The Calhoun-Liberty journal
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00027796/00280
 Material Information
Title: The Calhoun-Liberty journal
Portion of title: Calhoun Liberty journal
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: The Liberty Journal, Inc.
Place of Publication: Bristol Fla
Publication Date: 07-06-2011
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Bristol (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Liberty County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Calhoun County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Liberty -- Bristol
Coordinates: 30.426944 x -84.979167 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in Sept. 1991.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 11, no. 38 (Sept. 18, 1991).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002046630
oclc - 33425067
notis - AKN4565
lccn - sn 95047245
System ID: UF00027796:00280
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly journal (Bristol, Fla.)

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All A's for Calhoun, 500 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY J
includes THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY ws
Liberty elementary tax com

and jr. high schools
by Teresa Eubanks, O U R N A
Journal Editor OJ
The two-county area's C s Volume 31, Number 27 Wednesday, July 6, 2011
elementary and middle CO
schools have earned straight DistTict...
A's across the board in the Ca lo Scoo.A
recent round of school grades A,
issued by the Florida Department S....
of Education.
The final grades for the state's
high schools, including LCHS,
BHS and Altha High, are
pending and will be released 0
later in the year. High school COV
grades are based on other factors.I..
such as graduation rate, college
readiness, students enrolled inAP "lXofd ..
and dual enrollment classes.X

LIBERTY COUNTY
*Tolar School in Bristol made
the biggest improvement, leaping from a C grade
last year to this year's A.
*Hosford Elementary & Jr. High repeated its top
grade from the previous year, receiving another A.
"I am so proud of the staff and students at W.R.
Tolar School and Hosford School for their hard work
and commitment to excellence as shown in the school (
grades they received. Both schools were graded anA onE L E B R A T IN G
the state measures. The teachers have worked to provide
the instruction and support so that all students can THE
learn and be successful," said Liberty County School
Superintendent Sue Summers.
"I would like to thank the parents as well for the Carol Edwards, above, leads the way during the
support and encouragement they provide to their annual Walk to Liberty held Saturday in honor of
children. As we to move forward with new End of the Fourth of July. Walkers are shown below as
they make their way across Trammell Bridge. The o
See SCHOOL GRADES continued onpage 11 fireworks were popping Monday night, with the
skies over Blountstown filling up with glittering
images as the community gathered to enjoy the
show. See more on page 11.
PHOTOS BY TERESA EUBANKS and JOHNNY EUBANKS



'I



VERN MCCOMBS DAKOTA BRIGHT

Exchange of cold pills

leads to arrest of two
by Teresa Eubanks, Journal Editor
Two people were arrested after investigators with
the Calhoun/Liberty Drug Task Force monitored a drop
off of cold pills to a man found to be in possession of
methamphetamine Friday afternoon in Bristol.
Vein McCombs, 58, of Bristol, was charged with
the manufacture of methamphetamine, possession of
methamphetamine and possession of listed chemicals.
Dakota Helson Bright, 19, of Bristol was arrested on a
charge of possession of listed chemicals./
Investigators watched McCombs pull up next to a
black Honda Civic in the Dollar General parking lot,
get out of his pickup and take possession of a yellow
shopping bag that held cold pills from Roxanne Parrish
of Bristol that had been purchased by Bright, who was
riding in the backseat of her car.
Following his arrest, McCombs told investigators
the pills were to be used to make methamphetamine
and he had agreed to give some of the finished product
to Bright after it was cooked.
McCombs' truck was stopped after he drove away
and turned west on SR 20. An Altoids tin held a white
See COLD PILLS continued on page 11

II1!!1!1111 Sheriff's Log..o.2 Community Calendar...4 Commentary...6, 7 Poster contest.. .8 Birthdays & Achievements....9
7 812 090 8 Fireworks in Kinard...10 Blountstown Fireworks...11 Obituaries...15 Classifieds...16, 17 Jobs & Legals...18




Page 2 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JULY 6, 2011


ARREST REPORTS Journal
6 '0L ARR EST RE I EO REditor Teresa Eubanks

Woman charged with getting credit card with

victim's information and spending nearly $500


A 40-year-old Bristol One that a Visa credit card
woman was arrested in her name was past due.
June 28 following an The victim contacted the
investigation of a credit sheriff's office and in turn,
card that had been taken the matter was brought to
out using another woman's the attention of Capital
name and information, One's fraud division.
according to a report Fraud investigators
from the Liberty County .. found that Dabney was
Sheriff's Office. listed as an authorized
Kathy Lynn Dabney '. user on the account. The
was charged with - card was used eight times
criminal use of personal KATHY DABNEY between Oct. 12 and Oct.
identification. 20, 2010 and totaled up
The victim, with whom Dabney $496.61 in debt.
had previously lived, learned about The card was used to buy gas
the illegally-gotten credit card when in Bristol and Tallahassee, make
she received a notice from Capital payments on Dabney's cable and


Man arrested for selling

borrowed

trailer and

lawnmower
A Bristol man was arrested
Friday for selling a utility
trailer and a riding lawnmower
he had borrowed but never
returned, according to a report
CHARLIE DREW from the Liberty County
Sheriff's Office.
Charlie Drew, 29, was
charged with grand theft and dealing in stolen property.
The theft was discovered when the owner, Edward
Russell, 57, of Bristol, was approached by two people
seeking the registration for the trailer they said they had
just bought for $275 from Drew. Terry Owens and Juan
Torres told Russell they also paid Drew $100 for the
lawnmower a few weeks earlier. They said Drew led them
to believe he owned both items when he sold them.
Russell reported that he had loaned the trailer,
lawnmower and a chain saw to Drew a couple of months
earlier. He said he had repeatedly requested for Drew to
return the items to no avail.
The trailer, minus its tag, and lawnmover were returned
to Russell. No information was found about the missing
chain saw.
Drew is being held on $5,000 bond.

Husband arrested after

spraying wife with hose

during domestic dispute
A retired wildlife officer was arrested for domestic
battery following a 911 call that brought a deputy to his
CR 12 South home Saturday.
Arrested was Billy Ray Smith, 70.
According to the event report from the Liberty County
Sheriff's Office, Deputy Chad Smith arrived at the home
to find Smith's 69-year-old wife outside, standing behind
a grapevine in an attempt to stay out of sight from the
house. She was visibly upset and told the deputy, "He's
going to kill me."
She said an argument over a ladder became physical
when her husband grabbed her by the arms, sprayed her
on the side of her face with a water hose and rubbed soap
in her eyes.
Smith walked out of the home and the three went to
an outdoor cookshed, where they discussed what had
happened. Smith stated that his wife "kept going on and
on" about his choice of a ladder. He said he walked to the
cookshed, picked up a water hose and sprayed her in the
face. He said while he was washing his hands, his wife
continued arguing with him and he reached up to touch
her face and got soap in her eyes.
His wife told the deputy that Smith had threatened to
kill her numerous times.
He was then taken into custody and booked into the
county jail.


ADAM WESTER


phone bills and to purchase cleaning
supplies in Blountstown. The very
first purchase was made online to get
a business license for Dabney Paint
& Drywall at a cost of $155. Dabney
told investigators that she did make one
payment of$ 15 on the card in November.
On June 22, Dabney gave a recorded
statementto Investigator Brian Bateman
in which she admitted that while living
with the victim on Green Acres Road,
she filled out an application online
using the victim's information.
The current balance of the account is
$708.51. Capital One is also claiming
damages in the amount of $258.61.
She was released on a $5,000
bond.


Two arrested after picking up

scrap metal from county site


Two men were arrested
for trespassing and petty
theft after being caught
collecting a large amount
of scrap metal from the
old Health Department site
on NW Central Avenue in
Bristol last week, according
to a report from the Liberty
County Sheriff's Office.
Arrested was Adam
Wester, 33, and James
Lucas Kirkland, 27, both
of Bristol.
A phone tip led Deputy
Nick Finch to the scene
on June 28, where he
found a parked silver truck
already loaded with what
he estimated to be between
500 and 1,000 lbs. of scrap


metal.
A driver's license check
on the two men showed
that Wester's license had
been suspended indefinitely
and Kirkland's had been
suspended for failure to pay
fines. Wester said the truck
belonged to his girlfriend
who had parked it at the
scene and was going to
come back later to drive it
to the scrap yard.
After it was verified
that the county had not
given anyone permission
to collect scrap metal from
the site, the two men were
arrested. The 1984 Mazda
pickup, registered to Jessica
Thornton, was impounded.


Man arrested after ingredients

to make meth found in truck
A Blountstown man was arrested for possession of listed
chemicals and attempting to manufacture methamphetamine
after his truck was pulled over when a Blountstown Police
Officer noticed the driver was not wearing a seatbelt.
William Shane Black, 39, was stopped around 1:45 p.m.
on June 29 after he drove past a patrol car at the intersection
of Angle Street and Hwy. 71.
During the stop, Officer Caleb Tolbert noticed that Black
was becoming increasingly nervous.
After Lt. Tim Partridge arrived at the scene, the two
officers asked to search the vehicle. The driver acknowledged
that he had some cold medicine (pseudoephedrine) behind
his seat. Officers looked through the truck and found the cold
medicine, charcoal lighter fluid and ammonium nitrate, all of
which are commonly used to make methamphetamine.
When asked what he planned to do with the items, Black
replied that he was taking them to a man in Liberty County
to cook into methamphetamine.
Black was taken into custody. His bond was set at
$40,000.
His passenger, 35-year-old Stacy Lynn Shaw, was allowed
to leave the scene with pending charges.


Man arrested for sexual

battery on juvenile boy
A former Bristol resident now
living in Georgia has been charged
with sexual battery for allegedly
making a juvenile male perform
oral sex on him numerous times,
according to a report from the
Liberty County Sheriff's Office.
Norman Daniel Hall, 24, was
arrested June 27.
During an interview with
a Child Protection Team case
manager on June 10, the teenage
victim said Hall "did some bad NORMAN HALL
things to me... a bunch of times."
He also said Hall threatened to
shoot him if he told anyone. The activity had been going
on since October of 2009, according to the arrest report.
Hall came to the sheriff's office last week to discuss
the allegations with a deputy. In a recorded statement, he
admitted that he had "coerced" the boy to perform oral sex
on him but said it only happened one time.
He has been released on a $25,000 bond.




CALHOUN COUNTY

*Elton Pitts, VOCC (warrant), CCSO.
June 29
*William Shane Black, possession of listed
chemicals, BPD.
*Joseph Spence, grand theft (out of county
warrant), CCSO.
June 30
*Michael Kenneth Watson, VOP (warrant),
CCSO.
July 1
*Savannah Downum, VOP, CCSO.
*Paul Babagian, VOP (Hillsborough), CCSO.
July 2
*Clarence O'Neal, habitual traffic offender,
BPD.
*William Burnett, DUI (warrant), BPD.
*Jamal AI-ZibBeth, possession of less than 20
grams of marijuana, CCSO.
SAnthony Mills, possession of drug parapher-
nalia, CCSO.
July 3
*Terry Lee Lampe, warrant out of Bay County,
CCSO.
*Sean Nellan, violation of county ordinance,
CCSO.

LIBERTY COUNTY
June 27
*Norman Daniel Hall, sexual battery, LCSO.
June 28
*Kathy Lynn Dabney, criminal use of personal
identification information, LCSO.
*Adam A. Wester, petty theft, LCSO.
*James Kirkland, petty theft, LCSO.
June 30
*Patricia Richardson, hold for Sumter County,
FHP.
July 1
*Charlie Drew, grand theft, dealing in stolen
property, FCSO.
*Savannah Downum, hold for CCSO, CCSO.
*Vern I. McCombs, manufacture of metham-
phetamine, narcotic drug offenses, possession
of methamphetamine, LCSO.
*Rodrigo, Mejia-Fonseca, operating a motor
vehicle without a valid driver's license, FHP.
*Dakota Bright, drug narcotic offenses,
LCSO.
July 2
*Billy Ray Smith, domestic battery, LCSO.
July 3
*Ismael Ramirez, operating a motor vehicle
without a valid driver's license, FHP.
Listings include name followed by charge and identification of arresting agency The
names above represent those charged We remind our readers that all are presumed
innocent until pro ven guilty

Blountstown Police Dept. ,
June 27 through July 3, 2011
Citations issued:
Accidents.......... ...02 Traffic Citations... ....... 17
Special details (business escorts, traffic details)....112
Business alarms.....00 Residential alarms..........01
Com plaints ................................. ..................... 86




JULY 6, 2011 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 3


School grades hold steady despite increased standards


TALLAHASSEE - Even with an increase in writ-
ing standards this year, the grades of Florida's public
elementary, middle and non-high-school combination
schools remained relatively stable according to the 2011
school grades results released today. As a result, more
than three-quarters of these schools continue to be high
performing (receiving eitheran "A" or"B"). Some positive
exceptions to this stability include gains in the number
of elementary schools graded "A" (82 additional "A"
schools) and a reduction of 13 schools graded "F" (44 in
2010 to 31 in 2011).
"Our teachers, principals and school district leaders
deserve tremendous credit this year for answering the
call of higher standards with resounding success," said
Education Commissioner John L. Winn. "Over the last
decade we have continued to raise the achievement bar
to ensure our students are learning the skills they need to
be successful in today's economy, and every time that bar
has been raised our schools have redoubled their efforts
to the direct benefit of children."







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CHRYSLER * DODGE * JEEP (850) 627-2000 * www.tntchrysler.com


Of Florida's 2,547 graded elementary, middle and
non-high-school combination public schools earning "A"
through "F" grades this year:
* 1,481 earned an "A" (58 percent), an increase of 82
schools compared to last year.
* 458 earned a "B" (18 percent), decrease of 33 schools
compared to last year.
*460 earned a "C" (18 percent), decrease of 35 schools
compared to last year.
* 117 earned a "D" (5 percent), an increase of 16 schools
compared to last year.
* 31 earned an "F" (1 percent), a decrease of 13 schools
compared to last year.
ADEQUATE YEARLY PROGRESS (AYP)
Required as a part of the federal No Child Left Behind
(NCLB) Act, AYP requirements target the performance
and participation of various student subgroups on state-
wide assessments based on race or ethnicity, socioeco-
nomic status, disability, and English proficiency. Unlike
other states that set low standards for AYP proficiency
benchmarks, Florida adopted a rigorous schedule that
significantly raises the benchmarks each year leading up
to the 2013-14 requirement of 100 percent proficiency
for all students. This year, Florida schools must have 79
percent of their students in each subgroup proficient in
reading and 80 percent in each subgroup proficient in
math in order to meet AYP. According to the results, 325
of 3,063 schools made AYP this year (high schools are


PANAMA CITY - Maj. Eddie
Johnson, commander of the Florida
Highway Patrol's TroopA, announced
the closing of the stations in Crest-
view and Marianna on July 1. The
stations are two of 10 that the Florida
Department of Highway Safety and
Motor Vehicles recommended to the
Governor and the Florida Legislature
as part of a proposed budget reduc-
tion plan. The Department closed the
Patrol stations as a deliberate action
to operate more efficiently. Johnson
reassured motorists that the Patrol's
delivery of services to the local com-
munities will not be impacted.
"The number of state troopers
assigned to patrol the roads in and
around Crestview and Marianna will
remain the same. Road coverage and
response times by ourtroopers will not


included in this figure since AYP is calculated based on
Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test results).
FLORIDA'S SCHOOL
IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM
In 2008, Florida implemented its new school improve-
ment program, called DifferentiatedAccountability (DA),
which combines federal and state accountability systems
to provide more flexibility for schools in the types of
corrective actions they need to implement. Through the
program, schools are placed into improvement categories
based on their state-assigned letter grade, the percentage
of AYP requirements met, and the number of years they
have failed to achieve AYP. The 2011 DA results are still
being finalized and will be available in the near future.
SCHOOL RECOGNITION
PROGRAM REMAINS INCENTIVE
FOR IMPROVEMENT
The Florida School Recognition Program rewards
schools that have sustained high student performance
or demonstrated substantial improvement in student
performance. Schools that receive an "A," or improve at
least one performance grade from the previous year, are
eligible to earn an additional $70 per student. The School
Recognition Program has had a positive effect on schools
maintaining and improving grades. In 2011, 1,146 schools
maintained their "A," 23 schools that were not graded last
year earned an "A," 312 schools improved to an "A" and
187 schools improved to a grade other than an "A."


be impacted," said Johnson. "Public
safety is our top concern, and we
continue to develop and refine new
technologies and affiliations with lo-
cal partners to ensure that we continue
to serve at the high level the people
of Florida deserve."
Motorists who wish to request
crash reports still have options.
1. They may request crash reports
at FHP's headquarters in Tallahassee.
Visit FHP's web site at www.flhsmv.
gov/fhp for instructions.
2. They may visit FHP's stations
in Pensacola and Panama City at the
following locations:
* 150 W. Stumpfield Road, Pensa-
cola, FL 32522-7626
* 6030 County Road2321, Panama
City, FL 32404-5732
The Patrol will implement an on-


line crash report request function in
coming months, which will eliminate
the need for customers across the
state to visit FHP stations to obtain
the documents.

The Florida Department of High-
way Safety and Motor Vehicles
provides *hi,,!i \y safety and secu-
rity ;hi:, igh excellence in service,
education and enforcement. The
Department is leading the way to a
saferFlm, /J, i thI, ngh i/4-C t ,/ , ,,ii
professional execution ofits core mis-
sion: the issuance of driver licenses,
vehicle tags and titles and operation
of the Florida Hi-1,hi',,u Patrol. To
learn more about DHSMV and the
services offered, visitww i j i . -gov
or follow us on Twitter @FDHSMV.
You can find us on Facebook, too.


Motor Carrier Compliance officers now 'troopers'


TALLAHASSEE - Col. David Brierton, director of
the Florida Highway Patrol, announced that the Office
of Motor Carrier Compliance officially transitioned from
the Florida Department of Transportation to the Florida
Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles'
Division of the Florida Highway Patrol on July 1, 2011.
Motor Carrier Compliance officers perform safety in-
spections on commercial motor vehicles and perform
traffic enforcement in an effort to reduce the number of
commercial vehicle-related crashes.
The consolidation is a result of Senate Bill 2160, passed
by lawmakers during the 2011 Legislative Session, and
places the commercial vehicle licensing, registrations,
fuel permits, and enforcement all under the purview of
DHSMV.
"The Florida Highway Patrol and Office of Motor
Carrier Compliance share a common purpose to safe-
guard Florida's roadways through enforcement, and I am
confident that joining the two will create a synergy that
will increase our effectiveness," said Brierton. "A team
comprised of representatives from both agencies has been
hard at work to develop a smooth transition that ensures
public safety is our top priority."
The Office of Motor Carrier Compliance will transi-
tion to FHP as a bureau and will report to Lt. Col. Scotty
Sanderson. Sanderson currently holds the rank of lieuten-
ant colonel in his position as interim director ofthe Office


of Motor Carrier Compliance.
"This is a bold move on the part of our leadership to
help fill those identified deficits in our Florida budget by
streamlining operations and reducing duplicative manage-
ment efforts, which will certainly improve efficiencies
within our agencies," said Sanderson.
What changes should motorists expect to see as result
of the change?
PERSONNEL - Motor Carrier Compliance officers
will be "troopers". Motor Carrier Compliance troopers'
uniforms will include the FHP patch beginning July 1.
MCC troopers also will wear a Florida Highway Patrol
badge. They will continue to perform commercial vehicle
safety inspections and to weigh commercial vehicles with
portable scales at various locations around the state, in ad-
dition to FDOT weigh stations on Florida's highways.
VEHICLES - Motor Carrier Compliance vehicles
will replace the FDOT seal with the FHP seal on door
panels. The vehicles will bearthe FHP license plates, too.
Through attrition, motorists will eventually see more FHP
black and tan vehicles patrolling our roadways.
CONTACT- Motorists with questions relatedto com-
mercial vehicle enforcement can call (850) 245-7900. That
number is printed on all commercial vehicle inspection
reports and citations. Also, the Florida Highway Patrol's
web site at www.flhsmv.gov/fhp will feature information
on the Office of Motor Carrier Compliance.


Florida Highway Patrol closes its


Marianna and Crestview stations




Page 4 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JULY 6, 2011


NF


COMMUNITY


ALENDAR


Puppets and clowns

at Mt. Zion on July 9
Mt. Zion United Pentecostal Church
in Hosford will be having a preregistra-
tion kick off for Vacation Bible School on
Saturday . .Jil\ u at - p in There \\ill be
inck.. illt iision. and skits It \\ill be a fun
and ciaz\ nigt_'lt
The chliuch is located at 17177 H%\\
hi5 in Ho-foird
Foi moire' inf'or ation 'please call -143-
l13?x

REVIVAL

MIRACLE RESTORATION CENTER
CHLiRCH OF GOD IN CHRIST & ST
LLiUKE CHURCH ()F C(GO)D IN CHRIST-
A i\c \ ial %\ill be lild in tl\%: l,:catiton-
Ntartin'm \\itlih liiaclc Re.toiationi Ccnt'cil
Cihuch ofGodi in Clinst on NMoindai. JuIl
11 thiouit 'h \\'idn,'sdail. Jul\, 13 at 7 p ni
niightl\
On Thuisda\. Jul\ 14 .en ice. i\\ ll in o\e
t0 St Ltuke Chuch olif God in Clint and
last tlhuotu'li Satuiida\. JIul\ l1'- Tlie-;e
N.eni ice. \\Ill beg inm at 7 p in oni Tlihurida\
anid Friid a\d aiganll at 'hp in oni Satiuilal
E\ an'eli.t Diane Gieen \\ ill be leadin,' tlihe

MNhacle Re.toiationi Center Cihuclih of
iodi in Cihn. i. located at 21uu7 Hall St
in lMaanna and St Ltuke C lhuch of God
in Clhrint i located off H%\\ 12 Nortli in
Bristol
Foi moie imfornation, please call 447-
3X\u3 oi 7-v74-41 xi

SPECIAL MUSIC

ABE SPRINGS PENTECOSTAL HO-
LINESS CHU RCH Ti- Thie onrteationof
Abe Sprinis- Pentecostal Holine.s C huIchi
W \0otld like to 1in\ itc.' e i' one to a ',-o.spel
conice'i feattnrinii_ Thei Brad\ f fiomi Dotlian.
AL on Satiuda\. Jull\ u at '-p iin (CT)
Th, cliei icih i Icatcd on H\\ 275 SSontli.
S5 iiule, o'fft State Rd 2''
For movie information. call 7 " 2-22"-2

CHURCH
DEDICATION

ST LLiKE CHURCH OF GOD IN
CHRIST- \\ill hold a dedication s.en ice
at 7 p im on Slnda\. Jil\ II \\itli Bisholp
\illie G r C een. tlihe Prelate ofNortl\,est
Florinda Jtunsrdiction


The Calhoun-Liberty Journal is
published each Wednesday
by the Liberty Journal Inc.,
Summers Road, P.O. Box 536,
Bristol, FL 32321.
Annual subscriptions are $18.
Periodicals postage paid at Brislol, FL
POSTiMiaSTER Send address co:rrect:hns
to PO B:x 53':. Brisi:'l FL 32321


TODAY'S MEETINGS
* Rotary Club, noon, Calhoun-Liberty Hospital
* AA, 7 p.m., Calhoun County Old Ag Bldg. east door, in front of jail
* Boy Scouts Troop 200, 6:30 p.m., Mormon Church, Bristol



BIRTHDAYS
Junior Loffey

TODAY'S MEETINGS
* Liberty Commission, 6 p.m. in courtroom
* Nettle Ridge VFD, 7 p.m. at Fire House
* Liberty Children's Coalition, 10 a.m., Liberty Emergency Mgt. Office (
* Altha Area Recreation Committee, 6 p.m., Altha Town Hall
* Mossy Pond VFD. T p ir, Fie House
* AA 7 p i, ba seen ,i oi CaIhcun CCounyI CCu illCouse


a


BIRTHDAYS
'. ,I .LID I Pi ' 't' ill


Celebrate Recovery,
6' p n RiPvel 'own C'oninifunlIy C'il'LII


BIRTHDAYS
Cliai/ll'" -F i.,'lii &- Cli /l *olqc
Dance. 8-12 p n.
TR AIN DAY 4me, ican Legion Hall in
kT . .- *- I _ BlounlslOo1in


BIRTHDAYS
1'. P::q '.P y'.< , N-c iiit i. I ' ctcL"'.<,O I.


TODAY'S MEETINGS
* Altha Town Council. 6 p mi Cli Hall
* Blountstown City Council. 6 p ,i, Clyv Cc'unilI
; 1Ccr c'n -ngle S1
* Bristol Lions Club. 7 p m -palacliee Resiaunani
* Blountstown Chapter #179 O.E.S.. p n-
Dixie Lc'dge in BIc'unrsIc'wi
* Liberty School Board. - p ,n1 LC Sc-hOlcc
Scai i I leeling Roon",
* Bristol VFD. - 310 p in Bsirol C'l Hall
* Boy Scout Troop 206. - p i .,.elei ans
I lencial Pa k Civic Cen le


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1.


THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL
Located at 11493 NW Summers Road in Bristol
MAILING ADDRESS: P.O. Box 536, Bristol, FL 32321
TELEPHONE (850) 643-3333 Fax (850) 643-3334 '
EMAIL: thejournal@fairpoint.net iuSPS C 12367i
ADS: cljads@fairpoint.net Summers Ro:,ad


Benefit for Ziggler

family to be held

July 10 at St. Mary's
On July 10, the Women's Intermediate
Auxiliary of St. Mary M.B. Church is
sponsoring a relief effort to benefit and aid
the family of Danta and Latoria Ziggler
and their two children, who recently lost
their home in a house fire.
The theme of the program will be
"Parade of Hats." All women in the sur-
rounding counties are invited to wear their
favorite church hat for this occasion. Men
are also welcomed to sport their Sunday
best.
If you are unable to attend, donations
are appreciated.
The church is located at 16345 S.E.
ver Street in Blountstown.
, For more information please call 674-
2453 oif b74-5X32


Family Affair set for
Aug. 6 in Blountstown
Thli 14th Annual Calhoiin Counts
Cluldren s Coalition Famil\ Affair has
been schedtulcd for Satiurda\. ALu.'-ust i
fiom X to II a in at the \\ T Ncal Ci\ ic
('Cnitcr iI BloLilntto\mii
Adniission isi a $11 per cluId donation
and thlie r \\ill be: fi:ee school spplies tfor
an\ child in attendance C Ildien miiust Ibe
picc.iint itli an aduit to iccce\ c tlie fic

There \\II c a miinoonti alk. tiaiin nidel.
a ,_irant slide. face painting-. sni\\ ct:ones.
popcorn and miiLclih inoie
For moire information. please. call ,43-
24 15. e\t 244 or 227


Girl Scout troop 30 to
hold fundraiser July 7
Tlih Girl Scout Tioop 3ii out of
Blotliii to\\n i \\ ill be lioldinii a fiiidiai sr
Thursda\. .Juil\ 7 at
tlic NlcD ionaldk iII
N Ia1aiiiia offl- 1\
on H\\\ 71fio1n
5 to S i) I
The tr oop) \\ ll

of pi,,cci GIRL SCOUTS�
miade duinnr'
tiat time Tlie c o in -
i lniii\ I i.r encoiLa e to atiend
FoIr inoiI ifomnnatiton plea- e call -413-
N?34






That's how many copies of
The Calhoun-Liberty Journal
i were distributed last week,
ensuring plenty of coverage for
your community announcements
and great response for our
business advertisers!


JOURNAL STAFF
Johnny Eubanks............ ....Publisher
Teresa Eubanks........................ Editor
Sandra Brown................Bookkeeper
Debbie Duggar............ ....Advertising
Angie Davis.........Production Assistant
OFFICE HOURS 9 a m - 6. pi m M-F
Sat3urJdays Iro'm 9 a m until 1 p mn


SAttelld 1the C/llR11ch
B^K of \iour choice





TODAY'S MEETINGS
* Walk-A-Weigh Program. 9' a i .ei l ians I le ciai al Paik Clv,, Cenile
* Altha Boy Scouts. 7 p i, 11llna ,,oluileel Fie Depan9imeni
* Blountstown's Club. 65 p m -palalinee Resi
* AA 6 p in , lilla 'Co'inl'iunlly Cellei

TU SA,* UY1


I-




~VA ~~ h ~JULY 6, 2011 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 5


Liberty Co.
The Liberty County Senior
Citizens Association has sched-
uled the following events for the
month of July:
Thursday, July 7 - Piggly
Wiggly grocery shopping and
lunch.
Thursday, July 14 - Marianna
Wal-Mart shopping and lunch.
Call Liberty Transit at 643-2524
no laterthan 3 p.m., Monday, July
11 to reserve your Transit ride.
Saturday, July 16 - A trip
is scheduled to the Sopchoppy
Opry. This is a special program
with a tribute to George Jones
and Tammy Wynette. Shane
Collins of WPAP Radio will be
performing as George Jones and
MargoAnderson will be perform-


Seniors to take part in Community Service Day


ing as Tammy Wynette. Country
music lovers will most certainly
enjoy this event. The admission
price is $15. Call 643-5690 for
information. Call Liberty Transit
at 643-2524 no later than 3 p.m.,
Monday, July 11. This is a first-
call, first-seated basis.
Monday, July 18 - 7p.m., The
Liberty County Senior Citizens
Board of Directors will meet atthe
Bristol Senior Center. The public
is welcome to attend.
Wednesday, July 20-- 11 a.m.,
Our local Buy Rite Drug Store
is putting forth great efforts to
promote Community Health for
residents of Liberty County and
will be sponsoring class on chair
exercises for seniors. Kim Doug-
las of
Buy Rite
Drugs
will be


teaching this class at the Bris-
tol Senior Center. This type of
exercise is very important and
beneficial. Plan to attend. Should
you have questions, call 643-
5690. For transportation to this
event, call Liberty Transit no later
than Monday, July 18 to reserve
your transit ride. Lunch will be
served.
Thursday, July 21 - 10:30
a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Senior (Mini)
Community Service Day with
Area Agency on Aging for North
Florida.
1)Medicare Health Insurance
information and assistance check-
ups; extra help for prescription
and Medicare Savings Program,
2)Emergency Home Energy
Assistance for seniors of Liberty
County with overdue utility bills
3)FTRI Amplified Telephone
Distribution and Audibel will do


free hearing screenings,
4) Medical and Food Stamp
Application Assistance with an
area agency counselor.
Be sure to bring forms ofiden-
tification for application services.
There will be door prizes!!! For
information, call 643-5690. For
transportation to the center, call
Liberty Transit at 643-2524 no
later than 3 p.m., Monday, July
18.
Thursday, July 21 - Piggly
Wiggly grocery shopping and
lunch. Call Liberty Transit at
643-22524 no later than 3 p.m.,
Monday, July 18 to reserve your
transit ride.
Thursday, July 21 - 1 p.m.,
The Liberty County Senior Citi-
zens Advisory Council will meet
at the Bristol Senior Center.
Tuesday, July 26-- 10:30 a.m.,
Liberty County senior Citizens


Monthly Craft Class will be held
at the Bristol Senior Center. We
welcome seniors of Liberty Coun-
ty to join us. For information, call
643-5690. For transportation to
the Center, call Liberty Transit
at 643-2524 no later than 3 p.m.,
Thursday, July 21.
Wednesday, July 27 - Cindy
Grantham of Blountstown Health
and Rehab will be at the Bristol
Senior Center for a fun time play-
ing Bingo. Prizes are provided by
Blountstown Health and Rehab.
Lunch will be served. For infor-
mation, call 643-5690. For trans-
portation to the center, call Liberty
Transit at 643-2524 no later than
3 p.m., Friday, July 22.
Thursday, July 28 - Tallahas-
see Wal-Mart shopping and lunch.
Call Liberty Transit at 643-2524
no laterthan 3 p.m., Monday, July
24 to reserve your Transit ride.


American Red Cross offering summer

babysitter's training Camp in Tallahassee


TALLAHASSEE - The Capi-
tal Area Chapter of the American
Red Cross is offering its popular
Babysitter's Training Course during
the summer.
The two day class will be held
at the Chapter headquarters at 1115
Easterwood Drive on July 8 & 9
Friday night from 6 p.m. - 9 p.m.
and Saturday from 8:30 a.m. - 3:30
p.m.
This fun and fast paced training
class provides youth ages 11 years
and older with the skills and confi-
dence to safely and responsibly care
for children and infants.
Students will learn how to super-
vise children and infants, how to
perform basic child care skills such
as diapering and feeding, how to
choose safe, age-appropriate games
and toys, among other babysitting
staples and tips.
Course attendees also receive
their certification of Adult Infant and


Child CPR/AED with First Aid and
Pet CPR and First Aid.
"This class is great for developing
smart decision making skills while
babysitting," said Aimee Reed,
Health and Safety Services Director
of the Capital Area Chapter. "The
students gain confidence knowing
they will be the best babysitter on
the block."
The $100 fee for the Babysit-
ter's Training Camp includes the
American Red Cross Babysitter's
Training Handbook and CD-ROM,
Emergency Reference Guide, and
Certification in Adult Infant and
Child CPR/AED with First Aid and
Pet CPR/First Aid.
"The babysitter's camp includes a
fantastic CD-ROM that the partici-
pants get to take home with them,"
Reed adds. "The CD contains how
to interview and be interviewed,
templates for business cards, emer-
gency preparedness information and


a downloadable book with games
and recipes to help students get
started on their own babysitting
business."
To register for the course, please
contact Aimee Reed, the Chapter's
Director of Health and Safety Ser-
vices at (850)-402-5614 or visit our
web site at www.tallyredcross.org

The American Red Cross shel-
ters, feeds and provides emotional
support to victims of disasters;
teaches lifesaving skills; provides
international humanitarian aid;
and supports military members and
their families. The Red Cross is a
charitable organization - not a
government agency -and depends
on volunteers and the generosity
of the American public to perform
its mission. For more information,
please visit us atwww. tallyredcross.
orgorjoin us on ourFacebookpage,
blog or follow us on Twitter


I ! Business

*Real Property

6 * Divorce


+ Wills
Offices in Bristol and Panama City
By Appointment (850) 866-3680
or contact me at jenniferwshuler@yahoo.com
CALL ME FOR A FREE LIVING WILL


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Phone (850) 643-5454


Art Classes 45
by Joy School of Art
20869 S.E. SherryAve. * Blountstown -/

Classes with Dr. Tamaria E. Joyner
Call 674-2633 * 674-5731
SPACE LIMITED * RESERVE YOUR SPOT

CLASS SCHEDULE
Seniors - Fridays, 3-5:30 p.m.
on July 8, 15, 22, 29
Children - 7-12 yrs. old
Saturday, 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
on July 9, 16, 23, 30
Teen Adults - Saturdays, 1:30-5:30 p.m.
on July 9, 16, 23, 30
*VWhatever level of skill - Get back to the basics,
sharpen problem areas as you develop style.



79-T-77


Laban Bontrager, DMD
Monica Bontrager, DMD




ACCEPTING NEW PATIENTS
12761 NW Pea Ridge Rd., Bristol, FL 32321
TELEPHONE 643-5417
il _www.bristoldentalclinic.cornm


Jeri




Page 6 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JULY 6,2011 g


- * *
S.I ,'7-i(A 4i L. IAl


A RECAP OF RECENT OBSERVATIONS
BY LATE NIGHT TV HOSTS.

Anthony Weiner is reportedly involved in choos-
ing his successor. The first question he asked his
potential replacements is, "What's the difference
between 'reply' and 'reply all?" - CONAN O'BRIEN

A lot of people are taking time off for the holi-
days. For instance, Rod Blagojevich is going away
for a while. - DAVID LETTERMAN

California officials say that the census failed to
count over a million residents of the state. How
did Schwarzenegger manage to cover up all those
children? - CONAN O'BRIEN

Anthony Weiner is back in the private sector
now. When he was a congressman from New
York, I think it was his private sector that got him
in trouble. - DAVID LETTERMAN

Michele Bachmann is kind of like Sarah Palin
but without the charisma - or marksmanship.
You know, maybe we should stop telling kids that
anyone can grow up to be president of the United
States. - JIMMY KIMMEL

North Korea has shut down all of its universities
for 10 months so students can work in factories.
Or, as they call it in North Korea, "spring break."
- CONAN O'BRIEN

We're celebrating our independence from the
British. I hope that in a couple years, we'll be able
to celebrate our independence from the Chinese.
- DAVID LETTERMAN

The Senate canceled their vacation to work
on the budget. Either they really can't agree or
they're looking for an excuse to not go on vaca-
tion with their families. - JIMMY KIMMEL

Whitey Bulger's brother was a politician. So
one brother was operating in a world with no mor-
als, dealing with the lowest of the low, and the
other one was a mobster. - CRAIG FERGUSON

Sarah Palin says she should be ready to make
a decision on running for president by December
2012. - JIMMY KIMMEL

The Pope is now on Twitter. The church is real-
ly trying to connect with young people - in a way
that doesn't involve hush money. - DAVID LETTERMAN

Chris Wallace at Fox News asked Michele
Bachmann if she is a flake. I think that's an insult
to the fine folks at Kellogg's. - DAVID LETTERMAN

Rod Blagojevich was found guilty of trying to
sell President Obama's Senate seat. As the ver-
dict was read, Blagojevich's face remained ex-
pressionless while his hair remained ridiculous.
- CONAN O'BRIEN

New York Gov. Cuomo legalized gay marriage.
I think it's great for everybody - especially di-
vorce lawyers. - DAVID LETTERMAN

Lindsay Lohan had her house arrest bracelet
removed. Then, when no one was looking, she
slipped the bracelet into her pocket.
- CONAN O'BRIEN

The Pope tweeted last week. If you had told
me the Pope tweeted five years ago, I would have
said, "Why? Does he think he's a bird?"
- JIMMY KIMMEL


A $100 billion misunderstanding


This political game of chicken //
between Republicans and Demo- 0)
crats over increasing the debt ceil- OF
ing would be laughable if the con-
Jerry Cox is a
sequences of failing to increase the officerand writer
officer and writer
spending cap were not so severe, background in
McGraw-Hill is the parent com- foreign policy iss
pany to Standard & Poor's and re- kaloosa Countj
ports that investors in the US gov-
ernment bond market could lose
$100 billion if the US loses its triple A credit rating
as a result of the Congress failing to increase the debt
ceiling.
In addition to losses incurred by foreign investors
who buy US bonds that provides cash for US defi-
cit spending, the US taxpayer would have to pay $2
billion to $4 billion more per year in interest on the
national debt.
Congress has increased the debt ceiling 52 times.
The debt ceiling was increased eight times during the
George Bush presidency. Why was there no national
angst during any previous debt ceiling discussions?
The answer is that it's politics. In this case, it's Re-
publican politics. The Republicans have convinced
the voters that they are going to die and go to Hell
unless out-of-control government spending is reined
in.
In my view, the Republican inspired hoo-haa over
the budget debt ceiling is nothing more than an at-
tempt to end the Medicare and Social Security pro-
grams, a long held goal of Republicans.
Republican hand-wringers were not to be heard
when George Bush was adding about $5 trillion to
the national debt. So, all this "Oh my God, we are
broke" yelping from the right-wingers is just hypoc-
risy at its best. All of the presidents for the past 30
years own a part of the national debt.
The following is who spent what:
*Ronald Reagan's First Term - $656 billion in-
crease
*Ronald Reagan's Second Term - $1.036 trillion
increase
*George H.W. Bush's Term - $1.587 trillion in-
crease
*Bill Clinton's First Term - $1.122 trillion in-
crease
*Bill Clinton's Second Term - $418 billion in-


S crease
L * George W. Bush's First Term -
SNER $ 1.885 trillion increase
retired military *George W. Bush's Second Term -
ith an extensive $3.014 trillion increase
domestic and *Barack Obama's First "Year" -
'es. He lives in $1.573 trillion increase
/ I believe that some combination of
budget cuts and tax increases is the
answer to America's financial ills.
A good place to start in raising revenues is the tax
code. Most of the tax code is a result of providing
deductions to voters in order to get their vote.
While ending subsidies to the oil companies, farm-
ers and a host of others won't balance the budget, it
is a step in the right direction in establishing some
degree of equality for tax payers. The Russians got
rid of their hodgepodge of tax breaks and now have
a flat tax of 13%. But the Republicans won't even
discuss revamping the US tax code.
The Republican mantra is that taxes are bad for
businesses. Of course, no one wants to pay taxes,
but businesses don't pay taxes... they collect taxes.
Tax rates are figured into the operating cost of doing
business.
My daughter handles the finances for a restaurant.
Their operating cost varies from season to season.
The BP oil spill prevented her from buying local
seafood products. She found a new buyer in another
area of Florida, and the cost for fish increased. In
response, menu prices increased. When a business
incurs a tax or any other operating expense, the busi-
ness adjust their prices for their goods and services.
People who are familiar with Section 4 of the
14th Amendment argue that a spending cap on the
federal budget is not constitutional because the first
sentence of Section 4, which reads...
"The validity of the public debt of the United
States, authorized by law, including debts incurred
for payment of pensions and bounties for services in
suppressing insurrection and rebellion shall not be
questioned."
Whether the debt ceiling is constitutional or not
will be decided by the courts. The political parties
should stop with the bickering over this issue and
undertake a rational approach in solving the debt
crisis.


re
wi


y.




JULY 6,2011 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 7


� 2011 U.S. NEWS SYNDICATE, INC.


WASHINGTON

MERRY-GO-ROUND

by Douglas Cohn and Eleanor 1ft


THE REAL THREATS
WASHINGTON - In the ongoing budget talks, nego-
tiators like to say that "everything is on the table," and
for the first time in recent memory, that includes defense
spending. Fair enough, but let's hope the budget-cutters
have something more than the bottom line in mind, and
that they clearly assess the threats America faces, and ap-
portion the dollars where they are most needed.
The war on terror, a phrase coined by the Bush admin-
istration, consumed much of the public's attention for the
last decade, along with too much of the Pentagon's re-
sources. Bin Laden is dead, and when defense planners
forecast where the next major national security threats will
come from, it's not from Al Qaeda - and it's not from in-
surgents in Afghanistan and Iraq - and it's certainly not
from Muammar Qaddaafi.
The big-picture threats almost certainly are a rising Chi-
na and a resurgent Russia. Senator James Webb, D-Va., a
former Secretary of the Navy under Reagan, tried to raise
the specter of a newly assertive China in an appearance on
"Meet the Press" last Sunday. He called the blase reaction
in the U.S. to China's maneuvers in the South China Sea
"a Munich moment," comparing it to British Prime Minis-
ter Neville Chamberlain's appeasement of Germany in the
1930's.
Webb may be guilty of hyperbole, but he is right to sig-
nal his alarm at the singular focus today on Qaddaafi and
all the various permutations of the Arab Spring while look-
ing the other way when China, and perhaps Russia, are en-
tering a new phase in the world order that should demand
the attention of policy-makers.
The war in Afghanistan is now the longest war in Ameri-
can history, but it needs to be put in perspective. Aside from
longevity, it's nowhere near the magnitude of World War
II, which posed an existential threat, or Vietnam, where
more than 58,000 Americans lost their lives.
Al Qaeda as an organization cannot defeat and destroy
America. That doesn't mean the military shouldn't con-
front them, but the threat they pose is seriously diminished.
President Obama is keeping the agreement negotiated by
the Bush administration to withdraw American troops from
Iraq by year's end, and he has begun the drawdown in Af-
ghanistan, promising that the "surge" troops that he sent in
will be out by the end of summer 2012.
The amounts of money needed to conduct these wars is
out of proportion to the dangers they pose, down to and
including $20.2 billion - billion, not million - a year to air
condition tents in Iraq and Afghanistan, according to a re-
port on NPR. Ironically, the Pentagon scandalously short-
changed the troops on body armor and properly equipped
humvees, but the air-conditioning kept running, as it should
in the extreme conditions troops face in these countries.
The cost of air-condition is just one of the ancillary costs
involved in running these wars. Defense Secretary Gates,
who stepped down this week, said one of the toughest is-
sues he's had to raise when it comes to trimming the mili-
tary budget is the cost of health care. Just as it's going up
beyond the ability of the government to pay for it in the
Medicare program, it's costing the Pentagon huge sums as
well, especially considering the long-term care for troops
injured in these conflicts who because of better medical
care survived where they might not have in earlier wars.
These are the vexing questions that should be on the ta-
ble along with potential cuts to the defense budget. Proper-
ly evaluating future threats while always keeping in mind
the well-being of the troops who do so much to protect us,
that's the balance the politicians should strike.




Page 8 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JULY 6, 2011


First poster contest set for


Sunday Afternoon with the


Arts at Chipola College


The 7thAnnual SundayAfternoon with
the Arts Exhibit and Exhibit Reception
Planning Committee announces the first
Poster Contest sponsored by The Artists
Guild of Northwest Florida, Inc. and The
UPS (TM) Store in Marianna.
The Poster Contest is open to all individ-
uals 18 years old or older.
The Poster Contest Winner
will receive an award of 0%A
$100 and the poster design
will be used for publicity
purposes for the exhibit. A
limited number of posters
will be printed by The UPS
Store (TM) in Marianna.
The purpose ofthe Poster
Contest isto offer creative
and fun way for local and regional people
to get involved in the creative process and
promotion for the annual fall exhibit at
Chipola College scheduled for November
1 to 10. The Exhibit reception is scheduled
for November 6 from 1 to 5 p.m. It is open
to the public free of charge and offers a
variety of activities for the entire family.
The Poster Design winner will be
recognized at the Exhibit Reception and
presented the cash award. Planners hope
the the printed posters will be a collector's
item inthe future and great wayto engage
the community in a fun art related project.
"To our knowledge there is no Poster


Contest like this one in the region and we
are excited to offer this new opportunity
for people throughout the area. We deeply
appreciate our business sponsor for the
Poster Contest- The UPS Store (TM) in
Marianna," said Judy Brooten, Exhibit
Chairperson.
The annual Sunday Af-
ternoon with the Arts is a
co^ family-friendly event at
Chipola College featuring
a variety of art related ac-
tivities, a visual art exhibit,
authors and written word
presentations, hands on art
experiences for the entire
family, musical perfor-
mances, door prizes and
refreshments. The Grand Door Prize of a
beautiful framed print will be sponsored
by John Brewer's Studio in Marianna, as
it has been since 2005.
The annual event is sponsored by The
Artists Guild of Northwest Florida, Inc.,
the Chipola Regional Arts Association and
Chipola College.
The Poster Contest entry deadline is
September 1, 2011. Guidelines are avail-
able from the Exhibit Chairperson. Con-
tact JDBrooten@aol.com or at The UPS
Store (TM) in Marianna located at 4415-C
Constitution Lane open Monday through
Friday from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m.


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Students complete watercolor classes


The series of watercolor art classes at
the Blountstown Library Artnight was
completed on the June 28. All those who
attended can be proud of the many pieces
they created during exercises, warm ups
and projects.
The main things to be aware of when


painting with watercolors is to loosen up
and let the water and color do most of the
work! Let it flow!
Pictured here is a painting in progress
by Jane Breeze.
Watch the papers for signup information
on the next free Artnight.


Art classes offered for all ages July 8-9
Joy School of Art will taught by Dr. Tamaria E. 12:30 p.m.
be offering art classes dur- Joyner. * Teens and adults -
ing the month of July in The classes are sched- Saturday, July 9, 16,23 and
Blountstown. The classes uled as follows: 30 from 1:30 to 5:30 p.m.
are for all skill levels and * Seniors - Friday, July The school is located at
will help get back to the 8, 15, 22 and 29 from 3 to 20869 S.E. Sherry Ave. in
basics, sharpen problem 5:30 p.m. Blountstown.
areas and help develop a * Children ages 7-12 Space is limited. To
style that works best. This - Saturday, July 9, 16, reserve your seat call 674-
will be the last workshop 23 and 30 from 10 a.m. to 2633 or 674-5731.




JULY 6, 2011 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 9


B w BIRTH DAYS Former Wildcat honored

� .... ".-1-I for academic achievement


MADYSON BROOKE FINE
Madyson Brooke Fine celebrated
her eighth birthday on June 21.
She is the daughter of Chris and
Sherrie Johnson of Bristol. Her
grandparents are Naomi Fine and
Mitchell Fine of Hosford, John and
Annette Hires and the late Winiford
Johnson, all of Blountstown. Her
great-grandparents are Chuck and
the late Bonnie Benton of Bristol,
Nora Bailey, Ernest Bailey, both
of Frink, and Malcom and Annie
Johnson of Altha. Madyson enjoys
playing with her cousins and riding
the golf cart.


o . o

SKYLAR PEDDIE
Skylar Peddie will celebrate his
sixth birthday on July 8. He is the
son of Richard and Heather Ped-
die of Rock Bluff. His grandparents
are David and Tammy Lolley of Su-
matra, Wayne and Debra Peddie
of Rock Bluff and Jerry Hosey of
Quincy. Skylar enjoys hunting and
fishing with his daddy, watching
SpongeBob, mud riding and play-
ing with his best friend Chaff.


Former second baseman of the Altha
Wildcats Baseball team, Josh McIntosh,
was named a recipient of the National
Junior College Athletic Association's
(NJCAA) 2010-2011 Award for Superior
Academic Achievement on June 29.
This award is given annually to those
student-athletes who maintain a grade
point average (GPA) of 3.80 to 3.99 on a
4.00 scale.
Of the over 50,000 NJCAA student-
athletes, McIntosh was one of 1,470 that
received an academic award.
As the starting left fielder forthe Saints'
baseball team of Lurleen B. Wallace Com-
munity College (LBWCC) in Andalusia,
Alabama, Josh maintained a 3.80 GPA as
a Sports Medicine major. Ironically, the
only other LBWCC alumnus who was
named a recipient of the same award was
Josh's former roommate and teammate,
Chris Barrentine.
Josh will continue his degree in Sports
Medicine this fall at Florida State Univer-


sity in Tallahassee.
He was salutatorian of the Altha High
School Class of 2008. He is the son of Jim
and Miriam McIntosh of Altha.


Liberty All Stars head to state July 8
The Liberty County All funds to attend the state iff's Department at 643-
Star Boys Pony League championship in Sebringon 2235 orMichelle Singletary
baseball team ended their July 8. Allcontributions are at 510-3233. You can also
season undefeated. They greatly appreciated. make a deposit directly
went on to win the District 5 Ifyou would like to give, into the Liberty County All
Dixie Youth Championship. please contact Steve Swier Star account at Centennial
They are currently raising at the Liberty County Sher- Bank.



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Page 10 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JULY 6, 2011


Neighbors gathered in Kinard Saturday night to enjoy an informal Fourth of July celebration with plenty of fireworks, fellowship and frankfurters.
Shown above is Sydnee Pass who enjoyed a plate full of tasty food while waiting for the colorful show in the sky to begin. ANGIE DAVIS PHOTOS


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JULY 6, 2011 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 11


SCHOOL GRADES
continued from the frontpage

Course Exams and the new Core Curriculum Standards
we expect to see continued improvement in student
performance. This year Liberty County, on the End of
Course Exam for Algebra I, tied for the highest mean
scale score with Okaloosa and St. Johns counties with
a score of 55 percent. Of the students taking the EOC
for Algebra I, 56 percent scored at the highest level -
level 3," she said. "Excluding the labs schools, only
St. Johns County scored higher than Liberty County,"
Summers pointed out.
She added, "We expect the high school grades to be
released sometime in August but LCHS has already
shown great scores on the FCAT math. Seventy-six
percent of the students met high standards on the test and
78 percent showed learning gains. Also, of the lowest
25 percent of students, 87 percent showed adequate
progress in math."
CALHOUN COUNTY
*Blountstown Elementary improved on last year's B
with an A for the 2010-2011 school term. The school
maintained an A the previous three years.
*Blountstown Middle School kept up the good work
with its fourth consecutive A ranking.
*Carr Elementary and Middle School marked the
ninth consecutive year of earning A's.
Calhoun County is heading into its seventh year
of being an A district and Calhoun County School
Superintendent Tommy McClellan is understandably
proud. "We take pride in being an A school district,"
he said. "Everybody works real hard and puts in the
extra effort."


COLD PILLS
continued from the frontpage

powdery substance that was later confirmed to be
methamphetamine was found in the glovebox. The yellow
bag that contained cold pills with pseudoephedrine -
commonly used to make methamphetamine - was found
in the pocket of his vest.
During a search of his home at Riverview Trailer
Park on Central Avenue, investigators looking through
the bedroom found two light bulbs that had been used
as methamphetamine pipes, two small containers that
held an unspecified amount of methamphetamine and
two pieces of tin foil with drug residue. Under the bed
they found two more tin foil strips and a straw, all
containing drug residue.
Items found in the bathroom included a 20 ounce
bottle of acid and a camouflage bag that contained a
reaction vessel, a Ziplock bag with stripped-out lithium
batteries, ammonium nitrate and a 32-ounce bottle of
Coleman camping fuel.
An unopened box of pseudoephedrine was found
on the kitchen counter. A tin foil strip containing drug
residue was found in a nearby drawer.
After the exchange in the parking lot, the Honda
pulled out and turned east onto SR 20 and then north
onto Solomon Street, continuing on and ignoring two
stop signs; the first at the intersection of Solomon Street
and Faircloth Street, the second at the intersection of
Faircloth Street and CR 12 North.
Investigator Todd Wheetley with the Liberty County
Sheriff's Office conducted a traffic stop. Bright was
asked to step out of the car. When asked about his
purchase, Bright said he bought the cold pills for his
grandmother and that they had just dropped them off.
Bright said, "I ain't going to snitch," after being told
he was followed by a law enforcement officer from the
pharmacy into Bristol. When asked to identify the driver
of the pickup they met, he replied, "I don't know what
you are talking about."
During an interview at the sheriff's office, Parrish
said Bright asked her to drive him to a pharmacy in
Blountstown. She said she didn't know what was going
on until Bright asked her to call McCombs as they were
driving back to Bristol. She said he told her to ask
McCombs if"he wanted a box of chocolate brownies."
When he replied "yes", she was instructed to have him
meet them at the Dollar General.
She said Bright, who was sitting in the back seat,
told her to hand McCombs the bag, which she knew
contained cold pills. She was not charged.
McCombs has been released on a $45,000 bond.
Bright was released on $5,000 bond.


Folks gathered in downtown Blountstown Mon-
day night to enjoy a fireworks display in cel-
ebration of Independence Day. Colorful bursts
exploded overhead as onlookers watched with
family and friends. LEFT: Joseph P. Summer-
lin watches fireworks light up behind one of the
many flags lining SR 20. BELOW: Fireworks
fans try to capture a memory of the night with
their cell phone cameras.

PHOTOS BY DANIEL WILLIAMS & JOHNNY EUBANKS




Page 12 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JULY 6, 2011


Dove hunts in high demand, hard to find


To me, the best part about hunt-
ing is not harvesting game - but OUTTA'
spending quality time outdoors with THE W OOE
friends and family. One of the best
waystodothatisthroughdovehunt- '.- by Tony Young
ing, which is one reason why great eva nC mm "
dove hunts are in such high demand -- r wwc.om
but often difficult to find.
That's why the FWC created its
Special-Opportunity Dove Club Program - to offer hunt-
ers the chance of experiencing exceptional dove hunting
on the state's best public dove fields.
Dove Club permits enable one adult and one youth
(under age 16) to hunt all scheduled dates for the dove
field of their choice. Permits cost $150 and enable both
hunters to take a daily bag limit of birds each. There
are eight hunts on all but one of the selected dove fields
(Caravelle Ranch has six), and all hunts are from noon
until sunset and take place on Saturdays, starting Oct. 1
and ending Jan. 7.
Last year, 1,865 birds were harvested from six fields.
This coming season, there again will be six special-
opportunity dove fields scattered throughout the state
from which to choose.
One of the fields is on Allapattah Flats Public Small-
Game Hunting Area (PSGHA) in Martin County, east
of Lake Okeechobee. Thirteen Dove Club permits are
available for the 100-acre field. Participants last year
took an average of more than six birds per hunter per
day, harvesting 644 birds.
North Newberry PSGHA, in Alachua County, has
13 Dove Club permits on its 40 acres. That field didn't
produce as well last year but yielded 410 doves two
seasons ago.
Caravelle Ranch, in Putnam County, has a 200-acre
dove field with 30 Dove Club permits available. Last
season, 249 doves were harvested there.
The dove field on Hilochee Wildlife Management
Area, in Lake County, has 15 Dove Club permits avail-
able to hunt its 58 acres. Hunters there last season took
490 doves, which equated to a 2.5-birds-per-hunter, per
day average.
Frog Pond PSGHA, in Miami-Dade County, has been
a top producer in past years, and 246 birds were taken
there last season, for nearly a 2-birds-per-hunter, per day
average. Fifteen Dove Club permits are available to hunt
its 50 acres.


The remaining special-opportu-
nity dove field is a brand new one
to the system and is in Lafayette
County. Koon Farm PSGHA is a
40-acre dove field with 13 permits
available.
Dove Club permits will be is-
sued by random drawing during
Phase I. That application period is


July 1-18.
After obtaining the correct application worksheet by
going to MyFWC.com/Hunting and clicking on "Lim-
ited Entry Hunts," you can apply for these season passes
by filling out a single worksheet (with up to five dove
field choices) and turning it in at any county tax collec-
tor's office, license agent or by going online to www.
fl.wildlifelicense.com. During Phase I, hunters may be
awarded a permit for only one dove field.
If you're successful in getting drawn, you must pick
up and pay for your Dove Club permit at any of the same
places mentioned above by Aug. 8. Check for drawing
results in late July at MyFWC.com/Hunting, again by
clicking "Limited Entry Hunts." And any applicant who
provides his email address will be notified by the FWC
by email if drawn.
Brochures on each ofthese areas are available online at
MyFWC.com/Dove. Also at that Web address, beginning
in late September, hunters will be able to find the most up-
to-date information on these
six special-opportunity dove
fields, as well as Florida's
other public dove fields. The
website is updated every
Thursday throughout the
dove season, and informa-
tion includes dove densities,
previous weeks'harvests and
field conditions.
So if you'd like to join
the FWC's Dove Club, you Wheel
need to try to do so in July. , Alignments
Remember to introduce Oil Changes
someone new to hunting Balancing
when you can. As always, Brakes
have fun, hunt safely and Shocks
ethically, and we'll see you _
in the woods! MV5496 | |
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In an effort to allow the
deer population to rebound
if conditions improve, the
Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission
(FWC) approved an ex- -
ecutive order implementing
new deer harvest rules in
two areas of the Big Cy-
pressWildlife Management
Area in South Florida. The
rules will affect the upcoming 2011-2012
hunting season.
The new rules will affect zones 3 and
4 of the Stairsteps Unit (south and west
of Loop Road). No deer may be harvested
from Zone 4. Deer hunting will be allowed
in Zone 3, but with a reduced bag limit
from two to one deer per season, and all
deer harvested from Zone 3 must have a
forked antler.
The order will not affect zones 1 and
2, where deer hunting will be allowed to
continue under current regulations.
Data collected from annual surveys,
when FWC and National Park Service
(NPS) biologists fly over the area to
count deer, reflect a dramatic decline in
the deer population this past decade. An
average of three deer were counted in
surveys conducted in Zone 4 this year,
the southernmost and wettest zone. Last


year, an average of seven
deer were observed. The
previous year, 18 deer were
observed there. Surveys
were not conducted in 2008
due to lack offunds. In 2007,
123 deer were counted. The
highest count since the sur-
veys began in 1995 was in
2002, with 523 deer.
Ajointtask force ofFWC
and NPS scientists found the number
and duration of high-water events in the
Stairsteps Unithave increased significantly
since 1995. Biologists believe that survival
of fawns and, to a lesser extent, adult fe-
males, has been decreased by high-water
events, habitat changes and predation.
If the trends in these conditions reverse,
deer populations would likely rebound.
Access to all areas will remain open,
subject to NPS regulations, and all other
hunting will be allowed.
The FWC and NPS will continue
to monitor the deer population in the
Stairsteps Unit. Hunters are encouraged
to bring in whole deer harvested from the
area to the check station so they may be
examined. Hunters may call the FWC's
Naples Field office at (239) 417-6352
for directions and information on check
stations.


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JULY 6, 2011 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 13


Best days to harvest
aboveground crops

Best day to begin diet
to gain weight


f besides being celebrated as the 1906, he wrote the popular patri-
birth date of our na- otic song "You're aGrand
tion, July 4 is also the Old Flag," followed by the
birthday of those letter-- well-known "Yankee
writing twins, Abigail V.in Doodle Dandy" in 1908. In
Buren ("Dear Abby") - Hannibal, Missouri, July 4
Ann Landers. George M is Tom Sawyer Fence
han was born on July 3, Painting Day. So, write
1878, but he always cel a letter, sing a song or
ebrated it on July 4. In two, then paint the fence.

1/2 cup saffloweroil reheat the oven to 375*F. Une a muffin tin with
2 cups milk E.c papers or coat with nonstick spray.
I teaspoo anillaetract Mix together the first four ingredients , -Q
5 cupses flour -then sift in the dry ingredients, mixing
1-1/3 cups sugar at low speed. Fold in the rhu- .-.
2 tablespoons baking barb. Pour the batter into '
powder prepared muffin tins. Sprin- , ,a
4 cupschopped rhubarl> kle with cinnamon sugar. /
1/2 cup cinnamon sugar, Bake for 20 minutes. MAKES
for topping ABOUT30MUFFINS.
WIT AND WISDOM FROM THE OLD FARMER'S ALMANAC
N* .Alaih iliihh ri h, Iit ,i r, tni. .J a hrley.
* Be'or bakiing.c.. i the -kinm'l .lurtd peppers to retain
their cdIr
* n lul\ I , I'sN. the fir',t i ue l T1 liu allStreet
. '1;/, . j publ h
k I p I . I I - . , ,,1 II 'i , t,' I
Almana e.com


ASK OLD FARMER'S

THE _,.


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Why can foodd wastes
be added directly into
the soil?
-T. L., Antrim, N.H.


small quantities,
but most gardeners
find that composting
offers more advan-
tages.
For centuries, gar-
deners have added fish
wastes under newly
planted corn or banana
peels under rose bushes.
Camellias are supposed
to do well with a mulch
of tea leaves, while hol-
lyhocks thrive on the
old hops (or yeast) from
beer making. The trou-
ble comes from apply-
ing too much or at the
wrong time, or using the
wrong type of additive.
Too much raw material
can imbalance the soil
makeup, or even create
hot conditions as the
rotting ingredients break
down into useful soil
additives. As for timing,
applying a nitrogen-rich
food, for example, which
stimulates vegetative


JULY 4, MONDAY Independence Day. Earth I cs
at aphelion. Construction ofErie Canal began, 1817.
Poet Walt Whitman publishedthefirst edition ofLeaves 1 pa
of Grass, 1855.
JULY5, TUESDAY The SalvationArmy wat
was established by William Booth, 1865. mea
ElvisPresley hadhisfirstrecording session often
in Memphis, Tennessee, 1954. acid
JULY 6, WEDNESDAY - Moon ing
on equator Pennsylvania Evening Post V
first newspaper to publish Declaration of tiall
Independence, 1776. U.S. president George W was
Bush born, 1946. ant]
JULY7, THURSDAY Moon atperi- :- ,
gee. Conjunction ofSaturn andtheMoon. . fHill t -..- ..
Jim Thorpe won his first Olympic gold U.r " - , olk u
medal in the pentathlon, 1912.
JUL Y8, FRIDAY- The firstissue of -
The WallStreetJournal was published, ...'
1889. SieurdeMontsNationalMonu- -
mentestablished(laternamedAcadia
National Park), Maine, 1916
JULY 9, SATURDAY New .
York Mayor LaGuardia read the-
comics over the radio during a
newspaper strike, 1945. Actor ,r,, n
Jimmy Smits born, 1955. be
JULY10, SUNDAY Fourth . ier
Sunday after Pentecost. Uranus stationary. last
The Bahamas gained full independence, 1973. If it was
rains on July 10, it will rain for 7 weeks. can'


growth, at the time your
plants should focus on
flower and fruit produc-
tion might ruin your crop
yield or flower display.
Also, applying the wrong
type of fertilizer near
plants can provide nutri-
ents they don't need or
cause them harm.
The advantage of the
compost pile-though
admittedly, it may be
labor-intensive to turn
and mix-is that the
various ingredients can
be blended into a more
balanced soil additive
that, once broken down,
is safe to apply to various
parts of the garden, as
needed. Not only does
compost contain nutri-
ents for plants, but it also
improves soil structure.

Were, nJ,1i, glhu1ous-

Yellow or undersize
foliage on your trees
indicates a lack of nour-
ishment. Feed them regu-
larly, but don't overdo it.


es whitewashedand, ifso,
how did the whitewash
stand up to salt water?
-P. C., Cranston, R.I.

Many of them were
whitewashed, yes, but
I'm not sure you can say
that whitewash stands up
well over time, whether
there's salt water around
or not. Generally speak-
ing, any whitewashing
was considered an an-
nual chore, whether the
application was on light-
houses, pasture fences,
chicken coops, privy
interiors, or even kitchen
walls.
There was a "receipt"
(recipe) for a "Durable
Whitewash" that was
adopted by the U.S.
government especially
for use on lighthouses
and keepers' dwellings.


GARDENING

Jobs for July
from The Old Farmer's Almanac


If you have any house-
plants sitting directly in the window,
make sure the light is filtered or the
plant is moved to a site out of direct
sunlight. The windowpane intensifies
the heat, and you don't want to scorch
your plants.

Extend the indoor life of your cut flow-
ers by putting them in a solution that is
one part water, one part clear soft drink
(such as 7-Up, Sprite, etc.), and a few
drops chlorine bleach.


with
som
tenc
flak


pott
are
on t


P
cau
Ery:
It a
mus
gou
pum
there
prer
leave
folio
plan
frui
Fun
shoi
sign
and

On
have
fruits,
blossc
ing fru
this, a
plenty


JULY 7
Moon
atperigee

Independence
Day


If you have thick, thriving phlox,
thin the plants to four or five stalks per
clump to provide adequate ventilation
and avoid mildew.

If your celery is doing well, tie the
stalks together to keep them from
sprawling.

Fertilize your houseplants frequently
to ensure vigorous growth.


ALMANA


called for 10 parts of
hly slaked lime and
irt hydraulic cement,
was mixed with salt
ter. (Whitewashes
ant for chicken coops
n included carbolic
[, as well, for combat-
pests such as lice.)
Whitewash is essen-
y a liquid plaster and
often used as a seal-
for mortar, stone, and
brick. In some parts
of the country,
such as Penn-
sylvania, it is
still widely used
as a preservative
in rubble construc-
tion and for ma-
sonry walls and
chimneys. As better
paints became avail-
able, however, they
placed whitewash
;cause they were eas-
* to apply and they
;ed longer. White-
shes, for instance,
't contract and expand
h the weather the way
ie paints can, and they
Ito become dingy and
y over time.

What can I do about
ted cucumbers that
dying from mildew
he leaves?
-H. N., Amherst, Va.

'owdery mildew is
sed by the fungus
siphe cichoracearum.
attacks cucumbers,
skmelons, squashes,
rds, watermelons, and
ipkins. In dry seasons,
mildew can cause the
mature death of the
Tes. When most ofthe
age is attacked, the
itisweakenedandthe
t ripens prematurely.
gicide applications
uld begin at the first
n of powdery mildew
again after 10 days.

ce melon vines
set three or four
remove any new
oms. The remain-
jits will benefit from
nd you will still have
Y.


PP





















An eight-week-old kitten named Lucy is shown peeking over the
elbow of her new best friend, Tom Aycock of Blountstown. Tom
and his wife Melanie recently adopted Lucy and her sister, Tsukiko.
The little kittens are enjoying the run of Aycocks' home and hearts.
When he not resting in the chair with one of the new pets, Tom is
busy constructing a kitty condo for the pair to give them something
fun to climb on and play with...besides him, of course! The cuddly
kittens also have their own Facebook page listed under Tsukiko
and Lucy, where you can see photos of the pair at rest and play.


PETS AND THEIR PEOPLE IS SPONSORED BY
Altha Farmers Co-op, Inc.
We've got the feed you need to keep your animals happy and healthy!
CATTLE - HORSES - DOGS - CATS - BIRDS and more.
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Page 14 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JULY 6, 2011


S"Freedom from Eye Glasses,
Now a reality for many."
CatactCtS . Lee Mullis M.D.
SMART LENSES sM Board Certified Eye Surgeon
and Cataract Specialist


When the flowers are goi


to prune gardenias and I


Hydrangeas and gardenias
are two of our most beloved
shrubs in the South. They are
revered fortheir flowers and are
planted in large drifts through-
out Northwest Florida.
Gardenia shrubs are ev-
ergreen and produce shiny,
dark green leaves. They
are known for their waxy,
creamy white flowers. The
flower's aroma, adored by
many gardeners, is powerful
and pleasant.
Hydrangeas are deciduous
shrubs and produce coarse,
light green leaves. Their
large leaves will fall off after
a freeze.
Although you are left with
bare sticks during the winter,
the summer blooms are well
worth the winter bareness.
While there are many
different types of hydrangeas, the
mopheads are probably the most rec-
ognizable. Their large inflorescences
are usually blue on acid soil, pink
on alkaline soil and a dirty white on
neutral pH soil.
Even though these shrubs are dif-
ferent in many aspects, the one thing
they have in common is when they
"set" their flower buds. Both shrubs
develop flower buds on old (mature)
wood ofthe previous year and open in
early summer of the following year.
Flower buds are formed at the ter-
minal end of stems and, if not killed
by cold or removed by inappropriate
pruning, provide the showy floral


by Theresa Friday,
Horticulture Extension Agent,
Santa Rosa County


display the next year.
The best time to prune gardenias
and hydrangeas is after they finish
flowering for the season. Pruning
them at the incorrect time of the
year, such as winter, will remove the
flower buds.
Your pruning program should be
purposeful. First, remove all dis-
eased, weak and dead wood. It will
be importantto disinfect your pruning
equipment after removing suspect
branches.
Pruning shears, loppers and saws
can be dipped in a weak bleach so-
lution to prevent spread of disease
between plants.
Once all the problem branches have


Gardening Friends of the Big

Bend to meet July 12 in Quincy
Gardening Friends of the Big Bend will have its July meeting at the North
Florida Research and Education Center near Quincy at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday,
July 12. Under discussion will be the upcoming tropicals workshop fea-
turing Dr. Gary Knox, Dave Skinner, and Hayes Jackson on July 16; the
Plantaholic Preview Party on Wednesday, Sept. 28; and the Saturday Plant
Sale on Saturday, Oct. 1.
The purpose of this group is to promote gardening and gardening research
by supporting and assisting the faculty and staff of NFREC, an arm of the
University of Florida's Institute for Food and Agricultural Sciences.
For more information, contact Clara Skipper at (850) 671-2565 or Dr.
Gary Knox at (850) 875-7162.


GARDENIA


4G
























ne, it's time


hydrangeas

t been removed, then think about
thinning the plant. Shrubs are
often thinned to reduce a top-
heavy appearance or to open
up a dense canopy.
To thin, simply remove
some of the oldest branches
by pruning them down to
the ground. Remove about
a quarter to a third of the
branches, selecting the oldest
ones for elimination. When
thinning, take care not to
',, damage the nearby younger
stems and foliage.
Next, cut back branches
that are excessively long.
Prune back to alateral branch
that is six to twelve inches
below the desirable plant
height, removing no more
than a third of the stem.
Cut each branch sepa-
ratelyto different lengths with
hand pruners. This will maintain a
neat informal shrub with a natural
shape. Plants sheared into various
geometric shapes produce a formal-
ity not suitable for many modem,
natural landscapes. Making pruning
cuts down inside the canopy instead
of on the outside edge will also hide
unsightly pruning cuts.
Within the last several years,
reflowering hydrangeas have found
their way into the marketplace. Re-
flowering hydrangeas produce an
initial flush of flowers followed by
sporadic flowering or later flushes of
flowers in the same growing season.
Endless Summer� Hydrangea is a
reflowering hydrangea.
It is very forgiving and will not
suffer if left unpruned or pruned atthe
wrong time. In fact, young, recently
planted shrubs are best left alone.
Unlike other hydrangeas, your
Endless Summer� will bloom on
both old and new wood, branches that
grew last year and the new branches
from this year.
Another unique feature is that this
hydrangea will continue to set buds
and bloom throughout the season.
Deadheading, or removing the spent
flowers will encourage continual
blooming.


j Liberty

Post and

Barn Pole Inc.

DEMPSEY BARRON ROAD,
BRISTOL (OFF HWY. 12 N)
Phone (850) 643-5995


TOP
GRADE
7' Posts
Top Size
3-4"
4-5"
5-6"


TOP
GRADE
8' Posts
Top Size
2-3", 3-4"
4-5"
5-6"
6-7"
7-8"
8"+


TOP
GRADE
6'6" Posts
Top Size
2-2.5"
2-5.3"
3-3.5"
3.5-4"
4-5"
5"+


FACTORY
SECONDS
8' Corners
under 3"
3-4"
4-5"
5-6"
6-7"
7-8"
8"+


SPECIALTY I
POSTS
1/4 rounds Items FACTORY SECONDS
1/2 rounds subjectto 6'6" Posts, Top Size, under'
[Flat Face availability 2-3" 3-4" 4-5" 5"
S Wel've got tlie fence posts to meetyour needs, v


0


Mature drivers, it's our

policy to save you money.


i hen you insure your car with us, through Auto-Owners
Insurance Company, we'll save you money! Statistics show that

mature drivers experience fewer, less.costly accidents, allowing us to pass the

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at "No Problem"prices!


tAuto-Owners fshance
Lie Home Car Business


STOUTAMIRE INSURANCE INC.
16783 SE Pear St., Blountstown
Contact Bill Stoutamire
Phone 674-5974 * Fax 674-8307


EM


or


4


Offttice also available in Marianna.

within 72 hours or responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examnaton or treatment




ON THE RIv-
Best of the Latest Country Charted songs,
mixed in with your favorite oldies.
K102.7 FM Hometown News, weather and
river readings at 8 a.m. ET. Our daily newscast
also air at 1 p.m. and again at 5 p.m. ET.
Swap Shop with Ruth from 9-10 a.m. ET (sometimes
even longer!) Buy, Sell, Trade or Give Stuff Away.
SK102.7 is the voice of the Liberty
County Bulldogs, the Blountstown
High Tigers, Florida Gators and
Il E the Miami Dolphins
i S K-102.7 FM Y-1000AM
WPHK Radio WYBT Radio




JULY 6, 2011 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 15


2\HERMAN EUGENE
FILLINGIM
TALLAHASSEE - Herman Eu-
gene Fillingim, 84, of Tallahassee
passed away June 29, 2011 at Big
Bend Hospice House surrounded by his
loving family. He was born July 7, 1926 in Campbellton
and had lived in Tallahassee since 1962. He served in the
U.S. Navy in the Seabees during World War II serving
in the Pacific Theater. He was in the first co-ed class at
Florida State University. Dur-
ing his career he was a financial
auditor with offices throughout
Florida and in his retirement he
worked as a sales contractor for
building supplies.
He was preceded in death
by his parents, Joe and Millie
Fillingim; brothers Joe Otis and
Louie Fillingim and a grandson,
Jason Fagan.
Survivors include his wife of 61 years, Betty of Tal-
lahassee; four children, Ronnie and his wife, Rochelle,
Rickie and his wife, Kimberly, Linda Fagan and her
husband, Mike and Rusty and his wife, Mary, all of
Tallahassee; two sisters, Mildred Thompson and Agnes
LaLoge; eight grandchildren, Brandi Rich and her hus-
band, David Sanford of NC, Kristopher Fagan and his
wife, Elise, Robby Fagan of Brisbane, Australia, Jeremy
Fagan and his wife, Jennifer, Joey Fillingim, Jeffrey
Fillingim and his wife, Amanda and Jessica and Hunter
Fillingim, all of Tallahassee; three great-grandchildren,
Hannah Fagan of Tallahassee and Abigail and Jacob Rich
of Sanford, NC.
Services were held graveside on Saturday, July 2 at
MeadowWood Memorial Park in Tallahassee. In lieu of
flowers memorial contributions may be made to Big Bend
Hospice 2317 Mahan Center Boulevard, Tallahassee, FL
32308 or Immanuel Baptist Church Building Fund 2351
Mahan Drive, Tallahassee, FL 32308.
Bevis Funeral Home in Tallahassee was in charge of
the arrangements.

DORIS E. FOWLER
ALFORD - Doris E. Fowler, 95, of Alford passed
away Tuesday, June 28,2011 inMarianna. Born on March
6, 1916 in Essex, England, she had lived in Alford since
1978, coming from Illinois. She was a homemaker and a
member of the Church of England.
Survivors include two sons, Arthur Fowler of Alford
and Peter Fowler and his wife, Micaela of WS; two
daughters, Elisabeth Yoder and her husband, James of
Alford and Cathleen Palcynsky and her husband, Walter
of WS; 10 grandchildren, 22 great-grandchildren and 2
great-great-grandchildren.
No services are planned. Memorialization will be by
cremation. The family requests that any one wishing
may make contributions to the Partners for Pets charity
in Marianna.
Peavy Funeral Home in Blountstown is in charge of
the arrangements.


Peavy Funeral Home

& Crematory










Your hometown funeral home since 1994

Funeral Services with Dignity,
Caring and Professionalism.

Marion Peavy
A Hometown Funeral Director
You Can Trust and Depend On!
Telephone (850) 674-2266


MARY ETTA ROLLINS
BLOUNTSTOWN - Mary Etta Rollins, 98, of Blount-
stown passed away Thursday, June 30, 2011 at her home.
She was born in Wewahitchka on August 27, 1912 to the
Late Ebenezer and Queenie Elizabeth (Nichols) Weeks. She
v was retired from the Florida
Forestry Service and she was
the first female tower look-
out in Bay County. She was
a member of the Magnolia
Baptist Church and also a
member of The Florida Tribe
of Eastern Creek Indians.
SShe was preceded in death
S . by husbands, Charlie "Jake"
SPitts and Earl "Gordon" Rol-
lins; daughters, Agnes P. Roberts and Nancy P. Lee; five
grandchildren, and one great-grandchild.
She is survived by two sons, Rufus E. Pitts and Gene
Rollins, Jr. and his wife, Tonya, all of Blountstown; two
stepsons, James E. Rollins and George Wayne Rollins, all
of Blountstown; five daughters, Lovie P. Hall of Tallahas-
see, Elizabeth P. Roberts and her husband, Clyde of Bristol,
June P. Clemons of Clarksville, Norma R. King and her
husband, Keith Gregg of Blountstown andRenee R. Munoz
of Tampa; two stepdaughters, Patsy R. King and Angie R.
Champion, all ofBlountstown; 33 grandchildren; 70 great-
grandchildren; and 60 great-great grandchildren.
Services will be at 10 a.m. on Friday, July 8 in the Ad-
ams Funeral Home Chapel. Interment will follow in the
Cypress Creek Cemetery. The family will receive friends
from 6-8 p.m. on Thursday, July 7 at Adams Funeral
Home. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be
made to Covenant Hospice, 4440 Lafayette Street Suite C,
Marianna FI 32446.
Adams Funeral Home in Blountstown is in charge of
the arrangements. Online condolences may be made at
adamsfh.com.
EVA MAE FOSTER WILLIAMS
PANAMA CITY - Eva Mae Foster Williams, 75, of
Panama City passed away Monday, June 27, 2011. She was
bom in Bristol on February 28, 1936 to the late Alonzo and
Estelle (Foster) Black. She moved to Panama City in 1961
and was a member of the Body of Christ.
She was preceded in death by two brothers, Lynn and
Ronnie Black; two sisters, Ella Howard and Odessa Stevens;
and an uncle, David Faison.
Survivors include her children, Mack C. Roulhac and
his wife, Sandra, Roges Black and his wife, Elouise, Elijah
Black and his wife, Lisa, Leonard Black and his wife, Lettiert,
Melinda White and her husband, Willie, Marva Anderson,
SandraAnn Williams, SondraAnnette Williams, and Donna
GailWilliams; nine brothers, James Edward Black, Ozzie Eg-
gelton, Alonzo Black and his wife, Loretta, Charles, Lonnie,
Daniel, Larry, Lee Allen, and Darren Black; five sisters, Mary
Alice McClendon and her husband, James, Laverne Black,
Debra McClain, Darlene and Bonnie Black; a sister-in-law,
Jewel Black; three aunts, Martha Hall, Bessie Barnes and her
husband, Rufus, and Hazel Faison; 20 grandchildren and 29
great-grandchildren; and numerous close friends, Anna and
Herbert Brantley, Thelma Faison, Ella Mae Home, Lottie Mae
Hughley, Nettie Larkin, and Janet Anderson and family; and
god children, Angela H. Armagon and her husband, John,
Kelvin T. Faison, LaTasha King, and LaToya Wells.
Services were held Saturday, July 2 at Adams Funeral
Chapel in Blountstown. Interment followed in Watson
Cemetery in Bristol.
Adams Funeral Home in Blountstown was in charge
of the arrangements. Online condolences may be made at
adamsfh.com.



Charles McClellan

Funeral Home
Charles K. McClellan
Licensed Funeral Director
42 years experience
Call us - Let us explain how we can
conveniently handle arrangements
in Liberty County.
Butler-Morgan/Morgan-McClellan Funeral Home
Building at 15 S. Jackson St., Quincy, 32351
Phone: (850) 627-7677 or 643-2277
�7 Ir-I


F JACKY LEE COLLINS
WEWAHITCHKA - Jacky Lee Collins, 70, of We-
wahitchka passed away Wednesday, June 29, 2011 in
Panama City. He was born on July 5, 1940 in Graceville
and had lived in Wewahitchka most of his life. He was a
retired mechanic and heavy equipment operator with the
Gulf County Road Department for 21 years. He was a
member of the Holiness faith.
Survivors include his wife, Ann (Armstrong) Collins;
three sons, Ricky Collins and his wife, Carolyn, Johnny
Collins and his wife, Cathy and Mark Collins and his wife,
Jeannie; two stepsons, Carlee Daniels Jr. and Shannon
Keith Daniels all of Wewahitchka; one daughter, Cathy
Long of Blountstown; two stepdaughters, Kim Price of
Altha and Robin McDonald and her husband, Perry of
Wewahitchka; four brothers, Jake Hysmith and his wife,
Ruth Ann of Wewahitchka, Leon Collins and his wife,
Vicky ofNashville, TN, Troy Collins and his wife, Rachael
of Crawfordville and Leroy Collins of Tallahassee; seven
sisters, Martha O'Bryan and her husband, Charles of Tal-
lahassee, Sadie Braswell andherhusband, Leon of Seattle,
WA, Kathy Anderson and her husband, Don of Quincy,
Jesse Norton and her husband, Dave of Tallahassee, Anne
Roper and her husband, Louis James Roper, of Bonifay,
Rose Carter and her husband, Jim of Tennessee and Ruby
Nell Meredith and her husband, Shep of Wewahitchka;
16 grandchildren and 14 great-grandchildren.
Services were held Saturday, July 2 at the Sound of
Freedom Pentecostal Holiness Church with Reverend
Carlton Cain and Reverend Mike Sewell officiating. Inter-
ment followed in the Jehu Cemetery in Wewahitchka.
Peavy Funeral Home in Blountstown was in charge of
the arrangements.

GERALDINE MARTIN
ALTHA- Geraldine Martin, 85, ofAlthapassed away
Sunday, July 3, 2011 at her home inAltha. She was born on
October 28, 1925 in Masonville, NY and had lived inAltha
for most of her life. She taught high school math at Altha
High School from 1947 until her retirement in 1982. After
retirement she worked as a substitute school teacher for 12
years. In 1942, she graduated from Sidney High School
in Sidney, NY. She was a 1946 graduate of the University
of Alabama in Tuscaloosa, receiving a bachelor's degree
in education. Her major was in mathematics; her minor
was in commercial subjects. She was a member of Altha
First Baptist Church, serving as president of WMU for
10 years, and served as church clerk and Sunday school
teacher as well as sang in the church choir. She was a
member and officer with the Retired Educators Associa-
tion and a past member of the Board of Directors for the
Calhoun County Senior Citizens Association.
Survivors include, herhusband, Clarence Martin ofAltha;
two sons, Steve Martin and his wife, Brenda of Lynn Haven
and Wayne Martin of Blountstown; stepdaughter, Juddie
Barrett and her husband, Jim of Durham, NH; three grand-
children, Colby Martin, Kaylei Cain and her husband, Sean
and Kendall Martin; one great-grandchild, Aiden Cain.
Services will be held on Wednesday, July 6 at 11 a.m.
(CT) at the Altha First Baptist Church with Reverend Jim
McIntosh officiating. Interment will follow in the Chipola
Cemetery in Altha.
Peavy Funeral Home in Blountstown is in charge of
the arrangements.

JAMES ANDREW CRUTCHFIELD
ALTHA - James Andrew Crutchfield, 61, of Altha
passed away Sunday, July 3,2011 in Marianna. He was born
on October 24, 1949, and had lived in Altha for the past 39
years. He was a truck driver and had worked on offshore
oil platforms for several years. He was also a welder.
He was preceded in death by a son, Gregory Crutchfield,
as well as three brothers, Jack Crutchfield, Eugene Crutch-
field and Robert Earl Crutchfield. James was a member
of Kingdom Hall of Jehovah's Witnesses in Blountstown.
Survivors include his wife, Peggy Crutchfield of Al-
tha; one son, Christopher Crutchfield, Sr. of Milton; one
daughter, Susanne Bramblett and her husband, Rodney of
Altha; three sisters, Betty Peters ofWewahitchka, Dorothy
Simonton and her husband, Bobby ofNewnan, GA, Mary
Frances Plaisted ofPanama City; four grandchildren, Cara
Perry, Tyler Bramblett, Heidi Crutchfield and Christopher
Crutchfield, Jr.
Memorial services were held Tuesday, July 5 at Peavy
Funeral Home Chapel with Frank Belzer officiating. Me-
morialization will be by cremation.
Peavy Funeral Home in Blountstown was in charge of
the arrangements.




Page 16 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JULY 6, 2011


ITEMS FOR SALE
Nikon D3000 camera with lens, 6
months old, upgrading. $475. Call
674-7138 or 899-0269. 7-6, 7-13

Commercial candy machine
with three compartments. Clean,
in good condition, takes quarters,
$65. Exercise bike, in good con-
dition, does upper body too, $35.
Call 674-8385. 7-6, 7-13

King Kooker outdoor fryer, 25
qt., with lid, uses less oil, large
chrome plated strainer basket has
heat resistant handles, sits on stur-
dy heavy gauge steel stand, with
deep-fry thermometer and timer,
never used still in box; profes-
sional looking double burner hot
plate, 6" and 7" heavy duty cast
iron heating surface with double
thermostat, still in box. Call 447-
0685. 7-6,7-13

Boy's clothes sizes 4-8 $1 each.
Call 674-3264. 6-29, 7-6

Bestway portable building, 1
year old, like new, $2,950 firm.
Call 674-6002 after 5 p.m. 6-29, 7-6

Baby girl clothes sizes 6-9
months. Ball pit with balls, paid
$50, asking $10. Call 674-3264.
6-29, 7-6

Pedestalsinks, $40. Kitchensinks,
$30. Call 447-1141. 6-29,7-6

Chain-link fence gate, reduced
price $50. Call 762-8183. 6-29,7-6

Girl's clothes from newborn-2T,
make offer. Call 447-1968. 6-29, 7-6



FREE
Outside building with walls and
a tin roof. Needs tearing down or
moved. Located in Hosford. Call
408-3146 for more information.
6-29, 7-6


ELECTRONICS

Dell Studio 540 desktop com-
puter, 19 LCD monitor, keyboard,
mouse, mouse pad and speakers.
Comes with Windows Vista, 450
GB hard drive, 4 slots for memory
cards, can be upgraded to Win-
dows 7, $275. Call 762-2528.
6-29, 7-6
Dell computer desktop, $150.
Call 576-5641. 6-29,7-6


APPLIANCES

GE refrigerator, 18 cubic feet,
with icemaker, works great, $85;
Frigidaire chest freezer, 15 cubic
feet, 48Wx28Dx35H, needs some
work on the inside of the door but
works fine, $45. Call 674-8385.
7-6, 7-13

Amana 3-ton heat pump, $500.
Whirlpool 40G electric water heat-
er, $100. Call 447-1141. 6-29,7-6


FURNITURE


Dresser and chest of drawers,
walnut, best offer. Two china cabi-
nets, tall and thin, $125. Call 674-
3264. 7-6,7-13

Glass table top, very heavy glass,
52" square style, $25. Call 674-
8385. 7-6,7-13

Queen size bed, dining table.
Make offer. Call 674-3264. 6-29, 7-6

Dora toddler bed, $40. Call
447-1141. 6-29, 7-6
Furniture: King mattress and box
spring, twin mattress and box
spring, Fleet stove, microwave,
dishwasher, couch and chair set,
collectible plates. Can be seen at
the Calhoun Liberty Ministry Cen-
ter, Hwy 20 in Blountstown or call
674-1818. UFN


CARS

2000 Oldsmobile Silhouette.
Call 643-2808 for information.
7-6, 7-13


TRUCKS

1995 Dodge Dakota, needs mo-
tor, best offer. Call 674-3264.
7-6,7-13

2000 Ford F150, 4x4, 127,600
miles, runs great, new radio and
tires, A/C, heat, etc., $5,300 OBO.
Call 694-8477. 7-6,7-13

1998 Ford Explorer XLT 5.0, 4x4,
leather seats, all power, 166,000
miles, $3,000 OBO. In good con-
dition. Call 718-7502. 7-6,
7-13

1986 Ford F150, for parts, 4x4,
good motor, transmission, transfer
case and axel. $450. Serious in-
quiries only Call 447-3275.
6-29, 7-6

1986 Ford Bronco, 4x4, auto-
matic, A/C, 6,000 lb. winch, new
tires, great shape, $2,000, located
in Hosford, Serious inquiries only
Call 524-5788 or 447-3275.
6-29, 7-6


AUTO
ACCESSORIES

Four 16 inch aluminum rims,
fits Jeep, Dodge or Ford, multi-lug
pattern, $250. Call 674-7138 or
899-0269. 7-6,7-13

Dually adapter, eight lug, 6 1/2
B.C., 3 3/4 deep with four 16" du-
ally wheels, and three fair tires.
Call 643-2740. 7-6,7-13

Buy, sell & trade in the
Calhoun Liberty
Journal classified


MOTORCYCLES

& ATVS


YamahaZumal25cc, almost new,
only 1,200 miles, gets 89 mpg.
Has windshield, luggage rack, ga-
rage kept, very clean, $2,399. Call
643-4478. 6-29, 7-6

TOOLS and
EQUIPMENT

Yanmar Deck-side tractor, 4x4,
5 ft. finishing mower. Call 643-
1514. 6-29,7-6


BOATS & GUNS

Mossberg 20 gauge, model 500
pump, vent rib barrel. 28 inch with
accu-choke, shoots 2 1/2 and 3
inch shells. Checked stock & fore-
arm, in great condition, fired very
little, $265. 380 cal. AMT stain-
less steel pistol, backup model
with 2 clips, 5 inch overall length.
In good condition, $345. Call 443-
2422 in Bristol. 6-29, 7-6

Fiberglass fishing boat 13 1/2 ft.,
V-hull with 9.5 hp Evinrude motor
and nice trailer, $795. Aluminum
V-hull 11 ft. fishing boat, no motor
or trailer, $125. Call 443-2422 in
Bristol. 6-29, 7-6
G3 Aluminum 14 ft. boat with 25
hp Mercury motor, $1,200. Call
567-5641. 6-29,7-6


PETS/SUPPLIES
Red heeler, male, six months old,
good with kids, free to good home.
Call 643-3662. 7-6,7-13

Six kittens, two mama cats. Lab
mix puppy, nine weeks old. All free
to a good home. Call 447-4322.
7-6, 7-13

American Pit mixed, free to good
home. One Applehead Toy Chi-
huahua, $100. Call 643-2526. 7-6,
7-13

Kittens, 12 weeks old, free to a
good home. Call 674-1012.6-29,7-6

Three kittens, wormed, litter box
trained, free to a good home. Call
643-7660. 6-29, 7-6

Toy Poodle, female, $75. Call
674-1752. 6-29,7-6

Chihuahua, free to a good home.
Call 643-2554. 6-29, 7-6

Springer Spaniel, male, choco-
late and white, 4 months old, has
had 1st shots and wormed, $100
or will trade for a miniature puppy
Call 567-3418. 6-29,7-6

Five kittens with whole tails,
half tails and bob tails, calico, or-
ange and black. All free to good
homes. Call 819-9300 or 814-
1186. 6-22,7-1


THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL




C(L..ASSIFHEDS

To place your ad, call 643-3333 by noon Eastern
Time on Saturday. Non-business ads run FREE for 2 weeks.
A


[FO R




JULY 6, 2011 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 17


SUIDOKUA
5 8 94



9 42
2 43 9

8 6 2
7
8__

9456

3 1 5
Level: Intermediate


ARIES - Mar 21/Apr 20
Aries, develop a strategy to
save money because you're
going to need it. Now may be
the time to think about
clipping coupons or
researching discounts.
TAURUS - Apr 21/May 21
Taurus, if at first you don't
succeed, you may want to
attempt a different approach.
Don't beat yourself up over
things you can't change.
GEMINI - May 22/Jun 21
Smile, Gemini, because
happy news is coming your
way this week. Think about
sharing the good fortune with
someone you love, either a
spouse or a good friend.
CANCER - Jun 22/Jul 22
Cancer, what many people
admire about you is your ability
to be such a good friend. This
week you will display your ca-
pacity for humility and compas-
sion to a greater level.
LEO - Jul 23/Aug 23
Leo, partnerships are accentu-
ated this week and you will
find that you can do just about
anything you set your mind to.
Share your ideas with others.
VIRGO - Aug 24/Sept 22
Virgo, you could be very popular
with superiors at work this week.
Use this to your advantage to
ask for a raise or to get on a
lucrative project. Your dealings
with money will be positive.


Fun By The
Numbers
Like puzzles?
Then you'll love
sudoku. This
mind-bending
puzzle will have
you hooked from
the moment you
square off, so
sharpen your
pencil and put
your sudoku
savvy to the test!


LIBRA - Sept 23/Oct 23
A smooth, professional manner
helps you attain good results at
work this week, Libra. Others
are impressed at how you can
handle yourself under pressure.
SCORPIO - Oct 24/Nov 22
Clear some space so that
you can work more easily,
Scorpio. Clutter can make
even the most simple task
seem ever more complicated.
A productive week lies ahead.
SAGITTARIUS - Nov 23/Dec 21
Sagittarius, you will find
yourself being a sought-after
asset among friends this week.
Use these social situations to
further your position in
work-related matters.
CAPRICORN - Dec 22/Jan 20
Capricorn, many tasks
lie ahead this week, and it
will be the utmost importance
to stay focused. You have
become serious about
changing personal health.
AQUARIUS - Jan 21/Feb 18
A clear-minded insight to plans
you put in place comes to you
this week, Aquarius. It will be the
inspiration you need to get mov-
ing, considering you've been
stationary for too long.
PISCES - Feb 19/Mar 20
Express yourself with great
confidence this week,
Pisces. You feel in control
and organized, which are
two good things.


FAMOUS BIRTHDAYS


JULY 17
Mark Burnett, TV Producer (51)
JULY 18
Vin Diesel, Actor (44)
JULY 19
Brian May, 'Queen' Guitarist (64)


JULY 20
Chris Cornell, Singer (47)
JULY21
Josh Hartnett, Actor (33)
JULY 22
Willem Dafoe, Actor (56)


JULY 23
Daniel Radcliffe, Actor (22)


HOMES & LAND

3.94 Acres in Clarksville, sep-
tic, deep well, fenced, cleared,
$26,500. Call 509-8636. 7-6,7-13

Doublewide, 66x24, good condi-
tion, 3BD/2BA, garden tub, two
sided fireplace, central A/C, like
new, must be moved from Scotts
Ferry area, $25,000. Call 516-
5506. 7-6, 7-13

2006 Franklin modular dou-
blewide, 3BD/2BA, tape and
textured, must be moved,
$25,000. Call Kim at 643-3004 or
566-0103. 7-6, 7-13

Fiberglass bathtub, new, deep,
32"Wx60"L, cost $200 from
Lowe's, selling for $125 because
of minor damage to factory rein-
forcement in base; Bathroom lava-
tory cabinet, white enameled sink,
includes fixtures, 28Wx22D, $25;
Mauve carpet remnants, used but
in areat shane verv thick all dif-


ferent sizes. Call 674-8385.


Lot in Telogia, owner fine
possible. Call 294-9948.



For Rent in

HOSFORI

Nice, like new 2 BD, 2
House with large cov
ered front porch. Qui
neighborhood. Furnish
kitchen w/appliances

Call Ashley for m(
info at 694-413


Will buy 10 to -,
I 1,000 acres,
reasonably priced.
^ Immediate closing.
Call (850) 544-5441
, or (850) 570-0222


LOST/FOUND

LOST: Back pillow for wheel-
chair. Very important pillow, lost
Sunday, June 19 on the way to
church. Somewhere on Hwy 67,
on 379, on 12 or on 20. $100 re-
ward offered. Please call if you
have found it, 643-2945. 7-6, 7-13

LOST: White teacup chihuahua,
female, off Turkey Creek Rd.
Please return. Little girl misses her
dog. Call 447-5067. 7-6,7-13

LOST: Mini dachshund, male,
black and tan, five months old, in
the Frink area near Hwy 275. Call
643-8383. 7-6,7-13

LOST: Male peacock, around Lake
Mystic Area. Call 643-2020.
7-6,7-13

FOUND: Car key in a hide-a-key
box on Chester Street in Hosford.
Call 570-1574. 6-29,7-6


LOST: Dark gray male cat,
large with short hair. Weighs 15
lbs., blind in one eye, blind eye is
cloudy. He is named Jasper. Last
dancing seen on Hwy 69 N but could be
anywhere in Blountstown. Call
7-6, 7-13 643-8784 with any information.
6-29, 7-6



D WANTED

BA No-see-ums screen for a porch,
I. any quantity. Call 762-2528.
et 7-6,7-13
hed Homeschooling books for 1st
*. grade. Call 674-3264. 6-29, 7-6

ore Scrap lumber, free, will pick up.
1 Call 674-6002 after 5 p.m. 6-29,7-6
Baby bed and swing in good con-
dition, reasonably priced. Call
643-4402 ask for Alisa. 6-29, 7-6

--... We buy junk cars and trucks.
f-r We will pick them up. Call 643-
_ 5045 or 447-3819. 3-23T 12-28


Here's How It Works:
Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken down into nine
3x3 boxes. To solve a sudoku, the numbers 1 through 9 must fill each
row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row,
column and box. You can figure out the order in which the numbers will
appear by using the numeric clues already provided in the boxes. The
more numbers you name, the easier it gets to solve the puzzle!
L 6 Z 9 9 L 9 V
6 9 9 V 6 L .88
V 9 lI 9 C 3 6 9 L Z
9 L 8 1. VS 6 9
S81V L 9 6 9 9 L
691 9 .9 8 9 L V 6

8 8 6 L 9 L9 t
LV6 L 9 8 9
:HIMSNV


THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL




C(L..ASSIFIED S

To place your ad, call 643-3333 by noon Eastern
Time on Saturday. Non-business ads run FREE for 2 weeks.


CAMPERS

1996 Coachman Lite, 23 ft.
camper, sleeps six, roomy bath-
room, refrigerator, microwave,
stereo, gas stove. Does not need
fifth wheel hook-up. Great shape.
$3500, negotiable. Call 379-8611
or 841-0676 to view. 7-6, 7-13


Hughes autoformer RV power
booster, for campgrounds that
may have low or varying voltage,
works fine. Bought new for $350,
asking $85, original paperwork in-
cluded. Call 674-8385. 7-6,7-13

1996 Bayport, 32 ft. long, new
inside and out, new tires, 36,000
miles. Chevrolet 454 motor, class
A, must sell. Call 762-8589 or 899-
8589. 7-6,7-13


YARD SALES


4 ALTHA 4
Garage sale, Saturday, July 9, be-
ginning at 7 a.m., located at 16302
NW Willard Smith Rd., three miles
north of Hwy 20, plumbing, electri-
cal, camping supplies, some tools.
Call 272-3865.

l-l HOSFORD l-l
Huge multi-family yard sale,
Saturday, July 9, rain or shine
(covered area) 7 a.m. - 1 p.m., lo-
cated at 20892 NE Burlington Rd.,
men's, women's, and children's
clothing, toys, household items,
furniture including two couches,
tables, and much more. Every-
thing priced to go! Pre-view and
pre-sales welcome. Call 379-8611
or 841-0676.

Miss a recent Pets &
Their People column?
Catch up online at
CU News.com.


FOR RENT
South OF Altha
3 BD, 2 BA House
on Blackbottom Rd.

$800 MONTH



674-7138 or 899-0269


SSTHlRSCOPE
Week of July 17- July 23


Golden Retriever

PUPPIES
AKC/CKC
Registered
Males &
Females
Current
Shots &
Health Certificate
Call 447-2701
please leave message


BECOME A VOLUNTEER -.

FLORIDA GUARDIAN

AD LITEM FOUNDATION

PHONE (850) 410-4642




Page 18 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JULY 6, 2011


Threatened shorebird finds safe haven atop FWC building


State and federally protected roseate
terns nest in only two places in the Florida
Keys: the Dry Tortugas and the tar-and-
gravel roof of the Florida Department of
Management Services' Monroe County
Regional Service Center. It just so happens
that the two-story building on Overseas
Highway in the Florida Keys hosts an office
of the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conserva-
tion Commission (FWC), the state agency
charged with managing and protecting
Florida's fish and wildlife resources, includ-
ing this particular shorebird species.


"It is appropriate that of
all the tall buildings in the
Keys, the roseate tern has
established a major colony
on top of the government
building in Marathon, home
to the FWC's fish and
wildlife research and law
enforcement staff," said
Ricardo Zambrano, FWC
regional biologist with the
Division of Habitat and Spe-
cies Conservation. "As far as we know, this


is the only rooftop breeding
colony in the world."
Zambrano estimatesthere
are 67 nests on top of the
building. During breeding
season, FWC biologists
closely monitor this colony,
managing the population.
The work includes banding
fluffy, speckled chicks to
find out where they are win-
tering and to get an estimate
of survival. In addition, FWC protects the


rooftop inhabitants by limiting human
access to reduce disturbances and sealing
large drains so the small chicks cannot
fall through.
Because of loss of habitat, increased
predation and competition from other
birds, the Florida population of roseate
terns dropped to about 300 pairs. The FWC
and its partners are working diligently to
stabilize the population.
Formore information onthe roseate tern
and Florida's shorebirds, visit MyFWC.
com/Conservation.


FWC offers hunter safety

course in Leon County
The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Com-
mission (FWC) is offering a free hunter safety course in
Leon County.
The course will be conducted in the second-floor
conference room of the Farris Bryant Building, 620 S.
Meridian St., Tallahassee. Instruction is from 6 to 9 p.m.
July 12, 14, 19 and 21. The range portion of the class is
July 23. Attendance is required on all class dates and for
the range portion.
An adult must accompany children under the age of
16 at all times. Students should bring a pencil and paper
with them to take notes.
People born on or after June 1, 1975, must successfully
complete an approved hunter safety course before they
can purchase a Florida hunting license. The FWC course
satisfies hunter safety training requirements for all other
states and Canadian provinces.
Those interested in attending this course can register
online and obtain information about future hunter safety
classes at MyFWC.com/HunterSafety or by calling the
FWC's regional office in Panama City at 850-265-
3676.


Notice of
FICTITIOUS NAME
REGISTRATION

We hereby give notice to register
in compliance with Section 865.09,
Florida Statutes.
BUSINESS NAME &ADDRESS
Ambrose House
12167 NW Freeman Road
Bristol, Florida 32321
OWNER NAME &ADDRESS
Ruby Lee Varnum
12167 NW Freeman Road
Bristol, Florida 32321 76



IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
CALHOUN COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO: 2010-CA-000275


DIVISION:
UCN: 052010CA047946XXCICI
WALTER MORTGAGE COM-
PANY, LLC AND MID-STATE
TRUST VIII, A TRUST
Plaintiff,
vs.
WILLIE F BASS, ELOISE BASS,
JOHN DOE
Defendant(s),
/

NOTICE OF
RESCHEDULE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
THAT, PURSUANT TO THE
JUDGEMENT OF FORECLO-
SURE ENTERED INTHEABOVE
CAUSE, I WILLSELLTHE PROP-
ERTY SITUATED IN CALHOUN


COUNTY, FLORIDA, DESCRIBED
AS:
NE CORNER OF THE S 1/2 OF
THE NW 1/4 OF THE NW 1/4 OF
SECTION 32, TOWNSHIP 1S
RANGE 8W, CALHOUN COUNTY
FLORIDA, AND RUN WEST 210
FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 60
FEET; THENCE RUN EAST 210
FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH
60 FEET TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING.
AT PUBLIC SALE, TO THE HIGH-
EST AND BEST BIDDER, FOR
CASH, ON JULY 21, 2011, AT
11:00 A.M. AT CALHOUN COUN-
TY COURTHOUSE, 425 EAST
CENTRAL AVENUE, BLOUNT-
STOWN, FLORIDA.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN
INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS
FROMTHESALE, IFANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER
AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS


PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE
SALE.
IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE
AMERICAN WITH DISABILITIES
ACT, PERSONS WITH DIS-
ABILITIES NEEDING SPECIAL
ACCOMMODATION TO PAR-
TICIPATE IN THIS PROCEED-
ING SHOULD CONTACT THE
A.D.A. ADMINISTRATOR FOR
THE CLERK OF COURT NOT
LATER THAN 7 DAYS PRIOR
TO THE PROCEEDING, AT THE
CALHOUN COUNTY CLERK OF
COURT OFFICE. *IF HEARING
IMPAIRED, (TDD) 1-800-955-
8771, VOICE 1-800-955-8770.
THIS IS NOT A COURT INFOR-
MAITON LINE.
DATED: JUNE 24, 2011
CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT
RUTH W. ATTAWAY
CALHOUN COUNTY 7-6,7-13


Do you want to
make a difference?
BigBend
Hospice Are you a caring
compassionate nurse?

Big Bend Hospice is looking for you!

RN - Gadsden/Liberty Counties
On Call weeknights and weekends

Must have a current Florida RN license BSN preferred
and a minimum of 2 years nursing experience. Previous
hospice or home health experience preferred.
Email resumes to: hr@bigbendhospice.org
6-15T 7-13

Let workers know what jobs you have that need to
be filled with an ad in The Journal Job Market.


CHARTWELLS
School Dining Services

JOB OPPORTUNITY

Chartwells School Dining Services is accept-
ing applications for the following positions:

FOOD SERVICE WORKERS/COOK
Terms of Employment: 10 Months
Position Requirements:
Good work ethic, math and computer skills
Applications are available at the Liberty Coun-
ty School Board Office
Interviews will be held the
week of August 1st.

Questions concerning these positions may be
directed to Vernon Tanner at (850) 766-8815.
Equal Opportunity Employer


90 positions - Temporary/seasonal work plant-
ing, cultivating and harvesting broccoli and po-
tatoes. From 7/8/2011 to 10/26/2011 at Smith's
Farm Inc., Presque Isle, ME. Three months of
previous experience required in the job described.
Saturday work required. Must be able to lift/carry
60 Ibs. $10.25/hr or current applicable AEWR.
Workers are guaranteed 3/4 of work hours of total
period. Work tools, supplies, equipment supplied
by employer without charge to worker. Housing
with kitchen facilities provided at no cost to only


those workers who are not reasonably able to re-
turn same day to their place of residence at time
of recruitment. Transportation and subsistence
expenses to work site will be paid to nonresident
workers not later than upon completion of 50%
of the job contract. Interviews required. Apply
for this job at nearest State Workforce Agency
in state in which this ad appears, or Maine De-
partment of Labor, 45 Commerce Drive, Augusta,
ME 04333. Provide copy of this ad. Job Order
#45794.


Rex Lumber - Bristol is currently seeking
employment for the following positions:


Requirements
/ Must be bilingual (Spanish/English)
/ Must be able to read, write and verbally translate
both English to Spanish and Spanish to English
/ Computer Literate (including MS Word, MS Excel)
/ Typing, Data Entry
/ Good Communication Skills
/ Good Organizational Skills
/ Ability to work well with others
Responsibilities include but are not limited to an-
swering a multi-line telephone, delivering messages
promptly, greeting visitors in a respectful and pleas-
ant manner, multiple reports, assisting HR Manger
and Safety Manager and other duties that are not
listed.


Benefits Include
Health Insurance,
Holiday Pay


Life Insurance, 401 K, Vacation/


Please ONLY qualified applicants.
No Phone calls please apply in person.


28 positions - Temporary/seasonal work
planting, cultivating, and harvesting vegeta-
bles on a farm. From 6/26/2011 to 10/31/2011
at Brenckle Farms, Inc., Hartville, OH. Three
months of previous experience required in the
job described. Saturday work required. Must
be able to lift/carry 60 Ibs. Employer-paid
post-hire random, upon suspicion and post-
accident drug testing required. $10.84/hr or
current applicable AEWR and piece rates are
offered depending on crop activity. Workers
are guaranteed 3/4 of work hours of total pe-
riod. Work tools, supplies, equipment supplied
by employer without charge to worker. Hous-
ing with kitchen facilities provided at no cost
to only those workers who are not reasonably
able to return same day to their place of resi-
dence at time of recruitment. Transportation
and subsistence expenses to work site will
be paid to nonresident workers not later than
upon completion of 50% of the job contract.
Interviews required. Apply for this job at near-
est State Workforce Agency in state in which
this ad appears, or OH Dept of Job and Family
Services, Foreign Labor, 4020 East Fifth Ave.,
Columbus, OH 43219. Provide copy of this
ad. Job Order #OH526022.


L GAL OTICFS ]


T E JO NAL JOB MAR ET ]




JULY 6, 2011 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 19


Florida Park Service and National Forests in Florida win national award


TALLAHASSEE- The Florida Park Service along with
the U.S. Forest Service National Forests in Florida have
been selected as the 2011 Take Pride in America National
Award winners. A reception and ceremony will be held in
Washington, D.C., at the White House, recognizing the award
winning recipients and their achievements July 18.
Apanel ofjudges reviewed volunteerprograms from around
the country and selected entries based on their outstanding
commitment, hard work and dedication to public lands.
In 2010, Florida Park Service entered into a partnership
agreement with the U.S. Forest Service to place a Florida
Park Service AmeriCorps volunteer on each of the three
National Forests in Florida. This groundbreaking partnership
recognizes the need for an all lands approach to volunteer
engagement and community outreach.
"The Florida Park Service is pleased to partner with the
US Forest Service in this capacity as the AmeriCorps pro-
gram is one of our most valuable assets," said Department
of Environmental Protection Florida Park Service Director
Donald Forgione. "Developing this relationship for the bet-
terment of Florida's natural resources has allowed state park
team members to exchange ideas and experiences with those
serving in the national forests."
The collaboration, now in its second year, enables three
FPS AmeriCorps members to serve as volunteer and com-


Fom left: Florida Park Service AmeriCorps volunteers Heather
Grames, Chris Emmons, and Paul Wheelhouse along with Forest
Service Volunteer Program Coordinator Katie LaJeunesse attend
recent National Forests in Florida event. The three volunteers are
instrumental in furthering National Forests in Florida missions such
as environmental education and community outreach.

munity outreach coordinators on National Forest System
lands. The idea is simple but unprecedented. FPS oversees
a large and highly successful AmeriCorps program on its
state lands, which enables parks to efficiently and effectively
recruit, train, and manage volunteers.
The FPS AmeriCorps program is administered by the
Florida Department of Environmental Protection and operates
in 160 state parks throughout Florida and their surrounding
communities. In cooperation with park staff, local organiza-
tions and schools,AmeriCorps FPS members provide service


in the areas of habitat restoration, Americans with Disabili-
ties Act compliance, prescribed burning, trail maintenance,
cultural and historical restoration, environmental education
and volunteer recruitment.
"The Florida Park Service recognized an opportunity to
enhance their capability to connect Floridians to 'the Real
Florida' by increasing involvement with the U.S. Forest
Service to engage youth and community members in public
service," said U.S. Forest Service Volunteer Program Coor-
dinator Katie LaJeunesse.
The FPSAmeriCorps members serving onNational Forests
have overseen numerous volunteer events ranging from small
trail maintenance outings to large trash collection events with
hundreds of participants.
According to AmeriCorps volunteer Paul Wheelhouse,
"For me, my biggest sense of reward and fulfillment is living
the U.S. Forest Service's mission, 'caring for the land and
serving people.' I have been trying to embody the concept of
'serving people' each day I work in the AmeriCorps service."
The U.S. Forest Service and the Florida Park Service
invested in a belief that connecting people to their public
lands, regardless of administrative boundaries, contributes to
greater sustainability. With budgetary shortfalls, this concept
of cross-boundary public lands management has proven to
be a successful collaboration.


D.C. Electric
Voul cuneni problem is
ou business
Commercial
I Rcidentul
Service anytime

David
I Combs )

H: 379-9378 � C: 643-8871




SRM b



, l.:. : ,.: , -, H.:.: l . ..

Phone David Morris
al (856.018168-12';,.
.:,r Ipal: , .:rl i,?,.a i ,7 .4414

Septic
Services,
Inc.
* SEFriIc SYSTEM IIsF(ErTIONS
* SEF rif TANKS * 9AIu FrElS
SITE PK EF WATEK LINE
INSTALLATION , REFAIK


- I. , -1IT


RESIDENTIAL .. COMMERCIAL
Clint Hatcher. Owner
- ',-' I',- -" ' Ill'l: " _'-a ._' _'.U 1J J


& Jicon
C O niI.
I- : I I-1 I i J i


STUMP
GRINDING
. :' -. lea i,,nai ble
r ' I RaHei
,' �IJ FREE
S E is i aTl '
Call Chris Nissley
at 674-8081 or
643-8561 (Cell)


Mileage

Maxx


Visit the web at
ienmileageboosler.coni
Improve your
mileage 5�o to 20�o


William's Home
Improvements
No Jot? Too B , 0o SinM311'




- lFlRFEEEH . l -iE.
Call 674-8092


J pokldhee

C IiS1-1, ',.4-,'.'9 Business & Accounting Solutions Inc.
G 85,'i| R 43.-2,B:,4
g ric hi- , , a-s. l C.A : rI M.B Ai i ,r - . l ,,
,,'-.?,]. w V " l ..Pr. r.,n-_,
I .:, fll.: , .. II'. I.,e l l. .e e H . i :l :.l,,,r ll . I' l nlnll'll l
Gary Richards, EA MBA ,-,L"',, B,:,,:,
I-,,,,.,11,-,1 - ,),-,,[ I-,,,,11,-,1 [,, In :, . .,h:- I-,-h:,,- [1- 1 - i--":in st' ill~in g."


Clay O'Neal's
Land Clearing, Inc.
Dozer and Excavation work i
Demolition * Pond Digging 4f
Road Building * Tractor Work


4433 JWCR 274
S Altha Fl 32421


II


S,. S(50 3762-9402
.8 8Cell|S50S32-5_055j


To place your ad call us at 643-3333


o0 QUICK SHINE 0
Car Wash & Auto Detailing

"We Do it Right or your money back"
Outside $ 1 Soft water
Wash No Water
Most Cars Spots' -
"Best Job Best Price"


Margie 's

Florist
Cl"':. , . ur pri.c: . r-
L'LyIl', Iri, ':',n',* lllirE r .El
F.:.r VVW-.jo.::h Binhl.7lay: al.- a.ll
HI:-hji ay.:y .::.'i i 1 ,:,r :Call :i


SWANTIZS


LICENSE PLATES
I collect OLD and NEW tags
Please call Greg Lambe
^ at (850) 557-7030 I


Whaley Heating &

Air Conditioning

(850) 674-4777


SERVICE * UNIT REPL4CEAIENT
INSTALLATION .. ,:!

VI SA FILTERS ANY SIZE


That Darn Pump
There is never a convenient
lime to be without wtaler.
* REPAIRS * WELLS
* PUMPS-TANKS
Foi tnencilt S i ice anc i neci 3ant

r'.HFI F eilme cTai l ies ca L
ilr.inl W .;I;,.lIiIi Jr BrIsiII FL


LIBERTY TIRE COMPANY
We'i. spercial Triceis nsd arilers

OTR EquipiTein Farin EqluipiIei
P ssenger ar & Liglli Truci Tires
Call 643-2939L
T Cie .Te uS lor EiII VCur lire needs or give uS ~ Call e
S lor rCOaidsiie .=rviice oi cIIainges & lire roli.iain (n
" I- H :'ui ,r- ,r',,.n.:l ih, r Fr ,,.'1. I I " ir .hi - r I I _ !
. Il:r 7 1 A W ir H '- Eri :l,-: ,I I- '_ ' 1 1 --:


-ij k


BARLOW'S
Well Drilling Pump
Repair & Water Services
Well drilling & Pump repair
Deep or Shallow Wells
Serving Gulf, Franklin, Bay,
Calhoun, Washington &
Liberty Counties
137 Fern St. - Wewahitchka
850-639-9355
or
850-814-7454


Ii : 'F i i ii i -l l i, F1 1- 1 : I . I i i ill . 1 1 iI -i E r -
FI- FI 1 T l: Ii l * II I I: F III:IIIi l * ,,llllli Ih Ii i H Ji Ml - , T=,,r-i-




Page 20 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JULY 6, 2011



'DO 0�'D
@OLL Ek �EED
AME-IC 'S


2011 FORD RANGER XL




Stock #11242

2.3L 14 ENGINE: 5-SPD AUTOMATIC 0/D TRANS: A/C
MSRP................................ SS.... 9,70
Discounts ..............................-S 75
Retail Customer Cash......-33,000
Trade-In Assistance..........-S1,0DD0
NOW-..... S14,95

2011 FORD F-150 SUPER CAB XLT
Stock #1126BD -


9Ate 4.-1


#P3298A 04 FORD F-150
SUPER CAB FX-4
4X4 FLAIRSIDE,
, ,BRIGHT YELLOW,
S 7 MOONROOF,
LEATHER,
88K MILES
$1 7,995


10 FORD
EDGE SEL
#R3301
SATELITTE RADIO, POWER PKG., $24
ALLOYS, 30K MILES.................. W i
09 FORD F-250 #11217A
CREW CAB LARIAT 4X4f
DIESEL, LEATHER, GOOSENECK, HITCH,
26K MILES...................... $39,995
06 NISSAN
ARMADA LE
LEATHER, MOON ROOF, LOADED, $ A
76K MILES-...............................
10 FORD E-250 mf "-
CARGO VAN #P3284
V8, POWER PKG.,
16K MILES..................................
10 FORD E-350 -^,
12 PASS. VAN
#P3282
XLT, V8, POWER PKG., . 9
ONLY 17K MILES........................ $29 I 5


2011 FORD RANGER XL SUP CAB
Stock #11269





4 CYL; Automatic; A/C
MSRP...............................S..... 21,565
Discounts ........................... S1,07D0
Retail Customer Cash......-33,000
Trade-In Assistance..........-S31,000
NOW..... S16.495

2011 FORD F-150 SUPER CREW LARIAT
Stock #112fB


1&tat,


"10349A 09 FORD F-150
SUPER CAB LARIAT
LEATHER,
CHROME PKG.,
SUPER NICE,
ONLY 30K
MILES

,495


07 CHRYSLER PT CRUISER
71 K MILES, #11280AA
POWER PACKAGE, AUTO.......................$7,995
08 DODGE CHARGER #11159B
SXT POWER PKG., TILT,
CRUISE, CD, 62K MILES....................... $12,995
09 FORD FOCUS SE #R3241A
POWER PKG., CUISE,
ALLOYS, 20K MILES.............................$11,995
08 FORD FUSION SE #R3305
POWER PKG, 4 CYLINDER,
NICE! 45K MILES.................................$16,995
07 VOLVO s60 i1268A
LEATHER, MOONROOF,
SUPER NICE, 61K MILES........................$16,995
08 LINCOLN MKZ mR3302
LEATHER, LOADED,
33K MILES.......................................$21 ,995
10 FORD FLEX SEL #R33io
LEATHER, 3RD ROW SEATING,
ALLOYS, 19K MILES.............................$28,995


2011 FORD F-15D SUPER CAB XL
Stock #11162





3.7 V-B, 305 HP. Trailer Tow, Cruise
MSRP............................... S 8ZBO
Discounts ........................-1..... ,485
Retail Customer Cash.......-S2,500
FMCC BONUS CASH.............-S1,DOD
NOW..... S23,495

2011 FORD F-250 CREW CAB LARIAT
Stock #
11235 n
MLt - -2


7~c4 6e~eee~


#R3272 08 FORD F-150
SUPER CREW 4X2 LARIAT
LEATHER,
CLIMATE
CONTROL,
LIKE NEW,
ONLY
14K MILES
05 JEEP WR24495ANGLE

07 GMC YUKON
DENALI
#11211C MOONROOF, LEATHER,.
DV72, CHROME WHEELS,71K MILES...........
06 FORD F-SPORT 50
SUPER CAB XLMT. 4X4
LEATHER, WORK TRUCK. 54K MILES............ $1
05 JEEP WRANGLER E
UNLIMITED 4X4
#112DOOR9AAUTO.V6, LOTSOFEXTRAS. S0319



72AUTOMATIC, NICE, 36K MILES........................
07 FORD SPORT
TRAC LMT. 4X4
LEATHER, LOADED,49K MILES.........$22,
10 DODGE CHALLENGER-
2DOOR,V6, #10319B
AUTOMATIC, NICE, 36K MILES......... $2


Our Sales
Team Is .
Here To : "
Help You! e.. .
John Allen John Bryan Craig Bard Ronnie I
All prices ulus S299.50 P&H. Tax. Tan B Title. Pictures for Illustration on


www.ChipulaFord.com


Plenty More
Great Deals
DOn the Lot To
- Choose From!
aley Ryan McLaulin
F. Incentive oind thru DB6/3D/11. W.A.C


Rick Barnes, Sales Manager


3.7 V-B, 305 HP, XLT Plus Pkg, Chrome Pkg
MSRP................................. $33,850
Discounts ........................-.... 2,855
Retail Customer Cash.......-S3,500
FMCC BONUS CASH.............-3S1,000
NOW.....S26,495


4X4, LEATHER. ECOBDDST ENGINE. MAX TRAILER TOW
MSRPF................................4.... 5,430
Discounts ............................-S3,B35
Retail Customer Cash.......-S2,000
FMCC BONUS CASH.............-S1,00D
NOW.....S38,495


Diesel. Leather. 20" Wheels, LOADED!
MSRP ............................3S57,985
Discounts............................-S4,990
Retail Customer Cash.......-S2,500
FMCC BONUS CASH.............-S1,00DDD
Trade-In Assistance...........-S1,00DD0
NOW.....S48,495




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