Group Title: Calhoun-Liberty Journal (Bristol, Fla.).
Title: The Calhoun-Liberty journal
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00027796/00116
 Material Information
Title: The Calhoun-Liberty journal
Alternate Title: Calhoun Liberty journal
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Calhoun-Liberty Journal
Publisher: Liberty Journal, Inc.
Liberty Journal
Place of Publication: Bristol, Fla
Publication Date: September 10, 2008
Copyright Date: 2008
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Bristol (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Liberty County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Calhoun County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Liberty -- Bristol
Coordinates: 30.426944 x -84.979167 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in Sept. 1991.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 11, no. 38 (Sept. 18, 1991).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00027796
Volume ID: VID00116
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AKN4565
oclc - 33425067
alephbibnum - 002046630
electronic_aleph - 003298625
electronic_oclc - 60662266
lccn - sn 95047245
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly journal (Bristol, Fla.)

Full Text
Univ of Florida History Library
PO Box 117007
Gainesville Fl 32611


S2 11/6/2009
1846


/FOOT \aL T i r BlJ E C /T -THISTORY
BALL When


F nOIRNAL h
and roamed
BHS i free
S20 & 21 oume 28, Number 37 Wednesday, Sept. 10, 2008 PAGE 9



Telogia Power Plant sold for $2.5 million;


new owner to spend millions on upgrades


by Teresa Eubanks, Journal Editor
A Texas-based company has
purchased Telogia Power Plant for
$2.5 million and plans to get it back
to producing energy after pumping
in $8.8 million in renovations and
upgrades.
Built in 1986 by General Electric,
the power plant ceased operations
earlier this year due to equipment
problems. Local business leaders
believe the once silent plant will soon
be generating jobs as well as energy.
GreenHunter Renewable Power,
a wholly-owned subsidiary of
GreenHunter Energy Inc.; announced -
its acquisition of the Liberty County
waste-fired biomass power plant last
week. The plant, along with 125 acres -A"-
of land, was purchased from CQ
BioPower Producers, a subsidiary ofCQ. a privately-
held power plant operator based out of Blaris\ ille.
Pennsylvania.
"We believe that in the long-term, the Florida
power market will seek highly dependable renewable
power resources such as our Telogia po\\er plant as
the demand for renewable-power in the siate continues
to further expand," said GreenHunter Renew able
Power's president Stephen A. Wilex. "Dramatic
increases in the cost of fuel have required one of the
major utilities in Florida to propose an increase in the
pass-through fuel charge that would raise residential
electric bills by approximately 16 percent."
In a news release issued by GreenHunter Energy, the
company's President and CEO, Gary C. Evans, said,


Liberty County Chamber of Commerce President
Mark Plummer (left) gets a tour of the Telogia
Power Plant from Ted Hill of Jacksonville, who has
worked with the facility for several years under
different owners. JOHNNY EUBANKS PHOTOS


h-- "This-biomass power generation asset
fits extremely well in our strategy of
owning and operating a diverse portfolio
of renewable power and fuels assets
so as to aggregate within one entity
multiple types of revenue streams."
Company officials met Liberty County
Chamber of Commerce President Mark
Plummer, Chamber Executive Director
Johnny Eubanks and Richard Williams,
executive director of the Chipola
Regional Workforce Development
Board on Tuesday.
"It's clear after meeting them that
they're committed to the operation,
adding employees in the future and
making sure those employees have good
training," Williams said after talking
with Wiley.
"They're really an impressive
company," said Plummer following Tuesday's
meeting, noting that GreenHunter recently finished
constructing the nation's largest biodiesel refinery in
Houston. Texas.
"Basical ly, they're going to be doing the same thing
Timber Energy and Telogia Power did in the past -
burnm ood waste and available fuelto generate energy.
TheN 're not going to impact the county any differently
than they (Timber Energy and Telogia Power) did."
He said he understood the Telogia plant already
had 13 on staff and the new owners would soon hire
enough workers to bring that number up to 24. "They
hope to employ as many as 70 people out there once
they rejuvenate the existing plant, get it back up to
speed and update all of the equipment."


Candidate contests Liberty County Primary Election


by Teresa Eubanks, Journal Edior
A losing candidate in
the Liberty County School
Superintendent's race is
contesting the Aug. 26 election
and is asking that all the early
votes be recast.
Gay Johnson Uzzell. who


trailed w inner Sue Summers by
215 votes, filed the complaint
with the Liberty County Clerk
of Court Monday.
Uzzell alleges that the
election returns for early
voters are erroneous because
the "secrecy of the ballot was


violated." Her complaint states
that early voters were required
to sign in on a ballot stub
rather than a precinct register.
She said a number on the ballot
stub directly corresponded to
the ballot number entered in
the supervisor of election's


electronic
number a
"I'm
a possib
electronic
vote. Acc
there she
associated


data base by precinct said Uzzell.
nd ballot number. "I think she believes we can
saying there's determine how people voted.
ility that they can but that's not the case. There's
:ally track how voters no number on the actual ballot
.ording to state rule. to begin with," said Elections
,uld be no number Supervisor Marcia Wood, who
d with your ballot." See ELECTION page 17


Semi and van


collide Monday

Drivers traveling along Hwy. 71 North
had a three hour wait after a collision
between a tractor-trailer and a van left
the vehicles in the middle of the road-
way. One of the drivers was taken to an
area hospital by emergency helicopter
while the other received minor injuries.
For the complete story, see page 17.
TERESA EUBANKS PHOTO


II IIhIIIIllI Sheriff's Log...2 Community Calendar...4
7 1812209011118 Birthdays...12 Speak Up!...13 Schoo


Commentary...6, 7 News from the Pews...10 Farmer's Almanac...11
,ls...24 & 25 Obituaries...22 Classifieds...26 & 27 Legals...28 & 29
ols ... 24 & 25 Obituaries ... 22 Classifleds ... 26 & 27 Legals ... 28 & 29


--1
--








Page 2 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 10, 2008


Man charged with DUI after


hitting grandmother's home


He denied he was behind the
wheel but a Marianna man who
was in a car that slammed into
the front of his grandmother's
Altha home is facing charges
after a witness reported seeing
him driving moments before the
accident.
FHP Trooper Larry Battle
said James Paul Tucker, 28,
was charged with DUI, careless
driving, driving without a license
and no proof of insurance in the
Sept. 2 accident.
When deputies first arrived
at the scene they found the
driver bleeding from his fingers,
with blood covering his pants,
according to a report from
the Calhoun County Sheriff's
Office. Tucker angrily told
the officers, "Get out of my
(expletive) granny's yard!" He
continued spouting obscenities
as a crowd gathered. It took
more than 15 minutes to get him
seated in the back of a patrol
vehicle, the report noted.


Calhoun County

ARREST

REPORTS
compiled by
Journal Editor
Teresa Eubanks


According to Battle, Tucker
and two friends the owner
of the car, Jennifer Earnest
of Altha, 20, and Tucker's
cousin, Nicholas Tucker, 22,
of Marianna were traveling
south on Bates Road around
6:40 p.m. when the 2004 Toyota
Camry left the road, traveled
about 75 feet and hit the block
home.
"It kind of glanced the side
of the house right by the front
door," the trooper said. Damages
to the house were estimated at
approximately $1,000. The
vehicle, which the trooper said
had some damage prior to the
accident, had about $1,500 in


damages.
The collision left the front
windshield smashed. Tucker
told the trooper the blood on the
windshield and a window at the
house wasn't from any injury.
It came from his hand when he
punched them.
Other than cuts from the
glass he reportedly hit with his
fist, neither Tucker nor his two
passengers were injured.
"It was crazy," said the trooper
about the incident, explaining
that it appeared that all three
occupants of the vehicle were
intoxicated. Although she was
said to be sitting in the front
passenger seat, Earnest told
the trooper she didn't see what
happened because "she had an
anxiety attack and passed out."
Tucker "kept saying he wasn't
driving" and refused to take a
roadside sobriety test or give a
breath sample to determine his
level of intoxication.


Angry man arrested for firing


shotgun as ex-fiance packs up


When a woman returned to
the home she had shared for
the past year with her fiance to
pack up her things and leave
last week, he didn't take it too
well, according to a report from
the Calhoun County Sheriff's
Office.
Her angry ex was arrested
after he fired a shotgun as she
and a male friend attempted
to move her furniture from the
residence at 6227 NW County
Road 274. The arrest report
gave the following account of
the incident:
Robert A. Kimbrel, 33, and
Jessica Pitts, 29, called off their
engagement Sept. 3. She left
with one load of her belongings
without problems, but her ex-
fiance-became angered when
she returned with a male
friend to help her transport her
furniture.
Kimbrel accused Pitts and her
friend, Simon Snipes, ofhaving
a relationship and became
increasingly upset. Snipes was
in the yard dismantling a bed
frame and Pitts was standing
on the porch when Kimbrel
reached in the home and pulled
out a shotgun.
The two said Kimbrel said
something like, "Want me to
show you something?" as he
pumpedthe shotgun andfired one
shot with Pitts standing nearby.
Snipes said Kimbrel then put
the gun back inside the door.
Snipes then asked Kimbrel.
why he was acting that way.


Kimbrel responded by reaching
for the gun a second time, and as
he held it, Snipes said Kimbrel
said that he could "kill both
of them and get away with
it" because they were on his
property.
Pitts and Snipes then left and
reported the threat, providing a
deputy with one spent round of
12 gauge ammunition.
When a deputy went to the
residence, Kimbrel said that
he and Snipes had words and


suggested that Snipes had
threatened him with a rail from
the bed he was disassembling
in the yard.
Kimbrel repeatedly told the
deputy he was defending his
property. After talking with
Pitts and Snipes a second time,
a deputy returned to Kimbrel's
home and took him into custody.
He was charged with aggravated
assault, aggravated assault with
a deadly weapon and improper
exhibition of a firearm.


THANK YOU!


I am truly grateful for the
support I received during
the primary election and
again hope you will
consider voting for me in
the general election on
November 4. It would be a
privilege to continue to
work for you as your
supervisor of elections.'
Thank you!


KOAtifO/e .
ZArft


Keep 11 Years of Experience Working for You!
POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT PAID FOR AND APPROVED BY MARGIE LARAMORE, DEMOCRAT, FOR SUPERVISOR OF ELECTIONS.


CALHOUN COUNTY
Sept. 1
*Vincent Thomas Cooner, failure to appear, domestic
battery.
*Antwan Charquay Chambers, domestic battery,
aggravated battery.
*Eddie DeeValden Deveaux, VOP (Bay Co.).
*Karen Bryant, battery.
*Thomas Jenkins, fleeing and eluding law enforce-
ment officer, resisting arrest with violence, no valid
driver's license, violation of parole, failure to appear.
Sept. 2
*Meliekia Patricia Lynn Martin, principal to burglary
of dwelling, principal to grand theft.
*Manuel Martinel, no valid driver's license.
*Richard Mayo, VOSP (Jackson Co.).
*James Robert Walden, VOP, county.
*Charisma Smith, holding for Bay Co.
*James Paul Tucker, driving under the influence, no
valid driver's license.
*Dionne Marie Smith, holding for Bay County and
Jackson County.
*Larry Owens, giving false verification.
Sept. 3
*Antwan DeShun Miller, VOP state.
*William Lee Owens, VOP county.
*Robert A. Kimbrel, aggravated assault (domestic),
aggravated assault with deadly weapon, improper
exhibition of firearm.
*Steven Anthony Hall, driving under the influence.
Sept. 4
*Richard Chason, driving while license suspended
or revoked with knowledge.
*Billy Redding, failure to appear, VOCP.
Sept. 5
*Jamie McCardle, VOSP.
Sept. 6
*Abranda Dawn Ward, possession of methamphet-
amine, possession of drug paraphernalia.
*Carol Latisha Thomas, failure to appear, burglary
of an occupied dwelling, larceny over $300
*Roy Hill, domestic battery.
*Rachael Kilpatrick, battery (simple).


LIBERTY COUNTY
Sept. 1
*Jack Zingarelli, holding for Franklin Co.
*Karen Bryant, holding for CCSO.
Sept. 2
*Meliekia Martin, holding for CCSO.
*Julie D. Smith, county VOP.
*Charisma T. Smith, holding for CCSO.
*Toby Lee Dalton, county VOP.
*Ted Edwards, holding for court.
Sept. 3
*Dionne Smith, holding for CCSO.
Sept. 5
*Christopher Broxton, aggravated battery.
*Kelvin Anderson, burglary of occupied dwelling.
*Devin Herndon, two counts principle in first de-
gree.
Sept. 6
*Wayne Anthony Luke, driving under the influence
(felony), driving while license suspended or revoked
(misdemeanor), expired driver's license (misdemean-
or).
*Carol Latisha Thomas, holding for CCSO.
*Harold Kirkpatrick, driving under the influence.
*Abranda Ward, holding for CCSO.

Listingsincludenamefollowedbychargeandidentifcationofarrestingagency Thenamesabove represent
those charged. We remind our readers that all are presumed innocent until proven guilty

Blountstown Police Dept. 1;
Sept. 1-7, 2008
Citations issued: '
Accidents...............04 Traffic Citations... ...04
Special details (business escorts, traffic details)......78
Business alarms.....02 Residential alarms..........01
Com plaints............. ...... ................. ........ 126


SUPERVISORttvtY'


I








SEPTEMBER 10, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 3


Chipola propose free bus transportation

for counties including Liberty & Calhoun


MARIANNA-Chipola
College is joining with four local
school districts to determine
interest in offering free school
bus transportation to Chipola


Help your
students continue
their educaron.
*Tuition assist ':
* Career skills
* Leadership a rini


4^'


NAMUSM
GUARD


1-800-GO-GUARD
www. I-800-GO-GUARD.com


College.
If determined viable, bus
service would begin in January
of 2009. All Chipola College
students would be eligible to
ride the buses free of charge.
The program is a joint
project between Chipola and the
Liberty, Calhoun, Washington,
and Holmes County School
Districts.
If the project is initiated one
bus will originate in Holmes
County and travel east to
Chipola via U.S. Highway 90.
A second bus will originate
in Liberty County and travel
north to Chipola via State Road


71. The buses should arrive
at Chipola by 7:30 am and
depart Chipola after 3:30 p.m.,
Monday through Thursday of
each week. No bus service will
be provided on Fridays.
In an effort to determine the
viability of providing the free
service, interested students are
asked to complete a survey on
the Chipola website at www.
chipola.edu/bus
Surveys may also be
registered by phone by
calling Alice Pendergrass at
(850) 718-2270, e-mailing at
PendergrassA@Chipola.edu.


Free checking never

0. i 4 so good.


Here's a recipe for better banking: [,:;. i '-. I. '. E'rr

,. '; get a FREE i -^- r;,,-- F I- Lean Mean I' r r .r. ': -.
Free Cl1 l, irUn also includes:


.i ..

Freee~iP~lt ~~k;P ~~~c
F 1ve e'4&,,
FI ,,ee
Ci.


To get your free CGeje Foricii.nl'. Grill and in Irii:o the frirrTily service that
sets us apart -stop by today. Now's the tiiim to find out e'eryiling that's c: jrkinn
at Superior Bank.

Altta / 25463 North Main St / 850-762-3417
$UPERIOR tW Blountstown / 20455 West Centra Ave. i 850-674-5900
Local. Friendly. Superior. Bristot 10956 NW State Road 20 / 850-643-2221
Mariana 1 2260 Hwy 71 / 850-482-4029

www.superiorbank.com I Member FDIC


"Subject to approvaL $50 minImuml opening deposit required for Free Checking. Applies to personal accounts ondl The GTeorge foreman
tll ill wi be provldd at time that your account is opened, Ouanites are limited Superior Bank reserves the right to substitute an item of
comparable value. Gils will be subject to Income tax reporting. Estimate value O gift of $20. If you dose your account within l months
of account opening, you wl be charged a $10 account early clowe tfe. "*You can use your Superor ATM and Check Card at all Publlx
Supermarket ATMs with no fee from Stperor Bank and no tee from Pulix. because Superior Bank has joined )thu Plblix Presto! ATM
Network. Some ATM owners may impose an equlpmert surcharge for use of their ATMs. Cars from other financial institutions may
apply at non-proprietary ATMs. ,,;;


Liberty County

ARREST REPORTS
compiled by Journal Editor Teresa Eubanks


Man beat up after getting

tattooed at Talquin Circle
By the time his brother called for an ambulance to take him to the
emergency room at 2:30 a.m. Friday, Gerald Lee Hires had gotten one
tattoo, a couple of drinks and several punches to the head.
A deputy caught up with Hires at Thompson's Store, where he
was taken to meet the ambulance after being injured in a fight at a
Hosford residence.
In his report, Deputy Wade Kelly noted that Hires had trauma to
his head area with cuts throughout his face, a laceration over his left
eye and both eyes were beginning to swell.
While waiting for the ambulance, Hires told the deputy he had
gone to a house on Talquin Circle, where he had gotten a tattoo. As
he was leaving the site, he said he was "blindsided" by an unknown
person or persons and badly beaten.
When his assailant finally stepped away, a woman at the scene
drove him home. He then called his brother, who drove him out to
meet the ambulance.
Kelly noted the odor of an alcoholic beverage on Hires' breath and
had some difficulty getting him to recount what had happened. After
further discussion, Hires said he had been having problems with Chris
Broxton and his brother and said that it could have been one of them
who attacked him.
As Hires was taken to the emergency room, the deputy went to the
scene of the fight and found Broxton and three other people there.
Broxton admitted striking Hires after stating that Hires had "tried
to tackle him." He said he hit him "four to five times with an uppercut
to get him off of me," according to the arrest report.
Broxton said that after he hit Hires a few times, another man at the
scene pulled him off Hires while a woman there grabbed the injured
man and drove him home.
Broxton was charged with aggravated battery.

Intoxicated man charged with

burglary after entering trailer
A man who surprised a woman when he entered her mobile home
at Duggar's Trailer Park on Rock Bluff Road at 11:30 p.m. Thursday
was charged with burglary of an occupied dwelling after she picked
him out of a photo lineup, according to a report from the Liberty
County Sheriff's Department.
Arrested was Kelvin Anderson, 33, of Bristol, who is said to
be a suspect in two other burglaries, according to Deputy Brian
Bateman.
"He just snatched the door open and walked in," said Bateman.
"Apparently, he thought she wasn't home."
He said that when Anderson, who was intoxicated, saw the woman,
he told her he had just bought some drugs from one of her neighbors
and "asked her to do them with him." He was arrested Friday.
U' '


Laban Bontrager,







Page 4 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 10, 2008


Howell Family Reunion

set for September 20

in Bainbridge, Georgia
The 32nd annual \\oodward and Am,
Ho\well Family Reunion \ill be on
Saturday. Sept. 21. at the Reco\ern Fire
Department-Reco er Communitr ('enter.
Ix miles South of Bainbridge, GA.
Descendents of Woodward and Amn\'s
children i John. Henry. Thomas. Samuel,
Elias. George, Charles and Elijah) are
invited to attend the afternoon's e'ent,
beginning at 3 p.mi and ending nith a fish
frN at O p m.
Am\ and \\ood\\ard Ho\well \ere
married in I N40 in Decatur Count\. GA.
The family\ spent time in Baker, Decatur
and Mitchell Counties in Georgia and later
settled in Gadsden County. in the Mount
Pleasant. FL commtuntMr
If \ou would like additional
information, please contact Susan How ell
Mills at 850o-91i7-i.177 or b', e-mail
wood% ardho, ell fami l i'msn.com

Annual Car Show set

for Oct. 11 in B-town
The Calhoun Countr Sheriff's Office
\\ill be ha\ ine their 6th annual Car Sho\
on Saturday Oct. I I from S a.m to I p.m.
tCT at Xtremne Motor Sports located
one mnle south of
Bloiuitsto\\n on

This %kill be
an entrant judged
,,, extent \% ith top
40 trophies, best
U KL R I a of trophies, a
li\e DJ, 50i 5t.
draw ings. concessions, door prizes and
dra\ ings for the kids.
For registrations forms and infonnaton
call Lt Adam Terrn or Tony Shoemake
at 850-674-5049 or e-mail tshoemake,a'
calhounsheriff.com.
This is a "Chnsmias for the Children"
benefit e ent.


Lib. Co. Transportation

Disadvantaged Board

to meet September 23
The Liberty Count, Transportation
Disadvantaged Coordinating Board
I TDCB i announces a meeting to \wInch all
persons are invited. The proposed agenda
\'ill include the adoption of the annual
operating report, operation reports, and a
staff report.
The meeting \ill be held on Tuesday,
Sept. 23 at 2 p.m in Veterans Memorial
Park Ci, ic Center room 13.
For more information, or if \ou
require special accommodations at the
meeting because ofa disability or ph sical
impairment, contact Vanita Anderson at
the Apalachee Regional Planning Council
at i(50) 674-4571 or b\ e-mail at arpc7i1'
gtcom net

The Calhoun-Liberty Joumal is
published each Wednesday
by the Liberty Journal Inc.,
Summers Road, P.O. Box 536,
Bristol, FL 32321.
Annual subscriptions are $18.
Periodicals postage paid at Bristol, FL
POSTMASTER: Send address corrections
to: P.O. Box 536. Bristol, FL 32321.


'Ei erk EL;*'riey
TODAY'S MEETINGS
* Liberty County Children's Coalition 11 a m, Emergenrv Management Building
* Rotary Club noon. Calhoun-Liberty Hospital
* Weight Loss Support Group. 1:30 p m Shellon Park Library
* 4-H Sportsman Club. aner school, Veterans Memorial Park Civic Center
* AA, 7 p m., Calhoun County Old Ag Bldg east door, in Iront ol jail




PATRIOT DAY
S E P 1 L M B L R i
TODAY'S MEETINGS
* Liberty Women's Club. 11 a.m.. Apalachee Reslauranl
* Calhoun Co. Chamber of Commerce. board of directors, 12 p.m..
conference room
* Blountstown Historic Preservation Committee. 5 p m M&B Dep:ot on Pear Si
* Search & Rescue, 6 30 p m Wesiside Fire Dept in Blounisiown
* Forum Meeting. 7 p rn.. -loslord School Auditorium
* AA, 7 p.m., basement of Calhoun County Counrhouse


BIRTHDAYS
'Tcrrn Sut;er
EVENTS
Dance. 6 12p.m., American Legion Hall in Biounlslotwn

Dine & Dance for Charity
6 p.m., Jim's Buflet & Steakhouse in Marianna
LCHS Da\%gs %s. Cotondale
.-\i.a. at 8 pmn.iETi
B-tonn Tigers \s. \\est Gadsden
Home at 7 p m. iCTI


EVENTS
Train Rides, 11 a.m. 3 p.m.. Veterans Memorial Park Civic Center
Dance 6 12 p.m.. American Legion Hall in Blountstown


EVENTS
Hall Family Reunion
familyy of George & Hanrie)
10 a.m., Altha Community Center


TODAY'S MEETINGS
* Walk-A-Weigh Program, 9 a.m Veterans Memorial Park Civic Center
* Altha Boy Scouts, 5:30 p.m.. Allha Volunteer Fire Department
* AA, 6:30 p.m.. Liberty Co. Counhouse Iwest side enirancei
* Bulldog Club, 7 p.m.. LCHS lield house


TODAY'S MEETINGS
* Calhoun Co. Chamber of Commerce, noon. Calhoun Co. Sr. Citizens
* Calhoun County Commission, 5 p.m.. Cal. Co. Extension building
* Calhoun County Industrial Developmental Authority. 5 p.m., Calhoun
Co. EOC Room G-35
- Health Care Council, 5.30 p.m Veterans Memorial Park Civic Center
SAA. 6:30 p.m.. Liberty Co. Courthouse Iwest side entrance
SBoy Scout Troop 206, 7 pm Veterans Memorial Park Civic Center
SBrownie Troop 158. 7-8 30 p m Veterans Memorial Park Civic Center
SDixie 109 Masonic Lodge. 7 p m, Masonic Lodge. Blounistown
SHosford-Telogia VFD. 7-30 p.m.. Hoslord Fire Station


THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL
Located at 11493 NW Summers Road in Bristol
MAILING ADDRESS: P.O. Box 536, Bristol, FL 32321 ,"
TELEPHONE (850) 643-3333 Fax (850) 643-3334
EMAIL: thejournal@fairpoint.net (USPS 012367)
Advertising: cljads@fairpoint.net Summers Road


E


Art show opening

in Bristol Sept 12
The Libert\ Countr Arts Council is
in tinLtg e cn one to ime and see the great
arrmork \e \\ill hae on displa. for this
fifth annual art sho,\ \\e ill ha'e a lot
of our junior artists partiticipting as \ell.
The exhibit w ill be open all day as well as
Saturday' and Sunday at the Ci\ ic Centre
Tunes are as follow s:
Friday, Sept. 12 from 9 a m. 7 p m.
Sarurday. Sept. 13 from II am -
p nin.
Sunday. Sept 14 from 2 p.m. -5pm
Monday. Sept 15 from 9 a m. 7 p m.
Tuesday. Sept. lh fiorm 9 a.m 7 p.m.
Wednesday Sept. 17 from 9 a.m -7
p.m
Thursday. Sept IS from 9 a m 7p.m.
All times are Eastern and there is no
charge for admission. Arrangements can be
made for groups to be alloy, ed m other than
posted times. Please call Babs Moran at
b43-5491 or Gloria Keenan at 643-5_'2

Relay for Life to

kick off Sept. 16
It's the 25th Aniuiersar3 of Rela\ for
Life. Please join us this year in fight against
cancer.
Our kick off is going to be at Veterans
Memorial C'ivic Center in Bristol on
Tuesday. Sept. 16 at 7 p.m. IET).
Come loin us for fun. food and door
prizes.
Learn how .,ou can join the 2()00
Calhoun Libert Relay... celebrate the
sur iors, remember those \ ho lost the
battle and fight back to find a cure.
Call Joanne Anderson Harris 674-9424
or Jolene B3rant at 1-866-785-9205 (toll
free) for more infonnation.

Meeting set to discuss
Talquin office relocation
An open forum meeting \will be held
on Thursday. Sept. II at 7 p.m. in the
auditonium at Hosford School to discus the
relocation of the Talquin Elecmc Office to
Bristol "I solicit your input." said Davis
Stoutamire. Liberty Count. Conumissioner
District 4.

Hall family reunion
There dill be a Hall family reunion for
the family of George and Harvie. It will be
at the Altha Conmmunit Center on Sept.
14. Doors \ ll open at 10 a.m.




That's how many copies of
The Calhoun-Liberty Journal
were distributed last week,
ensuring plenty of coverage for
your community announcements
and great response for our
business advertisers!

JOURNAL STAFF
Johnny Eubanks................Publisher
Teresa Eubanks...................... Editor
Gina Brooks...................Bookkeeper
Missy Tanner.. ................Advertising
Angela Davis....Production Assistant
OFFICE HOURS: 9 a.m. 6 p.m. M-F,
Saturday from 9 a.m. until 1 p.m.


i








SEPTEMBER 10, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 5


ARTF FROM THE INSIDE:


Correctional Facilities exhibit


opens Thurs. in Tallahassee


LIVING WATERS EXHIBIT COMING TO CHIPOLA
The public is invited to the premier opening of "Living Waters:
Aquatic Preserves of Florida," a multi-media experience of film
and photographs, Thursday, Sept. 11, from 6 to 9 p.m., in the
Chipola College Arts Center. The exhibit features a collection
of 29 fine art images by photographer Clyde Butcher, and a
screening of the PBS film by documentary film-maker Elam
Stoltzfus with music by Sammy Tedder, shown above.


I, Tommy McClel-
lan would like to
ask everyone for
theirconsideration
and support as I
seek the office of
Calhoun County
Superintendent of
Schools. Howev-
er, I am all about
giving back to
the communities
more than 'just
being some politi-
cian sitting behind
a desk and holding an elected office. A
long time before I was elected, as well
as while I was elected, I gave my time,
money, and support to all our local
communities. I am not just someone
that you never see or hear from ex--
cept at election time when I am strut-
ting around shaking hands and acting
like I am glad to see you and I am your
best friend. My actions over the years
have been loud, clear, and visible. I
have been both a coach and league
president of the Pee Wee Football and
Dixie Youth Basketball leagues. I have
recently coached for several years in
the Upward Basketball League. I have
served as president of the Adult Liter-
acy Program in Calhoun County, and
gone to bat many times to help the Cal-
houn Library system get grants, pro-
grams, and financial support. I am a
former Sunday School teacher, Sunday
School superintendent, youth leader,
and deacon at the First Baptist Church
of Blountstown. I have served as a city
councilman, Rotarian, and Lions Club
member. I have been involved in help-
ing and supporting many church and
civic programs over the years. I have
6 grandkids, and 5 are in local schools


TALLAHASSEE- -
Secretary of State
Kurt S. Browning pho
announces the Arts
launch of Art Art
from the Inside,
an exhibition of Tt
works created by
inmates and former R
inmates of Florida's
correctional Cor
facilities. The art
exhibition will wi
begin on September
4 and run through or
November 13 in
the Division of
Cultural Affairs'
Gallery for Innovation &
Arts. The gallery is dedicated
showcasing Florida artwork 1
is educational and demonstr
inventive ways of using vis
media to convey new ideas
highlight often unheard voic


which gives me
an opportunity
to stay involved
in their activities
at church and
school. I have
volunteered my
itii-e recently to
broadcast foot-
ball on our local
radio station, and
announce both
Dixie Youth base-
ball, and Pee Wee
football games. I
am presently a teacher at the C.A.R.E.
program in Blountstown. I also have
been a coach, teacher, coordinator,
principal, and school superintendent
in the Calhoun County school system.
I am a former.businessman in Blount-
stown where my family owned and op-
erated McClellan's Home Furnishings
and Rhochlele's Jewelry and Gifts. I
have 2 daughters that are teachers in
the Calhoun County school system,
and a son that is a local chiropractor.
If elected I will continue to be active in
community affairs, and activities spon-
sored by all of our county schools. I
will be the same person after elected
that I am at the present if the voters
give me their trust and support. Even
if I don't get elected I will be the same
person, and you will continue to see
me being active in youth and adult ac-
tivities on the church, school, and civic
level.

Please vote Tommy McClellan for
your school superintendent Nov. 4.
He is someone you can trust and
depend on and serve you, the
people with honor and dignity.
HE WILL MAKE YOU PROUD.


Paid Political Advertisement Paid for by Tommy McClellan for Superintendent of Schools of Calhoun County, No Party Affiliation


he exhibition will also feature a
to collage from the Inmate Murals
Project of the FSU Department of
Education Art Therapy Program.
ie photo collage showcases the
collaboration between Warden
ussell Hosford and the Wakulla
rectional Institution inmates, FSU
therapy interns, and volunteers,
ho have now completed a mural
Sa wall of the chapel at Wakulla
Correctional Institution.


the Presented in partnership female pris,
d to with Art Behind Bars (Monroe facilities
that County), ArtSpring, Inc. principal o:
rates (Miami-Dade County), and the Inside Out a
usual Florida State University (FStJ) The exh
and Department of Art Education feature a p
ces. (Leon County), Art from the the Inmate i
Inside highlights the ability of the FSU
of the arts to offer solace and EducationA
transform lives. Secretary The photo
of State Kurt Browning and the collab
Deputy Secretary of Corrections Warderi Ru
Richard D. Davison, along the Waku
with the partners, will open the Institution
exhibit Thursday, September 4 therapy inte
at 1:30 p.m. who have
"This exhibition shows in mural on a
a profound way how the arts WakullaCor
impact people's lives, as well as The project
provides just a sampling of the with tools
outstanding work being done by Department
organizations supported by the paints obta
Division of Cultural Affairs," city dump,
said Secretary Browning. "The and scaffold
arts are not merely entertainment Wakulla Cor
they enrich people's lives by FSU art theo
providing education, therapy, have been:
and real-life skills to assist people group and
through life-long learning." fr Erepart
Formed in 1994, Art Behind imats
inmates fo
Bars is an "art-based community
service" program for inmates in years.
Secret'
the Monroe County Detention Se
continue(
Center. The mission of Artcontinue
Behind Bars is to give inmates to Secretal
the opportunity to contribute to Walter A.
society through the donation vitally imp
of artwork to numerous non- the Departn
profit organizations locally performs so
and nationally by providing his willingnc
skill-based training and art in pursuit of
education. Each program helps Corrections
to reinforce the usefulness of
The Div
arts in corrections programsA
in improving inmate behavior & te Arts i
while incarcerated, and the & theArtshe
chance for successful transition f r of the1
upon release. 500 S. Bron
ArtSpring, headquartered The galli
in Florida City, is a nationally public Moi
recognized 'organization 9:00 a.m. to
providing an arts-based and holidc
educational curriculum to p.m. Forfi
underserved and institutionalized contact La
female adult and youth offender Division of
populations. Programming 850.245.647


has expanded
to juvenile and
adult correctional
institutions, a
residential facility
for sexually abused
girls in the foster
care system, and
an adult residential
substance abuse
treatment facility.
Since 1994,
ArtSpring has
offered specifically
designed
interdisciplinary
arts-based
workshops in
ons and in juvenile
through its two
n-going programs:
and Breaking Free.
libition will also
hoto collage from
Murals Arts Project
Department of Art
rt Therapy Program.
collage showcases
oration between
issell Hosford and
il a Correctional
inmates, FSU art
mns, and volunteers,
now completed a
wall of the chapel at
rectional Institution.
t has been created
donated by FSU's
t of Art Education,
lined through the
and staff, security
ling contributed by
rectional Institution.
rapy student interns
providing art therapy
individual sessions
lent of Corrections
r more than five

ary Browning
d, "Thank you
ry of Corrections
McNeil for the
portant work that
lent of Corrections
admirably and for
ess to utilize the arts
f the Department of
'mission."

vision of Cultural
lery for Innovation
Located on the first
R.A. Gray Building,
ough Street.
sry is open to the
nday Saturday,
4:30p.m., Sundays
ays noon to 4:30
further information,
'ura Stone in the
Cultural Affairs at
75.








Page 6 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 10, 2008



-- -e l ---- -1 B --B -----L

L Late ight


ARECAPOGF REStE

NIGHT TELEVIS\ON HOSTSl


Did you see John McCain and SarahPalin
standing together at the Republican
Convention? Didn't it look like a special
episode of "Regis and Kelly?"
-JAY LENO


You know, Sarah Palin, the vice presidential
running mate on the Republican ticket, likes
to shoot assault rifles. I'll say this for her
daughter's boyfriend. The kid's got guts.
DAVID LETTERMAN

Researchers in Tokyo report that elephants
are able to do math. They report that given
basic math tests, Asian elephants got it right
87 percent of the time. You know, it's bad
enough our students can't compete with the
Asian students. Now we can't even compete
with the Asian elephants. JAY LENO


Sarah Palin says that she is a lifelong
member of the National Rifle Association.
Which may explain why she's in favor of


shotgun weddings.


- COI


JAN O'BRIEN


Well, Hurricane Gustav and Hurricane Hanna
were downgraded to tropical storms. This
downgrading is quite common. The same
thing happened last month to Hurricane
Hillary. Remember? JAY LENO


They say Sarah Palin's speech was written
by George Bush's speech writer, which was
great for that guy because he finally got a
chance-to use some'big words. JAY LENO


Is it just me, or does Sarah Palin lo


model for LensCrafters?


- DAVID


I don't know if you noticed this, bi
GOP convention, the camera mE
desperately trying to find minorities
audience they could zoom in on. Fin
an hour, they found one. It was a Pres
standing in a group of Methodists.



John Edwards, who is scheduled in
to speak at the University of Illin
raised his speaking fee from $5E
$65,000! Well, then again, he has
mouth to feed, and another mouth t
keep quiet.


IL Copyrighted Material


pi Syndicated Content 9


Available from Commercial News Providers"


- 0 -
0S 4


A letter to my friend James


James is a friend of mine. He and I
graduated from high school -together.
His older sister was married to my wife's
older brother. For us southerners, that's
close enough for "family, and James is
kinfolkss."
James said that he was a Democrat
until, the 1990s when southern Demo-
crats en masse crossed over and became
Republicans. Some of us are still won-
dering what that was all about.


/ OX'S
C CORNER
Jerry Cox is a retired military
officerand writer with an extensive
background in domestic and
foreign policy issues. He lives in
\pkaloosa County.


James sent me an e-mail extolling the virtues of the Mc-
Cain/Palin ticket, and I sent the following letter to James:
"James, I wore the uniform for 32 years, and I had to be
apolitical. Politics has no place in the military system. As
a commander, I made sure that we had a "voting officer"
who helped with absentee ballots, and my comments to the
troops were, "Exercise your right to vote." Taking a stance
on politics or religion was a sure way to get fired and ban-
ished to the boonies.
While I'm a Democrat, I'm still apolitical. I view the
issues like I did when I was serving. Look at the facts and
make a decision that is in the best interest of the mission of
the AF. We need a president and congress that will make
decisions in the best interest of most of the people, most
of the time. Not everyone on the right or left can be satis-
fied.


In my view, neither the Republican nor Democrat model
of government works. The excesses in both models are too
k ike a great. You and I probably agree on more issues than we
LETTERMAN might disagree. I'm a fiscal conservative. I think that pay
as you go is the answer.
Not even the U.S. can continue to borrow $2 billion a
Ut at the day to keep cash in the national ATM. Starting with Rea-
en were gan, the Republicans have run up the national debt to an
Astounding level. The Iraq War is costing $10 billion per
3s in the month. If a president, Bush in this instance, thinks that a
ally after war is necessary then let Congress debate it and ask the
sbyAmerican people to pay for it. By doing so, a president will
byterian have an up close and personal view of what the American
people think about his plan for war.
The problem that I have with McCain and Palin is that
- JAY LENO
they have nothing to offer except the basic conservative
dogma of"God, Guns, Guts and Gays." Their basic pitch is
October that we will save you from the terrorists, and we won't raise
your taxes. OK, but what about the fact that Fannie Mae
ois, has and Freddie Mac, the foundation of the secondary money
5,000 to market, lost $12 billion and the government is going to take
over these organizations to protect the investors? Palin's
comment on this issue was that John believes in smaller,
ie has to more efficient government. Duh, we all do, but what are
the consequences and unintended consequences of the gov-
- JAY LENO ernment taking over or not taking over these two crucial
financial institutions? Obama gave a measured response


indicating that he would have to review
the issues and make decisions that best
served the interest of the American peo-
ple. No hip-shooting or bumper sticker
answers.
McCain's POW story does iot qualify
him to be president. I say that as an of-
ficer and fighter pilot. I was shot down
in Cambodia, hid in the jungle and man-
aged not to get caught. Otherwise you
wouldn't be reading this. There are hun-


dreds of war stories from every war. The U.S. military man
or woman always rises to the occasion. We don't always
win, but that's because of the policies of the civilian leader-
ship.
Fighter pilots have egos as big as a house. Not many
can do what we do, but there is a danger in the fighter pi-
lot temperament. There are no Old, Bold Fighter Pilots
because they all let their egos get in the way of their judg-
ment and killed themselves. McCain has the mindset of
many Vietnam vets which is that we lost in Vietnam and
we aren't going to lose in Iraq. The surge worked so we
must be winning. Of course, putting more troops in a given
area increases security but when they leave the three ethnic
groups will duke it out. The analysis indicates that the Sun-
nis intend to rule so when the U'.S. leaves, what happens.
So, the question for you and me and the American people is
what is in this fight for us? History has proven that democ-
racy can't be achieved at the point of a gun."
James hasn't responded. Will my comments change his
mind? Not likely, but perhaps he will think about what I
said.
I have followed politics for a long time, and I know that
there is nothing more superficial than a political contest.
Political promises abound from both sides, a chicken in ev-
ery pot. But I find it discouraging that the current presiden-
tial contest has become an "American Idol" event.
The list of serious issues that the next president will
encounter is growing at a rapid rate. If the government
doesn't intervene there is a serious possibility that the U.S.
financial system can collapse. In my view, taking over the
failing Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac was the right thing to
do.
The U.S. is nose-to-nose with the Russians again. Where
the new Cold War will take us no one knows. The news
media reports that the Russians are going to have military
exercises with Hugo Chavez and the Venezuelan military.
So, President Palin, what do you plan to do about that?
The new Cold War with Russia isn't just about guns and
bullets. The Russians said that they were considering stop-
ping the importing of 12 million tons annually of U.S. pork
and chicken. Do you think that U.S. hog and chicken grow-
ers might be upset about that? So, President Palin, what do
you plan to do about that?


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SEPTEMBER 10, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 7


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Page 8 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 10, 2008



Vendors flock e----


to River Valley


Marketplace


Saturday marked the ribbon-cutting
and first day of the monthly River
,." Valley Marketplace, a place for
arts, crafts and food to be
sold and enjoyed, on the
green beside Wakulla Bank
in Blountstown. Families
took their time strolling
from booth to booth
while folks like Anita
Gouge, at left, offered
: tasty homecooked
treats for sale.


JOHNNY EUBANKS PHOTOS


-4-j


MR
Ip


SEPT. MEMBERSHIP MEETING
PLANNED TUES., SEPT. 16
Visioning 2011 committee signup Please
attend the Sept. membership meeting as we get the
ball rolling on the Visioning 2011 Work Plan. During
the V2011 exercise earlier this year, we outlined
objectives which were broken into five categories,
which translated into working committees. The
common denominator: to work hard, work together,
and make things happen in Calhoun County! The
five committees are Membership Enhancement,
Governmental Affairs, Economic Development,
Education, and Lodging. We will go over the
overall V2011 Strategic Plan during the membership
meeting, then members will have the opportunity to
sign up for a committee.
The meeting is Tuesday, Sept. 16 at the Calhoun
County Senior Center from noon 1 p.m. Lunch
will be chicken and dumplings, turnips, corn, corn
bread, and hot milk cake for $7.50 per person.
If you would like to attend, you must RSVP so that
we can get an accurate lunch count. Please call or
email Kristy at 674-4519 or kristy@calhounco.org
by Friday, Sept. 12th at noon to reserve your seat.

CHIPOLA RIVER CLEANUP UPDATE
In preparation for our coordinated Chipola River
Cleanup, we have been monitoring the river's
clarity. Unfortunately, conditions are not favorable
for locating debris on the river bottom. With the
possibility of more storms, we've opted to postpone
the cleanup up until the spring.
We look forward to "spring cleaning" our river in
April or May of next year. Until then, we encourage
all who love the river to take an extra bag on your
next visit and pick up any trash you may see on the
riverbank. Every little bit helps, and together we can
preserve our Chipola River.
For more information or to make sure you are
included in plans for the cleanup, please call or email
Kristy Speers at 674-4519 or kristy@calhounco.
org.

CALHOUN COUNTY
CHRISTMAS ORNAMENTS
The Chamber of Commerce will soon be selling
Christmas ornaments as a holiday fundraiser. This
year's ceramic keepsake ornament will have an
artist's rendition of the Historic Calhoun County
Courthouse and will be the first in a series of limited
edition ornaments. Items have been ordered and will
be available in October for $15 each.

CHRISTMAS PARADE
Believe it or not, it is that time of year again! We
have already received several calls asking about a
theme for the Christmas parade. We don't have a
clue, so we're passing it on to you! Any ideas? If
you have an idea for the theme of this year's parade,
simply reply to this email and we'll add it to the list.
Maybe we should Go Green? Have a Holiday Ho Ho
Ho-Down? Festival of Lights? Help us out!

WE HAVE NEW MEMBERS!
We had two new members join the Chamber in
August. Gulf State Chemical & Welding Supply,
owned by Ken "Shep" Sheppard, is a new member,
as well as the new ALCO store with store manager
Matt Worthen as the contact. We welcome them both
and appreciate their membership!








SEPTEMBER 10, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 9


Battle of Marianna anniversary to be

celebrated with guided tours Sept. 27


RADIO FOOTBALL

ON WYBT AND WPHK

Listen to football on WYBTand WPHK. This week..
Listen to Steven Seay and Glenn
Kimbrel's play by play of the Blountstown
High School Tigers as they take on
V i West Gadsden, in Blountstown Friday night
Sept. 13 on K102.7, airtime 6:30 p.m. CT.

Hear Michael Wahlquist, Jay Taylor, and Ray McCoy
with all the Liberty County High School game action.

The Liberty County Bulldogs take on
Cottondale in Cottondale....Air time
at 10 a.m. ET Saturday Sept. 13
immediately following the swap shop
on K-102.7 and Y-1000.

The Florida Gators are off this weekend.
^ ^


X j



an adult. Dale Cox is donating
his time in order for 100% of
the proceeds to benefit the Blue
Springs Society.
The tours focus on some of
the areas of heaviest fighting-
which took place in the block
between the Russ House and St.
Luke's Episcopal Church. This is
a great opportunity to learn more
about a fascinating episode in
Florida history from the author
of the best selling; The Battle of


WoEr H'


One of the things that has always fascinated me
was working with wild hogs in the woods. What
I like was catching several in a pen and being able to
tell which pigs belonged to which sow, and then catch-
ing and marking them according to the mark on the
sow. When all the pigs were marked with the same
mark as their mama, the small males or boars would
be "cut" (castrated) so they c6uld get fat and become
food for the table as soon as they got in good shape.
A lot of this whole operation was on the honor sys-
tem, watching out for your neighbor's stock as well as
for your own. All the families who lived in a commu-
nity were said to have a claim in the woods, each man
having a unique mark to distinguish his hogs from his
neighbor's. Most everyone knew each other's mark in
the community and would never put their own mark
on a pig beside someone else's sow.
At least once a year, each man would round up his
stock, mark the pigs, and do whatever type of doc-
toring that was needed. Sometimes the knife might
slip, and then a little sewing was needed. A mixture
of kerosene and turpentine was then sprayed onto the
patchwork. It was all a pretty intense din of noise
while the whole operation was going on. The thing to
do was catch the sow in the pen, separate the pigs from
her, and mark and work on them. Through all that
noise though, the old sow would be trying to get to
you. Sometimes she would tear out of the pen. Then
it was every man for himself!
The marks used in Liberty County were registered
in the office of the Clerk of Court. Once in a while
you'd see where someone had sold his mark and claim
to someone else. When you bought a mark, you also
bought the hogs there in the woods with that mark.
Some of the local marks of interest were these:
Wm. M. C. Neel's mark: CROP AND SPLIT in
the right ear and SPLIT AND UNDER-BIT in the left
ear. Recorded Jan'y 5th,1861. W. H. Dunn, Clk.
*Neel's daughter, Mourning S. Neel, also had her
own mark: CROP AND HALF CROP in the right ear
and UNDER-SQUARE in the left. Recorded Jan'y


5th, 1861.
*Casious M. Peddie's mark: CROP AND TWO
SPLITS in the right ear and SWALLOWFORK AND
UPPER AND UNDER BITS in the left ear. Recorded
this May 18th, A. D. 1893, Frank A. Hentz, Clerk Cir.
Ct.
Another strange record is this:
*Upon application of W. E. Whitehead, agent for
the Carrabelle Land and Timber Co., I have this day
recorded for said company, the following brand for.
mill or saw logs, viz: a girdle or belt to be chopped
with an ax in the bark at or near the middle of the
logs- Also, a STAR stamped in one or both ends of
the logs. Recorded this January 7th, 1895. Frank A.
Hentz, Clk.
Folks were so serious about their woods hogs that
there was an old saying, "I'd rather be up for murder
in Liberty County than for stealing a man's hog."


This is one in a series offeatures submitted for a history and heritage book on Liberty County. Journal readers are invited to submit their ownj I
family photos, histories and remembrancesfor the book by contacting Family Chairperson Vance Bateman, Topical Chairperson
Fran Rigsby at 643-5466 or Heritage Publishing Consultants at 1-800568-1611or by e-mail at heripubcon@aolcom.


The Blue Springs Society of
the Children of the American
Revolution will host two guided
tours on Saturday, Sept. 27
in remembrance of the Battle
of Marianna on its 144th
anniversary.
Noted historian Dale Cox will
conduct the tours which are open
to the public.
The walking tours will last
about 90 minutes each and will
begin at 11:00 a.m. CT and at
1:30 p.m. from the park area in
front of the Russ House at the
intersection of Lafayette and
Russ Streets in Marianna.
A donation of $5 is requested
for participating with children
under 12 free if accompanied by


Marianna, Florida, the definitive
book on the subject. You can
learn about the battle and reserve
a spot on one of the tours at www.
battleofmarianna.net.
The Jackson County Chamber
of Commerce at (850) 482-8061
is taking reservations, also.
The tours will be preceded
at 9 a.m. (CT) by a Sons of
Confederate Veterans service
at the churchyard of St. Luke's
Episcopal Church to honor Judge
A.H. Bush who was captured
during the Battle of Marianna.
The United Daughters of
the Confederacy will end the
service with a special memorial
presentation at Confederate Park
located between Lafayette St. and
Constitution Lane one block east
of the church.

Historical Society
to host Cape San
Bias Homecoming
The St. Joseph Historical
Society is hosting an Open House
and Homecoming for ALL the
folks that lived or worked at the
Cape San Blas Lighthouse, near
Port St. Joe. This would include
any members of the lighthouse
keepers' families that lived and
worked at the Cape San Blas
Lighthouse or the Cape San
Blas Coast Guard Loran Station
A., and we especially want to
extend an invitation to all the
Coast Guard servicemen that may
still be in or around the area and
would like to come back home.
September 20 is "Florida
Lighthouse Day" and we are
planning to open the lighthouse
tower for the very first time since
it was closed. We will also be
raising our new flag on its new
flag pole that Arizona Chemical
Company donated. Hours for
Saturday will be from 10 a.m.
until 4 p.m.
We welcome back home these
folks and those whose are just
interested and want to climb the
lighthouse tower.
If you know of anyone that
lived or worked the Cape San
Blas Station, please let us know
and come to our event.
For more information please
call the lighthouse at 850-229-
1151or (850) 229-1094 or email
bmdouds2002@yahoo.com

Family history
workshop to be
offered Sept. 20
The Church of Jesus Christ of
Latter-day Saints is conducting
a Family History Workshop for
those with an interest in getting
started on their Family Tree re-
search.
It will be held Saturday, Sept.
20 at the church in Bristol (be-
side LCHS) from 10 a.m. until 1
p.m. Eastern Time.
Refreshments will be served.
For information, please call
Justin Ford at (850) 814-3907.








Page 10 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 10, 2008


I want to acknowledge some
of the many, people who have
aided needy animals: Linda and
David Bateman, Tiff McClellan,
Randy Hulsey, Dr. Silas Greene
III, Alene Seger, Jimmy Fields,
Melva Shelton, Joni Moody,
Jessica and Karl Eastman, Nikki
Terry, Cathy and Frank King,
Barbara Mansey, Jean and Dillon
Hansford, Paul and Mary Smith,
Sandy and Ruby Freeman, Fred
Peddie, Debbie Harris, Linda
Williams, Arlene and Ralph Burt,
Annette Bontrager, Bill and Susan
Neel, Charlotte Januse, Ruth
Mullins, Marlon Sapp, Karen
Fields, Jennifer Glass Martin,
Tina and Wilt Quattlebaum,
Beth and Ken Crump, Cheryl


Homecomings &
Pastor Appreciation
TELOGIA ASSEMBLY OF
GOD Pastor Thomas Adams of
Telogia Assembly of God Church
would like to invite everyone to
come and join our congregation
for a great Homecoming Day on
Sunday, Sept. 14. Sunday School
begins at 9:45 a.m. and Morning
Worship Service will begin at 11
a.m. with guest speaker Brother
Charles A. Pettis bringing the
message.
Following the morning worship
service there will be a covered
dish lunch served in the church
fellowship hall. After lunch we will
return to the Church Sanctuary for
a sing. Our guest singers will be
The Willing Vessels from Panama
City and also we will have our
own local talented singers.
Brother Adams is extending a
special invitation to everyone to
come and receive a blessing and
enjoy this great Homecoming day
of fellowship, food and singing.
Special Music
& Concerts
ALTHA CHURCH OF GOD
- Altha Church of God is proud
to have recording artist Julian
Drive leading worship on Sept.
14 at 10:30 a.m. We would like to
extend an invite to all of the area


A .. - S -------


Wood, the Kendricks, Sandra
Parrish, Penny Hobby, Cheryl
Neal, Barbara Whitfield, Katrina
LeBlanc, Woody Stuart, Mary
Cruel, Carolyn Yancey, Lavelle
Larkins, Joe Wood, Connie
Conyers, Rufus Guilford, and
Gail, Ron, Ronnie, Kelley, Kassie,
and Mathew Wood.
I also want to thank the
following organizations and
businesses for supporting our
cause: Paws and Claws, Leon
County Animal Services, Bay
County Animal Control, our local
radio station WYBT/WPHK,


churches and those who do not
have a church home to come and
worship with us. Altha Church
of God is located at 26000 Fuqua
Circle off of Hwy 71 north. -
For more information,-call
850-762-8294.
GLORY HILL HOLINESS
CHURCH The Carpenters will
be singing at Glory Hill Holiness
Church on Sunday, Sept. 14 at 5
p.m. There will be refreshments
after the service in the fellowship
hall.
The church is located five
miles north of Clarksville on
Hwy. 73.
For more information call
762-8301.
TRUE HOLINESS CHURCH
OF CHRIST WRITTEN IN
HEAVEN The True Holiness
Church of Christ Written in
Heaven will be having a "Gospel
Explosion" on Saturday, Sept. 13
at 6 p.m. They will also celebrate
the pastor's seventh anniversary.


WJHG ,Channel 7 News, the
County Record, Ramsey's
Piggly Wiggly, Gwen's Nursery,
Golden Pharmacy, Badcock's
Home Furnishings and the Altha
Farmer's Co-op.
Patty Wood, Calhoun County
Humane Society

It is at times like these that we
find it most difficult to adequately
express our heartfelt appreciation
and gratitude for such great
neighbors, friends, family and co-
workers. If you visited, phoned,
sent food and/or flowers, said


The celebration will feature Peter
Brown and the Gospel Peace
Makers, the Gospel Chorale,
the Heavenly Voices all from
Tallahassee and many more!
The church is located at 15965
SE River St. in Blountstown.
For further information contact
Lewis (Randy) Edwards at 294-
9338.
Fellowship & Events
MT. ZION UNITED
PENTECOSTAL CHURCH -
"Ritz" Children's Portraits will
be taken on Sept. 13-14 at Mt.
Zion United Pentecostal Church
in Hosford.
Call 379-3717 or 643-6810 now
for your coupon for a free 8x10
portrait.


words of encouragement, prayed,
gave-a special wink or a friendly
smile, or just thought of us; it
did not go unnoticed and was
very much appreciated. A special
thank you to Dr. Farooqi and staff,
Marianna Davita Dialysis Center
staff, as well as the neurologist
and Bay Medical ICU nurse who
was with mom and the family
every step of the way on Sept.
2, also to Brother Kindig and the
Vessels of Clay singing group
for such an uplifttg service. To
Jim Johnson, Brent Hall, Buddy
Stephens, Norman Terry, Sid


Fundraisers
ALTHA FIRST BAPTIST
CHURCH- The World Changers
ministry of Altha First Baptist
Church will host a Pancake &
Sausage supper on Wednesday,
Sept. 17 from 5-7 p.m. in the
church fellowship hall. Everyone
is invited to attend. Funds raised
from this event will go toward their
mission trip next summer. These
youth and adults participate in
construction projects each summer
and do several local projects
throughout the year. Your support
will be greatly appreciated!
Plates will include pancakes,
sausage and drink and are $5. You
are welcome to dine in or carry
outs will be available. More info:
272-1608
Prayer Meetings
PRAYER BAND The
Liberty Community Prayer Band
will hold prayer service Thursday,
Sept. 11 at 7:30 p.m. (ET) at the
home of Sister Betty Beckwith.
Everyone is cordially invited to
attend. For more information, call
643-2622.


SLiberty Post&


Barn Pole Inc.

Dempsey Barron Road, Bristol (off Hwy. 12 N)
Phone (850) 643-5995 i
We 'e got the fence posts to meet your needs.


Johnson, and Butch Butcher who
helped lay mom to rest, and to
Hall's Funeral Home of Altha
for helping make it all possible.
To each of you, words can never
express what you mean to us
and our families. Thank you so
much.
Sincerely,
Kent, Margaret and Marjorie
Jacobs

I would like to thank Dr.
Jerry Boland at Calhoun Health
Department, Dr. M. Fahey Tallah
and his staff, Mr. G. Williams,
manager of Blountstown Health
and Rehab, Angie Wood, therapist
manager, Don, therapist, Kathy,
secretary and Libby Rives, CNA,
for being there for me in the time
of need when I had shoulder
surgery. God bless you.
Love you, Brena Davis & family




!TREASURES
I by Ryan McDougald_.-

A LYING TONGUE
Text: Proverbs 6:17
Earl C. Wilier tells the story of a young
banker who was in line for promotion as
head ofthe trust department. It would give
him a substantial increase in salary. The
directors decided that morning to inform
the young man of their decision at 4:00
PM that afternoon.
When they broke for lunch, one of the
directors happened to be behind the young
banker in the cafeteria. The director saw
the young banker take a small pat ofbutter,
put it inthe bottom of the tray, and cover
it up with other food to hide it from the
cashier. The intent was to avoid being
charged for the pat of butter. So he lied
about what was on his plate.
That afternoon, the directors met again
to inform the young banker that they had
intended on giving him a promotion, but
that because of his actions in the cafeteria,
they had no choice but to fire him. The
directors felt that they could not have
anyone who would lie and steal as the
head of their trust department.
Lying is one of the seven things that
God hates. To lie, according to Webster,
is to "exhibit a false representation; to say
or do that which deceives another, when
he has a right to know the truth, or when
morality requires just representation." A
person ought to be as good as his word. If
you say something, people should count
on it being accurate. There may be certain
things that I can keep to myself because
people don't have a right to know. For
instance, I don't have to tell people how
much money I make. But on the other
hand, it would be wrong to deceive people
by making them think that I make more
or less than I actually make. As Charles
Finney once said, "A person who is
dishonest in little things isn't really honest
in anything."


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SEPTEMBER 10, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 11


Can you tell me some of
the signs that indicate a
hard winter is on its way?
-P. C., Boothbay Harbor,
Maine
ANSWER: When the
bushes are full of berries
and the acorns are plentiful,
a hard winter is on the way.
Beechnuts have contradic-
tory weather lore associ-
ated with them. Some say
plentiful beechnuts signify
a long winter, while others
say that it means that the
winter will be mild. Corn-
husks are thicker, stronger,
and harder to husk before.
a cold winter. The same is
true for peeling onions. If
autumn leaves are slow to
fall, the winter will be hard.
It's said that "an early win-
ter is a surly winter." When
squirrels lay in a large sup-
ply of nuts, expect a cold
winter, but "When he eats
them on the tree, / Weather
as warm as warm can be."
The woolly bear caterpil-
lar, of course, is king of the
prognosticators -- the wider
its orange-brown center
band, the milder the winter.
If migratory birds depart
sooner than usual, expect a
hard winter. If the breast-
bone of a duck is red (you'd
have to make a meal of one
to know), expect a long
winter; if it's white, the
winter will be mild. A simi-


THAK OLD FARMER'S



ALMANAC
K


lar thing is said of geese,
but the breastbone may
look red, purplish, spotted,
or dark for a long winter,
and white for a mild one. If
(live) domestic geese walk
east and fly west, expect
cold weather.
What is the meaning o)
alarm, as in a three-alarm
fire? -S. W., Palm Springs,
Calif.
ANSWER: An alarm is
a warning, signal, or call to
action. It originated as a call
to arms.-- "All'arme!" (To
arms!) in Old Italian. As
used by fire departments,










AAf.
--- I


g


the signal is preceded by
a number, which alerts the
dispatcher to the magnitude
of the fire and the response
required. The numbers rep-
resent pre-established as-
signments of apparatus and
manpower and allow the
dispatcher to know instant-
ly how much equipment
and how many firefighters
will be needed to do the
job. The higher the number
is, the more of each will be
required.
Is there any truth to the
idea that colors such as
"institutional green" are


depressing? -B. T., Ithaca,
N.Y.
ANSWER: It's called
chromotherapy, the idea
that certain colors can ex-
ert psychological, or even
physical, influences upon
us. To put a positive spin on
it, green is often used to aid
balance and create peace in
a situation of, shall we say,
emotional upheaval. It's
often used in dormitories,
hospitals, and, well, yes,
mental institutions for its
reputed calming influences.
Yellow has positive in-
fluences over the intellect,


we're told, so if there's a
yellow tint to that green, it
may be a good choice for
the academic year. Blue is
cooling and relaxing, good
for sleeping, but maybe not
so good for studying. Or-
ange has been called "the
wisdom ray" and is sup-
posed to counteract preju-
dices (if only it were so
simple), open the mind,
encourage new ideas, and
boost confidence. Don't
swing too far from orange
to red, however. Red is ac-
tive and motivating, yes,
but a trifle off-balance and
passionate, perhaps, for
most tastes.
Send your questions
to: Ask The Old Farmer's
Almanac, P.O. Box 520,
Dublin, NH 03444. Visit
our "Question of the Day"
section at Almanac.com for
more advice.


SEPT. 10, WEDNESDAY -- Nathan Hale volunteered to spy behind enemy lines, 1776.
Anna Lindh, the foreign minister of Sweden, was fatally stabbed, 2003.
SEPT. 11, THURSDAY -- Conjunction of Mercury and Venus. The QE2 ocean liner was
struck by a rogue wave, 1995. Terrorist attacks on United States, 2001.
SEPT. 12, FRIDAY -- Moon at ascending node. Conjunction of Mercury and Mars. Astro-
nauts Jan Davis and Mark Lee became the first married couple in space, 1992.
SEPT. 13, SATURDAY -- Halford Mackinder's team became the first Europeans to summit
Mount Kenya, 1899. Author Roald Dahl born, 1916.
SEPT. 14, SUNDAY -- Graf Zeppelin II, made its first flight, 1938. Princess Grace of Monaco
died, 1982. Don't count your fish until they're on dry land.
SEPT. 15, MONDAY -- Holy Cross. Full Harvest Moon. Conjunction of Uranus and the
Moon. U.S. president William Howard Taft born, 1857.
SEPT. 16, TUESDAY -- Department store founder James C. Penney born, f875. William
Durant incorporated General Motors, New Jersey, 1908.


September 8-14 P 2008

SEPTPEMBERS OldiFarmer's SEPTEMBfRm9,10
Conjunction of/upiter Almanac Best days to
and the Moon begin losing
SEPTEMBER 9 SEPTEMBER 13
Admission Day Best day to begin diet


although Pope Gregory XIII calendar was "off' by 11 days. The
completed his reform of the Act decreed that the day following
Julian calendar in 1582, many of the September 2, 1752, would become
changes were not adopted september 14. The Act also
until later. When th.. 2 \ provided that the year
British Calendar Act .^-_ would begin on Janu-
was passed in 1751 Sary 1 instead of March
to bring Britain u 25, Gregory's calen-
and the Ameri- 'dar, with a slight
can colonies under the change for greater accuracy, is the
"Gregorian Correction," the Julian one most countries use today.

1 small cabbage coarsely chop the cabbage and steam until
salt and pepper, to taste Glit is tender (under 10 minutes). Drain,
2 inegarons then season with salt, pepper, vinegar, and
2 tablespoons butter. Beat the egg and Cleam, and stir into
butter the cabbage mixture, reheating briefly to
1egg just warm. Do not boil. Serve immediately.
I cup cream
MAKES 4 TO6SERVINGS,
WIT AND WISDOM FROM I ,-
THE OLD FARMER'S ALMANAC '
Sniff some lavender oil to reduce anxiety.
II ,26-t6f'l!9-, i,
A round-topped cloudwith flattened base. carrie ,''
rainfall in ift face. e I
On September 12, 1954, "Lassie" made its
television debut. '_
FOR RECIPES. GARDENING TIPS. AND WEATHER FORECASTS, VISIT:
Almanac.comr


FOR LIBERTY COUNTY
Are you ready





















SHERIFF
NOVEMBER 4, 2008 GENERAL ELECTION
Home: 643-2346 Cell: 508-2428
"Remember this is Your County,
Your Choice, Sic r'''lot
Your Change." Fe O


Political advertisement paid for and approved by Jimmy Faircloth, no party affiliation, for Sheriff








Page 12 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 1iO, 2008



;I-I ii qII
. N .I
m u1 .......


SPENCER O'BRYAN
Spencer O'Bryan celebrated
his first birthday on Sept. 11.
He is the son of Ashley Huff
and Anthony O'Bryan. He
is the grandson of Sharon
Adkins. Spencer enjoys
playing outside and spending
time with his friends and
family.


RYLEE MADISON
BLACKBURN
Rylee Madison Blackburn
celebrated her sixth
birthday on Sept. 6. She is
the daughter of Brent and
Michelle Blackburn. She is
the granddaughter of Terry
and Cathy Blackburn, Rusty
and Sherrie Gibbs and the
late Rita Gibbs. Rylee enjoys
going to kindergarten, going
to church and spending time
with her grandparents.


MARTHA HALL
Martha Hall is celebrating her
105th birthday on Sept. 15. She
is the mother of Henry, Deloris,
the late Plumter, John, Wilson
and Jenell. Martha enjoys
talking on the phone, sitting in
her rocking chair and watching
cars go by and dusting all her
what-nots that she received
during her life. There will be a
party Sept. 13 at 3p.m. at her
home. All friends and family
are welcome. There will be no
invitations.


DYLAN WILLIS
CHESTER
Dylan turned one on Aug. 28.
He celebrated his first birthday
with a football party with friends
and family. He is the son of
Matthew and Lanet Chester
of Bristol. His grandparents
are Stan and Debbie
Brannan of Bristol, Randy
Weeks of Chattahoochee
and Sue and the late Wayne
Chester of Sycamore. Great-
grandparents include Catherine
and the late Gene Shelton,
Eleanor and M.W. Weeks,
all of Chattahoochee, Merle
Brannan of Carrabelle, Katie
and the late Willis Chester
of Quincy and Evelyn Smith
of Greensboro. Dylan enjoys
splashing in the pool, chasing
his cat Cliff and playing with his
big sister Sara-Kate.


SARA OLIVIA AND
MADELYN ELIZABETH
MANSPEAKER
Sara Olivia Manspeaker
celebrated her third birthday
on Aug. 16. She is the
daughter of Robert and
Rachel Manspeaker of Bristol.
Maternal grandparents are
Ralph and Olivia Whitfield of
Bristol. Paternal grandparents
are Bob and Faye Manspeaker
of Quincy. Sara enjoys
playing with her big cousin,
Hana. Sara and her parents
are proud to announce the
birth of Madelyn Elizabeth
Manspeaker. She was born
July 21, 2008 at Tallahassee
Memorial Healthcare. She
weighed 6 Ibs. 14 ounces and
was 18 1/4 inches long.


j. .

-c --- was
RIYA CORINNE
HOWELL
Lenise and Clint Howell
of Grand Ridge are proud
to announce the birth
of their daughter, Riya
Corinne Howell. She
was born June 27, 2008
at Tallahasee Memorial
Women's Pavilion. She
.., weighed 7 lbs. and 2
ounces and was 19 1/4
inches long. She was
welcomed home by her
brother, Ronan Howell,
who is two years old. Maternal grandparents are Glen and
Marcia Wood of Bristol. Paternal grandparents are Clinton and
Lorelie Howell of Winter Garden.

NOREI YVONNE DEMPS
LaMonte and Sonya Demps of Orange Park are proud to
announce the birth of their daughter, Norei Yvonne Demps,


born on Aug. 22, 2008.
She weighed 7 Ibs. and
1 oz. and measured 19
inches long. Maternal
grandparents are Rob-
ert and Emma Mike.
Paternal grandparents
are Nathaniel and Mil-
dred Demps. She is the
great-granddaughter of
Mary Gary. Norei was
welcomed home by her
brother, Kendi, who
turned two years old in
July.


Poley, Thompson to exchange vows

Ernie and Baptist Church
Hellon Poley B located at 4785


Sr., of Clarks-
ville are proud to announce
the forthcoming marriage of
their daughter Dove Delores
Poley to Cole Alan Thomp-
son, son of Michael and Susan
Thompson of Punta Gorda.
The wedding will take
place on Saturday, Sept. 20,
2008 at 11:30 a.m. at Eastside


Hwy. 90 in
Marianna.
Invitations are not being
sent locally, but all family and
friends are invited to come as
Dove and Cole join their lives
as one. A reception will follow
the ceremony at the American
Legion at 3627 Highway 90
in Marianna.


Patrick Pippin graduates from

Infantry Training at Ft. Benning
Army Pvt. Patrick Pippin has graduated from the Infantryman
One Station Unit Training at Fort Benning, Columbus, Ga.
The training consists of Basic Infantry Training and Advanced
Individual Training.
During the nine weeks of basic combat training, the soldier
received training in drill and ceremonies, weapons employment,
map reading, tactics, military courtesy, military justice,
physical fitness, first aid skills, and Army history, core values
and traditions. Additional training included development of
basic combat skills and battlefield operations and tactics, and
experienced use of various weapons and weapons defenses
available to the infantry crewman.
The Advanced Individual Training course is designed to train
infantry soldiers to perform reconnaissance operations; employ,
fire and recover anti-personnel and anti-tank mines; locate and
neutralize land mines and operate target and sight equipment;
operate and maintain communications equipment and radio
networks; construct field firing aids for infantry weapons; and
perform infantry combat exercises and dismounted battle drills,
which includes survival procedures in a nuclear, biological or
chemical contaminated area.
He is the son of Sondra M. Nelson of Wewahitchka.
Pippin graduated in 2007 from the Tom P. Haney Technical
Center, Panama City.

Dehn graduates from basic training
Anthony Dehn ,.
graduated Basic -
Training in Fort Knox,
KY on August 22,
2008.
He is currently in Fort
Gordon, GA in AIT.
Anthony is the son of
Kim and David Dehn
of Altha and a 2006
graduate of Altha High
School.
His grandparents are
Diane & Edward Dehn _
and the late Christine
*and Coy Vickery, all
from Altha. I1


~








SEPTEMBER 10, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 13


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Humane Society seeks homes for pets
To the editor, / \ neglected animals, our Sheriff's
Almost two years ago, I A Offices are not performing their
founded the Calhoun County I SK L duties of enforcing Florida
Humane Society to promote animal control and protection
animal welfare while serving |T1 laws. Consequently, as soon as
Calhoun and Liberty counties. U I founded the Humane Society,
Because our local governments WITH A LETTER citizens began calling on us to
have failed to provide essential TO THE EDITOR help needy animals. Most have
animal services to citizens, we Write: The been given shelter here, where I
have been compelled to rescue Calhoun-Liberty Journal at have largely been providing, and
and shelter ninety-five animals, P.O. Box 536, Bristol 32321 funding, their care myself; the rest
even though it is not part of our have been in foster homes that are
ongoing mission to do so. Almost providing and caring for them.
all were "dumped" and left to good for our community. More I trusted that we would be able
starve. Many of these were also importantly, these dogs need to shelter them until we found
sick or injured. Of these, thirty- homes and the love and affection homes for them or convinced
three remain, here and in foster of their own families, officials to provide a shelter for
care. Because so many resources Not only have our County them. unfortunately, our officials
have been going for their support, Commissioners failed to provide have yet to do anything about our
we must find homes or shelters citizens with essential animal See LETTERS
1, 1 1See LETTERS


for them to better accomplish
our mission and do the most


services and a shelter to take in
homeless, unwanted, abused and


Marketplace thrives
To the editor,
Woo Hoo! I really think Blountstown Main
Street has something here. Although the sun, the
heat and the tail end of a head cold prohibited me
from staying long, I thoroughly enjoyed seeing what
everyone had to sell and even give away!
I was given a sample of a pecan tassie and a
pound cake bite. I bought a box of the tassies. Nuts
are good for you, right?
I really could have gone for one of those big
homemade layer cakes under one canopy, but settled
for a few homemade chocolate chip cookies being
sold by a real beauty queen, a small loaf of fruit
bread and a small jar of plum jam.
It was so nice to hear live music being played
softly as I walked around. The little ballerina girls
were beautiful in their colorful tu-tu's and addedjust
the right touch of class. The white and beige tents
and canopies really gave the Marketplace a clean
appearance. I was also thrilled to see lemonade
served in such a gorgeous old-fashioned way!
All of the produce and nursery items were
well-presented. I saw people taking end-of-season
watermelons to their vehicles and some were asking
about the pepper plants for sale.
All of the artists and craft persons were diverse
and offered unique, quality handmade items at really


continued on page 17


on small town spirit
good prices. There were watercolor renditions of
the M&B train on notecards, stroller blankets
& matching bibs lined in soft vintage chenille
bedspread fabric, heavy and earthy pottery, hand-
strung beaded jewelry and more.
The Wakulla Bank greenway was a perfect
spot for the premier of River Valley Marketplace,
but I have a feeling it's going to expand. As I
walked around, I caught bits of conversation
such as, "You know, I could finish making all
those..." and "I think next time I'll sell plates of
chicken & dumplin's with...." and "Hey, I could
make pumpkin rolls for October!" and even "My
sister in Alabama would probably like to sell her
homemade...."
In these hard times of economic strife and
assembly-line products, it's refreshing to know
that our community is doing it's part to keep alive
the true small-town American free enterprise.
Kudos to Blountstown Main Street for bringing
together farmers and artists, dancers and bakers
and jelly makers, potters, crafters, musicians and
cooks to the very heart of downtown Blountstown
for an opportunity to buy, sell or just enjoy the
socializing. I'm looking forward to the next River
Valley Marketplace!
Verena Nix, Blountstown


'Ignorant cowards' damaging campaign signs


To the editor,
I am writing in response to
an event that recently occurred
regarding one of our candidates
running for school superintendent,
namely Mr. Jimmy Marshall of
Clarksville. Shortly after erecting
a sign in Altha advertising his
running, a coward and totally
ignorant person and/or persons
decided they had the right to
destroy his poster by writing on
it and painting it.


This random act of vandalism
was and is a statement of some
of our citizens who have no pride
or conception of what is right
or wrong. That was someone's
property who had the right to
display the sign, someone who
paid for the sign to be made and
volunteers who helped erect them.
Who gave these ignorant cowards
the right to take it upon themselves
to destroy anyone's property? This
man is an honest and trustworthy


Letter writer is definitely 'anti-hunter'
To the editor,
It is evident that Pamala Anderson, Bristol, gun owner, is an anti-
hunter. What she is not is a biologist. Biologists all agree that any wild
animal, whose numbers are not controlled, will eventually become
over populated. Control is done by hunting, or as some northern and
western states have done, hire sharp shooters to eliminate some of the
population. I have never been attacked by a black bear, but I have read
stories of those who have. The female black bears are very protective
of their young, and will attack if they feel threatened. The male is just
mean, and will even kill young cubs, just so the sow can come into
heat again, and breed (wild boars also do this).
You accuse retired sheriff, Raymond Hamlin of acting like an eight-
year-old. The same could also be said of you, Pamala Anderson.
Sincerely,
Bill Lett, Havana


person who deserves better from
the community he is trying to help.
I know from personal knowledge
if anyone of these cowards needed
help he would be the first one to
assist in any way he could.
I assume we live in a place
where this kind of behavior
is acceptable unfortunately.
There are some who wish to
better conditions and stop this
unacceptable behavior some ofus
were taught to respect our fellow
man even though our fellow man
is a idiot and a fool.
Mr. Marshall has the right and
has earned the right to run for
any office he wishes to pursue
regardless and should be shown
the respect he is entitled to
receive. He only wishes to stop
waste in our school systems and
to improve the quality of life
for all of us and our children so
stop the stupidity and look at the
reality of the issues he is trying
to improve. He is working hard
to help bring about change and
he needs your support as a friend
not an enemy.
Norma Melvin, Clarksville









Page 14 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 10, 2008


Largemouth bass are amazing fish

* Late summer and fall provide
some of the best freshwater fishing
opportunities


BV FWO Stoff


Ai I i,. I I l .I .I_'ri.t iIIII bII assprepares
a spawning bed and the female lays her
eggs, the pair typically produces 5,000
- 10,000 11 l .'. .0I eggs, and it may hap-
pen multiple times during the breeding
season that starts in the springtime.
The male protects the eggs until they
hatch two to four days later, then the
young fish or fry live off yolk sac for a
couple of weeks, after which they start
feeding onl microscopic animals. The
male contnullls protecting the frI until
they reach about an inch long, and they.
start eating other lish including their
ownll brothers and sislers. I I. can etll
lish half as large as their owon bodies, but
they also cat insects, i . cravyish and
shrimp along othce' i i -.
O er a spawning season, a big female
largemouth bass can produce 100,000
eggs, but only two of them have to sur-
vive long enough to become adults and
to breed to keep the population stable.
That takes two to four years in the wild.
Bass survive by taking advantage of
their keen senses of sight, smell, taste,
hearing and touch, plus a lateral line that
enables them to detect motion in the wa-
ter around them. That helps them catch
food, even when they can't see well.
They can see colors and contrasts.
They seem to like reds and whites in
shallow water, and anglers know to use
those colors on the lures used to catch
them.
About 822,000 anglers target large-
mouths and other black bass in Florida
every year. If you take the number of
bass fishermen and multiply it by the
number of days they spend fishing for
them, the total is 15 million fishing days.
That compares to 6 million fishing days
for red drum, the most popular saltwater
fish in Florida.
Florida has its own distinct strain of
largemouth bass in the southern two


7

/~rcu


u1~14i


Support conservation


'5
A' I'
.7


x',-. ,

..-' ,


Jeffrey Smith caught this 18-pound, 8-ounce largemouth bass In a Polk County
orange grove lake. .(Photo by Steve Smith)


thirds of the state. In the rest of the
state, the largemouth has a mixhtre of
Florida and northern largemouth bass
genes, whichdon't grow as fast. Nearly
all the top 25 bass reported anywhere
have some Florida bass genes.
The largest bass ever caught was a
22.25-pounder, certified in 1932. The
largest ever caught in Florida weighed
a little more than 20 pounds, but fish-
cries biologists believe there are larger
ones swimming in Florida's waters
right now.


'.The oldest largemouth bass ever
recorded in Florida was 16 years old.
Scientists can tell how old a fish is by
counting the rings on its ear bones,
similar to the way they can tell how
old a tree is by -. .,niniL- i. wings in its
trunk.
All trophy bass are females, because
typically only females get larger than
20 inches long or weigh more than four
pounds'. Sometimes the males get a
little larger than that, but not typically.


FWC biologists list bass fishing honeyholes
Kach year, FlMorida l'ish amd Wildlife Conservation Commission (1 WC) fisheries biologists select a list of Florida lakcs and
rivers as top black bass fishing destinations. This year's picks are:


a Lake Gcorgel8 miles northwest of Dcland.
a Lake Tohopekaliga at Kissinumee.
* Lake Kissinunec, cast of Lake Wales.
a Rodman Reservoir, cast of Gainesville.
a Lake Tarpon near Tampa/St. Petersburg.
a Lake Weohyakapka, commonly known as Lake
a W'alk-in-Water south of Orliado.
a Lake Istokpoga south of Sebring.
a Deer Point Lake north of Panama City.
a The Suwannee River from a swampy region near the
GCeorgia border to the G(ulf of .Mexico.
* The I fverglades Water Conservation Areas in South
Foridta.
a Crescent ILake near C.rescent City.


maTenoroc Fish MAanagement Area neear Lakehad.
a Mosaic Iish M management Area in Polk and I lendry
counties.
For more details about how and where to fish these lakes,
updates throughout the year and information about fish con-
sumption advisories or special regulations, visit MyNfI1AC.
com .l 'shisng' iForecast.

Fishing has never been easier In Florida
You may obtain fishing license privileges 24 hours a day by visiting
MyFWC.com/License or Iy calling 1-888-FSHFLORIDA (3 17.,1356).
Processing fees apply on sales via telephone and Internet. A
unique license number will be assigned, which allows you to begir
fishing immediately aftel the transaction.


If you add up the numbers
economists use, you'll find
that in anl average day. Ilor-
itl's economy benceiis by
56.5 million from freshwa-
ter fishing in Florida. That's
about 54,500. every mninute. It
also provides jobs for 23,50(4
Floridians.
In 2006, 14.4 million
days of freshwater fishing in
Florida were 'nj', ,el by 1.4
inillion Americans over the
age of 16.'Keeping Florida's
fishing spots healthy to sus-
tain quality fishing that keeps
them coming back requires
a significant investment in
research, management and
law enforcement.
Of those anglers, approxi-
mately 562,000 buy a fresh-
water fishing license. Most of
the others are exempt. Those
license fees pay for much of
the state's conservation ef-
forts.
Another important source


of money that pays for keep-
ing fish and wildlife in good
shape comes froinm he "Go
Fishing" license plate seen
oil niahl cars and boat trail-
ers. It costs an extra $27 to
purchase the specialty license
plate. It features a natural tn-
derwater scene in native eel-
grass with a largemouth bass,
bluegill and redear sunfish,
designed by Scott I-Iestand.
The plate can be purchased
at most tax collectors' offices
or licensed tag agents or by
visiting www.BuyaPlate.com.
Another way to contribute
to fish and wildlife conserva-
tion is to visit www.Wild-
lifeFoundationofFlorida.com
and make a donation. While
there, purchase a Glen Lau
fishing print or DVD and re-
ceive a free 2008 bass calen-
dar and bumper sticker with
your purchase. The profits
support the Florida Bass
Conservation Center


Here's how to tie a

knot that won't let

fish slip away

Improved clinch knot
Used for tying line to a hook, swivel and some artificial
lures.


f


(9


,II,


1. Put the tag end of the line
through the eye of the
hook and bring toward the
line.

2. Make five twists around
the standing ince.

3. Take the tag end back
toward the hook and push
it through the first loop
nearest the eye. Bring
the tag end back through
the big loop made in the
previous step.


State-of-the-art facility conserves


and enhances bass fishing Florida


By FWC Staff
When the Florida Fish and
Wildlife Contservation Corm-
mission (FWC) dedicated the
new Florida Bass Conserva-
tion C(enter in February, the
tFWC began harnessing cut-
ting-edge technology to sup-
port the freshwater fishing
industry. Gov. Charlie Crist,
in a letter to FWC Chairman
Rodney Barreto, said the cer-
emony ushered in a new era.
"This state-of-the-art facil-
ity, combined with new re-
search and production meth-
ods, will help ensure safe
and sustainable use of these
resources for generations to
come," Crist said.
Recreational fishing pours
$2 billion a year into the
state's economy and sup-
ports 23,500 jobs. The new
facility includes a pathology
lab and will use genetic tech-


nology to enable scientists to
preserve the unique Florida
lari'geouth bass that is Ia-
live only to peninsular Ilor--
ida and ensure only healthy
fish leave the lab for stocking
projects.
Plms call for a compre-
hensive library and Internet
data center ands facilities to
host scientists from the high-
est levels of research.
A visitor center, with a
$6-million price tag, is part
of the vision. Most of the
funding for the visitor center
will come from private sec-
tor partners and matching
federal fiuds
Ed Moyer, then-director of
the FWC's Division of Fresh-
water Fisheries, initially pro-
posed construction of the new
conservation center about six
years ago when he and other
experts recognized the old


hbachcry was too antiquated
and inefficient to match the
state's needs. I Il envisioned
a climate-controlled rearing
facility to give biologists an
opportunity to spawn bass
and other freshwater species
at the most favorable tiue
for stocking projects.
The newx facility will en-
able scientists to produce
more fish than ever before
for stocking and to release
them when they can contrib-
ute most to healthy fisheries.
Combined with the FWC's
extensive efforts to enhance
aquatic habitats and to regu-
late the fisheries based on the
best scientific data available,
the possibilities can boggle
the mind.
"Think about it," Moyer
said. "We're already on top,
and we have no intention of
going anywhere but up."


4. Holding the hook and the
line, putll the knot tightly
until it looks like the knot
at left.
Tie the knot corrcctly,-anmd wcl the knot prior to filtly tighten
ing il. Trim tag end to 1 ) 8 itlch after complete tighteniug
the knot.



'- .'... .. .!,

'i:.








The new bass conservation center replaced the 1965-vintage Richloam Fish Hatchery and
triples its capacity to produce various bass. bream, catfish and feeder fish. (FWC photo)
'(e".4' ":





triples its capacity to produce various bass. bream, catfish end feeder fish. (FWC photo)


The FBCC enables
biologists to hatch eggs
hi well-oxygenated and
temperature- controlled
hatching jars and then
grow out the fry and
fingerlings indoors to S
avoid predators and
allow better monitoring |
of diseases to ensure
quality. (FWC photo)


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SEPTEMBER 10, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 15



Hospital. hopeful donations will increase


CALHOUN-LIBERTY

Hospital

i Corner
J by Ron Gilliard,
CLH Administrator


Let me discuss a topic that's
very important to this hospital.
Most large hospitals, and
many small ones, have formal
"Foundations" that accept
donations to the hospitals.
Such donations assist in
many wonderful ways, for
example, to help defray the
costs of purchasing equipment,
renovations, building
new additions or even new
hospitals.
To be very frank, it's tough in
the health care business today,
and especially for small, rural
hospitals. We're pleased with


the progress we've
made to "turn
around" Calhoun-
Liberty Hospital. j O
But we have a lot .
of challenges still t
facing us as all
hospitals do.
The amount
of "free care"
we provide will ,,,;q
approach over two
million dollars this '
year! Ifwe provide .
this amount of
care without any
compensation, you
can begin to see
a little bit of our
problem. Cuts to Medicare and
Medicaid continue each year.
So, Foundations can be critical
to hospitals.
It's a wonderful way for local
citizens and businesses to help
support their local hospital. It


A/


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U- tong Qi'stance"


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as low as

$B495Imo.


NUP.'.1 : ,j'.iae.1i dvjl IIbdir I
phorIT Iwith o ar ailh'- ti l tiianiii-cd
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lritvinvt Add DIRiiECT\ s, r % i,:r
1-11h J.U:S to '15nii--i l ca~u nril-I


.,:ll 800.400.5568 -,1
www.FairPoint com


Fa t.
comm!niefAjns
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L HI r ..3 l IIjT: ,, I t.. 4 .I iLr aFI.. A.[' [eFI 1f 'I_.i_ .11H.. f'fj lZ 1 r, If-
4rfl.[.' a' j-i jI 1,q1IT. IIJ .j. a fl. o:In. Ho m Phcafle a Fullloudia ...ji. 4l a k I i .- I I..






a' sif'~rm.z ~ ~ 'L.'n.1.~I ri.-....' U nlam iu- agDasET an - !,I,[,U a,. -'. l ,, i' L ':I liP
toi 5 `f--,,IM III III .w.'[..re auj'.dii.' r~. P[,. ii.. L,!, r.i,. a!,. r Ii,.h,.fII . 1jj y. f I
"Al '1fd'dr ipl7 C. ..hI K IY ffbIn-1 J .i.!r- ni m d aqi ..4. f* .'.... ...m ifiu- i.11-ed !4m. ISer-a-
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_0 rilil-.......... I A :._j,!1.._.I


also allows a well deserved
tax break for those making
donations.
Foundations are always "tax
exempt" organizations, thus
allowing the donations to also
be tax exempt.
Calhoun-Liberty Hospital
does not have a "Foundation."
However, we are a "not-for-
profit" hospital, operated by a
board of local citizens. That
makes us eligible to receive
donations just as any formal
Foundation. The official term
from the Internal Revenue
Service is a "501 (3) private,
not-for-profit organization."
That's a mouth full! But
again, it makes us just like a
Foundation.
As a not-for-profit hospital,
every penny we "make" goes
back into the hospital. No
individual or business profits
from our efforts. And again,
in today's health care world, it
presents real challenges for not
only necessary growth, but in
many cases, actual survival.


We've been
extremely fortunate
in the wonderful
support from
our community
since the Hospital
.. Association Board
,i '" regained control of
~the hospital. For
Example, many of
Syou have"adopted"
rooms or other
-.2 areas under our
SAdopt-A-Room
program.
S We'll soon have
all our inpatient
rooms renovated
and upgraded under
this program. As a not-for-
profit organization, the hospital
can provide documentation
to verify the tax advantages
of this kindness, if desired.
Many loved ones are being
honored and remembered in
the process.
We're also encouraging
donations to the hospital upon
the death of a family member
or of a friend. We feel this is a
very special way to honor the
individual. A gift in memory
of someone to the hospital will
last a long time. We notify the
family of the deceased as well
as provide documentation to the
donor, again, fortax purposes.
And we hope to increase
the number of donations to the
hospital. One of our Board
Members, Mrs. Ruth Attaway,
has done an amazing job
recently of obtaining donations
from Foundations, individuals,
and businesses and it has been
wonderful! Her efforts have
been tremendous in assisting
us in our continual upgrading


of the hospital.
Perhaps you've noticed some
of her efforts. She partnered
with Wakulla Bank to make
our main lobby much more
attractive. All our hallways
have been painted. Next,
we will completely redo the
Nurses' Station. Ifyou haven't
been in the hospital lately, I
think you will be pleasantly
surprised at our "upgraded
appearance." We'll also be
able to purchase some needed
equipment items as a direct
result of her dedication to the
hospital.
We'll be recognizing the
donors through Mrs. Ruth's
efforts in the near future. We're
so appreciative to her and them
for these kind and generous
donations.
We don't plan on establishing
a formal foundation. We feel
we can meet the same goal with
our not-for-profit status and
hopefully will begin to receive
increased donations. We'll put
each and every one to good use.
We always have equipment
needs and facility upgrade
requirements. And again, there
are the tax advantages for the
donor.
You don't have to give to a
big city medical center with a
Foundation to benefit from acts
o'f generosity and kindness.
You can do so right here at
home! You can perhaps honor
a loved one or a friend, and in
the process, greatly benefit this
hospital.
Give me a call if you have
any questions about donating to
the hospital or- about anything
else about the hospital at 674-
5411, ext 206.


Florida KidCare to launch advertising contest

for kids to promote benefits of good healthcare
TALLAHASSEE-Students dreaming ofa "big creativity and ability to promote Florida KidCare
break" can compete for their moment in the spotlight benefits to a diverse population. The winning
with the Florida KidCare "Act-Out for Health" commercial may air on television stations and the
contest [www.actout4health.org]. Middle school and winning print ad may be published in newspapers and
high school students across Florida are encouraged, magazines across the state as part of the 2009 Florida
to produce a 30 second television commercial or KidCare media campaign.
create a print advertisement promoting Florida A first'place winner and runner-up will be chosen
KidCare, the state and federally-funded insurance from six different regions across the state. One grand
program providing affordable health benefits for prize winner in the print and commercial categories
children birth through 18. will be chosen from the regional winners and awarded
"A recent study by the University of Florida a $5,000 scholarship. Other prizes include Best Buy
Institute for Child Health Policy revealed the highest gift cards for each student that helped produce the
percentage of uninsured children in the state are kids winning advertisement and a monetary donation given
between the ages of 12 and 18," said Rich Robleto, to the students' school.
executive director of Florida Healthy Kids, a Florida The contest is open to all middle and high school
KidCare partner. "This contest allows kids in this students across the state. To receive an entry form and
age range, whether they have insurance or not, to contest guidelines, visit www.actout4health.org. Visit
share their perceptions and thoughts about getting the Florida Healthy Kids website to view last year's
good healthcare and why families should apply for winning PSA entry at http://www.healthykids.org/
Florida KidCare benefits." marketing/aofh.php?lang=ENG.
Florida KidCare is available to all Florida children For questions about the Act-Out for Health contest
without health insurance. Children enrolled in the or to receive flyers to hang in your classroom, please
program receive preventive care, such as regular call Annie Butterworth, communications specialist
doctor's visits, immunizations, dental and eye care, for the Florida Healthy Kids Corporation at (850)
at a price their families can afford. Many pay less 224-5437, ext. 6114.
than $20 per month; most pay nothing at all. Florida KidCare must receive all entries by Friday,
All of the contest entries will be judged on December 5, 2008 at 4 p.m.


~4~ b

Fs":

srla







Page 16 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 10, 2008


Art Builds Florida! Statewide

Student Art Contest begins
TALLAHASSEE Secretary of State Kurt S. Browning announced
Art Builds Florida!, a statewide art contest inviting Florida's 9-12th
grade high school students to create visual pieces of art that express
the importance of art and culture to the future of their state. From
Sept. 8 to November 7, students can submit original 2-dimensional
artwork exploring the four key areas of Florida's strategic plan for
the arts, Culture Builds Florida's Future.
The Florida Department of State and Margo Bindhardt, chairperson
of Citizens for Florida Arts, Inc., officially opened the Art Builds
Florida! contest on the back steps of the Old Capitol. Remarks were
delivered by Secretary Browning; former Senator Charles W. Clary
III, FAIA; Tony Carvajal, Executive Vice President of the Florida
Chamber Foundation; Chancellor Frances Haithcock, K-12 Schools,
and special guest Tom Prestopnik, long-time arts educator from Martin
County. Complete contest information and official contest rules are
available on the Florida Department of State's Division of Cultural
Affairs Web site at www.florida-arts.org/artcontest/.
Florida's 67 counties have been divided into four regions, each
taking one of the focus areas of the state's 10-year strategic plan,
Culture Builds Florida's Future. The four areas are: Leadership,
Design and Development, Learning and Wellness, and Strengthening
the Economy. The winning designs will become visual representations
of the strategic plan, helping to develop momentum and inspire
excitement for future activities in each focus area through a variety
of promotional materials.
The 32 finalists will be announced on the Division's Web site
in December. Their work will be forwarded to a panel of arts
professionals and officials from partner state agencies who will then
select the final winners and runners-up in each category.
The four winners and their families will be invited to Tallahassee
in April2009 for events recognizing their achievements in the contest.
Simultaneously, an exhibition in the Division of Cultural Affairs
Gallery for Innovation & the Arts will feature the work of the 32
finalists.
Art Builds Florida! is an initiative of the Division of Cultural Affairs
and is sponsored by Citizens for Florida Arts, Inc., an organization
that supports the efforts of the Division of Cultural Affairs and the
many programs it administers.


It is with extreme gratitude that I look
forward to serving as your next
Superintendent of Schools. I enjoyed
getting to meet many of you during my
campaign and am grateful for the
hospitality you shared. Thank you for
the confidence you placed in me with
your vote. I appreciate your support and
look forward to meeting
your expectations during ,
the next four years.



Sincerely, .


Sue Summters
p i: ,i.


Political advertisement paid for and approved by Sue Summers,
Democrat, for Liberty County Superintendent of Schools








SEPTEMBER 10, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 17


One driver airlifted; other taken to ER

Semi, van collide on S.R. 71


by Teresa Eubanks, Journal Editor
A 51-year-old Youngstown man was
injured when his van collided with a
semi truck Monday on State Road 71
North at Bob Guilford Road.
According to a report from the
Florida Highway Patrol, William
A. Granger was parked on the east
shoulder of State Road 71 around 12:28
p.m. when he pulled back onto the road






who said the charge is unfounded.
"The reason for entering the ballot
number into the system is to keep people
from voting more than once," explained
Wood. "There's no way to track that
particular stub back to that ballot." She
said many other counties use the optical
balloting system in exactly the same
way.
"I've conducted a lot of elections and
this is the first time I have had my integrity
attacked," said Wood, who has held the
elections supervisor's job since 1997 and
had no opposition in this year's election.
"I do my dead level best to conduct these
elections in the fairest manner possible,"
she said.
Liberty County had 851 people take part
in early voting.


and drove into the path of a northbound
2006 Mack semi tractor-trailer carrying
a load of gravel.
The right side of the semi collided
with the left side of the van, crushing
the front and knocking it over on its
side.
Truck driver Rufus Farmer, 66, of
Crawfordville then lost control of the
semi, which rotated clockwise and
overturned on its left side.
The collision left a large diesel spill
on the road and dumped gravel in the
west ditch. The semi was spread out
across two lanes, causing Hwy. 71 to
be closed to traffic for three hours until
a large wrecker could be brought in
from Bay County to remove the truck
and trailer.
Granger was able to climb out of
the van through a window. He was
standing and talking at the crash scene
before being taken to Bay Medical
Hospital by emergency helicopter,
according to FHP Sgt. Lonnie Baker.
His condition that afternoon was listed
as serious.
The truck driver escaped with only
minor injuries and was taken to the
emergency room at Calhoun-Liberty
Hospital by Calhoun County EMS.
Both men were wearing seatbelts.
Charges are pending.


need for animal services and a
shelter, and there have not been
nearly enough homes for them.
Notwithstanding the resources that have
gone into sheltering these animals, we have
still been able to serve our community
in other ways. We have responded to
many citizen's calls for assistance and
information; assisted citizens in spaying
and neutering over a hundred animals;
established a Web site; and educated people
on humane attitudes towards animals.
This we have primarily done through our
participation in the 2006 and 2007 annual
Panhandle Pioneer Settlement "Goat Day"
festivals. (In 2006, we educated the public
on the pet overpopulation problem and
the importance of spaying and neutering;
and exhibited and taught about the Dixiee
dingos" that still run wild in the swamps
and piney woods of the South. In 2007,
we brought dogs for children to visit and
pet; distributed several hundred "Be Kind
to Animals" children's activity books; and
provided information on animal issues such
as pet overpopulation and animal neglect
and abuse.) We have also lobbied officials
to solve our animal control and protection
problems, giving four presentations to
Calhoun County Commissioners and
one to the Blountstown City Council, but
we have gotten nowhere with them. The
fourth, (and last), time that I spoke to our
County Commission, I told them that
solving these problems was about more
than protecting and controlling animals.
It is also about the example that we, as
a society. are setting for our children.
and the opportunities we are missing to
teach them kindness, compassion, and
responsibility. When I finished, I saw
smirks on some of their faces. It is clear
that these Commissioners will not solve
our problems; so we have been, and will


continue, actively campaigning for the
election of officials who are willing and
able to do so. We have also recently begun
pursuing the prosecution of animal neglect
and cruelty cases.
There is still much to do. We need
to apply for the tax-exempt status that
would make us eligible for grants and
other funding; plan and prepare for our
best "Goat Day" ever; and expand and
improve our Web site. We also want
develop programs, such as visiting health
and rehabilitation centers and classrooms,
to benefit our sick, elderly, and children.
Another goal is find ways to reduce the
number of lost pets and aid in the recovery
of those that are.
With your support in giving homes or
shelter to our dogs, we can accomplish
these things. These are all good dogs that
are vaccinated, socialized, and house-
trained. Most are already spayed and
neutered. Most have been here a year
or more, running free on five acres, so
leaving will be hard on them. Placement
in homes, rather than shelters, would
ease their transition, so we is hope that
many find homes right away, and that
those that must go to other shelters have
short stays before finding homes. You
can see their pictures on our website,
CalhounCountyHumaneSociety.net. Ifyou
can help us, by adopting or giving our dogs
shelter, please call (850)674-4075.
Sincerely,
Patti L. Wood, Founder,
Calhoun County Humane Society
10750 SW SR 73
Clarksville. Florida 32430
P.S. Last week the Calhoun-Liberty
Journal printed a letter by Pamala
Anderson, under the heading, "Shooting a
black bear is not sport." To Ms. Anderson,
"Well done!"


Let's set the record straight:

FACTS:
1. Funding: First Superintendent to apply for Special
Facilities Funding to build new facilities.
2. Property: The School Board has NOT purchased
any property for the new Blountstown High School.
3. Location: The new Blountstown High School will
be built behind the present BHS on Charley Johns
Street in Blountstown.
4. Architectural Fees: The School Board will be
reimbursed for the total architectural fees out of the
$24.5 million of Special Facilities Funding.
5. Consolidation: The School Board
amended the consolidation motion to
make it voluntary for the students that
choose to go to the new Blountstown


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lLETTERS










Page 18 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 10, 2008


Minutes from the Aug. 5 meeting of the Liberty County Commission


Official minutes from the Liberty County
Commission regular meeting Aug. 5, 2008
as recorded by the board secretary
The meeting was called to order
by Vice Chairman Albert Butcher.
Present at the meeting were Com-
missioners Davis Stoutamire, Jim
Johnson, L.B. Arnold, Attorney
Shalene Grover, Clerk Robert Hill,
and Deputy Clerk Charla Kearce.
Prayer was led by Reverend Jack
Strader.
Pledge of allegiance was led by
Clerk Robert Hill.
Motion to correct the July 8,
2008 minutes to change the county
payment on mosquito control from
$27,203.00 to $20,450.00 was made
by Johnson, seconded by Arnold,
and carried.
Motion to approve the minutes of
the regular meeting as corrected for
July 8, and special meeting July 14th,
public hearing and special meeting
held July 22nd, 2008 was made by
Stoutamire, seconded by Johnson
and carried.
Public Hearing on Ordinance #08-
01 amending the Liberty County pur-
chasing policy established ordinance
06-01 by providing a five percent
(5%) local bidders preference was
made by Stoutamire, seconded by
Johnson and carried.
Rick Marcum with Opportunity
Florida presented Resolution #08-
17 concerning revenue distribution
approach for RACES catalyst project
for Economic Development North-
west Florida RACES was made by
Johnson, seconded by Stoutamire
and carried.
Motion, to approve Resolution
#08-18 for advertising jobs on my-
floridaMilitary.com was made by
Stoutamire, seconded by Johnson
and carried.
Health Insurance bids were
opened. 1. Blount Insurance, 2.
Samuel Grubbs, 3. VISTA United
Health Care and Panhandle Insur-
ance, 4. Pat Thomas and Associ-
- ates. Bids were given to County
Attorney Shalene Grover for the
Committee to go over. The Insur-
ance Committee consists of Shalene
Grover, Carol Strickland, Lisa Shuler,
Monica Brinkley, Betty Brantley and
Dr. Gene Charbonneau.
James Copeland requested that
the county reverse the swap that was
made by John Fason and the county
back to the original way it was. The


County Attorney will look this over
and discuss at a later date.
Matt Carpenter with Preble-Rish
Engineers presented Resolution
#08-15 authorizing the Chairman
to execute and enter into the Small
County Outreach Program Agree-
ment. Motion to approve was made
by Johnson, seconded by Stoutamire
and carried.
Motion for the Chairman to sign
Resolution #08-15 was made by
Stoutamire, seconded by Johnson
and carried.
Gloria Keenan presented the
Cultural Affairs Arts Grant agreement
in the amount of $6,300.00. Motion
to approve was made Johnson, sec-
onded by Stoutamire and carried.
Motion to advertise N.W. Holiday
Lane was made by Johnson, sec-
onded by Arnold and carried.
There was discussion about
changing Moore Street to Hosford
Street. Motion to table this discus-
sion was made by Stoutamire, sec-
onded by Johnson and carried.
Rhonda Lewis talked to the Board
about the Debris Plan Agreement
with contractors. Board approved
her request.
The County Attorney will look
at the memorandum of agreement
between Liberty County and Rock
Bluff Fire Department who is trying
to apply for a $40,000.00 grant. We
need a survey and hopefully will have
it by the next special meeting.
Dr. Gene Charbonneau gave an
update on the Health Department
and the prescription cards that have
been issued.
Wendy Parrish presented the
2008-09 Small County Landfill
Grant agreement in the amount of
$277,316.00. Motion to approve
the Chairman signing was made by
Stoutamire, seconded by Johnson
and carried.
Carolyn King told the Board she
would like something done about
the dogs that have collars on them
that are tearing up her property and
are aggressive to her on her prop-
erty. County Attorney will research
and give options at the next special
meeting.
Farmers are having trouble with
dogs getting their calves. Rhonda
Lewis is looking for grant to help with
this problem.
Motion to approve the 2008-09
State Aid to Libraries Grant Applica-


tion was made by Johnson, sec-
onded by Stoutamire and carried.
Attorney Grover told the Board
the new procedures required for the
Value Adjustment Board and that it
would require schooling.
Wanda Moon talked to the Board
about her property on Spruce Av-
enue. This was her Mother's prop-
erty. She said that Harold Brown is
trying to close the road. The Board
told her that the road would not be
closed.
Clerk Robert Hill told the Board
that the Principal of Hosford School,
Hal Summers is requesting that
Woodmen Street be closed to thru
traffic until the new school is finished.
The Board requested that Hal Sum-
mers attend the next special meeting
to discuss this.
Motion to advertise Workman
Compensation and Liability Insur-
ance was made by Stoutamire, sec-
onded by Johnson and carried.
The Board requested that the
Sheriff's Office post a notice on the
mobile home at Bentley Bluff to be
removed from the property.
Motion to request that DOT
change the speed limit from 25
mph to 35 mph on Chester Street


and put "children at play" signs on
Chester Street and Shuler Street
and no passing zone double striped
at the intersection of Highway 20
and Chester Street was made by
Stoutamire, seconded by Johnson
and carried.
There was discussion if there
was a possibility that the Hosford
School lunch room could be moved
to the Wesleyan Methodist Church
property.
Tom Keenan talked to the Board
about getting a final inspection at the
Veterans Park Railroad building.
Larry Brown told the Board that
Jimmy Lewis will be retiring Sep-


tember 12, 2008 with the Water
System.
Scott Kady would like to change
the budget to purchase tools.
Motion to adjourn was made by
Stoutamire, seconded by Johnson
and carried.
Motion to pay the bills was made
by Johnson, seconded by Stoutamire
and carried.

Warrant List, Warrant Numbers
Operating Fund, 24779- 25008
Small County Grant, 3579-3600
SHIP Grant, 3743-3747
Weatherization Grant, 4321 -4336
Payroll, 25688-25848


Lawrence flnimaL HOSPiTaL
43 N. Cleveland Street in Quincy OFFICE (850) 627-8338
Jerry C. Lawrence, DVM
SEmergencies: (850) 856-5827 or (850) 856-5918
I '' Hours: Monday Friday 7 a.m. to 5 p.m.
S, DOCTOR'S HOURS BY APPOINTMENT.
We provide: Boarding Grooming Preventative Healthcare programs
which include vaccinations and yearly checkups Spay/neuter program
to reduce unwanted puppies/kittens.
PLUS MANY OTHER SERVICES.
CALL US ANYTIME IF YOU HAVE ANY QUESTIONS. FN


Liberty Co. Commission


special meeting minutes
Official minutes from the Liberty County Motion to pass Resolution 08-19
Commission special meeting Aug. 27, 2008 made by Stoutamire, Seconded by
as recorded by the board secretary Butcher and carried unanimously.
Meeting called to order by Chair- Motion to allow Chairman Barber
man Dexter Barber. to sign Resolution made by Stou-
Present at the meeting were Com- tamire was seconded by Butcher and
missioner Butcher, Commissioner carried unanimously.
Stoutamire, Commissioner Johnson Commissioner Stoutamire dis-
Commissioner Arnold, Clerk Robert cussed the Talquin Electric office
Hill and Deputy Clerk Vanell Sum- moving from Hosford with the board.
mers. Motion to draft a resolution against
Pledge of Allegiance was led by this move made by Stoutamire,
Clerk Robert Hill. seconded by Johnson and carried
Opening Prayer was given by unanimously.
Commissioner Butcher. Motion to adjourn made by Butch-
County Attorney Grover presented er, Seconded by Johnson and carried
Resolution 08-19 to the Board for unanimously.
approval. Meeting adjourned.


Liberty Co. Commission holds

emergency meeting Aug. 21


Official minutes from the Liberty County
Commission emergency meeting Aug. 21,
2008 as recorded by the board secretary
The meeting was called.to order
by Chairman Dexter Barber. Present
were Commissioners Davis Stou-
tamire, Jim Johnson, L.B. Arnold,
Clerk Robert Hill, EMS Director
Rhonda Lewis, 911 Director Stephen
Ford, Jason King FHP and Dr. Gene
Charbaneau of the Liberty County
Health Department.


Motion by Johnson, seconded by
Stoutamire and carried to declare a
local state of emergency because of
Tropical Storm Fay.
Motion by Johnson seconded by
Stoutamire and carried to approve
Resolution 0-8-18 declaring a local
state of emergency.
Motion to adjourn by Johnson sec-
onded by Stoutamire and carried.
Meeting adjourned.


ri


1i~B~s~ P I t
4 h'LA








SEPTEMBER 10, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 19



Florida State Parks celebrate September as literacy


month with readings scheduled at schools and parks


NORTHWEST FLORIDA -
Florida Governor Charlie Crist
recently signed a proclamation
designating Sept. as Literacy
Month. The Florida Department
of Environmental Protection's
(DEP) Florida State Parks are
celebrating the second annual
Literacy Month with special
events at many of the parks. In
conjunction with International
Literacy Day on Sept. 8th and
National Library Card Signup
Month, entrance to all of Florida's
state parks will be free the week
of Sept. 7-13 for visitors who
bring a library card, library book,
or who donate a new or gently
used family book.
"Promoting literacy at
Florida's state parks creates an
appreciation for both reading and
the environment that visitors can
take back to the classroom and


community," said Florida State
Park Director Mike Bullock.
"September's Literacy Month
is the perfect time for all park
visitors, including families and
schools, to experience resource-
based recreation while enhancing
the mind through literacy
events."
Partners in the Literacy Month
celebration include the Florida
Department of State, Florida
Department of Education, the
Florida Lottery, Volunteer USA
Foundation, Florida Literacy
Coalition, Adult and Community
Educators of Florida, Inc., local
libraries, schools and reading
programs statewide. More than
1.3 million visitors participated
in the Sept. 2007 Literacy Month
celebration, with nearly 35,000
people participating in 60 events
statewide. State parks collected


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10,000 books for donation and
DEP and the Florida Lottery
distributed 15,000 bookmarks
to libraries and book stores
throughout the state.
Literacy activities in northwest
Florida include:
TORREYA STATE PARK -
Read with a Ranger. Torreya State
Park will partner with W.R. Tolar
Elementary School in Bristol
to celebrate Literacy Month.
Park rangers and volunteers will
visit the classroom and read to
3rd grade students. For more
information, call (850) 267-
0299.
FLORIDA CAVERNS STATE
PARK Pages in the Park,
Saturday, Sept. 13 at 10 a.m.
Florida Caverns State Park
will host the Pages in the Park
program at the park's visitor
center. For more information, call
(850) 482-1228.
OCHLOCKONEE RIVER
STATE PARK Reading with
Park Staff, Saturday, Sept. 13
at 10 a.m. Ochlockonee River
State Park invites families to
come out and read a story with
park staff about nature, animals
and the environment. For more
information, call (850) 962-
2771.
GRAYTON BEACH -
Florida Folklore, Poetry and
Music, Wednesday, Sept. 24 at
10 a.m. Grayton Beach State
Park will present their Florida
Folklore, Poetry and Music at
the large beach pavilion. For
more information, call (850)
231-4210.
- EDWARD BALL WAKULLA
-SPRINGS STATE PARK -
Reflections over the Spring,
Saturday, Sept. 13 at 9 a.m., 10
a.m. and 11 a.m.
In cooperation with the Wakulla
County Public Library, the park
will offer three narrated glass
bottom boat trips over Wakulla
Spring. Literary selections for
children will be narrated on the
beach and the library will have a
book give-away in the concession
area. The three narrated glass
bottom boat tours will be available
at no charge but donations to the
Wakulla County Library will be


gratefully accepted. Tickets will
be available at the Waterfront
Visitors Center on a first-come,
first-served basis at 8:30 a.m.
Space is limited to 30 people
for each trip. Park entrance fee
will be waived for participants.
For more information, call (850)
561-7286.
DR. JULIAN G. BRUCE
ST. GEORGE ISLAND STATE
PARK Literacy Month Book
Exchange, month of September.
The park will host a month-long
book exchange in the campground
interpretive pavilion. For more
information, call (850) 927-
2111.
PONCE DE LEON SPRINGS
STATE PARK Literacy Month
Program, Sunday, Sept. 7 through
Saturday, Sept. 13. Ponce de
Leon Springs State Park, in
partnership with the Holmes
County Public Library, will install
colorful displays promoting the
wonders and beauty of the park
and the reading opportunities
at the library. Park staff will
also be participating in an after
school reading program. For
more information, call (850)
638-6130.
HENDERSON BEACH
STATE PARK Story Time with
Paul Lowery, Saturday, Sept. 13
and Wednesday, Sept. 17 at 1 p.m.
Henderson Beach State Park will
once again host story time with
Paul Lowery, author of Do you
know where Sea Turtles go?. A
question and answer session will
follow. Copies of Mr. Lowery's
book are on sale in the park's
store. For more information, call
(850) 259-6444.
FALLING WATERS STATE
PARK Literacy Month
Program, Sunday, Sept. 7 through
Saturday, Sept. 13. Falling Waters
State Park, in partnership with the
Holmes County Public Library,
will install colorful displays
promoting the wonders and
beauty of the park and reading
at the library. Park staff will
also be participating in an after
school reading program. For
more information, call (850)
638-6130.
ST. ANDREWS STATE


PARK Children Reading
Everywhere, Wednesday, Sept.
10 at 10 a.m. This event is part of
the Bay County Library Children
Reading Everywhere Program
in partnership with St. Andrews
State Park. Participants can apply
for their library card as well as
enjoy an award-winning program.
For more information, call (850)
233-5164.
LAKE JACKSON MOUNDS
ARCHAEOLOGICAL STATE
PARK Literacy in the Park,
Saturday, Sept. 13 at 10 a.m.
Lake Jackson Mounds State
Park will host a book reading
event to promote reading and
utilize the resources of public
libraries. There will be a story
about the wonders of nature and
a guided adventure around the
park immediately following the
reading. For more information,
call (850) 922-6007.
BLACKWATER RIVER
STATE PARK Reading on
the River, Sept. 13 at 10 a.m.
Blackwater River State Park will
host a children's book reading
about the animals- that inhabit
the park. A park ranger will read
the stories in Pavilion #23 on
the boardwalk complex. After
the reading, participants can
take a ranger-guided short hike
around Juniper Lake Trail. For
more information, call (850)
983-5363.
BIG LAGOON STATE PARK
Community Literacy Fair,
Saturday, Sept. 13 at 10:30
a.m. Big Lagoon State Park
will celebrate Literacy Month
along with the Escambia County
Southwest Branch Library.
Library staff and volunteers
will be in the park to hold a
Community Literacy Fair. This
event will be held at pavilion #39
(next to the observation tower).
For more information, call (850)
492-1595.
To view the Governor's
Proclamation honoring Sept. as
Literacy Month, visit http://www.dep.
state.fl.us/secretaly/events/090308
literacy.pdf For more information
about Florida State Parks 'Literacy
Month celebrations, visit 'www.
floridastateparks. org.


( SURVEYING

& MAPPING

PROGRAM
The Chipola College
SSurveying and Mapping
program has openings
Sfor new students or those
currently employed
in the land surveying
profession. Pictured
from left, are surveying
students Kelly Nichols
of Dellwood, Tyler Mills
of Marianna, Jed Peel
of Chipley and Lance
Munger of Vernon.
The Chipola program
welcomes new students
and those currently
4 employed in the field.


Fair.
Plo"~-int.
communications
HIGH-SPEED INTERNET PHONE U TELEVISION




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Page 20 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 10, 2008


ABOVE: The Blountstown team tried to outkick, tackle and chase down the Bulldogs but it wasn't enough to overcome a big scoring deficit Friday night.



Marianna Bulldogs overcome BHS



Tigers in first regular season game

by Richard Williams, Journal sports writer
Blountstown was defeated 34-7 by
Marianna in the first regular season
football contest of the year for both
teams Friday.
The Marianna Bulldogs were ahead
by fourteen late in the first half but
Blountstown was able to put together
a scoring threat. After fighting to get
deep in MHS territory, the Tigers had
a dropped pass on the ten yard line
that could have narrowed the lead and
shifted momentum going into the half.
The Tigers trailed 14-0 to start the
third quarter when Malcolm Ivory
scored a touchdown for the Tigers to
close the gap to 14-7 after the extra
point. Ivory's two yard run looked to
be the .spark the Tigers needed, but
Marianna responded with a touchdown ABOVE: A Blountstown.player and a Marianna Bulldog race to catch the pigskin as pitfalls.
of their own on the following drive and BELOW. Tiger Blake Shelton a, r ihe laoll
never allowed the Tigers to score again.
BHS Head Coach Greg Jordan said his Tigers simply had too many turnovers in a
game that they needed to play near perfect to win.
"We hung ini there and it was a tough contest," Jordan said. "It was close until the last
half of that fourth quarter against a real solid, real good football team. We gave them the
short field several times and they took advantage of it to score, but our kids kept fighting
even though they were up against a team with more depth in key places."
The Tigers face West Gadsden next in a home game at Blountstown. Class 2B West
Gadsden comes into the game after being defeated by Class 5A Niceville 42-7.
Jordan said West Gadsden is a very physical team with a lot of size and speed.
"We need to control the football to win, and this is really one of those cases where our
best defense is going to be a really good offense," Jordan said. "If we've got the ball and
can keep it, that makes it a lot harder for them to score."
The Head Coach also said he was hoping the nice crowd that traveled to Marianna was
an indicator of a good home crowd in Blountstown. Jordan said having a good crowd
means a lot to the kids and helps add excitement to the game.
The Tigers host West Gadsden September 12 at 7 p.m.
TONY SHOEMAKE PHOTOS







SEPTEMBER 10, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 21




Liberty Bulldogs fall to Graceville



Tigers 36-16 in season opener

by Richard Williams, Journal sports writer
Liberty County was unable to stop
the Graceville Tigers' rushing attack
in the second half and dropped a 36-16
decision in the opening football game
of the year for both teams.
Graceville opened the scoring in the
first quarter, but missed a two point
conversion to take a 6-0 lead. The
touchdown came just one play after
Graceville recovered a LCHS fumble
on the Bulldog 22 yard line.
The Bulldogs responded with a a
twelve play drive of their own. During
the drive LCHS converted once on
fourth down to keep the scoring threat
alive. Liberty quarterback Nolan
Brown hit Keith McCray on a 25-yard
pass play to tie the game at six. The
Bulldogs then took a two point lead
when McCray scored on a two point
run.
The Bulldogs were able to keep
the Tigers out of rhythm until late in
the second quarter when the home
standing Graceville put together an
eleven play drive that ended in a two
yard touchdown run to give the Tigers
the lead for good. Graceville added a
two point con version to make the score
14-8 heading into the half.
The Tigers added a touchdown on
their opening dri'e of the second half
to make the score 22-8. The scofi as
30-8 before Liberty would score again. -TOP: Bulldogs reach up to block
This time it was Senior Joseph Brinkley a punt from a. Graceville Tiger.
who scored.:Jimmy Lee Revell scored ABOVE: Bulldog Keith Mc-
the two-point conversion to make the Cray brings down Graceville s
score 30-16. Graceville added one ball carrier and later, at right,
more touchdown for the final margin moves the ball down the field.
of victory. BELOW- Kyle Sapp slips away
LCHS Head Coach Grant Grantham with the ball as his teammates
said he saw some players giving solid block the onslaught of Tigers.
effort and added he thought youth hurt
his team against a solid Graceville
squad. DANIEL WILLIAMS PHOTOS
"At one time I looked out there and
realized we had seven sophomores
playing offense," Grantham said. "We
ended up using a third string center
due to injuries, and a few other factors
just had us playing people in positions
they really don't have much experience
playing."
The Bulldogs travel to Cottondale
to take on the Hornets September 12
at 7 p.m. Central Time. The Hornets
defeated Sneads 32-24 in their first
game of the year.
Grantham said his Bulldogs are
going to need a solid effort in order to
stay in the game against Cottondale.
"They scored a whole lot of points at
the end of that game, so that tells you M IL
they are in real good shape," Grantham
said. '








Page 22 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 10, 2008


SCBC upping the ante to bring donors in during

critical shortage of A neg and 0 neg blood types
Forget tedious work projects scheduled surgenes. the combination of their latest
and school assignments that "The ANeg shortage is a result promotions will be the perfect
are way too long. This month, of a constant chronic us of this mix to motivate individuals within
Southeastern Community Blood blood type across the board," the community to donate blood,
Center is awarding extra credit to said Debbie Nennstiel, SCBC's especially in light of the current
individuals willing to complete Director of Laboratory Services. blood shortage andpotentialthreat
one simple yet rewarding task. This shortage impacts SCBC's of tropical storms and hurricanes.
SCBC is calling on individuals entire service area comprised of In the aftermath of tropical storm
within the community to help medical facilities in 26 counties Fay, SCBC was forced to cancel
boostthe Center'sblood supplyby in North Florida and South numerous blood drives as a result
donating blood. In exchange for Georgia. of flooding. These unexpected
this selfless act, each donor who In addition to giving away a changes hindered their ability
gives blood with the organization laptop computer, SCBC will also to keep the blood supply at a
in September will be entered to be raffling five $100 gas cards, level high enough to meet the
win a laptop PC. during the month of September, demands of hospital patients
"SCBC began the week by which should help take the edge within the community. In order
importing 10ANegs from outside off the end of summer blues. to maintain their blood supply,
the area and O Negs are below a 1 This incentive will surely come SCBC depends on the lifesaving
day supply," said Jeanne Dariotis, in handy for the tech-challenged gifts of dedicated donors.
SCBC CEO. SCBC's goal is to donors looking to help the Center Donating is a simple procedure.
maintain a 5-day supply of each pump up their blood supply for To be a donor, individuals have
blood type to be prepared for the upcoming months. to be in good health, at least 17
any emergency situation and for SCBC's ultimate hope is that years old (16 years old with a
parent's permission) and weigh
Caregiver's retreat to be held Sept. 26 a minimum of 110 pounds.
This year, the 10th annual caregiver's retreat, open to all caregives According to SCBC, less than 5
in the Big Bend area, will be held at St. Paul's United Methodist percent of the eligible population
Church, located at 1700 N. Meridian Rd. in Tallahassee on Friday, actually donates blood. For more
Sept. 26. All caregivers in the Big Bend are welcome. As a special treat information, contact SCBC at
this year, The Sleuths Mystery Theater from Orlando will entertain (850) 877-7181, (800) 722-
the caregivers. 2218 or visit its Web site www.
Caregivers face special problems, especially those of taking scbcinfo.org. All locations are
care of themselves while caring for loved ones. For this reason, the open Monday through Friday, 9
retreats have been organized to provide a day of relaxation, fun and a.m.-6 p.m. The Riggins Road
companionship with others facing the same problems. location in Tallahassee is also
Sponsored by the Area Agency on Aging of North Florida and open on Saturday, 9 a.m.-1 p.m.
facilitated by the Alzheimer's Project, Inc, the retreat will start at 11 The Southeastern Community
a.m. and endby 3 p.m. A catered lunch will be served to all caregivers Blood Center is a nonprofit and
and respite care will be provided. Limited seating is available and the only blood center providing
this event fills up fast so caregivers are encouraged to call Lori at bloodtofamilies in 26 counties in
386-2778. Other hosts for the event are Home Instead Senior Care, North Florida andSouth Georgia.
Beltone Hearing Center and Home Helpers. There is no charge to SCBC's home office is at 1731
caregivers for the event. Riggins Road in Tallahassee.


ANNA KRUGER MORRIS
QUINCY-Anna Kruger Morris, 78, died Sept.
9, 2008 at home. She was born in Baltmore, MD
and moved back to Quincy in 1959.
Survivors include a husband, Cecil Morris, Sr. of
Quincy; four sons, Cecil Morris, Jr. and his wife,
Kathy, Don Morris and his wife, Cindy all of Quincy,
Tim Morris and his wife, Sharon of Clinton, TN and
Marshall Morris and his wife, Debra of Homestead;
one daughter, Carol Ritter and her husband, Larry
of Lake City; one brother, John Kruger of Seven,
MD; two sisters, Rita Eberle and Agnes Uptain
of Baltimor, MD and Catherine Lake of Hanover,
PA; -along with 16 grandchildren and 20 great-
grandchildren.
The family will receive friends Thursday, Sept.,
11 from 6 to 7 p.m. at Charles McClellan Funeral
Home.
Graveside services will be held at 10 a.m. on
Friday, Sept. 12 at Hillcrest Cemetery in Quincy.
Charles McClellan Funeral Home in Quincy is
in charge of the arrangements.


SIDNEY A. (PETE) WHITE
BLOUNTSTOWN Sidney A. (Pete) White,
85, died Saturday, Sept. 6, 2008 in Bristol. He
was born on Oct. 11, 1922 in Dale County, AL and
had lived in Calhoun County for most of his life.
He was a retired carpenter and a veteran of WWII,
serving in the United States Army.
Survivors include one son, Albert S. White
and his wife, Myrtle (Tiny) of Blountstown;
two daughters, Johnnie Fay McDaniel and her
husband James of Bristol and Nancy Simons
and her husband, Bernie of Altha; a very special
friend, Opal Nealey of Blountstown; along with 6
grandchildren and 15 great-grandchildren.
Graveside services were held Monday, Sept. 8 at
Nettle Ridge Cemetery in Blountstown with Rev.
Billy Wallace officiating.
In lieu of flowers the family request contributions
be made to Covenant Hospice, 4440 Lafayette St.,
Marianna, FL 32446.
Peavy Funeral Home in Blountstown was in
charge of the arrangements.


COMEPFORD VAULT MEMORIAL SERVICE
593-6828 1-800-369-6828 Fax: 593-6888
Hwy. 90 W P.O. Box 933 Sneads, FL 32460
K- Pele Comterford Owner & Operator


Let us help you with a memorial of BEAUTY and DURABILITY
Serving Jackson & the Surrounding Counties for 42 Years
Precious Memories "I[fyou can t come to us, give us a call cmd we will come to you"


WHAT BETTER TRIBUTE
CAN THERE BE?
Honor your loved ones by making their memory part
of our best efforts to defeat cancer. For more infor-
mation, contact the American Cancer Society.


EAST GADSDEN UNIT
P.O. Box 563, Quincy, FL 32353


CARING Independent
for your comfort, Funeral Home
needs & concerns. 211 E. Jefferson St., Quincy
. . . * (850) 875-1529
James C. (Rusy) Black Weer (850)875-1529
Owner Manager Lic. Funeral Director LOCALLY OWNED & OPERATED



Charles McClellan L

Funeral Home
Charles K. McClellan
Licensed Funeral Director
42 years experience
Call us Let us explain how we can
conveniently handle arrangements
in Liberty County.
Butler-Morgan/Morgan-McClellan Funeral Home
Building at 15 S. Jackson St., Quincy, 32351
S Phone: (850) 627-7677 or 643-2277




evis Funeral

Home of Bristol
S& Crematory

S Al exi/s7g pre-need and a/ need
contracts are now handed by the
0 Bevis family and staff.

All operations of the funeral process
will be handled on location at
12008 NW State Road 20.

CALL 643-3636

Todd Wahlquist, Rocky Bevis & Ed Peacock
Licensed Funeral Directors


Peavy Funeral Home

& Crematory















Marion Peavy
A Hometown Funeral Director
Telephone (850) 674-2266


I


R.







SEPTEMBER 10, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 23


tJo\I that the preparations and the
I .b 1 1 i l
..ucci,.t-ul conduct of the PFrimair
Election h3- been accoLmpliIhe, I
'AIh to e,\tenj mnl heartfelt Fppre,:iiti>,'n
for the oCpportunlteI to .er'.e the ,re t
people oF LibertLI Counti .3a t~cur
superior of- Election., ftor -our more
tlears. There are ot-ten mantl challenge:
but it haI alwajl been mtI :on'. ictlon to
con.ji5tentltj-.er'.e e ri other r and
candidate w th the Same f-airne_-i, hone-ti)
and etticiencil that h.hould be
expected of e\er-l elected ofrticial.
-.sain, thanL tjou or !tour confidence


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Most gardeners do not like


wet feet & neither do plants


S by Theresa Friday,
Horticulture Extension Agent,
\ Santa Rosa County )
Recent tropical storms have
produced a lot of rain for
much of Florida and the Gulf
Coast. Frequent and intense
rain can cause excessively
wet soil. When combined
with high temperatures and
humidity, saturated soil con-
ditions can create stressful
and potentially destructive
conditions for bedding plants,
perennials, vegetables, shrubs
and even trees.
When the soil is saturated
from rain or flooding, pore
spaces in the soil that normal-
ly hold air are filled with wa-
ter. Since the roots of plants
get the oxygen they need
from the air in those spaces,
the roots can literally drown
when soils stay waterlogged
for an extended period. A sick
root system leads to a sick
plant. Plants in this situation
often lose vigor, look wilted,
yellow, stunted or may even
die.
Wet conditions also en-
courage fungus organisms in
the soil to attack the roots or
crown of a plant and cause rot.
These disease organisms can
cause dieback, severe dam-
age or even kill plants. Once
infection occurs, little can be
done to help a plant. Plants
with succulent stems (such
as impatiens and begonias),
those that like cooler temper-
atures (such as geraniums and
dianthus) and those that prefer
drier, well-drained soils (such
as Indian hawthorns) are par-
ticularly susceptible.
Gardeners can help alleviate
wet soil conditions. For one
thing, adjust your irrigation
systems that are on an auto-
matic timer. It's not unusual
to see sprinklers unnecessar-
ily watering at homes or busi-
nesses the day after a heavy
rain simply because the timer


Plants can fall over in wet soil, especially if they have circling roots.


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turned them on. Turn off the
automatic timer if the weather
is wet, and turn the system on
only when drier conditions
occur. Better yet, be sure
your irrigation system has a
functioning rain sensor.
Shrubs and other plants af-
fected by wet soils or root rot
may look wilted even though
the soil is moist. Leaf edges
or entire branches may turn
brown, and a bush may yel-
low and drop leaves. Shrubs
showing these symptoms
may ultimately be lost, but
soil aeration in the root zone
could help in some cases. Us-
ing a garden. fork, drive the
tines straight down into the
soil about 8 inches and pull
straight out in numerous plac-
es around the shrubs. Do not
dig with the fork, but make as
many holes as seems practi-
cal. This technique provides
air to the roots and encour-
ages the soil to dry faster.
Fungus diseases that attack
the foliage of many plants,
such as black spot on roses
and cercospora leaf spot on
crape myrtles, are encouraged
by rainy weather. Lawn dis-
eases, such as gray leaf spot,
thrive in wet weather and are
bound to be far more active as
a result of rainy periods. Leaf
spots and fruit rots are also
likely to be more prevalent in
vegetable gardens.


S.-^


As the weather dries, a pre-
ventive application of a broad
spectrum fungicide may be
helpful on lawns, ornamen-
tals and vegetables to prevent
problems with leaf.spots and
fruit rots. Contact your local
extension office for current
recommendations.
Other pests such as snails
and slugs thrive and reproduce
rapidly during rainy weather.
These pests chew holes in the
leaves and flowers of plants,
and they are particularly fond
of soft-leaved plants such as
impatiens, begonias and hos-
tas. Try not to let their popula-
tions get out of control. If you
have toads in your garden,
that's great because they feed
on slugs.
If floodwaters have cov-
ered any part of your land-
scape, here are a few tips. Do
not consume any vegetables
that have been touched by
the floodwater. There may
be contaminants in the water.
Once the floodwaters recede,
promptly remove any debris
or sediments covering the
lawn. Hose off low-growing
shrubs and bedding plants
that may have been covered
by floodwaters.

Theresa Friday is the
Residential Horticulture
Extension Agentfor Santa Rosa
County.


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t- -- - - -- -- --- I
Liberty and Calhouni
County Schools


our campus busy all da\ long. this \ear \ith six first Near
AROUND CAMPUS CONT. snidents and one second \ear


Mrs. Sullivan, the junior sponsor, with two BHS juniors, Christian
Leavins and Lavasyette Donaldson, holding football programs.


PARENT INFO
Edline activation codes will
be mailed soon to parents of
BHS students. These codes
will allow parents to access
their child's grades here at
Blountstown High School. Also,
administration has been utilizing
the Connect Ed phone service
to inform parents about school
related news and if parents are
not receiving calls from this
system, it may be that they screen
their calls for telemarketers, etc.
Please contact the school with
any questions about this.
SENIOR NEWS
Today, Wednesday Sept. 10,
is the last day for seniors to pay
their senior trip deposit! Don't
forget, if half the class does
not pay the deposit, the senior
sponsors cannot book a trip!


JUNIOR NEWS
The BHS Football Program
(above) will make its first
appearance at the varsity game
this Friday night, Sept. 12th.
Support thejunior class and learn
about the new team and coaches
by purchasing a program for $2.
2007-2008 SABER TOOTH
There are a few extra
yearbooks that are. available in
the Media Center for $40.
AROUND CAMPUS
by Jake Money
We are now in our fourth
week of school at BHS, and
as of today's date we have 426
students. So far there are 103
students in 9th, 129 students in .
10th, 99 students in 11th, and
91 students in 12th. The student
body here at BHS is divided by
211 boys and 215 girls, keeping


Businesses can provide

facilities for 'ABC' Schools


by Vicki Davis
District ABC
Program Liaison
In 2006,
the Florida
Legislature
created a
Business Community (ABC)
School Program to promote
partnerships in education and
to address shortage of space in
overcrowded school systems.
An ABC school is a public
school that offers instruction to
students in kindergarten through
third grade levels or any single or
multiple grade levels within this
range at facilities provided by a
local business. A qualified host
business may submit a proposal
agreeing to provide the appropriate
types of space on their site for
such a.school, including the
associated operating and upkeep
expenses. Calhoun County
School District will provide an
educational program, including
the appropriate instructional
supports, administration and staff,
teachers, textbooks, materials,
supplies, and curriculum for the
school.
First priority for admission of
students to an ABC school will
be given to the children of the
owners and employees of the
business. If additional capacity


remains after
children of the
owners and
employees are
- a i admitted, the
host business
may designate other neighboring
businesses whose owners or
employees may also participate
in order to generate a reasonable
number of students for the
school. To be considered, the
ABC school must comply with
the constitutional class size
requirements and have enough
students in attendance to support
the educational program. Parents
of the enrolled students would
be- responsible for providing
transportation to and from the
school for their children.
Within anABC school, parents
have the opportunity to spend
more time with their children
during the commute together to
school each day and some parents
may choose to serve as volunteers
in the classroom based on its
proximity to their work area.
If you know of a business
interested in submitting a proposal
for this program or in finding out
more about this program, please
contact Vicki Davis, District
ABC Program Liaison, at 674-
8734, extension 225.


by JacR Richards
The pace of technology
development has increased
immensely in recent \ears. it
has changed the \\orld! So here
at BHS \\e hate to keep up with
this pace and Mrs. Perdue. BHS
Business Education teacher.
is teaching a dual enrollment
A+ certification, Computer
systems technology course


student. This course prepares
a person for employment, and
or specialized training in a
\ariery of occupations in the
computer electronics industry.
Completion of this program
enables students to enter the
workforce with a beginning
salary of s15 per hour. BHS is
determined to keep up \ ith the
tempo of technology.


r- - - - ~- - -
B-town High School
Calendar of Events
Wednesday, Sept.10 Early
Release Sept.
Thursday, Sept. 11 JV Football at /1 6
home against Wewa at 6 p.m.
I Friday, Sept. 12 -Varsity Football
at home against W. Gadsden at 7
p.m.
Tuesday, Sept. 16 Volleyball at home against
Altha at 5/6 p.m.


r;


L-- - - - - -


2008-2009 CLASS
OFFICERS
Liberty County High School
announces the class officers for
the 2008-2009 school year. They
are as follows:
Senior Class Officers include
John Summers, president; Logan
Brown, vice president; Dianna
Greene, secretary; Samantha
Brannan, treasurer and Courtney
Neel, recorder.
Junior Class Officers include
Rachael Shepard, president; Cade
Guthrie, vice president and J.T.
Steverson, treasure.
Sophomore Class Officers
include Cheyenne Griffen,
president and Jenna Tharpe, vice
president.
Freshman Class Officers
include Courtney McGee,
president; Maggie McCaskill,
vice president and Molly Holmes,
SEC/treasure.
YEARBOOKS
Yearbooks are now in. Some
extras are available. Please call
Ms. Austin at 643.2241 ext 263.
'They are $40.
BAND COOKOUT
The Bon Voyage to Summer
Cookout hosted by the Liberty
County Band Boosters for the
Sound of Liberty High School band
will be held Sept. 19 from 6:30 -
9:30 p.m. at Veterans Memorial
Civic Center in the Rec room. You
will enjoy a hamburger dinner and
entertainment. There will also be
games and contests for the kids
along with prizes. There will be
300 tickets available until Sept.
16. Kids twelve years and older
are $8. Kids 4-11 $5. Kids three


years and younger are free.
Tickets available at Myrlene's
Beauty Shop or call Barbara at
509-0373 or 643-3679, or Lisa at
643-9715 or 447-3833.
HOMECOMING PARADE
Anyone interested in entering
a float in the homecoming parade
on Sept. 26 needs to contact.
guidance at 643-2241 ext. 229 or
230. Parade begins at 1:30 with
line up at 1.
BETA
The Beta Induction will be held
on Sept. 15 at 7 p.m. at the LCHS
Auditorium
GIRL'S VOLLEYBALL
Come out and support our
Girl's volleyball team as they
play here on the Sept. 16 against
Marianna.
PROGRESS REPORTS
Progress reports are set to go
out Sept. 17.
CLASS DUES
A reminder to all LCHS
students make sure you pay your
class dues.
JROTC
LCHS JROTC Booster Club
will hold its annual fundraiser
Friday, Sept. 19th. The club will
be selling Chicken Pilau for $6 a
plate at the old Whitfield Insurance
Agency building on Hwy. 20 from
10:30 a.m. (ET) until sold out.
Cadets will be selling tickets
through next Thursday. Plates
will include Chicken Pilau, green
beans, coleslaw, bread, and desert.
Delivery will be made locally if 5
or more meals or ordered. Cooks
are Doobie Hayes, Robert Hill,
and Donnie Coiiyers. Please come
our and support our cadets.


A choice of lowfat white,
chocolate or strawberry milk
served with all meals.

BREAKFAST

THURSDAY
Breakfast: Sausage gravy,
biscuit, and hash brown, as-
sorted cereal with buttered
toast, assorted fruit juice.
FRIDAY
Breakfast French toast sticks
and sliced ham, assorted ce-
real with buttered toast, and
assorted fruit juice.
MONDAY
Breakfast. Cheese grits and
.sausage patty, assorted cereal
with buttered toast, and as-
sorted fruit juice.
TUESDAY
Breakfast French toast sticks
and sliced ham; assorted
cereal with buttered toast,
assorted fruit juice.
WEDNESDAY
Breakfast. Scrambled egg and
diced ham with grits, assorted
cereal with buttered toast, as-
sorted fruit juice.

LUNCHES
Elementary (Pre-K thru 5th)
THURSDAY
Lunch: Oven fried chicken,
wild rice, green lima beans,
applesauce, and whole
wheat roll. LibertyAlternate:
Country fried steak. Cal-
houn Alternate: Tuna salad


on a bun.
F


FRIDAY


Lunch: Sausage pizza,
corn, and tropical fruit.
Liberty Alternate: Crispy
chicken sandwich. Calhoun
Alternate: Crispy Chicken


Wrap.


MONDAY
Lunch: Beefaroni with
whole wheat roll, seasoned
green beans and peaches.
Alternate: Chicken salad
in pita.
TUESDAY
Lunch: Shrimp poppers,
baked beans, sweet peas
and bread stick. Alternate:
Chili cheese corn dog.
WEDNESDAY
Lunch: Hamburgeron a bun,
salad with dressing, carrots
and apple. Alternate: Pep-
peroni wrap.


SPONSORED BY:
Laban Scn,,i ner, DMD
Br-;stol, Phone
643-5417


ti 340


-"x~


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SEPTEMBER 10, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 25


Altha
ALTHA, SEPT. 2
after celebrating Lab(
Altha Lady Wildcai
School A Team decide
little celebrating of 1
In Altha's first volley
of the season, Coac
Hall led her Lady W
a victory over the Pc
Sharks, 25-23 and 25
Dina Vaughn, wh
Lady Wildcats with
points, opened the f
of the match by givil
3-1 lead.
However, that lead
lived as the Sharks n
with 4 service point
own to go on top 6-3.
Altha tied the ga
with Vaughn's last thr
points. They stayed
ahead and won it o0
'Murphy's service poi
In Game 2 Port St. J
up a 7-3 lead but Cam
knotted the game at
three service points.
It remained tii
McKenzie Tanner o
a 20-15 lead with 5
service points.
McKenzie May s
deal by stroking 3
service points to give
a 25-17 win.
Dina Vaughn and
McKenzie were the tc
in the match with
points each. McKenzie
5, Camilla Taylor add
Brianna Yon came aw
service points.
The B Team came
in their match, 18-25


Lady Wildca
- A day 25. Emily Sewell and Deanna
r Day, the Griswold were the Top 'Cats
ts Middle in scoring with 3 service points
ed to do a apiece.
their own. Coach Carylee Sewell'sjunior
ball match varsity squad hit the hardwood
-h Leanna ready to play last week and
Vildcats to it showed as they have yet to
ort St. Joe lose a game and are 3-0 on the
-17. young season. Last Tuesday they
Lo led the squared off against the Liberty
6 service County Lady Bulldogs and
irst game quickly took care of business,
ng Altha a 25-15 and 25-23.
With her opening serve, Ariel
was short- Folsom gave Altha a 4-0 lead
responded with 3 straight service points and
:s of their that would be as close the Lady
Bulldogs would get the rest of
me at 14 the game.
tee service In the second game Liberty
d a point County jumped out to 6-1 lead
n Chelsea and the Lady Cats had to work
nt. to climb back on top. Angela
oe opened Waldron answered that call with
illa Taylor 9 straight service points to give
9 with her Altha a 13-11 lead.
The Lady Bulldogs tied the
ed until game at 19 but Ariel Folsom's
opened up three straight service points to
of her 6 put the Lady Cats back out in
front, 23-20.
ealed the Angela Waldron led her team
straight with 9 service points, Ariel
her team Folsom added 8, and Sharlyn
Smith posted 6 points.
d Tanner Coach Miranda Rehberg's
op scorers Varsity Lady Wildcats (0-1)
7 service started out strong against Liberty
e May had County (1-0) winning their first
led 4 and two games, 25-16 and 25-19, but
ray with 3 lost their focus that resulted in
the loss oftheir last three games,
up short 17-25, 9-25 and 7-15.
5 and 12- Altha fell behind 6-3 but 3


ts volleyball team is Ballin'!


by Jim Mclntosh,
contributing sports writer
straight service points by Cessna
Folsom gave the Lady Wildcats
a 13-11 lead. Lonnie Johnson
followed her with 3 service
points and extended Altha's lead
to 17-14. Folsom would seal the
win for the Lady Wildcats with
3 more service points.
Game two was close until
Christy Simmons put Altha
ahead by two points, 9-7.
Rebecca Wiltse stretched that
lead to 14-9 and Emily Brooks
left no doubt about the outcome
as she caught fire with 6 straight
service points of her own to put
her team out in front, 22-15. The
final tally was 25-19 in favor of
Altha.
The wheels began to come off
in Game 3 as the Lady Wildcats
got out of position that resulted
in 78 errors and left huge gaps in
their defense forLiberty County
to exploit. It was a nip and tuck
affair until Liberty County
pulled ahead halfway through
the game, 12-6. Then they put it
out of reach with a 5 point run
that made it 21-10 and Altha
couldn't make up the deficit as
they went down, 17-25.


Altha's inability to get their
first serves in Game 4 made it
easy for Liberty County to take
a 25-9 victory.
Again, the Lady Wildcats
were still infected with
"firstserveoutis" and Liberty
County won the final game, 15-
7, and the match.
Leading the Wildcats in
scoring was Emily Brooks
with 11 service points; Cessna
Folsom had 10 and 4 aces; Loni
Johnson tallied 9 points and 2
aces, Rebecca Wiltse came away
with 6 points along with a team-
leading 5 aces; Christy Simmons
chalked up 5 points and 2 aces,
Cortney Harris was credited with
4 points and 2 aces; and Tammy
Johnson scored 3 points.
COTTONDALE, SEPT.
4 The junior varsity and
varsity squads were on the road
last Thursday in a district match
against the Lady Hornets.
The JV Lady Cats (2-0)
jumped out quickly to a 11-3
lead thanks to Kimberly Wiltse's
5 straight service points. Ariel
Folsom add three more points
to make put the Lady Cats
comfortably out in front, 18-
12. Altha would go on to win,
25-16.
Once again Kimberly Wiltse
reeled off 5 straight service
points in Game Two to give
the Lady Cats a 10-7 lead and
Sharlyn Smith would add to that
with 4 points of her own to put
the game out of reach 20-14.
Altha's second match was in
the bag with a 25-18 victory.
The Top Cat in scoring was
Kimberly Wiltse with 11 points,
Sharlyn Smith had 6 points
(including 2 aces), and Ariel
Folsom was good for 6 points
and an ace.
Altha's varsity team (0-2,
0-1, 2-2A) was still recovering
from "firstserveoutis" and lost
their first district match: 18-25,
15-25, and 13-25.
Both Loni Johnson and Cessna
Folsom led the Wildcats with
4 points each. Emily Brooks
recorded 2 points and she had
an ace and 1 assist. Christy
Simmons recorded 2 points, had
a block as well as kill. Tammy
Johnson was credited with 2
kills and a kill in the match.
BETHLEHEM, SEPT. 5-
Although the junior varsity (3-0)
made their usual quick work
of their opponent, 25-16 and
25-13, it the varsity came away
with their first win of the season
with a four-game set against
Bethlehem, 21-25,25-13,25-19,
and 25-11.
Maybe it was the long bus
ride or the fact that it was Friday
that made the JV Lady Cats play
sluggish in their first game. They
fell behind 6-1 before Kelsey
Rehberg's four service points
brought Altha to within a point,
12-13. Ariel Folsom. put the
Lady Cats ahead, 19-16 with


5 straight service points. Ariel
was followed by Nikki Shamens
who served out the game with 5
service points of her own.
Ariel Folsom led the junior
varsity in scoring with 11 points
and 2 aces. Nikki Shamens put
up 7 points and 2 aces of her own.
Sharlyn Smith was credited with
6 points. Both Kelsey Rehberg
and Kimberly Wiltse chalked
up 4 points. Chelsea DeBerry
tallied 3 points.
The Varsity Lady Cats (1-2)
played Bethlehem close but
never could get over the hump in
the first game and lost, 21-25.
They found their grove in
the second game and never
let up. With their first service
opportunity, Loni Johson gave
Altha a 6-1 lead. Tammy Johnson
add 4 straight service points to
put the Lady Cats ahead, 15-3,
and Altha cruised to a 25-13
win.
Bethlehem put up a fight
in Game 3 and stayed within
striking distance of Altha, but
Emily Brooks responded with
5 service points to put the game
out,of reach. The Lady Cats
pulled away in the end to win,
25-19.
Game 4 found Bethlehem
unable to get their first serves
in and Emily Brooks served up
9 straight points for the 25-11
victory.
Leading the Lady Wildcats
in the scoring department was
Emily Brooks with 19 service
points and 8 assists. Loni
Johnson chalked up 14 points
along with 2.aces and 2 kills.
Tammy Johnson was good for
8 points, 4 aces, and a kill.
Rebecca Wiltse added 6 points.
Christy Simmons produced
5 points, 4 kills, and 2 aces.
Cortney Harris was credited
with 3 points.
All three Lady Wildcat's
teams were in action last
Monday in "The Den". The
Middle School hosted Tolar
while the JV and varsity teams
were tangling with 3-A Florida
High. Yesterday (Tuesday)
Blountstown came calling on
the middle school. (Check next
week's issue for details on
these matches.). Tomorrow
(Thursday) North Florida
Christian comes calling on the
JV at 5 p.m. (CT) and varsity
Lady Wildcats at 6 p.m. (CT).
The JV and varsity squads end
the week in Sneads for another
district match. Game times
are at 5 p.m. (CT) and 6 p.m.
(CT), respectively. On Monday
Altha's middle school travels
to Franklin County for a 4 p.m.
(CT) showdown. The JV and
varsity squads are on the road
as well to square off against
their county rival, Blountstown,
in another district match. First
serves for those games are
scheduled for 5 p.m. (CT) and
6 p.m. (CT).









Page 26 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 10, 2008


THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL




CLASSIu E.DS

To place your ad, call 643-3333 by noon Eastern
Time on Saturday. Non-business ads run FREE for 2 weeks.
\ 4


Nice Ifome,
Like NewN
199716x 80 Redman
4 bedrooms, 2 baths
Single-wide, cathedral
ceilings throughout,
new appliances, carpet
and vinyl, shingle roof,
vinyl siding, central
heat & air.

$21 000
762-3342 o-o
LL^ ~~-iooq |


LOOK


1, 2 & Bedroom
Apartments
"The Best Place to Live"
RENTAL ASSISTANCE



-E
Call (850) 674-4202
16978 NW Mayo Street,
Blountstown, FL 32424.
TTDTrTY 711.
EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY
. .. .. .


ITEMS FOR S1

Cash register, best off
handbags, fancy, one clotl
$30 each, asking $7 eac
674-3264.

Assortment of dolls, so
characters, $5 and up; b
$3 and up. Call 674-3264.

Home school books, A
first grade, paid $235, $75
offer. Call 643-1038.

Restaurant equipment, 17
68 chairs, stove, fryers, ct
griddle, dishes. Call 643-6



FREE

Baby formula, 12 ouncE
powder, four Enfamil Lipil, t
lac advanced, one Similac
Advanced. Call 447-3877.


Firewood, you cut, peca
cherry, etc.; pears, you pi
762-3366.

Rooster, grown, to good hor
762-8657.


FURNITURE

Vanity, best offer; two ceilin
antique, best offer, vases,
ment, some with flowers,
ably priced. Call 674-3264


Full size bed, white hea
great for little girl's room, m
box springs, headboard
used, one year old, $300. C
7378.

Living room suit, three piE
new, gold and burgundy pri
or best offer. Call 237-121


Microwave table, $20. C
2358.

Single bed, bookcase hea
mattress, boxspring, like ne
Boston rocker, with cushic
Call 762-3370.

Card table, Texas hold 'e
$75; water bed, complete k
$75. Call 510-0932 or 379



BABIES/INFAT

Eddie Bauer stroller, blE
grey, lots of features, inclu
tra padding, for boy or g
Little Tyke's cozy coop, $
643-3370.


CLOTHING(

Ladies' boots, size 8 for $
674-3264.


ALE

er; two
h, worth
ch. Call
9-10, 9-17

me are
)askets,
9-3, 9-10

SBeka,
or best
9-3,9-10

tables,
har grill,
A 1 A


APPLIANCES


Washer and dryer, $200 for the
set. Call 643-2358. 9-10, 9-17

Wall oven, Magic Chef by Maytag,
30", electric, self cleaning, electric
control pad on front, new $1,200,
sell for $350. Call 674-1948.
9-3, 9-10

Vacuum cleaner, Roomba dis-
covery, used but in good condi-
tion, $100. Call 643-1428 leave
message. 9-3,9-10


9-39-10 ELECTRONICS

DV-R, Toshiba, D-R 410 HDMI,
Upcomvert, 2008 model, book,
remote, box, $85; Nintendo 64,
e cans, one joystick, four games, great
woSimi- working condition, $35 orbest offer;
c Isomil rare regular Nintedo game system,
great working condition, with two
9-10 9-17 joysticks, six games, asking $40.
Call 762-3477. 9-3,9-10
In, oak,
ck. Call
9-10,9-17 CARS

me. Call
1992 Pontiac Firebird, good con-
9-3, 9-10
9-3,9 edition, two new tires on front, 2.0L
engine, approximately 28 mpg. Call
E 674-8517. 9-10,9-17
1969 Buick LaSabre, 56K miles, for
g lights, parts. Call 762-3366. 9-10,9-17
assort-
reason- Mercedes-Benz ML500, 25K
miles, silver, sunroof, navigation,
9-10,9-17 excellent condition, fully loaded,
$39,000. Call 643-7948.
board, 9-3,9-10
mattress,
hardly 1992 Ford Escort wagon, runs
aall 643- good, $800 or best offer. Call 556-
9-10,9-17 0966. 9-3,9-10

ece, like TRUCKS
nt, $250 TRUCKS
7.
9-10,9-17
1996 Dodge Ram, pick-up, loaded,
all 643- all power, stereo, good running
9-1, 917 condition, 190K miles, $2,500. Call
643-7002. 9-10,9-17
boardr,
w,$100; 1994 Ford Ranger XL, extra cab,
on, $40. 4x4, V6, 4.0L engine, automatic,
1017 air, no radio, minor body damage,
minor mechanical problems, $2,200
or best offer. Call 379-3046.
m, new,
ing size, 9-10, 9-17
-8276.
-8276.0 1995 Ford F-150, A/T, A/C, good
9-109-17 tires, excellent condition, camper
shell, asking $6,000. Call 379-
8427. 9-10,9-17
NTS
1995 Dodge Ram 1500, newly re-
built engine, less than three miles,
ack and price negotiable. Call 510-0932 or
ides ex- 379-8276. 9-10,9-17
irl, $40;
20. Call 1998 Chevy Z-71, extended cab,
9-3, 9-10 4WD, good condition, high mileage,
pewter color, $6,000 or best offer.
Call 643-7818. 9-3,9-10
J
1995 Ford F-250,. V8, automatic,
;15. Call runsgood, $1,000or bestoffer. Call
9-10, 9-17 762-8785 leave message. 9-3,9-10


1983 Chevy pick-up, 400 small
block motor, four speed transmis-
sion, mud truck, $2,500 or trade for
small car of equal value. Call 643-
3258 or 643-2634. 9-3, 9-10

1992 Chevrolet Z-71, black, new
radial tires, 9" lift, excellent condi-
tion. Call 762-2084. 9-3,9-10

1984 Toyota pick-up, 22R motor,
113k original miles, asking $1,200.
Call 570-6953. 9-3,9-10


SUVS/VANS


1993 Ford conversion van, like
,new interior, four captain's chairs,
electronic bed bench, runs good,
new transmission, in Altha, $2,995
or trade for 4x4 or pontoon boat.
Call 762-8726 after 5 p.m. 9-10,9-17.

1993 Grand Caravan, good tires,
new brakes, V6, new cold A/C,
$1,200 or best offer. Call 606-776-
1762. 9-3,9-10

S1998 Jeep Cherokee, everything
but cruise control, really good con-
dition, runs very well, automatic,
$3,500. Call 674-7138 or 899-0269
leave message. UFN


AUTO PARTS &

ACCESSORIES

Campertop shell, forfull size truck,
2004-2008, Leer, black in color,
with lights, $200; universal Lambo
door kit, made by GTfactory, brand
new, $800 or best offer; four tires,
with chrome wheels, 15", fits Chevy
truck, $200; Richmond Chevy ring
pinion set, 3.08 gear, brand new,
$100. Call 447-0506 or 674-3973.
9-10,9-17

Chevy 15" wheels, aluminum, bul-
let hole style, one good tire, $200.
Call 762-3366. 9-10, 9-17

15-inch wheels and tires, alumi-
num, lug pattern 5 on 5 1/2, $300.
Call 899-0269 or 674-7138 leave
message. UFN


GUNS/HUNTING


Ammo, new in case, NATO belted,
.308, every fifth round tracer, not
selling a gun just ammo, $150.
Call 762-8726 after 5 p.m. 9-10, 9-17

Zeiss scope, 3.5x10x44, excellent
shape, $500. Call 379-8410.
9-10,9-17

Cannon gun safe, double wide,
60"x60"x27", fireproof lining, versa-
tile interior, large capacity for your
guns orvaluables, serious inquiries
only, $2,000 firm. Call 643-1671
leave message 9-3,9-10


M & W Self
Storage Rentals
7 days a week serwvce
5' x 10' .........s20
10 1 x '...........s35
10' x 20' .........57
10' x 25' ......... S
NO DEPOS--
Call 762-9555. 762-8807
or 762-8597 'FM


3 bedroom, 2 bath
14 x 70 mobile home
1'2 acre lot w; 12 x 40 add-on
$35,000






In Scon'; Ferry, privale leakd-ena
road, bordering St. Joe Forest w/
S pr.ng-lea creeK or, property
: Walking distance 10 Cnrpoia River
GREAT FOR MulrTI ,G rlH' FISHING ..-





FOR RENT

In Bristol
*Mobile home lots
3 bedroom, 1 1/2 bath

In Blountstown
*1-room ehiciency.
utilities included 2BR/Daih
and a half apartment
SCommercial old Mexican
restaurant Commercial -
200 front h. wilh 3 buildings
S ard lenced in area
SPhone 643-7740 '



HOUSEHOLD ITEMS
S$155 2pc Queen
i Plushtop mattress set.
New in plastic w/ warran-
ty. Can deliver. 545-7112
$290 New Queen .
Orthopedic Pillowtop
Mattress Set in Sealed
Plastic, Warranty. Can
Deliver. 222-9879
LIVING ROOM SET.
NEW, lifetime warranty.
sacrifice $549. (delivery
avail). 545-7112
5pc bedroom set.
Brand new in boxes
$469 Can deliver 425-
8374
All NEW Pillowtop King
Mattress Set. w/ War-
ranty. $349. 545-7112.
SCan deliver.
Beautiful Queen Cherry
Wood 7-pc Sleigh Bed
Set w/ dovetail draw-
ers. Still in boxes. $2400
value, must sacrifice
$999 222-7783
BRAND NEW Full Mat-
tress set, $139 or Twin
set $124 w/ warranty.
425-8374.
CHERRY Sleigh Bed .:
w/ NEW Mattress set -
$399. Can deliver. 545-
7112.
CHERRY DINING table,
china cabinet & Chairs.
Deep. rich finish, boxed.
List $1800. lake $799.
425-8374.
SOLID WOOD-5 piece
Pub Set NEW In
boxes $199. 425-8374.








SEPTEMBER 10, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 27


/\/
THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL



DECLASSIFIED

To place your ad, call 643-3333 by noon Eastern
Time on Saturday. Non-business ads run FREE for 2 weeks.


SPORTING GOODS TOOLS & HEA'Y


& EXERCISE EQUIP.

Pool liner, for 16x32 in ground 8'
diving pool, brand new 20 gauge
liner still in box, beautiful blue pat-
tern, can be seen in existing pool
by appointment, $1,600. Call Janet
at 379-8750 or 933-8775 between
9 a.m. and 8:30 p.m. (ET) daily.
9-10,9-17

Ab lounge, new, never used,
paid 4280, asking $150. Call 379-
8817. 9-10,9-17

Bowflex Extreme, excellent condi-
tion, $150 or best offer. Call 526-
3738. 9-10,9-17

MOTORCYCLES

& ATVS

2007 Honda Rancher, 420, racks,
less than 20 hours on four wheeler,
shed kept, asking pay off. Call 643-
6437. 9-10, 9-17

Sport scooter, black and white,
150cc, new kick start, 75 mpg, 65
mph, $800 firm. Call 272-6168.
9-10; 9-17

Four wheeler,. small, 110, $650.
Call 674-2469. 9-3,9-10

2006 Harley Davidson Road
King, one owner, black, less than
100 miles, $14,000. Call 674-4364
or 643-7796. 8-6T. 9-10


WATERCRAFT

Aluminum boat, 10', 8 hp Yama-
ha motor, with trailer, $1,000. Call
447-1380. 9-10, 9-17

Boat, motor and trailer, 30 hp
Johnson, stick steering, electric
start,.all welded, aluminum boat,
11'10" in length, new seats, new
battery, trolling motor, fish finder,
serious inquiries only, $3,000. Call
674-1840. 9-10,9-17

1994 Nitro bass boat, 17.5', 115
hp Mercury, fish finder, dual con-
sole, green in color, $6,000 or best
offer. Call 643-7818. 9-3,9-10

Bass Tracker boat, 19', 48 hp
Evinrude motor, $2,500. Call 643-
6116. 9-3,9-10


EQUIPMENT

2006 Kubota tractor, 4x4, 35 hp,
front end loader and drag box, ap-
proximately 300 hrs., 18', heavy
duty trailer, $17,500. Call 625-
6906. 9-3, 9-10

Riding mower, yard machine,
runs good, $250. Call 643-1514.
9-3,9-10


CAMPERS/RVS

1996 32' motor home, 14' add-
a-room, 500 watt generator, flat
screen T.V., driver's side door, Ford
Titan V-10, $20,000 or best offer.
Call Wanda at 508-8154 or Eldon
at 544-0402. 9-10,9-17

2003 24' camper, sleeps four to
six, has RVQ two way fridge and
water heater, like new, clean in-
terior, all works, in Altha, $6,900.
Call 762-8726 after 5 p.m. 9-10, 9-17


HOMES & LAND

12x24 portable, fixed like apart-
ment, paneling, ceiling fan, four
windows, wide front door, carpet
and vinyl, hot water heater, sink,
shower, must be moved, $3,500.
9-10, 9-17

One acre of land in Hosford,
$12,000. Call 294-3511. 9-3,9-10

1994 mobile home, Homes of
Legend brand, 16x80, central heat
and air, full electric, three bedroom/
two bath, comes with appliances
and two porches, must be moved.
Call 566-5170. 7-23 T.10-8

Big lot on Chipola River, located in
Calhoun County. Call 643-1514.
UFN


LOST & FOUND

Found: Beagle, young, female, to
claim, describe her collar. If owner
not found, will look for good home
for her. Call 674-8802. 9-10,9-17

Found: terrier mix, female, white
and black, found in Blue Creek
area of Hosford. Call 379-8669.
9-10,9-17


Found: male Dachshund, found
Aug. 31 in Estiffanugla. Call 643-
2985 to identify. 9-10,9-17

Lost: ladies wallet, lost on Hwy.
275 at Shonna Dr. on Aug. 26,
contents are. very important, be-
longs to Virgina .Harris Nichols,
nice reward offered for return with
contents. Call 674-8033. 9-3,9-10


PETS,/,SUPPLIES

Black lab mix, four years old,
spayed, house broken but does
not stay in house. Vaccinated May
31, needs fenced in yard. Free to
good home. Call 762-2322 after 5
p.m. 9-10,9-17

Kittens and cats, free to good
home, must go. Call 643-5591 or
320-4542. 9-10, 9-17

Pit bull puppies, four males, four
and a half months old, $50 each.
Call 762-8844 leave message.
9-10, 9-17

Springer spaniel, two years old,
female, $75. Call 674-3264.
9-3, 9-10

Puppies, Shepherd/Black lab mix,
some solid black, some tan black,
total of nine dogs, will be ready
in two weeks, cute, playful, eyes
are open, free to good home. Call
674-4290. 9-3,9-10


\ANTED

Wanted: The nice man that
cleaned the pine limbs out of
Mrs. Willis' yard at 23506 NW
CR 275 in Altha, she would like
to extend her gratitude. Please
call 762-3653. 9-10,9-17

Wanted: Looking for a roof top
A/C unit for a camper. Call 524-
3437. 9-10,9-17

Wanted: Will give $60 to $80
for the bodies of junk autos and
$125 for full bodies of junk autos.
Call Jimmy Dawson at 850-544-
3478. 7-2 T.9-10

lYRD SALES

Yard sale, Saturday, Sept. 13, on
Bridges Ave. in Blountstown, be-
hind Gas Mart on Hwy. 71, starting
at 8 a.m, ladies', men's, junior's,
and children's clothing, shoes,
household items and what-nots.
Call 674-2637 after 5 p.m. 9-10


CLASSIFIED ADS
The Journal is glad to run your non-business classified ads free -
of charge for two weeks. If you would like to advertise the same
item after that time, there is a charge of $2 per week, payable in ,
advance.
Please remember that ourfree classified are for NON-BUS I NESS
related items only. Display ads (ads with borders) are also avail-
able in the classified section, starting at a cost of $11.50 per week
for a 2-inch-high, one-column ad.
If you'd like something bigger with art or a special border, we
have a chart of sizes and prices you can look over at our office. For
more information, give us a call at 643-3333 or 1-800-717-3333.


. TRAILER FOR RENT
. Two bedroom, two bath-
room mobile home for .,
rent located six miles
north of Blountstown on
HWY 69 north. Water,
sewer. and grass mow-
ing provided. Deposit
required. No pets.
Call 643-8934


'For Siale
Fertilized Round
HAY BALES
CALL 643-3825


& /


, a


"-t a 17


C THE
cornerstone

MARKET






Books Toys
Woodcrafts
Clothing Dishes
Whatnots
Plaques
Keyholders
Sports items


Bird Houses,
& Feeders


STORE HOURS-
Thurs Sat
8 a m. 5 p.m


LOC4 TED 4T SHELTON S
CORNER IN.4LTHA




WANTED:










"'Will buy 10 to
1,000 acres,
Reasonably
priced.
Immediate

closing.
Call (850)
544-5441

or (850)
570-0222


* STi


I "Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content I
Available from Commercial News Providers"


i I~r~t ~
'rl


..-


1.1:
i
c",-;
ir
ii;



i,


*is,
;-s

,









Page 28 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 10, 2008


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIR-
CUIT IN AND FOR LIBERTY
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION

CASE NO. 07168CA
DIVISION

TAYLOR, BEAN & WHITAKER
MORTGAGE CORPORATION,
Plaintiff,

vs.
MELISSA LOPEZ, et al,
Defendant(s)

NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to a Final Judgement of
Mortgage Foreclosure dated Au-
gust 21, 2008 and entered in Case
No. 07168CA of the Circuit Court
of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in
and for LIBERTY County, Florida
wherein TAYLOR, BEAN & WHI-
TAKER MORTGAGE CORPORA-
TION, is the Plaintiff and MELISSA
LOPEZ; FRANCISCO LOPEZ;
ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PAR-
TIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH,
UNDER, AND AGAINST THE
HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL
DEFENDANTS) WHO ARE NOT
KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE,
WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN
PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTER-
ESTAS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVI-
SEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER
CLAIMANTS; are the Defendants,
I will sell to the highest and best bid-
der for cast at FRONT DOOR OF
THE LIBERTY COUNTY COURT-
HOUSE at 11:00AM, on the 30 day
of September, 2008, the following
described property as set forth in
said Final Judgement:

A PARCEL OF LAND LYING
IN THE NORTHWEST 1/4 OF
THE NORTHWEST 1/4 OF SEC-
TION 18, TOWNSHIP 1 SOUTH,
RANGE 7 WEST, LIBERTY
COUNTY, FLORIDA AND BE-
ING A PART OF THAT CERTAIN
TRACT OF LAND DESCRIBED
IN OFFICIAL RECORD BOOK 39,
PAGE 677 OF THE PUBLIC RE-
CORDS OF SAID COUNTY AND
BEING MORE PARTICULARLY
DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:
BEGIN AT A 5/8 INCH RE-BAR
WITH CAP (PSM3031) MARKING
THE NORTHWEST CORNER
OF THE ABOVE DESCRIBED
LANDS AND RUN THENCE
S 00 DEGREES 44 MINUTES
00 SECONDS W ALONG THE
WESTERN BOUNDARY OF SAID
LANDS A DISTANCE OF 161.03
FEET TO A 5/8 INCH RE-BAR
WITH CAP (PSM3031); THENCE
S 89 DEGREES 39 MINUTES
43 SECONDS E A DISTANCE
OF 400.43 FEET TO A 5/8 INCH
RE-BAR WITH CAP (PSM3031)
ON THE EASTERN BOUNDARY
OF SAID LANDS; THENCE N 00
DEGREES 47 MINUTES 47 SEC-
ONDS E ALONG SAID EASTERN
BOUNDARY A DISTANCE OF
161.03 FEET TO A CONCRETE
MONUMENT (LS1785) MARK-
ING THE NORTHEAST CORNER
OF SAID LANDS; THENCE N 89
DEGREES 39 MINUTES 43 SEC-
ONDS W ALONG THE NORTH-
ERN BOUNDARY OF SAID
LANDS A DISTANCE OF 400.61
FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGIN-
NING.
THE WESTERLY PORTION
OF THE ABOVE DESCRIBED
LANDS BEING SUBJECT TO A
COUNTY MAINTAINED ROAD-
WAY KNOWN AS JACOBS
LANE.
TOGETHER WITH THAT CER-
TAIN MOBILE HOME LOCATED
THEREON, SERIAL NUMBERS
GAFL575A77756-BH21 AND


GAFL575B77756-BH21
A/K/A14750 NW JACO
BRISTOL, FL 32321
Any person claiming an
the surplus from the sa
other than the property
of the date of the Lis
must file a claim within
days after the sale.

WITNESS MY HAND ai
of this Court on August

Robert Hill
Clerk of the Circuit Cour
By: Vanell Summers
Deputy Clerk


IBS LANE,

interest in
ale, if any,
'owner as
s Pendens
I sixty (60)


nd the seal
26, 2008.


rt

9-3,10-08


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR LIBERTY COUNTY,
FLORIDA

CASE NO. 2008-CA-42

TALQUIN SPRINGS GENERAL
PARTNERSHIP,
Plaintiff,
vs.
KENOL MISTILIEN; AND UN-
KNOWN TENANTS,
Defendants.

NOTICE OF SALE

Notice is hereby given that, pursu-
ant to Final Judgement of Foreclo-
sure entered in the above-styled
cause, in the Circuit Court of Lib-
erty County, Florida, I will sell the
property situate in Liberty County,
Florida, described as:

LOT 3, OF SUMMERWIND, AC-
CORDING TO THE PLAT THERE-
OF AS RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK A, PAGE 65, OF THE
PUBLIC RECORDS OF LIBERTY
COUNTY, FLORIDA.

at public sale, to the highest bid-
der, for cash, at the front door of
the Liberty County Courthouse,
Bristol, Florida at 11:00 a.m., on
October 14, 2008. Any person
claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, other than the prop-
erty owner, must file a claim within
60 days after the sale.

ROBERT HILL
CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT

Vanell Summers
Deputy Clerk 9-3,10-08


IN THE CIRCUIT COU
LIBERTY COUNTY, F
FILE NO. 07-28-

IN RE: ESTATE OF
MAGGIE FLOYD
Deceased.

NOTICE TO CREDIT

The administration of
of Maggie Floyd, deceas
date of death was Nov
2006 and whose Socia
Number is 261-34-326
ing in the Circuit Court
County, Florida, Probat
the address of which is
399, Bristol, Florida 323
The names and addre
personal representative
personal representative
is set forth below.
The creditors-of the dec
other persons having cl\


mands against decedent's estate
on whom a copy of this notice has
been served must file their claims
with this court WITHIN THE LATER
OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AF-
TER THE TIME OF SERVICE OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims
or demands against decedent's
estate must file their claims with
this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AF-
TER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN
THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH
IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE
FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of the first publication of
this notice is September 3, 2008.

Attorney for Personal
Representative
James H. Richey, P.A.
Florida Bar No. 0846139
707 W. Eau Gallie Blvd
Melbourne, FL 32935
Telephone (321) 242-7552

Personal Representatives
Emanuel Allen
711 August Street, SE
Palm Bay, FL 32909 09-3,10-08


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT C
THE SECOND JUDICIAL Cl
CUlT IN AND FOR LIBERTY
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION

CASE NO. 39-2008-Cl
DIVIS

INDYMAC BANK F.S.B.,
Plaintiff,

vs.
SAMMIE T. CRUM, et al,
Defendant(s)

NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GI
pursuant to a Final Judger
of Mortgage Foreclosure d


August 21, 2008 and entered
Case No. 39-2008-CA-22 of
JRT FOR Circuit Court of the SECOND
-LORIDA dicial Circuit in and for LIBE
-CP County, Florida wherein IN
MAC BANK F.S.B., is the PIa
and SAMMIE T. CRUM; THE
KNOWN SPOUSE OF SAI\
T. CRUM N/K/A JANE DOE;
NAVON CRUM; THE UNKNC
ITORS SPOUCE OF DONAVON Cl
N/K/A JANE DOE 2 N/K/A J
the estate DOE 2; JO ANN CRUM; BR
sed, whose K. HILT D/B/A VINTAGE FLO(
'ember 23, DOOR; TENANT #1 N/K/A Ji
al Security DOE, and TENANT #2 N
4 is pend- JANE DOE 3 are the Defenda
for Liberty will sell to the highest and bes
e Division der for cast at FRONT DOOF
s P. BoxTHE LIBERTY COUNTY COI

sses of the HOUSE at 11:00AM, on the 3C
e and the of September, 2008, the folio
D's attorney described property as set for
said Final Judgement:
cedent and
aims or de- COMMENCE AT ROD


)F
IR-
Y



A-22
ION


MARKING THE SOUTHWEST
CORNER OF BLOCK 34 OF
THE TOWN OF SUMATRA, SEC-
TION 30, TOWNSHIP 5 SOUTH,
RANGE 7 WEST, LIBERTY
COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE
RUN NORTH 84 DEGREES 48
MINUTES 20 SECONDS EAST
ALONG THE NORTHERLY RIGHT
OF WAY OF 8TH STREET 673.44
FEET TO A ROD AND CAP FOR
THE POINT OF BEGINNING;
THENCE CONTINUE ALONG
SAID RIGHT OF WAY NORTH
84 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 49
SECONDS EAST192.28 FEET
TO A ROD AND CAP; THENCE
LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAY
RUN NORTH 05 DEGREES 11
MINUTES 01 SECONDS WEST
320.07 FEET TO A ROD AND
CAP LYING ON THE NORTH-
ERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF 7TH
STREET; THENCE RUN ALONG
SAID RIGHT OF WAY, SOUTH 84
DEGREES 44 MINUTES 49 SEC-
ONDS WEST 170.60 FEET TO
ROD AND CAP; THENCE LEAV-
ING SAID RIGHT OF WAY RUN
SOUTH 01 DEGREES 18 MIN-
UTES 34 SECONDS EAST 320.83
FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGIN-
NING. A/K/A 10780 SW HIGHWAY
22, BRISTOL, FL 32321

Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any,
other than the property owner as
of the date of the Lis Pendens
must file a claim within sixty (60)
days after the sale.

WITNESS MY HAND and the seal
of this Court on August 26, 2008.

Robert Hill
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: V. Summers
Deputy Clerk 09-3,10-08


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR LIBERTY
COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No.: 08-109-DR
Division: FAMILY LAW

Charles W. Coxwell, Petitioner
and
Rosalinda A. Dominguez,
Respondent.
VEN
ment NOTICE OF ACTION FOR
ated DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
*d in
Sthe To: Rosalinda A. Dominguez of
) u- 541 Lailay Corner Bomtaub St.
RTY Gstalca, Dipolog City, Zambonga
NDY- del Norte Philippines 7100.
lintiff
UN- You are notified that an action has
1MIE been filed against you and that
DO- you are required to serve a copy of
)WN your written defenses, if any, to it
RUM on Charles W. Coxwell whose ad-
ANE dress is P.O. Box 399, Bristol, Fl
UCE 32321 before service on Petitioner
OR& or immediately thereafter. If you
D fail to do so, a default may be
KHNA entered against you for the re-
K/ lief demanded in the petition.
nts, I
Sbid- Copies of all court documents
in this case, including orders,
URT- are available at the Clerk of the
)day Circuit Court's office. You may
wing review these documents upon
th in request.

You must keep the Clerk of the
AND Circuit Court's office notified


---- --------- -~
APB mmI


Dated: August 19, 2008.
ROBERT HILL
CLERK OF THE
COURT

By: Kathleen E. Brown
Deputy Clerk


CIRCUIT



8-27 t917


NOTICE TO RECEIVE
PROPOSALS
FOR ARCHITECTURAL
SERVICES

The Liberty County Board of Coun-
ty Commissioners will take propos-
als for architectural services.
All proposals should be submit-
ted to the Clerk of Courts Office,
Liberty County Courthouse, 10818
NW SR 20, P.O. Box 399, Bristol,
FL 32321 before 5:00 P.M., Tues-
day October 7, 2008.
Proposals will be reviewed at the
regular scheduled board meeting
Tuesday October 7, 2008 at 7:00
P.M. in the courtroom of the Liberty
County Courthouse.
PLEASE MARK ON THE OUR-
SIDE OF YOUR SEALED PRO-
POSAL "PROPOSAL FOR AR-
CHITECTURAL SERVICES"
The Board reserves the right to ac-
cept or reject any and all proposal
which they deem to be in the best
interest of the county.

Robert Hill, Clerk to the Board of
County Commissioners
9-10 & 17


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE SECOND JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR LIBERTY COUNTY,
FLORIDA

IN RE: ESTATE OF

WILLIAM E. CAYSON, JR.,
PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 2008- 30-PR


Deceased.


NOTICE TO CREDITORS

The administration of the estate of
WILLIAM E. CAYSON, JR.,, de-
ceased, whose date of death was
July 1, 2008 is pending in the Cir-
cuit Court for Liberty County, Flor-
ida, Probate Division, the address
of which is the Circuit Court for Lib-
erty County, Florida, Probate Divi-
sion, the address of which is the
Liberty County Courthouse, P.O.
Box 399 Bristol, Florida 32321.
The names and addresses of the
personal representative and the
personal representative's attorney
are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and
other persons having claims or de-
mands against decedent's estate,
on whom a copy of this notice is
required to be served, must file
their claims with this court WITHIN
THE LATER. OF 3 MONTHS AF-
TER THE TIME OF THE FIRST

I IL ~e


of your current address. (You
may file Notice of Current Ad-
dress, Florida Supreme Court
Approved Family Law Form
12.915.) Future papers in this
lawsuit will be mailed to the ad-
dress on record at the clerk's
office.

Warning: Rule 12.285, Florida
Family Law Rules of Procedure,
requires certain automatic dis-
closure of documents and infor-
mation. Failure to comply can
result in sanctions, including
dismissal or striking of plead-
ings.









SEPTEMBER 10, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 29


is required to be served, must file
their claims with this court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AF-
TER THE TIME OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE
OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE
OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims or
demands against decedent's es-
tate must file their claims with this
court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER
THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUB-
LICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN
THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH
IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE
FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.

The date of first publication of this
notice is: September 10, 2008.


CAROLYN LeBOEUF
Attorney for Personal Representa-
tive


Florida Bar No. 362409
909 East Park Avenue
Tallahassee, Florida 32301
Telephone: (850) 222-9757
JAMES SHULER
P.O. Box 1276
Bristol, Florida 32321
Personal Representative 9-10 &17

PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE
(07.02)
2nd Public Hearing Notice


The Liberty County Board of
County Commissioners is ap-
plying to the Florida Department
of Community Affairs (DCA) for
a grant under the Planning and
Design for Neighborhood Revital-
ization category in the amount of
$58,593.80 under the Small Cities
Community Development Block
Grant (CDBG) Program. For each


PUBLIC MEETING

CONCERNING


FCorida River Island

Do you like to hunt, fish, camp, hike, or otherwise enjoy
Florida River Island in Liberty County, Florida? If so, the
Northwest Florida Water Management District would like
to hear your thoughts about a proposed access manage-
ment program that would provide different amounts of
vehicle access for hunting, fishing and other recreational
activities throughout the year.

The bridge to Florida River Island was recently replaced
and some of the roads on the island have been stabi-
lized to enhance access. Staff from the Water Manage-
ment District will be hosting a public meeting to obtain
input about vehicle access and public use of the roads
on Florida River Island. Information about this meeting is
provided below:


DATE:
TIME:
LOCATION:


Monday, September 15, 2008
6:30 to 8:30 PM (Eastern)
Veterans Memorial Park
Civic Center
10405 N.W. Theo Jacobs Lane
Bristol, FL 32321


activity that is propo
70% of the funds mu
and moderate incoi
The application will
following funding:

Engineering

Grant Administration

If these activities are
resulting CDBG N
Revitalization project
clude the following ac
New 70,000 gallon
age tank in Rock Blu

New production well

Piping

Electrical Connection
Telemetry

Yard Piping and Fittir



All of the proposed ir
will be located at the
Bluff Water Plant. Th
ments will bring the
tem into compliance
requirements and all
growth. The Rock B
is currently serviced
system is 57% low
income.
No displacement of
result of CDBG funde
anticipated as a resu


)sed, at least posed project.
st benefit low If any persons are displaced as
me persons. a result of these planned activi-
provide the ties, the Liberty County Board of
County Commissioners will assist
such persons in securing tempo-
rary housing until they can return
$54.253.52 to their permanent residence.
A public hearing to provide citi-
$4,340.28 zens an opportunity to comment
e funded, the on the application will be held at
neighborhood Liberty County Courthouse on
ct would in- September 15, 2008 at 6:30 P.M.
activities: A final draft copy of the application
Ground stor- will be available for review at that
ff time. A final copy of the applica-
$120,000.00 tion will be made available at the
Liberty County Courthouse Clerks
$200,000.00 Office on Monday through Friday
between the hours of 8 A.M. and
$80,000.00 4:30 P.M. no more than 15 days
is and after September 15, 2008. The ap-
plication will be submitted to DCA
$100,000.00 on or before September 29, 2008.
igs To obtain additional information
concerning the application and
$30,000.00 the public hearing, contact Robert
Hill at Liberty County Courthouse,
improvements 10818 NW SR 20, (850) 643-
existing Rock 2215.
ese improve- The public hearing is being con-
current sys- ducted in a handicapped acces-
Swith FDEP sible location. Any handicapped
ow for future person requiring an interpreter for
luff area that the hearing impaired or the visual-
by the water ly impaired should contact Robert
to moderate Hill at Liberty County Courthouse,
10818 NW SR 20, (850) 643-2215
persons as a at least five calendar days prior
d activities is to the meeting and an interpreter
lit of the pro-


r g 1- -- ----- - ----- - ----~
AK- II


A subscription to The Calhoun-Liberty


Journal makes a great gift for anyone on your


list. Just drop by our office on Summers


Road in Bristol to set it up. We'll even give


you a personalized announcement


flyer like the one shown here!


NOTICE OF PUBLIC WORKSHOP

THE LIBERTY COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSION-
ERS WILL HOLD A FAIR HOUSING WORKSHOP MEETING
ON:

WHEN: Monday, September 15th, 2008
TIME: 6:30 P.M.
WHERE: Liberty County Courthouse
RE: Fair Housing Workshop
IN ACCORDANCE WITH-THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILI-
TIES ACT, Persons needing special accommodations to par-
ticipate in this proceeding should contact Robert Hill, Clerk of
Court, Liberty County, at (850) 643-2215.
All persons are invited to attend these meetings. (Any person
who decides to appeal any decision made by the Commission
with respect to any matter considered at said meeting will need
a record of the proceedings, and for such purpose may need
to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made,
which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which
the appeal is to be based. The Liberty County Board of County
Commissioners will not provide a verbatim record of this meet-
ing.)
9-10-08


If you have any questions about this meeting,
please contact Tyler Macmillan or Sarah Martin at
850-539-5999, or toll-free at 1-800 913-1518 or by
e-mail at: Tyler.Macmillan @nwfwmd.state. fl.us


se srtiollto


CID~


will be provided. Any non-English
speaking person wishing to attend
the public hearing should con-
tact Robert Hill at Liberty County
Courthouse, 10818 NW SR 20,
(850) 643-2215 at least five calen-
dar days prior to the meeting and
a language interpreter will be pro-
vided. To access a Telecommu-
nication Device for Deaf Persons
(TDD) please call Robert Hill at
Liberty County Courthouse, (850)
643-2215. Any handicapped per-
son requiring special accommo-
dation at this meeting should con-
tact Robert Hill at Liberty County
Courthouse, 10818 NW SR 20,
(850) 643-2215 at least five calen-
dar days prior to the meeting.
Pursuant to Section 102 of the
HUD Reform Act of 1989, the fol-
lowing disclosures will be submit-
ted to DCA with the application.
The disclosures will be made
available by Liberty County Board
of County Commissioners and
DCA for public inspection upon
request. These disclosures will be
available on and after the date of
submission of the application and
shall continue to be available for a
minimum period of five years.
1. Other government (fed-
eral, state and local) assistance
to the project in the form of a gift,
grant, loan, guarantee, insurance
payment, rebate, subsidy, credit,
tax benefit, or any other form of
direct or indirect benefit by source
and amount;
2. The identities and pecuni-
ary interests of all developers, con-
tractors, or consultants involved in
the application for assistance or in
the planning or development of the
project or activity;
3. The identities and pecuni-
ary interests of any other persons
with a pecuniary interest in the
project that can reasonably be ex-
pected to exceed $50,000 or 10%
of the grant request (whichever is
lower);
4. For those developers,
contractors, consultants, property
owners, or others listed in two (2)
or three (3) above which are corpo-
rations, or other entities, the identi-
fication and pecuniary interests by
corporation or entity of each offi-
cer, director, principal stockholder,
or other official of the entity;
5. The expected sources
of all funds to be provided to the
project by each of the providers of
those funds and the amount pro-
vided; and
6. The expected uses of all
funds by activity and amount.
9-10-08









Page 30 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 10, 2008


FWC law enforcement officers assist Navy submarines for first time


Thursday marked the
conclusion of a first-of-its-kind
mission in a U.S. port. For the
past 11 weeks, Waterborne
Response Teams deployed
from law enforcement agencies
throughout Florida to assist the
U.S. Coast Guard in protecting
Navy submarines leaving and
entering Mayport Naval Station


in Jacksonville. Teams included
law enforcement officers from
the Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission
(FWC).
Waterborne Response Teams
are part of a statewide security
plan, created to address significant
manmade and natural disasters,
provide escorts, dignitary


-_. -- --- .. .. .



protection, security and search-
and-rescue. In addition to FWC
officers, they comprise officers
from some of the Florida's
larger sheriff's' offices and
police departments who possess


Public comment sought on Florida River Island Vehicle Access


HAVANA The Northwest Florida Water
Management District wants to hear from the
public about vehicle access to the primary roads
on Florida River Island in Liberty County. It will
hold a meeting in Bristol on Monday-evening,
September 15 to inform people about the new
bridge constructed to Florida River Island, road
improvements on the island and to seek public
input about vehicle access preferences.
"For instance. some hunters are interested in an
enhanced pedestrian-only hunting experience by
having af the roads closed during certain seasons,
such as small game and turkey seasons," said
Tyler Macmillan, Chief of the District's Bureau
of Lands Management Operations. "Others have
said they want as many roads open as possible at
all times. We want to provide the users with an
opportunity to share their thoughts to see if there is
an interest in some limited road closure to enhance
the experience of our visitors. "
The District's Apalachicola River Water
Management Area totals 35,506 acres including
5,806 acres on Florida River Island. This property
is managed as part of the
Apalachicola Wildlife Management Area
through a cooperative agreement with the Florida


Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. It is
a popular destination for hunting, fishing, camping,
hiking, and birding.
When the District purchased Florida River Island
in 1985, a timber bridge connected the island to
the mainland, but its wooden pilings eventually
deteriorated to the point that the bridge was no
longer safe for vehicle crossings. In the spring
of 2008, the District completed construction of a
replacement bridge and has since worked to stabilize
some of the primary roads on the island.
The bridge and road improvements are intended
to provide access for land management, law
enforcement and appropriate resource-based
public recreation access. However, the recent
improvements have raised questions about what
level of vehicular access recreational users would
prefer.
Anyone interested in discussing these topics
should plan to attend the meeting on Monday at
the Veterans Memorial Park Civic Center, 10405
N.W. Theo Jacobs Lane, Bristol, 6:30 to 8:30 p.m.
Eastern Daylight Time. Questions may be directed
to Macmillan by mailing Tyler.Macmillan@
nwfwmd.state.fl.us or calling him, 850-539-5999,
or toll free, 1-800-913-1518.


t'. 4 '
.... ,.......... . .......
Pictured is the LDS church softball team, from left front, Drew
Bryant, Hannah Bryant, Heather Cain, Kalynn Travis, Tessa Ford,
Shann Layne with Aden Layne and Page Wahlquist; middle, Jace
Ford, Mannie Stafford with Carson Stafford, Rynn Redmon, Shad
Redmon, Jared Day, John Travis, Ricky Stafford, Eric Layne; back,
Michael Bryant, Justin Ford, Garet Shuler, Jared Roberts, Aaron Day,
Tranum McLemore.

LDS wins church co-ed softball tourney


The Liberty County Recreation
Department's Church Co-Ed Slow-
pitch Softball League came to an
end Tuesday night with Bristol
LDS winning the championship
over Bristol Christian Church 15-5
in the finals.
Tranum McLemore led LDS in
the final game as he banged out 4
hits including a home run. Rick
Stafford had 3 hits for LDS.
Bristol Christian Church was led
by Tim Davis with 3 doubles. Link
Barber and Howard Davis also had
3 hits each for Bristol Christian.
In semi-final action games
Tuesday night LDS defeated
Community Churches 14-4 and
Bristol Christian got by Pentecostal
Holiness 8-6 in 9 innings.
Jared Day, Garrett Shuler, Jared
Roberts, and Shann Stafford slapped


3 hits each for LDS while Alfred
Copeland, Keith Maxwell, Shakita
Knight, and Tony Mitchell scored
the Community Church's runs.
In the Bristol Christian-
Pentecostal game Corry Peddie.
had 4 hits for Pentecostal- Holiness.
Link Barber and Mark McCaskill
scored 2 runs each for Bristol
Christian.
The Recreation Department
felt like the league was very
successful. The department wishes
to thank managers Heather Cain,
Brent Blackburn, Ronnie Deason,
Casi Peddie, Alford Copeland,
Eddie Thomas, Tom Moore, Jeff
Sewell, Jeremy Summers, and
Charles Buggs for their help and
cooperation. Umpires Jimmy Reed
and Jim Davidson did a greatjob for
the program.


LIBERTY CO. REC STILL
HAS SOCCER OPENINGS
The Liberty County Recreation
Department's soccer program is
still open for registration.
Youth 5 to 13 as of June 1
of this year are eligible for the
program. Cost of registration is
$30.
Also anyone interested in
coaching can contact the
Recreation Department at 643-
2175.
DAVIS, PACE PITCH
REDBIRDS INTO
SEMI-FINALS
A pair of Liberty County
residents Tim Davis and
Andy Pace combined to
pitch Chattahoochee to a 5-1
win over the Jefferson A's in
a Sunday afternoon Georgia/
Florida/Alabama Baseball League
quarter-final play-off contest.
Davis pitched the first 6 innings
and got the win. The lefty struck
out 14 and allowed only 2 hits.
Pace, a big right-hander,
finished up and fanned 6 in his
3 innings of work, allowing no
hits.
Liberty County's Richie Smith
smacked 2 hits and Matt Neel and
Demetric Miller also had 2 hits for
Chattahoochee.
The Red Birds will be home
Sunday meeting.the Quincy
Dodgers in a 3 p.m. semi-final
game at Therrell Field.
The Dodgers upset the
Tallahassee Knights Sunday to
gain the semi-finals.


maritime capabilities.
"Assets, such as manpower,
boats and aircraft from many
different agencies were used to
escort Navy high-value assets
in and out of a Florida port on a
daily basis," said Mark DuPont,
the FWC's chief intelligence and
domestic security officer, and
primary planner for the event,.
tagged Operation Sturgeon.
"Using federal, state, county and
local resources on an effort such
as this has never been done before
anywhere in the country."
There are 41 seven-person
Waterborne Response Teams
throughout the state, trained
and equipped to protect critical
infrastructure and high-value
assets. These include 14 major
seaports, three nuclear power
plants situated on or near major
waterways and the thousands of
ships that ply the state's waters.
In support of the Coast Guard
- the primary agency responsible
for the nation's port security -
Waterborne Response Teams
responded outside their local
regions for the first time since
their creation as part of Florida's
Regional Domestic Security Task


Driver


20 Years Experience

S Call 674-1719
mmm or 890-21280


Forces.
"FWC Waterborne Response
Teams, our aviation units and
the agency's offshore vessel, the
C.T. Randall, worked with multi-
agency teams from as far away as
Miami-Dade and Lee counties,"
DuPont said. "We tested and
proved the state's ability to move
teams across the state to support
high-security operations, and the
Coast Guard and Navy know they
can rely on these teams."
Coordination, communication
and operations were facilitated by
FWC personnel.
"On behalf of the Navy and
submarine forces, I want to
express my deepest gratitude
to the Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission for
coordinating this effort, and to
each of the teams that came from
Okaloosa, Bay, Lee, Miami-Dade,
Duval, and Nassau counties,"
said Cmdr. Doug Jordan, deputy
director for strategic forces
and force protection for the
U.S. Navy Submarine Forces
Command. "This is something
that we will learn from and apply
in future operations throughout
the country."


One Stop Career Center
16908 NE Pear St. Suile 2.
Blountsitowr Phone (850) 674-5088
The following positions are
available: Construction Trades
Helper, Janitorial, Dietetic
Technician, Construction
Worker, Office Clerk, Food
Service Worker, Production
Manager, Truck Driver.
EOE
Service Chipola Workforce Board UFN


VOCATIONAL INSTRUCTOR III F/C

Position #70022979
LIBERTY CORRECTIONAL INSTITUTION

Starting Salary $1,020.79 Biweekly

The Florida Department of Corrections is accepting applications
for a Vocational HVAC Instructor III F/C at Liberty Correctional
Institution, Bristol, Fl. This is not a classroom setting. Requires
hands on work with instructions and guidance to inmates in the
area of HVAC. This is a Career Service position with full state
benefits.
Applicants must possess at least a high school diploma or
G.E.D. and have at least three years work experience in the area
of HVAC.
Qualified applicants should submit a State of Florida Employ-
ment Application with the above position number no later than
11:59 p.m. (EST) on Tuesday September 19, 2008 to Convergys,
ATTEN: People First, Staffing Administration P.O. Box 44058,
Jacksonville, Fl. 32231. Applicants may apply online at HTTPS://
PEOPLEFIRST.MYFLORIDA.COM or call 1-877-562-7287.
The Department is an Equal Opportunity Employer. If you re-
quire an accommodation to participate in the application/selection
process, please contact the hiring authority or personnel office in
advance. Certain veterans and spouses of veterans receive pref-
erence in employment by the State as provided by Chapter 295,
Florida Statutes and are encouraged to apply.
9-10 & 17






SEPTEMBER 10, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 31


F.E I A-1 TREE SERVICE FONSED
& STUMP GRINDING "INSURED
* Safe Tree Removal / STUMP
- Pruning & Trimming GRINDING
- 150'Aerial Bucket Best Prices
* Storm DamageInThe Area!
- Crane Service in The Ar
Residential & C'7iM E TF- T
AFFORDABLE QUALITY SERVICE
Call 674-3434 or 1-800-628-8733
VICKERY ENTERPRISES, INC.
Russell Vierv Jrl. OwnerIn


Daily dove hunt permits

will go on sale Sept. 18
Daily dove hunt pernnits go on sale at 10 a.m. (ET) Sept. IS
for special-opportunit, do\e fields throughout the state, the
Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC)
announced today.
Worksheets are available from FWC regional offices and at
MhN FWC.com huntmg under "Special-Opportunity \orksheets."
Sportsmen ma\ appl\ for these permits at vw\wv\ .ildlifelicense.
con. by calling 1-888-HUN T-FLCORID.- (486-8356). at county
tax collectors' offices or license agents.
The cost for the permit is $35. which entitles one adult and
one southh (under age 16t to hunt together, but allows only one
daily\ bag limit of birds to be harvested between them.
Permits are available for the follow' ng special-opportunit
public dove fields: Allapanah Flats (Martin County 25 dail\-
use permits). Brown Farm (Holmes County 12 daily-use
permits)i Cara\elle Ranch (Putnam County 40 daily-use
permits. Combs Farm (Baker County 10 daily-use pennits).
Frog Pond (Dade County 37 daily-use permits). Fussell Farm
(Polk County 12 daily-use permits). and North Newberrm
(Alachua County 17 daily-use permits).
Sportsmen also have the option of buying a $10 Youth Permit
at the same time they purchase a Dove Hunt Permit. This entitles
the youth (under age 16), while hunting under the supervision
of the adult permit holder, to harvest his own daily bag limit
of birds.
"These special-opportunity dove fields are planted and
managed by the FWC and offer great hunting opportunities in
a friendly, social atmosphere that provides the perfect setting
for friends and family, including youngsters, to hunt together."
said Kurt Hodges. FWC small-game biologist.
Beginning Oct. 5, up-to-date information on field conditions
and bird numbers will be a\ ailable by visiting the Dove Hunter's
Hotline at MyFWC.comnspecial.'dove.
Foi more inorination on hoiw you and.i'our flmi/i can gel
involved in these unique special-opportunitn dove hunts. vis. l
A 'F C.c oin special dove.



Roundman's


Featuring
The Last Ride

IVA


Thursday Night Special
8:30 p.m. 12:30
eDraft Beer $


I


$5 per person
18 to enter 21 to drink


1


CLAY O'NEAL'S

Land Clearing & Fencing
*Dozer and Excavation work
Demolition '.Pond Digging
SRoad Building Field Fence
r Barbed Wire Tractor Work
Cla O'NealOver 15 years experience
4433 NW County Road 274 (850)762-9402
SAltha, Fl32421 Cell (850) 832-5055 ,


Bac aw'. fB iE Must show IDsfft
Back at Roundman s U......
Brad, Randy Sric and Tony .l-!
Located 5 miles north of Blountstown on Hwy. 69




IEI D1EI]

Over the past several years some of our
SPREADER BUGGIES have gone missing.
A reward will be paid to whoever provides
information leading to the return of these
buggies. There are 3 different manufactures:
Newton-Crouch, Adams and Chandler.
These are stainless steel fertilizer buggies
designed to hold about 4 tons of fertilizer.
PLEASE CALL:
ALTHA FARMER'S CO-OP
850-762-3161 or the
CALHOUN COUNTY SHERIFF'S DEPT.
850-674-5049 ,!I,


--,31,T








Page 32 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 10, 2008


Drive one.


Ford brand makes significant quality gains -
According to the .D. Power and Associates
2008 Initial Quality Study, Ford vehicles
increased in quality at a faster rate than the
industry average.


I~1 'I


S 11 4k,


in$1414th


flu


w =I

~iL 4 CyL, 5 Spd-


uSHP ....*1 7,7ss
ichipla Fordi sOatS ... ....*260
uam Caseom cah ... 99a *

now *14,995w


Satellite Radio. Power Pkg.
A Cruse #*&"8


hipetk FuFOrdfiscE f net .-------67
For* Mredit Cask ... *50
adeai~poacustmwwcash tbia

Now $1 5,495
J-0. Power say% Ford Focus is most improved -Th 20WABdonuofiva Perfbrmance, ecerian and
..sycn APEAL Stbrd tJ POD o and Rm ssncisaias nosed the, Foc..gs gained a 88 rde pck- aver
,istyeat Tre Ford tEscape aLso cread a Wot amang rhe rap IQ mamo ngrripm w %,en.U E 1.1 W6 Flrcj"
---- f T1110 I



COnverienCe Pkg, Tow Pkg.,
__ __ _#M Sy#8


- ------------aif

Chrome Bumpers, AC, Cruise,
Trailer Tow, V6, #8321


u sHM... .*0,430
ChipeMa Fo~Mad scont .......*40
Ford sCet etaU Cash- ....* 000
- Retani Castemer Cash .... -- 500

nMow 15,49
Imp-
mnu'~ ~4g


4 -yA-uto., PW PDL,

4 Cyl, Auto.,PW, PDL.
Cruise #9107


afef FdDihcm .... .880
Ford Cmedt SOME Cash ....S'1 000
Reftaff emm cash ... i,50

Now w *17 ING


a9rj .p = = ,.1 j i mI
Leather;, Moonroof, Reverse
Sensing, #8139


MSHP.. -*27,57S
Ford Bescaast .....s*1,80
Fard credit eoBS Casi o .. o
Betai thaumr atel .-.*4t00
Retat dealer Cash .... .*OO
Agiin te.ry Banms Cash . 3.s,000
NOW $2 1.495


iLeather, Mioonroo f. Rear
^B_ EinterztaiHnr menst, Utimarate Pkg,
#.8266


SMIEP ... .. 5,900
Chipola Ford Discount... .... ,405
Ford Credit Bonus Cash ...... 500
P Retail Customer Gash . .. .1SO
"F Retail Owner Loyalty .... .2,000

NOW $29.495.


fIEW 0 8 FORD F. ISOr P i
LA IA "D-___


~9 I


u- 10


*M=P -033,950
Fod Ihf I.....1,45S
Forwd &M BRUN Ch ....... SSW
I- RS9aII c..na aerses .,..,IW
AW IWmetry Bomm Cashb .3000

NOW $26,495%


King Ranch, Moonroof, 20"
h.-a Wheels, Sprayed In Liner, 4X4,
Miim Loaded. #8164


Snsap ....42S
Chipola Ford Discn .....*4000
Ford Cedit Bs Cash ....."1,000
e Btai CEustor Cash ... .83,00
'Age IruentryB -usash .... O,000
NOW *31.495


r 10 T --T CC-~R p -= F-~ 0 3- U- JE


429Cr-I
Sell~c


I -- I Is- - -~---- I----IL II- I I


I9


WIVSY1


wwuc, ChIP04aford. coati


RIC=K BARNES, SALlES MANAGER




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