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The Calhoun-Liberty journal
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00027796/00273
 Material Information
Title: The Calhoun-Liberty journal
Portion of title: Calhoun Liberty journal
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: The Liberty Journal, Inc.
Place of Publication: Bristol Fla
Publication Date: 4/8/2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Bristol (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Liberty County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Calhoun County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Liberty -- Bristol
Coordinates: 30.426944 x -84.979167 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in Sept. 1991.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 11, no. 38 (Sept. 18, 1991).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002046630
oclc - 33425067
notis - AKN4565
lccn - sn 95047245
sobekcm - UF00027796_00273
System ID: UF00027796:00273
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly journal (Bristol, Fla.)

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1 Volume 29. Number 14


Wednesday, Apr. 8, 2009
Wednesday, Apr. 8, 2009


The Easter Bunny waves while arriving at the Harrell
Library in Bristol Monday to join kids in an afternoon
of reading stories, making cards and hunting Easter
eggs. More photos page 17.

SUSPECT WANTED ON TWO
WARRANTS FROM WAKULLA CO.

Man runs red


light, then runs


from sheriff
by Teresa Eubanks, Journal Editor
A man who was stopped by Liberty County Sheriff
Donnie Cofiyers for running a red light led deputies on
a foot chase for about three-quarters of a mile last week
during a heavy rainstorm.
Brandon K. Walker was in custody less than an hour
later and his uncooperative passenger also spent some
time in the county jail after the March 31 incident.
Walker was pulled over after the sheriff witnessed
him run the red light at the intersection of State Road 12
and Hwy. 20 in Bristol at 6:46 p.m. Walker drove into
the parking lot of the Express Lane, got out and fled on
foot.
Deputies were dispatched as the sheriff remained with
the passenger, who had a five-year-old child with her.
The woman refused to give her name or identify the
driver, stating that she had just picked him up and didn't
know him.
When the sheriff asked the woman a third time for the
driver's name, she replied, "I'm not going to do your job
for you."
She was then taken into custody. While being
questioned by another officer at the jail about her identity,
she stated, "You do your job."
When told she would remain in custody until her
identity was established, the woman replied, "S***
happens."

Walker's efforts to elude capture took him through the
yards of two deputies and up to the back door of a startled
See SUSPECT RUNS continued on page 16


Roads took a beating after days of heavy rains
poured down on the Panhandle. ABOVE:
Liberty County's Porter Lake Road (FH #13)
disappeared under the water. RIGHT: Sandbags
were stacked along the edge of the garage
door at this Bristol home in Twin Oaks as water
rises around it. BELOW: A clay road at the
Bristol landing is overtaken by water. BELOW:
Sherry Avenue in Blountstown is covered by a
combination of rain water and Lake Hilda.


--
Tol5 photo courtesy Rhonda Lewis. Other photos by Johnny
Eubanks and Daniel Williams.


S


Three charged with operating meth lab at Bristol home


Amanda Suzanne Holton Steven Michael Shiver

l I1111 Sheriff's Log...2
7 18122 090 8 Farmers Almanac...1


Savannah K. Baxley


by Teresa Eubanks, Journal Editor
Four children were removed from a
Bristol.home when the adult occupants
were arrested for manufacturing
methamphetamine last week, according to
a report from the Liberty County Sheriff's
Department.
Three of the four children appeared to
have a rash on their head and neck areas,
which officers say could be related to the
use of chemicals in the meth-cooking
process. The youngsters, including a one-


year-old, an 18-month-old, a two-year-old
and a six-year-old were turned over to
family members and the Department of
Children and Families was notified.
Arrested was Steven Michael Shiver,
31, Savannah K. Baxley, 23 and Amanda
Suzanne Holton, 32. All were charged
with manufacture of methamphetamine,
possession of methamphetamine and
aggravated child abuse.
Members ofthe Liberty/CalhounDrugTask
See METH ARRESTS continued on page 3


Community Calendar...4 Commentary...6, 7 News from the Pews...8 Fishing Buddies...9
S1 Birthdays...14 Speak Up!...19 Outdoors...27 Obituaries...22 Classifieds...28 & 29


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Page 2 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL APRIL 8, 2009


Man parked in front

of church is charged

with DUI, drug poss.
Calhoun County deputies responding to a call
about a man slumped over the wheel of a suspicious
vehicle in front of Glory Hill Church on State
Road 73 North arrived.to find the driver leaning
back in the seat, apparently asleep, just before 1
a.m. Sunday.
Deputies looked inside to see an open can of
alcohol sitting between the driver's legs, a pipe that
appeared to be full of marijuana on the seat next to
him and a plastic bag nearby that held marijuana
and rolling papers.
The engine was running and the headlights
were on.
Deputy Nick Keller reached in and turned off
the ignition before he roused 39-year-old Clifford
Alvie Newsome. During a search, the deputy found
a small bag of marijuana with a pack of rolling
papers in Newsome's left front pants pocket.
Although he was having trouble maintaining
his balance, Newsome agreed to a roadside
sobriety test but was unable to follow the deputy's
instructions.
He was taken into custody and later refused
.to give a breath sample to determine his level of
intoxication.
The marijuana collected at the scene weighed
37 grams.
Newsome was charged with DUI, possession of
more than 20 grams of cannabis and possession of
drug paraphernalia.

Bristol man arrested on

DUI charge after trooper

notices burned out light
A Saturday night traffic stop resulted in the arrest
of a Bristol man for driving under the influence.
Jeremy Shannon Proctor, 36, was driving
15 miles an hour under the speed limit with a
burned out headlight going east on State Road 20
when FHP Trooper Jason King passed him in the.
westbound lane at 10:35 p.m.
After the trooper turned around and pulled up
behind the 1996 Ford Explorer, Proctor's speed
was clocked at 20 mph in a 35 mph zone.
When the patrol car's signal lights were
activated, Proctor made an abrupt left turn oito
Walnut Street in front of an approaching westbound
car. Proctor traveled slowly along Walnut Street
before coming to a complete stop.
While making contact with the driver and his
passenger, the trooper noticed the strong odor of
an alcoholic beverage. After the driver stepped
out at the trooper's request, he staggered and had
to hold on to the side of the truck to stay upright,
the report noted.
Proctor stated he had left his license at home.
The trooper later learned that Proctor's license
was suspended due to a previous DUI and he was
wanted on two warrants for failure to pay child
support by the Liberty County Sheriff's Office.
He was charged with DUI, driving while license
suspended or revoked and refusing to submit to
breath alcohol testing. He also received citations
for having an open container of beer and not
wearing a seat belt.


DUI ARREST

REPORTS

compiled by Journal Editor
Teresa Eubanks


Late night drive ends

with DUI for Tallahassee

driver Sunday morning
A Tallahassee man was arrested on a DUI
charge after a Liberty County Sheriff's deputy
on patrol on County Road 67 around 12:26
a.m. Sunday morning noticed him driving
erratically.
Deputy Duncan Rudd's report indicated that
Jeffery Michael Austin was traveling west on
County Road 67 when his truck went from one
side of his lane to the other twice.
After making a traffic stop, the deputy
approached Austin and noticed the strong odor
of an alcoholic beverage on his breath.
When asked to step out, Austin had to lean on
the side of the truck to maintain his balance.
After failing a roadside sobriety test, Austin
was taken into custody. He refused to take a breath
test to determine his level of intoxication, which
resulted in an automatic one-year suspension of
his driver's license.

DUI arrest made after

BPD officer watches

driver swerve in lane
A car that pulled off the road and then quickly
returned to State Road 20 in Blountstown was
stopped after Blountstown Police Officer Jody
Hoagland noticed that it was traveling recklessly.
When the driver, identified as Charlene
McCardle, returned to the road she crossed into the
center turn lane then went back into the westbound
lane, narrowly missing the curb.
The Chevrolet four-door continued to swerve
in its lane until the officer activated his patrol
lights and signaled for the driver to pull over in
the parking lot of the Southern Express on the west
side of town.
While speaking with the driver, the officer
noticed the strong odor of an alcoholic beverage
and asked if she had been drinking. McCardle said
she had.four beers earlier that evening and stated
that her last drink was at least an hour ago.
After performing poorly on a roadside sobriety
test, she was arrested for DUI. She said she would
not give a breath sample to determine her level
of intoxication, resulting in a charge of refusal to
submit to BAL testing.

Blountstown Police Dept. .
March 30 through April 05, 2009
Citations issued:
Accidents...............04 Traffic Citations.............14
Special details (business escorts, traffic details..72
Business alarms.....06 Residential alarms.....00
Complaints.................................... ............ 168
EDITOR'S NOTE: In the information provided
below last week's frontpage photograph of a large
tree that fell across State Road 71 in Altha, we
neglected to mention that members of the Altha Fire
Department were quickly on the scene and took
part in getting the road cleared, along with some
help from several bystanders and other volunteer
firefighters.


CALHOUN COUNTY
March 30
*Viki Lynn Capps, VOCP, CCSO.
*Christopher Rhett Sanders, possession listed chemicals, pos-
session methamphetamine, manufacture of methamphetamine,
CCSO.
March 31
*CynthiaAnn Sullivan, possession listed chemicals, possession
methamphetamine, manufacture of methamphetamine, VOCP,.
CCSO.
*Sarah Louise Phipps, possession listed chemicals, possession
methamphetamine, manufacture of methamphetamine, CCSO.
*Angela Verna Baggett, felony criminal mischief, CCSO.
*Marsadie S. Amberg, felony criminal mischief, CCSO.
April 1
*Rose Burd, VOCP, CCSO.
-Jessie Coe, aggravated assault, CCSO.
April 2
-Christian Martin Dickey, VOSS, CCSO.
April 3
*Dashawn Holmes, Seminole Co. warrant, CCSO.
*Charlene McCardle, DUI, refusal to submit, BPD.
*Francisco Demeza, no valid driver license, CCSO.
April 4
*Clifford Newsome, DUI, possession less than 20 grams mari-
juana, possession drug paraphernalia, CCSO.
*Otis Lee Pennywell, Jr., aggravated battery with deadly
weapon, battery on pregnant victim, battery, CCSO
April 5
*Robert Immanuel Goodwin, driving while license suspended
or revoked with knowledge, possession less than 20 grams mari-
juana, possession drug paraphernalia, CCSO.
*Clifton Larry Stevens, possession controlled substance, pos-
session drug paraphernalia, expired driver's license, CCSO.
*Amanda Hill Harris, possession of a controlled substance,
possession of drug paraphernalia, BPD.
*Steven Ragston, trespassing, BPD.
*Darryl Basford, driving while license suspended or revoked
(2nd offense), CCSO.
*James Lerch, VOSP, battery, grand theft, CCSO.

LIBERTY COUNTY.
March 30
*Viki Lynn Capps, holding for CCSO, CCSO.
March 31
*Sarah Phipps, holding for CCSO, CCSO.
*Cynthia Sullivan, holding for CCSO, CCSO.
-James Mathis, state VOP, self.
*Angela Baggett, holding for CCSO, CCSO.
*Marsadie Amberg, holding for CCSO, CCSO.
*Octavis Barnes, county VOP, holding for Seminole Co. SO,
LCSO.
*Christy Sampson, failure to appear (capias), holding for Leon
Co. SO, self.
*Lacole Hogans, giving false information to a law enforcement
officer (2 counts), LCSO.
*Brandon Walker, resisting officer without violence, obstruction
by disguise, holding for Wakulla Co. SO, LCSO.
April 1
*Rose Mary Burd, holding for CCSO, CCSO.
*Napolean Filler, holding forAlachua Co. SO, LCSO.
April 2
*Amanda S. Holton, manufacture of methamphetamine, aggra-
vated child abuse, possession of methamphetamine, LCSO.
*Savannah K. Baxley, manufacture of methamphetamine, ag-
gravated child abuse, possession of methamphetamine, LCSO.
*Steven M. Shiver, manufacture of methamphetamine, aggra-
vated child abuse, possession of methamphetamine, LCSO.
April 3
*Charlene McCardle, holding for CCSO, CCSO.
*Martinez Peterson, county VOP (warrant), reckless driving/
failure to appear (warrant), LCSO.
*Deborah Morefield, forgery (3 counts), uttering a forged instru-
ment (3 counts), petty theft (3 counts), FHP.
*Jeremy Proctor, DUI, DUI refusal, driving while license sus-
pended or revoked, FHP.
April 4
*Jeffery Austin, DUI, LCSO.
April 5
*Amanda Harris, holding for CCSO, CCSO.
*Alex Harris, state VOP, LCSO.

Listingsinclude name followedbychargeandidentificationof arrestingagency. Thenamesaboverepresent
those charged. We remind our readers that all are presumed innocent until proven guilty


R i g Bend



574-TIPS (8477) It'S a Crim e www.BBCSI.org

i Anonymously report animal cruelty and be eligible for a CASH REWARD up to $1,000
Paid for by the Office of the Attorney General Crime Stoppers Trust Fund


/1C








APRIL 8, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 3


$17.6 million to expand Community Health

Centers to serve more patients in Florida


Family


Dentistry



DENTURE

LAB ON PREMISES
Same-Day Service on
Repairs and Relines


Laban Bontrager, DMD

Monica Bontrager, DMD

ACCEPTING

NEW PATIENTS
12761 NW Pea Ridge Rd., Bristol, FL 32321
TELEPHONE 643-5417


patients during the economic
downturn."
The Increased Demand for
Services (IDS) funds will be
distributed to 43 federally
qualified health center grantees
in Florida. The health centers
will use the funds over the next
two years to create or retain
approximately 255 health
center jobs.
Grantees submitted plans
explaining how the IDS funds
would be used. Strategies
to expand services may
include, but are not limited
to, adding new providers,
expanding hours of operations
or expanding services. The
funds will provide care to an
additional 100,976 patients


in Florida over the next two
years.
The IDS awards are the
second set of health center
grants provided through the
Recovery Act. On March 2,
President Obama announced
grants worth $155 million to
126 new health centers. Those
grants will provide access to
health center care for 750,000
people in 39 states and two
territories.
To see a list of grantees
by state, go to http://www.
hhs.gov/recovery/programs/
hrsa/idsgawards.html. To find
a health center near you or
to learn more about health
centers, visit http://bphc.hrsa.
gov/.


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IMETHAR
9 -a allr~~l


Force, joined by Gadsden County narcotics
officers and two FHP troopers, went to the
residence on S.W. Quail Street in Bristol at
11:30 p.m. April 1 with a search warrant.
Inside the home officers found the
ingredients needed to make meth scattered
through the home in the kitchen, one
bedroom and hidden in a washer and dryer.
A coffee filter containing suspected
methamphetamine was found wrapped in
a paper towel in a washing machine in the
north bathroom. A methamphetamine pipe
was discovered in the dryer. Also found in
the bathroom was a half-empty 16 ounce
bottle of drain cleaner.
*In the kitchen, investigators collected an
imodium nitrate instant cold pack and three
lithium batteries.
*A hot plate was found on a counter next
to a sink in the southeast bedroom.
*On a covered porch on the west end
of the home was found two one-gallon
containers of camp fuel. One was full; the


other was only a quarter full. Also on the
porch was a bottle of muriatic acid with
only an eighth of its contents remaining,
along with a nearly-empty 16 ounce bottle
of isopropyl alcohol.
*Investigators discovered what appeared
to be an effort to destroy some of the
evidence when items were found in a bur
pile on the northwest corner of the home.
Officers recovered plastic tubing, lithium
batteries, a burned pseudo ephedrine blister
pack, carburetor cleaner, drain cleaner, an
imodium nitrate instant cold pack, a hot
plate, camp fuel and muriatic acid from the
burn pile.
Taking part in the search was Investigator
Todd Wheetley, Sgt. Jamie Shiver, Deputy
Duncan Rudd, Calhoun County Sheriff's
Investigator Mark Mallory, Calhoun County
Sheriff's Deputy Eddie Dalton, Gadsden
County Sheriff's Investigator Billy Buckhalt
and FHP Troopers Dusty Arnold and Joel
Clark.


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handbags, purses and wallets.

BUY RITE DRUGS S.R. 20 in Bristol


WASHINGTON, DC -The
U.S. Department of Health and
Human Services announced
the release of $17.6 million
to expand services offered at
community health centers in
Florida. The money was made
available by the American
Recovery and Reinvestment
Act and comes as more
Americans join the ranks of
the uninsured.
"More Americans are losing
their health insurance and
turning to health centers for
care," said Health Resources
and Services Administrator
Mary Wakefield, Ph.D., R.N.
"These grants will aid centers
in their efforts to provide care
to an increasing number of
4








Page 4 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL APRIL 8, 2009


Area Agency on

Aging offering

services through

Medicaid program
Irom the Area Agency on Aging for North Florida
Are vou or a lo\ed one in need of in-
home ser ices? The aging resource center
is here to help, through the medicaid
%aiver program.
Counties being served include Bay.
Calhoun. Franklin, Gadsden. Gulf. Holmes.
Jackson. Jeffersonn. Ln. Liberty. Madison.
Taylor, Wakulla and Washington.
Qualifications for eligibility:
*Age 60 or older,
*Income, maximum amount of $2,022
for an individual and maximum amount of
$4.044 for a couple,
*Assets, maximum amount of $2.(000
for an Indi dual and maximum amount
of $3.000 for a couple (I car and I house
is excluded for the asset amount),
For additional eligibility, the applicant
must meet the functional criteria set by the
Department of Elder Affairs Cares Office
and meet the financial eligibility set b\ the
Department of Children and Families.
All clients assessed will be placed on
the wailing list. Priority ill be gi\en to
those with the greatest assessed need.
Please contact the Elder helpline at
1-800-96-ELDER (35337) to be screened
assessed for the Medicaid "Wai~er Program
in your area.
Services provided, personal care,
homemaker, home deliveries meals,
respice companionship, case management,
emergency alert system and home
modification. Please call to find out if a
particular sert ice is offered in your area.



Egg hunt set


Sat., April 11
Liberty Correctional Institute would
like to invite eter one out to the first
annual community Easter egg hunt.
sponsored by Libery Correcnonal Institute
and the Florida Council on Crime and
Delinquenc\
This eent is planned for Saturda, April
11 at the Veterans lemonial Park in Bntol
from 9 a.m. until 12 p.m. and is free for
children ages I-I1. All participants must
be accompanied by an adult.
For further information please call
Cindy S\ ier at 643-9455, Tnsh Perkins
at 643-9439 or Tammy McCroskey at
643-9455.


Free wrestling

show April 10
The Great American Wrestling
Federation will present a tree wrestling
event in Blountstow\n on Friday, April 10
in the Auto Zone parking lot.
Bell time w ill be at 2 p.m. ICT.I.
Everyone is in% ited to attend and bring the
kids for an entertaining afternoon

The Calhoun-Liberty Journal is


published each Wednesday
by the Liberty Journal Inc.,
Summers Road, P.O. Box 536,
Bristol, FL 32321.
Annual subscriptions are $18.
Periodicals postage paid at Bristol, FL
POSTMASTER: Send address corrections
to: PO. Box 536, Bristol, FL 32321


ALENDAR


BIRTHDAY
;?oin n /Almin/or
TODAY'S MEETINGS
* Rotary Club, noon, Calhoun-Liberty Hospital
* Weight Loss Support Group, 1:30 p m Shellon Park Library
* AA, 7 p.m Calhoun County Old Ag Bldg. east door, in front of tail
* 4-H Sportsman Club, after school, Veterans Civic Center
* Boy Scout Troop 200, 6-30 p m.. Mormon Church, Bristol


BIRTHDAYS
'11lii'ace BaLLt'crt, Ctliii OLst'erb'tTel, Loria Sit'lrol,
1'lni"le Si'tlmtnmn'rs &. La l S\'ln uilielT
TODAY'S MEETINGS
* Liberty Women's Club. 11 a m.. Apalachee Rest. Bristol
* AA. 7 p.m.. basement ol Calhoun County Courthouse
* Brownie Troop 158. 6-30 p m.. Tolar School, Bnslol
- :. -- '
BIRTHDAYS

ANNIVERSARY
'Bli- &- *Ainn 'Dekl
EVENTS
Folk Life Days. 9 a.m., Pioneer Settlement, Blountstown
Dance, 6 12 p.m., American Legion Hall, Blountstown


Check out Easter Weekend
Events List at RIGHT
for all activities
Afternoon Tea Party
2-4 p.m. at Panhandle Pioneer
7 & Senlemenl.
Blounrsloan .
to gel .


BIRTHDAYS
Tiln1olas 11 Pate
TODAY'S MEETINGS
* Walk-A'Weigh Program, 9 a.m., Veterans Memorial Park Civic Center
* Altha Boy Scouts, 5.30 p.m., Altha Volunteer Fire Deparment
* Blountstown Lions Club, 6 p.m., Apalachee Restaurant. Bristol
* AA, 6 p m., Altha Community Center
* Boy Scout Troop 207, 6:30 p.m.. First Baptist Church Bristol


*nBIRTHDAYS



TODAY'S MEETINGS
* AA. 6:30 p.m.. Liberty Co. Courthouse west side entrance)
* Boy Scout Troop 206, 7 p.m., Veterans Memorial Park Civic Center
* Bristol Lions Club, 7 p.m.. Apalachee Restaurant, Bristol
* Altha Town Council, 6 p.m.. Altha Town Hall
* Blountstown City Council, 6 p m.. Blounlslown Town Hall
* Blountstown Chapter #179 O.E.S., 7 p.m. (CT) Dixie Lodge, B-Town
* Bristol Vol. Fire Dept., 7:30 p m.. Bristol City Hall
* Calhoun Co. School Board. 5 p.m.. Calhoun Courthouse
* Liberty School Board, 5 p m Administrative Ofice, Hwy 12. Bristol


THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL
Located at 11493 NW Summers Road in Bristol
MAILING ADDRESS: P.O. Box 536, Bristol, FL 32321 7
TELEPHONE (850) 643-3333 Fax (850) 643-3334 .
EMAIL: thejournal@fairpoint.net (USPS 012367)
ADS: cljads@fairpoint.net Summers Road


Celebrate National

Library week April

12 through April 18
The Harrell Memorial Library in
Bristol and the Weater Memonal Library
in Hosford would like to invite everyone
to celebrate National Librarn week April
12-18.
National Library week is a time to
celebrate the contributions of libraries,
librarians and Iibrarn workers in schools,
campuses and communities nationwide
and the perfect time to discover how
worlds connect at your library.
At the Bristol Librar we v.%ill be
learning about history on Monday, animals
on Tuesday, poetry on Wednesday and art
on ThursdaN of this week.
At the Hosford Library on Monday. Apnl
13 from 6 to 7 p.m. will be family story
night with stories and light refreshments.
Everyda. libraries in big cities and
small towns, colleges and universities, in
schools and in businesses help transform
their communities. At our library, people
of all backgrounds come together for
programs to do research to get help finding
a job or to find homework help
Established in 195x. National Library
\week is a national observance sponsored
b\ the American Librarn Association and
libraries across the country each April
For more information visit or call
Harrell Memorial LibrarN in Bristol at
643-2247 or Weaver Memorial Librarn in
Hosford at 379-3300.


r -- -
I oer Weekend

Events Ust
*April 1-Egg Hunt. Veterans
SC\ ic Center-Bristol, 9 a.m.-noon, by
Liberty Recreation Department.
I *April 1-Egg Hunt. Veterans
SCi\ic Center-Bnstol. 9a.m.-noon. by
Liberty Correctional Institute.
S*April 11-Giant Family Egg Hunt,
W.T. Neal Ci\ ic Center-Blountstown,
I 10 a.m.-noon, by area Churches.
S*April 11-Blountstown First
Assembly Church Egg Hunt, 4 p.m.
I CT,.
*April ll-Hillcrest Easter Party,
10 a.m.-noon, Hillcrest Baptist
IChurch.
*April 12-Easter Children Church
Sser ice & Egg Hunt, 10 a.m.-noon,
Fellowship .AssemblN of God
SChurch.
L




That's how many copies of
The Calhoun-Liberty Journal
were distributed last week.
ensuring plenty of coverage for
your community announcements
and great response for our
business advertisers!


JOURNAL STAFF
Johnny Eubanks................. Publisher
Teresa Eubanks.................. Editor
Gina Grantham-Brooks... Bookkeeper
Missy Tanner....................Advertising
Debbie Duggar...Production Assistant
OFFICE HOURS: 9 a.m.- 6 p.m. M-F,
Saturday from 9 a.m. unlil 1 p m.


EVENTS:
Folk Life Days, 9 a.m..
Pioneer Settlement, Blountstown
Dance, 6 12 p.m., American
Legion Hall in Blountsiown
Fishing Derby. Derby Pond SR26
Forest Road 360. Leon County
COLORING CONTEST. Deadline,
nitllurp C in at the C.alhnoin I ihb rt, .








APRIL 8, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 5


19th Annual Carrabelle Riverfront festival


from the Carrabelle Chamber of Commerce
The 19th Annual Carrabelle Riverfront
Festival will be held on Marine Street
along the beautiful Carrabelle Riverwalk
onApril25 and 26. Established traditions,
along with exciting new features, are
expected to draw large crowds for this
two-day event.
Unique to our festival is the giant
maritime sand sculpture. Always a
surprise, even to the festival directors,
this great artistic endeavor has become
the festival's focal point. New for 2009 is
the Climb On Us Rock Wall, which is sure
to attract the youth, as well as the more
adventuresome adults.
Once.again, the Kids' Zone has been
expanded to include the magic of COO-
COO the Clown, the exotics of the Big
Bend Bird Club, a "pirate's treasure hunt,"
hands-on animal demonstrations by the
Florida Wild Mammal Association, plus
pottery-making opportunities for kids of
all ages. Special for Saturday only are


return appearances of the fun-filled Pet
Parade and the Fishy Fashion Show where
maritime models show off outrageous
-nautical-themed outfits made from found
& recycled materials. We also anticipate
the first-time appearance of stilt-walkers,
as well as many other costumed performers
interacting with festival-goers. Saturday's
entertainment will include the popular
singer Donovan Chapman and band
"Locomotive". It is rumored that "Elvis"
is coming on Sunday, plus various other
surprise attractions. Arts, crafts, food
and environmental booths complete this
admission-free event.
SAND ODYSSEY: Returning by
popular demand, master sand sculptor
Mark Flynn brings his award-winning
artistic talent to the downtown Carrabelle
site. Using a huge block of wet sand, he
will create a special sand sculpture based
on our riverfront theme. Spectators will
have the opportunity to watch Mark as he
builds this year's masterpiece.


S April 17 & 18

Fri., Noon until 10PM Sat., 9AM until 7PM
SCitizens' Lodge Park, Caverns Road, Marianna,
j.*' .. : %*
.,-. 1,- -,. .,


5;
I i-. ,,


Sponsored by
Marianna Toyota


* Backyard BBQ Contest
Memphis BBQ
Network Contest
SChildren's Activities
Fine Arts Contest
Live Music
Arts & Crafts
* Variety Of Food Vendors
Pony Rides
Dance Performances
*And Much, Much More!


a


PADDLING EVENTS: Also back by
popular request, kayak races are tentatively
scheduled for starting times of noon on
both Saturday and Sunday, weather and
tides permitting.. Further information on
these & other river events can be obtained
from Expeditions in Tate's Hell (850)
697-2434.
CLIMB ON US ROCK WALL: This
25 foot high realistic granite rock provides
a unique.adventure for all climbers. It
features routes of varying degrees of
difficulty so that everyone can enjoy the
thrill of this one-of-a-kind experience.
VENDORS: This year's line-up of
vendors promises to bring us the beautiful,
colorful, fun, unusual and awe-inspiring in
arts and crafts. Food booths will feature
the ever-popular local seafood, ethnic
offerings, and traditional "fair foods."
Service organizations will round out what
we anticipate to be the best Carrabelle
Riverfront Festival yet!
FREE ADMISSION-HOURS


/- EzD ".-'3 "'" ,,,i ";
'" /. '- .\ I


,' .(- i f ,....:< o.. ,. .. '.. I
'*^ L..!^^ j '

, ,:.- , .. .

' '.'; ," ,; -., .::. ... '- ,J* ' : '-*^ I
, . ,^:,. ... .., ,,. .;<^ *:,. .., .- .... . i"
E .' :- ." ". *, ,
,I" ' "
F..L t ,<"
-* i


Friday, April 17th
7:30PM until 10PM


FLORIDAN spoo nsor, h: NewteArs nir ....sJ
Your paricipaion in his year's ent will help continue our mission or the development yourory Musum of Jackson Csinty.de
Your participation in this year's event will help continue our mission for thc development of the Aris and History Museum of Jackson County.


)ril 25 & 26
turday: 10 a.m.-6 p.m.
nday: 10 a.m.-4 p.m. This event is
red in part by the Franklin County
t Development Council and the
elle Chamber of Commerce.
more information, call the Chamber
-697-2585 or check out the website
:arrabelle.org

ster Art work-

op in Quincy;

7er creative

cents planned

FAMILY EASTER ART
KSHOP, Saturday, April 11, 1-3
or ages 2 and up. Adults create with
Iildren, painting decorative wooden
eggs and creating "Easter Bunny
s." $5 per person, registration closes
April 10. Call 875-4866 or stop
by Gadsden Arts to register.
*EXPLORING
CREATIVITY drawing and
painting class with Linda Pelc,
for adult students, beginner to
advanced. Wednesday, 1-3
p.m., $65 for 6 week class, April
22-May 27. Call 875-4866 or
stop by Gadsden Arts to register
by April 19.
*OPEN HOUSE AT
QUINCYFEST artist
demonstrations, children's
art activities and games, face
painting and sidewalk chalk,
10 a.m.-5 p.m., Saturday, May
2 at the Gadsden Arts Center.
Free just show up! All ages
welcome.
*EXHIBITIONS
CONTINUE through April 26:
Dean Gioia paintings, North
Florida Woodturners, Anna
Carlton, the GAC Artists Guild,
and Shanks Middle School. Call
to schedule your free group tour,
or just drop by.
The Gadsden Arts Center is
located at 13 N. Madison St.,
just 10 miles from Tallahassee
City Limits. Admission is $1
(members and children admitted
free). Gallery and gift shop hours
are Tuesday through Saturday,
10 a.m.-5 p.m., and Sunday, 1-5
p.m. Hours for Miss Helen's
Espresso Cafe D'art and the
Artists Guild Co-op are Monday-
Thursday 8 a.m.-5 p.m. and
Friday-Saturday 8 a.m.-9 p.m.
Group tours are available free
of charge call (850)875-4866 to
make your reservation.



Get

Outdoors

Florida!


NOW

BUYING GOLD
l lWatson

Philip Watson GMOLOGIS
Downtown Marianna
Monday-Saturday
Mam-5pm 4424 Lafayette Street
850-482-4037


S. Rahal-
f ChevroletVc;,

A large selection of new and used cars are
now available at Rahal-Chevrolet in Marianna!
Ronnie Coley personally invites you to visit him any
time Monday thru Saturday from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Questions? Give him a call at (850)482-3051.
HE IS WAITING FOR YOUR CALL! ,


C = =- --~-- L -L C- ~-- -LIIC~I~IP-~IP ___ I


Join Us for the Smiling Pig SK-Walk/Run --
NNW=sponsored by Dr. Ben Saunders


~i~sss,


A_ B


- .


I


I









Page 6 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL APRIL 8, 2009


Barack Obama made his first trip as president to
England. Here is my question. If the President is in
England, who's running General Motors?
JAY LENO

So the United States government is now running
General Motors, because if there's anyone who
knows anything about streamlining costs, it's the
U.S. government. DAVID LETTERMAN

As you know by now, the government is now tak-
ing an active role in the auto business. President
Obama offering hope, change, and 0 percent fi-
nancing. -JAY LENO

A guy in Brazil goes spear fishing, and he ac-
cidentally gets shot in his own head with the spear.
Well, they operate on the guy. He's unconscious.
They pull the spear out and he's going to be fine.
And you know.the first thing he said when he came
to was, "Well, that's the last time I go spear fishing
with Dick Cheney." DAVID LETTERMAN

President Obama gave the first official online
town hall meeting over the internet. Apparently,
there must have.been an online mix-up, because
two guys from "Dateline: Predator" showed up with
a six pack of Mike's hard lemonade. JAY LENO

We're down to the Final Four now. And by that I
mean we're down to the last four working banks in
America. CRAIG FERGUSON

President Obama says that G.M. filing for bank-
ruptcy may be the best alternative. He said that
bankruptcy is a good legal tool for a company not
to have to pay creditors back, which sounds great
until you realize, hey wait a minute, we're the credi-
tors! Great, so you want to help them not pay us
back. I mean, even A.I.G. is going, "Why didn't we
think of this?" JAY LENO

Fox News launched a new editorial website to-
day that is based solely on reporters' opinions, not
on the facts of the stories themselves. They're call-
ing the site Fox News. JIMMY FALON

Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich, who may
run for president in 2012, that's the rumor, has con-
verted to Catholicism. So after a number of affairs,
two divorces, and three marriages, how would you
like to get stuck behind him for that first confes-
sion? JAY LENO

President Obama said yesterday that he be-
lieves that Osama bin Laden is plotting new attacks
against the United States. Obama came up with this
theory when he picked up any newspaper from the
last eight years. JIMMY FALON

President Obama is giving General Motors 60
days to come up with strategy of viability for the
American taxpayers' money. You know what G.M.
should have said? "Hey, you first." JAY LENO

President Obama is making his first presidential
European trip. But you know what he's doing there?
It's the G20 summit, in which the 20 major economic
powers get together and meet. And sadly, this year,
the U.S. just missed the cut. DAVID LETTERMAN


Vietnam: A long war for some


The Vietnam War officially ended
in 1975, but for the families of miss- O
ing soldiers and airmen the war goes
on until there is an answer as to what r
Jerry Cox is a
happened to their family member officerandwriteo
missing in action. background it
My local paper had a piece about foreign policy is
a young pilot killed in January 1968 Okaloosa Coun
in North Vietnam. His remains were
found and identified in 2000 but for
family reasons, he wasn't buried until 2009. The
young officer was flying in the backseat of an F-4D as
the Weapons System Officer (WSO). The pilot flying
in the front seat was then a captain but now a retired
colonel who lives in this community. While the WSO
was killed in the shoot down, the pilot in front was
able to eject. However, he was captured and spent
more than five years in a Hanoi prison.
For many families, the Vietnam War is still with
them as they await some word on family members who
did not return from the war. The POW/MIA group at
Camp Smith, Hawaii is doing an outstanding job of
finding the remains of missing soldiers and airmen in
Southeast Asia.
I was shot down in Cambodia and fortunately, my
-WSO and I were rescued before we were either killed
or captured by the Cambodian Khmer Rouge. In their
effort to resolve questions about Americans lost in the
war, the POW/MIA group called me almost 30 years
to the day after I was shot down.
The Cambodian search teams had found the crash
site of my F-4 and the POW/MIA group wanted to
confirm if either my WSO or I were killed in the crash.
Recognizing that we were both alive, case closed.
They then sent me a copy of the report and photo-
graphs of the crash site.
There are those that carp that the government is in-
ept in everything that government does, but I don't
agree. The work of the POW/MIA group is a good
example of a government agency doing its best for the
American people.
The Gulf War and now the wars in Iraq and Afghan-
istan, all of which has been debated at length, have
replaced the Vietnam War. Libraries are filled with
books written about the pros and cons of the Middle
East wars, so no need to rehash all that.
America is in Iraq and Afghanistan for the long
haul. President Obama is fulfilling a campaign prom-
ise to "disrupt, dismantle and defeat" al Qaida and the


r

s5
t
1


Taliban. Mr. Obama is sending more
' S troops and civilians to Afghanistan to
IINER improve security and promote eco-
retired military nomic development. There is no more
with an extensive talk about converting Afghanistan
domestic and into a Western-style democracy.
'ues. He lives in In my view, the most important is-
Vy / sue facing America is a deteriorating
economic system. For a consumption-
based economy like ours, people have
to work, be paid and buy stuff. Money has to circulate.
Economic instability, particularly on a worldwide
scale, is far more dangerous to the future of America
than a terrorist threat, or the Taliban.
This past week, I watched the Senate hearing on
Mr. Obama's plan for Afghanistan-Pakistan. The gen-
eral, the admiral and the Undersecretary of Defense
for Policy defended Mr. Obama's plan. All one had
to do was substitute Vietnam and Southeast Asia for
Afghanistan and Pakistan and you would have been
carried 40 years into the past. Rose-colored glasses
were in vogue.
I hope that Mr. Obama and America is successful
in achieving his goal in Afghanistan, but I think that
the odds are against it' Why? For starters, it's the ter-
rain. Most of it is vertical. There are few roads, mostly
dirt road, if any. Heavy motorized equipment sinks in
the mud.
The enemy is on foot carrying light weapons. The
U.S. troops have to do the same. Maybe airstrikes will
solve the problem. To some extent yes. Having done
a fair amount of aerial interdiction in Southeast Asia,
I know that airpower alone cannot stop supplies from
being moved on the backs of people and horses.
Aerial drones have a good capability. Helicopter as-
saults will work, but unless you secure the place you
just assaulted, the bad guys are back when darkness
falls. That was the problem in Vietnam.
SThe Taliban is also in Pakistan. Does the U.S. in-
vade Pakistan? The Taliban doesn't pay any attention
to government borders. In spite of the administration's
belief that the Pakistanis are going to help with the
problem, I don't think so. The Pakistanis will spend
U.S. money, but I don't think that Pakistan is going
to mount an armed force that rounds up and jails the
Taliban. I hope that I'm wrong, but...
I think that the war in Afghanistan will be another
long war.








APRIL 8, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 7



TlWASHINGTON


"Good thing we didn't kill off all you Native Americans when we settled America.
We've ended up needing the tax revenue from your casinos."




T URING TH
GREAT RECESSION


I'M OFFR? iUc5
-10 OR 5
rBuIJTOC


Somy...SGM SmwCK
SKL TOI
RISKY MIuGH
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- ------------ 7


DISTRIBUTED BY U.S. NEWS SYNDICATE, INC.


MERRY-GO-ROUND
by Douglas Cohn and Eleanor Clift

MEXICO AND THE U.S. ARMY
WASHINGTON -Among the problems landing on President
Obama's desk is the increased violence spilling over the border
from Mexico along with the drugs that cross illegally into the
United States on a daily basis, and the solution could be radi-
cal. After years of elected officials in both countries looking the
other way, the Mexican government is making a serious effort
to crack down on the drug cartels and the Obama administration
is conceding U.S. complicity in the thriving drug trade.
In a radical departure from previous attitudes, Secretary of
State Hillary Clinton said on a visit to Mexico last month that
American demand for drugs was part of the problem along
with the U.S.-made weapons flowing across the border that
are chiefly responsible for arming the cartels. This was a huge
admission on the part of the Obama administration, and one that
will foster a sense of mutual respect with America's neighbor
to the south after decades of pretending the problem solely
belonged to Mexico.
Ninety percent of the weapons in Mexico come from America.
Obama has promised more border guards to police the border,
but even'if they are able to stem the flow of weapons, Mexican
drug traffickers could always turn to other eager arms sellers,
Venezuela and China among them. American-made weapons
are handy, but they are by no means the cartels' only source. It
is equally futile to hold out the promise of reducing America's
appetite for marijuana and cocaine. Countless drug czars in
Republican and Democratic administrations have failed to curb
demand. Some states, recognizing what doesn't work, are going
in a different direction. California is de-criminalizing marijuana.
New York is repealing overly punitive mandatory minimum
drug sentencing laws passed in the 1970s.
So while it's nice that the Obama administration has recog-
nized the obvious, what they'll do about it is less clear. In the
meantime, Mexico doesn't have much time. It's on the verge of
becoming a narco-state. President Felipe Calderon has staked
his reputation on his ability to counter the brazen power of the
cartels, and so far he's getting mixed reviews. Local police
departments and even the military have been intimidated and
silenced. They are inadequate to the task of standing up to cartels
that are better armed and able to recruit an army of young men
otherwise unable to make a decent living. Ordinary Mexicans
applaud Calderon's efforts to take on the cartels but fear that
his government is not up to the task and that all he's doing is
stirring up a hornet's nest.
If Calderon comes to the conclusion that his armed forces and
police are so infiltrated that he cannot succeed, and the violence
continues its deadly upwards spiral, he could turn to the U.S.
government for military assistance in combating what has now
been acknowledged is a shared problem.
U.S. troops immune to the blandishments of the cartels could
cross the border and clean house with relative ease. One idea
would be to establish a 50-mile swath to impose law and order
and to disrupt the cartels. Given the sensitivities about foreign
troops, Calderon might prefer to appeal to the United Nations for
an international force led by the U.S. but that includes Canadian
and Brazilian troops as well.
The key of course is whether Calderon or any Mexican leader
for that matter could survive politically turning to the U.S. mili-
tary. The same goes for Obama who could not dispatch troops
to Mexico unless they were truly there by invitation. It's an
unlikely but not an impossible scenario.
If both countries are serious about wanting to address drug
violence, there aren't a lot of options. Either change America's
drug laws or send in the 82nd airborne division, take your
pick.


~lllsrrss~88~B~aaa~


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Page 8 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL APRIL 8, 2009


Egg hunt and cookout a

huge success at Corinth


First Baptist

Church Relay

for Life team

has a blast St.

Patrick's Day
The First Baptist Church Relay
for Life team and other teams met
on March 17 in a most unusual way.
They celebrated their meeting with a
costume contest between teams to earn
spirit points.
The First Baptist Church team
walked away a winner for most
-outrageous outfit. Tied for first place
was Shirley Bateman (right) who came
dressed as a Pea-ken Chicken and Jerry
Lewis sported the Hulk look.
To find out more about Relay for
Life and how you can participate
contact any of the area churches.


News
from the

~Pews


St. Mary's plans

photo fundraiser

on Easter Sunday
St. Mary M.B. Church Pastor's
Aide Ministry is having a photo
fundraiser Easter Sunday, April
12 at St. Mary M.B. Church. The
church is located at 16345 S.E.
River Street, Blountstdwn, Dr.
C.L. Wilson Pastor.
The photo shoot will begin at
9 a.m. and continue until 3 p.m.
(CT). Bring your family and
friends or church family.
Cost of pictures are: 4x6=$5,
5x7=$7 and 8x10=$10. Packages
consist of one 8x10, two 5x7s
and two 4x6s=$25.
To set up an appointment or for
more information, callEvangelist,
Patricia Mosley or Sister, Elsie
Fitzpatrick at 850-718-3710 or
850-674-8653. Walk-ins are
welcome.

Passover Supper


Women of Faith retreat May

15-17 in Donaldsonville, GA


Would you like to spend
three days in the presence of the
Lord? If so, this our Women of
Faith retreat is for you. Imagine
a retreat designed especially
for women of faith with three
days of relaxation, teaching,
meditation and fellowship in
nature's awesome beauty.
This retreat will restore, build
up and empower your faith walk,
"for without faith it is impossible
to please God."
Come join us at the beautiful
Lake Seminole with rustic cabins,
fireplaces, two-bedrooms, full
baths, patios all overlooking
the scenic lake with its gentle
breezes.
Come let us rest in the Lord
and be nourished of him.
Speakers during these three
days will be:


*Prophetess Kathy Peterson
from Eufaula, AL
*Minister Tammy Anderson
from Panama City
*Evangelist Reva Smith from
Panama City and
*Evangelist Jacquelyn
Solomon from Bristol.
Registration fee includes
lodging, meals and workshops
got the event, which will be held
May 15 17. Choose from the
$100 or $150 package.
Deadline for registration is
April 14, so call today.
For more information contact
Evangelist Patricia Mosley or
Sister Elisie Fitzpatrick at 850-
718-3710 or 850-674-8653.
This event is sponsored by
St. Mary M.B.C: Pastor's Aide
Ministry, Dr. C.L. Wilson Pastor/
Teacher.


Welcome Assembly of God Church

plans special Easter Sunday Service


The Welcome Assembly of
God Church would like to extend
a special welcome to everyone
to attend their Easter Services on
Sunday, April 12.
Join us Sunday morning for
Easter Sunrise Service from 6:30
to 7 a.m. followed by an Easter
Morning Sunrise Breakfast from
7 to 8:15 a.m.


at 8:30 a.m. followed by an
Easter Musical presented by the
Sanctuary Choir at 9:30 a.m.
concluding with Communion
Service.
The church is located in the
Dellwood Community at 6794
Messer Road.
If you have any questions or
need directions, please call the


Friday April 10 at Sunday school will begin church office at 850-592-50'

Glory Hill Church Celebrate the 'Resurrection
Glory Hill Holiness Church of the Lord' Sunday, April 12
will be hosting their annual
commemoration of the Passover You are invited to join us at following the Sunrise service
Supper Friday, April 10 at 7Christian Home FWB Church The Church is located on E
Supper Friday, April 1 at 7 to celebrate the resurrection of
p.m. on Snda Ai 12 69 N. across from the N
p-m. rnr T .nrd nn ,qundav Anril 12 at


Following the worship service
the supper will be served in the
Fellowship Hall. Everyone is
invited to join us in this special
service.
The church is located five
miles north of Clarksville on
Hwy. 73.
For more information call,
Pastor, William R. Adams at
762-8301.


VUL- -LIVIU VII 3kmuay, r-yi -a
6:30 a.m.
Plan to stay for breakfast


77.


e.
Iwy.
ettle


Ridge Cemetery.
Everyone is welcome.


Altha churches join services at

Sunny Hill on April 12 for Easter
We, the Altha community churches, invite you to celebrate with
us our risen Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ, this Sunday at 6:30 a.m.
at the Sunny Hill Pentecostal Holiness Church. Pastor Allen Nichols
of the Altha Church of God will be preaching.
The Sunny Hill Pentecostal Holiness Church is located at 19352
NE CR 274, four miles east of Altha.


Corinth Baptist Church had its
Egg hunt and Cookout following
its second service Sunday, April
5. The new Children's Ministry
sponsored the event. The turnout
was terrific and everyone had a
great time. The church provided
and the youth hid approximately
1,000 eggs. The church hosted
lunch for the families and
^^ :'-^


LU'


celebrated the blessings God has
given us.
Thanks td" everyone who
worked so hard at getting the new
Children's Ministry area ready and
to Rivertown Community Church
for their help and donation of our
new stage area. Our children and
families are very excited about
Easter this Sunday.


LEFT: Hiding eggs
was just as much
fun as hunting them.
Shown carrying
the eggs is Aaron
Black, in the tree is
Brad Andrews and
watching is Thomas
Blanton. BELOW:
Kids are shown
rushing around
getting ready to hunt
the 1,000 Easter
eggs hidden on the
grounds.
PHOTOS BY
GARY SCAFF


Sunrise service at Hillcrest April 12


Celebrate our Lord's
Resurrection this Sunday at 6:30
a.m. at Hillcrest Baptist Church.
The service will be led by Pastor
Forrest Parker with special music
provided. Watch the sun rise as
we worship together.
Following the Sunrise Service,
you are invited to attend a
breakfast. We will have Sunday
School at 10 a.m. and our regular


Worship Service at 11 a.m. Our
youth will be sharing a drama to
music portraying Christ's victory
over sin.
We are located 5 miles west
of Shelton's Comer on CR274.
Come join us at Hillcrest Baptist
Church this Sunday, we truly
serve a risen Saviour.
News from the Pews
continued on page 16


BECOME A VOLUNTEER
Florida Guardian ad Litem Foundation
PHONE (850) 410-4642


Sign Language Classes


at Word of Truth-United
SPentecostal Church

19397 SW South Street
(Behind City Tire Company)
Blountstown, Florida 32424 M


Learn to communicate with your
deaf friends and family members


h


wL6:0m. CS


To reserve your seat, or for more information contact
us at 850-674-4605 or wordoftruthupc@yahoo.com
1%t








APRIL 8, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 9


State parks, estuarine research reserves and kids' fishing clinics

promote environmental stewardship, fishing ethics, skills and safety


DEP & FWC 'Hook' kids and families on fishing


TALLAHASSEE The
Florida Department of
Environmental Protection
(DEP) is teaming up with
the Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission
(FWC) to remind parents
that spring is a great time to
get outside and take a child
fishing. Many of Florida's
state parks and estuarine
research reserves extend the
opportunity to fish for dinner
or catch-and-release, and
some state and local parks
offer free fishing clinics for
children throughout the spring
and summer.
"Florida boasts natural
resources rich in marine
culture and aquatic wildlife
that are in many ways the
heart of Florida's natural
beauty," said Florida Park
Service Director Mike
Bullock. "Fishing recreation
and marine exploration are
great ways for Floridians and
visitors to experience natural
Florida."
This weekend families can
enjoy a free freshwater fishing
weekend throughout the state,
when no fishing license is
required for freshwater fishing.
This covers both Florida
residents and non-Florida
residents fishing in public
fresh waters no matter what
age; all other rules apply.
Upcoming fishing events
at Florida's State Parks
include:
*April 11, at St. George
Island State Park. DEP is
hosting a saltwater fishing
workshop. Registration
limited to twenty.
*April 25, How to Fish,
Sebastian Inlet State Park
and surrounding water clinic,
held at Sebastian Fishing
Museum.
*May 2, Lake Griffin State
Park, 9 a.m. to 12 noon, ages
4 to 14, guardian must be
present.
*June 13, at Fort Clinch


FISH1n9 BUDDies WeT a uine
Cousins Nate Carpenter and Tanner McSpaddin, both three years old,
enjoy a sunny afternoon of fishing at a creek near Joe Chason Circle in
Bristol. Nate is the son of Matt and Sarah Carpenter. Tanner's parents are


Cari and Jeff McSpaddin. They are from Bristol.


State Park. Kid's fishing
clinic sponsored by FWC.
The clinic will teach children
to tie different knots, practice
good angling skills, learn
.what should be in a tackle
box, discover the marvels of
a touch tank, and casting.
Interested participants


Liberty County School Board -is proposing changes to
the following policies:

6.541 Annual/acation Leave
6.912 Terminal Pay Benefits

A public hearing on this policy will be held on April
14th at the Liberty County Administrative Offices,
Hwy 12 South, Bristol, FL 32321 at 5:05 pm. Copies
of the policies are available at the Superintendent's
Office.


should call the state park in
advance for directions and to
pre-register.
"The Florida Wildlife
Conservation Commission
hopes that the free freshwater
fishing weekend will give
Floridians a chance to share
the excitement of the outdoors


LIQUIDATION

LAND SALE
10 ACRE plus Tracts
From $3,995 per acre
$995 Total Down
OWNER FINANCING,
No Qualifying

Tri-land Inc.
R. E. Broker
Phone (813) 253-3258


SHARON AUSTIN PHOTO

and the respect for nature that
many sportsmen and women
enjoy throughout the year,"
said Bob Wattendorf, Special
Projects Coordinator for
FWC. "Taking a child fishing
will give children memories
that will last forever, and
hopefully provide them with a
lifetime of healthy recreation
that reconnects them with
nature."
Parents looking for other
top fishing holes will find some
tips at DEP's recently launched
Web site, Rediscover Florida
- 100 Ways in 100 Days. The
campaign aims to increase
awareness of all the activities
Florida's public lands offer -
from the traditional (hiking,
biking, and camping) to the
unique (festivals, historic
reenactments and museums).
Visitors to the Rediscover
Florida Web site can explore


an interactive list of 100
activities and track how many
of the activities they can
complete.
Fishing opportunities are
aplenty on the list, including:
#13- Cast a line. Anglers
find paradise almost anywhere
in Florida. Visit the George
Crady Bridge Fishing Pier
State Park in Jacksonville,
Sebastian Inlet State Park
on the Atlantic coast or the
Skyway Fishing Pier State
Park over Tampa Bay. Guana
Tolomato Matanzas National
Estuarine Research Reserve
is a popular place to go
redfishing.
#82- Catch dinner.
Freshly caught seafood makes
a fine meal. Launch a boat
from Rodman Campground on
the Cross Florida Greenway to
fish the reservoir, cast a line to
surf fish at Dr. Julian G. Bruce
St. George Island State Park
or fish from the pier at Three
Rivers State Park. Florida's
aquatic preserves also provide
excellent sites for fishing.
#99-Fish from Flagler's
historic bridges. Fishing on
the Keys bridges is popular
on historic Channel 2 Bridge,
Channel 5 Bridge, Long
Key Bridge and Seven Mile
Bridge.
In addition, the Governor
and Cabinet recently passed
a resolution supporting Get
Outdoors Florida coalition.
This coalition has been
instrumental in creating a
Florida Children's Outdoor
Bill of Rights, in which both
DEP and FWC are active
members striving to engage
communities, families
and individuals in outdoor
experiences to achieve
healthier lifestyles and sustain
Florida's natural resources.
~---------------------------
To view the Rediscover
Florida: 100 Ways in 100
Days web site, visit: www.dep.
state.fl.us andclickRediscover
Florida. To learn more
about the Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission,
visit: www.MyFWC.com.
For more information
on Florida's Free Fishing
Weekend, visit: www.myfwc.
com/NEWSROOM/09/
statewide/News 09 X
FreeFishingWeekend.htm
For more information
on Get Outdoors Florida
Where you can find a link
to Governor Crist's Get
Outdoors Resolution, visit:
www.getoutdoorsflorida.com








Page 10 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL APRIL 8, 2009


Final deadline approaching as family, church and


business stories sought for Calhoun Heritage Book


Is your family story going
to be in the Calhoun Heritage
Book? The following is a list of
the family stories that have been
turned in:
*John and Betty Tomlinson
*John Russ; Benjamin and Ser-
ena Pitts
*Irene Pitts Mayo
*George Baker
*Mason and Alice Chason
*Beatrice Burke
*Mason Chason
*Dr. Lyman Edward Porter
*Lawrence and Sarah Baker
*Elnora Baker Blanding
*Benjamin Franklin Pitts
*James Baker
*Carlton VanLierop
Romelie Talbert
*William and Susan Johnson
*Robert Henry and Mary E.
Johnson
*John Monroe Hall Family
*Luke Lott
*Mary Elizabeth Shiver and Sage
and Teacher
*John H. Davis Family
*The Halley Family
*Albert Lockwood
*James Harvie Peak Family
*Newton and Florence Dykes
-The Hanna Family
*The William Jonas Montford
Family
*John Hamilton & Hester Zany
Johnson Hanna
Ina Eleazer and Verna Mae
Dykes Hanna Family
*Modem Day Remnants of the
Apalachicola Creeks, the Polly Par-
rot Family; Mary Musgrove Era;
The Polly Parrot Clan
*Parrish Florida Pioneer Family
*William Douglas and France
Wood Price
*Nettie Pitts Wood
*The Charlie Wood Family -
Christmas;
*O. C. and Sara Ann Butler Mus-
grove Funeral Home
*John Henry Bailey, Sr. Eagle
Theater
*John Henry Bailey, Sr. Bailey
Sawmill
Elbert Shelton Family; Boze-
man Family
*Millard Brooks and Nan Deal
Hayes
*The Alex Long Faniily Child-
hood Memories in Calhoun County
*The John Henry Clark, Sr. Fam-


*Dock Tatumn
* Zachariah Tatum


THE HISTORY PAGE


Blountstown's old Colonial Hotel is shown here in 1948. This is one of the many old
photos that will be featured in the upcoming Calhoun Heritage Book.
June 30 is the last day to submit articles & photos. Please submit your stories to the
HBC, Post Office Box 275, Blountstown, Florida 32424-0275.
For more information contact Mary Lou Holley at (850) 674-8860, or Mary Lou Taylor
at 850-674-8276 or Lana Weeks at (850) 674-4638.


*Micajah Tucker Family of Cal-
houn County
*Henry Ernest and Grady Lou
Swails Family
*Rubylea Ray Hall The Great
Tide
*Chris and Sarah Nissley
*Rev. Isaac Cotton
*The John Henry Stone Family
S*Drew and Ninver Kingry Pea-
cock, Sr.
*Leonard and Georgia Belle Ay-
ers McCroan Family
*The Royce Merrill Taylor
*Joel Marion and Bertha Jones
Atkins
*Samuel Henry Grantham Fam-
ily
*Harvey Lee and Mae Bell Miles
Grantham
*Jesse Thomas and Navada Mor-
rell Bailey
*Morrell and Elizabeth Peacock
Bailey
*Lynwood "Lynny" and Brenda
Durham Seay
*Joseph Leon and Audrey Flan-


ders Durham
*Maggie Player Leonard and
Family
*Byron Bentley Bodiford
*David Anderson Bodiford
*Thomas Seaborn Bodiford
*Iris Glisson Ashley Frisby
*Berry William and Flora Eliza-
beth Smith Blackburn Glisson
*Roy and Jewell Glisson
*George Lundy and Trudy La-
Mae Johnson Hansford
*Edward Hopson and Mary Alice
Eldridge Johnson
*Jay Johnson
*Janey Perliner Johnson Stone
*John Russell Johnson
*Levy and Amanda Bodiford
Johnson
*The children of Levy and Aman-
da Etta Johnson
*Nion Lloyd Johnson; John Si-
mon and Annie Eliza Blackburn
Johnson
*The Houston Family; Robert
Carrell Johnson
*Alto Conner and Willie Mae


Strickland Newton
*Dorothy Ann Johnson Robbins;
Pauline Strickland Johnson
*Wibbie Jackson and Dorothy
Marie Hatcher Strickland
*Alexander Hershel and Bessie
Lee Smith Strickland
*Willie Mae Johnson Tucker
*Neal Mayo The Old Fisher-
man.

If you did not see your family
listed then a story has not been
sent to the Heritage Book to be
submitted. You need to hurry
and get the information in as the
deadline is June 30, 2009. There
will not be any additional time
added to this. Please remem-
ber that your grandchildren and
great-grandchildren will read
this book one day and wonder
why their family was not in-
cluded.
Maybe you have a topical sto-
ry about a business or a church


that you would like included in
the book. As of today we do not
have information on the follow-
ing Churches in Calhoun County
and we don't want a single one
to be left out.
We need information on the
following Churches:
*Advent Christian Church
*Blountstown Church of Naza-
rene
*Blountstown FPH Church
*Calvary Baptist Church
*Clarksville Baptist Church
*First Assembly of God
*First Presbyterian Church
*First United Methodist Church
*Gateway Baptist Church
*Kingdom Hall of Jehovah's
Witness
*Macedonia Baptist Church
*Macedonia First Baptist Church,
Macedonia Road
*Oak Terrace Bible Church
*Poplar Head Baptist Church
*Prayer Chainers Mission of
God
*River Town Community
Church
*St. Paul's AME Church
*St. Temple First Born Church of
the Living God
*Travelers Rest FWB Church
*True Holiness Community
Church Written in Heaven
*Williams Memorial Methodist
Church
*and Word of Truth United Pen-
tecostal Church.
Please submit something on
these churches. These only have
to be 250 words, so it won't take
you long to work this up. Ask
the secretary and pastor of your
church to help us out, because
these churches help to make
the Spiritual Heritage special.
Maybe your church is not listed
above, so call us and let us help
you with this small endeavor.
Please submit your stories to
the HBC, Post Office Box 275,
Blountstown, Florida 32424-
0275.
For more information please
feel free to contact Mary Lou
Holley at 850-674-8860, or Mary
Lou Taylor at 850-674-8276 or
Lana Weeks at 850-674-4638.


10781 NW SR 20
Bristol, Fl 32321


VISA


643-2939


LIBERTY T I COMPANY
A Division of Whitfield Steel Recycling, Inc.
We specialize in sales and repair of tires for:
Commercial Trucks and Trailers
OTR Equipment and Farm Equipment

"-D w -1 Ce ;-,'Hi tyour colcnmer'cia tire l l

w-- c....


_, Goodrich
,i _OE M_=- .


Alum.


- I ---- -~-""I"T~"I-"-~~""--~"~"~~-~~ '= ---










Our local market has
something called fiddleheads
for sale. What are they? -G. Z.,
Windsor, Conn.
Well, they're a spring
vegetable, generally harvested
in the wild along streams and
rivers. Specifically, a fiddlehead
is the early sprout of the ostrich
fern (Matteuccia struthiopteris).
In New England, in early spring,
you'll see many fern sprouts that
look just like fiddleheads, but not
all of them are edible. In fact,
most of the ones you're apt to
see in the woods and fields are
not edible. The ostrich fern will
always be found near running
water, and early in the year it
has a papery brown skin that is
something like an onion skin,
only more fragile. The spring


sprouts take their name from
their shape, since they resemble
the part of the fiddle that is held
in the hand. If left unharvested,
the fiddlehead will unfurl itself,
opening its leaves to the sun as
other ferns do.
On the table, fiddleheads have
been described as a cross between
asparagus and early spinach. If
you harvest them yourself, you'll
have to spend considerable time


.and trouble getting them really
clean and grit-free, much as you
would a curly spinach. Market
versions tend to be prerinsed,
however, and require only a brief
rinsing and the trimming of any
brown stems. Fiddleheads will
keep their firm, coiled shape
even when cooked or canned,
and they're often eaten steamed
or stir-fried, either alone or with
other vegetables. Since they often


Help seniors in your community:


*Answer Medicare Questions and Resolve Problems


*Make Informed Choices About Their Health Insurance


*Save Money on Their Prescription Medications


*Inform Them of Programs They May be Eligible







CALL THE ELDER
SHELPLINE TODAY!
I 1-800-96-ELDER
I NE (1-800-963-5337)
"01- Ef *E


APRIL 8, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 11


come on the market at about the
same time as the South's Vidalia
onions, the two vegetables are
often combined in stir-fries or
other recipes.
As a canned vegetable, the
fiddlehead loses its firm freshness
-- much as asparagus would -- but
canned fiddleheads are still tasty
baked in a casserole or added to
a salad.
Why won't the horizontal
dowels in the legs of my wooden
captain s chairs stay glued? -W
W, Kayenta, Ariz.
Well, it could be the glue you're
using, or what it's being applied
to, or the way it's being applied.
If you get all three of these
variables right, then you should
be able to expect just normal
wear and tear on those chairs
before you have to repair them
again. Granted, captain's chairs
-- common, round-shouldered,
wooden armchairs, also seen in
train stations, grange halls, and
fire departments -- are designed
to withstand a heavy load and a
lot of abuse, and they usually hold
up pretty well.
For glue, you should be using
a white glue or similarly bottled
version of "wood glue," or any
woodworker's paste glue mixed
from powder. Mixed properly, to
a creamy consistency something
like liquid soap, the paste versions
should be fine.
Avoid the old hot glues or
the newfangled, clear, plastic
glues, neither of which hold up
as well.
Before applying the glue to the
dowels and dowel holes, remove
any old glue that has adhered to
these surfaces. You might think
that the new glue would simply
bond to the old, but it doesn't
bind well at all. Instead, what you
want is for the new-glue to sink
well into the pores of the wood; it


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can't do that effectively if the old,
dried glue is in the way. So scrape
or sandpaper it off the dowels to
start with a clean surface.
Finally, let the glue soak into
each surface for a minute or two
before you reconnect the pieces.
Then, once you have secured a
good fit, apply pressure to the
glued joints. C-clamps work well
if you've got them, but if you
don't, try a piece of cord or even
the pressure of stacked books.
Without some sort of pressure,
the glue can't get a good tight
bond, and you'll be back to
square one -- so don't skip this
final step. Good luck!
Whydopeoplesay, 'forPete's
sake and 'for the love ofMike "?
Where do these sayings come
from? -M. B., Cotulla, Tex.
Both sayings are euphemisms,
used in times of impatience or
anger and meant to replace God's
name with that of Pete or Mike.
"For Pete's sake" is much like
"for pity's sake," "for goodness'
sake," or "for heaven's sake,"
and all three of these are ways
to refrain from taking the Lord's
name in vain. "For the love of
Mike" is another expression of
surprise or exasperation that is
meant to replace "for the love
of God."
One example of the expression
shows up in James Joyce's
Ulysses (1922), when the author
writes, "For the love of Mike,
listen to him."
In another vein entirely is
"robbing Peter to pay Paul," an
expression of futility that many.
assume comes from the Bible but
actually has uncertain origins.
Some translations suggest that
clothes are taken from Peter to
clothe Paul, but the meaning is
the same. Interestingly, the name
Peter is Greek for rock, which
helps to explain the origins of
the phrase "to peter out": Peter is
the name used to refer to a vein
of ore, in mining, and if the ore
runs out, it peters out. To blast
out ore, miners might resort to
the use of saltpeter, the explosive
used in gunpowder, which was
also used to extract and break up
gold-bearing rocks.


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Page 12 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL APRIL 8, 2009


Post and

Barn Pole Inc.
DEMPSEY BARRON ROAD,
BRISTOL (OFF HWY. 12 N)
Phone (850) 643-5995
We Ve got the fence posts to meet your needs.,


THECITYOFBRISTOL Ao NNloU Io-S

RESDET-L' oR I


2009 APPLICATION PERIOD FOR RESIDENTIAL
SEWER IRRIGATION RATES IS NOW OPEN: Resi-
dential users of the Bristol Municipal Wastewater Sys-
tem who wish to have a fixed sewer rate for the 2009
summer months may apply for an Irrigation Rate for
Sewer Services Only by making application to the City
of Bristol at the office of the City Clerk during regular
business hours NOW APRIL 21,- 2009. The Sewer
Irrigation Rate is based upon the applicant's average
water usage during the Jan, Feb, and Mar 2009 bill-
ing cycles, calculated at the rates set forth in City of
Bristol Ordinance #2006-02, and will be effective for
(6) billing cycles beginning May 1, 2009 and ending
October 1,2009.
3-25 T4-15


Thursday and Fridays 1-5 p.m.
Saturday 9 a.m.- 1 p.m.

The Calhoun County Recycling Center is located
approximately 4 miles north of Blountstown on
Magnolia Church Road/SR 71 North.
Waste Tire Month will begin on Thursday, April 2, 2009 at 1 p.m.
(CT) and will end on Saturday, May 2, 2009 at 12 p.m. (CT) or
when funds are exhausted, whichever comes first.


If you have any questions, please call
the Calhoun County Emergency
Management Office at
(850) 674-8075.


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APRIL 8, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 13


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affordable Simplified-Issue Whole Life policy offers up to

$50,000 ofprotection-extra security for the ones you love.


Applying for coverage couldn't be easier, there are
no qualifying exams and only three health

questions to answer. For a customized

proposal, call o r .wen,:v tul.i'. ..


Auto-Owners Insurwwane
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Days of rain sent campers as well as year-
round residents along the Ochlocknee River
scrambling for higher ground. ABOVE: Trailers
are shown as the water creeps up to the
windows. BELOW: Only the tops of these
sheds at on the edge of the Ochlocknee River
peeked out from under the water. RIGHT: This
leaning sign at the Blountstown Boat Landing
seems to be less of a road signal and more of
a plea for the rain to end. BELOW: The rising
Chipola River as seen from Peacock Bridge
near Altha.
PHOTOS BY JOHNNY EUBANKS AND DANIEL WILLIAMS


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kH:i' Si ed Int ie: e." at ies :r.e :ijo edn g '3 a s) S:,rILha C c 'bope bp es cm eS "cu ~ HT l: ; ': ; S .: To ,- ; S":" d o .. '.'w ': h !':ie J
.ai ,v1 e. I ,F f io'A 'i o4a.h ; i P .: ge s (" It r e es
ri;m f.i- ) ... :ea:l, ?a 2009 i-:A'f;iS Cn .l !.i;Ki:.!l.3 l] !;'.") 8! ; 1 1 i ",.''


*..5
* ~~ * ,


The family of Dorothy Culpepper would like to thank everyone for
their many prayers and kind words during the sudden illness and loss
of our beloved Mother. Your kindness and thoughtfulness is greatly
appreciated. May God bless and keep you all.
Roger, David, George, Jason, Rachel, Joseph and Velma

Hosford school would like to sincerely thank all those who helped
with this year's FCAT and Stanford 10 testing. Everything went very
well and that can be contributed to all those who gave a helping hand.
From those who volunteered their time to proctor in classrooms, to
those who contributed breakfast and helped in delivering the food to
the classrooms. It is people like you who make the.difference in this
community. All of the staff at Hosford School greatly appreciates
your support and dedication to our children and to this fine school.
Hosford School and Staff


The family of the late Rufus
Lee Dudley; wish to express
heartfelt thankfulness for the
many expressions of love and
support from the community,
during the death of our loved
one.
Your thoughtfulness and
kindness is immeasurable and
shall always be remembered.
May God continue to bless and
keep each of you.
Gratefully,
The Rufus Lee Dudley family


,Ir, '&4q ..
~~~otc Biellf1i I[,lll Stout mire
Phn 7 -5974 -Fax,64-830


Simple joy


"


I
L








Page 14 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL APRIL 8, 2009


Four generations Doris Traylor of Blountstown cradles
Four g en es her new great-grandson, four-and-a-
half-month-old Asher Edward Porter at the recent Turner Family Reunion, held March
28 at Veterans Memorial Civic Center in Bristol. Young Asher represents the fourth
generation of the Byrd Turner Eubanks family. Shown above, left to right, is Sue
Traylor Porter, her mother, Doris Traylor (holding Asher) and Sue's son, Matthew Porter.
Approximately 70 descendants of the Alexander Turner family gathered for the annual
event.


SEMMA KAY FORAN
: .... Emma Kay Foran will be
celebrating her first birthday on
April 11. She is the daughter
of Ty and Samantha Foran of
Hosford. Her grandparents
include Chad and Laurie Finuff
of Blue. Creek, Kenny and
Jayne Foran and Lesa Mabius,
all of Bristol. Her great-
grandparents are Edward and
Vera Finuff of Hosford and the
late Johnny and Carolyn Foran
and Betty Grurr, all of Bristol.
Emma Kay enjoys anything to
do outside with daddy, going
to the beach with mommy, and
Splaying with all her cousins.


Giant Family Egg lHunt
THIS SATURDAY, APRIL 11
1 from 10 a.m. to 12 noon at the
Neal Civic Center in Blountstown.
FREE FOR CHILDREN AGES 1-11 YEARS OF AGE.
All participants must be accompanied by an adult.
Sponsored by Blount-
stown United Methodist
Church and First Baptist
of Blountstown. Other
churches are heartily
invited to participate.
For further information,
please call Robyn Cony-
ers at 674-3144, or Mar- ,au..
shall Masai at 899-5491.
jS/~6~e^"-*'_^


Happy 18"h Birthday
April 9"h
Jordan Bennett


Daddy, Jessie, Mama,
Eric, Josh & Jarrett


Happy Birthday
Allie





-R





Allie Dawsey will celebrate her
12th birthday on April 12. She
enjoys reading, riding four
wheelers with her brother Cole
and step-sister, Ashley, and
playing with Max the dog. She
is the daughter of Nikki Creel
of Blountstown and Tommy
Dawsey of Frink.
% / e /oyveo,a
///y Jkiai/-


Calhoun's Take Stock in

Children to host annual

spring banquet Apr. 30
The Calhoun County Take Stock in Children Program will host
its annual spring banquet on Thursday, April 30 at the W.T. Neal
Civic Center at 6 p.m. (CST).
Take Stock in Children's 2009 Scholarship recipients, Nate
Davis, Emmerial Deveaux, and Jawon Mosley will be recognized
as they and their families sign an agreement contract. In signing
the contracts, the recipients and their parents agree to maintain
a set of criteria in order to keep the scholarships. To keep their
scholarships, recipients agree to maintain good grades, good
school attendance, good behavior, and to stay drug and crime
free.
Also recognized at the banquet will be the recipients' mentors.
Providing mentors and student advocates throughout the high
school years is the strength of the Take Stock in Children Program.
Mentors'and student advocates are placed to help keep students
on track and help them be successful as they pursue higher
education.
Donors and volunteers will also be recognized for their
contributions to the program. The local Take Stock in Children
Program depends entirely on donations and support from the
community. When the local program raises funds for scholarships,
Florida Prepaid matches it, dollar for dollar. This means when
money is put into the Take Stock in Children fund, the scholarship
amount is doubled. That makes the program an astonishing deal,
especially in today's economy!
In addition to dinner, banquet attendees will have the
opportunity to meet and hear from our local scholarship recipients
and their mentors. If you have been a Take Stock in Children donor
or volunteer, or are simply an interested community member, we
welcome you to attend the banquet. For food purposes, please
RSVP to Barbara Hathaway at 674-5927, Ext. 21, by April 17.


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(850)763-6666


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4








APRIL 8, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 15


FPPA 2009 Scholarship


Award Program is open
MARIANNA The Florida documentation of passing grades
Peanut Producers Association is is submitted to the FPPA Office.
pleased to announce the opening "The Florida Peanut Producers
of their 2009 Scholarship Award Association is committed to
Program, effective April 1. helping further the education of
Two $1,200 scholarships will young people in Florida and the
be awarded to deserving high scholarship program is evidence
school seniors and/or college of our commitment," said Ken
students. The applicant or Barton, Executive Director of
someone in the applicant's family the FPPA.
must be an actively producing "The FPPA welcomes all
peanut grower, not necessarily applicants. The final selection
a member of the FPPA. It is will be made by the committee
the intent of the Scholarship and all applicants will be notified
Award Committee, however, by mail, as will the scholarship
that the award recipients attend winners," said Barton.
a Florida Junior college or four- For an application contact
year university, the FPPA office at 2741 Penn.
Each winner will receive $600 Avenue, Suite 1, Marianna, FL,
when the scholarship winners 32448 or call (850) 526-2590.
are announced. The remaining FPPA Scholarship applications
$600 will be awarded after the must be postmarked no later than
completion of one semester and July 1.

Jennifer Devuyst & Katrina

Miles donate 18 inches hair

On March 28,
Miss Calhoun _
County Jennifer
Devuyst andLittle
Miss County
County Katrina
Miles cut their
hair to donate it to
theLocks of Love
organization.
Kim Barfield

Jenni'fer's hair
and Jennifer cut 14
eight inches off
Katrina's hair. s~ *
The girls went to
Hair by Heart in
Marianna where
Jennifer works.
If you would
like more
information on the Locks of Love organization you can visit their
Web site at www.locksoflove.org. The Miss Calhoun County pageant
is coming up on April 19 at 2 p.m.(CT) at Blountstown High School
Auditorium. Come watch the girls crown the new Miss Calhoun
County Queens.


Peddie, Myers joined in matrimony

March 14 in Tallahassee ceremony
Kendall Winnell
Peddie and Bradley
Dale Myers were joined
in Holy Matrimony
on March 14, 2009 in
Tallahassee. Reverend
Paul Smith performed
the double-ring
ceremony at the FSU.
Alumni Center. .
Kendall is the
daughter of Kevin and
Karen Peddie of Bristol.
Brad is the son of Merv
and Doris Myers of
Blountstown.
Presented in marriage
by her father, the bride
was attended by matron
of honor Brenda Petty,
bridesmaids Dani Del
Vento, Rachel Porter,
and Robin Eberly and
flower girl Clementine
Smith.
The bride's attendants
wore wine gowns and
carried bouquets of
Stargazer lilies. The
bride's strapless gown,
Mori Lee by Madeline
Gardner, with its. A-line '
skirt and chapel length
train, was accented with
cascading embroidery
and trimmed at the waist
and hemline with bands
of satin ribbon. Her veil
was outlined with satin


ribbon and tucked into her classic up-do with a pearl
comb. She carried a bouquet of Oriental lilies and
Mokara orchids.
Kyler Peddie, the bride's brother and long-time
friend of the groom, served as best man. Groomsmen
were Chuck Headings, Steve Porter, and brother of
the groom, Nick Myers. Matthew Hand and Thomas
Wheeler, served as ushers, and Jared Holcomb as
ring bearer.
After the ceremony, hors d'oeuvres were served
in the courtyard, followed by dinner and dancing


in the ballroom.
Brad is a graduate of Florida State University
with a bachelor's degree in Real Estate and
Finance. He is part owner of Merv Myers
Construction, Inc. in Blountstown. Kendall will
graduate from-Florida State in August with a
bachelor's degree in Recreation Management and
is currently working as an event planning assistant
with Florida Health Care Association.
The newlyweds honeymooned in the Caribbean
and currently reside in Tallahassee.


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Covenant Hospice


seeks volunteers for

Garden Gala event


Covenant Hospice is seeking
area businesses to participate in
this year's Garden Gala. Auction
items such as gift certificates,
jewelry and artwork, and multiple
level sponsorships are needed to
support the 4th Annual Garden
Gala benefiting Covenant
Hospice, to be held on Saturday,
June 27 at The National Guard
Armory in Marianna.'
Hosted by WJHG's Neysa
Wilkins, the evening includes
dinner & dancing, silent & live
auction, tasting & exhibits and
much more.
Tickets are $40 per individual
and $75 per couple. The Garden
Gala is critical to furthering
Covenant's mission in the
Marianna service area. For more
information, contact Jennifer
Griffin at 482-8520 or 209-0221.


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Page 16 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL APRIL 8, 2009


continued from page 8


Altha First Baptist presents

an Easter Musical April 12


their musical, In the Presence
of Jehovah, arranged by Russell
Mauldin. Jesus' life will be
presented through individual
characters who each came into
His presence through different


Blountstown First Assembly

annual egg hunt set April 11
Blountstown First Assembly invites you to join them for their
annual egg hunt on Saturday April 11. We will begin at 4 p.m.
(CT) with the Easter egg hunt followed by dinner on the grounds,
including hamburgers and hot dogs.
Eggs will be provided by the church so you do not need to bring
eggs with you. Also, we would like to invite you to attend Easter
service with us on Sunday, beginning at 9:45 a.m. (CT).
Have a blessed Easter.

Fellowship Assembly of God

plan Easter egg hunt April 12
The Fellowship Assembly of God youth group will be holding
their annual Easter egg hunt on Sunday April 12. A special
Easter Sunday school service with snacks will be held from 10-
11 a.m. followed by an egg hunt with lots of great prizes from
11 a.m. to noon.
For more information call 850-442-4992 or 850-447-0118.


homeowner who screamed when
she saw him.
Off-duty Deputy Caryl Marotta
was sitting in her garage when she
saw Walker racing east across
Myers Ann into a neighbor's
yard in front of her home. She
called the dispatcher to find out
what was going on, and was
told, "We've got a suspect on
foot in your neighborhood." At
that moment, patrol cars flew
past her house on Myers Ann,
heading south. She advised the
dispatcher that the suspect was
running down Judy Drive. Patrol


cars turned around and Walker
was apprehended at 7:36 p.m.
Walker, who first identified
himself as Gerald Murray and
said he did not know his date of
birth, was later found to be wanted
on two active warrants for sale of
cocaine with a $200,000 bond out
ofWakulla County. The 20-year-
old is from Crawfordville.
Walker identified his passenger
as Lacole Hogans, 25, of
Blountstown.
She was charged with two
counts of obstruction by disguise


circumstances, but whose lives
were all changed dramatically by
being in His presence. There is
something amazing about being
in the presence of holiness,
mercy and love. In the presence
of Jehovah we find forgiveness,
joy and fulfillment!
The Altha First Baptist
Church's sanctuary is located
at 15660 NW Chipola Street in
Altha.


Easter party at

Hillcrest April 11
Saturday, April 11, from 10
a.m. to noon there will be an
Easter Party for kids at Hillcrest
Baptist Church.
Each child will be able to
play games, participate in an
egg hunt, receive a gift bag, and
hear a Bible story! Hot dogs and
chips will be served as well!
Come and join the fun this
Saturday at Hillcrest. We are
located 5 miles west of Shelton's
Corer on CR274.


by giving false information to
a law enforcement officer by
refusing to give her or Walker's
name.
Walker was charged with
resisting an officer without
violence and obstruction by
disguise.
Assisting in Walker's
capture was Investigator Todd
Wheetley, Sgt. Jamie Shiver and
Deputy Wade Kelly, along with
Blountstown Police Department
Sgt. Fred Tanner and Major
Rodney Smith and his tracking
dog.


Kids don't forget to turn in your
Easter coloring contest pictures, the
deadline is Saturday, April 11


Choose one off our lot or
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The Altha First Baptist
Church family invites you to
join with them in celebrating
our Risen Lord Jesus Christ this
Sunday at 11 a.m. (CT)! The
Sanctuary Choir will present


,* a


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APRIL 8, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 17


rr


ABOVE: """
Ryan Harper
and the Easter Bunny.
LEFT: Easter Bunny shows off
Andrew Kern's artwork.


Kids had a ball
when the Easter
Bunny paid an early
visit to the Harrell
Library in Bristol
Monday afternoon.
There were stories,
art projects, an
egg hunt and of
course, a visit
with the Easter
Bunny. RIGHT:
Approximately 76
children enjoyed
the afternoon
program. BELOW
RIGHT: Krystal
Larson works
on creating an
Easter card. FAR
RIGHT: The Easter
Bunny (Rev. Myrna
Carnley) gets a ride
to the party from
Margie Jacobs.


,- ~.


-;r
-ci









Page 18 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL APRIL 8, 2009



2008 Annual Drinking Water Quality Report


or .







We're pleased to present to
you this year's Annual Water
Quality Report. This report is
designed to inform you about
the quality water and services
we deliver to you every day.
Our constant goal is to provide
you with a safe and depend-
able supply of drinking water.
We want you to understand the
efforts we make to continually
improve the water treatment
process and protect our water
resources. We are committed
to ensuring the quality of your
water. Our water source is
ground water from one well.
The well draws from the Flori-
dan Aquifer. Because of the
excellent quality of our water,
the only treatments require
dare chlorine for disinfection
purposes and Aqua-Mag for
stabilization and pH control.
In 2008 the Department
of Environmental Protection
performed a Source Water
Assessment on our system
and a search of the data
sources indicated no potential
sources of contamination near
our wells. The assessment
results are available on the
FDEP Source Water Assess-
ment and Protection Program
Web site atwww.dep.state.
fl.us/swapp.
If you have any questions
about this report or concern-
ing your water utility, please
contact Aaron Elkins @ (850)
545-1370. We encourage
our valued.customers to be
informed about their water
utility. If you want to learn
more, please attend any of
our regularly scheduled meet-
ings. They are held on the first
Tuesday after the first Monday
of each month at the .Liberty
County Courthouse @ 7pm.
Liberty County Estiffan-
ulga Water System routinely
monitors for contaminants in
your drinking water according
to Federal and State laws,
rules, and regulations. Except
where indicated otherwise,
this report is based on the re-
sults of our monitoring for the
period of January 1 to Decem-
ber 31,2008. Data obtained
before January 1, 2008, and
presented in this report are
from the most recent testing
done in accordance with the
laws, rules, and regulations.
If present, elevated levels
of lead can cause serious
health problems, especially for
pregnant women and young
children. Lead in drinking wa-
ter is primarily from materials
and components associated
with service lines and home
plumbing. Estiffanulga Wa-


LIBERTY COUNTY


ESTIFFANULGA WATER SYSTEM

We are pleased to announce that our drinking
water meets all federal and state requirements.


2008 TEST RESULTS TABLE
Contaminant and Unit of Dates of'sampling MCL Violation Level Range of MCG likely Source of
Measurement (mo./r.) Y/N Detected Ressuts Contamination
Inorganic Contaminants
Corrosion ofgalvanized
pipes; erosion of natural
deposits; discharge from
Cadmium (ppb) May-06 N 1.8 N/A 5 5 metal refineries; runoff
metal refineries; runoff
from waste batteries and
paints
Erosion of natural
deposits; discharge from
fertilizer and aluminum
factories. Water
Fluoride (ppm) May-06 N 0.2 NiA 4 4.0 addie rotes
additive which promotes
strong teeth when at
optimum levels between
0.7 and 1.3 ppm
Salt water intrusion,
Sodium (ppm) May-06 N 16.0 N/A N/A 160 al ar in rso,
I' I I leaching from soil
TTHMs and Stage 1 Disinfectant/Disinfection By-Product (D/DBP) Contaminants
Contaminant and Dates of MCL Range
Unit of sampling Violation eve of MLG o MRDL Likely Source of Contamination
Detected of MRDLG MRDL
Measurement (mo./yr.) Y/N Results __
Jan-Dec MRDLGC
Chlorine (ppm) N 0.73 0.5-0.7 R4 MRDL 4.0 Water additive used to control microbes
I laloacetic Acids
SfveA A pb) Jul-06 N 4.1 N/A NA MCL 60 By-product ofdrinking water disinfection
(five) (HAAS) (ppb)
TTHM [Total
trihalomethanes] Jul-06 N 40.1 N/A NA MCL =80 By-product of drinking water disinfection
(ppb) _
No. of
Contaminant and Unit Dates of AL 90th sampling AL
o amiseant admpling Violation Percentile sites MCLG (Action Likely Source of Conlamlnalion
o (o.yr.) Y/N Result exceeding Level)
t e AL
Lead and Copper (Tap Water)
Corrosion of household plumbing systems; erosion
Copper (ap water) Jun-Sep N 0.41 0 of10 1.3 1.3 of natural deposits; leaching from wood
(ppm) 07preservatives
Lead (tap water) Jun-Sep N 2.0 0 of 10 0 15 Corrosion of household plumbing systems, erosion
(ppb) 07 of natural deposits


In the table above, you may system must follow, microbial contaminants.
find unfamiliar terms and abbrevi- Initial Distribution System Maximum residual disinfec-
ations. To help you better under- Evaluation (IDSE): An important tant level goal or MRDLG: The
stand these terms we've provided part of the Stage 2 disinfection By- level of a drinking water disin-
the following definitions: products Rule (DBPR). The IDSE is fectant below which there is no
Maximum Contaminant Lev- a one-time study conducted by wa- known or expected risk to health.
el or MCL: The highest level of ter systems to identify distribution MRDLGs do not reflect the ben-
a contaminant that is allowed in system locations with high concen- efits of the use of disinfectants to
drinking water. MCLs are set as trations of trihalomethanes (THMs) control microbial contaminants.
close to the MCLGs as feasible and haloacetic acids (HAAs). Water Parts per million (ppm) or
using the best available treatment systems will use results from teh Milligrams per liter (mg/) one
technology. IDSE, in conjunction with their part by weight of analyte to 1 mil-
Maximum Contaminant Lev- Stage 1 DBPR compliance moni- lion parts by weight of the water
el Goal or MCLG: The level of touring data, to select compliance sample.
a contaminant in drinking water monitoring locations for the Stage Parts per billion (ppb) or
below which there is no known or 2 DBPR. Micrograms per liter (pg/I) -
expected risk to health. MCLGs Maximum residual disinfec- one part by weight of analyte to
allow for a margin of safety, tant level or MRDL: The highest 1 billion parts by weight of the
Action Level (AL): The con- level of a disinfectant allowed in water sample.
centration ofa contaminant which, drinking water. There is convincing Picocurie per liter (pCi/L)
if exceeded, triggers treatment or evidence that addition of a disin- measure of the radioactivity
other requirements that a water fectant is necessary for control of of water.


ter System fs responsible for
providing high quality drinking
water, but cannot control the
variety of materials used in
plumbing components. When
your water has been sitting for
several hours, you can mini-
mize the potential for lead ex-
posure by flushing your tap for
30 seconds to 2 minutes be-
fore using water for drinking or
cooking. If you are concerned
about lead in your water, you
may wish to have your water
tested. Information on lead in
drinking water, testing meth-
ods, and steps you can take to
minimize exposure is available
from the Safe Drinking Water


Hotline or at http://www.epa.
gov/safewater/lead.
The sources of drinking wa-
ter (both tap water and bottled
water) include rivers, lakes,
streams, ponds, reservoirs,
springs, and wells. As water
travels over the surface of the
land or through the ground, it
dissolves naturally occurring
minerals and, in some cases,
radioactive material, and can
pick up substances resulting
from the presence of animals
or from human activity.
Contaminants that may
be present in source water
include:
(A) Microbial contaminants,


such as viruses and bacteria,
which may come from sew-
*age treatment plants, septic
systems, agricultural livestock
operations, and wildlife.
(B) Inorganic contaminants,
such as salts and metals,
which can be naturally-oc-
curring or result from urban
storm water runoff, industrial
or domestic wastewater dis-
charges, oil and gas produc-
tion, mining, or farming.
(C) Pesticides and herbi-
cides, which may come from
a variety of sources such as
agriculture, urban storm water
runoff, and residential uses.
(D) Organic chemical con-


taminants, including synthetic
and volatile organic chemi-
cals, which are by-products
of industrial processes and
petroleum production, and can
also come from gas stations,
urban storm water runoff, and
septic systems.
(E) Radioactive contami-
nants, which can be naturally
occurring or be the result of oil
and gas production and mining
activities.
In order to ensure that tap
water is safe to drink, the EPA
prescribes regulations, which
limit the amount of certain con-
taminants in water provided
by public water systems. The
Food and Drug Administration
(FDA) regulations establish
limits for contaminants in
bottled water, which must
provide the same protection
for public health.
Drinking water, including
bottled water, may reason-
ably be expected to contain at
least small amounts of some
contaminants. The presence
of contaminants does not nec-
essarily indicate that the water
poses a health risk. More in-
formation about contaminants
and potential health effects
can be obtained by calling
the Environmental Protection
Agency's Safe Drinking Water
Hotline at 1-800-426-4791.
Some people may be more
vulnerable to contaminants
in drinking water than the
general population. Immuno-
compromised persons such as
persons with cancer undergo-
ing chemotherapy, persons
who have undergone organ
transplants, people with HIV/
AIDS or other immune system
disorders, some elderly, and
infants can be particularly at
risk from infections. These
people should seek advice
.about drinking water from their
health care providers. EPA/
CDC guidelines on appropri-
ate means to lessen the risk of
infection by Cryptosporidium
and other microbiological
contaminants are available
from the Safe Drinking Water
Hotline (800-426-4791).
We at Liberty County Estif-
fanulga Water System would
like you to understand the
efforts we make to continually
improve the water treatment
process and protect our water
resources. We are committed
to insuring the quality of your
water. If you have any ques-
tions or concerns about the
information provided, please
feel free to call any of the
numbers listed.








APRIL 8, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 19


*Gussie Pollard of Bascam
lost 40 Ibs


*Melissa Hewet of
Greenwood lost 60 lbs.
6;i.'r ," i- _' .'ll ,:', ; -h~ t, l
-John Rosenberger of
Grand Ridge lost 130 Ibs.
He is now off of 3 blood
pressure medicines.
,'*... t c,." 1 /i !,'-'h ~3 li\


Call (850) 482-0000 to book your
appointment for a free consultation.
Located at W.T. Neal Civic Center in Blountstown


)^


i- -R aaUy
TI L i

*, The Liberty County


SC





m A
,*'- .* : "





* .'II. *.c~if'- 'sf.:-
s


d~.
U
N .
U


U




U..

0S8a





sa
.1


Rapid Weight Loss
LOSE UP TO 30 POUNDS IN ONE MONTH!


To the editor,
I rarely read Mr. Cox but
when he put the headline "Are
We Our Own Worst Enemy"
I just had to see if he was
capitulating that he and the
media had let us down.
Instead he was talking about
the .American People. Some of
\% horn have been continuously
duped by a socialist-leaning
media that has helped lead us
down this path to totalitarianism
and socialism that we are on.
The Americanpeople have all
been duped by representatives
in Congress. When warned by
the Bush administration that
there was a potential crisis
with the housing mortgage
giants Fannie and Freddie,
Democrats pooh-poohed the
warnings and continued to
receive money from these two
entities.
I am sure it all sounded
good to socialist liberals
that everyone could have a
house (even if they could not


afford one) and the almighty
government would back up
the loans.
Haven't we learned yet
that WE are the government's
pocketbook, and that
government can give nothing
it has not taken away from
someone else?
We have been forced by
government to invest in failing
companies that should have
been allowed to fail and now
the government owns us and
them because of the debt it
took to buy them.
Never mind that your
children and grandchildren
are now indentured to China
by a debt none can ever hope
to repay. Confiscating our
country's entire wealth and
buying doomed industry is
expensive but our government
and China can easily afford


You say they have took
nothing from me; but the
bill of our devalued currency
and super inflation hasn't
even begun to come in yet.
I am sorry, Mr. Cox: I have
no intention of helping Mr.
Obama socialize and destroy
my country and I will give Mr.
Obama the same respect you
gave Mr. Bush. In fact I plan
to oppose him at every turn I
can by protesting in the streets
at the new Tea Party protests
along with millions of other
Americans who are fed up
with the government takeover
of America.
Who is the enemy Mr. Cox?
You are absolutely right we
are for sitting on our hands
while socialists like you helped
get us into this mess.
Glenn FLord Sr, Hosford


Register events with Chamber of

Commerce to avoid overlapping


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*Baby
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*Family
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*Bibles for
Children
*Bride's
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We have
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Bibles

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We also
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Located at 20634 E. Central in Blountstown
S674-8801 "Fine Jewelry & Gifts"* Open 9 5 p.m.
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To the editor,
This community is so
supportive with all the activities
that volunteers put on. This is
a good sign that those living
here care about it.
To help coordinate the
fundraisers so they don't


overlap, it would be good to
check in with the Chamber
of Commerce to register
your event. This will make
it possible to support each
other.
Sincerely, Linda Smith,
Panhandle Pioneer Settlement


SPEAK UP! with a letter to the editor

Write: The Calhoun-Liberty Journal at P.O. Box 536, Bristol 32321
Please note that letters should be no longer than 350 words
and include the writer's name, phone number and address.


Hosford reader vows to oppose Obama 'at every turn'


Who is the enemy, Mr. Cox?


F-fl


'4.


-Amy McLeod of Kinard
LOST 30 LBS.


courthousee will be


CLOSED

for Good Friday

on April 10


Robert Hill,


Clerk of Court


.. .... ... .. .








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Page 20 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL APRIL 8, 2009


Big Bend Baseball League Highlights...

Calhoun Horsemen run their way to first win of season, 18-7


by Jim Mclntosh
ALTHA, APRIL 5-Dillon
Burke, Ben Faurot and Josh
McIntosh all hammered homeruns
this past Sunday afternoon to lead
the Calhoun County Horsemen
to an 18-7 win over the Jackson
County Blue Jays. It was the first
game ever for both teams of the
newly formed Big Bend Baseball
League of Florida.
Brandon Smith picked up the
win for the Horseman. In three
innings of work Smith allowed
four earned runs off of five hits,
struck out four batters and he
surrendered 3 walks.
Keith Kirkpatrick relived
Smith in the fourth inning and
completed the game. Of the
three runs Kirkpatrick allowed
only one was earned, he fanned
eight batters and gave up only
two walks.
After Jackson County posted
three runs in the top of the first
inning, Ben Faurot jacked the
first pitch he saw approximately
330 feet over the left field fence.
Next, Jeremy Proctor delivered
his first offering as a double into
left centerfield. Moments later
he would score on a dead ball to
make it a 3-2 ball game.
The Blue Jays picked up a
run in the second inning but the
Horsemen would take the lead
for good with five runs of their
own. Chad Bailey led off with
a single to centerfield. With one
out Greg Betts grooved a single to
centerfield and a fielding error by
the centerfielder allowed Bailey to
score. Gary Chew and Brandon
Smith drew back-to-back walks
with two outs. Then Ben Faurot
turned around a 1-2 pitch for a
double to left centerfield to plate
Betts, Chew and Smith. Jeremy
Proctor's grass-burner to the
second baseman was mishandled
and that allowed Faurot to cross
the dish to put the Horsemen
ahead, 7-4.


Scoring two runs in the fourth
and fifth inning, Jackson County
pulled to within a run, 7-6.
However, Calhoun County got
back that run in the sixth inning.
Dillon Burke singled to right field
and advanced to third base on two
consecutive passed balls. With
one out Greg Betts scored Burke
with a sacrifice fly to right field.
The Blue Jays pulled to within
run in the seventh inning, 8-7.
But in the bottom of the inning
the Horsemen exploded with nine
runs of their own to put the game
away. Lead off batter Gary Chew
got it started by singling through
the right side of the infield and he
moved to second base on a wild
pitch. Josh McIntosh reached on
a fielder's choice and Chew was
put out trying to advance to third
base on the play. Ben Faurot
slapped a single to centerfield
moving McIntosh to third base.
Jeremy Proctor followed with
a single through the left side of
the infield to score McIntosh
and Faurot found himself on
second base. Kirkpatrick ripped
a turf-torcher through the left
side to score Faurot and Proctor
advanced to second base. Dillon
Burke mashed the frst pitch he
saw over the left centerfield fence
for a three-run homerun. Cale
Chafm was issued a walk but was
forced out at second base when
Greg Betts reached on a fielder's
choice. Tony Golden reached on
a single down the third base line
and Gary Chew walked to load
the bases. Josh McIntosh lifted
a grand slam homerun over the
left field fence to give Calhoun
County a comfortable 17-7 lead.
The Horsemen would add
their final run in the bottom of
the eighth inning. With one out
Dillon Burke reached on a fielding
error by the third baseman and
Cale Chafin scored him with a
single to right field.
Leading Calhoun County at


the plate was Ben Faurot who
was 4 for 5 (including doubles
and a homerun) on the afternoon,
scored three runs and collected 4
RBI. Dillon Burke went 2 for 3,
scored three runs and was credited
with 3 RBI. Jeremy Proctor was
2 for 5, scored twice and picked
up a RBI. Gary Chew and Josh
McIntosh both were 1 for 3 and
each scored two runs. McIntosh
racked up 4 RBI on the afternoon
with his grand slam home run.
Greg Betts went 1 for 4, scored
twice and posted 2 RBI.
The Horsemen will be back
in action this Saturday at 2 p.m.
(CT) when they take on the
Liberty County Dawgs at Altha
High School's baseball field.
There is no admission fee
to the game but donations are
encouraged to help offset the
teams' expenses. So if you
are looking for something to
do this Saturday, come to The
Cotton Patch and support your
local teams composed of local
players.


BIG BEND BASEBALL
LEAGUE'S SEASON
IS UNDER WAY
After being rained out the
weekend before, the Big Bend
Baseball League of Florida
opened their inaugural season this
past Sunday. In other diamond
duels, Chattahoochee defeated
Liberty County, 17-10, and Gulf
County edged Bay County, 8-6.
The Big Bend Baseball
League consists of two divisions
composed of six teams. The
Eastern Division teams are the
Chattahoochee Redbirds and the
Liberty County Dawgs. The Bay
County Brewers, the Calhoun
County Horsemen, the Gulf
County Drive and the Jackson
County Blue Jays.make up the
Western Division teams. The
games will usually be played
on-Sunday afternoons at 2 p.m.
(CT). There is no admission fee
for the games but donations are
welcomed. The present schedule
is being revised and it should be
available soon.


Chipola Lady Indians to

host 'Strikeout' game for

American Cancer Society
The Chipola Lady Indians will host the first Annual "Strikeout"
Cancer game on Thursday, April 9, at the Chipola Softball Field. The
Lady Indians will take on Pensacola in a double header that will be
played at 4 and 6 p.m.
The Lady Indians will be attired in pink to pay tribute to those
affected by breast cancer. Commemorative shirts and bracelets will
be on sale with proceeds donated to the American Cancer Society.
The first pitch of the game will be thrown out by a breast cancer
survivor.
Chipola coach Belinda Hendrix says, "The Lady Indians hope to
bring a greater sense of awareness to breast cancer and to celebrate
the brave individuals who have battled and continue to battle this
dreadful disease. We are asking for the support of the community, the
families of breast cancer victims, as well as breast cancer survivors
to participate in our endeavor to 'Strikeout' Cancer."
For more information on this event, contact Belinda Hendrix at
850-718-2358.


Liberty Rec. announces 0 Zone & AA baseball teams


by Richie Smith
The following are the 2009
Dixie Youth Baseball O Zone
and AA teams in the Liberty
County Recreation Department
program.
O ZONE Teams
Conyers' Gators: Coach
Grant Conyers. Players: Tyler
Ellison, GaberealNeldon, Phillip
Marotta, Blade Barineau, Ken
Thompson, Jemarius House, Jake
Bunkley, Bailey Singletary, Zach
Stoutamire,William Hayes, Ryan
Willis, Micah McCaskill, Ken
King, Brody Holland.
O ZONE Teams
Preble Rish Seminoles: Coach
Todd Wheatly. Players: Hunter
McDaniel, Jordan Pantoja, Lee
Lowery, Jeffery Holcomb Jr.,
Blaise Thaw, Keith Burs, Chase
Jordan, Nathaniel Dugger, Flint


Walker, Will Hosford, Noah
Davis, Garrett Swier, Eric
Fowler.
The O Zone teams will begin
their season this Saturday April
11 with a game against each
other at 10 a.m. at the Veteran's
Memorial Field. .
AA Teams
Subway: Coach Steven
Oswalt. Players: Cole Brandon,
Charlie Burns, Tyler Carman,
Frank Cotrell, Bradley Edwards,
Zac Eikeland, Carson Hatchett,
Zachery Hobby, Brock Holland,
Michael King, Gabriel Oswalt,
Andy Revell.
AA Teams
Piggly Wiggly: Coaches Evan
and Shelene Shuler. Timothy
Fant, Helaman Shuler, Brady
Peddie, Tucker Singletary, Brett
Thompson, Colton Thomas,


Braddock Hobbs, Lucas Barber,
Jacob Creamer, Brandon Shiver,
Matthew Shuler,
The AA season will begin
this Saturday, April 11 when the
two Liberty County teams play


each other at 9 a.m. at Veterans
Memorial Park.
Also, this Saturday Liberty
County AAA teams and Wakulla
Bank are slated to meet at 11 a.m.
at Veterans Memorial Park.


MAKE A NOTE ...

to get your

Classified ads

in by noon

Saturday!

6 Call 643-3333,
Fax 643-3334

Email: thejournal@fairpoint.net


Liberty and Calhoun
County Schools

SCHOOL MENU
April 9-15, 2009


i--


........ .




A choice of low fat white,
chocolate or strawberry
milk served with all meals.


THURSDAY
Pancakes and sausage
patty, assorted cereal with
buttered toast, assorted
fruit juice.
FRIDAY
Scrambled egg, grits and
toast, assorted cereal with
buttered toast, and as-
sorted fruit juice.
MONDAY
Grits with cheese toast,
assorted cereal with but-
tered toast, and assorted
fruit juice.
TUESDAY
Ham, egg and cheese
McMuffin, assorted cereal
with buttered toast, and
assorted fruit juice.
WEDNESDAY
Pancakes and sausage
on a stick, assorted cereal
with buttered toast, and
assorted fruit juice.

L LUNCHES
Elementary
'(Pre-K thru 5th)
THURSDAY
Chicken and rice soup with
grilled cheese sandwich,
carrots and rosy apple-
sauce. Alternate: Ham
club sandwich.
FRIDAY
Pepperoni pizza with bread
stick, corn and baked cin-
namon apples. Alternate:
Chicken ranchero wrap.
MONDAY
Corn dog nuggets, baked
beans, broccoli and diced
peaches. Alternate: BBQ
chicken on a bun.
TUESDAY
Chicken stir fry over rice
with roll, green beans and
applesauce. Alternate:
I Meatball sub.
WEDNESDAY
Hot dog, potato wedges,
carrots and pears. Al-
Sternate: Chicken Caesar
Iwrap.
All menus are
subject to change
SPONSORED BY:
I Laban Bontrager, DMD I
Monica Bontrager, DMD
Bristol, Phone 643-5417







APRIL 8, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 21




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Page 22 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL APRIL 8, 2009


2008 Annual Drinking Water Quality Report


We're pleased to present to
you this year's Annual Water
Quality Report. This report is
designed to inform you about
the quality water and services
we deliver to you every day.
Our constant goal is to provide
you with a safe and depend-
able supply of drinking water.
We want you to understand the
efforts we make to continually
improve the water treatment
process and protect our water
resources. We are committed
to ensuring the quality of your
water. Our water source is
ground water from two wells.
The wells draw from the Flori-
dan Aquifer. Because of the
excellent quality of our water,
the only treatment required is
chlorine for disinfection pur-
poses.
In 2008 the Department
of Environmental Protection
performed a Source Water
Assessment on our system
and a search of the data
sources indicated no potential
sources of contamination near
our wells. The assessment
results are available on the
FDEP Source Water Assess-
ment and Protection Program
Web site atwww.dep.state.
fl.us/swapp.
If you have any questions
about this report or concern-
ing your water utility, please
contact Aaron Elkins @ (850)
545-1370. We encourage
our valued customers to be
informed about their water
utility. If you want to learn
more, please attend any of our
regularly scheduled meetings.
They are held on the first Tues-
day following the first Monday
of each month at the Liberty
County Courthouse @ 7 pm.
Liberty County Lake Mystic
System routinely monitors for
contaminants in your drinking
water according to Federal
and State laws, rules, and
regulations. Except where
indicated otherwise, this report
is based on the results of our
monitoring for the period of
January 1 to December 31,
2008. Data obtained before
January 1, 2008, and pre-
sented in this report are from
the most recent testing done
in accordance with the laws,
rules, and regulations.
If present, elevated levels
of lead can cause serious
health problems, especially for
pregnant women and young
children. Lead in drinking wa-
ter is primarily from materials
and components associated
with service lines and home
plumbing. Lake Mystic Wa-


LIBERTY COUNTY


LAKE MYSTIC WATER SYSTEM

We are pleased to announce that our drinking
water meets all federal and state requirements.


2008 TEST RESULTS TABLE

Contaminant and Unit of Da MCL Violation Level Rangeof MCLG MC Likely Soorce of
Measurement mpling YN Detected Results Contamination
Radiological Contaminants
E osion of natural
Alpha emitters (pCi/L) Jun-03 N 0.9 N/A 0 15 d of atur
Inorganic Contaminants
Corrosion of galvanized
pipes; erosion of natural
Cadmium (ppb) May-06 N 1.8 N/A 5 5 deposits discharge from
metal retineries; runoff
from waste batteries and
S_______~ ___________~___~___ paints
Erosion oF natural
deposits; discharge from
fertilizer and aluminum
Fluoride (ppm) May-06 N 0.2 N/A 4 4.0 factories. Wate
additive which promotes
strong teeth when at
optimum levels between
.....____ ____ 0.7 and 1.3 ppm .
Sodium (ppm) May-06 N 5.0 N/A N/A 160 Salt ter intruon
I leachin,,g from soil
TTHMs and Stage 1 Disinfectant/Disinfection By-Product (D/DBP) Contaminants
Contaminant and Dates of NIC L ee Range MCL MCL or
Unit of mpling Vtion of R MRDL LikelySourceofContamination
Measurement (moJyr.) Y/N Results
C an-D)ee MRDL C
Chlorine (ppm) N 0.75 0.6-0.9 MR MRD 4.0 Water additive used to control microbes
ialoacetic Acids
(Ive) Ac5 hi Jul-06 N 4.0 N/A NA MCL = 60 By-product of drinking water disinfection
(five) (HAA5) (ppb)
T"HM [Total
trihalomethanes] Jul-06 N 2.0 N/A NA MCL = 80 By-product of drinking water disinfection
(ppb)________
No. of
Contaminant and Unit Dates of AL 90th sampling AL
o nMeasurement sampling Violation Percentile sites MCLG (Action Likely Source of Contamination
(modyr:) Y/N Resul exceeding Level)
the AL,
Lead and Copper (Tap Water)
r (p w) J p Corrosion of household plumbing systems: erosion
Copper p after Jun-Sep N 0.06 0 of 10 13 1.3 of natural deposits; leaching from wood
(ppm) 8 ,preservatives
Lead (tap waler) Jun-Sep N 1.00 0 10 0 1 Corrosion of household plumbing systems, erosion
(ppb) 08 of natural deposits

In the table above, you may system must follow, microbial contaminants.
find unfamiliar terms and abbrevi- Initial Distribution System Maximum residual disinfec-
ations. To help you better under- Evaluation (IDSE): An important tant level goal or MRDLG: The
stand these terms we've provided part of the Stage 2 disinfection By- level of a drinking water disin-
the following definitions: products Rule (DBPR). The IDSE is fectant below which there is no
Maximum Contaminant Lev- a one-time study conducted by wa- known or expected risk to health.
el or MCL: The highest level of ter systems to identify distribution MRDLGs do not reflect the ben-
a contaminant that is allowed in system locations with high concen- efits of the use of disinfectants to
drinking water. MCLs are set as trations of trihalomethanes (THMs) control microbial contaminants.
close to the MCLGs as feasible andhaloaceticacids(HAAs). Water Parts per million (ppm) or
using the best available treatment systems will use results from teh Milligrams per'liter(mg/l)-one
technology. IDSE, in conjunction with their part by weight of analyte to 1 mil- .
Maximum Contaminant Lev- Stage 1 DBPR compliance moni- lion parts by weight of the water
el Goal or MCLG: The level of touring data, to select compliance sample.
a contaminant in drinking water monitoring locations for the Stage Parts per billion (ppb) or
below which there is no known or 2 DBPR. Micrograms per liter (pg/l) -
expected risk to health. MCLGs Maximum residual disinfec- one part by weight of analyte to
allow for a margin of safety. tant level or MRDL: The highest 1 billion parts by weight of the
Action Level (AL): The con- level'of.a disinfectant allowed in water sample.
centration of a contaminant which, drinking water. There is convincing Picocurie per liter (pCi/L)
if exceeded, triggers treatment or evidence that addition of a disin- measure of the radioactivity
other requirements that a water fectant is necessary for control of of water.


ter System is responsible for
providing high quality drinking
water, but cannot control the
variety of materials used in
plumbing components. When
your water has been sitting for
several hours, you can mini-
mize the potential for lead ex-
posure by flushing your tap for
30 seconds to 2 minutes be-
fore using water for drinking or
cooking. If you are concerned
about lead in your water, you
may wish to have your water
tested. Information on lead in
drinking water, testing meth-'
ods, and steps you can take to
minimize exposure is available
from the Safe Drinking Water


Hotline or at http://www.epa.
gov/safewater/lead.
The sources of drinking wa-
ter (both tap water and bottled
water) include rivers, lakes,
streams, ponds, reservoirs,
springs, and wells. As water
travels over the surface of the
land or through the ground, it
dissolves naturally occurring
minerals and, in some cases,
radioactive material, and can
pick up substances resulting
from the presence of animals
or from human activity.
Contaminants that may
be present in source water
include:
(A) Microbial contaminants,


such as viruses and bacteria,
which may come from sew-
age treatment plants, septic
systems, agricultural livestock
operations, and wildlife.
(B) Inorganic contaminants,
such as salts and metals,
which can be naturally-oc-
curring or result from urban
storm water runoff, industrial
or domestic wastewater dis-
charges, oil and gas produc-
tion, mining, or farming.
(C) Pesticides and herbi-
cides, which may come from
a variety of sources such as
agriculture, urban storm water
runoff, and residential uses.
(D) Organic chemical con-


taminants, including synthetic
and volatile organic chemi-
cals, which are by-products
of industrial processes and
petroleum production, and can
also come from gas stations,
urban storm water runoff, and
septic systems.
(E) Radioactive contami-
nants, which can be naturally
occurring or be the result of oil
and gas production and mining
activities.
In order to ensure that tap
water is safe to drink, the EPA
prescribes regulations, which
limit the amount of certain con-
taminants in water provided
by public water systems. The
Food and Drug Administration
(FDA) regulations establish
limits for contaminants in
bottled water, which must
provide the same protection
for public health.
Drinking water, including
bottled water, may reason-
ably be expected to contain at
least small amounts of some
contaminants. The presence
of contaminants does not nec-
essarily indicate that the water
poses a health risk. More in-
formation about contaminants
and potential health effects
can be obtained by calling
the Environmental Protection
Agency's Safe Drinking Water
Hotline at 1-800-426-4791.
Some people may be more
vulnerable to contaminants
in drinking water than the
general population. Immuno-
compromised persons such as
persons with cancer undergo-
ing chemotherapy, persons
who have undergone organ
transplants, people with HIV/
AIDS or other immune system
disorders, some elderly, and
infants can be particularly at
risk from infections. These
people should seek advice
about drinking water from their
health care providers. EPA/
CDC guidelines on appropri-
ate means to lessen the risk of
infection by Cryptosporidium
and other microbiological
contaminants are available
from the Safe Drinking Water
Hotline (800-426-4791). We
at Liberty County Lake Mystic
System would like you to un-
derstand the efforts we make
to.continually improve the
water treatment process and
protect our water resources.
We are committed to insur-
ing the quality of your water.
If you have any questions or
concerns about the informa-
tion provided, please feel free
to call any of the numbers
listed.






APRIL 8, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 23


Auto, home
& marine
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IOTHORIZED RETAILER


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19277 State Road 20 West,
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BHS Calendar
of Events
Thurs.,April 9-Baseball at Home
against St. Joe at 5 p.m.; Softball at
Home against Altha at 6 p.m.; Track
at Wewa at 4 p.m.
Fri., April 10-Freshmen
Orientation; Softball at Home against
Sneads at 4 p.m./6 p.m.
Mon., April 13-Progress Reports;
FBLA State competition in Orlando
Tues., April 14-Baseball, Away at
Cottondale at 6 p.m.; Softball, Away
at E. Gadsden at 4 p.m.
Wed., April 15-Track, District at
Bozeman.


Neal Scholarship
meeting Apr. 13
at civic center
Mr. Pete Davis with the W.T. Neal
Scholarship program will be available at
the Civic Center Monday, April 13 from
1:30-5 p.m.
Any senior or their parent that is
interested in this scholarship should make
plans to attend. Any senior with the
completed application should bring it to
the meeting.
If there are questions, you can also
contact Sandra Waller, guidance counselor,
Blountstown High at 674-5724.


f f~-y'C


-A


The Calhoun County

COURTHOUSE

will be


CLOSED

for Good Friday


on April 10.

Ruth Attaway,

Clerk of Court

p ^ -.^^,(LA.,


I


3
.j


.31 \ | .,<


' "- .
r .a


Jacy Richards wins silver medal in
FCCLA state competition in Orlando
by Allie Small W-
Mrs. Nancy Mears, the *. ..-
FCCLA sponsor, and sophomore s. "
Jacy Richards (shown at right) U.
represented BHS at the FCCLA
State competition in Orlando,
during the week of March 25-28. .
This was Jacy's first time.
competing and she placed with 4
a silver in interior design.
In this event, Jacy was given a
scenario to design certain rooms "'
according to the client's needs y
and wants. At the competition
she then displayed and presented
her distinctive and unique
designs to a panel of judges.
This was a great learning
experience and she is looking
forward to competing again A
next year.
Guidance News
Any student interested in ,-'
taking Driver's Ed this summer
should sign up in the Guidance '
office as soon as possible. This
will be a first come, first serve, .
as enrollment is limited. -.


should shop with us,
we are the leader
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Page 24 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL APRIL 8, 2009


CLARENCE EUGENE MORGAN
PANAMA CITY Clarence Eugene Morgan,
57, affectionately known as "Wootzy" or "Kay", of
Panama City, passed away Saturday, April 4, 2009.
He was a native of Trenton, New Jersey.
Survivors include his beloved daughters, Marquita
Shae of Miami, Mia and Jasmin of Panama City.
He is also survived by his mother, Julia Clark of
Blountstown; his siblings, Renee Robinson and
Diane Taylor of Gainesville, Nathaniel Taylor of
Immokalee, Robert Taylor "Poopie" of Blountstown
and 3 grandchildren.
The family will receive friends and family on
Friday, April 10 from 5 to 7 p.m. at the St. Mary
M.B. Church.
Services will be held 2 p.m. (CT) Saturday April
11, at the St. Mary M. B. Church in Blountstown.
Interment will follow in the Magnolia Cemetery.
Bradwell Mortuary of Quincy is in charge of the
arrangements.
JOHN RUSCITO, III
ALTHA John Ruscito, III, 39, of Altha passed
away Sunday, March 29,2009 in Altha. He was born
in Ft. Leonard Wood, Missouri and moved to Altha
in 1992.
Survivors inlcude his parents, John, Jr. and Karen
Ruscito of Altha; a son, John Nicholas Ruscito of
Altha; a brother, Anthony Ruscito ofAltha and a sister,
Michelle Martin of New Jersey.
No services are planned at this time.
Adams Funeral home in Blountstown is in charge
of the arrangements.


RUPERT D. RUDD
PROVIDENCE COMMUNITY Rupert D.
Rudd, 80, of Providence Community in Quincy,
passed away Thursday April 2, 2009. He worked
with Colonial Baking Company for 18 years before
starting Rudd's Pest Control with his son, Steve. He
served with the U.S. Army during the Korean Conflict.
His heart was always in farming but his greatest love
was his family and church. He was a member of the
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints.
He was preceded in death by a son, Tony Rudd.
Survivors include his wife of 55 years, Sue
Rudd; a son, Steve Rudd and his wife, Arlene of
Providence; a sister, Agnes Grady of Gainesville; nine
grandchildren, Selena Rudd and her husband, Hamp,
Brad Rudd and his wife, Sarah, Becky Rudd and her
husband, Ron, Jessie and Dewayne Branch, Stacey
Rudd and her husband, Tim, Krystal and Phillip Clary,
Josh and Kiesa Rudd, Dylan Rudd and Mazie Rudd;
and twelve great-grandchildren.
Services were held Saturday April 4 at the Church
of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints in Quincy.
Interment followed in Providence Cemetery in
the Providence Community in Quincy. Memorial
contributions can be made to the Big Bend Hospice,
105 N. Jackson Street, Quincy, FL 32351 or the
American Heart Association, 2851 Remington Green
Circle, Suite C, Tallahassee, FL 32308.
Independent Funeral Home in Quincy was in
charge of arrangements.


LILLIAN DOROTHY (YON) CULPEPPER
ALTHA Lillian Dorothy (Yon) Culpepper, 73, of Altha, passed
away Tuesday, March 3, 2009 in Marianna. She was born on October 8,
1935 in Calhoun County and lived there all of her life. She was a cook
and waitress and also a homemaker. She was a member of Blountstown
Community Church. She was preceded in death by her parents, George
Dewey and Maude Pippin Yon.
Survivors include five sons, Roger Culpepper and his wife, Violet and
David Culpepper, all ofAltha, George Culpepper and his wife, Jane of
Defuniak Springs, Jason Culpepper of Sink Creek, and Joseph Culpepper
of Cordele, GA.; two daughters, Rachel Watson and her husband, Rick
of Altha and Velma Lockhart of Marianna; 18 grandchildren, 14 great-
grandchildren and two great-great-grandchildren; special friends, Charles
and Lucille Culpepper ofAltha; Bobbie Phillips ofAltha; and Danny and
Jesse Cole of Marianna.
Graveside services were held Wednesday, March 4 at Ocheessee
Cemetery with R. L. Phillips officiating.
Peavy Funeral Home of Blountstown was in charge of the
arrangements.

In Loving Memory In Loving
Sgt. Iray James Lee I ,,. ,


Beloved'qIusband, Tather,
'Brother & Uncle
We love you,
Annie (Suga), Stefan,
Nettie, Terry & Leonard


Apr


CARING
for your comfort,
needs & concerns.

James C. (Rusty) Black Jack W. Weier
Owner & Manager Lie. Funeral Director

Independent
Funeral Home
211 E. Jefferson St., Quincy
(850) 875-1529
LOCALLY OWNED & OPERATED

Memory of
M122wsff,. wz/lf fmv wz


You never said I'm leaving.
You never said good bye.
You were gone before we knew it
but, God only knows why.
A million times we've needed you.
A million times we've cried.
11 love alone could have saved
you, you never would have died.
In life we loved you dearly,
in death we love you still.
In our hearts we hold a place that
no one could ever fill.
It broke our hearts to loose you,
but you didn't go alone,
Ior part of us went with you
triat day God took you home.
ril 6, 1973 ~ April 23, 2006
We miss you,
your mom Bettye, your dad Willie, your son Reggie,
your sisters, brothers and step-sisters.


OB]hIT a RIE


Adams uneraflfome

"Defining Quality in FuneralService"

674-5449- Blountstown 643-5410 Bristol

Serving you for over 30 years.


In Loving Memory of

7ucane 7homna(iu,,ArW
April 6, 1973 April 23, 2006
We miss you,
With love,
lShawn, Jatiyana, andalof'Vs



evis Funeral

J Home of Bristol
& Crematory


Contracts are now handled by the
6Bevis family and staff

Al/ operations of the funeral process
will be handled on location at
12008 NW State Road 20.

CALL 643-3636

Todd Wahlquist, Rocky Bevis & Ed Peacock
Licensed Funeral Directors


Peavy Funeral Home

& Crematory




_,-..a


Yo r h i n l h fix.r "t99 .
.. ... ..






Funeral Services with Dignity,
Caring and Professionalism.
Marion Peavy
A Hometown Funeral Director
T IE|.111


COMERFORD VAULT MEMORIAL SERVICE
593-6828 1-800-369-6828 Fax: 593-6888
Hwy. 90 W P.O. Box 933 Sneads, FL 32460
C 7 Pete Comerford Owner & Operator


.... ; .


. :


Let us help you with a memorial of BEAUTY and DURABILITY
Serving Jackson & the Surrounding Counties for 42 Years
Precious MemoPies "If you can't come to us, gi'e us a call and we will come to you"


';''








APRIL 8, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 25


Be Florida-friendly with phosphorus free fertilizer


Having difficulty finding your
favorite lawn fertilizer in the
stores? You may have noticed
that many fertilizers are now
"phosphorus free." This is in
response to a current Florida
legislative rule that regulates the
types of fertilizers sold for lawn
applications.
The "Florida Urban Turf
Fertilizer Rule" is designed to
reduce nitrogen and phosphorus
losses which can create water
pollution when fertilizers are not
applied correctly.
Florida is covered with water.
The state boasts over 10,000
miles of rivers and streams,
about 7,800 lakes, more than
700 freshwater springs, and the
second-longest coastline in the
United States. Even if you do not
reside on a waterfront, the land
you live on is directly connected
to a nearby water body. What


you do in your yard has further-
reaching consequences than you
might imagine.
While a properly maintained
lawn filters stormwater runoff,
reduces erosion and helps prevent
pollution, improper fertilization
can pollute our water resources,
compromise the health of our
plants, and result in wasted money
and unnecessary maintenance.
Major concern is phosphorus,
the second number on the fertilizer
bag. Phosphorus that finds its way
into our water through runoff,
erosion or failure to remove
fertilizer from a hard surface may
contribute to eutrophication of
Florida's surface water bodies.
Eutrophication is the enrichment
of water with nutrients that results
in excessive aquatic plant (mostly
algae) growth. With time, oxygen
depletion of eutrophic waters can
lead to fish kills.


J .
by Theresa Friday,
Horticulture Extension Agent,
Santa Rosa County
While fertilization can be
beneficial for our lawns, be sure
to use the right type, the right
amount and apply it correctly.
The amount of phosphorus
in the fertilizer you buy should
be based on soil test results. If
a soil test indicates that your
phosphorus level is adequate, use
a fertilizer with zero, or no more


than 2 percent, phosphorus.
Establish a buffer zone around
water bodies. By surrounding all
water bodies with a maintenance-
free "ring of responsibility,"
potential pollutants can be
blocked from entering the water.
In this buffer area, there should be
no fertilization and no chemical
applications.
The fertilizer-free zone for
protection of water bodies is a
minimum of either 3 or 10 feet,
depending on soil type, slope, and
type of fertilizer spreader. The
minimum should be 3 feet when
either a drop spreader, rotary
spreader with deflector shield, or
handheld hose sprayer is used.
The minimum should be 10 feet
when a rotary spreader without a
deflector shield is used.
The buffer zone can be as
simple as allowing turfgrass to
grow naturally around the water.


Native aquatic plants can also
be used to create a beautiful
waterfront view; pickerelweed,
cannas and iris are just a few of
the flowering beauties available.
After applying the right
fertilizer and the right amount,
water it in by irrigating with
only enough water to remove the
granules from the grass blades-
about '/4 of an inch of water. And
never fertilize right before a rain
storm.
Be sure to sweep up any
fertilizer that reaches a hard
surface like a drive way or
sidewalk. And never sweep or
blow lawn debris into a storm
drain.
Confused about lawn
fertilization? Just pick up
the phone and call your local
Extension Office for help
choosing the right fertilizer for
your lawn.


' Southern Bulb Field

SDay April 18 in Quincy


New, arden Centerat'


Altha Farmer's Co-op


*Mulch by the Bucket!

*New Seed in Stock

*Fruit and Shade Trees

*Bird Houses *Bird Feeders

~*- Martin Houses

*Mushroom Compost
p(while supplies last)
;' n-'

"Everyo Shopso at the Co--op !"


Altha Farmers Co-op, Inc.
15543 NE Mt. Olive Cemetery Road Altha
PHONE (850) 762-3161

)urs: 7 a.m.
S4:30 p.m.


Have you been gardening
here in the Deep South believing
that bulbs just will not thrive
here? Join Gardening Friends
of the Big Bend to learn about
those lovely flowers produced
by bulbs, corms, or rhizomes
that will flourish, reproduce, and
naturalize in our climate.
Seventh generation South
Carolinian gardener Jenks
Farmer will educate and inspire
us in his presentation on lovely,
diverse crinum lilies. Jenks
has specialized in gardening
to take advantage of long, hot
summers and short cool winters.
He writes about and photographs
gardens throughout the country.
His articles appear regularly
in Carolina Gardener, Fine
Gardening, Organic Gardening,
Horticulture, American
Nurseryman ard several scientific
journals. Tallahassee's own Linda
Van Beck will tell us about the
multitude of daffodils, jonquils
and other narcissus that prosper
here. North Florida Research


Lawrence A



1r,4 HosPiTaL

Jerry C. Lawrence, DVM
Emergencies:
(850) 856-5827 or (850) 856-5918
Hours:
Monday- Friday 7 a.m. to 5 p.m.
DOCTOR'S HOURS BY APPOINTMENT.
WE PROVIDE: Boarding
Grooming Preventative
Healthcare programs which include
vaccinations and yearly checkups
Spay/neuter program to reduce
unwanted puppies/kittens.
PLUS MANY OTHER SERVICES.
CALL US ANYTIME IF YOU HAVE
ANY QUESTIONS.
43 N. Cleveland St., Quincy
OFFICE (850) 627-8338 u,


and Education Center's Dr. Gary
Knox will share his passion for
rain lilies. Local plants woman,
Sue Watkins will wrap up the
afternoon telling us about other
bulbs that please Deep South
gardeners.
Registration will begin at 1:45
p.m. onApril 18, with the program
beginning at 2 p.m. ending with
doorprizes at approximately 5 p.m.
As with all Gardening Friends
events this event will be held
at UF/IFAS's North Florida
Research and Education, 155
Research Center, Quincy, FL
32351. NFREC is located two
miles south of Quincy at the
intersection of Hwy 267 and
1-10, about 20 miles-west of
Tallahassee.
To cover costs of this event the
pre-registration for non-members
will be $10, pre-registration
for GFBB members will be $5.
Registration at the door will
increase to $15 for non-members,
$10 for members. Those attendees
pre-registering will receive two
door prize tickets. Please pre-
register by 5 p.m., Wednesday,
April 15. You may call NFREC
at .850-875-7100, e-mail Jill
Williams at B419@aol.com or
register on our new website,
www.thegfbb.com.


i .Hwy. 20 West Blountstown 674-8784 MV5496


He
S t


ADOPT

A PET
...from the Journal
CLASSFIEDS!







Page 26 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL APRIL 8, 2009


BBB warns of phony letters from Publishers


Clearing He
PENSACOLA Your Better
Business Bureau has received
reports of letters showing up in
northwest Florida mailboxes that
are supposedly from Publishers
Clearing House, claiming that
they have won a grand prize
drawing of $1 million. Although
the letters and checks look official,
the recipient is the target of a
scam making a sudden resurgence
nationwide.
"Not surprisingly, the revival
of this scam comes on the heels
of the real Publishers Clearing
House awarding a New Jersey
woman $5,000 a week for the
rest of her life," said Norman
Wright, president and CEO of
your BBB serving northwest
Florida. "Scammers often take
advantage of events in the news,
such as Publishers Clearing House
giving out a prize, knowing it'll
be on top of people's minds."
Victims receive a letter
supposedly from Publishers
Clearing House claiming that
they've won $1 million as
the second place winner of a


se in northwest Florida mailboxes IF


drawing sponsored by Reader's
Digest Magazine. The letter is
accompanied by a check for as
much as $5,900 with instructions
to call a Publishers Clearing


House representative. Victims are
told that they must cash the check
and then wire approximately
$4,000 to Publishers Clearing
House in order to receive their


U
i. b
ji "2,


prize. However, the check is
fraudulent and money wired to the
scammers cannot be recovered.
Since early March, reports of
the Publishers Clearing House
scam have come in from 20 states
including Florida. Some have
also reported receiving phone
calls from scammers pretending
to be with Publishers Clearing
House.
While this scam predominantly
takes advantage of individuals,
business owners also need to
be aware that their company's
name could potentially be used
by fraudsters.
The fraudulent checks sent
to the supposed prize winners
with the letter are copies of
checks from legitimate businesses
which have been stolen by the
scammers. Businesses located
in Alabama, California, Kansas,
Washington and West Virginia
have discovered that their
checks-which included their
name, address and even account
number-were reproduced as
part of the scam.


Your Top Choice For Music,
News & Weather Coverage
K-102.7 FM Y-1000AM
WPHK Radio WYBT Radio



- l' --!. -*.
,,.: .. "' ': -: ,;


L EDDIE NOBLES
AND CLEARING

Land clearing, excavation
and root raking:
*Private Drives & Roads
*Animal Food Plots
*Home Sites
*Small Acreage
Call Eddie Nobles
at (850) 643-5390
or (850) 447-0449 ..'


i ,
9





.i


,: 96,
. ,, .,-= .. -: .' ' -


Don't miss


Calhoun County's


HOUSEHOLD HAZARDOUS WASTE


COLLECTION DAY


Saturday, May 2

8 a.m. to 12 p.m.


We're taking old computers
and components at Calhoun
County Recycling Center.


HAZ-MATS are Hazardous
Household Materials and other
Toxic Wastes Pesticides Insecticides
* Pool Chemicals Solvents Fertilizers
* Spot Removers Paint Stale Gasoline


PLEASE, NO GAS
CYLINDERS OR
EXPLOSIVES.
Bring your plastic
soda and milk jugs,
newspapers and
cardboard.
NO COMMERCIAL
WASTES, HOUSEHOLD
WASTE ONLY.
"Small businesses in-
cluding schools and
growers will be accept-
ed at a reduced rate.
Please call 674-8075
for details."


* Used Oil Paint Thinners Antifreeze -.Batteries Brake Fluid
* Paint Strippers Furniture Polish Engine Degreasers
Calhoun Co. i- B
Recycling Center >: CALL 674-8075

magnolia FOR DETAILS
Church Rd. Sponsored by:
HWY. 20 Blountstown The Calhoun County

__Board of County Commissioners


Lee Nails
Come in today
for a pedicure!
We have Gift Certificates.





20755 Central Ave E Suite A
Blountstown 674-9030
Owned and operated by Ly Vo.


BECOME A
VOLUNTEER
Discover how you can make
a difference in a child's life.
Florida Guardian
ad Litem Foundation
PHONE (850) 410-4642









APRIL 8, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 27


S 12" Chocolate Chip Cookie
Plain $12.50 with nuts or decorated $15
SWhole cakes and pies available

r- The


Restauran

Hwy. 20, Bristol 643-2264



CCMA ON IN!
BEST DEAL IN THE TRI-STATE AREA!
Slow credit, no problem WA.C.
Hand-picked quality cars and trucks.
Business (850) 526-5254
Residence (850) 762-3679
Toll Free: 1-888-740-8222 -

SUMMERLIN

MOTORS
3905 W. H 90 in Marianna



il1att &Crystal Milton

Made the Cut
>ANP CHALLENGE YOU TO BE THE NEXT ENERGY
: : CONSERVATION CHALLENGE WINNER!

!.' *


FWC: Mallard ducklings don't


make good presents for Easter


With Easter approaching, many
parents contemplate purchasing
t mallard ducklings as gifts for
their children. The Florida
Fish and Wildlife Conservation
Commission (FWC) suggests
buying your child the stuffed-
animal version instead.
"Although these ducklings
might make nice pets while
they're young, they can live 10
years and quickly outgrow the
Qute-and-fuzzy stage, leaving
full-size droppings on your
patio and outdoor furniture,"
FWC waterfowl management
coordinator Joe Benedict said.
S"When this happens, parents
and children often grow tired of
caring for them and decide to turn
L them loose into the wild."
S They may not realize this is
illegal and puts Florida's native
: wildlife in jeopardy. By law,
no one may possess, buy or sell
mallards in Florida without a
special permit from the FWC, and
releasing them is prohibited.
These activities are against


y .


j]


the law because domesticated
ducks, once released, are
capable of transmitting diseases,
and they compete with native
wildlife for food and habitat.
Most importantly, releasing
mallards threatens the existence
of the Florida mottled duck, a
unique subspecies found only in
peninsular Florida.
"These domesticated mallards
are interbreeding with the
mottled duck, producing hybrid
offspring," Benedict said. "This
is a serious concern and if not


OUT

DOORS
News from The Florida
Fish and Wildlife
Conservation
SCommission


FL Fish & Wildlife continues tracking

panthers across Southwest Florida


The Florida Fish and Wildlife
S Conservation Commission (FWC)
stated Monday that the program
that tracks endangered florida
panthers with GPS-equipped
collars is intact, despite cutbacks


Man and Crystal Milton put all their energy iritc rntlnqg ihe cut
as the winner of Florida Public Lltilitie' Energy Conser,'3t;on
Challenge. They simply incorq.rated reccomrnmndationr from their
FPU Enerqgy Surey, such as
STalking shorter showers
Setting moderate thermostat temperature, using CFL 1lrrps and
Cutting out several small energy-waiingh habits from their daily
routines. like tujrnrng roff lights and fans when not in the room
Energized by their savings, they wanted to share how others can
easily do the same


The Milton's and FPI believe we
all can learn more about energy
efficiency. Conta.-t FPIJ for a FREE
Energy Survey and to develop your
personalized energy management
plan. FPU is committed to helping
you and your family better plan and
manage your energy costs Don't
waste your energy wondering, call
FPU today to get a head start on
savings and to loin the ne.t Energy
Conservation Challenge (June 2009?1


"i- P
\I4'\ V


Jadsoa County850) 5266800 Uberty & Calhoun Counties (850) 674-4748
WWW.FPUC.COM


in state budgets.
"We are still tracking the
panthers in Southwest Florida,"
said Darrell Land of the FWC's
panther team. "And we're using
the GPS-equipped collars to give
us information about individual
panther movements."
- Land spent Monday morning
flying all over Southwest
Florida and was able to track 12
panthers. Since Land joined the
FWC's panther team in 1985,
monitoring from the air has been
a regular practice every Monday,
Wednesday and Friday.
"We can tell if an animal has
moved," Land said. "And if they
haven't, we can get in there to
determine if it's been injured or
giving birth to kittens."
The FWC uses two methods
of tracking panthers. The newer
GPS equipment allows tracking
of the panther when biologists
can't get up in the plane at night
or during storms. The longevity
of the GPS monitor is limited,
so panther trackers also use the
old-style VHF equipment. The
older technology is dependable
for three or more years, but
its use requires a biologist to
collect location information from
airplanes.
Travel restrictions on state
agencies in recent months have
resulted in the FWC's panther
team cutting back on monitoring


panthers within Everglades
National Park, which requires
overnight stays in hotels.
"We can monitor just fine
within the area of our home
office in Naples without incurring
overnight travel costs," Land
said. "We felt this year it would
be better to limit our monitoring
program to more local areas."
The range ofthe Florida panther
has been reduced to Southwesf
Florida, where approximately
100 of the unique cats exist
today. The panthers' numbers
declined to approximately 30
cats by the early 1980s. Work
by FWC biologists has been
successful in bringing those
numbers back up and restoring
the genetic health and vigor of


the panther population. Much of
the funding for panther research
and monitoring comes from fees
collected when residents purchase
panther specialty license plates,
"Research by biologists
includes field studies on the
panther to determine denning
habits and movement patterns,"
said Kipp Frohlich, leader of
the FWC's Imperiled Species
Management Section. "All of
these studies aid in the long-term
survival and recovery of the
Florida panther."
For more information on the
Florida panther go to MyFWC.
com/panther/index.htm. To report
dead or injuredpanthers call the
Wildlife Alert Hotline at 888-
404-3922.


r
;
~ Slp.

a
~
4

~ cf .-r--
'c'
-~:U3L~:'In 'IPLL~~-~~i"- c~~
'ii- tr ;r;S


stopped, this hybridization could
result in the Florida mottled duck
becoming extinct."
Pet mallards will not migrate
when they are released. They
become established, year-round
residents of our state. When they
mate with wild mottled ducks, it
pushes Florida's mottled ducks
toward extinction.
The Florida mottled duck
population is relatively small,
and already FWC biologists say
as many as 12 percent of these
ducks show genetic evidence of
hybridization.
Today, the future of the mottled
duck is uncertain, but its fate is
in the hands of Floridians. The
solution starts with not buying
your child a live duckling for
Easter.
S For more information on
protecting Florida's mottled
duck, contact one of the FWC'
waterfowl offices at 850-488-
5878 or 321-726-2862, or click
MyFWC. com/WildlifeHabitats/
Duck moduhome.htm.


i









Page 28 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL APRIL 8, 2009


M & W Self
Storage Rentals
7 days a week service
5'x 10' .....s20 .
10' x 10'......35
10'x 20' .....s70
10'x 25' .....s$90
NO DEPOSIT
Call 762-9555, 762-8807
or 762-8597




L no"


1.2 & 3 Bedroom
Apartments
"The Best Place to Live"
RENTAL ASSISTANCE



Call (850) 674-4202 (
16978 NW Mayo Street,
Blountstown, FL 32424.
TTD TT' 711
EOUAL HOUSING OPPORTLIuITi



FOR RENT

In Bristol
*Mobile home lots
S3 bedroom, 1 1/2 bath
In Blountstown
*1-room efficiency.
ulities included 2BR'bath I
and a hall apartment
Commercial old Mexican
restaurant Commercial -
200 front it w;th 3 buildings
and fenced in area.
Phone-643-7740
UNF


HOUSEHOLD ITEMS
100% LEATHER 5 pc
Living room set, NEW,
hardwood foundation
w/ lifetime warranty,
sacrifice $699. (delivery
avail). Call 425-8374.
$150 Queen Plushtop
mattress set. New in
plastic wI warranty. Can
deliver. Call 545-7112
$649 Complete Solid
Wood Bedroom Sel.
Dovetail Drawers. Brand
new! Can deliver
Call 425-8374.
A SIMMONS BEAU-
TYREST maltress set
- BRAND NEW still in
sealed plastic.Full war-
ranty. List $1599, will
sacrifice $499. (can de-
liver). Call 222-7783.
A NEW Queen Ortho-
pedic Pillowtop Mattress
Set in Sealed Plastic
$269, Warranty. Can
Deliver. Call 222-9879.
Couch, loveseat &
chair. NEW. 100o micro
fiber, stain resistant, List
$1999, Let go for $699,
delivery available.
Call 222-9879.
NEW Pillowtop King
Mattress Set. Still in
plastic w/ Warranty.
$299, can deliver.
Call 425-8374


ITEMS FOR SALE


Swimming pool, t-framed, used
one season, 4 1/2 foot deep, 18
feet wide, $150. Call 674-1655.
4-8, 4-15

Beautiful Angel doll, moves a
little bit, $12; small light weight
lamp, $20. Call 674-3264. 4-8,4-15

Diamond wedding band, size
7, $200. Call 447-2048 or 643-
5255.


4-8,4-15
Game cube with six games,
$50; N64 with games and control-
ler, $40; PS3 with 2 games and
controller, $350; original Nintendo
with games, etc., $50; PS2 slim,
$50. Call 209-2733. 4-8,4-15

Hand held navigator by QVC,
$50; Pioneer GPS system naviga-
tor, $150; portable DVD player for
car, $50. Call 674-1655. 4-8,4-15

Little Tykes toy box, solid wood,
blue and green color, measures
17x26x17, excellent condition,
$25; Crib mattress pad, never
used, water proof, $10; Disney
Princess potty seat w/handles,
sits on regular toilet, like new, $10.
Call 643-3370. 4-1,4-8
DJ speakers, two-15", two-12's,
two-10's, DJ mixer, microphone,
DJ CD-player and strobe light.
Call 643-2925. 4-1,4-8

Computer desk with hutch, $60;
chest of drawers, $50. Call 643-
5516, leave message. 4-1,4-8

Cannon EOS Rebel 2000 film
camera with strap and carry case,
built-in flash and 35-80 mm zoom
lens, in good condition and work-
ing order. Call 443-2422 in Bris-
tol.
4-1,4-8

Ron-20 T.V. antenna tower, 10
foot sections, $100 per section.
Call 447-0011 or 643-2715. 4-1,4-8


Baseball cards, older cards in
new condition, $1 each or 20 for
$15. Call 379-3298. 4-1.4-8

Fancy pink radio, $20; 6 ceramic
fairies, $20; ceramic basket, $40;
misc. baskets, $6 & up; assorted
vases, $3; lamp, $140; plant hold-
er with five slots, $20; treadmill,
$450; Faberware 'Brandy Wine'
cup & saucer, $12. Call 674-
3264.
4-1,4-8

Round dinning table w/five
chairs and extension leaf. Call
445-6575. 4-1,4-8

Standard microwave silver and
black, $30; two end tables $10
for both; toddler/baby support for
sitting $5. Call if interested 674-
4290. 4-1.4-8

Girls Land of Nod crib bedding,
includes crib sheet, bumper, bed
skirt, quilt, changing pad cover


diaper stacker and curtain, $20.
Call 379-3386. 4-1,4-8
New pack and play with bassi-
net attachment, changing station
attachment, and storage stacker
attachment, Winnie the pooh
theme, $50; Fisher Price Ocean,
Sounds, two-way swing in excel-
lent condition, $25; Winnie the
Pooh Bouncer, $10; lots of Infant
boy clothes, sizes 0-9 month, will
sell all or separate, too many to
name. Call 447-4204. 4-1,4-8

Walker, bought new, hardly used.
Call 674-8517. 4-1,4-8

Free: wheelchair, good condition.
Call 674-8517. 4-1,4-8



PROM DRESSES


Prom dresses: White, clear
beaded strapless ball gown, size
8,'$75; pink strapless floor length
dress with very beautiful beading,
small train w/bushel, paid $450,
will sell for $200; pink strapless
floor length 2-piece dress, could
make a beautiful tea length, size
14, been taken in a little, $75; pink
halter tea length dress, size 8,
$75. Can make offers. Call 272-
7641, leave message. 4-8. 4-15

Prom dress, new, never been
worn, still has tags, size 7/8, cor-
al colored, halter top style, some
beading, train. Paid $180, asking
$75. Call 643-8815 leave mes-
sage. UFN



CARS


1990 Nissan 3002X, needs a
head, everything worked great
when parked, coupe, non-turbo,
automatic, includes A/C, power
windows, power locks, all origi-
nal, great project car, $1,000. Call
209-1913. 4-8,4-15

1998 Buick LeSabre, A/C, power
steering, power windows, cruise,
power locks, tilt wheel, AM/FM
cassette stereo, leather seats, low
miles, V-6 engine, auto. transmis-
sion, excellent condition $3,000.
Call 379-3800. 4-1,4-8

1976 Chevy Nova race car, small
block V8, auto transmission w/
shift kit, 411 Posi rear end, weld
wheels, 10 1/2 racing slicks, by
Mikey Thompson, ready to race,
$4,000 OBO. Call 227-4881.
4-1,4-8

1995 Mercedes Benz C2-20, dark
green, $4,200; 2001 Toyota Echo,
2-door, 5 speed manual transmis-
sion, $3,200. Both cars in excel-
lent condition. Call 762-3615 or
850-832-6860. 4-1,4-8


TRUCKS & SUVS

1977 Ford pickup, 351 Cleve-
land, C-6 performance, electric
fan, 4-core radiator, transmission


cooler, headers, 40 over, B&M
shifter plus extras, $2,200. Call
447-1378 ask for Tom. 4-8,4-15

2003 KIA Sedona LX, 3 row seat-
ing, tinted windows, electric locks,
cruise, no accidents, 81,000 miles,
$6,900. Call 643-1428. 4-1,4-8


AUTO ACCESSORIES


Set of four 6-lug wheels and
tires for Chevy truck or Suburban,
in good condition, $200. Call 643-
6003. 4-8,4-15

Three tires, 34x1050x17 Super
Swamper, 75% tread, $275. Call
643-6728. 4-8,4-15

Sony CD/AM/FM radio system
for automobile, $50. tall 447-
4730. 4-1,4-8

18" Mazzi wheels, chrome finish,
universal $400. Call 447-0011 or
643-2715. 4-1,4-8



MOTORCYCLE

& ATVS


2003 Honda XR80, runs good,
new chain, sprockets and brake
cable, $800 OBO. Cal 643-868
or 674-4046. a .s

2002 Yamaha Wardor 356
4-wheeler, runs good, looks good,
$1,800. Call 674-3589. 4-1,4-8

2002 Suzuki Katana 600, $3,200.
Call 447-0011 or 643-2715. 4-1,4-8


LOST & FOUND


LOST: Jack Russell puppy, 7
month old male, wearing green
collar, lost on C.R. 12 going to-
ward sawmill. Answers to 'Nemo.'
Call 643-2608. 4-8.4-15



HOMES & LAND

Corner lot for sale, 8.5 wooded
acres, many big Oak trees, located
off Revell Farm Loop and Parrish
Lane. Call 643-9391. 4-8,4-15


1.4 acres, located on Hwy. 65 N, closing.
highway frontage. Call 643-7326.
thru4-15 Call (850)

Big lot on Chipola River, located 544-5441
in Calhoun County. Call 643-1514. (
N or (850)

570-0222
TOOLS AND HEAVY

EQUIPMENT

0 .'Si^' ^mtLJBI


250 gallon Propane tank, older
model, would make good barbe-
cue grill or can be revalved and it


THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL




CLAS, SIFIEDS

To place your ad, call 643-3333 by noon Eastern
Time on Saturday. Non-business ads run FREE for 2 weeks.


4 .

Will buy 10 to

1,000 acres,


reasonably

priced.

Immediate


..



-!


Ni









APRIL 8, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 29


SSTflRSCOPE

Week ofApr. 5 to Apr. 11

ARIES Mar 21/Apr 20
Aries, you get waylaid by a bad cold and
you just can't seem to bounce back quickly.
There's no quick-fix to this one. Rest, rest
and more rest is all you can do.

TAURUS Apr 21/May 21
Don't put off your responsibilities any longer,
Taurus. The longer you wait, the more
things will add up on your plate. If you are
feeling the pressure, ask for help.

GEMINI May 22/Jun 21
Gemini, if you've been feeling like things are just not
going your way for some time, everything is about to
change for the better. Pisces will be the catalyst.

CANCER Jun 22/Jul 22
Cancer, there's a remote chance that you'll bump into
an old friend from school whom you haven't seen in
several years. Keep your eyes open for the encounter.

LEO Jul 23/Aug 23
Unfortunately the stars are not shining down on you
this week, Leo. But that doesn't mean you can't be
the master of your own fortune. Stay positive.

VIRGO Aug 24/Sept 22
Virgo, you're a pro at thinking you
can handle everything on your own. The trouble
is, sometimes you just have to ask for help or
risk getting in over your head.

LIBRA Sept 23/Oct 23
There's more than meets the eye with you, Libra. You
exude a certain personality that can throw others, but
deep down you're a completely different person.

SCORPIO Oct 24/Nov 22
Scorpio, having a few friends in your comer
won't help against a big-wig at work. Just calmly
state your case and you will find it's better received.

SAGITTARIUS Nov 23/Dec 21
Be thorough and thoughtful before making a financial
decision, Sagittarius. In this economic climate it is
not wise to go willy-nilly into money ventures.

CAPRICORN Dec 22/Jan 20
You can't avoid confrontation this week, Capricorn.
How you handle yourself the next few days will make
others envious or look on you with pity.

AQUARIUS Jan 21/Feb 18
Aquarius, you have trouble letting others make
decisions, and then get frustrated when you're
calling all of the shots. You can't have it
both ways, unfortunately.

PISCES Feb 19/Mar 20
Happiness and good times are right around the
corer, Pisces. You just have to make it
through one more rough patch on Tuesday.

FAMOUS BIRTHDAYS
APRIL 5
Colin Powell, Former, Secretary
of State (72)
APRIL 6
Zach Braff, Actor (34)
APRIL 7
Russell Crowe, Actor (45)
APRIL 8
Patricia Arquette, Actress (41)
APRIL 9
Kristen Stewart, Actress (19)
APRIL 10
Haley Joel Osment, Actor (21)
APRIL 11
Joss Stone, Singer (22)


~r~

would hold propane. $75 OBO.
Call 674-1024 or 294-6002.
UFN

16' x 6 1/2' landscape trailer, 2
metal baskets, weed-eater rack,
heavy duty tongue, reconstructed
gate, gate is spring assist, $1,800;
16' x 6 1/2' flatbed trailer, $1,000.
Call 643-6589. 4-1,4-8


Kubota tractor, very low hours,
Mod 6, L210, w/bush hog, finsh
mower, roto-tiller and cultivator,
$5,200 OBO. Call 674-8875.
4-1, 4-8

Capper propane tank, small size,
$15. Call 663-9838 or 643-8526.
4-1, 4-8



CAMPERS/RVS

Excalibur flat tow system for
RV, used twice, paid $700 will
take $500. Call 447-2048 or 643-
5255. 4-8, 4-15



PETS/SUPPLIES


AKC English Bulldog
vice in exchange for a
willing to trade him for
English Bulldog puppy.
4678.


stud ser-
puppy or
a female
Call 762-
4-8,4-15


, Beautiful multi-colored grown
S rooster, free to someone with a
'" pen. Call 762-8657 or 272-1982.
4-8, 4-15

Grown Pitt Bulldogs, male and
female, registered, good hog catch
dogs. Call 237-8141 for details.
4-1, 4-8


American Bulldog puppies,
6-weeks-old, first shots and
wormed, $100 OBO. Call 762-
2162. 4-1,4-8


Free to a good home, female
puppy, reddish/brown, black muz-
zle, very friendly, good with other
dogs. Call 643-9840. 4-1,4-8




WANTED


Beaglepuppy, female. Call 663-
9838 or 643-8526. 4-8, 4-15

Indian Runner duck, fawn and
white colored, male. Call 643-
1756. 4-8,4-15


Black Lab pure bred for stud ser-
vice in exchange for pick of litter.
Call 264-3435. 4-8, 4-15


Lumber, 2x4s, 2x6s and 2x8s rea-
sonably priced. Call 674-3264.
4-8.4-15


Junk cars and trucks, any con-
dition. We pay cash. Call 762-
8459 or 272-1126 cell. UFN


WATERCRAFT
& SUPPLIES


2005 14 ft. John boat, 25 hp.
Mercury motor, electric start, troll-
ing motor and trailer, $2,700. Call
447-2048 or 643-5255. 4-84-15

14' Queen Craft boat, 25 hp John-
son motor, foot control trolling mo-
tor and trailer, $3,000 never been
in salt water. Call 762-8000.
S4-8,4-15

14 Ft. Fiberglass Jon Boat,
15HP Evinrude motor and trailer
w/new carpet, ready to take fish-
ing, $1,595. Call 443-2422 in
Bristol. 4-1,4-8

Older fiberglass boat, needs in-
side cosmetic work, new trailer,
$900 OBO. Call 850-443-5407.
4-1,4-8

16ft. deep V welded aluminum
boat with 25 hp. Yamaha control
counsel, GPS & fishfinder, sunroof,
43 Ib. trolling motor, $2,300. Call
850-544-0402. 4-1,4-8



GUNS


AK47 gun, two-30 round clips
and 1,000 rounds of hollow points,
$1,500. Call 762-8000. 4-8,4-15


Ruger Mini Thirty Semi-Auto
rifle, 7.62-39 cal., 4 mags (5-20/2-
30s), scope, sling, recoil pad,
black synthetic stock, stainless
steel construction, $795; Stoeger
5x5 410GA shotgun, double trig-
ger, in excellent condition, walnut
stock and forearm checkered;
$425; Browning Buck Mark 22 LR
cal., 9 7/8 inch Bull barrel, serrat-
ed top rib for adj. sight positioning,
hooded target sights, walnut grip
and forearm and has special in-
stalled competition gold trigger for
accuracy, $495. Call 443-2422 in
Bristol. 4-1,4-8

Springfield 20 gauge pump
shotgun, model 67, series C, sin-
gle barrel, $145. Call 663-9838 or
643-8526.
4-1, 4-8


YARD SALES


Saturday, April 11 from 8 a.m.
to 2 p.m. located at 17673 NE
SR 65, Hosford, one block from
bridge. Furniture, clothes, shoes,
pictures, a large variety of items.
Moving, cancel if rain.
Buy, sell and trade in an ad in
The Calhoun-Liberty Journal.


THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL




CLASSIFIED

To place your ad, call 643-3333 by noon Eastern
Time on Saturday. Non-business ads run FREE for 2 weeks.
\









Page 30 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL APRIL 8, 2009


REQUEST FOR BIDS

The Chipola Regional Workforce
Development Board (CRWDB) is
currently accepting bids for the
cleaning of the One-Stop Cen-
ter and the Administrative Office
located in the Rim Plaza, 4636
Highway 90 in Marianna, FL. To
receive a copy of the Bid Speci-
fications please call Lisa Wells
at 850-718-0456, Ext. 101, or go
to our Web site located www.on-
estopahead.com in the Contact
Us Section and click on the link
Requests for Proposals and Re-
sults. Sealed bids should be sub-
mitted to the CRWDB by April 27,
2009 at 3 P.M. (CT). EOE/Drug
Free Workplace/Minority Owned
Businesses Encouraged to Apply.
The CRWDB reserves the right to
reject any and all bids. 4-8 4-15



IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND
FOR CALHOUN COUNTY, FLOR-
IDA
CASE NO: 2008-37-CA

FIRST FRANKLIN FINANCIAL
CORPORATION
Plaintiff,

vs.

VANESSA DAWSON, and any un-
known heirs, devisees, grantees,
creditors, and other unknown per-
sons or unknown spouses claim-
ing by, through and under any of
the above-named Defendants,
Defendants.



AMENDED NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE

NOTICE is hereby given that the
undersigned Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Calhoun County, Flori-
da, will on the 21st day of May,
2009 at 11 a.m. CST at On the
front steps of the Calhoun County
Courthouse, offer for sale and sell
at public outcry to the highest and
best bidder for cash, the following-
described property situate in Cal-
houn County, Florida:

The land referred to herein is
situated in the State of Florida,
County of Calhoun described
as follows:

Commence at the Southwest
corner of section 34, Township
1 North, Range 8 West, in Cal-
houn County, Florida, thence
run North 00 Degrees 02 minutes
East 594.00 feet, along the sec-
tion line, thence run East 75.0
feet to the point of beginning,
thence run North 00 degrees 02
minutes 72.0 feet to the South
edge of a graded road, thence
run East 75.0 feet along the
South edge of said graded road,
thence run South 00 degrees 02
minutes West 72.0 feet, thence
run West 75.0 feet to the point
of beginning

Commence at the Southwest
corner of section 34, Township,
1 North, Range 8 West, in Cal-
houn County, Florida, thence
run North 00 degrees 02 min-
utes East 594.0 feet, along the
section line thence run 150.0
feet to the point of beginning,
thence run North 00 degrees
02 minutes East 594.0 feet,
along the section line, thence
run 150.0 feet to the point of
beginning, thence run North 00
degrees 02 minutes East 72.0
feet to the "South Right of Way
Line" of a graded street thence
run South 00 degrees 02 min-
utes West 72.0 feet, thence run
West 68.25 feet to the "Point of


- .


beginning"
Also:
Being at the Southwest cor-
ner of section 34, Township 1
North, Range 8 West, and run
North along the section line 198
yards for the point of beginning,
thence run North 72 feet, thence
East 75 feet, thence South 72
feet, thence West 75 feet, to the
point of beginning.

pursuant to the Final Judgement
entered in a case pending in said
Court, the style of which is indi-
cated above.

Any person or entity claiming an
interest in the surplus, if any, re-
sulting from the foreclosure sale,
other than the property owner as
of the date of the Lis Pendens,
must.file for a.claim on same with
the Clerk of Court within 60 days
after the foreclosure sale.

WITNESS my hand and official
seal of said Court this 2nd day of
April, 2009.

If you are a person with a disabil-
ity who needs any accommoda-
tion in order to participate in this
proceeding, you are entitled, at no
cost to you, to provision of certain
assistance. Please contact Shelly
Yon at 674-4545 within 2 working
days of your receipt of this Sum-
mons; if you are hearing or voice
impaired, 1-800-955-8771.

Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Lori Flowers
Deputy Clerk 4-8 &4-15




IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR LIBERTY COUNTY,
FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION

CASE NO. 39-2008-CA-000150
DIVISION

WELLS FARGO BANK, NA,
Plaintiff,

vs.

CHRIS EARNEST, et al,
Defendant(s)



NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to a Final Judgement of
Mortgage Foreclosure dated April
02, 2009 and entered in Case
No. 39-2008-CA-000150 of the
Circuit Court of the SECOND Ju-
dicial Circuit in and for LIBERTY
County, Florida wherein WELLS
FARGO BANK, NA, is the Plain-
tiff and CHRIS EARNEST; CAN-
DICE EARNEST; MORTGAGE
ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION
SYSTEMS, INCORPORATED, AS
NOMINEE FOR COUNTRYWIDE
FINANCIAL CORPORATION;
TENANT #1 N/K/A JOHN DOE,
and TENANT #2 are the Defen-
dants, I will sell to the highest and
best bidder for cash at FRONT
DOOR OF THE LIBERTY COUN-
TY COURTHOUSE at 11 a.m., on
the 12 day of May, 2009, the fol-
lowing described property as set
forth in said Final Judgement:


COMMENCE AT A RAILROAD
IRON MARKING THE SOUTH-
WEST CORNER OF SECTION 36,
TOWNSHIP 1 SOUTH, RANGE 6
EAST, LIBERTY COUNTY, FLOR-
IDA, AND THENCE RUN NORTH
89 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 03
SECONDS EAST ALONG THE
SOUTH BOUNDARY OF SAID
SECTION 36, A DISTANCE OF
658.43 FEETTOAST. JOE PAPER
COMPANY CONCRETE MONU-
MENT, THENCE RUN NORTH
89 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 55
SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID
SOUTH BOUNDARY 660.19
FEET TO A ST. JOE PAPER
COMPANY CONCRETE MONU-
MENT; THENCE RUN NORTH
89 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 45
SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID
SOUTH BOUNDARY 476.59
FEET TO AN OLD HUB; THENCE
RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 07
MINUTES 52 SECONDS WEST
1308.73 FEET; THENCE RUN
NORTH 89 DEGREES 08 MIN-
UTES 23 SECONDS EAST 208.74
FEET TO A CONCRETE MONU-
MENT, THENCE RUN NORTH
00 DEGREES 09 MINUTES 40
SECONDS EAST 90.93 FEET
TO A ST. JOE PAPER COMPANY
CONCRETE MONUMENT ON
THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF
WAY BOUNDARY OF COUNTY
ROAD NO. 67, SAID MONUMENT
LYING ON A CURVE CONCAVE
TO THE NORTHERLY; THENCE
RUN ALONG SAID RIGHT OF
WAY BOUNDARY AS FOLLOWS;
SOUTHEASTERLY ALONG
SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS
OF 3,869.83 FEET THROUGH
A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 2 DE-
GREES 37 MINUTES 12 SEC-
ONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE
OF 176.96 FEET, THE CHORD
OF SAID ARC BEING SOUTH
84 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 25
SECONDS EAST 176.95 FEET;
THENCE SOUTH 86 DEGREES
17 MINUTES 45 SECONDS
EAST (BEARING BASE FOR
THIS DESCRIPTION) 1295.54
FEET TO THE POINT OF BE-
GINNING. THENCE FROM SAID
POINT OF BEGINNING CON-
TINUE SOUTH 85 DEGREES 17
MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST
ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY
BOUNDARY 208.71 FEET TO A
POINT, THENCE RUN SOUTH
3 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 25
SECONDS WEST 1283.96 FEET
TO A POINT ON THE SOUTH
BOUNDARY OF SAID SEC-
TION 36; THENCE RUN SOUTH
89 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 01
SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID
SOUTH BOUNDARY 209.22
FEET TO A POINT; THENCE
RUN NORTH 03 DEGREES 42
MINUTES 15 SECONDS EAST
1298.52 FEET TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING.


A/K/A 29111 NE COUNTY ROAD
67, HOSFORD, FL 32334

Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any,
other than the property owner as
of the date of the Lis Pendens
must file a claim within sixty (60)
days after the sale.

WITNESS MY HAND and the seal
of the.Court on April 2, 2009.

Robert Hill
Clerk of the Circuit Court


By: Vanell Summers
Deputy Clerk


STATE OF FLORID
DEPARTMENT OF ENVI
MENTAL PROTECTION
INTENT NOTICE OF AGI
ACTION

The Department of Enviror
Protection gives notice of it
to issue a permit, file num
0245669-003-DF, to the
Fish and Wildlife Conse
Commission to remove an
en berm that was constru
the northern entrance of thE
Bend oxbow system of the
chicola River. The berm, v
approximately 300' long,
and 20' wide (900 cubic yat
be pushed back into the
borrow pit that the berm v
tially excavated from. Twc
channels (approximately 2E
150' long, and 3' deep) w
be constructed to the nor
south of the leveled berm
commodate flushing to the
water areas during med
low flow river stages. In a(
approximately 750 cubic y
material will be dredged fr
southern entrance of Battli
and deposited within the
borrow pit. Finally, the n
deposited within the borrow
be graded to blend with the
tions of the adjacent chanr
toms and wetlands. The pr
located at northern entrance
Battle Bend oxbow systerr
the east bank of the Apala
River at Navigation Mile 2E
proximately 1.5 miles north
Chipola River influence
erty County, Florida; Secti
Township 5 South, Range
Latitude: 30 1' 13.75" Nor
Longitude: -85 6' 11.37"
The effected water body
Apalachicola River, an Ou
ing Florida Water and Cl
Water of the State.

A person whose substantial
ests are affected by the
ment's action may petition
administrative proceeding
ing) under Sections 120.51
120.57, Florida Statutes
The petition must contain
formation set forth below an
be filed (received by the C
the Office of General Cou
the Department at 3900 Co
wealth Boulevard, Mail Stat
Tallahassee, Florida 32399

Under Rule 62-110.106(4),
Administrative Code (F.A
person whose substantial
ests are affected by the
ment's action may also requ
extension of time to file a I
for an administrative hearing
Department may, for good
shown, grant the request
extension of time. Reque
extension of time must b
with the Office of General
sel of the Department al
Commonwealth Boulevard
Station 35, Tallahassee,
32399-3000, before the app
deadline. A timely request
tension of time shall toll th
ning of the time period for
petition until the request is
upon. If a request is filed la
Department may still grant
a motion by the requesting
showing that the failure to


request for an extension of time
before the deadline was the result
of excusable neglect.

If a timely and sufficient petition for
an administrative hearing is filed,
other persons whose substantial
S interests will be affected by the
Outcome of the administrative pro-
cess have the right to petition to
intervene in the proceeding. In-
4-8&4.15 tervention will be permitted only at
the discretion of the presiding of-
ficer upon the filing of a motion in
A compliance with Rule 28-106.205,
RON- F.A.C.
ON
ENCY Petitions must be filed within 14
days of publication of this notice.
Under Section 120.60(3), F.S.,
Mental however, any person who has
s intent asked the Department for notice
ber 39- of agency action may file a peti-
Florida tion within 14 days of receipt of
Drvation such notice, regardless of the date
I earth- of publication. The petitioner shall
cted at mail a copy of the petition to the
e Battle applicant at the address indicated
Apala- above at the time of filing. The
vhich is failure of any person to file a peti-
4' high, tion for an administrative hearing
rds) will within the appropriate time period
existing shall constitute a waiver of that
vas ini- person's right to request an ad-
o small ministrative determination (hear-
5'wide, ing) under Sections 120.569 and
vill also 120.57, F.S.
rth and
to ac- A petition that disputes the materi-
e back- al facts on which the Department's
ium to action is based must contain the
addition, following information: (a) The
ards of name and address of each agen-
om the cy affected and each agency's file
e Bend or identification number, if known;
existing (b) The name, address, and tele-
naterial phone number of the petitioner;
v pit will the name, address, and telephone
eleva- number of the petitioner's repre-
nel bot- sentative, if any, which shall be
oject is the address for service purposes
e of the during the course of the proceed-
n along ing; and an explanation of how the
chicola petitioner's substantial interests
8.8 ap- are or will be affected by the agen-
i of the cy determinatTon; (c) A statement
in Lib- of when and how the petitioner
ion 23, received notice of the agency de-
9 West, cision; (d) A statement of all dis-
th, and puted issues of material fact. If
West. there are none, the petition must
is the so indicate; (e) A concise state-
tstand- ment of the ultimate facts alleged,
ass III including the specific facts that the
petitioner contends warrant rever-
sal or modification of the agency's
il inter- proposed action; (f) A statement of
Depart- the specific rules or statutes that
for an the petitioner contends require
(hear- reversal or modification of the
69 and agency's proposed action; and (g)
(F.S.). A statement of the relief sought by
the in- the petitioner, stating precisely the
d must action that the petitioner wishes
lerk) in the agency to take with respect to
nsel of the agency's proposed action.
mmon-
:ion 35,
-3000. A petition that does not dispute
the material facts on which the
Florida Department's action is based shall
.C.), a state that no such facts are in dis-
inter- pute and otherwise shall contain
Depart- the same information as set forth
guest an above, as required by Rule 28-
petition 106.301, F.A.C.
g. The
cause Under Sections 120.569(2)(c) and
for an (d), F.S., a petition for administra-
*sts for tive hearing must be dismissed
e filed by the agency if the petition does
Coun- not substantially comply with the
t 3900 above requirements or is untimely
I, Mail filed.
Florida
Dlicable The application is available for
for ex- public inspection during normal
ie run- business hours, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00
filing a p.m., Monday through Friday, ex-
; acted cept legal holidays, at the Tallahas-
Ite, the see Branch Office of the Depart-
it upon ment of Environmental Protection,
3 party 630-3 Capital Circle Northeast,
file a Tallahassee, Florida 32301.













FLORIDA
CONCEALED WEAPONS I
PERMIT CLASS f __
Classes available every day.
Cost is 50.00 per person
group discounts available
,'-TEN MILE CREEK
DEFENSE, LLC.
SCall James at 850-2-'2-5193 or
email us at -,-'- '." i
Imcdefense'qgmail corn

^Ar1' [,3 ]
i L / MwnW ein-u- ..I ty
S lE Margie's
Mowing, Weedeating, Florist
Florist 3 i


APRIL 8, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 31


Residents urged to

report price-gouging

in flooded counties
TALLAHASSEE -- Florida Gadsden, Gulf, Hamilton
Agriculture and Consumer Holmes, Jackson, Liberty, Leon
Services Commissioner Charles Madison, Okaloosa, Santa Rosa
H. Bronson urged residents in Taylor, Wakulla, Walton anc
18 North Florida counties to Washintonn


, A Iss / "_
Independent Avon
Representative
Call 294-6002

Metal roofs, decks,
siding & room additions
Call 643-4536
Licensed & Insured


Individuals or businesses
found to have engaged in price-
gouging face fines of up to $1,000
per violation, or up to a maximum
fine of $25,000 a day.
"We're asking consumers to
come forward and let us know if
any retailers have exploited our
citizens or are profiteering from
the flooding conditions" Bronson
said. "This activity is not only
reprehensible, it's illegal."
Bronson is asking residents
who have any evidence that
price-gouging has occurred or is
occurring to report it at once to
his department's toll-free hotline
at 1-800-HELPFLA, (1-800-435-
7352).


FWC offers hunter safety course


The Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission
(FWC) is offering a free hunter
safety course in Leon County.
The course will be in the
second-floor conference room of
the Farris Bryant Building, 620
South Meridian St., Tallahassee.
Instruction will take place from 6
to 9 p.m. April 14, 16, 21 and 23.
The range portion of the class will
be on April 25.


Children under 16 must be
accompanied by an adult at all
times, Students are encouraged
to bring a pencil and paper with
them to take notes.
People interested in attending
this course can register online
and obtain information about
future hunter safety classes in the
Hunter Safety area of MyFWC.
com or by, calling the FWC's
regional office at 850-265-3676.


Weekly, BI-Weekly, Monthly, Seasonal One Time
Call for your FREE quote (850)251-1416


Greg Willis .

Tree Service
Tree Removal
Tree Trimming
Phone: 643-5582 Mobile: 643-7372
Mobile: 643-7107
10376 N. W. Willis Way in Bristol LICENSED & INSURED


CLAY O'NEAL'S
Land Clearing & Fencing
*Dozer and Excavation work
Demolition Pond Digging
SRoad Building Field Fence '.
Sr Barbed Wire Tractor Work ''
Clay ONeal Oer 15 ears experience
Clay O'Neal /850 7Rg-A9 o/
4433 NW County Road 274 (850) 762-9402
Altha, FI 32421 Cell (850) 832-5055


Appliance

REPAIR

SReasonable Rates

Locally owned

and operated


SCall Bob

Aultman

(850) 639-2225


report any instances of price-
gouging to his department in the
aftermath of the flooding rains
in the Panhandle during the past
week.
Under Florida law, it is unlawful
to charge exorbitant or excessive
prices for essential items --
including shelter, gasoline, food,
water, ice, generators or lumber
-- following the declaration
of an emergency, unless the
increases in the amount charged
are attributable to additional costs
incurred by retailers.
Governor Charlie Crist
declared a state of emergency
in the following 18 counties as a
result of the flooding rains: Bay,
Calhoun, Escambia, Franklin,


i$AVON$
Earn 50%, Starter Kit
ONLY $10
Call today:
(850)570-1499
www.youravon.com/tdavies
iufn


One Stop. Career Center
16908 NE Pear St. Sufe 2,
Biountslown Phone (850) 674-5088
The following positions are
available: Construction Trades
Helper, Janitorial, Dietetic
Technician, Construction
Worker, Office Clerk, Food
Service Worker, Production
Manager, Truck Driver.
EOE
Service Chipola Workforce Board UFN


SENIOR CLERK
Career Service Position

Medical Clinic experience required.
Customer service experience preferred.

To apply please visit the People First website:
https://peoplefirst.myflorida.com/logon.htm
This is the site for those seeking a career in Public
Service in Florida State Government.

For questions you may contact:
Tina Tharpe, CPM, AAII
Liberty County Health Department
(850)643-2415 ext. 240
CLOSING DATE: 4/14/09
4-8-09


,
,






Page 32 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL APRIL 8, 2009


S-r


-* -*


ackson County's New & Used Truck Cente



IJSLI) CuAR & TRUCK


C LEARANC S ALE


06 FORD FIVE
HUNDRED LIMITED
leather, inoonroof, alloys,
63K miles

$10,995)


08 CHEVY MALIBU (
pwr. pkg., tilt, cruise, 35

Sl 1,, 5


RiME &@ [L@wY A%


07 FORD TAURUS SE
pwr. pkg., cruise, CD 36K miles


E


for
30 mos,


DRfIV TA LITTLE ...*. V'7'9

CLASSIC ST SAVI A L T! 06 JEEP LIBERTY LIMITED
5K miles pwr. pkg., cruise, chromed up, 29K miles
$~ 911,495


CARS CARS CA RS- CAR SA -ARS


Ithr., luxury, only 15k mi.
24,W95P3033o

4 dr., 4 cyl., great
mileage, 22k mi.
SWWOP3038


Ithr., Hemi, V8, loaded, only
56k mi.
17,W58312A

auto trans., great gas mileage,
37K mi.
$1P1,1i
P3019


pwr. pkg., CD, auto.,
only 14k mi.
f14, P30171

pwr. pkg., auto.,
only 13k mi.
%SA R3000o


V6, pwr. pkg., tilt,
cruise, CD 27k mi.
"14,9S5
_ _ __ R3042

Ithr., pwr. pkg., cruise,
CD, 41k mi.
%W 5 gR3030A_


pwr. pkg., tilt, cruise,
CD, 39k mi.
*9^WW4R3052

V6, pwr. pkg., keypad entry
alloys, only 68k mi.
WW W P3014A


TRCS ANS- RCK AN


4X2, Ithr., CD, console
shift, 22K mi.


v8, Ithr., moonroof, loaded,
only 36k mi.
,W 3053


4x4, Ithr., console shift,
20" whls., 26k mi.
Vat,3041

V8, auto, like new, only 41k mi.
'16,os8281 A


4x4, pwr pkg, tilt, cruise,
CD, 27k mi
22, 58R3040

V6, auto., only 8k mi.
siS,998 o,,


Ithr., moonroof, climate control,
CD 41k mi.
2le ,W5o

pwr pkg, stow-n-go seats tilt,
cruise, 32k mi
*1,4915P30


4x4, pwr. pkg., super clean,
only 34k mi.
10, 543058A

V6, pwr. pkg., only 64k mi.
% 9 5R2938A


3.19%o


*All prices plus $299.50 P & H; Tax, Tag, & Title. Pictures for illustration only.. See dealer for full details.

HWY. 90 MARIANNA, FL (850) 482-4043 1-866-587-3673


www.ChipolaFord.co Sales Manager
mmws --C ola-- -ord m r


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