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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00027796/00214
 Material Information
Title: The Calhoun-Liberty journal
Portion of title: Calhoun Liberty journal
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Calhoun-Liberty Journal
Publisher: Liberty Journal, Inc.
Liberty Journal
Place of Publication: Bristol, Fla
Creation Date: September 9, 2009
Copyright Date: 2010
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Bristol (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Liberty County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Calhoun County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Liberty -- Bristol
United States of America -- Florida -- Calhoun
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in Sept. 1991.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 11, no. 38 (Sept. 18, 1991).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AKN4565
oclc - 33425067
alephbibnum - 002046630
electronic_aleph - 003298625
electronic_oclc - 60662266
lccn - sn 95047245
System ID: UF00027796:00214
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly journal (Bristol, Fla.)

Full Text




























SHERIFF: Man's death

due to 'natural causes'


Relative finds


man's body on


floor of home
by Teresa Eubanks, Journal Editor
The death of a Bristol man whose body was
-found on the floor of his home appears to be from
natural causes, according to Liberty County Sheriff
Donnie Conyers.
The deceased was identified as 51-year-old
Joseph Mathis of 11520 NW Harry Donar Road.
The body was discovered when Alvin Mathis,
47, went to check on his brother around 11 p.m.
Thursday.
According to the report filed by Deputy Chad
Smith, Mathis entered his brother's home and saw
him lying face down between a couch and a coffee
table. Realizing he was dead, Mathis left to contact
the sheriff's department.
When deputies arrived at the scene, they found
the elder Mathis on the floor, according to the
report.
There were no signs of a struggle and no
apparent injuries on the body.
Investigators examined the scene soon after
the discovery. The body was removed just before
2 a.m. and taken to the Medical Examiner at
Tallahassee Memorial Hospital, where an autopsy
was conducted.
While the sheriff's office is waiting for the
medical examiner's report, "everything was
consistent with a death from natural causes," the
sheriff said. He noted that Mathis "had a lot of
medical issues."


Univ of Florida History Library
PO Box 117007
Gainesville Fl 32611


S2 12/2912009
1846


includes :O CP", J. BERT




JOURNAL
S Volume 29, Number 36 h Wednesday, Sept. 9, 2009 " .


Three cases of Swine Flu


now confirmed at LCHS


by Teresa Eubanks, Journal Editor
Three LibertyCounty High
School students have been
diagnosed with the H1N1
Swine Flu virus, according to
Principal Harriet Brady.
. The first case was
discovered through the
Liberty County Health
Department; the other two
were made known to the
school by notes from family
doctors, she said.
As of Tuesday afternoon,
the Health Department had
not received reports of any
Calhoun County HIN1
cases, according to Dr. Gene
Charbonneau, director of the
Calhoun and Liberty County
Health Departments. "If w-
went out there and search
for it, I'm sure we could
said.


"Now that the kids are back in school,
we will see it start to spread," he said.
"Students need to stay home for seven
days from the onset of symptoms,"
Charbonneau said. "If they are fever-free
for 24 hours, they should be O.K." .
The symptoms for flu and the emerging
HIN1 flu are about the same, he said, but
there are a couple of distinctions. Those
affected by H1N1 will have longer lasting
fevers and more respiratory problems.
"The schools seem to be adapting
well," he said, noting, "They're not
in panic mode." Administrators and
staff have been busy passing out hand


7~~i


"
-ip "a


Emily Kern wipes down a tabletop with
disinfectant before class at Tolar School.


the number ofstudent
Llab ci.es from last
week, which showed:
LIBERTY CO.
ABSENCES
LCHS .....67
Tolar........36
Hosford..... 1
CALHOUN CO.
ABSENCES
BHS ...50
BMS...15
BES...'..2
Carr....1..
Altha.....7


sanitizers and tissues in hopes of lessening the spread
of the new virus.
Students returned to school just a couple of weeks
ago. The Health Department is tracking student
absences to detect clusters that could indicate the
spread of the virus in specific areas.
About 20 of the 50 students sent home from
Blountstown High School are believed to have
had symptoms similar to the flu. Of.last week's 67


students who left LCHS, at
least 50 appeared to have
flu-like symptoms, he said.
Five more were sent home
from LCHS Monday.
Health SupportAide Violet
Deese, who has worked at
the LCHS clinic for the past
seven years, said last week's
absences were unusually
high.
"Teachers are very aware
of the problem," she said,
noting that they're on the
lookout for symptoms and
quick to send them to the
school clinic to be checked.
"We're concerned about the
kids and we want the best for
them. We really go the extra
m.l +-\ o-n th ,i t- loxr ore the


,1i "ll'l,.ll ,ll,- it nds,'
^UUll1l1 H! If OJW I^l\., ~lllal uot .Jvril (IV,
she said.
"We're taking every precaution," said
Brady. "School bus drivers are wiping
down seats and janitors are working
overtime." She said parents have been
good about helping classes keep stocked
up on hand sanitizers, Clorox wipes and
Lysol,
On Friday, the health department
delivered surgical masks tb the schools
to use on those who become ill. Students
exhibiting flu symptoms will wear the
masks and be isolated in a separate room
until a family member can pick them up
from school.


Charbonneau said "a little social distancing" can
help reduce the spread of the virus, and suggests
a hearty 'hi' instead of a handshake upon greeting
someone.
Seasonal flu shots are now available at the health
departments,.but there may be a bit.more of a wait
for the two-shot vaccine for Swine Flu. He said it
may not be available until the end of the month or
early next month.


500 Ib. gator
caught at
River Styx
PAGE 9

Two youth
hunting
Field Days
planned
PAGE 9


Sherifs Log...2 Community Calendar...4


Three DUI
arrests
made
PAGE 2

Man charged
with taking
items from
rental home
PAGE 3


Commentary...6, 7 News from the Pews...8 Farmer's Almanac...9


Bithdays...10 The Stork Report...11 Weddings...11 Schools...14 & 15 Obituaries...18 Classifeds...20 & 21


R`-l~�i?







Page 2 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 9, 2009


Late-night-visit results in DUI


A woman paying a late-night
visit to a friend was taken into
custody for driving under the
influence, according to a report
from the Florida Highway
Patrol.
After radar showed her four-
door Kia was traveling 82 mph
in a 60 mph zone, FHP Trooper
Wes Harsey turned on his patrol
lights to signal 61-year-old Betty
Hartzell to pull over. Hartzell,
who was traveling west on S.R,
20, continued driving for another
quarter of a mile before making
a left turn without signaling into
a private drive at Bob Mayo
Lane in Clarksville at 12:35 a.m.
Sunday.
After fumbling pasther driver's
license in her wallet several
times, Hartzell finally located it
and handed it over to the trooper,
stating, "I don't have whatever
else it is you're looking for."
When asked why she was


Texting bl
A reckless driving complaint
resulted in the DUI arrest of
46-year-old Michael Warren
Money Aug. 29, according to a
report from the Calhoun County
Sheirff's Office.
A deputy was alerted around
6:40 p.m. that a white Chevrolet
pickup was traveling dangerously
along S.R. 20, just west of
Clarksville.
As he approached the
intersection of S.R. 20 and
Hwy. 73, the deputy spotted the
westbound vehicle and turned
to follow it, with two vehicles
between them. The truck went
off the edge of the road twice and
over the center line twice. During
that time, he ;vas passed by five
westbound vehicles.
When he stopped Money the
deputy told him of reports of him
passing vehicles at a high rate of
speed. Money admitted that he
may have been driving over the


ARRESTS
compiled by Journal Editor
Teresa Eubanks

speeding, she replied: "I have an
excuse, sir," and said that she was
going to see a friend.'
The trooper noted the strong
odor of an alcoholic beverage
coming from her facial area and
asked if she had been drinking.
Hartzell admitted to having two
beers earlier in Blountstown.
When asked if she would
take a roadside sobriety test,
she said, "Yeah, but this is
embarrassing."
The trooper's report noted
that Hartzell was unsteady on
her feet and swayed from side to


side. She repeated that.she had
only consumed two beers and
said her difficulty in performing
the sobriety tests was due to her
fibromyalgia.
At 12:45 a.m., she took a
portable breath test, which
resulted in a. 154 reading, which
is nearly twice the legal blood
alcohol limit for Florida. She
was handcuffed and taken to the
county jail, where she gave two
more breath samples to determine
her level of intoxication. The
first sample measured .125; the
second was .121.
Hartzell was emotional, going
from cursing, making derogatory
gestures about the person she
had planned to visit, laughing,
making jokes and then crying, the
trooper noted in his report.
In addition to the DUI
charge, Hartzell was cited for
unlawful speed and no proof of.
insurance.


named for bad driving


limit and passed a few cars. He
said the swerving was probably
the result of him texting his wife
while driving.
When asked if he had been
drinking, Money said he had
one alcoholic drink two hours


earlier.
After failing a roadside sobriety
test, Money was arrested. Breath
samples taken to determine his
level of intoxication resulted
in two .114 readings. The legal
limit for Florida drivers is .08.


Driver found passed out

with motor still running
A 20-year-old man was charged with DUI after a Calhoun County
Sheriff's Deputy found him passed out behind the wheel of a.truck
with the lights on and mbtor running at 3:28 a.m. Sunday.
A deputy responding to a suspicious vehicle report found Eric
James O'Bryan's Toyota pickup facing east in the westbound lane
of N.E. Oak Street.
It took three attempts to awaken the driver, who had thrown up on
the pavement and on the inside of the driver's side door.
When asked if he had been drinking, O'Bryan said he had con-
sumed a six pack of beer. After failing a roadside sobriety test,
O'Bryan was taken into custody. At the jail, he consented to a breath
test, which resulted in blood alcohol readings of. 104 and .107. Flor-
ida's legal limit is .08.


CALHOUN COUNTY
August 31
*Maria Thurman, VOCP, CCSO.
'Travis Leon Carter, VOCP, CCSO.
*Mersadies Amberg, principle to criminal mischief,
CCSO.
*Jeffery Jay Uhrick, possession of cocaine, CCSO.
September 1
*Robert Carl Gadsen, domestic battery, BPD.
*Billy Comer, Jr., possession of cocaine with intent
to sell within 1,000 ft. of place of worship, possession
of cocaine with intent to sell within 1,000 ft. of public
school, possession of cocaine, VOSP, CCSO.
*Justin B. Watson, sale of cocaine within 1000 ft. of
public housing, CCSO.
September 2
*Thomas Reddick, Liberty Co. warrant (posses-
sion of controlled substance with intent to sell/deliver
within 1.000 ft. of place of worship, sale or delivery of
controlled substance within 1,000 ft. of place of wor-
ship), CCSO.
*Sandy Griffis, driving while license suspended or
revoked, CCSO.
*David Griffin, Jr., grand theft, CCSO.
*Erica Brown, VOCP, CCSO.
*Anthony Knight, failure to appear (5 times), writ of
attachment, CCSO.
*Justin Watson, sale of controlled substance within
1000 ft. of public housing, possession with intent to
sale cocaine, BPD.
September 3
*Jena Diane Demaree, VOSP, CCSO.
*Craig Holmes, VOSP, BPD.
September 4
*J.D. Owens, sale of cocaine within 1,000 ft. public
school, BPD.
September 5
*Steve Shiver, theft from a 65-year-old person,
CCSO.
-Napoleon Byrd, possession of cocaine, BPD.
September 6
*Betty Hartzell, DUI, FHP.
*Eric O'Bryan, DUI, CCSO.

LIBERTY COUNTY
August 30
*Tammie Brown, county VOP, LCSO.
August 31
*Dale Green, county VOP, Gadsden.
*James Harris, county VOP, Gadsden.
*Mersadie Amberg, holding for CCSO, CCSO.
*Charles Jones, fleeing and eluding, possession of
less than 20 grams, resisting arrest without violence,
Gadsden.
September 2
*Sandy Griffis, holding for CCSO, CCSO.
*Erica Brown, holding for CCSO, CCSO.
*Thomas Reddick, warrant for Jackson County,
CCSO.
September 3
*Jena Diane Demaree, holding for CCSO, CCSO.
*Bobby Eugene Hood, writ of attachment, Liberty
Co. Court.
*Wade Cavanaugh, state VOP, LCSO.
SDemetria Moore, holding for CCSO, CCSO.
September 4
*Talris T. Brown, warrant (battery), LCSO.
September 6
*Betty Hartzell, holding for CCSO, CCSO.

Listingsincludenamefollowedbychargeandidentificationofarrestingagency Thenamesaboverepresent
those charged. We remind our readers that all are presumed innocent until proven guilty


Blountstown Police Dept.
Aug. 31 through Sept. 5, 2009
Citations issued:
Accidents...............02 Traffic Citations..................08
Special details (business escorts, traffic details)......68
Business alarms.....02 Residential alarms..........00
Complaints................... ............................. 121


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SEPTEMBER 9, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 3

Gadsden woman arrested for defrauding Medicaid of over $7,000


TALLAHASSEE -
Attorney General Bill
McCollum announced that
a Gadsden County woman
has been arrested on charges
she defrauded the Florida
Medicaid program out of more
than $7,000.
Marsha Perkins Hunter


turned herself over to
authorities in Leon County.
Investigators with the
Attorney General's Medicaid
Fraud Control Unit were
contacted by an anonymous
callerwho indicated that Hunter,
38, was billing the Medicaid
program for services she never


A man who allegedly took off with the furniture
after moving out of a rental trailer.is facing a charge
of grand theft, according to a report from the Liberty
County Sheriff's Department.
Bradley Warren Burke was arrested Aug. 28.
According to the probable cause report, Burke
rented a mobile home on Woodman Street in Hosford,
where he lived with his mother and brother.
Property owner Duncan Hosford reported that
several items were missing after Burke moved out
at the end of July. The items listed as being taken
from the trailer included a table and three chairs, two


provided. The investigation
revealed that Hunter billed
Medicaid for supported living
coaching services that were
never provided to two Leon
County Medicaid recipients.
Supported living coaching
services provide training
and assistance to adults with


couches, a living room chair, a full size bed and
a twin bed, a window air conditioning unit, three
rugs, six sets of curtains and seven window panes.
The total value of the property was set at $635.
In addition to the structure being cleared of
furniture, the trailer was damaged and a lot of
garbage was left behind.
When contacted by a deputy, Burke denied the
items were in the trailer originally but agreed to
clean up the mess.
After three weeks passed with no action on his
part, charges were filed.


developmental disabilities
that enable these individuals
to reside on their own.
Hunter is charged with two
counts of Medicaid provider
fraud, a third-degree felony.


If convicted, she faces up
to 10 years in prison and
a $10,000 fine. The case is
being prosecuted by the State
Attorney's Office for the
Second Judicial Circuit.


Man charged with grand theft

after failing to produce metal
A man who talked a scrap metal dealer into advancing him
the money to buy vehicles which he promised to then turn over
for scrap metal was arrested Saturday, over a year after he
failed to follow through.
Steven David Shiver, 47, was charged with grand theft
from a person age 65 or over after he reportedly took $600
dollars from Hubert Pitts. According to the complaint, in July
of 2008, Shiver told Pitts that he had located three junk cars
and would let him recover them for scrap metal after he made
the purchase.
Pitts signed a personal check for $600 on July 9, 2008. The
check was cashed the next day. Shiver did not contact Pitts as
he had agreed to in the following few days and Pitts was un-
able to reach Shiver until he was taken into custody this past
weekend.


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Renter arrested for taking off with

furniture from Hosford mobile home


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Page 4 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 9, 2009


Annual peanut boil

planned Sept. 26
Join us in Blountstown for the Annual
Panhandle Pioneer Settlement Peanut Boil
on Saturday. Sept. 26 from :30 p.m to
9 pm. iCT). There w.ill be lihe music.
peanuts, snow cones, games for the kids
and much more The general store w ill be
open, admission is free and refreshments
available for donations
For more info call 1850io64-2'' or
1isit the w eb site at wu.w ppmuseuni
org.

Sixth Annual Art Show

opens Friday in Bristol
The Liberm Counr, Arts Council will
be hold the Art Ali\e 2009 art show Fndai,,
September I from 3 a.m.-7 p in., Saturda.
and SindaN. Sepi 12 and 13 f'o1n 12-5
m in . and Monda\ and Tue.da',. Sept I-1
and 15 hiom l) a nm -- p m . -It [ etea'ils
Memorial Park CI\ ic Center The featured
artist this \ear is Dr. Tamaria .Jo ner fiom
Calhoun Count\ Tamiari. \\ho has been
leaching for 40 -\ears. %, all be showcasing
some of her %work and sonie from her
snudent,s.
Please stop b\ and enljo the talent of
of your friends and neighbors For more
information, please contact Minnie Shuler.
at 643-479s.

Tobacco Free Partnership
plans meeting Sept. 15
The Calhoun County Tobacco Free
Partnership will meet on Sept. 15 at the
W.T. Neal Civic Center at 3:30 p.m. ICTi.
The public is welcome to attend.
For more information, please contact
Pamela McDaniel at 674-5645. ext 236




George and Harvie Hall
reunion set for Sept. 13
The George and Harnie Hall reunion
\sill be held on Sunday. Sept. 13 at the
Altha Community Center. The center w ill
be open at 10 a.m. (CT).
All friends and family are Invited to
attend. For more information call 674-
8417

The Calhoun-Liberty Iournal is
S published each Wednesday
bythe Uberty Journal Inc.,
Surwfers Road,P.O. Box 536,
SBristol, FL32321.;

Annual subscriptions are $18.
e spostage paid at Bristol, FL

O. P. !,611 536, B"istol, FL 32321.


CALENDAR


TODAY'S MEETINGS
SLiberty Women's Club. 11 a m,
Apalachee Restaurant in Bristol
- AA. 7 p m.. basement of
Calhoun County Courhouse

.... . .. . .. . D, KC . 1, '-11


Red Hat
Society
LiQrlhoUjEi Rei In i
VWea. 12pm iCTi IT
C.arpoc.O Irom FBC I
A;iivli.?h Bldg -. .
11 am CTi L


I i


LCHS \olle\ball %s. H\e a BHS \olleDball s. nolmres Co.
Fime ji p ni i E Ti Home p pm IC T

FRIDAY, SEPEB ERTH 11


BIRTHDAYS
Sethi Gehir

Dance 6 - 12 p m. American
Legion Hall in Blounisto n


PATRIOT D


LCHS Da%%gs %i. Mlacla1 B-town Tigers
Horm a '.31ipm IETI OPEN


BIRTHDAYS
'T lrnt S. Lir ind .Aliice 'M t.11 ,m i


SUNDYSPTMBER


T7U


Atte.ld, tie-


Clu
cl


'ch of voun'
lto-tC e t-i s i.
tr d t.' " . .
.d ']I ZII


O,. "E. -
0 B~3I. * Siii^HBI


LCHS \olle. ball
\s. Coltondalel


BHS \olle ball
\s. Marianna
'Aa\ jat 5 6 p m ICTi


TODAY'S MEETINGS
* Walk-A-Weigh Program, 9 a m., Veterans Memorial Park Civic Center
* Altha Boy Scouts. 5:30 p.m., Altha Volunteer Fire Department
* AA, 6:30 p.m., Altha Community Center
* Bulldog Club, 7 p m., LCHS field house

TU-ESD3., SEPTEMBER 15


LCHS \olle ball %s. Marianna
A.y iat 7 p m ETi


TODAY'S MEETINGS
* Calhoun Chamber of Commerce, 12 noon (CTi, Calhoun Sr. Citizens
* Calhoun Co. Commission, 5 p.m.. Ag Bldg. Conference Room
across from Calhoun Courthouse
* Hosford-Telogia VFD. 7:30 p.m.. Hosford Fire Station
* Dixie 109 Masonic Lodge, 7 p.m.. Masonic Lodge in Blountsrown




national 1
mushroom
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THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL
Located at 11493 NW Summers Road in Bristol
MAILING ADDRESS: P.O. Box 536, Bristol, FL 32321
TELEPHONE (850) 643-3333 Fax (850) 643-3334
EMAIL: thejoural@fairpoint.net (USPS 012367)
ADS: djads@fairpoint.net Summers Road


BIRTHDAYS
Andrew gof, 'Martha Jane Jacobs andleroy r-taryer
TODAY'S MEETINGS
* Rotary Club, noon, Calhoun-Liberty Hospital
* Weight Loss Support Group, 1:30 p.m., Shelton Park Library
* Boy Scouts, 6:30 p.m., Mormon Church in Bristol
* Bristol City Council, 6:30 p.m., Bristol City Hall
* AA, 7 p.m., Calhoun County Old Ag Bldg. east door, in front of jail


,*f ~

b1


Calhoun County

History Project meets

Thursday, Sept. 10
The Blountstown Historic Preservation
Committee-Calhoun County History
Project invites you to attend their board
meetings the. second Thursday of each
month at 5 p.m. (CT) at the restored
M&B Train Depot on north Pear Street,
Blountstown. These meetings are open to
anyone interested in local history. We need
your help planning our upcoming events.
.The mission of the Calhoun County
History Project is to acquire and display
items that depict the rich history of
the people, agriculture, industry and
natural resources of Calhoun Countr and
surrounding communities. Donations are
\ery welcome' Currentl\ w\e %ish to add
a vintage piece of farm equipment to one
of our outside gardens.
For more infonnation. please contact the
Calhoun Counts Cooperatime Extension
Ser\ ce at (50i674-8323 or email at
mbrailroadaN ahoo.com.


Gardening Friends

of the Big Bend to

meet on Sept. 15
Gardening Friends of the Big Bend % ill
meet at the North Florida Research and
Education Center near Quincy at 6:30 p.m.
Tuesday , Sept 15
The purpose of this group is to promote
gardening and gardening research by
supporting and assisting the faculty and
staff of NFRIC - Ouinc,. an arm of the
Urh' eisio, of Florida', lisitrut: for Food
and XYrictluiral Sciences The purpose
oli his m-eeting v. ill be bl dlsicus's and plan
for the group's October ei ents - Agave
Succulent workshopp , Plantaholic Pre\ iew
and Saturda\ Plant Sale E\tij\auL'a za
For more information, contact Jill
\\Wlliamsn at I 5016o3-22So or Dr. Gar\
Knox at Siit5-' 1621.


Hosford School's Family

Reading starts Sept. 15
Food and fun ill kick off Hosford
School's first Famil\ Reading Night.
Come and enjo\ all that the school's ne\\
media center has to offer on Tuesday. Sept.
15 from 5:30 to 7:301 pm The kickoff
\ ll begin in the Cafetorium where the
new Accelerated Reader program will be
introduced to parents and students.
Family Reading Night will be e.ern
Tuesday from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. for the
remainder of the year.





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The Calhoun-Liberty Journal
were distributed last week,
ensuring plenty of coverage for
your community announcements
and great response for our
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JOURNAL STAFF
Johnny Eubanks...................Publisher
Teresa Eubanks........................ Editor
Gina Grantham................. Bookkeeper
Missy Tanner ......................Advertising
Debbie Duggar....Production Assistant
OFFICE HOURS: 9 am. - 6 p.m. M-F.
Saturday from 9 a.m. until 1 p.m.


_ I_


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Home at 5 3 p n IT TI








SEPTEMBER 9, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 5


Art collecting can be affordable fun for everyone


QUINCY - Have you ever
wanted to collect original art,
but thought it would be too
expensive?
Have you considered
buying original art, and talked
yourself out of making the
purchase because you don't
know enough about art?
Collecting original art can
be very affordable, is fun,
and stimulates your local
economy by supporting the
artists working in your area.
"People can buy original
art for as little as $100 or
$200, even some of the artists
represented in this exhibition,"
said art collector Calynne Hill,
referring to the Vernacular


Gadsden Arts Center's Art Collecting Seminar to be
offered Friday, Sept. 18 from 9 a.m. to 12 in Quincy


Art from the Hill Collection
exhibition, on display at the
Gadsden Arts Center through
October 25.. "Art collecting is
very personal, a powerful way
to express who you are, and
really adds character to your
home or office," commented
Toni Robinson, another
longtime art collector.
You can learn more about
collecting art at the Gadsden
Arts Center's Art Collecting
Seminar, offered Friday,
Sept. 18, from 9 a.m. to 12
noon. Topics will include


"Affordable Collecting:
Beginning & Building",
presented by Jeanine Taylor
of Jeanine Taylor Folk Art
Gallery, Sanford and "What's
My Art Worth?" presented
by Robert A. Stenstream of
Robert Stenstream Fine Arts,
Ocala.
Workshop registration is
only $35 ($45 non-members)
and includes snacks, coffee
and a guided exhibition
tour. To register, visit www.
gadsdenarts.org and click
on the Events tab, stop by
the Center or call (850) 875-
4866.
The Gadsden Arts Center
improves the quality oflife in the
region through cultural, social
and educational opportunities.
Fine art exhibitions, classes for
adults and children, cultural
events, summer art camps, a
gift shop and an artists' co-
op are housed in the Center's
beautiful historic buildings,
along with Miss Helen's
Espresso Cafi D'art. Group
tours are available free of
charge call (850) 875-4866 to
make your reservation.
The Gadsden Arts Center is
located on Quincy's historic


Courthouse Square at 13 N.
Madison St., just 10 miles
from Tallahassee City Limits.
Admission is $1 (members


and children admitted free).
Gallery and gift shop hours are
Tuesday through Saturday, 10
a.m.-5 p.m. and Sunday, 1-5
p.m. Hours for Miss Helen's
Espresso Caf6 D'art and
the Artists Guild Co-op are
Monday-Saturday 7 a.m.-5 p.m.


Chipola Fall Baseball

Classic set Sept. 17-20
MARIANNA-Chipola will host the 2009 Fall Baseball Classic
Sept. 17-20. Eleven teams will participate, including: Chipola,
Tallahassee, Wallace-Dothan, Gulf Coast, Pensacola, Central
Alabama, Middle Georgia, Northwest Florida State, Darton, Shelton
State and Alabama Southern.
The Classic opens Thursday, Sept. 17, with Chipola and Wallace-
Dothan at 5 p.m. Action continues Friday, Sept. 18, with the following
games: 10 a.m., Chipola vs. Pensacola; 12:30 p.m., Pensacola vs.
Northwest Florida State; 3 p.m.,,Middle Georgia vs. Northwest Florida
State; and 5:30 p.m., Chipola vs. Middle Georgia.
Saturday, Sept. 19 games are: 1 p.m., Tallahassee vs. Central
Alabama (at Marianna HS); 3:30 p.m., Central Alabama vs. Shelton
.State, and 6 p.m., Shelton State vs. Tallahassee.
Sunday, Sept. 20 games are: 10 a.m., Gulf Coast vs. Wallace-
Dothan; 10 a.m., Darton vs. Lurleen B. Wallace (at Marianna HS); 1
p.m., Gulf Coast vs. Lurleen B. Wallace; 1 p.m., Alabama Southern
vs. Wallace-Dothan (at Marianna HS); and 3:30 p.m. Darton vs.
Alabama Southern.
For information on the event, visit www.chipola.edu.

First annual Chipola College

Golf Classic set for Sept. 18
MARIANNA-The Chipola College Athletics Department is
hosting the First Annual golf classic at Indian Springs Golf Course
on Friday, Sept. 18.
Chipola has won numerous conference, state and national
championships and will be using this event as a major fundraiser for
the program.
Format is three man scramble with morning and afternoon starts
are available to help with scheduling.
Entry is $75 per player which covers greens fees, cart, lunch and the
chance to win door prizes. The Birdie package-$ 100-includes entry
in the big contests, which offer cash prizes and two Mulligans.
Three sponsorship options are available. Gold ($350): three birdie
packages, a club house sign and additional advertisement; Silver
($125): one birdie package and one hole sign and Bronze ($50): one
hole sign. Merchandise is also needed for awards and prizes.
For more information, call David Lane at (850) 718-2234 or e-mail
laned@chipola.edu.




S Ford .....

A large selection of new and used cars are
now available at Chipola Ford in Marianna!
Ronnie Coley personally invites you to visit him any
time Monday thru Saturday from 8 a.m. to 6p.m.
Questions? Give him a call at (850)482-4043.
HE IS WAITING FOR YOUR CALL!


JL
-ir
Tallahassee Memorial
Family Medicine
Blountstown


TMH 4r 1f{,r- ,




TMH.org


PUBLIC

NOTICE


The Bristol City Council will
hold a Budget Workshop on
September 10, 2009 at
6:30 p.m. at Bristol City Hall.


Skin care packed with
multiple benefits. Special
offers you don't want to'miss. '
Free samples so you can try
before you buy. Free makeovers
and expert tips. Shop at your
convenience with my personal
delivery. No crowds. No parking
hassles. No drain on your gas tank. What better
way to get all your skin care and makeup! Contact
me today!

SHELLEY MURRAY
Independent Beauty Consultant
www.marykay.com/srmurray
379-8861 or (904)704-4596


pr


i~I


I








Page 6 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 9, 2009


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Why shouldn't Obama talk to students?


A large number of American
people seem to be losing it. Bonkers
comes to mind. If it wasn't so seri-
ous, the right-wing fear of President
Obama would be laughable. But it's
not a laughing matter. A large num-
ber of Americans believe that Presi-
dent Obama is a Hitler, socialist,
communist and probably the Anti-
Christ. Combined with their hatred


of government, their fear and loathing of President
Obama takes on a dangerous tone.
The latest loony-tunes thrash from right-wingers
is that President Obama's plan to address America's
school children with a message of stay in school and
get an education is going to turn their children into
pint sized socialists. How bizarre is that?
I know something about children. Does "in one ear
out the other" ring any bells for parents? How many
times do we have to tell children to do or not to do
something? A million or so. When they ask, "Why,"
for the umpteenth time, we say, "Because I said so and
don't make me come in there."
Children have the attention span of a gnat, and the
likelihood that they will even listen to of remember
President Obama's stay-in-school message past the
first recess is remote.
Here's a test. When the child comes home from
school, ask him or her what they learned in school
today. Unless you are raising a little rocket scientist,
the answer will be "nothing, I don't know," or "I can't
remember."
Education in America is a political football, kicked
up and down the political field by both parties. In the
current recession, school districts are suffering from
lack of funding. Suggest increasing taxes of any type
to fund the school systems and out comes the pitch-
forks and shotguns. That's especially true in Florida
where much of the population is retired people living
on fixed incomes.
The Department of Education (DOE) in Washing-
ton puts out some interesting statistics on the status
of education in America, which makes the point that
there isn't a lot of educating going on. Why? The rea-


sons are multitude. People write books
about educational issues in America
relative to other countries.
A document titled The Condition
of Education 2009 can be downloaded
from the DOE and whether people like
the DOE or not, numbers are numbers
and they tell an interesting story about
education in America. We think that
we are the smartest people on earth,


but maybe not.
In 2007, 33% of 4th graders were reading below
the basic level. About 23% of 8th graders were in the
same boat. Math scores were a bit better. In 2007,
16% of 4th graders were below the acceptable level
but by the time they got to the 8th grade 29% couldn't
handle the adding and subtracting.
The Florida FCAT scores also indicate that per-
formance deteriorates as a child moves from elemen-
tary to high school. Not a lot of brain power displayed
in high school but Friday night football is alive and
well.
For the past decade, about 27% of all U.S. school-
children fail to graduate from high school. The num-
ber is higher in the southern states where more than
30% of children do not finish high school.
Presidential talks to schoolchildren are not a new
event. President Bush Senior talked about the impor-
tance of education. President Reagan talked about low
taxes and the line-item veto, but there was no outcry
from the left about indoctrinating future conserva-
tives. In 2001, President G. W. Bush talked to school-
children about backing the war against the Taliban in
Afghanistan, and, again, no screams about indoctri-
nating children on the virtues of warfare.
Jim Greer, the Chairman of the Florida Republican
Party, has gone nuts over the Obama talk to kids. I'm
on the Florida GOP e-mail list and have read all his
rants about this non-issue. The Florida GOP stuff was
so bizarre that Politifact gave it a "pants on fire" rat-
ing.
But this is America. Talking political trash is not a
crime, for some it's a vocation. Beam me up Scotty.
There is no intelligent life here.


- _


COX'S -
ORNER
Jerry Cox is a retired military
officer and writer with an extensive
background in domestic and
foreign policy issues. He lives in
Okaloosa County.


RTART





SEPTEMBER 9, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 7


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Page 8 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 9, 2009


HOMECOMING
CYPRESS UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH-The
Cypress United Methodist
Church will sponsor their annual
Homecoming Event, Sunday
Sept. 27. Everyone is invited to
join with us. Services will start at
10:30 a.m.
The Marianna-Panama
City District Superintenden,
Reverend Randy Woodham will
be delivering the message for
the day.
Music and singing will be
by "The Big River Blue Grass
Girls."
A covered dish luncheon will
follow at noon in the Family
Center at the back of the church.
The church, located on Cemetery
Road in Cypress, is the old
Cypress School building.

TELOGIA ASSEMBLY OF
GOD CHURCH-Pastor Thomas
Adams of Telogia Assembly of
God Church would like to invite
everyone to come and join the
congregation for Homecoming on
Sunday, Sept. 13. Sunday School
begins at 9:45 a.m. and morning
Worship Service will begin at 11
a.m. with guest speaker Brother
Mark Jakelsky from Marianna
bringing the message.
Following the morning service
there will be a covered dish lunch
served in the church fellowship
hall. After lunch plan to return
to the church sanctuary for
an afternoon sing. The guest
singer will be Sheila Smith from
Marianna. There will also be our
own local talented singers.
Brother Adams is extending
a special invitation to everyone


MESSAGE
OF THANKS

The family of Nicole Purvis
would like to thank everyone for
their prayers, visits, phone calls,
flowers and snacks that have been
received since the car accident
she was involved in on Aug.
28. She was released from the
hospital on Friday, Sept. 4 and is
going to a Rehab for 2-3 weeks
until she has surgery on her right
ankle and a skin graft on her right
leg. Anyone wishing to send a
card can do so at the address
listed below:
Sharon Nichole Purvis
Tallahassee Memorial
Rehabilitation Center
1609 Medical Drive,
Room 1224
Tallahassee, FL 32308
The family would also like
to thank everyone that helped
at the accident scene. The
Calhoun County Sheriff's Office,
the EMTs, the Volunteer Fire
Department, the personnel who
flew her to TMH, etc. There
were so many concerned people
it is hard to name each and ever
yone, but we Thank You from
the bottom of our hearts for your
swift response.
Sharon Nicole Purvis and family


g 8


i


U


to come and enjoy this great
Homecoming day of fellowship,
food and singing.
The church is located at 18889
NE S.R. 65 in Telogia. For more
information call 379-8899.

REVIVALS
BLOUNTSTOWN
COMMUNITY CHURCH -The.
Blountstown Community Church
will be having revival services
with Ken Helton and Family
starting on Sunday, Sept. 13 at 11
a.m. and 5 p.m. (CT). Services
for Sept. 14-16 will be held at 6
p.m. (CT) each evening.
Come and join in for a great
time in the Lord. For more
information, call 643-3602 or
762-8405.

GLORY HILL HOLINESS
CHURCH -The Glory Hill
Holiness Church will be holding
revival services with Evangelists
Wanda Osborne and Family
and Billy Gene Dickerson and
family. Both families are great
songwriters and singers. They
will truly bless you.
Revival services begin on
Sunday, Sept. 13 at 5 p.m. and
will continue Monday through
Friday, Sept. 14-18 starting at 7
p.m. each evening.
The church is located five
miles north of Clarksville on
Hwy. 73. For more information
call 762-8301.


News
j from the

Pews


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SI.
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PRAYER CHAINERS
MISSION OF GOD -The Prayer
Chainers Mission of God Church
will hold its Annual Pastor's
Revival on Sept. 19-26 at Prayer
Chainers Mission of God, located
at 19455 S.E. McDaniel Road in
Hugh Creek.
The church and the Pastor
would like to send out a special
invitation for all to attend. If
you can't attend, pray for us that
souls will be delivered, saved and
filled with the Holy Ghost. We
are living in an era now where
prayers to Our Lord and Praises
to the same is an opportunity to
God to be glorified.
Nightly services for all days
except for Sundays will be at 7
p.m. Sunday services are at 12
noon.
Revivalists will include Kathy
Peterson of Eufaula, Alabama, Dr.
C. Wilson, Apostle Cager Wells,
Bishop Jocquette Carroll, Pastor
Junior Carroll, Elder Delano
Reed, Elder James Hogan, Elder
Lavoris Williams, Minister
William T. Yon, Elder Raines
and many more.
SPECIAL EVENTS
& SERVICES
Corinth Baptist Church will
be kicking off.the Fall this week.
Sunday mornings in September
will feature messages on 'Joy
Stealers,' on how to unleash the
Joy God intended His children to
experience.
This Sunday, Sept. 13, there
will be a Covered Dish Fellowship
Fundraiser. The Church Families
will be bringing covered dish
dinners. The cost is $5 per person
and will go towards the New
Worship Center. Sunday night,
Sept. 13, the Bibletones will be in
concert at 6 p.m. A love offering
will be taken.
Please call Pastor Michael
Murray if you have any questions
at 447-4115.


Puzzled?


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irmncu pru:-lce ro..,ether? As a lo..
profkMiinl inlqd c iprdeTil inh,<'tiran' c


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FoF pI,. K -(,J-kin J I ri,,Recrion l ,
;ind i;i youir insurance ncds. . 1
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tAuto-Owners Insurance . * ,
.".: ' " .;:) ('- i<,..! e-"- r -c J


STOUTAMIRE INSURANCE INC.
16783 SE Pear St., Blountstown
Contact Bill Stoutamire
Phone 674-5974 * Fax 674-8307


IT'S VERY WISE TO ADVERTISE
Make the most of your business with an ad in
The Calhoun-Liberty

L. JOURNAL
PHONE (850) 643-3333 thejournal@fairpoint.net


FAITH OUTREACH ANOINTED MINISTRIES

3rd Annual Cake Sale 2009. We are doing it again so order
one of our top sellers such as Red Velvet, Rainbow Pound
Cake w/ Cream Cheese Batter, Sour Cream Pound Cake,
Cream Cheese Pound Cake, and more. So call or e-mail
us today to find out how you can order @ 850-210-5256
or faithoutreachanointedmini@yahoo.com, Also, we make
special designed cakes and if it's not on our list just ask and
we will make your cake. You have from now until January
09, 2010 to order.

We will be taking in food for our Food Drive Ministry starting
August 20, 2009 until November 10, 2009. We will be pick-
ing up food from donors and you may drop off food to our
address: 363 Carter Rd Quincy, FL. Any can goods, boxed
food, cake mix, cake icing, fruit, veggies, etc. are welcome.
If you would rather give a donation toward this event please
make check or money order payable to: F.O.A.M/ Minister
Paul Weston. You may give cash also. Remember, this food
.is to feed those in need and cannot afford to have a proper
Thanksgiving Dinner. We will notify the papers with the out-
come of the drive and who the food will go to.

We'll be having sign-up day at the Gadsden County Public
Library on Oct. 16, 2009 for all children ages 4-16 to join the
ministry. On Oct. 17, 2009 we will have activity day at the
Gadsden County Public Library. We will teach your children
things such as the commandments of Moses, the major and
minor prophets, and etc. Bring your children and sign them
up today using the sign in sheet at the library. Also, if you
think you have the skills, patience, time, and knowledge to
work with the youth during a two day- four month period
then you may come out too on sign up day.

Faith Outreach Anointed Ministries is looking for real, dedi-
cated, faithful, singers. People who will be willing to go the
extra mile, able to sing, able to sacrifice time from your
schedule, have transportation, have a good attitude, a point
of contact, willing to go to church, able to travel, willing to
be a part of a future recording, and take on responsibility. If
you or someone you know fits the description here, please
contact Faith Outreach Anointed Ministries.
For more information please
call us at 850-210-5256 or e-mail us at
faithoutreachanointedmini@yahoo.com








SEPTEMBER 9, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 9



'" OLD FARI MIR'



ALMANAC


Copyrighted Material



Syndicated Content



Available from Commercial News Providers


SEPT 9, WEDNESDAY-- St. Omer. Admission Day (California). Elvis
Presley appeared for the first time on The Ed Sullivan Show, 1956. Learn
S' not and know not.
SEPT 10, THURSDAY-- Jamestown colony in Virginia received a
new president, John Smith, 1608. Professional golfer Arnold Palmer orn,
1929.
SEPT 11, FRIDAY-- St. Protus. Patriot Day. Last quarter Moon. Pluto
stationary. Terrorist attacks on United States, 2001. Actor John Ritter died,
2003.
SEPT 12, SATURDAY-- Moon rides high. Hot, dry winds caused tree
foliage to crumble in east Kansas, 1882. Bonanza made its television
Debut, 1959.
SEPT 13, SUNDAY-- Fifteenth Sunday after Pentecost. Conjunction
of Mars and the Moon. Grandparents Day. Singer Mel Tormi bor, 1925.
SEPT 14, MONDAY-- Holy Cross. Moon at descending-node. U.S.
president William McKinley died, 1901. The World Series was canceled
due to a strike, 1994.
SEPT 15, TUESDAY-- The U.S. Department of Foreign Affairs was
renamed the Department of State, 1789. Author Agatha Christie was born,
1890. Failure teaches success.
old---- Far er'


Jon Plummer and his Fainting Goats
Jon Plummer of Blountstown, shown above, has an extraordinary small breed of
pets known as "Fainting Goats." He has been raising goats for two years and has had
Merlin, a long-haired "Silkie" for eight months. Merlin has company in his pen including
Olive, Puddle and Lilith, all breeds of fainting and regular goats.
"I like them because they are fun to watch, mild-mannered and they don't climb or
jump, which makes them easy to keep," Jon says about his flock. He says that he
started out owning a regular goat who was hateful and mean, so he decided to sell
him. While researching goat breeds for his farm, he came across this breed of goat,
also known as Myotonic Goats.
The breed name comes from a genetic condition, myotonia congenita. They have
muscles that freeze roughly for 10 seconds when the goat is startled. This causes
them to fall over, like they were fainting, while fully conscious. This is painless for the
goat and they do not suffer any effects from the spell. Older goats are known to adapt
to their condition and when startled, they spread their legs and lean against something
to keep themselves from falling over. Some even run about in a stiff-legged shuffle.
Jon has sold one and would like to continue to raise more on his goat farm. He
also has a four-year-old llama named Dolly and two donkeys, four-year-old Eleanor
Roosevelt and her son, one-year-old Tad Lincoln.

PETS AND THEIR PEOPLE IS SPONSORED BY

SAltha Farmers Co-op, Inc.
We've got the feed you need to keep your animals happy and healthy!
CATTLE - HORSES - DOGS - CATS - BIRDS and more.
Altha Store Blountstown Branch Marianna Branch
Phone: (850) 762-3161 Phone: (850) 673-8102 Phone: (850) 482-2416


September 7-13

SEPTEMBER 1I
Last Quarter Moon


SEPTEMBER 13
Grandparents Day


Old Farmer's
Almanac



SI


t was on a Tuesday, not a
Monday, in 1882 when the
first Labor Day parade was held in
New York City. Peter McGuire,
who had proposed the idea for a
holiday to honorAmerican workers
at a labor meeting earlier that year,
initiated the first Labor Day cele-
bration. Today's Labor Day parades
are a far cry from that first event.


2009


SEPTEMBER
Best days to harvest
belomgroundcrops

SEPTEMBER 13
Best day to make
sauerkraut, can, or
pickle


but the tribute to the contributions
that American workers make to-
ward our country's social and eco-
nomic achievements remains the
same.

..P4


Sripe cantaloupe, peeled, o n a large pot, combine cantaloupe, apricot
seeded, and cubed juice, lemon juice, sugar, cinnamon, ginger,
I quart apricotuce i and ground cloves. Cover and simmer for about
1itabespoon sugar 30 minutes. Puree mixture in a blender and cool.
1/4teaspooncinnamon i Blend in sour cream and
1/4teaspoonginger / chill. Serve in chilled
dash gound cloves bowls, garnished with fresh
1 cup sour cream
sprigs of fresh mint mint. MAES 6TOssERViNS.
for garnish
WITAND WISDOM FROM THE OLD FARMER'S ALMANAC
I September rain, good for crops and vines.
SIf your right ear itches, someone is saying good L
things about you.
* On September 12, 1954. Lassie made its television j i '
debut.-
FOR RECIPES. GARDENING TIPS. AND WEATHER FORECASTS. VISIT:
Almanac.cor


PETS A& PEOPLE


m


40-1,









Page 10 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 9, 2009

BIRTHDAYS


CALEIGH PEDDIE
Caleigh Peddle celebrated her
fourth birthday on Sept. 8. She
is the daughter of Corry Peddle
and Heather Peddle of Bristol.
Hergrandparents are Rocky and
Mary Peddle and Hal and Pam
Summers, all of Bristol. Her
paternal great-grandparents
are Margie Chason and the
late Robert Chason, the late
Buster and Tish Peddle. Her
maternal great-grandparents
are Mable Summers and the
late Jack Summers, Mary
Sediee and the late Gene
Sediee. Princess Caleigh
enjoys riding the 4-wheeler
with her daddy, playing with her
brother Caleb and feeding their
pet deer, Zoey.


SPENCER
ALEX O'BRYAN
Spencer Alex O'Bryan will
be celebrating his second
birthday on Sept. 11. He is
the son of Ashley Huff and
Anthony O'Bryan ofAltha. His
grandparents include Sharon
Adkins of Clarksville and Ruby
O'Bryan of Altha. He will be
having a 'Spongebob' party
with lots of family and friends.
He enjoys going swimming
and playing with his friends
and family.


LIZZIE HALLEY SPEERS
Lizzie Halley Speers will celebrate her fourth birthday on Friday,
Sept. 11. Lizzie is the daughter of Kristy and Adam Terry of
Blountstown and Neil Speers
of Altha. Her grandparents
are Mike and Lori Halley,
..Debbie and the late Myles
Si Barfield and Charles Ray
and Kathy Terry. Her great-
Sgrandparents are Sybil and
the late Johnny Halley, Roy
and Montez Golden, Marian
and the late James Peacock
M s and Martha Baggett. Lizzie
, enjoys ballet class, rides on
the golf cart and dress up. She
I -will celebrate her birthday with
S"family and friends and a trip to
Iv the zoo.


ii

ONETA LARKINS
Oneta Larkins celebrated
her 87th birthday on Sept.
2. She has 5 daughters,
16 grandchildren, and too
many great grandchildren to
count. She enjoys fishing
and gardening. She has
been a resident of Bristol her
whole life. She celebrated her
birthday surrounded by lots of
family and friends.


LOULIE NICOLE SMITH
Loulie Nicole Smith celebrated her 10th birthday on Aug.
27. She is the daughter of Bruce and Beth Smith of Bristol.
Her grandparents include Brigham and Charlotte Shuler of
| M Bristol and Lee and Mary Sue
Smith of Danville, KY She
R. , is the great-granddaughter
of Charles Lee and Loulie
S' Hutto of Smith Mountain Lake,
VA. She enjoys playing with
Sher dog Abby and the new
Kittens, she likes driving the
John Deere Gator out in the
yard, playing with her friends
"' -,'" and cousins. She also enjoys
visiting the neighbors. Loulie
celebrated her birthday with
a party at the Game Room in
Telogia on Aug. 22. She is in
-the 5th grade at WR. Tolar,
)' where she enjoys being in the
S.// ' .' Beta Club.


Share
those special
moments with an
announcement in
The Calhoun-Liberty

JOURNAL
Births, Birthdays,
Weddings,
Anniversaries,
Family Reunions
and more.


KIMBERLY
HOPE TANNER
Kimberly Hope Tanner will be
celebrating her first birthday on
Sept. 12. Hope is the daughter
of Warren and Kim Tanner of
Altha and the sister of Brett
and Colby Tanner of Altha.
Grandparents are William and
Margie Woodham of Bristol
and Bill and Christine Peacock
of Altha. Hope enjoys being
the center of attention.


JULIANA
BRITT HOLCOMB
Julianna Britt Holcomb will
be celebrating her first birth-
day on Sept. 9. She is the
daughter of Brittney Holcomb
of Bristol. Her grandparents
are Emmanual and Jea-
nette McGhee of Bristol. Her
great-grandparents are Alvin
and Patsy Godwin of Bristol
and Bobby and Alta McGhee
of Callaway. Julianna enjoys
spending time with mommy
and dancing every time she
hears the beat of music.


* - "*










44




Laban ontrager,
Monica Bontrager, DMD




ACCEPTING EW PATIENTS
12761 NW Pea Ridge Rd., Bristol, FL 32321
ia, TELEPHONE 643-5417








SEPTEMBER 9, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 11


RETIREMENT

IlShia` Howell retire

e Trs3years of hard wbrk
N NetIows D 6fBristol retired on Aug. 31 following 3-
years'with:the State of Florida. His wife, Shelia, is also a
retiree with 35 years of service as a teacher with the Lib-
erty County School Board. "
The Howells plans include some travelifig, fishing and
catching up on the "honey do" jobs around the house.


ALLYSON
FAITH HOOD
James and Rebecca Hood of
Hosford are proud to announce
the birth of their daughter,
Allyson Faith Hood, born on
July 11 at Tallahassee Memo-
rial Hospital in Tallahassee.
Allyson weighed in at 6 Ibs.,
4 ozs. and was 19.3 inches
long. Her maternal grand-
parents are Mary and Roddy
Mickel of Greensboro and
Richard Hicks of Tallahassee.
Her paternal grandparents
are Dewey and Allene Hood
of Hosford. Allyson was wel-
comed home by lots of family,
especially by her five-year-old
brother DeSoto.


I.


tThe Happy Couple


Registering for
your wedding ,
is easy and
convenient at
Blountstown
Drugs.
Come in
today and ask
for details.




WILL BE MARRIED Oct. 24, 2009
They are registered at Blountstown Drugs.

GIFTS AVAILABLE FOR
SPECIAL ORDER INCLUDE:
No need to leave
*Plates * Bowltow to shop for
Mugs-Bakeware wedding gift.
*ugs *Bakeware Come see the huge
Any gift item in stock is also selection of gifts
available for the registry. we have in stock.

BLOUNTSTOWN DRUGS
Locally owned and operated by Pharmacist Jon Plummer.
20370 Central Ave. W. * Blountstown * 674-2222


WEDDINGSS


Brewer, Sewell united in
Tony L. Sewell and Cheryl L. Brewer were
united in marriage on Feb. 13 in a quiet simple
ceremony at their residence, at 88 Flournoy
Moore Road in Dothan, AL.. Reverend Pat Jones
performed the ceremony for the happy couple.
The groom is the son of the late .Curtis -. ..
and Lillie Knight Sewell of Talquin Circle in
Hosford.
The bride is the daughter of Doris Clark
Conklin and the late James Conklin of New
York.
Present at the ceremony was Larry and Kim
Turner and their son Mason, and the bride's
son, Kris and his friend, Liz Stone, with her
son, Dylan, and Sam and Ruby Miller. Out of
town guests were Edward and Blance Taylor of
Jacksonville, AL and brother of the bride, Charles
Landon of St. Pete.
.A reception followed at the home of the happy
couple.


marriage


e1W
Lewis, Zuniga to wed on Sept. 26
Brannon Lewis and Landen
Zuniga invite everyone to share
in the joy of the marriage of
their mother, Shelly Lewis,.and
� e' -their father, Manuel Zuniga, on
Saturday, Sept. 26 at 5 p.m. (ET).
The ceremony will be at the home
of Bob and the late Louis Lewis
located at 18942 NW Mango
Drive in Bristol, just off CR 379
*A and H&H Loop.
Please come and join the
celebration. Balloons will be
pointing the way.


\I
.. v jY


-r: STORK REPORT

CHELSEY
SHAYE SMITH
David and Sabrina Smith of
Hosford are proud to announce
the birth of their daughter,
Chelsey Shaye Smith on Aug.
27. She weighed 7 lbs. and
8 ozs. and measured 20.1 ,
inches long. Maternal grand- '.
parents are Tommy and Dar- .
lene.Harris of Hosford. Pater-
nal grandparents are the late
Laura Atkins of Hosford, the
late Carol Ortuno of Hosford,
and Donald Atkins of Tampa.
Chelsey was welcomed home
by her siblings, D.J., 7 and I
Justin, 6. 2


UP










Page 12 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 9, 2009


Bulldogs take down the Bozeman Bucks 28-0


by Richard Williams,
Journal sports writer
Liberty County started buck
season early as they knocked
down the visiting Bozeman Bucks
28-0 in high school football action
Sept. 4 in Bristol. The Bulldogs
kept the Bucks on their heels
all night as the Dawgs scored
on their first three possessions.
Liberty's defense kept Bozeman
pinned on the Buck side of the


field most of the night.
Liberty started the game with
a 35 yard kick off return by
Terrance Evans that allowed the
Dawgs to start their first drive on
the Bozeman 48 yard line. After
a motion penalty moved the ball
back five yards, Liberty pressed
forward behind runs from Keith
McCray, Kevin McCray and
Terrance Evans. On third and
goal from the Buck seven yard


line, Wayne Young ran wide and
was chased down by a couple of
Bozeman defenders for no gain.
Facing fourth down LCHS Head
Coach Grant Grantham decided
to go for the touchdown.
Evans rewarded the coach's
vote of confidence by hitting
Kevin McCray with a pass into
the end zone for the touchdown
with 6:23 remaining in the first
quarter. Mike Lohse kicked the


extra point and Liberty had a
seven point lead.
The Bulldog defense forced
Bozeman into a three and out
situation, and Liberty started their
second drive of the night from the
Bozeman 44 yard line.
On first down, McCray gained
22 yards as he rushed to the Buck
22 yard line. Then on second
and twelve, Young made a catch
across the middle as he took a
hard hit while in the air to give
Liberty a first and goal at the
Bozeman four yard line. Keith
McCray scored on the next play
with 2,40 remaining in the quarter
to give Liberty the 14-0 lead after
the extra point by Lohse.
After forcing Bozeman to punt
again after just three offensive
plays Liberty's offense took the
field again. This time the Dawgs
used eleven plays to march down
the field and take a 21-0 lead
on Keith McCray's 27-yard
touchdown run.


Liberty's final touchdown of
the night was scored in the third
quarter when Young rushed in for
a score with 3:15 remaining in
the quarter. The touchdown was
set up on a pass over the middle
from quarterback Nolan Brown to
Daniel Deason who was tackled
at the four yard line.
Grantham said he was most
pleased with his team's defensive
play.
"We kept them pinned most
of the night and our defense
did a good job of forcing them
into three and out situations,"
Grantham said. "I thought our
backs also did a good job reading
the plays, but we still need to
work on our line play."
The Bulldogs host Maclay
Sept. 11 in Bristol for a non-
district contest. Maclay lost to
Wewahitchka 28-7. Maclay is
coached by former Florida State
receiver Kez McCorvey.


ABOVE: Bulldog Terrance Evans (#7) runs the ball in one of the many plays he completed at Friday
night's game. RIGHT: Bulldog Nolan Brown (#14) tackles a Buck to stop the play.


ABOVE: Bulldog Daniel Deason (#12) and teammate Jimmy Lee Rev-
ell (#42) get into position to stop the Bucks player. RIGHT: Wayne
Young (#27) keeps a tight grip on the ball as he avoids being caught k
by the Bucks. i








SEPTEMBER 9, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 13


LEFT: Blountstown
Tiger Leon Broxton
(#3) races away from a
Sneads player to make
a touchdown. RIGHT:
Tiger Alexander Gar-
rett (#21) blocks the
kick from a Sneads
player. BELOW: A trio
of Tigers bring down the
Pirates' ball carrier.


BHS Tigers overcol
by Richard Williams, Journal sports writer
The Blountstown Tigers started the 2009 high school football season
with a 27-7 win over the Sneads Pirates Sept. 4 on Bo%\ les Field.
The Tigers muffed the opening kickoff and allo% ed Sneads to
gain possession, but the Tiger defense stood firm and forced a
Sneads punts. The Tigers then drove the field and took the
lead when Jawon Mosley scored on a three-yard run
The.Tigers fumbled the ball to Sneads later in
the first quarter and the Pirates converted the P
miscue into a tie ballgame.
The Tigers punted on their next possession
and the BHS defense forced the Pirates into a
punting situation of their own near mid-field.
Alexander Garrett of Blountstown blocked the
punt and Mosley scooped up the lost ball and
then sailed away from the Pirates for a touch-
down that gave the Tigers the lead for good.
BHS added a touchdown by Leon Broxton in the
second period and a score by quarterback PJ Buggs in
the third quarter for the final margin of victory.
BHS Head Coach'Greg Jordan said he was proud of the ef-
fort from his defensive unit, but added the team must continue to
improve each week.
The Tiger defense held Sneads to 83 yards of offense and took
the ball away from the Pirates four times. Garrett and Jason 4
Money led the Tiger defense with 15 tackles each.
BHS has an off week before traveling to Chipley Sept. 18 for
a non-district contest.


PHOTOS BY TONY
SHOEMAKE


me Sneads Pirates 27-7






Page 14 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 9, 2009


SLIBERTYS COUNT H

5 ~ HIGH SCHOOL


, New s. -.'' .

Students spend Labor Day helping Jerry's Kids
Liberty County High School Allied Health students spent their Labor Day working to help Jerry's Kids. H.O.S.A.
students supported this year's Muscular Dystrophy Telethon by taking donations and manning the phones for the
last two hours on Labor Day in Panama City. Pictured with host Jerry Tabbatt and Bree Sison of News 13 Labor
Day Telethon are, front row, from left: Taylor Lowery, Betsy Bradwell, Hailey Abbott and Angelica Lopez. Second
row: Nikki Sellars, Darian Williams, Jordan White and Arminda Spikes. Back row: Joey Copeland, Cheyenne Griffin,
Schelbie Bright and Hitalina Morales. The students were very proud to be representatives for LCHS.


Passing FCAT gives
Juniors chance for
off campus lunches
The juniors. of this year that
passed the tenth grade FCAT
last year in all areas with at least
a 3, 4 or 5 have been rewarded
by getting to eat off campus on
Friday for lunch.

Sports news
Congratulations Bulldogs!. Our
Football team won both games
last Friday night against East
Gadsden and Marianna High. Our
volleyball players won their game
against Marianna High,*

Beta Club dues
Beta dues for regular members
should be paid immediately.
Applications and dues for all
new members are due Sept.-
11. Anyone who would like to
purchase the Beta Rules video
from'the first day of school
assembly can get them from Mrs.
Kennedy for $5 each. The Beta
Club will meet every 2nd and 4th
Wednesday of each month.

Regular Class
dues now due
All regular class dues are
due. They are $30 for freshman,
sophomores, and juniors. Senior
dues have been reduced to $20.
Every class is requiring dues to
be paid soon as possible. Students
can check with their homeroom-
teachers to find out how much
they owe.


Pictured above is Ms. Kennedy's Geometry class as they use Miras along
with foldables to explore symmetry.


RADIO FOOTBALL

ON WYBT AND WPHK

Listen to football on WYBT and WPHK. This week..
Blountstown Tigers are off this weekend.
------- ---
Hear Michael Wahlquist, Jay Taylor, and Ray McCoy
with all the Liberty County High School game action.
SThe Liberty County Bulldogs take on
Maclay High School at Liberty....
Air time at 10 a.m. ET Saturday, Sept. 12
immediately following the swap shop on
S K-102.7 and Y-1000.
The Florida Gators play in the swamp against Troy this
Saturday, Sept. 12:. Air time
on K102.7 immediately follow-
ing the. Liberty County High
School Broadcast at approxi-
mately 11 a.m. CT, 12 noon
ET.
The Miami Dolphins take on theAtlanta Falcons
in Atlanta this Sunday, Sept. 13. Air time on
K102.7 immediately following the Gateway
church at 12 noon CT.
L _


.---------------------------------------------------------



I-------------------------------------- ------ -
Calhoun County Liberty County
BREAKFAST BREAKFAST
THURSDAY THURSDAY
Waffle or sausage or assort- French toast sticks, sausage
ed cereals with buttered toast patty or assorted cereals
and assorted fruit juice.
with buttered toast and as-I
FRIDAY
Sausage gravy w/biscuit or sorted fruit juice.
assorted cereals with but- FRIDAY
tered toast and assorted fruit Chicken biscuit or assorted:
juice. cereals with buttered toast
MONDAY and assorted fruit juice.
Ham and cheese biscuit or MONDAY
assorted cereals with but- Ham and egg English muffin
tered toast and assorted fruit
je or assorted cereals with but-:
juice.
TUESDAY tered toast and assorted fruit
Pancakes and sausage juice.
patty or assorted cereal with TUESDAY
buttered toast and assorted Grits, scrambled eggs or
fruit juice. assorted cereal with but-
WEDNESDAY tered toast and assorted fruit:
Sausage and sweet potato . .
muffin or assorted cereal juice.
with buttered toast and as- WEDNESDAY
sorted fruit juice. Pancake & sausage patty
or assorted cereal with but-
LUNCHES tered toast and assorted fruit
(Pre-K thru 5th). juice.
THURSDAY
Chicken Tetrazzini, broc- LUNCHES
coli/cauliflower polonaise. Elementary
(Grades 6-12) Alternatives:
(Pre-K thru, 5th)
Cheeseburger; chef salad.
FRIDAY THURSDAY
FRIDAY
Pizza, garden salad w/dress- Beef taco, lettuce & tomato,
ing, fresh fruit. (Grades 6-12) salsa, whole kernel corn.
Alternatives: Hamburger on Alternative: Buffalo chicken
a bun; grilled chicken, gar-- wrap.
den salad. FRIDAY
MONDAY
S Pepperoni pizza, potato
Chicken BBQ sandwich,a, a
baked beans, apple crisp, wedges, fresh apple.-:Alter-
(Grades 6-12) Alternatives: . native: Tuna salad platter.
Cheeseburger, chef salad. MONDAY
TUESDAY Hot dog on bun, crinkle cut:
Loaded baked potato, broc- fries, carrots. Alternative:
coli flowerets, mixed fruit. Italian chef salad.
(Grades 6-12) Alternatives: TUESDAY
Crispy chicken wrap, whole
kernel corn, grilled chicken Sliced turkey roast mashed
caesar salad. . potato & gravy, turnip greens,
WEDNESDAY cornbread. Alternative:Ham
Ham and cheese sub, baked and cheese sandwich.
potato wedges, lettuce, to- WEDNESDAY.
mato, diced pears. (Grades Macho nacho, Mexican corn,
6-12) Alternatives: Chicken Ateative:
chilled peaches. Alternative:
burger, chicken salad w/
fresh fruit. * Turkey chef salad.




p MENUS SPONSORED BY:
BristoC Denta Chinic
Laban Bontrager, DMD, Monica Bontrager, DMD
Pea Ridge Rd in Bristol, Phone (850) 643-5417






SEPTEMBER 9, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 15


BLOUNTSTOWN V-4 HIGH SCHOOL


FEATURE I
Whoa! Take.a step into this
teacher's classroom and find true
team loyalty utterly blazing! A
parade of blue and orange brightens
the smile of anyone who dares
enter Auburn Alley. Have a seat,
and you'll soon discover that even
her abundant amount of team spirit
is nothing compared to her sense
oflove and dedication for not only
teaching but for each and every
student passing through her B.H.S.
classroom. Who is this epitome of
inspiration? Read on to find out.
SLast Thursday I had the chance
to slow down and interview Mrs.
Debra Betts of Blountstown High
School. Over the course of about
thirty minutes, I learned much
about Mrs. Betts as a teacher and
a friend.
Mrs. Betts was born and raised
in Alexander City,-AL. Due to a
job offer her husband received near
here, she and her husband moved
to Blountstown. Her favorite music
includes music wonders such as
The Beach Boys, The Beatles,
Nancy Sinatra, and Petula Clark.
Mrs. Betts enjoys reading to a
great degree - her favorite book
being Cold Sassy Tree by Olive
Ann Bums.
Mrs. Betts has an astounding
twenty-five years in the field of
teaching. She found her calling as
a social studies teacher but soon
found a new love - English. She
has been teaching at BHS going
on eight years. Mrs. Betts is an
alumni of both Central Alabama
Community College and, of
course, Auburn University. While
attending CACC, she received an
associate's degree in science and
then transferred to AU to achieve
a bachelor's degree and a master's
degree in education. Mrs. Betts
graduated with high honors from
both universities. When asked
if she would like to achieve any


Mrs. Debra Betts, BHS English teacher
pictured here in the her favorite place
the classroom.
TRENT SMITH PHOTO
additional degrees, she explained
her satisfaction with teaching.
Mrs. Betts loves to tell her life
stories. I was amused to hear the
one she shared with me during
the interview. Who doesn't want
the luxury of a car, right? What's
really special is one's first car!
She got her car and quickly
dreamt up the color she desired.
She envisioned a smooth, light
orange color for her beauty. Dad,
of course, had to be of some
assistance. He offered to take
care of getting the car painted
- her cousin being a car painter.
When the car was finished, she
was told that it wasn't exactly
what she had wanted. The car
came out to be the brightest
tomato red imaginable. Noticing
that her father felt that he had
failed, she cheerfully noted,
"Hey, at least I'll be able to find
it in the parking lot!"
SMrs. Betts also includes quotes
into her list of favorites. One
quote that she admires is one of
faith. "God grant me the serenity
to accept the things I cannot
change, courage to change the
things I can, and wisdom to know
the difference." - Unknown
author.
Mrs. Debra Betts is truly
a being of wisdom, love, and
dedication. Never am I left
uninspired.


Students in Ms. Baldwin's English class at BHS are shown working on their dual enrollment English course.


English 1101 on the Flip Side


by Casey Johnson.
Blountstown High School and
Altha High School are sharing an
English class this school year!
English teachers Mrs. Joyner
of Altha and Mrs. Baldwin of
Blountstown are teaming up
to generate one unique class
period.
Every day in Mrs. Baldwin's
first period class, students take
their required English course.
Their teacher though isn't Mrs.
Baldwin, their teacher is miles
away. How is this possible you
ask?
This technological
advancement in teaching is called
the ENC 1101/1102 Simulcast.
ENC stands for English
composition, which 'basically
introduces students to critical
thinking and writing. In this class,
students learn how to use proper
grammar and how to understand
the important connection between
reading and writing. The ENC
class is comprised of two separate
courses, the 1101 and the 1102.
ENC 1101 is taken the first
semester, ENC 1002 is taken
the second. This class is a dual
enrollment class which means
these students are enrolled in
Blountstown High School and


SALT HA WILDCAT S


Chipola College.
To be accepted into this
class, you must pass certain
requirements set by Chipola. The
class is made up of mostly seniors,
but there is one junior in the class.
The students receive two text
books, which are the same books
that Chipola gives their students.
In this class students will write
more essays, they must have a
set number of words written by
the end of the year, and they
must have a particular amount
of essays written. This is the first
time that this type of course has
been offered in Calhoun County.
ENC i101/1102 has been taught
at BHS before, but not with
simulcast. What is simulcast?
A simulcast by definition is -
simultaneous broadcast. That is
just a fancy word which means
that the teacher can teach the
class via an video feed. This
program is used primarily for
business purposes; in this case
however, we are using it to
teach students. Mrs. Joyner, who


teaches English at Altha Public
School, is the ENC 1101/1102
Instructor for Calhoun County.
Every morning she "calls" Mrs.
Baldwin's computer to start the
video instruction. Mrs. Joyner
has six students in her class at
Altha whereas Mrs. Baldwin has
seventeen.
There is a camera near
the ceiling to the left in Mrs.
Baldwin's classroom. This allows
Mrs. Joyner to see all the students
in the room. The technology is
incredible; Mrs. Joyner can see
every move a student makes.
She can answer a question when
a student raises their hand, she
can see their facial expressions,
and hear what they are saying.
This class is a new and innovative
form of teaching. Students will
learn writing and English skills
that will benefit them in their
business lives as adults. So if you
have a child that will be in 11th or
12th grade next year, think about
signing them up for this fun and
engaging class.


Apply for High School Heisman
Will you be a senior during the 2009-2010 school year? Do you
participate in at least one sport?
Are you a leader in your school and your community? Then don't
miss this opportunity to be recognized for everything'that you do!
Apply now for the 2009 Wendy's High School Heisman! Visit www.
wendysheisman.com for more information and to apply! The first
41,100 applicants will receive a FREE Wendy's Gift Card!


AMS A-Team defeats MHS 9th grade JV


On Thursday, Sept. 3 the Altha
Middle School (A)Volleyball Team
traveled to Marianna to face off
against the MHS 9th grade JV
team.
The Altha A-Team is lead by
returning players MacKenzie May-
8th grade, McKenzie Tanner-8th
grade, Mary Sewell-7th grade,
Emily Sewell-7th grade ind Brianna
Yon-8th grade, who is currently out
because of injury but is due to return
next week. Joining this group for
the first time are Morgan Lewis-8th
grade, Carly Schwartz-8th grade,
Hannah'Register-7th grade and
Brooke Boggs-7th grade.
After two games, 25-12 and 25-
13 the Lady Cats were able to chalk


up their first win of the season.
Leading scorer for the match was
Sewell with 9 points followed by
Boggs with 7 points, Sewell with
5 points, Register with 4 points,
Schwartz with 3 points. Lewis, May
and Tanner each had 2 points. "This
group did an outstanding job. They
were quick to correct their error and
offered words of encouragement to
their teammates. They displayed
the true character of teamwork,"
the coach said.
The Altha Middle School B-Team
is also looking forward to getting
their season started next week. This
group is lead by returning players,
Madison Rowe-8th grade, Deana
Griswold-8th grade, Elizabeth


Bailey-7th grade, and Jenny Moore-
7th grade. Joining this group for the
first time are Brittany Graham-8th
grade, Ashlyn Barfield-7th grade,
Shelby Murphy-7th grade and
Aubree Bay-6th grade. "These
girls work great together. They are
still a little timid, but have shown
remarkable improvements. As the
season progresses, I'm sure they
will become more aggressive. We
are looking forward to a productive
season," the coach said.
Both teams travel to Franklin
County on Tuesday, Sept. 8 for
matches beginning at 3:30 p.m.
(CT) and then to Blountstown
Middle School on Thursday, Sept.
10 at 3 p.m.


uuiaance news

for students
The next ACT is Oct. 24.
Deadline for registering is Sept.
18. Students can pick up packets
in the guidance office. Also,
Seniors, Elks Club scholarship
packets can be picked up now in
guidance.

Football ticket sale
Students can purchase home
football tickets on Fridays in the
front office during break and lunch
for $3. Please remember, these
tickets are for students only!


BHS Calendar
of Events
VThur. Sept. 10-Volleyball,
Home, against Holmes
County at 5/6 p.m. JV
Football, away at Liberty at
6 p.m.
VMon. Sept. 14-Volleyball,
away at Marianna at 5/6
p.m.
&Tue. Sept. 15-Volleyball,
Home, against Graceville at
5/6 p.m.
SVWed. Sept. 16-Early
Release for students.
.....................................


Homecoming 5K Race registration
Registration forms for the Homecoming 5K race are available
at BHS. Registration for the morning of the race will start at 7.


, ^^ _1









Page 16 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 9, 2009


Constitution Week designation signed Public
Members of the DAR/C.A.R. watched as Marianna
Mayor Paul A. Donofro, Jr. signed a proclamation, in Notice
accordance with Public Law 915, designating Sept, The Parks and Recreation
l 17-23 as Constitution Week. The proclamation urges Committee will hold two sole
"all citizens to study the Constitution, and reflect on purpose meetings on Friday,
the privilege of being anAmerican with all the rights September 11th at 1 p.m. at
and responsibilities which that privilege involves." Blountstown City Hall.
Jim's Buffet & Grill in Marianna will be the The Lake Hilda Park
setting for the annual DAR/C.A.R./SAR luncheon Florida Recreational
on Saturday, Sept. 19, at 11 a.m. with Major L.B. Development Assistance
"Cap" Pooser as the keynote speaker. St. Luke's Program Grant application
Episcopal Church will be designated as an Historic will be discussed at 1 p.m.
American Church by. Blue Springs Society, C.A.R. The Magnolia Square Florida
The Reverend Norman Bray, Rector of St. Luke's, Recreational Development
will accept a certificate from the National Society Assistance Program Grant
Children of the American Revolution for the application will be discussed
' church. at 1:30 p.m.
iThose interested in the Dutch treat event may call All persons are invited to
Public Relations Chairman Mary Robbins at 209- attend meetings.
S_________4066 for additional information.9-9-09






The Liberty County Board of County

Commissioners will accept applications

for caretaker of Bentley Bluff.

*Caretaker will reside at the park, providing a mobile home as their personal residence on said county owned property.
*Caretaker will open the park gates in the morning and close the-park gates in the evening at designated times set by the
county if a gate consists.
*Caretaker will attempt to maintain order in the park.
*Caretaker will report immediately to the Sheriff's Department of Liberty County, Florida any disturbance, disorder or unlaw-
ful act that occurs at the park.
*Caretaker will provide for scheduling at the picnic house for public use, and when said picnic house is in use by a family
who has pre-registered the house for its use- will ensure that the picnic house is closed at that time for public use.
*Caretaker will ensure that the picnic house is maintained in a clean and sanitary condition at all times.
*Caretaker will not store or allow to be stored on said ground, any personal property that would commonly be referred to as
junk property, and to keep the grounds around their residence in a neat and clean condition.
*Caretaker will not keep or have on the premises, any article or thing of a illegal, dangerous, inflammable or explosive char-
acter, other than what is kept in a normal household.
*Caretaker will pay for all moving expenses when their mobile home is moved out of the park. This will include cleanup
expenses in the area where the mobile home has been located.
*Caretaker will keep current and pay all charges above the base amount on the telephone bill.
*Caretaker will keep current and pay all charges above the base amount $40.00 per month on the electrical.bill.
*Caretaker will use and occupy the premises for lawful residential purposes only, and for no other purpose, and will allow
no unlawful use of said residential premises.
*Caretaker will not make any alterations, additions or improvements in, to, or about the premises without the written consent
of the Board of County Commissioners of Liberty County, Florida.
*There will be no alcohol stored or consumed on the premises.

The Board of County Commissioners will:
*Pay the base amount on the telephone bill.
*Pay $40.00 per month on the electric bill.
*Pay the hookup fee to the utility company in the amount of $15.00.
*Furnish a space for a single-wide or double-wide trailer at no charge to the caretaker.
*Furnish water to the residence at no charge.
*Waive inspection fees for the trailer and electrical hookup, although inspection will be required.
*Furnish a 200 amp electrical pole for the residential unit at no charge.

Miscellaneous
*Either the Board of County Commissioners of Liberty County, Florida or the Caretaker or Caretakers may terminate this
Agreement, upon written notice to the other party, at a minimum of thirty (30) days notice.
Notice shall be sent as follows:
*Liberty County Board of County Commissioners, P.O. Box 399, Bristol, FL 32321
*There will be back ground checks performed on each applicant.
*The Board reserves the right to accept or reject each and all applications which they deem to be in the best interest of the
county.

Applications will be accepted until 5:00 P.M., E.T. on
Wednesday, September 16, 2009.

Applications may be turned into the office of the
Clerk of Court, 10818 NW SR 20, P.O. Box 399, Bristol, FL 32321

AClbert Butcher,
Chairman of the Board of County Commissioners
9-2 & 9-9-09


Public Notice

The contents of the fol-
lowing storage units
rented at M & W Storage
in Altha, Florida will be
disposed of if not paid in
full AND emptied out by
September 11, 2009:

Donald Davis
Unit # 38 North
9-2 & 9-9-09







One Stop Career Center
18908 NE Pear SI. Suite 2,
Blountstown * Phone (850) 6741088
The following positions are
available: Construction Trades
Helper, Janitorial, Dietetic
Technician, Construction
Worker, Office Clerk, Food
Service Worker, Production
Manager, Truck Driver.
EOE
Service Chipola Workforce Board UFN


EXPERIENCED
Concrete Finisher

WANTED
Company benefits include:
*Insurance .
-IRA
*Vacation

Apply in person to:
PORTER
Construction Co., Inc.
4910 Hartsfield Road
Marianna, FL 32446.
EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER





BIL



BECOME A

VOLUNTEER
Become a vital part of
the advocacy team. Help
an abused, neglected
or otherwise at-risk child
by becoming a Volunteer
Guardian ad Litem.
Discover how you can
make a difference
in a child's life.
Florida Guardian
ad Litem Foundation
PHONE (850) 410-4642







SEPTEMBER 9, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 17


Good food. Good service.
Catfish, Seafood and Home Cooking

The ; "

SRestaurant jl
Hwy. 20, Bristol * 643-2264



WhA Deal!
BEST DEAL IN THE TRI-STATE AREA!
Slow credit, no problem W.A.C.
Hand-picked quality
cars and trucks.
Business (850) 526-5254
Residence (850) 762-3679
Toll Free: 1-888-740-8222
SUMMERLIN
3905 W. Hwy. 90 MOTORS


IT'S VERY WISE TO ADVERTISE
Make the most of your business with an ad in
.The Calhoun-Liberty

I- JOURNAL


500'b.


gator


pulled


from


River


Styx


Andy Bailey of
Bristol and Na-
scar driver Ster-
ling Marlin are
shown above with


a 500


lb. gator


TXE


SWAMP
Pool tournament starts a
8.OOp.m. every Medl
Up to $300.00 in prizes
$5.00 nbuyr
Thirsty Thursday
Ladles Night
Drinks half off for
Ladies

Watch up to 4 games at
Happy hour Every Week.day 4


STONK

t Thursday and Friday
Live music featuring



SATURDAY NIGHT
FEVER
$20.00 ALL YOU CAN DRINK
NO COVER
Live DJ
one time all season long
-7 Open 7 days a week


HWY 69 N. BLOUNTSTOWN NEXT TO MOEZELLE'S LIQUORS


they killed Sept.
1 at River Styx
in Liberty Coun-
ty. The huge ani-
mal measured 12
feet, 3 inches in
length. Shown at
right with the ga-
tor, from left, is
Andy Bailey, Vic
Williams, Sterling
Marlin and Jarrod
Roberts.


Youth Hunting Field Day planned


New hunters looking for help
and those with experience wanting
to sharpen their skills, listen up.
The Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission
(FWC) will offer a Youth Hunting
Field Day on Saturday, Sept. 12
at Tall Timbers Research Station
and Land Conservancy, north of
Tallahassee.
The FWC will partner with
Tall Timbers and the Big Bend
Youth Outdoor Foundation to put
on this free, half-day event for
kids of all ages and their parents
who are interested in attending.
Advance preregistration is not
necessary.
From 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.,
expert instructors will teach the
fundamentals of hunting deer,
turkey, waterfowl and small
game, and participants will learn
about using dogs for hunting.


Attendees will get to target-shoot
with bows, shotguns, rifles and.
muzzleloading guns and learn
about wildlife identification. The
event also features a seminar with
13-year-old hunting sensation
Zac Cooper.
Other activities include
getting an up-close look inside
an FWC helicopter and seeing
a K-9 demonstration by FWC


law enforcement officers and
their dogs. Participants also are
eligible for door prizes and the
chance of winning a youth hunt
or rifle.
For more information on the
Youth Hunting Field Day, call
Renee Hays at (850)413-0084.
For directions to Tall Timbers
Research Station, visit www.
talltimbers.org.


Turkey Federation to hold
Youth Field Day Saturday
The Big River Longbeards chapter of the National Wild Turkey
Federation is hosting a Porter Wagoner Jakes Conservation Field Day
Saturday, Sept. 12 at 9 a.m. The event will take place at the Buttermilk
Pond in the Apalachicola National Forest.
Let your child experience the outdoors through supervised, hands-
on activities at this local event.
For more information call Justin Ford at (850) 814-3907 or Jerry
Lewis at 643-5797.


t








Page 18 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 9, 2009


0BT URAL SPE


DALLIE CHASON WEST SASSER
TALLAHASSEE - Dallie Chason West Sasser,
98, went to be with the Lord Sept. 1, 2009. She was
a long-term resident of Tallahassee. She graduated
from Florida High School and Florida State College
for Women with a B.S. degree. She was a public
school teacher from 1929 - 1965, mostly third grade
at Kate Sullivan. She was a member of Alpha Delta
Kappa and Leon-Wakulla Teachers Organization.
She was past State President of the Association
for Childhood Education. She was a member of
Freedom Church where she taught Sunday School
and played the organ for many years. She also played
for Christian Heritage in her younger years. She will
'be remembered as one who would share the gospel
with all she came in contact with, as a loyal friend,
giving, loving, kind, caring, wise, cheerful, a love for
helping others and a person ofprayer. She passed her
love graciously to her family and friends. She lived
the past two years_at the Sherling House where the
staff gave her wonderful care.
She was preceded in death by her husband,
Wilbum West, who was a war casualty of World War
II in 1945; her second husband, Don Sasser Sr., to
whom she was married to for 37 years; her parents,
Rev. R.H. and Aggie Chason; two sisters, Eunice
Forehand and Ruby Alcom.
Survivors include a son, Don Sasser Jr. and his
wife, Margaret; a sister, Artie Leonard and her
husband, Charlie; two nephews, Cary Forehand
and his wife, JoAnn and Ron Forehand and his
wife, Anne, with whom she had a lifelong special
relationship; a great-nephew, Jon Forehand and his
wife, Chrissie.
The family wishes to thank friends who have
been very*supportive with their love, especially
her beloved Dr. Donald Zorn and his family, Dr.
Glen Beck and family, Dr. Russell Rowan and Dr.
Cognetta, Jim and Laurie Messer and family, Dottie
Daniels and family, LyndallAshburn, Annalee Stokes
and her husband, Bill, Amber and Dave Whetstone
and Reddick Langston.
Services were held Saturday, Sept. 5 at Beggs
Funeral Home with Dr. Charles Hughes and Rev.
John Todd officiating.
Memorial contributions may be made to Big Bend
Hospice, 1723 Mahan Center Blvd. Tallahassee, FL
32308.
Beggs Funeral Home in Tallahassee was in charge
of the arrangements.
WILLIAM J. (JACK) NOWLING


DONALD RAY WARREN
HARTFORD-Donald Ray Warren, 77, of
Hartford passed away on Thursday, Sept. 3, 2009
at his home. He was born April 1, 1932 in Cal-
houn County. Donald Ray as he was most often
called, grew up and spent his early years in the
Broadbranch Community near Kinard in Calhoun
County. He served four years in the U.S. Navy
and upon returning to his home place, he obtained
a job at Tyndall Air Force Base. Later he became
employed at Graham Air Base in Marianna. He
returned to school at Chipola College in Mari-
anna and obtained his high school diploma. He
started working at Fort Rucker in 1961, after 38
years he retired from DynCorp Corporation in
May 1999. He loved to read and enjoyed the his-.
tory of his birth county in Florida. In his early
years, he loved to fish and hunt. His hobbies were
working in his grapevines and plant propagation.
of fruit trees. He enjoyed his grandchildren and
great grandchildren and spent as much time as he
could with them. He will be greatly missed by
his family and everyone who knew him. He was
a member of the Blountstown IMasonic Lodge for
53 years and had received his 50-year pin. He
was also a member of the Order of the Eastern
Star Loyalty Chapter 438 in Geneva, AL.
He was preceded in death by one son, Donald
Ray Warren Jr.; one brother, Charles E. Skipper
and his mother, Pearl Skipper.
Survivors include his wife, Lois Jeanne Warren
of Hartford; one daughter, Elizabeth Jeanne War-
ren of Hartford; two sisters, Evelyn Rushing of
Broadbranch and Joyce Greene of Calhoun, GA;
four brothers, Johnny Skipper and Reggie Skip-
per of Broadbranch, Gerald Skipper of Grand
Ridge and Tommy Skipper of Wewahitchka; five
grandchildren, Eida Ballard, Dwayne Warren,
Rita Getz, Ryan O'Rourke and Heather Smith;
six great-grandchildren, Nathan Miller, Kiah
Smith, Krista Ballard, Troy Ballard, Lorena Getz
and Whyatte Smith; several nieces and nephews.
Services were held Saturday, Sept. 5 at Sor-
rells Funeral Home Chapel with Rev. John W.
Withrock, Jr. officiating. Graveside services with
full Masonic rites were held on Sunday, Sept. 6 in
Cypress Creek Cemetery in Kinard.
Sorrells Funeral Home of Slocomb, AL was in
charge of the arrangements.
I. .1


BRISTOL-William J. (Jack) Nowling, 70, of Bristol passed away
Thursday, Sept. 3, 2009 at his home. He was born in Flomaton, AL
and had lived in Liberty County for the past several years. He was
a retired truck driver and served in the United States Navy. He was
of the Protestant faith.
Survivors include his wife, Beverly Nowling ofBristol; three sons,
Kim Nowling of Blountstown, Jackie Nowling of~rizona and Ray-
mond Pelt of Bristol; two stepsons, Russell Davis of Charlotte, NC
and Timothy James Keeling of Bristol; two daughters, Lisa Carreon
of Bristol and Audie Nowling of Hosford; two stepdaughters, Kelly
Moll of Winter Haven and Sky Keeling of Bristol; numerous grand-
children including Alley Baggett and Paula Colleges and numerous
great-grandchildren; and the mother of his children, Betty Proctor
of Bristol.
Memorialization will be by cremation.
Peavy Funeral Home in Blountstown was in charge of the ar-
rangements.


HONOR
your loved one with
dignity & compassion.


James C. (Rusty) Black
Owner & Manager


Independent

Funeral Home
211 E. Jefferson St., Quincy
(850) 875-1529
LOCALLY OWNED & OPERATED


COMEPFORD VAULT MEMORIAL SERVICE
593-6828* 1-800-369-6828 * Fax: 593-6888
SHwy. 90 W * P.O. Box 933 * Sneads, FL 32460
. Pete Comerford - Owner & Operator


Ii


Let us help you with a memorial ofBEAUTY and DURABILITY
Serving Jackson & the Surrounding Counties for 42 Years
)Pecious Memopies "If you cant come to us, give us a call and we will come to you


Jack W. Weiler
LiUc. Funeral Director


JAMES ALLEN CAIN
KINARD-James Allen Cain, 51, of Kinard passed away Friday,
Sept. 4, 2009 in Panama City. He was born Dec. 11, 1957 in Panama
City and had lived in Kinard most of his life. He was a Tug Boat
Captain for 34 years with American Commercial Lines in Jefferson-
ville, IN. He was a 1975 graduate of Blountstown High School in
Blountstown. James was a member of the Cypress Creek Mission-
ary Baptist Church in Kinard.
Survivors include his wife, Gwen Cain of Kinard; two sons,
Christopher Cain and his wife, Jessica of Kinard and Jeremy Cain
of Kinard; two daughters, Jamie Roberts and Miranda Cain, both of
Kinard; one brother, Justin Cain of Clarksville; three sisters, Kathy
Franklin and her husband, Ricky ofKinard, Darlene Layfield and her
husband, Jimmy of Blountstown and Violet Goss and her husband,
Seymore of Clarksville; a very special mother-in-law, Ruth Stevens
of Blountstown; five grandchildren, Austin Cain, Jonathan Cain,
Jordan Cain, Taylor Roberts and Jaden Roberts; six nieces, Erica
Lambert, Chante Stevens, Jennifer Goldyn, Amy McCloud, Melissa
Parker and Morgan Stevens; seven nephews, Bradley Stevens, Ryan
Abbott, Branden Hall, Matt Layfield, Chuck Layfield, Tyler Stevens
and Noah Stevens and a son-in-law, Jason Roberts.
Services were held Monday, Sept. 7 at Peavy Funeral Home Cha-
pel with Reverend Carlton Cain and Reverend Joseph Yates officiat-
ing. Interment followed in Cypress Creek Cemetery.
Peavy Funeral Home in Blountstown was in charge of the ar-
rangements.


WHAT BETTER TRIBUTE
CAN THERE BE?
Honor your loved ones by making their memory part
of our best efforts to defeat cancer. For more infor-
mation, contact the American Cancer Society.


evis Funeral

SHome of Bristol
r 1& Crematory

All/ existing pre-need and at need
contracts are now handed by the
BeIv/s family and staff

Al operations of the furieralprocess
will be handled on location at
12008 NW State Road 20.

CALL 643-3636

Todd Wahlquist, Rocky Bevis & Ed Peacock
Licensed Funeral Directors




Peavy Funeral Home

& Crematory





SI lAl. I - i ,-*. .. ' , - I l . [ I




Your hometown funeral home since 1994
Funeral Services with Dignity,
Caring and Professionalism.
Marion Peavy
A Hometown Funeral Director
You Can Trust and Depend On!
Tepi (85 67.


EAST GADSQEN UNIT
P.O. Box 563, Quincy, FL 32353


I


. -i
pS^-i^trd


Li










SEPTEMBER 9, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 19


Time for a 'Labor Day' in the


t by Theresa Friday,
Horticulture Extension Agent,
Santa Rosa County
Are you longing to "labor"
in your garden? September
marks the beginning of the fall
gardening season. There's a lot
to do, so break out of the sum-
mer doldrums and head into the
garden and landscape to begin
those fall gardening chores.
September is the prime time
to plant many of the cool season
vegetables. You can sow seeds
of beets, broccoli, brussels
sprouts, carrots, cauliflower,
collards, endive, escarole, kale,
kohlrabi, lettuce, mustard,
onions, parsley and radishes. If
transplants of these are avail-
able they can also be set out.
If you plant early in the
month, you can still plant some
of the warm season vegetables
including beans, cucumbers and


summer squash.
Fall is a great
time to divide
clumping perenni-
als such as daylil-
ies, mondo grass
and liriope. Divi-
sion is the quickest
and easiest method
of multiplying
most herbaceous
perennials. Simply
dig the plants and
shake off the soil.
It will be apparent
where to separate
the plants into
smaller units hav-
ing roots and leaves.
Labor Day is also a good
time to groom your roses,
except for climbers. The fall
pruning is lighter than in the
spring; remove only about
one-third of the shrub. Be sure
to remove twiggy and unpro-


ductive growth along with any
crossing or dead canes. All
foliage is left on the bush at this
time.
September is also a good
time to start your preparation
for planting trees and shrubs.
Planting during fall and early


winter allows the
plants to establish
their root systems dur-
ing our relatively mild
winters. When hot
weather arrives next
summer, fall planted
trees and shrubs are
already well estab-
lished and better able
to cope with the heat
stress. Choose your
trees and shrubs care-
fully. Learn about the
plant before you buy
it. Know its mature
height and its sun or
shade requirements.
Even a well-chosen
tree or shrub can become a
problem if planted in the wrong
location.
September is also the last
month to fertilize our Northwest
Florida lawns. Do not fertilizer
too late, no later than September


garden

15th. A late season application
of high nitrogen fertilizer can
cause a flush of new growth
too late in the year. It "wakes"
the plant up at a time when it
should be getting ready to "go
to sleep" or enter dormancy. A
late season growth flush de-
creases the plant's winter hardi-
ness and increases the possibil-
ity of cold damage.
Carefully select your fertil-
izer. For your lawn, consider
an application of low nitrogen,
high potassium fertilizer such as
a 5-0-15 or a 5-0-20. And don't
be misled by the term "winter-
izer" fertilizer. Many fertil-
izers advertised as winterizers
are very high in nitrogen and
are not good choices for a late
season application.
So enjoy a holiday weekend
in the garden and you'll be
rewarded with the fruits of your
labor.


Safety programs offered online for

agricultural equipment & motorists


We've cut prices - then guaranteed them for a year!
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communications
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- I G Y 'I . Jro, 1' ' lo l i.* ' I- Ht lA.1 o I i , , ,' rr_,.,l[ ,'i r,, . l" ,, r ', i i.

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z x jdimbl I ~ t..3! AICIAW~~YP~ O,~L~ r - V T'O.V� IVWj.l. ' l "C.r c,


GAINESVILLE --- Patience
is a virtue. That's especially
true when motorists encounter
agricultural equipment on public
roads-the consequences of
impatience can be tragic, says
a University of Florida expert
who has developed a free, online
training program to keep motorists
safe.
"When John Q. Public hits a
tractor, you know who's coming
out on the bad end of things,"
says Carol Lehtola, an associate
professor with UF's Institute of
Food and Agricultural Sciences.
"Modem tractors can weigh as
much as four or five SUVs. It's
like hitting a brick wall."
The good news is that avoiding
those catastrophic collisions is
simply a matter of slowing down
and using caution, she said.


To help motorists understand
what to do-and not do-Lehtola
and colleague Charles Brown
put together "Sharing the Road
With Agricultural Equipment,"
a 25-minute multimedia training
program available at the National
Ag Safety Database Web site,
http://www.nasdonline.org.
Major topics in the program
include: characteristics of
agricultural equipment that can
create hazards for motorists;
-factors that affect motor vehicle
stopping distance; slow-moving
vehicle emblems and warning
lights on agricultural equipment;
the three most common collision
scenarios; descriptions of actual
collisions; the importance of
motorist attitude.
Attitude, Lehtola says,
is everything. Without the


willingness to slow down, observe
and determine how to proceed
safely, any motorist is at risk.
Part of that attitude is realizing
farmers have the right to move
their equipment on public roads,
and only do so because they're
hard at work.
"I like the description in the
lead-in (of the program), about
how the farmer must take his
factory to the field," Lehtola said.
,"If the public thinks of it that
way, they'll probably be more
patient."
The program ends with a
multiple-choice quiz so users can
test.their knowledge.
Lehtola will promote the
online course to driver education
instructors, FFA clubs and
other organizations that focus
on motoring safety or youth
development.
Funding for the program was
provided by the National Institute
for Occupational Safety and
Health.
To access the program: Go to
www.nasdonline.org and click
"Interactive Training Series."
Then log in or sign up (a free,
one-step registration process), and
click "View Training Courses."
From there, find the heading
"Road Safety: Sharing the Road
With Agricultural Equipment"
and click "Interactive" for the
multimedia program.


IT'S
VERY
WISE TO ADVERTISE
Make the most of your
business with an ad in
The Calhoun-Liberty

JOURNAL
PHONE (850) 643-3333










Page 20 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 9, 2009


ITEMS FOR SALE


King size Sealy Posturepedic mat-
tress, box spring and frame, like
new, $200. Call 625-0265. 9-09,9-16

Quick Track 5000 (no collars); dog
tracking system, $450. Call 570-
9358. 9-09, 9-16

Lowrey Jamboree Organ with
Magic Jeannie, recently serviced,
excellent condition with matching
bench. Would be great for church,
$750 OBO. Call 674-9578. 9-09,9-16

19" Color TV, $20; Kirby vacuum
with all parts, needs belt and bag,
$20; glass flat top stove, needs glass
replaced or repaired, $20. Call 379-
8973. 9-09,9-16

Oval dining table with three leafs
and pads aid six chairs, $150. Call
643-5486. 9-09, 9-16

Coffee table with two end tables,
wood with glass tops, good condi-
tion, $100. Call 447-0330. 9-9,9-16

Crib set, includes sheet set, com-
forter, bumper guards, $15; twin
-size Barbie comforter, sheet set
and curtains, $20; Leap Frog learn-
ing system, includes 15 cartridges,
books and carrying case, $30. Call
643-9332. 9-9, 9-16

Dining room table with 6 chairs,
oval shape with three leaves and
custom pads $225; China Cabinet
has glass shelves and door, light,
two drawer and two door for storage
underneath $225. Buy together and
pay only $400. Call 643-4155. 9-2,9-9

-14" Hotwheels child's bike, green
color, paid $80, asking $40. Call
557-8554. 9-2,9-9

Two brown colored chairs in good
condition, $40 for both; twin mat-
tress and box springs, good condi-
tion, $40. Call 688-6593. 9-2,9-9

Two blue electric lift recliner
chairs, like new,- large size $250,
medium size $200. Call 674-3194.
9-2, 9-9

Swimming pool, 16' round x 3-1/2'
deep, two months old, $100. Call
209-4837. 9-2,9-9

Fisher Price space saver high
chair/booster seat, in excellent
condition, $25; ladies 10K gold 18"
Figaio necklace, $50 firm. Call
643-3370. 9-2,9-9

Powertrip motorcycle jacket, X-
large, like new, mint condition, black,
fully armored, $125; Joe Rocket mo-
torcycle jacket, X-large, great condi-
tion, silver & gray, fully armored, $60;
and other miscellaneous motorcycle
items. Call 643-1178 or 510-6929.
9-2, 9-9

Six drawer dresser and entertain-
ment center, $30 for both. Call
674-9744 after 5 p.m. 9-2,9-9

Couch and love seat, cream col-
ored suede like material, $300 OBO.
Call 379-3859. 9-2,9-9

Wood frame twin bed with mattress
and matching chest of drawers,
entertainment center, light brown
dresser and chest of drawers, large
computer desk, make offer. Call
379-3859. 9-2,9-9


Computer desk $25; exercise
bike $50; Kirby vacuum $50; baby
swing, new$15; food dehydrator $5;
3-quart crock pot $5; coffee maker
$5; full size mattress top free. Call
762-2292. 9-2, 9-9




APPLIANCES


Whirlpool portable dishwasher,
$100. Call 762-2292. 9-2.9-9

Frigidaire electric stove, less than
a year old, like new, self cleaning
oven, $150. Call 674-3045. 9-2,9-9

Chest freezer, 5 cubic feet, used
approximately six months, $75. Call
674-6057. 9-2,9-9



ELECTRONICS


15" digital photo frame, new in
box, view your digital pictures,
watch your MPEG videos, listen to
MP3 music files, comes with remote
control, $280. Call 643-5905, leave
message. 9-9.9-16

DVD player, AC 12 volt for motor
home, $40; 75 DVDs, newer mov-
ies, two for $5. Call 694-6874.
9-9, 9-16

Pink Blackberry Pearl, four months
old, comes with a carrying case,
charger, USB cable and a CD that
goes with the phone, $80. Call 447-
0330. 9-9,9-16

XBox 360, one year old, 20 GB hard
drive, 256 MB -memory card, two
controllers, wireless internet adapt-
er, 17 games, blue face plate, $300
firm. Call 447-2233. 9-9, 9-16

Texas Instrument 84 Silver calcu-
lator, hot pink color, has all acces-
sories to use with computer, paid
$120, asking $60. Call (850)557-
8554. 9-2.9-9

Sony Stereo system, 6-disc CD
tuner, AM/FM w/2 15" woofer speak-
ers in the box, $400; 10-disc CD
changer, $50. Call 509-8636.
9-2, 9-9

2004 Dell Desktop computer, Win-
dows 98 w/speakers, mouse, HP
printer/FAX/Scanner, all in great
condition, $400 OBO. Willing to sell
printer separate, $100. Call 670-
1202. 9-2,9-9

PSP, eight months old, Limited Edi-
Stion Daxter Entertainment pack with
case, 1-GB memory stick duo, AC
power cord and five games, $130.
Call 674-3194. 9-2,9-9

Canon printer combination, copy/
scanner/fax, works great, $50. Call
762-2292. 9-2,9-9



CARS

2003 Blue PT Cruiser, excellent
condition, automatic, 62,000 miles,
$4,500. Call 762-2243. 9-09, 9-16

1997 Lincoln Town car, power;
windows, locks, steering, etc., leath-
er, new tires, runs good, 185K miles,
$2500 OBO. Call 447-0115. 9-2,9-9


TRUCKS & SUVS

1993 Ford Ranger, V6, 5-speed,
cold A/C,'$2,000. Call 209-4070.
9-09. 9-16

2004 2500 Duramax Diesel Chevy
and 2002 Keystone Montana 5th
wheel travel trailer w/two slides. Will
sell together or separate. Call 447-
3200. 9-09..9-16

1988 Chevy Blazer 4 x 4, full five,
automatic transmission, engine
knocking, $1,200. Call 210-4264.
9-9, 9-16

S1993 Ford conversion van, less
than 30K miles on engine, almost
new tires, AC works, TV, VCR, clean,
$3,000. Call 674-7854. 9-9. 9-1i

1971 Dodge D-100 truck, runs
good, $900 OBO. Call 762-2292.
9-2, 9-9

1996 Dodge 3500 Dually 4x4 Diesel
5.9, 12 valve, 5-speed, white, new
tires, manual windows and seats,
331K miles, lots of upgrades and
gooseneck hitch, $7,000. Call 251-
1416. 9-2. 9-9



AUTO ACCESSORIES

All-terrain tires, LT265-75-16 with
aluminum rims, came on Chevy
pickup. Call 643-2970.. 9-09,9-16

16" chrome mags, set of four, off
of 2001 Ford F150 2wd, tires are
245/70/R16, $250 for set. Call 694-
6874. 9-9,9-16

Set of 22" ALT Zyon wheels, 22"
x 9.5" chrome, 6 x 5.5 lug pattern,
tires are 305/40/22. Serious buyers
only. First $750 takes them. Call
447-1278. 9-9.9-16

Motor and transmission, fits 1995
S10, 4wd, 4.3 liter, V6, $200 for
both. Call 643-9332. 9-9,s-16




MOTORCYCLES

& ATVS


2005 Yamaha 1100 V-Star Silvera-
do Motorcycle with lots of extras,
2,777 miles, $5,500. Call 379-8428
between 6:30 to 9 p.m. weeknights
or anytime on weekends. 9-2,9-9




TOOLS AND HEAVY

EQUIPMENT

2005 New Holland Tractor TC35
w/front end loader and grapple,
bush-hog and box blade, 485 hours,
$16,000. Call 643-6589. 9-09, 9-16

Craftsman riding lawn mow-
er, needs battery and carburetor
cleaned, $100. Call 379-8973.
9-09, 9-16

4x6ft Heavy duty utility trailer, flat-
bed, $165. Call 443-2422 in Bristol.
9-09.9-16

55 gallon drums, $7.50 each. Call
210-4264. 9-9,9-16


For Sale:
40 acres located in the SE
corner of Hwy 392 & John
Daniel Road. Some owner
finance $3,000 per acre.
Call 265-5127 or 832-0955


-utnCee


THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL



CLASSItFIEDS


To place your ad, call 643-3333 by noon Eastern
Time on Saturday. Non-business ads run FREE for 2 weeks.











SEPTEMBER 9, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 21


#STflR-


SCOPE

Week of
Sept.13 - Sept. 19
ARIES - Mar 21/Apr 20
Aries, this week promises to be
one of the most romantic ever and
it starts out on a high note as a
personal relationship intensifies.
You cannot do wrong creatively.

TAURUS -Apr 21/May 21
Taurus, a friend's generosity
touches your heart. You should
get ready to-party -- an invitation
may be on its way. This week will
be a time for fun and friends.

GEMINI - May 22/Jun 21
Gemini, a strong connection
comes your way as you are
drawn to someone new. You will
soon see that your hard work is
noticed and rewarded. A hidden
agenda proves beneficial.

CANCER - Jun 22/Jul 22
Cancer, your unique talents
finally get the recognition they
deserve this week. A fascinating
friend returns to your life in an
unexpected way.

LEO - Jul 23/Aug23
Leo, you are on a lucky roll. With
every chance you take and every
move you make you charm others
into doing exactly what you want.
It can't last forever, though.

VIRGO -Aug 24/Sept 22
The week ahead may mark a
significantturning point in your
life, Virgo. The dreams and goals
you've been working toward in
your career and romantic life are
realized...

LIBRA-Sept 23/Oct 23
Libra, the past few months
have seen a whirlwind of
activity in your life. And
now your love life is about to
heat up in the same way.
Financial gains may soon arrive.

SCORPIO - Oct 24/Nov 22
Scorpio, you are given new
opportunities for romance, love
and travel. Your positive outlook
comes in handy when a friend
turns to you for help.

SAGITTARIUS - Nov 23/Dec 21
Sagittarius, a new look will turn
heads wherever you go. You have
been searching for joy and it finds
you when you least expect it. A
new interest excites you.

CAPRICORN - Dec 22/Jan 20
You're in the spotlight this week,
Capricorn, and feel in the mood
for fun. Don't worry because good
times are awaiting you around
every turn-the next few days.

AQUARIUS - Jan 21/Feb 18
Aquarius, a long-lost friend
or love wants to be back in your
life. This week, life is truly
unexpected -- with each day
filled with mysterious
happenings that are delightful.

PISCES - Feb 19/Mar 20
Happiness is yours for the
taking, Pisces. A long-time
goal is realized and good
fortune falls into your lap.

FAMOUS BIRTHDAYS
SEPTEMBER 13
Jean Smart, Actress (58)
SEPTEMBER 14
A.J. Trauth, Actor (23)
SEPTEMBER 15
Prince Harry, British Royalty (25)
SEPTEMBER 16
Nick Jonas, Singer (17)
SEPTEMBER 17
Mark Brunell, Athlete (39)
SEPTEMBER 18
Robert Blake, Actor (76)
SEPTEMBER 19
Trisha Yearwood, Singer (45)


Storage shed, 10' x 10', $500. Call
694-6874. 9-9,9-16

Utility trailer, 4x9, $100. Call 674-
2598. 9-2,9-9

Commercial propane floor buffer
with Honda engine, $300; 2007 5x8
Horton cargo trailer, $1,500. Call
237-2706. 9-2,9-9

Utility trailer, 8x10, bought new last
year, $900. Call 509-8636. 9-2,9-9

Howes HD7 7 ft. bush hog, pull-
type, Kabota orange, 3 months old,
used a total of 4 hours, excellent
condition, $3,700 OBO. Call 251-
1416. 9-2,9-9



HOMES & LAND

Beautiful 2004 Doublewide mobile
home, 4/BR, 2BA, 2128 sq. ft. Great
Room with fireplace, living room,
huge master bedroom, master bath
has double sinks, garden tub all lo-
cated on 1.4 acres on Janney Rd. in
Clarksville; $75,000 OBO. Call 643-
6488. 9-2,9-9

Big lot on Chipola River, located
in Calhoun County. Call 643-1514.
UFN

Brick House for sale in Neal Sub-
division, three bedroom, enclosed
garage converted to a game room.
Located at corner of 2nd Street and
2nd Avenue. A double corner lot
with privacy fence, $84,500. Call
643-8800 or 643-2626.
37/BC/9-9-09

New home on Finley Avenue in
Blouritstown, 1,400 sq. ft., 3 bed-
rooms, 2 baths, vinyl siding, laminate
floors in living area, carpet in bed-
rooms, tiled bathrooms, $110,000.
Call 447-0951 or 674-4118.
28/BC/thru 9-30-09


Name


PETS/SUPPLIES

Nine week old gray tiger striped
kittens, free to a good home. They
are litter box trained and eating kit-
ten chow. They are used to dogs
and would make a great addition to
any family. Call 643-3580. 9-09,9-16

Orange and white kittens, free to
a good home, 3-4 months old, litter
box trained. Call 643-3080. 9-9,9-16

Boxweiler puppies, Boxer/Rott-
weiler mix, just born, will.grow to be
very large, $40. Call 674-7854.
9-9, 9-16

Blue Pit Bull, female, eight months
old. Call 718-6580 for more info.
9-9, 9-16

Free male kitten, gray color, nine
weeks old, very sweet and good
with kids. Call 447-0659. 9-2,9-9

Free female cat and three kittens,
to a good home. Call 379-3279.
9-2, 9-9



WANTED

Will trade three vehicles for another
vehicle or use them as a down pay-
ment or partial down payment on a
house or mobile home. Call 674-
3264. 9-9,9-16

Outside toys, good, used, reason-
ably priced. Call 447-0848. 9-9,9-16

Floor control trolling motor, 45 Ib.
thrust or more. Call 693-0898. 9-2,9-9

Used aquariums, preferably large
ones. Call 674-7854. 9-2,9-9

Used computer with enough ca-
pacity for educational CDs for home
schooling. Call 670-4562. 9-2,9-9


SUBSCRIBE TODAY TO

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LIBERTY JOURNAL


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Address


City State Zip_


Phone


Please enclose a check or money
order for $18 and mail to:
The Calhoun-Liberty Journal,
P.O. Box 536,
Bristol, FL 32321


- ---... . .......


THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL




CL ASSFiEDS

To place your ad, call 643-3333 by noon Eastern
Time on Saturday. Non-business ads run FREE for 2 weeks.
N ,A


TRAILER FOR RENT
Two bedroom, two bath-
room mobile home for
rent. Located six miles
north of Blountstown on
Hwy. 69 north. Water.
sewer, and grass mow-
ing provided. Deposit
required. No pels.
Call 643-8934



BOSTON TERRIER
Puppies for Sale


8 weeks old. AKC
registered, shots
Stormed
'325 females '300 males


(850)573-6750


Junk cars and trucks, any con-
dition. We pay cash. Call.762-
8459 or 272-1126 cell. UFN




CAMPERS/RVS


2008 Sunnybrook Edgewater trav-
el trailer, still like brand new, Model
267RLE, $19,500; sway bars, reese
hitch and flat screen, 7 year trans-
ferrable warranty included. Call
694-8530 evenings, for more info or
to see. 9-2, 9-9

2006 25 ft. Gulf Stream Conquest
Supreme travel trailer, bumper
pull, w/one slide, excellent condi-
tion, $11,500. Call 237-2706 or 532-
9622. 9-2,9-9



WATERCRAFT
& SUPPLIES


1997 16' Aluminum Bass Tracker
'Pan Fish', stick steering, with new
stick steering and throttle cables,
1997 40Hp Mariner w/oil injection
and 2006 Galvanized trailer, $3,000
OBO. Call 272-4933. 9-9,9-16

1984 Bayliner boat, 18'8", with
125Hp Force engine and trailer. For
fishing or pleasure, ready for the
water, $1,995 or will trade for truck
or car OBO; 14ft. Starcraft Alumi-
num fishing'boat, with 20hp Mercury
motor and trailer, in good condition,
$1,095. Call 443-2422 in Bristol.
9-9,9-16

40' Fiberglass house boat, sleeps
six, totally remodeled. Living room,
kitchen wall appliances, bedroom,
full bath w/shower, top and front
deck, new generator, very nice
$11,500 OBO. Call 209-5806 or
209-0964. 9-2, 9-9

1982 Kennedy Craft, 14' fiberglass
boat with trolling motor, $600 OBO.
Call 591-7831 weekends or 413-
1162 weekdays/nights. 9-2,9-9

14 ft. Whiteline boat, all aluminum,
40 Hp. Evinrude and Evinrude troll-
ing motor, $2,800. Call 643-3748.
9-2 9-9



GUNS


12 Gauge Remington 870 pump
shotgun in good condition, $250;
Rossi 357 snub nose 6-shot revolv-
er, black matte finish and black rub-
ber grips, $295. Call 443-2422 in
Bristol. 9-9.9-16

Remington 12 gauge automatic,
Sportsman 58 model, made be-
tween 1960 and 1961, has engrav-
ings and comes with extra barrel,
all in excellent condition, $375; 20
gauge Mossberg, bolt action, model
185 KA, long gun made between
1953 and 1956, great condition,
$125. Call 643-8383. 9-9, 9-16

Walther P38 9-millimeter pistol,
w/matching serial numbers. It's
an original German Officer's pistol,
$600. Call 762-2080 after 6 p.m.
9-2, 9-9


I


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Nam









Page 22 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 9, 2009


With $2.3M award, FSU Nursing program to educate more


by Libby Fairhurst
TALLAHASSEE -- Amid
the national debate on health
care quality and access, $2.3
million in new grants to The
Florida State University College
ofNursing www.nursing.fsu.edti/
will support a unique Doctor of
Nursing Practice (DNP) degree
program that aims to increase
the number of advanced practice
nurses and see them lead and
manage health care delivery in
poor, underserved areas.
Highly competitive, the pair
of three-year grants (about $1.16
million each) will come to Florida
State from the Health Resources
and Services Administration
(HRSA), part of the U.S.
Department ofHealth and Human
Services.
For FSU's College of
Nursing, the awards represent an
unprecedented level of federal
support, affirming the goals of
its new DNP program, which
began with the fall 2009 semester.


TALLAHASSEE -- To an
outsider taking a tour, the National
High Magnetic Field Laboratory
at The Florida State University
is a mystery with glass and steel,
lights flashing, and a labyrinth
of hallways leading to squat
cylindrical magnets organized in
cinderblock cells.
Inside these cells -- and lots of
other places inside the sprawling
370,000-square-foot facility --
researchers investigate scientific
unknowns, pushing the limits of
temperature, magnetic field and
mechanical ingenuity to do so.
Many visitors leave the magnet
lab impressed, a little perplexed,
and wanting more.
With that in mind, the lab has
organized the Magnet Mystery
Hour, an ongoing series of free
talks that present the lab, its
instruments and its research in
a way that is accessible to the
curious-minded, even if they
haven't had a science class since
high school (or are currently
in high school!). The talks
are presented by the scientists
themselves -- many of them
leaders in their fields -- in a
conversational format appropriate
for older students and adults. Each
talk is held on a Tuesday night at
7 p.m. and is paired with a short
tour of the facility at 6:30 p.m.
A question and answer session
follows each talk.
MAGNET MYSTERY
HOUR '09-'10 ACADEMIC
YEAR SCHEDULE
* The Pull of High-Field
Magnets, Sept. 22: Most of
the scientists at the magnet lab
who use the magnets don't work
there -- and they don't pay to
use the magnets, either. DC User
Program Director Eric Palm
explains who these "users" are,i
why they are in Tallahassee,
and why it's important to pool


The program's mission: Produce
the most highly qualified nurse
experts - with special efforts
to recruit students from diverse
and disadvantaged backgrounds
throughout the Sunshine State
- and encourage them to serve
as practitioners and health care
system leaders in the poor, rural
communities of northern Florida
and across the Southeast.
"The state of Florida must
remain on the forefront of nursing
education, and $2.3 million from
HRSA will certainly help The
Florida State University www.fsu.edu/> do just that," said
College of Nursing Dean Lisa
Plowfield. "The graduates of our
new doctoral program will be
exceptionally qualified to help


national resources to advance
basic research.
* Kitchen Table Science For
Families, Oct. 20: Bring a child
to this'Magnet Mystery Hour to
discover science projects adults
and children can do together.
Center for Integrated Research
and Learning Director Pat Dixon
introduces "kitchen table science"
(or in this case, conference table
science) to participants, who
have an opportunity to build their
own electromagnets and try other
fun and low-cost .experiments.
Seating is limited, as are supplies,
so please reserve your spaces by
sending an e-mail to hancock@
magnet.fsu.edu.
* Petroleomics: Chemistry
of the Underworld, Nov. 17:
Ryan Rodgers of the magnet lab's
Ion Cyclotron Resonance (ICR)
group explains how scientists
use very sophisticated tools to
simultaneously separate and


solve many of the problems we
face in today's health care system
and meet the changing needs of
our patients and their families,
especially in traditionally
underserved areas."
Plowfield said the awards
couldn'thave come at abettertime.
"Despite significant statewide
budget cuts, the HRSA funding
will bolster our ability to recruit
nurses into our DNP program
and build a strong faculty and
curriculum with a dedicated
focus on diversity and cultural
competence in our health care
workforce," she said.
Each of the two grants will
help fund and grow one of two
doctoral "tracks" that students
can take to the DNP degree at


identify thousands of separate
chemical constituents within a
single crude oil sample. Dubbed
"petroleomics," this new field of
research has major implications
for how oil companies drill for
and refine natural resources.
* Magnet Myths and
Mysteries, Jan. 19, 2010: DC
Facilities and Instrumentation
Director Scott Hannahs discusses
some of the most common myths
about magnetism and the magnet
lab -- andhe'll take your questions,
no matter how strange they might
be. If you like good anecdotes,
you'll not want to miss this.
* Magnets: From Mini
to Mighty, March 23, 2010:
There's a lot more to magnets
than you think. This talk features
a rundown of magnet types,
uses and strengths, explained by
Magnet Science and Technology
Director Mark Bird in a way that
will help make the facts stick.


'Shrimp' to be topic at Thurs.

Coastal & Marine Lab lecture


A free public lecture is
scheduled from 7 to 9 p.m.
on Thursday, Sept. 10, at The
Florida State University Coastal
& Marine Laboratory, located
in St. Teresa, Fla. Refreshments
will be served. The lecture will be
presented by noted scientist and
author Jack Rudloe, managing
director of the Gulf Specimen
Marine Laboratory, who will
read from his and wife Anne's
upcoming book, "Shrimp - The
Endless Quest for Pink Gold."
The Sept. 10 lecture will be
the next one in the laboratory's
monthly Coastal & Marine
Conservation Lecture Series.
In association with Second
Harvest of the Big Bend, part
of "The Nation's Food Bank


Florida State. Both tracks - DNP
Family Nurse Practitioner and
DNP Health Systems Leadership
- have been designed for nurses
with Bachelor of Science in
Nursing or Master of Science in
Nursing degrees.
The DNP degree earned at
FloridaState would be comparable
to professional doctorates in
medicine (MD), dentistry (DDS),
pharmacy (PharmD), and physical
therapy (DPT), according to
Plowfield.
Graduates of the FSU program
would be qualified to enter an
advanced practice specialty area;
assume leadership positions in


--


SUNSHINE STATE CYPRESS

Hwy 65 North in Hosford

L Mulch for Sale
BULK & BAG
... l FOR PRICING & AVAILABILITY
SCALL 379-8892, ext. 202 or 203
I-- - ^


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Agent
craig.brinkley@ffbic.com

Helping You


is what we do best


For prompt, professional
attention, and fast fair
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I


Network," the FSU Coastal &
Marine Laboratory is collecting
non-perishable food items at each
of its monthly lectures. Attendees
are asked to bring an item or two
and help solve the community's
hunger crisis.
The FSU Coastal & Marine
Laboratory is locatedat 3618Hwy. 98
in St. Teresa, Fla. (Franklin County),
at the intersection of highways
319 and 98, halfway between
Carrabelle and Panacea, about
45 miles southwest of Tallahassee.
For additional information on
the free public lecture Sept. 10 or
future lectures planned as part of
the monthly Coastal & Marine
Conservation 2009 Lecture Series,
contact the FSU Coastal & Marine
Laboratory at (850) 697-4095 or
via e-mail at sthoman@fsiu.edu, or
visit the lab s Web site at http it-v >
marinelab.fsu. edu/.


17577 Main Street North
Blountstown
(850) 674-5471


t Libertv
Postand

Barn Pole Inc.
Dempsey Barron Road, Bristol * 643-5995 (off Hwy. 12 N)


TOP
GRADE
7' Posts
Top Size
3-4"
4-5"
5-6"


TOP
GRADE
8' Posts
Top Size
2-3", 3-4"
4-5"
5-6"
6-7"
7-8"


SPECIALTY 8"+
POSTS
1/4 rounds Items
1/2 rounds subject to
Flat Face availability


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Top Size
2-2.5"
2-5.3"
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FACTORY
SECONDS
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4-5"
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4-5" 7-8"
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FACTORY SECONDS
6'6" Posts, Top Size, under 2
2-3" 3-4" 4-5" 5"+


We've got the fence posts ,
to meet your needs.


0


Take a tour at Magnet Mystery


Hour Tuesday evenings at FSU


I


- �-
~E~--~--~-~


11
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u


*


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S
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health care; use technology and
information to transform health
care systems; design complex
theory-guided and evidence-
based models of care delivery;
conduct research on the evaluation
of outcomes of care through the
application of state-of-the-art
evidence; develop programs to
promote population health; and
collaborate on inter-professional
teams to improve long-term
patient and population health
outcomes.
"The HRSA grants will enable
us to expand the DNP program
model that we'd originally
proposed," Plowfield said. "As
a result,Florida State University
now can educate and graduate
greater numbers of expert
clinicians and researchers who
are uniquely qualified for the
diverse health care settings that
desperately need them."







SEPTEMBER 9, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 23




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AM.


Lawn Care
Mowing � Weedeating
Edging * Cleanup * Etc.

mmm TTBCC??


Metal roofs, decks,
siding & room additions
Call 643-4536
Licensed & Insured .,


CLAY O'NEAL'S
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Altha, FI 32421 o,,erieers Cell 18501 832-5055


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* Copper -.4uUm -H 0 HOURS
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Ick-up service available for large quantities.
* ~f�?ri~,.~ii,' ;..i~7~ 1*J H,:T1~ ~i


The Calhoun-Liberty Journal
Senring tw'o counties HOURS: i a rr - 6 p m Monna, Ihru
Friday 9 'm � 1 pm Saiurd3v ETI
that make up one, 9
great community! ....




PHONE (850) 643-3333



Whaley Heating &

Air Conditioning
(850) 674-4777
SERVICE UNIT REPLACEMENT
. ,IB I INSTALLATION


Accept. ng-
En VISA


FILTERS ANY SIZE


*NEW HOMES *iL PAGES .ADDiTIOI 3
*PEMODELI lG * FOUNDATiO n s
*ELECTP CAL *PORCHES *DECKS
* 'S EE: E I 0 0 M * S U rR 0 M
Clint Hatcher, owner


STRICKLAND'S
,E HARDWARE .


\ .i.r t.i.i. . - , :

I[1.urnd pI- l l r,


10l3 8 rw R ".'i , rIn rBr..il,,jl
PHONE 1850 l.,43.-23_


10781NWSR 20
Bristol, F132321


S643-2939
I


LIBERTY TIRE COMPANY
We specialize in sales and repair of tires for:
'------ Commercial Trucks and Trailers, OTR
Equipment Farm Equipment, Passenger , ..m
Car & Light Truck Tires
Come see us for all your tire needs or
! c==: give us a call for roadside service, oil
r,. : . changes & tire rotation.


William's Home
Improvements


Jackson
Counties


2888 Apalachee Trail * Marianna * 850-272-0144
L6ul...,-,, LI,: t MH ;'8 2 1- . Bl. 8 ElaF:Ai . .L-. : ER, :,:,1J. : -


S "No Job Too Big or Small"
Licer.Ied & lnsure .,jnlr icIjr . ro.irlir
I Courier.' ? work,
cl| ardinq r.ni.-.ltiur-
ri| -aml.' gun- r I 1 tI u
FOR FREE ESTIMATES ]-
Call 674-809
- H>.Ii:: I


STUMP
,GRINDING
S Reasonable
. rates
Sl-Free estimates
Call Chris Nissley
674-8081 or
643-8561 (Cell)


rGENERAC K E N

AUTHORIZED SALES & SERVICE DEALER l u

Portable & Automatic Standby Generators

INSTALLATION * SALES * SERVICE
call (850)545-4442 or online at power@kenruddelectric.comn
.. \ ,..,... .,. ^/


4. 1... ..... . .. . .. . ..... ............... .. ........... .......

FLORIDA Greg Willis
CONCEALED WEAPONS
PERMITCLASS Q Tree Service
Classes available every day . -r i-iemovai
Cost is '50.00 per person Tree Removal
(group discounts available) Tree Trimming
ITEN MILE CREEK
DE LLC Phone: 643-5582 - Mobile: 643-7
DEFENSE, LLC.
Call James at 850-272-5193 or Mobile: 643-7107
e-mail us at
tmcdelense@gmail.com 10376 N. W. Willis Way in Bristol * LICENSE


'372

D & INSURED


Margie's

| Florist
Check out our pnri? before
buying from t cmert lere else
For Weddings. Birtldays and all
Holidav, crme in or call us in AlMa


^.- WE Hf
3|: ([i1 iTi,'H 1niE BIg
SFI- HIHJG SI.IPPL
''. ' RO:,Rs, HO,,:, . I'E
'.' TACKLE, LF GI S. LI'.
*,~. ,lCRIC KETT, WRi.f


IES
EIGHT-.
vE BIT"
,. ETC


\ STRICKLAND'S
iKteHHARDWARE
pI,, . ..... s '-


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I


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Page 24 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 9, 2009
I.I


atJacIo Coy W


Jsed T k- Center


2006 MERCURY MILAN
4 cyl., auto.,
pwr. pkg.,
alloys,
40k miles
Mstk. #R3052
SUPER
NICE!..
2008 FORD ESCAPE XLT (
auto.,
pwrpkg. ,k
stk. #R3072


2005 FORD E-350
CUTAWAY
SERVICEVAN
V8, air,
service body
stk. 48281A
EXCELLENT
SHAPE!
0 2007 FORD E-350 XLT -(


2007 FORD EXPLORER
- EDDIE
BAUER
moonroof,
leather
stk. #R3056
4X4!_
2007 FORD F-150 XLT
SUPER
CREW
pwr. pkg.,
cruise. CD
Nsl. #9117A
NICE
TRUCK!.


1 s MARQUIS LS
pwr. pkg , Ithr., alloys,
#P3081
. $15,995
�iM Pism Pl_ _$US.A PMl, Tag._&1l AinwUsue eo ____


2004 FORD MUSTANG
GT CONVERTIBLE
auto. pwr pkg. cruise, alloys.
super nice car, #P3096A
$14,995
ma ay. 8EE DEALER For fdll Delil '.


WYriY90 9 MARIANNA, FL * (850) 482-4043 * 1866-587-3673


www.ChipolaFord.com


Rick Barnes
Sales Manager


- �


Im


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