Group Title: Calhoun-Liberty Journal (Bristol, Fla.).
Title: The Calhoun-Liberty journal
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00027796/00178
 Material Information
Title: The Calhoun-Liberty journal
Alternate Title: Calhoun Liberty journal
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Calhoun-Liberty Journal
Publisher: Liberty Journal, Inc.
Liberty Journal
Place of Publication: Bristol, Fla
Publication Date: November 18, 2009
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Bristol (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Liberty County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Calhoun County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Liberty -- Bristol
United States of America -- Florida -- Calhoun
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in Sept. 1991.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 11, no. 38 (Sept. 18, 1991).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00027796
Volume ID: VID00178
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AKN4565
oclc - 33425067
alephbibnum - 002046630
electronic_aleph - 003298625
electronic_oclc - 60662266
lccn - sn 95047245
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly journal (Bristol, Fla.)

Full Text



i


Meet Maddie & her special pet -
SMeet Maddie & her special pet -


a pig named Pinky........ PAGE 11


Univ of Florida History Library
PO Box 117007
Gainesville Fl 32611


The Great American Smokeout is
set for Thurs.,' Nov. 19....PAGE 12


I. _


S2 1/29/2011
1846


BHS football.............PAGE 21


Bristol man

arrested

after leading

deputies

to Liberty

County Jail
by Teresa Eubanks,
Journal Editor
"I've never had a
pursuit that ended at
the front door of the
jail," said Major Shawn
Wood of the Gadsden
County Sheriff's
Office about an usual
incident Monday night
that led to the arrest of
TAURUS BLACK Taurus Ternear Black
of Bristol.
Wood readily
admits, "The guy had bad luck."
Black was in a borrowed car when
he went to Gadsden County earlier that
evening. The vehicle was similar to one
used a short time earlier in a nearby home
invasion.
When Wood saw the Bristol man turn
onto a road that the suspects would most
likely have taken to leave the scene around
9:30 p.m., he pulled in behind him.
Wood signaled for the driver to stop and
Black pulled over near the Sycamore Fire
Dept. The car almost came to a complete
stop, but Black hit the gas and spun out,
throwing dirt back on Wood's patrol
vehicle as he took off toward the Liberty
County line.
Wood followed close behind while
radioing ahead for a Liberty County
deputy.
Traveling at speeds reaching 85 mph,

See DRIVE TO JAIL on page 8


LdV~


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includes
tax


JOURNAL


Volume 29, Number 46


-I,


ABOVE: Rivertown Church volunteer Janice Malone and Ministry Center Interim Director Cathy Brock-Revell sort out racks overflowing
with donated clothing for sale. BELOW: Wilber and Bulah Moran stock the shelves of the food pantry. TERESA EUBANKS PHOTOS



Ministry Center opens to


help those in need with


food, clothing & counseling


by Teresa Eubanks, Journal Editor
Area churches have come together to provide
nourishment for both the stomach and the soul with
this week's opening of the Calhoun-Liberty Ministry
Center in Blountstown.
Volunteers have been busy sorting and hanging up
clothing while others stock the spacious pantry with
canned goods, cereal, noodles, bread and more.
Food and clothing will be given free to those who
qualify for assistance. Everyone is invited to shop the
rows of clothes and browse through shelves of books,
household items and wall cubicles of toys. Money
raised through the thrift shop sales will be used to
replenish the food pantry.
While helping to (,. a:;t basic needs of
financially-strapped i. -, iteers will offer
spiritual support as well.
"We're trying to bring all of it into one central
place to take care of everyone's need," explains
Cathy Brock-Revell, who is the center's interim
director. "We will process clients for all kinds of
assistance."
She said the center is still formulating policy for
the services they will offer as they continue to seek
out resources. She hopes they may one day be able to
help clients with their rent and utility bills. They also
hope to eventually provide faith-based counseling for
troubled marriages and those battling addictions to


drugs or alcohol.
HOW TO QUALIFY
"We'll be serving a maximum of 20 families each
Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. until
noon CT," she says. To apply for help, applicants
need only show up with their ID and proof of income
in hand, take a number and wait their turn in a
partitioned-off room just inside the front door.


See MINISTRY CENTER continued inside on page 13


I Sheriffs Log...2


Community Calendar...4 Commentary...6, 7 News from the Pews...10


Farmer's Almanac... 1


Speak Up!...30 LCHS Volleyball...24 Schools...18, 19 Obituaries...22 Classifieds...26 & 27


8~Bla~~ma~- lba~~ gllLI~-- ------- ---LI


_J


11I


8 Birthdays... 15







Page 2 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL NOVEMBER 18, 2009

Altha woman charged

with DUI after collision


A 46-year-old
Altha woman was
charged with DUI and
DUI with property
damage following a
Nov. 7 accident that
was witnessed by the
Altha Police Chief
and an FHP Trooper.
The two lawmen
were standing in the


parking lot at the
Southern Express in
Altha around 6:30 p.m. when
they saw a red truck traveling
east on Main Street make a left
turn onto NW Broad Street, go
west in the eastbound lane and
into the path of an oncoming 1995
Ford Mustang driven by Joshua
Goodwin, 26, of Altha.
The front bumper of the 1999
Dodge Ram collided with the


front end of the
car, damaging the
car's bumper, left
headlight assembly
and fender.
No injuries were
reported.
The driver of-
the truck, Elizabeth
Ann Kaufman, got
out and staggered
backwards as Altha


Police Chief James
Baggett approached. When asked
how much she had been drinking,
she replied, "None."
Kaufman failed a field sobriety
test administered by FHP Trooper
Dallas Jones. She was then taken
into custody on a DUI charge.
She was issued citations for
careless driving and driving with
no insurance.


Intoxicated driver runs

into yard of Bristol home
A 21-year-old man from Mexico was charged
with DUI and driving without a Florida Driver's
License after he drove through a fence and into
the yard of a residence at 18895 NW County
-Road 12 in Bristol, according to a report from
the Florida Highway Patrol.
The driver, who did not speak English, was
identified as Valoriano Francisco. He was in
FVALERIANCIOF CO a borrowed 1999 Dodge registered to Arteaga
Rodriguez Ismael of Blountstown.
According to FHP Trooper Ronnie Snipes,
Francisco was backing out of a yard across from 18895 NW County
Road 12 around 7:45 p.m. Sunday. Instead of turning on the dirt road
between the two residences, he continued driving and veered south,
where he backed over a fence and hit a post at the home of Joseph
Goff.
Goff heard the noise from inside his mobile home and ran out to
find his fence torn down, saw a vehicle in his yard and realized the
driver was trying to leave.
The trooper arrived to find the driver bearing the strong odor of an
alcoholic beverage and noted that he couldn't walk without holding
on to something.
After failing a sobriety test, the driver was taken into custody. More
than two hours later, he gave a breath sample for a blood alcohol
reading with results of .231 and .230. Florida's legal limit is .08.
Property damages were estimated at $400.

Driver who rear-ended Bristol


CALHOUN COUNTY
November 9
*Joshua Sourbeck, VOCP, grand
theft with firearm, burglary while
armed, CCSO.
*Talris Terrell Brown, petty theft,
BPD.
November 11
*Avionce Gerard Brye, possession
of cocaine, possession less than 20
grams marijuana, BPD.
November 13
*Russell L. Dougherty, DUI, FHP.
*Yolanda Morales, FTA, BPD.
November 14
*Melvin Kenneth Dawson, domes-
tic battery, CCSO.
November 15
*Chad Thomas, possession of less
than 20 grams marijuana, CCSO.
November 16
*Donna Marie Reddick, exploita-
tion of an elderly person, CCSO.



Blountstown Police Dept.
Nov. 9 through Nov. 15, 2009
Citations issued:
Accidents.............. 08 Traffic Citations......
Special details (business escorts, traffic det
Business alarms.....00 Residential alarm
Com plaints........................ ............


LIBERTY COUNTY
November 12
*Theodore Black, Jr., VOP,
LCSO.

November 13
*Omar R. Martinez, serving 5
days, LC court.
*Jaret Ammons, serving 30 days,
LC court.
*Peggy Arnold, serving 90 days,
LC court.
*Michael Ammons, VOP (warrant
DUI), Leon.
*Derek Hemanes, VOCP (war-
rant), Leon.

November 15
*Valoriano Francisco, DUI, driving
with no valid driver's license, FHP.




.. Listings include name
followed by charge and
identification of arrest-
ing agency. The names
............ 05 above represent those
charged. We remind
ails) ......93 our readers that all are
s..........01 presumed innocent
...........115 until proven guilty.


WAMPY TONK


woman cited for careless driving TIIRSTYTIIITnV1:


A 21-year-old Blountstown
woman whose license had been
suspended for two years was cited
for causing a Nov. 8 accident
in front of the Dollar Store in
Altha at S.R. 71 and North Main
Street.
Eighty-seven-year-old Pearl
Lasseter of Bristol was traveling
south on S.R. 71 around 1:30 p.m.
when she was forced to come to
a complete stop after the vehicle
in front of her stopped. Moments
later, her car was hit from behind
by 21-year-old Samantha Gore,
according to a report from the
Altha Police Department.
"The driver (Gore) stated
she did not realize the vehicle
in front of her had stopped until
she was right on top of it and
then attempted to move into


the northbound lane to avoid a
collision," according to the report
from Altha Police Chief James
Baggett. Gore's vehicle collided
with the left rear of Lasseter's
car.
Evidence showed Gore was
"traveling way above the speed
limit and not paying attention,"
according to Baggett. Gore's
vehicle left 90 feet of skid marks
before slamming into Lasseter's
car, his report noted.
No injuries were reported.
When the police chief asked
Gore if she knew her license had
been suspended, she replied that
she did.
Gore was cited for driving
while license suspended or
revoked with knowledge and
careless driving.


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NOVEMBER 18, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 3


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An Altha man who
recently completed a jail
sentence in Bay County for
his part in the shooting death
of a Fountain grocery store
owner is back in Calhoun
County to face charges on a
year-old case involving the


theft of a gun.
On Sept. 8, Joshua
Sourbeck, 21, pleaded guilty
to accessory after the fact
to attempted robbery with
a firearm, according to the Bay
County Clerk's Office.
Sourbeck drove Nicholas
Tyrone Lee and Amy Beth Cucco,
also ofAltha, to Sylvia's Grocery
last year, where the owner, Vish
Patel, was shot and killed in a
robbery attempt. Sourbeck then
drove the pair to see two different
people in an attempt to sell the
gun used in the shooting.
Lee and Cucco were both
convicted of first-degree murder
and sentenced to life in prison.
Sourbeck was sentenced to
serve a year in the Bay County Jail
followed by two years community
control and two years probation.
He received 299 days credit for
his jail time.
He was transferred to the
Calhoun County Jail Nov. 9
to face charges from a 2008
burglary.
A Calhoun County couple
whose daughter was a friend of
&.


Sourbeck's reported that a .22
pump rifle with a wooden slide
had been stolen from their home
on Navajo Lane on Nov. 7, 2008.
They said Sourbeck was often at
their home and at one time had
a key.
During initial questioning,
Sourbeck denied taking the
weapon.


A week later, after Sourbeck
was in custody in Bay
County for his involvement
in the Fountain shooting, an
investigator from the Calhoun
County Sheriff's Office went
to speak with him. Sourbeck
admitted to taking the gun.
He said he entered the
home through the front door
and removed the gun from
a bedroom. He said he then
traded it to Justin Anderson in
Bay County for a CD player.
The investigator went to
Anderson's house and recovered
the gun. Anderson said that he did
not give Sourbeck a CD player in
the exchange; instead, he said he
traded an old .20-gauge shotgun
for the rifle.
Sourbeck is being held without
bond.


One arrested after off-duty

deputy sees bag of cocaine


A Blountstown man was
arrested after an off-duty deputy
pulled up next to him in a parking
lot and noticed him holding a
baggie of what appeared to be
cocaine.
On Nov. 11, the deputy was in
the Travis Wireless parking lot
just before 4 p.m. when he saw a
black male in a Yukon holding a


Man charged

with bike theft

A Blountstown man was
charged with petty theft after
a woman reported that he had
stolen a bicycle from her home
Nov. 6.
Talris Brown, 41, was arrested
three days later.
According to a report from
Blountstown Police Department,
a woman returned to her home on
Veterans Street around 8 p.m. to
find Brown sitting on her front
porch. A gray 10-speed women's
bike was in her front yard.
The woman told an officer
she went inside for about two
minutes. When she came out,
both Brown and the bike were
gone.


plastic baggie with a suspicious
substance.
Two officers from the
Blountstown Police Dept. were
called to the scene and approached
the driver, who they knew as
Avionce Brye, who was illegally
parked in the handicapped zone.
Brye, who became visibly
nervous when the officers
approached, denied that he had
anything illegal but when he was
searched, a small plastic baggie
containing a white substance
was found in his right watch
pocket. The substance field-tested
positive for cocaine.
Brye was placed under arrest
for possession of cocaine. When
asked ifhe had anything else, Brye
stated there were four more bags
of cocaine and one of marijuana
down his pants.
Five baggi'es of cocaine and
one of marijuana were collected
at the scene. Brye later gave a
taped statement that the cocaine
was his and said he had purchased
it in Bristol for $50.
In addition to the cocaine
charge, Brye was also charged
with possession of less than 20
grams of marijuana.


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Page 4 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL NOVEMBER 18, 2009


Covenant Hospice to
host 'Tree of Lights -
A Celebration of Life'
MARIANNA Covenant Hospice.
invites bereaved hospice families, as well
as community members who have endured
the loss of a loved one, to attend "Tree of
Lights -A Celebration of Life" ceremony
at 6 p.m., Thursday, Dec. 3 at Evangel
Worship Center, located at 2645 Pebble
Hill Road in Marianna.
This evening of celebration and
remembrance includes an inspirational
message, candle lighting, selected readings
and holiday music. A reception with
refreshments will immediately follow.
There is no charge to attend.
Participating in the Tree of Lights is a
meaningful way to remember or honor a
loved one. During the ceremony loved
ones will be personally recognized. We
invite the community to celebrate the
holidays with us while we remember
family and friends we have lost this year.
All donations benefit Covenant Hospice,
enabling us to continue our mission of
providing compassionate, quality care for
patients and loved ones facing end-of-life
issues.
For more information, call January
McKeithan or Jennifer Griffin at (850)
482-8520.
Applications being
accepted for the
Christmas for
Children project
It's time once again for the Calhoun
County Sheriff's Office annual Christmas
for the Children project.
Each year the Calhoun County Sheriff's
Office serves approximately 200 children
and families by providing presents and a
fun evening at the Christmas Village.
This is made possible through year long
fundraising by the Sheriff's Office staff
and by generous contributions from the
community.
Applications are now being accepted
through Dec. 4 for children 12 years old
or younger.
Applications are available at the Calhoun
County Sheriff's Office and Jail/Dispatch
and must be returned by Dec.4.
Meeting set to discuss
replacing Chipola
River Bridge on SR 20
CHIPLEY-The Florida Department of
Transportation (FDOT) will host a pub-
lic information meeting concerning pro-
posed improvements to State Road 20 at
the Chipola River Bridge.
The meeting will be held, Thursday,
Nov. 19, from 5:30 p.m. until 6:30 p.m.
at the Poplar Head Baptist Church, 19118
NW State Road 73 in Clarksville.
Proposed improvements consist of re-
placing the existing State Road 20 Bridge
over the Chipola River and reconstruction
of the roadway approaches
The Calhoun-Liberty Journal is
published each Wednesday
by the Liberty Journal Inc.,
Summers Road, P.O. Box 536,
Bristol, FL 32321.
Annual subscriptions are $18.
Periodicals postage paid at Bristol, FL
POSTMASTER. Send address corrections
to P.O. Box 536, Bnristol, FL 3232,


COMMUNITY
ALENDAR


j


* No, 25
TODAY'S MEETINGS
* Liberty Women's Club, 11 a.m.,
Thanksgiving Lunch, Anita Gouge's home in Bristol
* AA, 7 p.m., basement of Calhoun Courthouse
* Liberty Chamber of Commerce, 7:30 p.m., Apalachee Restaurant in Bristol
* Mossy Pond VFD, 7 p.m., Fire House
FRIAY NVEBE 2


Celebrate Recovery, 6 p.m.,
Rivertown Community
Church in Blountstown






ci r i l T unil)
tScofs Ferry VFD-9 a.m. (CT)


Dance, 6 12 p.m., American
Legion Hall in Blountstown





from 7:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. (CT)
Admission $2
Panhandle Pioneer Settlement
in Blountstown


Attem they Chluu ch cf
yotot c-diqce this-,SltxSu ay






TODAY'S MEETINGS
* Walk-A-Weigh Program, 9 a.m., Veterans Memorial Park Civic Center
* Altha Boy Scouts, 5:30 p.m., Altha Volunteer Fire Department
. AA, 6 p.m., Altha Community Center
* Blountstown Lions Club, 6 p.m., Apalachee Restaurant in Bristol
* Bulldog Club, 7:30 p.m., LCHS field house


TODAY'S MEETINGS
* Bristol Lions Club, 7 p.m.,
Apalachee Restaurant in Bristol
* Capital Area Community
* Blountstown Chapter #179 O.E.S.,
7 p.m., Dixie Lodge in Blountstown



nw & A7 .


THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL'
Located at 11493 NW Summers Road in Bristol
MAILING ADDRESS: P.O. Box 536, Bristol, FL 32321 0
TELEPHONE (850) 643-3333 Fax (850) 643-3334 I
EMAIL: thejournal@fairpoint.net (USPS 012367)
ADS: cljads@fairpoint.net Summers Road


TODAY'S MEETINGS Q
* Rotary Club, noon,
Calhoun-Liberty Hospital
* Weight Loss Support Group, Wu
1:30 p.m., Shelton Park Library
* Boy Scouts Troop #200, 6:30 p.m., Mormon Church in Bristol
* AA, 7 p.m., Calhoun County Old Ag Bldg. east door, in front of jail
THRSAY NVEBE 1


Big Bend Hospice
plans Service of
Remembrance
Monday, Dec. 14
The Big Bend Hospice Liberty Advisory
Council invites the community to their
annual Service of Remembrance on
Monday, Dec. 14 at 7 p.m. at Veterans
Memorial Civic Center, 10405 NW Theo
Jacobs Way in Bristol.
Big Bend Hospice's Service of
Remembrance is a non-denominational
service that brings together Liberty
County residents to honor the memories
of loved ones during this very special
time of the year. "Attending the Service
of Remembrance has become a tradition,"
said Wendy Melton, manager of the
Liberty County Big Bend Hospice team.
"The Service provides our Liberty Team
a special way to honor the memories of
the patients we have cared for in Liberty
County." Refreshments will be served
following the service.
This year's Service of Remembrance
will feature music and words of comfort
and will conclude with a special candle
lighting ceremony and passing of the
candlelight in memory of loved ones.
The Trees of Remembrance are adorned,
for a donation, with gold ribbons, porcelain
bells and angels, each bearing a personal
handwritten message, providing an
opportunity to recognize and remember
those who are close to our hearts.
Donations made go directly to providing
care, comfort and hope to Big Bend
Hospice patients and their families in
Liberty County and can be made at the
Apalachee Restaurant. Donations may
also be made the evening of the Service.
For more information contact Travia
Cohen at (850) 556-1786.

Calhoun Sr. Citizens
needs volunteers to
help deliver meals
The Calhoun County Senior Citizens
Association is in need of volunteers
to deliver Meals-on-Wheels to elderly
homebound clients. These folks are not
able to participate at the congregate meal
site and are not physically able to prepare
themselves a hot, well-balanced meal.
You are needed for only one hour a day
on Monday through Friday from 10:30-
11:30 a.m. This is a good opportunity for
you or your group to get involved with
helping the elderly in our community.
If you can spare one to five hours a
week, please call Ginger at 674-4163.



That's how many copies of
The Calhoun-Liberty Journal
were distributed last week, ensuring
plenty of coverage for your community
announcements and great response
for our business advertisers'
JOURNAL STAFF
Johnny Eubanks................Publisher:
Teresa Eubanks..................... Editor
Gina Grantham........ ........Bookkeeper!
Missy Tanner... .... ........... .Advertising
Debbie Duggar....Production AssistanIt
OFFICE HOURS. 9 am 6 p.m. M-F,
Saturday from 9 a.m. until 1 p m







NOVEMBER 18, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 5

'Calhoun Co. Chamber to host 'An

Evening with Michael Lister' Dec. 3


Work crews with the City of Blountstown are already
spreading some holiday cheer as they put up wreaths
and circle light poles with spirals of holly to mark the
season along State Road 20 in front of the court-
house. JOHNNY EUBANKS PHOTO


BLOUNTSTOWN The Calhoun County
Chamber of Commerce will host an "Evening
with Michael Lister" on December 3rd at The
Callahan Restaurant. In addition to a reading
of excerpts from Lister's latest novel, "Double
Exposure," photographs by Elam Stoltzfus and
Clyde Butcher will be on exhibit. This is the
second event in the Chamber's Artists' Series.
Lister is an acclaimed local author, who is
a native of Gulf County. He recently pledged
to donate all the profits from his new novel to
environmental protection and conservation.
"This book is a gift," Lister said. "Well, I
guess they all are, but there's something special
about this one. It's a literary love letter to this
area I so love."
The area is the Apalachicola River basin.
"Double Exposure" is set deep in the dangerous
river swamps. It's a suspenseful tale of life and
death survival.
"In the book, a wildlife photographer,
Remington James, is struggling to survive and
the odds are against him. I see the river system
the same way-fighting to survive, and I'm trying
to do my small part to make sure it does."
In "Double Exposure," one fateful fall evening,
Remington James, ventures deep into the river
swamp to try out some new equipment and check
his camera traps. While there, he comes across the
most haunting images of his life-the frame-by-
frame capture of a shocking crime. By exposing
the criminal, Remington has exposed himself
to danger, even possible extinction. Remington
must now do two things: make it to the river and
make it through the night and the odds of doing
either are slim to none.
"I'm so proud of this book," Lister said.
"And it feels so good to bring some attention
to the river and the swamps and thie endangered
species of vanishing Florida. Nothing feels better
than giving-and to give my very best in this


novel, then give the iI
profits from it to help
protect the land and
animals it honors. .L
it's indescribable." I
The Chamber's" ..
"Evening with
Michael Lister"
will be Thursday,
December 3rd
at 6 p.m. at
The Callahan
Restaurant in
Blountstown.
Tickets are $25 each, and are very
limited. Dinner is included. To purchase tickets, call,
email or stop by the Chamber office: mailto:kristy@
calhounco.org or call (850)674-4519.
For more information-on "Double Exposure"
visit www.MichaelLister.com or www.
doubleexposurebook.blogspot.com/.


' TELEPHONE -:
(850) 674-2222


Bela's Florist & Gifts

25-50% off Fall & Christmas

Home Decorations
S Call 674-4811 or 674-4455
20737 Central Ave. SE Blountstown
Located across from Wakulla Bank


PARAMOUNT HEALTHCARE



OPEN HOUSE
In honor of its opening,

ParMOUIT H6eaTHcare
will present an open house
Sunday, Nov. 29
S,"'1 3 p.m. (CT)
at 17400 NW Fifth Street,
BLOUNTSTOWN -
During the open house, (.
our home healthcare staff
will be available to answer
questions regarding the Q
home healthcare industry.
Refreshments will be served.

PHOne6 674-5455








Page 6 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL NOVEMBER 18, 2009




Fleeing Floridians


hurt state coffers


C( ox's
C ORNERs
Jerry Cox is a retired military
officerand writerwith an extensive
background in domestic and
foreign policy issues. He lives in
Okaloosa County.


Financially, the Sunshine State
is not so sunny for many people.
For the first time since WWII,
Florida's population is decreas-
ing, and so are revenues for the
state coffers. Not good.
The domino effect of the col-
lapse of the real estate market, the
Wall Street financial.fiasco, home
foreclosures and job losses has
resulted into the perfect storm-a
recession.


i


Copyrighted Material w 7

Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers

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For years, Florida has depended on the migration of retirees from
the northern states to sunny Florida for a major share of the state's
economic growth. People retired from their jobs, sold their homes,
moved to Florida arid lived out their last days on their savings, pen-
sions and Social Security checks. Now Floridians who have lost their
jobs, their homes are moving back north to live with mom and dad.
In the past, an increasing population meant more homes were
built and ad valorem taxes increased. The demand for properties ar-
tificially increased the market value of properties and ad valorem
taxes increased even more, but now with the collapse of the real
estate market, property values have decreased dramatically and so
have the flow of taxes to local and state governments. It's budget
crunch time for elected officials.
The Pew Center on the States reported that ten states are in a seri-
ous fiscal crisis. Florida is one of those states.
The report, which can be found at stateline.org, indicates that
Florida's revenue has decreased 11.5% from last year to create a
budget gap of 22.8%. Florida's home foreclosure rate is 2.72%,
which is higher than California's foreclosure rate of 2.02%. Of the
ten states in financial jeopardy, California is in the worst position
with a budget gap of 49.3%.
Florida balanced the current budget with cuts in spending, in-
creased taxes on cigarettes and various licenses. But there is next
year's budget. What to do about it?
While the focus of the Pew report was state budgets, all levels of
government have the- same problem. The federal government bor-
rows money that has and is resulting in enormous debt. State and lo-
cal governments have to balance budgets. That's a good thing when
the money is rolling in but a bad thing when the cash flow begins to
wane.
In the macro view, the U.S. is undergoing an economic resizing
relative to the international markets. In spite of our belief of Amer-
ica's exceptionality in the world community, other economic forces
shape America's future. Those forces are the emerging markets of
China and India.
As to local, state and federal budgets, we should live within our
means. That won't happen at the federal level but it will happen at
the local and state level.
I don't think it's that difficult. From the work that I do, I know
that properties artificially appreciated by leaps and bounds during
the 2003-2006 period when investors-were buying any and every-
thing. Residential subdivision developers were paying $60,000 or
more per acre for pine trees and scrub oaks. Condominium develop-
ment was in full swing with investors buying and flipping the units
for a quick buck.
Assessed values on properties increased and so did the tax base,
but now real estate values are about where they were in 2002. My
advice to local government is to go back to 2002 budgets and pro-
vide that level of service. We were all doing OK in 2002 so I think
we will be OK in 2011 on a 2002 budget. Try it.
Of course, everything gets politicized. Stimulus funds, for ex-
ample. Governor Crist accepted stimulus funds that helped bridge
the $5.9 billion shortfall in 2010 state budget.
Governor Crist is now being criticized for accepting stimulus
money. His main critic is Marco Rubio, Governor Crist's opponent
for Florida's U.S. Senate seat. I've listened to and watched Rubio's
political pitch. Rubio says that he would not have accepted the stim-
ulus money. In my opinion, Rubio is a far right, social conservative
from the fringe element of the Republican Party.
In my view, Governor Crist has done a good job. He
was correct to accept the stimulus money, which benefit-
ed Florida citizens. If elected as a senator, I think that Gov-
ernor Crist will be a good representative for Floridians.
Because of budget restraints, Americans and Floridians in par-
ticular will have to make a choice between political ideologies or
pragmatic politicians. Political ideologies do not provide goods and
services, but sensible men and women can.


How have our elected officials


really helped their constituents?


Many of my friends who
live here in the Calhoun
and Liberty County area
remember what'it was like
to live through the Great
Depression. Some say that
they were already so poor
that they really didn't no-
tice much difference. We
.are close to going through
similar times today. What
are the similarities? What
are the differences?
The similarities are that
everybody was having a hard


time. Money was hard to come by. Many com-
modities that we take for granted today either
did not exist or were rare and hard to come
by. Anyone who had a job was considered
fortunate as jobs were hard to come by also.
The big' question (and where-
in may lie the solution to today's situ-
ation) is "What are the differences?"
*It is obvious to me that self-reliance was the
number one quality of the citizens of this area
that enabled them to pull through in the man-
ner in which they did. Nobody asked "What are
'they' going to do?" Of course, today, everyone
knows "they" is the "government." Whether it
be the local, state or federal level, most of us
would rather the government kdep their nose
out of our lives because the cost is simply as-


1


tronomical when you accept
"help" from the government.
*A second difference is that
everyone pulled together and
helped each other out when
and where they could. There
was no "I got mine" attitude.
*A third huge difference
was that everyone had to, and
did, live within their budget.
There was no choice. How
extremely different from our
elected officials. How very
different from the attitude that


many Americans have today.
Credit has become the American way as we buy
everything from too many toys for Christmas and
birthdays to cars and houses that we can't afford.
Like many of our fellow Americans, we here
in this area are having a rough time. We are ex-
periencing many of the same problems the rest of
the country is. So may I remind my fellow citi-
zens of how our elected officials have "helped"?
Please recall the recent doubling of the cost
of your driver's license as well as the cost of
plates for your vehicles and trailers. Are you
having a hard time paying your bills and meet-
ing your needs? Who are you going to tax?
Remember this the next time you hear politi-
cians tugging at your heart and purse strings to
make you feel sorry for them and tell them "no"
both when they ask and at voting time as well.


-..~ -.

- ..~ - -
- - -


- -


- _


- C


The View from


Hewitt Flats
by Jim Pruette
Jim Pruette is a native of Mobile, AL and lives
in Calhoun County with his wife, Rita Smith
Pruette. They operate Granny Smith Farms
on Willard Smith Road. He is retired from the
U.S. Air Force, where he served as an avionics
technician with the Department of Defense.
Nowadays, he enjoys life as the
self-proclaimed Mayor of Hewitt Flats.
\___________/


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NOVEMBER 18, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 7


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Page 8 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL NOVEMBER 18, 2009


HOSFORD SCHOOL STUDENTS HONOR


AREA VETERANS WITH SPECIAL PROGRAM

Area veterans were
honored last week with
an early Veterans Day
program presented by
the students at Hosford
School. The young-
7, sters are shown here as
they sing and recite the
Pledge of Allegiance.
PHOTOS BY
TONY PATTERSON


DIVE TO JAILrC A i -ONTINEFROM THE FRTAGE


Black began throwing handfuls of something out the
window in the area of Askew Road and later at the
intersection of State Road 12.
Black turned south onto State Road 12 and headed
toward Bristol, where he was met by Liberty County
officers. Wood noted that within 15 minutes of calling
for assistance, "three people were out there."
As he came into Bristol on S.R. 12, Black slowed&
down. Patrol vehicles blocked him from going on to S.R.
20, forcing him to turn on Main Street, where he drove


to Pogo Street and stopped at the jail with four deputies
following him.
"He put the car in park and put his hands on his head,"
said Liberty County Deputy Jamie Shiver. When he
was pulled from the car, Black was covered in pieces
of marijuana which had apparently blown back into the
vehicle as he was trying to dispose of it while driving. "It
was all over the front of his shirt and his lap," according
to Wood.
Black was arrested on an open warrant out of Calhoun


County for sale of cocaine.
In Liberty County, he is facing charges of fleeing and
attempting to elude and possession of less than 20 grams
of marijuana as well as driving while license suspended
or revoked.
Shiver said Black had borrowed his girlfriend's car.
"He told her he was going to the store but he was up in
Gadsden County," he said.
Authorities are still seeking information on three
suspects involved in Monday's armed robbery.







NOVEMBER 18, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 9


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New Calhoun County

Christmas ornaments

are now

available
The second / K'A
ornament in a
series of Chamber
of Commerce's
Christmas ornaments
have arrived and they '
look great!
These ceramic
keepsake ornaments show
an artist's rendition of the
Panhandle Pioneer Settlement's Bailey Cabin.
The first ornament featured the historic Calhoun
County Courthouse, and those are also available.
Single ornaments are $15 each, or you may purchase
a first and second series for $25.
To take a look at the items, and purchase online
please visit www.calhounco.org/store.cfm, or visit the
Chamber office.
If several folks at your business want to purchase,
we're happy to deliver them to you. They make
wonderful gifts for those who live away, but would
treasure a reminder of home during the holidays.
They're also great teachers' gifts, a nice keepsake for
employees, or a lovely gift to new customers!


I comareous
to ote mq r etiev slln
siia m m r o s ets fo








Page' 10 THE' CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL NOVEMBER-18,'2009


COMMUNITY
THANKSGIVING
DINNER
HILLCREST BAPTIST
CHURCH -We at Hillcrest
Baptist Church would like
to invite you to our annual
Community Thanksgiving
Dinner following our 11 a.m.
worship service this Sunday,
Nov. 22.
"Every good and perfect gift is
from above..." James 1:17 Join
us in worshiping and thanking
God for all His blessings.
Our church is located 5 miles
west of Shelton's Corner on
CR 274. We look forward to
seeing you and your family this
Sunday!

CHURCH
FUNDRAISERS
CORINTH BAPTIST
CHURCH-Corinth Baptist
Church will be selling Poinsettias
this year as a fundraiser for our
new worship center. They will


MESSAGES
THANKS

The members of the Kinard
Volunteer Fire Department
extend their appreciation to all
the volunteers and supporters
who made the 2009 Halloween
Carnival fundraiser such a huge
success.
Thank you for your donations
of door prizes, cakes, supplies,
cash, advertisements and helping
hands. Without you, the Fire
Department would be unable to
handle such a large undertaking.
Thanks again, the Kinard
Volunteer Fire Department


The family of Dennis Allen
Brown would like to thank
the following people and
establishments for the support,
love and sympathy shown to our
family at the time of our brother's
return home to our Heavenly
Father.
Thanks to the Liberty County
Sheriff's Office, Adams Funeral
Home, Maria and Lupe from
the Main Street Restaurant, the
Prayer Chainers Church and most
of all, our church family from
the Blountstown Community
Church.
The Brown family, the DeCamp
family and the Shell family


PO IB OVEME80


NEWS
FROM THE

















be the large potted version and
may be pre-ordered in white or
red. The Poinsettias are $10
each. Tickets are available
from members of the church
or by calling Pastor-Michael at
447-4115.

iMi


NEW HARVEST
FELLOWSHIP ASSEMBLY
OF GOD-The New Harvest
Fellowship Assembly of God
Church will hold their Christmas
Bazaar on Saturday, Nov. 21
from 8 a.m. until 1 p.m. at 1800
N. Hwy. 71 in Wewahitchka.
This and that and baked goods
too!
For more information contact
Fay at (850) 832-7953.

COMMUNITY
APPRECIATION
CORINTH BAPTIST
CHURCH-Congratulations
and thanks to all our helpers, the
children and youth who came
and to the parents who helped
make our first Country Hoedown
a tremendous success.
There was dancing, karaoke,
snacks, a bonfire to 'roast
marshmallows and hotdogs and
of course the music videos with
all our favorite country songs.
Our youth and children are
raising money for a big Retreat
the end of March.


Sat., Nov. 28,
10 a.m. to Noon (ET),
Veterans Memorial ,-.
Train Park, Bristol

SMon., Nov. 30,
5:30 to 8 p.m. (CT),
M & B Train Depot,
Blountstown
Packages start at s8
Call 674-1004 to
Lai schedule your appointment










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NOVEMBER 18,2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 11


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Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers


PETS ANDPEOPLE


Naddie Willis and Pinky
Six-year-old Maddie Willis of Bristol has always been a lover of animals, taking after her
MeMaw, Sandra Willis. Last year all Maddie wanted for Christmas was a goat and a pig.
Santa brought her a Nigerian Dwarf Goat named Calico and a teacup piggy named Pork
Chop. Both are one year old. Nigerian Dwarf Goats are small in size and have very colorful
markings. They are very gentle, friendly and very good companions. Teacup piggies are
much smaller than a standard pig. When full grown at 2 to 3 years of age, they weigh about
25-35 pounds and are about the height of a cocker spaniel. Her animals require about the
same amount of care as a dog. Both love to eat Cheerios as a treat! They are very intel-
ligent and loving and can be litterbox trained. Porkchop loves to be petted and will roll over
On his side and let you scratch him. Recently, Maddie and her parents, Mitch and Heather
Willis, added two new baby Nigerian Dwarf Goats, Bootsy and Pepper, and a new baby
teacup piggy named Pinky. As babies, the goats are about the size of a cat. Pinky is the
smallest of the Willis Farm, weighing about 4 pounds and the size of a small puppy. "The
new animals are about 3 months old and are so much fun to have," says Heather. Maddie
enjoys going out daily and feeding all of her animals as well as bringing them in the house
to watch TV with her!

PETS AND THEIR PEOPLE iS SPONSORED BY

jS Altha Farmers Co-op, Inc. ,
We've got the feed you need to keep your animals happy and healthy'
CATTLE HORSES DOGS CATS BIRDS and more.
Altha Store Blountstown Branch Marianna Branch
Phone: (8501762-3161 Phone-1850) 673-8102 Phone: (850) 482-2416


NOVEMBER16 Ulda anner's NOVEMBERL7.18
New Moon Almanac Best days to

..L NOVEMBER 20
: ', *start projects

NOVEMBER17 1 Bestdays to harvest
St. Hugh of Lincoln aboveground crops


hl ese fall days are ideal for piece for the table. Em-
gathering large pinecones bellish with some pine
that make great winter kindling boughs and small
for the fireplace. Dip in scented pinecones, tuck in some
wax for a colorful and fragrant colorful straw flowers for
fire. With some adult supervi- Thanksgiving, or add
sion, children can drill candle-di- small gold balls and a red .
ameter holes in the length of a small ribbon for the December holidays.
birch log to make a holiday center- I nsert candles and enjoy!
---------Bj1 iiJ% n I-----


1 pound pasta
1 pound artichoke hearts,
drained and chopped
1 small red onion, chopped
i red bell pepper, chopped
1/2 cup black olives, pitted
1 small bunch fresh basil
1/2 cup crumbled feta cheese
1 small bunch fresh spinach
vinaigrette of choice
1 tablespoon olive oil
Parmesan
-WITANDW

'"".! Whe
mandd

Linc


B oil water and cook pasta. Meanwhile, com-
bine next seven ingredients and toss with
the vinaigrette. Drain pasta and toss with olive
oil. Combine -- -
salad ingredien: .Z ,
witllhthe hot pastab..
fore serving to jt I ',
wilt the greens.T rO!
with Parmesai
MAKES 6 TO 8 SERVINGS.
WISDOM FROM THE OLD FARMER'S ALMANAC
'6 there a-re three dqys cold, expect three dIll' colier.
n eating soup. hold your spoon like 6 pencil
dip away from you.
November 19. 1863, President Abraham
oln delivered the Gettysburg Address.


SOR RECIPrS, G;ABENI\(< TIPS, A\SD WEr.tR FORECASTS, VISIT:
Almanac.com


- -


]








Page 12 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL NOVEMBER 18, 2009


American Cancer Society marks


34th Great American Smokeout I'*


PANAMA CITY As the
official sponsor of birthdays,
the American Cancer Society
marks the 34th Great American
Smokeout on Nov. 19 by
encouraging smokers to use the
date to make a plan to quit, or to
plan in advance and quit smoking
that day. By doing so, smokers
will be taking an important
step towards t healthier life -,
one that can lead to reducing
cancer risk and creating more
birthdays. Researchers say that
quitting smoking can increase
life expectancy smokers who
quit at age 35 gain an average of
eight years of life expectancy;
those who quit at age 55 gain
about five years; and even long
term smokers who quit at 65 gain
three years. Smokers who want to
quit can call the American Cancer
Society Quit For Life Program
operated and managed by Free &
Clear at 1-877-U-CAN-NOW for
tobacco cessation and coaching
services that can help increase
their chances of quitting for
good.
Research shows that people
who stop smoking before age 50
can cut their risk of dying in the
next 15 years in half compared
with those who continue to
smoke. Smokers who quit also
reduce their risk of lung cancer -
ten years after quitting, the lung
cancer death rate is about half
that of a continuing smoker's.
Some of the health effects of
quitting are almost instant, too
- heart rate and blood pressure
drop 20 minutes after quitting.
"We know that quitting
smoking is tough and that most
smokers have to try several times
before quitting for good," said
Robin Blount, Chairperson of
the Relay For Life of Calhoun
and Liberty County's. "The
American Cancer Society offers
a variety of effective resources
ranging from online tips and
tools to personalized telephone
coaching by trained specialists.
We hope that smokers will use


slop



S$OKIHG


the Great American Smokeout
to map out a course of action that
will help them to quit, and in turn
to stay well and celebrate more
birthdays."
The Great American Smokeout
Web site www.cancer.org/
GreatAmericans contains user-
friendly tips and tools towards
a smoke-free life. In addition to
tip sheets and calculators, the site
also offers downloadable desktop
helpers to assist with planning to
quit and succeeding in staying
tobacco-free. The Quit Clock
allows users to pick a quit day
within 30 days, then counts down
the selected day with tips for each
day; and the Craving Stopper
helps smokers beat cravings by
offering a fun distraction.
The American Cancer Society
created the trademarked concept
for and held its first Great
American Smokeout in 1976 as
a way to inspire and encourage
smokers to quit for a day. One
million people quit smoking
for a day at the 1976 event in
California. The Great American
Smokeout encourages smokers
to commit to making a long-term
plan to quit smoking for good.
Important facts about tobacco
use:
*Tobacco use remains the


single largest preventable cause
of disease and premature death
in the U.S.
Cigarette smoking accounts
for about 443,000 premature
deaths including 49,400 in
nonsmokers.
*Thirty percent of cancer
deaths, including 87 percent
of lung cancer deaths, can be
attributed to tobacco.
*Smoking also accounts
for $193 billion in health care
expenditures and productivity
losses.
*Great progress is being made
in reducing tobacco use in the
U.S., with adult smoking rates in
2007 declining among all adults
to 19.8 percent.
About the American Cancer
Society
The American Cancer
Society combines an unyielding
passion with nearly a century
of experience to save lives and
end suffering from cancer. As a
global grassroots force of more
than three million volunteers,
we fight for every birthday
threatened by every cancer in
every community. We save lives
by helping people stay well by
preventing cancer or detecting
it early; helping people get well
by being there for them during
and after a cancer diagnosis; by
finding cures through investment
in groundbreaking discovery;
and by fighting back'by rallying
lawmakers to pass laws to
defeat cancer and by rallying
communities worldwide to join
the fight. As the nation's largest
non-governmental investor in-
cancer research, contributing
about $3.4 billion, we turn what
we know about cancer into what
we do. As a result, about 11
million people in America who
have had cancer and countless
more who have avoided it will be
celebrating birthdays this year. To
learn more about us or to get help,
call us any time, day or night, at
1-800-227-2345 or visit www.
cancer.org/.


I III III I I III III I I III IIII




11 I






COME SEE Ou
LARGE -
SELECTION
OFPANDROK
S1JEL' T i .'I I



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I1// i //11! an /1 N 11 B1 III I/i /f


Chef Vernon Tanner and Whitney Brinkley working on the evening's meal
at the Nov. 5 cooking class.

'Healthy People Program'

held; Next class Dec. 10
The Liberty County University of Florida IFAS Family Nutrition
Program and the Calhoun/Liberty County Health Department Healthy
Communities, Healthy People Program held their third healthy
cooking class for adults on Nov. 5.
With the holiday season upon us, Chef Tanner taught the class two
great recipes using leftover turkey. The first tasty recipe was a Turkey
Waldorf sandwich and the second one was a Kentucky Hot Brown
open-faced sandwich. The class enjoyed the cooking demonstration
and the hands-on learning experience.
On Dec. 10 at 5:30 p.m. (ET) we will be holding our next class at
the Veterans Memorial Civic Center. If you would like to attend the
class please come by Veterans Memorial Civic Center or the Calhoun
Extension Office to register and pay the $10 fee. This fee will help
purchase the food for the meal. The class is limited to twelve so
please register early.
If you have any questions,.please feel free to call Shellie King at
the Extension office at (850)643-2229 or Susan Chafin at the Liberty
County Health Department at (850)643-2415 ext 245.


WI

Heating &


Jim Whaley, M
SERVICE
FILTERS ANY S

(850)
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ir- Conditlonmng O
574-4777








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place to eat!











Restaurant

Hwy. 20, Bristol
PHONE 643-2264
<___________








NOVEMBER 18, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 13


MNllS Ii uVr MONTi NUEDwROM TE FROT PAG


Those who qualify will receive
food each month and vouchers to
purchase eight items in the shop
during a two-month period.
An interview will be conducted
to determine eligibility, which in
most cases will be established if
a family has $400 or less a month
after expenses.
At the same time, clients will
be given a "Spiritual Decision
Sheet" to see if they would
like counseling or for a church
member to follow up with them.
If their answer is no, it doesn't
mean they won't qualify. In fact,
notes Brock-Revell, "We might
pray for them a little harder."

HOW IT BEGAN
The idea for the center began
a few years ago with Clyde
Roberts of Bristol. Roberts, a
former pastor of Lake Mystic
Baptist Church who now serves
as Director of Missions for the
Apalachee Baptist Association,
says he has long been concerned
with "the hunger and need I see
here."
When he began efforts last
year to establish the center, things
began to fall in place. "It's really
worked out better in some ways
than I thought it would," he says.
"It looked almost impossible at
times but somehow the Lord just
worked out all the details."
Those details included finding
the right people, he says. Members
of both counties' ministerial
associations were recruited and
volunteers have followed. "Our
people are really generous. If you
show them a need and give them
a chance, it's amazing what they
can do."
Once the spacious 4,000 foot
building was secured, repairs
began. "We had to do a lot of
work on the building. Every time
we had a need for help or labor or
finances, it just happened," says
Roberts. "It just snowballed on us
and fell into place beautifully."
"We have a roster of
50 applicants approved as
volunteers," says Brock-Revell.
Thirty of those .attended an
orientation meeting Saturday
and many were on hand when the
doors opened to the public for the
first time Tuesday.


DONATIONS new pairs of men's pants, which
Most of the items are gently will sell for $3 each. He also sent
used, but there are a few brand new 60 brand new men's shirts to the
things to be found at remarkable shop.
prices in the Center's thrift shop. There are shelves of stuffed
"We've got a brand new printer animals, toy trucks and an Easy
for $10 and several other new Bake Oven. Cups, plates and
electronic items for $15 to $20," cutlery dividers are stacked up
according to Brock-Revell. in the household goods section,
A Jacksonville man who heard along with blankets and window
about the new center donated 100 blinds. On the other side of the


The Calhoun-Liberty
Ministry Center opened its
doors Tuesday morning in
Blountstown at 21754 S.R.
20 East, not far from the
Trammell Bridge.
A ribbon-cutting ceremony
is planned Saturday at
10:30 a.m. CT, followed by 4a,
refreshments.
The Ministry Center will -
be open Tuesday thru -
Friday from 9 a.m. 4 p.m.
and from 9 a.m. until noon
on Saturday. Donations
may be sent to CLMC at
P.O. Box 603, Blountstown,
FL 32424. .
For more information, call
(850) 674-1818.


TOP LEFT: Freddie Duggar straightens up
a shelf of men's pants. RIGHT: Pat Brake
and Karen Sykes find all kinds of interest-
ing items while sorting through donations.
BELOW: Volunteers' vehicles line up in
front of the new center in Blountstown on
Monday afternoon. TERESA EUBANKS PHOTOS .


shop are several lamps, a new
Canon printer still in the box and
other small electronics.
A shelf of books includes a
paperback of The Adventures of
Huckleberry Finn, a Bible and
101 Wacky Kid Jokes, along with
a couple of romance novels and
children's titles.
Monday, a cash donation made
possible the purchase of a freezer,


which will expand the foods
available to clients.
Donations have been plentiful
but there's room for much more
at the non-profit community
organization. Volunteers would
like to see more baby clothing,
especially socks, and towels on
the shelves.
"I think the need will always
be here. We'll help as many as
we can and keep going," Roberts
says, adding, "There will always
be somebody hurting."
THE BOARD & STAFF
Representatives from eight
local churches on both sides of
the Apalachicola River serve
on the Ministry Center's Board
of Directors, along with Clyde
Roberts, who is its chairman.
They include:
Vice-Chairman Charles Smith
ofFirst UnitedMethodist Church
in Blountstown
*Treasurer Hugh Black of
Cornith Baptist Church of
Hosford
*John Willis of First Baptist
Church ofAltha
*Krisi Williams ofPoplar Head
Baptist Church in Clarksville
*Sahdra Willis of the
Pentecostal-Holiness Church. in
Bristol
*Keven Yoder of Rivertown
Community Church in
Blountstown
*Jeff Gardner of Lake Mystic
Baptist Church in Bristol
*David Throckmorton of
the First Baptist Church of
Blountstown
*Interim Director Cathy Brock-
Revell
*Assistant to the Chairman
Freddie Duggar
*Secretary Robin Richards









Page 14 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL NOVEMBER 18, 2009


BHS ALTHA

9-WEEK ( HONOR ROLL


A Honor Roll
1st grade: Anna Alderman, Caleb
Bailey, Ariel Barrentine, Julie Burge,
Bettyanne Crank, Marijane Davis,
Zachery Demercurio, Alexandra Hanna,
Faith Hathaway, Sydney Helms, Dallas
Jones, Morgan Mactavish, Jayce
McLendon, Cadence Mears, Alexx
Miles, Jacob Nichols, Addison O'Bryan,
Ashleigh Rackley, Shanna Sapp, Gabriel
Short, Destiny Soto, William White,
Hunter Whitefield, Kadin Whitefield and
Gabriel Wilson.
2nd grade: Hadley Barfield, Sarah
Biswas, Karissa Detweiler, Abby Ham,
Clark Kelley, Zeb Kelley, Trayce King,
Michaela Markwalter, Dakota Recker,
Keagan Yon and Carly Young.
3rd grade: Anna Alday, James
Boatwright, Kaylee Brown, John Roberts
and William Sawyer.
4th grade: Stetson Branch, Coy
Cook, Megan Corbin, Megan Mantecon,
Madison Marshall, Robert Scott and
Harley Willis.
5th grade: Devin Adkins, Nolon
Bean, April Lynn and Collin Mears.
6th grade: Johnny Aaron and
Samantha Potter.
. 7th grade: Hunter Chason, Jennifer
Moore and Hannah Register.
8th grade: Brooke Coleman, Deana
Griswold and Porter Smith.
9th grade: Logan Cable, Aerial
Folsom, Anthony Gratz, Jesse Hall,
Kelsey Rehberg and Christina Watson.
10th grade: Wesley Chevillot and
Caleb Chew.
11th grade: Aleena McCoy.
12th grade: Kevin Alday, Kaylan
Beauchampi, Emily Brooks, Kayla
Curran, Brett Floyd, Cessna Folsom,
Kourtney Grice, Jeremy Pate and Ashley
Simco.
A/B Honor Roll
1st grade: Cara Aliffi, Wrangler
Baggett, Kerrigan Hollis, Levi Kimbrell,
Garrett Martin, Logan Martin, Braden


Mayo, Deveni Pena and Seth Williams.
2nd grade: Mallory Dalton, Kelsie
Edenfield, Bobbi Finuff, Barbara Granger,
Angel Martinez, Allyson Mears, Brooks
Ann Mears, Joseph Moore, Cheyenne
Nichols, Nikki Richards, Stone Taylor,
Joseph Vamum and Tyler Walker.
3rd grade: Kelly Ballard, Madison
Boggs, Audra Chason, Timothy Griffin,
Bethany Griswell, Madison Hathaway,
Erin Lynn, Katelyn McClure, Christina
Mitchell, Sydney Strickland and Tristan
Yon.
4th grade: Michelle Aaron, Levi
Baggett, Carlee Barfield, Graham Bruner,
Dew Carey, Garrett Lovelace, Gavin
Marston, Laureri Martin, Cain Smith,
Breanna Terry and Britni Tharp.
5th grade: Seth Alday, Kathrine
Alderman, Dalton Brazell, Morgan
Jones, Ashley Lytle, Destiny Morgan,
Kyle Potter, Kinsey Register, Kiana
Richards, Georgia Smith, Stephanie
Wriston and Hunter Young.
6th grade: Aubree Bay, Aleisa
Griffin, Claudia Griswell, Melody
Holt, Damon Maki, Alyssa McCardle,
Hannah Mills, Jesse Mills, Chelsey
Norman, Sawyer O'Bryan, Samuel
Short, Elizabeth Watson, Chasity Webb,
Hayden White, Dustin Willis and Jay
Yon. -
7th grade: Ashlyn Barfield, Cody
Barfield, Makaila Barton, Brooke Boggs,
Krista Chastain, Jamie Coleman, Summer
Farris, Rebecca Gay, Crystal Lemieux,
Nolan Musgrove and Lloyd Norman,
Austin Pierson, Claire Price, Christopher
Sale, Mary Sewell, Logan Sweares and
Breanna Walker.
8th grade: Kevin Dean, Brittany
Graham, Morgan Lewis, Mackenzie
May, Carly Schwartz, Allie Stripling,
Dina Vaughn, Brina Yand, Brianna Yon
and Nicholas Young.
9th grade: Colby Barrentine,
Christalyn Castleberry, Lynn Kearce,
Madelynn Lytle, Kaylee McCalvin,
Drew McPheters, Joshua Morris, Harley
Smith, Albert Varnum, Ryan Wood and
Trevor Wriston.


10th grade: Katelynn Ballard, Ricky
Boozer, Marissa Coleman, Kristin Cook,
Alicia Griffin, Summer Hand, Cortney
Harris, Charles Hill, Tyler Johnson,
Tyler McClellan, Samantha Nichols,
Brittany Pate, William Rogers, Brittany
Snively, Ashley Stone, Angela Waldron
and Kimberly Wiltse.
11th grade: Raven Griffin, Jake
Hall, Tyler McCoy, Kala Sewell, Sharlyn
Marie Smith and Terry Willey.
12th grade: Albert Blackburn,
Megan Branch, Blake Chason, Chelsea
DeBerry, Ethan Ellis, Kayla Hires, Loni
Johnson, Stephen Lee, Tiffany White and
RebekahWiltse.


Principal Duane Barber is pleased
to announce the BHS Honor Rollfor the
first nine weeks.
A Honor Roll
9th grade: Kelly Dunn, Jordan
Hatcher, Kristen Jenkins, Hayden
Jeppson, Casey Johnson, Randa McCroan,
Courtney McFarland, Caleb Mills, Cody
Morrow, Michael Owens, Brandon
Purvis, Bre Pybus, Hammadah Talib,
Camilla Taylor, Caroline Tomlinson, and
Gordon Yoder.
10th grade: Sarah Barton, Christopher
Byrne, Megan Brown, Karissa Flowers,
Shayla Chason, Kaley McDonald,
Brittany Norris and Caitlyn Stewart.
11th grade: Cherie Baggett, Shayn
Baggett, Junicia Baker, Cody Baldwin,
Taylor Brantley-Curl, Tasheana Brown,
Morgan Davis, Stewart Herndon, Eric
Jones, David Leonard, Kate McFarland,
Kristen Peacock, Harlea Perdue, Travis
Pittman and Zach Whitfield.
12th grade: Ashley Adams, Stanley
Andrews, Colleen Barbee, Jessica Collier,
Jessie Davis, Kevin Gutierrez, Cody
Paquette and Allison Wroblewski.
A/B Honor Roll
9th grade: Seth Alderman, Ashley
Alexander, Rachelle Basquez, Karah
Beaver, Lauren Blackburn, Brittney


Make & take workshop planned Dec. 3


Spending time in the kitchen
is a delight for many during the
holidays. This year you might
enjoy taking time to create gifts
from the kitchen for family and
friends on your shopping list.
The University of Florida,
Liberty County Extension Service
will be offering a Make and


Take workshop, "Gifts from the registration fee is required by
Kitchen", Thursday, Dec. 3 at 6 Wednesday, Nov. 25 in order to
p.m. in Veteran's Memorial Civic save yourself a spot in the class.
Center. Please come by the Liberty
Some recipes will be County Extension Office or call
demonstrated, some you will 643-2229 for further information.
make and take with you. Many What a great way to get ready for
samples will be available for the holidays. From our kitchen
participants to taste. A $10 to yours.


Thanksgiving decorations workshop set

Saturday, Nov. 21 at Gadsden Arts Center
This Thanksgiving, dress up historic buildings, along with from Tallahassee City Limits
your table with art made by you Miss Helen's Espresso Caf6 Admission is $1 (members anc
and your children! Saturday, Nov. D'art. Group tours are available children admitted free). Galler
21, from 1-3 p.m. The Gadsden free of charge, call (850) 875- and gift shop hours are Tuesda:
Arts Center invites you and 4866 to make your reservation, through Saturday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m
your children or grandchildren The Gadsden Arts Center is and Sunday, 1-5 p.m. Hours fo
to enjoy a Thanksgiving table located on Quincy's historic Miss Helen's Espresso Caf6 D'ar
decorations family art workshop. Courthouse Square at 13 N. and the Artists Guild Co-op ar


Create place mats and turkey
table toppers together and add
that personal touch to your family
celebration. The cost is $5 per
child with materials provided.
To register call: 875-4866. Visit
www.gadsdenarts.org for more
information.
The GadsdenArts Centerworks
to improve the quality of life in
the region through cultural, social,
and educational opportunities.
Fine art exhibitions, classes for
adults and children, cultural
events, summer art camps, a gift
shop, and an artists' co-op are
housed in the Center's beautiful


Madison St., just 10 miles


S.
d
y
y
i.
r
Ct
e


Monday-Saturday 8 a.m.-5 p.m.


Brown, Jacob Brown, Daniel Coburn,
Harrison Coley, Stedman Dawson,
Susan Gates, Jordan Griffin, Chance
Harris, Emily Hester, Ebony Jackson,-
Elizabeth Jerkins, Courtney Lairson,
Marysa Lee, Katie Malone, Staci Mayo,
Marisa Melvin, William Nowling,
Jacquelyn O'Neal, Ashley Oxendine,
Savannah Pitts, Shannon Pitts, Ally
Richards, Roxannah Roney, Reagine
Simmons, Zach Vamum, Chelsey Weiler,
Wesley Whitfield, Alexis Widner, Andre
Wielichowski, Kassandra Wood and
Justin Woods.
10th grade: Roger Abbott, Tiffany
Abbott,. Destiny Barbato, Kelsey
Bontrager, Tabatha Bramblett, Darryl
Brunson, Amber Burch, Shaquala Butler,
Emmerial Deveaux, Matthew Digsby,
Jose Duran, Chaz' Fain, Geraldine
Gutierrez, Cassandra Hires, Brooklynn
Hunt, Patrice Jackson, Heidi Jeppson,
William Keel, Megan Layfield, Brantley
Lee, Justin Lewis, Jasmine Martinez,
Ryan McIntyre, Kristyn Morris, Samantha
Morris, Patrick Pitts, Nilsa Prowant,
Angel Sapp, Seth Scheuermann, Melanie
Smith, Trenton Smith, Joseph Strong,
Jordan Sweinhart, Anthony Williams,
Trenten Wise, Krystal Yon and Donald
Young.


11th grade: Chelsea Baker, Charles
Buggs, Jr., Miranda Cain, Kelsey
Couch, Tyler Daniels, Gabriel Dawson,
Eurica Engram, Montoya Garrett,
Candice Griffin, DeeAnna Grimes,
Dillon Guilford, Caroline Johnson,
Jahnice Jones, Rufus Lee, Amanda
Lunsford, Ivy Martin, Sawyer Maxwell,
James McClellan, Lacy McLean
Paul Mosley, Makynzie O'Bryan,
Rebecca Pitts, Jacy Richards, James
Roney, Dillon Shinberger, Joseph Shiver,
Ann Marie Silcox, Alex Smith, Cameron
Smith, Karis Smith, Kayla Smith, Hayley
Sumner, Warren Tanner, China Williams,
Selena Williams and Cassandra Woods.
12th grade: Tarak Amin, Camrneica
Baker,.Virginiia Baker, Cory Baldwin,
Koneyshia Clark, Lesa Corlett, Aaron
Daniels, Alex Deason, Monique Dixon,'
Lavasyette Donaldson, Kelby Durham,
Treazure Engram, Erin Fowler, Hira
Farooqi, Blake Garrett, Kristi Grumbling,
Blake Hancock, Jeremiah Hardeit,
Jason Higgins, Darren Huff, John
Jourdan, Anna Kelley, Rachael King,
Michael Leonard, Marcus Martin, Tyler
McClellan, Jason Money, Tyler Prowant,
Quincy'Segers, Kayla Shuler, Alison
Slongo, Bria Snowden, Laura Stoltzfus
and Maria Trejo.


Iling searching sharing playing listening
reserving blogging tweeting posting watch

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NOVEMBER 18, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 15


MITCHELL
DEVON KEVER
Mitchell Devon Kever
celebrated his 14th birthday
on Nov. 10. He is the son of
Jeanne Shell Kever and Matt
Kever. His grandparents are
Jim and Patty Shell. Mitchell
attends Tolar Middle School
and enjoys riding his go-kart,
playing the computer, hunting
with his Uncle Stacy and
annoying his sister, Mariah
and spoiling his baby brother,
Alexander.


REAGAN ROBERTS
Reagan Roberts will celebrate
her third birthday on Nov. 19
with a 'My Little Pony' party at
Sam Adkins Park with family
and friends. She is the daughter
of Ridky and Janice Roberts of
Altha. Her grandparents are
Curtis and Cindy Grantham
of Altha and Alvin and Janis
Roberts of Marianna. Her
great-grandparents are Lois
Cole of Altha and Charles
and Jewell Benefield of Grand
Ridge. Reagan loves playing
with her big "Bubba," Austin,
and going to visit her MeMaw
and PawPaw.


RIELLY
NESMITH
Rielly NeSmith will celebrate
her 16th birthday on Nov.
18. She is the daughter of
James and Julie NeSmith of
Bristol. Her grandparents are
Joyce and the late Ralph Aiello
and Bert and the late Mona
McIntosh, all of Tallahassee.
Rielly loves hanging out with
her sisters, Marissa and
Gretchen and spending time
with friends and family.


MADISON
DIANNA SMITH
Madison Dianna Smith
celebrated her second birthday
on Oct. 9. She is the daughter
of Miranda and Casey Smith
of Altha. Her grandparents
are June and Allen Pitts of
Altha, Moe Pierce and Diana
McIntyre of Blountstown and
Richard and Sandra Ward of
Marianna. Madison enjoys
playing with her babies,
dressing up and playing with
her brother.


BRANDEN GARNER
Branden Garner will celebrate
his 10th birthday on Nov. 20.
He is the son of William and
Jennifer Garner of Bristol. His
grandparents are David and
Linda Goethe of Rock Bluff,
Mike Garner of Arkansas and
Karen and David Sallisky of Ft.
Myers. His great-grandparents
are Hazel Harrington of Bristol
and Paul Pletcher of St. Marks.
Branden enjoys hanging out
with friends, riding his bike and
playing video games. -


WEDDINGS


Yon, Godwin plan Nov. 20 wedding


VpSTORK REPORT -
AUBRYNN JOY MCLEMORE
Tranum and Winter McLemore are proud to announce the birth
of their daughter, Aubrynn Joy McLemore, born on Oct. 2, 2009
in Tallahassee. She weighed 7 lbs. and 4 oz. and measured
21 inches long. Maternal grandparents are Edwin and Tina
Goodman of Bristol. Paternal grandparents are Charles Mayhann
and Penny McLemore of Wewahitchka. She was welcomed home
by her big sisters, Autumn Grace and AubriAna Faith.


Party Blasters, LLC
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Wyoma Durden of Sneads and
Autumn, Shane and Peyton Yon
proudly announce the engagement
and upcoming marriage of her
'daughter and their mother, Brandee
Yon to Brian Godwin .of Quincy.
Brandee is the granddaughter of
the late Hinton Hatcher and Jeannette
Barber of Chattahoochee. She is
currently employed at Florida State
Hospital.
Brian is the son of John and Alice
Godwin of Quincy and the grandson
of the late Mr. and Mrs. Walter
Edenfield of Grand Ridge and Mr.
and Mrs. Harold Shepard of Orange.
He is currently employed at Barnes
Equipment Co. in Quincy.
The marriage will be Nov. 20 at
Gadsden County Courthouse at 1
p.m. There will be a brief reception
at the lome of the groom's parents in


Quincy from 3 to 5 p.m.
The couple plan a weekend getaway
Island. They will reside in Quincy.


otl


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at St. George


Huff, Pitts

married

on Oct. 9
The parents and children of
Randall Pitts and Traci Huff
would like to congratulate
them on their wedding held
on Oct. 9.
The bride is the daughter of
Sharon Huff and the mother
of Tylor, Darren and Kelsey
Huff.
The groom is the son of
Geneva Pitts and the father
of Dustyn and Austin Pitts,
Amanda McClendon and
Heather Meritt.


m:BIRTH DAYS


r


on and
Heather Meritt.


F3:
~L- ?~l~i .
I : -


mc::BIRTH DAYS


-'


tKly- -^W^ B^U': at ' ^ *'^ *
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Page 16 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL NOVEMBER 18, 2009


FALL RAMBLINGS:


A season for everything wild


Snowbirds migrating to
Florida might be the most
obvious signs of the onset
of fall for some full-time
residents of the state, but
wildlife is also keenly reactive
to the accompanying seasonal
changes that include shorter
days and cooler weather. We've
written before about cold fronts
and their effects on migratory
birds, but almost all wildlife
responds to fall seasonal
changes, though sometimes
in dissimilar fashion. So do
people.
As for birds, Neotropical
migrants are setting up shop
locally for the winter or fueling
up for a longer trip to the
Caribbean or South America.
Local bird feeders are being
visited by many species, and
increased numbers of ducks,
other migratory waterfowl and
wading birds dot our large lakes,
rivers, beaches and freshwater
ponds and tidal marshes.
As for birds of prey, northern
harriers can be seen actively
gliding over marsh areas, and
Cooper's hawks will be on
the prowl for the new feeding
opportunities brought on by the
vast migration of smaller bird
species into Florida. Eagles are
engaged in spectacular aerial
courtships, while their osprey
cousins rebuild nests, high on
a wide variety of naked perches
close to their fishing sites.
Not surprisingly, people
react to these fall migrations
too, by putting out backyard
feeders to attract birds. But
don't be surprised if your
backyard bird feeder creates an
ambush point for birds of prey
like Cooper's hawks. That's
Mother Nature -- sort of.
Bird feeders also can create
health problems for migrating
birds, so don't forget to clean


N gI On the other hand, mammals
*s Z are quite active during the fall,
see it and that includes the Florida
by Rodneyblack bear.
Barreto Although black bears don't
Chapman hibernate in Florida, they
for the prepare for it by entering
Florida Fish, a period of activity in the
and Wldlife fall, *called hyperphagia.
Conservation Hyperphagia is a behavior
Commission in all black bears that causes
them to feed at twice the
your bird feeders regularly normal daily rate they need to
with a 10-precent solution of maintain themselves.
chlorine bleach to help prevent This behavior is likely the
the spread of disease. We result of a gene that causes
owe it to these tiny migrating bears to put on weight in
birds, some having survived a preparation for a hibernation
grueling 2,000-mile journey period that in Florida, never
punctuated by bad weather and comes. Here, the caution to
other life-threatening issues, residents living in bear country
not to let them to become is to secure all trash and pet
victims of reckless human food in places and in ways
kindness by feeding them in that cannot attract a bear.
unsanitary conditions. Appreciating wildlife from
To top off the aerobatic a distance beats appreciating
bird festival, majestic sandhill it from inside your lanai or
cranes and white pelicans garage, especially if it's a
add to the variety of air show bear.
performers taking up winter Deer, hogs and squirrels
residence. are feeding actively, and of
Remember, there are good course, that signals the onset
reasons not to feed either of of hunting season.
these species, neither of which Hunters were the first
benefit from the practice. conservationists, and like all
Deliberately feeding pelicans conservationists, hunters have
at fish-cleaning stations is a vested interest in seeing
illegal. Feeding sandhill cranes that all wildlife, whether it
anywhere is illegal. is hunted or not, continues to
As for reptiles, including proliferate. Obeying the letter
native snakes, alligators, turtles -and the intent of the law, and
and a variety of other cold- insisting your hunting partners
blooded animals, the season do the same, is a great starting
for high activity is winding place from which to build an
down. Just don't forget that appreciation of all wildlife.
though the metabolic rates of Be you a snowbird, bird
cold-blooded animals decrease watcher, hunter, all around
with temperature, alligators are nature lover, pet owner or just
still capable of acting as apex somebody who appreciates
predators, and all cautions living in the Sunshine State,
in the FWC's "Living With fall is a time of thanksgiving
Alligators" brochure, need to and of wildlife.
be observed with due respect. Enjoy!


Big Bend Scenic Byway


earns national designation

APALACHICOLA -- The U.S. Department of Transportation Federal Highway Administration
announced the addition of the Big Bend Scenic Byway to the collection of America's Byways.
The coastal route along US Highway 98 in Franklin County and the forest trails through Wakulla,
and Leon Counties link Florida's Gulf Coast with the capital city Tallahassee.
The National Scenic Byway program was established to help recognize, preserve and enhance
selected roads throughout the United States. There are currently 125 such designated Byways in
44 states. The program awards National designation based on the road's important scenic, natural,
historical, cultural, archaeological or recreational qualities.
Pam Portwood, Program Coordinator said the "Big Bend Scenic Byway features over 200
miles of forests, wildlife, historic forts, battlegrounds, museums, beaches, fishing villages, historic
towns and rural communities."
Information including maps, driving directions, and recommended stops along The Big Bend
Scenic Byway can be found at http://www.floridabigbendscenicbyway.org/.


CANOEIST.





WITH STOP


Seven weeks and four-hundred-something miles a
I put my canoe named Aoipheus into the Chattahooc
River. It was swollen and muddy brown from three s
days of rains. Now it has brought me to Bristol for a b
layover.
lMy name's David Hanson. Earlier this summer I
cided to paddle the entire length of the Chattahooc
and Apalachicola Rivers. I grew up in Atlanta and I
a connection to this river, though I'd never done m
than jump in it from a high rock near my house. Tli
as a writer for a magazine based in Birmingham. Al
went to Apalachicola, FL and wrote a story on the to
-I met the oystermen and tonged with them one mc
ing. I learned how that same water I jumped into on
'Hooch near Atlanta flows into this bay and is the rea
why Apalachicola Bay is such an important and uni'
marine sanctuary.
I liked that 500-mile-long connection and, since I
a freelance wr iter and have time to explore. I decide(
float the w hole thing this fall. I'd meet people, see
ery inch of the river, and have a grand adventure. sor
thing we all need every once in a while.
I've seen the good, the bad, and the ugly. Pretty mi
w hat you'd expect from a long, slowjourney full of qu
tions, a camera, and an appetite for local flavor. I've sI
on islands, in woods hidden from suburban cul-de-sE
in campgrounds. at boat ramps, two motels, one RV
a barn, and in the guest rooms of people's homes. I
seen deer, coyote, hog, fox, alligator,, snakes, thousai
of buzzards, dozens of eagles, osprey, hawk, heron..
even a river otter. Maybe I'll see a beat in,the Ap

An ongoing account of David's journey c







NOVEMBER 18, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 17


David Hanson is
rJ










photos taken






by his brother,
Michael Hanson.





SHARES HIS RIVER JOURNEY




'IN BRISTOL


go, chicola National Forest. Fve taught students about after r
hee quality and protecting our rivers. Ive been coon hunting. 4
)lid eaten fresh fried catfish. wild hog barbecue, drank moon-
rief shine, fed cattle, nearly been flooded by rising water,
stood on trash piles the size of pools, and slept through
de- monsoon ramns.
lee But the characters I've met over 400+ mnile; would d
'eel make Mark Twain jealous. And the hospitality, curiosity,
ore and genuine enthusiasm for my adventure and for the
en. general sense of adventure has been the most rewarding
I gift from this river. In Bristol alone. it only took three
vn. minutes at the landing to have two different [ocals offer-
rn- ing a place for me to sleep.'
he I took them up on it. By staying with Sara Alrnm
on one night and Johnny and Linda Worthington another,
ue I've had the opportunity to not only share their compa-
nv. but I've been able to walk through Bristol and get to
am know this town.
to I ate eggs and an enormous biscuit at the Apalachee
Restaurant. I attended a service at the Bri-stol Pentacos-
ae- tal Church, and I photographed Aaron Everett and his
children before Sunday school at Evangelist Davis' Mlir-
ch acle of God Church. I photographed the rixer from the
es- highway bridge at sunset. All these moments and people
ept would have passed bN me, hidden behind the trees and
.cs, swamp bordenng the ri\ er had I not been extended such
.in a welcome at the Bristol boat ramp.
ve This river and its people are magical and worth preser-
ids ation and stewardship. I hope it can remain a place that
Ind welcomes a sense of adventure and discovery for future David Hanson adjusts the name on his boat, Morpheus, as he gets ready to put in
a- generations. at the Bristol Boat Landing Monday morning to resume his river adventure.
da.- generations.
TERESA EUBANKS PHOTO
an be found http/ /chattahoochee.wordpress.com










Page 18 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL NOVEMBER 18,2009

1 st Annual 'Hoops for Hope' takin' it
_BLOUNTSTOWN HIGH SCHOOL to the court for a cure Jan. 15, 2010


LEFT: R.L. Pitts and
his family after the
medal presentation.
Back row, L-R:
Tim Clemons,
Lee Ratliff, Norma
King-Gregg and
R.L. Pitts; middle
row: Peggy Frith,
Amanda Hope,
Beth Roberts,
June Clemons and
Dakota Varnum;
front row: Dan
Clemons, Jacob
Ratliff, Mary Rollins
and Jeanette Hall.


em .. . mas.man"""""

R.L. Pitts honored at Veterans program Nov. 11


by Trent Smith
For months, our BHS FFA officers have been working
on our BHS Veterans Day Program. As with any event
of this kind, it was very special to all who attended. This
year's Veterans Day Program possessed an even greater
touching ambiance. On Wednesday, Nov. 11, Colonel
Logan Barbee and Lt. Colonel Danny Hassig joined us
in our program by presenting a very prestigious and well
deserved medal to Mr. R.L. Pitts. He earned a Purple
Heart from -his duties in the Korean War. Due to lost

To cheer, or not to cheer? That is
something that Mrs. Kristy Baldwin
never questions. With a full plate
as an English teacher, a mother to
be, and the cheerleading coach, she
manages to keep a smile on her face
and always has a positive, relaxed
attitude.
Mrs. Kristy Baldwin is married to
the oh-so-handsome-wacky-and-crazy
Triniti Baldwin, a native of Blountstown.
Theylare waiting on the arrival of their
baby girl, Sofia Isabella. The Baldwins
recently moved from Tallahassee to
Chipley with their two dogs, a Golden
Retriever named Cooper and a Chihuahua
named Winston. They wanted to be closer
to their families when Sofia arrives. Bom rn
in Milton, she is one of five children. She
has three brothers and one sister. She also
has one nephew and four nieces.
Mrs. Baldwin graduated from BHS Sen
Graceville High School and then moved teacher, Kr
on to Chipola College and from there
went to Florida State University. She
has been teaching for three years. Before she came


files when he was seriously injured, the presentation of
this high honor was prolonged by many years.
On behalf of FFA, we were more than honored to host
this presentation. Immediately following the program,
the visiting veterans and their families joined us in our
library for a short reception where this photo was taken
of Mr. Pitts and his family, shown above.
Thank you again to all who attended and to each and
every veteran for the sacrifices they have made for our
country.

to Blountstown Highi School,
she was a teacher at Golson
Elementary School in Marianna.
This is her second year here at
BHS where she teaches Senior
English.
To relax, she likes to curl up
on the couch and watch her favorite
T.V. show, Criminal Minds, or read
her favorite book, Great Expectations.
While relaxing, she enjoys her favorite
snack, chocolate chip cookies, baked
S by her sweet husband. She loves
to exercise, especially running and
weight-lifting. She enjoys all types of
music, but country is her favorite.
On FSU game days you can find
Mrs. Baldwin and her family heading to
the game in her little white Scion, a.k.a.
the "matchbox". There is nothing that
she loves more than spending time with
ior English her family and friends and supporting
isty Baldwin the FSU Seminoles.
Mrs. Baldwin is a very interesting
teacher. We are very happy to have her
e as a part of our Blountstown High School Family.


---- --- -- -\


I


SGA News: Canned food drive continues
and Toys for Tots begins Nov. 30
by Laura Stoltzfus
Blountstown High School is currently holding a canned food drive to
benefit members of the community. If every student brings in just one can,
we will'have over 400. Our school-wide goal is to bring in 431 cans and
the drive ends Thursday. Whichever first period has the most cans will get
a special prize!
We, will also be holding a Toys for Tots drive from Nov. 30 to Dec. -16.
The toys will be donated.to children who might not otherwise receive any
gifts. If a student brings in a toy or toys worth more than $5, he/she will get
a homework pass redeemable in most classes.
Both of these drives tremendously help a variety of people in our
community, so please take the time to lend a hand.

Max Herndon recipient of FL Academic Top
Scholar Award for Calhoun County Schools
Superintendent of Schools Tommy
McC lellan. is proud to announce that Max
Hcrndon is the recipient of the Florida
Academic Top Scholar Award for the Calhoun
.Count\ Schools.
SOne Florida Academic Scholar award
rec ipieni in each district is designated as the
% academic Top Scholar award recipient. The
? Academic Top Scholar receives funds for
college ruiion as established by the Florida
Legislature in the General Appropriations
Act in addition to the Florida Academic
Scholars Award. Max is a 2009 graduate of
Blountstown High School. He is the son of
Mark and Beth Herndon. Max is currently
Max Herndon attending Chipola College.


Pictured is the cast and crew of this year's drama. In the back, from left: M[
Director, Tyler McCoy, Samantha Scott and Kevin Alday. Middle row: Da
Summer Hand, Brittney Pate and Katelynn Ballard. Front row: Terrance
Drama department performs 'An Evening of S
by Brittney Pate
Last Friday the Altha School Drama Department presented "An I
Scenes" in the gym. The production featured scenes from dramas,
monologues and poems. Scenes from "Romeo and Juliet", "I'
"Stuntman", "PBS Plus" and "A Few Good Men" were included


ALTHA WILDCATS

Advisory Council Altha's
meets Nov. 19 for the
There will be a School Advisory TheWer
Council meeting on Thursday, Nov. program,
19 at 5 p.m. in the Media Center. with the
Anyone is welcome to attend. celebrates
Nation's to

Thanksgiving in and out
eligible for
lunch Nov. 19 exhibit ex
Thanksgiving lunch will be served athletics
on Nov. 19. All parents who would leadership
like to eat with their child should Wendy's I
contact the office at 762-3121 to Emily Bro
make reservations. Reservations Emily i
should be made by Wednesday, daughter o
Nov. 18. Brooks. SI
athletics si
Portrait re-takes has been
planned Dec. I country for
Fall re-take portraits will be played vol
lrs. Moore, taken on Tuesday, Dec. 1.. Middle and has pl
avid Bevan, school, JV and Varsity basketball,
Shanks. girls weight lifting and cheerleading B re ttn
c pictures will also be taken on this eighteen-
day. Athletes, please bring all parts old son of
of your uniform. o sp
Evening of and Tai
comedies, ALTHA SCHOOL Floyd. Hi
VlacBeth", a s s i s t Ie
. continued oh page 21 participate


Emily Brooks & Brett Floyd candidates
Wendy's High School Heisman program


ndy's High SchoolHeisman
awarded in conjunction
collegiate Heisman,
the achievements of the
p high school seniors both
of the classroom. To be
r this award, students must
excellence in academics,
and community/school
. Altha Public School's
Heisman candidates are
oks and Brett Floyd.
s the seventeen-year-old
f Richard and Mary Frank
he has been imrohed 1i
nce middle clwool Enil)
a member of cross
r one yea anid hli
leyball and been
ider for si\ '.crt
lyed softball ti.,r
s.
is the
year-
f Joey

e has
d or
ed in y


athletics since the seventh grade.
Brett has played baseball for four
years and has played basketball for
two years. He has also been a cross
country runner for one year.
Both Wildcats are currently tied
with a grade point average of 3.85
and both are actively involved
as officers in various clubs and
organizations at Altha School, like
Beta, FCA, FCCLA and Student
Council. They are also both members
oftheAlthaFirst Baptist Youth
Group


N


slo~a~


, )/


Our BHS boys' and girls'
basketball teams will be dressed out
in PINK on Friday, Jan. 15, 2010,
for three very special games against
the Bozeman Bucks. All three BHS
teams will be completely outfitted
.in PINK uniforms, down to their
shoelaces and arm bands.
Leading up to the Jan. 15 "Hoops
for Hope" game, the school will be
sponsoring several events that focus
on making our young people and
our community more aware of how
important it is that we take care of
our health. That evening, we will
pay tribute to cancer survivors, those
currently fighting cancer, and special
memorials will be made to those who
lost their battle with the disease.
Our first goal that had to be met
was raising the funds necessary
to purchase PINK uniforms for
all three teams. Thanks to our
generous community, this did


not take any time to accomplish!
Donations from Blountstown Drugs,
Calhoun-Liberty Hospital, Golden
Pharmacy, McClellan Appraisals,
Ruth Attaway CPA and BHS alumni
Gerald Goodman have already made
it possible for us to order the teams'
PINK uniforms.
BHS is working hard to make this
a very special event and additional
funds are needed to guarantee that
"Hoops for Hope" is a great success.
THINK PINK Most of us have
someone we know, love, went to
school with, live next to, or work with
that has been touched by cancer or is
currently battling to survive. Let's all
do our part to honor, encourage and
increase awareness.
To donate and/or participate in
any way, please contact Sharon
Leonard-McCrone at 674-5724 or
mailto:sleonardmccrone@gmail.
com.


..- --....rn








NOVEMBER 18,,2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 19


Voter Registration at

Altha School Nov. 20


ALTHA SCHOOL
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 20


by Kayla Hires
On Friday, Nov. 20 a special
voter registration will be held
at Altha School. Mrs. Margie
Laramore, SupervisorofElections,
will be in the Media Center from
1-4 p.m. The registration will be *
open to anybody that is a resident
of the county and is eligible to
vote. In order to register you
must be 18 years old or older,
be a citizen of the United States
and Florida and not have been
convicted of a felony without
your civil rights being restored.
When registering, you must
provide a current and valid
Florida driver's license or Florida


identification number. If you
have neither of these, you must
.provide the last four digits of your
Social Security number. During
the process you will also choose
a party to be affiliated with or
choose not to be affiliated with
any party.
Anyone needing to make a
name or address change is also
welcome to stop by and take care
of that at this time.
When coming on campus,
make sure you stop by the office
- located to the left of the White
Building to get a visitor's pass.
The office personnel will direct
you to the media center.


* Altha's Calendar of Events *
Thursday Nov. 19-Thanksgiving Meal in the Lunchroom;.
Middle School Boys' Basketball at Tolar 3 p.m.; SAC
Meeting 5 p.m.; JV/ Boys' Basketball at Poplar Springs

Friday Nov. 20-Voter Registration Drive 1-4 p.m. in Media
Center; JVV Boys' Basketball at Poplar Springs.

Nov. 23-27-Fall/Thanksgiving Break


"i --- ~ --


Turkey Run,


SNov. 21 HL-


4 & 6 Cylinder entry lee 20 O
10 truck minimum
1st place 150 2nd place 100
3rd place '75 4th place '50
38.5 & down entry fee '30
No truck minimum
ist place k300 2nd place '200
3rd place '100 4th place '50
39 & up entry fee '30
No truck minimum
1ast place '300 2nd place '200
3rd place 100 4th place '50
Gates open at 3 p.m. Races begin at 5 p.m m
Admission is 10


Fo i t}T i If,
OFF IROLP PiA Z
For information, coniacl Ray Goodwin .
ai 447-0356 or 237-2945
iLn'al 1rin l -ari-:. i'. rnl i.i )uIn H ..' 1) -n H- ,, I.
^i, | U- -, ri r.n i.' ^ 31. A sam p.;lp~ .::, m ;


Altha's Cross Country team places 10th at Regionals
Altha School's Girls Cross Country team placed 10th at they've certainly set the bar very high." The girls are shown
the Regional Meet. The top six teams advance to State. here after competition at Regionals. L-R: Madison Rowe,
Altha's own 7th grader, Mary Sewell, placed 49 out of 84. Kimi Wiltse, Sharlyn Smith, Hannah Plazarin, Coach Maggie
Coach Maggie Sewell said that she was very proud of the Sewell, Carly Schwartz and Mary Sewell. Captain-Rebekah
girls and their hard work, noting, "For the their first season Wiltse in kneeling in front.


LIBERTY SCHOOL NEWS


LCH & Tolar

knitting hats

for babies
We would like to thank
all those in our community
who donated yam for our
knitting project.
We have completed over
25 toboggans and they
have been donated to Bay
Medical Center. Pictured
here are some of the hats the
students have completed
and donated.
We are still working
and will have more hats
ready soon. Thanks for
supporting our students in
their efforts to help others.
Vanesa Ford, LCHS


ji^^ffii '' 4 9^^B sSSfi l


i4AN
T T '^jyB
'*~~ ~ j-r*:,* ... *^lBfafl- ~ m *~hH


l o


LUNCHES BREAKFAST
LUNCHES THURSDAY '
(Pre-K thru 5th) THURSDAY
THURSDAY Sausage and gravy biscuits or as-
THURSDAY
Turkey and dressing, green bean sorted cereals with buttered toast,
Turkey and dressing, green bean
casserole, sweet potato souffle and hash brown and assorted fruit
i no 1;mwhole wheat rolls. juice.
EIlAYv FRIDAY


A choice of low fat white,
chocolate or strawberry milk
served with all meals.
BREAKFAST
THURSDAY
Assorted cereal with buttered toast
and assorted fruit juice.
FRIDAY
Cheese toast and grits with ham
cubes or assorted cereals with but-
tered toast and assorted fruit juice.
MONDAY WEDNESDAY
Fall Break & Thanksgiving holiday
NOTE. BES Ercv Iv s crnA ON MoNoA AN
HOT CooCE Toon THRD Fnpmy


Cheese pizza, garden salad and
diced pears. (Grades 6-12) Alterna-
tives: Hamburger; Caesar chicken
salad.
.MONDAY WEDNESDAY
Fall Break

Thanksgiving holiday


Waffles and ham or assorted ce-
reals with buttered toast and as-
sorted fruit juice.
MONDAY WEDNESDAY
Fall Break
&Thanksgiving holiday
Thanksgiving holiday


All menus are subject to change.
MENUS SPONSORED BY:
ristoC'DentaCCCinic
Laban Bontrager, DMD, Monica Bontrager, DMD
Pea Ridge Rd in Bristol, Phone (850) 643-5417


A choice or low rat white,
chocolate or strawberry milk
served with all meals.

LUNCHES
Elementary (Pre-K thru 5th)
THURSDAY
Chicken nuggets, mashed potatoes
and gravy, chilled fruit, whole wheat
roll. Alternative: Turkey and cheese
wrap.
FRIDAY
Cheese pizza, garden salad and chilled
peaches. Alternative: Turkey club.
MONDAY- WEDNESDAY
Fall Break & Thanksgiving holiday


Hosford plans

'Camo Jamo

Dance' Nov. 21
The Hosford 8th grade class
will host 'Camo Jamo Dance'
for students in grades 3-9 on
Saturday, Nov. 21 from 7-11
p.m. The dance will be in the
Hosford School Cafetorium.
This event is to raise money
for the Hosford 8th grade class
trip to Orlando.

VOLUNTEER
Discover how you can make
a difference in a child's life.
Florida Guardian
ad Litem Foundation
PHONE (850) 410-4642


,


!


'-.;3~t~B~ ~b~f:


rCL-~ ;









Page 20 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL NOVEMBER 18, 2009


LIBERT Y COUNTY!H1IGH SCHOOL BULLDOGFOOTBALL


Terrance Evans knocked one Hornet defender to the ground and later on the play, stiff-armed #34 for a big Bulldog gain during Liberty's
28-18 win over Cottondale. DANIEL WILLIAMS PHOTOS


Dawgs beat Hornets 28-18, will host 1st round of state playoffs


by Richard Williams, Journal sports Lriter
On paper the contest between Liberty County, losers of just one game
this season, and Cottondale, winners ofjust one game this season. looked
to be a blowout in favor of the Bulldogs. Liberty \\ as happy to simply
leave Cottondale with a 28-18 come-from-behind win.
On Liberty's first drive, things looked like they would go according
to script when Kevin McCray capped a six play, 65 yard drive with a
touchdown run to make the score 7-0 after the Mike Lohse extra point.
The Bulldog defense took the field and they too lookedti be following
the same script until Cottondale hit a pass over the middle that broke for
a touchdown. The Hornets were stopped on their two-point conversion
attempt and Liberty led 7-6.
The Bulldogs then fumbled the ball away; however Liberty's defense
was able to force a Hornet punt. This time Libert 's offense held on to
the ball and once again had a six play drive capped by a Ke\ in McCray
touchdown. At the end of the first quarter LCHS led 14-6
The only points of the second quarter were scored by Cottondale to
close the gap to 14-12. The Bulldogs almost put the ball into the end zone
before the half but a Liberty receiver-was ruled to have failed to make


the catch after he dropped the ball as he was pushed out of bounds at the
three yard line.
In the second half neither team was able to score on their first possession,
but Cottondale took the lead on their second possession with 10:17
remaining in the game.
Trailing 14-18, Liberty responded with a eight play drive that included
a fourth and ten conversion. Once again it was Kevin McCray with the
touchdown and Lohse with the extra point. The Bulldogs sealed the win
by forcing Cottondale to punt and having Terrance Evans break across
the field and outrace the defenders for a touchdown with 3:28 remaining
in the game.
After the 28-18 victory over Cottondale, the Bulldogs finished the
regular season at 9-1 overall.
Liberty plays host to the largest Class 1A school in the state during the
first round of the playoffs Nov. 20. South Walton travels to Liberty with
a 8-2 record with their only losses being to Walton and Freeport.
LCHS Head Coach Grant Grantham said that South Walton looks like
Liberty on both offense and defense in that both teams play a similar
style.


similar
style.








NOVEMBER 18, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 21


LEFT:
Blount-
stown's
Leon
Broxton
(#3) makes
the catch.

RIGHT:
Tiger
Charles
Buggs, Jr.
hangs
* on to
the ball.


Tigers travel to Freeport for playoff

Fourth quarter score gives

Blountstown win over Baker
by Richard Williams, Journal sports writer
With the game tied 20-20, Blountstown's Ryan McIntyre
recovered a Baker fumble and returned it six yards for a
touchdown. The two-point conversion gave the Tigers a 28-20
lead that they held the remainder of the fourth quarter to secure
the win and cap a 8-2 regular season record. -
McIntyre's heroics didn't look to be necessary-early as the
Tigers led 20-6 early in the third quarter. Baker, winless this
season, fought hard in the second half and tied the score in the
third.
The Tigers scored first on a four yard run by Jawon Mosley
and then followed with a two-point conversion to take a 8-0 lead.
Then just 41 seconds later, Cavon Cox scored from fifteen yards
out to make the score 14-0.
Up 14-6, P.J. Buggs tossed a pass to Leon Broxton who scored
on the forty yard pass play to make the score 20-6. Baker scored
right before the half to cut the lead to 20-14.
Baker tied the game with 5:43 remaining in the third quarter
on a four yard run. The game stayed tied until McIntyre's fumble
recovery with 7:41 remaining in the game.
The.Tigers sealed the win when they picked off a Baker pass
with less than one minute to go in the contest.
The Tigers travel to Freeport Nov. 20 for a first round playoff
game against the Freeport Bulldogs. Freeport comes into the game
with a 9-1 record that doesn't include the 36-13 preseason win
Freeport had over Blountstown this year.


ABOVE RIGHT and BELOW: Tiger Princeton Grant (#2) is caught in the
middle of several Baker players before being knocked to the ground.
RIGHT: Blountstown's Jawon Mosley (#10) leaps in for the tackle.
TONY SHOEMAKE PHOTOS


BLOUNTSTOWN HIGH SCHOOL TIGER FOOTBALL








Page 22 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL NOVEMBER 18, 2009


MAYMIE GRACE WILLIAMS
BLOUNTSTOWN- Maymie Grace Williams,
101, passed away Monday, Nov. 16, 2009 in
Blountstown. She was born on Oct. 28, 1908 in
Rusk County, TX and had lived in Blountstown
since 2004, coming from Henderson, TX. She was
a homemaker and a member of the Baptist faith.
Survivors include one son, Ray Dennis and his
wife, Elsie of Blountstown; four grandchildren
and eight great-grandchildren.
Services will, be held Wednesday, Nov.
18 at 1 p.m. (CT) from the graveside at Mt.
Zion Cemetery in Minden, TX. Interment will
follow.
Peavy Funeral Home in Blountstown is in
charge of the arrangements.

RUBY PUMPHERY
ALTHA Ruby Pumphery, 81, passed away
Sunday, Nov. 15, 2009 in Marianna. She was born
on Feb. 13, 1928 in Wills Point, TX and had lived
in Altha since 1946. She was a homemaker and a
member of the Methodist faith.
She was preceded in death by her husband,
Woodrow Pumphery.
Survivors include one son, Woody Ronald
Pumphery ofAltha; two daughters, Ruby Dianne
Adkins, ofAltha and Hanna Carolyn Pumphery of
Panama City; one sister, Betty Louise Tretter of
Orange, CA; seven grandchildren and 10 great-
grandchildren.
Services will be held Wednesday, Nov. 18 at
11 a.m. (CT) at Peavy Funeral Home Chapel with
Reverend Luther Pumphery officiating. Interment
will follow in the Chipola Cemetery in Altha.
Peavy Funeral Home in Blountstown is in.
charge of the arrangements.


MICHAEL WALDEN
LYNN HAVEN Michael Walden, 50, passed
away Monday, Nov. 16,2009 in Panama City. He
was born on Aug. 2, 1959 in Wewahitchka and
lived in Lynn Haven for the past 15 years. He was
a former resident of Calhoun County. He was a
millwright with Smurfit Stone in Panama City. He
loved playing his guitar and enjoyed fly fishing.
He was of the Protestant faith.
Survivors include his wife, Sally Walden of
Lynn Haven; his mother, Hazel Walden of Lynn
Haven; one son, Josh Walden of Tallahassee;
one daughter, Georgia Walden of Tallahassee;
one granddaughter, Abby Gunn of Tallahassee; a
stepson, Jay Reed of Clarksville; a stepdaughter,
Kelsey Reed of Lynn Haven; four brothers,
George Wendell (Bo Bo) Walden and his wife,
Debbie and Kenneth Walden and his wife, Susan, -
all of Clarksville, Troy Walden and his wife,
Garnett of the Red Oak Community and Wayne
Walden and his wife, Lisa of Blountstown; two
sisters, Sharon Edge of Clarksville and Michelle
Waldroff and her husband, Kenneth of Altha; a
brother-in-law, Greg McDaniel of Tallahassee;
several aunts, uncles, nieces and nephews.
The family will receive friends Wednesday,
Nov. 18 from 6 p.m. until 8 p.m. (CT) at Peavy
Funeral Home.
Services will be held Thursday, Nov. 19 at
3 p.m. (CT) at Travelers Rest Freewill Baptist
Church in Clarksville with Reverend Melvin Tate
and Dr. Shawn Williams officiating. Interment
will follow in Travelers Rest Cemetery in.
Clarksville.
Peavy Funeral Home in Blountstown is in
charge of the arrangements.


DENNIS ALLEN BROWN
BRISTOL Dennis Allen Brown, 52, passed
away Monday, Nov. 9, 2009 at his home. He was
born Nov. 22, 1956 in Howell, MS to Claude
Carson, Jr. and Evelyn June Brown. He was a
retired lumberyard fork lift operator.
Survivors include four brothers, Stacy Lee
Brown of Bristol, Don Brown of Kissimmee and
William and Kenneth DeCamp of Fowlerville,
*MI; two sisters, Tracey Johns of Kissimmee and
Patricia Shell of Bristol.
Memorial services will be held at a later date.
Adams Funeral Home in Blountstown is in
charge of the arrangements.

LEWIS KARL BAILEY
BLOUNTSTOWN Lewis Karl Bailey, 52,
passed away Thursday, Nov. 12,2009 at his home
in Blountstown. He was born on August 12,. 1957
in Port St. Joe and had lived in Calhoun County for
most of his life. He was a Registered Respiratory
Therapist and was a Certified Diving Instructor. He
was a 1975 graduate of Blountstown High School,
where he served as senior class president.
He was preceded in death by his parents, Lewis
and Louise Bailey and a brother, Ivey Bailey.
Survivors include one brother, Lewis Bailey Jr.
of Orlando; two sisters, Virginia Howard and her
husband, James ofBlountstown, Doreen Wynn of
Albany, GA and several nieces and nephews.
Services were held Saturday, Nov. 14 at the
Peavy Funeral Home Chapel with Reverend
David Goodman Officiating. Interment followed
at Cypress Creek Cemetery in Kinard.
Peavy Funeral Home in Blountstown was in
charge of the arrangements.

ROBERT ALLEN RANDALL
ALTHA Robert Allen Randal, 73, passed
away Thursday, Nov. 12, 2009 at his home in
Altha. He was born on Dec. 31, 1935 in Irvington,
NJ and had lived in Altha since 2003, coming
from Riverside, CA. He retired from the United
States Air Force after 23 years of duty. He was
a veteran of the Vietnam Conflict. He was also a
retired mail carrier.
Survivors include one son, David Randall; two
daughters, Tamara Randall and Darlene Randall;
two brothers, Dave Randall and Roy Randall and
two grandchildren.
Memorial services will be held Saturday,
Nov. 21 at 10 a.m. (CT) from the Altha United
Methodist Church with Reverend Frank Hyles
and Martha Hyles officiating. Memorialization
will be by cremation.
Peavy Funeral Home in Blountstown is in
charge of the arrangements.

DAISY I. HANSFORD
MARIANNA- Daisy I. Hansford, 94, passed
away Monday, Nov. 9, 2009 in Crestview. She
was born on March 27, 1915 in Jackson County
and had lived there most of her life. She was a
homemaker and a mepnber of the Assembly of
God faith.
She was preceded in death by her husband,
Robert Hansford, Sr. and a son, Buddy Miran
Hansford.
Survivors include one son, Robert Hansford,
Jr. and his wife, Mildred of Crestview; two
daughters, Helen Cole and her husband, John
of Altha and Betty Simmons and her husband,
Tommy of Cottondale; 15 grandchildren, 35 great-
grandchildren and 18 great-great-grandchildren.
Services were held Friday, Nov. 13 at Peavy
Funeral Home Chapel with Reverend Carroll
Senn officiating. Interment followed in Mt. Olive
Cemetery in Altha.
Peavy Funeral Home in Blountstown was in
charge of the arrangements.


O]:] UAR I ES


-' ~


Precious Memories
"If you can't come
to us, give us a call
and we will come to
you."


Let us help you with a memorial of BEAUTYand
DURABILITY Serving Jackson & the Surrounding
Counties for 42 Years.
Hwy. 90 W. P.O. Box 933 Sneads, Fl 32460
Pete Comerford Owner & Operator
593-6828 1-800-369-6828 Fax 593-6888




Sevis Funeral

Home of Bristol

& Crematory

All exis//igpre-needanda/ need
Scontracts are now /7andledl by 7he
Bevf family and staff

All operations of the funeral process
will be handled on location at
12008 NW State Road 20.

CALL 643-3636

Todd Wahlquist, Rocky Bevis & Ed Peacock
Licensed Funeral Directors



Peavy Funeral Home

& Crematory




,; ..... La .- .- .,',





Your hometown funeral home since 1994
Funeral Services with Dignity,
Caring and Professionalism.
Marion Peavy
A Hometown Funeral Director
You Can Trust and Depend On!
Telephone (850) 674-2266


4^ "Specializing in Remembrance
Arrangements"
Price range $27 to $45
Call (850) 272-1982
Shop online @ www.simplysilksetc.com

WHAT BETTER TRIBUTE CAN THERE BE? Honor your loved
ones by making their memory part of our best efforts to defeat
cancer For more info., contact the American Cancer Society.
East Gadsden Unit, P.O. Box 563, Quincy, FL 32353.



COMERFORD VAULT
MEMORIAL SERVICE







NOVEMBER 18, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 23


Fall the best time to plant trees along the Gulf Coast


S by Theresa Friday,
Horticulture Extension Agent,
Santa Rosa County
Fall is the best time to plant
trees along Florida's Gulf
Coast. The heat of summer
has abated, the day lengths are
shorter and plants will spend
the winter growing, their un-
derground root systems.
Planting now allows trees to
grow their root systems sev-
eral months prior to the heat
of summer. The result will be
a stronger and healthier plant.
So if you have been think-
ing about adding a tree or two
to your landscape, now is the
time to make your decision
and get the tree planted.
But, which tree to plant?
There are many to choose
from. Because trees are typi-
cally long lived, making a
good decision initially will
save you time and trouble
in years to come. The big-
gest mistake gardeners make
is choosing a tree that will
quickly outgrow its plant-
ing site. Be sure to learn the


mature size of the tree before
picking the perfect spot for its
home. If you already have a
spot in mind, be sure that you
choose a tree that will not out-
grow the spot.


CO/ME ON IN!
BEST DEAL IN THE TRI-STATE AREA!
Slow credit, no problem WA.C.
Hand-picked quality cars and trucks.
Business (850) 526-5254
Residence (850) 762-3679
Toll Free: 1-888-740-8222 f

SUMMERLIN


MOTORS "
3905 W. Hwy. 90 in Marianna


If you are looking for a large
tree, then consider a southern
favorite, the magnolia. Mag-
nolias come in all shapes and
sizes, but perhaps the most
well-known magnolia in Flor-
ida is the Southern magnolia,
Magnolia grandiflora.
These stately trees can grow
up to 90 feet tall, depending
on the cultivar, and have lus-
trous, evergreen foliage that
makes a great backdrop for
other garden plants. In the
spring and summer, Southern
magnolias produce creamy
white flowers that have a lem-
ony smell and can be as large
across as dinner plates.
Today, there are over 40
cultivars of Southern magno-
lia on the market. Many new


cultivars flower at an earlier
age and have a tighter, dens-
er canopy or smaller growth
habit than older cultivars. An-
other popular characteristic is
a rusty-bronze appearance of
the underside of the leaves,
commonly called the "back"..
'Bracken's Brown Beauty'
is considered one of the best
selections for foliage and plant
form. The lower leaf surface,
or back, is a rich, dark brown
and has a fuzzy texture. The
tree reaches 30 to 50 feet tall
and 30 feet wide, so it needs
room to spread. It tends to be
self-branching and forms a
dense canopy.
'Claudia Wannamaker' is
one of the older selections of
Southern magnolia that still is


POLE BARN






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S12'-48' Width Packages In Stock
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Enclosure Packages Available Including
Windows, Doors, Roll-Up Doors & Siding

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Marianna Truss, Inc.


850-594-5420


widely grown. The foliage is
dark green with a silvery-tan
back. At maturity, this tree
will be about 50 feet tall.
'D.D. Blanchard' reaches
over 50 feet at maturity. It has
leathery, lustrous, dark green
leaves with rich, orange-
brown or copper backs. It
flowers only sparingly when
young.
'Little Gem' is very widely
grown because of its compact
form. The leaves and flowers
are in proportion to its smaller
plant size. Though considered
compact, it still can grow up
to a height of 40 feet. While
it does have the longest flow-
ering season, typically from
May to November,. its form
is often "shrubby", lacking a
nice central leader.
'Teddy Bear' got its name
because the leaves are remi-
niscent of the ears of a stuffed
teddy bear. They are rounder
and fuzzy with a rusty-brown
back. The tree is smaller than
most, reaching a mature size
of about 20 feet.
There are many other cul-
tivars of Southern magnolia.
Most of these are. not widely
available. However, grower
and consumer preferences
may result in some of these
having greater availability or
popularity in certain markets
or with changing tastes of
consumers and landscapers.
Theresa Friday is the Resi-
dential Horticulture Extension
Agent for Santa Rosa County.
The use of trade names, if
used in this article, is solely
for the purpose of provid-
ing specific information. It is
not a guarantee, warranty, or
endorsement of the product
name(s) and does not signify
that they are approved to the
exclusion of others.
For additional information
about all of the county exten-
sion services and other ar-
ticles of interest go to: www.
santarosa.ifas.ufl.edu.


ACREAGE

FOR SALE
Liberty County
Rd Frontage
From $4,995 per acre
$1000.00 Total Down
OWNER FINANCING,
No Qualifying
TRI-LAND INC.
R. E. Broker
Phone (813) 253-3258








Page 24 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL NOVEMBER 18, 2009


LCHS falls to Maclay in regional semi-final game
by Crystal Spikes, contributing writer
Any true Liberty County volleyball fan that has fol-
lowed the team throughout their season this year has
certainly gotten their money's worth in exciting vol-
leyball entertainment. The Lady Bulldogs made it to
the Regional Semi-Final game where they hosted the
Maclay Marauders on Nov. 10, but came up short in
the end in front of a packed-out crowd in Bristol. *&A hI
The Lady Bulldogs started the match "off' their II,
normal game, losing the first two games and just wait-; OilS .wng-
ed too long to start digging themselves out of the hole- --
they had gotten themselves in to.
They lost the first two games 11-25 and 16-25 re-
R :spectively before fighting back to win the third game
1 25-23. The atmosphere in the gym was electrifying
and the crowd deafening at that point. Liberty County
came within a few points of pushing the match to five
games but just wasn't able to pull out game four, end-
ing with a 22-25 loss.
Offensively, Senior Hannah Moore had 8 kills and
9 services points, 2 of which were aces; Junior Tie-
sha Alston added 8 kills; Freshman Shelby White had
8 kills; and Kasey Revell added 2 aces on the night.
Senior Melanie Shuler had,23 assists and 7 service



-DQ A --- ----
points. Hannah Moore and Arminda Spikes had 9 and .:
6 service points respectively.
Shelby White (#12)-slams one over for Liberty County while Arminda Spikes On the defensive side, Ashley Black led with 12
(#18) and Melanie Shuler (#9) stand ready. digs, followed by Hannah Moore with 10 digs and Ar-
minda Spikes with 4 digs. Shelby White led in blocks Hannah Moore (#7) puts one over unchallenged
DANIEL with 4, followed by Tiesha Alston with 3 blocks and for the Lady Bulldogs.
WILLIAMS Melanie Shuler with 2 blocks.

SPIKESTAL Though the Lady Bulldogs were
PHOTOS disappointed with the loss on Tues- i;
day, they still had a great season
with a dominating overall record
of 23-3 and an undefeated district
,, TI" record of 8-0.
They won their district cham-
pionship title and triumphed over
their arch-rivals across the river
twice in the season all great ac-
complishments. Coach Casi Ped-
die said, "These girls really played
all year with a lot of heart and they
never, never, never gave up. I'm
so proud of all the girls and the
successful season we've had."
S The team will only lose three se-
niors this year so it promises to be
another exciting season next year.
We look forward to seeing more
great community support for the
OV:F Shehb White (#12n uhes the bll ner the net BLOW Tiecha team then. Tiesha Alston goes up for one of her 8 kills of the game.


AIVV L 01 )pIU I I I IV s 11 I JJUo IIv IV Ut I1 V*II 11.V I lI LLVU I vI l Ier
Alston (#20) tips the ball over.


RADIO FOOTBALL

ON WYBT AND WPHK

Listen to football on WYBT and WPHK. This week..
The Miami Dolphins take on Carolina
in Carolina, Thursday Nov. 19.
Air time 7:05 p.m. (CT) on K102.7.

Listen to Steven Seay and Glenn Kim-
.^ brel's play by play of the Playoffs.
(^ Blountstown High School Tigers vs
'L ** Freeport in Freeport, Friday night, Nov.
-.. 20 on K102.7 at 6:30 p.m. (CT) air time.

Hear Michael Wahlquist, Jay Taylor and Ray McCoy with all
the Liberty County High School Playoff game
action. The Bulldogs take on South Walton at a
home. Airtime is at 10 a.m. Saturday, Nov. 21,
immediately following Swap Shop on K1 02.7.

The Florida Gators play Florida Interna-
tional in the Swamp this Saturday, Nov.
441111 20. Air time on K-102.7 at 11 a.m. (CT).


I


;



;





NOVEMBER 18, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 25


If you're looking for a copy of

The Calhoun-Liberty Journal

you shouldn't have

to look too far! '. :..
















The Calhoun-Liberty Journal
is delivered every Wednesday morning to news racks
in Calhoun & Liberty counties at these locations:
CALHOUN COUNTY
*The Southern Express in Blountstown; East, West & Hwy. 69N and Altha
*Parramore's Restaurant in Blountstown *Pit Stop in Blountstown
*Piggly Wiggly in Blountstown *Connie's Kitchen in Blountstown
*The Quick Pic in Blountstown -Harvey's Grocery in Blountstown
*Clarksville General Store *Chapman's Grocery in Carr *Shelton's Store
*Smith's Grocery in Altha *Golden Pharmacy in Blountstown
*Scotts Ferry General Store -Gas Mart in Blountstown *Big Bend Bait & Tackle
LIBERTY COUNTY
*The Southern Express in Bristol & Hosford *Blackburn's Store in Hosford
*Telogia Grocery in Telogia *Crow's Citgo Hwy. 20 East -Richter's Store in Telogia
*Piggly Wiggly in Bristol *Benny's BP Station in Bristol -Busy Boy in Hosford
*Express Lane in Bristol *Apalachee Restaurant in Bristol
...and, if the racks are empty by the time you get to the store, we invite you to subscribe and
make sure you receive a copy every week! Just send us your name and mailing address,
along with a check for $18 per year, to: Journal Subscriptions, P.O. Box 536, Bristol, FL 32321.









Page 26 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL NOVEMBER 18,2009


Lots available in THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNALKC REGISTERED
Wallace Subdivision, AKC REGISTERED "
site built homeLASS IFI BEDaS sse"u




To place your ad, call 643-3333 by noon Eastern

Atnrtdo aRntnle Time on Saturday. Non-business ads run FREE for 2 weeks.


-E


WANTED: I


z






Will buy





S- priced.
SImmediate
closing. -
Call (850)
S544-5441
or (850).
S570-0222


ITEMS FOR SALE


Two antique chairs from the early
1900s, both painted black, in good
condition, $10 each. Call 643-
3370.
11-18,11-25

Sofa $55; stove $135. Call 674-
3264. 11-18,11-25

32" Toshiba TV, about a year old,
$350. Call 643-2371. 11-18,11-25

Treadmill, $200. Call 643-1591.
11-18, 11-25

Underwater video camera with
B/W monitor, new, never used, Har-
bor freight Model 91309, 60 ft. ca-
ble, charger, battery and case, $90
OBO. Call (850) 697-8665.
11-18, 11-25

Dark Cherry Eddie Bauer bassi-
net, paid $160, asking $115, used 4
weeks. Call 447-2610. 11-18,11-25

DVD player, $20. Call 379-3966.
11-18,11-25
Aluminum storm door, 36 inch
wide, $20. Call 674-1637. 11-11,11-18

Harley Davidson helmet, men's
size Lg, paid $200, asking $75. Call
643-5011. 11-11,11-18

Sectional sofa with built-in queen
size pullout bed, and two built-in re-
cliners, $500. Call 209-8784.
11-11,11-18

Wooden twin bed with mattress,
$40; Bistro type table with two bar
stools, foldable, $25; two pair of
navy blue BDU pants, size x-sniall,
$60 for both, never worn; Rocky
women's Alpha Force black boots,
size 7 1/2 never worn, paid $75,
asking $60. Call 643-7705.
11-11, 11-18

Queen size mattress and box
springs, $35; chair and other furni-
ture, best offer. Call 674-3264.
11-11, 11-18

Bowflex home gym, in good condi-
tion. Call 299-6394. 11-11,11-18



APPLIANCES'


Oven-wall mount, $50; 2-car vacu-
ums, $50; converter for TV, $30;
house vacuum $50. Call 237-1587.
11-18,11-25

Whirlpool microwave, new, hood
vent and lights for over stove range.
Paid $300, asking $200; older mod-
el dishwasher, built-in, works good,
$40 0BO. Call 674-5337, leave
message. 11.11,11-18

Roper refrigerator, like new, $250;
electric stove, $50. Call 643-5957.
11-11, 11-18


CARS


1989 Lincoln Town Car, as is, $300.
Call 237-1587. 11-18,11-25

2003 Buick LeSabre, 49K miles,
full power, all electric, V-6, excellent
condition, elderly lady can't drive
anymore, Call 674-5251. 11-18,11-25


1990 Cadillac Deville Sedan, good
condition, looks good and drives
-A tOr~n(11 7A-q~'5


oog d, $2,500. Call 76 6


TRUCKS & SUVS


1990 Ford Areostar Minivan, ex-
tended Eddie Batter edition, front
and rear air which needs recharg-
ing (R12), four reclining seats, rear
bench lets into bed and is remov-
able as are the two rear seats. Nice
interior, tinted glass, good tires,
low mileage, recent oil change and
alignment. Mileage for Hwy. 23
MPG, 19-20 city. Asking $2,200 but
ready to deal, give me an offer. Call
443-2422 in Bristol. 11-18,11-25

1987 single axle dump truck, works
good, $3,800. Call 762-8185.
11-18,11-25

1988 Ford Bronco, body in sort of
rough shape, $400; 1996 Dodge
pickup, 318 automatic, cold AC,
$1,200; 1991 Mustang parts car,
fiberglass body kit and hood, will
trade for anything of equal value.
Call 227-4881. 11-18,11-25

1991 Toyota pickup, regular cab,
4WD, 4 cylinder, runs great, $2,500.
Call 643-1591. 11-18,11-25
1995 Chevy Tahoe, needs trans-
mission, $2,500 OBO. Call 209-
9608. 11-18, 11-25

1996 Dodge 1500, two wheel drive,
loaded with Dixie package, $3,500.
Call 227-4881. 11-18,11-25

1993 Ford Ranger (LT, $1,500 firm.
Call 674-1637. 11-11,11-18

1973 Jeep CJ5, $2,500. Call 674-
1978 or 209-9705. 11-11,11-18


1987 Suz Samurai JLX 4
Jeep, nice condition, rur
been lifted, lots of custo
great hunting vehicle, $3,51
Call 762-8726.



AUTO ACCESS



V-6 Chevy starter, brand n
er used, $75. Call 674-163


Four Cooper tires, 24
35,000 miles, $100 for all. I
5337, leave message.



MOTORCYC]

& ATVS


1992 Honda Goldwing n
cle, 1500 Aspen Cade, 25
fully dressed out, many extr
than $3,000 worth), Canc
Red, $5,000. Call 643-630.

2006 Honda 4-wheeler 3
wheel drive, excellent shape
2005 Honda 4-wheeler 250
shift, $1,900. Call 227-488

2008 110 4-wheeler, front
racks, excellent condition, I
10 hours riding time, $60


674-2469.


11-11,11-18


3. 2004 Yamaha Bruin 350, automat-
11-11,11-18 ic, vry low hours, excellent condi-
tion, $2,000. Call 643-1402.


HOMES & LAND


1.4 acres land with septic and well,
$20,000. Call 643-6488. 11-18,11-25

2004 Modular home, excellent
condition, 2-bdr/2-bath, all applianc-
es, ceiling fans, custom deck, new
central heat and air guaranteed 10
years. You move it, $30,000 OBO,
located in Apalachicola. Call 653-
9118 or 653-8122. 11-18,11-25

1989 14x66 Liberty mobile home,
3 bedroom, 1 1/2 bath, $7,500. Call
442-6183. 11-11,11-18

Big lot on Chipola River, located in
Calhoun County. Call 643-1514.
UFN


TOOLS &

EQUIPMENT

3-horse lawn mower motor, $50;
6-horse lawn mower motor, $50;
power motor for air-compressor or
grinder, $50. Call 237-1587.
11-18, 11-25
Skill saw and chop saw, $50 for
both. Call 379-3966. 11-18,11-25

55-gallon steel drums with lids,
25, $10 and up, excellent storage.
Call 592-5780. 11-18 thru 12-23

Single axle trailer, rigged up to haul
two motorcycles with tailgate, as is
$700; flatbed trailer, two axles, 16 ft.
long with loading ramp, as is $700.
Call (850) 878-9019. 11-11, 11-18

Trailer pull behind car, 3 ft. 4 in.
wide x 4 ft. long, $60. Call 674-
1637. 11-11, 11-18


ew, nev- Craftsman wood plainer, like
7. new $200; pressure washer, $100;
11-11, 11-18 air compressor, $50; home-made
bench grinder, $20. Call 674-1637.
.5-70-17, 11-11,11-18
Call 674-
11-1111-8 150 gallon steel water trough w/
automatic waterer; large cattle feed
trough; barbed wire; 1 roll quarter
inch electric hot wire, 656 ft., white
LES rope brand new still in plastic. Call
LES 299-6394. 11-11,11-18



PETS/SUPPLIES
notorcy-
5K miles,
as (more Free puppies, six weeks old, white
ly Apple English bulldog mix. Call 762-8423
4. for more details. 11-18,11-25
Free cat; Cur-dog/Black Lab mix;

350, two two Yellow Labs. Call 237-1587.
$2,600; 11-18, 11-25
, electric
1. Free male puppy, black with some
11-18, 11-25 white, friendly, looks like Lab mix.
Was dropped off at my home. Call
and roar 447-0070. 11-18, 11-25


Five Bulldog/Lab mix puppies, 1


- -- -- -- - - -- -


Li~O


11-11,11-18"


s, 1


~- ------- -----------


~i~-~n


11-11, 11-18.










NOVEMBER 18, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 27


#STfIR-


SCOPE*

Week of
Nov. 22 Nov. 28

ARIES Mar 21/Apr 20
Keep your lips closed, Aries, even
if you need to duct tape them shut.
Anything you say this week will be
taken the wrong way and you don't
need any enemies at this time.

TAURUS Apr 21/May 21
There's more than meets the eye
to a situation that arises on Tues-
day, Taurus. You will have to read
between the lines if you want to
gauge the outcome.

GEMINI May 22/Jun 21
Gemini, with your financial situ-
ations in order, it may seem like
the right time to do a little extra
spending. However, the best thing
you can do right now is to keep
your wallet shut.

CANCER -Jun 22/Jul22
Cancer, you're antsy this week and
your restlessness is causing you to
take shortcuts when you shouldn't.
Focus your attention on what you
need to get done.

LEO-Jul23/Aug23
Risky-endeavors are not the way
to go, Leo. You should steer
toward safe bets instead. It's
important to have stability in your
life at this junction in time.

VIRGO Aug 24/Sept 22
You need all the help you can get,
Virgo, but unfortunately there
aren't too many offers for helping
hands this week. It's time to call in
some favors, pronto.
LIBRA Sept 23/Oct 23
The best laid plans often go awry,
Libra, which you'll find is the case
with travel you had scheduled.
With a little patience everything
will work out in the end.

SCORPIO Oct 24/Nov 22
There's a lot going on in your life
at this time, Scorpio, but being the
great organizer and go-getter that
you are you'll find a way to make
it all work out.

SAGITTARIUS Nov 23/Dec 21
What you could use is some sage
relationship advice, Sagittarius,
but there's no one willing to offer
it. Use your common sense to
figure out how to make the most
of your love life.

CAPRICORN Dec 22/Jan 20
This week you are propelled
through your daily tasks and have
lots of extra time for recreational
activities, Capricorn. How will
you put the time to good use?

AQUARIUS Jan 21/Feb 18
There's not much you can say to
calm an escalated situation this
week, Aquarius, but your actions
will speak quite loudly. Others
turn to you for support.

PISCES Feb 19/Mar 20
Remarkable things happen this
week without much effort on your
part, Pisces. Have fun sorting it
all out.

FAMOUS BIRTHDAYS
NOVEMBER 22
Jamie Lee Curtis, Actress (51)
NOVEMBER 23
Miley Cyrus, Actress/Singer (17)
NOVEMBER 24
Katherine Heigl, Actress (31)
NOVEMBER 25
John Larroquette Actor (62)
I ii- FrlA- B P r. )
'..' N 1. I,, b ..ri .l. I r1 1^r (28)
"
".. ... iii i' :


male and 4 females, free to good
home. Call 688-2827. 11-18, 11-25

Horse trailer, holds 2 horses, two ax-
les, saddle compartment, hay room
or dressing room in front, as is $700.
Call (850) 878-9019. 11-11, 11-18

Rabbit with cage, $25; goat for
$50. Contact Heather or Mitch at
643-5886 or 643-2336. 11-11,11-18

Boston Terrier puppy for sale, fe-
male, 3 months old, shots, Advan-
tage flea control, black and white,
very cute and friendly, needs loving
home, $100. Call 688-6593.

Golden Retriever, female, ap-
proximately 1 year old, had shots,
spayed, free to a good home. Call
379-8176. 11-11.11-18



WANTED

Someone to share rent/utilities.
Call 643-2468 or 643-6912.
11-18,11-25

GE telephone answering machine.
Call 674-8570 leave message.
11-11, 11-18
Junk cars and trucks, any condition.
We pay cash. Call 762-8459 or 272-
1126 cell. UFN



CAMPERS

Jayco pop-up camper, 7x20,
sleeps six, kept under shed, $1,200.
Call 447-2042. 11-18, 11-25


TOP
GRADE
7' Posts
Top Size,
3-4"'
4-5"
5-6"


SPECIALTY


TOP
GRADE
8' Posts
Top Size
2-3", 3-4"
4-5"
5-6"
6-7"
7-8"
8"+


POSTS
1/4 rounds Items
1/2 rounds subject to
Flat Face availability


TOP
GRADE
6'6" Posts
Top Size
2-2.5"
2-5.3"
3-3.5"
3.5-4"
4-5"


2000 Travel Supreme 5th wheel
34 ft., excellent condition, $18,500.
Call 442-6183. 11-11,11-18


BOAT & GUNS


Remington 1100 semi-auto shot
gun, 410 GA with vent rib barrel, full
choke, walnut checkered stock and
forearm, good condition, $695 OBO.
Call 443-2422 in Bristol.
11-18, 11-25

380 Cal. Jimenez Arms Inc., Las
Vegas, NV compact; about 5.3 inch-
es overall, semi-auto with clip, 19
oz. $200. Call 443-2422. 11-18, 11-25

Ruger Redhawk pistol, .44 Mag,
excellent condition, $475. Call 762-
2133. 11-18, 11-25

Ruger rifle, model Mini-30 7.62x39
cal., 3x9 scope, 6 magazines and
ammo. New condition, $650 qBO;
Beretta over/under shotgun Model
BL-3 20 gauge, 3 inch chambers,
mod/imp choke, finest bird gun
made, excellent condition, $1,000.
Call (850) 697-8665. 11-18,11-25

.38 Snub nose special, made by
Colt, $475. Call 643-3272. 11-18. 11-25

Ruger Mark II, 280 bolt action rifle
with 4x16x40 scope, $450. Call
762-8785. 11-11,11-18

Browning Bow w/case, arrows:and
a release. Call (850) 508-0529.
11-11, 11-18


0


(


FACTORY
SECONDS
8' Corners
under 3"
3-4"
4-5"
5-6"
6-7"
7-8"


5"+ 8"+
FACTORY SECONDS
6'6" Posts, Top Size, under 2'
2-3" 3-4" 4-5" 5"+


Ammo reloading supplies, 45 cal.
and 3030 cal. casings and primer.
Call 674-6242. 11-11,11-18



YARD SALES

4 ALTHA 4
Multi-Family Yard Sale on Satur-
day, Nov. 21 from 8-12, on Hwy 274
W, approx. 1 mile out of Altha. Baby
boy and toddler girl clothes and
toys, TVs, household items, Chris-
tian books, etc. Cancelled if raining.
Call 762-8423.

0 BRISTOL 0
Saturday, Nov. 21 beginning at 8
a.m. located in Bristol, turn at traffic
light going north towards river land-
ing, white doublewide on 1st drive-
way to left. Miscellaneous house-
hold items, furniture, toys, women
and young teen boy's clothes. Call
-670-8540 or 556-9348.

t. BLOUNTSTOWN I
Saturday, Nov. 21 from 7-11 a.m.
on Hwy. 20 west in Blountstown.
Call 674-8784.

Saturday, Nov. 21 beginning at 8
a.m. located at Orange and Oak
Street in Blountstown. Baby items,
women's clothes, misc. items, can-
cel if rain. Call 674-9841.

Deadline for all
CLASSIFIED is
Saturday at NOON!


1,000 square foot
building across from
Wakulla Bank in
Blountstown for rent
Call 674-4455
or 573-0716



J----------

FOR RENT

4 BR/2 BA MH
$500/mo.
$475 deposit
located in Clarksville
No pets allowed inside.
Call (850)643-6488


SFor Rent
3/1.5 Mobile Home
$450/month + electrical
2 RV Spots Available
with Full Hookup
n20/night
On Ochlockonee River

850-519-4945


THE CALHOUN-LIBERTYJOURNAL




C LASSITFIEDS

To place your ad, call 643-3333 by noon Eastern
Time on Saturday. Non-business ads run FREE for 2 weeks.


Do You Have an Unusual Pet?

If so, call the Journal and
YOU could be featured in
Pets & Their People!
s. b643-3333


liberty


SPostand


Barn Pole Inc.
Dempsey Barron Road, Bristol 643-5995 (off Hwy. 12 N)


We've gotf e fence posts

to meet your needs.


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Page 28 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL NOVEMBER 18, 2009


Wild weekend planned for the


14th annual Plantation Wildlife


Arts Festival on Nov. 21 & 22


THOMASVILLE--Excitement is building at
the Thomasville Cultural Center as it prepares
to host the 14thAnnual Plantation Wildlife Arts
Festival on Nov. 21 and 22.
Over 60 artists from across the United States
will bring their original works of art for show and
sale. A wide variety of work will be available for
purchase including oil and watercolor paintings,
sculpture, carvings, photography, jewelry and
pottery.
Amy Poor from Union, OR is being honored
as this year's featured painter. Poor is known for
her fluid style and use of brilliant color, as well
as the special way she portrays movement in her
paintings. A watercolor painter, Poor captures
her subjects by allowing the paint to move and
flow in an unpredictable and ephemeral way.
She has shown her work in numerous wildlife
and western art shows, as well as in numerous
fine galleries across the United States.
This year's featured sculptor is Maureen Riley,
an avid sportswoman who enjoys expressing her
country pursuits through art. Motivated by a
love of storytelling, Riley uses her keen sense
of observation to capture dynamic moments in
her representational bronzes. Riley's work has
been shown in the Smithsonian, as well as in
art exhibitions across the United States and in
Italy. She is a member of the Society of Animal
Artists, National Sculpture Society and the Oil
Painters of America. She resides in Lakeland,
Michigan.
Since the first festival in 1996, the Plantation
Wildlife Arts Festival has earned the reputation
of being one of the country's best wildlife and
sporting arts festivals, attracting over 80,000
visitors each year.
Festival Director Sharlene Cannon says the
Festival has several highlights for every member
of the family.
"Whether you're a sportsman, animal
-lover, or just all-around nature enthusiast, this
festival will provide hours of entertainment and
enjoyment," said Cannon.
In addition to the art show and sale, a variety
of lectures and demonstrations will entertain
festival-goers of all ages. Greathouse Butterflies


will once again pitch their butterfly garden tent,
and the Tallahassee Museum will set up a booth
with both nature activities and Florida wildlife.
Rangers from Reed Bingham State Park will bring
reptiles, amphibians, and birds for show-and-tell.
Back by popular demand, Sheila Klein, aka "the
Spider Lady", will bring her eight-legged friends.
Evelyn and Don Dally .from Albany, Georgia's
Parks at Chehaw will once again offer up-and-close
animal encounters and humorous tales from their
experiences at the zoo.
New demonstrations this year include archery
and casting lessons taught by Beau Turner and an
exhibition of underwater sea creatures provided
by the Gulf Specimen Marine Lab of Panacea,
Florida.
Festival Chairmari Debbie Gaskins says Festival
visitors can also try their hand at duck decoy
carving, fly fishing and pottery painting, hunt for
treasure in a fossil dig, and see a field trial dog
demonstration.
"It is extremely thrilling to have not only artists
and demonstrators from Thomasville, but from all
around our region gathered together to educate and
entertain at the festival," said Gaskins. "We have
so much to appreciate about our area of the country
and about nature-let's celebrate!"
The festival will take place on Saturday, Nov. 21
from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday, Nov. 22 from 11
a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Thomasville Cultural Center
which is located one-half mile north of downtown
Thomasville on -lighway 319. Tickets cost $12
for adults and $5 for children ages 5-11. Children
4 and under are admitted free of charge. Proceeds
from the Plantation Wildlife Arts Festival benefit
the arts and education programs of the Thomasville
Cultural Center. For more information visit the
festival website at pwaf.org or call the center at
229-226-0588.
The Thomasville Cultural Center is a non-
profit organization dedicated to enriching the
lives of south Georgia residents through the
visual, performing, and literary arts. For more
information about the Thomasville Cultural Center,
please call 229-226-0588 or visit the Center 's
website at thomasvilleculturalcenter.org.


THANK
YOU!
r." It's with
4. a humble
'' heart
1 that I say
THANK YOU to each of
you who came out in the
bad weather and cast your
vote for me last Tuesday.
I promise to work hard to
be deserving of the trust
and confidence that you
have entrusted in me to
serve as your City Council
representative. This is
your city and I will always
remember that I work for
you. Sincerely,
&1y/64 1. C)/W//l//i/
POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT, PAID rFO AND APPROVED BY
GILoA DRUM-ONO, BRISTOL Ciov COUNCIL.

ADOPT A PET
i through the
V JOURNAL
CLASSIFIED!
imaU-


Chipola College's
Chamber Qhorus,
Rock and Jazz
Ensemble, and
Show Choir invite
the public to a free
Fall Festival of the
Arts in the Chipola
Ads Center,
Sunday, Nov. 22,
aT 2:30 p.m. Here,
Rock and Jazz
Ensemble director
Dr. Daniel Powell,
is pictured with his
Jazz machine.


Fall festival of the


arts set at Chipola
MARIANNA-Chipola College's Chamber Chorus, Rock
and Jazz Ensemble, and Show Choir invite the public to a free
Fall Festival of the Arts in the Chipola Arts Center, Sunday,
Nov. 22, at 2:30 p.m.
Music will be presented by the Chamber Chorus under
the direction of Bethany Kiral, and accompanied by Dr. Josh
Martin. The audience will enjoy songs such as Bonse Aba, a
traditional Zambian Song, and works by P.L. van Dijk and G.F.
Handel. The Chamber Chorus will be joined by community
members for a portion of the concert.
Chipola's Show Choir will entertain with three high energy
medleys including Aladdin, Medley from the Broadway
musical Jekyll and Hyde, and Disco Fever: A medley of '70's
Dance Hits.
The Rock and Jazz Ensemble under the direction of Dr.
Daniel Powell will swing into action with a compliment of
standard jazz tunes and familiar rock favorites to close out the
show. Students and community members in this ensemble
have worked to provide a toe-tapping concert that will feature
various jazz styles that challenge the members to improvise
and work together.
Guests also are invited to enjoy a Student Art Show from
the teaching studios of Chipola adjunct art instructors Kelly
Boehmer and Chuck Carbia.
Joan Stadsklev, Chipola director of Fine and Performing
Arts, says, "Parents of our students will be honored during
the event. We especially want to thank them for sending their
children to Chipola."
This non-ticketed event is free and open to the public.
For more information contact Joan Stadsklev at 718-2301
or stadsklevj@chipola.edu.




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Contact Bill Stoutamire
Phone 674-5974 Fax 674-8307


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ACCEPTING NEW PATIENTS
12761 NW Pea Ridge Rd., Bristol, FL 32321
TELEPHONE 643-5417











NOVEMBER 18, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 29


NOTICE OF INTENT TO
USE UNIFORM METHOD OF
COLLECTING NON-AD
VALOREM ASSESSMENTS

The Liberty County, Florida (the
"County") hereby provides notice,
pursuant to section 197.3632(3)
(a), Florida Statutes, of its intent
to use the uniform method of col-
lecting non-ad valorem special as-
sessments to be levied within the
unincorporated area of the Coun-
ty, for the cost of providing solid
waste services commencing for
the Fiscal Year beginning on Oc-
tober 1, 2010 and continuing until
discontinued by the County. The
County will consider the adoption
of a resolution electing to use the
uniform method of collecting such
assessments authorized by sec-
tion 197.3632, Florida Statutes,
at a public hearing to be held at
7:00 p.m. on December 8, 2009 at
the 2nd Floor Courtroom, Liberty
County Courthouse, 10818 NW
SR 20, Bristol, Florida. Such res-
olution will state the need for the
levy and will contain a legal de-
scription of the boundaries of the
real property subject to the levy.
Copies of the proposed form of
resolution, which contains the le-
gal description of the real property
subject to the levy, are on file at
the County Clerk, 10818 NW SR
20, Bristol, Florida. All interested
persons are invited to attend.

In the event any person decides to
appeal any decision by the County
with respect to any matter relating
to the consideration of the resolu-
tion at the above-referenced public
hearing, a record of the proceed-
ing may be needed and in.such an
event, such person may need to
ensure that a verbatim record of
the public hearing is made, which
record includes the testimony and
evidence on which the appeal is to
be based. In accordance with the
Americans with Disabilities Act,
persons needing a special accom-
modation or an interpreter to par-
ticipate in this proceeding should
contact the County Clerk at (850)
643-2215, three (3) days prior to
the date of the hearing.

DATED this 11th day of November
2009.

By Order of:
LIBERTY COUNTY, FLORIDA

Publish in a newspaper of general
circulation during the weeks of:
November 10-16, 2009
November 17-23, 2009
November 24-30, 2009 11-1 T12-2-09


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, PRIVATE IN AND FOR
CALHOUN COUNTY, FLORIDA

PROBATE DIVISION
CASE NO. 09-PR-61


IN RE: The Estate of
SYLVESTER SIMMONS
Deceased.



PRIVATE NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION

The administration of the estate
of SYLVESTER SIMMONS, de-
ceased, File Number 09-CP-61,
is pending in the Circuit Court for
Calhoun County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is
20859 Central Ave. E., Blount-
stown, FL 32424. The names and
addresses of the personal repre-
sentative and the personal repre-
sentative's attorney are set forth


below.

ALL INTERESTED PERSONS
ARE NOTIFIED THAT:

All persons on whom this notice is
served who have objections that
challenge the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of this Court are required to
file their objections with this Court
WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE
MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE
OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE OF
THEM.

All creditors of the decedent and
other persons having claims or
demands against decedent's es-
tate on whom a copy of this notice
is served within three months after
the date of the first publication of
this notice must file their claims
with this Court WITHIN THE LAT-
ER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER
THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUB-
LICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR
THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE
OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.

All other creditors of the decedent
and persons having claims or de-
mands against the decedent's es-
tate must file their claims with this
Court WITHIN THREE MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE.

ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.

The date of the first publication of
this Notice is November 11, 2009.

Attorney for Personal
Representatives:
THOMAS R. THOMPSON
Thompson, Crawford & Smiley,
Attorneys at Law
Post Office Box 15158
Tallahassee, FL 32317
(850) 386-5777
Florida Bar No. 890596

Personal Representative:
Martha Jackson
15771 NW 18th Place
Miami, FL 33054 1-1181-18- 0


REQUEST FOF
COMMENTS


USDA Forest Serv
Apalachicola National
Apalachicola Ranger
Liberty County, Flo

Bradwell Game Farm I
Area

The Forest Service pro
treat approximately 316
slash and loblolly pine
the Bradwell Game Farrr
Area in Compartment 1
compartment is located ir
19, 20 and 30 of Townshi
(T1S), Range 4 West (F
sections 24 and 25 of To
South (T1S), Range 5 WE
of Liberty County, Florida

Based on initial review
data information there E


stands (108 acres) ready for 1st
thinning, four stands (41 acres)
ready for an intermediate thinning,
and three stands (21 acres) to be
clearcut and returned to historic
wildlife openings. In addition to
these stands, stand 5 (40 acres)
will be clearcut, treated with the
herbicide, planted with longleaf,
and have ground cover restora-
tion. Stand 31 (27 acres) is a stand
that was cut over in the past and
has been taken over by laurel oak,
sparse loblolly and sparkleberry.
This stand will have the overstory
removed by a combination of bio-
mass, firewood cutting and herbi-
cide. When the hardwoods have
been controlled, the stand will be
planted with longleaf and have
ground cover restoration. Stand
19 (76 acres) was mixed loblolly
and bottomland hardwood, that
was underplanted with loblolly in
1970. The stand will be thinned
to 50 BA, favoring hardwood over
pine, with scattered openings that
will be planted or seeded with de-
sirable hardwood. The number of
stands to treat is not expected to
change significantly from this es-
timate at the time of implementa-
tion.

Connected with these actions
would be the: reconstruction of
approximately 1.49 miles of main-
tenance level 3 roads, reconstruc-
tion of 1.5 miles of maintenance
level 2 roads, and purchaser
maintenance of approximately
2.05 miles of maintenance level
2 roads at the time of the timber
sale. There will be the following
temporary developments for the
timber sale: establishment of ap-
proximately 0.5 miles of tempo-
rary road, several skids trails and
log landings; all of which will be
closed after the timber sale opera-
tions are complete.

Also proposed are archeological
interpretation sites with kiosks
and interpretive signs. These will
.be accessed by a mixed use hik-
ing and horseback riding trail. A
primitive canoe launch and park-
ing area will be established on the
scenic Ochlockonee River.

The proposed actions are de-
signed to restore and interpret
the area to early 1900's era con-
ditions, improve gopher tortoise


habitat, improve forest health and
sustainability, and to implement
R the direction of the forest plan.
The proposed actions are needed
to move toward the desired future
vice conditions set forth in the National
Forest Forests in Florida Revised Land
District and Resource Management (For-
rida est) Plan 1999. The Forest Ser-
vice will evaluate three alterna-
Analysis tives: 1) Proposed action, 2) No
herbicide (hand tools) alternative
and 3) No action.
poses to
acres of An Environmental Assessment
stands in (EA) is currently available for re-
SAnalysis view and comments. The EA is
13. The available by request or on the in-
n sections ternet at http://www.fs.fed.us/r8/
p 1 South florida. It is anticipated that a Deci-
34W) and sion Notice will be prepared in ac-
)wnship 1 cordance with the Forest Service
est (R5W) Handbook 1909.15, Section 31.2.
i.
Pursuant to 36 CFR 215.5, the
of stand Responsible Official is seeking
are three comments on this proposal. Com-


ments need to be as specific as.
possible and must be postmarked
or received within 30 days after
this publication. Oral or hand-
delivered comments must be re-
ceived within our normal business
hours of 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Monday to Thursday and 8:00 a.m.
to 4:00 p.m. on Fridays, closed on
federal holidays. Comments may
be mailed electronically to our of-
fice, in a common digital format, at
comments-southern-florida-apala-
chicola@fs.fed.us. Comments
should be sent to District Ranger,
57 Taff Drive, Crawfordville, FL
32327. For more information on
this proposal contact Sonja Du-
rrwachter at (850) 643-2282, ext
1511. 11.1-.09



STATE OF FLORIDA

DEPARTMENT OF
ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION

NOTICE OF APPLICATION

The Department announces re-
ceipt of an application for a permit
from the Florida Department of
Transportation, file number 39-
0292057-001-DF, to mill and re-
surface 25.6 miles of State Road
65 in Liberty County. Impacts to
Waters of the State are proposed
to widening 9 mil6s of the roadway
from 10' to 12' (no paved shoul-
ders are proposed), culvert work
at 52 locations totaling 90 pipes
(25 replaced, 15 extended, and
12 will remain), and the addition
of 45 mitered end sections for side
drains. Impacts to Waters of the
State for this project include 5.92
acres of temporary fill, 0.29 of an
acre of permanent fill, and 2.68
acres of temporary disturbance
form construction. Two temporary
roads will be utilized on the east
side of the existing roadway at cul-
vert structures CD39 and CD54.

This project is located at State
Road 65 beginning at the Franklin
County line and continuing to the
north of Cypress Branch Bridge in
Liberty County, Florida,

Sections 3, 10, 15, 16, 21, 28, and
32, Township 2 South, Range 6
West, Sections 5-7, Township 3
South, Range 6 West, Sections
12, 13, 22-24, 26-28, 32, 33,
Sections 5-8, 18, 31, Township 4
South, Range 7 West, Sections
13, 24, and 25, Township 4 South,
Range 8 West, Sections 6, 7, 18,
and 30, Township 5 South, Range
7 West Latitude/Longitude: 300
12' 00", 0840 55' 00", in Liberty
County, Florida.

Much of the project is through the
Apalachicola National Forest.

This application is being pro-


cessed and is available for public
inspection during normal business Petitions filed by any persons oth-
hours, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., er than those entitled to written no-
Monday through Friday, except tice under Section 120.60(3), Flor-
legal holidays, at the Northwest ida Statutes, must be filed within
District, Tallahassee Branch Office fourteen days of publication of
at 630-3 Capital Circle Northeast, the notice or within fourteen days
Tallahassee, Florida 32301. n.a1809 of receipt of the written notice


STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF
ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION
NOTICE OF INTENT TO


whichever occurs first. Section


ISSUE PERMIT
(FLA010179-005-DW2P/RA)

The Department of Environmental
Protection gives notice of its intent
to issue a permit to Florida Depart-
ment of Corrections, Bailey Bare-
foot, Environmental Administrator,
2601 Blairstone Rd, Tallahassee,
Florida 32399-2500 to substantial
modify the Liberty Correctional
Institution wastewater treatment
plant (WWTP). The permitted
plant capacity of the WWTP will
increase from 0.200 MGD an-
nual average daily flow (AADF) to
0.280 MGD AADF.

The substantial modification in-
clude changes to the surge tank to
increase the anoxic process
(72,600 gallons) with a new float-
ing mixer, a new stand-alone re-
placement external surge equal-
ization basin (89,035 gallons)
and addition aeration volume will
be provided via conversion of the
original anoxic cells to expand the
aeration basins (204,100 gallons).
The permitted requests that the
four (4) existing percolation ponds
currently permitted for 0.200 MGD
to be re-rated for 0.280 MGD. In
addition, the permit is revised to
allow the application of liquid and/
or dry residuals on the approved
land application sites.

The facility is located at lati-
tude 30028'00.77" N, longitude
84051'29.0311" W on County
Road 1641, Bristol, Florida 32321-
9711 in Liberty County.

The intent to issue and applica-
tion file are available for public
inspection during normal business
hours, 8:00 a.m. to. 5:00 p.m.,
Monday through Friday, except le-
gal holidays, at the Department's
Northwest District Office, 160
Governmental Center, Suite 308,
Pensacola, Florida 32502-5794,
at phone number (850)595-8300.

The Department will issue the per-
mit with the attached conditions
unless a timely petition for an ad-
ministrative hearing is filed under
Sections 120.569 and 120.57,
Florida Statutes, within fourteen
days of receipt of notice. The pro-
cedures for petitioning for a hear-
ing are set forth below.

A person whose substantial in-
terests are affected by the De-
partment's proposed permitting
decision may petition for an ad-
ministrative proceeding (hear-
ing) under Sections 120.569 and
120.57, Florida Statutes. The pe-
tition must contain the information
.set forth below and must be filed
(received by the Clerk) in the Of-
fice of General Counsel of the De-
partment at 3900 Commonwealth
Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Talla-
hassee, Florida 32399-3000.

Under Rule 62-110.106(4), Florida
Administrative Code, a person may
request an extension of the time
for filing a petition for an adminis-
trative hearing. The request must
be filed (received by the Clerk) in
the Office of General Counsel be-
fore the end of the time period for
filing a petition for an administra-
tive hearing.









Page 30 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL NOVEMBER 18,2009


Send a thank-you to a vet


To the editor,
I would like to send
out a. Veteran's Day
challenge.
For several years, ,
my first grade class has
created a thank-you note
to send to our veterans,
for their sacrifices and
service to our country.
Then each.child would copy the
letter in their best handwriting, and
seal it in an envelope, sometimes
including a picture.
To be sure each note went to
a veteran on Nov. 11th, one year -
on a Sunday, I passed them out
at church.
Other years I have gone to
Walmart, restaurants, or shopping
centers asking strangers if they
are veterans. When they said yes,
I gave them a note.


120.60(3), Florida Statutes, how-
ever, also allows that any person
who has asked the Department for
notice of agency action may file a
petition within fourteen days of re-
ceipt of such notice, regardless of
the date of publication.

The petitioner shall mail a copy
of the petition to the applicant at
the address indicated above at
the time* of filing. The failure of
any person to file a petition or
request for an extension of time
within fourteen days of receipt of
notice shall constitute a waived
of that person's right to request
an administrative determination
(hearing) under Sections 120.569
and 120.57, Florida Statutes. Any
subsequent intervention (in a pro-
ceeding initiated by another party)
will be only at the discretion of the
presiding officer upon the filing of
a motion in compliance with Rule
28-106.205, Florida Administra-
tive Code.

A petition that disputes the materi-
al facts on which the Department's
action is based must contain the
following information, as indicated
in Rule 28-106.201, Florida

Administrative Code:
(a) The name and address of each
agency affected and each agen-
cy's file or identification number, if
known;
(b) The name, address, and tele-
phone number of the petitioner;
the name, address, and telephone
number of the petitioner's repre-
sentative, if any, which shall be the
address for service purposes dur-
ing the course of the proceeding,
and an explanation of how the pe-
titioner's substantial interests will
be affected by the determination;
(c) A statement of when and how
the petitioner received notice of
the Department's decision;
(d) A statement of all disputed is-
sues of material fact. If there are.
none, the petition must so indi-
cate;
(e) A concise statement of the .ul-
timate facts alleged, including the
specific facts the petitioner con-
tends warrant reversal or modi-
fication of the Department's pro-
posed action;
(f) A statement of the specific rules
or statutes the petitioner contends
require reversal or modification of
the Department's proposed ac-
tion; and


SPEAK UP!
ITH A LETTER TO THE EDITOR
Write: The Calhoun-Liberty Journal
P.O. Box 536, Bristol 32321


Often as I continue with my
search, the vets will find me in
the store or restaurant and thank
me again once they have read
their note.
My children have been
privileged to receive notes from
soldiers encouraging them to keep
up the good work and study hard.
In the last two years, we have
heard from 80-year-old veterans
who said this was the first time
anyone had ever thanked them.


(g) A statement of the relief sought
by the petitioner, stating precisely
the action
petitioner wishes the Department
to take with respect to the Depart-
ment's proposed action.

Because the administrative hear-
ing process is designed to formu-
late final agency action, the filing
of a petition means that the De-
partment's final action may be dif-
ferent from the position taken by
it in this notice. Persons whose
substantial interests will be af-
fected by any such final decision
of the Department have the right
to petition to become a party to the
proceeding, in accordance with
the requirements set forth above.

Mediation under Section 120.573,
Florida Statutes, is not available
for-this proceeding. 11-189

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIR-
CUIT IN AND FOR LIBERTY
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION

CASE NO. 39 2009 CA 000092
DIVISION

BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.,
Plaintiff,

vs.

MATTHEW DEWAYNE PERKINS,
et al,
Defendant(s)


NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to a Final Judgement of
Mortgage Foreclosure dated No-
vember 12, 2009 and entered in
Case No. 39 2009 CA 000092 of
the Circuit Court of the SECOND
Judicial Circuit in and for LIBERTY
County, Florida wherein BANK OF
AMERICA, N.A., is the Plainiff and
MATTHEW DEWAYNE PERKINS;
THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
MATTHEW DEWAYNE PERKINS
N/K/A REBECCA PERKINS; TEN-
ANT #1 N/K/A REBECCA PER-
KINS are the Defendants, I will
sell td the highest and best bid-
der for cash at FRONT DOOR OF
THE LIBERTY COUNTY COURT-
HOUSE at 11:00 AM, on the 16
day of February, 2010, the folldw-


They were quick to
say that they were
just doing their
jobs, but ladies
and gentlemen -we
can and should do
better!
My challenge is if
you-are an educator,


pastor, group leader,
grateful American ... please
encourage those in your area of
influence to write a note and put
it in the hand of a veteran.
Let our veterans know that we
are indeed a grateful nation. Don't
deperid on someone else to make
a speech on your behalf. Write
it down. Sign your name. Do it
every year. The encouragement
is contagious!
Sincerely, Ruth Barth
Carr School


ing described property as set forth
in said Final Judgement:

COMMENCE AT THE SOUTH-
WEST CORNER OF ESTIFFAN-
ULGA LAKESIDE ESTATE PLAT
BOOK 1, PAGE 24, LIBERTY
COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE
RUN SOUTH 64 DEGREES 43
MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST
ALONG THE NORTHERLY
BOUNDARY OF STATE ROAD
333, 681.0 FEET TO A POINT,
THENCE NORTH 25 DEGREES
17 MINUTES 00 SECONDS
WEST 100.31 FEET TO A POINT,
THENCE NORTH 73 DEGREES
14 MINUTES 07 SECONDS
WEST 376.02 FEET TO A POINT,
THENCE NORTH 64 DEGREES
00 MINUTES 40 SECONDS
WEST 132.0 FEET TO A POINT,
THENCE NORTH 60 DEGREES
12 MINUTES 40 SECONDS WEST
435.48 FEET, THENCE SOUTH
55 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 00
SECONDS WEST 294.02 FEET
TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING,
THENCE SOUTH 55 DEGREES
54 MINUTES 00 SECONDS
WEST 204.67 FEET TO A POINT,
THENCE NORTH 18 DEGREES
15 MINUTES 50 SECONDS
WEST 360.24 FEET TO A POINT
ON THE SOUTH BOUNDARY
OF A COUNTY ROAD, THENCE
NORTHEASTERLY ALONG A
CURVE CONCAVE TO THE LEFT
HAVING A CENTRAL ANGLE
OF 18 DEGREES 03 MINUTES
00 SECONDS AND A RADIUS
OF 306.86 FEET FOR AN ARC
DISTANCE OF 106.12 FEET TO
A POINT, THENCE SOUTH 34
DEGREES 26 MINUTES 47 SEC-
ONDS EAST 330.02 FEET TO
THE POINT OF BEGINNING.

A/K/A 8129 NW RIVER ROAD,
BRISTOL, FL 323214123

Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any,
other than the property owner as
of the date of the Lis Pendens
must file a claim within sixty (60)
days after the sale.

WITNESS MY HAND and the seal
of this Court on November 13,
2009.

Robert Hill
Clerk of the Circuit Court


V. Summers
Deputy Clerk


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Day and nights available in Leon, Gadsden, Liberty, Jeffer-
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NOVEMBER18, 200' TiHE CALHOUiN-UBERTY JOURNAL Page 31


.. ri


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STRICKLAND'S
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For Weddings, Birthdays and all
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TALLAHASSEE-Checking
a contractor's license is the
best way consumers can protect
themselves from unlicensed
activity, and checking a
contractor's license online is
now easier than before. The only
information a consumer needs
to check a contractor's license
online is the first and last name
of the contractor; the name of the
business is no longer necessary.
The 2009 Legislature eliminated
the Qualified Business license
for construction companies, and
the Department of Business and
Professional Regulation has made
Web enhancements to ensure
consumers can easily check
licenses online.
As of Oct. 1, the Construction
Industry Licensing Board only
licenses individuals as contractors
to perform construction work
pursuant to Chapter 489, Florida
Statutes. In order to do business
as a corporation, partnership,
limited liability company or any
business entity other than a sole
proprietorship, the contractor
must be approved to qualify that
business entity. The name of the
approved business entity appears
on the contractor's individual
license. Employees of licensed
contractors are not required to
have individual licenses; the
contractor assumes responsibility
for his or her employees' work.
If the contractor is operating as
an individual without a business
name, the word "Individual"
will appear on the contractor's
license.
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is licensed, all consumers will
need to know is the contractor's
name.
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com.


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click "Search."
tEnter the contractor's last and
first names.
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and click "Constructions
Industry."
Click "Search."
*A list of licenses that match
the individual name entered will
be displayed. Click on each
record to view the business name
associated with that individual
license.
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is to license efficiently and-
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licenses more than one million
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veterinarians, and accountants to
contractors and cosmetologists.
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Page 32 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL NOVEMBER 18,2009


Youth Field 1


Day held


ABOVE: Brooks Hayes helps a young visitor
from Georgia with the drill as he works on his
duck box.


TOP: Kids get a chance to pet a real live baby
gator during .a visit with FWC Officer Mike
Guy.


The Ducks Unlimited Apalachicola
Valley Chapter held the Green Wing/
Youth Field Day Saturday, Nov. 14 in
Calhoun County. Around 30 kids regis-
tered for the day of fun, which included
many educational activities related
to hunting safety. Activities included
4-wheeler safety and rides, firearm
safety and target shooting, a Game
and Fish demonstration by Mike Guy
and a dog hunting demonstration by
the Dan-D-Ridge Plantation. The .kids
built wooden duck boxes and attended
classes on the ethics and identification
of duck hunting. The kids were treated
to lunch before the day was complete.
Partners for the event were Florida
Fish & Wildlife Commission, Norris
Smoke House, Neal Land & Timber
and Big River Cypress.


DANIEL WILLIAMS PHOTOS




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