Group Title: Calhoun-Liberty Journal (Bristol, Fla.).
Title: The Calhoun-Liberty journal
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00027796/00179
 Material Information
Title: The Calhoun-Liberty journal
Alternate Title: Calhoun Liberty journal
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Calhoun-Liberty Journal
Publisher: Liberty Journal, Inc.
Liberty Journal
Place of Publication: Bristol, Fla
Publication Date: November 25, 2009
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Bristol (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Liberty County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Calhoun County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Liberty -- Bristol
United States of America -- Florida -- Calhoun
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in Sept. 1991.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 11, no. 38 (Sept. 18, 1991).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00027796
Volume ID: VID00179
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AKN4565
oclc - 33425067
alephbibnum - 002046630
electronic_aleph - 003298625
electronic_oclc - 60662266
lccn - sn 95047245
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly journal (Bristol, Fla.)

Full Text

Univ of Florida History Library
PO Box 117007
Gainesville Fl 32611


FWC urges safety harness use

Man.dies, woman

injured in 2 tree

stand accidents
Two serious tree stand accidents over the weekend
have Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission
(FWC) hunter safety staff reminding hunters to wear a
safety harness when using a tree stand.
On Saturday, Pace resident Anthony Eddie Vanna, 33,
died after falling from his tree stand in the Blackwater
River State Forest near Munson. Vanna was muzzleloader
hunting for deer when he fell 23.5 feet. He apparently was
attempting to come down the tree at sundown.
The previous day, Susan Rudd of Quincy fell
backwards off a 12-foot tall ladder stand while hog
hunting on private property in Gadsden County near the
Liberty County line.
"She's unbelievably lucky," according to FWC
spokesman Stan Kirkland. "She hit squarely on her
back, lay there for several minutes and realized she had
to get help." He said she walked to her vehicle, which
was between 250 and 300 feet away, made a 911 call and
collapsed.
Liberty EMS responded, and Rudd was taken by
emergency helicopter to Tallahassee Memorial Hospital,
where she was admitted and later released.
FWC law enforcement investigators say neither hunter
wore a safety harness.
Bill Cline, the FWC's section leader for hunter safety
and public shooting ranges, said anyone who hunts from
a tree stand should wear a safety harness.
"If you're going to leave the ground, you need to wear
a full body harness. If a hunter isn't willing to do that,
they need to stay on the ground. It's that simple," Cline
said.
Hunters who use older tree stand belts or upper-chest
straps should discard them, Cline said. He encourages
hunters to visit MyFWC.com/HunterSafety and take the
free online tree stand safety course.
-safety course.


50o
includes
tax


OUtNAL


1 j Volume 29, Number 47


Wednesday, Nov. 25, 2009 "


w"


Colton Hobby of Bristol
checks out a camo
jacket at the opening
of the Calhoun-Liberty
Ministry Center.
See page 5


Meet Summer Read
and her special friend
G-Man in this week's
PETS & THEIR PEOPLE.
Seepage 11


Kindergartner Sophia Matos, dressed as an Indian as part of Tolar School's
Thanksgiving Festival Thursday, tosses a horseshoe during an afternoon
game. For more on the children's activities, please see page 29.


7 181221009001 8


Sheriff's Log...2 Community Calendar...4


Truck runs over car

in Bristol collision
A Friday accident on State Road 20 left a pickup parked atop a
car after one driver pulled into traffic.
No injuries were reported but the aftermath left onlookers staring
as the vehicles sat in the middle of road after the 1:45 p.m. colli-
sion.
FHP Trooper Ronnie Snipes said Logan Hall, 23, of Bristol was
driving south on Baker Street when he stopped at the stop sign and
then pulled onto State Road 20 and turned left, colliding with a west-
bound car driven by Brenda D. Butcher, 52, also of Bristol. The
.. -.,-.:. r front of the car hit the left side of the truck before the truck's left side
w rolled onto the hood of the car.
Damages were estimated at $4,000 for the truck and $3,000 for
the car.
Hall was cited for operating a vehicle with a suspended license
and turning in front of approaching traffic.
BETHhEUBANKS PHOTO

Commentary...6, 7 Speak Up!...8 News from the Pews...10


Business...13 Birthdays...14 Stork Report...15 Schools...18, 19 Obituaries...22 Classifieds...26 & 27


S2 1/29/2011
1846


3










Page 2 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL NOVEMBER 25, 2009


Eastpoint man arrested for stealing back-

pack, binoculars and cooler from ATV


An 18-year-old man from
Eastpoint was arrested Friday
after he was seen driving around
the River Stix area where several
items had been stolen a day ear-
lier.
When Curtis William Nowl-
ing parked his vehicle and
walked away, the man who had c
spotted him took a look in his
parked vehicle and
saw a backpack |
and a cooler he
recognized as be-
ing stolen from a
friend's ATV. The
camouflage back-
pack that was tak- ...-
en held binoculars
and other hunting "
equipment. '
Nowling, ac- ,
companies byg ac- CURTIS NOWLING
companies by a


white male, returned
to the SUV and drove
off, entering the area
of Forest Road 115.
Liberty County
Sheriff's Office In-
vestigator Brian
Bateman, along with
an FWC officer and
a forestry officer,
caught up with the


truck about three miles south of
the landing. A short time later,
Nowling walked up and spoke
with the officers.
During a search of the vehi-
cle, a bong with marijuana resi-
due was found and Nowling was
arrested for possession of drug
paraphernalia.
Nowling then stated that a
friend he was camping with had
a camouflage backpack like the
one officers described and led
them to the campsite, where the
backpack, its contents and a red
cooler were retrieved.
Officers spoke with two juve-
niles at the scene and one con-
fessed that he, Nowling and two
others had taken the items from
an ATV the previous day.
Nowling later confessed to
the theft.


Telogia man arrested for shooting dog


A Telogia man has been charged
with cruelty to animals and possession
of a firearm by a convicted felon fol-
lowing an investigation into the shoot-
ing death of a dog last week.
Larry James Fine, 48, was arrested
after his neighbor's dog, which had
been seen running from his yard, was
found dead.
Liberty County Sheriff's Deputy
Corry Fletcher backtracked the ani-
mal's trail to Fine's residence. When
questioned about the dog, Fine admit-
ted, "I shot it."


When asked if the animal had been ag-
gressive or had become a nuisance, Fine
replied, "No. I saw him come down the
driveway so I got the gun, stepped out-
side and shot him."
Fine handed over a Winchester .410
gauge pump-action shotgun he said he
used.
He was then taken into custody on the
animal cruelty charge. After a routine
check revealed that he had a past felony
conviction, he was also charged with
possession of a firearm by a convicted
felon.


Customer banned from bar after altercation


A woman was charged with disor-
derly intoxication and her 27-year-old
son was arrested on three charges of -
battery after an argument escalated
into a fight at the Swampy Tonk bar
on S.R. 69 Sunday.
Calhoun County Deputy Nic Keller
arrived to find Christopher Colby Mc-
Croan being restrained by the bar's
bouncer, John Wesley Newsome.
When he walked up to find out what
had happened, McCroan's mother, CHRIS
Sandra Gill Guilford, intervened,
cursing loudly while apparently in-
toxicated, according to the arrest report. She
was charged after ignoring the deputy's re-
peated requests to tone down her outbursts.
Newsome said that he had intervened
when Guilford and another woman got into
a dispute. As Newsome began to escort Guil-
ford out of the bar, her son came up and told
Newsome to let her go.
Newsome complied and asked both moth-


Altha Police Dept. U A
vehicle inspections
set Dec. 7 Jan. 2 4
The Altha Police Department E
will be conducting vehicle in-
spections starting Monday, Dec. R
7 and ending Jan. 2, 2010.
Vehicle inspections will be
conducted on the following
streets:
*Main Street
*Broad Street2
*Chipola Street 28
*Evans Street and
*Fuqua Circle.


er and son to leave, which angered Mc-
Croan, who became belligerent.
As Newsome began to take McCroan
outside, McCroan became combative
and hit another person in the bar. He was
taken outside and told to leave.
McCroan then attacked Newsome
and bar owner Neil Alday, striking him
several times in the face. McCroan was
restrained until a deputy arrived and took
him in custody.
TOPHER MCCROAN Both McCroan and his mother were
issued trespassing warnings against re-
turning to the bar.

Blountstown Police Dept. M
Nov. 16 through Nov. 22, 2009
Citations issued:
Accidents...............03 Traffic Citations...................17
.Special details (business escorts, traffic details)....108
Business alarms.....01 Residential alarms..........01
Complaints............. .................. ............. 119



.I LI Li Li LI Li LI LI


r17y1,Ewrp~ I~vmrI-n


CALHOUN COUNTY
November 16
*William Hickman, FTA, CCSO.
*Timothy Smith, FTA, CCSO.
November 18'
*Malieka Martin, VOCP, CCSO.
*Kimberly Mannery, burglary, occupied dwelling with bat-
tery, CCSO.
*Phillip Dykas, grand theft over $20,000, CCSO.
*Taurus Black, possession with intent to sell within 1,000
ft. public housing, sale of substance within 1,000 ft. of public
housing, CCSO.
*Colby Wilson, burglary with assault/battery, CCSO.
November 19
*Alissa Rogers, unemployment compensation fraud,
CCSO.
*Laron Holland, VOSP, CCSO.
*Martis Ellis Davis,.VOCP, CCSO.
-Charles Edwin Murry, VOCP, CCSO.
*Lindsey Kaylin Rogers, VOSP, CCSO.
*Charles Alan Owens, FTA, worthless checks, CCSO.
November 20
*Jerry Pitts, domestic violence, CCSO.
*Daniel Sullivan, contempt of court, Court.
*Logan Matthew Hall, FTA, CCSO.
*George Huie, non support, CCSO.
*Michael Richard Daly, FTA (2 times), CCSO.
Theresa Ann Tuberville, exploitation of an elderly person,
CCSO.
November 21
*Brandy Roberson, leaving scene of accident, FHP.
November 22
*Sandra Guilford, disorderly intoxication, CCSO.
*Christopher C. McCroan, battery, CCSO.
*Arnold O'Brian, VOCP (2 times), CCSO.

LIBERTY COUNTY
November 16
*Donna Reddick, holding for CCSO, CCSO.
*Taurus T. Black, driving with license suspended or re-
voked, fleeing or attempting to elude law enforcement officer,
possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana, warrant
(Calhoun Co.), LCSO.
November 17
*Michael George Lindsey, DUI (warrant), CCSO.
November 18
*Kimberly Mannery, holding for CCSO, CCSO.
*Larry Fine, under investigation, LCSO.
November 19
*Alyson Doty, DUI, FHP
*Alissa Rogers, holding for CCSO, CCSO.
*Marquez Byrd, VOSP, LCSO.
November 20
*Curtis Nowling, grand theft, possession of drug para-
phernalia, LCSO.
*Logan Hall, driving while license suspended or revoked,
FHP.
*Theresa Tuberville, holding for CCSO, CCSO.
November 21
*Brandy Roberson holding for CCSO, CCSO.
November 22
*Sandra Guilford, holding for CCSO, CCSO.
*James Michael Hathaway, shooting into unoccupied
structure, aggravated assault with deadly weapon, LCSO.
Listings include name followed bycharge andidentification of arrestingagency. The namesaboverepresent
those charged. We remind our readers that all are presumed innocent until proven guilty




The Liberty County

Courthouse will be closed

on Thursday, Nov. 26 and

Friday, Nov. 27, in

observance of the

Thanksgiving Holidays.





1 *


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enforcement Supply
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Magazines Ammo
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& many more products for
law enforcement officers
68 Hwy. 71 N Marianna Call (850) 526-4205









NOVEMBER 25, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 3


Calhoun County man, 74, is one of 12 arrested for


illegal purchase, possession of foxes and coyotes


At the conclusion ofa 10-month
undercover investigation
Tuesday night, the Florida Fish
and Wildlife Conservation
Commission (FWC) arrested 12
people for the illegal purchase
and possession of live foxes and
coyotes, and the unpermitted
use of these animals in fenced
enclosures for the purpose of
allowing dogs to pursue them.
In addition to undercover work,
the investigation involved aerial
surveillance as the suspects
moved from county to county,
transporting the animals to
enclosures.
Permits are required to possess
these animals, and it is unlawful
to purchase foxes or coyotes
from an unlicensed person. In
addition, the enclosures must
be permitted and meet state
requirements. Large fenced
enclosures, often several hundred
acres, have been established and
permitted on private lands to
provide,areas where dogs can
chase foxes and coyotes without
crossing landowner boundaries
and creating trespass situations.
The owners of these enclosures
typically charge patrons a fee
to allow their dogs to track
the animals inside the fenced
enclosures.
During the investigation, FWC
officers posed as suppliers of
foxes and coyotes that were
illegally possessed and sold the
animals to the suspects. The
undercover officers told the
suspects that they did not have
the proper permits to sell the
animals.
"Over the past year, we have
received numerous complaints
regarding the enclosures," said
FWC Chairman Rodney Barreto.
"Last September, the other
commissioners and I directed the
FWC to conduct a comprehensive
review of this practice and
examine the agency's permitting
process and report back to us. This
investigation is something we will
weigh when we make decisions


these enclosures."
On Sept. 22, the FWC enacted
a moratorium on permitting
this activity any further. The
moratorium was the result of
complaints on permitted facilities
and subsequent inspections
conducted by FWC officers.
The moratorium applies to all
applications for releasing foxes or
coyotes in new fenced enclosures,
all pending applications for new
permits and all applications
for reissuance of permits for
enclosures where permits have
lapsed.
There are currently six
permitted enclosures in the
state.
With a valid permit, a person
may import foxes into the state
and release them into private
fenced enclosures only if the
animals are vaccinated and have
been quarantined. The trapping of
foxes for this purpose in Florida
is prohibited. Only those foxes
*from states that have been rabies-
free for a year are allowed into
the state. It's illegal to kill gray
or red foxes, and it is illegal to
possess gray or red foxes without
a permit.
The importation-of coyotes into
Florida is prohibited. However, a
valid permit allows for coyotes
to be trapped in Florida and
relocated to private enclosures.
Translocation "of wild-caught
foxes and coyotes can spread
disease and parasites. It is
believed that in 1994 a strain
of rabies was introduced into
Florida as a result of coyotes
being transported from Texas
to Florida. Rabies, distemper
and a tapeworm (Echinococcus
multilocularis) can infect foxes
and coyotes and spread to other
mammals.
In addition to citizens'
complaints, officials with
the Alabama Department of
Conservation and Natural
Resources also notified the FWC
that foxes and coyotes were
being illegally transported into


about the future operation of Florida for fenced enclosures.


OUT

DOORS
Newfrom The Florida
j Rsh and Wildlifa
| Conservation
Commission
I",


Alabama officers had learned
of the illegal activities in
Florida after conducting their
own investigation of similar
activities. The FWC began its
undercover operation last January
and investigated 12 facilities
throughout the state.
Twelve suspects were arrested
(see below) and 46 citations
issued. Most of the citations are
for second-degree misdemeanors.
A second-degree misdemeanor
carries a penalty of up to $500
and up to 60 days in jail. One
suspect, Edgar R. Bryan (DOB
10/23/35) is a convicted felon
who served 25 years in prison
for first-degree murder and is on
parole.
Of the 12 enclosures
investigated, eight were involved
in illegal activity. Suspects at two
permitted facilities made illegal
purchases. Six other facilities
were identified as having no
permits.
"I would like to commend
our FWC officers for a job well
done," Barreto said. "The difficult
and often dangerous work these
officers completed shows clearly
that some individuals operate
outside the boundaries of the
law, and they are now facing
charges."
Prior to the moratorium, to
get a permit for an enclosure,
an applicant was required to
have a minimum of 100 acres


within the enclosure, and the
enclosure had to meet fence-
height requirements and include
areas for the foxes and coyotes to
escape from the dogs. Those who
currently possess an enclosure
permit are also required to have
their animals vaccinated, and the
animals must be kept in a safe,
sanitary and humane manner.
Additionally, the facility owners
are required to show the source,
date of acquisition and date of
release of foxes and coyotes
into a high-fenced. The facilities
are subject to unannounced
inspections by the FWC.
Following is the list of those
arrested in this covert operation.
The county is the location of the
violation.
Calhoun County
*Edgar R. Bryan, 74. Charges: 3.
Counts Purchase of coyote from
an unpermitted person, F.S. 68A-
6.0023(7)--3 Counts Failure to
vaccinate prior to release, F.S. 68A-
9.002(1).
Columbia County
*James Edward Spradley, 66.
Charges: Purchase of fox/coyote
from an unpermitted person, F.S.
68A-6.0023(7)--Possession of Class
II animal (coyote) without a permit,
F.S. 68A-0011(1).
Gilchrist County
*James Nessmith,52. Charges:
Purchase of fox/coyote from
an unpermitted person, F.S.
68A-6.0023(7)--Possession of Class
II animal (coyote) without a permit,
F.S. 68A-6.0011(l)--Unlawful
possession of fox, F.S. 68A-24-
002(2c)--Possession of Class III
animal (fox) without a permit, F.S.
68A-6.0011(l)--Purchase of fox
unlawfully taken from Florida, F.S.
68A-9.002
Clay County
*Ronald Cercy, 26. Charges:
Purchase of fox/coyote from
an unpermitted person, F.S.
68A-6.0023(7)--Possession of Class
II animal (coyote) without a permit,
F.S. 68A-6.0011(l)--Unlawful
possession of fox, F.S. 68A-24-
002(2c)--Possession of Class III
animal (fox) without a permit, F.S.
68A-6.0011(l)--Purchase of fox
unlawfully taken from Florida, F.S.
68A-9.002.


Putnam County
*Tommy Lewis, 71. Charges:
Purchase of fox/coyote from
an unpermitted person, F.S.
68A-6.0023(7)--Possession of Class
II animal (coyote) without a permit,
F.S. 68A-6.0011(l)--Unlawful
possession of fox, F.S. 68A-24-
002(2c)--Possession of Class III
animal (fox) without a permit, F.S.
68A-6.0011(l)--Purchase of fox
unlawfully taken from Florida, F.S.
68A-9.002
Volusia County
Charles Jones, 71. Charges:
Purchase of fox from an unpermitted
person, F.S. 68A-6.0023(7)--Failure
to vaccinate prior to release, F.S.
68A-9.002(l)--Purchase of fox
unlawfully taken from Florida, F.S.
68A-9.002.
Okaloosa County
*William McCurdy, 65. Charges:
3 Counts Purchase of coyote from
an unpermitted person, F.S. 68A-
6.0023(7)--2 Counts Purchase of
fox from an unpermitted person, F.S.
68A-6.0023(7)--2 Counts Possession
of fox without permit, 68A-24.002(2)
(c)--3 Counts Possession of Class II
animal (coyote) without a permit, F.S.
68A-6.0011(1).
*Larry Moore, 61. Charges:
Purchase of coyote from
an unpermitted person, F.S.
68A-6.0023(7)--Possession of Class
II animal (coyote) without a permit,
F.S.68A-6.0011(1)
*James F. Melton, 70.
Charges: Purchase of coyote
from an unpermitted person, F.S.
68A-6.0023(7)--Possession of Class
II animal (coyote) without a permit,
F.S. 68A-6.0011(1)
Okaloosa and Bay counties
*Frankie C. Beverly, 60.
Charges: Purchase of coyote from
an unpermitted person (Okaloosa),
F.S. 68A-6.0023(7)--Failure to
control animal diseases (Bay), F.S.
585.145(2)
Bay County
*Billy Melvin Jr., 52.
Charges: Purchase of coyote
from an unpermitted person, F.S.
68A-6.0023(7)--Possession of Class
II animal (coyote) without a permit,
F.S. 68A-6.0011(1)
*James Lovett, 52. Charges:
Purchase of coyote from
an unpermitted person, F.S.
68A-6.0023(7)--Possession of Class
II animal (coyote) without a permit,
F.S. 68A-6.0011(1)


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Page 4 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL NOVEMBER 25, 2009


Sugar Cane and
Syrup day Nov. 28
Sugar Cane Syrup Making Da\. featuring
.Papa's Best Syrup." %\ill be held at the
Pioneer Panhandle Senttlement in Blounstown
on Sarurda. No%. 28 starting at I.'a n. iC Ti.
Biscuits and sausage a% ailable for donation
The general store will be open and visitors
are inlted to tour the Settlement. Walk
through time into the natural sugar cane field.
Admission and parking are free.
Visit our web site at3 www.ppmuseunm.
org or call (8501674-2777 Directions to
the Settlement- Take Hwy 20 W. I mile to
Silas Green Street. rum right and go mto Sam
Atkins Park. Follow signs to the Panhandle
Pioneer Settlement.
Tree lighting on the
square Friday, Dec. 4
The lighting of the downtown Blountstown
Christmas Tree will be held FndaN. Dec. 4
at 5 30 p m.
Christmas carols ill be sung around
the tree in Magnolia Square, with the tree
being lit just prior to the holiday Mo lie on
the Square, which will begin at 6:30 p.m.
Magnolia Square, downtown Blountstown.
Bnng your blanket and chairs, and bundle
up The location is Magnolia Square,
downtown Blountstown.
Christmas on the
square Dec. 12
The Fellowship Assembly of God
with Pastor Henr M. Griffin. the church
board. Henry C. McDaniel. Kenneth W.
Edwards, and Sharon NI Cooper will present
'Chrismias on the Square' Saturday. Dec. 12
beginning at 8 a.m. at the Liberm County.
Courthouse in Bristol
There will he crafts, food. li\e music, a
.ard sale section and more Bring the kids
to see to see Santa, w ho %%ill be Liis ng all
the %waN from the North Pole.
For booth or vendor space, contact .lud.
at ("61) 1(43-463)

Santa's coming to
Calhoun Libraries
Come losn the staff of the Calhuun Counrt
Public Libranes in celebrating the upcoming
holiday s. The annual open house w ill be Dec
5 at Y:30 a.m
Hot punch and Christmas cookies % ill be
served Santa & Mrs Claus will be joining
the festi ties at 10 a m Each child %ill
receive a book and a cand\ cane
The staff of the Calhoun Counr, Public
Libraries would like to thank erenrone for
their patronage and support
2nd Annual Redneck
Parade December 12
The Second Annual Redneck Christmas
Parade date has been set for Saturday. Dec.
12 at 5 p m. (CT) in beautiful downtown
Scotts Ferrm. Line up is at -1 p.m. (CTi on
Blon Carter Road and %%ill head down Lola
Road to Srumpknocker Road and end at the
home of Robert and Diane Long
All enrnes are asked to donate a toN for
Chnstmas for the children. Refreshments for
all entries % ill follow afterwards.
The palhoun-Liberty Journal is
published each Wednesday
by the Liberty Journal Inc.,
Summers Road, P.O. Box 536,
Bristol, FL 32321.
Annual subscriptions are $18.
Periodicals postage paid at Bristol, FL
POSTMASTER- Send address corrections
to: P.O. Box 536, Bristol, FL 32321.


ALENDAF


i


BIRTHDAY -- :essic 'Mae *'lMllI'na it


S 'National BIH I HUAY
S Flossing 'Pinkr E'.lii
Day
Celebrate Recovery. 6 p.m, Rivertoin
Community Church in Blountslton
Dance. 6- 12 p.m.. American Legion Shopping Day
Hall in Blountstown


Sugar Cane & ANNIVERSARY
Syrup making day -tt '1O ..7
Poner '.7rIen1,e nl.|.l:..Ir, 1, o p & P d'I f Slllcr'
be,'inninq al 8 a m |CTi


BIRTHDAYS
A ^^ "Sr'pliin tat .,te r
/ .,- hi~iil 'Rt"'lria, *AMiuiu s


:Attenid the Cliurcli oft
yiour choice this S iandll


TODAY'S MEETINGS
* Walk-A-Weigh Program. 9 a m. Veterans Memorial Park Civic Cenler
* Altha Boy Scouts, 5 30 p m Alma Volunmeer Fire Departmenl
* AA, 6 p.m Allha Community Center
* Bulldog Club, 7 p.m. LCHS field house
TY*M


TODAY'S MEETINGS
- Calhoun Co Commission. 2 p m.
Ag. Build. across from Courthouse
* Mossy Pond VFD Auxiliary.
12-30 p m, Fire house
* Dixie 109 Masonic Lodge, 7 p.m.,
Masonic Lodge in Blountstown


WORLD AIDS DAY


Hurry, hurry only 24 more
shopping days till Christmas,


THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL
Located at 11493 NW Summers Road in Bristol
MAILING ADDRESS: P.O. Box 536, Bristol, FL 32321 c-
TELEPHONE (850) 643-3333 Fax (850) 643-3334 B
EMAIL: thejournal@fairpoint.net (USPS 012367)
ADS: cljads@fairpoint.net Summers Road


BIRTHDAYS
'R.etL'ekali Oran I, C irlly 'lul iair,i
'L'-licir \'ood and *Beth 'MLcClOt'
TODAY'S MEETINGS
* Rotary Club, noon. Calhoun-Liberty Hospital
* Weight Loss Support Group, 1.30 p.m.. Shelton Park Library
* Boy Scouts Troop 200, 6:30 p.m.. Mormon Church in Bristol
* AA, 7 p.m., Calhoun County Old Ag Bldg. east door, in front of jail

-TURDANOEMER2


1% mmmmmmmmd


Christmas Tour of
Homes Dec. 11
Blountstol-n Main Street %will host the 4th
Annual Christmas Tour of Homes on Friday,
Dec. 11. from 5 3,i to S:30) p.m. CT.
This year's Tour of Homes e\patds across
the bridge into Liberry Count where there
are so many beautiful houses
+ The first stop on the tour is the old NM
& B Train Depot Museum on North Pear
Street in Blountstown. Folks can stop by
the museum to purchase their tickets for
S8 each and pick up a map to the homes.
While at the depot, be sure to take a tour of
this communirN landmark that is filled ilth
local history. After picking up your tickets,
tour the houses at your own pace and n any
order.
+ Homes on the tour include the
Blountstown residence o[Sidney and Mane
Granger. Located at 20139 NE Mane A% enue,
this beautiful home was built just a couple
years back and reflects the homeow ners'
impeccable taste and srt le.
Cross Trammell Bridge into Liberty
County for the next two stops on the tour.
+ Teresa Eubanks built her own home just
a few short Nears ago and it's one of the most
unique houses in Bnstol She has so many
interesting touches and design elements you
won't want to miss. The Eubanks home is
located at 11493 NW Summers Road off
Pea Ridge Road.
+ Silas and Mar\ Revell hale also
graciously opened thetr loaely home for the
tour. Located at 13370 NW Pea Ridge Road
in Bnstol. Muar's decor \\ill definitely get
\ou in the holiday spuit This house is a
must-see.
Refreshments % ill be served at each stop.
Tickets are Ss per person. Children under
10 accompanied bN a paying adult are free.
You can purchase \our rickets the night of
the e% ent at the NM & B Train Depot Museum
Please join us for this fourth annual holiday
tradition of meeting, greeting, and eating'
All proceeds \\ill go to Blountstown Nlain
Street to benefit do wntovwn re utilization
projects
B-town Christmas
parade set Dec. 5
This year's Calhoun Count\ "Cand\ land
C Iinsmias" parades w ill be held on Saturday.
Dec 5 The Aliha parade %%ill take place
at I p.m. witll the Blountstown portion
of the parade starting at 5 p.m. \We inite
all community organizations. clubs and
businesses to help make this the best parade
e\ er'
Please note that theChainmberof Commerce
Vehicle is the ONLY vehiclee for Santa and
Mrs Claus. All participants NMUST fill out
an application entry form
For more information or to sign up to
participate. visitt ww%%i.calhounco.org



That's how many copies of
The Calhoun-Liberty Journal
were distributed last week,
ensuring plenty of coverage for your
community announcements and
great response for our
business advertisers!
JOURNAL STAFF
Johnny Eubanks................... Publisher
Teresa Eubanks........................ Editor
Gna Grantham................... Bookkeeper!
Missy Tanner ......................Advertising
Debbie Duggar....Production Assistant
OFFICE HOURS: 9 a.m. 6 p.m. M-F,
Saturday from 9 a.m. until 1 p.m.


.A


-A







NOVEMBER 25, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 5


Calhoun-Liberty Ministry Center

holds ribbon-cutting Saturday


A





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Community members and some proud volunteers gathered for Saturday's ribbon-
cutting to mark the official opening of the new Calhoun-Liberty Ministry Center,
located at 21754 S.R. 20 in Blountstown. FROM LEFT: Two young Calhoun County
pageant queens. Center Board member Sandra Willis, Chairman's assistant Freddie
Duggar, Board member Jeff Gardener, Interim Director Cathy Brock-Revell, Ministry
Center Chairman Clyde Roberts, building owner Laddie Williams, board members
David Throckmorton, Kevin Yoder and John Willis and the center's secretary,


Robin Richards. ABOVE, FAR LEFT: Clyde Roberts, whose idea started the project
that grew into the Calhoun-Liberty Ministry Center. ABOVE, FAR RIGHT: Daniel
Throckmorton welcomes those gathered for the ceremony. BELOW: Visitors look
though the clothing and toys being sold in the center's thrift shop, where treasures
can be found for as little as a quarter. The center welcomes donations of all kinds
but is most in need of canned goods and boxed items for the food pantry.
DANIEL WILLIAMS PHOTOS


C I




1.0 at,- 6. p


- -- I


IT'S VERY WISE TO ADVERTISE
Make the most of your business with an ad in
S ^ ': The Calhoun-Liberty

J JOURNAL
PHONE (850) 643-3333 thejournal@fairpoint.net

ft,: ',



T Pictures at
The Unique Shop
Saturday, Dec. 2
10 a.m. until 2 p.m.
Package includes
8 ~ Wallets
$999




S Call 643-3222 for
more information

10510 NW SR 20 *Bristol 643-3222 i
'-,7 -' '-'_;*.-" *_;-.'-_:--,-ir..,:, ,. . t t ,; &"&, -'^_-CJ^ T- ,t-.-:.J ,,.l':Y-*s c a TE *"


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P 6 THE CALHOUN-LIBER 2009


00- *-... What started out as a good idea has


now been turned into a nightmare


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Healthcare gone awry


Healthcare reform, which started out as a good idea,
has turned into a bit of a nightmare. What a mess.
The Democrats flubbed this one. They misread the
American people. Too much change.
The public choked on it. Dramatic /
change like healthcare reform has to
be spoon-fed to the public. There is no 0
way the public is going to understand .
2,000 pages of change to anything, Jofieranowrite
particularly if they think it's going to background i
cost them. foreign policy h
In my view, there will never be any \\kaloosa Coui
significant change in societal issues in
America because of the public's aver-


sion to taxes and distrust of government. Healthcareis
a good thing, but people don't want to pay for it, par-
ticularly for someone else. But there is no free lunch
and never will be. If we want it, we have to pay for it.
I doubt that any significant healthcare reform will
make it through the Senate. There might be a stripped
down version that doesn't mean much, but all sides
will declare victory..
- In The Federalist No. 39, James Madison made the
case for America's political system, a republican form
of government in which people elect representatives to
exercise power for them. How well is America's repre-
sentative government working today? Not so great.
Why? Because America is a more complicated place
today than in 1788 when the Constitution was ratified.
In 1788, there were fewer than 4 million people in
America..People rode horses, traveled in wagons and
lived off the land. Their need for a central government
S- was not great.
S- Now there are more than 300 million people in
- America, and unlike 1788, most people today are not-
self-sufficient, living off the land. They depend on and
pay others to provide goods, like food, and services for
S.- their subsistence. People depend on the government for
services, and they expect their elected representatives
.- to deal with issues that affect them.
Healthcare reform is one of those issues. Health-
care is a moral issue and a right, not a for-profit busi-'


I
a
er
n

nj


ness. The healthcare industry does not have the right
to make obscene profits because people are afraid of
dying. The healthcare industry has the advantage, and
Congress has demonstrated its inabil-
ity to resolve healthcare issues in the
K S best interest of the people. Lobbyists
RNER come to mind.
SWe believe that the free market
retired military system will provide healthcare at a

domestic and reasonable price. Perhaps so, if there
sues. He lives in was real competition like in the ham-
burger business. Healthcare cost as
a percent of GDP has increased from
6% in 1965 to 16% in 2008. If there
was competition in the healthcare industry, these per-
centages would have decreased, or at least, remained
level at some point. In economics, it is called oligarchy
when a few entities control an industry.
According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, health-
care costs have increased 3.5% over the past year while
the CPI and GDP have decreased. Hospital services in-
creased 7.1%. The answer to that will be the increased
'cost to treat all those illegal immigrants. No doubt be-
cause the law says that everyone that comes to a hospi-
tal emergency room has to be treated. But for the legal
working poor, the emergency room is their only source
of healthcare. Prescription drugs increased 4.7%. Den-
tal services increased 2.6%, and nursing home care in-
creased 3.7%.
Long-term nursing home care is the real elephant
in the healthcare tent. Healthcare reform doesn't deal
with mom and dad in a nursing home. Try buying an
insurance policy for that service.
In 1948, President Truman tried for healthcare re-
form. Nothing happened. Since then presidents and the
congress have muddled along. Domestic issues have
taken a backseat to the Korean, Vietnam and Middle
East wars. The last major social issue resolved was the
1964 Civil Rights Act.
As to domestic issues, there might be some watered-
down healthcare reform, but I think that America is go-
ing to continue muddling along.


We've allowed elected officials to become American Royalty


"Healthcare is a moral issue and a
right" says fellow columnist Jerry The V
Cox. It is both interesting and sad to T 1
me that any American would make *
this kind of statement because there 1 ewi
are people who will believe it and the
fact is that this statement shows bla- by Jin
tant ignorance of the Constitution of
the United States of America. Allow Jim Pruette is a native
in Calhoun County
me to enlighten those who will hear. Pruette. They open
It is a fact that for the vast majority on willard Smith Rom
of children educated in public schools U.S. Air Force, where
technician with the.
today that there are NO classes taught Nowadays, he
on the Constitution. If there were self-proclaimed M
such classes taught, statements such
as the one quoted in the beginning of
this article would immediately be seen for what they are.
There is no hint of such a right found any where in neither
the Declaration of Independence nor the Constitution. As
close as anything comes is the right of the 'PURSUIT" of
life, liberty and happiness. Note that all have the right to
"pursue" these things as opposed to being "given" these
things.
The point has been made that while America has


changed, the representative form of
government has not, but needs to. I
eW from disagree. I don't believe that most

1 F|1latS of government we are "supposed"
to have in this country.
Pruette We live under a Representative
Republic. For too long, people
of Mobile, AL and lives have been brainwashed to believe
th his wife, Rita Smith that our politicians are elected to do
'e Granny Smith Farms
d. He is retired from the our thinking for us. Common sense
he served as an avionics would tell us otherwise. That is a
enjoys life as the mighty thin line.. Step over it and
ayor of Hewitt Flats. it looks, smells and sounds like a
dictatorship. Such was never in the
minds of the Founding Fathers. We
have created a class of "American Royalty." It is disgust-
ing to see the myriad of laws passed to govern the masses,
and yet the people who impose these unconstitutional
laws on us take great care to make sure that they them-
selves are exempt from those same laws. How absurd.
And yet most Americans simply accept this as normal and
expected, even legal and moral.
If an employer sends an employee to a convention to


represent his company's policies, practices and preferenc-
es, is that employee suddenly empowered to make policy
changes that the employer does not agree with? Can that
employee suddenly ignore the desires of his employer and
decide that even though his boss thinks "A" that the em-
ployee will decide "B"? And yet this is common practice
among our elected representatives. Just because I give a
politician my vote does not mean I surrender my rights nor
my brain to that politician.
Some now say that America is too big for that represen-
tative method to work, that when that system was imple-
mented that Americans were driving wagons and walking
and riding horses. This is cited as some sort of reasoning
why representative government is now ineffective. How
absurd. Today we have the most modern and effective
forms of communication and transportation ever known
to man. It is as easy as is it ever has been to hear and
communicate the views of constituents. An obvious fact
is that one representative cannot vote on both sides of one
issue and hence cannot possibly please everyone. How-
ever, this has always been the case, has it not? The point
is that you have to represent the majority of your constitu-
ents. And yes, that same majority will re-elect you. Nice
system, me thinks.


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NOVEMBER 25, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 7


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Page 8 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL NOVEMBER 25, 2009


Hospice workers, vets and caregivers

recognized for their many contributions


To the editor,
It is appropriate
that November
is the month we
commemorate
Veterans, Family
Caregivers and
Hospice. All of
these groups have
in common service
to others, being there


for those who count on us to
keep them comfortable, safe and
protected.
Big Bend Hospice is proud
to have partnered with the VA
Outpatient Clinic and DVA
to remember and honor our
veterans during a Service
of Remembrance held on
November 5. Every day we lose
1,000 WWII veterans, leaving a
hole in our hearts and in our
society's collective memory.
Likewise family caregivers are
selfless individuals who give of
themselves, sometimes putting
their own lives on hold, to care
for an ill or dying loved one;


they are unsung heroes. Each
day Big Bend Hospice witnesses
the love and comfort that these
sons and daughters, husbands
and wives, grandparents,
grandchildren and friends give
to those who depend on them
for care and.support.
Nationwide more than
50,000,000 people provide care
to a chronically- ill, disabled,
aged or dying family member
or friend during any given year.
At Big Bend Hospice we see
first hand the courage and love
that goes into being a caregiver
24/7 and we continually look
for ways to provide support to


ACS and volunteers provide

strength and hope for couple
To the editor,
I would like to thank the American Cancer Society and all the
Volunteers for the Relay for Life for their outstanding work and help
they have provided the people that cancer has touched. I volunteered
with the Relay for several years after losing my mother and little
brother to cancer.
My husband was diagnosed in August with prostate cancer and our
world seemed to collapse down around us.
Had it not been for the American Cancer Society and all those
volunteers, holding up the walls and restoring hope, I don't know what
would have happened. Within the American Cancer Society I was able
to find answers to many questions I had, help with transportation for
his 39 treatments and a shoulder to lean on in this our time of need.
Don has finished his treatments but still has a long road ahead to
walk.
I want to again thank the American Cancer Society, all the Relay
for Life family, and prayers we have received during this trying
time. There is still a need but we will get there to hear "cancer free".
Continue the prayers and please remember that the Relay for Life is
a great cause.
Support it because one day you may need the support like we
did!
Thanks to all
Martha and Don Glory


Bear Hunters Asso. seeking

info & photos on black bears
To the editor;
My name is Mickey Larkins and I am the Vice President of the
Florida Bear Hunters Association. I am conducting a population study
of the number of Florida Black Bears around the state and national
forests in the panhandle, on private and leased property.
I need input from the citizens who spend time in the woods. I am
requesting that if any outdoorsmen have pictures of black bears in
and around your private or leased property please email them to me
at mickeylarkins2@live.com.
I don't need or want your name, just the county and area where the
pictures were taken. If you don't have pictures but have had encounters
with bears, please send me a little story or your experience.
I am going to the Florida Fish and Wildlife Commission meeting in
Feb. 2010 and would like to have as much information as possible.
Thank you for any assistance.
Mickey Larkins, Bristol
Vice President, Florida Bear Hunters Association


Hospice family
caregivers and
ease their load
and renew their
spirit. In 2008,
almost one and
a half million
Americans
received
services from
hospice. In our


area over' 1,600 families used
Big Bend Hospice services.
Of those seeking our grief
support services, 60% never
used our Hospice for their loved
one, but we still walk with them
on their grief journey. I am
proud of our staff of over 300
caring professionals who work
tirelessly to care, educate and
comfort families as they care
for those they love. It is for all,
of us, so much more than a job,
it is a privilege and a calling to
do this important work.
Please join me during
November and salute all of
these groups as they do the
work that has to be done, but
which sometimes requires
incredible sacrifice. We are a
better -community because we
can come together in support
of each other. I encourage
everyone to join me in thanking
these dedicated individuals for
the work they do.
Carla Braveman,
RN, MEd, CHCE
President & CEO
Big Bend Hospice


SPEAK UP!
WITH A LETTER TO THE EDITOR
- Write: The Calhoun-Liberty Journal
P.O. Box 556, Bristol 32358121
^ /y


Y '


:,p THNNKQCfVYN


For your convenience, we
will be open normal business
hours on Thanksgiving,
/; Thursday, Nov. 26.


We invite you to come

and try our new

Philly Cheese Steak

Sandwiches & Pizza. (


, Corner of Hwy. 20/Hwy. 12S in Bristol
Telephone (850) 643-2145


/


'-1 * -i* T=.' Kj ,


Happy Thanksgiving






H HOLIDAY!


Jessica McC/endon

LIBERTY COUNTY EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT
11109 NW SR 20 Bristol (850)643-2339


BECOME A VOLUNTEER
Make a difference in a child's life.
Florida Guardian ad Litem Foundation
PHONE (850) 410-4642





Thanksgiig lessigs

TO ALL OUR NEIGHBORS....
thank you for your business!

Prepaid Boost
MOBILE PHONES
now in stock!
S|Phones start at 1599
Unlimited Service
mobile s50 a month


B & B ELECTRONICS, INC.
19872 SR 20W Blountstown, FL 32424 674-3711


--


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r
dr'
P


- IN


-;~ ;:r ;t







NOVEMBER 25, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 9


What are you most
thankful for?

My family because they raised
me, they feed me, give me
water and shelter and most
importantly, they love me.
--Sally Fowler

I am thankful for my brother
killing a turkey for Thanksgiv-
ing. --Anson Johnson

I'm most thankful for living,
growing and having a family
who loves me.
--Jaycette Maxwell

I am most thankful for my fam-
ily and friends because they
will be there when you need
them and they are always
there to take care of you like
my sister, mom and dad.
--Brooke Hargrove

I am thankful for my mom,
dad and my dog.
--Amberlyn Adams

How do you fix a turkey
for Thanksgiving dinner?

I always, bake my turkey and
after we are all done with the
baking part, we always eat
turkey.roast on top of the tur-
key and it tastes very fantas-
tic and it is good.
--Lacey Campbell


You cook turkey in the oven
and you cut it and pour sea-
soning on the turkey and salt
and pepper. And then stick it
on the table to eat.
--Anson Johnson.

I fix a turkey for Thanksgiv-
ing by washing it, pulling the
insides out and then butter it
and put it in the oven and let it
cook with love from me to my
family. --Amber.King

Roast it in an oven for six or
13 hours. --Amberlyn Adams

We barbecue the turkey.
--Dakota Goff


What does your family
do on Thanksgiving?

We eat turkey, ham and my
two other families come to
our house.
--Branden Garner

We go down to the camp. We
fish and hunt. We get together
at dinner and talk and laugh
out loud. --Sally Fowler

My family goes to my Aunt Er-
ica and Uncle Marty's house
and we eat turkey, corn and
mashed potatoes. We play
games -like hookie, volley-
ball and tennis and we laugh
about the things that hap-


opened last Thanksgiving or
even things that happened
about five years ago.
--Amber King

We eat turkey, ham, baked
beans and biscuits and we
also hang with family on
Thanksgiving. -
--Brooke Hargrove

Eat, play and catch up with
the family members that we
have not seen.
--Cyerra Burns

Have fun and we have our
whole family come then we
pray and have something like
turkey to eat. --Dylan


Thoughts on


Thanksgiving



from the students in
Ms. Newsome's fourth grade
class at W.R. Tolar School


The pilgrims wanted to ex-
plore the world but I'm not
sure why they came here.
--Logan Lee

English people who came
and built houses and prac-
ticed their new religion.
--Levi Collins

The saints were the people
that lived in London and they
wanted to leave King James
and his laws.
--Amberlyn Adams

The pilgrims were the people
who came to teach us how to
plant food. --Jezaniah Jacobs


DAY AFTER


THANKSGIVING


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We go to my grandmother's
; house and the family makes
lots of different kinds of food
and we eat a delicious dinner
at my grandmother's house.
--Jezaniah Jacobs


Who were the pilgrims,
and why did they come
to this country?

The pilgrims were saints and
came to this country to wdr-
ship God in peace.
--Sally Fowler

The pilgrims were saints and
came here because of being
bossed around. --Emilee Branch








Page 10 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL NOVEMBER 25,2009


Leave vou


Tree of Lights
The Rock Bluff Volunteer
Fire Department will host
their Christmas Tree of Lights
ceremony Dec. 11 beginning at
6:30 p.m. (ET) at the Liberty
Emergency Management office.
At the ceremony, each name
on the tree will be recognized.
The special Christmas Light
is in someone's memory (white
light) or honor (a red light)
and will be displayed glowing


r message on a Tree
When you've lost a loved one, whether
recently or years ago, the holidays can be
bittersweet. The Big Bend Hospice Trees of
Remembrance are adorned with gold bows,
porcelain bells and angels, each bearing a
personal handwritten message that serves as a
living reminder of the enduring power of love.
Donations made go directly to providing care,
comfort and hope to Big Bend Hospice patients
and their families in Liberty County and can be
made at the Apalachee Restaurant in Bristol.
Volunteers are available to assist at each site
beginning Nov. 28 through Dec. 24.
Please stop by and read some of the heartfelt
messages attached to each Tree and consider
making a contribution in honor or memory of
a loved one to support the mission of Big Bend
Hospice.

ceremony planned Dec. 11


outside on the tree located beside
Liberty County's Emergency
Management office. Holiday
refreshments and fellowship will
follow the ceremony. This special


light cost is a $5 donation.
To purchase one or both of
these Christmas lights contact
Pam Joiner at 643-3055 or 899-
5417.


Still. need a special holiday
gift? Join us on Saturday, Dec.


NEW PASTOR ARRIVES
CHRISTIAN LIGHTHOUSE CHURCH-We would like to
welcome everyone to the Christian Lighthouse Church to enjoy
our new Pastor, who is greatly anointed by God Brother Rabon
Haney and Sister Rhonda Haney from Corinth, MS.
Sunday School starts at 10 a.m. and Sunday Service begins at
6 p.m.
Our mid-week service starts at 7:30 p.m. on Thursdays.
Please come and join us.
CHURCH SPORTS
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH BLOUNTSTOWN-First Baptist
Church in Blountstown will be holding evaluations and uniform-
sizing for Upward Basketball and Cheerleading on Dec. 1 and 3
from 5:30-7 p.m. and Saturday Dec. 5 from 9:30-11 a.m. in the
Activities Building.
Please contact the church office for more information at 674-


5 to make a quilted, braided
table runner.
Learn this fast, fun technique
and go home with a completed
project!
You will need to bring your
own sewing machine and basic
sewing supplies. For this
project, you will need 1/8 yard
of at least 6 different fabrics
(or 6 fat quarters), a six inch
square for your center, 1/2 yard
of 2 coordinating fabrics for the
borders and binding, a 20 inch
by 60 inch piece of fabric and
batting for the back.
Please call to sign up as class
space is limited. There is a $10
class fee.
Contact the UF/IFAS, Liberty
County Extension Office at
643-2229 or Sandy Voss at
272-8980.


5923.

MESSAGES OF THANKS


All of us at Veterans Memorial Railroad would like to thank the
many who made our Halloween runs a screaming success. First, our
loyal passengers, some of whom stood in the cold for up to two hours
to get a scary ride. From the comments we heard, most riders were
happily frightened on the trip.
Of course it wouldn't have been possible without the many
volunteers who performed all the scary scenes and the railroad
crew who kept the trains rolling. We want to thank these people for
their generous support in time and labor to make them noteworthy
nights: John Anthamatten, Phyllis and Ray Brown, The Bristol
Fire Department and Richard Sims, Alvin Foran as well as Carmen
Foran and friend, Jerome Flowers and family, Danny Gouge, H &
P Construction, Liberty County High School JROTC and Lt. Col.
Charles Minyard, Liberty County Sheriff's Office, Garr Revell, Tony
Shoemake and Richard Williams.
A very special thanks to Edwin Hobby and Ricky Parrish for the
many hours of setting up the spectacular scene on the trestle and
bringing in plenty of ghouls, goblins and werewolves to make it a
bridge crossing to remember.
Sincerely,
Thomas A. Keenan (Mr Tom)
Secretary Treasurer


Thank you first to God
and to the fire department
and police department and all
the concerned neighbors and
friends for their quick response
when our house caught fire. If
not for their quick response
our house would have been a
complete loss.
Thanks to Fire Chief Ben
Hall and Police Chief Glen
Kimbrel for staying with Carol
and comforting her until family
arrived.
A special thanks to our
neighbor, Drissa Barfield for
her quick call to 911.
I'm proud to live in a place
where people are still concerned
and helpful of others.
Thank you,
Randall and Carol Kent


Basketball & Cheerleading

/I /* Sign-Ups

U pward basketball and
cheerleading for boys
and girls, grades 1 through 6.

Bring completed Cts
Cost is$450
registration form and per child
registration fees to shorts or mockne
turtlenecks
church office Mon.-Fri. optional at '11.
8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. A,
Evaluation & uniform sizing
Dec. 1 &3 '-4
5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. 4 C-,4'
& Dec. 5
9 a.m to 11 a.m.
at First Baptist Activity Building.

Call 674-5923 for more info






Whaley

Heating & Air Conditioning

We would like to welcome our new
Service Manager, CHRIS HATTON
to the Whaley Heating & Air Team!













Marcus Whaley, Jim Whaley, Chris Hatton & Jeffrey Tipton







B" Iiniw C 4 J

SERVICE UNIT REPLACEMENT
FILTERS ANY SIZE CLEAN AND CHECKS

(850) 674-4777
FL LIC. # CMC1249570 VISA


Christmas quilting class

set for Dec. 5 in Bristol








NOVEMBER 25, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 11



..0 OLD FAIMK '



ALMANAC

Copyrighted Material



Syndicated Content



Available from Commercial News Providers


PETS PEOPLE


Summer Read, 15, of Bristol has
lots of animals, but by far, her favorite
is her 20-year-old quarter horse, G-
Man. Summer has had G-Man for 9
years and has been barrel racing him
for the-past 7 1/2 years.
Summer is the daughter of Don-
nie and Joni Read and Angela Read,
all of Bristol. She is a 10th grader
at Liberty County High School and
enjoys racing her horse in compe-
titions, including the World Cham-
pionships, which she has com-
peted in 3 times, once placing 3rd.
Summer and G-Man made an ap-
pearance in the Liberty County High
School Homecoming Parade a few
weeks ago.
G-Man's favorite treats include


Pop-Tarts, apples, Sunchips and
sweet tea.
Summer says that she rides her
two barrel racing horses about three
times a week to keep them in shape.
She has a female barrel horse named
Racehorse, who is a thoroughbred.
Summer's horses are a part of a
new program at the Liberty Wilder-
ness Camp. The children who attend
the camp are using the animals as a
type of therapy by riding trails.
It is Summer's dream to become an
equine therapist to help handicapped
and troubled children by teaching
them about horses and riding.
Along with six horses, Summer has
a mini pig named Cowboy, four mini
goats and a border collie.


November 23-29

NOVEMBER24 Old Farmer's
Conjunction of Neptune AllIn ac Be.


and the Moon


NOVEMBER28
Thanksgiving Day


D he first Thanksgiving at Ply-
mouth was a three-day feast in
-heartfelt gratitude for survival,
but most of the Thanksgiv-
'/ ,, ings in our coun-
try's early history
were to celebrate
victories in battle.
'A iThe Continental
Congress pro-
claimned the first national day of


6 medium sweet
potatoes
6 medium cooking
apples
1/2 cup butter
1/2 cup apple cider
1/3 cup brown sugar
1/2 teaspoon nutmeg
1/4 teaspoon allspice


2009

NOVEMBER 25,26
st days to cut hair to
encourage grwth

Best day to destroy
pests and weeds


Thanksgiving on December 18,
1777, to celebrate the defeat of the
British at Saratoga. These national
observances were patriotic occa-
sions. The first nationwideThanks-
giving Day to combine patriotism,
harvesttime celebrations, and reli-
gious observances was in 1863. It
was not until 1941 that Thanksgiv-
ing Day was fixed at the fourth
Thursday in November.


reheat the oven to 350F. Bake, peel.
and slice sweet potatoes. Peel, coi,.. "
and slice apples. Melt butter oN ci
medium heat, add remaining ingredi.
ents, and simmer for 5 minutes. Altei
nate layers of sweet potatoes and applk ,a.
in a greased 2-quart casserole dish. d, '- .
zling the cider mixture over each layei
Cover and bake for 20 minutes. MAKES 6 SERVINGS.


S. WITAND WISDOM FROM THE OLD FARMER'S ALMANAC
; ,. ? I U On November 26, 1942, the movie Casablanca
I ,1 'htO '; i premiered.
I- ,. When beechnuts are plentiful. expect a mild winter
a To best get rid of germs, wash your hands for at
S least 20 seconds once lathered.
FOI a RCIlPE. (.ARDLsNIN( TIPs. AND w\E VuliIR FORCASTS, VISIT:
Almanac.com


Summer Read and G-Man


PETS AND THEIR PEOPLE IS SPONSORED BY

Altha Farmers Co-op, Inc.
We've got the feed you need to keep your animals happy and healthy!
CATTLE HORSES DOGS CATS BIRDS and more.
Altha Store Blountstown Branch Marianna Branch
Phene: (850) 762-3161 Phone: (850) 673-8102 Phone: (850) 482-2416


-~ ~pry~


-I WeathieiriiTgether








Page 12 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL NOVEMBER 25, 2009


Carr School fourth graders

share Thanksgiving thoughts


What are you most
thankful for?

Wild hogs. --Lia

My family and dog.
--Ei


My family because they're
helpful. They cheer me up
when I am down.
--Ambriah Pierce

I am most thankful for my
family, Jesus, God and my
guardian angel.
--Chrissy Hall

I am most thankful for my
family and friends,- my
teacher and everybody that
loves me. --Sheryl Smith

I am most thankful for my
friends and family. .
--Samantha Lowery

I'm most thankful for my
family, my house and my
freedom.
--Taylor McDougald

I am most thankful for
my mom, dad, God, fam-
ily, friends, clothes, dog,
school and most of all, my
life. --Alana


How do you fix a turkey
for Thanksgiving dinner?


from the
students
am in Ms.
Plazarin ^
and Ms.
ric
Hill's


fourth
grade
classes


We stuff the turkey with
mashed-up bread. Then
we bake the turkey til it is
brown. --Shawna Hope

First kill the turkey, then
skin the turkey. Then cut
what needs to be cut off
then cook the turkey.
--Katlin Tucker

I fix turkey so we will have
something good to eat on
this special holiday.
--Trey Summerlin

We cook it in the stove with
sauce. --Tiffany Burke

What does yourfamily
do on Thanksgiving?

Eat a huge feast!
--Lizzie Loveless

We either go to sleep or in-
vite friends.
--Selena Stone


Kill it, bake it, serve it. Stay home and have a
--Bryan good time. --Collin


We grease it or fry it and
we spice it and we put it in
the oven.
--Selena Stone

I smoke it with a pineapple
and a cherry. --Fritz

I just bake it in the oven
just like you do with other
food. --April Huggins

We kill the turkey, next we
clean it up and bake it.
--Melissa Conyers

You put the turkey in an
oven bag, roast it in the
oven at 4500 F and let it sit
for six hours. Get it out and
EAT! --Hannah Jarrett

Put it in the oven for one
day. --Chris Whitehead

First, we dethall it. Next,
we marinate it. Then, we
chunk it in the fryer and
pour in oil and turn on the
fryer. --Levi


Go to the Thanksgiving pa-
rade. --Eric

Go hunting fbr turkey and
deer to kill and eat it.
--April Huggins

They invited my whole
family in til we had to get
outside for Thanksgiving. It
was crowded.
--Katrina Johnson

Eat and play football, bas-
ketball and Xbox 360.
--Cole

We go to grandma's and
eat then we leave and go
to hunt in Sumatra.
--John Cole

Give thanks to people.
--Riley

They go to my aunt's to
eat. --Hunter Daniels

Go hunting, play games
and enjoy peace. --Austin


Our family comes together
for eight hours to be thank-
ful for what we have.
--Chris Whitehead

Go visit people in Eastpoint
and eat there then go to an-
other grandma's house to
eat. --Katlin Tucker

They talk a lot!
--Robert Bailey

We call people to come
gather at my house.
--Sheryl Smith


Who were the Pilgrims?


Early Explorers.


--Liam


The people who invented
the first Thanksgiving.
--Ambriah Pierce

Why did they come to
this country?

To plant crops and celebrate
Thanksgiving. --Collin

So they could have reli-
gion. --Eric

How did they get here?

They rode by car.
--April Huggins


What food did they
serve at the first
Thanksgiving?


Turkey, stuffing, deviled
eggs and milk. --Austin

Lobster, corn, wild turkey,
beans, blueberry mash,
squash and fish.
--TaylorT.

Turkey, corn and watermel-
on. --Robert Bailey

Turkey, corn and all sorts
of stuff. --William Hum-
phrey

They had turkey and corn.
--Shawn Andrews


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NOVEMBER 25, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 13


B N


Liberty County again


has state's lowest


unemployment rate.
from Kenny Griffin, Chipola Regional Workforce Board
For October 2009, LibertyCounty once again has the state's
lowest unemployment rate of 5.4 percent, with Flagler County
having the highest unemployment rate of 16.1 percent. Liberty
County was followed by Monroe County at 7.0 percent, Leon
and Alachua County at 7.1 percent and Jackson County with
an unemployment rate of 7.2 percent.
The counties that make up the Chipola Regional Workforce
Region showed only a tenth of one percent increase in
unemployment for the month of October.
According to the Agency for Workforce Innovation,
Florida's seasonally adjusted unemployment rate for October
2009 is 11.2 percent. This represents 1,027,000 jobless out of
a workforce of 9,175,000. The unemployment rate is nearly,
unchanged from the revised rate of 11.1 percent, but is up 4.3
percentage points from October 2008 rate.
The state unemployment rate is 1.0 percentage point higher
that the national unemployment rate of 10.2 percent. October's
rate was the highest since June 1975 when it was also 11.2
percent.
Based on the Florida Economic Estimating Conference
held November 3, 2009, Florida's job market is expected to
remain in a downturn during 2009 and to start improving in
the second quarter of 2010.

------------UNEMPLOYMENT RATES----------


Oct.'09 Sept.'09 Oct. '08

Liberty......5.4 5.3 4.6

Jackson....7.2 7.2 5.4


Oct.'09 Sept.'09 Oct. '08

Calhoun...8.5 8.4 5.2

Holmes.....7.5 7.3 5.2


Washington...9.8 9.6 6.6


Workforce Board to

host Career Fair on

Dec. 8 in Marianna
The Chipola Regional Workforce Development Board Region
3 Career Fair will be held Tuesday, Dec. 8 at the Eastside Baptist
Church, located on highway 90 East in Marianna. Students
from Calhoun, Holmes, Jackson, Liberty and Washington
counties will be attending.
During the Career Fair the students will be able to obtain
information that will assist them in making career choices.
Local employers and business owners are encouraged to take
advantage of this opportunity to share information about their
fields with the workforce of tomorrow. The students will be
in attendance from 8 a.m. until 12 noon (CT).
If you would like further information or are interested in
participating, please contact Robbie Bazzell at (850)638-1180,
extension 343.


Ocheesee Creamery is a dream

come true for Wesselhoeft family


by Judy Ludlow, Calhoun Co.
Extension Director
Look no further than Calhoun
County's own backyard for
examples of agricultural legacy,
determination, and endurance.
We are blessed with many hard
working farming families-
reaching back generations.
Among our fields of cotton,
peanuts, soybeans, corn, and
livestock, is the Wesselhoeft
Dairy, one of Calhoun County's
two remaining dairy farms.
Because of shifting markets,
and a challenging economy, the
Wesselhoefts envisioned a day
when they would pasteurize,
process, and bottle their own
milk products rather than ship it
elsewhere.
After 20 years of hard work
and mountains of paperwork, the
Ocheesee Creamery has become
a reality.
In 1999 the Wesselhoefts were
honored as Calhoun County's
Outstanding Farm Famihl
because oftheir land stew, ard4iip.
dedication to agriculture, and to


their community. Many school
children, FFA, and 4-H youth
have toured this fascinating dairy
operation. The Wesselhoefts milk
Jersey cows that are on a pasture-
based feeding program.
Now, the Ocheesee Creamery
is open for business! The store
front has large glass windows for
viewing the bottling operation.
The milk is sold in glass bottles
which are recyclable. Return
your bottles for a refund! They
currently process fresh milk,


cream, and butter, with more
goods such as ice cream
and cheese to follow.
You can purchase these
products directly from the
Ocheesee Dairy, or from
local farmer markets and grocery
stores.
Our strong, diverse agricultural
community is critical to Calhoun
County's economy. Purchasing
fresh, locally-grown produce,
like Ocheesee Dairy's milk,
cream, and butter, will not only
support our economy but will also
help sustain our cherished rural
lifestyle. You can purchase local
produce at grocery stores and
at Blountstown's River Valley
Marketplace the first Saturday of
each month.
For more information about
local agriculture and farmers
markets, please contact the
Calhoun County Extension Office
at 674-8323.


Blountstown City Manager speaks at national pipeline safety conference


Blountstown City Manager
James A. Woods gave a
presentation at a National Pipeline
Safety Conference held Nov. 5 &
6 in New Orleans.
The presentation included plans
to implement a GIS (Geographic
Information System) mapping
of the City of Blountstown's
natural gas system through a grant
from the Federal Department of
Transportation's Pipeline Hazard
Materials Safety Administration
for $50,000.
The grant will allow the City


of Blountstown to improve the
knowledge of the natural gas
system by providing better maps
and data to the City staff by
identifying key valves, regulators,
meters, pipe type and size with
specific locations. Since the
project will include verification
of the pipes and other locations,
crews responding to a problem
will be able to quickly view
the system maps and formulate
a plan to shut down problem
lines and assist in evacuations if
necessary.


"With this program, I can see
what users are users are going to
be affected when a valve needs
to be shut down," Woods says,
explaining that the program will
generate a list of users allowing
city workers to make contact with
them quickly.
The project will further
enhance public safety by
providing greater awareness to
industry stakeholders working
in underground construction, fire
fighters and police.
Another direct benefit will


be greatly enhanced ability to
provide public notice to citizens
living near city pipelines, making
them aware of the lines in their
neighborhoods, educating the
public on detecting and reporting
potential leaks and adequately
following up on public outreach
efforts.
He said it will take between six
and 12 months to get the program
in place. "When we finish, we'll
have a very good grasp of all of
the infrastructure involved with
all of our gas pipelines," he said.


While Woods was a speaker
at the conference, he participated
in attending most of the non-
conflicting presentations.
He said a lot of valuable
information was discussed
which has already resulted in
staff briefings to further enhance
employee safety in the field
-working on the natural gas
system.
Woods also learned of a couple
of measures that may result in
additional grant opportunities for
the City in the coming year.








Page 14 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL NOVEMBER 25, 2009


CHELSEA ANASTASIA
LAYFIELD
Chelsea Anastasia Layfield
celebrated her first birthday on
Nov. 17. She is the daughter of
Mathew R. and Dara Layfield of
Sound Off Audio in Blountstown.
Her maternal grandparents
are Becky and Larry Finn of
Largo and Richard Banzal
of Melbourne. Her maternal
great-grandparents are Marie
Holland-Boals and the late
Xenophon "Earl" Boals of Altha.
Her paternal grandparents are
Violet Goss and Gordon Layfield.
Chelsea loves following her two
older sisters, Ariana and Katie.
She wants to be with them all
the time. She also loves all of
her teachers at Kid's Kingdom,
her parent's dear friends and
many relatives.


ANN MARIE BROWN
Ann Marie Brown will celebrate
her 12th birthday on Nov. 26.
She is the daughter of Doyle
and Beth Brown of Blue Creek.
Her grandparents are Bob and
Ruth Pickron of Bristol and
Sonny and Pauline Brown of
Blue Creek. Ann Marie will be
turning on 12 on Thanksgiving
Day. The day will be spent cel-
ebrating with all of her family.
She enjoys reading everything
she can get her hands on and
keeping her two brothers and
two sisters straight.


ARABELLA LAMB
Arabella Lamb celebrated her
second birthday on Nov. 23.
She is the daughter of Richard
and Amanda Lamb of Altha.
Her maternal grandparents are
Willard and Annette Edenfield of
Altha. Her paternal grandparents
are Ronnie and Maria Lamb of
Bristol and the late Rebecca
Collins of Blountstown. Her
maternal great-grandparents
include Thomas and Nancy
Foster of Altha and-Kate and the
late Gordon Edenfield of Altha.
Her paternal great-grandparents
include Jeanette and the late
Earl Lamb of Tavares. Arabella
celebrated with a Mickey Mouse
Clubhouse party with her family
and friends. She enjoys playing
outside on her new gym set,
"fixing" stuff with daddy, and
playing dress up.with mama.


BROOKE LIBBY
Brooke Libby will celebrate her
second birthday on Nov. 29.
She is the daughter of Josh
and Ashley Libby of Clarksville.
Her grandparents are Sherry
and the late Freddie Jacobs of
Bristol and Grady and Regina
Libby of Clarksville. Her great-
grandparents include Carolyn
Goff and Judy and Roger Stay-
ton, all of Tallahassee. Brooke
enjoys watching TV and play-
ing with all of her toys. She will
be celebrating her birthday with
family at a Princess Party.


J.C. MARTIN
J.C. Martin celebrated his third
birthday on Nov. 7. He is the
son of Amanda Phillips and
Casey Martin, both of Bristol.
His maternal grandparents are.
Nicky and Faye Phillips of Bris-
tol. His paternal grandparents
are Rocky and Judy Martin of
Bristol. J.C. enjoys playing with
his tractors and bog trucks. He
also enjoys playing with his sis-
ter, Carmen.


KACY BRYNN
PARTRIDGE
Kacy Brynn Partridge will cel-
ebrate her seventh birthday on
Nov. 27. She is the daughter
of Kevin and Amy Partridge of
Bristol. Her grandparents in-
clude Daniel and Fannie Par-
tridge and Jack and Cathy Rev-
ell. Her great-grandparents
are Horace and Joyce Cushing
and Nelle Brock. Kacy likes to
go fishing with her daddy, bake
sweets with her mama and ride
the 4-wheeler with her sisters,
Kaly and Cheyanne. She also
likes to go to yard sales with
her Granny and Heidi. Kacy re-
ally enjoys being in Mrs. Jes-
sie's class with all her friends
this year. Most of all, though,
Kacy loves being with her dog,
Charlie!













ALEXANDER 'XANDER'
JAMES DANTE SHELL
Alexander, 'Xander' James
Dante Shell will celebrate his
first birthday on Nov. 28 with
a party at Chuck E. Cheese in
Tallahassee. Xander is the son
of Jeanne Renee Shell Kever
and the adored baby brother
of Mariah and Mickey Kever.
He is the grandson of Jim and
Patti Shell. He enjoys rid-
ing the 4-wheeler with .his big
brother Mickey and getting into
any and everything with his big
sister Mariah, who spoils him
rotten. He also enjoys taking
long walks in his stroller with
his Papa.

BRADDOCK HOBBS
Braddock Hobbs celebrated his
ninth birthday on Nov. 17. He is
he son of Mary Phillips of Bris-
ol and the late Joseph Dollar of
-lamilton, GA and Otho Hobbs, Jr.
and Hayley Hobbs of Ocala. His
maternal grandparents are Nicky
and Faye Phillips of Bristol. His
paternal grandparents are Janie
-lobbs of Altha and Otho Hobbs,
Sr. of Sneads. Braddock enjoys
playing his XBox 360, learning
everything about sharks and ter-
rorizing his little sister, Molly.


BI RTHDAYS


ACREAGE FOR SALE
LIBERTY COUNTY RD FRONTAGE
From $4,995 per acre
$1000.00 Total Down
Owner Financing, No Qualifying
Tri-land Inc. Broker Phone (813) 253-3258



Mrs. Pam's Childcare

SNow has an opening for
a one to two-year-old!

Located on Hwy. 71 North
Between Blountstown & Altha
TELEPHONE 674-9081




Chipola

Ford

A large selection of new and used cars are
now available at Chipola Ford in Marianna!
Ronnie Coley personally invites you to visit him any
time Monday thru Saturday from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Questions? Give him a call at (850)482-4043.
HE IS WAITING FOR YOUR CALL!


S"Freedom from Eye Glasses,
Now a reality for many."
Lee Mullis M.D.
SM Board Certified Eye Surgeon
SMART LENSES and Cataract Specialist
Dr. Mullis's Smart Lenssm procedure can
produce clear vision without eyeglasses.





(850) 526-7775 or
1(800)769-3429

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STOUTAMIRE INSURANCE INC.
16783 SE Pear St., Blountstown
Contact Bill Stoutamire
Phone 674-5974 Fax 674-8307







NOVEMBER 25, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 15


C'MON-IN!

SSUMMERLIN


MOTORS


BEST DEAL IN THE TRI-STATE AREA!
Slow credit, no problem W.A.C.
Hand-picked quality cars and trucks.
3905 W. Hwy, 90 Business (850) 526-5254
Residence (850) 762-3679
in Marianna Toll Free: 1-888-740-8222


PARAMOUNT HEALTHCARE


OPEN HOUSE
In honor of its opening,

Mara0UnT HeaLTHcare
will present an open house
Sunday, Nov. 29
1 3 p.m. (CT)
at 17400 NW Fifth Street,
Blountstown 7


During the open house,
our home healthcare staff
will be available to answer
questions regarding the
home healthcare industry.
Refreshments will be served.


jHoe674-5455
S\/ ... ..
, *'...... .-;--.. .. .


Health students learn with simulators


47


A KSheriff Donnie Conyers

!Keeping Your Family Safe


MARIANNA-The Chipola
College Health Science Department
is utilizing state-of-the-art
technology to teach clinical skills
in a safe learning environment.
Nursing, paramedic and
emergency medical technician
students are using a family of
patient simulators to practice
various skills.
A birthing simulator named
Noelle can breathe, bleed and talk
just like a real mother. The high
tech device is designed to help
students learn about the challenges
associated with delivering babies
by making quick decisions in a
stressful environment.
Noelle is Chipola's fourth human
simulator in the family which
includes a child, and male and
female adults. Funds for the latest
simulator came from the Chipola
Regional Workforce Development
Board.
All simulators can be adjusted
to suit the education point of
the student. Medical issues and
training can be progressively
increased in difficulty as students
move through the program. Amy
Samson, a Jackson Hospital nurse
and Chipola adjunct instructor,
is responsible for the patient
simulator project. Samson can
control the patients' vital signs
and speech from a remote location
which is equipped with cameras for
observing the students.
Chipola Health Science director
Vickie Stephens, says, "Simulation
in skills labs has become more
life-like with the development
of moulage, which uses molded
plaster to create realistic tissue. The
simulation experience affords the
students opportunities to integrate
critical thinking in the assessment


is planned for mid-December.
Alumni and members of the Chipola
Nursing Advisory Committee will
be invited to tour the facility and
learn of new opportunities to
partner with the nursing program
to ensure future generations of
success. An alumni link is being
added to the Chipola Nursing
website, at www.chipola.edu
For information about Chipola's
Health Science programs, call 850-
718-2316.


STORK REPORT


CAYSON MICHAEL FAULKNER
Jordon Rudd of Telogia and Zac Faulkner of Crawfordville are
proud to announce the birth of their son, Cayson Michael Faulkner,
on Oct. 10. He weighed 6 lbs. and 14 oz. and measured 19 inches
long. His maternal grandparents are Johnny and Marie Rudd of
Hosford. His paternal grandparents are Tammy Ransom and
J.R. Himler and the late James Faulkner, all of Tallahassee. His
maternal great-grandparents are Vonceal and the late J.C. "Coot"
Brackins of Sopchoppy and the late Joseph Edwin "Popsicle." Rudd
of Hosford. His paternal great-grandparents are Kaye and Eugene
Gross of South Dakota. He was welcomed home by several aunts,
uncles and cousins.


LOGAN TREY JOHNSON
Luke and Nikki Johnson are proud to announce the birth of their
son, Logan Trey Johnson, on Sept. 15. He weighed 7lbs. and 13
oz. and measured 20.5 inches long. He was welcomed into the
world by mom, dad, big sister Ellie and many family and friends.
Logan is the 12th grandchild for L. T (Sonny) and Mary Johnson of
Graceville and the second for Ricky and Kathy Brown of Bristol.


Chipola nursing students work with a newborn human patient simulator.
Pictured from left: Skills Lab Coordinator Amy Sampson and nursing students
Jessica Goodman, Alison Rudd and Jana McArthur.


' 4
.o' -


H-ere's wishing you

a Thanksgiving

holiday complete

with all the

trimmings good

food, good friends,

andgood times.


of medical conditions and promotes
self-confidence in the nursing
process."
Simulation exercises are often
videotaped and used by students
as a learning tool in de-briefing
sessions. When students arrive in
the real-life clinical setting, the
skills lab training has provided a
basic foundation for quality patient
care.
An Open House for Alumni
of the Chipola Nursing program


Il ,


I


'i


~J~.








Page 16 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL NOVEMBER 25, 2009


LEFT: Leon Bro ton (#3) makes the calch. ABOVE: Prinnceton Grant (#2) tangles with a Freeporl opponent, sending the ball
out ol their reach. TONY SHOEMAKE PHOTOS


LEFT: A BHS Tiger hangs on to the ball to score as he is taken down by Freeport players. RIGHT: A Tiger player wraps around a Freeport opponent to stop him in his tracks.


BHS ends season with


Nov. 20 loss to Freeport


by, Richard Williams, Journal sports writer
Tiger turnovers took their toll and the 'result
was a 48-12 defeat at the hands of Freeport.
The Blountstown Tigers traveled to Freeport
for their first-round playoff game Nov. 20
knowing they needed to play nearly perfect to
overcome the rash of injuries that hit the team at
the end of the year, yet each time they seemed
ready to get on track they managed to give the
football away to the home team.
The Tigers opened the game with a drive
down .the field, but a fumble gave the ball to
Freeport. The Bulldogs converted the miscue into
a touchdown and a 6-0 lead for Freeport.
On their next possession, the Tigers threw an
interception to Freeport that was also converted
into a touchdown.
This time the Bulldogs needed only one play
to score again by the pass.


Freeport faked the field goal and hit a pass for
a two-point conversion and a 14-0 lead.
Before the first quarter was over, Freeport
scored two more times and built a 27-0 lead.
Freeport added a second quarter touchdown
to make the score 34-0 at the half.
In the third quarter, Freeport scored on a four
play drive and then scored again in the third to
make the score 48-0.
The Tigers' first score of the night came on a
six yard run by P.J. Buggs in the third quarter.
BHS scored again on a 93 yard pass play from
Buggs to Ryan McIntyre.
The Tigers ended the game with 346 yards of
offense to 398 for Freeport, but three fumbles
and two interceptions were simply too much to
overcome.
The Tigers end the season at 8-3 in a strong
turn around from last year's 3-7 record.


RADIO FOOTBALL

ON WYBT AND WPHK

Listen to football on WYBT and WPHK. This week..

Hear Michael Wahlquist, Jay Taylor
and Ray McCoy with all the Liberty
County High School game action. The
Bulldogs take on Freeport High School "
Friday at Freeport. Air time is at 10
a.m. (ET) Saturday, Nov. 28, immedi-
ately following Swap Shop on K102.7.

The Florida Gators play Florida Sate
in the Swamp this Saturday, Nov. 28.
Air time on K-102.7 at 2 p.m. (CT).


The Miami Dolphins take on
Buffalo, Sunday, Nov. 29.
Air time 2 p.m. (CT) on K102.7.








NOVEMBER 25, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 17


L IB: ; ERTY CUNTY IGH:1r SCHOOL:[eI BULLDOG F'I~c ~OOTBALL~


ABOVE: Liberty's Terrance Evans #7), Keith McCray (#34) and Justin
a Soulh Walton ball carrier during Liberty's 24-17 lirsl round playoh win.

HR^';"^B^MH^^^I


~f~f~

ilr.x:
~gs

--a;i:

la .g
-j
t'- ..I
.r


LEFT:
Kevin
MrCray (#5)
runs down the
sidelines for a big
Bulldog gain. McCray scored two
touchdowns including a 46 yard romp in -
which he broke four tackles. ABOVE RIGHT: Sterling Lake (#30) tackles a Seahawk runner.
LCHS Head Coach Grant Grantham said Lake had a solid game for the Bulldogs.


Liberty Co. takes 24-17 victory over South Walton


by, Richard Williams,
Journal sports writer
Liberty's Terrance Evan hit
Kevin McCray on a 50 yard
touchdown pass on the first play
of the fourth quarter to start a
comeback that ended in a 24-
17 Bulldog victory in Bristol
Friday.
McCray's touchdown catch
was followed by a Mike Lohse
extra point that cut South Walton's
lead to 17-14. The 50 yard pass
play completed a 95 yard drive
for Liberty.
On the ensuing kickoff, the
Seahawks fumbled the ball as the
Liberty defenders charged down
the field. The returned managed
to recover the ball at the end zone
just before being tackled.
The Seahawks moved the ball


away from their goal line on their
first two plays, but on the third
Evans stripped the ball from
the running back and Stedman
Williams scooped up the loose
pigskin in the end zone for a
touchdown. The defensive score
gave Liberty their first lead of
the night at 21-17 with 10:26
remaining in the game.
The game didn't start well
for LCHS as the Bulldogs, 10-1
overall, were stuffed on their first
two plays of the game and then
fumbled the ball away on third
down at their own 30 yard line.
South Walton recovered the.
fumble and then put together an 11
play drive that included two fourth
down conversions to score the first
points of the game. The Seahawks


BELOW: A LCHS runner is pulled down by his shirt tail during Liberty's win
over South Walton. CENTER: Terrance Evans (#7) escapes a Seahawk
tackle. Evans had success rushing for Liberty and threw one pass which
went 50 yards for a touchdown.


longest play of the drive was a six
yard run.
The Bulldogs responded with
a drive of their own that covered
63 yards on three plays. The two
biggest plays of the drive were a
25yardrunbyEvansanda46yard
touchdown run by Kevin McCray.
On the touchdown McCray broke
four tackles as he swept to the
outside and then down the sideline
to tie the score.
South Walton came back with
an eight play drive of their owp
that covered 77 yards and ended in
a 15 yard touchdown run that gave
South Walton a 14-7 lead.
Later in the second quarter,
Liberty fumbled the ball away
to the Seahawks and again the
fumble was on the Liberty side of
the field. This time the Seahawks
took over at the Bulldog 17
yard line, but this time Liberty's
defense held and forced the
S ; ir Isl tors to kick afield goal.
The kick was good and
Liberty trailed 17-7
going into the halI
In the second

BullJog-
F B 0 ";g


way to stuff the South Walton
offense. On their first drive of the
second half the Seahawks drove
to the Liberty 26, but the Bulldogs
stopped them on a fourth down
attempt. Neither team was able to
threaten for the remainder of the
third quarter, but on the first play
of the fourth quarter the Bulldogs
struck on their only pass play of
the night to begin the momentum
shift towards Liberty.
The final score of the night
came on a 27 yard Lohse field
goal. The win was sealed when
Terry Jennings stepped in front of
a South Walton pass and secured
an interception. The Bulldogs
drove inside the Seahawk ten yard
line as time expired.
With the win, Liberty travels
to Freeport to take on the District


1 champions. Freeport, 10-
1, destroyed Blountstown in
their first round contest 48-12.
Freeport's only loss came against
Class 2B Walton.
LCHS Head Coach Grant
Grantham said he was glad to
get the win, but added that for
his team to continue to advance,
"We've got to play better from
the start."
Grantham was quick to add that
he was glad the fans stayed behind
the team and thought the fan
support makes a big difference.
"When you have a good crowd,
and we normally do, you just
generate some excitement for
everybody . and I hope we
have a great crowd traveling over
to Freeport to really support this
team," he said. *


BELOW: Terrance Evans (#7) is tackled on a rushing play for Liberty. The
Bulldogs fell behind early but recovered in the second half to score 17 un-
answered points to take the win.








Page 18 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL NOVEMBER 25, 2009


H1 N1 immunizations complete for

both Liberty & Calhoun schools


The Liberty and Calhoun'
County Health Departments
announce that they have
completed the immunization for
the HIN1 virus at all schools
in both Liberty and Calhoun
Counties.
Dr. Charbonneau, Director
of the two Health Departments,
expressed his appreciation for


all of those involved in the now starting to decline locally


vaccination event.
He also urges all of those
parents of the children that did
not receive the immunization,
to bring there children to either
Health Department and receive
the immunization.
Dr. Charbonneau stated that
while the incidence of H1N1 is


and in the state, there is a good
chance that a second wave of
the H1N1 flu could return this
spring.
For those students age ten and
under, the required second series
of immunizations will be given
after they return to school from
Christmas vacation.


-IBERTY SCHOOL NEWS


Hosford Celebrates
Veteran's Day!
Hurricane Ida was unable
to stop Hosford School from
honoring local veterans and
their families on Wednesday,
Nov. 11.
The day started off with a
program in which the students
proudly sang patriotic songs.
The audience was moved
to tears when the kindergarten
classes used sign language as they


0 Liberty Writes at Tolar
Liberty Writes will be given
on the morning of Wednesday,
Dec. 2.
Santa Pictures 04
Due to the Liberty Writes
scheduled for Wednesday,
December 2nd, Santa pictures
will be taken on Thursday, Dec.
3. Pictures are $5.
0 Santa Store
The annual Santa Store will
be offered the week of Dec.
7-11. This service is provided
to children at Tolar to help them
with their Christmas shopping.
Items for all members of the
family are available along with
free gift wrapping.
Christmas Dance V
A Christmas Dance will be
held at the Tolar gym on Friday,


LCHS Beta Club
delivers 128 boxes
for holiday project
LCHS Beta Club delivered
a total of 128 complete boxes
with shipping for their Operation
Christmas Child Project. The
members worked hard to make
sure all the boxes had the
suggested items in them.
They led homeroom assemblies
and urged each homeroom to
donate 2 filled boxes. Mrs. Austin
engineered a donation of $149,
plus 4 boxes, as well as extra
items to be used in the checking
of boxes.
Thanks to Ms. Austin and other
teachers wvho worked with Beta
to get the boxes finished. Also
Beta thanks Hosford School for
sending 33 boxes with postage.
This was a great effort! These
boxes will go to hurting children
in other parts of the world torn .
by war or disasters. This will be
their only Christmas gift in most
cases.


stated the Pledge of Allegiance.
The Hosford Junior Beta
Club proudly presented both the
Liberty and Calhoun VFWs with
$250 for their post.
An additional $80 was raised
by selling the traditional poppy
flowers.
After the program, the Veterans
were treated to a luncheon
provided by the Hosford School
Staff.
Thanks to all our Veterans.


Dec. 11, 7-10 p.m. for students
in grades 5-9. Admission for
the dance is $5 and a concession
stand will be available with pizza,
drinks, and more.
.' Piggly Wiggly Receipts
Please send in your Piggly
Wiggly receipts to school. All
receipts are used. The receipts
that are $10 or more will be used


Thanksgiving Luncheon
Hosford students invited
their families to share a tasty
Thanksgiving lunch.with them
on Wednesday, Nov. 18.
A traditional Thanksgiving
meal was served and about 100
family members were on hand to
share the feast.
To provide a more festive
atmosphere, homerooms
made crafts to decorate the
lunchroom.


in the competition among the.
schools.
Be sure to write your child's
name on their receipts.
Tolar PTO news... &
The PTO still has raffle tickets
available for two tickets to the
Nutcracker. If you would like
to get tickets call Missy at 294-
6002.


Dr. Donna L. Singletary, D.C.
Chiropractic Physician

Got Pain?
We can help!!

Call (850)674-5057

WELCOMING NEW PATIENTS
17019 Main Street SE
Blountstown, FL
Neck & Back Pain 'Headaches Carpal Tunnel
Arm & Leg Pain Cramps Sports Injuries



The Liberty County Landfill will be

closed Thursday, Nov. 26 thru

Saturday, Nov. 28 in observance of

Thanksgiving. We will be back to pick

up recycling on Monday, Nov. 30.
If you have any questions,
call Danny Earnest at 643-3777.


Have a safe and

wonderful holiday!


Liberty Community Health Care
11033 NW SR 20
S" ) P.O. Box 489
Y:,_C Bristol, FL 32321 -
(850) 643-2292


The Calhoun Count Clerk of Court's
Of'ce will be closed on Thursday, Nov. 27 and
Friday, Nov. 28 for the Thanksgiving Holidays. *
We would like to wish everyone

Happij TanKsglving! '
If you have any questions, please call 674-4545.


The City of Bristol will be closed on
Thursday, Nov. 26 & Friday, Nov. 27
in observance of Thanksgiving.
We would like to wish you and
yours a very Happy Thanksgiving.


k~ "..~i~b~








NOVEMBER 25, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 19


Pictured sorting canned food donations are SGA members Erin Fowler, Alex
Deason, Hira Farooqi and Alison Slongo.

BHS's SGA News: Food drive a success with
1,309 cans of food, Toy drive begins Nov. 30


Around the same time each f
year we come to realize what or
who we truly are thankful for.
On this day Nov. 26, I would
like everyone at BHS and every
where else to know that as a f
student at Blountstown High
School, who eats lunchroom food,
I am thankful for our lunchroom
ladies: Mrs. VeraAnderson (group
manager), Mrs. Sandra Dudley
(main cook), Mrs. Cristle Taylor
(outtake manager), Mrs. Catherine
Sheppard (manages the student accounts), and Mrs.
Marie McDaniel (helps serve the line, and washes
dishes).
Each day of the year the BHS lunchroom staff
makes every day the best. Before I go on I would
like to note that all of the ladies named above help
each other out. No one has one specific job. I'm
sure I speak for the entire BHS student body, faculty
and staff when I say "Thank you."
We truly do appreciate all the hard work you put
into the food when serving us our daily nutritional
meals. You always know how to make us smile. For
example, when you walk into the kitchen you can


Altha Wildcats
by Jim Mcintosh
POPLAR SPRINGS, NOV.
19-The Altha Wildcats hit the
hardwood last Thursday night in
the Tip-Off Preseason Classic.
They opened the season against the
Ponce De Leon Pirates and came up
short, 44-32.
Jacob Warner led Altha in the
scoring column with 12 points.
POPLAR SPRINGS, NOV.
20-A close game through three


The BHS student body came
through with an amazing 1,309 cans
of food for the SGA food drive! Our
goal was tripled and we are very
thankful for such successful results!
The winning 1st period class was
Mrs. Taylor's World History, with
Mrs. Howell's Algebra II Honors
coming in a close second. Third place
went to Mrs. Edmisson's Biology.
In addition, SGA is sponsoring
this year's toy drive. We want every


quiet and smiling.
You just cannot help but grin.
You all make the day brighten up a bit even though
you might not believe so.
Right now the BHS lunch ladies are making a
special Thanksgiving dinner for all to enjoy. They
are working non-stop to make it truly special. I
know this because when I took the picture, they
almost killed me because I had to get them to stop
cooking for just one moment. So you can tell they
truly are dedicated to what they do.
So once again.the BHS campus and I would
like to say "Thank you, and have a wonderful
Thanksgiving Holiday. You deserve every bit of
it."


basketball season underway
quarters of play slipped away from the Malone Tigers. The tip-off for
the Wildcats in the fourth quarter the Junior Varsity game is scheduled
as a late 3-pointer helped Poplar for 5:30 p.m. (CT) followed by the
Springs pull away with a 50-43 Varsity game at 7 p.m. (CT). They'll
victory, travel to Monroe next Thursday to
Again, Jacob Warner led the -take on the Bobcats at 5 p.m./ 6:30
Wildcats with 13 points, Tyler p.m. (CT). On Pearl Harbor Day
Hamilton posted 12 and Will Rogers (Monday, Dec. 7) the Wildcats will
put up 11 points. be in Tallahassee to face John Paul
Altha will open the regular II at 5 p.m./6:30 p.m. The next day
season with four straight district FAMU comes into THE DEN for a
games. Next Tuesday they will host 5 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. (CT) game.


person to bring a toy. You will make
some child's life full of joy. The toy
drive will begin Nov. 30 and it will be
a competition between 1st periods.
The winner will receive a full spread
breakfast!
Homework passes will be given
out and it is your teacher's discretion
how it is used. Over Thanksgiving
break, why not pick up a toy on sale.
Make a child's Christmas. Bring a
toy!


BHS's SWAT Club 'Wii are Smoking Out Tobacco Event' -- The club
recently challenged students and staff to stop using tobacco .products for
24 hours or longer in honor of the national "Great American Smoke Out."
Exercise is a great alternative to smoking. The club purchased two Wii
Consoles with Wii Fit games and several other educational games to be used
throughout the school. They are to help encourage healthy alternatives and
activities, instead of using tobacco products.

Jingle Bell 5K/1 mile Fun


Run Dec. 4 in
Bells ringing, people laughing
and lots of fun are just some of the
reasons that you need to register


LUNCHES BREAKFAST
(Pre-K thru 5th) THURSDAY & FRIDAY
THURSDAY & FRIDAY Fall Break

Fall Break lay
i A ,Fall Break & Thanksgiving holiday
A choic I~ f I l ft t hitL1VV iOI fVI fl


/ t^i uiut i Ta; ui wiv l o IIw e,
chocolate or strawberry milk
served with all meals.
BREAKFAST.
THURSDAY & FRIDAY
Fall Break
&
Thanksgiving holiday

MONDAY,
French toast sticks and sausage
patty or assorted cereals with but-
tered toast and assorted fruit juice.
TUESDAY
TBD, assorted cereals with buttered
toast and assorted fruit juice.
WEDNESDAY
TBD, assorted cereals with buttered
toast and assorted fruit juice.
NOTE: BES RECEIVES CEREAL ON MONDAY AND
HOT CHOICE TUESDAY THRU FRIAY.


Thanksgiving holiday


MONDAY
Beef-a-roni, green beans, mixed fruit
and bread sticks. (Grades 6-12) Al-
ternatives: Crispy chicken wrap; Chef
salad.
TUESDAY
To Be Determined
WEDNESDAY
To Be Determined


MONDAY
Waffles and sausage patty or
assorted cereals with buttered
toast and assorted fruit juice.
TUESDAY
French toast and ham or assort-
ed cereal with buttered toast and
assorted fruit juice.
WEDNESDAY
Ham, egg & cheese croissant
or assorted cereal with buttered
toast and assorted fruit juice.


S All menus are subject to change.
MENUS SPONSORED BY:
BristoClDentalCCdnic
Laban Bontrager, DMD, Monica Bontrager, DMD
Pea Ridae Rd in Bristol. Phone (850) 643-5417


A choice oI lUW iat white,
chocolate or strawberry milk
served with all meals.

LUNCHES
Elementary
(Pre-K thru 5th)
THURSDAY & FRIDAY
Fall Break
&
Thanksgiving holiday
MONDAY
Shrimp poppers, cheese grits, baked
beans and garden salad. Alternative:
Ham and turkey sub.
TUESDAY
Cheese pizza, corn on the cob and peach-
es. Alternative: BLT sandwich.
WEDNESDAY
Corn dog, mac & cheese, carrots and
peas. Alternative: Grilled cheese sand-
wich.


Blountstown
for the 5K/1 Mile Fun Run on
Dec. 4 which will immediately
follow the Movie on the Square.
Registration begins at 7 p.m.
downtown on the square. The
Run will begin following the
movie around 8 p.m. The cost of
the 5K will be $15 and the 1-Mile
will be $10. The cost will include
a T-shirt and jingle bells.
Registration forms are
available on the BMS web site
or you can call 674-8234 for more
information. We are strongly
encouraging you to preregister
either by mailing your registration
form and money to BMS or by
bringing your form and money
to BMS. Participants who pre-
register are more likely to receive
the T-shirt size they want. Pre-
registration ends Nov. 30.
All proceeds will go to the
Fellowship of Christian Athletes
and the Science Academy.
Children under 18 must be
accompanied by an adult in order
to participate in the race.


I


----CALHOUN SCHOOLS NEWS








Page 20 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL NOVEMBER 25, 2009


4th-graders tell us



ALL ABOUT


THANKSGIVING o
from the students in Ms. McCoy's Fourth
Grade Class at W.R. Tolar School


What are you most
thankful for?

I'm most thankful for the food
and just spending time with
my family and having a good
time. --Danielle Lee

My mom and dad and my
other wonderful family and
friends because they always
look after me and my dad is
my hero. --Davie Kersey

Native Americans and pil-
grams. --vontarius McCray

Jesus and the soldiers that
.fought for our country.
--Sierra Campbell

I'm most thankful for family,
and friends because if you
need help doing something
and your by yourself, you are
most likely to need help.
--Marlon Black

I am thankful for friends and
family because they are awe-
some. --Dustin Hostetter

I'm thankful for my family be-
cause they help me with my
working and cooking.
--Thomas Cole

I am most thankful for the food
and family because they are
nice and good. --Jack Foster

My whole family and siblings.
Also my cousins and friends.
--Caroline Carson

I am thankful for Ameri-
cans, my family, friends and
school.
--Logan Whittaker

I am thankful for my whole
family, my friends, my home,
my school and my dogs.
--Hanna Bailey


How do you fix a turkey for
Thanksgiving dinner?

I eat squirrel and we go hunt-
ing for squirrel then we skin
them and we cook them the*
day before Thanksgiving and
people bring food and after we
finish cooking, we pray and
then eat at my Uncle Jack's.
--Weston Summers

Well, there is more than one
but my family buys from the
store and just heats it up in
the oven. --Danielle Lee

I really don't know how to
make a turkey but I set the


table. I put the turkey in the
middle of the table, then I put
a knife on one side and the
spoon-and 'fork on the other.
Then I put the plates in the
middle.
--Davie Kersey

Skin the turkey, season it and
put it in the oven. When it's
done, you can eat it.
--Vontarius McCray

How I fix it is I kill a gobbler, I
put pepper, salt, butt rub and
a touch of lemon and let it
slowly roast until chow time.
--Blake Tharpe

First you put it in a pot, next
you heat the pot. Then you
check the temperature. Final-
ly you sit down. and eat.
5-Dustin Hostetter

First you kill it, second you
stuff it, then you cook it. Last
but not least, you eat it.
--Thomas Cole

1. Get your gun, next shoot
the turkey. 2. Pluck the feath-
ers off the turkey. 3. Take the
nasty stuff out of the turkey. 4.
Stuff the turkey with all kinds
of stuff. 5. Last but not least,
put your turkey on a tray and
put it in the oven.
--Caroline Carson

To fix a turkey for Thanksgiv-
ing, you skin the feathers off,
get the guts and everything
out but the meat, then you
cook it. --Hanna Bailey


What does your family
do on Thanksgiving?

We have a big get together
at my grandmother's house
and all my family comes and
we eat turkey, ham, beans,
potato salad, chicken wings,
chocolate cake, peanut butter
cake and pudding. We have a
great time spending time with
each other. --Danielle Lee

We all go to my grandparents'
house where we can meet all
of our family. We sit at the
big table in the middle of the
dining room and we pass the
food around the table so ev-
erybody can get some of this
delicious dinner.
--Davie Kersey

My family goes to Georgia
and stays for seven days and
learn about the pilgrims and
native Americans.
--Vontarius McCray


I hunt, fish, eat, sleep, play
football and cook.
--Blake Tharpe

My- family would cook food
that all of my family would
like. We'd eat peas, mash po-
tatoes, greens and sweet po-
tato pie. --Sierra Campbell

We have a Thanksgiving
dinner with some family and
friends. We eat turkey, corn,
beans, peas, pumpkin pie
and sometimes chicken. My
favorite food is chicken, peas
and pumpkin pie.
--Marlon Black

We dress up like pilgrims and
Indians and eat, play and
make our own Thanksgiving
play. --Thomas Cole

We all go to one of our family
members house and eat tur-
key, ham, cranberry sauce,
dressing, pie and that's what
my family does for Thanksgiv-
ing. My favorite food to eat on
Thanksgiving is pie and tur-
key. --Alexus Poole

My family cooks and gets
ready for Thanksgiving din-
ner. We eat a lot of corn, car-
rots and meat. --Jack Foster

We get together and eat and
spend time together. We go
to each others house and
eat more and more til we're
stuffed and I get to play with
my cousins.
--Caroline Carson

We celebrate Thanksgiving
in November. We eat turkey,
corn, cranberry sauce and
cornbread. --Logan Whittaker

We go down to the camp with
the whole family and eat ham,
dumplings, peas, cornbread
and more. We play cards and
hide and seek.
--Hanna Bailey

Who were the pilgrims,
and why did they come
to this country?

They were nice and thankful
people who needed some-
where to build their houses
so they wouldn't have to live
on a big boat anymore.
--Davie Kersey

Their king was mean and
busy. --Blake Tharpe

The pilgrims came to this
country to discover Thanks-
giving. --Dustin Hostetter


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Happy Thanksgiving
to our wonderful customers


Hwy. 20, Bristol 643-2264


LIBERTY POST AND BARN

would like to wish everyone a


fayyy We will e close
J. Thursday, Nov. 26
-. .,, and Friday, Nov. 27
in observance of
4-- ~ Thanksgiving
Hwy. 12, Bristol
PHONE 643-5995
f 1/2 mile south of Ine red light)


i"
-"


r^


* i








NOVEMBER 25, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 21


'Look Good, Feel
Better' classes for
cancer patients
The American Cancer Society
is offering Look Good... Feel
Better classes to help area women
undergoing cancer treatment
feel better about their physical
appearance. These classes are
free and are scheduled for:
*Dec. 14 from 1-3 p.m. in the
Hudnall Building (across from
Jackson Hospital), Marianna
*Jan. 4 from 6-8 p.m. at Bay
Medical Center, Panama City
class size is limited. To register
f r one of these classes contact
your American Cancer Society,
1-800-227-2345.
The American Cancer Society
is also looking for licensed
cosmetologists that may be
interested in volunteering a few
hours a couple of times a year
to facilitate the Look Good...
Feel Better program. For more
information on becoming a Look
Good...Feel Better volunteer,
please contact Heather Bastedo
at your local American Cancer
Society, (850)785-9205.
The American Cancer Society
is dedicated to eliminating cancer
as a major health problem by
saving lives, diminishing suffering
and preventing cancer through
research, education, advocacy
and service. For more information
about the American Cancer Society,
visit www.cancer.org.


771 7 .

__ _ ~ ';-. -~sr ;C~ .TU-~I~A~


Turkeys

donated

for needy

families


Thanksgiving Blessings
from
Dr. Barry Edewaard, Sherry Edewaard,
Betty Pitts & Kathy Lafontaine


W- R

r. Barry Ed-ewaard
Dr. Barry Edewaard


We are thankful for you.
Your support and friendship
means a lot to us. We are
here to serve you.
We will be closed
Thanksgiving Day
and Friday, Nov. 27
, Optometrist & Staff


17521 Main Street N. Blountstown Phone 674-2020
\WEACCEPT MEDICAID AND MEDICARE.











TO OUR WONDERFUL COMMUNITY

Get ready for those

family gatherings:
We carry Fish Fry supplies
and Cast Iron Ware.


TATUM'S
Hardware & Supply '
^. Hwy. 20 West Blountstown *
`L t AG E 7\ 1(8501 674-4559


Members of the Big River Long Beard Chapter of the National Wild Turkey Federation
donated 14 turkeys to the Calhoun-Liberty Ministry Center in Blountstown to give to
families in need this Thanksgiving. From left: Pam Joiner, Freddie Duggar (Assistant
to the Chairman of the center), Jerry Lewis (Public Relations for the Federation),
Ron Waterman, Rhonda Lewis and Tyler Stoutamire. Shown at right. is Mannie
Crump, holding a plastic bag with the federation logo 'Turkey Hunters Care,' and
Josh Crump. JOHNNY EUBANKS PHOTO



Workforce Board hosts meeting


of area service organizations


During the
holiday season
many people's
thoughts turn to
giving to others,
but fortunately
for local residents
there are a number
of organizations
that give to others
throughout the
year.
On Nov. 19, the
Chipola Regional
Work force
DevelopmentBoard
(CRWDB) hosted a
gathering of service -
organizations in
Marianna. The
gathering included
representatives
from faith-based,
community based
and governmental
entities that work to provide
services to those in need.
Richard Williams, Executive
Director of the CRWDB, said
the organization hosted the
meeting both as a way to say
thank you, a way to inventory
available services, and as a way
to help the groups get to know
one another.
"At this time of year we all
start to reflect on what we are


grateful for," Williams said.
"Within our organization we
realized we were thankful to live
in a community with so many
people- dedicated to helping
others and we wanted to give
them an opportunity to meet
each other and to say thank you
for all they do."
Each group in attendance
was able to identify themselves
and briefly describe the services


their organization
pro vided .
However, many
in attendance
said the most
important part
of the gathering
was the time they
had to talk with
other groups and
S earn about the

provide.
M a n y
commented this
was the first
time such a wide
variety ofservice
organizations had
gathered together
in this region,
and initial plans
were made for a
second meeting
in the spring.
Organizations providing
services to others that would
like to be included in the
spring meeting are encouraged
to contact Lisa Wells at the
Chipola Regional Workforce
Development Board.
Mrs. Wells can be reached
by phone at (850)718-0456 ext
101 or by email at www.lisaw@
onestopahead.com.


saw@
onestopahead.com.









Page 22 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL NOVEMBER 25, 2009


Consumers urged to be savvy while

shopping during the holiday season


TALLAHASSEE -- With the
holiday shopping season getting
underway, Florida Agriculture and
Consumer Services Commissioner
Charles H. Bronson is encouraging
consumers to shop wisely, know
their rights and keep track of
purchases.
"Whether you shop by telephone,
catalog, in retail stores or online, it
pays to be a savvy consumer,"
Bronson said. "Being smart about
shopping and exercising a little
care can be the difference between
having a happy holiday season and
a disastrous one."
Among the tips for shopping
wisely:
-- Get the best deal. Comparison
shop and research merchants'
pricing policies, as some will
match, or even beat, a competitor's
price. Where applicable, check
shipping and handling fees and
don't forget to factor those into the
cost of the item.
-- Can you get your money
back? Check out a merchant's
refund and return policy before
you buy.
-- Check delivery dates. When
shopping by phone, from a catalog
or online, find out how long it takes
for the item to be delivered. Be
sure to order merchandise early


enough to make sure that it arrives
on time.
-- Protect your privacy and
know who you are dealing with.
Provide personal information,
such as a credit card number, home
address or telephone number, only
when necessary and make sure
that you know the merchant with
whom you are dealing. If you have
never heard of the seller, check
out the company with your local
Better Business Bureau or with
the Division of Consumer Services
at 1-800-HELPFLA before you
decide to make a purchase.
-- Track your purchases. When
shopping online, keep printouts of
the web pages with details about
the transaction, including any
warranties, or return and refund
policies. When shopping by phone
or from a catalog, keep records of
your order, including the company's
name, address, telephone number,
date of your order, and item number
or description of the merchandise
you ordered.
-- Keep receipts. You might
need them to return an item or
reconcile a credit card statement.
When purchasing a gift, ask for a
separate gift receipt.
Gift cards are becoming an
increasingly popular choice for


holiday gifts as they enable the
recipient to choose whatever he
or she wants and eliminate the
guesswork about sizes, styles and
colors of merchandise.
In 2007, the Florida Legislature
enacted a law.that prohibits gift
cards from a retail store from having
an expiration date or imposing
monthly service charges, dormancy
fees or account maintenance fees.
However, those restrictions
do not apply to general-purpose
gift cards, including ones from
American Express, Discover,
MasterCard and Visa, which are
also sold at stores and honored by
establishments that accept those
forms of payment.
Therefore, consumers should
carefully examine the terms and
conditions of such cards and weigh
whatever fees, if any, they impose
against the flexibility of giving a
gift card that is widely accepted by
retailers throughout.the country.

For additional consumer
information or to file a complaint
against a business, Floridians can
visit the department's Division
of Consumer Services web site
at www.800helpfla.com or call
1-800-HELPFLA (1-800-435-
7352).


OBhTUrArYIS


ALBERT "ROSCO"
MITCHELL
QUINCY Albert
"Rosco" Mitchell, 87,
passed away Tuesday,
Nov. 17, 2009. He
graduated from Cairo
High School where he
was a member of the Syrup Makers football team.
He served his country during World War II in the
U.S. Navy aboard the Battleship USS Texas. He
married Bernice Holton on Nov. 11, 1944, who
preceded him in death. He owned and operated
Quincy Tire Co. until his retirement. He was an
avid outdoorsman and enjoyed hunting, fishing,
flying and scuba diving. He was a 60 year member
of Washington Lodge Number 2 of Free and
Accepted Masons, the Mazuq Shriners and past
president and secretary of the Gadsden Shrine
Club. He was also a member of First Presbyterian
Church and the Quincy Haredds R.O.M.E.O.
group.
He was preceded in death by his parents, Albert
and Mae Mitchell; a daughter, Burnice Elaine
Mitchell, brothers, W.H. and Wendell Mitchell;
and a sister, Myrtle Hall.
Survivors include two daughters, Dale McCall
and her husband, Mac and Cathy Conrad and her
husband, Wayne, all of Quincy; a grandson, Zack
Ray and his wife, Traci of Quincy; two step-
grandsons, Lance McCall and his wife, Devon and
Toby McCall, all of Dallax, TX; four brothers,
Hershel, Jimmy, Bobby and Preston Mitchell; and
one sister, Clara Collins.
Services were held Friday, Nov. 20 at First
Presbyterian Church in Quincy. Interment
followed in Hillcrest Cemetery in Quincy.
Memorial contributions may be made to
Shriners' Crippled Children's Fund, c/o Marzuq
Temple, P.O. Box 37130, Tallahassee, FL
32315.
Independent Funeral Home in Quincy was in
charge of the arrangements.


RUBY IRENE AYERS
ALTHA Ruby Irene Ayers, 89, passed away
Thursday, Nov. 19, 2009 at her residence. A lifelong
resident of Altha, she was a member of the Altha
United Methodist Church, an avid Elvis Presley fan,
and enjoyed working on her fish pond.
She was preceded in death by her husband, Marion
Ayers; daughter, Frances Livingston; grandson,
Bill Wheatley; brother, Mack Hanes; sister, Hazel
Williams; and two son-in-laws, Johnny Jernigan and
Jimmy Wheatley.
Survivors include one son, Gene Ayers and wife
Pat ofAltha; one daughter, Shirley Jemigan ofAltha;
six grandchildren, eight great-grandchildren, one
son-in-law, Bedford Livingston of Altha; and one
sister-in-law, Violet Hanes of Tallahassee.
Services were held Sunday, Nov. 22, 2009 at
Hall Funeral Home in Altha with Reverend Bill
Miller and Sister Martha Hyles officiating. Interment
followed in Chipola Cemetery.
Hall Funeral Home in Altha was in charge of the
arrangements.
WILLIE LEE SNEADS
BRISTOL-Willie Lee Sneads, 65, of Bristol,
passed away Saturday, Nov. 14, 2009 at Calhoun-
Liberty Hospital in Blountstown. He was born on
Aug. 25, 1945 in Wewahitchka and lived in Bristol
most of his life.
He was preceded in death
by his mother, Winnie Cooley;
three brothers, Doug, Clodis and
Cledis; and one sister, Kathrine.
Survivors include three
... daughters, Sharon Sneads Jones
and her husband, Joseph from
Bristol, Tilisha Patterson from
Albany, GA, Shelia Sneads from
Los Angeles, CA; one sister,
Rosea Lee Lane and her husband, James Lane, Sr.
from Bristol; one brother, Tommy Lee Patterson from
North Carolina; eight grandchildren, three great-
grandchildren and several nieces and nephews.
Graveside services will be held Wednesday,
Nov. 25 at 2 p.m. (CT) at the Bristol Cemetery
with Reverend Elder Delano Reed of Deliverance
Restoration Center of Marianna officiating.
Vann Funeral Home is in charge of the
arrangements.


Charles McClellan n

Funeral Home
Charles K. McClellan
Licensed Funeral Director
42 years experience
Call us Let us explain how we can
conveniently handle arrangements
in Liberty County.

Butler-Morgan/Morgan-McClellan Funeral Home
Building at 15 S. Jackson St., Quincy, 32351
0. Phone: (850) 627-7677 or 643-2277




COMEPFORD VAULT

MEMORIAL SERVICE




DPrecious Memories
"If you can't come
to us, give us a call

you.
Let us help you with a memorial of BEAUTY and
DURABILITY Serving Jackson & the Surrounding
Counties for 42 Years.
Hwy. 90 W. P.O. Box 933 Sneads, Fl 32460
Pete Comerford Owner & Operator
593-6828 1-800-369-6828 Fax 593-6888



Peavy Funeral Home

& Crematory






1 t.t.l. *4 -jA 9 ..A






Funeral Services with Dignity,
Caring and Professionalism.
Marion Peavy
A Hometown Funeral Director
You Can Trust and Depend On!

Telephone (850) 674-2266


CARING Independent
for your comfort, Funeral Home
needs & concerns. 211 E. Jefferson St., Quincy
. . . (850) 875-1529
James C. (Rusty) Black Jack W. Weller
Owner& Manager Lie. Funeral Director LOCALLY OWNED & OPERATED








NOVEMBER 25, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 23


Fall treatment for the gardeners'curse: fire ants


C by Theresa Friday,
Horticulture Extension Agent,I
Santa Rosa County

Collectively, ants are benefi-
cial insects in our environment.
Their nest-building activities re-
duce soil compaction and help to
aerate the soil. Many ant species
are omnivorous-eating just
about anything including pest
insects and other arthropods.
They can actually help to reduce
tick and mite populations in our
landscape.
However, fire ants can be a
curse to gardeners and anyone
who enjoys the outdoors. Thou-
sands of fire ants live in just
one fire ant nest. If a mound is
disturbed, hundreds of ants im-
mediately rush out, climb on
whatever disturbed them, and
sting. Multiple stings can lead to
severe and painful reactions.
So, how can you tell if your
ants are. fire ants? First, look at
the mound. The mound has no
opening in the center like most ant
mounds. Imported fire ants leave
and enter the mound through un-
derground tunnels. Next, look
at the ant. Fire ants are small,


only about
1/8 to 1/4-
inch long.
Variation in
size is a dis-
tinguishing
feature.
Many
other ant
species are
uniform in ,
size. Then, .
look at their
behavior.
They have
an aggres- -
sive nature
compared
to other ant
species. If
a mound is disturbed, usually
hundreds of fire ant workers will
swarm out and run up vertical
surfaces to sting.
According to Dan Suiter, a
Cooperative Extension ento-
mologist with the University of
Georgia College of Agricultural
and Environmental Sciences,
fire ants are easier to kill in the
fall for four main reasons.
First, they're more active.
That makes it easier to treat


them with fire ant baits. You can
use fire ant baits any time of the
year, but they're most effective
when the ants are actively forag-
ing for food.
Fire ants are most active in
spring and fall, when daytime
temperatures are between 70 and
85 degrees F.
A "bait" is a product that con-
tains slow-acting toxicants dis-
solved in oil. The oil acts as a
food source for fire ants. The
ants either carry the bait back to


FDOT seeks

input on 5-year

work program
CHIPLEY-Officials from
the Florida Department of
Transportation (FDOT) are
gearing up to hold several public
hearings on the department's
tentative five year work program.
The hearings are held throughout
the district to present and receive
input on the work program for
fiscal years July 1, 2010 through
June 30, 2015 and consider the
necessity of making changes to
the program.
The second hearing will be held
Friday, Dec. 4, from 10 a.m. until
11 a.m. in the FDOT District 3
Headquarters Design conference
room, 1074 Highway 90, Chipley.
Personnel will discuss and
receive input on projects in Bay,
Calhoun, Gulf, Jackson, Holmes
and Washington counties. The
last of three meetings will be held
in Midway, Dec: 8, to discuss
projects in other areas of the
district.
Public participation is solicited
without regard to race, color national
origin, age, sex, religion, disability
or family status. Persons who require
special accommodations under the
Americans with DisabilitiesAct (ADA)
or persons who require translations
services (free of charge) should
contact Regina Battles at (850)415-
9270 at least seven days prior to the
meeting. Written comments will be
received by the department at the
hearing and within ten (10) days
after the Public Hearing. Comments
should be addressed to: Tommy
Barfield, District Secretary, Florida
Department of Transportation,
District Three, 1074 Highway 90
East, Chipley, FL 32428.


the colony
and extract
the toxic oil
within the
mound, or
extract the
toxic oil im-
mediately
and carry it
back to the
colony in-
ternally. The
slow action'
of the toxi-
cants allows
W:n. the ants to
r feed the tox-
.1T ~ic oil to oth-
er members
of the colony
before they die. When the toxi-'
cant is fed to the queen, she ei-
ther dies or no longer produces
new workers and the colony will
eventually die.
Second, in the cooler weather
of fall, fire ants aren't too deep
in the ground. That makes
them easier to kill with a
mound-drench, granu-
lar, dust or aerosol /
contact insecti- / -'
cide. When you /


use those products, it's critical to
treat when the queen and brood
are close to the surface.
Third, in the fall, you're treat-
ing when many fire ant colonies
are very young. Fire ants mate
all year long, but they're most
actively mating in the spring.
Mated queens fly away and es-
tablish new colonies. By fall,
these colonies are well-estab-
lished but still fairly small.
Fourth, and the one thing that
makes fall the single best time
to treat fire ants, is that it's fol-
lowed by winter. Extreme cold
is tough on fire ants. This makes
baits even more effective in the
fall.
For more information on
"Imported Fire Ants in Lawns
and Turf' visit the University of
Florida publication at www.edis.
ifas.ufl.edu/lh059 or .call your
local extension office.


Get 'i auto insurance
that comes with a real Agent


U


The holidays are a busy time and we'd like to
remind our good friends and customers that
Harveys will be open on Thanksgiving Day,
Thursday, Nov. 26, from 7 a.m. until 2 p.m.
Central Time to make sure you have every-
thing you need for a bountiful family meal.








Harvey's #77 i -'
17932 Main St. Suite 6
Blountstown 674-3700


To Our Liberty Count & City of Bristol
WASTE PRO CUSTOMERS
Due to the Thanksgiving Holiday, your
Solid Waste pickup will be one day behind.






-IAPPy uIA nMI f \/IIM/M ,


LIBERTY COUNTY!

YOUR ROUTE MANAGER
YOUR ROUTE MANAGER


s~11fF


1-61a41


wi


0 I






Page 24 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL NOVEMBER 25, 2009


If you're looking for a copy of

The Calhoun-Liberty Journal

you shouldn't have

to look too far! n.. .
















The Calhoun-Liberty Journal
is delivered every Wednesday morning to news racks
in Calhoun & Liberty counties at these locations:
CALHOUN COUNTY
*The Southern Express in Blountstown; East, West & Hwy. 69N and Altha
*Parramore's Restaurant in Blountstown *Pit Stop in Blountstown
*Piggly Wiggly in Blountstown 'Connie's Kitchen in Blountstown
*The Quick Pic in Blountstown -Harvey's Grocery in Blountstown
*Clarksville General Store *Chapman's Grocery in Carr *Shelton's Store
*Smith's Grocery in Altha -Golden Pharmacy in Blountstown
*Scotts Ferry General Store -Gas Mart in Blountstown *Big Bend Bait & Tackle
LIBERTY COUNTY
*The Southern Express in Bristol & Hosford -Blackburn's Store in Hosford
*Telogia Grocery in Telogia -Crow's Citgo Hwy. 20 East -Richter's Store in Telogia
*Piggly Wiggly in Bristol -Benny's BP Station in Bristol -Busy Boy in Hosford
*Express Lane in Bristol *Apalachee Restaurant in Bristol
...and, if the racks are empty by the time you get to the store, we invite you to subscribe and
make sure you receive a copy every week! Just send us your name and mailing address,
along with a check for $18 per year, to: Journal Subscriptions, P.O. Box 536, Bristol, FL 32321.








NOVEMBER 25, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 25



905 AIfi9tr

3L~fV -1 os


As we count our blessings this Thanksgiving holiday, we realize that your
friendship is at the top of the list, and for this we are truly thankful.
From all of us to all of you go our sincere best wishes for a happy
Thanksgiving filled with the blessings of family, good friends, good
food and good fun. You deserve it!


GRIFFIN

Sand & Concrete
Ready Mix Masonry Sand Concrete Sand* Gravel Mesh Wire & Rebar
PHONE (850) 674-8664
20301 NW Evans Ave. in Blountstown
1255 Hwy. 386 in Wewa


Know someone with


an interesting pet?
Let us know and we may /
feature them in our '
Pets & People column!


.* ..* ,, .,^ ^ .
".. '.- .

-',. -. ~' Y'., i "* a* ,

.. ,--., ^ f ;- ,-,


" : .. "$. .: . <

.
1 ; ." '


, .
,,, -",. % *".


TURKEY BOWLING-Chipola College hosted the annual Turkey Bowl for students on Nov.
24. Here, bowler Tessa Ford of Bristol, flings a frozen turkey to knock down the bowling pins.
Winners received a Chipola Intramurals T-shirt.









Page 26 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL NOVEMBER 25, 2009


SLots available in
Wallace Subdivision,
site built homes only,
starting at $17,000
7749-2124 7atjonihde


ITEMS FOR SALE


Christmas tree, 9 feet tall, arti-
ficial, can be used inside or out,
$35. Call 643-5372. 11-25,12-2

Solid wood kitchen cabinets,
counter-top, stainless double sink,
in good condition, $1,200 OBO.
Call 762-8850. 11-25, 12-2


-E


WANTED:





-



I Will buy |


1,000 acres,
Reasonably

priced.
| Immediate
1 closing.
Call (850)
544-5441
or (850)




*


Treadmill, $200. Call 643-1591.
11-18,11-25
Underwater video camera with
B/W monitor, new, never used, Har-
bor freight Model 91309, 60 ft. ca-
ble, charger, battery and case, $90
OBO. Call (850) 697-8665.
11-18,11-25

Dark Cherry Eddie Bauer bassi-
net, paid $160, asking $115, used 4
weeks. Call 447-2610. 11-18, 11-25

DVD player, $20. Call 379-3966:
11-18,11-25


APPLIANCES


Oven-wall mount, $50; 2 car vacu-
ums, $50; converter for TV, $30;
house vacuum $50. Call 237-1587.
11-18,11-25
30" Magic Chef gas wall oven,
self-cleaning, with digital function
pad, $350, original price $1,200.
Call 674-1948- 11-
18,11-25



CARS


Regular XBox, has over 800
songs, one controller,.$50. Call
379-9555. 11-25, 12-2

Baby boy clothes, $1 each or
$60 for whole box, in great condi-
tion. Call 379-8176. 11-25,12-2

Entertainment center, $25;
green sofa/sleeper, $50 (both in
great condition; Pittman 98 cus-
tom paintball gun with 16" barrel,
used two times, $150. Call 643-
7710. 11-25,12-2

Toddler bed with Mickey Mouse
comforter set, brand new, slept in
once, dark wood, comforter still
has original packaging, could be
for boy or girl. Asking only $75;
also, matching Mickey Mouse ta-
ble and chair, $5. Call 643-6009.
-11-25,12-2

Rinnai LP gas heater, wall mount,
2900 btu per hour, $50. Call 674-
4610. 11-25,12-2

Executive style desk, measures
60"wx30"dx29.5"t, 7 drawers in-
cluding center drawer, $75. Call
674-5792 after 3 p.m. (CT).
11-25, 12-2

Contour core sculpting belt for
abs. Paid $225, asking $175. Call
643-6635. 11-25,12-2

EZ access aluminum wheelchair
ramp, $1,000. You take apart and
move. Call 557-1850. 11-25,12-2

Knight Kiln, several pieces to
go with it, $300; workout cross-
row made by Weider, uses rods
and folds, $75; hand and bench
weights, best offer. Call 209-8458.
11-25, 12-2

Scrubs, ladies.size small; tops,
pants, jackets all in good condi-
tion, gently used, no stains, $3
each. Call 643-8815, leave mes-
sage. 11-25, 12-2

27" Sanyo color TV, great for kids
room or playing video games. TV
is in excellent condition, $50. Call
728-8760. 11-25,12-2

Single waterbed, still in the box,
needs frame built, paid $160, ask-
ing $80; kitchen table, $60. Call
674-3264. 11-25,12-2

Two antique chairs from the early
1900s, both painted black, in good
condition, $10 each. Call 643-
3370. 11-18,11-25

Sofa $55; stove $135. Call 674-
3264. 11-18,11-25

32" Toshiba TV, about a year old,
$350. Call 643-2371. 11-18,11-25


4 Pony style rims, comes with
center caps, 4-lug, fits 1987-1993
Mustang, gray in color, comes with
tires, $250 for all, negotiable. Call
509-8636. 11-25,12-2

Set of 4 BF Goodrich tires size
P235/75R15, very good tread, has
rims to go with them, fits 90s model
Chevrolet, tires $200 w/rims $250.
Call 694-5589. 11-25,12-2



MOTORCYCLES

&AATVS


2001 Honda Shadow Ace 750,
loaded, 17K miles, very nice,
$2,900 negotiable. Call 557-
7167.
11-25, 12-2
1997 Honda 400 dirt bike, new
tires, runs and looks good, $2,200
OBO. Call 209-5270. 11-25, 12-2

2009 Honda Foreman 4-wheel-
er, 4WD, 28" Mud Lites aftermar-
ket rims, 2 1/2" lift kit, black, man-
ual shift, 78 miles only 11 hours,
$7,000. Call 272-6561. 11-25,12-2

Honda 300 4-wheeler, good con-
dition, low mileage, $1,500. Call
762-3686. 11-25,12-2

1992 Honda Goldwing motorcy-
cle, 1500 Aspen Cade, 25K miles,
fully dressed out, many extras (more
than $3,000 worth), Candy Apple
Red, $5,000. Call 643-6304.
11-18, 11-25
2006 Honda 4-wheeler 350, two
wheel drive, excellent shape, $2,600;
2005 Honda 4-wheeler 250, electric
shift, $1,900. Call 227-4881.
11-18, 11-25


HOMES & LAND


1.4 acres land with septic and well,
$20,000. Call 643-6488. 11-18,11-25

2004 Modular home, excellent
condition, 2-bdr/2-bath, all applianc-
es, ceiling fans, custom deck, new
central heat and air guaranteed 10
years. You move it. $30,000 OBO,
located in Apalachicola. Call 653-
9118 or 653-8122. 11-18,11-25

Big lot on Chipola River, located in
Calhoun County. Call 643-1514.
UFN

For Rent: 3/1.5 Mobile Home, $400
a month plus electrical, 2 RV spots
available with full hookup, $15 a night.
Located on Ochlockonee River. Call
(850) 519-4945 or (850) 510-4686.
30/BC/11-25-09


TOOLS &

EQUIPMENT


Utility shed 6'x10' high qual-
ity metal, good condition, working
lock with key, pre-wired for electric


THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL




CLASSIFITEDS

To place your ad, call 643-3333 by noon Eastern
Time on Saturday. Non-business ads run FREE for 2 weeks.


1989 Lincoln Town Car as is, $300.
Call 237-1587. 11-18,11-25

2003 Buick LeSabre, 49K miles,
full power, all electric, V-6, excellent
condition, elderly lady can't drive
anymore. Call 674-5251. 11-18,11-25


TRUCKS & SUVS


1998 Dodge SLT club cab truck,
4-door, 4-wheel drive, 360 V-8, au-
tomatic, runs great, $3,500. Call
227-4881. 11-25, 12-2

1990 Ford Areostar Minivan, ex-
tended Eddie Bauer edition, front
and rear air which needs recharg-
ing (R12), four reclining seats, rear
bench lets into bed and is remov-
able as are the two rear seats. Nice
interior, tinted glass, good tires,
low mileage, recent oil change and
alignment. Mileage for Hwy. 23
MPG, 19-20 city. Asking $2,200 but
ready to deal, give me an offer. Call
443-2422 in Bristol. 11-18,11-25

1987 single axle dump truck, works
good, $3,800. Call 762-8185.
S11-18,11-25
1988 Ford Bronco, body in sort of
rough shape, $400; 1996 Dodge
pickup, 318 automatic, cold AC,
$1,200; 1991 Mustang parts car,
fiberglass body kit and hood, will
trade for anything of equal value.
Call 227-4881. 11-18,11-25
1991 Toyota pickup, regular cab,
4WD, 4 cylinder, runs great, $2,500.
Call 643-1591. 11-18,11-25
1995 Chevy Tahoe, needs trans-
mission, $2,500 OBO. Call 209-
9608. 11-18. 11-25
1996 Dodge 1500, two wheel drive,
loaded with Dixie package; $3,500.
Call 227-4881. 11-18,11-25

AUTO ACCESSORIES









NOVEMBER 25, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 27


#STfIR-


SCOPE .

Week of
Nov. 29- Dec. 5

ARIES Mar 21/Apr 20
You are all wound up, Aries, and
may need to blow off some steam.
How about a trip to the gym, or
even a heated debate with someone?
Just don't let any tempers flare.
TAURUS -Apr 21/May 21
You have ajob to do, Taurus, but
you may not be exactly sure what
that job is. Don't worry about
losing your focus. You'll regain
it by the end of the week.
GEMINI May 22/Jun 21
Opinions are largely useful, but
this week they can alienate you
when you offer your two cents,
Gemini. You want to reinforce
your similarities to others, not
turn them against you.
CANCER Jun 22/Jul 22
Give yourself permission to enjoy
every moment this week, Cancer,
no matter what happens. You
deserve a little unbridled
satisfaction in your days.
LEO Jul 23/Aug 23
Leo, you're not likely to see others
clearly today because your percep-
tions are very jaded. It's good to
be optimistic, but don't be
foolish in your choices.
VIRGO Aug 24/Sept.22
It's not easy to keep your energy
levels up this week, Virgo. But
don't question your motivation
or apparent energy stores. You'll
muddle through somehow.
LIBRA Sept 23/Oct 23
Sometimes reaching the truth is
worth the extra effort, Libra, even
if you are afraid of what you may
discover. Gemini offers some
inspiration in your life.
SCORPIO Oct 24/Nov 22
Scorpio, you are feeling a little
out of sorts and trapped in a spell
this week. You must play detec-
tive and get to the bottom of the
"mood." Then the situation
will be managed.
SAGITTARIUS Nov 23/Dec 21
Setting a reasonable pace at work
this week enables you to accom-
plish more than you expect. Prior
to any project it helps to have all
of your tools in order.
CAPRICORN Dec 22/Jan 20
You lack the necessary clarity to
make an important financial
decision, Capricorn. Seek out
others who are knowledgeable and
can help you find the answers.
AQUARIUS Jan 21/Feb 18
Aquarius, you may get a strong
taste of inspiration this week,
Aquarius. It may almost seem like
you are floating into the clouds.
Come back to earth to put
your plans in action.
PISCES Feb 19/Mar 20
There is magic brewing in your
mind, Pisces, but others are not
clued into your thoughts. Let
your imagination run wild.
FAMOUS BIRTHDAYS
NOVEMBER 29
Jonathan Knight, Singer (41)
NOVEMBER 30
Billy Idol, Singer (54)
DECEMBER 1
Bette Midler, Actress (64)
DECEMBER.2
Nelly Furtado, Singer (31)
DECEMBER 3
Brendan Fraser, Actor (41)
DECEMBER 4
Tyra Banks, Model (36)
DECEMBER 5
Gary Allan, Singer (42)


cal, treated wood shelf and studs.
Must be moved, $750. Call 447-
0283. 11-25,12-2

Push mower 4.5 Hp Craftsman
Bogger, ex. condition, like new,
$75. Call 509-8636. 11-25,12-2

5-Hp Garden tiller, used very
little, bought new, $200 firm. Call
674-4554. 11-25,12-2

3-Hp lawn mower motor, $50;
6 horse lawn mower motor, $50;
power motor for air-compressor or
grinder, $50. Call 237-1587.
11-18,11-25
Skill saw and chop saw, $50 for
both. Call 379-3966. 11-18,11-25

55-gallon steel drums with lids,
25, $10 and up, excellent storage.
Call 592-5780. 11-18 thru 12-23


PETS/SUPPLIES


Free to a good home: English
Bullmastif/mixed and one Ameri-
can Bulldog/mixed. Call 643-2095
-or 643-2137. 11-25,12-2

Free puppies: Six weeks old, white
English bulldog mix. Call 762-8423
for more details. 11-18, 11-25
Free: Cat, Cur-dog/Black Lab mix;
two Yellow Labs. Call 237-1587.
11-18,11-25

Free: Male puppy, black with some
white, friendly, looks like Lab mix.
Was dropped off at my home. Call
447-0070. .11-18, 11-25
Five Bulldog/Lab mix puppies, 1
male and 4 females, free to good
home. Call 688-2827. 11-18,11-25


LOST/FOUND

LOST: Tritronic shock collar sys-
tem, lost on Forest Road 105 in
Bristol. Reward if found. Call Cliff
at 508-9568. 11-25,12-2

FOUND: Two female dogs, Crow's
Corner area, call to identify. Call
566-5053. 11-25,12-2

LOST: Two male hunting dogs, a
Black and Tan and a Lemon Spot-
ted Walker, last seen at Talquin
area in Hosford. Call 566-5053.
11-25,12-2

FOUND: Female, brown and
white dog off of 71N and Luke
Holland Rd., she came from the
woods. Call 237-1384 to claim.
11-25,12-2


WANTED

Someone to share rent/utilities.
Call 643-2468 or 643-6912.
11-18,11-25

Junk cars and trucks, any condition.
We pay cash. Call 762-8459 or 272-
1126 cell. UFN

CLASSIFIED deadline
is Saturday at noon.


CAMPERS

Jayco pop-up camper, 7x20,
sleeps six, kept under shed, $1,200.
Call 447-2042. 11-18,11-25



BOAT & GUNS


14' Fiberglass boat with stick
steering, 40 Hp Evinrude motor, in
excellent condition, $1,600. Call
762-8589. 11-25,12-2

2008 G3 boat, 15'11", red in color,
stick steering, trolling motor, 50
Hp Yamaha motor, good condi-
-tion, low hours, $8,500. Call 762-
3686.
11-25,12-2
Marlin semi-auto 22 rifle w/
scope, $125; Chinese 5K5 w/fold-
ing stock, laser light and scope,
muzzle brake, 30 round clip, $425;
Ruger semi-auto 22 pistol, $225.
Call 557-7167. 11-25, 12-2

12 gauge Remington 870 pump,
$225. Call 379-8410. 11-25,12-2

High Country Bow, 4 pin extreme
sight, quiver and release included,
hard cover case, $300. Call 510-
8337. 11-25, 12-2

Remington 1100 semi-auto shot
gun, 410 GA with vent rib barrel, full
choke, walnut checkered stock and
forearm, good condition, $695 OBO.
Call 443-2422 in Bristol.
11-18,11-25
380 Cal. Jimenez Arms Inc., Las
Vegas, NV compact, about'5.3 inch-
es overall, semi-auto with clip, 19
oz. $200. Call 443-2422. 11-18,11-25


Ruger Redhawk pistol,
excellent condition, $475.
2133.


.44 Mag,
Call 762-
11-18,11-25


.38 Snub nose special, made by
Colt, $475. Call 643-3272. 11-18, 11-25

PSE Boss 1 impact compound
bow, hunt ready, includes release,
$120. Call 557-7167. 11-25,12-2



YARD SALES

P CLARKSVILLE P4
Yard sale, Saturday, Nov. 27 be-
tween 7 a.m. and noon on Hwy.
20 in Clarksville, close to the BP
Station. There will be antiques and
much more. Cancel if rain. Call
643-7062.

0 BRISTOL 0
Moving sale, all must go within 2
weeks. 36" TV, antique wrought
iron rack/with several shelves,
hide-a-bed sofa, lamps, bed Liner
for 5.5 Ford truck, area rug and
other misc. items. Call 643-7955.
11-25, 12-2

Yard sale, Saturday, Nov. 27 be-
ginning at 8 a.m. at 12853 Myers
Ann St. in Bristol. Lots of clothes,
knick-knacks and much more.
Cancel if rain. Call 447-0841.
11-25, 12-2

1 BLOUNTSTOWN /
Multi-family yard sale, Saturday,
Dec. 5 from 7"a.m. until noon. Lo-
cated on Hwy. 71 N of Blountstown
just past Ashley Shiver Road. Lots
of items, baby clothes, household
items and more. Call 643-7900.


IHaF Thansgiving to our Ne6 bors
BRKLEY REALTY-* (850) 643-3289



CARSON FARMS

High quality
horse and cow
hay. Square and
round bales.
Also have
perennial peanut
hay. Delivery
available. Great
prices for
great hay!

Please call 447-2704 or 643-4747


THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL



CLTASSIFIEDS

To place your ad, call 643-3333 by noon Eastern
Time on Saturday. Non-business ads run FREE for 2 weeks.

S-,.. N


FOR RENT



utilities included. NO PETS.
Also RV for rent.
Call M-F9 a.m. to 6p.m. or
Sat. 9a.m.-12pp.m. Closedon Sunday
674-7616 or (850) 214-6203



White Boxer

PUPPIES

for Sale
3 males, 1 female
$150
762-3998 Evenings
209-1913 Anytime



FOR SALE
New 3 bed/2 bath 1325 SQ
Ft brick home under con-
struction in Altha. Lot 18 in
Wallace Subdivision. Tile
and laminate flooring, 9'
ceilings, all wood cabinets
with granite tips, city water
on paved streets.
$125,900
762-8185 evenings



Trailers for Rent
inAltha
Quiet, well
maintained park
with lawn service.
Call 762-9555
or 762-8597




POR SALE
40 acre tract in Jackson
County. Abundance of
deer with small spring
for water supply. Mar-
ketable pines, about
10 minutes from 1-10
and Walmart. *80,000,
other tracts available.
Call Elaine Gary, Blue-
Water Realty Group,
850-509-5409.
I 11-18 & 11-25-09


Lawrence
Animal Hospital

Jerry C.
Lawrence,
DVM
Hours:
Monday.- Thursday.
7 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Friday 7 a.m. to 2 p.m.
DOCTOR'S HOURS BY APPOINTMENT.
WE PROVIDE:
Boarding*
Grooming -Vac-
cinations -Yearly J,
Check-ups -Spay
and Neuter pro-
gram -plus many
other services
CALL FOR AN APPOINTMENT TODAY
43 N. Cleveland St., Quincy
Office Phone: 850627-8338


HOUSESroR SAL
ftLIBERTY COUNTY~ 8.5 acres, beautiful and back porches, gran
home site, BIG oak trees, REDUCED to tops, built in 2007,3.67
S60,000, motivated seller. $189,000.
ftHwY 67~ 4 bedroom, 2.5 bath home AORANGE~ 5 bedroom
with approx. 9 acres, this super nice many amenities, huge d
house with plenty of room, rock fire- built ins, cook house, ho
place, dinning room, GREAT kitchen, acre with garden and gr
amenities galore, pretty lot with many Price REDUCED to S 13
dogwoods, gazebo, fountain/fish. &WHITE SPRINGS ROAD
NEW LISTING at S240,000. asking 589,000, make o
AHOSFORD ~ 15792 Shadow Lane, ftFAIRCLOTH ROAD~ -3 b
2 large bedrooms, 2 baths,Jacuzti, brick house with firepla
fireplace, tile and cork floors, front S 139,000.
WE HAVE MANY OTHERS FOR SALE. GIVE US A CALL!


LE
ite counter
7 acres. Asking
s, 2.5 baths with
den, fireplace,
)use over one
rape arbor.
5,000
~ Foreclosure,
ffer.
bedroom
ce on 3 acres,






Page 28 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL NOVEMBER 25, 2009


ff~.~


Pictured above are some of the trucks that competed in Saturday evening's event and had lots of fun roaring
their engines, spinning tires and slinging lots of mud. DEBBIE DUGGAR PHOTOS

Tri-State Off Road Park annual
Turkey Run Bog-in held Saturday
Engines roaring, tires spinning, the crowd an oil change. The drivers were treated with a
cheering and lots and lots of mud flying. That drawing for them. Justin Flowers was the lucky
was the scene Saturday night at the Tri-State winner of 5 gallons of racing fuel. The other
Off Road Park for the annual Turkey Run drawing of the evening was the 'split the pot' in -
Bog-in. which the winner walked away with $91. The
Lots of drivers showed up to take their other half of the pot goes towards the Toys for
chance at winning bragging rights, a trophy Tots goal to be used in December.
adorned with a fitting Turkey on top and the The next bog-in will be Saturday, Dec. 5 with
money. gates opening at 3 p.m. (CT) and races beginning
Winners in the 39 & up class: at 5 p.m. (CT). Also, the next mud racing and
*1st place & $300: David Bowden sand drags will be on Saturday, Dec. 12 with
*2nd place & $200: Captain Chaos gates opening at 5 p.m. (CT) and the races
*3rd place & $100: Plug starting at 7 p.m. (CT). The play hole is open
*4th place & $50: David Jemison every race night for those who just want to get
Winners in the 38.5 & down class: their truck muddy and have a little bit of fun.
*1st place & $300: Captain Chaos For more information, contact Ray Goodwin
*2nd place & $200: David Bowden at (850) 447-0356 or (850) 237-2935. The park
*3rd place & $100: Tanya D is located in Clarksville, seven miles south of
*4th place & $50: TW Hwy. 20 on Hwy. 73.
Winners in the 4 & 6.Cylinder SHOWN LEFT is the turkey that topped the
1st place & $150: Justin Flowers trophies won by the drivers.
*2nd place & $100: Johnny Shadrick it


*3rd place & $75: Danielle
Rich
*4th place & $50: AJ Blake -
During intermission the crowd
was treated with lots of give-awa\s. .
Those holding a ticket from the eate
admission had the chance for one of fie
turkeys given away, a large tool set or


O


4


A:/
lip


Ii


. ": A


After a long morning of Shopping,
come see GENIA, AMANDA &, CHRISTIE for a
SPECIALLY priced pedicure and haircut!
Pedicures 18
Haircuts 0 1
Special Friday-After
Thanksgiving Hours
Open 3-6 p.m., Friday, Nov. 27 .
Burke & Co.
Hwy. 65 S. in Hoslord phone 379-3330


Vendors Movie Gallery
,'SIDEWALK SALE

Wed. Nov. 25 & Sat. Nov. 28
a n ncos Arts & crafts, purses (on
Office with TOYS FOR TOTS1 Sat.), woodworking vendors,
Ofie withOYdORaTOT Schwan's Ice cream, & more!
Come by to donate a new Sale starts at
wrapped toy. Sale sta
MOVie Gallery Specials? o pin-
11Pre-Played Rent 3 Core Movies and
(Some exclusions apply) get 2 bags Of popcorn
Bring your old games to trade-in. FREE!
20059 NW Central Ave. W Blountstown phone (850) 674-5662


Tell 'em you saw it. in
' The Calhoun-Liberty


,i.
Santa Claus is coming to

Countstown Drugs!











. Tris Tnmi


JOURNAL
0-' For advertising information,
call 643-3333 or 1-800-717-3333


I I


L





NOVEMBER 25, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 29


thanksgiving P


I Festival at


Tolar School
Lindsey Murkerson gives her cousin Taryn
Kirkland a piggyback ride (LEFT) while So-
phia Matos practices her Indian yell during )
Tolar School's annual Thanksgiving Festival -
in Bristol. Kindergarteners through second-
graders took part, having fun while learning
about the all-American holiday. Riley Rudd
(BELOW LEFT) takes aim as she tries her
skill at archery. Kids had plenty of fun trying
to beat each other in the sack race.


ABOVE: Students enjoyed donning Indian paint and headdresses they made in honor of Thanksgiving.


Parents joined their children at Tolar School last week for a special Thanksgiving lunch. School Secretary Tammy Pullam is shown at left with her daughters,
Jasper and Julianna. At right, Lena Schonveld enjoyed the company of her mom for the meal. PHOTOS COURTESY TOLAR SCHOOL









Page 30 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL NOVEMBER 25, 2009




a


NOTICE OF INTENT TO
USE UNIFORM METHOD OF
COLLECTING NON-AD
VALOREM ASSESSMENTS

The Liberty County, Florida (the
"County") hereby provides notice,
pursuant to section 197.3632(3)
(a), Florida Statutes, of its intent
to use the uniform method of col-
lecting non-ad valorem special as-
sessments to be levied within the
unincorporated area of the Coun-
ty, for the cost of providing solid
waste services commencing for
the Fiscal Year beginning on Oc-
tober 1, 2010 and continuing until
discontinued by the County. The
County will consider the adoption
of a resolution electing to use the
uniform method of collecting such
assessments authorized by sec-
tion 197.3632, Florida Statutes,
at a public hearing to be held at
7:00 p.m. on December 8, 2009 at
the 2nd Floor Courtroom, Liberty
County Courthouse, 10818 NW
SR 20, Bristol, Florida. Such res-
olution will state the need for the
levy and will contain a legal de-
scription of the boundaries of the
real property subject to the levy.
Copies of the proposed form of
resolution, which contains the le-
gal description of the real property
subject to the levy, are on file at
the County Clerk, 10818 NW SR
20, Bristol, Florida. All interested
persons are invited to attend.

In the event any person decides to
appeal any decision by the County
with respect to any matter relating
to the consideration of the resolu-
tion at the above-referenced public
hearing, a record of the proceed-
ing may be needed and in such an
event, such person may need to
ensure that a verbatim record of
the public hearing is made, which
record includes the testimony and
evidence on which the appeal is to
be based. In, accordance with the
Americans with Disabilities Act,
persons needing a special accom-
modation or an interpreter to par-
ticipate in this proceeding should
contact the County Clerk at (850)
643-2215, three (3) days prior to
the date of the hearing.

DATED this 11th day of November
2009.

By Order of:
LIBERTY COUNTY, FLORIDA

Publish in a newspaper of general
circulation during the weeks of:
November 10-16, 2009
November 17-23, 2009
November 24-30, 2009 Il-i T12-2-o9


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIR-
CUIT IN AND FOR LIBERTY- -
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION

CASE NO. 392009CA0000-3
DIVISION

BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.,
Plaintiff,


vs.

MATTHEW DEWAYNE PERKINS,


et al,
Defendants)


of the date of the Lis Pendens
must file a claim within sixty (60)
days after the sale.


WITNESS MY HAND an
of this Court on Nove
- 2009.


NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to a Final Judgement of
Mortgage Foreclosure dated No-
vember 12, 2009 and entered in
Case No. 39 2009 CA 000092 of
the Circuit Court of the SECOND
Judicial Circuit in and for LIBERTY
County, Florida wherein BANK OF
AMERICA, N.A., is the Plainiff and
MATTHEW DEWAYNE PERKINS;
THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
MATTHEW DEWAYNE PERKINS
N/K/A REBECCA PERKINS; TEN-
ANT #1 N/K/A REBECCA PER-
KINS are the Defendants, I will
sell to the highest and-best bid-
der for cash at FRONT DOOR OF
THE LIBERTY COUNTY COURT-
HOUSE at 11:00 AM, on the 16
day of February, 2010, the follow-
ing described property as set forth
in said Final Judgement:

COMMENCE AT THE SOUTH-
WEST CORNER OF ESTIFFAN-
ULGA LAKESIDE ESTATE PLAT
BOOK 1, PAGE 24, LIBERTY
COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE
RUN SOUTH 64 DEGREES 43
MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST
ALONG THE NORTHERLY
BOUNDARY OF STATE ROAD
333, 681.0 FEET TO A POINT,
THENCE NORTH 25 DEGREES
17 MINUTES 00 SECONDS,
WEST 100.31 FEET TO A POINT,
THENCE NORTH 73 DEGREES
14 MINUTES 07 SECONDS
WEST 376.02 FEET TO A POINT,
THENCE NORTH 64 DEGREES
00 MINUTES 40 SECONDS
WEST 132.0 FEET TO A POINT,
THENCE NORTH 60 DEGREES
12 MINUTES 40 SECONDS WEST
435.48 FEET, THENCE SOUTH
55 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 00
SECONDS WEST 294.02 FEET
TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING,
THENCE SOUTH 55 DEGREES
54 MINUTES 00 SECONDS
WEST 204.67 FEET TO A POINT,
THENCE NORTH 18 DEGREES
15 MINUTES 50 SECONDS
WEST 360.24 FEET TO A POINT
ON THE SOUTH BOUNDARY
OF A COUNTY ROAD, THENCE
NORTHEASTERLY ALONG A
CURVE CONCAVE TO THE LEFT
HAVING A CENTRAL ANGLE
OF 18 DEGREES 03 MINUTES
00 SECONDS AND A RADIUS
OF 306.86 FEET FOR AN ARC
DISTANCE OF 106.12 FEET TO
A POINT, THENCE SOUTH 34
DEGREES 26 MINUTES 47 SEC-
ONDS EAST 330.02 FEET TO
THE POINT OF BEGINNING.

A/K/A 8129 NW RIVER ROAD,
BRISTOL, FL 323214123

Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any,
other than the property owner as


Robert Hill
Clerk of the Circuit Cour

V. Summers
Deputy Clerk


IN THE CIRCUIT COL
THE SECOND
JUDICIAL COURT IN A
LIBERTY COUNTY, Fl
CIVIL ACTION

C
39-2009-C

PHH MORTGAGE
CORPORATION,
Plaintiff,

vs.

RICHARD L. BOYD, et;
Defendant(s).
__________


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The following positions are
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Company benefits include:

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Apply in person to:

PORTER
Construction Co., Inc.
4910 Hartsfield Road
Marianna, FL 32446
EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER


NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE


id the seal NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
mber 13, suant to a Final Judgement of
Mortgage Foreclosure dated No-
vember 12, 2009 and entered in
Case No. 39-2009-CA-000027 if
rt the Circuit Court of the SECOND
Judicial Circuit in and for LIBER-
TY County, Florida wherein PHH
MORTGAGE, CORPORATION,
is the Plaintiff and RICHARD
L. BOYD; ALLISON S. BOYD;
URT OF ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PAR-
TIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH,
tND FOR UNDER, AND AGAINST THE
LORIDA HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL
DEFENDANTS) WHO ARE NOT
KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE,
ASE NO. WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN
A-000027 PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTER-
EST AS SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVI-
SEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER
CLAIMANTS; are the Defendants,
I will sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash at FRONT DOOR
OF THE LIBERTY COUNTY
COURTHOUSE at 11:00 AM, on
al, the 19th day of January, 2010, the
following described property as
set forth in said Final Judgement:


LOT 14, BLOCK L, NEAL SUB-
DIVISION, UNIT NO. 2, AS PER
MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK A,
PAGE 2, OF THE PUBLIC RE-
CORDS OF LIBERTY COUNTY,
FLORIDA;

TOGETHER WITH THAT CER-
TAIN MOBILE HOME LOCATED
THEREON AS A FIXTURE AND
APPURTENANCE THERETO,
ID NO. 146M5780A AND ID NO.
146M5780B

A/K/A 9971 NW 3RD STREET,
BRISTOL, FL 32321

Any person claiming an interest
from the sale, if any, other than
the property owner as of the
date of the Lis Pendens must
file a claim within sixty (60) days
after the sale.

WITNESS MY HAND and seal of
this Court on November 1'3, 2009

Robert Hill
Clerk of the Circuit Court

By: Vanelle Summers
Deputy Clerk 11-25& 12-.209


JOB OPENING

The School Board of Liberty County is accepting applications
for the following position for the 2009-2010 school year. A
complete Classified Application listing three (3) profes-
sional references and Resume is required. It will need to
be submitted in the Information and Opportunities section of
the online application at the LCSB website, www.lcsbonline.
org. Once in this area, follow the "step by step" directions.
After completing application, it must be attached to the posi-
tion. Any computer with internet access may be used, i.e.
(Home, Library, One Stop Career Center, Adult School, etc.).
Those without computer access may come to the District
Administration office and complete your application. Assis-
tance will be provided, if needed. Reasonable accommoda-
tions for completing forms and interviews are available
for people with disabilities when requested in advance.
For a request for reasonable accommodations, please
contact the Office of the Superintendent.


Teacher
Allied Health Academy
Location: Liberty County High School
Full Time, Ten Month Position

MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS:
*Bachelor Science Degree from an accredited educational
institution with license or certification in any allied health oc-
cupation.
*Certified by the State of Florida in appropriate area.
*Must provide written references upon request from the Su-
perintendent.
ADDITIONAL REQUESTS:
1. Experience in hospital or other health care facility
preferred.
2. Must be self motivated with strong organizational
skills.
COMPENSATION: *31,770 *54,117
Applications will be received from:
November 18 December 3, 2009
EMPLOYMENT WIU. BE CONTINGENT UPON CLEARANCE OF RNGERPRINTS AND DRUG TEST.O
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES ARE OFFERED WITHOUT REGARD TO RACE,
RELIGION, SEX, NATIONAL ORIGIN, AGE, HANDICAP OR MARITAL STATUS.


Xb









NOVEMBER 25, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 31


Are you having

an energy crisis?
Karen Collins, MS, RD, CDN
American Institute for Cancer Research
As people everywhere complain
of needing more energy, the num-
ber of Americans consuming energy
drinks nearly doubled from 17.4 mil-
lion in 2003 to 34.5 million in 2008.
For people who frequently feel their
energy flagging, other strategies
probably offer a better solution.
Energy drinks provide caffeine
and often sugar. Studies show that
100 to 200 milligrams (mg) of caf-
feine (about 1 to 2 cups of regular
coffee) are sufficient to increase
energy and alertness. Many energy
drinks provide caffeine in this range,
but extra large portion sizes and ad-
ditional stimulant ingredients may
bring caffeine as high as 500 mg
per can or bottle. When people push
consumption beyond 250 mg per
day, they may experience headache,
sleep difficulties or increased anxi-
ety. If caffeine exceeds 1000 mg,
they may have heart palpitations.
Energy in food simply means
calories, but feeling low on energy
does not necessarily mean you need
more calories. Energy bars.typically
contain 200 to 300 calories, mostly
carbohydrate. This can be helpful in
certain sports. But for everyday life,
if you need a snack, it would be less
expensive to have a small banana
and an ounce of peanuts, with or
without a cup of coffee or tea on the
side. Some drinks are marketed in
16- to 24-ounce containers, and it's
easy to forget that the calories and
sugar listed on the label refer to an
eight-ounce serving a half or third
of the container.
As for the drinks and bars with
added guarana, taurine and ginseng,
amounts reportedly tend to be less
than amounts expected to have bio-
logical impact. However, manufac-
turers aren't required to list amounts
added. B vitamins may also be add-
ed, but though important in meta-
bolic processes to produce energy
from food, adding more B vitamins
is not some sort of tonic that makes
you feel more energetic.
Using caffeine to increase en-
ergy can end up worsening energy
problems in the long run. Caffeine
can stay in the body longer than
people realize, impairing sleep and
promoting daytime sleepiness and
low energy. It takes at least three
hours to clear even half the caffeine
from the body, and 15 to 35 hours to
eliminate virtually all of it. Certain
medications and diseases can make
clearance time even longer.
Indeed, lack of sleep is the rea-
son for many people's lack of en-
ergy. The number of Americans re-
porting less than six hours of sleep
nightly climbed to 20 percent in the
2009 Sleep in America Poll by the
National Sleep Foundation. Average
weekday sleep is now down to 6.7
hours a night. The optimal amount
for adults varies, -but is typically
seven to nine hours a night. Children
and teens need more.
If you often feel tired, talk with
your doctor so problems such as hy-
pothyroidism, depression, fibromy-
algia, chronic fatigue syndrome and
anemia can be considered.


EJ^on.-ri75M








Page 32 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL NOVEMBER 25, 2009
mI & A


Friday 7:30 a.m. ~ 6 p.m. & Saturday 8 a.m. ~ 4 p.m.


SAVE over 35* After Mail-In Rebate
Campbell Hausfeld Air $4A 99
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r"or


Any ONE Any ONE
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item $30 or less. item 50 or less. I
Valid Saturday, Valid December 1-24.
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STnUCIANIYSACEHARDWARE SnUCKlAND'S ACE YRDWIE f
10898 NW SR 20 in Bristol 10898 NW SR 20 in Br clori
Telephone 1850)643-2336 Telephone (8501643-2336
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$499 -
Stanley" InstantChange5 Utility Knife
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Small Pet Bed
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LED Twinkling Snowflake
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Single Head Spotlight Kit
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1 ., 1 1


STRICKLAND'S ACE HARDWARE
10898 NW SR 20 in Bristol- PHONE (850) 643-2336
visit our web site at www.stricklandsace.com


$1299
Step Stool
17" H. holds up
to 200 lob Rub.
ber Iread steps "
llama 800C"2E


'P


--~- __ _~ c~_~


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