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The Calhoun-Liberty journal
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00027796/00289
 Material Information
Title: The Calhoun-Liberty journal
Portion of title: Calhoun Liberty journal
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: The Liberty Journal, Inc.
Place of Publication: Bristol Fla
Publication Date: 09-14-2011
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Bristol (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Liberty County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Calhoun County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Liberty -- Bristol
Coordinates: 30.426944 x -84.979167 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in Sept. 1991.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 11, no. 38 (Sept. 18, 1991).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002046630
oclc - 33425067
notis - AKN4565
lccn - sn 95047245
System ID: UF00027796:00289
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly journal (Bristol, Fla.)

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News from the Pews...10 Confederate Signal Corps...20 9/11 Remembrance Ceremony..21 Obituaries...23 Arrest Reports...2 & 3 Community Calendar...4 Commentary...6, 7 New ambulance arrives...8 Almanac...1150includes tax THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY J OURNAL Volume 31, Number 37 Wednesday, September 14, 2011 CLJ News.comPair of escaped inmates spotted at McDonalds; both in custody soon after chaseby Teresa Eubanks, Journal EditorTwo 19-year-old inmates who slipped out of the Calhoun County Jail last week were soon back in custody after being spotted at McDonalds. Kristopher Honrine, of Altha, and Christopher Leach, of Blountstown left the jail at 1:08 a.m. Tuesday, Sept. 6. Deputies had them in handcuffs by 2 a.m. They left the jail through a cell door that they had manipulated so it would not lock securely, said Sheriff David Tatum. Once through the cell door, they were able to gain access to a maintenance hallway. The pair then left through a rear exit. The correctional officer working in the jail that evening went outside to his vehicle to get his lunch around 12:30 a.m. and stopped to talk with a dispatcher when he returned. Around 1 a.m., he heard a loud knock coming from the inside of the jail door and was met by two inmates who told him of the escape. checked the dorms. By 1:18 a.m., an alert was issued for the two inmates, who were CHRIST OPHER LEACH KRIST OPHER HONRINE line of motorcycles are reflected in the sunglasses worn by Andy Waldorff, president of the Calhoun he looks out on the riders gathered for Saturdays Poker Run fundraiser. Find out more on page 29. BEN HALL PHOT OPoker RunSee ESCAPEES BACK IN JAIL on page 20 Folks of all ages enjoyed S aturdays FlyI n at the Calhoun County A irport. Many kids got a chance for looks out the window as she heads into the sky. ABOVE Blountstown shows plenty of enthusiasm before going up in a helicopter. More photos inside on page 13! BEN HALL PHOTOS Calhoun AIRPORTFLY-IN

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Page 2 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 14, 2011 SH ER IFFS LOG Blountstown Police Dept. Citations issued: Accidents Special details Business alarms Residential alarms Sept. 5 VOP, CCSO. Sept. 6 escape, CCSO. escape, CCSO. VOP, CCSO. resisting, obstructing opCCSO. battery on a law enforceSept. 7 CCSO. non-support, CCSO. Sept. 8 DUI, CCSO. Sept. 9 VOP, CCSO. CCSO. Sept. 11 DUI, FHP. Sept. 5 Sept. 7 Sept. 8 VOCP, LCSO. Sept. 9 VOSP, LCSO. LCSO. property damage, criminal Sept. 11 LCSO. VOP, LCSO. DEALER of ACCEPTING NEW PA TIENTS www.bristoldentalclinic.com Same-Day Service on R epairs & R elines Bristol Dental Clinic Pitts charged with possessing ingredients to make methInformation that a Blountstown man had just purchased cold medicine containing pseudoephedrine in Jackson County resulted in the arrest of Michael Pitts for possession of listed chemicals Pitts was stopped at 5:16 Pitts was searched and a small piece of a marijuana pot method of making methamphetamine were found, with pseudoephedrine and an unopened gallon can of ARREST REPORTS Man charged with felony criminal mischief after ramming truckA man upset that his girlfriend charged with felony criminal mischief and property damage rammed a truck she was using explaining that she returned that day to get her clothing said she continued packing her things, which angered had happened, he said they got into an argument after Tallahassee woman leaving reception stopped for DUIA 23-year-old Tallahassee woman who said she was heading home after attending a reception was arrested into the middle of the road a second time as an oncoming later, she asked for another chance to walk a line heelMICHAEL PITTS

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SEPTEMBER 14, 2011 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 3 ARREST REPORTScontinued from the previous page by Teresa Eubanks, Journal EditorA 38-year-old Blountstown man is facing a long list of charges after an altercation at a SR 71 South home left a lot of blood behind, two people with minor injuries and damages to a home and a truck. 1:30 a.m. Sunday reporting that Jason William Mills had gone to the residence of Vicki Lynn King armed with a knife and was tearing up the house. By the time he was taken into custody, the charges against Mills included aggravated battery with a deadly weapon, burglary with battery, felony criminal mischief, misdemeanor criminal mischief, battery on a with violence. walking out of the driveway of Kings home and going north on SR 71. The deputys report stated that Mills had blood on his face and was walking in an aggressive manner with Mills ignored the deputys order to stop and continued walking away. The deputy warned him he was taking out his taser and again told him to stop and get on the ground. Mills complied but as the deputy attempted to handcuff him, Mills pulled away and tried to hit Hoagland. When Mills tried to stand up, the deputy subdued him and again started to handcuff him as the two struggled. Mills made a second attempt to get up and was again stopped by the and threw it into the northbound lane of SR 71. After again threatening to use his taser, Hoagland was able to restrain Mills. the scene to assist Hoagland with Mills, who was still struggling. At that point, the deputy deployed his taser used a second time. Paramedic Aaron Carter arrived and helped get Mills in handcuffs and into a patrol car, where he began kicking the doors. Cpl. Eddie Dalton assisted in putting Mills in leg shackles. Mills gave a statement in which he said he had been invited into the home and when he entered, he was jumped by Charles Brandon Dorch, 24. He admitted he had a knife and stated Dorch had one, too. He said he was so upset by the altercation that he began tearing up the house. After he ended his statement and the tape recorder was stopped, Mills told referring to King. When asked what he meant, Mills said, King and Mills gave a very different account of what happened that morning. According to King, she heard a loud knock at her door not welcome. She said when Mills started forcing the door open, Dorch went to the rear of the home to look out and see exactly where Mills was. Mills forced the door open, came in and grabbed King, holding her tightly. King said she asked several times for him to let go of her before he would. She said she then told him to leave and he responded by slapping in her the face, which Dorch said he witnessed. When Dorch ran out the back door. She said once she was outside, she heard the sound of glass shattering and looked to see Mills breaking out the windows of her home. The deputys report stated that Dorch was covered in blood and had a cut on the top of his right hand. He was treated at the scene by Calhoun EMS. Dorchs account of events matched Kings and he stated that he saw Mills grab her and hit her in the face. When the a knife and stabbed him in the hand, according to Dorch. He said Mills then tried to cut him in the face but he moved and the knife caught his lip. Dorch then went out the back door with Mills behind him. Once outside, Dorch said he began chasing Mills. He said Mills grabbed a weedeater from a neighbors yard and tried to hit him with it. He said Mills went back in the residence, began throwing things around and breaking the windows. Dorch walked past his 2002 Ford pickup, which was parked behind the home, and went to Kings parents house. When he returned to talk with deputies he saw the trucks windshield had been smashed and the drivers side mirror broken. back door, where there was a large amount of blood. The deadbolt on the front door was in the locked position and the door was bent. The disarray inside the home was photographed. Mills is being held on $63,500 bond. WILLIAM JASON MILLS Tallahasse man charged with DUI after calls about reckless driver on SR 71NA man who said he got lost driving from one side of Tallahassee to the other was charged with DUI after a deputy saw a vehicle forced to take evasive action to prevent a head-on collision around 9 p.m. Thursday. Deputies responded to several reports of a reckless driver traveling south on SR 71N at a high rate of speed while swerving all over the road. Near John F. Bailey Road, a deputy spotted the vehicle and measured its speed at 80 mph while it was straddling the center line of the road, causing other drivers to go off the pavement to avoid a crash. After a deputy pulled up behind the vehicle with his emergency lights and siren on, the driver William Joseph Tebo, 55, of Tallahassee continued on for another mile and a half before pulling over. During that time, Tebo continued weaving across the road and crossing the center line numerous times, according to the deputys report. Once Tebo stopped, the deputy had to tell him to it took him several minutes of fumbling through his wallet before the contents spilled out and he found his license. He almost fell to the ground after he stepped out to take a roadside sobriety test. Efforts to follow instructions to determine his ability to drive failed as he tried to walk heel-to-toe and turn and seemed unable to distinguish his right foot from his left. When deputies looked inside a briefcase in the vehicle, they found two prescription pill bottles. One was potassium; the other was the anti-anxiety medication Buspirone HCL, which had a warning label that said its Tebo later said he had taken two Valiums that day. Two receipts from Bonifay were found in his pocket. One was from a convenience store and the other was from a liquor store.Woman threatened after domestic battery arrestA report of a disturbance at a mobile home park on Rock Bluff Road led to the arrest of a Greensboro man for domestic battery Friday night. Christopher W. Lewis, 30, was taken into custody by a woman who said he grabbed her by the hair, and kicked her in the rib cage after accusing her of cheating on him. Deputy Chad Smith noted that the womans left side was red, she had bruising around her right eye and on her right arm and there were scrapes on her left shoulder. She directed the deputy to a bedroom where she said Lewis was. The deputy went down the hall and called out to Lewis several times with no response. When Smith entered the room, he found Lewis on the bed. Lewis emerged from the room when Smith asked if they could go out front and talk. Lewis was then arrested. As he was being led out to a patrol car, he threatened the woman in front of when he got out of jail. WILLIAM LEWIS WILLIAM TEBO LAND SALE TRI-LAND INC. Owner Financing No Qualifying BOUND RUGS2x4 ..........$5.00 2x8 ........$15.50 3x5 ........$12.50 4x6 ........$19.90 5x7 ........$39.90 6x9 ........$49.90 $ 109 90 $ 142 $ 135 $ $ 139 90 $ 324 $ 99 90 $ 185 $ 139 90 $ 252 $ 159 90 $ 306 $ 125 50 $ 214 $ 195 50 $ 315 $ 235 $ 285 $ 165 50 $ 291 $ 285 50 $ 561 SIZE COLOR/STYLE SALE PRICEBest Prices In Town!

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Page 4 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 14, 2011Thats how many copies of The Calhoun-Liberty Journal were distributed last week, ensuring plenty of coverage for your community announcements and great response for our business advertisers! 5,370 The Calhoun-Liberty Journal is published each Wednesday by the Liberty Journal Inc., Summers Road, P.O. Box 536, Bristol, FL 32321. Annual subscriptions are $18. Periodicals postage paid at Bristol, FLPOSTMASTER: Send address corrections to: P.O. Box 536, Bristol, FL 32321. (USPS 012367) Summers Road Located at 11493 NW Summers Road in Bristol MAILING ADDRESS: P.O. Box 536, Bristol, FL 32321 TELEPHONE (850) 643-3333 Fax (850) 643-3334 EMAIL: thejournal@fairpoint.net ADS: cljads@fairpoint.net JOURNAL ST AFFJohnny Eubanks...................Publisher Teresa Eubanks........................ Editor Sandra Brown...................Bookkeeper Debbie Duggar...................Advertising Angie Davis.........Production AssistantOFFICE HOURS: 9 a.m. 6 p.m. M-F, Saturdays from 9 a.m. until 1 p.m.THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Wednesday, September 14 TODAYS MEETINGS 9 a.m., Veterans Memorial Park Civic Center 7 p.m., Altha Volunteer Fire Department AA, 6 p.m., Altha Community Center noon, Senior Citizens Center 5 p.m., Ag. Bldg., Conference Room across from Courthouse 6 p.m., Fire House 7 p.m., Dixie Lodge in Blountstown TODAYS MEETINGS7 p.m., Veterans Memorial Park Civic Center 4 p.m., Liberty Emergency Management buildingTODAYS MEETINGS, noon, Calhoun-Liberty Hospital 7 p.m., Calhoun County Old Ag Bldg. east door, in front of jail 6:30 p.m., Mormon Church in BristolTODAYS MEETINGSAA, 7 p.m., basement of Calhoun County Courthouse 7 p.m., Fire House 4 p.m., Calhoun Liberty Hospital Monday, September 19 Tuesday, September 20 Sunday, September 18 Saturday, September 17 Thursday September 15 Friday, September 16BIRTHDAYS Kaiden Burke BIRTHDAYS Trent Smith & Nick Finch BIRTHDAYS Hannah Sumner CausseauxBIRTHDAYS Carlos Rainwater & Leroy WilliamsBIRTHDAYS Edwards Cooley & Tim RevellBIRTHDAYS James Flowers Garden Tea Party 2 p.m., Pioneer Settlement Attend the Church of your choice this Sunday Happy 108th Birthday Martha Missy Hall LCHS Dawgs vs. Marianna Home at 8 p.m. (ET) B-town Tigers vs. Freeport Home at 7 p.m. (CT) 7 p.m., Rivertown Community Church Southerland to host in Calhoun CountyBLOUNTSTOWN U.S. Representa tive Steve Southerland, II announced that his Florida staff will be hosting mobile ofSept. 15, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. (CT) at in the boardroom. surrounding area are invited to join Rep. Constituent Services Specialist to provide input, ask questions or request assistance Garden Tea Party this Sat., Sept. 17 will be held on Sept. 17 at 2 p.m. at the Pioneer Settlement. There will be door prizes, a silent auction and much more! Chapter 179 Order of the Easter Star. cancer, the Moffet Cancer Center in Tampa and the South Eastern Service Guide Dog organization (Paws for Patriots). from Eileen Bramblett at 643-2610, Lana Weeks at 674-4639 or Margie Mason at 674-8610 as well as at the door. BLOUNTSTOWN A Caregiver Sup15 from 2 to 3 p.m. This group is for those caring for someAlzheimer's, Parkison's and stroke. This is a time of sharing and learning from cumstances. We provide education, resources and counseling. All services are provided free of charge. Please call Recie Culpepper at 386-2778 or 566-2553 for information.Caregiver support group to meet at Gateway Sept. 15 from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Big Bend Hospice is sponsoring a bereavement seminar for professionals and peer supporters that work with bereaved families. Counselors, menpersonnel, funeral and nursing home staff are invited to attend. in supporting the bereaved as well as offering networking opportunities with other disciplines and service providers. This conference will provide professionals with useful and practical strategies to help clients and patients deal with grief, said Pam Mezzina, Bereavement Services Manager at Big well as learning strategies for self-care. There are 3 different tracks to choose from: a bereavement track, a spiritual Professional presenters include Dr. W. staff from Big Bend Hospices Pastoral departments. Nurses, Social Workers and Nursing Home Administrators can earn 6.5 this conference. A registration fee of $79 is required which includes breakfast and lunch. Please 433 with questions or go to www.bigbendhospice.org to register. Wiregrass Heritage Festival to be held Oct. 22 in Dothan from 10 a.m.4 p.m., Landmark Park our region during the Wiregrass Heritage Festival. Peanut harvesting demonstrations will salute farmers, past and present. Other making, a juried quilt show, an antique tractor pull and parade and more. Volunteers will also demonstrate blacksmithing, woodworking, cooking on a wood stove for the tractor show and quilt show can be found at www.landmarkpark.com Admission to Wiregrass Heritage Festival is $8 for adults, $6 for seniors and Landmark Park is a 135-acre historical and natural science park located on For more information, contact the park at 334-794-3452. Big Bend Youth Soccer League sign-ups for ages 4 to 16 will be held in Blountstown at Sam Atkins Park. For more information please call Marianne Parker at 643-1587. For information on Big Bend Youth Soccer League sign-ups in Bristol please call Richie Smith at 643-2175.

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SEPTEMBER 14, 2011 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 5 THE ARTS Friday, Oct. 7*Shane Owens *Cross Creek Junction *Confederate Railroad *Wally G. *T. Graham Brown *Andy Griggs *Daryle Singletary It all happens Columbus Day weekendOctober 7 & 8in beautiful Cottondale, FLand tickets are now on sale Plan to spend the entire weekend in the Real Florida, some of the best weather of the year. All just an hours drive from the Worlds Most Beautiful Beaches. Enjoy great local food, vendors, non-stop entertainment. JOIN US FOR FLORIDA FEST! Tickets at Quickshine Car Wash in Bristol Call 567-1722 Saturday, Oct. 8*Bittersweet Blues Band *James Matthews Hughes *Shawn Rader *King Cotton *Houston Deese *Tabacco Rd. Band *Outshyne *Chris Cagle *Diamond Rio MOREARTISTSCO M INGSOON! The Tree House HOURS 20759 Central Avenue E BLOUNTSTOWN PHONE NUMBERS: 762-2113 or (850) 722-7057 FSUs Seven Days of Opening Nights performing arts festival announces stellar lineup for upcoming seasonTALLAHASSEE. The 14th season of Florida State Universitys popular festival of the performing arts boasts a diverse, eclectic lineup and an array of educational opportunities for universitylevel and K-12 students. Running from Feb. 9-20, Seven Days of Opening Nights will once again highlight Florida States contribution excellence in visual art, theater, dance, val highlights include the Tallahassee debuts of the acclaimed Soweto Gospel Choir, New Orleans powerhouses Allen Toussaint and Trombone Shorty, jazz chanteuse Jane Monheit, comic legend Joan Rivers, the National Theatre of Scotland, and 2010 Pulitzer Prize winner Jennifer Egan. Seven Days will also present perfor mances outside of the festival, including shows by world music master Zakir Hussain (Sept. 28), dance maverick Monica Bill Barnes (Sept. 22-23), the original lineup of Bela Fleck & the Flecktones (March 21), and bestselling author Sarah Vowell (April 1). As always, the festival will focus on education. This season, a dozen Seven Days performers will offer master classes to FSU students of the arts, so that percussionists can learn from Zakir Hussain, writers from Jennifer Egan, dancers from Suzanne Farrell. Its a remarkable opportunity for the students and a hallmark of Seven Days. The festival also has expanded its K-12 offerings. Educational perfor mances and opportunities available for K-12 students include a full performance by the Soweto Gospel Choir in Ruby Diamond Concert Hall and in-school performances by the Ahn Trio and Carolina Chocolate Drops. ping up our education program, said Steve MacQueen, director of Seven Days of Opening Nights. Its one thing to talk about being a cultural leader in the community and another to get out there and do it. Were hoping to create opportunities for both artists and young audiences, and awareness of the arts in general, as well as getting exposure for our program. The full Seven Days of Opening Nights schedule for this season is as follows: & Company: One of the hottest young dancer/choreographers in New York, Barnes mixes comedy, pathos, movement and inventive uses of music to create entire worlds onstage. tabla player Hussain is universally acknowledged as one of the worlds greatest musicians, and a prime architect of the world music movement. For this sesh Chaurasia for an evening of Indian classical music. Inside Straight: Considered one of the will perform as bandleader of his group, Inside Straight. The show also caps the just a decade of existence, this South African choir has become a global sensation, earning two Grammy Awards and performing sold-out concerts to rave reviews around the world. Splendid Treasures of the Turkomen: This dual exhibit from the FSU Museum of Fine Arts offers an array of textiles and an assortment of handcrafted jewelry by the nomadic desert-dwellers of the Turkomen tribes. of the 2010 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction for her novel A Visit from the Goon Squad, Egan brings her unique voice and style to Florida State. Arts: The Tallahassee Museums popular Matinee of the Arts presents a rich lineup of visual and performing arts, including live music on the outdoor stage and in the museums historic buildings. of three Korean sisters educated at Juilliard, the Ahn Trio has created new energy and excitement in chamber music. The trio will perform two shows one at FSU, the other at Thomasvilles Pebble Hill Plantation as well as meeting with both university and K-12 students. music students from Florida States world-renowned wind and percussion programs, PRISM covers the spectrum of band activities at FSU Florida State Chamber Winds, the Campus Band, University Concert Band, Seminole Sound, University Symphonic Band, University Wind Orchestra and, of Cast announced for production of Our T own at Chipola CollegeMARIANNA Chipola College Theatre director Charles Sirmon recently cast local actors in the college production of "Our Town," which opens Nov. 3. The Our Town cast includes: Joe Gibson as Dr. Gibbs, Leah Page as Mrs. Gibbs, Trey McKay as George Gibbs, Jamal Engram as Howie Newsom, Ashleigh Stowe as as Emily Webb, Jae House as Professor Willard, Sierra Hill as Lady in Box, Dante Brown as Simon Stimson, Christin Wiggins as Mrs. Soames, Josh Tetlow as Constable Warren, Matthew Van Buren and Alex Anderson as Baseball Players, Laura Sweat as Sam Craig, Matthew Van Buren as Joe Stoddard, Alexus Perry and Sharraneka Jackson as Townspeople and John David Brown as Stage Manager. Our Town explores the lives of people living in produced in 1938 and received the Pulitzer Prize for Literature. The play is divided into three aspects of the human experience: Daily Life, Love and Marriage, and Death making it one of the most deeply human scripts in all of American theatre. Theatre fans are invited to join The Applauding Chipola Theatre (ACT) VIP fund, which guarantees the best seats bership including Sponsor, Patron, Benefactor, Angel and Corporate Angel with VIP seating available at all levels. A portion of ACT memberships are tax-deductible. For information, contact Charles Sirmon at (850) 7182227 or email: sirmonc@chipola.edu. See SEVEN DAYS OF OPENING NIGHTS continued on page 18 Home of the All-U-Can-Eat menu A little out of the way, A lot less to payFamily Coastal Seafood Restaurant Were Still open New director to speak at Chipola Regional Art Association meetingMARIANNAThe public is invited to attend the Chipola Regional Arts Association (CRAA) meeting on Tuesday, Sept. 20, at Jims Buffet in Marianna. A Dutch-treat luncheon begins at 11:30 a.m. with the program beginning at noon. The program for this will feature Dr. Daniel Powell, the newlyappointed Associate Dean of the Fine and Performing Arts department at Chipola. Dr. Powell will assume leadership over the Chipola Regional Arts Association as their executive director, and will speak about the future of the arts in the Chipola district. Dr. Powell will discuss exciting opportunities in the area and share ways to strengthen the community through the arts. I want to start a conversation with the community, Powell says, to improve and ways to implement this. I am not only an approachable guy, I am eager to meet people and involve everyone in the community with what we are doing. All of those wishing to make a difference in the community are invited to attend all or part of this event. For information, contact Daniel Powell at powelld@chipola.edu or (850) 7182257.DR. DANIEL POWELL

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Page 6 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 14, 2011 COMMENTARY Late Night LaughsA RECAP OF RECENT OBSER V ATIONS BY LATE NIGHT TV HOSTS.President Obama introduced his $447 billion jobs plan. A lot of economists say it could work if we had $447 billion. JAY LENOThe Republican presidential candidates had a debate at the Reagan Library. They were going to have it at the George W. Bush Library but they CONAN OBRIENAccording to the latest poll, a record 73 percent of Americans think the country is headed in the wrong direction. But the good news: Gas is so expensive that well never get there. JAY LENOPresident Obama plans to create thousands of new jobs by replacing all automobile GPS systems with real people who sit in the back seat with a map. JIMMY KIMMELAccording to the latest poll, a record 73 percent of Americans think the country is headed in the wrong direction. But the good news: Gas is so expensive that well never get there. JAY LENORick Perry said he understands healthcare because his wife is a nurse. He also says he understands terrorism because he watched all the seasons of . CONAN OBRIENRick Perry and Mitt Romney squared off at the Republican debate. The only thing they agreed on was shampoo, rinse, and repeat. JAY LENOTomorrow is Bring Your Son or Daughter to the DA VID LETTERMANThe oil industry said if they were allowed to drill more, they could create over a million new jobs. Of course most of those jobs would be cleaning oil off ducks. CONAN OBRIENTo give an idea of how bad the economy is, the NFL had to borrow the quarter for the coin toss from China. And they want it back. CONAN OBRIENMichele Bachmann said that if she is elected president, she would consider eliminating the Department of Education because the states could do a gooder job. JAY LENORick Perry used to be a Democrat. But then again, Barack Obama used to be a Democrat too. JAY LENO"Jobs Plan Tanks," screamed the Drudge Report the morning after the president's much anticipated speech. The headline linked to reports of the drops on the various stock markets, which are based, it appears, as much on global uncer tainty as they are on the support, or lack thereof, of the president's plan. But does it matter? The problem with building expectations is that whether you are a candidate or a president or a football coach you almost never meet them. That's why the usual game is to hype things down rather than up so that you can do better than expected or, to borrow from Bill Clinton, assume the mantle of "the Comeback Kid." Which is precisely what Barack Obama needs. In truth, the reaction was predictable. The logical recourse for a president seeking to create jobs is to spend money either by appropriating it or by for going it in tax cuts. When I was in law school, legendary tax professor Stan Surrey taught us that tax different from appropriations. "Tax expenditures" he called them. Conservatives, led by President Reagan Budget Director David Stockman, never bought it. Invoking JFK's 1960s tax cuts, they managed to convince the country that you could cut taxes and increase spending It didn't work that way, and years later, Stockman admitted that he never quite bought it even when he was doing it. Last month, when the president proposed closing ting the supposedly temporary Bush cuts for the richthe president backed down. Last week, when he proposed tax breaks for businesses that create jobs or raise wages, as well as new spending for infrastruc ture repair, they screamed bloody murder about the The short answer is that the Republicans aren't going to do anything to help this president, at least when it comes to economic policy. They'll never admit that their goal is to keep those unemploy ment numbers high, to wreak havoc with markets, recovery. In fairness, their strategy makes perfect sense. Their goal is to put a Republican in the White House, and sadly, from a policy perspective, the easiest way to do that is by keeping the bread and butter off the table and the chicken out of every pot. What became clear Thursday night is that the president is not going to win this election by seeking consensus in Washington, no matter how good his without looking both arrogant and weak, he isn't going to get a deal to pass his budget initiatives. Voters say they want consensus, but if Obama tries to deliver it, he will lose. Which leaves the oththe sand, even if it stays there. In times like this, the only way to win the presidency may be to put it at risk in no uncertain terms. What Obama needs more than a good and balGUEST COLUMNby Susan EstrichSusan Estrich is a legal and political analyst who appears frequently on FOX NEWS and contributes articles to NewsMax. com. She is a law professor and the author of several books.

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SEPTEMBER 14, 2011 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 7 WASHINGTONMERRY-GO-ROUNDby Douglas Cohn and Eleanor Clift CHINA TURMOIL IS COMING COMMENTARY WASHINGTON The 10th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks 2011 U.S. News Syndicate, Inc.

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Page 8 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 14, 2011 Calhoun Liberty HOSPITALCalhoun-Liberty Hospital will be offering *Free Mammography screenings October 17-31 *If you have insurance, CLH will bill your insurance. Patients will not be responsible for deductible or co-pay. See your doctor for your order today! We are dedicated to womens health.New digital mammography machine.Calhoun Liberty Hospital/ Calhoun County EMS has taken delivery of a new Wheeled Coach. The vehicle has four-wheel drive and is for three new electric stretchers at a cost of $23,000.FROM LEFT: Paramedic Sara Moses, EMT Andy Waldorff, Paramedic Latrinda Kemp, Paramedic Supervisor Jarrod Wester and EMT Jake Miller are show in front of the new vehicle. Calhoun-Liberty EMS gets new ambulance, 3 electric stretchersInfant death rate in 5-county area slightly higher than statesMARIANNA paign to increase the awareness of the high rate of infant

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SEPTEMBER 14, 2011 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 9 Williams to represent Liberty on Chipola Healthy Start BoardThe Chipola Healthy Start Board of Directors welcomed Richard Alan Williams, of Bristol, as their new board member at Director, he has spent the last nine years area, said Chipola Healthy Start Board Besides Chipola Healthy Start, Wilwife Denise settled in Bristol where they while employed as the owner/operator of a the Chipola Healthy Start Board as, Chipola Healthy Start is 501(c)3 nonCLJ N ews .COM Haney Video Games opens in BlountstownHaney Video is the newest business to open in Blountstown. Owned and operated by Sherrie and Able Haney of Bristol, the shop is located in a room of the cabin at McMillan Trees & Shrubs. The business offers new and pre-owned games as well as sells and trades gaming systems and accessories. Shown above at Saturdays grand opening, from left: Jacob Reed and his little brother, Samuel, Allen Holbert, Juston Burdick, Samantha Reed and co-owner Sherrie Haney at the cash register. DANIEL WILLIAMS PHOTO Martha Hall will mark 108th birthday Thursday, Sept. 15SUMMER RAYNE STONESummer Rayne Stone celebrated her ninth birthday Sept. 12. She is the daughter of Nick and April Stone of Clarksville. Her grandparents are Teresa and the late Larry Lee of Clarksville, Ben Stone of Kinard, Donna Osborne and the late Harlan Reddick of Bristol. Her birthdaysgreat-grandparents are Elizabeth and the late Harry Osborne of Blountstown, Rufus and Katie Reddick of Bristol, the late Nick and Lucille Demat of Clarksville and the Late B.H. and Nadine Stone and just being silly. Want to see whats new with T upperware? Meet or call your local Tupperware Consultant for Parties, Orders or Fundraisers. and receive a free hostess gifts. The more you sell, the greater the gifts.Call Beth Eubanks, your full time Tupperware Consultant at (850) 643-2498 or email at bethseubanks41@aol.com.Visit me online at www.my.tupperware.com/bethseubanks

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Page 10 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 14, 2011 Blountstown Health and Rehab16690 SW Chipola Road, Blountstown T elephone (850) 674-4311 Blountstown Health and Rehabilitation Center provides short-term and long-term care in a warm, personal manhealthcare, centered on caregiver compassion, offered in a comfortable home-like setting. Come Home to Rehab NEWS FROM THE PEWS Note of ThanksThis past Sunday as the family of Carr Chapel Advent Christian Church gathered to worship God, Pastor Harris used the time not only to present God's Word but to honor First Responders. We were blessed to have three men in the fellowship to stand in place of those who served on that faithful day on 9/11. Charles Morris of the Jackson County Sheriffs Department stood for all law enforcement people. David Odum, a Colonel in the Army Reserves, represented our service men and women in harms way, on the need to pray and witness to those of the Muslim faith Also to remember the price that converts from the Muslim faith pay in calling Jesus Christ their Lord and Saviour REVIVAL OPEN ARMS ASSEMBL Y OF GOD Open Arms Assembly of God will be having revival services from Sunday, Sept. 25 through Wednesday, Sept. 28. Sunday services will start with Sunday School at 10 a.m. followed by morning worship at 11 a.m. and evening worship will be at 6 p.m. Services will be held at 7 p.m. Monday through Wednesday. Be sure to come each night to hear an outpouring of Gods word through Rev. Juno Douglas. Campmeeting services are held every second and fourth Sunday evening at 6 p.m. The Wednesday night services are weekly at 7 p.m. and include classes for youth and children. The church is located at the corner of Hwy. 73 South and Smith Tower Road in Kinard. For more information please call Pastor B ill Mayo at 693-0445. CARR CHAPE L ADVENT CHRISTIAN CHURCH On Friday, Sept. 9 the inaugural fellowship meeting of Calhoun County Pastors The family of Edwin Earl Goodman Jr. would like to express sincere thanks and appreciation to all of our friends and family for the many expressions of kindness and sympathy given during the loss of our loved one. Whether a hug, a telephone calls, emails or cards it is all genuinely appreciated and we know that Ed would appreciate your kind gestures as well. It is during a time like this that we learn how much our friends really mean to us. Knowing you will miss him too makes our burden a bit easier to bear. The Edwin E. Goodman Jr. FamilyFROM LEFT : Wives was held at Carr Chapel. N ancy Kelly represented the Church of the Nazarene in Blountstown and Janice Harris represented Carr Chapel. There was a time of fellowship, prayer for our churches, community, and nation and a devotion from Max Lucados book Just Like Jesus. Another meeting has been set for Oct. 6 at 2 p.m. at Carr Chapel. Y ou may call Janice Harris at (386) 209-2524 for more information. P RA YE R C HA INE RS MI SSI ON OF GOD The members of Prayer Chainers Mission of God will be celebrating their annual Pastor Appreciation and Revival services on Sunday, Sept. 18 through Sept. 25. Sunday services will be held at noon and again at 4 p.m. with weekly services at 6:30 p.m. (CT) Our theme is The Hands of a Mighty War rior and as Paul states, For though we walk weapons of our warfare are not carnal, but mighty through God to the pulling down of strong holds; casting down imaginations and every high thing that exalted itself against the knowledge of God, and bringing into captivity every though to the obedience of Christ II Cor. 10:3-5. With this we shall bring in different speakers to be in atten dance with Apostle G.B. Sheard and the Prayer Chainers Mission of God nightly with a high time in the Lord to follow. Come expecting to hear a word from the Lord as some will be healed and others delivered, while we pray for God to save Ghost For more information please call Majorie Peter son at 674-3449, Debra Peterson at 674-9819 or Debra Abner Jones at 674-4101. MAGNOL IA BAPTIST CHURCH Magnolia Baptist Church will be celebrating Home coming on Sunday, Sept. 18. The services will begin at 10 a.m. with music by Swiftwater. Associate Pastor Clint Clemons will be our speaker for the morning worship ser vices followed by lunch in the fellowship hall. The church is located Blountstown on Magnolia Church Rd. off Hwy. 71.For more information please call 674-8080.The USDA-Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) in Florida is encour aging eligible landowners, farmers, and now to sign up for 2012 incentive programs. The application process for 2012 conservation programs is continuous, but funding selections are only made once a year. The Florida NRCS application cutoff date for consideration for Federal Fiscal Y ear 2012 funds is October 31, 2011. Applications received after that date will be considered for future funding periods. Were urging producers to get their applications in as soon as possible to be considered for this years funding. NRCS works with landowners through conservation planning and assistance deand animals that result in productive lands and healthy ecosystems. Cost share funding is available to eligible applicants for the following Farm Bill programs: sistance to farmers and ranchers who face threats to soil, water, air, and related natural NRCS develops contracts with agricul tural producers to voluntarily implement conservation practices. Persons engaged in livestock or agricultural production and owners of non-industrial private forestland are eligible for the program. Eligible land includes cropland, rangeland, pastureland, private non-industrial forestland, and other farm or ranch lands. (WHIP) is a voluntary program for developing or improving high quality habitat that cance. Through WHIP, the NRCS provides private and Tribal landowners for the development of upland, wetland, aquatic, and other types of wildlife habitat. The Wetlands Reserve Program (WRP) to private landowners and Tribes to restore, protect, and enhance wetlands in exchange for retiring eligible land from agriculture. NRCS encourages interested parties to visit with our staff as soon as possible. Applicants who apply early have more time to resolve any program or land eligibility issues. Additional information about NRCS programs is available on our website at www.fl.nrcs.usda.gov or at your local Calhoun, Liberty, Gulf, or Franklin counties contact Brian McGraw or Cathy Davis at the Blountstown USDA (NRCS) Service Center. Call us at (850) 674-8271 ext. 3. Conservation assistance opportunities

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SEPTEMBER 14, 2011 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 11 ASK THEO L D F A R M E R SA L M A N A C Heating & Air Conditioning FL LIC. # CMC1249570 (850) 674-4777Whaley WhaleyIn Shakespeares Much Ado About Nothing, he speaks of the V. B., La Jolla, Calif. Its a complicated equation, but it goes something like this, according to the English poet Stephen Hawes in The Passe-tyme of Plesure (1315): These are inwardly: First, Common witte, and then Ymagination, Fantasy, and Estimation truely, and Memory. The Dictionary of Phrase and Fable (1898) lists same order: common sense, imagination, fantasy, estimation, and memory. It also goes on to explain that common sense is the outcome of imagination is the wit of the mind; fantasy is the imagination linked with judgment; estimation is a measuring of the absolute (time, space, locality, etc.); and memory is the Got all that? Well quiz you later to measure how still got about you. P. L., Paterson, N.J. Its that red thing that no respectable hot fudge sundae should be without, of course. In its purest form, this cherry is the marasca cherry, from the Trieste region of Italy. Its pit is crushed and its juice fermented to make an alcohol-based, bittersweet cordial. The cherries are then soaked in this liquor to make the original maraschino cherry. But the cherry top of ice cream sundaes pure form. Commercial brands of maraschino cherries are mostly made with sugar or corn syrup and red dye. Sometimes, ing is added to the liquid. The good news is that the outlawed some of the more harmful red dyes that were being used, but the cherries are still being dyed to red or, less popularly, to green. The cherries used commer cially may be any edible red cherry. It would be easy to of a maraschino cherry by soaking freshly picked and washed pitted cher ries in a liquor of your choice such as kirsch, kir, or creme de cassis. might be made with an syrup, perhaps red dened with cranberry juice, and fresh, pitted cherries. The nonalcoholic types wouldnt life, of course, and all frigerated. C. F., Milford, Del. Not necessarily, al functioned as weather for their giddy whirling motions, probably started as whittlers amusements or possibly childrens toys in their early forms. A childs windmill, jousting knight on horseback, and pinwheel are other incarnations of the whirligig. Certainly, there are combinations of weather form and function were not always joined. Most whirligig as an early example of folk art that has culture. Early American whirligigs from the 18th and 19th centuries often draw on German or English origins. as well as soldiers from the War, all in their appropriate costume. Cyclists, farmsailors, and sawyers are also common. weathercocks were more goose, or other animal atop the pole. Some had no pointer and perhaps the compass points, or just N for north. Heraldry figuresfor example, ner designswere also common at one time. The Greeks are credited with Romans following suit in the art. SEPT. 12, MONDAY Full Harvest Moon. Moon on equator. Henry Hudson began exploration of what was later named the Hudson River, 1609. He who is contented has enough. SEPT. 13, TUESDAY Conjunction of Uranus and the Moon. Margaret Chase Smith became houses of Congress, 1948. SEPT. 14, WEDNESDAY Holy Cross. Zond 5 launched and Moon, 1968. Actor Patrick Swayze died, 2009. SEPT. 15, THURSDAY Moon at apogee. The Lone Ranger debuted on television with Clayton Moore and Jay Silverheels, 1949. Prince Harry born, 1984. SEPT. 16, FRIDAY Conjunction of Jupiter and the Moon. Pluto stationary. Edward in Missouri River near Vermillion, South Dakota, 1959. SEPT. 17, SATURDAY Writer William Carlos Williams born, 1883. Vanessa Williams became crowned Miss America, 1983. SEPT. 18, SUNDAY Four teenth Sunday after Pentecost. Fugitive Patty Hearst arrested in California after spending more than 6 months with Symbionese Liberation Army. 1975. Kaitlin Katie Lynn met Jade, a Daschund, after an accident Neighbors who had seen the Her favorite thing to do is to curl dog loves to chase squirrels and even imitates them when her cheeks with her food, leave her bowl and then move to the middle of Jade is eight years old and has been a part of Altha Store Phone (850) 762-3161 Blountstown Branch Phone (850) 673-8102 Marianna Branch Phone (850) 482-2416Altha Farmers Co-op, Inc. PETS AND THEIR PEOPLE IS SPONSORED BYWeve got the feed you need to keep your animals happy and healthy!CATTLE HORSES DOGS CATS BIRDS and more.AND THEIRPETS PEOPLE Katie & Jade Young trees should be from being pulled by fall and winter winds. If your houseplants in yet, do it them thoroughly before bringing them in to rid them of any pests and eggs.As perennials fade away, mark their locations with small sticks. Some might not be apparent after the winter and might be disrupted by spring culPlant spring bulbs as long as the ground is workable. Plant the following bulbs soon: trout lily, narcissus (including daffodil), snowdrop, winter For crown imperial, add a little lime to the soil.GARDENINGJobs for Septemberfrom The Old Farmers Almanac

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Page 12 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 14, 2011 Dear Neighbor, Please allow me to introduce myself. My name is Polly Coe and I am your Local Herbalife Wellness Coach. As Ive been out in the local area the past few months, I realize how many of us may not know each other and I would like the opportunity to change that by offering to you a FREE Wellness Evaluation and get to know you better! I have a fabulous relief from allergy symptoms. I love my wonderful great Energy and feeling great every single day! Herbalife has been in business for over 31 years, and although their speciality is healthy weight loss, they have the highest quality targeted nutritional and personal care products in the world, all of which produce incredible results that people want and need. We have over 50 million documented cases of our products helping people not only lose weight but maintain, gain and/or get their health back. Herbalife has products available in 76 countries worldwide. With UCLAs Dr. Prize Winner, Dr. Louis Ignarro working with Herbalife, these products are cutting edge nutrition! If there is something you could change about your health, without disrupting your schedule, what would it be? If you suffer from any of these, or know someone who does, please give me a call. I would love to get to know you and do a FREE WELLNESS EVALUA TION. I can give you some great information, let you try the products and share what has worked for millions of others as well as myself. But dont take my word for it...see results www.Results44.com or call toll free 1-888-229-6314 and then call me. It could change your life! We also have a line for the 24 hour athlete. Nutrition for the serious can be customized for your level of activity. If you have any questions and would like to schedule your FREE Wellness Evaluation and try our products for FREE please call Yours in Good Health, Polly Coe 21510 NE WL Godwin Road, Blountstown Want Extra Income? Check out www.smartinfonow.com or Call Me!Energy Chronic Fatigue Weight Loss Weight Gain Diabetes, Blood sugar level issues High Blood Pressure High Cholesterol Aching Joints, RA Headaches/Migraines Ulcers Hypoglycemia Fibromyalgia Depression A message from your local Herbalife Wellness Coach Calhoun School District donates Middle School to North Florida Child Development Inc.WEW AHITCHKA T he C alhoun C ounty School District recently donated the former Blountstown Middle School property and buildings to North Florida Child Development, Inc. The donation includes 15 acres and 31,000 square feet of building space includ ing classrooms, cafeteria, gymnasium, media center, and health unit. In announcing the receipt of the donated property, Sharon Gaskin, CEO stated, We are truly thankful to the Calhoun County School District for this donation that will provide us a permanent home for our early childhood learning programs in Calhoun County. Currently our services are housed in modular buildings, so these school facilities will be a great enhancement. Over the years, we have enjoyed a great working relationship with the Calhoun Jim McKnight, COO; Kenneth Speights, NFCD and Calhoun School Board Member, Damon McNair, Board Chairman, NFCD, Tommy McClellan, Calhoun Superintendent of Schools and Sharon Gaskin, CEO, NFCD. School District and through our cooperative agreements we both have been able to maximize dollars expended and at the same time provide higher quality services to the children and families of Calhoun County. NFCD will rename the school the Mayhaw School in honor of the historically black school that opened in the 1930s and moved to the current site in the 1950s. The school was later transitioned to the Blountstown Middle School and, with major additions in the 1990s, served as Blountstowns Middle School until this year. According to NFCD Board Chairman, Damon McNair, we intend to return the use of the school to the Mayhaw Community and we will partner with the Mayhaw Community groups in developing a museum to preserve the Mayhaw School memorabilia. According to Mrs. Gaskin, NFCD will lease some social service agencies in an effort to create a onestop-shopping for our families and to offset some of the operational costs. We are truly excited about the opportunity to work with Mayhaw Community groups toward developing the site as a community resource and lifelong learning school. The Landmark Park Quilt Show will be held on October 21-23, in conjunction with Wiregrass Heritage Festival in the Stokes Activity Barn. Over 150 quilts entered last years juried show, as well as a nonjuried exhibit of antique and contemporary quilts. A special exhibit of Civil War era quilts will also be on display. A pplications for quilt entry, vendor rules and applications can be found at www.landmarkpark.com The quilt and vendor applications are due by September 23. C ash prizes especially interested in displaying Civil War era quilts. Please call (334) 794-3452 for more information. Admission to the quilt show is free with your paid gate admission ($4 for adults and $3 for kids on Friday and Sunday; $8 for adults, $6 for seniors and active military, $4 for kids on Saturday. Free every day for park members). Landmark Park, home of the Alabama Agricultural Museum, is a 135-acre historical and natural science park located on U.S. Highway 431 North in Dothan, AL. For more information, contact the park at (334) 794-3452.

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SEPTEMBER 14, 2011 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 13 CALHOUN A IRPORT FLY-IN A view from the air is shown above in a photo taken by Anna Jo Hall as her airplane prepares to land at Saturdays Fly-In. RIGHT: A young passen ger gets ready to become airborne. FAR RIGHT: A boy cranes his neck to get a good view of an aircraft. BELOW RIGHT: Two young sters explore a bright blue airplane parked in a hanger. BELOW: Kids enjoyed getting their faces painted while waiting for their turn to go up in an airplane. PHOTOS BY BEN HALLFAR RIGHT PHOTO BY DAN DAVIS

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Page 14 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 14, 2011 CASH BALANCES BROUGHT FOR WARD.................................................. Estimated Revenues: T axes: Ad Valorem Taxes 3.00 mills per 1000 Franchise Taxes Communications Services Tax Licences Intergovernmental Water Revenue Wastewater Revenue Garbage Revenue Charges for Services Misc. Services Road Tax Interfund Transfer Non-Operating Income T OT AL ESTIMA TED REVENUE AND BALANCES............................... EXPENDITURES/EXPENSES: General Governmental Services Solid Waste Public Safety/Fire Control Human Services Non-Operating Debt Services Operating Debt Services Equipment Streets & Roads Interfund Transfer Capital Improvements Comprehensive Planning T OT AL EXPENDITURES/EXPENSES ...................... RESER VES T OT AL APPROPRIA TED EXPENDITURES/EXPENSES....................................... BUDGET SUMMARY $7,000 24,010 50 40,475 889,930 $961,465 54,000 2,500 10,500 889,930 $956,930 4,535 $961,465 $225,622 83,993 52,130 26,225 850 91,472 12,489 1,800 $494,581 221,648 23,090 5,000 18,818 28,000 25,000 46,600 $368,156 126,425 $494,581 $131,789 222,000 295,000 143,420 2,000 1,000 25,000 118,070 $938,279 363,595 131,300 176,600 6,500 120,466 $798,461 139,818 $938,279 $364,411 83,993 52,130 26,225 850 91,472 222,000 295,000 143,420 38,499 2,850 40,475 25,000 1,008,000 $2,394,325 585,243 131,300 23,090 5,000 249,418 0 37,000 10,500 25,000 1,010,396 46,600 $2,123,547 270,778 $2,394,325Road General Utility T otalCITY OF BRISTOL, FLORIDA FISCAL YEAR 2011-2012 The Proposed Operating Budget Expenditures of the City of Bristol are 3.6% More than Last Years Total Operating Expenditures. NOTICE OF BUDGET HEARI N GFY 2011-2012 FINAL DECISIONAND TAXESMonday, Sept. 19, 2011 at 6:30 p.m. (ET)

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SEPTEMBER 14, 2011 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 15 FWC Youth Conservation Centers expanding in many waysThe Florida Youth Conservation Centers Network is growing, according to the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC), which launched the initiative. Rae Waddell, FYCCN director, reported to Commissioners at the FWC meeting recently in Naples that the network of youth conservation centers now includes eight Wild Outdoors Centers (the hubs) and 35 Near Outdoors Centers (the smaller, neighborhood locations). Its no longer a dream; its a reality, FWC Executive Director Nick Wiley said. This is government going from one (facility) to 43. People see the success and now everyone wants to get on board, Wiley said, marveling that just about four years ago, you, Commissioners, said Lets do this. And we did. Beau Turner provided the boom factor, Commissioner Brian Yablonski noted, by building the youth conservation center near Tallahassee. This is just a start, Waddell said. We intend to constantly reach out to form new partnerships, with the goal of steady expansion. Because many young Floridians have not had the opportunity to experience the outdoor opportunities Florida offers, the FWC is creating conservation centers all around the state, where kids can explore the many wildlife-related archery, hunting, boating and horseback riding. To maximize resources, the FWC and the Wildlife Foundation of Florida are forming partnerships. For example, Waddell noted the agency has formalized a partnership with the Southwest Florida Water Management District and the Gulf Ridge Boy Scouts Council to create the Flying Eagle Youth Conservation Center in Inverness. Brick-and-mortar progress is also being made, she said. Ocala Youth Conservation Center upgrades include new pavilions near the boat ramp, a pavilion in the shooting sports area and newly shingled roofs for existing pavilion. Programs at these camps are expanding too, Waddell said. Ocala YCC added Fish Camp to its camp schedule this summer. The Everglades Youth Camp conducted its with outdoor recreational activities as well as conservation education sessions. Teachers and administrators deemed this pilot program successful, and 10 Charlie Pierce days are being planned for this school year with the Palm Beach County school system. Charlie Pierce Day is a program that will be implemented at other Wild Outdoors centers. Seven of FYCCNs eight hubs hosted week-long conservation education camps this summer. Over 2,000 kids participated in comprehensive, hands-on programming nature-based recreation. We are just getting started, Waddell said. Programs will be enhanced at each of our partner sites, and we anticipate the number of youths reached with quality programming to soar in the coming years. For more information on the Florida Youth Conser vation Centers Network, go to MyFWC.com or FYCCN. org.Buttons N Badges, Ads N Chads: 200 Years of Florida Campaign History topic of Sept. 25 West Gadsden Historical Society meetingGREENSBORO The West Gadsden Historical Society will hold its next meeting on Sunday, Sept. 25 at 3:00 p.m. in Gardner Hall in Greensboro. The guest speaker, John Owen Clark, native of Flat Creek and Greensboro areas, and now a resident of Tallahas see, will give a presentation about his extensive collection of political memorabilia that spans nearly 200 years of politics. John Clark, son of the late Hubert and Alice Owen Clark, is a seventh generation Floridian with a longtime love for politics and history. While a young student at Greensboro School, he bought both a Kennedy and a Nixon button at the North Florida Fair in 1960 and began collecting seriously in 1964. The collec tion has been featured in Florida Trend, subject of a cover story in Tallahassee Magazine, high lighted in several newspaper articles, and on the cover of the Florida Handbook twice. He has consulted with the Smithsonian Institution in Washington regarding their political history collection. His collection includes all kinds of political memorabilia dating from the 1820s to cur rent elections and specializes in items with a Florida connection. It has been exhibited at a national collectors convention, the Florida Archives, Florida State University, and the University of Florida. Clark has degrees in government and law from Florida State University and is a former assistant to a U.S. Congressman. Since 1984, he has been a Vice President with a major New Please mark your calendar to join with us on Sept. 25 as we welcome John back to opportunity in Gadsden County to see what John has collected through the years and is so willing to share with the county, state, and nation. The members of WGHS look forward to seeing you that day. For further information, please e-mail info@gadsdenhistory.org or call (850) 4426434. AGRICULTUREForeign persons required to report agricultural land holdings in U.S.BLOUNTSTOWNCalhoun/Liberty USDA Farm Ser vice Agency (FSA) Executive Director Charles H. Golden reminds foreign persons with an interest in agricultural lands in the United States that they are required to report their holdings and any transactions to the U.S. Secretary of Agriculture. "Any foreign person who acquires, transfers or holds any interest, other than a security interest, in agricultural land in the United States is required by law to report the transaction no later than 90 days after the date of the transaction," said Golden Agricultural Foreign Investment Disclosure Act (AFIDA) reports maintains reports for the county where the land is located. report can result in a penalty with market value of the agricultural land, said Golden. For AFIDA purposes, agricul used for farming, ranching or timber production, if the tracts total 10 acres or more. Disclosure reports are also required when there are changes in land use. For example, reports are required when land use changes from nonagricultural to agricultural or from agricultural to nonagricultural. Foreign investhere is a change in the status of ownership such as owner changes from foreign to non-foreign, from non-foreign to foreign or from foreign to foreign. Data gained from these disclosures is used to prepare an annual report to the President and Congress concerning the effect of such holdings upon family farms and rural communities in the United States. For more information regarding AFIDA and FSA programs, contact (850) 674-8388 or visit the USDA Web site at http://www.usda.gov. The Farm Service Agency (FSA) is currently accepting applica gible producers affected by natural disasters. This federally funded program covers non-insurable crop losses and planting prevented by disasters. Eligible disasters are any of the following: damaging weather such as drought, excessive moisture, or hurricane; an adverse natudamaging weather or adverse natural occurrence such as excessive heat or insect infestation. The natural disaster must occur before or during harvest and must directly affect the eligible crop. Applicants must pay a nonrefundable administrative fee of $250 per crop, per county. Fees are capped at $750 per county not to exceed $1875 for farmers with interest in multiple counties. Loss must be greater than 50 percent of expected production and coverage must have been purchased 30 days prior to the coverage period. The application closing dates are as follows: Failed crops must be reported within 15 days after the disaster.For further information on the NAP program, please contact the CalhounNAP deadline announced for coverage on blueberries, crop honey and potatoes FACTORY SECONDS 8' Corners under 3" 3-4" 4-5" 5-6" 6-7" 7-8" 8"+ TOP GRADE 6'6" Posts Top Size 2-2.5" 2-5.3" 3-3.5" 3.5-4" 4-5" 5"+We've got the fence posts to meet your needs.TOP GRADE 7' Posts Top Size 3-4" 4-5" 5-6" TOP GRADE 8' Posts Top Size 2-3", 3-4" 4-5" 5-6" 6-7" 7-8" 8"+ SPECIALTY POSTS 1/4 rounds 1/2 rounds Flat Face FACTORY SECONDS 6'6" Posts, Top Size, under 2" 2-3" 3-4" 4-5" 5"+Items subject to availabilityLiberty Post and Barn Pole Inc.DEMPSEY BARRON ROAD, BRISTOL (OFF HWY 12 N) Phone (850) 643-5995 ITS VERY WISE TO ADVERTISE in the Journal and... Email: thejournal@fairpoint.net CLJN ews.COM

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Page 16 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 14, 2011 SPORTSby Michael DeVuyst, contributing writerCHIPLEY Aesops fable The Tortoise and the Hare entertained the crowd at Memorial Stadium in Chipley last Friday night. Chipley played the role of the Tortoise where they showed that slow and steady wins the race. Chipley ran 51 plays compared to Blountstowns 32 and did not attempt a single pass. Chipley controlled the clock as well consuming 32 minutes doubling up Blountstowns 16 minutes. However, it was Blountstown that jumped out to the quick start. After each team had a possession and punted, Blountstown started their second offensive possession on Chipleys 23 yard line. Four plays later Jawon Mosley found the end zone for Blountstown on a 2 yard run. Two plays earlier, Mosley helped his cause with a 69 yard reception from Hunter Jordan, setting nya Baker kicked the extra point with 1:11 left in the After swapping possessions, Blountstown botched Blountstowns 41 yard line. Chipley started a slow 15 yards and Fletcher Dilmore kicked the extra point Chipley took the second half kickoff and again started a slow and steady drive all on the ground. Starting from their own 36 yard line, Chipley went 64 Josh Myers. Dilmores kick was no good but Chipley of the second half in a different offensive formation. Blountstown had Chipley confused and on their heels running from the shotgun with four wide receivers. Blountstown drove down to the Chipley 32 but the 33 yard line. Chipley again took the slow and steady the Blountstown 4 yard line. On 3rd and goal from the 4 yard line, former Blountstown Tiger Ryan McIntyre took the handoff but was stuffed by Corin Peterson and Javakiel Brigham. Chipley had to settle for a 21 knocked it through the uprights and Chipley extended on their second and last possession of the second half. dan. However, three plays later a Blountstown fumble all but sealed their fate. Coach Jordan was pleased with his teams effort, We played hard and we never gave up. I think we learned a lot from last week and we battled all night long. We just have to do a better job of protecting the football. Javakiel Brigham led Blountstown in rushing with with 1 INT. Thomas had 2 catches for 49 yards and les. Patrick Pitts, Corin Peterson and Anthony Wilhome game of the year this week against Freeport at Blountstown falls 16-7 on the road against Chipley The Blountstown Tigers listen as the coach discusses the next set of plays. ABOVE: BHS Hunter Jordan (#14) struggles to get free of a Chipley Tigers grip as he carries the ball. sandwiched between two Chipley Tigers. TONY SHOEMAKE PHOTOS

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SEPTEMBER 14, 2011 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 17 SPORTSby Richard Williams, Journal sports writerThe Liberty County Bulldogs fell to Class 5A Bay High 7-0 in a defensive battle in which the only score came after a turnover deep in Bulldog territory. Liberty County Head Coach Grant Grantham wasnt pleased with his teams offensive play and he said that after his squad spent time watching pleased with their efforts either. get hit you can get to the ball pretty fast. I counted the secondary and have a chance for a big play . and it wasnt the same While the offense had trouble most of the night. responded well on defense and I thought played a very solid game . on defense I thought we played when needed to stymie multiple Bay drives. son on defense. We had a lot of solid players on but I was real happy with the way Daniel Deason showed a real winning The Bulldogs host in Libertys last game before starting district play. Grantham said Liber ty will be facing the fastest team theyve seen thus far this year. The game starts at 7 p.m. in Bristol. Liberty Jr. Varsity schedule change for Sept. 15 gameThe LCHS junior varsity football team will host Graceville Sept. 15 in Bristol instead of Chipley. The schedule change was required because Chipley canceled their junior varsity football program this season. A storm of Bay High Tornado players tackle a Bulldog running back. ABOVE: Bulldog Chris Dilworth (#1) moves in to tackle the Bay High runner. BELOW: Libertys Michael Robinson (#22) stops a Bay High player, one of his many defensive plays of the evening. ABOVE: Bulldog Alex Marlowe (#5) takes to the air to avoid a pair of Bay High players. RIGHT: Libertys Terryal Jenkins (#4) makes his move with the ball while his teammates block their Bay High opponents. DANIEL WILLIAMS

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Page 18 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 14, 2011 Number of Students Promoted for Good Cause, by Category of Exemption ELL/LEP Students with Less than 2 Years in ESOL Students with Disabilities (SWD) not Tested on FCAT per IEP Students Passing Alternative Assessment Students Demonstrating through Portfolio SWD Rewith 2+ Years of Remediation Students Retained 2 or More Years of Remediation Total Promoted with Cause 8 3 5 0 0 0 0Students Scoring as Level 1 and Level 2 on the Reading Portion of the Florida Comprehensive Assessment T est (FCA T) The following table shows FCAT Reading results for all students (all curriculum groups) tested during the 2011 administration of the FCAT Grade Total Number Tested Number Level 1 Level 1 Number Level 2 Level 2 Number Levels 1 and 2 Levels 1 and 2 99 97 95 89 96 89 85 72 14 19 5 9 15 11 9 22 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 14.14% 19.59% 5.26% 10.11% 15.63% 12.36% 10.59% 30.56% 15 15 11 13 16 23 33 24 15.15% 15.46% 11.58% 14.61% 16.67% 25.84% 38.82% 33.33% 29 34 16 22 31 34 42 46 29.29% 35.05% 16.84% 24.72% 32.29% 38.2% 49.41% 63.89%Liberty County School District 2010-2011 District Report CardSTUDENT PROGRE SS ION REQUIREMENT S AND STUDENT PERFORMANCE DATAAs required by s. 1008.25 (8)(b), Florida Statutes, for Annual Public Reporting and for Presentation to the Florida Department of Education Students Retained (not promoted) in Grades 3 through 10 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Grade End-of-Year Membership Number Retained Retained 9 6 3 1 3 5 7 6 103 101 100 91 98 90 85 85 8.74% 5.94% 3% 1.1% 3.06% 5.56% 8.24% 7.06%Senior Class thanks Roger Reddick for building gun cabinet for fundraiser The seniors would like to thank Roger Reddick for building and donating a beautiful gun cabinet to the Liberty County Class of 2012. Reddick is shown above with Brenton Baily standing with the gun cabinet. The cabinet will be used for a fundraiser. Each ticket sold will be credited to the student who sold it. Tickets are being sold for $1 each and can be purchased from any 2012 Senior class member or by contacting Liberty County High School at (850) 643-2241 ext. 260. Our goal is to reach $1,500. Help support our Seniors and buy a ticket or two. LCHS Bulldogs Football update Our Liberty County Varsity Bulldogs played a great game at the jamboree. We came out with two victories against Chipley and Sneads with scores of 6-0 and 14the season against Graceville Tigers, holding a score of 39-0. We will be playing Marianna this Friday at 8 p.m. (ET). Come out and support your Bulldogs! We've had a great and successful season so far. Lady Dawgs Volleyball update The varsity volleyball team suffered some losses in the beginning of their season to Robert F. Monroe, John Paul and NFC. The ladies came back on top with two wins against Marianna and West Gadsden, leaving the Lady Dawgs with a 2-3 season. The girls next game will be Thursday at the LCHS gym at 7 p.m. (ET). They also have a game Sept. 19 against Rickards at 6 p.m. (ET). Pictures set for Sept. 14 Pictures for High School students grades 9-11 will be held on Sept. 14. Senior formals are going to be held Sept. 23. Seniors who need to schedule Senior portraits need to contact Mrs. Sharon Austin at 643-8345. Yearbooks Have Arrived Yearbooks have arrived. Extras are available but not yearbooks will be $40. W. R. Tolar School celebrated Patriots Day Friday with a 9/11 program put on by the seventh and eighth grade students and teachers. The program centered on the tragedy of 9/11 and the heroes that stepped-up dur ing those trying times. Although 2,977 people lost their lives on that dark day, the America Spirit and Pride that seemed hidden for so long has never been brighter due to the events of 9/11. LCHS Bulldog Beat w. r. tolar SchoolTolar celebrates Patriots Day with a special program Sept. 9TOLAR SCHOOL continued on page 19

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SEPTEMBER 14, 2011 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 19 SCHOOL LUNCH MENU Sept. 14-20 2011 Bristol Dental Clinic Laban Bontrager, DMD, Monica Bontrager, DMDPea Ridge Rd in Bristol, Phone (850) 643-5417MENUS SPONSORED BY: Bristol Dental Clinic LIBERTY WednesdayBREAKFAST: Sausage & gravy biscuit, hash browns, fresh apple. LUNCH: Turkey taco with romaine lettuce & tomato or BBQ pork on whole wheat bun, mexicorn, mixed fruit with fresh strawberries. (2nd & 3rd grade pizza)ThursdayBREAKFAST: French toast sticks and ham. LUNCH: Baked spaghetti with cheese or buffalo chicken wrap, tossed romaine salad with low fat dressing, peach crisp.FridayBREAKFAST: Grilled cheese on whole wheat bread and hash brown. LUNCH: Crispy chicken on a whole wheat bun or ham chef salad, green beans, peaches. (4th grade pizza)MondayBREAKFAST: Breakfast burrito and hash browns. LUNCH: Cheeseburger on a whole wheat bun or chicken salad wrap, tater tots, lettuce & tomato, fresh apple. (kg & 1st grade pizza)T uesday and orange slices. LUNCH: BBQ chicken with whole wheat roll or grilled cheese, baked beans, carrots, baked apples.*All breakfasts include a choice of assorted cereal with buttered toast whole wheat and juice CA L HOUN WednesdayBREAKFAST: Grits with ham cubes, sweet potato LUNCH: Grilled turkey and cheese sandwich, steamed broccoli bites with lite ranch dressing, fruit cup.Thursday syrup and sausage patty. LUNCH: Chicken and noodles, green beans, whole wheat roll, tropical fruit cup.FridayBREAKFAST: Sausage gravy and biscuit.LUNCH: Pepperoni pizza, garden salad and fresh fruit.MondayBREAKFAST: Cheese toast grits and ham cubes. LUNCH: Chicken nuggets, mashed potatoes, buttered carrots, whole wheat roll, fresh fruit.T uesday syrup and sausage patty. LUNCH: Country fried steak, rice with gravy, turnip greens, corn bread, mixed fruit.*All breakfasts include a choice of assorted cereal with buttered toast and juice blountstown elementary schoolFCAT Recognition B.E.S. recognized 4th and 5th graders for their outstanding performance on the FCAT test in last year on Friday, August 26. Students who made a Level 5 received a T-Shirt. Students who made perfect scores were presented a trophy and a T-shirt. Congratulations to all of these students! Goodies For Grandparents B.E.S. hosted the annual Goodies for Grandparents on Friday, Sept. 9. First Grade and Kindergarten students and their grandparents were treated to delicious "goodies" for breakfast. The B.H.S. Culinary Class served the tasty treats that they had prepared for the event. A big thanks to the B.H.S. Culinary Class for preparing the food and serving it. Also, we would like to thank all the grandparents who participated in this event with their grandchildren! Early Release Day Wednesday, September 14 is an Early Release Day for students. School will be dismissed for students at 12:45. by Kimi WiltseThe Altha Cross Country teams kicked off their season by competing in the Marianna Jamboree this past Saturday, Sept. 10. Coach John Sewell and Coach Maggie Sewell are excited for this years season to be under way. Some changes have been made to the district competition this year. The team will be competing in a new district against: Blountstown, Port St. Joe, Sneads and Wewa. Along with the district changes, there have also been some team changes made from the past two years. This year, for the first time, Altha will have a Jr. High team that will compete in two mile runs at certain meets. The next competition for Varsity and Jr. High is Sept. 24 in Tallahassee at the FSU Invitational at 6:45 a.m. (CST). ABOVE: from left: (front row) Katie Cox, Coy Cook, Max Scott, Johnny Sewell, Josie Hall, Jaylon Hall, Hardy Mitchell; (second row) Chasity Webb, Coach Maggie Sewell, Porter Smith, Mary Sewell, Emily Sewell, Carly Schwartz, Kimi Wiltse, Wayne Boozer, Coach John Sewell; (third row) Brendan Dew, Devin Ferrell, Kyler Dew, Corey Barton, Nick Young. Not pictured: Jamie Coleman, Abbie Edenfield and Madison Rowe.by Breanna PybusTo practice brotherhood, honor agricultural opportunities, and responsibilities and develop those qualities of leadership which an FFA member should possess. FFA members have recited this countless times and have learned over the years how exactly to portray these qualities. FFA has taught an abundance of students how to work with people from different backgrounds with different opinions and the impor tance of agriculture in the world we live in today. This organization has shown us how to be leaders those around us. FFA has taught lessons that nothing or no one else, ever could. The National FFA Organization continues to expand from the state of Maine to Hawaii, and continues to give students the state of mind that we can make a difference in our world by showing leadership ourselves and respecting others, as stated by in the FFA creed. Through active participation in the FFA organization, members learn through: pational skills and community improvement Our second-year Agriculture teacher, Joanna Everett has major plans for this coming year. She has recruited a great new crop of bright! Her schedule includes classes like Agriculture Communication, Biotechnology, and Agriculture Foundations. These new classes help to make information learned useful in the real world and it teaches students the importance of agriculture in society. Mrs. Everett plans to incorporate new competitions for the Blountstown Chapter, like horse evaluation & livestock judging. With a major commit ment from her team members, she is hoping that success will reign as it has before in state and national level competitions like Forestry, Mechanics, Agriculture Issues and Farm Business Management. Mrs. Everett said that her year has already started with great success! When asked about her goals for the year she stated that her main objective was to include more supervised agriculture experiences (SAE) for all the students and to teach them how to go above and beyond for themselves and others. With sixteen kids planning to attend forestry practices, the year has started off better than imagined! Some students say that, FFA is like the heart of Blountstown High School, so be sure to keep an eye and ear out for this booming organization. In the words of Dr. Debbie Williams, FFA for life! Hosford S chool remembered 9/11 with a Patriot's Day program featuring guest speaker Andrea Roberts, with music performed by Skeeter Whidden of Telogia Creek Band and Miranda Ellis (4th grade teacher) singing Cost of Livingand God Bless the U.S.A. S tudents Bailey S ingletary, Micah McCaskill and Austin Waller lead the program in the Pledge of Allegiance, prayer and a short story. Teachers incorporated the remembrance of 9/11/2001 into their class studies for the day with special videos and discussions. We would like to thank the members of the Veterans of Foreign Wars, Mr. Lee Thompson, Mr. Nicky Philips, Mr. Bob Pickron and Mr. Wes Johnston for attending the program. The students got the opportunity to take pictures and talk with some of our local heroes after the program. We would also like to thank Sergeant Milton from LCHS and the Color Guard for participating in the program along with the LCHS Band for playing a patriotic melody for the students. Several students participated in the program: Josie Bruffet sang the national anthem accompanied by Ms. Gayle Grissett on the piano. Ann Marie Brown and recounted the events of 9/11. Cephus Green, Jyrierra Brigham, Matt Reeves, Thomas Fleet and Courtney Hall each read a piece on American History or Patriotism. Randi Armstrong concluded the program by playing TAPS on the trumpet. The program was put on by Ms. Kristy Pleasant, Pat Holcomb and Rob Wheetley. Upcoming events at TolarVOLLEYBALL*Thursday, Sept. 15 Tolar vs. Franklin County, home, 4 p.m. *Tuesday, Sept. 20 Tolar vs. Blountstown, away, 4 p.m. *Thursday, Sept. 22 Tolar vs. Altha, home, 4 p.m.SCHOOL PICTURE S*Tuesday, Sept. 20 Kg-5th Grade *Wednesday, Sept. 21 6-8 GradePROGRE SS RE P ORT S*Wednesday, Sept. 21 TOLAR SCHOOL continued from page 18 Panther pulse Hosford School remembers 9/11 during special program Yoder, Sponsor Joanna Everitt, Student Advisor Brandon Purvis, President Caitlyn Stewart, Treasurer Mitchell Darnel, Vice-President Breanna Pybus and Reporter Trent Smith. blountstown high school altha wildcatsAlthas Cross Country team kicks off season competing in Marianna Jamboree Sept. 10

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Page 20 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 14, 2011 Confederate Signal Corps Memorabilia on display Saturday at SettlementConfederate Signal Corps memorabilia on display SaturdayVisitors to Saturdays Archaeology Day, held at the Panhandle Pioneer Settlement in Blountstown, got a treat when they discovered a unique display of items connected to the Confederate Signal Corps. The Signal Corps performed tactical communications during the Civil War, including wig-wag signaling which was accomplished during daylight hours with a pair of red and once used. Another authentic piece of equipment is a pair of binoculars pictured top right. Shown at left is a replica of a Confederate Cipher Cylinder also on display. The collection was brought to Blountstown by Lionel Young, coordinator of the NW Florida Living History Association in Marianna. BEN HALL PHOTOS said to have been missing for about an hour. Deputies were joined by the Blountstown Police Department, FHP and a canine tracking team in the search. After getting a report that the men were at McDonalds, Capt. Michael Bryant arrived at the scene and saw Honrine and Leach standing in the lobby, both still wearing their jail uniforms. When they saw him door and ran in the direction of the nearby Subway. An off-duty deputy from Franklin County who was at McDonalds reported seeing the inmates hiding in the bushes in the parking lot. When Cpl. Eddie Dalton turned onto Gaskin Street, he saw Leach running toward his patrol car. Leach continued running toward him as Dalton stepped out and ordered him to stop. Leach continue running and as he got closer to the Dalton dodged the punch and then grabbed Leach, who managed to push him away and run. Dalton chased him down and grabbed the back of his shorts. Leach turned and punched him in the neck. Leach continued to him, kicking his legs and swinging his arms, striking him several times Sheriff David Tatum found Honrine hiding under the bushes beside Superior Bank. Dalton and FHP Trooper Wes Harsey took him into custody after a brief struggle. Both were charged with escape, resisting, obstruction and opposing a law enforcement officer with violence. Leach was also charged with battery on a law enforcement The pair are being held without bond. Honrine was arrested last November on armed burglary and grand theft charges. Leach was arrested in February for grand theft, burglary of a dwelling and dealing in stolen property.ESCAPEES BACK IN CALHOUN CO. JAIL continued from the front page

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SEPTEMBER 14, 2011 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 21 9/11/01 Remembrance CEREMONY held SundayThe community joined members of the Blountstown Police Department at 8 a.m. Sunday, Sept. 11 in Magnolia Square for a program in remembrance of those who lost their lives on that day ten BFD Captains Mark Collier and Emory Godwin Chief Ben Hall participated in the program, his seven-year-old daughter Anna Jo took these photos of the event.FSU to lead consortium in BP-funded oil spill researchThe nation will be looking to Florida State University and its expertise in the marine sciences as it studies the long-term aftereffects and changes in the Gulf of Mexico following last years Deepwater Horizon oil spill. The Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative (GRI) announced earlier this month that the FSU-led consortium Deep-C: Deepsea to Coast Connectivity in the Eastern Gulf of Mexico will receive roughly $20 million in research funds $6.75 million each year for three years. The GRI awarded a total of $112.5 million over three years to eight research teams, including the FSU-led consortium, after a competitive review process. FSU scientists in a wide swath of disciplines will lead a consortium of universities and research institu tions as they study the environmental consequences of petroleum hydrocarbon release in the deep Gulf on living marine resources and ecosystem health. About 4.9 million barrels of oil were dumped into actly how the oil affected marine life and the health of the ecosystem, said FSU Vice President for Research Kirby Kemper. Florida State University is pleased to be leading the way in helping the nation to understand the answers to important questions that have arisen in the wake of the disaster. FSU lead researcher Eric Chassignet, professor of oceanography in the universitys Department of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences (EOAS) and the director of FSUs Center for Ocean-Atmospheric Prediction Studies (COAPS), said the news is exciting because its recognition of a group effort by the amazing team weve put together. Chassignet and his colleagues applied to the GRI for grant money in early July, pulling together a winning proposal in a matter of weeks. The GRI is an organiza tion that oversees BPs commitment to provide $500 million in funding over 10 years for independent sciOut of more than 80 research consortiums that applied for funding, only eight, including the consortium led by FSU, were chosen. The GRI award means FSU researchers will work closely with a select group of universities and research institutions including the University of West Florida; the University of South Florida; the University of Miami; the Georgia Institute of Technology; the Naval Research Laboratory; Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution; the Norwegian Meteorological Institute; the Dauphin Island Sea Lab; and Science Applications International Corporation. Within FSU, about 30 scientists from the universitys research and teaching faculties will contribute research and expertise. Its an interdisciplinary group consisting of geologists, biologists, chemists, physicists and meteorolo gists, Chassignet said. They will be examining how oil is dispersed into the deep ocean and can make it back up to the beaches. Observations will be combined with earth system and food web models in order to better evaluate the consequences of crude oil and gas released in the Gulf of Mexico. at everything from the biogeochemical and ecological effects of the spill to how it actually moved through the Gulf. According to the proposal summary, the resulting combination of earth system and food web research models will produce a powerful tool set that can be used to investigate and forecast environmental impact The grant validates the collective strengths in the marine and allied sciences at FSU, said W. Ross Ellington, FSUs associate vice president for Research. For more information about the FSU-led consortium, visit http://www.deep-c.org/.

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Page 22 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 14, 2011 Onions are nothing to cry aboutOnions are sold in every grocery store, served at most every meal and featured at sporting events across the United States. Onions are everywhere. If youve ever wanted to try to grow them, now is the time to plant. Edible onions have been cultivated America around the turn of the century when a retired French soldier brought some onion seeds from Corsica to the west. But it wasn't until the farmers in Georgia realized what a special thing they had in the Vidalia onion and began spreading the news that the sweet onion Onions have different requirements as to the number of hours of daylight required for bulb formation. The types that require 15 to 16 hours of light daily are referred to as long day varieties and not adapted for the South. Types that grow best in Florida are the shortday varieties. They must be started in the fall so that bulbing is induced by the short days of winter. However, the subsequent harvest of bulbs follows in the spring or early summer. Onions are often grouped according bulbing onion varieties for Florida include Excel, Texas Grano, Granex, White Granex and Tropicana Red. Yellow onions are gardeners most popular choices. Granex 33 is the early Texas hybrid grown in Vidalia, Georgia. Texas Grano 1015Y Aggie Sweet produces a large, mild bulb that is very sweet under the right growing and soil conditions. The Texas Grano 502 is well known for large, mild bulbs with fair storage potential. Onions are grown either from seed, plants. The planting method selected is based on cost, use, availability, and planting ease. Onions grown from sets do not make the best bulbs, and are rather costly. not available. They are sold simply as red, white, or yellow onion sets. Since and keeping quality of onions grown from sets varies considerably. Avoid sets more than an inch in diameter, as they are likely to bolt. Late plantings are more susceptible to cold or freeze injury. Planting too early can result in increased seed stem production. Growing onions from seed may be However, it is the least expensive and offers the greatest variety. Germination may be sporadic and plant growth can be slow. Be aware that onion seed does not remain viable long, and should not be planted when more than one year old. onions can be started between mid-Sep Onion seed can be planted directly in the garden or in per foot of row to one inch deep. If larger bulbs are desix inches apart. Set out transplants from late Decem ber through February. Plants should be about 6 inches high and about half the thickness of a lead pencil at the time of transplanting. Set plants with the bottom of the plant about 1 to 1 inch below the surface of the soil. Transplants should be spaced 3 to 4 inches apart in the row. Onions have a shallow, poorly developed root system, so regular fertilization and watering are essential. Inconsistent watering may lead to splits, doubles and small bulbs. Fertilize the crop monthly with a nitrogen fertilizer. Be sure to keep the fertilizer from contacting the plants directly. Good weed control is a must. Since young onions are small and grow slowly that reduce yield. Look out for diseases before they become established. Leaf blight diseases can seriously reduce yields. Monitor for insects twice each week, and use appropriate management techniques. Contact your local Extension Ofmanagement recommendations. by Theresa Friday, Horticulture Extension Agent, Santa Rosa County GARDENING EDDIE NOBLES LAND CLEARING Call Eddie Nobles at (850) 643-5390 or (850) 447-0449 or Chas at 447-0849Located in Bristol Land clearing, excavation and root raking: The Florida Gators play TenBlountstown High School Tigers night Sept. 16 on K102.7 at 6:30 RADIO FOOTBALL ON WYBT AND WPHKListen to football on WYBT and WPHK. This week.. Hear Michael Wahlquist and Jay Taylor with all The Bulldogs take on Marianna on K102.7 Saturday, Sept. 17 Cataracts? Lee Mullis M.D. and Cataract SpecialistSmart Lenses SMSM procedure can Close-up, Far away & In-between CALL TODAY for a Smart Lens Evaluation Mullis Eye Institute 1600 Jenks Ave., Panama City(850)763-6666 Jennifer Shuler, Esq.Attorney at Law Business Real Property Divorce WillsBy appointment (850) 866-3680CALL ME FOR A FREE LIVING WILL Largest Manufacturer of Portable Buildings in North FloridaALL BUILDINGS BUILT ON SITE Bestway Portable Buildings MENTION THIS AD We have OVER 80 different sizes.You can choose color and style (850) 482-8682We accept all major credit cards

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SEPTEMBER 14, 2011 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 23 Charles McClellan Funeral HomeButler-Morgan/Morgan-McClellan Funeral Home Building at 15 S. Jackson St., Quincy, 32351Phone: (850) 627-7677 or 643-2277Charles K. McClellanLicensed Funeral Director 42 years experience Call us Let us explain how we can conveniently handle arrangements in Liberty County. T elephone (850) 674-2266 Your hometown funeral home since 1994A Hometown Funeral Director You Can Trust and Depend On!Funeral Services with Dignity, Caring and Professionalism. Marlon PeavyPeavy Funeral Home& Crematory OBITUARIESETHEL ARLENE WILLIAMSBRISTOL Ethel Arlene Williams, 82, of Bristol passed away Thursday, Sept. 8, 2011 in Tallahassee. She was born on Feb. 12, 1929 in Liberty County and had lived in Liberty and Bay counties for most of her life. A retired beautician, she was a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints in Bristol. She was preceded in death by her son, Gary Williams.Survivors include one son, Glenn Williams of Goldsboro, NC; two daughters, Sandra Lee Schmuhl of Pleasant Grove, UT and Susan Marie Musgrove and her husband, Roy of Augusta, GA; 12 grandchildren and 20 great-grandchildren. Graveside services were held Saturday, Sept. 10 at 4 p.m. (ET) at Pleasant Hill Cemetery in Bristol with Bishop Peavy Funeral Home in Blountstown was in charge of the arrangements.SHERR Y LYNN STRICKLANDTALLAHASSEE Sherry Lynn Strickland, 47, of Tallahassee passed away Thursday, Sept. 8, 2011 in Monticello. She was born on January 27, 1964 in Blountstown and had lived in Tallahassee since 2008, coming from Bristol. A retired brick mason, she was of the Episcopal faith. Survivors include her parents, Sandra and Gene Strickland of Tallahassee; a foster son, Christopher Ridley of Georgia; a God daughter, Heather Herndon; one sister, Lisa Strickland Galloway and her husband, Thomas; two nieces, Kristina Todd and her husband, Tyler and Leanne Willhite, all of Bristol. Services were held Sunday, Sept. 11 at Peavy Funeral Home Chapel. Interment followed in the Pine Memorial Cemetery in Blountstown. Peavy Funeral Home in Blountstown was in charge of the arrangements.HELEN POPE W A TTSBLOUNTSTOWN Helen Pope Watts, 70, of Blountstown passed away Thursday, Sept. 8, 2011 in Blountstown. She was born on Oct. 2, 1940 in Calhoun County and had lived there all of her life. She was a homemaker and a member of the Abe Springs Baptist Church in the Abe Springs Community. She was preceded in death by her husband, E.T. Watts and two sons, Joe Watts and Walter Watts. Survivors include one son, Tom Watts and his wife, Fran; one daughter, Jennifer Stewart and her husband, Jim, all of Blountstown; one brother, James Pope and his wife, Ann of Dublin, GA; two sisters, Clarice Hall and her husband, Bill of Florence, SC and Rita Pope of Blountstown; four grandchildren, Kimberly Silcox and her husband, Cory, Josh Watts, T.J. Watts and Gina Stewart and one great-granddaughter, Addyson Silcox. Services were held Saturday, Sept. 10 at the Abe Springs Interment followed in the Abe Springs Cemetery. Peavy Funeral Home in Blountstown was in charge of the arrangements.HARRIET LOUISE FREEMANBLOUNTSTOWN Harriet Louise Freeman, 97, of Blountstown passed away Sunday, Sept. 11, 2011 in Blountstown. She was born on Aug. 17, 1914 in Cedar County, IA and moved with her parents, Walter J. Freeman and Nellie B. Freeman to Calhoun County in 1918 and considered it her home since that time. She was a member of the Blountstown United Methodist Church and was retired from Nations Bank, now Bank of America. Survivors include two cousins in Iowa and Nebraska and all her church family at the Blountstown United Methodist Church. Services were held Tuesday, Sept. 13 at Blountstown ciating. Interment followed in the Nettle Ridge Cemetery made to the Blountstown United Methodist Church at P.O. Box 299, Blountstown, FL 32424. Peavy Funeral Home in Blountstown was in charge of the arrangements.PAULA LUCY DEITERCLARKSVILLE Paula Lucy Deiter, 91, of Clarksville passed away Sunday, Sept. 11, 2011. She was born April 3, 1920 in Kokomo, IN and she and her husband, the late Carl J. Deiter, moved to Clarksville in 1972. She was a print artist for a book publishing company before her retirement. She was of the Lutheran faith. Survivors include three sons, Bruce Deiter of Clarksville, Dean Deiter of Centerville, TN, and Robert Law of Indiana; 14 grandchildren; many great-grandchildren, nieces, and nephews. Graveside services will be held at 10 a.m., Wednesday, Sept. 14 at Poplar Head Cemetery in Clarksville with Adams Funeral Home in Blountstown is in charge of the arrangements. Online condolences may be made at adamsfh.com.RAY DICKENSWEWAHITCHKA Ray Dickens, 76, of Wewahitchka passed away at home on Friday, Sept. 9, 2011 with his loving companion of forty-one years by his side, Sue Dickens. He had courageously battled cancer for in Sumrall, MS to Jack and Burnice (Barnett) Dickens. He graduated from Sumrall High School in 1955 and was offered a basketball scholarship to Pearl River Community College in Poplarville, MS which he declined to proudly enlist in the United States Army. During his six years in the Army he traveled to Tipa, China where he worked in the receiving and transmitter station and repaired radio antennas. He also played on the Army football team, where he played against players such as Rosey Grier. He returned to Sumrall to work with his older brother, Charles Dickens for Hercules, Inc. in Louisiana and Alabama. He later moved to DeFuniak Springs and started Dickens Land Clearing. He moved to Wewahitchka in 1968, where he fell in love with the area and the people. He decided to stay and call Wewahitchka home. It was here he met and married Sue Gaskin. He was an active member of Dalkeith Baptist Church in Wewahitchka where he led and directed life. He spent many hours enjoying playing his guitar and singing. For the past 22 years, he has proudly served as Mayor of Wewahitchka, for the citizens whom he greatly loved and called friends. This was a task he never took lightly, from handing out candy to the children, attending for the Senior Citizens. He always rose to every occasion and opportunity to serve and come alongside the citizens of Wewahitchka. The dedication of the Wewahitchka City Annex in 2010 was a great honor for him. In return, the citizens of Wewahitchka have poured out their love and support upon Ray and Sue during his illness. He was preceded in death by his parents, Jack and Bur nice Dickens and his nephew, Craig Lott, all of Sumrall; Charley and Rosselle Gaskin and Charles Arthur Gaskin, all of Wewahitchka. Survivors include his wife, Sue Dickens of Wewahitchka; a brother, Charles Dickens of Gulfport, MS and his wife, Amanda of Blountstown; a son, Bobby Dickens and wife, Cindy of Freeport; two daughters, Becky Minardo of Mobile, AL and Tracy Nowe of Houston, TX; two step-daughters, Sherry Hall and her husband, Steve of Niceville and Suzanne Aull of Wewahitchka; two grandgreat-granddaughter; three nieces and one nephew. Services were held Sunday, Sept. 11 from the Glad Tidings Assembly of God Church in Wewahitchka with Reverend Joey Smith and Reverend John Clenney ofPallbearers were Phillip Gaskin, Gage Gaskin, Harold Lester, Lee Mims, Chipper Wade, and nephew, Leslie Dickens. Honorary pallbearers were the Wewahitchka City Council Members, the City of Wewahitchka Workers, and the Adult Sunday School class of Dalkeith Baptist Church. Adams Funeral Home in Blountstown was in charge of the arrangements. Online condolences may be made at adamsfh.com. THEODORE JERR Y MCCRAYBLOUNTSTOWN Theodore Jerry McCray, 58, passed away Sept. 7, 2011 at the Jackson County Cancer Center at 11:45 a.m. He was born on October 17, 1952 to Geraldine Barnes Sheard and Charles E. Sheard. His early education took place in Calhoun County schools and he graduated from Florida A & M University. He was a retired math and science teacher from Dade County. He leaves to cherish his fondest memories his loving wife, Josephine K. McCray of Blountstown; two daughters, Decca H. Mosley and her husband, Cardrico of Bristol and Tarsha J.M. Battle and her husband, Lar and Tjyaa Battle, both of Blountstown and Jarian Mosley, Aston Mosley and Shammon Mosley, all of Bristol; his devoted mother, Geradine B. Sheard; two brothers, Myers McCray and his wife, La Wanna of Royal Palm Beach and Ronald McCray of Lake Wales; one sister, Lorraine McCray of Winter Haven; one special friend and brother Jerry P. McCray and his wife, Tiffany of Del Ray Beach; a host of uncles, aunts, nephews, nieces, cousins and friends. Services will be held Saturday, Sept. 17 at the Blountstown Middle School Auditorium on Pear Street at 1 p.m. (CT) in Blountstown. The wake will be held Friday, Sept. 16 at St. Paul A.M.E. Church on River St. at 5 p.m. (CT).HARRIET OGILVIE W AGNERTALLAHASSEE Harriet Ogilvie Wagner, 86, passed away Saturday, Sept. 10, 2011, at her residence at Westminster Oaks in Tallahassee. She was born Oct. 25, 1924, and was raised and lived the majority of her life in Greensboro. She had been a resident of the Westminster Oaks Community since 2004. She married Robert Wagner, February 3, 1945, and was a devoted wife and mother. She was preceded in death by her husband, Robert George Wagner; her grandson, Byrne Hampton Johnston; her granddaughter, Sarah Wallace Johnston and her sister, Emily Ogilvie Agerton. Survivors include her two daughters, Carol W. Johnston and her husband, Buster of Safety Harbor and Jane W. Clark and her husband, Lamar of Greensboro; one grandson, Alex Clark; one brother, Fred Ogilvie and his wife, Virginia of Perry and one sister, Jean O. Dean and her husband, Harold of Sycamore. A private family service will be held at a later date. Drawer D, Greensboro, FL 32330. Bevis Funeral Home in Tallahassee is in charge of the arrangements

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Page 24 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 14, 2011 ULLING P EANUTSThe residents at Blountstown Health and Rehab gathered around a mountain of peanuts, donated by Melton Brothers Farms, to pick em out so they could enjoy a peanut boil. Many of the facilitys residents grew up on farms and enjoyed an activity that they hadnt taken part of in many years. The group gathered on the portico and sat in rocking chairs or their own wheelchairs as they went through bushel after bushel of peanuts. ANGIE DAVIS PHOTOSScotlands Long Gone Lonesome: The internationally acclaimed National Theatre of Scotland makes its Florida debut with Long Gone Lonesome, the true blues and country music. No. 4. funny. to comment on the dance in real time, with their comone winner after another. For more information on this years schedule of Seven Days and Seven Nights continued from page 5 reached hurricane status. Florida has not suffered any mamore weeks before hurricane seastorms that may threaten our state ricane landfalls than any other state, Florida is the hurricane families and their homes, as well family members who are elderly, what actions you should take in reduce the effects to your family or business. Floridas residents to heed the ery effort will be made to assist Floridas residents after a disaseryone affected by the storm imyour family are able to take care For more information on the Florida Division of Emergency Management and to GET A PLAN!, please visit: www.FloridaDisaster.org. Follow us on Facebook at www.Facebook. com/FloridaSERT and on Twitter at www.Twitter.com/FLSERT. Sept. marks historical peak of hurricane season

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SEPTEMBER 14, 2011 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 25 SCHEDULE OF EVENTS Thursday, Sept. 15 Friday, Sept. 16 Saturday, Sept. 17 Sunday, Sept. 18 For more information please contact Todd W. Schroeder by com or Mike Cox by phone at (813)918-2303 or email Mike.cox@ Fire destroys unoccupied home & car off Hwy. 69 NFREC is located at 155 Research Road, Quincy, FL, on State Road 267 near I-10, taking Exit 181.Gardening Friends plan Plantaholic Preview Party Sept. 8Free Sept. 22 web conference helps caregivers with legal issues that impact seniors country dedicated exclusively to private pay home care rently represents more than 1,100 home care agencies in forty-four states and Puerto Rico.

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Page 26 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 14, 2011four chairs, $60. Call 379-8410. 9-7, 9-14 CARS1997 Buick Century, baby blue, four door, A/C works great, power windows and locks, four good tires, tinted windows, 185,000 miles, $2,600. Call 670-1762. 9-14, 9-211998 Lincoln Mark 8, two door, hard top, pearl white with silver gray interior, in good condition, with new tires, well maintained, $5,500 OBO. Call 639-4176 or 643-1502. 9-7, 9-142007 Pontiac Grand Prix, 107,000 miles, electric driver seat, power door locks, power windows, cruise control, CD player, tilt, steering wheel controls, tinted windows, remote start, keyless entry, V6 3.8 L engine, regular oil changes, runs great, $7,400 OBO. Call 643-8015. 9-7, 9-142006 CTS Cadillac, four door, standard shift, six speed. Call 5912346 or 643-2741. 9-7, 9-14 TRUCKS1989 T oyota Land Cruiser, 4WD, four door, 6 cyl., automatic, good condition, 189,000 road miles, $2,900. Call 643-5355. 9-14, 9-211995 Dodge Dakota, $2,500. Call 674-3264. 9-14, 9-212006 Ford F350 King Ranch Dually, 4WD, 36,000 miles, new condition, spray-in bed liner, $29,999 OBO. Call 643-5886 or 643-1650. 9-14, 9-211989 GMC S15, black, 95,000 miles, needs clutch and ignition, comes with extra set of tires and 9-14, 9-212004 Xterra Nissan, white, power locks and windows, running boards, clean, good tires, 109,000 miles, automatic, tinted windows, with racks, runs good, $7,200. Call 509-3271. 9-7, 9-14 Call 674-3264FOR SALE OR RENT IN BLOUNTSTOWNHouse located in a nice area, close to town and private.2006 Rubicon Jeep Wrangler, soft/hard top, 6 cyl., automatic, 20,800 miles, asking $19,500, book value $24,500. Call 6436086. 9-7, 9-141999 Jeep Grand Cherokee Laredo, 165,000 miles, two wheel drive, four door, 4.06 cyl., new tires, new transmission, $3,000 OBO. Call 260-5397. 9-7, 9-142004 Colorado crew cab, two wheel drive, leather and heated seats, and much more, brand new all terrain tires, 110,000 miles, $11,200. Call 272-6168. 9-7, 9-141998 T oyota T acoma SK5, ext. cab, two door, 4 cyl., with tool box, 125,417 miles, runs great, clean inside, nice stereo and tint, $6,000 OBO. Call 379-5850 after 5 p.m. 9-7, 9-14 AUTO ACCESSORIEST ow stabilizer setup, $250. Call 674-1740. 9-7, 9-14Fifth wheel hitch with mounting bracket and all hardware, $625 OBO. Call 363-3901. 9-7, 9-145x8 Utility trailer, good shape, $300. Call 447-3275. 9-7, 9-14 MOTORCYCLES & W A VERUNNERS2008 Kawasaki Ultra LX jet ski, 18 hours use on motor, brand new condition, $7,999 OBO. Call 6435886 or 643-1650. 9-14, 9-212006 Harley Davidson Road King Classic, 5,800 miles, $7,000 worth of added accessories, asking $13,500. Call 643-6086. 9-7, 9-14 HUNTING & FISHING semi-auto, THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNALCLASSIFIEDSTo place your ad, call 643-3333 by noon Eastern Time on Saturday. Non-business ads run FREE for 2 weeks. ITEMS FOR SALEBasketball shoes, two pairs, Kobe Bryant size 10 1/2 and Michael Jordan size 10 1/2, less than a month old. Paid $300 for both, asking $150. Call 524-0605 ask for Greg. 9--14, 9-21Record player, older model, plays 45s and 33 1/3 records, $15. Call 674-3264. 9-14, 9-21Kindle leather case generation 6 display, sells for $35 on Amazon, like new, asking $20. Call 674-8385. 9-14, 9-21Satin drapes, two pair, beige, ready to hang, $15 for both; sheer panel, new, never used, three pair, white, very wide, $15 for all; one vinyl mattress cover, regular size, still in package, $1.50; upright grand antique piano, $125 OBO, collectors item; one pair of custom made drapes, each panel lined, ready to hang, complete with rod and large rings, bone color, $18. Call 674-8376. 9-14, 9-21Potted plants, different size pots, shade house you take down, many extras. Call 674-2973 ask for Ruth. 9-7, 9-21Sportcraft T urbo air hockey game, 3x6, good and clean condition, $150. Call 674-8385. 9-14, 9-2132 Phillips LCD TV, less than one year old, works perfectly, $150; 19 color TV, $50. Call 6741740. 9-7, 9-14Girls bicycle with vehicle mount, $50; new Sears canister vacuum, $30. Call 674-6242. 9-7, 9-14Mae West aviation life jackets, two, $75. Call 674-8570 leave message. 9-7, 9-14 APPLIANCESFrigidaire portable dishwasher, $150. Call 674-2010. 9-14, 9-2130 Kenmore electric stove, white, with self clean oven, very good condition. Cooks and bakes very well, $225; 30 over the stove microwave, white, $75. Call 6744242 or 694-1992. 9-7, 9-14T oaster oven, $12; Refrigerator, $50. Call 674-3264. 9-7, 9-14Jack LaLanne juicer, hardly used, good condition, $50. Call 674-8918. 9-7, 9-14Frigidaire refrigerator, side by side, with ice maker, $250. Call 379-8410. 9-7, 9-14 FURNITURESingle waterbed, without frame, $50 or trade for queen mattress/ box spring/frame. Call 674-3264. 9-14, 9-21Dining set with china cabinet, $200. Call 591-0760. 9-7, 9-14Glass top dining room table with BD, 1 1/2 BA TownhousesBRISTOL FOR RENTBLOUNTSTOWN Phone 643-7740 For Rent in ALTHA762-9555 or 762-8597** Very NICE 2 & 3 bedroom trailers. ** 2 BD Apartment w/ large BD & Carport 5 x 10 .....$27 10 x 10 ....$43 10 x 20 ....$70 10 x 25 ....$90M & W SELFSTORAGE RENTAL SCall 573-5255, 762-9555, 762-8807 or 762-8597 7 days a week service UFN Mobile Home for Rent in CalhounCall 674-88882 BD, 2 BA, located six miles north on Hwy. 69 N. NO PETS. Damage & Cleaning deposit, Water, sewer and grass cutting provided.UFN Call 674-3694leave message if after 5 p.m.14x70 2 BD, 2 BA unfurnished mobile home. Located on 18th Street, Water and Sewer. Will be No more than 3 per family. FOR RENTin AL THACall 762-3706Large living room, dining area, water & garbage, NO PETS, located at 15726 NW Smith Street.2 BD, 2 BA Trailer $375 month plus $200 deposit. Roomy mobile home, w/added rooms, 3 BD, 2 BA, great room, dining room, living room, laundry room, very clean. Located on a nice lot. House, 2 BD, 1 BA, large living room or den, dining room, remodeled kitchen, fenced in back yard.Rental Units I B Call 643-6646 HOUSEHOLD ITEMS$159 QUEEN PILLOWTOP mattress & box. Manufacturer wrapped, warranty. 222-7783 Del. available. $399 Sofa/Loveseat set. Still in crate, never used. Can deliver 5457112. Must move this week! 4 piece Bedroom Set: Solid Wood. Brand new. $439, delivery available. 222-9879. 1 & 2 bedroom mobile homes in Blountstown and Bristol. $105 to $155 weekly. Deposit required. All utilities included. NO PETS. Singles or Couples preferred. Also RV for rent. 10% Sr. Disc. Call 674-7616FOR RENT Custom Cotton PICKINGOver 12 years of experience Dow Morris FarmsCall (850) 326-6881 or (850 527-6291 We pick & pack PU PP IES TINY TEACU P & REG PU P S Cutest ones youve ever seen. Some toy sizes available.Call 674-3532 or 545-5732

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SEPTEMBER 14, 2011 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 27 Home in Bristol FOR SALECheaper than RentRecently renovated, 3 BD, 2 1/2 BA, Mobile home on 1 acre lot. Close to Bristol. New carpet, plumbing, AC unit, well pump. Posminimum 10% down.Call 643-1566 3 BD, 2 BA on 1 1/4 acres. Nice, quiet area close to town on dead-end road. County water, recently updated 6 years ago. Appraised at $130,000, Asking... $119,900Call 643-1566Home FOR Sale B Land For Sale Altha areaCall 674-8385for more information30 Acres on Hwy. 274. Possible owner $112,500 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNALCLASSIFIEDSTo place your ad, call 643-3333 by noon Eastern Time on Saturday. Non-business ads run FREE for 2 weeks. 1911 Colt, new, with two clips and trade. Call 643-3662. 9-14, 9-21Compound bow PSE Rogue, biscuit, three pin sight, ready to hunt with, $275 OBO. Call 4474739. 9-7, 9-14 CAMPERS/RVS2003 Flagstaff by Forest River, 5th wheel, four brand new tires and new A/C, like new, very clean and updated interior. Call 6435886 or 643-1650. 9-14, 9-21 TOOLS & EQUIPMENTRiding lawn mower, $450; small aluminum trailer, $550. Call 6743264. 9-14, 9-2120 ft. Heavy duty equipment trailer, with let down ramps, electric winch in front, four new tires, $1,000. Call 762-8491. 9-14, 9-21, three point hitch, needs new belt and blade, in good condition, $300 OBO. Call 643-3662. 9-14, 9-21Victor welding torch, hoses and gauges, big and little, $125 each; Delta 10 table saw, $50; Sears 42 cut riding lawn mower, great shape, $200; one ton chain hoist, $50; breaker box, $70. Call 5735291 or (864) 353-3234. 9-14, 9-211952 8-N Ford T ractor. Call 6437815. 9-7, 9-14 LOST/FOUNDLost: I am desperately writing to plead with anyone who might have found a wedding ring at the Exxon station at the corner of Hwy. 20 and C.R. 12 in Bristol on Monday, Sept. 5 between 4 and 6 p.m. It has three diamond clusters with a diamond band on each side and is soldered together. I pray there are still honest people in the world and it will be returned. I will reward anyone who can help! Call 6255454 or 258-6346 day or night. 9-14, 9-21Lost: Bulldog mix puppy, solid black with white on chest, last seen on Lawarre Lane in Altha, belongs to a three-year-old who really misses her puppy. Call 557-3928. 9-14, 9-21Found : three-month-old Chocolate Lab, loving and playful. Call 237-2740. 9-14, 9-21Found : Weimaraner dog, female, found near Albry Whitehead Rd. in Hosford. Call 570-1574. 9-14, 9-21Lost: cat, male, long haired, mostly white, house broken, went missnorth of Blountstown on Hwy. 71. Call 674-8227. 9-7, 9-14 PETS/SUPPLIESShetland pony, male, paint, best offer; two saddles, and other accessories, best offer. Call 3639504. 9-14, 9-21Mini horse, one 15-year-old mare, registered twice, up-to-date on shots, 29 tall; one 5-year-old mare, registered, 30 tall, black, both very friendly and tame, best offer. Call 567-3418. 9-14, 9-21Female cat, declawed, strictly indoor, adult, free. Call 643-5009. 9-14, 9-21T wo billy goats, $50 each. Call 643-5886 or 643-1650. 9-14, 9-21Five adults cats cats on death row, we need a home soon. We are about two years old and will be spayed and neutered before adoption and are free. We will make good pets or barn cats. Call 237-2740. 9-14, 9-21Chihuahua male, full-blooded, seven months old, $50; Pekingese/Chihuahua mix, female, nine months old, $30; seven-year-old 27 miniature stud, Class A registered, $100 OBO. Call 237-1930. 9-7, 9-14Blue heeler, female, 1 1/2 years old, and her puppies, Blue Heeler/ Lab mix, eight weeks old, all free to a good home. Call 643-6086. 9-7, 9-14Pit mixed puppies, six weeks old, wormed, free to good home. Call 372-2107. 9-7, 9-14Kittens, two, hand-raised, litter box trained, free to good home. Call 674-3791. 9-7, 9-14 HOMES & LAND2BD/1BA frame house, to be moved, $4,000. Call 643-5355. 9-14, 9-212004 Clayton mobile home, 3BD/2BA, all appliances furnished, includes washer and dryer, must see to appreciate, must be moved, $20,000, no rent to own. Call 4474512 or 762-4734. 9-7, 10-5 FREE ITEMSGazebo, made of cypress wood, approximately 10 ft. in diameter. STARSCOPEFAMOUS BIRTHDA YSARIES Mar 21/Apr 20 Aries, if romance hasnt been on your mind, its time to make it a priority. Do what you have to do -wine, dine and pull out all the romantic punches. TAURUS Apr 21/May 21 Another persons misdeeds will shed some light on your own, Taurus. Recognize your mis takes and work to correct them as soon as possible. GEMINI May 22/Jun 21 Gemini, you will need an abun dance of patience if you are to make it through the next few days. Thursday proves especial ly challenging when a curveball gets thrown your way. CANCER Jun 22/Jul 22 to your advantage, Cancer. You already have a way with people, now you just have to get them on board with your idea. LEO Jul 23/Aug 23 Leo, after a few bumps along the road, things will even out to a steady pace for you. Thats a good thing be cause now youll be able to step back and review your actions. VIRGO Aug 24/Sept 22 Virgo, someone elses needs will take priority over your own this week. That could put a crimp in your plans. Find out if you will need help to get through the days. LIBRA Sept 23/Oct 23 Libra, just because something costs more doesnt mean it is necessar ily better. You will learn this on Friday with your next purchase as you do your research. SCORPIO Oct 24/Nov 22 Find a way to reduce the stress in your life, Scorpio. This way you can enjoy family and friends without a lot of things on your mind at any given time. SAGITTARIUS Nov 23/Dec 21 Sagittarius, dont make too much of a situation because youre reading into it the wrong way. The truth is much less than you are making things. Excitement awaits you. CAPRICORN Dec 22/Jan 20 Capricorn, if you dont take a breather now and then you will be left with little energy. Take advantage of invitations by friends to hang out and enjoy some downtime. AQUARIUS Jan 21/Feb 18 Aquarius, you may feel like youre taking two steps back every day, but the truth is youre making progress just in small doses. Stick with what youre doing. PISCES Feb 19/Mar 20 Pisces, few things are more exciting than being surprised by someone you love and respect. That is just what may happen to you. Week of Sept. 25 ~ Oct. 2 Terms: *All items sell AS IS *5% Buyer Premium *cash, cashier checks or credit cards accepted Complete liquidation of a large Commercial landscaping companyThursday, Sept. 15 at 9 a.m.Midway (Tallahassee), FL ITEMS INCLUDE: *2008 Cat Challenger tractor *2007 Vermeer RT650 trencher *Lowboy, van and equipment trailers *Late model Sod cutting and seeding equipment *(5)MF tractors *Mack water trucks *2003-2004 Chevy & Ford pickups *Spider & Navigator lifts *Cat mini excavator *Numerous other items**Live online bidding with proxibid** ABSOLUTEAUCTIONMidway Machinery & AuctionCall 576-5500 or visit, midwaymachineryandauction.comCall 447-2701. 9-7, 9-14 WANTEDDouble bed frame; small apartment or trailer rent to own. Call 674-3264. 9-14, 9-21Half or three quarter acre of land, in Altha area, reasonably priced. Call 762-9762. 9-7, 9-14Bed frame, double. Call 6743264. 9-7, 9-14Shower door enclosure assembly, two foot wide. Call 674-8570 leave message. 9-7, 9-14Refrigerator ; roof top A/C for travel trailer. Call 643-2201. 9-7, 9-14We buy junk cars and trucks. We will pick them up. Call 6435045 or 447-3819. 3-23 T. 12-28 YARD SALES BLOUNTSTOWNYard sale, Saturday, Sept. 17 from 7 a.m. to noon, located 20595 Hentz Ave., womens and mens clothing, whatnots and other miscellaneous items. Call 674-9867. Yard sale, Saturday, Sept. 17, at City Tire on Hwy. 20, lots of miscellaneous items, something for everyone, cancel if rain. Call 674-1752. Yard sale, Saturday, Sept. 17 beginning at 7 a.m., located three miles north of Blountstown Elementary on right. Look for signs. Boys and womens clothes various sizes, electronics, exterior door with single glass panel, three windows, odds and ends, household items. Call 674-9127. CLARKSVILLEYard sale, Friday and Saturday, Sept. 16 17, from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m., located 1.6 miles north of Hwy. 20 on Hwy. 287, books, movies, baby clothes, home school books and more. Call 674-9161. HOSFORDYard sale, Saturday, Sept. 17, beginning 8 a.m., located corner of Hwy. 65 and Blue Creek Rd., something for everyone, furniture and lots of baby items. Call 3793082. Yard sale, Saturday, Sept. 17, beginning at 7:30 a.m., located at 20770 NE Burlington Rd., clothes and whatnots. Call 379-3025.

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SEPTEMBER 14, 2011 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 29 Thirty-two motorcycles traveled over 75 miles and made stops at all seven Volunteer Fire Departments in Calhoun County while raising nearly $1,500 in the 10 year Sept. 11 Remembrance Rogers had the best hand of the day with a full house. The worst hand a Queen high was drawn by Gwen Oliver. The group gathered at the airport Saturday, where the annual Fly-In was underway. ABOVE: The bike lineup. ABOVE LEFT: Mike Blum of the Fire and Iron Motorcycle Club. LEFT: Flags were waving as the group came together on this special weekend, which Responders throughout the country. BELOW: Liz Parrish of Magnolia VFD checks in the bikers before they hit the road. BEN HALL PHOTOS Calhoun Co. Firefighters mark 9/11 anniversary weekend with fundraiser POKER RUN

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Page 30 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 14, 2011 OUTDOORS PUBLIC AND LEGAL NOTICES PUBLIC AUCTION Silver 2001 Linc Town Car 4-door Vin #1LNHM82W51Y625550 Green 1998 Chevy Malibu Vin #1G1ND52T1WY194720 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR LIBERTY COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBA TE DIVISION File No: 2011-18CP IN RE: ESTATE OF TODD A PRESTON a/k/a TODD ALLISON HAWKINS PRESTON Deceased. _____________________/ NOTICE OF ADMINISTRA TION AND NOTICE T O CREDIT ORS TO ALL PERSONS HAV ING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE AND ALL OTHER PERSONS INTERESTED IN THE ESTATE: YOU ARE NOTIFIED that the administration of the Estate of Todd A. Preston, a/k/a Todd Allison Hawkins Preston, File Number 2011-18 is pending in the Circuit Court for Liberty County, Florida, Probate Diaddress of which is the Liberty County Courthouse. The Personal Representative of the Estate is Paula A. Rahn. The name and address of the Personal Representatives attorney is set forth below. All persons having claims or demands against the Estate are required, WITHIN THREE MONTHS FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE, to Court a written statement of any claim or demand they may have. Each claim must be in writing and must indicate the basis for the claim, the name and address of the creditor or his agent or attorney and the amount the claim is contingent or unliquidated, the nature of the uncertainty shall be stated. If the claim is secured, the security shall be described. The copies of the claim to the Clerk to enable the Clerk to mail one copy to the Personal Repre sentative. All persons interested in the Estate to whom a copy of this Notice of Administration has been mailed are required, WITHIN THREE MONTHS FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICAany objection they may have, the validity of the Will, or the Representative, or the venue or jurisdiction of the Court. DATED THIS 5th day of August, 2011. J. DAVID HOUSE, P.A. 16865 SE RIVER STREET (850) 674-5481 COUNSEL FOR PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE PAULA A. RAHN 9-14, 9-21_______________________ ST A TEMENT OF NON-DISCRIMINA TION Talquin Electric Cooperative, Inc., is the recipient of fedthe Rural Utilities Service, an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and is subject to the provisions of Title VI of the Civil Rights Acts of 1964, as amended, Section 504 of the amended, the Age Discrimina tion Act of 1975, as amended, and the rules and regulations of the U.S. Department of Agriculture which provide that no person in the United States on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, disability, readmission or access to, denied subjected to discrimination under any of this organizations programs or activities. The person responsible for coordinating this organizations non-discrimination efforts is Kenneth A. Cowen, Director of Administrative Services. Any individuals, who feels that this organization has subjected them to discrimination may obtain further information about the statutes and regulations a written complaint with this organization; or the Secretary, U.S. Department of Agricul ture, Washington, D.C. 20250; or the Administrator, Rural Utilities Service, Washington, D.C. 20250. Complaints must the alleged discrimination. Crossbow season is expanded on private landsEven though you can hardly tell, summer is almost over. Kids have returned to school, football is back on TV and hunting seasons already been going on a month now in South Florida. Most of us have already hung our tree stands along well-traveled Finally, the time of year weve been waiting for is here! our state. Beginning this year, even more folks are bound to take to the woods earlier, day as archery in each of the four hunting zones. there started July 30. The fourth hunting zone, which was and lies south of S.R. 50, west of U.S. 441 and the Kissimmee Waterway, north of S.R. begin on the third Saturday of October. This year, that falls on Oct. 15. The line that divides zones C and D begins at U.S. 27 at the (Gadsden County) FloridaGeorgia state line and runs south on U.S. 27 until it meets S.R. 61 in Tallahassee. From there, it follows S.R. 61, running south until it hits U.S. 319. There, the line follows U.S. 319, continuing south to U.S. If you hunt west of that line, youre in To hunt during archery season, youll need a Florida hunting license and an youll need a hunting license and crossbow nual hunting license will cost $17. Nonresia 10-day license or $151.50 for 12 months. each, and all deer hunters must have the ing one of Floridas $26.50. brochure for the area you wish to hunt, because the hunting season dates have changed since last year on many of them. on many of the areas to more closely align with the new zonal season dates that were crossbow season that is concurrent with only legal bucks (having at least one antler that is at least 5 inches long) may be taken. The daily bag limit on deer is two. you hunt. year-round with no bag or size limits. On limits, and hogs are legal to take during Its also legal to shoot gobblers and bearded turkeys during archery and crossbow seasons, given you have a turkey limit. Its against the law to hunt turkeys in to shoot them while theyre on the roost, over bait, when youre within 100 yards of or with the aid of recorded turkey calls. If youre hunting during the archery season, you may hunt only with a bow and crossbow season, you may use either a crossbow or bow but must have the $5 allowed to use crossbows during archery hogs and turkeys, broadheads must have at width of 7/8 inch.Outta the WOODS by Tony YoungFWC proposes protection for hammerheads, tiger sharksThe Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) on Thursday advanced Florida waters. The action came during the second day of its threeSharks have been strictly regulated in Florida since 1992, limit for all recreational and Florida has been recognized management efforts for nearly 20 years, said FWC Chairman Kathy Barco. We recognize that lations is critical to the sustainability of our marine ecosystem. serve Floridas valuable marine resources. hammerheads, smooth hammer heads and tiger sharks from state high to be sustainable. Research tion declines in recent decades. ing the November FWC meeting in Key Largo.FWC takes over management of octocorals in federal watersLast Thursday, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservaefforts governing the harvest of marine life into federal take effect Oct. 31. federal waters off Florida, which allows Florida to take federal councils, Florida agreed to manage the octocoral To see the Marine Life Rule Extension: Octocoral, go to MyFWC.com/Commission, select Commission Meetings and click on the link to the September meeting agenda.

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SEPTEMBER 14, 2011 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 31 CLJ NEWS .COM To place your ad call us at 643-3333 SERVICE DIRECTORY Whaley Heating & Air Conditioning (850) 674-4777FL LIC. # CMC1249570 Accepting: : (850) 643-6925 : (850) 643-2064 : grich0656@aol.com10536-B NW SR 20 Bristol, FL 32321 Located in the Apalachee RestaurantGary Richards, EA MBAEnrolled Agent Enrolled to Practice Before the IRS Business & Accounting Solutions Inc. 4433 NW C.R. 274 Altha, Fl 32421 (850) 762-9402 Cell (850) 832-5055Dozer and Excavation work Over 20 years experienceClay ONealsLand Clearing, Inc. 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That Darn PumpThere is never a convenient time to be without water.WELLS (850)643-HELP Thats 643-4357 or Home 643-3857For friendly service and never any overtime charges call, BARLOWS Repair & Water ServicesWell drilling & Pump repair ________________________Serving Gulf, Franklin, Bay, Calhoun, Washington & Liberty Counties________________________850-639-9355or850-814-7454 Hwy 71 South on J.P. Peacock Rd, Altha. Day or night, Call 762-8127 Check out our prices before buying from somewhere else. For Weddings, Birthdays and all Holidays, come in or call us. Margies Florist Phone David Morris at (850) 868-1295 or Dispatch at (850) 575-4414 Locally owned & OperatedNow serving the Hosford, Telogia, and Bristol areas. Visit the web at Improve your mileage 5% to 20%Mileage Maxx Minutes from the Aug. 4 Liberty County Commission meeting Aug. 4 regular meeting of the Liberty County Commission as recorded by the board secretary. The meeting was called to order by Chairman Jim Johnson. Present at the meeting were Commissioners Kevin Williams, Davis Stoutamire, Dexter Barber, Albert Butcher, Attorney Shalene Grover, Clerk Robert Hill and Deputy Clerk Charla Kearce. Prayer was led by Clerk Robert Hill. Pledge of allegiance was led by Commissioner Dexter Barber. Motion to approve the minutes of the regular meeting held July 7 and special meeting July 21, 2011 was made by Stoutamire, seconded by Williams and carried. Lamar Holland presented a letter requesting changes at Veterans Memorial Park. Each Commissioner will meet with Holland to look at the requested changes. Motion to table until the next meeting was made by Stoutamire, seconded by Butcher and carried. Dave McClain gave an update on the Florida Riverkeepers budget. They are requesting $5,000 be put in the budget for next year. Keith McCarron with Apalachee Regional Planning Council discussed John Ard discussed chemical spraying. 26 miles would cost $4,500. Motion to table until after the new budget is adopted was made by Stoutamire, seconded by Barber and carried. Stephen Ford discussed the A.K. Associates proposal for 911. Motion to approve the A. K. Associates proposal was made by Stoutamire, seconded by Butcher and carried. Dr. Gene Charbonneau talked about the letter of agreement on the dental van. We have already paid for the van. Motion to approve the letter of agreement for 2011-12 was made by Williams, seconded by Barber and carried. Dr. Charbon neau also gave an update on the Health Department. Motion to reappoint Johnny Eubanks and appoint Commissioner Davis Stoutamire as an alternate to serve on the Chipola Regional Workforce Development Consortium was made by Butcher, seconded by Williams and carried. Motion approve Resolution #11-15 supporting Escambia County Resolu tion requesting that the Department of within our district was made by Stoutamire, seconded by Williams and carried. Motion to approve Memorandum of Agreement with Department of Corrections concerning our Fire Departments was made by Williams, seconded by Stoutamire, and carried. Motion to approve the health insurance contract with CHP and Blue Cross Blue Shield was made by Barber, seconded by Butcher and carried. There will be a workshop with the Recreation Director on Tuesday, Aug. 9, 2011 at 6 p.m. in the courtroom. Motion to pay the bills was made by Stoutamire, seconded by Williams, and carried. Motion to adjourn was made by Butcher, seconded by Barber and carried. *Operating Fund 3124 3323 *Payroll Fund 32033 32179 _____________________________ Robert Hill, Clerk of Court Jim Johnson, Chairman Monday Saturday 9 a.m. 9 p.m. Sunday 11 a.m. 6 p.m. 2816 Hwy. 98 West $575 Down......................2001 Chevy Malibu$675 Down.....................2002 Chevy Blazer$775 Down.................1999 Dodge Durango$1,275 Down..............2002 Ford F150 XCab$1,675 Down...2003 Chevy Silverado XCab AUTO FINANCINGDAYLIGHT *Lifetime Warranty on Repairs *Will pay up to $500 of your deductible *Over 75 years combined experienceTNTTOBY GARNETT, OWNER Collision Center Tell em you saw it in the Journal A great place to meet. An even better place to eat!T heApalacheeR estaurant

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Page 32 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 14, 2011 The Panhandle Pioneer Settlement presents the Smithsonian Institution and Florida Humanities Council Museum on Main Street --Journey Stories. The Panhandle Pioneer Settlement has been awarded the privilege of exhibiting the MOMS -Journey Stories, July 14 August 25, 2012. This is the only facility located in North Florida that has been selected for the exhibit. All other locations are in South Central and South Florida. In preparation for the exhibit, we are in need of volunteers to serve on various committees. Committees needed are for: Planning, Local exhibit planning, Exhibit installation, Program Development, School/teacher, Volunteer and docent training, and Publicity. Individuals are needed to present north Florida family journey stories, industry stories for the region, demonstrators, docents, assistance in creating an exhibit of local journey stories that support the MOMS Journey Stories. Anyone interested in supporting and participat ing in the presentation of the exhibit is invited to attend our initial planning meeting Oct. 6 at 6 p.m. CST in the Club House at the Panhandle Pioneer Settlement. Come and join us for our Annual Peanut Boil at the Panhandle Pioneer Settlement on Saturday, Sept. 24 at 5:30 p.m. Adults and children alike will enjoy this. We will have games for kids of all ages. Live Music, FREE Boiled Peanuts, other food and drinks available for a donation. Enjoy music performed by Easy Company Band with Charles Morris and brothers at the Wells Cabin on the Settlement. Come and enjoy the sights and sounds of the evening. Admission is free.The Panhandle Pioneer Settlement is a living museum documenting rural life in NW Florida since the early 1800s. It is located in Sam Atkins Park, about 1 mile west of the intersection of Hwy. 71 and Hwy. 20. Follow Hwy. 20 West out of Blountstown. Look for signs for Sam Atkins Park. Turn North at Lindys Fried Chicken. Silas Green St. (between 18th & 20th St.). Follow the signs. For more information, contact the Settlement at (850) 674-2777 For further directions and information on the historic buildings at the Settlement go to: www.ppmuseum.org.On Sept. 17 from 9 a.m.-2 p.m., The Center for Archaeological Studies at the University of South Alabama will present an introduction to archaeol ogy and the research that is being done in this area. Participants are invited to bring things from their own collections for idenA collection of artifacts from the Wiregrass will also be on display in the Interpretive Center Auditorium, plus a talk titled What is Archaeology? will take place at 10 a.m. Following the presentations, CAS will be gin documenting artifact collections and examining historical documents. Artifact documentation will include photographs, culture-historical typing, basic metric measure ments and technological analysis. This workshop will take place in the Interpre tive Center Auditorium and is free with paid gate admission. Landmark Park, home of the Alabama Agricul tural Museum, is a 135acre historical and natural science park located on U.S. Highway 431 North in Dothan, AL. For more information, contact the park at (334) 794-3452.ARCHAEOLOGY D AYat the Pioneer Settlement Settlement hosts Peanut Boil Sept. 24Initial planning meeting set for 6 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 6. at the Settlement Club House.



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News from the Pews...10 Confederate Signal Corps...20 9/11 Remembrance Ceremony..21 Obituaries...23 Arrest Reports...2 & 3 Community Calendar...4 Commentary...6, 7 New ambulance arrives...8 Almanac...1150includes tax THE CaALHoOUnN-LLIBErtRTY J OUURNALL Volume 31, Number 37 Wednesday, September 14, 2011 CLJ News.comPair of escaped inmates spotted at McDonalds; both in custody soon after chaseby Teresa Eubanks, Journal EditorTwo 19-year-old inmates who slipped out of the Calhoun County Jail last week were soon back in custody after being spotted at McDonalds. Kristopher Honrine, of Altha, and Christopher Leach, of Blountstown left the jail at 1:08 a.m. Tuesday, Sept. 6. Deputies had them in handcuffs by 2 a.m. They left the jail through a cell door that they had manipulated so it would not lock securely, said Sheriff David Tatum. Once through the cell door, they were able to gain access to a maintenance hallway. The pair then left through a rear exit. The correctional officer working in the jail that evening went outside to his vehicle to get his lunch around 12:30 a.m. and stopped to talk with a dispatcher when he returned. Around 1 a.m., he heard a loud knock coming from the inside of the jail door and was met by two inmates who told him of the escape. checked the dorms. By 1:18 a.m., an alert was issued for the two inmates, who were CHRIStT OPHeER LeEAcCH KRIStT OPHeER HHONRINeE line of motorcycles are reflected in the sunglasses worn by A Andy Waldorff, president of the Calhoun he looks out on the riders gathered for S Saturdays P Poker R Run fundraiser. Find out more on page 29. BENN HAHALL PHOPHOTO OPoker RunSee ESCAPEES BACK IN JAIL on page 20 Folks of all ages enjoyed S S aturdays Fly-I I n at the Calhoun County A A irport. Many kids got a chance for looks out the window as she heads into the sky. A ABOOVE Blountstown shows plenty of enthusiasm before going up in a helicopter. More photos inside on page 13! BEN HALL PHOTOS Calhoun AIRPORTFLY-IIN

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Page 2 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEpPTEMBER 14, 2011 SHER ER IFFS LOG BBlountstown Police Dept. Citations issued: Accidents Special details B Business alarms RResidential alarms Sept. 5 VOP, CCSO. Sept. 6 escape, CCSO. escape, CCSO. VOP, CCSO. resisting, obstructing opCCSO. battery on a law enforceSept. 7 CCSO. non-support, CCSO. Sept. 8 DUI, CCSO. Sept. 9 VOP, CCSO. CCSO. Sept. 11 DUI, FHP. Sept. 5 Sept. 7 Sept. 8 VOCP, LCSO. Sept. 9 VOSP, LCSO. LCSO. property damage, criminal Sept. 11 LCSO. VOP, LCSO. DealerEALER of ACCEPTING NNEW PPaA TIENTS www.bristoldentalclinic.com Same-Day Service on RR epairs & R R elines Bristol Dental Clinic Pitts charged with possessing ingredients to make methInformation that a Blountstown man had just purchased cold medicine containing pseudoephedrine in Jackson County resulted in the arrest of Michael Pitts for possession of listed chemicals Pitts was stopped at 5:16 Pitts was searched and a small piece of a marijuana pot method of making methamphetamine were found, with pseudoephedrine and an unopened gallon can of ARREST REPORTS MMan charged with felony criminal mischief after ramming truckA man upset that his girlfriend charged with felony criminal mischief and property damage rammed a truck she was using explaining that she returned that day to get her clothing said she continued packing her things, which angered had happened, he said they got into an argument after a neorthngtonTallahassee woman leaving reception stopped for DUIA 23-year-old Tallahassee woman who said she was heading home after attending a reception was arrested into the middle of the road a second time as an oncoming later, she asked for another chance to walk a line heelMichaelICHAEL PittITTS

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SEPTEMBER 14, 2011 / THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL PPage 3 ARREST REPORTScontinued from the previous page by Teresa Eubanks, Journal EditorA 38-year-old Blountstown man is facing a long list of charges after an altercation at a SR 71 South home left a lot of blood behind, two people with minor injuries and damages to a home and a truck. 1:30 a.m. Sunday reporting that Jason William Mills had gone to the residence of Vicki Lynn King armed with a knife and was tearing up the house. By the time he was taken into custody, the charges against Mills included aggravated battery with a deadly weapon, burglary with battery, felony criminal mischief, misdemeanor criminal mischief, battery on a with violence. walking out of the driveway of Kings home and going north on SR 71. The deputys report stated that Mills had blood on his face and was walking in an aggressive manner with Mills ignored the deputys order to stop and continued walking away. The deputy warned him he was taking out his taser and again told him to stop and get on the ground. Mills complied but as the deputy attempted to handcuff him, Mills pulled away and tried to hit Hoagland. When Mills tried to stand up, the deputy subdued him and again started to handcuff him as the two struggled. Mills made a second attempt to get up and was again stopped by the and threw it into the northbound lane of SR 71. After again threatening to use his taser, Hoagland was able to restrain Mills. the scene to assist Hoagland with Mills, who was still struggling. At that point, the deputy deployed his taser used a second time. Paramedic Aaron Carter arrived and helped get Mills in handcuffs and into a patrol car, where he began kicking the doors. Cpl. Eddie Dalton assisted in putting Mills in leg shackles. Mills gave a statement in which he said he had been invited into the home and when he entered, he was jumped by Charles Brandon Dorch, 24. He admitted he had a knife and stated Dorch had one, too. He said he was so upset by the altercation that he began tearing up the house. After he ended his statement and the tape recorder was stopped, Mills told referring to King. When asked what he meant, Mills said, King and Mills gave a very different account of what happened that morning. According to King, she heard a loud knock at her door not welcome. She said when Mills started forcing the door open, Dorch went to the rear of the home to look out and see exactly where Mills was. Mills forced the door open, came in and grabbed King, holding her tightly. King said she asked several times for him to let go of her before he would. She said she then told him to leave and he responded by slapping in her the face, which Dorch said he witnessed. When Dorch ran out the back door. She said once she was outside, she heard the sound of glass shattering and looked to see Mills breaking out the windows of her home. The deputys report stated that Dorch was covered in blood and had a cut on the top of his right hand. He was treated at the scene by Calhoun EMS. Dorchs account of events matched Kings and he stated that he saw Mills grab her and hit her in the face. When the a knife and stabbed him in the hand, according to Dorch. He said Mills then tried to cut him in the face but he moved and the knife caught his lip. Dorch then went out the back door with Mills behind him. Once outside, Dorch said he began chasing Mills. He said Mills grabbed a weedeater from a neighbors yard and tried to hit him with it. He said Mills went back in the residence, began throwing things around and breaking the windows. Dorch walked past his 2002 Ford pickup, which was parked behind the home, and went to Kings parents house. When he returned to talk with deputies he saw the trucks windshield had been smashed and the drivers side mirror broken. back door, where there was a large amount of blood. The deadbolt on the front door was in the locked position and the door was bent. The disarray inside the home was photographed. Mills is being held on $63,500 bond. WilliaILLIAM JaASonON MillMILLS Tallahasse man charged with DUI after calls about reckless driver on SSR 71NA man who said he got lost driving from one side of Tallahassee to the other was charged with DUI after a deputy saw a vehicle forced to take evasive action to prevent a head-on collision around 9 p.m. Thursday. Deputies responded to several reports of a reckless driver traveling south on SR 71N at a high rate of speed while swerving all over the road. Near John F. Bailey Road, a deputy spotted the vehicle and measured its speed at 80 mph while it was straddling the center line of the road, causing other drivers to go off the pavement to avoid a crash. After a deputy pulled up behind the vehicle with his emergency lights and siren on, the driver William Joseph Tebo, 55, of Tallahassee continued on for another mile and a half before pulling over. During that time, Tebo continued weaving across the road and crossing the center line numerous times, according to the deputys report. Once Tebo stopped, the deputy had to tell him to it took him several minutes of fumbling through his wallet before the contents spilled out and he found his license. He almost fell to the ground after he stepped out to take a roadside sobriety test. Efforts to follow instructions to determine his ability to drive failed as he tried to walk heel-to-toe and turn and seemed unable to distinguish his right foot from his left. When deputies looked inside a briefcase in the vehicle, they found two prescription pill bottles. One was potassium; the other was the anti-anxiety medication Buspirone HCL, which had a warning label that said its Tebo later said he had taken two Valiums that day. Two receipts from Bonifay were found in his pocket. One was from a convenience store and the other was from a liquor store.Woman threatened after domestic battery arrestA report of a disturbance at a mobile home park on Rock Bluff Road led to the arrest of a Greensboro man for domestic battery Friday night. Christopher W. Lewis, 30, was taken into custody by a woman who said he grabbed her by the hair, and kicked her in the rib cage after accusing her of cheating on him. Deputy Chad Smith noted that the womans left side was red, she had bruising around her right eye and on her right arm and there were scrapes on her left shoulder. She directed the deputy to a bedroom where she said Lewis was. The deputy went down the hall and called out to Lewis several times with no response. When Smith entered the room, he found Lewis on the bed. Lewis emerged from the room when Smith asked if they could go out front and talk. Lewis was then arrested. As he was being led out to a patrol car, he threatened the woman in front of when he got out of jail. WilliaILLIAM LewiEWIS WilliaILLIAM TeboEBO LAND SAlLE TRI-LAND IINC. Owner Financing No Qualifying BOUND RUGS2x4 ..........$5.00 2x8 ........$15.50 3x5 ........$12.50 4x6 ........$19.90 5x7 ........$39.90 6x9 ........$49.90 $ 109 90 $ 142 $ 135 $ $ 139 90 $ 324 $ 99 90 $ 185 $ 139 90 $ 252 $ 159 90 $ 306 $ 125 50 $ 214 $ 195 50 $ 315 $ 235 $ 285 $ 165 50 $ 291 $ 285 50 $ 561 sSIZeE CoOLorOR/stSTYLeE SALLE PRICICEBest Prices In Town!

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Page 4 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEpPTEMBER 14, 2011Thats how many copies of The Calhoun-Liberty Journal were distributed last week, ensuring plenty of coverage for your community announcements and great response for our business advertisers! 5,370 The Calhoun-Liberty Journal is published each Wednesday by the Liberty Journal Inc., Summers Road, P.O. Box 536, Bristol, FL 32321. Annual subscriptions are $18. Periodicals postage paid at Bristol, FLPOSTMASTER: Send address corrections to: P.O. Box 536, Bristol, FL 32321. (USPS 012367) Summers Road Located at 11493 NW Summers Road in Bristol MAILING ADDRESS: P.O. Box 536, Bristol, FL 32321 TELEPHONE (850) 643-3333 Fax (850) 643-3334 EM EMAIL: thejournal@fairpoint.net ADS: cljads@fairpoint.net JOURRNAL STT AFFJohnny Eubanks...................Publisher Teresa Eubanks........................ Editor Sandra Brown...................Bookkeeper Debbie Duggar...................Advertising Angie Davis.........Production AssistantOFFICE HOURS: 9 a.m. 6 p.m. M-F, Saturdays from 9 a.m. until 1 p.m.THE CALHOUN-LLIBERtTY JOURNAL Wednesday, September 14 TODAYS MEETINGS9 a.m., Veterans Memorial Park Civic Center 7 p.m., Altha Volunteer Fire Department AA, 6 p.m., Altha Community Center noon, Senior Citizens Center 5 p.m., Ag. Bldg., Conference Room across from Courthouse 6 p.m., Fire House 7 p.m., Dixie Lodge in Blountstown TODAYS MEETINGS7 p.m., Veterans Memorial Park Civic Center 4 p.m., Liberty Emergency Management buildingTODAYS MEETINGS, noon, Calhoun-Liberty Hospital 7 p.m., Calhoun County Old Ag Bldg. east door, in front of jail 6:30 p.m., Mormon Church in BristolTODAYS MEETINGSAA, 7 p.m., basement of Calhoun County Courthouse 7 p.m., Fire House 4 p.m., Calhoun Liberty Hospital Monday, September 19 Tuesday, September 20 Sunday, September 18 Saturday, September 17 Thursday, September 15 Friday, September 16BIRTHDAYS Kaiden Burke BIRTHDAYS Trent Smith & Nick Finch BIRTHDAYS Hannah Sumner CausseauxBIRTHDAYS Carlos Rainwater & Leroy WilliamsBIRTHDAYS Edwards Cooley & Tim RevellBIRTHDAYS James Flowers Garden Tea Party 2 p.m., Pioneer Settlement Attend the Church of your choice this Sunday Happy 108th Birthday Martha Missy Hall LCHS Dawgs vs. Marianna Home at 8 p.m. (ET) B-town Tigers vs. Freeport Home at 7 p.m. (CT) 7 p.m., Rivertown Community Church Southerland to host in Calhoun CountyBLOUNTSTOWN U.S. Representative Steve Southerland, II announced that his Florida staff will be hosting mobile ofSept. 15, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. (CT) at in the boardroom. surrounding area are invited to join Rep. Constituent Services Specialist to provide input, ask questions or request assistance Garden Tea Party this Sat., Sept. 17 will be held on Sept. 17 at 2 p.m. at the Pioneer Settlement. There will be door prizes, a silent auction and much more! Chapter 179 Order of the Easter Star. cancer, the Moffet Cancer Center in Tampa and the South Eastern Service Guide Dog organization (Paws for Patriots). from Eileen Bramblett at 643-2610, Lana Weeks at 674-4639 or Margie Mason at 674-8610 as well as at the door. BLOUNTSTOWN A Caregiver Sup15 from 2 to 3 p.m. This group is for those caring for someAlzheimer's, Parkison's and stroke. This is a time of sharing and learning from cumstances. We provide education, resources and counseling. All services are provided free of charge. Please call Recie Culpepper at 386-2778 or 566-2553 for information.Caregiver support group to meet at Gateway Sept. 15 from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Big Bend Hospice is sponsoring a bereavement seminar for professionals and peer supporters that work with bereaved families. Counselors, menpersonnel, funeral and nursing home staff are invited to attend. in supporting the bereaved as well as offering networking opportunities with other disciplines and service providers. This conference will provide professionals with useful and practical strategies to help clients and patients deal with grief, said Pam Mezzina, Bereavement Services Manager at Big well as learning strategies for self-care. There are 3 different tracks to choose from: a bereavement track, a spiritualProfessional presenters include Dr. W. staff from Big Bend Hospices Pastoral departments. Nurses, Social Workers and Nursing Home Administrators can earn 6.5 this conference. A registration fee of $79 is required which includes breakfast and lunch. Please 433 with questions or go to www.bigbendhospice.org to register. Wiregrass Heritage Festival to be held Oct. 22 in Dothan from 10 a.m.4 p.m., Landmark Park our region during the Wiregrass Heritage Festival. Peanut harvesting demonstrations will salute farmers, past and present. Other making, a juried quilt show, an antique tractor pull and parade and more. Volunteers will also demonstrate blacksmithing, woodworking, cooking on a wood stove for the tractor show and quilt show can be found at www.landmarkpark.com Admission to Wiregrass Heritage Festival is $8 for adults, $6 for seniors and Landmark Park is a 135-acre historical and natural science park located on For more information, contact the park at 334-794-3452. Big Bend Youth Soccer League sign-ups for ages 4 to 16 will be held in Blountstown at Sam Atkins Park. For more information please call Marianne Parker at 643-1587. For information on Big Bend Youth Soccer League sign-ups in Bristol please call Richie Smith at 643-2175.

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SEPTEMBER 14, 2011 / THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL PPage 5 THE ARTS Friday, Oct. 7*Shane Owens *Cross Creek Junction *Confederate Railroad *Wally G. *T. Graham Brown *Andy Griggs *Daryle Singletary It all happens Columbus Day weekendOctober 7 & 8in beautiful Cottondale, FLand tickets are now on sale Plan to spend the entire weekend in the Real Florida, some of the best weather of the year. All just an hours drive from the Worlds Most Beautiful Beaches. Enjoy great local food, vendors, non-stop entertainment. JOIN US FOR FFLORIDA FFEST! Tickets at Quickshine Car Wash in Bristol Call 567-1722 Saturday, Oct. 8*Bittersweet Blues Band *James Matthews Hughes *Shawn Rader *King Cotton *Houston Deese *Tabacco Rd. Band *Outshyne *Chris Cagle *Diamond Rio MOREARTISTSCOm M INGSSOON! The Tree House HOURRS 20759 Central Avenue E BLOUNTSTOWN PHONE NNUMBERS: 762-2113 or (850) 722-7057 FSUs Seven Days of Opening Nights performing arts festival announces stellar lineup for upcoming seasonTALLAHASSEE. The 14th season of Florida State Universitys popular festival of the performing arts boasts a diverse, eclectic lineup and an array of educational opportunities for universitylevel and K-12 students. Running from Feb. 9-20, Seven Days of Opening Nights will once again highlight Florida States contribution excellence in visual art, theater, dance, val highlights include the Tallahassee debuts of the acclaimed Soweto Gospel Choir, New Orleans powerhouses Allen Toussaint and Trombone Shorty, jazz chanteuse Jane Monheit, comic legend Joan Rivers, the National Theatre of Scotland, and 2010 Pulitzer Prize winner Jennifer Egan. Seven Days will also present performances outside of the festival, including shows by world music master Zakir Hussain (Sept. 28), dance maverick Monica Bill Barnes (Sept. 22-23), the original lineup of Bela Fleck & the Flecktones (March 21), and bestselling author Sarah Vowell (April 1). As always, the festival will focus on education. This season, a dozen Seven Days performers will offer master classes to FSU students of the arts, so that percussionists can learn from Zakir Hussain, writers from Jennifer Egan, dancers from Suzanne Farrell. Its a remarkable opportunity for the students and a hallmark of Seven Days. The festival also has expanded its K-12 offerings. Educational perfor mances and opportunities available for K-12 students include a full performance by the Soweto Gospel Choir in Ruby Diamond Concert Hall and in-school performances by the Ahn Trio and Carolina Chocolate Drops. ping up our education program, said Steve MacQueen, director of Seven Days of Opening Nights. Its one thing to talk about being a cultural leader in the community and another to get out there and do it. Were hoping to create opportunities for both artists and young audiences, and awareness of the arts in general, as well as getting exposure for our program. The full Seven Days of Opening Nights schedule for this season is as follows: & Company: One of the hottest young dancer/choreographers in New York, Barnes mixes comedy, pathos, movement and inventive uses of music to create entire worlds onstage. tabla player Hussain is universally acknowledged as one of the worlds greatest musicians, and a prime architect of the world music movement. For this sesh Chaurasia for an evening of Indian classical music. Inside Straight: Considered one of the will perform as bandleader of his group, Inside Straight. The show also caps the just a decade of existence, this South African choir has become a global sensation, earning two Grammy Awards and performing sold-out concerts to rave reviews around the world. Splendid Treasures of the Turkomen: This dual exhibit from the FSU Museum of Fine Arts offers an array of textiles and an assortment of handcrafted jewelry by the nomadic desert-dwellers of the Turkomen tribes. of the 2010 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction for her novel A Visit from the Goon Squad, Egan brings her unique voice and style to Florida State. Arts: The Tallahassee Museums popular Matinee of the Arts presents a rich lineup of visual and performing arts, including live music on the outdoor stage and in the museums historic buildings. of three Korean sisters educated at Juilliard, the Ahn Trio has created new energy and excitement in chamber music. The trio will perform two shows one at FSU, the other at Thomasvilles Pebble Hill Plantation as well as meeting with both university and K-12 students. music students from Florida States world-renowned wind and percussion programs, PRISM covers the spectrum of band activities at FSU Florida State Chamber Winds, the Campus Band, University Concert Band, Seminole Sound, University Symphonic Band, University Wind Orchestra and, of Cast announced for production of Our T T own at Chipola CollegeMARIANNA Chipola College Theatre director Charles Sirmon recently cast local actors in the college production of "Our Town," which opens Nov. 3. The Our Town cast includes: Joe Gibson as Dr. Gibbs, Leah Page as Mrs. Gibbs, Trey McKay as George Gibbs, Jamal Engram as Howie Newsom, Ashleigh Stowe as as Emily Webb, Jae House as Professor Willard, Sierra Hill as Lady in Box, Dante Brown as Simon Stimson, Christin Wiggins as Mrs. Soames, Josh Tetlow as Constable Warren, Matthew Van Buren and Alex Anderson as Baseball Players, Laura Sweat as Sam Craig, Matthew Van Buren as Joe Stoddard, Alexus Perry and Sharraneka Jackson as Townspeople and John David Brown as Stage Manager. Our Town explores the lives of people living in produced in 1938 and received the Pulitzer Prize for Literature. The play is divided into three aspects of the human experience: Daily Life, Love and Marriage, and Death making it one of the most deeply human scripts in all of American theatre. Theatre fans are invited to join The Applauding Chipola Theatre (ACT) VIP fund, which guarantees the best seats bership including Sponsor, Patron, Benefactor, Angel and Corporate Angel with VIP seating available at all levels. A portion of ACT memberships are tax-deductible. For information, contact Charles Sirmon at (850) 7182227 or email: sirmonc@chipola.edu. See SEVEN DAYS OF OPENING NIGHTS continued on page 18 Home of the All-U-Can-Eat menu A little out of the way, A lot less to payFamily Coastal Seafood Restaurant Were Still open New director to speak at Chipola Regional Art Association meetingMARIANNAThe public is invited to attend the Chipola Regional Arts Association (CRAA) meeting on Tuesday, Sept. 20, at Jims Buffet in Marianna. A Dutch-treat luncheon begins at 11:30 a.m. with the program beginning at noon. The program for this will feature Dr. Daniel Powell, the newlyappointed Associate Dean of the Fine and Performing Arts department at Chipola. Dr. Powell will assume leadership over the Chipola Regional Arts Association as their executive director, and will speak about the future of the arts in the Chipola district. Dr. Powell will discuss exciting opportunities in the area and share ways to strengthen the community through the arts. I want to start a conversation with the community, Powell says, to improve and ways to implement this. I am not only an approachable guy, I am eager to meet people and involve everyone in the community with what we are doing. All of those wishing to make a difference in the community are invited to attend all or part of this event. For information, contact Daniel Powell at powelld@chipola.edu or (850) 7182257.DrR. DanielANIEL PowellOWELL

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Page 6 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEpPTEMBER 14, 2011 COMMENTARY Late Night LaughsA recaRECAP oOF recentRECENT obOBSerER Vation ATIONS by BY lateLATE niNIGhtHT tV TV hoHOStTS.PPresident Obama introduced his $447 billion jobs plan. A lot of economists say it could work if we had $447 billion. JAY LENOThe Republican presidential candidates had a debate at the Reagan Library. They were going to have it at the G George W. Bush Library but they ConanONAN OBrienRIENAccording to the latest poll, a record 73 percent of Americans think the country is headed in the wrong direction. But the good news: G Gas is so expensive that well never get there. JAY LENOPPresident Obama plans to create thousands of new jobs by replacing all automobile GPS GPS systems with real people who sit in the back seat with a map. JIMMY KIMMELAccording to the latest poll, a record 73 percent of Americans think the country is headed in the wrong direction. But the good news: G Gas is so expensive that well never get there. JAY LENORick P Perry said he understands healthcare because his wife is a nurse. He also says he understands terrorism because he watched all the seasons of . ConanONAN OBrienRIENRick P Perry and Mitt Romney squared off at the Republican debate. The only thing they agreed on was shampoo, rinse, and repeat. JAY LENOTomorrow is Bring Your S Son or Daughter to the DAV VID LETTERMANThe oil industry said if they were allowed to drill more, they could create over a million new jobs. Of course most of those jobs would be cleaning oil off ducks. ConanONAN OBrienRIENTo give an idea of how bad the economy is, the NFFL had to borrow the quarter for the coin toss from China. And they want it back. ConanONAN OBrienRIENMichele Bachmann said that if she is elected president, she would consider eliminating the Department of Education because the states could do a gooder job. JAY LENORick P Perry used to be a Democrat. But then again, Barack Obama used to be a Democrat too. JAY LENO"Jobs Plan Tanks," screamed the Drudge Report the morning after the president's much anticipated speech. The headline linked to reports of the drops on the various stock markets, which are based, it appears, as much on global uncertainty as they are on the support, or lack thereof, of the president's plan. But does it matter? The problem with building expectations is that whether you are a candidate or a president or a football coach you almost never meet them. That's why the usual game is to hype things down rather than up so that you can do better than expected or, to borrow from Bill Clinton, assume the mantle of "the Comeback Kid." Which is precisely what Barack Obama needs. In truth, the reaction was predictable. The logical recourse for a president seeking to create jobs is to spend money either by appropriating it or by forgoing it in tax cuts. When I was in law school, legendary tax professor Stan Surrey taught us that tax different from appropriations. "Tax expenditures" he called them. Conservatives, led by President Reagan Budget Director David Stockman, never bought it. Invoking JFK's 1960s tax cuts, they managed to convince the country that you could cut taxes and increase spending It didn't work that way, and years later, Stockman admitted that he never quite bought it even when he was doing it. Last month, when the president proposed closing ting the supposedly temporary Bush cuts for the richthe president backed down. Last week, when he proposed tax breaks for businesses that create jobs or raise wages, as well as new spending for infrastructure repair, they screamed bloody murder about the The short answer is that the Republicans aren't going to do anything to help this president, at least when it comes to economic policy. They'll never admit that their goal is to keep those unemployment numbers high, to wreak havoc with markets, recovery. In fairness, their strategy makes perfect sense. Their goal is to put a Republican in the White House, and sadly, from a policy perspective, the easiest way to do that is by keeping the bread and butter off the table and the chicken out of every pot. What became clear Thursday night is that the president is not going to win this election by seeking consensus in Washington, no matter how good his without looking both arrogant and weak, he isn't going to get a deal to pass his budget initiatives. Voters say they want consensus, but if Obama tries to deliver it, he will lose. Which leaves the oththe sand, even if it stays there. In times like this, the only way to win the presidency may be to put it at risk in no uncertain terms. What Obama needs more than a good and balGUEESTT COLUMMNby SSusan EstrichSusan Estrich is a legal and political analyst who appears frequently on FOX NEWS and contributes articles to NewsMax. com. She is a law professor and the author of several books.

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SEPTEMBER 14, 2011 / THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL PPage 7 WASHINGTONMERRY-GO-ROUNDby Douglas Cohn and Eleanor Clift CHINA TURMOIL IsS cCOMING COMMENTARY WASHINGTON The 10th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks 2011 U.S. News Syndicate, Inc.

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Page 8 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEpPTEMBER 14, 2011 Calhoun Liberty HOSPITAlLCalhoun-Liberty Hospital will be offering *Free Mammography screenings October 17-31 *If you have insurance, CLH will bill your insurance. Patients will not be responsible for deductible or co-pay. See your doctor for your order today! We are dedicated to womens health.New digital mammography machine.Calhoun Liberty Hospital/ Calhoun County EMS has taken delivery of a new Wheeled Coach. The vehicle has four-wheel drive and is for three new electric stretchers at a cost of $23,000.FROM LEFT: Paramedic Sara Moses, EMT Andy Waldorff, Paramedic Latrinda Kemp, Paramedic Supervisor Jarrod Wester and EMT Jake Miller are show in front of the new vehicle. Calhoun-Liberty EMEMS gets new ambulance, 3 electric stretchersInfant death rate in 5-county area slightly higher than statesMARIANNA paign to increase the awareness of the high rate of infant

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SEPTEMBER 14, 2011 / THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL PPage 9 Williams to represent Liberty on Chipola Healthy Start BoardThe Chipola Healthy Start Board of Directors welcomed Richard Alan Williams, of Bristol, as their new board member at Director, he has spent the last nine years area, said Chipola Healthy Start Board Besides Chipola Healthy Start, Wilwife Denise settled in Bristol where they while employed as the owner/operator of a the Chipola Healthy Start Board as, Chipola Healthy Start is 501(c)3 nonCLJ N ews .cCOM Haney Video Games opens in BlountstownHaney Video is the newest business to open in Blountstown. Owned and operated by Sherrie and Able Haney of Bristol, the shop is located in a room of the cabin at McMillan Trees & Shrubs. The business offers new and pre-owned games as well as sells and trades gaming systems and accessories. Shown above at Saturdays grand opening, from left: Jacob Reed and his little brother, Samuel, Allen Holbert, Juston Burdick, Samantha Reed and co-owner Sherrie Haney at the cash register. DANIEL WILLIAMS PHOTO MMartha Hall will mark 108th birthday TThursday, Sept. 15SUMMERR RAYNE STONESummer Rayne Stone celebrated her ninth birthday Sept. 12. She is the daughter of Nick and April Stone of Clarksville. Her grandparents are Teresa and the late Larry Lee of Clarksville, Ben Stone of Kinard, Donna Osborne and the late Harlan Reddick of Bristol. Her birthdaysgreat-grandparents are Elizabeth and the late Harry Osborne of Blountstown, Rufus and Katie Reddick of Bristol, the late Nick and Lucille Demat of Clarksville and the Late B.H. and Nadine Stone and just being silly. Want to see whats new with TT upperware? Meet or call your local Tupperware Consultant for Parties, Orders or Fundraisers. and receive a free hostess gifts. The more you sell, the greater the gifts.Call Beth Eubanks, your full time Tupperware Consultant at (850) 643-2498 or email at bethseubanks41@aol.com.Visit me online at www.my.tupperware.com/bethseubanks

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Page 10 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEpPTEMBER 14, 2011 BBlountstown Health and RRehab16690 SW Chipola Road, Blountstown TT elephone (850) 674-4311 Blountstown Health and Rehabilitation Center provides short-term and long-term care in a warm, personal manhealthcare, centered on caregiver compassion, offered in a comfortable home-like setting. Come Home to Rehab NEWS FROM THE PEWS Note of ThanksThis past Sunday as the family of Carr Chapel Advent Christian Church gathered to worship God, Pastor Harris used the time not only to present God's Word but to honor First Responders. We were blessed to have three men in the fellowship to stand in place of those who served on that faithful day on 9/11. Charles Morris of the Jackson County Sheriffs Department stood for all law enforcement people. David Odum, a Colonel in the Army Reserves, represented our service men and women in harms way, on the need to pray and witness to those of the Muslim faith Also to remember the price that converts from the Muslim faith pay in calling Jesus Christ their Lord and Saviour REREVIVAL OpPEN ArmsRMS AsS-s SEmMBlL Y of OF GodOD Open Arms Assembly of God will be having revival services from Sunday, Sept. 25 through Wednesday, Sept. 28. Sunday services will start with Sunday School at 10 a.m. followed by morning worship at 11 a.m. and evening worship will be at 6 p.m. Services will be held at 7 p.m. Monday through Wednesday. B Be sure to come each night to hear an outpouring of Gods word through Rev. Juno Douglas. Campmeeting services are held every second and fourth Sunday evening at 6 p.m. The Wednesday night services are weekly at 7 p.m. and include classes for youth and children. The church is located at the corner of Hwy. 73 South and Smith Tower Road in Kinard. For more information please call Pastor B B ill Mayo at 693-0445.storss tnCarrARR ChapHAPEl L AdDVENtT ChrHRIstSTIaAN ChHUrchRCH On Friday, Sept. 9 the inaugural fellowship meeting of Calhoun County Pastors The family of E Edwin E Earl Goodman Jr. would like to express sincere thanks and appreciation to all of our friends and family for the many expressions of kindness and sympathy given during the loss of our loved one. Whether a hug, a telephone calls, emails or cards it is all genuinely appreciated and we know that E Ed would appreciate your kind gestures as well. I It is during a time like this that we learn how much our friends really mean to us. Knowing you will miss him too makes our burden a bit easier to bear. The Edwin E. Goodman Jr. FamilyFroROM left LEFT : Wives was held at Carr Chapel. N N ancy Kelly represented the Church of the N Nazarene in B Blountstown and Janice Harris represented Carr Chapel. There was a time of fellowship, prayer for our churches, community, and nation and a devotion from Max Lucados book Just Like Jesus. Another meeting has been set for Oct. 6 at 2 p.m. at Carr Chapel. Y Y ou may call Janice Harris at (386) 209-2524 for more information.storAppr ct ons r csPra RA YEr R Cha HA INErs RS MIss SSIo ON of OF GodOD The members of Prayer Chainers Mission of God will be celebrating their annual Pastor Appreciation and Revival services on Sunday, Sept. 18 through Sept. 25. Sunday services will be held at noon and again at 4 p.m. with weekly services at 6:30 p.m. (CT) Our theme is The Hands of a Mighty Warrior and as Paul states, For though we walk weapons of our warfare are not carnal, but mighty through God to the pulling down of strong holds; casting down imaginations and every high thing that exalted itself against the knowledge of God, and bringing into captivity every though to the obedience of Christ II II Cor. 10:3-5. With this we shall bring in different speakers to be in attendance with Apostle G.BB. Sheard and the Prayer Chainers Mission of God nightly with a high time in the Lord to follow. Come expecting to hear a word from the Lord as some will be healed and others delivered, while we pray for God to save Ghost For more information please call Majorie Peter son at 674-3449, Debra Peterson at 674-9819 or Debra Abner Jones at 674-4101.ocons r csMagAGNolOL IaA Bap BAP-t TIstST ChHUrchRCH Magnolia B Baptist Church will be celebrating Home coming on Sunday, Sept. 18. The services will begin at 10 a.m. with music by Swiftwater. Associate Pastor Clint Clemons will be our speaker for the morning worship services followed by lunch in the fellowship hall. The church is located B Blountstown on Magnolia Church Rd. off Hwy. 71.For more information please call 674-8080.The U USDA-NNatural Resources Conservation Service (NNRCS) in Florida is encouraging eligible landowners, farmers, and now to sign up for 2012 incentive programs. The application process for 2012 conservation programs is continuous, but funding selections are only made once a year. The Florida N NRCS application cutoff date for consideration for Federal Fiscal Y Y ear 2012 funds is October 31, 2011. Applications received after that date will be considered for future funding periods. Were urging producers to get their applications in as soon as possible to be considered for this years funding. N NRCS works with landowners through conservation planning and assistance deand animals that result in productive lands and healthy ecosystems. Cost share funding is available to eligible applicants for the following Farm BBill programs: sistance to farmers and ranchers who face threats to soil, water, air, and related natural N NRCS develops contracts with agricul tural producers to voluntarily implement conservation practices. Persons engaged in livestock or agricultural production and owners of non-industrial private forestland are eligible for the program. E Eligible land includes cropland, rangeland, pastureland, private non-industrial forestland, and other farm or ranch lands. (WHIIP) is a voluntary program for developing or improving high quality habitat that cance. Through WHIIP, the N NRCS provides private and Tribal landowners for the development of upland, wetland, aquatic, and other types of wildlife habitat. The Wetlands Reserve Program (WRP) to private landowners and Tribes to restore, protect, and enhance wetlands in exchange for retiring eligible land from agriculture. N NRCS encourages interested parties to visit with our staff as soon as possible. Applicants who apply early have more time to resolve any program or land eligibility issues. Additional information about NRCS programs is available on our website at www.fl.nrcs.usda.gov or at your local Calhoun, Liberty, Gulf, or Franklin counties contact Brian McGraw or Cathy Davis at the Blountstown USDA (NRCS) Service Center. Call us at (850) 674-8271 ext. 3. Conservation assistance opportunities

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SEPTEMBER 14, 2011 / THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL PPage 11 ASK THEO L D F A R M E R SA L M A N A C Heating & Air Conditioning FL LicIC. # CMC1249570R s s CCs (850) 674-4777Whaley WhaleyIn Shakespeares Much Ado About Nothing, he speaks of the V. B., La Jolla, Calif. Its a complicated equation, but it goes something like this, according to the English poet Stephen Hawes in The Passe-tyme of Plesure (1315): These are inwardly: First, Common witte, and then Ymagination, Fantasy, and Estimation truely, and Memory. The Dictionary of Phrase and Fable (1898) lists same order: common sense, imagination, fantasy, estimation, and memory. It also goes on to explain that common sense is the outcome of imagination is the wit of the mind; fantasy is the imagination linked with judgment; estimation is a measuring of the absolute (time, space, locality, etc.); and memory is the Got all that? Well quiz you later to measure how still got about you. P. L., Paterson, N.J. Its that red thing that no respectable hot fudge sundae should be without, of course. In its purest form, this cherry is the marasca cherry, from the Trieste region of Italy. Its pit is crushed and its juice fermented to make an alcohol-based, bittersweet cordial. The cherries are then soaked in this liquor to make the original maraschino cherry. But the cherry top of ice cream sundaes pure form. Commercial brands of maraschino cherries are mostly made with sugar or corn syrup and red dye. Sometimes, ing is added to the liquid. The good news is that the outlawed some of the more harmful red dyes that were being used, but the cherries are still being dyed to red or, less popularly, to green. The cherries used commer cially may be any edible red cherry. It would be easy to of a maraschino cherry by soaking freshly picked and washed pitted cherries in a liquor of your choice such as kirsch, kir, or creme de cassis. might be made with an syrup, perhaps red dened with cranberry juice, and fresh, pitted cherries. The nonalcoholic types wouldnt life, of course, and all frigerated. C. F., Milford, Del. Not necessarily, al functioned as weather for their giddy whirling motions, probably started as whittlers amusements or possibly childrens toys in their early forms. A childs windmill, jousting knight on horseback, and pinwheel are other incarnations of the whirligig. Certainly, there are combinations of weatherform and function were not always joined. Most whirligig as an early example of folk art that has culture. Early American whirligigs from the 18th and 19th centuries often draw on German or English origins. as well as soldiers from the War, all in their appropriate costume. Cyclists, farmsailors, and sawyers are also common. weathercocks were more goose, or other animal atop the pole. Some had no pointer and perhaps the compass points, or just N for north. Heraldry figuresfor example, ner designswere also common at one time. The Greeks are credited with Romans following suit in the art. SEPT. 12, MONDAY Full Harvest Moon. Moon on equator. Henry Hudson began exploration of what was later named the Hudson River, 1609. He who is contented has enough. SEPT. 13, TUESDAY Conjunction of Uranus and the Moon. Margaret Chase Smith became houses of Congress, 1948. SEPT. 14, WEDNESDAY Holy Cross. Zond 5 launched and Moon, 1968. Actor Patrick Swayze died, 2009. SEPT. 15, THURSDAY Moon at apogee. The Lone Ranger debuted on television with Clayton Moore and Jay Silverheels, 1949. Prince Harry born, 1984. SEPT. 16, FRIDAY Conjunction of Jupiter and the Moon. Pluto stationary. Edward in Missouri River near Vermillion, South Dakota, 1959. SEPT. 17, SATURDAY Writer William Carlos Williams born, 1883. Vanessa Williams became crowned Miss America, 1983. SEPT. 18, SUNDAY Fourteenth Sunday after Pentecost. Fugitive Patty Hearst arrested in California after spending more than 6 months with Symbionese Liberation Army. 1975. Kaitlin Katie Lynn met Jade, a Daschund, after an accident Neighbors who had seen the Her favorite thing to do is to curl dog loves to chase squirrels and even imitates them when her cheeks with her food, leave her bowl and then move to the middle of Jade is eight years old and has been a part of Altha Store Phone (850) 762-3161B Blountstown BBranch Phone (850) 673-8102M Marianna BBranch Phone (850) 482-2416Altha Farmers Co-op, Inc. PETS AND tTHeEIR pePEOpPLeE IsS spSPONsSOReED BYWeve got the feed you need to keep your animals happy and healthy!CAATTLLE HORHORSES DODOGS CAATS BIRD BIRDS and more.AND THEIRPetETS PEOPLE Katie & Jade Young trees should be from being pulled by fall and winter winds. If your houseplants in yet, do it them thoroughly before bringing them in to rid them of any pests and eggs.As perennials fade away, mark their locations with small sticks. Some might not be apparent after the winter and might be disrupted by spring culPlant spring bulbs as long as the ground is workable. Plant the following bulbs soon: trout lily, narcissus (including daffodil), snowdrop, winter For crown imperial, add a little lime to the soil.GARDENINgGJobs for Septemberfrom The Old Farmers Almanac

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Page 12 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEpPTEMBER 14, 2011 Dear Neighbor, Please allow me to introduce myself. My name is Polly Coe and I am your Local Herbalife Wellness Coach. As Ive been out in the local area the past few months, I realize how many of us may not know each other and I would like the opportunity to change that by offering to you a FREEREE Wellness E Evaluation and get to know you better! I have a fabulous relief from allergy symptoms. I love my wonderful great Energy and feeling great every single day! Herbalife has been in business for over 31 years, and although their speciality is healthy weight loss, they have the highest quality targeted nutritional and personal care products in the world, all of which produce incredible results that people want and need. We have over 50 million documented cases of our products helping people not only lose weight but maintain, gain and/or get their health back. Herbalife has products available in 76 countries worldwide. With UCLAs Dr. Prize Winner, Dr. Louis Ignarro working with Herbalife, these products are cutting edge nutrition! If there is something you could change about your health, without disrupting your schedule, what would it be? If you suffer from any of these, or know someone who does, please give me a call. I would love to get to know you and do a FREEREE WEELLNEESS E EVALUAT TION. I can give you some great information, let you try the products and share what has worked for millions of others as well as myself. B But dont take my word for it...see results www.RResults44.com or call toll free 1-888-229-6314 and then call me. It could change your life! We also have a line for the 24 hour athlete. Nutrition for the serious can be customized for your level of activity. If you have any questions and would like to schedule your FREEREE Wellness E Evaluation and try our products for FREEREE please call Yours in Good Health, Polly Coe 21510 NE WL Godwin Road, Blountstown Want Extra Income? Check out www.smartinfonow.com or Call Me!Energy Chronic Fatigue Weight Loss Weight Gain Diabetes, Blood sugar level issues High Blood Pressure High Cholesterol Aching Joints, RA Headaches/Migraines Ulcers Hypoglycemia Fibromyalgia Depression A message from your local Herbalife Wellness Coach Calhoun School District donates Middle School to North Florida Child Development Inc.WEwW AHITCHKA T T he C C alhoun C C ounty School District recently donated the former Blountstown Middle School property and buildings to North Florida C Child Development, I Inc. T The donation includes 15 acres and 31,000 square feet of building space including classrooms, cafeteria, gymnasium, media center, and health unit.I In announcing the receipt of the donated property, Sharon Gaskin, CE CEO stated, We are truly thankful to the C Calhoun C County School District for this donation that will provide us a permanent home for our early childhood learning programs in C Calhoun C County. C Currently our services are housed in modular buildings, so these school facilities will be a great enhancement. Over the years, we have enjoyed a great working relationship with the C Calhoun Jim McKnight, COO; Kenneth Speights, NFCD and Calhoun School Board Member, Damon McNair, Board Chairman, NFCD, Tommy McClellan, Calhoun Superintendent of Schools and Sharon Gaskin, CEO, NFCD. School District and through our cooperative agreements we both have been able to maximize dollars expended and at the same time provide higher quality services to the children and families of CCalhoun CCounty. NFCCD will rename the school the Mayhaw School in honor of the historically black school that opened in the 1930s and moved to the current site in the 1950s. T The school was later transitioned to the Blountstown Middle School and, with major additions in the 1990s, served as Blountstowns Middle School until this year. A According to NFCCD Board C Chairman, Damon McNair, we intend to return the use of the school to the Mayhaw C Community and we will partner with the Mayhaw C Community groups in developing a museum to preserve the Mayhaw School memorabilia.A According to Mrs. Gaskin, NFCCD will lease some social service agencies in an effort to create a onestop-shopping for our families and to offset some of the operational costs. We are truly excited about the opportunity to work with Mayhaw C Community groups toward developing the site as a community resource and lifelong learning school. TThe Landmark Park Quilt Show will be held on October 21-23, in conjunction with Wiregrass H Heritage Festival in the Stokes A Activity Barn. Over 150 quilts entered last years juried show, as well as a nonjuried exhibit of antique and contemporary quilts. A A special exhibit of C Civil War era quilts will also be on display. A A pplications for quilt entry, vendor rules and applications can be found at www.landmarkpark.com T The quilt and vendor applications are due by September 23. C C ash prizes especially interested in displaying C Civil War era quilts. Please call (334) 794-3452 for more information. A Admission to the quilt show is free with your paid gate admission ($4 for adults and $3 for kids on Friday and Sunday; $8 for adults, $6 for seniors and active military, $4 for kids on Saturday. Free every day for park members). Landmark Park, home of the Alabama Agricultural Museum, is a 135-acre historical and natural science park located on U.S. Highway 431 North in Dothan, AL. For more information, contact the park at (334) 794-3452.

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SEPTEMBER 14, 2011 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL PPage 13 CALHOUN AA IRPORT FLY-IN A view from the air is shown above in a photo taken by Anna Jo Hall as her airplane prepares to land at Saturdays Fly-In. RIGHT: A young passenger gets ready to become airborne. FAR RIGHT: A boy cranes his neck to get a good view of an aircraft. BELOW RIGHT: Two youngsters explore a bright blue airplane parked in a hanger. BELOW: Kids enjoyed getting their faces painted while waiting for their turn to go up in an airplane. PHOTOS BY BEN HALLFAR RIGHT PHOTO BY DAN DAVIS

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Page 14 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEpPTEMBER 14, 2011 CASH BBALANCEESBR BROUGHTT FORR WARRD.................................................. E Estimated RRevenues:T T axes: Ad Valorem Taxes 3.00 mills per 1000 Franchise Taxes Communications Services Tax Licences Intergovernmental Water Revenue Wastewater Revenue Garbage Revenue Charges for Services Misc. Services Road Tax Interfund Transfer Non-Operating Income T T OTT AL EESTTIMMATE TED REREVEENUEE AND BBALANCEES...............................E EXPEENDITTURERES/EEXPEENSEES: General Governmental Services Solid Waste Public Safety/Fire Control Human Services Non-Operating Debt Services Operating Debt Services Equipment Streets & Roads Interfund Transfer Capital Improvements Comprehensive Planning T T OTT AL EEXPEENDITTURERES/EEXPEENSEES ...................... RE RESERER VEEST T OTT AL APPRROPRRIATE TED E EXPEENDITTURERES/EEXPEENSEES....................................... BUDGET SUMMARY $7,000 24,010 50 40,475 889,930 $961,465 54,000 2,500 10,500 889,930 $956,930 4,535 $961,465 $225,622 83,993 52,130 26,225 850 91,472 12,489 1,800 $494,581 221,648 23,090 5,000 18,818 28,000 25,000 46,600 $368,156 126,425 $494,581 $131,789 222,000 295,000 143,420 2,000 1,000 25,000 118,070 $938,279 363,595 131,300 176,600 6,500 120,466 $798,461 139,818 $938,279 $364,411 83,993 52,130 26,225 850 91,472 222,000 295,000 143,420 38,499 2,850 40,475 25,000 1,008,000 $2,394,325 585,243 131,300 23,090 5,000 249,418 0 37,000 10,500 25,000 1,010,396 46,600 $2,123,547 270,778 $2,394,325RRoadGeneralUtilityT T otalCITY OF BRISTOL, FLORIDA FISCAL YEAR 2011-2012 The Proposed Operating Budget Expenditures of the City of Bristol are 3.6% More than Last Years Total Operating Expenditures. NOTICE OF BUDGET HEARIn N GFY 2011-2012 FINAL DECISIONAND TAXESMMonday, Sept. 19, 2011 at 6:30 p.m. (ETET)

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SEPTEMBER 14, 2011 / THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL PPage 15 FWC Youth Conservation Centers expanding in many waysThe Florida Youth Conservation Centers Network is growing, according to the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC), which launched the initiative. Rae Waddell, FYCCN director, reported to Commissioners at the FWC meeting recently in Naples that the network of youth conservation centers now includes eight Wild Outdoors Centers (the hubs) and 35 Near Outdoors Centers (the smaller, neighborhood locations). Its no longer a dream; its a reality, FWC Executive Director Nick Wiley said. This is government going from one (facility) to 43. People see the success and now everyone wants to get on board, Wiley said, marveling that just about four years ago, you, Commissioners, said Lets do this. And we did. Beau Turner provided the boom factor, Commissioner Brian Yablonski noted, by building the youth conservation center near Tallahassee. This is just a start, Waddell said. We intend to constantly reach out to form new partnerships, with the goal of steady expansion. Because many young Floridians have not had the opportunity to experience the outdoor opportunities Florida offers, the FWC is creating conservation centers all around the state, where kids can explore the many wildlife-related archery, hunting, boating and horseback riding. To maximize resources, the FWC and the Wildlife Foundation of Florida are forming partnerships. For example, Waddell noted the agency has formalized a partnership with the Southwest Florida Water Management District and the Gulf Ridge Boy Scouts Council to create the Flying Eagle Youth Conservation Center in Inverness. Brick-and-mortar progress is also being made, she said. Ocala Youth Conservation Center upgrades include new pavilions near the boat ramp, a pavilion in the shooting sports area and newly shingled roofs for existing pavilion. Programs at these camps are expanding too, Waddell said. Ocala YCC added Fish Camp to its camp schedule this summer. The Everglades Youth Camp conducted its with outdoor recreational activities as well as conservation education sessions. Teachers and administrators deemed this pilot program successful, and 10 Charlie Pierce days are being planned for this school year with the Palm Beach County school system. Charlie Pierce Day is a program that will be implemented at other Wild Outdoors centers. Seven of FYCCNs eight hubs hosted week-long conservation education camps this summer. Over 2,000 kids participated in comprehensive, hands-on programming nature-based recreation. We are just getting started, Waddell said. Programs will be enhanced at each of our partner sites, and we anticipate the number of youths reached with quality programming to soar in the coming years. For more information on the Florida Youth Conservation Centers Network, go to MyFWC.com or FYCCN. org.BButtons N BBadges, Ads N Chads: 200 Years of Florida Campaign History topic of Sept. 25 West Gadsden Historical Society meetingGREENSBORO The West Gadsden Historical Society will hold its next meeting on Sunday, Sept. 25 at 3:00 p.m. in Gardner Hall in Greensboro. The guest speaker, John Owen Clark, native of Flat Creek and Greensboro areas, and now a resident of Tallahassee, will give a presentation about his extensive collection of political memorabilia that spans nearly 200 years of politics. John Clark, son of the late Hubert and Alice Owen Clark, is a seventh generation Floridian with a longtime love for politics and history. While a young student at Greensboro School, he bought both a Kennedy and a Nixon button at the North Florida Fair in 1960 and began collecting seriously in 1964. The collection has been featured in Florida Trend, subject of a cover story in Tallahassee Magazine, high lighted in several newspaper articles, and on the cover of the Florida Handbook twice. He has consulted with the Smithsonian Institution in Washington regarding their political history collection. His collection includes all kinds of political memorabilia dating from the 1820s to current elections and specializes in items with a Florida connection. It has been exhibited at a national collectors convention, the Florida Archives, Florida State University, and the University of Florida. Clark has degrees in government and law from Florida State University and is a former assistant to a U.S. Congressman. Since 1984, he has been a Vice President with a major New Please mark your calendar to join with us on Sept. 25 as we welcome John back to opportunity in Gadsden County to see what John has collected through the years and is so willing to share with the county, state, and nation. The members of WGHS look forward to seeing you that day. For further information, please e-mail info@gadsdenhistory.org or call (850) 4426434. AGRICULTUREForeign persons required to report agricultural land holdings in U.S.BlountstownLOUNTSTOWNCalhoun/Liberty USDA Farm Service Agency (FSA) Executive Director Charles H. Golden reminds foreign persons with an interest in agricultural lands in the United States that they are required to report their holdings and any transactions to the U.S. Secretary of Agriculture. "Any foreign person who acquires, transfers or holds any interest, other than a security interest, in agricultural land in the United States is required by law to report the transaction no later than 90 days after the date of the transaction," said Golden Agricultural Foreign Investment Disclosure Act (AFIDA) reports maintains reports for the county where the land is located. report can result in a penalty with market value of the agricultural land, said Golden. For AFIDA purposes, agriculused for farming, ranching or timber production, if the tracts total 10 acres or more. Disclosure reports are also required when there are changes in land use. For example, reports are required when land use changes from nonagricultural to agricultural or from agricultural to nonagricultural. Foreign investhere is a change in the status of ownership such as owner changes from foreign to non-foreign, from non-foreign to foreign or from foreign to foreign. Data gained from these disclosures is used to prepare an annual report to the President and Congress concerning the effect of such holdings upon family farms and rural communities in the United States. For more information regarding AFIDA and FSA programs, contact (850) 674-8388 or visit the USDA Web site at http://www.usda.gov. The Farm Service Agency (FSA) is currently accepting applicagible producers affected by natural disasters. This federally funded program covers non-insurable crop losses and planting prevented by disasters. Eligible disasters are any of the following: damaging weather such as drought, excessive moisture, or hurricane; an adverse natudamaging weather or adverse natural occurrence such as excessive heat or insect infestation. The natural disaster must occur before or during harvest and must directly affect the eligible crop. Applicants must pay a nonrefundable administrative fee of $250 per crop, per county. Fees are capped at $750 per county not to exceed $1875 for farmers with interest in multiple counties. Loss must be greater than 50 percent of expected production and coverage must have been purchased 30 days prior to the coverage period. The application closing dates are as follows: Failed crops must be reported within 15 days after the disaster.For further information on the NAP program, please contact the CalhounNAPP deadline announced for coverage on blueberries, crop honey and potatoes FACTORY SECONDS 8' Corners under 3" 3-4" 4-5" 5-6" 6-7" 7-8" 8"+ TOP GRADE 6'6" Posts Top Size 2-2.5" 2-5.3" 3-3.5" 3.5-4" 4-5" 5"+We've got the fence posts to meet your needs.TOP GRADE 7' Posts Top Size 3-4" 4-5" 5-6" TOP GRADE 8' Posts Top Size 2-3", 3-4" 4-5" 5-6" 6-7" 7-8" 8"+ SPECIALTY POSTS 1/4 rounds 1/2 rounds Flat Face FACTORY SECONDS 6'6" Posts, Top Size, under 2" 2-3" 3-4" 4-5" 5"+Items subject to availabilityLiberty Post and Barn Pole Inc.DeEMpseyPSEY BarronARRON RoadOAD, BristolRISTOL (offOFF HwyWY 12 N) Phone (850) 643-5995 ITS VERY WiISE TO ADVERTiISE in the Journal and... Email: thejournal@fairpoint.net CLJNews.cCOM

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Page 16 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEpPTEMBER 14, 2011 SPORTSby Michael DeVuyst, contributing writerCHIPLEY Aesops fable The Tortoise and the Hare entertained the crowd at Memorial Stadium in Chipley last Friday night. Chipley played the role of the Tortoise where they showed that slow and steady wins the race. Chipley ran 51 plays compared to Blountstowns 32 and did not attempt a single pass. Chipley controlled the clock as well consuming 32 minutes doubling up Blountstowns 16 minutes. However, it was Blountstown that jumped out to the quick start. After each team had a possession and punted, Blountstown started their second offensive possession on Chipleys 23 yard line. Four plays later Jawon Mosley found the end zone for Blountstown on a 2 yard run. Two plays earlier, Mosley helped his cause with a 69 yard reception from Hunter Jordan, setting nya Baker kicked the extra point with 1:11 left in the After swapping possessions, Blountstown botched Blountstowns 41 yard line. Chipley started a slow 15 yards and Fletcher Dilmore kicked the extra point Chipley took the second half kickoff and again started a slow and steady drive all on the ground. Starting from their own 36 yard line, Chipley went 64 Josh Myers. Dilmores kick was no good but Chipley of the second half in a different offensive formation. Blountstown had Chipley confused and on their heels running from the shotgun with four wide receivers. Blountstown drove down to the Chipley 32 but the 33 yard line. Chipley again took the slow and steady the Blountstown 4 yard line. On 3rd and goal from the 4 yard line, former Blountstown Tiger Ryan McIntyre took the handoff but was stuffed by Corin Peterson and Javakiel Brigham. Chipley had to settle for a 21 knocked it through the uprights and Chipley extended on their second and last possession of the second half. dan. However, three plays later a Blountstown fumble all but sealed their fate. Coach Jordan was pleased with his teams effort, We played hard and we never gave up. I think we learned a lot from last week and we battled all night long. We just have to do a better job of protecting the football. Javakiel Brigham led Blountstown in rushing with with 1 INT. Thomas had 2 catches for 49 yards and les. Patrick Pitts, Corin Peterson and Anthony Wilhome game of the year this week against Freeport at Blountstown falls 16-7 on the road against Chipley The Blountstown Tigers listen as the coach discusses the next set of plays. ABOVE: BHS Hunter Jordan (#14) struggles to get free of a Chipley Tigers grip as he carries the ball. sandwiched between two Chipley Tigers. TONY SHOEMAKE PHOTOS

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SEPTEMBER 14, 2011 / THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL PPage 17 SPORTSby Richard Williams, Journal sports writerThe Liberty County Bulldogs fell to Class 5A Bay High 7-0 in a defensive battle in which the only score came after a turnover deep in Bulldog territory. Liberty County Head Coach Grant Grantham wasnt pleased with his teams offensive play and he said that after his squad spent time watching pleased with their efforts either. get hit you can get to the ball pretty fast. I counted the secondary and have a chance for a big play . and it wasnt the same While the offense had trouble most of the night. responded well on defense and I thought played a very solid game . on defense I thought we played when needed to stymie multiple Bay drives. son on defense. We had a lot of solid players on but I was real happy with the way Daniel Deason showed a real winning The Bulldogs host in Libertys last game before starting district play. Grantham said Liberty will be facing the fastest team theyve seen thus far this year. The game starts at 7 p.m. in Bristol. Liberty Jr. Varsity schedule change for Sept. 15 gameThe LCHS junior varsity football team will host Graceville Sept. 15 in Bristol instead of Chipley. The schedule change was required because Chipley canceled their junior varsity football program this season. A storm of Bay High Tornado players tackle a Bulldog running back. ABOVE: Bulldog Chris Dilworth (#1) moves in to tackle the Bay High runner. BELOW: Libertys Michael Robinson (#22) stops a Bay High player, one of his many defensive plays of the evening. ABOVE: Bulldog Alex Marlowe (#5) takes to the air to avoid a pair of Bay High players. RIGHT: Libertys Terryal Jenkins (#4) makes his move with the ball while his teammates block their Bay High opponents. DANIEEL WILLIAMMS

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Page 18 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEpPTEMBER 14, 2011 Number of Students Promoted for Good Cause, by Category of Exemption ELL/LEP Students with Less than 2 Years in ESOL Students with Disabilities (SWD) not Tested on FCAT per IEP Students Passing Alternative Assessment Students Demonstrating through Portfolio SWD Rewith 2+ Years of Remediation Students Retained 2 or More Years of Remediation Total Promoted with Cause 8 3 5 0 0 0 0Students Scoring as Level 1 and Level 2 on the RReading Portion of the Florida Comprehensive Assessment TT est (FCAT T) The following table shows FCAT Reading results for all students (all curriculum groups) tested during the 2011 administration of the FCAT Grade Total Number Tested Number Level 1 Level 1 Number Level 2 Level 2 Number Levels 1 and 2 Levels 1 and 2 99 97 95 89 96 89 85 72 14 19 5 9 15 11 9 22 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 14.14% 19.59% 5.26% 10.11% 15.63% 12.36% 10.59% 30.56% 15 15 11 13 16 23 33 24 15.15% 15.46% 11.58% 14.61% 16.67% 25.84% 38.82% 33.33% 29 34 16 22 31 34 42 46 29.29% 35.05% 16.84% 24.72% 32.29% 38.2% 49.41% 63.89%Liberty County School District 2010-2011 District Report CardSTUDENT PROGREss SS ION RREQUIREMENTs S AND STUDENT PERFORMANCE DDATAAs required by s. 1008.25 (8)(b), Florida Statutes, for Annual Public Reporting and for Presentation to the Florida Department of Education Students Retained (not promoted) in Grades 3 through 10 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Grade End-of-Year Membership Number Retained Retained 9 6 3 1 3 5 7 6 103 101 100 91 98 90 85 85 8.74% 5.94% 3% 1.1% 3.06% 5.56% 8.24% 7.06%Senior Class thanks Roger Reddick for building gun cabinet for fundraiser The seniors would like to thank Roger Reddick for building and donating a beautiful gun cabinet to the Liberty County Class of 2012. Reddick is shown above with Brenton Baily standing with the gun cabinet. The cabinet will be used for a fundraiser. Each ticket sold will be credited to the student who sold it. Tickets are being sold for $1 each and can be purchased from any 2012 Senior class member or by contacting Liberty County High School at (850) 643-2241 ext. 260. Our goal is to reach $1,500. Help support our Seniors and buy a ticket or two. LCHS Bulldogs Football update Our Liberty County Varsity Bulldogs played a great game at the jamboree. We came out with two victories against Chipley and Sneads with scores of 6-0 and 14the season against Graceville Tigers, holding a score of 39-0. We will be playing Marianna this Friday at 8 p.m. (ET). Come out and support your Bulldogs! We've had a great and successful season so far. Lady Dawgs Volleyball update The varsity volleyball team suffered some losses in the beginning of their season to Robert F. Monroe, John Paul and NFC. The ladies came back on top with two wins against Marianna and West Gadsden, leaving the Lady Dawgs with a 2-3 season. The girls next game will be Thursday at the LCHS gym at 7 p.m. (ET). They also have a game Sept. 19 against Rickards at 6 p.m. (ET). Pictures set for Sept. 14 Pictures for High School students grades 9-11 will be held on Sept. 14. Senior formals are going to be held Sept. 23. Seniors who need to schedule Senior portraits need to contact Mrs. Sharon Austin at 643-8345. Yearbooks Have Arrived Yearbooks have arrived. Extras are available but not yearbooks will be $40. W. R. Tolar School celebrated Patriots Day Friday with a 9/11 program put on by the seventh and eighth grade students and teachers. The program centered on the tragedy of 9/11 and the heroes that stepped-up during those trying times. Although 2,977 people lost their lives on that dark day, the America Spirit and Pride that seemed hidden for so long has never been brighter due to the events of 9/11. LCHS Bulldog Beat w. r. tolar SchoolTolar celebrates Patriots Day with a special program Sept. 9TOLAR SCHOOL continued on page 19

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SEPTEMBER 14, 2011 / THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL PPage 19 SCHOOL LLUNCH MENU Sept. 14-20 2011 Bristol Dental Clinic Laban BBontrager, DMMD, M Monica BBontrager, DMMDPea Ridge Rd in Bristol, Phone (850) 643-5417MenuENUS SSPONSSORED BY: Bristol Dental Clinic LIBERTY WednesdayBREAKFASST: S Sausage & gravy biscuit, hash browns, fresh apple. LUNCH: Turkey taco with romaine lettuce & tomato or bb BBQ pork on whole wheat bun, mexicorn, mixed fruit with fresh strawberries. (2nd & 3rd grade pizza)TThursdayBREAKFASST: French toast sticks and ham. LUNCH: Baked spaghetti with cheese or buffalo chicken wrap, tossed romaine salad with low fat dressing, peach crisp.FridayBREAKFASST: Grilled cheese on whole wheat bread and hash brown. LUNCH: Crispy chicken on a whole wheat bun or ham chef salad, green beans, peaches. (4th grade pizza)MMondayBREAKFASST: Breakfast burrito and hash browns. LUNCH: Cheeseburger on a whole wheat bun or chicken salad wrap, tater tots, lettuce & tomato, fresh apple. (kg & 1st grade pizza)TT uesday and orange slices. LUNCH: BbBQ chicken with whole wheat roll or grilled cheese, baked beans, carrots, baked apples.*All breakfasts include a choice of assorted cereal with buttered toast whole wheat and juice CAl L HOUN WednesdayBREAKFASST: Grits with ham cubes, sweet potato LUNCH: Grilled turkey and cheese sandwich, steamed broccoli bites with lite ranch dressing, fruit cup.TThursday syrup and sausage patty. LUNCH: Chicken and noodles, green beans, whole wheat roll, tropical fruit cup.FridayBREAKFASST: S Sausage gravy and biscuit.LUNCH: Pepperoni pizza, garden salad and fresh fruit.MMondayBREAKFASST: Cheese toast grits and ham cubes. LUNCH: Chicken nuggets, mashed potatoes, buttered carrots, whole wheat roll, fresh fruit.TT uesday syrup and sausage patty. LUNCH: Country fried steak, rice with gravy, turnip greens, corn bread, mixed fruit.*All breakfasts include a choice of assorted cereal with buttered toast and juice blountstown elementary schoolFCAT Recognition B.E.S. recognized 4th and 5th graders for their outstanding performance on the FCAT test in last year on Friday, August 26. Students who made a Level 5 received a T-Shirt. Students who made perfect scores were presented a trophy and a T-shirt. Congratulations to all of these students! Goodies For Grandparents B.E.S. hosted the annual Goodies for Grandparents on Friday, Sept. 9. First Grade and Kindergarten students and their grandparents were treated to delicious "goodies" for breakfast. The B.H.S. Culinary Class served the tasty treats that they had prepared for the event. A big thanks to the B.H.S. Culinary Class for preparing the food and serving it. Also, we would like to thank all the grandparents who participated in this event with their grandchildren! Early Release Day Wednesday, September 14 is an Early Release Day for students. School will be dismissed for students at 12:45. by Kimi WiltseThe Altha Cross Country teams kicked off their season by competing in the Marianna Jamboree this past Saturday, Sept. 10. Coach John Sewell and Coach Maggie Sewell are excited for this years season to be under way. Some changes have been made to the district competition this year. The team will be competing in a new district against: Blountstown, Port St. Joe, Sneads and Wewa. Along with the district changes, there have also been some team changes made from the past two years. This year, for the first time, Altha will have a Jr. High team that will compete in two mile runs at certain meets. The next competition for Varsity and Jr. High is Sept. 24 in Tallahassee at the FSU Invitational at 6:45 a.m. (CST). ABOVE: from left: (front row) Katie Cox, Coy Cook, Max Scott, Johnny Sewell, Josie Hall, Jaylon Hall, Hardy Mitchell; (second row) Chasity Webb, Coach Maggie Sewell, Porter Smith, Mary Sewell, Emily Sewell, Carly Schwartz, Kimi Wiltse, Wayne Boozer, Coach John Sewell; (third row) Brendan Dew, Devin Ferrell, Kyler Dew, Corey Barton, Nick Young. Not pictured: Jamie Coleman, Abbie Edenfield and Madison Rowe.by Breanna PybusTo practice brotherhood, honor agricultural opportunities, and responsibilities and develop those qualities of leadership which an FFA member should possess. FFA members have recited this countless times and have learned over the years how exactly to portray these qualities. FFA has taught an abundance of students how to work with people from different backgrounds with different opinions and the importance of agriculture in the world we live in today. This organization has shown us how to be leaders those around us. FFA has taught lessons that nothing or no one else, ever could. The National FFA Organization continues to expand from the state of Maine to Hawaii, and continues to give students the state of mind that we can make a difference in our world by showing leadership ourselves and respecting others, as stated by in the FFA creed. Through active participation in the FFA organization, members learn through: pational skills and community improvement Our second-year Agriculture teacher, Joanna Everett has major plans for this coming year. She has recruited a great new crop of bright! Her schedule includes classes like Agriculture Communication, Biotechnology, and Agriculture Foundations. These new classes help to make information learned useful in the real world and it teaches students the importance of agriculture in society. Mrs. Everett plans to incorporate new competitions for the Blountstown Chapter, like horse evaluation & livestock judging. With a major commitment from her team members, she is hoping that success will reign as it has before in state and national level competitions like Forestry, Mechanics, Agriculture Issues and Farm Business Management. Mrs. Everett said that her year has already started with great success! When asked about her goals for the year she stated that her main objective was to include more supervised agriculture experiences (SAE) for all the students and to teach them how to go above and beyond for themselves and others. With sixteen kids planning to attend forestry practices, the year has started off better than imagined! Some students say that, FFA is like the heart of Blountstown High School, so be sure to keep an eye and ear out for this booming organization. In the words of Dr. Debbie Williams, FFA for life! Hosford S S chool remembered 9/11 with a Patriot's Day program featuring guest speaker Andrea Roberts, with music performed by S Skeeter Whidden of Telogia Creek Band and Miranda Ellis (4th grade teacher) singing Cost of Livingand God Bless the U.SS.A. S S tudents Bailey S S ingletary, Micah McCaskill and Austin Waller lead the program in the Pledge of Allegiance, prayer and a short story. Teachers incorporated the remembrance of 9/11/2001 into their class studies for the day with special videos and discussions. We would like to thank the members of the Veterans of Foreign Wars, Mr. Lee Thompson, Mr. Nicky Philips, Mr. Bob Pickron and Mr. Wes Johnston for attending the program. The students got the opportunity to take pictures and talk with some of our local heroes after the program. We would also like to thank Sergeant Milton from LCHS and the Color Guard for participating in the program along with the LCHS Band for playing a patriotic melody for the students. Several students participated in the program: Josie Bruffet sang the national anthem accompanied by Ms. Gayle Grissett on the piano. Ann Marie Brown and recounted the events of 9/11. Cephus Green, Jyrierra Brigham, Matt Reeves, Thomas Fleet and Courtney Hall each read a piece on American History or Patriotism. Randi Armstrong concluded the program by playing TAPS on the trumpet. The program was put on by Ms. Kristy Pleasant, Pat Holcomb and Rob Wheetley. Upcoming events at TolarVOLLEYBALL*Thursday, Sept. 15 Tolar vs. Franklin County, home, 4 p.m. *Tuesday, Sept. 20 Tolar vs. Blountstown, away, 4 p.m. *Thursday, Sept. 22 Tolar vs. Altha, home, 4 p.m.SCHOOL PICTUREs S*Tuesday, Sept. 20 Kg-5th Grade *Wednesday, Sept. 21 6-8 GradePROGREss SS RREp P ORTs S*Wednesday, Sept. 21 TOLAR SCHOOL continued from page 18 Panther pulse Hosford School remembers 9/11 during special program Yoder, Sponsor Joanna Everitt, Student Advisor Brandon Purvis, President Caitlyn Stewart, Treasurer Mitchell Darnel, Vice-President Breanna Pybus and Reporter Trent Smith. blountstown high school altha wildcatsAlthas Cross Country team kicks off season competing in Marianna Jamboree SSept. 10

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Page 20 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEpPTEMBER 14, 2011 Confederate Signal Corps Memorabilia on display Saturday at SettlementConfederate Signal Corps memorabilia on display SaturdayVisitors to Saturdays Archaeology Day, held at the Panhandle Pioneer Settlement in Blountstown, got a treat when they discovered a unique display of items connected to the Confederate Signal Corps. The Signal Corps performed tactical communications during the Civil War, including wig-wag signaling which was accomplished during daylight hours with a pair of red and once used. Another authentic piece of equipment is a pair of binoculars pictured top right. Shown at left is a replica of a Confederate Cipher Cylinder also on display. The collection was brought to Blountstown by Lionel Young, coordinator of the NW Florida Living History Association in Marianna. BEN HALL PHOTOS said to have been missing for about an hour. Deputies were joined by the Blountstown Police Department, FHP and a canine tracking team in the search. After getting a report that the men were at McDonalds, Capt. Michael Bryant arrived at the scene and saw Honrine and Leach standing in the lobby, both still wearing their jail uniforms. When they saw him door and ran in the direction of the nearby Subway. An off-duty deputy from Franklin County who was at McDonalds reported seeing the inmates hiding in the bushes in the parking lot. When Cpl. Eddie Dalton turned onto Gaskin Street, he saw Leach running toward his patrol car. Leach continued running toward him as Dalton stepped out and ordered him to stop. Leach continue running and as he got closer to the Dalton dodged the punch and then grabbed Leach, who managed to push him away and run. Dalton chased him down and grabbed the back of his shorts. Leach turned and punched him in the neck. Leach continued to him, kicking his legs and swinging his arms, striking him several times Sheriff David Tatum found Honrine hiding under the bushes beside Superior Bank. Dalton and FHP Trooper Wes Harsey took him into custody after a brief struggle. Both were charged with escape, resisting, obstruction and opposing a law enforcement officer with violence. Leach was also charged with battery on a law enforcement The pair are being held without bond. Honrine was arrested last November on armed burglary and grand theft charges. Leach was arrested in February for grand theft, burglary of a dwelling and dealing in stolen property.ESCAPEES BACK IN CALHOUN CO. JAIL continued from the front page

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SEPTEMBER 14, 2011 / THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL PPage 21 9/11/01 Remembrance CEREMONY held SundayThe community joined members of the Blountstown Police Department at 8 a.m. Sunday, Sept. 11 in Magnolia Square for a program in remembrance of those who lost their lives on that day ten BFD Captains Mark Collier and Emory Godwin Chief Ben Hall participated in the program, his seven-year-old daughter Anna Jo took these photos of the event.FSU to lead consortium in BP BP-funded oil spill researchThe nation will be looking to Florida State University and its expertise in the marine sciences as it studies the long-term aftereffects and changes in the Gulf of Mexico following last years Deepwater Horizon oil spill. The Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative (GRI) announced earlier this month that the FSU-led consortium Deep-C: Deepsea to Coast Connectivity in the Eastern Gulf of Mexico will receive roughly $20 million in research funds $6.75 million each year for three years. The GRI awarded a total of $112.5 million over three years to eight research teams, including the FSU-led consortium, after a competitive review process. FSU scientists in a wide swath of disciplines will lead a consortium of universities and research institutions as they study the environmental consequences of petroleum hydrocarbon release in the deep Gulf on living marine resources and ecosystem health. About 4.9 million barrels of oil were dumped into actly how the oil affected marine life and the health of the ecosystem, said FSU Vice President for Research Kirby Kemper. Florida State University is pleased to be leading the way in helping the nation to understand the answers to important questions that have arisen in the wake of the disaster. FSU lead researcher Eric Chassignet, professor of oceanography in the universitys Department of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences (EOAS) and the director of FSUs Center for Ocean-Atmospheric Prediction Studies (COAPS), said the news is exciting because its recognition of a group effort by the amazing team weve put together. Chassignet and his colleagues applied to the GRI for grant money in early July, pulling together a winning proposal in a matter of weeks. The GRI is an organization that oversees BPs commitment to provide $500 million in funding over 10 years for independent sciOut of more than 80 research consortiums that applied for funding, only eight, including the consortium led by FSU, were chosen. The GRI award means FSU researchers will work closely with a select group of universities and research institutions including the University of West Florida; the University of South Florida; the University of Miami; the Georgia Institute of Technology; the Naval Research Laboratory; Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution; the Norwegian Meteorological Institute; the Dauphin Island Sea Lab; and Science Applications International Corporation. Within FSU, about 30 scientists from the universitys research and teaching faculties will contribute research and expertise. Its an interdisciplinary group consisting of geologists, biologists, chemists, physicists and meteorologists, Chassignet said. They will be examining how oil is dispersed into the deep ocean and can make it back up to the beaches. Observations will be combined with earth system and food web models in order to better evaluate the consequences of crude oil and gas released in the Gulf of Mexico. at everything from the biogeochemical and ecological effects of the spill to how it actually moved through the Gulf. According to the proposal summary, the resulting combination of earth system and food web research models will produce a powerful tool set that can be used to investigate and forecast environmental impact The grant validates the collective strengths in the marine and allied sciences at FSU, said W. Ross Ellington, FSUs associate vice president for Research. For more information about the FSU-led consortium, visit http://www.deep-c.org/.

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Page 22 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEpPTEMBER 14, 2011 Onions are nothing to cry aboutOnions are sold in every grocery store, served at most every meal and featured at sporting events across the United States. Onions are everywhere. If youve ever wanted to try to grow them, now is the time to plant. Edible onions have been cultivated America around the turn of the century when a retired French soldier brought some onion seeds from Corsica to the west. But it wasn't until the farmers in Georgia realized what a special thing they had in the Vidalia onion and began spreading the news that the sweet onion Onions have different requirements as to the number of hours of daylight required for bulb formation. The types that require 15 to 16 hours of light daily are referred to as long day varieties and not adapted for the South. Types that grow best in Florida are the shortday varieties. They must be started in the fall so that bulbing is induced by the short days of winter. However, the subsequent harvest of bulbs follows in the spring or early summer. Onions are often grouped according bulbing onion varieties for Florida include Excel, Texas Grano, Granex, White Granex and Tropicana Red. Yellow onions are gardeners most popular choices. Granex 33 is the early Texas hybrid grown in Vidalia, Georgia. Texas Grano 1015Y Aggie Sweet produces a large, mild bulb that is very sweet under the right growing and soil conditions. The Texas Grano 502 is well known for large, mild bulbs with fair storage potential. Onions are grown either from seed, plants. The planting method selected is based on cost, use, availability, and planting ease. Onions grown from sets do not make the best bulbs, and are rather costly. not available. They are sold simply as red, white, or yellow onion sets. Since and keeping quality of onions grown from sets varies considerably. Avoid sets more than an inch in diameter, as they are likely to bolt. Late plantings are more susceptible to cold or freeze injury. Planting too early can result in increased seed stem production. Growing onions from seed may be However, it is the least expensive and offers the greatest variety. Germination may be sporadic and plant growth can be slow. Be aware that onion seed does not remain viable long, and should not be planted when more than one year old. onions can be started between mid-Sep Onion seed can be planted directly in the garden or in per foot of row to one inch deep. If larger bulbs are desix inches apart. Set out transplants from late Decem ber through February. Plants should be about 6 inches high and about half the thickness of a lead pencil at the time of transplanting. Set plants with the bottom of the plant about 1 to 1 inch below the surface of the soil. Transplants should be spaced 3 to 4 inches apart in the row. Onions have a shallow, poorly developed root system, so regular fertilization and watering are essential. Inconsistent watering may lead to splits, doubles and small bulbs. Fertilize the crop monthly with a nitrogen fertilizer. Be sure to keep the fertilizer from contacting the plants directly. Good weed control is a must. Since young onions are small and grow slowly that reduce yield. Look out for diseases before they become established. Leaf blight diseases can seriously reduce yields. Monitor for insects twice each week, and use appropriate management techniques. Contact your local Extension Ofmanagement recommendations. by Theresa Friday, Horticulture Extension Agent, Santa Rosa County GARDENING EDDIE NOBLES LAndND CleLEARinING Call Eddie Nobles at (850) 643-5390 or (850) 447-0449 or Chas at 447-0849Located in Bristol Land clearing, excavation and root raking: The Florida Gators play TenBlountstown High School Tigers night Sept. 16 on K102.7 at 6:30 RRADIO FOOTBTBALL ON WYBTBT AND WPHKListen to football on WYBT and WPHK. This week.. Hear Michael Wahlquist and Jay Taylor with all The Bulldogs take on Marianna on K102.7 Saturday, Sept. 17 Cataracts? Lee MMullis MM.D. and Cataract SpecialistSmart Lenses SMSM procedure can Close-up, Far away & In-between CALL TODAY for a Smart Lens Evaluation MMullis EEye Institute 1600 Jenks Ave., Panama City(850)763-6666 Jennifer Shuler, Esq.Attorney at Law Business Real Property Divorce WillsBBy appointment (850) 866-3680CALL ME FOR A FREE LIVING WILL Largest Manufacturer of Portable Buildings in North FloridaALL BUILDINGS BUILT ON SSITE Bestway Portable Buildings MENTION THIS AD We have OVERER 80 different sizes.You can choose color and style (850) 482-8682We accept all major credit cards

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SEPTEMBER 14, 2011 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL PPage 23 Charles MMcClellan Funeral HomeButler-Morgan/Morgan-McClellan Funeral Home Building at 15 S. Jackson St., Quincy, 32351Phone: (850) 627-7677 or 643-2277Charles K. McClellanLicensed Funeral Director 42 years experience Call us Let us explain how we can conveniently handle arrangements in Liberty County. TT elephone (850) 674-2266 Your hometown funeral home since 1994A Hometown Funeral Director You Can Trust and Depend On!Funeral Services with Dignity, Caring and Professionalism. MMarlon PPeavyPPeavy Funeral Home& Crematory OBITUARIESEEThHEL ARLENE WILLIaAMsSBRISTOL Ethel Arlene Williams, 82, of Bristol passed away Thursday, Sept. 8, 2011 in Tallahassee. She was born on Feb. 12, 1929 in Liberty County and had lived in Liberty and Bay counties for most of her life. A retired beautician, she was a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints in Bristol. She was preceded in death by her son, Gary Williams.Survivors include one son, Glenn Williams of Goldsboro, NC; two daughters, Sandra Lee Schmuhl of Pleasant Grove, UT and Susan Marie Musgrove and her husband, Roy of Augusta, GA; 12 grandchildren and 20 great-grandchildren. Graveside services were held Saturday, Sept. 10 at 4 p.m. (ET) at Pleasant Hill Cemetery in Bristol with Bishop Peavy Funeral Home in Blountstown was in charge of the arrangements.ShHERRy Y LyLYNN STRIcCKLaANDTALLAHASSEE Sherry Lynn Strickland, 47, of Tallahassee passed away Thursday, Sept. 8, 2011 in Monticello. She was born on January 27, 1964 in Blountstown and had lived in Tallahassee since 2008, coming from Bristol. A retired brick mason, she was of the Episcopal faith. Survivors include her parents, Sandra and Gene Strickland of Tallahassee; a foster son, Christopher Ridley of Georgia; a God daughter, Heather Herndon; one sister, Lisa Strickland Galloway and her husband, Thomas; two nieces, Kristina Todd and her husband, Tyler and Leanne Willhite, all of Bristol. Services were held Sunday, Sept. 11 at Peavy Funeral Home Chapel. Interment followed in the Pine Memorial Cemetery in Blountstown. Peavy Funeral Home in Blountstown was in charge of the arrangements.HELEN PPOPE Wa A TTsSBLOUNTSTOWN Helen Pope Watts, 70, of Blountstown passed away Thursday, Sept. 8, 2011 in Blountstown. She was born on Oct. 2, 1940 in Calhoun County and had lived there all of her life. She was a homemaker and a member of the Abe Springs Baptist Church in the Abe Springs Community. She was preceded in death by her husband, E.T. Watts and two sons, Joe Watts and Walter Watts. Survivors include one son, Tom Watts and his wife, Fran; one daughter, Jennifer Stewart and her husband, Jim, all of Blountstown; one brother, James Pope and his wife, Ann of Dublin, GA; two sisters, Clarice Hall and her husband, Bill of Florence, SC and Rita Pope of Blountstown; four grandchildren, Kimberly Silcox and her husband, Cory, Josh Watts, T.J. Watts and Gina Stewart and one great-granddaughter, Addyson Silcox. Services were held Saturday, Sept. 10 at the Abe Springs Interment followed in the Abe Springs Cemetery. Peavy Funeral Home in Blountstown was in charge of the arrangements.HaARRIET LLOUIsSE FREEMaANBLOUNTSTOWN Harriet Louise Freeman, 97, of Blountstown passed away Sunday, Sept. 11, 2011 in Blountstown. She was born on Aug. 17, 1914 in Cedar County, IA and moved with her parents, Walter J. Freeman and Nellie B. Freeman to Calhoun County in 1918 and considered it her home since that time. She was a member of the Blountstown United Methodist Church and was retired from Nations Bank, now Bank of America. Survivors include two cousins in Iowa and Nebraska and all her church family at the Blountstown United Methodist Church. Services were held Tuesday, Sept. 13 at Blountstown ciating. Interment followed in the Nettle Ridge Cemetery made to the Blountstown United Methodist Church at P.O. Box 299, Blountstown, FL 32424. Peavy Funeral Home in Blountstown was in charge of the arrangements.PaPAULaA LLUcyCY DDEITERCLARKSVILLE Paula Lucy Deiter, 91, of Clarksville passed away Sunday, Sept. 11, 2011. She was born April 3, 1920 in Kokomo, IN and she and her husband, the late Carl J. Deiter, moved to Clarksville in 1972. She was a print artist for a book publishing company before her retirement. She was of the Lutheran faith. Survivors include three sons, Bruce Deiter of Clarksville, Dean Deiter of Centerville, TN, and Robert Law of Indiana; 14 grandchildren; many great-grandchildren, nieces, and nephews. Graveside services will be held at 10 a.m., Wednesday, Sept. 14 at Poplar Head Cemetery in Clarksville with Adams Funeral Home in Blountstown is in charge of the arrangements. Online condolences may be made at adamsfh.com.RayRAY DDIcCKENsSWEWAHITCHKA Ray Dickens, 76, of Wewahitchka passed away at home on Friday, Sept. 9, 2011 with his loving companion of forty-one years by his side, Sue Dickens. He had courageously battled cancer for in Sumrall, MS to Jack and Burnice (Barnett) Dickens. He graduated from Sumrall High School in 1955 and was offered a basketball scholarship to Pearl River Community College in Poplarville, MS which he declined to proudly enlist in the United States Army. During his six years in the Army he traveled to Tipa, China where he worked in the receiving and transmitter station and repaired radio antennas. He also played on the Army football team, where he played against players such as Rosey Grier. He returned to Sumrall to work with his older brother, Charles Dickens for Hercules, Inc. in Louisiana and Alabama. He later moved to DeFuniak Springs and started Dickens Land Clearing. He moved to Wewahitchka in 1968, where he fell in love with the area and the people. He decided to stay and call Wewahitchka home. It was here he met and married Sue Gaskin. He was an active member of Dalkeith Baptist Church in Wewahitchka where he led and directed life. He spent many hours enjoying playing his guitar and singing. For the past 22 years, he has proudly served as Mayor of Wewahitchka, for the citizens whom he greatly loved and called friends. This was a task he never took lightly, from handing out candy to the children, attending for the Senior Citizens. He always rose to every occasion and opportunity to serve and come alongside the citizens of Wewahitchka. The dedication of the Wewahitchka City Annex in 2010 was a great honor for him. In return, the citizens of Wewahitchka have poured out their love and support upon Ray and Sue during his illness. He was preceded in death by his parents, Jack and Burnice Dickens and his nephew, Craig Lott, all of Sumrall; Charley and Rosselle Gaskin and Charles Arthur Gaskin, all of Wewahitchka. Survivors include his wife, Sue Dickens of Wewahitchka; a brother, Charles Dickens of Gulfport, MS and his wife, Amanda of Blountstown; a son, Bobby Dickens and wife, Cindy of Freeport; two daughters, Becky Minardo of Mobile, AL and Tracy Nowe of Houston, TX; two step-daughters, Sherry Hall and her husband, Steve of Niceville and Suzanne Aull of Wewahitchka; two grandgreat-granddaughter; three nieces and one nephew. Services were held Sunday, Sept. 11 from the Glad Tidings Assembly of God Church in Wewahitchka with Reverend Joey Smith and Reverend John Clenney ofPallbearers were Phillip Gaskin, Gage Gaskin, Harold Lester, Lee Mims, Chipper Wade, and nephew, Leslie Dickens. Honorary pallbearers were the Wewahitchka City Council Members, the City of Wewahitchka Workers, and the Adult Sunday School class of Dalkeith Baptist Church. Adams Funeral Home in Blountstown was in charge of the arrangements. Online condolences may be made at adamsfh.com. ThTHEODORE JERRy Y McMCCRayAYBLOUNTSTOWN Theodore Jerry McCray, 58, passed away Sept. 7, 2011 at the Jackson County Cancer Center at 11:45 a.m. He was born on October 17, 1952 to Geraldine Barnes Sheard and Charles E. Sheard. His early education took place in Calhoun County schools and he graduated from Florida A & M University. He was a retired math and science teacher from Dade County. He leaves to cherish his fondest memories his loving wife, Josephine K. McCray of Blountstown; two daughters, Decca H. Mosley and her husband, Cardrico of Bristol and Tarsha J.M. Battle and her husband, Larand Tjyaa Battle, both of Blountstown and Jarian Mosley, Aston Mosley and Shammon Mosley, all of Bristol; his devoted mother, Geradine B. Sheard; two brothers, Myers McCray and his wife, La Wanna of Royal Palm Beach and Ronald McCray of Lake Wales; one sister, Lorraine McCray of Winter Haven; one special friend and brother Jerry P. McCray and his wife, Tiffany of Del Ray Beach; a host of uncles, aunts, nephews, nieces, cousins and friends. Services will be held Saturday, Sept. 17 at the Blountstown Middle School Auditorium on Pear Street at 1 p.m. (CT) in Blountstown. The wake will be held Friday, Sept. 16 at St. Paul A.M.E. Church on River St. at 5 p.m. (CT).HaARRIET OOGILVIE Wa AGNERTALLAHASSEE Harriet Ogilvie Wagner, 86, passed away Saturday, Sept. 10, 2011, at her residence at Westminster Oaks in Tallahassee. She was born Oct. 25, 1924, and was raised and lived the majority of her life in Greensboro. She had been a resident of the Westminster Oaks Community since 2004. She married Robert Wagner, February 3, 1945, and was a devoted wife and mother. She was preceded in death by her husband, Robert George Wagner; her grandson, Byrne Hampton Johnston; her granddaughter, Sarah Wallace Johnston and her sister, Emily Ogilvie Agerton. Survivors include her two daughters, Carol W. Johnston and her husband, Buster of Safety Harbor and Jane W. Clark and her husband, Lamar of Greensboro; one grandson, Alex Clark; one brother, Fred Ogilvie and his wife, Virginia of Perry and one sister, Jean O. Dean and her husband, Harold of Sycamore. A private family service will be held at a later date. Drawer D, Greensboro, FlL 32330. Bevis Funeral Home in Tallahassee is in charge of the arrangements

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Page 24 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEpPTEMBER 14, 2011 ULLING P EANUTSThe residents at Blountstown Health and Rehab gathered around a mountain of peanuts, donated by Melton Brothers Farms, to pick em out so they could enjoy a peanut boil. Many of the facilitys residents grew up on farms and enjoyed an activity that they hadnt taken part of in many years. The group gathered on the portico and sat in rocking chairs or their own wheelchairs as they went through bushel after bushel of peanuts. ANGIE DAVIS PHOTOSScotlands Long Gone Lonesome: The internationally acclaimed National Theatre of Scotland makes its Florida debut with Long Gone Lonesome, the true blues and country music. No. 4. funny. to comment on the dance in real time, with their comone winner after another. For more information on this years schedule of Seven Days and Seven Nights continued from page 5 reached hurricane status. Florida has not suffered any mamore weeks before hurricane seastorms that may threaten our state ricane landfalls than any other state, Florida is the hurricane families and their homes, as well family members who are elderly, what actions you should take in reduce the effects to your family or business. Floridas residents to heed the ery effort will be made to assist Floridas residents after a disaseryone affected by the storm imyour family are able to take care For more information on the Florida Division of Emergency Management and to GET A PLAN!, please visit: www.FloridaDisaster.org. Follow us on Facebook at www.Facebook. com/FloridaSERT and on Twitter at www.Twitter.com/FLSERT. Sept. marks historical peak of hurricane season

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SEPTEMBER 14, 2011 / THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL PPage 25 SCHEDULE OF EEVENTsS Thursday, Sept. 15 Friday, Sept. 16 Saturday, Sept. 17 Sunday, Sept. 18 For more information please contact Todd W. Schroeder by com or Mike Cox by phone at (813)918-2303 or email Mike.cox@ Fire destroys unoccupied home & car off Hwy. 69 NFREC is located at 155 Research Road, Quincy, FL, on State Road 267 near I-10, taking Exit 181.Gardening FFriends plan PPlantaholic PPreview PParty Sept. 8Free Sept. 22 web conference helps caregivers with legal issues that impact seniors country dedicated exclusively to private pay home care rently represents more than 1,100 home care agencies in forty-four states and Puerto Rico.

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Page 26 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEpPTEMBER 14, 2011four chairs, $60. Call 379-8410. 9-7, 9-14 CARS1997 B Buick Century, baby blue, four door, A/C works great, power windows and locks, four good tires, tinted windows, 185,000 miles, $2,600. Call 670-1762. 9-14, 9-211998 Lincoln M Mark 8, two door, hard top, pearl white with silver gray interior, in good condition, with new tires, well maintained, $5,500 OBO. Call 639-4176 or 643-1502. 9-7, 9-142007 Pontiac Grand Prix, 107,000 miles, electric driver seat, power door locks, power windows, cruise control, CD player, tilt, steering wheel controls, tinted windows, remote start, keyless entry, V6 3.8 L engine, regular oil changes, runs great, $7,400 OBO. Call 643-8015. 9-7, 9-142006 CTTS Cadillac, four door, standard shift, six speed. Call 5912346 or 643-2741. 9-7, 9-14 TRUCKS1989 T T oyota Land Cruiser, 4WD, four door, 6 cyl., automatic, good condition, 189,000 road miles, $2,900. Call 643-5355. 9-14, 9-211995 Dodge Dakota, $2,500. Call 674-3264. 9-14, 9-212006 Ford F350 King RRanch Dually, 4WD, 36,000 miles, new condition, spray-in bed liner, $29,999 OBO. Call 643-5886 or 643-1650. 9-14, 9-211989 GMMC S15, black, 95,000 miles, needs clutch and ignition, comes with extra set of tires and 9-14, 9-212004 Xterra Nissan, white, power locks and windows, running boards, clean, good tires, 109,000 miles, automatic, tinted windows, with racks, runs good, $7,200. Call 509-3271. 9-7, 9-14 Call 674-3264FOR SALE OR RRENT IN BLOUNTSTOWNHouse located in a nice area, close to town and private.2006 R Rubicon Jeep Wrangler, soft/hard top, 6 cyl., automatic, 20,800 miles, asking $19,500, book value $24,500. Call 6436086. 9-7, 9-141999 Jeep Grand Cherokee Laredo, 165,000 miles, two wheel drive, four door, 4.06 cyl., new tires, new transmission, $3,000 OBO. Call 260-5397. 9-7, 9-142004 Colorado crew cab, two wheel drive, leather and heated seats, and much more, brand new all terrain tires, 110,000 miles, $11,200. Call 272-6168. 9-7, 9-141998 T T oyota T T acoma SK5, ext. cab, two door, 4 cyl., with tool box, 125,417 miles, runs great, clean inside, nice stereo and tint, $6,000 OBO. Call 379-5850 after 5 p.m. 9-7, 9-14 AUTO ACCESSORIESTT ow stabilizer setup, $250. Call 674-1740. 9-7, 9-14Fifth wheel hitch with mounting bracket and all hardware, $625 OBO. Call 363-3901. 9-7, 9-145x8 Utility trailer, good shape, $300. Call 447-3275. 9-7, 9-14 MOTORCYCLES & Wa A VeruERUNNersERS2008 Kawasaki Ultra LX jet ski, 18 hours use on motor, brand new condition, $7,999 OBO. Call 6435886 or 643-1650. 9-14, 9-212006 Harley Davidson R Road King Classic, 5,800 miles, $7,000 worth of added accessories, asking $13,500. Call 643-6086. 9-7, 9-14 HUNNTINNG & FISHINNGsemi-auto, THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNALCLASSIFIEDSTo place your ad, call 643-3333 by noon Eastern Time on Saturday. Non-business ads run FREE for 2 weeks. ITEMS FOR SALEBBasketball shoes, two pairs, Kobe Bryant size 10 1/2 and Michael Jordan size 10 1/2, less than a month old. Paid $300 for both, asking $150. Call 524-0605 ask for Greg. 9--14, 9-21RRecord player, older model, plays 45s and 33 1/3 records, $15. Call 674-3264. 9-14, 9-21Kindle leather case generation 6 display, sells for $35 on Amazon, like new, asking $20. Call 674-8385. 9-14, 9-21Satin drapes, two pair, beige, ready to hang, $15 for both; sheer panel, new, never used, three pair, white, very wide, $15 for all; one vinyl mattress cover, regular size, still in package, $1.50; upright grand antique piano, $125 OBO, collectors item; one pair of custom made drapes, each panel lined, ready to hang, complete with rod and large rings, bone color, $18. Call 674-8376. 9-14, 9-21Potted plants, different size pots, shade house you take down, many extras. Call 674-2973 ask for Ruth. 9-7, 9-21Sportcraft TT urbo air hockey game, 3x6, good and clean condition, $150. Call 674-8385. 9-14, 9-2132 Phillips LCD T TV, less than one year old, works perfectly, $150; 19 color TV, $50. Call 6741740. 9-7, 9-14Girls bicycle with vehicle mount, $50; new Sears canister vacuum, $30. Call 674-6242. 9-7, 9-14MMae West aviation life jackets, two, $75. Call 674-8570 leave message. 9-7, 9-14 APPLIANNCESFrigidaire portable dishwasher, $150. Call 674-2010. 9-14, 9-2130 Kenmore electric stove, white, with self clean oven, very good condition. Cooks and bakes very well, $225; 30 over the stove microwave, white, $75. Call 6744242 or 694-1992. 9-7, 9-14TT oaster oven, $12; Refrigerator, $50. Call 674-3264. 9-7, 9-14Jack LaLanne juicer, hardly used, good condition, $50. Call 674-8918. 9-7, 9-14Frigidaire refrigerator, side by side, with ice maker, $250. Call 379-8410. 9-7, 9-14 FURNNITURESingle waterbed, without frame, $50 or trade for queen mattress/ box spring/frame. Call 674-3264. 9-14, 9-21Dining set with china cabinet, $200. Call 591-0760. 9-7, 9-14Glass top dining room table with BD, 1 1/2 BA TownhousesBRISTOL FOR RENTBLOUNTSTOWN Phone 643-7740 For Rent in ALTHaA762-9555 or 762-8597** Very NICE 2 & 3 bedroom trailers. ** 2 BD Apartment w/ large BD & Carport 5 x 10 .....$27 10 x 10 ....$43 10 x 20 ....$70 10 x 25 ....$90M & W SELFSTORAGE RRENTALs SCall 573-5255, 762-9555, 762-8807 or 762-8597 7 days a week service UFN MMobile Home for R Rent in CalhounCall 674-88882 BD, 2 BA, located six miles north on Hwy. 69 N. NO PETS. Damage & Cleaning deposit, Water, sewer and grass cutting provided.UFN Call 674-3694leave message if after 5 p.m.14x70 2 BD, 2 BA unfurnished mobile home. Located on 18th Street, Water and Sewer. Will be No more than 3 per family. FOR RREnNTin ALT THACall 762-3706Large living room, dining area, water & garbage, NO PETS, located at 15726 NW Smith Street.2 BD, 2 BA Trailer $375 month plus $200 deposit. Roomy mobile home, w/added rooms, 3 BD, 2 BA, great room, dining room, living room, laundry room, very clean. Located on a nice lot. House, 2 BD, 1 BA, large living room or den, dining room, remodeled kitchen, fenced in back yard.Rental Units I B Call 643-6646 HOUSEHOLD ITEMS$159 QUEEEEN PILLOOWTOTOP mattress & box. Manufacturer wrapped, warranty. 222-7783 Del. available. $399 Sofa/Loveseat set. Still in crate, never used. Can deliver 5457112. Must move this week! 4 piece BBedroom Set: Solid Wood. Brand new. $439, delivery available. 222-9879. 1 & 2 bedroom mobile homes in Blountstown and Bristol. $105 to $155 weekly. Deposit required. All utilities included. NO PETS. Singles or Couples preferred. Also RV for rent. 10% Sr. Disc. Call 674-7616FOR RENT Custom Cotton PIICKININGOver 12 years of experience Dow Morris FarmsCall (850) 326-6881 or (850 527-6291 We pick & pack PUpp PP IES TINY TEACUp P & REG PUp P S Cutest ones youve ever seen. Some toy sizes available.Call 674-3532 or 545-5732

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SEPTEMBER 14, 2011 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL PPage 27 Home in BBristol FOR SALECheaper than RentRecently renovated, 3 BD, 2 1/2 BA, Mobile home on 1 acre lot. Close to Bristol. New carpet, plumbing, AC unit, well pump. Posminimum 10% down.Call 643-1566 3 BD, 2 BA on 1 1/4 acres. Nice, quiet area close to town on dead-end road. County water, recently updated 6 years ago. Appraised at $130,000, Asking... $119,900Call 643-1566Home FOR Sale B LLand FFor SaleA Altha areaCall 674-8385for more information30 Acres on Hwy. 274. Possible owner $112,500 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNALCLASSIFIEDSTo place your ad, call 643-3333 by noon Eastern Time on Saturday. Non-business ads run FREE for 2 weeks. 1911 Colt, new, with two clips and trade. Call 643-3662. 9-14, 9-21Compound bow P PSEE R Rogue, biscuit, three pin sight, ready to hunt with, $275 OBO. Call 4474739. 9-7, 9-14 CAMPERS/RVS2003 F Flagstaff by F Forest R River, 5th wheel, four brand new tires and new A/C, like new, very clean and updated interior. Call 6435886 or 643-1650. 9-14, 9-21 TOOLS & EQUIPMENTRRiding lawn mower, $450; small aluminum trailer, $550. Call 6743264. 9-14, 9-2120 ft. Heavy duty equipment trailer, with let down ramps, electric winch in front, four new tires, $1,000. Call 762-8491. 9-14, 9-21, three point hitch, needs new belt and blade, in good condition, $300 OBO. Call 643-3662. 9-14, 9-21Victor welding torch, hoses and gauges, big and little, $125 each; Delta 10 table saw, $50; Sears 42 cut riding lawn mower, great shape, $200; one ton chain hoist, $50; breaker box, $70. Call 5735291 or (864) 353-3234. 9-14, 9-211952 8-N F Ford T T ractor. Call 6437815. 9-7, 9-14 LOST/FOUNDLLost: I am desperately writing to plead with anyone who might have found a wedding ring at the Exxon station at the corner of Hwy. 20 and C.R. 12 in Bristol on Monday, Sept. 5 between 4 and 6 p.m. It has three diamond clusters with a diamond band on each side and is soldered together. I pray there are still honest people in the world and it will be returned. I will reward anyone who can help! Call 6255454 or 258-6346 day or night. 9-14, 9-21LLost: Bulldog mix puppy, solid black with white on chest, last seen on Lawarre Lane in Altha, belongs to a three-year-old who really misses her puppy. Call 557-3928. 9-14, 9-21FFound : three-month-old Chocolate Lab, loving and playful. Call 237-2740. 9-14, 9-21FFound : Weimaraner dog, female, found near Albry Whitehead Rd. in Hosford. Call 570-1574. 9-14, 9-21LLost: cat, male, long haired, mostly white, house broken, went missnorth of Blountstown on Hwy. 71. Call 674-8227. 9-7, 9-14 PETS/SUPPLIESShetland pony, male, paint, best offer; two saddles, and other accessories, best offer. Call 3639504. 9-14, 9-21MMini horse, one 15-year-old mare, registered twice, up-to-date on shots, 29 tall; one 5-year-old mare, registered, 30 tall, black, both very friendly and tame, best offer. Call 567-3418. 9-14, 9-21FFemale cat, declawed, strictly indoor, adult, free. Call 643-5009. 9-14, 9-21TT wo billy goats, $50 each. Call 643-5886 or 643-1650. 9-14, 9-21FFive adults cats cats on death row, we need a home soon. We are about two years old and will be spayed and neutered before adoption and are free. We will make good pets or barn cats. Call 237-2740. 9-14, 9-21Chihuahua male, full-blooded, seven months old, $50; Pekingese/Chihuahua mix, female, nine months old, $30; seven-year-old 27 miniature stud, Class A registered, $100 OBO. Call 237-1930. 9-7, 9-14BBlue heeler, female, 1 1/2 years old, and her puppies, Blue Heeler/ Lab mix, eight weeks old, all free to a good home. Call 643-6086. 9-7, 9-14PPit mixed puppies, six weeks old, wormed, free to good home. Call 372-2107. 9-7, 9-14Kittens, two, hand-raised, litter box trained, free to good home. Call 674-3791. 9-7, 9-14 HOMES & LAND2BBD/1BABA frame house, to be moved, $4,000. Call 643-5355. 9-14, 9-212004 Clayton mobile home, 3BD/2BA, all appliances furnished, includes washer and dryer, must see to appreciate, must be moved, $20,000, no rent to own. Call 4474512 or 762-4734. 9-7, 10-5 FREE ITEMSGazebo, made of cypress wood, approximately 10 ft. in diameter. STARSCOPEFAMOFAMOUS B BIRTRTHDAA YSARARIEES MMar 21/AApr 20 Aries, if romance hasnt been on your mind, its time to make it a priority. Do what you have to do -wine, dine and pull out all the romantic punches.TA TAURRUS A Apr 21/MMay 21 Another persons misdeeds will shed some light on your own, Taurus. Recognize your mistakes and work to correct them as soon as possible. GEMEMINI MMay 22/Jun 21 Gemini, you will need an abundance of patience if you are to make it through the next few days. Thursday proves especially challenging when a curveball gets thrown your way. CAANCERER Jun 22/Jul 22 to your advantage, Cancer. You already have a way with people, now you just have to get them on board with your idea.LEO LEO Jul 23/AAug 23 Leo, after a few bumps along the road, things will even out to a steady pace for you. Thats a good thing because now youll be able to step back and review your actions. VIRRGOO A Aug 24/Sept 22 Virgo, someone elses needs will take priority over your own this week. That could put a crimp in your plans. Find out if you will need help to get through the days.L LIBRABRA Sept 23/OOct 23 Libra, just because something costs more doesnt mean it is necessarily better. You will learn this on Friday with your next purchase as you do your research. SCORPORPIOO OOct 24/Nov 22 Find a way to reduce the stress in your life, Scorpio. This way you can enjoy family and friends without a lot of things on your mind at any given time. SAAGITTARTTARIUS Nov 23/Dec 21 Sagittarius, dont make too much of a situation because youre reading into it the wrong way. The truth is much less than you are making things. Excitement awaits you. CAPRAPRICORORN Dec 22/Jan 20 Capricorn, if you dont take a breather now and then you will be left with little energy. Take advantage of invitations by friends to hang out and enjoy some downtime.A AQUARARIUS Jan 21/FFeb 18 Aquarius, you may feel like youre taking two steps back every day, but the truth is youre making progress just in small doses. Stick with what youre doing.P PISCEES FFeb 19/MMar 20 Pisces, few things are more exciting than being surprised by someone you love and respect. That is just what may happen to you. Week of Sept. 25 ~ Oct. 2 Terms: *All items sell AS IS *5% Buyer Premium *cash, cashier checks or credit cards accepted Complete liquidation of a large Commercial landscaping companyTThursday, Sept. 15 at 9 a.m.Midway (Tallahassee), FL ItemsTEMS includeINCLUDE: *2008 Cat Challenger tractor *2007 Vermeer RT650 trencher *Lowboy, van and equipment trailers *Late model Sod cutting and seeding equipment *(5)MF tractors *Mack water trucks *2003-2004 Chevy & Ford pickups *Spider & Navigator lifts *Cat mini excavator *Numerous other items**Live online bidding with proxibid** ABSOLUTEAAUCTTIOONMMidway MMachinery & A AuctionCall 576-5500 or visit, midwaymachineryandauction.comCall 447-2701. 9-7, 9-14 WANTEDDouble bed frame; small apartment or trailer rent to own. Call 674-3264. 9-14, 9-21Half or three quarter acre of land, in Altha area, reasonably priced. Call 762-9762. 9-7, 9-14BBed frame, double. Call 6743264. 9-7, 9-14Shower door enclosure assembly, two foot wide. Call 674-8570 leave message. 9-7, 9-14RRefrigerator ; roof top A/C for travel trailer. Call 643-2201. 9-7, 9-14We buy junk cars and trucks. We will pick them up. Call 6435045 or 447-3819. 3-23 T. 12-28 YARD SALES BBLOunUNTsSTOwnWNYard sale, Saturday, Sept. 17 from 7 a.m. to noon, located 20595 Hentz Ave., womens and mens clothing, whatnots and other miscellaneous items. Call 674-9867. Yard sale, Saturday, Sept. 17, at City Tire on Hwy. 20, lots of miscellaneous items, something for everyone, cancel if rain. Call 674-1752. Yard sale, Saturday, Sept. 17 beginning at 7 a.m., located three miles north of Blountstown Elementary on right. Look for signs. Boys and womens clothes various sizes, electronics, exterior door with single glass panel, three windows, odds and ends, household items. Call 674-9127. CLARksviKSVILLEYard sale, Friday and Saturday, Sept. 16 17, from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m., located 1.6 miles north of Hwy. 20 on Hwy. 287, books, movies, baby clothes, home school books and more. Call 674-9161. HOsSFORdDYard sale, Saturday, Sept. 17, beginning 8 a.m., located corner of Hwy. 65 and Blue Creek Rd., something for everyone, furniture and lots of baby items. Call 3793082. Yard sale, Saturday, Sept. 17, beginning at 7:30 a.m., located at 20770 NE Burlington Rd., clothes and whatnots. Call 379-3025.

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Page 28 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEpPTEMBER 14, 2011

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SEPTEMBER 14, 2011 / THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL PPage 29 Thirty-two motorcycles traveled over 75 miles and made stops at all seven Volunteer Fire Departments in Calhoun County while raising nearly $1,500 in the 10 year Sept. 11 Remembrance Rogers had the best hand of the day with a full house. The worst hand a Queen high was drawn by Gwen Oliver. The group gathered at the airport Saturday, where the annual Fly-In was underway. ABOVE: The bike lineup. ABOVE LEFT: Mike Blum of the Fire and Iron Motorcycle Club. LEFT: Flags were waving as the group came together on this special weekend, which Responders throughout the country. BELOW: Liz Parrish of Magnolia VFD checks in the bikers before they hit the road. BEN HALL PHOTOS Calhoun Co. Firefighters mark 9/11 anniversary weekend with fundraiser POKER RUN

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Page 30 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEpPTEMBER 14, 2011 OUTDOORS PUBLIC AND LEGAL NOTICES PUBLIC AUCTION Silver 2001 Linc Town Car 4-door Vin #1LNHMM82W51Y625550 Green 1998 Chevy Malibu Vin #1G1ND52TT1WY194720 IN TTHEE CIRRCUITT COURTRT FORR LIBERTBERTY COUNTTY, FLORRIDA PRROBBATE TE DIVISION File No: 2011-18CP IN RE: ESTATE OF TODD A PRESTON a/k/a TODD ALLISON HAWKINS PRESTON Deceased. _____________________/ NOTTICEE OF ADMMINISTRTRAT TION AND NOTTICEE TT O CREREDITT ORRS TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE AND ALL OTHER PERSONS INTERESTED IN THE ESTATE: YOU ARE NOTIFIED that the administration of the Estate of Todd A. Preston, a/k/a Todd Allison Hawkins Preston, File Number 2011-18 is pending in the Circuit Court for Liberty County, Florida, Probate Diaddress of which is the Liberty County Courthouse. The Personal Representative of the Estate is Paula A. Rahn. The name and address of the Personal Representatives attorney is set forth below. All persons having claims or demands against the Estate are required, WITHIN THREE MONTHS FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE, to Court a written statement of any claim or demand they may have. Each claim must be in writing and must indicate the basis for the claim, the name and address of the creditor or his agent or attorney and the amount the claim is contingent or unliquidated, the nature of the uncertainty shall be stated. If the claim is secured, the security shall be described. The copies of the claim to the Clerk to enable the Clerk to mail one copy to the Personal Representative. All persons interested in the Estate to whom a copy of this Notice of Administration has been mailed are required, WITHIN THREE MONTHS FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICAany objection they may have, the validity of the Will, or the Representative, or the venue or jurisdiction of the Court. DATED THIS 5th day of August, 2011. J. DAVID HOUSE, P.A. 16865 SE RIVER STREET (850) 674-5481 COUNSEL FOR PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE PAULA A. RAHN 9-14, 9-21_______________________ STT ATEME TEMENTT OF NON-DISCRRIMMINAT TION Talquin Electric Cooperative, Inc., is the recipient of fedthe Rural Utilities Service, an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and is subject to the provisions of Title VI of the Civil Rights Acts of 1964, as amended, Section 504 of the amended, the Age Discrimination Act of 1975, as amended, and the rules and regulations of the U.S. Department of Agriculture which provide that no person in the United States on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, disability, readmission or access to, denied subjected to discrimination under any of this organizations programs or activities. The person responsible for coordinating this organizations non-discrimination efforts is Kenneth A. Cowen, Director of Administrative Services. Any individuals, who feels that this organization has subjected them to discrimination may obtain further information about the statutes and regulations a written complaint with this organization; or the Secretary, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Washington, D.C. 20250; or the Administrator, Rural Utilities Service, Washington, D.C. 20250. Complaints must the alleged discrimination. Crossbow season is expanded on private landsEven though you can hardly tell, summer is almost over. Kids have returned to school, football is back on TV and hunting seasons already been going on a month now in South Florida. Most of us have already hung our tree stands along well-traveled Finally, the time of year weve been waiting for is here! our state. Beginning this year, even more folks are bound to take to the woods earlier, day as archery in each of the four hunting zones. there started July 30. The fourth hunting zone, which was and lies south of S.R. 50, west of U.S. 441 and the Kissimmee Waterway, north of S.R. begin on the third Saturday of October. This year, that falls on Oct. 15. The line that divides zones C and D begins at U.S. 27 at the (Gadsden County) FloridaGeorgia state line and runs south on U.S. 27 until it meets S.R. 61 in Tallahassee. From there, it follows S.R. 61, running south until it hits U.S. 319. There, the line follows U.S. 319, continuing south to U.S. If you hunt west of that line, youre in To hunt during archery season, youll need a Florida hunting license and an youll need a hunting license and crossbow nual hunting license will cost $17. Nonresia 10-day license or $151.50 for 12 months. each, and all deer hunters must have the ing one of Floridas $26.50. brochure for the area you wish to hunt, because the hunting season dates have changed since last year on many of them. on many of the areas to more closely align with the new zonal season dates that were crossbow season that is concurrent with only legal bucks (having at least one antler that is at least 5 inches long) may be taken. The daily bag limit on deer is two. you hunt. year-round with no bag or size limits. On limits, and hogs are legal to take during Its also legal to shoot gobblers and bearded turkeys during archery and crossbow seasons, given you have a turkey limit. Its against the law to hunt turkeys in to shoot them while theyre on the roost, over bait, when youre within 100 yards of or with the aid of recorded turkey calls. If youre hunting during the archery season, you may hunt only with a bow and crossbow season, you may use either a crossbow or bow but must have the $5 allowed to use crossbows during archery hogs and turkeys, broadheads must have at width of 7/8 inch.Outta the WooOODS by Tony YoungFWC proposes protection for hammerheads, tiger sharksThe Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) on Thursday advanced Florida waters. The action came during the second day of its threeSharks have been strictly regulated in Florida since 1992, limit for all recreational and Florida has been recognized management efforts for nearly 20 years, said FWC Chairman Kathy Barco. We recognize that lations is critical to the sustainability of our marine ecosystem. serve Floridas valuable marine resources. hammerheads, smooth hammerheads and tiger sharks from state high to be sustainable. Research tion declines in recent decades. ing the November FWC meeting in Key Largo.FWC takes over management of octocorals in federal watersLast Thursday, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservaefforts governing the harvest of marine life into federal take effect Oct. 31. federal waters off Florida, which allows Florida to take federal councils, Florida agreed to manage the octocoral To see the Marine Life Rule Extension: Octocoral, go to MyFWC.com/Commission, select Commission Meetings and click on the link to the September meeting agenda.

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SEPTEMBER 14, 2011 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL PPage 31 CLJ NEWS .COM To place your ad call us at 643-3333 SERVICE DIRECTORY Whaley Heating & Air Conditioning (850) 674-4777FL LicIC. # CMC1249570 Accepting:R Is s s : (850) 643-6925 : (850) 643-2064 : grich0656@aol.com10536-B NW SR 20 Bristol, FL 32321 Located in the Apalachee RestaurantGary RRichards, EEA MBMBAEnrolled Agent Enrolled to Practice Before the IRS BBusiness & Accounting Solutions Inc. 4433 NW C.R. 274 Altha, Fl 32421 (850) 762-9402 Cell (850) 832-5055Dozer and Excavation work Over 20 years experienceClay ONealsLand Clearing, Inc. 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That Darn PumpThere is never a convenient time to be without water.WEllsLLS psa s(850)643-HELP Thats 643-4357 or Home 643-3857For friendly service and never any overtime charges call, iesesreBBARRLOWSDR Repair & Water ServicesWell drilling & PPump repairD ________________________Serving Gulf, Franklin, BBay, Calhoun, Washington & Liberty Counties________________________850-639-9355or850-814-7454 Hwy 71 South on J.P. Peacock Rd, Altha. Day or night, Call 762-8127 Check out our prices before buying from somewhere else. For Weddings, Birthdays and all Holidays, come in or call us. Margies Florist Phone David Morris at (850) 868-1295 or Dispatch at (850) 575-4414 Locally owned & OperatedNow serving the Hosford, Telogia, and Bristol areas. Visit the web at Improve your mileage 5% to 20%MMileageM Maxx Minutes from the Aug. 4 Liberty County Commission meeting Aug. 4 regular meeting of the Liberty County Commission as recorded by the board secretary. The meeting was called to order by Chairman Jim Johnson. Present at the meeting were Commissioners Kevin Williams, Davis Stoutamire, Dexter Barber, Albert Butcher, Attorney Shalene Grover, Clerk Robert Hill and Deputy Clerk Charla Kearce. Prayer was led by Clerk Robert Hill. Pledge of allegiance was led by Commissioner Dexter Barber. Motion to approve the minutes of the regular meeting held July 7 and special meeting July 21, 2011 was made by Stoutamire, seconded by Williams and carried. Lamar Holland presented a letter requesting changes at Veterans Memorial Park. Each Commissioner will meet with Holland to look at the requested changes. Motion to table until the next meeting was made by Stoutamire, seconded by Butcher and carried. Dave McClain gave an update on the Florida Riverkeepers budget. They are requesting $5,000 be put in the budget for next year. Keith McCarron with Apalachee Regional Planning Council discussed John Ard discussed chemical spraying. 26 miles would cost $4,500. Motion to table until after the new budget is adopted was made by Stoutamire, seconded by Barber and carried. Stephen Ford discussed the A.K. Associates proposal for 911. Motion to approve the A. K. Associates proposal was made by Stoutamire, seconded by Butcher and carried. Dr. Gene Charbonneau talked about the letter of agreement on the dental van. We have already paid for the van. Motion to approve the letter of agreement for 2011-12 was made by Williams, seconded by Barber and carried. Dr. Charbonneau also gave an update on the Health Department. Motion to reappoint Johnny Eubanks and appoint Commissioner Davis Stoutamire as an alternate to serve on the Chipola Regional Workforce Development Consortium was made by Butcher, seconded by Williams and carried. Motion approve Resolution #11-15 supporting Escambia County Resolution requesting that the Department of within our district was made by Stoutamire, seconded by Williams and carried. Motion to approve Memorandum of Agreement with Department of Corrections concerning our Fire Departments was made by Williams, seconded by Stoutamire, and carried. Motion to approve the health insurance contract with CHP and Blue Cross Blue Shield was made by Barber, seconded by Butcher and carried. There will be a workshop with the Recreation Director on Tuesday, Aug. 9, 2011 at 6 p.m. in the courtroom. Motion to pay the bills was made by Stoutamire, seconded by Williams, and carried. Motion to adjourn was made by Butcher, seconded by Barber and carried. 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Page 32 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEpPTEMBER 14, 2011 The Panhandle Pioneer Settlement presents the Smithsonian Institution and Florida Humanities Council Museum on Main Street --Journey Stories. The Panhandle Pioneer Settlement has been awarded the privilege of exhibiting the MOMS -Journey Stories, July 14 August 25, 2012. This is the only facility located in North Florida that has been selected for the exhibit. All other locations are in South Central and South Florida. In preparation for the exhibit, we are in need of volunteers to serve on various committees. Committees needed are for: Planning, Local exhibit planning, Exhibit installation, Program Development, School/teacher, Volunteer and docent training, and Publicity. Individuals are needed to present north Florida family journey stories, industry stories for the region, demonstrators, docents, assistance in creating an exhibit of local journey stories that support the MOMS Journey Stories. Anyone interested in supporting and participating in the presentation of the exhibit is invited to attend our initial planning meeting Oct. 6 at 6 p.m. CST in the Club House at the Panhandle Pioneer Settlement. Come and join us for our Annual Peanut Boil at the Panhandle Pioneer Settlement on Saturday, Sept. 24 at 5:30 p.m. Adults and children alike will enjoy this. We will have games for kids of all ages. Live Music, FREE Boiled Peanuts, other food and drinks available for a donation. Enjoy music performed by Easy Company Band with Charles Morris and brothers at the Wells Cabin on the Settlement. Come and enjoy the sights and sounds of the evening. Admission is free.The Panhandle Pioneer Settlement is a living museum documenting rural life in NW Florida since the early 1800s. It is located in Sam Atkins Park, about 1 mile west of the intersection of Hwy. 71 and Hwy. 20. Follow Hwy. 20 West out of Blountstown. Look for signs for Sam Atkins Park. Turn North at Lindys Fried Chicken. Silas Green St. (between 18th & 20th St.). Follow the signs. For more information, contact the Settlement at (850) 674-2777 For further directions and information on the historic buildings at the Settlement go to: www.ppmuseum.org.On Sept. 17 from 9 a.m.-2 p.m., The Center for Archaeological Studies at the University of South Alabama will present an introduction to archaeology and the research that is being done in this area. Participants are invited to bring things from their own collections for idenA collection of artifacts from the Wiregrass will also be on display in the Interpretive Center Auditorium, plus a talk titled What is Archaeology? will take place at 10 a.m. Following the presentations, CAS will be gin documenting artifact collections and examining historical documents. Artifact documentation will include photographs, culture-historical typing, basic metric measure ments and technological analysis. This workshop will take place in the Interpretive Center Auditorium and is free with paid gate admission. Landmark Park, home of the Alabama Agricultural Museum, is a 135acre historical and natural science park located on U.S. Highway 431 North in Dothan, AL. For more information, contact the park at (334) 794-3452.ARCHaAEOLOGY Da AYat the Pioneer Settlement Settlement hosts Peanut Boil Sept. 24Initial planning meeting set for 6 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 6. at the Settlement Club House.