Group Title: Calhoun-Liberty Journal (Bristol, Fla.).
Title: The Calhoun-Liberty journal
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00027796/00115
 Material Information
Title: The Calhoun-Liberty journal
Alternate Title: Calhoun Liberty journal
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Calhoun-Liberty Journal
Publisher: Liberty Journal, Inc.
Liberty Journal
Place of Publication: Bristol, Fla
Publication Date: September 3, 2008
Copyright Date: 2008
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Bristol (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Liberty County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Calhoun County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Liberty -- Bristol
Coordinates: 30.426944 x -84.979167 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in Sept. 1991.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 11, no. 38 (Sept. 18, 1991).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00027796
Volume ID: VID00115
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AKN4565
oclc - 33425067
alephbibnum - 002046630
electronic_aleph - 003298625
electronic_oclc - 60662266
lccn - sn 95047245
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly journal (Bristol, Fla.)

Full Text
Urnv of Florida History Library
PO Box 117007
Galnesvllle Fl 32611


82 11/6/2009
1846


A PAGE TO
THE PAST
TRAVELS WITH JOHN
HOSFORD'S GHOST
A writer's fascination
with John Hosford
began when he read a
bundle of Civil War letters
wrapped in a faded blue
ribbon that had been
sent to his grandmother.
PAGE 9

Vendors sought for
22nd Annual Goat
Day next month
PAGE 4

Liberty County
agencies to share
over $7,500 in funds
PAGE 8

SPEAK UP!
Letter writers take two
very different views on
hunting and conservation
PAGE 15

Tips on attracting
hummingbirds to
your garden
PAGE 25


50"
includes
tax


THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY



JOURNAL


Volume 28, Number 36


g e Wednesday, Sept. 3, 2008


SHUTOUT
The cross-river rivalry between the Liberty
County Bulldogs and the Blountstown Tigers
ended with a 20-0 shutout by the visiting
Tigers on the field in Bristol during Friday's
pre-season game. ABOVE: Bulldog Joseph
Brinkley hangs on tight as Blountstown's ball
carrier tries to move forward. LEFT: Jordan
McCray clutches the ball as he tries to outrun
a Tiger in pursuit. See page 16 & 17 for more
on the game.


Liberty incumbents do well in Primary; General Election set for Nov. 4


by Teresa Eubanks, Journal Editor
Once again, Liberty County led the state in voter
turnout with 72.18 percent of the county's 4,260 reg-
istered voters casting their ballots.
Election night was a good _one for incumbents,
with Clerk of Court Robert Hill, Property Appraiser
Patricia Whitfield, District 1 County Commissioner
Albert "Butch" Butcher, District 3 County Com-
missioner Jim Johnson and District 2 School Board


member Tommy Duggar all winning re-election.
Sue Summers defeated two opponents to secure
the job of Superintendent of Schools.
Kevin Williams topped a field of five candidates to
win the District 5 seat on the Liberty County Com-
mission.
Three more local races will be decided in the Gen-
eral Election on Nov. 4.
*After winning the first round at the ballot box,


Donnie Conyers will face Jimmy Faircloth and Nick
Finch.
*In the race for Tax Collector, Marie Goodman
will face Teddy Eubanks.
*Incumbent James Flowers will be in a runoff with
Logan Kever for the District 1 School Board seat.
An election-day error at the Telogia precinct
caused some consternation among voters when three
See ELECTIONS continued on page 3


- ................ "-


SPELL

IT OUT!
Students at Tolar
School in Bristol
gathered on the
field to spell out
the school's name
during Friday's all
day celebration,
held to mark their
designation as a "A"
school.


l 1111111 11 Sheriff's Log...2 Community Calendar...4 Commentary....6,7 News from the Pews... 10 Farmers Almanac...10
7 082 090 Birthdays...12 Liberty Senior Citizens schedule...14 Schools...19 thru 21 Obituaries...23 Classifieds...26 & 27


Volume 28, Number 36








Page 2 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 3, 2008


Third set of Cold Case playing cards unveiled


TALLAHASSEE -- The
Florida Department of Law
Enforcement (FDLE), Department
of Corrections (DC), the Attorney
General's Office, and the Florida
Association of Crime Stoppers
again teamed up with Florida
sheriffs and police chiefs to create
a new deck of statewide cold
case playing cards. The third
edition features 52 of Florida's
unsolved homicide and missing
person cases. The decks will be
distributed to inmates in all 67
county jails and to supervised
offenders reporting in through the
state's 156 probation offices. Each
card features a photograph of the
victim and factual information
about the case.
"This is a creative and well-
crafted approach to investigating
some of Florida's toughest
cases," said FDLE Commissioner
Gerald Bailey. "I'm proud of
the collaboration between law
enforcement agencies to put this
program in place. It's worked
before and we're betting it will
work again."
There are approximately
65,000 inmates in the state's
county jails and 141,000
supervised offenders serving on
state probation. By distributing
the cold case playing cards to
offenders, law enforcement will
reach thousands of potential
sources who may be able to
provide critical information about.
an unsolved case. Printing for
the third edition deck was funded
through federal grant monies.
"We've already had two
inmates come forward with
information that solved crimes in
response to the Cold Case Cards


initiative and I anticipate some
of our offenders on community
supervision will do so as well. I
applaud this joint effort among
law enforcement agencies and
pledge to help in any way we can
to assist in solving these unsolved
crimes," said DC Secretary Walter
McNeil.
"These cards have been
immensely successful in
generating tips and two cases
have been solved, bringing
closure to the victims' families
and friends," said Attorney
General Bill McCollum. "The
Attorney General's Office
welcomes the opportunity to
collaborate with our corrections
and law enforcement partners,
particularly on such a creative
and important initiative."
A toll-free number for Crime
Stoppers is listed on each card
and offenders in county jail
facilities will be given access
to a phone in order to call in
information. As with all Crime
Stoppers initiatives, no identifying
information is obtained from the
callers they are free to remain
anonymous.
"The issuing of the third
edition of cold case playing cards
is a testimony to the success of
this program. Distributing these
to the thousands of inmates
within the jails and corrections,
facilities in our state exposes the
cases to an audience of people
most likely to have come in
contact with these individuals,",
.said Okaloosa County Sheriff
Charlie Morris, President of the
Florida Sheriffs Association.
"This will provide an excellent
source of information to help law


enforcement solve crimes. The
Florida Sheriffs Association is
proud to be a part of supporting
this effort."
The idea for cold case playing
cards originated in 2005 with
the Polk County Cold Case
Assessment Team who developed
a deck of unsolved cold cases
from the local area and distributed
them in the Polk County Jail.
Within months, an inmate tip
led to arrests in an unsolved
murder. In July 2007, Florida
developed two statewide decks
of cards which were distributed
to 93,000 inmates in 129 state
prison facilities, Two.murder
cases were solved as a result
of the statewide decks (James
Foote and Ingrid Lugo) and tips
from the cards continue to be
received regularly. The first and
second edition statewide decks
were funded through the Crime
Stoppers Trust Fund which is
administered by the Attorney
General.,
Florida was the first to develop
a deck of statewide cold case
cards and distribute them in the
state prison system. Since then,
the concept has been replicated by
law enforcement and correctional
agencies across the country and
internationally. At least 13 other
local jurisdictions in Florida have
developed local decks of cold
case playing cards in conjunction
with Crime Stoppers. '
To learn more about the Cold Case
Playing Cards initiative and to view
cards from each of the three editions,
please visit wwwfdle.state.f.us/OSI/
unsolved. The public can purchase
cards through Priority Marketing at
www.prioritymarketihg:com.


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CALHOUN COUNTY
August 21
*Albert Milton, trespass after warning, VOCR.
August 25
*Danielle Alexis Fage, violation county proba-
tion.
August 26
*Josie Kilby, VOSP.
*Adman White, criminal mischief.
*Joseph Cecil Reeder, VOP state.
*Pennie Laine Renfroe, VOP county.
*Anthony Blackburn, VOCP.
August 27
*Alphonso Robert Hayines, VOSS warrant.
*Henry D. Fain, driving while license suspended
or revoked with knowledge.
August 28
*Angela Surrency, VOSS.
*James Kirkland, VOSP.
*Thomas Kowcun, FTA, fraudulent use of ID
card.
*Dionne Marie Smith, writ of attachment (3
times).
August 29
*Clifford Edenfield, assault, battery.
*Shelton Vanover, driving while license sus-
pended or revoked with knowledge (3rd time).
*William Jason Mills, battery on law enforce-
ment officer, resisting with violence, disorderly
intoxication.
*Kelli Odom, VOSS, VOCP
*Luis Roman-Reyes, no valid driver license,
DUI.
August 31
*Jannie Lou Yon, disorderly intoxication, resist-
ing without violence.
*Curtis David Strickland, VOP.
*Christopher Tim Mercer, driving under the influ-
ence with property damage.


LIBERTY COUNTY
August 23
*Joseph Bracewell, VOP state.
August 26
*Rocky Lee Bryum, writ of attachment.
*Josie Kilby, holding for CCSO.
August 28
*Jacob Tyler Todd, burglary, false imprisonment,
impairing or impeding a telephone to a dwelling,
battery.
*Angela Renee Surrency, holding for CCSO.
*Dionne Smith, holding for CCSO.
August 29
*Steven Shiver, dealing in stolen property, petty
theft.
*Jackie Dale Kelley, warrants, Jackson County.
*Joshua Best, driving under thee influence, pos-
session of less than 20 grams.
August 30
*Jonella Dee Smith, driving under the influ-
ence.
*Jeania Louise Oliver, domestic violence.
*Juan Raymond Nava, domestic violence.
August 31
*Janie Lou Yon, holding for CCSO.
*Josh Daniel Davis, driving under the influ-
ence.
Listings include name followedbychargeandidentificationofarresting agency. The names above represent
those charged. We remind our readers that all are presumed innocent until proven guilty
Blountstown Police Dept.
August 23 through August 31, 2008 .
Citations issued:
Accidents............... 01 Traffic Citations.................. 03
Special details (business escorts, traffic details)......82
Business alarms.....02 Residential alarms..........01
Com plaints......................... ........... .................. 134








SEPTEMBER 3,2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 3


Price-gouging hotline remains

open for Tropical Storm Hanna


TALLAHASSEE -- Flori-
da Agriculture and Consum-
er Services Commissioner
Charles H. Bronson today re-
minded state residents that his
department's price-gouging
hotline, which was activated
two weeks ago for Tropi-
cal Storm Fay, remains op-
erational for the approaching
Tropical Storm Hanna.
"We're encouraging the
public to report to us any in-
stances of price-gouging that
they come across," Bronson
said.
Under Florida law, it is
unlawful to charge exorbi-


TALLAHASSEE, FL.- At-
torney General Bill McCollum
announced that his Economic
Crimes Division has obtained
a settlement which may be
worth more than $250,000
with two Utah website mar-
keters, resolving allegations
the companies used deceptive
practices to get consumers to
buy expensive website-cre-
ation products and services.
StoresOnline, Inc., and its par-
ent company, iMergent, Inc.,
must change their marketing
practices and. make refunds
to more than 150 Florida con-
sumers who filed complaints
about the companies.
The companies must also
make refunds to Floridians
who complain about them
within the next 18 months.
Consumers had complained


tant or excessive prices for
essential items -- including
shelter, gasoline, food, wa-
ter, ice, generators or lumber
-- following the declaration of
an emergency, unless the in-
creases in the amount charged
are attributable to additional
costs incurred by retailers.
Governor Charlie Crist de-
clared a state of emergency
for Fay last month, and he
signed another executive or-
der earlier today designating
that a state of emergency ex-
ists for Hanna.
Individuals or businesses
. found to have engaged in


to the Attorney General's Of-
fice and other agencies that
StoresOnline and iMergent's
products which are sold at
promotional seminars in Flor-
ida, other states and interna-
tionally were often impos-
sible to use and that promised
technical assistance was only
available for thousands of
dollars in extra charges.
Consumers also said
that, despite the companies'
claims, they were not able to
find business partners whose
goods they could sell on web-
sites.
Under the recent settle-
ment, StoresOnline and iM-
ergent are prohibited from
claiming that their products
are easy to use.
The companies will also
have to disclose that techni-


price-gouging face fines of up
to $1,000 per violation, or up
to a maximum fine of $25,000.
a day.
"We're asking consumers to
come forward and let us know
if any retailers have exploited
our citizens or are profiteering
from the approaching storm,"
Bronson said. "This activity
is not only reprehensible, it's
illegal."
- Bronson is asking residents who
have any evidence that price-goug-
ing has occurred or is occurring to
report it at once to his department's
toll-free hotline at 1-800-HELPFLA-


(1-800-435-7352).


cal assistance may be c
and that neither company
help customers find bus
partners.
These limitations must
be provided in written v
ings to Florida consu
who want to buy the coi
nips' products.
In addition to consi
restitution and altered
ness practices, StoresO:
and iMergent will reimi
the state $125,000 in fees
costs.
Florida consumers
believe they were victim
by StoresOnline and iMei
and want to request a re
may contact the Atto
General's Office toll-fre
1-866-966-7226 or may
tact the Office online at h
myfloridalegal. com/conta


Democrats were handed Republican ballots to fill out.
One of those voters was the wife of Democratic candidate
Eddie Joe White.
"The error was caught and they corrected it before the bal-
lots were run through the tabulator," said Liberty County Elec-
tions Supervisor Marcia Wood. "The clerk there had just fin-
ished using the first pad of 25 Democratic ballots. When she
reached down to get another pad, she accidentally picked up a
Republican pad. She issued three ballots from that pad and the
voters immediately caught it."
She said the first ballots were put in a spoiled ballot enve-
lope, the correct ballots were then issued and filled out before
being added to the others to be tallied.
"They were all able to redo their votes," Wood said.


Calhoun County Elections Supervisor Margie Laramore
said 50.99 percent of Calhoun County's 8,429 registered vot-
nS ers took part in the Aug. 26 Primary.
^h Don Miller won the District 3 seat on the Calhoun County
h Commission, while many other offices are facing runoffs or
non-Democratic candidates in the Nov. 4 General Election.
*Incumbent Clerk of Court Ruth Attaway will face former
costly clerk Willie D. Wise.
will *Calhoun County Sheriff David Tatum will face former
iness sheriff William "Buddy" Smith and Michael Carpenter.
*After overcoming incumbent Doris Burkett in the Tax Col-
also lector's race, Becky Tricky Smith will go up against Kenneth
arn- "Shep" Sheppard and Royce Gene Wise.
mers *Incumbent School Superintendent Mary Sue Neves will
mpa- face former school superintendent Wilson "Tommy" McClel-
lan and Jimmy D. Marshall.
nimer -*Incumbent Elections Supervisor Margie Laramore will
busi- meet opponent Roy Youl Pickron on the ballot.
nine
*Incumbent Danny Ray Wise will join Cecil Ray Cochran
burse
s and on the ballot in the race for the District 1 County Commission
seat.
who 'Harold Pickron will face Tammy S. Rushing on the ballot
nized for the District 5 County Commission seat.
urgent *Incumbent Grant Williams will be in a runoff with Danny
'fund Ryals for the District 1 School Board seat.
)rney 'Kenneth Speights and Thaddeus Simmons will be in a run-
>e at off for the District 4 School Board spot.
con- Due to delays at the polls last week, the precinct-by-precinct
ttp:// breakdown was unavailable by press time. The information
act. appears on Page 29 of this week's issue.


The Medical Center

OF BLOUNTSTOWN
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Board Certified ...


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Call us today to get your appointment scheduled.
We are PPO providers for BCBS, United Healthcare & Cigna
Also accept Vista, Healthease, Medicare & Medicaid
Walk-ins are welcome!! Now accepting VISA & MASTERCARD


Consumer restitution available for nearly 200 affected Floridiai

Attorney General reaches settlement wit

Website marketer for deceptive practices.


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Page 4 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 3, 2008


'Sew Much Fun Day'

to be held Sept. 13

at Leon Co. Library
Are you a sewing enthusiast? Do you
want to learn new sewing techniques?
Are you interested in short-term sewing
projects? If you answer yes to any of
these questions, then the third annual
Sew Much Fun Day is designed just
for you. In conjunction with National
Sewing Month, the Tallahassee Chapter
of the American Sewing Guild will be
celebrating its members' love of sewing
on Saturday, September 13 at the Leon
County Library Dow% ntow% n Branch from
10:30am to 2:30 p.m. in Librarn Room
A.
ASG is a non-profit organization
founded in 1978 to promote and present e
the art of se ting and to pro\ ide a support
organization for se%% ing enthusiasts. The
Tallahassee Chapter is comprised of
,\omen of all ages, all levels of seeing
skills, and all forms of se, ingt interests,
including wedding gown construction,
pattern design, embroidery art, clothing
creation, and community ser\ ice sew% ing.
Chapter meetings ma\ consist of sew ing,
lecture, or demonstration but ali a\ s \ill
include fun!
Sex' Much Fun Day \ ill incorporate
all aspects of the monthly meetings.
The day will begin with a lecture
demonstration at 10:45 by Lynn Griffith
of The Bernina Connection. Another
sewing professional. Nancy Holland,
FSLi adjunct professor in the Apparel
Design program % ill present at 1:15
Throughout the daN, ASG members will
share their machine embroidery skills and
secrets on different makes of machines.
A member w ill share her expertise
w ith a serger. Demonstrations ,\ ill also
be presented on making pillowcases
and hobo bags, and whxtateter else the
sewist ants to w ork on during Sewx
Nlluch Fun Da\. Comintuniui service
projects wheelchair caddies, pediatric
surgery dolls, adult bibs will be on
display Nlembers will also display\
variouss sew ing projects the\ ha\ c
completed perhaps "green" ,e\'wing
items, lace bookmarks, fabric bow-lIs.
quilted jean jackets. grandchildren's
clothing, pillowk cases the possibilities
are endless
Nlaik your calendar foi this exciting
e'ent and help celebrate National
Sev\ inc Month w ith vw omen w ho lo\ e to
se"w and desire to enhance se\ ing as an
art form and life skill. Pre-reristration
is not required, simply stop b\ the open
house and perhaps \win one of the door
prizes.

CALENDAR LISTING -Just call in the per-
son's name and their birthday to be listed on
our weekly community calendar. There is no
charge. Callers are asked to give their own
name and phone number in case we need to
verity a spelling or double-check the date. We
encourage our readers to compile a list of their
family's and friends' birthdays, printed clearly.
and mail or fax them to us at The Journal.

The Calhoun-Uberty Journal is
published each Wednesday
by the Liberty Journal Inc.,
Summers Road, P.O. Box 536,
Bristol, FL 32321.
Annual subscriptions are $18.
Periodicals postage paid at Bristol, FL
POSTMASTER: Send address corrections
to: P.O. Box 536, Bristol, FL 32321.


Featuring Eas CompanTy iith Joel Hathai-ay and more'

Dance, 6 12p m.. American Legion Hall in Blountstown
TODAY'S MEETINGS
AmVets. 6 p.m., AmVels Posi 2073

BIRTHDAYS
Grandparents -_

, a,: " TODAY'S MEETINGS
i American Legion Post 272, 2 p.m Ladies Auxiliary 2
pm Sons of the American Legion. 3 p m. all i me-t
ail Ihe Arneril:ar Legion Hall in Blounisiown


TODAY'S MEETINGS
Walk-A-Weigh Program, 9 a m Veler.anir Mer--ornal Park Cl,: Cenler
Altha Boy Scouts. 5 30 p m Altha Volunieer Fir- Deparnmeni
Keep Calhoun Co. Beautiful Inc., 9 a m od rm ol the Cal Co Evi office
Citizens Advisory Council for Big Bend Hospice 11 30 a r Apal crhee Re-i
Blountstown Lions Club. 6 p.m Apalacnhe- Reslaurani
Bristol City Council 6 30 p.m City Hall
AA 6:30 p m., Liberiv Co Courriouse twesi side enirancei
Hosford Neighborhood Watch, 7 p pm. Corinth Baptist Cnurch Fellowship Hall
Bulldog Club., 7 p.m LCHS held house
Red Level Lodge #134, 7 p.m.. 5602 Alliance Rd. Marianna


TODAY'S MEETINGS
Altha Park Committee, 4:30 p.m., Alina Town Hall
Calhoun Co. School Board. 5 p m., Calhoun Courthouse
Liberty County School Board. 5 p.m.. Lib. Ed. and Admin Cir in the hlrary
Calhoun County Girl Scout Troop 579, 5:30-7 p m.. W.T. Neal Cwic Center
Altha Town Council, 6 p.m., City Hall
Blountstown City Council. 6 p.m.
AA. 6:30 p.m.. Liberty Co Courinouse iwesi side entrance)
Boy Scout Troop 206. 7 p.m.. Veterans Memorial Park Civic Center
Blountstown Chapter #179 O.E.S., 7 p m.. Dixie Lodge
Bristol Lions Club, 7 p.m Apalachee Restaurant
Bristol VFD. 7:30 p.m, Bristol City Hall


THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL


Located at 11493 NW Summers Road in Bristol
MAILING ADDRESS: P.O. Box 536, Bristol, FL 32321
TELEPHONE (850) 643-3333 Fax (850) 643-3334.
EMAIL: thejournal@fairpoint.net


(USPS 012367)
Summers Road


-Fz---vWt4 .TY

CALENDAR


-


BIRTHDAYS
JacoIb 6ew
TODAY'S MEETINGS
* Rotary Club, noon, Calhoun-Liberty Hospital
* Weight Loss Support Group, 1:30 p.m., Shelton Park Library
* AA, 7 p.m., Calhoun County Old Ag Bldg. east door, in front of jail


BIRTHDAYS
-elen farklns
TODAY'S MEETINGS
* Magnolia VFD. 6 p.rrm Fire House
* Nettle Ridge FD, 7 p.m Fire House
* Mossy Pond VFD. 7 p.m.. Fire House
* AA. 7 p.m baseenit ol Caimoun County Counhrouse . .


EVENTS
Dance, 6 12 p m., American Legion Hall in Blounisloin
L(HS Dags vs. Gracetille a B-town Tiiers %s. Marianna
-Wia at pm iETi ATar a.t "'i) pm iCTi
TODAY'S MEETINGS
* Autism Support Group 6 p.m, W.T Neal Civic Center


BIRTHDAYS
\'irovt i ia '
EVENTS
Florida Panhandle Saddle Club Show
12 p.m., Sam Atkins Park

Cane Grinders Opry
5:30 p.m Panhandle Pioneer SeHlement


Goat Day to be held

Saturday, Oct. 18 at

Pioneer Settlement
Blountstown Rotary Club members
are gearing up for the 22nd Annual Goat
Day festival and the search is on for
additional vendors. The event is set for
Saturday, Oct. 18, from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.
at Sam Atkins Park.
If you are an artisan, craftsperson, or
create a delicious food item, this is the
year to join the Goat Day festivities.
In addition to arts, crafts and food, the
Goat Day celebration features games
for all ages. tours of the Panhandle
Pioneer Settlement. demonstrations
of old time traditions, and a variery of
entertainment.
To obtain a vendor application, go to
\ xv x\.blounitsto\, nrotary.com or contact
Angie Hill at 447-0336 or 674-9191.

LCHS Class of '98

money due Sept. 5
The Class of 1998 10 year reunion for
L ibertr Countr High School is scheduled
for Sept. 26-27.
We \\ ill be attending the homecoming
game on Fnda\. Sept. 26 and on Saturda\,
Aug. 27 from II a.m.-I p.m. \\e are
ha% ing a picnic for the class of '98 and
their kids. We will be going on The Lads
Anderson Dinner Cruise on Saturday
night for adults and couples. The price
is i50 per person.
If you intend to participate in the
class reunion activities money must be
paid by Sept 5. Please make checks
payable to LCHS Class of 1998 and mail
to Stephanie Roberts. P.O. Box 1081.
Bristol, FL 32321.


Faircloth family

reunion on Oct. 11
Friends and relatives of the late
Demps\ Faircloth and his decendents
%\ill hold their 34th annual reunion
on Sarurda\. (X t. 11. It %\ill be at Pat
Thomas Park in QOuinc. Lunch %11i
be served at 12:31. p m. after a short
business meeting at 12 p.m.
Those attending are asked to biiini
a covered dish basket lunch as \kell as
information relating to the Faircloth
history and photographs to share % ith the
group. There \ II be games for the kids'
For further information. please call
850(-627-23410.




That's how many copies of
The Calhoun-Liberty Journal
were distributed last week,
ensuring plenty of coverage for
your community announcements
and great response for our
business advertisers!


JOURNAL STAFF
Johnny Eubanks...............Publisher
Teresa Eubanks.................. Editor
Gina Brooks................Bookkeeper
Missy Tanner................Advertising
Angela Davis....Production Assistant
OFFICE HOURS: 9 a.m.- 6 p.m. M-F,
Saturday from 9 a.m. until 1 p.m.


-Ikklh
,Ooq








SEPTEMBER 3, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 5


The premier of "Living Waters:
Aquatic Preserves of Florida."
a multi-media experience of film
and photographs by Calhoun
County documentary filmaker
Elam Stoltzfus (pictured) and
photographer Clyde Butcher, is
Sept. 11 in Marianna.

*.R A-- ^ *.,
. .: :. '-.. M* ~ ^*,^-^ -- - -- ...-- *


S


, ,-:- A great place
: ---- to sit down
S i-.. and enjoy a
J nourishing
S. meal! Come
,- 2 i F, visit us
today!

12" Chocolate Chip Cookie
Plain $12.50 with nuts or decorated $15
Whole cakes and pies available rE


Living Waters premier is Sept. 11


MARIANNA-The public is
invited to the premier opening
of "Living Waters: Aquatic
Preserves of Florida," a multi-
media experience of film and
photographs, Thursday, Sept. 11,
from 6 to 9 p.m., in the Chipola
College Arts'Center.
The free evening of art,
film, music and refreshments,
will include discussions and
demonstrations by the artists.
The exhibit, which will be
on display Sept. 8 through
Oct. 10, features photography,


film and music inspired by the
Florida's natural waterways,
including a collection of 29
fine art photographic images by
Clyde Butcher, renowned Florida
Everglades photographer, and a
screening of the PBS film "Living
Waters: Aquatic Preserves of
Florida," by documentary film
maker Elam Stoltzfus.
For more than a decade,
'Stoltzfus and his Live Oak
Production Group, have captured
rare images of natural Florida,
with Living Waters winning a
coveted Crystal Reel award for
excellence. The film showcases
a dozen of the state's 41 aquatic
preserves, highlighting their
natural and cultural significance.
Michael S. Sole, Secretary
of the Florida Department of
Environmental Protection, says,
"Florida is known throughout
the world for its lush, watery
landscapes. Living Waters
emphasizes the more than two
million acres of diverse water
landscape and coastal areas that
are critical to Florida's future.
This award-winning film and
exhibit encourage us to be better
environmental citizens and gives
viewers an intimate look at the


unique 'aquatic preserves of
Florida."
Sammy Tedder, a Florida
Panhandle music legend, scored
the film, weaving sounds of
natural instruments he fashioned
from swamp reeds for flutes
and cypress logs for percussion.
Tedder also will perform at the
premier.
The traveling museum exhibit
is managed by the Office of
Coastal and Aquatic Managed
Areas, Florida Department of
Environmental Protection. The
exhibit will travel from the GTM
Reserve Environmental Education
Center in Ponte Verde Beach, FL
to Chipola and throughout the
South.
The Artists Guild of Northwest
Florida, Inc. and the Fine and
Performing Arts Department
of Chipola College have joined
together to bring this exhibit to
the Chipola Arts Center. The
exhibit is open weekdays from 8
a.m. to 3 p.m. School and civic
group visits are encouraged to
arrange group tours.
For information or to arrange
tours, contact Joan Stadsklev
at 850-718-2301 or email
stadsklevj@chipola.edu,


WRGREAT A MERIWAN
FWUE'I.ING MFEU)RATIION
Sactoedbyte meianWrslig .socato


NO ALCOHOL
OR PROFANITY
---- - -- -- -- - -- --
6. -l :


Saturday, September 6, 2008
Hosford Telogia Game Room
Entertainment Center


Bell Time 8 p.m. (ET)
All Tickets $10
Come out and see the return of GAWF Tag
Team Champions, The Hotbodies, GAWF
S Heavyweight Champ Steve Goins, Micheal
Patrick Cameron Thomas, and many more,
Check us out-www.awagawf.com We Support Our Troops


Thank You for
Your Vote and Support!

From the bottom of my heart,


Political advertisement paid for and approved by Nonpartisan for School Board District 2.


:


A reyouready


to make a











FAIRCLOTH


FOR LIBERTY COUNTY


SHERIFF
NOVEMBER 4, 2008 GENERAL ELECTION
Home: 643-2346 Cell: 508-2428

"Remember this is Your County,
Your Choice, sc t
Your Change." S0 1 ,'
Political advertisement paid for and approved by Jimmy Faircloth, no party affiliation, for Sheriff


-77-









Page 6 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 3, 2008


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VP pick a dumb decision


T his column is not about a
woman being on a presidential
ticket. I think that a qualified woman
can do as good a job as president as a
man. Women now fly fighter aircraft
in combat. The Air Force Thunder-
birds have a woman pilot. World class
aerobatic pilots are usually women,
so this column isn't about sexism.
This column is about what I think the


C ON
OR
Jerry Cox is a r
officer and writer w
background in
foreign policy issue
\Okaloosa County.


qualifications are to be president or vice president of the
United States.
Naming the governor of Alaska, Sarah Palin, a po-
litical novice as his vice presidential running mate was
political theater, a blatant suck up to social conserva-
tives. The right wing talking heads are all over television
and radio crowing about what a bold move John McCain
made by naming Palin as his vice. In my view McCain's
decision was dumb as dirt. Here's why.
John McCain is 72 years old. I'm 70 years old. I read
the obituary column every day, joking to my wife that
I'm checking to see ifI might have died and didn't know
it. To be excruciatingly serious, millions of Americans
suffer from heart disease and many don't know it. Like
it or not, if you have plaque buildup in your arteries, you
have heart disease. No surprises here, it's just part of the
aging process and the American diet.
So what happens if John McCain drops dead from
a heart attack? Well, say hello to President Palin who,
in my view, has zero qualifications to be president and
commander-in-chief.
I wouldn't be writing this column if McCain had
picked Republican Senators Kay Bailey Hutchinson of
Texas or Elizabeth Dole of North Carolina as his running
mate. These two women, like Senator Hillary Clinton,
are eminently qualified to be president.
So my angst isn't about women, it's about John Mc-
Cain's cavalier, impulsive attitude that he's boldly roll-
ing the dice, showing his maverick streak. McCain is
just like President Bush, a hip shooter who shoots first
without any thought to the unintended consequences of
his action.
The fact that McCain only had one meeting with Palin
and then picked her to be his running mate is a classic
example of impulsively shooting from the hip. McCain
will say that his staff reviewed Palin's record, but Mc-
Cain's staff isn't running for president, McCain is. Is
this an example of McCain's judgment, or lack of judg-


S ment?
S This place called America is in serious
SN ER straits. Our financial condition is precar-
ious. Not even America can continue to
retired military borrow a couple of billion dollars a day
ith an extensive
domestic and to stay afloat. With the beginning of the
es. He lives in Reagan era, the Republicans have run up
1 a national debt that is beyond imagina-
tion. Does Palin have any concept of the
enormity of the problems with America's
fiscal status? No. Her idea of fiscal reform is to veto ear-
marks. She was for the bridge to nowhere in Alaska then
against it when the issue became a political hot potato.
The Cold War with Russia is cranking up again. Rus-
sia's Prime Minister Putin is claiming that the U.S. or-
chestrated the conflict in Georgia. It doesn't matter who
started this dustup, the fact is that the U.S. is now in a
serious confrontation with a major world power.
What I read in my local paper are comments from
all the fat, old guys laid back in their La-Z-Boy rock-
ers stuffing their face with beer and chips that the U.S.
should go over there and whup up on those Russians.
Well, surprise, there is no U.S. military available to
go half way around the world to Russia's border and
whup up on anybody. The U.S. military is tied down and
ragged out in Iraq and Afghanistan. The Russians know
that the U.S. can't respond militarily, and besides, they
consider this Georgian thing to be their business. If the
U.S. was in a confrontation with Cuba would we expect
to see the Russians in Havana? The last time Russians
were in Cuba, we were on the brink of nuclear war.
What do you think that John McCain or Palin would
do if confronted with a nuclear threat as was President
Kennedy in October 1962? Have a gut reaction and hip
shoot. I hope not.
This column isn't about whether Barack Obama is a
better choice for president. I don't know if he is or not,
but he doesn't appear to be impetuous in his decision
making process as is McCain. McCain's temperament is
troubling for me. I don't think we need a president prone
to temper tantrums.
Joe Biden, Obama's pick for vice president running
mate, has 35 years experience in Washington. Many
people don't like Washington insiders, but if something
happens to Obama and Biden became president, I want
someone with some smarts to roll the dice for me and the
American people. I want an experienced gambler that
knows that the dice can come up sevens or craps.


4


*


. .







SEPTEMBER 3,2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 7


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Page 8 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 3,2008


Over $7,500 in funds will go to


agencies that serve Liberty Co.


TALLAHASSEE Liberty
County volunteers completed
the United Way of the Big Bend
(UWBB) Liberty community-
investment process recently,.
and the funds will soon be
distributed to 12 human-
service agencies that provide
services in Liberty County.
A group of knowledgeable
Liberty volunteers spent many
hours at the Liberty County
Emergency Management
Office to ensure the $7,503.11
was allocated in a fair and
unbiased manner so that these
select agencies can provide
services for local people in
need throughout the year.
The 2008 Liberty County
Agencies, their telephone
numbers and the types of
services they offer are as
follows:
The Alzheimer's Project
(386-2778 Full range of
resource services including
counseling, referral and support
groups)
American Red Cross,
Capital Area Chapter (878-
6080, Disaster, health, safety,
emergency, volunteer, youth,
military services)
America's Second Harvest
of the Big Bend (562-3033,
Provides surplus food to
the needy through nonprofit
agencies)
Big Bend Cares (656-
2437, Provides education and
comprehensive support to
people infected with or affected
by HIV/AIDS) -
Big Bend Hospice (878-
5310, Patient/family hospice
care and bereavement)
Big Brothers Big Sisters
(386-6002, Provides quality
role models to children whose


circumstances demonstrate
the need for additional adult
support)
Boy Scouts of America,
Suwanee River Area Council
(576-4146, Youth leadership
development and prevention.
programs)
Early Learning Coalition
of the Big Bend (385-0551,
Provides early learning and
school readiness programs for
children)
Elder Care Services (921-
5554, Comprehensive programs
.for senior citizens in need)
Fellowship of Christian
Athletes (383-1144, Serves
middle and high school students
and aims to teach honesty,
respect for authority, racial
harmony, selflessness, sexual
responsibility, and substance
-abuse prevention)
Office of the Public
Guardian (487-4609, Provides
guardianship services to
vulnerable or incapacitated
adults who haveno resources to
obtain a guardian to safeguard
their civil rights).
Refuge House (681-2111,
Assistance for victims of
domestic and sexual violence,
including safe shelter and 24-
hour crisis hotline).
The Liberty County
Community Investment
Team included Sue Roth and
Jeannette Vinson.
The team's agency review
process includes several
components that take time to
complete properly. Liberty
agencies or new applicants
submit an application to remain
or become a UWBB agency
for Liberty. This application
is comprised of a description
of their programs offered to


clients, numbers of clients
served in that county, how
the lives of their local, clients
changes for the better because
of their programs, budget
information on the agency, and
a list of their board of directors.
The team also studies their
budgets and hears testimonials
from clients and/or agency
volunteers. Upon completion,
they determine which agencies
and how much will be funded
for that particular year.
"It's inspiring to see these
volunteers in Liberty take time
out of their busy schedules to
go through this agency review
process," said Millie Smith,
UWBB Campaign manager
for Liberty. "This process is
critical to ensuring that these
funds are allocated properly
and make the most impact in
this county. We're very proud
of the bottom-line results these
.agencies are producing and
how they help people in need
throughout Liberty County."
For more information about
becoming a UWBB volunteer
or the agencies funded in this
process, please call Millie
Smith at 414-8825 or Arnold
McKay at 414-0844. For more
county information, please
visit UWBB online at www.
uwbb.org.


Roundman's

Thursday Night Special
Featuring 8:30 p.m. 12:30
The Last Ride Draft Beer $1


$5 per person
18 to enter 21 to drink

Back at Roundman's Iust show ID!!!!!!
Brad, Randy, Stric and Tony -.
Located 5 miles north of Blountstown on Hwy. 69



The scales of justice

could bankrupt you!



,, i ', i t r,' ,,uc'J I1i1 l, .1- 1,1ur 1 -ul' V tLi M t

V1.
u, rfId, n*Vin 1 v>-' 'll [A 'v.In JL./e o . "' .
ohi' l.t-. rll- .\' r 'rle'cm"'. ':
)-1us' in- u mbrLll.1 rruL i prto i-e on


Insuronc' 'mnir,in . '--. 'V

auto-Owners Insurance 'I
L , ..... !t ,
n..v ---

STOUTAMIRE INSURANCE INC.
16783 SE Pear St., Blountstown
Contact Bill Stoutamire
Phone 674-5974 Fax 674-8307


Chipola College to host workshop

on children's disabilities Sept. 16
MARIANNA-The Chipola College Teacher Education
department will host a workshop entitled, "Understanding Your
Child's Disability," Tuesday, Sept. 16, from 5:30 to 7 p.m. in Jackson
Hall of Building Z.
The presenter is Ashley Hudson of the Florida Network. The
workshop will cover a variety of disabilities covered by the IDEA
(Individuals with Disabilities Education Act), as well as advocacy
issues for parents. The public is invited to attend.
For information, call Chipola education instructor Tina Renaud at
526-2761, Ext, 3336.

Firearms course set Sept. 15-18
1MARIANNA-Chipola College Public Service will hold a 16-hour
Firearms Familiarization course Sept. 15-18 at the Reddoch Firing
Range on the Blue Springs Highway.
Successful completion of the course may be used in applying for
a Concealed Weapons Permit.
The 16-hour course will meet from 5:30 to 9:30 p.m. Monday
through Thursday.
Pre-registration and payment of the $60 fee is due prior to the first
class meeting. Registration forms are available at the front desk of
the Public Service Building.
For information, call Doris Williams at (850) 718-2394 or e-mail
williamsd@chipola.edu.








SEPTEMBER 3, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 9


About the writer:

David Morrill
This article at right, written
and copyrighted by David
Morrill, was first published
in an editor friend's Ashland,
Oregon Daily Tidings newspaper
and subsequently appeared in
about two dozen newspapers
in Northern California, Oregon
and Washington. For about ten
years, Morrill has received emails
and other correspondence about
"Hosford's Ghost" from across
the nation. In August 2008 he
gave permission to reprint it
in Heritage Book and in the
Calhoun Liberty Journal. .
Morrill, a California native,
spent most of his life in North
Florida.
Morrill's connections to the
Hosfords comes through the
Sealeys, his mother being Sarah
Sealey Morrill. His grandfather
was Romero Sealey, son of Laura
Rich to whom John Hosford's
letters were written. Romero
Sealey was an educator who
founded the Florida Education
Association.

Constitution Day
luncheon planned
by DAR Sept. 13
President Bush, Governor
Crist, and mayors from across
Florida have issued proclamations
making Sept. 17-23, Constitution
Week. Chipola Chapter, NSDAR
has obtained 2008 Constitution
Week proclamations from several
panhandle mayors including
Blountstown Mayor Winston
Deason and Altha Mayor Wes
Johnston.
The tradition of celebrating
the Constitution was started in
1890 by the Daughters of the
American Revolution (DAR) In
1955 the Daughters petitioned
Congress to set aside Sept. 17-
23 annually to be dedicated for
the observance of Constitution
Week. The resolution was later
adopted by the U.S. Congress
and signed into Public Law #915
on August 2, 1956 by President
Dwight D. Eisenhower.
Constitution Week has been
observed by Chipola Chapter,
NSDAR since the chapter was
founded in October 1958. This
year the Chipola Daughters
will be joined by the William
Dunaway Chapter, SAR and
Blue Springs Society, C.A.R.
for the annual Constitution Day
luncheon on Saturday, Sept. 13th
at MacKinnon Hall of St. Luke's
Episcopal Church in Marianna.
Noted historian Dale Cox will be
available at 11 a.m. to sign copies
of his new History of Jackson
County, Florida: Volume One.
The meeting will begin at 11:30
a.m. Mildred Barfield, Pastor
of the Assembly of God Church
of Alford, will speak on "Not
Without Sacrifice." Visitors are
welcome at the Dutch treat event
and must contact snoopyxii60@
hotmail.com or Regent Dorcas
Jackson (850) 579-2103 for
reservations.


84 1


Travels with John Hosford's ghost


by David Morrill
When I make the two-
hour trip from my home in
Tallahassee to the North
Florida Gulf coast, I cannot,
escape the fact that I pass
through a territory that was
once familiar to John W.
Hosford.
The countryside, mostly
state and national forest,
probably looks much as it
did to Hosford 140 years ago.
From north to south it unfolds
from rolling hills to flat coastal
plain, from live oak and long-
leaf pine to cabbage palm,
slash pine and scrub oak. Even
the small communities along
the way, Sumatra, Carrabelle
and Magnolia Bluff, would be
familiar to him.
My fascination with
Hosford began when I was
in elementary school, when
I first handled the bundle of
Civil War letters, wrapped
in faded blue ribbon that
he wrote to my great-great
grandmother Laura Rich.
Over the years, I came
to know the contents of the


John Hosford., 4toit hire in upiifvrpn is'henlie waY a cadet
at the .MAilitarvlcadcynv ldthe Soiah. was barn in 1832.


letters in intimate detail, even
using them as a source for a college term paper. (It helped that
the letters were published in an historical journal; deciphering
the fading brown script was slow, tedious sledding.) They
were eloquent letters of formal courtship written by a man
in the most ghastly and informal of circumstances.
Although I have, through the years, found out much about
Hosford, there remain glaring gaps in the record. Unlike
my Northern ancestors, who have, in true Yankee fashion,
maintained an amply annotated, multi-branched family tree
dating to Maine in the 1680s (I know for instance, that Sarah
Elizabeth was killed by Indians, April 30, 1703, near Sanford,
Maine, as she went out to fetch a pail of water), my southern
forbearers lead me down blind alleys.
The facts about John Hosford, as I know them, are these.
He was born in Georgia in 1832 and moved to Gadsden
County (present day Liberty County), Florida prior to the
Civil War.
He signed on with Company H, Fifth Florida Infantry, and
was mustered in at Ricco's Bluff, just north ofApalachicola
in March 1862. The Florida Fifth was assigned to Robert E.
Lee's Army of Northern Virginia, and, over the next three
years, took part in some of the most grisly fighting of the war.
Hosford's letters describe the horrors of Fredericksburg,
Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Spotsylvania Court House and
Cold Harbor, among other battles.
In April 1865, after Lee's surrender, he was mustered out


This is one in a series of
features submitted for a
history and heritage book
on Liberty County. Journal
readers are ,?fited to submit
their owi flimiy photos, his-
tories and remembrancesfor
the book by contacting Family
Chairperson Vance Bateman,
Topical Chairperson Fran
Rigsby at 643-5466 or Heri-
tage Publishing Consultants at
1-800-568-1611or by e-mail
at heripubcon@aol.com.


of service at Appomattox.
Using a barrelhead for a
table, sometimes one covering
150 pounds of gunpowder,
Hosford wrote letters that tell
a terrible but very personal
story. The real enemy is
always his separation from
home and the butchery of
the war. He knows "the
pain of the families of both
Yankees and Confederates
whose boys have fallen."
He despairs at the blighted
landscape. "Cornfields are
laid waste, houses are empty,
fences are burnt, whole
towns have been vacated."
He writes of burying the
dead near Rappahannock.
"Sometimes there is only a
part of a foot, sometimes a
whole arm or half of a head."
He describes the privation
of southern soldiers as the
war dragged on. "We are all
nearly bare of clothes, some
of the boys are barefooted."
But he also describes brilliant
sunsets over the snow-crested
Virginia Blue Ridge.
Most of all, he aches for


home and Laura's company,
although, after so many months away, "those things seem
like an old sweet dream."
Several months before Appomattox, Hosford's letters stop.
Maybe there were more letters that didn't make the bundle.
Maybe Laura dispatched a Dear John letter announcing her
engagement to my great-great grandfather.
I'll never know, of course, why Laura Rich, apparently
rejected John Hosford. Maybe he was ugly. Maybe he
cracked his knuckles in public and didn't take baths. Maybe
he had no money. But such explanations are too easy.
Surely there's more to the story. Laura did, after all, keep
the letters.
Although it is surely an opinion based on insufficient
facts, and one that represents a claim for my own oblivion,
I've always thought Laura should have married Hosford.
Last year, scrolling through newly posted on-line marriage
records; I discovered that John Hosford did, indeed, join the
family. He married the sister of my great-great grandfather,
the one who married Laura Rich. This brings me some
comfort, though I'm still in the hunt for later records.
Although genealogists can probably appreciate my quest,
they would recognize me as a rank amateur. I never claimed,
however, to be anything other than a dabbler, content to
pursue my answers at a leisurely pace.
John Hosford's ghost will help me tie up loose ends in
due course.


POSTSCRIPT Liberty County Judge Kenneth L. Hosford'wrote in a 2001
letter that "John Wesley Hosford's story is a sad one. A traveling dentist pulled
an abscessed tooth in 1882 and he died of blood poisoning within 24 hours.
His widow immediately moved the family, which included five sons, back to her
home in Columbia County, Florida. The Liberty County Hosfords have almost
lost track of them over the years."
The letter continues, "Charles Hosford, a grandson of John Wesley, from
Portland, Oregon, visited his grandfather's grave at Wesley Chapel Cemetery
south of Hosford last Thanksgiving (2000). He stood there and wept. A
granddaughter of John Wesley, Dolly Hosford, age 95, of Kansas called me
recently about coming with her family this Thanksgiving. She had only heard
that her grandfather was a judge and had fought with General Robert E. Lee.
She had not heard of the letters."
Interested readers may locate the ten surviving letters ofJohn Wesley Hosford to Laura
Rich. They were published in the Florida Historical Quarterly, January 1968, under the
title "A Florida Soldier in the Army ofNorthern Virginia: The Hosford Letters. "Florida
Historial Quarterly, Volume XLVI, Number 3, pages 243-271 is the exact citation. Large
public libraries, universities and archives may have this publication.









Page 10 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 3,2008


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To all the many friends and family who came by the rehab,
called, sent flowers or food, there is no way you can know
what that means to us. We love each and every one of you.
Thank you.
To Blountstown Health and Rehabilitation and Covenant
Hospice, thank you so much for helping make Mama's last
weeks and days so much easier. The compassion and love our
family received from you was overwhelming. Again thank you
to everyone.
The family of Mildred (Granny) Brown,
Hazel and C.L. Capps, grandchildren,
great-grandchildren & great-great-grandchildren

Congratulations to Jena Rogers of Hosford who is the proud
winner of the drawing on Aug. 26 at the Courthouse for the
$300.00 gift certificate that was sponsored by the Liberty
County Senior Citizens Advisory Council. We thank everyone
who made a donation and supported this fundraiser. We also
give special thanks the Advisory Members, Betty Miles, Jewell
Dykes, Sandra Foran, Sybil Arnold, Jean Black, Myrlene
Chason and Betty Todd who gave their time to make this fund-
raiser successful.
Liberty County Senior Citizens Advisory Council


Revivals F
A B E
SPRINGS
PENTECOSTAL
HOLINES S
CHURCH Pastor Michael
. Morris and the congregation
of Abe Springs Pentecostal
Holiness Church are ready for
revival. Evangelist Chad Griggs
of Andalusia, AL will begin
revival services Sunday, Sept. 7,
at 11 a.m., 5 p.m. and nightly at
6:30 p.m. Come to be and receive
a blessing through the anointed
preaching and teaching of the


'VHoly Ghost.
For more
information,
please call
Brother Michael
Morris at (850) 762-2292.
Prayer Meetings
PRAYER BAND The
Liberty Community Prayer
Band will hold prayer service
Thursday, Sept. 4 at 7:30 p.m.
(ET) at the home of Sister Patricia
Beckwith.
Everyone is cordially invited
to attend. For more information,
call 643-3660.


Sa- SEPT. 3, WEDNESDAY Conjunction of Saturn and the
" __ Sun. First classes at U.S. Naval War College began, 1885.
S- Actress Eileen Brennan born, 1935.
- SEPT. 4, THURSDAY George Eastman received a pat-
ent for the roll-film camera, 1888. "Crocodile Hunter" Steve
Irwin died, 2006. One's blessings are not known until lost.
SEPT. 5, FRIDAY Great Fire of London ended, 1666.
Composer Johann Christian Bach born, 1735. USS Mount
h" m Vernon torpedoed by German submarine, 1918.
SEPT. 6, SATURDAY On "Yellow Day," forest fires in
Michigan caused a luminous yellow haze throughout the
Northeast, 1881.
SEPT. 7, SUNDAY Grandparents Day. First Quarter
Moon. Jupiter stationary. The Entertainment and Sports Pro-
gramming Network (ESPN) made its debut, 1979.
AEb SEPT. 8, MONDAY Moon runs low. Shaker leader Ann
MURES 1 Lee died, 1784. Roanoke, Virginia, reported a low tempera-
SU ture of 42 degrees Fahrenheit, 1988.
SEPT. 9, TUESDAY Admission Day (California). St.
McDougal Omer. Conjunction of Jupiter and the Moon. Pluto stationary.
ITY EYES Actor Hugh Grant born, 1960.


~~mu


September 1-7



First Quarter Moa



SEPTEMBER 2
ofirt da
of~aawdan


2008


Old Farmer's SEPTEMBER4,
Al aaC Best days to plant
-l m ia abovegroundcrops

SEPTEMBER&6
Best days to prune to
S encourage growth


ith the Industrial Revolution began in the United States in
came 16-hour working days. I 8x4 withaday setaside to
In America, a movement for an hunuio .ll working people, it
-8-hour day caused widespread did not become a
strikes and violence as early as federal holiday
1860, and child labor problems until 1894, when
became acute after the Civil President Grover
War. The Fair Labor Standards Cleveland signed a bill
Act of 1938 marked the begin- k declaring the first Mon-
ning of improved labor condition day in September as
Although the Labor Day tradition Labor Day,


I small loaf of French bread i lice the bread on the diagonal, making at least a
8 tablespoons basil pesto i dozen slices. Coat one side of each slice
6 large ripe tomatoes, sliced with pe to. Layer on the tomato slices,
salt an pepper, to taste eson with salt and pepper, add
1 pound fresh C^ /y/, *e r s
mozzarella, thickly sliced ? e mozzarella slices and fresh
fresh basil leaves -basil leaves, and top with a
(about 24) second piece of bread. MAKES
: 6OR MORESANDWICHES.
WIT AND WISDOM FROM THE OLD FARMER'S ALMANAC
S To get rid of garlic breath, chew on a coffee bean.
J; 0 September dries up wells or breaks down bridges.
,..j ,g [ On September 2, 1789, Congress established the
. .. United States Department oftheTreasury.
FOR RECIPES, GARDENING TIPS, AND WEATHER FORECASTS, VISIT:
Almanac.comn


a -


~. a. a.
a -


-


HID
TREA

by Ryan
HAUGH


text: -roverbs :17 /
William Foster tells of a farmer
and his son who went out to look
at his wheat field. The boy gazed
across the field and said, "See, these
must be the best ones. Their stems
are straight!"
The farmer pulled up a stalk that
was straight and a stalk that was
sagging. "See here, this stalk that
stood so straight is light-headed and
almost good for nothing, while this
that hung its head so modestly is full
of the most beautiful grain."
So it is with pride. When one is
most proud and holds his head high,
he is the one who produces the least
amount of fruit in the kingdom of
God. Pride is one of the seven things
that God hates. The scripture literally
says, "Haughty eyes." It is not just
the look, but the swelling pride in
one's heart that inspires the look that
God hates.
When we are full of pride, we
are not teachable. We tend to tune
out the conviction of the Holy Spirit
because we feel good about ourselves
and think we've done nothing wrong.
We often insist that we are right when
it makes no sense to do so. Pride is
at the bottom of all disobedience and
rebellion against God's laws.
The example of Christ's life is one
of humility. He was and is the Creator
and Sustainer of the Universe. Yet He
was born in a barn. He slept in a feed
trough. He worked as a carpenter
until He entered the ministry at age
30. He owned no home. He had no
livestock or land or other possessions
that the world considers important.
He humbled Himself to the point
of dying on a cross for sins He did
not commit. Because of His great
humility, God exalted Him above
every power and authority in the
universe. Thomas Watson once said,
"Humility is like the lead to the net,
which keeps the soul down when it
is rising through pride."


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SEPTEMBER 3,2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 11


4Pcand O pein5

Sof the River Valley Marketplace
nuCe Saturday, Sept. 6 from 8 a.m. to noon

DOWNTOWN BLOUNTSTOWN
at the Greenspace next to Wakulla Bank


Featuring... *Syrup -Honey
*Homegrown Jellies
vegetables *Sausage
*Baked Goods .fl Lemonade
*Pottery -Artwork *Plants -Clothing
*Handmade jewelry and much
*Homemade candles *Quilts more!
*Headings Family Cookbook


App~


Vendor space is free, but registration is required.
CALL 899-0500 FOR DETAILS.
Fresh Produce Handmade Crafts
Original Artwork Baked Goods
Live Entertainment .


Hayes Jackson to speak at

gardening meeting Sept. 9
Gardening Friends of the Big Bend is very happy to invite
the public to its Sept. 9 regular meeting.
Hayes Jackson, a renown speaker and southern plant expert,
known for being as entertaining as he is informative, will be
speaking at 6:30 p.m.
Jackson has been a plant enthusiast and collector since he was
old enough to say "I want (need!) one of those plants".
He is a true plantsmann", a Calhoun County ( Alabama)
Extension Agent and has a nationally recognized garden, "Lost
Palms Botanical Gardens and Bamboo Forest", in Anniston,
AL. He is friends with many of the plant gurus in the country
and frequently snoops in their treasure chests of plants, not to
mention accompanying these garden gurus on plant exploring
trips to China, Viet Nam and Thailand.
Hayes will introduce you to the collector's treasury of
incredible plants.
The topic of his presentation will be Gingers: Tropical
Treasures for Southern Gardens. The business meeting will
follow the program.
The meeting will be at the North Florida Research and
Education Center Quincy, 155 Research Rd., Quincy, FL
32351.
Due to limited space, both members and non-members need
to pre-register by Friday, September 5 by calling 850-875-7100,
Ext. 0 or by e-mailing Dr. Gary Knox at gwknox@ufl.edu or
Jill Williams at B419@aol.com.


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Page 12 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 3, 2008


-li
S

..a


SHAYLA NICOLE CARR
Shayla Nicole Carr is celebrating
her second birthday on Sept.
4. She is the daughter of Mary
Turner and Jimmy Carr, Jr. Her
grandparents are Jo Vondell
O'Bryan and the late Rev. Ronald
Jack Nichols, Anna Womble and
the late Jimmy Carr, Sr. Her
great-grandmother is Josephine
Carr. Shayla enjoys fighting
with her-sisters, Shelby and
Summer, loving on her Nana,
watching hunting and racing
with Daddy and Uncle Adam.


ETHAN BEAUCHAMP
Ethan Beauchamp will celebrate
his tenth birthday on Sept. 7.
He is the son of Kim and Chuck
Barber of Bristol and Chris
Beauchamp of Mississippi.
His grandparents are Sid and
Eileen Johnson of Bristol, Allan
and Crystal Alexander of Pass,
MI and Skip and Donna Suess
of Bristol. Ethan enjoys playing
guitar and baseball, cooking
and playing with his brother,
sister and friends.


CARTER HUDSON
RAMSEY
Carter Hudson Ramsey
celebrated his first birthday
on Aug. 23 with friends, family
and Tropical Storm Fay. He
is the son of Patrick and
Misty Ramsey of Bristol. His
grandparents are Steve and
Renee Odom of Bristol, Boggs
Ramsey of Blountstown and
Sarah Jackson of Graceville.
His great-grandparents are the
late Virginia Pitts of Clarksville,
Martha Jacobs and the late
Zebbie Odom of Bristol, Dr.
Andrew and Wisa Ramsey of
Blountstown and the late Glenn
and Edra Peacock of Marianna.
Carter enjoys being healthy,
smiling and playing with his big
brother Swayde and always
being our little angel.


Martina, Bridges to exchange vows


Alvin
and Kathy
Martina of
Apalachicola would like to
announce the engagement and
upcoming marriage of their
daughter Betty Renae Martina.
to Christopher Benarr Bridges,
son of Denise Johnson of
Bristol and Bernarr Bridges
of Altha.
Bride is the granddaughter

Rummage sale
in Quincy Sept. 6
QUINCY Come buy
furniture, exercise equipment, fine
china and more at bargain prices
this Saturday while supporting
programs for our area schools!
The Gadsden Arts Center is
hosting a runmmage sale Saturday,
September 6 from 8am-lp.m. at 9
N. Madison Street, Quincy.
All proceeds benefitthe Center's
programs for Schools:' Bates
Gallery Childrens' Exhibitions,
Artists in the Schools, Art for
Literacy, Art to the Schools, and
Youth Artist of the Month.
For information, call (850)
875-4866.


of the Late
Buddy and
Evelyn
Martina of Apalachicola
and Red and Betty Hilton of
Eastpoint.
Groom is the grandson of
the Late William and LoraAnn
Barfield of Bristol and Bruce
Bridges and the Late Quinon
Bridges of Blountstown.
The couple will exchange
vows on December 6, 2008 at
St. Patrick's Catholic Church
in Apalachicola. All friends
and family are invited.


SERVING
PERSONS
WITH gAssociation
EPILEPSY of the Big Bend

HEALT Community Education


* Diagnosis and Treatment


* Case Management
* Support Groups


I United Way of the Big Bend


1215 Lee Ave., Suite M4 Tallahassee, FL 32303
TELEPHONE (850) 222-1777


SUBSCRIBE TODAY TO


THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL



I I
I I
I NAME 1
I I

ADDRESS i


CITY STATE ZIP_____
I I

1 PHONE__
Please enclose a check or money order for $18 and mail to:

The Calhoun-Liberty Journal, P.O. Box 536,
Bristol, FL 32321
-- -- - - - - - - - - -j


A Belated
Happy 86'1
Birthday to
ONETA
LARKINS
(on Sept. 2)
T from Lavern,
Diann, William
Dean, Buzzie,
Jackie Dale, and ^
the grandchildren.


Telt 'em you saw it in
THE JOURNAL!

LIQUIDATION

LAND SALE
10 ACRE plus Tracts
From $3,995 per acre
$995 Total Down
OWNER FINANCING,
No Qualifying

Tri-land Inc.
R. E. Broker |
Phone (813) 253-3258


7
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SEPTEMBER 3,2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 13


THamIK UO

FOR YOUR SUPPORT
p ,., ...


..~.
.i....


Thc1c irc I I.) I t hit



fl.lC P M I' A I\ E I C.Alt-'l I 'A I I."[
10111 [hc I-Ith, c 1 4 ri ic bho

1 "'Al

imI'l.il (ILI! !11.11-111t-l d.Ix 1 11.-1\ c Ill


the past 8 years.
Thank you very much,
Patricia S. Whitfield
..,' .. '


"' Promote your business with an ad in
The Calhoun-Liberty Journal. We've got
something to fit everyone's budget!


U \ II
UP T


Standard I
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Internet
service

I29 I/ o
FOR YOUR FIRST SIX MONTHS


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Call 877-342-9396 before
October 31st and mention
the code at left to get this
great deal!


communications
communications


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are i- t A 9.1 ,,iT F..., Fyj. r


Store earn


money whi
MARIANNA With
help from Florida Public ] '
Utilities (FPU), the Bealls
Outlet store located in
Marianna recently learned how
conserving energy can reap
great rewards. Taking advantage
of one of FPU's Energy for
Life conservation programs,
Bealls received a rebate of more
than $1,000 after upgrading its
lighting.
The Commercial Lighting
Rebate program, which is
available to all FPU commercial
customers, provides rebates for
indoor lighting retrofits that
are energy efficient and reduce
overall wattage by a minimum
of 1,000 watts. "We're seeing
more and more businesses that
are taking steps to become more
environmentally responsible,"
said Mason Brock, FPU's energy
conservation representative.
"Bealls is leading by example
by making extensive lighting
upgrades that will not only
control energy costs but will
also make them a more "Green"
company."
As energy costs continue to
escalate and Americans become
more cognizant of global
warming, companies are finding
a real need to assess their carbon
footprint and take steps to reduce
energy usage.. Lighting is a
substantial part of a business's
energy consumption, accounting
for 30 to 35 percent of electricity
use in the commercial sector.
All business owners have been
affected by the soaring prices
of energy. Not only is gasoline
consuming profits, but businesses
are paying more to heat and
cool buildings, run machinery
and illuminate work areas. At
the same time, there is so much
competition in the marketplace
that business owners are naturally
reluctant to pass along all cost
increases to customers.
Business owners stand to reap
great savings by -implementing
energy conservation measures.
Other small steps that companies
can take now include:
Controlling lighting with
motion detectors, especially in
conference rooms, restrooms and
copy rooms.
.* Installing separate light
switches for smaller areas. Large
buildings often have dozens of
lights that are controlled by a
single switch. These lights can be
rewired so that only those that are
needed can be turned on.
Adjusting building
housekeeping and custodial
maintenance routines to .minimize
after-hours lighting.
Lowering the thermostat
to 68 degrees or less. You can
save 5 percent on heating bills
for every one degree you lower
your thermostat. For optimal
energy savings, set thermostats
at 78 degrees F for cooling in
the summer and 68 degrees F for
heating in the winter.


s rebate and saves


le conserving energy
.. .* Buying ENERGY
STAR PCs, monitors,
printers, fax machines
S and copiers.


Adjusting thermostats when
space is unoccupied.
Turning off PCs, monitors,
printers, fax machines and copiers
every night and weekend, and
when not in use or not needed.
If appropriate, using laptop
computers they consume 90
percent less energy than standard
desktop computers.


For more information, visit
www.fpuc.com, where you will
find more about energy solutions
and the factors that determine
energy efficiency. You also may
contact Mason Brock for a free
energy survey of your home or
business by calling (850) 526-
6800 or by e-mail at mbrock@
fpuc.com.


J ..nn..G H


Oglesby Plants honored

at Workforce banquet
The ChipolaRegionalWorkforce constant efforts to meet the needs
Development Board has named of employers.
Oglesby Plants International as Parthenon Health Care was
their 2007-2008 Employer of the recognized for their participation
Year for the five county region in workforce training programs
and Parthenon Health Care of as well as their willingness to
Blountstown as their Blountstown work with individuals trained
One Stop Employer of the Year. using workforce funds. One of
Oglesby was cited for the those employees was named as
company's strong commitment to a Success Story for 2007-2008.
involvement in workforce related Chris Wester of Marianna was
issues as well as the company's recognized for his ability to take
willingness to support workforce advantage of the training programs
board efforts to improve the quality offered to learn new job skills that
of workforce available throughout resulted in his current employment
the five counties served by the with Parthenon. Wester thanked
CRWDB. Oglesby participated Parthenon for giving him an
in a work experience program for opportunity to meet the economic
local educators as well as hosted needs of his family and thanked
numerous tours that helped others One-Stop staff for helping him
understand the changing Workforce get the training he needed after his
skills needed to compete in the former employer closed the factory
global marketplace. in which he worked.
Gary Hennen, President of Wester also accepted the
Oglesby Plants International, Employer of the Year Award for
accepted the award for Oglesby Parthenon.
and thanked the workforce board TheChipolaRegionalWorkforce
for their continued efforts on Development Board is a non-
behalf of employers. Hennen profit corporation providing job
said his company has enjoyed skill training and employment
their long-term relationship with services in Calhbun, Holmes,
the workforce board and thanked Jackson, Liberty and Washington
board members and staff for their Counties.

Opportunity Florida will

offer Exporting Workshops
In an effort to acquaint businesses, city and counties with the many
opportunities offered in the international market, Opportunity Florida will
host a series of workshops focused on exporting products and services.
Exporting 101 will begin by focusing on the reasons to export your
product and the basic steps one would need to take. It will greatly benefit
anyone considering moving into the international marketplace.
The sessions are scheduled for Thursday, September 25 and Friday,
October 17, at the One Stop Career Center Community Room in
Marianna, from 10:00 a.m. 12:00 Noon Central. It is possible the
location may change if a large number of responses are received. The
workshops are free of charge but we do ask that anyone attending please
let us know in advance to allow us to plan accordingly.
Please feel free to contact Susan Estes at the Opportunity Florida
office at 850-718-0453 with any questions.








Page 14 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 3,2008


Liberty County Senior Citizens September activities


Thursday, Sept. 4 -
Shopping at the Bristol Piggly
Wiggly. We will enjoy lunch
before returning home.
Thursday, Sept. 11 -
Marianna Wal-Mart shopping
and lunch. Call Liberty Transit
at 643-2524 no later than
3 p.m., Monday, Sept. 8 to
reserve your transit ride.
Monday, Sept. 15 The
Liberty County Senior Citizens
Board of Directors will meet at
7 p.m. at the Bristol Senior
Center. The public is welcome
to attend.
Thursday, Sept. 18-
Piggly Wiggly grocery
shopping and lunch. Call
Liberty Transit at 643-2524 no
later than 3 p.m., Monday, Sept.
15 to reserve your transit ride.
Thursday, Sept. 18 The


Liberty County Senior Citizens
Advisory Council will meet at
1:45 p.m. at the Bristol Senior'
Center.
Tuesday, Sept. 23 10
a.m. until 1:30 p.m. A
representative from Eye Center
South in Dothan will be at the
Bristol Senior Center located
on Highway 12 South to do
free eye health and vision
screenings. Some eye diseases
have virtually no symptoms
and left untreated, can cause
permanent blindness. Apart of
the screening is for Glaucoma;
there are many people who have
glaucoma and do not know
they have it. The representative
will also be checking visual
acuities and lens opacity and
she will have a variety of eye
health education pamphlets


to give out. Remember, this
is a free screening and'could
be very important for you.
Call Jeannette at 643-5613
for information. Call Liberty
Transit at 643-2524 no later
than 3 p.m., Friday, Sept. 19
in you need transportation the
Bristol Center.
Wednesday, Sept. 24
.-From 10 a.m. until noon at
the Maxwell Harrell Library on
Highway 12 South in Bristol,
there will be a representative
available to talk with anyone
interested in knowing about
the services that are available
through Liberty County Senior
Citizens and Liberty County
Transit.
Thursday, Sept. 25 We
have scheduled a trip for lunch
and a movie in Tallahassee or
Panama City. The decision for
which one will be made later
in the month. For information,
call Jeannette at 643-5690. To
reserve your transit ride, call
Liberty Transit at 643-2524.
no later than 3 p.m., Monday,
Sept. 22.
Thursday, Sept. 25 -
Marianna Wal-Mart shopping
and lunch. Call Liberty Transit
at 643-2524 no later than 3
p.m., Monday, Sept. 22 to
reserve your transit ride.


SN C'MON IN!

2 SUMMERLIN

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Thank you for your vote
of confidence and your
support on August 26!
Remember that all voters in District 1
(Republicans, Democrats, and Independents)
can vote for Danny Ryals for Calhoun County
School Board District 1 on November 4!
P.,r.Cd l c ,1-nrr. Tnl PA.J d i.: ,.t rn o I ..: 3 ,r4.0 l U rjn R al; H.:.',nr ,-i;. Ica S r,:1 &3r ,Tr..I l 1 .' i


Pat Barfield (right) accepts the Chipola College Career
Employee of the Year award from Chipola executive vice
president Dr. Sarah Clemmons.

Barfield is Chipola employee of the year
MARIANNA-Pat successful grant projects
Barfield has been and accreditation
named Chipola documents, hosting
College's Career / visiting committees,
Employee of the serving as an officer
Year for 2008. \ in several campus
Barfield has organizations,
worked at the i including a term as
college since 1988, president of Chipola's
starting-as Switchboard chapter of Florida
Operator. She currently serves as Association of Community
a Staff Assistant in the college's Colleges. She is a member of
Institutional Development and Chipola's Career Employees
Planning Office. Association and serves as secretary
Barfield's supervisor Gail to the Chipola Governance
Hartzog says, "I nominated Pat Council.
for this year's award because of Barfield has four children, four
the outstanding results -of our step-children, 10 grandchildren,
Title III project and the SACS eight step-grandchildren, and four
Reaffirmation Review. Now that step-great-grandchildren. The
we know of the results of both family is active in Rocky Creek
of these crucial projects, I feel Baptist Church, where she has
confident in saying that no career served as Church Clerk for several
employee did more for Chipola years.
duringthelastyear.Pathasbecome The Employee, of the Year
one of Chipola's most valuable recognizes the exceptional work
employees because ofher capacity of Chipola's career service
and willingness to work for the employees. Candidates are-
good of all.-She takes pride in her nominated by fellow employees
work and seeks always to present for exhibiting courtesy, motivation
the college at its best. While there and professionalism. Annual
are many deserving people at winners receive a $1,000 bonus,
Chipola, no one is more deserving reserved parking for a year, a
than Pat Barfield this year." one-year membership in FACC,
Pat has served Chipola in several and a $100 gift certificate from the
capacities, including preparation of college Book Store.







SEPTEMBER 3,2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 15


%) %44Marie

wo GOODMAN
for Uberty County Tax Collector
I would like to say Thank You to the people of Liberty County for
your support and confidence in the August 26 primary election.
I am truly humbled and grateful. I will need your continued
support for the General Election on November 4.
Again Thank You. ,
"Let Experience With Proficiency Continue Working for You!"
Political Advertisement paid for and approved by Marie Goodman, Democrat for Tax Collector


Serving two counties that
make up one great community!

The Calhoun-Liberty


JOURNAL


OFFICE DIRECTIONS: From State Road 20
in Bristol, turn south onto Pea Ridge Road,
go one mile, turn east onto Sugmmers


Sincerelyby R
PDI ica1 adve lrmene,P paid lor and approved by Robert HIll. Democ.at Liberty County Clerk Court


SPEAK UP!
WITH A LETTER TO THE EDITOR
Write: The Calhoun-Liberty Journal
P.O. Box 536, Bristol 32321

Shooting a black

bear is not sport
To the editor:
There he goes again.
Raymond Hamlin, in his recent announcement of a meeting for
bear hunters, calling people names, having "public forum hissy fits"
and vilifying anyone with a scientific background or an education.
How old is he, eight? While his rabid polemic has always been good
for a few laughs, a man of his age should know that name calling is
best left on the playground.
The little epithets he hurls are neither hurtful nor insulting to
the people and agencies trying to protect our dwindling wilderness
and wildlife. Name calling is the tool of a simple mind and erodes
credibility.
Mr. Hamlin, please check the accuracy of your statements. Your
adjective describing Ursus americanus floridanus (Florida Black
Bear) as predatory was laughable. The Florida Black Bear is in no
way predatory,- unless you are a blueberry or a mouse. There are
no verified cases of a Florida Black Bear attack on record. Florida
Black Bears do not stalk people. Humans are most definitely not on
the menu of Florida Black Bears.
Hiding in the bushes and shooting a diminutive Florida Black Bear
with a high powered rifle is not sport. In a true sporting scenario,
you would don a loincloth, stick a Bowie hunting knife between
your teeth and seek out a truly impressive adversary, Ursus arctos
horribilis, the Grizzly Bear. That would take true courage. I could
get rich selling tickets for that!,.
That being said, Mr. Hamlin, I thinkyou should seek professional
help to understand your obsessivee need to kill Florida Black
Bears. If killing a Florida Black Beat is an attempt to bolster your
manliness, may I suggest you investigate the many well-advertised
pharmaceutical products that have proven to be quite effective for
this condition. See your doctor and leave the Florida Black Bears
alone!
Pamala Anderson, Bristol
Gun owner, Tree hugger, Environmentalist,
Animal lover, Nature lover, Flower kisser (Mr. Hamlin,
where did you come up with that one? I really like it!),
Intelligent human being, Child of the Earth,
(Did I forget any?)

Freedom is the real target

of avid environmentalists
To the editor:
There were many mischaracterizations in the last week's letter
from Marilyn Blackwell condemning hunters as blood thirsty killers.
I would not claim myself to be a hunter as I haven't had the inclination
or the time of late to do so. I do know many hunters and I can tell
you that besides being proud of their trophies they also do not waste
game or kill just to kill. Hunting is a skill and is often the means by
which many a child has learned responsibility and respect for woods
and the animals that live there.
Clear cutting is a farm action that provides us with many jobs and
products that benefit us all. Those trees are a constantly renewed
source of energy and raw materials. If anyone would hug a tree it
would be the timbermen who know you have to renew what you
take.
The environmental and animal rights crowd wants you to think they
are the only ones that care for the environment and nothing could be
further from the truth. They lobby the government with billions of
dollars and the end product is more regulation and red tape we all have
to deal with. This over regulation has all but killed our commercial
fishing industry and made sport fishing a study in ever changing laws
and guessing if you will go to jail every time you drop a line.
Hunters don't burn down millions of dollars worth of construction
in the name of the planet, or throw paint on fur coats people chose to
wear. If anything that is what the environmental crowd is after, your
right to choose and your right to use private property. They want to
place the rights of animals and trees over that of people and they are
not beyond using the government to do just that.
Saving the animals and the planet may sound like great causes but
I am afraid freedom is the real target, your freedom to hunt, to own
private property and use it for your purpose not theirs.
Glenn F. Ford, Hosford


I76a 6


Dear Citizens:
My family and
I sincerely
appreciate the
confidence you've
shown in me by
allowing me to
serve you as your
Clerk of Court
during the next
four years.








Page 16 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 3, 2008


4C0.'


Tigers shut out Bulldogs 20-0 in pre


by Richard Williams,
Journal sports writer
The. Blountstown Tigers'
blanked the Liberty Bulldogs
20-0 in preseason high school
football action Aug. 29 in'
Bristol. Both head coaches
called the game a typical game
between Blountstown and
Bristol in that it was hard
hitting, hard fought and well
played.
The Tigers heldthe Bulldogs


to less than one hundred
yards of offense. The Bulldog
defense stayed strong against
the Tigers and were helped by
150 yards of penalties racked
up by BHS.
Both head coaches were
forced to dig deeper into their
reserves before the game
even started as five Liberty
and two Blountstown players
were forced to sit out due


Football players suspended
by Teresa Eubanks, Journal Editor
Seven football players, including five from Liberty County High
School and two from Blountstown High School were suspended from
their teams after a skirmish following a pep rally in Blountstown.
The players were involved in an altercation Aug. 26 on the Blount-
stown High School campus, according to a report from the Blount-
stown Police Department.
The Liberty County players attended the pep rally and afterwards,
were waiting outside when some of the Blountstown players emerged
and a fight began.
The LCHS players were gone from the scene, when officers re-
sponded to a call about the disturbance. The police department turned
the matter over to school officials, who decided to suspend the boys
from their teams.
The two Blountstown students involved were both put on in-school
suspension. One was banned from all home games and the other re-
ceived a one-game suspension, according to the police report.
The five LCHS players included one freshman, one sophomore
and three juniors. Two received two-game suspensions, while the
other three were not allowed to play in Friday's preseason Bulldogs-
Tigers game in Bristol.
Blountstown Principal Duane Barber requested that officers issue


to disciplinary reasons. The
Bulldogs also had two players
sitting out due to injuries.
Neither coach offered the
missing players as an excuse
for their team. LCHS Head
Coach Grant Grantham said,
"you always want to see more
players in a preseason game,"
and added that the missing
players just meant that others
had to step up earlier than they
might have otherwise.
The Tigers opened the
scoring when Malcolm Ivory
scored on a trap play up the
middle from 21 yards out with
8:37 remaining in the first
quarter. The extra point was no
good, but the Tigers held a six
point lead.
On Liberty's next drive, the,
Tigers intercepted a pass from
Bulldog starting quarterback
Nolan Brown. The Tigers
offense-was stopped by Liberty
when BHS failed to convert
on fourth down to end another
scoring threat..
After the half both teams
exchanged possessions before
the Tigers. mounted a scoring
drive on a 33 yard run to the
right by Alexander Garrett.
The Tigers then scored on a


the LCHS students involved a trespassingiwarning to keep them off two-point conversion run by
the BHS campus-for the ennre school year. quarterback Heath Bailey to


take a 14 point lead.
The Bulldogs needed to
respond to pull momentum
back on their side, but Tiger
defense held LCHS to minus
six yards and a punt on the
'Dogs next drive.
Both teams traded possession
for the rest of the game until
Liberty mounted a couple of
short drives in the fourth quarter
only to see the Tigers bring
them to a halt. The Bulldogs
threatened to score their first
points of the game late in the
fourth quarter but Tiger senior
Jeremy Watson stepped in front
of a Brown pass and raced over
70 yards for a touchdown and a
20 point Tiger lead. The extra
point was no good.
BHS Head Coach Greg
Jordan said he was happy with
his defensive play, but quickly
added thatthe team still needed
to work hard.
"We can't turn the ball over,
give up 150 penalty yards and
expect to keep coming away
with wins," Jordan said. "We've
got a tough schedule coming up
and we need to work hard if
we want to have a successful
season. I think Liberty will
be fine in their classification.
They played tough and they
will keep getting better."


The Tigers face Class 2A
foe Marianna and running back
Bradley Battles. Jordan said
Battles has already verbally
committed to the University
of Central Florida. The game
starts at 7 p.m. Sept. 5 in
Marianna.
"We've got to crowd them
and plug the holes to force
them to run wide as well as
throw," Jordan said. "They
(Marianna) play a ball control
offense and play solid defense,
so if we want to win we've got
to play a solid game."
Grantham said he thought
the Bulldogs had some good
points to build off of from the
game.
"We've got to improve
across the board," Grantham
said. "We played hard, but we
didn't play well in terms of
technique or assignments. The
good news is we had really
good effort and we can work on
technique and assignments."
The Bulldogs started Brown
at quarterback and Grantham
noted that to his knowledge,
"Brown hasn't played as
starting quarterback at any
level."
Despite the youth he said
Brown showed good presence
in the huddle and learned a lot


4". N F








SEPTEMBER 3, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 17


season game


rom the game. This experience
ill help him in seasons to
ome, Grantham said.
Grantham also thanked
ordan for his help during the
veek with off-the-field issues.
"I've have a lot of respect
or Greg this week," Grantham
aid. "He was great to work
vith through the situation we
tad this week involving a few
)layers and I really thank him
or that."
The Bulldogs travel to
raceville to take on a team
hat beat Liberty's district foe


Sneads 42-14 in a preseason
contest.
Grantham said Graceville
is a "very good football team
overall and they've got a
great' chance to go to state in
Class lB. We've got to play
assignment football and if we
don't we won't have a chance
to win."
Grantham thanked the fans
for coming out to the game and
asked that a special thanks be
given to all the volunteers that
work at the game.


PHOTOS BY TONY SHOEMAKE AND DANIEL WILLIAMS


bulldogs add two coaches
j tichard Williams, Journal sports writer
The LCHS Bulldogs added two new coaches to the football staff
his year.
Desmond Baxter from Port St. Joe was added as a wide receiver
:nd defensive backs coach. LCHS Head Coach Grant Grantham called
tim a "tremendous hire."
Baxter played basketball and baseball at Chipola and basketball at-
he University of New Orleans. He was also a verbal commitment to the
University of Alabama in football before deciding to go to Chipola.
Grantham said he has known Baxter for a long time and is glad to
tave him on the team after watching from across the field from the
lays when Baxter played his high school football at St. Joe.
The Bulldogs made their latest coaching hire last week when Gerald
ranquille was hired as the fullback/quarterback coach as well as the
secondary coach on defense. Grantham said he was excited about the
addition of Tranquille and added he thought having a local player
;ome back as a coach would help with the connection between the
community the players and the team. Tranquille played football and
baseball at Culver-Stockton college in Missouri.
Derrick Causseaux and David Shuler are also back from last year's
coachingg staff.







Page 18 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 3, 2008


YUU 1-1 I-UU I BALL &
SOCCER REGISTRATION
The Liberty County Recreation Department is still having
registration for youth football and soccer. The deadline for football
registration will be Friday, Sept. 5 at 12 p.m. Soccer registration will
continue until Tuesday, Sept. 9 at 12 p.m. Call the Liberty County
Recreation Department at (850)643-2175 for further details.
LAST CALL FOR MEN'S
SLOW PITCH SOFTBALL LEAGUE
Friday will be the last day for teams interested in registering for the
Liberty County Recreation Department's men's slow pitch softball
league. All interested team representatives should call the recreation
department at (850) 643-2175.
PACE, SMITH HELP RED
BIRDS BANG UP EUFALA
Andy Pace pitched a 3-hit complete game and Richie Smith
stroked 3 hits and drove in 7 runs to help the Chattahoochee Red
Birds lace Eufala 25-1 Sunday at Chattahoochee's Therrell Field in
first round action of the Georgia/Florida/Alabama Baseball League's
play-offs.
Pace struck out 14 in his effort and Smith slapped 2 doubles and
a triple.
Austin Riano and Brandon Stidam also drove in 4 runs each for
the Red Birds.
Chattahoochee will host a second round game Sunday at 3 p.m.,
against either the Quincy Dodgers or the Miccosukee Devils, as the
play-offs continue.


STRICKLAND'S
CEHARDWARE _

NOW OFFERS:
*Pennington Seed Deer
and Wildlife Seed Mixture
S Pennington Wildlife Food
Plot Fertilizer 8-12-12
*Buck Masters
Feeding Frenzy
We also carry Ruff & Tuff dog food, -
scratch feed, and rabbit pellets.
Located at 10898 NW SR 20 in Bristol PHONE (850) 643- 336


"The way a team plays as a whole determines its success. You may
have the greatest bunch of individual stars in the world, but if they
don't play together, the club won't be worth a dime." -BABE RUTH


r


Blountstown

9'High School


TIGER FOOTBALL

2008 Varsity Schedule


Benders place second in tourney
The Benders Baseball Team competed in a tournament August
9-10 in Donalsonville, GA and placed second out of 10 teams
competing.
In Saturday's pool play, the Benders defeated the Rebels, 13-2
and the Tallahassee Thrashers, 19-1. After winning both games and
giving up only 3 runs, the Benders went into Sunday's tournament
play as the number one seed. Sunday's tournament games consisted
of play against the Rebels, defeating them 10-2, Tallahassee Heat,
defeating them 8-7 before falling to the Tifton County Thunder in
the championship game by a score of 11-2.
These young men did an excellent job playing 5 baseball games
in two days and bringing home a second place trophy.
Team members consisted ofLatavian Godwin, Jaylon Hall, Bryson
Home, Shad Johnson, T.A. Polver, Peter Setterich, Dylan Smith,
Tyreek Sumner and Tanner Young. The Benders are coached by
Emory Home, Terry Blair and Tim Young.


Aug. 29
Sept. 5
Sept. 12
Sept. 19
Sept. 26
Oct. 3
Oct. 10
Oct. 17
Oct. 24
Oct. 31
Nov. 7
Nov. 14


Liberty County ...........................
Marianna ....................................
W est Gadsden .........................
Port St. Joe ...............................
Florida District............................
W akulla......................................
OPEN
Northview .....................................
Bozeman District .........................
Chipley District ..........................
FAMU...........................................
W ewahitchka ............................


6:30
7:00
7:00
6:30
6:30
7:00

7:00
7:00
7:00
6:30
7:00


2008 JV Schedule
Sept. 4 Port St. Joe .......................... 6:00
Sept. 11 Wewa..................................... 6:00
Sept. 18 Liberty .................................. 6:00
Sept. 25 Freeport................................. 6:00
Oct. 2 Bozeman................................ 6:00
Oct. 9 Port St. Joe............................ 6:00


THIS SCHEDULE
SPONSORED BY:


Home games are bold Away games are light
All times are Central


Share your special
moments with an
announcement in
THE JOURNAL
Births Birthdays
Weddings Anniversaries
Family Reunions & more!


I

I


I






I


I


I


* ~ .;,~ ~
S.:. S.' -


H OM K ,: ~ ~xI r


20291 Central Ave. West Blountstown Call 674-4359
. ..... . r . .. .. ........ -. .!.


L


* I
* I






I






* I







SEPTEMBER 3, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 19


it


' a w.. .
(! oK


t'


. . . . . .


LCHS students say 'Thanks' to Health Dept.
The Liberty County Health Department's Healthy have any questions about the Healthy Communities
Communities Healthy People program is proud Healthy People program, please contact Susan
to be able to provide "Dance Dance Revolution" Chafin, Healthy Communities Coordinator at the
tournament pads to all of the schools in Liberty Liberty County Health Department. Liberty County
County in our onpoing effort to promote healthy High School students send out a big thank you to
lifestyles. Each school has been provided with Ms. Susan Chafin of the Liberty County Health
a complete set that includes two dance pads, Department forproviding our school with two Dance
PlayStation 2 and a game. The dance pads are a Dance Revolution mats and the PS2.equipment to
great way to promote physical exercise in a fun, yet go with them. These mats will provide a fun and
competitive environment which is an alternative to motivating way for us to, exercise through dance and
the traditional sports provided in our schools. If you rhythm activities.


I


NEW JROTC BUILDING AND EQUIPMENT
Liberty County High School JROTC and the 9th grade moved
into their new building (shown above) this school year. The school
has received a grant from the Lowe's Charitable and Educational
Foundation's Toolbox
for Education in the
amount of $5000. This
grant will be used to
complete landscaping
around the new building
and to create a reading
garden. Any business
or individual that wants
to assist by donating
funds, equipment or 11W.
time should -contact
LTC Minyard at 643-
-7131.
Also Liberty County High SchoolRifle Team received a,$-2900
grant from the NRA:Foundation to purchase range equipment. Shown
above (right) is equipment in the new rifle range in the ROTC/9th
grade building. This year the team bought a roller- rack for its floor
coverings and stands for shooters to place their pellets without
changing position.
SENIOR NEWS
Seniors, on Sept. 9 you are required to pay Herff Jones $80 on
this day if you make ati order for over that amount.


Si.


Ir


Libe County Hip


2


Aug. 29
Sept. 5
Sept. 12
Sept. 19
Sept. 26
Oct. 3
Oct. 10
Oct. 17
Oct. 24
Oct. 31
Nov. 7
Nov. 14


Blountstown ................................ 8:00
Graceville ....................................... 8:00
Cottondale .................................... 8:00
OPEN
Franklin District (Homecoming) ........ 8:00
W ewahitchka District .................... 8:00
Freeport District .............................. 8:00
Port St. Joe District ..................... 7:30
Jay District ..................................... 8:00
Sneads District .............................. 8:00
W est Gadsden District ................... 7:30
Arnold (Sr. Night) ................................... 8:00


PBL students recognized

at State & National Levels
MARIANNA-Chipola College sophomore Chirag (Chris) Shah was
recently named Phi Beta Lambda Region I Vice-President for the state
of Florida, representing colleges and universities in the northwest region
of Florida on the PBL state board.
PBL is a non-profit educational association
of student members whose mission is to bring
business and education together in a positive
working relationship through innovative leadership
and career development programs. Shah was
instrumental in establishing the 2008-2009
PBL Florida theme, "Defy Gravity. Anytime.
Anywhere." State officers selected the American
Heart Association and the Buddy Walk as the
official state projects for the coming year. Chris Shah
On the national level, Chipola student Adam
Duren received recognition at the recent Phi
Beta Lambda National Leadership Conference
in Atlanta. Duren won fifth place in Computer
Concepts. Students from colleges and universities
across the nation participated in competitive events,
Nik,
business training and leadership workshops.
For information on joining Phi Beta Lambda
at Chipola, contact Vikki Milton, advisor, at
miltonv@chipola.edu. Adam Duren


Sept. 4
Sept. 11
Sept. 18
Sept. 23
Oct. 2
Oct. 9


Florida ........................................... 7:00
Port St. Joe .................................... 7:00
Blountstow n ................................. 7:00
G raceville ...................................... 7:00
Sneads ........................................... 7:00
W ew a ............................................. 7:00


THIS SCHEDULE
SPONSORED BY.


Home games are bold Away games are light
ALL TIMES ARE EASTERN


a cock..",
HOM E FU RN ITU R Eck more
20291 Central Ave. West Blountstown Call 674-4359
mom JU . .


1008 varsi



Schedule

Bull 0


Football


2008 JV Schedule








Page 20 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 3, 2008


B-town High School

Calendar of Events
Thursday, Sept. 4 JV
Football at St. Joe at 6 p.m. Set
Friday, Sept. 5 Varsity
Football at Marianna at 7
p.m.
Saturday, Sept. 6 -
Volleyball at Chipley all
day
Monday, Sept. 8 School picture day and
Senior make-up picture day
Tuesday, Sept. 9 Volleyball at Bozeman
at 5/6 p.m.
Wednesday, Sept. 10 Early Release


CELEBRATION
On Friday, Aug. 29, the BHS auditorium was transformed into the
FCAT edition of "Deal or no Deal". Students were in the company of
"Howie Mandel" and his beautiful models, along with many exciting
and sweet prizes!
To celebrate the school's achievement of earning a "B" from last
year's FCAT, the Blountstown High School Student Government,
along with their sponsor Mrs. Samantha Taylor, entertained the student
body and faculty with their version of "Deal or no Deal". Students'
names were drawn, and each contestant was given the chance to
pick a number to win a prize. Two 26" flat screen TVs, a number of
MP3 players, and $50 gas cards were a few of the prizes, plus gift
certificates from Pizza Hut, Hungry Howie's, and Movie Gallery. A
bag of M&Ms and Skittles also surfaced throughout the game. After
all the prizes were won, a delicious lunch of grilled hamburgers and
goodies were served at an extended lunch, which all of the BHS
students and faculty enjoyed.
Special thanks to police Chief Glen Kimbrel, Warren Tanner, Jody
Hoagland, and fire Chief Ben Hall for grilling the burgers.
WELCOME TO OUR PRIDE
After the last bell rang on Friday, cake and ice cream were dished
out, and the faculty and staff at BHS welcomed five new faculty
members to their pride: Sue Price- Assistant Principal; Tony Davis-
PE and basketball en Rn- n.] 1Rivnnq nnd To hrliq Gnrda-n- k'rMtm


teachers; and Kri





GUIDANCE NEWS
The ACT will be given on Oct. 25. Deadline
to mail registration is Sept. 19. The registration cost
is $31 without the Writing portion or $46 with the
Writing portion. Juniors and Seniors who qualify
for free and reduced meals may receive two fee
waivers for testing. ESE students may apply for
accommodations during testing. Please see Mrs.
Yon guidance for a registration packet, prep book,
or waivers.
In other Guidance news, the Florida JCI Senate,
Inc. Scholarship is now posted on the guidance
scholarship board. Deadline to apply is Jan. 11,
2009. Check out the scholarship board for details
and an application. See Mrs. Yon or Mrs. Lee in
guidance for assistance.
CATS' CUISINE
Cats' Cuisine will be serving its first meal of
the 2008-09 school year on Thursday, Sept. 11. The
menu will consist of: Chicken Fajita Salad, Fiesta
Corn Chips and Homemade Salsa, Peaches and
Cream Shortcake and a beverage. Serving times
are 11:40 and 12:30. Please make reservations by
Tuesday, Sept. 9.
YEARBOOKS
The 2008 Wildcat has arrived! The theme of
the yearbook is "League of Our Own" and last year's
Mass Media class has captured the excitement of the
2007-08 school year. The price of this year's Wildcat


c ; ac e vans an y a ars e- science
isty Watford- English teacher.


is $40. You may send payment with your child or
come by the media center from 7:30 3:15. Please
make checks payable to Altha Public School. If you
have any questions, call 762-3121.
SCHOOL ADVISORY COUNCIL
Altha School's School Advisory Council will
meet Thursday, September 4 at 5:30 in the Media
Center. Everyone is welcome.
r- - - - - ---1
ALTHA SCHOOL
CALENDAR OF EVENTS I
Thursday, Sept. 4 Middle School Boys
Basketball vs. Malone, 4/5 p.m.; JVN Volleyball
at Cottondale, 5/6 p.m.
Friday, Sept. 5 JVN Volleyball at Bethlehem,
4/5 p.m.
Monday, Sept. 8 Middle School Volleyball
vs.Tolar, 4 p.m.; Middle School Boys Basketball
at Poplar Springs, 4:30/5:30 p.m.; JVN Volleyball
vs. Florida High, 5/6 p.m.
Tuesday, Sept. 9 Middle School Volleyball
vs. BMS, 3:30 p.m.
Thursday, Sept. 11 -
SJVN Volleyball vs. North Sept
Florida Christian, 5/6 e
p.m.
Friday, Sept. 12 4
JVN Volleyball at
Sneads, 5/6 p.m.


r- -----------
Cc. fiatyir4



SCHOOL MEN

A choice of low fat white,
chocolate or strawberry milk
served with all meals.

BREAKFAST
THURSDAY
Breakfast: Pancakes and
sausage link, assorted cereal
With buttered toast, assorted
fruit juice.
FRIDAY
Breakfast: Scrambled egg
rith grits and toast, assorted
cereal with buttered toast, and
assorted fruit juice.
I MONDAY
IBreakfast Grits with cheese
toast, assorted cereal with
buttered toast, and assorted
6ruit juice.
TUESDAY
breakfast: Cinnamon Roll
and bacon, assorted cereal
with buttered toast, assorted
fruit juice.
WEDNESDAY
Breakfast: Pancakes and
sausage link, assorted cereal
vith buttered toast, assorted
iruit juice.


U Sept--4- - 12

s ch os 1

IU Sept. 4-10,2008 |


LUNCHES
THURSDAY
Lunch: Roasted pork,
mashed potatoes with gravy,
collard greens, corn bread.
Alternate: Sausage and pep-
per hero.
FRIDAY
Lunch: Pepperoni pizza,
baked potato wedges, ap-
ple. Alternate: Hot ham and
cheese sandwich.
MONDAY
Lunch: Breaded chicken
nuggets, green beans,
banana, and chocolate
pudding. Alternate: Cuban
pressed sandwich.
TUESDAY
Lunch: Grilled cheese sand-
wich with chicken noodle
soup, carrot sticks with ranch
dressing, and pears. Alter-
nate: Turkey club sandwich.
WEDNESDAY
Lunch: BBQ riblet on a bun,
corn on the cob, green beans
and peaches. Alternate:
Fish sticks.


All menus are subject to change
SPONSORED BY:
I Laban Bontrager, DMD l3-:so!, Phcne 643-54 17


-I___ __ _* _ L - - - - - - - - - -- j


BHS juniors Shaterial.Davis
(above) and Cassie Taylor (below)
with their flat screen TVs.


Now open 24 hours a day!
Also, credit card processing is now
available. Come sign up today!
LOCATED AT 10667 NW SR 20 IN BRISTOL
^^^^^^^ Contact Derek Ca ^^sscatix at
(850043-144 rBE^B^^w^^m^^IH







SEPTEMBER 3,2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 21


Bronson reminds

AG producers of

Farm Bill change
TALLAHASSEE-With the hurricane season
entering its peak period, Florida Agriculture and
Consumer Services Commissioner Charles H.
Bronson reminded agricultural producers that
they must have crop insurance or non-insured crop
disaster assistance coverage (NAP) to be eligible
for compensation under the government's disaster
programs.
A provision of the 2008 Farm Bill, which was
enacted into law in June, requires that farmers and
ranchers carry one or the other of the two insurance
programs to be reimbursed for agricultural losses.
Prior to the law's enactment, such coverage was
not mandatory.
Because the law took effect after application
periods expired for the insurance programs,
producers have until Sept. 16 to take advantage of
a waiver that permits them to pay a "buy-in" fee to
be eligible for disaster assistance. Producers can
contact their local FSA County Office to file the
waiver application and pay the applicable fees.
The buy-in fee is $100 per crop, or a maximum.
of $300 per county for growers who raise multiple
crops in a county. For those growing in mulnple
counties, the fee is capped at $900.
"It is vitally important that growers obtain
insurance coverage to protect themselves,"
Bronson said. "While we've had a brief lull
since the catastrophic hurricanes of 2004 and
2005, meteorologists remind us that we are in
the middle of what is forecast to be a particularly
active hurricane period."
For more information about the 2008 cropyear
buy-in for disaster assistance programs, visit www.
fsa.usda.gov/Internet/FSA_File/buyinwaiver08.
pdf


. .. ,.. .. .




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ThaROM
FROM


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Students are pictured above enjoying a ride on the Tolar
Express Train at Veterans Memorial Park during last week's
"A" school celebration in Bristol.


.2 ~


I am very honored by the overall support I received dur-
ing the recent election, yet we still have one more election
on November 4, 2008. I hope to see each of you some
time between now and then. If you have questions or
concerns, please feel free to call me at 643-2107, email
me at.. :. ... or see me person-
ally while at the various school functions I attend. My
phone number and my email address have not changed.


I encourage you to call with concerns and suggestions,
which will be discussed with the appropriate personnel.
My commitment to fairness, loyalty, and open commu-
nications has not changed! We have a job to do and that
is to give our children the best education possible in the
best facilities we can provide, which we are continuing
to do while staying within our annual budget. We have
worked to bring more vocational programs to our school
system so those that choose to follow a vocational ca-
reer can be better prepared when they graduate. We
also offer more dual enrollment classes so students have


the option to take college courses in high school and be
ahead of the game when they graduate, saving us all
education dollars. We also have after school tutoring
programs that offer 1 teacher to 5 students ratio to help
bring our students that are struggling with their math and
reading skills.
We have also been awarded the 21st Century Grant
that will also involve tutoring, help with homework assign-
ments (before and after school) and provide transporta-
tion after tutoring in the afternoon to our organized youth
activities or other destinations that will be predetermined,
therefore helping relieve some of the pressure put on
parents to get their children from one place to the other.
As the cost for services continue to rise, it is important for
us as a school board to continue looking for ways to save
money and look for new sources through grants while
continuing to offer the needed services for our children.
Again I would like to say "Thank you for your support!"
Our children deserve the best!


Political advertisement paid for and approved by James E. Flowers for School Board


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James E. Flowers!
Candidate for Liberty Co. School Board Member District 1


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Page 22 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 3, 2008


Homeowner's policies don't cover flood damage


Rainmakers may be good for
business, but they're bad for ho-
meowners especially for the
two-thirds of Florida homeown-
ers who lack flood insurance.
Flood claims for Tropical
Storm Fay which made a re-
cord four Florida landfalls in
August continue to pouring
in. Fay dropped 27.65 inches
of rain near Melbourne, caused
canals to overrun their banks in
South Florida, flooded neighbor-
hoods in the rural Panhandle and
turned drainage ditches in Port
St. Lucie into skim-boarding
venues for teenagers.
As the calendar advances into
September historically the
busiest during hurricane season
now is a good time to remind
homeowners and potential buy-
ers that regular homeowner's
insurance policies don't cover
flood damage.
To insure. against damage
caused by flooding, owners must
be covered by policies issued
through the National Flood In-
surance Program (NFIP), estab-
lished by Congress.
This is particularly important
for homes impacted by "storm
surge" the combination of
natural tides plus waves caused
by tropical storms and hurricanes.
Damage caused by storm surge is
considered flood damage and not
covered by homeowner's policies.
Even just a two-inch flood
approximately halfway up a
typical baseboard could cause
up to $7,800 in damage, after
considering the cost of new car-
pets, drywall, baseboards, lamps
and furniture. (Want to try the
simulation yourself? Click on
the following link: http://www.
floodsmart.gov/floodsmart/pag-
es/flood_policies/the_costof_
flooding.jsp)
Inland owners also should be
mindful of their risks, since trop-
ical storms are known to pro-
duce flash floods throughout the


state. A Rand Corporation study
showed one-third of all floods
occurred outside standard flood
hazard areas; however, only 1
percent of people outside the
flood plains buy flood insurance.
And, according to the Indepen-
dent Insurance Agents and Bro-
kers of America, homeowners
are 26 times more likely to be
affected-by a flood than a fire.
In the wake of Fay and Hur-
ricane Gustav, calls to Florida
agents about flood insurance
increased by about 20 percent
- including homeowners, asking
about buying insurance for the
first time as well as policyhold-
ers checking on their coverage.
"Tropical Storm Fay has
raised awareness," said Lynne
McChristian, a spokesman for
the Insurance Information Insti-
tute, which represents the indus-
try. In some offices, agents are
writing up to four flood policies
a day, compared to just one be-
fore Fay.
An important caveat: Typi-
cally, there is a standard 30-day
waiting period before flood cov-
erage takes effect. While sign-
ing a policy now won't protect
against flood damaged incurred
during September, it's a worth-
while consideration, especially
since hurricane season lasts
through Nov. 30.
As the sogginess of hurricane
season continues, here are other
tips to consider:
CHECK YOUR ELIGIBILITY:
To qualify, a homeowner must live
in a community that participates in
the NFIP program. To reciprocate,
communities are required to imple-
ment floodplain best practices de-
signed to mitigate future losses due
to floods. The list of participating
Florida communities can be found
at this URL: http://www.fema.gov/
cis/FL.pdf Renters and business
owners can also protect their be-
longings.
KNOW THE LIMITS: Florida
consumers can purchase flood in-


RADIO FOOTBALL

ON WYBT AND WPHK

Listen to football on WYBT and WPHK. This week..
Listen to Steven Seay and Glenn
Kimbrel's play by play of the Blountstown
High School Tigers as they take on
.'' Marianna in Marianna, Friday night
S... Sept. 5 on K102.7. airtime 6:30 p.m. CT.


Hear Michael Wahlquist, Jay Taylor, and Ray McCoy
with all the Liberty County High School game action.


4- I


The Florida Gators play
Miami (FL) in the swamp this
Saturday, Sept. 6 air time on
K-102.7 and Y-1000 is
at 6:30 p.m. CT.


The Liberty County Bulldogs take on
the Graceville Tigers in Graceville...
Air time Saturday, Sept. 6 imme-
diately following the swap shop at
approximately 10 a.m. ET
on K-102.7 and Y-1000.


surance for up to $250,000 for
property damage and $100,000 for
personal contents. While a building
and contents policy for the maximum
level of coverage in a high flood risk
area not on the water may be over
$2,000, many low- to moderate-risk
areas with the same coverage would
cost less than $325.


EVALUATE FLOOD RISKS:
It's possible that your home, even
though not in a flood plain when
purchased, may be in one now. The
Federal Emergency Management
Agency has updated flood-plain
maps in recent years and. areas
once considered "safe" now might
be in high-risk zones. If you regu-


larly notice standing water near
your house after a rainstorm, that
may be a signal that your area is
at potential risk during a tropical
storm or a hurricane. You can go
online and check Floodsmart.gov,
FEMA's flood-insurance Web site.
Type in your address to determine
your property's flood risk.


ELECT TOMMY





MCCLELLAN

ISuperintendent of Calhoun County Schools


DEAR CALHOUN
COUNTY CITIZENS:.
It was my privilege to serve
as your superintendent of
schools from 2000-2004.
During those 4 years I was
able to compensate the -
teachers that taught dual "- 7.
enrollment classes with a
small bonus so they could
afford to complete the re- ..
quired 18 hours above a ..
master, and thus allowing
us to offer our students college credit courses
other than college English. We were able to
add social studies, science, math, and foreign
language credits to give them a head start.
We were able to add girls basketball, golf,
and boys and girls weight lifting to the Altha
School program. We also added girls and boys
weight lifting to the Blountstown High School
program.
During my tenure as superintendent I received
state certification in the school superintendent
area, and also spent two additional years of
training to complete the necessary require-
ments in the Chief Executive Officer Leader-
ship Development Program. During my term in
office we had four years of being called a honor
roll school district with FCAT scores that were
among the best in the state. Also our school
grades were all A's and B's with the exception
of one lone C at Blountstown High School.
There were so many outstanding achieve-
ments by individuals, and programs during
that time. We had a very successful state
recognized football program at Blountstown
High School. Altha and Blountstown both had
highly successful weight lifting programs dur-
ing that time with several state winners, includ-
ing a state championship at Blountstown High
School. Altha had a very successful volleyball
program that was among to state's best in their
class. Altha also received recognition as the
best athletic program in the state in their class
during that period. Both Altha and Blountstown
had very successful basketball programs dur-
ing my tenure. The Altha School culinary arts
program was the best in the state, and one of
the elite national programs. Altha and Blount-
stown dominated the Chipola College math
competition with both schools usually 1 and 2
in the area most of that time. Adam Harpool
of Blountstown High School was awarded a
number one national award in Technology
achievement. Both Altha and Blountstown had
successful softball programs. Those are some
of the many accomplishments made during
my superintendent years. I am proud to say
it was a wonderful 4 years of achievements. I


made a dedicated effort
to write each student,
Sponsor, coach, and
S teacher a hand written
letter recognizing and
complimenting them for
their achievements.
I am very community
minded with a real com-
4 mitment to improve all of
our schools, but in their
.. .own individual communi-
ties. I feel that schools
and churches are the backbone of our com-
munities, and very. precious institutions that
are strongly supported by the citizens of those
communities. Also, I don't want to be known
as the person who put a stake through the
hearts of those communities, or the villain that
-divided our county down.the middle. You were
told 4 years ago that I was going to consolidate
Blountstown, and Altha. Many people believed
that rumor, but I never had that in my plans.
You were told that I was going to raise your
taxes, and that wasn't my plan either. I believe
it is my duty to be a good steward of the mon-
ey I was entrusted with, and to use it wisely. It
is a very tough financial era we are in, and ev-
erybody is feeling the crunch, and I don't have
all the answers, but I pledge to work sincerely
and earnestly with the school board members
to find the best solutions to these problems.
We must be a team, and seek the best plan of
action that will benefit all students, staff, and
community personnel. We will have an awe-
some responsibility to undertake. It will take
much careful planning, soul searching, and a
lot of prayer (both ours and yours), and with
God's help and guidance we will try our best
to do the right thing. This office and all elect-
ed offices belong to the people, and we when
elected are public servants who must stay in
touch with the people, listen to their concerns,.
and follow the will of those that elect us to the
best of our abilities. Our country is built on the
premise that our government is of the people,
for the people, and by the people.
We cannot operate without you and your sup-
port, nor should we try to. When we ask for
your trust and confidence our objective should
be to prove you made the right choice. My
grandfather taught me to "let your word be
your bond", and that is embedded in my mind
permanently. I will try to keep my campaign
clean, honest, and work hard to live up to the
highest degree of expectation and perfor-
mance. What 'you see is what you get with
me. I hope seeking this office is in God's plan,
and if not I will accept the consequences with-
out question.


S S ice-ey, Tonmmy McC eUav
Paid Political Advertisement Paid for by Tommy McClellan for Superintendent of Schools of Calhoun County, No Party Affiliation


IN =Mir








SEPTEMBER 3,2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 23


Q: Is it true that adding
cereal to a baby's bottle helps
him or her sleep through the
night?
A: The American Academy
of Pediatrics and other experts
on infant nutrition discourage
adding cereal or any other
solid food to a baby's bottle.
Solid foods such as cereal are
generally not recommended
in any form until a baby is
six months old. Because an
infant's digestive system is
immature, adding these foods


.11.iw ai M aid


that food allergies will de-
velop. Experts also express
concern that cereal in a bottle
can lead to overfeeding, which
can begin an unhealthy road
to overweight. Moreover,
research simply does not sup-
port the suggestion that feed-
ing infants cereal aids them


earlier increases the chances in sleeping through the night.


Young babies have such small
stomach capacity compared
with their nutritional needs
that they need calories every
few hours. For infants who
are naturally more wakeful
at night, experts recommend
creating a soothing environ-
ment, dimming the lights and
keeping play to a minimum


OBU A RE S


MARSHALL BRINSON FLOWERS
BRISTOL Marshall Brinson Flowers, 67
died Saturday, August 30, 2008, in Gainesville.
He was a native and lifelong resident of Liberty
County. He was a veteran of the U.S. Navy and
liked the outdoors and to be in his garden. His
hobbies were being on the computer, photography
and woodworking.
He was preceded in death by his father
and mother, Ralston and Molly Flowers;
brother, Steve Flowers; and a sister, Betty Jean
Braxton.
Survivors include his children, Robert Glen
Flowers, and Marshall Keith Flowers, both of
Florala, AL, Michele Flowers-Stokes of Canton,
GA, and Carrie Flowers ofHosford; four brothers,
Jimmy Flowers, Leonard Flowers, John Daniel
Flowers and Timothy Flowers all of Bristol; two
sisters, Mary Lee Hinch of Alabama, and Ida
Charles of Clarksville; and eight grandchildren.
Service will be at 3 p.m. (ET) Wednesday,
Sept. 3 at Life More Abundant Fellowship
Church in Bristol.
Bevis Funeral Home in Bristol is in charge of
the arrangements.

CHARLES "ETWOOD"
ALLEN REDDICK
BRISTOL Charles "Etwood" Allen
Reddick, 46, died Monday, August 25, 2008 at
Hospice in Fort Myers. He was born Oct. 12,
1961 in Blountstown. He worked for Masonry
Inc. in Tallahassee and ran heavy equipment for
C.W. Roberts for many years.
He was preceded in death by his mother,
Molly Pletcher.
Survivors include three sons, Allen Reddick,
Shane Reddick, Zack Reddick; one daughter,
Ashley Reddick all of Fort Meyers; father, Jim
Tom Reddick of Bristol; three brothers, Bobby
Reddick, James Reddick and Rex Reddick
all -from Bristol; one sister Eileen Johnson of
Bristol.
No services are planned at this time.
Memorialization was by cremation.
National Cremation Society and Funeral
Home in Fort Myers was in charge- of the
arrangements.


EVELYN HOBBS. -
BLUECREEK COMMUNITY Evelyn
Hobbs, 78, died Friday, August 29, 2008 at
Scycamore Community. She was a native and
lifelong resident of the Blue Creek area. She
was a member of The Church of Jesus Christ
of Latter-Day Saints, Hosford Ward. She loved
her family and she will be greatly missed.
She was preceded in death by her husband,
Clyde Hobbs and two sisters, L.V. Spears and
Lottie McCalister..
Survivors include her son, Kenneth C.
Hobbs of Blountstown; two daughters, Laree
Higgenbotham and Laverne Hill, both of Blue
Creek; a brother, Thomas Mercer: two sisters,
Lossie Larkins of Bristol and Evelia Hall of
Tampa; along with five grandchildren and five
great-grandchildren.
Graveside services were held Monday,
Sept. 1 at Blue Creek Cemetery in Blue Creek
Community.
Bevis Funeral Home in Bristol was in
charge of the arrangements.

WARREN TALMADGE WHITE
BLOUNTSTOWN Warren Talmadge
White, 73, died Friday, Aug. 29, 2008 in
Blountstown. He was born on May 20, 1935
in Blountstown and had lived here for most of
his life. He was an airplane pilot and worked
in general aviation. He served in the United
States Marines and was of the Protestant
faith.
Survivors include one son, Randy White
of Blarisville, GA; one daughter, Laura
Reeves and her husband, Tom of Tallahassee;
one brother, James M. "Snookie" White
of Blountstown; two grandchildren, Aaron
Waters of California and Charlotte Waters
of Tallahassee; along with 12 nieces and
nephews.
Services were held Sunday, Aug. 31 at
Peavy Funeral Home Chapel with Chaplain
Ronnie Wright officiation. A private interment
service will be held at Nettle Ridge Cemetery
in Blountstown.
Peavy Funeral Home in Blountstown was
in charge of the arrangements.


to help your little one settle
down.
Q: As long as a weight
loss product is labeled natu-
ral and "clinically proven,"
there's no reason to avoid it,
is there?
A: There is plenty of rea-
son! Label claims on supple-
ments and weight-loss aids are
not approved in advance by
the Food and Drug Adminis-
tration (FDA). Manufacturers
can make a wide variety of
claims as long as they don't
advertise their product as a
cure for a specific disease.
Manufacturers do not have
to offer proof of clinical test
results, so there is no way to
verify the kind of testing that
was done, who and how many
subjects were tested, or how
the results were analyzed.
Even claims that a product is
safe cannot be trusted, since
they don't have to be sub-
stantiated. In fact, the onus is
on the FDA to prove dietary
supplements unsafe, not on
manufacturers to prove them
safe. Pay particular attention
to the safety claims on some
products (usually listed in
small print) that warn certain
groups not to use the product.
Also look for disclaimers that
the product may contain ingre-
dients that have questionable
safety records.
Q: Does thephytochemical
content vary among different
types of onions?
A: Phytochemicals are
natural compounds found in
plants that may offer protec-
tion from a variety of diseases,
including cancer. Onions are
major contributors to our
consumption of the'largest


group ofphytochemicals fla-
-vonoids that act as powerful
antioxidants. Phytochemical
content of plant foods always
varies somewhat with growing
conditions, but yellow and red
onions tend to contain much
higher levels of flavonoids
such as quercetin, when com-
pared to white onions, Vidalias
and other sweet onions. Like
garlic and shallots, onions
contain sulfur-containing phy-
tochemicals that seem to pro-
vide protection at several steps
during the process of cancer
development. Researchers
have not documented any dif-
ferences in content of these
sulfur compounds among dif-
ferent types of onions at this
time. You are best advised to
choose your onions based on
their intended use, rather than
their phytochemical make-
up. Yellow onions, by far
the most common type, are
full-flavored, and great for
cooking especially when
recipes require longer cooking
times or when you want more
flavor. Many chefs consider
red onions best for use raw in
salads or sandwiches, or for
quick cooking recipes, like
kabobs. White onions have a
sweet flavor and are the classic
choice for traditional Mexican
cuisine.
_AICR's Nutrition Hotline is a
free service that allows you to ask
a registered dietitian questions
about diet, nutrition and cancer.
Access it online at www.aicr.org/
hotline or by phone (1-800-843-
8114) 9a.m. to 5p.m. ETMonday-
Friday. AICR is the only major
cancer charity focused exclusively
on the link between diet, nutrition
and cancer. It provides education
programs that help Americans
learn to make changes for lower
cancer risk. AICR also supports
innovative research in cancer
prevention and treatment at uni-
versities, hospitals and research
centers. It has provided more than
$78 million for research in diet,
nutrition and cancer.


Peavy Funeral Home

& Crematory













Funeral Services with Dignity,
Caring and Professionalism.

Marion Peavy
A Hometown Funeral Director
Telephone (850) 674-2266.*
UFN


COMEPFORD VAULT MEMORIAL SERVICE
59.-628 1-800-360-6828 Fa: 593-6888
S H. 90 \\ P.O. Box 933 Sneads, FL 324611
Pete Coinerli d- Own'r & Operator



Let us help you with a memorial of BEAUTY and DURABILITY
Serving Jackson & the Surrounding Counties for 42 Years
Precious Memopiesf 'fyou can't come to us, give us a call and we will come to you"








Page 24 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 3, 2008


Kansas Coach Bill Self to


MARIANNA-NCAAcoachof
the year Bill Self of the University
of Kansas and Greg Marshall
of Wichita State will speak at
Chipola College, Saturday, Oct.
4, at 7 p.m.
The leadership,banquet is free
and open to the public. Business
leaders and high school athletic
departments are also invited to
attend and bring their staff and
employees.
"This is a great opportunity for
the community to come out and
preview this year's team and hear
from two very inspiring leaders.
Many of the ideas expressed by
these extremely talented coaches
can help improve individual
life skills and increase business
productivity," said Coach Greg
* Heiar.


The Chipola Indians and
Northwest Florida, formerly
Okaloosa-Walton, will each play
two scrimmage games beginning
at 10 a.m. earlier that day. Other
teams include Talladega College,
Alabama Southern, and Northwest
Shoals.
Coach Bill Self's Kansas
Jayhawks team won the Big 12
title and the Big 12 conference
tournament. Self's team marched
through the tournament by
defeating overall number one
seed North Carolina 84-66. The
Jayhawks won the 2008 NCAA
Championship with a 75-q8
overtime victory over Memphis.
Self is one of two active coaches
to lead three different teams to
the Elite Eight of the NCAA
Tournament. In August, Self


speak at Chipola Leadership Banquet
of Kansas. Former Chipola All- five 20-win seasons, was named
American Mario Little will play Big South Coach of the Year three
for Coach Self at Kansas this times, and in 2006, surpassed
season. Nield Gordon as the all-time
Wichita State coach Gregg winningest coach in Winthrop
Marshall previously coached at men's basketball history. Former
Winthrop University for nine Chipola Indian, Clevin Hannah,
seasons, leading the Eagles to seven will be play for coach Marshall at
NCAA tournament appearances. Wichita State this season.
At Winthrop, Marshall led For more information regarding
Bill Self, University of Kansas the team to regular season titles the Oct. 4 event, call Joc Calloway
signed a 10-year contract showing six times, won the Big South at 850-718-2451 or Greg Heiar at
his dedication to the University Tournament five times, has had 850-573-6839.


Chipola Electronics student Daniel Alley of Altha (seated) gets
help from instructor James Bailey.

Electronics programs open at Chipola


MARIANNA-Chipola College
has openings in four programs
leading to careers in the electronics
industry.
The Computer Systems
Technology and Electronics
Technology are clock-hour
programs that can be completed in
a year and a half. Job opportunities
are available with cable and power
companies, as well as computer
system repair and security.
The Associate in Science (AS)
program in Electronic Engineering
Technology is a two-year academic
program with job opportunities
in the cable, power, computer
and security industries. The AS
program also offers the option of
transferring to UWF or FAMU to
earn a B.S. degree in Electronic
Engineering Technology.
Chipola also offers an Associate
in Applied Science (AAS)
program in Telecommunications
Engineering. This two year program
offers prospects in the rapidly
expanding technologies in cable,
video and phone systems.
Electronics instructor James


Bailey says, "There are good job
opportunities in our area for skilled
electronic technicians. We offer
industry certification which will
enhance career advancement."
All of Chipola's Workforce
Development programs prepare
students for good-paying jobs in
the area. Many programs feature
open-enrollment which allows
students to enroll whenever the
college is in session.
Other Certificate programs
include: Automotive Technology,
Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA),
Computer Systems Technology,
Corrections, Cosmetology, Law
Enforcement, Firefighter II,
Masonry Apprentice Training
and Surveying and Mapping
Technology.
Associate in Science (AS)
degrees include: Network Support,
Computer Programming, Computer
Information Technology, Criminal
Justice Technology, Culinary
Management, and more.
For information about Chipola's
Workforce programs, call 718-
2270, or visit www.chipola.edu


rl former owner of
Nissley's
i ^ Garden Center
.' .,". v, W '.'tret *, L-
..4


Ci





I [-E MU








SEPTEMBER 3, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 25


asual The orange tubular flowers of the firebush makes an attractive addition to your garden.

1 Attract hummingbirds to your garden


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Few sights are more thrilling
in the garden than rapidly
moving hummingbirds darting
among colorful flowers.
Hummingbirds, also known
as hummers, are always a
wonder to see, and it's easy to
attract them to your garden.
In Florida, we see
three different types of
hummingbirds, but the most
common is the ruby-throated.
This feathered jewel is only
about three inches long and
weighs as little as a single
penny!
For their size,
hummingbirds have among
the largest appetites in the
bird world. They feed every
10 or 15 minutes from dawn
until dusk. During this period,
they eat more than half their
weight in food and 8 times
their weight in water.
If you're fascinated by
hummingbirds, as I am, you
probably hang out a feeder or
two in the summer to provide
them with sugar water.
Artificial feeders will attract
hummingbirds. However,
feeders should not be the sole
source of food provided. The
sugar solution may appeal
to the hummingbirds' sweet
tooth, but it provides little
nourishment. Nectar is much
more vital to the hummingbird
than just water and sugar. By
planting certain flowers and
shrubs, home gardeners can
provide food and habitat for
hummingbirds.
Typical hummingbird
flowers are red, have a
tubular shape and have no
strong scent. But there are
several notable exceptions


Hummingbirds are only about
3 inches long and weigh as
little as a single penny.

to this general rule. Many
plants with red flowers don't
contain very much nectar.
Roses, petunias, geraniums
and zinnias have brilliant
colors but little nectar.
Plants that produce an
abundance of flowers over
an extended period of time
and those that require little
care are good choices. Native
plants can "fill the bill" where
nectar-seekers are concerned
and should be used whenever
possible.
Perennials that are
recommended as nectar
sources include butterfly
milkweed (Asclepias
tuberosa), red basil
(Calamintha coccinea),
shrimp plant (Justicia
brandegeana), cigar plant
(Cuphea ignea), firespike
(Odontonema stricta), red
star hibiscus (Hibiscus
coccineus), and obedient
plant (Physostegia spp.).
It's also important to plant
a mixture of nectar producing
trees, vines and shrubs that


have overlapping blooming
seasons. This will insure
that a continuous source of
nectar will be available to
hummingbirds throughout the
growing season. Some of the
species recommended include
red buckeye, bottlebrush,
firebush (Hamelia patens),
wild azalea, trumpet vine, and
coral honeysuckle.
Contrary to popular belief,
hummingbirds are not strictly,
nectar feeders. Insects and
other invertebrates are the
primary source of protein for
adult hummingbirds and their
young. An adult female can
consume up to 2,000 insects
per day. Small invertebrates
including mosquitoes,
gnats, small bees, fruit flies,
spiders, caterpillars, aphids,
and insects eggs make up
the hummingbirds diet. So
keep your plants free of
pesticides. Pesticides destroy
the insect food base vital
to hummingbirds and their
offspring, and'may also
contaminate the nectar they
drink.
And if you do use artificial
feeders, remember that the
sugar solutions must be kept
fresh. Florida's hot weather
can cause rapid bacterial
growth in these feeders and
birds that drink contaminated
water could die. To avoid this,
change the solution every 3 to
5 days. Clean the feeders with
hot water and white vinegar.
Do not use soap or chlorine
bleach.
Theresa Friday is the
Residential Horticulture
Extension Agent for Santa
Rosa County. For additional
information about all of the
county extension services and
other articles of interest go to:
http://santarosa.ifas. ufl. edu.









Page 26 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 3, 2008


THE CALHOUN-LIBERTYJOURNAL M & W Self
Bristol Mobile Home Rental L ASStorage Rentals
2/1 New Carpet & Vinyl 7 days a week service
Call 850-447-1533 after 4:00 F 10 x 1 0' .........$
9-3-08 10'x 20' .........70
To place your ad, call 643-3333 by noon Eastern 10' 25' ........ 90
FOR RENT Time on Saturday. Non-business ads run FREE for 2 weeks. NO DEPOSIT
Bedroom mobile home Call 762-9555, 762-8807
............. or 762-8597 UF


ITEMS FOR SALE

Assortment of dolls, some are
characters, $5 and up; baskets,
$3 and up. Call 674-3264. 9-3,9-10

Home school books, A Beka,
first grade, paid $235, $75 or best
offer. Call 643-1038. 9-3, 9-10

Restaurant equipment, 17 tables,
68 chairs, stove, fryers, char grill,
griddle, dishes. Call 643-6116.
9-3,9-10

CB box antenna, Antron 99, 75'
heavy coax, with 45' push up pole,
$80. Call 379-3010. 8-27,9-3


FREE


CARS

Mercedes-Benz ML500, 25K
miles, silver, sunroof, navigation,
excellent condition, fully loaded,
$39,000. Call 643-7948.
9-3, 9-10

1992 Ford Escort wagon, runs
good, $800 or best offer. Call 556-
0966. 9-3,9-10

2003 Buick Regal LS, 2.8L, V6,
traction control, dualclimatecontrol,
keyless entry, loaded with every-
thing but leather, four new tires,
68K miles, very nice, light copper
in color, $9,995. Call 674-2480.


1996 Ford Explorer, control track,
four wheel drive, 136K miles, sun-
roof, A/C, runs great, needs trans-
mission, asking $500. Call 379-
9505

1998 Jeep Cherokee, everything
but cruise control, really good con-
dition, runs very well, automatic,
$3,500. Call 674-7138 or 899-0269
leave message. UFN


AUTO PARTS &

ACCESSORIES

Stock Chevy wheels, four, six
lug, aluminum, air pressure sen-
sors inside, 17x7.5, $200. Call
762-4675. 8-27, 9-3


Apartments
"The Best Place to Live"
RENTAL ASSISTANCE




Call (850) 674-4202 I
16978 NW Mayo Street,
Blountstown, FL 32424.
TDL I Ii. 7 OiTi.
EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY


Rooster, grown, to good home. Call
762-8657. 9-3, 9-10


FURNITURE

Dining table, glass, no chairs, $25.
Call 762-3455. 8-27, 9-3


BABIES/INFANTS

Eddie Bauer stroller, black and
grey, lots of features, includes ex-
tra padding, for boy or girl, $40;
Little Tyke's cozy coop, $20. Call
643-3370. 9-3,9-10

Boy's bedding, airplane theme,
bumper, sheet, dust ruffle and mo-
bile, $35; wipe warmer, $10; activ-
ity play mat, $10; Radio Flyer rock
and bounce pony, for ages nine
months to three years, $30. Call
643-4362. 8-27, 9-3


APPLIANCES

Wall oven, Magic Chef by Maytag,
30", electric, self cleaning, electric
control pad on front, new $1,200,
sell for $350. Call 674-1948.
9-3, 9-10

Vacuum cleaner, Roomba dis-
covery, used but in good condi-
tion, $100. Call 643-1428 leave
message. 9-3,9-10

Water heater, 65 gallon, gas, $50.
Call 762-3455. 8-27,9-3


ELECTRONICS

DV-R, Toshiba, D-R 410 HDMI,
Upcomvert, 2008 model, book,
remote, box, $85; Nintendo 64,
one joystick, four games, great
working condition, $35 or best offer;
rare regular Nintedo game system,
great working condition, with two
joysticks, six games, asking $40.
Call 762-3477. 9-3,9-10

Digital camera, Panasonic Lu-
mix, five mega pixels, 12x zoom,
paid $450, sell for $120; CB base
microphones, Silver Eagle, D104
and D104 standard, $80 each. Call
379-3010. 8-27, 9-3


TRUCKS


S1998 Chevy Z-71, extended cab,
4WD, good condition, high mileage,
pewter color, $6,000 or best offer.
Call 643-7818. 9-3,9-10

1995 Ford F-250, V8, automatic,
runs good, $1,000 or best offer. Call
762-8785 leave message. 9-3,9-10

1983 Chevy pick-up, 400 small
block motor, four speed transmis-
sion, mud truck, $2,500 or trade for
small car of equal value. Call 643-
3258 or 643-2634. 9-3, 9-10

1992 Chevrolet Z-71, black, new
radial tires, 9" lift, excellent condi-
tion. Call 762-2084. 9-3,9-10

1984 Toyota pick-up, 22R motor,
113k original miles, asking $1,200.
Call 570-6953. 9-3,9-10

1986 Chevy C10, long wheel base,
black V8, 400 turbo transmission,
new tires, $1,000. Call 762-4561.
8-27, 9-3

1992 Toyota, runs good, everything
works, $3,500. Call 643-3812.
8-27, 9-3
2000 Ford F-150, extra cab, 4x4,
$3,500 or best offer. Call 643-4106
or 643-1811. 8-27,9-3

1999 Chevy Silverado, very nice
condition, V6, auto, A/C, 166K
miles, asking $5,400. Call 379-
8732. 8-27,9-3

1999 Dodge pickup, as is, for parts,
$800 or best offer. Call 237-1623.
8-27, 9-3


SUVS/VANS


1993 Grand Caravan, good tires,
new brakes, V6, new cold A/C,
$1,200 or best offer. Call 606-776-
1762. 9-3,9-10

1985 Bronco, paint is like new,
mud tires, runs great, 90K miles,
new dual exhaust, after market CD
player, 351 Winsler motor, asking
$3,500. Call 447-1569. 8-27, 9-3


15-inch wheels and tires, alumi-
num, lug pattern 5 on 5'1/2, $300.
Call 899-0269 or 674-7138 leave
message. UFN


GUNS/HUNTING


Cannon gun safe, double wide,
60"x60"x27", fireproof lining, versa-
tile interior, large capacity for your
guns orvaluables, serious inquiries
only, $2,000 firm. Call 643-1671
leave message. 9-3,9-10

Colt 45, series 80, stainless,
original box, excellent condition,
with manual, two clips and tactical
holster, $550. Call 379-3010.
8-27, 9-3

Remington 270 model, 700 BDL,
with scope and sling, $300. Call
272-0358


SPORTING GOODS

& EXERCISE EQUIP.

Bicycle tires, 26", four blackwalls
with tubes, like new, $5 each; two
whitewalls, brand new, $7 each.
Call 643-5417. 8-27, 9-3


MOTORCYCLES

& ATVS

Four wheeler, small, 110, $650.
Call 674-2469. 9-3,9-10

Four wheeler, 110, mid-size, brand
new, $1,000 or best offer. Call 674-
2469. 8-27,9-3

Polaris 500 four-wheeler, four
wheel drive, equipped with gun
rack. Call 762-8000. 8-27,9-3

550 Kawasaki Mule, full wind-
shield, dump body, 650 hours,
excellent condition, $3,000. Call
639-2689. 8-27,9-3

Motor scooter, 150cc, 25 miles,
goes 60 mph, 100 mpg, fully street
legal, protective cover is included,
carrierto fittwo inch hitch receiver is
available, $980 firm. Call 643-7594
or 643-5235. 8-27, 9-3


100*1 LEATHER 5 piece
LIVING -ROOM SET.
NEW, lifetime warranty,
sacrifice *699. (delivery
available). 545-7112.
5 piece bedroom set.
Brand new in boxes
$460. Can deliver 425-
8374.
All NEW Pillowtop
King Mattress Set. with
Warranty. $350. 425-
8374. Can deliver.
BRAND NEW Full Mat-
tress set, $125 or Twin
set $100 with warranty.
425-8374.
CHERRY Sleigh Bed
with NEW Mattress
set *375. Can deliver.
545-7112.








SEPTEMBER 3, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 27


*STMI
StaNl


Copyr ghted Mater a


$ynd'cated Content




Ayea ab e from Commerc'a News Prov'ders


2006 Harley Davidson Road
King, one owner, black, less than
100 miles, $14,000. Call 674-4364
or 643-7796. 8 -6T. 9-10


WATERCRAFT

1994 Nitro bass boat, 17.5', 115
hp Mercury, fish finder, dual con-
sole, green in color, $6,000 or best
offer. Call 643-7818. 9-3,9-10
Bass Tracker boat, 19', 48 hp
Evinrude motor, $2,500. Call 643-
6116. 9-3,9-10
Motor, 25 hp Mariner, electric
start, tiler handle, $700. Call 643-
4106 or 643-1811. 8-27, 9-3
Boat motor and trailer, 70 hp
Johnson, stick steering, electric
start, all welded aluminum, 11'10"
in length, new seats and battery,
trolling motor, ready for water,
$3,300, serious inquirers only. Call
674-1840. 8-27, 9-3

TOOLS & HEAVY

EQUIPMENT

2006 Kubota tractor, 4x4, 35 hp,
front end loader and drag box, ap-
proximately 300 hrs., 18', heavy
duty trailer, $17,500. Call 625-
6906. 9-3,9-10
Riding mower, yard machine,
runs good, $250. Call 643-1514.
9-3, 9-10

Bulldozer, John Deere 550G,
six way blade, no longer in need,
must go, runs great, $13,500 or
will trade for something of equal
value. Call 272-5193. 8-27,9-3

Mobile home axle, with brake
hook up, 8', $100; two mobile
home axles, 8', $75 each. Call
762-3455. 8-27,9-3


HOME

IMPROVEMENT

Two A/C units, scratched and
dented, condensing units, never
used, one ton and one and a half
ton units, $200 each. Call 674-.
8438. 8-27,9-3

Fireplace for trailer, you take out,
nice, paid $1,000, sell for $600.
Call 674-3264. 8-27, 9-3

Central air, one and a half ton,
$200. Call 643-4402. 8-27, 9-3


HOMES & LAND

One acre of land in Hosford,
$12,000. Call 294-3511. 9-3,9-10
House for sale, 3 bedroom/1.5
bathroom, one plus acre, corner
lot, fenced out building, walk to
shopping, K-12, medical, downtown
Blountstown, must relocate due to
job, asking for payoff, $113,000.
Call 606-776-1762. 9-3,9-10
2001 custom built home, five bed-
room/two bathroom, 2,700 square
feet, heated and cooled, five acres,
$255,000. Call 545-7843. 8-27,9-3
1994 mobile home, Homes of
Legend brand, 16x80, central heat
and air, full electric, three bedroom/
two bath, comes with appliances
and two porches, must be moved.
Call 566-5170. 7-23 T. 10-8
Big lot on Chipola River, located in
Calhoun County. Call 643-1514.
UFN

LOST & FOUND

Lost: ladies wallet, lost on Hwy
275 at Shonna Dr. on Aug. 26,
contents are very important, be-
longs to Virgina Harris Nichols,
nice reward offered for return with
contents. Call 674-8033. 9-3, 9-10
Found: Cadillac car keys, with
remote, several weeks ago, in
Blountstown. Call 674-8108. 8-27,9
Lost: Blue Pit, black and white,
ears cropped, wearing collar, four
months old, lost on Thursday, near
Round Man's Bar on 69 in Blount-
stown, reward offered. Call 674-
2699. 8-27, 9-3


PETS/SUPPLIES

Two horses, quarter horses, geld-
ings, 12 years old. Call 643-4246.
9-3, 9-10
Great Dane puppies, AKC regis-
tered. Call Trish at 643-2592.
9-3, 9-10
Springer spaniel, two years old,
female, $75. Call 674-3264.'9-3,9-10
Puppies, Shepherd/Black lab mix,
some solid black, some tan black,
total of nine dogs, will be ready
in two weeks, cute, playful, eyes
are open, free to good home. Call
674-4290. 9-3,9-10
Jack Russell terriers, eight
weeks old, males and females,
$100 each; Rat terriers, eight
weeks old, males and females,
$100 each. Call 379-3536.. 8-27,9-3


Kittens, seven weeks old, pale
orange, tabby, free to good home.
Call 557-1346. 8-27,9-3
Miniature Schnauzers, CKC reg-
istered, three females, four and
a half-five months old. Call 643-
5631 or 643-4367. 8-27,9-3

WANTED

Wanted: I am trying to get in
contact with Shannon Kent. If he
does not contact me within three
weeks, his rights, as a father to
Eric Michael, will be terminated by
the courts. Thanks in advance for
anyone who comes forward with
information. If anyone has any
information on his whereabouts,
please contact Laura Schofield at
459-0088. 9-3, 9-10
Wanted: Will give $60 to $80 for
the bodies of junk autos and $125
for full bodies of junk autos. Call
Jimmy Dawson at 850-544-3478.
7-2 T. 9-10
Wanted: Junk cars and trucks, any
condition, we pay cash. Call 762-
8459 or 272-6836 cell. UFN

YARD SALE

Multi-family sale, 18384 NW Bob
Guilford Road in Blountstown, one
mile North of RiverTown church,
Sept. 6, 7 a.m.-12 p.m. (CT),
clothes for children and adults, lots
of miscellaneous items. Call 674-
2848. 9-3
Yard sale, Sept. 5 and 6, Friday
and Saturday, Mickey Street, be-
hind ball fields in Bristol, starting at
8 a.m., clothes for everyone. Call
447-0468. 9-3
Multi-family sale, Sept. 6, starting
at 8 a.m., will be in covered area,
25478 NE Evans Street in Altha,
clothes for little boys and adults,
furniture, and dishes. Call 762-
3356. 9-3
Yard sale, Sept. 6, 15312 JW
Rackley Road, .25 miles West of
Chevron in Altha, starts at 7 a.m.
(CT), furniture, toolboxes, hunting
clothes, cancel if rain. Call 762-
3354. 9-3
Yard sale, Pear Street and Aza-
lea Street in Blountstown, Sept. 6,
starting at 7 a.m. (CT), furniture, ap-
pliances, tools, used paneling old
dishes, toys, guitar, adult old-style
bike, movies, children's clothes,
men's clothes, name brand wom-
en's clothes sizes 8-18, women's
shoes sizes 7.5 and up, shelves,
books, bedding, something for ev-
eryone. 9-3


CLASSIFIED ADS
The Journal is glad to run your non-business classified ads free ,
of charge for two weeks. If you would like to advertise the same
item after that time, there is a charge of $2 per week, payable in "
advance. *
Please rememberthat ourfree classified are for NON-BUSINESS '
related items only. Display ads (ads with borders) are also avail-
able in the classified section, starting at a cost of $11.50 per week
for a 2-inch-high, one-column ad.
If you'd like something bigger with art or a special border, we a
have a chart of sizes and prices you can look over at our office. For P
more information, give us a call at 643-3333 or 1-800-717-3333.


THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL


DECLASSIFIED


To place your ad, call 643-3333 by noon Eastern
Time on Saturday. Non-business ads run FREE for 2 weeks.


wmm


- *


. -


- - Z7








Page 28 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 3,2008


FDOH urges precautionary measures

to prevent mosquito-borne illnesses


TALLAHASSEE Due
to floodwaters from Tropical
Storm Fay, Florida Department
of Health (DOH) officials
emphasize the importance of
Florida's residents and visitors
protecting themselves against
mosquito-borne diseases. DOH
continues to advise the public
to remain diligent in protecting
themselves from mosquito bites"
by following the "5 D's," which
include:
Dusk and Dawn Avoid
being outdoors when mosquitoes
are seeking blood. For many
species, this is during the dusk
and dawn hours.
Dress Wear clothing that
covers most of your skin.
DEET- When the potential
exists for exposure to mosquitoes,
repellents containing DEET (N,N-
diethyl-meta-toluamide, orN,N-
diethyl-3 -methylbenzamide)
are recommended. Picaridin
and oil of lemon eucalyptus
are other repellent options..
If additional protection is
necessary, a permethrin repellent
can be applied directly to your
clothing. Again, always follow
the manufacturer's directions.
Drainage Check around
your home to rid the area of
standing water, which is where
mosquitoes can lay their eggs.
TIPS ON REPELLENT USE
Always read label directions
carefully for the approved usage
before applying a repellent to
skin. Some repellants are not
suitable for children.
Products with concentrations
of up to 30 percent DEET are
generally recommended. Other
potential mosquito repellents,
as reported by the Centers for
Disease Control and Prevention
(CDC) in April 2005, contain
picaridin or oil of lemon
eucalyptus. These products
are generally available at local
pharmacies. Look for active


ingredients to be listed on the
product label.
Apply insect repellent to
exposed skin, or onto clothing,
but not under clothing.
*- In protecting children, read
label instructions to be sure the
repellent is age-appropriate.
According to the CDC, mosquito
repellents containing oil of lemon
eucalyptus should not be used on
children under the age of 3 years.
DEET is not recommended on
children younger than 2 months
old.
Infants should be kept
indoors or mosquito netting
should be used over-carriers
when mosquitoes are present.
Avoid applying repellents
to the hands of children. Adults
should apply repellent first
to their own hands and then
transfer it to the child's skin and
clothing.
If additional protection is
necessary, apply a permethrin
repellent directly to your
clothing. Again, always follow
the manufacturer's directions.
TIPS ON ELIMINATING
MOSQUITO BREEDING
SITES
Elimination of breeding sites
is one of the keys to prevention.
Clean out eaves, troughs
and gutters.
Remove old tires or drill
holes in those used in playgrounds
to drain.
Turn over or remove empty
plastic pots.
Pick up all beverage
containers and cups.
Check tarps on boats or
other equipment that may collect
water.
Pump out bilges on boats.
Replace water in birdbaths
and pet or other animal feeding
dishes at least once a week.
Change water in plant trays,
including hanging plants, at least
once a week.


Reimioe l egetation or
obstrticuon- in draIin.'.e ditches
1that present the floh of \ ter
S, miptoms of \\est Nile irus
ma,', include headache, f\ei
fjlitie, dizzines.s. w'ea.kness ijnd
conIfusion. PIlh,Sicians should
Contact their co int health
department if tihe\ suspect ain
indi\ idual ImII\ hai ca niosquIto-
horne illne.ss. DOH laboratoine,
pro% ide lest ing ser' ices for
ph siN ians treating patients dith
clinical Sil'iS of mosquito-borne

DOH continties to conduct
site'i ide sur\ eillance for
mosquito borne illnesses.
including \esi Nile WN \ iLrus,
Eastem Equine E ncephalom. elitis
(EEEi. St. Louis Encephalitis
(SLE). m la-a and dengue
FOr IHOi i& ilorl'lh lloli i'i
il sql tollO-hoioil t' /lncsse' 'i/i
DOH's Environmental Health
H1'b swie alt lirp nnit:.do/ sliate
17.us Environent conmmunninr
arbo ra'l inde.x\ Ihl. call the
fest Nile I ins Hot line at 1-8-
880-5"S2 or 'our local counri'
hleadepaIrnet'll.


ELECT


Becky Trickey


MIT



1 Y({e^}! (W s];


To all my Family, Friends and Supporters



THANK YOU!

First, I want to Thank GOD. I want to THANK my family
and friends for all the help and support given to me dur-
ing this step of my campaign. Especially the ones who
worked so hard on election day at the polls. I want to
THANK YOU the citizens of Calhoun County for putting
your trust in me. Maybe someday I'll be able to find all
the right words to tell you all how much you mean to me.
In the meantime, I just hope you all know that I THANK
YOU with all my heart or your support. However, the
race is not complete. I would like to say now that I would
appreciate your vote whether it be early voting, voting
absentee, or going to the polls on November 4.


Please vote for me... Becky Trickey Smith
for Calhoun County Tax Collector.
Again THANK YOU and may God Bless You.
Frilidl Al.,rh_,.rrie'r i Appri,, P.d ard PFa3 lor py B-i. -v Trickev Smirn Demo:cr3l for Ta Coll.-l':r


SUPERINTEN ENT
of Calhoun County Schools
Dear Citizens of Calhoun County,

I wish to personally thank each of you for your encour-
agement, vote and support on August 26 in my bid for
re-election as your Superintendent of Schools.

I humbly ask for your continued support in the general
election on November 4. Working together we can keep
our commitment to preparing our children to meet the
challenges of tomorrow.

Again, thank you so much for your vote and continued
support.
Sincerely,
A" ^ SuzNtev
POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT PAID FOR AND APPROVED BY
MARY SUE NEVES, DEMOCRAT, FOR SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS
1 I Ii









SEPTEMBER 3,2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 29


P SQ Continuing education courses set


X 0O/ld 'ik(e eo eli \

ca/ of di5rct one

for -your votee5 cnd

Suporf. I hope to

c on6ieue 5erv'. /o you 5

ourd CVi/7oun Coui'y


MARIANNA-Chipola College will offer a
variety of short courses in the coming weeks.
The following Mandatory training for Child
Care Facility Personnel and Family Child
Care Home are scheduled: Child Abuse and
Neglect, Sept. 12, 6 to 10 p.m.; Child Growth
and Develop.m.ent, Sept. 13, 7 a.m. to 1 p.m.;
Behavioral Observation and Screening, Sept.
8 and 10, 6 to 9 p.m.; Rules and Regulations
(center), Sept. 15 and 17, 6 to 9 p.m.; Health,
Safety and Nutrition, Sept. 20, 7 a.m. to 3 p.m.;
Pre-School Appropriate Practices, Oct. 4, 7 a.m.
to 5 p.m.; Special Needs Appropriate Practices,
Nov. 1, 7 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Costs range from $17
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"'l''I L'f'1 '''q '11 it H-f i :j Iv JIo -aduroTl. (fl w ro-(i'. 42iuneOB


( Calhoun County Election Results
"-from the First Primary heldAug. 26
UNOFFICIAL RESULTS
SHERIFF Democratic
Precinct Number 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11A 11B 12 13 Total
Charles McCrone Jr. 230 77 75 170 112 94 59 95 32 58 17 176 144 18 1357
David L. Tatum 413 157 138 310 294 238 103 119 52 93 23 230 267 24 2461
TAX COLLECTOR Democratic
Doris Burkett 310 114 102 172 178 131 74 88. 24 48 .21 151 167 18 1598
Becky Trickey Smith 237 79 92 258 171 180 56 76 52 72 7 156 181 13 1630
Royce Gene Wise 106 45 23 53 58 19 36 56 7 30 12 110 72 11 638
SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS Democratic
Ron Mears 205 76 52 204 157 121 83 68 31 42 3 42 152 16 1252
Mary Sue Neves 293 99 64 68 85 115 46 85 26 71 25 287 184 20 1468
Dr.GlendaSue.Vikery 150 61 103 213 165 94 37 65. 26 36 12, 86 79 6 1133
SUPERVISOR OF ELECTIONS Democratic
Margie Laramore 460 1146 4661 345 1288 11451 115159 36 88 1 24 12871 273-1261 2538
JaraWhitworth 189 94 71 137 115 186 50 53 47 57 16 126 140 16 1297
COUNTY COMMISSIONER DISTRICT 1 Democratic Precincts 7 & 8
Jerry Guilford 229 45 72 346
Shelby Hires 209 67 59 335
Danny Ray Wise 209 54 90 353
COUNTY COMMISSIONER DISTRICT 3 Democratic Precincts 5 & 6
Teddie M. Attaway Jr. 22 56 78
Wanda Abbott Chason 72 19 91
Jeral R. Hall Sr. 198 67 265
Steve Johnson 55 36 91
Don Miller 147 199 346
COUNTY COMMISSIONER DISTRICT 5 Democratic Precincts 9, 10, 11B & 13
Thomas G. Flowers 18 44 147 11 220
Steve G. Mears, Sr. 2 12 37 6 57
Clifford "Jeff" O'Brian 28 27 113 14 182
Harold E. Pickron 32 67 121 10 230
SCHOOL BOARD DISTRICT 1 Non Partisan
Edward F. Holley 197 47 65 309
Steve Mears Jr. 44 4 19 67
Danny Ryals 198 90 86 374
Grant Williams 275 44 71 390
SCHOOL BOARD DISTRICT 4 Non Partisan
Clifford Jackson 9 100 109
ThaddeusJ. Simmons 19 151 170
Kenneth Speights 17 190 207
TOWN OF ALTHA Town Mayor
Sarah Eagleston 20 20
Wes Johnston 70 70
Tim Lewis 56 56
Rachel Watson 26 26
TOWN OF ALTHA Town Councilman


* 3


$B495Imo.









Page 30 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 3, 2008


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIR-
CUIT IN AND FOR LIBERTY
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO. 07168CA

TAYLOR, BEAN & WHITAKER
MORTGAGE CORPORATION,
Plaintiff,

vs.
MELISSA LOPEZ, et al,
Defendant(s)

NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pur-
suant to a Final Judgement of
Mortgage Foreclosure dated Au-
gust 21,2008 and entered in Case
No. 07168CA of the Circuit Court
of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in
and for LIBERTY County, Florida
wherein TAYLOR, BEAN & WHI-
TAKER MORTGAGE CORPORA-
TION, is the Plaintiff and MELIS-
SA LOPEZ; FRANCISCO LOPEZ;
ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PAR-
TIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH,
UNDER, AND AGAINST THE
HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL
DEFENDANTS) WHO ARE
NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR
ALIVE, WHETHER SAID. UN-
KNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM
AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES,
HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES,
OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; are
the Defendants, I will sell to the
highest and best bidder for cash
at FRONT DOOR OF THE LIB-
ERTY COUNTY COURTHOUSE
at 11:00AM, on the 30 day of
September, 2008, the following
described property as set forth in
said Final Judgement:

A PARCEL OF LAND LYING IN
THE NORTHWEST 1/4 OF THE
NORTHWEST 1/4 OF SEC-
TION 18, TOWNSHIP 1 SOUTH,
RANGE 7 WEST, LIBERTY
COUNTY, FLORIDA AND BE-
ING A PART OF THAT CERTAIN
TRACT OF LAND DESCRIBED
IN OFFICIAL RECORD BOOK 39,
PAGE 677 OF THE PUBLIC RE-
CORDS OF SAID COUNTY AND
BEING MORE PARTICULARLY
DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:
BEGIN AT A 5/8 INCH RE-BAR
WITH CAP (PSM3031) MARK-
ING THE NORTHWEST CORNER
OF THE ABOVE DESCRIBED
LANDS AND RUN THENCE S 00
DEGREES 44 MINUTES 00 SEC-
ONDS W ALONG THE WEST-
ERN BOUNDARY OF SAID
LANDS A DISTANCE OF 161.03


I S 9 -
S A


FEET TO A 5/8 INCH RE-BAR
WITH CAP (PSM3031); THENCE
S 89 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 43
SECONDS E A DISTANCE OF
400.43 FEET TO A 5/8 INCH RE-
BAR WITH CAP (PSM3031) ON
THE EASTERN BOUNDARY OF
SAID LANDS; THENCE N 00
DEGREES 47 MINUTES 47 SEC-
ONDS ALONG SAID EASTERN
BOUNDARY A DISTANCE OF
161.03 FEET TO A CONCRETE
MONUMENT (LS1785) MARK-
ING THE NORTHEAST CORNER
OF SAID LANDS; THENCE N 89
DEGREES 39 MINUTES 43 SEC-
ONDS W ALONG THE NORTH-
ERN BOUNDARY OF SAID
LANDS A DISTANCE OF 400.61
FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGIN-
NING.
THE WESTERLY PORTION
OF THE ABOVE DESCRIBED
LANDS BEING SUBJECT TO A
COUNTY MAINTAINED ROAD-
WAY KNOWN AS JACOBS
LANE.
TOGETHER WITH THAT CER-
TAIN MOBILE HOME LOCATED
THEREON, SERIAL NUMBERS
GAFL575A77756-BH21 AND
GAFL575B77756-BH21
A/K/A 14750 NW JACOBS LANE,
BRISTOL, FL 32321
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any,
other than the property owner as
of the date of the Lis Pendens
must file a claim within sixty (60)
days after the sale.

WITNESS MY HAND and the seal
of this Court on August 26, 2008.


Robert Hill
Clerk of the Circuit Cour
By: Vanell Summers
Deputy Clerk


IN THE CIRCUIT COUF
SECOND JUDICIAL C
AND FOR LIBERTY
FLORIDA

CASE NO. 2008-CA-42

TALQUIN SPRINGS (
PARTNERSHIP,
Plaintiff,
vs.
KENOL MISTILIEN;
KNOWN TENANTS,
Defendants.

NOTICE OF SA


Notice is hereby given that, pursu-
ant to Final Judgement of Fore-
close entered in the above-styled
cause, in the Circuit Court of Lib-
erty County, Florida, I will sell the
property situate in Liberty County,
Florida, described as:

LOT 3, OF SUMMERWIND,
ACCORDING TO THE PLAT
THEREOF AS RECORDED IN
PLAT BOOK A, PAGE 65, OF
THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF LIB-
ERTY COUNTY, FLORIDA.

at public sale, to the highest bid-
der, for cash, at the front door of
the Liberty County Courthouse,
Bristol, Florida at 11:00 a.m., on
October 14, 2008. Any person
claiming an interest in the surplus
from the sale, other than the prop-
erty owner, must file a claim within
60 days after the sale.

ROBERT HILL
CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT

Vanell Summers
Deputy Clerk 9-3,10-08


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
LIBERTY COUNTY, FLORIDA
FILE NO. 07-28-CP

IN RE: ESTATE OF
MAGGIE FLOYD -
Deceased.

NOTICE TO CREDITORS


The administration of the estate


of Maggie Floyd, deceased, whose
date of death was November 23,
rt 2006 and whose Social Security
Number is 261-34-3264 is pend-
9-3,10-08 ing in the Circuit Court for Liberty
County, Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is P.O. Box
RT IN THE 399, Bristol, Florida 32321.-
IRCUIT IN The names and addresses of the
COUNTY, personal representative and the
personal representative's attorney
is set forth below.
The creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims
GENERAL or demands against decedent's
estate on whom a copy of this
notice has been served must file
their claims with this court WITHIN
AND UN- THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AF-
TER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE
OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE TIME
,LE OF SERVICE OF THIS NOTICE
ON THEM.


I Lokig So W rk'


a 9-3,10-08


All other creditors of the decedent
and other persons having claims or
demands against decedent's es-
tate must file their claims with this
court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER
THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUB-
LICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITH-
IN THE TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF
THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH
IS BARRED.
The date of the first publication of
this notice is September 3, 2008.

Attorney for Personal
Representative
James H. Richey, P.A.
Florida Bar No. 0846139
707 W. Eau Gallie Blvd
Melbourne, FL 32935
Telephone (321) 242-7552

Personal Representatives
Emanuel Allen -
711 August Street, SE
Palm Bay, FL 32909 09-3,10-08


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIR-
CUIT IN AND FOR LIBERTY
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO. 39-2008-CA-22
DIVISION_
INDYMAC BANK F.S.B.,
Plaintiff,

vs.
SAMMIE T. CRUM, et al,
Defendants)

NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant- to a Final Judgement
of Mortgage Foreclosure dated
August 21, 2008 and entered in
Case No. 39-2008-CA-22 of the
Circuit Court of the SECOND Ju-
dicial Circuit in and for LIBERTY
County, Florida wherein INDY-
MAC BANK F.S.B., is the Plaintiff
and SAMMIE T. CRUM; THE UN-
KNOWN SPOUSE OF SAMMIE
T. CRUM N/K/A JANE DOE; DO-
NAVON CRUM; THE UNKNOWN
SPOUCE OF DONAVON CRUM
N/K/A JANE DOE 2 N/K/A JANE
DOE 2; JO ANN CRUM; BRUCE
K. HILT D/B/A VINTAGE FLOOR &
DOOR; TENANT #1 N/K/A JOHN
DOE, and TENANT #2 N/K/A
JANE DOE 3 are the Defendants, I
will sell to the highest and best bid-
der for cast at FRONT DOOR OF
THE LIBERTY COUNTY COURT-
HOUSE at 11:00AM, on the 30 day
of September, 2008, the following
described property as set forth in
said Final Judgement:

COMMENCE AT ROD AND
MARKING THE SOUTHWEST
CORNER OF BLOCK 34 OF
THE TOWN OF SUMATRA, SEC-
TION 30, TOWNSHIP 5 SOUTH,
RANGE 7 WEST, LIBERTY
COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE
RUN NORTH 84 DEGREES 48
MINUTES 20 SECONDS EAST
ALONGTHENORTHERLYRIGHT
OF WAY OF 8TH STREET 673.44
FEET TO A ROD AND CAP FOR
THE POINT OF BEGINNING;
THENCE CONTINUE ALONG
SAID RIGHT OF WAY NORTH
84 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 49


.SECONDS EAST192.2g- FEET
TO A ROD AND CAP; THENCE
LEAVING SAID RIG"T OF WAY
RUN NORTH 05 DEGREES 11
MINUTES 01 SECONDS WEST
320.07 FEET TO A" ROD AND
CAP LYING ON THE NORTH-
ERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF 7TH
STREET; THENCE RUN ALONG
SAID RIGHT OF WAY, SOUTH
84 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 49
SECONDS WEST 170.60 FEET
TO ROD AND CAP; THENCE
LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAY
RUN SOUTH 01 DEGREES 18
MINUTES 34 SECONDS EAST
320.83 FEET TO THE POINT
OF BEGINNING. A/K/A 10780
SW HIGHWAY 22, BRISTOL, FL
32321

Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any,
other than the property owner as
of the date of the Lis Pendens
must file a claim within sixty (60)
days after the sale.

WITNESS MY HAND and the seal
of this Court on August 26, 2008.

Robert Hill
Clerkof the Circuit Court
By: V. Summers
Deputy Clerk 09-3,10-08


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR LIBERTY
COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No.: 08-109-DR
Division: FAMILY LAW

Charles W. Coxwell, Petitioner
and
Rosalinda A. Dominguez,
Respondent.

NOTICE OF ACTION FOR
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE

To: Rosalinda A. Dominguez of
541 Lailay Corner Bomtaub St.
Gstalca, Dipolog City, Zambonga
del Norte Philippines 7100.

You are notified that an action has
been filed against you and that
you are required to serve a copy
of your written defenses, if any, to
it on Charles W. Coxwell whose
address is P.O. Box 399, Bristol, Fl
32321 before service on Petitioner
or immediately thereafter. If you
fail to do so, a default may be
entered against you for the re-
lief demanded in the petition.

Copies of all court documents
in this case, including orders,
are available at the Clerk of the
Circuit Court's office. You may
review these documents upon
request.

You must keep the Clerk of-the
Circuit Court's office notified
of your current address. (You
may file Notice of Current Ad-
dress, Florida Supreme Court
Approved Family Law Form
12.915.) Future papers in this
lawsuit will be mailed to the ad-
dress on record at the clerk's
office.

Warning: Rule 12.285, Florida
Family Law Rules of Procedure,
requires certain automatic dis-
closure of documents and infor-
mation. Failure to comply can
result in sanctions, including
dismissal or striking of plead-
ings.

Dated: August 19, 2008.
: ROBERT HILL
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT
COURT

By: Kathleen E.Brbwn: .6_
Deputy Clerk 8-27t 917


SCHOOL HEALTH SUPPORT AIDE
Medical experience with children preferred.
Duties to include: Assist licensed nurse in K 8
school clinic with medications, screenings, first aide,
etc.
Bilingual (English/Spanish) preferred but not re-
quired.
To apply please visit https://peoplefirst.myflorida.
com/logon.htm
For questions you may contact:
Tina Tharpe, Administrative Assistant II
Liberty County Health Department
(850) 643-2415, ext. 240
9-3-08


One Stop Career Center
16908 NE Pear St Suite 2,
Blountstown Phone (850) 674-5088
The following positions are
available: Construction Trades
Helper, Janitorial, Dietetic
Technician, Construction
Worker, Office Clerk, Food
Service Worker, Production
Manager, Truck Driver. EOE
Service Chipola Workforce Board UFN







SEPTEMBER 3, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 31


REE A- 1Tfltt SEKVICE BOND
& STUMP GRINDING &.INSURED
- Safe Tree Removal STUMP
* Pruning &Trimming GRINDING
- 150' Aerial Bucket Best Prices
- Storm Damage In The Area!
* Crane Service in TheAra
R residential & m m erc at .. ....
AFFORDABLE QUALITY SERVICE
Call 674-3434 or 1 -800-628-8733
VICKERY ENTERPRISES, INC.
Russell Vickerv Jr., 'Owner UFN


I, Charles McCrone, Jr. would like to
thank family, friends, and neighbors
of Calhoun County for supporting and
having faith in me in the 2008 Sheriff's
race. It has been an .F:0
honor and I thank"
each and everyone
of you from the bot-
tom of my heart.
Until next time, -
God Bless.
Paid Political Advertisement Paid for and Approved by
Charles McCrone Jr., Democrat for Sheriff




Crowns

\ d Crowns or caps have been used
in dentistry in some form for hun-
.- j dreds of years. In general, crowns
/are recommended for teeth that
are so badly broken down by
caries, wear, or trauma or some
combination of the three that
Dr. Larry J. Cook other restorative methods (such
as fillings) are not appropriate. When certain strategic
portions of the tooth are gone or already replaced by fill-
ing or restorative material, the tooth becomes too weak
to be statistically likely to withstand biting and chewing
forces. Unlike fillings which rest within the confines of
the tooth, a crown fits over tooth like a thimble over the
finger. The importance of the crown is that it fits over and
around the tooth far and reinforces it like a ring reinforc-
es and contains the staves of a barrel. In short, it makes
the tooth less likely to break while replacing the miss-
ing tooth structure. This has important implications for
both the form and function of the newly restored tooth.
It is strong enough to with stand biting forces, and when
constructed or porcelain by a skilled technician, can look
exactly like the teeth around it.

Originally, most crowns were constructed of gold, which
is a very strong material, but not the most cosmetically
pleasing. In the 1960is a method of fusing porcelain to
gold was perfected and most crowns for the last 45 to
50 years have been constructed of porcelain fused to a
gold coping or core. Technicians have now developed a
way to make cores out of zirconium, which act like metal
as far as strength, but does not have the metallic color
and can in fact be shaded to different tooth colors. These
core now even are strong enough for bridge work. With
such beautiful materials to work with, it is a wonderful
time to be a dentist.

The one downside to performing this type of dentistry is
that in some circumstances, some healthy tooth struc-
ture must be sacrificed in order to create the shape of
the preparation so
the resulting crown
is beautiful, strong, M
and long-lasting.
Only you, in con- 4307 Third Avenue
sultation with your Marianna, FL 32446
dentist, can decide
if a crown is appro- (850) 526-4220
private for any given
dental problem you www.drlarrycook.com
might have.







Page 32 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL SEPTEMBER 3,2008


Polinial Adiertisemeni Paid for and Approved b% Donnie Convers, Democral for Sheriff


iawrence iimaL HOSPiTaL
43 N. Cleveland Street in Quincy OFFICE (850) 627-8338
Jerry C. Lawrence, DVM
Emergencies: (850) 856-5827 or (850) 856-5918
Hours: Monday Friday 7 a.m. to 5 p.m.
l .'k DOCTOR'S HOURS BY APPOINTMENT.
We provide: Boarding Grooming Preventative Healthcare programs
which include vaccinations and yearly checkups Spay/neuter program
to reduce unwanted puppies/kittens.
PLUS MANY OTHER SERVICES.
CALL US ANYTIME IF YOU HAVE ANY QUESTIONS. U


I qWWVWV V WW-W V W VV V wWV ~V 'V I JI


TH&J]XK


~Dear Friends,
From the bottom of my heart I most sincerely and humbly thank you for your vote.
You have given me a great and wonderful gift and I am most grateful to you for it. You may rest assured that
the faith that you placed in me by your vote will not be misplaced. You may also be assured that you have a
friend in the Sheriff's office.
This race was hard fought. I faced two very strong opponents. I thank them for a clean campaign. I respect
them for the courage and strength they showed. They are both good men.
To those who did not vote for me, I hold no ill will. I understand that there are many reasons that you did not
vote for me. You may have had a family member in the race and felt obligated to him. You may have had a
long-time friend in the race. Whatever the reason, please know that I respect your decision and want to be
your Sheriff also. I extend to you my hand in friendship and promise you that I will be no less
a friend to you than if you had voted for me. I want to serve all of the people of this great county.
My race is not over. I face two opponents in the Novem-
ber general election. I ask all of you for your vote again. I
am the most experienced person in the race and the best
I OHIM e ^O]Il eriS qualified to take care of you and your family.
fo LibeXt CaXiMty Notwithstanding the fact that I have another campaign to
run, I will never forget what you have done for me in this
Race. My family and I are very grateful to you for it. Thank
you dear friends, thank you.


M4)Oemmbexr' '4, 04OS




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