Group Title: Calhoun-Liberty Journal (Bristol, Fla.).
Title: The Calhoun-Liberty journal
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00027796/00154
 Material Information
Title: The Calhoun-Liberty journal
Alternate Title: Calhoun Liberty journal
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Calhoun-Liberty Journal
Publisher: Liberty Journal, Inc.
Liberty Journal
Place of Publication: Bristol, Fla
Publication Date: June 3, 2009
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Bristol (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Liberty County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Calhoun County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Liberty -- Bristol
United States of America -- Florida -- Calhoun
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in Sept. 1991.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 11, no. 38 (Sept. 18, 1991).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00027796
Volume ID: VID00154
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AKN4565
oclc - 33425067
alephbibnum - 002046630
electronic_aleph - 003298625
electronic_oclc - 60662266
lccn - sn 95047245
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly journal (Bristol, Fla.)

Full Text
Univ of Florida History Library
PO Box 117007
Gainesvllle F1 32611


S2 12929/2009
1846


OU MURNALLET



JOURNAL


Volume 29, Number 22 ^ Wednesday, Jun. 3, 2009 .



Body of Blountstown man recovered


after accident on Apalachicola River


ABOVE: Anthony Lake adjusts his tie
as he gets ready to graduate with the
kindergarten class at Tolar. BELOW:
Kimberley Taylor makes sure her cap is
just right before stepping inside the gym
for the BHS graduation.


Dv Teresa EuDanks Journal Editor
"He loaed the afterr and that's what took his _
life." said Tammn Rector Bottoms of the untimely
death this past weekend of her son. Jefferie Scott r
Rector.
The body of the 28-year-old Blountsto\wn
man was recovered from the Apalachicola
River Monday morning, two days after he
disappeared into the water following a
boating accident.
Rector was found near the accident
site, approximately one mile south
of the Chaitahoochee boat landing.
according to the Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conser action Commission
(FW\Ci.
Rector and a friend. Mark Hamilton.
29. of Marianna. entered the river
from the Ocheesee Landing Saturday l
morning.
They were headed north m a 15-foot
aluminum boat. powered by a 75-hp
motor, when they attempted to go
around a na igation buoN. according 1
lnestiglator Ion Brunsoi a;d it's
not clear %%hat happened. but as
S they itrned the boat it hit a .wake or Jefferie Scott i
. "something" that caused'both nmen to his children, Jo
V be ejected. Neither man %\ore a life
jacket. nor did the\ h.i\e any in the
boat. said FWC Lt. Stan Kirkland.
S The boat began circling wildly and hit Rector.
4 Another boater downstream heard the boat circlulm
but "thought is \ as lhoisepla\ and didn't pay attention "
said Kirkland. "Then he realized he couldn't see any body
in the boat." At that point. Larr3 Hooper started his boat
and headed for the accident site. He found Hamilton in
the `water. pulled him out and called 911 By that time.


the men could not see Rector.
S Bottoms later talked %w ith Hamilton, w ho told her
about the harrowt ine accident. "He said Jefft as steering
the boat t hen something happened that bucked them out
of the %water." according to Bottoms. "Both were
treading water. Mark said he kept telling Jeff to
hang on" she said. "He said Jeff kind of laid
"- *. back in the \ater with his arms floating out.
^ .. There \\ as a pool ofblood around him. He
took a breath. vwent under and that was
the last tine he saw, him."
She speculated that Jeff. \\ho \\as
a strong s\' unmer. %w as trying to save
the boat. which belonged to his aunt
and uncle.
She said Jeffspoke to his sister by
phone and after learning this his mother
was not able to make a planned \isit
to Ne%\ Orleans to meet with him and
other family members, he decided to
Ssta in Blountstow\n.
"A half Ihour latei is when it
happenedd" said Bottoms.
While distraught oier the loss,

"He was out doing what he lo\ ed to
sector is shown with do. enjoying the beautiful nature of
ocelyn and Joseph. Northwest Florida." she said. "He
was a big. easygoing laid-back kid
w\ho lo\ed life."
His two children, age six and eight. li\e with their
mother in Louisiana. \ here he worked as an off-shore
crane operator. He considered Blountstown his home
and often stayed there with hs aunt and uncle.
"-He leaves behind a multitude of good friends, here
and in Louisiana." she said.

See JEFFERIE RECTOR continued page 18


Gadsden County men arrested on multiple felonies in Bristol


ANDRE KELLY
- - -


BRYANT WILLIAMS



7 "812 0900 8


by Teresa Eubanks, Joumal Editor
Two Gadsden County men are,
facing felony charges after they
were found with a large amount of
cocaine, nearly ran down a deputy
and hit a patrol car as they fled a
traffic stop Friday night in Bristol.
Deputies found 17 baggies of
powder cocaine, estimated to be
worth about $1,700, along with
60 rocks of crack cocaine, said
to be worth $1,200, and about six
grams of marijuana.
Earlier that evening, Liberty
County Sheriff's Department Cpl.
Todd Wheetley and Blountstown
Police Officer Timothy Partridge
were monitoring phone calls
between a confidential informant
and a man known by the street
name of "Black,"who had agreed
to cometo Liberty County to sell


$500 of crack cocaine, according
to the probable cause.
Wheetley and Gadsden County
Investigator Billy Buckhalt
caught up with the suspects'
southbound vehicle on County
Road 12 North. The Ford sedan
was going 20 miles-below the
speed limit and the driver was
having trouble staying in his lane.
The vehicle failed to stop at a pre-
arranged meeting site, according
to Wheetley, who said, "I guess
they got lost."
The suspects continued on
into Bristol- where they pulled
in to the Express Lane at S.R.
20 and C.R. 12 South around 10
p.m., stopping sideways in front
of the store.
See COCAINE ARRESTS
continued on page 18


e XWf5"* LO -----------...- _________


Sh riffs Lo 2 Community 7


Birthdays...12 Speak Up!...18 Outdoors...19 Schools...16 Obituaries...20 & 22 Classifieds...24 & 25


500
includes
tax


News from the Pews...8 Farmer's Almanac...9


t


mown=1









Page 2 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JUNE 3, 2009


Calhoun deputy cited in accident


by Teresa Eubanks, Journal Editor
A Calhoun County sheriff's
deputy was cited for leaving
the scene of an accident with
property damage after he hit
the bumper of another vehicle
while pulling out to pass it last
month, according to a report
from the Blountstown Police
Department.
. A 1996 Mercury was stopped
on Clark Street at the intersection
with North Main Street where the
driver,'Laura Adkins Hopkins of
Bristol, was waiting to make a
right turn into a parking lot at
10:15 a.m. on May 8.
Mark Christopher "Kipper"
Mallory drove up behind
Hopkins in an unmarked vehicle


Copeland


registered to the Calhoun County
Sheriff's Department. As Mallory
attempted to take the 2003 Ford
SUV around Hopkins' vehicle,
he struck the rear bumper of
the car, leaving a black paint
transfer.
He then left the scene.
The driver noted the license
tag of Mallory's vehicle and
reported the incident.
"We're fully cooperating with
the police department concerning
the accident," said Major Roman
Wood of the Calhoun County
Sheriff's Department. He said
there was no damage to the
county-owned vehicle.
The state attorney's office is
conducting an independent in-


arrested after


officers search Hall Circle
On Tuesday, May 26 at approximately 12 a.m.,
Timothy Alan Copeland, Jr. was apprehended in
Liberty County by the Liberty County Sheriff's
Department with the assistance of Officers of
the Blountstown Police Department, Calhoun
Corrections K9 Units andthe State Attorney's Office.
Copeland was wanted on numerous outstanding
warrants.
Authorities got a tip that Copeland was staying in
the Hall Circle area of Bristol.
"We worked the neighborhood and tracked him
to a house," said Blountstown Police Chief Glenn
Kimbrel. "He called someone to pick him up. We
saw a car in the neighborhood zipping around before
picking him up on Hwy. 12 North." Officers then
moved in to make the arrest.
Kimbrel said Copeland is a suspect in a current
active investigation, is wanted on a burglary charge
in Bay County and has several felony warrants for
thefts in Calhoun County.


vestigation of the incident.
Assistant State Attorney
Bob Pell said it is unlikely that
charges will be filed. "It looks
like there was an inadvertent
contact with the vehicle Deputy
Mallory was driving," he said,
explaining, "There was no paint
transfer. The car that had been
hit had a black mark on it but
there was no corresponding
physical evidence on Deputy
Mallory's car."
Pell said if there was any
contact between the two vehi-
cles, "It may have been a very
slight glance from the tire. It's
easy to see how he would feel
no contact was made with the
other car."


Man arrested after

baby, girlfriend hurt

A Blountstown man. was arrested after he
reportedly bit his girlfriend on her leg and shut
a door on her infant's head.
Keith William Parrish was charged with
domestic violence and aggravated battery
after an officer from the Blountstown Police
Department responded to a disturbance at
Parrish's residence on NE Pear Street at 7:19
p.m. Saturday.
Erica Porter, 27, said Parrish "shut her
infant's head in their bedroom door." There
was a line on the side of the baby's head, which
was turning blue, according to Officer Timothy
Partridge's report. Porter had a large bite mark
on her lower left leg, with redness and visible
bite marks, the report stated.
As Porter spoke with the officer, Parrish came
out of the apartment and said the woman needed
to "get out of here." Parrish said he bit Porter
after she kicked him in the stomach.
Parrish was very hostile and could not be
reasoned with, according to the officer. He was
transported to the county jail. -
An ambulance crew treated the mother and
child at the scene.

Blountstown Police Dept.
May 25 through May 31, 2009
Citations issued:
Accidents...;...........03 Traffic Citations..................14
Special details (business escorts, traffic details).....111
Business alarms.....00 Residential alarms..........00
Com plaints........................... ................................. 150


Wrong-way driver charged with DUI


ABristolmanwas chargedwith .
DUI and resisting arrest without
violence after a police officer and
two deputies saw him traveling
east in the westbound lane on
Central Avenue in Blountstown
Tuesday.
The brown SUV continued"
going east until making an abrupt
right turn, crossing the eastbound
lane and eastbound turn lane,'


to enter the Southern Express
parking lot, stopping near the
diesel pumps.
As officers approached the
vehicle, they noted the strong
odor of an alcoholic beverage
coming from the driver, Thomas
W. Griffin.
Griffin stumbled as he stepped
out of the SUV and admitted he
had consumed several beers.


After failing a field sobriety
test, Griffin was taken to the
Blountstown Police Department,
where he gave two breath
samples to determine his level of
intoxication. Both samples were
0.19. Florida's legal limit is .08.
The resisting charge was made
after Griffin failed to sign a
fingerprint card and instead,
began writing a sentence on it.


CALHOUN COUNTY
May 25
*Rebecca Jones, driving while license suspended or re-
voked, resisting arrest without violence, CCSO.
May 26
*Shannon Kay Bryant, VOP (county), CCSO.
*Jeanette Addison,. VOP (state), CCSO.
May 27'
*Thomas Griffin, DUI, resisting arrest without violence,
BPD.
*Mario Alberto Pulido, no valid driver's license, failure to
appear (3 times-Houston Co., AL), possession of a forged
instrument (Houston Co., AL), BPD.
*Timothy Copeland, VOP (2 times), burglary (warrant),.
grand theft (warrant), dealing in stolen property (warrant),
CCSO.
May 28
*James Paul Tucker, VOP, resisting arrest without vio-
lence, CCSO.
*'Adrian Flowers, child support (Walton Co.), CCSO.
*Hector Flores-Lopez, fraudulent ID card, driving while
license suspended or revoked, FHP.
*Alfred Leroy Davis, no vehicle registration, tag attached
not assigned, BPD.
May 29
*Steven Fowler, VOSP, CCSO.
*Wayne Luke, VOSP, CCSO.
May 30
*Daniel Creamer, battery on a law enforcement officer,
resisting arrest with violence, CCSO.
*Alejandro Hernandez, no valid driver's license, BPD.
*Keith William Parrish, domestic battery, BPD.
May 31
*Cory McFann, VOCP (2 times), CCSO.
*Jamarial Taneeshia Brown, resisting without violence,
CCSO.
*Quinton LaMark Peterson, possession of a controlled
substance (2 counts), CCSO.
LIBERTY COUNTY
May 25 .
*Shawn Lamond Thomas, VOP (county), LCSO.
-Gertrude Schonveld, holding for Sumter Co.SO, FHP.
*Rebecca Jones, holding for CCSO, CCSO.
*Catrina Capps, VOP (county), self.
*Spencer Clemons, trespass on property (fenced), loiter-
ing or prowling, LCSO.
*Robert Kilgore, possession less than 20 grams mari-
juana, possession drug paraphernalia, trespass on property
(fenced), loitering or prowling, LCSO.
May 26
*Crystal M. Brown, grand theft bypassing worthless bank
checks, LCSO.
*Jeanette Addison, holding for CCSO, CCSO.
May 27
*Timothy Alan Copeland, resisting arrest without violence,
holding for CCSO, holding for Bay Co. SO, LCSO.
May 29
*Andre Kelly, aggravated battery on a law enforcement
officer, aggravated fleeing and/or attempting to elude, resist-
ing with violence, possession of cocaine with intent to sell,
possession of marijuana with intent to sell, LCSO.
*Bryant Williams, aggravated assault on a law enforce-
ment officer, aggravated fleeing and/or eluding, resisting
arrest with violence, possession of cocaine with intent to
sell, LCSO.
*Wayne Anthony Luke, VOP, LCSO.
May 30
*Jamarial Brown, holding for CCSO, CCSO.
May 31
*Heather McClellan Jones, obstruction by disguise,
CCSO.
*Robert Edward Gibson, obstruction by disguise,
CCSO.
Ustingsincludename tollowedbychargeandidentificationofarrestingagency.Thenamesaboverepresent
those charged. We remind our readers that all are presumed innocent until proven guilty


Blountstown

Police Dept.

ARREST'

REPORTS

compiled by
Journal Editor
Teresa Eubanks








JUNE 3,2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 3



Altha man arrested after reports of gunfire
A28-year-oldAltha man was Department and said that he was then taken to the ground but rounds of 223, nine rounds of
arrested Sunday after a report firing guns to keep his neighbors Calhoun County continued to fight, headbutting .40-caliber, over 100 rounds of
that he was firing high-powered off his property. Dalton who came forward to .22-caliber, and over 200 rounds
weapons from his yard and the Deputy Nic Keller contacted ARREST help restrain him. He was then of 20-gauge ammunition.
bullets were hitting neighbors' Creamer by phone and urged REPORTS placed in leg cuffs and put in a Two 12-gauge shotguns
homes. him to meet him outside. compiled by patrol car. were discovered in a bunker
Nine law enforcement officers Creamer allowed Keller to pat Journal Editor Creamer was charged with that had been dug under a
responded tothecalljustbefore him down and then handcuff Teresa Eubanks battery on a law enforcement shed. Creamer had also secured


midnight Friday at 11654 NW
Glory Hill, the home of 28-year-
old Daniel Creamer.
Earlier that day, it was
reported that Creamer was
walking around in a ski mask
with a handgun, saying that he
was looking for Deputy Eddie
Dalton.
While deputies were en route
to the home, Creamer contacted
the Calhoun County Sheriff's


him. Creamer, an Iraq war
vet said to suffer from post-
traumatic stress syndrome,
admitted to Keller he had
stopped his medication because
it was against his religion.
Keller noted in his report that
Creamer smelled of an alcoholic
beverage.
When he spotted Dalton,
Creamer resumed earlier threats
he had made against the deputy


r F (ati Cenu ct r I t ,or, ( ir Ch at
Saurke & Co.
'- .for .'u rjpp,,umtj, ti. '
HWY. 65 S. i HOSFORD
PHONE 379-3330
...l... .'... a u "-s


and said he was going to kill
him. Creamer made a number
of other disturbing statements
and told Keller he believed
Hitler was alive and running the
government.
After interviewing a neighbor,
Dalton returned to where officers
were gathered with Creamer,
who became enraged and started
yelling obscenities at him.
A scuffle ensued, with
deputies grabbing Creamer by
his arms as he lunged toward
Lt. Adam Terry. Creamer began
flailing his arms in an effort to
break free and struck Reserve
Deputy Alvin Edenfield in the
face with his elbow, leaving
him with a bloody nose. He was


a
s

a


i


t
o


o
s
5


officer and resisting arrest with
violence.
After being placed in a jail
cell, Creamer told Keller, "Your
badge is going to get pinned to
your body."
Further charges are pending.
SWhen officers went inside
the house, they found weapons
in plain view on the kitchen
counter, including an AR15
223 assault rifle and a Smith &
Wesson .40-caliber handgun.
Both were loaded and ready to
fire. A single marijuana cigarette
was also on the counter. A
.22-caliber rifle was found
next to the counter. The serial
number had been painted over.
A large stash of ammunition
found in the home included 57


several hundred pounds of food
in the bunker and told a deputy
he was "getting ready for the
Apocalypse."
Deputies have been called to
the residence several times in
response to reports of Creamer
firing guns at night.
In the arrest report, Keller
noted that in the past, Creamer
had bragged about how he had
been hiding in the woods when
Keller arrived at his home, had
the scope of his gun aimed at the
deputy's head and "could have
taken his life at any time."
In his event report, Dalton said
Creamer was angry with him
over a traffic stop that resulted
in a verbal warning for speeding.


Two charged after traffic stop
A driver playing loud music pulled over at the BP station. pill was found to-be Klonipin,
and spinning his tires as he at the comer of Clark and S.R. a Schedule IV narcotic.
;ped off was pulled over and 71. Prior to identifying the pills,
ne of his passengers arrested In the arrest report, the Crawford went to get a test kit
after a deputy smelled the odor deputy stated that he searched from a patrol car when a vehicle
)f burning marijuana coming the vehicle while BPD Officer suddenly pulled into the station,
from inside the vehicle Sunday Patrick Crawford searched almost hitting him.
nBlountstown. : one of the passengers, Quinton When the car came to a
Deputy Eddie Dalton stopped Lemark Peterson, 26. stop, the driver identified
Adam Johnson, 21, after he left While Peterson was emptying as Jamarial Brown, 20 got
he parking lot of the Gas Mart. his pockets, a blue pill fell out. out arid started screaming and
)n S.R. 71 just before-6 p.m. A red pill with the image of a cursing atthe officers, saying, "I
Dalton followed the vehicle, gun stamped on it was found in know y'all planted that.dope!"
vhich was going about 10 miles the vehicle where Peterson had She was asked several times
)ver the speed limit, as it went been sitting. The red pill was to leave the scene before she
outh on S.R. 71 and finally identified as Ecstasy; the blue finally got in her car, drove
across the street and pulled
into the parking lot at Golden
S1 Drugs. She then stepped out,

L Road and continued cursing
We have Gift Certificates. and screaming at the officers,
-. prompting numerous passersby

on.
After ignoring warnings that
20755 Central Ave E Suite A she would be arrested if she
Blountstown 674-9030 1. did not leave, she was taken


into custody for resisting arrest
without violence.
Peterson was charged with
possession of a controlled
substance.

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a difference in a child's life.
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ad Litem Foundation
PHONE (850) 410-4642


Q -ELLIS

[ BARBERSHOP
Mon. Fri. 8 a.m. 5 p.m.
Saturday 8 a.m. 12 p.m.
18622 SR 20 W. Blountstown Call 674-1038
NEXT TO WHITE'S AIR CONDITIONING


ACREAGE

FOR SALE

Liberty County
Rd Frontage
From $4,995 per acre
$1000.00 Total Down

OWNER FINANCING,
No Qualifying

TRI-LAND INC.
R. E. Broker
Phone (813) 253-3258






Page 4 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL-JUNE,3, 2009


Farmers Market
set this Saturday
in Blountstown
Blounistown Main Street is proud to
sponsor the downtown farmers market
featuring fresh produce. home baked
items, handmade crafts, and onginal art-
\work. along with live entertainment.
The River Valley Marketplace is open
the first Saturday of e\ery month from
8 a.m. to noon in the greenspace next to
Wakulla Bank. The next market date is
this Saturday. June 6.
The marketplace was a big hit when it
opened last fall There have been a \ ide
,anety of booths, but the crowds are ask-
ing for more fresh produce. If \ou are a
farmer or have a garden and would like
to make some extra dollars, bring our
goods to the River Valle Marketplace
Vendor spaces are complete\ FREE.
but there are some requirements:
Absolutely[ no flea markets or 'ard
sales.
The \ endor is responsible for all their
set up items such as tables, tents, etc.
There is no electricity. If you use a tent. it
must be \ white or beige so we can create a
cohesive look.
Produce must be vendor grown and
sold.
Please set up a nice presentation at
s our booth. There are Iumited spaces aa all-
able for truck tailgate vegetable sales.
If you would d like to be a \endor. \ou
must register in advance. Again, there is
no fee, but \ou must apply.
Also. lain Street is seeking carnage
rides as well as entertainers to perfonn.
Contact Kelli at 899-0500.

Women's First

Health Seminar

Friday, June 12
The First Annual Women's Health
Seminar will be held Fnda\. June 12 from
10 a.m. to 2 p.m. (ET) at the Bnstol Pen-
tecostal Holiness Church located at 12413
NW Soloman Street in Bristol.
The meeting will be loaded with a
wide \anets of events, including a com-
plimentary lunch. makeovers. massages.
manicures, door prizes and more.
Topics that will be discussed at the
meeting and the speakers include:
*Self-esteem by Carol Sutton. M.D.
*Women's Health Sern ices by Jocelvn
Stowell. A.R.N.P.
*MNanaging Nenopause b\ Anthony
Speights. M.D.
Heart Health by Lisa Mullee. IMS.
RDCS. RVT
For more information contact Susan
Chain at (850) 643-2415. ext. 245 at the
Liberty County Health Department.
This program is sponsored by the Cal-
houn and Liberty County Health Depart-
ment's Healthy Communities and Healthy
People.


The Calhoun-Liberty Journal is
published each Wednesday
by the Liberty Journal Inc.,
Summers Road, P.O. Box 536,
Bristol, FL 32321.
Anual subscriptions are $18.
Periodicals postage paid at Bristol, FL
POSTMASTER: Send address corrections
to: P.O. Box 536, Bristol, FL 32321.


QMMUN? T
CALENDARR
DAI Ri'


I


MONTH
*. .


TODAY'S MEETINGS
* Rotary Club, noon, Calhoun-Liberty Hospilal
* Weight Loss Support Group, 1:30 p m.. Shellon Park oLirary
* Boy Scouts. 6.30 p.m, Mormon Church in Bristol
* AA, 7 p.m.. Calhoun County Old Ag Bldg. east door. in front of jail

BIRTHDAYS
'Aliarstria '.RIfir ii A"M ili "' .Fi ni
TODAY'S MEETINGS
* AA, 7 p.m, basement of Calhoun County Counhouse


EVENT
Dance 6 12p.m.. American
Legion Hallin Blounistobn


M\PORLDV
ENVIRON IENT
DAY .


STRAJUE


IKAID,I
DAI


BIRTHDAYS
'Ti~mnII ll\'liiats adi
*H}Ii'cI 'Pa riik,


EVENT
Dance. 6 12 p.m., American
Legion Hall in Blounitoi n


national

e JUNE
1L 7-13


EVENT
Relay for Life. Wrap up Party, 5:30 p.m.. W. T Neal Citc Center
TODAY'S MEETINGS
* Walk-A-Weigh Program. 9 a m.. Veterans Memorial Park Civic Center
* Altha Boy Scouts, 5:30 p.m, Almia Volunteer Fire Department
* City of Bristol, 6:30 p.m.. Bristol City Hall
* Blountstown Lions Club, 6 p.m.. Apalachee Restaurant in Bristol
* AA, 6 p.m., Almha Community Center


BIRTHDAY -- lackie 'Dal 'Kelle- t
TODAY'S MEETINGS
* Chipola Healthy Start, Coalition meeting & Board meeting. 8:30 a m..
Chipola College's Conlinuing Education Building, Marianna
* Liberty Community Health Care, Federally Qualified Health Center, 4
p.m.. Veterans Memorial Civic Center, Room 10, Brislol
* Liberty Co. School Board, 5 p m, School Board Administration Building
* Calhoun Co. School Board, 5 p m., Calhoun Courhouse
* Altha Town Council. 6 p.m.. Allha Town Hall
* Blountstown City Council, 6 p.m., Blounlslown Town Hall
* Bristol Lions Club, 7 p.m .
Apalachee Restaurant, Bristol
- Blountstown Chapter #179 OES,
7 p.m., Dixie Lodge in Blountslown
* Bristol Vol. Fire Dept.,
7:30 p.m, Bristol City Hall
n Ht oi 0 nl H mL
ROSE I4MOH-ITH


THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL
Located at 11493 NW Summers Road in Bristol
MAILING ADDRESS: P.O. Box 536, Bristol, FL 32321
TELEPHONE (850) 643-3333 Fax (850) 643-3334
EMAIL: thejournal@fairpoint.net (USPS 012367)
ADS: cljads@fairpoint.net Summers Road


AP


BIRTHDAY
'Kaidiice Shelilroin


I RDYJN


Summer programs
at Liberty libraries
start next Tuesday
Beginning Tuesday. June 9 the Libert\
County Public Libraries ill be present-
ing the sununer program. "Be Creamtie at
Your Librar' These progranLs are fun
and entertaining and help keep reading
going during the summer.
*Thursdays. June I1. l;. 25 and Jul\ 2
the programs % ill be from 2:31-4 p m. at
the Bristol Librar for ages 7-10.
*Tuesda\s, June 9. 16. 23 and 30 the
programs ll be held at the Bristol Da\
Care from 9-10-3r0 a im.
-The Hosford Librar \\ ill have their
programs at the public library on Tues-
das. June '. o. 23 and 30 from 2 30-4
p m. for ages 7'-10
-Thursda\s. June 11. IS, 25 and July 2
the programs \ IIl be held at Noah's Ark
Davcare from 10-II a.mn.
For more infonnation. please call Pat
Miller at 643-_247 ini Bristol or Edith
Kirn at 379-3300 in Hosford

Gardening Friends
meet next Tuesday
Gardening Fne'nds of the Big Bend
\\ ll meet at the North Florida Research
and Education Center near Quinc. at 6:30
p.m. on Tuesda',, June 9.
The purpose of this group is to pro-
mote gardening and gardening research
b., supporting and assisting the faculrt
and staff of NTREC. an ann of the Lin-
versinr of Florida's Institute for Food and
A.ericutural Sciences. There \\ill be a
brief business meeting follow ed b, a pre-
sentation b\ Dr. Gary Kno\ on his recent
trip to China.
For more information contact Jill Wi\I-
hams at (185i) 663-2280 or Gar Knox at
iS50i () 5-7102.

Church Co-ed
Softball meets
Mon., June 22
The Liberty County Recreation De-
parinent \will hold an organization meet-
ing for summer Church Co-Ed Softball
on Monda\. June 22 at Veterans Memo-
rial Park Civic Center
Costs, schedules and rules % Ill be dis-
cussed.
For further infonnation call the Recre-
ation Department at 643-2175.



That's how many copies of
The Calhoun-Liberty Journal
were distributed last week,
ensuring plenty of coverage for
your community announcements
and great response for our
business advertisers!

JOURNAL STAFF
Johnny Eubanks...............Publisher
Teresa Eubanks..................... Editor
Gina Grantham...............Bookkeeper
Missy Tanner... ....Advertising
Debbie Duggar....Production Assistant
OFFICE HOURS; 9 am. 6 p.m. M-F,
Saturday from 9 a.m. until 1 p.m.







JUNE 3, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 5


'A Ride for Hope' Saturday, June 6 in Tallahassee


TALLAHASSEE Tallahas-
see Memorial HealthCare is
getting a leg up on community
support for its Cancer Center
through money raised from the
2009 Ride for Hope on June 6
at Celebration Baptist Church,
3300 Shamrock East in Killearn.
The Ride for Hope was created
by Lou Farrah, a cancer patient
who wanted to make a differ-
ence with a bike ride and a com-
munity celebration of life.
Although Lou died in 2006,
his legacy lives on through this
athletic, wellness and family fun
event that will provide "Cancer
Care Close to Home" to those
in Tallahassee and the Big Bend
Region.
"Participating in the Ride for
Hope as cyclists, as volunteers,
as donors, as supporters and as
attendees we are planning for
the future and that means we be-
lieve that 'Cancer Care Close to
Home' is a reality for our com-
munity. And to me, that is what
hope is all about," said volunteer
Ride for Hope Director, Mandy
Lou Stark. "This is our chance to
change the lives of those battling
cancer now, those who might be
afflicted in the future and possi-
bly even our own one' day. This
is also to cheer on survivors and
to remember those we've lost.
I've never been involved in a
more meaningful event, and I


am so thankful to everybody in-
volved."
The success of this health and
wellness event that benefits the
Tallahassee Memorial Cancer
Center and the people of this re-
gion would not be possible with-
out the support of great sponsors
like Mainline Information Sys-
tems, MBF Healthcare Partners,
Tallahassee Democrat, Fonvielle
Lewis Foote & Messer, Fox 49,
Gordos & Bandidos Restaurants
and many others. Because of
- this kind of support, and grow-
ing participation, the 2009 Ride
for Hope will introduce two new
features a Vendor Expo and a
100-mile century option.
The Vendor Expo will be in
the gym at Celebration Baptist
from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. on Fri-
day, June 5. It will include rider
packet pick up, registration, pas-
ta dinner by Brickyard Cafe with
celebrity servers--Sheriff Larry
Campbell, Cash from TNT 94.9
and Blythe from Magic 107, and
music by the Royal Garden Dix-
ieland Band.
Visit many great vendors in-
cluding Sunshine Cycles, Path-
way Wellness Centre, Vitamin
Shoppe, Krank It Up, Premier
Health & Fitness Club, Sherman
Rosier from Fit & Functional,
GroupFit Studio, and more!
Don't miss out on fantastic door
prizes every.15 minutes.


Aaron Kinnon, Director of
Community Outreach for the
TMH Foundation, outlined the
schedule: "The main event is
Saturday, June 6, and features
five bicycling courses ranging
from a 5-mile family fun ride
to a 100-mile century through
the rolling countryside of North
Florida. All courses begin and
end at the beautiful grounds of
Celebration Baptist Church in
Killearn. Riders for the century.
and metric century will saddle
up and start at 7- a.m. with the
40 and 15-mile riders taking off
at 8:30 a.m. The 5-mile family
fun ride will begin at 10 a.m."
You don't even have to ride!
The event includes a family fes-
tival from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. with
food, prizes, family-friendly en-
tertainment including the Moun-
tain Dew Cloggers and Talla-
hassee native, Billboard artist
and cancer survivor, Robbie
Russell. Kid's activities include
face painting by Klown Kapers,
a kid's trolley ride, fun, games
and much more! Kids, be sure to
bring your bikes!
"Tallahassee Memorial, its
Cancer Center and the patients
and families it serves are ex-
ceedingly grateful to the Ride
for Hope team of volunteers, do-
nors, sponsors and vendors. The
team's generosity -- in terms of
both time and treasure -- is quite


remarkable with respect to its
positive influence on cancer care
at TMH and its promotion of
healthy and active lifestyles in
our community," said Paula For-


tunas, President and CEO of the
TMH Foundation.
To register, donate or get more
information about the Ride for
Hope, visit www.ride4hope.net.
:tat


Ladies have a blast on

15 day tour of Europe
A group of ladies from Liberty County returned Thurs-
day, May 26 from a 15 day tour of Europe, which was
sponsored by the Calhoun County Senior Citizens
organization. Pictured above in their 'tourist garb'
are Annette Phillips, Ruth Duncan, Carolyn Johnson
and Dorothy Sewell.


DsB 9 AL9
DBIHu@IblA


I8I7


.r Yaar CIas Reujnion


7/ Friday, July 3
7 p.m. at BHS Cafeteria
BBQ/Potluck Dinner
Everyone bring a salad to share.
Meat, bread, drinks, cake and
plates, etc. will be provided.


Saturday, July 4

6:30 p.m.
Lady Anderson
Dinner Cruise with
Fireworks, Panama City
(All expenses paid)


Will the following classmates or their families

please call Mary Garrett at the above number:


RSVP is
mandatory
No later than
June 20


Andy Adams
Gail Baker
Paula Bosh
Pos Byrd
Russell Christmas
- Brenda Cook
Essie Dudley
Reggie Durr
Hosea Fitten


Vernice Gatlin
Reggie Gibbs
Robby Goodman
Allen Griffin
Michele Hansel
Rita Henry
Craig Holmes
Don Johnson
Tanguela Jones


Kalier Robinson
Bobby Sapp'
Sophia Simmons
Wanda Terry
Pat Tipton
Rebecca Vickery
Donald Williams
Rhonda Yon


1 .
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Page 6 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JUNE 3, 2009


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SEducation: A national strategic issue


S Education of America's youth is
a political football endlessly kicked
from one end of the political field to
the other.
Education is one of those local things
in American life. No surprise there be-
cause the schools are in our towns. We
Send our children to local schools with
children generally from our neighbor-
hoods. Our children and their friends
- pass-through the school system in


OX

Jerry Cox is a r
officerandwriter w
background in i
foreign policy issu
pkaloosa County.


* loosely knit groups. Finally, if we are lucky, they graduate
S from high school. Great, but now what? Graduation day is
the first day of the rest of their life.
If they choose not to go to college or learn a trade, will
* a high school education prepare them for the workplace?
The answer is no.
Life is not easy and will be even worse for teenagers
who do not graduate from high school. The U.S. Depart-
ment of Education's report, "The Condition of Education
2009" prepared by the National Center for Education Sta-
tistics indicates that nationwide about 72% of freshmen
who enter high school actually graduate. So about one-.
S third of the fresh-faced freshmen who enter high school
each year fall by the wayside.
r According to U.S. Department of Education, there are
w 12 states with a high school graduation rate of 70% or less.
e Six are southern states with Florida being ift the group.
- Alaska, California, Nevada, New Mexico and New York
are in this group.
U According to U.S. Department of Education data, high
School graduates don't do exceptionally well in the market
place and high school dropouts fare even worse. In 2007,
the median income for high school dropouts was $23,000
per year. That's about $11 per hour for the standard 2080
hour work year. The median wage at $29,000 per year was
a bit better for the high school graduate. The median wage
for people with bachelor degrees was $45,000 per year
proving that education has value in the market place.
Why is the education of America's youth soon to be
S America's workforce a national security issue? The an-
S swer is globalization.
e The U.S. competes in international markets. What does
the U.S. have to sell to world markets? Manufactured
products? Well, not much. Seems like everything that I
own except my Ford truck and my two GM cars is made in
China. Probably some of the pieces of my truck and cars
were made "over there."
I just bought a new weed trimmer. Comments on the
S packing box said, "Assembled in the USA from imported
parts." GuesstheUSAisan"assembler,"notamanufacturer.


How does education fit into this discus-
[S sion about weed trimmers or automobile
manufacturing? The U.S needs an educat-
M E U ed workforce if we are going to compete
retired military in the world markets.
ith an extensive Other countries like China and India
domestic and recognize the value of a well-educated
'es. He lives in workforce. Their governments subsidize
S their national educational process be-
cause foreign governments recognize that
a well-educated, well-trained workforce
is essential to gaining their share of the international mar-
ketplace. It's economics, pure and simple, but in AnQerica,
educating our youth, which is educating our workforce, is
just another political football.
Education is just another red meat issue for conserva-
tives and liberals to jawbone. Funding for all services in
Florida is critical, but funding the educational system is
particularly critical.
In some respects, the stimulus bill has saved teaching
jobs in some districts for another year, but when that mon-
ey is gone the issues of educational funding will be back
on the front burner. People will be bitching, whining and
complaining again.
Florida has a particular problem relative to funding
any service. It's a demographic problem in that much of
the state population are old people on a fixed budget try-
ing to live out their last days on a social security check.
The don't want to pay taxes for anything, particularly for
someone else's kids to go to school.
I'm old, retired once, but still working and still paying
taxes, so I'm not too sympathetic to all the grumping from
the retired crowd. As someone said, paying taxes is the
price of living in a democratic America.
Education in America is more than Friday night foot-
ball. Americans suffer from a malady called "exceptional-
ness." It goes like this. Because we are Americans we are
"exceptional." We know more than other people know. We
do things better. Our system of government is better. In
short, we are the king of the hill.
OK by me if you want to believe that, but we need
something to back up our claim to greatness. One of those
things is a workforce bar none. If we want to excel in the
international marketplace then we have to have the smart-
est, most productive workers on the block. We think that
we are there now, but I doubt that.
If we want to continue being the king of the hill in the
international markets we need an educated workforce.
With one out of three young men and women failing to
make it through high school, then it is going to be a tough
slog for America's workforce.


jjj






JUNE 3, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 7


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Page 8 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JUNE 3,2009:


VBS June 6 at

Sycamore United

Methodist Church
Sycamore United Method-
ist Church at 3246 Sycamore
Road in Sycamore will be hold-
ing Vacation Bible School start-
ing Monday, June 8 and going
through Friday, June 12. The
programs start at 6 p.m. and
ending at 9 p.m.
Dinner will be served each
night at 6 p.m. For more infor-
mation call 442-6665.


The music department at De-
liverance Temple COGIC of
Gretna, Inc. will be hosting a
Gospel Music Explosion Con-
cert on Saturday, June 13.
The concert will feature John
Smiley and The Voices from
Nashville, TN, Lady Corder
Chapman, a former member
of the New Life gospel singers
from the Dr. Bobby Jones Gospel


River Assembly of God an-
nounces the following activities:
*Honor Bound Men's Fellow-
ship will be having a luncheon
on Saturday, June 6 at 1 p.m. in
the church fellowship hall. Men
of all faiths are cordially invited
to attend and. share our common
bond of advancing the Word of
the Lord.
*West Florida District's 81st
Camp Meeting will be at the
campgrounds on Hwy. 90, June
6-10. Service times will be 10
a.m. (CT) and 7 p.m. (CT) each
day.
Featured speaker will be Rev.
Randy Valimont and the keynote
address will be given by Super-
intendent, Bobby Thompson.
Youth Camp dates set
vtYouth camp I will be June
6-10 with Jaroy Carpenter
speaker.


SNews
From the

SPews


Show from Nashville, TN, and a
host of other choirs, groups, and
soloists.
Come out and enjoy some
great gospel music. Admission
is free!
For more information or if
you would -like to participate as
a performer in this event, please
-contact Brother Marcus Mathews
at (850) 643-1745.


VYouth camp II will be July
13-17 with Doug Reed speaker.
vYouth camp III will be July
20-24 with Jacob Jester speaker.
"...continue to work out your


Puppets and

Clowns June 6
Puppets and Clowns will be
at Mt. Zion United Pentecos-
tal Church on Saturday, June
6 at 6 p.m.
Come join the swash buck-
ling fun as these treasure hunt-
ing pirates learn what the real
treasure is. Fun for all ages.
There will be refreshments
served after the program.
The church is located at
17177 Hwy. 65 South in Hos-
ford.


Revival planned for June 5-7


Glen Julia United Method-
ist Church at 2592 Mt. Pleasant
Road in Mt. Pleasant and Syca-
more UMC at 3246 Sycamore
.Rd.in Sycamore have upcoming
Revival meetings.
Susie Tapp 'from Australia
will be visiting and holding re-
vival meetings at both churches
from June 5-7. The schedule is
as follows:
*Friday, June 5 at 6 p.m. with
a covered dish and revival ser-
vices follow at 7 p.m. at Glen
Julia UMC.
*Saturday morning June 6 at


8 a.m. Glen Julia UMC will hold
a continental breakfast and ser-
vice follows at 9 a.m. Later that
Saturday, Sycamore will have a
revival meeting at 6 p.m. and re-
freshment after.
*On Sunday, June 7, Glen Ju-
lia UMC will hold a revival ser-
vice at 9:30,a.m. and Sycamore
UMC will have their morning
services at 11 a.m.
*Glen Julia will hold the last
revival service at 5 p.m. with a
covered dish supper and service
follows at 6 p.m.
All are invited to come and


participate. If you would like to
go to Mrs. Tapp's web page it is:
www.passionforrevival.org.
For any further information
please call Pastor Sandra Garner
at (850) 856-8091.
Blessings in Jesus!


Homecoming

and Camp

meeting set

June 7-12
The Glory Hill. Holiness
Church Camp meeting isplanned
for June 7-12 with Homecoming
planned for June 7, beginning at
10 a.m. Following the service,
dinner is planned.
The camp meeting schedule is
as follows:
*Sunday night will start at 5
p.m.
*Monday-Friday) programs
will be at 10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m.
Two meals will be served dai-
ly during this event.
The church and campgrounds
are located five miles north of
Clarksville on Hwy. 73.
For more information, call
(850) 762-8301.


salvation with fear and trem-
bling, for it is God who works in
you to will and to act according
to His good purpose." Philippi-
ans 2:13 NIV.


HOP ON BOARD
TH BOOMERANG EXPRESS
Lake Mystic Baptist Church Vacation Bible School
KICK-OFF PARTY: FAMILY NIGHT:
Saturday, June 6 ,f-. i--- 1 June 12
10 a.m. -12 p.m. 7p.m.
Pre-register, enjoy moon o "The Boomerang
walking, jousting, and a snacx' '~ Express Musical"
VB$ ACTIVITIES: TRANSPORTATION:
June 7-11 Please call the church office
Children age 3 grade 6 at 643-2851 by 1 p.m.
Registration & meal will begin nightly leave your name, address,
at 5:30. VBS activities begin at 6 p.m. & phone number j' .gft
BOOMERANG EXPRESS:
IT ALL COMES BACK TO JESUS!
S.. ystic Baptist Church 1529 NW CR 12 Bristol 643-2351


On February 25, God called our mother and grandmother Mary
Lee Sherrod home. She took his hand and now is free. Our fam-
ily would like to express our gratitude to the staff at the Blount-
stown Rehab and Hospice staff for your gentle and loving care of our
mother during her illness. We would also like to express our spe-
cial thanks to those that visited her and prayed with her during this
illness. May God bless everyone that prayed, visited, spoke kind
words, gave money and brought food and flowers that you blessed
our family with during this loss of our loved one.
Gods Blessings from
Raymond, Juanita, Carol and all the Sherrod family

The Bristol First Baptist Relay for Life team would like to thank
all the people who supported our team; Thank you for the cake
donations, fish donations, buying our cakes to help us raise money,
buying our smoked chicken plates, purchasing track markers or lu-
minaries, buying a chance at our Opportunity Gas and WalMart tick-
ets. Congratulations go out to Robert Jackson, Loni Johnson, Royce
Holcomb, Gene Free and Marie Goodman, they were the lucky win-
ners of these tickets. The winner of the blanket, donated by Debbie
Duggar, was Beth McCoy. Words cannot express our appreciation
to all the businesses that donated food for us to sell or cut the prices
down so we couldmake a profit from it. With the support of the gra-
cious people in the community that took part we were able to raise
$5,300 for the American Cancer Society.
Our support will save lives, God Bless You!
Relay team leaders,
Lila Davis and Shirley Bateman

I was privileged to volunteer at Hosford Elementary and Tolar
school during the 2008-09 school year. My primary "Volunteerism"
role was reading with Kindergartners and 1st graders. Because of
the influence of my granddaughter, Maddie Willis, I quite naturally
spent more time in her Tolar Kindergarten class, where Mrs. Krys-
tal Strickland was the teacher. I found 'Miss Krystal' to be a very
dedicated, caring teacher who had a special way of bringing out the
best in her students.
This also holds true for Mrs. Sherry Flowers and Mrs. Betty Wil-
son, both 1st grade teachers at Tolar where I also spent time,
Earlier in the school year, I was assigned to Mrs. Jessica Peddie
and Mrs. Desiree Sewell, 1st grade teachers. They also demonstrat-
ed a dedication to the teaching profession. Thank you Mrs, Krystal,
Mrs. Betty, Mrs. Jessica and Mrs. Desiree for making a difference in
lives you teach.
Sincerely yours, Sandra S. Willis


oftdo-


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Deliverance Temple in

Gretna hosts 'Gospel

Music Explosion' June 13


River Assembly of God June activities


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JINE 3; 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY'jOURNAL Page 9


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The Andrew Jackson & Catherine

Harriet (Meigs) McClellan Family


James Pierpont Innis McClellan's oldest son.
Andrew Jackson McClellan. was born on Decem-
ber 17. 1852. and married Catherine Harriet Meigs
on October 22. 1874. Catherine Harriet was born
June 3. 1854. was the daughter of John Benjamin
Meigs and Gabrella Ward, an Indian Princess from
Walton County, Florida. John Benjamin Meigs was
from New York State and an educator in the early ,'
days of Walton County, where he maintained his
ouvn private school. Gabrella Ward NMeigs. daughter
of Elijah Ward and his wife. Sarah Cochran, were
both of Creek descent John Benjamin Meigs was
the youngest son of Josiah Meigs, the first acting
President ofthe University ofGeorgia. Josiah Meigs
was also a Commissioner in the General Land Of-
fice of the United States Government in 1819 acting
on claims west of the Pearl Riser.
Andrew Jackson McCleUan (1852-1924) and
his wife, Catherine (1854-1934) had eight children:
Henry. Alice Elizabeth. Charles A., Mary F., Ida C.,
Florence Meigs, Lilhan and John. Andrew Jackson .
was a farmer and lumberman and around 1885 he.
moved from Walton County to Calhoun County. In ,: /
1896 he was elected Sheriffof Calhoun County and : :0- ;
remained in office for eight years. He was also a "'..
member of the State Legislature in 1911, a member .
of the Senate from the 25th District, serving from .
1913-1915, and later was re-elected to the House of '
Representatives, serving from 1923 to the tune of
his death in 1924.
Henry V. (1875-1958) married Christian A. Gar- SeatedL-R:Alice
rett (1878-1974). She was from Walton County John H. McClellai
where her family was among the pioneers there.
They had seven children: Harry G., Henry L., Aly-
ese, Willard. Wayne, Rivers W. and Christine. Henry received his early
education in the Calhoun County schools. He established a successful
mercantile business which he ran for ten years. Henry was County Judge
for Calhoun County from 1913-1917, and during this time, he studied
law. He was admitted to the bar in 1915 and was active as both a lawyer
and member of the local bar association. From 1917 -1929 he served as
County Attorney. He was elected to fill the unexpired term of William
Riley McDaniel (who was the Senator who was murdered on the streets
in Wewahitchka) of the 25th District for the 1927 session. He was elected
for two terms as mayor of Blountstown and for one term he was city
clerk. He was also county committeeman for several years and influential
in the Democratic Party's councils and campaigns.
Alice Elizabeth (1881-1962) married James Daniel Boggs 1.1871-
1933) and together they bad seven children: Minnie, Edith. Albert, Vin-
cent, Ireta. Kathleen and Ldibel.
Charles A. i 1884-) married Alma Pridgeon and they made their home
in Port St. Joe where he owned and operated a furniture store. They had
one daughter. Earline.
Mary F. (1886-1922) married Clarence C. Corbin (1879-1934). Their
children were: Perc Olin, Katherine L., Sybil. and Johnnie V. Percy mar-


.F
f , ,, '- "': [






McClellan Boggs and Samantha Mixon McClellan. Standing L-R:
n and Andrew Jackson McClellan.

ried Elizabeth "Betb'" Finlay and were the parents of Dr. Finlay
Corbin.
Ida C. (1888-1938) married James L. Griffin from Wewa-
hitchka. They had two children: Charles, who was a professional
boxer, and Veronica, who mamed Dr. Hurt from Jacksonville.
Florence Meigs (1890-1968) married Albert S. Pound (1880-
1940). They had two daughters: Janet and Fannie Kate. You
might remember that Fannie Kate married Allen Stewart and
taught school in Blountstown until she retired. Fannie Kate and
Allen had one daughter. "Little" Florence Nleigs.
John (1894- ) married Pauline Jones. Pauline was known as
"Aunt Dove." They were the parents of Jack Paul McClellan.
Their log house has stood for many years on Central Avenue
across from the NMovie Gallery. The building in back of their
house was the Kist Beerage Bottling Company.
Lillian (1897-1980) married Malcom Thomas and then Jeff
Corbett They had no children. Aunt Lil was known for wearing
white gloves whenever she went out in public. ir. Jeff ran a seed
store on the corner of Central Avenue and Pear Street w here the
C C. Corbin Hardware stood for many years


Submitted hy Sue Howell
The Heritage Book Committee of Calhoun County will meet again on June 22, 2009 at 10:00 a.m. CST
at the Calhoun County Library. This will be the last meeting before the deadline, so be sure
to come and bring your stories and photographs for the upcoming book.


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Page 10 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JUNE 3, 2009


June senior citizens activities set


The Liberty County Senior
Citizens Association plans the
following events for the month
of June:
*June 4-Thursday; Piggly
Wiggly shopping and lunch. Call
Liberty Transit at 643-2524 no
later than 3 p.m. Monday, June 1
to reserve your transit ride.
*June 9-Tuesday from 10-
11:30 a.m.; A representative will
be at the Hosford Senior Center
to provide information about
services provided by Liberty
County Senior Citizens and Lib-
erty County Transit.
*June ll-Thursday; Marian-
na WalMart shopping and lunch.
Call Liberty Transit at 643-2524
no later than 3 p.m. Monday,
June 8 ifyou would like to go on
this shopping trip.
*June 15-Monday; The Lib-
erty County Senior Citizens
Board of Directors will meet'at
7 p.m. at the Bristol Senior Cen-
ter. The public is welcome to at-
tend.
*June 18-Thursday; Piggly
Wiggly shopping and lunch. Call
Liberty Transit at 643-2524 no
later than 3 p.m. Monday, June
15 to arrange transportation.


*June 18-Thursday at 1
p.m., the Liberty County Senior
Citizens Advisory Council will
meet at the Liberty County Se-
nior Citizens building in Bristol.
*June 24-Wednesday at 11
a.m., Buddy Money from the
Liberty County Sheriff's De-
partment will be at the Bristol
Senior Center to do a presenta-
tion on several types of fraud, in-
cluding credit card fraud and in-
ternet fraud. Be at this meeting
to learn how to protect yourself
from becoming a victim of fraud
and what to do if this should hap-
pen to you. Refreshments will
be served. Call Liberty Transit
at-643-2524 no later than 3 p.m.
Monday, June 22 if you need
transportation. Call Jeannette at
643-5613 for more information.
*June 25-Thursday; Mari-
anna WalMart shopping and
lunch. This is the opportunity to
complete your shopping for the
July 4 celebration. Call Liberty
Transit at 643-2524 no later than
3 p.m. Monday, June 22 to re-
serve your transit ride.
*June 26-Friday from 2-3
p.m. at the Bristol Senior Center,
a representative will be available


to discuss and provide informa:
tion to anyone who might be
interested in receiving services
provided by Liberty County Se-
nior Citizens or Liberty County
Transit.
*June 26-Friday at 3 p.m.
we will have the drawing for
the $200 Piggly Wiggly gift cer-
tificate. If you do not have your
tickets) for this and would like
to get one, call Jeannette at 643-
5613. There is a $2 donation per
ticket. You are welcome to be
here for the drawing but winner
does not have to be present.
*June 30-Tuesday; A trip is
planned for Wakulla Springs.
Park admission is $1 per per-
son, the river cruise is $6 and
the glass bottom boat ride is $6
(when available). The group
will have lunch in the Wakulla
Springs Restaurant. Call Liberty
Transit at 643-2524 no later than
3 p.m. June 19 to reserve your
transit ride so we can make res-
ervations with Wakulla Springs.
The Liberty County Senior
Citizens Association will have
a July 4 lunch/celebration. The
date has not been determined at
this time.


Apalachicola National Forest seeking

comments on recreation fees increase


TALLAHASSEE The Apalachicola National
Forest is taking public comments on a proposal
to increase the fee for the Annual Pass (hangtag).
The agency proposes to increase the fees from $40
per year to $50 per year. The fee for the pass has
not been increased in over 10 years.
In 2004, Congress passed the Federal Lands
Recreation Enhancement Act which allows the
Forest Service to keep 95 percent of fees collect-
ed and to use these funds locally to operate and
maintain and improve these sites. The fee increase
would be consistent with inflationary costs as well
as ensure that the fee is comparable to similar pub-
lic and private sites in the area.
"We recognize how important these sites are to
our local communities and.those who use the sites.
This fee increase will help us maintain these recre-
ation sites to the level and quality that people have
come to expect," said Cathy Briggs, Recreation


Manager on the Apalachicola National Forest.
All fee change proposals will be presented be-
fore a citizen's advisory committee, called the Rec-
reation Resource Advisory Committee, or RRAC.
Committee members represent a broad array of
recreation interest groups to help ensure that the
Forest Service is proposing reasonable and pub-
licly acceptable fee changes. Committee members
will help ensure that the Forest Service addresses
public issues and concerns about recreation fees.
The public is welcome to attend and comment at
all advisory committee meetings.
Send comments by July 10 to: Apalachicola
National Forest, 57 Taff Drive, Crawfordville,
FL 32327 or e-mail: "mailto:cbriggs@fs.fed.us"
cbriggs@fs.fed.us.
For more information, questions or comments,
please contact Cathy Briggs at 850-926-3561 ext.
6509.


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JUNE 3, 2009THECALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 11


Calhoun Correctional is top money earner for 2009

Calhoun-Liberty Relay for Life event, raising $9,300


The Miss-Ter Relay Pageant contestants are shown above. This year, Savannah Calhoun, better
known to the corrections family as Major Jon Brown, earned $1,037.33 by working the crowd.


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The Chain Gang does it
again! Calhoun Correctional
Institution's Relay for Life
Team is top money earner for
2009 Calhoun-Liberty Relay
Event.
Footballs, flowers and fish-
ing tournaments, massages,
money and Mother's Day
meals... These are just some
of the unique ways employ-
ees at Calhoun Correctional
Institution were able to raise
$9,300 for the Calhoun-Lib-
erty 2009 Relay for Life and
the American Cancer Society.
For the past year, dedicat-
ed staff members at Calhoun
Correctional Institution have
used their creative minds and
personal talents to raise mon-
ey and awareness in the fight"
against cancer. This is the
second year in a row that Cal-
houn's Relay team has. been
the top money earner for the
eighteen-hour American Can-
cer Society event, held May
15 and 16 at Sam Atkins Park.
A few of the other noteworthy
fundraisers were opportunity
drawings for a Turkey Hunt,
a day off, and personalized
items made by several differ-
ent staffers. There was also
a golf tournament and a mo-
torcycle ride, which helped
pad the charities' pocket. Two
-of the most productive fund-
raisers were the opportunity
drawings for a 2008 National
Championship Football with,
a certificate of authenticity,
signed by the Florida. Gator's
own outstanding quarterback,
Tim Tebow, and an FSU foot-
ball, signed by the legendary
Bobby Bowden. Other cre-
ative staff members designed
and sold their own Relay
Ribbon Hearts in honor of
Warden Varnum, which read
"Mary Ellen's Kids." Region
I Accounting, Purchasing
and Business office person-
nel also collected money and
participated in the fundraising
efforts.
This is also the second year
that the institution's contestant
in the Miss-Ter Relay Pageant
has brought home the crown.
Last year Samanfha Calhoun,
otherwise known as Colo-
nel Sammy John McAlpin,
donned his pretty purple dress
and collected over $1,000 for
the cause.
This year however, with
stiff competition, Samantha
relinquished her crown to her
very own twin sister Savan-
nah Calhoun, better known to
the corrections family as Ma-
jor Jon Brown, who earned
$1,037.33 working the crowd;
nothing to bat a fake eyelash
at!


The two lovely ladies
graced the event with a loose
tribute to Marilyn Monroe, in
white halter top dresses and
bobbed, brunette hair styles.
Nearly every employee
contributed -in some way,
whether by purchase of a bake
sale item or opportunity draw-
ing ticket, or by physically
walking the track the night of
Relay. Correctional Officers,
Sergeants, Lieutenants and
Captains used their own leave
throughout the night to show
their support and kept the
track hot the entire eighteen
hours, all the while carrying
the team flag.
This was a big year for Re-
lay for Life as it was the 25th
Birthday of the event and the
Calhoun-Liberty Relay Com-
mittee chose to celebrate with
a birthday party. Each team
chose a birthday theme, and
Calhoun Correctional Institu-
tion's team theme was a "Bik-
er Birthday Bash", hence the
name, "The Chain Gang"!
As part. of the evening's
festivities, The Chain Gang
put on-a skit, lip-syncing and
acting out, appropriately, The
Leader of the Pack, the 1960s
hit by.The Shangri-Las. With
a very dramatic Jimmy, and an
impressive Betty, as well as
the doo-wop girls, The Pack,
and who can forget mom and
dad, the crowd was wowed by
the performance!
Back by popular demand
and for the third year in a row
on-site fundraising included
the famous Calhoun C.I: fun-
nel cake as well as delicious
smoked-chicken dinners, sau-
sage dogs, hot dogs, and sweet
tea. Other efforts included
,glow-necklaces and tattoos,
rub-on of course.
The Spirit of Competition
between teams was evident
throughout the year. The
Chain Gang would like to say
"Thank you to all the teams
who kept us on our toes and
encouraged us to be the top
fundraising team again." The
event was amazing, the food
was great, spirit trophies were
nice and the games were a
hoot, but it's real dollars that
support cancer research and
the programs funded by The
American Cancer Society and
that is the true spirit of relay.
It is the belief of Calhoun
Correctional Institution's ad-
ministration that each person
who attended the event had a
great time and was rewarded
by the experience; and we
would like to thank every per-
son who assisted in this en-
deavor and made it the over-
whelming success that it was.








Page 12 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JUNE 3, 2009


BIRTHDAYS
I RT.H


ERYK BLAKE BECK
Eryk Blake Beck celebrated
his seventh birthday on June
2. He is the son of Jennifer
Beck and Chris Wilhit of Bris-
tol. He lives with Darleen and
Tommy Harris of Telogia. His
uncle and aunt include Tom-
my and Lisa Galloway. His
grandparents include Granny
and Papa Beck, his grand-
mother Marleen and the late
Michael Craig, all of Telogia.
He enjoys fishing, hunting
and spending time with his
sister Leann of Bristol, his
cousins, Sabrina, David, Jus-
tin and D.J. and his Aunt Kat,
all from Telogia.


SAMANTHA &
JONATHAN STORY
Jonathan marked his first
birthday on May 27. He cel-
ebrated with a Winnie-the-
Pooh party on Saturday, May
30 at Four Mile Creek with
family and friends. Samantha
.celebrated her tenth birthday
on April 9 with a party at Four
Mile Creek; They are the
children of David and Virginia
Story of Clarksville. Paternal
grandparents are Willard and
Carol Story of Hosford. Ma-
ternal grandparents are Ha-
zel Burke of Quincy and Bill
and Edna Grice of Malone.
Jonathan enjoys jumping and
playing with his big sister.
Samantha enjoys reading
and spending time with her
mother.


M WEDDING


Smith, Hayes announce engagement
John and Jennifer Smith of Clarksville announce the engagement
of their daughter, Laurinda Renee, to Calvin Lester Hayes, son of
Calvin and Cindy Hayes of Blountstown.
Laurinda graduated from Blountstown High School in 2006,
Chipola College in 2007 and is employed with Merle Norman/ Stu-
dio 20 in Blountstown as a stylist.
Calvin graduated from Blountstown High School in 2001 and is
employed with Hayes Well Service. He recently completed EMT
training and is currently enrolled in Fire Fighting Traning at Gulf
Coast Community College.
Laurinda is the granddaughter of Hazel Smith and the late George
Dewey Smith of Clarksville, Lowell Pippin of Daytona Beach and
John and Lavada Gladdin of Mobile, AL.
Calvin is the Grandson of C.L. and Hazel Capps of Blountstown
and the late Calvin and Betty Jo Hayes of Bristol.


THE STORK REPORT


CABELA -
ANN WARD
Brandon Ward and Teresa Mclntyre
of Altha are proud to announce the ..
birth of their daughter, Cabela Ann
Ward, born May 4 at Jackson Hos-
pital. She weighed 6 Ibs.. and was
19 3/4 inches long. Her maternal
grandmother is Stephanie Mcln- A
tyre of Salt Springs. Her paternal
grandparents are-Diane McIntyre
and Moe Pierce of Blountstown .
and Richard and Sandra Ward of ,,"' .
Marianna. Cabela was welcomed
home by her Aunt Miranda, Uncle
Casey and her cousins Chason ,
.and Madison.

National organizations host workshop with

FWC to foster reconnecting youth to nature


The National Wildlife Feder-
ation and the Turner Foundation.
hosted a workshop in partnership
with the Florida Fish and Wild-
life Conservation Commission
(FWC) at the Beau Turner Youth
Conservation Center (BTYCC)
last month.
The workshop brought to-
gether staff from the three part-
nering organizations, along with
members of the Association
of Fish and Wildlife Agencies,
BASS, the Conservation Fund,
Ducks Unlimited, Get Outdoors
Florida!, the National Wild Tur-
key Federation, the Recreational
Boating and Fishing Foundation,
various universities and others.
They all came with one mission
in mind: to help make BTYCC
the model outdoor facility for
getting youths outdoors and re-
connected with nature.
"This center is the starting
point for something quite mo-
mentous, and we are excited that
conservation, sportsmen and
outdoor recreation leaders from
across the nation have come here
to experience the center first-
hand," said FWC Commissioner
Brian Yablonski. "Truly this
center is the blueprint for what
can happen all over Florida and
the United States if we all work
together to bring youths back
outdoors."
This center is the first of its
kind in Florida, but the FWC
hopes it is not the last. Beau
Turner, son of CNN founder
and philanthropist Ted Turner,
generously donated 160-acres of
land and developed state-of-the-
art facilities where young people
can connect with the outdoors.
He leased these facilities at no
cost- to the FWC, establishing
the state's first public/private
conservation effort aimed at
youngpeople and resource con-
servation.
"The youth center addresses
the challenge of getting children
involved in the outdoors and
away frori computers and video
games," Turner said. "It's a place
where they can participate in ex-
citing outdoor activities and also
learn about the environment,
land use and alternative energy.


Wednesday's meeting included
voices from all over the country
demonstrating that the outdoor
community is dedicated to this
idea and building toward the fu-
ture."
Turner not only donated the
property and facilities at BTY-
CC, but he also opened up 900
acres adjacent to the youth cen-
ter for the FWC's Youth Hunt-
ing Program, which encourages
landowners to share their land
to preserve hunting traditions in
Florida for future generations.
"Every American child
should have the opportunity to
understand and enjoy the natu-
ral world," said Michael Finley,


president of the Turner Founda-
tion. "The example set by the
FWC and Beau Turner at the
Beau Turner Youth Conserva-
tion Center is a model that can
be easily adopted and adapted
.to the rest of Florida and other
states."
The workshop focused on
using BTYCC as .a template
for making other such facilities
available across the state and na-
tion. Future plans include com-
piling research on landowner.
liability and good Samaritan
protections nationally, so other
landowners can make property
available for outdoor recreation
and outreach.


Mrs. "'s" summer rT worKSHOP!
NpSiC S Learn TO Draw!
lanLuOi,,. June 8 25
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JUNE 3, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 13


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iriSERVICE NEWS


Airman William Rankin graduates basic training


Air Force Airman William
C. Rankin graduated from basic
military training at Lackland Air
Force Base, San Antonio, Texas.
The airman completed an
intensive, eight-week program
that included training in military
discipline and studies, Air Force
core values, physical fitness,
and basic warfare principles and
skills.
Airmen who complete basic
training earn four credits toward
an associate in applied science
degree through the Commu-
nity College of the Air Force.
Rankin earned distinction as an
honor graduate.
He is the son'of William and
Joanne Rankin of Lake Mystic.
Road in Bristol.
Rankin is a 2007 graduate of
North Florida Christian High
School in Tallahassee.


Airman Diamond Heffington completes basic training


Rapid Weight Loss
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Janna Grantham, a 2006 Blountstown
High School graduate, completed her AA
degree in 2007 from Chipola College.
On May 7, Janna graduated from Chipola
with an Associate in Science Degree in
Nursing.
She is currently employed at BHRC in
Blountstown as an LPN and is awaiting
her appointment to take the state boards
for her RN license.
Janna is the daughter of Gina Gran-
S ham of Blountstown and Gene and Cin-
dy Grantham of Blountstown.


Air Force Airman Diamond
Heffington graduated from basic
military training at Lackland Air
Force Base, San Antonio, TX.
The airman completed an
intensive, eight-week program
that included training in military
discipline and studies, Air Force
core values, physical fitness,
and basic warfare principles and
skills.
Airmen who complete basic
training earn four credits toward
an associate in applied science
degree through the Community
College of the Air Force.
Heffington is the daughter of
Kathy Baxley.of Jarrott Daniel
Road in Wewahitchka and sister
of Krystal Strickland of Bristol.
The airman is a 2006 graduate
of Wewahitchka High School.


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Page 14 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JUNE 3, 2009


V~rt


Sixty-five young students donned white caps and
gowns, along with big smiles, and took that walk down
the aisle to collect their Kindergarten Diplomas at the
graduation ceremony held Thursday, May 28 at Tolar
School. The youngsters are shown below with music teach-
er Gayle Grissett as they sing for an appreciative audience.


N:.]


Jaryn Hamsey


Dejari Belvin


Abygail Hernandez


'Cheyenne Spring & Jamie White


Special magistrate
MARIANNA-Special Magistrate Thomas W.
Young, appointed by the Florida Public Employees
Relations Commission, on May 29 released his recom-
mendations in the contract impasse between Chipola
College and the United Faculty of Florida (UFF), the
union which represents the Chipola faculty.
Chipola College president Dr. Gene Prough said,
"We are pleased that the Magistrate has substantially
agreed with the college's position with regard to the
budget challenges being experienced and rejected the
UFF's bargaining demand for fewer faculty hours
on campus and fewer courses taught by each faculty
member."
These recommendations will likely proceed to the
Chipola College Board of Trustees for a final resolu-
tion at the June 16 board meeting. Prough, said, "We
look forward to an efficient and effective resolution of
all unresolved issues and a contract."
The main issues covered in the magistrate's 42-
page report involved Faculty Working Conditions, and
Compensation and Fringe benefits. The unresolved is-
sues fall into three general areas: (1) UFF proposed a
wage bonus of $1,000 per faculty member; (2) UFF"


issues recommendations for Chipola
proposed a reduction of faculty workloads from a Fall, faculty member could choose to replace an adjunct at
Spring and possibly Summer (72 point) schedule to a any time prior to two weeks into the academic session.
Fall and Spring (60 point) schedule; and (3) UFF pro- The practice the College is seeking to avoid is where a
posed a reduction of the contractually scheduled hours faculty member actually replaces an adjunct instructor
on campus from 35 hours to 25'hours per workweek, that has been employed to teach a class and may have
The magistrate recommended that UFF bargaining even met with the course and began the instruction -
unit members receive a one-time $1,000 bonus effec- only to be bumped by a full time faculty member. Such
tive FY 2008-2009, with the understanding that this a practice results in the unfair treatment of the adjunct
bonus does not change the base salaries of bargaining instructor, the possibility of disruption in the course
unit members in terms of future salary negotiations: delivery and generally discourages the recruitment of
The magistrate rejected UFF's proposal to reduce adjuncts.Faculty's ability to "bump" a part time facul-
faculty workload from 72 to 60 point workload over a ty member for any course offered as an overload could
166 day academic year workload (Fall and Spring con- have a potentially adverse impact on adjuncts.
tract without a summer load of 12 points). Currently In a section entitled, "Interest and Welfare of the Pub-
the faculty teaching load is two and one-half semesters, lic," the magistrate wrote, "It is concluded that funding
72 points and 198 days. the UFF economic proposals in their entirety could con-
The magistrate rejected UFF's proposal to reduce ceivably result in the elimination of programs and the
the faculty work week from 35 to 25 hours. replacement of full time faculty with adjuncts, assum-
In an issue commonly known as first-right-of refus- ing there were adjuncts available. These results are not
al, the magistrate also recommended the college posi- consistent with the delivery of services currently main-
tion on substantive change to prevent a faculty mem- tained by the College. It is concluded that fully funding
ber from replacing "bumping" an adjunct instructor the UFF proposals would notbe in the best interest of the
that has been employed to teach a class. Previously, a employees, or the students and community they serve."


6


PIBO









JUNE 3, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 15


ABOVE: Salulatorian Chenre Hiers gives her farewell
speech lo the graduating class as they begin a new
chapter in their lives.









Page 16 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JUNE 3, 2009


Altha Senior Beta Club places at State Convention


On Saturday, April 18 a group of very
weary juniors and seniors left the Altha
School parking lot bound for the Senior
Beta State Convention in Tampa..
After an exhaustive prom the night be-
fore, the group was definitely looking for-
ward to break away from school. With
the convention scheduled to begin Sunday
evening, they took advantage of some free
time Sunday morning and visited Busch
Gardens.
The theme for this year's convention
was "Lights! Camera! Beta! Scene 75."
This is the 75th year anniversary of the:Na-
tional Beta Club. On Sunday evening, the
competitions begai and continued again on
Monday. Competing at the convention and
how they placed were:
*Science-Jessica Smith
*Math-Caitlyn Bruner
*English-Brittany Stephens-3rd place
and invitation to Nationals!
*Creative Writing-Brittany Stephens
*Quiz Bowl Team -Brett Floyd, Brittany
Stephens, DJ Griswold, Caitlyn Bruner


*Scholarship Exam-Brittany Stephens,
Jessica Smith, DG Griswold, Caitlyh
Bruner
*Banner Competition-Rebekah Wiltse,
Morgan Swilley- 3rd place
*Black and White Photography (Still)-
Brett Floyd
*Black and White Photography (Ac-
tion)- Brett Floyd 1st place
*Color Photography (Still)-Brett
Floyd- 1st place
*Color Photography (Action)-Brett
Floyd- 2nid place
While at the convention each member
of the group attended three general ses-
sions, participated in the election of next
years state officers and watched various
talent and oratory competitions. This is
the first group to attend a Senior Beta
State Convention in over 20 years. They
did an extremely great job representing
their school and community and are ready
to begin preparing for next years conven-
tion. Accompanying the group on the trip
were sponsor LeAnna Hall and chaperone
Dottie Wiltse.


SBHS Juniors win National

Leadership Award May 6


BHS juniors Kelby Durham and
Alex Deason have been awarded the
American Youth Foundation's Na-
tional Leadership Award in recogni-
tion of personal integrity, balanced
living, and potential for leadership.
The honor was presented by Assis-
tant Principal Sue Price at their award
ceremonies held at Blountstown High
on May 6.
The National Leadership Award is
presented each year by the American
Youth Foundation (AYF) in coopera-
tion with the principals, counselors,
county 4-H agents, church groups
and other organizations across the


country.
The award was first offered in
1941 by. the late William H. Dan-
forth, founder of the Ralston Purina
Company in St. Louis, who chal-
lenged young people to achieve their
highest potential and to influence
others through lives of service.
Inaddition to a certificate of recog-
nition each recipient received a copy
of Danforth's inspirational book, I
Dare You! and an opportunity to at-
tend AYF's Leadership Conference
located in Michigan. Congratula-
tions to Kelby and Alex for this hon-
orable award!


LEFT BHS guidance counselor Mrs. Waller with Alex Deason & Kelby Durham.


BHS
Cheerleaders
News
The BHS Cheerleaders will
be conducting a cheer camp for
students in grades K-5th. The
camp will be June 4th-5th from.
8am-12 noon in the Blountstown
High School gym. The cost of
the camp is $25 anda snack will
be provided daily. If your little
cheerleader would like to work
on perfecting her cheer tech-
nique or learn the latest stunt,
call 674-5724 to sign up!

SGA
Officers
News
The SGA officers for the
2009-2010 school' year are:
President- Laura Stoltzfus, Vice-
President- Alexandria Smith,
Secretary- Shaterial Davis, and
Treasurer- Alex Deason. The of-
ficers are excited about the up-
coming school year and hope to
make it the best BHS has seen!


Hosford Chorus performs some good old 'Rock & Roll'


Cheerleader Pup Camp planned June 11
The Liberty County Varsity School Gymnasium. be an ice chest provided at th
Cheerleaders would like to in- Registration is $25 per child camp. The camp will consist
vite girls ages 4-12 to join the and can be dropped off at the centers: cheer, chant, dance an
2009 Pup Camp. Liberty County High School jump/stunt.
The camp-will be held Thurs- front office. Please contact Sharmon Pa
day, June 11 from 9 a.m. to 2 We ask that your child bring a rish at 643-2241 ext. 229 wil
p.m. at the'Libertv County High drink and sack lunch. There'will any questions.


The Hosford School Cho-
rus stepped back in time
on May 26 to honor some
of the "rock and roll" hit
tunes enjoyed by their
grandparents. The stu-
dents shared historical
moments from the rock era
and featured songs includ-
ing: Chantilly Lace, Rock
and Roll Music, Twist and
Shout and the Locomotion.
The Chorus put on a great
performance in front of the
school, parents and grand-
parents.


JUNE



SAFETY

MONTH


he
of
id

r-
th


II


,----- v








JUNE 3, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 17



Calhoun County Horsemen sweep Jackson


Jays in first double header Sunday
COTTONDALE-With


the bases loaded in the top of
the seventh inning and the ty-
ing run at the plate, the Horse-
men's hurler Jeremy Barber got
Chance Burnett to groundout to
shortstop Ben Faurot to secure
Calhoun County's 10-6 win over
Jackson County in the first game
of last Sunday's doubleheader.
It was also Jeremy Barber's
(3-1) first complete game of this
inaugural season. After sur-
rendering his only walk and 4
earned runs off of 8 hits in- his
first 3 innings of work; Barber
settled in and began locating his
pitches. He allowed only 4 hits
through the remaining 4 innings.
Six of Barber's 10 strikeouts
came after the third inning.
Jackson County (1-6) took a
2-0 lead in the first inning cour-
tesy of two Horsemen's errors
and a passed ball.
Keith Kirkpatrick scored Cal-
houn County's (4-3) first run in
third inning. He took 0-1 pitch
and delivered a turf-torcher back.
up the middle, stole second
base and continued onto third
on the catcher's throwing error.
Cale Chafin's single to left field
brought Kirkpatrick across the
plate to make it a 2-1 ballgame.
The Jays tacked on a run in
the bottom of the second inning
to take a 3-1 lead.
But the Horsemen welcomed
new pitcher Bud Masterson to
the game by exploding with a
7-run third inning. Chad Bailey
got it started by bouncing single
to the right side of the infield.


With one out Tad Scott reached.
after being hit by a pitch. Josh
McIntosh reached on a fielder's
choice but Jackson County's at-
tempt to force Scott out at second
base went awry as the shortstop
threw wide of the mark. Bailey
scored on the play and Scott ad-
vanced to third. Then McIntosh
stole second base. With two
outs the first baseman's fielding
error allowed Keith Kirkpatrick
to reach first wlile Scott scored
on the play. Cale Chafin single
to left field brought McIntosh
home. A wild pitch allowed
Kirkpatrick to move to third
base and Chafin found himself
on second. Kirkpatrick stole
home a second after Greg Betts
was singling to right field and
Chafin crossed the plate. Both
Brandon Smith and Chad Bai-
ley drew a walk. Ben Faurot's
single through the left side of the
infield plated Smith and put the
Horsemen on top, 8-6.
Calhoun County posted their
last 2 runs in the sixth inning.
The first came off of Ben Fau-
rot's lead off jack over the left
centerfield fence, his fourth of
the season. With one out Josh
McIntosh'reached on an infield
single to the left side. With
two outs and two back-to-back-
walks to load the bases, McIn-
tosh scored after Greg Betts was


issued a walk to give the Horse-
men the 10-6 win.
With there 31 at bats Calhoun
County collected 10 hits while
striking out only 3 times. Jack-
son County collected 12 hits
in their 35 opportunities at the
plate. Of those 12 hits, 10 were
singles.
Leading Calhoun County of-
fensively was Greg Betts who
was 2-for-2, he scored a run and
he had 2 RBI. Cale Chafin, who
was 2-for-3, scored a run and he
was credited with 2 RBI. Ben
Faurot was 2-for-5, including his
solo homerun and he collected 2
RBI.
Dominant pitching in Game
Two allowed the Horsemen to
complete the twin killing. They
gave up only 2 hits and starting
pitcher Keith Kirkpatrick (2-1)
picked up the win. In two in-
nings of work he struck out 2
batters and allowed a hit. Jason
Barber relieved him in the third
inning and he was equally ef-
fective, fanning 4 batters while
giving up a hit and a walk. Fac-
ing only one batter over the
minimum through three innings,
closer Tad Scott sat down 4 of
Jackson County's (1-7) would
be hitters.
Complementing the Calhoun
County's, (5-3) pitching was
timely hitting. Lead off batter


Brandon Smith slammed the first
pitch he saw into the left center-
field fence for a double. With
one out Ben Faurot picked up his
third RBI of the afternoon when
he plated Smith with a scream-
ing single to left field. Jeremy
Proctor followed with a single
of his own into right field. Then
Nick Edenfield poked a single
into centerfield that scored Fau-
rot and the Horsemen had a 2-0
lead.
Another run was added to
their side of the ledger in the
second inning. Gary Chew beat
out a high-hopping single in
front of the plate. Chew crossed
the plate when Brandon Smith
delivered his second hit of the
game, a single to centerfield.
Calhoun County extended
their lead to 4-0 in the fourth in-
ning. With one out both Chad
Bailey and Ben Faurot reached
on consecutive singles. Jer-
emy Proctor found himself on
first base courtesy of a fielder's
choice but Bailey was forced out
at third on the play. Josh McIn-
tosh. delivered a single to left
field that plated Faurot.
Tad Scott led off the fifth in-
ning by reaching base after-be-
ing hit by a pitch for the third
time on the afternoon. After he
stole second and third base, Gary
Chew brought Scott home with a
sacrifice fly to left field and the
Horsemen held a comfortable
5-0 lead.


Liberty Rec. I


hold summer
by Richie Smith, Liberty
Recreation Department Director
The Liberty County Recre-
ation Department and SWAT
will co-sponsor the following
youth sports camps.
*BASEBALL-Richie Smith
will conduct baseball camps
June 8-10 at Veterans Memorial
Field. Camp for youth ages 7-12
will be held from 9-11:30 a.m.
Camp for youth ages 13-15 will
be held from 6-8:30 p.m. daily.
*BASKETBALL-Buzzy
Lewis will conduct a basketball
camp for youth ages 7-14 at To-
lar Gym June 22-25. Camp time
is 5-7 p.m.
David Shuler will conduct
a camp for youth ages 14-17 at
the Liberty County High School
Gym June 15-18. Camp time is
6-8 p.m.
*SOFTBALL-Jennifer
Sewell will conduct a softball
camp for youth ages 14-17 at
the Liberty County High School


)ept. & SWAT


sports camps
Softball Field June 16-18. Camp
times are 5:15-7:15 p.m.
Ladell Holland will conduct
a softball camp for youth ages
7-13 at Veterans Memorial Field
June 22-25. Came times are 2-4
p.m.
*VOLLEYBALL-Casey
Peddie will conduct a volleyball
camp for youth ages 14-17 June
22-25. Camp time is 10 a.m. to
noon.
A camp for youth 7-13 will be
held June 29-July 2. Details will
be announced later.
Students will learn basic fun-
damentals of the sport and will
have skill instructions. Educa-
tion about tobacco hazards will
also be discussed.
There is no charge for the
camps and interested youth can
enroll at the camps at camps be-
ginning.
For any additional informa-
tion call the Liberty County Rec-
reation Department 643-2175.


May 31
In the sixth inning Chad Bai-
ley reached .after shooting a
single through the left side of
the infield. With two outs Josh
McIntosh launched his second
homer of the season a line-drive
shot over the centerfield fence
and the Horsemen were up by a
7-0 score.
Their final two runs came
in the seventh inning and Gary
Chew got it started by singling
through the left side of the in-
field. Tony Golden followed by
blasting a double into centerfield
to score Chew. Then Golden
moved to third base on Brandon
Smith's fly out to centerfield and
touched the dish after the ball
was mishandled by the short-
stop.
Leading the Horsemen at the
plate was Josh McIntosh who
went 4-for-3, including a two-
run homerun, and he picked up
3 RBI. Gary Chew was 2-for-3,
scored twice and he had a RBI.
Brandon Smith was 2-for-4,
scored a run and tallied 2 RBL
Ben Faurot was 2-for-5, crossed
the plate twice and collected a
RBI.
With the sweep of Jackson
County, Calhoun County con-
tinues to lead the Western Divi-
sion and is in second place in the
league's overall standings.
This Sunday they will take
on the league-leading Liberty
Dawgs on Liberty County High
School's field. The first seven-
inning game of the doubleheader
will begin, at 2 p.m. (ET) and 1
p.m. (CT). The finale is sched-
uled for a 5 p.m. (ET) and 4 p.m.
(CT) start.








Page 18 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JUNE 3, 2009


Moments later, the officers attempted a traffic stop in the store
parking lot with a patrol vehicle pulling up behind the suspect's
vehicle and an unmarked vehicle going in front \'hen \\heetle.\
who was wearing a tactical vest with his badge display ed. stepped out
of the unmarked vehicle and identified himself the suspects' \ vehicle
suddenly accelerated and raced toward him. He had to lump out of
the way to avoid being hit.
As the suspects' vehicle sped up. it narrow 'l, issed hitting .1
marked patrol vehicle head on. That unit. a Blountstoin Police
Department vehicle driven by Officer Jod\ Hoag land. turned to pursue
the suspects, who were eastbound on S.R. 20.
"They deliberately hit Jody's car\\ hen he tried to go around them."
said Wheetley. The impact only damaged the patrol e hicle's turn
signal but caused the suspects to lose control of their \ ehicle. lea\ ing
them in the middle of the intersection of S.R. 20 and Pea Ridge Road
Law enforcement vehicles then bo\ed in the suspects' car
Bryant Williams, 26, of Gretna and the dit er. Andre Kell\. 2-1. of
Quincy; were combative when the: \w erreremo ed from the \ vehicle.
swinging their arms and kicking officers. A taser \\ as used to subdue
Kelly.
As Kelly was taken into custody, rt o clear plastic bags containing
cocaine and marijuana fell from his hands.
A plastic bag that held several smaller bags of cocaine packaged
for sale was found in the passenger area of the \ hicle Outside the
vehicle, a small brown pill bottle that held approximately\ 50 rocks
of crack cocaine was found. Cash totaling $234 w~as seized from
Williams; Kelly had $87.
The men are charged with aggravated asauIt on a la% enforcement
officer, aggravated fleeing.or attempting to elude a labI enforcement
officer, resisting arrest with violence and possession of cocaine w ith
intent to sell. Kelly was also charged w ith possession of marijuana
with intent to sell.
Williams is known gang member who was released from prison
'this past March. Kelly has also served time, and was released from
prison in January of 2008.
Also taking part in the arrest were Major Rodney Smith and Fred
Tanner of the Blountstown Police Department and the canine unit
from Liberty Correctional Institution.




The family moved to Bristol in 1981, the year Jeff was born. In
the late 1980s, Tammy and her husband Joe (now deceased) operated
Tammy's Furniture Store in the building that now houses Doobie's
Barbecue on State Road 20. They later moved to Blountstown and
Jeff attended Altha High School. Bottoms now lives in Indiana.
She said Jeff began working right after.highschool.."He was a hard
working boy and loved working on the water," she said. "He was the
kind of boy who always had.a twinkle in his blue eyes."
Services.are planned for 2 p.m. (CT) Thursday at the Adams Funeral
Home Chapel. His complete obituary appears on page 22.



SPEAK UP!
WITH A LETTER TO THE EDITOR
Write: The Calhoun-Liberty Journal
R O. Box 536, Bristol 3231

Stranger appreciates kindness
shown when her car broke down
To the editor:
On Saturday my car broke down in Sumatra.
I was alone, new to the area, and without cell phone reception.
I was overwhelmed by the kindness of those who helped me.
Heather, Rodney, and John all took time away from their Sat-
urday evening plans when they noticed I was having trouble.
They didn't hesitate to open the hood and get their hands dirty
trying to find the problem. I would especially like to thank Mr.
Jake Flowers, who gave me a ride to the Sumatra Grocery and
waited for me while Ms. Betty Hill let me use her business phone
to call a tow.
Heather and Rodney came to check up on me while John stayed
with my car.
I want to express my deepest appreciation for their selfless re-
sponse when they saw a stranger in trouble. When I think of Su-
matra, I will always remember their kindness.
Sincerely,
Becky Blanchard, Gainesville


PUBLIC NOTICE
Liberty County School Board is proposing changes
to the following policies:
2.91 LOCAL WELLNESS POLICY
i A public hearing on these policies will be held on June
r 9, 2009 at the Liberty County Administrative Offices, Hwy
S 12 South. Bristol, FL 32321 at 5:05 pm. Copies of the
policies are available at the Superintendent's Office.
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Notice of Cancellation
AT A SPECIAL MEETING OF THE LIBERTY COUNTY
COMMISSION ON MONDAY, JUNE 1, 2009
THE BOARD TABLED PROPOSED ORDINANCE 09-04.
An ordinance restricting user fees for recreational
purposes charged for land classified as agricul-
tural; providing for the removal of the agricultural
classification if user fees for recreational purpos-
es exceed three times taxes paid per acre per year;
recognizing that property owners are currently re-
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statutes, and providing for an effective date.
THE SCHEDULED PUBLIC HEARINGS ON JUNE 4, 2009
AND JULY 7, 2009 HAVE BEEN CANCELLED.
Robert Hill, Clerk of Court
Clerk to the Board of County Commissioners
I A







JUNE 3, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 19


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Page 20 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JUNE 3, 2009


LAURA SUE KYLE PERKINS
LLOYD-Laura Sue Kyle Perkins, 65, of
Lloyd passed away Sunday, May 31, 2009. She
was born in Hosford on July 26, 1943. She retired
from the State of Florida, Division of Driver's
License after thirty years of loyal service, Laura
made time for herself to enjoy her 'habit' of play-
ing bingo. Her motto would be "no rain, sleet,
snow or hail will keep me away from the bingo
hall"! As a wife, mother, grandmother and sister
her free spirit will continue to move through our
lives until the day that the rest of the family will
join her at our final home amongst the Angels.
Her presence here on earth has made a loving and
lasting memory that has touched so many people
in so many ways. Like the song once said 'Some
gave all' that was Laura, always looking out for
the other person and often doing without herself.
She never complained but handled the cards that
were dealt to her and put that smile on her face
and flashed those baby blue eyes of hers and just
moved forward, one day at a time. She will truly
be missed.
Survivors include her loving husband, Basil
Perkins of Lloyd and their two children, Michael
Perkins and his wife, Rose Marie of Lloyd and
Debbie Mitchem of Panama City; four grandchil-
dren, Amanda Perkins of Lloyd, Kayla Mitchem
of Tallahassee, Mike and Ashley Perkins both of
Lloyd; She was the 'expert' on how to properly
spoil her only great-granddaughter, Kylie Perkins
of Lloyd; and four siblings, Margie Robinson of
West Memphis, AR, D.L. Kyle of Bristol, Tru-


ALICE WILLIFORD
BLOUNTSTOWN-Alice Williford, 99, of
Blountstown passed away Thursday, May 28, 2009
in Blountstown. She was born on March 1, 1910
in Holyrood, KS and had lived in Blountstown
since 1970 coming from Chula Vista,. CA. She
was a homemaker and a member of the Eastern
Star Chapter 179 in Bloutstown where she served
numerous times as a Worthy Matron and in other
stations. She was a member of the Torreya Garden
Club, Blountstown Woman's Club and served with
the Area Agency on Aging for North Florida.
Survivors include one son, James Williford of
Blountstown; one daughter, Connie Williford of
Blountstown;'one sister, Irma Cantwell of San
Diego, CA; one sister-in-law, Irene Williford of
Sneads; numerous nieces and nephews, Bill and
Frances Williford, Evelyn and J.D. Suber, Jack and
Joyce Williford; John and Judy Williford, Linda
and Roland Benton, Shirley and Steve Vieres, Joe
and Judy Williford and Christa Starr of San Diego,
CA.
Services were held Tuesday, June 2 from the
graveside at Mt. Olive Cemetery in Altha with
Reverend Richard Waterman and Reverend David
Goodman officiating. Interment followed with
Eastern Star rites at the graveside. The family will
accept flowers but any one wishing may make con-
tributions to Blountstown Eastern Star Chapter 179
in Blountstown or to your favorite charity.
Peavy Funeral Home in Blountstown was in
charge of the arrangements.


PageL20 T OB A


man Kyle of Wausau and Lisa Howell of Panama JAMES R. HALLEY
City. BLOUNTSTOWN-James R. Halley, 81, of
The immediate family would like to say 'Thank Blountstown passed away Friday, May 29, 2009 in
You' to Rose Marie Perkins for her outstanding Blountstown. He was born on February 20, 1928
care of Laura during a very difficult time. It was in Calh6un County and had lived here all of his
a much needed comfort to know that Rose was., life. He was a retired carpenter and painter and
taking care of our loved one with compassion'and was a member of Blountstown First Pentecostal
a heart full of love. Thank you Rose, words.will Holiness Church in Blountstown.
never be able to describe the gratitude that we Survivors include two. sons, Bill Holley of
will always carry in our hearts for you. We could Crawfordville and Chuck Halley o6f Blountstown;
not have picked another caregiver that showed as one daughter, Teresa (Halley) Mears and her hus-
much love as you did and as you continue to show ,band, Cliiiton of Blountstown; three grandchildren,
today. Thank you. Christopher Bailey, Travis McCardle and Brandon
Graveside services will be held Wednesday, NlcCardle and twoo great-grandchildren, Blake and
June 3 at 10 a.m. at Springfield Cemetery in Lloyd. Montana Bailey. ..
In lieu of flowers, kindly make donations to the Services were held Sunday; May 31 at the
kind staff of Covenant Hospice, 1545 Raymond Blountstown First Pentecostal Holiness Church in
Diehl Road, Suite 102, Tallahassee, FL 32308. Blountstown with Reverend David Goodman offi-
Beggs Funeral Home Monticello Chapel in ciating. Interment followed in Nettle Ridge Cem-
Monticello is in charge of the arrangements. ' ,etery in Blountstown.
DPeavyEFuneral Home in Blountstown was in
DANIEL MONROE COLVIN charge of the arrangements.


BRISTOL-Daniel Monroe Colvin, 94, of
Bristol passed away Monday, May 25, 2009 in
Panama City. He was a native and lifelong resi-
dent of Liberty County. He retired after 54 years
as a brick mason. He had worked on many.homes.
and state buildings in Tallahassee and around this
area. He attended the Bristol Church of God and
loved to hunt and fish.
Survivors include his wife of 72 years, Orie
Colvin of Bristol and a daughter, Gilda C. Drum-
mond of Bristol.
Services were held Thursday, May 28 at the
*Bristol Church of God in Bristol. Interment fol-
lowed in the Lake Mystic Cemetery.
Bevis Funeral Home in Bristol was in charge
of the arrangements.


JAMES CLIFFORD SHIVER
BLOUNTSTOWN-James Clifford Shiver,
58, ofBlountstown passed away May 28, 2009 in
Bfountstown. He was a lifelong resident of Cal-
houn County and-was a truck driver.
Survivors include his daughter, Selena Maine of
High Springs; a brother, Steven David Shiver of
Georgia; three sisters, Catherine Francis and Bar-
bara Maybin of Tallahassee and Sybil Owens of
Bristol; two grandchildren and several nieces and
nephews.
No services are planned. Memorialization will
be by cremation.
Adams Funeral Home in Blountstown was in
charge of the arrangements.


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MYRTICE MARIE JOHNSON
CLARKSVILLE-Myrtice Marie Johnson, 82, of Clarksville
passed away Saturday night, May 30, 2009 in Blountstown. She
was born on March 30, 1927 in Clearwater and had lived in Cal-
houn County since 1979, coming from Dunnellon. She was a home-
maker and a member of Christian Home Freewill Baptist Church in
Blountstown. She was preceded in death by her husband, Bonnie
Johnson.
Survivors include two sons, Mickey Johnson and his wife, Syl-
via and Mike Johnson and his wife, Brenda, all of Clarksville; five
grandchildren, Amy Steedman and her husband, Dave of Ocala, Lori
Flowers and her husband, Chris of Kinard, Bonnie Richards and her
husband, Thad of Blountstown, Tessa Garnett and her husband, Toby
of Blounstown and Amanda Dehn and her husband, Paul of Clarks-
ville; ten great-great-grandchildren, Karissa Flowers, Ryan Flowers,
Meagan Steedman, Blair Steedman, J.T. Richards, Emma Richards,
Aidan Richards, Zoey Garnett, Eli Dehn and Sadie Dehn.
Services were held Tuesday, June 2 at Christian Home Freewill
Baptist Church with Reverend Mickey Johnson and Reverend Ron
Burger officiating. Interment followed in the Poplar Head Cemetery
in Clarksville..
Peavy Funeral Home in Blountstown was in charge of the ar-
rangements.

See OBITUARIES continued on page 22


WHAT BETTER TRIBUTE
CAN THERE BE?
Honor your loved ones by making their memory part
of our best efforts to defeat cancer. For more infor-
mation, contact the American Cancer Society.


~3~J~









JUNE 3,2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 21


Aageselection of new and used cars are
now available at Chipola Ford in Marianna!
Ronnie Coley personally invites you to visit him any
time Monday thru Saturday from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Questions? Give him a call at (850)482-4043.
HE IS WAITING FOR YOUR CALL!







We can repair most any lawn mower!


Enrollment trends and increases


being studied by Chipola College


MARIANNA-Chipola Col-
lege officials are looking for
enrollment trends by comparing
profiles of the last two academic
years.
A report issued by the col-
lege Planning Office compares
the total annual enrollments in
2007-08 with 2008-09 to deter-
mine where the greatest fluctua-
tions have occurred.

ENROLLMENT GROWTH
IN BS AND AA
DEGREE PROGRAMS
Dean of Enrollment Services
Dr. Jayne Roberts said enroll-
ment in BS degree programs
increased from 69 students last
year to 145 this year. "That's a
110% increase in one year," said
Roberts. She said there are likely
several reasons, one of which is
that area residents are learning
about the availability of our eight
Bachelor's degrees at Chipola.
She also said budget cuts have
caused universities to accept
fewer transfer students into up-
per-division programs and that
attending Chipola is much less
expensive for local students who
cannot afford to relocate to com-
plete their degrees.
"I'm convinced that one of the
main reasons is that so many of
our BS degree seeking students
are 'place bound,' and many
are employed while attending
college. Every week I talk with
someone who years ago earned
part or all of an AA degree and
wanted to earn a Bachelor's de-
gree but could not relocate for
two or more years because of
home, family, and work respon-
sibilities," said Roberts. "We are
offering these students a chance
to achieve that goal, and they are
taking us up on the offer."
The number of Associate in
Arts degree seeking students
increased from 1,784 to 1,933,
an increase of 8.35%. Roberts
cited several possible explana-
tions, including the economic
downturn and people's need for
retraining to become more em-
ployable. She also said, "I think
the availability of Bachelor's
degrees might be causing some
of this enrollment increase." She
said that more students are will-
ing to enroll and remain enrolled
because they now know they can
finish right here at Chipola.
Roberts, also cited the like-
lihood that more students are
persisting and re-enrolling as a
result of-the college's Academic
Center for Excellence (ACE) and
Supplemental Instruction. "It
will be a while before we know
whether students are re-enrolling
at a significant rate, but it makes
sense that our headcount would
increase because we are retain-
ing more students who used to


CHIPOLA ENROLLMENT INCREASES-Sharon Sapp
and Alton Rogers, both of Vernon, work in a Chipola Col-
lege science lab. The college is enjoying a four percent
enrollrhent increase this year.


leave while also bringing in the
first-time students we have al-
ways enrolled."

FULL TIME
EQUIVALENCY (FTE)
ENROLLMENT
As of February 13, the col-
lege had enrolled 100 more
students than last year. "That's,
almost a 4% annual increase in
headcount," said Roberts. She
also confirmed that other recent
reports indicate a 13% increase
in Full Time Equivalency (FTE)
for this 2009 spring semester
compared to last year's 2008
spring enrollment. FTE is an
average calculation of the num-
ber of hours students take. "This
means we have more students on
campus and they are taking more
classes."
Roberts also said this year's
enrollment is expected to in-
crease even more before the end
of the spring term because Work-
force Development programs
have open-enrollment options.
She said this additional en-
rollment is driven largely by
Public Service, programs, which
vary from year to year because
of the training needs of local and
state agencies. "We don't always
know which training or retrain-
ing will be requested," conclud-
ed Roberts.


- ENROLLMENT TRENDS
AMONG STUDENT GROUPS
GENDER The percentage of
females enrolled increased from
57% in 2007-08 to 60% in 2008-
09. In the early 1990's about
half the population was female.
By the mid-1990s, about 60%
were female. The percentage of
females has ranged from 55% to
62% since that time.
ETHNICITY Data reflecting
ethnicity also show little change
over the last decade. From 75%
- 76% are White, around 20%
are Black, and the remaining
4% are Hispanic, Asian, and Na-
tive American. No other ethnic
groups are represented.
AGE Percentages of most
age groups have remained about
the same except the increase in
the "under 18" group, which to-
taled. 13% in 2004. This group
increased significantly to 16%
in 2007-08 and 26% in 2008-09.
This is due to the growth of high
school dual- enrollment offer-
ings across the district.

RESIDENCE:
IN-DISTRICT COUNTIES
Data reflecting county of
residence shows little change
over the last decade. Over 50%
continue to come from Jackson
County, followed by 10% to
12% from Washington, about
10% each from Calhoun and
Holmes Counties, and 2% to 3%
from Liberty County.


Chipola

Ford


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Auto-1








Page 22 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JUNE 3, 2009


JEFFERIE SCOTT RECTOR
BLOUNTSTOWN-Jefferie Scott Rector, 28 ofBlountstown,
passed away Monday, June 1, 2009 after a boating accident.
Jefferie was a native and lifelong resident of Blountstown and
worked as an oil rig crane operator for Bay Limited in Louisiana.
Survivors include his son, Joseph Quinton Rector and a
daughter, Jocelyn Nicole Rector, both of Burwick, LA; his fa-
thfer, Ronald J. Rector of Fair Oaks, IN; his mother, Tammy
Rector Bottoms of Rensselaer, IN; his grandparents, Henry and
Bessie Hesson of Rensselaer, IN and Louise and the late Joseph
Rector of Fair Oaks, IN; six brothers, Donny Rector of Cross-
ville, TN; Mike, Tim, Doug and Scott Rector all of Fair Oaks,
IN, and Nathan Rector of Adica, IN; 11 sisters Joann Thatcher
of Merritt Island, Linda Bellamy of Sweetwater, TN, Deborah
Thorton Smith of Blountstown, Kathy Lynch of Louts, IN,
Shellie Barrett, Jody Rector Lloyd, Kalee Rector, Tami Spencer,
all of Rensselaer, IN, and Jenna Rector Aguilar of Logansport,
IN, Makenzie Rector of Wheatfield, IN, Sheena Armstrong of
!ensa, IN; many loving nieces, nephews, aunts and uncles and
friends including his best friend and "brother" Jeremy Thornton.
Services will be held at 2 p.m. Thursday, June 4 from the
Adams Funeral Home Chapel. The family will receive friends.
from 6-8 p.m. Wednesday, June 3 at the Adams Funeral Home
in Blountstown.
Adams Funeral Home in Blountstown is in charge of
the arrangements.


NELL TAYLOR
BLOUNTSTOWN-Nell Taylor, 86, of Blountstown
passed away Friday, May 29, 2009 in Blountstown. She
was born in Portchester, NY and moved from Jackson-
ville to Blountstown in 1964. She was a member of First
Baptist Church where she served as secretary for twenty
years. She was preceded in death by her husband, Ben
Hugh Taylor.
Survivors include five sons, Jeffery Riley Taylor of
Oklahoma, Christopher Hugh Taylor and William Charles
Taylor of Chicago, IL, Russell Glenn Taylor of Tallahas-
see, and Jonathan Ben Taylor of Connecticut; four daugh-
ters, Valerie Ann Sies of North Carolina, Christine Ben-
ton of Bristol, Florence Powers of Tallahassee, and Susie
Summerlin of Hosford; twenty-six grandchildren; and
twenty-five great-grandchildren.
- Graveside services were held Tuesday, June 2 in Nettle
Ridge Cemetery with Reverend David Throckmorton of-
ficiating. -
Adams Funeral Home in Blountstown was in charge, of
the arrangements.


DAVID N. BARNETT
CLARKSVILLE--Dvid N. Barnett, 87, of Clarks-
ville passed away Thursday, May 28, 2009 in Blount-
stown. He was born on November 11, 1921 in Kemp-
ster, WI and had lived in Calhoun County since 1961.
He was a retired Master Sergeant with the United States
Air Force with over 21 years of service. He was a WWII
veteran and was a Pearl Harbor survivor. He was a mem-
ber of the American Legion, Am Vets and Woodmen of
the World. He was the last old State Florida Prison Road
Captain. He was of the Baptist Faith.
Survivors include three sons, Robert Barnett and his
wife, Judy of Baker, LA, Thomas Barnett and his wife,
Mavis of Tampa and Glen Barnett of Clarksville; one
daughter; Faith Mears and her husband, Billy ofAltha;
nine grandchildren and seventeen great-grandchildren.
Services were held Sunday, May 31 at Peavy Funeral
Home Chapel in Blountstown with Reverend Marvin
Nichols officiating. Interment followed in the Pine Me-
morial Cemetery in Blountstown with full military hon-
ors.
Peavy Funeral Home in Blountstown was in charge of
the arrangements.


CITY OF BLOUNTSTOWN
NOTICE OF JOB OPENING
Title: ELECTRIC LINEMAN

GENERAL DESCRIPTION:
This is skilled work in the construction, maintenance and operation of underground and
overhead electrical distribution system. The work involves the performance of skilled tasks
in accordance with standard trade practices in construction, operation and maintenance of
the municipally-owned electric distribution system.
Job Duties:
*Install or repair cables or wires used in electrical power or distribution systems.
*May erect poles and light or heavy duty transmission towers.
,Open switches or attach grounding devices to remove electrical hazards from disturbed
or fallen lines or to facilitate repairs.
*Climb poles or use truck-mounted buckets to access equipment.
*Cut, trim, remove vegetation from power lines, easements and rights-of-way of the distri-
bution system.
*Install, maintain, and repair electrical distribution and transmission systems, including
conduits, cables, wires, and related equipment, such as transformers, circuit breakers,
and switches.
*Place insulating or fireproofing materials over conductors and joints.
*Identify defective sectionalizing devices, circuit breakers, fuses, voltage regulators, trans-
formers, switches, relays, or wiring, using wiring diagrams and electrical-testing instru-
ments.
*Drive. vehicles equipped with tools and materials to job sites.
*Coordinate work assignment preparation and completion with other workers.
*Inspect and test power lines and auxiliary equipment to locate and identify problems, us-
ing reading and testing instruments.
.*String wire conductors and cables between poles, towers, trenches, pylons, and build-
ings, setting lines in place and using winches to adjust tension.
*Required to perform overtime work when called during off-duty hours if problems occur in
the distribution system or to connect customers. Frequently works in inclement weather.
*Other Duties as may be assigned.
Training & Experience:
*Minimum 10 years-of work experience in the field as a lineman working distribution, or
transmission systems.
*Must be certified as a Lineman with proper training and certification.
*Class B CDL
Other:
*Must have a clean record
*Pass a DOT Physical
*City of Blountstownfis a Drug Free Work Place and an Equal Opportunity Employer.
FResumes may be submitted to the office of the City Manager during the regular City work-
ing hours of 7:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M., Monday'- Friday at 20591 Central Avenue West,
Blountstown, Florida 32424 through July 15, 2009. Interviews will be granted only upon
invitation.
DRUG-FREE WORK PLACE
EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER
BY: R.W DEASON, MAYOR
ATTEST: JAMES A. WOODS, CITY MANAGER 6-3.6-10.6-17 Juy 8


City of Blountstown
Now Hiring: (3) Ninety Day Positions
Part-time Temporary Public Works Laborers


*You must be able to pass a criminal
Background check.
*Must posses a Class B CDL or obtain
one shortly after employment.
*Employee will be expected to perform


Heavy labor, and work
team.


Applications will be
accepted until
June 17, 2009 at
close of business.


as part of a


Preference
will be give
to the most
qualified
individual for
interviews.


Applications available at:
City Hall
20591 Central Avenue West,
Blountstown, Florida 32424


SAn equal opportunity employer & A Drug Free Workplace.



Calhoun County School Board
JOB OPPORTUNITY
The School Board of Calhoun County is accepting
applications for the following position:


Food Service Worker
*Terms of Employment: 180 days
*Salary: Commensurate with Current
Salary Schedule and Experience.
*Applicant Qualifications: Previous work
experience in food services is desirable.

Apply online at http://www.calhounflschools.org/.
Applications must be completed by
Thursday, June 4, 2009.
A copy of the job duties pertaining to this position is
available at the Superintendent's Office.
Questions concerning this job opening may be
directed to Mrs. Diana Alday, Food Service Assistant
at the Special Programs Office or Tommy McClellan,
Superintendent.
Employment opportunities are offered without regard to race,
religion, sex, national origin, age, handicap or marital status.
DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE/EOE
5-27 & 6-3


$AVON$
Earn 50%, Starter Kit
ONLY $10
Call today:

(850)570-1499
www.youravon.com/tdavies
S ufn


One Stop Career Center
16908 NE Pear St. Suite 2,
BlounLstown Phone (850) 674-5088
The following positions are
available: Construction Trades
Helper, Janitorial, Dietetic
Technician, Construction
Worker, Office Clerk, Food
Service Worker, Production
Manager, Truck Driver.
EOE.
Service Chipola Workforce Board UFN


~SIPISIIIISIIB~








JUNE 3, 2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 23


'Bee' aware of pollination


in your vegetable garden


Family


Dentistry



DENTURE

LABON PREMISES

Same-Day Service on

Repairs and Relines


Laban Bontrager, DMD

Monica Bontrager, DMD

ACCEPTING

NEW PATIENTS
12761 NW Pea Ridge Rd., Bristol, FL 32321
TELEPHONE 643-5417


When growing squash,
vigorously growing plants and
lots of pretty, yellow flowers
are good signs but certainly not
a guarantee that you will have
a bountiful harvest. Actually,
those healthy-looking plants and
showy flowers may be signaling
a time for you to literally get "as
busy as a bee."
Squash, like all members of
the cucurbit family, have separate
male and female flowers on the
same plant. For fruit set to occur,
pollen must be transferred from
the male to the female flower.
This process (pollination) is a
function normally carried out by
insects, most often honeybees.
The primary reason the
numerous yellow flowers may
yield little, if any, squash is an
absence of honeybees and the
resulting lack of pollination.
This is especially true in urban/
suburban areas where honeybees
seldom choose to build their
hives.
An absence of honeybees
is a real problem, but one that
can easily be overcome if you
are willing to'take their place.
You can play "bee" by hand
transferring the pollen from the
male to the female flowers. It's
simple, easy and almost always
guaranteed to result in plenty
of garden-fresh squash for your
dinner table.


[ by Theresa Friday,
Horticulture Extension Agent,
Santa Rosa County
Before we get into the art of
"playing bee," you obviously
need to be able to tell the
difference between the male
and female flowers. The female
squash flowers are those that
have a very distinct swelling
or enlargement directly behind
the petals which is actually
the small, immature squash
fruit. The male flowers lack the
immature fruit and are simply
attached to the plant by a long,
slender stem. Both male and
female squash flowers are open
only for a single day. They
open during early morning
and generally close by mid
afternoon. Pollination is best
done in the morning, when high
humidity helps to activate the
pollen.
Playing bee can be
accomplished in several different
ways.
You can use a cotton swab or
a small paint brush to transfer
the pollen from the male to the
female flower. Simply dab either
the swab or brush into the center
of a fully open male flower,
making sure some of the yellow
pollen grains adhere to the
cotton or bristles. Then, transfer
the pollen by dabbing the swab


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or brush into the center of an
open female flower. In most
cases there is enough pollen
in one male flower to pollinate
three to five female flowers.
A less sophisticated, but just as
effective, method when playing
"bee" is to simply pull off an
open male flower, remove or
peel back the flower petals and
then dab its pollen-laden center
into the center of an open female
flower. Make sure the center of
the male flower (anther) makes
good contact with the center
(stigma) of the female flower.
Since this is a much less pollen-
efficient technique, use one male
flower to pollinate no more than
three female flowers.
If you find reason to treat your
squash with pesticides to control
diseases or insects, do so during
late afternoon. Spraying or
dusting at this time will greatly
reduce the chance ofiharming
pollinating honey bees.
So don't let. an absence
of honeybees keep you from
enjoying the great taste ofhome-
grown squash. Arm yourself
with a cotton swab, small brush
or a male flower and pollinate
away!
For more information visit
the University of Florida IFAS
publication "Hand Pollination"
at http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/
HS398.


Mi-









Page 24 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JUNE 3, 2009


m-


* 1- l -


ITEMS FOR SALE

60 gallpn fish tank with wooden
cabinet stand, pump, filters, drain
hoses, rocks and accessories. Paid
$500, asking $175. Call 643-2422.
6-3, 6-10
White Whirlpool electric cook
stove, excellent condition, clean,
$100; 22 cubic foot refrigerator with
ice maker, excellent condition, $100.
Call 580-3335. 6-3, 6-10

Brown wooden jewelry armoire,
4 drawers and mirror, $30; brown
wooden coffee table with storage
cabinet, $25 or- trade for a small
.dresser. Call 643-2422. 6-3, 6-10

Grayco comfort sport convertible
car seat, excellent condition, infant
and toddler from 5-40 Ibs. and up to
40 inches. Light tan color, $45. Call
643-3370. 6-3,6-10

Round galvanized water tank,
holds 592 gallons, measures 7 ft. x
2 ft. $100. Call 643-3370. 6-3;6-10

2009 16-bulb Tanning bed, used
approximately 24 hours, works great,
needs new acrylic for top (cracked
during shipping). Comes with a new
set of bulbs (still in the box), $2,300
invested, asking $1,600. Call 762-
4678. 6-3,6-10

Rigid Cordless Drill 1/2" 12 volt
with dual port charger, 2 max bat-
teries, new, real nice. Sold for $159,
asking $70. Call 643-3007. 6-3,6-10

Shed full of furniture, buy all or
one piece, reasonably priced. Call
933-4968. 6-3,6-10

Women's scrubs sizes XL and XXL
only worn 6 months, tops $5, sets
$9. Call 643-2422. 6-3; 6-10

Furniture sale at Humility Baptist
Church: one stove, dining chairs
and table, office desk, three chairs,
30 padded church pews, heating/
AC window unit and other church
furniture. Call 674-8269 for more in-
formation. 6-3, 6-10'

Two steel culverts. Will sell to-
gether or separate. One measures
-18x24, asking $300, the other mea-
sures 24x24 asking $375. Has mi-
tered ends. Call 643-5386. 6-3,6-10

Free to someone who needs it:
hospital bed, hospital table ard adult
potty chair. Call 237-1764. 5-27,6-3

Baby walker, $5. Call-447-4730.
5-27,6-3
L
Baby crib, white, converts to day
bed, with mattress, $30; chang-
ing table, natural wood color, with
.changing pad, $15. Call 674-5483.
5-27, 6-3

New swimming pool, never used, 8
ft. wide by 2 1/2 ft deep, sells for $35
asking $30; new ceiling fans, blades
are 20" long, $40. Call 674-3264.
5-27, 6-3
Rocawear diaper bag, light blue,
$5; maternity belt, brand new, never
opened, $5; baby bed mattress, $20.
Call 447-4730. 5-27 6-3

Carpet, blue, about five rolls, $40 for
all. Call 447-4730. 5-27, 6-3


AUTO ACCESSORIES

Two Genuine Merit aluminum'
headache racks for semi truck, $350
each OBO. Call (850) 573-3319.
6-3, 6-10

Two 16" P225 tires on rims, $20
each. Call 379-3966. 6-3,6-10


Living room chair with arms, $20.
Call 674-3264. 5-27, 6-3

Chanel sunglasses, black, $50;
White Coach sunglasses, pink tint,
$50; or $75 for both. Call 643-
6080. 5-27, 6-3
King size waterbed frame, head-
board has mirror with 2 attached
lamps, base frame has 6 drawers,
asking $200. Call 674-4666 after 5
p.m. 5-27,6-3

Scrubs, good condition, small &
medium pants, tops and jackets, $4
each piece. Call 643-8815, leave
message. UFN

55-gallon steel drums with lids,
25, $10 each, excellent storage.
Call 592-5780. 5-20, 6-10


PROM DRESSES


Prom dress, new, never been
worn, still has tags, size 7/8, cor-
al colored, halter top style, some
beading, train. Paid $180, asking
$75. Call 643-8815 leave mes-
sage. UFN


ELECTRONICS

PS3 video game, 40GB with 3
games, $300 OBO. Call 209-4388.
5-27,6-3

Sony stereo, with Atwo regular
speakers and 8" sub-woofer speak-
er, $30. Call 447-4730. 5-27,6-3


CARS


1990 Olds Cutlass Siera, 91,000
miles, AC, auto transmission, new
tires, great condition, $1,000 seri-
ous inquiries only. Call (850) 210-
9116 in Hosford. 6-3, 6-10

1971 Ford Galaxy 500, green in
color, needs a little work, $1,000.
Call 643-4639 for more information.
5-20, 5-27


TRUCKS & SUVS


1992 Chrysler Mini Van, needs
transmission. Reasonable offer ac-
cepted. Call 643-2255. 6-3, 6-10

1986 Ford F150 4x4 all major parts
good, but needs work. Reasonable
offer accepted. Call 643-2255.
6-3, 6-10

1989 Jeep Wrangler w/350 Chevy
engine, $3,500. Call 762-8107.
6-3, 6-10

2001 Dodge Durango, black, in
great condition, power windows and
door locks, 3rd row seating, duel air,
134,000 miles, $5,000 OBO. Call
557-4815. 6-3,6-10

2000 Ford F250, V10, 3 inch lift,
dual exhaust, gold color, approxi-
mately 164,000 miles, $8,000. Call
643-8345. 5-27,6-3


M&W Self
Storage Rentals
7 days a week service
5' x 10.' ....s20
10' xl10'......35
10'x20' ....70
10' x 25' .....s90
NO DEPOSIT
Call 762-9555. 762-8807
or 762-8597


FOR RENT

2 Bedroom
Trailer for rent in
Altha. Very nice.
Call 762-9555
,..'. ..', |,., % ?


I.;


FOR RENT
In Bristol
*Mobile home lots
3 bedroom, 2 bath mobile
homes with CHA
In Blountstown
1I-room efficiency,
utilities included 2BR/bath
and a haltapartment
* Commercial old Mexican
restaurant Commercial -
200 front ft. with 3 buildings
and fenced in area.

Phone 643-7740


Full. set of tires and rims for
2007 Chevy Silverado pickup, size
P245-70R-17 mud and snow, less
than 18,000 miles on them, $200;
bed liner w/tailgate guard for 1007-
Chevy extended cab, $100. Call
674-1637.
5-27, 6-3


MOTORCYCLES

& ATVS

2006 Suzuki Quad Racer 4-wheel-
er, $3,200 OBO. Call 643-6777.
6-3, 6-10

Two 2005 Suzuki Boulevard mo-
torcycles, $9,200 for the pair. Call
762-8107. 6-3,6-10

Firehawk Mini-bike, 6 hp., like new,
$350. Call 379-3966. 6-3, 610

2007 Yamaha white YFZ450 4-whel-
er, $5,000; Honda CR150 dirt bike,
$1,500; motorcycle trailer, $400.
Call 209-4388. 5-27,6-3


LOST & FOUND

FOUND: Dark brown, female, Chi-
huahua in the Hugh Creek area
around the library. Call 237-1447.
6-3, 6-10
LOST dog, Black Lab male, ap-
proximately 4 months old, lost on Bo
Street off Chester Street in Hosford,
answers to Berry. Kids miss their
dog, anyone who knows.where he
is please call to return home. Call
688-0254. 6-3,6-10

LOST: Seiko Diver's watch with
silver bard at Bristol Landing on
May 10. Call Sammy at 643-7815
if found.
5-27, 6-3
LOST: Walker female puppy, about
3 months old, white with brown
markings on head. Last seen in the
Blue Creek/CR 67A area. Please
call 509-3568. 5-27 6-3
LOST: Large Black Lab, male w/
blue collar on May 21 between 4:30-
9:30 p.m., in the area of Calhoun/
Jackson Co. line on hwy 71. Please
c11l 557-7141,334-798-9186 or 762-
5093 leave message. Reward, no
questions asked, belongs to a can-
cer patient. We were just dog sitting
until patient gets well enough to care
for his dog again. 5-27,
6-3
FOUND: set of keys at Wakulla
Bank main branch in Blountstown
about two weeks ago. Call 237-
2800. 5-27,6-3
FOUND: Pekingese adult dog, ap-
proximately 3 1/2 years old, found
5/20 at Farmers Co-op in Blount-
stown. The dog really misses owner.
Call 639-2025. 5-27, 6-3


1.,


WANTED:|


SWill buy 10 to
1,000 acres,
reasonably
priced.
Immediate
closing.
Call (850)
544-5441
or (850)
^ 570-0222 ".
S .- .


THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL




CLASSIF!ED-S
A A_3


To place your ad, call 643-3333 by noon Eastern
Time on Saturday. Non-business ads run FREE for 2 weeks.

T


Lawrence n




HOSP1TaL
Jerry C. Lawrence. DVM
Emergencies:
1850l 856 5827 or 1850) 856-5918
Hours:
Monday- Friday a m. to 5 p.m
SDO CTIR'S HOURS B 'APPOIrJTMErNT
WE PROVIDE Boarding
SGrooming Preventative
Healthcare programs which include
vaccinations and yearly checkups
SSpay/neuter program to reduce
unwanted pupples/kilens
S PLUS MAN', OTHER SERVICES
S CALL US AirTIME IF OU HAVE
ArlY OUESTIOIS
43 N. Cleveland St., Ouincy
OFFICE (850) 627-8338 .









. JUNE 3,2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 25


SSThlR-


SCOPE
Week of
May 31 to June 6

ARIES Mar 21/Apr 20
With some room for negotiation
you can actually see something
you want come within reach,
Aries. Quick thinking is your
key to success on Monday.

TAURUS Apr 21/May 21
Romantic endeavors will have
to be put on hold for the time
being, Taurus. You have bigger
fish to fry this week, especially
in the work department.

GEMINI May 22/Jun 21
Kind words go a long way to
helping someone out, Gemini.
This person can use as much
support as you're willing to
offer. Wednesday is a day
to play catchup.'

CANCER Jun 22/Jul22
Cancer, tough times call for
even tougher measures. Expect
that you will seriously be put to
the test in the next few weeks. A
shining example is made.

LEO Jul 23/Aug 23
Don't let others take
advantage of your benevolent
nature, Leo. The tides can quickly
turn if you require them to do so.
Make the most of a meeting this
week. It is a big one.

VIRGO Aug 24/Sept 22
Virgo, you can't trust someone
who is close to you and that is very
frustrating You, and you alone
must work out the situation. Think
hard about what is best.
LIBRA Sept 23/Oct 23
You know your strengths and
weaknesses, Libra, and now
it's time to put your strengths
to the test. Work assignments
seem overwhelming this week,
-but you'll pull through.

SCORPIO Oct 24/Nov 22
Lately it seems-you're being
hit with the one-two punch of
bad news, Scorpio. Do the only
thing you can: Pick yourself up
and dust yourself off.

SAGITTARIUS Nov 231Dec 21
Big changes are in store if you
keep your eyes on the horizon,
Sagittarius. Lady Luck just may
make a visit to you in the next
few days. You can certainly use it.

CAPRICORN Dec 22/Jan 20
Capricorn, too much information
can be a bad thing for you this
week. You may want to tune out
for a while and just enjoy spending
some time inside of your head.

AQUARIUS Jan 21/Feb 18
You will be called upon to provide
emotional support to someone who-
needs it, Aquarius. You have to be
a rock that this person can lean on.
It will be rewarding for you, also.

PISCES Feb 19/Mar 20
Pisces, a little sunshine can bright-
en your mood. A trip somewhere
warm and sunny, or even a day in
the yard, can work wonders.

FAMOUS BIRTHDAYS
MAY31
Brooke Shields, Actress (44)
JUNE1
Heidi Klum, Model (36)
JUNE 2
Dana Carvey, Comic (54)
JUNE 3
Lalaine, Actress (22)
JUNE 4
Russell Brand, Actor/Comic (34)
JUNE5
Pete Wentz, Musician (30)
.JUNE 6
Harvey Fierstein, Actor (57)


HOMES & LAND

2003 Pioneer mobile home, must
be moved, 16 x 80, 3 bdr., 2 bath,
new porch, central heat & air, new
side by. side refrigerator, new light
fixtures & ceiling fans, new tiled
floors (kitchen, bathroom and front
door entry) also comes with a 8 x 10
- shed, lots of extras. If interested,
call 447-3839. 6-3

Home for sale: Great mountain
home in Robbinsville, NC near Bry-
son City, 3 bd, 2 bth, 1,639 sq. ft.
heated and cooled. Fully furnished
on 3-acres with mountain stream.
Call (850)363-3919 for more infor-
mation. 6-3, 6-10

Land for sale, 20 acre tract in Cal-
houn County, all high and dry, agri-
culturally classified, located at 4028
NW Malverty Lane in Altha, $75,000.
Call (850) 653-2153 ask for Robert
.or call (850) 670-8070 and ask for
Mark or Charlotte. 6-3,6-10

House for sale in Bristol, 3 bd., 2
bth., over 1,600 sq.ft. on 1.25 acres,
located on a quiet dead end road,
with a 16x20 shed, $115,000. Call
643-1566. 5-27, 6-3

Big lot on Chipola River, located
in Calhoun County. Call 643-1514.
UFN


CAM PERS/RVS

2007 29' 5th-wheel Travel trailer
with two slide outs and a 1995 Ford
F350 Crew Cab Dually pickup. 5th
Wheel has been pole barn .kept,
sold as a set for $28,000. Call 762-
8107.
S6-3,6-10


ALTHA
.Saturday, June 6 beginning at 8 a.m.
Located at 22150 NW White Water
Grade in Altha, many assorted items
too many to mention.
Saturday, June 6 beginning at 7 a.m.
cancel if rain. Located on Hwy. 71 N
at the fork at 275 and 71 right behind
old store, look for signs. Children and
adult clothes, stereo, dishes, glasses,
toys and much more.
BRISTOL
Saturday, June 6 from 8 a.m. to
12. Cancel if rain, lots of clothes,
prom dresses, porcelain dolls, men's
clothes, little boy clothes, teenage girl
clothes, sheets, lots of odds and ends.
Located on left, 1 block from red light
on Hwy. 20 W. Call 643-2412 or 447-
1194.

BLOUNTSTOWN
Saturday, June 6 from 8 a.m. to 12,
located at 17502 NE Pear Street in
Blountstown. Some women's clothing
size large, blouses, scrubs, girls cloth-
ing sizes, 3T and up, toys, VHS mov-
ies and lots of other miscellaneous
items. Call 447-1093.
Saturday, June 6 from 8 a.m. to 1
p.m., located at 20817 SE Morning-
side Circle in Blountstown. Dishes,
clothes, books, kitchenware and much
more. Cancel if rain.
Saturday, June 6 beginning at 7 a.m.
(CT) located at 17391 NW 11th street
in Shuler Brothers parking lot. Items
include: clothes, shoes, household
items, linens, holiday items, new items
and much more. Call 643-6009.
Multifamily yard sale, Friday, June


1994 20' Chateau camper, bumper
pull, good condition, asking $3,300.
Call 643-8815 and leave message.
UFN


PETS/SUPPLIES

Small house dog, male, 3 1/2
months old, Yorkie/Dachshund/Shi-
atsu mix, free to a good home. Call
557-1850. 6-3,6-10

Four Basset hound mix breed
puppies, one male and three fe-
males, free to a good home. Call
557-1850. 6-3, 6-10

Nine English Bulldog/Catahoula
Hound mix puppies. Six to seven
weeks old, some have blue eyes
and three have leopard spots. Free
to a good home. Call 674-8010.
6-3, 6-10

Free puppies, part Lab/Poodle,
some have straight hair, some have
curly hair, all black, one is black with
brown. Call 762-3895, if no answer
leave detailed message. 6-3,6-10

Two kittens, free to a good home,
"5 weeks old, one tabby color, the
other black, very friendly. Call 643-
5622. 6-3, 6-10

2004 Bee-2 horse trailer, walk thru,
bumper pull, everything works, ex-
cellent condition, $4,000. Call 899-
5501 or 643-2979. 6-3 6,-10

Four free kittens to a good home, 7
weeks old, ready to go; one adult fe-
male cat, free to a good home. Call
643-5320. 5-27, 6-3

-Free German Shepherd Belgian


5 and Saturday, June 6 beginning
at 7 a.m. in Blountstown at NW 10th
Street. Children and adult clothes all
sizes, variety of bedding and dishes,
nick knacks, a-flute in good shape,-
electric organ and much more, every-
thing priced right. Call 674-1094.
6-3, 6-10.
CLARKSVILLE
Moving sale located at Hwy 73 S.
Clarksville, many items. Call 643-
7955 for information on times, items,
pricing, etc. 63, 6-10
KINARD
Friday, June 12 and Saturday June
13 beginning at 7 a.m., located at
3589, Hwy. 73 S. in Kinard, 1 mile off
Hwy. 71 on Rt. look for signs, indoor
sale. Furniture, dishes, appliances,
everything must go. Call 639-6923.
6-3, 6-10


Melaois mix, 4-5 months old, male,
neutered, has had shots and micro-
chip, name is Jack. Call 663-9838
or 643-8526. 5-27, 6-3

Seven free puppies, Pit Bull/Cata-
houla hound mix, 7 weeks old, to a
good home. Call 272-6299 leave


message.


5-27,6-3


Free Bulldog puppies, 6 weeks
old, had 1st shots. Call 762-8844.
5-27, 6-3


WANTED


Looking for a small lot in the
Calhoun County area, reasonably
priced. Call 447-3839. 5-27,6-3

Queen size mattress and large rug.
Call 674-3264. 5-27, 6-3

-Toddler seat for back of ladies
bike, reasonably priced. Call 294-
6002. UFN

Ladies bike, good condition, rea-
sonably priced. Call 643-8815,
leave message. UFN

Junk cars and trucks, any con-
dition. We pay cash. Call 762-
8459 or 272-1126 cell. UFN


WATERCRAFT

& SUPPLIES

14 ft. Queen Craft boat with 25 hp.
motor and trailer. Call 762-8000 for
information. 5-27,6-3

13 ft. Aluminum V-hull boat with
15 hp. Honda motor and galvanized
trailer, $1,800. Call 387-6603.
5-27, 6-3

1985 35 hp. Mercury motor for
parts, $250 OBO. Call 762-8000.
5-27, 6-3

Scandy White Open Pro boat and
trailer, 15', 10" long, 54" wide on bot-
tom, stick steering, Scandy White
duck blind, buggy top, $3,750. Call
478-474-5575. 5-20,7-22


GUNS

AK47 with 1000 rounds. Call 762-
8000 for more information. 5-27,6-3


THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL




CLASSIaFIEDS

To place your ad, call 643-3333 by noon Eastern
Time on Saturday. Non-business ads run FREE for 2 weeks.


Located on Hwy 73 at Shelton's Comer


YARD SALE AT THE
BARGAIN BARN

Satune 9, 8 a.m.-1 .m.



21521 NESR20
1/4 miles west of Hosford on Hwy 20
379-3000.






HOUSES FOR SALE
BRISTOL ~ 3 bedroom brick house
on 3 acres near town. s 39,000
BLOUNTSTOWN ~ 2 bed/2 bath
brick house with a formal living and
dining room, many updates on 1
acre. 5l19,000
LIBERTY COUNTY N 80 acres near
the river, all wooded. 1320,000
TWIN OAKS ~ 3 bed/2 bath, like
new, 2 car garage, fenced yard with
goabove ground pool. 5148,000
BRISTOL- 3bed/2 bath all cypress
(very nice), more land available,
,motivated seller.
LIBERTY COUNTY-8.5 acres,
beautiful home site with big oak
ggtrees. 70,000
HWY 12 SOUTH ~ Lots of room, 5
bed/2.5 bath home with fruit trees,
grape arbor and a garden space.
Several new listings have come in this week.
STo BUYor SELL, please give us a call
^ lBRINKLEY REALTY
S ( 643-3289


SUMMER

SPECIALS
COWMIJIES- LAPTOPS AIRS

*We offer up-grades,
computer and laptop
repair.

*Refurbished Computers
as low as 149.00

*Refurbished Laptops as
low as 199.00

*New complete comput-
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as 499.00

*New laptops as low as
$599.00
Limited quantities
available.
Parts, Accessories,
WE DO IT ALL AT
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CALL NOW!
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Hwy 71 North Altha, Fl.


YARD SALES


MERLE


NORMAN
Now offering

Hair Extensions!

Call today for your

Consultation appointment


674-9191

20452 W. Central Ave. Blountstown









Page 26 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JUNE 3, 2009


LIBERTY COUNTY
PROJECT #58.109
ROAD REPAIR, IMPROVEMENT
AND PERIODIC
MAINTENANCE CONTRACT
FLORIDA RIVER ISLAND
ROADS

NOTICE TO RECEIVE
SEALED BIDS

The Liberty County Board of
County Commissioners will re-
ceive proposals from any qualified
person, company or corporation
interested in constructing the fol- *
lowing project:

ROAD REPAIR, IMPROVEMENT
AND PERIODIC MAINTENANCE
CONTRACT FLORIDA RIVER
ISLAND ROADS

Request-for Proposal Packages
can be obtained at Preble-Rish,
Inc., 324 Marina Drive, Port St.
Joe, Florida 32456, (850) 227-
7200.

Completion date for this project
will be 180 days from the date
of the Notice to Proceed present-
ed to the successful bidder.

Liquidated damages for failure to
complete the project on the speci-
fied date will be set at $500.00 per
day.

Please indicate on the envelope
that this is a sealed bid and what
the bid is for.

There will be a MANDATORY Pre-
Bid Meeting on Tuesday, June 2,
2009 at Preble-Rish, Inc., 10490
NW Main Street, Bristol, FL 32321
at 10:00 AM E.T.

Proposals will be received un-
til 4:00 .p.m. Eastern Time, on
June 9, 2009 at the Liberty County
Clerk's Office, Liberty County
Courthouse, 10818 NW S.R. 20,
Bristol, Florida 32321, and will be
evaluated by selection committee.

Cost for the proposal package will
be $ 50.00 per set and is non-
refundable. Checks should be
made payable to PREBLE-RISH,
INC.

The Board of County Commis-
sioners reserves the right to waive
informalities in any proposal, to
accept and/or reject any or all pro-
posals, and to accept the bid that
in their judgment will be in the best
interest of Liberty County.

If you have any questions, please
call Philip Jones at (850) 227-
7200. 5-27 &6-3


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR LIBERTY COUNTY
CIVIL DIVISION

CASE NO. 08-166-CA

TAYLOR, BEAN & WHITAKER
MORTGAGE CORP.,
Plaintiff,

vs.

TARA A. NICHOLS; UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF TARA A. NICHOLS;
JOSEPH NICHOLS; UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF JOSEPH NICH-
OLS; IF LIVING, INCLUDING
ANY UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
SAID DEFENDANTSS, IF RE-
MARRIED, AND IF DECEASED,


THE RESPECTIVE UNKNOWN
HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANT-
EES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS,
LIENORS; AND TRUSTEES, AND
ALL OTHER PERSONS CLAIM-
ING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR
AGAINST THE NAMED DEFEN-
DANT (S); UNKNOWN TENANT
#1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2;
Defendant(s)
/

NOTICE OF SALE

Notice is hereby given that, pur-
suant to a Final Summary Judge-
ment of Foreclosure entered in the
above-styled cause, in the Circuit
Court of Liberty County, Florida,
I will sell the property situated in
Liberty County, Florida, described
as:

COMMENCE AT THE NORTH-
WEST CORNER OF SECTION 3
TOWNSHIP 1 SOUTH. RANGE
7 WEST, LIBERTY COUN-
TY, FLORIDA; THENCE RUN
SOUTH 660.00 FEET; THENCE
RUN EAST 210.00 FEET OR
TO THE CENTER OF CCC OR
FOREST ROAD TO THE POINT
OF BEGINNING; THENCE RUN
NORTH 210.00 FEET; THENCE
RUN EAST 210.00 FEET;
THENCE RUN SOUTH 210.00
FEET; THENCE RUN WEST
210.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING, SAID PROPERTY
SITUATE, LYING AND-BEING
IN SECTION 3, TOWNSHIP 1
SOUTH RANGE 7 WEST, LIB-
ERTY COUNTY, FLORIDA.
A/K/A
13146 Turkey Creek Road
Bristol, FL 32321

at public sale, to the highest and
best bidder, for cash, at-the front
door of the Liberty County Court-
house, Bristol, Florida at 11:00
a.m., on June 23, 2009.

DATED THIS 14 DAY OF MAY,
2009.

Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any,
other than the property owner as
of the date of the lis pendens,
must file a claim within 60 days
after the sale.

Witness, my hand and seal of this
court on the 14 day of May, 2009.

ROBERT HILL
CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT

VANELL SUMMERS
Deputy Clerk

THIS INSTRUMENT PREPARED
BY:
Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra
9204 King Palm Drive
Tampa, FL 33619-1328
Phone: 813-915-8660
Attorneys for the Plaintiff

In accordance with the'American
with Disabilities Act of 1990, per-
sons needing a special accom-
modation to participate in this pro-
ceeding should contact the ASA
Coordinator no later than seven
(7) days prior to the proceed-
ings. If hearing impaired, please
call (800)955-8771 (TDD) or (800)
955-8770 (voice), via Florida Re-
lay Service. 5-27 &~


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR
LIBERTY COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO: 2008-CA-000137

EMC MORTGAGE CORPORA-
TION
PLAINTIFF

VS.

RICHARD M. DAVIS; SHERRY
N. DAVIS; ANY AND ALL UN-
KNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING
BY THROUGH, UNDER, AND
AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED
INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS)
WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO
.BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETH-
ER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES
MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS
SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES OR OTHER CLAIM-
ANTS; JOHN DOE AND JANE
DOE AS UNKNOWN TENANTS
IN POSSESSION.
DEFENDANTS)

NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to a Summary Final Judge-
ment of Foreclosure dated May
14, 2009 entered in Civil Case No.
2008-CA-000137 of the Circuit
Court of the 2ND Judicial Circuit
in and for LIBERTY County, Bris-
tol, Florida, I will sell to the highest
and best bidder for cash at THE
FRONT DOOR OF THE COURT-
HOUSE at the LIBERTY County
Courthouse located at HIGHWAY
20 in Bristol, Florida, at 11:00 a.m.
on the 16th day of June, 2009 the
following described property as
set forth in said Summary Final
Judgement, to-wit:

LAND SITUATED IN THE COUN-
TY OF LIBERTY.IN THE STATE
OF FL


COMMENCE AT AN EXISTING
CONCRETEMONUMENTMARK-
ING THE NORTHEAST CORNER
OF THE SE 1/4 OF THE NE 1/4
OF SECTION 3, TOWNSHIP 1
SOUTH, RANGE 7 WEST, LIBER-
TY COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE
SOUTH 89 DEGREES 38 MIN-
UTES 52 SECONDS WEST, A
DISTANCE OF 1,729.98 FEET
TO AN EXISTING IRON PIPE,
THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES
58 MINUTES 31 SECONDS
WEST, A DISTANCE OF 263.88
FEET, TO A CONCRETE MONU-
MENT, THENCE SOUTH 00 DE-
GREES 05 MINUTES 58 SEC-
ONDS EAST; A DISTANCE OF
904.52 FEET TO A CONCRETE
MONUMENT, THENCE SOUTH
57 DEGREES 27 MINUTES 02
SECONDS EAST, A DISTANCE
OF 395.73 FEET, TO A POINT OF
CENTERLINE OF STATE ROAD
NO. 20 (SAID POINT BEING .ON
A PROJECTION OF THE WEST-
ERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF THE.
WHITE SPRINGS ROAD PRO-
JECTED NORTHERLY TO THE
CENTERLINE OF SAID STATE
ROAD NO. 20),THENCE SOUTH
16 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 00
SECONDS WEST, ALONG .THE
WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF
THE WHITE SPRINGS ROAD, A
DISTANCE OF 316.00 FEET TO
A CONCRETE MONUMENT SET


ON THE WESTERLY RIGHT OF
WAY OF SAID ROAD, AND CALL
THISTHEPOINTOFBEGINNING,
THENCE CONTINUE SOUTH
16 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 00
SECONDS WEST ALONG THE
WESTERLY RIGHTOF WAY SAID
ROAD, A DISTANCE OF 150.00
FEET, TO A CONCRETE MONU-
MENT, THENCE NORTH 66 DE-
GREES 51 MINUTES 54 SEC-
ONDS WEST, A DISTANCE OF
150.00 FEET TO A CONCRETE
MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH
16 DEGREES 24 MINUTES..00.
SECONDS EAST, A DISTANCE
OF 150.00 FEET TO A CON-
CRETE MONUMENT, THENCE
SOUTH 66 DEGREES 51 MIN-
UTES 54 SECONDS EAST, ADIS-
TANCE OF 150.00 FEET, TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING. THIS
PARCEL IS LOCATED IN THE E
1/2 OF SECTION 3, TOWNSHIP
1 SOUTH, RANGE 7 WEST, LIB-
ERTY COUNTY, FLORIDA.

Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale. if any.
other than the property owner as
of the date of the lis pendens.
must file a claim within 60 days
after the sale.

Dated this 14th day of May, 2009.

Robert Hill,
Clerk of the Circuit Court

Vanell Summers,
Deputy Clerk

THE LAW OFFICES OF DAVID
J. STERN, P.A., ATTORNEY FOR
PLAINTIFF
900 South Pine Island Road Suite
400
Plantation, FL 33324-3920
(954)233-8000
08-93276EMC

IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE
AMERICANS WITH DISABILI-
TIES ACT, persons with disabilities
needing a special accommodation
should contact COURT ADMINIS-
TRATION, at the LIBERTY Coun-
ty Courthouse at 850-643-2215,
1-800-955-8771 (TDD) or 1-800-
955-8770, via Florida Relay Ser-
vice. 5-276-3-09


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR LIBERTY COUNTY
CIVIL DIVISION

CASE NO. 2009-CA-27

TAYLOR, BEAN & WHITAKER.
MORTGAGE CORP.,
Plaintiff,

vs.


CHARLES W. PIERCY; THE UN-
KNOWN SPOUSE OF CHARLES
W. PIERCY; BARBARA LYNN
PIERCY; IF LIVING, INCLUDING
ANY UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
SAID DEFENDANTSS, IF RE-
MARRIED, AND IF DECEASED,
THE RESPECTIVE UNKNOWN
HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANT-
EES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS,
LIENORS, AND TRUSTEES,
AND ALL OTHER PERSONS
CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UN-
DER OR AGAINST THE NAMED
DEFENDANTSS; STAGE FUND-
ING ASSISTANCE CORPORA-


TION; WHETHER DISSOLVED
OR PRESENTLY EXISTING,
TOGETHER WITH ANY GRANT-
EES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS,
LIENORS, OR TRUSTEES OF
SAID DEFENDANTS) AND ALL
OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING
BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR
AGAINST DEFENDANTS) AND
ALL OTHER PERSONS CLAIM-
ING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR
AGAINST DEFENDANTSS; UN-
KNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN
TENANT #2;
Defendant(s)
/


NOTICE OF SALE


Notice is hereby given that, pur-
suant to a Final Summary Judge-
ment of Foreclosure entered in the
above-styled cause, in the Circuit
Court of Liberty County, Florida,
I will sell the property situated in
Liberty County, Florida, described
as:

A PARCEL OR TRACT OF LAND
LYING IN THE NORTHWEST 1/4
OF SECTION 13, TOWNSHIP 1
SOUTH, RANGE 6 WEST, LIB-
ERTY COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND
BEING. MORE PARTICULARLY
DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:
COMMENCE AT A ST. JOE PA-
PER COMPANY CONCRETE
MONUMENT KNOWN AS MARK-
ING THE NORTHWEST CORNER
OF EAST 1/2 OF THE NORTH-
WEST 1/4 OF THE NORTHWEST
1/4 OF SECTION 13 AND RUN
NORTH 89 DEGREES 12'49'
EAST ALONG THE NORTHERN
BOUNDARY OF SAID NORTH-
WEST 1/4 A DISTANCE OF
1145.49 FEET TO A CONCRETE
MONUMENT (PSM 3031) FOR
THE POINT OF BEGINNING.
FROM SAID POINT OF BEGIN-
NING THENCE CONTINUE
NORTH 89 DEGREES 12'49"
EAST ALONG SAID NORTHERN
BOUNDARY A DISTANCE OF
208.24 FEET TO A CONCRETE
MONUMENT (PSM 3031);
THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES
47'11" EAST 316.90 FEET TO A
CONCRETE MONUMENT (PSM
3031) ON THE RIGHT-OF-WAY
BOUNDARY OF A 60.00 FOOT
ROADWAY; THENCE NORTH 77
DEGREES 47'00" WEST ALONG
SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUND-
ARY A DISTANCE OF 213.72
FEET TO A CONCRETE MONU-
MENT (PSM 3031); THENCE
NORTH 00 DEGREES 47'11"
WEST 268.82 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING.
To include a:
2007 Fleetwood VIN GAF-
L707A56748ER21 98184149
2007 Fleetwood VIN GAFL-
707B56748ER21 98184341
A/K/A

15871 Ne State Road 65
Hosford, FL 32334

at public sale, to the highest and
best bidder, for cash, at the front
door of the Liberty county Court-
house, Bristol, Florida at 11:00
a.m., on June 23, 2009.

DATED THIS 14 DAY OF MAY,
2009.

Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any,
other than the property owner as
of the date of the lis pendens,
must file a clain within 60 days
after the sale.

Witness, my hand and seal of this
court on the 14 day of May, 2009.

Robert Hill
Clerk of the Circuit Court.

Vanell Summers
Deputy Clerk

.......... 'riII


MA TIC s


--









'JUNE 3,.2009 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 27


THIS INSTRUMENT PREPARED
BY:
Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra
9204 King Palm Drive
Tampa, FL 33619-1328
Phone: 813-915-8660
Attorneys for Plaintiff


Coordinator no later than seven
(7) days prior to the proceedings.
If hearing impaired, please call
(800)955-8771 (TDD) or (800)955-
8770 (voice), via Florida Relay
Service. 5-27 s 6-

NOTICE OF SITE
PLAN APPLICATION


Notice is hereby given that the
In accordance with the American Bristol City Council of Bristol, Lib-
with Disabilities Act of 1990, per- .erty County, Florida proposes to
sons needing a special accom- accept a site plan application and
modation to participate in this pro- grant use of property for the fol-
ceeding should contact the ASA lowing:.


A SITE PLAN APPLICATION
PROPOSING TO BUILD AN
EMERGENCY OPERATION
CENTER LOCATED AT 10979
NW SPRING STREET, WHICH
IS LOCATED ON THE NORTH
SIDE OF SR 20, JUST EAST OF
SOLOMON STREET, LYING IN
SECTION 31, TOWNSHIP 1N,
RANGE 7W, BRISTOL, LIBERTY
COUNTY, FLORIDA, WHICH IS
CURRENTLY ZONED TOWN
CENTER AND REQUIRES NO
CHANGE IN ZONING, AND IS IN
COMPLIANCE WITH THE CITY


OF BRISTOL COMPREHENSIVE
PLAN AND FUTURE LAND USE
MAP;

A public hearing on the proposed
site plan application will be held
on Monday, June 8, 2009 at 6:30
p.m. ET at Bristol City Hall located
at 12444 NW Virginia G. Weaver
Street, Bristol, Florida 32321.

All interested persons are invited
to attend. In accordance with the
Americans with Disabilities Act,
persons needing special accom-
modations or an interpreter to' par-


ticipate in the proceeding should
contact the City Clerk's office at
(850) 643-2261 at least five days
prior to the date of the hearing.

Dated this 3rd day of June, 2009.

CITY OF BRISTOL, FLORIDA

BRIGHAM S. SHULER,
CHAIRMAN


ROBIN M: HATCHER,
CITY CLERK


6-3-09


NOTICE OF
VOTE IN QUESTION
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:,
WILLIAM L. OWENS
Last known address of:
18634 NW STATE ROAD 12
BRISTOL, FL 32321
You are hereby notified that your eligibility
to vote is in question. You are required
to contact the Supervisor of Elections, in
Bristol, Florida, no laterthanthirty (30) days
after the date of this publishing. Failure
to respond will result in a determination
of ineligibility by the Supervisor and your
name will be removed from the statewide
voter registration system.
Published onetime in the Calhoun-Liberty
Journal 06-03-09
Marcia A. Wood
Liberty County Supervisor of Elections
P.O. Box 597, Bristol, FL 32321
Dated May 29, 2009 6-3-09


g Pine beetle

3 prevention

sign-up time
S TALLAHASSEE -- FL Agri-
culture and Consumer Services
S.Commissioner Charles H. Bron-
son announced that the depart-
S .ment's Division of Forestry is re-
offering the Southern Pine Beetle
Prevention Cost-Share Program
to eligible non-industrial private
forest landowners.
The sign-up period will run
from July 1 through August 12.
SThe goal of the program is to
minimize southern pine beetle
damage in Florida.
Periodic southern pine beetle
outbreaks in FL have resulted
in millions of cubic feet of pine
timber killed on thousands of
acres. The program offers par-
tial cost reimbursement-forpre-
commercial thinning, prescribed
r burning, planting longleaf pine,
and mechanical underbrush treat-
ments, and an incentive payment
for landowners who conduct a
first pulpwood thinning.
:- The program is limited to 44
northern Florida counties located
Within the range of the southern
h pine beetle. Qualified landown-
ers may apply for no more than
two approved practices per year.
Application forms and more
S information on program require-
ments and procedures can be
obtained from a local Division
of Forestry office or visit www.
fl-dof.com to obtain application
materials and contact informa-
tion for county forester offices.
All qualifying applications re-
Sceived during the signup period
will be evaluated and ranked for
funding approval. The program
is supported through temporary
grants from the USDA Forest
S Service and limited funding is
available.


C NW ON, j






Page 28 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JUNE 3,2009


SA CCOL


LEFT: Tony Golden receives the Altha Farmer's Co-op Scholarship from Arthur Faurot. CENTER: Margie Mason presents Brittany Stephens
with a Rotary Scholarship. RIGHT: Assistant Superintendent Vicki Davis presents the Gulf Coast Electric Co-op Scholarship to Kayla Yon.




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