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UF00027796 UFPKY NEH LSTA SLAF



The Calhoun-Liberty journal
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00027796/00294
 Material Information
Title: The Calhoun-Liberty journal
Portion of title: Calhoun Liberty journal
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: The Liberty Journal, Inc.
Place of Publication: Bristol Fla
Publication Date: 11-02-2011
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Bristol (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Liberty County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Calhoun County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Liberty -- Bristol
Coordinates: 30.426944 x -84.979167 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in Sept. 1991.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 11, no. 38 (Sept. 18, 1991).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002046630
oclc - 33425067
notis - AKN4565
lccn - sn 95047245
System ID: UF00027796:00294
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly journal (Bristol, Fla.)

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Birthdays, anniversaries...12 BHS Football...16 LCHS Football...17 Obituaries...23 Photo display at gallery...25 Sheriff's Log...2 Hwy. 71 collision near Altha...3 Community Calendar.....4 Commentary...6, 7 Speak Up.....8Diverse group meets to learn about meth and synthetic drugs50includes tax ThHE CalhouALHOUN-LIbBERt TY J OURNRNAL Volume 31, NNumber 44 Wednesday, N N ovember 2, 2011 CLJ News.com HALLOWEENCELEBRATING WWII pilot Terrell Yon to receivelongawaited French Combat MedalPAGE 9Montford, Coley hold legislation delegation meeting PAGE 9Halloween celebrations were in full swing this past weekend with the annual Kinard Halloween Carnival (Pages 28 & 32), B B ristols T T runk or T T reat event (Page 24) and the Durham familys amazing B Backyard Haunt tour (see Page 13). AB ABOVEE: Jim R Redmond takes his son, T T ripp, around the parking lot to visit with everyone during Saturdays T T runk or T T reat at the Mormon Church. RIG RIG HT T : Chris Mills took third place in his age group in the costume David T T aylor, a substance prevention specialist with Chemical A Addiction R Recovery E Effort (CAREARE), talks to a group about the dangers posed by the use of methamphetamine and synthetic drugs. TERE TERE SA A E E UBAN BAN KS PHOT T O by T T eresa EEubanks, Journal EditorProbation officers, Healthy Start employees, staff from the Department of Juvenile Justice, case workers from the Department of Children and Families and local business owners were among nearly 60 people who gathered for a two-hour presentation on methamphetamine and synthetic drugs Friday morning at the library in Blountstown. Most have dealt with meth addicts or their family members in the course of their jobs. All have seen how the drug has gotten a foothold in the community, tearing apart families and sending many to jail. Friday was an opportunity to ask questions and get answers about the fast-growing epidemic that is changing the way social workers, health care professionals and their jobs. The first question on everyones mind is why would anyone knowingly ingest a substance created with drain cleaner, camp stove fuel and battery acid? David Taylor, a substance prevention specialist with Chemical Addiction Recovery Effort (CARE), had the answer. The availability of ready ingredients and the simple one pot cooking method thats come in use in the last three years lured crack cocaine users when they discovered meth gave them, A strong, longer lasting high, according to Taylor. never be repeated. Each time addicts use meth, they get less of a high. Eventually, they have to take the drug to feel normal, said Taylor. It changes the brain chemistry. Its a powerful central nervous stimulate that gets users so revved up they cant concentrate or focus, he said. Users become dangerously paranoid and may hallucinate. It would be easier to deal See METH & SYNTHETIC DRUGS continued on page 2

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Page 2 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL NOVEMBER 2, 2011 C A L H OO U N C OO U N T YOOct. 24 Kimberly Melvin, grand theft, more than $300 less than $1,000, BPD. Brandon Harris, VOP, aggravated battery, aggravated battery with deadly weapon, CCSO.O Oct. 25 Brandy Foster, VOP, CCSO. Richard Hogarth, VOP x2, CCSO. Lisa McClendon, grand theft, CCSO.O Oct. 26 Lisa Fant, VOP, CCSO. Kenneth Ivey Walden, uttering forged instrument, larceny under $300, CCSO.O Oct. 27 Marvin Lee Johnson, VOP, CCSO.O Oct. 28 Randy Dale Kent, battery, damage to property, criminal mischief over $200 under $1000, aggravated assault with deadly weapon without intent, CCSO. Steven Waldron, DUI, CCSO.L I BB EE RR T Y C OO U N T YOOct. 24 Kimberly Melvin, hold for CCSO, CCSO.O Oct. 25 Lisa McClendon, hold for CCSO, CCSO. Brandy Foster, hold for CCSO, CCSO. Edmond Ellis, DUI, driving while license suspended or revoked, LCSO. O Oct. 26 Lisa Fant, hold for CCSO, CCSO.O Oct. 28 Danzavieran Thurman, hold for court, LCSO. Deivon Moore, hold for court, LCSO.O Oct. 30 Randy A. Varnum, DUI, alcohol or drugs, LCSO. SHER ER IFFS LO OG BBlountstown Police Dept.Oct. 22 through Oct. 30, 2011 Citations issued: Accidents...............03 .................16 Special details B Business alarms.....03 RResidential alarms..........00 Complaints..............................................................49 Nov. 19 at 9 a.m. 20960 NE Burlington Rd., HosfordFARM EQUIPMe E NT AND A ANTIQUe E AAUCTION Tractors, MMowers, Cultivators and All Types Farm EEquipment10% Buyers Premium All Consignments Welcome MMeth and synthetic drugs continued from the front pagewith if the drug only affected those who make and use it. Someone who mixes a batch of meth in a plastic bottle is putting everyone in the home in harms way, he explained. Once these chemicals get in the house, theres no way to get it out. The chemicals permeate the structure, Taylor said. What is it doing to children living in the home where a parent is cooking meth? We do not know the impact these chemicals and all this exposure has on children, said Peggy Howland of The Calhoun County Childrens Coalition. Its very toxic. When teams come to clean up after a meth lab is found, they wear hazardous material suits. She said were raising a new generation of children who may be affected by their parents meth use in ways that have yet to be discovered. The schools will see the impact in a short time, she predicts. The reason were focusing on so many different people here today is because they have to deal with families with these problems, especially the women and men who go out to the homes, said Howland. She said it was important that they recognize the signs of meth use when they make home site visits. They need to be looking at whats in a burn pile, whats in the garbage and what smells to be aware of. Howland continued, explaining, If nothing else, todays program showed a need. Most of these people deal directly with those who are substance abusers. She emphasized that it was critical that they have an awareness of what meth use, as well as the growing use of synthetic drugs like Mojo and bath salts, can lead to, particularly when children share a home with meth users. Im really impressed with the turnout, she said of Fridays event. Were considering doing an actual summit with a half-day to full day of workshops in the future. She added they would like to open the workshop up to the public so more people can learn to identify and help those struggling with addiction and exposing their children to unknown harm. David Taylor makes a point during Fridays session at the library in Blountstown. Those in attendance had plenty of questions at the end of the two-hour program. TERESA EUBANKS PHOTOS TALLAHASSEE On Tuesday, Florida Education Commissioner Gerard Robinson announced Floridas results on the 2011 National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) Reading and Mathematics assessments. The results show that fourth graders in the Sunshine State continue to outpace the nation in reading, with an average scale score of 225 compared to 220 nationwide. Results for Floridas Hispanic students also show higher average scale scores than their counterparts across the country, in both reading and mathematics in fourth and eighth grades, while the overall results for grades 4 and 8 show recent 2009 results. I want to commend our students, teachers, and school districts for their tremendous efforts as these results help us further adapt classroom instruction to accommodate the needs of our students, said Education Commissioner Gerard Robinson. We remain committed to the work that lies ahead to ensure students are fully prepared for their educational journey and for the demanding economy that awaits them. In fourth grade mathematics, Hispanic students, students with disabilities and students eligible for free or reduced price lunch scored higher than the national average, and overall fourth graders matched the national average score of 240. In addition, Hispanic eighth graders scored higher than their national counterparts with a score of 274. Since 1998, Florida has seen steady progress on NAEP and the Department of Education continues to work closely with schools across the state to infuse effective reading instruction focused on prevention and intervention, including phoneognition and text processing, construction of meaning, vocabulary, spelling and writing. ReadingEADING Since 2003, every state in the nation has participated in NAEP, also referred to as the Nations Report Card. The 2011 NAEP results show that since 2003, Floridas fourth and eighth grade students have increased their overall reading spectively, compared to a four-point gain by the nations fourth graders and a three-point gain for eighth graders. MathematicsATHEMATICS The 2011 NAEP results show that since 2003, Floridas fourth and eighth grade students have increased their overall mathematics scores by six and seven points respectively, matching their national counterparts. A congressionally-mandated project overseen by the National Center for Education Statistics to continuously monitor the achievement of the nations children and youth, NAEP has measured and reported on the knowledge and abilities of Americas fourth, eighth and 12th grade students, providing data about students performance in a variety of subject areas at national, regional and state levels.Florida fourth graders outshine national counterparts in reading

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NOVEMBER 2, 2011 / THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 3 Calhoun-Liberty Employees Credit Union Skip-A-Pay Skip A Loan Payment Coupon Card Need A Little Extra Cash for Christmas? Call (850) 643-3000 or email: singletarychiro@fairpoint.net Donna L. Singletary, DC NOW OOPEn N FOR BUSIn N ESSnext door to Buy Rite Drugs HOOURRS MMon, Wed, Fri, 9 A.M.-2 P.M. & 3:30-7 P.M. & Tues, Thurs, BY APPOINTMENT ONLYNow accepting insurance from: BLOUNTSTOWN DRUGSMark your calendars for...Saturday, Nov. 19 from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. (CT) PACKAGES START AT $995 Altha was an unusual

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Page 4 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL NOVEMBER 2, 2011Thats how many copies of The Calhoun-Liberty Journal were distributed last week, ensuring plenty of coverage for your community announcements and great response for our business advertisers! 5,368 The Calhoun-Liberty Journal is published each Wednesday by the Liberty Journal Inc., Summers Road, P.O. Box 536, Bristol, FL 32321. Annual subscriptions are $18. Periodicals postage paid at Bristol, FLPOSTMASTER: Send address corrections to: P.O. Box 536, Bristol, FL 32321. (USPS 012367) Summers Road Located at 11493 NW Summers Road in Bristol MAILING ADDRESS: P.O. Box 536, Bristol, FL 32321 TELEPHONE (850) 643-3333 Fax (850) 643-3334 EM EMAIL: thejournal@fairpoint.net ADS: cljads@fairpoint.net JOOURRNAL STAFFJohnny Eubanks...................Publisher Teresa Eubanks........................ Editor Sandra Brown...................Bookkeeper Debbie Duggar...................Advertising Angie Davis.........Production AssistantOFFICE HOURS: 9 a.m. 6 p.m. M-F, Saturdays from 9 a.m. until 1 p.m.THE CALHOUN-LLIBERtTY JOURNAL Adult Dance, 8-12 p.m. at the Legion Hall in Blountstown Wednesday, November 2 Monday, November 7 Tuesday, November 8 Sunday, November 6 Saturday, November 5 Thursday, November 3 Friday, November 4TODAYS MEETINGS7 p.m., Altha Volunteer Fire Department AA, 6 p.m., Altha Community Center 2 p.m., Ag. Bldg., Conference Room, across from Courthouse6 p.m., Fire House 7 p.m., Apalachee Restaurant 7 p.m. (CT), Dixie Lodge in Btown 6 p.m., St. Paul AME Church in BlountstownTODAYS MEETINGS7 p.m., Veterans Memorial Park Civic Center 5 p.m., Designated locationsTODAYS MEETINGS, noon, Calhoun-Liberty Hospital 7 p.m., Calhoun County Old Ag Bldg. east door, in front of jail 6:30 p.m., Mormon Church, BristolTODAYS MEETINGSAA, 7 p.m., basement of Calhoun County Courthouse10 a.m., Liberty Co. 6 p.m., Altha Town Hall 7 p.m., Fire House6 p.m., St. Paul AME Church in Blountstown 6 p.m., W.T. Neal Civic Center 2 p.m., Legion Hall in Blountstown NATIOn N AL Men Make Dinner DAY LCHS Dawgs vs. Port St. Joe Away at 7:30 p.m. (ET) B-town Tigers vs. West Gadsden Away at 6:30 p.m. (CT) Attend the Church of your choice this Sunday BIRTHDAYS Rachael Orama, Marcus Sherrod & David Ranson HOSFORD 8Th H GRADE Mullet Dinner Fundraiser 5 8 p.m. at Whitney's Seafood Restaurant in Hosford ($7 per plate)ANNIVERSARIES Dan & Lynne Davis3 p.m. at fire houseMossy Pond VFD The Apalachee Regional Planning Council announces a public meeting to which all persons are invited. The Liberty County Transportation Disadvantaged Coordinating Board will meet on Tuesday, Nov. 8 at 2 p.m. (ET) at Veterans Memorial Park Civic Center located at 10405 NW Theo Jacobs Way in Bristol. In addition to its regular business, the agenda includes the adoption of the annual evaluation of the CTC, grievance procedures, board bylaws and the Annual Operating Report. The public is invited to the annual public hearing that will follow this meeting. If any person decides to appeal any decision made by the Board with respect to any matter considered at this meeting, he/she will need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceeding is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence from which the appeal is to be issued.Apalachee RRegional Calhoun County 4-H is selling tickets for a chance to win a hand crafted cypress porch swing. Tickets cost just $1 each and can be bought from the Calhoun County Extension Tickets will also be on sale at the BHS homecoming game, and the winner will be drawn and announced between the third and fourth quarters. All money raised from this fundraiser will be used in 4-H gardening programs which are available to all youth between the ages of 5 and 18 years. For more information on this fundraiser or on 4-H in general please contact Whitney Cherry at (850) 674-8323 or cherryw@ Calhoun 4-H selling tickets for chance to win porch swing to raise funds for the Panhandle Pioneer Settlement Club House porch on Saturday, Nov. 5 from 6 to 9 a.m. (CT). A special breakfast will be served in the Club House which consists of all-you-caneat pancakes, sausage, and your choice coffee, milk, or juice. The donation cost is $5 a plate.Pancake breakfast NEWS FROM THE PEWSRREViIVal ALTelogia Baptist Church will be in revival on Nov. 6 9. Rev. Morris Anderson will be preaching Sunday, Nov. 6 at 11 a.m. and again at 7 p.m. The Monday through Wednesday night services will start at 7:30 p.m. Each service will have a theme. The themes are listed below: starting at 6:30 p.m. and there will be door prizes at every service.ast rpprcatnPage Pond Assembly of God Church will have a pastor appreciation service on Nov. 6 for School begins at 9:45 a.m. and the Pastor Appreciation service will begin at 11 a.m. The members of the church would like to invite friends and family in the community to join them in showing appreciation for all Church. The church is located on Murdock Drive just off Hwy. 73 and C.R. 274 at Sheltons Corner.ansgvngnnrAre you alone? Hungry? Have no Thanksgiving dinner plans? Come enjoy a traditional Thanksgiving Dinner at our Pre-Thanksgiving Feast on Wednesday, Nov. 23 from 5 to 7 p.m. at Veterans Memorial Civic Center in Bristol. You may eat in or take out and walk-ins are welcome! To sign up for a meal or for meal delivery please send an email to good2give10@gmail. com or have someone else send the email for you. The dinner is provided by local churches in participation with the Calhoun Liberty Ministry Center.rcaaarThe annual St. John the Baptist Episcopal Church Bazaar will be held on Nov. 12 from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. (CT) in Wewahitchka. This event goes beyond the average bazaar. Items for sale include handmade crafts, freshly baked goodies, homemade chili and chili dogs, and a huge yard sale. tertain the crowd while Waynebow the Clown and Smokey Bear provide enjoyment for kids of all ages. ment demonstration and informational booths will be on display. Pony rides will be available. Children will have the opportunity to actually paint a live white pony. Youngsters will feed the hungry church. Bring a lawn chair and enjoy the fellowship surrounded by the beauty of thick woods lush with fall leaves.Ya ARdD salSALE fundFUNDRasiASIERThe Sunny Hills Womens Ministry will have a yard sale fundraiser on Saturday, Nov. 5 beginning at 7 a.m. It will be held at Goodmans Mini Plaza on Hwy. 69, past Pine Island. For more information, please call 7628184.

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NOVEMBER 2, 2011 / THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 5 EVENTS LOGGERS! Dont get stopped in your tracks. Call us!Premium namebrand tires CLJN ews .cCOM ITS VERY WiISE TO ADVERTiISE in the Journal and . Email: thejournal@fairpoint.netBLOUNTSTOWN The Blountstown Public Library announces the next ARTS Series Event, From Ethnic Flutes to Indian Roots, set for Saturday, Nov. 19 from 6:30 until 8:30 p.m. in the Heritage Room. The program is sure to be inter esting and entertaining. Paul McAuliffe is returning for another show by popular demand! His beautiful original music, played on the many again carry us on a fantastic journey. He will introduce new music from his most recent CD called "Young Cat Dreams: Quiet Time For Kids of All Ages." His soothing stress-relieving lullabies are created from the heart, sending out peace ful feelings to each and everyone. Paul is also a great storyteller and plans on narrating one or two of his own. Jeffrey Watt is a visual artist that en joys wood burning, airbrush work, and several other mediums of painting. He is Cherokee Indian and loves to depict the Native American culture and his roots. A demonstration will be done with acrylic paints as he shares his techniques and inspirations. Jeffrey speaks American sign language and would like to invite the disabled to attend this event. Cheryl, his wife, will be translating for him dur ing the evening. This get together will be a familyfriendly presentation and, as always, is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be served. Please join us! Nature paintings by local artist on display at libraryBLOUNTSTOWN The Blountstown Public Library is excited to share with the community "Nature As I See It", a display of acrylic paintings by Kelly Wyrick. The exhibit is located near the front desk and in the Adult Reading Room of the library. Kelly was inspired years ago by her only art teacher, Johnnie Shoemake. She enjoys "outlet"! The works express her love of nature and they present a tender softness that comes truly from the heart. Library hosts to Indian rootsBRISTOL The Veterans Memorial Railroad will be having a fundraising sale Saturday, Nov. 5 starting at 8 a.m. next door to the Talquin Electric Building on SR 20 in Bristol, rain or shine. There will be lots of great stuff: furniture, china, glassware, toys, Christmas decorations and books. The only thing we dont have is clothes. For information, call Babs Moran at 643-5491.Rummage sale to MARIANNA Realizing that the time for those who have suffered the loss of a loved one, the Covenant Hos pice Bereavement Department will be providing a free workshop to help. The workshop will be held from 9:00 a.m. to noon Thursday, Nov. 10 at the Marianna at 4215 Kelson Avenue, Suite E. The workshop will include many tips on how to cope during the holidays, normal grief reactions, coping strate gies for the holidays, ways to remember a loved one and supporting children through the holidays. This free workshop is open to the public and light refresh ments will be served. Those who attend will also receive free material and literature on coping during the holidays. If you are interested in at tending this very special workshop, call January McKeithan or Riley Henderson at 482-8520 to make a reservation. The Chipola Regional Workforce Development Board Region 3 Career Fair will be held Wednesday, Nov. 9 at the Eastside Baptist Church, located on Hwy. 90 East in Marianna. Students from Calhoun, Holmes, Jackson, Liberty and Washington counties will be attending. During the Career Fair the students will be able to obtain information that will assist them in making career choices. Local employers and business own ers are encouraged to take advantage of this opportunity to share informa tion about their businesses with the workforce of tomorrow. The students will be in attendance from 8 a.m. until 12:30 p.m. (CT). If you would like further information or your business is interested in partici pating, please contact Terry Jumper at (850) 482-1338, extension 221.Job Fair to be held next week

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Page 6 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL NOVEMBER 2, 2011Smaller, less intrusive government? Really?To steal a line from the latenight comedians, Republicans believe in smaller, less intrusive government. Really? Of course, the Republicans are joking or talking out of both sides of their mouth at the same time. Republicans love government, particularly the parts of government they use to foist their social conservative views and beliefs on others in American society. Tea Party Republicans took control of the House in 2010. They didnt go to Washington to govern, they went to Washington with the intent In the sham debt crisis, Tea Party acolytes almost shut down the government, a lesson learned from the right-wing, self-professed intellectual guru, Newt Gingrich. We all know how Newts government shutdown worked out. The Republicans came to power on the promise to do something about the unemployment rate. Soon as the election dust settled, and they found abortion campaign was underway in Washington and most states. Republican state legislatures and the House of Representative in Washington have conjured up more than 600 anti-abortion bills. This anti-abortion frenzy wasnt started by women, but by old men in baggy suits nursing swollen prostates who have found the perfect pander to the Republican right-wing. They want to be re-elected so the perfect horse to ride is that nag named anti-abortion. The most egregious, the most draconian antiabortion effort is the Personhood Amendment initiative in Mississippi, which will come up for a vote on November 8. For the ballot, it is Initiative 26, and if passed by the people of Mississippi, the stitution will be changed to a human being from the moment of fertilization. tion of when life begins is when a fertilized egg attaches itself to the wall of the womans uterus. Eggs are fertilized in labs, frozen and some discarded. Is this willing destruction of an embryo murder? What if a woman miscarries? Is she guilty of murder? Did the attending physician aid and abet a crime? If this terrible amendment should pass, the CORNERJerry Cox is a retired military OXS courts will decide these issues, but the worst aspect of this proposed amendment is no exception for abortions in the case of rape or incest. My view is that rape is probably one of the most traumatic events that could happen to a woman. But then to force a woman to carry the child el and inhumane punishment. Then what happens to the child? Oh, yes, I know. Some loving couple will adopt the child. Right! While waging anti-abortion wars, the Republicans in state legislatures went after their state workers, teachers and other public servants. That was especially true in Florida where Governor Scott and the Republican legislature demonized public workers. In Wisconsin, union busting was the game of the day. Republicans demonize Unions because they tend to vote the Democrat ticket. Without unions and the right to collective bargaining, the American worker would be working for peanuts. While Ohio and Michigan have jumped on the anti-union bandwagon, Republican dominated state legislatures have found the silver bullet for winning electionssuppress voters and voting rights, particularly in cities and areas where it affects Democrats the most. In many states, laws have been passed that require voters to show government-issued photo Sounds easy to get the ID, but not if you are elderly, a minority and poor. University School of Law states that the new laws eligible voters to cast ballots in 2012. fort to suppress the vote? A dramatic one relative alleges that states, which includes suppressing the 270 required to win the presidency. In their commitment to defeat President Obama in 2012, the Republicans have found a horse to ride with their effort to keep Democrats from voting in the presidential election. But, Republicans dont believe in large, intruCOMMENTARY Late Night LaughsA recaRECAP oOF recentRECENT obserOBSER Vations ATIONS by BY lateLATE niNIGhtHT tV TV hostsHOSTS.The planets seven-billionth person was born. Of the 7 billion people in the world, no one is surprised that Kim Kardashian is getting divorced. CRAIGG FFERGGUSONBritish scientists say they have developed a dont you come up with a food people will actually eat? Like a super glazed doughnut. JAY LENOA bank in Washington was robbed by two men in G George W. Bush masks. Luckily, right afterwards two guys in P President Obama masks came ConanONAN OBrienRIENA team of British lawyers has now concluded that the Declaration of Independence was illegal, and the American colonies had no right to secede from England. Well, you thought our court system was backed up. JAY LENOA company in Illinois is selling a collectible baby doll of P President Obama. Its really cute. The doll can even say a few words, as long as it has a teleprompter. And just so Republicans dont com JIMMY FF ALLONThe United States has been using Twitter to will surrender if they read enough tweets from Kanye West. ConanONAN OBrienRIENMichele Bachmann told reporters that she will lead the nation in prayer if she is elected president. You know if she is elected president, we all better be praying. She doesnt have to lead us. JAY LENOMichele Bachmann said she wants her three daughters to learn to shoot a gun. Mostly so they can put her campaign out of its misery. ConanONAN OBrienRIEN Yankees cap. Did you see that? If hed had a Boston Red Sox hat on he probably would have missed. DAV VID LETTERMANRick P Perry unveiled his new tax plan. He says JAY LENOThats right, Kim Kardashian is ending her marriage. Details of the proceedings will remain private, until E! airs its three-hour divorce special. JIMMY FF ALLONNew Jersey G Gov. Chris Christie is going to Israel. Hes going to be pretty disappointed when hear that, Michelle Obama? You can take your celery sticks and throw them in the deep fryer. JIMMY KIMMEL shot him. Or as they call it in the Middle East, an orderly transfer of power. DAV VID LETTERMANThe New York Times reports that Moammar sophomore in college. Thats what I did. ConanONAN OBrienRIEN

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NOVEMBER 2, 2011 / THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 7 Postal system: The bond of the scattered family COMMENTARYNow that Andy Rooney has retired from his perch as CBS News' "curmudgeonat-large," I may volunteer for that role. Currently hospitalized, that 92-year old veteran managed to tickle viewers of "Sixty Minutes" for more than 30 years. I sure hope he rallies. Even though I rarely agreed with him, his long tenure alone invites respect. And it's a tribute to our free republic that you can make a career of getting in peoples' faces. Socrates, this doesn't happen in tyrannies. I'd like to audition for the role of curmudgeon with a gripe of my own. Too many of my friends are forever Every time the cost of a First Class stamp goes up, howls of protest go up higher. Question: Is there any other country where you can put so much information in an envelope for so little? Think of what the postal system has meant to American freedom. Go all the way back to Ben Franklin. He was a Royal Postmaster before we gained our independence. He used the mail to So, masterfully, did Samuel Adams, inventor of the Committees of Correspondence. More recently, in the 1970s, the mass media was monochromatically liberal. Without Rush, without the Internet, how could conservatives compete? How could we even survive? The U.S. Mail, that's how. National Review and Human Events and countless direct mail appeals from conservative organizations used the freedom burning. I am forever being told to get with the 21st Century. Lots of my young friends want to be Linked In with me. I apologize to all of them, but I don't know how. Send me an email. Better a post card. I've been sending letters and post cards to family and friends for 40 years. I can get 400 words on a post card. Pretty good for 29 cents. Now, I'll admit that my good wife has a point when she complains about surly folks behind the counter at she who mails the packages and buys the stamps in our family. Remember, postal workers: you are civil servants; it helps to be civil. But I've never had anything but good relations with our many letter carriers over the years. In forty years of letter writing, I've never had one go astray. That includes weekly letters to a friend in prison and letters to brave U.S. soldiers in combat in Iraq and Afghanistan. I'm still astounded at how fast the mail goes through. There's an eloquent tribute to the U.S. Mail inscribed on the National Postal Museum in Washington. It's part of the Smithsonian.Messenger of Sympathy and Love Servant of Parted Friends Consoler of the Lonely Bond of the Scattered Family Enlarger of the Common Life Carrier of News and Knowledge Instrument of Trade and Industry Promoter of Mutual Acquaintance Of Peace and of Goodwill Among Men and Nations[From "The Letter," by Dr. Charles W. Eliot, former president of Harvard University, as revised by President Woodrow Wilson.]Bond of the scattered family. I like that line best. I get to see our grandson often, but not as often as I'd like. So I send him weekly postcards. He's only two and a half, but our daughter reads them to him. I wasn't sure what impact, if any, they were having. Today she told us he takes the subscription cards from her magazines. They're the same size as my post cards. He "reads" them to her and ends each one with "Love, GranDad." I love to Skype. I love email. I love blogs. And I'm going to learn to LinkIn, or whatever. But there's nothing quite like holding a letter that was handwritten by someone you love, a message from one heart to another. GUEST COLUMNBY ROBErR T MOrrRRISONRobert Morrison holds degrees in government and foreign affairs and is now a senior fellow for policy studies at the Family Research Council

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Page 8 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL NOVEMBER 2, 2011 Buy Rite DrugsTentative dates for the enrollment period are Nov. 7 18, 2011Contact your local Buy Rite Pharmacist before making your decision. We will be glad to assist you. OOur Services include: We are PPO providers for BCBS, United Healthcare & Cigna Also accept Vista, Healthease, Medicare & MedicaidNow accepting (CHP) Capital Health PlanACCEEPTING NEEW PATIEENTS & WALK INS!! Dr. Iqbal Faruqui Arlena Falcon, ARRNPDorcas Goodman, ARRNP The MMedical Center ofontstown Ronnie Coley personally invites you to visit him any time Monday thru Saturday from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. eiswaitingfororca Chipola To the editor, Im writing this letter to inform computer owners of something that happened to me just last week at home. I received a phone call from a private caller who insisted he needed to walk me through some steps on my computer to prevent a virus I was about to get in Windows. Even if you are on the Do Not Call Registry list from solicitors, dont be so sure its not one of them or even worse, a computer hacker. I asked him, What is your companys name since its not showing up on my caller ID. How do you even know I own a computer? He said, I work for Windows and I received a message to call this number and walk you through cleaning up your Window applications because you are about to get a virus on your computer. I told him, Once I get your company name and number, I will run it by the Better Business Bureau to make sure you are a legitimate business and then I will call you back, okay? He began getting irritated with the questions I kept asking him and became insistent that I go get on my computer right now while I had him on the phone! About 40 minutes later he called again. This time I put him on the speaker phone and told the kids to listen to him so they would know what a computer hacker sounds like. Because we have antivirus software on our computer and it lets us know if we have a virus, I knew we would have received a message telling us if a virus was detected. Just to be safe, I ran another virus scan after said nothing was detected. I spoke with some IT staff at work and found out that this is a new way for hackers to gain access to your machine, temporary interbrowser history, and typed URL history. They can even get your passwords from temporary directories on the hard drive and mostly from items contained within the Windows Registry. Not only can the hackers steal this, they can steal your identity with this information, steal your credit and ruin your life! If you own a computer, let your children be aware and know what to do should they answer the phone when youre not at home and get convinced to get on the computer. Do not do it. Loretta King Hosford To the editor, Elections for 2012 are approximately one year away. I would like to take this presidential election. American to be elected President of the United States. As I have observed, listened and researched President Obamas job performance, he has executed the duties of the presidency with integrity, commitment and perseverance despite the blatant disreholds. African-Americans whether they are Democrat, Republican or Independent have always given respect to the President of the United States. We may not have past elections, but we gave support once Maybe I am the only one who sees the dent. His father came from the continent of Africa, his mother was white (AngloSaxon) from America. In my observation, President Obama is the product of the oppressor and the oppressed race. To me, this speaks volumes. A white gentleman, whom I respect, and myself were discussing the results of the 2008 elections. He kindly reminded me that on a local level, Marsha Harpool was the the City of Blountstown. He further stated that she received votes not only from the African-American voters but from the white community as well. People, we are living in the 21st century and I wonder will we be able to look to the character of the individual and not the color of their skin. To the incumbents who currently hold positions on the local level and the candidates who will run against them in 2012, if you cannot discuss your goals, plans or not seek my support or vote. When you come to me and can only talk about what African-American man or woman who use to work for you or your family, only offends me. Talk issues. Let me be clear, my livelihood is solely dependent on my Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ, and not man. In closing, I leave you with the words of Dr. M.L. King, Jr.: Intelligence plus character that is the goal of true education. Respectfully submitted, Sally GadsonRReader responds to letter from mother alleging son & friends were harrassedTo the editor, I am writing in reference to the lady who wrote that his level headed friends are continually being harassed for just hanging out. for by tax payers and is not designated a hangout. No one has singled out your child nor are he and his friends being harassed. then our sheriff and his deputies must react to the plaint! You stated they moved their hangout to the forest and because they were being watched, they decided to move to private land. Great! So be it! You go on to say that three weeks into their playtime on private land, they were again harassed by the law! Again, I say to you, the sheriff and his deputies have better things to do than harass your child and his friends. Someone phoned in a complaint! Pure and simple. So stop blaming the sheriff and his deputies for all the ills of the world. Nobody promised anyone a rose garden to play in. Whats wrong with school (university) or the military? Respectfully Jan EganLocal candidates are urged to pay more attention to issues and less to skin color SPEAK UP! TO THeE eEDITORWrite: The Calhoun-Liberty Journal, P.O. Box 536, Bristol 32321Email: thejournal@fairpoint.net WITH aA LeETTeERMMake your family aware of a new tactic used by computer hackersADOPT A PET...from the JournalCLASSIFIEDS!

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NOVEMBER 2, 2011 / THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 9 Coley, MMontford hold legislative delegation meetingWorld War II pilot Terrell Yon will nally receivelong-awaited French Combat Medal this FridayFroROM Par ARK TraRAMMellELLAfter waiting 67 years, World War of Blountstown, is about to receive a Terrell E. Yon is shown above left as a young pilot and below, standing alongside an aircraft. The FFrench Combat MMedal is pictured above right. Rep. M Marti Coley and State Senator Bill M Montford came to Blountstown to discuss issues with the citizens of Calhoun County on Oct. 25. Due to redistricting, the legislative delegation meeting was moved up from its usual time in F February. This scheduling difference is believed to be the reason no one asked to be put on the agenda and accounted for the low attendance, a common occurrence across the panhandle, according to Rep. Coley. Attendance may have been down but at least four people spoke up about issues of concern, including lobbyist Patrick Bell and Calhoun County Chamber of Commerce Director KKristy Terry. Bell addressed several issues, including Amendment No. 1 regarding septic tank inspection, sewage repairs in Blountstown before the repaving of Hwy. 20 in 2014, the need for grant money for the new clinic at Calhoun Liberty Hospital and the clean up of Lake Hilda. In regard to Amendment No. 1, Rep. Coley stated she and several other representatives have been working on a measure to allow counties to opt-in instead of requiring all counties across FFlorida to take part. She pointed out that while a complete repeal would be ideal, the opt-in compromise would protect counties from the cost and complication of the unneeded inspections. Terry stated that after having a conversation with Richard Williams, the executive director of the Chipola Regional Workforce Board, the subject of the minimum wage increase scheduled to take place in January is a concern for local small business owners. She explained that while the business owners would like to pay their employees more, doing so would mean hiring less employees to offset the higher pay. The option of placing a cap on minimum wage was offered as a possible solution. FFROMM LEFFT: Patrick Bell, Rep. MMarti Coley, Senator Bill MMontford and KKristy Terry. Watch video of the meeting at CLJNews.com. JOHNNY EUBANKKS PHOTOS

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Page 10 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL NOVEMBER 2, 2011 Home of the All-U-Can-Eat menuPhone (850) 670-8441Family Coastal Seafood Restaurant A little out of the way, a lot less to pay! Were Still open Come see us for the best seafood in town. WEEDNEESDAY THURRSDAY FRRIDAY C Mullet Seafood HOuURsS AUTO FINaANCINGDAYLIGHT SENIOR DAY AT CHIPOLA NOOTICEE TO O PROROPERERTY O OWNERERS/TAXPAYERERS**2011** TAX ROLLS OPEN FOR COLLECTION **2011** Payment Schedule: Penalties begin April 1, 2012 LAKE CITYThe Chipola College and third, respectively, Oct. 22 at the Florida Gateway Invitational in Lake City. Chipola A team members were: Paul Kelson, Caroline Peacock and William Singleton. Chipola B team members were: Annemarie Nichols, Travis Bontrager, Adrian Carr and Nick Ratzlaff. scoring for the tournament, averaging 151.50 points per game, answering 123 tossups, with 73 powers. A power is when the player buzzes in early enough to earn additional points. Annemarie Nichols finished sixth in individual scoring, averaging 64.38 points per game, answering 46 tossups, eleventh overall, averaging 42.50 points per game, answering 30 tossups, with 12 powers. Tournament statistics are available at http://hsquizbowl.org/db/tournaments/120/stats/combined/standings/ The Chipola team will next play Nov. 11-12 in Orlando at the Delta Burke Tournament. The CalhounLiberty JOuURnalNALServing two counties that make up one great community!HOOURRS: PHOONEE (850) 643-333 FAX OFFICE DIRECTIONS: From State Road 20 in Bristol, turn south onto Pea Ridge Road, go one mile, turn east onto Summers Road and look for sign.

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NOVEMBER 2, 2011 / THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 11 ASK THEO L D F A R M E R SA L M A N A C Heating & Air Conditioning FL LicIC. # CMC1249570R s s CCs (850) 674-4777Whaley Whaley Altha Store Phone (850) 762-3161B Blountstown BBranch Phone (850) 673-8102M Marianna BBranch Phone (850) 482-2416Altha Farmers Co-op, Inc. PETS AND tTHeEIR pePEOpPLeE IsS spSPONsSOReED BYWeve got the feed you need to keep your animals happy and healthy!CAATTLLE HORHORSES DODOGS CAATS BIRD BIRDS and more.AND THEIRPetETS PEOPLE OCT. 31, MONDAY All Hallows Eve. Reformation Day. The temperature at Minneapolis, Minnesota, reached 83 degrees Fahrenheit, 1950. NOV. 1, TUESDAY All Saints. Rainbow Bridge at Niagara Falls opened to public, no more sail. NOV. 2, WEDNESDAY All Souls. Frontiersman Daniel Boone born, 1734. Charles Van Doren admitted he had been given answers in advance on quiz show Twenty-One, 1959. bank, Bank of Montreal, opened, 1817. Good Morning America debuted on television, 1975. NOV. 4, FRIDAY Will Rogers Day (Oklahoma). Conjunction of Neptune and the Moon. First cash register patented by James and John Ritty of Dayton, Ohio, 1879. NOV. 5, SATURDAY Sadie Hawkins Day. Moon on equator. Board game Monopoly released by Parker Brothers, 1935. Cartoonist Al Capp died, 1979. Sunday after Pentecost. Daylight Saving Time ends, 2:00 A.M. Conjunction of Uranus and the Moon. Actress Sally Field born, 1946.I suffer from sinus headaches. Do you have any remedies to offer? M. K., Loveland, Colo. A sinus headache, or sinusitis, can be brought on by a cold or any respiratory ailment. Even dental infections sometimes lead to sinus problems. Sinusitis is mation and often, the cavities that surround the nasal passages. We can tell you some of the favorite home remedies, but if the condition persists or worsens, you with your health practitioner.A favorite remedy that weve tried and ness has to do with pressure points over the eyes. Often, a sinus headache localizes around just one eye. Theres a little peasize dip in the bone just under the top of your eyebrow, often located just above the iris of that eye. (Theres one on each side, but only use both if both sides to gently nudge your eyebrow out of the way feel along the bone for the dip. Press your little, but after a minute or so you are apt to feel the sinus draining down The pressure is a little uncomfortable, but the draining relieves some of the mucus buildup and the headache di hours, you might need to repeat the process.The next-best remedy is a hot washcloth, used as a compress. Some Chinese herbalists recommend Tiger Balm, an ointment that comes in a red tin with a tiger blend of menthol from peppermint, eugenol from cloves, cinnamon, and camphor. Certain teas thought to ease sinus headaches teaspoon of the seeds in a cup of boiling wamint. Oregano also has antiseptic compounds. into a tea. Echinacea boosts the immunity, as does goldenseal, helping to ease the infection. Horseradish helps to clear the sinuses. Can I add woodstove ashes to my compost, and will it continue working through the winter? H. T., Amherst, Va. Unless youre a real pro at maintaining your compost, the decom position is apt to slow down considerably or even stop during the freezing weather. Thats resume when things warm up in the spring, so theres no harm in continuing to add to your pile with your regular areas, raccoons can be a problem if the compost well-covered and bar ricaded, but woodstove ashes help to discourage pests if you apply them in thin layers to cover the layer on every time you ashes are a good source of potash as well, al though it leaches away easily with snow and spring rains. Dont add charcoal or coal ashes, though. Also, be sure the woodstove ashes are completely cold before you let them out of the metal ash days or more for the last of the embers to die out, so be very cautious about especially if your compost is near the house or woods. Whats the risk of lead contamination from crops grown near the roadside? We wish there were a simple answer to this uneasy question, but theres not. The way to tell absolutely is to have the soil tested for lead, which is especially advisable for public farm stands or private gardens that are located within Clearly, the more constant and congested the with only a few cars a Urban gardeners might be wise to use greenhouses or cold frames to minimize airborne pollution from automobile exhaust fumes. Despite lead-free fuels that have helped to reduce the problem, airborne lead is still present. Because lead poisoning can build up cumulatively in the body, even low emissions over a long period of exposure can be dangerous. Greater concentra tions of lead are more outer surfaces of leafy vegetables, such as spinach, lettuce, or cabbage (the larger the leaf exposure, the greater the as potatoes and carrots. Fruit-bearing vegetables such as tomatoes, beans, of containing lead. To guard against lead contamination, maintain a soil pH above 6.5 percent, add organic matter, and plant your garden as far away from the road as your own, have it tested to give you greater peace to the neighborhood if they have had tests you. I never thought Id be much of a dog person, says Laura Wahlquist, but that changed when Lucy came into her life last year. Lucy is a Shorkie half Shih Tzu and half Yorkie, who lives with her owner in Marianna where Laura works as an assistant state attorney. The little dog will be a year old in January. The playful pup has had plenty of toys but her favorite is a stuffed penguin named Baby Penguin, according to Laura. Shell look for it to play with even when her other toys are around. The pair enjoy their trips home to Bristol on the weekend and took part in Saturdays Trunk or Treat. Earlier that day, Lucy walked in a Halloween parade at Sunland in costume. Dressing her up is no problem because Lucys friends, Annabeth, 4, Avory and Ava, both 3, the daughters of Lauras best friends, play with her all the time. She gets super excited to see them. They call her Lucy gurl or Wucy. The little dog is always ready to hit the road. Anytime I say, Lucy, do you wanna go? and grab my keys, she runs to the garage door and stares at it until I open it. Then I open the car door and she jumps in, said Laura. She recognizes my parents (Patrick and Lynne Wahlquist) house in Bristol and will stand on her back feet and look out the window of the car once we get on their road. I try to take her with me everywhere pretty used to cars and boats. Shes a very good traveler! LaAURaA & LUCYNIKI BBARBERRBER PHOOTO O

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Page 12 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL NOVEMBER 2, 2011 Happy 13TH BBirthday B Blaine!!BLAINE THARPE NNOV. 3We are so proud of you and love you very much!Always, Momma, Jase, Blake and Jack Want to see whats new with Tupperware? Meet or call your local Tupperware Consultant for Parties, free hostess gifts. The more you sell, the greater the gifts.Call Beth Eubanks, your full time Tupperware Consultant at (850) 643-2498 or email at bethseubanks41@aol.com.Visit me online at www.my.tupperware.com/bethseubanks Calhoun Liberty Primary Care Clinic20370 NE Burns Ave., Blountstown Telephone (850) 237-3000 Calhoun Liberty Primary Care Clinic New patient applications can be picked up at the front desk of the Primary Care Clinic. NOW OOPEn N Call us at (850) 237-3000 for an appointment today. BirthdaysKLOEEB BAILEYKloee Bailey will celebrate her fourth birthday on Nov. 2. Kloee loves playing with her cousins Sadie and Bradley. Most of all, she loves her Mommy, Hailey, Gammy, Big Daddy, Uncle Scott and Aunt Bec Bec.JACkK StTRICkKLAnNDJack Strickland celebrated his fourth birthday on Oct. 24. He is the son of Jason and Dani Strickland of Bristol. His grandparents are Tom and Irene Davis of Conway, AZ, Randy Stutler of Jane Lew, WV, Charlotte Strutko of Bristol and Larry and Cora Strickland of Dellwood. Jack celebrated his birthday with friends and family with a party at the Train Depot in Blountstown. He enjoys playing outside, anything musical and imitating his big brothers.DDIXIE LLEAnnNN GILMORE birthday at the Altha Recreation Park with friends and family. Dixie is the daughter of Yancy and Selina Gilmore of Clarksville. Her grandparents are Daryl and Dolores Brogdon of Big Prairie, OH, Jane Gilmore and Larry Sapp of Sink Creek, and W.C. and Kathy Gilmore of Compass Lake. Dixie was surprised with a Littlest Pet Shop cake and her three best friends, Emily Dunway, Morgan Foster and Macy Oakford. J.CC. MMARtTInNJ.C. Martin will celebrate his fifth birthday on Nov. 7 with a Toy Story party with family and friends. He is the son of Amanda Phillips of Bristol and Casey and Maggie Martin of Clarksville. J.C. enjoys playing with his tractors, bogg trucks and his dog, Oliver. Nick and April Stone of Clarksville will celebrate their 15th wedding anniversary on Nov. 2. They were mar ried at Abe Springs Pentecostal Holiness Church. Stones celebrate 15 years of marriage Anniversary DDavis celebrate 34th wedding anniversaryDan and Lynne Davis of Kinard will celebrate their 34th anniversary on Nov. 5. Dan is employed by Gulf Power in Panama City and Lynne is a homemaker. They have two children, Angie Davis of Kinard and Bryan Davis of San Diego, CA.

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NOVEMBER 2, 2011 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 13 A terrifyingly good time! Quincy Police Chief Walter A. MMcNeil sworn in to head up International Asso. of Chiefs of Police The Florida Police Chiefs Association (FPCA) is proud to announce that one of Floridas Own, Quincy Police Chief Walter McNeil, was sworn in as the President of the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) on October 26, 2011. The Inter national Association of Chiefs of Police is the worlds over 100 different countries. IACPs leadership consists of the operating chief executives of international, What a great tribute this is to Chief McNeil and quality of policing in our State. experience and has held executive positions within the supervision. odically with both the President and Vice President safety issues.Southerland launches revamped website newly redesigned congressional website. Ive often closest to the people, and us do that better than ever. Our new website, which includes constituent services, detailed issue positions, provides several avenues share ideas about the issues people of North and Northwest Florida and I hope house.gov. COONGRERESSMMANSteve Southerland

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Page 14 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL NOVEMBER 2, 2011 HISTORY NOOTICEETAX IMMPACT OOF VV ALUEE ADJUSTMEMENT BOBOARRDLiberty Tax Year 2011CountyDR-529 R. 12/09 Rule 12D-16.002 Florida Administrative Code StT OutaUTAMiIRE InsuNSURancANCE IncNC.16783 SE Pear St., Blountstown ACCEPTING NNEW PPaA TIENTSLaban Bontrager, DMD12761 NW Pea Ridge Rd., Bristol, FL 32321www.bristoldentalclinic.com DEENTURERE LABB OON PREMREMISEESSame-Day Service on RR epairs & R R elines Bristol Dental ClinicMonica Bontrager, DMD CHATTAHOOCHEE The West Gadsden Historical Societys Annual Meeting will be held on Saturday, Nov. 12 at 3 p.m., (ET), at Chattahoochee Landing, 500 South River Landing Road, Chattahoochee. At that time, the Society will host a book signing by Dale Cox as he releases his newest book The Scott Massacre of 1817: A Seminole War Battle in Gadsden County, Florida. Southern writer and historian Dale Cox has announced the completion of this new book and that all proceeds from its sale will support WGHS in its efforts to preserve and interpret the history of Gadsden County. The book tells the story of a First Seminole War attack on a U.S. Army vessel on the Apalachicola River. Hundreds of Creek and Seminole warriors had assembled on the Gadsden County shores of the river bend just below Chattahoochee Landing. Infuriated over an attack by U.S. troops on the Lower Creek village of Fowltown in what is now Decatur Co., GA, the warriors ambushed a supply vessel commanded by Lt. Richard W. Scott as it was forced near the shoreline by the strong current of the river. One of the bloodiest days in the long series of wars between the U.S. and the Seminole Nation, the massacre resulted in the deaths of 44 of the 51 men, women, and children under Lt. Scotts command. Four other men were wounded and a single female survivor, 26-year-old Elizabeth Stewart, was taken prisoner. She was the wife of a soldier stationed at nearby Fort Scott on the Flint River about 10 miles upstream from Chattahoochee. Read the exciting story of Mrs. Stewarts survival and her safe return to her husband and father while they were serving with General Andrew Jackson. A dramatic victory for the Seminole and Creek alliance then battling against the southward expansion of the Georgia frontier, the battle shocked an American nation still celebrating its victory over the British in the War of 1812. As details of the massacre spread through the length and breadth of the U.S., Major General Andrew Jackson moved on the Creek and Seminole towns in Spanish Florida with an army of thousands of soldiers and volunteers. His invasion broke the power of the Seminole/Creek alliance and clearly demonstrated that Spain could not defend its American colony. Just four years after the attack on Scotts command, Florida became a permanent part of the United States. The new book tells the story of the 1817 battle in detail never before offered. Filled with new information and rich in source material, the volume presents the Scott Massacre of 1817 as a pivotal event in American history and November 30, 1817 as the day U.S. possession of Florida was guaranteed. Dale Cox, who is a lifetime member of WGHS and a wellregarded researcher and writer, is the author of ten other books, including The Early History of Gadsden County and The Battle of Natural Bridge, Florida For further information, please e-mail info@gadsdenhistory.org or call (850) 442-6434.Area writer Dale Cox to discuss new book about the Scott MMassacre at historical society meeting NO INTEREEREST PLANS I R.E. BrokerLAND SALE 10 ACRE + TRACTSPaved Highway Frontage With Planted Pine Trees From $4,995 per acreWith $600 DownR Regular ContractWith $2,500 Down No Interest First YearWith $5,000 Down No Interest First 2 Years Owner Financing No Qualifying Hwy. 20, Bristol ApalacheeTheRR estaurant

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NOVEMBER 2, 2011 / THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 15 CHIPOLA COLLEGE The Board of Commissioners of the Northwest Florida R Regional Housing Authority will hold aSpecial Meeting Nov. 15, 2011OONBeginning at 1 p.m. (ET) Open to the PublicHarvard medical professor and surgeon to speak Nov. 14MARIANNADr. John Mayer, Professor of Surgery at Harvard Medical School and a Senior Associate in the Department of Cardiovascular Surgery at Childrens Hospital in Boston, will discuss his research during two meetings at Chipola College on Monday, Nov. 14. Dr. Mayer will speak to Chipola students, faculty and the community at 11 a.m. in the Chipola Theatre. Pam Rentz and Chipolas Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society will host a reception in his honor at noon. At 6:30 p.m. on Nov. 14, Dr. Mayer will speak to physicians and medical personnel at a dinner in the Continuing Education Conference Center. Medical professionals may earn C.M.E. credit for attending the seminar. To register, contact Dr. James Clemmons in Chipley at (850) 638-0678 or Cindy Burns at Jackson Hospital at (850) 762-3645. Dr. Mayer grew up in Tampa. He received his BA from Yale University and his MD from Yale University Medical School. He completed post-graduate training in General Surgery and Cardiothoracic Surgery at the University of Minnesota. Dr. Mayer served for three years in the U.S. Air Force Medical Corps, and then began his career at Childrens Hospital, Boston and Harvard Medical School. He has published expediatric cardiac surgery and tissue engineering. The tissue engineering research has been carried out in the Cardiac Surgery Research Laboratory at Childrens Hospital, Boston. His group developed lar structures (pulmonary artery patch, have been implanted into animals. Dr. Mayer is author or co-author of 30 book chapters. He serves on the American Board of Thoracic Surgery, and is a past President for the Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Hearts of Promise is sponsoring Dr. Mayers visit to Chipola. The foundation was established in honor of nine year-old Holly Turner by her family after her second open-heart surgery performed by Dr. Mayer in 2003. Hollys aunt, Carol Saunders, is a speech and English professor at Chipola. Hollys cousin, Hillary Saunders, is responsible for Dr. Mayers visit to Chipola as part of her Phi Theta Kappa service project. She is also organizing a walk and pancake breakfast to be held in Chipley on Saturday, Nov. 5. The breakfast is 7-10 a.m. at First Baptist Church of Chipley. The walk will be held at Shivers Park (across from the church) from 8 to 9 a.m. Hillary has also raised funds through awareness presentations to church and civic groups, Beanie Baby sales for children having heart surgery at CHB, and Hearts of Promise cookbook sales. All funds raised will go to research being conducted by Dr. Mayer at Childrens Hospital Boston. The goal of this research is to grow valves and arteries from a patients own tissue, thus eliminating the need for multiple open-heart surgeries for thousands of children. Proceeds from these events will be presented to Dr. Mayer during his visit to Chipola. CHIPOLA IN 3-D Chipola College is now accepting students for the Chipola 3-D course set for JanuaryMARIANNAChipola College is now accepting students for the Simulation Modwhich begins in January, 2012. Application deadline for the program is Dec. 15. Applications must be submitted to Christen Bennett in A-115. Students in the program will develop the technical skills necessary to produce three-dimensional content to be used in business, industry, education, state and federal government as well as the military. Matt White, Chipolas Network Coordinator and Dylan Bass will teach the course. Software used in the program will include Photoshop, 3D Studio Max, Java Script, AutoCAD and Unity gaming software. ciency in computer applications in order to successfully complete the course. The course begins Jan. 9, 2012 and runs through May 1. Classes are scheduled for Monday, Tuesday and Thursday evenings from 5 to 10 p.m. Cost of the program is $1,500. Due to the length and the nature of the program, traditional Financial Aid is not available. students. The college reserves the right to cancel the program if minimum enrollment requirements are not met. For information, call (850) 718-2455, email bennettc@chipola.edu or visit www. chipola.edu/3d Dr. JohnM Mayer (850) 674-8801 "Fine Jewelry & Gifts"strigrirLAYAWAYThe Diamond Corner $10BRING THIS COUPON IN FORO F F1 Pair Jeans

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Page 16 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL NOVEMBER 2, 2011 BHS sSPORTsSby Michael DeVuyst, Journal sports writerEASTPOINT Any worry of a letdown after the huge district win last week was put to rest early against Franklin the home-standing Seahawks. Jawon Mosley scored three catch came from 14 yards out and the second reception from 15 yards out. Mosley also scored on a 5 yard run. Marquel Thomas found pay dirt from 7 yards and Javakiel Brigham lead. The second half started with a Mosley 83 yard kickoff return which put the ball on the Franklin Co. 15. The next play from scrimmage Mosley ripped a run up the middle for the 39 point lead. Franklin Co. managed to score in the 4th quarter with a short drive set up by a Tiger fumble. Franklin started their scoring drive on the Tiger 25 and two plays later found the end zone on an 11 yard catch by Ladarius Rhodes from TreSean Carr. The extra point attempt was botched but Brenden Warren got loose in the end zone and caught a pass from the holder for the two point conversion. With the score, Franklin Co. cut the lead to 39-8. fort, We set some goals for our team before this game and were pretty much able to accomplish those goals. Our offense moved the ball well and our defense was super again. The Tiger offense produced 341 yards of offense and limited Franklin Co. to 76 total yards. Javakiel Brigham led the Tigers in rushing with 66 yards on 4 carries. Marquel Thomas had 53 yards on 4 carries. Hathcox led the Tiger receivers with 54 yards on 2 catchyards. The Tiger defense was lead by Anthony Williams and Brigham with 8 tackles apiece. Brett Bozeman recorded an interception and caused a fumble. Blountstown evens their record to 4-4 on the season and 3-0 in district play. The Tigers travel to West Gadsden this onship. A Tiger loss and a Liberty Co. win will result in a three-way tie with Blountstown, Liberty Co. and West Gadsden. A tiebreaker game (if necessary) will be played on Monday, Nov. 7 at 7 p.m. local time at a site to be determined. Blountstown holds onto district lead with 47-8 win over Franklin County Blountstowns Ryan Hathcox (#45) tries to avoid the tackle from the Franklin player. ABOVE: A group of Tigers tackle a Seahawk. BELOW: Blountstowns Jawon Mosley (#10) ABOVE: Tigers Corin Peterson (#2), C.J. Heirs (#62) and Bobby Andrews (#1) take down the Franklin player in a great tackle. BELOW: Blountstowns Javakiel Brigham (#28) reaches out to block a Franklin County opponent. He led the Tigers in rushing with 66 yards on 4 carries.

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NOVEMBER 2, 2011 / THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 17 LCHS sSPORTsSby Richard Williams, Journal sports writerAt halftime of Liberty Countys 40-14 win over South Walton, Ben Beckwith played in the band, but in the fourth quarter the LCHS sophomore running back made the band play for him as he raced 91 yards night. Beckwiths second touchdown of the night gave him 106 yards on three carries. Liberty County opened the game on defense and forced South Walton to punt after they failed to gain sponded with a three play drive capped by a touchdown run up the middle by quarterback Alex Marlowe. Marlowe had two rushing touchdowns and one passing touchdown in the game. Brenton Bailey intercepted a Seahawk pass on the next defensive stand for LCHS, and the Bulldog offense converted the opportunity into a touchdown on a Harold Washington run. Bailey scored a touchdown on Libertys next possession as he hauled in a 48 yard pass from Marlowe to put Liberty up 21-0 after on defense with seven tackles and nine assists. With LCHS ahead 21-0 in the second quarter, and Liberty held a 27-0 lead at the half. In the second half the Bulldogs had touchdowns from Marlowe and Beckwith while the Seahawks scored two touchdowns of their own. Libertys defense held the Seahawks in check most of the night as Ethan Foran, ten tackles, and Michael the defensive effort. for their last district game of the year. A Bulldog win means they will play again either Monday night in a three-way tie-breaker (see accompanying story) or as the second seed in the district depending on the outcome of the Blountstown versus West Gadsden game played the same night. Grant Grantham, LCHS Head Coach, said the win was nice, but for Liberty the playoffs actually start this week. If we win we keep playing, Grantham said. It really is as simple as that, and we face a talented, quick team this week so we need to bring our best game to Liberty B Bulldogs win against South Walton 40-14 by Richard Williams, Journal sports writer the Department of Education might want to consider using them as a word problem on the next standardized test they develop. First the current district standings: that went 0-4 in the district. With Blountstown playing at West Gadsden and Liberty know which two teams will represent the district in the playoffs. their own fate, but even they could still fail to make the playoffs if they lose to West 0, defeated Franklin County 34-26, and lost to Liberty County 26-17. Rank School Overall Record District Record 1 Blountstown 4-4 3-0 2 Liberty 7-2 2-1 2 West Gadsden 3-5 2-1 5 Franklin County 3-6 0-4 Many possibilities await teams for playoffs after Fridays gamesFOOTBALL PLAYOFFS continued on page 20ABOVE: A Bulldog tackles the South Walton runner. RIGHT: The Bulldogs block for Alex Marlowe (#5) giving him time to throw the ball. BELOW: The South Walton players swarm in on Libertys Daniel Deason (#12). Libertys Brenton Bailey (#16) leads the way for Harold Bulldog Lando Brown (#23) puts his shoulder into this tackle of a South Walton player. Libertys Ben Beckwith (#10) takes off with the ball, followed by many South Walton players. He raced 91 yards down the sideline for LibDANIEEL WILLIAMMS PHOOTO OS

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Hosford School is proud to announce its honor roll for the A Honor Roll Kindergarten: 1st Grade: 2nd Grade: 3rd Grade: 4th Grade: 5th Grade: 6th Grade: 7th Grade: 8th Grade: A/B Honor Roll Kindergarten: 1st Grade: 2nd Grade: 3rd Grade: 4th Grade: 5th Grade: 6th Grade: 7th Grade: 8th Grade: Perfect Attendance Kindergarten: 1st Grade: 2nd Grade: 3rd Grade: 4th Grade: 5th Grade: 6th Grade: 7th Grade: 8th Grade: SEpPTEMbBErR Students of the MMonth OCTob OBErR Students of the MMonthPanther Pride Page 18 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL NOVEMBER 2, 2011 Hosfords Honor Roll Oh My! Hosford students and staff celebrated Halloween with a parade and songs. The morning started with a hilarious clown skit by faculty members. Pre-K through 4th grade classes each delightfully performed a song onstage and showcased their costumes. From Princesses, Fairy Tale characters, and rock stars to soldiers, gorillas, and ghouls the students had a fun time proudly showing off their costumes. The eighth grade class enjoyed the day at a local cemetery researching for a family history project. ing stories about their lives. A fun day was had by all!Witches, Ghosts, and Goblins... SCHOOL LLUNCH MENU Nov. 2-8, 2011 Bristol Dental Clinic Laban BBontrager, DMMD, M Monica BBontrager, DMMDPea Ridge Rd in Bristol, Phone (850) 643-5417MenuENUS SSPONSSORED BY: Bristol Dental Clinic LIBERTY WednesdayBREAKFASST: sausage. LUNCH: Chicken nuggets or pepperoni wrap, mashed potatoes and gravy, carrots and diced apricots. (2nd & 3rd grade pizza)ThursdayBREAKFASST: Grits and scrambled eggs. LUNCH: Beef and bean burrito or turkey chef salad, pinto beans, tossed romaine salad with light dressing and fresh apple.FridayBREAKFASST: Whole wheat pancakes. LUNCH: Turkey corndog or chicken caesar salad, mac and cheese, garden peas and fresh orange. (4th grade pizza)MMondayBREAKFASST: Cinnamon roll and ham. LUNCH: Nacho beef casserole or cobb salad, green beans and sliced cantaloupe. (kg & 1st grade pizza).TuesdayBREAKFASST: Cheese grits and scrambled eggs. LUNCH: Japanese chicken or turkey club on autumn grain, rice, broccoli and applesauce.*All breakfasts include a choice of assorted cereal with buttered toast whole wheat and juice CAl L HOUN WednesdayBREAKFASST: S Scrambled eggs with cheese grits. LUNCH: Meatball sub, baked potato wedges and diced pears.ThursdayBREAKFASST: Ham and cheese biscuit and potato tots.LUNCH: Beef taco pie, corn on the cob, diced pears.FridayBREAKFASST: Whole wheat pancakes with syrup and sausage patty.LUNCH: Cheese pizza, garden salad, fresh fruit and home baked cookie.MMondayBREAKFASST: S Sausage and egg biscuit and potato tots. LUNCH: Hot dog, mac and cheese, garden peas and TuesdayBREAKFASST: S Scrambled eggs with cheese grits. LUNCH: Beef vegetable soup, grilled cheese sandwich and fruit.*All breakfasts include a choice of assorted cereal with buttered toast and juice

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NOVEMBER 2, 2011 / THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 19 blountstown elementary schoolThis year Blountstown High School has partnered with Blountstown Elementary School in a program called Teen Trendsetters. Teen Trendsetters pairs high school juniors and seniors with third graders to help polish their reading skills. Research suggests that third grade is the optimal grade to help struggling readers. The students meet weekly throughout the school year where the mentor (the high school student) teaches a guided reading lesson to the mentee (third grader). Not only do the third graders look forward to having a high school student spend quality time with them, but the high school students look forward to having someone look up to them. A special bond is formed and learning occurs. Teen Trendsetters is a program that we hope continues for many years. blountstown high schoolGuidance News The next date for ACT testing is Dec. 10. The registration deadline is Nov. 4. Students can register online or pick up a packet from guidance. Senior News *Herff Jones will be taking orders on Nov. 3. If seniors did not receive a packet, they can see Mrs. Curl to get one. An $80 deposit is required. *Senior Portrait retakes will be done on Friday, Nov. 4. Seniors must sign up with Mrs. Baldwin by Thursday, Nov. 3. The B.E.S. third grade class presented the musical How Does Your Garden Grow? on Thursday, October 27 at 8:30 in the school cafeteria. The audience got to animals as the gardeners tried to keep the weeds from taking over the garden! Great performance by our 3rd graders!BES third grade presents musical Oct. 27BES third graders and Blountstown High Teen Trendsetters bond during reading sessions *Friday, November 4: Family Breakfast 7:00-7:45 *Thursday, November 10 4th Grade Veterans Day Program 8:30 am *November 7-11 Homecoming Week *November 21 25 Thanksgiving HolidaysDATES TTO REMEMBEr RBHS Calendar of Events Wednesday, Nov. 2-Cross Country District in Wewa @ 10:00 a.m. Thursday, Nov. 3-Herff Jones taking orders for Seniors Friday, Nov. 4-Deadline to register for Dec. 10th ACT testing; Senior Portrait re-takes; Football vs West Gadsden Away @ 6:30 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 5-Varsity Cheer leaders compete in the National Peanut Festival Cheer Competition ABOVE: Wayne Boozer tries to balance a slinky on his head as Lonnie Pitts looks on. BELOW: Fourth graders catch the Drug Free Wave and sport their beach attire with Teachers Maegan Davis and Miranda Rehberg. Last week students at Altha School pledged to be Drug Free during the annual Red Ribbon Week Celebration. Two clubs on campus, the Fellowship of Christian Athletes (FCA) and Students Working Against Tobacco (SWAT), teamed up to plan a variety of activities including dress up days, games, guest speakers, and a canned food drive. Thanks to club sponsors Melissa McGill, Mary Frank Brooks, Shirley Lee, and Kennesse Dew for their hard work in making this a memorable week for the students. AT ALTHa A SCHOOL

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Page 20 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL NOVEMBER 2, 2011 H 2 O Wellness Center/Day SpaTaking you on a Journey to Wellness18831 State RRoad 20 West 24 Hour Gym FOOTBALL PLAYOFFS continued from page 17ABOVE LEFT: Bulldog Alex Marlowe (#5) runs the Do You Have a Special Pet? and Call us at 643-3333If the Tigers lose to West Gadsden and Liberty County defeats Port St. Joe, the Tigers will be in a three-way West Gadsden. In this situation the Tigers will face a district tie-breaker in Bristol, November 7 at 7 p.m. Eastern. If the Tigers lose to West Gadsden and Liberty County loses to Port St. Joe then West Gadsden would be the number one seed in the district and Blountstown would be the number two seed. A win by Liberty County over Port St. Joe combined with a Tiger loss to West Gadsden would put LibBlountstown and West Gadsden. A win by Liberty County and a win by Blountstown will put Liberty in the playoffs as the second place team. A loss by Liberty combined with a win by Blountstown creates a three-way tie for second. In the case of a three-way tie for second, a tiebreaker would be held in Bristol to determine the second place team. A loss by Liberty and a win by West Gadsden would eliminate Liberty and Port St. Joe from the playoffs. place the game would be played in Bristol because Liberty County has the best overall record. West Gadsden and Blountstown would play in If the game was tied at the end of would play a 10-yard tiebreaker contest. Each team would get the ball at the ten-yard line and after each team has had a possession the team ahead would advance. If the score remained tied another ten-yard tiebreaker would be played. The winner of the West Gadsden versus Blountstown contest would then play Liberty County. If Liberty County wins that contest they would be the number one seed and the loser would be the number two seed. If Liberty County lost, the winner of the game would be the number one seed and Liberty would play the which team receives the number two seed. If there is a three-way tie for second place, Liberty County would still host and West Gadsden would play winner of that round would move on to play Liberty and the loser would be eliminated. The winner of the second round game would receive the number two seed in the district. Now get out your pencils and a clean piece of paper the test will beLEFT: Johnson the gap between the South Walton DANIEL WILLIAMS PHOTOS

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NOVEMBER 2, 2011 / THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 21 AlthaFALL FESTStudents, parents and the staff of Altha School held their Fall Festival celebration Friday night with plenty of food, games and fun. The annual event is used to help provide Christmas gifts for some of the areas needy children. PHOTOS COURTESY ALTHA SCHOOLThe Altha FFA and Softball team are once again selling Satsumas. See any FFA member or softball player to place your order. The deadline to order is November 4. They are $20 a box. If you would like to call your order in, please call 762-3121.Altha School will host To the Book Fair and Beyond! Reading is Out of this World November 7 11. Shopping hours will be 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. daily. Families, faculty, and the community are invited to attend this fun reading event that helps inspire children to become lifelong readers. The Book Fair will feature a special Family Event on Tuesday, November 8, from 3 to 6 p.m. This event will feature time to shop at the fair, book fair related activities, and refreshments. Parents, Grandparents as well as other relatives are invited to our Book Fair Breakfast on Friday, November 11, from 7 7:30 a.m. A light breakfast will be served and there will be time to shop at the Book Fair. The Book Fair offers specially priced books and educational products, including popular series, award-winning titles, new releases, and other great reads from more than 100 publishers. In addition, the Book Fair will feature the One for Books program, where students can share the thrill of reading by donating their loose change to help purchase books for classroom libraries. Scholastic matches monetary donations with a donation of up to one million books, which go to national nonin need, such as the Marine Toys for Tots Foundation, Kids in Distressed Situations, Inc., and Kids In Need Foundation. The more a child reads, the stronger reader he or she becomes. Strong reading skills are essential to a childs success in school and life. Our Book Fair encourages this success by offering students access to great books at affordable prices. Children are more likely to read books they personally choose. The wide variety of choices offered at our Book Fair ensures that there will be something for everyone! For more information, please call the Media Center at 762-3121.Altha School plans Scholastic BBook Fair Nov. 7-11FFA & Softball team selling satsumas; order by Nov. 4 November 3rd NAEP Testing; Trio trip 11th grade; Middle School Basketball at Tolar 3 p.m. November 4th 4th Grade Field Trip November 6th Daylight Savings time November 8th Middle School Basketball at Blountstown 3:30 p.m. November 9th Chipola Job Fair November 10th Cats Cuisine; Blood Drive; SWAT Meeting 2:45; Middle School Basketball vs. Hosford 3:30 p.m. November 11th Veterans Day Program at 8 a.m.ALTHA WIlLDCatAT EVE EVENTS CCALEENDDARR altha wildcats FCA attends Game Day The Altha Fellowship of Christian Athletes took the opportunity to join in the south eastern Game Day at Florida State University this past weekend. They met for a pre-game rally at the Bradfordville First Baptist Church of Tallahassee with more than ten other middle and high schools from across the South East. The pre-game rally consisted of an explosive worship service followed by a message from Anthony Beckham founder of the Power Unlimited weight lifting team. beautiful Florida sun before advancing to the FSU game against Maryland. A Florida State win over Maryland topped off the eventful day, and for many students, this A special thanks to the FCA sponsors Ms. McGill, Mrs. Brooks, Mrs. Lee, and all the parents that helped make Saturdays event a successful and enjoyable time for the students.

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Page 22 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL NOVEMBER 2, 2011 GARDENINGWhats brewing in the garden this Halloween?Lurking just around the corner is Halloween. While thoughts of candy and scary costumes may be on your mind, lets take a look at some be-witching horticulture curiosities.WITCH HHAZELWithin the vast plant world, the Hamamelidaceae is known as the witch-hazel family. The horticultural name means "together with fruit" year's leaf buds all appear on the branch simultaneously, a rarity among woody plants. Witch hazel's name upholds mysterious connotations. In colonial branches were a favorite "witching stick" of dowsers used for searching out hidden waters or precious metals. This has nothing to do with witches, but rather originates from the old English word for pliable branches "wych." In England dowsers call an elm (Ulmus glabra) the "witch hazel tree." When early British settlers arrived in the Americas, they fancied our witch hazel as the logical replacement for dowsing chores, given its pliable, crooked branches. There are several landscape ornamentals in this family including the Chinese witch hazel (Hamamelis mollis), witch hazel (Hamamelis virginiana) and the very popular Chinese fringe bush (Loropetalum chinensis).WITCHES BBROOMAt this time of year hearing someone mention a witchs broom may not seem that out of the ordinary, but have you ever heard it mentioned any other time of the year? Occasionally, plants will form unusual and alarming growths. When a growing from a single point that resembles a broom or a bird's nest we call it witches broom. In medieval times, mysterious and blamed on witchcraft. Brooms during this time were made of bundles of twigs. The term witches' broom comes bundle of twigs (besom). A number of stresses, both biological and environmental, can lead to the formation of brooms. They can be caused by a number of organisms including fungi, mites, insects, viruses, bacteria and mistletoes. Additionally, some brooms appear to be caused by genetic mutations in the buds of the branches. Unlike brooms caused by living organisms, there is usually just one broom per tree when the cause is a genetic mutation. Witches' brooms occur on many different woody plant species, including deciduous trees such as hackberry, maple, willow and conifers such as pine and spruce. Pinpointing the cause of a witches' the formation is related to an environmental factor. Analyzing the plant tissue for infectious agents such as phytoplasmas requires specialized testing that can be costly. cause branches to break more easily and can reduce tree vigor. Pruning out the affected twigs, if feasible, can help improve the tree's appearance.WELw WITCHIA (WELL-wWITCH-EE-A)Welwitschia mirabilis is a very unusual plant native to a strip of land about 50 miles wide and about 500 miles in length along the coast of the Namib Desert. Known to be one of the worlds oldest deserts, part of it is located in Namibia, Africa. On a recent trip there, I had the opportunity to see this rare plant and hear some of its history. Welwitchia is a plant of remarkably bizarre habits and survives in very harsh localities where the annual welwitchia's oldest living specimens are estimated at 1500 to 2000 years. It is comprised of only two leaves, a stem base and a taproot. From grow horizontally from the stem base for the lifespan of the plant, a most unusual, if not unique, characteristic. Weathering eventually causes the leaves to become frayed and split. The torn and twisted leaves of the adult plant give the impression that there are multiple leaves, hence the description 'octopus-like'. by Theresa Friday, Horticulture Extension Agent, Santa Rosa County Gardening Friends of the Big Bend will have its November meeting at the North Florida Research and Education Center near Quincy at 6:30 p.m., Tuesday, Nov. 8. Bring your favorite covered dish and enjoy some camaraderie with fellow plant folks at a potluck supper. A brief business meeting will follow. A report will be given on the fundraisers, the Plantaholic and Saturday Plant Sale, and on progress in the Gardens. The purpose of this group is to promote gardening and gardening research by supporting and assisting the faculty and staff of NFREC, an arm of the University of Florida's Institute for Food and Agricultural Sciences. For more information, contact Clara Skipper at (850) Gardening Friends to meet Nov. 8 in Quincy LLocated in BBristolLLAnND CCLEARIngNG-Private drives and roads -Food plots -Home sites -Small acreageCCall EEddie Nobles at (850) 643-5390 or (850) 447-0449 or Chas (850) 447-0849EEddie NoblesLAND ClLEARING, EEXCACA VA A TIIONN AND RootOOT RAKING FoOR: FLANDERSRVRV RE REPAIR AIR 18360 State RRd 20 West, BlountstownTT elephone (850) 674-2482IInsurance CClaims Welcome NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours or responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment.Cataracts?Freedom from Eye Glasses, Now a reality for many.LLee MMullis MM.DD. and Cataract SpecialistSmart Lenses SMDr. Mulliss Smart LensSM procedure can produce clear vision without eyeglasses.Close-up, Far away & In-between CALL TODAY for a Smart Lens Evaluation MMullis EEye IInstitute 4320 5th A A ve. MMarianna(2 Blks from Jackson Hospital)(850) 526-7775 or 1(800)769-3429 Listen to Steven Seay and Glenn Kimbrels play by play of the Blountstown High School Tigers vs. West Gadsden County High at West Gadsden Friday night on Nov. 4 on K102.7 at 6 p.m. (CT). The Florida Gators play Vanderbilt in the Swamp on Saturday, Nov. 5. Air time on K102.7 at 11 a.m. or immediately following the Liberty High School game.RADIORADIO FOOTBALLOOTBALL O ON WYBTBT A ANDD WPHHKListen to football on WYBT and WPHKK. This week.. Hear Michael Wahlquist and Jay Taylor with all the Liberty County High School game action. The Bulldogs take on Port St. Joe High School at Port St. Joe. Air time on K102.7 Saturday, Nov. 5 immediately following Swap Shop at 10 a.m. (ET). ITS VERY WiISE TO ADVERTiISEin the Calhoun-Liberty Journal and... CLJNews.cCOM

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NOVEMBER 2, 2011 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 23 OBITUARIES All existing pre-need and at need contracts are now handled by the Bevis family and staff.All operations of the funeral process will be handled on location at 12008 NW State Road 20.CALL 643-3636Todd Wahlquist, Rocky Bevis & Ed PeacockLicensed Funeral Directors & Crematoryevis FuneralHome Bof Bristolof Bristol Two locations to serve youBlountstown and Bristol Adams Funeral Home674-5449 or 643-5410Visit us online: www.adamsfh.com Telephone (850) 674-2266 Your hometown funeral home since 1994A Hometown Funeral Director You Can Trust and Depend On!Funeral Services with Dignity, Caring and Professionalism. MMarlon PeavyPeavy Funeral Home& CrematoryKAth THRyn YN FAntNTALTHA Kathryn Fant, 87, of Altha passed away Thursday, October 27, 2011 at her home. She was born on September 11, 1924 in Oklahoma and had lived in Calhoun County for most of her life. She was a homemaker and a member of Travelers Rest Freewill Baptist Church in Clarksville. She was preceded in death by her husband, Clarence Fant. Survivors include three sons, Eugene Fant and his wife, Frances of Altha, Billy Fant of California and Al Fant and his friend, Anita of Blountstown; two daughters, Dale Shaw and Judy Danley and her husband, David, all of Blountstown; one brother, Alfred Kennedy and his wife, Deloris of California; two sisters, Mary Luker of California and Alice Smith and her husband, George of New Mexico; A special friend and caregiver, Sandra Beck; along with 19 grandchildren, numerous great-grandchildren and great-great-grandchildren. Services were held Sunday, Oct. 30 at Travelers Rest Freewill Baptist Church in Clarksville with Dr. ing. Interment followed in the Travelers Rest Cemetery in Clarksville. Peavy Funeral Home in Blountstown was in charge of the arrangements.WALt TER PAyn YNEMARIANNA Walter Payne, 88, of Marianna went to be with the Lord on October 28, 2011. He passed peacefully at his home in Marianna after an extended illness. He was born in 1923 in Richmond Hill, NY. In 1951, he moved to Ft. Lauderdale, where he operated a gas station and then a Firestone Store. He moved to Marianna in 2005. He was a member of the First United Methodist Church of Marianna. He served in World War II in the Army Air Corps, enjoyed playing golf and being with his family. Survivors include his loving wife of 37 years, Fauleen K. Payne; three sons, Robert W. Payne and his wife, Suzanne of Marianna, James C. Payne and his wife, Marsha of Melbourne and Thomas A. Payne of Ft. Lauderdale; and their spouses, all of Marianna, Lillie and Haily Payne of Melbourne and Thomas A. Payne, Jr. and his wife, Joy of Tennessee; one great-granddaughter, Sarah J. Payne of Ft. Lauderdale; along with two stepsons, Carlie McJunkin and his wife, Sue of Westminster, SC, and Wayne McJunkin of Fair Play, SC. Peavy Funeral Home in Blountstown was in charge of the arrangements.JUAnNItT A H. BBRAnNDOnNTALLAHASSEE Juanita H. Brandon, 80, passed away in Tallahassee on October 28, 2011. She was born in Quincy on May 31, 1931 to John and Jessie Horton. She was married to Clarence N. Brandon from March 8, 1953, until his death in 2001. She was from a small family herself but her husband was one of nine children. She embraced Clarence's large, extended family where their annual Thanksgiving celebrations sometimes totaled as many as 75. She graduated from Florida State University and enjoyed a teaching career of almost 40 years that included Quincy and Shanks High Schools, Bristol Elementary School and Hosford School. Following her retirement from teaching, she actively participated in traveling with senior citizens groups and mission trips with her Bristol First Baptist Church family, where she devoted much of her time and energy. She was preceded in death by her mother, father, two brothers, husband and two infant children. Survivors include three children, Ricky Brandon and his wife, Deb of Sycamore, Clare Bilbo and her husband, Jimmy of Bristol, and Julie Necy Andergrandchildren, Melissa Brandon, Joey Bilbo and his wife, Lacy, Bruce Brandon, Mary Beth Cobb and her husband, Daven, Mandy Brandon and Jeff Dodson; and three great-granchildren, Jessie Harris, Reagan Bilbo, and Shelby Dodson. Services were held on Monday, Oct. 31 at Bristol First Baptist Church. Entombment followed at Hillcrest Cemetery in Quincy. Memorial donations may be made to Florida Baptist Children's Home, 8415 Buck Lake Road Tallahassee 32317-7151, phone (850) 878-1458, or Bristol First Baptist Church, 10677 NW Michaux Road, Bristol 32321, phone (850) 643-5400. Independent Funeral Home in Quincy was in charge of the arrangements.RROBERtT BBRUcCE M MAnNSpPEAkKERQUINCY Robert Bruce Manspeaker, 69, passed away Wednesday, October 26, 2011 at his home in Quincy surrounded by family and loved ones. He retired from the U.S. Navy after 20 years traveled all over the world. He was born and raised in a small town in Pennsylvania hills and lakes with his cousin Herbie Lear. He never met a stranger and everyone who ever met him would tell you he could spin a story a mile long. He had a story for everyone and loved a captive audience. He loved planting things, working with his hands and he always had multiple on-going projects. He was a man who knew something about everything and enjoyed sharing it with you. He was one of a kind and will be greatly missed. Survivors include his wife, Faye Manspeaker; three daughters, Marcy Kamalu of Hawaii, Valerie Smith and her husband, Tay of Havana and Suebrina Dalton and her husband, Jeffrey of Chattahoochee; one son, Robert H. Manspeaker and his wife, Rachel of Bristol; along with 13 grandchildren and three great-grandchildren. A memorial service will be held for family and friends on Wednesday, Nov. 2 at 2 p.m. at Thomas Memorial Baptist Church in Quincy. Charles McClellan Funeral Home in Quincy is in charge of the arrangements. VVERnNOnN LL. RREynYNOLDSBLOUNTSTOWN Vernon L. Reynolds, 91, of Blountstown passed away Monday, Oct. 31, 2011 in Blountstown. Born January 24, 1920 in Texas, he had lived in Blountstown since 2004, coming from Orangeville, CA. He was a retired state park ranger and was owner of his own dry cleaners in Sacramento, CA. He served in the United States Army during WWII. He was a member of the Masonic Lodge Concord Lodge # 117 in Sacramento, a 32nd degree Scottish Rite Mason and was a Shriner with Ben Ali Temple in Sacramento. He was a member of the First Presbyterian Church in Blountstown. Survivors include his wife, Eleanor Reynolds of Blountstown; two nephews, Larry Reynolds and Robert Reynolds; one niece, Nancy Reynolds, all of Sacramento, CA; two sister-in-laws, Jeanette Bailey of Blountstown and Ann Herndon of Tallahassee, several other nieces and nephews in Florida and California and a loving church family. Memorial services will be held Thursday, Nov. 3 at 11 a.m. (CT) at Peavy Funeral Home Chapel with Dr. cremation. Peavy Funeral Home in Blountstown is in charge of the arrangements. MariannaARIANNA Covenant Hospice wants to share an important message with the community this November during National Hospice and Palliative Care Month: Hospice and palliative care providers take the time to make sure patients understand their illness and what care options might be available. Patient wishes are a top priority and our caregivers make sure they get the quality, compassionate care they want and deserve. We work hard all year to make sure people know that support, comfort and respect are available at a time when hope seems out of reach, said Dale O. Knee, Covenant Hospice President & CEO. Yet during November, we ramp up our efforts to raise awareness of the high-quality care thats available during one of lifes most challenging times. Hospice care provides expert pain management, symptom control, psycho-social support and spiritual care to patients and families when a cure is not possible. All the necessary medicines and equipment needed to keep a patient comfortable can be brought right to the home, which is where most Americans would like to be if at all possible. Hospice makes this happen. Palliative care brings these same skilled services earlier in the course of an illness and can be provided along with other treatments a patient may want to pursue. Many people dont realize that hospices are the largest providers of palliative care services in the US. More than 1.5 million people with a life-limiting illness get help from the nations hospice and palliative care providers every single year. Its about quality of life. With the help of hospice and palliative care, patients and families can focus on whats most important, living as fully as possible in spite of illness. Knee said. For additional information on hospice and palliative care, please contact your local Covenant Hospice branch.Covenant Hospice raises awareness during Hospice & Palliative Care Month

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Kids collect goodies and have lots of fun at Saturdays TRUNK OR TREAT Page 24 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL NOVEMBER 2, 2011 Families enjoyed a safe, fun Halloween event Saturday when the Mormon Church in Bristol sponsored the annual Trunk or Treat. Folks of all ages arrived in costume and went from vehicle to vehicle to collect goodies for their treat bags. LEFT: Kayla Eikeland and her son, Zack, handed out candy. ABOVE: A shy trick-or-treater has a up with toys and candy. DANIEL WILLIAMS PHOTOS

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NOVEMBER 2, 2011 / THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 25 PhotoWalk images showcased at Blountstown gallery FridayPhotographers shared their unique vision of downtown Blountstown when an exhibit of their work produced during the recent Scott Kelby WorldWide PhotoWalk went on display at the Preble-Rish Gallery in Blountstown Friday evening. LEFT: Guests enjoyed an outdoor reception at the gallery as they listened to acoustic music by Erik Alford. RIGHT: Anna Jo Hall stands with her camera slung against her hip in front of a display of her photographs. BELOW: Lynn Atwood and Anna Layton look over a portfolio of photos taken by Chris Calohan, Calohan is a photography instructor at Bay High School. Both he and Atwood took part in the PhotoWalk. LEFT: A display of photos by Luanne Stone of Enterprise, AL, features many close-ups of things that often go unnoticed, including a rusting tractor plaque and the front of an old truck radio.PHOTOS BY BEN HALL, ANNA JO HALL and CHRIS CALOHAN.

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Page 26 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL NOVEMBER 2, 2011from 3-8 p.m. 10-26, 11-21998 Ford E Explorer, 5.0 engine, V-8, runs great, needs battery, $1,000. Call 482-5049. 10-26, 11-22004 Xterra Nissan, white, power locks and windows, running boards, clean, good tires, 110,000 miles, automatic, tinted windows, with racks, runs good, $6,650 OBO/make offer. Call 509-3271.10-5, 11-2 MOTORCYCLES, ATVs & Waver AVERUNNersERS2003 Honda ST 1300 Sport Touring bike, fully loaded, Stock or Two Brothers exhaust, heated grips, ABS brakes and a Corbin heated saddle. In excellent condi10-26, 11-2 HUNUNTINNG & FISHINNGBBrowning A-bolt 270 with dash mounts, $425. Call (706) 8161268. 10-26, 11-2, model 500AT, slide action, VR-30 barrel, ish stock, in excellent condition, $250. Remington model 522 Viper semi-auto, 22 cal LR, 20 barrel, black synthetic stock, 10 shot mag, cocking indicator, adj. rear sight, 4 5/8 lbs, $150. Call 4432422 in Bristol. 10-26, 11-2 TOOLS & EQUUIPMENNTCultivatorhas all the feet, $325 Call 526-1753. 11-2, 11-9 FREEPine straw, located in Bristol. Call 643-5401. 10-26, 11-2 LOST/FOUNUNDFound yellow lab, male, has been neutered, has a collar, found in Lake Mystic area. Call 6432516. 11-2, 11-9 Found Walker Hound, male, no collar, found in Turkey Creek area. Call 274-0124. 11-2, 11-9 FUURNNITUUREDouble bed with frame and box spring, $65; 42 round table with golden legs and two chairs, $65; two night stands, $15 for both; sofa chair, $20; two desks, $15 $25. Call 674-3264. 11-2, 11-9 Hutch computer desk, $150. Call 674-6022. 10-26, 11-2Chest of drawers, $15. Call 6743264. 10-26, 11-2 CARS1998 Honda Accord, two door, black, sunroof, automatic, 146,000 miles, runs good, $4,200. 2002 Honda Civic, silver, four door, standard transmission, 164,000 miles, $3,500. Call 557-7897 11-2, 11-9 1999 Saturn hatchback, four door, runs good, 44,000 miles, $2,000 OBO. Call 674-9161. 11-2, 11-9 1995 Toyota Camry, white, runs great, automatic, $1,500 OBO. Call 447-1137 or 674-1357. 11-2, 11-92001 Ford M Mustang, runs great, cold AC, Lambo doors, $1,500. Call (850) 372-3204. 10-26, 11-2 TRUUCKS2009 Chevy Silverado, 2500 HD, crew cab, 4x4, good as a work truck, $29,000. Call 447-1711. 11-2, 11-9 1987 Chevy Suburban, needs some work but does run, $1,000. Call 674-9161. 11-2, 11-9 2003 Chevy S10 ZRR2, 4 wheel drive, extended cab with third door, 4.3 liter motor, V6, $7,000. Call 447-4331. 11-2, 11-9 1993 Ford E Econoline van, good condition, has owners manual, good on gas, TV-VCR combo, $2,500 OBO. Call 762-9504 or (850) 557-2134 and leave message. 10-26, 11-21998 Ford F150 XLT Tritan, V-8, 4.6 liter, extended cab, 3-door, $2,800. Call (850) 557-3583.10-26, 11-21989 Chevy B Blazer, engine needs work, $800 OBO. Call 643-2977 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNALCLASSIFIEDSTo place your ad, call 643-3333 by noon Eastern Time on Saturday. Non-business ads run FREE for 2 weeks. ITEMS FOR SALECashmere coat, womens size, has real fur collar, $15; assorted stuffed animals, $3 each; Christmas yard decorations, two deer, one snowman, lots of lights and much more. Make offer. Call 6748376. 11-2, 11-9 Wig, average size, brown, $15; 1940s antique adding machine, make offer; cookbooks, 25 cents each. Call 379-3002. 11-2, 11-9 Jackets, mens, $5 each. Childs jeep, needs battery and paint, $30. Call 674-3264. 11-2, 11-9 Jet 10 Power electric chair, new battery, $800. Call 674-4454.10-26, 11-2Weslo treadmill, one year old, used very little, $200. Call 6744454. 10-26, 11-217 R Roping saddle, tooled leather, great condition, with stand, $225. Call (850) 625-0265. 10-26, 11-2Kodak M Medalist AF Carousel projector, 35mm slide, comes with two lenses, one Kodak Ektanar C 102mm f/2.8 projection lens, and one Kodak projection Ektagraphic IF 100 to 150mm A3.5 zoom lens, plus 3-140 Kodak Ektagraphic slide trays and 2-80 slide trays. Projector never used except to test. New in box with manuals, $90. Call 443-2422 in Bristol. 10-26, 11-2Acer Aspire O One D255EE Notebook, 10.1 LED screen with Win 7, ultra thin, about eight months old, carrying case and charger, $195. Call 443-2422 in Bristol.10-26, 11-2Grandfather clock, $40. Dishes with 22K gold trim, make offer; mens jacket, $5; small doll crib, $12. Call 674-3264. 10-26, 11-2BBaby changing table, $40. Call 209-2700. 10-26, 11-2SportRRider scooter, brand new, battery never been charged. Several TV cabinets, several vanity cabinets with sink. Good selection of clothes, men, women and childrens, shoes, ladies purses, electronic equipment, furniture and appliances. Everyone is invited to shop at the Calhoun-Liberty Ministry Center store. Located on Hwy. 20 E. in Blountstown, 6741818. UFN APPLIANNCESRRonco rotisserie, as seen on TV, comes with cookbook, like new, $50 OBO. Call 674-8376. 11-2, 11-9MMicrowave, large, $25; Toaster oven, $12. Call 674-3264. 10-26, 11-2Washing machine, $50. Call 447-2885. 10-26, 11-2 BD, 1 1/2 BA TownhousesBRISTOL FOR RENTBLOUNTSTOWN Phone 643-7740 For Rent in ALTHaA762-9555 or 762-8597Very NICE 2 & 3 bedroom trailers. 5 x 10 .....$27 10 x 10 ....$43 10 x 20 ....$70 10 x 25 ....$90M & W SELFSTORAGE RRENTALs SCall 573-5255, 762-9555, 762-8807 or 762-8597 7 days a week service UFN MMobile Home for R Rent in CalhounCall 674-88882 BD, 2 BA, located six miles north on Hwy. 69 N. NO PETS. Damage & Cleaning deposit, Water, sewer and grass cutting provided.UFN Home for Rent inHOSFORDCall 379-8287 or 509-4227for more information3 BD, 2 BA Located across from Hosford School$400 MONTH REREAL EESTATEE Will buy 10 to 1,000 acres, reasonably priced. Immediate closing.Call (850) 544-5441 or (850) 570-0222 WANTED: NO INTEREEREST PLANSI R.E. BrokerLAND SALE 10 ACRE + TRACTSPaved Highway Frontage With Planted Pine Trees From $4,995 per acreWith $600 DownR Regular ContractWith $2,500 Down No Interest First YearWith $5,000 Down No Interest First 2 Years Owner Financing No Qualifying 1 & 2 bedroom mobile homes in Blountstown and Bristol. $105 to $155 weekly. Deposit required. All utilities included. NO PETS. Singles or Couples preferred. Also RV for rent. 10% Sr. Disc. Call 674-7616FOR RENT AKC MMale YorkiesBorn on Aug. 8. Parents/ Grandparents on site. Raised in our home for companion dogs. No Breeders. Interview & Some Restrictions. $500 eachCall 850-643-2321 FOROR RERENT2 BD, 1 BA very clean $450 month Call (954) 643-8322 for more information. Country Home FOR Sale in BBristol $175,000Call 643-6207 Hard Drives, Power Supplies, Memory, Sound Cards, Laptop Adaptors and more. Call The Computer Man, J. Hatch at (850) 674-3546REPAIR PARTS for ComputersCATcCH UP ONLINE AT CLJNEWS.cC OM.Miss a recent news story?

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NOVEMBER 2, 2011 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 27 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNALCLASSIFIEDSTo place your ad, call 643-3333 by noon Eastern Time on Saturday. Non-business ads run FREE for 2 weeks. PETS/SUPPLIESMMini chihuahua, long haired, female, nine months old, $80; Pekingese, free to a good home; mini horse, Appaloosa and Palomino Chow puppiesen weeks old, mom and dad on Kittens, two male and one female, gray and white, litter box trained and eats dry food, approximately eight weeks old. Free to a good Dwarf bunnies, six males, $6 each; Gerbils, four, $3 each. Call Turkeys, RRottweiler, AKC registered feon shots and worming, approximately 40 lbs., Good with kids and 2058. Kittens: one tabby female, three orange males. Free to good Dwarf hamsters, six weeks old. MMoving: need homes for two dogs, one a Chocolate Lab/White and other animals, the other a with kids not with other animals, Two mini horses, one six-monthold male and one female, a year WANTEDEElectric stove, reasonably priced. VV ehicle, disabled person in need of a car or truck to make payments Field fence needed, Small house dog White E English B Bulldog puppy. We buy junk cars and trucks. We will pick them up. Call 643YARD SALES BBLOUntstNTST OwnWN Yard Sale decor items, clothing, shoes, Yard Sale noon. Located at 20830 SE table, $5; coffee table, free. Yard Sale 2 p.m., located in the Kids King6002.M Multi-family Yard Sale, Sat., 3058.M Multi-familyYard Sale, Sat., cated at Heads Up & Nails For M Multi-family Yard Sale, Sat., Road. Household items, furniture, decor, clothes, baby items Yard Sale men, women and girls, shoes, toys, household items, books BR BRISTOL OL Yard Salethe Liberty County Courthouse. Baby items, household items M Multi-family Yard Sale, Sat., ed at the corner lot next to Quick Pic. Phone 643-8383. CLLARRKSVVILLELLE Yard Sale north of Hwy 20. Household items, furniture, baby boy and adult clothes and more. Phone Two Family E Estate Sale, Fri. electric heaters, tools, household items, furniture, collectibles E Estate Sale M MARRIANNAM Moving Sale clothes, decorations, household items, kitchen items, tools, furniture, exercise equipment, camALL THAM Multi-family Yard Sale, Sat., Childrens clothes, toys, household items and baby furniture. Yard Sale beginning at 8 a.m., located on tors, Keyboards, Speakers and much more. Call The Computer Man, J. Hatch at (850) 674-3546Just in time for CHRISTMAS STARSCOPEFAMOUMOUS BBIRRTHDAYSARRIEES MMar 21/Apr 20 Aries, make memories this week because the person with whom you days. Romance is out of the cards. TAURUURUS Apr 21/MMay 21 Taurus, if you are on a health kick, then this is the time to start incorporating some exercise into your routine. If joining a gym is out, then simply walk with friends. GEMEMINI MMay 22/Jun 21 book not to get something done, Gemini. The fact remains that the much procrastination. CANCERER Jun 22/Jul 22 Cancer, momentary lapses in judgement could cause focused on the tasks at hand to LEO LEO Jul 23/Aug 23 Leo, friendship is the name of the game this week, and you will meet potential to be lifelong buddies. Introduce your existing friends, too.V VIRRGOO Aug 24/Sept 22 Sometimes the answer is right cant see it right away, Virgo. Look more closely at the possibilities and stop naysaying.L LIBRBRA Sept 23/OOct 23 Libra, you may be reconsidering a recent decision. It just may be too late to change things at SCORORPIOO OOct 24/Nov 22 less than satisfying. Not one to know of the injustice that was done and garner some supporters. SAGITTARRIUUS Nov 23/Dec 21 Happy times call for a celebration, Sagittarius. Host a party or a get-together with friends and family. Use the time to catch up on old times and relationships. CAPRRICORORN Dec 22/Jan 20 Capricorn, theres not much to do this week that you cant tackle at another time. This it is you desire. AQUUARRIUUS Jan 21/Feb 18 Take a few days to relax, Aquarius. It will clear your head and put you in a better place for making hard decisions that seem to crop up out of nowhere. PISCEES Feb 19/MMar 20 Its time to put that romance into the next gear, Pisces. You dont want to run the risk of Week of Nov. 6 ~ Nov. 12NOVEMBER 6 NOVEMBER 8 Lane in Altha, water included. NO PETS. Monthly rent$500 plus $300 depositDouble-wide FOR Rent I C C.Call 643-7770 (DAYS) or 674-3570 (NIGHTS) Really nice, $650 month(850) 962-9711Riverfront home for Rent in Telogia The CalhounL Liberty JOURnaNALServing two counties that make up one great community!HOUROURS: PHOONEE (850) 643-3333 or FAX

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Page 28 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL NOVEMBER 2, 2011 Ages 9-12First place Chick Magnet, Marcus Barbee, 10, Mark and Casite Barbee of Kinard and Paulette Smith of Panama City Second place Hunter in Tree Stand, Tripp McGill, 9, Claude and Lynn McGill of Wewahitchka Third place Facebook and Twitter, Chris Willis, 12, Tom and Catrina Willis of Blountstown and Corey Thrasher, 11, Alan and Michelle Thrasher of Altha (ABOVE) Ages 6-8First place Flo from Progressive Insurance, Jaden Parramore, 6, Kelyn and Danielle Parramore of Bristol Second place Rockem Sockem Robots, Dixson and Dylan Thrasher, 7, Alan and Michelle Thrasher of Altha Third place Humpty Dumpty, Christian Ward, 8, Chris and Tammy Ward of Wewahitchka (LEFT) Ages 0-2First place Future Fisherman, Trent McCardle, 7 months old, son of Brent McCardle and Ashley Simco of Clarksville. Second place Bowl of Spaghetti and Meatballs, Connor Johns, 10 months old, son of Summer Grice and Steven Johns of Wewahitchka. Third place Cruella de Vil and her pup, Keianna Powell, 14 weeks old, December Wilson of Blountstown and Jayce Morgan Reynolds, 9 weeks old, Terri Lynn Richards and Craig Lipford of Clarksville. Fourth place Dippin Dots, Jadelyn Underwood, 1, Julie and Josh Underwood of Blountstown. (BELOW) Ages 3-5First place Amelia Earhart, Katy Hill, 3, Jennifer and Brian Hill of Tallahassee Second place Robot, Jalynn Simms, 5, Tyson and Bridget OBryan of Kinard Third place Praying Mantis, Gracie Barbee, 4, Mark and Casite Barbee of Kinard ANGIEE DAV VIS PHOOTO OS

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NOVEMBER 2, 2011 / THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 29 AREA EVENTS Bristol Bigfoot terrorizes riders on annual Halloween train tripThe riders on this years Scream-Liner Express train at Veterans Memorial Park in Bristol got a shock when Bigfoot emerged from the woods to taunt them as they traveled through the park. TOP: Bigfoot gets frighteningly close to a group of nervous riders. ABOVE: A couple of helpful Zombies help Bigfoot freshen up his fur before he goes out to greet another group of passengers. LEFT: A youngster looks stunned after getting a glimpse of one of the scary creatures chasing the train. BELOW LEFT: A girl warns the other passengers that a Zombie is approaching. BELOW: Bigfoot lumbers toward a passing train car. DANIEL WILLIAMS PHOTOS Make plans now to come help us celebrate our 30th anniversary of the annual Homemakers Holiday Fair on Nov. 4 & 5 at the Santa Rosa County Auditorium in Milton from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. During the past 29 years, the show has gained a reputation as a great place decorations from local and regional crafters. A special highlight of the show has always been the wonderful homemade soup and sandwiches made by the talented members of the Association for Home and Community Educators (HCE) which sponsor the show. Admission is free. Lots of door prizes will be given away. For more information, call the University of Florida/IFAS-Santa Rosa County Extension, at (850) 623-3868, between the hours of 8 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. weekdays. Homemakers Holiday Fair set for MiltonBeekeeping tradeshow set for Washington Co.Santa RRosa Co. starts beekeeping Santa Rosa County Extension and the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Science (UF/IFAS) will present a series of classes called Beekeeping in the Panhandle. The classes cover a variety of beekeeping topics including types of honey bees, pollen collection and how to split hives. These classes will be offered by interactive video at the Santa Rosa County Lane in Jay and held from 6-8 p.m. on the scheduled dates. Eight sessions are as follows: Bees Beekeeping and Beekeeping Equip ment eases Pollination Ecology Hive Increasing Hive Numbers and Pollination Beekeeping Along with the registration form, a $50 fee per person and $25 for each additional person covers the cost of the class and materials. You can mail the registration to the Santa Rosa County Extension OfRegistration and payments are due by A Beekeeping Tradeshow is also being held at the Washington County Extension tration is at 9 a.m. the day of the event. This free tradeshow consists of hands-on demonstrations, exhibits and more.

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Page 30 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL NOVEMBER 2, 2011 CHIPOLA COLLEGE is accepting applications for THEAt TRE TECHnNICAL DIRECtT ORBachelors degree (BA/BFA) plus two years related work experience required; Masters degree (MA/ MFA) in Theatre Design and Technology or related preferred. DEGREE(S) MUST BE FROM A REGIONALLY ACCREDITED COLLEGE AND/OR UNIVERSITYA APPLICALICA TIOION DEAEADLILINEE:O OPEEN UNTILIL FILLEILLED tigations which may include, but are not limited to Contact Human Resources at pippenw@chipola.edu or at (850)718-2269 for application details.EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER Part-time Nursery Worker NeededSUNDAYs S & WEDNEs S DAYs S First Baptist Church Blountstown Monday-Friday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. 16693 SE Pear Street Blountstown, FL 32424NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE MManagement OOpportunityChartwells School Dining is currently looking for a County. This position will afford a successful candidate the The candidate will be responsible for successfully managing a single school operation ensuring quality well as accounting and tracking required by company and state guidelines. School dining experience would be a plus but is not required. If interested please send your resume to: Vernon.tanner@compass-usa.com by November 10, 2011. Senior Dental Care is currently accepting applications for an AAdministrative A Assistant experience with answering multiple communication skills. Experience with Medicaid claims is a plus. Must apply through the One Stop Center in Blountstown. Senior Dental Care is currently accepting applications for an MMarketing RRepresentative Must be a gifted communicator with a strong sales and marketing background. work experience in Marketing/Sales. Fax Resume to (850) 674-2951 CLJ JOBS PuUBLIC & LLEGAL NOtTICESNOOTICEICE OOF A APPLICALICA TIOION FOROR TA AX DEEEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that PACKY G. JOHNSON the holder of the followbe issued thereon. The cerissuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are CERTIFICATE NO. 17 lying in Section 26, Township 1 South, Range 6 West, Liberty County, Florida, said parcel of land being more particularly described by metes and bounds as folCOMMENCE at a 4 inch by 4 inch blank concrete monument (found) known as marking the Southwest Corner of Section 26, and run thence East 3896.31 feet; thence North 2173.35 feet to a State Road Department right of way concrete monument on the Northeasterly right of way boundary of County Road No. S-67-a, (100.00 foot right of way), thence South 52 Degrees 23 Minutes 54 Seconds West 50.00 feet to a centerline State 90 + 25.01 feet of said County Road, as per State Road Right of Way Map Section No. 565091964; thence continue South 52 Degrees 23 Minutes 54 Seconds West 50.00 feet to the Southwesterly right of way of said County Road, thence along said Southwesterly right of way bound37 Degrees 36 Minutes 06 Seconds West (bearing Base) along said Southwesterly right of way boundary, a distance of 865.74 feet to a 5/8 inch rebar with a cap (RLS#3031) for a Point of us of 2915.93 feet through a central angle of 15 Degrees 36 Minutes 30 Seconds, for an arc distance of 794.34 feet (The chord of said arc being North 29 Degrees 47 minutes 52 Seconds, West 791.89 feet) to a point on the Northerly right of way boundary of a 60.00 foot roadway; westerly right of way boundary run South 57 Degrees 48 Minutes 40 Seconds West, along said Northerly right of way, a distance of 603.56 feet for the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING, thence continue South 57 Degrees 48 Minutes 40 Seconds West, along said Northerly right of way boundary, a distance of 150.77 feet; thence North 32 Degrees 28 Minutes 44 Seconds West, 278.60 feet to a concrete monument (PSM#3031) thence North 70 Degrees 58 Minutes 42 Seconds East, 190.67 feet to a concrete monument (PSM#3031); thence South 24 Degrees 05 Minutes 10 Seconds East, 237.54 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. THE EASTERLY 30.00 feet being subject to an assess Easement. MANUFACTURERS AND TRADERS TRUST COMPANY Said property being in the County of Liberty, State of Florida. be redeemed according to law the property described sold to the highest bidder at the front door of the L Liberty CCounty CCourthouse at 11:00 A A.MM. E E.SS.T. on the 8th day of December, 2011. ROBERT HILL, CLERK OF COURT Kathleen E. Brown, Deputy Clerk11-2 T 11-23This report represents some events the FWC handled over the week of Oct. 21-27; however, it does not include all actions taken by the Division of Law Enforcement. Patrol, Protect, PreserveBA BA Y COCOUNTY SA SANTA A ROSAROSA COCOUNTY OOKALOOSAALOOSA COCOUNTY FWCC Division of LLaw EEnforcement Weekly RReport for OOct. 21-27

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NOVEMBER 2, 2011 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 31 CLJ NEWS .COM To place your ad call us at 643-3333 SERVICE DIRECTORY Whaley Heating & Air Conditioning (850) 674-4777FL LicIC. # CMC1249570 Accepting:R Is s s : (850) 643-6925 : (850) 643-2064 : grich0656@aol.com10536-B NW SR 20 Bristol, FL 32321 Located in the Apalachee RestaurantGary RRichards, EEA MBMBAEnrolled Agent Enrolled to Practice Before the IRS BBusiness & Accounting Solutions Inc. 4433 NW C.R. 274 Altha, Fl 32421 (850) 762-9402 Cell (850) 832-5055Dozer and Excavation work Over 20 years experienceClay ONealsLand Clearing, Inc. William's HomeImprovements "No Job Too Big or Small"Concrete work, landscape, pressure cleaning, renovations, seamless gutter, painting, vinyl, & screen enclosure Call 674-8092Licensed & Insured, contractor & rooferFOROR FREEREE EESTIMMATEES LIBERTY TTIRE COMPANY 10781 NW SR 20 Bristol, Fl 32321Call 643-2939 MV75332Hours: Monday thru Friday 7 5 & Saturday 7 12Come see us for all your tire needs or give us a call for roadside service, oil changes & tire rotation. We specialize in sales and repair of tires for:Commercial Trucks and Trailers, OTR Equipment, Farm Equipment, Passenger Car & Light Truck Tires Call Chris Nissley at 674-8081 or 643-8561 (Cell) STUMP GRINDINGReasonable Rates & FreeREE Estimates! That Darn PumpThere is never a convenient time to be without water.WELLsS psa s(850)643-HELP Thats 643-4357 or Home 643-3857For friendly service and never any overtime charges call, iesesreBBARLORLOWSWell Drilling Pump R Repair & Water ServicesWell drilling & Pump repair Deep or Shallow Wells________________________Serving Gulf, Franklin, BBay, Calhoun, Washington &L Liberty Counties________________________850-639-9355or850-814-7454 Hwy 71 South on J.P. Peacock Rd, Altha. Day or night,Check out our prices before buying from somewhere else. For Weddings, Birthdays and all Holidays, come in or call us. Margies Florist Phone David Morris at (850) 868-1295 or Dispatch at (850) 575-4414 Locally owned & OperatedNow serving the Hosford, Telogia, and Bristol areas. Clint Hatcher, OwnerElectrical Lic. # ER13014037 Building Lic. # RB29003511New Homes Garages Additions Electrical Remodeling Foundations Screenrooms Sunrooms VINYL SIDING RESIDENTAL & COMMERCIAL FREE EstimatesServing Calhoun, LLiberty & Jackson CountiesBBecome FWCs eyes and ears to protect wildlifeIf you are like most Florida anglers and boaters, you enjoy your time on the water. Its an opportunity to get close to nature and break the routine of work, school or retirement. The peaceful challenge of tryrial prey is made possible, in part, by the So when you see someone threatening those resources by damaging habitat, polluting the water, using illegal gear, taking more than the bag limit or keeping underoptions, but the newest, most real-time option is to silently send a text message to the Florida Fish and Wildlife ConserConscientious anglers and boaters can text Tip@MyThe text-messaging opnient for the public, said Col. Jim Brown, director Law Enforcement. We also hope it will make Wildlife catching poachers and other The Wildlife Alert Reward Program has helped the FWC be anonymously reported online The highly successful Wildlife Alert Reward Program has been around for more peoples informa tion results in an arrest, they may become eligible for a reward of up to $1,000. Many conclaim the reward because helping get a life by reporting unsafe boaters, including boating ward enough. But being able to do so crucial. Cell phones, and now texting, help get incrime is still ongoing. When text message, it is important to include as much information as possible, such as the location. Once a report is initiated, FWC dispatchers can respond gather additional details. tion immediately, dont forget to include reporters may remain anonymous; they do addresses, and they will not be required for a reward, either by text, email or calling 888-404-FWCC. Trained dispatchers The real beauty of the program is that ones who pay the reward money. When into the Wildlife Alert Reward Fund. So, turn them in. There are many other ways that concerned citizens can directly assist the FWC. 0511. For additional listings, and online contact forms for many of these reporting those who misuse our wildlife resources while intoxicated is one way we can all help. Through Wildlife Alert and these other programs, ordinary people become the eyes and ears of the FWC, keep costs keep outdoor enthusiasts safe. Katie Purcell contributed to this column. She is the FWCs public information coordinator for its Division of Law Enforcement. Florida Fish B Busters lletiby Bob Wattendorf Check us out in Print or online atCCLJNews .com

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Page 32 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL NOVEMBER 2, 2011 Crowds return for the annual KINARD HALLOWEEN CARNIVAL For many people, Kinard is the only place to be to celebrate Halloween and enjoy a true old-fashioned small town carnival. About 3,500 people attended Saturdays event and Kinard Fire Dept., which sponsors the carnival to raise funds TOP RIGHT: Lee Shelton stays close by as son Gunner enjoys a horseback ride. Twins Sara Grace and Savannah Highsmith join a friend to look at a tub full of bright colored rubber ducks. LEFT: Contestants take their turn in front of the judges as the costume contest judging begins. ANGIEE DAV VIS PHOOTO OS



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Birthdays, anniversaries...12 BHS Football...16 LCHS Football...17 Obituaries...23 Photo display at gallery...25 Sheriff's Log...2 Hwy. 71 collision near Altha...3 Community Calendar.....4 Commentary...6, 7 Speak Up.....8Diverse group meets to learn about meth and synthetic drugs50includes tax THE CALHOUN-LIBER TY J OURNAL Volume 31, Number 44 Wednesday, N ovember 2, 2011 CLJ News.com HALLOWEENCELEBRATING WWII pilot Terrell Yon to receivelongawaited French Combat MedalPAGE 9Montford, Coley hold legislation delegation meeting PAGE 9Halloween celebrations were in full swing this past weekend with the annual Kinard Halloween Carnival (Pages 28 & 32), B ristols T runk or T reat event (Page 24) and the Durham familys amazing Backyard Haunt tour (see Page 13). ABOVE: Jim Redmond takes his son, T ripp, around the parking lot to visit with everyone during Saturdays T runk or T reat at the Mormon Church. RIG H T : Chris Mills took third place in his age group in the costume David T aylor, a substance prevention specialist with Chemical Addiction Recovery Effort (CARE), talks to a group about the dangers posed by the use of methamphetamine and synthetic drugs. TERE S A E U BAN KS PHO T O by T eresa Eubanks, Journal EditorProbation officers, Healthy Start employees, staff from the Department of Juvenile Justice, case workers from the Department of Children and Families and local business owners were among nearly 60 people who gathered for a two-hour presentation on methamphetamine and synthetic drugs Friday morning at the library in Blountstown. Most have dealt with meth addicts or their family members in the course of their jobs. All have seen how the drug has gotten a foothold in the community, tearing apart families and sending many to jail. Friday was an opportunity to ask questions and get answers about the fast-growing epidemic that is changing the way social workers, health care professionals and their jobs. The first question on everyones mind is why would anyone knowingly ingest a substance created with drain cleaner, camp stove fuel and battery acid? David Taylor, a substance prevention specialist with Chemical Addiction Recovery Effort (CARE), had the answer. The availability of ready ingredients and the simple one pot cooking method thats come in use in the last three years lured crack cocaine users when they discovered meth gave them, A strong, longer lasting high, according to Taylor. never be repeated. Each time addicts use meth, they get less of a high. Eventually, they have to take the drug to feel normal, said Taylor. It changes the brain chemistry. Its a powerful central nervous stimulate that gets users so revved up they cant concentrate or focus, he said. Users become dangerously paranoid and may hallucinate. It would be easier to deal See METH & SYNTHETIC DRUGS continued on page 2

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Page 2 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL NOVEMBER 2, 2011 C A L H O U N C O U N T YOct. 24 Kimberly Melvin, grand theft, more than $300 less than $1,000, BPD. Brandon Harris, VOP, aggravated battery, aggravated battery with deadly weapon, CCSO. Oct. 25 Brandy Foster, VOP, CCSO. Richard Hogarth, VOP x2, CCSO. Lisa McClendon, grand theft, CCSO. Oct. 26 Lisa Fant, VOP, CCSO. Kenneth Ivey Walden, uttering forged instrument, larceny under $300, CCSO. Oct. 27 Marvin Lee Johnson, VOP, CCSO. Oct. 28 Randy Dale Kent, battery, damage to property, criminal mischief over $200 under $1000, aggravated assault with deadly weapon without intent, CCSO. Steven Waldron, DUI, CCSO.L I B E R T Y C O U N T YOct. 24 Kimberly Melvin, hold for CCSO, CCSO. Oct. 25 Lisa McClendon, hold for CCSO, CCSO. Brandy Foster, hold for CCSO, CCSO. Edmond Ellis, DUI, driving while license suspended or revoked, LCSO. Oct. 26 Lisa Fant, hold for CCSO, CCSO. Oct. 28 Danzavieran Thurman, hold for court, LCSO. Deivon Moore, hold for court, LCSO. Oct. 30 Randy A. Varnum, DUI, alcohol or drugs, LCSO. SH ER IFFS L OG Blountstown Police Dept.Oct. 22 through Oct. 30, 2011 Citations issued: Accidents...............03 .................16 Special details Business alarms.....03 Residential alarms..........00 Complaints..............................................................49 Nov. 19 at 9 a.m. 20960 NE Burlington Rd., HosfordFARM EQUIPM E NT AND ANTIQU E AUCTION Tractors, Mowers, Cultivators and All Types Farm Equipment10% Buyers Premium All Consignments Welcome Meth and synthetic drugs continued from the front pagewith if the drug only affected those who make and use it. Someone who mixes a batch of meth in a plastic bottle is putting everyone in the home in harms way, he explained. Once these chemicals get in the house, theres no way to get it out. The chemicals permeate the structure, Taylor said. What is it doing to children living in the home where a parent is cooking meth? We do not know the impact these chemicals and all this exposure has on children, said Peggy Howland of The Calhoun County Childrens Coalition. Its very toxic. When teams come to clean up after a meth lab is found, they wear hazardous material suits. She said were raising a new generation of children who may be affected by their parents meth use in ways that have yet to be discovered. The schools will see the impact in a short time, she predicts. The reason were focusing on so many different people here today is because they have to deal with families with these problems, especially the women and men who go out to the homes, said Howland. She said it was important that they recognize the signs of meth use when they make home site visits. They need to be looking at whats in a burn pile, whats in the garbage and what smells to be aware of. Howland continued, explaining, If nothing else, todays program showed a need. Most of these people deal directly with those who are substance abusers. She emphasized that it was critical that they have an awareness of what meth use, as well as the growing use of synthetic drugs like Mojo and bath salts, can lead to, particularly when children share a home with meth users. Im really impressed with the turnout, she said of Fridays event. Were considering doing an actual summit with a half-day to full day of workshops in the future. She added they would like to open the workshop up to the public so more people can learn to identify and help those struggling with addiction and exposing their children to unknown harm. David Taylor makes a point during Fridays session at the library in Blountstown. Those in attendance had plenty of questions at the end of the two-hour program. TERESA EUBANKS PHOTOS TALLAHASSEE On Tuesday, Florida Education Commissioner Gerard Robinson announced Flor idas results on the 2011 National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) Reading and Mathematics assessments. The results show that fourth graders in the Sunshine State continue to outpace the nation in reading, with an average scale score of 225 compared to 220 nationwide. Results for Floridas Hispanic students also show higher average scale scores than their counterparts across the country, in both reading and mathematics in fourth and eighth grades, while the over all results for grades 4 and 8 show recent 2009 results. I want to commend our students, teachers, and school districts for their tremendous efforts as these results help us further adapt classroom instruction to accommodate the needs of our students, said Education Commissioner Gerard Robinson. We remain committed to the work that lies ahead to ensure students are fully prepared for their educational journey and for the demanding economy that awaits them. In fourth grade mathematics, Hispanic students, students with disabilities and students eligible for free or reduced price lunch scored higher than the national average, and overall fourth graders matched the national average score of 240. In addition, Hispanic eighth graders scored higher than their national counterparts with a score of 274. Since 1998, Florida has seen steady progress on NAEP and the Department of Education continues to work closely with schools across the state to infuse effective reading instruction focused on prevention and intervention, including phoneognition and text processing, construction of meaning, vocabulary, spelling and writing. READING Since 2003, every state in the nation has participated in NAEP, also referred to as the Nations Report Card. The 2011 NAEP results show that since 2003, Floridas fourth and eighth grade students have increased their overall reading spectively, compared to a four-point gain by the nations fourth graders and a three-point gain for eighth graders. MATHEMATICS The 2011 NAEP results show that since 2003, Floridas fourth and eighth grade students have increased their overall mathematics scores by six and seven points respectively, matching their national counterparts. A congressionally-mandated project overseen by the National Center for Education Statistics to continuously monitor the achievement of the nations children and youth, NAEP has measured and reported on the knowledge and abilities of Americas fourth, eighth and 12th grade students, providing data about students performance in a variety of subject areas at national, regional and state levels.Florida fourth graders outshine national counterparts in reading

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NOVEMBER 2, 2011 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 3 Calhoun-Liberty Employees Credit Union Skip-A-Pay Skip A Loan Payment Coupon Card Need A Little Extra Cash for Christmas? Call (850) 643-3000 or email: singletarychiro@fairpoint.net Donna L. Singletary, DC NOW OPE N FOR BUSI N ESSnext door to Buy Rite Drugs HOURS Mon, Wed, Fri, 9 A.M.-2 P.M. & 3:30-7 P.M. & Tues, Thurs, BY APPOINTMENT ONLYNow accepting insurance from: BLOUNTSTOWN DRUGSMark your calendars for...Saturday, Nov. 19 from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. (CT) PACKAGES START AT $995 Altha was an unusual

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Page 4 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL NOVEMBER 2, 2011Thats how many copies of The Calhoun-Liberty Journal were distributed last week, ensuring plenty of coverage for your community announcements and great response for our business advertisers! 5,368 The Calhoun-Liberty Journal is published each Wednesday by the Liberty Journal Inc., Summers Road, P.O. Box 536, Bristol, FL 32321. Annual subscriptions are $18. Periodicals postage paid at Bristol, FLPOSTMASTER: Send address corrections to: P.O. Box 536, Bristol, FL 32321. (USPS 012367) Summers Road Located at 11493 NW Summers Road in Bristol MAILING ADDRESS: P.O. Box 536, Bristol, FL 32321 TELEPHONE (850) 643-3333 Fax (850) 643-3334 EMAIL: thejournal@fairpoint.net ADS: cljads@fairpoint.net JOURNAL STAFFJohnny Eubanks...................Publisher Teresa Eubanks........................ Editor Sandra Brown...................Bookkeeper Debbie Duggar...................Advertising Angie Davis.........Production AssistantOFFICE HOURS: 9 a.m. 6 p.m. M-F, Saturdays from 9 a.m. until 1 p.m.THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Adult Dance, 8-12 p.m. at the Legion Hall in Blountstown Wednesday, November 2 Monday, November 7 Tuesday, November 8 Sunday, November 6 Saturday, November 5 Thursday November 3 Friday, November 4TODAYS MEETINGS 7 p.m., Altha Volunteer Fire Department AA, 6 p.m., Altha Community Center 2 p.m., Ag. Bldg., Conference Room, across from Courthouse6 p.m., Fire House 7 p.m., Apalachee Restaurant 7 p.m. (CT), Dixie Lodge in Btown 6 p.m., St. Paul AME Church in BlountstownTODAYS MEETINGS7 p.m., Veterans Memorial Park Civic Center 5 p.m., Designated locationsTODAYS MEETINGS, noon, Calhoun-Liberty Hospital 7 p.m., Calhoun County Old Ag Bldg. east door, in front of jail 6:30 p.m., Mormon Church, BristolTODAYS MEETINGSAA, 7 p.m., basement of Calhoun County Courthouse10 a.m., Liberty Co. 6 p.m., Altha Town Hall 7 p.m., Fire House6 p.m., St. Paul AME Church in Blountstown 6 p.m., W.T. Neal Civic Center 2 p.m., Legion Hall in Blountstown NATIO N AL Men Make Dinner DAY LCHS Dawgs vs. Port St. Joe Away at 7:30 p.m. (ET) B-town Tigers vs. West Gadsden Away at 6:30 p.m. (CT) Attend the Church of your choice this Sunday BIRTHDAYS Rachael Orama, Marcus Sherrod & David Ranson HOSFORD 8T H GRADE Mullet Dinner Fundraiser 5 8 p.m. at Whitney's Seafood Restaurant in Hosford ($7 per plate)ANNIVERSARIES Dan & Lynne Davis3 p.m. at fire houseMossy Pond VFD The Apalachee Regional Planning Council announces a public meeting to which all persons are invited. The Liberty County Transportation Disadvantaged Coordinating Board will meet on Tuesday, Nov. 8 at 2 p.m. (ET) at Veterans Memorial Park Civic Center located at 10405 NW Theo Jacobs Way in Bristol. In addition to its regular business, the agenda includes the adoption of the annual evaluation of the CTC, grievance procedures, board bylaws and the Annual Operating Report. The public is invited to the annual public hearing that will follow this meeting. If any person decides to appeal any decision made by the Board with respect to any matter considered at this meeting, he/she will need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceeding is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence from which the appeal is to be issued.Apalachee Regional Calhoun County 4-H is selling tickets for a chance to win a hand crafted cypress porch swing. Tickets cost just $1 each and can be bought from the Calhoun County Extension Tickets will also be on sale at the BHS homecoming game, and the winner will be drawn and announced between the third and fourth quarters. All money raised from this fundraiser will be used in 4-H gardening programs which are available to all youth between the ages of 5 and 18 years. For more information on this fundraiser or on 4-H in general please contact Whitney Cherry at (850) 674-8323 or cherryw@ Calhoun 4-H selling tickets for chance to win porch swing to raise funds for the Panhandle Pioneer Settlement Club House porch on Saturday, Nov. 5 from 6 to 9 a.m. (CT). A special breakfast will be served in the Club House which consists of all-you-caneat pancakes, sausage, and your choice coffee, milk, or juice. The donation cost is $5 a plate.Pancake breakfast NEWS FROM THE PEWSREVIV ALTelogia Baptist Church will be in revival on Nov. 6 9. Rev. Morris Anderson will be preaching Sunday, Nov. 6 at 11 a.m. and again at 7 p.m. The Monday through Wednesday night services will start at 7:30 p.m. Each service will have a theme. The themes are listed below: starting at 6:30 p.m. and there will be door prizes at every service. Page Pond Assembly of God Church will have a pastor appreciation service on Nov. 6 for School begins at 9:45 a.m. and the Pastor Appreciation service will begin at 11 a.m. The members of the church would like to invite friends and family in the community to join them in showing appreciation for all Church. The church is located on Murdock Drive just off Hwy. 73 and C.R. 274 at Sheltons Corner.Are you alone? Hungry? Have no Thanksgiving dinner plans? Come enjoy a traditional Thanksgiving Dinner at our Pre-Thanksgiving Feast on Wednesday, Nov. 23 from 5 to 7 p.m. at Veterans Memorial Civic Center in Bristol. You may eat in or take out and walk-ins are welcome! To sign up for a meal or for meal delivery please send an email to good2give10@gmail. com or have someone else send the email for you. The dinner is provided by local churches in participation with the Calhoun Liberty Ministry Center.The annual St. John the Baptist Episcopal Church Bazaar will be held on Nov. 12 from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. (CT) in Wewahitchka. This event goes beyond the average bazaar. Items for sale include handmade crafts, freshly baked goodies, homemade chili and chili dogs, and a huge yard sale. tertain the crowd while Waynebow the Clown and Smokey Bear provide enjoyment for kids of all ages. ment demonstration and informational booths will be on display. Pony rides will be available. Children will have the opportunity to actually paint a live white pony. Youngsters will feed the hungry church. Bring a lawn chair and enjoy the fellowship surrounded by the beauty of thick woods lush with fall leaves.Y ARD SALE FUNDRASIERThe Sunny Hills Womens Ministry will have a yard sale fundraiser on Saturday, Nov. 5 beginning at 7 a.m. It will be held at Goodmans Mini Plaza on Hwy. 69, past Pine Island. For more information, please call 7628184.

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NOVEMBER 2, 2011 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 5 EVENTS LOGGERS! Dont get stopped in your tracks. Call us! Premium namebrand tires CLJ N ews .COM ITS VERY WISE TO ADVERTISE in the Journal and . Email: thejournal@fairpoint.net BLOUNTSTOWN The Blountstown Public Library announces the next ARTS Series Event, From Ethnic Flutes to Indian Roots, set for Saturday, Nov. 19 from 6:30 until 8:30 p.m. in the Heritage Room. The program is sure to be inter esting and entertaining. Paul McAuliffe is returning for another show by popular demand! His beauti ful original music, played on the many again carry us on a fantastic journey. He will introduce new music from his most recent CD called "Young Cat Dreams: Quiet Time For Kids of All Ages." His soothing stress-relieving lullabies are created from the heart, sending out peace ful feelings to each and everyone. Paul is also a great storyteller and plans on narrating one or two of his own. Jeffrey Watt is a visual artist that en joys wood burning, airbrush work, and several other mediums of painting. He is Cherokee Indian and loves to depict the Native American culture and his roots. A demonstration will be done with acrylic paints as he shares his techniques and inspirations. Jeffrey speaks American sign language and would like to invite the disabled to attend this event. Cheryl, his wife, will be translating for him dur ing the evening. This get together will be a familyfriendly presentation and, as always, is free and open to the public. Light re freshments will be served. Please join us! Nature paintings by local artist on display at library BLOUNTSTOWN The Blountstown Public Library is excited to share with the commu nity "Nature As I See It", a display of acrylic paint ings by Kelly Wyrick. The exhibit is located near the front desk and in the Adult Reading Room of the library. Kelly was inspired years ago by her only art teacher, Johnnie Shoemake. She enjoys "outlet"! The works express her love of nature and they present a tender softness that comes truly from the heart. Library hosts to Indian roots BRISTOL The Veterans Memorial Railroad will be having a fundraising sale Saturday, Nov. 5 starting at 8 a.m. next door to the Talquin Electric Building on SR 20 in Bristol, rain or shine. There will be lots of great stuff: furniture, china, glassware, toys, Christmas decorations and books. The only thing we dont have is clothes. For information, call Babs Moran at 643-5491. Rummage sale to MARIANNA Realizing that the time for those who have suffered the loss of a loved one, the Covenant Hos pice Bereavement Department will be providing a free workshop to help. The workshop will be held from 9:00 a.m. to noon Thursday, Nov. 10 at the Marianna at 4215 Kelson Avenue, Suite E. The workshop will include many tips on how to cope during the holidays, normal grief reactions, coping strate gies for the holidays, ways to remember a loved one and supporting children through the holidays. This free workshop is open to the public and light refresh ments will be served. Those who attend will also receive free material and literature on coping during the holidays. If you are interested in at tending this very special workshop, call January McKeithan or Riley Henderson at 482-8520 to make a reservation. The Chipola Regional Workforce Development Board Region 3 Career Fair will be held Wednesday, Nov. 9 at the Eastside Baptist Church, located on Hwy. 90 East in Marianna. Students from Calhoun, Holmes, Jackson, Liberty and Washington counties will be attending. During the Career Fair the students will be able to obtain information that will assist them in making career choices. Local employers and business own ers are encouraged to take advantage of this opportunity to share informa tion about their businesses with the workforce of tomorrow. The students will be in attendance from 8 a.m. until 12:30 p.m. (CT). If you would like further information or your business is interested in partici pating, please contact Terry Jumper at (850) 482-1338, extension 221. Job Fair to be held next week

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Page 6 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL NOVEMBER 2, 2011Smaller, less intrusive government? Really?To steal a line from the latenight comedians, Republicans believe in smaller, less intrusive government. Really? Of course, the Republicans are joking or talking out of both sides of their mouth at the same time. Republicans love government, particularly the parts of government they use to foist their social conservative views and beliefs on others in American society. Tea Party Republicans took control of the House in 2010. They didnt go to Washington to govern, they went to Washington with the intent In the sham debt crisis, Tea Party acolytes almost shut down the government, a lesson learned from the right-wing, self-professed intellectual guru, Newt Gingrich. We all know how Newts government shutdown worked out. The Republicans came to power on the promise to do something about the unemployment rate. Soon as the election dust settled, and they found abortion campaign was underway in Washington and most states. Republican state legislatures and the House of Representative in Washington have conjured up more than 600 anti-abortion bills. This anti-abortion frenzy wasnt started by women, but by old men in baggy suits nursing swollen prostates who have found the perfect pander to the Republican right-wing. They want to be re-elected so the perfect horse to ride is that nag named anti-abortion. The most egregious, the most draconian antiabortion effort is the Personhood Amendment initiative in Mississippi, which will come up for a vote on November 8. For the ballot, it is Initiative 26, and if passed by the people of Mississippi, the stitution will be changed to a human being from the moment of fertilization. tion of when life begins is when a fertilized egg attaches itself to the wall of the womans uterus. Eggs are fertilized in labs, frozen and some discarded. Is this willing destruction of an embryo murder? What if a woman miscarries? Is she guilty of murder? Did the attending physician aid and abet a crime? If this terrible amendment should pass, the CORNERJerry Cox is a retired military OXS courts will decide these issues, but the worst aspect of this proposed amendment is no exception for abor tions in the case of rape or incest. My view is that rape is probably one of the most traumatic events that could happen to a woman. But then to force a woman to carry the child el and inhumane punishment. Then what happens to the child? Oh, yes, I know. Some loving couple will adopt the child. Right! While waging anti-abortion wars, the Republicans in state legislatures went after their state workers, teachers and other public servants. That was especially true in Florida where Governor Scott and the Republican legislature demonized public workers. In Wisconsin, union busting was the game of the day. Republicans demonize Unions because they tend to vote the Democrat ticket. Without unions and the right to collective bargaining, the American worker would be working for peanuts. While Ohio and Michigan have jumped on the anti-union bandwagon, Republican dominated state legislatures have found the silver bullet for winning electionssuppress voters and voting rights, particularly in cities and areas where it affects Democrats the most. In many states, laws have been passed that require voters to show government-issued photo Sounds easy to get the ID, but not if you are elderly, a minority and poor. University School of Law states that the new laws eligible voters to cast ballots in 2012. fort to suppress the vote? A dramatic one relative alleges that states, which includes suppressing the 270 required to win the presidency. In their commitment to defeat President Obama in 2012, the Republicans have found a horse to ride with their effort to keep Democrats from voting in the presidential election. But, Republicans dont believe in large, intruCOMMENTARY Late Night LaughsA RECAP OF RECENT OBSER V ATIONS BY LATE NIGHT TV HOSTS.The planets seven-billionth person was born. Of the 7 billion people in the world, no one is surprised that Kim Kardashian is getting divorced. CRAIG FERGUSONBritish scientists say they have developed a dont you come up with a food people will actually eat? Like a super glazed doughnut. JAY LENOA bank in Washington was robbed by two men in George W. Bush masks. Luckily, right afterwards two guys in President Obama masks came CONAN OBRIENA team of British lawyers has now concluded that the Declaration of Independence was illegal, and the American colonies had no right to secede from England. Well, you thought our court system was backed up. JAY LENOA company in Illinois is selling a collectible baby doll of President Obama. Its really cute. The doll can even say a few words, as long as it has a teleprompter. And just so Republicans dont com JIMMY F ALLONThe United States has been using Twitter to will surrender if they read enough tweets from Kanye West. CONAN OBRIENMichele Bachmann told reporters that she will lead the nation in prayer if she is elected president. You know if she is elected president, we all better be praying. She doesnt have to lead us. JAY LENOMichele Bachmann said she wants her three daughters to learn to shoot a gun. Mostly so they can put her campaign out of its misery. CONAN OBRIEN Yankees cap. Did you see that? If hed had a Boston Red Sox hat on he probably would have missed. DA VID LETTERMANRick Perry unveiled his new tax plan. He says JAY LENOThats right, Kim Kardashian is ending her marriage. Details of the proceedings will remain private, until E! airs its three-hour divorce special. JIMMY F ALLONNew Jersey Gov. Chris Christie is going to Israel. Hes going to be pretty disappointed when hear that, Michelle Obama? You can take your celery sticks and throw them in the deep fryer. JIMMY KIMMEL shot him. Or as they call it in the Middle East, an orderly transfer of power. DA VID LETTERMANThe New York Times reports that Moammar sophomore in college. Thats what I did. CONAN OBRIEN

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NOVEMBER 2, 2011 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 7 Postal system: The bond of the scattered family COMMENTARYNow that Andy Rooney has retired from his perch as CBS News' "curmudgeonat-large," I may volunteer for that role. Currently hospitalized, that 92-year old veteran managed to tickle viewers of "Sixty Minutes" for more than 30 years. I sure hope he rallies. Even though I rarely agreed with him, his long tenure alone invites respect. And it's a tribute to our free republic that you can make a career of getting in peoples' faces. Socrates, this doesn't happen in tyrannies. I'd like to audition for the role of curmudgeon with a gripe of my own. Too many of my friends are forever Every time the cost of a First Class stamp goes up, howls of protest go up higher. Question: Is there any other country where you can put so much information in an envelope for so little? Think of what the postal system has meant to American freedom. Go all the way back to Ben Franklin. He was a Royal Postmaster before we gained our independence. He used the mail to So, masterfully, did Samuel Adams, inventor of the Committees of Correspondence. More recently, in the 1970s, the mass media was monochromatically liberal. Without Rush, without the Internet, how could conser vatives compete? How could we even survive? The U.S. Mail, that's how. National Review and Human Events and countless direct mail appeals from conservative organizations used the freedom burning. I am forever being told to get with the 21st Century. Lots of my young friends want to be Linked In with me. I apologize to all of them, but I don't know how. Send me an email. Better a post card. I've been sending letters and post cards to family and friends for 40 years. I can get 400 words on a post card. Pretty good for 29 cents. Now, I'll admit that my good wife has a point when she complains about surly folks behind the counter at she who mails the packages and buys the stamps in our family. Remember, postal workers: you are civil ser vants; it helps to be civil. But I've never had anything but good relations with our many letter carriers over the years. In forty years of letter writing, I've never had one go astray. That includes weekly letters to a friend in prison and letters to brave U.S. soldiers in combat in Iraq and Afghanistan. I'm still astounded at how fast the mail goes through. There's an eloquent tribute to the U.S. Mail inscribed on the National Postal Museum in Washington. It's part of the Smithsonian.Messenger of Sympathy and Love Servant of Parted Friends Consoler of the Lonely Bond of the Scattered Family Enlarger of the Common Life Carrier of News and Knowledge Instrument of Trade and Industry Promoter of Mutual Acquaintance Of Peace and of Goodwill Among Men and Nations[From "The Letter," by Dr. Charles W. Eliot, former president of Harvard University, as revised by President Woodrow Wilson.]Bond of the scattered family. I like that line best. I get to see our grandson often, but not as often as I'd like. So I send him weekly postcards. He's only two and a half, but our daughter reads them to him. I wasn't sure what impact, if any, they were having. Today she told us he takes the subscription cards from her magazines. They're the same size as my post cards. He "reads" them to her and ends each one with "Love, GranDad." I love to Skype. I love email. I love blogs. And I'm going to learn to LinkIn, or whatever. But there's nothing quite like holding a letter that was handwritten by someone you love, a message from one heart to another. GUEST COLUMNBY ROBER T MORRISONRobert Morrison holds degrees in government and foreign affairs and is now a senior fellow for policy studies at the Family Research Council

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Page 8 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL NOVEMBER 2, 2011 Buy Rite DrugsTentative dates for the enrollment period are Nov. 7 18, 2011Contact your local Buy Rite Pharmacist before making your decision. We will be glad to assist you. Our Services include: We are PPO providers for BCBS, United Healthcare & Cigna Also accept Vista, Healthease, Medicare & MedicaidNow accepting (CHP) Capital Health PlanACCEPTING NEW PATIENTS & WALK INS!! Dr. Iqbal Faruqui Arlena Falcon, ARNPDorcas Goodman, ARNP The Medical Center Ronnie Coley personally invites you to visit him any time Monday thru Saturday from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Chipola To the editor, Im writing this letter to inform computer owners of something that happened to me just last week at home. I received a phone call from a private caller who insisted he needed to walk me through some steps on my computer to prevent a virus I was about to get in Windows. Even if you are on the Do Not Call Registry list from solicitors, dont be so sure its not one of them or even worse, a computer hacker. I asked him, What is your companys name since its not showing up on my caller ID. How do you even know I own a computer? He said, I work for Windows and I received a message to call this number and walk you through cleaning up your Window applications because you are about to get a virus on your computer. I told him, Once I get your company name and number, I will run it by the Better Business Bureau to make sure you are a legitimate business and then I will call you back, okay? He began getting irritated with the questions I kept asking him and became insistent that I go get on my computer right now while I had him on the phone! About 40 minutes later he called again. This time I put him on the speaker phone and told the kids to listen to him so they would know what a computer hacker sounds like. Because we have antivirus software on our computer and it lets us know if we have a virus, I knew we would have received a message telling us if a virus was detected. Just to be safe, I ran another virus scan after said nothing was detected. I spoke with some IT staff at work and found out that this is a new way for hackers to gain access to your machine, temporary inter browser history, and typed URL history. They can even get your passwords from temporary directories on the hard drive and mostly from items contained within the Windows Registry. Not only can the hackers steal this, they can steal your identity with this information, steal your credit and ruin your life! If you own a computer, let your children be aware and know what to do should they answer the phone when youre not at home and get convinced to get on the computer. Do not do it. Loretta King Hosford To the editor, Elections for 2012 are approximately one year away. I would like to take this presidential election. American to be elected President of the United States. As I have observed, listened and researched President Obamas job performance, he has executed the duties of the presidency with integrity, commitment and perseverance despite the blatant disreholds. African-Americans whether they are Democrat, Republican or Independent have always given respect to the President of the United States. We may not have past elections, but we gave support once Maybe I am the only one who sees the dent. His father came from the continent of Africa, his mother was white (AngloSaxon) from America. In my observation, President Obama is the product of the oppressor and the oppressed race. To me, this speaks volumes. A white gentleman, whom I respect, and myself were discussing the results of the 2008 elections. He kindly reminded me that on a local level, Marsha Harpool was the the City of Blountstown. He further stated that she received votes not only from the African-American voters but from the white community as well. People, we are living in the 21st century and I wonder will we be able to look to the character of the individual and not the color of their skin. To the incumbents who currently hold positions on the local level and the candidates who will run against them in 2012, if you cannot discuss your goals, plans or not seek my support or vote. When you come to me and can only talk about what African-American man or woman who use to work for you or your family, only offends me. Talk issues. Let me be clear, my livelihood is solely dependent on my Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ, and not man. In closing, I leave you with the words of Dr. M.L. King, Jr.: Intelligence plus character that is the goal of true education. Respectfully submitted, Sally GadsonReader responds to letter from mother alleging son & friends were harrassedTo the editor, I am writing in reference to the lady who wrote that his level headed friends are continually being harassed for just hanging out. for by tax payers and is not designated a hangout. No one has singled out your child nor are he and his friends being harassed. then our sheriff and his deputies must react to the plaint! You stated they moved their hangout to the forest and because they were being watched, they decided to move to private land. Great! So be it! You go on to say that three weeks into their playtime on private land, they were again harassed by the law! Again, I say to you, the sheriff and his deputies have better things to do than harass your child and his friends. Someone phoned in a complaint! Pure and simple. So stop blaming the sheriff and his deputies for all the ills of the world. Nobody promised anyone a rose garden to play in. Whats wrong with school (university) or the military? Respectfully Jan EganLocal candidates are urged to pay more attention to issues and less to skin color SPEAK UP! TO THE EDITORWrite: The Calhoun-Liberty Journal, P.O. Box 536, Bristol 32321Email: thejournal@fairpoint.net WITH A LETTERMake your family aware of a new tactic used by computer hackersADOPT A PET...from the JournalCLASSIFIEDS!

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NOVEMBER 2, 2011 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 9 Coley, Montford hold legislative delegation meetingWorld War II pilot Terrell Yon will nally receivelong-awaited French Combat Medal this FridayFROM P ARK TRAMMELLAfter waiting 67 years, World War of Blountstown, is about to receive a Terrell E. Yon is shown above left as a young pilot and below, standing alongside an aircraft. The French Combat Medal is pictured above right. Rep. Marti Coley and State Senator Bill Montford came to Blountstown to discuss issues with the citizens of Calhoun County on Oct. 25. Due to redistricting, the legislative delegation meeting was moved up from its usual time in February. This scheduling difference is believed to be the reason no one asked to be put on the agenda and accounted for the low attendance, a common occurrence across the panhandle, according to Rep. Coley. Attendance may have been down but at least four people spoke up about issues of concern, including lobbyist Patrick Bell and Calhoun County Chamber of Commerce Director Kristy Terry. Bell addressed several issues, including Amendment No. 1 regarding septic tank inspection, sewage repairs in Blountstown before the repaving of Hwy. 20 in 2014, the need for grant money for the new clinic at Calhoun Liberty Hospital and the clean up of Lake Hilda. In regard to Amendment No. 1, Rep. Coley stated she and several other representatives have been working on a measure to allow counties to opt-in instead of requiring all counties across Florida to take part. She pointed out that while a complete repeal would be ideal, the opt-in compromise would protect counties from the cost and complication of the unneeded inspections. Terry stated that after having a conversation with Richard Williams, the executive director of the Chipola Regional Workforce Board, the subject of the minimum wage increase scheduled to take place in January is a concern for local small business owners. She explained that while the business owners would like to pay their employees more, doing so would mean hiring less employees to offset the higher pay. The option of placing a cap on minimum wage was offered as a possible solution. FROM LEFT: Patrick Bell, Rep. Marti Coley, Senator Bill Montford and Kristy Terry. Watch video of the meeting at CLJNews.com. JOHNNY EUBANKS PHOTOS

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Page 10 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL NOVEMBER 2, 2011 Home of the All-U-Can-Eat menuPhone (850) 670-8441Family Coastal Seafood Restaurant A little out of the way, a lot less to pay! Were Still open Come see us for the best seafood in town. WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY C Mullet Seafood HOURS AUTO FINANCINGDAYLIGHT SENIOR DAY AT CHIPOLA NOTICE T O PROPERTY OWNERS/TAXPAYERS**2011** TAX ROLLS OPEN FOR COLLECTION **2011** Payment Schedule: Penalties begin April 1, 2012 LAKE CITYThe Chipola College and third, respectively, Oct. 22 at the Florida Gateway Invitational in Lake City. Chipola A team members were: Paul Kelson, Caroline Peacock and William Singleton. Chipola B team members were: Annemarie Nichols, Travis Bontrager, Adrian Carr and Nick Ratzlaff. scoring for the tournament, averaging 151.50 points per game, answering 123 tossups, with 73 powers. A power is when the player buzzes in early enough to earn additional points. Annemarie Nichols finished sixth in individual scoring, averaging 64.38 points per game, answering 46 tossups, eleventh overall, averaging 42.50 points per game, answering 30 tossups, with 12 powers. Tournament statistics are available at http://hsquizbowl.org/db/tournaments/120/stats/combined/standings/ The Chipola team will next play Nov. 11-12 in Orlando at the Delta Burke Tournament. The CalhounLiberty JOURNALServing two counties that make up one great community!HOURS: PHONE (850) 643-333 FAX OFFICE DIRECTIONS: From State Road 20 in Bristol, turn south onto Pea Ridge Road, go one mile, turn east onto Summers Road and look for sign.

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NOVEMBER 2, 2011 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 11 ASK THEO L D F A R M E R SA L M A N A C Heating & Air Conditioning FL LIC. # CMC1249570 (850) 674-4777Whaley Whaley Altha Store Phone (850) 762-3161 Blountstown Branch Phone (850) 673-8102 Marianna Branch Phone (850) 482-2416Altha Farmers Co-op, Inc. PETS AND THEIR PEOPLE IS SPONSORED BYWeve got the feed you need to keep your animals happy and healthy!CATTLE HORSES DOGS CATS BIRDS and more.AND THEIRPETS PEOPLE OCT. 31, MONDAY All Hallows Eve. Reformation Day. The temperature at Minneapolis, Minnesota, reached 83 degrees Fahrenheit, 1950. NOV. 1, TUESDAY All Saints. Rainbow Bridge at Niagara Falls opened to public, no more sail. NOV. 2, WEDNESDAY All Souls. Frontiersman Daniel Boone born, 1734. Charles Van Doren admitted he had been given answers in advance on quiz show Twenty-One, 1959. bank, Bank of Montreal, opened, 1817. Good Morning America debuted on television, 1975. NOV. 4, FRIDAY Will Rogers Day (Oklahoma). Conjunction of Neptune and the Moon. First cash register patented by James and John Ritty of Dayton, Ohio, 1879. NOV. 5, SATURDAY Sadie Hawkins Day. Moon on equator. Board game Monopoly released by Parker Brothers, 1935. Cartoonist Al Capp died, 1979. Sunday after Pentecost. Daylight Saving Time ends, 2:00 A.M. Conjunction of Uranus and the Moon. Actress Sally Field born, 1946.I suffer from sinus headaches. Do you have any remedies to offer? M. K., Loveland, Colo. A sinus headache, or sinusitis, can be brought on by a cold or any respiratory ailment. Even dental infections sometimes lead to sinus problems. Sinusitis is mation and often, the cavities that surround the nasal passages. We can tell you some of the favorite home remedies, but if the condition per sists or worsens, you with your health practitioner.A favorite remedy that weve tried and ness has to do with pressure points over the eyes. Often, a sinus headache localizes around just one eye. Theres a little peasize dip in the bone just under the top of your eyebrow, often located just above the iris of that eye. (Theres one on each side, but only use both if both sides to gently nudge your eyebrow out of the way feel along the bone for the dip. Press your little, but after a minute or so you are apt to feel the sinus draining down The pressure is a little uncomfortable, but the draining relieves some of the mucus buildup and the headache di hours, you might need to repeat the process.The next-best remedy is a hot washcloth, used as a compress. Some Chinese herbalists recommend Tiger Balm, an ointment that comes in a red tin with a tiger blend of menthol from peppermint, eugenol from cloves, cinnamon, and camphor. Certain teas thought to ease sinus headaches teaspoon of the seeds in a cup of boiling wamint. Oregano also has antiseptic compounds. into a tea. Echinacea boosts the immunity, as does goldenseal, helping to ease the infection. Horseradish helps to clear the sinuses. Can I add woodstove ashes to my compost, and will it continue working through the winter? H. T., Amherst, Va. Unless youre a real pro at maintaining your compost, the decom position is apt to slow down considerably or even stop during the freezing weather. Thats resume when things warm up in the spring, so theres no harm in continuing to add to your pile with your regular areas, raccoons can be a problem if the compost well-covered and bar ricaded, but woodstove ashes help to discourage pests if you apply them in thin layers to cover the layer on every time you ashes are a good source of potash as well, al though it leaches away easily with snow and spring rains. Dont add charcoal or coal ashes, though. Also, be sure the woodstove ashes are completely cold before you let them out of the metal ash days or more for the last of the embers to die out, so be very cautious about especially if your compost is near the house or woods. Whats the risk of lead contamination from crops grown near the roadside? We wish there were a simple answer to this uneasy question, but theres not. The way to tell absolutely is to have the soil tested for lead, which is especially advisable for public farm stands or private gardens that are located within Clearly, the more constant and congested the with only a few cars a Urban gardeners might be wise to use greenhouses or cold frames to minimize air borne pollution from automobile exhaust fumes. Despite lead-free fuels that have helped to reduce the problem, air borne lead is still present. Because lead poisoning can build up cumulatively in the body, even low emissions over a long period of exposure can be dangerous. Greater concentra tions of lead are more outer surfaces of leafy vegetables, such as spinach, lettuce, or cabbage (the larger the leaf exposure, the greater the as potatoes and carrots. Fruit-bearing vegetables such as tomatoes, beans, of containing lead. To guard against lead contamination, maintain a soil pH above 6.5 per cent, add organic matter, and plant your garden as far away from the road as your own, have it tested to give you greater peace to the neighborhood if they have had tests you. I never thought Id be much of a dog person, says Laura Wahlquist, but that changed when Lucy came into her life last year. Lucy is a Shorkie half Shih Tzu and half Yorkie, who lives with her owner in Marianna where Laura works as an assistant state attorney. The little dog will be a year old in January. The playful pup has had plenty of toys but her favorite is a stuffed penguin named Baby Penguin, according to Laura. Shell look for it to play with even when her other toys are around. The pair enjoy their trips home to Bristol on the weekend and took part in Saturdays Trunk or Treat. Earlier that day, Lucy walked in a Halloween parade at Sunland in costume. Dressing her up is no problem because Lucys friends, Annabeth, 4, Avory and Ava, both 3, the daughters of Lauras best friends, play with her all the time. She gets super excited to see them. They call her Lucy gurl or Wucy. The little dog is always ready to hit the road. Anytime I say, Lucy, do you wanna go? and grab my keys, she runs to the garage door and stares at it until I open it. Then I open the car door and she jumps in, said Laura. She recognizes my parents (Patrick and Lynne Wahlquist) house in Bristol and will stand on her back feet and look out the window of the car once we get on their road. I try to take her with me everywhere pretty used to cars and boats. Shes a very good traveler! LAURA & LUCYNIKI BARBER PHOT O

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Page 12 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL NOVEMBER 2, 2011 Happy 13TH Birthday Blaine!!BLAINE THARPE NOV. 3We are so proud of you and love you very much!Always, Momma, Jase, Blake and Jack Want to see whats new with Tupperware? Meet or call your local Tupperware Consultant for Parties, free hostess gifts. The more you sell, the greater the gifts.Call Beth Eubanks, your full time Tupperware Consultant at (850) 643-2498 or email at bethseubanks41@aol.com.Visit me online at www.my.tupperware.com/bethseubanks Calhoun Liberty Primary Care Clinic20370 NE Burns Ave., Blountstown Telephone (850) 237-3000 Calhoun Liberty Primary Care Clinic New patient applications can be picked up at the front desk of the Primary Care Clinic. NOW OPE N Call us at (850) 237-3000 for an appointment today. BirthdaysKLOEE BAILEYKloee Bailey will celebrate her fourth birthday on Nov. 2. Kloee loves playing with her cousins Sadie and Bradley. Most of all, she loves her Mommy, Hailey, Gammy, Big Daddy, Uncle Scott and Aunt Bec Bec.JACK STRICKLANDJack Strickland celebrated his fourth birthday on Oct. 24. He is the son of Jason and Dani Strickland of Bristol. His grandparents are Tom and Irene Davis of Conway, AZ, Randy Stutler of Jane Lew, WV, Charlotte Strutko of Bristol and Larry and Cora Strickland of Dellwood. Jack celebrated his birthday with friends and family with a party at the Train Depot in Blountstown. He enjoys playing outside, anything musical and imitating his big brothers.DIXIE LEANN GILMORE birthday at the Altha Recreation Park with friends and family. Dixie is the daughter of Yancy and Selina Gilmore of Clarksville. Her grandparents are Daryl and Dolores Brogdon of Big Prairie, OH, Jane Gilmore and Larry Sapp of Sink Creek, and W.C. and Kathy Gilmore of Compass Lake. Dixie was surprised with a Littlest Pet Shop cake and her three best friends, Emily Dunway, Morgan Foster and Macy Oakford. J.C. MARTINJ.C. Martin will celebrate his fifth birthday on Nov. 7 with a Toy Story party with family and friends. He is the son of Amanda Phillips of Bristol and Casey and Maggie Martin of Clarksville. J.C. enjoys playing with his tractors, bogg trucks and his dog, Oliver. Nick and April Stone of Clarksville will celebrate their 15th wedding anniversary on Nov. 2. They were mar ried at Abe Springs Pentecostal Holiness Church. Stones celebrate 15 years of marriage Anniversary Davis celebrate 34th wedding anniversaryDan and Lynne Davis of Kinard will celebrate their 34th anniversary on Nov. 5. Dan is employed by Gulf Power in Panama City and Lynne is a homemaker. They have two children, Angie Davis of Kinard and Bryan Davis of San Diego, CA.

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NOVEMBER 2, 2011 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 13 A terrifyingly good time! Quincy Police Chief Walter A. McNeil sworn in to head up International Asso. of Chiefs of Police The Florida Police Chiefs Association (FPCA) is proud to announce that one of Floridas Own, Quincy Police Chief Walter McNeil, was sworn in as the President of the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) on October 26, 2011. The Inter national Association of Chiefs of Police is the worlds over 100 different countries. IACPs leadership consists of the operating chief executives of international, What a great tribute this is to Chief McNeil and quality of policing in our State. experience and has held executive positions within the supervision. odically with both the President and Vice President safety issues.Southerland launches revamped website newly redesigned congressional website. Ive often closest to the people, and us do that better than ever. Our new website, which includes constituent services, detailed issue positions, provides several avenues share ideas about the issues people of North and Northwest Florida and I hope house.gov. CONGRESSMANSteve Southerland

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Page 14 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL NOVEMBER 2, 2011 HISTORY NOTICETAX IMPACT OF V ALUE ADJUSTMENT BOARDLiberty Tax Year 2011CountyDR-529 R. 12/09 Rule 12D-16.002 Florida Administrative Code ST OUTAMIRE INSURANCE INC.16783 SE Pear St., Blountstown ACCEPTING NEW PA TIENTSLaban Bontrager, DMD12761 NW Pea Ridge Rd., Bristol, FL 32321www.bristoldentalclinic.com DENTURE LAB ON PREMISESSame-Day Service on R epairs & R elines Bristol Dental ClinicMonica Bontrager, DMD CHATTAHOOCHEE The West Gadsden Historical Societys Annual Meeting will be held on Saturday, Nov. 12 at 3 p.m., (ET), at Chattahoochee Landing, 500 South River Landing Road, Chattahoochee. At that time, the Society will host a book signing by Dale Cox as he releases his newest book The Scott Massacre of 1817: A Seminole War Battle in Gadsden County, Florida. Southern writer and historian Dale Cox has announced the completion of this new book and that all proceeds from its sale will support WGHS in its efforts to preserve and interpret the history of Gadsden County. The book tells the story of a First Seminole War attack on a U.S. Army vessel on the Apalachicola River. Hundreds of Creek and Seminole warriors had assembled on the Gadsden County shores of the river bend just below Chatta hoochee Landing. Infuriated over an attack by U.S. troops on the Lower Creek village of Fowltown in what is now Decatur Co., GA, the warriors ambushed a supply vessel commanded by Lt. Richard W. Scott as it was forced near the shoreline by the strong current of the river. One of the bloodiest days in the long series of wars between the U.S. and the Seminole Nation, the massacre resulted in the deaths of 44 of the 51 men, women, and children under Lt. Scotts command. Four other men were wounded and a single female survivor, 26-year-old Elizabeth Stewart, was taken prisoner. She was the wife of a soldier stationed at nearby Fort Scott on the Flint River about 10 miles upstream from Chattahoochee. Read the exciting story of Mrs. Stewarts survival and her safe return to her husband and father while they were serving with General Andrew Jackson. A dramatic victory for the Seminole and Creek alliance then battling against the southward expansion of the Georgia frontier, the battle shocked an American nation still celebrating its victory over the British in the War of 1812. As details of the massacre spread through the length and breadth of the U.S., Major General Andrew Jackson moved on the Creek and Seminole towns in Spanish Florida with an army of thousands of soldiers and volunteers. His invasion broke the power of the Seminole/Creek alli ance and clearly demonstrated that Spain could not defend its American colony. Just four years after the attack on Scotts command, Florida became a permanent part of the United States. The new book tells the story of the 1817 battle in detail never before offered. Filled with new information and rich in source material, the volume presents the Scott Massacre of 1817 as a pivotal event in American history and November 30, 1817 as the day U.S. possession of Florida was guaranteed. Dale Cox, who is a lifetime member of WGHS and a wellregarded researcher and writer, is the author of ten other books, including The Early History of Gadsden County and The Battle of Natural Bridge, Florida For further information, please e-mail info@gadsdenhistory.org or call (850) 442-6434.Area writer Dale Cox to discuss new book about the Scott Massacre at historical society meeting NO INTEREST PLANS R.E. BrokerLAND SALE 10 ACRE + TRACTSPaved Highway Frontage With Planted Pine Trees From $4,995 per acreWith $600 Down Regular ContractWith $2,500 Down No Interest First YearWith $5,000 Down No Interest First 2 Years Owner Financing No Qualifying Hwy. 20, Bristol ApalacheeTheR estaurant

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NOVEMBER 2, 2011 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 15 CHIPOLA COLLEGE The Board of Commissioners of the Northwest Florida Regional Housing Authority will hold aSpecial Meeting Nov. 15, 2011ONBeginning at 1 p.m. (ET) Open to the PublicHarvard medical professor and surgeon to speak Nov. 14MARIANNADr. John Mayer, Professor of Surgery at Harvard Medical School and a Senior Associate in the Department of Cardiovascular Surgery at Childrens Hospital in Boston, will discuss his research during two meet ings at Chipola College on Monday, Nov. 14. Dr. Mayer will speak to Chipola students, faculty and the community at 11 a.m. in the Chipola Theatre. Pam Rentz and Chipolas Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society will host a reception in his honor at noon. At 6:30 p.m. on Nov. 14, Dr. Mayer will speak to physicians and medical personnel at a dinner in the Continuing Education Conference Center. Medical professionals may earn C.M.E. credit for attending the seminar. To register, contact Dr. James Clem mons in Chipley at (850) 638-0678 or Cindy Burns at Jackson Hospital at (850) 762-3645. Dr. Mayer grew up in Tampa. He received his BA from Yale University and his MD from Yale University Medical School. He completed post-graduate training in General Surgery and Car diothoracic Surgery at the University of Minnesota. Dr. Mayer served for three years in the U.S. Air Force Medical Corps, and then began his career at Childrens Hospital, Boston and Harvard Medical School. He has published expediatric cardiac surgery and tissue engineering. The tissue engineering research has been carried out in the Cardiac Surgery Research Laboratory at Childrens Hospital, Boston. His group developed lar structures (pulmonary artery patch, have been implanted into animals. Dr. Mayer is author or co-author of 30 book chapters. He serves on the American Board of Thoracic Surgery, and is a past President for the Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Hearts of Promise is sponsoring Dr. Mayers visit to Chipola. The foundation was established in honor of nine year-old Holly Turner by her family after her second open-heart surgery performed by Dr. Mayer in 2003. Hollys aunt, Carol Saunders, is a speech and English professor at Chipola. Hollys cousin, Hillary Saunders, is responsible for Dr. Mayers visit to Chipola as part of her Phi Theta Kappa service project. She is also organizing a walk and pancake breakfast to be held in Chipley on Saturday, Nov. 5. The breakfast is 7-10 a.m. at First Baptist Church of Chipley. The walk will be held at Shivers Park (across from the church) from 8 to 9 a.m. Hillary has also raised funds through awareness presentations to church and civic groups, Beanie Baby sales for children having heart surgery at CHB, and Hearts of Promise cookbook sales. All funds raised will go to research being conducted by Dr. Mayer at Childrens Hospital Boston. The goal of this research is to grow valves and arteries from a patients own tissue, thus eliminating the need for multiple open-heart surgeries for thousands of children. Proceeds from these events will be presented to Dr. Mayer during his visit to Chipola. CHIPOLA IN 3-D Chipola College is now accepting students for the Chipola 3-D course set for JanuaryMARIANNAChipola College is now accepting students for the Simulation Modwhich begins in January, 2012. Application deadline for the program is Dec. 15. Applications must be submitted to Christen Bennett in A-115. Students in the program will develop the technical skills necessary to produce three-dimensional content to be used in business, industry, education, state and federal government as well as the military. Matt White, Chipolas Network Coordinator and Dylan Bass will teach the course. Software used in the program will include Photoshop, 3D Studio Max, Java Script, AutoCAD and Unity gaming software. ciency in computer applications in order to successfully complete the course. The course begins Jan. 9, 2012 and runs through May 1. Classes are scheduled for Monday, Tuesday and Thursday evenings from 5 to 10 p.m. Cost of the program is $1,500. Due to the length and the nature of the program, traditional Financial Aid is not available. students. The college reserves the right to cancel the program if minimum enrollment requirements are not met. For information, call (850) 718-2455, email bennettc@chipola.edu or visit www. chipola.edu/3d Dr. John Mayer (850) 674-8801 "Fine Jewelry & Gifts"The Diamond Corner $10BRING THIS COUPON IN FORO F F1 Pair Jeans

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Page 16 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL NOVEMBER 2, 2011 BHS SPORTSby Michael DeVuyst, Journal sports writerEASTPOINT Any worry of a letdown after the huge district win last week was put to rest early against Franklin the home-standing Seahawks. Jawon Mosley scored three catch came from 14 yards out and the second reception from 15 yards out. Mosley also scored on a 5 yard run. Marquel Thomas found pay dirt from 7 yards and Javakiel Brigham lead. The second half started with a Mosley 83 yard kickoff return which put the ball on the Franklin Co. 15. The next play from scrimmage Mosley ripped a run up the middle for the 39 point lead. Franklin Co. managed to score in the 4th quarter with a short drive set up by a Tiger fumble. Franklin started their scoring drive on the Tiger 25 and two plays later found the end zone on an 11 yard catch by Ladarius Rhodes from TreSean Carr. The extra point attempt was botched but Brenden Warren got loose in the end zone and caught a pass from the holder for the two point conversion. With the score, Franklin Co. cut the lead to 39-8. fort, We set some goals for our team before this game and were pretty much able to accomplish those goals. Our offense moved the ball well and our defense was super again. The Tiger offense produced 341 yards of offense and limited Franklin Co. to 76 total yards. Javakiel Brigham led the Tigers in rushing with 66 yards on 4 carries. Marquel Thomas had 53 yards on 4 carries. Hathcox led the Tiger receivers with 54 yards on 2 catch yards. The Tiger defense was lead by Anthony Williams and Brigham with 8 tackles apiece. Brett Bozeman recorded an interception and caused a fumble. Blountstown evens their record to 4-4 on the season and 3-0 in district play. The Tigers travel to West Gadsden this onship. A Tiger loss and a Liberty Co. win will result in a three-way tie with Blountstown, Liberty Co. and West Gadsden. A tiebreaker game (if necessary) will be played on Monday, Nov. 7 at 7 p.m. local time at a site to be deter mined. Blountstown holds onto district lead with 47-8 win over Franklin County Blountstowns Ryan Hathcox (#45) tries to avoid the tackle from the Franklin player. ABOVE: A group of Tigers tackle a Seahawk. BELOW: Blountstowns Jawon Mosley (#10) ABOVE: Tigers Corin Peterson (#2), C.J. Heirs (#62) and Bobby Andrews (#1) take down the Franklin player in a great tackle. BELOW: Blountstowns Javakiel Brigham (#28) reaches out to block a Franklin County opponent. He led the Tigers in rushing with 66 yards on 4 carries.

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NOVEMBER 2, 2011 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 17 LCHS SPORTSby Richard Williams, Journal sports writerAt halftime of Liberty Countys 40-14 win over South Walton, Ben Beckwith played in the band, but in the fourth quarter the LCHS sophomore running back made the band play for him as he raced 91 yards night. Beckwiths second touchdown of the night gave him 106 yards on three carries. Liberty County opened the game on defense and forced South Walton to punt after they failed to gain sponded with a three play drive capped by a touchdown run up the middle by quarterback Alex Mar lowe. Marlowe had two rushing touchdowns and one passing touchdown in the game. Brenton Bailey intercepted a Seahawk pass on the next defensive stand for LCHS, and the Bulldog offense converted the opportunity into a touchdown on a Harold Washington run. Bailey scored a touchdown on Libertys next possession as he hauled in a 48 yard pass from Marlowe to put Liberty up 21-0 after on defense with seven tackles and nine assists. With LCHS ahead 21-0 in the second quarter, and Liberty held a 27-0 lead at the half. In the second half the Bulldogs had touchdowns from Marlowe and Beckwith while the Seahawks scored two touchdowns of their own. Libertys defense held the Seahawks in check most of the night as Ethan Foran, ten tackles, and Michael the defensive effort. for their last district game of the year. A Bulldog win means they will play again either Monday night in a three-way tie-breaker (see accompanying story) or as the second seed in the district depending on the outcome of the Blountstown versus West Gadsden game played the same night. Grant Grantham, LCHS Head Coach, said the win was nice, but for Liberty the playoffs actually start this week. If we win we keep playing, Grantham said. It really is as simple as that, and we face a talented, quick team this week so we need to bring our best game to Liberty Bulldogs win against South Walton 40-14 by Richard Williams, Journal sports writer the Department of Education might want to consider using them as a word problem on the next standardized test they develop. First the current district standings: that went 0-4 in the district. With Blountstown playing at West Gadsden and Liberty know which two teams will represent the district in the playoffs. their own fate, but even they could still fail to make the playoffs if they lose to West 0, defeated Franklin County 34-26, and lost to Liberty County 26-17. Rank School Overall Record District Record 1 Blountstown 4-4 3-0 2 Liberty 7-2 2-1 2 West Gadsden 3-5 2-1 5 Franklin County 3-6 0-4 Many possibilities await teams for playoffs after Fridays gamesFOOTBALL PLAYOFFS continued on page 20ABOVE: A Bulldog tackles the South Walton runner. RIGHT: The Bulldogs block for Alex Marlowe (#5) giving him time to throw the ball. BELOW: The South Walton players swarm in on Liber tys Daniel Deason (#12). Libertys Brenton Bailey (#16) leads the way for Harold Bulldog Lando Brown (#23) puts his shoulder into this tackle of a South Walton player. Libertys Ben Beckwith (#10) takes off with the ball, followed by many South Walton players. He raced 91 yards down the sideline for LibDANIEL WILLIAMS PHOT OS

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Hosford School is proud to announce its honor roll for the A Honor Roll Kindergarten: 1st Grade: 2nd Grade: 3rd Grade: 4th Grade: 5th Grade: 6th Grade: 7th Grade: 8th Grade: A/B Honor Roll Kindergarten: 1st Grade: 2nd Grade: 3rd Grade: 4th Grade: 5th Grade: 6th Grade: 7th Grade: 8th Grade: Perfect Attendance Kindergarten: 1st Grade: 2nd Grade: 3rd Grade: 4th Grade: 5th Grade: 6th Grade: 7th Grade: 8th Grade: SEPTEMBER Students of the Month OCT OBER Students of the MonthPanther Pride Page 18 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL NOVEMBER 2, 2011 Hosfords Honor Roll Oh My! Hosford students and staff celebrated Halloween with a parade and songs. The morning started with a hilarious clown skit by faculty members. Pre-K through 4th grade classes each delightfully performed a song onstage and showcased their costumes. From Princesses, Fairy Tale characters, and rock stars to soldiers, gorillas, and ghouls the students had a fun time proudly showing off their costumes. The eighth grade class enjoyed the day at a local cemetery researching for a family history project. ing stories about their lives. A fun day was had by all!Witches, Ghosts, and Goblins... SCHOOL LUNCH MENU Nov. 2-8, 2011 Bristol Dental Clinic Laban Bontrager, DMD, Monica Bontrager, DMDPea Ridge Rd in Bristol, Phone (850) 643-5417MENUS SPONSORED BY: Bristol Dental Clinic LIBERTY WednesdayBREAKFAST: sausage. LUNCH: Chicken nuggets or pepperoni wrap, mashed potatoes and gravy, carrots and diced apricots. (2nd & 3rd grade pizza)ThursdayBREAKFAST: Grits and scrambled eggs. LUNCH: Beef and bean burrito or turkey chef salad, pinto beans, tossed romaine salad with light dressing and fresh apple.FridayBREAKFAST: Whole wheat pancakes. LUNCH: Turkey corndog or chicken caesar salad, mac and cheese, garden peas and fresh orange. (4th grade pizza)MondayBREAKFAST: Cinnamon roll and ham. LUNCH: Nacho beef casserole or cobb salad, green beans and sliced cantaloupe. (kg & 1st grade pizza).TuesdayBREAKFAST: Cheese grits and scrambled eggs. LUNCH: Japanese chicken or turkey club on autumn grain, rice, broccoli and applesauce.*All breakfasts include a choice of assorted cereal with buttered toast whole wheat and juice CA L HOUN WednesdayBREAKFAST: Scrambled eggs with cheese grits. LUNCH: Meatball sub, baked potato wedges and diced pears.ThursdayBREAKFAST: Ham and cheese biscuit and potato tots.LUNCH: Beef taco pie, corn on the cob, diced pears.FridayBREAKFAST: Whole wheat pancakes with syrup and sausage patty.LUNCH: Cheese pizza, garden salad, fresh fruit and home baked cookie.MondayBREAKFAST: Sausage and egg biscuit and potato tots. LUNCH: Hot dog, mac and cheese, garden peas and TuesdayBREAKFAST: Scrambled eggs with cheese grits. LUNCH: Beef vegetable soup, grilled cheese sandwich and fruit.*All breakfasts include a choice of assorted cereal with buttered toast and juice

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NOVEMBER 2, 2011 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 19 blountstown elementary schoolThis year Blountstown High School has partnered with Blountstown Elementary School in a program called Teen Trendsetters. Teen Trendsetters pairs high school juniors and seniors with third graders to help polish their reading skills. Research suggests that third grade is the optimal grade to help struggling readers. The students meet weekly throughout the school year where the mentor (the high school student) teaches a guided reading lesson to the mentee (third grader). Not only do the third graders look forward to having a high school student spend quality time with them, but the high school students look forward to having someone look up to them. A special bond is formed and learning occurs. Teen Trendsetters is a program that we hope continues for many years. blountstown high schoolGuidance News The next date for ACT testing is Dec. 10. The registration deadline is Nov. 4. Students can register online or pick up a packet from guidance. Senior News *Herff Jones will be taking orders on Nov. 3. If seniors did not receive a packet, they can see Mrs. Curl to get one. An $80 deposit is required. *Senior Portrait retakes will be done on Friday, Nov. 4. Seniors must sign up with Mrs. Baldwin by Thursday, Nov. 3. The B.E.S. third grade class presented the musical How Does Your Garden Grow? on Thursday, October 27 at 8:30 in the school cafeteria. The audience got to animals as the gardeners tried to keep the weeds from taking over the garden! Great performance by our 3rd graders!BES third grade presents musical Oct. 27BES third graders and Blountstown High Teen Trendsetters bond during reading sessions *Friday, November 4: Family Breakfast 7:00-7:45 *Thursday, November 10 4th Grade Veterans Day Program 8:30 am *November 7-11 Homecoming Week *November 21 25 Thanksgiving HolidaysDATES TO REMEMBE RBHS Calendar of Events Wednesday, Nov. 2-Cross Country District in Wewa @ 10:00 a.m. Thursday, Nov. 3-Herff Jones taking orders for Seniors Friday, Nov. 4-Deadline to register for Dec. 10th ACT testing; Senior Portrait re-takes; Football vs West Gadsden Away @ 6:30 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 5-Varsity Cheer leaders compete in the National Peanut Festival Cheer Competition ABOVE: Wayne Boozer tries to balance a slinky on his head as Lonnie Pitts looks on. BELOW: Fourth graders catch the Drug Free Wave and sport their beach attire with Teachers Maegan Davis and Miranda Rehberg. Last week students at Altha School pledged to be Drug Free during the annual Red Ribbon Week Celebration. Two clubs on campus, the Fellowship of Christian Athletes (FCA) and Students Working Against Tobacco (SWAT), teamed up to plan a variety of activities including dress up days, games, guest speakers, and a canned food drive. Thanks to club sponsors Melissa McGill, Mary Frank Brooks, Shirley Lee, and Kennesse Dew for their hard work in making this a memorable week for the students. AT ALTH A SCHOOL

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Page 20 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL NOVEMBER 2, 2011 H 2 O Wellness Center/Day SpaTaking you on a Journey to Wellness18831 State Road 20 West 24 Hour Gym FOOTBALL PLAYOFFS continued from page 17ABOVE LEFT: Bulldog Alex Marlowe (#5) runs the Do You Have a Special Pet? and Call us at 643-3333If the Tigers lose to West Gadsden and Liberty County defeats Port St. Joe, the Tigers will be in a three-way West Gadsden. In this situation the Tigers will face a district tie-breaker in Bristol, November 7 at 7 p.m. Eastern. If the Tigers lose to West Gadsden and Liberty County loses to Port St. Joe then West Gadsden would be the number one seed in the district and Blountstown would be the number two seed. A win by Liberty County over Port St. Joe combined with a Tiger loss to West Gadsden would put LibBlountstown and West Gadsden. A win by Liberty County and a win by Blountstown will put Liberty in the playoffs as the second place team. A loss by Liberty combined with a win by Blountstown creates a three-way tie for second. In the case of a three-way tie for second, a tiebreaker would be held in Bristol to determine the second place team. A loss by Liberty and a win by West Gadsden would eliminate Liberty and Port St. Joe from the playoffs. place the game would be played in Bristol because Liberty County has the best overall record. West Gadsden and Blountstown would play in If the game was tied at the end of would play a 10-yard tiebreaker contest. Each team would get the ball at the ten-yard line and after each team has had a possession the team ahead would advance. If the score remained tied another ten-yard tiebreaker would be played. The winner of the West Gadsden versus Blountstown contest would then play Liberty County. If Liberty County wins that contest they would be the number one seed and the loser would be the number two seed. If Liberty County lost, the winner of the game would be the number one seed and Liberty would play the which team receives the number two seed. If there is a three-way tie for second place, Liberty County would still host and West Gadsden would play winner of that round would move on to play Liberty and the loser would be eliminated. The winner of the second round game would receive the number two seed in the district. Now get out your pencils and a clean piece of paper the test will beLEFT: Johnson the gap between the South Walton DANIEL WILLIAMS PHOTOS

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NOVEMBER 2, 2011 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 21 AlthaFALL FESTStudents, parents and the staff of Altha School held their Fall Festival celebra tion Friday night with plenty of food, games and fun. The annual event is used to help provide Christmas gifts for some of the areas needy children. PHOTOS COURTESY ALTHA SCHOOLThe Altha FFA and Softball team are once again selling Satsumas. See any FFA member or softball player to place your order. The deadline to order is November 4. They are $20 a box. If you would like to call your order in, please call 762-3121.Altha School will host To the Book Fair and Beyond! Reading is Out of this World November 7 11. Shopping hours will be 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. daily. Families, faculty, and the community are invited to attend this fun reading event that helps inspire children to become lifelong readers. The Book Fair will feature a special Family Event on Tuesday, November 8, from 3 to 6 p.m. This event will feature time to shop at the fair, book fair related activities, and refreshments. Parents, Grandparents as well as other relatives are invited to our Book Fair Breakfast on Friday, November 11, from 7 7:30 a.m. A light breakfast will be served and there will be time to shop at the Book Fair. The Book Fair offers specially priced books and educational products, including popular series, award-winning titles, new releases, and other great reads from more than 100 publishers. In addition, the Book Fair will feature the One for Books program, where students can share the thrill of reading by donating their loose change to help purchase books for classroom libraries. Scholastic matches monetary donations with a donation of up to one million books, which go to national nonin need, such as the Marine Toys for Tots Foundation, Kids in Distressed Situations, Inc., and Kids In Need Foundation. The more a child reads, the stronger reader he or she becomes. Strong reading skills are essential to a childs success in school and life. Our Book Fair encourages this success by offering students access to great books at affordable prices. Children are more likely to read books they personally choose. The wide variety of choices offered at our Book Fair ensures that there will be something for everyone! For more information, please call the Media Center at 762-3121.Altha School plans Scholastic Book Fair Nov. 7-11FFA & Softball team selling satsumas; order by Nov. 4 November 3rd NAEP Testing; Trio trip 11th grade; Middle School Basketball at Tolar 3 p.m. November 4th 4th Grade Field Trip November 6th Daylight Savings time November 8th Middle School Basketball at Blountstown 3:30 p.m. November 9th Chipola Job Fair November 10th Cats Cuisine; Blood Drive; SWAT Meeting 2:45; Middle School Basketball vs. Hosford 3:30 p.m. November 11th Veterans Day Program at 8 a.m.ALTHA WILDCAT EVENTS CALENDAR altha wildcats FCA attends Game Day The Altha Fellowship of Christian Athletes took the opportunity to join in the south eastern Game Day at Florida State University this past weekend. They met for a pre-game rally at the Bradfordville First Baptist Church of Tallahassee with more than ten other middle and high schools from across the South East. The pre-game rally consisted of an explosive worship service followed by a message from Anthony Beckham founder of the Power Unlimited weight lifting team. beautiful Florida sun before advancing to the FSU game against Maryland. A Florida State win over Maryland topped off the eventful day, and for many students, this A special thanks to the FCA sponsors Ms. McGill, Mrs. Brooks, Mrs. Lee, and all the parents that helped make Saturdays event a successful and enjoyable time for the students.

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Page 22 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL NOVEMBER 2, 2011 GARDENINGWhats brewing in the garden this Halloween?Lurking just around the corner is Halloween. While thoughts of candy and scary costumes may be on your mind, lets take a look at some be-witching horticulture curiosities.WITCH HAZELWithin the vast plant world, the Hamamelidaceae is known as the witch-hazel family. The horticultural name means "together with fruit" year's leaf buds all appear on the branch simultaneously, a rarity among woody plants. Witch hazel's name upholds mysterious connotations. In colonial branches were a favorite "witching stick" of dowsers used for searching out hidden waters or precious metals. This has nothing to do with witches, but rather originates from the old English word for pliable branches "wych." In England dowsers call an elm (Ulmus glabra) the "witch hazel tree." When early British settlers ar rived in the Americas, they fancied our witch hazel as the logical replacement for dowsing chores, given its pliable, crooked branches. There are several landscape ornamentals in this family including the Chinese witch hazel (Hamamelis mollis), witch hazel (Hamamelis virginiana) and the very popular Chinese fringe bush (Loropetalum chinensis).WITCHES BROOMAt this time of year hearing someone mention a witchs broom may not seem that out of the ordinary, but have you ever heard it mentioned any other time of the year? Occasionally, plants will form unusual and alarming growths. When a growing from a single point that resembles a broom or a bird's nest we call it witches broom. In medieval times, mysterious and blamed on witchcraft. Brooms during this time were made of bundles of twigs. The term witches' broom comes bundle of twigs (besom). A number of stresses, both biological and environmental, can lead to the formation of brooms. They can be caused by a number of organisms including fungi, mites, insects, viruses, bacteria and mistletoes. Additionally, some brooms appear to be caused by genetic mutations in the buds of the branches. Unlike brooms caused by living organisms, there is usually just one broom per tree when the cause is a genetic mutation. Witches' brooms occur on many different woody plant species, including deciduous trees such as hackberry, maple, willow and conifers such as pine and spruce. Pinpointing the cause of a witches' the formation is related to an environmental factor. Analyzing the plant tissue for infectious agents such as phytoplasmas requires specialized testing that can be costly. cause branches to break more easily and can reduce tree vigor. Pruning out the affected twigs, if feasible, can help improve the tree's appearance.WEL WITCHIA (WELL-WITCH-EE-A)Welwitschia mirabilis is a very unusual plant native to a strip of land about 50 miles wide and about 500 miles in length along the coast of the Namib Desert. Known to be one of the worlds oldest deserts, part of it is located in Namibia, Africa. On a recent trip there, I had the opportunity to see this rare plant and hear some of its history. Welwitchia is a plant of remarkably bizarre habits and survives in very harsh localities where the annual welwitchia's oldest living specimens are estimated at 1500 to 2000 years. It is comprised of only two leaves, a stem base and a taproot. From grow horizontally from the stem base for the lifespan of the plant, a most unusual, if not unique, characteristic. Weathering eventually causes the leaves to become frayed and split. The torn and twisted leaves of the adult plant give the impression that there are multiple leaves, hence the description 'octopus-like'. by Theresa Friday, Horticulture Extension Agent, Santa Rosa County Gardening Friends of the Big Bend will have its November meeting at the North Florida Research and Education Center near Quincy at 6:30 p.m., Tuesday, Nov. 8. Bring your favorite covered dish and enjoy some camaraderie with fellow plant folks at a potluck supper. A brief business meeting will follow. A report will be given on the fundraisers, the Plantaholic and Saturday Plant Sale, and on progress in the Gardens. The purpose of this group is to promote gardening and gardening research by supporting and assisting the faculty and staff of NFREC, an arm of the University of Florida's Institute for Food and Agricultural Sciences. For more information, contact Clara Skipper at (850) Gardening Friends to meet Nov. 8 in Quincy Located in BristolLAND CLEARING-Private drives and roads -Food plots -Home sites -Small acreageCall E ddie Nobles at (850) 643-5390 or (850) 447-0449 or Chas (850) 447-0849Eddie NoblesLAND CLEARING, EXCA V A TION AND ROOT RAKING FOR: FLANDERSRV REP AIR 18360 State Rd 20 West, BlountstownT elephone (850) 674-2482Insurance Claims Welcome NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours or responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment.Cataracts?Freedom from Eye Glasses, Now a reality for many.Lee Mullis M.D. and Cataract SpecialistSmart Lenses SMDr. Mulliss Smart LensSM procedure can produce clear vision without eyeglasses.Close-up, Far away & In-between CALL TODAY for a Smart Lens Evaluation Mullis Eye Institute 4320 5th A ve. Marianna(2 Blks from Jackson Hospital)(850) 526-7775 or 1(800)769-3429 Listen to Steven Seay and Glenn Kimbrels play by play of the Blountstown High School Tigers vs. West Gadsden County High at West Gadsden Friday night on Nov. 4 on K102.7 at 6 p.m. (CT). The Florida Gators play Vanderbilt in the Swamp on Saturday, Nov. 5. Air time on K102.7 at 11 a.m. or immediately following the Liberty High School game.RADIO FOOTBALL ON WYBT AND WPHKListen to football on WYBT and WPHK. This week.. Hear Michael Wahlquist and Jay Taylor with all the Liberty County High School game action. The Bulldogs take on Port St. Joe High School at Port St. Joe. Air time on K102.7 Saturday, Nov. 5 immediately following Swap Shop at 10 a.m. (ET). ITS VERY WISE TO ADVERTISEin the Calhoun-Liberty Journal and... CLJN ews.COM

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NOVEMBER 2, 2011 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 23 OBITUARIES All existing pre-need and at need contracts are now handled by the Bevis family and staff.All operations of the funeral process will be handled on location at 12008 NW State Road 20.CALL 643-3636Todd Wahlquist, Rocky Bevis & Ed PeacockLicensed Funeral Directors & Crematoryevis FuneralHome Bof Bristol of Bristol Two locations to serve youBlountstown and Bristol Adams Funeral Home674-5449 or 643-5410Visit us online: www.adamsfh.com Telephone (850) 674-2266 Your hometown funeral home since 1994A Hometown Funeral Director You Can Trust and Depend On!Funeral Services with Dignity, Caring and Professionalism. Marlon PeavyPeavy Funeral Home& CrematoryKA THR YN FANTALTHA Kathryn Fant, 87, of Altha passed away Thursday, October 27, 2011 at her home. She was born on September 11, 1924 in Oklahoma and had lived in Calhoun County for most of her life. She was a homemaker and a member of Travelers Rest Freewill Baptist Church in Clarksville. She was preceded in death by her husband, Clarence Fant. Survivors include three sons, Eugene Fant and his wife, Frances of Altha, Billy Fant of California and Al Fant and his friend, Anita of Blountstown; two daughters, Dale Shaw and Judy Danley and her husband, David, all of Blountstown; one brother, Alfred Kennedy and his wife, Deloris of California; two sisters, Mary Luker of California and Alice Smith and her husband, George of New Mexico; A special friend and caregiver, Sandra Beck; along with 19 grandchildren, numerous great-grandchildren and great-great-grandchildren. Services were held Sunday, Oct. 30 at Travelers Rest Freewill Baptist Church in Clarksville with Dr. ing. Interment followed in the Travelers Rest Cemetery in Clarksville. Peavy Funeral Home in Blountstown was in charge of the arrangements.WAL TER PA YNEMARIANNA Walter Payne, 88, of Marianna went to be with the Lord on October 28, 2011. He passed peacefully at his home in Marianna after an extended illness. He was born in 1923 in Richmond Hill, NY. In 1951, he moved to Ft. Lauderdale, where he oper ated a gas station and then a Firestone Store. He moved to Marianna in 2005. He was a member of the First United Methodist Church of Marianna. He served in World War II in the Army Air Corps, enjoyed playing golf and being with his family. Survivors include his loving wife of 37 years, Fauleen K. Payne; three sons, Robert W. Payne and his wife, Suzanne of Marianna, James C. Payne and his wife, Marsha of Melbourne and Thomas A. Payne of Ft. Lauderdale; and their spouses, all of Marianna, Lillie and Haily Payne of Melbourne and Thomas A. Payne, Jr. and his wife, Joy of Tennessee; one great-granddaughter, Sarah J. Payne of Ft. Lauderdale; along with two stepsons, Carlie McJunkin and his wife, Sue of Westminster, SC, and Wayne McJunkin of Fair Play, SC. Peavy Funeral Home in Blountstown was in charge of the arrangements.JUANIT A H. BRANDONTALLAHASSEE Juanita H. Brandon, 80, passed away in Tallahassee on October 28, 2011. She was born in Quincy on May 31, 1931 to John and Jessie Horton. She was married to Clarence N. Brandon from March 8, 1953, until his death in 2001. She was from a small family herself but her husband was one of nine children. She embraced Clarence's large, extended family where their annual Thanksgiving celebrations sometimes totaled as many as 75. She graduated from Florida State University and enjoyed a teaching career of almost 40 years that included Quincy and Shanks High Schools, Bristol Elementary School and Hosford School. Following her retirement from teaching, she actively participated in traveling with senior citizens groups and mission trips with her Bristol First Baptist Church family, where she devoted much of her time and energy. She was preceded in death by her mother, father, two brothers, husband and two infant children. Survivors include three children, Ricky Brandon and his wife, Deb of Sycamore, Clare Bilbo and her husband, Jimmy of Bristol, and Julie Necy Ander grandchildren, Melissa Brandon, Joey Bilbo and his wife, Lacy, Bruce Brandon, Mary Beth Cobb and her husband, Daven, Mandy Brandon and Jeff Dodson; and three great-granchildren, Jessie Harris, Reagan Bilbo, and Shelby Dodson. Services were held on Monday, Oct. 31 at Bristol First Baptist Church. Entombment followed at Hillcrest Cemetery in Quincy. Memorial donations may be made to Florida Baptist Children's Home, 8415 Buck Lake Road Tallahassee 32317-7151, phone (850) 878-1458, or Bristol First Baptist Church, 10677 NW Michaux Road, Bristol 32321, phone (850) 643-5400. Independent Funeral Home in Quincy was in charge of the arrangements.ROBERT BRUCE MANSPEAKERQUINCY Robert Bruce Manspeaker, 69, passed away Wednesday, October 26, 2011 at his home in Quincy surrounded by family and loved ones. He retired from the U.S. Navy after 20 years traveled all over the world. He was born and raised in a small town in Pennsylvania hills and lakes with his cousin Herbie Lear. He never met a stranger and everyone who ever met him would tell you he could spin a story a mile long. He had a story for everyone and loved a captive audience. He loved planting things, working with his hands and he always had multiple on-going projects. He was a man who knew something about everything and enjoyed sharing it with you. He was one of a kind and will be greatly missed. Survivors include his wife, Faye Manspeaker; three daughters, Marcy Kamalu of Hawaii, Valerie Smith and her husband, Tay of Havana and Suebrina Dalton and her husband, Jeffrey of Chattahoochee; one son, Robert H. Manspeaker and his wife, Rachel of Bristol; along with 13 grandchildren and three great-grandchildren. A memorial service will be held for family and friends on Wednesday, Nov. 2 at 2 p.m. at Thomas Memorial Baptist Church in Quincy. Charles McClellan Funeral Home in Quincy is in charge of the arrangements VERNON L. REYNOLDSBLOUNTSTOWN Vernon L. Reynolds, 91, of Blountstown passed away Monday, Oct. 31, 2011 in Blountstown. Born January 24, 1920 in Texas, he had lived in Blountstown since 2004, coming from Orangeville, CA. He was a retired state park ranger and was owner of his own dry cleaners in Sacramento, CA. He served in the United States Army during WWII. He was a member of the Masonic Lodge Concord Lodge # 117 in Sacramento, a 32nd degree Scottish Rite Mason and was a Shriner with Ben Ali Temple in Sacramento. He was a member of the First Presbyterian Church in Blountstown. Survivors include his wife, Eleanor Reynolds of Blountstown; two nephews, Larry Reynolds and Robert Reynolds; one niece, Nancy Reynolds, all of Sacramento, CA; two sister-in-laws, Jeanette Bailey of Blountstown and Ann Herndon of Tallahassee, several other nieces and nephews in Florida and California and a loving church family. Memorial services will be held Thursday, Nov. 3 at 11 a.m. (CT) at Peavy Funeral Home Chapel with Dr. cremation. Peavy Funeral Home in Blountstown is in charge of the arrangements. MARIANNA Covenant Hospice wants to share an important message with the community this November during National Hospice and Palliative Care Month: Hospice and palliative care providers take the time to make sure patients understand their illness and what care options might be available. Patient wishes are a top priority and our caregivers make sure they get the quality, compassionate care they want and deserve. We work hard all year to make sure people know that support, comfort and respect are available at a time when hope seems out of reach, said Dale O. Knee, Covenant Hospice President & CEO. Yet during November, we ramp up our efforts to raise awareness of the high-quality care thats available during one of lifes most challenging times. Hospice care provides expert pain management, symptom control, psycho-social support and spiritual care to patients and families when a cure is not possible. All the necessary medicines and equipment needed to keep a patient comfortable can be brought right to the home, which is where most Americans would like to be if at all possible. Hospice makes this happen. Palliative care brings these same skilled services earlier in the course of an illness and can be provided along with other treatments a patient may want to pursue. Many people dont realize that hospices are the largest providers of palliative care services in the US. More than 1.5 million people with a life-limiting ill ness get help from the nations hospice and palliative care providers every single year. Its about quality of life. With the help of hospice and palliative care, patients and families can focus on whats most important, living as fully as possible in spite of illness. Knee said. For additional information on hospice and pallia tive care, please contact your local Covenant Hospice branch.Covenant Hospice raises awareness during Hospice & Palliative Care Month

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Kids collect goodies and have lots of fun at Saturdays TRUNK OR TREAT Page 24 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL NOVEMBER 2, 2011 Families enjoyed a safe, fun Halloween event Saturday when the Mormon Church in Bristol sponsored the annual Trunk or Treat. Folks of all ages arrived in costume and went from vehicle to vehicle to collect goodies for their treat bags. LEFT: Kayla Eikeland and her son, Zack, handed out candy. ABOVE: A shy trick-or-treater has a up with toys and candy. DANIEL WILLIAMS PHOTOS

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NOVEMBER 2, 2011 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 25 PhotoWalk images showcased at Blountstown gallery FridayPhotographers shared their unique vision of downtown Blountstown when an exhibit of their work produced during the recent Scott Kelby WorldWide PhotoWalk went on display at the Preble-Rish Gallery in Blountstown Friday evening. LEFT: Guests enjoyed an outdoor reception at the gallery as they listened to acoustic music by Erik Alford. RIGHT: Anna Jo Hall stands with her camera slung against her hip in front of a display of her photographs. BELOW: Lynn Atwood and Anna Layton look over a portfolio of photos taken by Chris Calohan, Calohan is a photog raphy instructor at Bay High School. Both he and Atwood took part in the PhotoWalk. LEFT: A display of photos by Luanne Stone of Enterprise, AL, features many close-ups of things that often go unnoticed, including a rusting tractor plaque and the front of an old truck radio.PHOTOS BY BEN HALL, ANNA JO HALL and CHRIS CALOHAN.

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Page 26 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL NOVEMBER 2, 2011from 3-8 p.m. 10-26, 11-21998 Ford Explorer, 5.0 engine, V-8, runs great, needs battery, $1,000. Call 482-5049. 10-26, 11-22004 Xterra Nissan, white, power locks and windows, running boards, clean, good tires, 110,000 miles, automatic, tinted windows, with racks, runs good, $6,650 OBO/make offer. Call 509-3271.10-5, 11-2 MOTORCYCLES, ATVs & W AVERUNNERS2003 Honda ST 1300 Sport Touring bike, fully loaded, Stock or Two Brothers exhaust, heated grips, ABS brakes and a Corbin heated saddle. In excellent condi10-26, 11-2 HUNTING & FISHINGBrowning A-bolt 270 with dash mounts, $425. Call (706) 8161268. 10-26, 11-2, model 500AT, slide action, VR-30 barrel, ish stock, in excellent condition, $250. Remington model 522 Viper semi-auto, 22 cal LR, 20 barrel, black synthetic stock, 10 shot mag, cocking indicator, adj. rear sight, 4 5/8 lbs, $150. Call 4432422 in Bristol. 10-26, 11-2 TOOLS & EQUIPMENTCultivatorhas all the feet, $325 Call 526-1753. 11-2, 11-9 FREEPine straw, located in Bristol. Call 643-5401. 10-26, 11-2 LOST/FOUNDFound yellow lab, male, has been neutered, has a collar, found in Lake Mystic area. Call 6432516. 11-2, 11-9 Found Walker Hound, male, no collar, found in Turkey Creek area. Call 274-0124. 11-2, 11-9 FURNITUREDouble bed with frame and box spring, $65; 42 round table with golden legs and two chairs, $65; two night stands, $15 for both; sofa chair, $20; two desks, $15 $25. Call 674-3264. 11-2, 11-9 Hutch computer desk, $150. Call 674-6022. 10-26, 11-2Chest of drawers, $15. Call 6743264. 10-26, 11-2 CARS1998 Honda Accord, two door, black, sunroof, automatic, 146,000 miles, runs good, $4,200. 2002 Honda Civic, silver, four door, standard transmission, 164,000 miles, $3,500. Call 557-7897 11-2, 11-9 1999 Saturn hatchback, four door, runs good, 44,000 miles, $2,000 OBO. Call 674-9161. 11-2, 11-9 1995 Toyota Camry white, runs great, automatic, $1,500 OBO. Call 447-1137 or 674-1357. 11-2, 11-92001 Ford Mustang, runs great, cold AC, Lambo doors, $1,500. Call (850) 372-3204. 10-26, 11-2 TRUCKS2009 Chevy Silverado, 2500 HD, crew cab, 4x4, good as a work truck, $29,000. Call 447-1711. 11-2, 11-9 1987 Chevy Suburban needs some work but does run, $1,000. Call 674-9161. 11-2, 11-9 2003 Chevy S10 ZR2, 4 wheel drive, extended cab with third door, 4.3 liter motor, V6, $7,000. Call 447-4331. 11-2, 11-9 1993 Ford Econoline van, good condition, has owners manual, good on gas, TV-VCR combo, $2,500 OBO. Call 762-9504 or (850) 557-2134 and leave message. 10-26, 11-21998 Ford F150 XLT Tritan, V-8, 4.6 liter, extended cab, 3-door, $2,800. Call (850) 557-3583.10-26, 11-21989 Chevy Blazer, engine needs work, $800 OBO. Call 643-2977 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNALCLASSIFIEDSTo place your ad, call 643-3333 by noon Eastern Time on Saturday. Non-business ads run FREE for 2 weeks. ITEMS FOR SALECashmere coat, womens size, has real fur collar, $15; assorted stuffed animals, $3 each; Christmas yard decorations, two deer, one snowman, lots of lights and much more. Make offer. Call 6748376. 11-2, 11-9 Wig, average size, brown, $15; 1940s antique adding machine, make offer; cookbooks, 25 cents each. Call 379-3002. 11-2, 11-9 Jackets, mens, $5 each. Childs jeep, needs battery and paint, $30. Call 674-3264. 11-2, 11-9 Jet 10 Power electric chair, new battery, $800. Call 674-4454.10-26, 11-2Weslo treadmill, one year old, used very little, $200. Call 6744454. 10-26, 11-217 Roping saddle, tooled leather, great condition, with stand, $225. Call (850) 625-0265. 10-26, 11-2Kodak Medalist AF Carousel projector, 35mm slide, comes with two lenses, one Kodak Ektanar C 102mm f/2.8 projection lens, and one Kodak projection Ektagraphic IF 100 to 150mm A3.5 zoom lens, plus 3-140 Kodak Ektagraphic slide trays and 2-80 slide trays. Projector never used except to test. New in box with manuals, $90. Call 443-2422 in Bristol. 10-26, 11-2Acer Aspire One D255E Notebook, 10.1 LED screen with Win 7, ultra thin, about eight months old, carrying case and charger, $195. Call 443-2422 in Bristol.10-26, 11-2Grandfather clock, $40. Dishes with 22K gold trim, make offer; mens jacket, $5; small doll crib, $12. Call 674-3264. 10-26, 11-2Baby changing table, $40. Call 209-2700. 10-26, 11-2SportRider scooter, brand new, battery never been charged. Several TV cabinets, several vanity cabinets with sink. Good selection of clothes, men, women and childrens, shoes, ladies purses, electronic equipment, furniture and appliances. Everyone is invited to shop at the Calhoun-Liberty Ministry Center store. Located on Hwy. 20 E. in Blountstown, 6741818. UFN APPLIANCESRonco rotisserie, as seen on TV, comes with cookbook, like new, $50 OBO. Call 674-8376. 11-2, 11-9Microwave, large, $25; Toaster oven, $12. Call 674-3264. 10-26, 11-2Washing machine, $50. Call 447-2885. 10-26, 11-2 BD, 1 1/2 BA TownhousesBRISTOL FOR RENTBLOUNTSTOWN Phone 643-7740 For Rent in ALTHA762-9555 or 762-8597Very NICE 2 & 3 bedroom trailers. 5 x 10 .....$27 10 x 10 ....$43 10 x 20 ....$70 10 x 25 ....$90M & W SELFSTORAGE RENTAL SCall 573-5255, 762-9555, 762-8807 or 762-8597 7 days a week service UFN Mobile Home for Rent in CalhounCall 674-88882 BD, 2 BA, located six miles north on Hwy. 69 N. NO PETS. Damage & Cleaning deposit, Water, sewer and grass cutting provided.UFN Home for Rent inHOSFORDCall 379-8287 or 509-4227for more information3 BD, 2 BA Located across from Hosford School$400 MONTH REAL ESTATE Will buy 10 to 1,000 acres, reasonably priced. Immediate closing.Call (850) 544-5441 or (850) 570-0222 WANTED: NO INTEREST PLANS R.E. BrokerLAND SALE 10 ACRE + TRACTSPaved Highway Frontage With Planted Pine Trees From $4,995 per acreWith $600 Down Regular ContractWith $2,500 Down No Interest First YearWith $5,000 Down No Interest First 2 Years Owner Financing No Qualifying 1 & 2 bedroom mobile homes in Blountstown and Bristol. $105 to $155 weekly. Deposit required. All utilities included. NO PETS. Singles or Couples preferred. Also RV for rent. 10% Sr. Disc. Call 674-7616FOR RENT AKC Male YorkiesBorn on Aug. 8. Parents/ Grandparents on site. Raised in our home for companion dogs. No Breeders. Interview & Some Restrictions. $500 eachCall 850-643-2321 FOR RENT2 BD, 1 BA very clean $450 month Call (954) 643-8322 for more information. Country Home FOR Sale in Bristol $175,000Call 643-6207 Hard Drives, Power Supplies, Memory, Sound Cards, Laptop Adaptors and more. Call The Computer Man, J. Hatch at (850) 674-3546REPAIR PARTS for ComputersCATCH UP ONLINE AT CLJNEWS.C OM.Miss a recent news story?

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NOVEMBER 2, 2011 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 27 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNALCLASSIFIEDSTo place your ad, call 643-3333 by noon Eastern Time on Saturday. Non-business ads run FREE for 2 weeks. PETS/SUPPLIESMini chihuahua, long haired, female, nine months old, $80; Pekingese, free to a good home; mini horse, Appaloosa and Palomino Chow puppiesen weeks old, mom and dad on Kittens, two male and one female, gray and white, litter box trained and eats dry food, approximately eight weeks old. Free to a good Dwarf bunnies, six males, $6 each; Gerbils, four, $3 each. Call Turkeys, Rottweiler, AKC registered feon shots and worming, approximately 40 lbs., Good with kids and 2058. Kittens: one tabby female, three orange males. Free to good Dwarf hamsters, six weeks old. Moving: need homes for two dogs, one a Chocolate Lab/White and other animals, the other a with kids not with other animals, Two mini horses, one six-monthold male and one female, a year WANTEDElectric stove, reasonably priced. V ehicle, disabled person in need of a car or truck to make payments Field fence needed, Small house dog White English Bulldog puppy. We buy junk cars and trucks. We will pick them up. Call 643YARD SALES BLOUNTST OWN Yard Sale decor items, clothing, shoes, Yard Sale noon. Located at 20830 SE table, $5; coffee table, free. Yard Sale 2 p.m., located in the Kids King6002. Multi-family Yard Sale, Sat., 3058. Multi-familyYard Sale, Sat., cated at Heads Up & Nails For Multi-family Yard Sale, Sat., Road. Household items, furniture, decor, clothes, baby items Yard Sale men, women and girls, shoes, toys, household items, books BRIST OL Yard Salethe Liberty County Courthouse. Baby items, household items Multi-family Yard Sale, Sat., ed at the corner lot next to Quick Pic. Phone 643-8383. CLARKSVILLE Yard Sale north of Hwy 20. Household items, furniture, baby boy and adult clothes and more. Phone Two Family Estate Sale, Fri. electric heaters, tools, household items, furniture, collectibles Estate Sale MARIANNA Moving Sale clothes, decorations, household items, kitchen items, tools, furniture, exercise equipment, camAL THA Multi-family Yard Sale, Sat., Childrens clothes, toys, household items and baby furniture. Yard Sale beginning at 8 a.m., located on tors, Keyboards, Speakers and much more. Call The Computer Man, J. Hatch at (850) 674-3546Just in time for CHRISTMAS STARSCOPEFAMOUS BIRTHDAYSARIES Mar 21/Apr 20 Aries, make memories this week because the person with whom you days. Romance is out of the cards. TAURUS Apr 21/May 21 Taurus, if you are on a health kick, then this is the time to start incorporating some exercise into your routine. If joining a gym is out, then simply walk with friends. GEMINI May 22/Jun 21 book not to get something done, Gemini. The fact remains that the much procrastination. CANCER Jun 22/Jul 22 Cancer, momentary lapses in judgement could cause focused on the tasks at hand to LEO Jul 23/Aug 23 Leo, friendship is the name of the game this week, and you will meet potential to be lifelong buddies. Introduce your existing friends, too. VIRGO Aug 24/Sept 22 Sometimes the answer is right cant see it right away, Virgo. Look more closely at the possibilities and stop naysaying. LIBRA Sept 23/Oct 23 Libra, you may be reconsidering a recent decision. It just may be too late to change things at SCORPIO Oct 24/Nov 22 less than satisfying. Not one to know of the injustice that was done and garner some supporters. SAGITTARIUS Nov 23/Dec 21 Happy times call for a celebration, Sagittarius. Host a party or a get-together with friends and family. Use the time to catch up on old times and relationships. CAPRICORN Dec 22/Jan 20 Capricorn, theres not much to do this week that you cant tackle at another time. This it is you desire. AQUARIUS Jan 21/Feb 18 Take a few days to relax, Aquarius. It will clear your head and put you in a better place for making hard decisions that seem to crop up out of nowhere. PISCES Feb 19/Mar 20 Its time to put that romance into the next gear, Pisces. You dont want to run the risk of Week of Nov. 6 ~ Nov. 12NOVEMBER 6 NOVEMBER 8 Lane in Altha, water included. NO PETS. Monthly rent$500 plus $300 depositDouble-wide FOR Rent I C C.Call 643-7770 (DAYS) or 674-3570 (NIGHTS) Really nice, $650 month(850) 962-9711Riverfront home for Rent in Telogia The Calhoun Liberty JOURNALServing two counties that make up one great community!HOURS: PHONE (850) 643-3333 or FAX

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Page 28 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL NOVEMBER 2, 2011 Ages 9-12First place Chick Magnet, Marcus Barbee, 10, Mark and Casite Barbee of Kinard and Paulette Smith of Panama City Second place Hunter in Tree Stand, Tripp McGill, 9, Claude and Lynn McGill of Wewahitchka Third place Facebook and Twitter, Chris Willis, 12, Tom and Catrina Willis of Blount stown and Corey Thrasher, 11, Alan and Michelle Thrasher of Altha (ABOVE) Ages 6-8First place Flo from Progressive Insurance, Jaden Parramore, 6, Kelyn and Danielle Parramore of Bristol Second place Rockem Sockem Robots, Dixson and Dylan Thrasher, 7, Alan and Michelle Thrasher of Altha Third place Humpty Dumpty, Christian Ward, 8, Chris and Tammy Ward of Wewahitchka (LEFT) Ages 0-2First place Future Fisherman, Trent McCardle, 7 months old, son of Brent McCardle and Ashley Simco of Clarksville. Second place Bowl of Spaghetti and Meatballs, Con nor Johns, 10 months old, son of Summer Grice and Steven Johns of Wewahitchka. Third place Cruella de Vil and her pup, Keianna Powell, 14 weeks old, December Wilson of Blountstown and Jayce Morgan Reynolds, 9 weeks old, Terri Lynn Richards and Craig Lipford of Clarksville. Fourth place Dippin Dots, Jadelyn Underwood, 1, Julie and Josh Underwood of Blountstown. (BELOW) Ages 3-5First place Amelia Earhart, Katy Hill, 3, Jennifer and Brian Hill of Talla hassee Second place Robot, Jalynn Simms, 5, Tyson and Bridget OBryan of Kinard Third place Praying Mantis, Gracie Barbee, 4, Mark and Casite Barbee of Kinard ANGIE DA VIS PHOT OS

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NOVEMBER 2, 2011 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 29 AREA EVENTS Bristol Bigfoot terrorizes riders on annual Halloween train tripThe riders on this years Scream-Liner Express train at Veterans Memorial Park in Bristol got a shock when Bigfoot emerged from the woods to taunt them as they traveled through the park. TOP: Bigfoot gets frighteningly close to a group of nervous riders. ABOVE: A couple of helpful Zombies help Bigfoot freshen up his fur before he goes out to greet another group of passengers. LEFT: A youngster looks stunned after getting a glimpse of one of the scary creatures chasing the train. BELOW LEFT: A girl warns the other passengers that a Zombie is approaching. BELOW: Bigfoot lumbers toward a passing train car. DANIEL WILLIAMS PHOTOS Make plans now to come help us celebrate our 30th anniversary of the annual Homemakers Holiday Fair on Nov. 4 & 5 at the Santa Rosa County Auditorium in Milton from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. During the past 29 years, the show has gained a reputation as a great place decorations from local and regional crafters. A special highlight of the show has always been the wonderful homemade soup and sandwiches made by the talented members of the Association for Home and Community Educators (HCE) which sponsor the show. Admission is free. Lots of door prizes will be given away. For more information, call the University of Florida/IFAS-Santa Rosa County Extension, at (850) 623-3868, between the hours of 8 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. weekdays. Homemakers Holiday Fair set for MiltonBeekeeping tradeshow set for Washington Co.Santa Rosa Co. starts beekeeping Santa Rosa County Extension and the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Science (UF/IFAS) will present a series of classes called Beekeeping in the Panhandle. The classes cover a variety of beekeeping topics including types of honey bees, pollen collection and how to split hives. These classes will be offered by inter active video at the Santa Rosa County Lane in Jay and held from 6-8 p.m. on the scheduled dates. Eight sessions are as follows: Bees Beekeeping and Beekeeping Equip ment eases Pollination Ecology Hive Increasing Hive Numbers and Pollina tion Beekeeping Along with the registration form, a $50 fee per person and $25 for each additional person covers the cost of the class and materials. You can mail the registration to the Santa Rosa County Extension OfRegistration and payments are due by A Beekeeping Tradeshow is also being held at the Washington County Extension tration is at 9 a.m. the day of the event. This free tradeshow consists of hands-on demonstrations, exhibits and more.

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Page 30 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL NOVEMBER 2, 2011 CHIPOLA COLLEGE is accepting applications for THEA TRE TECHNICAL DIRECT ORBachelors degree (BA/BFA) plus two years related work experience required; Masters degree (MA/ MFA) in Theatre Design and Technology or related preferred. DEGREE(S) MUST BE FROM A REGIONALLY ACCREDITED COLLEGE AND/OR UNIVERSITY APPLICA TION DEADLINE: OPEN UNTIL FILLED tigations which may include, but are not limited to Contact Human Resources at pippenw@chipola.edu or at (850)718-2269 for application details.EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER Part-time Nursery Worker NeededSUNDAY S & WEDNE S DAY S First Baptist Church Blountstown Monday-Friday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. 16693 SE Pear Street Blountstown, FL 32424NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE Management OpportunityChartwells School Dining is currently looking for a County. This position will afford a successful candidate the The candidate will be responsible for successfully managing a single school operation ensuring quality well as accounting and tracking required by company and state guidelines. School dining experience would be a plus but is not required. If interested please send your resume to: Vernon.tanner@compass-usa.com by November 10, 2011. Senior Dental Care is currently accepting applications for an Administrative Assistant experience with answering multiple communication skills. Experience with Medicaid claims is a plus. Must apply through the One Stop Center in Blountstown. Senior Dental Care is currently accepting applications for an Marketing Representative Must be a gifted communicator with a strong sales and marketing background. work experience in Marketing/Sales. Fax Resume to (850) 674-2951 CLJ JOBS PUBLIC & LEGAL NOTICESNOTICE OF APPLICA TION FOR T AX DEED NOTICE IS HEREBY GIV EN, that PACKY G. JOHNSON the holder of the follow be issued thereon. The cerissuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are CERTIFICATE NO. 17 lying in Section 26, Township 1 South, Range 6 West, Liberty County, Florida, said parcel of land being more particularly described by metes and bounds as folCOMMENCE at a 4 inch by 4 inch blank concrete monument (found) known as marking the Southwest Corner of Section 26, and run thence East 3896.31 feet; thence North 2173.35 feet to a State Road Department right of way concrete monument on the Northeasterly right of way boundary of County Road No. S-67-a, (100.00 foot right of way), thence South 52 Degrees 23 Minutes 54 Seconds West 50.00 feet to a centerline State 90 + 25.01 feet of said County Road, as per State Road Right of Way Map Section No. 565091964; thence continue South 52 Degrees 23 Minutes 54 Seconds West 50.00 feet to the Southwesterly right of way of said County Road, thence along said Southwesterly right of way bound 37 Degrees 36 Minutes 06 Seconds West (bearing Base) along said Southwesterly right of way boundary, a distance of 865.74 feet to a 5/8 inch rebar with a cap (RLS#3031) for a Point of us of 2915.93 feet through a central angle of 15 Degrees 36 Minutes 30 Seconds, for an arc distance of 794.34 feet (The chord of said arc being North 29 Degrees 47 minutes 52 Seconds, West 791.89 feet) to a point on the Northerly right of way bound ary of a 60.00 foot roadway; westerly right of way bound ary run South 57 Degrees 48 Minutes 40 Seconds West, along said Northerly right of way, a distance of 603.56 feet for the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING, thence continue South 57 Degrees 48 Minutes 40 Seconds West, along said Northerly right of way boundary, a distance of 150.77 feet; thence North 32 Degrees 28 Minutes 44 Seconds West, 278.60 feet to a concrete monument (PSM#3031) thence North 70 Degrees 58 Minutes 42 Seconds East, 190.67 feet to a concrete monument (PSM#3031); thence South 24 Degrees 05 Minutes 10 Seconds East, 237.54 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. THE EASTERLY 30.00 feet being subject to an assess Easement. MANUFACTURERS AND TRADERS TRUST COMPANY Said property being in the County of Liberty, State of Florida. be redeemed according to law the property described sold to the highest bidder at the front door of the Lib erty County Courthouse at 11:00 A.M. E.S.T. on the 8th day of December, 2011. ROBERT HILL, CLERK OF COURT Kathleen E. Brown, Deputy Clerk11-2 T 11-23This report represents some events the FWC handled over the week of Oct. 21-27; however, it does not include all actions taken by the Division of Law Enforcement. Patrol, Protect, Preserve BA Y COUNTY SANT A ROSA COUNTY OKALOOSA COUNTY FWC Division of Law Enforcement Weekly Report for Oct. 21-27

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NOVEMBER 2, 2011 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 31 CLJ NEWS .COM To place your ad call us at 643-3333 SERVICE DIRECTORY Whaley Heating & Air Conditioning (850) 674-4777FL LIC. # CMC1249570 Accepting: : (850) 643-6925 : (850) 643-2064 : grich0656@aol.com10536-B NW SR 20 Bristol, FL 32321 Located in the Apalachee RestaurantGary Richards, EA MBAEnrolled Agent Enrolled to Practice Before the IRS Business & Accounting Solutions Inc. 4433 NW C.R. 274 Altha, Fl 32421 (850) 762-9402 Cell (850) 832-5055Dozer and Excavation work Over 20 years experienceClay ONealsLand Clearing, Inc. William's HomeImprovements "No Job Too Big or Small"Concrete work, landscape, pressure cleaning, renovations, seamless gutter, painting, vinyl, & screen enclosure Call 674-8092Licensed & Insured, contractor & rooferFOR FREE ESTIMATES LIBERTY TIRE COMPANY 10781 NW SR 20 Bristol, Fl 32321Call 643-2939 MV75332Hours: Monday thru Friday 7 5 & Saturday 7 12Come see us for all your tire needs or give us a call for roadside service, oil changes & tire rotation. We specialize in sales and repair of tires for:Commercial Trucks and Trailers, OTR Equipment, Farm Equipment, Passenger Car & Light Truck Tires Call Chris Nissley at 674-8081 or 643-8561 (Cell) STUMP GRINDINGReasonable Rates & FREE Estimates! That Darn PumpThere is never a convenient time to be without water.WELLS (850)643-HELP Thats 643-4357 or Home 643-3857For friendly service and never any overtime charges call, BARLOWSWell Drilling Pump Repair & Water ServicesWell drilling & Pump repair Deep or Shallow Wells________________________Serving Gulf, Franklin, Bay, Calhoun, Washington & Liberty Counties________________________850-639-9355or850-814-7454 Hwy 71 South on J.P. Peacock Rd, Altha. Day or night,Check out our prices before buying from somewhere else. For Weddings, Birthdays and all Holidays, come in or call us. Margies Florist Phone David Morris at (850) 868-1295 or Dispatch at (850) 575-4414 Locally owned & OperatedNow serving the Hosford, Telogia, and Bristol areas. Clint Hatcher, OwnerElectrical Lic. # ER13014037 Building Lic. # RB29003511New Homes Garages Additions Electrical Remodeling Foundations Screenrooms Sunrooms VINYL SIDING RESIDENTAL & COMMERCIAL FREE EstimatesServing Calhoun, Liberty & Jackson CountiesBecome FWCs eyes and ears to protect wildlifeIf you are like most Florida anglers and boaters, you enjoy your time on the water. Its an opportunity to get close to nature and break the routine of work, school or retirement. The peaceful challenge of tryrial prey is made possible, in part, by the So when you see someone threatening those resources by damaging habitat, polluting the water, using illegal gear, taking more than the bag limit or keeping under options, but the newest, most real-time option is to silently send a text message to the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conser Conscientious anglers and boaters can text Tip@MyThe text-messaging opnient for the public, said Col. Jim Brown, director Law Enforcement. We also hope it will make Wildlife catching poachers and other The Wildlife Alert Reward Program has helped the FWC be anonymously reported online The highly successful Wildlife Alert Reward Program has been around for more peoples informa tion results in an arrest, they may become eligible for a reward of up to $1,000. Many conclaim the reward because helping get a life by reporting unsafe boaters, including boating ward enough. But being able to do so crucial. Cell phones, and now texting, help get incrime is still ongoing. When text message, it is important to include as much information as possible, such as the location. Once a report is initiated, FWC dispatchers can respond gather additional details. tion immediately, dont forget to include reporters may remain anonymous; they do addresses, and they will not be required for a reward, either by text, email or call ing 888-404-FWCC. Trained dispatchers The real beauty of the program is that ones who pay the reward money. When into the Wildlife Alert Reward Fund. So, turn them in. There are many other ways that concerned citizens can directly assist the FWC. 0511. For additional listings, and online contact forms for many of these reporting those who misuse our wildlife resources while intoxicated is one way we can all help. Through Wildlife Alert and these other programs, ordinary people become the eyes and ears of the FWC, keep costs keep outdoor enthusiasts safe. Katie Purcell contributed to this column. She is the FWCs public information coordinator for its Division of Law Enforcement. Florida Fish Busters by Bob Wattendorf Check us out in Print or online atCLJNews .com

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Page 32 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL NOVEMBER 2, 2011 Crowds return for the annual KINARD HALLOWEEN CARNIVAL For many people, Kinard is the only place to be to celebrate Halloween and enjoy a true old-fashioned small town carnival. About 3,500 people attended Saturdays event and Kinard Fire Dept., which sponsors the carnival to raise funds TOP RIGHT: Lee Shelton stays close by as son Gunner enjoys a horseback ride. Twins Sara Grace and Savannah Highsmith join a friend to look at a tub full of bright colored rubber ducks. LEFT: Contestants take their turn in front of the judges as the costume contest judging begins. ANGIE DA VIS PHOT OS