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The Calhoun-Liberty journal
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00027796/00216
 Material Information
Title: The Calhoun-Liberty journal
Portion of title: Calhoun Liberty journal
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Calhoun-Liberty Journal
Publisher: Liberty Journal, Inc.
Liberty Journal
Place of Publication: Bristol, Fla
Creation Date: September 23, 2009
Copyright Date: 2010
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Bristol (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Liberty County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Calhoun County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Liberty -- Bristol
United States of America -- Florida -- Calhoun
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in Sept. 1991.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 11, no. 38 (Sept. 18, 1991).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AKN4565
oclc - 33425067
alephbibnum - 002046630
electronic_aleph - 003298625
electronic_oclc - 60662266
lccn - sn 95047245
System ID: UF00027796:00216
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly journal (Bristol, Fla.)

Full Text




Yoders named
Outstanding Farm
Family at Banquet
PAGE 9


32 !2/2912009
18z8c


Timmy Partridge of the Blountstown Police Dept is
shown with the plants found growing in a shed.

Man charged after

17 marijuana plants,

seeds and growing

equipment found-
by Teresa Eubanks, Journal Editor
Seventeen mature
marijuana plants, ranging in
size from five to seven feet
tall, were seized when officers I ,
from the Blountstown Police
Department discovered a
growing operation behind a
Marie Avenue residence. BPD
estimated the worth of the plants at approximately
$17,000.
SThomas Leonard Maclean was charged with
cultivation of marijuana, possession of more than 20
grams of marijuana and possession of a controlled
See MARIJUANA CROP on page 17


50 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY



JOURNAL
, Volume 29, Number 38 Wednesday, Sept. 23, 2009


After three year battle by City of Bristol to clean up S.R. 20 property

Former flea market owner ordered to


pay over $11,000 in fines & damages
by Teresa Eubanks, Journal Editor
Flea market owner John Shuler, whose land was cleared
earlier this year after he failed to comply with a cleanup L .
ordinance from the City of Bristol, got more bad news / "
during a court hearing Thursday. I
Following three years of wrangling over the appearance '
of his property, which borders S.R. 20, Circuit Court Judge
Frank Sheffield ordered Shuler to pay more than.$11,000
in fees, fines and damages, including:
* $3,881 to the City of Bristol for cleaning up and
disposing of years of flea market items, including
everything from hub caps to bed frames.
*$6,625 ($25 a day for 265 days) for failing to comply
with the city ordinance.
*$500 in damages to City Council ( 'i iinarn Brigham " ...
Shuler for damages when a lien that John Shuler filed i
prevented the chairman from refinancing his home
"I think the judge's decision overall was very fair, and.
based on the facts that were presented in open court," " ii.
commented Brigham Shiler. He added that the judge. .
looked at the lien filed against him as "a stunt" and ordered
it removed from the official records.
On Aug. 8 of this year, John Shuler filed a handwritten
request for an investigation into the removal of his
property, which included a list of items with their
estimated value that he maintains was stolen from him
when the city brought a dump truck in to cart away his
things.


See ORDERED TO PAY on page 17


John Shuler's flea market is shown after he cleaned it up and
before a city crew came in to haul away his yard full of items.


Lt. Col. Ty Edwards of Blountstown presented with

customized van by the Wheels for Warriors program


Wounded veteran Marine Lt.
Col. Ty Edwards shows off the
customized 2010 Toyota Sienna
van he and his family received
from Operation Support Our
Troops to one of the friends who
saved his life in Afghanistan,
Navy Corpsman Stephen
Albright of Germantown. The
van was. officially presented to
Edwards Sept. 12 in a ceremony
following the Navy-Louisiana
Tech football game, and
Edwards was the guest of honor
at a tailgate party hosted by the
academy's Class of 1974.


FPU says rates
will be going
up in 2010
PAGE 3


7 l18122ll 0l 90l ll


* Altha student charged with
grand theft for taking portable
medical device from another student
PAGE 3


Written by Wendi Winters and reprinted with
permission from The Capital, Annapolis
The vast parking lot surrounding
Navy-Marine Corps Memorial Stadium
was a sea of navy blue and gold, as Naval
Academy graduates and midshipmen's
families celebrated before, during and after
yesterday's Navy-Louisiana Tech game.
Feasts from simple paper bag picnics to
elaborate tented, catered affairs were on
display at tailgate parties that dotted the
lot like confetti.
In the lower end of the lot, beneath
a high-flying, helium-filled balloon, the
Class of '74 dedicated its fiesta-themed
party to a Marine officer from Florida
who was grievously wounded during an


Woman arrested on felony j
DUI also charged with
biting, spitting on officers
PAGE 2


ambush in Afghanistan last Oct. 18.
In a special post-game ceremony, the
officer, Lt. Col. Ty Edwards, 39, was
presented with a customized 2010 Toyota
Sienna van valued at $50,000. The vehicle
had been adapted to safely accommodate
the officer, his motorized, 325-pound
wheelchair and his young family.
The van's rearview mirror is outfitted
with a Bluetooth, GPS and a backup
camera. At the touch of a button, a short
ramp glides out the right side door. Special
devices allow Edwards to lock his chair
securely in place without assistance, and

See TY EDWARDS on page 25


Woman says
boyfriend held
knife to her throat
L PAGE 2
[ . � �__j


Sheriff's Log...2 Community Calendar...4 Commentary...6, 7 News from the Pews...10 Farmer's Almanac...11


Birthdays...12 Stork Report...13 Schools...18, 19 Obituaries...22 Classifieds...26 & 27 Hunting news...29


1









Page 2 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 23, 2009


A Tallahassee woman whose
alcohol level was more than three
times over the legal limit escaped
injurywhen she ran offthe road and
overturned her vehicle Saturday
in Calhoun County, according
.to FHP Trooper David Cox.
Because this was 51-year-
old Kathy
Marie Blain's
third arrest for
Drinking and
driving, she is
being charged
with felony AR
DUI . "REP
Cox said compiled b
Blain was Teresa
combative and
she bit and spit
on him and a deputy as they
took her into custody, resulting
in additional charges, including
two counts each of resisting arrest
with violence and battery on a law
enforcement officer.
He said Blain, who works
as a nurse, told.him she was
coming from Mexico Beach and
was heading back to Tallahassee
when she ran offHwy. 71 South,
about two miles south of Chipola
Road around noon Saturday.
Blain seemed unaware that she
was traveling the wrong way by
going south on Hwy. 71. "She
said she made a wrong turn," he


A 43-year-old Hosford man
whose wife called for help after.
he threatened to kill himself and
sliced his legs with a razor was'
arrested on two counts of battery
on a law enforcement officer and
one count of criminal mischief
Sunday night.
Deputies arrived at a Pogo
Street residence around 8:24 p.m.
where Matthew Wayne Ulam
was found sitting on the steps
of a shed with cuts on his shins
and blood on his hands and legs,
according to a report from the
Liberty County Sheriff's Office.
Ulam's wife told deputies
that he had been drinking and
threatened to take his own life.
Deputy Duncan Rudd
approached Ulam and asked if
he had a weapon, Ulam opened
his hand to show that he was
holding a razor blade. At the
deputy's request, he threw it on
the ground.
Ulam needed assistance
walking to the patrol car because
he was "very intoxicated,"
according to the report. He was
asked to sit in the car to wait for
the ambulance to arrive to check
his injuries.
Lt. Shane Geiger was speaking


commented, adding, "She didn't
know where she was."
WhenBlain lost control of her
2008 Honda Pilot SUV, the vehicle
traveled onto the west shoulder.
When she tried to steer back on
the road, she overcorrected and
the vehicle starting rotating, going
across the road
onto the east
shoulder. The
vehicle went
into the ditch
and overturned,
IEST sliding on its
IORTS right side for
'Joumral Editor 50 or 60 feet
Eubanks before coming
to rest.
When Cox
arrived at the scene, he found
Blain sitting in the back of the
vehicle. "When I made contact
with her, she could barely hold
her head up and had slurred
speech," he said. She denied that
, she had been drinking.
Ambulance crew members
had to help her walk to the patrol
vehicle. When a portable alcohol
breath test was administered it
gave a reading of .285. Florida's
legal blood alcohol limit for
drivers is .08.
When the trooper first began
to handcuff her,'she pulled away.
After the handcuffs were secured,


Matthew Wayne Ulam

with Ulam's wife when Ulam
started walking toward them.
When Rudd stopped him by
grabbing the back of his shirt,
Ulam became aggressive and told
him to let him go. To keep things
from escalating, Rudd escorted
Ulam to the porch where the two
were talking.
Ulam's wife put her arm around
him and began asking why he cut
himself and caused her to call the
law. Ulam became angry, kicked
offhis shoes and said that he was
"about to go off." He hit Geiger
and tried to jump over the porch
railing. The deputies grabbed him
by the arms, he continued to resist
and screamed that they weren't
taking him to jail.
Ulam grabbed the railing in an


she began kicking the trooper and
Calhoun County Deputy Eddie
Dalton.
As the two put her in leg
restraints, she tried to bite both.
men and then spit on them,
according to Cox.
Once they got her in the back
of a patrol car, she began kicking
the windows and had to be further
restrained.
When they arrived at the
Calhoun County Jail, "She was
cursing and said she wasn't going
to go to jail," the trooper said.
'We, had to pick her up out of
the patrol car and carry her into
the jail."
After being booked in at the
jail, Blain was once again put
in a patrol car to be taken to the
Liberty County Jail, which holds
female inmates for Calhoun
County. She had to be restrained
after she attempted to kick out the
windows of the vehicle.
She was released on her own
recognizance with conditions on
Sept. 20. Her court date is set for
Oct. 28.


effort to avoid being handcuffed.
The deputies wrestled his arms
behind him, put him in restraints
and walked him to a patrol car,
where he continued to struggle,
kicking both of the men.
He was seated in the patrol car
when he lunged at Rudd, who was
standing by the open car door.
Ulam hit the deputy with his
shoulder, trying to push him back
and Rudd responded by pushing
him back into the vehicle.
The ambulance arrived but
was unable to transport him
because he was so combative and
threatened to "hurt somebody."
Ulam was put in leg shackles,
which were attached to his
handcuffs, because he kept
kicking the patrol car windows
but still managed to kick out the
back left window.
Ulam couldn't be transported in
Rudd's vehicle due to the missing
window and was then placed in
Deputy Andrea Skrabal's patrol
car after his handcuffs and leg
shackles were checked. Still
fighting and kicking, he was
taken to the Liberty County
Jail and then transported to
Tallahassee Memorial Hospital
for observation.


Woman arrested for felony DUI


an argument when he
arrived at their N.E. Kever Road
residence north ofTelogia shortly
after 11 p.m. on Sept. 16.
Hope Latrell Jones yelled,
"He's got a knife and tried to cut
me!" when Rudd approached
them, according to the arrest
report.
A small pocketknife was found
during a search of Joshua Andrew
Demarest, 22. Demarest said his
cousin had given him the knife
that night and stated that he had
not pulled it on her.


Jones said they had
been drinking when she got ill
and came home. She said they
argued when they got home and
Demarest locked her out of the
house. She said when she got
back inside, he pulled the knife,
put it to her throat and said he was
tired of her and would kill her.
Therewere no marks or signs of
a struggle on Jones or Demarest,
the deputy noted.
Demarest was taken into
custody and driven to the Liberty
County Jail.


gets more charges


for biting & spitting


on trooper, deputy


-I


Bleeding, intoxicated man battles


deputies waiting for medical help


CALHOUN COUNTY
Sept. 15
*Laura Raffield, VOSP, CCSO.
*Steve Arrington, VOSS, CCSO.
Sept. 16
*John L. Jeter, FTA (3 counts, worthless checks),
CCSO.
*Josh Green, VOCP, CCSO.
*Josh Lytton, organized scheme to defraud more
than $20,000, criminal use personal ID (2 times),
criminal possession of personal ID (3 times),
CCSO.
Sept. 17
*Thomas Maclean, possession of more than 20
grams, possession with intent to distribute, cultiva-
tion of marijuana, BPD.
*Celesta Manasco, criminal use of personal
identification, CCSO.
Sept. 19
*William Steven Skipper, driving while license.
suspended or revoked with knowledge, CCSO.
*Kathy Marie Blain, DUI, resisting arrest w/vio-
lence (2 times), battery on law enforcement officer
(2 times), FHP
*Roger Middleton, DUI, FHP.
Sept. 20
*Brian Davis, possession less than 20 grams
marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia,
CCSO.
LIBERTY COUNTY
Sept. 15
*Laura Raffield, VOSP, CCSO.
, Sept. 17
*Joshua Demarest, felony aggravated assault
with a deadly weapon, LCSO.
*Celesta Manasco, holding for CCSO, CCSO.
Sept. 19
*Kathy Marie Blain, holding for CCSO, CCSO.
Sept. 20
*Wayne Matthew Ulam, battery on law enforce-
ment officer (2 counts), criminal mischief (1 count),
LCSO.
Listingsincludenamefollowedbychargeand identiicationofarrestingagency Thenamesaboverepresent
those charged. We remind our readers that all are presumed innocent untilproven guilty

Blountstown Police Dept.
Sept. 14 20 through Sept. 20,,2009
Citations issued: 9
Accidents..............01 Traffic Citations.................05
Special details (business escorts, traffic details)......95
Business alarms.....03 Residential alarms..........01
Com plaints............................................................ 121


Woman charges Telogia man

with threatening her with knife
A Liberty County Demareststatedthat
man was charged with earlier that evening, he
aggravated assault with and Jones were at his
a deadly weapon after cousin's house, where
his girlfriend reported Jones had gotten sick
that he put a knife to her and threw up. When
throat and threatened they returned to the
to kill her. B their home, they began
Deputy Duncan arguing.Demarestsaid
Rudd found the Joshua Andrew he told her he wanted
couple embroiled in Demarest her to leave.








SEPTEMBER 23, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 3


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FPU: Electric bills to go


up due to increase in


wholesale energy costs


from Florida Public Utilities
MARIANNA - Due to in-
creased costs from its wholesale
power provider, Florida Public
Utilities (FPU) recently filed a pur-
chased power cost adjustment with
the Florida Public Service Com-
mission (FPSC), which will bring
higher electric costs.
Purchased power cost increases
will take effect January 1, 2010 re-
sulting in a total increase in resi-


dential electric service of 13.8 percent. Under
the new cost structure, the electric bill for'a resi-
dential customer using 1,000 kwh per month,
will increase from $136.71 to $155.60 not in-
cluding taxes and franchise fees.
FPU does not generate power and purchases
energy wholesale from Gulf Power. By regula-
tion, purchased power costs are directly passed-
through to customers without any mark-up.
FPU does not earn a profit on this portion of
customer's electric bill. FPU's base customer
charge remains unchanged.
The cost increase is driven by two factors:
first, the cost for purchasing electrical power
from FPU's supplier, Southern Company's
Gulf Power, will increase significantly begin-
ning in January. Second, FPU under-charged
customers by approximately $1.7 million for
purchased power during 2009 and must recover
that amount in 2010, in accordance with FPSC
rules.
"We understand the difficult timing of this
increase and are doing everything possible to
lessen the impact on our customers," said Bud-
dy Shelley, general manager of FPU's North-
west Division. "We have contacted Southern
Company to request their assistance in reducing
purchased power costs, and are also requesting
that the Florida Public Service Commission al-
low us to use other funds to offset some of the
under-collected costs from 2009."
If FPU is authorized to reduce the under-
collected costs, the resulting residential rate for
1,000 kwh per month is expected to be approxi-
mately $149.97 not including taxes and fran-


chise fees. The Public Service
Commission will make a final
ruling on the issues at the an-
nual hearing currently sched-
uled to be conducted Novem-
ber 2 - 5, 2009, in Tallahassee.
"We're committed to work-
ing with our customers to ad-
dress the impact of these costs
and continue to increase our
outreach into the community
to educate customers about


conservation measures that can directly reduce
costs" added Shelley. "Our customer relations
team is working with customers on a case-by-
case basis to explore payment options. They are
directing customers to area organizations to find
out if they qualify for payment assistance."
FPU offers customers a number of conserva-
tion programs and the best place to start is a free
Residential and.Commercial Energy Survey. A
qualified FPU Conservation Representative will
conduct an energy use evaluation of your home
or business, and provide a comprehensive list of
recommendations for saving energy and money
while improving comfort and increasing the
value of your home or business.
For more detailed energy efficiency informa-
tion, including rebates for energy efficient im-
provements for your home or business, contact
the local office at (850) 526-6800 and ask to
speak to a conservation representative.
FPU also offers customers Residential Bud-
get Billing, a free service that allows you to sta-
bilize your monthly energy costs by spreading
usage over the course of the year to give you
more balanced and predictable bills. Many fac-
tors including weather, fuel costs, addition of
appliances and house guests can cause electric
bills to temporarily spike.
Valuable conservation information can be
found online by visiting www.fpuc.com.
Florida Public Utilities is a publicly traded util-
ity company which, since 1924, has provided safe,
reliable and competitively priced energy, as well as
value added services to approximately 96,000 cus-
tomers in growing markets throughout FloFida.


Altha School student charged with

stealing expensive insulin pump


An Altha School student
has been charged with grand
theft and criminal mischief for
taking another student's insulin
pump, according to a report from
the Calhoun County Sheriff's
Office.
The child, who is not named
because he or she is a minor,
reportedly took the item believing
it was an MP3 player. The
Paradigm Insulin Pump is valued
at $6,300.
The owner of the pump
removed it to prevent damaging
it while taking part in a running
exercise in seventh-period P.E.
on Aug. 28. Afterwards, she
returned to class and then came
back for the pump after the final
bell rang to dismiss school for the
day..The pump was no longer on
the bleachers where it had been
left.


ARREST REPORT:
Student who took
the insulin pump
at first thought it
was an MP3 player.
Two classes of students
adjacent to the area where the
pump had been left were told
about the missing item the
following Monday morning.
The importance of the pump was
explained and students were told
its use by its owner could be a
matter of life or death, according
to the report filed by Lt. Randy
McCroan of the Calhoun County
Sheriff's Office.
The children were told
the device could be returned
anonymously and no further
action would be taken. They
were warned that if someone


was found in possession of the
pump, charges would be filed.
Flyers were circulated and a
silent bulletin was put on the
school's closed circuit TV to
remind students of the urgency to
recover the pump. The messages
continued until Thursday, Sept.
3 when McCroan got a tip about
a student showing a group of
kids what was believed to be the
insulin pump, and later received
information from another student
who named the suspect.
A suspect who was called into
the school office and questioned
admitted taking the pump. After
learning it had been reported
stolen, threw it out a school bus
window into a ditch.
McCroan searched the area
and discovered the pump, which
had been washed underneath the
grass due to recent rains.


Purchased power
cost increases will
take effect January
1, 2010 resulting in
a total increase in
residential electric
service of 13.8%.







Page 4 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 23, 2009


Super Council meeting
set Tuesday, Sept. 29
The Calhoun Count\ Chamber of
Commerce will host the second meeting
of Calhoun County's "Super Council"
Tuesday. Sept. 20 at 5:30 p.m. at the W.T. (
Neal Civic Center in BlountstowTn.
The Super Council is made up of all
the elected boards in Calhoun County. (
Members of the Board of Calhoun
County Commissioners, Blountstown (
City Council. Altha Town Council and the
Calhoun County School Board ha% e been (
invited to participate in the meeting The
event is open to the public.
The Chamber took comments and ideas (
from the Visioning sessions, developed
a three-year strategic plan and created (
the Super Council. The council concept
has been applauded by the Florida Dept.
of Community Affairs IDCA) and the
Go ernor's Office of Tounsm. Trade and
Economic Development (OTTED). (
Current plans are to hold this meeting
twice a year, making it easier to moe (
forward with discussions that affect
Calhoun County. The first Council
meeting was held in Januar, and was v ert
successful Having all parties in one room,
at one time, should enable constructed (
discussions that result in progress
The Super Council meenng will pnmarily
focus on tvo things: first, an update on the
Rural Economic Development Catalst
Project. Second, updates from each of the
Boards on ongoing projects.

Cyber Crime training
set for Thurs. Sept. 24
FCCD Chapter 23 along ,with Libert
Cotinr Sheriff's Deparmnent is sponsoring (
a training program Thursday. Sept 2-I on
Cy ber Crinie
The training is being held from 10-30
a.m. until 1 p.m. at Liberty Correctional (
Institution's Training Building. Everyone
is encouraged to attend. Lunch will
be provided for $5 per person. Lunch
includes. spaghetti, salad, bread, tea and
dessert.
If \ou have any questions, contact
Pamcia Perkins, Angie Durden or Taniny
McCroskey at 643-94001( or Melissa Nobles
at 62'7--49.

MEETINGS
The Calhoun Counti Children's
Coalition % ill meet Monday. Sept 28 at
9 a.m. iCTi at the \.T. Neal Civic Center
in Blountstown (
The Libert Communit Health Care
board meeting is rescheduled for Monda.,
Sept. 28 The meeting will be held at
Veterans Cit ic Center at 4 p m (ET i
@...............
The Area Agency, on Aging for North
Florida will hold a joint meeting of the
Board of Directors and Ad\ isorN Council
on Thursday Sept. 24 at 10-30 a.m. The
meeting will be held at the Area Agency
on Aging for N. FL. 2414 Mahan Dne in
Tallahassee.
For more information calf Linda Burns
at t850)488-0055
The Calhoun-Liberty Journal is
published each Wednesday
by the UbertyJournal Inc.,
- . Bristo, FL 32321.

N ~ ~~' .s,..


COMMUNITY
ALENDAR


i


B-toi'n Tigers %s. \\ewa
HOMECOMING GAME
at 7 p.'m CTi


4W" LCHS Bulldogs %s. Port St. Joe
a ya ai 7 3 p.m IETi


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NATIONAL _ BIRTHDAYS- tiinc lil t'lituis

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FISHINn B-lunslon
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SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 27
Attend the
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: ,', , ,MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28


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LCHS Dags 's. Ba' High
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l, " !. I i rr . iETi
BHS Tigers \s. hlha .
A j,; ),it . - p m i(C T)


Ao-u-


E


TODAY'S MEETINGS
- Calhoun Children's Coalition, 9 a m..
W T. Neal Civic Center in Blounislown
- Liberty Health Care Board meeting.
4 p.m , Veterans Civic Center in Bristol
* Altha Boy Scouts. 5 30 p.m., Allha Volunteer
Fire Department
* AA, 6:30 p m, Allha Community Center
* Bulldog Club, 7 p.m, LCHS field house


\v September 27-October 3 ,JHJ JOURNAL STAFF
Johnny Eubanks...................PublisherI
THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL TrEuaks ...............r
S Located at 11493 NW Summers Road in Bristol Ga Gan .................
MAIIUNG ADDRESS:.P.O. Box 536, Bristol, FL 32321 Msy Taner..... .di vertisn
TELEPHONE (850) 643-3333 Fax (850) 643-3334 Dg, L Pr.. ' A s
.I- :- AIL: .th ourn@farpoint.net S 012) OFFICEHOURS: 8 i.- p.n M-
. :. -.- ;^ _^ ... i_ . ._ * . . ( t . 2 tr . ..W .D123 :-. . -P-.' .I


SiWYEDNESDA' SEPTEMBER 23'
TODAY'S MEETINGS
* Rotary Club. noon. Calhoun-Liberry Hospital
* Weight Loss Support Group. 1-30 p.m , Shelton Park Library
* Boy Scouts Troop 200, 6.30 p.m.. Mormon Church in Bristol
* AA, 7 p m, Calhoun County Old Ag Bldg. east door, in front of jail
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24
BIRTHDAY-'DraI in W lli'1 ms i
Red Hat 'i
TODAY'S MEETINGS ociet
* AA, 7 p.m., basement of Society
Calhoun County Courthouse meets, 12 noon
Veterans Civic Center in Bristol Station
* Rock Bluff Comm. Fire Dept.,ion
7 p m , voting house in Rockbluf Blountstown
:' ' FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25 , .
TODAY'S MEETINGS
* Celebrate Recovery, 6 p.m. (CT). Riverlown Community
Church in Blounistown
Dance, 6 - 12 p.m., American Legion Hall in Blountstown


23rd Annual Goat
Day set Saturday,
Oct. 17 in B-town
BLOUNTSTOWN - Don't miss
GOAT DAY 2009 as the Blountstown
Rotary Club presents the 23rd annual
festival on Saturday, Oct. 17 at Sam
Atkins Park in Blountstown. GOAT
DAY is the second largest arts and crafts
show in North Flonda and attendance has
become an honored tradition in Calhoun
County.
This year's event will feature favorite
vendors from years past and also net first-
time vendors specializing in handmade
goods and crafts. A highlight of the 2009
festival %will be the reintroduction of live
goats into the mix with a GOAT SHOW
AND PARADE! In addition, there will
be plenty of food vendors and li\ e music
throughout the day.
Gates open at 9 a.m. and vendors
will be present until 3 p.m. Cost: $5 per
person with children under I admitted
free. Please note that all children's
activities are free of charge and \\ill
include pon\ rides, train rides, inflatable
jumping acti\ ities, coin dig. greased pig
chase, moon walk. with the addition of a
chicken chase this year!

Chicken Pilau benefit
planned Friday, Sept.
25 for Nick Barber
A chicken pilau benefit is planned for
Nick Barber on Fridal. Sept. 25 beginning
at II a.m. ETI at the Talquin Electric
building in Bristol. Nick recently had
surgery for the removal of a 6" rumor on
his spinal cord He is the son of Charles
and Susan Barber, the brother of Chuck
and Rusty Barber. Medical and travel
expenses to Shands Hospital in Gaines ille
are enormous. Monev raised from this
benefit . ill help \w ih those costs.
Tickets are available at Liberty
Emergency Management, all schools.
Liberty Shenff's office. Liberty & Calhoun
Correctional Institutions, Calhoun Sheriff's
office and Calhoun Courthouse. Dinners
\kill be delivered to schools, correctional
institutions and businesses with orders of
10 or more.
Cost of the dinner is $6 and it will
consist of chicken pilau. coleslaw, green
beans, rolls and desserts.
This event is sponsored b\ Doobie
Brothers.



That's how many copies of
The Calhoun-Liberty Journal
were distributed last week,
ensuring plenty of coverage for
your community announcements
and great response for our
business advertisers!


v







SEPTEMBER 23, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 5


Spiritual Music concert with Pam Laws and
Mary Roberts Oct. 8 at Gadsden Arts Center
QUINCY - On Oct. i Delta Sigma Theta Sorority,
8 at 7 p.m., The Gadsden inc. For ticket information
Arts Center is pleased to contact: Grace Maloy (850)
present Spiritual Music by 875-4688, or buy online at
Pam Laws, accompanied by www.gasdsenarts.org.
Mary Roberts on piano. The GadsdenArts Center
A native of Tallahassee, works to improve the
with a career span of over quality of life in the region
25 years, Pam Laws has through cultural, social, and
performed throughout educational opportunities.
Europe and the former Fine art exhibitions, classes
Soviet Union. Laws has for adults and children,
performed with the - cultural events, summer art
Greenville Symphony, the camps, a gift shop, an artists'
Tallahassee Symphony, at co-op, and Miss Helen's
Camegie Hall, as well as with MusicalArts, Piano Performance Espresso Caf6 D'art are
the Mormon Tabernacle Choir in from the Florida State University. housed in the Center's beautiful
a 2006 performance. She has four She is a retired professor of music historic buildings. Group tours
recordings, and is renowned for fromthe FloridaA&M University. are available free of charge - call
her vocal talent. Roberts performs regularly with (850) 875-4866 to make your
Mary Roberts received her Pam Laws and the Javacya Fine reservation.
BachelorofMusic degree inMusic Arts Conservancy. The Gadsden Arts Center is
Performance at the University of This concert is presented by located at 13 N. Madison St.,
Kansas at Lawrence, a Masters the West End Grille, with a just 20 miles from downtown
of Music degree from the Indiana wine reception sponsored by Tallahassee, and 10 miles from
University, and her Doctor of the Gadsden County Chapter of Tallahassee City limits.


BLIC


0


AREA EVENTS

Former House Speaker to

address group at Chipola


MARIANNA--
Allan Bense,
former Speaker of
the Florida House
of Representatives,
will address Honors
students at Chipola
College, Wednesday,
Sept. 23, at 1 p.m., in
Jackson Lecture Hall
in Building Z. The
public is invited.
Bense is a


Allan Bense, former Speaker of
he FL House of Representatives


businessman from
Panama City. He is a partner in
several companies with interests
in road building, contracting,
insurance, golf courses, and
farming.
Bense holds a BS and an


IC


I
IN


MBA from Florida
State University.
He served in the
Florida Legislature
from 1998 through
2006. He was
Speaker of the
Florida House
from 2004 through
2006.
He is a
member of the
following Boards:


Vice Chairman,
Enterprise Florida; Chairman
of the Board, James Madison
Institute; Chairman of the Board,
Gulf Coast Community Hospital.
He is also member of the Florida
Council of 100 and the Florida
Chamber of Commerce.
Bense is also on the Board
of various local charities and is
Chairman of the Bense Family
Foundation which makes
significant contributions to
numerous state and local not-
for-profit causes.
Bense married his wife Tonie
Johnson Bense in 1975 and they
have three children, Courtney
Weatherford, Jason Bense,
and Taylor Bense. Courtney's
husband, Will Weatherford, is
a member of the Florida House
of Representatives. Jason Bense
works in Bense's Road Building
Company, and Taylor Bense is a
senior at the Berklee College of
Music in Boston.

Hunter safety
course set for
Liberty County
The Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission
(FWC) is offering a free hunter
safety course in Liberty County.
The course will be at the
Woodmen of the World camp,
22459 NE Woodmen of the World
Rd. in Hosford. Instruction will
be from 6-9 p.m. Sept. 29, Oct. 1,
5 and 8. The range portion of the
class is on Oct. 10.
Children under 16 must be
accompanied by an adult at all
times. Students should bring a
pencil and paper with them to
take notes.
The hunter safety course is
required before anyone born on or
after June 1, 1975, can purchase
a Florida hunting license. The
FWC course satisfies hunter
safety training requirements for
all other states and Canadian
provinces.
People interested in attending
this course can register online and
obtain information about future
hunter safety classes at MyFWC.
com/HunterSafety or by calling
the FWC's regional office in
Panama City at (850)265-3676.


p


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Page 6 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 23, 2009








tli;0 m)r


Copyrihted Materi'I



Syndicated Co r



Available from Cpmerc


Why remain in Afghanistan?


C OX'S 1
CORNER
Jerry Cox is a retired military
officer and writer with an extensive-
background in domestic and
foreign policy issues. He lives in
0kaloosa County.


decided to invade Iraq, and U.S. military forces were
- taken out of Afghanistan for the Iraq invasion. Books
have been written about those events.
* "" With the Taliban government banished, Afghanistan
S- - was in need of the goods and services required to main-
- t - ain a society. People have to have jobs and buy goods
* -and services if an economy is to prosper. Afghanistan
is one of the poorest countries in the world and after
Sthe initial foray to capture bin Laden, the U.S. paid lip
service to the Afghan government and it people. There-
was no major effort to establish a basic economy in the
country.
S - So, now the foreign policy emphasis is on helping Af-
- ghanistan. Well, probably too late because the Afghan
government isn't capable of providing security for its
citizens. The Taliban control large areas of the country.
S o --s C AP --- 0 WWhat is the U.S. mission in Afghanistan? Depends on
S - - - - - whom you ask. If a military victory against the Taliban is
w- - - - co the goal, then the U.S. military requires a large number
l o - of combat troops.
There are some Vietnam era tactics in play in Afghan-
istan. The military establishes base camps from which
they send out patrols to villages and in pursuit of the
Taliban. The fallacy in this is that the troops don't cap-
* * ture and hold territory. When the U.S troops leave a vil-
S" " .. lage the Taliban are back.
A new effort is underway to gain their hearts and
w * - - - minds. It's called "soft power." In some cases, U.S.
- -- - .0 troops live in the villages and attempt to convince tribal
_ leaders that the U.S. is there to stay. In a way, this is
nation-building, which presidents say the U.S. isn't go-
- - - ing to do, but we do.
Depending on which of his speeches you have lis-
tened to, Mr. Obama's goal is to prevent Afghanistan
S"once again from becoming a safe haven for Al Qaida, or
- " the goal might be to capture bin Laden and dismantle the
SAl Qaida organization.
S - -Whatever the goal might be, if the answer is a military
victory in the traditional sense in which the U.S. Army


and Marines control the country and the
people, then be prepared to field a ma-
jor military force.
But that's not going to happen. Why?
Here is a clue. The administration is
so concerned about civilian causali-
ties from U.S. bombing that the use of
conventional airpower, as we applied in
Vietnam, is tightly controlled. The U.S.
Air Force won't be taking out targets as
we did in Vietnam.


A sad note about the restrictions on the use of air-
power is that four soldiers were killed in a firefight with
the Taliban because there was no airpower, no bombs on
the Taliban, which would have saved the soldiers.
The Democrats in congress, particularly in the Sen-
ate, are opposed to sending more troops to Afghanistan.
Their contention is that the Afghan Army and police
should be trained and equipped to fight the Taliban. Not
a bad idea, but good luck on that. Seems like that was a
major issue in securing a reasonable degree of security
in. Iraq but we know how that is turning out. The bad
guys in Iraq pop off a car bomb whenever they like.
Another bit of d6jA vu because I recall that the U.S.
was going to train and equip the South Vietnam Army to
combat the Viet Cong and the North Vietnamese Army.
Well, we also know how that turned out.
Even if the U.S. is successful in capturing bin Laden,
the Al Qaida and Islamic threat remains. These people
are everywhere. The threat is at our national front door.
The FBI has rousted four suspected terrorists, three in
New York and one in Denver. Good for them. Keep up
the good work. I know it's profiling, but I don't care. If
they look, act or smell like a terrorist, then roll them up.
No sense getting Americans killed because we are wor-
rying about being politically correct. Just do it.
Here is my prediction for Afghanistan. Just like in
Vietnam, the U.S. will plod along, always claiming that
there is a light at the end of the tunnel. Victory is nigh.
We just need a few more, troops and a little more time.
Unless you are willing to apply massive military
force, kill a lot of people and control the population, then
there.is no military victory. The Soviets tried that for ten
years and failed.
The U.S can build infrastructure, spark economic ef-
forts but unless the Afghan government and its people
are willing to expel the Taliban and provide a secure en-
vironment in which a reasonable degree of democracy
and economic activity can occur then the U.S. efforts are
for naught.


-e *e


- -


-lb


President Obama says that the war
in Afghanistan is a necessary war and
many people agree with him. I'm not
so sure.
The U.S. military has been in Af-
ghanistan for eight years. Initially, the
mission was to rout the Taliban and
catch bin Laden. We routed the Taliban
but failed to catch bin Laden. There
are many reasons for our failure to cap-
ture bin Laden. Former President Bush


o o -


r


m


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SEPTEMBER 23, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 7

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Page 8 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 23, 2009


Wakulla Bank announces completion of compliance


measures to meet State Regulatory Agreement


CRAWFORDVILLE - Wakulla Bank
announced that it is ahead of schedule
in completing elements of an August 21,
agreement with state financial regulators.
The agreement requires the bank
to increase oversight of its loans and
strengthen its Allowance for Loan and
Lease Losses (ALLL) reserves to support
real estate devaluation and non-performing
loans.
According to Wakulla Bank President
and CEO Walter C. Dodson Jr., the bank
has completed several of the agreement's
steps well ahead of the Florida Office of
Financial Regulation's specified deadlines.
The agreement requires the bank to
increase its capital and rid the bank's
portfolio of non-performing loans, mostly
related to real estate devaluation.
The agreement follows a routine
examination by state banking regulators.
'"When regulators tell us to 'write off'
loans from our portfolio, we don't see


*

paperwork - we see the faces of customers
and friends who in some cases have
borrowed from our bank for a quarter of a
century," said Dodson. "We are committed
to working hand-in-hand with banking
regulators to implement the provisions
of the agreement, but we feel the losses
personally."
Wakulla Bank has not received any
government funding.
Like many community banks, Wakulla
Bank has monitored the mortgage crisis
and corresponding reduction of real
estate values since the end of 2007. In
response, the bank increased its oversight
of problem loans, and in 2009 more than
tripled its loan-loss reserves as it prepared
to work through changes in its real estate


Calhoun Chamber of Commerce

welcomes three new memberships
VDucks Unlimited, Apalachicola Valley Chapter recently joined the Calhoun County
Chamber of Commerce. The organization is nationally recognized as the world's leader
in wetlands and waterfowl conservation. They work to conserve, restore and manage
wetlands and associated habitats for North America's waterfowl. These habitats also
benefit other wildlife and people. The local contacts are John Dunlap and Tony Stewart.
For more information, visit http://www.ducks.org.
*/Margie Laramore joined the Chamber as an individual member. We all know
Margie as our Supervisor of Elections, however, she is also a strong supporter of our
community and shows that support through her personal membership with the Chamber.
Thanks Margie!
VDan-D-Ridge Plantation in Marianna is another new member. At Dan-D-Ridge
Plantation you can step back in time to the days of the Old South. The quail hunting
plantation is fast becoming Northwest Florida's Premier wing shooting destination. Dan-_
D-Ridge Plantation can accommodate corporate groups, families and couples, and can
customize a hunting package that will suit your specific needs. For more information,
call (850)871-1516 or visit http://dan-d-ridge.com.


portfolio.
During May Wakulla Bank completed
a routine exam by the State of Florida's
Office of Financial Regulation. As a result
of the exam, the bank entered into a formal
agreement with the Office of Financial
Regulation, which ordered the bank to
reassess and evaluate all processes related
to its real estate loan portfolio. The action
requires bank management to comply
with certain practices and activities that
will strengthen the bank. The bank must


take specific steps within a period of time
to correct all identified deficiencies noted
during the examination. -
"Wakulla Bank has been in business for
nearly 35 years, and our roots run strong
in these communities," said Dodson. "We
remain committed to our customers and
will continue to provide efficient, friendly
and knowledgeable service."
Wakulla Bank is an independent,
FDIC-insured bank dedicated to quality
and innovative service, with branches
in Calhoun, Leon, Liberty and Wakulla
counties. The bank maintains more than
$490 million in assets and has served these
communities for over 34 years. To learn
more, visit www.wakullabank.com. "


Job seekers: Beware of scams!


PENSACOLA-As the unemployment
rate rises, so does the threat of scams
targeting job seekers. The Better Business
Bureau (BBB) warns job hunters to be
wary of scammers looking to mTke a fast
buck.BBB suggests you be wary of:
Requiring fees up-front
A company recently ran ads in Florida
claiming it was looking to hire 2,500
employees for its new headquarters'
Applicants had to submit $24 "for a
background check." Law enforcement
later found out the money only went to
the pockets of the company's owner.
BBB advice: You should never have
to pay money up front to get a job. Be
leery if a potential employer asks you to
pay the company for testing, training or
background checks.
Big promises without results
Job placement businesses, or headhunter
firms, generally don't charge job seekers;
instead they're paid by companies looking
to fill positions. Some job placement
companies, however, take money from job


hunters and don't fulfill their promises of
quick employment.BBBAdvice: Research
ajob placement company with BBB before
signing contracts or paying money. Be
cautious about paying up front fees and
know their refund policy.
Phishing attempts
Identity thieves use numerous methods
to get personal information from job
hunters. Spam e-mail may offer a great job
and direct the job hunter to a Web site that
installs malware or solicits bank account
or Social Security numbers. In other cases,
the job hunter might be asked to submit
a resume, be told they're hired and then
immediately be asked for bank account or
Social Security numbers.
BBB'Advice: Be cautious when
responding to unsolicited e-mails, even .
if the company name is well-known, and
don't click on links in the e-mail until
you've confirmed the business and e-mail
are legitimate.
For additional information, start with
bbb.org or call (850)429-0002.


AUGUST UNEMPLOYMENT RATES

Liberty continues leading the state

with a 5.6% unemployment rate


9 �.


from Kenny Griffin, Chipola
Regional Workforce Board
Once again Liberty County
leads the state of Florida with the
lowest unemployment rate of 5.6
percent, followed by Monroe and
Walton Counties at 6.5 percent.
All five of the Counties that
make up the Chipola Regional
Workforce Board had a small
decrease in their unemployment
rate, with Washington County
showing the largest reduction of
.7 percent.
According to Florida's Agency
for Workforce Innovation, Florida's
seasonally adjusted unemployment
rate for August 2009 is 10.7
percent. This represents 984,000
jobless out of a labor force of
9,194,000. The unemployment
rate is nearly unchanged for the
revised July rate of 10.8 percent
and is up 4.2 percentage points
from the August 2008 rate.
The states unemployment rate
is 1.0 percentage point higher than
the national rate of 9.7 percent.
The last time the unemployment
rate was higher that the past three
months was October 1975 when it
was 11.0 percent.


-------UNEMPLOYMENT RATES-------
Aug.'09 Jul.'09 Aug '08
Liberty......5.6 5.9 5.1
Calhoun...8.2 8.8 6.1
Jackson....7.4 7.7 5.7
Holmes.....7.4 7.9 5.3
Washington...9.5 10.2 6.4
Florida's total nonagricultural
employment in August 2009 is
7,348,400, representing a job
loss of 372,700, or -4.8 percent
compared to August 2008. This
is steeper than the national rate
of decline for August which is
-4.3 percent over the-year. The
August 2009 job loss continues
the trend of annual declines that
began in August 2007. The
downturn started with declines
in construction jobs, but has now
spread to almost all other major
industries.
Based on the Florida Economic
Estimating Conference, held July
17, 2009, Florida's job market is
expected to start improving in the
second quarter of 2010 as the job
growth rate turns positive. Current
forecast project a job growth rate
of 1.5 percent in the second quarter


Back By Popular Demand!








S0 ASSORTED
COLORS

50 each

Delivery available anywhere
from Altha to Hosford.

While Supplies Last

Sara is shown wearing a dress by Petit Amis, sold at the Unique Shop.


* J AU Seyice 1ot "i *I Ldde iken itaL HOURS:
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SEPTEMBER 23,2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 9


From left: Andrew Ramsey and Sue Porter look over a table filled with tempting desserts. Craig Brinkley congratulates Steve Yoder Jr.
Farm Bureau members dish out a hearty supper to guests at Thursday night's banquet. DANIEL WILLIAMS PHOTOS


Yoders honored as Outstanding Farm


Family at annual Farm Bureau Banquet

The highlight of Thursday's Calhoun County Farm .
Bureau Banquet was the announcement that Steve and
Michelle Yoder and their four young daughters had been
named 2009 Farm Family of the Year.
Before presenting the honor, Extension Director Judy 1
Ludlow noted that the award is given to a family whose - .
pride, dedication, and devotion to farming is a way of
life. These qualities are also reflected every day by their
* interactions with family, community, and colleagues. i_. .
The Yoders (shown at right) raise cattle, peanuts, soy- .-
beans and corn. They are grounded in a proud farm- U,- .
ing heritage; other family members are previous Farm' '
Family recipients. Steve, who has also been named
2009 Young Peanut Farmer of the Year, sees farming
as a unique blend of tradition and technology. He en-'"'
courages young farmers to find a mentor, and to expand -. -
their education and skills. He feels it is important to '-' "
learn about all aspects of farming, from field to market.
Blountstown High School FFA officers and members, :
shown below right, helped with the banquet. . '.
Approximately 215 people attended the dinner, held
at the W. T. Neal Civic Center.


Meet the Staff of

NT Mere J rm) OD


Matt Schmarje, is a Hair
Stylist at Merle Norman/
Studio 20. He specializes
in razor and precision cuts,
color, color correction and
a master at hair extensions.
Matt is up on the latest styles
and techniques to care and
style hair. He has been a
stylist at Merle Norman for
5 years. Call today to book
your appointment for a new
color and a precision cut!


Stephanie Alday is the Nail
Technician and a Beauty
Consultant at Merle Nor-
man. She specializes in spa
manicures, pedicures and
facials. As a beauty consul-
tant, Stephanie coordinates
custom cosmetic make
overs for special events
such as weddings, prom,
pageants or a night out.
In November, she will be-
come a full time hair stylist.


It's Free Gift Time Again! Come in today for
your FREE Merle Norman fall color makeover


S20452 W. Central Ave. in Blountstown * Phone 674-9191 d


Saturation patrols
set Sept. 25-26 in
Gadsden County
QUINCY - The Florida
Highway Patrol willbe conducting
saturation patrols Sept. 25 from
9 p.m. until 3 a.m Sept. 26 in
Gadsden County. The saturation
patrols or "wolf-packs" will
concentrate on impaired drivers.
Realizing the dangers of
impaired driving, the Florida
Highway Patrol wants to educate
the public, remove impaired
drivers from the roadways of
Florida and help ensure a safe
driving environment for all of
Florida's citizens.
A DUI "wolf-pack" helps
address all of the above mentioned
needs.


L' -



2.
.




1.


Stephanbie Aldfy,
-.ti' rfech and Bemau Cotnsultxant


~ "P~~Gt, ScTam~P~e,
Exhnr;i~ns ~ J~~ i�~rjrt.









Page 10 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 23, 2009


AFBC sponsors volleyball tournament Sept. 12
Team RBW,.shown above, won the four-on-four volleyball tournament sponsored by the Altha First Baptist Church
Youth Group held on Saturday, Sept. 12. Thanks to all the teams who participated. We look forward to seeing you
again on Oct. 24. Team RBW, from left: Pierre Wesselhoeft, Rocky Weaver, Heidi Weaver and Scott Cloud.


SPECIAL
SERVICES
& MEETINGS
FRINKBAPTISTCHURCH-
A new church year begins at
Frink Baptist Church. Sunday
School will start at 10 a.m. with
a new approach to teaching
which will be explained on
Sunday, Sept. 27 during the 11
a.m. morning worship service.
Additional services will start
the first week of October with
Sunday evening service at 6
p.m. and Wednesday prayer
service at 6:30 p.m.
Help the dim lights at Frink
Baptist Church glow bright
againwithyourpresence. Words
to the old hymn 'Brighten the
Corer Where You Are' comes
to mind as we go into a new year
with excitement about what the
Lord can do at Frink Baptist
Church. We look forward to
seeing you soon.
For more information, call
Pastor Dan Thomas at (850)
674-3324 or (850) 643-7591.

RIVEROF LIFEASSEMBLY
OF GOD-The River of Life
Assembly of God church will
be holding a special meeting
for parents and children ages
6-18 on Saturday, Sept. 26 at
5 p.m. The meeting will be at
the church located on Spring
Branch Road in Bristol. If you
are interested in the future of the
children, please attend.
For more information, call
Reverend Aaron Schwendeman
at 509-4048.

HOMECOMING
SERVICES
RIVER OF LIFE
ASSEMBLY OF GOD-The
River of Life Assembly of God
church, formerly The Bristol
Assembly of God Church,
will be celebrating its annual


I NEWS
FROM THE

I PEWS


Homecoming service on Oct.
4. Come and be blessed by
anointed singing and fellowship.
A covered dish lunch will be
served at 12 noon.

YARD SALES &
FUNDRAISERS
ALTHA FIRST BAPTIST
YOUTH -The Altha First
Baptist Youth will be sponsoring
a yard sale on Saturday, Oct. 3
from 8 a.m. until noon.
The sale will be on the church
property behind the Town Hall
on Hwy. 274 West on West
Chipola Street.
If you would like to purchase
a spot to participate, we will set
up one table for you for $10. All
proceeds go toward Altha FBC
Youth.

DELIVERANCE TEMPLE
CHURCH OF GOD IN CHRIST
-Brother and Sister Mathews of
Deliverance Temple Church of
God in Christ will be hosting
a glorious fundraiser worship
service Saturday, Sept. 29 at
7:30 p.m.
The program entitled,
"Standing Together in Christ"
will take place at Deliverance
Temple COGIC which is located
at 1156 Dewey Johnson Way in
Gretna. Please come out and
enjoy the Lord with us!
For more information,
please contact Brother or Sister
Mathews at (850)643-1745 or
(850)442-4281.


CHRISTIAN HOME
AUXILIARY-The Christian
Home Women's Auxiliary will
be having their annual yard sale
on Oct. 3, located at 69 north
in Blountstown behind the
Christian Home FWB Church
in the Recreation Building.
This year there will be many
items: clothes, new shoes, crafts,
jellies, happy home flavorings,
Christian Home cookbooks,
baked goods, free coffee and
cookies and much more.
Remember, the early bird
gets all the bargains. Call Janet
Dietz at 674-4163 for more
information.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
OF BRISTOL- The Men's
Ministry of the First Baptist
Church of Bristol will be
hosting a bow shooting contest
on Saturday, Oct. 3 from 9 a.m.
until 12 p.m. (ET).
This event will feature six
divisions of competition:
*Kids,youthI-ages 13 &under,
*Youth II -ages 14 to 17
*Traditional -ages 18 and
up
*Hunters -ages 18 and up
*Open -ages 18 and up
There is no entry fee for this
event but canned food donations
are requested to help those in the
community who are in need. A
chicken and rice lunch will be
served for all who attend.
To register please call 643-
5400, Monday-Thursday from
9 a.m. until 4 p.m.

PRAYER
MEETINGS
PRAISING PRAYER BAND
--There will be a Praising Prayer
Band meeting Wednesday, Sept.
23 at 7 p.m. at Rosa Lee Lane's
home at 11544 Chestnut Lane
in Bristol. Everyone is invited
to attend.
For more information, call
643-5958.


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tod, to jiiin tD., We ik rur .K m irpa a m am tm ldtw G L of de ioW tPnw d M aurm uam aWor 1o WM
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SEPTEMBER 23, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 11


.: OLD VARKMER'


AL


ANAC


-a-
- _


Available from Commercial NewsPr.oviders


- -- - -


PETS OTH . P|PLE


Gall Cerulo & Indy
Gail Cerulo of Bristol received a special gift after an operation that changed her life. Her
son, Michael gave his mother a puppy in hopes that it would cheer her up..
Little did any of them know how special this puppy - a Havenese breed that they named
Indy (short for Indiana) - would become to them. Michael suggested that they take the puppy
to be trained as a service dog, specifically a diabetes notifier.
With the help of a dog trainer, Roberta, Indy and Gail began training. First the basics: sit,
stay, come, fetch; slowly, he was taught to notify Gail when her sugar gets low by barking to
get her attention. If barking doesn't work, he stands on his hind legs and puts his front paws
on her. Gail has been a diagnosed diabetic for more than 40 years and has slowly lost the
ability to know when it is happening. Indy has been her help. He can
tell that her sugar is low by licking her hand or arm. The smell and
taste is the chemical trigger that he has been trained to detect.
When he signals that her sugar is low, she gets out her glucose
monitor and takes a reading.
Although he is a small breed dog, weighing only nine
- pounds, Indy is a huge help! He has made it possible for Gail
to leave her home without the assistance of another person.
Indy goes with her and is certified to do so. He goes to res-
taurants with Gail, to the mall and his favorite place to visit is
.. Sam's. Indy is rewarded with low calorie dog treats,
- - Pupperoni Snacks but his favorite is quarter pound
plain cheese burgers from McDonald's.
Gail and Indy play fetch, he loves to jump through
ps,ride in the car and is good with children. He
SJ even visits Shands Hospital and plays with
the kids. "He is taught not to bark at other
animals and is used to wheel chairs," Gail
explains. "He only barks as a signal that
* someone is outside our house or when
I need help."
One night she passed out while her
husband was sleeping. Indy barked
to get him awake and when that
wasn't successful, the two-year-old
dog nipped his ear. That woke him,
up! Indy showed her husband where
S she was and he revived her.
They are truly thankful for their
little dog. "People usually think
of big dogs as service dogs,"
Gail says. "But, little dogs
-. are great service dogs.
Indy has been a
blessing."

PETS AND THEIR PEOPLE IS SPONSORED BY

Altha Farmers Co-op, Inc.
We've got the feed you need to keep your animals happy and healthy!
CATTLE - HORSES - DOGS - CATS - BIRDS and more..
Altha Store Blountstown Branch Marianna Branch
Phone: (850) 762-3161 Phone: (850) 673-8102 Phone: (850) 482-2416


September 21-27

SEPTEMER26 Old Farmer's EPTEMBE2122
First.Quarter Moon Almanac Best daystoplant
-1, | aboveground crops


SEPTEMBER_21
International Day
ofPeace


SEP.EMBER.6 27
Best days to
begin logging


AM *M ,


D his year's autumnal equinox winter will belong.Ifthere'smuch
occurs on September 22 at I autumn fog, there will be much win-
5:19 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time. It I ter snow. If the autumn is
is said that the wind and clear, the winter will be
weather at the time of windy. If the storms of
the equinoxes foretells September clear off
the wind and weather � warm, however, you
during the following -- can expect the winter
three months. If the au- storms to be relatively
tumn is warm, it is reputed that the warm as well.
1:1 1.1 lii / I~rloi : I~,l


1 cup whole wheat flour
1 cup cornmeal
2 teaspoons baking
powder
i teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon salt
1-1/2 cups buttermilk
2 eggs
1/4 cup vegetable oil
1/4 cup brown sugar


'IA


, reheat the oven to 4000F. Combine flour, cornmeal,
baking powder, baking soda, and salt. In
a separate bowl, whisk together the remaining
ingredients until smooth and
add to the flour mixture.
Pour into a greased 9-inch i
square pan and bake for
about 20 minutes, until
golden brown. MAKESSERVINGS.


- WIT AND WISDOM FROM THE OLD FARMER'S ALMANAC
SIfowls hoot at night, expect fair weather.
* Wear a sprig of rosemary in your lapel to aid memory.
* On September 24, 1988, the first female Episcopal
assistant bishop was elected.


FOR RECIPES. GARDENING TIPS. AND WEATHER FORECASTS. VISIT:
Almana.co . * ..


- _


Copyrighted Material



SSyndicated Content


- .m -


- 0--


-4b


-








Page 12 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 23,2009


DESTINY AND
TRISTA TUCKER
Destiny Tucker will celebrate
her-seventh birthday on Sept.
24. Her sister Trista Tucker
celebrated her fourth birthday
on June 13. They are the
daughters of Tommy and
Patricia Tucker of Bristol.
Their maternal grandparents
are Bruce and Ann Keith of
Bristol and their paternal
grandparents are Tommy
and Debra Tucker of Altha.
Destiny and Trista love playing
big sisters to their new baby
brother, Hunter, and enjoy
spending time at the river.


BILLY BINGG' GARNER
Billy 'Bing' Garner will be cel-
ebrating his 13th birthday on
Sept. 23. He is the son of
William and Jennifer Garner
of Bristol. His grandparents
are David and Linda Goethe
of Rock Bluff, Mike Garner of
Arkansas and Dave and Kar-
en Sallisky of Ft. Myers. His
great-grandparents are Hazel
Harrington of Bristol and Paul
Pletcher of St. Marks. He en-
joys skateboarding, fishing,
hanging out with friends and
bike riding.

ASHLEY
MARIE SIMCO
Ashley Marie Simco cel-
ebrated her 18th birthday
on Sept. 19. She is the
daughter of Tonya and
SBobby Simco of Altha.
Her grandparents are
Tommy and Debra Tuck-
er of Altta and Bradford
Sand Ellen Simco of Colo-
Srado Springs, CO. She
enjoys spending time
with her boyfriend Brent
McCardle and is always
talking and texting on
Sher cell phone.


SHANNON TUCKER
Shannon Tucker will celebrate
her 13th birthday on Sept. 26.
She is the daughter of Terra
Tucker of Hosford and Steve
Tucker of Illinois. Her mater-
nal grandparents are Sharon
and Bert Crews of Hosford.
Her paternal grandparents
are Barbara and Wayne Lin-
ton of Wewa. Her maternal
great-grandmother is Chiq-
uita Rudd of Hosford and her
maternal great-great-grand-
mother is Lucille Johnson of
Bristol. She enjoys shopping
for shoes, reading, playing
basketball and being mother
to her little cousin Jaden. -


Five generations attend & celebrate
Carlton Cain's 70th birthday July 19
On July 19 family and friends gathered to celebrate Carlton
Cain's 70th birthday In attendance were five generations.
Pictured with him is his mother, Maude Cain of Kinard, his
daughter, Anita Vannatta, granddaughter Mekeysha Donnelly
and great-grandchildren Marti
and Bryce, all of St James, $ i apply Diiday .o
MO. Also in attendance was
daughter Debbie and husband D V
Melvin and grandchildren , a en
Michael and Gabe of Kinard BIG 50 TODAY!!
and grandchildren Myka and t
lan of St James, MO along
with about 100 other family Love
members and friends. They :-.
celebrated with a lunch that I-
was prepared by guests who ,. Han.
attended. All the meat was -.-
prepared by his brother-in-law, . ,i
Pete Bright. A wonderful time E.
of fellowship was had by all Foan
who attended. + submtted by JayeForan
-*..*..-, ..*-..-.**�. '" o1+. �- "-.


l SERVICE NEWS

Shardae Stephens completes basic
combat training at Fort Jackson, SC
Army Reserve Pfc. Shardae R. Stephens reports that she has
completed basic training in South Carolina and is now presently
attending training (ATL) in Richmond, VA. Shardae, who plans to
come home on Oct. 28, hopes to graduate with flying colors. Shardae
states she is passing all her tests, she's only received medical attention
as required, everything else is good.


Shardae would like to thank
everyone for their continuous
time and prayers.
Shardae hopes to be coming
home soon before starting
college at West FL in the spring
semester.
Apologies for the
miscommunication from previous
service news. Shardae's mom
stated she'd be coming home
after Basic Training graduation.
Shardae received a minor injury
Causing her to remain in SC
X ;0 *longer than planned. She was
1 ' able to come home due to her
injuries and later completed her
\j Basic Training as stated and then
proceeded to Richmond, VA.


JL.
"ir
Tallahassee Memorial
Family Medicine
Blountstown


9
fl-p


TMH.org


STEPHE


TMH 94 f'TawL^}S


BIRTHDAYS







SEPTEMBER 23, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 13


F4


Friday &

Saturday


October 2 - 3
Special prices on corn,
S 10% off Georgia
Boots and drawings both
days. We will be having
MANY in-store specials
on hunting supplies


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10898 NW SR 20 in Bristol- PHONE (850) 643-2336
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home from our central office. Speed and uninterrupted service are not guaranteed. Taxes and additional charges
may apply. Not all services available in all areas. Services subject to change. 02009 FairPomt Communicaions, Inc.
All rights rerved. 6741


HUNTER WAYNE TUCKER
Tommy and Patricia Tucker are proud to home by his big sisters Destiny atFd Trista
announce the birth of their son, Hunter Tucker. His maternal grandparents are
Wayne Tucker, born on Aug. 1. He Bruce and Ann Keith of Bristol and his
weighed 7 lbs. and 1 oz. and was 19 paternal grandparents are Tommy and
1/2 inches long. Hunter was welcomed Debra Tucker of Altha.





Jacobs, Copeland plan Oct. 9 wedding

Kristy Jacobs and "
Jeffrey Copeland will
be united in marriage
on Friday, Oct. 9 at
6:30 p.m. (ET) at the
residence of the late
Kelly and Peggy Jacobs
in Bristol. A reception I
will immediately follow
the ceremony.
No invitations are
being sent, all family
and friends are invited
to attend. If and only if
inclement weather occurs
on the date of the wedding,
the ceremony will take i.-
place at the Blountstown
First Assembly of God
Church.
For further information
or directions call 643-
2515 or 643-2519 after 5
p.m. Feel free to leave a
message.
There will also be
signs beginning at the
red light on Hwy. 20 in
Bristol to the location of
the wedding, 1.2 miles
down Hwy. 12 south
beside Tolar School.


A preview of our hunting supplies


STORK REPORT


AUGUSTUS
CORNELIUS PLUMMER
Jon and Johanna Plummer are
proud to announce the birth of
: "1 their son, Augustus. Cornelius
Plummer, born on Aug. 13 at
Tallahassee Memorial Hospital.
He weighed 6 lbs. and 12 ozs.
and was 20 inches long. His
- - grandparents are Jo and Mark
a. ', Plummer and Debbie Van Lierop.
S His great-grandparents include
Vondell Plummer, Howard and
-'' .o -Jeanette Johnson, and Carlton
----- ..and Marilyn Van Lierop. Other
_. family includes six cousins and
'i. six aunts and uncles. He was
welcomed home by lots of family
and friends.


._ '
K ':I 11


I








Page 14 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 23, 2009



NOTICE OF BUDGET HEARING

The Liberty County Board of County Commissioners has

tentatively adopted a budget for fiscal year 2009-2010. A

public hearing to make a FINAL DECISION on the budget

AND TAXES will be held on Monday, September 28, 2009

at 7 p.m. (E.T.) at the Liberty County Courthouse,

10818 NW SR 20, Bristol, FI 32321-0399.
Robert H/1, Clerk of Court
Clerk to the Board of County Commissioners

U


BUDGET SUMMARY

COUNTY OF LIBERTY - FISCAL YEAR 2009-2010


Constitutional
Officers


Capital
Project
Fund


Debt Expendable
Service Trust Funds


CASH BALANCE
BROUGHT FORWARD

ESTIMATED REVENUES:
Taxes Millac
Ad Valorem Taxes 3.
Ad Valorem Taxes 6.
Sales & Use Taxes
Charges for Services
Intergovernmental Revenue
Licenses & Permits
Fines & Forfeitures
Interest Earned/Other
TOTAL REVENUES


ge Per $1000
55 Mills
,45 Mills


717,255

333,779
32,196
2,532,330
32,165
19,825
63.560


1,303,182

791,579
2,013,853


6,849
2.304


306,806


551,154


3,731,110 4,117,767 306,806 551,154


717,255
1,303,182
333,779
1,130,581
5,097,337
32,165
9,426 36,100
65.864


- 9,426


8,716,263


OTHER FINANCING SOURCES
Other Financing Sources
Operating Transfers In
Transfers from Board of County Commissioners
Transfers from Constitutional Officers
TOTAL OTHER FINANCING SOURCES


63,400


816,059


- 199,140 -


1,078,599
2,143,051


2,143,051


63,400 816,059 2,143,051


- 199,140


3,221,650


TOTAL ESTIMATED REVENUE &
FINANCING SOURCES

EXPENDITURES
General Governmental
Public Safety
Physical Environment
Transportation
Debt Services
Human Services
Economic Environment
Culture and Recreation
Contingency
TOTAL EXPENDITURES

OTHER FINANCING USES
Operating Transfers Out
Transfers to Constitutional Officers
Reserves
TOTAL OTHER FINANCING USES


3,794,510


1,310,799
286,985
78,269


234,806
19,768
678,329


4,933,826


477,398
378,811
1,668,570

750,000

8,455


2,449,857


551,154


199,140


1,159,965
1,289,892


9,426 11,937,913


6,500
2,926


199,140


2,477,264
2,057,201-
457,080
1,668,570
199,140
984,806
19,768
686,784


2,608,956 3,283,234 2,449,857 - 199,140 9,426 8,550,613


332,395 340,561 490,000 1,162,956
853,159 1,289,892 2,143,051
- 20.139 - 61,154 - 81,293
1,185,554 1,650,592 - 551,154 - - 3,387,300


TOTAL APPROPRIATED EXPENDITURES
AND RESERVES


3,794,510 4,933,826


2,449,857


551,154 199,140


9,426


11,937,913


THE TENTATIVE, ADOPTED, AND/OR FINAL BUDGETS ARE ON FILE IN THE OFFICE OF THE ABOVE-MENTIONED TAXING AUTHORITY AS A PUBLIC RECORD.


General
Fund


Special
Revenue
Fund


Total


-1 - w"w--I--







SEPTEMBER 23, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 15



NOTICE OF SUPPLEMENTAL BUDGET HEARING

FOR THE YEAR 2008-2009 FOR THE

LIBERTY COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS

The public is invited to attend a Public Hearing on Monday,
September 28, 2009 at 7 p.m. (E.T.) at the Liberty County Courthouse
located at 10818 NW SR 20, Bristol, Florida 32321.
Robert Hill, Clerk of Court
Clerk to the Board of County Commissioners




BUDGET SUMMARY



SUPPLEMENT

COUNTY OF LIBERTY - FISCAL YEAR 2008-2009


Special
General Revenue
Fund Fund


Constitu-
tional
Officers


Capital
Project
Fund


Debt Expendable
Service Trust Funds


CASH BALANCE
BROUGHT FORWARD


988,382 415,383


44,297 1,117,585 553,010


- 3,118,657


ESTIMATED REVENUES:
Taxes Millage Per $1000
Ad Valorem Taxes 4.10 Mills
Ad Valorem Taxes 5.90 Mills
Sales & Use Taxes

Charges for Services
Intergovernmental Revenue
Licenses & Permits
Fines & Forfeitures
Interest Earned/Other.
TOTAL REVENUES

OTHER FINANCING SOURCES
Other Financing Sources
Operating Transfers In
Transfers from Board of County Commissioner
Transfers from Constitutional Officers
TOTAL OTHER FINANCING SOURCES

TOTAL ESTIMATED REVENUE &
FINANCING SOURCES

EXPENDITURES
General Governmental
Public Safety
Physical Environment
Transportation
Debt Services
Human Services
Economic Environment
Culture and Recreation
Contingency
TOTAL EXPENDITURES

OTHER FINANCING USES
Operating Transfers Out
Transfers to Constitutional.Officers
Reserves
TOTAL OTHER FINANCING USES

TOTAL APPROPRIATED EXPENDITURE
AND RESERVES


762,743

385,000

32,196
3,184,350
36,000
35,500


1,321,055


1,162,118
4,404,444


373


550,991
629,517


634,771


11,500


S762,743
1,321,055
385,000

1,745,305
8,853,082
36,000
47,373


65,000 - 51,000 1,025 117,025
4,500,789 6,887,990 1,231,508 634,771 1,025 11,500 13,267,583



63,400 1,198,073 - 342,165 1,603,638
rs 2,193,168 2,193,168
20,000 20,000
83,400 1,198,073 2,193,168 - 342,165 - 3,816,806


5,572,571 8,501,446 3,468,973 1,752,356 896,200 11,500 20,203,046


1,459,629 - 1,539,095 6,500 3,005,224
324,500 550,000 1,885,581 5,000 2,765,081
88,500 870,474 958,974
4,039,731 4,039,731
16,000 - 343,190 359,190
265,500 577,500 843,000
18,500 - 18,500
767,000 285,000 1,052,000
10,371 10,371
2,950,000 6,322,705 3,424,676 - 343,190 11,500 13,052,071


536,804 391,930 634,771 1,563,505
871,740 1,321,428 .2,193,168
1,214,027 465,383 44,297 1,117,585 553,010 3,394,302
2,622,571 2,178,741 44,297 1,752,356 553,010 - 7,150,975

S


5,572,571 8,501,446 3,468,973 1,752,356 896,200


11,500 20,203,046


THE TENTATIVE, ADOPTED, AND/OR FINAL BUDGETS ARE ON FILE IN THE OFFICE OF THE ABOVE-MENTIONED TAXING AUTHORITY AS A PUBLIC RECORD.


Total








Page 16 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 23, 2009


BELOW: Overall 5K winner Mark McCarra of Grand Ridge makes his way across a bridge Saturday morning
in Blountstown. LEFT: Edna Alford keeps a steady pace. BELOW LEFT: Caroline Howell hands her mom,
Allyson Howell, a cup of water as she races by. ABOVE: Garry Futch watches John Bryan run in as Ray
Howell records his time. BELOW RIGHT: Billy Jones and Thomas Howell.


-k~aw^Rv


9


Sixty people took part in
Saturday's 5K in Blount-
stown, while seven competed
in a one-mile fun run. Mark
McCarra of Grand Ridge was
the overall winner in the 5K
with a time of 20.57. Adult win-
ners were Billy Jones with a
time of 20.57 and Tina Smith
at 25.00. Youth winners were
Thomas Howell and Kristin
Jenkins. Runners started at
Sam Atkins Park and followed
the trail to the ttain depot.


CATEGORY WINNERS
Male 13 & Under: 1st Place - Cole
Skipper, 2nd Place - Joshua Van Li-
erop.
Male 14-18: lst-Brandon Purvis,
2nd-Kelly Ruiz, 3rd-Jake Brown.
Female 14-18:. 1st- Morgan Welch,
2nd-Caroline Tomlinson & Courtney
McFarland, 3rd- Bre Pybus.
Female 19-24: 1st-Lori Goodman,
2nd-Jessica Cantu.
F 25-29: 1st- Stephanie McDaniel
F 30-34: 1st - Regina Williams, 2nd:
Teresa Mills, 3rd: Jessica Bennett.
M 30-34: 1-Marc Tomlinson.
F 35-39: 1st - Dawn Sullivant, 2nd-
Edna Alford, 3rd- Allyson Howell.
M 35-39: 1st- Terry Blair, 2nd- Sean


Collins, 3rd- Toby Garnett.
F 40-44: 1st- Angie Wood, 2nd- Di-
ane Wroblewski, 3rd-Carmen Overholt.
M 40-44: lst-Reggie Sewell, 2nd:
Phillip Griffin, 3rd- John Bryan.
F 45-49: 1st-Dot Strong
M 45-49: 1- Rodney Smith, 2- Chris
Atkins, 3-Gene Alford.
F 50-54: 1- Carolyn Brock, 2- Sue
Price, 3- Kay Tipton.
F 55-59:Dorcas Goodman
M: Glenn Kimbrel
One Mile Fun Run Winners
Female: 1) Sarah Pitts, 2) Jaren Wil-
liams, 3) Randa McCroan, 4) Caroline
Howell.
Male: 1st- Blake Barber, 2nd- Conner
Fielder, 3rd- Cole Fielder.


DANIEL WILLIAMS PHOTOS


.d
"- '" d~
----
~- �';
"'
~-~� �~
L~~











contimnuedufrm.page. 1
The list included windows for remodeling, valued
at $1800 and a stock pile of copper and brass, said to
be worth $800, along with numerous smaller items,
including a chain link gate, 23 treated posts, numerous
farm implements and a stainless steel smoker. The list
also stated that marked fruit and pecan trees were killed
and several tools, toolboxes and an aluminum workbench
were taken during the city's clean up of his property.
"What they did in my view is ethically, morally and
legally wrong and now they're trying to get his land,"
said attorney Jonna Bowman, who is representing John
Shuler.
At the end ofThursday's hearing, Bowman immediately
filed a notice of appeal. "My job was to put Mr. Shuler
in the position where he would be able to take it out of
Liberty County and appeal his case to a higher court,"
she said, explaining that the District Court of Appeals
should review the case, "They're going to be shocked at
what they see. They took everything he owned and took
it to the dump."
According to Bowman, "He is in an area zoned as
rural village. It's specifically listed that a flea market and
residence can be on the same land."
Earlier this year, John Shuler said he had tried to
comply with the city's demands and had hauled away 13
trailers of items and removed three mobile homes from
the property.
"In these economic times, somebody like John Shuler
should be respected for taking something that's been
thrown away, refurbishing it and selling it," said Bowman,
who noted that he had built a business on his "found
antiques and little treasures."




substance with the intent to distribute after officers went
to his home last Thursday.
When BPD Investigator Timmy Partridge contacted
Maclean and told him of the allegations about his
marijuana-growinmg activities, Macleaih "gave a
spontaneous statement that he had a grow house in his
shed," according to the arrest report.
Maclean led the investigator to the back yard, where
he entered a shed and then opened a door in a room built
inside the shed. Partridge spotted several marijuana plants
and then advised Maclean of his Miranda rights.
Maclean said he had been growing the plants that were
in the shed for two months. He then showed two bags of
marijuana that had already been harvested. Together, they
weighed 550 grams (19.40 ounces). He was then placed
under arrest.
BPD Chief Glenn Kimbrel, Major Rodney Smith and
SSgt. Fred Tanner responded to the scene after the illegal
plants were discovered around 10:38 a.m.
In a taped statement, Maclean said he had grown
marijuana on three other occasions. He said the plants
and the operation were solely his. He also stated that the
plants he grew was for personal use only.
In addition to the 17 plants, items recovered
included:
*Eight indoor grow lights
*Two automatic light timers
*Two dual exhaust systems
*A circular fan
*Two sets of hanging scales
*Eight different bottles of fertilizer, including
Organic Iguana Bloom Juice, Hydroponic Bush Master,
Beastic Bloom Building, a can of Cha Ching Heavy
Resin Production, a bottle of Molasses and one can of
Tarantula.
Partridge returned around 7:30 p.m. with a search
warrant for Maclean's home. Items seized at that time
were:
*A marijuana plant with three grow lights which was
hidden in Maclean's bedroom closet.
*Two bags of marijuana packaged in plastic bags for a
total weight of 250 grams (8.8 ounces) that were secured
in a safe beside Maclean's bed:
*Five bottles of marijuana seeds that were found on a
nightstand.
*Nine pill bottles full of marijuana seeds were found
in a tin on the dresser.
*$400 cash.
Also found on the dresser was what was described as
"a large smoking device."


SEPTEMBER 23, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 17







.. I


FIRED UP FANS - LEFT: The Liberty County crowd signals game point in the final game to win the match.
RIGHT: Parik Amin, Ashley Adams and Clint Coley help keep BHS spirits up during the game.

Lady Dawgs still undefeated


after Monday battle with BHS
The undefeated Lady Bulldogs Var-
sity Volleyball team pulled out an
exciting win against the BHS Lady
Tigers in a four game match on
Monday, Sept. 21 at the BHS Gym.
The scores were: Game 1: 25-27
(B-town); Game 2: 25-13(Liberty);
Game 3: 25-19 (Liberty) and Game
4: 25-12 (Liberty).


'3<


Shelby White (12) kills the ball to get a point for the Liberty County team.


Hannan Moore (/) kills the Dall.


Kim JenKs (1l) returns tne Dall.









Page 18 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 23, 2009




BLOUNTSTOWN HIGH SCHOOL
- ---.


Lions, Tigers, and Bears!
Don't cry. Sad faces are
nonexistent in Mrs. DeAngelis'
English class. Constructive
learning, hands-on teaching,
and purejoy, make up a normal
day in her class. Books about
mysterious phenomena, life in
the olden days, and wacky'stories
that provide merriment in one's
mind are just a few of the types of
stories we read. Reading has never
been as fun and engaging as it is in
Mrs. DeAngelis' class.
Rachel DeAngelis is a new
teacher at BHS. She teaches 9th
grade English at our school and
enjoys it very much. I had the
chance to sit down and discuss
how she likes it here and got to
hear some interesting stories and
anecdotes of hers. Being that Mrs.
DeAngelis was a new teacher, I
asked her how she liked BHS so
far. She replied exuberantly, "I
really like it here, everybody's
been very welcoming!" She has
had experience in teaching English
before. Last year she taught at
South Effingham High School in
Guyton, Georgia, which is right
outside of Savahnah, Georgia. Her
husband found ajob in Tallahassee
so she set off to find a new school
to call her home. Few jobs were
actually open in this area, but she
found BHS and saw that it fit her
liking immensely. Keep in mind
though, that Mrs. DeAngelis lives
in Tallahassee. To drive an hour
back and forth everyday takes true
dedication!


When receiving a new job that
you like, you always set goals and
achievements for yourself; Mrs.
DeAngelis was kind enough to
share with me what she hoped
to achieve here at BHS. To get
better at teaching and become a
wise, highly educated instructor is
something that she is working very
hard to reach. Learning to teach
things more effectively, whether
learning from a fellow teacher, or
learning from students, is another
goal that Mrs. DeAngelis seeks
to achieve in her future here at
Blountstown High. When asked if


i_ - t-'


~"""'~""II"~"I"""~`"~""


Homecoming events for

Sept. 23 through Sept 25


byli^ 2ase 71 ;


she hoped to stay at BHS for
awhile, she couldn't answer
soon enough, "Definitely,"
that one word sums up her
admiration for this school.
Mrs. DeAngelis is very
easy to get to know. At
the beginning of the year
she had students fill out forms
with information, this could
be personal or not. She was
surprised at how open some of
the students were; they knew that
they could trust herjust from her
humble aura.
When in schoolMrs. DeAngelis
was a self proclaimed "nerdy kid,
who answered all the questions,
sat at the front of the class, and
enjoyed school very much." She
knows how it is for those who
adore school, and knows how
it can be for those who despise
it. Conforming her teaching
methods to accommodate each
and every kids'likes is something
Mrs. DeAngelis does very well.
Who doesn't love to draw and
color a picture of a scene from
a book? Everyone should want
to have Mrs. DeAngelis as their
English teacher, I'm happy to
say that I do. She embodies all
the requirements that a teacher
should have. Exciting charisma
and a kind and modest personality
is all wrapped up inside her. If
you want a class that you learn in,
but at the same time you have fun
and do awesome assignments,
then apply for English with Mrs.
DeAngelis!


Altha School's Kids of Character for August
Principal Ladona Kelley proudly
announces Altha School's Kids
of Character for the month
of. August: front row, from
left, Rileigh Collins, Faith
Hathaway, Gabriel Short and
Bristen Bramblett; second row,
Bobby Finuff, Clark Kelley,
Paityn Parker and Remington
Mills; on back row Max Scott,
Kerrie Edwards, Mary Shurrum
and Kiana Richards; not
pictured, Leslee McMullon.


Altha's Cross Country teams c
by Kimi Wiltse . 3) Kimi Wiltse: 27:45,
Altha School's boys and girls 4) Becka Wiltse: 27:55, and
Cross Country teams competed in 5) Madison Rowe: 28:43.
their first meet on Saturday, Sept.
'19 at the Lincoln Invitational in
Tallahassee. Coach Maggie Sewell.
stated that for the first meet, the
boys and girls did very weil. Some
of them shaved several minutes off
their personal best times. .-; .
The top five finishers for the boys'
team were:
S1) Devin Ferrell: 22:06,
2) Ashton Baggett: 22:22,
3) Brett Floyd: 22:34, The Cross Country team in the firs
4) Tyler Hamilton: 24:41, and Hannah Plazarin, Madison Rowe,
5) Porter Smith: 24:42. and Trent Woodham. Second row
The girls' team top five finishers Kaa well, Rebekah Wilse, Emil
weKale Sewell, Rebekah Wiltse, Emily
were: Sewell, Girls Coach..Third row: Ett
I1) Mary Sewell: 23:58, Baggett, Brett Floyd, Kyler Dew a
2) Hannah Plazarin: 26:47, John Sewell.


'ompeted Sept. 19
Their next meet will be this
Saturday, Sept. 26 at the Bay
Invitational at 8:45 a.m.


;t row, from left: Brendan Dew, Mackenzie May,
Mary Sewell,-Ashlyn Barfield, Hannah Register
I: Porter Smith, Emily Sewell, Carly Schwartz,
y Brooks, Sharlyn Smith, Kimi Wiltse and Maggie
Ian Ellis, Devin Ferrell, Jeremy O'Bryan, Ashton
Lnd Tyler Hamilton. Not pictured is boys coach


r- ------ - - - - - -
Altha's Calendar of Events
Wed., Sept. 23-"See You at the Pole" 7:15 a.m.
Thurs., Sept. 24 -MS Volleyball vs. Hosford 3 p.m.; JV/V Volleyball vs.
SBethlehem 5/6 p.m.
Sat., Sept. 26-Cross Country Bay Track
Mon., Sept. 28-MS Volleyball vs. BMS 3 p.m.; JV/V Volleyball vs. BHS
S5/6 p.m.
Tues. Sept. 29-JV/V Volleyball vs. Marianna 4/5/6 p.m.
Thurs. Oct. 1-MS Volleyball at PSJ 3:30 p.m.
Fri. Oct. 2-Altha Invitational (Home) 3 p.m.
L - - - - - - - - - - -i

RADIO FOOTBALL

ON WYBT AND WPHK

Listen to football on WYBT and WPHK. This week..

Listen to Steven Seay and Glenn Kim-
brel's play by play of the Blountstown
High School Tigers vs Wewa .for the
homecoming game Friday night, Sept.
25 on K102.7 at 6:30 p.m. (CT) air time. "
Hear Michael Wahlquist, Jay Taylor and
Ray McCoy with all the Liberty County
High School Game Action. The Bulldogs
S take on Port St. Joe in Port St. Joe. Air
time is at 10 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 26, im-
mediately following Swap Shop on K102.7.

The Florida Gators play Kentucky at
Kentucky this Saturday, Sept. 26 air
time on K-102.7.at 4:30 p.m. (CT).

i ,The Miami Dolphins take on San Diego in San
Diego on Sunday, Sept. 27 air time 3 p.m. (CT).


ALTHA WILDCATS__


by Laura Stoltzfus
As many of you know, this
week is BHS Homecoming 2009!
Each day, the High School has a
variety of fun activities planned!
We have a detailed schedule of all
the events, as follows:
Wednesday, Sept. 23:
Celebrity Day: who will win the
prize for the best impersonation?
Also, FCA is hosting "See You
At the Pole" at 7:15 a.m. in front
of the school. Classmates will
duke it out in a fierce Tug-of-War
during break.
Thursday, Sept. 24: Wear your
camo for Country Day! Tiger's
Growl is in the BHS Auditorium
at 1 p.m. The JV football team is
playing Freeport away beginning
at 6 p.m., the varsity team will be
against Vernon away at 5 p.m.
and 6 p.m.
Friday, Sept. 25: Sport your
Tiger Pride for the Red and White

Project Graduation
2010 Yard Sale
The BHS Seniors of 2010 are
having a Huge Yard Sale, Oct. 3
at the BHS teacher's parking lot
starting at 7 a.m. All proceeds go
to Project Graduation.


1I~I1~II mu 1- -~-~a~-~-�xr~


Day. There will be the first parade
in 4 years, starting at 1 p.m.. The
Pre-game show starts at 6:30 p.m.
with our annual Homecoming
game vs. Wewa beginning at 7
p.m. (CT).

Homecoming
Dance Friday
Project Graduation is hosting
a dance afterwards ending at
midnight in the BHS Gym. The
cost is $5. (No elementary or
middle school students will be
allowed to attend.)

S BHS Calendar
of Events
*Wed. Sept. 23: See You
at the Pole at 7:15 a.m.
*Tues. Sept. 24: Tiger's
Growl at 1 p.m.; Volleyball,
away at Vernon at 5/6
p.m.; JV Football, away at
Freeport at.6 p.m.
*Fri. Sept. 25:
Homecoming parade at 1
p.m.; Pre-Game at 6:30
p.m.; Football against Wewa
at 7 p.m.; Homecoming
Dance in the BHS gym after
game until midnight.







SEPTEMBER 23, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 19


FSU nursing students

speak to Tolar about


---------------- ---



----------------------------------------------------------
Calhoun County Liberty County
BREAKFAST BREAKFAST
THURSDAY THURSDAY
French toast sticks with sau- Ham, egg and cheese crois-:
sage tt orassoe cere- sant or assorted cereals with
als with buttered toast and
assorted fruit juice. buttered toast and assorted:
FRIDAY fruit juice.
Sausage gravy and biscuit FRIDAY
or assorted cereals with but- Pancakes and sausage or
tered toast and assorted fruit assorted cereals with but-:
juice. tered toast and assorted fruit
MONDAY
Grits with cheese toast or juice.
assorted cereals with but- MONbAY
tered toast and assorted fruit Waffles and sausage patty
juice. or assorted cereals with but-
TUESDAY tered toast and assorted fruit
Scrambled eggs with grits juice.
or assorted cereal with but- 'iSA
TUESDAY
tered toast and assorted fruit T Uts
juice. French toast sticks and sau-
WEDNESDAY sage patty or assorted ce-
Pancakes and sausage real with buttered toast and
patty or assorted cereal with assorted fruit juice.
buttered toast and assorted EDNE
fruit juice.WEDNESDAY
Sausage biscuit with hash
LUNCHES brown or -assorted cereal
(Pre-K thru 5th) with buttered toast and as-
THURSDAY sorted fruit juice.
Homemade beef vegetable
soup with grilled cheese LUNCHES
sandwich, carrot sticks with Elementary
ranch dressing and cinna- (Pre-K thru 5th)
mon roll. (Grades 6-12) Al- THURSDAY
ternatives: Cheeseburger; Baked chicken, mashed po-
chef salad. aked chicken, mashed
.FRIDAY tatos with gravy, California
cheese pizza, potato wedg-b blend veggies and roll. Alter-I
es, Caesar salad and sugar native: BBQ riblet sandwich.
cookie. (Grades 6-12) Alter- FRIDAY
natives. Hamburger; grilled Sausage pizza, green beans
chicken garden salad. and stewed cinnamon ap-
MONDAY ' pies. Alternative: Chicken
Spaghetti with meat sauce, salad sandwich.
garden salad and pineap- MONDAY
pies. (Grades 6-12) Alterna- Sloppy joe, baked potato
tives: Cheeseburger; chef ges, broccoli and or-
salad.wedges, broccoli and or-
TUalaA. ange. Alternative: Chicken
TUESDAY f
Corn dog, mac and cheese, fajita wrap.
TUESDAY
green beans and mixed fruit.
(Grades 6-12) Alternatives: Shrimp poppers, baked
Crispy chicken wrap; grilled beans, garden salad and
chicken garden salad. roll. Alternative: Ham and:
WEDNESDAY turkey sub.
Chicken and Spanish rice, WEDNESDAY
Stossed salad and seasoned Spaghetti and meat sauce,
carrots. (Grades 6-12) Al- corn on the cobb and grapes.
ternatives: Chicken burger; Alternative: Ham and cheese
chicken salad w/fresh fruit. sandwich





MENUS SPONSORED BY:
SBristolCDental Clnic
K Laban Bontrager, DMD, Monica Bontrager, DMD
Pea Ridge Rd in Bristol, Phone (850) 643-5417
- -- --------------------I


not spreading germs
Florida State University nursing students were on ca
Wednesday, Sept. 16 to help us learn how to prevent the s
of germs.
The nursing students visited each classroom to demor
proper hand washing and sneezing/coughing techniques.
students learned to say their ABCs or sing the Happy Bir
song twice to ensure they were spending enough time wa
their hands to get rid of all the germs.
Sneezes and coughs should be covered with the arm
By sneezing or coughing into the material on
your shirt, germs are not spread like they are
when hands are used to cover.
Band instruments needed
W. R. Tolar Middle School's beginning band is
in need of band instruments. Please help us out
by looking in your closets, attic, under your bed,
and anywhere else you may have a used instrument
stored...we need them! You may contact Gayle
Grissett at 643-2426, ext. 602, if you wish to sell or
donate your instrument to the beginning band.
PTO meeting
Our next PTO meeting will be Sept. 28. The third
grade students will be performing a new song about
the 50 states. All parents are encouraged to join in
the PTO meetings. Parental involvement is very
important to your child.


thday Pictured enjoying the books at this year's
fishing book fair, from left, Summer Hosey, Allyssa
Chasteen, and Taryn Kirkland.
. Volunteers welcome
W. R. Tolar always welcomes volunteers. There
are many areas in our school in which you can help.
Whether it is assisting teachers in the classroom,
monitoring students during lunch, or helping out
in the front office, we can always find the perfect
volunteer position for your skills. If you would like to
volunteer with us, please call Fran Cutshaw, Volunteer
Coordinator, at 643-2426.
Recycling program
We are once again this year collecting used printer'
ink cartridges and old cell phones. We return these
items to a recycling company as a way to make money
to fund school "green" projects. Most cartridges are
accepted, however, toner cartridges are not. All cell
phones are accepted. Please drop these items off at
the collection boxes outside the front office, or in the
media center.


Tolar being a 'B' school a lesson on honey bees was perfect
A big thank you to Hali Phinney and bees. Students were treated to bread with honey.
Randy Holcomb for presenting information Bees work together as a team and that's what
about honey bees on Friday, Sept. 18. we are doing at Tolar. Our goal is to make sure
Since our school was ranked a high we are learning every day.
performing school by making a "B", we
celebrated with our students by learning about



LCHS CLASS OF '79


^ 30 YEAR


CLASS REUNION

Friday & Saturday,

October 16- 17, 2009


Tailgate
F Party
Friday, Oct. 16
7 p.m. at the LCHS
L Football StadiumA


Bget-S2ieD Ver

Sat. Oct. 17 at Doobie Bros. Restaurant on Hwy 20 in Bristol
The restaurant is closed to the public and the only cost will
be for your meal; a spouse or a guest may attend
Please R.S.V.P. if you plan on attending
For more information, please
contact Donna Coxwell Summers


at (850)643-5842 or Kelly Peddle
Umphress at (850)443-4301


I


_______ ,-_I,-


) m- m-- ---


'tJfi


or


III


I~~b*o~








Page 20 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 23, 2009
S..... The Chipola College
A,"Nu Chi Chapter of
.. .. Phi Theta Kappa is
S,.promoting literacy
area students and

each first grader in
Jackson County.
PTK member Jessica
'" Bradley and advisor
Pam Rentz recently
-; visited Grand Ridge
', ISchool to read to the
* first grade classes
of Ms. Oliver and
. . " Ms. Nichols. The
S- Chipola group plans

e, ,the book "The One
and Only Magnificent
Me," to every first
grader in Jackson
County:


Chipola CQllege PTK promotes

literacy with free books for kids


MARIANNA-The Chipola
College Nu Chi Chapter of Phi
STheta Kappa is promoting literay
by reading to area students and
donathi-:a book to each first
S-grader in Jaackson. County. ,
-- Members of the honor society
purchased copies of "The-One
and Only Magnificent Me," a
children's novel celebrating the
uniqueness ofeVereperson.
Project coordinator sophomore
Jessica Bradley and PTK advisor
Pam Rentz recently visited


Grand Ridge School and Sneads
Elementary School to read the
Sbook to first grade classes and to
present each first grader with their
own copy.
PTK Advisor. Pam Rentz, says,
"Jesica has done an excellent job
in coordinating this project. She
is passionate about promoting
literacy for all age groups and
she should be commended for her
dedication in serving school age
children in the Chipola district."
Rentz also thanked the


principals and teachers for
allowing the Chipola students the
opportunity to visit the campuses
Sand classrooms. "What a joy it
was reading to the students," she
said.
Phi Theta Kappa members
will be visiting all.first grade
classrooms in Jackson County over
the next several weeks to encourage
reading and to present books to the
students. For information about the
project, email jessica.bradley91 @
yahoo.com


MARIANNA-The Chipola College Division
of Workforce Development hosted a meeting to
explore regional training needs of electric power
line distribution technician training.
The meeting was attended by regional electric
cooperatives and companies representing Gulf
Coast Electric Cooperative, Florida Public
Utilities, West Florida Electric Cooperative and
Gulf Power Company.
Bud Riviere, Dean Workforce Development at
Chipola, facilitated the meeting which focused on
the college's plans to implement a new Electric
Line Technician Training and Certification
program in the near future. Riviere said, "The
meeting was very productive in that everyone
attending pledged to support the instructional


' Fundraiser W
The cheerleaders are having
their annual fundraiser. You
can contact any cheerleader to
purchase any of the wonderful
meat products offered. Stock up
now for the holidays.
' Blood Drive 0
The Blood Mobile is coming
to LCHS Thursday, Oct. 1 from
8 a.m. until 2 p.m. Anyone can
give blood; please check into the
front office to sign up. You must
have a picture ID. Anyone under


program and collaborate in terms of sharing
resources in order to provide required training
for Line Techs and related occupations. Chipola
College is, delighted to lead in training for this
exciting career opportunity."
The next step in the process is to review existing
curriculum frameworks and customize training to
local needs. In the process, regional facilities
will be visited in order to plan the construction
of a laboratory site for hands-on training.
Riviere indicates that land for the program has
been procured at the college's Reddoch Annex
site. Some classroom instruction will begin
immediately for incumbent workers. Program
completion is planned for the fall of 2010.
For more information, call (850)718-2268.


17 has to have a parent's signature
to donate.
0 Sports f'
Our volleyball and football
teams are still undefeated.
4 School Pictures 4i
School day pictures are online
at www.pictureladies.com
These need to be ordered
through Ms. Austin at the school
unless you want to use a credit
card, then you can order online.
Seniors need to get their


pictures scheduled as soon as
possible. Deadlines are fast
approaching. The senior picture
for the yearbook must be taken
by-the middle of Nov. unless you
are not using Ms. Austin as the
photographer. If so, the deadline
is the middle of Oct.
& Message of Thanks 4
Teachers and staff appreciate
the cooperation from the students
while the bells weren't working
the this past Thursday and Friday
due to a lightning strike.


We're your one-stop a

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Contact Bill Stoutamire
Phone 674-5974 * Fax 674-8307


Chipola College hosts meeting on

Electric Line Technician training







SEPTEMBER 23, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 21


BHS TIGER


RIGHT: A tangle of Tigers
trounce a Chipley opponent
in Friday's game.

CENTER: Blountstown
High School's Leon Broxton
(#3) moves the ball.

BELOW LEFT: The
coach talks with his
players after
the game.

TONY
SHOEMAKE /
PHOTOS


.< J4


I*"


FOOT


- BALL


Blountstown Tigers survive penalties, win 6-3
by Richard Williams,
Journal sports writer
Blountstown had ten penalties, the
majority for ten or more yards, in their
6-3 win over Chipley Sept. 18, but it
was a five yard penalty on the home
team that kept Chipley from sending
the game into overtime.
With time winding down, a penalty rI
against Chipley moved the ball back .
five yards. On fourth down Chipley
lined up for a 49-yard field goal attempt
that fell just short. It appeared the kick
would have been good from 44 yards.
A wet field, too many penalties,
and some stubborn defense kept both
teams from scoring in the first half
of the contest. Chipley opened the
scoring when they kicked a 24-yard
field goal with 8:34 remaining.in the
third quarter.
Blountstown responded with a
scoring drive that was capped by a
28-yard touchdown run with 5:45
remaining in the third quarter. BHS
missed the extra point and held on to
a 6-3 lead.
Chipley appeared ready to tie the
game with just over eight minutes left
in the game, but they missed a 27-yard
field goal attempt.
The Tigers had opportunities to put
the game out of reach for Chipley, but
Tiger miscues and penalties kept the
game close.
Blountstown kept a late Chipley
drive alive as they were called for a 15-
yard penalty, but it was a 5-yard Chipley
penalty that proved the difference and
helped BHS preserve the three point
win.
The victory moves the Blountstown
Tigers to 2-0 it the year.

by Richard Williams, Journal sports writer Maclay.
Daw gs & Tigers The Blountstown Tigers and the Liberty Bulldogs open The Tigers play host to the Wewahitchka Gators. The
rs their district play against tough opponents Sept. 25. Tigers come into the contest sporting a 2-0 record while
The Bulldogs travel to Port St. Joe to take on the Wewa has a 3-0 record with wins over Maclay, Chipley
open district footbalI preseason favorite, Sharks, who are 2-1 this year with and Jefferson County. The Tigers and Gators have one
wins over Class 3A Bay High and Class 2B Interlachen. common opponent thus far as both teams defeated
action on Sept 25 The Sharks' only loss was to Class 3A Rutherford. Chipley. Blountstown traveled to Chipley taking a 6-3 win
The Bulldogs are 2-0 with wins over Bozeman and while the Gators won at home against Chipley 25-13.


LPI


III








Page 22 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 23, 2009


SHIRLEY
FAYE BLACKMAN
BLOUNTSTOWN-ShirleyFaye Blackman,
73, of Blountstown passed away Wednesday,
Sept. 16, 2009 in Panama City. She was born
on April 18, 1936 in Blountstown, where she
lived all of her life. She was a homemaker and
a member of the Chipola Community Church.
She was proceeded in death by her parents,
Early and Fannie May Sapp and her husband,
Andrew Blackman.
Survivors include six children, Joyce Bruce
and her husband, Pete of Marrero, LA, Linda
Tamayo and her husband, Harlen of Gretna,
LA, Wanda Miles and her husband, Chester
of Port .St. Joe, -Freddie Brown and his wife,
Yvonne of Downing, MO, Macy Lee and her-
husband, Mark ofRobertsdale, AL and Richard
Blackman and his wife, Apryl of St. Mary's,
GA; one brother, Joseph Sapp and his wife
Gwen of Blountstown; seven sisters, Luquita
Whitfield and her husband, Eddie ofAshford,
AL, Martha Jean Burch and her husband, Jack
of Texas, Elizabeth Brake and her husband,
Donald of Mexico Beach, Lynell Tucker and
Glennell Tucker, both of Blountstown, Agnes
Loretta Cole and her husband, James of Altha
and Linda Darlene Lintonland her husband,
Frank bofWewahitchka; 11 grandchildren and
four great-graidchildren.
Services were held Saturday, Sept. 19. at
Peavy Funeral Home Chapel with Reverend
Michael Morris officiating. Interment fol-
lowed in the Mt. Olive Cemetery in Altha.
Peavy Funeral Home in Blountstown was in
charge of the arrangements.
NEDA MAE
DAWSON JACKSON
BRISTOL-Neda Mae Dawson Jackson of
Bristol, 79, passed away Sept. 12, 2009 in
Bristol.
Survivors include a brother, Tom Dawson
of Chattahoochee; three sisters Jan Dawson
of Bristol, Felda Hunter of Chipley and May-
Belle Greenwood of Bakersville, CA; a sister-
in-law, Annie J. Dawson and numerous nieces,
nephews and cousins.
Services were held Thursday, Sept. 17 at
Rockeyville Cemetery in Bristol.
Crawford & Moultry Funeral Home in Chat-
tahoochee was in charge of the arrangements.


BLOUNTSTOWN-George Arthur "Art"
Schmitt, 67, of Blountstown, passed away on
Friday; Sept. 18, 2009. Art was-born in Illinois
but lived in Blountstown for the past thirty
years. He is remembered by his many friends


BILLY
W. DYER
MACCLENNY-Billy W. Dyer, 69, of
Macclenny, passed away Sept. 20, 2009 in
Macclenny. He was born in the Rock Bluff
Community and worked for Montgomery El-
evator for 37 years.
Survivors include his wife, Mary Johnson
Dyer of Macclenny; three daughters, Cheryl
and Tillie Dyer of Macclenny and Terri Os-
teen and her husband, Don of Albany, GA; two
.sons, Tony and Tommy Dyer of MacClenny;
three sisters, Carolyn Rudd and her husband,
Willard of the Providence Community, Katie
Bums and her husband, David of Havana and
Eleanor Brunson of Quincy; three aunts, Jean
Dyer of Sycamore Community, Leona Stou-
tamire of the Blue Creek Community and
Ramona Peters of Blountstown; two uncles,
Massey and Carlton Dalton of Bristol; nine
grandchildren and two great-grandchildren.
A graveside service will be held Wednes-
day, Sept. 23 at 11 a.m. at the Rock Bluff
Cemetery.
Charles McClellan Funeral Home in Quin-
cy is in charge of the arrangements.

NICOLE
WEEKS
GREENSBORO-Nicole Weeks, 24, of
Greensboro passed away Sept. 21, 2009 in
Tallahassee.
She was preceded in death by her grandfa-
ther, Sherrill Phillips.
Survivors include her grandmother, Mary
Sue Phillips and her husband, Glenn, of
Greensboro; her father, William Weeks of
Sarasota; her mother, Susan Sizemore of
Daytona Beach; a brother, Kevin Jarina of
Greensboro; an aunt, Lynn Ward of Greens-
boro and three cousins, Candy Lemieuz of
Chattahoochee, Jami Watson of Telogia and
Kati Phillips of Chattahoochee.
A graveside service will be held on Friday,
Sept. 25 at 11 a.m. at the Flat Creek Cem-
etery in the Flat Creek Community. The fam-
ily will receive friends on Thursday,. Sept. 24
from 5-7 p.m. at the Charles McClellan Fu-
neral Home in Quincy.
Charles McClellan Funeral Home-in Quin-
cy is in charge of all arrangements.


and neighbors.
A memorial service will be held at a later
date.
Adams Funeral Home in Blountstown was
in charge of the arrangements.


e 22 A CRN S E


evis Funeral

Home of Bristol
& Crematory

A// existing pre-need andat need
T contracts are now handed by/ he
SBevi fam/iy and staff

All operations of the funeral process
-will be handled on location at
12008 NW State Road 20.
CALL 643-3636

Todd Wahlquist, Rocky Bevis & Ed Peacock
Licensed Funeral Directors



Peavy Funeral Home

& Crematory


Funeral Services with Dignity,
Caring and Professionalism.
Marion Peavy
A Hometown Funeral Director
You Can Trust and Depend On!


GEORGE ARTHUR 'ART' SCHMITT


COMEI1ORD VAULT MEMORIAL SERVICE
593-6828 * 1-800-369-6828 * Fax: 593-6888
SHwy. 90 W * P.O. Box 933 * Sneads, FL 32460
Pete Comerford - Owner & Operator


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[Al Wrkan Mteia Garnted $^l


i- I--- lllllillDl�-
Let us help you with a memorial of BEAUTY and DURABILITY
Serving Jackson & the Surrounding Counties for 42 Years
Precious Memories "Ifvou cant come to us, give us a call andwe will come to you"


CARING Independent
for your comfort, Funeral Home
needs & concerns. 211 E. Jefferson St., Quincy
. . . . . . . . (850) 875-1529
James C. (Rusty) Black Jack W. Weiler
Owner & Manager Uc. Funeral Director LOCALLY OWNED & OPERATED

WHAT BETTER TRIBUTE
CAN THERE BE?
Honor your loved ones by making their memory part
of our best efforts to defeat cancer. For more infor-
mation, contact the American Cancer Society.
EAST GADSDEN UNIT
P.O. Box 563, Quincy, FL 32353


w









SEPTEMBER 23, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 23


Multiply Louisiana irises by d


by Theresa Friday,
Horticulture Extension Agent,
Santa Rosa County

The most beautiful irises for
Northwest Florida gardens are
called Louisiana irises. These
plants originated in America and
are well adapted to the soils and
climate along the Gulf Coast.
John James Audubon was ap-
parently the first to use the name
"Louisiana iris" to describe the
beardless irises growing wild in
the warm and wet environment
of the Louisiana swamps. Early
French explorers to the Gulf of
Mexico called the Louisiana iris
"les glis de marais" or "glads of
the marsh".
Louisiana irises are derived
from five species, most of
which are native to a limited
area of south Louisiana and the
Gulf Coast marsh areas between
Texas and Florida. They include
Iris giganticaerulea, I. fulva, I.
brevicaulis, I. nelsonii and I.
hexagona. Only in Louisiana
are all five species found. They
are closely related and will in-
terbreed with one'another.'


It is this abil-
ity to interbreed
that has pro-
duced a wide
range of colors,
heightsandblos-
soms. Virtu-
ally every color
of the rainbow
is found in the
flowers of these
iris species.
Louisiana
irises are very
easy to grow.
They thrive in
ditches, . bogs,
along pond
edges, or in gar-
den beds that
stay moist and
fertile. When
planting in water, place the root
ball no-deeper than six inches
below the water surface. They
prefer acidic soil with lots of or-
ganic material.
Each year, Louisiana irises
grow and spread, creating more
underground rhizomes and
shoots. Eventually, the plants
may become crowded, which


can lead to poor flowering. Di-
viding will help keep the clump
the size you want and prevent
the irises from taking over areas
where they were not intended to
grow.
Louisiana irises can be di-
vided and transplanted anytime
from August through mid-Oc-
tober. Unlike most plants, Loui-


siana irises are at
their most dormant
stage in the late
summer, making
now the ideal time
:' to divide them. You
might have noticed
" how many brown
or yellow leaves
S are on your plants.
The first step is
to use a shovel or
garden fork to lift
the Louisiana iris
plants from the.
:' bed. Try to get as
much of their root
systems as pos-
sible, and do not
damage the fans
of new growth at
the ends of the rhi-
zomes. Put them aside in a shady
area, and-hose them down to
keep them from drying out.
To decide where to divide
your irises, look over the clumps
carefully. You will see that
young rhizomes branch off from
the older rhizomes. The younger
rhizomes have a fan of green
leaves at their tips with roots


ividing

growing out from the rhizome
at the base of the leaves. Break
or cut off the young rhizomes at
the point where they branch off
from the old rhizome. Discard
the old rhizome, and replant the
young rhizomes.
Plant the rhizomes horizon-
tally with the fan of foliage
facing the direction you want
the plant to grow, and carefully
cover all of the roots. Space the
rhizomes about 1 foot apart. The
top of the rhizome should be
just below or barely show above
the soil surface. Mulch the bed
about 2 inches deep, and water
thoroughly.
If the weather should become
dry this fall, winter or spring,
water the irises once or twice
a week to keep the plants well-
supplied. An application of fer-
tilizer in February will keep the
plants growing vigorously into
the blooming season.
Southerners who have been
disappointed with the perfor-
mance of the popular bearded
irises or Japanese iris will be
delighted with these beardless
beauties.


Home-Life Craig Brinkley
Agent
craig.brinkley@ffbi

Helping You


is what we do bes


For prompt, professional
attention, and fast fair
claims service, call today.


17577 Main Street I
Blountstown
(850) 674-5471


S Liberty

Post and,

Barn Pole Inc.
Dempsey Barron Road, Bristol
* 643-5995 (off Hwy. 12 N)


TOP
GRADE
7' Posts
Top Size
3-4"
4-5"
5-6"


TOP
GRADE
8' Posts
Top Size
2-3", 3-4"
4-5"
5-6"
6-7"
7-8"


SPECIALTY 8"+
POSTS
1/4 rounds items
1/2 rounds subjectto
Flat Face availability


TOP
GRADE
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Top Size
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2-5.3"
3-3.5"
3.5-4"
4-5"
5"+


FACTORY
SECONDS
8' Corners
under 3"
3-4"
4-5"
5-6"
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FACTORY SECONDS
6'6" Posts, Top Size, under
2-3" 3-4" 4-5" 5"+


We've got the fence posts \
to meet yourneeds.


Eligible biomass conversion facilities should

begin applying for BCAP qualification online
The Florida Acting State however, they nust work wit
Executive Director for the FSA State -the Forest Service and confon
i USDA Farm Service Agency to any rules, permits, or oth,
(FSA) DebraFolsom announced Executive guidance applicable to th
that biomass conversion Director National Forest System.
facilities may.begin to apply for � Biomass conversion facility
c.com qualification under the Biomass annOUnCeS may become "qualified" b
Crop Assistance Program signing an Agreement with FS
(BCAP). This allows producers BCAP state offices. The Agreemer
or owners of eligible material, generallyprovides the framewoi
t who sell to these facilities to implementation that facilitates the making (
apply for matching payments CHST matching payments t
North under the collection, harvest, biomass conversion facility eligible material owners (
storage and transportation which will be paid at a rate of producers who plan to deliv
(CHST) component of BCAP. $1 for $1 per dry-ton equivalent biomass to that facility.
"BCAP will provide financial received from a qualified biomass After a biomass conversion
assistance to owners of eligible conversionfacility, not to exceed facility becomes "qualified
material who deliver the material $45 per dry-ton equivalent. An by signing an Agreement wil
to qualified biomass conversion eligible material owner may FSA, eligible material owner
facilities that use biomass to receive payments for a period or producers, who mark.


produce heat, power, biobased
products or advanced biofuels,"
said Folsom.
An eligible material owner
may be eligible for a matching
CHST payment for eligible
material delivered to a qualified



ACREAGE

FOR SALE
Liberty County
Rd Frontage
From $4,995 per acre
$1000.00 Total Down

OWNER FINANCING,
No Qualifying

TRI-LAND INC.
R. E. Broker
Phone (813) 253-3258


of two years. The purpose of
the matching payments is to
assist biomass producers with
the CHST cost of delivering
biomass.to a qualified biomass
conversion facility.
For example, if a qualified
biomass conversion facility pays
a producer $30 per dry ton for
biomass, the eligible material
owner or producer would be able
to apply for a matching payment
of $30 per dry ton from FSA.
An added benefit of BCAP
is the reduction of fuel loads
on forest and range lands that
reduce the risks associated
with wildfires and other natural
disasters. Contractors who
harvest the forest thinning on
National Forest System land
may be eligible to apply for a
matching payment for those
materials sold to a qualified
biomass conversion facility;


:h
m
er
he

es
y
A
it
-k
of
;o
or
er

in
I"
th
rs
et


eligible material to that biomass
conversion facility, must apply
for the CHST matching payment
program at their nearest FSA
county office before the eligible
material is delivered. Eligible
material owners must provide
an agreement with the qualified
biomass conversion facility
as part of an application for
a CHST matching payment.
After the product is delivered,
a producer must provide FSA
with documentation of product
quantity, quality, and payment
rate. County offices will validate
payment requests information
provided under the terms of the
Agreement with the qualified
biomass conversion facilities.
Interestedbiomass conversion
facilities should contact their
FSA state offices and visit http://
www.fsa. usda.gov/energy to
download the Agreement.


Auto*


IN SURA E: 7 ;'"
J .




:~ :
f. . -. .







Page 24 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 23, 2009


Chipola announces cast for 'Murders of 1940'


MARIANNA-Chipola
College Theater Director
Charles Sirmon recently
announced the cast for
the upcoming, "Musical
Comedy Murders of 1940."
Performances ofthe show are
set for Nov. 5-9.
Several local actors were
cast in the following roles:
Sarah Lovins as Helsa
Wenzel, Piper Williams as
Elsa Von Grossenkruelen,
Austin Pettis as Michael
Kelly, Ben Grande as Patrick
O'Reilly, Mark Lent as Ken
De La Maize, Breanna Kneiss
as Nikki Crandall, Aven Pitts as
Eddie McCuen, Kristina Lopez
as Majorie Baverstock, Matthew
Van Buren as Roger Hopewell,
Kayla Todd as Bernice Roth and
Joe Evans as the radio voice.
This ingenious and wildly
comic romp pokes fun at the
actors and director as they


the mystery is solved in the
nick of time.
The "Slasher" is
unmasked, but not before the
audience has been treated to
a sidesplitting good time and
a generous serving of the
author's biting, satiric and
refreshingly irreverent wit.
For information, call the
theatre director at (850)718-
2227, or email sirmons@
chipola.edu


prepare their performance, a
blizzard cuts off any possible
retreat, bodies start to drop in
plain sight, knives spring out of
nowhere, masked figures drag
their victims behind swiveling
bookcases, and accusing fingers
point in all directions.
The bumbling police inspector
snowshoes in to investigate and


Mystery Dinner begins Nov. 12
BLOUNTSTOWN - The Blountstown Main Street 4th Annual
Murder Mystery Dinner Theatre & Silent Auction is right around
the comer, set for Nov. 12-14 at the Panhandle Pioneer Settlement.
Items are being sought for the silent auction. If you have something
to donate, please contact Lisa at 557-4815 or Kelli at 899-0500.
Tables are also being pre-sold at this time. If you'd like to be a
Dinner Theatre table sponsor you will have your company name on
your table, receive recognition as a sponsor and be able to promote
your business with brochures, etc. in the goodie bags to all guests each
night. Tables are $280 each and that includes 8 tickets.
Contact Kelli at 899-0500 if you'd like to be a table sponsor.


Start your day w
breakfast from.
The

0 * Restaurant
Hwy. 20, Bristol *


ith a hot




643-2264
643-2264


NOTICE OF PRIVATE

Talquin Electric Co-operative Inc.

69gth ANNUAL
MEETING


.eOA~stration


.-30-'10:00 a.m.


SATURDAY,
SEPT. 26,
2009


including 42" flat screen tv, Wii game sySteym,.DVD.
players, iPod, water conservation kits, trolling motor,
electric energy efficiency kits and morel


- Vote to Keep


BOBBY STRICKLAND
Talquin Electric Trustee - District 7


eLifetime citizen of Wakulla Experi
County - 4th Generation *31 ye;
*World War II Veteran - U.S. service(
Navy Destroyer - USS Fred T. Certifil
Berry NREC
*Strong advocate of ade- *NREC
quate power, superior service, *As Ed
at the lowest possible cost. , by Nat

Your Problem is My Problem and I will work to get it resolved.
I also will continue to be available 24 hours, phone calls are always returned.


'ence:
ars active, experienced
e as a Talquin Electric Director
ed:
,A Co-op Director
:A Board Leadership Director
lucated and Credentialed Director
ional Rural Electric Co-operative


850-926-7290


Talquin works closely with its supplier to generate alternative methods of affordable, clean, pollution-free electricity.
VOTE FOR BOBBY STRICKLAND, TALQUIN ELECTRIC TRUSTEE - DISTRICT 7
ON SEPT. 26 8:30-10 A.M. AT JAMES A. SHANKS MIDDLE SCHOOL


C Chipolaf
Fdrd�- rord
A large selection of new and used cars are
now available at Chipola Ford in Marianna!
Ronnie Coley personally invites you to visit him any
time Monday thru Saturday from 8 a.m. to 6'p.m.
Questions? Give him a call at (850)482-4043.
HE IS WAITING FOR YOUR CALL!


LOCATION:
James A. Shanks
Middle School
Gymnasium
1400 W.,King St,
SQuincy, Florida


ENTERTAINMENT:
9:00 - 9:45 a.m.
Enjoy the music of
"Country
Connections"
\ /


1 N









SEPTEMBER 23, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 25


The Edwards family admire the new adaptive, customized 2010 Toyota Sienna van presented to them by Operation Support Our Troops. The special
vehicle will make it easier to transport wounded veteran, Marine Lt. Col. Ty Edwards to visit his family on weekends and to see his children's sports
activities. From left: Mason; Lt. Col. Edwards; Alaina; and Anna Edwards. PHOTOS BY WENDI WINTERS FOR THE CAPITAL



TY EDW ARDS CONTINUED FROMnTHE*FRONTPAGE


the headrests are custom-embroidered with the
U.S. flag. In the rear, there's a drop-down, 10-inch
TV with a DVD player for his children, Mason
and Alaina.
"The country should be doing this everywhere,"
said Skip Stocknick of Crownsville, vice president
of the Class of'74. "Everyone should be involved,
not just former military. This guy sacrificed his
future for all of us. He deserves the benevolence
of society, not just that of academy grads."
During the firefight in Kunar Province near the
Pakistan border, Edwards, an embedded training
team commander, was struck in the forehead with
an armor-piecing bullet that blew off the top of
his head. A local translator shielded Edwards'
body and radioed for help. Navy Corpsman
Stephen Albright, of Germantown, and Capt. Sean
McQuiston, currently stationed at Quantico, Va.,
crawled through the hail of bullets and rockets to
administer first aid to the unconscious officer.
Edwards was airlifted to a military hospital
in Germany and then to hospitals in the United
States. Though he's still paralyzed on his right
side and faces years of physical therapy, he has
come a long way in the past 11 months.
During the week, Edwards stays at the Tampa
Polytrauma Rehabilitation Center, part of the
James A. Haley Veterans Hospital in Florida, 300
miles from his Blountstown, Fla., hometown.
He has been unable to attend his son's football
games or watch his daughter tumble for the Tiny
Mites cheerleading team. The new van may
change all that.
"This van is great," said Edwards'wife, Anna,
34. "It's beyond description. It means freedom.
You don't realize how restricted he's been from
participating in life."
It was Operation Support Our Troops that
stepped in to help Edwards. The group was
founded in 2002 by Mary Kay Salomone, an
Army wife and mother of two Army officers.
Severna Park resident Ste cn Middleton, a retired
Navy commander and president of lhc Naval


Alaina Edwards, daughter of wounded Marine Lt. Col Ty
Edwards, tries out the front seat in the van presented to
her father by the Wheels for Warriors program, part of the
non-profit organization, Operation Support Our Troops. The
headrests were specially embroidered with the American
flag.

Academy's Class of 1974, is chairman of the nonprofit
organization's Wheels for Warriors pir.or.mIl
For the 16th time since April .,'iVi, the group raised
$5(I11,1 to purchase, customize and present a new,
adaptive van to a veteran' � onitiIL i)n oXtvseas 1lhlill.'
Edwards is the fourth Mailnec to receive a van fiom thel


organization - and the first officer.
"We get donations from anywhere we can,"
Middleton said. "A group in Connecticut does a
spin-a-thon every year and gave us $100,000 this
year. Kids send change. Some people send $25
every month. The more money we have, the more
vans -we can give away."
"It's a miracle Ty Edwards is here," said
Salomone, who wore Navy colors for the
occasion. "An Auburn ROTC graduate in 1992,
he's been on active duty for 171/2 years. We
felt for all these years of selfless service to our
nation, we are honored to give him this van and
this special weekend. The van will give his family
independence and freedom they haven't had."
Another nonprofit group, Angel Warrior
Flight, flew Edwards, his wife, his children and.
his father from Florida in a private jet to attend
yesterday's football game and the official post-
game presentation of the van in the stadium
parking lot.
During their whirlwind weekend in Annapolis,
the Edwards family was treated to a special 10
a.m. "Pledge of Allegiance" ceremony at Chick
& Ruth's Delly on Friday. Later, the family
lunched with the midshipmen and Naval Academy
Commandant Capt. Matthew Klunder in King
Hall, toured the renovated Naval Academy
Museum and visited with friends on campus.
"I feel so honored and humbled by all of this,"
Edwards said. "It's so overwhelming, kind and
supportive."
Class of '74 alumnus Tom Luketich of
Severna Park noted: "It's very emotional and
heartwarming. ... It's great there is something we
can do to help those veterans."
For more information about Wheels for
Warriors and Operation Support Our Troops,
e-mail Steecii Middleton at ,ilecemi bilplanet
coin or visit the Web site at www.\\ cst-poinl org/
flimily/support-oiur-troops.
Il-ntii H interx is a , /.'u, ,.- writer who lives
oIn t/hf nIrthl/cA.k P'oniinsiltda.









Page 26 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 23, 2009


-E


ITEMS FOR SALE


Quilting frame, free standing, in
good condition, can be used for all
size quilts, $100. Call 674-8437.
9-23,9-30

Metal spiral staircase, $200. Call
762-8812. 9-23,9-30

Girl's Dream Dazzle 4x4 Jeep, pink
and lavender, 1 seater, good condi-
tion, $40. Call 643-3370. 9-23, 9-30

Power chair, Jawi 1100, $750;.two
20" bicycles, less than a year old, 1
boy's, 1 girl's. Paid $130, each ask-
ing $130 for both. Call 674-2480.
9-23, 9-30

Wedding dress, girl's size 14, pur-
chased at David's Bridal, $30. Call
674-5026. 9-23,9-30

Trampoline, 15 ft. free, you take
down. Call 762-9402. 9-23,9-30

Ladies clothes, very nice, like new.
Sizes from 12 misses to women's
20+, reasonably priced. Call 643-
2072, leave message. 9-23. 9-30

Sofa, love seat, coffee table, 2 end
tables, dinning table with six chairs.
All in good condition, $450 for all.
Call 643-5411. 9-23,9-30
Vanity with flip-open top, has a
drawer and door for storage. Flower
design on door. Light colored wood,
$30. Call 447-4529. 9-23, 9-30

Women's Harley Davidson jacket,
medium, in perfect condition, only
Worn twice. Black with orange and
white Harley emblem on back and
design down sleeves. Paid $130,
asking $90. Call 447-4529. 9-23,9-30

Ab Lounger, practically new, hardly
used, $65. Call 447-4529. 9-23,9-30

Wedding dress, beautiful ball gown
style with elaborate beading and
crystals, long train, strapless. Size
10 but runs small. Bought from
Andrews Bridal, paid $800 asking
$500. Call 447-4529. 9-23,9-30

Treadmill, standard type about 4
years old, not used much. has digi-
tal read outs, kill switch and folds for
storage, asking $100 OBO; Jet 3
Power Chair from the Scooter Store,
deep metallic red in color. Asking
$350 OBO. Call Gretchen at 379-
8101. 9-23, 9-30

Red metal bunk bed (joints weld-
ed) top bed is twin size, bottom bed
is full size futon. Asking $50. Call
Sarah at 379-8101. 9-23,9-30

Dining room table and 4 chairs,
$150; corner entertainment unit,
oak finish with glass doors at bot-
tom, $250; 4 bar stools, $25 each
or $75 for all; telescope, $50. Call
237-2467, 899-1091 or 674-2969.
9-16, 9-23

Queen size bed with everything,
$150; TV, $100. Call 890-751,2.
9-16, 9-23

Computer desk with matching
bookshelf, $30. Call 575-3815.
9-16,9-23
Bruno swing arm lift for wheel-
chair, $400. Call 643-4476.
9-16,9-23
Queen size bed, box springs, head-
board and frame, $125; Tempur-
Pedic topper, $70; chest of drawers
(5 drawers) $20. Call 674-2480.
9-16,9-23


Two old cultivator wheels (approx-
imately 60 years old), makes good
driveway markers, $35 each or $75
for both; black 12 gallon wash pot in
great shape, $225. Call 674-4554.
9-16, 9-23



APPLIANCES


Maytag dryer, works, $50. Call
.237-1702. 9-23, 9-30

Whirlpool portable dishwasher,
black with countertop, asking $100.
Call 447-4529. 9-23,.9-30

Kenmore dryer, used, runs good,
$75. Call 762-9402. 9-23,9-30

G.E. Refrigerator w/ice maker,
white, bought in 2009 $400; Hot-
point gas stove, self cleaning, white,
bought in 2009, $200; gas dryer,
white, front load, $150. Call 643-
2070. 9-23,9-30

GE Frost free side by side refrig-
erator/freezer with ice/water in the
door, $450; microwave, $30. Call
237-2467, 899-1091 or 674-2969.
9-16,9-23

Refrigerator $100; washer $100,
dryer $100. Call 890-7512. 9-16,9-23

Stove, gas cook, $40 OBO. Call
762-3706. 9-16,"9-23

Side by side refrigerator, glass top
stove, dishwasher, $1,000 for all.
Call 209-7506 or 762-4755. 9-16, 9-23


CARS

1995 Cutlass Olds Supreme,
leather seats, runs great, 136,000
miles, $2,900. Call 643-6488.
9-23, 9-30

2005 Chevy Malibu, gold, in good
condition, tinted windows, CD play-
er w/iPod capability, 90,000 miles,
$9,000. Call 447-4529. 9-23, 9-30

1999 Nissan Altima, 210K miles,
good condition, $2,000. Call 566-
3344. 9-23, 9-30

1989 Buick Park Avenue, runs but
needs some work, $800. Call Jeff at
643-8199. 9-16,9-23

2007 Nissan 350Z Sports Car,
69,500 miles. Excellent condition,
new tires, automatic transmission,
CD player, Nismo factory exhaust
add-on, FAST! $34,000 brand new
asking $19,000. Contact (850)899-
6263. 9-16,9-23


MOTORCYCLES

& ATVS


1992 Yamaha Virago 750cc motor-
cycle, maroon, has less than 24K
miles, new drag bar, Harley David-
son leather saddlebags, after-mar-
ket leather seat and windshield (not
currently attached), $2,500. Call
643-6124 after 5 p.m. 9-23,9-30

1995 Yamaha Virago Motorcycle
original low mileage, runs great.
New tires, light, blinker switch, re-
cent tune up. Asking $2,200 OBO.
Call Roger at 379-8101. 9-23,9-30

2001 Harley Davidson Road
King Classic, perfect condition,
3,500 miles, Kelly Blue book value
$13,000. Asking $11,500; 2004 mo-
torcycle trailer, 8x12, 2-axle, paid
$5,000, asking $2,500. Call 294-
9522. 9-23,9-30

2004 Honda CRF50F motorcycle,
4 stroke, 3-speed automatic, great
for a beginner, bike is all stock, in
great shape and never raced. Must
sell, kids outgrown and want bigger
bike, $650 OBO. Call 674-2311 or
643-8006. 9-23,9-30

2007 Suzuki LTR 450 4-wheeler,
$5,000 OBO. Call 209-2700.
9-16, 9-23

2004 Honda Shadow Spirit 1100,
23K miles, one owner, never
dropped, never wrecked, new tires,
$3,500 firm. Call 674-3509. 9-16.9-23



TOOLS AND HEAVY

EQUIPMENT

Anderson 20 ft. gooseneck dump
trailer. Call 544-0354. 9-23,9-30

1978 Massy Ferguson 245 diesel
tractor with 6' finish mower, 2,300
hours, great shape, $7,500. Call
643-5839. 9-23,9-30

5 ft. drum chopper, $850. Call
643-4476. 9-16,9-23

1948 Farmall Super C tractor,
runs, good restoration project, $850
firm. Call 674-3509. 9-16,9-23

55-gallon steel drums with lids,
25, $10 each, excellent storage.
Call 592-5780. 9-16 thru 10-14


TRUCKS & SUVS -HOMES & LAND
1 L " v


1999 Ford Ranger XLT, extended
cab, $650, needs motor replaced..
Call 762-8586. 9-23,9-30

1988 Dodge Dakota 4WD w/camp-
er top, two new tires on front, in
good condition, $1,000 OBO. Call
674-1416. 9-23,9-30

1981 CJ5 4x4 Jeep, chrome rims, 4"
lift, gator orange color, 6 cyl., $7,000
negotiable. Call Ed at 942-6302.
9-23, 9-30
1988 Jeep Cherokee, 4 door, 4WD,
no title, motor, transmission and
transfer case are good, $700 OBO.
Call 643-8263. 9-16.9-23


1.5 Acres in Bristol off Turkey
Creek, $20,000 OBO. Call 674-
4292. 9-23, 9-30

1990 doublewide mobile home.
Must be moved to your location. Call
for info 643-1879 or 643-8237.
9-23, 9-30

Estiffanulga Lakeside land, 2 3/4
acres, no realtors, serious inquires.
only. Call 643-2255. 9-16,9-23

Big lot on Chipola River, located in'
Calhoun County. Call 643-1514.
UFN


THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL




CLASiFLEDS

To place your ad, call 643-3333 by noon Eastern
Time on Saturday. Non-business ads run FREE for 2 weeks.
" .1 11









SEPTEMBER 23, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 27


SSTfIR-


SCOPE*


Week of
Sept27- Oct. 3

ARIES - Mar 21/Apr 20
Aries, no matter how many times
you say something this week it
just doesn't sink in for the recipi-
ent Keep your patience and try
your message again.
TAURUS -Apr 21/May 21
Taurus, there's nothing you can
doto help with a situation that has
already escalated out of control.
.It's best to just sit back and watch
it play out. Romantic ventures
look promising.
GEMINI - May 22/Jun 21
Where have you been, Gemini?
An extended absence or extreme
quiet has led many to ask that very
question. It's time to catch up with
friends and family this week.
CANCER - Jun 22/Jul 22
Cancer, this week you'll have a
good time without many respon-
sibilities. The party will end,
though, when you come back to a
long list of work and things to get
accomplished.
LEO - Jul 23/Aug 23
Leo, you are bound to get a little
recognition this week. Something
you have done is in the limelight
and others will prove quick to
praise you.
VIRGO -Aug 24/Sept 22
Virgo, you will need the help of
others much more in the months
to come. Swallow your pride and
don't be afraid to accept whatever
assistance is given.
LIBRA- Sept 23/Oct 23
Libra, things are about to get a
little hot under the collar at work.
You may wish to lie low while
things blow over, otherwise you
may get caught in the crossfire.
SCORPIO - Oct 24/Nov 22
Scorpio, your finances will be tight
for a few weeks so start thinking
about ways you can creatively
conserve money. Dining out may
have to be squelched for a while.
SAGITTARIUS - Nov 23/Dec 21
Sagittarius, it's easy to lose your
temper in bad situations. However,
you have to learn how to hold your
tongue when others push your but-
tons -especially the case this week.
CAPRICORN - Dec 22/Jan 20
Capricorn, it's not a sign of weakness
to ask for help. Rather, it's a sign that
you know your limits. Furthermore,
others may want to pitch in.

AQUARIUS - Jan 21/Feb 18
When work becomes a bit of a bore,
Aquarius, you're tempted to start
looking elsewhere. The trouble is
the economy has not rebounded to-
the place where that is a wise move.
PISCES -Feb19/Mar 20
Pisces, if you just slow down for
a few days, you'll find that the
things you were hoping for will
land right in your lap.
FAMOUS BIRTHDAYS
SEPTEMBER 27
Avril Lavigne, Singer (25)
SEPTEMBER 28
Naomi Watts, Actress (41)
SEPTEMBER 29
Bryant Gumbel, News Anchor (61)
SEPTEMBER 30
Jenna Elfnan, Actress (38)
OCTOBER 1
Julie Andrews, Actress (74)
OCTOBER 2
Donna Karan, Designer (61)
OCTOBER 3
Tommy Lee, Drummer (47)


14x70 Mobile home on 1 3/4 acres,
3 bdr., 2 bth., with 12x24 built-on
addition. Large pole barn in back.
Located on Robertson Mill/Tanton
Road in Bristol. Call 643-8337 after
3 p.m. serious inquires only.
25/BC/9-23-09

New home on Finley Avenue in
Blountstown, 1,400 sq. ft., 3 bed-
rooms, 2 baths, vinyl siding, laminate
floors in living area, carpet in bed-
rooms, tiled bathrooms, $110,000.
Calr447-0951 or 674-4118.
28/BC/thru 10-7-09



PETS/SUPPLIES


Free puppies: mother is Red Nose
Pit and White English Bulldog. Call
209-0910. 9-23,9-30

Free puppy: 3-month-old Blonde
(mixed) Lab-pointer puppy. Female,
good blood lines from mother/father,
very smart. Call Jodi at 508-1842.
9-23, 9-30

Black & Tan Walker puppies, $50.
Call 209-0506. 9-23,9-30

Bulldog puppies white w/black
ring around one eye, free to a good
home, real sweet, wormed, shots;
jone male kitten, half coon cat. Call
879-6067. 9-23,9-30
Retiring pair of Rat Terriers, free
to a good loving home. Call 762-
8657 or 762-1982. 9-23,9-30

Free to a good home: Black Lab/
mix, male puppy, 2-3 months old,
dropped off in Altha. Call 762-
8623.
9-16,9-23

S �vOuN: .,



LOST: Red Nose Pit, male, ap-
proximately one year old, answers
to Otis, went missing from Hwy. 275
$ in Blountstown. Generous reward
offered for safe return. Call 643-
8089. 9-23,9-30


LOST Dog: Lost in the Hosford
area, female, black Plot/Beagle mix.
Call 509-1678. 9-16,9-23

FOUND: Saturday, Sept. 5: Dachs-
hund dog, between Clarksville and
Hwy. 231. Identify collar to prove
ownership. Call 762-2983.
9-16, 9-23


WANTED

Bolen lawn mower, needed for
parts, reasonably priced. Call 762-
9762. 9-23,9-30

White English Bulldog, male or fe-
male. Call (850)509-4708. 9-16,9-23

Junkcars and trucks, any con-
dition. We pay cash. Call 762-'
8459 or 272-1126 cell. UFN

Tell 'em you saw it in
THE JOURNAL!



CAMPERS/RVS

1973 Terry Camper trailer, excel-
lent condition, everything works,
$1,000 OBO. Call 674-1297.
9-16, 9-23


WATERCRAFT
& SUPPLIES

2000 Lifetyme Aluminum com-
mercial Jon Boat, 20 ft., 70 hp Su-
zuki four stroke, with trailer, $7,000.
Call 643-2375. 9-23, 9-30

1975 18' Starcraft aluminum boat
with 70 hp Evinrude motor, runs
good, paid $2,600 asking $1,800.
Call 294-9522. 9-23, 9-30

1976 Jon Boat, 16 ft., 35 hp
Evinrude, $1,000. Call 643-7858.
9-23,9-30


Cabin boat, 25 ft., built on North
Carolina coast, no power w/tandem
axle trailer, $4,900. Call 762-8812.
9-23, 9-30,10-7


2002 20' Kingfisher Pontoon boat, in Altha
90 hp outboard motor, trolling motor
and fish finder. Has awning, seats Quiet, well
10 comfortably, excellent condition. maintained park
Serious inquires only, $8,500 firm.
Call 209-5076 or 447-4204, 9-16,9-23 With lawn service.
Call 762-9555
House boat, located in Blountstown, Call 7
3 years old, $8,000 OBO. Call 209- or 762-8597
7506 or 762-4755. 9-16,9-23



GUNS/HUNTING

EQUIPMENT 2 bedroom, 1 bath home
on private land in Bristol
Marlin 30/30 Rifle w/scope in good New carpet and vinyl
shape, $350. Call 762-8000. with god roof.
9-23, 9-30 wgood
.300 rent per month
Crimson Trail Laser Grips fits Ber- rent per month
etta 92 or 96, new in the box, $175. $300 damage deposit
Call 643-6041. 9-16,9-23
Call 447-1533 after 6 p.m.
Mathews Switch Back XT, left
handed bow, completely setup w/
sights, shot very few times, mint
condition, sells for $1,000 asking
$600.- Call Marissa at 643-8600. F -V
9-16, 9-23

3 bedroom
YARD SALES 2 bath house with
garage on Twin
Oaks Drive in Bristol
Saturday, Sept. 26 from 8 a.m. until
noon, located on Bridges Street be- $800 a month.
hind Gas Mart on Hwy. 71. House- 643-1864
old items, clothes, shoes, tools, toys
truck, trailer, etc.

Saturday, Oct. 3 the Annual Chris-
tian Home Auxiliary sale, located on
69N in Blountstown behind Christian IMOBILE IO1JtE
Home FWB Church in Recreation FO| R SALE
building. Lots of items for sale. For
more information, call Janet Dietz at 3 bedroom, 2 bath
674-4163. 9-23, 9-30 ,^..,-, ...:A19 -.


Remember, our deadline for
classified is Saturday at noon.


THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL




CGLASSIFIED.S

To place your ad, call 643-3333 by noon Eastern
Time on Saturday. Non-business ads run FREE for 2 weeks.
v -


SUBSCRIBE TODAY TO THE

CALHOUN-LIBERTY

JOURNAL

r- I

Name
Address
City State _Zip_
Phone

Please enclose a check or money order for $18 and mail to:
I The Calhoun-Liberty Journal, P.O. Box 536,
I Bristol, FL 32321
L ------------- --- -------------- J








Page 28 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 23, 2009


New captive wildlife

rules announced
New rules that regulate the keeping of captive
wildlife are now in effect. The Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission (FWC) approved changes to
laws regulating captive wildlife in June after considering
staff recommendations and gathering input from
individuals, groups and government agencies.
New regulations provide that U.S. Department of
Agriculture-registered research facilities 'must maintain
a detailed research proposal and meet the strength
requirements for cages and enclosures. The provision
does not include bison kept for production of meat,
skins or hides; or propagation. Bison, when kept for
propagation only, are exempt from licensing and caging
requirements.
Certain wildlife species have been reclassified from
Class II to Class I, including cougar, cheetah, hyena
and aardwolf. Class I designation means the species is
among the most potentially dangerous to humans. Class II
animals are less potentially dangerous but still represent a
threat to public safety if not kept in suitable conditions.
A "grandfather" clause in the rule provides that anyone
possessing Class II wildlife for personal use will not
have to obtain additional permits now that their animals'
classification has changed to Class I. All Class I wildlife,
except those for exhibition or sale, must have permanent
identification devices (microchips, photographs of
identifying distinct features, such as tattoos, etc.).
Although the new rules are .in effect, animal owners
have until Jan. 1, 2010, to comply with the permanent
identification requirement.
The FWC also reclassified certain wildlife species from
Class III to Class II, including the American alligator,
patas monkey, giraffe, okapi, tapir and certain wild species
of the bovidae (cow) family.
The experience requirements for Class I and II wildlife
possession call for documented experience in caring for
the specific family of the animal except for crocodilians,
which require experience with animals of the same
biological order.
The FWC clarified regulations on the documentation
of experience for corporations: One must have a U.S.
Department ofAgriculture license for possession of Class
I wildlife for exhibition or sale.
The FWC requires critical incident and disaster plans
for Class I, II and III wildlife when the wildlife is housed
or maintained in Florida. In addition, the FWC mandates
critical incident and disaster plans for out-of-state permit
holders traveling in Florida with Class I or II wildlife.
Barriers must be in place when unconfined Class I or
II wildlife are on exhibit to the public. The FWC requires
prior written approval for certain Class I wildlife for
incidental contact with the public, such as when the animals
are under supervision and control of the permit holder
or handler but are subject to spectators touching them.
Animal owners must maintain records of animal
acquisitions, sales and transfers for three years. Owners
of Class I and Class II animals must maintain records of
animals' births and deaths.
Wild or domestic hybrids that are indistinguishable
(having more wild characteristics than domestic) from
the wild animal will be regulated as wildlife. A permit is
required for personal possession of brush-tailed opossums.
The new rules prohibit personal possession of wild foxes,
skunks, bats, raccoons and white-tailed deer.
Nonprofit captive wildlife sanctuaries providing
lifetime care for unwanted or frail captive wildlife are
required to have the animals permanently identified;
the FWC prohibits public contact with such wildlife.
People possessing performing wildlife that can no longer
perform due to age or physical condition may continue to
possess the wildlife for lifetime care under the exhibition/
sale license. These animals must also be permanently
identified.
A rehabilitation permit is not a requirement for
rehabilitating nonnative species. Those rehabilitating
native wildlife are required to meet a timeline for
rehabilitation. It is illegal to comingle sick or injured
normative wildlife in the same cage or enclosure with
sick or injured, or otherwise impaired, native wildlife.
Nonnative wildlife or domestic animals can be used for
fostering orphaned native wildlife.
For more information on captive wildlife, visit
MyFWC.coril/RULESANDREGS/Rules_Captive index.
htm.


Exotic fish poster


is now available


LFish a-d:Wilklite .

Commission
\ . � .._ . . "" . . . " .. ,


.
f:


FWC proposes more


protection for sharks
The Florida Fish andWildlife Conservation Commission
(FWC) on Thursday proposed rules to enhance its long-
standing policy to protect stressed shark populations in
Florida waters.
Sharks have been strictly regulated in Florida since
1992 with a 1-fish-per-person/2-fish-per-vessel daily bag
limit for all recreational and commercial harvesters, a
prohibition on nearly two dozen overfished or rare shark
species, and a ban on the cruel and wasteful practice of
harvesting only shark fins - called finning.
The Commission is proposing to bolster these rules to
further protect sharks in Florida waters and comply with
recent management measures that have been implemented
for sharks in coastal waters from Florida to Maine.
The FWC's proposed rules would prohibit harvest of
sandbar, silky and Caribbean sharpnose sharks from state
waters. Sandbar sharks are considered overfished and
are experiencing overfishing, which means that fishing
pressure is too high to be sustainable. Silky sharks are
highly vulnerable to overexploitation, and Caribbean
sharpnose sharks do not occur in waters off Florida, so
adding this species will have no effect on harvesters in
state waters.
The proposed rules would also establish a 54-inch fork
length minimum size limit for all sharks except Atlantic
sharpnose, blacknose, bonnethead, finetooth and blacktip
sharks and smooth dogfish. This would help 14 species
of sharks reach maturity before they are taken in Florida
waters. The species for which no size limit is required
are considered to be at healthy population levels or don't
warrant a minimum-size limit.
In addition, the proposed rules would prohibit the
removal of shark heads and tails at sea, allow only hook-
and-line gear to harvest sharks, and make other technical
shark rule changes.
.The Commission also directed staff to work with
stakeholders and develop options to possibly add other
shark species to the prohibited list, especially lemon
sharks, and to require the use of circle hooks to harvest
sharks in state waters.
"Florida has controlled the harvest of sharks for nearly
20 years and is recognized as a pioneer and a leader in
shark-management efforts," said FWC Chairman Rodney
Barreto. "We are now proposing to add further protections
to sharks to help ensure the sustainability of our marine
ecosystem that relies, in part, on maintaining healthy
shark populations."
A final public hearing on the proposed shark rules
will be held during the December FWC meeting in
Clewiston.


Wildlife grant dead-

line set for Oct. 15
The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation
Commission's (FWC) Wildlife Legacy Initiative is now
accepting grant applications for the State Wildlife Grants
Program for the 2010-2011 fiscal year.
This program is a federally funded matching grants
program, providing financial support for projects that
address conservation needs as identified in Florida's
Comprehensive Wildlife Conservation Strategy. This
year's criteria focus on the Legacy Initiative's priority
habitats and filling in gaps on species of greatest
conservation need. Preference will be given to projects
addressing multiple species, partnerships and climate
change issues for Florida's fish and wildlife and their
habitats.
Submission deadline is Oct. 15 at 5 p.m.


"Don't release
exotic pets!" That's
the message behind
ra colorful new
poster available
through joint effort
between the Florida
Fish and Wildlife
Conservation
Commission
(FWC) and the


SOME OF FLORIDA'S
EnOac FRESHWATER FIHES



S ....T.r
I -"- ^' ./^M


Florida Outdoor . ..
Writers Association --
(FOWA). The 20" --
x 36" poster, titled
"Some of Florida's !
Exotic Freshwater "
Fishes," displays 17 "
species ofnonnative Hel opPro e turNatra " rc
Don't Relm* Exot c Pbts!
fish es cu rren tly.................................... ..
established in
Florida. These exotic species were introduced by man
from foreign countries and with a couple of exceptions,
are unwanted residents in the Sunshine State.
There are 34 reproducing exotic fishes established
in Florida, according to the FWC's Division of Habitat
and Species Conservation. The poster depicts the most
widespread or commonly caught species. Wildlife artist
Diane Rome Peebles produced 15-ofthe illustrations used
in this poster. The other two illustrations were created by
well-known wildlife artist Duane Raver. University and
federal government researchers familiar with each species
advised the artists to help create attractive, detailed and
accurate depictions.
The new "Exotic Freshwater Fishes" poster was
designed as a sister-publication to the FWC's "Freshwater
Fishes" poster.
"The FWC actually initiated this project several years
ago," said FWC biologist Paul Shafland, who along
with biologist John Cimbaro created the poster's design.
"Without FOWA's generous funding, it would not have
come to fruition at this time. We are very grateful for
their contribution."
FOWA provided $2,500 for printing of 9,300 posters,
which are being made available to the public at no cost.
The FWC hopes to convey a simple message.
"It is illegal to release any nonnative fish or any other
nonnative organism in Florida," said Scott Hardin, the
FWC's exotic species coordinator. "The only way to
really stop exotics is to let people know they should never
release them."
Moreover, some people consider releasing exotic
pets inhumane because most will die shortly after
being released. However, those that survive could have
detrimental environmental effects.
The FWC has a three-pronged approach to exotic
fishes: prevention of illegal exotic fish releases through
education, development of specific regulations, and law
enforcement; assessment of those exotic fishes already
present in Florida to understand what their effects really
are; and management aimed at reducing the abundance
of these unwanted residents. One management approach
is to encourage people to fish for exotic fishes they can
eat.
There are two exceptions: the butterfly peacock bass,
which was purposefully released by the FWC to eat
other exotic fishes, while increasing recreational angling
opportunities in metropolitan Southeast Florida canals;
and the triploid grass carp, which have been introduced
to eat exotic vegetation..

The exotic fishes poster is online in a reduced,
printable size at MyFWC.com/images/Conservation/
FWExotics_Poster_Small.jpg or a full-size poster is
available at any of the FWC's regional offices. More
information about exotic species in Florida is at MyFWC.
com/Nonnatives. In the meantime, the FWC is reminding
Floridians: "Help protect our natural resources - Don 't
release exotic pets!"








SEPTEMBER23, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 29


*- Hunting season's on its way, time to get ready


Summer's officially over and
the early mornings are finally
feeling pleasant. We've finished
our preseason scouting and
hung our tree stands along well-
traveled deer trails, we hope next
to a mature oak tree that'll begin
dropping acorns soon. Finally
- the time of year we've been
waiting for is here - the beginning
of football season and better yet,
opening day of hunting season,
specifically archery.
Archery season provides a
great opportunity to take a trophy
whitetail and is arguably one of
the best times to do so, along
with hunting the rut. If you're
stealthy enough and have done
your homework, you've got a
good chance of having a nice one
walk out in front of you.
Florida's divided into three
hunting zones, and you'll need
to know which zone you'll be
hunting in, because season dates
vary.
Hunting season comes in first
in the South Hunting Zone, where
archery season begins Sept. 12
and ends Oct. 11. Next up is the
Central Zone, which runs Sept.
26 - Oct. 25. In the Northwest
Hunting Zone, archery season
begins Oct. 17 and ends Nov.
15.
To hunt during archery season,
you'll need a Florida hunting


license and an archery permit.
If you're a Florida resident,
a hunting license costs $17.
Nonresidents may pay $46.50 for
a 10-day license or $151.50 for
12 months. The archery permit
costs $5 for in-state and out-of-
staters.
Anyone planning to hunt
one of Florida's many wildlife
management areas (WMAs) must
purchase a management area
permit for $26.50.
All of these licenses and
permits are available at county
tax collectors' offices, retail
outlets that sell hunting and
fishing supplies, or by calling,
toll-free, 888-HUNT-FLORIDA
or clicking www.wildlifelicense.
com/fl.
The most common game to
take during archery season are
deer and wild hog. During this
period, deer of either sex are legal
game, regardless of antler size
(except for spotted fawns). The


daily bag limit on deer is two.
Bag limits on WMAs can differ,
so consult the area's brochure first.
Wild hogs aren't considered
game animals on private lands
and- with landowner permission
- can be hunted year-round with
no bag or size limits. On most
WMAs, there's no bag or size
limits, and hogs are legal to take
during any hunting season except
spring turkey. On a few WMAs,
limits do apply, so again, check
the area brochure.
In addition to hunting big
game, it's also legal to shoot
gobblers and bearded turkeys
during archery season. You
can take only one per day, and
there's a two-bird fall-season
limit. It's against the law to
hunt turkeys in Holmes County
during this period, and you can't
shoot turkeys while they're on the
roost, over bait, while using dogs,
when you're within 100 yards
of a game-feeding station when
feed is present or with the aid of
recorded turkey calls.
If you're quite the marksman,
gray squirrel, quail and rabbit are
three other species legal to take
during archery season, and there's


OUTTA' THE

WOODS

- by Tony Young
Florida Fish and WildUlfe
conservation Comnlsslon
m rro


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Blountstown Phone (850) 674-088
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Rules now allow quota

hunters to bring a guest


If you plan to hunt on a wildlife
management area (WMA) this
season, you should take note
of a change the Florida Fish
and Wildlife Conservation
Commission made to its quota
permit system. Hunters can now
take a friend or family member
on their quota hunt.
For every general gun, archery,
muzzleloading gun, wild hog,
mobility-impaired and spring
turkey quota permit (excluding
Blackwater WMA dog hunts and
Holton Creek WMA mobility-
impaired hunts), one no-cost,
nontransferable guest permit may
be obtained until the last day of
the hunt at tax collectors' offices
and other license agents. To take
advantage of this, the guest must
have a valid management area
permit (unless exempt) as well
as all other necessary permits and
license required for the specific
hunt.
2009-2010 guest permit
worksheets are available for
download at MyFWC.com/
Hunting by clicking under
"Limited Entry Hunts." Either
the quota permit holder or the
guest may fill out the worksheet
and present it to any license
agent.


The Customer ID numbers for
botl the quota permit holder and
guest are needed to fill out the
worksheet, as well as the guest's
date of birth and four-digit hunt
number that identifies the specific
hunt. The hunt number is not
printed on most quota permits,
but it is on the quota permit
holder's quota hunt worksheet,
which also is at the above Web
address.
There are some stipulations
to the guest permit, however.
Both quota permit holder and
guest must enter and exit the
management area together, share
the same vehicle and share a
single person's bag limit. Also,
the guest may hunt only when the
quota permit holder is present on
the area. Additionally, on areas
that have zone tags, the permit
holder and guest must hunt in the
same zone.
Once issued, a guest permit
cannot be changed or given to
another person for their use, so it
is recommended to wait until just
before the hunt before obtaining
it. All guests must have picture
identification when using their
guest permit, and lost permits
may be replaced for $2 at any
license agent.


a daily bag limit of 12 for each.
Only bows may be used during
archery season - no crossbows
allowed, except for hunters with
a disabled crossbow permit.
Bows must have a minimum
draw weight of 35 pounds, and
hand-held releases are permitted.
For hunting deer, hog and turkey,
broadheads must have at least two
sharpened edges with a minimum
width of 7/8 inch.
Legal shooting hours are a
half-hour before sunrise to a
half-hour after sunset. Except
Sfor turkeys, you're permitted to
take resident game over corn or
soybeans on private land. It's
against the law to use such feed
on WMAs.
Some things you can't do
during archery season include
possessing firearms, using
explosive or drug-injecting
arrows, using bows equipped
with electronic computational
or laser sights and possessing a
bow on an airboat in Miami-Dade
County.
You can't use dogs to hunt deer
or hogs during archery season,
but you can use bird dogs if quail
hunting. Otherwise, the only time
you can have a dog in the woods
while hunting is when it's on a
leash and you're using it to trail
wounded game.
Here's hoping all your
preparation and persistence pay
off and wishing you luck on
taking that monster buck. As
always, have fun, hunt safely and
ethically, and we'll see you in the
woods!


IT'S VERY

WISE TO

ADVERTISE

Make the
most of your
business with
an ad in

The
Calhoun-
Liberty

JOURNAL
PHONE
(850) 643-3333
FAX
(850) 643-3334
thejournal@fairpoint.net


BABYSITTING
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before, during and after
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SEEKING ONE FULL-TIME POSITION

Paramedic Position or EMT-B Position

Requirements: n
18 years of age tii
Valid Florida " "
Driver License
Florida Paramedic -
Certification T
(Paramedics)
Valid American Heart ACLS (Paramedics)
Florida EMT-B Certification (EMTS)
Valid American Heart CPR Card
16 Hours Emergency Vehicle Operations Course

Closing date on accepting applications: Sept. 25

Applications may be picked up at the Ambulance Build-
ing or the Clerk's office. For more information call Pa-
tricia Shuler at (850) 643-5866 or 379-8000.

The board reserves the right to accept or reject each
and all applications which they deem to be in the best
interest of the county. 9-16 &9-23-09


Th~ ~~


v









Page 30 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 23, 2009


NOTICE TO RECEIVE
SEALED BIDS

The Liberty County Board of
County Commissioners will re-
ceive sealed bids from any quali-
fied person, company or corpora-
tion interested in constructing:

HOSFORD PARK
ENTRANCE ROAD

Plans and specifications can be
obtained at Preble-Rish, Inc.,
20684 Central Avenue, East,
Blountstown, FL 32424, (850)
674-3300. The bid must conform
to Section 287.133(3) Florida Stat-
utes, on public entity crimes.

This project consists of new con-
struction of the Hosford Park en-
trance road near the railroad (250
LF), installation of approx. 56 LF
of 48" RCP with headwalls and re-
grading of area surrounding pro-
posed road.

Completion date for these projects
will be 120 days from the date
of the Notice to Proceed present-
ed to the successful bidder.

Liquidated damages for failure to
complete the project on the speci-
fied date will be set at $200.00 per
day.

Please indicate on the envelope
that this is a sealed bid, the bid
number and what the bid is for.

Bids will be received until 2:00
p.m. (E.S.T.), on Thursday, Octo-
ber 1, 2009, at the Liberty County
Clerk's Office, Liberty County
Courthouse, 10818 SR 20, Bristol,
Florida 32321, and will be opened
and read aloud on Thursday, Octo-
ber 1, 2009 at 4:00 p.m. (E.S.T.).

Cost for Plans and Specifications
will be $35.00 per set and is norr-
refundable. Checks should be
made payable to PREBLE-RISH,
-INC.

The Board of County Commis-
sioners reserves the right to waive
informalities in any bid, to accept
and/or reject any or all bids, and
to accept the bid that in their judg-
ment will be in the best interest of
Liberty County.

If you have any questions, please
call Kristin Brown at (850) 643-
2771 or Donald Stanley at (850)
674-3300. 9-16T9-9




NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED
BIDS FOR DESIGN-BUILD
FIRMS

The Liberty County Board of
County Commissioners will re-
ceive sealed proposals from any
qualified person, company or cor-
poration interested in designing
and constructing:

LIBERTY COUNTY
GUARDRAIL PROJECT

The Design/Build Firm shall be re-
sponsible for providing plans and
specifications for the project and
constructing in accordance with
FDOT standards. This project
shall consist of the replacement
of guardrail at 10 sites in Liberty
County. Project sites shall include
Hoecake Road, C.R. 67A, C.R.
270, C.R. 2224 and C.R. 1641.
Total guardrail to be replaced is
approximately 4,500 LF plus end
treatments.


Request for Proposals can be ob-
tained at the Liberty County Clerks
Office, 10818 NW S.R. 20, Bris-
tol, FL 32321, (850) 643-2215.
The bid must conform to Section
287.133(3) Florida Statutes, on
public entity crimes.

Completion date for this project
will be 120 calendar days from the
date of the Notice to Proceed pre-
sented to the successful bidding
team. Contractor must be FDOT
qualified. Proof of this qualifica-
tion is required in the proposal
package.

Liquidated damages for failure to
complete the project on the speci-
fied date will be set at $200.00 per
day.

Please indicate on the envelope
that this is a sealed bid, the bid
number and what the bid is for.

Bids will be received until 4:00
p.m. Eastern Time, on October
6 , 2009, at the Liberty County
Clerk's Office, Liberty County
Courthouse, Hwy 20, Bristol, Flor-
ida 32321, and will be opened and
read aloud on October 6, 2009, at
4:30 p.m. Eastern Time. The pub-
lic is invited to attend.

Cost for Request for Proposals
will be $ 50.00 per set and is
non-refundable. Checks should
be made payable to LIBERTY
COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY
COMMISSIONERS.

The Board of County Commis-
sioners reserves the right to waive
informalities in any bid, to accept
and/or reject any or all bids, and
to accept the bid that in their judg-
ment will be in the best interest of
Liberty County.

If you have any questions, please
call Board of County Commission-
ers Office at (850) 643-5404 or
Kristin Brown at (850) 643-2771.
9-16T9-30-09

NOTICE OF INTENT TO
ADOPT ORDINANCE 09-05



Notice is given that the Board of
County Commissioners of Liberty
County, Florida, proposes to adopt
the following Ordinance:

AN ORDINANCE OF THE COUN-
TY COMMISSION OF LIBERTY
COUNTY, FLORIDA, AMENDING
CHAPTER 5 OF THE LIBERTY
COUNTY LAND DEVELOPMENT
REGULATIONS; PROVIDING
FOR CONFLICTS; PROVIDING
FOR SEVERABILITY; AND PRO-
VIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE.

A public hearing on the Ordinance
will be held at 7:00 p.m. east-
ern standard time, on October 6,
2009, at the Liberty County Court-
house, Highway 20, Bristol, Flori-
da, 32321.

All interested persons are invited
to attend. A copy of the proposed
Ordinance may be reviewed at
the Board of County Commission-
ers Office in the Liberty County
Courthouse. In accordance with
the Americans with Disabilities
Act, persons needing special ac-
commodation or an interpreter
to participate in this proceeding
should contact the County Com-
missioners Office at (850) 643-
5404 at least seven days prior to
the date of the hearing. Persons
are advised, that if they decide to
appeal any decisions made at this
hearing, they will need a record


of the proceedings, and for such
purposes, they may need to en-
sure that a verbatim record of the
proceedings is made which record
includes the testimony and evi-
dence upon which the appeal is to
be based.

Dated this 14th day of September,
2009.

Liberty County, Florida
Robert Hill, Clerk to the
Board of County Commissioners
9-23-09

Notice of Exchange Proposal
Land-For-Land Exchange

Notice is hereby given that the
Forest Service (FS), United States
Department of Agriculture, is con-
sidering an exchange of land (in-
terests in lands) with The Nature
Conservancy, under the authority
of the Bankhead Jones Farm Ten-
ant Act, P.L. 75-210; the Federal
Land Policy and Management Act
of 1976, P.L. 94-579; and the Fed-
eral Land Exchange Facilitation
Act of 1988, P.L. 100-409. The
lands (interests in lands) under
the jurisdiction of the FS that are
being considered for exchange
are described as:

Tract W-1979 (Part of W-60), also
known as the Flea Market Tract,
being approximately 114.83 acres,
situated and lying in the N1/2 of
Section.25, Township 1 South,
Range 1 West, Tallahassee Me-
ridian, Leon County, Florida, and
managed as part of the Wakulla
Ranger District, Apalachicola Na-
tional Forest, National Forests in
Florida.

The non-Federal lands (interests
in lands) are described as: Tracts
A-960a,b,c,d,e,f,g otherwise'
known as the Post Office Bay
Tracts consisting of all of Section
12, and part of Section 13, T. 4 S.,
R. 8 W., and part of Section 5, T.
4 S., R. 7 W., all in Liberty Coun-
ty, Florida. The legal description
consists of (7) pages, prepared by
Edwin Brown and Associates and
can be found at the Forest Head-
quarters Office. Total acreage is
approximately 1,377.44 acres.

Any or all of the above described
lands (or interests in lands) may
be exchanged if the values are
equal. If the values are unequal,
either party may equalize the val-
-ues by making a cash payment,
not to exceed 25 percent of the
value of the lands (interests in
lands) transferred out of Federal
ownership.

The Forest Service proposes to
acquire land with freshwater for-
ested shrub wetland over a sub-
stantial portion of Section 12 and
part of Section 13 in T. 4 S., R.
8 W. and a very small portion of
Section 5, in T. 4 S., R. 7 W. in
Liberty County, Florida. There are
no wetlands or floodplains on the
Federal tract.

Persons claiming such properties
or having valid objections to this
proposed exchange must file their
claims or objections with the For-
est Supervisor, Forest Service, U.
S. Department of Agriculture, 325
,John Knox Rd, Suite F-100, Talla-
hassee, FL 32303-4160, within 45
days after the initial date of publi-
cation of this notice.

Publication dates: September 23,
September 30, October 7, Octo-
ber 14, 2009. 9-23T102109


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT

IN AND FOR CALHOUN
COUNTY, FLORIDA

FILE NO: 2009 18 PR

PROBATE DIVISION

IN RE: ESTATE OF HENRY KIR-
MET BROXTON,
Deceased. /

NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION

The Administration of the Estate
of HENRY KERMIT BROXTON,
deceased, Case Number 2009
18 PR is pending in the Circuit
Court for Calhoun County, Florida,
Probate Division, the Address of
which is Calhoun County Court-
house, 20859 Central Avenue
East Room 130, Blountstown, FL
32424. The name and address of
the personal representative and
personal representative's attorney
are set forth below.

ALL INTERESTED PERSONS
ARE NOTIFIED THAT:

All persons on whom this notice is
served who have objections that
challenge the validity of the Will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of this Court are required to
file their objections with this Court
WITHIN THE LATTER OF THREE
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE-OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE
OFA COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.

All creditors of the Decedent and
other persons having claims or
demands against Decedent's es-
tate on whom a copy of this notice
is served within.three.months after
the date of first publication of this
notice must file their claims with
this Court WITHIN THE LATTER
OF THREE MONTHS AFTER
THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUB-
LICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR
THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE
OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.

All other creditors of the Dece-
dent and persons having claims


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against the Decedent's Estate
must file their claims with this court
WITHIN THE LATTER OF THREE
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE
OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.

ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.

The date of first publication of this
notice is Sept. 23, 2009.

Attorney for Personal Representa-
tive

WILLIAM R. WATERS, JR.
Fla. Bar No. 71080
WATERS & ASSOCIATES, PA.
117 South Gadsden Street
Tallahassee, FL 32301
(850) 692-3841 - telephone
(850) 692-3849 - facsimile

9-23 T10-21-09


INVITATION FOR BID

Bids for furnishing all labor, ma-
terials, equipment, and services
required for the Work known as
Cross City Roofing, FL15-6 A & FL
15-6 B, Cross City Florida will be
received until 10:00 AM local time
on 15 October 2009 at the office
of the Housing Authority (PHA)
indicated below. At this time and
place all bids received will be pub-
'licly opened and read aloud.

Without force and effect on the
Bidding Documents and the pro-
posed Contract Documents, the
work required is briefly described
as: Partial modernization of twen-
ty four (24) Dwelling Units and one
(1) attached Maintenance Build-
ing and sixteen (16) Non-dwelling
Buildings at two (2) sites known as
FL 15-6 A and FL 15-6 B in Cross
City, Florida. The work consists
of, but is not limited to, providing
deck sheathing repair, thirty pound
(301b) felt, one inch by four inch
(1"x4") yellow pine lathing, two
foot (2') on center over existing
asphalt shingles secured to roof-

MR1A
contined n ae. 31


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SATURDAY NIGHT

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q


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!







SEPTEMBER 23, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 31


WE HR VE E\VERTH]Ng Y011 NEED
TO C(-TCH THE Big, 0)E!
FiSHiriG SUPPLIES
RODS, HOOKS, WEIGHTS,
TACKLE, LP GAS, LIVE BAIT:
CRICKETS, WORMS, ETC.
S wwvw stncklandsace conm
STRICKLAND'S
HARDWARE .
- .'.:o'l . . .. -B ' - a
| ,*-' OltC o0 .. -,D : V

fTQ 4VERTJ$- IN THE
SP KVICE DIRECTORY,

.k-c 43- 3 3 3 -
't-63


Arrant's Stump Grinding
&TractorService
m Stump Grinding
P Bush Hog TBox Blade
".Discing MLawn Care
LICENSED& INSURED -
S,643-3524or294-0462
! ,' n //.4',:,+,t. son.'


William's Home '
Improvements
"No Job Too Big or Small"
Licenr-rd & Irinured Crilraljor A rooler
Cricr-aie u ork

sIdnren c e PnclurE

FOR FREE ESTIMATES -
Call 674-809
I:#' F a . . : - . I


- ., - --." - ---,---- - -"
*IiEw Ht rf ._ b iPU., AIi ."'
*1IE W HOM1E * P G PAG E A D D I T :ll rj C . .1 N
PE MODELI rG FOC 11* i A T ] i rj , ri and
* ELECTRICAL .POPFC ES -DECKS Jackson
- SCREE I OOP M 3 S UR RO MS Counties
Clint Hatcher, owner
S 2888 Apalachee Trail * Marianna * 850-272-0144
S BuildngLIc # RR282811298 Eleclrcal L. C b ERI30n 403-


Whaley Heating &

Air Conditioning

. (850) 674-4777
SERVICE * UNIT REPLACEMENT
. I- j' INSTALLATION ';
Accepting: "".
FL LC CMC12450 VISA FILTERS ANY SIZE
- 77


LIBERTY TIRE COMPANY
We specialize in sales and repair of tires for:
c Commercial Trucks and Trailers, OTR
Equipment. Farm Equipment, Passenger.
Car & Light Truck Tires
Come see us for all your tire needs or
L give us a call for roadside service, oil
1' 33 .1 changes & tire rotation.


aGENERAC K E N

AUTHORIZED SALES & SERVICE DEALER UD D

Portable & Automatic Standby Generators

INSTALLATION * SALES * SERVICE
call (850)545-4442 or online at power@kenruddelectric.com.
....- ,f


STUM

GRINDI
"-, Reas
ra
, Free e,
Call Chris N
674-8081
643-8561 (1
... . _ . __ -
STRICKLAN
ACE HARDWA
r :, !:L r. T. , :.: ..:. : T . ,i ,-
r-, . ,,_j .jl J-L ,_I=. -i.ill i t r_'
\\'aier-esung ierxi
pool cheniicls
in ground & dabou
ground pool parts
mwwo incklandsace c
10898 NW SR 20 in Br
PHONE 18501 643-23


P FLORIDA
CONCEALED WEAPONS
ING PERMIT CLASS 9
unable Classes available every day.
Cost is "50.00 per person
tes (group discounts available)
estimates 'TEN MILE CREEK
issley DEFENSE, LLC.
r Call James at 850-272-5193 or
or email us at
Cell) Imcdelense@gmail.com

D'S :
kRE
.E .' G rantham's

2 Lawn Care
Mowing * Weedeating
Edging * Cleanup * Etc.
iom ~
SI I 5


Greg Willis

Tree Service
* Tree Removal
* Tree Trimming
Phone: 643-5582 * Mobile: 643-7372
Mobile: 643-7107
10376 N. W. Willis Way in Bristol * LICENSED & INSURED
i *


tops with three inch (3") screws,
new 29 gage metal roofing, new
drip edge, rake trim, new Profile
Vent by Ventco, new flashings and
flues at all existing roof penetra-
tions and associated work.
Each prospective bidder shall
follow Buy America require-
ments of section 1605 of the
America Recovery and Rein-
vestment Act and use only iron,
Steel and manufactured goods
produced in the United States
2 on this project as well as pro-
vide energy star rated equip-
ment.


The work required is fully de-
Sscribed in the Bidding Documents
Consisting of the Project Manual
' and the Drawings.
Proposed Contract forms, Draw-
ings and Project Manual are on
file in the office of the Consultant,
Mr. Randall O'Barr, Post Office
SBox 357, Baldwin, Georgia 30511,
telephone @ (678) 231-0675 OR
FAX (706) 754-4121. Bidding
Documents may be obtained by
S providing a NONREFUNDABLE
payment of $35.00 perset of Doc-
uments to the Consultant, do not
contact the PHA. No partial sets
will be issued. Checks should
be made payable to Mr. Randall
O'Barr and mailed to the above
address. Information regarding
this Project, including a list of the
Plan Holders will be provided upon
request.
Each bid shall include Bid Guar-
antee in an amount equal to five
percent of the Bid. Provide as a
certified check or bank draft pay-
able to the PHA; U.S. Government
Bonds, or as a properly executed
Bid Bond with surety acceptable
to the PHA. A Surety Company
executing the Bid Bond must be
authorized to transact business
in the Project State, and must
S appear on the most current U.S.
Treasury Department's Circular
No. 570. The successful bidder
is required to provide satisfactory
Performance and Payment Bonds
prior to execution of the Agree-
ment.
Refer to provisions for equal em-
ployment opportunities and pay-
ment of not less than minimum
salaries and wages indicated in
the Project Manual.
Each bid shall include THE
SIGNED ORIGINAL AND TWO
CONFORMED COPIES of the fol-
lowing:
A properly executed Bid Form.
A properly executed Bid Guaran-
tee.
A properly executed Non-Collusive
Affidavit.
Small businesses and minority
firms are urged to submit propos-
als. Certification as a Minority-
business Enterprise (or number of.
partners, shareholders, employ-
ees who are members of minor-
ity classification or are women)
should be included in the Bid pro-
posal. Refer to Articles 38, 39 and
40 of The General Conditions.
The PHA reserves the right to re-
ject any and all bids, and to waive
irregularities and formalities in the
bidding. No bids may be with-
drawn for a period of sixty days
subsequent to the opening of bids
without PHA consent.
Northwest Florida
Regional Housing Authority
Housing Authority (PHA)
Post Office Box 218
(5302 Brown Street)
Graceville. Florida 32440
9-23 & 9-30-09


The Calhoun-Liberty Journal
Serving two counties HOURS: ? a m - 6 pm Monday thru Fri-
. , 1a, . .da 94 a m . p m Saiurday i 'T


10781 NWSR 20 Ws
Brltol, Fl 132321
[]


r LO n.-Iri 322 S43-.3


/I-'/ J
12905 NW SR 20 in Bristol * www.whitfieldrecycling.com
-We Purchase: -Phone: (850) 643-4797
SCpper , um Fax: (850) 643-5001
SSiee. reparea ( H0OURS
and Unprepared Mon througn Fri
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W n-site baling, torchng & roll-off services available
ick-up service available for large quantities.
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CLAY O'NEAL'S
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,j--1 '-.Dozer and Excavation work .'
* Demolition * Pond Digging * Road ',
Building- Field Fence or Barbed Wire"
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Altha, F 32421 ears (850) 832-5055
expenence Cell (850) 832-5055,t


61


643-2939






Page 32 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 23, 2009


C


T


i


$ck.'on County'

2009 FORD RANGER 009 FORD F-150 STX
SPORT 4L SUPER CAB SU B E***r
p V6,. 5 apd., Sg eor.
pwr. pkg., low pkg.

AIR~r


Chipola Ford Discount -
. Rptall Customer Cash -


MSRP-
Chipola Ford Discount -
. . Retail Customer Cash -


s New &UsedTruCenter

009 FORD F-250 4X4
KING RAIN REW CAB
., |,i P ' moonroof, diftl , auto.,


MSRP-
Chipola Ford Discount -
.Retail Customer Cash -


FORD EXPLORER
DDIE BAUER
Ithr., moonroof,
Sync


MSRP.- 34,860
Chipola Ford Discount - $1,865
.Retail Customer Cash - S4 000
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2006 FORD
F-150 XL
V6, auto., one owner,
#9210A
$12.995


Chipo
Retail


TAURUS SEL
alloys,
climate control.
I reverse sensing


q -s28,30.
ta Ford Discount - $131
1I Customer Cash - 3,00(
credit Bonus Cash - $50C
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va, auto., cu,
#R3049A
$16,995


I MUSTANG GT
�t.^ VS. 5 spd..
Slouvers. spoller
side scoops


MSRP-33,
Chipols Ford Discount - $ ,1 2
Retail Customer Cash - $ 1 0
r4 Credit Bonus Cash - $ 100
AVE .NOW 1
I". W-1 � @PAP
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2007 FORD F-150XLT
SUPER CAB 4X4
5.4L V8, console, two-tone.
low miles, #9244A


2006 FORD F-150
LARIAT SUPER CREW
4x4, Ithr., two-tone paint;
climate control, #3099
$26.995


2007 FORD EXPLORER
SPORT TRACK LIMITED
V8, Ithr., hard cover, loaded,
#R3092


2008 FORD F-Z50
LARIAT SUPER CAB
4x4, auto., diesel, capt.'s
chairs, 7k miles, #92098
$37.995


ZUM FURUD
ESCAPE XLT
auto., pwr. pkg., tilt, cruise,
nice SUV, R3072


2007 CHEVY TAHOE
LT 4X4
leather, fall power, loaded,
#10124A


-2605 FORD
FIVE HUNDRED SEL
Ithr., pwr alloys,
$10,995.


V6, auto., pwr. pkg.,
cruise, alloys, #P3109
$16.995


2005 FORD
MUSTANG
auto., pwr. pkg., CD,
$1111A995
$12,995


2009 CHEVY
MALBU LT
new body style, Ithr.,
nice, #P3102
$17.995


2008 MERCURY
MARQUIS LS
pwr. pkg., Hhr., alloys,
#P3081
$15.495


Ithr., loaded with luxury,
#P3097
$33,995


.m . ARIAN A, FL * (850) 482-4043 * 1.866.5873673

www.ChipolaFord.com ales Manager
. . . . .. . . . . . . .. . .. .. 'l l I l l 1 I I I I 1 .1 1 1 11 1 II I II+ I I r - i , I ' II 1 ' " ' . . .


*4,845
*5,000


2008 FORD
EXPLORER XLT
V6, 3rd row, dual air.
appearance pkg., P3089


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$4,