Group Title: Calhoun-Liberty Journal (Bristol, Fla.).
Title: The Calhoun-Liberty journal
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00027796/00163
 Material Information
Title: The Calhoun-Liberty journal
Alternate Title: Calhoun Liberty journal
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Calhoun-Liberty Journal
Publisher: Liberty Journal, Inc.
Liberty Journal
Place of Publication: Bristol, Fla
Publication Date: August 5, 2009
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Bristol (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Liberty County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Calhoun County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Liberty -- Bristol
United States of America -- Florida -- Calhoun
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in Sept. 1991.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 11, no. 38 (Sept. 18, 1991).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00027796
Volume ID: VID00163
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AKN4565
oclc - 33425067
alephbibnum - 002046630
electronic_aleph - 003298625
electronic_oclc - 60662266
lccn - sn 95047245
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly journal (Bristol, Fla.)

Full Text
Univ of Florida History Library
PO Box 117007
Gainesville FlI 32611


S2 12/29/2009
1846


Community 'passion' convinces bank to keep Akna uranui up..,


by Teresa Eubanks, Journal Editor
A plan to close Superior Bank's Altha
Branch has been stopped after a group of
concerned citizens met with bank officials
to let them know how much the business
was needed in the community.
A sign was posted on the front door of
the bank branch last month to announce


its impending closure, notifying customers
that they would cease operations on Sept.
30 and urging them to claim the contents
of their safe deposit boxes.
"There really was an uproar about it,"
said Maxie Waldorff, whose business,
Waldorff Ace Hardware, banks with
Superior. As a member of the Calhoun


County Industrial Development Authority
(IDA), he was also concerned with
the impact the closing would have on
future plans now being shaped for the
community.
"There's an 18 mile stretch where this
is the only bank," he said. The closing
"would really hurt our town."


He and other members ofthe community
convinced bank officials to meet with them
at Altha Baptist Church June 23.
The group was told the cutback was
part of the bank's plan to operate more
efficiently in lean times. "They" said it was
one of three banks on the list to close,"
See ALTHA BRANCH on page 5


Rock Bluff

man dies


after ATV

overturns
by Teresa Eubanks, Journal Editor
An 88-year-old man has
become Liberty County's
fourth traffic fatality of the
year following a July 29 ATV
accident.
Joseph Hardy of Rock Bluff
died at Tallahassee Memorial
Hospital Friday, two days
after he was injured in an ATV
accident.
According to the report from
FHP Trooper Jason King, Hardy
was traveling east on-a private
dirt roadway after turning
left from the east shoulder of
Rockyville Road last Wednesday
afternoon. The rear tires of his
2007 Honda ATV began to lose
traction on the unmaintained
dirt road, which was full of ruts
and holes, and started to rotate
counter-clockwise. The right
front tire hit a hole, causing the
vehicle to overturn. Hardy was
ejected and the ATV landed on
top of him.
-The 4:44 p.m. accident
happened approximately 45 feet
east of Rockyville Road.
A witness found Hardy lying
on the ground on his back,
underneath the ATV.
He was pronounced dead at
the hospital at 1 p.m. Friday.
The Liberty County Sheriff's
Office and Liberty County EMS
assisted at the scene.
The death is being investigated
by FHP Homicide Investigator
Trerrence Chukes.
He is survived by his brother,
Richard Hardy, his niece, Belinda
Wiggins, and cousin, Gilbert
Hardy.
His complete obituary appears
inside on page 22.


50"
includes
TaX


= I


THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY




JOURNAL
Volume 29, Number 31 Wednesday, Aug. 5, 2009


Young Alec Sansom gives Liberty County School Board member
Kyle Peddle a smile after he cut the ribbon to officially open
the new Hosford School building Saturday. As officials began
the ceremony, Peddle stopped and pulled the youngster out of
the crowd, saying that a child should have the honor. The
school's new principal, Aaron Day, speaks to a group as
they get ready to tour the new building. See more
on page 15. JOHNNY EUBANKS PHOTOS


3 charged

in home

invasion

enter 'not

guilty' plea
by Teresa Eubanks, Journal Editor
The three women who allegedly
fled the scene of a Bristol home
invasion that left their accomplice
dead entered 'not guilty' pleas in
court Monday.
Mandy Allen, 43, of Bristol,
and Heather Ammons, 22,
and Jessica Long, 19, both of
Blountstown, were each charged
with second degree murder in the
death of 24-year-old Octavius
Barnes after he attempted to rob
Slip 'n Slide bar owner Bradley
Harvell July 19.
Barnes was killed after forcing
his way into Harvell's home,
pushing back the 82-year-old man
with a stun gun while demanding
money. Harvell handed over the
contents of his wallet $1,100 in
cash. Barnes told Harvell to give
him more money, and then he
pushed him too far forcing him
back toward a bed, where Harvell
reached down and grabbed a
loaded .357 Magnum from a box
and fired at his assailant.
Barnes was shot in the chest
and in the right eye and died at
the scene.
Investigators with the
Liberty County Sheriff's Office
announced the women's arrest
at a July 22 press conference.
They said the three admitted to
planning the robbery, took part
in a dry run six weeks earlier and
planned to split the proceeds.
In addition to the second
degree murder charge, the women
are also charged as principals in
the first degree to a home invasion
robbery. If convicted, they could
face life in prison.
The women are being held at the
Liberty County Jail without bond.


Intoxicated
man making
scene at
ER injures
himself.....3

Altha man
charged
after he
flees from
trooper.....2


Man charged
with chasing
visitor with
knife..........2

Woman sought
for theft of
purse, using
credit cards
and pawning
jewelry.........3


71111812200900 "8


Birthdays..... 12 Wedding..... 13 Sports.....1 8 Obituaries......22 Growing tomatoes..... 23 Classifieds...,.24 & 25


Sheriffs Log...2 Community Calendar...4 Crmme e'ry... ?7 News from the Pews...8 Farmer's Almanac...9


I I


ORONO I NINE i








Page 2 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL AUGUST 5, 2009


Altha man charged after fleeing trooper;


two scuffle in
An Altha man who failed
to heed a stop sign on his way
home was arrested after he fled
and almost caused a collision
Monday morning, according to a
report from the Florida Highway
Patrol.
DavidMargrill, 56, was charged
with fleeing and attempting to
elude an officer, resisting arrest
with violence, running a stop
sign and a right-of-way violation,
according to FHP Trooper David
Cox.
The trooper.was on his-way
to a deposition hearing at the
Calhoun County Courthouse at
8:25 a.m. when he saw a white
van run the stop sign on N.W.
Magnolia Church Road.
The van was stopped just south
of John F. Bailey Road on S.R. 71
by the trooper, who approached
the driver and asked to see his
license. As he walked to his
patrol car to run a license check,

Man arrested

after chasing

off visitor with

an open knife
A 59-year-old Blountstown
man was charged with aggravated
assault with a deadly weapon
after he reportedly pulled a
knife on a visitor at the NE Ash
Avenue home he shares with his
girlfriend of 15 years, according
to a report from the Calhoun
County Sheriff's Office.
Robert Jerome Raper was
arrested after confronting Alfred
Elden Way, 46.
Way told deputies he was
sitting in the living room with
Raper's girlfriend, Michelle
Yeomans, 43, shortly before
midnight last Wednesday when
Raper walked in.
Yeomans gave a sworn
statement that Raper asked Way
if he had a knife. Way replied
that he did not. "I've got mine,"
Raper replied as he opened the
knife and advanced toward Way
aggressively.
Way ran out the back door with
Raper in pursuit. Unable to catch
Way, Raper returned to the home
and turned his aggression toward
Yeomans. Way told deputies he
heard her screaming after he got
away from Raper.
Raper returned to the home,
striking Yeomans with an open
palm and almost knocking
her down, according to the
arrest report. He then left the
residence.


front yard pr

ARREST

REPORTS
compiled by
Journal Editor
Teresa Eubanks

Margrill drove off.
The van made a left turn into
oncoming traffic to go north
on S.R. 71, causing drivers to
take evasive action to avoid
a collision, according to the
trooper's report.
The 'trooper caught up with
the van and attempted to pull
it over a second time, but the
driver refused to stop until he
reached his home at 16544 N.W.
Magnolia Church Road. Margrill
got out of the van and attempted
to go inside but was stopped by
the trooper, who pulled out a taser
and ordered him to put his hands
behind his back.
Margrill responded by cursing
at the officer, put his hands in the
air and began yelling for his wife


*ior to arrest
and daughter to come out of the
house.
The trooper holstered his taser
away and put the driver against
the patrol car in an attempt to
handcuff him. Margrill kept his
hands in front of him, struggled
and kicked the trooper three times
in his right leg. The two struggled
for several minutes.
Margrill then pulled .away
and went inside, with the trooper
following close behind.
When the trooper attempted
to handcuff him again, Margrill
ran into his bathroom and locked
the door. His wife then told
the trooper her husband had a
medical problem.
When Margrill came out of
the bathroom, he was handcuffed
and arrested. When asked why
he refused to stop, he told the
trooper, "It's none of your f----
-- business.".
Before the situation escalated,
"I was just going to give him a
verbal warning for running a stop
sigh," Cox said.


CALHOUN COUNTY
July 26
*Paul J. Pitts, disorderly intoxication, CCSO.
*Cory Stephen Girardot, disorderly intoxication,
BPD.
July 27
*William Neal, possession of meth, drug parapherna-
lia (times 2), CCSO.
*Billy Gaskin, VOSS county, CCSO.
*Bobby Gene Creamer, VOP, CCSO.
*Donnie Ray Manning, grand theft, CCSO.
*Archie Faircloth, VOCC, CCSO.
July 28
*Cory James Guster, driving while license suspend-
ed or revoked, CCSO.
July 29
*Shawn Crib, failure to appear, CCSO.
*Mark Honnaker, petty theft, BPD.
*Robert Jerome Raper, driving while license sus-
pended or revoked with knowledge, aggravated as-
sault with weapon, CCSO.
July 30
*Rebecca Kay Livingston, possession of a controlled
substance, CCSO.
*Rebecca Sims, trespass after warning, CCSO.
July 31
*Curtis Carter, violation of county probation (war-
rant), CCSO.
*Douglas Wade Barnhart, violation of probation
(county), CCSO.
*John Thomas Woods, domestic battery, BPD.
LIBERTY COUNTY
July 26
*Bobby Creamer, VOP state, LCSO.
July 28
*Donnie Manning, grand theft, LCSO.
*Lorraine Dunklin, VOP state, self.
July 29
*Tammy Ammons,. VOP state, battery, self.
July 30
*Patrick Layfield, violated drug offender probation,
self.
*Rebecca Lynn Sims, holding for CCSO, CCSO.
*Rebecca Kay Livingston, holding for CCSO,
CCSO.
July 31
*Dannyelle White, serving weekends for CCSO (2),
CCSO.
August 2
*Willard Ray Womble, DUI, driving while license sus-
pended or revoked, refusal to submit to breath test,
open container, operating ATV on county maintained
roadway, FHP.

Listingsincludenamefollowedbychargeandidentlficationofarrestngagency Thenamesaboverepresent
those charged. We remind our readers that all are presumed innocent until proven guilty.


Blountstown Police Dept.
Aug. 3 through Aug, 9, 2009
Citations issued:
Accidents............03 Traffic Citations................05
Special details (business escorts, traffic details).....117
Business alarms.....01 Residential alarms..........02
Complaints.......................... ....... ..147


O* All calls are n
P.ut U eCultls anonymous. q I/e'^
--- Rewards up to S t
$1000 for feStpbers
i information Paid fo
information the Attorney General,
leading to arrest., Crime Stoppers Trust Fund

iCai Crime Stoppers 574-TIPS


ll~~~~jjl8, m 'f^^ ^ SS^i t,^ ^SL








AUGUST 5, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 3


Woman sought

for taking purse,

using credit cards
Charges are pending against aBlountstown
woman who reportedly confessed to
stealing a purse from a parked car.
A warrant has been issued for 20-year-
old Latasha Mathis, who is facing charges
of burglary of a conveyance, grand theft
of over $300, dealing in stolen property
and giving a false statement to a law
enforcement officer.
An event report from the Blountstown
Police Department related the following:
Kimberly Ashebranner pulled up to the
coin laundry at 20118 West Central Avenue
in Blountstown July 29. When she stepped
out of her car around 1:30 p.m., she left her
purse in the unlocked vehicle.
When she returned, her purse-was
missing. She reported seeing two people,.
including Mathis, standing nearby when
she arrived.
Ashebranner reported that items inside
her missing'purse included several credit
cards and personal identification, her
child's medication and jewelry that she
estimated to be valued at $800. She
immediately contacted the Blountstown
Police Department.
The credit cards were used quickly;
just minutes later, at 1:48 p.m., one of
Ashebranner's cards was used to buy gas in
Bristol. At 2:30 p.m., a card from her wallet
was used to make a purchase of $85.77 at
Wal-Mart in Marianna. Thirty minutes later,
another purchase was made at the store for
$228.13. That transaction was declined.
During a review of store video at
Wal-Mart, Mathis and her sister, Clarissa
Pouncy, were both shown using one of
the stolen credit cards, according to the
report.
The sisters were asked to come to
the police department where they were
interviewed about the theft. Mathis gave a
sworn taped statement that it was her, not
her sister, involved in the theft.
Mathis said she and a white male, who
was not identified in the police report, were
there when Ashebranner pulled up. Mathis
said the man took the purse from the car
and brought it inside the laundrymat, where
the two of them went through the contents..
Mathis said she took four credit cards and
said the man took a gold bracelet.
She said she used the credit cards, going
to the Bristol BP to get gas and then on to
Wal-Mart, where she bought a phone card
and other items. She admitted signing
Ashabranner's name on the receipt. Mathis
told officers the purse had been left behind
one of the machines at the laundry.
The purse was retrieved and the sisters
were allowed to leave the police station
with the understanding that Mathis would
return Friday. She did not.
When contacted by police, Pouncy said
her sister was on the run. Pouncy then gave
a statement and told officers that her sister
asked her to drive her to Wal-Mart. Pouncy
said she would but needed gas. They went
to Bristol and after Pouncy's credit card
was declined at the Express Lane, they went
across the street to the BP, where Mathis
got out of the car and used a credit card at
the pump.
Next, they went to a Blountstown pawn
shop, where her sister was asked to sign a
pawn ticket for Mathis, who did not have
identification. Mathis turned over a gold
bracelet and a gold watch, receiving $25.
Pouncy said her sister had not told her
the items had been stolen. Before their first
interview with officers, Mathis told her
sister that a white male had taken the.purse.
When the women were asked to return to
speak with officers a second time, Mathis
admitted to her sister that she had taken the
purse and said "They're going to have to
catch me," because she wasn't returning to
the police station.


Eighteen people took part in the July 25th
firearms safety class offered by the Blountstown
Police Department (BPD). In five years of offering
such programs, "This is the most we've ever
had in the class," said Major Rodney Smith.
Smith and BPD Chief Glenn Kimbrel conducted
the four-hour class with the assistance of Sgt.
Warren Tanner and Sgt. Fred Tanner. Participants
brought their own weapons and after viewing
a safety video, went to the shooting range for


An intoxicated man who brought
his girlfriend to the emergency room at
Calhoun-Liberty Hospital around 2:20
a.m. Sunday left a short time later in a
patrol car with a self-inflicted gash to
his head, according to a report from the
Blountstown Police Department (BPD)..
Stephen Girardot, 20, of Altha, was
charged with disorderly intoxication after
he became disruptive as the ER staff was
attempting to check in his girlfriend for
treatment.
Girardot was found standing in the ER
parking lot when officers arrived, visibly
upset and extremely intoxicated, following
a disturbance with a paramedic.
When asked what happened, Girardot
stated he became upset "because that nurse
wouldn't help us and got in my face." He
said he brought his girlfriend in because
she was having trouble breathing.
Paramedic Lou Condon stated that
when Girardot arrived with his girlfriend,.
he was asked to fill out the necessary
paperwork. Girardot began kicking the
door in an attempt to get into the treatment
rooms, he said.
Condon said he repeatedly told Girardot
to calm down and return to the lobby
to finish filling out paperwork. When
Girardot finally walked away, he went in
the lobby and began yelling obscenities.
When Condon once again asked him
to take care of the paperwork, Girardot
turned aggressively and began swearing
at him. He continued yelling profanities,
disrupting the staff's efforts to do their
jobs, as he walked out to the parking lot..
The hospital then called the BPD.
When an officer arrived to speak with
Girardot, he was still agitated, raising his


some hands-on experience. The group included
some experienced shooters as well as at least
one student who had never before used a gun,
according to Smith. The course is required
before gun owners can get a concealed weapons
permit. Another class will be held in a few weeks.
Those interested may sign up by contacting the
BPD at 674-5987. There is no charge for the
class, which is open to residents of Calhoun
County and Liberty County. BEN HALL PHOTO


ARREST

REPORTS
compiled by .
Journal Editor
Teresa Eubanks


voice and causing a scene in the parking
lot. He swore at officers and continually
interrupted them as they attempted to
speak with him, becoming belligerent
and loud.
Girardot was arrested for disorderly
intoxication and as an officer walked him
to a patrol car, he asked him how much he
had to drink. "Not enough to put up with
your f------ a--," he replied.,
Once inside the back seat of the patrol
car, Girardot began banging his head on
the cage, hitting it hard enough to create a


laceration on his upper forehead.
Girardot was removed from the car and
taken inside the ER, to be treated for his
injury. While inside, he stated he didn't
want "to wait for anything" and signed
himself out against medical advice. He was
then taken to the police department, where
he. was fingerprinted and photographed
before going to the county jail.
A friend who went to the ER with the
couple was also arrested. Paul Joseph
Pitts; 19, was said to be involved in the
disturbance inside the ER. He fled when
officers arrived but was later caught and
brought back to the scene.
Like Girardot, Pitts smelled strongly
of alcohol and his speech was slurred.
When the ER staff asked him to leave the
premises, Pitts became irate, waving his
arms and cursing loudly. He was charged
with disorderly intoxication and taken to
the county jail.


Petty theft arrest made after man

leaves grocery store with beer
A man who decided to help himself to the beer cooler at Harveys was arrested after
a Blountstown Police Officer caught him with the goods just a few yards away from
the store.
Around 9 a.m. on July 29, an employee reported seeing Mark Honnaker lift up his
shirt and place several items down his pants. The manager confronted Honnaker and
asked he had anything that belonged to the store. He said he did not and walked out
of the business.
She followed him outside and saw him pull two quart bottles of beer from his
pants.
He went to the back door at Classic Cleaners, where he put down the bottles. An
officer arrived to find him squatting beside a dumpster at the dry cleaners and found
two bottles of Cobra Malt Liquor just inside the back door.
Honnaker was arrested on a charge of petty theft.


Two charged with disorderly intoxication


Man making scene at ER injures himself








Page 4 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL AUGUST 5, 2009


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C'lhnr in (n Ilictrtr/


a/ci I1UI I o.-/U. I IoLIJy IY
Project meets 2nd
Thursday each month
The Blountstown Historic Preserva-
ion Committee Calhoun County His-
ory Project invites you to attend their
board meetings on the second Thursday
Af each month at 5 p.m. (CT) at the re-
tored M&B Train Depot on north Pear -
Street in Blountstown.
These meetings are open to anyone in-
erested in local history. We need your
ielp planning our upcoming events, and
deas developing this community trea-
3ure.
The mission of the Calhoun County
History Project is to acquire and display
teams that depict the rich history of the
people, agriculture, industry, and natural
sources of Calhoun County and sur-
ounding communities.
For more information please contact
he Calhoun County Cooperative Exten-
ion Service at (850) 674-8323 or email-
nbrailroad@yahoo.com.


Freedom from nicotine

s just a call away!
There's good news for Calhoun Cqun-
y residents who want to kick the nicotine
addiction. Several of our local doctors
ind dentists are equipped to provide you
vith free information about quitting ciga-
ettes. Ask your doctor about the Fax-To-
Quit form.
Here's how it works: Your doctor will
ill out the form and fax it to the Florida
QuitLine. Once the form is received, a
rained counselor will contact you on the
late and time that you have requested.
t's just that easy! They also offer free
nicotine replacement. If you are ready to
)e free from nicotine, contact your doc-
or or call the toll free Florida QuitLine 1-
377-U-CAN-NOW.
Fax-To-Quit forms can be obtained by
;ontacting Pamela McDaniel, Tobacco
Prevention Specialist, at 674-5645, ext
236.

Roy Bethum class

reunion meeting
There will be a Roy Bethum class
reunion meeting Wednesday, Aug. 11 at
6:30 p.m. at the Apalachee Restaurant in
Bristol.
Everyone is invited to attend.
For more information call Gloria Parrish
at 643-5338.

Tolar football meeting
A Tolar football meeting is scheduled
for Aug. 17 at 6:30 p.m.
If you are in the 6th-8th grade, attend
either Tolar or Hosford School and would
ike to play football, meet with Coach
Lewis at Tolar Gym at that time.
For more information, you can contact
the front office. 643-2426 ext.104.

The Calhoun-Liberty Journal is
published each Wednesday


by the Liberty Journal Inc.,
Summers Road, P.O. Box 536,
Bristol, FL 32321.
Annual subscriptions are $18.
Periodicals postage paid at Bristol, FL
POSTMASTER: Send address corrections
to: P.O. Box 536, Bristol, FL 32321.


COMMUNITY

ALENDAR


TODAY'S MEETINGS
* Rotary Club, noon,
Calhoun-Liberty Hospital
. Weight Loss Support Group,
1:30 p.m., Shelton Park Library
* Boy Scouts Troop 200, 6:30 p.m.,
Mormon Church in Bristol
* AA, 7 p.m., Calhoun County Old Ag
Bldg. east door, in front of jail


& LEARI6NG
MONTH


TODAY'S MEETINGS
'i Altha Rec. Committee, 6 p.m Altha Town Hall
Nettle Ridge VFD. 7 p m.. Fire House
Mossy Pond VFD. 7 p.m., Fire House
AT. Red Oak VFD. 6.30 p.m Fire House
AA, 7 p m.. basement of Calhoun Co. Courthouse

FRID AYA G S
rM ,rKrrf


EVENTS
Dance, 6 12 p.m., American
Legion Hall in Blountstown


Gates open at 5 p.m.
Call 674-7854


FCCD Chapter 23
Bog-In 1st Annual
Breakaway Catf ish
in DgFountain Tournament'
c5.. .m n til 1 n m


o a.m. unIm i p.m.Ih
Bristol Boat Landing


Dance, 6- 12 p.m.,
American Legion Hall
in Blountstown


TODAY'S MEETINGS
* Walk-A-Weigh Program, 9 a.m., Veterans Memorial Park Civic Center
* Altha Boy Scouts, 5:30 p.m., Altha Volunteer Fire Department
* AA, 6 p.m., Altha Community Center
* Bristol City Council, 6:30 p.m., Bristol City Hall
" Blountstown Lions Club, 6 p.m., Apalachee Restaurant, Bristol



TODAY'S MEETINGS
* Calhoun Co. School Board, 5 p.m., Calhoun Courthouse
* Liberty Co. School Board, 5 p.m., Hwy. 12 S. Admin. Building, Bristol
* Altha Town Council, 6 p.m., Altha Town Hall
* Blounstown City Council, 6 p.m., Blountstown City Hall
* Bristol Lions Club, 7 p.m., Apalachee Restaurant in Bristol
* Blountstown Chapter #179 O.E.S., 7 p.m., Dixie Lodge in Blountstown
* Bristol VFD, 7:30 p.m., Bristol City Hall



NATIONAL

SInUEnTORS$

V MONTH


THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL
Located at 11493 NW Summers Road in Bristol
MAILING ADDRESS: P.O. Box 536, Bristol, FL 32321.
TELEPHONE (850) 643-3333 Fax (850) 643-3334 .j
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JOURNAL STAFF
Johnny Eubanks...............Publisher
Teresa Eubanks....................... Edtor
Gina Grantham.... ......Bookkpper
Missy Tanner...........L..,. .:Advk.ising
Debbie Duggar....ProdvuctonAsssant
OFFICE HOURS:9 am.n- 6pM M-F,


Y, UGUT


" ~ ""~'


Upward Flag Football
evaluations next month
The new Upward Flag Football league
has divisions for boys and girls in the 1st-
6th grade. There will be a weekly team
practice and an optional skills practice.
The practices will be held at the First
Baptist Church Park.
The games will be on Saturdays at the
new Sam Atkins Park football field. The
cost is $45 and registration forms may be
picked up at the First Baptist Church of-
fice, McClellan Chiropractic and the area
schools. The registration forms need to be
returned to the FBC office.
All players must attend one evalua-
tion. Evaluations will be held on Aug. 22,
27 and 29. Practices will begin the week
of Aug. 31 and the first game will be on
Sept. 19.. The six game season will con-
clude on Oct. 24 with an Awards Night
on Oct. 25.
For more information call the FBC of-
fice at 674-5923.

Death by Chocolate

set for Thurs. Aug. 13
Have you ever wanted to eat all the
chocolate you could ever hold? Now is
your chance ... Calhoun County Senior
Citizens will be serving up "Death by
Chocolate" on Thursday, August 13 at 6
p.m. at the W.T. Neal Civic Center
While enjoying your dessert we will
have a silent auction with various items
including: homemade porch furniture,
cruise to Key West & Nassau, paintings,
and many other items.
Advance tickets are just $10. At the
door the cost is $15. Tickets can be
picked up at CCSCA, 16859 NE Cayson
St., Blountstown, or call (850) 674-4163.
With each ticket purchase you will re-
ceive a raffle ticket for the Grand Prize.
You DO have to be present to win!
Come in out of the heat and show your
support for the Calhoun County Senior
Citizens in Calhoun County. If you have
items that you would like to donate for
the auction we would appreciate it.
Thanks for your support.


Family fun set Aug. 29
The Panhandle Pioneer Settlement has
planned a family fun event Friday, Aug.
29 from 6 to 9 p:m. (CT) at Sam Atkins
Park near Blountstown. There will be an
ice cream social, games and music.
Admission is free for the whole fam-
ily! Refreshments are available for a do-
nation.
For more information call (850) 674-
2777.or visit www.ppmuseum.org.





That's how many copies of
The Calhoun-Liberty Journal
were distributed last week,
ensuring plenty of coverage for your
community announcements and
great response for our
business advertisers!


month.


n








AUGUST 5, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 5


Community traffic safety

outreach in Liberty Co.
Program funded by a Highway presentations and hanilds on time
Safety Grant through FDOT during which, the students will
Liberty County Emergency actually drive golf carts through a
Management, in partnership with course to learn how real the dan-
the Liberty County Board of gers.canbe.
County Commissioners and Lib- The dates, times and locations
erty County Community Traffic of the classes are at the Veterans
Safety Team, is offering a new, Memorial Park/Civic Center:
NO COST, Teen Driver Improve- *Aug. 6--8 a.m.-12 p.m. & 1-5
ment Program to teens ages 15-19
p.m..
who have a current Operators Li- *Aug. 8 am1 pm. & 1-5
*Aug. 7--8 a.m.-12 p.m. & 1-5
cense or Learners Permit on the
date of the program. The goal is p.m.
this new program is to educate teen *Aug 8--8:45 a.m.-12:45 pm.
drivers of the dangers of impaired *Aug. 28--3:45-7:45 p.m.
driving, aggressive driving and *Aug. 29--8:45 a.m.-12:45 p.m.
distracted driving and to reinforce *Sept. 5--8:45 a.m.-12:45 p.m.
the benefits of seatbelt use. These *Sept. 12--8-45 a.m.-12:45 p.m.
four issues have been found to be *Sept. 19--8:45 a.m.-12:45 p.m.
the major causes of teen involved 'A times are eastern
crashes, injuries and fatalities. Class sizes are six to twelve
This program is free of cost students. Please call and sched-
and is four hours in duration. The ule a date and time. For more
program consists of classroom information contact Jessica Mc-
instruction, videos, power point Clendon at (850) 643-2339.


Con

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Telogia Creek band wins 1st' place at

'Battle of the Bands' in Crawfordville
Local band Telogia Creek won first place at the Southern Spirits 2009 Bike Fest 'Battle'
of the Bands' in Crawfordville on Saturday, Aug. 1. There were several hundred people
there who voted by ballet for the band they thought was the best. Band members
shown above include, left to right, Skeeter Whidden of Telogia, Ben Stone of Kinard,
Phillip Stidam of Chattahoochee, Mark Donofro and Scotty Henderson of Marianna.


First annual FCCD Chapter 23


Catfish Tournament Sat., Aug. 8


FCCD Chapter 23 will be
having a Catfish Tournament
on August 8. Registration will
begin at 5 a.m. (ET) August 8
at the Bristol Landing and con-
tinue until 12 p.m. (ET). Ad-
vance registration is required if
you wish to have boats inspected
at any authorized landing other
than Bristol Landing. To register
in advance, mail the registration
form with your entry fee of $35
to 11064 NW Dempsey Barron
Road, Bristol, FL 32321 Attn:
Tammy McCroskey. These must
be post marked on or before Au-
gust 5.
Kids division entry: You
must be 14 years of age or under
to participate in this division.
Tournament hours will be
from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. (ET). All
fish to be weighed in must be in
by 7 p.m. (ET) for them to be
counted. This tournament will


raise money for Liberty Coun-
ty's Chapter of FCCD.
For more information about
this tournament you can con-
tact any of the following people:
Warden Liberty CI Chris Doug-
las, FCCD Chapter 23 President
Patricia Perkins, Vice President
Scott Duvall, Treasurer Tammy
McCroskey or Secretary Cin-
dy Swier. Any of them can be
reached at (850) 643-9400 and
after 4 p.m. you can contact
Tommy or Chris Ernest at (850)
627-5400.
What is FCCD? The Florida
Council on Crime and Delin-
quency is a non-profit corpora-
tion dedicated to the promotion
of high professional standards
for Criminal Justice agencies
and Criminal Justice personnel.
The keystone for FCCD is its
educational programs which are
designed to foster an interchange


he said, naming the other two banks as the branches
in Mexico Beach and Carrabelle.
\\'aldorff said around 15 citizens met with bank
officials to tell them the impact the closing would
lha\ e onAltha and ask them to reconsider. "It looked
kind of hopeless there to start with," he said, but
after the meeting, "They were kind of impressed
\ i ll the reaction from the community."
Friday, it was learned that the bank would stay
open..
"I was very impressed at the passion of the
community and its leaders," said David Biliter,
Superior Bank's executive vice-president of retail
banking. "Altha's unique," he said. "We look
forn ard to continuing to be a good member of the
community."
Superior Bank officials attending the June
meeting along with Biliter included George Hall,


of information and training be-
tween the professionals in Law
Enforcement, the Courts, Cor-
rections, Probation and Parole,
Juvenile Justice and Interested
Citizens. Visit the Web site at
www.fccdweb.org. On a more
local front, FCCD is a non-profit
organization that provide com-
munity services such as Toys foi
Tots at Christmas, food drives
during the holidays, Easter egg
hunts for the community, and
school supply drives. In order
for us to continue with our ser-
vice to the community, we need
to raise money to fund these pro-
grams.
We would like to encourage
all interested parties to come out
and have some fun in the sun and
fish with us. This would offer
you the opportunity to help your
community and spend some time
with great people.


the bank's state president; Chief Credit Officer
John.Figlewski, Regional Manager Anna Harris,
Business Relationship Banking executive Shannon
Maddox and Altha Branch Manager Sonya
Edenfield.
Biliter confirmed that their branches in Carrabelle
and Mexico Beach wilflclose. Those operations will
be merged with neighboring Superior Banks in Port
St. Joe and Apalachicola.
Biliter could not give a time frame on how long
the Altha branch would remain open, but stated,
"Our hope is that we don't ever have to close it."
He added, "Our commitment is to do everything
in our power to work with the community to see
if we can grow. We have to become profitable in
that location by growing relationships. We've just
got to go out and find those who aren't banking
with us already."


( pf Expedia'
1 f cruisesrpcentfers'


Roy Barnes, Independent Cruise Consultant
with ExpediaD CruiseShipCenters,'
Expediai'' CruiseShipCenters''
is North America's #1 seller of Enter For Your
cruise vacations, where you Chance to Win a FREE
can get the best value on the Caribbean Cruise lor two
widest selection of cruises. Dby logging on to my webslie
including discounted prices / a www.cruiseshipcenters.
that aren't advertised to the com/roybarnes. ClicK on
general public. Ihe log-in icon and then on
Join7Seas. Complete the
As a Cruise Consultant I information and submitl.
continuously participate in Cruise
Line and Association training to
provide quality service. If you have any questions,
please give me a call or send me an email.
Roy Barnes -(850)814-3941 rbames@cruiseshipcenters.com


ALTH BRNC cniu fo pag 1iWT









Page 6 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL AUGUST 5, 2009


















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A woman from my high school
days sends me doom and damnation
e-mails on a regular basis. The latest
one says that the government is com-
ing for our guns. About once a week,
there is a letter in the local newspaper
warning all of us that the government
is going to take away our guns.
The National Rifle Association is a


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Associated Press, the NRA is putting the pressure on
senators who vote for confirmation of Supreme Court
nominee Sonia Sotomayor, as if she could convince the
So other eight judges to trash the Second Amendment.
Mi o The Second Amendment is etched in stone and the
b _____ likelihood that congress would attempt to dilute the
amendment is utter foolishness. We are all armed to the
teeth and congress knows it. So, I say to my paranoid
friends, "What's your point?"
Seemingly intelligent people that I have met over the
past fifty years send me e-mails questioning whether
SPresident Obama was bom in the U.S. Obama's birth
certificate in on the White House Web page. There is a
*- notice in the birth announcements in the Honolulu news-
paper written at the time of his birth. People say the birth
certificate is faked, but the archival data can't be faked.
It was written forty-something years ago.
The proposed changes to the healthcare program have
many people in a tailspin. Changes to Medicare will
cause old people to die. According to one senior citizen's
letter in the local paper, all of us on Medicare would-
have to be counseled every five years about "palliative
care and hospice for seniors."
I regularly receive mail about long-term healthcare
and medical service for the aging. My mother died at
age 95 in a nursing home. She was there four years.
Even though my first instinct was to bring her into my
house, medical people involved in long-term care ad-
vised against it. She required 24-hour care and my wife
and I would have become 24-hour nurses, but my mother
wanted to maintain as much independence as possible.
The nursing home was the best choice.
A brother-in-law died last January from cancer. He
spent his last days in hospice. So, being counseled about
what long-term care or hospice services are available is


probably information that we all could
SS 1use. So, the belief that the government
IN ER is going to ration medical care to seniors
and let them die is foolish. But it is also
tired military tnie that in some cases death is inevi-
th an extensive
omestiand table, and there is nothing else that the
domestic and
es. He lives in doctor can do to prolong one's life. That
was the case for my brother-in-law. But
the government is not promoting eutha-
nasia.
Another myth going about is. that
healthcare will be rationed but Medicare will cover abor-
tions. Abortion is not mentioned in the House bill.
Racism has reared its ugly head again. President
.Obama didn't help matters when he commented on the
Professor Gates and the Cambridge police sergeant al-
tercation. Mr. Obama would have been well served to
have ignored the question.
A black man in the White House is bothering some
people. I get a couple of e-mails a week that make the
point that Mr. Obama is black. They don't use the "N"
word but their inference is clear. The Professor Gates
thing got them riled up. I guess that the president's "beer
summit" wasn't enough to clear up that foolish event for
some people.
I think that President Obama had good intentions
when he announced that America's healthcare programs
had to be revised. The problem is that financially, Amer-
ica's healthcare system is unsustainable, meaning Amer-
ica will go broke if something doesn't change.
Good intentions aren't enough. My grandmother use
to say, "The road to Hell is paved with good intentions."
While the proposed healthcare change is a good and nec-
essary thing, the plan is unraveling like a cheap shirt.
The American people are confused, addled with eyes
glazed over from all the events that have occurred like
TARP, stimulus, GM takeover and then Mr. Obama has
the gall to toss out healthcare change, and the whole
nation has gone tilt like a pinball machine. Lights are
flashing, bells are ringing and people are in the overload
mode.
What does it all mean? For starters, it means that we
as a society and our form of government are not capable
with dealing with complicated issues. Is there a solu-
tion? I doubt it because no matter how much we wish,
it's not 1776 anymore.


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AUGUST 5,2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 7


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Page 8 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL AUGUST 5, 2009


Wishin' you were fishing?


Have you ever been sitting in
church but wishin' you were on
the water? On the weekend of
August 15 and 16 you can have
both at the Bristol Pentecostal
Holiness Church located on Sol-
omon Street.
We will kick off our water
weekend on Saturday, August 15
at 9 a.m. with a one day VBS/
Water Park.
Please bring your children
ages 4-12 along with a towel

Prayer Band
meets Aug. 6
There will be a Prayer Band
meeting Thursday, Aug. 6 at
7:30 p.m. at Brother and Sister
Louie Beckwith's home at 11810
NW Edwards Road in Bristol.
Everyone is invited to attend.
For more information, call
643-3660.

Praising Prayer
Band to meet
There will be a Praising Prayer
Band meeting Wednesday, Aug.
5 at 7 p.m. at Brother James
Lane's home on Chestnut Lane
in Bristol. Everyone is invited
to attend.
For more information, call
643-5958.


and let them join in the fun. All we
children need to be wearing their from the
swimsuit (under their clothes)
and sunscreen when they arrive. Pe W s
Lunch will be served. P
Children will need to be .
picked up by 3:30 p.m.
On Sunday morning our pas-
tor will be delivering an illustrat-
ed sermon. Immediately follow-
ing our service we will have a
picnic lunch with homemade ice
cream for dessert. Please come
dressed in. casual attire for our
Sunday morning service.
Sunday morning services be-
gin with Sunday School at 9:45
a.m. and the morning worship
beginning at 11 a.m.

Clothing giveaway Aug. 8
The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints will be sponsor-
ing a free clothing giveaway on Saturday, Aug. 8 from 8 a.m. to 12
noon (ET). There will be something for the whole family.
The church is located on Myers Ann Street in Bristol. Everyone
is welcome.

Women's Missionary meeting
The Women's Missionary Group from the River of Life Assembly
of God will be having their monthly meeting Thursday, Aug. 6.
The meeting will be at 6 p.m. in the church fellowship hall. The
church is located at 10800 Spring Branch Road.

Yard sale set this Saturday
River of Life Assembly of God will be holding a yard sale Satur-
day, Aug. 8 beginning at 8 a.m. in the church fellowship hall.
The church is located at 10800 Spring Branch Road. Follow the
signs, there will be something for everyone.


Revival planned Aug. 5-16
Word of Truth will host two weeks of special services beginning
Wednesday night, Aug. 5 and continuing through Sunday night,
Aug. 16.
Services will be on Wednesdays, Fridays, and Saturdays at 7 p.m.,
and Sunday afternoon at 3 p.m. Make plans to come and enjoy the
great ministry of Rev. Steve Grimsley from Tennessee. He will min-
ister to those with special needs each night. If you are ready for a
change in your life, this revival is for you.
Pastor Ron Baker and the entire Word of Truth Church family
cordially invite you to attend. Word of Truth is located behind City
Tire'on Highway 20 West.
All services will be interpreted for the deaf; also, signed dramatic
songs will be presented several nights during the revival.
For more information, call the church office at 674-4605.

FAITH OUTREACH ANOINTED MINISTRIES
FUND-RAISER EVENT
3rd Annual Cake Sale 2009. We are doing it again so order one
of our top sellers such as Red Velvet, Rainbow Pound Cake w/
Cream Cheese Batter, Sour Cream Pound Cake, Cream Cheese
Pound Cake, and more.
So call or e-mail us today to find out how you can order @ 850-
210-5256 or faithoutreachanointedmini@yahoo.com.
Also, we make special designed cakes and if it's not on our list
just ask and we will make your cake.
You have from now until January 09, 2010 to order.
1ST ANNUAL FOOD DRIVE MINISTRY 2009
We will be taking in food for our Food Drive Ministry starting Au-
gust 20, 2009 until October 17, 2009. We will be picking up food
from donors and you may drop off food to our address 363 Carter
Rd, Quincy. Any can goods, boxed food,.cake mix, cake icing, fruit,
veggies, and etc. are welcome. If you would rather give a donation
toward this event please make check or money order payable to:
F.O.A.M/ Minister Paul Weston. You may give cash also.
Remember, this food is to feed those in need and cannot afford to
have a proper Thanksgiving Dinner. We will notify the papers with
the outcome of the drive and who the food will go to.
For more information on how to donate your food or money please
call or e-mail us at 850-210-5256 or faithoutreachanointedmini@
yahoo.com You may also help us give the food away.


BcZShoLIJ%
k-^~ff!, 2 S -...i- i


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Walk-Ins welcome & most glasses made in 1 hour!


1 South East Eve Specialists t
I' James Stephens, O.D. W Stan Peacock, O.D. Josh Trafton, O.D.
21 South Madison Street Quincy, FL 32351 (850) 627-9521 .
Some restrictions apply. Does not include any other extras or upgrades. Cannot be combined with any other coupons, discounts, or insurances. Must be under 18 years of age or have a valid student ID.






AUGUST 5, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 9


'" OLD FARMEU'S


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Syndicated Content


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- __


PETS HR PEOPLE


Freddie Duggar & Alice Nell
Alice Nell Duggar, a full-blooded Golden Retriever, started out her life living in Tal-
lahassee with a little three-year-old girl named Marygrace Duggar. When Marygrace's
father was transferred to Baton Rouge, Freddie and Peggy Duggar of Bristol said they
would keep Alice until their granddaughter had a place to play with her. Five years
later, Alice Nell and Freddie are best pals. Alice rides in Freddie's little red truck all over
Bristol. "Every day, Alice goes on a field trip," says Freddie. Her trip could be to the
post office, the drug store, to get coffee at the Express Lane, the bank or even to the
farm to pick blueberries. He says she minds real good and follows him everywhere.
Alice, now 10 1/2 years old, has never met a stranger and loves to get pats on her head.
Even though Marygrace now has a place to let Alice roam, Alice stays with Freddie and
Peggy. He says that she is his dog now. Marygrace:, now 12 years old, enjoys visiting
her grandparents here in Bristol and playing with Alice.
PETS AND THEIR PEOPLE IS SPONSORED BY
Altha Farmers Co-op, Inc.
We've got the feed you need to keep your animals happy and healthy!
CATTLE HORSES DOGS CATS BIRDS and more.
Altha Store Blountstown Branch Marianna Branch
Phone: (850) 762-3161 Phone: (850) 673-8102 Phone: (850) 482-2416


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Page 10 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL AUGUST 5, 2009


August activities include Pier Park trip,

monthly craft class in Hosford & Bristol


The following events are
scheduled for Liberty County
Senior Citizens for the month
of August:
Thursday, Aug. 6 Mari-
anna Wal-Mart shopping and
lunch.
Tuesday, Aug. 11-11 a.m.
at Hosford Center A repre-
sentative from the Department
of Health in Tallahassee will
give a presentation on Colon
Cancer.
If you need a ride to the
Hosford Center, call Liberty
Transit at 643-2524 no later
than 3 p.m., Thursday, Aug. 6.
Call Jeannette at 643-5690 if
you plan to attend.
Thursday, Aug. 13 Pig-
gly Wiggly grocery shopping
and lunch. Call Liberty Tran-
sit at 643-2524 no later than
3 p.m., Monday, Aug. 10 to
reserve your Transit ride.
Monday, Aug. 17 7 p.m.
at the Bristol Senior Center,
the Liberty County Board of
Directors will meet. The pub-
lic is welcome to attend.
Tuesday, Aug. 18 A trip
to the Grand Theatre at Pier
Park in Panama City Beach
has been scheduled. You can
relax in a seat that rocks and
enjoy a movie in a very nice
theatre. The group will have
lunch at a restaurant. Call
Liberty Transit at 643-2524
no later than 3 p.m. to reserve
your transit ride.
Thursday, Aug. 20 Mar-
ianna Wal-Mart shopping and
lunch. Call Liberty Transit at
643-2524 no later than 3 p.m.,
Monday, Aug. 17 to reserve
your Transit ride.


Thursday, Aug. 20 The
Liberty County Senior Citi-
zens Advisory Council will
meet at 1 p.m. at the Bristol
Senior Center.
Wednesday, Aug. 26 -
10:30 a.m. at the Bristol Se-
nior Center, we are begin-
ning a monthly craft class for
seniors who are age 60+. We
are excited about this new ad-
venture.
The first class will be deco-
rating picture frames. Tell
your friends about this and be
prepared to share ideas for fu-
ture classes. There will be a
drawing for a door prize.
Call Jeannette at 643-5690
for information. Lunch will
be provided for all attending
seniors. This time will also
be used for informing Lib-
erty County residents about
services that are provided
by Liberty County Senior
Citizens and Liberty County
Transit, if you want informa-
tion on these services, please
visit with us.
Thursday, Aug. 27 11
a.m. at the Hosford Center.
We are beginning a monthly
craft class in Hosford for se-
niors who are age 60+. The
first class will be decorating
picture frames. Bring a friend
and be prepared to share ideas
for future classes: There will
be a drawing for a door prize.


Call Jeannette at 643-5690
for information. Lunch will
be provided for all attending
seniors. This time will also
be used for informing Lib-
erty County residents about
services that are provided
by Liberty County Senior
Citizens and Liberty County
Transit, if you want informa-
tion on these services, please
visit with us.
Thursday, Aug. 27 Pig-
gly Wiggly grocery shopping.
Call Liberty Transit at 643-
2524 no later than 3 p.m.,
Monday, Aug. 24 to reserve
your Transit ride.
Saturday, Aug. 29 From
7:30 p.m. until 12 midnight
the Liberty County Senior
Citizens is hosting a fundrais-
ing dance at Veterans Memo-
rial Park Civic Center. The
Morris Brother and Easy
Company Band will be per-
forming. Admission price
is $5 per person. Hamburg-
ers, hot dogs, french fries and
drinks will be sold. Be sure
to mark this date on your cal-
endar and plan to attend for a
fun time. Call 643-5690 for
information.
Monday, Sept. 7 La-
bor Day, the Liberty County
Senior Citizens in Bristol
and Hosford and the Liberty
County Transit will be closed
for observance of Labor Day.


Adina Combs wins $200 gift certificate
The Liberty County Senior Citizens congratulate Adina
Combs of Hosford for winning the $200 Piggly Wiggly Gift
Certificate. The ticket was drawn Friday, July 31.
We sincerely appreciate everyone who donated to have their
name in the pot for the drawing.


JL

Tallahassee Memorial
Family Medicine
Blountstown


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AUGUST 5, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 11


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Rotary Club awards EMT scholarships


Wesley Newsome and Brian Flowers.have
been named recipients of a Blountstown Ro-
tary Club Scholarship. Both were awarded full
scholarships to Chipola to continue their edu-
cation in the medical field in the EMT program.
Wesley Newsome is currently working part-
time with Adams Funeral Home and attending
the Fire Academy at Chipola. Brian Flowers is
a CNA at Calhoun-Liberty Hospital.
The presentation was made at the regular


Blountstown Rotary Club meeting on July 29.
The Rotary Club meets each Wednesday at
noon at the Calhoun-Liberty Hospital lunch-
room.
Rotary Club members pictured front, left
to right: Harry 'Hagan, Terri Waldron, Wesley
Newsome, Margie Mason, Brian Flowers and
Angie Hill. In back: Ron Gilliard, Ken Sheppard,
James Woods, Danny Ryals, Joanna Bowman,
Phillip Hill and Tim Adams..


The Medical Center


OF BLOUNTSTOWN

Dr. Iqbal Faruqui Arlena Falcor
Board Certified Dorcas Goodma
Internal Medicine


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Page 12 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL AUGUST 5,2009


B 1RT H DDAYSiSl


ALEXIS
TAPP
Alexis Tapp celebrated her
tenth birthday on July 31.
She is the daughter of Sa-
brina Tapp of Blountstown
and Marshall Tapp of Blount-
stown. Her grandparents
include Charles and Bonita
Grantham of Blountstown,
Tim and Tammy Tapp of Ft.
Walton Beach and Donna
Manning of Altha. Her great-
grandparents are Charles and
Dorothy Grantham of Blount-
stown and Faye and the late
James Jerkins of Bristol. She
enjoys cheerleading, softball
and listening to music.


ABBIGAYLE
PENA
Abbigayle Pena will celebrate
her second birthday on Aug.
6. She is the daughter of Jam-
mie Taylor and Carlos Pena
of Altha. Her grandparents
include Steve and Lisa Taylor
of Altha and Ralph and Dean-
na Lawson of Marianna. She
enjoys riding the 4-wheeler
with Paw-paw, wearing Mi-
mi's shoes and playing with
her big brother, Gage.


*..


--,


DELAYNA
MORGAN DALTON
Delayna Morgan Dalton
celebrated her tenth birth-
day on July 27. She is the
daughter of Janie Dalton
and Kris Bailey of Bristol
and Chad Dalton of Bristol.
Her grandparents include
Joyce and David Hardwick
of Bristol, Dianne Evans
of Altha and Massey and
Edwinna Dalton of Bristol.
Her great-grandparents are
Deloyce and the late Lewis
Fenn of Orange and Viv-
ian Bailey .of Blountstown.
Delayna enjoys shopping,
drawing, swimming, rid-
ing the four wheeler at her
daddy's and playing with
her step-siblings, Blake
and Montana Bailey. She
celebrated her birthday
with a trip to Disney and
then a spa slumber party at
home with her "besties."


The


Come try
Served all


CHELSEA BATEMAN
Chelsea Bateman, who is
called Chelly by her friends
and family, celebrated her 15th
birthday on July 27. Although
Chelsea had several parties
and events centered around
celebrating her birthday the
'funniest" part was going to
the Driver's License office to
get her learner's license. She
is the daughter of Reggie and
Edie Ethridge of Bristol and
Brian and Nannette Bateman
of Blountstown. She has two
sisters, Kristen and Clary.
She is the granddaughter of
Marvin and Mildred Goodson
and John, and Lila Davis and
the great-granddaughter of
Shirley Bateman, all of Bris-
tol. Chelsea enjoys texting
with her friends, driving every
chance she gets and shop-
ping with Mimi. She also
likes hanging out with her sis-
ters and cousins and going
to Wednesday and Sunday
night church services. She
is excited to be entering her
freshman year at LCHS.


L



Restaurant

our coffee...
I day long!


1 Hwy. 20, Bristol 643-2264 "



CCAHE CC *
BEST DEAL IN THE TRI-STATE AREA!
Slow credit, no problem WA.C.
Hand-picked quality cars and trucks.
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Residence (850) 762-3679
Toll Free: 1-888-740-8222 1

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TREVAN ALEXANDER and
CHAYCEN CADE WOOD
Trevan Alexander Wood celebrated his first birthday on June
26 and Chaycen Cade Wood celebrated his fourth birthday on
August 2. They are the sons of Arthur and Angel Wood and
brothers to Shay Wood, all of Bristol. Their parental grand-
parents are Eugene and Barbara Wood of Bristol. Maternal
grandparents include Lamar and Debby Hatcher of Marianna.
Their great-grandmother is Dorothy Dudley of Blountstown.
Chaycen and Trevan both enjoy spending time with their cous-
ins and playing Thomas the Train.


112


Contact me today for
a FREE 10 minute
educational DVD by mail
"Annuities- A Safe
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Presented by Fran Tarkenton
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MARA
CAITLYN MYERS
Mara Caitlyn Myers celebrat-
ed her tenth birthday on July
30. She is the daughter of
Jack and Amanda Myers of
Bristol. Her maternal grand-
parents are Victor and Marilyn
Smith of Telogia and David
and Debbie Lollie of Tallahas-
see. Her paternal grandpar-
ents are Albert and Wanda
McCallister of Blue Creek.
She enjoys painting, reading,
sewing and telling her little
sister Savannah what to do.


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Located in Harvey's shopping center in Blountstown
Telephone 674-FROG (3764)


Free Consulation, call Les rown at 643-15666








AUGUST 5, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 13


A large selection of new and used cars are
now available at Chipola Ford in Marianna!
Ronnie Coley personally invites you to visit him any
time Monday thru Saturday from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Questions? Give him a call at (850)482-4043.
HE IS WAITING FOR YOUR CALL!
I,'5741.


r7/Tieu/ fettqya


MARRIED













They are registered
at Blountstown Drugs.


Registering for your wedding is easy
and convenient at Blountstown Drugs.
Come in today and ask for details.


GIFTS AVAILABLE FOR
SPECIAL ORDER INCLUDE:
*Plates Bowls
*Mugs *Bakeware
Any gift item in stock is also
available for the registry.


K


- No need to leave
town to shop for .'
a wedding gill.
Come see the huge
. selection of gifts 2
. we have in stock. .J
.?6,". '*slK.l?~lx..


BLOUNTSTOWH DRUGS
Locally owned and operated by Pharmacist Jon Plummer.
20370 Central Ave. W. Blountstown 674-2222


Lawrence

Siuimar

SHOSPiTaL
Jerry C. Lawrence, DVM
Emergencies:
(850) 856-5827 or (850) 856-5918
Hours:
Monday- Friday 7 a.m. to 5 p.m.
DOCTOR'S HOURS BY APPOINTMENT.
WE PROVIDE: Boarding
Grooming Preventative
Healthcare programs which include vac-
cinations and yearly checkups
Spay/neuter program to reduce
unwanted puppies/kittens.
PLUS MANY OTHER SERVICES.
CALL US ANYTIME IF YOU HAVE
ANY QUESTIONS.
43 N. Cleveland St., Quincy OF-
FICE (850) 627-8338 uM


WEDDING

Eberly, Haussmann announce

plans for October 10 ceremony
Mr. and Mrs. Doyle Eberly
are pleased to announce the
engagement and forthcom-
ing wedding of their daugh-
ter, Robin Deanne to Simon
Rainer Haussmann of Berlin,
Germany. Simon is the son of
Rainer and Heiderose Hauss-
mann.
pia on Robin is the granddaugh-
ter of Ella Mae Detweiler and
the late Harvey Detweiler.
Her paternal grandparents
f are John and Ruby Eberly of
Blountstown.
Simon is the grandson of
Christa Haussmann of Berlin
and the late Oswald Hauss-
1 mann. His maternal grand-
parents are the late Siegmund
and Ilse Muller.
Robin is a graduate of
Blountstown High School,
Gulf Coast Community Col-
lege and the University of
40 t Florida. She is currently en-
rolled in the Physician Assis-
tant program at Nova South-
eastern University. She will
graduate on Aug. 30.
Mike and Michalle S'imon attended Blount-
Kilts are pleased stown High School as an ex-
change student in 2001 and
Mk announce the
then returned home to Berlin
40th anniversary to complete his Abitur. He
celebration of graduated fromTeidel School
ofBerlin in June 2009 with his
their parents, Joe degree in Physical Therapy.
and Audrey Kilts. Simnon and Robin plan to
make their home in Florida
All friends and family are invited to a chicken after their Oct. 10 wedding.
pilau on August 8 at 1 p.m. at the home of Mike All friends and family are
Kilts and Miley Williams. Please bring a covered invited to the home of Doyle
dish. Call 544-0857 for more information, and Ruth Ann Eberly where
you can enjoy the traditions
of a combined American and
German wedding.
For further information
visit, www.mywedding.com/
SimonandRobin.






Page 14 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL AUGUST 5, 2009
addIN anadr


Ballet is hard work.....






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reamsJ caan come~ twe//
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A little girl gets a big hug from the Piggly Wiggly mascot
during Saturday's annual Family Affair event, held at the
W.T. Neal Civic Center in Blountstown. JOSEPH SUMMERS PHOTO


CLASSES START AUG. 17


Call 643-9808 for more information
`:i






AUGUST 5,2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page15


* e& -- -'.


Students get a look at one of the many classrooms that will be in use soon at the new Hosford School. JOHNNY EUBANKS PHOTOS


Hostord School Dedication


There was plenty of room to roam for v
who came to Saturday's dedication of th
Hosford School. The new gym is shown a
while a line of spotless equipment waits
kitchen for the first meal of the school y
be prepared, below right. Families er
exploring the library, below.


P* 'Pwfcwiw iM t~e ?4ww










Page 16 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL AUGUST 5,2009


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Ribbon-cutting held for Pear Street



Sidewalk Project in Blountstown


City officials gathered Monday in Blountstown to officially open the
new section of sidewalk that extends Pear Street from the train depot
to the Hwy. 69 intersection.
The new sidewalk is five feet wide and 4/10ths of a mile long. The
$331,000 project was funded by the Safe Routes to School Program.
"The streets had begun to show cracking wear down to the base," the
city manager said. "They were resurfaced so they would be stabilized
and good for another 20 years or so."
He said the work has inspired others in the area to spruce up their
own property. "Ifs spurred a bit of pride in the neighborhood," said
Woods.
The project also included resurfacing a haif mile of Pear Street to the
Hwy. 69 intersection, at a price of around $200,000. That also included
resurfacing Johnson Street, near the Fuqua Circle Apartments.
ABOVE: Doing the honors, Dowling Parnsh, Danny Ryals, City
Manager James Woods, Police Chief Glenn Kimbrel, Clerk of Court
Ruth Attaway and other members of the Pear Street Sidewalk Project.
The depot building is at the right; the trail is shown at far left.
CENTER: An island was installed at the Hwy. 69/Pear Street
intersection to slow down traffic. BELOW: A wide view of the Hwy. 69/


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Pear Street intersection, facing south. "We want to remind everybody
that the Pear Street and Railroad intersection is now an all-ways
stop," said Woods. "The stop signs are up; the L.E.D. and pedestrian
crosswalk signs are coming." JOCHNNi EUBAr4KS PHOTOS


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AUGUST 5, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 17
I..,


S ,News, Stay Tuned
S Music, \ .' For
Spos Trivia,
We Have I ,.' Swap
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News & Weather Coverage
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ACREAGE FOR SALE
Liberty County Rd Frontage
From $4,995 per acre
$1000.00 Total Down
Owner Financing, No Qualifying
Tri-land Inc. Broker Phone (813) 253-3258


John Ritter works
hard chopping
potatoes
so the class
can start
cooking.


BELOW:
Chef
Tanner
checks
the
food
as it
cooks
in the
oven.


\*


S'Tops & Bottoms'


.... cooking class


v. shows adults


how to make


a special meal
12.' ...
tI .,


I Liberty

Post and

Barn Pole Inc.
DEMPSEY BARRON ROAD,
BRISTOL (OFF HWY. 12 N)
Phone (850) 643-5995


TOP
GRADE
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Twelve adults attended the 'Tops and
Bottoms' cooking class July 21 sponsored
by the University of Florida/IFAS/Liber-
ty County Family Nutrition Program and
the Liberty County Health Department
Healthy Communities Healthy People.
We've been very fortunate to have
Chef Vernon Tanner from Chartwells to
join us and teach knife skills and safety
along with cooking tips.
The menu of the evening was:
*Breadcrumb crusted chicken breast
*Sage butter sauce
*Summer roasted squash
*Mashed red potatoes
*Chocolate truffle tart
It was a scrumptious success! Every-
one was surprised at how good the Oven
Fried Chicken was. Thank you, Chef
Vernon Tanner! Keep an eye out at the
Liberty County Schools for new and ex-
citing dishes for our kids and adults.
For more information on the next adult
cooking class, please contact Shellie King
at the Liberty County Extension Office at
643-2229 or Susan Chafin at the Liberty
County Health Department at 643-2415
ext.245.


-------


--5'C


Chocolate Truffle Tart


-8 oz.
1 cup
1/2 stick
1/2 cup
3


Semi Sweet Chocolate (chopped)
Heavy Cream or low fat milk
Unsalted Butter
Sugar
Large eggs


Preheat oven to 350, place chocolate, cream I
and butter in a sauce pan, bring to a boil and turn
off. I
While the chocolate melts, place sugar and
eggs in a bowl. Whisk the egg mixture until lightI
in color. (This may take 2 to 4 minutes by hand)
Then whisk the melted chocolate mixture to com-
bine. Slowly add egg mixture to prevent the eggs |
from cooking, whisk together as adding in.
Pour into your prepared tart shells. I
Bake at 3500 until the sides are slightly puffed.
Take out of the oven and allow to cool. I




.


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Page 18 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL AUGUST 5, 2009


Baseball playoffs in

In Sunday afternoon's first
round of the Big Bend Baseball Bay Brewers
playoffs, No. 4 seed Bay Coun- & GulfDrive go
ty Brewers host defeated No. 5
seed Chattahoochee Red Birds forward after First
20-10. In the game hosted by Round of the Big
No. 3 seed Gulf County Drive Bend Baseball
(PSJ),-the Drive defeated No. 6 Playoff
seed Jackson County Jays 9-0. layoffs
This sends Gulf and Bay to the
second round of the playoffs next
Sunday.
On Sunday, Aug. 9, the second round of Championshi
Big Bend will be played as follows: will be played&


full swing

*No. 4 seed Bay Brewers
will play No. 1 seed Liberty
Diamond Dawgs. This game
will be played at 3 p.m. (ET)
at 'Bristol High School.
*No. 3 seed Gulf Drive
will play No. 2 seed Calhoun
County Horsemen. This game
will be played at 2 p.m. (CT)
at Altha High School.
The winners of the second
round will advance to the
p Series the best 2 of 3 games
dAugust 15-16.


Youth baseball camp Aug. 10-12 in Altha


There will be a youth
baseball camp for local area
kids Aug. 10-12 from 3-7
p.m. (CT) at the Altha High
School baseball field.
There will be a charge of
$80 per child to cover the
travel costs for Next Level
Baseball's staff to travel.to
our area. They are based out
ofTallahassee and are affili-
ated with Titus Sports Acad-
emy.
Any child interesting in
amending can contact Frank


King at (850) 209-2647.
The staff will be composed
of several ex-pro and col-
lege baseball players. We
will ask that the children
arrive one hour early on the
first day for sign up.
Our goal is to get as many
local children involved as
possible to increase the in-
terest and involvement in
our Dixie Youth Baseball
League.
There has been a decline
nationwide in participation


in the past couple of years.
This is a great oppor-
tunity for the local kids to
get first class instruction
and have a chance to meet
and learn from some really
good professional level
players.
This same camp has been
going on in Tallahassee all
summer, the cost to attend
in Tallahassee is around
$175 per child a great sav-
ings and no traveling a long
way.


k.a*


Signing up for Soccer
Dustin Hostertter waits patiently as his mother, Kristi fills out the
necessary papers to get him registered for soccer. The Liberty
County Recreation Department will accept registration through-
out the entire month of August at the recreation office at Veterans
Memorial Civic Center. No further registrations will be accepted
afterAug. 31. For further information, please call the Liberty Rec-
reation Dept. at 643-2175. JOSPEH SUMMERS PHOTO


ALL ESE FAILS,


IE THERE



-,, ,'"
'Aw e- a/. er S ie


.' 7r to di 5 ^, ,r' c. /.' e


***y 1 - '> -


S\


/I


Celebrate Smokey Bear's 65th


birthday Saturday in Tallahassee


T.A.LLA-
HASSEE--The ,
U.S. Forest Ser-
vice invites the "
public to cel-
ebrate Smokey
Bear's birthday
at the Tallahas-
see Museum
Aug. 8, from
10 a.m. to 3
p.m.. "Smokey
is an American
icon and we are
honored to invite the Tallahassee
and surrounding communities to
celebrate and share his legacy,"
said Lynne Howard, U.S. Forest
Service Fire Staff Officer. "His
enduring *message of wildfire
prevention communicated to
generations of Americans over
the past 65 years remains criti-
cal today as it was when he was
introduced in 1944."
To help celebrate Smokey's
birthday, the U.S. Forest Service
in partnership with the Tallahas-
see Museum, are offering the
following:
S VFree admission to the mu-
seum throughout the day and
three. guided tour opportunities
through he "Wild Florida Trail"
V Appearances by Smokey
Bear with photo opportunities
V Fun activities such as face
painting by the Florida Division
of Forestry "Fire Prevention


Clowns," Florida Black Bear
paw print craft table, and GPS
tracking of a toy bear on the
Wild Florida Trail
/ Games and prize give-
aways
V Fire suppression equipment
displays and meet/greet' with
U.S. Forest Service firefighters
V Prescribed fire ignition
demonstrations with U.S. Forest
Service fire management experts
on hand to discuss how pre-
scribed fire is vital to maintain-
ing ecosystems in the National
Forests in Florida (please be ad-
vised that this demo may affect
individuals sensitive to smoke)
V Refreshments, to include
grilled hot dogs, cake and water
Since his "birth" on Aug. 9,
1944, Smokey Bear has been a
recognized symbol of conserva-
tion and protection of America's
forests. Smokey's message of


"Only ,ou can.
prevent wild-
fires" is about
wildfire preven-
tion, and has
helped reduce the
number of acres
burned annu-
ally by wildfires,
from about 22
S* million acres in
1944 to an aver-
age of 7 million
acres today.
Wildfire prevention remains
one of the most critical envi-
ronmnental issues affecting our
nation's forests. Many people
believe that lightning starts inost
wildfires. In fact, on average, 9
out of 10 wildfires nationwide
are principally caused by unat-.
tended campfires, trash burning
on windy days, arson, careless
discarding of smoking materi-
als or BBQ coals and operating
equipment without spark arres-
tors.
More information about
Smokey Bear can be found at
www.smokeybear.com.
The Tallahassee Museum
is located at 3945 Museum
Drive, Tallahassee, FL, 32310.
Other organizations support-
ing Smokey's birthday celebra-
tion include The Home Depot,
Florida Division of Forestry and
Wakulla Bank.


*^../


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AUGUST 5, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 19


Lobster season runs Aug. 6 through March 31, 2010


Recreational and commer-
cial harvest seasons for spiny
lobster in Florida are set to re-
open soon. The special two-
day spiny lobster sport season
came first, July 29-30 this
year, followed by the regular
lobster season Aug. 6 March
31.
The special two-day sport
season occurs on the last
consecutive Wednesday and
Thursday in July each year
to let recreational fishermen
collect spiny lobsters before
commercial lobster traps are
placed in the water. Com-
mercial fishermen may begin
putting their traps in the water
Aug. 1, and recreational and
commercial fishermen may
harvest spiny lobsters starting
Aug. 6.
Spiny lobsters must have a
carapace length greater than
3 inches to be taken during


the open seasons, and divers
must possess a measuring de-
vice and measure all lobsters
in the water.
During the two-day spiny
lobster sport season, divers
and snorkelers are allowed to
take up to 6 lobsters per per-
son daily in Monroe County
and Biscayne National Park
waters and 12 lobsters per
person daily in other Florida
waters. Lobster fishermen
may possess no more than
the daily bag limit of lobsters
when on the water.
When lobster fishermen are
off the water, they may pos-
sess the daily bag limit on the
first day and double the daily
bag limit on the second day.
Possession limits are enforced
on and off the water during
the two-day sport season.
Night diving for spiny lob-
sters during the two-day sport


OUT

DOORS

News from The FL
Fish and Wildlife
Conservation
Commission









season is not allowed in Mon-
roe County, and all harvest of
lobsters is prohibited in John
Pennekamp Coral Reef State
Park during the two-day sea-
son.
Lobster harvest is also
prohibited at all times in Ev-


erglades National Park, Dry
Tortugas National Park, Bis-
cayne Bay/Card Sound Spiny
Lobster Sanctuary, certain
areas in Pennekamp Park,
and the no-take areas :in the
Florida Keys National Marine
Sanctuary.
During the Aug. 6 March
31 regular season, the daily
recreational bag and on-the-
water possession limit is 6
spiny lobsters per person.
Recreational harvesters
must have a saltwater fishing
license or beginning Aug.
1 a resident shoreline fish-
ing license if they are wading
from shore, and a spiny lob-
ster permit to harvest spiny
lobsters unless they are ex-
empt from the recreational
license requirements.
Divers and snorkelers are
required to display a "divers-
down" flag (red with a white


. diagonal stripe) while in the
water. Divers-down flags dis-
played on vessels must be at
least 20 inches by 24 inches,
and a stiffener is required to
keep the flag unfurled. Dive
flags carried on floats must
be at least 12 inches by 12
inches.
The FWC's Web site has more in-
formation as follows:
*Dive flag requirements My-
FWC.com/Boating
*Licenses and permit require-
ments MyFWC.com/License
*Spiny lobster rules and regu-
lations MyFWC.com/RULESAN-
DREGS/Saltwater_Regulations_
lobster, htm
*Monroe County lobster fish-
ing brochure MyFWC.com/docs/
RulesRegulations/Lobster_Bro-
chure.pdf
*Commercial lobster fishing
-MyFWC.com/RULESANDREGS/
SaltwaterRules_CommercialRegs.
htm.


Shoreline fishing license requirement starts Aug. 1


Time's up. Florida's new
shoreline fishing license re-
quirement takes effect Aug.
1, so resident anglers who
fish for saltwater species from
shore or a structure affixed to
shore must have a $9 shoreline
fishing license or a $17 regu-
lar "saltwater fishing license.
Nonresident anglers need
a regular nonresident saltwa-
ter fishing license to fish from
shore or from a vessel. Short-
term and annual nonresident
fishing licenses cost between
$17 and $47. Additional fees
may apply, depending on
where the angler purchases


the license.
The requirement does al-
low exemptions for resident
anglers who fish in their home
county, using live or natural
bait, on a line or pole without
a line-retrieval mechanism.
This exemption does not ap-
ply to anglers who use nets,
traps, gigs, spears or who
gather seafood by hand or any
type of gear other than hook
and line.
Other exemptions apply for
anglers who qualify for tem-
porary cash assistance, food
stamps or Medicaid. Also,
resident anglers who are age


VOTE FOR:
Mayor
City Clerk



CITY OF BRISTOL
NOTICE OF ELECTION
NOTICE OF QUALIFYING DATES
Notice is hereby given that the City of Bristol
will hold its biennial election on Tuesday,
November 10. 2009 from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.
The following city officials will be elected:
*Mayor ....... Two-year term
*City Clerk .....Two-year term
*Three Council Members ..... Two-year terms
All candidates for the above named offices shall
qualify with Robin M. Hatcher, City Clerk, at City Hall,
12444 NW Virginia G. Weaver St., Bristol. Florida.
beginning Monday, August 3 and ending Thursday.
August 13th, 2009 during regular business hours.
Those wishing to vote, please register with the Super-
visor of Elections in the Liberty County Courthouse,
Bristol, FL. The books will close on October 12th,
2009 for registering to vote in the November 10th City
of Bristol Election.
Brigham S. Shuler, Chairman
Robin M. Hatcher, City Clerk


65 or older and children un-
der age 16 may fish without a
license. Active-duty military
personnel may fish without a
license while home on leave
in Florida.
Licensed fishing piers have
licenses that cover everyone


who fishes from them.
The FWC suggests the
$17 regular saltwater fishing
license may be the best op-
tion for most resident anglers
unless they are certain they
will fish only from shore or a
structure affixed to shore all


year.
By creating the shoreline
fishing license, the Florida
Legislature arranged for Flor-
ida anglers to be exempt from
a more-expensive federal an-
gler registration requirement
that will take effect in 2011.


Habitat conservation tools now online


Having the right informa-
tion at the right time is the
most critical element to sound
decision-making, and it's no
different for anyone trying to
provide for wildlife conserva-
tion through land-use planning
or land management. Anyone
in the land-use planning and
development industry can
tell you that pulling together
pertinent wildlife information
can be a challenge.
Now the Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation Com-
mission (FWC), in collabo-
ration with the U.S. Fish and
Wildlife Service (USFWS)
and the Florida Natural Areas
Inventory (FNAI), offers a
one-stop shop for this infor-
mation with the Florida Wild-
life Conservation Guide. The
guide is an online portal that
provides access to much of
the basic technical assistance
information that the partner-
ing agencies use when con-
sulting with landowners and
land managers about conser-
vation issues and opportuni-
ties in Florida.
"We've recognized for a


long time that there is a large
number of regulated activi-
ties out there that could really
benefit from early consulta-
tions, but we simply do not
have the staff resources to
handle the volume," said Joe
Walsh, environmental com-
menting leader. "However,.
we envisioned a much wider
audience for the guide as well.
For example, there are new
landowners who have moved
to the countryside and want
to conserve wildlife on their
properties, but simply don't
know where to begin. The
guide pulls together as many
Florida-relevant information
sources as we could find to
one convenient place."
While information on
many of Florida's common
species, such as the robin or
white-tailed deer, is available
on this Web-based applica-
tion, the guide also empha-
sizes resources vital to the
maintenance and recovery of
Florida's rare and imperiled
species, such as the Florida
scrub-jay and gopher tortoise.
The guide also is endorsed by


the USFWS.
"We are pleased to be a.
part of this comprehensive
reference for managing and
conserving Florida's wildlife
and their habitats," said Dave
Hankla, supervisor of the US-
FWS Jacksonville Field Of-
fice. "Information unique to
our federal endangered spe-
cies programs is included as
well."
The Florida Wildlife Con-
servation Guide assists land-
owners in understanding the
resources at their site and
offers guidance for develop-
ment and conservation. The
guide is intended to increase
the capacities of the FWC,
USFWS, and FNAI to deliver
technical assistance on proj-
ects and land-use planning
activities to support fish and
wildlife resources.
To access the Florida Wild-
life Conservation Guide, go to
MyFWC.com/Conservation/
FWCG.htm. Finding all -the
information needed to make
wise conservation choices for
wildlife is now as easy as a
click of the mouse.








Page 20 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL AUGUST 5, 2009


0.




Chipola hosts

'Big Sam' event

MARIANNA-"Big Sam,"
Mitchell as he was known for.
more than 40 years of state ser-
vice, will be honored at a cer-
emony, dinner and dance cel-
ebrating his life on Aug. 29 at
the National Guard Armory in
Marianna.
The event will pay tribute to
the former Florida legislator's
legacy while raising funds to
create a perpetual scholarship
in his name at Chipola, where
he played on the college's first
football-and basketball teams in
1947.
Mitchell was a life-long friend
of the late Chipola coach Milton
H. Johnson. Both attended Liv-
ingston College (now the Uni-
versity of West Alabama) in the
late 1940's.
Mitchell began his coaching
duties at Campbellton High in
1952-53 off with a bang with
a first-year season record of 24
wins and only two losses. His
coaching job was short-lived at
Campbellton, however, as he
was called to service in the Unit-
ed States Army.
Returning home from mili-
tary duty, Mitchell established
himself at Vernon High School,
where he completed an over-
all career record as a basketball
coach of 396-59.
He distinguished himself
as the only coach in Florida to
coach both the basketball and
football All-Star Games. He
was chosen Florida Coach of the
Year in 1957, and in football in
1960-61. Mitchell's basketball
team won the state basketball
championship in 1957.
Mitchell was appointed prin-
cipal of Vernon High School
during the school year 1967-68
and served until 1977. He was
elected to the Board of Directors
of the Florida High School Ac-
tivities Association from 1968-
1975, and was elected vice-pres-
ident form 1975-1977.
He served in the Florida Leg-
islature for more than 20 years,
receiving many legislative
awards.
The event will begin with a
social at 6:30 p.m., followed by
dinner at 7 p.m. Entertainment
will begin at 8 p.m., featuring
the world-famous Embers. Tick-
ets -are $75 per person which
includes a smoked-steak dinner
and social hour.
For ticket information on the
event, call Lillie Hamil at 718-
2375.


INTHECIRCUITCOURT,SECOND
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
LIBERTY COUNTY, FLORIDA.

CIVIL ACTION
CASE NUMBER: 09-31-CA
DIVISION:

WOODLAND III, LTD.,
a Florida limited partnership,
Plaintiff,

vs.

VERNON THOMAS,
Defendant.



NOTICE OF SALE

NOTICE is hereby given that, pur-
suant to an Order or a Final Judg-
ment of Foreclosure in the above-
captioned action, I, Robert Hill,
Clerk of the Circuit Court, will sell
to the highest and best bidder for
cash, at the front entrance of the
Liberty County Courthouse, locat-
ed at 10818 NW SR 201, in Bristol,
Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the 25th
day of August, AD, 2009, the fol-
lowing described property:

PARCEL 22, TELOGIA CREEK
PLANTATIONS:

A PARCEL OF LAND LYING IN
SECTIONS 1 AND 2, TOWN-
SHIP 1 SOUTH; RANGE 7 WEST,
AND SECTION 36, TOWNSHIP
1 NORTH; RANGE 7 WEST, LIB-
ERTY COUNTY, FLORIDA AND
BEING MORE PARTICULARLY
DESCRIBED' AS FOLLOWS:
COMMENCE AT THE SOUTH-
WEST CORNER OF SECTION 1,
TOWNSHIP 1 SOUTH; RANGE
7 WEST, AND RUN NORTH
00040'07" EAST, A DISTANCE OF
1,608.34 FEET to the northerly
right of way of state road No. 20;
THENCEALONG SAID RIGHTOF
WAY THE FOLLOWING COURS-
ES: NORTH 79e47'10" WEST,
A DISTANCE OF 483.32 FEET;
THENCE NORTH 79059'27"
WEST, A DISTANCE OF 412.55
FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID
RIGHT OF WAY RUN NORTH
09003'22" EAST, A DISTANCE OF
S50.30 FEET; THENCE NORTH
01 041'05" EAST, A DISTANCE OF
498.84 FEET; THENCE NORTH
00053'29" EAST, A DISTANCE OF
426.60 FEET; THENCE SOUTH
79047'03" EAST, A DISTANCE OF
1,873.09 FEET; THENCE NORTH
00040'07" EAST, A DISTANCE
OF 393.00 FEET TO THE AP-
PROXIMATE CENTERLINE OF A
10' WIDE DIRT ROAD; THENCE
ALONG SAID CENTERLINE THE
FOLLOWING COURSES: NORTH
4800'58" WEST, A DISTANCE OF
22.18 FEET; THENCE NORTH
27020'24" WEST, A DISTANCE
OF 51.95 FEET; THENCE NORTH
03'27'33" WEST, A DISTANCE OF
58.23 FEET; THENCE NORTH
15032'03" EAST, A DISTANCE OF
61.07 FEET; THENCE NORTH
3244'21" EAST, A DISTANCE OF
93.35 FEET; THENCE NORTH
23006'50" EAST, A DISTANCE OF
43.48 FEET; THENCE NORTH
08001'01" EAST, A DISTANCE OF
306.60 .FEET; THENCE NORTH
00019'56" WEST, A DISTANCE
OF 59.92 FEET; THENCE NORTH
11051'37" WEST, A DISTANCE OF
'474.95 FEET; THENCE NORTH
07027'42" WEST, A DISTANCE OF
407.87 FEET; THENCE NORTH
00"05'39" WEST, A DISTANCE OF
158.59 FEET; THENCE NORTH
02023'31" EAST, A DISTANCE OF


89.43 FEET; THENCE NORTH
13012'09" WEST, A DISTANCE
OF 130.17 FEET; THENCE
NORTH 05009'09" WEST, A DIS-
TANCE OF 79.89 FEET; THENCE
NORTH 18024'01" WEST, A DIS-
TANCE OF 12.91 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING, FROM
SAID POINT OF BEGINNING
AND LEAVING SAID CENTER-
LINE RUN NORTH 85039'57"
WEST, A DISTANCE OF 481.98
FEET TO A POINT LYING 50.00'
FEET FROM THE CENTERLINE
AND ON. THE BOUNDARY OF
ROADWAY "C"; THENCE SOUTH
86039'43" WEST, A DISTANCE
OF 50.00 FEET to THE CEN-
TERLINE OF SAID ROADWAY;
THENCE CONTINUE SOUTH
86039'43" WEST ALONG SAID
CENTERLINE, A DISTANCE OF
332.39 FEET TO THE INTER-
SECTION OF SAID CENTER-
LINE AND THE CENTERLINE OF
ROADWAY "D"; THENCE NORTH
07007'56" EAST ALONG SAID
CENTERLINE, A DISTANCE OF
726.47 FEET; THENCE LEAVING
SAID CENTERLINE RUN SOUTH
87036'21" EAST, A DISTANCE OF
30.10 FEET TO A POINT LYING
30.00 FEET FROM THE CEN-
TERLINE OF SAID ROADWAY;
THENCE CONTINUE SOUTH
87036'21" EAST, A DISTANCE
OF 465.14 FEET TO THE AP-
PROXIMATE CENTERLINE OF A
10' WIDE DIRT ROAD; THENCE
ALONG SAID CENTERLINE THE
FOLLOWING COURSES: SOUTH
05010'11" WEST, A DISTANCE OF
76.67 FEET; THENCE SOUTH
18000'57" EAST, A DISTANCE OF
49.35 FEET; THENCE SOUTH
35001'55" EAST, A DISTANCE OF
112.79 FEET; THENCE SOUTH
26046'22" EAST, A DISTANCE OF
119.39 FEET; THENCE -SOUTH
31015'54" EAST, A DISTANCE OF
75.27 FEET; THENCE SOUTH
14018'31" EAST, A DISTANCE OF
125.37 FEET; THENCE SOUTH
26006'38" EAST, A DISTANCE OF
83.35 FEET; THENCE SOUTH
18024'01" EAST, A DISTANCE
OF 138.51 FEET TO THE POINT
OF BEGINNING CONTAINING
A GROSS ACREAGE OF 10.77
ACRES, MORE OR LESS,(10.01
ACRES MORE OR LESS EX-
CLUSIVE OF ANY LANDS LYING
WITHIN ROADWAY "C" OR 30.00
FEET OF THE CENTERLINE OF
ROADWAY "D").

Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any,
other than the property owner as
of the date of the lis pendens must
file a claim within 60 days after the
sale.

WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 23rd day of July,
2009.

ROBERT HILL
.Clerk of the Circuit Court

Vanelle Summers
Deputy Clerk

H. EDWARD GARVIN
Attorney for Plaintiff
P.O. Box 358041
Gainesville, FL 32635
(352) 373-2598
Florida Bar No. 749753

If you are a person with a disability
who needs any accommodation in
order to participate in this proceed-
ing, you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to the provision of certain
assistance. Please contact the
Court Administrator for the Sec-


ond Judicial Circuit, Leon County
Courthouse, 301 S. Monroe St.,
Tallahassee, FL 32301, (850) 488-
1357, within 2 working days of
your receipt of this notice; if you
are hearing or voice impaired, call
711. 7-29 & 8-5-09

CALHOUN COUNTY
CHIPOLA ROAD IMPROVEMENTS

Project #14.140

NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS

The Calhoun County Board of
County Commissioners will re-
ceive sealed bids from any quali-
fied person, company or corpora-
tion interested in constructing the
following project:

CALHOUN COUNTY
CHIPOLA ROAD IMPROVEMENTS

Plans and specifications can be
obtained at Preble-Rish,. Inc.,
20684 Central Ave. East Blount-
stown, FL 32424, (850)674-3300.
The bid must conform to Section
287.133(3) Florida Statutes, on
public entity crimes.

Completion date for this project
will be 180 days from the date of
the Notice to Proceed presented
to the successful bidder.

Liquidated damages for failure to
complete the project on the speci-
fied date will be set at $250.00 per
day.

All bidders must be pre-qualified
with Florida Department of Trans-
portation per Section 2-1 of the
FDOT Standards and Specifica-


tions of Road and Bridge, latest
edition.

Please indicate on the envelope
that this is a sealed bid, the bid
number and what the bid is for.

Bids will be received until 2:00
p.m. (CT), on August 18, 2009, at
the Calhoun County Clerk's Of-
fice, Calhoun County Courthouse,
20859 Central Avenue East, Room
130, Blountstown, Florida 32424,
and will be opened and read aloud
on August 18, 2009, at 5:00 p.m.
(CT).

Cost for Plans and Specifications
will be $50.00 per set and is non-
refundable. Checks should be
made payable to PREBLE-RISH,
INC.

The Board of County Commis-
sioners reserves the right to waive
informalities in any bid, to.accept
and/or reject any or all bids, and to
accept the bid that in their judge-
ment will be in the best interest of
Calhoun County.

If you have any questions, please
call Matt Carpenter at (850)643-
2771. 7-298-5-09

PUBLIC AUCTION
Bristol 66 Towing and Recovery will
hold a Public Auction on Aug. 21,2009
at 5:30 p.m. (ET).
1994 GREEN DODGE RAM VAN
Vin# 2B6HB21XORK143759
Our Auction will be held at Bristol 66
Storage on Hoecake Road off Highway
20 East, one half mile on left, you will see
our sign. Bristol 66 Towing reserves the
right to reject any and all bids.
The Calhoun-Liberty Journal 8-5-09
If you need any more information on the
above vehicle, please call (850) 643-2522
or 228-9555 ask for Dale.


One Stop Career Center
16908 NE Pear SI. Suite 2.
BlounLsiown Phone (850) 674-5088

The following positions are
available: Construction Trades
Helper, Janitorial, Dietetic
Technician, Construction
Worker, Office Clerk, Food
Service Worker, Production
Manager, Truck Driver.
EOE
Service Chipola Workforce Board UFN


EXPERIENCED
Concrete Finisher

WANTED
Company benefits include:

*Insurance
*IRA
*Vacation > "_

Apply in person to:

PORTER
Construction Co., Inc.
4910 Hartsfield Road
Marianna, FL 32446
EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER


Office Manager Wanted

Dr. Barry Edewaard's Optometric Office is accepting re-
sumes for an OFFICE MANAGER. This mature person
must be outgoing and have Office Management experi-
ence. Responsibilities will include, but not be limited to
billing Medicare/Medicaid and other insurance companies,
patients' frame selection, ordering glasses and contact
lenses, inventory control of frames, contact lens and office
supplies, answer phones and make appointments, updat-
ing patients' charts and schedule referrals. Peachtree ac-
counting will include paying bills, payroll and balancing end
of day and end of month books. Training will be provided,
salary is negotiable. Holidays and vacation pay included,
no health insurance.

Send resumes to Dr. Barry A. Edewaard,
17521 Main Street North, Blountstown, FL 32424


u








AUGUST 5, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 21


LEFT: A young girl looks around at the balloons, books and displays filling the civic center at Saturday's Family Affair in Blountstown,
where youngsters were given bags of school supplies and their parents got an introduction to area services and programs. CENTER:
Firefighters take it easy between visits by kids anxious for a look at the big truck. RIGHT: There was plenty of room to play behind the
civic center as youngsters enjoyed riding down an inflatable slide and blowing bubbles. BELOW: A long line forms as everyone waits for
the doors to open. The first families arrived at 6:30 a.m; the doors opened at 9 a.m. BELOW LEFT: Judy Barber and Wendy Smith get
ready for the crowds by putting out big containers of school supplies. PHOTOS BY PEGGY HOWLAND and JOSEPH SUMMERS

IK...Yi -


A


* iE1I' .


Families made the most of this school-supply give away known as Family Affair, held each year
in Blountstown. Over 650 children attended the event, each receiving their own set of school
supplies the most ever in the event's history. Twenty-three youth volunteers helped 11 adult
volunteers to keep things entertaining as 34 agencies and businesses set up booths. ABOVE:
Nicki Darnell gets a hug from McGruff the Crime Dog. BELOW LEFT: Smokey Bear was on
hand to share some cake marking his 65th birthday. BELOW CENTER: Volunteers Nicki Damell
and Tyler Sangster help celebrate Smokey's birthday. BELOW RIGHT: The civic center's main
room was crowded with visitors enjoying the food, games and displays.


a .
"p'I *'
-a -,~,. :a
;u~~i iSr pW.








Page 22 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL AUGUST 5,2009


Proceeds benefit Big Bend
Hospice. Individual players and
team sponsorships are available
for an 8 a.m. morning shotgun
or 1:30 p.m. afternoon shotgun.


Hospice hosts annual Professional

Bereavement Conference Sept. 25


Big Bend Hospice hosts its
Fifth Annual Bereavement Con-
ference, "Seasons of Grief' on
September 25 from 8-4:30 p.m.
at the Tallahassee Community
College Center for Economic
and Workforce Development.
The conference creates a fo-
rum in which professionals and
other helpers can explore current
bereavement practices; network
and connect with other providers
in a nurturing and uplifting envi-
ronment; promote self-care and
highlight bereavement services/
expertise at Big Bend Hospice
and in the community.
Seasons of Grief will offer
practical strategies to help sup-
port clients through the grief
process. Counselors and Mental
Health Professionals, Therapists,
Health and Hospice Providers,
Advocates, Clergy, Educators,
Emergency Responders, Law
Enforcement, Military Person-
nel, Funeral Directors, Nursing
Home Staff, Students and' any-
one providing support to the be-
reaved are invited to. attend this
important conference.
Topics include suicide loss
and prevention, grief in adoles-
cents and college students, spiri-
tuality, sibling loss; sudden and
traumatic death, and use of cre-
ative arts, music, and therapeutic
activities with the bereaved and
for self- care.


The cost of the conference is
$69 with special rates for stu-
dents, or four or more from the
same agency. 6.5 Continuing
Education Units will be offered.
Late registration after September
14 will add $10 to each catego-
ry. Contact Lisa Baggett, (850)
309-1628, ext. 433 or Lisa@
bigbendhospice to register or for
more information.


BigBendHospice announced
the launch of a brand new web
site this month. The new web
site has increased the amount
of information available on line
and offers new features to, pro-
vide increased responsiveness
to those seeking information
on Hospice care. "We are so
pleased with the community's
response to our new web site,"
said Diane Tomasi, Community
Relations Director at Big Bend
Hospice. "It has many new fea-
tures and is more user friendly
than our previous site."
Visitors are now able to take
a pictorial tour of the Marga-
ret Z. Dozier Hospice House
as well as see photo galleries
from recent events; share their
Hospice story; sign up to be a
volunteer and find out about


Play for a chance to win exciting
prizes from local golf clubs and
retailers. This event funds direct
patient care and provides grief
support for children and teens
in all of the counties served by
Big Bend Hospice including
Liberty.
For more information contact
Laura Glennat 701-1341 or mail
to, laurag@bigbendhospice.org.
Tournament sponsors are Cap-
ital City Bank Group, Mainline
Information Systems, Wakulla
Bank, Comcast, Florida Bank,
Bob & Gail Knight, Greenberg
Traurig, BB&T/Landrum-Yae-
ger, Lamar, Tallahassee Demo-
crat, Cumulus, Coca-Cola and
Tri-Eagle.


employment opportunities.
Also, those wishing to make a
donation can do so online, and
a separate link provides infor-
mation on additional giving op-
portunities.
Special features of the web
site also include a quiz to see
if Hospice care is appropriate
for you or a loved one as well
as a form to request a free, no
obligation in-home visit to ex-
plain Big Bend Hospice servic-
es. "We continue to welcome
community input on our web
site and hope these new fea-
tures provide a way for family
members from outside the area,
as well as the local community,
to get more information on our
agency," added Tomasi. The
web address remains the same:
www.bigbendhospice.org.


OBITUARIES


THOMAS WENNON
ARNOLD, SR.
TELOGIA Thomas Wennon Arnold, Sr., 51,
passed away Tuesday, July 28, 2009 in Telogia. Born
in Quincy, he lived most of his life in Liberty County.
He was a member of Lighthouse Christian Church and
was an avid outdoorsman.
He was preceded in death by his wife, Johnny
Belinda Arnold and his mother, Leola Arnold.
He is survived by his wife, Sherry Arnold; two
sons, Thomas Wennon Arnold, Jr. and his wife, Ra-
chel of Bristol and Jason Capps and his wife, Missy of
Frederica, DE; a daughter, Erica Mathers and her hus-
band, Billy of Blountstown; a step-daughter, Jessica
Simmons of Blountstown; his father, Tom B. Arnold
of Telogia; three brothers, "Curly" Arnold, Otis Love
and his wife, Linda and Earnest Arnold, all of Telogia;
four sisters, Betty Sue Richards of Hosford, Eloise Ar-
nold and Lynette Earnest, both of Telogia and Bernice
Arnold of Bristol; seven grandchildren, Matt, Ryan,
Wayne, Kaleb, Summer, Adeline, and Ethan.
Services were held on Thursday, July 30 at the
Lighthouse Christian Church in Telogia with Rever-
end Terry Estes and Reverend Bill Mayo officiating.
Interment followed inWesleyan Chapel Cemetery in
Telogia.
Adams Funeral Home in Bristol was in charge of
the arrangements.


JOSEPH HARDY
BRISTOL Joseph Hardy, 88, of Rock
Bluff, died on Friday, July 31, 2009 in Tal-
lahassee. He was a native of Liberty County
and was a member of Rockyville Missionary
Baptist Church.
Survivors in-
clude his brother,
Richard. Hardy;
devoted neice
and caregiver,
Belinda Wiggins
and a devoted
cousin, Gilbert
Hardy, all of
Bristol; many
friends, relatives
and other ac-
quaintances.

Services will be
held at 10 a.m.
(ET) on Satur-
day, August 8 at the Rockyville Missionary
Baptist Church Cemetery.
Bradwell Mortuary of Quincy is in charge
of the arrangements.


Big Bend Hospice to host annual Dr. Bass' Large

Mouth Open Golf Tourney planned for Sept. 14


Funeral Services with Dignity,
Caring and Professionalism.
Marion Peavy
A Hometown Funeral Director
You Can Trust and Depend On!


The ninth annual Dr. Bass'
Large Mouth Open Golf Tour-
nament will be held Monday,
September 14 at Golden Eagle
Country Club.


- Charles McClellan

Funeral Home
Charles K. McClellan
Licensed Funeral Director
42 years experience
Call us Let us explain how we can
conveniently handle arrangements
in Liberty County.

Butler-Morgan/Morgan-McClellan Funeral Home
Building at 15 S. Jackson St., Quincy, 32351
Phone: (850) 627-7677 or 643-2277 -,
F



WHAT BETTER TRIBUTE

CAN THERE BE?

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making their memory part of
our best efforts to defeat cancer.
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AUGUST 5, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 23


Since our first frosts usually don't arrive until late in

the year, Gulf Coast gardeners can enjoy a fall crop


Fall for tomatoes


E by Theresa Friday,
Horticulture Extension Agent,
Santa Rosa County
The tomato is one of the
most popular vegetables grown
in home gardens. Gulf Coast
gardeners revel in the planting
of tomato plants in the spring.
But unless you have grown hot-
set tomatoes or the small fruited
cherry and grape varieties, your
tomato plants may have stopped
setting fruit by mid-summer.
Most tomatoes are sensitive to
night temperature. They set fruit
best when it is near 70 degrees F.
When tomato plants experience
night temperatures lower than
55 degrees F or above 75 degrees
F, interference with the growth
of pollen tubes prevents normal
fertilization. The pollen may even
become sterile, thus causing the
blossoms to drop.
High daytime temperatures,
rain, or prolonged humid
conditions also hamper good fruit
set. If the humidity is too low, the
pollen will be too dry and will
not adhere to the stigma. If the
humidity is too high, the pollen
will not shed readily. Pollen
grains may then stick together,
resulting in poor or nonexistent
pollination.
But living along the Gulf Coast
does have its advantages. Since
our first frosts generally don't
arrive until late November or
early December, gardeners can
enjoy a fall crop'of tomatoes.
Unless spring tomato plants
were protected with routine
fungicide applications they are
probably infested with diseases
by now. If the foliage is yellowed
and spotted and if production has
ceased, it's best to start over.
Visit area nurseries to find out
what transplants are available.
For the adventuresome, try some
unusual varieties by starting
them from seed, which can be
ordered from specialty tomato
seed companies.
Move to a new spot in the
garden for your fall planting.
You are asking for trouble if you
plant tomatoes in the same spot
more than once. If you know
that you have nematodes or soil-
bome diseases, try growing your
tomatoes in a container with fresh


We can re
\\ any lawn

IVAN N
i^S former o
Nissley's Ga

16609 SE Pear Str<
Call (850) 674-3911


STOUTAMIRE INSURANCE INC.
16783 SE Pear St., Blountstown
Contact Bill Stoutamire
Phone 674-5974 Fax 674-8307





SO
What a deal...'

whichever speed you need!


bugs, aphids and caterpillars are
commonly seen. Since insect and
disease pressure often is greater in
the late summer/early fall than in
the spring, watch plants carefully
for problems and use appropriate
control measures promptly when
needed.
The key to heavy fall production
is timing. The idea is to. have
healthy plants that are flowering
as our night temperatures begin to
gradually drop. If fall conditions
are agreeable, it is possible to
have fresh vine ripened tomatoes
in December.
Fall vegetable gardening is
not limited to tomatoes. Both
sweet and hot pepper plants
produce well if set oit at about
the same time. Other warm
season vegetables can be started
from seed in August. These
include snap beans, lima beans,
cucumbers, southern peas and
summer squash.


Gardening Friends meet Aug. 11

at Research Center near Quincy
Gardening Friends of the Big Bend will meet at the North Florida
Research and Education Center near Quincy at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday,
August 11.
The purpose of this group is
to promote gardening and gar-
dening research by supporting
and assisting the faculty arid staff
L of NFREC, an arm of the Uni-
i rversity of Florida's Institute for
pair most Food and Agricultural Sciences.
mower! GFBB member Pete Diamond
Y xC will speak about his work with
ISSLEY Florida Natural Areas Inventory.
)wner of A brief business meeting will
rden Center follow.


eet Blountstown
I (850) 674-8896


For more information, contact
Jill Williams at (850)663-2280
or Gary Knox at (850)875-7162.


potting media.
Of course, it's important to
prepare beds properly before
planting this next crop of
tomatoes. To do that, clear the site
of all weeds or finished vegetable
plants. Spread a 2-inch to 4-inch
layer of organic matter (leaves,
grass clippings, aged manure or
compost can be used) over the
soil. Turn the soil with a shovel,
fork or tiller to a depth of at least
8 inches. This helps to maintain a
high level of organic matter in the
soil, which encourages a strong,
healthy root system, improves
drainage, retains moisture,
provides nutrients and promotes
vigorous plant growth. Be sure
to wait a couple of weeks prior
to planting if organic matter has
been added.
By this time of year, insects
and diseases have had all summer
to build up their populations, and
insects such as whiteflies, stink


I I rI p-. ,,, -,... t,. .1.i. .
-A a t ..J )..I .. .1 1


I-- -









Page 24 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL AUGUST 5, 2009


ITEMS FOR SALE


-1/2 Block, approximately 210 piec-
es, $1 each, must take all. Roof tin,
131 pieces, $100 firm for all. Call
643-2635 or 320-4542. 8-5, 8-12

Portable smoker on wheels, $600
OBO. Call 718-6580. 8-5,8-12

Wolff 24xS power (220V) tanning
bed, one year old, 24 bulb w/dual
-tone twister bulbs and triple twister
facial tanners. Used approx. 25
hrs. commercial grade bed for resi-
dential use. Comes with approx.
$400-$600 in tanning lotions, 'clean-
ers, etc. Perfect for beauty salon,
$2,000 OBO. Call 762-4961.
8-5, 8-12

Sunquest Wolff tanning bed, 26
bulb, $1,500. Call 447-2865.
8-5, 8-12

Suede chaise lounger, tan color,
like new, $100; ab lounger, like new,
$75. Call 694-4131. 8-5,8-12

Texas Hold 'em table, $60; exer-
cise bike $50; ab exerciser $50.
Call 762-2223. 8-5,8-12

55-gallon steel drums with lids,
25, $10 each, excellent storage.
Call 592-5780. until 8-19

Two 16" girls bicycles, in good con-
dition, $20 each. Call 674-8320.
7-29, 8-5

Lifetime basketball goal, complete
with net. Portable, approximate-
ly 24" backboard with adjustable
height. Excellent condition, $35.
Call 643-2298. 7-29, 8-5

Vitamaster stationary bike, like
new, $100. Call 933-4968. 7-29,8-5

Moving sale: sofa and matching
chair, extra large,r tan color $275;
metal bunk bed, full on bottom,
frame only $40. China cabinet,
$400; 2 porch rocking chairs, $25
each. Call 674-4404. 7-29,8-5

Trampoline, $75 and fiberglass
pontoons, $100. Call 643-8603 or
447-1202. 7-29, 8-5

Invicta speedway chronograph
wristwatch, stainless steel and
copper. Retails for $550, will sell for
$100; Swiss Legend chronograph
wrist watch, black mother of pearl
and stainless steel, Lexor. Sells
for $1,000, asking $200. Call 674-
2480. 7-29,8-5

24-bulb tanning bed, like new,
$1,100. Call 209-5270. 7-29,8-5

John Deere steel toe boots, size
13, zip-up style, paid $150 brand
new, never worn. Asking $50. Call
879-0727. 7-29, 8-5


APPLIANCES

Large white GE refrigerator, freez-
er located in top, six feet tall, like
new, $350, Call 674-8269. 8-5,8-12

Mini fridge, brand new, $50 OBO;
chest freezer, good condition, $250
OBO. Call (850) 670-8070. 8-5,8-12


Kenmore dryer, $50. Ca
6738 or 237-1473.


ill 643-
8-5, 8-12


Washer and dryer, in good condi-
tion, $250 for both. Call 447-0985.
7-29, 8-5.

5-cubic foot deep freezer, like new,
used two or three months, $150.
Call 643-8603 or 447-1202. 7-29,8-5

Large.Kenmore chest freezer, 18
cu. ft. $200. Call 674-4404. 7-29,8-5



ELECTRONICS


Blackberry Pearl phone, silver,
eight weeks old, $150. Call 643-
6738 or 237-1473. 8-5,8-12

GE Record Player, with radio and
double tape deck, $50. Call 762-
2960 or 272-2552. 7-29, 8-5

52" Akai TV, 5-years-old, $300.
Call 674-2480. 7-29, 8-5

Portable DVD player with charger
and carrying case, used several
times, $40. Call 643-8603 or 447-
1202. 7-29,8-5



CARS


1998 Mitsubishi Mirage, two door,
CD player, 135,000 miles, is in good
condition and drives good, $2,000.
Call 591-2063. 8-5, -12

1989 Lincoln Town Car, great con-
dition, rebuilt motor, transmission
has 50,000 miles, four brand new
tires, brand new air compressor for
A/C, brand new alternator, black with
burgundy interior, $2,000 OBO. Call
674-2480. 7-29,8-5

1992 Mazda Navajo, $1,000. Can
be seen on Hwy. 69 S or call 674-
1954 after 5 p.m. 7-29, 8-5

1967 Dodge Charger, no engine,
has rebuild potential or can use for
parts. For more information call
447-0122. 7-29, 8-5

1997 Lincoln Towncar Execu-
tive Series, power windows, locks,
steering, etc. Has leather interior,
good A/C, 184.000 miles, $2,500
OBO. Call 447-0115. 7-29,8-5




TRUCKS & SLTVS


1999 White Ford Ranger, approxi-
mately 92,000 miles, $4,000. Call
442-6603. 8-5,8-12

1985 Jeep CJ7, 4x4, black, 4-speed,
$1,250. Call 674-4293. 8-5, 8-12



AUTO ACCESSORIES


18" Mazzi wheels, universal 5-lug,
$275. Call 447-0011 or 643-2715.
8-5, 8-12

Truck bed cover, fits F250 short bed
and others, $75. Call 643-4491.
8-5, 8-12


Heavy duty 8-lug rear end for a
Dodge, $300 OBO. Call 718-6580.
8-5,8-12



MOTORCYCLES

& ATVS


2000 Yamaha Classic 1100CC,
pipes, windshield, saddlebags,
$3,000 OBO. Call 445-2915.
8-5, 8-12

2002 Suzuki Katana 600, $3,200.
Call 447-0011 or 643-2715. 8-5,8-12

2006 Suzuki Boulevard C90T, less
than 5,000 miles, asking $8,000.
Call 643-6376. 7-29, 8-5

2002 Suzuki Marauder 800CC,
$2,500. Call 762-8881 after 3 p.m.
(CT).
7-29, 8-5


LOST & FOUND


FOUND: dog, tan/white hound
mix, male, less than a year old,
found on CR67 and 379 one month
ago. Was starved and poor, now
looks real good. Needs someone
to claim or adopt. Call 643-4491.
8-5, 8-12



TOOLS AND HEAVM

EQUIPMENT


Yard Machine lawn mower, 18 hp.
riding, $300. Call 643-1459 or 643-
1514. 8-5,8-12

Woods mower, 14ft. in good.condi-
tion, $2,500. Call 762-9513. 8-5,8-12

Craftsman riding mower, 13.5 hp.,
30 inch blade, needs minor work,
make offer. Call 379-8973. 8-5,8-12
Mulcher and leaf machine (picks
up leaves) new, $250. Call 762-
2223. 8-5,8-12
150 gallon propane tank, $100.
Call 643-2672. 7-29,8-5
200 amp service power pole, $200.
Call 643-2672. 7-29, 8-5

Electric pea sheller, $150. Call
.674-3911. 7-29, 8-5

Toro lawn mower, only used part of
a season, like new, comes with bag-
ger, $900. Call 674-3911. 7-29,8-5



HOMES & LAND


Mobile home on approximately
two acres of land, 5 miles N of
Blountstown, $35,000. Call 237-
1278, ask for Lisa. 8-5, 8-12

20 acre tract in Calhoun County,
agriculturally zones, located at 4028
Malverty Lane outside of Clarksville
off Malvin New Grade -Road, has a
well and power, $75,000. Call Mark
or Charlotte at (850) 670-8070.


r


I
Si-i


Ii


13


THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL




CLASSIFIEDS

To place your ad, call 643-3333 by noon Eastern
Time on Saturday. Non-business ads run FREE for 2 weeks.


LAND FOR SALE
IN BRISTOL
22 acres with planted
pines and lish pond'
on corner of Old
Bristol Rd/ Hwy 379.
Price reduced/must
sell $189,000. or will
divide. Call 643-2721
or 643-6760.
. ...g 1 :7..


For Rent
2 RV Spots
Available with Full
Hookup on the
Ochlockonee River
'20/night or a
'300/monthly
850-519-4945
or 510-4686

41-----I


"pEm


Suto Cre









AUGUST 5;.2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 25


#STflR-


SCOPE*

Week of
Aug. 9 to Aug. 15

ARIES Mar 21/Apr 20
Aries, it's an uphill battle with a
problem that has been plaguing
you. However, the end of the
tunnel has finally arrived. Now
you can focus on happier times.

TAURUS -Apr 21/May 21
Lashing out at a loved one when
he or she expresses an opinion
will lead to trouble, Taurus.
Rather, listen with an open
mind, and choose your
response carefully.

GEMINI May 22/Jun 21
Gemini, it's good to budget
purchases, but lately you've
taken being thrifty to an extreme.
Learn to indulge once in a while
--it will be frivolous and fun.

CANCER Jun 22/Jul 22
Cancer, a disagreement at work
leaves you the odd person out.
Be a diplomat and don't let it get
to you. Things will smooth over
and return to normal soon.

LEO Jul 23/Aug 23
Leo, your emotions are running
wild, which is not in your
normal mode of operation.
Don't try to suppress them.
Others will justhave to adapt
to this change of pace.

VIRGO -Aug 24/Sept 22
Virgo, a fight with your romantic
partner leaves you at odds for
a while. Don't worry, this isn't
the end of the relationship, just a
chance to make it stronger.

LIBRA Sept 23/Qct 23
Stop pushing people away, Libra.
Being alone isn't always good
for the spirit. Surround yourself
with those who care and make
a concerted effort to socialize
that much more.

SCORPIO Oct 24/Nov 22
Scorpio, if you can't beat them,
join them. Take this advice when
your family invites you into a
group event laterin the week.
Have fun and let your hair down.

SAGITTARIUS Nov 23/Dec 21
It's been.an interesting year
so far, Sagittarius. And it's
bound to get that much more
exciting. There's nothing but
good news coming in the
immediate future, so enjoy it.

CAPRICORN Dec 22/Jan 20
Capricorn, offer more compli-
ments to loved ones, otherwise
you'll be viewed as unlikable. A
friend welcomes your advice on
Wednesday. So give it freely.

AQUARIUS Jan 21/Feb 18
Aquarius, stay close to home for
a while. There's simply too
much going on in your life at
this time for you to be away
from the homefront for a time.

PISCES Feb 19/Mar 20
Pisces, a rash move in the finan-
cial sector leaves you with less
cash than you hoped -- and all in
time for a large stack of bills.

FAMOUS BIRTHDAYS
AUGUST 9
Eric Bana, Actor (41)
AUGUST 10
Antonio Banderas, Actor (49)
AUGUST 11
Hulk Hogan, Wrestler (56)
AUGUST 12
Pete Sampras, Athlete (38)
AUGUST 13
Fidel Castro, Cuban Dictator (83)
AUGUST 14
Halle Berry, Actress (43)
AUGUST 15
Joe Jonas, Singer (20)


2 lots, Hwy. 20 frontage in Calhoun
Cty. Lots 2 & 3 Blk D. Tallahassee,
2 1/2 Acre Ests. Call (904) 219-
7820. a-s,8-12

2001 16x80 Fleetwood Singlewide
mobile home. 3 bdr./2 bath, comes
with well equipment and many im-
provements including floors and
deck. Home needs to be moved.
Call 591-3913. 8-5,8-12

Beautiful home in Bristol for sale.
On one acre in great location. Re-
cently built in 2004, 2,500 sq. ft., 4
bdr. 3 bth. with foyer, vaulted ceil-
ings, large deck, separate garage
that matches the home. Call for
more information: 643-2721 or 643-
8640. 7-29,8-5

1.4 acres land in Hosford for sale.
Highway frontage. Call 643-7326 or
212-8300. 6-17, 8-19

Big lot on Chipola River, located
in Calhoun County. Call 643-1514.
UFN




GUNS


Marlin 22 mag rifle, with 12x40
scope, bolt action, $200. Call 762-
2960 or 272-2552. 7-29, 8-5




PETS/SUPPLIES



Free: Two Calico kitties to a good
home, beautiful coloring. Includes a
mini-starter kit. Call 762-2528.
8-5, 8-12

Black Lab/Collie mix dog, 1 year
old, female. Very friendly and in
good health. Call 762-4398.
8-5, 8-12

Free kittens to a good home. Call
674-3264. 8-5, 8-12

Free kittens, six to a good home.
Call 875-1381 after 6 p.m. in the
Lake Talquin area. 8-5, 8-12

Two goats, six months old, $60 for
both or will sell separately. Call 762-
3667, leave message. 7-29, 8-5


American Pit Bull Terriers CKC
registered, four males, one fe-
male, 10 weeks old, first shots and
wormed. Asking $50 each. Call
674-1206. 7-29,8-5

Kittens, free to a good home,
three, approximately six weeks old.
Call 643-5401. 7-29, 8-5

Chihuahua puppies, male and fe-
male, very small, $100 each. Call
379-8632. 7-29, 8-5

Great Dane, 8 months old, female,
black and white. Call (850) 718-
6580. 7-29,8-5

Ball Python with aquarium and
table light, water bowl and knick
knacks, $150. Call 643-8603 or
447-1202. 7-29,
8-5




WANTEDD

How-to-book on repair of 1995
Dodge Dakota. Call 674-3264. ,
8-5,8-125

14" tire for a Buick Regal. Call
674-3264. 8-5,8-12

Roommate, female in Bristol area
looking for female roommate. Any
age, pets possibly acceptable,
smoker ok, no drugs or drama, rea-
sonable rent. Call 566-1369.
7-29,8-5

2-Gallon air compressor. Call 674-
8570, leave phone number on an-
swering machine. 7-29, 8-5

Junk cars and trucks, any con-
dition. We pay cash. Call 762-
8459 or 272-1126 cell. UFN



CAMPERS/RVS


1980 Nomad pull camper, 19 ft.,
cold AC, comes with title, $800
OBO. Call 688-6593, if no answer
leave message. 8-5, 8-12

,1994 24' travel trailer, mint condi-
tion, everything works great, $4,000
OBO. Call (850) 210-6006, ask for
David. 7-29,8-5


SUBSCRIBE TO

THE CALHOUN-

LIBERTY JOURNAL


I


I
I Name


- -- -I


WATERCRAFT
& SUPPLIES


35 hp. Chrysler .outboard motor,
electric start, runs good, $300. Call
379-8689 after 6 p.m. on Friday &
Saturday call between 10 a.m. and
3 p.m. 8-5,8-12




YARD SALES



BRISTOL
Small family yard sale Saturday,
Aug. 8 beginning at 8 a.m. at the
Liberty County Courthouse on Hwy.
20 in Bristol. Girls' clothes sizes 10-
12, boys' clothes-sizes 6-8, some
shoes, women's clothes and more.

BLOUNTSTOWN
Yard and back to school sale, Sat-
urday starting at 8 a.m. Located at
Trailer City on Hwy. 71 N, Lot 25 in
Blountstown. Girls' clothes sizes
10-12, clocks, toys, some house-
hold items, cheap prices, good qual-
ity. Call 674-4475 for more informa-
tion, cancel if rain.

Saturday, August 8 starting at 8
a.m., located at 17150 NW Charlie
John Street in Blountstown. Every-
thing from children's clothes to adult
clothes, a little bit of everything.

Yard sale Saturday, Aug. 8 starting
at 7 a.m. Located at 17360 SR 20
W, 3 1/2 miles out of Blountstown.
Lots of items, Christmas items,
make offer and it is yours. Call 674-
1655 for more information.

Yard sale Saturday, Aug. 8 start-
ing at 7 a.m. Located at 16852 NW
21st Street in Blountstown. Lots
of items, women's clothes sizes
4-8, men's clothes large and 36W,
couch, dressers, grill, TV, a car (a
hot tub, call 762-3832) and other
misc. items. Call 674-3323 for more
information.

CLARKSVILLE
Multi-family yard sale Friday, Au-
gust 7 and Saturday, August 8 from
7 a.m. until dusk. Located on Hwy.
73, four miles north of Hwy. 20 in
Clarksville. Call 643-7158 for infor-
mation.


I
I
I
I


THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL




CLTASSItFFEDS

To place your ad, call 643-3333 by noon Eastern
Time on Saturday. Non-business ads run FREE for 2 weeks.

v ____~ ~~~~~~~.__ *...,..,., .(


Address

City State- Zip

Phone L

Please enclose a check or money order for $18 and mail to:
The Calhoun-Liberty Journal,
P.O. Box 536, Bristol, FL 32321
L-------------------------------------- .


Ir^iniM iiiiiaT








Page 26 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL AUGUST 5, 2009


Florda Fish and WIIdiffe
Comnsrvan ComQnholhF

The swallow-tailed kite. is a
snack-food junkie if ever there
was one. It spends most of the
day aloft, eating on the run, so to
speak catching bugs and eating
them in one swoop, then circling
and diving to devour another.
"Elanoides forficatus" is also
an energy miser. The kite uses
thermal uplifts and winds to
spend the day gliding, merely
flipping one side of its forked
tail to change direction. Rapidly
flapping wings are not for this
raptor. From its nest in the top
of tall pines and cypress trees, it
spies arboreal vertebrates rep-
tiles, amphibians and sometimes
a fledgling from another nest. It
can seize that.prey and eat it on
the wing.
The black-and-white beauty
is a symbol of many things. The
Florida Fish and Wildlife Con-
servation Commission (FWC)
features the kite, a white-tailed
deer and spotted seatrout on its
logo. Motorists probably have
noticed an image of the kite on
signs throughout the state des-
ignating the 489 Great Florida
Birding Trail sites. If you go to
the Breeding Bird Atlas Web site
(MyFWC.com/BBA/), the first
bird pictured is the kite.
The swallow-tailed kite makes
a perfect symbol for Florida and
for bird enthusiasts for four good
reasons. For instance, "Florida
has more swallow-tailed kites
than the rest of the nation com-
bined," said Mark Kiser, a bio-
logical scientist with the FWC's
Office of Recreation Services,
Wildlife Viewing Section. "It is
easily identifiable by color and
shape. Its underside is snow
white with long, narrow wings
edged in black feathers. While
the bird's back is midnight blue-
black, its neck and head are pure
white. Its opposite colors are
clearly defined. In addition, not
many birds share its unique sil-
houette a deeply forked, black
tail."
The FWC also chose the


swallow-tailed kite for its logo.
and Great Florida Birding Trail
signs because of its beauty and
gracefulness, Kiser said.
It represents a species that can
use mankind's help. One reason
is its own housing crisis due to
habitat loss.
Development residential,
agricultural and industrial --con-
tinues to drain wetlands. The
Australian pine, an invasive spe-
cies, also changed the kite's habi-
tat, replacing the bird's preferred
tall trees (cypresses and native
pines) that grow above the cano-
py. Think of the three little pigs,
one of whom built its house out
of straw. The big, bad wolf blew.
it down. The Australian pine
does not make a good house
either. According to Audubon
of Florida, the nonnative tree,
although offering good height,
"often fails to support nests."
Big, bad winds frequently topple
Australian pines because of their
shallow roots.
Many agencies recognize that
wetland preservation and resto-
ration, as well as eradication of
the Australian pine, are solutions
to the housing crisis- swallow-
tailed kites encounter while
summering in Florida to nest and
raise their young.
Swallow-tailed kites form
loose colonies when they nest.
Dr. Kenneth D. Meyer received
a grant from the FWC to study
the kite's roosting needs. In his
1989 report, Meyer noted that
the kite formed groups of 10 to-
40 birds when nesting.
After nesting is completed, A
the kites migrates Nf
southward and form larg
communal roosts, often
clustered in isolated
South Florida
sites.
"Some of
these
communa
roosts,


P i particularly
in Everglades
National Park,
were active until
late August or early


September," Meyer wrote.
By September, swallow-tailed
kites lift off and head for Brazil,
hopping across the Caribbean
islands to the Yucatan Peninsula
to reach the Central America fly-
way.
Come spring, they return to
North America. The swallow-
tailed kite used to have a larger
distribution (up to 21 states),
Kiser said, but now its U.S.
breeding range is confined to
Florida and pockets of suitable
habitat from Texas to South Car-
olina.
"Interestingly, you rarely see
them perched during the day,"
Kiser said. "They're nearly al-
ways flying. One minute they
might be soaring over an inter-
state highway, and the next they
are swooping down and gliding
over a pasture. They will circle
overhead like any bird of prey.
And I've seen them make an in-
verted, backward dive to catch
an insect."
Nature writer and activist
Susan Cerulean, in "Tracking
Desire; A Journey After Swal-
low-Tailed Kites" (University
of Georgia Press), roamed the
kite's fragmented habitat to learn
about this captivating
bird and the threats
it faces.
"My
journeys
after kites
have led me
to understand
that the power
of our longings is
placing the integrity
of life on our tender
emerald planet so
greatly at risk.
What are
the
fractured places in
our hearts and minds
and spirits that have
allowed us to stand by
and watch, and even to
participate in, the destruction of
so much of life?"
Indeed, Kiser said, one can't
help but appreciate the swallow-
tailed kite for its beauty and rar-
ity.


SURPRISING RESULTS:


FWC analyzes its


volunteer programs


Volunteers are worth their
weight in gold. The proof is in
an analysis conducted recently
by University of Florida' docto-
rial student Stuart Carlton of the
partnership between volunteers
and the Florida Fish and Wild-
life Conservation Commission
(FWC). Some of Carlton's con-
clusions were surprising. -
The FWC relies on 3,100 vol-
unteers in more than two dozen
programs, including Hunter
Safety, Ridge Rangers, Project
WILD, Chinsegut Nature Center
events and a variety of scientific
research and resource manage-
ment projects. The value of
their services totals roughly $1.9
million per year, according to
Carlton, who collaborated with
professors Susan K. Jacobson
and Martha C. Monroe on the
project.
When Carlton polled FWC
volunteers, he noted that 90
percent of them said the FWC
seems to appreciate their hard
work, and that is an important
element in retaining them for the
long term. Thirty-five percent
have volunteered services at the
FWC for more than five.years.
Three-fourths of them volunteer
more than 13 hours per year.
Motivations for volunteers in-
cluded helping the environment,
learning, supporting the resourc-
es they use recreationally and the
feeling that they are living close
to their ecological values. Carl-
ton and other researchers found
a noticeably more intense feel-
ing of motivation in women.
"Volunteering with the FWC
provides Floridians with a.
unique way of experiencing our
environment," said Anne Glick,
section leader in the FWC's Of-
fice of Recreation Services. "Cit-


izen-scientists, working hand in
hand with FWC scientists, get
an in-depth, behind-the-scenes
experience while serving a criti-
cal role in protecting Florida's
native habitats and species."
Volunteers indicated the
types of work most appropri-
ate for them include working
on improving habitats, survey-
ing wildlife populations and
public outreach activities. Their
least favorite activities included
maintenance and fundraising.
"They don't want to feel that
they are just doing grunt work,"
Carlton said. "They want to feel
they are contributing something
significant."
Carlton found that most who
responded to his survey were
males, and 95 percent were
white. The typical volunteer
was middle-aged, employed
part-time and had attended col-
lege. However, the largest set of
volunteers work in the FWC's
Hunter Safety Program, which
uses mostly male instructors.
Removing Hunter Safety from
the equation results in a shift that
reveals 60 percent of volunteers
are females.
The study also evaluated the
attitudes of the FWC's -volun-
teer coordinators and the coor-
dinators' supervisors, comparing
their findings with the attitudes
of supervisors who do not work
with volunteers or volunteer co-
ordinators.
Not surprisingly, FWC em-
ployees who work with volun-
teers, or supervise those employ-
ees, place a high value on the
services provided by volunteers.

To learn more about volunteer
opportunities at the FWC, visit
MyFWC.com/GetInvolved.


Public health resource guide on


harmful algal blooms available
The Florida Fish and Wildlife eludes background inform
Conservation Commission and on harmful algal bloom:
the Florida Department of Health scriptions of different po
recently released a new tool to scenarios and contact inI
assist local health officials when tion for various bloom-i
responding to harmful algal organizations.
blooms in Florida. The Resource In addition to being a
Guide for Public Health Re- reference for health official
sponse to Harmful Algal Blooms guide provides easy-to-re;
in Florida addresses critical HAB formation for the public tc
issues that may affect the health about this topic.
of Florida's residents and visitors Based on recommend
and recommends procedures to from the Public Health Tec
handle events and minimize their Panel of Florida's Harmful
impacts. Bloom Task Force, scientist
In Florida, many species of managers developed the gi
harmful microscopic algae can meet the critical need for t
affect fish and wildlife, and some source.
can cause human illness. The The guide is available
guide -is the first reference that search.MyFWC.com/fea
compiles critical information re- view_article.asp?id=32552
lated to these species as well as For more information
other harmful algal bloom issues harmful algal blooms in Fl
in one easy-to-use source. visit research.MyFWC.co
Along with suggested oper- www.myfloridaeh.com/mec
ating procedures, the guide in- aquatic/index.html.


nation
s,. de-
tential
forma-
-elated

go-to
Is, the
ad in-
Sleam

nations
hnical
Algal
sts and
tide to
his re-

at re-
tures/

n on
'orida,
m or
licine/


i~ .

ti : ^- --.^ -'-









AUGUST 5,2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 27


Expand your horizons with freshwater fish, turtles, frogs, crayf
Although Florida requires any- turtles; frogs; crustaceans, such as and other foreign markets, caused
one between the ages of 16 and 65 crayfish and grass shrimp; and mol- Fish Buster the Florida Fish and Wildlife Con-
to purchase a recreational freshwa- lusks, such as mussels and clams? servation Commission (FWC) to
ter fishing license, there are animals To take these species recreationally Bulletin prohibit all commercial take or sale
you can take recreationally, without or for personal use, you do not need of wild native freshwater turtles, of
a license, from fresh water for con- a fishing license. However, it is very ob Wattendorf which there are 18 ,species in Flor-
sumption or to use as bait, provided important to understand that specif- News from The -. ida. State law prohibits harvesting
you know and follow the rules. ic regulations apply. People must i Fish and WIIdilfe alligator snapping turtles and regu-
Obtaining a recreational fresh- have a commercial fishing license C servation Co m slon lar snapping turtles, Barbour's and
water fishing license is easy just or Class III exhibition and sale li- Escambia map turtles, and cooters.
call 888-FISH FLORIDA, or visit cense to sell some of these species.. Other freshwater turtles (chiefly
MyFWC.com/License. The license Recent reports of large harvests softshell turtles) are restricted to.
is a great value, of several species of freshwater tur- one per person per day for person-
However, what about taking tles, promoted by demand in Asian al use. They are typically caught


. Fr75 a -:


c
t


1


. .


ish & mollusks
by hand, dip net, minnow seine or
baited hook and used for human
consumption. These flattened look-
ing turtles with leathery shells can
inflict a painful bite and have sharp
claws, so be careful if you choose to
harvest one.
Red-eared sliders are a com-
mon nonnative freshwater turtle in
Florida's waters, but people cannot
catch them to keep as pets. While
red-eared sliders can be taken and
used for human consumption, once
captured, they cannot be released
back into Florida's waters.
'Among the most common frogs
taken for consumption are pig frogs
and bullfrogs. There are no seasons,
bag or size limits. Most people use
gigs at night to hunt them. (Some
specific areas prohibit this, so check
the local regulations.) Sale of frogs
or frog legs requires a commercial
fishing license.
Mollusks, which include mus-
sels and clams, are filter feeders and
live on or in the sand at the bottom
of rivers and lakes. Certain species
of freshwater mussels may be col-
lected for personal use. However,
federal laws protect seven Florida
mussel species that occur from the
Suwannee .River system north and
west throughout the Panhandle.
Possessing or disturbing these pro-
tected species can result in sub-
stantial penalties, so be sure to do
your research first. The daily bag
limit for unprotected mussels, such
as Florida spiney spike and paper
pondshell varieties, is 10 per person
(or 20 half shells), and they can only
be taken by handpicking. Freshwa-
ter mussels may not be sold. Spe-
cies of freshwater mussels from
families other than Unionidae or
Margaritferidae, such as the Asian
clam, have no daily bag or posses-
sion limits and are often taken for
bait. People remove the tough body
from the shell and place it on a bait-
holder style hook.
There are more than 50 species
of freshwater crayfish in Florida;
many are imperiled and may not be
taken. However, there are no sea-
sons, gear, bag or size limits on the
more abundant "crawdads." These
critters look like little lobsters and
are sometimes taken with small
traps or dip nets, for use as bait or
for consumption in things such as
Cajun stews or Creole recipes. Red
swamp and white river crayfish are
the, most common species used for
these purposes. They are found in
ditches and vegetated areas with
clear water and often around algae-
covered rocks. Traps are baited
with abundant amounts of fresh or
frozen fish parts, not spoiled. Leav-
ing the trap overnight is normally
important, but remember to'tag it
with your name and address and be
sure it is placed legally and safely.
Red swamp and white river crayfish
are listed as conditional species, so
while they may be personally used
for human consumption, they may
not be kept alive or sold without
special permits.
Getting outdoors and learning
about nature is a great way to have
fun, get exercise and get away from
the stress of everyday life. To learn
more and to check local rules visit
MyFWC.com.
Instant licenses are available at
MyFWC.com/License or by calling
888-FISH-FLORIDA (347-4356).
Report violators by calling *FWC
or #FWC oh your cell phone, or
888-404-3922.







Page 28 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL AUGUST 5,2009


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