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UF00027796 UFPKY NEH LSTA SLAF



The Calhoun-Liberty journal
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00027796/00293
 Material Information
Title: The Calhoun-Liberty journal
Portion of title: Calhoun Liberty journal
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: The Liberty Journal, Inc.
Place of Publication: Bristol Fla
Publication Date: 10-26-2011
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Bristol (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Liberty County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Calhoun County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Liberty -- Bristol
Coordinates: 30.426944 x -84.979167 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in Sept. 1991.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 11, no. 38 (Sept. 18, 1991).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002046630
oclc - 33425067
notis - AKN4565
lccn - sn 95047245
System ID: UF00027796:00293
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly journal (Bristol, Fla.)

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Birthdays.....13 Speak Up!...15 Schools....18 & 19 Obituaries.....23 Volleyball...25 Classieds.....26 & 27 Sheriff's Log...2 Community Calendar...4 Commentary...6, 7 News from the Pews...10 Farmer's Almanac...11 THE CalALHounOUN-LIbBERt TY J OURRNAL Volume 31, Number 43 Wednesday, Oct. 26, 2011 50includes taxCLJ News.com Marianna teen dies in wreck on Bodiford RRd. by Teresa Eubanks, Journal EditorAn 18-year-old Marianna teen died Monday evening after her vehicle overturned on Bodiford Road, 1.5 miles west of SR 71, in Altha. According to the Florida Highway on Bodiford Road around 7:15 p.m. when she traveled onto the north grass shoulder. She overcorrected, lost control of her 1999 Ford Explorer, and went across both lanes of the road. The vehicle overturned in a ditch, coming to rest on its roof. The accident was reported a couple of hours later, with FHP arriving on scene at 9:32 p.m. The car rolled over and pinned her arm on the drivers side, said Altha Fire people on scene that we were able to lift the car up and pull her arm out from under it. They got her out pretty quick. She was not wearing a seat belt. got there, he said. She had a serious head injury. They were working on her in the ambulance but they lost her en route to the hospital, according to another emergency worker at the scene. She was Hospital. The cause of the accident has not possible that she wrecked while trying to avoid hitting an animal. That place is notorious for deer crossing the road, he said. Very few people live down that road and none of them knew who she was, why she was there or who she might have been visiting, he said. The Marianna address listed for her was not current, he said, explaining, She hadnt been there in a month. He noted that the vehicle had a temporary tag from South Florida. School through her junior year last year and then moved to Marianna, according to a school employee. She was not registered at Marianna High School. The crash was investigated by FHP Crystal Oday is shown above in a photo posted on her Facebook page. The wreckage of her Ford Explorer is show as it was removed from the scene Monday night. DANIEL WILLIAMS PHOTO Hosford ParadeA youngster surveys the trail ahead as he rides in Saturdays Hosford PTO Fall Festival parade. More parade and festival photos on page 21. DANIEL WILLIAMS PHOTO Tigers defeat LCHSA Blountstown Tiger player races past a Liberty County opponent as the cross-river rivals met on Bowles Field Friday. See pages 16 & 17 for more. DANIEL WILLIAMS PHOTOInvestigators nd meth cooking on hotplate in home with 8 childrenby Teresa Eubanks, Journal Editor after announcing their presence and repeatedly knocking, members of the door open to enter a home where they found four women, eight children and a batch of methamphetamine cooking on a hot plate. The Task Force went to 19054 NE to serve a search warrant and found a meth lab in operation. The three women who share the 41, Amy Johnston, 30, and Maria Thurman, 34, were there, along with a fourth woman, Violet Manning, 37, of Blountstown. Manning was taken into custody on a felony warrant. She handed over a plastic container that held approximately a half gram of methamphetamine before being placed in a patrol car.FoOUR womenWOMEN a ARRestedESTED inIN OctCT 19 RaidAID SamanthaAMANTHA WhiteHITE MaARiaIA ThHURmanMAN AmMY JohnsonOHNSON VioletIOLET ManninANNING See METH MOMS continued inside on page 3 A Jacksonville man was charged with introducing contraband into a state correctional facility after his palm print was found on a package containing 18 grams of marijuana that was mailed Institution earlier this year. inspection, a manila envelope was found inside that contained several pieces of an inmates mail. A slot had been cut in one envelope and a green leafy substance wrapped in cellophane had tested positive for marijuana. The package was submitted to Bond was set at $5,000. Riley was released from custody Saturday.Man charged with mailing marijuana to prison inmate ShaHA YeE RileILEY RResidents of Kinard want Bay County to pave its side of Scotts Ferry RRoadPAGEE 9 INSIDE Volunteers get ready for big Halloween Carnival Saturday......5LCHS class reunion.....12Business news..........14

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Page 2 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL OCTo OBER 26, 2011 ARREST REPORTS compiled by Journal Editor Teresa Eubanks CC A L H O U N CC O U N TT YOct. 17 Hamilton Thomas, battery, CCSO. Alfred Way, driving with license suspended or revoked, CCSO. Oct. 19 Gregory Couch, VOP, CCSO. James Melvin, VOCR, failure to appear, CCSO. Violet Virgina Manning, manufacture of meth, possession of meth, aggravated child abuse, CCSO. Oct. 20 Amy Michelle Johnston, manufacture of meth, possession of meth, aggravated child abuse, CCSO. Maria Thurman, manufacture of meth, possession of meth, aggravated child abuse, CCSO. Samantha Michelle White, manufacture of meth, possession of meth, aggravated child abuse, CCSO. Brandon Ronnie Pitts, VOP, CCSO. Matthew Alexander Hall, possession of a controlled substance with intent to distribute within 1,000 feet of a school, possession of drug paraphernalia, possession of a weapon BPD. Oct. 22 Lisa Ammons, ing with license suspended or revoked, BPD. Oct. 24 Keith Jones, contempt of court, CCSO.L I BB EE RR TT Y CC O U N TT YOct. 17 Arnold Pitts, VOCP, LCSO. Oct. 18 Victor OJeda, VOSP, LCSO. Oct. 20 Violet Manning, holding for CCSO, CCSO. Amy Johnston, holding for CCSO, CCSO. Marie Thurman, holding for CCSO, CCSO. Samantha M. White, holding for CCSO, CCSO. Violet Manning, VOSP, escape, LCSO. Oct. 21 Shaye Riley, introducing contraband into a state correctional facility, LCSO. Oct. 22 Lisa Ammons, holding for CCSO, CCSO. Jessica H. Thomas, breach of peace, disorLCSO. SHER ER IFFS LOG BBlountstown Police Dept.Oct. 17 through Oct. 23, 2011 Citations issued: Accidents...............04 .................12 Special details B Business alarms.....00 RResidential alarms..........01 C C omplaints..............................................................41 Arrested? D. Winn, P.A. is here to help. We understand how important it is for you to know your legal rights and how to protect them. Our areas of practice include:Felony & Misdemeanor Offenses Violations of Probation*Call for a free consultationJason D. Winn, P.A. (850) 222-7199 20960 NE Burlington Rd., HosfordFARM EQUIPMe E NT AND A ANTIQUe E AAUCTION TT ractors, Mowers, C Cultivators and All TT ypes Farm EEquipment10% Buyers Premium All Consignments Welcome Man charged with battery after dispute at local night clubA 51-year-old Blountstown man was charged with battery after a dispute with a woman at a Calhoun County night club Sept. 25. Hamilton Thomas was arrested and then given a conditional release after a woman filed charges against him. According to the woman, she and a female friend were leaving the Cabin in the Pines nightclub when Thomas started walking with them. The woman said he was upset over an incident involving a cigarette a few days earlier and the two argued as they walked toward a parked vehicle. She said Thomas then pushed her, causing a small scratch on her back, and when she got into her friends car to leave, Thomas leaned in through the drivers door and started hitting her. The womans friend said she got Thomas out of her car and got him to leave after witnessing him hitting the other woman. Hamilton was later picked up on an outstanding warrant. When asked about the altercation, he said they argued but their dispute never became physical. HamiltonAMILTON ThomasHOMASA Blountstown man was arrested after a Blountstown pulled him over and found that his license was suspended. Johns Street behind Blountstown Middle School around When asked if he had any illegal substances on him, Hall handed over a bag of marijuana from his front pants pocket, according to the arrest report. During a search of Halls found a black bag inside the pocket of a jacket that had been left on the front passengers seat. Inside the bag was a set of digital scales with marijuana residue on them, along with several small plastic baggies commonly used to package marijuana for sale. An unloaded .38-caliber revolver was found hidden in a speaker hole in the drivers door, covered by a blue washcloth. Hall denied ownership of the gun but admitted the marijuana and scales were his. He was charged with possession of a controlled substance with intent to distribute within 1,000 feet suspended license and possession of drug paraphernalia. He is being held on $26,000 bond.Man arrested after being stopped for expired tag MatthewATTHEW HallALLA 22-year-old Hosford woman was charged with breach of peace, disorderly conduct, fighting and escape after a disturbance on Third Street in Bristol early Saturday morning. Arrested was Jessica Ann Thomas. Liberty County Sheriffs Deputy Jonathan Gentry responded to a disturbance call around 2 a.m. and found two women fighting in the street. A bystander came forward and restrained Thomas, who was screaming and yelling uncontrollably. The deputy handcuffed Thomas, who smelled strongly of an alcoholic beverage and was unsteady on her feet, and placed her in the back seat of his patrol car. She kept screaming and yelled that she didnt want to go to jail. A 17-year-old friend came up and hugged Thomas before she got into the patrol car and begged the deputy not to arrest her. The girl left only after repeated requests from the deputy. After securing Thomas in his car, the deputy went to the residence of Brandy Wagoner, who said she walked outside when she heard someone screaming. She said she saw Thomas, who yelled at her and accused her of stealing her camera. Wagoner said she tried to tell Thomas she did not take her camera but Thomas was very swing at her in the middle of the street. Wagoner stated she told Thomas and her friend to leave but Thomas kept trying to hit her. The deputy arrived just as the two women started Thomas younger friend, who also smelled strongly of alcohol, became agitated when the deputy tried to talk with her and screamed that neither she nor Thomas had done anything wrong. As the deputy spoke with several bystanders to determine what had happened, he looked back at his patrol car and saw Thomas teenage friend open the back door of the vehicle. Thomas ran into a nearby yard. He handcuffed the juvenile, who began screaming and cursing uncontrollably. She was put in the back of the patrol car before the deputy began searching for Thomas. Thomas disappeared but after the sheriffs office got a phone tip on her whereabouts, the deputy caught up with her hiding on the back porch of a home on CR 12 South. The two women were taken to the county jail. The deputy later asked the younger woman why she had let Thomas out of the patrol car. Because she has The younger girl, who is not named here because she is a juvenile, was and aiding an escape.Woman arrested for creating disturbance, JessicaESSICA ThomasHOMAS

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OCTo OBER 26, 2011 / THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 3 All were charged with manufacturing methamphetamine, possession of methamphetamine and aggravated child abuse. They were jailed and bond was set at $15,000 each. During a search of the home, Task Force members found a one pot method meth lab in the back bedroom. As they entered, they turned off a hot plate being used to heat meth oil that had been produced in a reaction vessel in the same room. Numerous items used in the meth-making process were found in the home with most being located in the master bedroom, including stripped out lithium batteries, Coleman fuel, acid and drain opener. During interviews after their arrests, White, Johnston and Thurman admitted that methamphetamine was being manufactured in the presence of children. Each woman described her part in the process, according to the arrest report. Thurmans six children and Whites two were removed from the residence and turned over to family and friends under the supervision of the Department of Children and Families. Lt. Mark Mallory, Sgt. Todd Wheetley, Sgt. Jared Nichols and Calhoun County Sheriffs Deputies Scotty Norris, Gary McGhee and Jail Deputy Christian Smith took part in last weeks search and arrests.METETH MOMScontinued from the front pageA woman arrested during a raid on a Blountstown meth lab had one more charge added to the list when she escaped from the Liberty County Jail Thursday. According to a report from the Liberty County processed at 5:29 p.m. when she asked a correctional When told that she would be placed in a regular cell, Manning stated, I cant do that and then ran out of the jail. Responding to a report from the dispatcher of an escape, Deputy Bobby Revell headed for the county jail and spotted Manning about 50 yards from the building where she was laying down by a fence. She was returned to custody within ten minutes and charged with escape.Woman charged with escape from Liberty CCounty JailView UF bats online this Halloween with new Fla. Museum video camerasStreaming videos of the colony, new website available online now the corner, its time to look out for those fabled blood-sucking bats. But dont confuse fact with legend bats are too busy eating insects to worry about sucking blood or getting tangled in your hair. fered centuries of misconceptions. Yet, bats have proven more intriguing than spooky when provided a home in an urban setting, as the University of Florida campus sees thousands of visitors to its stilted bat structures every year. UF has the worlds largest continuously occupied bat houses, a.m. EDT today, the Florida Museum of Natural the colony. Bats are often portrayed in movies as just sleeping all day, but thats not the way they operate if you have the opportunity to see them up close, theyre amazingly attractive animals, and theyre not as menacing as you might think, said Florida Museum mammalogy curator David Reed. They may have ugly faces, but theyre brightly colored and you dont get to see that at night. Three bat-cams are installed in and around the structures, including one inside the bat house with tilt, pan and zoom capabilities controlled remotely by museum technicians. Internet users may access edu/bats, where there are also facts about the colony, links to bat conservation organizations and daily sunset times. The bat-cams are really cool for an educational tool, for one thing, Reed said. Also, having that many bats in one concentrated area always gives opportunity for study. Combined, the structures currently house are Brazilian free-tailed bats, Tadarida brasiliensis, a non-migratory, maternity colony that birth their young and dwell in the area year-round. The best time to observe the bats is when they exit the structures after sunset. In the winter here, the bats who are most eager start warming up, doing laps up top before they exit, Reed said. And consequently, the exodus of the bats during winter is slower and over a longer period of time. But in the summer time, they can leave more en masse because they dont have On weeknights, about 50 to 60 people observe the exodus, but on weekends, there may be between 150 and 200 spectators, said UF environmental health and safety pest management coordinator Ken Glover, who helped build the structures and implement the bat-cam project. With the streaming videos, hundreds of people may watch the colony at the same time, and researchers hope the accessibility will help dispel some of the common misconceptions about bats and educate viewers about their important ecological value. My feelings for bats have always been most appreciative theyre non-game wildlife and ing insects, Glover said. So theyre one of our most reliable forms of natural pest control and theyre largely misunderstood because they come out at night and you only see them when theyre The bat house was constructed in March 1991 to accommodate a bat colony that had inhabited the James G. Pressly Stadium at the track and Scott Linder Tennis Stadium on the north side of campus. The University Athletic Association supported its construction so the droppings (guano) and urine would be contained at a safe distance from humans. The alternative habitat was deemed a success when the structure was permanently occupied in 1995. A pests status is determined usually by its location, not species, Glover said. So a bat is considered a pest when its living in the wrong place, a pile of manure. In August 2009, the weight of the bats combined with deterioration of some of the interior It was renovated within a few months and construction of a second structure, the bat barn, began in March 2010. We incorporated some changes, such as a different roof style so there would be more room for insulated it to keep it warmer and there are now Although the unexpected collapse of the bat houses internal structure killed about 100 of its inhabitants, the victims were preserved as specimens at the Florida Museum and helped kick-start a research project on biogeographical distribution of the species. Because we had specimens here, we started collecting specimens of the free-tail in the Bahamas and the DNA showed some were dramatically different from the ones in Florida, which tells us the Bahamas has a really interesting history in terms of this species. Reed said. Its a project that never would have started if not for the bat house. The videos are being made available during the Year of the Bat, a two-year, worldwide species awareness initiative whose founding partners include the United Nations Environment Programme, the Convention on Migratory Species and the Agreement on the Conservation of Populations of European Bats. Were happy to launch this project during the Year of the Bat, said Beverly Sensbach, associate director of museum operations. We felt the timing was appropriate, during this global effort to raise awareness about bats and bat conservation. ADVERTISE IN THECalhoun-Liberty JOURNAL& online ATCLJNEWS.COM PHONE: (850) 643-3333e EMailAIL: thejournal@fairpoint.net

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Page 4 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL OCTo OBER 26, 2011Thats how many copies of The Calhoun-Liberty Journal were distributed last week, ensuring plenty of coverage for your community announcements and great response for our business advertisers! 5,366Attention all Vendor/Handmade Crafters: We invite you to join us with your handmade craft items at the Panhandle Pioneer Settlement on Saturday, Nov. 12 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. (CT). Space is limited inside so you must RSVP. We provide you with one 8 table set up inside the gym or set up outside with your own table and tent. Call (850) 674-2777 or email us at info@ppmuseum. org for more information.Mossy Pond VFD chili cook-off set for Nov. 5Mossy Pond V.F.D. will hold their annual chili cook-off on Saturday, Nov. 5 at and judging will start at 4 p.m. Chili and cornbread will be sold for $1 and beverages are $.50 each. There will also be baked goods for sale. Tickets for the 50/50 drawing are $1 each and you do not have to be present to win. There is a $5 entry fee and all proceeds will be donated to Mossy Pond V.F.D. Porter Grade Rd. off C.R. 274. The 2011 Jake and Susan Summers family reunion is planned for Sunday, Nov. 6 at 1 p.m. at Torreya State Park in Bristol. Bring your favorite covered dish, dessert or drink, family memorabilia and a chair if youd like to sit a spell. Dont forget to remind all of your relatives since the address list may be incomplete. You are invited to Gordon and Melissa Durhams House for three nights of spooky fun at their 7th Annual Backyard Haunt. The Backyard Haunt features lots of Halloween favorites such as vampires, ghosts, mummies and our famous tunnel of terror! Of course no haunt is complete without witch! Our Haunted House will be full of new surprises this year and will give you a scare if you dare! We spend weeks preparing our Haunt every year and thoroughly enjoy providing this free event to our community. Please stop by our house on 11798 NW Durham Road in Bristol on Oct. 28, 29 and BBPD Hunted Hay R Ride at Sam Atkins The Blountstown Police Department Haunted Hay Ride on Friday and Saturday, Oct. 28-29 starting at 6 p.m. each night at Sam Atkins Park. Admission is $5. All proceeds from the event will go to scholarships for local seniors. For more information please call 6745987.Trick-or-treat at the Caverns in MariannaAs a safe alternative to door to door trickor-treating the Florida Caverns State Park will be holding The Spirits of the Caverns on Friday and Saturday, Oct. 28-29 from 6 to 10 p.m. There will be childrens games, living historians, a spirit trail, candy and prizes. Smokey Bear, along with other guests, will be in attendance. There is a $4 donation per vehicle. in Marianna. For more information please call 482-1228. This years Kinard Volunteer Fire Departments annual Halloween Carnival Fundraiser will be held Saturday, Oct. 29 starting at 5 p.m. (CT). The carnival has been going for almost 40 years and now draws a crowd of thousands for one night a year. Some of the activities at the carnival include a kids costume contest beginning at 6 p.m., numerous door prizes, pony rides, cake walk, dunking booth, cake auction, haunted spook ride, car bash, and various booths with prizes at most. Food and drinks will be available on site. The carnival will be located at the South. All proceeds go to the Kinard Volunteer Fire Department. For more information please contact the Fire Chief Doyle Daniels at (850) 718-5218 or (850) Kinard Halloween Carnival fundraiser to be held Oct. 29BBackyard Haunt begins Oct. 28 Trains will leave for Zombie World on Friday, Oct. 28, Saturday, Oct. 29, and on ture time is dark-thirty. der are free. All children under 6 must be accompanied by an adult. For information Veterans Memorial Railroad, Inc., is a trains, tracks and operational expenses. Vendors needed at Settlement on Nov. 12 The Calhoun-Liberty Journal is published each Wednesday by the Liberty Journal Inc., Summers Road, P.O. Box 536, Bristol, FL 32321. Annual subscriptions are $18. Periodicals postage paid at Bristol, FLPOSTMASTER: Send address corrections to: P.O. Box 536, Bristol, FL 32321. (USPS 012367) Summers Road Located at 11493 NW Summers Road in Bristol MAILING ADDRESS: P.O. Box 536, Bristol, FL 32321 TELEPHONE (850) 643-3333 Fax (850) 643-3334 E EMAIL: thejournal@fairpoint.net ADS: cljads@fairpoint.net JOURRNAL STT AFFJohnny Eubanks...................Publisher Teresa Eubanks........................ Editor Sandra Brown...................Bookkeeper Debbie Duggar...................Advertising Angie Davis.........Production AssistantOFFICE HOURS: 9 a.m. 6 p.m. M-F, Saturdays from 9 a.m. until 1 p.m. Adult Dance 8-12 p.m. at the Legion Hall in Blountstown Wednesday, October 26 Monday, October 31 Tuesday, November 1 Sunday, October 30 Saturday, October 29 Thursday, October 27 Friday, October 28TODAYS MEETINGS 2 p.m., Ag. Bldg., Conference Room 6 p.m., Fire House 7 p.m., Apalachee Restaurant 7 p.m. (CT), Dixie Lodge in Btown 6 p.m., St. Paul AME Church 7 p.m., Altha Volunteer Fire Department AA, 6 p.m., Altha Community CenterTODAYS MEETINGS, noon, Calhoun-Liberty Hospital 7 p.m., Calhoun County Old Ag Bldg. east door BBoy Scouts TT roop 200, 6:30 p.m., Mormon Church in BristolTODAYS MEETINGSAA, 7 p.m., basement of Calhoun County Courthouse 7 p.m., Voting house in Rock Bluff 7:30 p.m., Veterans Civic Center RRed Hat SocietyApalachee Rest. 12 p.m. (CT) BIRTHDAYS Eric Flowers ANNIVERSARIES Merrill & Marie Detweiler Birthdays-Bessie CombsB P D. Trick-or-Treat5:30 to 8:30 p.m.Attend the Church of your choice this Sunday DURHAMS Backyard Haunt 6:30 11:30 p.m. 11798 Durham Rd. in Bristol DURHAMSBackyard Haunt 6:30 to 11:30 p.m. 11798 Durham Rd. in Bristol B-town Tigers vs. Franklin LCHS Dawgs vs. South Walton DURHAMSBackyard Haunt 6:30 to 11:30 p.m. 11798 Durham Rd. in Bristol KINARD VFDD Halloween Carnival 5 p.m. (CT) Kinard Community Center (Costume Contest at 6 p.m.)THE CALHOUN-LLIBERtTY JOURNAL

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OCTo OBER 26, 2011 / THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 5 EVENTSBlountstown photo exhibit opens FridayBLOUNTSTOWN An art exhibit featuring images captured during the Scott Kelby WorldWide Photo Walk will open Friday, Oct. 28 at the Preble-Rish Gallery. All photographs were taken by local and regional amateur and professional photographers in one 2-hour period in downtown Blountstown on Saturday, Oct. 1. The exhibit highlights our fair city in a beautiful and unique way, while illustrating the different perspectives seen by the 26 photographers. The exhibit will be displayed alongside a portion of the gallerys permanent exhibit, Apalachicola River: An American Treasure by Clyde Butcher. A Downtown after Dark theme will be carried out with an outdoor reception, live acoustic music performed by Erik Alford, and refreshments. Tickets are available for $10 each, and include the reception. Tickets can be purchased online at www.calhounco.org/ store or at Blountstown Drugs. The Liberty County Senior Citizens Association would like to remind area seniors of the Halloween lunch to be held on Thursday, Oct. 27 at 11 a.m. at the Bristol Senior Center. There will be games and prizes too! The following events are scheduled for the month of November: Wednesday, Nov. 2 11 a.m. Bristol Senior Center. A Representative will be here to present information about the Medicare programs that are available through Capital Health for Medicare recipients of Liberty County. Medicare Open Enrollment is open through Dec. 7. This is the time you can join, drop or switch your medicare health or drug coverage. Call 643-5690 for information. Call Liberty Transit at 6432524 no later than 3 p.m., Friday, Oct. 28 for transportation to the center. Thursday, Nov. 3 Marianna WalMart shopping and lunch. Thanksgiving is only a few weeks away and you can start purchasing your Turkey Day items. Call Liberty Transit at 643-2524 no later than 3 p.m., Monday, Oct. 31 for your transit ride. Tuesday, Nov. 8 A shopping trip has been scheduled to Graceville outlets. Call Liberty Transit at 643-2524 no later than 3 p.m. on Thursday, Nov. 3 to reserve your transit ride. Call 643-5690 for information. Thursday, Nov. 10 Shopping at the Piggly Wiggly and lunch. Call Liberty Transit at 643-2524 no later than 3 p.m. on Monday, Nov. 7 to reserve your transit ride. Friday, Nov. 11 Bristol and Hosford Senior Citizens Centers and Liberty County Transit will be closed in observance of Veterans Day. There will be no meal deliveries on this date. Thursday, Nov. 17 11 a.m. at the Bristol Senior Center. Thanksgiving lunch for seniors of Liberty County. Call 6432524 no later than 3 p.m. on Monday, Nov. 14 if you need transportation to the center. Come join us for a yummy lunch. Thursday, Nov. 17 Shopping at the Tallahassee Wal-mart and lunch. Call Liberty Transit at 643-2524 no later 3 p.m., Monday, Nov. 14 to reserve your transit ride. Thursday, Nov. 17 10 a.m. The Liberty County Senior Citizens Advisory Council will meet. Monday, Nov. 21 7 p.m. at the Bristol Senior Center. The Liberty County Senior Citizens Board of Directors will meet. Tuesday, Nov. 22 10:30 a.m. The Bristol Monthly Craft Class will meet at the Bristol Senior Center. Call Liberty Transit at 643-2524 no later than 3 p.m. on Friday, Nov. 18 if you need transportation. Wednesday, Nov. 23 Shopping at the Piggly Wiggly and lunch. Call Liberty Transit no later than 3 p.m. on Monday, Nov. 21 to reserve your transit ride. Thursday, Nov. 24 and Friday, Nov. 25 The Bristol and Hosford Senior Citizens Centers and Liberty County Transit will be closed for Thanksgiving. There will be no meal deliveries on these dates.Liberty Senior CCitizens announce November schedule of events RRiver TT own CCommunity Health CCare & the CCalhoun C County Health Department Welcomes Mike McKenzie, Pediatric ARNPStarting Monday, October 31stWe accept the following insurances: Phone (850) 674-5645 Jennifer Shuler, Esq.Attorney at Law Business Real Property Divorce WillsBBy Appointment (850) 866-3680CALL ME FOR A FREE LIVING WILL Volunteers start work on Kinard CCarnival Floridas Long-Term Care Ombudsman Program needs volunteers to join its corps of dedicated advocates who protect the rights of elders residing in nursing homes, assisted living facilities and adult family care homes. All interested individuals who care about protecting the health, safety, welfare and rights of long-term care facility residents are encouraged to call toll-free (888) 831-0404 or visit the programs Web site at www.om

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COMMENTARYPage 6 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL OCTo OBER 26, 2011 Late Night LaughsA recaRECAP oOF recentRECENT obOBSerER Vation ATIONS by BY lateLATE niNIGhtHT tV TV hoHOStTS.PIERRE, S.D. -The good news about MoamAiding and abetting a real warBY OLIVER NoORTHOliver North is the host of War Stories on Fox News Channel, the founder and honorary chairman of Freedom Alliance, and the author of American Heroes in Special Operations. White House Chief of S Staff Bill Daley announced hell be leaving the White House after the election. I get the feeling a lot of people are going to be leaving the White House after the election. JAY LENOHerman Cain has moved ahead of Mitt Romney. Can you believe that? P Political analysts say this is because Americans dont understand Mormonism but they do understand pizza. ConanONAN OBrienRIENLindsay Lohan has to go back to court after showing up more than an hour late for community service. But her lawyer says shes got a good excuse. S She forgot to steal a watch. CRAIGG F FERGGUSSONRick P Perry got the date of the American revolution wrong by two centuries. What is it with the right wing? Michele Bachmann doesnt know where the SShot Heard Round the World took place, S Sarah P Palin doesnt know why P Paul Revere went on his ride, Rick P Perry doesnt know that 1776 happened in the 1700s. These arent gotcha questions. I know this sounds mean about Rick P Perry, but if was a child, youd leave him behind. BILL MAHEREarlier this week, a protester at Occupy Wall S Street proposed to his girlfriend. His exact words were, Will you occupy my parents basement with me until I get a job? ConanONAN OBrienRIENHerman Cain said, starting today, if you buy into his 9-9-9 plan, hell throw in a free 32-ounce soda. DAV VID LETTERMANAt the last Republican debate, the candidates were seated according to how theyve been doing in the polls. S So Jon Huntsman was seated next to Tim PPawlenty at a Dennys across the street. ConanONAN OBrienRIENJoe Biden once again denied stories that he will be replaced on the ticket in 2012. He says he will continue to embarrass P President Obama for another four years. JAY LENOThe Occupy Wall S Street protests continue to grow. Theyve started to attract a very unsavory element celebrities. CRAIGG FFERGGUSSONPPresident Obamas teleprompter was stolen. P Police are on the lookout for a thief thats eloquent and spreading a message of hope. ConanONAN OBrienRIENBig news in the Republican ranks, there is a new front-runner: Herman Cain. The Republican establishment is freaking out because their token black guy is in the lead now. Its like an episode of S Star Trek where the black guy beams down to the planet and lives. BILL MAHERThe Republican candidates are still looking for ways to stop Romney. S See, its hard to disagree with his positions because as you know, hes taken every position JAY LENOThe CEO of Citigroup said that he can understand why all these Occupy Wall S Street protesters are so frustrated. In fact, he felt so bad for them, he gave himself a $10 million sympathy bonus. JIMMY FF ALLONYou know whos also joining the Wall S Street protesters? Kanye West. Thats a real good idea -a guy with diamonds in his teeth protesting greed. DAV VID LETTERMAN

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OCTo OBER 26, 2011 / THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 7 COMMENTARY Hillary Clinton takes a chanceWASHINGTON Secretary of State Hillary Clinton was in Tripoli meeting with Libyas transitional government leaders less than 48 hours before deposed captured the headlines, but Clinton should rity conditions to assure the interim prime minister of the Obama administrations commitment to help build a democracy. Clintons trip followed similar visits by British Prime Minister David Cameron, All made secret trips. Their presence in the country was not announced and not reported until they were in the air and an indication of how important the Obama administration considers Libya. Libya is the only country roiled by the Arab Spring where President Obama chose to get directly involved with military intervention. He received criticism for intervening on humanitarian grounds, paign stretched on longer than anticipated. end to the bombing, but Clintons presthat outside help will still be needed. Clinton did not come empty-handed, the $135 million the administration has been parceling out since February. During her short time in the country, Clinton got much done, including dispensing plenty of good will. She met with college students tional exchanges, and visited a medical center where she promised help in getting medical equipment and in untangling bureaucratic red tape that might allow some of the wounded to be treated abroad, including in the United States. Times quoted Clinton telling one wounded fighter, We are on your side. visit Tunisia when those countries were in the midst of changing their governments. tion by the Obama administration that this was at least in part Obamas war, and he wants to get the post-war part right. America doesnt have the resources or the desire to nation-build, but at the same their own is not acceptable either. Putting Clinton on the front lines reher performance as a diplomat. She has said that even if Obama is reelected, she would not continue as Secretary of State in a second term. It is an exhausting job, and she has handled it well, but the bigso far eluded her. There are still many challenges left, and in her last year, Clinton may well dewill provide the capstone to her career. One obvious area is the Israeli-Palestinian peace process. Her husband came close to getting a historic deal in the months before he left the White House. The prisoner thousand Palestinians are being released in exchange for one Israeli soldier, Gilad Shalit, who was captured in 2005, created diplomat should be able to exploit. Clinton may decide as so many before her have, including former Senate Major ity Leader George Mitchell, who stepped a fruitless and frustrating two years, that the search for peace is a dead-end. Or such daring missions in the time she has left as Americas top diplomat. WASHINGTONMERRY-GO-ROUNDby Douglas Cohn and Eleanor Clift THE MESSAGE FROM ZANESVILLE, O O HIOAs I watch politicians on the stump, at the moment Republican presidential candidates, Im reminded of the western afternoons. There were the good guys, the white hats, and the conniving, evil, low-down, the women and God-fearing townspeople. If gun-toting scalawags shooting up the saloon were not enough trouble for the string tie that rode into town on his wagon best. the main street in front of the saloon, climb on the wagons tailgate and begin his spiel of, I have a cure for whatever ails you. As I watch the Republican presidential debates, they are all perched on the tailgate of their political wagons promising the American people any and everything as they pander for the conservative vote. B westerns, they will say anything to sell become the Garden the National Preacher that saves America from all those sinners. I will banish President Obama and his evil Obama Care plan to the far reaches of Hell. A bit of tongue in be serious, not too far from the truth. Having been raised attending a conservative, independent Bible Baptist church and havpreaching, when I hear the Republican for National Preacher, not the presidency. dency and a National Preacher are one in the same. As I was watching the last presidential debate, I had this somewhat whimsical thought that the debates should be conshow. At each event, the public votes someone off the stage. Last person standing gets the nod.See JERRERR Y CCOX continued on page 8 CORNER OXSJerry Cox is a retired military background in domestic and Okaloosa County.Candidates peddling plenty of political snake oil

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Page 8 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL OCTo OBER 26, 2011JERRERR Y CCOX CCOLUMN continued from page 7Herman Cains 999 tax plan is a bottle of snake taxes. Call (850) 643-3000 or email: singletarychiro@fairpoint.net Donna L. Singletary, DC NOW OOPEn N FOR BUSIn N ESSnext door to Buy Rite Drugs HOURRS Mon, Wed, Fri, 9 A.M.-2 P.M. & 3:30-7 P.M. & TT ues, TThurs, BY APPOINTMENT ONLYNow accepting insurance from: Medicare, Aetna, Integral Quality Care, Auto Accidents.NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours or responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment.Cataracts?Freedom from Eye Glasses, Now a reality for many.Lee Mullis M.D. and Cataract SpecialistSmart Lenses SMDr. Mulliss Smart LensSM procedure can produce clear vision without eyeglasses.Close-up, Far away & In-between CALL TODAY for a Smart Lens Evaluation Mullis EEye Institute 1600 Jenks Ave., Panama CCity(850)763-6666 CLJNEWS.COMT MEmMBERSHIP BREAKFASTABOVE: Blountstown Fire Chief Ben Hall talks with realtor Danny Ryals at Thursdays Calhoun County Chamber of Commerce Membership Breakfast held at the Calhoun County Senior Center in Blountstown. Chamber directors organized the breakfast to acknowledge the contributions and support of their members. LEFT: Chamber Director Kristie Terry speaks with Doris Trayor. BELOW: Richard Williams, Executive Director of the Chipola Regional Workforce Board, sends a quick text during a break in the conversation at his table, where he enjoyed breakfast with Sharon Gaskin with Northwest Florida Child Development and Blountstown One Stop Career Center staff members. TERESA EUBANKS PHOTOS

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OCTo OBER 26, 2011 / THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 9 by Angie Davis, contributing writerAbout 30 people gathered at the single lane timber bridge on Scotts Ferry Road on the Bay County side early Tuesday morning to discuss the paving of the road and eventual replacement of the bridge. Kinard residents, who made up the majority of those in attendance, came to express their interest in the project as many of these Calhoun County residents use this connecting road for their daily commute to work in Panama City. Bay County Commissioner Guy Tunnell and Bay County Public Words Director Ken Schnell explained that the current project was in accordance to a DEP order citing an issue with sediment washing into the creek. The Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) previously issued a notice of violation at the site and ordered Bay County to eliminate the problem. That money will cover paving the hills on both sides of the bridge. Commuters from Calhoun County will travel a little over six miles of paved road on the Calhoun side. Once they cross the Bay County line, they will travel for another mile on clay, then the road will be paved for one mile. At that point, the road will turn back to clay for the last mile before ending at Hwy. 231 after this initial project is complete. This plan left many residents confused and looking for an explanation. Schnell explained that plans to complete the paving of the Bay County side of Scotts Ferry and replacing the single lane bridge are in the works but funding is needed before the projects can begin. It is being proposed to the Bay County Commission that funds should be bonded for ten years to pay for the project and during that time the money saved on maintaining the road would cover the interest incurred. The bridge replacement is expected to cost around $800,000. Funding for this project has yet to be established. Tunnell encouraged residents of both counties to write their repreSoutherland and Rep. Marti Coley, to request the funds. He explained that having multi-county problems are a good way to get funding. He went on to say, Its good for the state to give money to problems that extend to more than one county. The residents of Calhoun County were vocal in their reasons for wanting the work done on Scotts Ferry Road. Minnie Johnson, of Kinard pointed out that many people from Kinard and the surrounding area do most of their shopping in Bay County, which pays into the countys tax revenue. Brooke Ann Miles, also of Kinard, stated that paving Scotts Ferry Road which connects Hwy. 231 to C.R. 392 would provide an alternate route for hurricane evacuation. Kinard VFD Chief Doyle Daniels explained that when the emergency personnel responded to accidents on Scotts Ferry Road, instead of taking the most direct route to Hwy. 231, the ambulance must travel up to 30 miles out of the way going through Wewahitchka to get to Bay Medical Center in Panama City. The time used could easily make the difference in life or death, he said. The one voice of opposition was Charlie Johann, who lives on the Bay County side of the road. He is concerned that the project will not alleviate the problem of sediment in the creek due to ditches that will wash into the creek during hard rains located on private property surrounding the bridge. He is also worried that paving the road will ing will become a problem along the straight sections. If the Bay County Commission passes the bond agreement, Tunnell believes the Scotts Ferry Road could be completely paved within three years. Schnell explained that there was one bridge in Bay County ahead of the Scotts Ferry bridge that needs to be replaced. He said that the Scotts Ferry bridge was a priority to Bay County and should be reKinard residents want paving completed on Bay County side of Scotts Ferry RoadBay County Commissioner Guy Tunnell stands in front of the small timber bridge that connects Calhoun and Bay County on Scotts Ferry Road. Tunnell addresses the group gathered on Scotts Ferry Road Tuesday morning. ANGIE DAVIS PHOTOSB LoOUNtstowTSTOWN Approximately 70 students from Blountstown High and Blountstown Elementary are part of the countys new Teen Trendsetters program. The youth-led reading program focuses on improving student achievement by pairing high school students with second and thirdgraders for weekly mentoring sessions. From educators to parents and policyreading is the root of long term academic success, said Barney Bishop, chair of Volunteer U U SA Foundation which manages the program. This program focuses attention one-on-one mentoring time provided by trained teen mentors. According to the Annie E. Casey Foundation Report (April 2011), nationwide 88% of students who failed to earn a high school diploma were struggling readers in the 3rd grade. So, with the commitment of local teachers and administrators, Volunteer U USA launched Teen Trendsetters in Calhoun County to help boost student success. Thirty-three Blountstown teens and their 33 young mentees are now meeting weekly reading and learning about weather, animals and famous scientists. The curriculum used during the sessions is based reading skills. And, whats really great is the kids are learning to actually enjoy reading, said one teacher. I can see bonds are being formed and the youngsters are thrilled with the attention they get from their teen role models. In addition to promoting reading skills, the program encourages classroom achievement and leadership skills among the high school students, as well. N Ninety-nine percent of Teen Trendsetters graduated from high school, compared to the state average of 79%80% of Teen Trendsetters earned a scholarship compared to 38% of their peers Statewide, 3,000 students in Florida are participating in Teen Trendsetters programs this year. With support from the Florida L Legislature, State Farm and Comcast the mentoring program is offered at no cost to schools or students. N Next week in Blountstown, special guests will be paying a visit to a mentoring session to watch the students in action. Theyll be learning about Jane Goodalls work with chimpanzees and participate in a hands-on learning activity. It is so rewarding to see students helping their younger peers learn. As a former teacher, I know just how much the teachers here appreciate the extra attention their students are getting, said Rep. Marti Coley, Marianna. Watching these teens give back is incredible.they are becoming young leaders who understand the real value of community service. For more information on Teen Trendsetters Reading Mentors please visit our websites at www.volunteerusafoundation. org.Calhoun students participate in new Teen Trendsetters

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Page 10 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL OCTo OBER 26, 2011 The Liberty County Ministerial Association PRESENtTSThe 2011 Harvest Festivalat the First Baptist Church of Bristol A safe, fFREE alternative to trick-or-treating. For more details, call 643-5400 or 379-8861.Saturday, Oct. 29 from 5-8 p.m.Sunday, Oct. 30 (Judgement House from 5-8 p.m.) at the Grace United Methodist Church, Food & Games Trunk or Treats S Slides Pony RRides Judgement HouseSSun. 5-8 p.m. The Board of Commissioners of the Northwest Florida R Regional Housing Authority will hold aSpecial Meeting Nov. 15, 2011ONBeginning at 1 p.m. (ET) Open to the PublicListen to Steven Seay and Glenn Kimbrels play by play of the Blountstown High School Tigers vs. Franklin County High at Franklin County High Friday night on Oct. 28 on K102.7 at 6:30 p.m. (CT). The Florida Gators play Georgia Bulldogs in the Gator Bowl in Jacksonville on Saturday, Oct. 29. Air time on K102.7 at 2 p.m.RRADIO FOOTBTBALL ON WYBTBT AND WPHKListen to football on WYBT and WPHK. This week.. Hear Michael Wahlquist and Jay Taylor with all the Liberty County High School game action. The Bulldogs take on South Walton at Liberty. Air time on K102.7 Saturday, Oct. 29 immediately following Swap Shop at 10 a.m. (ET). NEWS FROM THE PEWS JEsSUsS inIN ThHE Pa ARkKCHURcCHES OF ALTHaA E Everyone is invited to a communitywide S Sunday morning worship service sponsored by the churches of Altha. T There will be childrens activities, live music, a free lunch and giveaways. T This event will take place on O Oct. 30 in the R Recreation and Ball Park in Altha. R Registration for the giveaways and lunch will begin at 10 a.m. (CTT).F For more information, please call Cindy Nichols at 447-0938.ShoHOE BoOX MinisINISTRiIEsSPOp P La A R HEa A D bap BAPTIST c CHURcCH Poplar H Head Baptist Church is a relay center for the S Shoe Box Ministries operated through the S Samaritans Purse O Operation Christian Child. We will be a collection center for any individual or church that would like to do the shoe boxes. T T he collection week is Nov. 14-21. T The relay center will be open from 10 a.m. to noon each day and from 1-3 p.m. on S Sunday for drop off.I If you have any questions, please call the church at 674-4201 and leave a message. Fall ALL FEsSTiIVals ALSPa AGE POnND ASSEmbMBLY OF G GOD Page Pond Assembly of G G od will be holding a Clary Bateman would like to thank everyone who helped celebrate her birthday.She had a wonderful time. Please continue to keep Clary in your prayers! Clary Strong! A special thanks for all our friends and the members of G G race U U nited Methodist Church for their love, care and support during the loss of our grandmother, L Lula Mae Bradwell R Revell R Rabon on O O ct. 18. A special heartfelt thanks to Judge Kenneth H Hosford for his beautiful song and eulogy and R Reverend Paul Cook for his spiritual support. Love, Debbie Eddleman and family Notes of ThanksSSpecial thanks to E Edie and Mike S S toutamire for their love, care and special support to me and my family in our time of loss of a wonderful grandmother, L Lula Mae Bradwell RRevell RRabon. Love, Debbie Eddleman and familyF F all F F estival at the church on O Oct. 30. T The fun will last from 5-7 p.m. T There will be food, games, a moonwalk. T The church is located on Murdock D Drive west of Altha, just off H Highways 73 and 274.BLOU LOU NTSTO TSTO WN FIRST FIRST ASSESSEMBLYLY Blountstown F First Assembly will have a fall festival on S S aturday, O Oct. 29 beginning at 4:30 p.m. (CTT). T There will be games for the kids. T The church is located at the corner of 13th S St. and HHwy 20. FIRSTFIRST BAPTISTTIST CHURHURCHH OF OF BLOULOUNTT -STO STOWN F First Baptist Church of Blountstown will be having its F F all F F estival this S S unday, O O ct. 30 from 4-5:30 p.m. What will the O Ol Church D Downtown have planned for the children of Blountstown this time? grade and under. Parents, please accompany your children. F For more information, at 674-5923 or visit F FBC Blountstown page on F Facebook.Pas ASTo OR AppPPRECiaIA TionIONBLOU LOU NTSTO TSTO WN FIRST FIRST ASSESSEMBLYLY Blountstown F First Assembly will have a pastor appreciation service on S S unday, O O ct. 30 for Pastor S Shelton Kindig. Church service will begin at 11 a.m. (CTT).T The members of the church would like to invite friends and family in the community to join them in showing appreciation for all of the love, care, time, and effort that Brother Kindig has displayed for the church and the community. T The church is located at the corner of 13th S St. and HHwy 20. CClary says thanks for the birthday wishesAstronauts prepare for Nov. autograph showKEnnNNEDY Spac SPACE CEnNTER More than 30 legendary astronauts will descend on Kennedy S Space Center Nov. 5-6, for the worlds largest Astronaut Autograph and Memorabilia S Show. T T ickets are now available online at www.AstronautSScholarship.org/aams.T The shows roster boasts hero astronauts and space icons including Mercury 7 astronaut S Scott Carpenter, Apollo 11 moonwalker Buzz Aldrin and Apollo 13 astronauts F Fred H Haise and Jim L Lovell, to name a few, who will all gather for a star-studded weekend. I In addition to autograph sessions, guests will have access to exclusive photo opportunities, a lunch celebrating the S Space S Shuttle program, a G Gemini XIIII Anniversary dinner, astronaut talks and more.G Guests may bring their own items to have signed or purchase memorabilia and photos at the show. I Individual tickets are $15 and do not include admission to Kennedy S Space Center Visitor Complex (KSSCVC); for the ultimate space experience, guests may secure a ticket package from $300 to $600, which includes admission Both are available online at www.AstronautSScholarship.org/aams or by calling (321) 455-7014. T T ickets are packages, over fair market value, should be considered a tax-deductible donation. Astronaut autographs are at an additional fee. The Astronaut Scholarship Foundation is a 501(c)

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OCTo OBER 26, 2011 / THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 11 ASK THEO L D F A R M E R SA L M A N A C Heating & Air Conditioning FL LicIC. # CMC1249570R s s CCs (850) 674-4777Whaley WhaleyWhat was the May- B. F., Phoenix, AZ Sounds like an economy car, doesnt it? Actually, it was a written document signed on board men of age, providing that such a government and governors as we should by common consent agree to make and choose would oversee the group. When the English separatists (sometimes called saints) and others (called strangers) they had a patent from the Virginia Company of London to settle a piece of land in Virginia. Landing off Cape Cod and then making their way to what is now Plymouth, they were considerably north of the intended Virginia settlement and consequently out of the jurisdiction of the London company. Especially since the strangers outfor prostate health, constipation, impotence, and improved complexion. G. P., Washington, IASure, but dig deep to get the long taproot and then give the plant a deep pot. Its best to choose smaller plants (those planted at midsummer or after, ideally) to bring indoors, so that their taproots will not have grown too long, and also so that theyll be at their best for picking during the winter months. Give parsley a sunny windowsill and rich, well-drained soil. Younger plants tend to give a sweeter taste. Even in areas where parsley will winter over, gardeners tend to plant new seeds because the herb will grow bitter with age. The seeds are slow to germinate, which may have led to the theory that parsley is the devils plant and the seed goes to the devil and back nine times before it will grow. Some believed that if the parsley was sown by a pregnant woman, it would speed the germination. Greeks fed the herb to their horses for valor. World War I soldiers drank parsley tea for dysentery. Wreaths of parsley, considered sacred to the dead, once decorated ancient graves. And ancient lore said that you must never cut parsley if you are in love. Similarly, folklorists say never to give away parsley or you give away your luck. numbered the saints and were threatening to use their own libertie, it was decided that a unifying document was needed. The signed Compact committed the group to act as a civil Body Politick, for our better ordering and preservation and allowed them to frame such just and equal laws, ordinances, acts, constitutions, and eral good of the colony, unto which we promise all due submission and obedience. It later became a model for other colonies. H. C., Lancaster, PA Weve heard of it, yes. We suspect that the pumpkin was simply a readily available means of applying heat to a swollen area, probably applied in pieces with the rind helping to hold the hot pumpkin intact. Theres nothing we know of in the pumpkin meat itself that would effect a cure, although we have heard of pumpkin being eaten for insomnia. Pumpkin seeds are plentiful in the old remedy books, often recommended for ridding children of tapeworms or other intestinal parasites. The eating of the pumpkin seeds was generally followed by a hearty dose of castor oil, however. ure in old-fashioned cures OCT. 24, MONDAY United Nations Day. Canadian schooner Bluenose won International Fishermens Trophy, 1921. Civil rights activist Rosa Parks died, 2005. OCT. 25, TUESDAY Artist Pablo Picasso born, 1881. Bismarck, North Dakota, recorded its earliest below-zero reading, degrees Fahrenheit, 1919. OCT. 26, WEDNESDAY New Moon. Moon at perigee. Conjunction of Saturn and the Moon. St. Elsewhere made its television debut, 1982. OCT. 27, THURSDAY Conjunction of Mercury and the Moon. Macys Department store opened, New York City, 1858. A good conscience is a soft pillow. OCT. 28, FRIDAY St. Simon. St. Jude. Nevada Day. Conjunction of Venus and the Moon. Christopher Columbus discovered Cuba and claimed it for Spain, 1492. OCT. 29, SATURDAY Moon runs low. Moon at ascending node. First peacetime draft in U.S. history went into effect, 1940. Actor Richard Dreyfuss born, 1947. OCT. 30, SUNDAY Twentieth Sunday after Pentecost. Conjunction of Pluto and the Moon. Twenty-four-second shot clock made its NBA debut, 1954. Cider made from blemished apples, known as avoid using too many apples with bruises or open wounds. If rot has already set in, it will affect the taste and longevity of the cider. If you have unripe tomatoes still on the vine and frost is fast approaching, pull out the vines by the roots and hang them upside down in a cool, dark place. Transplant rhubarb, strawberries, and so that some root development may take place. Rhubarb and strawberries deplete the soil of nutrients in a short for them every three or four years. dried on the plants. The seeds will be difbefore they die naturally. Cover the heads with cheesecloth if you need to protect your crops from the birds. On Michaelmas Day the devil puts his foot on the blackberries. Supplement your apple pies with fruit frozen or canned earlier in the season.GARDENINgG Jobs for Oct.from The Old Farmers Almanac Altha Store Phone (850) 762-3161B Blountstown BBranch Phone (850) 673-8102 Marianna BBranch Phone (850) 482-2416Altha Farmers Co-op, Inc. PETS AND tTHeEIR pePEOpPLeE IsS spSPONsSOReED BYWeve got the feed you need to keep your animals happy and healthy!CAATTLLE HORHORSES DODOGS CAATS BIRD BIRDS and more.AND THEIRPetETS PEOPLEHis parents say one-year-old Channing Crosby and his Yorkshire Terrior, Toby, became best buddies the day Channing was born. Toby, 5, originally belonged from a breeder in Ebro. Toby loves to chase squirrels or anything that moves. He protects Channing as if he was the to run and play outside together. When his bassinet. Nowadays, Channing and Toby enjoy sitting on their little couch with a corndog while watching the movie Rio and Toby gladly takes the son of Alan and Mandie Crosby of Bristol. Channing & TobyNiIKiI BarberARBER photo PHOTO

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Page 12 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL OCTo OBER 26, 2011 LCHS Class of gathers Saturday for dinner cruise reunion Members of Liberty County High Schools Class of 1976 marked their 35th year since graduation with a dinner cruise in Panama City Saturday night. LEFT: Cindy Copeland, Veldina Dawson and Diana Hall enjoyed dancing to the band playing onboard the Lady Anderson. BELOW LEFT: Jim Moran, Benji Read and his wife, Tammy, shared a table with Tommy Roddenberry and his wife, Janet. BELOW RIGHT: Kingsley and Audrey (Zimmerman) Clawson and Ricky and Kathy Brown. After the cruise, several classmates met at a nearby hotel and stayed up late reminiscing and sharing stories from lives since high school. The next morning, they met again for breakfast before departing. TERESA EUBANKS PHOTOSPam (Story) Addison and her husband, Richard, of Tallahassee; Rhonda (Headings) Martin of Blountstown; Morgan Foran and his wife, Nancy of Bristol; Onaleah (Jones) McClellan and her husband, Bill, of Crawfordville. Classmates, front center: James Flowers and Cindy Copeland. Standing, from left: Bren Phillips, Teresa Eubanks, Veldina Dawson, Audrey (Zimmerman) Clawson, Rhonda (Headings) Martin, Bennarr Revell and Wayne Wiggins. Second row: Ricky and Kathy Brown, Pam (Story) Addison, Tommy Roddenberry, Onaleah (Jones) McClellan, Mike Mercer, Benji Read and Jim Moran. Back row: Diana Hall, Morgan Foran and Willard Reddick. RIGHT: Bren Phillips unburdened his conscience by replenishing a box of Animal Crackers for longtime friend Bennarr Revell. He told the group that when they were in kindergarten together, he noticed how Bennarrs mother packed a box of Animal Crackers in his lunch bag every day but Bennarr would never share. One day, little Bren swiped the cookies from Bennarrs lunch and let him think his mother had forgotten about his special treat. He decided to fess up after all these years. He presented him with a fresh pack of Animal Crackers and they shook hands. Despite the tender moment between the two lifelong friends, Bennarr still didnt offer to share his cookies.FWC seeks public input on gopher tortoise conservationFour years after adopting Floridas For more information on the gopher tortoise, please visit MyFWC.com/GopherTortoise.

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OCTo OBER 26, 2011 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 13 Halloween Portrait $5GET A FREEEE 5X7 Pr R INTFORR Photographs by SmoochCapture those Memories!Drop by on Halloween for your...CCall (850) 643-2244 from 6:30-9 p.m. Located at 11258 SR 20 in Bristol Across from the Dollar General Treat Bags for each Trick-orTreater 17932 Main Street N, Suite 5 PHONE (850) 674-9191 Merle Norman has personalized holiday ornaments in stock! More than 100 to choose from. PRICED FROM: $650 $750BBRonONICA SPRUILL-HoOWARDBronica Spruill-Howard will celebrate her 14th birthday on Oct. 31. She is the daughter of Justin and Carolann Howard and the sister of Britany Howard and Skylor SpruillHoward, all of Altha. Her grandparents are Jim and Sue Hill of Robertsdale, AL, Ron and Mary Howard of Dorris, CA and Don and Debbie Davis of Queencreek, AZ. Bronica is a cheerleader and plays volleyball for Altha School. She loves riding the fourwheeler, hanging out with her friends, and loves to cheer for Alabama football. RREnnNNER Ro ROBERTsSRenner Roberts celebrated his fourth birthday on Oct. 25. He is the son of Jared and Stephenie Roberts of Bristol. His grandparents are Stephen and Vanesa Ford of Bristol, Mary Katherine and Durwood McElvy of Whigham, GA and George and Stephanie Roberts of Panama City. His great-grandparents are Erika and the late Lamar Ford, Betty and the late C.W. Roberts, Buddy and Laverne Whiddon and the late Marjorie and Van Bailey. on the Smooth Ride and collecting rubber enjoys riding with his little sister, Allie, and cousin, Peyton, on his Gator.CCADAnNCE RR YLAnN D DEPRATTERCadance Rylan DePratter celebrated her first birthday on Oct. 19. Her parents are Ethan and Candace DePratter of Lake City. Her grandparents are Andy and Jodi Bailey and Keith and Bristol, Clint and Ann Pittman of Fort White and Rusty DePratter of Lake City. Cadance enjoys playing with her princess truck, spending time with her mama and hanging out with her cousin, Kylee. birthdaysDont let your skin get spooked this HalloweenA few simple tricks can keep your skin from turning into a nightmare this Halloween. One common problem trick-or-treaters face is irritation to Halloween makeup. Dr. Rajani Katta, assistant professor of dermatology at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, says following some simple tips will help keep your skin in the clear: -Use water-based makeup. before applying it to the entire face. -Properly clean your face at night. -Remember sensitive skin when shopping for costumes. Katta said there is no need to worry about breakouts as you enjoy your Halloween treats. Contrary to popular belief, chocolate or sugars do not cause acne. Following these suggestions and using a little common knowledge about your skin health will help you put your best face forward this Halloween, Katta said. Liberty County 4-H youth joined millions of young people across the nation to become scientists for the day during the fourth annual 4-H National Youth Science Day (NYSD) on Oct. 5. As part of 4-H NYSD, youth participated in Wired for Wind: the 2011 National Science Experiment which demonstrated how young people can implement alternatives to traditional energy production and have a positive impact on their communities and ecosystems. To combat a national shortage of young people pursuing science college majors and occupations, and to enhance the nation's contribution to the sciences, 4-H NYSD demonstrates that science, engineering, math and technology are fun and attainable options for college degrees and future young people across the nation participate in 4-H science, engineering, technology and applied math year-long programming. Through the One Million New Scientists, One Million New Ideas campaign, 4-H is working toward a bold goal to engage one million new young people in science, engineering, technology and applied math programs by the year 2013. Liberty County 4-H had youth ages Krystal Larson, Chase Revell, Ryan Harper, Kendal Wade and Crystal Harper take part in 4-H National Youth Science Day. Jenny Lytle shows off her windmill with Myncie Carnley and volunteer J.J. Lytle.LLiberty CCounty 4-H members build wind energy technologies8-14 to participate in this event. The 8 to 10-year-olds participated by doing activities such as making pin wheels, rocket balloons, and blow painting through a straw while youth ages 11-14 participated in the wired for wind event making wind turbines, designing their blades to see which design they thought would be the best in this area. These youth enjoyed the experience of being a scientist for a day.

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Page 14 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL OCTo OBER 26, 2011 BUSINESSNew group holds Inaugural Rural Tourism Summit in Blountstown; MARIANNA A A new tourism cheerleader for the central Panhandle is up and running. Homer Hirt, president of R RiverWay South A Apalachicola Choctawhatchee (RR WSAAC) has announced the organization will host its inaugural R Rural Tourism Development Summit, on Oct. 28 from 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. (CT) at the Pioneer Panhandle Settlement in Blountstown. Were less opportunities for rural tourism development in our region, Hirt said. Our goal for the Summit is to network potential rural tourism businesses and resources to grow local tourism with increased destination marketing in our eight county region. The Summit will feature sessions on public relations, promotions, cultural heritage programming, agri-tourwayshowing and tourism professional development. Tourist Development Councils, civic groups, historical societies, outdoor clubs, arts organizations, colleges & others who value the mission of R R WSAAC are encouraged to attend. travel planning, awarded R RiverWay South A Apalachicola Choctawhatchee a Cultural, Heritage and N Nature Tourism Education Grant for the 2011-2012 Fiscal Year to conduct this summit. We are pleased that VIISIIT FLORIRIDAA and its Board of Directors selected us from a large number of grant applicants, during their most competitive grant cycle to date, said Sharon Liggett, project manager for RR WSAAC. entities and local governments stretch their tourism marketing dollars in an effort to expand cultural, heritage, rural and nature tourism activities in Florida, said Christopher Thompson, President & CEO for VIISIIT FLORIRIDAA.R RiverWay South A Apalachicola Choctawhatchee is a economic development through the preservation and promotion of the natural, cultural and historical resources of the A Apalachicola and Choctawhatchee R River basins including Calhoun, Franklin, Gadsden, Gulf, Holmes, Jackson, Liberty and Washington counties.Floridas seasonal adjusted unemployment rate for September 2011 is 10.6 percent. This represents 977,000 jobless our of a labor force of 9,216,000. The states unemployment rate for September fell 0.1 percentage points from A August rate of 10.7 percent. The May through September rates are the lowest since A August 2009. Floridas unemployment rate has declined or held steady for the last nine months. The states nonagricultural employment is 7,253,900 in September 2011, an increase of 23,300 jobs over the month and has gained 93,000 jobs over the year. Liberty County followed Monroe with the second lowest unemployment rate in the state at 6.9 percent. Henry County had the highest unemployment rate at 17.6 percent.Each of the 5 counties that make up the Chipola R R egional Workforce R Region, showed a decrease in unemployment for the month of September 2011.---UNEMPLOYMENT RATES ---July-11 June-11 Jul-10 Liberty....................6.9 7.2 6.7 Calhoun..................8.5 9.1 9.0 Holmes...................8.0 8.3 8.4 Jackson..................8.5 8.9 8.2 Washington................10.6 10.9 11.6 Chipola Region..........11.2 11.2 11.4Florida releases Sept. unemployment rates fChipola Regional Workforce BoardThe Board of Directors of Talquin Electric Cooperative, I I nc. and Talquin Water & Wastewater, I I nc. are pleased to announce the appointment of Tracy A Allen Bensley as General Manager. Bensley is a licensed Professional Engineer and holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Electrical Engineering from Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL. He brings over 19 years of industry experience and leadership to Talquin, having served as Vice President, Engineering and Operations at Jackson Purchase Energy Corporation, Paducah, KY; Senior Vice President, Electric Operations at Lumbee R River EMC, R Red Springs, N NC; and President, Electrical Consulting Engineers, I I nc., Charlotte, NNC. A As the General Manager, Bensley will be responsible for overseeing the operations of Talquin Electric Cooperaheadquartered in Quincy, FL. Talquin Electric provides electric distribution services to over 50,000 homes and businesses in four counties of N North Florida, including areas surrounding Floridas capital city, Tallahassee. Tracy will also serve as General Manager of Talquin Water and Wastecorporation providing water and wastewater utility services. I I am honored to become a member of the enthusiastic team at Talquin Electric. I I am also excited about the opportunity to return to Florida and am looking for ward to serving the Members of the Cooperative, said Bensley after Talquins Board of Trustees announced his appointment. Talquins Board and Staff look forward to welcoming Tracy, his wife, Leigh A A nn, and their two daughters to the area.Talquin Electric names Bensley General Manager TracyRACY AllenLLEN BensleyENSLEY MANY MORE TO CHOOSE FROm M, COm M E BY OOUR LOT TTODAY AND CHEc C K OOUT OUR GREAT SEl L Ec C TION AND GREAT PRIc C ES.Rivertown Auto Sales, INC(850) 237-2424 or (850)899-0979 AT RIVEr R TOWN A AUTO SALEs S, IINC.All must go to make room for new shipment12x16 Side Lofted Barn..................................................$181.84 PER MONTH10x16 P Side Lofted Barn..............................................$139.38 PER MONTH10x12 Barn...................................................................$105.51 PER MONTH8x12 Utility......................................................................$92.82 PER MONTH12x32 Side Lofted Barn Cabin......................................$368.28 PER MONTHCome check us out for the Best Deal around. DONT PAY TTO MUCH CCOm M E SEE UUsS!Located at 19984 Central Ave. W, Hwy. 20 West, Blountstown (In front of Alco)Dont Search all over just call the Grovers at.... Weatherking Portable BBuildings While Supplies Last BBlountstown Health and RRehab16690 SW Chipola Road, Blountstown TT elephone (850) 674-4311 Blountstown Health and Rehabilitation Center provides short-term and long-term care in a warm, personal manhealthcare, centered on caregiver compassion, offered in a comfortable home-like setting. Come Home to Rehab

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OCTo OBER 26, 2011 / THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 15 Calhoun Liberty HOSPITAlL20370 NE Burns Ave., Blountstown Telephone (850) 674-5411Calhoun Liberty Hospital is proud to announce the opening of the.... Calhoun Liberty PPrimary Care Clinic ON Nov. 1st New patient applications can be picked up at the front desk of the hospital. OPENING SOONInitially we will be taking regular medicare, regular medicaid, BCBS and United Healthcare. We will be taking other insurances within 30-45 days of opening; such as CHP, Coventry, Healthease, Healthykids and other HMOs. Trunk or TreatSaturday, Oct. 29from 6-8 p.m. family. Trick-or-Treating, Free Food, Cake Walk and Lots of Candy.EEveryone is Welcome! SAFETY TTIPs S 1. Stop only at well lit houses. 3. Use make up instead of a mask so you can see. 4. Start early, end early. 5. Use sidewalks or 6. Stop, look & listen at corners. 7. Walk, dont run. 8. Parents should accompany young children. 9. Dont go inside a strangers house, TTHEs S E SAFETY TTIPs S ARE BROUGHT TO YOU COURTEs S Y OF LIb B ERTY CCOUNTY SHERIFF DONNIE CCONYERs S ANd D THE LCC SHERIFFsS OOFFICE Buy, sell & trade with an ad in The Journal or online at CLJNews.com!To the editor, As parents of a 19-year-old, let us start by saying we are extremely proud of him. He, along with his close friends have made clear and level headed choices in their lives. They are all wonderful boys that enjoy spending time together in the woods with their trucks and being boys. However, it seems that they are continuously being harassed and singled out. They were hanging out at the football trespassing. They moved their hangout to the forest, riding in the woods, staying out of town and trouble. Before long they were told that they didn't need to be going to the forest because they were being watched. So they decided to stay out of the forest and move to private land. They received permission from two landowners that combined, own approximately 50 acres of land, to hang out there. The boys took their four-wheel drive trucks out to the private land and spent their extra time playing in the mud or riding through the woods. Unfortunately, about three weeks into their good times they were being harassed by the law again! My question is this, "What are kids supposed to do in Liberty County?" They have nowhere to hang out and nothing to do. Frankie & Debbie Clark, BristolWhere are kids supposed to go to hang out with their friends? SPEAK UP!WITH aA LeETTeER TO THeE eEDITORWrite: The Calhoun-Liberty Journal P.O. Box 536, Bristol 32321 CChipola shortens paramedic program to 11-month, three semester courseMARIANNAThe Chipola College Paramedic program has recently been changed to an 11-month, three-semester program. Application deadline for the next class is Nov. 30. The Paramedic program was shortened from the 16-month curriculum to line up with other institutions in the area. Chipola also offers an A and B schedule to help employed persons better arrange their work schedules. Students will attend one "A" session (Monday or Tuesday) and one "B" session (Wednesday or Thursday) for a total of two days a week. There are also 16 mandatory days scheduled during the the program. Class hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Classes begin Jan. 9, 2012 and end in early December, 2012. Orientation is Jan. 6 at 10 a.m. in the Health Sciences building. Due to a shortage of paramedics, there are multiple job opportunities for those who complete the program and earn state licensure. Applicants for the program must have completed 240 hours of EMS experience as an employee or volunteer. Applicants also must have a State of Florida EMT License and Basic Life Support for Healthcare Applicants should complete a Chipola College application and a Paramedic Program apof high school, GED, and/or college transcripts must be submitted to the Chipola Admissions and Records Office. Mini mum test scores include: a Reading score of 18 on ACT, 83 on CPT, or 104 on PERT. Applicants also must provide numerous immunization and health records. A complete list of requirements is available at www.chipola.edu Tuition for the 42 semester-hour program is approximately $100 per hour, plus additional fees. Information about the Paramedic program is available online at http://www.chipola.edu/ instruct/Health-Sciences/Paramedic/ PARAMEDIC.html. Contact Chris Murray, EMT/Paramedic Program Coordinator at (850) 718-2251, or email: murrayc@chipola.edu

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Page 16 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL OCTo OBER 26, 2011 OCTo OBER 26, 2011 / THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 17 by Michael DeVuyst and Richard Williams, Journal sports writersBLOUNTSTOWN-District championship hopes were on the line last Friday night in Blountstown when the Liberty County Bulldogs made the short trip across the river to play the Blountstown Tigers. The winner of this game would to the Class 1A Region 2 District 4 title. erty County turnovers and converted three of those turnovers into 20 points to secure a 20-7 victory. of the Bulldogs when a Tiger punt was muffed and Bulldog Kyle Brunson recovered the ball on the Bulldog 47 yard line. Two plays later the Tiger defense rose to the occasion when Thomas Tierney rocked the Liberty County ball carrier, causing the ball to pop up in the air. Hunter Jordan picked off the ball on the run at the 50 yard line and rumbled down to the Bulldog 18. Four plays later, Jawon Mosley found the sons extra point gave the Tigers an early After swapping punts Liberty County started a drive on their own 45 yard line. Two plays later, Alex Marlowe found the edge to the left sideline and raced 53 yards to pay dirt. Trey Johnsons extra point knotted the score at 7 with 8:45 left in the half. The Bulldogs took the second half kickoff but a penalty and two incomplete passes forced a 3 and out. Blountstown took possession of the ball and found themselves Thomas 29 yard catch from Hunter Jordan. Two plays later, Bulldog Shelby Williams broke through the line and forced a Tiger fumble that was recovered by Ethan Foran. Two plays later the Bulldogs found the red zone after a 43 yard run by Terryal Jenkins placed the ball on the Tiger 17. However, two consecutive penalties and a fumble recovered by Steadman Dawson turned the ball over to the Tigers on their own 25. Four plays later, the Bulldogs got the ball back by way of an interception by Marlowe at the Bulldog 17 yard line. That possession was short lived. Two plays later, Chaz Fain caused another Bulldog fumble that was scooped up by Tiger Steadman Dawson. Dawson ran untouched into extra point gave the Tigers the lead at 14-7 A failed onside kick attempt gave the their own 48. The Bulldogs again lost a fumble that was recovered by Bobby Andrews on the Bulldog 48 yard line. The Tigers drove the ball inside the Bulldog 35 but was forced to punt the ball away. The Bulldogs took over on their own 6 yard line. Runs by Marlowe and Jenkins pushed the ball out to the 22 yard line. On 3rd and 1 from the Bulldog 25, another Bulldog fumble was recovered by Tiger Javakiel Brigham. Brigham picked up the ball at the 15 yard line and raced into the was wide left but the Tigers extended their lead to 20-7 with 10:07 left in the game. Another 3 and out caused by the Tiger defense forced a Bulldog punt. The Tigers coughed up the ball on the next play when a blitzing Ethan Foran jarred the ball loose and Michael Robinson recovered the ball at the Tiger 26 yard line. A QB sack by Brigham and an incomplete pass on fourth down stopped the Bulldog drive on the Tiger 30 yard line with 6:59 left in the game. The Tigers were able to take the ball and run the clock out to end the game. A cool, damp night caused the ball to the ball on the ground eight times and lost similar problems. Blountstown fumbled four times, losing three of them. Blountstown Head Coach Greg Jordan way. We have been so close all year. We kept telling our kids to work hard and stay focused. They understood how close we were to winning every game we lost this way, he said. Jawon Mosley led the Tiger offense with 93 yards on 17 carries. QB Hunter Jordan completed 5 of 10 passes for 87 yards with and Ryan Hathcox all had big catches for the Tiger offense. Thomas Tierney paced the Tiger defense with 13 tackles including three for a loss and a caused fumble. LCHS Head Coach Grant Grantham said his team was simply outplayed by Blountstown. He gave their defense credit for getting key stops and taking advantage of the Liberty miscues. Theyve got a lot of good athletes and they played hard but the bottom line is you arent going to fumble the ball eight times and win too many games, Grantham said. The Bulldog coach added that despite the loss, nothing has changed for Liberty concerning the playoffs. either be second in the district or we will face a three way tie-breaker with two teams going to the playoffs, but the bottom line is if we win out we make the playoffs, they host South Walton Friday night, Oct. 28. South Walton runs a different style offense than weve faced this season and weve got to make sure we are ready in order to win, he said. The Tigers move to 3-4 on the season and 2-0 in district play. The Blountstown team now control their own destiny to a district championship. If they win the next two district games they will clinch the District 4 Championship. Liberty still has a lot to play for, because a Tiger loss may force a tiebreak situation for the title. The Tigers will travel Friday, Oct. 28 to play district foe Franklin County. BBlountstown defense stuns Liberty CCo. 20-7Bulldog Club plans Old-Timers Chicken Pileau Oct. 28 prior to S. Walton gameThe Liberty County Bulldog Club is holding their annual chicken pileau for former football players and cheerleaders from Liberty County High School prior to the football game against South Walton Oct. 28. Serving will All former LCHS football players, cheerleaders, coaches and Bulldog Club members are invited to attend and enjoy a good meal and wonderful fellowship. Drinks and dessert will also be provided. The meal is held each year in appreciation of those who have devoted time to help make Liberty County football special. former players come out to recognize Coach Richard Kennedy earlier this year and hopes they will all come back to enjoy another night together watching Liberty County football on Senior Night. ABOVE: Libertys Daniel Deason (#12) begins his tackle of BHS Hunter Jordan (#14) but teammate Patrick Pitts (#53) moves in and stops him. LEFT: Tiger Thomas Tierney (#52) tackles Bulldog Alex Marlowe (#5) and Harold Armstrong (#34). ABOVE: Libertys Terryal Jenkins moves through the crowd as the path is cleared by his teammates. PHOTT OS BBY TT ONY SHOEEMAKEE & DANIEEL WILLIAMS ABOVE: Blountstowns Thomas Tierney (#52) and Javakiel Brigham (#28) tackle Libertys Alex Marlowe (#5). ABOVE RIGHT: Bulldog Daniel Deason (#12) moves to avoid Tiger Javakiel Brigham (#28) while Deasons teammate Chuck Morris (#64) moves in to assist. RIGHT: BHS Tiger Jawon Mosley runs the ball through the crowd of Bulldogs and Tigers while Libertys Ben Beckwith (#10) moves in. ABOVE: The teams hear the rules before the coin toss. RIGHT: Tiger Jawon Mosley (#10) gets tackled by Bulldogs Terryal Jenkins (#4) and Alex Marlowe (#5). BELOW: Libertys Alex Marlowe (#5) runs the ball trying to avoid Blountstowns Stedman Dawson (#81) and Anthony Williams (#3). ABOVE: Libertys Michael Robinson (#22) and a teammate tackle Blountstowns Charlie Bradford (#14). BELOW: Tiger Ben Beckwith (#10) gets tackled by a Bulldog. Liberty County students generated plenty of school spirit with a special pep rally Thursday night to prepare for Fridays big game. Students performed skits and sang to entertain the crowd as they looked forward to the upcoming game between longtime rivals, the LCHS Bulldogs and the BlountstownTigers. DANIEEL WILLIAMS PHOTT OS

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Page 18 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL OCTo OBER 26, 2011 Hosford School was excited to house the Scholastic Book Fair Oct. 10-14. The students enjoyed their time browsing over a variety of books and goodies. Tuesday, Oct. 11 was our school Family Night. Families spent time together shopping the Book Fair, reading and sharing snacks. We usually sell a little over $3,000 in Scholastic products earning us around $2,200 in books. All proceeds are donated to upgrade the school library. This is a biannual event and we are looking forward to the Fairs arrival in March! ABOVE: Tryston Lopez holding his favorite books, the Magic Tree House Series. Volleyball Update The Lady Dawgs will be competing in their District Tournament Oct. 27. Time and opponent is to be announced. Come out and cheer on the Lady Dawgs to help them bring home a District Championship! If you havent seen this years Tolar Football team you have missed one incredible group of young men! They have represented the future of Liberty County football on the gridiron in an outstanding manner this season, culminating in bringConference Championship. The team won the championship in Chipley Tuesday, Oct. 18 by beating Rhoulac Middle School from Chipley 26-14. The offense was led by Micah McCaskill and Kenny Godwin at quarterback. JJ House scored 3 touchdowns and rushed for over 100 yards and Jarrod Beckwith scored 2 touchdowns and rushed for over 80 yards in the contest. The defense was led by middle linebacker Maze Holmes, ends Cephus Green and Jordan Chaney and a strong secondary led by Beckwith and Brody Holland. This team went 5-1 through the season with a scoring offense that would rival any team you will see on Friday or Saturday. They averaged over 30 points a game this year. Their defense allowed less than 10 points a game. One county resident called this group Over the last two years, this group of 7th and 8th graders went 11-2, resulting in them claiming this years championship trophy. The future of Liberty County High School football is going to be loaded with talented young men for many years to come. W.R Tolar science students and our local 4-H teamed up to perform wind-powered experiments recently. The goal of our experiment was to make electricity using a windmill. We successfully made one volt of electricity. We had a good time and accomplished a goal. Anti-tobacco spokesman Rick Bender recently spoke to Liberty County students about the dangers of tobacco use. The presentationat the sponsored by Liberty County SWAT (Students Working Against Tobacco). Rick spoke to the 5th through 8th grade classes at Hosford and Tolar schools on Thursday. Red Ribbon Week is a week of celebrating for drug-free students. Teachers and students got involved the week of Oct. 17. signs decorated the hallways and encouraged students to be drug-free. Oct. dents had the opportunity to sign their names pledging to be drug free. A drug-free presenta tion was given for grades 4th-8th. On Oct. 19 a Wear Red Rally took place and the students and staff all wore Day and everyone dressed up as their favorite Super Hero. The week ended with Health Day on Oct. 21. Students choosing to be drug-free and healthy took a power walk around the block. Panhandle CConference CChampionship w. r. tolar SchoolTT olar and 4-H team up to perform wind-powered electricity experiments Rick Bender speaks at Hosford and Tolar Schools Panther Pulse Hosford School holds Scholastic Book FairPictures from Power Day. FroROM left LEFT : Sarah and Nate Carpenter, Shelly Stafford and Trenton Hires and Deanna Weston and Wyatt HunterHosford School celebrates Red Ribbon week LCHS Bulldog Beat ApalacheeTT heRR estaurantHwy. 20, Bristol 643-2264Friday NightAll your favorites and more. Now with Fried Oysters, Boiled Shrimp and Crab Bites. With Salad for ONLY... $1298 Oysters on the Menu E E verydayNOWIts VerY Wise to Advertise Make the most of your business with an ad in The Calhoun-Liberty JOURNALPHONE (850) 643-3333 thejournal@fairpoint.net SCHOOL LLUNCH MENU Oct. 26-Nov.1, 2011 Bristol Dental Clinic Laban BBontrager, DMD, Monica BBontrager, DMDPea Ridge Rd in Bristol, Phone (850) 643-5417MenusMENUS SPONSORED BY: Bristol Dental Clinic LIBERTY WednesdayBREAKFAST: Cheese grits and sausage patty. LUNCH: Roasted turkey with whole wheat roll or chicken burrito, mashed potatoes & gravy, carrots. (2nd & 3rd grade pizza)TThursdayBREAKFAST: Whole wheat pancakes and ham. LUNCH: Crispy chicken on whole wheat bun or turkey club salad, french fries, fresh cut cantaloupe.FridayBREAKFAST: Grits and scrambled eggs. LUNCH: Chicken pot pie or wheat bun, green beans, applesauce. (4th grade pizza)MondayBREAKFAST: Biscuit and scrambled eggs. LUNCH: Turkey nachos or grilled ham & cheese on whole wheat bread, romaine let. & tomato, corn, baked cinnamon apples (kg & 1st grade pizza).TT uesdayBREAKFAST: Cheese omelet and cinnamon toast. LUNCH: Baked chicken with cornbread or turkey and cheese on sub roll, local fresh collard greens, mixed fruit with fresh strawberries.*All breakfasts include a choice of assorted cereal with buttered toast whole wheat and juice CAl L HOUN WednesdayBREAKFAST: Grits with ham and cubes, sweet poLUNCH: Turkey and cheese sub, steamed broccoli bites with lite ranch dip, fruit cup.TThursdayBREAKFAST: syrup and sausage patty.LUNCH: Chicken and noodles, green beans, roll, tropical fruit cup.FridayBREAKFAST: Sausage gravy and biscuit.LUNCH: Pepperoni pizza, garden salad, fruit cup.MondayBREAKFAST: Cheese toast and grits and ham cubes. LUNCH: Chicken nuggets, mashed potatoes, orange glazed carrots, fresh fruit.TT uesdayNo menu for November was available at print time.*All breakfasts include a choice of assorted cereal with buttered toast and juice

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OCTo OBER 26, 2011 / THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 19 blountstown high school altha wildcatsIt was an exciting day at Blountstown Elementary, Friday, Oct. 21. We had 33 Teen Trendsetters from Blountstown High School of reading. There were lots of smiles on some third grade students' faces as they learned about endangered animals from their trendsetter. BHS students paired up with their third grader and had an exciting lesson planned that was enjoyed by all. Thanks to the trendsetters for their time spent preparing and the energy they brought with them! We are looking forward to an exciting year. The Small Town, Big Dreams 2011 yearbook has arrived. The 160 page yearbook includes PK 12th grades and highlights all the memories of the 2010-2011 school year. This year marks the able to do the yearbook in full color; however, the price is still just $40. If you did not pre-order, there are some extra copies available. While youre at it, consider buying a copy of the Wildcat from prior years. There are still extra copies available from most school years. Memories are priceless, so purchase a copy today. For more details, call the media center at 762-3121. Blountstown High School is pleased to announce the selection of our newest HOBY ambassador, Calen Masai. For the competion, Calen submitted an inspired essay on the importance of leadership at the school and in the community. Calen will travel to Tallahassee in June to represent our school at the 2012 HOBY Leadership Seminar. The faculty and staff at BHS are very proud of Calen and are excited about the leadership opportunities that HOBY will be able to provide for him. Congratulations to Katie Strawn and Kristyn Morris for receiving Microsoft Katies score was 273 points higher than the score she did it in half the time allowed. Kristyn Morris 240 points higher than she needed. Austin Britt was stown High School to get He had the same score as Kristyn. The students at Blountstown High School are working hard to be Mi (MOS) is the credential required by academia and business, recognized globally as the premier credential chosen by individuals seeking to validate their knowledge, skills and abilities relating to the MicroIn academia, MOS promotes success in the classroom for students and instructors, and prepares students for an increasingly competitive workforce. For business, MOS maxnization and increases job satisfaction and heightens career achievement among employees. In workforce development, MOS prepares and places job candidates, ensuring they possess the skills employers require. Specialists the students must pass certification exams in Microsoft Word, Excel and Power Point. Blountstown Middle School students in grades 6th-8th and 9th graders from BHS were treated to a full day of activities and prizes for being an A school for the 2010-2011 school year. ball, food, entertainment from BMS own Micah John Martin and his P.C.M.O.G. Drum Masters drum line, a showcase and demonstration of Outlaw Racing and Race Cars from Altha, and hundreds of prizes that were given out throughout the day. One lucky student took home a new iPod Touch and three students were drawn to win a pair of Costa Del Mar sunglasses. Coupons and gift cards from area restaurants, T-shirts, caps, jewelry, bags, candy, free haircuts and posters were just a few of the items that were given away during the celebration. Teachers and staff members from BMS donated a ten dollar gift to give away to students during the celebration and collected gifts from businesses and members of the community. BMS would like to thank Blountstown Police Department, the City of Blountstown, Adams Funeral Home, Micah John Martin and PCMOG, Outlaw Racing, Terry Blair, Calhoun/Liberty Health Department/ SWAT and Ramsey Piggly Wiggly for their time and donations that made the A Celebration possible. BMS would also like to thank the area businesses and community members who so graciously donated items to give away during the drawings throughout the celebration. The list includes Blountstown Drugs, Golden Pharmacy, Big Bend Sporting Goods, The Diamond Corner, Advanced Auto Parts, Main Street Restaurant, Rapunzels, Ja-Makin-Me-Tan, Subway, Star Struck Movie Rentals, Rianna Michele Photos, Big River Sports, The Unusuals, Angel Spurling Beauty Control, Tommy McClellan, Danny Ryals, Danny Hassig, and Diane Long. Because of their generous contributions and donations the BMS A Celebration was a huge success. The BMS Lady Tigers Volleyball Team ended their impressive undefeated 10-0 season with a huge win over the Hosford Panthers to claim the 2011 Panhandle Conference Championship on Oct. 13. Blountstown Middle School in the BMS gym. Hosford has held the Panhandle Conference Title for the past three years and the championship game came down to a match between the Hosford Panthers and the Blountstown Tigers. Blountstown went into the tourAltha to move on to the championship game. Altha previously defeated Franklin County, which eliminated them from the tournament, and Hosford defeated Tolar in Round One, eliminating them from the tournament. RIGHT, Front row: Madison Yoder, Courtnee Shuler, Autumn Lee, Lana Wood, Hannah Bryant, Mackenzie Eubanks, Mary Beth Williams, Bianca Martinez, Nykeria Patterson, Annika Milligan. Back row: Jenny Snowden, Lexie DeVuyst, Dharma Lee, Anna Hassig, Sarah Pitts, Trudie Alford, Becky Jenks, Taylor Stalnaker, Jasmine Abbott, Jordan Herndon and Chessa Goodman. The BMS Lady Tigers were coached this year by Wendy Eubanks. BMS Volleyball Team wins 2011 Panhandle Conference Championship blountstown middle schoolBlountstown Middle School celebrates being named an A schoolFirst Grade Body Day The foot bones connected to the leg learned on Friday, Oct. 21, when they had Body Day! They danced, checked their pulses, learned where bones and body parts are and how they are connected! Thanks to BODY SMART! Dates to Remember *Third Grade Musical How Does Your Garden Grow? Thursday, Oct. 27 *Early Release Day Monday, Oct. 31BHS Teen Trendsetters visit BES for reading fun BESKatie Strawn & Kristyn Mooris receive BHS Announces HOBY Ambassador for 2012Altha Schools 2011 Yearbook has arrivedby Autumn Cook The Senior Beta Club will sponsor Altha Schools annual Autumn Fest on Friday, Oct. 28 from 6 to 8 p.m. no admission fee but there will be games, activities, and the concession stand. Everyone in the community is invited to attend. Remember to wear your Halloween costume.Autum Fest planned Oct. 28

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Dear EarthTalk: I want to use cleaning products that are healthier for the environment, but I worry that baking soda and the like wont really get my tub and toilet germ-free. Should I continue using bleach products in the bathroom? -Margaret Pierce, Columbia, MOWhen it comes to household cleaning products, most mainstream brands make use of chlorine bleach, ammonia or any number of other chemicals that can wreak havoc on the environment and human health. Ammonia is a volatile organic compound that can irritate the respiratory system and mucous membranes if inhaled, and can cause chemical burns if spilled on the skin. Bleach contains sodium hypochlorite, which can cause eczema and other skin ailments as well as breathelements in the environment, toxic organochlorines can form, damaging the ozone layer and causing health ties and even cancer. Fortunately, growing public concern about the health effects of toxic exposure have led to an explosion of environmentally friendlier and non-toxic products, says the health information website, WebMD. There are many products in this categoryfrom laundry detergents and tile and bathroom cleanersthat aresafer for people and the planet. WebMD warns that while many are indeed safer, others are greenwashed, meaning they are marketed as natural while still including suspect chemicals. How does one know? Get in the simple practice of looking at product labels to see if the cleaning manufacturer is clearly disclosing all ingredients, reports WebMD. If it is notit could mean the manufacturer is trying to hide a particular suspect ingredient. printed on its label doesnt necessarily mean it should be trusted. To make sure, check the Eco-Labels section of Consumer Reports Greener Choices website, which gives the low-down on what labels really mean and whether they are backed up by government regulations. Another good resource is the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Household Products Database, which provides ingredient lists for thousands of products on U.S. store shelves. If you want to play it safe and natural when cleaning your home, WebMD suggests using white distilled vinegarit kills mold and mildew, eliminates soap scum and sanitizes, all in one fell swoopto clean windows, tile, cutting boards and countertops. Another effective yet gentle natural cleaner for countertops and bathtubs is baking soda, especially when mixed with a few drops of mild soap. Borax can be called in for tougher stains. If youre interested in cleaning greener, there are many sources of natural cleaning recipes online. Or check out the cleaning products aisle at your local natural food store, range of cleaning formulations from the likes of Seventh Generation, Ecover, Green Works and Earth Friendly Products (which sells a Safeguard Your Home retail pack that includes one each of a window cleaner, an all-purpose cleaner, a dishwashing liquid, an automatic dishwasher gel, a laundry detergent and a fabric refresher), among many others. Dear EarthTalk: What is the environmental impact of so many people now using sites like Facebook and spending so much time online?                  -Bob Yearling, Paris, TXThe environmental impact of so much online time really boils down to energy usage, which in turn affects the amount of greenhouse gases we pump into our atmosphere. For one, each of us can help by limiting computer down or putting them into sleep mode when we arent using them (this can be automated via the computers power management control panel). Also, when shopping for a new computer, consumers Star label. If all computers sold in the U.S. met Energy Star requirements, Americans could pocket $1.8 billion annually in saved energy costs and reduce greenhouse gas emissions by an amount equivalent to taking some two million cars off the road. Individual responsibility aside, the creation and manhubsespecially as we enter the age of cloud computing whereby most of the software, content and services we look to our computers for resides online and is served to us as-neededis what can have the biggest impact. Google, Facebook, and Amazon.com are already deeply committed to the cloud computing model, with Microsoft, Yahoo and others following suit accordingly. For its part, Google has been a real leader in the building of green data centers, even powering them with renewable energy. The company recently released environmental footprint scores for several of its data centers. While the energy usage required to run its cloud services (Google Search, Google+, Gmail and YouTube) seems huge in the aggregateit used 260 megawatt hours to power its data centers in 2010it boils down to only 7.4 kilowatt hours worth of energy annually per user. Google reports that to provide an individual user with its services for a month uses less energy than leaving a light bulb on for three hours. And because the company has been carbon neutral since 2007, even that small amount of energy is offset completely, so the carbon footprint of your life on Google is zero. In an April 2011 report entitled How Dirty is your for the 10 largest IT companies involved in cloud computyear when reporters uncovered that the company planned to buy electricity for its brand new eco-friendly data center in Prineville, Oregonone of the greenest such facilities ever designed and constructedfrom a utility that derives most of its power from coal.) Yahoo, Amazon.com and Microsoft scored best in use of renewable alternative energy sources for cloud services. In the long run, analysts think that the widespread shift to cloud computing will be a great boon to the environment. A report released in September 2011 by Pike Research, because of the shift to cloud computing and increasing by 31 percent between 2010 and 2020. Page 20 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL OCTo OBER 26, 2011 If youre interested in cleaning greener, there are many sources of natural cleaning recipes online. Or check out the cleaning products cleaning formulations safe for your health and the environment. Pictured: Earth Friendly Products' Safeguard Your Home retail pack. Since moving to the Florida Panhandle, Panama City musicians Mary Ellen Reedie, Yasya Brown and Rose Docy have made beautiful music in just about every venue you can imagine from ballrooms to will bring their delightful sounds to Jackson County starting at 1 p.m. on Nov. 6 at the 7th Annual Sunday Afternoon with the Arts. This family friendly event is not your typical art show. So plan now to bring your family and friends for a free afternoon of entertainment. The sounds of Elegant Strings will greet you as you arrive at the Chipola Arts Center for the celebration of art featuring a wide variety of work created by 65 local and regional artists and authors in addition to this years special guest artists Dean Mitchell, Michael Harrell, and Kristin Anderson. The Elegant Strings Trio has been making music on the Emerald Coast for 10 the Panama City area. They are the principle chairs of the string sections in the Panama City Pops Orchestra. The trios repertoire covers the classic literature, as well as, an ever-growing collection of contemporary music arranged expressly for them by one of its members. Their ensemble plays for weddings, parties, meetings, fund raisers, grand openings and local area churches throughout the Florida Panhandle. Not shy of the outdoors the trio has also played at beaches, parks, and on boats. Trio members are Mary Ellen Reedie, violin; Yasya Brown, violin; and Rose Docy, cello. Mary Ellen, a graduate in church music from Westminster College, came to North Florida from California, where she conducted vocal and bell choirs, played the organ and piano, and was a member of a local string quartet. Yasya came from Russia, where she majored in music at the Moscow Conservatory of Music. Coming to the United States on holiday led her to the man she would marry and her eventual US citizenship. Rose, a graduate of Capital University Conservatory of Music, came to the Emerald Coast from Ohio where she played in many musical theater productions and was a member of 3 regional symphonies. The free admission family event is November 6 from 1 to 5 PM at Chipola Arts Center. It is organized by The Artists Guild of Northwest Florida, Inc. in partnership with the Chipola Regional Arts Association and Chipola College. Interactive art activities for children and adults, door prizes and a Grand Door Prize donated by John Brewers Studio are a part of the annual event. Corporate sponsors for this years event include: Renaissance Gold Sponsors: Florida Public Utilities and the Jackson County Floridan; Renaissance Silver Sponsors: Focus Credit Union and United Member Business Services, LLC. Contributing Business Sponsors are Florida Commerce Credit Union, John Brewers Studio, The UPS Store, and Outside the Lines Art Studio. The Jackson County Chamber of Commerce and the Jackson County Tourist Development Council also support the event. the event at The Artists Guild web site: Orchestra to play at the Sunday Afternoon with the Arts in Marianna

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OCTo OBER 26, 2011 / THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 21 DANIEL WILLIAMS PHoOTo OS Folks of all ages enjoyed the opportunity to don a new Halloween costume, ride in the parade or just stand along the road and wait for a big piece of candy to come their way during Saturdays PTO Fall Festival in Hosford. The community turned out to enjoy the annual event, collecting treats while watching the procession roll through town and afterwards taking turns playing games and vying for prizes at the carnival.

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Page 22 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL OCTo OBER 26, 2011 GARDENINgGCitrus grown in the home landscape can be attacked by a number of insect and mite pests. Some are large enough to be spotted early in their infestation. Others are so small that you cant see them without tend to notice their damage until its too late to do anything about it. One very small pest that delivers an unsightly punch is the citrus rust mite (CRM). Mites are arachnids rather than insects making them related to spiders. While there are several different types of mites common. The citrus rust mite is found on all citrus varieties throughout Florida. Populations conditions with a female laying 20 to 30 eggs over a 20-day period. Although they peak populations usually occur during June and July. Rust mites have piercing-sucking mouthparts and feed on the outside exposed epidermal surface of fruit that is 1/2 inch or larger and on plant leaves and green twigs. Feeding destroys the rind cells and ultimately causes a very unappealing and alarming looking fruit. The appearance and amount of damage depends on when the infestation occurs. When a fruit is injured in summer surface is smooth and dark brown monly referred to as "bronzing". Mites feeding on fruit early in the spring produce a peel referred to as color. Blemished fruit lose water faster than undamaged fruit and will be smaller and appear substandard. Citrus rust mites prefer the fruit on the trees outer canopy that is exposed to sunthe most sun-exposed portion of the fruit. This behavior results in a sun spot of undamaged rind on the sunny side of the fruit. This pattern of damage is helpful in the diagnosis of this pest. and not every citrus tree in the yard will a surface blemish. It does make fruit unsaleable (and sometimes even hard to give there is nothing you can do for it once the fruit is damaged. Since rust mites are not readily visible would usually be too late to be scouting is critical to avoid fying glass to look for the mites at the times when infestation is expected to commence. Mite populations usually begin to increase in April on new foliage and reach a peak in June to July. Depending on weather conditions and the occurrence mite populations usually deagain in October and November. Pay special attention to trees recently sprayed with insecticides. The misuse of insecticides can sometime allow an explosion of mites. Horticultural oils can be used to control work by suffocating insects and causing them to die. very useful tool for controlling some citrus avoid plant Injury. Be sure to carefully read any insecticide labels before applying them to your citrus trees. Before you spray your citrus with any the label. Make sure the insects or mites you would like to control are listed on the label. RRusty looking citrus fruit might mean you have an infestation of citrus rust mites by Theresa Friday, Horticulture Extension Agent, Santa Rosa County EDDIE NOBLES LAndND CleLEARinING Call Eddie Nobles at (850) 643-5390 or (850) 447-0449 or Chas at 447-0849Located in Bristol Land clearing, excavation and root raking:ACCEPTING NNEW PPaA TIENTS www.bristoldentalclinic.com DEENTTURERE LABB ON PREREMISEESSame-Day Service on RR epairs & R R elines Bristol Dental Clinic Want to see whats new with TT upperware? Call Beth Eubanks, your full time Tupperware Consultant at (850) 643-2498 or email at bethseubanks41@aol.com. TALLAHASSEE Florida Education Commissioner Gerard Robinson and Florida Agriculture ever Florida Grown School Lunch Week during a celebration event at the Capitol on Monday. Florida Grown School Lunch Week was established to help nationwide observance that ensures children obtain ment. The physical and mental wellbeing of our chilCommissioner Robinson. Floridas local farmers are an excellent resource to help us achieve this sioner Putnam to offer healthier meals for our students. showcased the healthy foods they will be providing to Floridas public schools. The event also featured demonstrations by culinary staff who work with tricts highlighting the local foods in school lunchactivities were provided to attendees to help them improve eating habits and establish an active lifestyle. missioner Adam Putnam. It is important to direct these wholesome foods to Floridas school cafetetheir minds and bodies need to grow strong. After Farm to School programs are widely recognized as an effective way to encourage healthy eating and boost local agricultural sales by bringing local vegFor more information about Floridas Farm to toschool/.Florida home grown school lunch week celebrated

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OCTo OBER 26, 2011 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 23 OBITUARIES All existing pre-need and at need contracts are now handled by the Bevis family and staff.All operations of the funeral process will be handled on location at 12008 NW State Road 20.CALL 643-3636Todd Wahlquist, Rocky Bevis & Ed PeacockLicensed Funeral Directors & Crematoryevis FuneralHome Bof Bristolof Bristol Two locations to serve youBlountstown and Bristol Adams Funeral Home674-5449 or 643-5410Visit us online: www.adamsfh.com TT elephone (850) 674-2266 Your hometown funeral home since 1994A Hometown Funeral Director You Can Trust and Depend On!Funeral Services with Dignity, Caring and Professionalism. Marlon PeavyPeavy Funeral Home& CCrematoryLINDA DDUNCANPINSON, AL Linda Duncan, 68, of Pinson, AL passed away Monday, Oct. 17, 2011. She was born in Quincy on Sept. 21, 1943 to the late Forehand and Eunice Hazel (Bateman) Rankin. She was a graduate of Florida State University and taught school in Helena and Mobile, AL. Survivors include her husband, Daniel Duncan; three sons, John Duncan and his wife, Susan of Odenville, AL, Marc Duncan and his wife, Michele of Lakeland and Scott Duncan and his wife, Heather of Lincoln, Graveside services were held Wednesday, Oct. 19 in Adams Funeral Home was in charge of the arrangements. Online condolences may be made at adamsfh. com.EERmMA KATE CoCOBB passed away Wednesday, Oct. 19, 2011 in Blountstown. She was born in Glennville, GA on February 6, 1922 to the late William and Mary Lena (Sapp) Sykes. She She was preceded in death by her husband, B. T. Hosford. Graveside services were held Friday, Oct. 21 in HosAdams Funeral Home was in charge of the arrangements. Online condolences may be made at adamsfh. com.EEUNICE M. MESSERALTHA Eunice M. Messer, 79, of Altha passed away Thursday, Oct. 20, 2011 in Altha. She was born (Burke) Messer. A homemaker, she was a member of She was preceded in death by two brothers, J. B. Messer and Howell Dick Messer; and a sister, Helen Survivors include her sister, Edna Earl Laramore; a sister-in-law, Erlene Messer, both of Altha; and several nieces, nephews, and other extended family. Services were held Saturday, Oct. 22 in the chapel at Adams Funeral Home. Interment followed in Page Adams Funeral Home in Blountstown was in charge of the arrangements. Online condolences may be made at adamsfh.com.MElLANEE RRAIyYNE CCRAIG passed away Thursday, Oct. 20, 2011 in Gainesville. She was preceded in death by her sister, Destinee ther, Julias Pullam. Survivors include Michael Paul and April J. (Lewis) Hosford; her grandparents, Ricky and Terry Lou Lewis, and Marleen Beck; great-grandparents, Jean Pullam, Myrtice and A. W. Beck, all of Hosford, and Litamay Lewis of Blountstown; aunts Jennifer Beck of Hosford and Rosy Lewis of Altha; many cousins and other extended family. Graveside services were held Sunday, Oct. 23 in Adams Funeral Home was in charge of the arrangements. Online condolences may be made at adamsfh. com.LUlLA MAE BBRADWEllLL R REVEllLL RRABoON 90, of Lake Mystic passed away Tuesday, Oct.18, 2011. and Lula Bradwell. She was retired from the Dept. of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles, State of Florida. in Hosford. She was preceded in death by her husband, John H. Rabon; sister, Betty Bradwell; brother, Bubba John Bradwell and daughter, Suzanne Revell Dabney. Survivors include her daughter, Jo Ann Lewis and her husband, Buddy of Woodville; a son-in-law, Billy Dabney of Bristol; six grandchildren, Jeff and Greg ley and Eddie Dabney; 11 great-grandchildren and four great-great-grandchildren. Services were held Friday, Oct. 21 at Grace United charge of the arrangements. Honor your loved ones by making their memory part of our best efforts to defeat cancer. For more information, contact the American Cancer Society.hat bettertribute cathere beBE?EEAST GGADSDEN UUNIT P.O. BBox 563, Quincy 32353 Study shows Commission on Human Relations saved businesses $61 millionTALLAHASSEE A new study by the the states leading anti-discrimination saved Florida businesses $60.7 million litigation in hundreds of discrimination vices produced outcomes that typically cost businesses 89 percent less than if the cases age return on investment of 144 percent for every $1.00 provided by taxpayers avoided costs associated with discrimination lawsuits. missions record resolving cases that allege Michelle Wilson. While ensuring the rights of individuals is of paramount impor tance, the less money and time a business has to spend defending itself in court, the more that business can focus on creating jobs for Floridians. Over the span of the 2006-07 through tion process helped individual complainants in 508 cases reach a mutually agreeable resolution with those they had accused of illegal discrimination. issued no cause determinations in 3,571 quickly, a portion of them likely would have gone to court and required busi nesses to incur attorney costs, court fees, investigative and deposition expenses, and other court-related expenses even though the actual complaints may not have been substantiated. While the extensive savings from these tablished, the mediation cases offer clear sector: federal Bureau of Justice Statistics, the average court-ordered damage award in discrimination cases was $134,125. amount in cases successfully mediated by services is $119,598. the number of successful mediations (508) equals $60,755,784, or an average of $12,151,156 per year. expenditures, such as attorney fees or court costs. servative estimate based on the last documented federal study of discrimination case awards. Avoided court costs to businesses could in fact be substantially higher than cannot be determined conclusively. return on investment for the taxpayers of Florida, based on the successful resolution of cases through mediation. islature has appropriated just under $5 entire annual budget. In the same period, businesses have realized, conservatively, more than $12.1 million per year in avoided costs. Thus businesses saved an additional $1.44 beyond each $1.00 spent to fund operations. tively, more than $12.15 million per year in avoided costs (as documented above). funding.

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MARIANNAChipola College education majors in elementary, middle and secondary school science recently attended a Project Learning Tree workshop at the Florida Caverns. Bill Kleinhans and fellow Project Learning Tree (PLT) facilitators, foresters, and naturalists: Linda Hebb, Mark Hebb, Phil Smith and Bruce Turnbull led the workshops. The purpose of the meetings was to help the future teachers learn to integrate lessons on the Florida Environment into math, reading and science courses. Chipola students received the PreK-8 Environmental Education Activity Guide with educator resources. Activities were selected from the guide and implemented at the park. They adopted trees, used trigonometric functions to calculate the heights of trees, became a human tree depicting heartwood, xylem, phloem, cambium; studied tree cookies and rings; and competed for tree resources while connecting, math, science and reading. Developed in 1976, Project Learning Tree is recognized as one of the premier environmental education programs in the world. While meeting state and national standards, it gives teachers the strategies, techniques and conceptual knowledge for activity-based learning to take the environment into the classroom and students into the environment. Topics include forests, wildlife, water, community, planning, recycling and energy. LEFT: Project Learning Tree (PLT) facilitators, foresters, and naturalists discuss activities. They are, from left: Bruce Turnbull, Bill Kleinhans, Phil Smith, Mark Hebb and Linda Hebb. Page 24 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL OCTo OBER 26, 2011 Buy Rite DrugsTT entative dates for the enrollment period are Nov. 7 18, 2011Contact your local Buy Rite Pharmacist before making your decision. We will be glad to assist you.from Altha SchoolAs Altha students returned to school after the weekend, some began to notice a totaled car parked between the buildings on campus. When 8:45 came around, students went to the gym for one of the most powerful presentations the school has seen in a while. Renee Napier, a passionate mother whose made it her mission to promote drunk driving awareness in a positive and productive way, shared her story about her daughters accident that could have been avoided if her guest, Eric Smallridge, wouldnt have made the decision to drink and drive drunk in 2002. Eric (pictured here in a blue jail uniform) was escorted out in handcuffs and shackles. He gave his side of the story and said he takes full responsibility for taking the two girls lives. Thats why I want to give them mine, and dedicate it to them. Ms. Napiers powerful message has been heard by more than one hundred thousand middle and high school students around the state. Altha students said the presentation made them think about everyday decisions and how they can make a difference like Ms. Napier and the Meagan Napier Foundation. The school would like to thank Renee Napier, Eric Smallridge, David Tatum and the Calhoun County Sheriffs Department, as well as Mrs. Kelley, for making the presentation possible. MARIANNA The family of the late Wanda B. Henderson has established a Chipola College scholarship in her memory. Henderson was employed for a number of years with the Jackson County School Board and retired as the Graceville High School Guidance Counselor. One of the joys during her educational career was coordinating the WINGS program at Marianna Middle School and Graceville High School. Henderson was the wife of the Rev. Riley J. Henderson, pastor of the Saint Luke Baptist Church in Marianna. The Hendersons had four children: Leticia, Francesca, Fodina and Julius; a granddaughter, Xaviera Henderson and a grandson, RyJuan Awak. The Wanda B. Henderson Memorial Education Scholar ship will be awarded to a junior or senior education major at Chipola in August of 2012. Applicants must be residents of Jackson County and maintain a 2.5 GPA each semester. Those wishing to make a donation in memory of Wanda Henderson may send a check to the Chipola College Foundation, 3094 Indian Circle, Marianna, FL 32446. For information, phone (850) 718-2478. ITS VERY WiISE TO ADVERTiISE CLJNews.cCOM Call us at (850) 643-3333Email: thejournal@fairpoint.net in the Calhoun-Liberty JOURNAL and

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OCTo OBER 26, 2011 / THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 25 Lady Tigers beat Lady Wildcats in four set volleyball action Oct. 20Blountstown and Altha met Oct. 20 on the Lady Tigers turf for an intense afternoon volleyball game that was full of action. BHS took Altha in three of the four matches, scoring 26-24, 25-13, 25-18 and 25-23. Hope Jerkins led the Blountstown Tigers with 4 kills, 11 digs, 6 aces and 2 blocks. Teammates Jordan blocks, Courtney McFarlin had 3 kills, 5 aces and 6 digs, Randa McCroan had 5 aces and 7 assists, Kaycee Yon had 6 assists while Kim Jinks had 11 digs. For the Altha Wildcats, Mary Sewell led with 11 service points and 12 assists. Teammates Hannah Register had 8 service points, Angela Waldron had 7 kills and 2 blocks, Cortney Harris had 4 kills and 6 assists while McKenzie Tanner had 4 kills and 2 blocks. DanielANIEL WilliamsILLIAMS PhotosHOTOSABOVE: The stands were full of Altha fans to support the Lady Wildcats. RIGHT: Blountstowns the net while an Altha player attempts to block.

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Page 26 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL OCTo OBER 26, 2011 CARS2001 Ford Mustang, runs great, cold AC, Lambo doors, $1,500. Call (850) 372-3204. 10-26, 11-2 TRUCKS1993 Ford E Econoline van, good condition, has owners manual, good on gas, TV-VCR combo, $2,500 OBO. Call 762-9504 or (850) 557-2134 and leave message. 10-26, 11-21998 Ford F150 XLT T T T riton, V-8, 4.6 liter, extended cab, 3-door, $2,800. Call (850) 557-3583.10-26, 11-21989 C Chevy B Blazer, engine needs work, $800 OBO. Call 643-2977 from 3-8 p.m. 10-26, 11-21998 Ford E Explorer, 5.0 engine, V-8, runs great, needs battery, $1,000. Call 482-5049. 10-26, 11-22001 Ford F150, 4x4, leather interior, never been in the woods, $9,800 OBO. Call 892-5080. 10-19, 10-261966 Dodge C Charger, taken apart for restoration, includes all parts, 383 motor with transmission, will make a great project car, $4,000 OBO. Call 447-0122. 10-19, 10-261995 C Chevy Silverado, 350 motor, low miles, new tires and battery, very dependable, $2,500. Call (850) 661-7016. 10-19, 10-262004 Xterra Nissan, white, power locks and windows, running boards, clean, good tires, 110,000 miles, automatic, tinted windows, with racks, runs good, $6,650 OBO/make offer. Call 509-3271.10-5, 11-2 AUTO ACCESSORIESTT wo tires, 215 70 R15, $50; four wheel covers, $25 for set. Call 214-6043. 10-19, 10-26TT ransmission mount for full size Bronco, $10. Ford factory 17 inch steel wheels with lugs and center gas cans, $5 each. Call 674-1617 or 447-1023 leave message. 10-19, 10-26White strapless wedding gown on bottom, $300 OBO. Call 6438383. 10-19, 10-26SportRRider scooter, brand new, battery never been charged. Several TV cabinets, several vanity cabinets with sink. Good selection of clothes, men, women and childrens, shoes, ladies purses, electronic equipment, furniture and appliances. Everyone is invited to shop at the Calhoun-Liberty Ministry Center store. Located on Hwy. 20 E. in Blountstown, 6741818. UFN APPLIANCESMicrowave, large, $25; Toaster oven, $12. Call 674-3264. 10-26, 11-2Washing machine, $50. Call 447-2885. 10-26, 11-2Washing machine, Roper brand, $60. Call 214-6043. 10-19, 10-26EElectric stove, four burners, $150. Call 674-3264 or 447-1380. 10-19, 10-26GEE refrigerator, new, freezer on top, with icemaker, 18.1 cubic ft.. List $649, asking $350. Call 7623966. 10-19, 10-26 FURNITUREHutch computer desk, $150. Call 674-6022. 10-26, 11-2CChest of drawers, $15. Call 6743264. 10-26, 11-2Sofa chair cabinets, very nice, all for $100. Toddler bed, $30. Call 674-3264 or 447-1380. 10-19, 10-26EElectric hospital bed, with mattress, $75. Small table and two chairs, $75. Call 643-2945. 10-19, 10-2639 Glass table top, 3/8 thick, $65. Call 674-1617 or 447-1023 leave message. 10-19, 10-26Queen marble/brass bed frame, $50; black TV stand with swivel top, $75. Call 247-8035. 10-19, 10-26 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNALCLASSIFIEDSTo place your ad, call 643-3333 by noon Eastern Time on Saturday. Non-business ads run FREE for 2 weeks. ITEMS FOR SALEJet 10 Power electric chair, new batteries, $800. Call 674-4454.10-26, 11-2Weslo treadmill, one year old, used very little, $200. Call 6744454. 10-26, 11-217 R Roping saddle, tooled leather, great condition, with stand, $225. Call (850) 625-0265. 10-26, 11-2Kodak Medalist AF C Carousel projector, 35mm slide, comes with two lenses, one Kodak Ektanar C 102mm f/2.8 projection lens, and one Kodak projection Ektagraphic IF 100 to 150mm A3.5 zoom lens, plus 3-140 Kodak Ektagraphic slide trays and 2-80 slide trays. Projector never used except to test. New in box with manuals, $90. Call 443-2422 in Bristol. 10-26, 11-2Acer Aspire One D255EE Notebook, 10.1 LED screen with Win 7, ultra thin, about eight months old, carrying case and charger, $195. Call 443-2422 in Bristol.10-26, 11-2Grandfather clock, $40. Dishes with 22K gold trim, make offer; mens jacket, $5; small doll crib, $12. Call 674-3264. 10-26, 11-2BBaby changing table, $40. Call 209-2700. 10-26, 11-2Four cell phones, make offer. Call 214-6043. 10-19, 10-26CCash register, $200; young boys clothes, sizes 4-8, 75 $1.25; grandfather clock, $55. Call 6743264 or 447-1380. 10-19, 10-26Fire Flyer combination safe, $75; one wheelchair, small child size, manual, $35. Call 643-2945. 10-19, 10-26Stair stepper, $30. Call 6437915. 10-19, 10-2616x20 Shed with double carport, wired for electricity, carport has light. Paid $7,800, asking $3,500. Call 447-0122. 10-19, 10-26Schwinn 26 mens mountain bike, great condition, $50. Mongoose 26 womens mountain bike, good condition, $30. Weedeater brand electric trimmer and edger, new, ries, like new, $500. Call 674-1617 or 447-1023 leave message. 10-19, 10-26BBaby bouncer, Jump-a-roo, $10. V-Tech teddy bear, $3. Elmo Spins and Talk chair, $10. Bouncer, vibrates, $10. Entire Princess bedroom set, bed, canopy, TV, DVD player, toy box, benches, containers, make offer. V-Tech Cycling drive, for 1-4 year olds, brand new, $20. Baby clothes, 6 to 9 months up to 5 years, 50 each. Crib with mattress, $50. Pack-nplay, $10. Call 247-8035. 10-19, 10-26 BD, 1 1/2 BA TownhousesBRISTOL FOR RENTBLOUNTSTOWN Phone 643-7740 For Rent in ALTHaA762-9555 or 762-8597Very NICE 2 & 3 bedroom trailers. 5 x 10 .....$27 10 x 10 ....$43 10 x 20 ....$70 10 x 25 ....$90M & W SELFSTORAGE RRENTALs SCall 573-5255, 762-9555, 762-8807 or 762-8597 7 days a week service UFN Mobile Home for R Rent in CCalhounCall 674-88882 BD, 2 BA, located six miles north on Hwy. 69 N. NO PETS. Damage & Cleaning deposit, Water, sewer and grass cutting provided.UFN Home for Rent inHOSFORDCall 379-8287 or 509-4227for more information3 BD, 2 BA Located across from Hosford School$400 MONTH Really nice, 3 BD, 2 BA$650 month(850) 962-9711Riverfront home for Rent in Telogia 3.94 Acres For Sa A LECall 509-8636Cleared & Fenced, Deep well & SepticHwy. 73 N in Clarksville$26,000 REREAL EESTT ATE TE Will buy 10 to 1,000 acres, reasonably priced. Immediate closing.CCall (850) 544-5441 or (850) 570-0222 WANTED: NoO INTERETERESTT PLANSI R.E. BrokerLAND SALE 10 ACRE + TRACTSPaved Highway Frontage With Planted Pine TT rees From $4,995 per acreWith $600 DownR Regular CContractWith $2,500 Down No Interest First YearWith $5,000 Down No Interest First 2 Years Owner Financing No Qualifying Nov. 5 at 7 p.m.(First Saturday of every month) Public is invited.18098 NW County Rd. 12AUCTION643-7740 Col. James W. Copeland AB1226/AU0001722 FreeREE setupSETUP forFOR yard YARD sale SALE everyEVERY SaturdayATURDAY 1 & 2 bedroom mobile homes in Blountstown and Bristol. $105 to $155 weekly. Deposit required. All utilities included. NO PETS. Singles or Couples preferred. Also RV for rent. 10% Sr. Disc. Call 674-7616FOR RENT FoOR RREnNTin BBlountstownCall 674-3264Close to shopping, School, Town, Rent to Own or Just Rent4 BD House Money off for 3 year lease.

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OCTo OBER 26, 2011 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 27 Miss a recent Pets & Their People column?Catch up online at CLJNews.com. THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNALCLASSIFIEDSTo place your ad, call 643-3333 by noon Eastern Time on Saturday. Non-business ads run FREE for 2 weeks. Luggage rack for vehicle, $75. Call 247-8035. 10-19, 10-26 MOTORCYCLES, ATVs & Waver AVERUNNersERS2003 Honda STT 1300 Sport T T ouring bike, fully loaded, Stock or Two Brothers exhaust, heated grips, ABS brakes and a Corbin heated saddle, in excellent condi10-26, 11-2Five four wheelers, need minor work, $650 for all. Call 643-2635 or 320-4542. 10-19, 10-26 HUNUNTINNG & FISHINNGBBrowning A-BBolt 270 with dash mounts, $425. Call (706) 8161268. 10-26, 11-2, model 500AT, slide action, VR-30 barrel, ish stock, in excellent condition, $250. Remington model 522 Viper semi-auto, 22 cal LR, 20 barrel, black synthetic stock, 10 shot mag, cocking indicator, adj. rear sight, 4 5/8 lbs, $150. Call 4432422 in Bristol. 10-26, 11-2RRemington model 700, BDL 30.06, includes scope, mount, and rings, four boxes of ammo, sling and softcase, $750. Call 7624856. 10-19, 10-26 TOOLS & EQUUIPMENNTAir compressor, $500. Call 6743264 or 447-1380. 10-19, 10-26 FREEPine straw, located in Bristol. Call 643-5401. 10-26, 11-2 LOST/FOUNUNDLOSTT : Male, 1 1/2 year old, brown and black brindle bulldog mix, has red collar, answer to Lucky. Last seen in Rock Bluff community. Call 443-0648. 10-19, 10-26LOSTT : White Daschund, piebald, missing from Lake Mystic area, male with black, answers to Stanley. Call 643-2020 or 643-8383. 10-19, 10-26 PETS/SUUPPLIESDwarf hamsters, six weeks old. Call 674-6022. 10-26, 11-2TT wo C Chihuahua/Dachshund mix puppies have had shots, one looks like a Chihuahua and other looks like a Dachshund. Free to a good home. Call 447-1022. 10-26, 11-2Moving, need homes for two dogs, one a Chocolate Lab/White English mix named China, 14 months old, very good with kids and other animals, the other a 16 month old Rottweiler mix, good with kids not with other animals, very protective. Free to good homes. Call 762-4524. 10-26, 11-2TT wo mini horses, one six-monthold male and a year old female. Make offer. Call 363-9504.10-26, 11-2TT wo Jack R Russell, both females, one two years old and one six years old, free to good homes. Call 762-8657. 10-19, 10-26RRoosters, six, mixed Rhode Island Red and Cukoo Maran, $10 each. Call 209-1395. 10-19, 10-26 WANNTEDSmall house dog. Call 674-3033. 10-26, 11-2White E English B Bulldog puppy. Call 447-1542. 10-26, 11-2EElectric stove; Springer Spaniel, er. Call 674-3264 or 447-1380.10-19, 10-26Welded aluminum boat, 14-16 ft. with stick steer. Call 693-0898. 10-19, 10-26We buy junk cars and trucks. We will pick them up. Call 6435045 or 447-3819. 3-23 T. 12-28 YARD SALES Blo BLOUNTsSTow OWN Yard Sale, Saturday, Oct. 29, beginning at 7 a.m., located at 17854 NE Charlie Johns in Chipola Manclothes, shoes, miscellaneous, womens leather jacket size 1X. Phone 674-3033. Yard Sale, Friday & Saturday, Oct. 28 & 29 at Rivertown Auto Sales, Hwy. 20 in front of Alco beginning at 8 a.m. Lots of items, furniture, appliances, linens, dishes, yard tools and much more. Phone 2372424 or 899-0979.BR BRISTT OLE Estate Sale, Saturday, Oct. 29, from 8 a.m. to noon, located at 10803 NW Spring Street. Furniture, tools, dishes and more. Phone 447-4111. C CLARRKSVILLEE Wednesday, Oct. 26 from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. (CT), rain or shine, located at 18426 NW Nichols Road. tackle, hand tools, riding mowers, yard tools and more. Phone 2371930. STARSCOPEFAMOUUS BBIRTRTHDAYSARRIEES Mar 21/Apr 20 Aries, once something is in your head, it is hard to get rid of it. A stubborn nature can be an asset at times, especially when getting ahead in business.T T AURUURUS Apr 21/May 21 Its a love of life that will move you through the next few days, Taurus. Otherwise you can become bored with the mundane responsibilities of day to day. GEEMINNI May 22/Jun 21 Gemini, once the wheels are to turn back. That is why it is best to think things through before you take any action.C CANCERNCER Jun 22/Jul 22 others to hear what you are saying when they refuse to listen. You will just have to be more diligent in your efforts. LEEO Jul 23/Aug 23 Leo, many people will be following your lead this week. Be on your best behavior, so you will be a role model and set a positive example for those who follow. VIRRGO Aug 24/Sept 22 Virgo, when someone chooses to offer advice, listen to that advice even if you dont agree with it. Things will have a funny way of working out. LIBRBRA Sept 23/Oct 23 Make an effort to spend some time with someone whom you have not seen in awhile, Libra. You wont regret the decision because soon you will part ways again. SCCORRPIO Oct 24/NNov 22 between the time you spend with others and the moments you secure for yourself. While not secretive, you do relish in your privacy. SAGITTTT ARRIUUS NNov 23/Dec 21 Sagittarius, you will quickly become persona non grata if you dont mend your ways. Taking advantage of others will cause them to rescind their generosity.C CAPRRICCORNRN Dec 22/Jan 20 Personal matters take precedence once again, Capricorn. Just when it seems you can never conquer the challenges that arise, you are met with a welcome surprise. AQUARIUS Jan 21/Feb 18 Aquarius, bide your time because the stars indicate a changing of times that will move in your favor. This will be an opportunity for wrongs to be righted. PISCECES Feb 19/Mar 20 Pisces, dont devote too much attention to recreational activities this week because then it could distract you from work that needs doing.Week of Oct. 30 ~ Nov. 5OCTOBER 30 Matthew Morrison, Actor (33) OCTOBER 31 Willow Smith, Singer (11) NOVEMBER 1 Jenny McCarthy, Actress (39) NOVEMBER 2 David Schwimmer, Actor (45) NOVEMBER 3 Gemma Ward, Model (24) NOVEMBER 4 Matthew McConaughey, Actor (42) NOVEMBER 5 Kevin Jonas, Singer (24) 3 BD, 1 1/2 BA with central air. $575 a month with $200 deposit. Or rent to own for $375 a month. 3 BD power included. $550 a month 2 BD power included. $550 a monthCCall 447-2885 For RRent in BBristol Liberty Post & Barn Pole Inc.We've got the fence posts to meet your needs.Dempsey Barron Road, Bristol (off Hwy. 12 N) Telephone (850) 643-5995 3 BD, 2 BA double-wide, very clean and landscaped, located off Hwy. 275 N on Circle Lane in Altha, water included. NO PETS. Monthly rent$500 plus $300 depositDouble-wide FOR Rent I C C.CCall 643-7770 (DAYS) or 674-3570 (NIGHTS)

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Page 28 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL OCTo OBER 26, 2011eries and many species of wildlife are dependent on natural aquatic vegetation. Rooted aquatic plants stabilize shorelines, prevent erosion, reduce turbidity to hide from predators, serve as food for insects and waterfowl, help reduce algal blooms, provide shade and cover Invasive plant species, however, can be harmful and have few natural checks. The spread of water lettuce, hyacinth and hydrilla are prime examples of nonnative plants that require management. Proposals in the late 1960s and early 1970s to stock open water bodies with diploid (fertile) grass carp (Ctenopharygodon idella) to feed on nonnative plants quickly became contro versial. These Asian carp spawn in similar habitats to striped bass, and naturally reproducing populations could have gotten out of control and wreaked havoc on native plant and wildlife communities. Florida helped lead the way with grass carp re search, determining their food habits and helping create triploid (functionally sterile) grass carp. Florida biologists also developed Counters, which the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and many state agencies use to ensure only triploid grass carp are stocked. However, many grass carp are stocked and plants are eliminated, the problem may last as long as and that can be more than 15 years. Thus far, in Florida, thanks in part to the diligence of management agencies, there are no documented cases of grass carp spawning in the wild. Recently, however, Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) biologists discovered a few diploid escapees in the Suwannee River, having come states. This caused renewed concern and the need to repeat the message about the importance of stocking only triploid grass carp. So legitimate concerns revolve around use of grass carp and a full gamut of options for aquatic plant management are considered, depending on circumstances. In 2008, the FWC participated in A Risk Analysis Pertaining to Use of Triploid Grass Carp for Biological Control of Aquatic Plants. The review concluded that in public waters, agencies should develop management plans for each stocking. The safest approach was determined to be an initial herbicide treatment followed by low-level stocking of triploid grass carp. The FWCs Invasive Plant Management Section also recently concluded a public review process to create a new Agency Position on Hydrilla Management (MyFWC.com/Nonnatives; search Hydrilla Position). The position recognizes that native aquatic plant communities provide ecological functions to tions. Hydrilla, as an invasive, nonnative plant, requires management. However, in water bodies where hydrilla is established, the FWC will manage it in light of the primary use of the water body. Plans will incorporate public input, be adaptive Chemical control is expensive (up to $750 per acre per year). Mechanical control is even more so about twice as costly as chemical control. Biological controls using insects or diseases have not proved suitable for managing hydrilla, leaving triploid grass carp as the most effective biocontrol. plants in moderate-sized lakes at a cost of $20 to $250 per acre. In private ponds, golf course ponds, irrigation ditches and grass carp provide an environmentally sound, cost-effective way of controlling aquatic plants. Such stockings require a permit from the FWC. The Invasive Plant Management Section issues nearly 1,500 such permits annually, saving users money and reducing herbicide use (MyFWC.com/License; select Aquatic Plants). FWC personnel also plan and stock triploid grass carp in public waters. Currently, staff is monitoring about 100 locations. However, in situations where plants, destroy important habitat, adversely affect recreation and negatively affect the local economy. In summary, FWC uses a permit program to allow citizens to purchase and stock triploid grass carp as a costeffective means of controlling plants in self-contained private waters. The FWC also saves state money bodies to reduce the need for expensive chemicals, but it draws the line at stocking triploid grass carp in large, open systems where triploid grass carp are unpredictable and could negatively affect the states immensely valuable sport natural ecosystems. Dave Eggeman contributed to this column. He is a biologist with the FWCs Invasive Aquatic Plants Section. Instant licenses are available at MyFWC.com/License or by calling (888) FISH-FLORIDA (347-4356). Report violators by calling *FWC or #FWC on your cell, or (888) 404-3922. Visit MyFWC.com/Fishing for more Fish Busters columns.Triploid grass carp evolve as an aquatic-plant management tool Florida Fish B Busters B BULLETINby Bob Wattendorf LaADieIES, LetETS GoO FiIShingHING! Weekend offers angling fun the next Ladies, Lets Go Fishing! seminar, Nov. 11-13 at the Holiday Isle Resort and Marina in Islamorada. Ladies, Lets Go Fishing! is a national organization to promoting conservation and responsible angling. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) is co-hosting the event through the Sport Fish Restoration Program. During the three-day, hands-on event, FWC educators will demonstrate ethical angler habits such as safe and methods. Our Islamorada seminar provides women with a unique experiential vacation getaway where they can learn, network and enjoy the fabulous Florida Keys founder of the series. Wildlife management areas are safe, natural havens for the publicWe are incredibly fortunate to have a vast system of public lands in Florida. Over the years, the state has acquired a range of local and state parks, forests and a wildlife management area system that is one of the largest in the nation. These heritage and our connection with the natural world. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) operates our wildlife management areas under a multiple-use concept, accommodating a range of public Wildlife management areas are the only places where such varied activities as hiking, paddling, hunting, wildlife viewing or horseback riding may be so widely available. Most importantly, our WMAs, as we call them, have a long history of multiple recreational activities conducted safely. Millions of people visit our management areas every year boat. Those who come experience safe areas of scenic beauty with abundant wildlife because of the well-managed habitat there. Sharing these resources during hunting seasons is no exception. As Florida has urbanized, fewer Floridians participate in or have been exposed to hunting. This can lead to unnecesbased on a lack of understanding and inaccurate perceptions. Even worse, people may avoid visiting some of the most beautiful places in our state. Learning about hunting can change these misperceptions. All hunters born after 1975 are required to complete a hunter safety course before they can purchase a license. This requirement contributes to Floridas long record of safely offer ing hunting with other activities on public lands. The National Safety Council documents hunting as one of the safest types of outdoor recreation, and it continues to become safer. A check of the different WMA locations at MyFWC.com/ Recreation quickly allows visitors to review the hunting calendar and plan a trip around hunting activity if they so desire. Additional information is provided that explains the character and popularity of hunting seasons. For example, general gun season draws the most users. During small game season, we typically see fewer hunters on public lands. Shooting hours spring turkey season, shooting hours end at 1 p.m. Visitors can use this type of information to plan the experience they are seeking. All of us share the same desire to enjoy the outdoors. Hunters need to welcome other wildlife management area users, and these users should extend the same courtesy to hunters and to each other. By reaching out to get to know one another, we can reduce lands. Through mutual understanding and respect, we can continue our heritage of access to public lands for ourselves and for future generations. HoOURS Monday SSaturday 9 a.m. 9 p.m.S Sunday 11 a.m. 6 p.m. 2816 Hwy. 98 West AUTO FINaANCINGDAYLIGHT CITY TIRE cCO. We're your one-stop"Volkswagens to semi's, we handle them all" driving from the tire store to the parts place and then to a service station to get it all put together? CityITY TireIRE iIS your YOUR oneONE-StoTOP tire TIRE ShoHOP! TTIRE SSTo ORE! "Authorized DEaALER" Wheel Alignments Oil Changes Balancing BrakesS Shocks

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OCTo OBER 26, 2011 / THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 29 ANNUaAL CONCERT RaA ISES MONEY FORFF lorida SSheriffs YY outh RRanches Buddy Smith (RIGHT) headed up the 19th annual Bluegrass Gospel Concert Saturday night at the BHS gym in Blountstown, with groups including the Big Bend Bluegrass Band and the Sheriffs Posse Band, along with solo performances from Russ Renfroe from Montgomery, AL and Wayne Martin (BELOW) of Calhoun County. An appreciative audience helped raise between $2,500 and $3,000, which will go to the Florida Sheriffs Youth Ranches. DANIEL WILLIAMS PHOTOS CCovenant Hospice 5-week grief support group meetings start Oct. 27 in T T allahasseeTALLAHASSEE Feelings of grief and loss can be overwhelming. For this reason, Covenant H Hospice their grief in a safe and caring environment. hospice.org. ADOPT A PET...FROM THE JOURNALCLALASSFFIEEDS!

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Three Alabama men and a woman face a multitude of charges for illegally shooting deer at night north of Marianna, in Jackson County. William Cody Tillery, 21, Brandon Leigh Smith, 20, and Dustin Chase Parker, 19, all from Dothan, AL, and Lindsay Brooke Holloway, 19, of Troy, AL, are charged with killing eight deer and shooting at other deer in agricultural line. They were accompanied by three the group began working an area of north Jackson County near Sellars Road and September. Dodson, who was riding late at night on Christmas Road after seeing the occu with their headlights. ing kits, and the trunk was lined with plastic. Smith, Tillery and Holloway were inside the car. Smith and Tillery allegedly admitted they had been night hunting. They said they had been watching and antlers. Additionally, a crossbow were seized as In addition to illegal face charges for shooting and criminal mischief for ing peanuts that were in People can also send a text message People with tips may remain anonymous and collect a reward if an arrest is made based on their information. this case will be scheduled by the Jackson County Clerk of the Court. follows: adoighmith three counts DUstiSTIN ChasHASE Par ARKErR counts WilliamILLIAM COdDY TillILLErR Y LiINdsaDSA Y BrROOKE HOllLLOwaWA Y Additional charges are pending against the suspects.This report represents some events the FWC handled over the week of Sept. 31 Oct. 13; however, it does not include all actions taken by the Division of Law Enforcement. CALHOUN cCOUNTY BAYAY COUNTYOUNTYN only undersized grouper and threw them all back. When asked if he knew the size limit for grouper, he replied, inches. When asked about the cooler in his truck, under some garbage bags. A citation was issued.JAACKSONON COUNTYOUNTY R R area of Jackson County. After hearing gunshots from a group of hunters in baited with wheat, sorghum, and pea seeds. N N ine hunters were charged with hunting migratory birds GULULF COUNTYOUNTY near Pig Island in St. Joe Bay. lons of whole scallops. Their legal limit was four gallons, and were going to the ramp to get some ice. Both were the water. HOLHOLMES COUNTYOUNTY and bag limits. baited with cracked corn. Citations were issued to ten SANTAANTA ROOSAA COUNTYOUNTYWhile patrolling on Highway 87 north of Holley, O Of R E Visual contact with the truck was lost for a time and Jones contacted the two occupants of the truck who led him to the location of the dumped lumber. dumping. R R cleaning a freshly killed deer in his backyard. The ing the doe deer feeding deer were seized. The taking an illegal deer out of season.ESCAAMBIAA COUNTYOUNTY and K K enneth Manning were working night hunt E R E hicle. occupants, was stopped and O O fficer Manning tempting to take deer with a gun and light. Additionally, one ci tation was issued to the OOKALOOALOOSAA COUNTYOUNTY safety inspection determined the boat was returning from and determined both were undersized. The legal size limit is 30 inches or greater. The operator was cited for Page 30 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL OcOCTOberBER 26, 2011FWC Division of Law Enforcement weekly report for Sept. 31-Oct. 13 Four A Alabama residents face numerous illegal hunting charges for shooting deer at night in Jackson County NOW HIRIn N GSenior Dental Care is now accepting resumes for the position of...R Fax resume to (850) 674-295110-26, 11-2 JOBS Part-time Nursery Worker NeededSUNDAYs S & WEDNEs S DAYs S Monday-Friday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. 16693 SE Pear Street NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE Management OOpportunity County. required. If interested please send your resume to: Vernon.tanner@compass-usa.com by November 10, 2011.

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OCTo OBER 26, 2011 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 31 CLJ NEWS .COM To place your ad call us at 643-3333 SERVICE DIRECTORY Whaley Heating & Air Conditioning (850) 674-4777FL LicIC. # CMC1249570 Accepting:R Is s s : (850) 643-6925 : (850) 643-2064 : grich0656@aol.com10536-B NW SR 20 Bristol, FL 32321 Located in the Apalachee RestaurantGary RRichards, EEA MBBAEnrolled Agent Enrolled to Practice Before the IRS BBusiness & Accounting Solutions Inc. 4433 NW C.R. 274 Altha, Fl 32421 (850) 762-9402 Cell (850) 832-5055Dozer and Excavation work Over 20 years experienceClay ONealsLand Clearing, Inc. William's HomeImprovements "No Job Too Big or Small"Concrete work, landscape, pressure cleaning, renovations, seamless gutter, painting, vinyl, & screen enclosure CCall 674-8092Licensed & Insured, contractor & rooferFORR FREEREE EESTTIMATE TES LIBERTY TTIRE COMPANY 10781 NW SR 20 Bristol, Fl 32321Call 643-2939 MV75332Hours: Monday thru Friday 7 5 & Saturday 7 12Come see us for all your tire needs or give us a call for roadside service, oil changes & tire rotation. We specialize in sales and repair of tires for:Commercial Trucks and Trailers, OTR Equipment, Farm Equipment, Passenger Car & Light Truck Tires Call Chris Nissley at 674-8081 or 643-8561 (Cell) STUMP GRINDINGReasonable Rates & FreeREE Estimates! That Darn PumpThere is never a convenient time to be without water.WELLsS psa s(850)643-HELP Thats 643-4357 or Home 643-3857For friendly service and never any overtime charges call, iesesreBBARLRLOWSDR Repair & Water ServicesWell drilling & Pump repairD ________________________Serving Gulf, Franklin, BBay,C Calhoun, Washington &L Liberty CCounties________________________850-639-9355or850-814-7454 Hwy 71 South on J.P. Peacock Rd, Altha. Day or night,Check out our prices before buying from somewhere else. For Weddings, Birthdays and all Holidays, come in or call us. Margies Florist Phone David Morris at (850) 868-1295 or Dispatch at (850) 575-4414 Locally owned & OperatedNow serving the Hosford, Telogia, and Bristol areas. Clint Hatcher, OwnerElectrical Lic. # ER13014037 Building Lic. # RB29003511New Homes Garages Additions Electrical Remodeling Foundations Screenrooms Sunrooms VINYL SIDING RESIDENTAL & COMMERCIAL FREE EstimatesServing C Calhoun, LLiberty & Jackson C Counties Chipola offers rnRN to bsnBSN nursing degree with online classesMARIANNAChipola College now offers a Bachelor of Science degree in Nursing commonly known as the RN to BSN. All upper level courses in the program are offered in an online format. The RN to BSN is designed for students who have earned an Associate in Science (AS) degree in Nursing from a regionally accredited institution and possess a current, clear, active Florida RN license. To earn the BSN from Chipola, students must complete 40 semester hours of courses at the 3000 level and above. At least 30 of the 40 hours must be earned in residence at Chipola. Chipolas RN to BSN program focuses on the development of professional nursing practice to health care settings. The program may be completed in three semesters or longer according to the student preference. The program adheres to all common prerequisites, courses of study, and clinical requirements for RN to BSN programs in Florida. The following prerequisites are required for entrance into the program: (BSC 2093 & 2093L) Anatomy & Physiology I and Lab; (BSC 2094 & 2094L) Anatomy & Physiology II and Lab; (DEP 2004) Human Growth & Development; (HUN 1201) Elements of Nutrition; (MCB 2010 & 2010L) Microbiology & Lab; (PSY 2012 or SYG 1000) General Psychology or Intro to Sociology; (STA 2023 or 2122) Statistics; (BSC 2010 or 2011) Integrated Biology I or II; (CHM 1030) Chemistry for Health Related Science; (CHM 1045 or 1046) General Chemistry I or II; (PHY 1053 or 1054) General Physics I or II. Chipola also requires (ENC 1102) Communication Skills II; a Gordon Rule Writing course and an additional Social Science course. In addition to the BSN, Chipola offers nine other bachelors degree programs: Business Administration (with majors in Accounting or Management), English Education, Elementary Education, Mathematics Education (Middle or High School), Science Education (Middle or High School) and Exceptional Student Education. Of the 2,000 students enrolled at Chipola, nearly 200 of those are junior and senior students working on bachelors degrees. Since 2004, dozens of teachers have graduated from Chipola to begin careers in area middle and high schools. The Education program has nearly a 100% placement rate. Chipolas Bachelors level tuition is $110 per semester hour compared to more than $160 at area universities. For information about Chipolas BSN program, call (850) 718-2278. To learn about all of the colleges bachelors degrees, visit www.chipola.eduFromROM left LEFT : OB Nurse Manager Connie Swearingen, RN, and Jackson Hospital nurse Delilah Lewis, RN. *Lifetime Warranty on Repairs *Will pay up to $500 of your deductible *Over 75 years combined experienceTNTCollision CenterENTERNTOBY GARNETT, OWNER

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Page 32 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL OCTo OBER 26, 2011 OCT. 27, 28 & 29



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Birthdays.....13 Speak Up!...15 Schools....18 & 19 Obituaries.....23 Volleyball...25 Classieds.....26 & 27 Sheriff's Log...2 Community Calendar...4 Commentary...6, 7 News from the Pews...10 Farmer's Almanac...11 THE CALHOUN-LIBER TY J OURNAL Volume 31, Number 43 Wednesday, Oct. 26, 2011 50includes taxCLJ News.com Marianna teen dies in wreck on Bodiford Rd. by Teresa Eubanks, Journal EditorAn 18-year-old Marianna teen died Monday evening after her vehicle overturned on Bodiford Road, 1.5 miles west of SR 71, in Altha. According to the Florida Highway on Bodiford Road around 7:15 p.m. when she traveled onto the north grass shoulder. She overcorrected, lost control of her 1999 Ford Explorer, and went across both lanes of the road. The vehicle overturned in a ditch, coming to rest on its roof. The accident was reported a couple of hours later, with FHP arriving on scene at 9:32 p.m. The car rolled over and pinned her arm on the drivers side, said Altha Fire people on scene that we were able to lift the car up and pull her arm out from under it. They got her out pretty quick. She was not wearing a seat belt. got there, he said. She had a serious head injury. They were working on her in the ambulance but they lost her en route to the hospital, according to another emergency worker at the scene. She was Hospital. The cause of the accident has not possible that she wrecked while trying to avoid hitting an animal. That place is notorious for deer crossing the road, he said. Very few people live down that road and none of them knew who she was, why she was there or who she might have been visiting, he said. The Marianna address listed for her was not current, he said, explaining, She hadnt been there in a month. He noted that the vehicle had a temporary tag from South Florida. School through her junior year last year and then moved to Marianna, according to a school employee. She was not registered at Marianna High School. The crash was investigated by FHP Crystal Oday is shown above in a photo posted on her Facebook page. The wreckage of her Ford Explorer is show as it was removed from the scene Monday night. DANIEL WILLIAMS PHOTO Hosford ParadeA youngster surveys the trail ahead as he rides in Saturdays Hosford PTO Fall Festival parade. More parade and festival photos on page 21. DANIEL WILLIAMS PHOTO Tigers defeat LCHSA Blountstown Tiger player races past a Liberty County opponent as the cross-river rivals met on Bowles Field Friday. See pages 16 & 17 for more. DANIEL WILLIAMS PHOTOInvestigators nd meth cooking on hotplate in home with 8 childrenby Teresa Eubanks, Journal Editor after announcing their presence and repeatedly knocking, members of the door open to enter a home where they found four women, eight children and a batch of methamphetamine cooking on a hot plate. The Task Force went to 19054 NE to serve a search warrant and found a meth lab in operation. The three women who share the 41, Amy Johnston, 30, and Maria Thurman, 34, were there, along with a fourth woman, Violet Manning, 37, of Blountstown. Manning was taken into custody on a felony warrant. She handed over a plastic container that held approximately a half gram of methamphetamine before being placed in a patrol car.FOUR WOMEN ARRESTED IN OCT 19 RAID SAMANTHA WHITE MARIA THURMAN AMY JOHNSON VIOLET MANNING See METH MOMS continued inside on page 3 A Jacksonville man was charged with introducing contraband into a state correctional facility after his palm print was found on a package containing 18 grams of marijuana that was mailed Institution earlier this year. inspection, a manila envelope was found inside that contained several pieces of an inmates mail. A slot had been cut in one envelope and a green leafy substance wrapped in cellophane had tested positive for marijuana. The package was submitted to Bond was set at $5,000. Riley was released from custody Saturday.Man charged with mailing marijuana to prison inmate SHA YE RILEY Residents of Kinard want Bay County to pave its side of Scotts Ferry RoadPAGE 9 INSIDE Volunteers get ready for big Halloween Carnival Saturday......5LCHS class reunion.....12Business news..........14

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Page 2 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL OCT OBER 26, 2011 ARREST REPORTS compiled by Journal Editor Teresa Eubanks C A L H O U N C O U N T YOct. 17 Hamilton Thomas, battery, CCSO. Alfred Way, driving with license suspended or revoked, CCSO. Oct. 19 Gregory Couch, VOP, CCSO. James Melvin, VOCR, failure to appear, CCSO. Violet Virgina Manning, manufacture of meth, possession of meth, aggravated child abuse, CCSO. Oct. 20 Amy Michelle Johnston, manufacture of meth, possession of meth, aggravated child abuse, CCSO. Maria Thurman, manufacture of meth, possession of meth, aggravated child abuse, CCSO. Samantha Michelle White, manufacture of meth, possession of meth, aggravated child abuse, CCSO. Brandon Ronnie Pitts, VOP, CCSO. Matthew Alexander Hall, possession of a controlled substance with intent to distribute within 1,000 feet of a school, possession of drug paraphernalia, possession of a weapon BPD. Oct. 22 Lisa Ammons, ing with license suspended or revoked, BPD. Oct. 24 Keith Jones, contempt of court, CCSO.L I B E R T Y C O U N T YOct. 17 Arnold Pitts, VOCP, LCSO. Oct. 18 Victor OJeda, VOSP, LCSO. Oct. 20 Violet Manning, holding for CCSO, CCSO. Amy Johnston, holding for CCSO, CCSO. Marie Thurman, holding for CCSO, CCSO. Samantha M. White, holding for CCSO, CCSO. Violet Manning, VOSP, escape, LCSO. Oct. 21 Shaye Riley, introducing contraband into a state correctional facility, LCSO. Oct. 22 Lisa Ammons, holding for CCSO, CCSO. Jessica H. Thomas, breach of peace, disorLCSO. SH ER IFFS LOG Blountstown Police Dept.Oct. 17 through Oct. 23, 2011 Citations issued: Accidents...............04 .................12 Special details Business alarms.....00 Residential alarms..........01 C omplaints..............................................................41 Arrested? D. Winn, P.A. is here to help. We understand how important it is for you to know your legal rights and how to protect them. Our areas of practice include:Felony & Misdemeanor Offenses Violations of Probation*Call for a free consultationJason D. Winn, P.A. (850) 222-7199 20960 NE Burlington Rd., HosfordFARM EQUIPM E NT AND ANTIQU E AUCTION T ractors, Mowers, Cultivators and All T ypes Farm Equipment10% Buyers Premium All Consignments Welcome Man charged with battery after dispute at local night clubA 51-year-old Blountstown man was charged with battery after a dispute with a woman at a Calhoun County night club Sept. 25. Hamilton Thomas was arrested and then given a conditional release after a woman filed charges against him. According to the woman, she and a female friend were leaving the Cabin in the Pines nightclub when Thomas started walking with them. The woman said he was upset over an incident involving a cigarette a few days earlier and the two argued as they walked toward a parked vehicle. She said Thomas then pushed her, causing a small scratch on her back, and when she got into her friends car to leave, Thomas leaned in through the drivers door and started hitting her. The womans friend said she got Thomas out of her car and got him to leave after witnessing him hitting the other woman. Hamilton was later picked up on an outstanding warrant. When asked about the altercation, he said they argued but their dispute never became physical. HAMILTON THOMASA Blountstown man was arrested after a Blountstown pulled him over and found that his license was suspended. Johns Street behind Blountstown Middle School around When asked if he had any illegal substances on him, Hall handed over a bag of marijuana from his front pants pocket, according to the arrest report. During a search of Halls found a black bag inside the pocket of a jacket that had been left on the front passengers seat. Inside the bag was a set of digital scales with marijuana residue on them, along with several small plastic baggies commonly used to package marijuana for sale. An unloaded .38-caliber revolver was found hidden in a speaker hole in the drivers door, covered by a blue washcloth. Hall denied ownership of the gun but admitted the marijuana and scales were his. He was charged with possession of a controlled substance with intent to distribute within 1,000 feet suspended license and possession of drug paraphernalia. He is being held on $26,000 bond.Man arrested after being stopped for expired tag MATTHEW HALLA 22-year-old Hosford woman was charged with breach of peace, disorderly conduct, fighting and escape after a disturbance on Third Street in Bristol early Saturday morning. Arrested was Jessica Ann Thomas. Liberty County Sheriffs Deputy Jonathan Gentry responded to a disturbance call around 2 a.m. and found two women fighting in the street. A bystander came forward and restrained Thomas, who was screaming and yelling uncontrollably. The deputy handcuffed Thomas, who smelled strongly of an alcoholic beverage and was unsteady on her feet, and placed her in the back seat of his patrol car. She kept screaming and yelled that she didnt want to go to jail. A 17-year-old friend came up and hugged Thomas before she got into the patrol car and begged the deputy not to arrest her. The girl left only after repeated requests from the deputy. After securing Thomas in his car, the deputy went to the residence of Brandy Wagoner, who said she walked outside when she heard someone screaming. She said she saw Thomas, who yelled at her and accused her of stealing her camera. Wagoner said she tried to tell Thomas she did not take her camera but Thomas was very swing at her in the middle of the street. Wagoner stated she told Thomas and her friend to leave but Thomas kept trying to hit her. The deputy arrived just as the two women started Thomas younger friend, who also smelled strongly of alcohol, became agitated when the deputy tried to talk with her and screamed that neither she nor Thomas had done anything wrong. As the deputy spoke with several bystanders to determine what had happened, he looked back at his patrol car and saw Thomas teenage friend open the back door of the vehicle. Thomas ran into a nearby yard. He handcuffed the juvenile, who began screaming and cursing uncontrollably. She was put in the back of the patrol car before the deputy began searching for Thomas. Thomas disappeared but after the sheriffs office got a phone tip on her whereabouts, the deputy caught up with her hiding on the back porch of a home on CR 12 South. The two women were taken to the county jail. The deputy later asked the younger woman why she had let Thomas out of the patrol car. Because she has The younger girl, who is not named here because she is a juvenile, was and aiding an escape.Woman arrested for creating disturbance, JESSICA THOMAS

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OCT OBER 26, 2011 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 3 All were charged with manufacturing methamphetamine, possession of methamphetamine and aggravated child abuse. They were jailed and bond was set at $15,000 each. During a search of the home, Task Force members found a one pot method meth lab in the back bedroom. As they entered, they turned off a hot plate being used to heat meth oil that had been produced in a reaction vessel in the same room. Numerous items used in the meth-making process were found in the home with most being located in the master bedroom, including stripped out lithium batteries, Coleman fuel, acid and drain opener. During interviews after their arrests, White, Johnston and Thurman admitted that methamphetamine was being manufactured in the presence of children. Each woman described her part in the process, according to the arrest report. Thurmans six children and Whites two were removed from the residence and turned over to family and friends under the supervision of the Department of Children and Families. Lt. Mark Mallory, Sgt. Todd Wheetley, Sgt. Jared Nichols and Calhoun County Sheriffs Deputies Scotty Norris, Gary McGhee and Jail Deputy Christian Smith took part in last weeks search and arrests.METH MOMScontinued from the front pageA woman arrested during a raid on a Blountstown meth lab had one more charge added to the list when she escaped from the Liberty County Jail Thursday. According to a report from the Liberty County processed at 5:29 p.m. when she asked a correctional When told that she would be placed in a regular cell, Manning stated, I cant do that and then ran out of the jail. Responding to a report from the dispatcher of an escape, Deputy Bobby Revell headed for the county jail and spotted Manning about 50 yards from the building where she was laying down by a fence. She was returned to custody within ten minutes and charged with escape.Woman charged with escape from Liberty County JailView UF bats online this Halloween with new Fla. Museum video camerasStreaming videos of the colony, new website available online now the corner, its time to look out for those fabled blood-sucking bats. But dont confuse fact with legend bats are too busy eating insects to worry about sucking blood or getting tangled in your hair. fered centuries of misconceptions. Yet, bats have proven more intriguing than spooky when provided a home in an urban setting, as the Univer sity of Florida campus sees thousands of visitors to its stilted bat structures every year. UF has the worlds largest continuously occupied bat houses, a.m. EDT today, the Florida Museum of Natural the colony. Bats are often portrayed in movies as just sleeping all day, but thats not the way they operate if you have the opportunity to see them up close, theyre amazingly attractive animals, and theyre not as menacing as you might think, said Florida Museum mammalogy curator David Reed. They may have ugly faces, but theyre brightly colored and you dont get to see that at night. Three bat-cams are installed in and around the structures, including one inside the bat house with tilt, pan and zoom capabilities controlled remotely by museum technicians. Internet users may access edu/bats, where there are also facts about the colony, links to bat conservation organizations and daily sunset times. The bat-cams are really cool for an education al tool, for one thing, Reed said. Also, having that many bats in one concentrated area always gives opportunity for study. Combined, the structures currently house are Brazilian free-tailed bats, Tadarida brasilien sis, a non-migratory, maternity colony that birth their young and dwell in the area year-round. The best time to observe the bats is when they exit the structures after sunset. In the winter here, the bats who are most eager start warming up, doing laps up top before they exit, Reed said. And consequently, the exodus of the bats during winter is slower and over a longer period of time. But in the summer time, they can leave more en masse because they dont have On weeknights, about 50 to 60 people observe the exodus, but on weekends, there may be between 150 and 200 spectators, said UF environmental health and safety pest management coordinator Ken Glover, who helped build the structures and implement the bat-cam project. With the streaming videos, hundreds of people may watch the colony at the same time, and researchers hope the accessibility will help dispel some of the common misconceptions about bats and educate viewers about their important ecological value. My feelings for bats have always been most appreciative theyre non-game wildlife and ing insects, Glover said. So theyre one of our most reliable forms of natural pest control and theyre largely misunderstood because they come out at night and you only see them when theyre The bat house was constructed in March 1991 to accommodate a bat colony that had inhabited the James G. Pressly Stadium at the track and Scott Linder Tennis Stadium on the north side of campus. The University Athletic Association supported its construction so the droppings (guano) and urine would be contained at a safe distance from humans. The alternative habitat was deemed a success when the structure was permanently occupied in 1995. A pests status is determined usually by its location, not species, Glover said. So a bat is considered a pest when its living in the wrong place, a pile of manure. In August 2009, the weight of the bats combined with deterioration of some of the interior It was renovated within a few months and construction of a second structure, the bat barn, began in March 2010. We incorporated some changes, such as a different roof style so there would be more room for insulated it to keep it warmer and there are now Although the unexpected collapse of the bat houses internal structure killed about 100 of its inhabitants, the victims were preserved as specimens at the Florida Museum and helped kick-start a research project on biogeographical distribution of the species. Because we had specimens here, we started collecting specimens of the free-tail in the Bahamas and the DNA showed some were dramatical ly different from the ones in Florida, which tells us the Bahamas has a really interesting history in terms of this species. Reed said. Its a project that never would have started if not for the bat house. The videos are being made available during the Year of the Bat, a two-year, worldwide species awareness initiative whose founding partners include the United Nations Environment Programme, the Convention on Migratory Species and the Agreement on the Conservation of Populations of European Bats. Were happy to launch this project during the Year of the Bat, said Beverly Sensbach, associate director of museum operations. We felt the tim ing was appropriate, during this global effort to raise awareness about bats and bat conservation. ADVERTISE IN THECalhoun-Liberty JOURNAL& online ATCLJNEWS.COM PHONE: (850) 643-3333 EMAIL: thejournal@fairpoint.net

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Page 4 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL OCT OBER 26, 2011Thats how many copies of The Calhoun-Liberty Journal were distributed last week, ensuring plenty of coverage for your community announcements and great response for our business advertisers! 5,366Attention all Vendor/Handmade Crafters: We invite you to join us with your handmade craft items at the Panhandle Pioneer Settlement on Saturday, Nov. 12 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. (CT). Space is limited inside so you must RSVP. We provide you with one 8 table set up inside the gym or set up outside with your own table and tent. Call (850) 674-2777 or email us at info@ppmuseum. org for more information.Mossy Pond VFD chili cook-off set for Nov. 5Mossy Pond V.F.D. will hold their annual chili cook-off on Saturday, Nov. 5 at and judging will start at 4 p.m. Chili and cornbread will be sold for $1 and beverages are $.50 each. There will also be baked goods for sale. Tickets for the 50/50 drawing are $1 each and you do not have to be present to win. There is a $5 entry fee and all proceeds will be donated to Mossy Pond V.F.D. Porter Grade Rd. off C.R. 274. The 2011 Jake and Susan Summers family reunion is planned for Sunday, Nov. 6 at 1 p.m. at Torreya State Park in Bristol. Bring your favorite covered dish, dessert or drink, family memorabilia and a chair if youd like to sit a spell. Dont forget to remind all of your relatives since the address list may be incomplete. You are invited to Gordon and Melissa Durhams House for three nights of spooky fun at their 7th Annual Backyard Haunt. The Backyard Haunt features lots of Halloween favorites such as vampires, ghosts, mummies and our famous tunnel of terror! Of course no haunt is complete without witch! Our Haunted House will be full of new surprises this year and will give you a scare if you dare! We spend weeks preparing our Haunt every year and thor oughly enjoy providing this free event to our community. Please stop by our house on 11798 NW Durham Road in Bristol on Oct. 28, 29 and BPD Hunted Hay Ride at Sam Atkins The Blountstown Police Department Haunted Hay Ride on Friday and Saturday, Oct. 28-29 starting at 6 p.m. each night at Sam Atkins Park. Admission is $5. All proceeds from the event will go to scholarships for local seniors. For more information please call 6745987.Trick-or-treat at the Caverns in MariannaAs a safe alternative to door to door trickor-treating the Florida Caverns State Park will be holding The Spirits of the Caverns on Friday and Saturday, Oct. 28-29 from 6 to 10 p.m. There will be childrens games, living historians, a spirit trail, candy and prizes. Smokey Bear, along with other guests, will be in attendance. There is a $4 donation per vehicle. in Marianna. For more information please call 482-1228. This years Kinard Volunteer Fire Departments annual Halloween Carnival Fundraiser will be held Saturday, Oct. 29 starting at 5 p.m. (CT). The carnival has been going for almost 40 years and now draws a crowd of thousands for one night a year. Some of the activities at the carnival include a kids costume contest beginning at 6 p.m., numerous door prizes, pony rides, cake walk, dunking booth, cake auction, haunted spook ride, car bash, and various booths with prizes at most. Food and drinks will be available on site. The carnival will be located at the South. All proceeds go to the Kinard Volunteer Fire Department. For more information please contact the Fire Chief Doyle Daniels at (850) 718-5218 or (850) Kinard Halloween Carnival fundraiser to be held Oct. 29Backyard Haunt begins Oct. 28 Trains will leave for Zombie World on Friday, Oct. 28, Saturday, Oct. 29, and on ture time is dark-thirty. der are free. All children under 6 must be accompanied by an adult. For information Veterans Memorial Railroad, Inc., is a trains, tracks and operational expenses. Vendors needed at Settlement on Nov. 12 The Calhoun-Liberty Journal is published each Wednesday by the Liberty Journal Inc., Summers Road, P.O. Box 536, Bristol, FL 32321. Annual subscriptions are $18. Periodicals postage paid at Bristol, FLPOSTMASTER: Send address corrections to: P.O. Box 536, Bristol, FL 32321. (USPS 012367) Summers Road Located at 11493 NW Summers Road in Bristol MAILING ADDRESS: P.O. Box 536, Bristol, FL 32321 TELEPHONE (850) 643-3333 Fax (850) 643-3334 EMAIL: thejournal@fairpoint.net ADS: cljads@fairpoint.net JOURNAL ST AFFJohnny Eubanks...................Publisher Teresa Eubanks........................ Editor Sandra Brown...................Bookkeeper Debbie Duggar...................Advertising Angie Davis.........Production AssistantOFFICE HOURS: 9 a.m. 6 p.m. M-F, Saturdays from 9 a.m. until 1 p.m. Adult Dance 8-12 p.m. at the Legion Hall in Blountstown Wednesday, October 26 Monday, October 31 Tuesday, November 1 Sunday, October 30 Saturday, October 29 Thursday, October 27 Friday, October 28TODAYS MEETINGS 2 p.m., Ag. Bldg., Conference Room 6 p.m., Fire House 7 p.m., Apalachee Restaurant 7 p.m. (CT), Dixie Lodge in Btown 6 p.m., St. Paul AME Church 7 p.m., Altha Volunteer Fire Department AA, 6 p.m., Altha Community CenterTODAYS MEETINGS, noon, Calhoun-Liberty Hospital 7 p.m., Calhoun County Old Ag Bldg. east door Boy Scouts T roop 200, 6:30 p.m., Mormon Church in BristolTODAYS MEETINGSAA, 7 p.m., basement of Calhoun County Courthouse 7 p.m., Voting house in Rock Bluff 7:30 p.m., Veterans Civic Center Red Hat SocietyApalachee Rest. 12 p.m. (CT) BIRTHDAYS Eric Flowers ANNIVERSARIES Merrill & Marie Detweiler Birthdays-Bessie CombsB P D. Trick-or-Treat5:30 to 8:30 p.m.Attend the Church of your choice this Sunday DURHAMS Backyard Haunt 6:30 11:30 p.m. 11798 Durham Rd. in Bristol DURHAMSBackyard Haunt 6:30 to 11:30 p.m. 11798 Durham Rd. in Bristol B-town Tigers vs. Franklin LCHS Dawgs vs. South Walton DURHAMSBackyard Haunt 6:30 to 11:30 p.m. 11798 Durham Rd. in Bristol KINARD VFD Halloween Carnival 5 p.m. (CT) Kinard Community Center (Costume Contest at 6 p.m.)THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL

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OCT OBER 26, 2011 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 5 EVENTSBlountstown photo exhibit opens FridayBLOUNTSTOWN An art exhibit featuring images captured during the Scott Kelby WorldWide Photo Walk will open Friday, Oct. 28 at the Preble-Rish Gallery. All photographs were taken by local and regional amateur and professional photographers in one 2-hour period in downtown Blountstown on Saturday, Oct. 1. The exhibit highlights our fair city in a beautiful and unique way, while illustrating the different perspectives seen by the 26 photographers. The exhibit will be displayed alongside a portion of the gallerys permanent exhibit, Apalachicola River: An American Treasure by Clyde Butcher. A Downtown after Dark theme will be car ried out with an outdoor reception, live acoustic music performed by Erik Alford, and refreshments. Tickets are available for $10 each, and include the reception. Tickets can be purchased online at www.calhounco.org/ store or at Blountstown Drugs. The Liberty County Senior Citizens Association would like to remind area seniors of the Halloween lunch to be held on Thursday, Oct. 27 at 11 a.m. at the Bristol Senior Center. There will be games and prizes too! The following events are scheduled for the month of November: Wednesday, Nov. 2 11 a.m. Bristol Senior Center. A Representative will be here to present information about the Medicare programs that are available through Capital Health for Medicare recipients of Liberty County. Medicare Open Enrollment is open through Dec. 7. This is the time you can join, drop or switch your medicare health or drug coverage. Call 643-5690 for information. Call Liberty Transit at 6432524 no later than 3 p.m., Friday, Oct. 28 for transportation to the center. Thursday, Nov. 3 Marianna WalMart shopping and lunch. Thanksgiving is only a few weeks away and you can start purchasing your Turkey Day items. Call Liberty Transit at 643-2524 no later than 3 p.m., Monday, Oct. 31 for your transit ride. Tuesday, Nov. 8 A shopping trip has been scheduled to Graceville outlets. Call Liberty Transit at 643-2524 no later than 3 p.m. on Thursday, Nov. 3 to reserve your transit ride. Call 643-5690 for information. Thursday, Nov. 10 Shopping at the Piggly Wiggly and lunch. Call Liberty Transit at 643-2524 no later than 3 p.m. on Monday, Nov. 7 to reserve your transit ride. Friday, Nov. 11 Bristol and Hosford Senior Citizens Centers and Liberty County Transit will be closed in observance of Veterans Day. There will be no meal deliveries on this date. Thursday, Nov. 17 11 a.m. at the Bristol Senior Center. Thanksgiving lunch for seniors of Liberty County. Call 6432524 no later than 3 p.m. on Monday, Nov. 14 if you need transportation to the center. Come join us for a yummy lunch. Thursday, Nov. 17 Shopping at the Tallahassee Wal-mart and lunch. Call Liberty Transit at 643-2524 no later 3 p.m., Monday, Nov. 14 to reserve your transit ride. Thursday, Nov. 17 10 a.m. The Liberty County Senior Citizens Advisory Council will meet. Monday, Nov. 21 7 p.m. at the Bristol Senior Center. The Liberty County Senior Citizens Board of Directors will meet. Tuesday, Nov. 22 10:30 a.m. The Bristol Monthly Craft Class will meet at the Bristol Senior Center. Call Liberty Transit at 643-2524 no later than 3 p.m. on Friday, Nov. 18 if you need transportation. Wednesday, Nov. 23 Shopping at the Piggly Wiggly and lunch. Call Liberty Transit no later than 3 p.m. on Monday, Nov. 21 to reserve your transit ride. Thursday, Nov. 24 and Friday, Nov. 25 The Bristol and Hosford Senior Citi zens Centers and Liberty County Transit will be closed for Thanksgiving. There will be no meal deliveries on these dates.Liberty Senior Citizens announce November schedule of events River T own Community Health Care & the Calhoun County Health Department Welcomes Mike McKenzie, Pediatric ARNPStarting Monday, October 31stWe accept the following insurances: Phone (850) 674-5645 Jennifer Shuler, Esq.Attorney at Law Business Real Property Divorce WillsBy Appointment (850) 866-3680CALL ME FOR A FREE LIVING WILL Volunteers start work on Kinard Carnival Floridas Long-Term Care Ombudsman Program needs volunteers to join its corps of dedicated advocates who protect the rights of elders residing in nursing homes, assisted living facilities and adult family care homes. All interested individuals who care about protecting the health, safety, welfare and rights of long-term care facility residents are encour aged to call toll-free (888) 831-0404 or visit the programs Web site at www.om

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COMMENTARYPage 6 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL OCT OBER 26, 2011 Late Night LaughsA RECAP OF RECENT OBSER V ATIONS BY LATE NIGHT TV HOSTS.PIERRE, S.D. -The good news about MoamAiding and abetting a real warBY OLIVER NORTHOliver North is the host of War Stories on Fox News Channel, the founder and honorary chairman of Freedom Alliance, and the author of American Heroes in Special Operations. White House Chief of Staff Bill Daley announced hell be leaving the White House after the election. I get the feeling a lot of people are going to be leaving the White House after the election. JAY LENOHerman Cain has moved ahead of Mitt Romney. Can you believe that? Political analysts say this is because Americans dont understand Mormonism but they do understand pizza. CONAN OBRIENLindsay Lohan has to go back to court after showing up more than an hour late for community service. But her lawyer says shes got a good excuse. She forgot to steal a watch. CRAIG FERGUSONRick Perry got the date of the American revolu tion wrong by two centuries. What is it with the right wing? Michele Bachmann doesnt know where the Shot Heard Round the World took place, Sarah Palin doesnt know why Paul Revere went on his ride, Rick Perry doesnt know that 1776 happened in the 1700s. These arent gotcha questions. I know this sounds mean about Rick Perry, but if was a child, youd leave him behind. BILL MAHEREarlier this week, a protester at Occupy Wall Street proposed to his girlfriend. His exact words were, Will you occupy my parents basement with me until I get a job? CONAN OBRIENHerman Cain said, starting today, if you buy into his 9-9-9 plan, hell throw in a free 32-ounce soda. DA VID LETTERMANAt the last Republican debate, the candidates were seated according to how theyve been doing in the polls. So Jon Huntsman was seated next to Tim Pawlenty at a Dennys across the street. CONAN OBRIENJoe Biden once again denied stories that he will be replaced on the ticket in 2012. He says he will continue to embarrass President Obama for another four years. JAY LENOThe Occupy Wall Street protests continue to grow. Theyve started to attract a very unsavory element celebrities. CRAIG FERGUSONPresident Obamas teleprompter was stolen. Police are on the lookout for a thief thats eloquent and spreading a message of hope. CONAN OBRIENBig news in the Republican ranks, there is a new front-runner: Herman Cain. The Republican establishment is freaking out because their token black guy is in the lead now. Its like an episode of Star Trek where the black guy beams down to the planet and lives. BILL MAHERThe Republican candidates are still looking for ways to stop Romney. See, its hard to disagree with his positions because as you know, hes taken every position JAY LENOThe CEO of Citigroup said that he can under stand why all these Occupy Wall Street protesters are so frustrated. In fact, he felt so bad for them, he gave himself a $10 million sympathy bonus. JIMMY F ALLONYou know whos also joining the Wall Street protesters? Kanye West. Thats a real good idea -a guy with diamonds in his teeth protesting greed. DA VID LETTERMAN

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OCT OBER 26, 2011 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 7 COMMENTARY Hillary Clinton takes a chanceWASHINGTON Secretary of State Hillary Clinton was in Tripoli meeting with Libyas transitional government leaders less than 48 hours before deposed captured the headlines, but Clinton should rity conditions to assure the interim prime minister of the Obama administrations commitment to help build a democracy. Clintons trip followed similar visits by British Prime Minister David Cameron, All made secret trips. Their presence in the country was not announced and not reported until they were in the air and an indication of how important the Obama administration considers Libya. Libya is the only country roiled by the Arab Spring where President Obama chose to get directly involved with mili tary intervention. He received criticism for intervening on humanitarian grounds, paign stretched on longer than anticipated. end to the bombing, but Clintons presthat outside help will still be needed. Clinton did not come empty-handed, the $135 million the administration has been parceling out since February. During her short time in the country, Clinton got much done, including dispensing plenty of good will. She met with college students tional exchanges, and visited a medical center where she promised help in getting medical equipment and in untangling bureaucratic red tape that might allow some of the wounded to be treated abroad, including in the United States. Times quoted Clinton telling one wounded fighter, We are on your side. visit Tunisia when those countries were in the midst of changing their governments. tion by the Obama administration that this was at least in part Obamas war, and he wants to get the post-war part right. America doesnt have the resources or the desire to nation-build, but at the same their own is not acceptable either. Putting Clinton on the front lines reher performance as a diplomat. She has said that even if Obama is reelected, she would not continue as Secretary of State in a second term. It is an exhausting job, and she has handled it well, but the bigso far eluded her. There are still many challenges left, and in her last year, Clinton may well dewill provide the capstone to her career. One obvious area is the Israeli-Palestinian peace process. Her husband came close to getting a historic deal in the months before he left the White House. The prisoner thousand Palestinians are being released in exchange for one Israeli soldier, Gilad Shalit, who was captured in 2005, created diplomat should be able to exploit. Clinton may decide as so many before her have, including former Senate Major ity Leader George Mitchell, who stepped a fruitless and frustrating two years, that the search for peace is a dead-end. Or such daring missions in the time she has left as Americas top diplomat. WASHINGTONMERRY-GO-ROUNDby Douglas Cohn and Eleanor Clift THE MESSAGE FROM ZANESVILLE, O HIOAs I watch politicians on the stump, at the moment Republican presidential candidates, Im reminded of the western afternoons. There were the good guys, the white hats, and the conniving, evil, low-down, the women and God-fearing townspeople. If gun-toting scalawags shooting up the saloon were not enough trouble for the string tie that rode into town on his wagon best. the main street in front of the saloon, climb on the wagons tailgate and begin his spiel of, I have a cure for whatever ails you. As I watch the Republican presidential debates, they are all perched on the tailgate of their political wagons promising the American people any and everything as they pander for the conservative vote. B westerns, they will say anything to sell become the Garden the National Preacher that saves America from all those sinners. I will banish President Obama and his evil Obama Care plan to the far reaches of Hell. A bit of tongue in be serious, not too far from the truth. Having been raised attending a conservative, independent Bible Baptist church and havpreaching, when I hear the Republican for National Preacher, not the presidency. dency and a National Preacher are one in the same. As I was watching the last presidential debate, I had this somewhat whimsical thought that the debates should be conshow. At each event, the public votes someone off the stage. Last person standing gets the nod.See JERR Y COX continued on page 8 CORNER OXSJerry Cox is a retired military background in domestic and Okaloosa County.Candidates peddling plenty of political snake oil

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Page 8 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL OCT OBER 26, 2011JERR Y COX COLUMN continued from page 7Herman Cains 999 tax plan is a bottle of snake taxes. Call (850) 643-3000 or email: singletarychiro@fairpoint.net Donna L. Singletary, DC NOW OPE N FOR BUSI N ESSnext door to Buy Rite Drugs HOURS Mon, Wed, Fri, 9 A.M.-2 P.M. & 3:30-7 P.M. & T ues, Thurs, BY APPOINTMENT ONLYNow accepting insurance from: Medicare, Aetna, Integral Quality Care, Auto Accidents.NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours or responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment.Cataracts?Freedom from Eye Glasses, Now a reality for many.Lee Mullis M.D. and Cataract SpecialistSmart Lenses SMDr. Mulliss Smart LensSM procedure can produce clear vision without eyeglasses.Close-up, Far away & In-between CALL TODAY for a Smart Lens Evaluation Mullis Eye Institute 1600 Jenks Ave., Panama City(850)763-6666 CLJNEWS.COMT MEMBERSHIP BREAKFASTABOVE: Blountstown Fire Chief Ben Hall talks with realtor Danny Ryals at Thursdays Calhoun County Chamber of Commerce Membership Breakfast held at the Calhoun County Senior Center in Blountstown. Chamber directors organized the breakfast to acknowledge the contributions and support of their members. LEFT: Chamber Director Kristie Terry speaks with Doris Trayor. BELOW: Richard Williams, Executive Director of the Chipola Regional Workforce Board, sends a quick text during a break in the conversation at his table, where he enjoyed breakfast with Sharon Gaskin with Northwest Florida Child Development and Blountstown One Stop Career Center staff members. TERESA EUBANKS PHOTOS

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OCT OBER 26, 2011 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 9 by Angie Davis, contributing writerAbout 30 people gathered at the single lane timber bridge on Scotts Ferry Road on the Bay County side early Tuesday morning to discuss the paving of the road and eventual replacement of the bridge. Kinard residents, who made up the majority of those in attendance, came to express their interest in the project as many of these Calhoun County residents use this connect ing road for their daily commute to work in Panama City. Bay County Commissioner Guy Tunnell and Bay County Public Words Director Ken Schnell explained that the current project was in accordance to a DEP order citing an issue with sediment washing into the creek. The Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) previously issued a notice of violation at the site and ordered Bay County to eliminate the problem. That money will cover paving the hills on both sides of the bridge. Commuters from Calhoun County will travel a little over six miles of paved road on the Calhoun side. Once they cross the Bay County line, they will travel for another mile on clay, then the road will be paved for one mile. At that point, the road will turn back to clay for the last mile before ending at Hwy. 231 after this initial project is complete. This plan left many residents confused and looking for an expla nation. Schnell explained that plans to complete the paving of the Bay County side of Scotts Ferry and replacing the single lane bridge are in the works but funding is needed before the projects can begin. It is being proposed to the Bay County Commission that funds should be bonded for ten years to pay for the project and during that time the money saved on maintaining the road would cover the interest incurred. The bridge replacement is expected to cost around $800,000. Funding for this project has yet to be established. Tunnell encouraged residents of both counties to write their repreSoutherland and Rep. Marti Coley, to request the funds. He explained that having multi-county problems are a good way to get funding. He went on to say, Its good for the state to give money to problems that extend to more than one county. The residents of Calhoun County were vocal in their reasons for wanting the work done on Scotts Ferry Road. Minnie Johnson, of Kinard pointed out that many people from Kinard and the surrounding area do most of their shopping in Bay County, which pays into the countys tax revenue. Brooke Ann Miles, also of Kinard, stated that paving Scotts Ferry Road which connects Hwy. 231 to C.R. 392 would provide an alter nate route for hurricane evacuation. Kinard VFD Chief Doyle Daniels explained that when the emergency personnel responded to accidents on Scotts Ferry Road, instead of taking the most direct route to Hwy. 231, the ambulance must travel up to 30 miles out of the way going through Wewahitchka to get to Bay Medical Center in Panama City. The time used could easily make the differ ence in life or death, he said. The one voice of opposition was Charlie Johann, who lives on the Bay County side of the road. He is concerned that the project will not alleviate the problem of sediment in the creek due to ditches that will wash into the creek during hard rains located on private property surrounding the bridge. He is also worried that paving the road will ing will become a problem along the straight sections. If the Bay County Commission passes the bond agreement, Tunnell believes the Scotts Ferry Road could be completely paved within three years. Schnell explained that there was one bridge in Bay County ahead of the Scotts Ferry bridge that needs to be replaced. He said that the Scotts Ferry bridge was a prior ity to Bay County and should be reKinard residents want paving completed on Bay County side of Scotts Ferry RoadBay County Commissioner Guy Tunnell stands in front of the small timber bridge that connects Calhoun and Bay County on Scotts Ferry Road. Tunnell addresses the group gathered on Scotts Ferry Road Tuesday morning. ANGIE DAVIS PHOTOSB LOUNTSTOWN Approximately 70 students from Blountstown High and Blountstown Elementary are part of the countys new Teen Trendsetters program. The youth-led reading program focuses on improving student achievement by pairing high school students with second and thirdgraders for weekly mentoring sessions. From educators to parents and policyreading is the root of long term academic success, said Barney Bishop, chair of Volunteer U SA Foundation which manages the program. This program focuses attention one-on-one mentoring time provided by trained teen mentors. According to the Annie E. Casey Foundation Report (April 2011), nationwide 88% of students who failed to earn a high school diploma were struggling readers in the 3rd grade. So, with the commitment of local teachers and administrators, Volunteer USA launched Teen Trendsetters in Calhoun County to help boost student success. Thirty-three Blountstown teens and their 33 young mentees are now meeting weekly reading and learning about weather, animals and famous scientists. The cur riculum used during the sessions is based reading skills. And, whats really great is the kids are learning to actually enjoy reading, said one teacher. I can see bonds are being formed and the youngsters are thrilled with the attention they get from their teen role models. In addition to promoting reading skills, the program encourages classroom achievement and leadership skills among the high school students, as well. Ninety-nine per cent of Teen Trendsetters graduated from high school, compared to the state average of 79%80% of Teen Trendsetters earned a scholarship compared to 38% of their peers Statewide, 3,000 students in Florida are participating in Teen Trendsetters programs this year. With support from the Florida Legisla ture, State Farm and Comcast the mentoring program is offered at no cost to schools or students. Next week in Blountstown, special guests will be paying a visit to a mentoring session to watch the students in action. Theyll be learning about Jane Goodalls work with chimpanzees and participate in a hands-on learning activity. It is so rewarding to see students helping their younger peers learn. As a former teacher, I know just how much the teachers here appreciate the extra attention their students are getting, said Rep. Marti Coley, Marianna. Watching these teens give back is incredible.they are becoming young leaders who understand the real value of community service. For more information on Teen Trendsetters Reading Mentors please visit our websites at www.volunteerusafoundation. org.Calhoun students participate in new Teen Trendsetters

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Page 10 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL OCT OBER 26, 2011 The Liberty County Ministerial Association PRESENTSThe 2011 Harvest Festivalat the First Baptist Church of Bristol A safe, FREE alternative to trick-or-treating. For more details, call 643-5400 or 379-8861.Saturday, Oct. 29 from 5-8 p.m.Sunday, Oct. 30 (Judgement House from 5-8 p.m.) at the Grace United Methodist Church, Food & Games Trunk or Treats Slides Pony Rides Judgement HouseSun. 5-8 p.m. The Board of Commissioners of the Northwest Florida Regional Housing Authority will hold aSpecial Meeting Nov. 15, 2011ONBeginning at 1 p.m. (ET) Open to the PublicListen to Steven Seay and Glenn Kimbrels play by play of the Blountstown High School Tigers vs. Franklin County High at Franklin County High Friday night on Oct. 28 on K102.7 at 6:30 p.m. (CT). The Florida Gators play Georgia Bulldogs in the Gator Bowl in Jacksonville on Saturday, Oct. 29. Air time on K102.7 at 2 p.m.RADIO FOOTBALL ON WYBT AND WPHKListen to football on WYBT and WPHK. This week.. Hear Michael Wahlquist and Jay Taylor with all the Liberty County High School game action. The Bulldogs take on South Walton at Liberty. Air time on K102.7 Saturday, Oct. 29 immediately following Swap Shop at 10 a.m. (ET). NEWS FROM THE PEWS JESUS IN THE P ARKCHURCHES OF ALTHA Everyone is invited to a communitywide Sunday morning worship service sponsored by the churches of Altha. There will be childrens activities, live music, a free lunch and giveaways. This event will take place on Oct. 30 in the Recreation and Ball Park in Altha. Registration for the giveaways and lunch will begin at 10 a.m. (CT). For more information, please call Cindy Nichols at 447-0938.SHOE BOX MINISTRIESPO P L A R HE A D BAPTIST CHURCH Poplar Head Baptist Church is a relay center for the Shoe Box Ministries operated through the Samaritans Purse Operation Christian Child. We will be a collection center for any individual or church that would like to do the shoe boxes. T he collection week is Nov. 14-21. The relay center will be open from 10 a.m. to noon each day and from 1-3 p.m. on Sunday for drop off. If you have any questions, please call the church at 674-4201 and leave a message. F ALL FESTIV ALSP AGE POND ASSEMBLY OF GOD Page Pond Assembly of G od will be holding a Clary Bateman would like to thank everyone who helped celebrate her birthday.She had a wonderful time. Please continue to keep Clary in your prayers! Clary Strong! A special thanks for all our friends and the members of G race U nited Methodist Church for their love, care and support during the loss of our grandmother, Lula Mae Bradwell Revell Rabon on O ct. 18. A special heartfelt thanks to Judge Kenneth Hosford for his beautiful song and eulogy and Reverend Paul Cook for his spiritual support. Love, Debbie Eddleman and family Notes of ThanksSpecial thanks to Edie and Mike S toutamire for their love, care and special support to me and my family in our time of loss of a wonderful grandmother, Lula Mae Bradwell Revell Rabon. Love, Debbie Eddleman and family F all F estival at the church on Oct. 30. The fun will last from 5-7 p.m. There will be food, games, a moonwalk. The church is located on Murdock Drive west of Altha, just off Highways 73 and 274.B LOU N TSTO WN FIRST ASSEMBLY Blountstown First Assembly will have a fall festival on S aturday, Oct. 29 beginning at 4:30 p.m. (CT). There will be games for the kids. The church is located at the corner of 13th St. and Hwy 20. FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF BLOUNT STOWN First Baptist Church of Blountstown will be having its F all F estival this S unday, O ct. 30 from 4-5:30 p.m. What will the Ol Church Downtown have planned for the children of Blountstown this time? grade and under. Parents, please accompany your children. For more information, at 674-5923 or visit FBC Blountstown page on Facebook.P AST OR APPRECIA TIONB LOU N TSTO WN FIRST ASSEMBLY Blountstown First Assembly will have a pastor appreciation service on S unday, O ct. 30 for Pastor Shelton Kindig. Church service will begin at 11 a.m. (CT). The members of the church would like to invite friends and family in the community to join them in showing appreciation for all of the love, care, time, and effort that Brother Kindig has displayed for the church and the community. The church is located at the corner of 13th St. and Hwy 20. Clary says thanks for the birthday wishesAstronauts prepare for Nov. autograph showKENNEDY SPACE CENTER More than 30 legendary astronauts will descend on Kennedy Space Center Nov. 5-6, for the worlds largest Astronaut Autograph and Memorabilia Show. T ickets are now available online at www.AstronautScholarship.org/aams. The shows roster boasts hero astronauts and space icons including Mercury 7 astronaut Scott Carpenter, Apollo 11 moonwalker Buzz Aldrin and Apollo 13 astronauts Fred Haise and Jim Lovell, to name a few, who will all gather for a star-studded weekend. In addition to autograph sessions, guests will have access to exclusive photo opportunities, a lunch celebrating the Space Shuttle program, a Gemini XII Anniversary dinner, astronaut talks and more. Guests may bring their own items to have signed or purchase memorabilia and photos at the show. Individual tickets are $15 and do not include admission to Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex (KSCVC); for the ultimate space experience, guests may secure a ticket package from $300 to $600, which includes admission Both are available online at www.AstronautScholar ship.org/aams or by calling (321) 455-7014. T ickets are packages, over fair market value, should be considered a tax-deductible donation. Astronaut autographs are at an additional fee. The Astronaut Scholarship Foundation is a 501(c)

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OCT OBER 26, 2011 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 11 ASK THEO L D F A R M E R SA L M A N A C Heating & Air Conditioning FL LIC. # CMC1249570 (850) 674-4777Whaley WhaleyWhat was the May- B. F., Phoenix, AZ Sounds like an economy car, doesnt it? Actually, it was a written document signed on board men of age, providing that such a government and governors as we should by common consent agree to make and choose would oversee the group. When the English separatists (sometimes called saints) and others (called strangers) they had a patent from the Virginia Company of London to settle a piece of land in Virginia. Landing off Cape Cod and then making their way to what is now Plymouth, they were considerably north of the intended Virginia settlement and consequently out of the jurisdiction of the London company. Especially since the strangers outfor prostate health, constipation, impotence, and improved complexion. G. P., Washington, IASure, but dig deep to get the long taproot and then give the plant a deep pot. Its best to choose smaller plants (those planted at midsummer or after, ideally) to bring indoors, so that their taproots will not have grown too long, and also so that theyll be at their best for picking during the winter months. Give parsley a sunny windowsill and rich, well-drained soil. Younger plants tend to give a sweeter taste. Even in areas where parsley will winter over, gardeners tend to plant new seeds because the herb will grow bitter with age. The seeds are slow to germinate, which may have led to the theory that parsley is the devils plant and the seed goes to the devil and back nine times before it will grow. Some believed that if the parsley was sown by a pregnant woman, it would speed the ger mination. Greeks fed the herb to their horses for valor. World War I soldiers drank parsley tea for dysentery. Wreaths of parsley, considered sacred to the dead, once decorated ancient graves. And ancient lore said that you must never cut parsley if you are in love. Similarly, folklorists say never to give away parsley or you give away your luck. numbered the saints and were threatening to use their own libertie, it was decided that a unifying document was needed. The signed Compact committed the group to act as a civil Body Politick, for our better ordering and preservation and allowed them to frame such just and equal laws, ordinances, acts, constitutions, and eral good of the colony, unto which we promise all due submission and obedience. It later became a model for other colonies. H. C., Lancaster, PA Weve heard of it, yes. We suspect that the pumpkin was simply a readily available means of applying heat to a swollen area, probably applied in pieces with the rind helping to hold the hot pumpkin intact. Theres nothing we know of in the pumpkin meat itself that would effect a cure, although we have heard of pumpkin being eaten for insomnia. Pumpkin seeds are plentiful in the old remedy books, often recommended for ridding children of tapeworms or other intestinal parasites. The eating of the pumpkin seeds was generally followed by a hearty dose of castor oil, however. ure in old-fashioned cures OCT. 24, MONDAY United Nations Day. Canadian schooner Bluenose won International Fishermens Trophy, 1921. Civil rights activist Rosa Parks died, 2005. OCT. 25, TUESDAY Artist Pablo Picasso born, 1881. Bismarck, North Dakota, recorded its earliest below-zero reading, degrees Fahrenheit, 1919. OCT. 26, WEDNESDAY New Moon. Moon at perigee. Conjunction of Saturn and the Moon. St. Elsewhere made its television debut, 1982. OCT. 27, THURSDAY Conjunction of Mercury and the Moon. Macys Department store opened, New York City, 1858. A good conscience is a soft pillow. OCT. 28, FRIDAY St. Simon. St. Jude. Nevada Day. Conjunction of Venus and the Moon. Christopher Columbus discovered Cuba and claimed it for Spain, 1492. OCT. 29, SATURDAY Moon runs low. Moon at ascending node. First peacetime draft in U.S. history went into effect, 1940. Actor Richard Dreyfuss born, 1947. OCT. 30, SUNDAY Twentieth Sunday after Pentecost. Conjunction of Pluto and the Moon. Twenty-four-second shot clock made its NBA debut, 1954. Cider made from blemished apples, known as avoid using too many apples with bruises or open wounds. If rot has already set in, it will affect the taste and longevity of the cider. If you have unripe tomatoes still on the vine and frost is fast approaching, pull out the vines by the roots and hang them upside down in a cool, dark place. Transplant rhubarb, strawberries, and so that some root development may take place. Rhubarb and strawberries deplete the soil of nutrients in a short for them every three or four years. dried on the plants. The seeds will be difbefore they die naturally. Cover the heads with cheesecloth if you need to protect your crops from the birds. On Michaelmas Day the devil puts his foot on the blackberries. Supplement your apple pies with fruit frozen or canned earlier in the season.GARDENING Jobs for Oct.from The Old Farmers Almanac Altha Store Phone (850) 762-3161 Blountstown Branch Phone (850) 673-8102 Marianna Branch Phone (850) 482-2416Altha Farmers Co-op, Inc. PETS AND THEIR PEOPLE IS SPONSORED BYWeve got the feed you need to keep your animals happy and healthy!CATTLE HORSES DOGS CATS BIRDS and more.AND THEIRPETS PEOPLEHis parents say one-year-old Channing Crosby and his Yorkshire Terrior, Toby, became best buddies the day Channing was born. Toby, 5, originally belonged from a breeder in Ebro. Toby loves to chase squirrels or anything that moves. He protects Channing as if he was the to run and play outside together. When his bassinet. Nowadays, Channing and Toby enjoy sitting on their little couch with a corndog while watching the movie Rio and Toby gladly takes the son of Alan and Mandie Crosby of Bristol. Channing & TobyNIKI BARBER PHOTO

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Page 12 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL OCT OBER 26, 2011 LCHS Class of gathers Saturday for dinner cruise reunion Members of Liberty County High Schools Class of 1976 marked their 35th year since graduation with a dinner cruise in Panama City Saturday night. LEFT: Cindy Copeland, Veldina Dawson and Diana Hall enjoyed dancing to the band playing onboard the Lady Anderson. BELOW LEFT: Jim Moran, Benji Read and his wife, Tammy, shared a table with Tommy Roddenberry and his wife, Janet. BELOW RIGHT: Kingsley and Audrey (Zimmerman) Clawson and Ricky and Kathy Brown. After the cruise, several classmates met at a nearby hotel and stayed up late reminiscing and sharing stories from lives since high school. The next morning, they met again for breakfast before departing. TERESA EUBANKS PHOTOSPam (Story) Addison and her husband, Richard, of Tallahassee; Rhonda (Headings) Martin of Blountstown; Morgan Foran and his wife, Nancy of Bristol; Onaleah (Jones) McClellan and her husband, Bill, of Crawfordville. Classmates, front center: James Flowers and Cindy Copeland. Standing, from left: Bren Phillips, Teresa Eubanks, Veldina Dawson, Audrey (Zimmerman) Clawson, Rhonda (Headings) Martin, Bennarr Revell and Wayne Wiggins. Second row: Ricky and Kathy Brown, Pam (Story) Addison, Tommy Roddenberry, Onaleah (Jones) McClellan, Mike Mercer, Benji Read and Jim Moran. Back row: Diana Hall, Morgan Foran and Willard Reddick. RIGHT: Bren Phillips unburdened his conscience by replenishing a box of Animal Crackers for longtime friend Bennarr Revell. He told the group that when they were in kinder garten together, he noticed how Bennarrs mother packed a box of Animal Crackers in his lunch bag every day but Bennarr would never share. One day, little Bren swiped the cookies from Bennarrs lunch and let him think his mother had forgotten about his special treat. He decided to fess up after all these years. He presented him with a fresh pack of Animal Crackers and they shook hands. Despite the tender moment between the two lifelong friends, Bennarr still didnt offer to share his cookies.FWC seeks public input on gopher tortoise conservationFour years after adopting Floridas For more information on the gopher tortoise, please visit MyFWC.com/GopherTortoise.

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OCT OBER 26, 2011 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 13 Halloween Portrait $5GET A FREE 5X7 P R INTFOR Photographs by SmoochCapture those Memories!Drop by on Halloween for your...Call (850) 643-2244 from 6:30-9 p.m. Located at 11258 SR 20 in Bristol Across from the Dollar General Treat Bags for each Trick-orTreater 17932 Main Street N, Suite 5 PHONE (850) 674-9191 Merle Norman has personalized holiday ornaments in stock! More than 100 to choose from. PRICED FROM: $650 $750BRONICA SPRUILL-HOWARDB ronica Spruill-Howard will celebrate her 14th birthday on Oct. 31. She is the daughter of Justin and Carolann Howard and the sister of Britany Howard and Skylor SpruillHoward, all of Altha. Her grandparents are Jim and Sue Hill of Robertsdale, AL, Ron and Mary Howard of Dorris, CA and Don and Debbie Davis of Queencreek, AZ. Bronica is a cheerleader and plays volleyball for Altha School. She loves riding the fourwheeler, hanging out with her friends, and loves to cheer for Alabama football. RENNER ROBERTSRenner Roberts celebrated his fourth birthday on Oct. 25. He is the son of Jared and Stephenie Roberts of Bristol. His grandparents are Stephen and Vanesa Ford of Bristol, Mary Katherine and Durwood McElvy of Whigham, GA and George and Stephanie Roberts of Panama City. His great-grandparents are Erika and the late Lamar Ford, Betty and the late C.W. Roberts, Buddy and Laverne Whiddon and the late Marjorie and Van Bailey. on the Smooth Ride and collecting rubber enjoys riding with his little sister, Allie, and cousin, Peyton, on his Gator.CADANCE R YLAN DEPRATTERCadance Rylan DePratter celebrated her first birthday on Oct. 19. Her parents are Ethan and Candace DePratter of Lake City. Her grandparents are Andy and Jodi Bailey and Keith and Bristol, Clint and Ann Pittman of Fort White and Rusty DePratter of Lake City. Cadance enjoys playing with her princess truck, spending time with her mama and hanging out with her cousin, Kylee. birthdaysDont let your skin get spooked this HalloweenA few simple tricks can keep your skin from turning into a nightmare this Halloween. One common problem trick-or-treaters face is irritation to Halloween makeup. Dr. Rajani Katta, assistant professor of dermatology at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, says following some simple tips will help keep your skin in the clear: -Use water-based makeup. before applying it to the entire face. -Properly clean your face at night. -Remember sensitive skin when shopping for costumes. Katta said there is no need to worry about breakouts as you enjoy your Halloween treats. Contrary to popular belief, chocolate or sugars do not cause acne. Following these suggestions and using a little common knowledge about your skin health will help you put your best face forward this Halloween, Katta said. Liberty County 4-H youth joined millions of young people across the nation to become scientists for the day during the fourth annual 4-H National Youth Science Day (NYSD) on Oct. 5. As part of 4-H NYSD, youth participated in Wired for Wind: the 2011 National Science Experiment which demonstrated how young people can implement alternatives to traditional energy production and have a positive impact on their communities and ecosystems. To combat a national shortage of young people pursuing science college majors and occupations, and to enhance the nation's contribution to the sciences, 4-H NYSD demonstrates that science, engineering, math and technology are fun and attainable options for college degrees and future young people across the nation participate in 4-H science, engineering, technology and applied math year-long programming. Through the One Million New Scientists, One Million New Ideas campaign, 4-H is working toward a bold goal to engage one million new young people in science, engineering, technology and applied math programs by the year 2013. Liberty County 4-H had youth ages Krystal Larson, Chase Revell, Ryan Harper, Kendal Wade and Crystal Harper take part in 4-H National Youth Science Day. Jenny Lytle shows off her windmill with Myncie Carnley and volunteer J.J. Lytle.Liberty County 4-H members build wind energy technologies8-14 to participate in this event. The 8 to 10-year-olds participated by doing activities such as making pin wheels, rocket balloons, and blow painting through a straw while youth ages 11-14 participated in the wired for wind event making wind turbines, designing their blades to see which design they thought would be the best in this area. These youth enjoyed the experience of being a scientist for a day.

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Page 14 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL OCT OBER 26, 2011 BUSINESSNew group holds Inaugural Rural Tourism Summit in Blountstown; MARIANNA A new tourism cheerleader for the central Panhandle is up and running. Homer Hirt, president of RiverWay South Apalachicola Choctawhatchee (R WSAC) has announced the organization will host its inaugural Rural Tourism Development Summit, on Oct. 28 from 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. (CT) at the Pioneer Panhandle Settlement in Blountstown. Were less opportunities for rural tourism development in our region, Hirt said. Our goal for the Summit is to network potential rural tourism businesses and resources to grow local tourism with increased destination marketing in our eight county region. The Summit will feature sessions on public relations, promotions, cultural heritage programming, agri-tour wayshowing and tourism professional development. Tourist Development Councils, civic groups, historical societies, outdoor clubs, arts organizations, colleges & others who value the mission of R WSAC are encour aged to attend. travel planning, awarded RiverWay South Apalachi cola Choctawhatchee a Cultural, Heritage and Nature Tourism Education Grant for the 2011-2012 Fiscal Year to conduct this summit. We are pleased that VISIT FLORIDA and its Board of Directors selected us from a large number of grant applicants, during their most competitive grant cycle to date, said Sharon Liggett, project manager for R WSAC. entities and local governments stretch their tourism marketing dollars in an effort to expand cultural, heritage, rural and nature tourism activities in Florida, said Christopher Thompson, President & CEO for VISIT FLORIDA. RiverWay South Apalachicola Choctawhatchee is a economic development through the preservation and promotion of the natural, cultural and historical resources of the Apalachicola and Choctawhatchee River basins including Calhoun, Franklin, Gadsden, Gulf, Holmes, Jackson, Liberty and Washington counties.Floridas seasonal adjusted unemployment rate for September 2011 is 10.6 percent. This represents 977,000 jobless our of a labor force of 9,216,000. The states unemployment rate for September fell 0.1 percentage points from August rate of 10.7 percent. The May through September rates are the lowest since August 2009. Floridas unemployment rate has declined or held steady for the last nine months. The states nonagricultural employment is 7,253,900 in September 2011, an increase of 23,300 jobs over the month and has gained 93,000 jobs over the year. Liberty County followed Monroe with the second lowest unemployment rate in the state at 6.9 percent. Henry County had the highest unemployment rate at 17.6 percent.Each of the 5 counties that make up the Chipola R egional Workforce Region, showed a decrease in unemployment for the month of September 2011.---UNEMPLOYMENT RATES ---July-11 June-11 Jul-10 Liberty....................6.9 7.2 6.7 Calhoun..................8.5 9.1 9.0 Holmes...................8.0 8.3 8.4 Jackson..................8.5 8.9 8.2 Washington................10.6 10.9 11.6 Chipola Region..........11.2 11.2 11.4Florida releases Sept. unemployment rates fChipola Regional Workforce BoardThe Board of Directors of Talquin Electric Cooperative, I nc. and Talquin Water & Wastewater, I nc. are pleased to announce the appointment of Tracy Allen Bensley as General Manager. Bensley is a licensed Professional Engineer and holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Electrical Engineer ing from Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL. He brings over 19 years of industry experience and leadership to Talquin, having served as Vice President, Engineering and Operations at Jackson Purchase Energy Corporation, Paducah, KY; Senior Vice President, Electric Operations at Lumbee River EMC, Red Springs, NC; and President, Electrical Consulting Engineers, I nc., Charlotte, NC. As the General Manager, Bensley will be responsible for overseeing the operations of Talquin Electric Cooperaheadquartered in Quincy, FL. Talquin Electric provides electric distribution services to over 50,000 homes and businesses in four counties of North Florida, including areas surrounding Floridas capital city, Tallahassee. Tracy will also serve as General Manager of Talquin Water and Wastecorporation providing water and wastewater utility services. I am honored to become a member of the enthusiastic team at Talquin Electric. I am also excited about the opportunity to return to Florida and am looking for ward to serving the Members of the Cooperative, said Bensley after Talquins Board of Trustees announced his appointment. Talquins Board and Staff look forward to welcoming Tracy, his wife, Leigh A nn, and their two daughters to the area.Talquin Electric names Bensley General Manager TRACY ALLEN BENSLEY MANY MORE TO CHOOSE FRO M, CO M E BY OUR LOT TODAY AND CHE C K OUT OUR GREAT SE L E C TION AND GREAT PRI C ES.Rivertown Auto Sales, INC(850) 237-2424 or (850)899-0979 AT RIVE R TOWN AUTO SALE S, INC.All must go to make room for new shipment12x16 Side Lofted Barn..................................................$181.84 PER MONTH10x16 P Side Lofted Barn..............................................$139.38 PER MONTH10x12 Barn...................................................................$105.51 PER MONTH8x12 Utility......................................................................$92.82 PER MONTH12x32 Side Lofted Barn Cabin......................................$368.28 PER MONTHCome check us out for the Best Deal around. DONT PAY TO MUCH CO M E SEE US!Located at 19984 Central Ave. W, Hwy. 20 West, Blountstown (In front of Alco)Dont Search all over just call the Grovers at.... Weatherking Portable Buildings While Supplies Last Blountstown Health and Rehab16690 SW Chipola Road, Blountstown T elephone (850) 674-4311 Blountstown Health and Rehabilitation Center provides short-term and long-term care in a warm, personal manhealthcare, centered on caregiver compassion, offered in a comfortable home-like setting. Come Home to Rehab

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OCT OBER 26, 2011 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 15 Calhoun Liberty HOSPITAL20370 NE Burns Ave., Blountstown Telephone (850) 674-5411Calhoun Liberty Hospital is proud to announce the opening of the.... Calhoun Liberty Primary Care Clinic ON Nov. 1st New patient applications can be picked up at the front desk of the hospital. OPENING SOONInitially we will be taking regular medicare, regular medicaid, BCBS and United Healthcare. We will be taking other insurances within 30-45 days of opening; such as CHP, Coventry, Healthease, Healthykids and other HMOs. Trunk or TreatSaturday, Oct. 29from 6-8 p.m. family. Trick-or-Treating, Free Food, Cake Walk and Lots of Candy.Everyone is Welcome! SAFETY TIP S 1. Stop only at well lit houses. 3. Use make up instead of a mask so you can see. 4. Start early, end early. 5. Use sidewalks or 6. Stop, look & listen at corners. 7. Walk, dont run. 8. Parents should accompany young children. 9. Dont go inside a strangers house, THE S E SAFETY TIP S ARE BROUGHT TO YOU COURTE S Y OF LI B ERTY COUNTY SHERIFF DONNIE CONYER S AN D THE LC SHERIFFS OFFICE Buy, sell & trade with an ad in The Journal or online at CLJNews.com!To the editor, As parents of a 19-year-old, let us start by saying we are extremely proud of him. He, along with his close friends have made clear and level headed choices in their lives. They are all wonderful boys that enjoy spending time together in the woods with their trucks and being boys. However, it seems that they are continuously being harassed and singled out. They were hanging out at the football trespassing. They moved their hangout to the forest, riding in the woods, staying out of town and trouble. Before long they were told that they didn't need to be going to the forest because they were being watched. So they decided to stay out of the forest and move to private land. They received permission from two landowners that combined, own approximately 50 acres of land, to hang out there. The boys took their four-wheel drive trucks out to the private land and spent their extra time playing in the mud or riding through the woods. Unfortunately, about three weeks into their good times they were being harassed by the law again! My question is this, "What are kids supposed to do in Liberty County?" They have nowhere to hang out and nothing to do. Frankie & Debbie Clark, BristolWhere are kids supposed to go to hang out with their friends? SPEAK UP!WITH A LETTER TO THE EDITORWrite: The Calhoun-Liberty Journal P.O. Box 536, Bristol 32321 Chipola shortens paramedic program to 11-month, three semester courseMARIANNAThe Chipola College Paramedic program has recently been changed to an 11-month, three-semester program. Application deadline for the next class is Nov. 30. The Paramedic program was shortened from the 16-month curriculum to line up with other institutions in the area. Chipola also offers an A and B schedule to help employed persons better arrange their work schedules. Students will attend one "A" session (Monday or Tuesday) and one "B" session (Wednesday or Thursday) for a total of two days a week. There are also 16 mandatory days scheduled during the the program. Class hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Classes begin Jan. 9, 2012 and end in early December, 2012. Orientation is Jan. 6 at 10 a.m. in the Health Sciences building. Due to a shortage of paramedics, there are multiple job opportunities for those who complete the program and earn state licensure. Applicants for the program must have completed 240 hours of EMS experience as an employee or volunteer. Applicants also must have a State of Florida EMT License and Basic Life Support for Healthcare Applicants should complete a Chipola College application and a Paramedic Program apof high school, GED, and/or college transcripts must be submitted to the Chipola Admissions and Records Office. Mini mum test scores include: a Reading score of 18 on ACT, 83 on CPT, or 104 on PERT. Applicants also must provide numerous immunization and health records. A complete list of requirements is available at www.chipola.edu Tuition for the 42 semester-hour program is approximately $100 per hour, plus additional fees. Information about the Paramedic program is available online at http://www.chipola.edu/ instruct/Health-Sciences/Paramedic/ PARAMEDIC.html. Contact Chris Murray, EMT/Paramedic Program Coordinator at (850) 718-2251, or email: murrayc@chipola.edu

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Page 16 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL OCT OBER 26, 2011 OCT OBER 26, 2011 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 17 by Michael DeVuyst and Richard Williams, Journal sports writersBLOUNTSTOWN-District champi onship hopes were on the line last Friday night in Blountstown when the Liberty County Bulldogs made the short trip across the river to play the Blountstown Tigers. The winner of this game would to the Class 1A Region 2 District 4 title. erty County turnovers and converted three of those turnovers into 20 points to secure a 20-7 victory. of the Bulldogs when a Tiger punt was muffed and Bulldog Kyle Brunson recovered the ball on the Bulldog 47 yard line. Two plays later the Tiger defense rose to the occasion when Thomas Tierney rocked the Liberty County ball carrier, causing the ball to pop up in the air. Hunter Jordan picked off the ball on the run at the 50 yard line and rumbled down to the Bulldog 18. Four plays later, Jawon Mosley found the sons extra point gave the Tigers an early After swapping punts Liberty County started a drive on their own 45 yard line. Two plays later, Alex Marlowe found the edge to the left sideline and raced 53 yards to pay dirt. Trey Johnsons extra point knotted the score at 7 with 8:45 left in the half. The Bulldogs took the second half kickoff but a penalty and two incomplete passes forced a 3 and out. Blountstown took possession of the ball and found themselves Thomas 29 yard catch from Hunter Jordan. Two plays later, Bulldog Shelby Williams broke through the line and forced a Tiger fumble that was recovered by Ethan Foran. Two plays later the Bulldogs found the red zone after a 43 yard run by Terryal Jenkins placed the ball on the Tiger 17. However, two consecutive penalties and a fumble recovered by Steadman Dawson turned the ball over to the Tigers on their own 25. Four plays later, the Bulldogs got the ball back by way of an interception by Marlowe at the Bulldog 17 yard line. That possession was short lived. Two plays lat er, Chaz Fain caused another Bulldog fumble that was scooped up by Tiger Steadman Dawson. Dawson ran untouched into extra point gave the Tigers the lead at 14-7 A failed onside kick attempt gave the their own 48. The Bulldogs again lost a fumble that was recovered by Bobby Andrews on the Bulldog 48 yard line. The Tigers drove the ball inside the Bulldog 35 but was forced to punt the ball away. The Bulldogs took over on their own 6 yard line. Runs by Marlowe and Jenkins pushed the ball out to the 22 yard line. On 3rd and 1 from the Bulldog 25, another Bulldog fumble was recovered by Tiger Javakiel Brigham. Brigham picked up the ball at the 15 yard line and raced into the was wide left but the Tigers extended their lead to 20-7 with 10:07 left in the game. Another 3 and out caused by the Tiger defense forced a Bulldog punt. The Tigers coughed up the ball on the next play when a blitzing Ethan Foran jarred the ball loose and Michael Robinson recovered the ball at the Tiger 26 yard line. A QB sack by Brigham and an incomplete pass on fourth down stopped the Bulldog drive on the Tiger 30 yard line with 6:59 left in the game. The Tigers were able to take the ball and run the clock out to end the game. A cool, damp night caused the ball to the ball on the ground eight times and lost similar problems. Blountstown fumbled four times, losing three of them. Blountstown Head Coach Greg Jordan way. We have been so close all year. We kept telling our kids to work hard and stay focused. They understood how close we were to winning every game we lost this way, he said. Jawon Mosley led the Tiger offense with 93 yards on 17 carries. QB Hunter Jordan completed 5 of 10 passes for 87 yards with and Ryan Hathcox all had big catches for the Tiger offense. Thomas Tierney paced the Tiger defense with 13 tackles including three for a loss and a caused fumble. LCHS Head Coach Grant Grantham said his team was simply outplayed by Blountstown. He gave their defense credit for getting key stops and taking advantage of the Liberty miscues. Theyve got a lot of good athletes and they played hard but the bottom line is you arent going to fumble the ball eight times and win too many games, Grantham said. The Bulldog coach added that despite the loss, nothing has changed for Liberty concerning the playoffs. either be second in the district or we will face a three way tie-breaker with two teams going to the playoffs, but the bottom line is if we win out we make the playoffs, they host South Walton Friday night, Oct. 28. South Walton runs a differ ent style offense than weve faced this season and weve got to make sure we are ready in order to win, he said. The Tigers move to 3-4 on the season and 2-0 in district play. The Blountstown team now control their own destiny to a district championship. If they win the next two district games they will clinch the District 4 Championship. Liberty still has a lot to play for, because a Tiger loss may force a tiebreak situation for the title. The Tigers will travel Friday, Oct. 28 to play district foe Franklin County. Blountstown defense stuns Liberty Co. 20-7Bulldog Club plans Old-Timers Chicken Pileau Oct. 28 prior to S. Walton gameThe Liberty County Bulldog Club is holding their annual chicken pileau for former football players and cheerleaders from Liberty County High School prior to the football game against South Walton Oct. 28. Serving will All former LCHS football players, cheerleaders, coaches and Bulldog Club members are invited to attend and enjoy a good meal and wonderful fellowship. Drinks and dessert will also be provided. The meal is held each year in appreciation of those who have devoted time to help make Liberty County football special. former players come out to recognize Coach Richard Kennedy earlier this year and hopes they will all come back to enjoy another night together watching Liberty County football on Senior Night. ABOVE: Liber tys Daniel Deason (#12) begins his tackle of BHS Hunter Jordan (#14) but teammate Patrick Pitts (#53) moves in and stops him. LEFT: Tiger Thomas Tierney (#52) tackles Bulldog Alex Marlowe (#5) and Harold Armstrong (#34). ABOVE: Libertys Terryal Jenkins moves through the crowd as the path is cleared by his teammates. PHOT OS BY T ONY SHOEMAKE & DANIEL WILLIAMS ABOVE: Blountstowns Thomas Tierney (#52) and Javakiel Brigham (#28) tackle Libertys Alex Marlowe (#5). ABOVE RIGHT: Bulldog Daniel Deason (#12) moves to avoid Tiger Javakiel Brigham (#28) while Deasons teammate Chuck Morris (#64) moves in to assist. RIGHT: BHS Tiger Jawon Mosley runs the ball through the crowd of Bulldogs and Tigers while Libertys Ben Beckwith (#10) moves in. ABOVE: The teams hear the rules before the coin toss. RIGHT: Tiger Jawon Mosley (#10) gets tackled by Bulldogs Terryal Jenkins (#4) and Alex Marlowe (#5). BELOW: Libertys Alex Marlowe (#5) runs the ball trying to avoid Blountstowns Stedman Dawson (#81) and Anthony Williams (#3). ABOVE: Libertys Michael Robinson (#22) and a teammate tackle Blountstowns Charlie Bradford (#14). BELOW: Tiger Ben Beckwith (#10) gets tackled by a Bulldog. Liberty County students generated plenty of school spirit with a special pep rally Thursday night to prepare for Fridays big game. Students performed skits and sang to entertain the crowd as they looked forward to the upcoming game between longtime rivals, the LCHS Bulldogs and the BlountstownTigers. DANIEL WILLIAMS PHOT OS

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Page 18 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL OCT OBER 26, 2011 Hosford School was excited to house the Scholastic Book Fair Oct. 10-14. The students enjoyed their time browsing over a variety of books and goodies. Tuesday, Oct. 11 was our school Family Night. Families spent time together shopping the Book Fair, reading and sharing snacks. We usually sell a little over $3,000 in Scholastic products earning us around $2,200 in books. All proceeds are donated to upgrade the school library. This is a biannual event and we are looking forward to the Fairs arrival in March! ABOVE: Tryston Lopez holding his favorite books, the Magic Tree House Series. Volleyball Update The Lady Dawgs will be competing in their District Tournament Oct. 27. Time and opponent is to be announced. Come out and cheer on the Lady Dawgs to help them bring home a District Championship! If you havent seen this years Tolar Football team you have missed one incredible group of young men! They have represented the future of Liberty County football on the gridiron in an outstanding manner this season, culminating in bringConference Championship. The team won the championship in Chipley Tuesday, Oct. 18 by beating Rhoulac Middle School from Chipley 26-14. The offense was led by Micah McCaskill and Kenny Godwin at quarterback. JJ House scored 3 touchdowns and rushed for over 100 yards and Jarrod Beckwith scored 2 touchdowns and rushed for over 80 yards in the contest. The defense was led by middle linebacker Maze Holmes, ends Cephus Green and Jordan Chaney and a strong secondary led by Beckwith and Brody Holland. This team went 5-1 through the season with a scoring offense that would rival any team you will see on Friday or Saturday. They averaged over 30 points a game this year. Their defense allowed less than 10 points a game. One county resident called this group Over the last two years, this group of 7th and 8th graders went 11-2, resulting in them claiming this years championship trophy. The future of Liberty County High School football is going to be loaded with talented young men for many years to come. W.R Tolar science students and our local 4-H teamed up to perform wind-powered experiments recently. The goal of our experiment was to make electricity using a windmill. We successfully made one volt of electricity. We had a good time and accomplished a goal. Anti-tobacco spokesman Rick Bender recently spoke to Liberty County students about the dangers of tobacco use. The presentationat the sponsored by Liberty County SWAT (Students Working Against Tobacco). Rick spoke to the 5th through 8th grade classes at Hosford and Tolar schools on Thursday. Red Ribbon Week is a week of celebrating for drug-free students. Teachers and students got involved the week of Oct. 17. signs decorated the hall ways and encouraged students to be drug-free. Oct. dents had the opportunity to sign their names pledging to be drug free. A drug-free presenta tion was given for grades 4th-8th. On Oct. 19 a Wear Red Rally took place and the students and staff all wore Day and everyone dressed up as their favorite Super Hero. The week ended with Health Day on Oct. 21. Students choosing to be drug-free and healthy took a power walk around the block. Panhandle Conference Championship w. r. tolar SchoolT olar and 4-H team up to perform wind-powered electricity experiments Rick Bender speaks at Hosford and Tolar Schools Panther Pulse Hosford School holds Scholastic Book FairPictures from Power Day. FROM LEFT : Sarah and Nate Carpenter, Shelly Stafford and Trenton Hires and Deanna Weston and Wyatt HunterHosford School celebrates Red Ribbon week LCHS Bulldog Beat ApalacheeT heR estaurantHwy. 20, Bristol 643-2264Friday NightAll your favorites and more. Now with Fried Oysters, Boiled Shrimp and Crab Bites. With Salad for ONLY... $1298 Oysters on the Menu E verydayNOWIts VerY Wise to Advertise Make the most of your business with an ad in The Calhoun-Liberty JOURNALPHONE (850) 643-3333 thejournal@fairpoint.net SCHOOL LUNCH MENU Oct. 26-Nov.1, 2011 Bristol Dental Clinic Laban Bontrager, DMD, Monica Bontrager, DMDPea Ridge Rd in Bristol, Phone (850) 643-5417MENUS SPONSORED BY: Bristol Dental Clinic LIBERTY WednesdayBREAKFAST: Cheese grits and sausage patty. LUNCH: Roasted turkey with whole wheat roll or chicken burrito, mashed potatoes & gravy, carrots. (2nd & 3rd grade pizza)ThursdayBREAKFAST: Whole wheat pancakes and ham. LUNCH: Crispy chicken on whole wheat bun or turkey club salad, french fries, fresh cut cantaloupe.FridayBREAKFAST: Grits and scrambled eggs. LUNCH: Chicken pot pie or wheat bun, green beans, applesauce. (4th grade pizza)MondayBREAKFAST: Biscuit and scrambled eggs. LUNCH: Turkey nachos or grilled ham & cheese on whole wheat bread, romaine let. & tomato, corn, baked cinnamon apples (kg & 1st grade pizza).T uesdayBREAKFAST: Cheese omelet and cinnamon toast. LUNCH: Baked chicken with cornbread or turkey and cheese on sub roll, local fresh collard greens, mixed fruit with fresh strawberries.*All breakfasts include a choice of assorted cereal with buttered toast whole wheat and juice CA L HOUN WednesdayBREAKFAST: Grits with ham and cubes, sweet poLUNCH: Turkey and cheese sub, steamed broccoli bites with lite ranch dip, fruit cup.ThursdayBREAKFAST: syrup and sausage patty.LUNCH: Chicken and noodles, green beans, roll, tropical fruit cup.FridayBREAKFAST: Sausage gravy and biscuit.LUNCH: Pepperoni pizza, garden salad, fruit cup.MondayBREAKFAST: Cheese toast and grits and ham cubes. LUNCH: Chicken nuggets, mashed potatoes, orange glazed carrots, fresh fruit.T uesdayNo menu for November was available at print time.*All breakfasts include a choice of assorted cereal with buttered toast and juice

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OCT OBER 26, 2011 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 19 blountstown high school altha wildcatsIt was an exciting day at Blountstown Elementary, Friday, Oct. 21. We had 33 Teen Trendsetters from Blountstown High School of reading. There were lots of smiles on some third grade students' faces as they learned about endangered animals from their trendsetter. BHS students paired up with their third grader and had an exciting lesson planned that was enjoyed by all. Thanks to the trendset ters for their time spent preparing and the energy they brought with them! We are looking forward to an exciting year. The Small Town, Big Dreams 2011 yearbook has arrived. The 160 page yearbook includes PK 12th grades and highlights all the memories of the 2010-2011 school year. This year marks the able to do the yearbook in full color; however, the price is still just $40. If you did not pre-order, there are some extra copies available. While youre at it, consider buying a copy of the Wildcat from prior years. There are still extra copies available from most school years. Memories are priceless, so purchase a copy today. For more details, call the media center at 762-3121. Blountstown High School is pleased to announce the selection of our newest HOBY ambassador, Calen Masai. For the competion, Calen submitted an inspired essay on the importance of leadership at the school and in the community. Calen will travel to Tallahassee in June to represent our school at the 2012 HOBY Leadership Seminar. The faculty and staff at BHS are very proud of Calen and are excited about the leadership opportunities that HOBY will be able to provide for him. Congratulations to Katie Strawn and Kristyn Morris for receiving Microsoft Katies score was 273 points higher than the score she did it in half the time allowed. Kristyn Morris 240 points higher than she needed. Austin Britt was stown High School to get He had the same score as Kristyn. The students at Blountstown High School are working hard to be Mi (MOS) is the credential required by academia and business, recognized globally as the premier creden tial chosen by individuals seeking to validate their knowledge, skills and abilities relating to the MicroIn academia, MOS promotes success in the classroom for students and instructors, and prepares students for an increasingly competitive workforce. For business, MOS maxnization and increases job satisfaction and heightens career achievement among employees. In workforce develop ment, MOS prepares and places job candidates, ensuring they possess the skills employers require. Specialists the students must pass certification exams in Microsoft Word, Excel and Power Point. Blountstown Middle School students in grades 6th-8th and 9th graders from BHS were treated to a full day of activities and prizes for being an A school for the 2010-2011 school year. ball, food, entertainment from BMS own Micah John Martin and his P.C.M.O.G. Drum Masters drum line, a showcase and demonstration of Outlaw Racing and Race Cars from Altha, and hundreds of prizes that were given out throughout the day. One lucky student took home a new iPod Touch and three students were drawn to win a pair of Costa Del Mar sunglasses. Coupons and gift cards from area restaurants, T-shirts, caps, jewelry, bags, candy, free haircuts and posters were just a few of the items that were given away during the celebration. Teachers and staff members from BMS donated a ten dollar gift to give away to students during the celebration and collected gifts from businesses and members of the community. BMS would like to thank Blountstown Police Department, the City of Blountstown, Adams Funeral Home, Micah John Martin and PCMOG, Outlaw Racing, Terry Blair, Calhoun/Liberty Health Department/ SWAT and Ramsey Piggly Wiggly for their time and donations that made the A Celebration possible. BMS would also like to thank the area businesses and community members who so graciously donated items to give away during the drawings throughout the celebration. The list includes Blountstown Drugs, Golden Pharmacy, Big Bend Sporting Goods, The Diamond Corner, Advanced Auto Parts, Main Street Restaurant, Rapunzels, Ja-Makin-Me-Tan, Subway, Star Struck Movie Rentals, Rianna Michele Photos, Big River Sports, The Unusuals, Angel Spurling Beauty Control, Tommy McClellan, Danny Ryals, Danny Hassig, and Diane Long. Because of their generous contributions and donations the BMS A Celebration was a huge success. The BMS Lady Tigers Volleyball Team ended their impressive undefeated 10-0 season with a huge win over the Hosford Panthers to claim the 2011 Panhandle Conference Championship on Oct. 13. Blountstown Middle School in the BMS gym. Hosford has held the Panhandle Conference Title for the past three years and the championship game came down to a match between the Hosford Panthers and the Blountstown Tigers. Blountstown went into the tour Altha to move on to the champion ship game. Altha previously defeated Franklin County, which eliminated them from the tournament, and Hosford defeated Tolar in Round One, eliminating them from the tournament. RIGHT, Front row: Madison Yoder, Courtnee Shuler, Autumn Lee, Lana Wood, Hannah Bryant, Mackenzie Eubanks, Mary Beth Williams, Bianca Martinez, Nykeria Patterson, Annika Milligan. Back row: Jenny Snowden, Lexie DeVuyst, Dharma Lee, Anna Hassig, Sarah Pitts, Trudie Alford, Becky Jenks, Taylor Stalnaker, Jasmine Abbott, Jordan Herndon and Chessa Goodman. The BMS Lady Tigers were coached this year by Wendy Eubanks. BMS Volleyball Team wins 2011 Panhandle Conference Championship blountstown middle schoolBlountstown Middle School celebrates being named an A schoolFirst Grade Body Day The foot bones connected to the leg learned on Friday, Oct. 21, when they had Body Day! They danced, checked their pulses, learned where bones and body parts are and how they are connected! Thanks to BODY SMART! Dates to Remember *Third Grade Musical How Does Your Garden Grow? Thursday, Oct. 27 *Early Release Day Monday, Oct. 31BHS Teen Trendsetters visit BES for reading fun BESKatie Strawn & Kristyn Mooris receive BHS Announces HOBY Ambassador for 2012Altha Schools 2011 Yearbook has arrivedby Autumn Cook The Senior Beta Club will sponsor Altha Schools annual Autumn Fest on Friday, Oct. 28 from 6 to 8 p.m. no admission fee but there will be games, activities, and the concession stand. Everyone in the community is invited to attend. Remember to wear your Halloween costume.Autum Fest planned Oct. 28

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Dear EarthTalk: I want to use cleaning products that are healthier for the environment, but I worry that baking soda and the like wont really get my tub and toilet germ-free. Should I continue using bleach products in the bathroom? -Margaret Pierce, Columbia, MOWhen it comes to household cleaning products, most mainstream brands make use of chlorine bleach, ammonia or any number of other chemicals that can wreak havoc on the environment and human health. Ammonia is a volatile organic compound that can ir ritate the respiratory system and mucous membranes if inhaled, and can cause chemical burns if spilled on the skin. Bleach contains sodium hypochlorite, which can cause eczema and other skin ailments as well as breath elements in the environment, toxic organochlorines can form, damaging the ozone layer and causing health ties and even cancer. Fortunately, growing public concern about the health effects of toxic exposure have led to an explosion of environmentally friendlier and non-toxic products, says the health information website, WebMD. There are many products in this categoryfrom laundry detergents and tile and bathroom cleanersthat aresafer for people and the planet. WebMD warns that while many are indeed safer, others are greenwashed, meaning they are marketed as natural while still including suspect chemicals. How does one know? Get in the simple practice of looking at product labels to see if the cleaning manufacturer is clearly disclosing all ingredients, reports WebMD. If it is notit could mean the manufacturer is trying to hide a particular suspect ingredient. printed on its label doesnt necessarily mean it should be trusted. To make sure, check the Eco-Labels section of Consumer Reports Greener Choices website, which gives the low-down on what labels really mean and whether they are backed up by government regulations. Another good resource is the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Household Products Database, which provides ingredient lists for thousands of products on U.S. store shelves. If you want to play it safe and natural when cleaning your home, WebMD suggests using white distilled vinegarit kills mold and mildew, elimi nates soap scum and sanitizes, all in one fell swoopto clean windows, tile, cutting boards and countertops. Another effective yet gentle natural cleaner for countertops and bathtubs is baking soda, especially when mixed with a few drops of mild soap. Borax can be called in for tougher stains. If youre interested in clean ing greener, there are many sources of natural cleaning recipes online. Or check out the cleaning products aisle at your local natural food store, range of cleaning formulations from the likes of Seventh Generation, Ecover, Green Works and Earth Friendly Products (which sells a Safeguard Your Home retail pack that includes one each of a window cleaner, an all-purpose cleaner, a dishwashing liquid, an automatic dishwasher gel, a laundry detergent and a fabric refresher), among many others. Dear EarthTalk: What is the environmental impact of so many people now using sites like Facebook and spending so much time online? -Bob Yearling, Paris, TXThe environmental impact of so much online time really boils down to energy usage, which in turn affects the amount of greenhouse gases we pump into our atmo sphere. For one, each of us can help by limiting computer down or putting them into sleep mode when we arent using them (this can be automated via the computers power management control panel). Also, when shopping for a new computer, consumers Star label. If all computers sold in the U.S. met Energy Star requirements, Americans could pocket $1.8 billion annually in saved energy costs and reduce greenhouse gas emissions by an amount equivalent to taking some two million cars off the road. Individual responsibility aside, the creation and manhubsespecially as we enter the age of cloud comput ing whereby most of the software, content and services we look to our computers for resides online and is served to us as-neededis what can have the biggest impact. Google, Facebook, and Amazon.com are already deeply committed to the cloud computing model, with Microsoft, Yahoo and others following suit accordingly. For its part, Google has been a real leader in the building of green data centers, even powering them with renewable energy. The company recently released environmental footprint scores for several of its data centers. While the energy usage required to run its cloud services (Google Search, Google+, Gmail and YouTube) seems huge in the aggregateit used 260 megawatt hours to power its data centers in 2010it boils down to only 7.4 kilowatt hours worth of energy annually per user. Google reports that to provide an individual user with its services for a month uses less energy than leaving a light bulb on for three hours. And because the company has been carbon neutral since 2007, even that small amount of energy is offset completely, so the carbon footprint of your life on Google is zero. In an April 2011 report entitled How Dirty is your for the 10 largest IT companies involved in cloud comput year when reporters uncovered that the company planned to buy electricity for its brand new eco-friendly data center in Prineville, Oregonone of the greenest such facilities ever designed and constructedfrom a utility that derives most of its power from coal.) Yahoo, Amazon.com and Microsoft scored best in use of renewable alternative energy sources for cloud services. In the long run, analysts think that the widespread shift to cloud computing will be a great boon to the environment. A report released in September 2011 by Pike Research, because of the shift to cloud computing and increasing by 31 percent between 2010 and 2020. Page 20 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL OCT OBER 26, 2011 If youre interested in cleaning greener, there are many sources of natural cleaning recipes online. Or check out the cleaning products cleaning formulations safe for your health and the environment. Pictured: Earth Friendly Products' Safeguard Your Home retail pack. Since moving to the Florida Panhandle, Panama City musicians Mary Ellen Reedie, Yasya Brown and Rose Docy have made beautiful music in just about every venue you can imagine from ballrooms to will bring their delightful sounds to Jackson County starting at 1 p.m. on Nov. 6 at the 7th Annual Sunday Afternoon with the Arts. This family friendly event is not your typical art show. So plan now to bring your family and friends for a free after noon of entertainment. The sounds of Elegant Strings will greet you as you arrive at the Chipola Arts Center for the celebration of art featuring a wide variety of work created by 65 local and regional artists and authors in addition to this years special guest artists Dean Mitchell, Michael Harrell, and Kristin Anderson. The Elegant Strings Trio has been making music on the Emerald Coast for 10 the Panama City area. They are the principle chairs of the string sections in the Panama City Pops Orchestra. The trios repertoire covers the classic literature, as well as, an ever-growing collection of contemporary music arranged expressly for them by one of its members. Their ensemble plays for weddings, parties, meetings, fund raisers, grand openings and local area churches throughout the Florida Panhandle. Not shy of the outdoors the trio has also played at beaches, parks, and on boats. Trio members are Mary Ellen Reedie, violin; Yasya Brown, violin; and Rose Docy, cello. Mary Ellen, a graduate in church music from Westminster College, came to North Florida from California, where she conducted vocal and bell choirs, played the organ and piano, and was a member of a local string quar tet. Yasya came from Russia, where she majored in music at the Moscow Conser vatory of Music. Coming to the United States on holiday led her to the man she would marry and her eventual US citizenship. Rose, a graduate of Capital University Conservatory of Music, came to the Emerald Coast from Ohio where she played in many musical theater productions and was a member of 3 regional symphonies. The free admission family event is November 6 from 1 to 5 PM at Chipola Arts Center. It is organized by The Artists Guild of Northwest Florida, Inc. in partnership with the Chipola Regional Arts Association and Chipola College. Interactive art activities for children and adults, door prizes and a Grand Door Prize donated by John Brewers Studio are a part of the annual event. Corporate sponsors for this years event include: Renaissance Gold Sponsors: Florida Public Utilities and the Jackson County Floridan; Renaissance Silver Sponsors: Focus Credit Union and United Member Business Services, LLC. Contributing Business Sponsors are Florida Commerce Credit Union, John Brewers Studio, The UPS Store, and Outside the Lines Art Studio. The Jackson County Chamber of Commerce and the Jackson County Tour ist Development Council also support the event. the event at The Artists Guild web site: Orchestra to play at the Sunday Afternoon with the Arts in Marianna

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OCT OBER 26, 2011 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 21 DANIEL WILLIAMS PHOT OS Folks of all ages enjoyed the opportunity to don a new Halloween costume, ride in the parade or just stand along the road and wait for a big piece of candy to come their way during Saturdays PTO Fall Festival in Hosford. The community turned out to enjoy the annual event, collecting treats while watching the procession roll through town and afterwards taking turns playing games and vying for prizes at the carnival.

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Page 22 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL OCT OBER 26, 2011 GARDENINGCitrus grown in the home landscape can be attacked by a number of insect and mite pests. Some are large enough to be spotted early in their infestation. Others are so small that you cant see them without tend to notice their damage until its too late to do anything about it. One very small pest that delivers an unsightly punch is the citrus rust mite (CRM). Mites are arachnids rather than insects making them related to spiders. While there are several different types of mites common. The citrus rust mite is found on all citrus varieties throughout Florida. Populations conditions with a female laying 20 to 30 eggs over a 20-day period. Although they peak populations usually occur during June and July. Rust mites have piercing-sucking mouthparts and feed on the outside exposed epidermal surface of fruit that is 1/2 inch or larger and on plant leaves and green twigs. Feeding destroys the rind cells and ultimately causes a very unappealing and alarming looking fruit. The appearance and amount of damage depends on when the infestation occurs. When a fruit is injured in summer surface is smooth and dark brown monly referred to as "bronzing". Mites feeding on fruit early in the spring produce a peel referred to as color. Blemished fruit lose water faster than undamaged fruit and will be smaller and appear substandard. Citrus rust mites prefer the fruit on the trees outer canopy that is exposed to sunthe most sun-exposed portion of the fruit. This behavior results in a sun spot of undamaged rind on the sunny side of the fruit. This pattern of damage is helpful in the diagnosis of this pest. and not every citrus tree in the yard will a surface blemish. It does make fruit unsaleable (and sometimes even hard to give there is nothing you can do for it once the fruit is damaged. Since rust mites are not readily visible would usually be too late to be scouting is critical to avoid fying glass to look for the mites at the times when infestation is expected to commence. Mite populations usually begin to increase in April on new foliage and reach a peak in June to July. Depending on weather conditions and the occurrence mite populations usually deagain in October and November. Pay special attention to trees recently sprayed with insecticides. The misuse of insecticides can sometime allow an explosion of mites. Horticultural oils can be used to control work by suffocating insects and causing them to die. very useful tool for controlling some citrus avoid plant Injury. Be sure to carefully read any insecticide labels before applying them to your citrus trees. Before you spray your citrus with any the label. Make sure the insects or mites you would like to control are listed on the label. Rusty looking citrus fruit might mean you have an infestation of citrus rust mites by Theresa Friday, Horticulture Extension Agent, Santa Rosa County EDDIE NOBLES LAND CLEARING Call Eddie Nobles at (850) 643-5390 or (850) 447-0449 or Chas at 447-0849Located in Bristol Land clearing, excavation and root raking:ACCEPTING NEW PA TIENTS www.bristoldentalclinic.com DENTURE LAB ON PREMISESSame-Day Service on R epairs & R elines Bristol Dental Clinic Want to see whats new with T upperware? Call Beth Eubanks, your full time Tupperware Consultant at (850) 643-2498 or email at bethseubanks41@aol.com. TALLAHASSEE Florida Education Commissioner Gerard Robinson and Florida Agriculture ever Florida Grown School Lunch Week during a celebration event at the Capitol on Monday. Florida Grown School Lunch Week was established to help nationwide observance that ensures children obtain ment. The physical and mental wellbeing of our chil Commissioner Robinson. Floridas local farmers are an excellent resource to help us achieve this sioner Putnam to offer healthier meals for our students. showcased the healthy foods they will be providing to Floridas public schools. The event also featured demonstrations by culinary staff who work with tricts highlighting the local foods in school lunchactivities were provided to attendees to help them improve eating habits and establish an active life style. missioner Adam Putnam. It is important to direct these wholesome foods to Floridas school cafete their minds and bodies need to grow strong. After Farm to School programs are widely recognized as an effective way to encourage healthy eating and boost local agricultural sales by bringing local vegFor more information about Floridas Farm to toschool/.Florida home grown school lunch week celebrated

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OCT OBER 26, 2011 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 23 OBITUARIES All existing pre-need and at need contracts are now handled by the Bevis family and staff.All operations of the funeral process will be handled on location at 12008 NW State Road 20.CALL 643-3636Todd Wahlquist, Rocky Bevis & Ed PeacockLicensed Funeral Directors & Crematoryevis FuneralHome Bof Bristol of Bristol Two locations to serve youBlountstown and Bristol Adams Funeral Home674-5449 or 643-5410Visit us online: www.adamsfh.com T elephone (850) 674-2266 Your hometown funeral home since 1994A Hometown Funeral Director You Can Trust and Depend On!Funeral Services with Dignity, Caring and Professionalism. Marlon PeavyPeavy Funeral Home& CrematoryLINDA DUNCANPINSON, AL Linda Duncan, 68, of Pinson, AL passed away Monday, Oct. 17, 2011. She was born in Quincy on Sept. 21, 1943 to the late Forehand and Eunice Hazel (Bateman) Rankin. She was a graduate of Florida State University and taught school in Helena and Mobile, AL. Survivors include her husband, Daniel Duncan; three sons, John Duncan and his wife, Susan of Odenville, AL, Marc Duncan and his wife, Michele of Lakeland and Scott Duncan and his wife, Heather of Lincoln, Graveside services were held Wednesday, Oct. 19 in Adams Funeral Home was in charge of the arrange ments. Online condolences may be made at adamsfh. com.ERMA KATE COBB passed away Wednesday, Oct. 19, 2011 in Blountstown. She was born in Glennville, GA on February 6, 1922 to the late William and Mary Lena (Sapp) Sykes. She She was preceded in death by her husband, B. T. Hosford. Graveside services were held Friday, Oct. 21 in HosAdams Funeral Home was in charge of the arrange ments. Online condolences may be made at adamsfh. com.EUNICE M. MESSERALTHA Eunice M. Messer, 79, of Altha passed away Thursday, Oct. 20, 2011 in Altha. She was born (Burke) Messer. A homemaker, she was a member of She was preceded in death by two brothers, J. B. Messer and Howell Dick Messer; and a sister, Helen Survivors include her sister, Edna Earl Laramore; a sister-in-law, Erlene Messer, both of Altha; and several nieces, nephews, and other extended family. Services were held Saturday, Oct. 22 in the chapel at Adams Funeral Home. Interment followed in Page Adams Funeral Home in Blountstown was in charge of the arrangements. Online condolences may be made at adamsfh.com.MELANEE RAIYNE CRAIG passed away Thursday, Oct. 20, 2011 in Gainesville. She was preceded in death by her sister, Destinee ther, Julias Pullam. Survivors include Michael Paul and April J. (Lewis) Hosford; her grandparents, Ricky and Terry Lou Lewis, and Marleen Beck; great-grandparents, Jean Pullam, Myrtice and A. W. Beck, all of Hosford, and Litamay Lewis of Blountstown; aunts Jennifer Beck of Hosford and Rosy Lewis of Altha; many cousins and other extended family. Graveside services were held Sunday, Oct. 23 in Adams Funeral Home was in charge of the arrange ments. Online condolences may be made at adamsfh. com.LULA MAE BRADWELL REVELL RABON 90, of Lake Mystic passed away Tuesday, Oct.18, 2011. and Lula Bradwell. She was retired from the Dept. of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles, State of Florida. in Hosford. She was preceded in death by her husband, John H. Rabon; sister, Betty Bradwell; brother, Bubba John Bradwell and daughter, Suzanne Revell Dabney. Survivors include her daughter, Jo Ann Lewis and her husband, Buddy of Woodville; a son-in-law, Billy Dabney of Bristol; six grandchildren, Jeff and Greg ley and Eddie Dabney; 11 great-grandchildren and four great-great-grandchildren. Services were held Friday, Oct. 21 at Grace United charge of the arrangements. Honor your loved ones by making their memory part of our best efforts to defeat cancer. For more information, contact the American Cancer Society. BE?EAST GADSDEN UNIT P.O. Box 563, Quincy 32353 Study shows Commission on Human Relations saved businesses $61 millionTALLAHASSEE A new study by the the states leading anti-discrimination saved Florida businesses $60.7 million litigation in hundreds of discrimination vices produced outcomes that typically cost businesses 89 percent less than if the cases age return on investment of 144 percent for every $1.00 provided by taxpayers avoided costs associated with discrimina tion lawsuits. missions record resolving cases that allege Michelle Wilson. While ensuring the rights of individuals is of paramount impor tance, the less money and time a business has to spend defending itself in court, the more that business can focus on creating jobs for Floridians. Over the span of the 2006-07 through tion process helped individual complain ants in 508 cases reach a mutually agreeable resolution with those they had accused of illegal discrimination. issued no cause determinations in 3,571 quickly, a portion of them likely would have gone to court and required busi nesses to incur attorney costs, court fees, investigative and deposition expenses, and other court-related expenses even though the actual complaints may not have been substantiated. While the extensive savings from these tablished, the mediation cases offer clear sector: federal Bureau of Justice Statistics, the average court-ordered damage award in discrimination cases was $134,125. amount in cases successfully mediated by services is $119,598. the number of successful mediations (508) equals $60,755,784, or an average of $12,151,156 per year. expenditures, such as attorney fees or court costs. servative estimate based on the last documented federal study of discrimination case awards. Avoided court costs to businesses could in fact be substantially higher than cannot be determined conclusively. return on investment for the taxpayers of Florida, based on the successful resolution of cases through mediation. islature has appropriated just under $5 entire annual budget. In the same period, businesses have realized, conservatively, more than $12.1 million per year in avoided costs. Thus businesses saved an additional $1.44 beyond each $1.00 spent to fund operations. tively, more than $12.15 million per year in avoided costs (as documented above). funding.

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MARIANNAChipola College education majors in elementary, middle and secondary school science recently attended a Project Learning Tree workshop at the Florida Caverns. Bill Kleinhans and fellow Project Learning Tree (PLT) facilitators, foresters, and naturalists: Linda Hebb, Mark Hebb, Phil Smith and Bruce Turnbull led the workshops. The purpose of the meetings was to help the future teachers learn to integrate lessons on the Florida Environment into math, reading and science courses. Chipola students received the PreK-8 Environmental Education Activity Guide with educator resources. Activities were selected from the guide and implemented at the park. They adopted trees, used trigonometric functions to calculate the heights of trees, became a human tree depicting heartwood, xylem, phloem, cambium; studied tree cookies and rings; and competed for tree resources while connecting, math, science and reading. Developed in 1976, Project Learning Tree is recognized as one of the premier environmental education programs in the world. While meeting state and national standards, it gives teachers the strategies, techniques and conceptual knowledge for activity-based learning to take the environment into the classroom and students into the environment. Topics include forests, wildlife, water, community, planning, recycling and energy. LEFT: Project Learning Tree (PLT) facilitators, foresters, and naturalists discuss activities. They are, from left: Bruce Turnbull, Bill Kleinhans, Phil Smith, Mark Hebb and Linda Hebb. Page 24 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL OCT OBER 26, 2011 Buy Rite DrugsT entative dates for the enrollment period are Nov. 7 18, 2011Contact your local Buy Rite Pharmacist before making your decision. We will be glad to assist you.from Altha SchoolAs Altha students returned to school after the weekend, some began to notice a totaled car parked between the buildings on campus. When 8:45 came around, students went to the gym for one of the most powerful presentations the school has seen in a while. Renee Napier, a passionate mother whose made it her mission to promote drunk driving awareness in a positive and productive way, shared her story about her daughters accident that could have been avoided if her guest, Eric Small ridge, wouldnt have made the decision to drink and drive drunk in 2002. Eric (pictured here in a blue jail uniform) was escorted out in handcuffs and shackles. He gave his side of the story and said he takes full responsibility for taking the two girls lives. Thats why I want to give them mine, and dedicate it to them. Ms. Napiers powerful message has been heard by more than one hundred thousand middle and high school students around the state. Altha students said the presentation made them think about everyday decisions and how they can make a difference like Ms. Napier and the Meagan Napier Foundation. The school would like to thank Renee Napier, Eric Smallridge, David Tatum and the Calhoun County Sheriffs Department, as well as Mrs. Kelley, for making the presentation possible. MARIANNA The family of the late Wanda B. Henderson has established a Chipola College scholarship in her memory. Henderson was employed for a number of years with the Jackson County School Board and retired as the Graceville High School Guidance Counselor. One of the joys during her educational career was coordinating the WINGS program at Marianna Middle School and Graceville High School. Henderson was the wife of the Rev. Riley J. Henderson, pastor of the Saint Luke Baptist Church in Marianna. The Hendersons had four children: Leticia, Francesca, Fodina and Julius; a granddaughter, Xaviera Henderson and a grandson, RyJuan Awak. The Wanda B. Henderson Memorial Education Scholar ship will be awarded to a junior or senior education major at Chipola in August of 2012. Applicants must be residents of Jackson County and maintain a 2.5 GPA each semester. Those wishing to make a donation in memory of Wanda Henderson may send a check to the Chipola College Foundation, 3094 Indian Circle, Marianna, FL 32446. For information, phone (850) 718-2478. ITS VERY WISE TO ADVERTISE CLJN ews.COM Call us at (850) 643-3333Email: thejournal@fairpoint.net in the Calhoun-Liberty JOURNAL and

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OCT OBER 26, 2011 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 25 Lady Tigers beat Lady Wildcats in four set volleyball action Oct. 20Blountstown and Altha met Oct. 20 on the Lady Tigers turf for an intense afternoon volleyball game that was full of action. BHS took Altha in three of the four matches, scoring 26-24, 25-13, 25-18 and 25-23. Hope Jerkins led the Blountstown Tigers with 4 kills, 11 digs, 6 aces and 2 blocks. Teammates Jordan blocks, Courtney McFarlin had 3 kills, 5 aces and 6 digs, Randa McCroan had 5 aces and 7 assists, Kaycee Yon had 6 assists while Kim Jinks had 11 digs. For the Altha Wildcats, Mary Sewell led with 11 service points and 12 assists. Teammates Hannah Register had 8 service points, Angela Waldron had 7 kills and 2 blocks, Cortney Harris had 4 kills and 6 assists while McKenzie Tanner had 4 kills and 2 blocks. DANIEL WILLIAMS PHOTOSABOVE: The stands were full of Altha fans to support the Lady Wildcats. RIGHT: Blountstowns the net while an Altha player attempts to block.

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Page 26 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL OCT OBER 26, 2011 CARS2001 Ford Mustang, runs great, cold AC, Lambo doors, $1,500. Call (850) 372-3204. 10-26, 11-2 TRUCKS1993 Ford Econoline van, good condition, has owners manual, good on gas, TV-VCR combo, $2,500 OBO. Call 762-9504 or (850) 557-2134 and leave message. 10-26, 11-21998 Ford F150 XL T T riton, V-8, 4.6 liter, extended cab, 3-door, $2,800. Call (850) 557-3583.10-26, 11-21989 Chevy Blazer, engine needs work, $800 OBO. Call 643-2977 from 3-8 p.m. 10-26, 11-21998 Ford Explorer, 5.0 engine, V-8, runs great, needs battery, $1,000. Call 482-5049. 10-26, 11-22001 Ford F150, 4x4, leather interior, never been in the woods, $9,800 OBO. Call 892-5080. 10-19, 10-261966 Dodge Charger, taken apart for restoration, includes all parts, 383 motor with transmission, will make a great project car, $4,000 OBO. Call 447-0122. 10-19, 10-261995 Chevy Silverado, 350 motor, low miles, new tires and battery, very dependable, $2,500. Call (850) 661-7016. 10-19, 10-262004 Xterra Nissan, white, power locks and windows, running boards, clean, good tires, 110,000 miles, automatic, tinted windows, with racks, runs good, $6,650 OBO/make offer. Call 509-3271.10-5, 11-2 AUTO ACCESSORIEST wo tires, 215 70 R15, $50; four wheel covers, $25 for set. Call 214-6043. 10-19, 10-26T ransmission mount for full size Bronco, $10. Ford factory 17 inch steel wheels with lugs and center gas cans, $5 each. Call 674-1617 or 447-1023 leave message. 10-19, 10-26White strapless wedding gown on bottom, $300 OBO. Call 6438383. 10-19, 10-26SportRider scooter, brand new, battery never been charged. Several TV cabinets, several vanity cabinets with sink. Good selection of clothes, men, women and childrens, shoes, ladies purses, electronic equipment, furniture and appliances. Everyone is invited to shop at the Calhoun-Liberty Ministry Center store. Located on Hwy. 20 E. in Blountstown, 6741818. UFN APPLIANCESMicrowave, large, $25; Toaster oven, $12. Call 674-3264. 10-26, 11-2Washing machine, $50. Call 447-2885. 10-26, 11-2Washing machine, Roper brand, $60. Call 214-6043. 10-19, 10-26Electric stove, four burners, $150. Call 674-3264 or 447-1380. 10-19, 10-26GE refrigerator, new, freezer on top, with icemaker, 18.1 cubic ft.. List $649, asking $350. Call 7623966. 10-19, 10-26 FURNITUREHutch computer desk, $150. Call 674-6022. 10-26, 11-2Chest of drawers, $15. Call 6743264. 10-26, 11-2Sofa chair cabinets, very nice, all for $100. Toddler bed, $30. Call 674-3264 or 447-1380. 10-19, 10-26Electric hospital bed, with mattress, $75. Small table and two chairs, $75. Call 643-2945. 10-19, 10-2639 Glass table top, 3/8 thick, $65. Call 674-1617 or 447-1023 leave message. 10-19, 10-26Queen marble/brass bed frame, $50; black TV stand with swivel top, $75. Call 247-8035. 10-19, 10-26 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNALCLASSIFIEDSTo place your ad, call 643-3333 by noon Eastern Time on Saturday. Non-business ads run FREE for 2 weeks. ITEMS FOR SALEJet 10 Power electric chair, new batteries, $800. Call 674-4454.10-26, 11-2Weslo treadmill, one year old, used very little, $200. Call 6744454. 10-26, 11-217 Roping saddle, tooled leather, great condition, with stand, $225. Call (850) 625-0265. 10-26, 11-2Kodak Medalist AF Carousel projector, 35mm slide, comes with two lenses, one Kodak Ektanar C 102mm f/2.8 projection lens, and one Kodak projection Ektagraphic IF 100 to 150mm A3.5 zoom lens, plus 3-140 Kodak Ektagraphic slide trays and 2-80 slide trays. Projector never used except to test. New in box with manuals, $90. Call 443-2422 in Bristol. 10-26, 11-2Acer Aspire One D255E Notebook, 10.1 LED screen with Win 7, ultra thin, about eight months old, carrying case and charger, $195. Call 443-2422 in Bristol.10-26, 11-2Grandfather clock, $40. Dishes with 22K gold trim, make offer; mens jacket, $5; small doll crib, $12. Call 674-3264. 10-26, 11-2Baby changing table, $40. Call 209-2700. 10-26, 11-2Four cell phones, make offer. Call 214-6043. 10-19, 10-26Cash register, $200; young boys clothes, sizes 4-8, 75 $1.25; grandfather clock, $55. Call 6743264 or 447-1380. 10-19, 10-26Fire Flyer combination safe, $75; one wheelchair, small child size, manual, $35. Call 643-2945. 10-19, 10-26Stair stepper, $30. Call 6437915. 10-19, 10-2616x20 Shed with double carport, wired for electricity, carport has light. Paid $7,800, asking $3,500. Call 447-0122. 10-19, 10-26Schwinn 26 mens mountain bike, great condition, $50. Mongoose 26 womens mountain bike, good condition, $30. Weedeater brand electric trimmer and edger, new, ries, like new, $500. Call 674-1617 or 447-1023 leave message. 10-19, 10-26Baby bouncer, Jump-a-roo, $10. V-Tech teddy bear, $3. Elmo Spins and Talk chair, $10. Bouncer, vibrates, $10. Entire Princess bedroom set, bed, canopy, TV, DVD player, toy box, benches, containers, make offer. V-Tech Cycling drive, for 1-4 year olds, brand new, $20. Baby clothes, 6 to 9 months up to 5 years, 50 each. Crib with mattress, $50. Pack-nplay, $10. Call 247-8035. 10-19, 10-26 BD, 1 1/2 BA TownhousesBRISTOL FOR RENTBLOUNTSTOWN Phone 643-7740 For Rent in ALTHA762-9555 or 762-8597Very NICE 2 & 3 bedroom trailers. 5 x 10 .....$27 10 x 10 ....$43 10 x 20 ....$70 10 x 25 ....$90M & W SELFSTORAGE RENTAL SCall 573-5255, 762-9555, 762-8807 or 762-8597 7 days a week service UFN Mobile Home for Rent in CalhounCall 674-88882 BD, 2 BA, located six miles north on Hwy. 69 N. NO PETS. Damage & Cleaning deposit, Water, sewer and grass cutting provided.UFN Home for Rent inHOSFORDCall 379-8287 or 509-4227for more information3 BD, 2 BA Located across from Hosford School$400 MONTH Really nice, 3 BD, 2 BA$650 month(850) 962-9711Riverfront home for Rent in Telogia 3.94 Acres For S A LECall 509-8636Cleared & Fenced, Deep well & SepticHwy. 73 N in Clarksville$26,000 REAL EST A TE Will buy 10 to 1,000 acres, reasonably priced. Immediate closing.Call (850) 544-5441 or (850) 570-0222 WANTED: NO INTEREST PLANS R.E. BrokerLAND SALE 10 ACRE + TRACTSPaved Highway Frontage With Planted Pine T rees From $4,995 per acreWith $600 Down Regular ContractWith $2,500 Down No Interest First YearWith $5,000 Down No Interest First 2 Years Owner Financing No Qualifying Nov. 5 at 7 p.m.(First Saturday of every month) Public is invited.18098 NW County Rd. 12AUCTION643-7740 Col. James W. Copeland AB1226/AU0001722 FREE SETUP FOR YARD SALE EVERY SATURDAY 1 & 2 bedroom mobile homes in Blountstown and Bristol. $105 to $155 weekly. Deposit required. All utilities included. NO PETS. Singles or Couples preferred. Also RV for rent. 10% Sr. Disc. Call 674-7616FOR RENT FOR RENTin BlountstownCall 674-3264Close to shopping, School, Town, Rent to Own or Just Rent4 BD House Money off for 3 year lease.

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OCT OBER 26, 2011 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 27 Miss a recent Pets & Their People column?Catch up online at CLJNews.com. THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNALCLASSIFIEDSTo place your ad, call 643-3333 by noon Eastern Time on Saturday. Non-business ads run FREE for 2 weeks. Luggage rack for vehicle, $75. Call 247-8035. 10-19, 10-26 MOTORCYCLES, ATVs & W AVERUNNERS2003 Honda ST 1300 Sport T ouring bike, fully loaded, Stock or Two Brothers exhaust, heated grips, ABS brakes and a Corbin heated saddle, in excellent condi10-26, 11-2Five four wheelers, need minor work, $650 for all. Call 643-2635 or 320-4542. 10-19, 10-26 HUNTING & FISHINGBrowning A-Bolt 270 with dash mounts, $425. Call (706) 8161268. 10-26, 11-2, model 500AT, slide action, VR-30 barrel, ish stock, in excellent condition, $250. Remington model 522 Viper semi-auto, 22 cal LR, 20 barrel, black synthetic stock, 10 shot mag, cocking indicator, adj. rear sight, 4 5/8 lbs, $150. Call 4432422 in Bristol. 10-26, 11-2Remington model 700, BDL 30.06, includes scope, mount, and rings, four boxes of ammo, sling and softcase, $750. Call 7624856. 10-19, 10-26 TOOLS & EQUIPMENTAir compressor, $500. Call 6743264 or 447-1380. 10-19, 10-26 FREEPine straw, located in Bristol. Call 643-5401. 10-26, 11-2 LOST/FOUNDLOST : Male, 1 1/2 year old, brown and black brindle bulldog mix, has red collar, answer to Lucky. Last seen in Rock Bluff community. Call 443-0648. 10-19, 10-26LOST : White Daschund, piebald, missing from Lake Mystic area, male with black, answers to Stanley. Call 643-2020 or 643-8383. 10-19, 10-26 PETS/SUPPLIESDwarf hamsters, six weeks old. Call 674-6022. 10-26, 11-2T wo Chihuahua/Dachshund mix puppies have had shots, one looks like a Chihuahua and other looks like a Dachshund. Free to a good home. Call 447-1022. 10-26, 11-2Moving, need homes for two dogs, one a Chocolate Lab/White English mix named China, 14 months old, very good with kids and other animals, the other a 16 month old Rottweiler mix, good with kids not with other animals, very protective. Free to good homes. Call 762-4524. 10-26, 11-2T wo mini horses, one six-monthold male and a year old female. Make offer. Call 363-9504.10-26, 11-2T wo Jack Russell, both females, one two years old and one six years old, free to good homes. Call 762-8657. 10-19, 10-26Roosters, six, mixed Rhode Island Red and Cukoo Maran, $10 each. Call 209-1395. 10-19, 10-26 WANTEDSmall house dog. Call 674-3033. 10-26, 11-2White English Bulldog puppy. Call 447-1542. 10-26, 11-2Electric stove; Springer Spaniel, er. Call 674-3264 or 447-1380.10-19, 10-26Welded aluminum boat, 14-16 ft. with stick steer. Call 693-0898. 10-19, 10-26We buy junk cars and trucks. We will pick them up. Call 6435045 or 447-3819. 3-23 T. 12-28 YARD SALES BLOUNTST OWN Yard Sale, Saturday, Oct. 29, beginning at 7 a.m., located at 17854 NE Charlie Johns in Chipola Manclothes, shoes, miscellaneous, womens leather jacket size 1X. Phone 674-3033. Yard Sale, Friday & Saturday, Oct. 28 & 29 at Rivertown Auto Sales, Hwy. 20 in front of Alco beginning at 8 a.m. Lots of items, furniture, appliances, linens, dishes, yard tools and much more. Phone 2372424 or 899-0979. BRIST OL Estate Sale, Saturday, Oct. 29, from 8 a.m. to noon, located at 10803 NW Spring Street. Furniture, tools, dishes and more. Phone 447-4111. CLARKSVILLE Wednesday, Oct. 26 from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. (CT), rain or shine, located at 18426 NW Nichols Road. tackle, hand tools, riding mowers, yard tools and more. Phone 2371930. STARSCOPEFAMOUS BIRTHDAYSARIES Mar 21/Apr 20 Aries, once something is in your head, it is hard to get rid of it. A stubborn nature can be an asset at times, especially when getting ahead in business. T AURUS Apr 21/May 21 Its a love of life that will move you through the next few days, Taurus. Otherwise you can become bored with the mundane responsibilities of day to day. GEMINI May 22/Jun 21 Gemini, once the wheels are to turn back. That is why it is best to think things through before you take any action. CANCER Jun 22/Jul 22 others to hear what you are saying when they refuse to listen. You will just have to be more diligent in your efforts. LEO Jul 23/Aug 23 Leo, many people will be following your lead this week. Be on your best behavior, so you will be a role model and set a positive example for those who follow. VIRGO Aug 24/Sept 22 Virgo, when someone chooses to offer advice, listen to that advice even if you dont agree with it. Things will have a funny way of working out. LIBRA Sept 23/Oct 23 Make an effort to spend some time with someone whom you have not seen in awhile, Libra. You wont regret the decision because soon you will part ways again. SCORPIO Oct 24/Nov 22 between the time you spend with others and the moments you se cure for yourself. While not secre tive, you do relish in your privacy. SAGITT ARIUS Nov 23/Dec 21 Sagittarius, you will quickly be come persona non grata if you dont mend your ways. Taking ad vantage of others will cause them to rescind their generosity. CAPRICORN Dec 22/Jan 20 Personal matters take precedence once again, Capricorn. Just when it seems you can never conquer the challenges that arise, you are met with a welcome surprise. AQUARIUS Jan 21/Feb 18 Aquarius, bide your time because the stars indicate a changing of times that will move in your favor. This will be an opportunity for wrongs to be righted. PISCES Feb 19/Mar 20 Pisces, dont devote too much attention to recreational activities this week because then it could distract you from work that needs doing.Week of Oct. 30 ~ Nov. 5OCTOBER 30 Matthew Morrison, Actor (33) OCTOBER 31 Willow Smith, Singer (11) NOVEMBER 1 Jenny McCarthy, Actress (39) NOVEMBER 2 David Schwimmer, Actor (45) NOVEMBER 3 Gemma Ward, Model (24) NOVEMBER 4 Matthew McConaughey, Actor (42) NOVEMBER 5 Kevin Jonas, Singer (24) 3 BD, 1 1/2 BA with central air. $575 a month with $200 deposit. Or rent to own for $375 a month. 3 BD power included. $550 a month 2 BD power included. $550 a monthCall 447-2885 For Rent in Bristol Liberty Post & Barn Pole Inc.We've got the fence posts to meet your needs.Dempsey Barron Road, Bristol (off Hwy. 12 N) Telephone (850) 643-5995 3 BD, 2 BA double-wide, very clean and landscaped, located off Hwy. 275 N on Circle Lane in Altha, water included. NO PETS. Monthly rent$500 plus $300 depositDouble-wide FOR Rent I C C.Call 643-7770 (DAYS) or 674-3570 (NIGHTS)

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Page 28 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL OCT OBER 26, 2011eries and many species of wildlife are dependent on natural aquatic vegetation. Rooted aquatic plants stabilize shorelines, prevent erosion, reduce turbidity to hide from predators, serve as food for insects and waterfowl, help reduce algal blooms, provide shade and cover Invasive plant species, however, can be harmful and have few natural checks. The spread of water lettuce, hyacinth and hydrilla are prime examples of nonnative plants that require management. Proposals in the late 1960s and early 1970s to stock open water bodies with diploid (fertile) grass carp (Ctenopharygodon idella) to feed on nonnative plants quickly became contro versial. These Asian carp spawn in similar habitats to striped bass, and naturally reproducing populations could have gotten out of control and wreaked havoc on native plant and wildlife communities. Florida helped lead the way with grass carp re search, determining their food habits and helping create triploid (functionally sterile) grass carp. Florida biologists also developed Counters, which the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and many state agencies use to ensure only triploid grass carp are stocked. However, many grass carp are stocked and plants are eliminated, the problem may last as long as and that can be more than 15 years. Thus far, in Florida, thanks in part to the diligence of management agencies, there are no documented cases of grass carp spawning in the wild. Recently, however, Fish and Wildlife Conser vation Commission (FWC) biologists discovered a few diploid escapees in the Suwannee River, having come states. This caused renewed concern and the need to repeat the message about the importance of stocking only triploid grass carp. So legitimate concerns revolve around use of grass carp and a full gamut of options for aquatic plant management are considered, depending on cir cumstances. In 2008, the FWC participated in A Risk Analysis Pertaining to Use of Triploid Grass Carp for Biological Control of Aquatic Plants. The review concluded that in public waters, agencies should develop manage ment plans for each stocking. The safest approach was determined to be an initial herbicide treatment followed by low-level stocking of triploid grass carp. The FWCs Invasive Plant Management Section also recently concluded a public review process to create a new Agency Position on Hydrilla Management (MyFWC.com/Nonnatives; search Hydrilla Position). The position recognizes that native aquatic plant communities provide ecological functions to tions. Hydrilla, as an invasive, nonnative plant, requires management. However, in water bodies where hydrilla is established, the FWC will manage it in light of the primary use of the water body. Plans will incorporate public input, be adaptive Chemical control is expensive (up to $750 per acre per year). Mechanical control is even more so about twice as costly as chemical control. Biological controls using insects or diseases have not proved suitable for managing hydrilla, leaving triploid grass carp as the most effective biocontrol. plants in moderate-sized lakes at a cost of $20 to $250 per acre. In private ponds, golf course ponds, irrigation ditches and grass carp provide an environmentally sound, cost-effective way of controlling aquatic plants. Such stockings require a permit from the FWC. The Invasive Plant Management Section issues nearly 1,500 such permits annually, saving users money and reducing herbicide use (MyFWC.com/License; select Aquatic Plants). FWC personnel also plan and stock triploid grass carp in public waters. Currently, staff is monitoring about 100 locations. However, in situations where plants, destroy important habitat, adversely affect recreation and negatively affect the local economy. In summary, FWC uses a permit program to allow citizens to purchase and stock triploid grass carp as a costeffective means of controlling plants in self-contained private waters. The FWC also saves state money bodies to reduce the need for expensive chemicals, but it draws the line at stocking triploid grass carp in large, open systems where triploid grass carp are unpredictable and could negatively affect the states immensely valuable sport natural ecosystems. Dave Eggeman contributed to this column. He is a biologist with the FWCs Invasive Aquatic Plants Section. Instant licenses are available at MyFWC.com/License or by calling (888) FISH-FLORIDA (347-4356). Report violators by calling *FWC or #FWC on your cell, or (888) 404-3922. Visit MyFWC.com/Fishing for more Fish Busters columns.Triploid grass carp evolve as an aquatic-plant management tool Florida Fish Busters BULLETINby Bob Wattendorf LADIES, LETS GO FISHING! Weekend offers angling fun the next Ladies, Lets Go Fishing! seminar, Nov. 11-13 at the Holiday Isle Resort and Marina in Islamorada. Ladies, Lets Go Fishing! is a national organization to promoting conservation and responsible angling. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) is co-hosting the event through the Sport Fish Restoration Program. During the three-day, hands-on event, FWC educa tors will demonstrate ethical angler habits such as safe and methods. Our Islamorada seminar provides women with a unique experiential vacation getaway where they can learn, network and enjoy the fabulous Florida Keys founder of the series. Wildlife management areas are safe, natural havens for the publicWe are incredibly fortunate to have a vast system of public lands in Florida. Over the years, the state has acquired a range of local and state parks, forests and a wildlife management area system that is one of the largest in the nation. These heritage and our connection with the natural world. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) operates our wildlife management areas under a multiple-use concept, accommodating a range of public Wildlife management areas are the only places where such varied activities as hiking, paddling, hunting, wildlife viewing or horseback riding may be so widely available. Most importantly, our WMAs, as we call them, have a long history of multiple recreational activities conducted safely. Millions of people visit our management areas every year boat. Those who come experience safe areas of scenic beauty with abundant wildlife because of the well-managed habitat there. Sharing these resources during hunting seasons is no exception. As Florida has urbanized, fewer Floridians participate in or have been exposed to hunting. This can lead to unnecesbased on a lack of understanding and inaccurate perceptions. Even worse, people may avoid visiting some of the most beautiful places in our state. Learning about hunting can change these misperceptions. All hunters born after 1975 are required to complete a hunter safety course before they can purchase a license. This requirement contributes to Floridas long record of safely offer ing hunting with other activities on public lands. The National Safety Council documents hunting as one of the safest types of outdoor recreation, and it continues to become safer. A check of the different WMA locations at MyFWC.com/ Recreation quickly allows visitors to review the hunting calendar and plan a trip around hunting activity if they so desire. Additional information is provided that explains the character and popularity of hunting seasons. For example, general gun season draws the most users. During small game season, we typically see fewer hunters on public lands. Shooting hours spring turkey season, shooting hours end at 1 p.m. Visitors can use this type of information to plan the experience they are seeking. All of us share the same desire to enjoy the outdoors. Hunters need to welcome other wildlife management area users, and these users should extend the same courtesy to hunters and to each other. By reaching out to get to know one another, we can reduce lands. Through mutual understanding and respect, we can continue our heritage of access to public lands for ourselves and for future generations. HOURS Monday Saturday 9 a.m. 9 p.m. Sunday 11 a.m. 6 p.m. 2816 Hwy. 98 West AUTO FINANCINGDAYLIGHT CITY TIRE CO. We're your one-stop"Volkswagens to semi's, we handle them all" driving from the tire store to the parts place and then to a service station to get it all put together? CITY TIRE IS YOUR ONE-STOP TIRE SHOP! TIRE ST ORE! "Authorized DEALER Wheel Alignments Oil Changes Balancing Brakes Shocks

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OCT OBER 26, 2011 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 29 ANNUAL CONCERT RA ISES MONEY FORF lorida Sheriffs Y outh Ranches Buddy Smith (RIGHT) headed up the 19th annual Bluegrass Gospel Concert Saturday night at the BHS gym in Blountstown, with groups including the Big Bend Bluegrass Band and the Sheriffs Posse Band, along with solo performances from Russ Renfroe from Montgomery, AL and Wayne Martin (BELOW) of Calhoun County. An appreciative audience helped raise between $2,500 and $3,000, which will go to the Florida Sheriffs Youth Ranches. DANIEL WILLIAMS PHOTOS Covenant Hospice 5-week grief support group meetings start Oct. 27 in T allahasseeTALLAHASSEE Feelings of grief and loss can be overwhelming. For this reason, Covenant Hospice their grief in a safe and caring environment. hospice.org. ADOPT A PET...FROM THE JOURNALCLASSFIEDS!

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Three Alabama men and a woman face a multitude of charges for illegally shooting deer at night north of Marianna, in Jackson County. William Cody Tillery, 21, Brandon Leigh Smith, 20, and Dustin Chase Parker, 19, all from Dothan, AL, and Lindsay Brooke Holloway, 19, of Troy, AL, are charged with killing eight deer and shooting at other deer in agricultural line. They were accompanied by three the group began working an area of north Jackson County near Sellars Road and September. Dodson, who was riding late at night on Christmas Road after seeing the occu with their headlights. ing kits, and the trunk was lined with plastic. Smith, Tillery and Holloway were inside the car. Smith and Tillery allegedly admitted they had been night hunting. They said they had been watching and antlers. Additionally, a crossbow were seized as In addition to illegal face charges for shooting and criminal mischief for ing peanuts that were in People can also send a text message People with tips may remain anonymous and collect a reward if an arrest is made based on their information. this case will be scheduled by the Jackson County Clerk of the Court. follows: three counts DUSTIN CHASE P ARKER counts WILLIAM CODY TILLER Y LINDSA Y BROOKE HOLLOWA Y Additional charges are pending against the suspects.This report represents some events the FWC handled over the week of Sept. 31 Oct. 13; however, it does not include all actions taken by the Division of Law Enforcement. CALHOUN COUNTY BAY COUNTY only undersized grouper and threw them all back. When asked if he knew the size limit for grouper, he replied, inches. When asked about the cooler in his truck, under some garbage bags. A citation was issued.JACKSON COUNTY area of Jackson County. After hearing gunshots from a group of hunters in baited with wheat, sorghum, and pea seeds. N ine hunters were charged with hunting migratory birds GULF COUNTY near Pig Island in St. Joe Bay. lons of whole scallops. Their legal limit was four gallons, and were going to the ramp to get some ice. Both were the water. HOLMES COUNTY and bag limits. baited with cracked corn. Citations were issued to ten SANTA ROSA COUNTYWhile patrolling on Highway 87 north of Holley, Of Visual contact with the truck was lost for a time and Jones contacted the two occupants of the truck who led him to the location of the dumped lumber. dumping. cleaning a freshly killed deer in his backyard. The ing the doe deer feeding deer were seized. The taking an illegal deer out of season.ESCAMBIA COUNTY and K enneth Manning were working night hunt hicle. occupants, was stopped and O fficer Manning tempting to take deer with a gun and light. Additionally, one ci tation was issued to the OKALOOSA COUNTY safety inspection determined the boat was returning from and determined both were undersized. The legal size limit is 30 inches or greater. The operator was cited for Page 30 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL OCTOBER 26, 2011FWC Division of Law Enforcement weekly report for Sept. 31-Oct. 13 Four Alabama residents face numerous illegal hunting charges for shooting deer at night in Jackson County NOW HIRI N GSenior Dental Care is now accepting resumes for the position of... Fax resume to (850) 674-295110-26, 11-2 JOBS Part-time Nursery Worker NeededSUNDAY S & WEDNE S DAY S Monday-Friday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. 16693 SE Pear Street NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE Management Opportunity County. required. If interested please send your resume to: Vernon.tanner@compass-usa.com by November 10, 2011.

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OCT OBER 26, 2011 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 31 CLJ NEWS .COM To place your ad call us at 643-3333 SERVICE DIRECTORY Whaley Heating & Air Conditioning (850) 674-4777FL LIC. # CMC1249570 Accepting: : (850) 643-6925 : (850) 643-2064 : grich0656@aol.com10536-B NW SR 20 Bristol, FL 32321 Located in the Apalachee RestaurantGary Richards, EA MBAEnrolled Agent Enrolled to Practice Before the IRS Business & Accounting Solutions Inc. 4433 NW C.R. 274 Altha, Fl 32421 (850) 762-9402 Cell (850) 832-5055Dozer and Excavation work Over 20 years experienceClay ONealsLand Clearing, Inc. William's HomeImprovements "No Job Too Big or Small"Concrete work, landscape, pressure cleaning, renovations, seamless gutter, painting, vinyl, & screen enclosure Call 674-8092Licensed & Insured, contractor & rooferFOR FREE ESTIMA TES LIBERTY TIRE COMPANY 10781 NW SR 20 Bristol, Fl 32321Call 643-2939 MV75332Hours: Monday thru Friday 7 5 & Saturday 7 12Come see us for all your tire needs or give us a call for roadside service, oil changes & tire rotation. We specialize in sales and repair of tires for:Commercial Trucks and Trailers, OTR Equipment, Farm Equipment, Passenger Car & Light Truck Tires Call Chris Nissley at 674-8081 or 643-8561 (Cell) STUMP GRINDINGReasonable Rates & FREE Estimates! That Darn PumpThere is never a convenient time to be without water.WELLS (850)643-HELP Thats 643-4357 or Home 643-3857For friendly service and never any overtime charges call, BARLOWS Repair & Water ServicesWell drilling & Pump repair ________________________Serving Gulf, Franklin, Bay, Calhoun, Washington & Liberty Counties________________________850-639-9355or850-814-7454 Hwy 71 South on J.P. Peacock Rd, Altha. Day or night,Check out our prices before buying from somewhere else. For Weddings, Birthdays and all Holidays, come in or call us. Margies Florist Phone David Morris at (850) 868-1295 or Dispatch at (850) 575-4414 Locally owned & OperatedNow serving the Hosford, Telogia, and Bristol areas. Clint Hatcher, OwnerElectrical Lic. # ER13014037 Building Lic. # RB29003511New Homes Garages Additions Electrical Remodeling Foundations Screenrooms Sunrooms VINYL SIDING RESIDENTAL & COMMERCIAL FREE EstimatesServing Calhoun, Liberty & Jackson Counties Chipola offers RN to BSN nursing degree with online classesMARIANNAChipola College now offers a Bachelor of Science degree in Nursing commonly known as the RN to BSN. All upper level courses in the program are offered in an online format. The RN to BSN is designed for students who have earned an Associate in Science (AS) degree in Nursing from a regionally accredited institution and possess a current, clear, active Florida RN license. To earn the BSN from Chipola, students must complete 40 semester hours of courses at the 3000 level and above. At least 30 of the 40 hours must be earned in residence at Chipola. Chipolas RN to BSN program focuses on the development of professional nursing practice to health care settings. The program may be completed in three semesters or longer according to the student preference. The program adheres to all common prerequisites, courses of study, and clinical requirements for RN to BSN programs in Florida. The following prerequisites are required for entrance into the program: (BSC 2093 & 2093L) Anatomy & Physiology I and Lab; (BSC 2094 & 2094L) Anatomy & Physiology II and Lab; (DEP 2004) Human Growth & Development; (HUN 1201) Elements of Nutrition; (MCB 2010 & 2010L) Microbiology & Lab; (PSY 2012 or SYG 1000) General Psychology or Intro to Sociology; (STA 2023 or 2122) Statistics; (BSC 2010 or 2011) Integrated Biology I or II; (CHM 1030) Chemistry for Health Related Science; (CHM 1045 or 1046) General Chemistry I or II; (PHY 1053 or 1054) General Physics I or II. Chipola also requires (ENC 1102) Communica tion Skills II; a Gordon Rule Writing course and an additional Social Science course. In addition to the BSN, Chipola offers nine other bachelors degree programs: Business Administration (with majors in Accounting or Management), English Education, Elementary Education, Mathematics Education (Middle or High School), Science Education (Middle or High School) and Exceptional Student Education. Of the 2,000 students enrolled at Chipola, nearly 200 of those are junior and senior students working on bachelors degrees. Since 2004, dozens of teachers have graduated from Chipola to begin careers in area middle and high schools. The Education program has nearly a 100% placement rate. Chipolas Bachelors level tuition is $110 per semester hour compared to more than $160 at area universities. For information about Chipolas BSN program, call (850) 718-2278. To learn about all of the colleges bachelors degrees, visit www.chipola.eduFROM LEFT : OB Nurse Manager Connie Swearingen, RN, and Jackson Hospital nurse Delilah Lewis, RN. *Lifetime Warranty on Repairs *Will pay up to $500 of your deductible *Over 75 years combined experienceTNTCollision CENTERTOBY GARNETT, OWNER

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Page 32 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL OCT OBER 26, 2011 OCT. 27, 28 & 29