The Calhoun-Liberty journal
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00027796/00279
 Material Information
Title: The Calhoun-Liberty journal
Portion of title: Calhoun Liberty journal
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: The Liberty Journal, Inc.
Place of Publication: Bristol Fla
Publication Date: 06-22-2011
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Bristol (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Liberty County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Calhoun County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Liberty -- Bristol
Coordinates: 30.426944 x -84.979167 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in Sept. 1991.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 11, no. 38 (Sept. 18, 1991).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002046630
oclc - 33425067
notis - AKN4565
lccn - sn 95047245
System ID: UF00027796:00279
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly journal (Bristol, Fla.)

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Full Text
QUALIFYING WEEK FOR BLOUNTSTOWN CITY COUNCIL & ALTHA TOWN COUNCIL WILL END AT NOON FRIDAY ............PAGE 3


500
includes
tax


Interviews set for

final 5 candidates

for Btown City Mgr.
by Teresa Eubanks, Journal Editor
The Blountstown City Council has set a date of
Friday, July 15 to conduct interviews with the final
five candidates seeking the job of city manager. All
five men are from Florida.
The list includes:
*Richardo Mendez-Saldivia of Miami
*Nathan Goodman of Blountstown
*Don Hart of Tallahassee
*Emory Pierce of Brooksville
*Patrick Miller of Palm Coast
A sixth candidate who was on the list indicated
he was no longer interested in seeking the
position.
"We expect the council to ask some good hard
questions. I don't think it's going to be a quick
and easy decision," said Interim City Manager
Traci Hall, explaining, "They will take their time
to question each candidate."
She indicated that council members hope to
learn more about each applicant "to make a good
decision for the city."
The candidate selected will probably be asked
to begin the job as soon as he is available, she
added.
The interviews are slated to start at 1 p.m. at the
city council meeting room.

Hosford man acquitted

of molesting 6-year-old
by Teresa Eubanks, Journal Editor
A Liberty County jury returned
a verdict of not guilty Tuesday for .
a Hosford man charged with lewd .
and lascivious molestation of a
child under 12 years of age.
Ronnie Richter, 50, was arrested
last August after the mother of a -
six-year-old girl reported that her
daughter indicated that Richter
had touched her vaginal area and RONNIE RICHTER
her chest.
According to the arrest report, Richter was at a
Hosford residence with three children, their mother and
their grandfather July 25, 2010. He was left alone with
the children for a few minutes when the grandfather
went outside to work on a vehicle and the mother left
the room to do laundry.
When the six-year-old was on the stand Tuesday she
was unable to identify Richter in the courtroom.
The six-member jury deliberated for approximately
30 minutes before returning with an acquittal.


THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY N




JOURNAL


CLJ
EWS
.corn


Volume 31, Number 25 Wednesday, June 22, 2011


K' d


Over 110 guests enjoyed massages, manicures,
makeovers, door prizes /and a tasty lunch at last
week's Women's Health Seminar, held June 17 at Veterans
Memorial Civic Center in Bristol. The focus of the free four-hour
seminar was to help women become more aware of their well
being, with an emphasis on colon health and learning how to
manage stress in their lives. The event is headed up by
the Liberty County Health Department. ABOVE:
An array of colorful nail polish bottles are lined
Iup on the table as Sara Waldorff enjoys
manicure. LEFT: Masseuse Jacob
z4 Tolbert helps soothe back muscles
forone of the attendees. BELOW:
White tablecloths, potted plants
and floral arrangements set off
the midday meal.
S � ... . ANGIE DAVIS PHOTOS


Best arrested for holding gun on man at Bristol convenience store


by Teresa Eubanks, Journal Editor
A Bristol man who allegedly held
a gun on another man on two separate
occasions at a convenience store has
been arrested for aggravated assault
with a deadly weapon, according to
a report from the Liberty County
Sheriff's Office.
Arrested was Kenneth Adrian
Best, 35. He was also charged with
possession of methamphetamine and
paraphernalia after being taken into
custody June 16.


Deputies responded to the BP
Store in Bristol at 7:15 a.m. Thursday
where they met William Garner, 34,
who said that a few weeks earlier,
Best had pointed a deer rifle at him
while he was in the store. He said
when he saw Best's truck Thursday,
he pulled into the parking lot to
confront him about the incident.
Garner stated that Best was
standing beside his 2001 Dodge
pickup when he walked up and asked
why he had previously pulled a gun


on him.
According to Gamer, Best reached
into his truck to grab a double-
barreled shotgun and told him, "I'll
shoot you now. You don't know
me."
Gamer said he stepped toward
Best, pointed his finger at him and
told him to do it. He said Best
pointed the gun at him with his finger
on the trigger.
Both men then told the other they
were calling the law. Best put the gun


back in his truck.
A witness at the store confirmed
Gamer's account of events.
As Best was being taken into
custody, he was searched. A folded
piece of tin foil found in his right front
pants pocket later tested positive for
methamphetamine. His rifle was
seized and found to be loaded with
two rounds of buck shot, according
to Sgt. Jamie Shiver.
He is being held on $20,000
bond.


111111111111 Sheriff's Log..2 Speak Up!...3 Calendar...4 Commentary...6, 7 News from the Pews... ChipolaCollege...
7 18122 00900 8 Birthdays..... 10 & 11 Pets & Their People...13 Gardening column.....14 Obituaries.....15 Classifieds.....16 & 17




Page 2 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JUNE 22, 2011


Traffic stop leads to citation, then arrest for woman


A Calhoun County woman
who was initially cited for failure
to maintain a single lane was
later arrested for possession of
a Schedule II narcotic after an
altercation at her home on June
10.
FHP Trooper Dallas Jones
stopped Crystal Wooten, 28,
around midmorning as she was
heading home after noticing she
was driving around 35 mph along
Hwy. 71 North and repeatedly
going off the edge of the road.
"She was going slow. It was kind
of odd," he said.
When he stopped her, he was
surprised to see the condition
she was in. "She'd been in some


rough altercation a few
days before," he said.
She had two black eyes,
her wrists were swollen
blue and her hands were
bandaged. She also had
other numerous bruises.
Wooten told him that
her wrists were broken and her
power steering had gone out.
After having her step out of the
car, the trooper determined that
she had not been drinking and,
other than her obvious injuries,
seemed OK.
She had stopped across the
road from her home and as they
were speaking, family members
joined them outside. Wooten's


,RREST

:PORTS


compiled by Journal Editor Teresa Eub,
brother then drove her home and
they went inside.
The trooper parked nearby to
complete his report on the traffic
stop when he heard Wooten's
mother calling for help. When
he looked toward the house, he
could see Wooten and her brother
struggling on the floor. The
trooper later learned that she had
become upset when the family
said they wanted to take her to get
treatment for substance abuse.


Calhoun County
Sheriff's Deputy Gary
McGee was called to
the scene. Wooten
became combative with
him and the trooper and
began acting erratically,
according to the arrest


report.
Wooten told him she had
taken a prescription pill but
two other pills, later identified
as Lorazepam, a narcotic, were
found in her purse. She said she
had gotten the pills from a friend.
Wooten's brother said that
when he drove her car from the
road to the house, she tried to
jump out while it was still moving.


He said he
remained
outside
when she
ran into
the house.
Moments
later, her
boyfriend
screamed
out "She's CRYSTAL WOOTEN
got a knife"
and her brother ran inside and
grabbed her by the wrists. They
were later separated by the
trooper. The brother later stated
that he did not see a knife.
Wooten was then taken into
custody.


Pair charged after marijuana plants found in closet


AnAltha couple was charged with the
manufacture of marijuana after officers
were called to their Hanna Tower Road
residence June 10.
Arrested was Olen Senterfitt III, 20,
and Kaylan Leann Beauchamp, 19.
Altha Police Chief Jimmy Baggett
and Calhoun County
Deputy Bobby Sims
responded to a report
of a man causing a
disturbance outside
the residence at 4:24
p.m.
They arrived
to find Timothy
KAYLAN BEAUCHAMP Beauchamp pulling
out of the driveway,
according to the
deputy's report.
Beauchamp stated he
was there to confront
his daughter's
boyfriend, Olen
Senterfitt, because
he had been told
OLEN SENTERFITT III he was cooking
he was cooking


methamphetamine.
Beauchamp's daughter came out and
told officers she did not want him on the
property. He then left.
When asked about allegations
regarding methbeing cooked at the home,
the young woman agreed to let the police


chief and the deputy
residence she shares
with Senterfitt.
When she opened
the door, both officer
noticed the strong
odor of marijuana.
They walked through
home and in a back
bedroom, which
Beauchamp said
had belonged to her
older brother who no
longer lived there,
found a plastic lid
that held marijuana
shake, seeds and
stems in plain view
on a dresser.
They went into a


Bristol man returning from

beach trip charged with

DUI; almost hits patrol car
A Liberty County man driving home
late Thursday night was arrested after
he crossed the white line on SR 71
South and almost hit a marked patrol
car, according to a report from the
Calhoun County Sheriff's Office.
Deputy Anthony Norris was
monitoring traffic from a patrol car
in the parking lot of the former Booth
Chevrolet dealership when he saw a
northbound vehicle traveling recklessly KIM MERRITT
around 10:54 p.m. After nearly being LEWIS SR
hit, Norris pulled out to follow the
vehicle and followed it long enough to see it straddle the white
line for several feet before crossing back into the lane and
then going over the center line into the oncoming lane.
Norris watched as the vehicle nearly struck a guard rail
on the south side of the road as it came into the city limits
of Blountstown.
The deputy then signaled for the driver to pull over;
instead, the driver braked suddenly and stopped in the middle
of the road. Norris stepped out and had the driver, Kim Merrit
Lewis Sr., 56, of Bristol, pull into the parking lot of Keith's
Auto Repair.
When the deputy asked to see his license and registration,
Lewis handed him a citation showing he had been charged
with DUI in Gulf County four days earlier.
Lewis said he was driving poorly because he was trying
to reach his cigarettes. He also stated that he had three or
four beers a couple of hours earlier while visiting with his
son at the beach.
After performing poorly on roadside sobriety exercises,
Lewis was taken into custody. Breath sample testing to
determine his level of intoxication resulted in results of. 155
and .154. Florida's legal limit is .08.


look through the


second bedroom and noticed the strong
odor of marijuana. Sims opened a closet
door and found three large marijuana
plants in pots under grow lights.
Beauchamp and Senterfitt were taken
into custody. He was given a conditional
release; as of Monday, she remained in
custody.


Man arrested for selling

cocaine in drug sting
A 25-year-old Blountstown man
was charged with sale of cocaine and
possession of less than 20 grams of
marijuana after a controlled buy was
arranged by the Calhoun-Liberty Drug
Task Force on June 15.
Arrested was Jamie Joe Koonce.
According to the arrest report, a
confidential source working withthe task
force agreed to make a buy from man
knownas "Jamie." The informant called JAMIE JOE KOONCE
Koonce on his mobile phone and asked
to purchase an "eightball" of cocaine - 3.5 grams - for $180.
The informant, who was outfitted with equipment allowing
investigators to monitor the transaction, drove to 11th Street
in Blountstown and waited until Koonce pulled up in a black
Chevrolet Trailblazer. The informant got in the vehicle with
Koonce, who then drove onto Lee Hill Road, where they
made the exchange.
After the transaction was completed and the informant got
out of the vehicle, deputies were sent to pull over Koonce's
vehicle.
Koonce and a female passenger were taken into custody.
She was later released without being charged.
Investigators found a clear bag with approximately four
grams of marijuana in the vehicle, along with what was
described as "numerous dime baggies with cocaine residue."
The marked money used in the buy had been hidden in the
headliner of the vehicle.
The SUV was seized and taken to the impound lot.

Blountstown Police Dept. .
June 13 through June 19, 2011
Citations issued:
Accidents...............04 Traffic Citations..................08
Special details (business escorts, traffic details)....107
Business alarms.....00 Residential alarms..........01
C o m p la ints ................................... .. .. .......... ............ 056


ALE * SALE * SALE BUY
SALE * SALE

Lots of other apparel L
on Sale * Everyone GET
welcome to shop 4
the thrift store
FR E
an St 9a~.1 no (O FREE


Calhoun-Liberty
Ministry Center
uHwy 20 * Blountstown
Phone 674-1818


I


CALHOUN COUNTY

June 10
*Crystal Wooten, possession of schedule III
narcotic, FHP.
*John W. Brown, VOCP (warrant), CCSO.
*Olen Senterfitt, III, manufacture of marijuana,
CCSO.
*Kaylan Beauchamp, manufacture of mari-
juana, CCSO.
June 13
*John H. Davis, non-support, CCSO.
June 14
*Rebecca Livingston, VOSP (warrant),
CCSO.
*George Haie, non-support, CCSO.
*Shay T. Prevost, VOCP (warrant), CCSO.
*William S. McCranie, VOSP (warrant),
CCSO.
June 15
*Felicity Middlebrooks, VOCP (warrant),
CCSO.
*Aaron D. Burkes, VOCP (warrant), CCSO.
*Jamie Joe Koonce, sale of cocaine, pos-
session of less than 20 grams of marijuana,
CCSO.
June 16
*Calvin H. Hayes, VOSP (warrant), CCSO.
*Woody Pumphrey, manufacture of marijuana
(warrant), CCSO.
*Rodney Pumphrey, manufacture of mari-
juana (warrant), CCSO.
June 17
*Kim Merritt Lewis, Sr., DUI, CCSO.
June 18
*Troy Marlo Lewis, driving with license sus-
pended or revoked, FHP.


LIBERTY COUNTY

June 13
*Joni Bodiford, grand theft, LCSO.
June 14
*Rebecca Living, VOSP, LCSO.
*Jessica Thornton, battery (warrant), LCSO.
June 15
*Antwann Dilworth, holding for Gadsden,
GCSO.
*Shelia Miller Sneads, VOSP, LCSO.
*Eddie Hockaday, driving with license sus-
pended or revoked, LCSO.
*Christian Ganzy, holding for Bay Co., FHP.
June 16
*Kenneth Adrian Best, aggravated assault
with a deadly weapon with intent to kill, posses-
sion of meth, possession of drug paraphernalia,
LCSO.
*Travis Hall, no valid driver's license,
LCSO.
June 20
*Deborah Lynn Powell, VOP, possession of
more than 20 grams of marijuana, LCSO.

Listings include name followed by charge and identification of arresting agency The
names above represent those charged We remindour readers that all are presumed
innocent until proven guilty


S













way for two

Blountstown
Qualifying week began
Monday for two seats on the
Blountstown City Council.
The positions are those
currently held by Clifford
Jackson in Ward 1 and Janie
Boyd in Ward 2.
Candidates interested
in serving the City of
Blountstown have until
noon Friday to file their
intent with the Calhoun
County Elections Office.
Councilmembers serve


positions on

City Council
two-year terms. They are
paid $25 per meeting.
The remaining board
members currently serving
include James Griffin in
Ward 3, Tony Shoemake in
Ward 4 and Mayor Winston
Deason.
The city election will be
held August 30.
The City Council holds
regular meetings on the
second Tuesday of each
month at 6 p.m.


Two at-large seats open

on Altha Town Council
Two at-large seats on the Altha Town Council
currently held by Joe Amason and Lee Alday will be
up for election Aug. 23.
Candidates interested in running for those jobs, which
pays $1 a year, have until noon Friday to file their intent
with the Calhoun County Elections Office. Traditionally,
candidates for the town council filed at Altha Town Hall
but this year they will have to go to the elections office
in Blountstown. There is a $2 qualifying fee.
The remaining board members currently serving the
town of Altha include Tammy Gable, Derek Creamer,
Rick Watson and Mayor Wes Johnson.
The Altha Town Council meets the second Tuesday
of each month at 6 p.m.

THREE COUNCIL SEATS, MAYOR
AND CLERK'S POSITIONS OPEN

City of Bristol election


No date has been set
but qualifying week
is expected to be held
in late August or early
September for the Bristol
City Council election.
Three council positions
will be open, along with
the job of Mayor and City
Clerk.
Those city council
positions are currently held
by Mayor Betty Brantley
and council members
Steve Cutshaw, Gilda
Drummond and Brigham


Shuler. Robin Hatcher is
the City Clerk.
The remaining board
members currently serving
include Chairman Mitch
Willis and Ed Botting.
Council members are
paid $1 a year.
The election will be
held in November.
The Bristol City
Council meets on first
Monday following the
first Thursday of each
month at 6:30 p.m.


,Liberty

Post and

Barn Pole Inc.
DEMPSEY BARRON ROAD,
BRISTOL (OFF HWY. 12 N)
Phone (850) 643-5995
TOP TOP TOP FACTORY
GRADE GRADE GRADE SECONDS
7' Posts 8' Posts 6'6" Posts 8' Corners
Top Size Top Size Top Size under 3"
3-4" 2-3", 3-4" 2-2.5" 3-4"
4-5" 4-5" 2-5.3" 4-5"
5-6" 5-6" 3-3.5" 5-6"
6-7" 3.5-4" 6-7"
7-8" 4-5" 7-8"
SPECIALTY 8"+ 5+ 8 '"+
POSTS
1/4 rounds Items FACTORY SECONDS
/2 rounds subject to 6'6" Posts, Top Size, under ~
Flat Face availability 2-3" 3-4" 4-5" s5"
W-' Weve got the fence posts to meet your needs /


Qualifying week und

Qualifying week under


To the editor:
On August 30, 2011,
the citizens of Liberty
County will go to the
polls to vote on a �1 cent
sales tax increase for our
schools. This increase
was deemed absolutely
necessary by not only the
school administration and


elected officials but also unanimous-
ly by a budget advisory committee.
This committee consisted of ap-
proximately 15 residents of Liberty
County who have worked diligently
to find solutions that would have the
least amount of financial impact on
our citizens.
On May 26, Governor Rick Scott
signed the 2011/12 budget proposed
by lawmakers. This legislation
reduced the Liberty County School
Board's operating budget by 7.8%
or $864,731. Since the 2008-2009
school year, district revenues have
declined by $3.1 million while op-
erating expenses such as fuel and
energy costs have continued to rise
significantly. Sadly, Florida's coun-
ties are facing similar reductions
to result from the next legislative
session.
Numerous options were discussed


in detail by the committee. Our
teachers are already facing ap-
proximately 4% pay reduction for
next year due to furlough days and
a state required contribution to the
Florida Retirement System. Staff
reductions have been made by the
Superintendent in administration
and other non-essential areas and at
least two of the school board mem-
bers have voluntarily taken a pay
reduction. However, this still left a
considerable short fall and the com-
mittee members with few options
to consider such as implementing a
four-day school week, increase in
millage rate by the School Board and
the 1/2 cent sales tax increase. The
sales tax increase was determined to
be the best choice because:
*It does not disrupt the learning
environment for students
*It does not affect only land own-
ers paying property taxes


SPEAK UP

WITH A LETTER TO THE EDIT
Write: The Calhoun-Liberty Jouri
P.O. Box 536, Bristol 32321


Citizen concerned over sidewalk projects


To the editor:
The Charlie Johns Street Sidewalk Project in Blount-
stown can be and should be re-designed immediately
before cement is poured!
At a recent Blountstown City Council meeting, with the
mayor's absence, Prebble-Rish Engineering Co. suddenly
advisedthatthis particular project (grant?) is separate from
the other sidewalk projects unveiled at a city meeting by
the former manager, it has to be completed by the end
of December. They advised it would cost $250,000 to
fill in the ditch alongside the street in order to separate
the sidewalk from the street. In other words, they want
to duplicate another dangerous street-widening as done
on Pear Street in back of the post office.
This is dangerous because vehicle mirrors and other
extensions can strike walkers on so-called sidewalks that
join streets (which are nothing more than extended street
widths). This one does not have a parking area separating
walkers from the street.
This is costly because land values and legal actions
are negatively affected by badly designed sidewalks,
such as the two new ones on Pear Street and the street


on the side of Alco.
I feel that meeting was a bad day for all. And appar-
ently it was for the acting mayor, who would not allow
citizens to respond to the surprise new Engineers Report,
and for the city attorney, who had to state several times:
"You need a motion" (Change Order). Change orders
are simple and used by contractors/engineers to make
corrections on original blueprints.
If gas gets higher we'll be walking more, so please
park at the Old Train Station or at the post office and
look at the new sickly Pear Street sidewalk. Be careful
if you take a walk on it. Either way, pray that we don't
get more like this!
Citizens and homeowners: no matter where you live
you should call your mayor. Tell him we taxpayers don't
need more costly legal actions. Once cement gets hard it
will be too late to pay for other professional opinions.
The city's telephone number is (850) 674-5488.
Your servant,
Mike Calhoun, CCCC
(Concerned Citizen Calhoun County)



Family Coastal

Seafood Restaurant

A little out of the wy
A Lot less to-pa y


Purchase one entree for *
I $10 or more and get... U
your 2nd entree l
S/0 purchase
OFF One per customer
per visit, dine in onl
Valid thru June 31

Home of the All-U-Can-Eat menu
Hwy. 65 S * Sumatra
Phone (850) 670-8441


JUNE 22, 2011 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 3


Committee member urges Liberty Co. voters

to support half cent sales tax for our schools


S *It would result in income
S from non-residents passing
through
S *Nominal impact to resi-
'OR dents (5 cents per $100
spent)
a&l According to the Florida
Department of Revenue,
== this /2 cent sales tax has
been implemented in all sur-
rounding counties.
The sales tax rate in Liberty
County is currently 7% while Cal-
houn, Gadsden, Jackson and Leon
Counties all benefit from a 7.5% rate.
Essentially, if you shop at a nearby
Wal-Mart or eat at McDonald's or
Burger King, you are making a con-
tribution to that school district and
likely do not even know it.
In order to maintain a solid and
well-rounded education for Liberty
County students, we ask that you
support the sales tax increase. If
you have any questions or concerns,
please do not hesitate to contact one
of the following committee mem-
bers: Michael Wright, Stephanie
Hofheinz, Jed Hiers, Joe Shuler,
Thomas Flowers, Kelli Flournoy,
Bruce Smith or Diane Hayes.
Michael Wright,
Bristol


I ,Business

. Real Property

I , Divorce

Wills / Trusts


Offices in Bristol and Panama City
By Appointment (850) 866-3680
or contact me at jenniferwshuler@yahoo.com
CALL ME FOR A FREE LIVING WILL


--


|


I




Page 4 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JUNE 22, 2011
-----------------,----'-----^,,


'Death by Chocolate'
planned for Aug. 18
at Neal Civic Center
Have you ever wanted to eat all the
chocolate you could ever hold? Now is
your chance! The Calhoun County Senior
Citizens Association will be serving up
"Death by Chocolate" with every imagin-
able chocolate dessert for you.
While enjoying your dessert we will
have a silent auction with various items
up for bid. The event is scheduled for
Thursday, August 18 at 5 p.m.. It will
be held at the W.T. Neal Civic Center on
Hwy. 69N, Blountstown. Call 674-4163
for directions.
Advance tickets are $10 each and are
available at the door for $15 each. Tickets
can be purchased at The Calhoun County
Senior Citizens Association at 16859 NE
Cayson St. in Blountstown or call (850)
674-4163. With each ticket purchase you
will receive a raffle ticket for the grand
prize. You do have to be present to win!
There are only 250 tickets to be sold!

Fourth of July
fireworks display
in Blountstown
Have a blast in downtown Blountstown
with Independence Day fireworks on
Monday, July 4 at 8:45 p.m.
Amazing fireworks will be launched
from the BHS campus in downtown
Blountstown. The campus will be com-
pletely closed to due to safety issues,
but there are plenty of other great spots
downtown to watch the show!
Find a spot in Magnolia Square, Main
Street Gazebo, or the place you usually
watch downtown parades. If you live in
town, you may be able to host a backyard
BBQ and watch the show from the comfort
of your own yard!
The event is sponsored by Rivertown
Community Church, Blountstown Rotary
Club, Ramsey's Piggly Wiggly, Calhoun
County Chamber of Commerce, City of
Blountstown, Blountstown Police Depart-
ment, and the Calhoun County Sheriff's
Office.

New 4-H camps
added for summer
New Liberty Co. 4-H summer camps
have been added to this summer's line up.
* 4-H "Cooking Around the World"
will be held on June 28-29, from 8 a.m.
to 4 p.m., ages 8-14 as of Sept. 1, 2010,
limited to 16 youth, Veterans Memorial
Civic Center, fee $25.
* 4-H Intermediate Quilting Day Camp
will be held July 14-15 for youth who have
experience sewing. Camp will cost $20
and be held atthe Veterans Memorial Civic
Center from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m.
* 4-H Cloverbud Day Camp will be held
August 4-5 from 9 a.m.-noon at Veterans
Memorial Civic Center for ages 5-7 as of
Sept. 1, 2010. The fee is $20.
Call 643-2229 to register your child

The Calhoun-Liberty Journal is
published each Wednesday
by the Liberty Journal Inc.,
Summers Road, P.O. Box 536,
Bristol, FL 32321.
Annual subscriptions are $18.
Periodicals poslage paid at Brislol, FL
POSTIM STER Send addres ,:,'rre,:Ilin
1.. PO Box 536 Bnrisl, FL 32321


I


ANNIVERSARY
Jerry &' Efaine
Anders


GASKIN PARK
Flathead
Fishing
SToiiriiiamente
'I in I r i. I
at 4 p.m. (CT)
Ends: Saturday
at 12 p.m. (CT)
at Gaskin Park
in Wewahitchka


Celebrate Recovery
6 p.m., Rivertown
Community Church
ASATURDAYSJUNE25


BIRTHDAYS
qmiy 'Brock Partridge,
9'faley Brad
& Craig B rinkley


ioog to
Work
"B F y


Tent
Summit
'tarts : Fri.
11 4p.m ii
Ends: Saturday
at 12 p.m. (CT)
Cooper's Park
in Blounstown


Dance, 8-12 p.m., American Legion Hall in Blountstown


BIRTHDAYS
Pailli Sillitlh &- ' )T '.l'i Stiilltc'll S ,if


.Attedtle tie Cu111chl o


\t/oL clio ce tlis S1111,i


0


9 O DA J U NE7II


Gone
^-Fishing

. Walk-A-Weigl
* Calhoun Chil
* Blountstown
* Altha Boy Sc
* AA, 6 p.m., Al





* Sit-n-Sew me
Youth Hall on C
Post Office).
* Bristol Lions
* Blountstown
Lodge in Blouni
* Boy Scout Tr
P'9V i Ik Civic CeII,r


BIRTHDAYS
"jolal't" " ' 1 i'l' l il.
TODAY'S MEETINGS
h Program, 9 a.m., Veterans Memorial Park Civic Center
dren's Coalition, 9 a.m., WT Neal Civic Center
Lions Club, 6 p.m., Apalachee Rest.
outs, 7 p.m., Altha Volunteer Fire Department
tha Community Center


BIRTHDAYS
Lindaa Bontrager &' 'Monica Reeves
TODAY'S MEETINGS
,eting, 6 pm., First United Methodist Church
linton St. Marianna (behind Marianna
Club, 7 p.m., Apalachee Restaurant
Chapter #179 O.E.S., 7 p.m., Dixie
:stown.
oop 206. 7 p m Veterans Memorial
lieSM


THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL
Located at 11493 NW Summers Road in Bristol
MAILING ADDRESS: P.O. Box 536, Bristol, FL 32321 -V
TELEPHONE (850) 643-3333 Fax (850) 643-3334
EMAIL: thejournal@fairpoint.net LuSPS ,'123,-7,
ADS: cljads@fairpoint.net Summers R:,oad


-


TODAY'S MEETINGS
* Rotary Club, noon, Calhoun-Liberty Hospital
* AA, 7 p.m., Calhoun County Old Ag Bldg. east door, in front of jail
* Boy Scouts Troop 200, 6:30 p.m., Mormon Church, Bristol


BIRTHDAYS ANNIVERSARY
'Ben guthrie Richard&- Ruth
&- Jason T'owfer Waterman

Red Hat Society _
Minnie Lee's, 12p.m. (CT)
TODAY'S MEETINGS
* Rock Bluff Community Fire Dept., 7 p.m., Voting house in Rock Bluff
* VFW Post 12010, 7:30 p.m., Veterans Civic Center
* AA, 7 p.m., basement of Calhoun County Courthouse

FRIDAY, JUNE 24
YO 7


-ma


m rrr


1%


Flathead Catfish
Tournament to be
held this week
in Wewahitchka
The 7th annual Gaskin Park Flathead
Catfish Tournament will be in Wewa-
hitchka on Friday, June 24 and Saturday,
June 25 at Gaskin Park. Registration is
from 9 a.m. until 10 p.m. (CT) on Friday,
June 24 with the tournament beginning
at 4 p.m. that day. The tournament ends
with the awards presentation at noon on
Saturday, June 25.
There is a $1,000 prize for the largest
flathead along with more cash prizes for
2nd through 5th place as well as the most
poundage caught. An additional cash prize
of $800 will be awarded to the fisherman
with the most combined individual flat-
head poundage from the following 2011
tournaments: the Liberty County Senior
Citizens, the Florida Catfish Classic, the
Gaskin Park Flathead Catfish Tournament,
Gator Classic Flathead Catfish Tourna-
ment. (Must fish 3 out of 4 tournaments
to be eligible.)
You can register at Gaskin Park on the
day of the tournament for a fee of $55.
All flatheads mustbe 14 inches long and
live flatheads will not be released.
Proceeds will benefit the employees
club of the City OfWewahitchka Scholar-
ship Fund.
For more information please call Don
Minchew at 639-2605 or 814-3180. You
can also visit www.floridacatfishclassic.
com.

Tent Summit at
Cooper's Park
on June 24-25
The Mayhaw Community Association
will be hosting a Tent Summit at Cooper's
Park in Blountstown on June 24 and 25
beginning at 4 p.m. Friday and ending up
at noon on Saturday. This is an overnight
event that is designed to help mentor our
young men in this county and surround-
ing counties.
There will be free food, flag football,
movies, popcorn, and breakfast served
the following day with a presentation on
tobacco use and its effects.
Please bring your sons, nephews, are
any male child ages (5-15) that would love
to participate to this event.
If you should have any questions please
call Ken Speights at (850) 557-7413.
Calhoun Sr. Citizens
fish fry set for July 1
The Calhoun County Senior CitizensAs-
sociation will behaving afish fry on Friday,
July 1 to celebrate Independence Day.
Bobby O'Bryan has donated bream again
so that we can provide you with another
fish fry. We will be serving fried bream,
baked beans, cheese grits, hush puppies,
and dessert.
The cost is $3 to cover expenses.
If you would like to sign up please call
v174-4 1,i3

JOURNAL STAFF
Johnny Eubanks............ ....Publisher
Teresa Eubanks........................ Editor
Sandra Brown................Bookkeeper
Debbie Duggar.......... Advertising
Angie Davis.........Production Assistant
OFFICE HOURS ' .a m -6 p m M-F
S.a3turdlaySv Ir'o'm 3 m uniLll 1 p mI


I









Joel Scilley works featured at the Jackson County Public Library


The spirit of the American entrepreneur
is alive and well in Northwest Florida! The
Jackson County Public Library has many ex-
amples of their work on display in the 2011
SummerArt in Public Places Exhibit hosted by
the library and The Artists Guild ofNorthwest
Florida, Inc.
Library patrons will be fascinated when they
see the exhibit in the glass exhibit case in the
main lobby. They will discover that tucked
away in Grand Ridge is an extremely talented
and nationally recognized artist, Joel Scilley.
Scilley is a designer/woodworker/carpenter
who, with his wife, relocated to Jackson County
in recent years. His company, Audiowood,
specializes in unique audio gear and home
accessories that combine high technology and
the character of traditional woodcraft.
Audiowood designs are featured in doz-


ens of major national magazines and design
websites, and are carried by select retailers
like Anthropologie. Several examples of major magazine
articles and newspaper articles, including The New York
Times, featuring Joel Scilley's work are included in the
library display. Audiowood is also a retailer for several
innovative brands of audio equipment.
"It is a pleasure and an honor to have an innovative
artist such as Joel Scilley join us in our local exhibits,
Brooten said.
Scilley studied art, design and architecture in New
York City and in Europe with Hobart College and Parsons
School of Design. He earned a PhD in media studies from
the University of Pittsburgh, and has performed various
forms of woodworking and highly unique carpentry for
more than 15 years.
Joel Scilley welcomes inquiries regarding custom
carpentry, woodworking and audio equipment. More
information can be found at www. audiowood.com and
on Audiowood's Facebook page.
Lynwood Tanner of Cottondale has two handsomely
painted works in the exhibit, "Amphora" and "Egret". "Mr.


Artist Joel Scilley is pictured at right. His work
is seen above in an exhibit case at the Jackson
County Public Library.


Tanner supported the library during spring the Plein Air
event and we are delighted to have his work in the main
room of the library this summer", said Brooten.
Visitors to the library can view more than 30 pieces of
art on display including acrylic paintings by Jesse Blanch-
ette, oil paintings by Karen Roland, Nancy Zurenda, Ed
Griggs and Berit Jackson. Michele Tabor Kimbrough has
a duet of lovely watercolor paintings entitled "Lotus I"
and "Lotus II". Bascom artist, Sam Camley's "Two Egg
in Monochrome" is a pen and ink drawing of the Jackson
County icon, The Two Egg Store..
Newto the exhibit is Lou Brown's framed paper quilling
assemblages. She creates delicate pictures with hundreds
of small strips of paper that are rolled, shaped and glued
together to create decorative designs. Quilling or paper
filigree is an art form that dates back to the Renaissance,
when French and Italian nuns and monks used quilling to
decorate book covers and religious items. Today, quilling
has many artistic applications including decorative items,
framed pictures and cards.
Other artists with work in the exhibit include photog-


raphers, Lois Jones and Pat Crisp and colored
pencil artist, Judy Brooten. Some art on display
in the exhibit belong to private collections and
are marked Not for Sale.
"Many people do not think that local and
regional artists are entrepreneurs but many of
them are managing small businesses and studios
throughout the region, and are nationally known."
said Judy Brooten, Exhibit Chairperson.
The Artists Guild's Art in Public Places Com-
mittee works with local businesses and organiza-
tions to host ongoing art exhibits such as the one
currently at the Jackson County Public Library
on Green Street.
"I am especially excited about this summer's
exhibit because we have wide variety of work on
display and much of it is for sale", said Brooten.
The summer exhibit features items priced from
$45 to well over $1,000, all beautifully painted,
photographed or handcrafted by artists in the
region. If an artist sells a work of art in the ex-
hibit, they donate 20% oftheir sale to benefit The Jackson
County Public Library creating a winning combination
for both artist and the Library.
In addition to working full time or running a business,
many artists donate their time and talent to numerous
projects and organizations throughout the area. One ex-
ample is The Artists Guild of Northwest Florida, Inc.'s
committee led by Lois Jones whose task it is to work with
the Jackson County Public Library to bring interesting and
diverse programs to Jackson County through collabora-
tion with the library.
The Artists Guild oJ .... tii... t Florida, Inc. is a 501(c)
(3) not for profit Florida Corporation based in Jackson County,
Florida whose mission is to enrich the cultural and artistic life
oJ .0i... 11.. t Florida and the surrounding areas ;lih. 'hit edu-
cational programs and opportunities in the visual, performing
and literary arts. For more information about the *iai,: ,,i
contact Karen Roland, Vice- President, or Sam Carnley, Trea-
surer at The Artists Guild oJ .... ion,. t Florida, Inc. P.O. Box
1605, Marianna, Fl. 32447.


Catatacts?
SMART LENSES SM


"Freedom from Eye Glasses,
Now a reality for many."
Lee Mullis M.D.
Board Certified Eye Surgeon
and Cataract Specialist


West Gadsden Historical Society to host


7th Annual Open House in Greensboro


Ottlce also available In Marlanna.

within 72 hours or responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee serce, examination or treatment







;0t 50
STORiE!WIDE


* Suits (36S-72L)
* Jackets/Blazers
* Dress Pants
* Shirts
* Banded Collar Shirts
* Ties
* Hats & Caps
* Suspenders
* Belts
* Socks


* Jewelry
(cuff links, etc.)
* Gloves
* Leisure Suits
* Collar Extenders
* Handkerchiefs
* Shirt Garters
* Sock Garters
* Boys Suits (2T-20)
* Boys Shirts


Suitman's Men Shop
4406 Lafayette St. in Marianna
Telephone (850) 482-5400


On Monday, July 4, the West Gadsden Publicatio
Historical Society will host its 7th An- the Liberty C
nual Open House at its headquarters, the Book as wel
historic James A. Dezell house, located
at 328 East 8th St., Greensboro (comer History of Gi
of State Rd. 12), beginning at 9:00 a.m. and others w
and continuing until 2:00 p.m. forpurcha
Throughoutthe day, the Society mem-
bers will have homemade goodies for sale.
Local history books that will be available for purchase
include: The Early History of Gadsden County by Dale
Cox; ', ""w, thlig Gold by Kay Davis Lay (a compilation
of numerous interviews about the shade tobacco era in
Gadsden County); Illustrated Index -J. Randall Stanley s
History of Gadsden County 1948 by David A. Avant, Jr.,
which is very strong in the area of the War and Recon-
struction era and the story of the shade tobacco industry;
Dr. Charles Hentz, A Southern Practice; and the Liberty
County Heritage Book. In addition, the Society's cook-


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s including book, Flavors of Home, as well as note
unty Heritage cards, t-shirts, and other items will be
as The Early available for purchase.
se Greensboro's Mayor Buddy Pitts
dsden County will display various collections of pho-
1 be available tographs and items from days of long
e on July 4. ago in and around Greensboro.
For those especially interested in
local history, Kenneth Edwards will have an exhibit fea-
turing the McLane Family Massacre that took place near
Greensboro in 1840. Mr. Edwards is always willing to
share his time in talking with those who are interested in
learning more about this tragedy.
Coastal Seafood Restaurant in Panacea will be back
again this year selling delicious seafood lunches. We in-
vite you to come join us at our Open House on July 4 and
enjoy some down home time together with your friends
and neighbors. For further information, please e-mail
info:i -adsdnhistory.org or call (850) 442-6434.



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Page 6 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JUNE 22, 2011 MT

- - Boldr am a @6115/11 creators.com


A RECAP OF RECENT OBSERVATIONS
BY LATE NIGHT TV HOSTS.
Several congressmen have filed a lawsuit against
President Obama for getting us involved in Libya.
They claim Obama got the U.S. in a Middle East
war without authorization from Congress. To which
Dick Cheney and Bush said, "You can get sued for
that?" - JAY LENO

According to a new study, American fathers are
spending more than twice the amount of time with
their children than they used to in years past. Ex-
perts say it's due to a sweeping new trend called
"unemployment." - CONAN O'BRIEN

President Obama met with the president of
Mongolia. Of course, Sarah Palin had to chime in,
saying her favorite movie was "Steel Mongolians."
- JAY LENO

The New York Daily News is reporting that An-
thony Weiner's car isn't registered at the DMV. Oh
man - he must be so embarrassed right now.
- JIMMY FALLON

Officials still can't say what happened to $6.6 bil-
lion that was sent to Iraq for reconstruction. That's
money we could have wasted and mismanaged
right here at home. - JAY LENO

Rep. Michele Bachmann once said thatgay people
lead a very sad life. Apparently, she has never cele-
brated Halloween in San Francisco. -CONAN O'BRIEN

Rush Limbaugh has come out with his own brand
of iced tea, with a picture of him on horseback
dressed as Paul Revere. How confusing is this go-
ing to be for Sarah Palin? - JAY LENO

Did you see the Republican debate? Those guys
up there and Michele Bachmann, and it was excit-
ing, and you know who did well? Michele Bachmann.
Bachmann did well. Newt Gingrich was so impressed
with Michele Bachmann, he gave her a $200,000
gift certificate from Tiffany's. - DAVID LETTERMAN

A recent study found that today's fathers spend
twice as much time with their kids as fathers in
1960. Meanwhile, the study found that Arnold
Schwarzenegger spends time with twice as many
kids as he did three weeks ago. - JIMMY FALLON

According to a new report, only 12 percent of
American high school students can pass a basic
history test. That's the lowest percentage since our
country was founded in 1922. - JAY LENO

Bin Laden's deputy was made head of Al Qaeda.
I know because today he updated his status on
Linkedln. - JIMMY FALLON

The shame would be if Democrats get thrown
out of office without ever having tried Democratic
policies. - BILL MAHER

Photos of Congressman Weiner have surfaced
of him cross-dressing in college, in bra and panty-
hose, proving that even back then he knew he
wanted to be a Congressman. - JAY LENO

A Tea Party group has a summer camp for kids,
the only one where they sit around the campfire
and tell scary stories about taxing the top 2%.
- CONAN O'BRIEN

Anthony Weiner has asked that everyone respect
his privacy. I guess that wasn't his concern when he
was texting pictures of himself. - DAVID LETTERMAN

Happy birthday to Donald Trump, who turned 65,
allegedly. We still haven't seen the birth certificate
so we don't know for sure. - JIMMY KIMMEL


Examining five economic myths


I cringe when I hear politicians say all /
that has to happen to fix America's econ- 0 9
omy is to reduce taxes and government C
regulations and let the private sector do
it's magic. Their economic ignorance is Jerry Cox is
astounding, but that is the official posi- officerand write
tion of the Republicans that control the background i
House of Representatives. foreign policy i'
Okaloosa Coun
In the June 20 issue of Time maga-
zine, Rana Foroohar sets forth five eco-
nomic myths that are "law and gospel"
to many Americans and politicians of both political par-
ties. The following essay is based on Foroohar's article,
for which she gets full credit.
Myth No. 1. This is a temporary dip in economic out-
put and once recovery is evident, then full steam ahead.
Well, according to Foroohar, maybe not. The McKinsey
Global Institutes predicts that it will take five years for the
U.S. economy to "recover." Reason being is that the high
rate of unemployment reduces economic growth because
of reduced consumer demand.
This is not rocket science. We have a consumer-based
economy so unless we "consume" then there is no demand
for goods and services and businesses fail. Foroohar esti-
mates that we need to create 187,000 jobs per month and
grow at a rate of 3.3% to achieve the desired 5% unem-
ployment rate by 2020.
Myth No. 2. Can we buy or "stimulate" our way out
of our economic doldrums? The Obama stimulus did jolt
the economy in a positive way, but the stimulus was just
strong enough to get the economy sputtering along at a
rate of less than 3%. It's not possible to employ Keynesian
economic theory and stimulate the economy again with
Republicans in control of the House and dead set on cut-
ting the federal budget to the bone. Republicans kill off
any spending initiative such as unemployment payments.
One dollar of unemployment money spent generates about
$1.60 in economic activity, a fact lost on Republicans and
the Tea Party.
Myth No. 3. The private sector can do everything bet-
ter than the government. America's blind allegiance to the
markets is one of the country's economic weak points.
Justin Fox's book, The Myth of Rational Markets, is an
excellent dissertation of the fallacies and foibles of the
market place.
Foroohar states that American companies made $1.7
trillion in profits in the last quarter of 2010, but they didn't
share their largess with their workers. Foroohar cites No-
bel Laureate Michael Spence who states that in the period
of intense globalization from 1990 to 2008, U.S. compa-
nies doing business overseas contributed almost nothing
to create jobs in America.
It's a myth when Republicans say that American com-
panies won't create jobs because of the uncertainty of the
effects of economic and regulatory conditions. The reality


is that American companies create jobs
('S in the cheapest labor markets.
Myth No. 4. Foroohar's myth of mo-
SN ER ability. If there is a demand for jobs in
retired military Texas them people will move to Texas.
with an extensive Tell that to the fellow whose house is in
domestic and foreclosure and his car or truck about to
ues. He lives in be repossessed. Most people live from
y_ payday to payday. Having moved 27
times during my time in the military,
even with government subsistence,
moving wife and kids across country is a stressful and ex-
pensive experience.
Myth No. 5. The myth that "Entrepreneurs are the foun-
dation of the economy." While entrepreneurship is one of
America's strengths. Forhoohar makes the point that busi-
ness creations has been declining since the 1980s.
There is a direct correlation between the decline in new
business efforts and the expansion of the financial sector.
Dramatic growth in the financial sector absorbed much of
the entrepreneurial talent that might have engaged in grass
roots business development.
In America's heyday of economic growth in the 1950s
there was a job for the high school graduate. Sons fol-
lowed fathers into the factory. People could make a good
living in the trades.
Today? Not so much. A large segment of America's
manufacturing capability moved offshore. Forhoohar
states that America should emulate Germany in its quest
for economic rebalancing.
In 2000, the Germans were facing a rebalancing of
their economy. German officials took the long-term view.
Company CEOs met with union officials and worked out
a plan. The German government offered firms temporary
subsidies to counter outsourcing of jobs. Forhoohar says
that German companies worked with educators to produce
a workforce with the skills needed for the German mar-
ketplace. Germany now has a high export rate and a low
unemployment rate.
What are we doing in America? America's "mean
streak" is showing itself. Republicans have demonized
union workers and are in a major campaign to bust unions.
Displaying their meanest of mean streaks, Republicans
state with a straight face that unemployment payments are
a bad thing because America's working men and women
are lazy and would rather live off unemployment than
work.
There won't be any sensible solutions to righting the
American economy until both political parties cease to po-
liticize every issue for political gain.There won't be any
sensible solutions to righting the American economy until
both political parties cease to politicize every issue for po-
litical gain. This is a time for America's leadership to come
together and agree on issues that are in the best interest of
all Americans, not just Democrats or Republicans.


a

in
tss
nty




JUNE 22, 2011 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 7


� 2011 U.S. NEWS SYNDICATE, INC.


UNE 22, 2011 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 7


WASHINGTON

MERRY-GO-ROUND

by Douglas Cohn and Eleainor Clift


Taking Bachmann seriously

WASHINGTON - The breakaway star in last week's
Republican debate in New Hampshire was without ques-
tion Minnesota Republican Rep. Michelle Bachmann, who
presented herself in such a pleasing light that she now
has to be taken seriously. The cable news networks have
had great fun with her and her tendency to say outrageous
things, but she demonstrated the other night that she is a
savvy politician, disciplined about staying on message,
and immensely appealing when she steers away from the
more hard-edged partisanship and talks about bringing to-
gether small-government, fiscal and social conservatives
under the banner of defeating President Obama.
Bachmann chairs the Tea Party caucus in the House of
Representatives, and more than any of the other candi-
dates, she wears the mantle of the Tea Party. She chose
the New Hampshire debate as the venue to announce she
had formally filed the papers to run for president, and she
is considered a favorite, perhaps the favorite, to win the
Iowa caucuses, the first test of next year's primary season.
It helps that she was born in Iowa, but more than that, her
family values and her positions on social issues, from guns
to abortion, make her the likely first choice of the social
conservatives who dominate the Iowa Republican elector-
ate.
She would likely then go head-to-head with Mitt Rom-
ney in New Hampshire, or possibly Jon Huntsman, the oth-
er moderate in the race, to set up a contest in a critical state
for Republican contenders, South Carolina, where Bach-
mann would be favored over the more establishment GOP
types. It's hard to imagine her winning Florida or any of
the big battleground states, but if she wins South Carolina,
she would carry the flag for the Tea Party and its legion
of disaffected voters who look at Romney as more of the
same, and Huntsman, who worked in the Obama adminis-
tration as ambassador to China, as not a true conservative.
It would create a split in the GOP that mirrors the 1912
election, when Teddy Roosevelt broke away from President
Taft to form the Bull Moose Party, handing the election to
Democrat Woodrow Wilson. Roosevelt was progressive
and Bachmann is conservative, but the dynamics are the
same - and Bachmann wouldn't have to formally break
away, which she is unlikely to do. She would just have to
make known her displeasure with the nominee, and the rest
would evolve.
Republicans made enormous gains in the 2010 elections,
taking back the House and winning six new Senate seats,
thanks to the energy and enthusiasm of the Tea Party. If
Bachmann falls short of the nomination but does well in
the primaries, the Tea Party will demand the vice presi-
dency. And if the nominee, let's say it's Romney, shuns
Bachmann, that could take a fatal toll on Tea Party partici-
pation in the fall.
Intensity matters, and if a portion of that Tea Party vote
stays home, the election could tilt to Obama. Bachmann
could choose another course and set aside any personal
feelings of disappointment she may experience, and put all
her energies toward electing a Republican. If she did that,
she would be rewarded in the traditional way that politi-
cians get ahead, and avoid getting labeled a spoiler. Her
choice of veteran GOP operative, Ed Rollins, as her cam-
paign manager, and pollster Ed Goeas, a respected main-
stream analyst, suggest pragmatism and a willingness to
engage in traditional politics that make her far more than a
fringe candidate.
She is no Sarah Palin, and that is a compliment. Some
of her misstatements about American history will haunt
her, such as crediting Concord, New Hampshire with fir-
ing the first shots in the Revolutionary War and claiming
the Founding Fathers ended slavery. A strong debate per-
formance doesn't change everything, but it's a promising
debut for Bachmann.




Page 8 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JUNE 22, 2011


VACATION 9:45a.m.forSundayschool REVIVAL GUEST
BIBLE SCHOOL and worship at 11 a.m. SPEAKER
We have a Sunday SOUTHSIDE ASSEM-
TELOGIA BAPTIST School class for everyone BLYOF GOD Southside PAGE POND ASSEM-
CHURCH - If you are including a Men's Sunday Assembly of God will be BLY OF GOD - Need
looking for a church home School class, Ladies' Sun- having revival from Friday, B f ne
. .. . .. ..-l.... ,I , ,, v, l24 answers for a situation you


or a place to investigate the
truths of God's Word in a
safe non-judgmental place
among friends, come check
us out at Telogia Baptist
Church. We like to think
of ourselves as the church
in the country that God is
using in a mighty way.
We get together for ser-
vices Sunday mornings at


day School Class, Young
Adult Class, Teen Class,
and a large number of age-
graded children's classes.
In addition, we provide a
nursery during our Sunday
School time for babies and
toddlers.
We provide a Children's
Church service for young-
sters ages 2 thru 12 years


Join us on Friday, June 24 at 7 p.m. at
the W.T. Neal Civic center as Blountstown
United Methodist Church presents Van
Dyke UMPuppets For Christ. This award
winning puppet troupe brings the joy of
God's message to kids of all ages. Six foot
frogs, huge dancing flamingos, and stick
figures were just a few things this youth
group has brought in the past.
Puppets For( hI perform extensively
in the Tampa Bay area most of the year,
touching the hearts of kids of children and
the senior citizens alike. Dur-
ing the summerthey take the
show on the road to spread
God's word to other parts
of the US.
Their mission state-
ment is "to seek out
believers and non-be- -
lievers-both young and .
old- to creatively and "- j
joyfully express God's
word through creative arts


Words cannot express
our heartfelt appreciation to
everyone that has reached
out to us during the loss of
our son, Robby McDonald.
There is no way we will ever
be able to list each of you
because the outpouring of
love and support has been
so tremendous.
We are thankful for our
family, the many friends
and our church families who
have helped carry us through
this time. The food, flowers
and most important, your
prayers, have been God's
arms embracing us. We have
been truly blessed.
We know our sweet Rob-
by's memory will never leave
us and through the saddaysto
come the wonderful memo-
ries you all have shared will
be a comfort to our hearts.
May God bless you and
your family. The peace of
God surpasses all under-
standing. We love and ap-
preciate you!
Robert, Lawana
and Joseph McDonald

The family of Russell
Vickery, Jr. would like to
thank everyone for their sup-
port during the illness and


old, which starts at
We have a nurse
children under two
of age.
Wednesday nigh
about children and
Services begin at 7:
Before we begin w
activities, we provide
at 6:45 p.m. for the


and puppetry and to boldly go wh
puppet has gone before!"
Along with performing, PFC, asth
themselves, have sent puppets to Ug
Cuba and Haiti, and have assisted ch
in the creation of puppet teams.
Mark your calendar, invite your i
and spend the evening with us as we
and worship God on Friday, June
p.m. (CST).
Admission is free!


- I'
-4


passing of our husband and
father. Your prayers, phone
calls, visits, food and many
other expressions oflove and
concern helped to sustain us
during the most difficulttime
of our lives. Russell would
have been so honoredbyyour
outpouring of love and gen-
erosity. We would especially
like to thank Dr. Bristol and
his nurses for their personal
attention to his medical care
and Rivertown Community
Church for their personal
attention to his homegoing
celebration.
The family of
Russell Vickery, Jr.

The family of Curtis
Farrell Mullins would like
to thank each and everyone
who came and brought food,
comfort and support to our
family during our sadness
of my son and our brother's
passing. Our thoughts and
prayers go out to all. May
God Bless each and everyone
ofyou. A special thanks to my
church family at Abe Spring
Pentecostal Holiness Church.
I love you all.
Elma Mullins
and family


A special thanks
eryone who came out
birthday party June 1
blessed to have such v
ful friends. Thanks
gifts, but especially
for your friendship.
Michael Murrc


11 a.m. children and workers. Par-
ry for ents are always welcome
years to come and visit in any
activity with their child. We
t is all invite you to come eat with
youth. your child and see the pro-
30 p.m. gram for yourselves. Our
ith our Wednesday night program
a meal runs year round and so it
for the will be their for your child
all summer, exceptthe week
rm for Vacation Bible School
when this will replace the
r regular program for the
week.
ere no Whether it is Sunday
School, Children's Church
iey call or our Wednesday night
ganda, programs, all ofthe workers
urches have a passion for working
with children.
friends We work to create a safe,
praise fun atmosphere where chil-
24 at 7 dren can learn about God
and have fun with their
friends. Each worker is
- committed to working with
your child and making sure
they have great experience
whether they are teaching
God's Word, doing crafts
or recreation.
Vacation Bible School
r will be July 17-21 at 6 to
8:30p.m.withakickoffFun
Day on July 16 from 1 to 4
p.m. Please come and join
us and be part ofthe Telogia
Baptist Church family for
the week. It will be a great
time of prayer and God's
Sword and learning to live
according to His will.
to ev- The church is located at
t for my 19800 NE State Route 65
1. I am in Telogia.
wonder- Find out more about
for the Telogia Baptist Church by
thanks checking us out online at
www.telogiabaptist.com.
ay


J u lll, z-o LU aylla, J ulll
26. Services on Friday and
Saturday will begin at 7 p.m.
and the Sunday services will
be 10 a.m. and at 5 p.m. The
speaker will be Rev. James
Harrell.
The church is located on
S.R. 71, two miles south of
Hwy 20, in Blountstown.
For more information
please call 237-1527 or
272-0742.

'WHAT CATHOLICS
BELIEVE'

ST. FRANCIS OFASSI-
SI CATHOLIC CHURCH
- On Wednesday, June
22 at 6:30 p.m. St. Francis
of Assisi Catholic Church
is presenting the last seg-
ment of the series on "What
Catholics Believe" for the
session. Stephanie McNeill,
the Adult Faith Formation
Director of the Diocese of
Pensacola-Tallahassee, will
be presenting what Catho-
lics believe about Mary and
the saints.
Hors d'oeuvres and
punch will be served dur-
ing the session.
The church is located at
16498 SW Gaskin St. in
Blountstown.
For more information
please call 674-4482.


are going through? Come
hear what God has to say!
Beginning Wednesday,
June 29 at 7 p.m., Page
Pond Assembly of God will
be hosting guest speaker
Jeremiah Hubbard and his
wife "Charity James" Hub-
bard. If you attended any
of the Brownsville revival
services, you likely heard
Charity singing.
Services will be held
Wednesday, June 29through
Saturday, July 2 at 7 p.m.
and on Sunday, July 3 at
10:45 a.m. and at 5 p.m.
The church is located at
23422 Northwest Murdock
Dr. in Altha.
For more information
please call 762-8406.


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Page 8 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JUNE 22, 2011


' %




JUNE 22, 2011 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 9


Chipola has lowest course withdrawal
MARIANNA-According to statewide - . .V---
data, Chipola College has the lowest course -- -
withdrawal rate among colleges in the State
College System.
The report, released in March, shows that
only 6.3% of Chipola's students withdrew "
from a set of monitored classes in the last
three years, compared to the state average -- "
of 11.3%.
According to the report, the analysis was
undertaken because when students fail to


complete a course, it costs the student and
the state money, reduces available class-
room space, and increases the length of time
required for the student to graduate. While
many withdrawals are necessary for personal
and academic reasons, excessive w ithd ral als
pose a significant burden on the student, the
college, and the state.
The data used for the analysis included all Chipola s
college preparatory and college credit courses Adams, s
offered from 2007-2008 to 2009-2010 in the
state of Florida. There were 3,157 courses
with 6,608,926 enrollments. The list of courses was then
limited to those with at least 3,000 course enrollments
system-wide. This reduced the number of courses to


Chipola to offer law

enforcement academy

MARIANNA-Chipola College will offer an evening
Law Enforcement academy beginning July 25.
The program will meet weeknights from 5:30 to 9:3 0
p.m. The course lasts approximately 11 months.
Candidates for the program must be at least 19 years
of age and earn a passing score on the Criminal Justice
Basic Abilities Test (CJBAT). Applicants must have a
standard high school diploma and undergo a medical
physical examination, background check and drug
screening.
A Crossover from Corrections to Law Enforcement
course begins Aug. 1. Orientation is July 21 for both
the Law Enforcement Academy and the Crossover
course. All registration materials must be completed
by this date.
For information, call 718-2394.


students (from left) Hannah Waldorf, Carolyne Van Lierop and As
study between classes.


213 of the most commonly offered courses representing
89% of course enrollments in all 28 colleges. The data
focused on courses with high withdrawal percentages
since they represent the classes which students struggle


conta<
ninga
May%


rate in Florida
to complete.
Between 2007-2008 and 2009-2010,
there were 668,850 withdrawals, represent-
ing 11.3% of the total course enrollments.
Chipola College had the lowest percentage
at 6.3%.
The report also included the five courses
with the highest percentage of withdrawals
at each college. The five courses with the
highest withdrawal rates at Chipola are:
Anatomy and Physiology I (BSC 2093),
Elementary Spanish I (SPN 1120), Calculus
with Analytic Geometry II (MAC 2312),
Chemistry (CHM 1045) and Introduction
to Earth Science (ESC1000).
Data from the study was published
in Chipola FACTS, a monthly factsheet
produced jointly by the Chipola Offices of
Development and Planning and Information
shley Systems/Technology. The purpose ofChipo-
laFACTS isto facilitate good-decision mak-
ing by publishing college-related data.
For information about Chipola FACTS,
ct Gail Hartzog, Director of Development and Plan-
t (850) 718-2342 orvisitwww.chipola.edu/Planning/
o202011.pdf.


S BECOME A VOLUNTEER North Florida Child Development, Inc.
receives grant to enhance outdoor pla
FLORIDA GUARDIAN AD LITEM FOUNDATION
Head Start Body expand and enh
PHONE (850) 410-4642 StartNationalCenter North Florida Child their current p
S�fnr oPhsQicanl Devjel- 1)D lomreno'it Ir/nicf as,' ornundsr hut I


ly
ance
lay-


OPEN NO1W


U-Pick


Tomatoes


E Peppers

Open 7 days
a week at

JACKSON FARMS
IN GRAND RIDGE

592-5579


opment and Out-
door Play announced
North Florida Child
Development, Inc. as
five of 436 recipients
of $5,000 grants to
improve the outdoor
play space at their
centers in Gulf, Cal-
houn, Madison and
Wakulla Counties.


NFCD will purchase value added
packages from one of 27 elite vendors
(Preferred Vendors) who were selected
by a team of evaluators for the packages'
developmental appropriateness, safety and
both play and monetary value.
The National Center was created
through a federal grant to the National As-
sociation for Sport and Physical Education
(NASPE) and the American Association
for Physical Activity and Recreation (AA-
PAR) from the Office of Head Start.
According to CEO of NFCD Sharon
Gaskin, "We appreciate Head Start Body
Start for helping us evaluate our play
spaces and educate our children and their
families aboutthe value ofphysical activity
and playing outdoors, in particular.
This grant will enable our Centers to


importantlyto educate
our parents, staff and
elected officials on the
importance of healthy
habits. Those devel-
oped very young will
be habits of a healthy
adult."
"Outdoor play is
associated with great-
er amounts of physi-


cal activity in children, and research has
shown that opportunities for whole body
exercise has along lasting influence as pre-
school physical activity tracks throughout
childhood," said Center Director Kwame
M. Brown, Ph.D. "Unfortunately children
today spend less time playing outdoors
than any previous generation," added
Brown.
"We want to help the Head Start staff
discoverthe benefits ofoutdoorplay across
developmental domains and learn about
the features of high quality outdoor play
spaces thatpromote movement opportuni-
ties for children of all ability levels."
In addition to the play space improve-
ment, each award-winning Center will
have access to online courses, webinars
and resource materials.


LEARNING TO
CARE-Chipola
College students in
a Practicing Nursing
Skills course
recently deployed
personal protective
equipment to
provide care for a
patient on isolation
precaution in the
Patient Simulation
lab. Pictured
from left, are
Olivia Mosier and
Whitney Whitaker.
For information
about the Chipola
Nursing program,
call 718-2316.


�^\^uv~t~p ,\^ n. U*O
five of 436 recipients of
$5,000 grants to improve
the outdoor play space
at their centers in Gulf,
Calhoun, Madison and
Wakulla Counties.


ARK & FRIENDS I
PRE-SCHOOL AND CHILDCARE
NOW ACCEPTING
ENROLLMENT
For VPK 2011-2012 School Year
That's right! If you have a child
that will be four years of age by
Sept. 1, 2011 and plans to attend VPK,
please come by and see the exciting
Noah's Ark & Friends Pre-School.
Call now, space is limited!
_ - ALSO HAVE OPENINGS FOR
2, & $4- YEAR OLPS AT THIS TIME."

Located at 19057 NE SR 65
Hosford * 850-379-8915
Owned and operated by ,
Delores Tharpe & Nikki Thomas lAr
LICENSE #C02L10503








Page 10 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JUNE 22, 2011


BIRTHDAYS


DALLAS RODESHA
HOGANS
Dallas Rodesha Hogans cel-
ebrated her 27th birthday on
on June 19. She is the wife of
Chivas Williams and the moth-
er of Cha'miya, Chivas Jr. and
her new addition, Chivar Wil-
liams. Her God children are
Taliyah Reed, Ja'Cyia Ivory
and Te'Kori Berrieum. She
enjoys talking on the phone,
being a full time mother to her
Williams crew and, last but
not least, keeping Facebook
updated with her life, "Ok!"
She is thankful for her early
birthday gift from God, the
birth of her son Chivar.

Miss a recent Pets &
Their People column?

Catch up online at
CLUNews.com


DESIRAE LEE
GOFF
Desirae Lee Goff will celebrate
her fourth birthday on June 22.
She is the daughter of Billy and
Jessica Goff of Blountstown.
Her grandparents are Carolyn
Cook of Bristol and Mike and
Susan Keith of Blountstown.
Her great-grandparents are Al-
bert and Elise Osborn. Desirae
enjoys ballet, Dora, Disney
Princesses, playing with her big
sister and going to the beach
and the park.


TEKORI LATRELL
BERRIEUM
Tekori Latrell Berrieum will be
celebrating his third birthday on
June 25. He is the son of Chris
Berrieum and Brittany Smith.
His grandparents are Girtha
Berrieum and Esther Smith. He
attends an Early Childhood Pro-
gram where he enjoys learning
from his teachers and play-
ing with his classmates. Tekori
loves spending quality time with
his younger siblings and family.

OLIVIA ISABELLA
'BELLA' JACKSON
Oliva Isabella "Bella"
Jackson will celebrate
her first birthday day on
June 26. Her Guardian is
Margaret Linton of Kinard.
Bella enjoys singing and
dancing, playing in the
trash, eating and spending
time with her cousin and
playtoy, Karen.


Bristol dance students Allison Myers & Noelle Prichard

attend two-week workshop with the Tallahassee Ballet
Two local ballerinas have just
dedicated two weeks of their sum-
mer vacationto participate in a Sum-
mer Intensive Workshop with the
Tallahassee Ballet. Allison Myers,
12 and Noelle Prichard, eight, both
of Bristol commuted to Tallahassee .
daily to participate.
Allison attended full day sessions
of both ballet and jazz instruction
with numerous guest teachers from
across the country. Noelle attended
a ballet class daily under the instruc-
tion of Jillian Vincent, Assistant.
Artistic Director of the Tallahassee
Ballet. y
Both young ladies are students
ofBonita Deck, owner/instructor of
The Bristol Ballet School. Allison
is the daughter of Irene Myers and
Noelle is the daughter of Dr. and
Mrs. Gregory Prichard.
Liberty County and Bristol can
be very proud of these two young
ladies and their accomplishments.
The classes were rigorous and took
a great deal of dedication by both
the girls and their parents.
They are both pictured at right
in front of the ballet studio in Tal-
lahassee. .. ..


MARY BETH
BROWN
Mary Beth Brown celebrated
her 11th birthday on June 14.
She is the daughter of Doyle
and Beth Brown of Hosford.
Her grandparents are Bob and
Ruth Ann Pickron of Bristol
and Phavis and the late Pau-
line Brown of Hosford. Mary
Beth enjoys playing soccer and
spending time with her family.
She likes swimming as well as
spending time with friends.


OLIVIA GAIL
SHULER
Olivia Gail Shuler celebrated her
third birthday May 29. She is
the daughter of Rhett and Leena
Shuler of Hosford and little sister
to Helaman and Cannon. Her
grandparents are Michael and
Rumpai Abramo of Panama
City and the late Jerry and Gail
Shuler of Hosford. She is the
great-granddaughter of Johnny
Barber of Bristol and Andy
and Alice Patrick of Tyrone,
PA. Olivia's favorite things are
playing with her toys, swimming,
and spending time with her
family and friends.


BIRTH L

CHIVAR JERIEL WILLIAMS


Dallas and Chivas Williams
of Bristol are proud to an-
nounce the birth of their son,
Chivar Jeriel Williams, born
June 18, 2011. He weighed 7
Ibs. and 7 ozs. and measured
20 and 1/4 inches long.
His siblings are Ja'Vas Da-
vis, Aaliyah, Chamiya and
Chivas Williams Jr. His mater-
nal grandparents are Dallas
and Patricial Hogans of Bris-
tol, Bernice Glover of Blount-


stown, Charles Wright of New
York, Nancy Bacon of Bristol
and the late Dallas F. Hogans.
His paternal grandparents
are Jackie Williams of Bris-
tol, Jerome Oliver of Greens-
boro, and the late Charlie and
Gearldine Williams of Bristol.
His Godparents are Kalo-
ski and Aisha Chambers of
Blountstown.
His Godbrother is Tyler
Chambers.


COLTON BRUCE
ANDERS JR.
Colton Bruce Anders Jr. cel-
ebrated his first birthday on
June 16. He is the son of Col-
ton and Schelbie Anders of
Bristol. His grandparents are
Connie and Robert Barton of
Blountstown, Bruce and Pam
Anders of Bristol and Joey and
Carlyan Bright of Tallahassee.
His great-grandparents are
Elaine and Jerry Anders of Bris-
tol and Robert and Gail Barton
of Blountstown. Colton enjoys
driving his paw's big truck, fall-
ing asleep on great-grandpaw
Jerry's four wheeler and riding
paw's horse, but most of all he
loves to spend time with daddy
and mama.


Calhoun Co. Horseman play Sunday at 2 p.m.


The Calhoun County Horsemen
have a game Sunday, June 26 at 2
p.m. (CT) against the Jackson Jays
at the baseball field in Altha.


The Calhoun County Horsemen
will be selling $1 chances at a $100
dollar gift certificate to Classic Auto
Detail Center.


If you would like to purchase any
tickets get in contact with one of the
players or come out to the game this
Sunday.


JUNE 22, 2011 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 11


.ANN IVERSARIFS %


- a

Richard & Ruth Waterman celebrate

50th wedding anniversary June 23
Richard and Ruth Waterman of Blountstown and her husband, Burke Dasher of Bristol and
were wed 50 years ago on June 23, 1961. two sons, Ralph Waterman and his wife, Ruth
Richard is a retired from the pastorate where of Altha and Roger Waterman and his wife,
he served at Blountstown First Church of the Elizabeth of lndio, CA.
Nazarene. Ruth is a retired first grade teacher They also have six grandchildren, Danae
from Blountstown Elementary School. Dasher, Cole Griffin, Caliegh, Riley, Ryan and
They have one daughter, Kathy LaFontaine Reid Waterman.


Jerry & Elaine

Anders to mark

So 50th anniversary

p with cookout
Jerry and ElaineAnders will celebrate
, . their 50th wedding anniversary on June
24.
. - There will be a cookout to celebrate
on Saturday, June 25 starting at 1 p.m.
(ET) behind Veterans Memorial Civic
' \Center at the covered pavilion area next
to the park.
. All friends and family are invited. No
- 'gifts, please.
The Anders are pictured at left on their
. .- wedding day.


Blountstown FFA travels to Orlando to compete at state


KARIS SMITH


Members of the Blountstown FFA Chapter
joined over 3,000 other members from across the
state last week for the Florida FFA Convention
in Orlando.
They went on business, including receiving
awards for competitions earlier in the year,
competing in state finals, and receiving state
degrees.
Caitlyn Stewart (right) competed at convention
in the Job Interview Career Development Event
(CDE) and placed second in the state.
Michael Leonard and Karis Smith (left) com-
peted in the Proficiency category. Karis was
chosen to submit her portfolio for the national
competition.
The Agribusiness Management CDE team,


including Trent Smith, Mitchell Darnell, Gor-
don Yoder and Saad Farooqi was recognized for
placing third in the state earlier this year, as well
as the Agricultural Communications CDE team,
consisting of Faith Plazarin, Savannah Stephens,
April Rich, Cassidy Odom, and Aelon Dykes,
which placed fifth in the state.
We are proud of our competitors, who continue
to represent the Blountstown FFA Chapter well.
Karis Smith also represented the chapter excel-
lently, screening through as one of the top two
candidates for the Area One Vice-presidential
office.
We would like to extend our appreciation to
everyone in the community who helped make
this year successful.


CAI I LYN WI AWAHI


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Page 12 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JUNE 22,2011



Florida's State Board of Education selects Gerard


Robinson as Florida's Commissioner of Education


TAMPA- Following a day ofinterviews with five final-
ists, Florida's State Board of Education (SBE) unanimously
voted Tuesday to select Gerard Robinson as Florida's
next Education Commissioner. Currently serving as the
Commonwealth of Virginia's Secretary of Education
where he advises the Governor in the development and
implementation of education policy, Robinson joined a
pool of 26 other candidates vying for the Sunshine State's
top education position.
"As anticipated, Florida was able to attract a very quali-
fied, very impressive group of finalists for this extremely
important position," said State Board of Education Chair
Kathleen Shanahan. "Mr. Robinson was able to showcase
his passion for education and his desire to lift the achieve-
ment of all students in a very effective way, and I'm
extraordinarily pleased in the Board's decision to make
him our next Commissioner of Education."
Gerard Robinson is the former President of the Black
Alliance for Education Options and has also served as the
Program Director and Principal Investigator. He taught


fifth grade in Los Angeles, California, and was a gradu-
ate Instructor at the University of Virginia and Piedmont
Virginia Community College. He is a graduate of Howard
University and earned his Master's degree from Harvard
University.
"Mr. Robinson's application presented a very strong


Crude oil settles at $93 a barrel, lowest settlement since Feb.


TAMPA- Oil prices fell below $95 a barrel last week
as the U.S. and international economic outlook was less
than optimistic. Crude oil settled Friday at $93.01 a bar-
rel on the New York Mercantile Exchange-$6.28 less
than last week.
The International Monetary Fund cut the U.S. eco-
nomic growth outlook to 2.5 percent this year, from the
projected 2.7 percent based on a slow economic recovery
and poor job market.
Consumer sentiment in the U.S. also fell to 71.8 in
June from 74.3, according to a Thomson Reuters report.
U.S. stockpiles of crude oil rose to the highest level in
almost 30 years in the month of May with a total of ap-
proximately 367 million barrels.
The European debt crisis continues to push oil prices
below $100 amid concern the global economic recovery
will remain at a reduced pace than initially expected and
lower global fuel demand.
"Oil prices are expected to drop further this week and
push retail gas prices even lower," said Jessica Brady,
spokesperson, AAA Auto Club South. "Retail gas prices
reflected minimal decreases for the past two weeks as oil
prices hovered around $100 a barrel.


Now that oil prices dropped below $95, consumers
can expect gas prices to fall another 5 to 10 cents this
week."
The national average price of unleaded regulargasoline
is $3.65 a gallon, 5 cents less than last week.
Florida's average price of $3.59 and Tennessee's av-
erage price of $3.45 both reflect a 4-cent decrease from
last week.
Georgia's average price of $3.56 reflects a 2-cent
decrease from last week, respectively.

CURRENT AND PAST PRICE AVERAGES
Regular Unleaded Gasoline
Current Week Ago Month Ago Year Ago
National: $3.708 $3.775 $3.982 $2.702
Florida: $3.633 $3.685 $3.933 $2.649
Georgia: $3.583 $3.624 $3.945 $2.547
Tennessee: $3.490 $3.530 $3.793 $2.531

AAA s Daily Fuel Gauge Report is updated each day
and reflects actual prices from credit card transactions
within the past 24 hours at two-thirds (100,000) gasoline
stations in the U.S. Its accuracy is unparalleled.


LIVESTOCK MARKET REPORT
For the week ended June 15, 2011 300-400 lbs 136.00-170.00
At the Florida Livestock Auctions, receipt totaled 7,674 400-500 lbs 118.00-150.00
head, compared to 6,929 last week, and 7,634 a year ago. Ac- FEEDER HEIFERS: Medium & Large Frame No. 1-2
cording to the Florida Federal-State Livestock Market News 200-300 lbs 122.50-155.00
Service: Comparedto lastweek: Slaughter cows and bulls were 300-400 lbs 112.00-137.50
unevenly steady to 2.00 lower; feeder steers and heifers were 400-500 lbs 106.00-125.00
unevenly steady to 3.00 lower. SLAUGHTER COWS: Lean: 750-1200 lbs
85-90 percent 63.00-71.00
FEEDER STEERS: Medium & Large Frame No. 1-2 SLAUGHTER BULLS: Yield Grade No. 1-2
200-300 lbs 152.50-190.00 1000-2100 lbs 86.00-96.00


candidate who has the experience and qualifications to
keep Florida's ongoing education improvements moving
full steam ahead," said State Board of Education Vice
Chair Roberto Martinez. "
His thoughtful responses to the Board during his inter-
view clearly defined a Commissioner of Education that
has the energy, enthusiasm andtalentto continue Florida's
educational successes, and improve the academic and life
outcomes of our young people."
The Commissioner of Education serves as Florida's
chief educational officer and is responsible for providing
full assistance to the State Board ofEducation and devel-
oping actions and policies that champion the mission and
goals of Florida's seamless preK-20 education system.
To learn more about the State Board of Education, visit
WwwWJVV h, , .i*,, ,lII .


Liberty County 2nd lowest in state

Latest unemployment rates

lowest since August of 2009
from Kenny Griffin, Chipola Regional Workforce Board
Florida's seasonally adjusted unemployment rate
in May 2011 is 10.6 percent, the lowest since August
2009, when it was 10.6 percent. This represents 980,000
jobless our of a labor force of 9,249,000. The state's
unemployment rate is down 0.2 percentage point from
the April 2011 10.8 percent and is 0.7 percentage point
lower than the May 2010 rate of 11.3 percent.
Florida's total nonagricultural employment in May
2011 is 7,238,000, an increase of 28,000jobs fromApril
2011. The number of jobs in the state is up 24,900 over
the year, an increase of 0.3 percent from May 2010.
"The announcement that unemployment continues
to drop and business continue to add thousands of jobs
shows that Florida's economy is moving in the right
direction," said Agency for Workforce Innovation Di-
rector Cynthia Lorenzo.
There was mixed results from those counties that make
up the Chipola Workforce Board Region, with some of
the counties having slight reductions in unemployment,
while others showed a slight increase. Liberty County
still has the lowest unemployment rate in the region
and has the second lowest unemployment rate in the
state at 6.5 percent.


---UNEMPLOYMENT RATES---
May. '11 Apr. '11
Liberty........................ ...... 6.5 6.5
Calhoun........................... 8.2 8.0
Holm es............................ 7.4 7.5
Jackson........................... 7.4 7.3
Washington....................... 10.5 10.6


May. '10
6.1
8.1
7.6
7.4
10.0


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JUNE 22, 2011 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 13


Whaleyv

Heating & Air Conditioning

SERVICE * UNIT REPLACEMENT
FILTERS ANY SIZE * CLEAN AND CHECKS

(850) 674-4777

SFL LIC. #CMC1249570 VISA


June 20-26 2011

.UNE Old Farmer's
Moon on equator Al anac Best days to destroy
JUN2 pests and weeds
Summer Solstice . .JU.26
Best day to harvest
belowground crops


ln June 20, 1921, the town of of the Town" shows. In New-
Circle, Montana, got 11.5 port, Rhode Island, as the
inches of rain, a state record. In summerof 1969 began, over
Tennessee on June 20, 1924, a baby 150,000 fans flocked to a
boy named Chet Atkins was born; music festival where
he was destined to become one of Jimi Hendrix was going
America's great guitar players. In to be playing. Now, how
the summer of 1948, Ed Sullivan are you going to spend
began hosting the first of the "Toast your summer?

3 tablespoons butter seit the butter in a saucepan, then saut6 the
3 large cucumbers, peeled rdJdcucumbers and onion for about 10 minutes.
and sliced Add the flour, salt, and pepper, stirring until
1/2 small sponion, churpped smooth. Add the broth and simmer for 15 min-
salt and pepper to taste utes to thicken, then puree the soup in a blender.
4cupschicken broth Chill well. Just before serving, stir in the
1/2 cup hea cream cream and garnish with
choppedchlves,efor chives and dill.
garnish
chopped dill, for garnish MAKcES 3 TO 4 SERVINGS.
IT AND WISDOM FROM THE OLD FARMER S ALMANAC -

o* T d k~i rp tiLr I. Itc*,. pni lr'.nil.s in your
SOn Juin.: 2", l ,r. IlI Itr.i LI S ri.in.. rild lip-reading
.'r..aL.i l .. I., h ld riin hladelphi. Pennsylvania.
FRfECIPE L S, GARDENING TIPS, AND) WEATHER FORECASTS, VISIT
Almanac.com


How much is "two
bits" and where did the
phrase come from?
-G. D., Frankfurt, Ky.
Two bits is com-
monly understood in
America to be one quar-
ter. The word "bit" long
meant, in England, any
coin of alow denomina-
tion. In early America,
"bit" was used for some
Spanish and Mexican
coins that circulated and
were worth one-eighth
of a peso, or about
12 and one-half cents.
Hence, two bits would
have equaled about 25
cents.

Why is "Midsummer
Day" associated with
the summer solstice,
when summer begins?
Shouldn't it occur lat-
er?
-D. N., Silver Spring, Md.
In modem times, the
summer solstice marks
for us the beginning
of summer, when the
longest day and shortest
night occur. But to farm-
ers of ages past, whose
interest was the grow-


PEAND PEOPLE
THEIR


Jessie &


Big Poppa -

Big Poppa, a rooster, met Jessie West, 14, two ' ' -
years ago when he wandered into her family's
yard and started a fight with their dog. Big Poppa
loves her and her brother, Marcus, and
sister, Gracie. They often hold and
pet him until he falls asleep. But ,
he is mortal enemies with all
the other family pets, including
a dog and several cats. He
also chases the children's
father into the house almost
every night. His beak is *'
a little deformed so he
has trouble eating but
his spurs work! He
was named Big Papa
because he is the ruler
of his kingdom. Jessie .
is the daughter of Casite
Barbee and John West.
She lives with her mom . :
and stepdad, Mark Barbee,
in Kinard.

PETS AND THEIR PEOPLE IS SPONSORED BY
Altha Farmers Co-op, Inc.
We've got the feed you need to keep your animals happy and healthy!
CATTLE - HORSES - DOGS - CATS - BIRDS and more.
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?hone (850) 762-3161 Phone (850) 673-8102 Phone (850) 482-2416


JUNE 20, MONDAY- West TV,,g,, Day. Conjunc-
tion ofNeptune and the Moon. Apatentfor the telegraph
was granted to Samuel Morse, 1840.
JUNE 21, TUESDAY - Summer Solstice. The first
amendment to Canada's ConstitutionActof]982, which
guaranteed the constitutional rights of Indians and
Inuits, took effect, 1984.
JUNE 22, WEDNESDAY - St. Alban. Moon on
equator Henry Hudson, son, and seven crew members
set adrift by mutineers, 1611. "AskAnn " columnistAnn
Landers died, 2002.
JUNE 23, THURSDAY - Last quarter Moon. Con-
junction of Uranus and the Moon. William Penn signed
a treaty ofpeace and friendship with the Lenni Lenape
Indians in what is now Pennsylvania, 1683.
JUNE 24, FRIDAY Nativity St. John the Baptist.
Midsummer Day. Moon at apogee. The guitar Eric
Clapton used to record the song "Layla" sold at auction
for in4',500, 1999.
JUNE 25, SATURDAY-Massachusetts Bay Colony
governor John Winthrop introduced the fork toAmerican
dining, 1630. Better alone than in bad company.
JUNE 26, SUNDAY- Corpus Christi. Conjunction
ofJupiterand the Moon. U.S. presidentJohnF. Kennedy
visited West Berlin and gave his "Ich bin ein Berliner"
speech, 1963.


ing season, the summer
solstice was seen as
the midpoint between
planting andharvesting.
This festive occasion
was called Midsummer
Day in terms of sunlight
rather than weather.
So why is Midsum-
mer Day on June 24,
when the summer sol-
stice is around June
21? At the time the
Midsummer Day cel-
ebration developed,
the sun reached its
northernmost point on
June 24. Nowadays,
however, because of
the precession of the
equinoxes, the summer
solstice occurs around
June 21. The holiday



Mow your lawn ac-
cording to the needs of
the grass, not the calendar
-- for example, every Sat-
urday. Grasses thicken and
provide better cover when


remained fixed, but
the time of the solstice
gradually shifted. Some
prefer to celebrate Mid-
summer Day on the ac-
tual day of the summer
solstice rather than the
traditional date.
Midsummer Day is
one of the Quarter Days,
originally developed
by the ancient Celtic
peoples who first in-
habitedthe British Isles.
They had divided the
year into four major
sections (Quarter Days)
and then divided each
of these in half (Cross-
Quarter Days) to make
an eight-part year that
reflected the natural pro-
cession of seasons. Long



GARDENING

Jobs for June
from The Old Farmer's Almanac


regularly clipped at the proper height.
Adjust your lawn mower blades to cut
the grass at 2 or 3 inches rather than at
1 1/2 inches.

Prune rhododendrons after they
flower. Onyoung andoldplants, snap off
spent flower stalks by bending them over
until they break away from their stems.
Be careful not to damage growth buds
at the base of each flower stalk.

Don't trim iris leaves into scallops or
fan shapes after the flowers fade. Leaves
carry on photosynthesis and develop
nourishment for next year's growth. Cut
off brown tips and remove the flower-
ing stalk down to the rhizome. If you're
dividing irises, cut the leaves back by


after the Anglo-Saxon
culture became domi-
nant and the 12-month
Roman calendar was
adopted for both civil
and religious purposes,
the old Celtic division
of the year continued,
especially in rural so-
cieties.

Is it true that frogs
croak more before a
rainstorm?
-D. L., Bennington, N. H.
Scientists would
probably say no, that a
frog's croak is a mating
call and not related to
the weather. Folklore
says the opposite, so
we'll let you decide
for yourself. Certainly,
frogs and various wa-
terfowl, such as ducks
and geese, have long
been credited with fore-
casting rain, probably
because of their close
association with water
in general. Toads are
said to come out of their
holes in great quantity
before a rain, sea ur-
chins to dig in the mud,
crabs to head toward
land, and eels to turn
lively. (But have you
ever seen an apathetic
eel?)
Some people say that
if geese walk "south to
north, rain will surely
soon break forth." Also,
if geese cackle or if
tame geese fly, expect
rain. And weather lore
suggests that ducks that
quack more than usual
are calling for rain.



about halfj ust before you
move them.

If you're growing
plants outdoors in con-
tainers, don't use a soil-


less potting mix. Be sure it contains at
least half soil. Or make your own blend
for windowboxes andpatio containers by
mixing one part compost, one part garden
soil, and one part builder's sand.

When shopping at a nursery, don't
buy a tree or shrub with a damaged root
ball. Inspect it carefully to make sure it is
uniform, not crushed, and good size. For
every inch of the trunk, the ball should
be seven to eight inches in diameter.

Unless you're working your way
through knee-high grass, don't remove
those grass clippings from the lawn.
Leave them where they fall to filter
down to the soil, decompose, and recycle
nutrients into the roots.


ASK OLD FARMER'S
THE I f


I


ALMANA




Page 14 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JUNE 22,2011 G A R D E NIN G


Pollinators critical for growing fruits and vegetables
1 by Theresa Friday,- www.pollinator. org/PDF s/
Horticulture Guides/OuterCoastalrx-
Extension Agent, 7FINAL.pdf.
Santa Rosa County For more information,
be sure to contactyour local
Pollinators, such as Extension Office.


bees, birds, bats and
insects, play a crucial
role in the production
of most fruits and veg-
etables. Pollinators are
so important that June
20-26, 2011 has been
designated National
Pollinator Week by the
U.S. Department of
Agriculture.
About 1,000 of all
pollinators are verte-
brates such as birds,
bats, and small mam- .
mals. Most pollinators
(about 200,000 species)
are beneficial insects
such as flies, beetles,
wasps, ants, butterflies, moths, and
bees.
Some U.S. crops are 90 percent or
more dependent on pollination. Some
of these are almonds, apples, sweet
cherries, melons, squash, cucumbers
and blueberries.
Furthermore, 35 percent of the
world's food and beverage produc-
tion, including chocolate and coffee,
depends on pollination.

THREATS
Pollinators are facing an increasing
number of threats. The main threat
is habitat loss, degradation and frag-
mentation.
As native vegetation is replaced
by roadways, crops and non-native
gardens, pollinators lose the food and
nesting sites that are necessary for


their survival.
Pollinators that migrate, such as
the monarch butterfly, face special
challenges.
If the distance between suitable
habitat patches along their migration
route is too great, weaker individuals
may die during their journey.
The improper use of pesticides can
also negatively impact pollinators and
their habitats. Pesticides include prod-
ucts such as weed killers and insecti-
cides, which are designed to prevent,
destroy, repel or reduce pests such as
insects, mice and other animals.

POLLINATOR
GARDENS WILL HELP
The most obvious need for pollina-
tors is a diversity of nectar and pollen
sources. So help pollinators by plant-
ing a "pollinator garden." Consider


Earthworm friends in the garden


by Marilyn Pokorney
Research has shown that Ea
earthworm excrement, also
called castings or vermicom-
post, improves the aeration, guard,
porosity, structure, drainage
and moisture-holding capac- best
ity of soil.
Many studies prove that
when compared to conventional composts,
vermicompost is less variable and much
more stable. Mixing vermicompost into the
planting medium essentially eliminated the
need for additional fertilizer in the produc-
tion of tomato plugs as one example.
Studies show that earthworm castings in-
crease height, stem diameter, enhance root
growth, increase dry weight and produce
more flowers per plant than peat moss.
Redworm castings are the richest and
purest humus matter in the world. Humus
is believed to aid in the prevention of
harmful plant pathogens, fungi, nematodes
and bacteria.
One pound of worms can convert one
pound of pig manure into compost in 48
hours.
Worms consume three times theirweight
a week or more. Red wrigglers are very
active, reproduce quickly and consume
their own body weight of waste every 24
hours. Therefore ten pounds of worms


irth-

is are a

ener 's

friend


will eat ten pounds of waste
in 24 hours.
Worm castings provide
a rich source of a variety of
essential plant nutrients.
Microbial activity in worm
castings is 10 to 20 times
higher than in the soil and
organic matter that the worm


the following when choosing plants
for your garden:
* Choose plants that flower at dif-
ferent times of the year to provide
nectar and pollen sources throughout
the growing season.
* Plant in clumps, rather than single
plants, to better attract pollinators.
* Provide a variety of flower colors
and shapes to attract different pol-
linators.
* Whenever possible, choose na-
tive plants. Native plants will attract
more native pollinators and can serve
as larval host plants for some species
of pollinators.
Excellent resource material from
The Pollinator PartnershipTM/North
American Pollinator Protection Cam-
paign is available to help you design
your pollinator garden.
Go online to www.pollinator.org/
guides.htm and find your ecoregion.
Northwest Florida is in the "outer
coastal plain mixed province" and our
regional guide can be found online at


VALUE NATIVE
BEES
Another way to help
pollinators is to learn to
identify and value bees.
Apiarists, the professional
S * *. title for bee scientists, esti-
mate that one out of every
three bites of food you eat
is directly or indirectly pol-
linated by honey bees. With
honey bee populations im-
periled by the mysterious
condition called colony
collapse disorder, Florida
residents should appreciate
native bees for their role
in the state's environment
and economy.
Florida is home to more than 300
bee species, including some found
nowhere else. About three-quarters of
native species nest in the ground.
People can attract native bees to their
yards by clearing surface debris from
areas with sandy, hard-packed earth.
Native bees are particularly suitable
for home gardens because they do not
sting unless roughly handled.

FINAL
THOUGHTS
Anyone that has been stung by a
bee probably remembers the experi-
ence. To some people, a sting is a
life-threatening situation.
Nevertheless, bees are important
pollinators and pollinators are crucial
to our food supply.
So help the plight of the pollinator
by allowing them to exist in our land-
scapes. Better yet, invite them in by
planting a pollinator garden.


ingests.
How to use worm castings:
*When planting vegetable and annu-
als line the rows and holes with about
two inches of castings. About every eight
weeks side dress the plants with one-half
cup of castings per plant or one cup per
foot of row.
*For perennials work one-half cup of
castings into the soil in the spring, middle
of summer, and early fall.
* For pots and hanging baskets add one-
half inch castings to the top and water in.
Then reapply every eight weeks.
*Roses appreciate four cups of castings
per plant.
* If starting a new lawn add 15 pounds
of casting per 100 square feet when sow-
ing. Once established use seven pounds
per 100 square feet.
For more information aboutvermicom-
S I, lnet I i l i /garden li 'earthworm.htm. l I l/1 I i .
net/garden/earthworm.htm.




JUNE 22, 2011 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 15


Products from flooded-out farms banned for sale to the public


What will be the effect of all the flood-
ingul 11 ,g i hc Mississippi River for organic
farmers, given all the pollutants in the
water? When they recover, can they still
certify their products as organic?
-- Michael O'Loughlin, Tigard, OR

The combination of record floods and
record numbers of organic farms has led
many to wonder about the safety of even our
organic groceries. Luckily for Americans,
the U.S. Food and Drug Administration
(FDA) has a policy in place to govern how
farmers respond to such situations and
how affected crops and fields are handled
to ensure that consumers continue to have
access to healthy and safe food.
For one, the FDA doesn't allow any
flooded out crops-organic or otherwise-
to be sold or consumed by people. The
agency considers "ready to eat crops.. .that
have been in contact with flood waters to
be adulterated due to potential exposure
to sewage, animal waste, heavy metals,
pathogenic microorganisms or other con-
taminants." Given that there is no known
method of"reconditioning" such crops that
would "provide a reasonable assurance
of safety for human food use," the FDA
instructs farmers to dispose of them "in a
manner that ensures they do not contami-
nate unaffected crops during harvesting,
storage or distribution." So-called "adul-
terated" food can be seized and violators


The U.S. Food and Drug Administration doesn't allow any flooded out crops - organic
or otherwise - to be sold or consumed by people, due to potential exposure to sewage,
animal waste, heavy metals, pathogenic microorganisms or other contaminants.
Pictured: An aerial view of farms flooded alongside the Mississippi River.


prosecuted under federal law.
Of course, many farms affectedby floods
have other fields that remain unaffected.
The FDA recommends a 30 foot buffer
between flooded areas and fields that can
still yield edible food. Also, farm equipment
shouldn't be driven through or exposed to
flooded areas (or their affected crops) to
minimize the risk of contamination. As to
when farmers, organic or conventional, can


replant fields inundated with floodwaters,
the FDA suggests waiting at least 60 days
to ensure contaminants aren't still in the
soil.
No discussion of organic farming and
flooding is complete without mention of
global warming. Italian researchers ana-
lyzed runoff data recorded in the Swiss
Alps to study how flood risk varies with
temperature, precipitation and elevation


in mountainous regions. They reported
in the January 2010 edition of the journal
Geophysical Research Letters that global
warming does increase flood risk signifi-
cantly, and that large floods have occurred
more frequently in recent years than in
the past.
Furthermore, they predict global warm-
ing will result in such floods occurring more
often in the future. If global temperatures
increase by 3.6 degrees Fahrenheit, as many
scientists expect, so-called "hundred-year-
floods" could occur every 20 years or so,
putting untold numbers of people at risk.
Global warming is also responsible for
more frequent and more intense storms that
can cause widespread flooding.
The good news is that farming organi-
cally is one way to stave off global warm-
ing. Research at the Rodale Institute found
that "organic farming helps combat global
warming by capturing atmospheric carbon
dioxide and incorporating it into the soil,
whereas conventional farming exacerbates
the greenhouse effect by producing a net
release of carbon into the atmosphere."
And Cornell University researcher David
Pimentel found that organic farms use 63
percent of the energy used by same-size
conventional farms, which rely on large
amounts of nitrogen fertilizer produced
synthetically with large amounts of en-
ergy.


S:A ;1 1
RICHARD ARLON KIMBERLY BETH
miI IA dC%nFI - - -%


ALTHA- RichardArlon Chason, 73,
of Altha, passed away Tuesday, June
14, 2011 at his home in Altha. He was
born on Nov. 7, 1937 in Altha and lived
in Altha all of his life. He was a retired
Supervisor at Florida State Hospital, where he worked for
37 years. He served in the United States Army for two
years and was of the Baptist Faith.
Survivors include his wife, Judy Chason ofAltha; two
sons, Sterling Chason and his wife, Sharon and Shannon
(Coot) Chason and friend, Cindy, all ofAltha; two daugh-
ters, Sherry Byrd and her husband, Bill of Columbia, MS
and Charlie Lipford and her husband, R.L. of Altha; two
brothers, Joe Chason and his wife, Betsy of Lawtey and
Howard Chason and his wife, Jean of Chattahoochee; one
sister, Sandra Summerlin of Altha; seven grandchildren
and seven great-grandchildren.
Services were held on Friday, June 17 at 7 p.m. (CT)
at the Altha Church of God in Altha with Reverend Allan
Nichols and Reverend Bill Mayo officiating. Memorial-
ization will be by cremation.
Peavy Funeral Home in Blountstown was in charge of
the arrangements.


Peavy Funeral Home

& Crematory










Your hometown funeral home since 1994
Funeral Services with Dignity,
Caring and Professionalism.

Marion Peavy
A Hometown Funeral Director
You Can Trust and Depend On!
Telephone (850) 674-2266


MARGARETTE CAPELL HANNEY ACREE
PENSACOLA- Mararette Capell HanneyAcree, 92,
of Pensacola and formerly of Quincy, passed away on June
20, 2011 in Pensacola. She was born in Hosford on Aug.
22, 1918. She was a retired RN who spent many years in
Gadsden County as a public health nurse.
She was preceded in death by her husbands, Clayton
E. Hanney and Fred Acree, Jr.; two sons, Clayton and
Donald Capell Hanney; a grandson, Joey Hitchcock;
a stepdaughter, Mary Catherine Young; a son-in-law,
Joseph Hitchcock, Jr. and her parents, Robert and Ida
Stallworth Capell.
Survivors include her daughter, Mary Beth Hanney
Hitchcock of Pensacola; a daughter-in-law, Carlotta Han-
ney of Tallahassee; a stepdaughter, Anna Belle Madison
and her husband, Warren; a stepson, Fred Acree, III; eight
grandchildren; 14 great-grandchildren and three great-
great-grandchildren.
Services will be Saturday, June 25 at2 p.m. at St. Paul's
Episcopal Church in Quincy. Family will receive friends
from 1 p.m. to the start of the service in the Parish Hall
of St. Paul's. Interment will be at Hillcrest Cemetery in
Quincy.
Charles McClellan Funeral Home in Quincy is in charge
of arrangements.



Charles McClellan

Funeral Home
Charles K. McClellan
Licensed Funeral Director
42 years experience
Call us - Let us explain how we can
conveniently handle arrangements
in Liberty County.
Butler-Morgan/Morgan-McClellan Funeral Home
Building at 15 S. Jackson St., Quincy, 32351
Phone: (850) 627-7677 or 643-2277
[[^ I..


IVILCUY
BLOUNTSTOWN - Kimberly Beth McCoy, 31, of
Blountstown passed away Friday, June 17,2011. She lived
in Blountstown most of her life. She worked at Superior
Bank in Bristol as a Commercial Loan Processor for several
years. She attended Rivertown Community Church.
She was preceded in death by her father, James Morgan
and her grandparents, John Wesley and LauraMae Morgan
and Roland Larkins.
Survivors include her husband, John Paul McCoy;
her children, Lucas and Madison, all of Blountstown;
her mother, Joan Morgan and her fiance, Mike Williams
of Bristol; her grandmother, Oneta Larkins; five sisters,
Angel Tipton and her fiance, Robby Kyle, Jamie Morgan,
all of Bristol, Heather Wood and her husband, Tommy, of
Altha, Shannon Harper and her husband, Leroy of Bristol
and Karen Morgan of Kinard; her stepfather, Carlos Ar-
razattee of Greenwood; a special cousin, Lynn Peddie,
who was like a sister to her; and many extended family
members.
Services will be held at 3 p.m., Wednesday, June 22 at
Rivertown Community Church with Paul Smith officiating.
Interment will follow in Pine Memorial Cemetery.
Adams Funeral Home in Blountstown is in charge of
the arrangements. Online condolences may be made at
adamsfh.com.

LEONA PAULINE
CHESTER
MIDDLEBURG - Leona Pauline Chester, 92, of
Middleburg, passed away Wednesday, June 15,2011. She
was born Oct. 26, 1918 in Rock Bluff.
She was preceded in death by her loving husband of
50 years, Clarence Lee Chester.
Survivors include one sister, two children, five grand-
children and 13 great-grandchildren.
Services were held Saturday, June 18 at 10 a.m. (ET) at
the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints in Quincy.
Interment followed at the Sycamore Cemetery.
Charles McClellan Funeral Home in Quincy was in
charge of the arrangements.


IT'S VERY WISE TO ADVERTISE
in the Calhoun-Liberty Journal and...
Call 643-3333 * Fax 643-3334 * Email: thejournal@fairpoint.net
R_________________________


CLJ
News
.COM F




Page 16 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JUNE 22, 2011


M & W SELF
STORAGE RENTALS



5'x10'.....$27
S10'x10'.....43
10'x20'....$70
10'x25'....790
Call 573-5255, 762-9555,
762-8807 or 762-8597UF,


Ffor Rent
in ALTHA

Very NICE
2 & 3 bedroom
trailers.

762-9555
or 762-8597


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miles north on Hwy. 69
N. NO PETS. Dam-
age & Cleaning deposit,
plus first months rent.
Water, sewer and grass
cutting provided.
Call 674-8888


LIBERTY COUNTY
10 acres $65,000
$600 Down, Low
Monthly payments
Owner financing,
zoned for House
or Mobile Homes
TRI-LAND INc. BROKER
(813) 253-3258



AUCTION
July 2 at 7 p.m.
(First Saturday of every month)
* Old Coins * Candy
*Tools * Food
* Collectibles * Misc. items
FREE SETUP FOR YARD
SALE EVERY SATURDAY.
Public is invited.
18098 NW County Rd. 12
643-7740
Col James W CopelandAB1226/AU0001722


- For Rent in
BLOUNTSTOWN
14x70, 3BD, 2 BA mobile
home. Unfurnished, water
with rent, ready by July 1.
$400 month
$200 deposit
NO Pets or more than 4 people
Call 674-3694
rafter 5 p.m.


Estate Sale
in Blountstown
June 23, 24, 25 & 30
also July 1 & 2
Located at 16075 NW
Carter Lane, Blountstown



. Call 447-2867 /


ITEMS FOR SA
IBM laptop, 14" screen
dows XP Professional with
1.7 GHz processor, DVD/(
drive, $175. Call 693-0898.


Pink radio, $20; record
plays 33 1/3 and 45s, $1
electric clock, $50; 6 ft.
rack, $50. Call 674-3264.

2007 Jazzy Electric whe
in excellent condition. Ne
and controls, $300 firm. CE
3485. 6-22, 6

Bowflex Motivator weight
in excellent condition. Lik
with all attachments and v
for $300. Call 674-4242.

20x25 Deck for building a
boat, with some lumber. Eig
dows, both front and rear do
sulation and 4 blocks of sty
(2x4x12), $2,500. Call 64
after 5 p.m. or leave mess


Arm Reach Co-Sleeper
bed. Holds one or two
comfortably. Portable, cc
from a free-standing bass
CO-SLEEPER@ brand bas
play yard. Includes removal
ric liner, mattress and fitted
40" x 28" x 31." Natural tol
color. Comes with leg exte
to raise the CO-SLEEPERC
bassinet in 2" increments fr
(normal bed height) to 3
lowtop bed height). $50.
lent condition. From a smo
pet free home. Call 37c
6-22, 6-29

Pack 'n Play Classic Pla'
Natural tan color. Excelle
edition. From smoke and p
home, $30. Call 379-80
any questions. 6-22, 6

Nikon D3000 camera with
months old, upgrading. $47
674-7138 or 899-0269.

Big shop shelf unit with
shelves, 6 1/2 ft. high x 18"
4 ft. wide, enclosed. Heavy
material, $45. Call 762-42;


Gateway laptop comput
crosoft Windows, works pe
$350. Call 447-1533.

Wurlitzer piano, $250 OB
557-3180.



FREE

Blueberries, u-pick. Ca
5544.


kLE
, Win-
1 SP-3,
CD-RW


Under counter microwave, like
new, $150. Call 643-2859. 6-15,6-22


FURNITURE


Dining hutch with cabinet, $100.
6-22629 Two lighted curio cabinets, $100
for both. Call 674-9161. 6-22,6-29
player, Broyhill living room set, over-
0; 6 ft. stuffed couch and chair with cof-
baker's fee table, two end tables and two
6-22, 6-29 lamps, $300. Country dining room
set in white pine, has 4 chairs and
elchair custom bench, $250. Call 674-
)w tires 1655. 6-22,6-29
all 762-
-29 Two night stands, medium size,
white, $30 for both. Call 674-
bench 3264. 6-22,6-29
ke new
weights Largechest ofdrawerswith 30x38
6-22, 6-29 mirror, $50. Call 762-3370. 6-22,6-29

house- 42" Glass round table, very nice,
jht win- $50; 4x4 cabinet, metal, looks new,
rofoamrs, in- $40; lamp, $20; black dresser with

3-6124 mirror, $200; TV set, $75; chest of
age. drawers, $25. Call 674-3264.
6-22,6-29 6-15, 6-22

baby Cedar chest, $75; new queen
babies size mattress and box spring,
converts $300; entertainment center, $165.
Binet to Call 643-2859. 6-15, 6-22
sinet to
ble fab- La-Z-Boy sleeper sofa, queen
I sheet. size, clean, good condition, $100.
ffee/tan Call 674-7210. 6-15,6-22
tensions
@ brand
om 24" Furniture: King mattress set,
0" (pil- queen mattress set, twin set,
Excel- wrought iron coffee table and end
Dke and tables, Broyhill couch and lots
9-8016. more furniture. Can be seen at
the Calhoun Liberty Ministry Cen-
ter, Hwy 20 in Blountstown or call
y Yard. 674-1818. UFN
nt con-
)et free
16 with
29 CARS

lens, 6
5. Call6 1988 Toyota Tercel, needs work
6-22,6-29 or for parts, $500. Call 674-6002

seven after 5 p.m. 6-22,6-29
deep x
Gauge 1999 Saturn, $2,800 OBO. Call
31. 674-9161. 6-22,6-29
6-22, 6-29
1997 Mercury station wagon,
needs radiator, $1,200. Call 674-
rfectly. 3264. 6-22, 6-29
perfectly.
6-15, 6-22

0. Call TRUCKS
6-15, 6-22
1993 Dodge Dakota, extended
cab, V6 Magnum, runs good. Will
trade for good running boat or
$1,500. Call 573-8563.
6-22, 6-29
ll 545-
6-22,6-29 1978 Ford F150, XLT Lariat, long


wheel base, two door sup
.351 modified with two bar
APPLIANCES buretor, two way radio, ti
speed control, AM/FM rac
GE upright freezer, $50. Call blights, good 15" tires with
674-6002 after 5 p.m. recent parts, C-6 Transrr
6-22,6-29 $2,500 OBO. Call 643-350!


Three ton AC unit, $700. Call


674-9161.


6-22,6-29 2004 Chevy Tahoe e


er cab,
rel car-
oolbox,
lio, ca-
lots of
mission,
9.
6-22, 6-29

excellent


condition, clean interior. Listed
at $9,360. Must sell, $7,760 firm.
Call 447-0235. 6-22,6-29

2006 Nissan Titan with 97,000
miles, loaded, $14,500 negotiable.
Call 447-2379. 6-22, 6-29

2006 Lincoln Navigator, cash-
mere color. Beige leather heated
and cooled seats, sunroof, navi-
gation system, 6-disc CD changer,
DVD rear entertainment system
with headphones, seats eight.
Excellent condition. $18,900. Call
643-4362. 6-22, 6-29

1998 Dodge van, high top, hy-
draulic lift for wheelchair, cold A/C,
$3,600 OBO. Call 643-5622.
6-15, 6-22

1998 Chevy S-10, 4x4, new mo-
tor, $1,500. Call 508-1679.
6-15, 6-22


AUTO
ACCESSORIES

Utility trailer, 4x6, all metal, $175.
Call 643-3509. 6-22,6-29

Radiators, serviceable, GM,
V-8. Call 674-8570 leave mes-
sage. 6-22, 6-29

Four 17 inch Motag racing rims,
5-spoke, brand new. With 205-
4R17 Cooper tires, racing lug nuts
included, $550 OBO. Call 443-
0020. 6-22, 6-29

Headache rack with lights for
full size truck, $300 OBO. 1999
wrecked Ford F350, 7.1 liter pow-
er stroke, $3,500. Call (850) 258-
4052. 6-22, 6-29

Four 16 inch aluminum rims,
fits Jeep, Dodge or Ford, multi-lug
pattern, $250. Call 674-7138 or
899-0269. 6-22, 6-29

Goodyear tires Wrangler Du-
roTrak, LT285/70/17, $350 OBO.
Call 447-4993. 6-22, 6-29

4x8 Utility trailer, drop gate, new
tires, $350. Call 379-8410.
6-15, 6-22


MOTORCYCLES

& ATVS


Four wheeler, $250. Call 447-
3457.


THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL




C(T ASSIFEDS

To place your ad, call 643-3333 by noon Eastern
Time on Saturday. Non-business ads run FREE for 2 weeks.


BRISTOL
*2 BR/1 bath
* Mobile home lots
* 3 BR/2 BA Mobile Homes

BLOUNTSTOWN
*1 room efficiency, utilities
included -Commercial, Old
Mexican Restaurant -Day
care location available *2
BD/1 1/2 BA Townhouses
Phone 643-7740 .


LOOK


1, 2, & 3 Bedroom
Apartments
"The Best Place to Live"
Rental Assistance

Sutton Creek Jipartments
16978 NW Mayo Street
Blountstown, FL 32424
850-674-4202
TDD/TTY 711
"This institution is an equal
opportunity provider, and
employer."



HOUSEHOLD

ITEMS
$159 - 2pc Queen mattress
set. New in plastic w/ war-
ranty. Can deliver. 545-7112

$349 NEW King Orthope-
dic Pillowtop Mattress Set
in Sealed Plastic, Warranty.
Can Deliver. 222-9879

4 piece matching Living
Room set. BRAND NEW still
wrapped. $550. Can deliver.
222-7783.


S 6 PC


6-22, 6-29 (NEW)
es. $549.


2008 motor scooter with less
than 150 miles, clear title, $850.
Call 762-4231. 6-22, 6-29

2007 Yamaha Virago 250cc,
6,000 miles, does not run
(dropped a valve), looks new, no
dents or scratches, never been
dropped, serviced regularly, clear
title, $1,000 OBO; 2005 Kawasaki
Ninja 250 cc, 10,000 miles, runs
great, serviced regularly never
been dropped, two new tires and
battery, clear title, $2,000 OBO.
Call or text 567-8076. 6-15 6-22


* 425-8374.


bedroom
Still in
Can deliver.


Adjustable bed with
Memory Foam Mattress
***$999!***, BRAND NEW
in Boxes with warranty. Can
deliver. 425-8374.

Sealy Posturpedic Queen
mattress set - BRAND NEW
still in sealed plastic. Full 10
year warranty. ONLY $399.
Call 222-7783. Delivery is
available.


* House for Rent*
* in Bristol *
* 2 BD, 1 BA, *
New Carpet & Vinyl *
*350 month + *
$ 300 deposit *
S NO Pets33
SCall 447-1533
A '4F A A A




JUNE 22, 2011 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 17


SLADOKLU

5 6 4 9

3 6

98 2

1

2 4

68 7 1

5 4

1 7 2 5 9

7
Level: Intermediate


JULY 3
Julian Assange, Journalist (40)
JULY 4
Malia Obama, President's child (13)
JULY 5
Shane Filan, Singer (32)


Fun By The
Numbers
Like puzzles?
Then you'll love
sudoku. This
mind-bending
puzzle will have
you hooked from
the moment you
square off, so
sharpen your
pencil and put
your sudoku
savvy to the test!


Here's How It Works:
Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken down into nine
3x3 boxes. To solve a sudoku, the numbers 1 through 9 must fill each
row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row,
column and box. You can figure out the order in which the numbers will
appear by using the numeric clues already provided in the boxes. The
more numbers you name, the easier it gets to solve the puzzle!

9 4VZ L 9 8 C 6
9 6 6 9 8 LZI. L
SL 9 t C 6 9 9 Z
F 986 L L 6 8 9
V 9 9 6 9S 1 1 IL
6 L I. 9 8 Z 9 S
6ZL 9 6 9 9 9 VI.
L 9 9 Z L t 8 6 9
8 6 7 V 9 . Z L
:U3MSNV



SSTHRSCOPE

Week of July 3 ~ July 9


ARIES - Mar 21/Apr 20
Social interaction will
put a smile on your face,
Aries. This week you will
find you spend a lot of time
with friends, simply
enjoying their company.

TAURUS - Apr 21/May 21
Taurus, if you question
too many things, you will
never get anything accom-
plished. Ambivalence leaves
you feeling paralyzed. It's
time to make a move.

GEMINI - May 22/Jun 21
Recent admissions by someone
close to you has you wondering
what the ulterior motive could
be, Gemini. Take things at face
value and don't be so suspi-
cious.

CANCER - Jun 22/Jul 22
Cancer, planning a birthday
bash takes on new meaning
when you're ready to pull out all
the stops. If done right, it has the
makings of a party to remember.

LEO - Jul 23/Aug 23
Leo, regardless of what you be-
lieve, the world will keep turning
if you don't have ultimate control
of everything. Therefore, lighten
up and share the workload.

VIRGO - Aug 24/Sept 22
Financial concerns come to the
forefront, Virgo. Without some
assistance, your accounts could
dip much lower than you would
like. Take action immediately!


LIBRA - Sept 23/Oct 23
Libra, focus on personal
issues that need to be resolved.
Once you tackle these things,
you will have more free time to
devote to guilty pleasures that
have been avoided.

SCORPIO - Oct 24/Nov 22
Scorpio, you and your
spouse or partner don't see
eye-to-eye on many things.
This can lead to misunderstand-
ings that need to be resolved.
Have a little patience.

SAGITTARIUS - Nov 23/Dec 21
Sagittarius, a relationship
that you thought might be
long-term has ended prema-
turely. Don't dwell on what
might have been; move on to
greener pastures this week.

CAPRICORN - Dec 22/Jan 20
Capricorn, matters of the heart
must be temporarily set aside
because you have other press-
ing requirements. Just don't
neglect family life for too long.

AQUARIUS - Jan 21/Feb 18
Aquarius, sometimes you
have to lighten up or people
may not want to spend time
with you. Now is the time to
let loose and enjoy yourself.
Try to make new friends.

PISCES - Feb 19/Mar 20
Don't get too lost in your own
thoughts this week, Pisces. You
need to be focused to handle a
few tasks at hand.


JULY 6
Sylvester Stallone, Singer (65)
JULY 7
Michelle Kwan, Athlete (31)
JULY 8
Toby Keith, Singer (50)


JULY 9
Tom Hanks, Actor (55)


Harley Davidson Sportster
1200, custom year 2000, $2,800.
Call 508-1679. 6-15, 6-22


BOATS & GUNS

1987 23 ft. center console boat,
excellent condition, clean interior,
no soft spots. Ready to go in the
water. $7,000 OBO. Call 447-
0235. 6-22, 6-29

14 ft. fiberglass boat with a 25 hp
Mercury motor with stick steering
and trailer, $850. Call 762-8146.
6-22, 6-29
1979 Venus Hydro Stream boat,
no motor, with aluminum trailer,
$1,000 OBO. Yamaha waverun-
ner, $250. Call (850) 258-4052.
6-22, 6-29

1988 Sailfish, 21 ft., 225 Johnson
Looper, $2,800 OBO. Call 508-
1679. 6-15, 6-22

14' Fiberglass boat, with 40 hp
Mercury four stroke motor, in-
cludes trailer, $1,700 OBO. Call
718-6580. 6-15,6-22

TOOLS and

EQUIPMENT

Troy-Bilt Super Bronco tiller,
use twice, $650. Call 447-2440.
6-22, 6-29

14" Pullen chainsaw, $40. Call
762-3370. 6-22, 6-29

Snapper riding lawn mower with
a 33" cut. In excellent condition.
$325. Call 526-1753. 6-22,6-29

Animal-drawn cultivator, an-
tique, iron wheels, $140. Avery
farm tractor, gas, 4 cyl. Needs
painting but works. Comes with
manual. $2,200. Call 762-4231.


Call 762-4059.

Male beagle, 15 months o
tered, $50; female register
tick beagle, 15 months o
643-6808.

Mini horses, one female
male, 4 months old, best
cepted on each. Call 363-


Red Lab, real friendly, nee
yard to play. Free to a good
Call 762-8146.

Five kittens with whole ta
tails and bob tails, calico,
and black. Mother and
young male gray cat. All
good homes. Call 819-9
814-1186.

Boxer/Pit bull puppies, si
old, free to a good home. C
4163 ask for Marilyn.

Shih tzu male, full growl
dogs; black lab and blue
puppies. All free to a gooc
Call 762-8566.

Rat terrier puppies, six
old, first shots and worme
and dad on site, $75. C
3877 after 4 p.m.

Puppies, eight weeks o
shots and wormed. Mother
er/Pit bull, father is Ameri
$50 each. Call 447-1560.

Irish Setter, male, beaut
sure about age, very play
good with kids and other
free to a good home; mali
black and white calico, al
months old, has been wor
no shots. Call 447-0111.

Hog, male, $100. Call 237


6-22,6-29 LOST: Semi-automatic pistol.
1983 Lar Grissley Win Mag Mark I
Ild, neu- 45 ACP. Fully loaded with 7-round
red blue magazine. Black iron sights, red
)ld. Call front sight, white rear site. With a
6-22, 6-29 polyester holster and small flash-
light. Lost between May 5-7 at the
and one Chipola River park in Clarksville
offer ac- or on CR 5 at Frink Community
-9504. Center. Reward offered for return.
6-22, 6-29 Call 674-5837. 6-22, 6-29

ds large LOST: Black and tan coon hound
d home. named Ruby, female, seven
6-22,6-29 months old. Lost in the Hosford

ails, half area off Chester St., missing since
orange Saturday, June 11. Reward of-
a small fered. Call 294-1398. 6-15,6-22
free to
9300 or LOST: Black and brown Peking-
6-22, 6-29 ese, blind, 13 years old, last seen
on J.M. Dillard Rd in Altha on
x weeks Monday, June 6. Reward for re-
'all 674- turn. Call Anthony at 762-2018 or
6-15, 6-22 272-8333. 6-15, 6-22

n; three FOUND: Calico cat in Hosford
� heeler area. Needs good home. Call 294-
d home. 1398. 6-15,6-22
6-15, 6-22

weeks HOMES/LAND
1d. Mom
all 639- 1/2 Acre lot, great location, with
6-15,6-22 city water and sewer, paved street.
Only five minutes from downtown
d, first Bristol. Call 447-1533. 6-15,6-22
r is Box-
can Pit, One acre land with single wide
6-15, 6-22 trailer, has built on living room and

iful, not screened in back porch, in Altha,
near Chipola River, needs work,
ue and, $18,000 OBO. Call 674-1254,
e pets, leave message with call back


e kItten,
bout six
med but
6-15, 6-22

'-1587.


6-22,6-29 Yellow Lab, male, three months


Craftsman 6" belt and 8" sander
on stand, $100. Call 557-3180.
6-15, 6-22

Poland Pro garden tiller, 6.5 hp,
brand new motor, $350 OBO. Call
237-1587. 6-15, 6-22

Craftsman 3/8 14.4V cordless
drill, variable speed, reversible,
never used, $60. Call 674-7210.
6-15, 6-22


PETS/SUPPLIES

Free puppies, mixed breed with
lab, three female, one male. Two
chocolate colored, one brindle,one
black. Eight weeks old, wormed.







Located in the City Lim-
its, close to everything.
$400 month or
small down payment
plus $500 month.
Call 674-3264


old, no papers. Free to a good
home. Call 643-1514 or 643-1459,
ask for Nicky. 6-15, 6-22

Free puppies to a good home.
Call 643-2526. 6-15, 6-22

Razor Edge Pit bull, 17 months
old. Call 718-6580. 6-15, 6-22

LOST/FOUND
LOST: Back pillow for wheel-
chair. Very important pillow, lost
Sunday, June 19 on the way to
church. Somewhere on Hwy 67,
on 379, on 12 or on 20. Please call
if you have found it, 643-2945.
6-22, 6-29



Cute Longeared

Passed Hound Lab

PUPPIES




$150


447-3001


number.


6-15 6-22


WANTED


AC unit, 5,000 BTU with 110 amp.
Call 674-3264. 6-22, 6-29

Hog panels. Call 643-5431 or
643-7117, if no answer leave mes-
sage. 6-22, 6-29

Ezgo electric golf cart, running
or not, cheap. Need for a disabled
man. Call 762-3617. 6-15, 6-22

We buy junk cars and trucks.
We will pick them up. Call 643-
5045 or 447-3819. 3-23T 12-28


CAMPERS

1997 5th wheel camper, 33 ft.,
two slide outs, fully equipped. Call
762-9763. 6-22, 6-29


YARD SALES

1t ALTHA I
Friday & Saturday, June 24 &
25 from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Locat-
ed at 15329 JW Rackley Street,
turn by Altha Library on Hwy. 274.
Tools, electronics, chemistry and
medical books, electronics testing
equipment, aquarium and miscel-
laneous items.
I BRISTOL N
Saturday, June 25 beginning at 7
a.m. Located at 12729 NW Twin
Oaks Drive. Household items,
boy's and girl's clothes, name
brand purses and more. Phone
643-2827.


THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL




C(L..ASSIFIED S

To place your ad, call 643-3333 by noon Eastern
Time on Saturday. Non-business ads run FREE for 2 weeks. A


FAMOUS BIRTHDAYS




Page 18 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JUNE 22, 2011


FWC refines gopher tortoise permitting process


The FloridaFish andWildlife Conserva-
tion Commission (FWC) approved revi-
sions to its gopher tortoise permitting
guidelines June 8 during its meeting in
St. Augustine.
The FWC approved a management
plan for gopher tortoises in September
2007, providing conservation measures
to ensure that gopher tortoises thrive in
Florida. The plan calls for permitting
guidelines that make certain that Florida
meets the tortoise's habitat needs now
and in the future. Initially approved
in 2008, the guidelines are revised as
the FWC learns more about the needs


of gopher tortoises and
receives input from the
public.
The revisions approved
reflect input from meet-
ings with stakeholders
during the past year.
The revised guidelines
include reduced moni-
toring requirements for
landowners who receive relocated
tortoises and a modified conservation
permit to include an on-site relocation
option for public projects (e.g., roads,
public schools or governmental facili-


ties) that occur on or next
to public conservation
lands. Both revisions help
reduce landowner costs
incurred in relocating
gopher tortoises.
"The Gopher Tortoise
Technical Assistance
Group and FWC staff
have worked together
since 2006 to build and refine the
FWC's landmark gopher tortoise
management plan," said Deborah Burr,
Gopher Tortoise Management Plan
coordinator. "Working closely with our


stakeholders, we are always improving
the permitting process so we have the
best possible plan to ensure a place for
gopher tortoises in Florida now and in
the future."
"I encourage staff to think outside
the box," said Commission Chairman
KathyBarco. "Continue to look for new
ways to make the permitting process
more efficient and equitable for all
landowners."

For more information about the
management plan, go to MyFWC. corn
Gopher Tortoise.


Bay scallop season to open early, close late this year


The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Com-
mission (FWC) reminds people that the recreational
harvest season for bay scallops in Florida will begin
June 25 and extend through Sept. 25. The FWC, in
support of Gov. Rick Scott and Cabinet, added three
weeks to this year's season to help relieve Florida
fishing communities suffering from possible eco-
nomic hardships due to the 2010 Deepwater Horizon
oil spill.
Open scalloping areas on Florida's Gulf coast
extend from the west bank of the Mexico Beach
Canal in Bay County to the Pasco-Hernando county
line near Aripeka. It is illegal to possess bay scal-
lops while you're in or on state waters outside the
open harvest areas, or to land bay scallops outside
the open areas.


There is a daily limit of 2 gallons of whole bay
scallops in the shell or 1 pint of bay scallop meat
per person. In addition, no more than 10 gallons of
whole bay scallops in the shell or one-half gallon
of bay scallop meat may be possessed aboard any
vessel at any time. You are allowed to harvest bay
scallops only by hand or with a landing or dip net.
Bay scallops may not be harvested for commercial
purposes.
Unless otherwise exempt, you will need a regular
Florida saltwater fishing license when you use a boat
to harvest scallops. If you wade from shore, you will
need a regular Florida saltwater fishing license or a
free resident shore-based license.
Divers and snorkelers are required to display a
"divers-down" flag (red with a white diagonal stripe)


while in the water. Boaters must stay at least 100
feet away from a divers-down flag in a river, inlet or
channel. In open waters, boaters must stay 300 feet
away from a divers-down flag.
During the season, scallop harvesters can assist
FWC's scallop researchers by completing an online
survey at www.svy.mk/bayscallops. Harvesters can
indicate where they harvest scallops, how many they
collect and how long it takes to harvest them. Partici-
pants can also email BayScallops@MyFWC.com to
ask questions or send additional information.
More information on bay scallops, including management
rules, dive-flag jgi.,i,.,oi, and b'ioiiig safety is available
onlineatMyFW( .ni I i/.i ig (clickon "RL gi.'r I'"under
"Saltwater F, li ig '). Information about scallop research is
available at MyFWC/Research/Saltwater under the "Mol-
lusc " section.


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR LIBERTY COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVI-
SION
FILE NO. 11-10CP
IN RE: ESTATE OF,
ALEXIS PATTY,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the es-
tate of ALEXIS PATTY, de-
ceased, whose date of death
was April 13, 2011, and whose
social security number is
XXX-XX-8806, is pending in
the Circuit Court for LIBERTY
County, Florida, Probate Divi-
sion, the address of which is
10818 NW SR 20, BRISTOL,
FLORIDA 32321. The names
and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the
personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.


All creditors of the decedent
and other persons having
claims or demands against
decedent's estate on whom
a copy of this notice is re-
quired to be served must file
claims with this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SER-
VICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the dece-
dent and other persons having
claims or demands against de-
cedent's estate must file their
claims with this court WITHIN
3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED
WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS
SET FORTH IN SECTION
733.702 OF THE FLORIDA


PROBATE CODE WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING
THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM
FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR
MORE AFTER THE DECE-
DENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED.
The date of first publication of
this notice is June 15, 2011.
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
MICHELE MARIE
CORCIONE, ESQ.
Attorney for BETTY HUTTO
Florida Bar Number: 52025
ELLIS, GED & BODDEN, P.A.
7171 North Federal Highway
Boca Raton, FL 33487
Telephone: (561) 995-1966
Fax: (561) 228-0914
email: mcorcione@el-
lisandged.com


Personal Representative:
BETTY HUTTO
18587 NE OLD BLUE
CREEK ROAD,
HOSFORD, FL 32334 6-15,
6-22


NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
SHARLETT D. GONZALEZ-
SPRING
Last known address of:
12373 NW Virginia G. Weaver
Street
Bristol, FL 32321
You are hereby notified that
your eligibility to vote is in
question. You are required to
contact the Supervisor of Elec-
tions, in Bristol, Florida, no
later than thirty (30) days af-
ter the date of this publishing.
Failure to respond will result
in a determination of ineligibil-
ity by the Supervisor and your
name will be removed from


the statewide voter registra-
tion system.
Published one time in the Cal-
houn Liberty Journal
Marcia A. Wood
Liberty County Supervisor of
Elections
P. 0. Box 597
Bristol, Florida 32321
Date: June 22, 2011 6-22


NOTICE FOR BID
THE CALHOUN LIBER-
TY EMPLOYEES CREDIT
UNION WILL BE ACCEPTING
SEALED BIDS ON THE FOL-
LOWING:
2008 Kia Optima, 4 cylinder,
4 door, LX sedan, 41,118
miles, NADA retail value,
$11,225
May be seen at Calhoun Lib-


erty Employees Credit Union,
Blountstown Branch.
ONLY REASONABLE BIDS
WILL BE ACCEPTED. The
credit union reserves the right
to reject any and all bids.
Last day to submit bid is July 5,
2011. 622&29

PUBLIC AUCTION
Jamie's Auto Repair will hold a
public auction on June 30, 2011 at
2 p.m. (ET).
1997 2-door Chevrolet/Geo Metro LS
Vin# 201 MR2291 V6713970
Our auction will be held at Jamie's
Auto Repair at 12395 Baker Street,
Bristol, FL Jamie's Auto Repair
reserves the right to reject any and
all bids
The Calhoun-LibertyJournal 6-15-11
& 6-22-11.
If you need any more information
on the above vehicle, please call
(850) 643-6495 ask for Jamie.
6 15, &22


iC fs)JOB* M*aET


I


Positions Available

IN BRISTOL

Leon Advocacy and Resource Center, a
non-profit agency with an excellent reputa-
tion and work environment, has caring staff
full-time & part-time positions available in
Bristol. Salary, benefits and leave package
available.
Position requires 1 year related experi-
ence, reliable transportation, current auto
insurance, pre-employment drug screening
and background clearance.
Applications can be accessed from LARC's
website, www.leonarc.com, and faxed to
(850) 422-0824 or mailed to 1949 Common-
wealth Lane, Tallahassee, FL 32303. EOE


I


Do you want to
make a difference?
Big Bend
Big Hospce Are you a caring
Hospicecompassionate nurse?


Big Bend Hospice is looking for you!

RN - Gadsden/Liberty Counties
On Call weeknights and weekends

Must have a current Florida RN license BSN preferred
and a minimum of 2 years nursing experience. Previous
hospice or home health experience preferred.
Email resumes to: hr@bigbendhospice.org
6-15 T 7-13


r Liberty County School Board

JOB ANNOUNCEMENT
The Liberty County School District cur-
rently has two positions open for the 2011-
2012 school year.
To view and apply for this position, go to
www.lcsbonline.org.

Applications will be received from
June 16 through June 25

Transportation Provider

Employment opportunities are offered without regard to race,
Religion, sex, national origin, age, handicap or marital status.


PUBLIC AND LEGAL NOTICES I




JUNE 22, 2011 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 19


FWC gives more protection to Florida's permit fishery


The Florida Fish and Wild-
life Conservation Com-
mission (FWC) took
final action June 9 on
several rule amend-
ments to further en-
hance and protect
Florida's permitfishery,
while also strengthening
management of the Florida
pompano and African pompano
fisheries.
The FWC extended the cur-
rent regulations in Florida waters
for these species into adjacent
federal waters. Federal waters
extend beyond nine nautical miles
from shore in the Gulf of Mexico
and three miles from shore in the
Atlantic Ocean. This will give
permit, Florida pompano and
African pompano more protection
and increase the enforceability
of our current rules. Previously,
there were no regulations regard-
ing the harvest of permit, Florida
pompano or African pompano in
these adjacent federal waters.
In addition, the new rules sepa-
rate the management strategies for
the three species and create two
new management areas for the
harvest of permit. In South Florida


and the Florida Keys, permit
is largely a trophy and

ery. In other areas of
Florida, anglers catch
permit from the shore
and more often keep
them as a food fish.
To better manage per-
mit for these different uses,
the FWC created a Special Permit
Zone, which includes all state and
federal waters south of a line run-
ning due east from Cape Florida
and south of a line running due west
from Cape Sable. The remainder
of the state (north of these lines)
makes up another management
zone.
In the Special Permit Zone,
the commercial harvest of permit
will be prohibited. In this zone
the recreational fishery has a
minimum size limit of 22 inches
fork length and a daily bag limit of
one permit per person and two per
vessel. Also, recreational anglers
are allowed to use only hook-and-
line gear, except that spearing for
permit is allowed in federal waters
in the zone. Additionally, a May,
June and July harvest closure ap-
plies in this area.


Outside this zone, recreational
slot size for permit of 11-22 inches
fork length and a daily bag limit
of two fish per person applies,
with an allowance for one permit
over 22 inches in length. A vessel
limit of two permit larger than 22
inches in length also applies. Also,
recreational anglers are allowed
to use only hook-and-line gear
for permit, except that spearing
for permit is allowed in federal
waters. No commercial harvest
for permit is allowed, however,
commercial fishers who are (
targeting other species with nets
outside of the Special Permit t
Zone are allowed an incidental r
bycatch trip limit of 250 fish.
In addition, the rules:
* extend current FWC Florida w
pompano recreational and com-
mercial gear regulations and V
commercial trip and size limits s
into federal waters; j
* maintain the Florida pom-
pano recreational minimum size e
limit of 11 inches fork length; f
* eliminate the 20-inch l
Florida pompano maximum
size limit for recreational har- l
vest; and u
* maintain the recreational t


daily bag limit of six Florida
pompano per person (no longer an
aggregate limit with permit).
Current FWCAfrican pompano
recreational size and bag limits
also were extended into federal
waters, and spearfishing for Afri-
can pompano is allowed in federal


The Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission (FWC)
approved a rule June 9 that makes
he recreational harvest season for
ed snapper in Gulf of Mexico state
waters consistent with the recently
announced season in Gulf federal
waters.
This year's open recreational har-
vest season for red snapper in Gulf
state waters will be June 1 through
uly 18.
Florida state waters in the Gulf
extend out to nine nautical miles
from shore; federal waters extend
beyond that line.
Gulf red snapper stocks are re-
building but are still considered to be
undergoing overfishing, which means
hat red snapper are being taken at a


waters.
The new permit, pompano and
African pompano rules approved
by the FWC take effect on Aug.
31. For more information regard-
ing permit, pompano and African
pompano, go to MyFWC.com/
Fishing.


rate greater than established manage-
ment goals for this fishery. Shorten-
ing the fishing season in Gulf state
waters this year will help to avoid a
harvest overrun and continue to re-
build red snapper populations so that
longer red snapper fishing seasons
will be possible in the future.
The Commission also gave the
FWC's executive director the ap-
proval to use his executive authority
to allow an additional harvest season
for red snapper in the Gulf at the
summer's end if NOAA Fisheries
Service implements a supplemental
season.
More information regarding
red snapper fishing regulations is
available online at MyFWC.com/
Fishing.


STUMP

GRINDING
. ReasorLa:.le
.i" ' 7 Ratei
4W , U FREE
.-. ;. Estimates'
Call Chris Nissley
al 674-8081 or
643-8561 (Cell)



SRM b



T.-l,:,i.: a o.' Bril.:'l ra.-a:


Phone David Morris
al (850181,-.8- 12;c .5
.:,r ISl:,np l.:ri al ,.?,.0 5i5 5--44 14

Septic
Services,
Inc.
SSEfriP SYSTEM INSFETiIONS
* SEFrie TANKS * 9- AIN FilEtu
SSITE PKEF WATEK LrEi
INstAttIATION U& REFAIK

1- 1 d : , _ J -


Whi I field Steel Recycling, Inc.I- I




S F r Iw f RF -.- I n I I ri I.:' www wn . ..in ii
We Purchase: .- : '".'^ ..i
I- ,F , . . , :, , , , 1- 1 ... , 1. . . .:II I' I-,I I











^, ur, . ,:, ,,, . . .. .l.o P , ,: , ... ..:, -. _r -
IIE'SI",EI T,-,L8 1 I FII: ,-, L







a - .rPU-- ,-" ,,1 I - 1- 1 r ,A,1, - h- .1-
� LE^ US - TouR -pincASI�


BRO w

W lrlg u
Repir Waer ervce
Welldriling& Pmp rpai
Deepor halow ell
Servig Gul, FrnklinLBay


William's Home
Improvements
"N' J0 T'0 ' BiO O r Snl.Fi"




F'HR FREE ESiiAiE
Call 674-8092


Margie 's

Florist
-y.:l' . :'UI ,:,Ur pr.:- .El:.
alyIlI'I Ir ,. i .-iI i.r.- .- :.
F.:.r VVW ..'a..h : Bi r,1.lay: a .n1' all
H I l . : .":,: r Ca11 :r .: ll :i


%,pl-pofdchee '

� s1c'1 '-' ,.,4-,.'-,1 Business & Accounting Solutions Inc.
Sl85'i| '543-'2064
. grI ch'I S A . -, ,-,I l n h I IH. r ,r LI.l'f
:i.r :ll FI I I.,, I . ..F

Gary Richards, EA MBA 1-i"-: ,:,,:4 S



LIBERTY TIRE COMPANY
W e ".pecializeinsles -


OTR Equipivimeni Farm iEquipmeni r.I
Passenger Crar & LigMI Truck Tires.
Call 643-2939
Co're '.se uS IC.r all U.Lir lire need.S r give uS aE Call
CI.r rca,.dside vicee Cii cllianges & lire, ro'liain
H.:i.ir- TlC.',n..l- r It r Fr,.l-Fr - � . S .F M.1 1 -
li'7- 1 n -.W H '*i' Frn:h-.I I-I '* '1


BF-oodrcr
1 r
ii -i:^


Clay O'Neal's
Land Clearing, Inc*
Dozer and Excavation work i.
Demolition * Pond Digging . I
Road Building * Tractor Work


4433 JWC 274
Alitha Fl 32421


S. |(S8501762-9402
..rn.:( Cell 850) 832-5055


To place your ad call us at 643-3333


FWC sets this year's Gulf red

snapper recreational season


That Darn Pump
There is never a convenient
time to be without nwaler.
* REPAIRS * WELLS
* PUMPS-TANKS
Fo l tenIl\ s 'i ice anrin nci c& 3nt
O I elrme chaices caJ/
i.:'.,OiS.4?. L-I_1' Thai E 6i , .?*- '~?. .,:r H 'ir. me . .?.:..
.aar,,ln W ;",d,.1iai1i Jr * Brisil FL


II


Whaley Heating &

Air Conditioning

(850) 674-4777


SERVICE * UNIT REPL ACEAIENT
INSTALL NATION

VISA FILTERS ANY SIZE


CompuNet Technical Services
" U'r ,, I'orlcl Class Techology S.,ppol Teoin'
C'ni ipieiensive Teec:i'nolcgr/ Suppc'ii and
Sei vices Se Iving Cal~i.cliun Lieily l Ja,;kson Bay
Wasninglrcn G III anld 1 adsdeni Coullies
WWW.COMPUNETTECHNICALSERVICES.COM
20775 Cential Avenue East, Suite B
Blountsto\ in, FL 32424
Telephone (850) 237-1888
email: cIs@compunellechnicalservices.com


-ij k


~� ��




Page 20 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JUNE 22, 2011


F6 D,"Z O?�wD
4 p @IP�LL NE�EE
AMERIC A'S* "*^' ~


2011 FORD RANI3ER


2011 FORD RANGER




Stock #11242


2.3L 14 ENGINE: 5-SPD AUTOMATIC 0/D TRANS A/C
MSRP.................................... 9,B70
Discounts ..........................S.... 75
Retail Customer Cash......-33,000
Trade-In Assistance..........-S1,00DDD
NOW.....S14,995

2011 FORD F-15D SUPER CAB XLT
Stock #1126D --


4 CYL; Automatic; A/C
MSRP................................S.... 21,565
Discounts ............................ -1,070
Retail Customer Cash......-33,000
Trade-In Assistance..........-3S1,000
NOIW.....S16,495

2011 FORD F-150 SUPER CREW LARIAT


2011 FORD F-15D SUPER CAB XL
Stack #11162


3.7 V-B,


Trailer Tow, Cruise


MSRP.................................... 28,480
Discounts ............................. 1,485
Retail Customer Cash.......-$2,500
FMCC BONUS CASH.............-S1,00DD
NODW..... S23,495

2011 FORD F-250 CREW CAB LARIAT
Stock #
11235
-AIL


9�t ( ( �$ f/


i&e,


ly4/ed


6eatelc


p3298A 04 FORD F-150
SUPER CAB FX-4
X4 FLAIRSIDE,
BRIGHT YELLOW,
DIESEL, WEATHER, GOOSENECK, HMOONROOF,
LEATHER,
K MILES.........................K MILES
117,995







10 FORDE-250 , . -
EDGE SEL P -3284
SATELITTE RADIO, POWER, PKG
ALLOYS1630K MILES.................................. 95
09 FORD F-250 #11217A
CREW CAB LARIAT 4X4
DIESEL, LEATHER, GOOSENECK, HITCH,
26K MILES ..................... $39,995

0612 PANISSAN
ARMADA LE
LEATHER, MOON ROOF. LOADED, $ 1
76K MILES...............................
10 FORD E-250
CARGO VAN #P28
VS, POWER PKG.,
16K MILES ...................................
10 FORD E-350 ,ai;Um~qfthll
12 PASS. VAN
XLT VS POWER PKG.,s$
ONLVY I 1K MILES .................... 2 , 9


Our Sales '
Team Is s
Here To
Help You! 4D
John Allen
All prices plus S299.50 PrH, Tax, Ta


WWW.


#1o349A 09 FORD F-150
SUPER CAB LARIAT
LEATHER,
CHROME PKG.,
SUPER NICE,
ONLY 30K
MILES

, 495

07 CHRYSLER PT CRUISER
71 K MILES, #11280AA
POWER PACKAGE, AUTO.......................$7,995
08 DODGE CHARGER #11159B
SXT POWER PKG., TILT,
CRUISE, CD, 62K MILES.....................$12,995
09 FORD FOCUS SE #R3241A
POWER PKG., CUISE,
ALLOYS, 20K MILES.............................$11,995
08 FORD FUSION SE #R33os
POWER PKG, 4 CYLINDER,
NICE! 45K MILES.................................$16,995
07 VOLVO s60 #11268A
LEATHER, MOONROOF,
SUPER NICE, 61K MILES........................$16,995
08 LINCOLN MKZ #R3302
LEATHER, LOADED,
33K MILES........................................$21,995
10 FORD FLEX SEL #R3310
LEATHER, 3RD ROW SEATING,
ALLOYS, 19K MILES.............................$28,995


John Bryan Craig Bard Ronnie Coley Ryan I
in 6f Titi-. Pirctur-s fnr Illustration nnlv. Incrntive


#R3272 08 FORD F-150
SUPER CREW 4X2 LARIAT
LEATHER,
CLIMATE
CONTROL,
LIKE NEW,
ONLY
14K MILES



07 GMC YUKON
DENALI
#11211C MOONRAUTO. F, LEATHER,
V72, CHROME WHEELS,71K MILES............
07 FORD F-SPORT50
#10333 1
SUPER CAB XL 4X4 $1.7
V8LEATHER, WORK TRUCKADED,54K MILES......... N,
05 JEEP WRANGLER
UNLIMITED 4X4
11259ADAUTO., LOTSOF EXTRAS, $
72K MILES ...............3 ....... 2 1 5
07 FORD SPORT
TRAC LMT. 4X4
LEATHER, LOADED,49K MILES.........$22,995
10 DODGE CHALLENGER-
2000R,V6, #10319B
AUTOMATIC, NICE, 36K MILES......... $2


Plenty More
Great Deals
On the Lot To
Choose From!


nnd thru OR/3I0/1. W.A.C


Rick Barnes, Sales Manager


XL


2011 FORD RANGER XL SUP CABIN
Stock #11269


3.7 V-B, 305 HP, XLT Plus Pkg, Chrome Pkg
MSRP.................................... 33,850
Discounts.........................-S2855
Retail Customer Cash.......-S3,500
FMCC BONUS CASH.............-S1,000
NOW..... S26,495


4X4. LEATHER. ECUBDDST ENGINE, MAX TRAILER TOW
MSRPF.................................... 45,430
Discounts ............................ 3,935
Retail Customer Cash.......-S2,00DD
FMCC BONUS CASH.............-31,000
NODW.....S38,495


Diesel, Leather. 20" Wheels. LOADED!
MSRP....................................S57,985
Discounts ............................ 4,990
Retail Customer Cash.......-2,500
FMCC BONUS CASH .............-S1000
Trade-In Assistance...........-S1,00D
NOW.....S48,495


lipulaFord.com


--


*7-*ae4-'




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