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UF00027796 UFPKY NEH LSTA SLAF



The Calhoun-Liberty journal
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00027796/00291
 Material Information
Title: The Calhoun-Liberty journal
Portion of title: Calhoun Liberty journal
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: The Liberty Journal, Inc.
Place of Publication: Bristol Fla
Publication Date: 10-12-2011
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Bristol (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Liberty County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Calhoun County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Liberty -- Bristol
Coordinates: 30.426944 x -84.979167 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in Sept. 1991.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 11, no. 38 (Sept. 18, 1991).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002046630
oclc - 33425067
notis - AKN4565
lccn - sn 95047245
System ID: UF00027796:00291
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly journal (Bristol, Fla.)

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Almanac...11 BHS football...12 LCHS football...13 Sound of Liberty gets a new look...16 Obituaries...19 Sheriff's Log...2 Community Calendar...4 Speak Up!...6 Car knocks down utility pole near police dept. ...950includes tax THE CALHOUN-LIBER TY J OURNAL Volume 31, Number 41 Wednesday, Oct. 12, 2011 CLJ News.com LCHS Homecoming A Hosford man was fatally injured when he lost control of his 1998 Ford pickup, ran off the road and hit a tree Sunday evening. Killed was Donald Edward Williams, 54. According to the FHP investigation, Williams was northbound on County Road 67 and going toward Good Hope Church Road around 7:13 p.m. The truck traveled onto the east shoulder of the road and Williams overcorrected, causing the vehicle to cross both lanes and go onto the west shoulder of the road where he collided with a tree. Williams died at the scene. Liberty County Emergency Medical System assisted the FHP in the investigation, which is still ongoing. Funeral arrangements were not available at press time.Hosford man is killed when truck strikes tree Sunday evening SATURDAY BLAZE SEE PAGE 9Altha Town Council members who were scheduled to discuss raising the water and garbage rates at Tuesdays meeting decided to table the topic. Wes Johnston. Were going to check and see what other small communities in the area are doing. We will probably have another meeting in a couple of No members of the public were in attendance at Tuesdays meeting. Johnston said the council is considering raising the current rates by $1 a month. The town charges $16 a month for garbage collection and $13 a month for water service.Altha Town Council tables discussion on $1 rate increase Dont miss the 25th ANNUAL Goat Day Oct. 15

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Page 2 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL OCT OBER 12, 2011 C A L H O U N C O U N T YOct. 2 Brandon Jerome Smith, no valid drivers license, CCSO. Oct. 3 Dennis Sullivan, VOCP (warrant), CCSO. Amanda Thomas, contempt (suspended sentence violation), CCSO. Alan Kenneth Pyles, VOSP (warrant), CCSO. Crystal Gail Landrum, VOP (warrant), APD. Oct. 4 Lamar William Crawford, failure to appear (2 times) (warrants), CCSO. Gene Bess, non-support, CCSO. Oct. 5 Simon Jared Hathaway, driving with license suspended or revoked (felony), VOCR, operating an unregistered motor vehicle, CCSO. Jeffery Tipton, VOP (warrant), CCSO. Oct. 6 Timothy Olsen, VOP (warrant), CCSO. Jon Nicholas Whitworth, driving with license suspended or revoked, CCSO. Oct. 7 Charlie McClendon, possession of meth, manufacture of meth, CCSO. Oct. 8 Adam Richerson, permitting unauthorized driver to drive, CCSO. Jessica Clark, VOP, CCSO. Kelvin Anderson, reckless driving, driving with license suspended or revoked, CCSO. Brian Young, DUI, possession of listed chemicals, CCSO. Oct. 9 Mandi Waldron, sion of listed chemicals), CCSO. Michael Hughes, manufacture of meth, possession of listed chemicals, CCSO. Johnathan Sansom, manufacture of meth, possession of listed chemicals, CCSO.L I B E R T Y C O U N T YOct. 3 Angela Mickel, VOSP, possession of prescription drugs without a prescription (Tramadol), possession of prescription drugs without a prescription (Flexeril), possession of methamphetamine, possession of marijuana less than 20 grams, LCSO. Amanda Thomas, holding for CCSO, CCSO. Crystal Landrum, holding for CCSO, CCSO. Oct. 7 Michael Flournoy, battery, LCSO. Oct. 8 Antwan Fielder, aggravated battery with a deadly weapon, LCSO. Oct. 9 Tony Smith, warrant arrest, LCSO. Oct. 10 Mandi Jeanene Waldron, holding for CCSO, CCSO. SH ER IFFS LOG Blountstown Police Dept.Oct. 3 through Oct. 9, 2011 Citations issued: Accidents...............03 .................08 Special details Business alarms.....00 Residential alarms..........00 C omplaints..............................................................44 SingletaryCall (850) 643-3000 or email: singletarychiro@fairpoint.netnext door to Buy Rite Drugs NOW OPE N Largest Manufacturer of Portable Buildings in North FloridaALL BUILDINGS BUILT ON SITE Bestway Portable Buildings MENTION THIS AD We have OVER 80 different sizes.You can choose color and style (850) 482-8682We accept all major credit cards NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours or responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment.Cataracts?Freedom from Eye Glasses, Now a reality for many.Lee Mullis M.D. and Cataract SpecialistSmart Lenses SMDr. Mulliss Smart LensSM procedure can produce clear vision without eyeglasses.Close-up, Far away & In-between CALL TODAY for a Smart Lens Evaluation Mullis Eye Institute 1600 Jenks Ave., Panama City(850)763-6666 RREST REPORTS Acompiled by Journal Editor Teresa EubanksDriver charged with DUI, listed chemicals possessionA 21-year-old Altha man was charged with DUI and possession of Blountstown Saturday night. Arrested was Brian Jordan Young of Altha. Young pulled out from the Cherokee Motel onto SR 20 around 11:07 p.m. and then traveled across the center line as he went into the turn lane, according to the arrest report from Cpl. Eddie Dalton. Dalton noted that the pickup veered back toward the sidewalk. Moments later, he saw the truck cross the center line again. After stopping the pickup at the intersection of SR 20 and Mayo Street, Dalton saw that the driver was not wearing his seat belt and noticed the odor of an alcoholic beverage. When asked if he had been drinking, Young said he had two beers. When he stepped out of the truck, he was unsteady on his feet and had to lean on the hood of Daltons patrol car to maintain his balance. A drug dog was taken around the vehicle and gave an alert of possible narcotics at the drivers side door. Young challenged Daltons right to search without a warrant. Dalton told him the dogs response gave him probable cause to conduct a search. Dalton told Young he was aware that he had bought two boxes of cold medicine containing pseudoephedrine a necessary ingredient in the manufacture of methamphetamine earlier at Walmart in Marianna. Young admitted he made the purchase and said he had already sold the pills. When asked who he sold them to, he said he didnt know. When asked what he thought the buyer was going to do with the pills, Young replied, What do you think? Young said he didnt use meth but sells the pills to make money. Young was arrested for DUI and taken to the county jail, where he refused to give a breath sample to determine his level of intoxication despite being told he would lose his drivers license for at least one year. Two boxes of 48-count Equate Suphedrine were found in a tool box of his truck during a search after his arrest. When asked if the pills belonged to him, the report said that Young hung his head and stated, You got me. The arrest report noted that investigators were aware that Young had purchased over 25 grams of pseudoephedrine in approximately four months, which could produce over a half ounce of methamphetamine. He is being held on $5,000 bond. BRIAN YOUNGBristol man arrested for pulling gun in domestic disputeA deputy responding to a disturbance on Third Street in Bristol at 6 a.m. Saturday was met by the suspect, who ran up to his patrol car with his hands behind his back and yelled out, Just take me to jail! Just take me to jail! He did. Antwan Fielder, 27, of Bristol was charged with aggravated assault with a deadly weapon without the intent to kill after an altercation with his ex-girlfriend and another woman at the residence. According to Deputy Jonathan Gentrys report, Fielder said he and Rebecca Coxwell, 26, had broken up a week earlier. Fielder said he was upset because he had no where to sleep and went to the residence they previously shared. Coxwells roommate, Ashley Rogers, 22, told the deputy Fielder had pulled a gun on her after she entered Coxwells bedroom in response to her calls for help. Gentry removed the .22 revolver, which was cocked and loaded, from the back bedroom. Coxwell told the deputy she was awakened by Fielder, who started arguing with her when he came in the bedroom. When she told him to calm down and leave her alone, she said he would not let her leave and began throwing her around the bedroom. Coxwell screamed for help, calling out to Rogers, who was sleeping in the other bedroom. She said Fielder grabbed the gun from a drawer, pointed it at the door and cocked the trigger just before Rogers walked in. Fielder began arguing with Rogers and started waving the gun back and forth, she said. Rogers left and called 911. Coxwell was able to calm him down and convince him to put the gun back in the drawer. Rogers told the deputy that Fielder blamed her for the problems between him and his girlfriend.Fielder is being held on $10,000 bond. ANTWAN FIELDERArgument leads to battery charge after attack in storeA man involved in an altercation in a hardware store this past August has been charged with battery. Michael Paul Flournoy, 55, of Bristol, was taken into custody Oct. 7. According to the Liberty County Sheriffs Office, a deputy responded to a report Hardware Aug. 10. The victim, Hollis Finuff, stated that he and Flournoy got into a discussion over property that belonged to Finuffs deceased brother as they walked into the store. Finuff said he walked to the aisle where the nuts and bolts are located. He said about two minutes later, Flournoy walked up to him and stated that he better get a lawyer. Finuff said that when he replied that he already had a lawyer, Flournoy started swinging at him and struck his left eye. A store employee and a customer witnessed the altercation and stated they saw Flournoy hitting Finuff. Flournoy left before a deputy arrived. Following his arrest Friday, Flournoy was released on $1,000 bond. MICHAEL PAUL FLOURNOYKEEP READING! ARREST REPORTS CONTINUED ON PAGE 3 AND PAGE 22

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OCT OBER 12, 2011 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 3 Mother, son & sons friend charged with making methThree people including a teenager and his 33-year-old mother, along with a friend of the teens were arrested Sunday for manufacturing methamphetamine at a Clarksville residence where a meth lab had previously been dismantled, according to a report from the Calhoun County Aware that Mandi Jeanene Waldron bought cold medicine containing pseudoephedrine earlier that day at Walmart in Marianna, Deputy Jody residence on Big Mac Road in Clarksville around Two young men jumped out of a truck at the home where methamphetamine was being made by the shake Deputies made contact with Steven Waldron at his the truck as his 18-year-old son, Michael Tyler Hughes, Waldron and his wife, Mandi, were asked to step They were told that authorities were aware that Mandi Waldron had purchased medication containing pseudoephedrine that day and requested permission to When speaking separately with a deputy, Mandi Waldron admitted she bought the medication that day Deputies stopped the couples juvenile daughter when she went to the truck to retrieve her fathers cigarettes, warning her that a meth lab was in Waldron was arrested next and placed in a patrol Before being taken into custody, Mandi Waldron admitted that she, her husband, her son She said she bought the cold pills while her son bought lye, Coleman fuel and other components When they got home, she left everything in the truck and stated that her son was supposed to cook the meth manufacturing methamphetamine and principal in the and Sansom were both charged with manufacture of methamphetamine and possession of listed MICHAEL HUGHES MANDI W ALDRON JOHNATHAN SANSOMMcClendon arrested for making & possessing methamphetamineMembers of the Calhoun-Liberty Drug Task Force arrested Charlie Fredrick McClendon, 30, after a search of his Clarksville home turned up evidence last week that the site was being used to cook Investigators arrived at the Wendall Register Road residence Friday after the Calhoun County Sheriffs Office received information about drug activity During a search of the home, a suspected cutting agent using for processing meth in its powder form (known as MSM) was found in the A folded piece of tin foil which appeared to have been used to smoke methamphetamine was found in the east When investigators looked around the exterior of the home, they found what they were looking for A meth lab with the supplies and ingredients to make the When investigators pulled a plastic bag from an outdoor garbage can, they discovered reaction vessels used to manufacture meth, plastic tubing, stripped lithium batteries, paper strain chemicals and suspected lye from a household drain cleaner, which is commonly used to adjust the pH in the Five feet from the trash can was an oven; inside, investigators found a bag with other ingredients apparently gathered for a recovered included charcoal a bottle of suspected acid, plastic tubing, a plastic pill crusher, a homemade funnel, a glass cup and an instant cold pack, which provides a source of ammonium nitrate which is mixed in the reaction vessel during the A piece of tinfoil with meth residue McClendon admitted he used meth he had allowed two people to come to his home the previous night to make McClendon was charged with possession of methamphetamine and Two women at his home when the McClendon said they did not live at the home and had no knowledge of any drug Task Force members taking part in Mallory and Deputy Jody Hoagland of Tim Partridge of the Blountstown Police CHARLIE MCCLENDON RREST REPORTS A IN BR I STOL NOW OPEN

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Page 4 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL OCT OBER 12, 2011Thats how many copies of The Calhoun-Liberty Journal were distributed last week, ensuring plenty of coverage for your community announcements and great response for our business advertisers! 5,378 The Calhoun-Liberty Journal is published each Wednesday by the Liberty Journal Inc., Summers Road, P.O. Box 536, Bristol, FL 32321. Annual subscriptions are $18. Periodicals postage paid at Bristol, FLPOSTMASTER: Send address corrections to: P.O. Box 536, Bristol, FL 32321. (USPS 012367) Summers Road Located at 11493 NW Summers Road in Bristol MAILING ADDRESS: P.O. Box 536, Bristol, FL 32321 TELEPHONE (850) 643-3333 Fax (850) 643-3334 EMAIL: thejournal@fairpoint.net ADS: cljads@fairpoint.net JOURNAL ST AFFJohnny Eubanks...................Publisher Teresa Eubanks........................ Editor Sandra Brown...................Bookkeeper Debbie Duggar...................Advertising Angie Davis.........Production AssistantOFFICE HOURS: 9 a.m. 6 p.m. M-F, Saturdays from 9 a.m. until 1 p.m.THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Wednesday, October 12 Monday, October 17 Tuesday, October 18 Sunday, October 16 Saturday, October 15 Thursday October 13 Friday, October 14TODAYS MEETINGS 7 p.m., Altha Volunteer Fire Department AA, 6 p.m., Altha Community Center noon, Senior Citizens Center 5 p.m., Ag. Bldg., Conference Room across from Courthouse 7 p.m., Dixie Lodge in Blountstown TODAYS MEETINGS7 p.m., Veterans Memorial Park Civic CenterTODAYS MEETINGS, noon, Calhoun-Liberty Hospital 7 p.m., Calhoun County Old Ag Bldg. east door, in front of jail 6:30 p.m., Mormon Church, BristolTODAYS MEETINGSAA, 7 p.m., basement of Calhoun County Courthouse 11 a.m., Apalachee Restaurant in Commission Board RoomBIRTHDAYS Jacquez Brown, Larenda Ivory, Diane Larkins, Katelyn Bozeman & Chelsea Suber BIRTHDAYS William Booth & C.W. OBrian BIRTHDAYS Joshua Adkins, Morgan McClendon & Victoria Fant BIRTHDAYS Shannon Harper Goat Day this Saturday! Attend the Church of your choice this SundayLCHS Dawgs vs. Bozeman Away at 8 p.m. (ET)B-town Tigers vs. Marianna Home at 7 p.m. (CT) 9 a.m. to 3 pm. at the Pioneer Settlement in Blountstown 25 th annual Goat Day 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Sam Atkins Park in BlountstownMark your calendar for Nov. 12 when a fall festival and Veterans Day parade will be held in Carrabelle at the Seniors Center. Participate in childrens and family games or just relax and enjoy the never-ending array of foods while listening to our live entertainment, featuring CR 67 Band, Not Quite Ready Band, Greg Kristofferson, Evelyn McAnally and our own Chuck Spicer. There will also be various local singers performing what you love most: gospel, country, pop and the songs from the 50s. Discover the talent of our local artists and crafters. There will be a cake walk, 50/50 cash drawing and a Thompson muzzleloader Carrabelle. And dont forget this is a day to This event is sponsored by the Franklin County Senior Citizens Council. For vendor information call (850) 6974195 or email shirleycox210@gmail.The Club begins Monday, Oct. 17 and will be held on Monday through Friday from 3:35 to 6:35 p.m. daily for ninth through 12th graders in Liberty County. The Club will meet at Liberty County High School in the old 50+ club building (across from Dollar General) and is sponsored by the 21st Century Community Leadership Center Program and Donnie Read with Twin Oaks Juvenile Development Inc. An Open House will be held on Thursday, Oct. 13 from 3:30 to 6:30 p.m. at the high school in the old 50+ club building. There will be free food for all who attend. Participants of The Club will enjoy team-building, photography, fashion, drumline, archery, poultry projects, leader ship, horse programs and fear factor. For more information please contact Tracy Collins at 643-8662 or Dawn Arrant at 294-0462.Bluegrass Gospel Buddy Smiths annual Bluegrass Gospel Concert will be held Saturday, Oct. 22 at 6:30 p.m. (CT) at Blountstown High Sheriffs Youth Ranches and will feature The Sheriffs Possse and Big Bend Bluegrass. Tickets are $8 in advance and may be purchased at the door for $10. Children eight years of age and younger will be admitted free of charge. Tickets may be purchased at Hinson Insurance in Marianna, Blount Insurance in Blountstown and Coastal Insurance in Port St. Joe. For more information, please call Buddy at 674-5793. Kinard VFD Halloween Carnival set for Oct. 29Kinard VFD will be holding their annual Halloween Carnival on Saturday, Oct. 29 at the Kinard Community Building off Hwy. 73 South in Kinard. The fun will begin at 5 p.m. The costume contest starts around 6 p.m. All proceeds benefit the Kinard Volunteer Fire Department. For more information please call (850) 639-5011. NEWS FROM THE PEWSREVIVAL T ABERNACLE Revival Tabernacle will be having a Youth Revival on Thursday and Friday, Oct. 13-14 at 6 p.m. and a Youth Bash on Saturday, Oct. 15 at 6 p.m. At the Youth Bash on Satur day there will be free food, give-a-ways, awesome music, radical out of the box teaching and fun games. Some of the prizes to be given away include an iPod, more. You must be there to win so make plans to attend the youth revival and bash at Revival Tabernacle. Revival Tabernacle is committed to impacting the world with the gospel of Jesus Christ. The church is located at 17003 NW 11th St. in Blountstown. Fall Festival time at Calhoun County public librariesCome join in the fun at your local library. Festival will be held Oct. 28 from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. in the courtyard with games, prizes, face painting and food. will be Oct. 29 from 10 to 11 a.m. Come enjoy a great story. Everyone will receive a goody bag. Festival will be Oct. 27, from 3 to 5 p.m. with games, prizes, crafts, and food. LIBRARY NEWS

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OCT OBER 12, 2011 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 5 LOCAL EVENTS *Lifetime Warranty on Repairs *Will pay up to $500 of your deductible *Over 75 years combined experienceTNTTOBY GARNETT, OWNER Collision Center Home of the All-U-Can-Eat menu A little out of the way, A lot less to payFamily Coastal Seafood Restaurant Were Still open Come see us for the best seafood and prices around for a really great meal. AT BLOUNTSTOWN DRUGS T uesday, Oct. 18 from 3-6 p.m. (CT) 674-222240% All Christmas Decorations 30% ALL FA LL MERCH A NDISE PHONE (850) 674-9191 would like to welcome their newest stylist:Sandra Smith BLOUNTSTOWN Dont miss the 25th Annual Goat Day festival, presented by the Blountstown Rotary Club, Oct. 15 at Sam Atkins Park in Blountstown. Goat Day is one of the largest arts and crafts show in North Florida and attendance has become an honored tradition in Calhoun County. Featured entertainment from the Main Stage will include Roger and Amy Williams Stepping Out on Faith from Marianna. They have been performing gospel music for 19 years. Jackie Hill and the Blue Shades of Grass from Tallahassee will round out the entertainment lineup. Another highlight of the 25th festival will be a new kids entertainment area, featuring a show by Zoo World! Main Stage Entertainment: Emcees Bob & Anita Key 9 9:45 a.m. Money Sisters 9:45 10:30 a.m. Jackie Hill & the Blue Shades of Grass 10:30 11:15 a.m. Stepping Out on Faith 11:15 a.m. 12 p.m. Bob and Anita Key 12 p.m. Announcement of Goat Day poster contest winners 12:15 1 p.m. Money Sisters 1 1:45 p.m. Jackie Hill and the Blue Shades of Grass 1:45 2:15 p.m. Stepping Out on Faith 2:15 3 p.m. Bob and Anita Key Kids Entertainment Area: 11:30 a.m. Zoo World Live Animal Show at the Main Stage 12:30 p.m. Zoo World Live Animal Show at the Main Stage 1:30 p.m. Magician Show at the Main Stage Goat Day Games: 11 a.m. Coin Dig (Categories: 1 8 and 9 15 years old) 12 p.m. Chicken Chase (Catego ries: 3 5 and 6 7 years old) 1 p.m. Greased Pig Chase (Categories: 8 9, 10 11, 12 15 years old) Just across the park at the Panhandle Pioneer Settlement will be Pioneer Day featuring music, demonstrations, old fashioned games, food and fun for the family. General Store will also be open so you can shop early for the holidays! Gates open at 9 a.m. and vendors will be present until 3 p.m. Cost: $5 per person with children under 1 admit ted free. Please note that all childrens activities will be free of charge. Featuring: pony rides, train rides, coin dig, face painting, moon walk, magicians, and new games! For more information, call (850) 6745449 or visit www.blountstownrotary. com/goatday.htm.GOAT DAY is produced by the Blountstown Schedule set for Saturdays 25th annual Goat Day festivalThe Liberty County Senior Citizens Association has scheduled the following events for the month of October: Monday, Oct. 17 7 p.m., The Liberty County Senior Citizens Board of Directors will meet at Hosford Senior Center. The public is welcome to attend. Tuesday, Oct. 18 11 a.m., Bingo with Cindy. This is always a fun time. She will give prizes and lunch will be served to seniors. Call Liberty Transit at 6432524 no later than 3 p.m., Friday, Oct. 14 for transportation to the Center. Wednesday, Oct. 19 11 a.m., Hos ford Senior Center Capital Health Plan of Tallahassee has extended their services to Liberty County. A Capital Health Plan representative will be at the Center to discuss Medicare Plan programs that are available with Capital Health. The Open enrollment period for those who wish to change their Medicare Plans and those quickly approaching. Plan to come and listen to the presentation Call 643-5690 for information. Call Liberty Transit at 643-2524 no later than 3 p.m., Monday, Oct. 17 if you need transportation to the Center. Thursday, Oct. 20 Shopping at the Tallahassee Wal-Mart and have lunch. Call Liberty Transit at 643-2524 no later than 3 p.m., Monday, Oct. 17 to reserve your Transit seat. Thursday, Oct. 20 The Liberty County Senior Citizens Advisory Council will meet at the Bristol Center at 1 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 25 10:30 a.m., The Bristol Monthly Craft Class will meet at 10:30 a.m. For information call 6435690. Call Liberty Transit at643-2524 no later than 3 p.m., Friday, Oct. 21 if you need transportation to the center. Wednesday, Oct. 26 From 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., There will be a Senior Citizens Representative going door-todoor in Bristol to explain services that are provided through Senior Citizens. Call 643-5690 for information. Thursday, Oct. 27 Shopping at the Piggly Wiggly Grocery Store and then lunch. Call Liberty Transit at 643-2524 no later than 3 p.m., Monday, Oct. 24 to reserve your Transit ride. Thursday, Oct. 27 11 a.m., At the Bristol Center, the Halloween Party begins. Games, prizes and lunch. Call 643-5690 for information. Call Liberty Transit at 643-2524 no later than 3 p.m., Monday, Oct. 24 for transportation to the Center.Liberty Senior Citizens Asso. announces October event list

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Page 6 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL OCT OBER 12, 2011 Jennifer Shuler, Esq.Attorney at Law Business Real Property Divorce WillsBy Appointment (850) 866-3680or contact me at jenniferwshuler@yahoo.comCALL ME FOR A FREE LIVING WILL Listen to Steven Seay and Glenn Kimbrels play by play of the Blountstown High School Tigers vs. Marianna at Blountstown Friday night on Oct. 14 on K102.7 at 6:30 p.m. (CT). The Florida Gators play Auburn at Auburn on Saturday, Oct. 15. Air time on K102.7 at 5:30 p.m. (CT).RADIO FOOTBALL ON WYBT AND WPHK Hear Michael Wahlquist and Jay Taylor with all the Liberty County High School game action. The Bulldogs take on Bozeman High School at Bozeman. Air time on K102.7 Saturday, Oct. 15 immediately following Swap Shop at 10 a.m. (ET). Roddenberry sworn in as attorneyTiffany (McClellan) Roddenberry of Tallahas see was sworn in as a member of the Florida Bar on Sept. 29. After taking the Florida bar this summer, Tiffany began a federal judicial clerkship for U.S. District Court Judge Robert Hinkle of the Northern District of Florida in Tallahassee. She earned her under graduate degree in Political Science, summa cum laude, from the Florida State University in 2006. She graduated summa cum laude from the Florida State University College of While in law school, Tiffany served as a Notes and Comments Editor and Executive Editor for the Florida State University Law Review Her peers on the journal awarded her a Meritorious Service Award for her contributions to the law review. As a member of the Flor ida State Law Moot Court Team, Tiffany was selected as one of the top four competitors in the Judges John S. Rawls and James R. Wolf Intramural Moot Court Competition. As a top four competitor, she argued a case before the Florida Supreme Court in the Final Four Competition. Additionally, during her second year at Florida State Law, she and her the Luke Charles Moore Civil Rights Invitational Moot Court Competition in Washington, D.C. She has received eight book awards and will publish a note, Say-on-Pay: Cautionary Notes on the Use of Third Party Compensation Guidelines in the United States, in the Florida State University Law Review later this year. A graduate of Blountstown High School, Tiffany is the daughter of Alice Ann McClellan of Ocala and Tiff McClellan of Clarksville. She is the granddaughter of Gus and Syble McClellan of Blountstown and the late Bill and Lenora Lewis of Bristol. To the editor, For many parents, the thought of plac ing their young child in day care can be unnerving. Fears may arise that cause parents to question the safety and well being of their child in a place other than their home. Parents also wonder if they are good parents because they have to work and dont keep their child at home. Some parents have to work. Dollars dont stretch as far as they use to. For parents who must work and need daily care for their child, we would like to reveal a hidden gem in the Hosford and Telogia community known as Noahs Ark and Friends Early Childcare. We are so tremendously pleased with the care our child receives from Noahs Ark. Of course we were nervous when ladies there have been such a blessing. They are the reason for the success of Noahs Ark. The ladies are kind, caring and professional. The kids get lots of love, good food, good play and are constantly learning. Our child has learned so much. Of course we think she is the smartest thing on two legs, but she really is doing great. She is 18 months old and talking, singing, counting, dancing, coloring, sharing and behaving quite well. Almost equally important is how happy she is. She is happy when we drop her off and happy when we pick her up. Our fears are set at ease knowing while we work our child is in a safe place of love and care. Any questions or concerns we have are professionally addressed by the staff. Shes not treated as just another child they have to take care of. They know her and her personality. Thats the way they treat all of the kids at Noahs Ark. With much appreciation of the daily care our child receives. Daniel and Jessica Stanley, HosfordPanthers, black bears should be added to FWC mapping programTo the editor, I am fascinated by the fox squirrel mapping program being conducted by FWC Biologist Courtney Hooker. Anyone sighting a fox squirrel can go online and record the sighting on FWCs Google map. So far 600 sightings have been reported. This technology could also be applied to panthers and black bears. This would be an economical way to determine the number of black bears, which is highly disputed, along with their location. Sincerely, Bill Lett, Havana *The article Bill Lett is referring to ran in the Oct. 5 issue of The Journal and can also be found online at CLJNnews.com. SPEAK UP! WITH A LETTER TO THE EDITORWrite: The Calhoun-Liberty Journal P.O. Box 536, Bristol 32321 EMAIL: thejournal@fairpoint.netFamily appreciates the efforts of the staff at Hosford daycare center

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OCT OBER 12, 2011 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 7 Isaias Orama and Betty Orama of Hosford and Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Ransom of Orange Park are proud to announce the engagement and upcoming wedding of their children, Rebekah Ruth Orama and David Eugene Ransom. Their marriage will be on Oct. 21 at the Latter Day Saints Orlando Temple. A ring ceremony with the reception to follow will be held in their honor on Saturday, Oct. 22 at the Quincy Garden Club. The couple will reside in Tallahassee. wedding 17932 Main Street N, Suite 5 PHONE (850) 674-9191 We offer Manicures and Pedicures with Shellac at... JACK EDWARD HIATTLee and June Hiatt of Tallahassee are proud to announce the birth of their son, Jack Edward Hiatt, born on Aug. 15, 2011 at home. He weighed 6 lbs., 10 ozs. and measured 20 inches long. Maternal grandparents are Doug and Janie Pelt of Clarksville and Sue Lee of Michigan. Paternal grandparents are Lyle and Vanda Ragans of Tallahassee. Great-grandparents are the late Robert Hiatt and Gloria Hiatt of Tallahassee and the late Eldora Pelt Barber of Bristol. Jack was welcomed home by his big sister Zoe and big brother Liam, family and friends. LIAM EVERETT HIATTLiam Everett Hiatt celebrated his third birthday Aug. 14. He is the son of Lee and June Hiatt of Tallahassee. His maternal grandparents are Doug and Janie Pelt of Clarksville and Sue Lee of Michigan. His paternal grandparents are Lyle and Vanda Ragans of Tallahassee. His greatgrandparents are the late Robert Hiatt and Gloria Hiatt of Tallahassee and the late Eldora Pelt Barber of Bristol. Liam enjoys playing with big sister Zoe and baby brother Jack, coloring and playing outside.NATHAN MARTINNathan Martin will celebrate his fifth birthday on Oct. 14. He is the son of Carrie Martin and Matt Martin, both of Blountstown. His grandparents are Michelle Yeomans, John Adams and Charlene Martin, all of Blountstown and Mike Yeomans of Tacoa, GA. His great-grandparents are Shirley Owens and Ken Owens, both of Tallahassee and C.B. Barbee of Blountstown. Nathan enjoys going to school. He loves dinosaurs and anything that has to do with outside. He also loves his little sister, Hazel, very much! T ANNER LANIER LYONSTanner Lanier Lyons celebrated his first birthday on Oct. 10. He is the son of Jonathan and Julie Lyons of Bristol. His grandparents are Jack and Cathy Revell of Bristol and Tommy and Marcia Lyons of Springfield, TN. His great-grandparents are Horace and Joyce Cushing of Tallahassee, Nelle Brock of TN and Mary Lou Lyons of Hixson, TN. His great-greatgreat-grandmother is Annie Stark eating snacks at the counter with nana and papa, riding his car outside and playing with his cousins. Tanner will celebrate with a Mickey Mouse party as soon as his daddy, Jonathan, returns home from Afghanistan at the end of the month. DRAVIN & CRISTIAN HODGEDravin Hodge celebrated his 14th birthday on Aug. 8 and Cristian Hodge celebrated his seventh birthday on Sept. 17. They are the sons of Robert and Betty Hodge of Blountstown. Dravin and Cristian both enjoy sports, music, dancing and swimming. CAILIN THOMASCailin Thomas celebrated her 14th birthday on Sept. 8. She is the sister of Colton and the daughter of Jamie and Nikki Thomas of Hosford. Her grandparents are Butch and Delores Tharpe, Karen Sykes of Hosford and the late James Thomas of Ft. Myers. Her great-grandparents are Jackelene and the late Rhoden Pullam, Mildred and the late Olin Tharpe and Betty Henthorn, all of Hosford, and the late Woody and Mary Thomas of Ft. Myers. Cailin enjoys hunting and fishing with her dad, playing volleyball, spending time with her new little cousin Waylon Tharpe, and hanging out with her Sista Jimmy, Sarah Shierling. She got her footer! Orama, Ransom to marry Oct. 21 in Orlando birthdays BIRTHAntique T ractor Pull to be held at W iregrass Heritage Festival On Saturday, Oct. 22, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Landmark Park will celebrate the agricultural heritage of the Wiregrass with the annual Wiregrass Heritage Festival. The annual antique tractor pull will be held, with entries limited to pre-1964 tractors. Competitive pullers with tractors as close to their original appearance as possible will enter in different weight classes. Exhibitors from across the Southeast will display their restored antique tractors, engines and farm equipment. Park staff and volunteers will harvest peanuts using mules and vintage farm equipment. Cane grinding and syrup making will be featured activities on the Wiregrass Farmstead. Syrup, still warm from the kettle, will be on sale at the event. Other activities will include blacksmithing, woodworking and more. Volunteers will also demonstrate spinning, weaving, cooking on a wood stove and open hearth, quilting, soap making and traditional household chores. A juried quilt show will hang in the Stokes Activity Barn. Concessions will be available and musical performances will take place throughout the day in the Gazebo. The Shelley General Store and Martin Drugstore will be open, selling ice cream, candy and old country items. Admission to the Wiregrass Heritage Festival is $8 for adults, $6 for senior citizens and active military, $4 for kids, and free for members and children 3 and under. Sponsored by the National Peanut Festival, WDHN and Star 100.5FM. Landmark Park is a 135-acre historical and natural science park located on U.S. Highway 431 North in Dothan, Ala. For more information, contact the park at (334) 794-3452.

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Page 8 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL OCT OBER 12, 2011 COMMENTARY Late Night LaughsA RECAP OF RECENT OBSER V ATIONS BY LATE NIGHT TV HOSTS. GOP is playing musical chairsWASHINGTON The GOPs game of musical chairs continues, but unlike the childrens game where the person without a seat is out, the last candidate standing will be the winner. New Jersey Governor Chris Christie was the latest player. He walked around the chairs, and when the music stopped, he walked away. At least he didnt string the media along the way Donald Trump did, or the way Sarah Palin did for so long, treating a potential presidential run like an audition for a reality show. Christie took a hardheaded look at the mechanics of getting into the race at this late date, and concluded he wasnt ready to take on the challenge despite the clamor for his candidacy. The track record for late entering dream candidaout for the Democrats in 2004; Tennessee Senator Fred Thompson did the same for the Republicans 2008. We have to go back to 1940 when Wendell Willkie won the Republican nomination on the sixth ballot. Willkie Clubs had sprung up around the country, and the charismatic businessman surprised everyone with the strength he was able to muster at the Convention. Republicans have always liked the idea of a businessman as their standard bearer rather than a politician, and Herman Cains candidacy got a boost with his surprise win of the Flor ida straw poll last month. Cains 9-9-9 economic proposals to dramatically cut taxes on investment and personal income taxes goes farther than any of the other candidates, and deming honed perhaps when he headed Godfathers Pizza. He is still standing. Christie recognized the pitfalls ahead for a candidate who is not prepared for the scrutiny of a national campaign. Texas Governor Rick Perry is exhibit A for what can go wrong, and while Perry remains a viable candidate, his path to the nomination is far more challenging than he and his supporters could have announced. Still standing, but on his knees. Former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney is the big winner in the wake of Christies decision, and Romney would have come out ahead even if Christie had decided to run. Romney has spent the last four years preparing for this race. He studied what went wrong in his 2008 run, and is measurably better in every way, from his debating skills to handling the stump. If Christie had jumped into the primaries, Romney would have been there waiting to trip up the thinskinned New Jersey governor, provoking him into a display of temper with charges of cronyism. Christie warding his friends and bullying his enemies. Now Romney will be courting Christie for his endorsement, and hes likely to get it sooner rather than later. Romney is the GOPs best bet to defeat President Obama, and the more Christie does to help Romney secure the nomination the more he will nail down his own prospects for getting a prime time speaking slot at the GOP convention in Tampa. Christie is thinking about 2016 or 2020, and a star turn at the Convention could launch his future candidacy in the same way Barack Obamas One America speech vaulted him into the presidential sweepstakes. Meanwhile, Republicans are going to have to settle down and realize there are no more knights in shining armor waiting to rescue them from the malaise they feel about Romney, or their disappointment in Perry. By bowing out of the race, Christie signaled the end of the anybody-but-Romney movement. There is an old saying that Republicans fall in line; Democrats fall in love. The GOP just got stood up again, and now the party faithful will do what they always do love the one theyre with. Romney is standing tall.Unemployment is still at 9.1 percent. Well, 9.2 percent if you count Hank Williams, Jr. JAY LENOYouTube has launched a politics channel so Bachmann. a carbon copy of Obama. Yes, that has always China is now expected to surpass Japan as the 2nd richest country in the world. They could become the richest, but thats only if we pay them happen. JAY LENO day, Sarah Palin also announced that she would ment. would be taxed at 9 percent. Now, Rick Santorum says he has a better tax plan called 0-0-0. Oh, JAY LENO who thinks Obama is like Hitler, who will be our JAY LENORick Perry assured Hank Williams that he has turn out to be his. JAY LENOSarah Palin wont run for president. Who better to lead us out of the troubles of the world than a WASHIN GTONMERRY-GO-ROUNDby Douglas Cohn and Eleanor Clift

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OCT OBER 12, 2011 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 9 BPD loses phone, internet for an hour after car hits poleby Teresa Eubanks Journal EditorA woman suffered a fractured arm and totaled her car after driving into a city utility pole across from the Blountstown Police Department (BPD) Tuesday afternoon. The accident is being investigated as a possible DUI, according to BPD Cpl. Patrick Crawford, who said it appeared that the driver, Connie Carter, 32, of Defuniak Springs, may have been under she fell asleep before losing control of her car. The crash knocked out the phone and internet access at the police department for about an hour. Crawford said Carter was southbound around 4:15 p.m. when she ran onto a curb at the corner of North Pear and Clark Street. The 1999 Toyota Camry slammed into the utility pole and knocked it over, causing it to land in such a way that it blocked the car from Carter was taken to Calhoun-Liberty Hospital and treated before being transferred to Tallahassee Memorial Hospital for further medical evaluation. She was charged with reckless driving and property damage. Other charges are pending.RIGHT: The Blountstown Police Department is shown in the background of the crash site at North Pear and Clark Street.by Teresa Eubanks, Journal Editor DANIEL WILLIAMS PHOT OS

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Page 10 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL OCT OBER 12, 2011Covenant Hospice to honor chaplains by celebrating Pastoral Care WeekTALLAHASSEE Covenant Hospice will honor the contributions of its dedicated chaplains during Pastoral Care Week, October 23 29. Each day pastoral caregivers are invited into the life experiences of women, men, children, and organizations. Faith can be tested and questions arise about the meaning of suffering and pain. Pastoral caregivers bring many gifts to the process of healing and wholeness. They are trained to help individuals draw on their own faith traditions and teachings for comfort and guidance as they walk through dark valleys. In 2010, Covenant Hospice chaplains made over 15,800 calls and visits to patients facing life-limiting illnesses and their families, and were asked to ofIn honor of National Pastoral Care Week, Covenant Hospice will be holding various Faith Gathering events for local clergy to help them walk beside congregation members and loved ones when they face end-of-life issues. Covenant Hospice staff members will share some of their experiences and will provide answers to tough questions. For more information, contact your local Covenant Hospice enanthospice.org. Care Week is sponsored by the Coalition on Ministry in Specialized Settings Network (COMISS) a national organization of pastoral care providers, pastoral care professionals, and faith group endorsers. Now in its 25th year, the week-long observance promotes spiritual values as a part of the healing process and invites us to celebrate the work of caregivers in such settings as hospitals, hospices and nursing homes. Calhoun Liberty HOSPITAL20370 NE Burns Ave., Blountstown Telephone (850) 674-5411Calhoun Liberty Hospital is proud to announce the opening of the.... Calhoun Liberty Primary Care Clinic November 1st New patient applications can be picked up at the front desk of the hospital. ApalacheeT heR estaurant Note of ThanksEmily and Wyatt Calam want to thank all of the students who came to their combined eighth and ninth brought a book for donation. This past Saturday, the children donated a total of 23 new books to the Panhandle Public L ibrary Cooperative S ystem, Blountstown library, including some really neat pop-up books and several books in the Junie B. Jones series. Thanks also goes to Gail Trickey of Wind Drinker Arabians who provided Jera and Fred for all the children to ride at the party. See you all next year! Emily and Wyatt CalamCovenant Hospice, Marianna Fire Dept. to host 5K Run/WalkMARIANNA In an effort to raise awareness during National Hospice and Palliative Care Month, Covenant Hospice and the Marianna Fire Department will be partnering together again this year for the Covenant Hospice and Firemans Ladder Scatter 5K Run/Walk at 9 a.m. on Saturday, Nov. 5 located at the E in Marianna. There is a $15 registration fee for the 5k run/walk in advance and a $10 student registration fee. Registration fee guarantees shirt, race packet and barbecue lunch from George Gay and Marianna Fire Department for runners registered before Nov. 1. Additional barbeque lunches will be available for purchase during the event for $5 each. Participants can sign up for the event at the Marianna Covenant Hospice branch in advance or register on race day beginning at 7:30 a.m. Fees will increase $5 for registrations on the day of the event. Businesses that have 5 or more participants registered before Oct. 19 will get a free logo on the back of the t-shirt. A wards will be given to overall top three male and female in all age groups and overall male and feCovenant Hospice. dedicated to providing comprehensive, compassionate services to patients and loved ones during times of life-limiting illnesses. For additional information please contact Merian Milton at merian.milton@covenanthospice.org or (850)

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OCT OBER 12, 2011 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 11 ASK THEO L D F A R M E R SA L M A N A C Heating & Air Conditioning FL LIC. # CMC1249570 (850) 674-4777Whaley Whaley Altha Store Phone (850) 762-3161 Blountstown Branch Phone (850) 673-8102 Marianna Branch Phone (850) 482-2416Altha Farmers Co-op, Inc. PETS AND THEIR PEOPLE IS SPONSORED BYWeve got the feed you need to keep your animals happy and healthy!CATTLE HORSES DOGS CATS BIRDS and more.AND THEIRPETS PEOPLEWeve had trou ble with nails coming loose in our old horsehair-plaster walls, where pictures have been hung and rehung over the years. Any solution, short of a new plastering job? W. G., Bennington, Vt. If its horsehair plaster, then well assume that it has wooden lathwork behind it, so that theres something for those nails to bite into. If this is the case, a slightly longer nail might help, and you can repair the old plaster around the nail hole with a dab of fresh spackle or plaster of Paris. If theres none handy, you can also do a good job with a bit of cotton wadding saturated in a good, thick glue. Wrap the saturated wadding around the nail as tightly as possible, then reinsert the nail and tap it into the lath with a hammer, taking care not to crack more plaster away. Wipe the surface clean with a damp rag and let the glue dry thoroughly before applying any weight to the nail. Any bits of loose plaster can also be touched up with the glue. Repaint, if needed. If the nail does not bite into wood, beyond the plaster, it will not ulti mately bear much weight, regardless of how good a glue job you do. In this case, you might look into acquiring a special drywall nail or screw mount, which has a second part, usually made of plastic, that expands and fans out behind the plaster to create a stronger hold. Ask your local hardware store to guide you.Im searching for the perfect apple crisp recipe. Any suggestions? A. C., Spokane, Wash. Some chefs say that its in the topping, some say that its in the apples. And what may be your perfect crisp might be another persons disappointment. Its a matter of personal taste. Even the name of these fruit desserts comes into question. Are you looking for a true apple crisp, or could it be an apple pan dowdy, a grunt or cobbler, a buckle or slump? Some are more like puddings; some use biscuits instead of crumb topping; others are served with pouring cream, whipping cream, or ice cream. In any case, start with a good cooking apple. Some modern recipes specify Granny Smith apples, because they are sour, and hold their shape well after baking. Paula Reds and McIntoshes, common apples (especially earlier in the season), tend to get mushy before the crisp topping is done. Macouns, Cortlands, Braeburns and Fujis are all good candidates to consider for baking. Crisp toppings are often too sweet, as a result of combining too much sugar with an alreadysweet apple. Common recipes call for a cup of sugar (usually white, although brown is sometimes used) with a cup of of cinnamon, a teaspoon of salt, and a stick of butter. That works well with a Granny Smith or a similarly tart apple, but if youve substituted the common Paula Red or McIntosh, youre apt to have too much sweetness for the average palate. One after-the-fact remedy is to serve the dessert with a lemon sorbet instead of vanilla ice cream, but purists will disagree. To be safe, taste your not tart, try cutting the sugar to 1/2 or 2/3 of a cup. The other big variable in crisp toppings is whether to add oatmeal or granola for added crunch. The above proportions can be used in addition to 2/3 of a cup of rolled oats, or with the same amount of almost any health food store granola that you like. Dont try using the boxed grocery store granolas, because theyre much too sweet and youll go overboard with the sugar, again. Good luck! Angel Brake, 8, and her kittens Fiona and Tiger love to play together. The kittens chase Angel through the yard and then she will chase them. The fun ends with Angel laying in the grass on her back with both kittens sound asleep on her stomach. Angel has eight kittens, but it seems like every week a new one comes along. She asked her mom if they could get a two story house so they could have room for all her orphaned cats. Her mothers reply: Maybe one day we can. Angel is the daughter of Patty Brake and the late Larry Brake of Hosford. She is a student at Hosford School. Angel, Fiona & T iger DOTHANOn Saturday, Oct. 22, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Landmark Park will celebrate our agricultural heritage with the annual Wiregrass Heritage Festival. One of the featured activities on the Wiregrass Farmstead will be the annual grinding of the sugar cane for syrup making. Few farms in the Wiregrass at the turn of the century were without sugar cane. It was grown to supply syrup and crude brown sugar for sweetening. The leaves were a secondary source of feed for livestock. Processing the cane was an occasion for celebration in many rural areas. Demonstrators at Wiregrass Heritage Festival will cut the sugar cane and bring it to the mule-drawn cane mill. The cane will then be crushed and the juice cooked down to syrup in an 80-gallon kettle. Syrup, still warm from the kettle, will be on sale at the event. Exhibitors from across the Southeast will display restored antique tractors, engines and farm equipment. The annual antique tractor pull for pre-1964 tractors will also be. Park staff and volunteers will har vest peanuts using mules and vintage farm equipment. Other activities will include blacksmithing, basket making, corn shelling, woodworking and more. A quilt show of over 100 quilts will hang in the Stokes Activity Barn. Volunteers will also demonstrate spinning, weaving, cooking on a wood stove and open hearth, quilting, soap making and other traditional household chores. Musical performances will take place throughout the day in the Gazebo. The Shelley General Store and Martin Drugstore will be open, selling ice cream, candy and old country items. Concessions will be available. Admission to the Wiregrass Heritage Festival is $8 for adults, $6 for senior citizens and active military, $4 for kids, and free for members and children 3 and under. The festival is sponsored by the National Peanut Festival, WDHN and Star 100.5FM. Landmark Park is a 135-acre historical and natural science park located on U.S. Highway 431 North in Dothan, AL. For more information, contact the park at (334) 794-3452.Syrup making will be the featured event during the Wiregrass Heritage Festival

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Page 12 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL OCT OBER 12, 2011by Michael DeVuyst, contributing writerSNEADS-Blountstowns defense continues its hot streak shutting out the Sneads Pirates last Friday night 14-0. The Tigers defense held Sneads to 9 yards of toSneads only reached the Tigers side of the 50 twice. One possession was stopped on downs and the other by an interception by Corin Peterson late in the fourth quarter. The Tiger offense found pay dirt on their second drive of the night. Hunter Jor dan converted a 4th and goal pass Corin Peterson knocked in the at the end of an 11 play drive that covered 45 6:56. Sneads coughed the ball up on their next possession. and Patrick Pitts repoint of the night with his extra point kick with 11:08 14-0. Leading rusher for the Tigers was Javakiel Patrick Pitts lead the defensive charge with nine tackles. LEFT: Three Tigers tackle the Sneads quarterback. RIGHT: A Blountstown Tiger jumps in an attempt to knock down a Pirate throw.Blountstowns defense shuts out Sneads 14-0 T ONY SHOEMAKE PHOT OSTiger Javakiel Brigham (#28) moves quickly to avoid getting caught ABOVE: Tigers and Pirates all dive for the ball with Blountstowns Chaz Fain (#33) ABOVE: A Blountstown Tiger grabs hold and gets taken for Patrick Pitts (#53) pats Tiger Bobby Andrews (#1) on the head BHS FOOTBALL

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by Richard Williams, Journal sports writerThe Liberty County Bulldogs outscored West Gadsden 26-17 to survive a close homecoming game that wasnt decided until the last few minutes of the contest. Daniel Deason scored a touchdown and a two-point conversion that moved Liberty ahead by nine points to secure the win. night when he picked up a bouncing onside kick and raced down the sideline for the score. Deasons score came immediately after visiting West Gadsden scored on a long half-back pass to take a 7-0 lead. Liberty missed the game to put Liberty up 12-7. The Bulldogs came up short on their two-point conversion attempt. Libertys defense gave up another big play to help the score to 12-10 in favor of LCHS. The Bulldogs responded to the West Gadsden points with another touchbut the ball was misplayed by LCHS and West Gadsden recovered the fumbled punt to take over deep in LibPanthers running back appeared cut off behind the line of Liberty. The Bulldogs got a lot of pressure up the middle on the kick and blocked the attempt. From there both teams LCHS fumble recovered for a touchback by West Gadsden. Liberty responded to the fumble with an intercep tion by Deason. Liberty forced a West Gadsden turnover deep in Panther territory to set up Dea sons late game scores that sealed the victory. With the win Liberty moved to 5-1 for the year and 2-0 in the district. West Gadsden fell to 1-4 overall and 0-1 in the district. LCHS Head Coach Grant Grantham said Deason had a very solid game against West Gadsden and added he also thought that Eduardo Rosas had great game on the offensive line. Eduardo (Rosas) may have had his best game of the The Bulldogs travel to play Bozeman Oct. 14 in Bay County. Bozeman comes in with a 2-3 record overall but 21-0 win over Port St. Joe. LCHS Head Coach Grant Grantham said the Bucks are the most physical team the Bulldogs have faced to this point with a lot of athletes that have both speed and power. They will get after you and if we arent ready to come OCT OBER 12, 2011 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 13 LCHS FOOTBALL Liberty Bulldogs outscore West Gadsden Panthers 26-17ABOVE: Bulldog Alex Marlowe (#4) tries to avoid a tackle by a West Gadsden player. LEFT: Liberty Bulldog defense players Toren Guthrie (#17) and Chris Dilworth (#1) move in on the West Gadsden player running the ball. The Bulldogs showed great defensive action, shutting down West Gadsden during the second half of the game. ABOVE: Bulldog Terryal Jenkins (#4) tries to avoid the Panther as he carries the ball. RIGHT: Libertys Chase Taylor (#53) leads the way for Alex Marlowe (#5) to move the and third touchdown of the evening. ABOVE: Bulldogs Brenton Bailey (#16) and Trey Johnson (#61) move in on a lone Panther. LEFT: Bulldog Alex Marlowe (#5) runs the ball for a touchdown. DANIEL WILLIAMS PHOT OS

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Page 14 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL OCT OBER 12, 2011SCHOOL LUNCH MENU Oct. 12-18, 2011 Bristol Dental Clinic Laban Bontrager, DMD, Monica Bontrager, DMDPea Ridge Rd in Bristol, Phone (850) 643-5417MENUS SPONSORED BY: Bristol Dental Clinic LIBERTY WednesdayBREAKFAST: Sausage & gravy biscuit, hash browns, fresh apple. LUNCH: Turkey taco with romaine lettuce & tomato or BBQ pork on whole wheat bun, mexicorn.ThursdayBREAKFAST: French toast sticks and ham. LUNCH: Baked spaghetti with cheese or buffalo chicken wrap, tossed romaine salad with low fat dressing.FridayBREAKFAST: Grilled cheese on whole wheat bread and hash brown. LUNCH: Crispy chicken on a whole wheat bun or ham chef salad, green beans, apricots.MondayBREAKFAST: Breakfast burrito and hash browns. LUNCH: Cheeseburger on a whole wheat bun or chicken salad wrap, tater tots, lettuce & tomato.T uesday ham and orange slices. LUNCH: BBQ chicken with whole wheat roll or grilled cheese, baked beans.*All breakfasts include a choice of assorted cereal with buttered toast whole wheat and juice CA L HOUN WednesdayBREAKFAST: Scrambled eggs with grits and sweet LUNCH: Beef ravioli with meat sauce, garden peas, bread sticks and apple crisp.ThursdayBREAKFAST: Egg and cheese wrap and potato tots.LUNCH: Sliced turkey with gravy, buttered rice, whole kernel corn, whole wheat roll and diced pears.FridayBREAKFAST: French toast sticks with syrup and linked sausage.LUNCH: Stuff crust pizza, garden salad, fresh fruit and home baked cookie.MondayFall BreakBe Safe!T uesdayBREAKFAST: Scrambled eggs with cheese grits.LUNCH: Beef-a-roni, green beans, mixed fruit and whole wheat roll.*All breakfasts include a choice of assorted cereal with buttered toast and juice Liberty County High School students to host BRISTO L S tudents from Liberty County will be joining thousands of other youth on athletic month of October to share their Christian faith during the sixth annual national Fields of Faith event. This rapidly-growing, inter denominational outreach event will be held at more than 475 locations throughout the nation on various nights during this month. While many Christian rallies are anchored to an entertainer or professional speaker that creates a spectator event, Fields of Faith is structured as a student-to-student ministry movement. Peers invite their own classmates and teammates to meet on their students share their testimonies, challenge them to read the Bible and to come to faith in Jesus Christ. This will be the second Fields of Faith event for students from Hosford T olar and Liberty County High School. Last year, approximately 200 students and supporters attended at the high school football The national growth of Fields of Faith has been remarkable. Since the beginning of Fields of Faith in 2004, over half a million students have joined in the movement. In 2010 alone, more than 150,000 across 40 states to participate in the event. Its not just those numbers that Fields of Faith. Its the real-life impact that these gatherings are having on young people. Last years series of events saw 3,568 students to follow Jesus Christ, 5,290 recommitted their life to Christ and 12,786 committed to reading the Bible daily. The impact of Fields of Faith has been incredible in just these past president and former veteran NFL coach. Its all about young people in these communities coming together on their schools athletic to go back to the fundamentals of reading Gods Word and coming to faith in Jesus Christ. The impetus for Fields of Faith staff person, who conceived the idea from an Old T estament reference in 2 Chronicles 34 after searching how to help todays generation of students face spiritual battles and temptations. In the scripture, King Josiah, an to Fields of Faith attendees today, gathered his people and challenged they changed their culture. dream came true when 6,000 students gathered on school athletic the beginning of what has become related gathering of students in a single day. Fields of Faith challenges this generation to be committed to reading the Bible and living a trans formed life for Jesus Christ, said Martin. Its students challenging students, peers challenging peers and thats the heart and soul of Fields of Faith. We are seeing entire communities changed because of Fields of Faith. While Fields of Faith has its roots is designed to include multiple cal leadership team will determine the program of each Fields of Faith event. The event will be held at the Oct. 19, at 7 p.m. More information about Fields of Faith is available at FieldsofFaith.com. T o learn more about the event in Liberty County, contact R ob Wheetley at (334)-303-4029 or Beckie Black at (850) 556-4270. LCHS Bulldog BeatLCHS Football NewsThe Liberty County High School Var man High School this Friday for their homecoming! ET Come out and support the Dawgs.LCHS Volleyball NewsThe Liberty County High School var sity volleyball will be facing our rival, Blountstown High School, on Oct. 15 at 7 p.m. ET in Blountstown. Come out and cheer on the volleyball team as they face the Lady T igers! assessment that measures student and 10. Beginning in 2010, each essay was scored by one rater using a rubric. T he scoring rubrics and sample writings are available on years, two raters were used and the scores were averaged. Prior to 2010, a student could have received a half-point score, such as 4.5; whereas since 2010, no half-point scores are possible. each student within the same grade level was required to write an essay using the same mode of writing (narrative, expository or persuasive). tant to the schools and the district, it is not the only measure used to determine if a student has the skills needed to express himself/herself in a written format. require writing as a measure of success in the class. Each nine weeks the students in grades K-12 participate in the Liberty Writes. This assessment follows the same and helps students and teachers determine areas of strength and areas for improvement before the Writing is a process and cannot be perfected in a single 45 minute writing sample. Because writing is a process and each draft of the student writing becomes more a parent, to know something about this process so you can help your students understand and develop good writing processes. Ms. T rikia White, an English teacher at Liberty County High, has developed this template to assist Ms. White says Ive learned that students struggle the most with the basic structure of writing an essay. When given time to think and plan, for students; however, the organigreat writers to fail on writing assignments. Ms. Miranda Ellis, a 4th grade teacher at Hosford S chool, also helps her students through the writing process. She states, We take a piece of writing through the entire process and then we have a publishing party. T he students get to read their writing pieces and give each other constructive feedback. It develops ownership of their writing. Parents also have an online resource available to all 4th, 8th and 10th grade students in Liberty writing pieces on the system can be accessed from anywhere through the internet. Students receive immediate feedback on the work and can make unlimited submissions. There is a MyT utor aspect that will walk them through easy revisions to bring up their score. Richter, 4th grade teacher at T olar School, practice and modeling are essential to building strong writing skills. Students need to see good writing samples and practice what they see. Reading a variety of lit erature will show students different writing styles and having students write about various daily events, section of their text will provide the practice students need.Liberty Writes used as measure of assessment in preparation for important FCAT Writing testThe Liberty County High School Varsity cheerleaders participated in their competing in more competitions in the

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OCT OBER 12, 2011 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 15 October Family Breakfast B.E.S. hosted its monthly Family Breakfast Friday, October 7. Parents, grandparents and students were served a delicious breakfast of eggs, grits, ham and biscuits. We had a huge crowd! Thanks everyone for coming and eating breakfast with us! Doughnuts for Dads On Friday, October 14 from 7-8 a.m., Blountstown Elementary School will be hosting their annual Doughnuts for Dads. This tasty event will be held for ONLY 4th and 5th grade Dads. Please feel free, if your child is in 4th or 5th grade, to come join us. Come hungry and be ready to eat a doughnut with us! Fall Holiday There will be no school on Monday, October 17. It is a Fall Holiday for Calhoun County Schools. Picture Retakes Picture re-takes will be held on Tues., Oct. 18. The Altha FFA Chapters recently par ticipated in the District Forestry Career Development Event. The middle school team brought home top honors. Team members included Johnny Aaron, Justin Moore and Cody Finuff. Each of the students also brought home several individual ribbons. Johnny Aaron Timber Estimation. Justin Moore placed second in Timber Estimation and General in General Knowledge Exam and third in Map Interpretation. The Senior team placed 4th overall a great feat for a team with only one returning member. Team members included Rena OBryan, Porter Smith, Kyler Dew, Corey and Claire Price. Porter Smith placed in two categories individually-second in General Knowledge. Cats' Cuisine set for Oct. 20The Institute of Culinary Arts invites the public to Cats' Cuisine on Thursday, Oct. 20. The menu for this Cats' Cuisine is Cheddar Baked Chicken, Mashed Potatoes, Cobb Salad, Cheddar Biscuits, and Pecan Pie. All of our meals are served with your choice of Sweet or Unsweet Tea. Seating times are 11:40 a.m. and 12:30 p.m. Reservations can be made by calling the school. Please reserve by Tuesday, October 18. The price is $6. The Altha and Blountstown Cross Country teams hosted an invitational at Sam Adkins Park last Wednesday, Oct. 5. The Varsity teams participating ran a 5k and the Jr. High teams ran two miles. Coach Sewell was pleased with the of the course and the weather. The Altha Varsity boys placed second Awards were given to the top ten individual runners for the varsity and the top The results from the meet are as follows: For Varsity boys, Devin Ferrell17:54 (2nd overall) (Personal Record), Kyler Dew22:03, Nick Young22:49, Porter Smith23:00, Wayne Boozer23:35, Brendan Dew24:02, Jamie Coleman24:02 and Corey Barton25:09. For Varsity girls, Mary Sewell23:12 (2nd overall), Kimi Wiltse25:25 (5th overall), Katie Cox25:49 (7th overall), Carly Schwartz25:56 (8th overall), Emily Sewell29:54 and Madison Rowe31:38. For Jr. High boys, Hardy Mitchell15:31 (4th overall), Jaylon Hall15:49 (5th overall), Johnny Sewell16:31, Max Scott19:12 and Coy Cook21:00. 20:18 (4th overall) and Chasity Webb21:41. We would like to say thank you to some people who helped make the invitational possible: Piggly Wiggly for donating water, the Wildcat Den owners, Faye Morris and Dawn Kent for donating fruit for the runners, all of the parents and volunteers who helped with the meet and the Police Department and Police Chief, Rodney Smith for donating the cones and driving the pace car. The Altha Cross Country teams will compete again this Saturday in the Mosley Dolphin Dash, at the Lynn Haven Recreation Center off of Hwy 390, with the Varsity girls starting at 9 a.m. B.E.S. fourth graders loaded the buses and headed to Quincy to the University of Floridas annual Agriculture Day on Friday, Sept. 30. Students visited stations where they learned about: corn, pumpkins, bees, peanuts, pollination, cotton and many other fantastic facts. They also enjoyed going through a corn maze and were served snacks and drinks. What a great day! blountstown elementary schoolBlountstowns 4th grade travels to Ag Day in Quincy blountstown high schoolFBLA an active and worthwhile clubby Calen MasaiHave you been looking for a school club to join? Then check out FBLA at BHS. Future Business Leaders of America is a club that builds character, leadership and employability skills. Students are also taught responsibility, teamwork and dependability. This organization encourages students to focus on careers and helps them to make plans for after high school. The are Mitchell Darnell (President), and Missy Newsome (Parliamentarian). The members attend and compete on the district and state level. They are currently involved with a Yankee Candle sale to help fund their attendance and participation in these events. Mrs. Perdue, the club sponsor teaches a dual enrollment class through Chipola College, that helps to prepare students for various software Britt passed his Microsoft Word 2007 are very pleased to recognize Austins success. If you are interested in joining a very active and worthwhile club, I highly recommend FBLA. Mrs. Perdue presenting Austin Britt with his Altha & Blountstown Cross Country teams host invitational meet Oct. 5 altha wildcats Althas FFA participates in District Forestry Career Development event

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Page 16 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL OCT OBER 12, 2011 CLJNEWS.COMT 17932 Main Street N, Suite 5 PHONE (850) 674-9191 SALE SALE SALE SALE SALE SALE SALE SALE SALE SALE Thursday & FridayOct. 13 & 14Out with the GOLD in with the NEW25%OFFMerle Norman of Blountstown still has some products in the Classic Gold packaging. All Merle Norman products in Classic packaging will be... Merle Norman has a new look and logo Liberty County Judge Ken Hosford had a full courtroom Monday when 78 students gathered to hear him speak about the Constitution of the United States, considered to be one of the greatest statements of human liberty ever written. The seventh-grade classes from Hosford School and Tolar School also received booklets on The Declaration of Independence and the U.S. Constitution from the Calhoun-Liberty Patriots organization from member Jim Pruette. Prior to meeting with the judge, the group took part in a question-answer session with Liberty County Deputy Caryl Marotta on courtroom conduct and bailiff duties. After the presentation on the Constitution, students toured the 911 dispatch room of the Liberty County Jail. CARYL MAROTTA PHOTOSeventh-graders visit Liberty Co. courthouse Sound of Liberty debuts new uniforms at HomecomingThe Liberty County High School band showed off a new look during halftime at Friday nights homecoming in Bristol. Although not brand new, their updated uniforms were found online and within the $5,000 budget they were given by the school board. The ones we had been wearing were from the 1980s, said Band Director Kim Everette. We were running out of uniforms and had trouble matching them up, she said. The uniforms arrived about two weeks ago and were found with the help of Diane Hayes of Big River Sports. She said having newer uniforms was a big boost for the 31-member band, explaining, DANIEL WILLIAMS PHOTO

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OCT OBER 12, 2011 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 17 Minutes from the Sept. 8 Liberty Commission meeting The meeting was called to order by Chairman Jim Johnson. Present at the meeting were Commissioners Kevin Williams, Davis Stoutamire, Albert Butcher, Clerk Robert Hill and Deputy Clerk Charla Kearce. Prayer was led by Aaron Elkins. Pledge of allegiance was led by Lamar Holland. Motion to approve the minutes of the regular meeting held Aug. 4, 2011 was made by Williams, seconded by Stoutamire, and carried. Motion to add the request from Lamar Holland to the agenda. Motion to approve recommendations from Lamar Holland on the Veterans Park was made by Butcher, seconded by Stoutamire, and carried. Executive Director Dorothy Inman Johnson with Capi tal Area Community Action Agency came before the Board to discuss projected budget cuts. Next year Liber ty County will be cut by $36,325. They will have to close #11-17 opposing cuts to Capital Area Community Action Agency was made by Butcher, seconded by Williams and carried. Kristin Brown with Preble-Rish Engineers told the Board that she had the approval for power to the Hosford Park. Motion to approve the Talquin Electric Coopera tive utility easement was made by Williams, seconded by Stoutamire and carried. Ray Gray with C.B.E.C. discussed the county taking the program back over effective Oct. 1, 2011. Motion to approve was made by Butcher, seconded by Williams and carried. Dr. Gene Charbonneau presented the 2011-12 CORE Contract for the Health Department. Motion to approve was made by Stoutamire, seconded by Butcher and carried. Monica Welles presented the application for the Shirley Conroy Grant that is a 90-10 match. Motion to adopt Resolution #11-16 was made by Williams, seconded by Stoutamire and carried. Stephen Ford presented the Mosquito Control Contract contract and budget was approved at a previous meeting. Ford also presented a 911 Information Management System Grant in the amount of $1,250 for him to attend a conference. Also an E911 Rural County Grant in the amount of $34,913 concern ing cell towers. Motion to approve both grants was made by Williams, seconded by Stoutamire and carried. Motion to approve purchase from Essential Manage ment Solutions, LLC for 911 was made by Williams, seconded by Butcher and carried. Ford told the Board that the fall Mosquito Conference he would be attending would come out of the budget. Motion to approve the State Aid to Libraries Grant in the amount of $71,747 was made by Butcher, seconded by Williams and carried. Kevin Williams discussed Seventh Street in Sumatra. Motion to install speed humps on this street was made by Williams, seconded by Butcher and carried. Stoutamire voted no. Motion to appoint Kevin Williams, Albert Butcher and Dexter Barber to serve on the Value Adjustment Board was made by Stoutamire, seconded by Williams and carried. Motion to approve Capital Recovery Systems Collection Agency to handle the garbage bills was made by Stoutamire, seconded by Williams and carried. Motion to pay the bills was made by Butcher, second ed by Williams and carried. Motion to adjourn was made by Butcher, seconded by Williams and carried. Warrant List & Warrant Numbers Operating Fund 31241 Weatherization Fund 4564 Payroll Fund 32034________________________________ Robert Hill, Clerk of Court, Jim Johnson, Chairman The meeting was called to order by Chair man Jim Johnson. Present at the meeting were Commissioners Kevin Williams, Davis Stoutamire, Dexter Barber, Albert Butcher, Attorney Shalene Grover, Clerk Robert Hill and Deputy Clerk Charla Kearce. Motion to advertise Ordinance #11-01 repealing previous adopted Ordinances made by Butcher, seconded by Stoutamire and carried. Motion to advertise Ordinance #11-02 concerning collection services for unpaid garbage and water bills was made by Stoutamire, seconded by Butcher and carried. Clerk Hill requested that these items be added to the agenda. 1. Agreement with NW FL Water Management maintenance agreement on Florida River Island. 2. Road closure for Homecoming parade. 3. Change of time on the Oct. 6 regular meeting. 4. Ordinance #11-02. Attorney Grover will contact Commissioner Williams concerning the statutes on speed limits in the residential areas. The Board said we can post the speed limit signs on Old Burnt Bridge Road after we get approval from the Attorney. Motion to approve N.W. FL Water Management Florida River Island maintenance agreement was made by Stoutamire, seconded by Butcher and carried. Motion to approve Road Closure on Oct. 6 from 1-2:10 p.m. for the Homecom ing Parade in Bristol was made by Butcher, seconded by Barber and carried. Motion to approve changing the Oct. 6 Regular meeting time from 6 p.m. to 4 p.m. was made by Williams, seconded by Barber and carried. Motion to adjourn was made by Williams seconded by Barber and carried. _____________________________ Robert Hill, Clerk of Court Jim Johnson, Chairman The meeting was called to order by Chairman Jim Johnson. Present at the meeting were Commissioners Kevin Williams, Davis Stoutamire, Albert Butcher, Attorney Shalene Grover, Clerk Robert Hill and Deputy Clerk Charla Kearce. Prayer was led by Chairman Jim Johnson. Pledge of allegiance was led by Charla Kearce. Motion to tentatively adopt the millage rate at 10 mills for the 2011-2012 year was made by Butcher, seconded by Stoutamire and carried. Motion to tentatively adopt the 20112012 budget in the amount of $12,422,885 was made by Williams, seconded by Stoutamire and carried. Motion to appoint Joe Shuler to serve on the Value Adjustment Board was made by Stoutamire, seconded by Williams and carried. Motion to remove Albert Butcher from the Value Adjustment Board was made by Stoutamire, seconded by Williams and carried. Motion to adjourn was made by Stoutamire, seconded by Williams and carried. _________________________________ Robert Hill, Clerk of Court Jim Johnson, ChairmanSept. 12 public hearing minutes The Public Hearing was called to order by Chairman Jim Johnson. Present at the meeting were Commissioners Kevin Williams, Davis Stoutamire, Dexter Barber, Albert Butcher, Attorney Shalene Grover, Clerk Robert Hill and Deputy Clerk Charla Kearce. Prayer was led by Clerk Robert Hill. Pledge of allegiance was led by Commissioner Albert Butcher. Motion to approve Resolution #201118 adopting the 2011-12 millage rate at 10 mills was made by Williams, seconded by Butcher and carried. Motion to approve Resolution #2011-19 adopting the 2011-12 budget in the amount of $12,220,66 was made by Barber, seconded by Williams and carried. Motion to approve Resolution #2011-20 adopting the 2010-2011 amended budget in the amount of $17,976,369 was made by Butcher, seconded by Williams and carried. Motion to adjourn was made by Butcher, seconded by Williams and carried. _______________________________ Robert Hill, Clerk of Court Jim Johnson, Chairman Blountstown Health and RehabT elephone (850) 674-4311 Blountstown Health and Rehabilitation Center provides short-term and long-term care in a warm, personal manhealthcare, centered on caregiver compassion, offered in a comfortable home-like setting. Come Home to Rehab Millage rate adopted, budget ITS VERY WISE TO ADVERTISE in the Calhoun-Liberty JOURNAL and . .Email: thejournal@fairpoint.net CLJN ews.COM

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Page 18 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL OCT OBER 12, 2011 GARDENINGDividing pays dividends on perennialsAfter a few years in the garden, some perennial plants grow too big for their own good. When perennial plants become overcrowded they and, in some cases, die in the center. When that happens, it's time to dig them up, divide them, and replant the smaller clumps. In general, it is best to divide perennials during their dormant or "off" season; divide spring bloomers in the fall and fall bloomers in spring. Don't divide perennials. Start three to six inches away from the outside-most stems of the plant and dig straight down about a foot; separating the whole plant from the soil all the way the plant to thrive in its new location. If the plant is too large to easily lift the entire unit from the ground, cut down through the plant taking a wedge of healthy stems and root systems. Do this several times, as needed, keeping the healthiest parts of the plant and discarding the dead middle portion. Work quickly and out of the direct sunlight to protect exposed roots and minimize stress on the plant. This process may seem as though the plant is being butchered, but in fact, this is a renewal and rehabilitaRe-plant one of the new divisions in the center of the space from which you just dug, keeping your original perennial garden intact. Take the other plants and start new sections in your landscape. This is also a great time to rework the soil in your perennial garden. To get your rejuvenated plant off to a great start next spring, add organic amendments such as compost or peat to the bed while you are replanting. After you have re-planted the bed, water and mulch the area appropriately. Some common perennicontrol its rampant growth in the fall or spring. years in the fall or early spring. desired to increase the number of plants. The ideal time with three or more shoots will bloom sooner. reach its best form if not divided too often. They can be divided as needed for additional plants in early spring or early fall. clumping roots are large and brittle so avoid dividing unless it is needed to improve blooming. years to prevent center die-back. Spring is the best time to divide for most grasses since many grasses do not tolerate fall division. They tend to have very an ax or saw to divide. the weakened center portion. center dies out in the spring or fall. For more information, be sure to contact your local by Theresa Friday, Horticulture Extension Agent, Santa Rosa County Located in BristolLAND CLEARING-Private drives and roads -Food plots -Home sites -Small acreageCall E ddie Nobles at (850) 643-5390 or (850) 447-0449 or Chas (850) 447-0849Eddie NoblesLAND CLEARING, EXCA V A TION AND ROOT RAKING FOR: ACCEPTING NEW PA TIENTSLaban Bontrager, DMD12761 NW Pea Ridge Rd., Bristol, FL 32321TELEPHONE 643-5417 www.bristoldentalclinic.com DENTURE LAB ON PREMISESSame-Day Service on R epairs & R elines Bristol Dental ClinicMonica Bontrager, DMD We're your one-stopTIRE SHOP! "Volkswagens to semi's, we handle them all" CITY TIRE CO. MV5496BFGG O O D Y E A RDUNLOP Liberty Post & Barn Pole Inc.We've got the fence posts to meet your needs.Dempsey Barron Road, Bristol (off Hwy. 12 N) Phone (850) 643-5995 We have Openings! Infancy to school age. Kids Kingdom

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OCT OBER 12, 2011 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 19 Two locations to serve youBlountstown and Bristol Adams Funeral Home674-5449 or 643-5410Visit us online: www.adamsfh.com All existing pre-need and at need contracts are now handled by the Bevis family and staff.All operations of the funeral process will be handled on location at 12008 NW State Road 20.CALL 643-3636Todd Wahlquist, Rocky Bevis & Ed PeacockLicensed Funeral Directors & Crematoryevis FuneralHome Bof Bristol of Bristol OBITUARIES T elephone (850) 674-2266 Your hometown funeral home since 1994A Hometown Funeral Director You Can Trust and Depend On!Funeral Services with Dignity, Caring and Professionalism. Marlon PeavyPeavy Funeral Home& CrematoryGEORGE DANIEL BOGGSJACKSONVILLE George Daniel Boggs, 83, of Jacksonville and formerly of Blountstown passed away peacefully surrounded by his family Monday, Oct. 3, 2011 in Jacksonville. He was born January 18, 1928 in Thomasville, GA to the late Homer Boggs of Conneaut, OH and Minnie Boggs Greene of Blountstown. He was a longtime Florida resident. He graduated as Salutatorian from Blountstown High School in 1946, earned a Bachelors degree in Electrical Engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology in 1953 and a Masters in Business Administration from Georgia State University in 1971. He was a member of Phi Kappa Tau, Eta Kappa Nu and Tau Beta Pi, and Sons of the American Revolution. He was a Navy veteran who served after for 36 years for Southern Bell, Bell Labs and AT&T. He was a deacon in several churches and a member of Deermeadows Baptist Church in Jacksonville. He was also a Boy Scout Scoutmaster and proud that all three of his sons were Eagle Scouts. After retirement, he volunteered for 11 years at St. Lukes hospital in Jacksonville. He was known for his warm smile and met the world and all people with a helping hand.He was preceded in death by his brother, Louis Atkins. Survivors include his wife of 58 years, Joyce Bridges Boggs; three sons, David and his wife, Danuta, James and his wife, Monique and Ralph and his wife, Sarah; seven grandchildren, Dan, Scott, Jill, Mitchell, Lucy, Samantha, and Chloe; niece, Nancy Revell and her husband, Terry; sister-in-law, Margie Atkins and niece, Janie Atkins; along with numerous cousins, nephews and nieces. Graveside services were held Saturday, Oct. 8 in Boggs Cemetery in Blountstown with Reverend David Throck11 a.m. (ET), Saturday, Oct. 15 at Deermeadow Baptist Church in Jacksonville. Memorial contributions may be made to his favorite charity, The Salvation Army online at www.salvationar myusa.org. Adams Funeral Home was in charge of the arrangements. Online condolences may be made at adamsfh. com. MAR Y ETHELL HARVELLBLOUNTSTOWN Mary Ethell Harvell, 87, of Blountstown passed away Saturday, Oct. 8, 2011 at her home in Blountstown. She was born on Nov. 13, 1923 in Blountstown and had lived there all of her life. She was a homemaker and attended Rivertown Community Church in Blountstown. She was preceded in death by her husband, Barney Harvell; parents Dessie and Aredell Stone; three sisters, Estelle Hood, Maggie Martin and Viola Rossen. Survivors include one daughter, Sandra Cook and her husband, Tommy of Blountstown; three stepdaughters, Patricia McGee and her husband, Gary of Pensacola and Irma Kindell of Oklahoma City, OK; two grandsons, William Thomas Cook and his wife, Celest of Blountstown and Corey Neal Cook and his wife, Patricia of Clarksville; 19 other grandchildren; Cook, Carleigh Cook, Morgan Welch, Aaron Welch and numerous nieces and nephews. Services were held Tuesday, Oct. 11 at Peavy Funeral Home Chapel with Reverend Michael Morris followed in the Pine Memorial Cemetery in Blountstown. Peavy Funeral Home in Blountstown was in charge of the arrangements.DENNIS CHRIS MCKNIGHTPORT ST. JOE Dennis Chris McKnight, 57, of Port St. Joe passed away Sunday, Oct. 9, 2011 in Wewahitchka. He was born August 26, 1954 in Panama City to the late George Thomas and Iris Percival McKnight. A long time resident of Gulf and Bay County, he was a millwright. Survivors include his brother, Scotty McKnight of in-law, Linda McKnight; nephew, Rusty McKnight and great-nephew, Chase McKnight. A memorial service will be held at 10 a.m. (CT), Saturday, Oct. 15 in the Chapel at Adams Funeral Home in Blountstown. Adams Funeral Home is in charge of the arrangements. Online condolences may be made at adamsfh. comIN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR LIBERTY COUNTY, FLORIDA Case Number 08-106DR IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF: SHANNON BARLOW Petitioner/Former Husband and TERESA BAILEY F/K/A TERESA BARLOW, Former Wife, _________________/ NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to the Final Judgment dated October 6, 2011, entered in Civil Case No. 2008-106DR of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Liberty County, Bristol, Florida, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash ON THE FRONT STEPS of the Liberty County Courthouse, 10818 NW SR 20, Bristol, Florida 32321, at 11 a.m. EST on the 27th day of October, 2011 the following described property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to wit: Section 15-1S-6West, Commence at the Northeast corner of Southeast 1/4 of Section 15, thence South 00 degrees 24 minutes East 377.20, thence West 161, along the North right of way line of John Street to Point of Beginning. Thence West 173.25 along North right of way of said John Street thence North 00 degrees 24 minutes West 188.60, thence East 173.25, thence South 00 degrees 24 minutes East 188.60 to Point of Beginning. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must ter the sale. Dated this 6 day of October, 2011. ROBERT HILL Clerk of the Circuit by: Vanell Summers, DC Deputy Clerk 10-12, 10-19 LEGALS is in search of a FULL TIME Mechanic/ Millwrightwith a minimum of 2 years experience. Drug Free Workplace. Excellent Pay rate will depend on experience.Please send resume to jscoggins@purenergyllc.com or call (850) 379-8341 TELOGIA POWERLLC in T elogia, FL CLJ JOB MKT. CHIPOLA COLLEGE is accepting applications for FOUNDATION ACCOUNTING MANAGERBachelors degree in Accounting, Finance or reinvestment experience, or equivalent combination of education and experience required. DEGREE(S) MUST BE FROM A REGIONALLY ACCREDITED COLLEGE AND/OR UNIVERSITY APPLICATION DEADLINE: OPEN UNTIL FILLED Candidates may be subject to background investigations which may include, but are not limited to criminal history, credit history, drivers license, and/ or previous employment and references.Contact Human Resources at pippenw@chipola.edu or at (850)718-2269 for application details.EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER BECOME A VOLUNTEER FLORIDA GUARDIAN AD LITEM FOUNDATIONPHONE (850) 410-4642 Honor your loved ones by making their memory part of our best efforts to defeat cancer. For more information, contact the American Cancer Society.WHAT BETTER TRIBUTE CAN THERE BE?EAST GADSDEN UNIT P.O. Box 563, Quincy 32353

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Page 20 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL OCT OBER 12, 2011Catch up online at CLJNews.com.Miss a recent Pets & Their People column?Propane heater, large home unit with thermostat and electric fan, like new, $150. Call 643-2255 leave message. 10-12, 10-19 FURNITUREEntertainment center, lighted, TV, stereo set, surround sound speakers, reduce to sell, $500; Dinette oval table with four chairs, $200. Call 643-2658. 10-12, 10-19Redwood coffee table, can also be used as a mini bar, 5 ft. long, very unique, made from wood from Sequoia National Forrest, very rare, water resistant. A bargain at $250 OBO. Call 643-2255 leave message. 10-12, 10-19Coffee and end tables, wrought iron set, excellent condition, $75. Call 272-2552. 10-12, 10-19Glass top coffee table $150 OBO. Call 447-4512. 10-5, 10-12Older round dining table. Oblong dining table with four chairs. Call 379-3965. 10-5, 10-12Three-piece living room set, brown tweed, with two end tables and coffee table, $400. Call 3793965. 10-5, 10-12King size bed frame with mattress. Call 379-3965. 10-5, 10-12Large desk, tan, $80. Single water bed, $45. Sleeper sofa, queen size, multi-colored, $150. Call 674-3264. 10-5, 10-12Dinette table, made in the 70s with a Formica top, in excellent condition, $75. Six high back antique chairs, $20 each or $125 for all. Two end tables in excellent condition, $15. Call 643-8320. 10-5, 10-12King size bed in great condition, frame, mattress pad and sheet set. All for $250. Call 237-2529. 10-5, 10-12Bathroom sink with cabinet, white, $35. Call 237-2529. 10-5, 10-12 TRUCKS2006 Chevrolet Silverado, half ton, single cab, 4.3 V6, 96,600 miles, $7,500; 1996 Jeep Laredo, 162,000 miles, fully loaded, great condition, $3,500. Call 674-3021 or 447-4957. 10-12, 10-191997 Dodge Dakota, V6 motor, 5-speed, needs clutch, $750 OBO. Call (850) 718-6580 or 447-1715. 10-5, 10-122004 Xterra Nissan, white, power locks and windows, running boards, clean, good tires, 110,000 miles, automatic, tinted windows, with racks, runs good, $6,650 OBO/make offer. Call 509-3271.10-5, 11-2 AUTO ACCESSORIESRadiator for 4 cyl. Chrysler like new, used only one month, paid $100 asking $50. Call 762-3264. 10-12, 10-19Commercial ladder rack for full size pickup truck, with wench and strap system to tie down load, $400. Call 573-5255. 10-12, 10-19 MOTORCYCLES, ATVs & W AVERUNNERSPolaris 4-wheeler, 2000 Sportsman 335, clean, like new, only 495 miles and 85 hours. Has camo covered dash gun rack. $3,000 10-5, 10-12 HUNTING & FISHING, $15 each. Call 643-8320. 10-5, 10-12 TOOLS & EQUIPMENTAluminum trailer, 4x6, $600. Call 674-3264. 10-12, 10-19 HOMES & LANDDoublewide mobile home, 66x24, 3 BD, 2 BA in excellent condition, comes with AC central unit and many extras, $20,000 must be moved. Call (850) 5165506. 10-5, 10-12 CAMPERS2005 Four Winds travel trailer, 22 ft., kitchen, bath, queen bed, combo, built in stereo, all appliances, AC, awning, good tires, new tankless hot water heater, no slide out, $6,000. Call 899-9721. 10-12, 10-192006 Layton by Skyline camper trailer, 23 foot, like new, $5,000. Call 762-8589 or 899-8589. 10-5, 10-12Hunting Camp on wheels, 7x9 with no leaks. Needs some work inside, $200. Call (850) 228-5307. 10-5, 10-12 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNALCLASSIFIEDSTo place your ad, call 643-3333 by noon Eastern Time on Saturday. Non-business ads run FREE for 2 weeks. ITEMS FOR SALE26 TV, will need generic remote, $50. Call 643-2658. 10-12, 10-19Cabinet top with oval sink, for bathroom, marble, $20; Three dows, $15 for all. Call 762-3264. 10-12, 10-19Samsung 21 TV, $20. Call 2722552. 10-12, 10-19Bakers rack es, one for mobile home, $375, one for $200. Call 674-3264; Kerosene heater, $130; baby buggy, $40. Call 674-3264. 10-12, 10-1915 Speed bicycle, $60. Call 4471025. 10-12, 10-19SportRider scooter, brand new, battery never been charged. Several TV cabinets, several vanity cabinets with sink. Good selection of clothes, men, women and childrens, shoes, ladies purses, electronic equipment, furniture and appliances. Everyone is invited to shop at the Calhoun-Liberty Ministry Center store. Located on Hwy. 20 E. in Blountstown, 6741818. UFNT wo wigs. Paid $30, asking $12 each. Call 674-3264. 10-5, 10-12Accu check strips, 100, free style, $50. Towing package for a power chair, $25. Call 674-4475. 10-5, 10-12Perfect Sun 26T Wolff Tanning bed, 11 minute timer with 26 bulbs and six turbo face tanning lamps, in excellent condition, $1,500 OBO. Call 445-0828, leave message if no answer. 10-5, 10-12Fireplace, portable, needs burner, $200. Holiday Mickey Mouse musical house, $140. Call 674-3264. 10-5, 10-12Solid wood hope chest, white, in good condition, measures 35x18x19, $20. Call 643-3370.10-5, 10-12 FREEFree: Older refrigerator. Call 3793965. 10-5, 10-12 APPLIANCESGE glass top stove, only used six months. Paid $500, asking $350. Call 643-2658. 10-12, 10-19Heat Maid kerosene heater, portable indoor radiant heat, 10,600 BTU output, bought Dec. 6, 2010. Used only four nights. Sells for $199, will take $60. Call 7623264. 10-12, 10-19T appan gas stove, hardly used, like new, $150. Call 272-4452. 10-12, 10-19 Mexican Restaurant TownhousesBRISTOL FOR RENTBLOUNTSTOWN Phone 643-7740 For Rent in ALTHA762-9555 or 762-8597Very NICE 2 & 3 bedroom trailers. 5 x 10 .....$27 10 x 10 ....$43 10 x 20 ....$70 10 x 25 ....$90M & W SELFSTORAGE RENTAL SCall 573-5255, 762-9555, 762-8807 or 762-8597 7 days a week service UFN Mobile Home for Rent in CalhounCall 674-88882 BD, 2 BA, located six miles north on Hwy. 69 N. NO PETS. Damage & Cleaning deposit, Water, sewer and grass cutting provided.UFN Call 674-3694leave message if after 5 p.m.14x70 2 BD, 2 BA unfurnished mobile home w/deck. Located on 18th Street, Water and Sewer furnished. NO PETS No more than 3 per family. 3.94 Acres For S A LECall 509-8636Cleared & Fenced, Deep well & SepticHwy. 73 N in Clarksville$26,000 Buy, sell and trade in 3 BD, 2 BA double-wide, very clean and landscaped, located off Hwy. 275 N in Altha, water included. NO PETS. Monthly rent$500 plus $300 depositDouble-wide FOR Rent I C C.Call 643-7770 (DAYS) or 674-3570 (NIGHTS) REAL EST A TE Will buy 10 to 1,000 acres, reasonably priced. Immediate closing.Call (850) 544-5441 or (850) 570-0222 WANTED: NO INTEREST PLANS R.E. BrokerLAND SALE 10 ACRE + TRACTSPaved Highway Frontage With Planted Pine T rees From $4,995 per acreWith $600 Down Regular ContractWith $2,500 Down No Interest First YearWith $5,000 Down No Interest First 2 Years Owner Financing No Qualifying For Rent inBRISTOLCall 379-8725 2 BD, 2 BA mobile home NO PETS, Reference Check$450 mth$300 deposit

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OCT OBER 12, 2011 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 21 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNALCLASSIFIEDSTo place your ad, call 643-3333 by noon Eastern Time on Saturday. Non-business ads run FREE for 2 weeks. LOST/FOUNDLOST : two females, half beagle/ half walker, nine months old, chopped off tails. Have name on collars, number on collars are wrong. Please call 643-8487. 10-12, 10-19FOUND: Weimaraner dog in the Bristol area. Call 643-7628. 10-5, 10-12FOUND: Blue Pit, male, brown with white stripe down face, has had ears clipped, well taken care of. Found on Faircloth Road. Call 643-1428. 10-5, 10-12LOST : Female Walker Hound, answers to the name of Butterbean, last seen around Hwy. 333 in Bristol. She has an orange collar. Call 643-3938. 10-5, 10-12 PETS/SUPPLIESKing Ranch mare, registered, 12 years old, free to good home. Call 545-7205. 10-12, 10-19Kitten needs home. Fran is about 12 weeks old and has been hand raised since 2 1/2 weeks old. She and negative for parasites and feline leukemia (Felv). People, dog and cat friendly Very playful and personality. Call (850) 237-2740. 10-5, 10-12T wo treeing Walker & Black n T an dogs, already trained to run deer. Two treeing Walker puppies, 7 months old, need training. Call (850) 510-0593. 10-5, 10-12Jack Russell puppies, 8 weeks each. Call 762-8657. 10-5, 10-12Kittens free to a good home. Located at 9312 NW JJ Meeley Lane in Clarksville. No phone. Come see in person. 10-5, 10-12Rhode Island Red hens, just Call after 12 noon, 762-8393. 10-5, 10-12T wo Quick T ract dog tracking collars 7628. 10-5, 10-12Free puppies to a good home. Mother is a Redbone Hound. They were born on Aug. 22. Very beautiful puppies. Call 762-2470. 10-5, 10-12 WANTEDLarge gun cabinet. Call 3793965. 10-5, 10-12Roommate to share expenses with in Blountstown. Call 4471380. 10-5, 10-12Used pitchfork in good condition, reasonably priced. Call 237-2529. 10-5, 10-12Electric stove and washing machine. Call 674-3264. 10-5, 10-12We buy junk cars and trucks. We will pick them up. Call 6435045 or 447-3819. 3-23 T. 12-28 YARD SALES AL THA Yard sale, Friday and Saturday, Oct. 14-15 and 21-22, from 8 Sheltons Corner off Hwy. 274, antiques, folding chairs and collectables. Phone 762-8471. 10-12, 10-19 Yard sale, Friday and Saturday, Oct. 14-15 from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Located at the Corner Bar and Hwy. 71. Phone 762-8127. BLOUNTST OWN Yard sale, Saturday, Oct. 15 from 7 a.m. to 3 p.m., located at 21215 NE C.R. 69-A, furniture, boys clothing sizes 8-12, womens clothing, lots of other things. Phone 674-5740 or 447-3668. STARSCOPEFAMOUS BIRTHDAYSARIES Mar 21/Apr 20 Theres really no time for procrastination, Aries. If you want to be the early bird getting the worm, then you have to act quickly this week. Buckle down. T AURUS Apr 21/May 21 Taurus, sometimes the inexplicable is just meant to be a mystery. Dont beat yourself up over not having all of the answers. New opportunities arrive Tuesday. GEMINI May 22/Jun 21 Gemini, you cant help but feel giddy over what is to come. Others will soon be caught up in this infectious feeling. Money matters take priority later in the week. CANCER Jun 22/Jul 22 Hold on to your horses, Cancer, because it is going to be a bumpy ride the next few days. When you think everything will smooth over, it starts up all over again. LEO Jul 23/Aug 23 Leo, a moment of inspiration comes when you werent even looking for it. Take the opportunity to do something fun with your ideas rather than focus energy on work. VIRGO Aug 24/Sept 22 Virgo, you are back on track and the feeling is exhilarating. Right now you feel like your life has purpose and youre shooting through goals left and right. Tackle romance next. LIBRA Sept 23/Oct 23 Indecision only leads to inactivity, Libra. Stop talking about all the things you want to do and just do it already. You may be pleasantly surprised with the results. SCORPIO Oct 24/Nov 22 You are in dire need of a break, Scorpio. So relinquish the reins for a little while at work and take an extended vacation so you can recharge and regain your productivity. SAGITT ARIUS Nov 23/Dec 21 Sagittarius, you may want to make a resolution to change a few things about yourself that seem irksome to others. The same old strategy isnt working so give a new one a try. CAPRICORN Dec 22/Jan 20 Capricorn, a battle of wills leaves you licking your wounds. Now you may new way to mend fences. Put AQUARIUS Jan 21/Feb 18 Aquarius, you may have been stepping aside and letting others take a leadership role in important decisions. But you have missed out on essential information. Get involved once more. PISCES Feb 19/Mar 20 Others may not know just how capable you are at handling things, Pisces. Show them just how effective you can be.Week of Oct. 16 ~ Oct. 22OCTOBER 16 John Mayer, Singer (34) OCTOBER 17 Wyclef Jean, Producer (39) OCTOBER 18 Lindsey Vonn, Athlete (27) OCTOBER 19 Omar Gooding, Actor (35) OCTOBER 20 John Krasinski, Actor (32) OCTOBER 21 Kim Kardashian, Pitchwoman (31) OCTOBER 22 Zac Hanson, Singer (26) New Home for Sale plan with 1,632 sq. ft.$129,900 Clint Hatcher, Owner (850) 272-0144This home on your land $109,900 HOURS Monday Saturday 9 a.m. 9 p.m. Sunday 11 a.m. 6 p.m. 2816 Hwy. 98 West 575 Down....................2001 Pontiac Grand Prix575 Down...........1999 Dodge Durango, 3-rows775 Down......................1998 Ford F150 Ex/Cab1,900 Down...........2001 Chevy Silverado Ex/cab AUTO FINANCINGDAYLIGHT For Rent in Hosford3 BD, 2 BA mobile home, fenced yard, partially furnished. months rent due at lease signing. 379-3346 or 545-6537 Want to see whats new with T upperware? Meet or call your local Tupperware Consultant for Parties, Orders or Fundraisers. ceive free hostess gifts. The more you sell, the greater the gifts.Call Beth Eubanks, your full time Tupperware Consultant at (850) 643-2498 or email at bethseubanks41@aol.com.Visit me online at www.my.tupperware.com/bethseubanks

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Page 22 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL OCT OBER 12, 2011 Man arrested for 5th time for driving with a suspended/revoked licenseA man known not to have a valid drivers license was spotted by a Calhoun County Sheriffs Deputy traveling along Ashley Shiver Road on a dirt bike around 7:15 p.m. Oct. 3. When Deputy Jared Nichols recognized Simon Jared Hathaway, 32, of Altha he turned around to conduct the dirt bike. Nichols stopped at the intersection of Ashley Shiver Road and NW Annie Grantham Road and noticed a track where a dirt bike had made a sudden turn onto a lime rock road. About 50 feet down the road, the deputy saw that the dirt bike had been left under an old barn east of the roadway. Hathaway The motor of the bike was still hot. number showed the Honda CRF 70F belonged to Hathaway, who was previously arrested on the same bike by another deputy Sept. 9. A tow truck was called to remove the bike but before it arrived, Hathaways mother drove up. She told the deputy her son was not home and left, but returned a short time later with her daughter. Hathaways mother then leaned down beside the dirt bike as though she was going to pick it up but was stopped by Nichols, who told her it would be impounded because it was used in the commission of a felony. When the women became verbally combative, according to Nichols report, he turned on his patrol car camera. Hathaways mother insisted the bike would not be towed and accused deputies of harassing and picking on her son. The dirt bike was towed and a hold was placed on it pending possible seizure. A warrant was issued for Hathaway. Hathaway was arrested Oct. 5 and charged with felony driving while license suspended or revoked, violation of community release and operating an unregistered motor vehicle. The original offense report noted that he had been arrested for driving while license suspended or revoked four times with two convictions. He is being held without bond. RREST REPORTS compiled by Journal Editor Teresa Eubanks AAlthough the victim offered to forgo it was discovered that he had stolen $10,000, the young man wouldnt agree to the conditions that were set. The victim who is related to the he would agree to live with her, honor an 8 p.m. curfew, be respectful to his teachers and other adults, do his homework and not skip school. The boys response? Just prosecute me. According to a report from Altha Police Chief Jimmy Baggett, a young male relative of the victim said he was at her home last month and went into her bedroom to speak with her. She took a ring and a pendant along with a He told the police chief he went to a friends house, where he showed him the items. He kept the ring but left the pendant behind. His friend later turned the pendant over to Baggett. The boy was charged with grand theft.Altha juvenile charged with grand theft for taking ring & pendant worth over $10,000CONTINUED FROM P AGE 2 A Kissimmee man sustained incapacitating injuries in a single-vehicle accident Friday morning on SR 12 in Liberty County. According the FHP report, Angel Luis Bush, 20, was eastbound on SR 12 and approached a right curve at over 75 mph and lost control of the vehicle. The 2007 Chevrolet HHR crossed the center double solid line, went through the westbound lane and into the north ditch. The vehicles front right tire and undercarriage collided with a culvert, causing it to become airborne, rotating in a spiral motion onto the drivers side as it hit the ground. The vehicle overturned front end to back end and collided with a small tree, coming to rest about 1.8 miles east of CR 1641. The driver was wearing a seat belt but his airbag did not deploy. He was taken to a Tallahassee hospital by Liberty EMS. The 9:45 a.m. crash was investigated by FHP Trooper Jason King. Bush was cited for careless driving. JOHNNY EUBANKS PHOTO Driver injured in single-vehicle crash Friday in Liberty CountyProbationer arrested in Bristol after leaving treatment centerA woman who was taken into custody on a probation violation is facing additional charges after she was arrested in Bristol Oct. 3. A warrant was issued for Angela Diane Mickel, 40, of Blountstown after she left a residential treatment facility in Tallahassee on Sept. 16 without notifying was on probation following her conviction for grand theft of a motor vehicle. Todd Wheetley stopped a car in which Mickel was a passenger around 4:10 p.m. When she stepped out of the vehicle, she told Wheetley, I was going to turn myself in this week. Wheetley found pills lying loose in the bottom of Mickels purse, along with a pill bottle containing residue that tested positive for methamphetamine. In addition to the probation violation, Mickel was charged with two counts of possession of prescription pills without a prescription methamphetamine and possession of less She is being held without bond. ANGELA DIANE MICKEL SIMON HATHA W AYCalhoun Chamber to hold Membership Appreciation Breakfast on Thursday, Oct. 20The Calhoun County Chamber of Commerce will show their appreciation to their members by hosting a Membership Appreciation Breakfast Thursday, Oct. 20 at 7 a.m. at the Calhoun County Senior Center. While the past year has been a struggle for many, Chamber members have worked together to help support and sustain our local business community. Our Chamber strives to cover much ground as we work towards our overall mission: To provide community leadership, support existing businesses, lead the way to economic growth, and promote our community through tourism. These goals affect our community in countless ways from local jobs and opportunities, to maintaining an outstanding quality of life in Calhoun County. As the 2011-2012 membership year begins, the Chamber Board of Directors wants to infuse the organization with new ideas, new faces, and new energy to help work towards a stronger and more sustainable community. We invite all members to attend the breakfast, and to bring a potential new member to the event. Please plan to join fellow Chamber members for a breakfast buffet beginning at 7 a.m. on Thursday, Oct. 20. To assist with planning, all guests MUST RSVP by calling or emailing Kristy Terry at 674-4519 or kristy@calhounco.org.

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OCT OBER 12, 2011 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 23 CLJ NEWS .COM To place your ad call us at 643-3333 SERVICE DIRECTORY Whaley Heating & Air Conditioning (850) 674-4777FL LIC. # CMC1249570 Accepting: : (850) 643-6925 : (850) 643-2064 : grich0656@aol.com10536-B NW SR 20 Bristol, FL 32321 Located in the Apalachee RestaurantGary Richards, EA MBAEnrolled Agent Enrolled to Practice Before the IRS Business & Accounting Solutions Inc. 4433 NW C.R. 274 Altha, Fl 32421 (850) 762-9402 Cell (850) 832-5055Dozer and Excavation work Over 20 years experienceClay ONealsLand Clearing, Inc. William's HomeImprovements "No Job Too Big or Small"Concrete work, landscape, pressure cleaning, renovations, seamless gutter, painting, vinyl, & screen enclosure Call 674-8092Licensed & Insured, contractor & rooferFOR FREE ESTIMA TES LIBERTY TIRE COMPANY 10781 NW SR 20 Bristol, Fl 32321Call 643-2939 MV75332Hours: Monday thru Friday 7 5 & Saturday 7 12Come see us for all your tire needs or give us a call for roadside service, oil changes & tire rotation. We specialize in sales and repair of tires for:Commercial Trucks and Trailers, OTR Equipment, Farm Equipment, Passenger Car & Light Truck Tires Call Chris Nissley at 674-8081 or 643-8561 (Cell) STUMP GRINDINGReasonable Rates & FREE Estimates! That Darn PumpThere is never a convenient time to be without water.WELLS (850)643-HELP Thats 643-4357 or Home 643-3857For friendly service and never any overtime charges call, BARLOWS Repair & Water ServicesWell drilling & Pump repair ________________________Serving Gulf, Franklin, Bay, Calhoun, Washington & Liberty Counties________________________850-639-9355or850-814-7454 Hwy 71 South on J.P. Peacock Rd, Altha. Day or night,Check out our prices before buying from somewhere else. For Weddings, Birthdays and all Holidays, come in or call us. Margies Florist Phone David Morris at (850) 868-1295 or Dispatch at (850) 575-4414 Locally owned & OperatedNow serving the Hosford, Telogia, and Bristol areas. Septic Tank ServiceBRISTOLCall 643-2691 or 273-0758 Clint Hatcher, OwnerElectrical Lic. # ER13014037 Building Lic. # RB29003511New Homes Garages Additions Electrical Remodeling Foundations Screenrooms Sunrooms VINYL SIDING RESIDENTAL & COMMERCIAL FREE EstimatesServing Calhoun, Liberty & Jackson CountiesLearn about bears, have great family fun at Forgotten Coast Black Bear Festival October 15 in CarrabelleAs fall settles into the Big Bend, the Florida black bear begins foraging for winter. Its a perfect time to celebrate the states largest land mammal. Come out for the third annual Forgotten Coast Black Bear Festival, an event dedicated to helping people understand and live in harmony with the Florida black bear. The family-oriented festival is Saturday, Oct. 15, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Sands Park in Carrabelle. The festival is free and a great way for families to spend the day together doing something fun and educational. The small, Gulf-side community of Carrabelle is in Franklin County, which sits in the heart of Apalachicola National Forest, one of Floridas biggest undeveloped habitats for black bears. Our goal is for festival-goers to learn everything they always wanted to know about the Florida black bear and more, said David Telesco, bear management program coordinator for the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC). Helping people understand bear behavior is one of the primary goals for the festival. If people who live in bear country understand what makes bears tick, they will know what they can do to discourage bears from hanging around in their neighborhoods. Telesco will offer informative presentations about black bears and their biology. Betsy Knight will tell interesting stories about wildlife rehabilitation, and Laurie McDonald of Defenders of Wildlife will share tips on how to coexist with black bears. Other activities at the festival include exciting tours into bear habitat with Adam Warwick, an FWC biologist who gained instant fame by rescuing a black bear from drowning in the bay off Alligator Point. Join us in the storytell ing tent, where you can sit on hay bales and enjoy stories from local authors or listen to great music by locally renowned southern rock and blues band King Cotton and folk musician Dale Crider. Bring your kids to the Come Be a Bear activity, and watch them transform into a black bear and learn about the life of a bear through the seasons. The festival is presented by the FWC, Defenders of Wildlife, U.S. Forest Service, Florida Forest Service, city of Carrabelle and the Franklin County Tourist Development Council. For more information about the third annual For gotten Coast Black Bear Festival visit www.mycar rabelle.com or call the festival coordinator, Allen Loyd at (727) 823-3888. High school students invited to create bear-awareness video for FWC contestHigh school students interested in conserving the Florida black bear and raising public awareness about bears are invited to create a 1-minute video. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conser vation Commission (FWC) is extending the deadline in its 2011 Florida black bear public service announcement (PSA) contest. Launched in May, the FWCsponsored contest now has a deadline of Nov. 18. High school students participating in the contest will use their creativity to inform Floridians about black bears, so people their communities. The winners videos will be posted online at MyFWC.com and YouTube. com/MyFWCvideos. Winning entries also will be submitted to television stations in Florida for possible airtime. There will be other prizes as well. For more information, email BearContest@MyFWC.com or visit MyFWC. com/Bear.

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Page 24 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL OCT OBER 12, 2011

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Page 1 LCHS HOMECOMING INSERT OCT OBER 12, 2011 OCT OBER 12, 2011 LCHS HOMECOMING INSERT Page 4 MV5496City Tire Co.Hwy. 20 West Blountstown 674-8784 Way to Go Bulldogs!Charles McClellan Funeral Home15 S. Jackson 627-7677 or 643-2277 16998 NE State Rd., IN HOSFORD Phone 379-8672 Blackburns Grocery & Hardware Bristol City HallWe love our BULLDOGS! Hwy. 20 in BRISTOL 643-2264palachee Restaurant buffet before heading to the game!A Compliments of your friends at 20291 Central Ave. West Blountstown 674-4359 Apalachee Tax ServiceBusiness and Accounting Solutions Inc. PHONE (850) 643-6925LOCATED IN THE APA L ACHEE RESTAU R ANTE-mail: grich0656@aol.comGary Richards, EA MBAEnrolled Agent Enrolled to Practice Before the IRS Go Dawgs! 643-2442 (850)643-4068 BRISTOL 66 Towing Call 643-5254 Go BullDogs! 643-2378 LIBERTY COUNTY HIGH SCHOOL HOMECOMING 2011 A Luau Homecoming nights football game against West Gadsden, which ended with a 26-17 win for the Bulldogs. Earlier Summer Read and Homecoming King Kyle Brunson (seated in front) are shown below with the court. Bulldogs take 26-17 victory over West Gadsden at Homecoming defense held West Gadsden scoreless in the second half of the game. DANIEL WILLIAMS PHOT OS Bass drum Blane marches with the LCHS band. Drum major Marotta leads The Sound of Liberty in

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Page 2 LCHS HOMECOMING INSERT OCT OBER 12, 2011 OCT OBER 12, 2011 LCHS HOMECOMING INSERT Page 3 RamseysPiggly Wiggly Have a great football season!LOCA TED IN BRISTOL AND BLOUNTSTOWN W ay to go Bulldogs! Located on State Road 20Bristol Buy Rite Drugs CongratulationsBULLDOGS!The Liberty County Property Appraisers Ofce The Liberty County Property Appraisers Ofce WAL MARTAL WAYS LOW PRICES.Always. We are proud of ourLIBERTY COUNTYBULLDOGS!THE LIBERTY COUNTY SHERIFFS OFFICEwould like to say ... LIBERTY TIRE COMPANY10781 NW SR 20 in Bristol643-2939 T win Oaks Juvenile Development, Inc.A Florida CorporationFor employment information Go LCHS Bulldogs Bay BlountstownFORDGo LCHS Bulldogs! Blountstown DRUGS Congratulations on a great Homecoming celebration! Phone Pizza & Subs Whaley Heating & Air Conditioning(850)674-4777 Season, Bulldogs! Good Luck This LIBERTY COUNTY HIGH SCHOOL HOMECOMING 2011 enjoyed a week of special dress days, with Character Day, Twin Day, Color Day and Hawaiian Day as they led up to Fridays homecoming Students cheer during the W omanless Beauty Pageant. Before Thursdays coronation, students gathered W ednesday afternoon for a W omanless Beauty Pageant where male students competed to contestant. At least one of the contenders for the crown suffered A contestant in the W omanless Beauty Pageant succeeds in get ting the judges attention before Photos by Sharon Daniel Williams and Teresa Eubanks. decorating contest with giant stuffed panther on a spit to show what a roasting the Bulldogs would EVIS FUNERALHOMEWay to go, Dawgs!!! B



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Almanac...11 BHS football...12 LCHS football...13 Sound of Liberty gets a new look...16 Obituaries...19 Sheriff's Log...2 Community Calendar...4 Speak Up!...6 Car knocks down utility pole near police dept. ...950includes tax ThHE CalhouALHOUN-LIbBERt TY J OURNRNAL Volume 31, NNumber 41 Wednesday, Oct. 12, 2011 CLJ News.com LCHS Homecoming A Hosford man was fatally injured when he lost control of his 1998 Ford pickup, ran off the road and hit a tree Sunday evening. Killed was Donald Edward Williams, 54. According to the FHP investigation, Williams was northbound on County Road 67 and going toward Good Hope Church Road around 7:13 p.m. The truck traveled onto the east shoulder of the road and Williams overcorrected, causing the vehicle to cross both lanes and go onto the west shoulder of the road where he collided with a tree. Williams died at the scene. Liberty County Emergency Medical System assisted the FHP in the investigation, which is still ongoing. Funeral arrangements were not available at press time.Hosford man is killed when truck strikes tree Sunday evening SATURDAY BLAZE SEE PAGE 9Altha Town Council members who were scheduled to discuss raising the water and garbage rates at Tuesdays meeting decided to table the topic. Wes Johnston. Were going to check and see what other small communities in the area are doing. We will probably have another meeting in a couple of No members of the public were in attendance at Tuesdays meeting. Johnston said the council is considering raising the current rates by $1 a month. The town charges $16 a month for garbage collection and $13 a month for water service.Altha Town Council tables discussion on $1 rate increase Dont miss the 25th ANNUAL Goat Day Oct. 15 inlountstown

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Page 2 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL OCTo OBER 12, 2011 CC A L H O U N CC O U N TT YOct. 2 Brandon Jerome Smith, no valid drivers license, CCSO. Oct. 3 Dennis Sullivan, VOCP (warrant), CCSO. Amanda Thomas, contempt (suspended sentence violation), CCSO. Alan Kenneth Pyles, VOSP (warrant), CCSO. Crystal Gail Landrum, VOP (warrant), APD. Oct. 4 Lamar William Crawford, failure to appear (2 times) (warrants), CCSO. Gene Bess, non-support, CCSO. Oct. 5 Simon Jared Hathaway, driving with license suspended or revoked (felony), VOCR, operating an unregistered motor vehicle, CCSO. Jeffery Tipton, VOP (warrant), CCSO. Oct. 6 Timothy Olsen, VOP (warrant), CCSO. Jon Nicholas Whitworth, driving with license suspended or revoked, CCSO. Oct. 7 Charlie McClendon, possession of meth, manufacture of meth, CCSO. Oct. 8 Adam Richerson, permitting unauthorized driver to drive, CCSO. Jessica Clark, VOP, CCSO. Kelvin Anderson, reckless driving, driving with license suspended or revoked, CCSO. Brian Young, DUI, possession of listed chemicals, CCSO. Oct. 9 Mandi Waldron, sion of listed chemicals), CCSO. Michael Hughes, manufacture of meth, possession of listed chemicals, CCSO. Johnathan Sansom, manufacture of meth, possession of listed chemicals, CCSO.L I BB EE RR TT Y CC O U N TT YOct. 3 Angela Mickel, VOSP, possession of prescription drugs without a prescription (Tramadol), possession of prescription drugs without a prescription (Flexeril), possession of methamphetamine, possession of marijuana less than 20 grams, LCSO. Amanda Thomas, holding for CCSO, CCSO. Crystal Landrum, holding for CCSO, CCSO. Oct. 7 Michael Flournoy, battery, LCSO. Oct. 8 Antwan Fielder, aggravated battery with a deadly weapon, LCSO. Oct. 9 Tony Smith, warrant arrest, LCSO. Oct. 10 Mandi Jeanene Waldron, holding for CCSO, CCSO. SHER ER IFFS LOG BBlountstown Police Dept.Oct. 3 through Oct. 9, 2011 Citations issued: Accidents...............03 .................08 Special details B Business alarms.....00 RResidential alarms..........00 C C omplaints..............................................................44 SingletaryCall (850) 643-3000 or email: singletarychiro@fairpoint.netnext door to Buy Rite Drugs NOW OOPEn N Largest Manufacturer of Portable Buildings in North FloridaALL BUILDINGS BUILT ON SSITE Bestway Portable Buildings MENTION THIS AD We have OVERER 80 different sizes.You can choose color and style (850) 482-8682We accept all major credit cards NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours or responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment.Cataracts?Freedom from Eye Glasses, Now a reality for many.Lee Mullis M.D. and Cataract SpecialistSmart Lenses SMDr. Mulliss Smart LensSM procedure can produce clear vision without eyeglasses.Close-up, Far away & In-between CALL TODAY for a Smart Lens Evaluation Mullis EEye Institute 1600 Jenks Ave., Panama CCity(850)763-6666 RREST REPORTS Acompiled by Journal Editor Teresa EubanksDriver charged with DUI, listed chemicals possessionA 21-year-old Altha man was charged with DUI and possession of Blountstown Saturday night. Arrested was Brian Jordan Young of Altha. Young pulled out from the Cherokee Motel onto SR 20 around 11:07 p.m. and then traveled across the center line as he went into the turn lane, according to the arrest report from Cpl. Eddie Dalton. Dalton noted that the pickup veered back toward the sidewalk. Moments later, he saw the truck cross the center line again. After stopping the pickup at the intersection of SR 20 and Mayo Street, Dalton saw that the driver was not wearing his seat belt and noticed the odor of an alcoholic beverage. When asked if he had been drinking, Young said he had two beers. When he stepped out of the truck, he was unsteady on his feet and had to lean on the hood of Daltons patrol car to maintain his balance. A drug dog was taken around the vehicle and gave an alert of possible narcotics at the drivers side door. Young challenged Daltons right to search without a warrant. Dalton told him the dogs response gave him probable cause to conduct a search. Dalton told Young he was aware that he had bought two boxes of cold medicine containing pseudoephedrine a necessary ingredient in the manufacture of methamphetamine earlier at Walmart in Marianna. Young admitted he made the purchase and said he had already sold the pills. When asked who he sold them to, he said he didnt know. When asked what he thought the buyer was going to do with the pills, Young replied, What do you think? Young said he didnt use meth but sells the pills to make money. Young was arrested for DUI and taken to the county jail, where he refused to give a breath sample to determine his level of intoxication despite being told he would lose his drivers license for at least one year. Two boxes of 48-count Equate Suphedrine were found in a tool box of his truck during a search after his arrest. When asked if the pills belonged to him, the report said that Young hung his head and stated, You got me. The arrest report noted that investigators were aware that Young had purchased over 25 grams of pseudoephedrine in approximately four months, which could produce over a half ounce of methamphetamine. He is being held on $5,000 bond. BrianRIAN YoungOUNGBristol man arrested for pulling gun in domestic disputeA deputy responding to a disturbance on Third Street in Bristol at 6 a.m. Saturday was met by the suspect, who ran up to his patrol car with his hands behind his back and yelled out, Just take me to jail! Just take me to jail! He did. Antwan Fielder, 27, of Bristol was charged with aggravated assault with a deadly weapon without the intent to kill after an altercation with his ex-girlfriend and another woman at the residence. According to Deputy Jonathan Gentrys report, Fielder said he and Rebecca Coxwell, 26, had broken up a week earlier. Fielder said he was upset because he had no where to sleep and went to the residence they previously shared. Coxwells roommate, Ashley Rogers, 22, told the deputy Fielder had pulled a gun on her after she entered Coxwells bedroom in response to her calls for help. Gentry removed the .22 revolver, which was cocked and loaded, from the back bedroom. Coxwell told the deputy she was awakened by Fielder, who started arguing with her when he came in the bedroom. When she told him to calm down and leave her alone, she said he would not let her leave and began throwing her around the bedroom. Coxwell screamed for help, calling out to Rogers, who was sleeping in the other bedroom. She said Fielder grabbed the gun from a drawer, pointed it at the door and cocked the trigger just before Rogers walked in. Fielder began arguing with Rogers and started waving the gun back and forth, she said. Rogers left and called 911. Coxwell was able to calm him down and convince him to put the gun back in the drawer. Rogers told the deputy that Fielder blamed her for the problems between him and his girlfriend.Fielder is being held on $10,000 bond. ANTWAN FIELDERArgument leads to battery charge after attack in storeA man involved in an altercation in a hardware store this past August has been charged with battery. Michael Paul Flournoy, 55, of Bristol, was taken into custody Oct. 7. According to the Liberty County Sheriffs Office, a deputy responded to a report Hardware Aug. 10. The victim, Hollis Finuff, stated that he and Flournoy got into a discussion over property that belonged to Finuffs deceased brother as they walked into the store. Finuff said he walked to the aisle where the nuts and bolts are located. He said about two minutes later, Flournoy walked up to him and stated that he better get a lawyer. Finuff said that when he replied that he already had a lawyer, Flournoy started swinging at him and struck his left eye. A store employee and a customer witnessed the altercation and stated they saw Flournoy hitting Finuff. Flournoy left before a deputy arrived. Following his arrest Friday, Flournoy was released on $1,000 bond. michaelMICHAEL paulPAUL flournoy FLOURNOYKEEEEP REREADING! ARREsST RREpoPORTsS ConONTinuINUEdD ON PAGEE 3 AND PAGEE 22

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OCTo OBER 12, 2011 / THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 3 Mother, son & sons friend charged with making methThree people including a teenager and his 33-year-old mother, along with a friend of the teens were arrested Sunday for manufacturing methamphetamine at a Clarksville residence where a meth lab had previously been dismantled, according to a report from the Calhoun County Aware that Mandi Jeanene Waldron bought cold medicine containing pseudoephedrine earlier that day at Walmart in Marianna, Deputy Jody residence on Big Mac Road in Clarksville around Two young men jumped out of a truck at the home where methamphetamine was being made by the shake Deputies made contact with Steven Waldron at his the truck as his 18-year-old son, Michael Tyler Hughes, Waldron and his wife, Mandi, were asked to step They were told that authorities were aware that Mandi Waldron had purchased medication containing pseudoephedrine that day and requested permission to When speaking separately with a deputy, Mandi Waldron admitted she bought the medication that day Deputies stopped the couples juvenile daughter when she went to the truck to retrieve her fathers cigarettes, warning her that a meth lab was in Waldron was arrested next and placed in a patrol Before being taken into custody, Mandi Waldron admitted that she, her husband, her son She said she bought the cold pills while her son bought lye, Coleman fuel and other components When they got home, she left everything in the truck and stated that her son was supposed to cook the meth manufacturing methamphetamine and principal in the and Sansom were both charged with manufacture of methamphetamine and possession of listed MichaelICHAEL HuUGheHES ManANDiI Wal ALDronRON JohnathanOHNATHAN SanSANSomOMMcClendon arrested for making & possessing methamphetamineMembers of the Calhoun-Liberty Drug Task Force arrested Charlie Fredrick McClendon, 30, after a search of his Clarksville home turned up evidence last week that the site was being used to cook Investigators arrived at the Wendall Register Road residence Friday after the Calhoun County Sheriffs Office received information about drug activity During a search of the home, a suspected cutting agent using for processing meth in its powder form (known as MSM) was found in the A folded piece of tin foil which appeared to have been used to smoke methamphetamine was found in the east When investigators looked around the exterior of the home, they found what they were looking for A meth lab with the supplies and ingredients to make the When investigators pulled a plastic bag from an outdoor garbage can, they discovered reaction vessels used to manufacture meth, plastic tubing, stripped lithium batteries, paper strain chemicals and suspected lye from a household drain cleaner, which is commonly used to adjust the pH in the Five feet from the trash can was an oven; inside, investigators found a bag with other ingredients apparently gathered for a recovered included charcoal a bottle of suspected acid, plastic tubing, a plastic pill crusher, a homemade funnel, a glass cup and an instant cold pack, which provides a source of ammonium nitrate which is mixed in the reaction vessel during the A piece of tinfoil with meth residue McClendon admitted he used meth he had allowed two people to come to his home the previous night to make McClendon was charged with possession of methamphetamine and Two women at his home when the McClendon said they did not live at the home and had no knowledge of any drug Task Force members taking part in Mallory and Deputy Jody Hoagland of Tim Partridge of the Blountstown Police CharlieHARLIE McCClenLENDonON RREST REPORTS A IN BRi I STOL NONOWO OPENN

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Page 4 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL OCTo OBER 12, 2011Thats how many copies of The Calhoun-Liberty Journal were distributed last week, ensuring plenty of coverage for your community announcements and great response for our business advertisers! 5,378 The Calhoun-Liberty Journal is published each Wednesday by the Liberty Journal Inc., Summers Road, P.O. Box 536, Bristol, FL 32321. Annual subscriptions are $18. Periodicals postage paid at Bristol, FLPOSTMASTER: Send address corrections to: P.O. Box 536, Bristol, FL 32321. (USPS 012367) Summers Road Located at 11493 NW Summers Road in Bristol MAILING ADDRESS: P.O. Box 536, Bristol, FL 32321 TELEPHONE (850) 643-3333 Fax (850) 643-3334 E EMAIL: thejournal@fairpoint.net ADS: cljads@fairpoint.net JOURRNAL STT AFFJohnny Eubanks...................Publisher Teresa Eubanks........................ Editor Sandra Brown...................Bookkeeper Debbie Duggar...................Advertising Angie Davis.........Production AssistantOFFICE HOURS: 9 a.m. 6 p.m. M-F, Saturdays from 9 a.m. until 1 p.m.THE CALHOUN-LLIBERtTY JOURNAL Wednesday, October 12 Monday, October 17 Tuesday, October 18 Sunday, October 16 Saturday, October 15 Thursday, October 13 Friday, October 14TODAYS MEETINGS7 p.m., Altha Volunteer Fire Department AA, 6 p.m., Altha Community Center noon, Senior Citizens Center 5 p.m., Ag. Bldg., Conference Room across from Courthouse 7 p.m., Dixie Lodge in Blountstown TODAYS MEETINGS7 p.m., Veterans Memorial Park Civic CenterTODAYS MEETINGS, noon, Calhoun-Liberty Hospital 7 p.m., Calhoun County Old Ag Bldg. east door, in front of jail 6:30 p.m., Mormon Church, BristolTODAYS MEETINGSAA, 7 p.m., basement of Calhoun County Courthouse 11 a.m., Apalachee Restaurant in Commission Board RoomBIRTHDAYS Jacquez Brown, Larenda Ivory, Diane Larkins, Katelyn Bozeman & Chelsea Suber BIRTHDAYS William Booth & C.W. OBrian BIRTHDAYS Joshua Adkins, Morgan McClendon & Victoria Fant BIRTHDAYS Shannon Harper Goat Day this Saturday! Attend the Church of your choice this SundayLCHS Dawgs vs. Bozeman Away at 8 p.m. (ET)B-town Tigers vs. Marianna Home at 7 p.m. (CT) 9 a.m. to 3 pm. at the Pioneer Settlement in Blountstown 25 th annual Goat Day 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Sam Atkins Park in BlountstownMark your calendar for Nov. 12 when a fall festival and Veterans Day parade will be held in Carrabelle at the Seniors Center. Participate in childrens and family games or just relax and enjoy the never-ending array of foods while listening to our live entertainment, featuring CR 67 Band, Not Quite Ready Band, Greg Kristofferson, Evelyn McAnally and our own Chuck Spicer. There will also be various local singers performing what you love most: gospel, country, pop and the songs from the 50s. Discover the talent of our local artists and crafters. There will be a cake walk, 50/50 cash drawing and a Thompson muzzleloader Carrabelle. And dont forget this is a day to This event is sponsored by the Franklin County Senior Citizens Council. For vendor information call (850) 6974195 or email shirleycox210@gmail.The Club begins Monday, Oct. 17 and will be held on Monday through Friday from 3:35 to 6:35 p.m. daily for ninth through 12th graders in Liberty County. The Club will meet at Liberty County High School in the old 50+ club building (across from Dollar General) and is sponsored by the 21st Century Community Leadership Center Program and Donnie Read with Twin Oaks Juvenile Development Inc. An Open House will be held on Thursday, Oct. 13 from 3:30 to 6:30 p.m. at the high school in the old 50+ club building. There will be free food for all who attend. Participants of The Club will enjoy team-building, photography, fashion, drumline, archery, poultry projects, leader ship, horse programs and fear factor. For more information please contact Tracy Collins at 643-8662 or Dawn Arrant at 294-0462.BBluegrass Gospel Buddy Smiths annual Bluegrass Gospel Concert will be held Saturday, Oct. 22 at 6:30 p.m. (CT) at Blountstown High Sheriffs Youth Ranches and will feature The Sheriffs Possse and Big Bend Bluegrass. Tickets are $8 in advance and may be purchased at the door for $10. Children eight years of age and younger will be admitted free of charge. Tickets may be purchased at Hinson Insurance in Marianna, Blount Insurance in Blountstown and Coastal Insurance in Port St. Joe. For more information, please call Buddy at 674-5793. Kinard VFD Halloween Carnival set for Oct. 29Kinard VFD will be holding their annual Halloween Carnival on Saturday, Oct. 29 at the Kinard Community Building off Hwy. 73 South in Kinard. The fun will begin at 5 p.m. The costume contest starts around 6 p.m. All proceeds benefit the Kinard Volunteer Fire Department. For more information please call (850) 639-5011. NEWS FROM THE PEWSothvvalRevivalEVIVAL Tabernacle ABERNACLE Revival Tabernacle will be having a Youth Revival on Thursday and Friday, Oct. 13-14 at 6 p.m. and a Youth Bash on Saturday, Oct. 15 at 6 p.m. At the Youth Bash on Saturday there will be free food, give-a-ways, awesome music, radical out of the box teaching and fun games. Some of the prizes to be given away include an iPod, more. You must be there to win so make plans to attend the youth revival and bash at Revival Tabernacle. Revival Tabernacle is committed to impacting the world with the gospel of Jesus Christ. The church is located at 17003 NW 11th St. in Blountstown. Fall Festival time at Calhoun County public librariesCome join in the fun at your local library. Festival will be held Oct. 28 from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. in the courtyard with games, prizes, face painting and food. will be Oct. 29 from 10 to 11 a.m. Come enjoy a great story. Everyone will receive a goody bag. Festival will be Oct. 27, from 3 to 5 p.m. with games, prizes, crafts, and food. LIBRARY NEWS

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OCTo OBER 12, 2011 / THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 5 LOCAL EVENTS *Lifetime Warranty on Repairs *Will pay up to $500 of your deductible *Over 75 years combined experienceTNTTOBY GARNETT, OWNER Collision Center Home of the All-U-Can-Eat menu A little out of the way, A lot less to payFamily Coastal Seafood Restaurant Were Still open Come see us for the best seafood and prices around for a really great meal. AT BLOUNTSTOWN DRUGS TT uesday, Oct. 18 from 3-6 p.m. (CT) w674-222240% All Christmas Decorations 30% ALL FaA LL MERCHa A NDISE PHONE (850) 674-9191 would like to welcome their newest stylist:Sandra Smith BLOUNTSTOWN Dont miss the 25th Annual Goat Day festival, presented by the Blountstown Rotary Club, Oct. 15 at Sam Atkins Park in Blountstown. Goat Day is one of the largest arts and crafts show in North Florida and attendance has become an honored tradition in Calhoun County. Featured entertainment from the Main Stage will include Roger and Amy Williams Stepping Out on Faith from Marianna. They have been performing gospel music for 19 years. Jackie Hill and the Blue Shades of Grass from Tallahassee will round out the entertainment lineup. Another highlight of the 25th festival will be a new kids entertainment area, featuring a show by Zoo World! ofs Main Stage Entertainment: Emcees Bob & Anita Key 9 9:45 a.m. Money Sisters 9:45 10:30 a.m. Jackie Hill & the Blue Shades of Grass 10:30 11:15 a.m. Stepping Out on Faith 11:15 a.m. 12 p.m. Bob and Anita Key 12 p.m. Announcement of Goat Day poster contest winners 12:15 1 p.m. Money Sisters 1 1:45 p.m. Jackie Hill and the Blue Shades of Grass 1:45 2:15 p.m. Stepping Out on Faith 2:15 3 p.m. Bob and Anita Key Kids Entertainment Area: 11:30 a.m. Zoo World Live Animal Show at the Main Stage 12:30 p.m. Zoo World Live Animal Show at the Main Stage 1:30 p.m. Magician Show at the Main Stage Goat Day Games: 11 a.m. Coin Dig (Categories: 1 8 and 9 15 years old) 12 p.m. Chicken Chase (Categories: 3 5 and 6 7 years old) 1 p.m. Greased Pig Chase (Categories: 8 9, 10 11, 12 15 years old) Just across the park at the Panhandle Pioneer Settlement will be Pioneer Day featuring music, demonstrations, old fashioned games, food and fun for the family. General Store will also be open so you can shop early for the holidays! Gates open at 9 a.m. and vendors will be present until 3 p.m. Cost: $5 per person with children under 1 admitted free. Please note that all childrens activities will be free of charge. Featuring: pony rides, train rides, coin dig, face painting, moon walk, magicians, and new games! For more information, call (850) 6745449 or visit www.blountstownrotary. com/goatday.htm.GOAT DAY is produced by the Blountstown Schedule set for Saturdays 25th annual Goat Day festivalThe Liberty County Senior Citizens Association has scheduled the following events for the month of October: Monday, Oct. 17 7 p.m., The Liberty County Senior Citizens Board of Directors will meet at Hosford Senior Center. The public is welcome to attend. Tuesday, Oct. 18 11 a.m., Bingo with Cindy. This is always a fun time. She will give prizes and lunch will be served to seniors. Call Liberty Transit at 6432524 no later than 3 p.m., Friday, Oct. 14 for transportation to the Center. Wednesday, Oct. 19 11 a.m., Hos ford Senior Center Capital Health Plan of Tallahassee has extended their services to Liberty County. A Capital Health Plan representative will be at the Center to discuss Medicare Plan programs that are available with Capital Health. The Open enrollment period for those who wish to change their Medicare Plans and those quickly approaching. Plan to come and listen to the presentation Call 643-5690 for information. Call Liberty Transit at 643-2524 no later than 3 p.m., Monday, Oct. 17 if you need transportation to the Center. Thursday, Oct. 20 Shopping at the Tallahassee Wal-Mart and have lunch. Call Liberty Transit at 643-2524 no later than 3 p.m., Monday, Oct. 17 to reserve your Transit seat. Thursday, Oct. 20 The Liberty County Senior Citizens Advisory Council will meet at the Bristol Center at 1 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 25 10:30 a.m., The Bristol Monthly Craft Class will meet at 10:30 a.m. For information call 6435690. Call Liberty Transit at643-2524 no later than 3 p.m., Friday, Oct. 21 if you need transportation to the center. Wednesday, Oct. 26 From 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., There will be a Senior Citizens Representative going door-todoor in Bristol to explain services that are provided through Senior Citizens. Call 643-5690 for information. Thursday, Oct. 27 Shopping at the Piggly Wiggly Grocery Store and then lunch. Call Liberty Transit at 643-2524 no later than 3 p.m., Monday, Oct. 24 to reserve your Transit ride. Thursday, Oct. 27 11 a.m., At the Bristol Center, the Halloween Party begins. Games, prizes and lunch. Call 643-5690 for information. Call Liberty Transit at 643-2524 no later than 3 p.m., Monday, Oct. 24 for transportation to the Center.Liberty Senior Citizens Asso. announces October event list

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Page 6 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL OCTo OBER 12, 2011 Jennifer Shuler, Esq.Attorney at Law Business Real Property Divorce WillsBBy Appointment (850) 866-3680or contact me at jenniferwshuler@yahoo.comCALL ME FOR A FREE LIVING WILL Listen to Steven Seay and Glenn Kimbrels play by play of the Blountstown High School Tigers vs. Marianna at Blountstown Friday night on Oct. 14 on K102.7 at 6:30 p.m. (CT). The Florida Gators play Auburn at Auburn on Saturday, Oct. 15. Air time on K102.7 at 5:30 p.m. (CT).RRADIO FOOTBTBALL ON WYBTBT AND WPHK Hear Michael Wahlquist and Jay Taylor with all the Liberty County High School game action. The Bulldogs take on Bozeman High School at Bozeman. Air time on K102.7 Saturday, Oct. 15 immediately following Swap Shop at 10 a.m. (ET). Roddenberry sworn in as attorneyTiffany (McClellan) Roddenberry of Tallahassee was sworn in as a member of the Florida Bar on Sept. 29. After taking the Florida bar this summer, Tiffany began a federal judicial clerkship for U.S. District Court Judge Robert Hinkle of the Northern District of Florida in Tallahassee. She earned her undergraduate degree in Political Science, summa cum laude, from the Florida State University in 2006. She graduated summa cum laude from the Florida State University College of While in law school, Tiffany served as a Notes and Comments Editor and Executive Editor for the Florida State University Law Review Her peers on the journal awarded her a Meritorious Service Award for her contributions to the law review. As a member of the Flor ida State Law Moot Court Team, Tiffany was selected as one of the top four competitors in the  Judges John S. Rawls and James R. Wolf Intramural Moot Court Competition. As a top four competitor, she argued a case before the Florida Supreme Court in the Final Four Competition. Additionally, during her second year at Florida State Law, she and her the Luke Charles Moore Civil Rights Invitational Moot Court Competition in Washington, D.C. She has received eight book awards and will publish a note, Say-on-Pay: Cautionary Notes on the Use of Third Party Compensation Guidelines in the United States, in the Florida State University Law Review later this year. A graduate of Blountstown High School, Tiffany is the daughter of Alice Ann McClellan of Ocala and Tiff McClellan of Clarksville. She is the granddaughter of Gus and Syble McClellan of Blountstown and the late Bill and Lenora Lewis of Bristol. To the editor, For many parents, the thought of placing their young child in day care can be unnerving. Fears may arise that cause parents to question the safety and well being of their child in a place other than their home. Parents also wonder if they are good parents because they have to work and dont keep their child at home. Some parents have to work. Dollars dont stretch as far as they use to. For parents who must work and need daily care for their child, we would like to reveal a hidden gem in the Hosford and Telogia community known as Noahs Ark and Friends Early Childcare. We are so tremendously pleased with the care our child receives from Noahs Ark. Of course we were nervous when ladies there have been such a blessing. They are the reason for the success of Noahs Ark. The ladies are kind, caring and professional. The kids get lots of love, good food, good play and are constantly learning. Our child has learned so much. Of course we think she is the smartest thing on two legs, but she really is doing great. She is 18 months old and talking, singing, counting, dancing, coloring, sharing and behaving quite well. Almost equally important is how happy she is. She is happy when we drop her off and happy when we pick her up. Our fears are set at ease knowing while we work our child is in a safe place of love and care. Any questions or concerns we have are professionally addressed by the staff. Shes not treated as just another child they have to take care of. They know her and her personality. Thats the way they treat all of the kids at Noahs Ark. With much appreciation of the daily care our child receives. Daniel and Jessica Stanley, HosfordPanthers, black bears should be added to FWC mapping programTo the editor, I am fascinated by the fox squirrel mapping program being conducted by FWC Biologist Courtney Hooker. Anyone sighting a fox squirrel can go online and record the sighting on FWCs Google map. So far 600 sightings have been reported. This technology could also be applied to panthers and black bears. This would be an economical way to determine the number of black bears, which is highly disputed, along with their location. Sincerely, Bill Lett, Havana *The article Bill Lett is referring to ran in the Oct. 5 issue of The Journal and can also be found online at CLJNnews.com. SPEAK UP! WITH aA LeETTeER TO THeE eEDITORWrite: The Calhoun-Liberty Journal P.O. Box 536, Bristol 32321 EMAIL: thejournal@fairpoint.netFamily appreciates the efforts of the staff at Hosford daycare center

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OCTo OBER 12, 2011 / THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 7 Isaias Orama and Betty Orama of Hosford and Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Ransom of Orange Park are proud to announce the engagement and upcoming wedding of their children, Rebekah Ruth Orama and David Eugene Ransom. Their marriage will be on Oct. 21 at the Latter Day Saints Orlando Temple. A ring ceremony with the reception to follow will be held in their honor on Saturday, Oct. 22 at the Quincy Garden Club. The couple will reside in Tallahassee. wedding 17932 Main Street N, Suite 5 PHONE (850) 674-9191 We offer Manicures and Pedicures with Shellac at... JACK EEDWARD HIATTLee and June Hiatt of Tallahassee are proud to announce the birth of their son, Jack Edward Hiatt, born on Aug. 15, 2011 at home. He weighed 6 lbs., 10 ozs. and measured 20 inches long. Maternal grandparents are Doug and Janie Pelt of Clarksville and Sue Lee of Michigan. Paternal grandparents are Lyle and Vanda Ragans of Tallahassee. Great-grandparents are the late Robert Hiatt and Gloria Hiatt of Tallahassee and the late Eldora Pelt Barber of Bristol. Jack was welcomed home by his big sister Zoe and big brother Liam, family and friends. LIAM EEVERETT HIATTLiam Everett Hiatt celebrated his third birthday Aug. 14. He is the son of Lee and June Hiatt of Tallahassee. His maternal grandparents are Doug and Janie Pelt of Clarksville and Sue Lee of Michigan. His paternal grandparents are Lyle and Vanda Ragans of Tallahassee. His greatgrandparents are the late Robert Hiatt and Gloria Hiatt of Tallahassee and the late Eldora Pelt Barber of Bristol. Liam enjoys playing with big sister Zoe and baby brother Jack, coloring and playing outside.NAThHAnN MMARTInNNathan Martin will celebrate his fifth birthday on Oct. 14. He is the son of Carrie Martin and Matt Martin, both of Blountstown. His grandparents are Michelle Yeomans, John Adams and Charlene Martin, all of Blountstown and Mike Yeomans of Tacoa, GA. His great-grandparents are Shirley Owens and Ken Owens, both of Tallahassee and C.B. Barbee of Blountstown. Nathan enjoys going to school. He loves dinosaurs and anything that has to do with outside. He also loves his little sister, Hazel, very much! TT AnnNNER LAnNIER LYonONSTanner Lanier Lyons celebrated his first birthday on Oct. 10. He is the son of Jonathan and Julie Lyons of Bristol. His grandparents are Jack and Cathy Revell of Bristol and Tommy and Marcia Lyons of Springfield, TN. His great-grandparents are Horace and Joyce Cushing of Tallahassee, Nelle Brock of TN and Mary Lou Lyons of Hixson, TN. His great-greatgreat-grandmother is Annie Stark eating snacks at the counter with nana and papa, riding his car outside and playing with his cousins. Tanner will celebrate with a Mickey Mouse party as soon as his daddy, Jonathan, returns home from Afghanistan at the end of the month. DDRAVInN & CCRISTIAnN HoODGEDravin Hodge celebrated his 14th birthday on Aug. 8 and Cristian Hodge celebrated his seventh birthday on Sept. 17. They are the sons of Robert and Betty Hodge of Blountstown. Dravin and Cristian both enjoy sports, music, dancing and swimming. CCAIlLInN ThoTHOMASCailin Thomas celebrated her 14th birthday on Sept. 8. She is the sister of Colton and the daughter of Jamie and Nikki Thomas of Hosford. Her grandparents are Butch and Delores Tharpe, Karen Sykes of Hosford and the late James Thomas of Ft. Myers. Her great-grandparents are Jackelene and the late Rhoden Pullam, Mildred and the late Olin Tharpe and Betty Henthorn, all of Hosford, and the late Woody and Mary Thomas of Ft. Myers. Cailin enjoys hunting and fishing with her dad, playing volleyball, spending time with her new little cousin Waylon Tharpe, and hanging out with her Sista Jimmy, Sarah Shierling. She got her footer! Orama, Ransom to marry Oct. 21 in Orlando birthdays BIRTHAAntique TT ractor Pull to be held at WW iregrass Heritage Festival On Saturday, Oct. 22, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Landmark Park will celebrate the agricultural heritage of the Wiregrass with the annual Wiregrass Heritage Festival. The annual antique tractor pull will be held, with entries limited to pre-1964 tractors. Competitive pullers with tractors as close to their original appearance as possible will enter in different weight classes. Exhibitors from across the Southeast will display their restored antique tractors, engines and farm equipment. Park staff and volunteers will harvest peanuts using mules and vintage farm equipment. Cane grinding and syrup making will be featured activities on the Wiregrass Farmstead. Syrup, still warm from the kettle, will be on sale at the event. Other activities will include blacksmithing, woodworking and more. Volunteers will also demonstrate spinning, weaving, cooking on a wood stove and open hearth, quilting, soap making and traditional household chores. A juried quilt show will hang in the Stokes Activity Barn. Concessions will be available and musical performances will take place throughout the day in the Gazebo. The Shelley General Store and Martin Drugstore will be open, selling ice cream, candy and old country items. Admission to the Wiregrass Heritage Festival is $8 for adults, $6 for senior citizens and active military, $4 for kids, and free for members and children 3 and under. Sponsored by the National Peanut Festival, WDHN and Star 100.5FM. Landmark Park is a 135-acre historical and natural science park located on U.S. Highway 431 North in Dothan, Ala. For more information, contact the park at (334) 794-3452.

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Page 8 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL OCTo OBER 12, 2011 COMMENTARY Late Night LaughsA recaRECAP oOF recentRECENT obOBSerER Vation ATIONS by BY lateLATE niNIGhtHT tV TV hoHOStTS. GOP is playing musical chairsWASHINGTON The GOPs game of musical chairs continues, but unlike the childrens game where the person without a seat is out, the last candidate standing will be the winner. New Jersey Governor Chris Christie was the latest player. He walked around the chairs, and when the music stopped, he walked away. At least he didnt string the media along the way Donald Trump did, or the way Sarah Palin did for so long, treating a potential presidential run like an audition for a reality show. Christie took a hardheaded look at the mechanics of getting into the race at this late date, and concluded he wasnt ready to take on the challenge despite the clamor for his candidacy. The track record for late entering dream candidaout for the Democrats in 2004; Tennessee Senator Fred Thompson did the same for the Republicans 2008. We have to go back to 1940 when Wendell Willkie won the Republican nomination on the sixth ballot. Willkie Clubs had sprung up around the country, and the charismatic businessman surprised everyone with the strength he was able to muster at the Convention. Republicans have always liked the idea of a businessman as their standard bearer rather than a politician, and Herman Cains candidacy got a boost with his surprise win of the Florida straw poll last month. Cains 9-9-9 economic proposals to dramatically cut taxes on investment and personal income taxes goes farther than any of the other candidates, and deming honed perhaps when he headed Godfathers Pizza. He is still standing. Christie recognized the pitfalls ahead for a candidate who is not prepared for the scrutiny of a national campaign. Texas Governor Rick Perry is exhibit A for what can go wrong, and while Perry remains a viable candidate, his path to the nomination is far more challenging than he and his supporters could have announced. Still standing, but on his knees. Former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney is the big winner in the wake of Christies decision, and Romney would have come out ahead even if Christie had decided to run. Romney has spent the last four years preparing for this race. He studied what went wrong in his 2008 run, and is measurably better in every way, from his debating skills to handling the stump. If Christie had jumped into the primaries, Romney would have been there waiting to trip up the thinskinned New Jersey governor, provoking him into a display of temper with charges of cronyism. Christie warding his friends and bullying his enemies. Now Romney will be courting Christie for his endorsement, and hes likely to get it sooner rather than later. Romney is the GOPs best bet to defeat President Obama, and the more Christie does to help Romney secure the nomination the more he will nail down his own prospects for getting a prime time speaking slot at the GOP convention in Tampa. Christie is thinking about 2016 or 2020, and a star turn at the Convention could launch his future candidacy in the same way Barack Obamas One America speech vaulted him into the presidential sweepstakes. Meanwhile, Republicans are going to have to settle down and realize there are no more knights in shining armor waiting to rescue them from the malaise they feel about Romney, or their disappointment in Perry. By bowing out of the race, Christie signaled the end of the anybody-but-Romney movement. There is an old saying that Republicans fall in line; Democrats fall in love. The GOP just got stood up again, and now the party faithful will do what they always do love the one theyre with. Romney is standing tall.Unemployment is still at 9.1 percent. Well, 9.2 percent if you count Hank Williams, Jr. JAY LENOYouTube has launched a politics channel so Bachmann. a carbon copy of Obama. Yes, that has always China is now expected to surpass Japan as the 2nd richest country in the world. They could become the richest, but thats only if we pay them happen. JAY LENO day, S Sarah P Palin also announced that she would ment. would be taxed at 9 percent. Now, Rick S Santorum says he has a better tax plan called 0-0-0. Oh, JAY LENO who thinks Obama is like Hitler, who will be our JAY LENORick P Perry assured Hank Williams that he has turn out to be his. JAY LENOSSarah P Palin wont run for president. Who better to lead us out of the troubles of the world than a WASHInN GTOnNMERRY-GO-ROUnNDby Douglas Cohn and Eleanor Clift

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OCTo OBER 12, 2011 / THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 9 BBPD loses phone, internet for an hour after car hits poleby Teresa Eubanks Journal EditorA woman suffered a fractured arm and totaled her car after driving into a city utility pole across from the Blountstown Police Department (BPD) Tuesday afternoon. The accident is being investigated as a possible DUI, according to BPD Cpl. Patrick Crawford, who said it appeared that the driver, Connie Carter, 32, of Defuniak Springs, may have been under she fell asleep before losing control of her car. The crash knocked out the phone and internet access at the police department for about an hour. Crawford said Carter was southbound around 4:15 p.m. when she ran onto a curb at the corner of North Pear and Clark Street. The 1999 Toyota Camry slammed into the utility pole and knocked it over, causing it to land in such a way that it blocked the car from Carter was taken to Calhoun-Liberty Hospital and treated before being transferred to Tallahassee Memorial Hospital for further medical evaluation. She was charged with reckless driving and property damage. Other charges are pending.RIGHT: The Blountstown Police Department is shown in the background of the crash site at North Pear and Clark Street.by Teresa Eubanks, Journal Editor DANIEEL WILLIAMS PHOTT OS

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Page 10 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL OCTo OBER 12, 2011CCovenant Hospice to honor chaplains by celebrating Pastoral CCare WeekTALLAHASSEE Covenant H Hospice will honor the contributions of its dedicated chaplains during Pastoral Care Week, October 23 29. E Each day pastoral caregivers are invited into the life experiences of women, men, children, and organizations. Faith can be tested and questions arise about the meaning of suffering and pain. Pastoral caregivers bring many gifts to the process of healing and wholeness. They are trained to help individuals draw on their own faith traditions and teachings for comfort and guidance as they walk through dark valleys. In 2010, Covenant H Hospice chaplains made over 15,800 calls and visits to patients facing life-limiting illnesses and their families, and were asked to ofIn honor of National Pastoral Care Week, Covenant H Hospice will be holding various Faith Gathering events for local clergy to help them walk beside congregation members and loved ones when they face end-of-life issues. Covenant H Hospice staff members will share some of their experiences and will provide answers to tough questions. For more information, contact your local Covenant H Hospice enanthospice.org. Care Week is sponsored by the Coalition on Ministry in S Specialized S Settings Network (COMISSSS) a national organization of pastoral care providers, pastoral care professionals, and faith group endorsers. Now in its 25th year, the week-long observance promotes spiritual values as a part of the healing process and invites us to celebrate the work of caregivers in such settings as hospitals, hospices and nursing homes. Calhoun Liberty HOSPITAlL20370 NE Burns Ave., Blountstown Telephone (850) 674-5411Calhoun Liberty Hospital is proud to announce the opening of the.... Calhoun Liberty PPrimary Care Clinic November 1st New patient applications can be picked up at the front desk of the hospital. ApalacheeTT heRR estaurant Note of ThanksEEmily and Wyatt Calam want to thank all of the students who came to their combined eighth and ninth brought a book for donation. This past S Saturday, the children donated a total of 23 new books to the Panhandle Public L L ibrary Cooperative S S ystem, Blountstown library, including some really neat pop-up books and several books in the Junie B. Jones series. Thanks also goes to Gail Trickey of Wind Drinker A Arabians who provided Jera and Fred for all the children to ride at the party. S See you all next year! Emily and Wyatt CalamCovenant Hospice, Marianna Fire Dept. to host 5K Run/WalkMARiIAnnNNA In an effort to raise awareness during National H Hospice and Palliative Care Month, Covenant H Hospice and the Marianna Fire Department will be partnering together again this year for the Covenant H Hospice and Firemans L Ladder S Scatter 5K R Run/Walk at 9 a.m. on S Saturday, Nov. 5 located at the E E in Marianna. There is a $15 registration fee for the 5k run/walk in advance and a $10 student registration fee. R Registration fee guarantees shirt, race packet and barbecue lunch from George Gay and Marianna Fire Department for runners registered before Nov. 1. A Additional barbeque lunches will be available for purchase during the event for $5 each. Participants can sign up for the event at the Marianna Covenant H Hospice branch in advance or register on race day beginning at 7:30 a.m. Fees will increase $5 for registrations on the day of the event. Businesses that have 5 or more participants registered before Oct. 19 will get a free logo on the back of the t-shirt. A A wards will be given to overall top three male and female in all age groups and overall male and feCovenant HHospice. dedicated to providing comprehensive, compassionate services to patients and loved ones during times of life-limiting illnesses. For additional information please contact Merian Milton at merian.milton@covenanthospice.org or (850)

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OCTo OBER 12, 2011 / THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 11 ASK THEO L D F A R M E R SA L M A N A C Heating & Air Conditioning FL LicIC. # CMC1249570R s s CCs (850) 674-4777Whaley Whaley Altha Store Phone (850) 762-3161B Blountstown BBranch Phone (850) 673-8102 Marianna BBranch Phone (850) 482-2416Altha Farmers Co-op, Inc. PETS AND tTHeEIR pePEOpPLeE IsS spSPONsSOReED BYWeve got the feed you need to keep your animals happy and healthy!CAATTLLE HORHORSES DODOGS CAATS BIRD BIRDS and more.AND THEIRPetETS PEOPLEWeve had trou ble with nails coming loose in our old horsehair-plaster walls, where pictures have been hung and rehung over the years. Any solution, short of a new plastering job? W. G., Bennington, Vt. If its horsehair plaster, then well assume that it has wooden lathwork behind it, so that theres something for those nails to bite into. If this is the case, a slightly longer nail might help, and you can repair the old plaster around the nail hole with a dab of fresh spackle or plaster of Paris. If theres none handy, you can also do a good job with a bit of cotton wadding saturated in a good, thick glue. Wrap the saturated wadding around the nail as tightly as possible, then reinsert the nail and tap it into the lath with a hammer, taking care not to crack more plaster away. Wipe the surface clean with a damp rag and let the glue dry thoroughly before applying any weight to the nail. Any bits of loose plaster can also be touched up with the glue. Repaint, if needed. If the nail does not bite into wood, beyond the plaster, it will not ultimately bear much weight, regardless of how good a glue job you do. In this case, you might look into acquiring a special drywall nail or screw mount, which has a second part, usually made of plastic, that expands and fans out behind the plaster to create a stronger hold. Ask your local hardware store to guide you.Im searching for the perfect apple crisp recipe. Any suggestions? A. C., Spokane, Wash. Some chefs say that its in the topping, some say that its in the apples. And what may be your perfect crisp might be another persons disappointment. Its a matter of personal taste. Even the name of these fruit desserts comes into question. Are you looking for a true apple crisp, or could it be an apple pan dowdy, a grunt or cobbler, a buckle or slump? Some are more like puddings; some use biscuits instead of crumb topping; others are served with pouring cream, whipping cream, or ice cream. In any case, start with a good cooking apple. Some modern recipes specify Granny Smith apples, because they are sour, and hold their shape well after baking. Paula Reds and McIntoshes, common apples (especially earlier in the season), tend to get mushy before the crisp topping is done. Macouns, Cortlands, Braeburns and Fujis are all good candidates to consider for baking. Crisp toppings are often too sweet, as a result of combining too much sugar with an alreadysweet apple. Common recipes call for a cup of sugar (usually white, although brown is sometimes used) with a cup of of cinnamon, a teaspoon of salt, and a stick of butter. That works well with a Granny Smith or a similarly tart apple, but if youve substituted the common Paula Red or McIntosh, youre apt to have too much sweetness for the average palate. One after-the-fact remedy is to serve the dessert with a lemon sorbet instead of vanilla ice cream, but purists will disagree. To be safe, taste your not tart, try cutting the sugar to 1/2 or 2/3 of a cup. The other big variable in crisp toppings is whether to add oatmeal or granola for added crunch. The above proportions can be used in addition to 2/3 of a cup of rolled oats, or with the same amount of almost any health food store granola that you like. Dont try using the boxed grocery store granolas, because theyre much too sweet and youll go overboard with the sugar, again. Good luck! Angel Brake, 8, and her kittens Fiona and Tiger love to play together. The kittens chase Angel through the yard and then she will chase them. The fun ends with Angel laying in the grass on her back with both kittens sound asleep on her stomach. Angel has eight kittens, but it seems like every week a new one comes along. She asked her mom if they could get a two story house so they could have room for all her orphaned cats. Her mothers reply: Maybe one day we can. Angel is the daughter of Patty Brake and the late Larry Brake of Hosford. She is a student at Hosford School. Angel, Fiona & TT iger DOTHANOn Saturday, Oct. 22, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Landmark Park will celebrate our agricultural heritage with the annual Wiregrass Heritage Festival. One of the featured activities on the Wiregrass Farmstead will be the annual grinding of the sugar cane for syrup making. Few farms in the Wiregrass at the turn of the century were without sugar cane. It was grown to supply syrup and crude brown sugar for sweetening. The leaves were a secondary source of feed for livestock. Processing the cane was an occasion for celebration in many rural areas. Demonstrators at Wiregrass Heritage Festival will cut the sugar cane and bring it to the mule-drawn cane mill. The cane will then be crushed and the juice cooked down to syrup in an 80-gallon kettle. Syrup, still warm from the kettle, will be on sale at the event. Exhibitors from across the Southeast will display restored antique tractors, engines and farm equipment. The annual antique tractor pull for pre-1964 tractors will also be. Park staff and volunteers will harvest peanuts using mules and vintage farm equipment. Other activities will include blacksmithing, basket making, corn shelling, woodworking and more. A quilt show of over 100 quilts will hang in the Stokes Activity Barn. Volunteers will also demonstrate spinning, weaving, cooking on a wood stove and open hearth, quilting, soap making and other traditional household chores. Musical performances will take place throughout the day in the Gazebo. The Shelley General Store and Martin Drugstore will be open, selling ice cream, candy and old country items. Concessions will be available. Admission to the Wiregrass Heritage Festival is $8 for adults, $6 for senior citizens and active military, $4 for kids, and free for members and children 3 and under. The festival is sponsored by the National Peanut Festival, WDHN and Star 100.5FM. Landmark Park is a 135-acre historical and natural science park located on U.S. Highway 431 North in Dothan, AL. For more information, contact the park at (334) 794-3452.Syrup making will be the featured event during the Wiregrass Heritage Festival

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Page 12 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL OCTo OBER 12, 2011by Michael DeVuyst, contributing writerSNEADS-Blountstowns defense continues its hot streak shutting out the Sneads Pirates last Friday night 14-0. The Tigers defense held Sneads to 9 yards of toSneads only reached the Tigers side of the 50 twice. One possession was stopped on downs and the other by an interception by Corin Peterson late in the fourth quarter. The Tiger offense found pay dirt on their second drive of the night. Hunter Jordan converted a 4th and goal pass Corin Peterson knocked in the at the end of an 11 play drive that covered 45 6:56. Sneads coughed the ball up on their next possession. and Patrick Pitts repoint of the night with his extra point kick with 11:08 14-0. Leading rusher for the Tigers was Javakiel Patrick Pitts lead the defensive charge with nine tackles. LEFT: Three Tigers tackle the Sneads quarterback. RIGHT: A Blountstown Tiger jumps in an attempt to knock down a Pirate throw.Blountstowns defense shuts out Sneads 14-0 TT ONY SHOEEMAKEE PHOTT OSTiger Javakiel Brigham (#28) moves quickly to avoid getting caught ABOVE: Tigers and Pirates all dive for the ball with Blountstowns Chaz Fain (#33) ABOVE: A Blountstown Tiger grabs hold and gets taken for Patrick Pitts (#53) pats Tiger Bobby Andrews (#1) on the head BHS FOOTBALL

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by Richard Williams, Journal sports writerThe Liberty County Bulldogs outscored West Gadsden 26-17 to survive a close homecoming game that wasnt decided until the last few minutes of the contest. Daniel Deason scored a touchdown and a two-point conversion that moved Liberty ahead by nine points to secure the win. night when he picked up a bouncing onside kick and raced down the sideline for the score. Deasons score came immediately after visiting West Gadsden scored on a long half-back pass to take a 7-0 lead. Liberty missed the game to put Liberty up 12-7. The Bulldogs came up short on their two-point conversion attempt. Libertys defense gave up another big play to help the score to 12-10 in favor of LCHS. The Bulldogs responded to the West Gadsden points with another touchbut the ball was misplayed by LCHS and West Gadsden recovered the fumbled punt to take over deep in LibPanthers running back appeared cut off behind the line of Liberty. The Bulldogs got a lot of pressure up the middle on the kick and blocked the attempt. From there both teams LCHS fumble recovered for a touchback by West Gadsden. Liberty responded to the fumble with an interception by Deason. Liberty forced a West Gadsden turnover deep in Panther territory to set up Deasons late game scores that sealed the victory. With the win Liberty moved to 5-1 for the year and 2-0 in the district. West Gadsden fell to 1-4 overall and 0-1 in the district. LCHS Head Coach Grant Grantham said Deason had a very solid game against West Gadsden and added he also thought that Eduardo Rosas had great game on the offensive line. Eduardo (Rosas) may have had his best game of the The Bulldogs travel to play Bozeman Oct. 14 in Bay County. Bozeman comes in with a 2-3 record overall but 21-0 win over Port St. Joe. LCHS Head Coach Grant Grantham said the Bucks are the most physical team the Bulldogs have faced to this point with a lot of athletes that have both speed and power. They will get after you and if we arent ready to come OCTo OBER 12, 2011 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 13 LCHS FOOTBALL Liberty BBulldogs outscore West Gadsden Panthers 26-17ABOVE: Bulldog Alex Marlowe (#4) tries to avoid a tackle by a West Gadsden player. LEFT: Liberty Bulldog defense players Toren Guthrie (#17) and Chris Dilworth (#1) move in on the West Gadsden player running the ball. The Bulldogs showed great defensive action, shutting down West Gadsden during the second half of the game. ABOVE: Bulldog Terryal Jenkins (#4) tries to avoid the Panther as he carries the ball. RIGHT: Libertys Chase Taylor (#53) leads the way for Alex Marlowe (#5) to move the and third touchdown of the evening. ABOVE: Bulldogs Brenton Bailey (#16) and Trey Johnson (#61) move in on a lone Panther. LEFT: Bulldog Alex Marlowe (#5) runs the ball for a touchdown. DANIEEL WILLIAMS PHOTT OS

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Page 14 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL OCTo OBER 12, 2011SCHOOL LLUNCH MENU Oct. 12-18, 2011 Bristol Dental Clinic Laban BBontrager, DMD, Monica BBontrager, DMDPea Ridge Rd in Bristol, Phone (850) 643-5417MenuENUS SSPONSSORED BY: Bristol Dental Clinic LIBERTY WednesdayBREAKFASST: S Sausage & gravy biscuit, hash browns, fresh apple. LUNCH: Turkey taco with romaine lettuce & tomato or bb BBQ pork on whole wheat bun, mexicorn.TThursdayBREAKFASST: French toast sticks and ham. LUNCH: Baked spaghetti with cheese or buffalo chicken wrap, tossed romaine salad with low fat dressing.FridayBREAKFASST: Grilled cheese on whole wheat bread and hash brown. LUNCH: Crispy chicken on a whole wheat bun or ham chef salad, green beans, apricots.MondayBREAKFASST: Breakfast burrito and hash browns. LUNCH: Cheeseburger on a whole wheat bun or chicken salad wrap, tater tots, lettuce & tomato.TT uesday ham and orange slices. LUNCH: BbBQ chicken with whole wheat roll or grilled cheese, baked beans.*All breakfasts include a choice of assorted cereal with buttered toast whole wheat and juice CAl L HOUN WednesdayBREAKFASST: SScrambled eggs with grits and sweet LUNCH: Beef ravioli with meat sauce, garden peas, bread sticks and apple crisp.TThursdayBREAKFASST: Egg and cheese wrap and potato tots.LUNCH: SSliced turkey with gravy, buttered rice, whole kernel corn, whole wheat roll and diced pears.FridayBREAKFASST: French toast sticks with syrup and linked sausage.LUNCH: SStuff crust pizza, garden salad, fresh fruit and home baked cookie.MondayFall BreakBe Safe!TT uesdayBREAKFASST: SScrambled eggs with cheese grits.LUNCH: Beef-a-roni, green beans, mixed fruit and whole wheat roll.*All breakfasts include a choice of assorted cereal with buttered toast and juice Liberty CCounty High School students to host BRISTO L S S tudents from Liberty County will be joining thousands of other youth on athletic month of O October to share their Christian faith during the sixth annual national Fields of Faith event. T This rapidly-growing, interdenominational outreach event will be held at more than 475 locations throughout the nation on various nights during this month. While many Christian rallies are anchored to an entertainer or professional speaker that creates a spectator event, Fields of Faith is structured as a student-to-student ministry movement. Peers invite their own classmates and teammates to meet on their students share their testimonies, challenge them to read the Bible and to come to faith in Jesus Christ. T This will be the second Fields of Faith event for students from Hosford T T olar and Liberty County High S School. Last year, approximately 200 students and supporters attended at the high school football T The national growth of Fields of Faith has been remarkable. S Since the beginning of Fields of Faith in 2004, over half a million students have joined in the movement. I In 2010 alone, more than 150,000 across 40 states to participate in the event.I Its not just those numbers that Fields of Faith. I Its the real-life impact that these gatherings are having on young people. Last years series of events saw 3,568 students to follow Jesus Christ, 5,290 recommitted their life to Christ and 12,786 committed to reading the Bible daily. TThe impact of Fields of Faith has been incredible in just these past president and former veteran NFL coach. IIts all about young people in these communities coming together on their schools athletic to go back to the fundamentals of reading Gods Word and coming to faith in Jesus Christ.T The impetus for Fields of Faith staff person, who conceived the idea from an O Old T T estament reference in 2 Chronicles 34 after searching how to help todays generation of students face spiritual battles and temptations. I In the scripture, King Josiah, an to Fields of Faith attendees today, gathered his people and challenged they changed their culture. dream came true when 6,000 students gathered on school athletic the beginning of what has become related gathering of students in a single day. Fields of Faith challenges this generation to be committed to reading the Bible and living a trans formed life for Jesus Christ, said Martin. IIts students challenging students, peers challenging peers and thats the heart and soul of Fields of Faith. We are seeing entire communities changed because of Fields of Faith. While Fields of Faith has its roots is designed to include multiple cal leadership team will determine the program of each Fields of Faith event. T The event will be held at the O Oct. 19, at 7 p.m. More information about Fields of Faith is available at FieldsofFaith.com. T T o learn more about the event in Liberty County, contact R R ob Wheetley at (334)-303-4029 or Beckie Black at (850) 556-4270. LCHS Bulldog BeatLCHS Football NewsTThe Liberty County High S School Varman High S School this Friday for their homecoming! ETT Come out and support the Dawgs.LCHS Volleyball NewsTThe Liberty County High S School varsity volleyball will be facing our rival, Blountstown High S School, on O Oct. 15 at 7 p.m. ETT in Blountstown. Come out and cheer on the volleyball team as they face the Lady T T igers! assessment that measures student and 10. Beginning in 2010, each essay was scored by one rater using a rubric. T T he scoring rubrics and sample writings are available on years, two raters were used and the scores were averaged. Prior to 2010, a student could have received a half-point score, such as 4.5; whereas since 2010, no half-point scores are possible. each student within the same grade level was required to write an essay using the same mode of writing (narrative, expository or persuasive). tant to the schools and the district, it is not the only measure used to determine if a student has the skills needed to express himself/herself in a written format. require writing as a measure of success in the class. Each nine weeks the students in grades K-12 participate in the Liberty Writes. T This assessment follows the same and helps students and teachers determine areas of strength and areas for improvement before the Writing is a process and cannot be perfected in a single 45 minute writing sample. Because writing is a process and each draft of the student writing becomes more a parent, to know something about this process so you can help your students understand and develop good writing processes. Ms. T T rikia White, an English teacher at Liberty County High, has developed this template to assist Ms. White says IIve learned that students struggle the most with the basic structure of writing an essay. When given time to think and plan, for students; however, the organigreat writers to fail on writing assignments. Ms. Miranda Ellis, a 4th grade teacher at Hosford S S chool, also helps her students through the writing process. S She states, We take a piece of writing through the entire process and then we have a publishing party. T T he students get to read their writing pieces and give each other constructive feedback. I It develops ownership of their writing. Parents also have an online resource available to all 4th, 8th and 10th grade students in Liberty writing pieces on the system can be accessed from anywhere through the internet. S Students receive immediate feedback on the work and can make unlimited submissions. T There is a MyTT utor aspect that will walk them through easy revisions to bring up their score. R Richter, 4th grade teacher at T T olar S School, practice and modeling are essential to building strong writing skills. S Students need to see good writing samples and practice what they see. R Reading a variety of literature will show students different writing styles and having students write about various daily events, section of their text will provide the practice students need.Liberty Writes used as measure of assessment in preparation for important FCAT Writing testThe Liberty County High School Varsity cheerleaders participated in their competing in more competitions in the

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OCTo OBER 12, 2011 / THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 15 October Family Breakfast B.E.S. hosted its monthly Family Breakfast Friday, October 7. Parents, grandparents and students were served a delicious breakfast of eggs, grits, ham and biscuits. We had a huge crowd! Thanks everyone for coming and eating breakfast with us! Doughnuts for Dads On Friday, October 14 from 7-8 a.m., Blountstown Elementary School will be hosting their annual Doughnuts for Dads. This tasty event will be held for ONLY 4th and 5th grade Dads. Please feel free, if your child is in 4th or 5th grade, to come join us. Come hungry and be ready to eat a doughnut with us! Fall Holiday There will be no school on Monday, October 17. It is a Fall Holiday for Calhoun County Schools. Picture Retakes Picture re-takes will be held on Tues., Oct. 18. The Altha FFA Chapters recently participated in the District Forestry Career Development Event. The middle school team brought home top honors. Team members included Johnny Aaron, Justin Moore and Cody Finuff. Each of the students also brought home several individual ribbons. Johnny Aaron Timber Estimation. Justin Moore placed second in Timber Estimation and General in General Knowledge Exam and third in Map Interpretation. The Senior team placed 4th overall a great feat for a team with only one returning member. Team members included Rena OBryan, Porter Smith, Kyler Dew, Corey and Claire Price. Porter Smith placed in two categories individually-second in General Knowledge. Cats' Cuisine set for Oct. 20The Institute of Culinary Arts invites the public to Cats' Cuisine on Thursday, Oct. 20. The menu for this Cats' Cuisine is Cheddar Baked Chicken, Mashed Potatoes, Cobb Salad, Cheddar Biscuits, and Pecan Pie. All of our meals are served with your choice of Sweet or Unsweet Tea. Seating times are 11:40 a.m. and 12:30 p.m. Reservations can be made by calling the school. Please reserve by Tuesday, October 18. The price is $6. The Altha and Blountstown Cross Country teams hosted an invitational at Sam Adkins Park last Wednesday, Oct. 5. The Varsity teams participating ran a 5k and the Jr. High teams ran two miles. Coach Sewell was pleased with the of the course and the weather. The Altha Varsity boys placed second Awards were given to the top ten individual runners for the varsity and the top The results from the meet are as follows: For Varsity boys, Devin Ferrell17:54 (2nd overall) (Personal Record), Kyler Dew22:03, Nick Young22:49, Porter Smith23:00, Wayne Boozer23:35, Brendan Dew24:02, Jamie Coleman24:02 and Corey Barton25:09. For Varsity girls, Mary Sewell23:12 (2nd overall), Kimi Wiltse25:25 (5th overall), Katie Cox25:49 (7th overall), Carly Schwartz25:56 (8th overall), Emily Sewell29:54 and Madison Rowe31:38. For Jr. High boys, Hardy Mitchell15:31 (4th overall), Jaylon Hall15:49 (5th overall), Johnny Sewell16:31, Max Scott19:12 and Coy Cook21:00. 20:18 (4th overall) and Chasity Webb21:41. We would like to say thank you to some people who helped make the invitational possible: Piggly Wiggly for donating water, the Wildcat Den owners, Faye Morris and Dawn Kent for donating fruit for the runners, all of the parents and volunteers who helped with the meet and the Police Department and Police Chief, Rodney Smith for donating the cones and driving the pace car. The Altha Cross Country teams will compete again this Saturday in the Mosley Dolphin Dash, at the Lynn Haven Recreation Center off of Hwy 390, with the Varsity girls starting at 9 a.m. B.E.S. fourth graders loaded the buses and headed to Quincy to the University of Floridas annual Agriculture Day on Friday, Sept. 30. Students visited stations where they learned about: corn, pumpkins, bees, peanuts, pollination, cotton and many other fantastic facts. They also enjoyed going through a corn maze and were served snacks and drinks. What a great day! blountstown elementary schoolBlountstowns 4th grade travels to Ag Day in Quincy blountstown high schoolFBLA an active and worthwhile clubby Calen MasaiHave you been looking for a school club to join? Then check out FBLA at BHS. Future Business Leaders of America is a club that builds character, leadership and employability skills. Students are also taught responsibility, teamwork and dependability. This organization encourages students to focus on careers and helps them to make plans for after high school. The are Mitchell Darnell (President), and Missy Newsome (Parliamentarian). The members attend and compete on the district and state level. They are currently involved with a Yankee Candle sale to help fund their attendance and participation in these events. Mrs. Perdue, the club sponsor teaches a dual enrollment class through Chipola College, that helps to prepare students for various software Britt passed his Microsoft Word 2007 are very pleased to recognize Austins success. If you are interested in joining a very active and worthwhile club, I highly recommend FBLA. Mrs. Perdue presenting Austin Britt with his Altha & Blountstown Cross Country teams host invitational meet Oct. 5 altha wildcats Althas FFA participates in District Forestry Career Development event

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Page 16 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL OCTo OBER 12, 2011 CLJNEWS.COMT 17932 Main Street N, Suite 5 PHONE (850) 674-9191 SALE SALE SALE SALE SALE SALE SALE SALE SALE SALE Thursday & FridayOct. 13 & 14Out with the GOLD in with the NEW25%OFFMerle Norman of Blountstown still has some products in the Classic Gold packaging. All Merle Norman products in Classic packaging will be... Merle Norman has a new look and logo Liberty County Judge Ken Hosford had a full courtroom Monday when 78 students gathered to hear him speak about the Constitution of the United States, considered to be one of the greatest statements of human liberty ever written. The seventh-grade classes from Hosford School and Tolar School also received booklets on The Declaration of Independence and the U.S. Constitution from the Calhoun-Liberty Patriots organization from member Jim Pruette. Prior to meeting with the judge, the group took part in a question-answer session with Liberty County Deputy Caryl Marotta on courtroom conduct and bailiff duties. After the presentation on the Constitution, students toured the 911 dispatch room of the Liberty County Jail. CARYL MAROTTA PHOTOSeventh-graders visit Liberty Co. courthouse SSound of Liberty debuts new uniforms at HomecomingThe Liberty County High School band showed off a new look during halftime at Friday nights homecoming in Bristol. Although not brand new, their updated uniforms were found online and within the $5,000 budget they were given by the school board. The ones we had been wearing were from the 1980s, said Band Director Kim Everette. We were running out of uniforms and had trouble matching them up, she said. The uniforms arrived about two weeks ago and were found with the help of Diane Hayes of Big River Sports. She said having newer uniforms was a big boost for the 31-member band, explaining, DANIEL WILLIAMS PHOTO

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OCTo OBER 12, 2011 / THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 17 Minutes from the Sept. 8 Liberty CCommission meeting The meeting was called to order by Chairman Jim Johnson. Present at the meeting were Commissioners Kevin Williams, Davis Stoutamire, Albert Butcher, Clerk Robert Hill and Deputy Clerk Charla Kearce. Prayer was led by Aaron Elkins. Pledge of allegiance was led by Lamar Holland. Motion to approve the minutes of the regular meeting held Aug. 4, 2011 was made by Williams, seconded by Stoutamire, and carried. Motion to add the request from Lamar Holland to the agenda. Motion to approve recommendations from Lamar Holland on the Veterans Park was made by Butcher, seconded by Stoutamire, and carried. Executive Director Dorothy Inman Johnson with Capital Area Community Action Agency came before the Board to discuss projected budget cuts. Next year Liberty County will be cut by $36,325. They will have to close #11-17 opposing cuts to Capital Area Community Action Agency was made by Butcher, seconded by Williams and carried. Kristin Brown with Preble-Rish Engineers told the Board that she had the approval for power to the Hosford Park. Motion to approve the Talquin Electric Cooperative utility easement was made by Williams, seconded by Stoutamire and carried. Ray Gray with C.B.E.C. discussed the county taking the program back over effective Oct. 1, 2011. Motion to approve was made by Butcher, seconded by Williams and carried. Dr. Gene Charbonneau presented the 2011-12 CORE Contract for the Health Department. Motion to approve was made by Stoutamire, seconded by Butcher and carried. Monica Welles presented the application for the Shirley Conroy Grant that is a 90-10 match. Motion to adopt Resolution #11-16 was made by Williams, seconded by Stoutamire and carried. Stephen Ford presented the Mosquito Control Contract contract and budget was approved at a previous meeting. Ford also presented a 911 Information Management System Grant in the amount of $1,250 for him to attend a conference. Also an E911 Rural County Grant in the amount of $34,913 concerning cell towers. Motion to approve both grants was made by Williams, seconded by Stoutamire and carried. Motion to approve purchase from Essential Management Solutions, LLC for 911 was made by Williams, seconded by Butcher and carried. Ford told the Board that the fall Mosquito Conference he would be attending would come out of the budget. Motion to approve the State Aid to Libraries Grant in the amount of $71,747 was made by Butcher, seconded by Williams and carried. Kevin Williams discussed Seventh Street in Sumatra. Motion to install speed humps on this street was made by Williams, seconded by Butcher and carried. Stoutamire voted no. Motion to appoint Kevin Williams, Albert Butcher and Dexter Barber to serve on the Value Adjustment Board was made by Stoutamire, seconded by Williams and carried. Motion to approve Capital Recovery Systems Collection Agency to handle the garbage bills was made by Stoutamire, seconded by Williams and carried. Motion to pay the bills was made by Butcher, seconded by Williams and carried. Motion to adjourn was made by Butcher, seconded by Williams and carried. Warrant List & Warrant Numbers Operating Fund 31241 Weatherization Fund 4564 Payroll Fund 32034________________________________ Robert Hill, Clerk of Court, Jim Johnson, Chairman The meeting was called to order by Chairman Jim Johnson. Present at the meeting were Commissioners Kevin Williams, Davis Stoutamire, Dexter Barber, Albert Butcher, Attorney Shalene Grover, Clerk Robert Hill and Deputy Clerk Charla Kearce. Motion to advertise Ordinance #11-01 repealing previous adopted Ordinances made by Butcher, seconded by Stoutamire and carried. Motion to advertise Ordinance #11-02 concerning collection services for unpaid garbage and water bills was made by Stoutamire, seconded by Butcher and carried. Clerk Hill requested that these items be added to the agenda. 1. Agreement with NW FL Water Management maintenance agreement on Florida River Island. 2. Road closure for Homecoming parade. 3. Change of time on the Oct. 6 regular meeting. 4. Ordinance #11-02. Attorney Grover will contact Commissioner Williams concerning the statutes on speed limits in the residential areas. The Board said we can post the speed limit signs on Old Burnt Bridge Road after we get approval from the Attorney. Motion to approve N.W. FL Water Management Florida River Island maintenance agreement was made by Stoutamire, seconded by Butcher and carried. Motion to approve Road Closure on Oct. 6 from 1-2:10 p.m. for the Homecoming Parade in Bristol was made by Butcher, seconded by Barber and carried. Motion to approve changing the Oct. 6 Regular meeting time from 6 p.m. to 4 p.m. was made by Williams, seconded by Barber and carried. Motion to adjourn was made by Williams seconded by Barber and carried. _____________________________ Robert Hill, Clerk of Court Jim Johnson, Chairman The meeting was called to order by Chairman Jim Johnson. Present at the meeting were Commissioners Kevin Williams, Davis Stoutamire, Albert Butcher, Attorney Shalene Grover, Clerk Robert Hill and Deputy Clerk Charla Kearce. Prayer was led by Chairman Jim Johnson. Pledge of allegiance was led by Charla Kearce. Motion to tentatively adopt the millage rate at 10 mills for the 2011-2012 year was made by Butcher, seconded by Stoutamire and carried. Motion to tentatively adopt the 20112012 budget in the amount of $12,422,885 was made by Williams, seconded by Stoutamire and carried. Motion to appoint Joe Shuler to serve on the Value Adjustment Board was made by Stoutamire, seconded by Williams and carried. Motion to remove Albert Butcher from the Value Adjustment Board was made by Stoutamire, seconded by Williams and carried. Motion to adjourn was made by Stoutamire, seconded by Williams and carried. _________________________________ Robert Hill, Clerk of Court Jim Johnson, ChairmanSept. 12 public hearing minutes The Public Hearing was called to order by Chairman Jim Johnson. Present at the meeting were Commissioners Kevin Williams, Davis Stoutamire, Dexter Barber, Albert Butcher, Attorney Shalene Grover, Clerk Robert Hill and Deputy Clerk Charla Kearce. Prayer was led by Clerk Robert Hill. Pledge of allegiance was led by Commissioner Albert Butcher. Motion to approve Resolution #201118 adopting the 2011-12 millage rate at 10 mills was made by Williams, seconded by Butcher and carried. Motion to approve Resolution #2011-19 adopting the 2011-12 budget in the amount of $12,220,66 was made by Barber, seconded by Williams and carried. Motion to approve Resolution #2011-20 adopting the 2010-2011 amended budget in the amount of $17,976,369 was made by Butcher, seconded by Williams and carried. Motion to adjourn was made by Butcher, seconded by Williams and carried. _______________________________ Robert Hill, Clerk of Court Jim Johnson, Chairman BBlountstown Health and RRehabTT elephone (850) 674-4311 Blountstown Health and Rehabilitation Center provides short-term and long-term care in a warm, personal manhealthcare, centered on caregiver compassion, offered in a comfortable home-like setting. Come Home to Rehab Millage rate adopted, budget ITS VERY WiISE TO ADVERTiISE in the Calhoun-Liberty JOURNAlL and . .EEmail: thejournal@fairpoint.net CLJNews.cCOM

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Page 18 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL OCTo OBER 12, 2011 GARDENINGDividing pays dividends on perennialsAfter a few years in the garden, some perennial plants grow too big for their own good. When perennial plants become overcrowded they and, in some cases, die in the center. When that happens, it's time to dig them up, divide them, and replant the smaller clumps. In general, it is best to divide perennials during their dormant or "off" season; divide spring bloomers in the fall and fall bloomers in spring. Don't divide perennials. Start three to six inches away from the outside-most stems of the plant and dig straight down about a foot; separating the whole plant from the soil all the way the plant to thrive in its new location. If the plant is too large to easily lift the entire unit from the ground, cut down through the plant taking a wedge of healthy stems and root systems. Do this several times, as needed, keeping the healthiest parts of the plant and discarding the dead middle portion. Work quickly and out of the direct sunlight to protect exposed roots and minimize stress on the plant. This process may seem as though the plant is being butchered, but in fact, this is a renewal and rehabilitaRe-plant one of the new divisions in the center of the space from which you just dug, keeping your original perennial garden intact. Take the other plants and start new sections in your landscape. This is also a great time to rework the soil in your perennial garden. To get your rejuvenated plant off to a great start next spring, add organic amendments such as compost or peat to the bed while you are replanting. After you have re-planted the bed, water and mulch the area appropriately. Some common perennicontrol its rampant growth in the fall or spring. years in the fall or early spring. desired to increase the number of plants. The ideal time with three or more shoots will bloom sooner. reach its best form if not divided too often. They can be divided as needed for additional plants in early spring or early fall. clumping roots are large and brittle so avoid dividing unless it is needed to improve blooming. years to prevent center die-back. Spring is the best time to divide for most grasses since many grasses do not tolerate fall division. They tend to have very an ax or saw to divide. the weakened center portion. center dies out in the spring or fall. For more information, be sure to contact your local by Theresa Friday, Horticulture Extension Agent, Santa Rosa County Located in BBristolLAND ClCLEARING-Private drives and roads -Food plots -Home sites -Small acreageCCall EEddie NNobles at (850) 643-5390 or (850) 447-0449 or Chas (850) 447-0849EEddie NNoblesLAND ClLEARING, EEXCACA VA A TIIONN AND RootOOT RAKING FoOR: ACCEPTING NNEW PPaA TIENTSLaban Bontrager, DMD12761 NW Pea Ridge Rd., Bristol, FL 32321TELEPHONE 643-5417 www.bristoldentalclinic.com DENTDENTURERE LABAB ONN PREREMIISEESSame-DDay Service on RR epairs & R R elines Bristol Dental ClinicMonica Bontrager, DMD We're your one-stopTIRE SHOP! s "Volkswagens to semi's, we handle them all"H CITY TIRE cCO. MV5496BBFGGGG O OD D YE EA AR RDDUNNLOP LibertyP Post & Barn PPole IInc.We've got the fence posts to meet your needs.Dempsey Barron Road, Bristol (off Hwy. 12 N) Phone (850) 643-5995 We have Openings! Infancy to school age. Kids Kingdom

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OCTo OBER 12, 2011 / THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 19 Two locations to serve youBlountstown and Bristol Adams Funeral Home674-5449 or 643-5410Visit us online: www.adamsfh.com All existing pre-need and at need contracts are now handled by the Bevis family and staff.All operations of the funeral process will be handled on location at 12008 NW State Road 20.CALL 643-3636Todd Wahlquist, Rocky Bevis & Ed PeacockLicensed Funeral Directors & Crematoryevis FuneralHome Bof Bristolof Bristol OBITUARIES TT elephone (850) 674-2266 Your hometown funeral home since 1994A Hometown Funeral Director You Can Trust and Depend On!Funeral Services with Dignity, Caring and Professionalism. Marlon PeavyPeavy Funeral Home& CCrematoryGEoORgGE DANIEL Bogg BOGGSJACKSONVILLE George Daniel Boggs, 83, of Jacksonville and formerly of Blountstown passed away peacefully surrounded by his family Monday, Oct. 3, 2011 in Jacksonville. He was born January 18, 1928 in Thomasville, GA to the late Homer Boggs of Conneaut, OH and Minnie Boggs Greene of Blountstown. He was a longtime Florida resident. He graduated as Salutatorian from Blountstown High School in 1946, earned a Bachelors degree in Electrical Engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology in 1953 and a Masters in Business Administration from Georgia State University in 1971. He was a member of Phi Kappa Tau, Eta Kappa Nu and Tau Beta Pi, and Sons of the American Revolution. He was a Navy veteran who served after for 36 years for Southern Bell, Bell Labs and AT&T. He was a deacon in several churches and a member of Deermeadows Baptist Church in Jacksonville. He was also a Boy Scout Scoutmaster and proud that all three of his sons were Eagle Scouts. After retirement, he volunteered for 11 years at St. Lukes hospital in Jacksonville. He was known for his warm smile and met the world and all people with a helping hand.He was preceded in death by his brother, Louis Atkins. Survivors include his wife of 58 years, Joyce Bridges Boggs; three sons, David and his wife, Danuta, James and his wife, Monique and Ralph and his wife, Sarah; seven grandchildren, Dan, Scott, Jill, Mitchell, Lucy, Samantha, and Chloe; niece, Nancy Revell and her husband, Terry; sister-in-law, Margie Atkins and niece, Janie Atkins; along with numerous cousins, nephews and nieces. Graveside services were held Saturday, Oct. 8 in Boggs Cemetery in Blountstown with Reverend David Throck11 a.m. (ET), Saturday, Oct. 15 at Deermeadow Baptist Church in Jacksonville. Memorial contributions may be made to his favorite charity, The Salvation Army online at www.salvationarmyusa.org. Adams Funeral Home was in charge of the arrangements. Online condolences may be made at adamsfh. com. MARy Y EEThHELL HARVELLBLOUNTSTOWN Mary Ethell Harvell, 87, of Blountstown passed away Saturday, Oct. 8, 2011 at her home in Blountstown. She was born on Nov. 13, 1923 in Blountstown and had lived there all of her life. She was a homemaker and attended Rivertown Community Church in Blountstown. She was preceded in death by her husband, Barney Harvell; parents Dessie and Aredell Stone; three sisters, Estelle Hood, Maggie Martin and Viola Rossen. Survivors include one daughter, Sandra Cook and her husband, Tommy of Blountstown; three stepdaughters, Patricia McGee and her husband, Gary of Pensacola and Irma Kindell of Oklahoma City, OK; two grandsons, William Thomas Cook and his wife, Celest of Blountstown and Corey Neal Cook and his wife, Patricia of Clarksville; 19 other grandchildren; Cook, Carleigh Cook, Morgan Welch, Aaron Welch and numerous nieces and nephews. Services were held Tuesday, Oct. 11 at Peavy Funeral Home Chapel with Reverend Michael Morris followed in the Pine Memorial Cemetery in Blountstown. Peavy Funeral Home in Blountstown was in charge of the arrangements.DENNIS ChCHRIS MCKNIghGHTPORT ST. JOE Dennis Chris McKnight, 57, of Port St. Joe passed away Sunday, Oct. 9, 2011 in Wewahitchka. He was born August 26, 1954 in Panama City to the late George Thomas and Iris Percival McKnight. A long time resident of Gulf and Bay County, he was a millwright. Survivors include his brother, Scotty McKnight of in-law, Linda McKnight; nephew, Rusty McKnight and great-nephew, Chase McKnight. A memorial service will be held at 10 a.m. (CT), Saturday, Oct. 15 in the Chapel at Adams Funeral Home in Blountstown. Adams Funeral Home is in charge of the arrangements. Online condolences may be made at adamsfh. comIN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR LIBERTY COUNTY, FLORIDA Case Number 08-106DR IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF: SHANNON BARLOW Petitioner/Former Husband and TERESA BAILEY F/K/A TERESA BARLOW, Former Wife, _________________/N NOTICETICE OF FORECLRECLOSSURERE SALESALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to the Final Judgment dated October 6, 2011, entered in Civil Case No. 2008-106DR of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Liberty County, Bristol, Florida, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash ON THE FRONT STEPS of the Liberty County Courthouse, 10818 NW SR 20, Bristol, Florida 32321, at 11 a.m. EST on the 27th day of October, 2011 the following described property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to wit: Section 15-1S-6West, Commence at the Northeast corner of Southeast 1/4 of Section 15, thence South 00 degrees 24 minutes East 377.20, thence West 161, along the North right of way line of John Street to Point of Beginning. Thence West 173.25 along North right of way of said John Street thence North 00 degrees 24 minutes West 188.60, thence East 173.25, thence South 00 degrees 24 minutes East 188.60 to Point of Beginning. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must ter the sale. Dated this 6 day of October, 2011. ROBERT HILL Clerk of the Circuit by: Vanell Summers, DC Deputy Clerk 10-12, 10-19 LEGAlLS is in search of a FULL TIME Mechanic/ Millwrightwith a minimum of 2 years experience. Drug Free Workplace. Excellent Pay rate will depend on experience.Please send resume to jscoggins@purenergyllc.com or call (850) 379-8341 TELOGIA POWERLLCLLC in TT elogia, FLL CLJ JOB MKT. CHIPOLA COLLEGE is accepting applications for FOUNNDATIATIONN ACC ACCOUNTINNTING MANAANAGERERBachelors degree in Accounting, Finance or reinvestment experience, or equivalent combination of education and experience required. DEGREE(S) MUST BE FROM A REGIONALLY ACCREDITED COLLEGE AND/OR UNIVERSITYA APPLICATILICATIONN DEAEADLINELINE: OPENEN UNTILNTIL FILLEILLED Candidates may be subject to background investigations which may include, but are not limited to criminal history, credit history, drivers license, and/ or previous employment and references.Contact Human Resources at pippenw@chipola.edu or at (850)718-2269 for application details.EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER BECOME A VOLUNTEER H b b bVG L FLORIDA GUARDIAN AD LLITEM FOUNDATIONPHONE (850) 410-4642 Honor your loved ones by making their memory part of our best efforts to defeat cancer. For more information, contact the American Cancer Society.WhatHAT betterBETTER tribute TRIBUTE canCAN there THERE beBE?EEAST GAdDSdDEN UNIT P.O. BBox 563, Quincy 32353

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Page 20 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL OCTo OBER 12, 2011Catch up online at CLJNews.com.Miss a recent Pets & Their People column?Propane heater, large home unit with thermostat and electric fan, like new, $150. Call 643-2255 leave message. 10-12, 10-19 FURNITUREEEntertainment center, lighted, TV, stereo set, surround sound speakers, reduce to sell, $500; Dinette oval table with four chairs, $200. Call 643-2658. 10-12, 10-19RRedwood coffee table, can also be used as a mini bar, 5 ft. long, very unique, made from wood from Sequoia National Forrest, very rare, water resistant. A bargain at $250 OBO. Call 643-2255 leave message. 10-12, 10-19CCoffee and end tables, wrought iron set, excellent condition, $75. Call 272-2552. 10-12, 10-19Glass top coffee table $150 OBO. Call 447-4512. 10-5, 10-12Older round dining table. Oblong dining table with four chairs. Call 379-3965. 10-5, 10-12TThree-piece living room set, brown tweed, with two end tables and coffee table, $400. Call 3793965. 10-5, 10-12King size bed frame with mattress. Call 379-3965. 10-5, 10-12Large desk, tan, $80. Single water bed, $45. Sleeper sofa, queen size, multi-colored, $150. Call 674-3264. 10-5, 10-12Dinette table, made in the 70s with a Formica top, in excellent condition, $75. Six high back antique chairs, $20 each or $125 for all. Two end tables in excellent condition, $15. Call 643-8320. 10-5, 10-12King size bed in great condition, frame, mattress pad and sheet set. All for $250. Call 237-2529. 10-5, 10-12BBathroom sink with cabinet, white, $35. Call 237-2529. 10-5, 10-12 TRUCKS2006 C Chevrolet Silverado, half ton, single cab, 4.3 V6, 96,600 miles, $7,500; 1996 Jeep Laredo, 162,000 miles, fully loaded, great condition, $3,500. Call 674-3021 or 447-4957. 10-12, 10-191997 Dodge Dakota, V6 motor, 5-speed, needs clutch, $750 OBO. Call (850) 718-6580 or 447-1715. 10-5, 10-122004 Xterra Nissan, white, power locks and windows, running boards, clean, good tires, 110,000 miles, automatic, tinted windows, with racks, runs good, $6,650 OBO/make offer. Call 509-3271.10-5, 11-2 AUTO ACCESSORIESRRadiator for 4 cyl. C Chrysler like new, used only one month, paid $100 asking $50. Call 762-3264. 10-12, 10-19CCommercial ladder rack for full size pickup truck, with wench and strap system to tie down load, $400. Call 573-5255. 10-12, 10-19 MOTORCYCLES, ATVs & Waverunners AVERUNNERSPolaris 4-wheeler, 2000 Sportsman 335, clean, like new, only 495 miles and 85 hours. Has camo covered dash gun rack. $3,000 10-5, 10-12 HUNTING & FISHING, $15 each. Call 643-8320. 10-5, 10-12 TOOLS & EQUIPMENTAluminum trailer, 4x6, $600. Call 674-3264. 10-12, 10-19 HOMES & LANDDoublewide mobile home, 66x24, 3 BD, 2 BA in excellent condition, comes with AC central unit and many extras, $20,000 must be moved. Call (850) 5165506. 10-5, 10-12 CAMPERS2005 Four Winds travel trailer, 22 ft., kitchen, bath, queen bed, combo, built in stereo, all appliances, AC, awning, good tires, new tankless hot water heater, no slide out, $6,000. Call 899-9721. 10-12, 10-192006 Layton by Skyline camper trailer, 23 foot, like new, $5,000. Call 762-8589 or 899-8589. 10-5, 10-12Hunting C Camp on wheels, 7x9 with no leaks. Needs some work inside, $200. Call (850) 228-5307. 10-5, 10-12 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNALCLASSIFIEDSTo place your ad, call 643-3333 by noon Eastern Time on Saturday. Non-business ads run FREE for 2 weeks. ITEMS FOR SALE26 T TV, will need generic remote, $50. Call 643-2658. 10-12, 10-19CCabinet top with oval sink, for bathroom, marble, $20; Three dows, $15 for all. Call 762-3264. 10-12, 10-19Samsung 21 T TV, $20. Call 2722552. 10-12, 10-19BBakers rackes, one for mobile home, $375, one for $200. Call 674-3264; Kerosene heater, $130; baby buggy, $40. Call 674-3264. 10-12, 10-1915 Speed bicycle, $60. Call 4471025. 10-12, 10-19SportRRider scooter, brand new, battery never been charged. Several TV cabinets, several vanity cabinets with sink. Good selection of clothes, men, women and childrens, shoes, ladies purses, electronic equipment, furniture and appliances. Everyone is invited to shop at the Calhoun-Liberty Ministry Center store. Located on Hwy. 20 E. in Blountstown, 6741818. UFNTT wo wigs. Paid $30, asking $12 each. Call 674-3264. 10-5, 10-12Accu check strips, 100, free style, $50. Towing package for a power chair, $25. Call 674-4475. 10-5, 10-12Perfect Sun 26TT Wolff Tanning bed, 11 minute timer with 26 bulbs and six turbo face tanning lamps, in excellent condition, $1,500 OBO. Call 445-0828, leave message if no answer. 10-5, 10-12Fireplace, portable, needs burner, $200. Holiday Mickey Mouse musical house, $140. Call 674-3264. 10-5, 10-12Solid wood hope chest, white, in good condition, measures 35x18x19, $20. Call 643-3370.10-5, 10-12 FREEFree: Older refrigerator. Call 3793965. 10-5, 10-12 APPLIANCESGEE glass top stove, only used six months. Paid $500, asking $350. Call 643-2658. 10-12, 10-19Heat Maid kerosene heater, portable indoor radiant heat, 10,600 BTU output, bought Dec. 6, 2010. Used only four nights. Sells for $199, will take $60. Call 7623264. 10-12, 10-19TT appan gas stove, hardly used, like new, $150. Call 272-4452. 10-12, 10-19 Mexican Restaurant TownhousesBRISTOL FOR RENTBLOUNTSTOWN Phone 643-7740 For Rent in ALTHaA762-9555 or 762-8597Very NICE 2 & 3 bedroom trailers. 5 x 10 .....$27 10 x 10 ....$43 10 x 20 ....$70 10 x 25 ....$90M & W SELFSTORAGE RRENTALs SCall 573-5255, 762-9555, 762-8807 or 762-8597 7 days a week service UFN Mobile Home for R Rent in CCalhounCall 674-88882 BD, 2 BA, located six miles north on Hwy. 69 N. NO PETS. Damage & Cleaning deposit, Water, sewer and grass cutting provided.UFN Call 674-3694leave message if after 5 p.m.14x70 2 BD, 2 BA unfurnished mobile home w/deck. Located on 18th Street, Water and Sewer furnished. NO PETS No more than 3 per family. 3.94 Acres For Sa A LECall 509-8636Cleared & Fenced, Deep well & SepticHwy. 73 N in Clarksville$26,000 Buy, sell and trade in 3 BD, 2 BA double-wide, very clean and landscaped, located off Hwy. 275 N in Altha, water included. NO PETS. Monthly rent$500 plus $300 depositDouble-wide FOR Rent I C C.CCall 643-7770 (DAYS) or 674-3570 (NIGHTS) REREAL EESTT ATE TE Will buy 10 to 1,000 acres, reasonably priced. Immediate closing.CCall (850) 544-5441 or (850) 570-0222 WANTED: NoO INTERETERESTT PLANSTI R.E. BrokerLAND SALE 10 ACRE + TRACTSPaved Highway Frontage With Planted Pine TT rees From $4,995 per acreWith $600 DownR Regular CContractWith $2,500 Down No Interest First YearWith $5,000 Down No Interest First 2 Years Owner Financing No Qualifying For Rent inBRISTTOLLCall 379-8725 2 BD, 2 BA mobile home NO PETS, Reference Check$450 mth$300 deposit

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OCTo OBER 12, 2011 / THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 21 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNALCLASSIFIEDSTo place your ad, call 643-3333 by noon Eastern Time on Saturday. Non-business ads run FREE for 2 weeks. LOST/FOUNDLOSTT : two females, half beagle/ half walker, nine months old, chopped off tails. Have name on collars, number on collars are wrong. Please call 643-8487. 10-12, 10-19FOUND: Weimaraner dog in the Bristol area. Call 643-7628. 10-5, 10-12FOUND: B Blue Pit, male, brown with white stripe down face, has had ears clipped, well taken care of. Found on Faircloth Road. Call 643-1428. 10-5, 10-12LOSTT : Female Walker Hound, answers to the name of Butterbean, last seen around Hwy. 333 in Bristol. She has an orange collar. Call 643-3938. 10-5, 10-12 PETS/SUPPLIESKing R Ranch mare, registered, 12 years old, free to good home. Call 545-7205. 10-12, 10-19Kitten needs home. Fran is about 12 weeks old and has been hand raised since 2 1/2 weeks old. She and negative for parasites and feline leukemia (Felv). People, dog and cat friendly Very playful and personality. Call (850) 237-2740. 10-5, 10-12TT wo treeing Walker & B Black n T T an dogs, already trained to run deer. Two treeing Walker puppies, 7 months old, need training. Call (850) 510-0593. 10-5, 10-12Jack R Russell puppies, 8 weeks each. Call 762-8657. 10-5, 10-12Kittens free to a good home. Located at 9312 NW JJ Meeley Lane in Clarksville. No phone. Come see in person. 10-5, 10-12RRhode Island R Red hens, just Call after 12 noon, 762-8393. 10-5, 10-12TT wo Quick T T ract dog tracking collars 7628. 10-5, 10-12Free puppies to a good home. Mother is a Redbone Hound. They were born on Aug. 22. Very beautiful puppies. Call 762-2470. 10-5, 10-12 WANTEDLarge gun cabinet. Call 3793965. 10-5, 10-12RRoommate to share expenses with in Blountstown. Call 4471380. 10-5, 10-12Used pitchfork in good condition, reasonably priced. Call 237-2529. 10-5, 10-12EElectric stove and washing machine. Call 674-3264. 10-5, 10-12We buy junk cars and trucks. We will pick them up. Call 6435045 or 447-3819. 3-23 T. 12-28 YARD SALES AlL ThaHA Yard sale, Friday and Saturday, Oct. 14-15 and 21-22, from 8 Sheltons Corner off Hwy. 274, antiques, folding chairs and collectables. Phone 762-8471. 10-12, 10-19 Yard sale, Friday and Saturday, Oct. 14-15 from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Located at the Corner Bar and Hwy. 71. Phone 762-8127.Bloun BLOUNTsSTown OWN Yard sale, Saturday, Oct. 15 from 7 a.m. to 3 p.m., located at 21215 NE C.R. 69-A, furniture, boys clothing sizes 8-12, womens clothing, lots of other things. Phone 674-5740 or 447-3668. STARSCOPEFAMOUS BBIRTRTHDAYSARRIEES Mar 21/Apr 20 Theres really no time for procrastination, Aries. If you want to be the early bird getting the worm, then you have to act quickly this week. Buckle down.T T AURRUS Apr 21/May 21 Taurus, sometimes the inexplicable is just meant to be a mystery. Dont beat yourself up over not having all of the answers. New opportunities arrive Tuesday. GEEMINI May 22/Jun 21 Gemini, you cant help but feel giddy over what is to come. Others will soon be caught up in this infectious feeling. Money matters take priority later in the week.C CANCERCER Jun 22/Jul 22 Hold on to your horses, Cancer, because it is going to be a bumpy ride the next few days. When you think everything will smooth over, it starts up all over again. LEEO Jul 23/Aug 23 Leo, a moment of inspiration comes when you werent even looking for it. Take the opportunity to do something fun with your ideas rather than focus energy on work. VIRRGO Aug 24/Sept 22 Virgo, you are back on track and the feeling is exhilarating. Right now you feel like your life has purpose and youre shooting through goals left and right. Tackle romance next. LIBRBRA Sept 23/Oct 23 Indecision only leads to inactivity, Libra. Stop talking about all the things you want to do and just do it already. You may be pleasantly surprised with the results. SCCORRPIO Oct 24/Nov 22 You are in dire need of a break, Scorpio. So relinquish the reins for a little while at work and take an extended vacation so you can recharge and regain your productivity. SAGITTTT ARRIUS Nov 23/Dec 21 Sagittarius, you may want to make a resolution to change a few things about yourself that seem irksome to others. The same old strategy isnt working so give a new one a try.C CAPRRICCORRN Dec 22/Jan 20 Capricorn, a battle of wills leaves you licking your wounds. Now you may new way to mend fences. Put AQUARRIUS Jan 21/Feb 18 Aquarius, you may have been stepping aside and letting others take a leadership role in important decisions. But you have missed out on essential information. Get involved once more. PISCECES Feb 19/Mar 20 Others may not know just how capable you are at handling things, Pisces. Show them just how effective you can be.Week of Oct. 16 ~ Oct. 22OCTOBER 16 John Mayer, Singer (34) OCTOBER 17 Wyclef Jean, Producer (39) OCTOBER 18 Lindsey Vonn, Athlete (27) OCTOBER 19 Omar Gooding, Actor (35) OCTOBER 20 John Krasinski, Actor (32) OCTOBER 21 Kim Kardashian, Pitchwoman (31) OCTOBER 22 Zac Hanson, Singer (26) New Home for Sale plan with 1,632 sq. ft.$129,900 CClint Hatcher, Owner (850) 272-0144This home on your land $109,900 HouOURsS Monday Saturday 9 a.m. 9 p.m. Sunday 11 a.m. 6 p.m. 2816 Hwy. 98 West 575 Down....................2001 Pontiac Grand Prix575 Down...........1999 Dodge Durango, 3-rows775 Down......................1998 Ford F150 Ex/Cab1,900 Down...........2001 Chevy Silverado Ex/cab AUTO FINaANCINGDAYLIGHT For RRent in Hosford3 BD, 2 BA mobile home, fenced yard, partially furnished. months rent due at lease signing. 379-3346 or 545-6537 Want to see whats new with TT upperware? Meet or call your local Tupperware Consultant for Parties, Orders or Fundraisers. ceive free hostess gifts. The more you sell, the greater the gifts.Call Beth Eubanks, your full time Tupperware Consultant at (850) 643-2498 or email at bethseubanks41@aol.com.Visit me online at www.my.tupperware.com/bethseubanks

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Page 22 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL OCTo OBER 12, 2011 Man arrested for 5th time for driving with a suspended/revoked licenseA man known not to have a valid drivers license was spotted by a Calhoun County Sheriffs Deputy traveling along Ashley Shiver Road on a dirt bike around 7:15 p.m. Oct. 3. When Deputy Jared Nichols recognized Simon Jared Hathaway, 32, of Altha he turned around to conduct the dirt bike. Nichols stopped at the intersection of Ashley Shiver Road and NW Annie Grantham Road and noticed a track where a dirt bike had made a sudden turn onto a lime rock road. About 50 feet down the road, the deputy saw that the dirt bike had been left under an old barn east of the roadway. Hathaway The motor of the bike was still hot. number showed the Honda CRF 70F belonged to Hathaway, who was previously arrested on the same bike by another deputy Sept. 9. A tow truck was called to remove the bike but before it arrived, Hathaways mother drove up. She told the deputy her son was not home and left, but returned a short time later with her daughter. Hathaways mother then leaned down beside the dirt bike as though she was going to pick it up but was stopped by Nichols, who told her it would be impounded because it was used in the commission of a felony. When the women became verbally combative, according to Nichols report, he turned on his patrol car camera. Hathaways mother insisted the bike would not be towed and accused deputies of harassing and picking on her son. The dirt bike was towed and a hold was placed on it pending possible seizure. A warrant was issued for Hathaway. Hathaway was arrested Oct. 5 and charged with felony driving while license suspended or revoked, violation of community release and operating an unregistered motor vehicle. The original offense report noted that he had been arrested for driving while license suspended or revoked four times with two convictions. He is being held without bond. RREST REPORTS compiled by Journal Editor Teresa Eubanks AAlthough the victim offered to forgo it was discovered that he had stolen $10,000, the young man wouldnt agree to the conditions that were set. The victim who is related to the he would agree to live with her, honor an 8 p.m. curfew, be respectful to his teachers and other adults, do his homework and not skip school. The boys response? Just prosecute me. According to a report from Altha Police Chief Jimmy Baggett, a young male relative of the victim said he was at her home last month and went into her bedroom to speak with her. She took a ring and a pendant along with a He told the police chief he went to a friends house, where he showed him the items. He kept the ring but left the pendant behind. His friend later turned the pendant over to Baggett. The boy was charged with grand theft.Altha juvenile charged with grand theft for taking ring & pendant worth over $10,000continueCONTINUED FromROM Pa AGeE 2 A Kissimmee man sustained incapacitating injuries in a single-vehicle accident F Friday morning on SR 12 in Liberty County. According the F FHPP report, Angel Luis Bush, 20, was eastbound on SR 12 and approached a right curve at over 75 mph and lost control of the vehicle. The 2007 Chevrolet HHR crossed the center double solid line, went through the westbound lane and into the north ditch. The vehicles front right tire and undercarriage collided with a culvert, causing it to become airborne, rotating in a spiral motion onto the drivers side as it hit the ground. The vehicle overturned front end to back end and collided with a small tree, coming to rest about 1.8 miles east of CR 1641. The driver was wearing a seat belt but his airbag did not deploy. He was taken to a Tallahassee hospital by Liberty EMS. The 9:45 a.m. crash was investigated by F FHPP Trooper Jason King. Bush was cited for careless driving. JOHNNY EUBANKS PPHOTO Driver injured in single-vehicle crash Friday in Liberty CountyProbationer arrested in BBristol after leaving treatment centerA woman who was taken into custody on a probation violation is facing additional charges after she was arrested in Bristol Oct. 3. A warrant was issued for Angela Diane Mickel, 40, of Blountstown after she left a residential treatment facility in Tallahassee on Sept. 16 without notifying was on probation following her conviction for grand theft of a motor vehicle. Todd Wheetley stopped a car in which Mickel was a passenger around 4:10 p.m. When she stepped out of the vehicle, she told Wheetley, I was going to turn myself in this week. Wheetley found pills lying loose in the bottom of Mickels purse, along with a pill bottle containing residue that tested positive for methamphetamine. In addition to the probation violation, Mickel was charged with two counts of possession of prescription pills without a prescription methamphetamine and possession of less She is being held without bond. anANGelaELA DianeIANE mickelMICKEL SimonIMON HathaATHA Way AYCalhoun Chamber to hold Membership Appreciation Breakfast on Thursday, Oct. 20The Calhoun County Chamber of Commerce will show their appreciation to their members by hosting a Membership Appreciation Breakfast Thursday, Oct. 20 at 7 a.m. at the Calhoun County Senior Center. While the past year has been a struggle for many, Chamber members have worked together to help support and sustain our local business community. Our Chamber strives to cover much ground as we work towards our overall mission: To provide community leadership, support existing businesses, lead the way to economic growth, and promote our community through tourism. These goals affect our community in countless ways from local jobs and opportunities, to maintaining an outstanding quality of life in Calhoun County. As the 2011-2012 membership year begins, the Chamber Board of Directors wants to infuse the organization with new ideas, new faces, and new energy to help work towards a stronger and more sustainable community. We invite all members to attend the breakfast, and to bring a potential new member to the event. Please plan to join fellow Chamber members for a breakfast buffet beginning at 7 a.m. on Thursday, Oct. 20. To assist with planning, all guests MUST RSVP by calling or emailing Kristy Terry at 674-4519 or kristy@calhounco.org.

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OCTo OBER 12, 2011 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 23 CLJ NEWS .COM To place your ad call us at 643-3333 SERVICE DIRECTORY Whaley Heating & Air Conditioning (850) 674-4777FL LicIC. # CMC1249570 Accepting:R Is s s : (850) 643-6925 : (850) 643-2064 : grich0656@aol.com10536-B NW SR 20 Bristol, FL 32321 Located in the Apalachee RestaurantGary RRichards, EEA MBBAEnrolled Agent Enrolled to Practice Before the IRS BBusiness & Accounting Solutions Inc. 4433 NW C.R. 274 Altha, Fl 32421 (850) 762-9402 Cell (850) 832-5055Dozer and Excavation work Over 20 years experienceClay ONealsLand Clearing, Inc. William's HomeImprovements "No Job Too Big or Small"Concrete work, landscape, pressure cleaning, renovations, seamless gutter, painting, vinyl, & screen enclosure CCall 674-8092Licensed & Insured, contractor & rooferFORR FREEREE EESTTIMATE TES LIBERTY TTIRE COMPANY 10781 NW SR 20 Bristol, Fl 32321Call 643-2939 MV75332Hours: Monday thru Friday 7 5 & Saturday 7 12Come see us for all your tire needs or give us a call for roadside service, oil changes & tire rotation. We specialize in sales and repair of tires for:Commercial Trucks and Trailers, OTR Equipment, Farm Equipment, Passenger Car & Light Truck Tires Call Chris Nissley at 674-8081 or 643-8561 (Cell) STUMP GRINDINGReasonable Rates & FreeREE Estimates! That Darn PumpThere is never a convenient time to be without water.WELLsS psa s(850)643-HELP Thats 643-4357 or Home 643-3857For friendly service and never any overtime charges call, iesesreBBARLRLOWSDR Repair & Water ServicesWell drilling & Pump repairD ________________________Serving Gulf, Franklin, BBay,C Calhoun, Washington &L Liberty CCounties________________________850-639-9355or850-814-7454 Hwy 71 South on J.P. Peacock Rd, Altha. Day or night,Check out our prices before buying from somewhere else. For Weddings, Birthdays and all Holidays, come in or call us. Margies Florist Phone David Morris at (850) 868-1295 or Dispatch at (850) 575-4414 Locally owned & OperatedNow serving the Hosford, Telogia, and Bristol areas. Septic Tank ServiceBRISTOLCCall 643-2691 or 273-0758 Clint Hatcher, OwnerElectrical Lic. # ER13014037 Building Lic. # RB29003511New Homes Garages Additions Electrical Remodeling Foundations Screenrooms Sunrooms VINYL SIDING RESIDENTAL & COMMERCIAL FREE EstimatesServing C Calhoun, LLiberty & Jackson C CountiesLLearn about bears, have great family fun at Forgotten C Coast BBlack BBear Festival October 15 in CCarrabelleAs fall settles into the Big Bend, the Florida black bear begins foraging for winter. Its a perfect time to celebrate the states largest land mammal. Come out for the third annual Forgotten Coast Black Bear Festival, an event dedicated to helping people understand and live in harmony with the Florida black bear. The family-oriented festival is Saturday, Oct. 15, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Sands Park in Carrabelle. The festival is free and a great way for families to spend the day together doing something fun and educational. The small, Gulf-side community of Carrabelle is in Franklin County, which sits in the heart of Apalachicola National Forest, one of Floridas biggest undeveloped habitats for black bears. Our goal is for festival-goers to learn everything they always wanted to know about the Florida black bear and more, said David Telesco, bear management program coordinator for the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC). Helping people understand bear behavior is one of the primary goals for the festival. If people who live in bear country understand what makes bears tick, they will know what they can do to discourage bears from hanging around in their neighborhoods. Telesco will offer informative presentations about black bears and their biology. Betsy Knight will tell interesting stories about wildlife rehabilitation, and Laurie McDonald of Defenders of Wildlife will share tips on how to coexist with black bears. Other activities at the festival include exciting tours into bear habitat with Adam Warwick, an FWC biologist who gained instant fame by rescuing a black bear from drowning in the bay off Alligator Point. Join us in the storytelling tent, where you can sit on hay bales and enjoy stories from local authors or listen to great music by locally renowned southern rock and blues band King Cotton and folk musician Dale Crider. Bring your kids to the Come Be a Bear activity, and watch them transform into a black bear and learn about the life of a bear through the seasons. The festival is presented by the FWC, Defenders of Wildlife, U.S. Forest Service, Florida Forest Service, city of Carrabelle and the Franklin County Tourist Development Council. For more information about the third annual Forgotten Coast Black Bear Festival visit www.mycarrabelle.com or call the festival coordinator, Allen Loyd at (727) 823-3888. High school students invited to create bear-awareness video for FWC contestHigh school students interested in conserving the Florida black bear and raising public awareness about bears are invited to create a 1-minute video. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) is extending the deadline in its 2011 Florida black bear public service announcement (PSA) contest. Launched in May, the FWCsponsored contest now has a deadline of Nov. 18. High school students participating in the contest will use their creativity to inform Floridians about black bears, so people their communities. The winners videos will be posted online at MyFWC.com and YouTube. com/MyFWCvideos. Winning entries also will be submitted to television stations in Florida for possible airtime. There will be other prizes as well. For more information, email BearContest@MyFWC.com or visit MyFWC. com/Bear.

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Page 24 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL OCTo OBER 12, 2011

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Page 1 LCHS HOMECOMING INSERT OCTo OBER 12, 2011 OCTo OBER 12, 2011 / LCHS HOMECOMING INSERT Page 4 MV5496City Tire Co.Hwy. 20 West Blountstown 674-8784 Way to Go Bulldogs!Charles McClellan Funeral Home15 S. Jackson 627-7677 or 643-2277 16998 NE State Rd., IN HOSFORD Phone 379-8672 Blackburns Grocery & Hardware Bristol City HallWe love our BULLDOGS! Hwy. 20 in BRIStTOL 643-2264palachee Restaurant buffet before heading to the game!A Compliments of your friends at 20291 Central Ave. West Blountstown 674-4359 Apalachee Tax ServiceBusiness and Accounting Solutions Inc. PHONE (850) 643-6925LOCATED IN THE AAPAl L ACHEE RESTAUr R ANTE-mail: grich0656@aol.comGary Richards, EA MBAEnrolled Agent Enrolled to Practice Before the IRS Go Dawgs! 643-2442 (850)643-4068 BRISTOL 66 Towing Call 643-5254 Go BullDogs! 643-2378 LIBERTY COUNTY HIGhH SchCHOOlL HOMECOMING 2011 A Luau Homecoming nights football game against West Gadsden, which ended with a 26-17 win for the Bulldogs. Earlier Summer Read and Homecoming King Kyle Brunson (seated in front) are shown below with the court. Bulldogs take 26-17 victory over West Gadsden at Homecoming defense held West Gadsden scoreless in the second half of the game. DANIEEL WILLIAMS PHOTT OS Bass drum Blane marches with the LCHS band. Drum major Marotta leads The Sound of Liberty in

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Page 2 LCHS HOMECOMING INSERT OCTo OBER 12, 2011 OCTo OBER 12, 2011 / LCHS HOMECOMING INSERT Page 3 RamseysPiggly Wiggly Have a great football season!LocOCAte TED inIN BristolRISTOL AnND BloLOUntstoNTSTOWnN WW ay to go Bulldogs! Located on State RRoad 20BBristol B Buy RRite Drugs CongratulationsBULLDOGS!The Liberty County Property Appraisers Ofce The Liberty County Property Appraisers Ofce WAL MARTAlL WAYsS lo LOW PricesRICES.Always. We are proud of ourLIBERTY COUNTYBUBULLDOOGS!TTHEE LIBERTY COUNTY ShHERIFFsS OOFFIcCEwould like to say ... LIBERTY TTIRE COMPANY10781 NW SR 20 in Bristol643-2939 TT win Oaks Juvenile Development, Inc.A Florida CorporationFor employment information Go LCHS Bulldogs Bay BBlountstownFoORdDGo LCHS Bulldogs! Blountstown DRUGS Congratulations on a great Homecoming celebration! Phone sw Pizza & SSubs Whaley Heating & Air Conditioning(850)674-4777c Season, Bulldogs! Good Luck Thishsscal fra sasctnfth mcmnsmassblbth srtrsan a rtsrslstal nth btt mfacha LIBERTY COUNTY HIGhH SchCHOOlL HOMECOMING 2011 OVEEO IG enjoyed a week of special dress days, with Character DDay, Twin DDay, Color DDay and Hawaiian DDay as they led up to Fridays homecoming EO Students cheer during theW W omanless Beauty PPageant. Before Thursdays coronation, students gathered WW ednesday afternoon for a WW omanless Beauty PPageant where male students competed to contestant. A At least one of the contenders for the crown suffered A A contestant in the W W omanless Beauty P Pageant succeeds in get ting the judges attention before PPhotos by Sharon OD Daniel WWilliams and Teresa Eubanks.OVE decorating contest with giant stuffed panther on a spit to show what a roasting the Bulldogs would EEVIS FUNERAlLHoOMEWay to go, Dawgs!!! EB