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The Calhoun-Liberty journal
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00027796/00274
 Material Information
Title: The Calhoun-Liberty journal
Portion of title: Calhoun Liberty journal
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: The Liberty Journal, Inc.
Place of Publication: Bristol Fla
Publication Date: 4/15/2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Bristol (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Liberty County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Calhoun County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Liberty -- Bristol
Coordinates: 30.426944 x -84.979167 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in Sept. 1991.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 11, no. 38 (Sept. 18, 1991).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002046630
oclc - 33425067
notis - AKN4565
lccn - sn 95047245
sobekcm - UF00027796_00274
System ID: UF00027796:00274
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly journal (Bristol, Fla.)

Full Text
Univ of Florida History Lbrary
PO Box 117007
Gainesville Fl 32611


Monday


50"
includes
-tax


storm


blasts


Calhoun


&, Liberty
by Teresa Eubanks, Journal Editor
A fierce storm that tore through the
panhandle Monday left a trail of broken
limbs, downed power lines, torn shingles
and lengthy power outages along with
scattered reports (although no official
confirmation) of tornados.
The National Wehther Service was in
Calhoun County Monday, touring the area
with Emergency Management Director
Sonny O'Bryan to assess the damage.
O'Bryan's office reported Tuesday that
there was evidence of straight-line winds,
but no verified tornados.
"I wouldn't be surprised if there was a
tornado," O'Bryan said. "We just didn't
see any evidence of it."
When the storm got going it unleashed
a volley of marble-sized hail for several
minutes, according to Liberty County
Emergency Management Director Rhonda
Lewis. A bolt of lightning from Monday's
storm is said to be cause of a house fire on
Lake Mystic.
Storm watchers in both counties report
seeing dark "rotations" of clouds which
never made contact with the ground.
"I speculate that whatever came through
Blountstown, we were at the center of it,"
said Blountstown City Manager James
Woods. "The winds initially started
blowing from the west and before the
storm was over, the winds were coming
from the north. By the time the storm
finished, the wind moved in a 180 degree
direction."
City crews were scrambling to restore
power to Blountstown during the storm
and at times, "Visibility was less than 25
to 30 feet," Woods said.
"At one point for two or three hours, the
power was out in the entire city," he said.
"By 6:30 p.m., I would say that probably
half to two-thirds of the city had power."
Many other Blountstown homes were
without power until Tuesday morning.
But two Liberty County High School
seniors say they did see a tornado.
Sami Marotta, 17, and her friend,
Clara Foran, 18, were about to drive out
See STORM continued on page 17


Vo -Volu


JOURNAL
iime 29, Number 15 Wednesday, Apr. 15, 2009 i


No one was inside when the Lake Mystic weekend home of the Forrest family of Tallahassee caught fire
Monday afternoon. JOHNNY EUBANKS PHOTO


Lightning strike ignites home at


Lake Mystic Monday afternoon


by Teresa Eubanks, Journal Editor
A lightning strike is believed to be the cause of a fire
that consumed a weekend home on Lake Mystic, rapidly
engulfing it in flames Monday afternoon.
A series of storms moving through the panhandle brought
hail, rain, strong wind and numerous lightning strikes -
including one heard that afternoon by Angela Read, who
lives about 20 feet from the brick and wood home owned
by Terry and Karlene Forrester of Tallahassee.
"Around 3 p.m.. I heard a loud boom and I'm almost
positive lightning struck their house," she said.
When she started to leave her house a couple of
hours later, she was stunned to see the home next door
burning.
"I had just walked out the door to go pick up my
daughter from cheerleading practice when I saw my
neighbor's garage aflame," she said, estimating the time
at around 4:50 p.m. Another neighbor, Donnie Stover,
rushed to Read's door to warn her about the fire and met
her as she was coming outside.
Stover said she noticed the sky getting darker and


stepped outside to take a look around 4:40 p.m. "I saw
smoke billowing out the back really bad." she said of the
Forrester home. "After calling 911. I went outside again
and I could see flames coming out."
The fire was contained to the lot located at 11130 NW
Lake Mystic Road.
Read said she was grateful that the ground was
dampened by recent rain but credits the quick response of
volunteer firefighters with saving her property, pointing
out. "The way the wind was blowing, it was coming to
my house."
The only damage to the Read home was to a section of
siding, but at one point it looked like the fire was coming
to them.
Read's daughter, Jessica, 14, came home and when
she and her mother were inside their house there was a
moment when firefighters thought a burning utility pole
might fall on the building. "People came in screaming
'Get out, get out now!'" she.said. Jessica darted into her
See LIGHTNING STRIKE continued on page 17


Bristol man charged
with 22 counts of
credit card fraud...3


Police seek help
identifying suspect
in store video.... 9


Invite butterflies to
your garden with the
right plants..........25


Former deputy clerk
arrested on a charge
of grand theft.......9


Il I 11111 Sheriff's Log...2 Community Calendar...4 Commentary...6, 7 FWC hog hunting dates...10 Page to the Past....11
7 1812 00900 8 Farmer's Almanac...11 Birthdays...14 Weddings...15 Schools...20 & 21 Obituaries...22 Classifieds...28 & 29


S2 12/2912009
1846








Page 2 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL APRIL 15, 2009


A Blountstown man found
himself in the back ofa patrol car
after being stopped for driving
with loud music Friday night.
The bass was thumping as
Patrick Daniel Bess, 29, traveled
west on Central Avenue as he
approached a patrol car.
Bess then turned left onto
River Street, where the patrol
car pulled out to follow after a
cracked taillight was observed on
the vehicle.
After stopping Bess, a police
officer approached and asked for
his driver's license. According to
the arrest report, Bess was "very
argumentative" and demanded to
know why he had been stopped.
The officer said he would
explain the stop after he handed
over his registration and license.
Bess gave him the registration
and stated that he didn't have his
driver's license with him.
The officer then stated that he
was stopped because his music
was audible more than 25 feet
from his vehicle, he had a cracked
taillight and failed to signal when
he turned onto River Street.
Bess again became
argumentative after being issued


A pair of half-brothers were
arrested after a Saturday traffic
stop in which one fled and the
other resisted arrest, according
to a report from the Blountstown
Police Department.
Officer Tim Partridge noticed
the four-door Oldsmobile they
were traveling in speed up
suddenly after he fell in behind
them on State Road 20 as they
passed the Southern Express on
the east side of town.
When the officer accelerated
to keep up with the car, the
driver then began going even
faster, according to the arrest
report.
The eastbound car turned
off State Road 20 onto a long


citations for loud music and
failing to present his driver's
license on demand.
"I'm not signing the loud music
ticket," Bess stated, according to
the officer's report.
Bess was asked to step out
and put his hands on top of
the vehicle. As the officer was
putting him in handcuffs, Bess
pulled back and then went toward
the driver of the vehicle.
He was then grabbed and put
in the patrol car.
During the search, the driver's
sister, Ericka Bess and her
boyfriend arrived on scene. She
claimed the vehicle was hers and
would not leave until threatened
with an obstruction of justice
charge.
A wrecker was called to move
the vehicle. Bess was taken to the
Blountstown Police Department,
where he continued to argue with
the officer. Bess said that next
time, officers would have to chase
him before he stopped, according
to the arrest report.
Bess was booked into the jail
on a charge of refusal to sign a
citation.


Teen caught with 3 bags

of marijuana in traffic stop
A Friday traffic stop led to the arrest of a Port St. Joe man on drug
charges.
Blountstown Police Officer Patrick Crawford stopped an eastbound
Cadillac on S.R. 20 just before the intersection with Mason Road for
not having an operable tag light.
The officer asked the driver, identified as Tommy M. Martin, 19, to
step out of the car and talked with him a few moments before asking
if he had anything illegal on his person or in the vehicle.
Martin, who was visibly nervous, said no but later admitted he had
some marijuana in his right front shorts pocket.
A plastic bag pulled from his pocket held three smaller bags, all
with small amounts of marijuana with a total weight of approximately
S25 grams.
Martin was handcuffed and placed in a patrol vehicle. His
passenger, 19-year-old Kellie Renee Wright, was asked to step outside
the vehicle as it was searched. She was taken to the police station
where she was picked up by a relative.
Martin was charged with possession of more than 20 grams of
marijuana and possession of a controlled substance with intent to
distribute.


Blountstown

Police Dept.

- ARREST


Man arrested after fleeing from officer;

half-brother charged with resisting arrest


driveway, where the driver
again accelerated and pulled in
behind a brick house.
When the officer pulled up, he
saw a white female identified
as Michelle Purkey, 40, of
Bristol get out of the back
seat. The two front doors of the


car were standing open.
Purkey stated that her
boyfriend, Robert William
Kersey, 33, and his half-brother,
William Grady Noel, 29, of
Perry, ran from the vehicle.
She said Kersey is on 7 a.m. 7
p.m. drug offender curfew and
his brother was driving with a
suspended license.
She said when they pulled
behind the house, Noel stated
that, "I'm not going back to
jail."
Tracking dog teams were
called to the site to find the
two men but before the search
began, Noel came walking out
of the woods, yelling that he was
going to give himself up. He
was taken into custody.
Tracking dogs then began
the search for Kersey, who was
found hiding in the woods a
short time later.
Noel was charged with fleeing
or attempting to elude a police
officer, felony driving with a
suspended license and resisting
arrest without violence.
Kersey was charged with
resisting arrest without violence
and violating state drug offender
probation.

Driver admits

to drinking and

smoking pot

before DUI stop
A man who admitted to a
police officer that he'd had some
whiskey and "smoked a couple
of joints" earlier in the evening
was arrested for DUI, according
to a report from the Blountstown
Police Department.
Charged Saturday was
Anthony Scott Reddick,18, of
Blountstown.
Blountstown Police Officer
Jody Hoagland spotted a green
Jeep traveling west on Clark
Street with an inoperable tag
light. He followed the vehicle as
it crossed North Main Street onto
Angle Street and then made a
quick left turn from Charlie Johns
Street onto Pennington Avenue
before coming to a stop partially
in the road.
The officer noted the strong
odor of an alcoholic beverage
coming from the driver as he
spoke with him. When Reddick
got out of the Jeep, he stumbled
and caught himself, the officer
stated in his report.
After attempting a series of
roadside sobriety exercises,
Reddick said, "I just can't do it."
He was then taken into custody.
Riding with Reddick were five
passengers.
Breath tests taken at the police
department showed Reddick with
a blood alcohol content of .05
and .049. A urine sample tested
positive for THC.


CALHOUN COUNTY
April 6
*Stephen Hill, VOSP (warrant), CCSO.
*Norman John Horner, II, disorderly intoxication,
resisting arrest without violence, CCSO.
April 7
*Debbie Lynn Pizani, battery (domestic), BPD.
*Jose Camallio, failure to appear, CCSO.
*Rufus Cargile, VOP (state), CCSO.
April 9
*Waymon Leon Richardson, VOP (county), CCSO.
*Timothy Hatton, VOP (county), CCSO.
*Dawn Rollyson Elrod, possession less than 20
grams marijuana, CCSO.
*Paula Wiggins Camp, possession of drug para-
phernalia, CCSO.
*James W. Branning, battery, CCSO.
*Jessica Whitfield, possession of drug paraphernalia,
possession of controlled substance, BPD.
April 10
*Jennifer Marie Pullam, VOP (warrant LCSO),
CCSO.
*Gary Myt Brown, VOP, resisting arrest without vio-
lence, BPD.
April 11
*Patrick Daniel Bess, refusal to sign citation, BPD.
*Tommy Mack Martin, possession more than 20
grams marijuana, possession with intent to distribute,
BPD.
*Anthony Scott Reddick, DUI, BPD.
SApril 12
*William Grady Noel, fleeing and.eluding police,
resisting arrest without violence, driving while license
suspended or revoked (felony), BPD.
*Robert William Kersey, VOP, resisting arrest without
violence, BPD.
*Adam Brent Crenshaw, worthless check less than
$150 (8 counts), worthless check less than $150 (2
counts), CCSO.
*Cameka Shanae Blue, possession drug para-
phernalia, possession less than 20 grams marijuana,
CCSO.
*Tiffini C. Guster, possession drug paraphernalia,
possession less than 20 grams marijuana, CCSO.
LIBERTY COUNTY
April 6
*Billy Pullam, bond revoked by judge, Judge.
*Kathryn Young, domestic battery, LCSO.
*Shelbra Finch, serving 90 days, Court.
*Charles Drew, credit card fraud (22 counts),
LCSO.
April 7
*Debbie Lynn Pizani, holding for CCSO, Name.
*Jena Rogers, grand-theft, LCSO.
April 8
*Eugene Lamb, VOP (state), LCSO.
April 9
*Michael Naylor, VOP (state), LCSO.
*Andrew Perkins, holding for CCSO, CCSO.
April 10
*Paula Wiggins Camp, holding for CCSO; CCSO.
*Dawn Rollyson Elrod, holding for CCSO, CCSO.
*Jessica Lynn Whitfield, holding for CCSO, CCSO.
*Sebrina Travis, driving while license suspended or
revoked, LCSO.
*Jennifer Pullam, holding for CCSO, CCSO.

Blountstown Police Dept. t,
April 06 through April 12, 2009

Citations issued:
Accidents......................03 Traffic Citations..................20
Special details (business escorts, traffic details).............89
Business alarms..........00 Residential alarms............01
Complaints..:... ....................163

Listingsincludenamefollowedbychargeandidentificationofarrestngagency The names above represent
those charged. We remind our readers that all are presumed innocent until proven guilty


Loud music leads to arrest

for refusal to sign citation







APRIL 15, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 3

Woman charged after racing through trailer park, bottle in hand


A report of a woman speeding
through Duggar's Trailer Park
with a whisky bottle in her hand
resulted in the arrest of 28-year-
old Sebrina Jeanette Travis of
Bristol.
Liberty County Deputy Wade
Kelly responded to the Friday


call and saw a silver SUV with
a black female driver pulling
out of the trailer park onto Rock
Bluff Road.
When she saw the patrol car,
Travis stopped her vehicle and the
deputy pulled up next to her.
After giving her name, she


responded to his request for her
license by stating that she did not
have one. When asked if she had
ever had a valid driver's license,
Travis responded that she had but
it had been suspended.
The deputy noted in his report
that he could smell the strong


odor of an alcoholic beverage
coming from the driver's face.
When asked if she had been
drinking, she replied, "Yes."
She then held up a pint bottle
of Seagram's gin that was about
half empty, according to Kelly's
report. When asked if she had
consumed the missing alcohol,
the driver replied, "Yes."
Travis was arrested for driving
while license suspended or
revoked,
After a tow truck arrived to get
the vehicle, Travis was taken to
the county jail.
Kelly's report noted that Travis
was not given a roadside sobriety


test at the scene for safety issues
due to the heavy traffic. She
later passed a field sobriety test
at the jail.
In addition to the DWLSR
charge, she was cited for having
an open container of alcohol in
a vehicle.


Bristol man arrested for 22

counts of credit card fraud


SLCHSS

students:


SUBMIT YOUR DESIGNS

BETWEEN APRIL 6 & MAY 11


Prizes will be:

*Free shirt

of the design :s

*$100 gift

certificate

*A Spirit

Gift basket

*Free entry to first

football game

with a free

hot dog & drink ,

from Buy Rite Drugs


SFor more information,
call or stop by


U ,You ge7







Js,// oe
0eein s


Buy Rite Drugs
SR 20 in Bristol a Phone 643-5454


A Bristol man is facing 22
counts of credit card fraud after
his foster mother discovered her
credit card had been taken from
her residence in Orange.
Deputies arrested 27-year-old
Charles Lee Drew at K&K Trailer
Park, where he had been staying
with his sister.
After deputy Wade Kelly
caught up with Drew at the back
door of the home around 8 p.m.,
Drew admitted to taking the debit
card from the NW County Road
12 home of Rita Lewis. He said
he used it to get cash at several
stores throughout Liberty County
and Gadsden County to buy
methamphetamine.
Drew went inside the trailer


CHARLES LEE DREW
and retrieved the card from where
he had hidden it on the top of a
kitchen cabinet. He also handed
over a receipt for a purchase from
which he got $20 in cash back
from T&P Foods that day.
He was transported to the
Liberty County Jail, where he is
being held on $65,000 bond.


S1i. Come in today
Lee Nal s for a pedicure!
We have Gift Certificates.



20755 Central Ave E Suite A
Blountstown 674-9030


=Z DIBLla T E"*B8I~


J








Page 4 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL APRIL 15, 2009


Larry Brown &8 De6ie Brannan
TODAY'S MEETINGS
S Rotary Club, noon, Calhoun-Liberty Hospital
Weight Loss Support Group, 1:30 p.m., Shelton Park Library
SBoy Scouts Troop 200, 6:30 p.m., Mormon Church, Bristol
* AA, 7 p.m., Calhoun County Old Ag Bldg. east door, in front of jail


Using a pump to get water is just one
way kids experience a bit of the past
at Blountstown's Pioneer Settlement,
which will hold Folk Life Days this week
on April 16, 17 & 18.

Indian artifact

show May 9

in Bainbridge
The Decarur Counr\ Young Farmnnis
and Tri State Archaeolocical Societ',
will present an Indian Artifact Show' in
Bainbridge. GA on NMa 9 at the Cloud
Liestock Facillir, located at 1213 \ada
Road
Come see the finest Indian artifacts e\ er
found in the Deep South. Showt hours are
Sam until 2 p m. Saturday adnmissilon I
52. Kids 12 and under are free.
Bring sour finds there \\ill be experts
present for identification and evaluation.
There \ ill be books, display cases,
posters, fossils for sale and breakfast \ ill
be sold. Pork chop sandwiches \\1i be
aaislable for lunch and a portion of the
proceeds will benefit the Decatur Count
Young Farmer to help offset expenses
\\ith liestock sho\\s and competitions
throughout the' ear. Auction proceeds
benefit TSAS scholarship fund which h
awards three $5001 scholarships annually
to assist recipients towards college
education
Contact Ke in Dow\d\ at POB -125.
Bainbndge GA 39S I or phone i'2291) -116-
6021 or e-mail bolenbe\ eli'aol.coni

8th annual spring

fun day April 25
The St. Joseph Masonic Lodge # 0
would \ill hold its Eighth. annual Spring
Fun Da\ on April 25 from 9 am until
2 p.m. The event will be at Green\wood
Town Park on H\w. 162, Fort Road in
Greenwood.
Spaces are a ailable for those with items
they wish to display. A I O 1 0 space is $ill.
Everyone is encouraged to come join the
fun: indiv iduals, churches, organizations
and businesses, all are welcome.
For reser action information, call Leo at
(850) 594-618I, Sonnieat (850)1482478 I.
Baker at (850) 594-7441 or an\ member
of the Lodge. You can send mail to St.
Joseph Lodge #99-3693. Popular Springs
Road. Mananna. FL 32446.

The Calhoun-Liberty Journal is
published each Wednesday
by the Liberty Journal Inc.,
Summers Road, P.O. Box 536,
Bristol, FL 32321.
Annual subscriptions are $18.
Periodicals postage paid at Bristol, FL
POSTMASTER: Send address corrections
to: P.O. Box 536. Bristol, FL 32321.


BIRTHDAYS
'.P,'nit' 'AliitLiji 4
TODAY'S MEETINGS
* Brownie Troop 158, 6 30 p m Tolar School. Bris[ol
* Mossy Pond VDF, 7 p m, Fire House
* AA 7 p m asemenl ol Calhoun County Courthouse


I 1fFRIDAY, APRIL 17
*. fLTn" BIRTHDAYS

S 2009 EVENTS
00 Dance. 6 12p m. American
*" Legion Hail in BlountsiOl n
SATURDAY, APRIL 18

Apalachicola BIRTHDAYS
Forest Free Q PiTri &
Fishing Derby Ji'ic S "wet
8 a.m.-12 p.m. / EVENTS
r , FR I 3 P i
.:. FR 12 ,: .'Je Dance. 6 12pm. American
Loo1 k lor iqri Legion Hall in Blounisito~n

SUNDAY, APRIL 19

BIRTHDAYS Atd
Conni -_Attend the
Church of your
Nat.ml choice this
WILDLIFunday

MONDAY, APRIL 20
TODAY'S MEETINGS
* Liberty Comm. Health Care (FOHC), 4 p m.. Veterans Civic Cenler #10
* Walk-A-Weigh Program. 9 a m Veterans Memorial Park Civic Center
* Altha Boy Scouts, 5:30 p.m. Alima Volunleer Fire Department
* AA, 6 p.m Aliha Community Center
* Boy Scouts Troop 207, 6:30 p.m.. First Baptisl Church. Brsiol


V


INATIOHAL


April 19- April 25


BIRTHDAYS
M ',itl l Collills
L


TODAY'S MEETINGS
* Calhoun Chamber of Commerce, 12 p.m., Calhoun Sr Citizens Center
* Calhoun Co. Commission, 5 p m.. Ag. Bldg. across Irom Court House
* Hosford-Telogia VFD, 7:30 p m.. Hoslord Fire House
* Dixie 109 Masonic Lodge, 7 p.m..
Masonic Lodge in Blountstown NATIONAL
* Boy Scouts Troop 207, 6-30 p.m.. 'TfACH
First Baplist Church, Bristol H.llMNu TO


Natio Moal


rintton Month


THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL
Located at 11493 NW Summers Road in Bristol
MAILING ADDRESS: P.O. Box 536, Bristol, FL 32321
TELEPHONE (850) 643-3333 Fax (850) 643-3334
EMAIL: thejournal@fairpoint.net (USPS 012367)
ADS: cljads@fairpoint.net Summers Road


M&B Railroad Depot

Open House May 2
Come visit Blountstown's historic M&B
Train Depot for Open House Saturday, May
2 from 9 a.m. 2 p.m. Tour the Depot
museum and view new displays of artifacts
and memorabilia from Blountstown and
surrounding communities. A large screen
TV will be projecting historic pictures
of the M&B Railroad, local citizens, and
founding families. Outside, there will be
displays by the Calhoun County Heritage
Committee, Calhoun County Extension
Service, and Department of Health.
Listen to some good music, stroll the
Blountstov, n Greenwt a\, and treat yourself
to a burger and cold soda on the grounds of
the restored NM&B railroad depot.
\ endorse are in cited. Booths are 10\ 10
i feet and cost is $10 each. There are a
limited number of booths w ith electricity
for 515 each.
For more information or a \endor
appi..ation please contact Adrienne Wood
at nSi.i .74-4698 or email mbrailroad,,
ahloo.om Applications are also available
at the counr extension office or call (5150)
6 4-S323.

Child development

open enrollment for

school year '09-'10
North Florida Child De elopment. Inc..
Calhoun Center is taking applications for
open lots. current slots and the 20019-20 10
school \ear
For children ages 3 and 41. ,ou need
to bring the follow\ ing documentation to
complete an application and determine
sour ellibillht:
"child's birth certificate
2008 \V-2 or 2008 ta\ return
*Proof of residence\
For more infonnation, contact Kristx
Plazarm at (850) 6"4-2600 or 185() t-13-
6247. You may come by our office at
20382 NW\ Pennmgton A, e., Blountstown.
FL 32424


Sneads Dog Show

rescheduled May 2
The Sneads Carlisle Rose Garden Club
4th Annual Dog Show scheduled for
March 28 \\as canceled due to inclement
\weather and has been rescheduled for
Saturday. Ma\ 2.
Registration begins at 4 p.m. The Dog
Show e\ent begins at 5 p.m. (CT) at the
Citizen's Football Field in Sneads.
For more infonnation, call 593-6204
or 593-6143.





That's how many copies of
The Calhoun-Liberty Journal
were distributed last week,
ensuring plenty of coverage for your
community announcements and
great response for our
business advertisers!

JOURNAL STAFF
Johnny Eubanks...............Publisher
Teresa Eubanks...................... Editor
Gina Grantham-Brooks..Bookkeeper
Missy Tanner...................Advertising
Debbie Duggar..Production Assistant
OFFICE HOURS: 9 a.m. -6 p.m. M-F,
Saturday from 9 a.m. until 1 p.m.


TUESDAY, APRIL 21









APRIL 15, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 5


Folklife Days
PANHANDLE FOLK
LIFE DAYS
The Panhandle Pioneer
Settlement will be having their
annual Folk Life Days April 16,
17 & 18. Please come out and join
demonstrations relating to home
life including biscuit making,
soap making, quilting, knitting,
crocheting and washing clothes.
Other features relating to life on
the farm includes beekeeping,
blacksmithing, wood carving,
making crackling, churning
butter and using a saw mill.
There will be hayrides and music
throughout the day. All cabins


this week, rodeo April 25, fishing tourna


will be opened and manned by
volunteers.-Admission is $3 at the
Panhandle Pioneer Settlement in
Blountstown. Call 850-674-2777
or email ppsm@ppmuseum.org
for more information.

PANHANDLE SADDLE
CLUB RODEO
The Florida Panhandle Saddle
Club will host a rodeo at the Skeet
Davis Arena at Sam Atkins Park
on Saturday, April 25 at 7 p.m.


Spectators will enjoy an action
packed rodeo featuring several
local contestants, as well as
competitors who have traveled
to compete for cash prizes. As
an added feature, Bkountstown
Middle School teacher Jason
White has pledged to attempt to
ride a bull at the rodeo if BMS
students can raise $1,000 between
now and the night of the rodeo.
The money raised will go to the
Calhoun County Take Stock in


Marti Vickery appointed Executive Director

for Pioneer history museum in Calhoun Co.
The Panhandle Pioneer ] experience including media
Settlement, a living history planning, project development,
museum in Calhoun County, I .. implementation and


announces the recent appointment
of Marti Vickery as Executive
Director.
Marti has lived and worked in
the area for several years.
Formerly the Calhoun County
chamber director and economic
development representative,
working locally and at the
state level, Marti brings a
broad knowledge of creating
partnerships among community
members, regional organizations
and state agencies to provide
opportunities for growth and


improved visibility for Calhoun
County and its rich heritage.
Marti has vast marketing
and non-profit organizational


management.
"I look forward to working with
founders, Willard and Linda Smith,
the entire board, staff, caretakers
and our community volunteers.
Our goal is to strengthen and
enhance the Panhandle Pioneer
Settlement museum. My efforts
at the museum will be focused
on creating a strong and vital
organization for generations,
preserving our history through
education, heritage tourism
events and regional awareness,"
says Marti.


a April 17 & 18
Ss.'i f/ Fri., Noon until 10PM Sat., 9AM until 7PM
i/ Citizens' Lodge Park, Caverns Road, Marianna,


Sponsored by


Marianna Toyota


* Backyard BBQ Contest
Memphis BBQ
Network Contest
Children's Activities
Fine Arts Contest
Live Music
Arts & Crafts
* Variety Of Food Vendors
Pony Rides
Dance Performances
And Much, Much More!


Children Scholarship Foundation.
Saturday, April 25 at 7 p.m., Skeet
Davis Arena in Blountstown. For
more information or if you would
like to support the rodeo through
sponsorship, contact Stephanie
Brogden at 850/643-7590 or
skbfarms@yahoo.com.

14 T ANNUAL BIG RIVER
ROUNDUP CATFISH
TOURNAMENT
Friday, May 22 through
Saturday, May 23
The Big River Roundup Florida
Flathead Catfish Tournament is all
set for Memorial Day weekend!
Here's a little.history:
The tourney started in 1996
with the visionary efforts of
the Blountstown Rotary Club
membership and the cooperation
of the Florida Game and
Freshwater Commission in an
effort to reduce and keep in check
the ever-growing population ofthe
flathead catfish in theApalachicola
River system. The Roundup
was the first organized flathead
catfish tournament in Florida.
The success of the event spurred
the eventual creation of four
other such flathead tournaments
in the Florida panhandle. Over
the past fourteen years, those
ten years approximately 3,000
fishermen have participated in


FL -
FL


Friday, April 17th
7:30PM until 10PM


FLORIDAN Sponsored : b%: W"-
oonnnonno ono ono r a M
Your participation in this year's event will help continue our mission for the development of the Arts and History Museum of Jackson County.


ment in May
the "Big River Roundup", and
an estimated 14,000 pounds
of flathead primarily and other
catfish species have been weighed
in at the tournaments.
The "Big River Roundup
Florida Flathead Catfish
Championship" tournament is
unlike any other with fierce
competition between locals for
bragging rights, cash prizes and
the chance at $ 50,000 at stake if
the current State Record is broken
during the event. Blountstown
Rotary is proud to say that their
tournament has graced the pages
of Field & Stream, Florida Fish
& Game, and GAFF magazines.
And as word has spread about
the tournament, fisherman from
Mississippi, Georgia, Alabama,
Arkansas, Tennessee, South
Carolina, and even as far as
Ohio have regularly traveled to
take their chances at winning the
event.
For more information on
the tournament, a list of rules
and an application, visit http://
blountstownrotary.com/catfisht.
htm.
WAKULLA BANK: Featured
Business of the Month
Wakulla Bank is our featured
Business of the Month for April..
This year, the bank is celebrating
35 years of quality banking
and outstanding service for its
customers and the community.
The bank opened its first
branch in 1983 in St. Marks,
and since has added additional
in-store and branch locations,
bringing the current total to 14
locations in Calhoun, Liberty,
Leon and Wakulla counties.
Wakulla Bank is constantly
expanding its line of innovative
products and services for
personal banking, businesses
and investors.
The Blountstown branch of
Wakulla Bank is-now offering
Saturday banking from 9 a.m. to
12 p.m., extending their personal,
local service to make banking
more convenient for members.
RSVP TODAY APRIL
MEMBERSHIP MEETING
Please join us for our April
Membership Meeting Tuesday,
April 21 at 12 to 1 p.m. at the
Calhoun Co. Senior Citizens
Center. We will be welcoming
the Blountstown FFAAgricultural
Issues Team as our guest speaker.
The team is currently presenting
"Water Wars: A Fight for the
South's Greatest Resource" which
focuses on Lake Lanier, north of
Atlanta, GA, and the drought over
the past couple years. Lake Lanier
not only impacts Georgia, but
because of the connection to the
Chattahoochee and Apalachicola
Rivers also affects our local area.
Cost to attend the meeting is
$7.50 per person and payment
can be made at the door.
If you would like to attend, you
must RSVP so that we can get
an accurate lunch count. Please
call or email Kristy at 850/674-
4519 or kristy@calhounco.org
by Friday, April 17th at noon to
reserve your seat.


Ir~ll-Il- ,-~ -----~c------------~-lc~-c r ---r


Join Us for the Smiling Pig SK-Walk/Run
sponsored by Dr. Ben Saunders

a a s -, e *LIM. ,a


1La


I









Page 6 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL APRIL 15, 2009


rlb~ 1


President Obama took on the teachers union
by saying he wants merit pay for teachers and
to fire the ones who do not perform well. That
is pretty bold. A Democrat taking on the unions
is like Rush Limbaugh going after the doughnut
manufacturers. JAY LENO

The economy is horrible, isn't it? Just hor-
rible. Every day there are little reminders that
jump right in your face and remind you how bad
the economy is. This morning, I wake up, I go
downstairs. The Starbucks that was in my liv-
ing room has closed. I go to Barnes and Noble,
every book on sale in Barnes and Noble begins
on Chapter 11. My retirement fund has lost so
much value, it's now a 401 K-Mart.
DAVID LETTERMAN

Bernard Madoff, the sleaze-ball guy in that
$50 billion Ponzi scheme thing, is going to plead
guilty. But Madoff's lawyer is trying to get all the
charges dropped by arguing that Madoff is no
longer a threat to society because there aren't
any rich people anymore. JAY LENO

You know you have a drinking problem when
your.car is a barstool. Police in Ohio arrested
a man after he crashed his motorized barstool.
Although in his defense, the man said he was
depressed because he just lost his job as CEO
of General Motors. BILL MAHER

Three different customers at a grocery store
in Queens, New York, all bought peppers that
turned out to have bags of cocaine stuffed, in-
side them. Well... you thought spicy food kept
you up all night. JAY LENO

Michelle Obama was photographed in Lon-
don wearing clothes from J-Crew, the store is
selling out of the clothes she's been wearing.
Now if someone could just get her to drive a
Chrysler. SETH MYERS

How's this for hypocrisy? While Congress
has been chastising companies for giving out
bonuses, last year, members of Congress gave
out over $9 million in bonuses, paid for by the
taxpayer, to their staff. But Congress is saying
they're not hypocrites because this extra money
they give their staff really isn't bonus money. It's
hush money. They just call it bonus money for
legal reasons. JAY LENO

I tell you, the economy's in rough shape. It's
terrible. In fact, you know Snap, Crackle, and
Pop? Well, they were arrested today for selling
smack, crack, and pot. JAY LENO

Hey, you know that new X-Men movie, 'Wol-
verine,' that's coming out this summer? The
F.B.I. is investigating it. There's an HD version
that was leaked online. As soon as the F.B.I.
solves the case, they'll get back to looking for
bin Laden. JIMMY FALLON


The unintended consequences of war


Getting involved in an ongoing _
war is easy. Just pick a side and start 0)
fighting. That is what the U.S. did in |
Vietnam. We picked South Vietnam
as an ally in the early 1950s, and then Jerry Cox is a
officer and writer \
engaged in a jungle war for 25 years. fficerand writer
The reason for getting involved was foreign policyiss
the U.S. believed that all of Southeast \kaloosa Count
Asia would fall like dominos to Com-
munist rule.
Also, wars are easy to start but difficult to end. The
wars in Afghanistan and Iraq are good examples. The
U.S. invaded Afghanistan in 2001 and disposed of the
Taliban. We thought that the Taliban were vanquished
and would never return.
Nice thought, but it didn't happen that way. The Tali-
ban took to the hills and waited us out while U.S. forces
attacked Iraq. With minimal U.S. opposition, the Tali-
ban have reclaimed control over most of Afghanistan.
President Obama has vowed to defeat the Taliban and to
establish some degree of security in Afghanistan. I hope
that his plan works, but I think that America is in for
another decade, or longer, of warfare.
Wars are expensive in money and lives. Former Pres-
ident Bush was spending about $10 billion per month
on the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. President Obama is
doing the same. Mr. Bush spent about a trillion dollars
on a lost cause and PresidentObama will do the same.
One of those unintended consequences of war is that
the cost can destabilize a nation's financial system. Most
people know that the cost of the Middle East wars com-
bined with the cost of bailing out Wall Street schemers and
cheats has caused the U.S. to borrow unbelievable amounts
of money. Talk about being in debt. We are, in spades.
The most serious unintended consequence of war is
the effect on the military force, the soldier, sailor, Ma-
rine and airman.
When Johnny goes marching off to war bad things
happen. When Johnny comes marching home he is a dif-
ferent person and not always for the good.
Actual combat and warfare are not what people see on
television and in the movies. Warfare is brutal. Warfare
is about using force, killing people when necessary, to
take and control real estate and to control people.
The stress of warfare on the American fighting man


re

c
d
;u
Y.


Sor woman is tremendous. In the urban
S guerilla warfare in Iraq and Afghanistan,
IN ER there are no battle lines. Danger lurks in
all quarters when a soldier is out in the
tired military streets of Iraq or the mountains of Af-
than extensive
domestic and ghanistan.
es. He lives in The enemy doesn't wear distinctive
/ uniforms. The enemy blends into the
population. A soldier can be killed by a
woman, a child or a man. For the soldier,
the enemy can be anyone, anywhere at anytime.
America's youth fight our wars. Now that I'm in the
senior citizen category, their youth is even more appar-
ent when I see photographs of military units or see them
in person when I visit a military base.
The military trains people to kill. I was trained to fly
fighter aircraft to bomb targets and shoot down enemy
aircraft. The soldier is trained to kill the enemy.
In June, the young man is graduating from high school.
He joins the Army and within a couple of month, he is
carrying a rifle and is part of a military unit. Shortly after
basic training,he is in the.streets of Iraq or the mountains
of Afghanistan. He kills people and watches his friends
die. He is a changed man. He is a different person when
he comes marching home to mom and dad.
An unintended consequence of warfare is post-trau-
matic stress disorder (PTSD) which affects some sol-
diers. When a soldier claims to be suffering from PTSD,
many in the military don't believe it. The military is a
macho man environment. No place for wussess." How-
ever, there is some recognition of the PTSD issue by the
Department of Defense and the department of Veter-
ans Affairs, but soldiers continue to take drastic action.
Some commit suicide.
In my view, America's military men and women
committing suicide is the worst of the unintended con-
sequences of warfare. There were 140 military suicides
in 2008 and 48 in the first quarter of 2009 which if that
rate of suicides continues; the death rate in 2009 would
be about 250 military personnel.
Former President Eisenhower said it best. "I hate war
as only a soldier who has lived it can, only as one who
has seen its brutality, its futility, its stupidity."
-Dwight D. Eisenhower, U.S. general
and 34th president (1890-1969)


e Ml


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ipk*
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APRIL 15, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 7


1I- EWAIKS
-GmT pE'!


I.M UGGLES
CV-WN S4WS.


FRGMuWES OUrAISOWN NTES!


IF T1lE= US. GCMERrNT TDEALT WnH SOMALI PlWTES 's rr Es BNKS
....


WASHINGTON

MERRY-GO-ROUND

by Douglas Cohn and Eleanor Clift


MEDICARE FOR ALL
WASHINGTON President Obama signed an executive
order this week establishing a White House Office of Health
Reform, another signal of the seriousness of his intent to over-
haul the U.S. health care system with an eye to cutting costs
and expanding coverage to the growing ranks of people who
are without coverage. It's early in the legislative process, but
one key point of contention is the new public health insurance
plan that Obama proposes and that would compete with private
insurance plans.
The easiest way to describe it is to say it would be like Medi-
care, except for younger people, which begs the question, why
not just expand Medicare and call it a day? Making Medicare
universal would be a whole lot easier than what Hillary Clinton
attempted 15 years ago with a jerry-rigged system that tried
to accommodate all the special interests with a stake in the
.outcome, most notably the insurance industry, and ended up
pleasing no one. If Medicare expanded down the age range, the
system would be strengthened and costs reduced with risk spread
over a larger number of younger and healthier people.
Advocates of expanding Medicare call it "Medicare for all,"
and the chief obstacle is that critics say it moves us into the
socialist model of Europe and Canada with a government-run
system. Political attacks on "socialized medicine" and "gov-
ernment-run health care" still carry some sting though they're
not nearly as powerful as they were when Clinton attempted to
rally the Congress behind health-care reform. She was undone
by a television ad paid for by business interests and delivered
by a friendly Middle America couple, Harry and Louise, fretting
over losing their choice of doctor.
Obama's proposed public plan strikes fear in the heart of the
insurance industry, which sees it as a slippery slope toward a
full-fledged, Canadian-style, single-payer system that would
put them out of business. Defenders of the public plan, cham-
pioned by the Congressional Progressive Caucus (CPC), say
it will increase competition and keep the private plans honest.
Critics say it would be unfair competition because the public
plan would operate without the need to make a profit, and could
drive private plans out of the market. These charges and counter-
charges are made without acknowledging that we already have
such a system in place with Medicare providing basic care for
seniors while a host of private insurers offer supplementary
plans for seniors who want to upgrade and have the resources
to buy greater coverage.
The same model could work in the general marketplace, and
unless government does such a bang-up job that people line up
for the public option, there should be plenty of room for private
insurers to compete and make a profit. What Americans want
is choice, and adding a public option that offers very basic
coverage to bring the 46 million Americans without insurance
.into the system should not threaten a thriving private market
of enhanced insurance plans. It's ironic that those who criticize
government as inefficient and wasteful and overly bureaucratic
are the same people who fear a new public plan will put them
to shame in delivering affordable health care coverage. They're
also the same people who cry socialism when the government
steps in to care for its citizens.
Bottom line: If Medicare for people 65 and older is accept-
able, then the same must be true for people over 55 or 45 or 35
or, better yet, for everyone. Medicare for all does not eliminate
private insurers; it encourages them to compete and enhances
their ability to expand the highly lucrative supplemental insur-
ance business. The creative destruction that is enshrined in the
theory of capitalism would be at play, and consumer and busi-
ness would benefit alike.


DISTRIBUTED BY U.S. NEWS SYNDICATE, INC.


.. .;. .., :.


lllblsl~se38PIBslllslBBBBl~~








Page 8 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL APRIL 15, 2009


D urke

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- AND CHALLENGE YOU TO BE THE NEXT ENERGY :
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"1 :


Man and Crystal Milton put all their energy into making the cut
as the winners of Florida Public Utilities' Energy Conservation
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FPU Energy Sur.ey, suah as:
STaking shorter showers
Seating moderate thermostat temperatures, using CFL lamps and
Cutting out several small energy-vasting habits from their daily
routines, like turning off lights and fans when not in the room
Energ-ed by their savings, they wanted to share how others can
easily do the same


The Mlton's and FPU believe we
all can learn more about energy
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WWW.FPUC.COM








APRIL 15, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 9


Former Liberty County Clerk's Office employee


charged with grand theft following investigation


by Teresa Eubanks Journal Editor
A former employee with the
Liberty County Clerk of Courts'
office has been charged with grand
theft following an investigation
of missing payments from the
traffic fines division.
Jean Coon Rogers, 31, of
Telogia worked at the Clerk's
office for more than five years
before her dismissal in August
of 2008. She was arrested April
7 following an investigation by
the state attorney's office.
In her job as deputy clerk,
Rogers collected fines while
working with child support,
traffic and probate cases, as well
as handling some duties with the
county commission. When she
was out, other employees would
collect the money brought into
the office,-issue a receipt and put
the payment in a designated box
for Rogers to record.
The employee hired to replace
Rogers found discrepancies
with the traffic docket accounts,
according to a probable cause filed


JEAN COON ROGERS


in the case. Clerk of Court Robert
Hill had a cash collection and
audit report done by the Florida
Association of Court Clerks
Financial and Audit Services.
Auditors examined suspicious
citations and dockets from
November 2007 to Aug. 27,
2008, which was Rogers' last
day of employment at the clerk's
office. Handwritten receipts were
found for traffic citations that
appeared to have been paid but


no money was deposited. "Most
of these dockets or receipts were
tied to Rogers either by signature
or initials," read the probable
cause.
The audit did not identify who
was responsible for the problems
for the missing payments but
did recommended procedures
to prevent the problem from
reoccurring. "There are "checks
and double checks and individual
lock boxes as far as money's
concerned," according to Hill.
During an April 3 meeting
at the Gadsden County State
Attorney's Office in Quincy,



~c-1..-
-T 7r


investigators asked Rogers how
a citation could be cleared from
the computer when no money
had been deposited. She said
it could not be done unless the
judge signed off on it.
Investigators then gave her
a copy of the docket for her
last day of work at the Clerk's
Office, which showed eight
citations that had been cleared
from the computer with no money
deposited.
Rogers became tearful and
confessed to taking money. She
said she attempted to hide the
thefts by clearing the citations in


the computer.
The investigators had citations
showing $1,311 was missing.
Rogers said she had also taken
money in 2004 and 2007, and
admitted that she believed the
total was closer to $1,500.
She stated that when she took
money in 2004, it was because
she was having marital problems
before her divorce. She said the
funds she took in 2007 and 2008
were to help a relative who was
having financial problems.
She was released on her own
recognizance following her
arrest.


Homeowners are urged to

beware of post-flood scams


PENSACOLA Your Better
Business Bureau warns
homeowners affected by the
recent flooding and storms that
scam artists will try to take
advantage of the chaos during
the cleanup. Your BBB advises
homeowners:
*Don't be pressured into
making an immediate decision
on a permanent repair. Make
temporary repairs if necessary.
o Check with your insurance
company about policy coverage
and specific filing requirements.
Save all receipts, including those
for repairs, food, temporary
lodging or other expenses that
maybe covered underyour policy.
Shop around for contractors,
get at least three competitive
bids from properly-licensed
contractors, check out references
(of at least a year old). If possible,
homeowners should visit and
inspect completed projects.
Contact your BBB for a free
Reliability ReportTM on a specific
business by calling 800-729-9226


LIQUIDATION

LAND SALE
10 ACRE plus Tracts
From $3,995 per acre
$995 Total Down

OWNER FINANCING,
No Qualifying

Tri-land Inc.
R. E. Broker
Phone (813) 253-3258


or starting with bbb.org. BBB also
provides industry reference lists
of all BBB Accredited Businesses
within a specific industry free-
of-charge. All BBB Accredited
Businesses have agreed to uphold
BBB standards for ethics in the
marketplace.
Be wary of door-to-door
workers who claim to have left-
over repair materials from a
nearby job or who do not have a
permanent place of business.
Be leery if a worker shows
up on your doorstep to announce
your home is unsafe. If you
are concerned about possible
structural damage in your home,
have an engineer, architect or
building official inspect it.
Prepare a written contract
agreement with anyone you hire.
Make sure oral promises are
included in the written contract,
including warranties on materials
or labor. Make sure the written
contract includes the contractor's
full name, address, telephone
number and professional license
number. Never sign a partial or
blank contract.
Ensure the contractor will
apply for all building permits
in his or her name so that if the
contractor's work does not pass
inspection, you cannot be held
financially responsible for any
corrections that must be made.
Never pay for all repairs in
advance, and do,not pay'cash.
Don't make the final payment
until the work passes all required
inspections.
For additional information and
advice you can trust on hiring a
contractor and disaster recovery,
start with bbb.org.


Information sought on man in security

video using stolen credit card March 24


The Blountstown
Police Department is '"
looking for information .
on the whereabouts of an
unidentified man believed f
to have taken a wallet from
a Georgia woman while she
was shopping in Dillard's
at the Panama City Mall
March 24.
AmeliaA. Ryzer Taylor's
wallet contained several
credit cards and a debit
card.
While in the process of
reporting the stolen wallet, she learned
that the thief was making_ quick use of
her cards. While on the phone with Bank
of America, she was advised that a $1
charge had been made on her card at a
Panama City Exxon station at 2:55 p.m.
At 3:35 p.m., the same card was used for
a $15.58 purchase at the Blountstown
Piggly Wiggly.
An attempt was made to buy items
adding up to $210 at Alco in Blountstown


at 7:41 p.m. but the card
was denied when it
came back as suspected
fraudulent activity.
Police are reviewing
surveillance videos from
the area in hopes of
identifying the suspect
seen using the card.
The stolen wallet also
had the owner's Medicare
Card, her Georgia driver's
license and a Macy's
credit card with a $10,000
limit.
The suspect is shown above in a frame
taken from the surveillance video at the
Blountstown Piggly Wiggly on March
24. The white male appears to have
either a birthmark or a tattoo on the right
side on his neck.
Anyone who can identify the man
pictured above or can give information
on his whereabouts is urged to contact
the Blountstown Police Department at
674-5987.







Page 10 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL APRIL 15, 2009


FWC opens Bradwell Unit by

permit only to hog hunting


Due to an abundance of
wild hogs, a number of hunting
opportunities will be available
during the coming months on the
Bradwell Unit ofthe Apalachicola
Wildlife Management Area.
The Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission (FWC)
has quota permits available for
hog-dog and still hunts for May,
June and July on the 1,400-acre
tract in Liberty County.
The FWC set the hog-dog
hunts for nighttime hours on
May 1-3, June 5-7 and July 3-5.
It will issue three quota permits
for each three-day hunt. Permit
holders can bring along one guest.
The permit holder and guest are
limited to one firearm.
Dogs of any size or breed are


OUT
DOORS
News from The Florida Fish
and Wildlife Conservation
Commission






allowed, with a maximum of
three dogs per permit holder.
The FWC set daytime legal
still hunting for May 15-17,
June 19-21 and July 17-19. It
will issue up to six permits for
each still hunt. Permits are


transferrable.
Anyone interested in applying
for the May, June or July hunts
can do so beginning April 21 at
10 a.m. EDT through the Total
Licensing System at county tax
collectors' offices or online on
a first-come, first-served basis.
The FWC's Managed Hog Hunt
worksheet has more information
about the hunts. Go to the Hunting
section of MyFWC.com.
The agency will hold
subsequent drawings starting in
June for August and September
hunts. See the Managed Hog
Hunts worksheet for more
information on those hunts.
There will be no size or bag
limit on hogs. No live hogs may
be removed from the area.


FWC needs help thinning out the feral

hogs on Box-R Wildlife Management Area
Wildlife managers often for each three-day hunt. Up to hog population.
tolerate a few wild hogs, but there two hunters may hunt per quota Anyone interested in applying
are so many on the 11,200-acre permit. They may possess only for the May-July hunts can do
Box-R Wildlife Management one firearm. so beginning April 21 at 10 a.m
Area in Franklin and Gulf Hog dogs are legal to use and (ET) through the Total Licensing
counties they are destroying encouraged on this dusk-to-dawn System at county tax collectors
agricultural fields, native plants hunt. Up to three dogs may be offices or online on a first-come
and habitat. used at a time. first-served basis at MvFWC


As a result, the Florida Fish
and Wildlife Conservation
Commission will allow nighttime
hog hunts May 8-10, June 12-14,
July 10-12, Aug. 14-16, and
Sept. 11-13.
The hunts are by quota permit,
with 10 quota permits issued


Jerry Pitts is the Box-R
wildlife biologist and said still-
hunters began hunting hogs on
the area in the 2004-05 hunting
season. Since then, hunters have
killed an average of 14 hogs per
year, but that hasn't come close
to slowing the growth of the wild


g
o
I.
g
'
,


com/License.
A separate application and
subsequent drawing will be held
in July for the Aug. 14-16 and
Sept. 11-13 hunts.
There will be no size or bag
limits on hogs. No live-hogs may
be removed from the area.


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T april 14, 1865, was a distress- News of Lincolns death
going day when Abraham Lincoln stirred such strong feel-
was shot by John Wilkes Booth at ings of grief and re- '
Ford's Theater. Apparently, Booth sentiment in the national ".,
believed that Lincoln's death might that the eventual set-
help Confederate causes. Ironically tlement was proba-
Lincoln had been putting together bly less generous
a much milder peace settlement thanitmighthave
than what was later agreed upon. been otherwise.

1 small bunch asparagus ut the asparagus Into 2-Inch lengths, steam
1/2 pound bay or i briefly, drain, and set aside. Poach the scal-
sea scallops lops in lightly salted water and keep warm.
6 to 8 cups chicken broth
1 yellow onion, chopped Heat the broth. Saut6 the onion in the
3 tablespoons butter butter; add the rice to the onion and stir
1-1/2 cups arborlo rice over low heat for about 3 minutes. Add the
2 tablespoons heavy cream hot broth. Cook until the rice is tender,
1/2 cup fresh grated
Parmesan t about 20 minutes. Remove from the heat;
salt and pepper, to taste add the cream, Parmesan, scallops, and as-
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Almanac.cor


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APRIL 15, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 11


Is it true that Thomas Jefferson
suffered from debilitating
headaches? -E. R., Rayville,
La.
Absolutely. Some historians
believe that Jefferson (1743-
1826) probably had migraines
for most of his life. His writings
speak of headaches that lasted
as long as 2 weeks, such as
after the death of his wife,
Martha Skelton, in 1792, and
when a British warship fired
on an American ship, the USS
Chesapeake.
Jefferson was known as
"Long Tom" for his height, a
towering (for his day) 6 feet,
2-1/2 inches. He had carrot-red
hair, freckles, and hazel eyes,
and some belittled him for his
too-casual dress. For over 60
years, he kept up a routine of
bathing his feet in cold water
every morning, believing that
it helped him to ward off colds.
This, plus luck and moderation in
food and drink, were his secrets
to good health. He disdained
cold weather almost as much
as he disliked dogs. During his
two terms in the White House,
his wine bill exceeded $10,000,
which some might argue
could have contributed to the
headaches. Most consider him
as having been happily married,
although he had had at least
two unsuccessful infatuations


before he courted Martha Wayles
Skelton, the young widow who
became his wife. His marriage
lasted 10 years, until her early
death at the age of 33, and he
kept his promise to her that he
would never remarry.
Jefferson died on Independence
Day, July 4, 1826, the 50th
anniversary of the Declaration of
Independence. He was 83. Two
other presidents also ended their
days on Earth on Independence
Day: John Adams, our second
president, died on the same
day as Jefferson. Adams was
90. James Monroe, our fifth
president, died on July 4 in 1831,
at age 73.
Is there any way to mend a
wire screen that has a puncture
hole in it? -R. Y, Dunsmuir,
Calif
It's just like darning a sock,
only on a much larger scale.
If the puncture is near an edge
or corner of the window or
door, it can be tricky, but if it's
surrounded by screen, you're in
luck. First, find a small awl or


other sharp, pointed tool. You
want something you can use to
restore the individual pieces of
wire to their rightful positions in
the mesh. If necessary, find some
additional wire of approximately
the same size (or similarly
colored nylon thread) and "sew"
in these pieces, as needed, to
restore the mesh pattern.
Once you have repositioned
the wire or thread, apply a
coat or two of clear nail polish
or shellac over both sides of
the mended area. Let this dry
between coats. The polish will
help to hold the mended area
in position and keep any frayed
ends from coming adrift.
If the hole is near the edge
of the screen or in a corner, you
may want to consider applying
a screen patch, instead of trying
to mend the hole. Cut a bit of
screening of approximately the
same gauge as what you have
in the door or window, then
apply the patch with some clear
silicone caulking. The caulking
should adhere both to the old


screen and to the edges of the
frame that border the screen. Let
it dry thoroughly, and the patch
should be fairly inconspicuous.
Why do some bath salts fizz,
while others don't? -S. M.,
Herrin, Ill.
Bath salts can be made from
any number of recipes. All
include some sort of salt, such
as Epsom salts, sea salt, coarse
table salt, baking soda (sodium
bicarbonate, a mild alkaline
salt), or some combination of
these, and usually a fragrant oil
of some kind. Some of the oils
commonly used are peppermint,
eucalyptus, chamomile, jasmine,
and bergamot, but virtually any
fragrant oil could be chosen.
Some bath salt mixes include
powdered milk, for a milky soak,
or glycerin for more of a bubble
bath effect. With any of these
ingredients, or just salt and oil,
however, the bath salts will not
be fizzy.
The fizz is generally added
by the inclusion of citric acid,
with cornstarch as a binder.


ASK OLD FARMER'


ALHEANAC
ALMANAC


. .,n.. . .


..PA GE TO THEPAT


Evidence of our Indian heritage

remains along the river banks
by Wynelle Jones Bateman were placed in a hole dug-in the groun
Long before the name Calhoun County, and wood was piled on top and burned ui
The United States or even Florida was til the fire was finished and the pots wei
thought about there were people living in cool to the touch.
this area. This would have been about the When you walk open areas like a farm
time Christ was born in the "old world." er's field that has been plowed and pa
The climate was mild and there were all close attention you will see that the remain
kinds of animals to be found for food and of a village will be there. You will fin
clothing. Hickory nuts, chestnuts, acorns, areas with projectile points (arrow heads
wild grapes, berries, and plums were grow- and round clay marbles where games wei
ing in abundance. The streams, lakes, and. played, places with lots of flint shaving
rivers were also well stocked with fish. where they made their arrowheads usin
If you take a walk along, or go on a boat deer bones, and where they cooked there
trip on, the Chipola River or Apalachicola will be lots of broken pottery shards. Th
River and look closely you can still see the is usually surrounded by stands of wil
remains of their existence. There is clay plum trees, grape vines, huckleberrie
in the banks of the rivers and moss in the blackberries, and "maypops". The flow
trees that they used to make pottery. Tall ers of maypops look like passion flower
pine trees with straw that was used to make The people lived on the rivers in the sun
baskets still line the rivers. The palmetto mer and "up the hill" in the winter. There
bushes were used to make the roofs on is evidence of small towns along the riv
their homes, make fans, and the roots were ers. Canoes were made from tree trunk
dug to cook as a food. "Swamp" cabbage and used for transportation, too.
is what it was called in the 1940s. When you think about where the pec
If you are lucky you will find broken ple went you realize that they didn't re
pieces of pottery. Sometime it will have ally go anywhere because they were her
a design on it. They used things like pine when the explorers came and they married
straw to wrap around the clay pot or used and had families and became a part of th
a corn cob to make patterns on it before community.
they fired it. The freshly made clay pots They are our ancestors!

This is one in a series of stories submitted for the upcoming Calhoun County Heritage Book.
To submit your own story, contact Lana Weeks at 674-4638.
The deadline is June 30. 1


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Calhoun County Heritage Book

Committee to meet on April 20
The Calhoun County Heritage Book Committee will meet Mon-
day, April 20 at 10 a.m. CST at the Library on Highway 69. The
Committee would invites everyone to join us for this meeting. The
time is drawing near for us to start going to print with the book. The
deadline will be June 30. This will be the final date, it will not be
extended!
The stories are still coming in very slow. The Golden Agers and
Golden Anniversaries are also slow coming in. This is a very special
way to show your love and respect for these very special people.
The Golden Agers are those who lived to be 90 years of age or older.
Please send us a photograph of only the person who is being hon-
ored, their date of birth, date of death (if it applies), and the persons
full name (be sure to include the maiden name for the ladies). Gold-
en Anniversaries are couples married for 50 years or more. Please
send us a photograph of the special couple, their name (including the
lady's maiden name), date of birth, date of death (if it applies), date
of marriage, and the number of children that the couple had.
If you need any assistance or information please feel free to contact
the Committee at: HBC, Post Office Box 275, Blountstown, Florida
32424-0275 or you may call Mary Lou Holley at 850-674-8860, or
Mary Lou Taylor at 850-674-8276, or Lana Weeks at 850-674-4638.
You may also email Lana Weeks at week5523@fairpoint.net.

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at acts Now a reality for many."
SLee Mullis M.D.
SM Board Certified Eye Surgeon
SMART LENSES and Cataract Specialist


(850) 526-7775 or
1(800)769-3429


Main office located in Panama City.
NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay,
cancel payment or be reimbursed by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and
within 72 hours or responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment.


Made from fermented citrus
fruit sugars, citric acid is easily
obtained from a pharmacy, wine
supply store, or health food
outlet, while cornstarch is sold in
grocery stores. Both the salts and
the citric acid are soothing to the
skin, making for a relaxing bath.
The cornstarch binder is added
to fizzing bath salts so that the
mixture can be easily molded
into a tablet or ornamental shape.
As the small mold dissolves in
the bathwater, the fizzy citric
acid is slowly released.
-------------------------------
APR. 16, THURSDAY -- Moon
at apogee. Two giant pandas, given
to the U.S. by China, arrived at the
National Zoo in Washington, D.C.,
1972.
APR. 17, FRIDAY-- Last quarter
Moon. Author Thornton Wilder born,
1897. The song Hail, Hail, the Gang's
All Here, was copyrighted, 1908. -
APR. 18, SATURDAY -- Moon at
ascending node. Conjunction of Ve-
nus and Mars. Cardinals gathered-in
Rome to select Pope John Paul I's
successor, 2005.
APR. 19, SUNDAY -- Orthodox
Easter Conjunction ofJupiter and the
Moon. Conjunction of Neptune and
the Moon. Naturalist Charles Darwin
died, 1882.
APR. 20, MONDAY -- Patriots
Day (Maine, Massachusetts). During
a fishing trip, an upset swamp rabbit
approached President Carter's boat,
Plains, Georgia, 1979.
APR. 21, TUESDAY -- San Ja-
cinto Day (Texas). Moon on equator
The New York Giants and New York
Yankees played an exhibition game to
benefit survivors of the Titanic, 1912.


I







Page 12 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL APRIL 15, 2009


TOP: Monday's storm brought classes to a standstill at Tolar Elementary
and left teachers with their hands full as they lined up kids in the safest part
of the building the hallways. TOP RIGHT: Marcie Gregg arrived in time
to comfort her son, Carson, as they waited with the rest of the students
for the worst of the weather to pass. The storm delayed busses for about
20 minutes. ABOVE CENTER: Students at LCHS braved the weather to
get to the parking lot but found the storm growing worse as the prepared
to drive home. ABOVE: A tree toppled this building and knocked it onto a
car next to Boggs Cemetery in Blountstown. ABOVE RIGHT: Emergency
crews found numerous limbs on utility lines like this one shown in Calhoun


County.


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APRIL 15, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 13


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tree hit the front, busted the windshield, got my door, fender and hood," he said. The truck
was parked on the grass on the south side of the courthouse.


Don't miss

S.Calhoun Cour


HOUSEHOLD HAZARD(

COLLECTION
Saturday, May 2
8 a.m. to 12 p.m.


We're taking old computers
and components at Calhoun
County Recycling Center.

HAZ-MATS are Hazardous
Household Materials and other
Toxic Wastes Pesticides Insecticides
Pool Chemicals Solvents Fertilizers
Spot Removers Paint Stale Gasoline
* Used Oil Paint Thinners Antifreeze E
* Paint Strippers Furniture Polish Engir
Calhoun Co. ,- A
Recycling Center CAL

i Magnolia FOI
Church Rd. S
HWY. 20 O Blountstown The
Board of C


1



rI


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;


ty's


)US WASTE

1 DAY

PLEASE, NO GAS
CYLINDERS OR
EXPLOSIVES.
Bring your plastic
soda and milk jugs,
newspapers and
cardboard.
NO COMMERCIAL
WASTES, HOUSEHOLD
WASTE ONLY.
"Small businesses in-
cluding schools and
growers will be accept-
ed at a reduced rate.
Please call 674-8075
for details."

atteries Brake Fluid
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While Calhoun County Emergency Management
Director Sonny O'Bryan was in the courthouse
staying on top of weather reports during
Monday's storm, the storm left its calling card
by knocking a large tree onto the hood of his
2007 GMC pickup. The mishap occurred
around 1 p.m. Monday, he said, and left him
with a damaged but still drivable vehicle. 'The


Storm damages
Emergency Mgt.
Director's truck








Page 14 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL APRIL 15, 2009


BRADY LANE
ENFINGER
Brady Lane Enfinger will
celebrate his third birthday
on April 21. He is the son of
Samantha and Marty Enfinger
of Altha. His grandparents
include Linda and Eugene
Silcox of Altha, Penny
Enfinger of Marianna and Ken
Enfinger of Alabama. His
great-grandfather is Hinton
Kirkland of Marianna. Brady
will celebrate his birthday
with a Dinosaur Party on April
25 with family and friends
at 4-Mile Creek after his trip
to Wild Adventures. Brady
enjoys time with family, friends
and playing with all his animals
and just being the center of
our world.


HALI DANIELLE
SMITH
Hali Danielle Smith celebrated
her birthday on April 11, turning
17. She is the daughter of
Patricia and Greg Johnson of
Hosford and Tracy Smith of
Blountstown. Her maternal
grandparents are Ilona M.
Pitts and the late Ellis Pitts
of Hosford. Her paternal
grandparents June and Allen
Pitts of Altha. Hali celebrated
her 17th birthday with her
cousin Nick on Easter at her.
Aunt Loretta's home with lots
of family and friends. She
enjoys swimming, texting her
friends, shopping, cooking
and being with her friends
and family.


HAZEL RENEA MARTIN
Hazel Renea Martin celebrated
her first birthday on April 6.
She is the daughter of Matt
Martin and Carrie Martin,
both of Blountstown. Her
grandparents include Charlene
Martin and John Adams of
Blountstown and Michelle
Yeomans and Robert Raper
of Blountstown. Her great-
grandparents are C.B. Barbee
of Blountstown and Shirley and
Ken Owens of Tallahassee.
She celebrated with a Princess
Party. She loves playing
outside with her big brother,
Nathan and loves to dance and
play with their puppy.


SAMUEL MADDOX
TAUNTON
Samuel Maddox Taunton
celebrated his second birthday
on April 5. He is the son of Krysti
and Wes Taunton of Bristol. His
grandparents include Sammy
and Jill Shuler of Bristol and
David and Abigail Taunton
of Wewahitchka. Maddox
celebrated his birthday with
a Dinosaur Party at his Mimi
and Papa's house. He enjoys
playing at his Shuggie at Papa
Sam's house, riding the tractor
with his Growler and shooting
bucks with his daddy. He has
a 3-month-old sister that he
loves named Lynlei.


GRAYSON SKIPPER
Grayson Skipper turned 14
on his birthday April 7. He
is the son of David and Kim
Skipper of Boydton, VA. He
has three sisters and he
is the grandson of Annie
Buchanan of Tallahassee and
Clyde Buchanan of Graceville
and the late Tony and Terry
Skipper of Virginia Beach,
VA.


Monazia Smith Elmore wins Ms.

Sunburst Pre-teen in VA in March
Monazia K. Smith Elmore
competed-and won the Ms. :. ".
Sunburst Pageant in the pre-
teen category in Newport, VA
in March, also winning Ms.
Photogentic. She is the daughter
of Irvin and Lynnette Elmore
(Harris) and the granddaughter :.
of Don and Nela Wilson and
Myles D. Brown, Sr. ,, .
Monazia will go on to compete
in the state finals in Richmond,
VA on May 1-3 where she will
compete against girls from
other states. She gives thanks
to God, Ms. Tonya Reed and
the Prayer Chainers Mission of
God (Pastor G.B. Sheard) for all
her training.


MARYSA LEE
Marysa Lee will be celebrating
her 14th birthday on April 19.
She is the daughter of Keith
and Brandy Lee of Scotts Ferry.
Marysa enjoys swimming,
hunting, riding four-wheelers
and talking on her cell phone.


JUSTIN BEAUCHAMP
Justin Beauchamp will
celebrate his 13th birthday on
April 27. He is the son of Kim
Barber of Bristol and Chris
Beauchamp of Mississippi. He
is a 6th grader at W.R. Tolar
school. He enjoys playing in
the woods with his best friend
Chris, talking on the phone and
playing Guitar Hero.


LINDA SILCOX
Linda Silcox will celebrate her 50th birthday on April 19. She
is the wife of Eugene Silcox. Her children include Samantha
Enfinger and Scott Silcox. She is self-employed with her own
business, Linda's Hair Care. She enjoys spending her days with
her family and trying to keep up with her grandson, Brady.


Donna Singletary receives Doctor

of Chiropractics degree March 27
Donna L. Singletary, D.C., received her Doctor of Chiropractic
degree during commencement exercises at Palmer College of
Chiropractic, Florida Campus in Port Orange on March 27.
Dr. Singletary is the daughter of Beatrice A. Singletary of Bristol
and the late Harry K. Singletary. Dr. Singletary currently resides in
Largo where she will be establishing a clinic.
To earn the Doctor of Chiropractic degree, Dr. Singletary completed
four-and-one-third academic years of professional study at Palmer
College of Chiropractic's Florida Campus.
Palmer College of Chiropractic's Florida Campus, which opened
in 2002, is a branch campus of Palmer College of Chiropractic,
Davenport, Iowa, the profession's founding college. Students can
earn a Doctor of Chiropractic Degree after receiving a bachelor's
degree from an undergraduate college and completing four-and-one-
third academic years of clinical and classroom instruction at Palmer's
Florida campus.


From Kimberly the Pink
Power Ranger to Prom
Queen and everything else
in between ~ we love you
and are so proud of you.

Happy i8th
Birthday
LMiranda O'Bryan
.ApriC4th!
Love, 1Mo0n & Dad


I


-94W^








APRIL 15, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 15


Peacock, Dunn to wed Saturday
Kelli Peacock
; -: and Jason Dunn of
Blountstown are
pleased to announce
their final wedding
plans.
A wedding
celebration is set
for Saturday, April
18, at the Panhandle
C.0 Pioneer Settlement
in Blountstown. The
festivities will begin
with a front porch
reception at 6 p.m.
with heavy hours
d'oeuvres. A candlelight ceremony will follow in the old log cabin
fondly referred to by locals as the clubhouse. After the vows have
been exchanged, the newlyweds will host a dessert buffet featuring
live music by some of their musically gifted friends.
Kelli and Jason would love to have all their.family and friends join
them for this special occasion.






Chase Rankin graduates basic

training in US Air Force Mar. 27
Chase Rankin, son of
Billy and JoAnne Rankin
of Bristol graduated from
basic training in the U.S.
Air Force on March 27 at
Lakeland Air Force Base,
San Antonio, TX.
Training took about 8
1/2 weeks. Chase graduated
cum laude in the top ten
percent of his class of over
770 Airmen.
He graduated high
school in 2007 from North
Florida Christian School in
Tallahassee.
He has begun advanced
training .in Avionic
Component Systems at
Keesler Air Force Base
in Biloxi, MS to prepare
him to work on computer
systems of fighter jets,
which will take about eight
months to complete.


Bontrager, Godwin plan May 9 wedding
James and Denielle
Manning of Blountstown and
Philip 3Bontrager of Wewa
Share proud to announce the
engagement of their daughter,
Jessica Lynn Bontrager, to
Justin Lee Godwin. He is the
son of Linda Godwin ofAltha
and Lee and Betty Godwin of
VBlountstown.
Jessica is the granddaughter
V of Jonas and Emma Bontrager
of Blountstown and Robert
... Borelli of Massachusetts.
_.4 Justin is the grandson of
Johnnie and Patricia Godwin
of Altha and Versta Branson
of Bradenton.
The- two plan to wed on
May 9 at Chipola Community
Church in Calhoun County at
2 p.m. (CT)
All family and friends are
invited to attend.


Todd, Perkins get married on April 10


Brandon Matthew
Perkins is proud
to announce the "
marriage of his
parents Matthew '
Dewayne Perkins to
Rebecca Jolene Todd '
on April 10.
Rebecca is the i ,
daughter of Joe
and Donna Todd
of Altha. and Alicia
Todd of Hosford.
Her grandparents are
Frank and Evelyn
Clark of Bristol..
Matt is the son of
Ken and Cynthia
Sumner of Bristol.
His grandparents
are Vernon and Nell 1'
Ross and Edward Sumner, all of
Bristol.
Rebecca is a student at Chipola


College, where she is pursing her
associate degree in nursing and
Matt is employed with Liberty


Correctional Institution.
The couple will hold a big
reception at a later date.


Xny is..ur )m n, >l fllolbe..iRO


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Of Tallahassee "Where Quality is Affordable"


7579 W. TENNESSEE ST. TALLAHASSEE


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S Firrt i.:i.1 19() 7 Fi L.i,)j .' nr, Lot
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H,.v. 2) E o1 Gea.3,.e Ra Turn
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Free firearms

safety course

offered Apr. 18
A free firearms safety course
Swill be offered Saturday, April
18 from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m.
by the Blountstown Police
Department.
For more information or to
register call 674-5987. There
are only 16 positions available.
Acceptance will be on a first
come first serve basis.

Baggett reunion

Sat., April 25
The .descendants of Matthew
and Lov Baggett will have their
yearly family reunion at Four
Mile Creek Park Saturday, April
25.
Please come and bring food,
drinks, pictures and the latest
news of your family.









Page 16 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL APRIL 15, 2009


LCHS Baseball team holding strong with a


mid-season record of 11 wins and 3 losses


by Beverly Sapp
The Bulldogs hosted the
Blountstown Tigers on March
6 and pulled off a big win. Kyle
Sapp would be the winning
pitcher of the game throwing
4 innings with 8 strikeouts and
allowing no runs. Leaders at
the plate for the Dawgs were
Brenton Bailey, who went 2-2,
2 RBI;Kyle Sapp 3-3, 2 RBI and
Jimmy Revell 2-3, RBI. Coach
Maclemore was really happy with
his team effort and said this was
a good team win.
On March 7, the Bulldogs
took on Sneads at home. Jared
Barber pitched a great game
giving up only one earned run. At
the plate Jeremy Shuler had one
hit with an RBI and Ryan Travis
had one hit. The Bulldogs come
away with a loss with the final
score 4-2.
On March 12, Jeremy Shuler
picked up his third win on the
mound for the Dawgs against
Altha, pitching 3 innings with
8 K's.
Leaders at the plate were Jared
Barber 2-2, Jeremy Shuler 2-2,
Brenton Bailey 1-2, Kyle Sapp
1-2 and Ryan Travis 1-2.
The Dawgs traveled to Port St.
Joe March 13 with Ryan Travis
taking his first loss of the season
on the mound. Shalin Palel came
in for relief of Travis, pitching
a very good game. The Dawgs


gave up four
unearned L
runs against
the Sharks, Kyle Sapp
giving up the Jared Barber
win with a Brenton Bailey
score of 6-0. Jimmy Revell
Ryan Travis
Jared Barber, Ryan Travis
Jeremy Shuler
Kyle Sapp, Jordan Reddick
and Brenton
Bailey had
one hit each.
Traveling to Tallahassee on
March 19, the Bulldog team
brought home a win against John
Paul with a score of 12-3. Kyle
Sapp took the mound for his third
win, pitching 6 innings with 5
K's: At the plate, Nolan Brown
was 3-6, 2 RBI; Jared Barber,
3-5, 2 RBI; Jeremy Shuler, 2-5,
2 RBI;Tryston Summers 2-5 and
Daniel Deason, 1-3.
On March 20, the Bulldogs
hosted the Wewa Gators. The
Dawgs jumped out on top early
with a 5-0 lead. Kyle Sapp led
the Dawgs at the plate going 2-3
with 4 RBI, and a grand slam.
Ryan Travis was 2-4; Jeremy
Shuler, 1-2. The Dawgs got too
comfortable too early and the
Gators came back to win the
game with a final score of 9-5.
Cossa ValleyAcademy traveled
to Liberty County on March 23,
-playing a great game. Jared
Barber pitched for the Dawgs,
with 6 IP, 10 K's, 4 hits, and 1 run,


CHS BASEBALL HITTING STATS
AVG AB Hits HRS RI
509 51 26 4 19
434 46 20 0 1
431 44 19 0
400 35 14 0 1
375 40 15 1
342 38 13 0
325 40 13 1


giving way to Jeremy Shuler in
the 7th. With a 5-1 lead going in
to the top of the 7th, Coosa Valley
didn't go down easily, coming
back on top of the Dawgs with a
score of 7-5. The Dawgs fought
back and picked up the win
with a final score of 8-7. Coach
Maclemore said it was a good
team effort to pull off the win.
S On April 4, after twelve days
off, the Bulldogs took on North
Florida Christian in Marianna,
with the Dawgs picking up their
4th loss with the final score 15-3.
Coach Maclemore said the
time -off really showed the boys
did not show up to play but he
was really proud of the 8 hits the
team got off a really good NFC
pitcher. At the plate Kyle Sapp led
the team going 3-4, HR, 1 RBI;
Jimmy Revell was 1-2 and Scotty
Brown was 1-2, RBI.
Following their loss to NFC
the Bulldogs had a few minutes
to get ready to play again, with
Jared Barber taking the mound to


defeat Marianna.
Jared pitched a
31 SB fine game for
9 13 the Dawgs with
2 8 6IP, giving up 4
8 5 ER and striking
3 out 5. Jared also
8 8
8 8 led at the plate
7 7
6 6 going 4-4, 4RBI;
Jordan Reddick
3-4, 2 RBI; Ryan
Travis 2-3, IRBI;
Brenton Bailey 2-4, 1RBI and
Jimmy Revell 2-4, 1 RBI. It was
a great win for the Bulldogs.
On April 7, the Bulldogs
gave up another win to Maclay.
Maclay jumped out to a early
7-0 lead against the Dawgs. The
Bulldogs fought back hard to
come with in a few runs to make
it 8-3. They had chance to get
back in game in the fifth inning
but failed to put the runs on the
board. Maclay took the win
with the final score 15-5. Scotty
Brown led the team at the plate
2-3, 2 RBI; Kyle Sapp 1-2, 1
RBI, HR; Daniel Deason 1-1 and
Jimmy Revell, 1-3, 1RBI.
The Bulldogs picked up
another win on April 9 against
West Gadsden. Jeremy Shuler
pitched 5 innings, allowing one
hit and striking out 8 moving his
record to 4-0 and 2-2 in district.
Leaders at the plate for the Dawgs
were Kyle Sapp 2-3; Jimmy
Revell, 1-1 and Daniel Deason


1-2 with the final score 10-0.
Coach Maclemore says that
overall the team is stillnot playing
consistent, noting, "Someone
needs to step it up and be a
leader." He feels his team can win
district but it's going to take a lot
of hard work. Coach Mac says
he's not sure if the team is willing
to do what it takes to get there.
He feels the Dawgs have the
ability to be a very good team
he's just waiting to see who will
step forward and lead this team.
Hopefully someone will do that
soon and take this team to the
next level, win the district and go
on from there.

Sign-ups set for

Calhoun/Liberty

volleyball league

The Calhoun-Liberty
Summer Volleyball League
will be holding sign-ups on
Tuesday, April 21 from 3 to 6
p.m. at the Neal Civic Center
in Blountstown.
The league is open to girls
ages 11-15. There willbe a $25
registration fee to participate.
Anyone interested in playing
or coaching please be there at
this time or call (850) 447-
0959.


Altha Wildcats plan 'Senior Night' April 16 followed by game against BHS


by Jim Mclntosh,
contributing writer
ALTHA, APRIL 6--The
Wewahitchka Gators (10-8) run-
ruled the Altha Wildcats (3-11) in
five innings last Monday, 11-1.
Tyler Huff scored the only run
for the Wildcats in the second
inning. After reaching base on a
walk he advanced to second base
on a passed ball. Huff advanced
to third on Anthony's ground out
to second base and he scored on
a wild pitch.
Altha's two hits were recorded
by Jake-Edenfield-a single and
a double along with two stolen
bases.
ALTHA, APRIL 7--Seniors
Jake Edenfield and Ethan Byier
put the Wildcats (4-11; 3-3,
2-2A) on their shoulders last
Tuesday night and carried them
to a 5-1 district win over the
Cottondale Hornets (10-8; 2-3,
2-2A). Between the two of them
they mashed three home runs.
Jake Edenfield hit the first two
dingers of his baseball career as
part of his four-for-four night.
Edenfield's first jack came in the
first inning as he drove his first
pitch over the right center field


fence to give Altha an 1-0 lead.
In the sixth inning he broke open
a 2-1 ballgame when again he
drove the first pitch out of the
pasture with Jacob Warner on
base to put the Wildcats up, 4-1.
Following Edenfield, pitcher
Ethan Byler helped himself by
taking a full pitch count pitch
yard over the left field fence to
give the Wildcats their 5-1 win.
Cottondale scored their
unearned run in the second inning.
In the fourth inning Edenfield
and Byler worked together to
break a 1-1 tie. Edenfield singled
through the left side of the infield.
Then he stole second and third
base. Byler's hot shot to the
third baseman was mishandled
allowing him to reach first base
and Jake to score.
On the mound Ethan did a great
job, striking out 11 of the batters
he faced, and he surrendered no
walks. He allowed only two
hits and Cottondale's run was
unearned.
Other Wildcats contributing
-to their nine-hit night were:
Corey Johnson who was 2 for 4,
including a double; Caleb Morris
singled in his two at bats; and,


Caleb Chew reached on an infield
single.
ALTHA, APRIL 10-The
week didn't end on a good note
for the Wildcats (4-12) as they
were shut out by the Malone
Tigers (11-3) last Thursday night,
10-0.
Jake Edenfield had two singles
and a stolen base to lead the
Wildcats at the plate. Also, Corey


Johnson singled in the game.
Altha hosts three more home
games Monday, April 13. They
played Liberty County and
Tuesday, April 14 they had their
sights on the Bozeman Bucks in
a district game. (Check out next
week's issue for game details).
Thursday, April 16 is the Wildcats'
"Senior Night" as they take on
Blountstown at 6 p.m. (CT).


Before their final regular season
home game, the following five
seniors and their parents will be
recognized: Ethan Byler, Jake
Edenfield, D.J. Griswold, Corey
Johnson and Caleb Morris.
Next Tuesday, April 21 the
Wildcats will travel to Madison
to take on Aucilla Christian in
double header that is slated for a
12 p.m.-(CT).


Seminoles defeat Gators in Liberty County

Dixie Youth O-Zone action Saturday, April 11


from Richie Smith
The Liberty County Recreation
Department's Dixie Youth
Baseball season began Saturday,
April 11 with the Preble Rish
Seminoles defeating the Conyers
Gators 10-2.
Garrett Swier was the winning
pitcher, hurling a one-hitter and
fanning 8.
Keith Bums had two hits for
the Seminoles and drove in four
runs. D.J. Pittman also had a
run-scoring hit for Preble Rish.
Swier, Pittman, Bums, and Ricky
Ramer scored two runs apiece for
the winners.
Micah McCaskill hit a double


to account for the Gator hit.
This week's schedule had the
Gators play at the Blountstown
Cardinals Tuesday and they will
host the Blountstown Yankees
on Thursday. On Tuesday April
21 they play at Chattahoochee at


6:30 p.m.
The Seminoles host
Chattahoochee on Tuesday. They
play at the Yankees Friday at 7
p.m.
Monday, April 20 the Yankees
play at the Seminoles at 7 p.m.


T-ball league planned for Apr. 18
from Richie Smith
This Saturday, April 18 the Liberty County Recreation
Department will begin its 2009 T-Ball League with a double-
header.
At 9 a.m. the Bee Boppers play SWAT and at 10:30 a.m. C.W.
Roberts Construction will play Superior Bank.
T-Ball action is set for Tuesdays and Thursda's at Veterans
Memorial Field until the end of May.


890Peo


i~ ---









APRIL 15, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 17


room and grabbed a collection
of dolls given to her by her late
grandmother before running
outside. Read, who had forgotten
where she had put down her keys
in all the confusion, left without
them. Their home was spared and
Bristol Fire Chief Dale Hobby
later located the missing keys.
Read said she is saddened by
the loss of her neighbor's weekend
home, who live in Tallahassee
and "are here every weekend."
The home previously belonged


to Karlene Forrester's father,
the late Ed Haywood, and was
filled with family photographs,
furniture and mementos. The
building featured a lot of tongue-
in-groove cypress paneling. The
couple's 16-year-old daughter's
car was in the garage.
Stover, who has had a lot at
the lake since 1965, called the
fire "terrifying." She said that if
the ground had been dry, "There
would have been much less left
on this side of the lake."


from the school parking lot onto
Myers Ann Street around 2:30
p.m. when they looked out to see
a huge twisting dark cloud in the
distance toward the river.
"It was really gray and stormy.
Then the sky turned a crazy shade
of green," said Sami. "When
.we went to pull out, I looked at
the sky and said, 'Clara, what is
that?'"
"It's a tornado," Clara said.
"You could just see it rolling,"
said Sami, describing what they
saw in the far distance behind
the Mormon Church. "It was
not a defined funnel. It was just
a mass of stuff slanting down
toward the ground but it wasn't
rain." She described it as "kind
of like a big ball that appeared to
be rotating."
Clara whipped the car around


and returned to the school, pulling
up in the parking lot, cutting the
car off without bothering to put it
in park as they raced into front of
the building.
"It was big," said Clara. "We
could see where the top was
the widest and it was funneling
down.
The girls, along with Clara's
15-year-old brother Ethan, waited
out the storm in the school hallway
for about 20 minutes before the
sky cleared.
"Everybody was calm except
Sami," said Clara. "There's no
real point in freaking out," she
said, noting that her parents stay
calm in bad weather and showed
her how to take precautions. She
added, "The school's a hurricane
shelter. Nothing's going to get
us."


Liberty JV brings home trophy from

March 30 & 31 tournament in Wewa
The Liberty County High School Junior Varsity Baseball team walked away winners from a
tournament in Wewahitchka on March 30 & 31 after playing Sneads, St. Joe and Bay High.
The Bulldogs took the tournament with an 8-7 score against Bay High to bring home the
trophy. Team member Daniel Deason was recognized with the MVP award for his efforts on
the field.


Hundreds converge on Capitol to celebrate 100 years of 4-H


TALLAHASSEE -- More than 550 Florida 4-H
members clad head-to-toe in green converged on the
state Capitol Tuesday, April 14 to commemorate the
youth organization's centennial anniversary, leaving
their mark later in the day by planting a tree. A 11:30
a.m. press conference on the Old Capitol steps at 11:30


Gadsden Arts Center

plans affordable art

classes for older kids
QUINCY-The Gadsden Arts Center now offers
Saturday art classes for children and youth, ages 8 to
18, in the Center's beautiful second floor art studio.
Each week, students will experiment with a different
art material to create a project: watercolor, charcoal and
graphite, tenmpera and acrylic paint, soft pastels, and
clay. "This is a productive, fun, and educational way for
students to spend time on a Saturday. We are expanding
after-school and weekend offerings for youth, helping to
meet a growing need in our community" said Executive
Director Grace Maloy.
Students will learn new skills, learn to express
themselves, and also view and discuss works of art in
the Center's galleries. Classes are offered on Saturdays,
1-3 p.m., from May 9-30. Tuition is $65 and all materials
are included. Registration closes April 30. For more
information, call 875-4866 or stop by the Gadsden Arts
Center. For younger children, ask about the Gadsden Arts
Center's Summer Art Camp.


a.m. will include Gov. Charlie Crist, Commissioner of
Agriculture Charles Bronson, state Rep. Faye Culp,
state Sen. Ronda Storms, and numerous 4-H officials.
At 2 p.m., 4-H members and state Attorney General Bill
McCollum will plant a crepe myrtle in the rose garden
by the House Office Building.
"This'event, which was planned by our state youth
council, will give our youth the knowledge and skills to
become informed citizens," said Marilyn Norman, an
associate dean who leads the state's 4-H program. "As
adults we sometimes don't realize the powerful impact
that young people can make."
During the day, 4-H members will take tours and
attend workshops to learn about state government.


Attendees will be frori: Alachua, Bradford, Broward,
Clay, Collier, DeSoto, Duval, Escambia, Flagler,
Hardee, Hillsborough, Lake, Lee, Leon, Liberty,
Marion, Miami-Dade, Nassau, Orange, Osceola, Palm
Beach, Pinellas, Polk, Putnam, Sarasota, Santa Rosa, St.
Johns, Sumter, Taylor, Volusia, Walton and Washington
counties. Interviews will be available.
Founded in.1909, the Florida 4-H Youth Development
Program works with more than 263,000 young people,
ages 5-18, and nearly 12,000 volunteers. The program
is active in all 67 counties and the Seminole Tribe of
Florida. Headquartered in Gainesville, it's part of UF's
Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences. For more
information, visit www.florida4h.org.


Blountstown Public Library to host Charles

Carman Pierce open house on April 20-23


The Blountstown Public Library is pleased to provide
an exhibit of Charles Carman Pierce works of art April
20-23 and to cordially invite the public to meet the artist
in person on April 21 from 6 to 8 p.m.
The exhibit will feature Plein Air paintings of North
Florida and the Golden Isles of Georgia. Selected
portraits of students who were in the Blountstown High
School band in 1983 will be displayed along with Pencil,
Charcoal and Oil Portraits providing retrospective as
well as current examples of work.
Pierce is noted for his mastery of traditional portraiture
in the selected mediums of Charcoal, Pastels and Oil.
Plein Air study in landscapes, still life, animals and the


left-handed modem swing in mediums of acrylic and-
watercolor are within his facile reach.
His respect for subjects and compositions is reflected
in the emotion, space and movement portrayed in the best
use of his chosen medium; moving from dark to light
and thin to thick density.
Hostesses are Dannie Bracewell, Marie Simpson and
Anna Layton. Light refreshments will be served. There
is no charge for this delightful event.
If you are an art enthusiast or artist you will want to
become acquainted with this extraordinary artist, please
do not miss this event.


Ali


I .z


LIGHT ING TRIK

continued from page 1









Page 18 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL APRIL 15, 2009


2008 Annual Drinking Water Quality Report


ft


We're pleased to present to
you this year's Annual Water
Quality Report. This report is
designed to inform you about
the quality water and services
we deliver to you every day.
Our constant goal is to provide
you with a safe and depend-
able supply of drinking water.
We want you to understand the
efforts we make to continually.
improve the water treatment
process and protect our water
resources. We are committed
to ensuring the quality of your
water. Our water source is
ground water from two wells.
The wells draw from the Flori-
dan Aquifer. Because of the
excellent quality of our water,
the only treatment required is
chlorine for disinfection pur-
poses.
In 2008 the Department
of Environmental Protection
performed a Source Water
Assessment on our system
and a search of the data
sources indicated no potential
sources of contamination near
our wells. The assessment
results are available on the
FDEP Source Water Assess-
ment and Protection Program
website atwww.dep.state.fl.us/
swapp.
If you have any questions
about this report or concern-
ing your water utility, please
contact Aaron Elkins @ (850)
545-1370. We encourage
our valued customers to be
informed about their water
utility. If you want to learn
more, please attend any of
our regularly scheduled meet-
ings. They are held on the first
Tuesday after the first Monday
of each month at the Liberty
County Rock Bluff Water Sys-
tem @ 7pm.
Liberty County Rock Bluff
routinely monitors for contami-
nants in your drinking water
according to Federal and State
laws, rules, and regulations.
Except where indicated oth-
erwise, this report is based on
the results of our monitoring
for the period of January 1 to
December 31,2008.
Data obtained before Janu-
ary 1, 2008, and presented in
this report are from the most
recent testing done in accor-
dance with the laws, rules, and
regulations.
If present, elevated levels of
lead can cause serious health
problems, especially for preg-
nant women and young chil-
dren. Lead in drinking water
is primarily from materials and
components associated with
service lines and home plumb-
ing. Rock Bluff Water System
is responsible for providing
high quality drinking water,
but cannot control the variety
of materials used in plumbing
components. When your wa-


LIBERTY COUNTY


ROCK BLUFF WATER SYSTEM


We are pleased to announce that our drinking
water meets all federal and state requirements.

2008 TEST RESULTS TABLE
Dates of
Contaminant and Unit of p MCL Violation Level Range of MCLG MCL Likelv Source of
Measurement $o1r, Y/N Detected Results Contamination
Radiological Contaminants
Alpha emitters (pCiL) May-Oct 05 & N a098 0Erosion of natural
Alpha emitters (Jan-06 N avg=0.98 0.9-1.2 0 1 deposit
Radium 226 + 228 or May-Oct05 & N avg=1.5 1.3-1. 0 5 Erosion ofnatural
combinedradium(pCi/L) Jan-06 deposits
inorganic Contaminants
Corrosion of galvanized
pipes; erosion of natural
Cadmium (ppb) May-06 1.5 N/A 5 5 deposits; discharge from
N metal refineries; runoff
from waste batteries and
_____~_________ _____~_________ paints
Erosion of natural
deposits; discharge from
fertilizer and aluminum
Fluoride (ppm) May-06 N 0.8 N/A 4 4.0 icres. te
additive which promotes
strong teeth when at
optimum levels between
0.7 and 1.3 ppm
Salt water intrusion,
Sodium (ppm) May-06 N 43.0 N/A N/A 160 Salte ingfromsion
S1 _leaching from soil
TTHMs and Stage 1 Disinfectant/Disinfection By-Product (D/DBP) Contaminants
Contaminant and Dates of MCL Range MCLor
Level MCLG or MCL or
Unit of sa .ingn Violao teed of MRDLG MRDL Likely Source of Contamination
Measurement (motyr.) Y/N Dt Results
Jari-Dece MRDLG
Chlorine (ppm) 0 N 0.68 0.5-0.7 G MRDL= 4.0 Water additive used to control microbes
Haloacetic Acids Jul
alotic Acids Jl N avg= 8.3 5.5-12.7 NA MCL = 60 By-product of drinking water disinfection
(five) (HAAS) (ppb) &Sep-08
TITHM [Total
"rHM'totalJul avg= 49.4-
trihalomethanes] S lo N av NA MCL = 80 By-product-of drinking water disinfection
(Ppb) &Sep-08o 64.5 88. 1
Contaminant and Unit of Datsf MCL Violatibn Level Rane of MCLG MCL Likey Source of
Measurement sampling Y/N Detected Results Contamination
_mo./yr.
TTHMs and Stage 1 Disinfectant/Disinfection By-Product (D/DBP) Contaminants
Contaminant and Dates of MCL Range MMCL or
Unit of sampling Violation Level of Likel Source of Contmintion
Mea nD(no/yr Y Detected MRDLG MRDL
Measurement (Imo.yr.) Y/N Results _
Jan-Dec MRD1LG
Chlorine (ppm) 08De N 0.75 0.6-0.8 MRDG MRDL 4.0 Water additive used to control microbes
Haloacetic Acids 35.3 -
a'te liAids J) ul-06 N 35.9 3 NA MCL =60 By-product ofdrinkingwater disinfection
36e(HAA5) Ppb)36.5 ,1,60 B
rTHLi [Total 396-
trihalometlianesj Jul-06 N 41.8 44.0 NA MCL 80 By-product of drinking water disinfection
(ppb)440
No. of
Contaminant anti nttn Dates of AL 90th sampling AL
o M .esurenent sampling Violation Percentile sites MCLG (Action Likely Source ofContamination
(mo./yr.) Y/N Result exceeding Level)
the AL
Lead and Copper (Tap Water)
SCorrosion of household plumbing systems; erosion
Copper (tap water) Jun-Sp N 0.07 0 of 20 1.3 1.3 ofnatural deposits; leaching from wood
(ppm) 08 preservatives
Lead (tap water) Jun-Sep N 3.00 0 of20 15 Corrosion of household plumbing systems, erosion
(ppb) 08 N of natural deposits

In the table above, you may system must follow, microbial contaminants.
find unfamiliar terms and abbrevi- Initial Distribution System Maximum residual disinfec-
ations. To help you better under- Evaluation (IDSE): An important tant level goal or MRDLG: The
stand these terms we've provided part of the Stage 2 disinfection By- level of a drinking water disin-
the following definitions: products Rule (DBPR). The IDSE is fectant below which there is no
Maximum Contaminant Lev- a one-time study conducted by wa- known or expected risk to health.
el or MCL: The highest level of ter systems to identify distribution MRDLGs do not reflect the ben-
a contaminant that is allowed in system locations with high concen- efits of the use of disinfectants to
drinking water. MCLs are set as trations of trihalomethanes (THMs) control microbial contaminants.
close to the MOLGs as feasible and haloacetic acids (HAAs). Water Parts per million (ppm) or
using the best available treatment systems will use results from teh Milligrams per liter (mg/) one
technology. IDSE, in conjunction with their part by weight ofanalyte to 1 mil-
Maximum Contaminant Lev- Stage 1 DBPR compliance moni- lion parts by weight of the water
el Goal or MCLG: The level of touring data, to select compliance sample.
a contaminant in drinking water monitoring locations for the Stage Parts per billion (ppb) or
below which there is no known or 2 DBPR. Micrograms per liter (pg/1) -
expected risk to health. MCLGs Maximum residual disinfec- one part by weight of analyte to
allow for a margin of safety. tant level or MRDL: The highest 1 billion parts by weight of the
Action Level (AL): The con- level of a disinfectant allowed in water sample.
centration of a contaminant which, drinking water. There is convincing Picocurie per liter (pCi/L)
if exceeded, triggers treatment or evidence that addition of a disin- measure of the radioactivity
other requirements that a water fectant is necessary for control of of water.


ter has been sitting for several
hours, you can minimize the
potential for lead exposure
by flushing your tap for 30
seconds to 2 minutes before
using water for drinking or
cooking. If you are concerned
about lead in your water, you
may wish to have your water
tested. Information on lead in
drinking water, testing meth-
ods, and steps you can take to
minimize exposure is available
from the Safe Drinking Water
Hotline or at http://www.epa.


gov/safewater/lead.
The sources of drinking wa-
ter (both tap water and bottled
water) include rivers, lakes,
streams, ponds, reservoirs,
springs, and wells. As water
travels over the surface of the
land or through the ground, it
dissolves naturally occurring
minerals and, in some cases,
radioactive material, and can
pick up substances resulting
from the presence of animals
or from human activity.
Contaminants that may


be present in source water
include:
(A) Microbial contaminants,
such as viruses and bacteria,
which may come from sew-
age treatment plants, septic
systems, agricultural livestock
operations, and wildlife.
(B) Inorganic contaminants,
such as salts and metals,
which can be naturally-oc-
curring or result from urban
storm water runoff, industrial
or domestic wastewater dis-
charges, oil and gas produc-


tion, mining, or farming.
(C) Pesticides and herbi-
cides, which may come from
a variety of sources such as
agriculture, urban storm water
runoff, and residential uses.
(D) Organic chemical-con-
taminants, including synthetic
and volatile organic chemi-
cals, which are by-products
of industrial processes and
petroleum production, and can
also come from gas stations,
urban storm water runoff, and
septic systems.
(E) Radioactive contami-
nants, which can be naturally
occurring or be the result of oil
and gas production and mining
activities.
In order to ensure that tap
water is safe to drink, the EPA
prescribes regulations, which
limit the amount of certain con-
taminants in water provided
by public water systems. The
Food and Drug Administration
(FDA) regulations establish
limits for contaminants in
bottled water, which must
provide the same protection
for public health.
Drinking water, including
bottled water, may reason-
ably be expected to contain at
least small amounts of some
contaminants. The presence
of contaminants does not nec-
essarily indicate that the water
poses a health risk. More in-
formation about contaminants
and potential health effects
can be obtained by calling
the Environmental Protection
Agency's Safe Drinking Water
Hotline at 1-800-426-4791.
Some people may be more
vulnerable to contaminants-
in drinking water than the
general population. Immuno-
compromised persons such as
persons with cancer undergo-
ing chemotherapy, persons
who have undergone organ
transplants, people with HIV/
AIDS or other immune system
disorders, some elderly, and
infants can be particularly at
risk from infections. These
people should seek advice
about drinking water from their
health care providers. EPA/
CDC guidelines on appropri-
ate means to lessen the risk of
infection by Cryptosporidium
and other microbiological
contaminants are available
from the Safe Drinking Water
Hotline (800-426-4791).
We at Liberty County Rock
Bluff would like you to under-
stand the efforts we make to
continually improve the water
treatment process and protect
our water resources. We are
committed to insuring the qual-
ity of your water. If you have
any questions or concerns
about the information pro-
vided, please feel free to call
any of the numbers listed.









APRIL 15, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 19



2008 Annual Drinking Water Quality Report


LIBERTY COUNTY


We're pleased to present to
you this year's Annual Water
Quality Report. This report is
designed to inform you about
the quality water and services
we deliver to you every day.
Our constant goal is to provide
you with a safe.and depend-
able supply of drinking water.
We want you to understand the
efforts we make to continually
improve the water treatment
process and protect our water
resources. We are committed
to ensuring the quality of your
water. Our water source is
ground water from two wells.
.The wells draw from the Flori-
dan Aquifer. Because of the
excellent quality of our water,
the only treatments required
are chlorine for disinfection
purposes and fluoride for den-
tal health purposes.
In 2008 the Department
of Environmental Protection
performed a Source Water
Assessment on our system.
The assessment was con-
ducted to provide information
about any potential sources of
contamination in the vicinity of
our.wells. There is three po-
tential source of contamination
identified for this system with a
moderate to high susceptibility
level. The assessment results
are available on the FDEP
Source Water Assessment
and Protection Program web-
site at www.dep.state.fl.us/
swapp or they can be obtained
from the Town of Hosford.
If you have any questions
about this report or concern-
ing your water utility, please
contact
Aaron Elkins @ (850) 545-
1370. We encourage our val-
ued customers to be informed
about their water utility. If you
want to learn more, please
attend any of our regularly
scheduled meetings. They
are held on the first Tuesday
after the first Monday of each
month at the Liberty County
Courthouse @ 7pm.
Liberty County Hosford Wa-
ter System routinely monitors
for contaminants in your drink-
ing water according to Federal
and State laws, rules, and
regulations. Except where
indicated otherwise, this re-
port is based on the results of
our monitoring for the period
of January 1 to December
31,2008. Data obtained be-
fore January 1, 2008, and
presented in this report are
from the most recent testing
done in accordance with the
laws, rules, and regulations.
If present, elevated levels of
lead can cause serious health
problems, especially for preg-
nant women and young chil-
dren. Lead in drinking water
is primarily from materials and
- components associated with


HOSFORD WATER SYSTEM

We are pleased to announce that our drinking
water meets all federal and state requirements.

2008 TEST RESULTS TABLE
Contaminlnt and Unit of s MCL Violation Level Range of MCLG CL Likely Source of
Measurement n, ni YIN Detected Results Cunlamation
(m./yr.)
Radiological Contaminants
Erosion of natural
Alpha emitters (pCi/L) Jun-03 N 1.2 1.1-1.2 0 dep15os it u
Radium 226 228 or Ju -1.8 0.5-1.8 0 5 Erosion of natural
combined radium (pCi/L) deposits
Contaminant and Unit of Dates of sampling MCL Violation Level Range of MCLG MCL Likely Source of
Measurement (mo./yr.) Y/N Detected Results Contamination
Inorganic Contaminants
Discharge from
petroleum refineries;
Antimony (ppb) Apr-06 N 3.0 N/A 6 6 fire retardants;
ceramics; electronics;
solder
Corrosion of galvanized
pipes; erosion of natural
deposits; discharge from
Cadmium (ppb) Apr-06 N 1.9 N/A 5 5 deposits; discharge from
metal refineries; runoff
from waste batteries and
paints
Erosion of natural
deposits; discharge from
fertilizer and aluminum
factories. Water
Fluoride (ppm) Apr-06 N 0.3 0.2-0.3 4 4.0 factrie. Waters
additive which promotes
strong teeth when at
optimum levels between
0.7 and 1.3 ppm
Residue from man-made
pollution such as auto
Lead (point of entry) (ppb) Apr-06 N 1.0 ND-1.0 N/A 15 emissions and paint;
lead pipe, casing, and
solder
Salt water intrusion,
Sodium (ppm) Apr-06 N 11.0 4.0-11.0 N/A 160 leaching from soil
Contsminant and Unit of Da MCL Violation [Level Rangeof MCLG MCLI Likely Source of
Measurement (mo.plyri. Y/N Detected Results Contamination
TTHMs and Stage 1 Disinfectant/Disinfection By-Product (D/DBP) Contaminants
Contaminant and Dates of MCL L Range MCLG or ML or
Unit of sampling Violation eee of LLikely Source of Contamination
Detected MRDLG MRDL
Measurement (moJyr.) Y/N Results
Chlorine (ppm) Jan-Dec N 0.75 0.6-0.8 MRDLG MR,= 4.0 Water additive used to control microbes
08 = 4
aloace Ac)ids Jul-06 N 35.9 35 NA MCL = 60 By-product of drinking water disinfection
(five)(HlAA5)) (ppb) _________ 36.5.____________________
1I7'HM [Total 39.6 -
trihalomethanes] Jul-06 N 41.8 .6 NA MCL = 80 By-product of drinking water disinfection
(ppb) ____
No. of
Cont t ad Datesof AL 90th sampling AL
oftMensuramntan i sampling Violation Percentile sites MCLGC (Action Likely Source or Contamination
(mo./yr.) YN Result exceeding Level)
Ihe ALt
Lead and Copper (Tap Water)
Copp ) J p Corrosion of household plumbing systems; erosion
Copper tap water) u N 0.07 0 of20 t.3 1.3 of natural deposits; leaching from wood
) preservatives
Lead (tap water) Jun-Sep N 3.00 0 o 20 15 Corrosion of household plumbing systems, erosion
(ppb) 08 of naturaldeposits
In the table above, you may find other requirements that a water sys- control of microbial contaminants.
unfamiliar terms and abbreviations. tem must follow. Maximum residual disinfec-
To help you better understand these Initial Distribution System Evalu- tant level goal or MRDLG: The
terms we've provided the following ation (IDSE): An important part of levelof a drinking water disinfectant
definitions: the Stage 2 disinfection Byproducts below which there is no known or
Maximum Contaminant Level Rule (DBPR). The IDSEis a one-time expected risk to health. MRDLGs
or MCL: The highest level of a con- study conducted by water systems to do not reflect the benefits of the use
taminant that is allowed in drinking identify distribution system locations of disinfectants to control microbial
water. MCLs are set as close to the with high concentrations of triha- contaminants.
MCLGs as feasible using the best lomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic Partspermillion (ppm) orMilli-
available treatment technology, acids (HAAs). Water systems will use grams per liter (mg/) one part by
Maximum Contaminant Level results from teh IDSE, in conjunction weight of a te to 1 m ii on part b
Goal or MCLG: The level of a con- with their Stage 1 DBPR compliance eig of te t 1 mll
taminant in drinking water below monitoring data, to select compliance by w eight of the water sample.
which there is no known or expected monitoring locations for the Stage 2 programs per liter (g) -one part
risk to health. MCLGs allow for a Dm r l dt by weight of analyte to 1 billion parts
margin of safety. Maximum residual disinfectant
Arinf Leve ( : Th co n- level or MRDL: The highest level of a by weight of the water sample.
Action Level (AL): The con- disinfectant allowed in drinking water Picocurie per liter (pCi/L) -
centration of a contaminant which There is convincing evidence thatad- measure of the radioactivity of
if exceeded, triggers treatment or ditionf a disinfectantisnecessaryfor water.
edition ofa disinfectant is necessary for wtr


service lines and home plumb-
ing. Hosford Water System
is responsible for providing
high quality drinking water,
but cannot control the variety
of materials used in plumbing
components. When your wa-
ter has been sitting for several
hours, you can minimize
the potential for lead expo-
sure by flushing your tap for 30
seconds to 2 minutes before
using water for drinking or
cooking. If you are concerned
about lead in your water, you
may wish to have your water
tested. Information on lead in


drinking water, testing meth-
ods, and steps you can take to
minimize exposure is available
from the Safe Drinking Water
Hotline or at http://www.epa.
gov/safewater/lead.
The sources of drinking wa-
ter (both tap water and bottled
water) include rivers, lakes,
streams, ponds, reservoirs,
springs, and wells. As water
travels over the surface of the
land or through the ground, it
dissolves naturally occurring
minerals and, in some cases,
radioactive material, and can
pick up substances resulting


from the presence of animals
or from human activity.
Contaminants that may
be present in source water
include:
(A) Microbial contaminants,
such as viruses and bacteria,
which may come from sew-
age treatment plants, septic
systems, agricultural livestock
operations, and wildlife.
(B) Inorganic contaminants,
such as salts and metals,
which can be naturally-oc-
curring or result from urban
storm water runoff, industrial
or domestic wastewater dis-


charges, oil and gas produc-
tion, mining, or farming.
(C) Pesticides and herbi-
cides, which may come from
a variety of sources such as
agriculture, urban storm water
runoff, and residential uses.
(D) Organic chemical con-
taminants, including synthetic
and volatile organic chemi-
cals, which are by-products
of industrial processes and
petroleum production, and can
also come from gas stations,
urban storm water runoff, and
septic systems.
(E) Radioactive contami-
nants, which can be naturally
occurring or be the result of oil
and gas production and mining
activities.
In order to ensure that tap
water is safe to drink, the EPA
prescribes regulations, which
limit the amount of certain con-
taminants in water provided
by public water systems. The
Food and Drug
Administration (FDA) regu-
lations establish limits for
contaminants in bottled water,
which must provide the same
protection for public health.
Drinking water, including
bottled water, may reason-
ably be expected to contain at
least small amounts of some
contaminants. The presence
of contaminants does not nec-
essarily indicate that the water
poses a health risk. More in-
formation about contaminants
and potential health effects
can be obtained by calling
the Environmental Protection
Agency's Safe Drinking Water
Hotline at 1-800-426-4791.
Some people may be more
vulnerable to contaminants
in drinking water than the
general population. Immuno-
compromised persons such as
persons with cancer undergo-
ing chemotherapy, persons
who have undergone organ
transplants, people with HIV/
AIDS or other immune system
disorders, some elderly, and
infants can be particularly at
risk from infections. These
people should seek advice
about drinking water from their
health care providers. EPA/
CDC guidelines on appropri-
ate means to lessen the risk of
infection by Cryptosporidium
and other microbiological
contaminants are available
from the Safe Drinking Water
Hotline (800-426-4791).
We at Liberty County Hos-
ford Water System would
like you to understand the
efforts we make to continually
improve the water treatment
process and protect our water
resources. We are committed
to insuring the quality of your
water. If you have any ques-
tions or concerns about the
information provided, please
feel free to call any of the
numbers listed.








Page 20 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL APRIL 15, 2009

I Liberty and Calhounj
S1 !County Schools!


BHS competes at the Math Olympiad April 10i
On Friday, April 10 Mrs. high schools. BHS came home Algebra I category Catilyn Stewart and 3rd Place,
Howell took several students to with fantastic results! 1st place ciphering: Caitlyn Saad Farooqi.
the 25th Annual Chipola Math 1st place team overall: Caitlyn Stewart, P.J. Buggs, and Saad Geometry category
Olympiad where they competed Stewart, Harlea Perdue, and Farooqi. *2nd place ciphering: Harlea
in various math events with other Ashley Adams. *IndividualAwards: 2nd Place, Perdue, Stewart Herndon and
Travis Pittman.
*Individual Awards: 2nd
Place, Travis Pittman and 3rd
Place, Harlea Perdue and Stewart


1"


Math team pictured, back row, L-R: Travis Pittman, Saad Farooqi, Tarak Amin, Ashley Adams,
PJ Buggs, Aubrey Tharpe, and Stewart Herndon. Front row, L-R: Harlea Perdue, Mrs. Howell
and Caitlyn Stewart..


Students raising money to see teacher

ride bull at the Rodeo Friday, April 24


Blountstown Middle School students are currently
raising money for the Calhoun County Take Stock
in Children Scholarship Fund. A goal of $1,000
has been set and currently the students have raised
$500. If they make their goal of $1,000 by April 24,
Mr. Jason White, the social studies teacher at BMS
will attempt to ride a bull at the Rodeo set for April


25 at Sam Atkins Park at 7 p.m. BMS is asking all
community members to help make this happen.
If you would like to contribute money to Take
Stock in Children and help make Mr. White a bull
rider, contact BMS Guidance Counselor, Stephanie
Brogden at 674-8234 or TSIC Representative,
Barbara Hathaway at 674-5927, ext. 21.


Altha competes in National Quizbowl March 20
by Brittany Stephens
On Friday, March 20 the Altha
Brain Bowl team headed to
Chipola College to compete
in the High School National
Quizbowl Team Competition.
Team Captain Brittany Stephens
placed with the third highest
individual score. Alice Marshall
is the team sponsor. A special
thanks to Ms. Cathy Sumner who
chaperoned this trip. Pictured
at-right are the Altha Brain Bowl JW04
team members:* (Bottom row,
L-R) Brittany Stephens (Captain)
and SummerAttaway. (Top row,
L-R) D.J. Griswold, Jonathan
Sumner, Lucas Basford andLane
Parrish.


~@j - - - - - -



Tolar raises $975

for AR program
; ,W.R. Tolar held a very special event to raise money for
the Accelerated Reader Program. Kids had the opportunity
to take their pictures with a very soft loveable bunny.
Pictures were taken Wednesday, April 8 in the Media
Center for a cost of $5 for two pictures.
The school raised $975 for the AR program. The
money will be used for new books, field trips, special days
(water day, p.j. day, pizza parties, etc.) all incentives to
students to make their goal set by their teacher.
Pictured left is Jeremy Spring and right is Sydni
Smith, shown cuddling the bunny.


frnrcuuuo.
Algebra II category
*Individual Awards: 3rd Plac
Aubrey Tharpe, 4th Place, Ashle
Adams, and 10th Place, Tan
Amin.
Congratulations to Mr
Howell and the Math Olympia
team.


5.
ak

s.
ad


Mandatory
Cheerleader Meeting
On Thursday, April 16, there
will be a mandatory meeting
for all girls interested in trying
out for cheerleader at BHS for
the 2009/2010 school year. The
meeting will be at 6 p.m. in the
auditorium to discuss changes
that will be made to the BHS
cheer squad. A parent plus the
student interested must attend
the meeting to be able to try
out. If you have any questions,
please call, Samantha Taylor at
674-5724.

Altha Calendar
of Events
Thursday, April 16-Varsity
Softball vs. Liberty County,
5 p.m.; Varsity Baseball vs.
Blountstown, 6 p.m.
Friday, April 17-6th Grade
Field Trip; Folk Life Festival,
4th/5th Grades; Prom, 8 11
p.m.
Tuesday, April 21-Sr. Beta
State Convention Friday, April
24 Varsity Softball District
Tournament at Sneads, TBA;
County Tropicana Speech
Competition; Varsity Baseball
(Doubleheader) at Aucilla, 12
p.m.
Friday, April 24-Varsity
Baseball at East Gadsden,
5:30 p.m.
Saturday, April 25-Project
Graduation 5K Run


I
I
I






I
I
I
'I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I


BREAKFAST
THURSDAY
Sausage gravy and biscuit,
assorted cereal with but-
tered toast, assorted fruit
juice.
FRIDAY
French toast sticks and
sliced ham, assorted cereal
with buttered toast, and
assorted fruit juice.
MONDAY
Cheese grits and sausage
patty, assorted cereal with.
buttered toast, and as-
sorted fruit juice.
TUESDAY
French toast sticks and
sliced ham, assorted cereal
with buttered toast, and
assorted fruit juice.
WEDNESDAY
Scrambled egg and grits,
assorted cereal with but-
tered toast, and assorted
fruit juice.

LUNCHES
Elementary
(Pre-K thru 5th)
THURSDAY
Baked chicken, mashed I
potatoes and gravy, limas
and corn bread. Alternate:
Turkey club wrap.
FRIDAY
Sausage pizza with bread
stick, salad and banana.
Alternate: Hot ham and
cheese sandwich.
MONDAY
Breaded chicken nuggets,
mashed potatoes and
gravy, carrots and corn
bread. Alternate: Turkey
sandwich.
TUESDAY
Liberty County: Chicken
and broccoli alfredo, car-
rots and orange.
Calhoun County: Chicken
Tetrazzini, carrots and
orange.
Alternate: Ham and
cheese sub.
WEDNESDAY
Corn dog, mac and cheese,
green beans and peaches.
Alternate: Turkey club
sandwich.


SPONSORED BY:
Laban Bontrager, DMD
Monica Bontrager, DMD
Bristol Phone 643-5417
_L _---_jJ


I


e,
yV








*APRIL 15, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 21


Marion Peavy speaks with

LCHS Allied Health students
LCHS Allied Health students would like to thank Mr. Marlon
Peavy for his wonderful presentation to health students. Mr. Peavy
graciously volunteered his time this week to speak with medical
students. He offered to students a new perspective on medical care
by relating experiences in his profession, explaining educational
certification requirements and explaining postmortem medical
procedures. Students were most struck by the care and compassion
in Mr. Peavy's presentation.

Students read to school's

new bulldog puppy 'Liberty'
Ms. Chesnee Rudd's third graders at W.R. Tolar got the opportunity
to read to the high school's new bulldog puppy, Ms. Liberty.
After completing the novel 'Because of WinnDixie', each student
was encouraged to pick their favorite part from the book and be
prepared to read it aloud.
Ms. Liberty was a great listener! The students were very excited
about reading to her, and we hope she can visit again sometime
soon.


FSU's Science on the Move visits the 8th

grade science class at WR Tolar April 7

FSU's Science on
the Move instructor
Jonathon Grooms
I pn! visited the eighth
grade science class at
W.R. Tolar April 7.
The Science on the
Move program is a
collaboration between
S. the Office of Science
Teaching Activities
and the Department
of Physics at Florida
State University. The
mission of Science on
the Move is to make


TOP: Jonathon Grooms discusses the motion sensor lab with students. ABOVE LEFT: Peggy
Hanks and Eliza Nobles, working hard on the motion sensor lab. ABOVE: Kaylene Kady enjoys
riding the hovercraft across the gym.


Sr-$AVON$

Earn 50%, Starter Kit

APAL/ HEE ONLY *10
CIWfER Call today:
(850)570-1499
-Sl 18 tr / .www.youravon.com/tdavies
-7LL- ufnn
Healing minds and empowering the lives of people with un
mental illness takes more than lust skill...it takes compas-


Calhoun County School Board
JOB OPPORTUNITY
The School Board of Calhoun County is accepting appli-
cations for the following position:
Lunchroom Manager
Terms of Employment: 10 months
Salary: Commensurate with Current Salary Schedule
Applicant Qualifications: High School diploma or equiva-
lent; one year experience in school food service or
related work desired; must have some knowledge of the
principles of nutrition and quantity food service manage-
ment.
Applicant Qualifications: High School diploma or equiva-
lent; one year experience in school food service or related
work desired; must have some knowledge of the principles
of nutrition and quantity food service management.
A copy of the job duties pertaining to this position is
available at the School Board Office.
Questions concerning this job opening may be directed
to Mrs. Diana Alday, Food Service Assistant at the Special
Programs Office or Tommy McClellan, Superintendent.
Employment opportunities are offered without regard
to race, religion, sex, national origin, age, handicap or
marital status.
DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE / EOE


One Stop Career Center
16908 NE Pear St. Sulte 2
Blountstown Phone (850) 6745088
The following positions are
available: Construction Trades
Helper, Janitorial, Dietetic
Technician, Construction
Worker, Office Clerk, Food
Service Worker, Production
Manager, Truck Driver.
EOE
Service Chipola Workdorce Board UFN


HELP
WANTED

The Altha Diner will be
holding job interviews at
the diner located at 25563
Main Street in Altha on
Friday. April 24 from 2 4
p.m. Interested parties
please bring resumes.

Now hiring experienced
cooks and waitresses.
4-186&4-22 (


sion. Apalaehee Center has been offering its clients and
their families caring service for over fifty years. Apalachee
Center, Inc. is a Joint Commission accredited, private, not-
for-profit behavioral health center serving the Big Bend
Area. We offer competitive pay, benefits and an excellent
work environment. Are you ready to make a difference?
Come join our team at Apalachee Center and make a dif-
ference in someone's life.

The following positions are now available at our Quincy
clinic:
Recovery Specialist II (floater)

Ideal Candidate will posses: A bachelor's with a major in
counseling, social work, psychology, criminal justice, or a
related human services field and one year of experience
working with adults experiencing serious mental illness
and one year of experience working with children experi-
encing serious mental illness..

To view a complete listing of our opportunities, please visit
our website www.apalacheecenter.org Applications are
received in person or by mail. Human Resources 2634-J
Capital Circle N.E., Tallahassee, FL32308
Pre-Hire Drug Screen & FDLE background check
An Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer
Drug-Free Workplace
-dl r







Page 22 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL APRIL 15, 2009 -


GRACE DIANE (GRACIE) PARRISH
PANAMA CITY--Grace Diane (Gracie)
Parrish, 57, of Panama City and a former resident
of Blountstown passed away Thursday, April 9,
2009 in Panama City. She was born on Oct. 29,
1951 in Calhoun County and had lived here for
most of her life. She was a 1969 graduate of
Blountstown High School. She was an advertising
clerk for the Advertiser paper in Panama City.
She was a devout Christian and loved the Lord
with all her heart.
She was preceded in death by her parents, J.C.
and Gladys Parrish; two brothers, Edward and
Archie Parrish; a half sister, Mary Lou Bowman;
a half brother, James Franklin Young.
Survivors include one daughter, Chelsea
Williams and her husband, Aaron of Yuma, AZ;
one brother, Roger Parrish of Ozark, AL; one
sister, Velma Jo Cordovano and her husband,
Michael of Greensboro, NC; a host of nieces,
nephews and cousins.
Memorial services will be announced at a later
date. Memorialization will be by cremation.
Peavy Funeral Home in Blountstown is in
charge of arrangements. -

WILLIAM N. (BILL) KEENE
GRAND RIDGE -- William N. (Bill) Keene,
80, of Grand Ridge, passed away April 7, 2009
of pancreatic cancer.
Survivors include his six children and their
families including seven grandchildren, three
great-grandchildren, one brother and three
sisters.
A. memorial gathering of family and friends
was held at his home in the Shady Grove
Community. In lieu of flowers; etc., the family
would appreciate monetary donations to the
Covenant Hospice at 4440 Lafayette Street,
Marianna, FL 32446.
Peavy Funeral Home in Blountstown was in
charge of arrangements.


FRANCES IRENE RIGSBY
BRISTOL--Frances Irene Rigsby, 67, passed away
Wednesday, April 1, 2009 after a valiant battle with
cancer. She was a librarian with the Department of
Corrections until her retirement.
Survivors include one brother, Joseph W. Rigsby,
Jr. and his wife, Kaye of Crestview; two nieces,
Martha Jo Finn and her husband, Eric of Ft. Walton
Beach andAudrey Bishop of Crestview; one nephew,
Nathan Rigsby ofAlpharetta, GA; two great nieces,
Chloe Finn and Kristen Bishop; an aunt, June Mixon
of Daytona Beach and many cousins and friends.
A memorial service will be held Saturday, April
18 at 3 p.m. (ET) at Lake Mystic Baptist Church in
Bristol. Interment will be at a later date in Tifton,
GA. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to
the American Cancer Society, 2619 Centennial Blvd.,
Suite 101, Tallahassee, FL 32308.
Bevis Funeral Home of Bristol is in charge of
arrangements.
JOYCE A. RANKIN
BRISTOL -- Joyce A. Rankin, 55, of Bristol
passed away Saturday, April 11, 2009 at her home.
She was born on Oct. 25, 1953 in Blountstown and
had lived in Calhoun and Liberty Counties for most
of her life. She was a-homemaker and a member of
the Protestant faith.
She was preceded in death by her father, Jack
Wimberly, Sr. and a brother, Jack Wimberly, Jr.
Survivors include her husband of 23 years, Mike
Rankin of Bristol; her mother, Hazel Harrington
of Bristol; two sons, Eli Rankin of Bristol and Bill
Nowling and his wife, Vicki of Blountstown; one
daughter, Carol Flowers and her husband, Andy of
Bristol; one brother, Steve Wimberly of Ft. Myers;
one sister, Linda Goethe and her husband, Dave of
Bristol; ten grandchildren and 12 great-grandchildren,
several nieces and nephews.
No funeral services are planned. Memorialization
will be by cremation.
Peavy Funeral Home in Blountstown is in charge
of arrangements.


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APRIL 15, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 23


Minutes from the March 9 Bristol City Council regular meeting


Official minutes from the
Mar. 9 regular meeting of
the Bristol City Council as
recorded by the city clerk.

This meeting was called to or-
der by Chairman Brigham Shuler
with Council members Mitch
Willis, Bobby Reddick, and John
E. Fairchild present. Council
woman Meiko Whitfield was not
present due to medical reasons.
City Clerk Robin Hatcher, Mayor
Betty Brantley, and Attorney Da-
vid House were also present.
Willis offered the opening
prayer followed by the Pledge of
Allegiance led by Reddick.
Reddick moved to approve the
previous minutes, seconded by
Fairchild, all voted in favor.
Reddick moved to approve
payment of the monthly bills, sec-
onded by Willis, carried by all..
Justin Ford of Preble-Rish,
Inc. reported back to the council
on behalf of the Citizens Advi-
sory Task Force (CATF). He
reported that they had identified


a road resurfacing need in Neal
Subdivision which based upon
the income surveys obtained for
the current CDBG Neighborhood
Revitalization grant, would qualify
for a CDBG grant for road im-
provements. He suggested that
other qualifying roads that need
resurfacing or dirt roads that need
to be paved, could be included in
the project as additional unmet
needs to be addressed using
any unspent grant funds. By
general consensus, the council
authorized the engineers to pro-
ceed with advertising-for the city's
First Public Hearing to receive
public comments regarding the
proposed CDBG project.
Students from W.R. Tolar's
eighth grade class requested a
donation to assist with the travel
expenses associated with their
parent sponsored trip to Wash-
ington, D.C. Reddick moved
to approve a $100 donation,
seconded by Fairchild, carried
unanimously.
Don Myers of Florida Public


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Utilities submitted some proposed
changes to City of Bristol Ordi-
nance #2008-01, Florida Public
Utility Franchise Agreement.
Council members reviewed the
proposed changes, conferring
with Attorney House. Chairman
Shuler directed Attorney House
to prepare a written response
back to Florida Public Utility Co.,
indicating acceptance, rejection,
or modification of the proposed
changes that were submitted by
FPUC, based upon the council's
expressed preferences.
Reddick made a motion to
approve having a street light in-
stalled on the corner of Camellia
Street and CR 12 per the request
of Ben Spivey, seconded by Wil-
lis, approved by all.
Willis suggested that the city
needs to improve Camellia Street
and Charlie McDowell Road with
milling until the city is in a position
to pave them. Chairman Shuler
asked Maintenance Supervisor
Shannon Phillips to check with
the Liberty County Road Dept./
C.W. Roberts to inquire about
obtaining free milling that may be
available from C.W. Roberts' 1-10
resurfacing project.
Waste Pro, the company con-
tracted by the City of Bristol for
solid waste collection, submitted


Official minutes from the
Mar. 17 special meeting of
the Bristol City Council as
recorded by the city clerk.

Chairman Shuler called this
meeting to order at 7 p.m. with
Councilmen Mitch Willis, and John
E. Fairchild present. Clerk Robin
Hatcher, Mayor Betty Brantley,
and Tony Arrant, AICP were also
present. Councilwoman Meiko
Whitfield was absent due to medi-
cal reasons. Councilman Reddick
and Attorney House were not
present.
Opening prayer was offered by
Willis. Fairchild led the Pledge of
Allegiance.

LOCAL PLANNING AGENCY
PUBLIC HEARING TO
CONSIDER COMP PLAN
AMENDMENTS

The Bristol City Council serves
as the Local Planning Agen-
cy, therefore, Chairman Shuler
opened the first public hearing
of the Local Planning Agency to
consider proposed amendments to
the City of Bristol Comprehensive
Plan. Chairman Shuler turned the
floor over to Tony Arrant, AICP,
for presentation of Proposed Plan


a letter to the council requesting
a 3.0% rate increase, which is
less than the 4.9% Consumer
Price Index increase that their
contract allows, noting that they
did voluntarily waive the resi-
dential CPI increase last year.
Reddick moved to agree to a rate
increase of 3.0% by Waste Pro,
seconded by Fairchild, carried
unanimously.
Phillips submitted an estimate
from Jamie's Auto Repair for the
F350 to make it ready to install
a crane. The.council requested
that he also obtain an estimate
from Sirmon's Alignment, and that
he get a price from Josh Potter for
putting a hydraulic winch on the
backhoe, for their consideration
at the next regular meeting.
Operator Michael Wahlquist
notified the council that during the
annual inspection of the City of
Bristol's water system by Florida
Dept. of Environmental Protec-
tion, it was noted that Elevated
Tank Number 7 is due for fifth year
inspection and washout under the
supervision of a Florida Regis-
tered Engineer within 90 days of
the written notice by FDEP dated.
February 25, 2009. By general
consensus, the Council autho-
rized advertising for Request for
Proposals for the cleaning and


Amendments. Hard copies and
digital copies of the proposed
amendments were available in
strike thru/underline format. Ar-
rant's presentation reflected pro-
posed amendments that bring the
City of Bristol Comprehensive Plan
document up to date and compli-
ant with new legislative changes
and mandates, a new planning
period established (2006-2020),
that computerized maps are to
be included as part of the amend-
ments, and that it is proposed that
the City of Bristol remain one large
mixed use category, that being Ru-
ral Village without a town center.
At the conclusion of Arrant's
presentation, Chairman Shuler
opened the floor to the public for
comment. No one from the public
was present. There were no pub-
lic comments made. Chairman
Shuler closed the public comment
period.
Willis motioned to move forward
with the Plan Amendments as
proposed, seconded by Fairchild,
all voted in favor.
There being no further items for
the LPAto consider, Shuler closed
the Public Hearing of the Local
Planning Agency at 7:08 p.m.

CITY COUNCIL PUBLIC


inspection of elevated tank no. 7,
requesting that Wahlquist contact
our engineers, Preble-Rish, Inc.,
to prepare the advertisement for
proposals.
By general consensus, the
council approved for Wahlquist
to fill both generators at our wells
with diesel.
Bo Creel of EPCI Code Ad-
ministrative Services requested
permission to schedule a pre-
sentation to the council re: Con-
tracting for Building Permitting &
Inspection services on a percent-
age of permits issued basis. The
council did not show interest in
a presentation. By general con-
sensus, they did ask Chairman
Shuler to speak to Mr. Larry (Joe
Red) Shuler to inquire if he would
be willing to work oh a percentage
basis again.
A workshop to review the City
of Bristol Charter and Ordinances
was tentatively scheduled for
Thursday, April 9, 2009 at 6:30
p.m.
There being no further busi-
ness, Reddick moved to adjourn,
seconded by Fairchild, all voted
in favor. Meeting adjourned at
7:35 p.m.
Chairman: Brigham S. Shuler
City Clerk: Robin M. Hatcher


HEARING TO CONSIDER
TRANSMITTAL OF PROPOSED
AMENDMENTS TO DCA
Chairman Shuler opened the
City Council Public Hearing at
7:09 p.m. He turned the floor over
to Arrant, AICP for presentation of
the proposed Comprehensive Plan
Amendments as recommended by
the Local Planning Agency. Hard
copies and digital copies of the
proposed amendments were avail-
Sable in strike thru/underline format.
Arrant's presentation reflected pro-
posed amenarments that bring the
City of Bristol Comprehensive Plan
document up to date and compli-
ant with new legislative changes
and mandates, a new planning
period established (2006-2020),
that computerized maps .are to
be included as part of the amend-
. ments, and that it is proposed that
the City of Bristol remain one large
mixed use category, that being Ru-
ral Village without a town center.
At the conclusion of Arrant's
presentation, Chairman Shuler
opened the floor for public com-
ment. No one from the public was
present. There were no public
comments made. Chairman
Shuler closed the public comment
period.
Fairchild moved to approve
transmittal of the proposed Com-
prehensive Plan Amendments to
the Florida Department of Com-
munity Affairs, seconded by Willis,
carried by all.
Chairman Shuler closed the
City Council Public Hearing at
7:13 p.m.
There being no further business
for the council to consider at this
special meeting, Willis motioned to
adjourn, seconded by Fairchild, all
voted in favor. Meeting adjourned
at 7:14 p.m.
Chairman: Brigham S. Shuler
City Clerk: Robin M. Hatcher


March 17 special meeting minutes


from the Bristol City Council meeting


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A large selection of new and used cars are
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Ronnie Coley personally invites you to visit him any
time Monday thru Saturday from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.

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Page 24 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL APRIL 15, 2009


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APRIL 15, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 25


Plant flowers that will invite butterflies to your garden


A butterfly garden is an easy
way to see more butterflies
and to contribute toward their
conservation. Conservation
efforts are important since many
natural butterfly habitats have
been lost to urbanization and
other development.
To begin, select a site for
your butterfly garden that will
receive sun for most of the day.
Although full sun is desirable
for the garden, butterflies will
benefit from having a windbreak
nearby for those days with gusty
winds. The same windbreak can
provide shade on those very
hot days in north Florida. If
the windbreak includes shrubs,
the butterflies may also use
the plants as a roosting area at


by Theresa Friday,
Horticulture Extension Agent,
Santa Rosa County
night.
Once a sunny location is
selected and before planting, take
a soil sample. Contact your local
Cooperative Extension Office for
soil testing information. Apply
lime and fertilizer according to
the recommendations from the
soil test. Keep in mind that once
established it will be difficult to
improve the soil in the butterfly
garden, particularly if perennial
plants are involved.
When choosing a site for your
butterfly garden remember to
place it close to a water supply
so that the plants in the garden


2009 APPLICATION PERIOD FOR RESIDENTIAL
SEWER IRRIGATION RATES IS NOW OPEN: Resi-
dential users of the Bristol Municipal Wastewater Sys-
tem who wish to have a fixed sewer rate for the 2009
summer months may apply for an Irrigation Rate for
Sewer Services Only by making application to the City
of Bristol at the office of the City Clerk during regular
business hours NOW APRIL 21, 2009. The Sewer
Irrigation Rate is based upon the applicant's average
water usage during the Jan, Feb, and Mar 2009 bill-
ing cycles, calculated at the rates set forth in City of
Bristol Ordinance #2006-02, and will be effective for
(6) billing cycles beginning May 1, 2009 and ending
October 1, 2009.
3-25 T 4-15


can be watered if necessary.
Be sure to plant both host
plants and nectar plants. Host
plants are those where the
adult butterfly lays her eggs
and the caterpillar will feed.
Several good host plants include
milkweed for the monarch
butterfly, passionvine for the gulf
fritillary, cassia for the cloudless
sulphur, wild lime for the giant
swallowtail and pawpaw for the
zebra swallowtail.
Nectar plants are also needed
in the butterfly garden. These
plants provide the food for the
adult butterflies. Several good
nectar plants include zinnas,
goldenrod, butterfly bush,
plumbago, verbena, firebush,
pentas and porterweed.
Remember to add an artificial
puddle or two. Several species
of butterflies are attracted to
free-standing puddles. They not
only benefit from a drink but
also utilize salts and breakdown
-products of decaying vegetation
which is present in most
puddles.
To keep your puddles
from becoming a source of
mosquitoes, bury a shallow
potted plant saucer to its rim in
an area receiving full sun in the
butterfly garden. Fill the saucer
with coarse pine bark or stones
and fill to overflowing with
water. The butterflies are able to
drink from the cracks between
the pine bark pieces or the
stones while the mosquito larvae
have a difficult time becoming
established. Occasionally


I .
The g.ul. -.lr c. et arav
The gulf fritillary caterpillar eats the passionvine.


adding a small piece of over-
ripe fruit, some stale beer, or
a tablespoonful of composted
cow manure or leaf compost
to the puddle will provide the
salts and amino acids that the
butterflies need.
To keep the plants in your
butterfly garden productive,
scatter a slow release fertilizer
two to three times during the
summer. Do not over fertilize.


Excessive nitrogen may reduce
flowering.
Avoid the use of broad-
spectrum pesticides.Alteratives
are oils, soaps and microbial
insecticides. But keep in mind
that oils and insecticidal soaps
can kill caterpillars if sprayed
directly on them. A.good side
effect of decreased pesticide
use is the increase of natural.
enemies.


: *.Maclay Gardens to host

W faden Ceter at annual tour May 1 & 2
lcwW VwadeCnte atalt TALLAHASSEE-TheFlorida at9a.m.until 5p.m.


Department of Environmental
Protection's Alfred B. Maclay
Gardens State Park will host the
15th Annual Tour of Gardens on
Friday, May 1 and Saturday, May
2, sponsored by the Friends of
Maclay Gardens, Inc.
The event will feature a guest
speaker at the Timberlane Church
of Christ on Friday evening
starting at 6 p.m. followed by a
reception at the park's Gardener's
Cottage. Saturday's event starting


Altha Farmer's Co-op

*Mulch by the Bucket!
*New Seed in Stock
*Fruit and Shade Trees

*Bird Houses *Bird Feeders

f- -~ , *Martin Houses
*Mushroom Compost
(while supplies last)


"Evewyotne Shops at the C (-op! 4


S@Altha Farmers Co-op, Inc. S
15543 NE Mt. Olive Cemetery Road Altha
PHONE (850) 762-3161


Hours: 7 a.m.
to 4:30 p.m.
i-Os 0


The day will begin with a
continental breakfast at the
Maclay Gardens visitor center
followed by a silent auction,
plant and book sale. The private
gardens open for tours at 10 a.m.
and a map and driving directions
to the gardens will be distributed
during breakfast.
Tickets are $45, including the
speaker, reception, breakfast and
tour. For more information, visit
www.floridastateparks.org.


The "
Board of
Commissioners of ther.!y
Northwest Florida
Regional Housing Authority
will hold its
Annual Meeting
Thursday, April 23, 2009
Ramada Inn North,
in the Cambridge Room
2900 North Monroe St. *Tallahassee
Meeting will begin at T ie meeting wilff6e
1:00 p m E D S.T. open to t pub(lic


I


llls


ob~ir
'''









Page 26 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL APRIL 15, 2009


REQUEST FOR BIDS

The Chipola Regional Workforce
Development Board (CRWDB) is
currently accepting bids for the
cleaning of the One-Stop Center
and the Administrative Office lo-
cated in the Rim Plaza, 4636 High-
way 90 in Marianna, Fl. To receive
a copy of the Bid Specifications
please call Lisa Wells at 850-718-
0456, Ext. 101, or go to our web-
site located www.onestopahead.
com in the Contact Us Section
and click on the link Requests for
Proposals and Results. Sealed
bids should be submitted to the
CRWDB by April 27, 2009 at 3:00
P.M. (CT). EOE/Drug Free Work-
place/Minority Owned Businesses
Encouraged to Apply. The CR-
WDB reserves the right to reject
any and all bids. 4-8& 4-15



IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND
FOR CALHOUN COUNTY, FLOR-
IDA
CASE NO: 2008-37-CA

FIRST FRANKLIN FINANCIAL
CORPORATION
Plaintiff,

vs.

VANESSADAWSONI, and any un- -
known heirs, devisees, grantees,
creditors, and other unknown per-
sons or unknown spouses claim-
ing by, through and under any of
the above-named Defendants,
Defendants.


AMENDED NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE

NOTICE is hereby given that the
undersigned Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Calhoun County, Flori-
da, will on the 21st day of May,
2009 at 11 a.m. CST at On the
front steps of the Calhoun County
Courthouse, offer for sale and sell
at public outcry to the highest and
best bidder for cash, the following-
described property situate in Cal-
houn County, Florida:

The land referred to herein is
situated in the State of Florida,
County of Calhoun described
as follows:

Commence at the Southwest
corner of section 34, Township
1 North, Range 8 West, in Cal-
houn County, Florida, thence
run North 00 Degrees 02 minutes
East 594.00 feet, along the sec-
tion line, thence run East.75.0
feet to the point of beginning,
thence run North 00 degrees 02
minutes 72.0 feet to the South
edge of a graded road, thence
run East 75.0 feet along the
South edge of said graded road,
thence run South 00 degrees 02
minutes West 72.0 feet, thence
run West 75.0 feet to the point
of beginning

Commence at the Southwest
corner of section 34, Township
1 North, Range 8 West, in Cal-
houn County, Florida, thence

PUBLIC AUCTION
Bristol 66 Towing and Recvery wil hold a
PubtcAucion May 1,2009at530 pm. (El)
2002 GREEN 4 DOOR
PONTIAC GRANDAM
VIN #-1G2NE52F72C308133
Our auction will be held at Bristol 66
Storage on Hoecake Road off Hwy. 20
East, one half mile on left, you will see
our sign. Bristol 66 Towing reserves
the right to reject any and all bids.
Calhoun Liberty Journal 4-15-09
If you need any more information on
the above vehicle call and ask for Dale
at (850) 643-2522 or (850) 228-9555.


run North 00 degrees 02 min-
utes East 594.0 feet, along the
section line thence run 150.0
feet to the point of beginning,
thence run North 00 degrees
02 minutes East 594.0 feet,
along the section line, thence
run 150.0 feet to the point of
beginning, thence run North 00
degrees 02 minutes East 72.0
feet to the "South Right of Way
Line" of a graded street thence
run South 00 degrees 02 min-
utes West 72.0 feet, thence run
West 68.25 feet to the "Point of
beginning"
Also:
Being at the Southwest cor-
ner of section 34, Township 1
North, Range 8 West, and run
North along the section line 198
yards for the point of beginning,
thence run North 72 feet, thence
East 75 feet, thence South 72
feet, thence West 75 feet, to the
point of beginning.

pursuant to the Final Judgement
entered in a case pending in said
Court, the style of which is indi-
cated above.

Any person or entity claiming an
interest in the surplus, if any, re-
sulting from the foreclosure sale,
other than the property owner as
of the date of the Lis Pendens,
must file for a claim on same with
the Clerk of Court within 60 days
after the foreclosure sale.

WITNESS my hand and official
seal of said Court this 2nd day of
April, 2009.

If you are a person with a disabil-
ity who needs any accommoda-
tion in order to participate in this
proceeding, you are entitled, at no
cost to you, to provision of certain
assistance. Please contact Shelly
Yon at 674-4545 within 2 working
days of your receipt of this Sum-
mons; if you are hearing or voice
impaired, 1-800-955-8771.

Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Lori Flowers
Deputy Clerk 4-8 4-15



IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR LIBERTY COUNTY,
FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION

CASE NO. 39-2008-CA-000150
DIVISION

WELLS FARGO BANK, NA,
Plaintiff,

vs.

CHRIS EARNEST, et al,
Defendant(s)



NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to a Final Judgement of
Mortgage Foreclosure dated April
02, 2009 and entered in Case
No. 39-2008-CA-000150 of the
Circuit Court of the SECOND Ju-
dicial Circuit in and for LIBERTY
County, Florida wherein WELLS
FARGO BANK, NA, is the Plain-


tiff and CHRIS EARNEST; CAN-
DICE EARNEST; MORTGAGE
ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION
SYSTEMS, INCORPORATED, AS
NOMINEE FOR COUNTRYWIDE
FINANCIAL CORPORATION;
TENANT #1 N/K/A JOHN DOE,
and TENANT #2 are the Defen-
dants, I will sell to the highest and
best bidder for cash at FRONT
DOOR OF THE LIBERTY COUN-
TY COURTHOUSE at 11:00AM,
on the 12 day of May, 2009, the
following described property as
set forth in said Final Judgement:

COMMENCE AT A RAILROAD
IRON MARKING THE SOUTH-
WESTCORNER OF SECTION 36,
TOWNSHIP 1 SOUTH, RANGE 6
EAST, LIBERTY COUNTY, FLOR-
IDA, AND THENCE RUN NORTH
89 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 03
SECONDS EAST ALONG THE
SOUTH BOUNDARY OF SAID
SECTION 36, A DISTANCE OF
658.43 FEETTOAST. JOE PAPER
COMPANY CONCRETE MONU-
MENT, THENCE RUN NORTH
89 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 55
SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID
SOUTH BOUNDARY 660.19
FEET TO A ST. JOE PAPER
COMPANY CONCRETE MONU-
MENT; THENCE RUN NORTH
89 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 45
SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID
SOUTH BOUNDARY 476.59
FEET TO AN OLD HUB; THENCE
RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 07
MINUTES 52 SECONDS WEST
1308.73 FEET; THENCE RUN
NORTH 89 DEGREES 08 MIN-
UTES 23 SECONDS EAST 208.74
FEET TO A CONCRETE MONU-
MENT, THENCE RUN NORTH
00 DEGREES 09 MINUTES 40
SECONDS EAST 90.93 FEET
TO A ST. JOE PAPER COMPANY
CONCRETE MONUMENT ON
THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF
WAY BOUNDARY OF COUNTY
ROAD NO. 67, SAID MONUMENT
LYING ON A CURVE CONCAVE
TO THE NORTHERLY; THENCE
RUN ALONG SAID RIGHT OF
WAY BOUNDARY AS FOLLOWS;
SOUTHEASTERLY ALONG
SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS
OF 3,869.83 FEET THROUGH
A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 2 DE-
GREES 37 MINUTES 12 SEC-
ONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE
OF 176.96 FEET, THE CHORD
OF SAID ARC BEING SOUTH
84 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 25
SECONDS EAST 176.95 FEET;
THENCE SOUTH 86 DEGREES
17 MINUTES 45 SECONDS
EAST (BEARING BASE FOR
THIS DESCRIPTION) 1295.54
FEET TO THE POINT OF BE-
GINNING. THENCE FROM SAID
POINT OF BEGINNING CON-
TINUE SOUTH 85 DEGREES 17
MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST
ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY
BOUNDARY 208.71 FEET TO A
POINT, THENCE RUN SOUTH
3 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 25
SECONDS WEST 1283.96 FEET
TO A POINT ON THE SOUTH
BOUNDARY OF SAID SEC-
TION 36; THENCE RUN SOUTH
89 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 01
SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID
SOUTH BOUNDARY 209.22
FEET TO A POINT; THENCE
RUN NORTH 03 DEGREES 42
MINUTES 15 SECONDS EAST
1298.52 FEET TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING.


ROAD


rest in
if any,
vner as


A/K/A 29111 NE COUNTY
67, HOSFORD, FL 32334

Any person claiming an inti
the surplus from the sale,
other than the property ow
of the date of the Lis Pc
must file a claim within six
days after the sale.

WITNESS MY HAND and t
of the Court on April 2, 200

Robert Hill
Clerk of the Circuit Court

By: Vanell Summers
Deputy Clerk


CITY OF BRISTOL
PROJECT # 205.02(
ELEVATED WATER TA
CLEANING AND INSPEC

NOTICE TO RECEIVE
SEALED BIDS

The Bristol City Council will
sealed bids from any qualifi
son, company or corporation
ested in performing the sc
work for the following proje

ELEVATED WATER TA
CLEANING AND INSPEC

Specifications can be obta
Preble-Rish, Inc., 10490 N\
St, Bristol, FL 32321, (85C
2771. The bid must conf
Section 287.133(3) Florid
utes, on public entity crime.

Completion date for this
will be 90 days from the
the Notice to Proceed pre
to the successful bidder.

Liquidated damages for fa
complete the project on the
fied date will be set at $1
day.

Please indicate on the en
that this is a sealed bid,
number and what the bid is

Bids will be received until
p.m. Eastern Standard Til
May 11, 2009, at Bristol Ci
12444 NW Virginia G. \
Street, P.O. Box 207,
Florida 32321, and will be
and read aloud on May 11
at 6:30 p.m. Eastern St
Time. The Board reserve
right to reject any and all bi

Cost for Specifications
$25.00 per set and is non-
able. Checks should be
payable to PREBLE-RISH,


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CALHOUN
COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL CIVIL DIVISION

CASE NO.: 09-005 CA


TYNDALL FEDERAL
UNION,
Plaintiff,


NOTICE OF SALE

NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accor-
dance with the Final Judgment of
Foreclosure dated April 8, 2009,
in the above styled cause, I will
sell to the highest and best bidder
for cash at the North front door.of
the Calhoun County Courthouse,
at 20859 Central Ave. E. Blount-
stown, FL 32424 at 11 a.m. CST
on June 11, 2009, the following
described property in Calhoun
County:


endens Commence at the Southeast Cor-
4ty (60) ner of the Northeast Quarter of
the Southwest Quarter of Section
36, Township 1 North, Range 10
he seal West, Calhoun County, Florida
9' and run thence North 89 degrees
42 minutes 47 seconds West,
a distance'of 75.00 feet to the
Southeast Corner of lands de-
scribed in Official Records Book
199 at Page 331 of the Public Re-
4.8 &5 cords of Calhoun County, Florida;
thence North 00 degrees 17 min-
utes 13 seconds East along the
Easterly boundary of said lands, a
0 distance of 25.93 feet to a point on
kNK the Northerly right of way bound-
:TION ary of State Road No. 20; thence
North 89 degrees 22 minutes 32
E seconds West along said North-
erly right of way boundary, a dis-
tance of 7.08 feet to the southerly
receive projection of an old fence; thence
ed-per- North 00 degrees 44 minutes 19
n inter- seconds East along said south-
;ope of early projection, said fence and the
ct: northerly projection of said fence,
a distance of 184.03 feet to the
.NK Northerly boundary of the afore-
TION said lands described in Official
Records Book 199 at Page 331,
ined at thence North 89 degrees 42 min-
N Main utes 47 seconds West along the
3) 643- Northerly boundary of said lands,
form to a distance of 129.37 feet; thence
a Stat- South 00 degrees 17 minutes 13
S seconds West along the Westerly
boundary of said lands, a distance
project of 183.27 feet to the aforesaid
date of Northerly right of way boundary;
*sented thence South 89 degrees 22 min-
utes 32 seconds East along said
Northerly right of way boundary,
ilure to a distance of 127.92 feet to the
Sspec- POINT OF BEGINNING.
00 per
Dated this 9th day of April, 2009.

velope Ruth Attaway,
the bid Clerk of the Court
for.
Lori Flowers,
:0n Deputy Clerk 4-is+4-


me, on
ty Hall,
Weaver
Bristol,
opened
,2009,
andard
'es the
ds.

will be
refund-
made
INC.
4-15 &22


CREDIT


Vs.

SAM J. EDWARD, ETAL.,
Defendants


Lawrence


fflima


^ HOSPiT&

Jerry C. Lawrence, DVM
Emergencies:
(850) 856-5827 or (850) 856-5918
Hours:
Monday- Friday 7 a.m. to 5 p.m.
DOCTOR'S HOURS BY APPOINTMENT.

We provide: Boarding
Grooming Preventative Health-
care programs which include
vaccinations and yearly checkups
Spay/neuter program to reduce
unwanted puppies/kittens.

PLUS MANY OTHER SERVICES.
CALL US ANYTIME IF YOU HAVE
ANY QUESTIONS.
43 N. Cleveland Street in Quincy
OFFICE (850) 627-8338
UFN









APRIL 15, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 27


Minutes from the regular meeting of the



Liberty Co. Commission held on March 3


Official minutes from the
March 3 regular meeting of the
Liberty County Commission as
recorded by the board secretary.

The meeting was called to or-
der by Chairman Albert Butcher.
Present atthe meeting were Com-
missioners Davis Stoutamire,
Dexter Barber, Jim Johnson,
Kevin Williams, Attorney Shalene
Grover, Clerk Robert Hill and
Deputy Clerk Charla Kearce.
Prayer was led by Bill Walker.
Pledge of allegiance was led
by Commissioner Davis Stou-
tamire.
Motion to approve the min-
utes of the regular meeting held
February 3 and special meeting
February 18, 2009 was made by
Stoutamire, seconded by Barber
and carried.


Jessica Clark representing
the 8th grade class from Hosford
requested that when the 8th
grade class from Tolar Elemen-
tary School requested a donation
for the Washington trip that they
consider a donation for Hosford
8th grade also.
Stoutamire requested that
Williams, and his children attend
the Apalachicola National Forest
third annual free fishing derby for
kids on Saturday, April 18, 2009
from 8 a.m. 12 p.m. Williams
agreed to attend.
Motion to approve the agenda
was made by Johnson, seconded
by Stoutamire, and carried.
There was a Public Hearing on
Ordinance 09-02 approving the
deferred compensation plan with
Superior Bank. Motionto approve
was made by Johnson, seconded


Minutes from the March 26

special meeting of the Liberty

Co. Board of Commissioners

Official minutes from the March 26 special meeting of the Liberty
County Commission as recorded by the board secretary.
The meeting was called to order by ChairmanAlbert Butcher. Present
were Commissioners Dexter Barber, Jim Johnson, Davis Stoutamire,
Kevin Williams, Attorney Shalene Grover and Clerk Robert Hill.
The opening prayer was given by Chairman Butcher. The Pledge
of Allegiance was led by Commissioner Barber.
Motion to approve the agenda with the following emergency items
was made by Barber, seconded by Williams and carried.
Emergency Items:
1. Stimulus money from DOT
2. Hosford Water System decision
3. Donation to Forest Service Fishing Tournament
Motion by Johnson, seconded by Williams and carried to approve
Resolution 09-06. This resolution approves Grant Application for
Transportation Disadvantaged.
Motion by Johnson, seconded by Stoutamire and carried to ap-
prove Resolution 09-07. The resolution approves Grant Application
for The Florida Boating Improvement Grant.
Motion by Williams, seconded by Johnson and carried to approve
Resolution 09-08. This resolution recognizes the importance of the
duties and responsibilities of the locally elected Clerk of the Circuit
Court to the citizens of Liberty County, Florida.
Motion by Barber, seconded by Stoutamire and carried to approve
Resolution 09-09. This resolution asks St. Regis Paper Co., LLC to
provide reasonable rates and access to land located within Liberty
County.
Kristin Brown with Preble-Rish informed the Board that the new
school in Hosford will require additional water storage for that facility.
The Board gave permission for this additional storage facility to be
placed on the County's Water System Property.
The DOT stimulus funds were discussed. A decision was made
to use the funds for Bristol side walk project, guard rail projects and
available road striping.
Motion by Johnson, seconded by Williams and carried to donate
$ 200.00 for the Forest Service Fishing Tournament.
Motion to adjourn by Johnson, seconded by Barber and carried.

Robert Hill, Clerk
Albert Butcher, Chairman

MINUTES continued on page 23



Country Lunch Buffet

Served daily 10:30 a.m. until 2:30 p.m.


by Williams and carried.
The 8th grade class requested
a donation for their Washington,
DC trip. The Board requested that
they go before the School Board
and request a donation.The Board
will match what ever they donate.
They will address the Board atthe
special meeting.
John Pat Thomas with Pat
Thomas Insurance Agency told
the Board thatthey are their agent
for workers compensation, casu-
alty, property and auto insurance
coverage. The cost of coverage is
$34,625 less than last years and
the county will receive a credit of
$18,976 to the current premium.
Philip Jones with Preble-Rish
Engineers came beforethe Board.
Bids were opened for paving of
County Road 12.
1. Peavy and Sons Construc-
tion bid $2,206,439.
2. C.W. Roberts Contracting
bid $2,088,470.05.
3.Gulf Asphalt bid
$2,614,419.27.
A decision will be made at the
next special meeting.
Bids on the Emergency Op-
erations Center were opened.
Motion to accept a bid from Billco
Construction Company that was
turned in at 5:05 p.m. was made
by Stoutamire, seconded by Wil-
liams and carried.
1. Billco Construction, Inc. bid
$630,000.
2. Eldridge Construction, Inc.
bid $595,000.
3. Cathey Construction bid
$498,990.
4. Warren Building Company
bid $ $574,000.
5. RAM Construction bid $
569,000.
6. C.W. Roberts Contracting
bid $665,000.00.
7. I.C. Construction bid
$676,356.
8. M & W Construction bid
$637,000.
9. GAC Contractors, Inc. bid
$649,181.
A decision will be made at the
next special meeting.


Philip Jones presented a slide
show with options for repair at the
Estiffanulga Boat Ramp. Stou-
tamire made motion to employ
Preble-Rish to get this project
underway, seconded by Barber,
and carried.
Motion to advertise for the
Florida River Island project with
Water Managements approval
was made by Johnson, seconded
by Stoutamire and carried.
Kristen Brown with Preble -
Rish presented change order # 1
on Tolar Sidewalk in the amount
of $55,765.62. Motion to approve
was made by Johnson, seconded
by Stoutamire and carried.
Brown told the Board that the
Bentley Bluff Park agreement was
executed in November and it is in
the process of being started.
The Board appointed a com-
mittee to open and review the
grants proposals. The committee
consists of Hill, Monica Brinkley,
Grover and Rhonda Lewis. The
recommendation on the grants
writer will be made at a special
meeting.
Gloria Keenan discussed the
gate at the Veterans Memorial
SPark. No action was taken.
The Board will schedule a
workshop for Vicki Montford with
Wakulla Bank to present a pro-
posal to offer employees a tax
deferred savings plan.
Motion to change the name
of Moore Street in Hosford to
Hosford Street was made by
Stoutamire, seconded by Barber
and carried.
Monica Welles with Liberty
Transit presented Resolution #
09-05 requesting grantfunds from
the Capital Stimulus Assistance.
Motion to approve was made by
Johnson, seconded by Williams
and carried.
Dr. Gene Charbonneau gave
an up date on the Health Depart-
-ment and FQHC.
Jim Shuler gave a report on
the EWP projects.
Motion to approve Resolution
# 09-05 authorizingthe Clerk and


Chairman to execute resolutions
of the Wakulla Bank concerning
certificate of deposit renewals and
new certificate of deposits was
made by Johnson, seconded by
Barber and carried.
Motion to approve John Shep-
pard to provide services, opening
and closing the Civic Center at
$15.00 per hour paid bythe renter
was made by Stoutamire, sec-
onded by Barber and carried.
Motion to not waive the fee for
the Wesleyan Methodist Church
for Wyman Gamble was made by
Stoutamire, seconded by Barber
and carried.
Motion to approve a $200.00
donation for project graduation
at the High School was made by
Johnson, seconded by Williams'
and carried.
Motion to approve Charlene
McCardle as care taker at the
Estiffanulga Park was made by
Stoutamire, seconded by Williams
and carried.
Motion to approve the Sheriff's
Department to provide custo-
dial services to the courthouse at
$9.53 hour, 25 hours perweekwas
made by Stoutamire, seconded by
Barber, carried by Butcher. John-
son and Williams voted no.
. Motion to pay the bills was
made by Stoutamire, seconded
by Johnson and carried.
Motion to adjourn was made by
Stoutamire, seconded byJohnson'
and carried.

WARRANT LIST
Warrant Numbers
Operating Fund
26076 26241
SHIP Grant
3862- 3881
Weatherization Grant
4402- 4408
Small County Grant
3706- 3720
Payroll Fund
26930 27084

Robert Hill, Clerk of Court
Albert Butcher, Chairman


March 11 L.C.C. special meeting minutes


Official minutes from the
March 11 special meeting of the
Liberty County Commission as
recorded by the board secretary.

The meeting was called to or-
der by Chairman Albert Butcher.
Present were Commissioners
Stoutamire, Barber, Johnson,
Williams, Attorney Grover, and
Clerk Robert Hill.
The prayer was given by Chair-
man Butcher. The Pledge of Al-
legiance was led by Stoutamire.
Motion to approve the agenda
with two additional items-Adver-
tise ordinance for Wakulla Bank
and Orange easement was made
by Stoutamire, seconded by Wil-
liams and carried.
Attorney Grover representing
Grant Writer Committee, recom-
mended Preble Rish as CDGB
grants writer and administrator.
Deborah Roumelis Belcher as
grants writer for all other grants
that are not being done by County
employees. Motion to approve by
Stoutamire, seconded by Williams


and carried.
Scott Kady recommended to
the board that George O'Bryan's
annual leave be changed from 8
to 13 hours per month to reflect
his total experience. Motion to
approve by Johnson, seconded
byStoutamire and carried. Barber
voted no.
Kady recommended that Pat
Hagerman salary be adjusted
from $11.90 to $12.81. Motion
to approve by Williams, seconded
by Johnson and carried.
Kady asked for a waiver on the
Mayo home to reflect the overage
of $1099.29. Motion to approve by
Stoutamire, seconded by Johnson
and carried.
Tolar's 8th grade class asked
for donation fortheir Washington
trip. Motion to approve a $200 do-
nation for both Tolar and Hosford
was made by Johnson, seconded
by Williams and carried.
Kristin Brown representing Pre-
ble-Rish told the board that CW
Roberts low bid of $2,088,470.05
was in order and recommended


the board to accept it. Motion by
Stoutamire, seconded by Barber
and carried to accept this bid for
County Road 12 Paving Project.
Brown stated the low bid
by Cathey Construction of
$498,990.00 for the EOC project
was in order and recommended
the board accept it. Motion to
accept contingent upon arrival
of Hazard Mitigation Funds was
made by Barber, seconded by
Williams and carried.
Motion by Williams, seconded
by Johnson and carried to pursue
an easement on property in Or-
ange owned by Steve McKehen
and J.L. McCroan to alleviate
drainage problem.
Motion by Johnson, seconded
by Barber and carried to approve
advertisement of Ordinance #
09-03 for Wakulla Bank Savings
Plan.
Motion to adjourn by Stou-
tamire, seconded by Barber.

Robert Hill, Clerk of Court
Albert Butcher, Chairman


Whole The
cakes and |
pies
available Restaura

Hwy. 20, Bristol 643-2264


MMOF


nt









Page 28 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL APRIL 15, 2009


M & W Self
Storage Rentals
7 days a week service
5' x10' .....$20
10' x 10'......$35
10'x20' .....$70
10'x 25'.....$s90
NO DEPOSIT
Call 762-9555, 762-8807
or 762-8597



L00


1, 2 & 3 Bedroom
Apartments
"The Best Place to Live"
RENTAL ASSISTANCE



Call (850) 674-4202
16978 NW Mayo Street,
Blountstown, FL 32424.
TTD/TTY 711.
EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY



FOR RENT

In Bristol
*Mobile home lots
S3 bedroom, 1 1/2 bath
In Blountstown
I1 -room efficiency,
utilities included 2BR/bath
and a half apartment
Commercial old Mexican
restaurant Commercial -
200 front ft. with 3 buildings
and fenced in area.
Phone 643-7740
UNF




$169 QUEEN PILLOWTOP
mattress & box. Manufac-
turer wrapped,
full warranty. 222-7783.
Delivery available.
$499 Microfiber Living
Room matching set. Still
in crate, never used. Can
deliver 545-7112.
100% LEATHER SOFA
& LOVESEAT, must sell,
$799. never used,-in
crates. 425-8374. Delivery
avail.
6-pc Solid Wood Sleigh
Bedroom Set. NEW.
English Dovetail Drawers.
$699. Delivery available.
222-7783
7pc KING size bdrm set.
Solid wood dovetailed
drawers. New still in boxes.
Worth $4k give away
$1299. Can deliver: 425-
8374
Brand NEW KING PLUSH-
TOP MATTRESS SET,
.$269 still in plastic &
warranty. Can deliver. 545-
7112
Casual Dining Room
Table with 4 chairs. Solid
Wood, Brand New $299.
425-8374.
FULL $139 mattress w/
matching base. BRAND
NEW with warranty. 222-
7783
NEW Queen Orthopedic
Pillowtop mattress set in
sealed plastic w/ warranty.
Sacrifice $249. Can deliver.
222-9879 4-15


ITEMS FOR SALE


Misc. office furniture: desk, filing
cabinet, etc., make offer. Call 379-
8892, ext. 202 or 203. 4-15,4-22

Lace up Ropers, brand new, la-
dies size 8, distressed leather,
$50. Call 379-8892, ext. 202 or 2
03. 4-15, 4-22

Green metal table, 6x42, 1/3 bev-
eled glass top, with 4 upholstered
chairs all in good condition, $150.
Call 482-8346. 4-15,4-22

3-in-one convertible crib, chang-
ing table and dresser drawers,
$200; bedroom.linen set, girl's
butterfly design, bumper pad,
sheets, curtains, etc., $100. Call
643-2625 leave message. 4-15.4-22

Two 12" and two 10" punch
speakers in custom box with
82DW SPL amp, fits car or SUV,
$300. Call 510-0763. 4-15,4-22

Glass top table, 72x42 with
chairs, $110. Call 674-1637.
4-15, 4-22


Free: two satellite dishe
pick up. Call 762-3370. 4

King size bed with mattre
box spring, $120; dining re
ble with chairs, $80; sofa wi
$50; three recliners, $30 ea
dressers, $40 each; 27" T
entertainment center, $25;
$15 each; two walkers, $1
wheelchairs, $10; bowling b
case, $10; wooden computE
with chair, $80; glass patio
chairs, $80; Sharp VCR, $2
Edna at (850) 638-9850 o
814-7966, leave message.


Maytag washer and dr
good condition, both work
Call 447-0501 after 4 p.m.

Coleman 3-ton central ai
ditioner unit with furnace
mobile home, both in good
ing condition. Call 447-050
4p.m. 4

Two Lazy Susans, $10 eac
674-3264.

Infant car seat/carrier with
excellent condition, $25;
en swing set with fort/play
slide, monkey bars, swin
two-person glider, $75. Ca
4204. 4

Beautiful Angel doll, movE
tie bit, $12; small lightweight
$20. Call 674-3264. 4-8,4-15

Diamond wedding band
7, $200. Call 447-2048
5255.


Game cube with six g
$50; N64 with games and
ler, $40; PS3 with 2 gami
controller, $350; original Ni
with games, etc., $50; PS
$50. Call 209-2733.


s, you
-15, 4-22

ss and
3om ta-
ith bed,
ch; two
v, $50;
tables,
0 both;
)all with


Hand held navigator by QVC,
$50; Pioneer GPS system naviga-
tor, $150; portable DVD player for
car, $50. Call 674-1655. 4-8,4-15


PROM DRESSES


Prom dresses: White, clear
beaded strapless ball gown, size
8, $75; pink strapless floor length
dress with very beautiful beading,
small train w/bushel, paid $450,
will sell for $200; pink strapless
floor length 2-piece dress, could
make a beautiful tea length, size
14, been taken in a little, $75; pink
halter tea length dress, size 8,
$75. Can make offers. Call 272-
7641, leave message. 4-8,4-15

Prom dress, new, never been
worn, still has tags, size 7/8, cor-
al colored, halter top style, some
beading, train. Paid $180, asking
$75. Call 643-8815 leave mes-
sage. UFN



CARS


1997 Teal Chevy Cavalier, paid
$3,200 will take $1,500 OBO,
clear title in hand. Call 379-8433
or 363-9071. 4-15, 4-22

1999 Saturn Sudan, midnight
blue, standard, 165K miles,
4-door, AC, 33 mpg, great reliable
car, $2,000. Call 643-7618.
4-15, 4-22


er desk 1973 Ford Mustang, brand new
set with windshield, motor, everything new,
15. Call $15,000 OBO; 1972 Mustang
r (850) body, $1,000; 1966 3/4 Ton Step-
side Chevy, complete motor and
4-15,4-22 transmission, all original, needs -
body work, make offer; 1984 Nis-
yer in san Datsun, 30K on motor, lots of
S$125. new parts, has wiring problems,
4-15.4-22 $150 OBO. Call 482-8346.
4-15,4-22
ir con-
e for a 1995 Mercury Cougar, $1,500.
Swork- Call 674-1297. 4-15,4-22
)1 after
-15,4-22 1990 Nissan 3002X, needs a
head gasket, everything worked
-h. Call great when parked, coupe, non-
4-15,4-22 turbo, automatic, includes A/C,
power windows, power locks, all
h base, original, great project car, $1,000.
wood- Call 209-1913. 4-8,4-15
y deck,
gs and
all 447-
-15,4-22 TRUCKS & SUVS

es a lit-
it lamp, 1992 Toyota pickup 4WD, runs
good, brand new Buck Shot Mud-
der tires, 32-11-50s, tool box,
d, size ready to go, $3,500. Call 643-
or 643- 3812. 4-15,4-22

4-8,4-15 1998 Chevy Z71 extra cab with
third door, brush guard, step bars
games, and lift kit, $5,500. Call 237-
control- 2706.
es and 4-15,4-22
ntendo
2 slim, 1996 Chevrolet 4x4 truck,
4-8,4-15 new motor, needs transmission,


$2,500; 1998 Chevrolet Tahoe,
loaded, high miles, excellent con-
dition, $4,500. Call 643-2625 leave
message. 4-15,4-22


1977 Ford pickup, 351 Cleve-
land, C-6 performance, electric
fan, 4-core radiator, transmission
cooler, headers, 40 over, B&M
shifter plus extras, $2,200. Call
447-1378 ask for Tom. 4-8,4-15



AUTO ACCESSORIES


Set of tires and rims, aluminum
stock, off of F150 Lariat, BF Goo-
drich Rugged trail, P275/65R18,
$500. Call 643-3812. 4-15,4-22

Set of four 6-lug wheels and
tires for Chevy truck or Suburban,
in good condition, $200. Call 643-
6003. 4-8,4-15



MOTORCYCLES

& ATVS


2006 Kawasaki Ninja 650R, scor-
pion exhaust, 8,700 miles, $4,000,
title in hand. Call 510-0763.
4-15, 4-22


2003 Honda XR80, runs good,
new chain, sprockets and brake
cable, $800 OBO. Call 643-8689


or674-4046.


4-8,4-15


LOST & FOUND


LOST: Jack Russell puppy, 7
month old male, wearing green
collar, lost on C.R. 12 going to-
ward sawmill. Answers to 'Nemo.'
Call 643-2608. 4-8, 4-15



HOMES & LAND

Corner lot for sale, 8.5 wooded
acres, many big Oak trees, located
off Revell Farm Loop and Parrish
Lane. Call 643-9391. 4-8,4-15

1.4 acres, located on Hwy. 65 N,
highway frontage. Call 643-7326.
thru 4-15

Big lot on Chipola River, located
in Calhoun County. Call 643-1514.
UFN

TOOLS AND HEAVY

EQUIPMENT


6x12 utility trailer with tandem
axel and gate, $800. Call 237-
2706. 4-15,4-22

E-Z Go golf cart and charger,
$300. Call 544-0402. 4-15,4-22


THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL



(CLASSIFIEDS

To place your ad, call 643-3333 by noon Eastern
Time on Saturday. Non-business ads run FREE for 2 weeks.
\ ,4I ^ II. I I l L 1 111 .1 1..1. I I.L l J I .I. ll l









APRIL 15, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 29


FOR

RENT
1 bed/1 bath mobile home
in Blountstown. No smok-
ing, no-pets, references
and proof of income re-
quired.
$300 mo/300 deposit
643-6373


Post and


Barn Pole Inc.

DEMPSEY BARRON ROAD,
BRISTOL (OFF HWY. 12 N)

Phone (850) 643-5995

We've got the fence posts to meet your needs.


speed Internet and enjoy five
months of extra-low pricing and...


Fast downloads
FREE activation and use of modem
FREE Videomail and 100MB of
email storage
FREE self-installation and
24/7 tech support
FREE security package with
anti-virus and firewall ($50 value)
Support for email files up to 25MB -
(great for photos and music)
The option to add phone and television
and save on all three!

Call 877.342.7092 to get this great deal!


aiPaint
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HIGH-SPEED INTERNET M PHONE 0 TELEVISION

arPoint ill aumaticaolyssue a aedt of S20 e0 oeah month for e months to customer'sI btll a a ota sava gs oi S1o00.. C e must
, a I ,, d ai ,. 7. A. ,a r n' I n, .. .. . ,. . , l
coos fos moe devils. V2039 fairPo:ot Comoi alio sOs In. c. ; lights :served


250 gallon Propane tank, older
model, $75 OBO. Call 674-1024
or 294-6002. UFN



CAMPERS/RVS

1994 20" Chateau camper, bum-
per pull, good condition, asking
$3,500. Call 643-8815 and leave
message. UFN

2006 25 ft. Conquest travel trail-
er by Gulf Stream, one slide out,
$12,500. Call 237-2706. 4-15,4-22

1986 29 foot travel trailer, very
nice, located in Blountstown,
$5,000. Call 227-4067. 4-15,4-22

Excalibur flat tow system for
RV, used twice, paid $700 will
take $500. Call 447-2048 or 643-
5255. 4-8,4-15.



PETS/SUPPLIES


Young kitten, orange, female
tabby cat, free to a good home.
Sweet and needs a loving family.
Call 643-6919. 4-15,
4-22

Free 6-week-old puppies, ador-
able, mixed breed, parents' breed
is unknown, need loving homes.
Call 557-1346. 4-15,4-22

Full blooded German Shepherd,
free to good home, 4 years old,
very friendly. Call 762-2959.
4-15, 4-22
Pekinese full-blooded, male, 7
months old, has had 1st shots and
wormed, $75. Call 379-3242 or
643-6080. 4-15,4-22


AKC English Bulldog
vice in exchange for a
willing to trade him for
English Bulldog puppy.
4678.


ARIES Mar 21/Apr 20
Aries, there's not much to
keep you busy this week, so you'll
have to figure out a few activities to
keep you busy. Or maybe you want to
catch up on some quiet time.
TAURUS -Apr 21/May 21
You could use a break, Taurus, but
it's not possible this week. Work re-
sponsibilities continue to pile up and
it'll take all of your energy to muddle
through them.
GEMINI May 22/Jun 21
Gemini, put others first when plan-
ning a party. Factoring guests' likes
and dislikes will help ensure most
people in attendance will enjoy
themselves.
CANCER Jun 22/Jul 22
Cancer, your mate could get on your
nerves this week, but only if you take
what he or she says to heart. Consider
that this person is speaking out of
frustration.


Beautiful multi-colored grown
rooster, free to someone with a
pen. Call 762-8657 or 272-1982.
4-8, 4-15


WANTED


Wanted: Camper or something
longer. Call 674-3264. 4-15,4-22

Beagle puppy, female. Call 663-
9838 or 643-8526. 4-8,4-15


Indian Runner duck, fawn and
white colored, male. Call 643-
1756. 4-8,4-15

Black Lab pure bred for stud ser-
vice in exchange for pick of litter.
Call 264-3435. 4-8, 4-15

Lumber, 2x4s, 2x6s and 2x8s rea-
sonably priced. Call 674-3264.
4-8, 4-15
Junk cars and trucks, any con-
dition. We pay cash. Call 762-
8459 or 272-1126 cell. UFN



WATERCRAFT
& SUPPLIES


70 HP Mariner boat motor, 3
cylinder, 2 stroke, stainless steel
prop, excellent shape; hardly
used, $1,000. Call, 850-482-
2549. 4-15,4-22

48 HP Evinrude motor, runs
good, power tilt and trim, $1,400;
5 HP Mercury motor, excellent
shape, $400; 2000 90 HP Tohatsu,
controls and prop, $1,900. Call
227-4881. 4-15,4-22


stud ser- 28 foot Crestliner Cabin Cruiser
puppy or boat, 350 V-8 Chevy motor, OMC
a female
Soutdrive with stainless steel prop,
Call 762- really good shape, set up for div-
4-8, 4-15 ing with large rear platform, alumi-


Week ofApr. 12 to Apr. 18

LEO Jul 23/Aug23
Speak up, Leo. If you get your voice
heard, others will take you much more
seriously. Scorpio could be your biggest
opponent. I you can get past him or her,
you're in the clear.
VIRGO Aug 24/Sept 22
It's been a few months of
rough sailing, Virgo. But things have fi-
nally quieted down and you're in a groove.
You will find that daily activities
become much easier now.
LIBRA Sept 23/Oct 23
A big move could be in your future, Libra.
Others may be apprehensive about your
ability to assimilate, but deep down you
know that you will be just fine.
SCORPIO Oct 24/Nov 22
Scorpio, you're not quite ready for the
big changes that are in store for you in the
weeks to come. However, you will cope
just like you always do.


num trailer, twin axel, $3,500. Call
227-4881. 4-15,4-22

2005 14 ft. Jon boat, 25 hp. Mer-
cury motor, electric start, trolling
motor and trailer, $2,700. Call
447-2048 or 643-5255. 4-8, 4-15

14' Queen Craft boat, 25 hp John-
son motor, foot control trolling mo-
tor and trailer, $3,000 never been
in salt water. Call 762-8000.
4-8,4-15


GUNS


AK47 gun, two-30 round clips
and 1,000 rounds of hollow points,
$1,500. Call 762-8000. 4-8,4-15



YARD SALES

Yard sale: Saturday April 18,
multi-family at 8 a.m. until, weather
permitting. Lots of stuff, too many
items to list, household, furniture,
bedding, appliances, dishware,
children and adult clothing, misc.
items. Something for everyone,
located on CR 275, approximately
4 miles north of Hwy. 20 on right
side of road or 4 miles south of
Hwy. 71. Watch for signs. Call
447-2500 for more information.


Yard Sale: Page Pond Assembly
of God Church, Saturday, April 18
from 8 a.m.-12 p.m. We will be
selling pulled pork dinners, Lots
of great deals, all proceeds will go
to missions. The church is located
at 23422 NW Murdock Drive (near
Shelton's Corner). For more infor-
mation call 762-8406.


Multi-family yard sale, Saturday
April 18 from 7 a.m. until, lots of
items, all sizes clothes, toys other
misc. items. Located off Laramore
Road on Lloyd Road in Altha.


SAGITTARIUS Nov 23/Dec 21
Sagittarius, there will be plenty
of time for having fun this
weekend. Until then, buckle
down and get some work done.
Friday is a promising love day.
CAPRICORN Dec 22/Jan 20
A change of outlook and
attitude can result in more
things working in your favor,
Capricorn. Look to a diplomat like
Aquarius for advice on how to put
your best foot forward.
AQUARIUS Jan 21/Feb 18
Don't run from change, Aquarius.
Rather, embrace the things
that come your way and you'll
be a stronger, well-rounded
person for your efforts.
PISCES Feb 19/Mar 20
It's been more work than fun,
and Pisces feels like a dull boy or
girl. Let loose this week and put
enjoyment on the front burner.


FOR RE NT
2 bed/1 bath mobile home
in Neal Subdivision in
Bristol. No smoking, no
pets, references and proof
of income required.
$375 mo/300 deposit
643-6373
*^_________r


THE CALHOUN-LIBERTYJOURNAL




CLA A SSEF[IEID

To place your ad, call 643-3333 by noon Eastern
Time on Saturday. Non-business ads run FREE for 2 weeks.


SSTiRSCOPE


BINS NOMENIMMEN


BB^B B









Page 30 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL APRIL 15, 2009



2008 Annual Drinking Water Quality Report


We're pleased to present to
you this year's Annual Water
Quality Report. This report is
designed to inform you about
the quality water and services
we deliver to you every day.
Our constant goal is to provide
you with a safe and depend-
able supply of drinking water.
We want you to understand the
efforts we make to continually
improve the water treatment
process and protect our water
resources. We are committed
to ensuring the quality of your
water. Our water source is
ground water from one well.
The well draws from the Flbri-
dan Aquifer. Because of the
excellent quality of our water,
the only treatment required is
chlorine for disinfection pur-
poses.
In 2008 the Department
of Environmental Protection
performed a Source WaterAs-
sessment on our system and a
search of the data sources in-
dicated no potential sources of
contamination near our wells.
The assessment results are
available on the FDEP Source
Water Assessment and Pro-
tection Program website at
www.dep.state.fl.us/swapp.
If you have any questions
about this report or concern-
ing your water utility, please.
contact Aaron Elkins @ (850)
545-1370. We encourage
our valued customers to be
informed about their water
utility. If you-want to learn
more, please attend any of
our regularly scheduled meet-
ings. They are held on the first
Tuesday after the first Monday
of each month at the Liberty
County Courthouse @ 7pm.
The Liberty County Water
System routinely monitors for
contaminants in your drinking
water according to Federal
and State laws, rules, and
regulations. Except where
indicated otherwise, this report
is based on the results of our
monitoring for the period of
January 1 to December 31,
2008. Data obtained before
January 1, 2008, and pre-
sented in this report are from
the most recent testing done
in accordance with the laws,
rules, and regulations.
If present, elevated levels of
lead can cause serious health
problems, especially for preg-
nant women and young chil-
dren. Lead in drinking water
is primarily from materials and
components associated with
service lines and home plumb-
ing. Sumatra Water System
is responsible for providing
high quality drinking water,
but cannot control the variety
of materials used in plumbing
components. When your wa-
ter has been sitting for several


LIBERTY COUNTY


SUMATRA WATER SYSTEM

We are pleased to announce that our drinking
water meets all federal and state requirements.

2008 TEST RESULTS TABLE
Contaminant and Dates ofsampling MCL Violation Level Range of MiCL Mc Likely Source of
Unit of Measurement (mo./yr.) Y/N Detected Results Contamination
Radiological Contaminants
Alpha emitters (pCi/.) Jun-03 N 1.8 N/A 0 15 erosion ofnatural
deposits
Inorganic Contaminants
Erosion of natural
deposits; discharge from
fertilizer and aluminum
factories. Water
Fluoride (ppm) Apr-06 N 0.7 N/A 4 4.0 f e. e
additive which promotes
strong teeth when at
optimum levels between
_______0_ 0.7 and 1.3 ppm
Residue from man-made
Lead (point of ent) pollution such as auto
d (pp Apr-06 N 2.0 N/A n/a 15 emissions and paint;
lead pipe, casing, and
solder
Runoff from fertilizer
use; leaching from
Nitrate (as Nitrogen) fo
Nitrate (as Nitrogen) Sep-08 N 0.12 N/A 10 10 septic tanks, sewage;
erosion of natural
______ deposits
Discharge from
petroleum and metal
Selenium (ppb) Apr-06 N 5.0 N/A 50 50 refineries; erosion of
natural deposits;
_discharge from mines
Salt water intusiron,
Sodium (ppm) Apr-06 N 10.0 N/A N/A 160 leachin from soil
Searching from soil
Contaminant and Unit of Dates of MCL Violation Level Range of MCL MCL Likely Source of
Measurement sampling YN Detected Results Contamination
I (moivr.) I I I i _
TTHMs and Stage 1 Disinfectant/Disinfection By-Product (D/DBP) Contaminants
Contaminant and Dates of MCL Range
Unit of sampling Violation v of M M o Likely Source of Contamination
Detected of MRDL( MRDL
Measurement (moJyr.) Y/N Results
Jan-Dec MRDLG
Chlorine (ppm) Jan N 0.75 0.6-0.8 MRDL MRDL= 4.0 Water additive used to control microbes
08 = 4
alocic Acids Jul-06 N 35.9 NA MCL = 60 By-product of drinking water disinfection
(five) (HAA5" (ppb) 36.5
TTHM [Total
trihalomethanes] Jul-06 N 41.8 3.6 NA MCL =80 By-product of drinking water disinfection
(ppb) __44.0 _____
No. of
Contaminant and Unit )aes of AL 90th sampling AL
sampling Violation Percentile sites MCLG (Action Likely Source ofContamination
orMeasurement (moyr.) Y/N Result exceeding Level)
the AL
Lead and Copper (Tap Water)
r (p w ) J Corrosion of household plumbing systems; erosion
Copper (tap water) Jun-Sep N 0.07 0 of20 1.3 1.3 of natural deposits: leaching from wood
(ppm) 08 preservatives
Lead (tap water) Jun-Sep N 3.00 0 of20 0 1 Corrosion of household plumbing systems, erosion
(ppb) 08 N of natural deposits

In the table above, you may system must follow, microbial contaminants.
find unfamiliar terms and abbrevi- Initial Distribution System Maximum residual disinfec-
ations. To help you better under- Evaluation (IDSE): An important tant level goal or MRDLG: The
stand these terms we've provided part of the Stage 2 disinfection By- level of a drinking water disin-
the following definitions: products Rule (DBPR). The IDSE is fectant below which there is no
Maximum Contaminant Lev- a one-time study conducted by wa- known or expected risk to health.
el or MCL: The highest level of ter systems to identify distribution MRDLGs do not reflect the ben-
a contaminant that is allowed in system locations with high concen- efits of the use of disinfectants to
drinking water. MCLs are set as trations of trihalomethanes (THMs) control microbial contaminants.
close to the MCLGs as feasible and haloacetic acids (HAAs). Water Parts per million (ppm) or
using the best available treatment systems will use results from teh Milligrams per liter (mg/1)-one
technology. IDSE, in conjunction with their part byweightofanalyte to 1 mil-
Maximum Contaminant Lev- Stage 1 DBPR compliance moni- lion parts by weight of the water
el Goal or MCLG: The level of touring data, to select compliance sample.
a contaminant in drinking water monitoring locations for the Stage Parts per billion (ppb) or
below which there is no known or 2 DBPR. Micrograms per liter (pg/i) -
expected risk to health. MCLGs Maximum residual disinfec- one part by weight of analyte to
allow for a margin of safety, tant level or MRDL: The highest 1 billion parts by weight of the
Action Level (AL): The con- level of a disinfectant allowed in water sample.
centration of a contaminant which, drinking water. There is convincing Picocurie per liter (pCi/L)
if exceeded, triggers treatment or evidence that addition of a disin- measure of the radioactivity
other requirements that a water fectant is necessary for control of of water.


hours, you can minimize the
potential for lead exposure
by flushing your tap for 30
seconds to 2 minutes before
using water for drinking or
cooking. If you are concerned
about lead in your water, you
may wish to have your water
tested. Information on lead in
drinking water, testing meth-
ods, and steps you can take to
minimize exposure is available
from the Safe Drinking Water
Hotline or at http://www.epa.
gov/safewater/lead.


The sources of drinking wa-
ter (both tap water and bottled
water) include rivers, lakes,
streams, ponds, reservoirs,
springs, and wells. As water
travels over the surface of the
land or through the ground it
dissolves naturally occurring
minerals and, in some cases,
radioactive material, and can
pick up substances resulting
from the presence of animals
or from human activity.
Contaminants that may
be present in source water


include:
(A) Microbial contaminants,
such as viruses and bacteria,
which may come from sew-
age treatment plants, septic
systems, agricultural livestock
operations, and wildlife.
(B) Inorganic contaminants,
such as salts and metals,
which can be naturally-oc-
curring or result from urban
storm water runoff, industrial
or domestic wastewater dis-
charges, oil and gas produc-
tion, mining, or farming.


I




(C) Pesticides and herbi-
cides, which may come from
a variety of sources such as
agriculture, urban storm water
runoff, and residential uses.
(D) Organic chemical con-
taminants, including synthetic
and volatile organic chemi-
cals, which are by-products
of industrial processes and
petroleum production, and can
also come from gas stations,
urban storm water runoff, and
septic systems.
(E) Radioactive contami-
nants, which can be naturally
occurring or be the result of oil
and gas production and mining
activities. In order to ensure
that tap water is safe to drink,
the EPA prescribes regula-
tions, which limit the amount
of certain contaminants in
water provided by public wa-
ter systems. The Food and
Drug Administration (FDA)
regulations establish limits for
contaminants in bottled water,
which must provide the same
protection for public health.
Drinking water, including
bottled water, may reason-
ably be expected to contain at
least small amounts of some
contaminants. The presence
of contaminants does not nec-
essarily indicate that the water
poses a health risk. More in-
formation about contaminants
and potential health effects
can be obtained by calling
the Environmental Protection
Agency's Safe.Drinkirig Water
Hotline at 1-800-426-4791.
Some people may be more
vulnerable to contaminants
Sin drinking water than the
general population. Immuno-
compromised persons such as
persons with cancer undergo-
ing chemotherapy, persons
who have undergone organ
transplants, people with HIV/
AIDS or other immune system
disorders, some elderly, and
infants can be particularly at
risk from infections. These
people should seek advice
about drinking water from their
health care providers. EPA/
CDC guidelines on appropri-
ate means to lessen the risk of
infection by Cryptosporidium
and other microbiological
contaminants are available
from the Safe Drinking Water
Hotline (800-426-4791).
We at Liberty County Water
System would like you to un-
derstand the efforts we make
to continually improve the
water treatment process and
protect our water resources.
We are committed to insur-
ing the quality of your water.
If you have any questions or
concerns about the informa-
tion provided, please feel free
to call any of the numbers
listed.








APRIL 1,5, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 31


S A I iss 'Titne l-i r Metal roofs, de
Independent Avon siding & room add
Representative Call 643-453
Call 294-6002 -" Licensed & Insi



Grantham's


Lawn Car
Mowing Weedeating Edging Cleanup E


Mowing, Weedeating.
and more! ,-
SFREE Estimates
Please call John at
(850)674-4642, leave
message, thankS!


FLORIDA L
ecks, CONCEALED WEAPONS
editions PERMIT CLASS
36 Classes available every day.
red, Cost is $50.00 per person
(group discounts available)
S TEN MILE CREEK
1 DEFENSE, LLC.
SCall James at 850-272-5193 or
email us at
Imcdefense@gmail.com


e
tc.


E850570935 I j


NEW HOME~ *.iARA ,ES .ADDITIOl0 Tj.
*F: MO D ELiI F OULI ATIND S (i ldS
*ELECTRICAL *.FPIo :HES *DEC: S Jackson
C S P E E ri P MS C urAFl oI M Counties
Clint Hatcher, owner
2888 Apalachee Trail Marianna 850-272-0144
Bu.a.r. gL-.- RR 8?.'811:98 Ele.:..:a' L.-: ERI'l,)14.0 -


Greg Willis

Tree Service
Tree Removal
Tree Trimming
Phone: 643-5582 Mobile: 643-7372
Mobile: 643-7107
10376 N. W. Willis Way in Bristol LICENSED & INSURED


CLAY O'NEAL'S
Land Clearing & Fencing
*Dozer and Excavation work A
Demolition Pond Digging
^ r Road Building Field Fence
or Barbed Wire Tractor Work
Clay O'Neal Oter 15 years experience
4433 NW County Road 274 (850) 762-9402
SAltha. Fl 32421 Cell (850) 832-5055





Tractor Services
Equipment & Material Hauling
Bush Hogging, Grading, Harrowing, and
Many More Services Available!
FARM & CONSTRUCTiorn EQUIPMENT
HAY & JOB MATERIALS HAULING
OR JUST ABOUT "AfI'THING" THAT CArJ BE HAULED.


LINDA'S
Lawn Care & More
"When it comes to your
lawn, just give me a call
cause I can do it all!"
Call Linda Haines 643-2491
14632 NW SR 20 Bristol


STUMP
.GRINDING
SReasonable
f rates
i 'Tree estimates
Call Chris Nissley
674-8081 or
643-8561 (Cell)


Margie's r
SFlorist
Ve specialize in weddings
ai a good price' I
.-~~ Flowers for Live and silk
all occasions arrangements
Alnma, Hwy 71 S:,uir.l:n 'i"
SJ P Peacr Rdj
Day or night, call 762-8127
or (850) 557.5825

STRICKLAND'S
Ac HARDWARE "



pu,:Il chcmialsi
in-ground & abo\e "
ground pool pnrts
l08'96 rIiJV SR 20 in Beriii J
PHONrE i850 643-.3j6

William's Home
Improvements
"No Job Too Big or Small"
L-rie Ir:u. re. ] ,:nrlr jo r rock r
In r'".C;i pr,: ur l: i'j i
gue. r I r
pairlrl I
FOR FREE ESTIMATES
Call 674-8092
,l. H kA 1i ,,.. .: .,: ,:


Bill Nelson, Allen Boyd

relaunch effort to study

Apalachicola River & Bay
S WASHINGTON, D.C.-U.S. Senator Bill Nelson (D-Florida)
and U.S. Congressman Allen Boyd (D-North Florida) reintroduced
legislation calling for a comprehensive study of the water
management, needs, and conservation along the Apalachicola-
Chattahoochee-Flint (ACF) River System. The legislation
introduced in the Senate and the House of Representatives
would require the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to enter into
an agreement with the National Research Council (NRC) of the
National Academies to conduct a basin-wide assessment of the
ACE system.
The reintroduction of-the Nelson-Boyd NRC bill coincides
with the workshop being held by the NRC about the ACF System
on Friday, April 3, in Washington, D.C. Senator Nelson and
Congressman Boyd pushed for the workshop as a way to bring
local stakeholders, scientific experts, and state and federal officials
together to discuss the ACF System.
"The issue here is protecting the interests of the residents in each of
the three states involved in a dispute over water," said Nelson. "This
study hopefully would give policy-makers some impartial evidence
on which to base an equitable long-term solution to the dispute."
"There is no question that we have a clear need for impartial,
ecological data on the ACF system and a better understanding
of the influence that low water flows have had on our river and
our bay," said Congressman Boyd. "The NRC workshop will
be a good first step to help advance a scientific study of the ACF
system, and it is my hope that a study by the NRC will allow the
three states and the Corps to develop a more successful, long term
water management strategy that recognizes the needs of all the
users along the ACF system."
The legislation calls for the NRC study to include:
Scientific information on the Apalachicola River and Bay
and the impact of freshwater flow on the ecology of the river and
the bay.
An assessment of water availability, supply options, demand-
management alternatives, and socioeconomic factors that influence
.uses in the ACF River System.
Recommendations for an approach to determine water
limits that recognize the needs of all users along the ACF River
System.
Suggestions for any additional measures to address the long
term watershed management needs of the ACF River System.
The Boyd/Nelson Commission has also been endorsed by
President Barack Obama, who called for an NRC study of the ACF
Region during the 2008 Presidential Campaign.
Joining Congressman Boyd as original cosponsors in the
House are Congresswoman Ginny Brown-Waite (R-Brooksville),
Congresswoman Kathy Castor (D-Tampa), Congressman Ander
Crenshaw (R-Jacksonville), Congressman Lincoln Diaz-Balart
(R-Miami), Congressman Mario Diaz-Balart (R-Miami),
Congressman Ron Klein (D-Boca Raton), Congressman JeffMiller
(R-Chumuckla), and Congresswoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz
(D-Weston). Senator Mel Martinez (R-FL) is an original cosponsor
with Senator Nelson.

Congressman Boyd to host

annual Military Academy Day
TALLAHASSEE-CongressmanAllen Boyd (D-North Florida)
will host his annual Military Academy Day Saturday, April 18
from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. (ET). The event will be at the Tallahassee
S Antique Car Museum in the Tucker room at 6800 Mahan Drive,
S Tallahassee. High school freshmen, sophomores, and juniors who
are interested in attending one of the U.S. military academies are
S encouraged to attend. As part of the application process, students
are required to have a congressional nomination submitted on
their behalf.
The event will give interested students and parents an.
opportunity to learn more about our nation's military academies,
requirements for admission, and the appointment process. The
event is free and open to the public.
Congressman Boyd and members of his staff will be joined
by representatives from each of the service academies: U.S.
Military Academy (West Point), Naval Academy, Air Force
Academy, Merchant Marine Academy, and Coast Guard Academy.
Representatives from the ROTC units of Florida State University,
Florida A & M University, and the University of Florida also will
be in attendance.
For more information about Military Academy Day, please
contact Edna Parker in Congressman Boyd's Tallahassee office
at (850) 561-3979 or edna.parker@mail.house.gov.





Page 32 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL APRIL 15, 2009


Tyndall Ba i
FEDERAL CREDIT UNION K I


will be at the Panama City Fairgrounds April 16-18
ThInDaLL WiLL Be OFFering SPeciaL
At our Panama City Lot, aUTO LMan raTes FOr
Saturday, April 18 THree DnS ON1T !
*Live Remote with Kramer and Holly 1 THI'f DaiJO U0 0 1
from Island 106 FM 11 a.m.-1 p.m.
*Entertainment for the kids Call 888-871-2669 to get
*Pizza from the Red Elephant Pizza re-approved before the event.
& Grill
*Special Rates from Tyndall available Introducing a
on the lot or at the Fairgrounds. new way to roll...
new way to roll...
S1 eil/ the 2010 Kia Soul









Come and see it toda-y!
Located at 2435 TELEPHONE
East 15th Street A (888) 871-2669


^NAMA CI
www.billbyrdkiapanamacity.com


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