Group Title: Calhoun-Liberty Journal (Bristol, Fla.).
Title: The Calhoun-Liberty journal
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00027796/00118
 Material Information
Title: The Calhoun-Liberty journal
Alternate Title: Calhoun Liberty journal
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Calhoun-Liberty Journal
Publisher: Liberty Journal, Inc.
Liberty Journal
Place of Publication: Bristol, Fla
Publication Date: September 24, 2008
Copyright Date: 2008
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Bristol (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Liberty County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Calhoun County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Liberty -- Bristol
Coordinates: 30.426944 x -84.979167 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in Sept. 1991.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 11, no. 38 (Sept. 18, 1991).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00027796
Volume ID: VID00118
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AKN4565
oclc - 33425067
alephbibnum - 002046630
electronic_aleph - 003298625
electronic_oclc - 60662266
lccn - sn 95047245
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly journal (Bristol, Fla.)

Full Text
Univ of Florida History Library
PO Box 117007
Galnesville F 32611


Calhoun man


charged with

sexual solicitation

of minor through

MySpace page
by Teresa Eubanks, Journal Editor
The discovery of graphic email exchanges sent
to a 15-year-old Bay County boy led to the arrest
Monday of Wayne J. Faircloth, 22, of Blountstown,
for solicitation of a minor for sexual activity,
according to a news release from the Bay County
Sheriff's Office.
The sheriff's office said the victim's mother
found sexual messages, including pornographic
photos pirated from Web sites, on her teenage son's
MySpace page that were sent by Faircloth.
The emails included
solicitations to commit
sexual acts as well
i % as recluests to meet.
Bay County Sgt. Marc
Tochterman said Faircloth
and the juvenile never
met..
Faircloth is charged with
AW one count of solicitation of
Wayne J. Faircloth a minor for sexual activity
via the internet and three
counts of transmission of harmful materials to a
minor via an electronic device.
Following his arrest in Panama City, Faircloth
was booked into the Bay County Jail and scheduled
for first appearance Tuesday.
"Even with the proactive law enforcement
approach to these investigations, it is imperative
that parents check their child's internet activities and
know who they are communicating with," said Bay
County SheriffFrank McKeithen. "This case is proof
that a proactive parent can assist.law enforcement in
stopping this type of child exploitation."


to-/Me


Liberty County's
Hester Gary
Rankin Sr. was
one of the first
Navy SEALs

PAGE 11 1


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S2 11/6/2009
1846


THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY




JOURNAL


- Volume 28,


Number 39 Wednesday, Sept. 24, 2008 -


EMERGENCY TRAINING Rock Bluff Firefighter Bill Anderson looks on as
another firefighter practices his technique cutting into a vehicle with the
Jaws of Life rescue equipment during a training session Saturday in Bristol.
The weekend class topped off 160 hours of training for several Liberty
County volunteer firefighters working toward certification.



One charged after metal stolen


from Bristol is sold to recycler

by Teresa Eubanks, Journal Editor and George Long, who brought the items in a green
A21-year-old Bristol resident was arrested on grand mini-van. He said Smith signed a receipt for $93.40
eft and trespassing charges after deputies discovered after selling theproperty for scrap metal.
at he had sold three stolen items to a metal recycler During an inter iew\ with deputies. Smith confessed
Blountstown to taking the engine block from Rock BluffRoad and
Deputies identified a vice stand and propane stated that he \\ent under the fence at the stake yard
lender that had been taken from Whitfield Stake to take the other items.
ard in Bristol. Also recovered was a Chevrolet 305 Smith said some school age kids in a neighboring
Igine block which was stolen from a residence on trailer park helped him load up the items.
ock Bluff Road. He said that Long, who rode with him to the
Recycling dealer David Kyle told officers he recycling yard on Sept. 5, did not know the the
membered two people, identified as Daniel Smith property had been stolen.


Hosford land designated as Century Pioneer Family Farm


Florida Agriculture and Consumer
Services Commissioner Charles H.
Bronson announced that three North
Florida properties have qualified for
recognition as Century Pioneer Family
Farms. Recognition in this program
means the families have maintained
continuous ownership of the property
for at least 100 years.
The families who qualified are
Duncan Hosford and Kenneth Hosford
in Liberty County and James Tyrus Peel
in Washington County.
"These families have been able to
retain ownership oftheirlandthrough the


Great Depression,
diseases, droughts,
freezes and the
urbanization of
Florida," Bronson
said. "That is a
great tribute to the
many generations of
these families."
The Peel property
in Washington
County is currently
in timber and cattle


"These families have been
able to retain ownership of
their land through the Great
Depression, diseases, droughts,-
freezes and the urbanization
ofFlorida," Commissioner
Charles H. Bronson said.
"That is a great tribute to
the many generations of
these families "


production and has been used for row
crop production in the past, including


watermelons.
The Hosford
properties include
400 acres owned
by Duncan Hosford,
and 300 acres
owned by Kenneth
Hosford. The
Hosford properties
are used for
perennial peanut,
corn and pine tree
production as well


as livestock such as cattle and swine.
Kenneth Hosford has also been a


Liberty County Judge for 12 years.
Since the program began 25
years ago, 149 family farms have
received the Century Pioneer Family
Farm designation. The program is
administered by the Florida Department
of Agriculture and Consumer
Services.
For more information or to apply for
membership, contact Richard Gunnels
at gunnelr@doacs.state.fl.us, call (850)
488-3022, or visit the Century Pioneer
Family Farm Web site at http://www.
florida-agriculture.com/marketing/
centurypioneers.htm.


1111d1UIIIIII Sheriff's Log...2 Community Calendar...4 Commentary...6, 7 News from the Pews...10 Farmer's Almanac...11
71812 090 8 Birthdays...12 SPEAK UP! Bristol's 'Road to Nowhere', more letters...14 & 15 Obituaries...24 Classifeds...26 & 27


u
F.
-. -~
'";" .


.. .







Page. 2 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBERB4; 2008


Man charged with theft of scrap metal


A man was arrested Thursday
andcharged with stealing scrap
metal said to be worth $6,000 from
his girlfriend's father, according
to a report from the Calhoun
County Sheriff's Office.
Jim Parker told investigators
that a large quantity of scrap
metal was missing from his shed,
which is located near the SW Jack
Lake Road residence his daughter
shares with Joshua Savell.
The items Parker reported
missing included a culvert,
6,500-lb. torsion axles with hub

Blountstown man
arrested for selling
real & fake cocaine
A Blountstown man was
charged with sale ofcrack cocaine
within 1,000 feet of a school
following an exchange that was
monitored by deputies on June
25, according to a report from
the Calhoun County Sheriff's
Office..
Eric Raphael Padilla, 33, was
taken into custody Sept. 15,
nearly three months after he
allegedly handed over crack
cocaine in exchange for $40 in
marked bills froli a confidential
source near the apartments at
Canal Lane in Blountstown.
Following the transaction,
Sgt. Mark Mallory conducted
a chemical field test on the
substance purchased and got a
positive result for the presence
of cocaine.
Padilla was also charged with
two counts of sale of an imitation
controlled substance following
two other monitored transactions
with a confidential source at the
same location July 9.

Pair charged
after pot plant
found in home
An anonymous tip that led a
deputy to the Kinard home of
Gordon Hammond and Sandra
Adkison resulted in charges
against both after a one-foot tall
marijuana plant was found in
their living room, according to a
report from the Calhoun County
Sheriff's Office.
Hammond acknowledged that
he had the plant in the home when
Deputy Eddie Dalton came to his
door on Sept. 2.
After seeing the plant in the
living room, Mallory.searched .
the home and found several
marijuana leaves laid out to
dry some were left on top of a
computer and others were on a
plate in a closet. A metal can that
held approximately two grams of
marijuana, a marijuana grinder
and other paraphernalia including
seeds, papers, roach clips and a
pipe was confiscated after being
found on a coffee table.
Both were charged with
possession of less than 20 grams
of marijuana and manufacture
of marijuana. Adkison was also
charged with possession of drug
paraphernalia.


assemblies, four 16-inch tires and
wheels, a junk Toyota motor and
two 4x8 steel shafts.
During an interview Thursday
with Investigators Mark Mallory
and Michael Bryant, Jody Jessica
Parker Crisp, 24, said she was
aware that Savell-had taken a'
culvert from the field near the
shed.
The investigators received a
call that Parker had located Savell
on Hwy. 71. Parker stated that
Savell told him he had taken the
metal and sold it to Blountstown


ARREST

KtPOKIS
compiled by
Journal
Editor
Teresa
Eubanks


Father, son

charged with

burning tires
A Calhoun County father
and son were charged with
dumping litter for commercial
purposes and their case turned
over to the Florida Department
of Environmental Protection
(DEP) after a deputy responded
to a complaint about tires being
burned at Shelton Blvd. last
month.
When Deputy Bliss Moreau
reached the scene, he found a
fire ten to 12 feet in diameter
that contained the remains of
approximately 25 to 30 rims from
steel-belted radial tires.
A stack of 35 to 40 tires were
stacked nearby.
The deputy spoke with Thomas
Edward Davis, who stated that he
was burning the tires to salvage
the metal inside.
When Moreau told-him that
burning tires was in violation of
Florida Statute and that D.E.P.
would be contacted, Davis then
said his son, William Nile Davis,
was responsible for the blaze.
Information about the incident
was sent to the D.E.P. Charges
against the two were filed Sept.


scrap dealer David Kyle.
An employee at the scrap
dealer's recalled buying items
from Savell that Parker said had
been stolen. He turned over six
receipts, which showed Savell
had received a total of $734.80
on Sept. 9, 13, 16 and 17.
Because it had already been
cut up and sold, none of the stolen
property could be recovered.
Savell was charged with
burglary of a structure, grand theft
and dealing in stolen property.

Woman admits
to stealing and
using credit card
A Sneads woman was arrested
Sept. 9 on charges of burglary
of a conveyance and.fraudulent
use of a credit card after she was
identified on two store security
videos as using a stolen credit
card, according to a report fom
the Liberty County Sheriff's
Department.
During an interview with
investigators on Aug. 29, Candis
Caroline Shuler confessed that on
the morning of Aug. 7 she took
two credit cards from a purse that
had been left on the passenger's
seat of a 2006 Pontiac Grand Prix
parked at the home of Robin and
Amanda Myers.
The bank card had been used
at the Exxon in Bristol around 4
a.m. on Aug. 7, as well as at the
T.A. Travel Center and Walmart
in Marianna.
When deputies reviewed
video from the Bristol store and
Walmart, they recognizedShuler.
A store clerk later picked out
Shuler in a photo lineup as the
person who used Myers' debit
card to purchase $53 in fuel.
Shuler admitted that she bought
fuel in Bristol before driving to
the Marianna Walmart, where
she spent $222.64 on cosmetics
and other items. She returned to
the store minutes later to make an
additional purchase for $19.35.
She stated that she forged the
name of the cardholder, Amanda
Myers, on the electronic signature
pad at Walmart. She said she
then went to the TA Travel Store,
where she charged $21.90 in fuel
on one of the stolen cards.
She said she threw the cards
out of the window of her car as
she drove home to Sneads.


Woman charged with theft of rifle
A Calhoun County woman is charged with armed burglary, grand
theft of a firearm and dealing in stolen property after she reportedly
took a gun from the home of her brother and sister-in-law.
Jody Parker Crisp was arrested Sept. 18, following an investigation
at the County Road 275 residence of Jake and Marianne Parker.
On Sept. 17, the couple reported that a Remington .306 semi-
automatic rifle was taken from a wooden chest in their home.
After investigators found a pawn ticket for the rifle, the Parkers
went to a Blountstown business where they identified their gun and
paid $90.60 to get it out of pawn.
Crisp, who lives on the same property, told investigators she had
pawned a rifle in July but said she did not steal the gun from her
brother. She did riot explain how she came into possession of the
Remington.
She denied taking anything else from the home although her brother
later discovered he was missing a McPherson Bow and accessories.


CAL HON'N COUNTY T
Sept. 15
*Eric Raphael Padilla, sale of an irmitati'n con-
trolled substance (2 times), sale of cocaine within
1,000 ft. of school.
*Julian Wayne Roberts, grand theft, dealing in
stolen property.
Sept. 16
*Gordon Franklin Hammond, possession less
than 20 grams marijuana, manufacture of mari-
juana.
*Joseph Ramanda Jones, aggravated assault
on law enforcement officer, aggravated fleeing
and eluding, sale of cocaine within 1,000 ft. of
school.
Sept. 17
Christopher Michael Hyatt, failure to appear,
VOCR.
*Kayla Christine Williams, failure to appear
(worthless checks).
Sept. 18
*Ernest Daniel Smith; dealing in stolen prop-
erty.
*Jody Parker Crisp, armed burglary, grand theft
of a firearm, dealing in stolen property.
*Joshua Allen Savell, grand theft, burglary of
structure, dealing in stolen property.
Sept. 19
*Amanda Suzanne Thomas, failure to appear
(2 times).
Sept. 21
*Sandra Finch Adkinson, possession less than
20 grams, manufacture of marijuana, possession
of drug paraphernalia..


LIBERTY COUNTY
Sept. 15
*Ruby Lee Jones, holding for CCSO.
*Donna Jean Jacobs, county VOP
Sept. 18
*Austin Lee Scott, state VOP
*Jody Parker Crisp, holding for CCSO.
Sept. 19
*Amanda Thomas, holding for CCSO.
*Curtis Lee Harris, driving under the influence,
driving while license suspended or revoked with
knowledge.
Sept. 21
*Jody Sellers, domestic battery.

Listingsincludenamefollowedbychargeandidentficationofarestingagency.Thenamesaboverepresent
those charged. We remind our readers that all are presumed innocent until proven guilty

Blountstown Police Dept.
Sept. 15 through Sept. 21, 2008
Citations issued:
Accidents...............02 Traffic Citations..................01
Special details (business escorts, traffic details)......77
Business alarms.....02 Residential alarms..........00
Complaints.................... 137





Roundman's


-hursday Night Special


8:30 p.m. 12:30

Draft Beer


$1


$5 per person
i b "18 to enter 21 to drink
Back at Roud Must show ID!!!!!!
Back at Roundman's
Brad, Randy, Stric and Tony
Located 5 miles north of Blountstown on Hwy. 69


7
Featuring
The Last Ride
m~;u -s;;--~tfL








SEPTEMBER 24, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 3



Hair Design

A nycrne/ c 3
LaQ/a2enMake


H~jcyior aF Tanning

orc'K Perms
new styl&
o ai Foils



LAUREN'GRA;NT~M
For appointments, call 643-4247 (Hair)
Located on State Road 20 in Bristol
^ *^


Two North Florida gang members

convicted for criminal racketeering


TALLAHASSEE -Attorney
General Bill McCollum
announced Tuesday that two
members of a violent "hybrid"
gang in Gadsden County have
been convicted by an Orange
County jury on criminal charges
of racketeering and conspiracy
to commit racketeering. The two
men are among seven who were
arrested earlier this year during
a coordinated operation by the
Attorney General's Office of
Statewide Prosecution, the Florida
Department ofLaw Enforcement,
the Gadsden County Sheriff's
Office, and the State Attorney's
Office for the Second Judicial


owWo Prime
OW as low as

On a Home Equity
Line of Credit*

......M---


Current monthly payment:
Credit Card: $217
Credit Card 2: $188
CreditCard3: $157
Auto Loan: $364
Total: $926


One new single payment:
Credit Card: 0
Credit Card 2: 0
-Credit Card 3: 0
Auto Loan: 0
Home Equity Payment: $525


[This example is based on an equity line of $35,000 with an APR of 5.00% and a monthly payment of 1.5% of the
outstanding balance.]



If you want to put more money into your pocket every month, now's the time to get
a Superior Home Equity Line. You can consolidate bills, renovate your home, or take
a vacation anything you want. Best of all, we make it easy with no closing costs,
no application fees and.the interest may be tax deductible.** Simply call or visit one
of our friendly offices today,


Alta / 25463 North Main St / 850-762-3417
$I.PEgf R IOR Blountstown / 20455 West Central Ave. / 850-674-5900
$UPERIORBA K ,""'"s .m'"'"
71I Bristol /10956 NW State Road 20 / 850-643-2221
Local. Friendly. Superior. Marianna / 2260 Hwy 71 / 850-482-4029

www.superiorbank.com I Member FDIC


*TheWa Street Journal Prn Rate is the base rate on corporate loans posted by at feast 75% of the nations 30 largs banks. The Wall StreetJournal Prime Rate i subject to change.
APR stands for Annual Percentage Rate. "Superor lank pays customary closing costs up to $500 including: credit report, flood certification, collateral valuation, properly report,
signing and recording services. Tobe gAible for $500wavaier ofcosing costs. you musttake an nitialadraw of $10,000 or 100%ofthe ineofcredit. Customary closing costs donot
Include wire fees. tte insurance premiums, or appraisal fees, i applicable. You must pay any difference between actual closing costs and costs paid by Superior Bank. Typical closing
costs on an Equity Une of Credrt range between $0 and $1,500. You also pay stale taxes i aplicable. Offer limited to owner-occupied, pnmary residences in Alabama and Floida
(manufactured homes ar ineigible) with combined loanito val (including the amount of your new line) of less than 85% based on property Inspection or appraisal saisactory to
Superior Bank. Superior Bank must have a first or second les position in your primary single.famlly residence at closing Superior Bank may require a title and a food insrancn policy,
and you must pride evidence of hazard Insurance coverage In an a amomit acceptable to Superior Bank which is a least equal to the Insser of 100% of thie tiplauement guaranteed
coverage or the amount of this line plus anynlher outstanding lines or mlon an property. Consult a tax advisor to delermine lax-deductiblty of interest


Seven members

of violent 'hybrid'

gang in Gadsden

County charged

with criminal

racketeering
Circuit. All seven were prosecuted
by the Attorney General's Office
of Statewide Prosecution.
"As this case exemplifies,
gangs pose a serious threat to
every part of our state large
cities and smaller communities
alike," said Attorney General
McCollum. "Only through
statewide cooperation are we
able to reclaim our state from
these dangerous criminals."
The jury returned guilty
verdicts against Terrance Shorter,
28, for racketeering, conspiracy
to commit racketeering, and
conspiracy to traffic in cocaine,
400 grams or more; and Daltonica
Shorter, 33, for racketeering
and conspiracy to commit
racketeering. Codefendant Aaron
Thomas, 29, will be retried at
a later date. Charges against
Quintarius Shorter, 25; Gabriel
James, 26; Ladipo Chad Bethea,
33; and Laterrance Parks, 27, are
still pending. Gabriel James is
also facing separate first-degree
murder charges in Gadsden

Four complaint

price-gouging i
TALLAHASSEE, As of
9:45 a.m. Tuesday, the Attorney
General's' Office has referred
3,064 complaints about gasoline
price gouging to the Economic
Crimes Division for review.
Tuesday's numbers showed
that four complaints had been
filed about Liberty County busi-
nesses. No price-gouging com-
plaints were reported for Cal-
houn County.
# COUNTY
18 Alachua
1 Baker
71 Bay
65 Brevard
85 Broward
19 Charlotte
52 Citrus
40 Clay
24 Collier
4 Columbia
84 Dade
10 Dixie
285 Duval
49 Escambia
8 Flagler
1 Franklin
64 Gadsden
2 Gilchrist
1 Gulf
1 Hamilton
2 Hardee
4 Hendry
37 Hernando
118 Highlands


County.
STerrance Shorter faces up to
90 years in prison and Daltonica
Shorter faces up to 60 years in
prison when they are sentenced in
October. The case was prosecuted
in the Ninth Judicial Circuit
because some of the narcotics-
related charges were related
to criminal activity in Orange
County.
The gang had been classified
by investigators as a "hybrid
gang," one which operates locally
without national ties. Hybrid
gang members rarely exhibit the
traditional gang signs and colors,
but are often just as dangerous
if not more destructive than
traditional gangs and hold smaller
communities hostage under their
violent and terrifying influence.
The arrests marked the end
of a lengthy investigation into
a series of murders in Gadsden
County. During the course of the
murder investigations, evidence
of numerous other crimes, such
as home invasion robberies, drug
trafficking and various other
violent crimes, was-developed
and led to the indictments. The
investigation identified the alleged
gang members as individuals
connected towidespread criminal
activity including several murders,
statewide drug trafficking and
witnesses tampering. The 18th
Statewide Grand Jury issued
indictments for the men in
February.

:s about gas

n Liberty Co.
275 Hillsborough
2 -Holmes
34 Indian River
11 Jackson
1 Jefferson
15 Lake
45 Lee
179 Leon
10 Levy
4 Liberty
1 Madison
53 Manatee
99 Marion
17 Martin-
26 Monroe
45 Nassau
18 Okaloosa
8 Okeechobee
121 Orange
22 Osceola
117 Palm Beach
182 Pasco
170 Pinellas
114 Polk
7 Putnam
87 Saint Johns
129 Saint Lucie
16 Santa Rosa
42 Sarasota
27 Seminole
22 Sumter
3 Suwannee
77 Volusia
11 Wakulla
3 Walton
26 Washington
Total 3064







Page 4 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 24, 2008


River Valley Market

opens again Saturday

Oct. 4 in Blountstown
Blountstown NMain Street is pleased (
to announce the next opening date of
the downtown farmers market featuring
fresh produce, home baked items.
handmade crafts, and onginal artwork.
along w ith live entertainment.
The River Valley Marketplace is
open the first Saturday of every month
from 8 a.m. to noon. The next date for
the market is Saturday. Oct. 4. in the
greenspace next to Wakulla Bank.
The marketplace was a big hit when
it opened earlier this month. There
were a wide variety of booths, but
the crowd was asking for more fresh
produce. If you are a farmer or have a
garden and would like to make some
extra dollars, bring your goods to the
River Valley Marketplace.
Vendor spaces are completely free.
but there are some requirements:
Absolutely no flea markets or \ard
sales.
The vendor is responsible for all
their set up items such as tables, tents.
etc. There is no electricity. If you use<
a tent, it must be white or beige so we
can create a cohesive look.
Produce must be vendor grown
and sold.
No selling out of trucks; please set
up a nice presentation at your booth.
If you would like to be a vendor. you
must register in advance. Again, there
is no fee, but you must apply. Contact
Kelli at 899-0500. (

Bank account opened

to benefit Christan Hupp (
Christan Scott Hupp is the 3 ear old
son of. David and Amanda Bodiford (
Hupp ofAltha. Christan \vas kicked by
a horse on Sept. 16. He is at Tallahassee
Memorial Hospital and will not get to
come home for a little while. It \\ill be
a whilee before his mom can go back
to work.
Anyone \wshing to help Christan and
his family during this time can make
donations at Superior Bank under (
the Christan Hupp Fund account
# 7000204581. (
There are donation cans at Altha
Farmers Co-Op. Altha Church of God. (
Smiths Grocery, Altha Town Hall.
Dr. Cobbs Dental Office. The Quick (
Pick, Studio 20. Kyle's Recycling and
Stephens CheTon.


CALENDAR LISTING -Jjust call Ine person's
name and date to be listed on our weekly com-
munity calendar There is no charge. Callers
are asked to give their own name and phone
number in case we need to verity a spelling
or double-check the date. We encourage our
readers to compile a list of their family's and
friends' brthdays, printed clearly, and mail or
fax them to us at The Journal.
The Calhoun-Liberty Journal is
published each Wednesday
by the Liberty Journal Inc.,
Summers Road, P.O. Box 536,
Bristol, FL 32321.
Annual subscriptions are $18.
Periodicals postage paid at Bristol, FL .
POSTMASTER: Send address corrections
to: P.O. Box 536, Bristol, FL 32321.


ALENDAR


(
(

(


THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL
Located at 11493 NW Summers Road in Bristol
MAILING ADDRESS: P.O. Box 536, Bristol, FL 32321 V
TELEPHONE (850) 643-3333 Fax (850) 643-3334 ,j
EMAIL: thejournal@fairpoint.net (USPS 012367)
ADS: cljads@fairpoint.net Summers Road


Carr-Clarksville VFD


BIRTHDAYS
'Baan Williii S
TODAY'S MEETINGS
* Rotary Club, noon, Calhoun-Liberty Hospilal
* Weight Loss Support Group. 1 30 p.m., Shelton Park Library
* AA, 7 p.m Calhoun County Old Ag Bldg east door, in front of jail


TODAY'S MEETINGS
* Congressman Allen Boyd's Rep.. 9:30 to 11 a.m. (CT), Calhoun County
Courthouse; & 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. (ET), Liberty County Courthouse
* AA. 7 p.m., basement of Calhoun County Counhouse
* VFW, 7:30 p.m., Veterans Memorial Park Civic Center


BIRTHDAYS: \V'l/ite'll 'hfI lIii
EVENTS

S 1 QCS Homecoming
Parade. 1:30 p.m.
wLCHS vs. Franklin (homeJ, 8 p.m.

-.LCS4 Class of 1998 Reunion
4 6 6:30 (ET) meet at El Jalisco

B-town Tigers vs. Florida High
Away at 6:30 p.m. (CT)
Dance, 6 12 p.m., American Legion Hall in Blountstown
TODAY'S MEETINGS
* Calhoun County Children's Coalition, 9 a.m., W. T. Neal Civic Center


ALTHA BIRTHDAYS
BOG-IN
Gates open at 3 LaTl/ app
Bog-in starts at 5 EVENTS
LCtHS Class of 1998 Reunion Continues
1 p.m.. Picnic at Veterans Memorial Park
a 7:30 p.m. boarding time For Lady Anderson Dinner Cruise

+ Peanut Boil
5:10 p.m. (CT) at Panhandle Pioneer Settlement
Dance. 6 12 p.m American Legion Hall in Blounlsitown

SUNDAY-SEPTEBER 2
AOr ol. ci, hCe;% oj A



BIRTHDAYS
Jimi 'Trtn 'Redidick
TODAY'S MEETINGS
* Walk-A-Weigh Program, 9 a.m.. Veterans Memorial Park Civic Center
* Altha Boy Scouts, 5:30 p.m., Allha Volunteer Fire Department
* AA, 6:30 p.m, Liberty Co. Courthouse Iwest side entrance)
* Bulldog Club, 7 p.m., LCHS field house


BIRTHDAYS
fBiraoii Ciorrelitet H ,1dIe IIn W'lliitr
TODAY'S MEETINGS
* AA, 6:30 p.m., Liberty Co. Courthouse (west side entrance)
* Boy Scout Troop 206, 7 p.m.. Veterans Memorial Park Civic Center


That's how many copies of
The Calhoun-Liberty Journal
were distributed last week,
ensuring plenty of coverage for
your community announcements
and great response for our
business advertisers!
JOURNAL STAFF
Johnny Eubanks................Publisher
Teresa Eubanks...................... Editor
Gina Brooks...................Bookkeeper
Missy Tanner................... Advertising
Angela Davis....Production Assistant
OFFICE HOURS: 9 a.m.- 6 p.m. M-F,
Saturday from 9 a.m. until 1 p.m.


r -I


SI: fundraiser set for

ct. 4 at Carr School
The annual Carr-Clarkssville
Volunteer Fire Department Fundraiser
will be held on Saturday. Oct. 4 at Carr
School. They will be serving good ole
Boston Burts and Chicken at 5:30 p.m.
(CTI in the cafetena. There will be live
entertainment and cake w alks under the
P.E. shelter along with demonstrations
by members of the fire department.
We ~\ill be hosting silent auctions
for several nice items so bring your.
checkbooks and wallets.
The dinner plates will cost $6
and whole Boston Butts will be sold
for $25. Tickets will be sold at the
door. So come on out and enjoy
visiting with your neighbors while
enjoying some delicious food and great
entertainment.
For more information please call
Chief Darryl O'Bryan at 762-4156
or Assistant Chief Randie Lykins at
674-8471.

Bluegrass Concert to

benefit Youth Ranches
Buddy Smith's annual Bluegrass
Concert benefiting the Florida Sheriff's
Youth Ranches is set for Saturda., Oct 18
at 6:30 p.m. at Blountstown High School.
The event will feature Blue Hollow,
Lisa Yon. and The Rivertown Girls.
Please show your support for our
Florida Sheriff's Youth Ranches by
buying \our tickets and attending this
great night of bluegrass gospel music
and fun!
Tickets are $8 in advance and S10
at the door. Children under the age of
8 \will be admitted free.
Advance tickets are on sale at
Hinson Insurance in Marianna and
Blount Insurance in Blountstown.
For further information, call 674-
5793.

Altha Bog-In set Sept. 27
The Town of Altha would like
to invite \ou to the Altha Bog-In
this Saturday. Sept. 27 at the Altha
Recreation Park. Gates open at 3:00 :
Bog-In Starts at 5:00!
For further info, please contact the
Altha Town Hall at 762-3280.


310







SEPTEMBER 24, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 5


Gulf/Franklin Sportsman's banquet set for Nov. 6


I (d ^ I
- --- -

LET'S TALK. ALLSTATE OFFERS ANNUITIES AND IRAS THAT CAN HELP
SUPPLEMENT YOUR RETIREMENT INCOME.


Jon Johnson LUTCF, CLTC
2867 Caledonia St
Marianna
850-526-2799


Allstate.
You've in good hands.


Allstate Life Insurance Company. Home Office. Northbrook. IL. Securities offered by Personal Financial
Representatives through Allstate Financial Services, LLC. Registered Broker-Dealer. Member NASD, SIPC. Main
Office; 2920 South 84i Street, Lincoln, NE 68506. 877-525-5727. 2004 Allstate Insurance Company.
5-28


That little hint of fall teasing
us early each morning these days
gives notice that one of area
sportsmen's most anticipated
events is soon to occur.
The date of the Annual Gulf/
Franklin Sportsman's Banquet has
been set for Thursday evening,
Nov. 6. Port St. Joe Lions Club
members are scurrying to make
this year's event bigger and better
than ever.
Attendees will once again
enjoy the natural beauty of the Box
R Ranch while socializing with


numerous area sportsmen, and
enjoying appetizers ofApalachicola
oysters, boiled shrimp and all the
trimmings beginning at 5:00 p.m.
The beverage bar will also open
at that time.
At 6:30 p.m., beneath a canopy
of live oaks and palms the serious
eating begins. Chef Charlie
Norton's "world famous, no-man-
left-hungry" ribeye steaks will
take up a goodly portion of the
dinner plate, leaving just enough
room for the salad, potato and
rolls. Don't forget to save room for
Paige's "almost equally famous"
banana pudding.
At 7:30, it's time to let a few
notches out of your belt and get
ready for the real excitement. Over.
$25,000 worth of contributions
and prizes will be distributed to
the guests through silent auctions,
public auctions, and raffles.
Hundreds of items will be offered,
including shotguns, hunting rifles,
offshore fishing trips, vacation
rentals on Cape San Blas and
Mexico Beach, rods and reels,


original art, prints, and numerous
other outdoor products.
Understanding that not every
attendee will have the same
affinity for outdoor products,
there will also be an array of items
specifically noted for the ladies'
auctions.
Tickets are $50 for individuals,
$80 for couples and $25 for
children. They can be purchased
at Preble-Rish and Hannon
Insurance in Port St. Joe and
all Apalachicola State Bank
locations and Carrabelle Chamber
of Commerce in Franklin County
and any Lions Club member.
Additional information or ticket
purchases can be made by calling
850-227-7200, 229-1133 or 653-
8805.
The real winners at this year's
banquet will be the beneficiaries
of the community service projects
supported by the Lions Club.
Nearly $20,000 was raised at
2007's banquet for community
service programs in Gulf arid
Franklin Counties.


Saturday, Sept* 17

starting at 1 p.m. and continuing until

everyone goes home!


SVInventory


S-> reduction items

FREE from all 3 stores.


HOTDOGS,
HAMBURGERS
AND DRINKS.
Come for lunch
and stay for
the party.
MOON WALK
FOR THE KIDS!


VL L D Aofl7LlK2f5


L JKLFL OL


pact' wllu MARKED DOWN!
,mpact will A.-,Ls I -


Holiday of Hope Marketplace
to be held Oct. 3-5 in Dothan
DOTHAN, AL- Take the stress out of the holiday season by getting
your shopping all wrapped up this fall. From October 3 5, the City of
Dothan will present the fourth annual Holiday of Hope Marketplace
benefiting Covenant Hospice. This shopping extravaganza takes place
at the Dothan Civic Center and offers an incredible selection of gifts
from around the country.
It begins with a spectacular evening previewparty onOct. 2 at 6:30
p.m. Guests can shop early in a relaxed atmosphere and enjoy hours
d'oeuvres, beverages, door prizes, a silent auction and entertainment
by the Ivey Brothers Band.
The shopping and fun continues with the three-day event that
features local and national vendors offering unique specialty items,
artisan jewelry, original artwork, children's items, women's apparel,
home accessories, holiday decorations, gourmet foods, fine crafts,
and a caf6 area featuring local restaurants.
Preview party tickets are $30 per person. General admission tickets
are $6 per day with children 8 and under free. Shopping hours are
Friday, October 3, 9 a.m. 7 p.m., Saturday, October 4, 9 a.m. 7
p.m., and Sunday, October 5, 12:30 p.m. 4 p.m. Tickets on sale
now at the Dothan Civic Center.
Call (334)794-7847, toll free to (877)244-7379 or visit www.
covenanthospice.org for details. Proceeds benefit Covenant Hospice,
a not-for-profit organization.



YOU fAre Invited?


Nick


Finchi
candidate for a
LIBERTY
COUNTY
SHERIFF
is hosting a

TOWN HALL MEETING
Thursday, Sept. 25 from 7 9 p.m.
at Veterans Memorial Civic Center
I -Hope to See you There,
Nick Finchl
Political advertisement paid for and approved by Nick Finch, Republican, for Sheriff


-..*- -

.... -- - -- -


0










5,


It


UUD LP -R








Page 6 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 24,2008


.......i "l D H





ARECAP OF RtCENT
OBSERV\AT-ONS BY LATE
oBSION HOSTS
NIGHT TELEIS'O i
ifis S ^ AERkk^S ^B^^^^^^ ^l B ,,: ": : ^ m I MM m MHR~ HI^HMHII R^^^i^ll^^H^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^


Experts say we're going through what's known as a
lock, stock and barrel financial phase. You know how
that works? People are locked out of their homes,
their stocks are worthless, and the oil companies
have us over a barrel.
-JAY LENO

You may already know, the government has bailed
two huge financial companies out, and they strongly
hinted that they would bail the rest of them out, at
taxpayers' expense. It's all part of a new approach
our leaders in the White House and Congress are
taking to the economy. It's called socialism.
JIMMY KIMMEL

Well, the Olive Garden and the Red Lobster
announced they are going to have to raise prices
to keep up with the economy. But things are okay.
Today, John McCain said unlimited bread sticks are
still fundamentally sound. JAY LENO

Somebody hacked into vice presidential candidate
Sarah Palin email account and posted it all online.
Apparently, the hacker was able to figure out her
password, which turned out to be bible-hockey-
lipstick-gun. JIMMY KIMMEL

Computer hackers have broken into Governor Sarah
Palin's private email account, and posted information
from it on a website. And of course, Senator McCain
is furious about this breach in security. But again, you
know, he's not that computer literate. Like when he
heard about the break-in, he ordered Secret Service
agents to guard her computer so this never happens
again. -JAY LENO

Everybody is trying to find out more about Sarah
Palin. Last week someone was able to hack into
Sarah Palin's Yahoo! email account because she
hadn't taken the proper security measures. So,
folks, it's official. No one in the Palin family uses
protection. CONAN O'BRIEN

Another day, another federal bailout. The Federal
Reserve has just loaned the AIG Insurance Company
$85 billion to keep it afloat. $85 billion...Let me ask
you, why are we bailing out an insurance company?
What's the first thing an insurance company does
when you have a loss? They cancel your policy,
right? That's what we should do, cancel their policy.
"Ooh, sorry, you're too much of risk." JAY LENO

Stock.prices are down, major companies are being
purchased by the government. It is a bear market
and, I have to say, Sarah Palin is just the lady to
shoot it for us. JIMMY KIMMEL

The John McCain campaign said that Sarah Palin will
not talk to the media, this is a quote, until reporters
can address her with respect and deference. Oh,
what is she running for, vice president or queen?
JAY LENO

A weird thing came out of the John McCain
campaign. An adviser to John McCain claimed that
McCain helped create the BlackBerry. Or, as McCain
calls it, "the fancy garage door opener."
CONAN O'BRIEN

Karl Rove said John McCain's attack ads have gone
too far. When Karl Rove says you've gone too far,
that's like Mel Gibson saying you've had too much to
drink. CRAIG FERGUSON


S .Copyrighted Material


'Syndicated Content,


Available from Commercial News Providers"



.a


Wall St. meltdown a test of capitalism


Capitalism is defined as an economic /
system based on the private ownership 0
of the means of production and distri-
bution of goods, characterized by a free Jerry ox is
Jerry Cpx is ,
competitive market and motivation by officer and write
profit. The Wall Street meltdown is a background i
test of capitalist theory. foreign policy is
Most people, particularly politicians, _Okaloosa Cou
believe that the market will solve all
problems. Tnist that the market will
provide the goods and services that people demand.
The theory of capitalism is good, but capitalistic mar-
kets don't operate in a vacuum. People are in charge of
the market. People make the decisions about supply and
demand for goods and services, and the fact that people
are in charge is the fault line of America's capitalist mar-
ket place.
Why can't people manage markets in the best interest
of all ofus? Well, the Seven Deadly Sins come to mind:
pride, avarice, lust, anger, gluttony, envy and sloth. Ava-
rice, another name for greed, is the culprit. People aren't
willing to be satisfied with a reasonable profit. People
lie, cheat and steal. They have to have it all.
The current Wall Street debacle isn't a new event. The
Savings and Loan Crisis in the late 1980s was a precur-
sor.. The value of properties such as office buildings were
puffed up, money was loaned, buildings couldn't be sold
or leased, cash flows dried up and the S&L industry
wound up with a lot of real estate. The government came
to the rescue, created the Resolution Trust Corporation
(RTC) to take over and sell off the real estate.
The current $700 billionWall Street crisis is far more
complicated and far more serious than the S&L crisis.
The reason is that the RTC was selling off real estate, but
the current crisis is about "paper," specifically financial
instruments like "credit default swaps."
A credit default swap is a form of insurance. One
party agrees to insure another party against any loss in-
curred when a third party defaults on a mortgage or other
financial obligations. The insurer was supposed to set
aside money to pay any obligations, but they didn'tset
aside a sufficient amount of money.
Complicated? You bet, but this program grew rapidly
to about $45 trillion in value. Well, guess what. This
scheme works as long as the cash flows, but when peo-
ple and companies began defaulting on their debt obliga-
tions the financial house of cards came tumbling down.
Because companies did not escrow sufficient funds to
cover their obligations the government is now picking
up the pieces. Picking up the tab is a better description.
An even better description is that the U.S. taxpayer is


\ picking up the tab.
IX'S The idea that this complicated is-
RN ER sue can be resolved over a weekend is
questionable at best. The two,political
a retired military
rwithanextensive parties are at odds about the degree
n domestic and of government regulation required to-
ssues. He lives in insure that America's financial infra-
nty. structure operates in the best interest
Sof the American people.
As usual, the Republicans want to
privatize any and everything. The Republicans deserve
most of the fault for this mess. Their idea that all we
have to do is deregulate financial institutions and every-
thing will be OK is ludicrous. The Democrats also have
mud on their boots because they are also responsible.
Robert Rubin, President Clinton's Secretary of Treasury
engineered the demise of the Glass-Steagall Act of 1933-
which created the Federal Deposit Insurance Corpora-
tion and prevented banks from engaging in investment
activities. The result was a merging of financial institu-
tions providing a buffet style of banking and investment
choices for the consumer.
Since the details of the bailout haven't been revealed,
it is difficult to determine home much of the $700 bil-
lion will be spent to cover losses and how much of the
money will be used in the form of guarantees for various
financial institutions until they are able to operate with
appropriate equity to debt ratios.
I work in the financial and real estate markets, and I
agree with the government bailing out Freddie Mac, Fan-
nie Mae and AIG. Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae are the
underpinnings of the secondary money market. Most of
the home and commercial mortgages are sold to these two
agencies. If the local bank can't sell off their mortgages
they use up their money supply and no more mortgages.
Because of their importance to the secondary money
market, I think that these two agencies should be govern-
ment agencies. If large commercial banks want to com-
pete with these two agencies in the purchase of mort-
gages that's OK, but the mortgage market is so crucial
to the economy of the U.S. there should be a couple of
well regulated agencies to buy the bulk of the mortgages
insuring liquidity in the mortgage market.
As to commercial banks, investment houses and other
financial organizations, I think that market force should
prevail. If they fail, so be it.
But as Americans, we need to get over the idea that
'the market should never be regulated. I have heard more
than one economics professor state that unfettered mar-
kets are dangerous. Wall Street has proven that to be
true.


a

is.







SEPTEMBER 24, 2006 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page7



f wft lnfglqlra


FE *. *


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- ~. -


wzs.1w4


'b ; Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers"

is II -


ILVJL1iJLi. Z -UU-.U U 1M U
Sby Douglas Cohn and Eleanor Clift

ECONOMICS 101
WASHINGTON Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., says the "funda-
mentals" of the U.S. economy are strong, which Sen. Barack Obama,
D-Ill., seized on as evidence that McCain is out of touch with the
economic worries of the American people. McCain amended his
statement to say that by fundamentals, he means U.S. workers, who
are the best in the world, known for hard work and innovation, and
Obama is insulting them by suggesting they are not strong. He wasn't
kidding when late last year he told the Boston Globe: "The issue of
economics is not something I've understood as well as I should."
This is what passes for campaign rhetoric on a day when work-
ers were seen carrying their belongings out of the fabled brokerage
house, Lehman Brothers, and the stock market tumbled 500.points,
the biggest single-day drop since the first day of trading after the
9/11 attacks. Once the presidential debates get underway, the two
candidates will be forced to move beyond one-liners to explain what
they would do as president to shepherd the country through what is
likely to be a long period of economic dislocation.
Herbert Hoover, a president whose name is synonymous with
the Great Depression, uttered the same empty reassurance about the
fundamentals being strong. The unfortunate phrase carries historical
echoes, and it does little to inform those trying to make sense of what
is happening on Wall Street. After refusing to put taxpayer money on
the line to rescue Lehman Brothers, the Bush administration stepped in
late Tuesday and pressured the Federal Reserve to come up with an $85
billion bridge loan for AIG, the American International Group, which
had been teetering on the edge of bankruptcy through the weekend.
Insuring 70 million customers, AIG met the definition of an entity
that is too big and too intertwined with the global financial system
to fail, a test the much smaller brokerage house, Lehman Brothers,
did not pass. The AIG loan carries a high interest rate and gives the
government the option to buy 80 percent of the company, which in
theory should discourage other institutions from seeking government
funds if they can find private financing.
The financial meltdown that we are watching with a mixture of
horror and fascination has its roots in the Reagan Revolution and its
anti-regulation policies. What's happened is not complicated. Presi-
dent Reagan's policies stemmed from his belief that government is
not part of the solution, that it is part of the problem. With government
out of the way, the free markets can work their will. The result was a
generation of lax regulation with regulatory agencies under-funded,
regulators looking the other way, and members of Congress neglecting
their traditional oversight role while Wall Street partied on.
Fueled by money from lobbyists representing various financial.
institutions, Congress changed banking regulations to allow other
institutions to get into banking activities, chiefly writing mortgages.
Savings and Loans branched out, and the result was a vast over-
reaching that cost many people their lifesavings. That scandal touched
McCain personally when he intervened on behalf of a constituent,
Charles Keating, seeking relief from regulators. McCain has written
about the experience.and while he maintains he did nothing wrong,
he concedes there was the appearance of a conflict. The shame he felt
as one of the so-called Keating Five, four Democrats and himself,
spurred him to become a reformer, he says.
Since all the experts are making comparisons to the Great Depres-
sion, it is worth noting that the brokerage houses that went under in
1929 collapsed because of securities. Today, the securities business
is fine; it's the other aspects of financial life that are failing. Merrill
Lynch got bought out by the Bank of America because it got into
the mortgage business and that's where the bottom fell out. AIG is a
mammoth insurance company that branched out into the unregulated
field of insuring mortgages, and when the loans went bad, AIG didn't
have the funds to cover them. And when their shaky financial situa-
tion became known, their bond rating was downgraded which meant
they had to pay more at a time when they desperately need money. If
there's one fundamental that is strong, it's the Bush administration's
understanding that things could get worse, and fast, if they didn't step
in to stave off further disaster.


LiJ


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Page 8 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 24, 2008

Identification requirements change for driver licenses


TALLAHASSEE The
Florida Department of Highway
Safety and Motor Vehicles
is announcing changes that
will impact Florida drivers
and Department customers
beginning Oct. 1, 2008. One of
the principal changes will be the
identification required for driver
licenses.
Customers must present
proof of social security number
(for example, social security
card or any of the following
documents showing your social
security number: tax return,
W-2 form, pay check, DD-214,
school record).
All passports,, permanent
resident cards and.employment
authorization cards presented
as proof of identification or
legal presence must be valid.
Expired documents will not be
accepted.
The department will no
longer accept driver licenses
or identification cards issued
by other states as primary
identification.
A person will be allowed to
elect the school option to avoid
points five times in a 10-year
period instead of five times in
a lifetime.
Commercial Driver License
holders who receive a Driving
Under the Influence conviction
on or after Oct. 1, 2008, even
while driving a personal vehicle,
will be disqualified from


operating a commercial motor
vehicle for one year for the
first offense, and permanently
disqualified for the second
offense. These penalties are
based on convictions dates and
not offense dates.
"Upcoming changes are
a result of recent statutory
requirements and department
efforts to increase security,"
said Director of the Division of
Driver Licenses Sandra Lambert.
"We anticipate the benefits of
enhanced identity protection will
far outweigh the inconvenience
of providing additional proof of
identification."
In addition to identification
requirements, license fees and
the length of time for which
certain identification cards and
motor vehicle licenses are valid
are changing. For U.S. Citizens
and Immigrants with Permanent
Legal Presence
Florida Class E driver
licenses will be valid for eight
years except for customers 80
and older.
*Commercial Driver Licenses
for Class A, B, or C driver
licenses will be valid for eight
years except for customers 80 and
older. Licenses with a hazardous
materials endorsement will be
valid for four years. -
All licenses for customers
80 and older will be valid for
six years.


Identification cards for
children five through 14. years
6f age will be valid for four
years. Identification cards for


customers 15 and older will be flhsmv.gov/ddl/dlclass.html.
valid for eight years. To learn more about DHSMV
For details on Florida's driver and the services offered, visit
license classes, visit http://www. www.flhsmv.gov.


We Make It Easy with Our Own In-Store Financing!


'Are you ready


to make, a


difference?


*L- 1-L ;.I I




FAIRCLOTH


FOR LIBERTY COUNTY


SHERIFF
NOVEMBER 4, 2008 GENERAL ELECTION
Home: 643-2346 Cell: 508-2428

e "Remember this is Your County,
Your Choice, icerl utA
Your Change." ,,Ti 1
Politicaladvertisement paid for and approved by Jimmy Faircloth, no party affiliation, for Sheriff






SEPTEMBER 24, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 9


Hospital presented with first of


three $10,000 donations by GAC


Spurred on by the fundraising efforts of Calhoun County Clerk
of Court Ruth Attaway, Gulf Asphalt Contractors (GAC) made the
first of three check presentations on Sept. 9 to the administrative
staff at Calhoun-Liberty Hospital. The company has pledged
$30,000 to the facility and those funds are earmarked for
improvements to the building. GAC Partner Allan Bense and
Project Manager Andrew Rowel (second and third from the
left) are shown above as they hand over the first check to
Hospital Board Chairman Laddie Williams. Also pictured above
is Hospital Administrator Ron Gilliard, at far left, and at right,
Ruth Attaway, Phillip Hill and Rachel Whitfield Manspeaker. In



Marianna

celebrates

Constitution -

Day with

Ringing of I;

the Bells
The 221st anniversary of the drafting B----
of the Constitution was marked by the.
Chipola Chapter, NSDAR members "-
who flewAmerican flags and celebrated
the week, September 17th-23rd, with
a luncheon, a live auction, and school .
programs.
Churches offered prayers of
thanksgiving andjoined in the "Ringing '- -
of Bells Across America." William
Dunaway Chapter, SAR and Blue
Springs Society C.A.R. were partners
in the observance that was made an
annual event in 1956 by President
Eisenhower.
RIGHT President Harry Dunaway
of the William Dunaway Chapter
Sons of America rings the historic -
bell at St. Luke's Episcopal Church
in Marianna to conclude a DAR/
SAR/C.A.R. luncheon in honor of the
Constitution.


making the presentation, Bense commented that having been
a board member at Bay Medical Center for over 30 years he is
well aware of community's need for a hospital, both for quality
of life and economic importance. Attaway began her fundraising
efforts by sending letters to area businesses urging their support
of Calhoun-Liberty Hospital with donations to make some much-
needed improvements. She set a goal to raise $50,000 and has
already topped that, bringing in $52,000. And she's just getting
started. Anyone who'd like to help with the effort to improve the
facility is invited to contact Attaway at 674-4545.
JOHNNY EUBANKS PHOTO



Youth Hunting Field Day
set Oct. 4 at Tall Timbers
New hunters looking for help and those with experience
wanting to sharpen their skills are invited to attend the Florida
Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission's (FWC) Youth
Hunting Field Day on Saturday, Oct. 4 at Tall Timbers Research
Station, north of Tallahassee.
The FWC will partner with Tall Timbers and the Big Bend
Youth Outdoor Foundation to put on this free, half-day event for
kids of all ages and their parents who are interested in attending.
Pre-registration is not necessary.
From 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., expert instructors will.teach the
fundamentals of hunting deer, turkey, waterfowl and small game,
and participants will learn about using dogs while hunting.
They will get to target-shoot with bows, shotguns, rifles and
muzzleloading guns, and there is even going to be a fishing pole
casting competition.
Other activities include getting a close look at the inside of an
FWC helicopter and seeing a K-9 demonstration by FWC law
enforcement officers and their dogs. Participants also are eligible
for door prizes and the chance on winning a youth hunt or rifle.
Sponsors and volunteers include the Future of Hunting in
Florida, the National Wild Turkey Federation, Kevin's Guns
and Sporting Goods, Sportsman's Warehouse, Talquin Portable
Restrooms, Plantation Security Inc., Ducks Unlimited, Jefferson
Long Rifles, Seminole Archery Supply, Tallahassee Bowhunters
Association, Horse Creek Traditional Archery Club,
Quality Deer Management Association, the U.S. Fish and
Wildlife Service, Safari Club'International and the Florida
Division of Forestry.
For more information on the Youth Hunting Field Day, call
Renee Hays at (850) 413-0084. For directions to Tall Timbers
Research Station, click www.talltimbers.org.








Page 10 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 24, 2008


Revivals
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
OF BRISTOL First Baptist
Church of Bristol will hold
revival services Sunday, Sept. 28
thru Wednesday, Oct. 1.
Services will begin at 11 a.m.
(ET) on Sunday and will continue
at 7 p.m. (ET) each night.
Dr. Bill Jenkins will bring
the message along with special
music being provided at each
service. All are invited to come
and join us.
POPLAR HEAD BAPTIST
CHURCH Poplar Head
Baptist Church will be having a
Youth Revival on Oct. 5-8 from
6:30 to 8 p.m. nightly.
Duke Underwood will be our
guest evangelist with special
praise and worship music, door
prizes and more!
A love offering will be
collected each night for our
guest.
Fellowship & Events
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
OF BRISTOL First Baptist
Church of Bristol will be hosting
a Community Wide -Youth
SYATP (See You At The Pole),
on Wednesday, Sept. 24 at 7
p.m., (ET).
Arisen will be in concert
and there will be dramas, food,
worship and lots of fun.
Our location is 10677 Michaux
Road in Bristol. .
Call 643-5182 for more
information.
Church Services
DELIVERANCE TEMPLE
CHURCH OF GOD IN CHRIST
- Deliverance Temple Church
of God in Christ wishes to extend
an invitation to all to join us
for our spirit-filled weekly


services:
Tuesday, 7:30 p.m., Bible
Band
Friday, 7:30 p.m., Prayer &
Tarry Service/Pastoral Teaching,
Sunday, 10 a.m., Sunday
School; noon, Worship Service.
Superintendent Jesse
F. Mathews, a resident of
Blountstown, is the pastor of
Deliverance Temple Church of
God in Christ.
Deliverance Temple Church
of God in Christ is located at
1156 Dewey Johnson Way in
Gretna.
Phone (850) 856-5401 or (850)
674-3286 for more information
or to request transportation.
Fundraisers
& Yard Sales
BLOUNTSTOWN UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH -
The Pumpkin Patch opens at
Blountstown United Methodist
ChurchonHwy20inBlountstown
October 18-31.
The truck arrives at 1 p.m.
for unloading and the patch is
expected to be up and running
later that same afternoon until 7
p.m. nightly.
Hours.will be Monday thru
Saturday from 10 a.m. til 7 p.m.
and Sundays 1 to 5 p.m.


NE W S a children's festival on Oct. 26
NEWS at 6 p.m.
FROM THE Games and outdoor activities
will be ongoing daily surrounding
PEW S the pumpkin patch. Pumpkin pies
and breads will also be available
for pickup or order. Pumpkins
should be expected to-be priced
higher than local vendors but
this is due to being a fund raising
project for not only our church
."' but for the Navajo Indian tribes
S -- -who grow them in New Mexico.
Several schools andpreschools We appreciate your support.
will be attending as well as open POPLAR HEAD BAPTIST
to the general public. CHURCH Poplar Head
Money earned for this project 'Baptist Church youth will be
is to support our youth ministry having- a car wash at Advance
and mission projects throughout Auto Parts, Saturday, Sept. 27
the year as well as a church from 8-12. We will be raising
outreach project. money for the upcoming youth
In conjunction with the revival.
pumpkin patch will be a youth .... Please come and support this
Harvest Hoedown on Sunday event and our young people.
evening, Oct. 19 at 6 p.m. and' Donations only.






The Panhandle Pioneer Settlement would like to thank the
community for its support in our Auction Fundraiser held Saturday
the 13th of September. A special thanks goes out to all of the local
Blountstown businesses, Marianna businesses and, Panama City
businesses all of whom made item and cash donations. Thanks to all
of you, our first auction was a success, so good that we plan to make
it an annual event. If you missed it this time, catch us next year.
Effie Aultman
Panhandle Pioneer Settlement Museum

The family of J.T. O'Bryan would like to thank all the friends and
family that helped us through this difficult time with food, flowers
and the embracing of love that was shown to us during the loss of
our precious loved one, Colt O'Bryan.
Also we would like to express our sincere appreciation for the
wonderful article that was published in the paper about Colt.
J.T. ,.Johnny, Carol and Steve O'Bryan


!T
TREASURES
LbyRyan McDougaldj-

A HEART THAT DEVISES
WICKED SCHEMES
Text: Proverbs 6:18
R.P. Anderson tells of a man who
dreamed he died. An angel met him to
show him a great golden book. "This
is the book of your life," explained the
angel as she opened the book.
Showing him the first page that
contained some writing, she said,
"These are your evil acts and you see
they are many."
The angel turned to the next page,
which had more writing than the first
and said, "These are your evil words,
and you see that there are more of
them than there are acts, for a man
speaks more than he acts."
The angel turned the page again
and the next page contained even
more writing. "These are your evil
thoughts, and you see that there are
very many, for a man thinks more
than he speaks or acts," explained
the angel.
The angel turned to the last page
revealing that it was totally black.
The angel concluded, "'This represents
your evil heart, for it is out of the
blackness of the heart that all thoughts
and words and acts come."
God hates a heart that "devises
wicked schemes (NV)." Matthew
Henry says this-is a heart that has,
"wisdom to do evil." Henry explains,
"The more there is of craft and
management in sin the more it is an
abomination to God."
It is one thing to make a mistake
or be caught off guard by temptation
and commit a sin of commission or
omission. It is another thing to plot,
scheme, and contrive to do evil.
The good news is that if we
confess our sins and believe, Jesus
Christ can forgive us and make the
blackest heart clean and pure and like
the brightest snow. "If we confess our
sins, He is faithful .and just and will
forgive us our sins and purify us from
all unrighteousness."
John 1:9 NIV.


September 22-28

SEPTEMBER22 Old Farmer's
Last Quarter Moon Almanac



SEPTEMBER22 nxB
Autumnal Equinox

-E l-Ti?^Xij3BI


Srn both Europe and Brjtain,
the conclusion of the harvest
each autumn was once marked by
great festivals of fun, feasting, and
thanksgiving known as "Harvest
Home." It was also a time to hold
elections, pay workers, and col-
lect rents. These festivals usually
took place around the time of the
autumnal equinox (September 22


2008

SEPTEMBER 22,23
Best days to make
sauerkraut, can,
orpickle

SEPTEMBER 24,25
est days to prune to
discourage growth


this year). Many rural communities
in this country
have kept thec ."
tradition a!. f. e
and harve ,,
fairs and fe--
tivals con-
tinue to be 4
customary
throughout ie t.ll.


I cup mayontef Iombine all of the Ingredients In a
1/8 cup water
1/2 teaspoon lemon juice bowl, or a jar with a lid, and re-
1/4 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce frigerate. Allow flavors to blend for at
1/4 teaspoon bottled steak sauce least one hour before using: MAKES ABOUT
1 tablespoon freshly grated pepper
Tablespoon grated Parmesan cheese 11/4cUPS.
1/2 teaspoon salt__ _
1/4 teaspoon dry mustard
1/4 teaspoon sugar
1/4 teaspoon garlic powder
dash of red-pepper sauce
WIT AND WISDOM FROM THE OLD FARMER'S ALMANAC
N Keep cattle and sheep sheltered on stormy days.
0 The higher the clouds, the finer the weather.
On September 26, 1983, Australia won the
America's Cup.
FOR RECIPES, GARDENING TIPS, AND WEATHER FORECcSTS, VISIT:
Almanac.com


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SEPTEMBER 24,2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 11


What can we do with bushels
of green tomatoes? -N. H.,
Farmdale, Ohio
Answer: First, stave off the
first frosts as long as you can by
covering plants with blankets
and plastic sheeting, staked
so that they don't touch the
foliage. After that, it's time to
pick what you can and leave the
rest. The kitchen windowsill will
ripen many a tomato to a good
redness, but the tomatoes don't
need light to ripen and will do
just as well wrapped in a bit of
clean newsprint. You would be
surprised at how long they keep
this way.
There are also many good
recipes that use green tomatoes,
as in the famous fried green
tomatoes of literary and movie
fame. Basically, they are breaded
tomatoes sauteed in bacon
drippings -- and quite delicious.


STSK OLD FARMER'S





ALMANAC


Consider also piccalilli relish
(great with lamb), a green tomato
chutney, or salsa made with both
red and green tomatoes. Now's
the time to can some Christmas
gifts or hostess favors to bring
to the Thanksgiving gathering.
After you've done what you can
in the kitchen, there's always the
compost pile, where you can gain
some satisfaction from returning
those nutrients to your soil.
Why is it called "playing
hooky" if you miss school or
work?-A. B., Dumas, Ark.
Answer: The origins of this
informal phrase, dating back


to the mid-19th century, are
uncertain, but the possibilities are
many. Schoolboys who played
hooky often went fishing, so
maybe the .hook refers to their
lures. Another thought is that
"to hook" is sometimes used to
mean to run away, or make off
with, although it can also mean
the opposite, to snag or catch or
trap. A hook shot has a sweeping
arc, instead of a straight line to its
destination. In boxing, the hook
is a blow with a swing to one
side. Either one might suggest
that the person playing hooky
took a detour and didn't end up


where he was supposed to, but
- instead hooked offtoward another
destination. In Old English, hook
was sometimes used for "steal,"
as in hooking something that
.didn't belong to you. Perhaps the
person playing hooky is stealing
free time. On the other hand, if
he's off the hook, he's free of a
difficult situation -- e.g., school
or work -- but if he's caught, he'll
catch it, hook, line, and sinker.
If it is his boss who catches him,
likely that person will be on the
hook. He might even get the hook
and be relieved of his job.
You once printed a column


Written and submitted by
Thomas Morgan Rankin

SM y father, Hester Gary "Hester"
Rankin, Sr. (1927-1979); has
the unique distinction of being one of
the first of an honorable and prestigious
group of sailors now recognized as '"
United States Navy SEALs.
Like many young men in Liberty :,.;
County during World War II, he an-
swered his country's call to serve in
the military to do what he could to
stop the German and Japanese war
machines. In 1944, at the age of
seventeen he approached his parents,
Alto Thomas Rankin (1880-1963)
and Nettie Forehand Rankin (1888-
1946), for permission to join the
United States Navy. Little did he
know when he left Bristol and enlisted in the
Navy that he would spend the majority of his life serving
his country in places far from the home he loved.
After enlisting in the Navy in the summer of 1944 he
left Bristol and reported for basic training. Seaman First
Class (SC1) Hester Rankin was assigned to the Under-
water Demolition Team Five. In Fort Pier6e, Florida he
went through ten weeks of rugged training in preparation
for missions of hydrographic reconnaissance and clear-
ance activities. Every man was required to swim one
mile in order to qualify as a team member. This was one
of the few pieces of information he told me and my sib-
lings (Hester G. Rankin Jr. and Mary Rankin Bracewell)
about his Navy career. He told us that during the training
his team was taken off-shore at Ft. Pierce, Florida and in-
structed to jump off of the ship and swim back to shore.
Along with the swim training, he received training
on underwater explosives. The Underwater Demolition
Teams were involved in dangerous missions with the long-


distance swimmers using bombs
and mines to clear paths for other
S united States military troops to
safely pass. His involvement in
These missions impaired his hear-
ling which he -struggled with the
remainder of his life.
A s a member of Team Five, he
". served during the last year of the
war with missions in Japan and was
:among the first American troops to
view the destruction of Hiroshima
after the United States dropped the
Atomic bomb.
Team Five was formally decom-
missioned in October 1945. After
:honorably being discharged from the
U.S. Navy, Hester re-enlisted in the
SUnited Slates Air Force serving his
country with tours in Italy, France and
SVietnam. He retired from the U.S. Air
F o r c e and returned to Liberty County in 1969
and died in 1979.
Hester was patriotic and loved his country. He rarely
spoke of his military accomplishments; although, they
had a profound and detrimental toll on his health and life.
Several years, after his death, a World War II veteran
knocked on my mother's (Edith Laverne Bailey Rankin)
door and told her of his remarkable accomplishments and
notoriety as a member of one of the first Navy Underwa-
ter Demolition Teams the precursor of the honorable
Navy Seals who continue to serve and protect.
In 1983, the U.S. Navy converted all Underwater De-
molition Teams to SEAL Teams merging their missions.

Sources: World War II Era Historical Series, Underwater
Demolition Team Histories, The UDT-SEAL Museum, Ft.
Pierce, Florida.


about proverbs and advice
that contain the word "keep. "
Will you run it again? -R. S.,
Galveston, Tex.
Answer: Sure, here it is. If you
don't keep good hours, you might
burn the candle at both ends,
or bur the midnight oil. Not a
thrifty thing to do, and you know
that Yankees are frugal. While
you're keeping up with the rest,
you might keep in touch with
some other keepers of advice.
First, keep your powder dry,
keep your courage, and keep
prepared. Be sure to keep your
own counsel and not spout off at
the mouth. If you decide to keep
company with someone of the
opposite sex, to help you keep
body and soul together, start out
by keeping one another at arm's
length. Once you're sure you can
keep up the friendship, then you
might propose keeping house
together. If you decide the other
is a keeper, don't keep that person
in the dark be sure to tell them
how you feel. Offer a suitable
keepsake. And finally, if, over the
course oftime, small annoyances
make you ill-tempered, keep
your breath to cool your porridge.
Keep your countenance, keep
your wits about you, and you'll
be apt to keep your spouse.

Send your questions to: Ask
The OldFarmer 'sAlmanac, P.O.
Box 520, Dublin; NH 03444.
Visit our "Question of the Day"
section atAlmanac.comfor more
advice.

SEPT. 24, WEDNESDAY
- Mercury stationary. The
Sun and Moon appeared
blue over the Northeast due
to smoke from forest fires in
Alberta, Canada, 1950.
SEPT. 25, THURSDAY -
Moon at descending node.
Congress established Yosem-
ite National Park in California,
1890. Football player Matt
Hasselbeck born, 1975.
SEPT. 26, FRIDAY -
Frontiersman Daniel Boone
died, 1820. The temperature
in Los Angeles, California,
reached 109 degrees Fahr-
enheit, 1963.
SEPT. 27, SATURDAY -
St. Vincent de Paul. Conjunc-
tion of Saturn and the Moon.
The Warren Commission Re-
port on the assassination of
President John F. Kennedy
was issued, 1965.
SEPT. 28, SUNDAY-
Moon on Equator. Juan Ro-
driguez Cabrillo of Portugal
arrived at what is now San
Diego, 1542. Television host
Ed Sullivan born, 1902.
S.EPT. 29, MONDAY St.
Michael. New Moon. David
Hempleman-Adams became
the first person to cross the
Atlantic solo in an open wick-
er basket balloon, 2003.
SEPT. 30, TUESDAY -
St. Sophia. Rosh Hashanah.
U.S. first lady Edith Roosevelt
died, 1948. "Cheers" made its
television debut, 1982.


. A.. .A .. . .
- - - ... ... ------- ---


Hester Gary Rankin, Sr. was



one of the first Navy SEALs


This is one in a series offeatures submitted for a history and heritage book on Liberty County. Journal readers are invited to submit their own
family photos, histories and remembrances for the book by contacting Family Chairperson Vance Bateman, Topical Chairperson
Fran Rigsby at643-5466 or Heritage Publishing Consultants at 1-800-568-1611or by e-mail at heripubcon@aol.com.


LI








Page 12 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 24, 2008


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Toll Free: 1-888-740-8222


CHA'MIYA DENAYSHA
WILLIAMS
Cha'miya Denaysha Williams
celebrated her first birthday
on Sept. 22 at the WT Neat
Civic Center with a Dora the
Explorer party with friends
and family. Her parents are
Dallas Hogans and Chivas
Williams, both of Bristol. Her
grandparents are Dallas and
Patricia Hogans and Jackie
Williams, all of Bristol and
Jerome Oliver, of Greensboro.
Her great-grandparents are
Nancy Bacon, Geraldine and
the late Charlie Williams, all
of Bristol, Charles Wright, of
Bronx, NY, Bernice Glover
and the late Dallas Hogans,
Sr., all of Blountstown. She
has two siblings, Ja'Vis
Davis, of Blountstown and
Aaliyah, of GA. Her godfathers
are Rayshon Peterson of
Blountstown and Carlyle Hall
of Bristol. Cha'miya enjoys
and loves to watch Dora the
Explorer, baby talk on the
phone with her dad, fight with
Granny Patricia, cousin Aidan
and Marcus Matthews and
playing with friends Darcya
and Jacari at their home. She
loves to go to McDonald's for
chicken nuggets. Cha'miya
adores going shopping every
week with her mother to get
her Dora the Explorer outfits
and having her way, spoiled.


COLTON REID GRIFFIN
Colton Reid Griffin celebrated
his second birthday on Aug.
23. Colton is the son of
Amanda Griffin of Altha. He
is the grandson of Mike and
Seena Griffin ofAltha. Colton's
great-grandparents are Irene
Stanley, Sharon Griffin and
the late J. Carl Griffin, all of
Altha. He loves playing in the
water, riding the four-wheeler
with his Aunt Ray-Ray and
Uncle Bubba, playing with his
brand new cousin, Chase,
and spending the day with his
Nanna Roberta.


CHAYCEN CADE WOOD
Chaycen Cade Wood
celebrated his third birthday
on Aug. 2. 2Chaycen is the
son of "Arthur and Angel
Wood of Bristol. His maternal
grandparents are Lamar and
Debra Hatcher of Marianna
and Eugene and Barbara
Wood of Bristol. His great-
grandmother is Dorothy
Dudley of Blountstown.
Chaycen celebrated his
birthday with a John Deere
Tractor party with his big
sister Shay, his new baby
brother, Trevan and all of
his cousins that he loves
spending time with.


-
---------- ----------- ---------- -


Justin Carpenter joins US Army
. Justin S. Carpenter has joined the United States Army under the
Delayed Entry Program. The program gives young men and women
the opportunity to delay entering active duty for up to one year.
The enlistment gives the new soldier the option to learn a new skill,
travel and become eligible to receive as much as $50,000 toward a
college education. After completion ofbasic military training, soldiers
receive advanced individual training in their career job specialty prior
to being assigned to their first permanent duty station.
The recruit qualifies for a
$7,000 enlistment bonus.
Carpenter will report to Fort
Benning, Columbus, GA, for
basic training in October 2008. Happy
He is the son of Angela Birthday
Simmons of Blountstown. to the 4

. sweetest lady,
Colleen Green.
,l Much love,

Melissa '


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KINSLEY PAIGE
SELLERS
Shawn and Melanie Sellers are
proud to announce the birth of their
daughter, Kinsley Paige Sellers,
born onAugust5,2008 at 4:52 a.m.
at Jackson Hospital. She weighed
6 Ibs. and 5.5 oz. and measured 19
inches long. Maternal grandparents
are Dan and Marilyn Clemons and
Mr. and.Mrs. Donnie Edenfield, all
of Altha. Paternal grandparents
are Paul and Phyllis Sellers of
Marianna. Kinsley was welcomed
home by family and friends, her big
sister Anna and Bama.


TREVAN ALEXANDER
WOOD
Arthur andAngel Wood are proud
to announce the birth of their son,
TrevanAlexander Wood. Trevan
was born June 26, 2008. He
weighed 9 lbs., 15 oz. and was
20 1/4" long. He was welcomed
home by his big sister Shaylon
and his big brother Chaycen:
Maternal grandparents are Lamar
and Debra Hatcher of Marianna
and Eugene and Barbara Wood of
Bristol. His great-grandmother is
Dorothy Dudley of Brountstown.


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SEPTEMBER 24, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 13


Country Lunch


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New rules for
The Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission
(FWC) passed a rule last week
that sets new limits for the harvest
of freshwater turtles.
The new rule limits the harvest
of native Florida freshwater
turtles to five per day. However,
fishermen with a commercial
license are allowed to harvest
20 Florida soft-shell turtles per
day. The new rules have been
passed to protect freshwater
turtle populations while the
FWC develops a long-term
comprehensive strategy for
sustainable use of amphibian
and reptile populations. The new
rules limit the number of turtles
that may be taken from the wild,
not from turtle farms or other
aquaculture facilities. No changes
have been made to the number


freshwater turtle harvests


i '


of turtles people may possess;
the existing limits still apply.
Furthermore, rules about selling
or buying turtles also have not


-in place protecting freshwater
turtles, we will continue to
develop a long-term strategy for
the management andconservation
of Florida's amphibian and reptile
species," said Bill Turner, an


Daniels, Duggar to exchange-vows

Daniels, Duggar to exchange vows


Monty and Sue Duggar of Hosford and Dennis
and Janice Kirkland of Clarksville are proud to
announce the engagement of their daughter, Car-
la, to Lou Daniels, son of Jerry and Joan Daniels
ofBlountstown.
Her paternal grandparents are Lonzell and
Ruby Duggar. Her maternal grandparents are
Benjamin and Shirley Bussey and the late Carl
(Rooster) Stone.
His paternal grandparents are the late Ovid and
Orblee Daniels. His maternal grandparents are the
late Joe and Annie Laurie Johnston.
The bride-to-be is a 2003 graduate of Liberty
County High School and is pursuing her Bach-
elor's Degree at Chipola College in Math Educa-
tion.
The groom-to-be is a 2002 graduate of Bloun-
stown High School and received his Bachelor's
Degree in Social Science from the University of
West Florida in 2007. He is currently employed
with the Florida Department of Corrections.


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Carla and Lou will marry Saturday, Oct. 11, 2008
at 5 p.m. (CT) The wedding and reception will be
at the home of Benjamin and Shirley Stone Bussey,
23064 NE County R6ad 69A, Blountstown.
All friends and relatives are invited to attend..


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lar au imiathe pteced[Nr 180 daw Stanr'dd or b*e package riequrd Anrtr si. mrnjn Slaridard
ura~e~sf 8 be bitIld at j44 9~E~ rwth. o~,er rj~ls~l at tlea '~ r e~ L~Tar. and ad 5clnaI
(arhj~srn ap~ 3PP4 modern ui~ilTe~a~ Iofy~g al glI k~p te 'e Faii~iFrn Tow, tP Lrn the rn.,tlh.
ivrxalr l r 4r? cnn ita42r.,,or r.o4ei ,cl j orv ot ma 00 for th- r m &d ftIrhO foa .fV
W,..rc:.r d Prngtubpea I d~ng ~Thcu1 n.?t~e t-isih i InVtricI mAllt b.- t iib in ilB
rrr Cal~W 93..n.6cirwvn w\1~s.Fon t~ri,m fni Toml rl~ark e2&n3 Fj~rik.,ri !:C-rTTr,,CA
t~of~ i'i edt nght. r~se'e~d l4lHB


FWC amphibian and reptile
specialist. "We expect to bring
the strategy for freshwater turtles
back to the Commission in one
year."
Increased demand for
freshwater turtles nationally and
internationally caused the FWC to
begin to evaluate the management
of these species to ensure, the
populations aren't over-exploited.
Alabama, Michigan, Maryland,
North Carolina, South Carolina,
Tennessee and Texas recently
restricted their turtle harvests,
which may cause turtle harvesters
from those states to focus on
Florida, Turner said.
The new rules are interim
measures while the FWC
works diligently on a long-term
strategy for conservation of these
species.


"'
i;..i





e


Blow= -+, 4-








Page 14 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 24,2008


Bristol's 'Road to Nowhere' shows how private


property in danger of becoming public property


To the editor:
I am writing this letter to
inform citizens of Liberty County
that their private property may
be in danger of becoming public
property.
Let me explain my rather
simple story. Several members
of my family have houses and
property on a self-contained piece
of property in Bristol that we enter
on a dirt road from Hwy. 12S
called Hester Drive. This road
starts out as a fairly decent road
but quickly becomes a winding
pig trail. At no point does this
road connect with the Whitfield,
Summers, Strickland, Willis or
Revell families who own property


They have


adjoining ours.
access to their
property either
directly from
the- highway or
through easement
agreements. I do
not know if their
roads are private,
city or county. I
am not sure if the
county knows the
difference either
which puts you


as a property owner at great
risk. This allows any county
commissioner, if they so desire,
to make issue of roads on your
property using poorly documented
records make decisions about
land you own. -These decisions
can be made in a highly political
environment using the "good ol'
boy" system.
For over 30. years we have
maintained this road purchasing
dirt from the county and


/ 'SPEAK UP! I
WITH A LETTER TO THE EDITOR
Write: The Calhoun-Liberty Journal
P.0. Box 536, Bristol 32321
\ /


spreading it ourselves. The
county, not at our request, has
entered our property and graded
the road while we were at work,
unaware, despite repeatedly
asking them not to as it was
private. In fact, a few years
back when we asked a road
maintenance supervisor about the
poor condition of our culvert, he
told us our road was private and
we would have to pay for a new


rationale that was applied to our
property is applied for all. If it is
convenient for the commissioners
to please others or if they see
some personal gain for your
road to become a county road -
Beware.
Hester Drive is a mile road
that is self-contained and does
not touch anyone else's property.


It winds to NOWHERE. It has
no benefit to the county and if
deemed county will result in
additional cost for taxpayers.
Watch closely how the Liberty
County Commissioners'
individually vote on the status
of Hester Drive it will be quite
revealing. I encourage you to
contact county officials who
will speak to you and find out
today about your rights, roads
and properties. Otherwise, one
day you may find yourself in our
situation: Losing your property
to the county.
Sincerely,
Tom Rankin


i HOSPiTaL
Jerry C. Lawrence, DVM
Emergencies:
(850) 856-5827 or (850) 856-5918
Hours:
Monday- Friday 7 a.m. to 5 p.m.
DOCTOR'S HOURS BY APPOINTMENT.
We provide: Boarding
* Grooming Preventative Health-
care programs which include
vaccinations and yearly checkups
* Spay/neuter program to reduce
unwanted puppies/kittens.
PLUS MANY OTHER SERVICES.
CALL US ANYTIME IF YOU HAVE
ANY QUESTIONS.
43 N. Cleveland Street in Quincy
OFFICE (850) 627-8338 M


culvert. That
"If it is convenient for was fine with
was fine with


us.
Recently, not
at our request,
but at the direct
orders ofa county
commissioner,
dirt was brought
in by the county
and spread on
our road. It is
amusing that


there has never been concern
about the condition of this road in
the past. We have not received a
logical explanation. Maybe you
need to ask them yourselves!
This is opening a "can ofworms".
What is lawful for one should be
.applied to all. If Hester Drive
becomes a county road then the
status of all roads in the county
should be assessed consistently.
This would be disastrous for
many folks if the same poor


Free checking never

: .so good.


I '., : ::-.
ih
1 :.o I.


Unlike hogs and deer, Florida

black bears are not plentiful
To the editor,
It is evident that Mr. Bill Lett, Hogsanddeerabound
Havana, FL did not read my letter in in large numbers, as
a recent issue of The Journal. And, do the humans who
his talent for stating the obvious is continually destroy
amazing! Yes, we all know that over
abundant species need to be hunted habitat. However,
to keep the populations healthy. I've Florida Black Bears
read the studies. It's no secret or are notplentiful by any
closely held idea. It is based in sound fact es
science which I fully support. Feral
hogs have to be controlled to prevent and they do not
damage to sensitive ecological areas exist in numbers that
and I know that deer must also be threaten anything or
controlled. Hogs and deer abound
in large numbers, as do the humans anyone.
who continually destroy habitat. .
However, FLORIDA Black Bears are not plentiful by any factual
estimation, and they do not exist in numbers that threaten anything
or anyone.
SIf you had read the letter more carefully, you would have been
aware that I specifically stated that there have never been any verified
attacks on human beings by FLORIDA Black Bears. I was not writing
about western black bears, southwestern black bears, northeastern
black bears or black bears from any other state. My letter was about
FLORIDA Black Bears. And, as to your statement about bears
defending their young, I must say again, you have a real knack for
stating the obvious. Most animals, including the human animal, will
defend their young. That is an elemental factor for species survival.
Again, what does that have to do with hunting FLORIDA Black
See Florida Black Bears continued on page 15


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the commissioners
to please others or
if they see some
personal gain for
your road to become
a county road -
Beware."


~88~
~f~;-T :


L,


/c/nir~:






SEPTEMBER 24, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 15


NOTICE OF PRIVATE


Talquin Electric Co-operative Inc.

Smith ANNUAL

( MEETING


SATURDAY,

SEPT. 27,

2008


d :nt

: including 42" flat screen tv, Wii game
: : system DVD players, iPd, trolling motor,
-, gas ards and mote .:..

S LOCATION: ENTERTAINMENT:
James A. Shanks 9:00 9:45 a.m.
Middle School Eninv the musin nf
e. ht.j-..........


Gymnasium -
1400 W. King St,
Quincy, Florida


"Country
Connections"
/


Are you saying they should be killed because they protect their
babies?
And, I'm sorry to ruin your "gotcha" moment. Your assumption that
I am against hunting is another one of your misconceptions. I have
never been against hunting and I never will be. I am fifth generation
Floridian and I come from a long line of ranchers and hunters. We ate
what we killed. While my father was living, we hunted turkey, quail,
dove and ducks, and I never ate domestic pork while growing up. Our
pork was always feral hogs, acorn sweet and delicious!
I was a science major, and I assure you my article was fully
researched and totally accurate. I vetted the article through many
filters, i.e. biologists from Department of Environmental Protection,
Florida State University, University of Florida and several other state
agencies.
May I dare ask for your sources about FLORIDA Black Bear
attacks? Are they urban legends, hearsay or more likely, someone's
tall tales?
Sincerely,
Pamala Anderson, Rock Bluff


FWC ignoring public safety

when it comes to FL bears


To the editor:
The release on April 3rd of
FWC's new black bear management
plan and the full page article no
doubt also in most of the states
other newspapers entitled "The
Bare Facts on Living With The
Florida Black Bear" along with
the creation of a $17 wildlife tag
to be used to finance the bear
program, alerted me to the fact
that Orwell's big brother in the
form of FWC had in fact arrived.
That all inhibitions to prevent
Florida from becoming the U.S.'s
big bear den had been removed.
My family has lived in the Florida
woods for seven generations, 180
years with the black bear without


"The fact that no relief
is provided in places
where people are
worried sick with the
bear as in Carrabelle,
Eastpoint and other
places proves that
FWC will not give due
consideration to the
public safety andpeace
of mind by keeping
the bear numbers in
sync with the available
habitat."


serious incident by using our own judgment which we are not going
to substitute for the judgment of some elites who have been here no
more than a decade.
Dr. Thomas Eason and Stephanie Semik are good well intentioned
people but they as well as the commissioners don't know what they
don't know. That being how ordinary working class Floridians feel
about the Black bear as they have been misinformed by the left wing
press. That the flower kissers, tree huggers and animalphile freaks
opinions are held by the majority. They don't seem to take into
consideration the black bear social instincts, especially the homing
instinct.
The fact that no relief is provided in places where people are
worried sick with the bear as in Carrabelle, Eastpoint and other
places proves that FWC will not give due consideration to the public
safety and peace of mind by keeping the bear numbers in sync with
the available habitat.
Also enclosed are writings that reveal how our government has
evolved to the point where anything can happen. There is also a piece
revealing my reaction to the new bear plan.
The FWC's Black bear management team is motivated by the
fact that if they don't come up with a plan that will please the flower
kissers, tree huggers and animalphile freaks assuring the legislature
that FWC is abiding by their sellout deal preventing the legislature
from cutting FWC's budget, they would have to look for another
job.
The main problem in the U.S. and State governments is that all
levels of government are out of touch with the majority. They don't
seem to know which group is the majority.
Raymond Hamlin Jr.,
President Florida Bear Hunters Association,
Former Elected Sheriff of Leon County, Tallahassee


~..
~'" '''


dintio








Page 18 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 24,2008


NOTICE OF SUPPLEMENTAL BUDGET HEARING

FOR THE YEAR 2007-2008 FOR THE

LIBERTY COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS


The public is invited to attend a Public Hearing on Monday, September 29, 2008 at
7:00 P.M. (ET) in the courtroom of the courthouse located at 10818 NW SR 20, Bristol,
Florida 32321.
Robert Hill, Clerk of Court
Clerk to the Board of County Commissioners




BUDGET SUMMARY



SUPPLEMENT


COUNTY OF LIBERTY -
--


Special
Revenue
Fund


General
Fund


FISCAL
Constitu-
tional
Officers


YEAR
Capital
Project
Fund


2007-2008

Debt Expendable
Service Trust Funds


CASH BALANCE
BROUGHT FORWARD
ESTIMATED REVENUES:
Taxes Millage Per $1000
Ad Valorem Taxes 3.579 Mills
Ad Valorem Taxes 6.421 Mills
Sales & Use Taxes


Charges for Services
Intergovernmental Revenue
Licenses & Permits
Fines & Forfeitures
Interest Earned/Other
TOTAL REVENUES


873,777

403,427

19,000
2,597,001
29,258
77,389
48,706


1,300,264


1,238,480
4,531,127

18,000


560,333
659,765


47,885


873,777
1,300,264
403,427


623,368


4,048,558 7,087,871 1,267,983 623,368


1,817,813
8,411,261
29,258
3,500 98,889
96,591


- 3,500


13,031,280


OTHER FINANCING SOURCES
Other Financing Sources
Operating Transfers In
Transfers from Board of County Commissioners
Transfers from Constitutional Officers
TOTAL OTHER FINANCING SOURCES


63,400 1,475,000


347,550


2,190,733


20,000.


83,400 1,475,000 2,190,733


347,550


1,885,950
2,190,733
20,000


4,096,683


TOTAL ESTIMATED REVENUE &
FINANCING SOURCES

EXPENDITURES
General Governmental
Public Safety
Physical Environment
Transportation
Debt Services
Human Services
Economic Environment
Culture and Recreation
Contingency
TOTAL EXPENDITURES

OTHER FINANCING USES
Operating Transfers Out
Transfers to Constitutional Officers
Reserves
TOTAL OTHER FINANCING USES


4,131,958 8,562,871 3,458,716


1,425,932
281,391
64,486


317,404
9,617
476,358
10,371


623,368 347,550


3,500


3,458,716


697,000
786,458
4,555,000

551,000


3,500


347,550


48,000


17,127,963


4,884,648
981,891
850,944
4,555,000
347,550
868,404
9,617
524,358
10,371


2,585,559 6,637,458 3,458,716 347,550 3,500 13,032,783


845,000 418,965 623,368 1,887,333
873,422 1,317,311 2,190,733
954 16,160 17,114
1 719O37 1 752' dA' o 1iRR- 4nfloRIfl


TOTAL APPROPRIATED EXPENDITURES
AND RESERVES 4


1,304,935 8,389,894 3,458,716 623,368


347,550


3,500


17,127,963


THE TENTATIVE, ADOPTED, AND/OR FINAL BUDGETS ARE ON FILE IN THE OFFICE OF THE ABOVE-MENTIONED TAXING AUTHORITY AS A PUBLIC RECORD.


- -- -- --


,e.0.3u


I l u i a I, i ."r







SEPTEMBER 24,2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 19



NOTICE OF BUDGET HEARING


The Liberty County Board of County Commissioners have

tentatively adopted a budget for fiscal year 2008-09. A public

hearing to make a FINAL DECISION on the budget AND TAX-

ES will be held on Monday, September 29, 2008 at the Liberty

County Courthouse, 10818 NW SR 20, Bristol, FI 32321-0399.

Robert Hill, Clerk of Court
Clerk to the Board of County Commissioners


BUDGET SUMMARY

COUNTY OF LIBERTY FISCAL YEAR 2008-2009


Debt Expendable
Service Trust Funds


CASH BALANCE
BROUGHT FORWARD

ESTIMATED REVENUES:
Taxes Milla
Ad Valorem Taxes


ag
3.


Ad Valorem Taxes 6.
Sales & Use Taxes
Charges for Services
Intergovernmental Revenue
Licenses & Permits
Fines & Forfeitures
Interest Earned/Other
TOTAL REVENUES


le Per $1000
579 Mills
421 Mills


762,743


343,845
32,196
1,866,959
29,978
83,389
33,155


1,368,420

1,162,118
1,394,080

373


512,424
65,364


51 000-


634,771


1.025


3,152,265 3,924,991 628,788 634,771


1,025


762,743
1,368,420
343,845
1,706,738
3,961,174
29,978
8,508 92,270
85.180


8,508


8,350,348


OTHER FINANCING SOURCES
Other Financing Sources
Operating Transfers In
Transfers from Board of County Commissioners
Transfers from Constitutional Officers
TOTAL OTHER FINANCING SOURCES


63,400 1,112,281

20.000


342,165


2,193,168


83,400 1,112,281 2,193,168


342,165


1,517,846
2,193,168
20,000


3,731,014


TOTAL ESTIMATED REVENUE &
FINANCING SOURCES

EXPENDITURES
General Governmental
Public Safety
Physical Environment
Transportation
SDebt Services
Human Services
Economic Environment
Culture and Recreation
Contingency
TOTAL EXPENDITURES

OTHER FINANCING USES
Operating Transfers Out
Transfers to Constitutional Officers
Reserves
TOTAL OTHER FINANCING USES


3,235,665 5,037,272 2,821,956


1,025,932
181,391 470,890
64,486 470,474
1,803,817


217,404
9,617
376,358
103.71


2,821,956
-


634,771 343,190


8,508


6,500
2,008


343,190


501,000

14,208


12,081,362


3,854,388
654,289
534,960
1,803,817
343,190
718,404
9,617
390,566
10.371


1,885,559 3,260,389 2,821,956 343,190 8,508 8,319,602


451,012 391,930 634,771 1,477,713
871,740 1,321,428 2,193,168
27,354 63,525 90,879
1,350,106 1,776,883 634,771 3,761,760


TOTAL APPROPRIATED EXPENDITURES
AND RESERVES


3,235,665 5,037,272 2,821,956


634,771 343,190


8,508 12,081,362


THE TENTATIVE, ADOPTED, AND/OR FINAL BUDGETS ARE ON FILE IN THE OFFICE OF THE ABOVE-MENTIONED TAXING AUTHORITY AS A PUBLIC RECORD.


General
Fund


Special
Revenue
Fund


Constitu-
tional
Officers


Capital
Project
Fund


Total


,---


I









Paae 20 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 24, 2008


PROPOSED CONSTITUTIONAL
AMENDMENTS
TO BE VOTED ON
NOVEMBER 4, 2008
NOTICE OF ELECTION

I, Kurt S. Browning, Secretary of
State of the State of Florida, do
hereby give notice that an elec-
tion will be held in each county in
Florida, on November 4, 2008, for
the ratification or rejection of pro-
posed amendments to the Consti-
tution of the State of Florida.

No. 1-
CONSTITUTIONAL
AMENDMENT
ARTICLE I, SECTION 2
(Legislative)

Ballot Title:
DECLARATION OF RIGHTS

Ballot Summary:
Proposing an amendment to the
State Constitution to delete provi-
sions authorizing the Legislature
to regulate or prohibit the owner-
ship, inheritance, disposition, and
possession of real property by
aliens ineligible for citizenship.

Full Text:

ARTICLE I
DECLARATION OF RIGHTS

SECTION 2. Basic rights.--All
natural persons, .female and male
alike, are equal before the law and
have inalienable rights, among
which are the right to enjoy and
defend life and liberty, to pursue
happiness, to be rewarded for
industry, and to acquire, possess
and protect property; excepHlhat
the ownership, inheritance, dis-
position and possession of real
property by aliens ineligible for
citizenship may be regulated or
prohibited by law. No person shall
be deprived of any right because
of race, religion, national origin, or
physical disability.

No. 2
CONSTITUTIONAL
AMENDMENT
ARTICLE I, NEW SECTION
(Initiative Petition)

Ballot Title:
FLORIDA MARRIAGE PROTEC-
TION AMENDMENT

Ballot Summary:
This amendment protects mar-
riage as the legal union of only
one man and one woman as hus-
band and wife and provides that
no other legal union that is treat-
ed as marriage or the substantial
equivalent thereof shall be valid or
recognized.


Financial Impact Statement:
The direct financial impact this
amendment will have on state
and local government revenues
and expenditures cannot be de-
termined, but is expected to be
minor.

Full Text:

ARTICLE I, NEW SECTION
DECLARATION OF RIGHTS

Inasmuch as marriage is the legal
union of only one man and one
woman as husband and wife, no
other legal union that is treated as
marriage or the substantial equiv-
alent thereof shall be valid or rec-
ognized.

No. 3
CONSTITUTIONAL
AMENDMENT
ARTICLE VII, SECTIONS 3 AND
4
ARTICLE XII, NEW SECTION
(Taxation and Budget Reform


I


-~ -- =---


Commission)

Ballot Title:
CHANGES AND IMPROVE-
MENTS NOT'AFFECTING THE
ASSESSED VALUE OF RESI-
DENTIAL REAL PROPERTY

Ballot Summary:
Authorizes the Legislature, by
general law, to prohibit consider-
ation of changes or improvements
to residential real property which
increase resistance to wind dam-
age and installation of renewable
energy source devices as factors
in assessing the property's value
for ad valorem taxation purposes.
Effective upon adoption, repeals
the existing renewable energy
source device exemption no lon-
ger in effect.

Full Text:

ARTICLE VII
FINANCE AND TAXATION

SECTION 3. Taxes; ex-
emptions.--
(a) All property owned
by a municipality and used exclu-
sively by it for municipal or public
purposes shall be exempt from
taxation. A municipality, owning
property outside the municipality,
may be required by general law to
make payment to the taxing unit
in which the property is located.
Such portions of property as are
used predominantly for educa-
tional, literary, scientific, religious
or charitable purposes may be ex-
empted by general law from taxa-
tion.
(b) There shall be ex-
empt from taxation, cumulatively,
to every head of a family residing
in this state, household goods and
personal effects to the value fixed
by general law, not less than one
thousand dollars, and to every
widow or widower or person who
is blind or totally and permanently
disabled, property to. the value
fixed by general law not less than
five hundred dollars.
(c) Any county or munici-
pality may, for the purpose of its
respective tax levy and subject to
the provisions of this subsection
and general law, grant community
and economic development ad va-
lorem tax exemptions to new busi-
nesses and expansions of existing
businesses, as defined by general
law. Such an exemption may be
granted only by ordinance of the
county or municipality, and only
after the electors of the county or
municipality voting on such ques-
tion in a referendum authorize the
county or municipality to adopt
such ordinances. An exemption
so granted shall apply to improve-
ments to real property made by or
for the use of a new business and
improvements to real property re-
lated to the expansion of an exist-
ing business and shall also apply
to tangible personal property of
such new business and tangible
personal property related to the
expansion of an existing busi-
ness. The amount or limits of the
amount of such exemption shall
be specified by general law. The
period of time for which such ex-
emption may be granted to a new
business or expansion of an exist-
ing business shall be determined
by general law. The authority to
grant such exemption shall expire
ten years from the date of approv-
al by the electors of the county or


municipality, and may be renew-
able by referendum as provided
by general law.
(d) By general law and
subject to conditions specified
therein, there may be granted an
ad valorem tax exemption to a
renewable energy source device
and to real property on which such
device is installed and operated,
to the value fixed by general law
not to exceed the original cost of
the device, and for the period of
time fixed by general law not to
exceed ten years.
Ld)fe) Any county or mu-
nicipality may, for the purpose of
its respective tax levy and subject
to the provisions of this subsec-
tion and general law, grant his-
toric preservation ad valorem tax
exemptions to owners of historic
properties. This exemption may
be granted only by ordinance of
the county or municipality. The
amount or limits of the amount of
this exemption and the require-
ments for eligible properties must
be specified by general law. The
period of time for which this ex-
emption may be granted to a prop-
erty owner shall be determined by
general law.
e){f) By general law and
subject to conditions specified
therein, twenty-five thousand dol-
lars of the assessed value of prop-
erty subject to tangible personal
property tax shall be exempt from
. advalorem taxation.
SECTION 4. Taxation;
assessments.--By general law
regulations shall be prescribed
which shall secure a just valuation
of all property for ad valorem taxa-
tion, provided:
(a) Agricultural land, land
producing high water recharge to
Florida's aquifers, or, land used
exclusively for noncommercial rec-
reational purposes may be classi-
fied by general law and assessed
solely on the basis of character or
use.
(b) Pursuant to general
law tangible personal property
held for sale as stock in trade and
livestock may be valued for taxa-
tion at a specified percentage of
its value, may be classified for tax
purposes, or may be exempted
from taxation.
(c) All persons entitled
to a homestead exemption under
Section 6 of this Article shall have
their homestead assessed at just
value as of January 1 of the year
following the effective date of this
amendment. This assessment
shall change only as provided in
this subsection herein.
(1) Assessments subject
to this subsection provision shall
be changed annually on Janu-
ary 1st of each year; but those
changes in assessments shall not
exceed the lower of the following:
a. Three percent (3%) of
the assessment for the prior year.
b. The percent change in
the Consumer Price Index for all
urban consumers, U.S. City Aver-
age, all items 1967=100, or suc-
cessor reports for the preceding
calendar year as initially reported
by the United States Department
of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statis-
tics.
(2) No assessment shall
exceed just value.
(3) After any change of
ownership, as provided by general
law, homestead property shall be
assessed at just value as of Janu-
ary 1 of the following year, unless


the provisions of paragraph (8)
apply. Thereafter, the homestead
shall be assessed as provided in
this subsection herein.
.(4) New homestead
property shall be assessed at just
value as of January 1st of the year
following the establishment of the
homestead, unless the provisions
of paragraph (8) apply. That as-
sessment shall only change as
provided in this subsection here-
in.
(5) Changes, additions,
reductions, or improvements to
homestead property shall be as-
sessed as provided for by general
law; provided, however, after the
adjustment for any change, addi-
tion, reduction, or improvement,
the property shall be assessed as
provided in this subsection here-
in.
(6) In the event of a ter-
mination of homestead status, the
property shall be assessed as pro-
vided by general law.
(7) The provisions of this
amendment are severable. If any
of the provisions of this amend-
ment shall be held unconstitu-
tional by any court of competent
jurisdiction, the decision of such
court shall not affect or impair
any remaining provisions of this
amendment.
(8)a. A person who es-
tablishes a new homestead as of
January 1, 2009, or January 1 of
any subsequent year and who has
received a homestead exemption
pursuant to Section 6 of this Ar-
ticle as of January 1 of either of
the two years immediately preced-
ing the establishment of the new
homestead is entitled to have the
new homestead assessed at less
than just value. If this revision is
approved in January of 2008, a
person who establishes a new
homestead as of January 1, 2008,
is entitled to have the new home-
stead assessed at less than just
value only if that person received
a homestead exemption on Janu-
ary 1, 2007. The assessed value of
the newly established homestead
shall be determined as follows:
1. If the just value of the
new homestead is greater than or
equal to the just value of the prior
homestead as of January 1 of the
year in which the prior homestead
was abandoned, the assessed
value of the new homestead shall
be the just value of the new home-
stead minus an amount equal to
the lesser of $500,000 or the dif-
ference between the just value
and the assessed value of the pri-
or homestead as of January 1 of
the year in which the prior home-
stead was abandoned. Thereafter,
the homestead shall be assessed
as provided in this subsection
herein.
2. If the just value of
the new homestead is less than
the just value of the prior home-
stead as of January 1 of the year
in which the prior homestead was
abandoned, the assessed value
of the new homestead shall be
equal to the just value of the new
homestead divided by the just
value of the prior homestead and
multiplied by the assessed value-
of the prior homestead. However,
if the difference between the just
value of the new homestead and
the assessed value of the new
homestead calculated pursuant to
this sub-subparagraph is greater
than $500,000, the assessed val-
ue of the new homestead shall be


increased so that the difference
between the just value and the
assessed value equals $500,000.
Thereafter, the homestead shall
be assessed as provided in this
subsection herein.
b. By general law and
subject to conditions specified
therein, the Legislature shall pro-
vide for application of this para-
graph to property owned by more
than one person.
(d) The legislature may,
by general law, for assessment
purposes and subject to the pro-
visions of this subsection, allow
counties and municipalities to au-
thorize by ordinance that historic
property may be assessed solely
on the basis of character or use.
Such character or use assessment
shall apply only to the jurisdiction
adopting the ordinance. The re-
quirements for eligible properties
must be specified by general law.
(e) A county may, in the
manner prescribed by general
law, provide for a reduction in the
assessed value of homestead
property to the extent of any in-
crease in the assessed value of
that property which results from
the construction or reconstruction
of the property for the purpose of
providing living quarters for one or
more natural or adoptive grand-
parents or parents of the owner
of the property or of the owner's
spouse if at least one of the grand-
parents or parents for whom the
living quarters are provided is 62
years of age or older. Such a re-
duction may not exceed the lesser
of the following:
(1) The increase in as-
sessed value resulting from con-
struction or reconstruction of the
property.
(2) Twenty percent of the
total assessed value of the prop-
erty as improved.
(f) For all levies other
than school district levies, assess-
ments of residential real property,
as defined by general law, which
contains nine units or fewer and
which is not subject to the as-
sessment limitations set forth in
subsections (a) through (c) shall
Change only as provided in this
subsection.
(1) Assessments subject
to this subsection shall be changed
annually on the date of assess-
ment provided by law; but those
changes in assessments shall not
exceed ten percent (10%) of the
assessment for the prior year.
(2) No assessment shall
exceed just value.
(3) After a change of
ownership or control, as defined
by general law, including any
change of ownership of a legal
entity that owns the property, such
property shall be assessed at just
value as of the next assessment
date. Thereafter, such property
shall be assessed as provided in
this subsection.
(4) Changes, additions,
reductions, or improvements to,
such property shall be assessed
as provided for by general law;
however, after the adjustment for
any change, addition, reduction,
or improvement, the property shall
be assessed as provided in this
subsection.
'(g) For all levies other
than school district levies, assess-
ments of real property that is not
subject to the assessment limita-
tions set forth in subsections (a)
through (c) and (f) shall change
only as provided in this subsec-
tion.
(1) Assessments sub-,
ject to this subsection shall be
changed annually on the date of
assessment provided by law; but
those changes in assessments









SEPTEMBER 24, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 21


shall not exceed ten
(10%) of the assessment
prior year.
(2) No assessme
exceed just value.
(3) The legislature
provide that such property
be assessed at just value
the next assessment dat
a qualifying improvement,
fined by general law, is n
such property. Thereafte
property shall be assessed
vided in this subsection.
(4) The legislatu
provide that such property
be assessed at just value
the next assessment date
change of ownership or cor
defined by general law, in
any change of ownership
legal entity that owns the p
Thereafter, such property
assessed as provided in th
section.
(5) Changes, ad
reductions, or improvemi
such property shall be as
as provided for by gene
however, after the adjust
any change, addition, re
or.improvement, the propel
be -assessed as provided
subsection.
(h) The legislat
general law and subject to
tions specified therein, m
hibit the consideration of
lowing in the determinafior
assessed value of real p
used for residential purpose
(1) Any change
provement made for the F
of improving the property'
tance to wind damage.
(2) The installati
renewable energy source

*ARTICLE XII
SCHEDULE

Limitation on tl
sessed value of real proper
for residential purposes.--
(a) The repeal of
newable energy source p
tax exemption in Section
tide VII shall take effect ul
proval by the voters.
(b) The amendr
Section 4 of Article VII a
ing the legislature to prol
increase in the assessed
of real property used for r
tial purposes as the result
proving the property's res
to wind damage or instE
renewable energy source
shall take effect January 1

No. 4
CONSTITUTIONAL
AMENDMENT
ARTICLE VII, SECTIONS
4
ARTICLE XII, SECTION
(Taxation and Budget R
Commission)

Ballot Title:
PROPERTY TAX EXEI
OFPERPETUALLYCONS
LAND; CLASSIFICATION
ASSESSMENT OF LAND
FOR CONSERVATION



Ballot Summary:
Requires Legislature to
a property tax exemption
property encumbered b
petual conservation eas
or other perpetual consi
protections, defined by
law. Requires Legislature
vide for classification and
ment of land used for co
tion purposes, and not per
encumbered, solely on th
of character or use. Subjc
sessment benefit to cor


percent
for the

nt shall

re must
ty shall
e as of
:e after
as de-
iade to
r, such
as pro-

re may
ty shall
e as of
after a
ntrol, as
including
of the
property.
shall be
his sub-


limitations, and reasonable defini-
tions established by general law.
Applies to property taxes begin-
ning in 2010.

Full Text:

ARTICLE VII
FINANCE AND TAXATION

SECTION 3. Taxes; ex-
emptions.--
(a) All property owned
by a municipality and used exclu-
sively by it for municipal or public
purposes shall be exempt from
taxation. A municipality, owning
-property outside the municipality,
may be required by general law to
make payment to the taxing unit
in which the property is located.
Such portions of property as are
used predominantly for educa-
tional, literary, scientific, religious
or charitable purposes may be ex-
empted by general law from taxa-
tion.


(b) There shall be ex-
Iditions, empt from taxation, cumulatively,
cents to to every head of a family residing
sessed in this state, household goods and
ral law; personal effects to the value fixed
lent for by general law, not less than one
auction, thousand dollars, and to every
rty shall widow or widower or person who
in this is blind or totally and permanently
disabled, property to the value
ure. by fixed by general law not less than
Scondi- five hundred dollars..
ay pro- (c) Any county or munici-
the fol- pality may, for the purpose of its
n of the respective tax levy and subject to
property the provisions of this subsection
es: and general law, grant community
or im- and economic development ad va-
purpose lorem tax exemptions to new busi-
s resis- nesses and expansions of existing
businesses, as defined by general
on of a law. Such an exemption may be
device. granted only by ordinance of the
county or municipality, and only
after the electors of the county or
municipality voting on such ques-
tion in a referendum authorize the
he as- county or municipality to adopt
rty used such ordinances. An exemption
so granted shall apply to improve-
the re- ments to real property made by or
property for the use of a new business and
3 of Ar- 'improvements to real property re-
pon ap- lated to the expansion of an exist-
ing business and shall also apply
ment to to tangible personal property of
uthoriz- such new business and tangible
hibit an personal property related to the
d value expansion of an existing busi-
'esiden- ness. The amount or limits of the
t of im- amount of such exemption shall
distance be specified by general law. The
ailing a period of time for which such ex-
device emption may be granted to a new
S2009. business or expansion of an exist-
ing business shall be determined
by general law. The authority to
grant such exemption shall.expire
ten years from the date of approv-
3 AND al by the electors of the county or
municipality, and may be renew-
N 28 able by referendum as provided
eform by general law.
(d) By general law and
subject to conditions specified
therein, there may be granted an
IPTION ad valorem tax exemption to a
ERVED renewable energy source device
N AND and to real property on which such
SUSED device is installed and operated,
to the value fixed by general law
not to exceed the original cost of
the device, and for the period of
time fixed by general law not to
exceed ten years.
provide (e) Any county or munici-
for real pality may, for the purpose of its re-
'y per- spective tax levy and subject to the
cements provisions of this subsection and
ervation general law, grant historic preser-
general ovation ad valorem tax exemptions
to pro- to owners of historic properties.
assess- This exemption may be granted
nserva- only by ordinance of the county or
petually municipality. The amount or limits
e basis of the amount of this exemption
ects as- and the requirements for eligible
editions, properties must be specified by


general law. The period of time
for which this exemption may be
.granted to a property owner shall
be determined by general law.
(f) By general law and
subject to conditions specified
therein, twenty-five thousand dol-
lars of the assessed value of prop-
erty subject to tangible personal
property tax shall be exempt from
ad valorem taxation.
(g) There shall be grant-
ed an ad valorem tax exemption
for real property dedicated in per-
petuity for conservation purposes,
including real property encum-
bered by perpetual conservation
easements or by other perpetual
conservation protections, as de-
fined by general law.
SECTION 4. Taxation;
assessments.--By. general law
regulations shall be prescribed
which shall secure a just valuation
of all property for ad valorem taxa-
tion, provided:
(a) Agricultural land, land
producing high water recharge to
Florida's aquifers, or land used
exclusively for noncommercial rec-
reational purposes may be classi-
fied by general law and assessed
solely on the basis of character or
use.
(b) As provided by gen-
eral law and subject to conditions,
limitations, and reasonable defini-
tions specified therein, land used
for conservation purposes shall be
classified by general law and as-
sessed solely on the basis of char-
acter or use.
(_)(b) Pursuant to gener-
al law tangible personal property
held for sale as stock in trade and
livestock may be valued for taxa-
tion at a specified percentage of
its value, may be classified for tax
purposes, or may be exempted
from taxation.
(d)(e) All persons entitled
to a homestead exemption under
Section 6 of this Article shall have
their homestead assessed at just
value as of January 1 of the year
following the effective date of this
amendment. This assessment
shall change only as provided
herein.
(1) Assessments subject
to this provision shall be changed
annually on January 1st of each
year; but those changes in as-
sessments shall not exceed the
lower of the following:
a. Threb percent (3%) of
the assessment for the prior year.
b. The percent change in
the Consumer Price Index for all
urban consumers, U.S. City Aver-
age, all items 1967=100, or suc-
cessor reports for the preceding
calendar year as initially reported
by the United States Department
of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statis-
tics.
(2) No assessment shall
exceed just value.
(3) After any change of
ownership; as provided by general
law, homestead property shall be
assessed at just value as of Janu-
ary 1 of the following year, unless
the provisions of paragraph (8)
apply. Thereafter, the homestead
shall be assessed as provided
herein.
(4) New homestead
property shall be assessed at just
value as of January 1st of the year
following the establishment of the
homestead, unless the provisions
of paragraph (8) apply. That as-
sessment shall only change as
provided herein.
(5) Changes, additions,
reductions, or improvements to
homestead property shall be as-
sessed as provided for by general
law; provided, however, after the
adjustment for any change, addi-
tion, reduction, or improvement,
the property shall be. assessed as
provided herein.
(6) In the event of a ter-


mination of homestead status, the
. property shall be assessed as pro-
vided by general law.
(7) The provisions of this
amendment are severable. If any
of the provisions of this amend-
ment shall be held unconstitu-
tional by any court of competent
jurisdiction, the decision of such
court shall not affect or impair
any remaining provisions of this
amendment.
(8)a. A person who es-
tablishes a new homestead as of
January 1, 2009, or January 1 of
any subsequent year and who has
received a homestead exemption
pursuant to Section 6 of this Ar-
ticle as of January 1 of either of
the two years immediately preced-
ing the establishment of the new
homestead is entitled to have the
new homestead assessed at less
than just value. If this revision is
approved in January of 2008, a
person who establishes a new
homestead as of January 1, 2008,
is entitled to have the new home-
stead assessed at less than just
value only if that person received
a homestead exemption on Janu-
ary 1,2007. The assessed value of
the newly established homestead
shall be determined as follows:
1. If the just value of the
new homestead is greater than or
equal to the just value of the prior
homestead as of January 1 of the
.year in which the prior homestead
was abandoned, the assessed
value of the new homestead shall
be the just value of the new home-
stead minus an amount equal to
the lesser of $500,000 or the dif-
ference between the just value
and the assessed value of the pri-
or homestead as of January 1 of
the year in which the prior home-
stead was abandoned. Thereafter,
the homestead shall be assessed
as provided herein.
2. If the just value of
the new homestead is less than
the just value of the prior home-
stead as of January 1 of the year
in which the prior homestead was
abandoned, the assessed value
of the new homestead shall be
equal to the just value of the new
homestead divided by the just
value of the prior homestead and
multiplied by the assessed value
of the prior homestead. However,
if the difference between the just
value of the new homestead and
the assessed value of the new
homestead calculated pursuant to
this sub-subparagraph is greater
than $500,000, the assessed val-
ue of the new homestead shall be
increased so that the difference
between the just value and the
assessed value equals $500,000.
Thereafter, the homestead shall
be assessed as provided herein.
b. By general law and
subject to conditions specified
therein, the Legislature shall pro-
vide for application of this para-
graph to property owned by more
than one person.
(e)(d) The legislature
may, by general law, for assess-
ment purposes and subject to the
provisions of this subsection, allow
counties and municipalities to au-
thorize by ordinance that historic
property may be assessed solely
on the basis of character or use.
Such character or use assessment
shall apply only to the jurisdiction
adopting the ordinance. The re-
quirements for eligibleo5rqperties
must be specified by general law.
(f)(e) A county may, in
the manner prescribed by gener-
al law, provide for a reduction in
the assessed value of homestead
property to the extent of any in-
crease .in the assessed value of
that property which results from
the construction or reconstruction
of the property for the purpose of
providing living quarters for one or
more natural or adoptive grand-


parents or parents of the owner
of the property or of the owner's
spouse if at least one of the grand-
parents or parents for whom the
living quarters are provided is 62
years of age or older. Such a re-
duction may not exceed the lesser
of the following:
(1) The increase in as-
sessed value resulting from con-
struction.or reconstruction of the
property.
(2) Twenty percent of the
total assessed value of the prop-
erty as improved.
(g)(f) For all levies other
than school district levies, assess-
ments of residential real property,
as defined by general law, which
contains nine units or fewer and
which is not subject to the assess-
ment limitations set forth in sub-
sections (a) through (d)(e) shall
change only as provided in this
subsection.
(1) Assessments subject
to this subsection shall be changed
annually on the date of assess-
ment provided by law; but those
changes in assessments shall not
exceed ten percent (10%) of the
assessment for the prior year.
(2) No assessment shall
exceed just value.
(3) After a change df
ownership or control, as defined
by general law, including any
change of ownership of a legal
entity that owns the property, such
property shall be assessed at just
value as of the next assessment
date. Thereafter, such property
shall be assessed as provided in
this subsection.
(4) Changes, additions,
reductions, or improvements to
such property shall be assessed
as provided for by general law;
however, after the adjustment for
any change, addition, reduction,
or improvement, the property shall
be assessed as provided in this
subsection.
(h)(g) For all levies oth-
er than school district levies, as-
sessments of real property that
is not subject to the assessment
limitations set forth in subsections
(a) through (d)(e) and (g)(f) shall
change only as provided in this
subsection.
(1) Assessments subject
to this subsection shall be changed
annually on the date of assess-
ment provided by law; but those
changes in assessments shall not
exceed ten percent (10%) of the
assessment for the prior year.
(2) No assessment shall
exceed just value.
(3) The legislature must
provide that such property shall
be assessed at just value as of
the next assessment date after
a qualifying improvement, as de-
fined by general law, is made to
such property. Thereafter, such
property shall be assessed as pro-
vded in this subsection.
(4) The legislature may
provide that such property shall
be assessed at just value as of
the next assessment date after a
change of ownership or control, as
defined by general law, including
any change of ownership of the
legal entity that owns the property.
Thereafter, such property shall be
assessed as provided in this sub-
section.
(5) Changes, additions,
reductions, or improvements to
such property shall be assessed
as provided for by general law;
however, after the adjustment for
any change, addition, reduction,
or improvement, the property shall
be assessed as provided in this
subsection.

ARTICLE XII
SCHEDULE

S.. -L G LS.
cohmiued otipagge 2










Page 22 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 24, 2008


tax exemption and classification
and assessment of land used
for conservation purposes. The
amendment to Section 3 of Article
VII requiring the creation of anrad
valorem tax exemption for real
property dedicated in perpetuity
for conservation purposes, and
the amendment to Section 4 of
Article VII requiring land used for
conservation purposes to be clas-
sified by general law and assessed
solely on the basis of character or
use for purposes of ad valorem
taxation, shall take effect upon ap-
proval by the electors and shall be
implemented by January 1. 2010.
This section shall take effect upon
approval of the electors.


No. 6
CONSTITUTIONAL
AMENDMENT
ARTICLE VII, SECTION 4
ARTICLE XII, NEW SECTION
(Taxation and Budget Reform
Commission)

Ballot Title:
ASSESSMENT OF WORKING
WATERFRONT PROPERTY
BASED UPON CURRENT USE


Ballot Summary:
Provides for assessment based
upon use of land used predomi-
nantly for commercial fishing
purposes; land used for vessel
launches into waters that are navi-
gable and accessible to the pub-
lic; marinas and drystacks that
are open to the public; and water-
dependent marine manufactur-
ing facilities, commercial fishing
facilities, and marine vessel con-
struction and repair facilities and
their support activities, subject to
conditions, .limitations, and rea-
sonable definitions specified by
general law.

Full Text:

ARTICLE VII
FINANCE AND TAXATION

SECTION 4. Taxation;
assessments.--By general law
regulations shall be prescribed
which shall secure a just valuation
of all property for ad valorem taxa-
tion; provided:
(a) Agricultural land, land
producing high water recharge to
Florida's aquifers, or land used
exclusively for noncommercial rec-
reational purposes may be classi-
fied by general law and assessed
solely on the basis of character or
use.
(b) Pursuant to general
law tangible personal property
held for sale as stock in tradednd
livestock may be valued for taxa-
tion at a specified percentage of
its value, may be classified for tax
purposes, or may be exempted
from taxation.
(c) All persons entitled
to a homestead exemption under
Section 6 of this Article shall have
their homestead assessed at just
value as of January 1 of the year
following the effective date of this
amendment. This assessment
" shall change only as provided
herein.
(1) Assessments subject
to this provision shall be changed
annually on January 1st of each
year; but those changes in as-
sessments shall not exceed the
lower of the following:
a. Three percent (3%) of
the assessment for the prior year.
b. The percent change in
the Consumer Price Index for all
urban consumers, U.S. City Aver-
age, all items 1967=100, or suc-


cessor reports for the preceding
calendar year as initially reported
by the United States Department
of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statis-
tics.
(2) No assessment shall
exceed just value.
(3) After any change of
ownership, as provided by general
law, homestead property shall be
assessed at just value as of Janu-
ary 1 of the following year, unless
the provisions of paragraph (8)
apply. Thereafter, the homestead
shall be assessed as provided
herein.
(4) New homestead
property shall be assessed at just
value as of January 1st of the year
following the establishment of the
homestead, unless the provisions
of paragraph (8) apply. That as-
sessment shall only change as
provided herein.
(5) Changes, additions,
reductions, or improvements to
homestead property shall be as-
sessed as provided for by general
law; provided, however, after the
adjustment for any change, addi-
tion, reduction, or improvement,
the property shall be assessed as
provided herein.
(6) In the eventof a ter-
mination of homestead status, the
property shall be assessed as pro-
vided by general law.
(7) The provisions of this
amendment are severable. If any
of the provisions of this amend-
ment shall be held unconstitu-
tional by any court of competent
jurisdiction, the decision of such
court shall not affect or impair
any remaining provisions of this
amendment.
(8)a. A person who es-
tablishes a new homestead as of
January 1, 2009, or January 1 of
any subsequent year and who has
received a homestead exemption
pursuant to Section 6 of this Ar-
ticle as of January 1 of either of
the two years immediately preced-
ing the establishment of the new
homestead is entitled to have the
new homestead assessed at less
than just value. If this revision is
approved in January of 2008, a
person who establishes a new
homestead as of January 1, 2008,
is entitled to have the new home-
stead assessed at less than just
value only if that person received
a homestead exemption on Janu-
ary 1, 2007. The assessed value of
the newly established homestead
shall be determined as follows:
1. If the just value of the
new homestead is greater than or
equal to the just value of the prior
homestead as of January 1 of the
year in which the prior homestead
was abandoned, the assessed
value of the new homestead shall
be the just value of the new home-
stead minus an amount equal to
the lesser of $500,000 or the dif-
ference between the just value
and the assessed value of the pri-
or homestead as of January 1 of
the year in which the prior home-
stead was abandoned. Thereafter,
the homestead shall be assessed
as provided herein.
2. If the just value of
the new homestead is less than
the just value of the prior home-
stead as of January 1 of the year
in which the prior homestead was
abandoned, the assessed value
of the new homestead shall be
equal to*the just value of the new
homestead divided by the just
value of the prior homestead and
multiplied by the assessed value
of the prior homestead. However,
if the difference between the just
value of the new homestead and
the assessed value of the new
homestead calculated pursuant to
this sub-subparagraph is greater
than $500,000, the assessed val-
ue of the new homestead shall be
increased so that the difference


between the just value and the
assessed value.equals $500,000.
Thereafter, the homestead shall
be assessed as provided herein.
b. By general law and
subject to conditions specified
therein, the Legislature shall pro-
vide for application of this para-
graph to property owned by more
than one person.
(d) The legislature may,
by general law, for assessment
purposes and subject to the pro-
visions of this subsection, allow
counties and municipalities to au-
thorize by ordinance that historic
property may be assessed solely
on the basis of character or use.
Such character or use assessment
shall apply only to the jurisdiction
adopting the ordinance. The re-
quirements for eligible properties
must be specified by general law.
(e) A county may, in the
manner prescribed by general
law, provide for a reduction in the
assessed value of homestead
property to the extent of any in-
crease in the assessed value of
that property which results from
the construction or reconstruction
of the property for the purpose of
providing living quarters for one or
more natural or adoptive grand-
parents or parents of the owner
of the property or of the owner's
spouse if at least one of the grand-
parents or parents for whom the
living quarters are'provided is 62
years of age or older. Such a re-
duction may not exceed the lesser
of the following:
(1) The increase in as-
sessed value resulting from con-
struction or reconstruction of the
property.
(2) Twenty-percent of the
total assessed value of the prop-
erty as improved:
(f) For all levies other
than school district levies, assess-
ments of residential real property,
as defined by general law, which
contains nine units or fewer and
which is not subject to the as-
sessment limitations set forth in
subsections (a) through (c) shall
change only as provided in this
subsection.
(1) Assessments subject
to this subsection shall be changed
annually on the date of assess-
ment provided by law; but those
changes in assessments shall not
exceed ten percent (10%) of the
assessment for the prior year.
(2) No assessment shall
exceed just value.
(3) After a change of
ownership or control, as defined
by general law, including any
change of ownership of a legal
entity that owns the property, such
property shall be assessed at just
value as of the next assessment
date. Thereafter, such property
shall be assessed as provided in
this subsection.
(4) Changes, additions,
reductions, or improvements to
such property shall be assessed
as provided for by general law;
however, after the adjustment for
any change, addition, reduction,
or improvement, the property shall
be assessed as provided in this
subsection.
(g) For all levies other
than school district levies, assess-
ments of real property that is not
subject to the assessment limita-
tions set forth in subsections (a)
through (c) and (f) shall change
only as provided in this subsec-
tion.
(1) Assessments subject
to this subsection shall be changed
annually on the date of assess-
ment provided by law; but those
changes in assessments shall not
exceed ten percent (10%) of the
assessment for the prior year.
(2) No assessment shall
exceed just value.
(3) The legislature must


provide that such property shall
be assessed at just value as of
the next assessment date after
a qualifying improvement, as de-
fined by general law, is made to
such property. Thereafter, such
property shall be assessed as pro-
vided in this subsection.
(4) The legislature may
provide that such property shall
be assessed at just value as of
the next assessment date after a
change of ownership or control, as
defined by general law, including
any change of ownership of the
legal entity that owns the property.
Thereafter, such property shall be
assessed as provided in this sub-
section.
(5) Changes, additions,
reductions, or improvements to
such property shall be assessed
as provided for by general law;
however, after the adjustment for
any change, addition, reduction,
or improvement, the property shall
be assessed as provided in this
subsection.
(h)(1) The assessment
of the following working waterfront
properties shall be based upon
the current use of the property:
a. Land used predomi-
nantly for commercial fishing pur-
poses.
b. Land that is accessible
to the public and used for vessel
launches into waters that are navi-
gable.
c. Marinas and drystacks
that are open to the public.
d. Water-dependent
marine manufacturing facilities,
commercial fishing facilities, and
marine vessel construction and
repair facilities and their support
activities.
(2) The assessment ben-
efit provided by this subsection is
-subject to conditions and limita-
tinns and reasonable definitinns


as specified by the legislature by
general law.

ARTICLE XII
SCHEDULE

Assessment of working
waterfront property.--The amend-
ment to Section 4 of Article VII
providing for the assessment of
working waterfront property based
on current use, and this section,
shall take effect upon approval by
the electors and shall first apply to
assessments for tax years begin-
ning January 1. 2010.


No. 8
CONSTITUTIONAL
AMENDMENT
ARTICLE VII, SECTION 9
(Taxation and Budget Reform
Commission)

Ballot Title:
LOCAL OPTION COMMUNITY
COLLEGE FUNDING.


Ballot Summary:
Proposing an amendment to the
State Constitution to require that
the Legislature authorize counties
to levy a local option sales tax to
supplement community college
funding; requiring voter approval
to levy the tax; providing that ap-
proved taxes will sunset after 5
years and may be reauthorized by
the voters.
Full Text:

ARTICLE VII
FINANCE AND TAXATION

SECTION 9. Local taxes.--
(a) Counties, school districts, and
municipalities shall, and special
districts may, be authorized by law
to levy ad valorem taxes and may
be authorized by general law to
levy other taxes, for their respec-
tive purposes, except ad valorem


taxes on intangible personal prop-
erty and taxes prohibited by this
constitution.
(b) Ad valorem taxes,
exclusive of taxes levied for the
payment of bonds and taxes lev-
ied for periods not longer than two
years when authorized by vote
of the electors who are the own-
-ers of freeholds therein not wholly
exempt from taxation, shall not
be levied in excess of the follow-
ing millages upon the assessed
value of real estate and tangible
personal property: for all county
purposes, ten mills; for all mu-
nicipal purposes, ten mills; for all
school purposes, ten mills; for wa-
ter management purposes for the
northwest portion of the state lying
west of the line between ranges
two and three east, 0.05 mill; for
water management. purposes for
the remaining portions of the state,
1.0 mill; and for all other special
districts a millage authorized by
law approved by vote of the elec-
tors who are owners of freeholds
therein not wholly exempt from
taxation. A county furnishing mu-
nicipal services may, to the extent
authorized by law, levy additional
taxes within the limits fixed for mu-
nicipal purposes.
(c) Counties served by
an open-access public institution
whose primary mission
and. responsibility includes pro-
viding lower level undergraduate
instruction and awarding associ-
ate degrees shall be authorized
by law to levy a local option sales
tax to supplement the funding of
the institution. The tax may not
be levied unless approved by the
electors of each county served by
the institution. The local option tax
shall sunset after five years and
may be reauthorized by the elec-
tors as provided by law. 9-24-08

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
PRIVATE SECOND JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR LIBERTY
COUNTY, FLORIDA

PROBATE DIVISION

IN RE: The Estate of

JAMES PATRICK O'STEEN

CASE NO. 08-38-CP


'Deceased.


NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION

The administration of
the estate of JAMES PATRICK
O'STEEN., deceased, File Num-
ber 2008-CP-, is pending in the
Circuit Court for Liberty County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is Post Office Box
399, Bristol, FL 32321. The names
and addresses of the. personal
representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS
ARE NOTIFIED THAT:
All persons on whom this
notice is served who have objec-
tions that challenge the validity of
the will, the qualifications of the
personal representative, venue,
or jurisdiction of this Court are re-
quired to file their objections with
this Court WITHIN THE LATER
OF THREE MONTHS AFTER
THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUB-
LICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR
THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE
OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE OF THEM.
All creditors of the de-
cedent and other persons having
claims or demands against dece-
dent's estate on whom a copy of
. --- . .









SEPTEMBER 24, 2008 THE CALHOJN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 23


this notice isserved within three
months after the date of the first
publication of this notice must file
their claimswith this Court WITHIN
THREE MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIR-
TY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS

PUBLIC AUCTION
Bristol 66 Towing and Recovery will
hold a Public Auction Oct. 6, 2008 at
5:30 p.m. (ET)
1997 2D BLACK FORD MUSTANG
VIN# 1FLAP4046VF116361
Our auctioh will be held at Bristol 66
Storage on Hoecake Road off Hwy. 20
East, 'one half mile on left, you will see
our sign. Bristol 66 Towing reserves
the right to reject any and all bids.
Calhoun Liberty Journal 9-24-08
If you need any more information on
the above vehicle call and ask for Dale
at (850) 643-2522 or (850) 228-9555.


NOTICE ON THEM."

All other creditors of the decedent
and persons having claims or de-
-mands against the decedent's es-
tate must file their claims with this
Court WITHIN THREE MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.

ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS AND OB-
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.

The date of the first publication of'
this Notice is Wednesday, Septem-
ber 17, 2008.

Attorney for Personal
Representatives:
THOMAS R. THOMSPON Thomp-
son, Crawford & Smiley At t o r-


From Liberty County Board of
LEGALS County Commissioners to Chris
fr m paMoran and Martin Hayes
continued from page 22 Begin at SE Corner of Block 16,
neys at Law Town of Bristol and run thence North
1330 Thomasville Road 00 degrees 1 minutes East 81 feet;
Tallahassee, FL 32303 thence North 89 degrees 28 min-
(850) 386-5777 utes East 100 feet; thence South 00
Florida Bar No. 890596 degrees 01 minutes West 81 feet
more or less to the Right of Way
Personal Representative: of State Road Number 20; thence
Ms. Gretchen Welles South 89 degrees 28 minutes West
15549 New Market Rd. 100 feet more or less to the Point
Hosford, FL32334 9-17&24 of Beginning. Approximately 81' x
100' = 8,100.


NOTICE OF PROPOSED
EXCHANGE OF COUNTY
REAL PROPERTY
FOR OTHER REAL PROPERTY/
PUBLIC HEARING
Notice is given that the Board of
County Commissioners of Liberty
County, Florida, will consider the
following proposed exchange of
property located off Highway 20
and Pogo Street in Bristol, Florida:

From Chris Moran and Martin Hayes
to the Liberty County Board of Coun-
ty Commissioners Commence at a
rod and cap marking the Southeast
corner of Lot 16, in the Town of Bris-
tol, Florida per map or plat thereof
recorded in Deed Book "H", page
374, of the Public Records of Lib-
erty County, Florida, said point also
lying on the Northerly right of Way of
State Road Number 20; thence run
North 81 feet to the Point of Begin-
ning. Thence continue to run North
104 feet to a point. Said point also
lying on the Southerly boundary line
of property described in Deed Book
39, page 107, Liberty County, Flori-
da; thence run along said southerly
boundary line South 88 degrees 52.
minutes 10 seconds West 75 feet
to a "X" in concrete sidewalk lying
on the Easterly right of way of Pogo
Street; Thence leaving said South-
erly Boundary line run along said
Right of South 104 feet. Thence
North 88 degrees. 52 minutes 10
seconds East 75 feet tothe Point
of Beginning. Approximately 75' x
104'= 7,800.


The S' :rtD ,, .hv

3594 plat One Tncc- OSp::s Fi i(.pT



















p---- -w- -- p
.
.... i




-.. -- -.-- - - - -













Step Two p Thre
F.i .. "t. '"-. w/ ,,sh .B l i' m ,.s,




762-3228
Waldorff Ace Hardware
.... 25615 North Main Street
ml ,ln at work |Altha, FL 32421


Conditions of the Proposed Ex-
change of Property:
1) The land to be exchanged will
be approximately an equal amount
of land.
2)The costs of the survey will be
split by both parties.

A public hearing on the pro-
posed exchange of land will be
held at 7:00 p.m. eastern stan-
dard time, on Tuesday, October
7, 2008, at the Liberty County
Courthouse, Highway 20, Bristol,
Florida, 32321.
All interested persons are invited
to attend. A copy of the proposed
Resolution can be received at the
Board of County Commission-
ers Office. In accordance with the
Americans with Disabilities Act, per-
sons needing special accommoda-
tion or an interpreter to participate
in this proceeding should contact
the County Commissioners Office
at (850) 643-5404 at least seven
days prior to the date of the hear-
ing. Persons are advised that if
they decide to appeal any decisions
made at this hearing, they will need
a record of the proceedings, and
for such purposes, they may need
to ensure that a verbatim record
of the proceedings is made which
record includes the testimony and
evidence upon which the appeal is
to be based.

Dated this 19th day of September,
2008.
Liberty County, Florida
Robert Hill, Clerk to the Board of
County Commissioners

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND
FOR CALHOUN COUNTY, FLOR-
IDA
CASE NO: 2008-200-CA

DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL
TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE
FOR FFMLT 2006-FF4, MORT-
GAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFI-
CATES, SERIES 2006-FF4

Plaintiff,
vs.

DONNA SMITH A/K/A/ DON-
NA JEAN SMITH; UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF DONNA SMITH A/K/A
DONNA JEAN SMITH; UNKNOWN
TENANT I; UNKNOWN TENANT II,
and any unknown heirs, devisees,
grantees, creditors, and other un-
known persons or unknown spous-
es claiming by, through and under
any of the above-named Defen-
dants,


Defendants..


NOTICE OF ACTION


DONNA SMITH A/K/A
DONNA JEAN SMITH
17688 NE JANE STREET
BLOUNTSTOWN, FL 32424

UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF DON-
NA SMITH A/K/A DONNA JEAN
SMITH
17688 NE JANE STREET
BLOUNTSTOWN, FL 32424

LAST KNOWN ADDRESS STAT-
ED, CURRENT RESIDENCE UN-
KNOWN

And any unknown heirs, devisees,
grantees, creditors and other un-
known persons or unknown spous-
es claiming by, through and under
the above-named Defendant(s), if
deceased or whose last known ad-
dresses are unknown.

YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that
an action to foreclose Mortgage
covering the following real and per-
sonal property described as follows,
to-wit:

Commence At The NE Corner Of
The Se 1/4 Of The NE 1/4 Of Sec-
tion 29, Township 1 North, Range
8 West, And Run South 238.7
Feet Along The Section Line And
Center Line Of Charlie Johns
Street; Thence Run North 890 49'
West 1873 Feet To The Point Of
Beginning; Thence Run South
00 14' East 188.7 Feet; Thence
Run North 89 49' West 120 Feet;
Thence Run North 000 14' West
188.7 Feet; Thence Run South 890
49' East 120 Feet To The Point Of
Beginning, Containing .52 Acres,
More Or Less, And Also Known
As Lot 6 Of Davis, Tomlinson
And Smith Subdivision.

has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on John
Howarth Farren, Butler' & Hosch,
PA., 3185 South Conway Road,
Suite E, Orlando, Florida 32812
and file the original with the Clerk
of the above-styled Court on or be-
fore 30 days from the first publica-
tion, otherwise a Judgement may
be entered against you for the relief
demanded in the Complaint.

WITNESS my hand and seal of
said Court on the 19th day of Sept.
2008.

If you are a person with a disability
who needs any accommodation in
order to participate'in this proceed-
ing, you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to provision of certain assis-
tance. Please contact Shelly Yon
at 674-4545 within 2 working days
of your receipt of this Summons; if
you are hearing or voice impaired,
1-800-955-8771.


CLERK OF THE COURT
By: Lori Flowers
Deputy Clerk


9-24,10-8


Chevrolet Buick


OF QUINCY

Introduces

our newest

sales associate,







New and Used Vehicles'


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2039 W Jefferson Street in Quincy

1-800-490-1607


NOTICE OF

SPECIAL MEETING

The Board of Commissioners of the Northwest
Florida Regional Housing Authority will hold a
Special Meeting, October 2, 2008 in the Cambridge
Room of the Ramada Inn North, 2900 North
Monroe St., Tallahassee, Florida.
Meeting will begin at 1:00 p.m. E.S.T.
The meeting will be open to the public.
9-17 & 24


I"" '

.~







Page 24 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 24, 2008


OBITUARIES11]


REV. HUBERT L. EDWARDS
BRISTOL Rev. Hubert L. "Shorty" Edwards,
86, passed Friday, Sept. 19, 2008, at his home. He
was born in the Polar Branch area of Liberty County
on March 22, 1922. He was a painting contractor and
retired Assembly of God Minister, having served as
pastor of the Old Assembly of God (now Bethel) two
different occasions, the-Quincy Assembly of God on
two different occasions, El Bethel Assembly of God
in Jackson County, Rock BluffAssembly of God, and
Glad Tidings Assembly of God (now Harvest Chapel)
in Oak Grove. He served for 17 years as the Presbyter
of Section 10, West Florida District of Assembly of
God.
Survivors include his wife of 67 years, Oleta Shepard
Edwards of Bristol; two sons, Frank Edwards and his
wife, Gail of Quincy, and Kenny Edwards and his
wife, Alice of Bristol; sister-in-law, Rev. Pearl Shepard
Edwards of Greensboro; six grandchildren; six great-
grandchildren; and numerous nieces and nephews.
Services were held Monday, Sept. 22 at Bethel
Assembly of God Church. Interment followed in Bethel
Cemetery in Greensboro.
Memorial contributions may be made to Covenant
Hospice, 4440 Lafayette St. Marianna, FL 32446.
Charles McClellan Funeral Home in Quincy was in
charge of the arrangements.

BARBARA SUSAN WINTER
BLOUNTSTOWN Barbara Susan Winter,
61, died peacefully at home Friday, Sept. 19, 2008,
after a long and courageous battle with cancer.
She was born May 28, 1947, in Calvary, Ga., to
Grady and Agnes Pitts Allen. She grew up in the
"piney woods" of Calhoun County where her
mother and grandmother kept a fire tower. It is
here that she learned to find delight in the smallest
things, an ability she kept throughout her life.
She was a member of the Florida Tribe of Eastern
Creeks. She married Jon Winter on June 21, 1969;%
in Blountstown. They lived in Tallahassee where
she earned a Bachelor of Fine Arts and a Master
of Arts in Instructional Design from Florida State
University. She found her greatest pleasure in
being a mother. Outside the home she had a varied
career that included being a Lamaze instructor and
running her own graphics and instructional design
business. She loved to write and in 2000 published
a murder mystery set in Tallahassee. She worked
as a graphic artist, investigator and administrator
at several state agencies. She was very involved in
civic activities, including serving as president of the
Democratic Women's Club and her neighborhood
association. Susan embodied the Will Rogers quote,
"A stranger is just a friend I haven't met yet." It was
her infectious smile that first drew people to her and
her abundant kindness that kept them close.
Survivors include her husband of 39 years, Jon;
her son, Jess William Winter of New York City; her
sisters, Mary Neel and husband, Sam and Francis
Drew and her husband, Fred; and her grandmother,
Mary Rollins of Blountstown.
Services will be held 3 p.m. (ET) Thursday, Sept.
25, at St. Peter's Anglican Church, 901 Thomasville
Road in Tallahassee. A reception will follow at the
church.
In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the
Capital Area Healthy Start Coalition, 1311 N. Paul
Russell Rd., Suite A101, Tallahassee, FL 32301
(850-488-0288), or the American Cancer Society,
2619 Centennial Blvd., Suite 101, Tallahassee, FL
32308.


LULA JANE MCCOY
BLOUNTSTOWN Lula Jane McCoy, 96,
died Friday, Sept, 19, 2008 in Blountstown. She
was born on March 25, 1912 in Jackson County
and had lived in Calhoun County most of her life.
She was a homemaker and a member of Calvary
Baptist Church in Blountstown.
Survivors include two sons, Roberty McCoy
Jr. and his wife, Lucille of Clarksville and J.W.
McCoy and his wife, Joann of Chattahoochee;
three daughters, Hazel Walden of Clarksville,
Oianne Benson and her husband, Neal of
St. Augustine, and Wanda Sue Spooner of
Chattahoochee; one brother, Dan Griffin of Port
St. Joe; two sisters, Lila Walden and Elsie Pippin,
both of Blountstown; along with 29 grandchildren,
a host of great and great-great-grandchildren.
Services were held on Tuesday, Sept. 23 at the
Peavy Funeral Home Chapel with Rev. Francis
Carlisle and Rev. Marvin Nichols. Interment
followed'in Williams Memorial Cemetery in
Scotts Ferry.
Peavy Funeral Home in Blountstown was in
charge of the arrangements.

ROY LOWREY JR.
WEWAHITCHKA- Roy Lowrey Jr., 59, died
Thursday, Sept. 18, 2008, in Louisiana. He was.
born Oct. 28, 1948 in Panama City and.had lived
in Wewahitchka for the past 31 years, coming from
Panama City. Roy was a commercial fisherman
for more than 30 years and worked as a merchant
mariner with Edison Chouest Offshore. He attended
Open Arms Assembly of God Church in Kinard.
SSurvivors include his wife, Susan Lowrey of
Wewahitchka; four sons, Roy Lowrey III, Jason
Matthew Lowrey and his wife, Krissi, all of
Wewahitchka, Royce Michael Chancey Jr. and his
wife, Donya of Howard Creek and Randall Lee
Chancey and his wife, Brandy of Howard Creek:
two daughters, Sandra Burkett and her husband,
Willard of Howard Creek, and Christy Lynn
Moore and her husband, John of Wewahitchka;
four brothers, Kenneth Lowrey and his wife,
Sandi, Reuben Lowrey and his wife, Becky, David
Vananda and his wife, Leslie and Billy Writch
and his wife, Belinda, all of Panama City; three
sisters, Gail Carrion and her husband, Joe ofDallas,
Janice Grant of Panama City, and Deborah Lowrey
and Luli of Kenneth City; 24 grandchildren; one
great-grandchild; stepfather, Billy Writch Sr. of
Panama City; previous wife, Sherry Williams of
Bonifay; and a daughter-in-law, Karen Chancey


of Wewahitchka.
Services were
Peavy Funeral
Home chapel
with the Rev.
Nixon Miller
and the Rev.
Jason Lowrey
officiating.
Interment
followed in
Buckhorn
Cemetery in
Wewahitchka.
Peavy
Funeral Home
in Blountstown
was in
charge of the
arrangements.


held Monday, Sept. 22, at the


Come

Home
to comfort & care
James C. (Rusty) Black Jack W. Weiler
Owner & Manager Lic. Funeral Director

Independent
Funeral Home
211 E. Jefferson St., Quincy
(850) 875-1529
LOCALLY OWNED & OPERATED


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593-6828 1-800-369-6828 Fax: 593-6888
Hwy, W P.O,. Box 933 Snead FL 32460
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Serving Jackson & the Surrounding Counties for 42 Years
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Funeral Home
Charles K. McClellan
Licensed Funeral Director
42 years experience
Call us Let us explain how we can
conveniently handle arrangements
in Liberty County.
Butler-Morgan/Morgan-McClellan Funeral Iome
\. .Building at 15 S. Jackson St., Quincy, 32351
S Phone: (850) 627-7677 or 643-2277



Jereminuik loragla& 6Sle:
Feb 17, 1989-Sept. 24, 2006
Two years ago
today I experienced
the worst fear of a
parent, the loss of
my son, Jeremy..
i My hear felt as if
it was ripped from
my chest. I feel Jeremy's presence
around me often and it helps the pain.
Let us not forget. I miss him so much.
Love, Dad & Grace.



*
evis Funeral

SHome of Bristol
&- Crematory

All existing pre-needandat need
contracts are now handled by the
SBevis family and staff.

All operations of the funeral process
will be handled on location at
12008 NW State Road 20.

CALL 643-3636

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Licensed Funeral Directors



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+ ~








SEPTEMBER 24, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 25


Passionate about butterflies? Plant passion vine!


( by Theresa Friday,
Horticulture Extension Agent,
* Santa Rosa County
As the name implies, the
Gulf fritillary butterfly haunts
the Gulf of Mexico and is the
most commonly seen butterfly
along the Gulf Coast this time
of year. In Florida, it can be
found in all 67 counties.
The Gulf fritillary can be
identified by the striking silver
spots on its underside. The
adult butterfly is bright orange
with black markings and has
a 212 to 3% inch wingspan.
It is a beautiful butterfly
that many people want to
attract to their garden. The
adult is frequently seen on
nectar-producing verbena,
penta, phlox, porterweed and
lantana.
The larva, or caterpillar,
of the Gulf fritillary grows to
approximately 1/2 inches in
length and is bright orange in
color. It is covered in rows
of black spines on its head
and back. The spines are soft
to the touch and do not sting.
However, the caterpillars are
poisonous if eaten, as the
bright coloration advertises.
Their toxic flesh provides
Gulf-fritillary caterpillars
with excellent protection from
predators.
The Gulf fritillary adult
female lays her eggs and the
caterpillars feed on plants in
the Passiflora genus. There
are many species ofPassiflora,
also known as passioniflower
or passion vine;
Our native passionflower,
Passiflora incarnata, can be
found growing on sunny


The orange color and black spines
The Gulf fritillary is a beautiful orange butterfly with silver of the Gulf fritillary caterpillars warns


markings underneath.


fence lines and in open
fields throughout the region.
Commonly called maypops,
for the sound they make when
stepped on, the fruits are
edible, withpomegranate-like
seed pods filled with richjuice.


predators of its toxic taste.


Some gardeners will tell you
it's called maypop because it
may pop-up anywhere in your
garden.
Passion vine is a fast-
growing perennial vine which
uses its tendrils to attach to


fences, trees, or other supports,
usually reaching heights of 10
to 20 feet. Frosts will kill it
back to the ground, but it will
happily reappear in the spring,
but not always where you
planted it.


This is a plant known to
sucker and can cover a large
area fairly quickly. On the
otherhand, a little maintenance
yields a nice vine with some
of the most exotic flowers in
the world.
Passion vines require good
drainage and plenty of sunlight
to be prolific bloomers. Provide
a good support structure and
keep well mulched. A light
application of fertilizer in late
spring and mid-summer keeps
the foliage looking its best.
Passion vine is chemically
protected by toxins, which
prevents most insects from
feeding on it, so it has few
pest problems. It is, however,
fed upon by the Gulf fritillary
caterpillar, which can totally
defoliate the vine. Insecticides
should be avoided if attracting
these winged creatures is
a priority. Many gardeners
grow passion vine primarily
to attract butterflies to their
gardens and don't care about
its ragged appearance in late
summer.
All :of the passionflowers
have beautifully complex
blossoms and maypop is no
exception. They have large
flowers, usually 3-5 inches in
diameter.
Since passion-vine sends
up new\ plants yards away
from where it was planted,
getting new plants is as easy
as pulling up the unwanted
sprouts and putting them in
containers. These sprouts
have a better survival rate if
part of the root is attached to
it, but you must dig down a
bit. Just pulling the sprout will
detach it from its root.
The passion vine is a
versatile flowering vine that
just might have a place in
your yard. Plant one for
the beauty of the flower and
the knowledge that you are
supporting the Gulf fritillary
butterfly.
Theresa Friday is the
Residential Horticulture
.Extension Agentfor Santa Rosa
County.

LIQUIDATION

LAND SALE
10 ACRE plus Tracts
From $3,995 per acre
$995 Total Down
OWNER FINANCING,
No Qualifying

Tri-land Inc.
R. E. Broker "
Phone (813) 253-3258


We'll protect you with

Universal Life.










STO TAI RE"N INC.
TI 111 l .. 1I T%11 .NI .l I 1i-l, I v IN C


Contact Bill Stoutamire

Phone 674-5974 Fax 674-8307
aAuto-Oawners hsurane e


STOUTAMIRE INSURANCE INC.
16783 SE Pear St., Blountstown
Contact Bill Stoutamire
Phone 674-5974 Fax 674-8307


Laban Bontrager,









Page 26 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 4, 2008


In Home Daycare
2 Spots Available
850-228-7243


THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL




CLASSJIFIEDS

To place your ad, call 643-3333 by noon Eastern
Time on Saturday. Non-business ads run FREE for 2 weeks.
\ .......... ..... . ,-.. .... ............. .. ... ...... ..


TRAILER FOR RENT
Two bedroom, two bath-
room mobile home for
rent located six miles
north of Blountstown on
HWY 69 north. Water,
sewer, and grass mow-
ing provided. Deposit
required. No pets.
Call 643-8934


L OK

S1 edroom
Apartments
"The Best Place to Live"
RENTAL ASSISTANCE




Call (850) 674-4202 -
16978 NW Mayo Street,
Blountstown, FL 32424.
TTDfTTY 711.
EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY


MObile Home
For Rent


3 bedroom,
1.5 bath MH on
Ochlocknee River
$400

,850-510-4686,


ITEMS FOR SALE


Anniversary/engagement ring,
beautiful marquise cut style, main
stone 3/4 carat, side diamonds,
total weight is 1.25 carats, 14k
gold, given for five year anniver-
sary, seldom worn, must sell, $900
or best offer. Call 228-1462.
9-24, 10-1

Roll of plastic, heavy gauge, new,
enough to cover a large green-
house, $175. Call 573-3155.
9-17, 9-24

Wrist watch, for man, Invicta
Chronograph, worth $500, $200.
Call 674-2480. 9-17,9-24



FURNITURE


Dining room table, solid wood,
with six chairs, asking $150. Call
643-2614. 9-24,10-1

Two recliners, matching, navy
blue, $100 for the pair. Call 643-
3799. 9-24,10-1

Dining table, wooden, good condi-
tion, $50. Call 674-1637. 9-17,9-24

Chest of drawers, grandfather
clock, 42"roundglasstable. Call 674-
3264. 9-17,24

End table, glass, square, $20. Call
643-2414. 9-17,9-24

Dining set table, oak, five chairs,
like new, $200 or best offer; T.V. arm,
holds upto 31 "television, solid pine,
$100 or best offer. Call 674-2480.
9-17,9-24

BABIES/INFANTS

Baby girl clothes, four boxes,
0-6 months; Graco swing; Fisher
Price vibrating chair with rainfor-
est theme; Fisher Price Jumperoo,
Rainforest theme. Call 643-6738
for more info. 9-24,10-1

Kolcraft bassinet, white lace,
night light, vibrations and music,
bottom storage basket, $65; Pa-
pazan bouncer, khaki, with vibra-
tions and music features, includes
blanket, $40; Aquarium Ocean
Wonder bouncer, child activation,
music, vibration and lights, $25;
play pallet, Rain Forest Jungle
Gym, lights and music, $25. Call
643-3799. 9-24,10-1

Baby rainforest jumparoo, good
condition, paid $90, asking $60;
bouncy seat, plays music and vi-
brates, $10. Call 258-3719.
9-17, 9-24

Baby blankets, beautiful, hand-
made, one white, one blue with
sparkles, $20 each. Call 573-
3155. 9-17, 9-24


CLOTHING

Box of boys shoes, size three.
Call 674-3264. 9-17,24



APPLIANCES


Washer and dryers, one
two dryers,, pair for $10(
dryer $50. Call 643-5991.

Tappan stove, electric, o
old, $250; Frigidaire refri
one year old, $250. Call 37
after 5 p.m. on Monday-TI
or Friday before 3 p.m.

Portable dishwasher, K
brand, very good conditic
674-4105..

GE electric stove, gooc
tion, $150. Call 674-1637.

Dryer, $50; washer and
stackable, $130. Call 762-


Dryer, $80. Call 643-2414

Frigidaire washer and
stackable, one year old,.
best offer. Call 643-6260.


ELECTRONIC

NES system, regular
with advantage joystick
N64 system, with five gar
joysticks, memory card, $
762-3477.

Two house speakers, $1
T.V., 13" Zenith, needs
cable ready. Call 643-241


Dell computer with sp
computer cabinet and ch
year old, $425. Call 643-6


CARS


2004 Chevy Cavilier, great condi-
tion, 45K miles, great gas mileage,
below book price, $7,500. Call 762-
3370. 9-24,10-1

1998 Oldsmobile Bravada, 87k
miles, fourdoor, all wheel drive, sun.
roof, all electric, all leather, second
owner, $4,500 or trade for small car
of equal value. Call 379-0609.
9-24,10-1

1991 Camaro RS, new motor, two
new tires, T-top, $1,500 or best of-
fer. Call 447-4187 or 447-4186.
9-24, 10-1

1977 El Camino, classic, low mile-
age, $1,500 firm. Call 762-2223.
9-17, 9-24

1988 Buick Regal, best offer. Call
674-3264. 9-17,24

Buick LaSabre, custom edition
#11. Call 237-1659 for informa-
tion. 9-17, 9-24


1996 Pontiac Sunfire, rebuilt mo-
tor, less than 600 miles, new tires,
looks good, runs good, $3,000. Call
643-4402. 9-17,9-24

TRUCKS


1986 Ford F-150, V6, automatic,
4x4, $2,000; 1985 Toyota, 4 cyl-
inder, 4x4, automatic, air, $2,800.
Call 674-5312. 9-24,10-1

1994 Chevy 4x4, step-side, new
tires, battery, pipes and tint, runs
good, all electric, lots of chrome,
C.D. player, lift kit, $5,800. Call
762-8952. 9-24, 10-1

2002 ChevyAvalanche, leather, all
power, 89K miles, $8,900 or best
offer. Call 674-8245. 9-24, 10-1

2002 Chevy Avalanche, pick-up,
four door, 20" rims, 90K miles, runs
good, $10,500. Call 447-2772.
9-24,10-1


2003 F-250 XLT, crew cab, super-
dryer, duty, 4WD, leather seats, bucket
8566. front seats, brush guard, step bars,
9-17,9-24 tinted windows, towing package,
67K miles, $17,500 firm. Call 643-
.9-17,9-24 3589. 9-24, 10-1

dryer, 1995 S-10, extended cab, air bags,
$900 or .four link air ride suspension, custom
9-17,9-24 c-notch frame, 10-switc box, shaved
door handles, tail lights and tailgate
C S handle, new candy paint with tweed
and billet interior, new 18" rims and
tires, 4.3L, V6, must sell, $5,500 or
system, best offer. Call 228-1462. 9-24,10-1
s, $30; 1989 Toyota, pick-up, great on gas,
.es, two clean, runs good, $2,200. Call 674-
40. Call 8003. 9-17,9-24
9-24, 10-1
2006 Ford F-150, $2,000 and take
0 each; over payments, or make offer. Call
remote, 674-1385 leave message. 9-17,9-24
4.
9-17,9-24 1989 GMC, 4x4, pick-up, $1,500
or best offer. Call 718-6580 or 762-
eakers, 2849. 9-17,9-24
air, one
132.
9-17,9-24 SUVS/VANS


1994 Ford van. Call 674-3264.
9-17,24

1998 Jeep Cherokee, everything
but cruise control, really good con-
dition, runs very well, automatic,
$3,500. Call 674-7138 or 899-0269
leave message. UFN


AUTO PARTS &

ACCESSORIES

Toolbox, for large truck, $60. Call
674-3264. 9-24,10-1

Truck cover, windows, LeerCrown,
fits Dodge Dakota, good work top,
blue with paint markings, sliding
glass side windows, hinged glass
back hitch, the lifts need replacing,
$10 or best offer. Call 762-2528.
9-24, 10-1

15-inch wheels and tires, alumi-
num, lug pattern 5 on 5 1/2, $300.
Call 899-0269 or 674-7138 leave
message. UFN


wI^
Foil


:'i:,








SEPTEMBER 24,2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 27


THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL



CLASSIFIEDTS

To place your ad, call 643-3333 by noon Eastern
Time on Saturday. Non-business ads run FREE for 2 weeks.
. .-- "- '" -


GUNS/HUNTING

Rifle, CVA black powder, .50 cali-
ber, brand new, $100; tree stand,
Cougar Claw, climber, $100. Call
643-6260. 9-24,10-1

SPORTING GOODS

& EXERCISE EQUIP.

Skateboard ramps, $20; Paintball
gun, make offer. Call 933-6165 for
details. 9-24, 10-1

Poker table. Call 762-2223.
9-17, 9-24

Pool table, like new, $450. Call 718-
6580 or 762-2849. 9-17,9-24


MOTORCYCLES

&ATVS


I. 2007 Yamaha V-Star, 650, custon
3,700 miles, $5,500 firm: Call 643
1726. 9-24,10-


1984 Honda Shadow GT, 700cc
motorcycle, $1,500 or best offer.
Call 674-1740. 9-24,10-1

2007 Honda Foreman 500, 4WD,
like new, 120 hours on ATV, any
reasonable offer accepted. Call
643-6589. 9-17,9-24

2006 Harley Davidson Road
King, one owner, black, less than
100 miles, $13,500. Call 674-4364
or 643-7796. \ 9-10T.10-15


WATERCRAFT

1995 Sea-Doo Wave Runner.
580cc, trailer, just had all mainte-
nance and upkeep done, $1,200.
Call 899-3595. 9-24,-10-1

1979 Hydrostream Venus, 20',
2.4, 200 hp, $4,000. Call 258-
4052. 9-24, 10-1

Boat, motor and trailer, 25 hp
Mercury, stick steering, electric
start, 14' aluminum Voyager, troll-
ing, foot control, can be seen at
15608 NW JJ Young Road, Hwy
71 1/2 mile North of Altha, on Fri-
day and Saturday, Sept. 19 and
20, $2,200, serious inquiries only.
Call 762-3923. 9-17,9-24

1988 Bayliner, 14', on galvanized
trailer, 50 hp, outboard, $1,200 or
best offer. 718-6580 or 762-2849.
9-17, 9-24



TOOLS AND HEAVY

EQUIPMENT

Horton V-nose trailer, 7x16, set
up for landscaping, weed eater
racks, etc., spare tire, $4,000. Call
643-6589. 9-24,10-1


-


LOST & FOUND

Found: bulldog, young, male, solid
white with brown patch over eye,
found near Camilla St. and Neal
subdivision. Call 643-2556.
9-24, 10-1


.Il. da
- 0 ft


sreo


Utility trailer, 6x10, with drop
gate, $525. Call 379-8410.9-24, 10-1

Leaf vacuum and chipper. Call
762-2223. 9-17,9-24

Tool trailer, 6'x12', enclosed,
good shape, home built, $475.
Call 674-1840. 9-17, 9-24

Full size toolbox, diamond plat-
ed, $150. Call 674-8003. 9-17,9-24

16' trailer, 4' drop down gate, new
tires, $1,600. Call 674-4301.
9-17, 9-24


HOME

IMPROVEMENT

A/C unit, two and a half tons. Call
762-2223. 9-17,9-24

Storm door, standard size, like
new, $50. Call 643-5486. 9-17,9-24

Window unit, 24,000 BTU, not-
ing wrong with it, $300. Call 258-
3719. 9-17, 9-24

Central unit, one and a half tons,
$150. Call 643-4402. 9-17,9-24

Central A/C unit, Ten Star Spirit,
works good, needs condenser,
$250. Call 573-3155. 9-17,9-24



CAMPERS/RVS

2004 Emerald Bay camper, 28',
slide out, very good shape, $13,900.
Call 447-2772. 9-24,10-1

2005 S&S 8.5 truck camper. Fits
full size pick-up, short of long bed,
2395 Ibs., electric jacks, awning,
outside and inside shower, air and
head, built in microwave, stove with
oven, like new, $14,900. call 643-
4491 leave message. 9-17,9-24

1998 Alegro Bay motor home.
New tires, less than 18K original
miles on motor, asking $8,500. Call
643-4402. 9-17,9-24


HOMES & LAND

One acre for sale, in Hosford,
$12,000, Call294-3511. 9-17,9-24

1993 double wide, four bed, two
bath, you move, $30,000 or best
offer. Call 570-9358. 9-17,9-24

1990trailer, single wide, three bed,
two bath, new floors in living room,
new. bathtub, you move, asking
$5,000. Call 545-3939. 9-17, 9-24

1994 mobile home, Homes of
Legend brand, 16x80, central heat
and air, full electric, three bedroom/
two bath, comes with appliances
and two porches, must be moved.
Call 566-5170. 7-23 T.10-

Big lot on Chipola River, located in
Calhoun County. Call 643-1514.
-UFN


Lost: Black lab, full grown
male, very friendly and tru,
disappeared on Monday, Se
from her yard on NW 11th S
in Blountstown, name is Baby
blue collar with rabies tag; sco
forehead, missed and wanted
home. If you have any inform
on her, please call 674-8237 I
message. 9-1


PETS/SUPPLIE

Kittens, grey male tabby an
ange fuzzy male tabby, frie
eight weeks old, free to i
home. Call 762-2528. 9-2,

Rescued puppy, approxim
six months old, looks good,
taken care of, medium size, rr
White English, sweet dispos
free to a good home. Call
9771. 9-2,

Kittens, eight weeks. old,
to good home; six month olk
ten and mother cat, need Ic
homes. Call 557-1346. 9-1:

Poodle mix, female, tan, ver)
ing, $75. Call 674-3264. 9-1

Basset hound, female, spE
one and a half years old,
:shots, $50. Call 643-6260. 9-1


WANTED

Wanted: Roommate needed
Blountstown, male or female
more information, call 447-41E
9-E

Wanted: Junk cars and trn
any condition, we pay cash.
762-8459 or 272-6836 cell.



YARD SALES


Moving sale, begins Wednes
Sept. 24, in Grand Ridge, el
thing must go. Call 762-867
693-1401. 9-21


Yard sale, Saturday, Sept. 2;
the Carr-Clarksville Fire Sta
Highway 73 North, lots of iti
no clothes. Call 643-7955 for r
info. 9-24

Multi-family sale, Saturday,
4, 7 a.m.-12p.m. (CT), at Han
parking lot, clothes, shoes, f
ture and many more items.
643-2415 for more info. 9-2


* 5- *


r =


abalauction.com
ucks, Calhoun County
Call ALTHA, FL 3 bed, 3.5
UFN bath on White
Pond. Online
bidding now! Live
auction Oct. 16.
S 850-510-2501
sday, AB2387


a


-


J "Copyrighted Material -
Syndicated Content I
Available from Commercial News Providers"




S o


a-

-
- --~-


-

-


FOR RENT
3 bedroom, 1
bath house on
Pea Ridge Road.
Hardwood floors
throughout, open
floor plan.
$750/month
Serious inquiries only.
PHONE
643-3799
9-24-08


House for Sale
3 bedroom/1.5 bathroom,
one plus acre, corner lot,
fenced out building, walk
to shopping, K-12, medical,
downtown Blountstown,
must relocate due to job,
asking for payoff, $113,000.
Call 606-776-1762.
S9-17&24


Home For Sale
By Owner

Approx. 2 miles from
Blountstown on paved
road, 2.32 acres, 4 BR 3
BA, large walk in closet,
large family room, inside
laundry room, pantry in
kitchen. Over 2,000 l,. 2
car garage, workshop. at
shed, cook shed with We
smoker. New metal' f
in 2005, new a/c in l7.
$198,900. Call 674-W38
to see. 9-24-08


Pea ShelB

Compost

Nitrogen Rich

Plant Elixir
Leave Message Order.

674-8570


AUCTION
First Saturday of every month
The auction will be held Oct.
3 at 7 p.m. (Old Coins, Tools,
Collectibles, candy, food &
Misc. items) Free setup for
yard sale every Saturday.
Public is invited.
Col. James W. Copeland
18098 NW County Rd; 12
Phone: 643-7740
AB1226 AU001722


. qw.


r


---








Page 28 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 24, 2008


VOLUNTEERS
NEEDED
W.R. Tolar Middle School
Art Classes are now in full
swing. Mrs. Gayle Grissett
has been coordinating visiting
artists to show off their own
work and style. If you would
be interested in providing a
brief 15-30 minute lesson as
well as show off your craft,
please contact her at 643-2426
ext. 603. Youalso will need to
have a background screening
done.
BUTTERFLY GARDEN
During the spring, W.R.
began a butterfly garden
memorial project in memory
of our former teacher, Cindy
Mitchell. Mrs. Mitchell was
a dedicated teacher for 27
years. She touched the lives
of countless children who had
the privilege of entering her
classroom. The memory of
Mrs. Mitchell's extraordinary
gift of teaching will have
a permanent place at W.R.
Tolar through the children she
touched and in our butterfly
garden.
The memorial garden
contains several nectar andhost


plants that attract butterflies
native to Florida. Included so
far is salvia, virbinum, purple
cone flower, lantana, fennel,
parsley, milkweed, butterfly
bush, daises, honeysuckle,
passion vine, thistle and a
variety of additional plants.
The garden also includes a
small pond that is a work
in progress. The memorial
garden will serve as a place
where students can remember
Mrs. Mitchell's dedication to
education and a means for her
memory to continue to touch
our lives.
7TH GRADE
HAPPENINGS
Next Wednesday, Marcia
Wood, Supervisor of
Elections, will be putting on
a mock election. Students
will be learning about the
election process and elect
class officers. We will be
visiting the Florida Caverns
next Friday; pre-purchased
tickets are $4/person, if you
would like to chaperone, send
your money by this Friday,
tickets purchased at the gate
are $8. Students should bring
a sack lunch. Students who


PHYSICS CLASS ROCKET COMPETITION
by Stacie Worthington
This year our Physics class will be in a rocket competition.
The participants must design a rocket that will climb to 750
ft. in the air and stay for 45 seconds. This year's new task is
transporting the one-egg payload lying on its side rather than
positioned vertically, mimicking the position of an astronaut.
The contest gives future engineers the opportunity to
demonstrate their math and physics skills. Working together in
a team environment, they will design a real aerospace product,
'which will be put through the rigors of testing and evaluation.
Lets' try and bring home the first place position.

Liberty County High School
Calendar of Events
Thursday, Sept. 25 Coronation 9 a.m. at LCHS
gym
Friday, Sept.26 Homecoming I
Parade, 1:30 p.m.; Pre-
Game Activities, 7:30
p.m.; Homecoming
Game, 8 p.m.
Tuesday, Sept. 30 -
Volleyball LCHS v. Port
St. Joe, 5 and 6 p.m.


qualify for free/reduced lunch
will be provided a sack lunch
from the lunchroom if needed.
Lunchroom sack lunches will
also be available for any
student without lunch the day
of the field trip at the standard
student rate.
COMMUNITY HELPERS
Mrs. Flowers' and Mrs.
Anita's class has been learning
about community helpers. We
were very fortunate to have
four special visitors come
to our classroom last week.
We would like to thank Ms.
Kayla Eikeland, Mrs. Sandy
O'Bryan, Mr. Jamie Shiver,
and Mr. Steve Cutshaw for
visiting our class and sharing
great information about their
careers.
KINDERGARTEN NEWS
As kindergarten will be
learning the letter Pp next
week, we will be taking a
field trip to Pizza Hut in
Blountstown on Thursday,
Oct. 2. Please see your child's
Star Newsletter or teacher if
you have any questions.
RECORDER CLASSES
The Recorder Karate class
is getting in full swing. Fourth
and fifth graders seem very
excited about learning to
play the recorder this year!
Their teacher, Gayle Grissette
anticipates wonderful concerts
and entertainment during the
year for our school assemblies
and programs. Stay tuned for
more!!
TOLAR VOLLEYBALL
INFORMATION
The Tolar volleyball record
as of 9/18/08 is 6-1 (A Team)
and 5-1(B Team).
Remaining Schedule:
Sept. 22 Port St. Joe, 4:30
p.m., away
Sept. 23 Blountstown, 4
p.m., home
Sept. 25 -Altha, 5:30-p.m.,
home
Sept. 30 Franklin MS /
ABC, 4:30 p.m., away
*,Oct. 2 ABC, 4 p.m., home
Oct. 9 Blountstown, 4 p.m.,
.away


LIBERTY COUNTY
UPCOMING ELECTION

Dates to Remember
Election Date
November 4, 2008
Closing of the Registration Books
October 6, 2008
Early Voting
October 20 November 1, 2008
Hours: 8:00 a.m. 4 p.m.
Monday through Saturday
Logic & Accuracy Testing
of Voting Equipment
October 16, 2008 @ 9:00 a.m

Located at the Courthouse in the Elections Office
9-24,10-1









That's right, SWAT's back

and we're celebrating!
All Calhoun County middle school
students are invited to join in on the fun.




Friday,

Sept. 26

from 6-11 p.m.
i W.T. Neal Civic Center
Blountstown



SWAT enrollment will be on site


STUDENTS WORKING
AGAINST TOBACCO


Home of the MISS FLORIDA PALM STATE SCHOLARSHIP PAGEANT: '7,5000 in Prizes in 2008


Wedding
j Erq, SO MP

OF PAU K'


Clarksville
at Hwy. 20 &
County Rd. 287


gs Prom Formals Pageants Homecomings


NDs SALON
10% ro 40% SALES EVERY PAY




1 00: OF GOWNS, 1,000'S AVAILABLE ,

S674-9685
wwwroan)We ( 674-PROM
www.prowant.net (7766)








SEPTEMBER 24, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 29


Liberty and Calhounf
County Schools
Sept. 25-Oct. 1, 2008
















THURSDAY
Breakfast Grits with
Cheese toast, assorted
cereal with buttered
toast, assorted fruit
I juice.
FRIDAY
Breakfast Waffles and
Sausage link, assorted
cereal with buttered
toast, and assorted fruit
juice.
MONDAY
Breakfast Pancakes
and sausage link, as-
sorted cereal with but-
tered toast, and as-
sorted fruit juice.
TUESDAY
Breakfast Sausage
biscuit with hash brown,
assorted cereal with
buttered toast, assorted
fruit juice.
WEDNESDAY
Breakfast Scrambled
egg, grits with toast,
Assorted cereal with
Sputtered toast, assorted I
fruit juice.






THURSDAY
Lunch: BBQ Chicken,
Mac and cheese, broc-
coli, and pears. Alter-
nate: Baked ham.
FRIDAY
SLunch: Pepperonipizza,
I baked potato wedges, I
Sand apple. Alternate: I
STurkey sub.
MONDAY
I Lunch: Beef taco, let-
tuce, tomato, salsa,
whole kernel corn, and
applesauce. Alternate:
Chicken taco.
TUESDAY
Lunch: Chicken Tet-
razzini, carrots, orange,
whole wheat roll. Alter-
nate: Italian hoagie.
WEDNESDAY
Lunch:Spaghetti,tossed
salad, and tropical fruit.
SAlternate: Hot turkey
Sand cheese sandwich.


I *--. .- --~


M ILt Fi .- -_- ., .. .s-Q -a llalu
UE
T4ODRIs


SPORTS NEWS
by Junicia Baker, BHS sports
correspondent
The Lady Tigers Varsity
Volleyball team had a great
game on Sept. 16 against the
Lady Altha Wildcats. The
games were extremely close
and filled with excitement,
ending with our ladies bringing
the victory to our courts. The
Lady Tigers won three out of
four games; 33-31, 25-21, 21-
25, and 26-24. The JV team
also played hard with-good
sportsmanship and dedication
but, at the end of the game
Altha took it home.
FCCLA
by Jacy Richards
On Tuesday, Sept.16,
FCCLA sponsor Mrs. Nancy
Mears traveled with club
members to Bethlehem
school for a FCCLA district
planning meeting. All district
clubs attended this meeting
where they planned this year's
district meeting which will be
held at BHS. Parliamentary
procedures were followed
in their meeting which
made it very interesting and
fascinating. BHS FCCLA has
a full and motivating schedule
for this year.
VICA
by Makynzie O'Bryan
The VICA Club sponsor
Mr. Sidney Granger is pleased
to announce this year's club
officers: President John
Wesley Newsome, Vice


. -- .-- .--
VICA members sitting on a picnic table made by the VICA club
for BHS students to use at lunch time.


President- Brittany McCardle,
Secretary Hannah Smith,
Treasurer Rebecca Pitts,
and SGA Rep. Genny Starr.
VICA (Vocational Industrial
Clubs of America) stays busy
repairing and building items
such as bookshelves, desks,
picnic tables, and cabinets.
These club members not
only learn a craft that could
potentially end up being a
career, but they also can save
the school money by doing
projects and various ventures
for the teachers .
Genny Starr, a club member,
says 'I enjoy the people the
most. If you mess up while
working on a project, after
everyone is done picking fun
at you they show you how
to correct your mistake and
prevent it from happening
again." VICA stays very active


Kids of Character


Principal Ronnie Hand proudly announces Altha School's Kids
of Character for the month of August. Pictured from left, top
row: Johnny Aaron, Samantha Potter, Koleby Dean, Max Scott;
middle row: Remington Mills, Stephanie Wriston, Nolon Bean,
Anna Alday, Paityn Parker; bottom row: Brooke Rackley, Julie
Burge, Joseph Varnum, Hadley Barfield and Ashley Bramblett.
Not pictured: Skyler Barrentine.


and involved throughout
the school year, eager and
prepared to tackle any and all
projects.
SENIOR NEWS
Herff Jones will be on
campus Sept. 29 to talk
to seniors about ordering
graduation materials.


Around Campus
STUDENTS VOTE IN '08
by Carolyne Van Lierop
BHS students will be given
the opportunity to voice their
opinion and vote on the
presidential candidates on
campus through a project
developed by senior Carolyne
Van Lierop, who is in Mrs.
Ayers' Mass Media class.
This gives the students at
BHS the perfect chance to be
made aware of the historical
political era we are in and
to experience how their vote
is their voice. Stay tuned
for further updates on this
project.
In addition, Mrs. Margie
Larramore, Supervisor of
Elections, will be in the BHS
Media Center this Thursday,
Sept. 25 at 8:30 a.m.-to register
eligible students.


r - - - - - -
B-town High School
Calendar of Events
I Wednesday, Sept. 24 See you at the pole at 7:30
a.m.
I Thursday, Sept. 25 Volleyball at home against Sneads
at 5/ 6 p.m.; JV football at home against Freeport at 6 p.m.
I Friday, Sept. 26 Varsity Football
at Florida High at 6:30 p.m.
SMonday, Sept. 29 Volleyball
(at home against Wewa 5/ 6 Sept
p.m.; Progress reports; Herff
SJones meets with Seniors
Tuesday, Sept. 30 -
I Volleyball at NFC 4/ 5 p.m.
L - - - --- ---


FALL PICTURES
Remember, Thursday, Sept. 25, will beFall Picture Day for grades
PreK 11. Senior portraits will be made for those seniors who did not
have them done during preschool. Also, seniors who want re-takes
should plan on having them done on this day.
r - - - - - -
ALTHA SCHOOL
CALENDAR OF EVENTS

Thursday, Sept. 25 Picture Day; Middle School
I Volleyball at Tolar 4:30 p.m.; Middle School Boys Basketball
at Bethlehem, 4/5 p.m.; JVN Volleyball at Marianna, 5/6
I p.m.
Friday, Sept. 26 JVN Volleyball at Graceville, 5/6
I p.m.
.Tuesday, Sept. 30 Middle School Volleyball at
Wewahitchka 4 p.m.; JVN Volleyball vs. Bozeman 5/6 p.m.;
SSGA Fundraiser Kickoff
Thursday, Oct. 2 Middle School
SVolleyball vs. Hosford, 3:30 p.m.;
JVN Volleyball at North Florida
I Christian, 4/5:30 p.m.; Middle
School Boys Basketball vs.
SPoplar Springs, 4:30/5:30
p.m.
I Friday, Oct. 3 JVN/V
Volleyball vs. Bethlehem,
I 2/3 p.m
L -- - -------- ---------








Page 30 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 24, 2008


Lady Wildcats tang
BLOUNT STOW N, SharlynSmithledAlthainscoring
SEPTEMBER 16-The Altha with 9 service points. Schamens
Junior Varsity Lady Wildcats had 6 service aces in the match.
handed the Blountstown Junior Angela Waldron posted 8 service
Varsity Lady Tigers their first loss points, including 5 service aces.
of the season last Tuesday, 25-18, Kelsey Rehberg and Kimberly
22-25, and 15-6. Wiltse each had 6 service points
Blountstown ledby points in and Wiltse had a service ace.
Game untilSharlynSmithtiedit Aerial Folsom chalked up 4
at 11 with her 3 service points. service points.
The score remained tied until Taking 25 minutes to complete
Angela Waldron put the Lady Game 1 of the varsity match
Cats (5-2) ahead, 22-18, with 4 indicated that this county rivalry cc
straight service points, was going to be a nail-biter.
Altha opened Game 2 with an Altha's Loni Johnson opened the strai
early 2-pointleadbutBlountstown game with 3 service points that A
would retake the lead by that was the biggest lead either team up a
margin until late in the game. would enjoy. However, in the.end held
The Lady Tigers led 22-17 until Blountstown came away with a tied
Sharlyn Smith's again came 33-31 victory. Lon
through with 4 straight service In Game 2 Blountstown served Cats
pots that brought the Lady theirfirstserve outofbounds and Bloi
Wiktats to within a point. 23-22. once again Lonnie Johnson came 26-2
Hoiev\er, Blountstown got the through for the Lady Wildcats "
win, 25-22, to force a third and reeling off 5 straight service but
deciding game. points. But Altha's inability to few
Angela Waldron's 3 straight be consistent with their serves led the
service points put Altha ahead, to another Tigers' win, 25-21. rem
6-3, to stay in Game 3 and the The Lady Cats turned the tables Mira
Lady Cats never looked back on on Blountstown in Game 3 and L
their way to a 15-6 decision. handed them a 25-21 loss that was the
Both Nikki Schamens and largely due to Caitlyn Bruner's 7 Johr


a


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Licensure as a Practical Nurse
In accordance with
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This position will requires experience with
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Medical clinic experience also required.
Leadership skills and abilities.
Knowledge of nursing administration, preventive
health care, nursing principles, practices
and techniques.
To apply please visit https://peoplefirst.myflorida.com/
logon.htm

For questions you may contact:
Tina Tharpe, CPM, AA II
Liberty County Health Department
(850) 643-2415 ext. 240
Closing Date: 10/03/08
9-24 & 10-1



SENIOR CLERK
Career Service Position

Bi-lingual required.
Medical Clinic experience preferred.
Customer service experience preferred.

To apply please visit the People First website:
https://peoplefirst.myflorida.com/logon.htm
This is the site for those seeking a career in
Public Service in Florida Stafe Government.

For questions you may contact:
Tina Tharpe, CPM, AAII
Liberty County Health Department
(850)643-2415 ext. 240
CLOSING DATE: 9/26/08
9-17 & 24


le with


by Jim Mclntosh,
contributing sports writer

eight service points.
kltha (1-6; 0-3, 2-2A) opene
i 3-point lead in Game 3 an
.that lead until Blountstow
it at 18 late in the game
ni Johnson gave her Lad
Sa 24-22 lead but in the en
untstown came out on top
24.
We played better as a tear
we just came up short on
serves tonight. That wa
difference in the game,
larked Wildcats' Coac
anda"Rehberg.
leadingg the Wildcats i
scoring column \Sas Lor
ison with 18 ser ice point


Tigers an!
3 service aces, 3 digs, and a kill.
Caitlyn Bruner came away with.
10 service points and 3 digs.
Both Emily Brooks and Rebecca:
Wiltse posted 6 service points
and 2 service aces. Brooks had.
11 assists and a dig. Wiltse was
credited with 4 digs. Christy
Simmons chalked up 4 service
points and a service ace along
with 9 kills, 2 digs and a block.
Cortney Harris put up 3 service
points including a service ace
and 5 digs.
WEWAHITCHKA,
d SEPTEMBER 18-On their way
d to their sixth win of the season,
n the Altha Lady Junior Varsity
e. Wildcats (6-2) made it interesting
y for their fans.
d In Game 1 they fell behind the
p, Wewa Lady Gators, 21-14, until
Aerial Folsom served up 5 points
n to give Altha a one point lead.
a Nikki Schamens served out the 2
is final points to give the Lady Cats
"the win, 25-23.
h Nikki Schamens gave Altha
a 12-5 lead in Game 2 with 10
n straight service points including
ii .9 consecutive service aces. But
s, the Lady Gators worked their


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Medical Clinic experience required.
Customer service experience preferred.

To apply please visit the People First website:
https://peoplefirst.myflorida.com/Iogon.htm
This is the site for those seeking a career in
Public Service in Florida State Government.

For questions you may contact:
Tina Tharpe, CPM, AAII
'Liberty County Health Department
(850)643-2415 ext. 240
CLOSING DATE: 9/26/08
9-17 & 24


d Gators
way back to take a 20-19 lead
but that's as close-as they would
get as Altha caite home with a
25-20 win.
Leading the NV Lady Cats in
scoring with a career high was
Niki Schamens with 15 service
points and 12 service aces. Also,
posting double-digit service
points was Aerial Folsom with
10 and 5 service aces. Sharlyn
Smith contributed 3 service
points. Kimberly Wiltse was
credited with 2 service points and
a service ace.
Taking on a Lady Gators' team
that had beaten the Bay High
Tornadoes the week before, the
varsity Lady Wildcats (1-7, 0-3,
2-2A) gave Wewa all they wanted
but came up short, 28-26, 22-25,
17-25, and 27-29.
Cortney Harris came up big for
Altha in Game 1 with 8 service
points.
Starting for the first time after
being hospitalized with a staph
infection, Cessna Folsom began
Game 2 by serving up 5 straight
service points for the Lady Cats.
Altha held a one points lead, 20-
19, until they misfired on three
straight service opportunities and
Wewa won, 22-25.
The Wildcats played the Lady
Gators close in Game 3 until the
Lady Gators made a 7-0 run and
took a 22-11 lead.- -
In Game 4 the Lady Cats
showed Wewa they weren't going
down without a fight. It was-a
1-point seesaw affair until Altha
knotted the score, 22-22. After
that it was whomever could get
their serves in would win the
game. Unfortunately, Wewa
came out on top, 27-29.
Cortney Harris led Altha in
scoring with 12 service points
and 2 service aces. She also
recorded 3 digs on the night.
Caitlyn Bruner had 11 service
points and 5 digs. CessnaFolsom
and Rebecca Wiltse delivered
9 service points and Wiltse had
3 service aces. Emily Brooks
posted 6 service points along
with 2 service aces and 12 assists.
Christy Simmons chalked up 5
points, a service ace and 2 digs.
The Lady Wildcats were back
in action this past Monday.
The Middle School hosted
Franklin County while the JV and
varsity entertained Cottondale.
Yesterday (Tuesday) the Middle
School took on the Sharks in Port
St. Joe. Tomorrow (Thursday)
they will be in Bristol taking on
Tolar at 4:30 p.m. (CT). The JV
and varsity squads will be headed
north to Marianna tomorrow
to face the 3A Lady Bulldogs.
The first serves for those games
are scheduled for 5 p.m. (CT)
and 6 p.m. (CT), respectively.
Next Tuesday Altha's Middle
School team faces the Gators in
Wewa in a 4 p.m. (CT) game.
The JV and varsity Lady Cats
are back in "The Den" next
Tuesday doing work against
district foe Bozeman. JV action
gets underway at 5 p.m. (CT)
followed by the varsity at 6 p.m.
(CT).


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SEPTEMBER 24, 2008 ..THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 31"



jrP~ '*"1


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GRANTHAM'S I Specializing in lots and small acreage.


RED BIRDS' SLAM DOES IN CAMILLA
Demetric Miller hit a grand slam home run in the top of the ninth
inning to get the Chattahoochee Red Birds by Camilla 9-8 in a Sunday
afternoon Georgia/Florida/Alabama Baseball league championship
round game.
In a game that was reminiscent of the Division Final against the
Quincy Dodgers the previous Sunday, the Red Birds found themselves
trailing for most of the game.
Chattahoochee did score first in the game played in Camilla as Chris
Pullen led off the game with a walk and came around to score on a
fielder's choice pulling the Red Birds up 1-0 after a half inning.
That lead was short lived. Camilla scored 4 in the bottom of the
first and got 3 more in the second to go up 7-1.
Pullen tripled in the fifth and scored on a sacrifice fly to make it
7-2. Liberty County's Richie Smith hammered a 2-run homer for
Chattahoochee in the seventh to cut it to 7-4.
A Camilla run in the bottom of the seventh made it 8-4 before
Brandon Stidam doubled in an eight inning Red Bird run, putting it
at 8-5.
That was the score in the top of the ninth as Donny Moore and
Pullen led of with back to back walks. Two outs later Smith was
intentionally walked to load the bases.
Two pitches later Miller slammed it out making it 9-8 into the
bottom of the ninth.
Tim Davis, who had pitched since the third inning, held Camilla
and Chattahoochee headed home with a 1-0 lead in the three game
series.
Davis fanned 10 and allowed only a run and 5 hits in his stint.
It was the second straight week the Liberty County lefty has won a
playoff in relief.
Chattahoochee tries to wrap up the league title this Sunday when
they host Camilla in the second play-off game at 3 p.m. at Therrell
Field. A win by Camilla would force a third game in Camilla on
Oct. 5.
LCRD ANNOUNCES CHEERLEADERS
The Liberty County Recreation Department is pleased to announce
this year's cheerleaders for the upcoming football season.
The T-Tiny Mite cheerleaders-are coached by Genia Burke and her
squad include: Emma Wade, Beyonce Garrett, Autumn McLemore,
Makenzie Cotrell, Taelor Kersey, Courtney Hall, Zala White, Zaikera
White and Reneisha Marlow.
The Tiny Mite cheerleaders are coached by Melisa Nobles and
include: Hana Bailey, Madison Wright, Tara Young, Sara Burke,
Kelsey Nobles, Taylor Williams, Holly Ammons, Camryn Durden,
Lorraina Nava and Lauren Harger.
The Pee Wee cheerleaders are coached by Ashlie Parrish. Her
team consists of the following girls: Morgan McClendon, Cheyenne
Miranda, Destiny Clark, Brooke Hargrove, Cheyanne Kyle, Kaly
Partridge, Sylvia Vaught, Josie Bruffett and Kendall Wade.
Make plans to come out and show support to these young ladies as
they cheer on their respective football teams this fall. They have been
working very hard and are excited to have the chance to cheer for all
the fans. This year's jamboree will be held Oct. 4 in Sneads, while
the football season for the Big Bend Football League begins Oct. 7.

RADIO FOOTBALL

ON WYBT AND WPHK

Listen to football on WYBT and WPHK. This week..
Listen to Steven Seay and Glenn

SHigh School Tigers as they take on
Florida High, at Florida High Friday night
Sept. 26 on K102.7, airtime 6:00 p.m. CT.

Hear Michael Wahlquist, Jay Taylor, and Ray McCoy
with all the Liberty County High School game action.
The Liberty County Bulldogs take on Frank-
lin County High School at Liberty for Home-
coming....Air time at 10 a.m. ET Saturday .
Sept. 27 immediately following the swap
shop on K-102.7 and Y-1000. ,

The Florida Gators play
Ole Miss in the Swamp this
Saturday, Sept. 27. Air time'
on K-102.7 and Y-1000 is at
11a.m. CT.






Page 32 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 24, 2008


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Parade
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wash only wheelcleanerair Reg He is a Proven WINNER:
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Checkout Reg.'12&up exteriorVinyl dressing. W ell Informed School Board
our Gift Shop WE ALSO OFFER:
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Located on S.R. 20 in Bristol No to Flip Flopping on Issues

It'svery wise to advertise E excellence in Education and Competitions
.. inmthe
"" Calhoun
Liberty Reliable, Responsible, and Accessible
Journal.
*Call 643-3333 *Fax 643-3334- Email" cjads(flirporn.nel Paid PollC31a Aavernimenren Pal Ifor Dv Tommy McCiellanr, or SSupenrienaer, l Scr, S ols l Calhoun County No Parry Atfilaion
Tr. i,-- ....


-.---.-.-.-.-....




. ...- .-.----- -.---..---.. .
Samf "-.ha- told.me, isAigr
ars tust we45r or a t8o p hay they haeI

e.t .fl a ~my Iek 4're stmid e e se of the d ~L~Cr i at ho ,
a thew Suts ,,parimuIt "To SOr and r ect"! Wit -h overI 2cr ii sheda.~L..|i
I ear as a 2succes ah aLdIs...rator I have tlmhelefadAersipills cessay.r.... -Se- -p- l-
21st Cemt~ I wa provide wour Coaty with true sl I wilnl lead by uoe*mpl and i ma 07t a
do tLe samIehor wiii becetait y aintrae afie ssd
2P or 77Mper s1py-u will always be tretWed with the respect and d y thattz
~bal a a m ne, day, a new en mit s de for a new Sheriff T-gether-we will e difference.
Let ..r..b -heard ,whe ye vote for atew choe~ e as Siherff IoCs Caosut~y. Contact e at 674-719

.-ame --fora wwwe fer a 1M et itth Ath Co~e.m t Ceter _on ThurdAv.
Seat. 25 from 6 to 8 uan. C -RSu.i tour st I have answmn.
oNNo 4TH VOTE MICHAEL "MIKE" CARPENTER,
C9X &EW CHOICE FOR S.kRIE F

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