a special dinner celebration. CELEBRATE WITH YOUR MOm M ON SUNDAY FOR MOTHERsS DDAY AT...

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Page 26 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL MAY 9, 2012Baby girl clothes, three four boxes, ages 0 9 months, brand new with tags, includes some silk dress and Winnie the Pooh bassinet, all for $75. Call 693-9728. 5-2, 5-9Utility pole, $250. Call 6744656. 5-2, 5-9Eureka vacuum, Rubbermaid ice chest. Call 674-3033 for more information. 5-2, 5-9AAir conditioning unit, 15,000 BTU, used only one month, $600; Kobe Bryant basketball shoes, size 11, worn only once, $100. Call 524-0605. 5-2, 5-9Good selection of items: Mens, ladies and childrens clothes. Many items for the home. New items arriving daily. Everyone is invited to shop at the Calhoun-Liberty Ministry Center store. Located on Hwy. 20 E. in Blountstown, 674-1818. UFN APPLIANCESMicrowave, der cabinet, like new, $150. Call 643-2859. 5-9, 5-16Full size gas stove in good condition, $150. Full size refrigerator in good condition, $150. Call 5261753. 5-9, 5-16Ecowater water softener, Model ERR300, includes paperwork with all instructions, $195. Call 6748385 or 294-4389. 5-2, 5-9Gas range, uses natural gas. Everyone is invited to shop at the Calhoun-Liberty Ministry Center store. Located on Hwy. 20 E. in Blountstown, 6741818. UFN FURNITUREQueen size bed, rustic look, footboard and headboard, high quality pillow top mattress, $300. Call 643-5011. 5-9, 5-16Childs Wooden Table 18 X 24, height 18, sturdy, good shape $8.50. Call 643-7567 or 6745257. 5-9, 5-16Childs Cosco bed rail to deter falling from standard mattress and box springs (age 2 & older) rail, to deter falling from standard mattress and box springs (age 2 & older) 48 long, $36. Call 6437567 or 674-5257. 5-9, 5-16Black leather couch, $250, new queen size mattress with box springs, $300, antique piano, $50. Call 643-2859. 5-9, 5-16Victorian couch and chair, a full size mattress and box springs in plastic. Call 762-8471. 5-9, 5-16Wicker bed headboard, queen size, $70. Computer desk, $15. Call 674-3264. 5-9, 5-16 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNALCLASSIFIEDSTo place your ad, call 643-3333 by noon Eastern Time on Saturday. Non-business ads run FREE for 2 weeks. ITEMS FOR SALEMassage table with carrying case with sheets, heating pads, neck and face pieces, $100. Call 6435696. 5-9, 5-16Worm casting fertilizer for your garden, Two truck loads, $25 each. Call 674-4656 please leave message.5-9, 5-16Pull Golf Cart, great shape. Full set of golf clubs including bag, balls & tees. Will sell together or separately. Take a look make an offer. Call 643-7567 or 6745257. 5-9, 5-16Wall Mirror with a nice green wash pine frame, 22 1/2 X 18 1/2 like new, $13. Beautiful antique mirror, ornate gold frame, wired for hanging, 22 1/2x26 1/2, $45. Call 643-7567 or 674-5257.5-9, 5-16Four senior picture booklets, In Appreciation. Graduate presents to parents, grandparents, etc. Tan w/gold lettering. Thank You verse inside w/graduates picture, $5 each. Call 643-7567 or 7645257. 5-9, 5-16Vintage Kitchen Items: Red handled rolling pin, $7.50; retro egg slicer, $2.50; retro aprons, $7$14; Prices vary on wood handled potato mashers; ladles w/bakelite handles; souvenir & retro bottle openers; bone handle tableware; and much more. Come look, make offer if not priced. Call 6437567 or 674-5257. 5-9, 5-16Nurse scrubs, sizes 2x-3x, hardly 4084 or 762-2041 after 4 p.m.5-9, 5-16Baby bouncy, $30, baby swing like new, $60. Call 643-2859.5-9, 5-16Large A A VON collection, old Singer sewing machine, round 4 ft. plywood circles. Call 762-8471. 5-9, 5-16Chain saw and air tank. No calls after 9 p.m. Call 899-0792. 5-9, 5-16Quilt $30. Asking $15. Two small lamps $4 & $8. Call 674-3264. 5-9, 5-1620 ft. A Aluminum ladder, like new. Call 899-0792. 5-9, 5-16Scotts lawn spreader, $5; Cultured marble bath vanity sink top, 31 x 19, $12; Incline sliding exerciser with pulleys, $15; Old type kerosene heater with two burners, $15; Heavy, homemade wooden teeter-totter, $5; two 20 girls bicycles, includes a box of parts, $25 for all. Call 674-8385 or 2944389. 5-2, 5-9Electric scooter, in excellent condition, with batteries, $1,500 or make an offer. Need to sell. Call 890-8004 to make an appointment to try it out. 5-2, 5-9 For Rent in ALTHaA762-9555 or 762-8597Very NICE *2 & 3 BD trailers.With lawn service 5 x 10 .....$27 10 x 10 ....$43 10 x 20 ....$70 10 x 25 ....$90M & W SELFSTORAGE RRENTALs SCall 573-5255, 762-9555, 762-8807 or 762-8597 7 days a week service UFN Find a bargain in the Journal CLASSIFIEDS! BD, 1 1/2 BA TownhousesBRISTOL Phone 643-7740 FOR RENT BLOUNTSTOWN Owner (813) 253-3258LibeIBERtTY CountOUNTY Owner Financing No Qualifying Acreage --All$600 Down BECOME A VOLUNTEER FLORIDA GUARDIAN AD LLITEM FOUNDATIONPHONE (850) 410-4642 3 BD, 2 BA mobile home. (Available May 1). Located six miles N of Blountstown on Hwy. 69 N. Water, sewer and grass mowing provided. Deposit Required. No Pets.(850) 556-3173FOR RENT B RREAAL ESTA A TEWANTED: Will buy 10 to 1,000 acres, reasonably priced. Immediate closing. Call (850) 544-5441 or (850) 570-0222 Directly across from Altha School. Priced to sale. Call (850) 762-4592 Business Opportunity AAntique furniture in perfect condition. Similar to an armoire with wooden rollers. Must see to appreciate. Call for more information, 899-0792. No calls after 9 p.m. please. 5-9, 5-16Kitchen table with two chairs, night stand and end table. Call 674-3033 for more information. 5-2, 5-9Headboard white, with extra storage, $5. Call 674-8385 or 294-4389. 5-2, 5-9Bunk beds, includes mattress; antique table, $450; lounge chair, dark red, $60. Call 674-3264. 5-2, 5-9Good used furniture and appliances needed at Calhoun Liberty Ministry Center. Call 674-1818. UFN TRUCKS1995 Dodge Dakota, 4 cyl., red, bedliner, standard, $3,200 negotiable or will trade for an automatic truck. Call 674-3264. 5-9, 5-161993 Ford Explorer, new tires, runs good, $1,100. Call 228-2820 after 5 p.m. (CT). 5-2, 5-9 CARS2005 Chevy Malibu, white. Call 575-8194 for more information. 5-2, 5-9 AUTO ACCESSORIESCenter seat, two person, blue, for older Dodge van, in good shape, $10. Call 674-8385 or 294-4389. 5-2, 5-9 MOTORCYCLE & ATVSAA TV rims and tires, four each 26x12x12 ITP mud tires with rims, chrome lug nuts and ITP chrome center caps. Two each 26x9x12 ITP mud tires with rims, chrome lug nuts and ITP chrome center caps. $550 for all six tires and rims like new. Call (850) 3224190. 5-9, 5-16 WATER WELL SUPPLIESDo you need parts for That Darn Pump? We have Capacitors, relays, control boxes, pressure switches, check valves, foot valves, air volume control valves, wire, pumps, tanks and much more. Available 7 days a week until 9 p.m. Repair questions are welcomed, call us at That Darn Pump 643-4357. BPA/UFN PETS/SUPPLIESDog box, aluminum, double compartment, $375 OBO. Call 6434028. 5-9, 5-16

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MAY 9, 2012 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 27 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNALCLASSIFIEDSTo place your ad, call 643-3333 by noon Eastern Time on Saturday. Non-business ads run FREE for 2 weeks. STARSCOPEFA AMOUS BIRTHDAYAYSAARIES Mar 21/AApr 20 Aries, although you may have your mind set on one outcome, it might be good to expect the unexpected this week. Keep your eyes and ears open. TA AURUS A Apr 21/May 21 Think of this week as the opportunity to rest and recharge, Taurus. Schedule a family movie night or lounge in the yard instead of packing your schedule. GEMINI May 22/Jun 21 Gemini, you have been thinking about getting into something creative, and your plans just may come to fruition some of the details. CAANCER Jun 22/Jul 22 Cancer, keeping secrets doesnt often turn out well because sooner or later those secrets are revealed. Honesty usually is the best way to go in most situations. LEO Jul 23/AAug 23 Beating the doldrums could involve some creative thinking, Leo. If youre fresh out of ideas, you can ask someone you are close to for some suggestions. VIRGO A Aug 24/Sept 22 Virgo, you are on the road to recovery from an issue thats been bothersome. This recovery is long overdue, but you will be stronger for having gone through these trials. LIBRAA Sept 23/Oct 23 but speak up for yourself from time to time, especially when something is important to you. Your opinions count, too. SCORPIO Oct 24/Nov 22 Sometimes there is no shortcut to success, Scorpio. You just have to trudge through and hope that all the effort will be worth it in the long run. SAAGITTA ARIUS Nov 23/Dec 21 Sagittarius, someone is worried about you and this concerns. Maybe the worry is because you have been out of touch for so long. CAAPRICORN Dec 22/Jan 20 Capricorn, when a new career path is presented to decide whether you should make a move. Go with your gut and trust your instincts.A AQUAARIUS Jan 21/Feb 18 Those close to you are accommodating nature very appealing, Aquarius. This new attitude is bound to paint you in a new light. PISCES Feb 19/Mar 20 Pisces, you have a huge support system in the way of family and friends. Expect them to rally behind you when needed.Week of May 6 ~ May 12MAY 6 Bob Seeger, Singer (67) MAY 7 Taylor Abrahamse, Actor (21) MAY 8 Melissa Gilbert, Actress (48) MAY 9 Rosario Dawson, Actress (33) MAY 10 Kenan Thompson, Comic (34) MAY 11 Corey Monteith, Actor (30) MAY 12 Kim Fields, Actress (43)Call 643-1514 or 643-1459. 5-9, 5-161995 mobile home, must be moved, 3 BD, 1 BA, new carpet, $4,500. Call 643-5172 or 6434630. 5-2, 5-9 YARD SALESBRISTOL Saturday, May 12 beginning at 8 a.m. located on CR 379, on Hwy. 12 S, turn in front of Rex Lumber, look for signs. Cancel if rain, no early birds please. Call 6435011or 643-6757. Moving sale, beginning Thursday, May 10 ending Saturday, May 12 weather permitting. Located 3 miles south on Hwy. 12, right on Lake Mystic/Lee Duggar Road, look for signs. 17 aluminum boat with 85 hp Yamaha motor, $3,500, don reel, 15x17 stainless steel propellar no dents or dings, $150, couch, tables and chairs, large Igloo ice chest and much more. Call 643-8383.A ALTHAA Saturday, May 12, Hillcrest Baptist Church yard sale/bake sale, beginning at 8 a.m. Located 5 miles west of Sheltons Corner on CR 274. Six baby rabbits, 5 weeks old, all white, $10 each. Call 379-9400 leave message please. 5-9, 5-16Kittens, free to a good home. Call 573-4084 or 762-2041 after 4 p.m. 5-9, 5-16Dog house $50. Call 643-2859.5-9, 5-16Seven kittens, (sex not determined) and mom. Some have bob-tail. Free to a good home. Call 209-4922. 5-9, 5-16Kittens, free to a good home. Call 643-4559. 5-9, 5-16Jack Russell/Beagle mixed puppies, six weeks old, free to a good home. Call 570-3806. 5-2, 5-9Puppies, Rottweiler/White English Bulldog mixed, 6-8 weeks old, cute and adorable, have had shots and been wormed. Free to a good home Call 4474586. UFN LOST & FOUNDLOST: Female Curr, tall, brownish red with white markings, answers to Lucy, has a collar but no tag, she is gentle and sweet. Call 379-8222. 5-9, 5-16FOUND: Rednose Pit mixed female, 5 or 6 months old, showed up on 69A about a week ago. Call 209-8808. 5-9, 5-16LOST: Bassett Hound she dug out of the yard while I was at work. Last seen on Turkey Creek, answers to Freckles. Shy around strangers and may bite if approached. She has OCD, current on her shots. I love Freckles very much. If you see her, please call 643-2208 (cell), 643-4657 (home) or 643-2247 (work Monday-Thursday). 5-9, 5-16 WANTEDLarge bird cage, reasonably priced. Call 273-0404. 5-2, 5-9Looking to rent a home or pasture in the Hosford/Telogia area, at least 3 BD, 2 BA. Needs place suitable for horses and an outside dog. I am interested in renting a fenced pasture with water. Call 510-6647. 5-2, 5-9Large bird cage, reasonably priced. Call 273-0404. 5-2, 5-9 HOMES & LAND1982 Mobile home, 2 BD, 1 BA has an extra roof built over trailer. A whole industry has grown up around freeing diabetics to lead less restricted lives. New on the market, or on the verge of being introduced, are three frozen foods. With the number of diabetics growing worldwide 246 million at last count, according to the World Health Organization businesses are motivated. In 2011, diabetes therapeutic products were a $23.7 billion dollar industry feeding a growing population thats starving for a better quality of life, says Chef cookbooks for people with the metabolic disorder. It wasnt long ago that Type 1 diabetics had to be sure they packed ample sterile syringes and insulin, whether they were going to work for the day or on a which is crucial to keeping vital organs healthy, was And food? Thats been the hardest. A diabetes diagnosis can feel like a life sentence of bland eat themselves shots around the clock to control their blood sugar levels. In some cases, diabetics were hospitalized to ensure they got the insulin necessary to prevent ketoacidosis, a condition that can lead to coma and death. In 1983, the insulin pump was introduced. It attaches to the body and provides con tinuous insulin injections. But while it was a major breakthrough, it can be bulky and awkward, with a dangling catheter. The most recent innovation is a streamlined version called the OmniPad. It has no tubes, its smaller and it attaches anywhere on the monitoring system. sugar levels, which will free people from the painful pricks needed to get a small blood sample for testing multiple times a day. The device, which attaches with adhesive to the body, continuously tracks glucose levels day and night and can send the readings to your smart phone. Under development for more necessary to win regulatory approval. roll out across the country through the end of the year. Theyre low on the glycemic index, low in high in lean protein and low in sodium, Lewis says. varieties two vegan and three vegetarian include exciting because, while there have been advances in equipment that makes life easier for diabetics, there Diabetics who do not watch what they eat may wind up suffering kidney damage, stomach problems, heart disease, pneumonia, gum disease, blindness, stroke, nerve damage, complications during pregnancy, loss of limb and other health problems, according to the CDC. But many Americans are trending toward healthier diets, eating less meat, gluten, salt and sugar, Lewis says. Tasty foods developed for diabetics will be excel lent choices for them, too. he says. And you dont have to give up one tea The Happy Diabetic; I have discovered the joy of Diabetes on the go: Growing industry helps diabetics maintain active lifestyles

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Page 28 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL MAY 9, 2012 Just in time for Mothers Day, the Chamber is coordinating their Spring Business Bounce on Thursday, May 10 from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. The Chamber initiated business bounces in 2010 and has continued the events with much support from the community. The concept encourages shoppers to visit local retailers during a scheduled time to receive extreme savings and discounts. The events are win/win for the business and the shopper! Merle Norman, The Diamond Corner and Blountstown ticipate. Spring business bounce Thursday Ribbon-cutting held for opening of NorthFlorida Womens Care in Blountstown Women will now be able to receive obstetrical and gynecological services locally with the opening of North Florida Womens Care at Calhoun-Liberty Hospital. Community members and the staff were joined by hospital board members for the April 19 ribbon-cutting ceremony. Marianna native Dr. Alex Sinclair Franz will be at the hospital once a month to provide services. JOHNNY EUBANKS PHOTO BUSINESS NNEWS & NNOTES Mens Health SeminarThe Calhoun/Liberty Health Department hosted the annual Mens Health Seminar May 1 at the Altha Church of God. The event focused on a variety of health-related topics. This years guest speaker was Roger Dutremble, former Los Angeles Lakers Basketball Coach. Those attending this event enjoyed a great dinner and lots of giveaways. DANIEL WILLIAMS PHOTO

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MAY 9, 2012 / THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 29 byBY FranciRANCIS PriceRICEThe year was 1886 when 20-year-old Ben Pitts shivered in the early morning chill of late Autumn. Gently nudging his horse into a slow canter and cracking his long whip over his head, he circled behind a young steer who had found a few bites of grass that was still green. The older cows stepped smartly along, seeming to have a vague recollection of where they were headed. Open range in the Chipola River Basin in Calhoun County was a land of plenty. They would grow fat as they wintered there, eating acorns from the myriads of oak trees and the belly deep wiregrass. They would be joined with other cattle as well, identiears called markings. It was Bens job to lodge nearby and keep watch on the cattle, should a cow have trouble birthing a calf, as well as marking them for into steers. Afterwords, he would return the cattle to Washington County in the spring. He had arranged to lodge with his Uncle John Pitts, who was an old Civil War Veteran and had proved up a homestead in the area after the war. Another thing of interest to young Ben was the fact that in the area was a family of Lintons, from the infamous Richards Clan, who had some beautiful daughters of an age to marry. Within two years, Ben, who was a gentle giant of a man, had staked out a homestead on the southwest edge of the Chipola River Basin where any livestock Ben had or would acquire could enjoy the abundance of the basin year round. He dug a well on his property, built a cabin, privey and smokehouse and took a wife, Frances, from the Linton clan. He cleared the required land for farming and hand split the rails with which to fence it from livestock which roamed on open range. Barns, cribs and other related farm buildings would come as time and energy allowed. The cabin was eventually replaced by a large, better than average house with wide, welcoming porches. Ben and Frances would raise nine of the 13 children they birthed and one grandchild. Ben could read as well as write with a good hand, so he served as community letter reader/writer until his daughters took over the job. He was interested in world events and subscribed to several news papers on a weekly basis: The New York Times, The Miami News Herald and the Jacksonville Tribune. Also the National Geographic. Though they came through the mail and the news was about a week old when it got to him, it was news all the same. Ben served as school trustee for his provide free text books for their students. He was gifted in healing so he served his community, both white and colored, as doctor, dentist and veterinarian. He was especially good at setting broken bones and kept a supply of splints on hand. He was a skilled carpenter and one of his Frances carded the cotton with which to pad them and lined them with unbleached muslin which she bought by the bolt. There was no charge for this service. Their home burned to the ground in 1925 but Ben rebuilt it in the same spot. With some upgrades, it is still being used today. His barn and several farm related farm buildings were relocated to the Tallahassee Junior Museum around 1949 and are part of their Pioneer Farmstead Exhibit to this day. About three fourth of a mile from the Pitts homestead was a large turpentine workers. Over several years, Frances sold enough farm produce to those workers 1915. While they were not ones to travel (there was always too much to be done on the farm) they did drive to Miami to visit their daughter Gertie, who had married and moved there. Her children were privileged to spend every summer on the farm playing with all the cousins who lived nearby, eating watermelon and swimming in Juniper Creek. Six generations of Pitts descendents have lived in this area and for the most part, have continued the traditions and values established by Ben and Frances. Side by side, they rest in the Clarksville Cemetery, about half a mile from where Most of the home place is still in the family.From Cracker Cowboy in 1886 to Country Gentlemanby Beverly Veress, BlountstownIn the late 1800s my Grandfather, John Kashay, born in Austria, left for America. He arrived in New York before Ellis Island existed. He headed to West Virginia with a friend that came with him. My Grandmother, Veronica Kashay, born in Czechoslavakia, (that had its borders shifted and was Hungary when she arrived at Ellis Island), left for America in 1900 with a daughter. Mary and 16 American dollars in her pocket. She came by a vessel called the Konigin Luise, that was built in Germany in 1897. It held 2400 pasthird class. Im thinking Grandma traveled third class, since she only had $16 in her pocket when she arrived at Ellis Island. Grandfather out of work and not doing too well. She found work for them in a coal mine in West Virginia, for the next three years to save money for land. Her dream was to own land in America. They moved to Pennsylvania, bought farm land and, since she was a farmers daughter, she dug right in. Grandpa began to work in a nearby galvanized pipe factory and together their life began and began well. They had ten children. Since Grandma did not believe in banks she added to her lands by buying more land during the Depression. She opened her large home to room-and-boarders and was doing just wonderfully when Grandpa came home one day and said he wanted to go back to see the family in the Old World. While visiting there, he was killed by a train. When Grandma got photos of him in his casket (very common in Europe those days), she was down and out for a couple of weeks, but pulled up her boot straps, because she had more children to raise. Life continued on and she got all of the girls graduated from school and learned to speak, write and count in English. The only word that she never could get was absolutely which she always pronounced Hopsatutely, Never did get that word down. Her family grew as the daughters married and had children. They all went every Sunday to her house and that was when I noticed what a big family I came from. After Grandma died she had grandchildren that graduated from college and I am sure that would have made her proud. Her daughter, my Mom, married a farmer and when Dad died we moved to South Florida. I was a nurse for a good many years and soon my family (Grandmas great-grandchildren) were doing their own thing. I followed my son to Blountstown and when I got here I realized my life had done a 180. I was now in a small town again, where people were friendly and full of community spirit and just knew I was back to my roots. Grandma would have been proud! Hopsatutely!!The Journey from Czechoslovakia to the United States in 1900The Panhandle Pioneer Settlement Presents the Smithsonian Institution and Florida Humanities Council Museum on Main Street --Journey Stories. The Panhandle Pioneer Settlement has been awarded the privilege of exhibiting the MOMS -Journey Stories, July 14 August 25, 2012. This is the only facility located in North Florida that has been selected for the exhibit. All other locations are in South Central and South Florida. In preparation for the exhibit, we are in need of volunteers to serve on various committees. Committees needed are for: Planning, Local exhibit planning, Exhibit installation, Program Development, School/teacher, Volunteer and docent training, and Publicity. Individuals are needed to present north Florida family journey stories, industry stories for the region, demonstrators, docents, assistance in creating an exhibit of local journey stories that support the MOMS Journey Stories. For additional information, call (850) 447-0298 or (850) 447-0964 or send email JOURNEY STORIEsS John Kashay Veronica Kashay ABOVE: Konigin Luise built in Germany in 1897, accommodating 2,400 passengers. This was Veronicas transportation to the states in 1900. S She was a third class passenger with $16 in her pocket. BELOW: The whole family after settling in Pennsylvania.

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Page 30 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL MAY 9, 2012 $ AA VON$www.youravon.com/tdaviesCallALL to TODayAY : (850) 570-1499 EarnARN40%STARTERKITONLY $I0 JOB MARKET 8 positions Temporary/seasonal work planting, cultivating, and harvesting vegetables, from 6/5/2012 to 8/20/2012 at Written Produce Patch, Lowell, OH. Three months of previous experience required in the job described. Saturday work required. Must be able to lift/carry 60 lbs. Post-hire employer-paid background check required. $11.10/hr or current applicable AEWR, plus applicable piece rates. Workers are guaranteed of work hours of total period. Work tools, supplies, equipment supplied by employer without charge to worker. Housing with kitchen facilities provided at no cost to only those workers who are not reasonably able to return same day to their place of residence at time of recruitment. Transportation and subsistence expenses to work site will be paid to nonresident workers not later than upon completion of 50% of the job contract. Interviews required. Apply for this job at nearest State Workforce Agency in state in which this ad appears, or One Stop Career Center 16908 Northeast Pear Street, Suite 2, Blountstown, FL 32424. Provide copy of this ad. Job Order #OH542140. Twin Oaks Juvenile Development, Inc. CorporationFor more information phone 643-1090.Positions A A vailableRegistered Nurse and a Social Studies or English/Reading Teacher (additional ESE south Liberty County campus. Nurse position at the Liberty-JUST program. Contact D Donald Lasseter at (850) 379-8344 or donald.lasseter@libertywilderness.org. Teacher position is at Apalachicola Forest Youth Camp. Contact Carla Greene at (850) JOB OPENING Liberty Community Health Care/Liberty County Health Department Position number 64004465 Salary is commensurate with experience Closing date: 05/16/2012 If you have any questions, please contact Lisa Taylor at (850) 643-2292 PUbBLIC AND LEGAL No OTICESIN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR LIBERTYY COUNTYY FLORIDAA PROBAA TE DIVISION File No. 12-07CP IN RE: ESTATE OF NAOMI SMITH SUMMERS DDeceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Naomi Smith Summers, deceased, whose date of death was March 19, 2012, is pending in the Circuit Court for Liberty County, Florida, Probate D Division, the address of which is P. O. Box 399, Bristol, Florida 32321. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 D DAYS AFTER THE D DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against declaims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE D DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILEDD WITHIN THE TIME PERIODDS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDDA PROBATE CODDE WILL BE FOREVER BARREDD. NOTWITHSTAND D ING THE TIME PERIODDS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILEDD TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE D DECE-D DENTS D DATE OF D DEATH IS BARREDD. this notice is May 9, 2012. Attorney for Personal Representative: Kimberly L. King Attorney for D Donald E. Summers Florida Bar Number 0593011 KING & WOODD P.A. 1701 Hermitage Blvd. Suite 104 Tallahassee, FL 32308 Telephone: (850) 580-7711 Fax: (850) 205-4501 E-Mail: kimking@kingandwoodlaw.com Personal Representative:D Donald E. Summers 21075 NW County Road 333 Bristol, FL 32321 5-9, 5-16________________________NoticeOTICE ofOF VoteOTE inIN QuestionUESTIONNoticeOTICE isIS herebHEREBY givenGIVEN: WENDEE M. WA ALDEN 12489 NW Old Post Road eligibility to vote is in question. You are required to contact the Supervisor of Elections, in Bristol, Florida, no later than thirty (30) days after the date of this publishing. Failure to respond will result in a determination of ineligibility by the Supervisor and your name will be removed from the statewide voter registration system. Published one time in the Calhoun-Liberty Journal 5-9-12 Marcia A. Wood Liberty County Supervisor of Elections P.O. Box 597, Bristol, FL 32321 D Dated May 9, 2012 5-9-12________________________NoticeOTICE ofOF VoteOTE inIN QuestionUESTIONNoticeOTICE isIS herebHEREBY givenGIVEN: KIM M. LEWIS 25539 NW County Road 12 eligibility to vote is in question. You are required to contact the Supervisor of Elections, in Bristol, Florida, no later than thirty (30) days after the date of this publishing. Failure to respond will result in a determination of ineligibility by the Supervisor and your name will be removed from the statewide voter registration system. Published one time in the Calhoun-Liberty Journal 5-9-12 Marcia A. Wood Liberty County Supervisor of Elections P.O. Box 597, Bristol, FL 32321 D Dated May 9, 2012 5-9-12If you havent been seeing the quantity or quality of game youd like, you may want to consider applying for a special-opportunity hunt. For the past 15 years, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) has offered these unique fall-season hunts for deer, wild hog and released quail on the states arguably best public hunting lands. Maybe its time you look into getting in on the action and experience the hunt of a lifetime. These extraordinary hunts offer large tracts of land with an abundance of game and low hunting pressure. All deer hunts enable you to take only mature bucks with at least one antler having four or more points, one inch or longer. Hunters can take does during archery hunts and, if they draw an antlerless deer permit, also during general gun hunts. This practice of deer management offers hunters excellent chances of taking quality bucks and the opportunity to take a doe on public land. Wild hogs also are legal to take, and there is no size or bag limit on them. These specialopportunity deer and wild hog hunts take place on Fort Drum (Indian River County), Lake Panasoffkee (Sumter County), Triple N Ranch (Osceola County) and Green Swamp West Unit (Pasco County) wildlife management areas. Fort Drum has 20 permits available for its seven-day general-gun deer and hog hunt on 20,858 acres; they cost $50, should you get drawn. Lake Panasoffkee offers eight four-day archery hunts on the 8,676-acre tract, which cost $100 each. Triple N Ranch has two seven-day general-gun deer and hog hunts on its 15,391 acres, and each permit costs $175. Green Swamp West Unit is where James Stovall took the states highestscoring deer on record a 25-point, nontypical that netted a 206 Booneand-Crockett score. He took the trophy buck in 1999 after getting drawn for the specialopportunity archery hunt. The area offers archery and gun hunts on 34,335 acres, and permits cost $100 each. The FWC also has week-long released-quail hunts on the Blackwater Carr Unit in Santa Rosa County. With these hunts, you must bring and release your own pen-raised quail. Theres just one $100 permit available for each of the 16 weeks, and if youre lucky enough to draw one, you and up to three of your friends will have the entire 590 acres to yourselves. If youd like to apply for any of these do is get a 2012-2013 Special-Opportunity Fall Hunt Worksheet available at MyFWC.com/License. Beginning at 10 a.m. (EDT) on May 1, you can submit your completed application at MyFWC.com/License or license agent. The application period runs through June 5. These coveted permits are issued by random drawing, and you may apply for as many hunts and dates as you like to increase your chances of being selected. You must include a $5 nonrefundable fee for each hunt you apply for, though hunters are limited to drawing only one permit per hunt. If youre selected in the random drawing, you have until the deadline hunt. You can do this online at MyFWC. com/License or at any license agent or it, and itll go to the next applicant selected in the random drawing. Whether still hunting by yourself or hunting with family and friends for deer, hogs or released quail, the FWCs special-opportunity fall hunts are just what the doctor ordered for a premium hunting experience.Outta the Woods

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MAY 9, 2012 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 31 To place your ad call us at 643-3333 SERVICE DIRECTORY Whaley Heating & Air Conditioning (850) 674-4777FL LicIC. # CMC1249570 Accepting:R Is s s Phone: (850) 643-6925 Fax: (850) 643-2064 email: grich0656@aol.com10536-B NW SR 20 Bristol, FL 32321 Located in the Apalachee RestaurantGary Richards, EAA MBAAEnrolled Agent Enrolled to Practice Before the IRS Business & A Accounting Solutions Inc. 4433 NW C.R. 274 Altha, Fl 32421 (850) 762-9402 Cell (850) 832-5055Dozer and Excavation work Over 20 years experienceClay ONealsLand Clearing, Inc. William's HomeImprovements "No Job Too Big or Small"Concrete work, landscape, pressure cleaning, renovations, seamless gutter, painting, vinyl, & screen enclosure Call 674-8092Licensed & Insured, contractor & rooferFOR FREE ESTIMAA TES Call Chris Nissley at 674-8081 or 643-8561 (Cell) STUMP GRINDINGReasonable Rates & FreeREE Estimates! That Darn PumpThere is never a convenient time to be without water.WeELLsS psa s(850)643-HELP Thats 643-4357 or Home 643-3857For friendly service and never any overtime charges call, Hwy 71 South on J.P. Peacock Rd, Altha. Day or night,Check out our prices before buying from somewhere else. For Weddings, Birthdays and all Holidays, come in or call us. Margies Florist Clint Hatcher, OwnerElectrical Lic. # ER13014037 Building Lic. # RB29003511New Homes Garages Additions Electrical Remodeling Foundations Screenrooms Sunrooms VINYL SIDING RESIDENTAL & COMMERCIAL FREE EstimatesServing Calhoun, LLiberty & Jackson Counties LIBERTY TTIRE COMPANY 10781 NW SR 20 Bristol, Fl 32321Call 643-2939 MV84845Hours: Monday thru Friday 7 5 & Saturday 7 12Come see us for all your tire needs or give us a call for roadside service, oil changes & tire rotation. We specialize in sales and repair of tires for:Commercial Trucks and Trailers, OTR Equipment, Farm Equipment, Passenger Car & Light Truck Tires JEMISON Heating & Cooling, C Lic# RM1416924Carrier Equipment MMasters Farm Supply LS Tractor Equipment Committed To Quality Since 1973 (850) 762-3222 faxmasters7@fairpoint.net CLJNEWS.COM TThe Apalachicola National Forest is accepting applications for volunteer camp hosts at various recreation sites throughout the forest. Forest Service camp host volunteers are needed for the Apalachicola National Forest Camp hosts on the Apalachicola National Forest are unpaid volunteer positions. The hosts camp for free on one of our beautiful camping or day use recreation areas in exchange for 30 hours of service per week. This time requirement may be divided up when there is more than one individual occupying the host site. Some of the duties that camp hosts are required to perform include welcoming visitors and providing them with information about the forest, performing general site maintenance, and assisting the Recreation Technicians. Camp hosts are valued members of the Apalachicola National Forest. Their contributions are vital to the operation of the forest. With over 570,000 acres can enjoy a multitude of recreational opportunities dling, OHV trail riding and hunting. Situated in the Florida Panhandle southwest of Tallahassee, the Apalachicola National Forest is the largest National Forest in Florida and is surrounded by an abundance of educational and cultural opportunities. Camp hosts must have their own self-contained wheel trailer. Full hookups are available at most host sites. To apply for a camp host position on the Apalachicola National Forest, contact Anna Servay at (850) 575-9064 ext. 6626 or amservay@fs.fed.us for more information.N camp hosts for Spring, Summer and Fall 2012 The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) is offering a free hunter safety course in Leon County. The will be held in the secondBryant Building, 620 S. Meridian St., Tallahassee. Instruction is from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. May 15, 18, 22 and 24. The range portion of the class is May 26. An adult must accompany children under the age of 16 at all times. Students are encouraged to bring a pencil and paper with them to take notes. The hunter safety course is required for people born on or after June 1, 1975, to purchase a Florida hunting license. The FWC course satisfies hunter-safety training requirements for all other states and Canadian provinces. People interested in attending this course can register online and obtain information about future hunter safety classes at www.myfwc.com/huntersafetyMyFWC. com/HunterSafety or by calling the City at (850) 265-3676.Hunter safety course offered in Leon County this month

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Page 32 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL MAY 9, 2012 The Calhoun-Liberty Community Baby Dedication held on April 28 was sponsored and hosted by Chipola Healthy Start for area families with young children or who are expecting babies. About 100 participants were provided a venue to access many community organizations and resources for with a wealth of information. Some of the organizations present were Liberty & Calhoun County Health Departments, the FQHC in Liberty County, Dr. Franz of North Florida Womens Care, Big Bend Community-Based Care, Healthy Families, Big Bend AHECs Quit Smoking Now Program, Magellan Health Services, Department of Children & FamiliesACCESS program, the Refuge House, and of course, our local CalhounLiberty Healthy Start program. Vendors all provided a fun activity for kids. These activities ranged from face painting to making beaded bracelets. Children by the FQHC in Liberty County. There was also an also brought door prizes and 12 were given out to lucky visitors. Mid-morning a formal non-religious ceremony was led by Pastor Roger Phillips of First Baptist Church of Bristol. Parents and/or guardians were able to participate in our parents pledge and community members and those representing organizations took part in reciting the Community Pledge. Two Healthy Start participants, Margaret Linton and Jackline Pinedam spoke on their experiences as mothers and working with Healthy Start in Calhoun-Liberty. Community members Donnie Read and Cathy Revell of Liberty County were invited to share their testimonials and give advice to the parents in the room. Educational components were addressed during the event, including safe sleep for babies, bicycle safety, mental health, smoking cessation, and child abuse. Through the United Way of Northwest Florida, Chipola Healthy Start was able to host a drawing for those who completed the safe sleep education for a chance to win one of four These two speakers were Donnie Read and Cathy Revell of Liberty County. Pack n Play cribs. Chipola Healthy Start Coalition also solicited losor the event. Under the direction of Pastor Phillips, the First Baptist Church of Bristol hosted the event and provided the food for all participants. Cadence Bank, Rivertown Community Church, Dr. Franz of North Florida Womens Care, Veterans Memorial Railroad and Piggly Wiggly Supermarket all served as event sponsors. The Coalition would like to thank them. The Piggly Wiggly matched funds with the Coalition to be able to provide $10 Piggly Wiggly ABOVE: Margaret Linton holds Bella, who is enjoying her new bike helmet RIGHT: Mothers in line to sign up for information and free products.ABOVE: Community Liaison for Big Bend Community Based-Care Mary Helen Barnes making bead bracelets with the kids. RIGHT: A little one Guest speakers Donnie Read and Cathy Revell of Liberty County. Chipola Healthy Start hosts Baby Dedication