Group Title: Calhoun-Liberty Journal (Bristol, Fla.).
Title: The Calhoun-Liberty journal
ALL ISSUES CITATION
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00027796/00113
 Material Information
Title: The Calhoun-Liberty journal
Alternate Title: Calhoun Liberty journal
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Calhoun-Liberty Journal
Publisher: Liberty Journal, Inc.
Liberty Journal
Place of Publication: Bristol, Fla
Publication Date: August 20, 2008
Copyright Date: 2008
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Bristol (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Liberty County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Calhoun County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Liberty -- Bristol
United States of America -- Florida -- Calhoun
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in Sept. 1991.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 11, no. 38 (Sept. 18, 1991).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00027796
Volume ID: VID00113
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AKN4565
oclc - 33425067
alephbibnum - 002046630
electronic_aleph - 003298625
electronic_oclc - 60662266
lccn - sn 95047245
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly journal (Bristol, Fla.)

Full Text




Boy OK after

accidental

shooting at

Bristol home
by Teresa Eubanks, Journal Editor
"It wasn't intentional, but it was very careless,"
said Liberty County Investigator Steve Swier about
an accidental shooting that sent a 12-year-old boy
to the hospital with a shoulder wound Monday.
Doctors said the shot fired from a .22 pistol "went
clean through his right shoulder," according to
Swier, bypassing an artery by an eighth of an inch.
"It missed an artery, bone and all major organs,
leaving -only minor tissue damage," he said.,
The victim was transported by ambulance to
Tallahassee Memorial Hospital, where he was
treated and later released that evening.
After interviewing both boys, who were not
named because of their ages, Swier gave the
following account of the accident.
The victim was visiting a 16-year-old friend who
lives on Odom Lane. The two were in the boy's
bedroom around noon, looking at a pistol that had
been removed from a cabinet in the home,
Swier said the teen said the gun, which belonged
to his adult guardian, was stored unloaded. He told
the investigator he put in a single bullet and spun
the chamber around. "He said he clicked it off a
few times but just underestimated where the round
was in the firearm."
Then the gun went off, sending a bullet through
the right shoulder of the younger boy sitting about
three feet away.
The injured youngster insisted that his friend take
him home and the two climbed on a four-wheeler,
with the older boy taking his friend about a-quarter
of a mile to his home on County Road 379.
The boy's father then began driving the boy to
the hospital but stopped at the parking lot of Tolar
School, where he called for help.
"It's really very, very fortunate," said Swier.
"Maybe this will serve as a reminder for adults to
keep their firearms secured," although he added
that by law, unloaded guns do not have to be locked
up.


500
includes
tax


THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY



JOURNAL


. ,( Volume 28, Number 34 S Wednesday, Aug. 20, 2008 ,


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Missy Hall, 104, recognized

at annual banquet in Bristol
Liberty County's own Missy Hall was honored as the eldest in attendance
at last week's Seniors in Bloom banquet, held at Veterans Memorial Park
Civic Center in Bristol. The 104-year-old woman was recognized at the
annual event, which brings together people of all ages and talents to
celebrate the area's eldest residents. For more on this special event,
please see page 21. DANIEL WILLIAMS PHOTO


A. Clearing

the way

tobuild

a new

school
X.. .Bulldozers are busy on
the campus.of Hosford
School where old
buildings are being pulled
down to make room for
.construction to start on
a long-awaited two-story
school. The community
.i. .. receivedivd $14.9 million
for the project.
JOHNNY EUBANKS PHOTO



-111 II"II Sherif~s Log ...2 Page to the Past...11 4-H Day Camps held...13 Llberty County Sample Ballots...28, 30 & 31
7 8122 009010 8 Birtlays..23 Letters1...34 Altha Open House...33 Fairy Rings...48 Obituaries...56 Classifieds...58 & 59


7"0


2 11G6/2009
'ZS


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Page 2 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL AUGUST 20, 2008 *


Woman gets 30 stitches after injury

in beer bottle brawl in Blountstown


A neighborhood cookout
erupted into a fight and ended
with the arrests of two women
who reportedly threw beer
bottles at each other, according
to a report from the Calhoun
County Sheriff's Office.
Witnesses gave conflicting
accounts of who started it, but
both Paula Renee Pitts and
Cassandra Michelle Jones
were taken into custody.
When deputies responded to
a call at Owens Lane Sunday
night in Blountstown, they
found Pitts intoxicated and
yelling profanities. She then
directed her anger at them,
spouting a racial slur at one


ARREST
REPORTS
compiled by
Journal
Editor
Teresa
Eubanks


of the officers, according to
the report.
The incident left Jones with
injuries that required 30 stitches
and she was transported to the
emergency room at Calhoun
Liberty Hospital. Pitts' four-
year-daughter sustained an
unspecified injury from broken


glass when a bottle was thrown
at her mother as she stood next
to her.
After talking with numerous
witnesses, an officer concluded
in his report, "What remains
unclear is who threw first and
who threw multiple times." It
was noted that neither of the
women were interviewed that
night due to their suspected
level of intoxication.
Pitts was charged with
felony battery and disorderly
intoxication. Jones was
charged with cruelty towards
a child. Both women were
also charged with a probation
violation.


Woman arrested for threatening and

running after man with boxcutter


A disturbance at the
Southern Express in
Blountstown resulted in the
arrest of a woman on charges
of aggravated assault after she
allegedly threatened a man
with a boxcutter, according to
a report from the Blountstown
Police Department.
An officer was called to the
scene at 7 p.m. Sunday, where


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he found Gwen McKelvin
yelling and arguing with
Donnie Lee Donaldson. After
separating the two, Donaldson
stated that he was pumping gas
when McKelvin pulled up and
started cursing at him.
He said he then began
cursing back at her, which
prompted her to get out of the
car. He said she was,holding


a boxcutter-style knife and
threatened him.
Donaldson said he threw
the gas nozzle at her and ran
behind the store as she chased
him. He said he armed himself
with a metal bar and came back
to the front of the business to
check on his girlfriend.
McKelvin was charged with
aggravated assault.


STUMP GRINDING

$15
A-1 Tree Service
& Stump Grinding
- 2 FrT. Vickery Enterprises, Inc.
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Best prices in the industry. 1-800-628-8733



Cookout to benefit

Calhoun

Liberty

Hospital
Intersection of
S.R. 71 & S.R. 20
BLOUNTSTOWN

Tuesday, Aug. 26
at 11:00 (CT)

Menu includes
Boston Butt,
Baked Beans,
Potato Salad
Sponsored by Preble-Rish
Consulting Engineers


CALHOUN COUNTY
August 11
*Sharon Taylor, VOCC (times two)
August 12
*Albert Marshall, aggravated battery
*Thaddeus Evans Alston, trespass after warn-
ing
*Robert Jerome Taylor, VOP (warrantless)
*Heather Lynn Pierce, VOP County
August 13
*Gary Otha Chapman, FTA
*Jasmine Paige Williams, FTA
*Geanna Lynell Hitt, VOCR
August 14
*Beth Ann Adams, FTA
*Alene Vickers, FTA
August 15
*Richard Alan Mayo, Jr., grand theft
*Sharlett Gonzalez, VOSS
*Daniel William Maxwell, disorderly intoxica-
tion
*Cornelius Eugene Akines, improper exhibit of
firearm, warrant Hillsborough County, posses-
sion of firearm by felon, holding for Hillsborough
County
*Timothy Vann Smith, disorderly intoxication

August 16
*April Nicole McCollum, VOP, VOSS, driving
while license suspended or revoked
*Holley Danyelle Kent, driving while license
suspended or revoked with knowledge
August 17
*Chasity Marie Coleman, FTA Jefferson Coun-
ty
*Paula Renee Pitts, disorderly intoxication,
felony battery, VOP
*Gwendolyn Elaine McKelvin, aggravated as-
sault
*Cassandra Michelle Jones, cruelty towards a
child, VOP


LIBERTY COUNTY
August 11
*Thomas Lee Miller, grand theft
August 12
*Sandy Coburn, holding for CCSO.
August 13
*Jasmine Williams, holding for CCSO.
*Geanna Hitt, holding for CCSO
*Sedessa Fisher, holding for Century Cl trans-
port
August 14
*Joyce Mears, VOP.
*Alana Vickers, holding for CCSO
*Beth Ann Adams, holding for CCSO
August 15
*Billy Pierce, out of county warrant
*Kevin Tyler Martina, holding for Franklin
County
August 16
*April N. McCollum, holding for CCSO.
*Holley Danyelle Kent, holding for CCSO.
August 17
*Paula Renee Pitts, holding for CCSO.
*Gwen Elaine McKelvin, holding for CCSO.
Listingsinclude namefollowedbychargeandidentificationof arrestingagency The namesabove represent
those charged. We remind our readers that all are presumed innocent until proven guilty.
Blountstown Police Dept. .
August 11 through August 17, 2008
Citations issued:
Accidents...............03 Traffic Citations.... ..... 04
Special details (business escorts, traffic details)......89
Business alarms.....11 Residential alarms..........02
Complaints.... ..........................................................150






AUGUST 20, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 3


Comprehensive roadside sobriety

checkpoint set for Bristol Aug. 29


Thank. /ow!

To the folks
of Liberty
County, I t
personally
thank you
for the
opportu- .
nity
serving
you for
the past
four years
as your County
Commissioner, District 1. I ask you,
the people of Liberty County for your
vote and support on August 26, to
re-elect me Albert "Butch" Butcher
for County Commissioner for Dis-
trict 1.
Once again, I thank you.
Albert "Butch" Butcher
Paid Political advertisement paid for and approved by Albert Butcher, Democrat, Candidate for Liberty County Commission.


RE-ELECT


PATRICIA S.


BRISTOL The Florida Highway Patrol
will be conducting a Comprehensive Roadside
Sobriety Checkpoint (CRSC) within Troop H,
on Friday, August 29. The checkpoint will be
conducted in Liberty County on State Road
20 near Bristol.
This is a continuing enforcement program
to identify persons who are operating a motor
vehicle with defective equipment, without a
valid driver's license, without a proper vehicle
registration, proper insurance or while under
the influence of alcohol or other drugs.
During 2006, more than 1,099 motorists
were killed and another 16,319 injured in
22,858 alcohol-related crashes in Florida
Additionally, during the same year, Liberty
County experienced 5 alcohot- lsaed crashes
resulting in 4 fatalities and 5 i4wjes.
Checkpoints have proven ie reduce the
number of DUI drivers on our highways.
The objectives of these checkpoints are:
1. Deter vehicles from being operated on the
highways with defective equipment.
2. Deter drivers from operating vehicles
without a valid driver's license.
3. Deter drivers from operating vehicles
without proper insurance and/or proper
registration.
4. Deter DUI and thereby reducing death,
injury and property damage caused by alcohol
and drug impaired drivers.


HITFIELD


Liberty County PROPERTY APPRAISER


Twenty-one years of
experience serving the
people of Liberty County.


NIM name is Panieia S. airfieldld and I am
running for re-election a.s \ 'ur Liberm t Count
Property. Appraiser.
I am manried to Steve \\hirfield and \\e
have three children, Stephanie Phillips and her
husband. Sherman. Bnian Whirfield. HoIll\
W\hirfield and five grandchildren
Due to circumstances beyond ni\ cL''n-r ol. I
ha\e not been ahle t-, get out and meet each of
\'ou indi\iduall\ but I ho pe mni prctous. elnice
as Property Appraiser % ill speak foir me.
I have 21 eari experience in this office. with
eight of tho' se jear .s Propecmi .\ppiaiser.
The P operti .-ppraiser's otAice is r.esponi-
siblec for placing a fAir and iust \Jaluc on each
indAtidual's propern in Libei-T iCounLt. The
value OfI real estate fluctuates due to sales ini
different areas o(f the country. If t'u hale an
area with sale prices shoinnng an increase or
decrea.se in valuc. then the land \alues in that
area increases or decreases. Florida la\ s-peci-
fies that all proper must be inspected at least
once etren five \ears,. The field appraisers Ior
this oliee phlsicall\ inspect the pitperlne
to determine aIll cliangCes such .1s addirtiions.
ehaniges inll C lodtilrin etc. It' \(i l e ltf I Ion e-
srTeadl .\ llprif)i <,lln \ tIIl pinp lT\. \'lil Is-
hssstld Value can oully illnca.tc up tO 3o t3/ tll
amount is set by the legislature) each year,
until you reach your market value, unless you
add structural changes to your house, such as


an addition ro o-ur home. shed. pool. ere. Im-
provements made like changing roofing mate-
rial from i shingles to metal., carper to nie. ere..
will onl\ change sour overall market value but
no t our assessed \ alue.
The role oftsemng the amount of taxes to be
paid as a result ,f the appraised value ofa pro p-
errv is that of the ailous taxing authorities.
including the (..ounnt Co(mmission. School
Board. Northwest Florida \\arer Manage-
ment and Citr of Bristol.
The taxing authorities use our appraisal
as a base ltr' setting the millage rate. So. in a
manner oft speaking. \our taxes could go up or
down. not due tn the appraised \alue but due
to mill.gec rates set b\ the taxing authyritics.
Your tax bill is computed b\ the total taxes re-
Lquired b\ all the authorines.
I \\ill eonnnue to use whatever discrerion-
an po\ier I hate trn tfar \ou the t.LTpa\er
- in all decisions and circumstances. I \%ill
give the same good. fair and impartial senice
you are used to. and to continue to keep prop-
ern alues .as I\\ as possible and still abide h\
Flo ida .LaL.
I as.k \'ui sinL'iCl\ t' re-elct me as \(eu ur
PI'pel'rn \ppra'isi.u.
Thank you very much,,-.
P7rWd-1S. lV/IfueL
fl li 21 5


Political advertisement paid for and approved by Patricia S. Whitfield, Democrat, Property Appraiser
S"P.K ..: "le-,, 0 ,


5. Deter currently impaired drivers before
a crash occurs.
. 6. Conduct checkpoints with a minimum
amount of intrusion and motorist
inconvenience.
7. Ensure the safety of the affected motorist
and officers.
Every citizen using the highways is asked
to report impaired drivers to the nearest law
enforcement agency, giving the following
information:
1. Where you saw the vehicle and which
direction the vehicle was traveling.
2. A description of the vehicle: its color,
make and model.
3. A description of the driver: sex, race, etc.
4. The vehicle license number and st..
Cellular telephone users may dial Star'
FHP (*347)" to reach the nearest Florida
Highway Patrol Communications Office. This
is a free call to the user and is courtesy of the
cellular companies in Florida. Cellular callers
should continue to dial 911 for emergency
medical or fire rescue assistance.
The roadside safety checkpoint is part of
our extensive enforcement plan. This plan,
coupled with increased public awareness of
the dangers associated with highway safety
during one of Florida's heavily traveled
holiday periods will hopefully result in' a
reduced number of traffic deaths.


I
rr~A








Page 4 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL AUGUST 20, 2008


Paddling trip set

for August 23 at

Indian Creek Park
The Apalachicola Riverkeeper and the
Franklin County Parks and Recreation
Department will sponsor the fifth in a
series of FREE educational paddling
programs at Franklin County's newly
acquired Indian Creek Public Park.
The park is located on North Bayshore
Drive in Eastpoint. The Indian Creek
Education (ICE) paddling trips are
scheduled for the fourth Saturday of every
month year round.
The upcoming trip is scheduled for
Saturday, Aug. 23 from 9 a.m. to 1
p.m. A short educational talk will be
followed by a 3.5 hour kayak/canoe trip
led by experienced Riverkeeper Staff and
Volunteers.
No boat? A limited number of kayaks,
PFD's, and paddles are available through
the Apalachicola Riverkeeper. Participants
should bring water and lunch and be
comfortable paddling open water, tidal
streams, and narrow creeks teeming with
wildlife. Participants should be prepared
to use their vehicles as shuttles to water
access locations.
The exact location of the paddle trip will
be governed by weather conditions and the
skill level of the participants.
Reservations are required and can
be made by calling the Apalachicola
Riverkeeper office at 850-653-8936.


Bear Hunters Assoc. to

meet Aug. 30 in Hosford
The Florida Bear Hunters Association
will hold its 14th annual meeting Aug.
30 (the last Saturday in Aug.) at 3 p.m.
at the Hosford-Telogia Fire Department
in Hosford.
We urge all those to attend that think the
FWCC should give more consideration to
the people's safety and peace of mind that
to Florida's predatory wildlife, the gator,
bear and sturgeon.
"If ordinary, common sense people
don't speak out loud and clear, the flower
kissers, tree huggers and amimalphile
freaks will continue to prevail as they have
for the last 15 years," said the association's
president, Raymond Hamlin.


Main Street meeting set

for August 25 in B-town
Blountstown Main Street will meet
Monday, Aug. 25, at 12 noon at Connie's
Kitchen downtown.
Anyone interested in downtown
revitalization is urged to attend.
Items on the agenda include the
upcoming 3rd Annual Murder Mystery
Dinner Theatre, plans for the opening of
the River Valley Marketplace, and much
more.
For more details, call Kelli at 899-
0500.

The Calhoun-Liberty Journal is
published each Wednesday
by the.Liberty Journal Inc.,
Summers Road, P.O. Box 536.
Bristol, FL 32321.
Annual subscriptions are $18.
Periodicals postage paid at Bristol, FL
POSTMASTER: Send address corrections
to: P.O Box 536, Bristol, FL32321.


Tropical COMMUNITY
Storm Fay
breezes across C ALENDAR
Central Florida


TODAY'S MEETINGS
Rotary Club, noon, Calhoun-Liberty Hospital
Weight Loss Support Group, 1:30 p.m.,
Shelton Park Library
Bridle Club, 3:30 5 p.m., Veterans Memorial
Park Civic Center
AA, 7 p.m., Calhoun County Old Ag Bldg. east
door, in front of jail for i Cu



BIRTHDAYS
Tammey Carroll
EVENTS
ALCO Grammid m0|emmimq
8 a.m., in Blountstown
TODAY'S MEETINGS
Magnolia VFD, 6 p.m., Fire House
Mossy Pond VFD, 7 p.m., Fire House
AA, 7 p.m., basement of Calhoun County Courthouse



BIRTHDAYS ANNIVERSARIES
1Pam Anders & 'Bruce & 'Pam Anders
John 'lmarki BuCzer
EVENTS
Dance, 6 12 p.m., American Legion Hall in Blountstown
TODAY'S MEETINGS
Calhoun County Children's Coalition, 9 a.m., W. T. Neal Civic
Center



EVENTS
Dance, 6 12 p.m., American Legion Hall in Blountstown

U N A YAAGUT2


00, C& Otz ti&S Swu "d


TODAY'S MEETINGS
Walk-A-Weigh Program, 9 a.m., Veterans Memorial Park Civic
Center
Calhoun County Children's Coalition, 1 p.m., the Calhoun
SCounty Library
Altha Boy Scouts, 5:30 p.m., Altha Volunteer Fire Department
Blountstown Lions Club, 6 p.m., Apalachee Restaurant
AA, 6:30 p.m., Liberty Co. Courthouse (west side entrance)
Red Level Lodge #134, 7 p.m., 5602 Alliance Rd., Marianna
Rock Bluff Community Fire Dept., 7 p.m., voting house



BIRTHDAYS il
Wayne White &' Witiam Sumner PRIMARY

TODAY'S MEETINGS
Calhoun County Girl Scout Troop 579, LCTIONS
5:30-7 p.m., W.T. Neal Civic Center
AA, 6:30 p.m., Liberty Co. Courthouse
(west side entrance)
Bristol Lions Club, 7 p.m., Apalachee Restaurant
Blountstown Chapter #179 O.E.S., 7 p.m., Dixie Lodge
Boy Scout Troop 206, 7 p.m., Veterans Memorial Park Civic
Center


THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL


Located at 11493 NW Summers Road in Bristol
MAILING ADDRESS: P.O. Box 536, Bristol, FL 32321
TELEPHONE (850) 643-3333 Fax (850) 643-3334
EMAIL: thejournal@fairpoint.net


I'
(USPS 0123671
Summers Road


Covenant Hospice

offers monthly grief

support group
BLOUNTSTOWN Feelings of grief
and loss can be overwhelming. For this
reason, Covenant Hospice will be offering
a monthly grief support group from 9 a.m.
to 11 a.m. on the last Thursday of every
month in Blountstown at the Calhoun
County Senior Citizens Association,
located at 16859 NE Cayson St. Those
who attend will have the opportunity to
explore their grief in a safe and caring
environment.
The first meeting will begin on Thursday,
Aug. 28. The support group is free but
registration is required. Light refreshments
will be served. To register for this support
group, or for additional information, call
January McKeithan at (850) 482-8520 or
(888) 817-2191.
Celebrating 25 years of keeping the
promise, Covenant Hospice is a not-for-
profit organization dedicated to providing
comprehensive, compassionate services
to patients and loved ones during times
of life-limiting illnesses. The focus of
Covenant Hospice is to enable its patients
to live as fully and comfortably as possible,
to provide dignified palliative care, to
assist patients' loved ones in coping with
end-of-life issues and the eventual death
of the patient, and to improve care for all
patients at the end of their lives by example
and education.

2008 annual Noma
Community Reunion
The annual Noma Community Reunion
will be held in the Noma Town Hall
building on Saturday, Aug. 30. The town
hall will open at 10 a.m. and lunch will be
served at noon.
All past and present residents and their
friends are cordially invited to attend.
People planning to attend are asked to
bring a well-filled basket of their favorite
dishes.
Also, please bring tea, if that is the
beverage you prefer. Soft drinks, ice,
cups, plates, and eating utensils will be
furnished.
This gathering, held on the Saturday
before Labor Day, strengthens the bonds
of friendship and lets us relive memories
of the past, renew our ties with the land
that once nourished us and walk among the
graves of our dear departed kinsmen.
Anyone desiring additional information
is urged to contact Nora Edgerton at (850)
263-3200.





That's how many copies of
The Calhoun-Liberty Journal
were distributed last week,
ensuring plenty of coverage for
your community announcements
and great response for our
business advertisers!


JOURNAL STAFF
Johnny Eubanks.............Publisher
Teresa Eubanks.................. Editor
Missy Tanner...................Advertising
Angela Davis....Production Assistant
OFFICE HOURS. 9 a.m.- 6 pm. M-F,
Saturday from 9 a.m until 1 p.m.







AUGUST 20, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 5


Gadsden Arts Center receives Knight Foundation grant


QUINCY The Gadsden
Arts Center is proudto announce
a recent grant award from the
Knight Foundation Donor
Advised Fund (KFDAF). This
award supports the Center's
efforts to serve the community
by improving accessibility to
art exhibitions and cultural
education for people of all


ages.
The KFDAF grant enables
Gadsden Arts to invest in some
of the latest education and
accessibility technologies.
A camcorder will be used
to record Artist Gallery Talks
and other presentations that
will then made available "on
demand" at the Arts Center on


large flat panel monitors and
via the Gadsden Arts Center
Web site. A digital microphone
will be used to record audio
interviews with regional artists,
authors, and other cultural
leaders. A Web site visitor will
be able to simply click on an
artist or author's photograph to
hear the recorded interview.


EXPERIENCED ~ QUALIFIED ~ COMMITTED



Elect S & Scgmew






K sa classroom teacher in ,M A
iberty County for 12 years I
challenged my students to plan for
their future. I was personally involved
in their education through developing
relationships that are still strong today.
Having been born here and spent my
entire career working for the Liberty
County School Board, I have kept sight
of who we are and how it feels to be a
BULLDOG. As your Superintendent
I commit to use this experience to
challenge all of our students to plan for
their future and I will work to make that
future a reality.

As Director of Instruction for Liberty
County for 18 years I have worked with
all aspects of our School System. I o
know our past the good and the bad. 4 I-A. A. c
I've rejoiced with the "A" Schools and
cried with the "C" Schools. I know ourpresent~ we have some great programs and I
am helping schools to work on the areas needing improvement. Know what our future
could hold~ with the support of the community and staff we can offer our students a
competitive future in the global world. My years of successful experience within this
district have ensured I am qualified for the role of Superintendent of Liberty County
Schools, and I have a Master's Degree in Educational Administration which equipped
me with an understanding of educational systems, an ability to manage a large number of
people and the ability to navigate the often cumbersome bureaucracies of a public school.

D during my tenure I have worked diligently to acquire many grants to fund new
programs. I am committed to continued fiscal stability. In collaboration with
our Finance Department and The Liberty County School Board, I commit to refine and
improve our financial status even further. I will continue to pursue additional funding
through grant opportunities. I have a proven ability togain additional funding for our
district through the acquisition of numerous grants including:

School Health Facilities Grant bringing new clinics to school campuses
21' Century Grant providing before and after school tutoring and enrichment
SEDNET which provides a service network for students with emotional
disabilities
Family Involvement Grant which provides resources for Family Reading Nights
and more
Succeed Florida Grant which allows LCHS a new Allied Health Program to
prepare our students for a career in health professions
IT Wired Grant providing A+ Certification for students interested in careers in
technology
Ready to Work Diplomas
Technology Facilities Grant providing computer labs for Hosford
Healthy Schools Grant providing nurses for our schools
E2T2 (Enhancing Education Through Technology) providing technology support
for all schools
Transition to Teaching Grant which helps career professionals to enter the
teaching profession

So as voters, I hope you ask yourselves, "Who's experienced with our schools and our
community today, who's proven to be qualified to take us from today and into the future
fiscally sound, and who's committed to improving our schools?"
Poitical ad someOt paoo for m nd appwr-td ySo SuSmnmrs. ODeoocrwaw, for SupnrintenWdt of Schoolb


Art exhibitions and the
Center's Permanent Collection
will be photographed and
entered, along with information
about the art, into specially
designed database software
that presents this information
online as a virtual art exhibition,
accessible to anyone with
a computer and internet
connection.
"The technology that
Gadsden Arts is putting in
place will allow almost anyone
anywhere in the world to enjoy
our art exhibitions, the region's
artists, authors, and the cultural
education opportunities that
we offer," said Gadsden Arts
Center Director Grace Maloy.
"With today's gas prices,
fewer people can visit, and
those that visit may come less
often. Schools have less money
for field trips, and some older
people cannot drive at night to
hear the Artist Gallery Talks.
These technology upgrades
will help solve all of those
issues. We are very grateful to
the Knight Foundation, and in


particular, to Alberto Ibargtien,
President, Mike Pate, program
administrator, and Joy Watkins,
Executive Director of the
Community Foundation of
North Florida, for their support
of this project."
Gadsden Arts plans to
have all of the technology
enhancements up and running
by January, with some tools
available by next month. The
recorded Gallery, Talk given
by Dean Mitchell and Tim
Myrick will be available "on
demand" at the Arts Center in
early September.
The Gadsden Arts Center is
located just 25 minutes from
the State Capitol at 13 N.
Madison on Quincy's historic
courthouse square. Regular
gallery hours are Tuesday
through Saturday 10 am-5 pm
and Sunday 1-5 pm. Public
admission $1; members and
children admission is free.
For more information, call
875-4866 or check the web at
www.gadsdenarts.org.


Enrollment opens for art classes

at Gadsden Arts Center in Quincy
QUINCY Have you always wanted to learn to draw or paint?
Everyone can learn to create art, especially with the guidance of an
experienced, inspiring teacher in a fun, supportive environment. If
you are already and artist, sharpen up those rusty old drawing skills,
and join a fun group in one of the Arts Center's fall classes.
Drawing instructor Linda Pelc offers 30 years of art teaching
experienced and is an accomplished artist, with paintings currently
featured in the Light Impressions exhibition at the Gadsden
Arts Center. Mrs. Pelc exhibits work throughout the region in
art festivals and juried exhibitions, and is currently the Vice-
President of the Tallahassee Watercolor Society. Drawing and
Painting instructor Dawn McMillan is a career graphic designer
and fine artist who exhibits her work throughout the region. She
has taught and volunteered with Gadsden Arts since its inception,
and is presently exhibiting art work in the Soul Mates exhibition
at LeMoyne in Tallahassee.
Enroll by August 30 and mention this article to earn 10% off of
tuition. To register for a class, call (850) 875-4866 or stop by the
Gadsden Arts Center. Fall classes are: Foundations of Drawing
I: September 4-October 9, 1-3pm, Foundations of Drawing
II: October 16-November 17 1-3pm, and Drawing & Painting
Social: October 13-November 17, 6:30-8:30pm. Tuition is $65
(nonmembers $75).
The Gadsden Arts Center is located just 25 minutes from the
State Capitol at 13 N. Madison on Quincy's historic courthouse
square. Regular gallery hours are Tuesday through Saturday 10
am-5 pm and Sunday 1-5 pm. Public admission $1; members and
children admission is free. For more information, call 875-4866
or check the web at www.gadsdenarts.org.







Page 6 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL AUGUST 20, 2008









STATIONS BY LATE


Sources say Colin Powell is getting ready to
endorse Barack Obama. Bad news for John
McCain'but at his age, you've got to expect


colon problems.


- CRAIG FERGUSON


And now comes proof that McCain has
learned to use a computer, because evidently,
he has plagiarized from the internets.
Congressional Quarterly reported that John
McCain may have copied some facts in a
recent speech on the Georgian crisis from
Wikipedia. I think it should have been obvious
when he referred to the country's leader as
President 404 Error: File Not Found.
STEPHEN COLBERT

John McCain has been accused of stealing
policy ideas from Wikipedia, which is
ridiculous! Everybody knows McCain doesn't
know how to use the Internet, so how could
you even accuse him of that?
CRAIG FERGUSON

The presidential race has been rocked by
the news that two years ago, John Edwards
had an extramarital affair with campaign
worker Rielle Hunter..:Hunter produced
campaign webisodes about Edwards. But
there's an even bigger scandal to this story
This was reported in the National Enquirer
last October. Why is the mainstream media
ignoring the National Enquirer? I mean,
look at the latest issue... Why isn't the New
York Times reporting on what happened to
Madonna's face? Why didn't CNN pick up on
this story on page five about Eva Longoria
gaining weight in her attempts to get
pregnant? By the way, confidential to Miss
Longoria, if you're trying to get pregnant,
I recommend making webisodes for John
Edwards. STEPHEN COLBERT

Barack Obama said he wouldn't raise taxes
on anyone over 70... and McCain said
Obama was just pandering to the youth
vote. CRAIG FERGUSON

It turns out the Chinese faked part of the
opening ceremonies. They made the
fireworks look more lively. It's the same
technology they use for John McCain.
CRAIG FERGUSON

Well, according to a new study, coffee can
improve your memory, that's what they say,
drinking coffee improves your memory.
Which is good news for both Barack Obama
and John McCain. If we can get them to have
some coffee before their first debate, maybe
they can remember what their original
positions were. JAY LENO


9 *
Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content

v Available from Commercial News Providers


~h


VL^Ij


America's dilemma: The Cold War


The Cold War is upon us again.
The Russians invaded which lies
on the southern border of Russia and a
country that the U.S. has been sponsor-
ing into the western fold, particularly as
a member of NATO..
The pretense for the Russian inva-
sion is that a couple of Georgian prov-
inces that border Russia prefer to be in
the Russian fold and it's the Russians
to their rescue. Of course, the U.S. sup-


ported government of Georgia objects to any breakaway
provinces joining with the Russians, and Georgia at-
tacked the Russian invaders. Fights on.
The real issue in this dustup between the Russians and
the Georgians is oil. The former Soviet Republics that
ring the Caspian Sea are rich in oil and gas. But the Cas-
pian Sea is landlocked and oil and gas has to be moved
by pipeline.
Russia would like to transport Caspian oil and gas
through its pipelines which would give Russia control of
energy supplies in Western Europe. To avoid that situ-
ation, President Clinton had the idea to make Georgia
the corridor for the pipeline, and Clinton accomplished
the initial funding on a pipeline from Baku on Azerbi-
jan's Caspian Sea coast to Tibilisi in Georgia, to Ceyhan
on Turkey's Mediterranean coast, now called the BTC
pipeline.
President Bush finished the work on the pipeline, but
Clinton and Bush's projection of American power into
the Russian sphere of influence stuck in the Russian's
craw like a chicken bone.
The Russians attempted to prevent the construction
of the pipeline but failed. The Russian solution is to use
the breakaway provinces as an excuse and invade. If you
capture the pipeline, problem solved.
. The Cold War was technically over with the demise
of the Soviet Union, but in reality, the Cold War is not
over, never was, and the U.S. is still locking horns with
the Russians over any and everything that is seen as an
affront to both or either side. The Russian invasion is a
major affront to the U.S. and the West. So, now what?
Who is at fault in this Russian-Georgian dustup? De-
pends on who you ask. Like most issues, it is in the eye
of the beholder. But in the U.S., both Democrats and
Republicans are blaming the Russians. National secu-
rity experts and presidential contenders from both po-
litical parties are burning up the television with their
denouncements of the Russians. The scary part is that


they talk about U.S. intervention in
this fracas.
Should the U.S. go to war over this
incident? I don't think so, but there
is a lot of chest pounding and talk of
our superpower status. We will show
the Russians a thing or two, but you
might want to ask what U.S. military
force is available to counter the Rus-
sians? The Russians know that the
U.S. military is tied down in Iraq and


Afghanistan, and the American response is limited to
shrill threats.
Unless we double or triple the size of the U.S. military
forces to have the military might to enforce our foreign
policy initiatives, America's imperialistic period is com-
ing to an end. Since the Reagan era, America has been
quick to use military force to project American power
around the world, but I don't think that the all-volunteer
force is sufficiently robust to enforce America's foreign
policy ventures.
From a macro view, the U.S. has three major chal-
lengers in the international community; Russia, China
,and India.
Russia is oil, gas and money rich. In the near future,
China will be the largest manufacturing country in the
world surpassing the U.S. China is flush with cash and
is buying raw materials world wide, particularly energy
sources. The U.S. is a debtor nation, borrowing billions
per year and sending about $700 billion to the Middle
East for the oil that we buy.
Fortunately, India is the largest democracy in the
world and friendly toward the U.S., but eating our lunch
in the job market. An Indian company could be handling
the administration of your health insurance program.
The American dilemma is that we are collectively be-
tween the proverbial rock and a hard place. We are cash
poor, the front porch is falling off our American house,
the roof leaks, and we have no money for repairs. We
need to project American power, challenge the Russians
and Chinese, but the wheels have come off the American
sedan. We are in the ditch and that's America's dilemma.
The irony is that the American pass-fail test for the
next president seems to be if he goes to church regu-
larly, believes in God and the Ten Commandments. I'm
all for the religion of your choice, but I'd like to think
that the next president can solve America's dilemma, or
at least recognize that America is in a bit of a mess and
do something.


C( OX'S \
CORNER.
Jerry Cox is a retired military
officer and writer with an extensive
background in domestic and
foreign policy issues. He lives in
Okaloosa County.






AUGUST 20, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 7


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To my Fellow Liberty County Citizens, "I
The campaign is winding down to the vote. I have tried
to get to everyone's house, but I may not make it because
I still have my responsibilities to take care of at the Sheriff's
office. I hope that you will forgive me if I miss you.
At a recent speaking, all of the candidates seemed to
think that Liberty County is a great place to live. I too be-
lieve that. I think that a strong supporter of our quality of
life has been the Sheriff's office, especially in the way that
we fight against criminal activity in this county. We know
that arrests without conviction are meaningless. We have
a 98% conviction rate in Circuit Court. This is one of the
highest conviction rates in the circuit.
Our drug effort has always been focused. From January
S1, 2007 to June 30, 2008, we made 142 drug arrests, most
of which pled guilty in Circuit court. These arrests were not
made recently for political purposes as alleged by an oppo-
nent. We continue to make drug arrests. Our efforts in the
future will be more focused toward the dealers who bring
the junk into our county.
We will continue to do our job to protect you, the citizens
of Liberty County. Liberty County is statistically the safest
county in Florida. Our crime rate. particularly crimes against
persons, is very low.
I have worked in this Sheriff's office for 22 years, 16 years
as Undersheriff. Through all of these years I have prepared
myself to lead this department. No one knows this depart-
ment or its people as well as I do. I am exceptionally
grateful to the employees of this department for en-
dorsing me as well. No one cares more for our citizens
more than I do. I love Liberty County and want to do my
part to insure that this department can fulfill its role in main-
taining our quality of life.
Your vote and support on August 26, 2008 will be greatly
appreciated. You can count on me to help you. I am asking
you to please help me now, so that together we can con-
tinue to enjoy the benefits of our beautiful county.


3~o7/7'e Coy/ei-s


V


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r __ SIX


~~~~(. ., W ,rJ






AUGUST 20, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 9


VOTE FOR AND ELECT


for Liberty
County


School Board Member, District 2


Hello Friends &
Neighbors, I'm
Greg Brandon
running for
School Board
Member, Dis-
trict 2. I am
employed as a
Quality Control
Technician with
CW. Roberts
Contracting.
My wife Lau-
rie is employed
at W.R. Tolar
School and we
have three chil-
dren attending
Liberty County
Schools.
The job as School Board Member is an im-
portantseat as decisions made directly effect
the education, safety, and well-being of our
children. I am sincerely concerned during
these trying economical times of reduced ed-
ucation funding and the rising cost of goods
and services. Given the opportunity to serve,
I promise to diligently investigate, pursue,
and secure both state and federal education
grants necessary for forthcoming growth.
Never has the wise use of your education tax
dollars been as important as they are today.
I realize that a quality education for each


Liberty County
student must
be considered
second to no
other respon-
sibility of a
school board
member.
I will visit
each school
to talk with
school person-
nel, allowing
me a better
understanding
of each facil-
ity's needs and
concerns. also
plan to ride a
number of school buses to gain insight into
that aspect of your child's educational day. I
am confident by working together with de-
termination and leadership we can continue
to improve our academic programs, expand
our vocational programs, and achieve our
goals to raise each school to an "A"!
Your vote and support for Greg Brandon
will be a vote for progress in our schools and
for a man with a vested interest in the future
of your children and mine.
If you have any questions or concerns,
please contact me at 643-5516.


Political Advertisement Paid For and Approved By Greg Brandon, Non Partisan, for School Board District 2


Liberty County 4-H open

enrollment starts Sept. 1
Do you want your child to join 4-H? Or are you a child that wants
to join 4-H? If so, this is how you do it: Call (850) 643-2229 or come
by the Liberty County Extension Office located in Veterans Memorial
Civic Center, pick up and fill out an enrollment form. The following
clubs are available for your child to join: the Barnyard Club, The
Outdoors Club, Krafty Kritters, The Teen Club 13-18 as of Sept. 1,
The G. A. L.S. Club and The Liberty County Horse Club. You can
enroll in one club only. If you are a returning 4-H'er you must re-
enroll. We have new forms to fill out this year so please give us a
call or come by the office.
What do we do in 4-H? We learn, have fun, and explore new ideas
through hands on learning. We are looking for 4-H club volunteers
in the following areas Rock Bluff/Sweetwater/Roy, Hosford/Telogia
Area and Sumatra. What does a 4-H Club usually do? It concentrates
on one or more projects allowing five or members to build leadership
by electing officers and conducting their own business meetings. They
work together on community service activities, meet new friends, and
most important, have lots of fun. A 4-H Club teaches youth how to
cooperate and get along with one another in a positive way and how
to be a good citizen along with teaching life skills and knowledge
for daily living. Some of the project areas include; horses, rabbits,
sewing, cooking, shooting, fishing, leadership, public speaking, crafts
and much more.
How old do you have to be to join 4-H? Members are 8-18 years
of age or until high school graduation. Clover buds are 5 to 7-year-
olds who participate in only non-competitive events.
The age breakdown is: Clover buds, 5 to 7-year-olds; Junior
4-H'ers, 8 to 10-year-olds; Intermediates, 11 to 13-year-olds; Seniors,
14 to 18-year-olds. All as of Sept. 1.
If you are interested in becoming a Liberty County 4-H Club leader
or volunteer please give us a call or stop by our office so we can help
you get started in making a difference in our young people's lives.
The power of 4-H is our youth and volunteers!
All programs and related activities sponsored for or assisted by, UF/
IFAS Extension are open to all person with non-discrimination with respect
to race, creed, color, religion, disability, sex, sexual orientation, martial
status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations.


%eeP


It0olBIxtTr


Robert Hill, a public servant
who consistently supports com-
munity efforts.


Robert Hill, Estiffanulga Boat
Ramp, a promise made and a
promise kept.


MILL

Liberty County's

Clerk of the Court

Working with the community and
Commissioners to provide leadership,
commitment and direction to produce

CONTINUED RESULTS!
Because it is more than just a title it is
a responsibility to the community.


Robert Hill, Veterans Memorial
Complex, a multi-phased proj-
ect providing for the needs of the
county.


il
-'U

I,


Robert Hill, Wesleyan Methodist
Church, committed to preserving
the history of the community.
I - - -


- 1
[~


Robert Hill, Hosford-Telogia
Sports Complex, building for our
young people and the community.


Robert Hill, Courtroom ren-
ovation, preserving the past
and merging the present.


Robert Hill, Jail expan-
sion, meeting the needs of
the county and the future.


Robert Hill, Hosford-Telogia
Emergency Services, a commu-
nity project that provides for the
safety of our citizens.


Politcal adjenisment paid for and approved b\ Roben Hill Demucrat. Clerk ol Cucuw Coun


__ I -L






Page 10 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL AUGUST 20, 2008


V iG RIVER CINITHIUCTIORJ IZNC.
3.uS1 RA .lfu l --Dm BiW iI.I4


FILL DIRT
WANTED
We need fill dirt
for the Hosford
School project.
Have you been wishing
for a fishing pond of our
own? Do you live near
the Hosford School?
SWe'll buy the dirt and
. dig the pond for you.
SOR WE'LL DIG FROM A DIRT
PIT NEAR THE SCHOOL


S : .:


WHO ]'"- i


:4


Vote for and Elect


Mrs. Pam's Childcare

( Now has openings for
two and three year olds!
Located on Hwy. 71 North
Between Blountstown & Altha
Telephone 674-9081
^a'^i ^ xii\


Time for Change


I'M PUTTING KIDS FIRST


. With dassroum success for all students.

. With positive changes for school
improvements.

. With classroom and financial account-
ability.

, With increased school funding. "We
need to spend our money more wisely
and maximize our income".

. I'll have an open door to the community
and staff.


Make the right choice for our
students On August 26th vote
Stephen "Craig" Shuler and
make a change that will lead
Liberty County schools into the
future.


Stephen "Craig" Shuler
For Liberty CountV
School Superintendent


Illustration by Jean;lGriff
Married over20 .e.rs. to Vikkl with four
children ia our local school system.
Albert Gretchen Everhart School
Christina Sr. at LOIS
Alycia -Jr. at LCHS
Neil 7th Grade W.R. Tolar School

I am a concerned parent and a successful school system is min
priority


AN EXPERIENCED LOCAL
LEADER IN THE CLASSROOM
AND COMMUNITY


Organizes and sponsors the 8th Grade
parent/student Washington, D.C. trip.
4-H Program leader and developer.
Small business owner/operator
| "Skyland Ranch Smokehouse".
Successful students after school tutor-
ing program.
Florida Council for the Social Studies
3 Teacher of the Year 2004

10 years Middle School teacher
2 years Adult Education teacher
'in 13 years Vocational Rehabilitation counselor
1975 graduate Liberty County High School
1982 graduate BAAnthro/Soc. Sci. UWF
2005 Graduate Masters in Education FSU
2008 Graduate Specialist Degree in
Education with emphasis in Educational
Leadership FSU
2006-2008 Florida Agricultural Advisory
* Council University of Florida


P1L.%II( I1 ,\l)\13 fIR l M l.: 'PAll) F i.H ANII.\1''l(HiV [i Sl IJ'H I C ( i tll; SHL I 1 II MI )C H,\AI FHO IR( HIHl II.. Rl' ,iIR'. lNll I


Tr Edward "Kevin"


Williams
fbr
County Commissioner District 5


If elected, I pledge to:
Prioritize budget items based on what will best serve the
needs of the taxpayers.
Protect private property rights.
Aggressively pursue federal grants and low interest loans
to help support public infrastructure
Oppose legislation that shifts administrative or un-fimded
programs to the county level.
Seek additional state funding due to high r-y v' -.
percentage of local property exempt -41 0
from the tax roll. A

I graciously ask for your support *
and for your vote on August 26,
for County Commissioner, District 5.
If you have questions or concerns, *
feel free to call me anytime at 379-8379.

Political advertisement paid for and approved by Edward Kevin Williams, Democrat for County Commis!ioner, District 5.


- Ir rrr


..: ,.






AUGUST 20, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 11


LIBERTY COUNTY
Waste Pro Customers
Due to the Labor Day Holiday your Solid
Waste pickup will be one day behind.


Current Day of Service
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday


Holiday Service
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Saturday


LEAD THE WAY
Leaders are made in the National Guard.
Contact a recruiter today!
Leadership training Ger
Career skills UP TO A
*Tuition assistance $20 J1000
Part-time service r
in your community SfS ?B
I-800-GO-GUARD GUARD
www. I-800-GO-GUARD.com



'Thank you

Over the
past several
months,. I ,
have visited
with many of "
you in your
homes. and
I'm sorry for
those of you that I missed. These are
many kind people in Liberty County that
have offered me acool drink, something
to eat or simply just to come inside and
cool off. I have enjoyed talking with
you and wanted, to thank you for your
kindness and tremendous support. I
will always treasure the friendship and
encouragement that I have received
during this election. Many sacrifices
have been made on my behalf by my
family and friends. I will always cher-
ish how so many of you stood by me.
Whatever the outcome on Tuesday, I
will forever be grateful to those of you
who supported me in my campaign. I
am proud to live and raise my children
in Liberty County!

Thank you for your support,
Joan Wright,
Candidate for Liberty County
Tax Collector
Political Advertisement Paid for and Approved by Joan Wright,
Democrat, Candidate for Liberty County Tax Collector.


A "PAGE TOiH .pA
.1 A. M. "


A close up of one of tags shows the name of Alfred Duggar. Below, a section of
post that held a line of weathered tags. PAM ANDERSON PHOTOS


Fence Post

Tells A Story
by Fran Rigsby
Topical Story Chairman
Liberty Heritage Book
A weathered pine fence post once on the
property of the Butler-Morgan Funeral Home
in Quincy holds pieces of Liberty County
history.
Charles McClellan worked at the funeral
home in 1962, became a partner in 1976, and
was overseeing the paving of the parking lot
in 1977. He decided to save two feet of that
pine post. He took it inside and stored it until
some future date.
Firmly nailed to the post are now only
thirteen pieces of five inch by almost two
inches of weathered aluminum tags with bits
of old red paint and raised letters and numbers.
Some names of Liberty's World War II soldiers
are clear, others are partially obscured. These
were casket tags, nailed in the 1940s onto the
outside of shipping crates by the U.S. Army,
and sent to the funeral home closest to Liberty
County. Someone there saved the tags by
nailing them to that fence post.
Years rolled by. About ten years ago, Charles
McClellan promised Johnny Eubanks he could
have the post and its tags when he was ready
to utilize it. It is now at the newspaper office
and may become part of a historical display at
the civic center in the future. Some restoration
will be done to make the tags easier to read.
Liberty's names which are easy to read
are Martin V. Bateman, Delmar C. Mercer
and William B. Henderson, all of whom
were killed in action. Alfred Duggar, whose
name appears in the top photo, was killed by
a bulldozer on Okinawa when it turned over
on him.
The post (shown at right) also includes
several tags of servicemen who were not from
Liberty County.


*t I I






Is
.( = .I







'. 'i '
I', _


This is one in a series of features submitted for a history and heritage book on Liberty County. Journal
readers are invited to submit their own family photos, histories and remembrances for the book by
contacting Family Chairperson Vance Bateman, Topical Chairperson Fran Rigsby at 643-5466 or
Heritage Publishing Consultants at 1-800-568-1611or by e-mail at heripubcon@aol.com.





Page 12 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL AUGUST 20, 2008


L


As your clerk, these
are some of the
things I would like
to be a part of:
*With board approval,
meet with the US For-
est Service on a reg-
ular basis to ensure
that our recreational
activities and work
heritage are always
taken into consider-
ation as they make
decisions concerning
the Apalachicola Na-
tional Forest.
*Make sure as we
move into the high
tech world of the internet that the security of
our deeds and records are not compromised
and always remember a human voice and smil-
ing face can never be replaced.
*Process monthly reports on all county expen-
ditures for the Board so if individual budgets
are being overspent the problem can be cor-
rected before it progresses. This will also serve
as a tool for the Commissioners to monitor the
fiscal well-being of the county.
*Provide the board of county commissioners
with all information available to the clerk's of-
fice resulting in better, more informed decisions
by the Board.
*Always look for ways to be more efficient as
well as securing additional revenue from sourc-
es other than our local taxpayers.
*Expedite completion of the Hosford-Telogia
Sports Complex that I helped start two years
ago.


Political advertisement paid for and approved by John Troy Sanders, Democrat, for Liberty County Clerk of Court


-I I -- I-I--, I II -I -r -


JOHN TROY SANDERS
for Liberty County
CLERK OF THE
CIRCUIT COURT


Psuawk Move


I
IV ip
!s


*With the Board's approval,
help encourage the state
legislature to build satel-
lite offices in our county for
state workers. With today's
growing technology, state
employees could work
here instead of commut-
ing to Tallahassee, saying
time, energy, and money.
*With the Board's approval,
work to acquire land adja-
cent to the Liberty Correc-
tional Facility for future ex-
pansions. This will provide
jobs, insurance, and retire-
ment for our residents.
*I believe there is a tre-
mendous amount of work that can and should be
done inside your clerk's office. It is my goal to work
with current employees to provide quality servic-
es, protect your deeds, records, and documents,
be forthcoming with all information available to
the Clerks office, and create an atmosphere of
TRUST, FAIRNESS, AND OPENNESS.
I would like to give you my word on this--- I can
run your clerk's office, treat everyone with dignity
and respect, and will only use your office to ac-
complish good things.
Liberty County is my home and always will be. All
of my children and grandchildren live here. I hope
you will consider me as your clerk. Together we
can make decisions and take actions that will en-
sure that Liberty County will remain Florida's Best
for many years to come.
I humbly ask for your vote and support.
Your friend,
906 ~o~SV&4e







AUGUST 20, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 13


4-H summer events keep kids busy


from the Liberty County Extension Office
If you were not apart of the the 2008 Summer
4-H program here in Liberty County you missed
out on some wild and crazy fun. We started out
the summer with the "Pirates of Timpoochee"
which was held June 16-20. Thirty-three youth
attended the week-long camp in Niceville, Florida
located a long the bay. They had a blast learning
archery, kayaking, snorkeling, making crafts,
leaning about marine life and exploring their
surroundings. They were taught team building
skills, how to line dance, and about what is under
your feet by digging in the dirt. But most of all
they learned how to become leaders and build
new friendships with others while away from
home.
After returning home we jumped right into
our summer day camps which started off with a
blast at Mrs. Shellie's Xtreme Cuisine School on
June 24 & 25. They learned how to make healthy
lifestyle choices by making fun and nutritious
snacks such as fruit pizza, blueberry smoothies,
corn on the cob and much more. ABOVE LEFT:
Good clean fun.in the kitchen with Crystal Harper,
Samantha Millette, and Savannah Owens.
Then we jumped into CSI (Crime Scene Insect)
Investigation. Did you know that the cockroach
is the oldest group of insects on earth? Yes, dating
back 300 million years. Termites are a popular
food in parts of Africa and Australia, caterpillars -
in Mexico and crickets in Thailand, so how many
insects have you eaten today? Mrs. Shellie King
prepared special treats for us including "Ants on
a Log", Spider Cookies" and a Gnat Shake. They
were good. We also learned that flies on a dead carcass
can be used to help determine the time of death or
other factors that may have legal implications about
the scene of a crime. We solved four cases while
leaning about these crime solving insects. So don't
be surprised when your child grows and becomes a
. CSI expert.

To top the summer, 4-H volunteers Mrs. Cyndi
McKuhen and Mrs. Ruth Wade joined in on the fun
and taught a 3 day Summer Stitch class for beginning


Kara Fowler tasting a spider cookie she mad


Stitch Class students show their work.


sewers. They had 11 girls and 1 boy, who
spent their time learning how to straight stitch
by hand, make a pin cushion out of a Mason
jar lid, and the fifial project was to sew on the
machine and make a shopping bag for Mom
or themselves. After learning the parts of the
sewing machine they got down to business.
Who knows? We just might be bringing up the
next Tommy Hilfiger designer!
. .
Then on to July 29 & 30, things got pretty
silly. We did a variety of activities for the silly
science day camp such as: Rippen Rocketry
with a two-liter bottle, making silly putty,
exploding marshmallows, Fizz, Bubble, and
Goo, checking out our DNA and a strawberry's
DNA and designed our own DNA molecule.
Snacks included with this day camp was
Bread in Bag which taught us about yeast and
how it makes the bread rise, we made crystal
lollypops, and berry smoothies, along with
jelly genes.
Last but not least before the summer ends
we just had to throw in Sports and Fitness fun
with Xtreme volleyball, basket ball, soccer
and hockey. We had lesson on how to get
your heart rate up and how important it was
to drink lots of water and re-energize your
body to keep it healthy. Liberty Counties
eO. Park & Recreation Directors Mr. Richie
Smith, and Mr. Joe Ferolito, along with Health
Department volunteers Michael Collins,
S.W.A.T. Coordinator and Susan Chafin joined with
us to teach the basic about sports and fitness and
finally a beautiful kayak trip around Lake Mystic on
our new kayaks.
Let's not forget to say thank you to Mrs. Shellie
King, FNP Program Assistant, for all the healthy
snacks she taught the youth to prepare at each day
camp this summer. They were great! Also the 4-H
Teen Volunteers Daniel Williams and Jeremiah House
"Jae" you guys were "AWESOME!"


At our July 15 & 16 day camp we learned Etiquette skills
with Mrs. Whitney Brinkley, a student at FSU. She brought in
a new atmosphere that we have never experienced before as
she taught us table manners, proper phone etiquette, how to .
say thank you and write thank you notes the proper way, how to
address letters and.envelopes with the proper Mr, Mrs. or Ms,
how to properly sit and behave at nice restaurant. Mrs. Cathia
Schmarje taught us the basics to swing dancing, the proper way
for ask someone to dance and how to say no without hurting .
someone's feelings. We also learned some new line dancing .
from Jeremiah House, a teen 4-H volunteer, while in the end Mr .
Michael Collins came in and taught us about Tobacco and what e.
it can do to our bodies. We then we went on afield trip to Chez '.. .,
Pierre Restaurant in Tallahassee where we enjoyed the special
blend ofFrench cuisine. LEFT: Tyler Myers tries some escargot.
Max Parrish said it was pretty good but he couldn't think about.
RIGHT: The group gathers for a photo after the meal.








Page 14 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL AUGUST 20, 2008


6 p.m.
The Shepherds have
appeared on TBN, Daystar
and the Angel Network.
As Dove Music -recording
-artists, The Shepherds, with
their true -family harmony
and youthfulness, create a
unique vocal blend giving
them a progressive sound that
is re-defining gospel music for
future generations.
Come and be a part of this
worship experience!


Revivals
TELOGIA BAPTIST
CHURCH -Telogia Baptist
Church is having revival on
Aug. 24-27. It will begin
Sunday at 7 p.m. and 7:30
p.m. on Monday through
Wednesday. Doyle Bell is
the Evangelist. There will be
special music each night.
For more information,
contact Telogia Baptist Church
at 379-8439.


If you didn't come by the Seniors in Bloom Banquet, you missed a
chance to hear music that feeds your soul by Fortress, a poem recited
by Alice Solomon and encouraging remarks by Pastor Jack Strader.
We were welcomed by Ann Kincaid, Director of Liberty County
Senior Citizens, with an opening prayer by Pastor C. Wilson, music
selection by BYA students and Calvin Cross. Ferrell Wahlquist did
a super job as Master of Ceremonies. The highlight of the evening
was when Hugh Black, manager of the Walkulla Bank of Bristol,
honored Missy Hall, 104 years old, and Robert Woodham,.84
years old, with a cash certificate. Thanks to Jeanett Vinson-who
gave out door prizes that were donated by Golden Pharmacy, Buy
Rite Drugs, Badcock Furniture, Blountstown Drugs and the Senior
Citizens Association. My heart felt thanks goes out to each person
who made "Seniors in Bloom" a joyous event. Thanks to the BYA
students, Rita Lewis, Linda Blair, Chaille Eikland, Alice Edward,
Margie Woodham, Stephanie Williams for the decorations, helping
in serving and entertainment.
The delicious chicken was donated by Robert I-ill, our clerk, and
Major Donnie Conyers, of the sheriff's dept., who also smoked it.
These two men also cooked and donated the chickens last year.
Hats off to the kitchen team who also worked last year. This team
included Yvette Carlos, Calvin and Lisa Cross, Jerry and Rhonda
Lewis, Jessica McClendon, Sherita Bernard arid daughter, Jyierra.
Thank God for the donations that came the following caring
leaders and businesses: Tim Revell, Jim Johnson, Albert Butch,
Judge Hosford, Dexter Barber, Doobie, Marcie Woods, H.W. Revell,
Sue Summers, David Summers, L.B. Arnold, K.F.C., Apalachee
Restaurant, Roger Reddick, John Eikeland, The Calhoun-Liberty
Journal and the Veteran's Memorial Civic Center.
It is such a joy to live in a county that responds to the needs of
their people. May God bless and keep you and your families in His
loving care. By God's grace, I hope to see you next year.
Rosetta Daughtry


On behalf of the Hosford Cub Scout Pack 214, I would like to
thank all of my friends and all in the community who supported
our fundraiser. There are a few people who really went the extra
mile to help us and I would like to thank you for a job well done.
Kayce Ammons, Jerilyn Ammons, Jennie Mathis, Denise Sansom
and Kay Shuler, thanks for the help, it was good to have you there.
A special thanks to Curtis Fletcher for his sacrifice of time and
selfless act of service by getting everything prepared. We had a lot
of success because of the community, so from the Hosford Club
Scout Pack to our community, thank you.
Scott Ammons


Fellowship & Events
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
OF BRISTOL- We will be
having a Church Movie Night
Thursday, August 28 at 7 p.m.
What if your deepest secrets
were suddenly exposed? Nine
friends discover just how
explosive it can be when their
past becomes their present.
Reunited at the funeral of
hometown hero, Chris Hayden,
the friends find tensions
escalating rapidly as their
darkest secrets are revealed.
Jeremy (David A.R. White -
"Mercy Streets"), struggling
with his calling as a former
youth pastor, is caught in an
(Stacey Keanan "Step by
Step") and his old flame Sherry
(Tracey Melchoir "Bold and
the Beautiful"). Meanwhile,
Gary (John Schneider -
"Dukes of Hazzard") questions
everyone's beliefs as this close
knit group of friends dispute
world views, lifestyles, and.
personal passions. Pastor
Wexler (Reginald V. Johnson
"Family Matters") encourages
them not to give up but to
follow the truth that Chris
Hayden lived.
"Hidden Secrets" is a
story of love, friendship,
redemption and ultimately
faith. Humorous, touching and
always entertaining, it features
music by Rachel Lampa and
Building 429.
Free tickets are now available
by calling our church office at
643-5400. We are open 9 a.m.-
4 p.m. (ET) Monday-Thursday
and close for lunch 12 p.m.-1
p.m.
Church Sport Teams
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
OF BRISTOL- -The deadline
to sign up for the Pray then
Play basketball season at the
First Baptist Church of Bristol
has been extended to Aug.
27. It is for boys and girls
ages 4-18 who would like to
learn new skills and have fun
while playing basketball. It is
a ministry of reaching out to
the children in our community
who may not otherwise get an
opportunity.
For those who register to
play, Meet the Coach Night
will be Sept. 2 in the FBC-
Bristol Gymnasium at 6:30
p.m. (ET.) Practice begins on
Sept. 8 with games scheduled
to begin on Sept. 22. Once the


banquet.
Individuals or businesses/
organizations can become a
Basketball Booster by making
a donation to the Pray then
Play ministry. Your donation
would help allow kids to play
that can't afford to pay, to
purchase start up equipment
and to provide an end of season
banquet.
If you would like more
information, please call us at
643-5400 or come by our office
at 10677 NW Michaux Road in
Bristol. We are open Monday-
Thursday from 9 a.m.-4 p.m.
and close for lunch from 12-1
p.m.
Prayer Meetings
PRAYER BAND The
Liberty Community Prayer
Band will hold prayer service
Thursday, Aug. 21 at 7:30 p.m.
(ET) at the home of Sister Ella
M. Howard. -
Everyone is cordially invited
to attend. For more information,
call 643-2332.


August 18-24



Last Quarter Moon



AUGUST 18
Discovery Day (Yt,
Canada)


AUGUST.19,20
Best days to
oathay


AUGUST 22, 23
Best days to cut hair to
discourage growth


Hooray 'I.


ugust21... what day! On that
day in 1878, the American Bar
Association was formed. Exactly
ten years later, in 1888, William S.
Burroughs patented the adding ma-
chine. On August 21, 1904, musi-
cian Count Basie was born. On the
same day in 1911, the "Mona Lisa"
was stolen. August 21, 1920. saw


the bi rth of author
Christopher Robin
Milne, followed
in 1936 by bas- 1-
ketballplayer Wilt
Chamberlain and
then, in 1938, by singer Kenny
Rogers. In 1959, Hawaii became
the 50th state on this date.


4 large unpeeled potatoes, I reheat the oven to425*F. In a 13x9-Inch pan,
cut nto chunks to toss the potatoes and onion with I table-
I medium red onion, cutInto
wedges spoon olive oil, salt, pepper, and herbs. Roast
3 tablespoons olive oil for 15 minutes. Add the remaining vegetables
salt and pepper, to taste and 2 tablespoons vegetable oil. Add
I tablespoon minced fresh \ g .
thyme or rosemary the lemon and additional salt and
1 cup baby carrots, trimmed pepper to taste. Continue roasting
2 cups squash slices ". --- for 45 minutes, turning occa-
4 pepprs (red, yello "
orsgrew), llocd sionally, until vegetables are
I lemon, sliced tender. MAKES SERVING$S.
WIT AND WISDOM FROM THE OLD FARMER'S ALMANAC
S Dried tomato leaves help repel bugs indoors.
I t ,'i The south wind warms the aged.


i- ." On July 23,1829, the first typewriter was patented
iRI by William Burt.
FOR RECIPES. GARDENING TIPS, AND WEATHER FORECASTS, VISIT:


Almanac.com


TREASURES
by Ryan McDougald

CHOOSE TO
FEAR THE LORD
Text: Proverbs 1:20-33
There was a superstitious practice
long ago in Scotland among the
farmers. The farmer would leave a
patch of uncultivated ground each
year to the evil spirits. Since the evil
spirits were given their own plot of
ground, they were to leave the ground
containing the good crops alone. In
reality, the uncultivated ground was
overrun by thorns, briars, and all kinds
of other weeds. The uncultivated
ground became a menace to the good
ground as the wind scattered the bad
seed among the good crops.
That is the way sin affects the life
of a person. The devil is out to steal,
kill, and destroy. So the devil tempts
us with sin in an effort to destroy us.
A life of sin leads to destruction.
But God gives us a choice. We
don't have to lead a life doomed
to destruction. We can choose to
embrace wisdom. We can fear God.
We can accept God's salvation from
sin by grace through faith. We can
hear wisdom's cry as she calls aloud
from the streets. We can respond to
wisdom's rebuke and give heed to her
advice. We can embrace truth and
gain knowledge about God. We can
apply that knowledge to our lives and
allow it to ripen into wisdom.
Or we can choose to ignore
wisdom's call. We can reject her
rebuke. We can choose not to heed
her advice. We can embrace sin and
enjoy its pleasures for a brief time.
But in the end, we will discover this
truth, "For the waywardness of the
simple will kill them; but whoever
listens to me (wisdom) will live in
safety and be at ease, without fear of
harm (NIV)."
A.W. Tozer once said, "Wisdom is
always associated with righteousness
and humility and is never found apart
from godliness and true holiness of
life."


L--






AUGUST 20,2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 15


S.. OLD rAIBMRUR


ALMANAC

Copyrighted Material


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Syndicated Content


:: Available from Commercial News Providers -


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_____ a
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S GOODMAN
for Liberty County Tax Collector
"Let Experience With Proficiency Continue Working for You!"
I'I' Policl Adivc'rfi.menI paid, E[r and approved by Marie Goodman. Dc rxeatl for'Ul x (Collector




FREE FISH FRY

SATURDAY, AUc. 2 3

starting at 1 p.m. at the

BRISTOL BOAT LANDING


Cookout given for Liberty County Commission District 5
candidate Eddie Pullam. Other politicians welcome.


Hello, I'm Eddie Pullam and I want to be
your next County Commissioner. Your vote
and support will be greatly appreciated.
To those whom I haven't spoken with, I
apologize. I look forward to meeting with
you. Please call me with any questions. My
phone numbers are 379-8431 and 508-5824.
THANK YOU AND GOD BLESS.
VOFIiiORIC IE.w


Poilical advenisemenl paid for and approved by Eddie Pullam, Democrat, lor County Commissioner


* 0 a -4 ID1- w *- 4 -W a









on-* Aw *











Iawrence flnlmam HOSPIT
43 N. Cleveland Street in Quincy OFFICE (850) 627-8338
4^ iJerry C. Lawrence, DVM iS
'^A- i Emergencies: (850) 856-5827 or (850) 856-5918
i Hours: Monday Friday 7 a.m. to 5 p.m.




We provide: Boarding Grooming Preventative Healthcare programs
which include vaccinations and yearly checkups Spay/neuter program
to reduce unwanted puppies/kittens.
PLUS MANY OTHER SERVICES.
CALL US ANYTIME IF YOU HAVE ANY QUESTIONS. u


I Reach readers in


two counties

with an ad i

the Jourqnl.j


3ive usia call
1. 33333


"IPldg Cninued usoerSrvcaWie-etig or edsI a iml


Marie


_^__-^-^-^ifa^---


8




Page 16 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL AUGUST 20, 2008


ECect


Gay Johnson



TSuperintendent of Schools


"Ms. Uzzell is one of the most loyal, hard-working, efficient and intelligent people I've
known. Her diverse experiences include management of our district's Pre Kindergar-
ten program, our highly unique and nationally recognized Blended School, a voca-
tional CHOICE academy and an alternative discipline program. She has consistently
maintained excellent relationships with students, parents, teachers, businesses and
universities. She has received the highest marks possible in each of her yearly per-
formance evaluations as an administrator.
She managed hundreds of thousands to millions of dollars in her schools' and pro-
grams' budgets each year, with most of the funds being spent in the classrooms. Her
proficiency was evident in her consistent local, state and federal excellent-rated au-
dit reports. She was extremely resourceful with funds to ensure each dollar was effi-
ciently and effectively spent." -Etcerptfrom Lceier of Coninendanon, Ion Dr Frank Fuller, iornier
.-ssi Superntendent of Okaloosa School im 1irrnilm diate super'visor)

7& Cand te W&o WItfleadlor Scchool to Exce ce!
"It's time for our schools to have the leadership they need to take them from near the bottom of the state in academics to the
top. I have proven myself time and again as an outstanding manager of nationally recognized schools and district educational
programs. I have the devotion, knowledge, character and COURAGE to stand-up for what is right for ALL students and school
employees! There has been too much "talk" and not enough positive action from some employees who currently hold school dis-
trict leadership positions. This is taking away from the education of our children, and it's time to elect a Superintendent of
Schools who will take proactive measures to bring our schools back to their winning traditions." ,'ayJ oAiion' tljel'


MY TEN STEP PLAN
1. Ensure that all school employees treat each child fairly and as if he or she is their own.

2. Visit EACH SCHOOL EVERY WEEK to support our students and staff. It's my belief that you cant run
a school system from behind a desk.
3. Make school spirit and pride a high priority. I'll support our student athletes, music groups, clubs,
and coaches like you've never seen before. Period.
4. Recognize and reward students and school district employees for their outstanding efforts and/or in-
novative plans for school success.
5. Provide our teachers and staffs with the curriculum, training, supplies and materials they need to
teach effectively.
6. Establish fair and consistent policies regarding discipline, dress codes, nutrition and attendance for
students and school employees.
7. Add and upgrade current vocational courses in order for students who don't go to college to obtain
the training they need to get a job upon graduation.
8. Schedule School Board meetings for 7 PM so that working citizens may attend them. I'll ensure that
all citizens receive agendas well in advance.
9. Restructure district level administrative positions in order to better compensate others.

10.Utilize a majority of YOUR tax dollars in the classrooms. Parents and teachers SHOULD NOT have to
spend hundreds of dollars on school supplies.

I offer a real plan for school improvement and excellence in all areas.
Please vote for Gay Johnson Uzzell for Liberty County Superintendent of Schools.




AUGUST 20, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 17


C
n
t

U


W Served our Country as the wife
r1 an of an Air Force ilot.
n
I



mi e--augii h EI'm not only an educator, but a
foe mother as well. My children are
Johnson, former coach, prin- My brother, Jeff Johnson, Head Base- Christy (18), CydnewellMy (10)children arend
cipal, and Superintendent of ball Coach at Chipola, leads his team Christy (18), Cydney (10) and
Ln Puberty County Schools. to a National Championship! Lucas (15).



Have a Fantastic School Year!


Political advertisement paid for and approved by Gay Johnson Uzzell, democrat, for Liberty County Superintendent of Schools


--- -----------C-- ~ -~' I1







Page 18 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL AUGUST 20, 2008


Community members pitch in

to pick up & deliver textbooks
New textbooks delivered! We would like to say a great big thank
you to Johnette Wahlquist for arranging to have both Hosford's
and Tolar's new textbooks picked up from the Florida Schoolbook
Depository in Jacksonville at a tremendous savings to the district. We
would also like to thank Mitch and Heather Willis and Ace Hardware
for donating their forklift for the afternoon to unload the textbooks.
During these tight economic times it is great to know that we have
community members who are willing to help our schools out in
innovative ways!
Back to School Dance set for Aug. 22
W.R. Tolar's Annual Back to School Dance is scheduled for Friday,
August 22 and is open to students in grades 5-9 from 7-11 p.m. The
cost is $5 per child. There also will be concessions.
Open House schedules announced
Open Houses are scheduled for Thursday, Aug. 21 for Kindergarten-
3rd grade and next Thursday, Aug. 28 for 4th-8th grades.


LIBERTY COUNTY DISTRICT ADVISORY COUNCIL
NOTICE TO PARENTS:
ASSISTANCE NEEDED '


Are you aware that the Liberty County
School District receives funding from the
government to educate our children? The
district is provided funding for each stu-
dent individually. The amount per student
varies.
The federal government determines
what they believe it will cost to educate
each student based on several factors
including disabilities and socio-economic
status.
The government recognizes that stu-
dents with disabilities require more ser-
vices and that students frequently need
financial assistance for their meals. Often
yearly income that the public believes is


eligible for assistance is not what the gov-
ernment recognizes.
You could help Liberty County School
District provide educational services to
all of our students by simply filling out
the Free/Reduced Meal Form that is sent
home each year. The information you
provide is kept confidential and no one
need know. All students progress through
the meal lines using their personal code ,
and when meals are paid in advance no
money is exchanged to distinguish free,
reduced or full pay students.
Please call Ms. Karen Peddie, Director
of Food Services (643-2275, ext 238), for
more information.


LIBERTY COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT NOTICE FOR PARENTS


NO CHILD LEFT BEHIND SCHOOL CHOICE
W. R. Tolar and Hosford School did not make
Adequate Yearly Progress as determined by the.
US Department of Education. Based on the AYP
status of each of these schools parerits are to be
provided with options. If your student attended
either school during the 2007-2008 school year
you should have received a letter outlining your
options. Copies of this letter are also available at
the school, the Superintendent's office and may
be printed from the district Web site at www.lcs-
bonline.org
COMMUNICATION
For your child's safety, please ensure that the
schools have current contact information for you
including current mailing address and telephone
numbers. Please update these during the year
when changes occur.
This year we will again be implementing the
Connect-ED messaging service throughout
the district. This service enables us to person-
ally communicate with parents about emergency
situations, school events and important issues
impacting your child. It will allow us to send per-
sonalized voice messages to your family's home,
work or cell phones, e-mail communications, and
even text messages. We will be able to reach ev-
eryone in the district within minutes.
It is important that your school has all of your
current telephone numbers and e-mail address-
es so that you will not miss out on any important
communications. Please help us ensure we have
your current information, and indicate on the en-
rollment form sent home on the first day of school
what data you want included in our database.
Please be aware that the Connect-ED service
cannot dial an extension, so be sure the numbers
you include are direct lines. Also, we recommend
that high school and middle school attendance
messages be routed to a number other than the
home telephone number such as a parent cell
phone number.
Please note that if your home phone has the
Teleblocker or Telezapper feature activated Con-
nect-ED messages will not be delivered to that


phone line. To ensure you are receiving the im-
portant information that will be communicated
via Connect-ED messages, please make sure
you provide us with an alternative primary con-
tact phone number (such as a cell phone or work
number).
Please have your child return the completed
form no later than August 25, 2008, and be as-
sured that all personal information will be main-
tained in the strictest confidence. For more infor-
mation, call us at 643-2275 x238.
SCHOOL MEALS
T There have been many changes related to
school meals this year.
Balanced Choices: LCSB in partnership with
Chartwells will be offering a Balanced Choices
program in addition to student favorites. Balanced
Choices are complete meals that have been ex-
amined by dieticians to meet or exceed the rec-
ommended dietary guidelines for Americans set
forth by the US Department of Agriculture in calo-
rie, fat content & vitamin consumption for lunch.
We will also be offering whole grains several days
a week through such items as wild rice and whole
grain breads and cereals.
Seniors may leave campus at lunch with a
signed note from their parent/guardian.
In accordance with Florida Statute NO outside
food vendors are allowed to make deliveries to
any school campus during normal school hours.
School meal prices are as follows:
Breakfast $1.25
Lunch $2.00.....Pre-K- 5th Grade
Lunch $2.25 ...........Grades 6-12
Lunch $3.00 ...................... Adults
Your child may qualify for free or reduced price
meals. Reduced price is $0.30 for breakfast and
$0.40 for lunch. If you are interested, please com-
plete and return the application that will be sent
home with students on the first day of school.
MealPay Plus is a new and exciting opportunity
for parents/guardians to monitor their child's meal
balance daily. Much like an online banking ac-
count, parents will be able to deposit funds into
their child's meal account, monitor daily activity


on the account, and monitor how their child is
spending their funds i.e. purchasing pizza slic-
es instead of a whole meal. We hope this new
service will assist parents in being proactive in
teaching their children about healthy eating hab-
its, as well as assisting parents to keep a positive
balance in the meal account.
All students with insufficient funds in the morn-
ing will be given an opportunity to contact their
parent/guardian to obtain funds prior to their lunch
period. Students in K-5th grade who have insuf-
ficient funds will be provided a mdal consisting
of a cheese sandwich, a choice of fruit/vegetable
and choice of milk or juice which will be charged
to your child's lunch account. No meals will be
charged for students in grades 6-12.
ATTENDANCE
Due to the number of students with truancy
problems the school district will strictly enforce
the attendance of all students again this year.
We have conferred with Judge Ken Hosford and
have been assured of his full support in enforcing
state law. Please read carefully the attendance
policy in the Student Code of Conduct which will
be sent home with each student on the first day
of school.
CELL PHONE POLICY
Personal telephones or other electronic com-
munication devices are discouraged during school
hours. Carefully read your child's school policy
related to electronic devices when it is sent home
on the first day of school. A copy may be acquired
from the school prior to the first day if desired.
DRESS CODE FOR 2008-2009
Students' dress and personal grooming are the
responsibility of the student and parent. Dress
or grooming shall not be permitted to disrupt the
teaching/learning process or school activities.
Clothing worn to school and school functions
must be safe and appropriate. Carefully read
your child's school policy related to dress code
requirements that will be sent home with students
on the first day of school. A copy of the LCHS
Dress Code may be seen on the district Web site
at www.lcsbonline.org


OPEN HOUSE SCHEDULES


HOSFORD

All grades

Monday, Aug. 18
7- 8 p.m.


LCHS

All grades

Tuesday, Aug. 19

3:30 5:00 p.m.
\_____/


WR TOLAR
K -3rd

Thursday, Aug. 21

6:30 8 p.m.
\_____/


WR TOLAR
4th 8th

Thursday, Aug. 28

6:30 8 p.m.






AUGUST 20, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 19


Tips for hurricane clean up


f


SPoellFords ForLess,,A LOT LESSP

BRAND NEW FORD BRAND NEW FORDB
208 ESCAPE 2008 F250 KING RAN
Power Sunroof, Leather Rax KO L Kin
Power Driver's Seat, 6 Disc R anch Package, 6 L
CD, V6, Auto M.---B'- 0 Diesel,5 year- 100k Mile -R -----
c. a MRSP $26,010 Powertraine Warranty MRSP $53,555
24 MPG Rebate $3,000 Rebate $5,500
Fin wIFMCC $3750 Fin wIFMCC 1,000
BayFord Discount $2,270 BayFord Discount $5,065
Your Your
BAY BAY
Price! Price!
=nii M-w roo B ^i n' 'l ^ BBRAND NEW FORD .1 ,E.., J
BRAND NEW FORD BRAND N FORn
2 V6,., 5 speed iv a,,,nual Trn SUPERDUrTY 5spdAuol. 3.73
4.21. VO, 5 speed Manual Transmission, B Limited Slip, Trailer Tow pge
AC, 3 year or 36k Mile Bumper to Burn- Limited Slp, Trailer Tow pkge
per A5 yearor 60k MRSP $19,700 with Tow command MRSP $33,800
Powertre n Rebate $3,500 Rebate 500
Fin wFMCC $1.000 Fin w/FMCC 000
BayFord Discount $710 Ba Ford Discount 310
Your YOur
BAY BA Y
Price! Price.
...... - - -


07HYUNDAI SONATA 07 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY 07 FORD EXPLORER 06 LINCOLN MARK LT 06 CHEVYW MONTE CARLO LT



07 FORD SPORT TRACK 02 GRAND MARQUIS LS 06 JEEP WRANGLER 4WD 07LINCOLN TOWINCAR SIG 05 CHEVY COLORADO

Ira.: .. ".- S ,'
07 E350 SUPERDUTY WAGON 06 CHEVY SILVERADO 07 FORD EXPEDITION 06 MUSTANG COUPE 97 MERCURY SABLE LS WGN


LWS ..A9792_ 88008,2W. l8 ,
07 GRAND MARQUIS LS 08 KIA SPORTAGE LX 07 LINCOLN TOWNCAR 07 CHRYSLER 300C 5.7 HEMI 07 FORD EXPLORER XLT
61lc bEA Fl-c t Auto Full P-1 3;UPE .-- A;l aBF P
i .f .,. Is "V ,,ff o I!f v^J T~fl v. ff,,..f
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CALHOUN-
LIBERTY
HOSPITAL


Cookout to benefit


'i"


Menu includes Boston Butt,
Baked Beans, Potato Salad


Intersection of
S.R. 71 & S.R. 20
BLOUNTSTOWN

Tuesday, Aug. 26
at 11:00 (CT)


By Jane Morse, University of Florida/IFAS
Extension Agent, Pinellas County
This is dangerous business. Homeowners
can be seriously injured or killed trying to
do their own tree work. If you are not
experienced in operating a chainsaw or are
not physically fit then hire a professional.
If you must use a chain saw, work-only
on the ground. Never do any tree work
that ii'nvoics felling (cutting down) trees,
climbing of any kind, or using ropes. These
activities should be done by professionals
only.
GENERAL SAFETY TIPS:
1. Always work with a partner.
2. Assemble a well-stocked first-aid
kit
3. Avoid overexertion. Overexertion is
the most common reason for injury. Get


, Sponsored by Preble-Rish


Consulting Engineers


help if the item is too heavy to lift easily.
Remember to always use your legs for lifting
and not your back.
Chain Saw Safety: Chain saws are
considered the most dangerous hand tool
available!
1. Keep both hands on the handles.
2. Follow manual instructions carefully to
ensure safe operation and proper maintenance
of the equipment.
3. Take your time. Most injuries are the
result of aggressive or careless cutting. Most
injuries occur when people are fatigued. If
you are tired, take a break. Remember to
drink lots of cool water.
4. Wear protective equipment. This
includes protective glasses and face shield,
a hard hat, hearing protection, gloves, leg
chaps, and heavy work boots.
5. Cut at waist level or below. Making
overhead cuts can lead to head injuries
and death.
6. Take extra care when cutting limbs.
Limbs that are bent, twisted, or caught
under another object can snap back and
hit you or pinch the saw.
7. Shut off equipment. When refueling,
carrying a distance greater than 100 feet
or through slippery areas or heavy brush
turn it off.-
8. Stay away from chain saw operator.
They usually cannot see or hear you
approaching and if you tap them on the
back and they turn around with an active
chain -saw, you can get cut in half or
seriously injured. From a safe distance
toss a glove at their back to get their
attention.
9. Do NOT cut with the upper tip of the
saw! Kickback occurs when.the upper
tip of the guide bar contacts an object
and causes the saw to come straight back
at the operator. It happens so fast there
is no time for reaction (thus the reason
for a face shield). To prevent kickback,
cut with the part of the bar closest to the
engine. Watch the tip and do NOT let it
contact the ground, other branches, or
any object.
Electrocution is one of the most
common types of serious tree trimming
accidents. Call the power company to
report tree limbs that have fallen on a
power line. Assume all power lines are
energized and do NOT touch. Improper
use of generators may energize lines
without warning. Beware! Electrocution
may occur if any part of your body
touches a conductor (water, tool, tree
branch, metal fence, etc.) in contact with
an energized power line.
Remember to always think safety
and practice safety! Your life and limb
depend on it.
More safety information can be found
at these Web sites: www.flagsafe.ufl.edu;
http://treesandhurricanes.ifas.ufl.edu or
by googling NASD tree trimming safety
or NASD chain saw safety.







Page 20 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL AUGUST 20, 2008


Survey shows
migraine more
than head pain
CHICAGO, IL Migraine
sufferers often experience a
series of associated symptoms in
addition to migraine head pain,
according to a recent survey
conducted by the National
Headache Foundation (NHF).
Survey results reveal that more
than 50% of respondents said they
frequently or always experience
symptoms such as nausea, neck
pain, or sensitivity to lights,
sounds or smells when suffering
from a migraine. Additionally,
78% of respondents said their
healthcare professional does not
regularly inquire about associated
symptoms experienced beyond
actual migraine head pain.
"It is extremely important for
headache sufferers to talk with
their.healthcare professionals
about symptoms occurring in
conjunction with pain," said
Dr. Roger Cady, Vice President
and Board member of NHF.
"Diagnosis of migraine is based
in part on associated symptoms
or characteristics such as nausea,
vomiting or sensitivity to lights
but communication about the
entire migraine experience aids
your medical provider with proper
diagnosis, understanding you, and
your specific treatment needs."
Of those respondents
experiencing nausea or vomiting
along with their migraine head
pain, many reported having to
delay taking migraine medication
or taking additional medication to
manage their nausea. Others said
they alternate an injectable form
of migraine medication instead of
swallowing a pill.
In order to manage migraine
head pain and associated
symptoms, the majority of survey
respondents said they try to
maintain a regular sleep schedule,
eat balanced meals and reduce
stress.
Additional NHF survey results:
78% of survey respondents
reported missing work due to
migraine pain and/or its associated
symptoms.
84% said they frequently or
always experience throbbing pain
on one-side of their head with their
migraine.
When asked to rate their migraine
pain on a scale of 1-10 with 10 being
unbearable, 56% of respondents
said their migraine pain is typically
between a 7 and 8.
NHF's Tips for dealing with
migraine head pain and associated
symptoms:
*Get help. Discuss the associated
symptoms of your migraine with
your healthcare provider S/He can
help you determine your treatment
options.
*If you experience nausea or
vomiting as associated symptoms
of your migraine, talk with your
healthcare provider about other
forms of your medication such as
injections, nasal sprays or tablets
that do not require drinking water to
take them.
*Track your migraines. Write
down when your migraines occur
Bring your results to your healthcare
professional to review. A free
downloadable headache diary is
available at www.headaches.org.


V. VOTE FOR

& ELECT

Delores





1ryant


"DAVIS "

for
Liberty


County

PRPRYAPRIE


Hello,
My name is Delores Bryant Davis.
I am the daughter of Ruth Shiver of
Bristol and the late Crawford Shiver.
I have three wonderful children: my
daughter Anita Tucker and her hus-
band, Daniel and their two children
Tray and Katlin, my son Al Bryant and
his wife Kim, and their child Breyden,
and my son Bradley "Boo" Bryant.
I am a 25 year resident of Liberty County
and I have come to Love and Appreciate
this wonderful place I have been blessed
to call my home for all these years.
The relationships that I have built, both
professionally and personally, with the
people in Liberty County, I consider to be


some of the most important ones in my
life.
If elected as Liberty County Property
Appraiser, I pledge to do my personal
best to perform my job without prejudice.
I pledge to give each individual the equal
attention it requires for completing the
task at hand. I will devote myself to find-
ing and repairing areas of conflict and
concern.
I have come by and met with many of
you in your homes and I am sorry with
the ones that I have missed.
Once again, my name is Delores Bry-
ant Davis, and I am asking for your sup-
port and vote for Liberty County Property
Appraiser.
THANK YOU


Political advertisement paidfor and approved by Dolores Bryant Davis, Democrat for Property Appraiser


mI





AUGUST 20, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 21


fYIr


-in- -n P


w


ABOVE, LEFT TO RIGHT: Jerry Lewis serves up grilled chicken, Sybil Arnold and Rhonda Lewis
share a hug, Rosetta Daughtrey and friend, Yvette Carlos and a young friend, Betty Roberts.
Liberty County's most important
residents our senior citizens -
were honored Thursday night with
a community dinner at Veterans .
Memorial Park Civic Center in ,T
Bristol. Diners enjoyed lots of
e good food, music by Fortress and
other entertainment, including a
dance performance from students
at Bristol Youth Academy. BELOW
LEFT: Calvin Cross, Lisa Cross
and Sherita Bernard help out in the
p kitchen. BELOW: Rita Lewis leads
a group in a dance.
DANIEL WILLIAMS PHOTOS

Pi


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Page 22 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL AUGUST 20, 2008


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Copyrighted Material .
Syndicated Content -

Available from Commercial News Providers


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I am Curtis "Lee" Fletcher
and I desire to be your county
commissioner and voice for
District 5.
After graduating from Liber-
ty County High School in 1986,
it was my honor to serve my
country in the United States
Army. Upon completion of my
tour of duty, I worked at North
Florida Lumber Company
while going to college. I later
worked at Computer 101 and
the Department of Transpor-
tation, gaining valuable ex-
perience in my field of study.
For the last ten years, I have
been employed by the Clerk
of Circuit Court in Gadsden
County as the Computer Sys-
tems Administrator and have
gained a great deal of county
government administrative
experience in that time.
I love my community and I
am committed to helping im-
prove the quality of life for all
j citizens of Liberty County. I


VOTE FOR AND ELECT



Curtis Lee



FLETCHER
for Liberty County

Board of County

Commissioners, District 5


have two children, Chris and
Britney and I want them to be
able to enjoy our county as
much as I did growing up. It
is ingrained in me to do my
part in making this world a
better place. I currently serve
on the Board of Directors for
the Hosford and Telogia Vol-
unteer Fire Department and
the Senior Citizen's Board
of Directors. I volunteer as
a firefighter with the Hosford
and Telogia Volunteer Fire
Department and donate my
time and computer experi-
ences to the Liberty County
Senior Citizens.
I am abreast of the chal-
lenges that face us as a small
county -given the economic
environment in which we now
struggle. If you will place your
confidence in me, I will work
tirelessly on your behalf. I will
focus my efforts on the fol-
lowing areas of my vision for
Liberty County:


- Provide improvements and
maintenance to the roadway
systems.
* Provide improvements and
maintenance to the public
boat ramps and parks.
* Enhance fire departments
with better equipment, train-
ing and funding.
* Enhance Search and Res-
cue with better equipment,
training and funding.
* Seek new industry to locate
here that will provide higher
paying jobs and generate
more county revenue.
* Expand EMS to have full
time units in Bristol, Hosford
and Sumatra to improve re-
sponse times.
- Provide better infrastructure
such as water and fire hy-
drants.
* Provide DOT approved He-
lipads for Emergency Medical
Service transport.
* Seek new programs to pro-.
vide guidance to our youth.


PI:jF,,n.n ,n ,,: .-j _-j ',.f,.cjI..,,,1, I r C'... --,--,, ,. ,


REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS FOR AUDIT SERVICES

The City of Bristol hereby requests proposals and qualifications from qualified individuals or firms to
provide independent audit services annually for a 5 year period beginning with the 2007-2008 fiscal
year for the city. Said individuals or firms shall be duly licensed under Chapter 473 and qualified to
conduct audits in accordance with government auditing standards as adopted by the Florida Board of
Accountancy.

Additional information concerning the proposed services and qualifications being requested and the
ranking criteria to be used to evaluate the proposals may be obtained from Robin Hatcher, City Clerk,
The City of Bristol, PO Box 207,12444 NW Virginia G. Weaver Street, Bristol, Florida 32321, tele-
phone 850-643-2261.

Sealed proposals must be marked "Audit Services" and received by 5 pm EST on September 8, 2008,
to the attention of Robin Hatcher. Proposals will be acknowledged at the regular council meeting that
same evening at 6:30 pm EST. Pursuant to Florida Statutes, the proposals will be turned over to the
Audit Selection Committee and shall be ranked and brought back before the council at a different date
and time.

THE CITY OF BRISTOL SUPPORTS EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYMENT, FAIR HOUSING,
HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE JURISDICTION.


A,''? \ **:"


By: H. MiAchWi t, Chaiman
Robin Hatdier, City Clerk


Dated this 20th day of August, 28.


8-20-08


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w







AUGUST 20, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 23


It's sign-up month at the library

from the Liberty County Public Library
Sept. is Library Card Sign-up Month at your local libraries. Sept.
is a time when the American Library Association and libraries across
the country remind parents that a library card is the most important
school supply of all.
The observance was launched in 1987 to meet the challenge of
then Secretary of Education William J. Bennett who said: "Let's have
a national campaign... every child should obtain a library card and
use it" Since then, thousands of public and school libraries join each
fall in a national effort to ensure every child dies just that.
Library cards are free to those living in the library's service area.
Borrowing privileges are granted on the spot. Our libraries require a
driver's license, or Florida ID, proof of residency and a signature of
the person requesting the library card or signature and driver's license
number of the responsible person, if a child.
Libraries play an important role in the education and development
of children. Studies show that children, who are read to in the home
and who use the library perform better in school and are more likely
to continue to use the library as a source of lifetime learning.
Libraries offer books, magazines, audio and videotapes,
computers, software and other multimedia materials. Libraries offer a
variety of programs to stimulate an interest in reading and learning.
Summer reading has been shown to be the most important factor
in avoiding the decrease in reading skill that educators refer to as
"summer learning loss."
For more information please call the Harrell Library in Bristol at
643-2247 or the Weaver Library in Hosford at 379-3300.


Country Lunch


BUFFET
Served daily
10:30 a.m. until 2:30 p.m.


DINE IN $799
with tea & salad............. + tax
TO GO
drink not included $799
without salad................... + tax
with salad......................... 8 +tax

12" Chocolate Chip Cookie
Plain $12.50 with nuts or decorated $15
Whole cakes and pies available


The


7/6"r Restaurant
Hwy. 20, Bristol 643-2264


MADISON KYNDALL
LOVE
Madison Kyndall Love
-celebrated her eleventh
birthday on Aug. 11. She is
the daughter of Scott and
Andrea Love and Tori and
Mike Harper all of Hosford.
Her grandparents are Odis
and Linda Love and John T.
Sanders and Michelle Sanders
all of Hosford and Debbie and
Ken Bridges of North Carolina.
Her great-grandparents are
Bernard and the late Leola
Arnold and Chiquita Rudd, all
of Hosford, Francis and the late
Trulon Creel of Greensboro
and Maxie and Bobby Philips
of Bristol. Madison enjoys
talking on the phone, shopping,
listening to music and going to
church at Cornith Baptist.


RYLEE BLAYNE NORRIS
Rylee Blayne Norris celebrated
his first birthday July 13. He is
the son of Scotty and Amber
Norris of Blountstown. His
grandparents are Tony and
Sherryl Norris of Blountstown,
Teresa Hall of Scotts Ferry and
James and Suzanne Cobia of
Cottonwood, AL. His great-
grandparents are Patricia
Cobia of Cottonwood, AL, Jack
Edwards of Scotts Ferry and
Earnest Bailey of Blountstown.
Blayne enjoys playing with
his big brother, Landon, and
big sister, Brianna. He also
enjoys riding the gator with
Aunt Corinda.


.M
.-P










Freeman, Weaver to wed
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Freeman have the honour to announce that
their daughter, Vanesse Lynette, and James Riley Weaver, son of
Eleanor Donnell Weaver and James Wilson Weaver, will be married
during a private ceremony on Saturday, Sept. 20, at St. Mary's Chapel,
Charlotte, North Carolina.
We will sincerely miss everyone too far away to attend. Your good
wishes will be in our hearts on this joyous day.





YBAIT&

AVAILABLE AT ,



0 0 Corner of N. W. Clay Street & Rock Bluff Rd H
in Bristol Telephone (850)447-1290-_
.. N -... .. .. --
AFThWORMS BIG REJ 1MS .11ACK Wt l


CAMRYNN BAILEY
FAIRCLOTH
Camrynn Faircloth will be
celebrating her fourth
birthday Aug. 23 with a Diego
swimming party. Camrynn is
the daughter of Derrick and
Gem Lynn Faircloth of Bristol.
Her grandparents are Ray and
Joan Gaines of Talking Rock,
GA the late Gary Bentley of
Greensboro, and Jimmy and
Kathy Faircloth of Bristol.
Camrynn enjoys playing with
her dog, Gunner, and riding
four wheelers with her Daddy
and big brother, Cole.


I~ f
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KAYNE BAKER
Kayne Baker celebrated his
third birthday on Aug. 17. He is
the son of Kenya L. and Felicia
S. Baker of Tallahassee. His
grandparents are Clifford E.
and Glenda M. Sewell of
Hosford and Larry and Linda
Baker of Blountstown. His
great-grandmother is Cassie
Pullam of Bristol. Kayen enjoys
watching "Go Diego Go" and
riding in Daddy's big truck.


ROY WAYNE MOREFIELD
Roy Wayne Morefield
celebrated his second birthday
on Aug. 16 at home with family
and friends. He is the son of
Wayne and Debra Morefield
of Bristol. His grandparents
are Betty Dawson and the late
Roy Dawson of Bristol and
Linda and Howard Hobby of
Wakulla County. Roy enjoys
playing outside with his big
trucks and tractors.


I s
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Page 24 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL AUGUST 20, 2008
__..U


Miles "Jinker"


Liberty Co


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I'm Miles "Jinker" Potter your candidate for Lib- Office.
erty County Sheriff. I've been married 32 years to working
- Debbie Brown Potter of Hosford. Debbie and I these diff(
have been blessed with two sons, Josh and Will department
-- their families include Josh's wife Melissa, and our have lear
grandchildren, Remington and Gracyn; and Will's various
wife Selina. As you probably know, I have great ganizatiol
S= interest in Liberty County for the safety of my fam- skills a
ily as well as yours. I have been involved in the technique
: : community by continuing to be a Senior Citizen that control
B aRI ordI Iprnmhe r Ai rkLrinn wIwith the fltheord rtffish ,hin k/ill


While
with I r -, -- ...
rent 1; -.: -
ts, I 'j..' -
rned i. ..
or- -
nal ,'-/ ,r ';. -. -
and
es
bute to my leader-


o-U FUI LI IVI I IUII1 VVI W lIIII VVY ll 11 IILA IILI IM LI 5lI.1P i O K11. OlpiIO. .
tournaments for Senior Citizens, working the flat- As most of you know I'm employed with Liberty :
head tournaments with Hosford Fire Department, Corrections as a work squad officer, so I know the -
- and working with other fundraisers and organi- capabilities of a crew and the money they can save = :
_ zations to fulfill the needs of our the taxpayers of Liberty County. So, elect me your =
:= community. next Sheriff and I will work to make our County as .
NJ ,L! 1 I've been em- safe and secure for your families as mine.
t played in law As citizens of Liberty County you have the right to
QUr I t enforcement for expect all of the above, and I want you to get what
pai .- over 17 years you expect... so elect me, Miles "Jinker" Potter as
,: 0 while working your next Sheriff of Liberty County.
,,. e c,'?: with the De- If any of you wish to hear specifics relating to my
1 apartmentt of experience, wish to discuss your concerns in regards
.-. ,, -- ,to the community, or just wish
SI to talk, feel free to come see
me or look me up in the phone
book (850-643-9272).





Correction, Liberty 1Qr. IE P
S Crossroads Camp under "SE "T
the Department of Juve- "
nile Justice, in addition to I i i -i l
the Liberty County Sheriff's


Political Advertisement paid for and approved by Miles Potter, Democrat, for Sheriff.


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AUGUST 20, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 25


Vote for and elect e C0tA t c

for Liberty County Superintendent of Schools


I am running for the office of
Superintendent of Schools
and need your vote.
I am QUALIFIED:
*28 years in the Liberty County
School System
*Master's Degree in Educational
Administration, Nova S.E. University
*Doctoral Degree in Social
Science Education, FSU
I am EXPERIENCED:
*12 years as a teacher in Liberty
County
*18 years as Director of
Instruction for Liberty County
*Proven, successful history in
grant acquisition


Political advertisement p


QUALIFIED EXPERIENCED
COMMITTED
paid for and approved by Sue Summers, Democrat, for S


JOHNSON

County I
... o, ... one


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I am COMMITTED:
As your Superintendent of
Schools I will:
*Provide a well balanced educa-
tional program for ALL students
*Work diligently and use my
experience wisely
*Continue to actively pursue grant
monies to enhance and expand
educational opportunities for our
students and community
*Hire qualified, energetic and
committed teachers and staff to cre-
ate a positive learning environment
*Provide principals, teachers, staff,
students and parents the opportunity
to make decisions for their schools
and our community


superintendent of Schools


* Born and Raised in Liberty County.
* 1986 Graduate of Liberty County High School.
* I will make each decision with the people of Liberty
County first in mind.
- I will work with the Chamber of Commerce to bring
quality, environmentally safe and clean industry that
will promote smart and responsible growth.
- I will be available and accessible to all the people of
Liberty County.
Please call me with ANY questions

Deir w. I..; .,r .r I- ; I


Rock Bluff

Firefighters

plan cookout
The Rock Bluff Volunteer
Fire Department will be having
a fundraiser cookout on Election
Day, Tuesday, August 26.
The hamburger/hotdog
cookout will be from 11:00
a.m.-l:00 p.m. and 4:00 p.m.
-6:00 p.m. at the Rock Bluff
Fire House, 6925 NW Torreya
Park Rd.
Everyone is invited.

Soccer, football
registration set
for Saturday
The Liberty County Recreation
Department will hold registration
for fall football and soccer this
Saturday in the Hosford School
Gym from 9 am until noon.
Copies of birth certificates
should be brought for both
sports.
The football program is opened
to boys ages 7-12 as of June 1 this
year. Teams will be divided into
age groups. Cost of football
registration is $50. Practice will
begin September 8 and the season
opens with a jamboree Oct. 4.
The soccer program is co-ed
and opened to participants 5-13
as of June 1 this year.
Teams will be divided into
age groups. Cost of soccer
registration is $30. The soccer
program will begin practice Sept.
8. The season will begin the
week of Sept. 28 and run through
October. Coaches are needed for
the soccer program.
For information call the
Recreation Department at 643-
2175.
LCRD hopes to
organize men's
softball league
The Liberty County Recreation
Department will organize a
late summer men's slow pitch
softball league is enough interest
is shown. The department needs
to contacted by Monday August
25 if this league is to start.
For more information call
643-2175.


DIFFERENT
STUDENTS NEED
DIFFERENT CHOICES


Help your
students continue
their education.
*Tuition assistance
* Career skills
* Leadership training


WN^


NATIONAL.
GUARD


I-800-GO-GUARD
www. I -800-GO-GUARD.com


Jed Hiers
T e .1
Liberty County

School Board District 2

Business Experience-23 years of banking,
insurance, bookkeeping, and business
experience.

Loyalty-Served the people of Liberty County
with 23 years of community involvement.

Education-BS in Finance, Florida State
University. State of Florida Mortgage Broker
License. Certification of Banking and
Economics, University of Florida.

Sincerity-My children, as are your children,
are very important to me.


Your support would be greatly appreciated! Political Advertisement paid for and approved-
by Jed Hiers for School Board District 2.


r ~~c --- -- -- --- -- ----


-- -







Page 26 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL AUGUST 20, 2008


FWC to address wildlife and

climate change at conference


Climate change experts and fish
and wildlife scientists will huddle
together in Orlando to discuss the
future of Florida's fish and wildlife
and ask the difficult questions about
how best to conserve and manage
Florida's abundant and unique
natural resources.
"Florida's Wildlife: On the
front line of climate change,"
a summit hosted by the Florida
Fish and Wildlife Conservation
Commission (FWC), will highlight
the challenges facing wildlife
managers, governments, industry
leaders and the public in the next 50
years amid the realities with climate
change. On Oct. 1-3, experts from
the FWC and other state and federal
agencies will converge in Orlando
at the Rosen PLAZA to frame
the impacts of climate change on
wildlife nationally and determine
what it means for Florida.
This summit is the first of its
kind in the country, where the
difficult questions will be asked as
the climate changes at an increasing
pace.
The summit will feature
presentations and workshops to
stimulate discussion and offer
solutions to the complexities
of a state growing rapidly in an
environment changing just as
quickly.
On Wednesday, Oct. 1, Dr.
Virginia R. Van Sickle-Burkett


OUT

DOORS
News from The Florda
Fish and
SWildlife
Conservation
Commission

from the United States Geological
Survey (USGS) will present the
key points from a report on climate
change she is presenting to Congress
in Sept.. The model used in her
report suggests the model for South
Florida will differ greatly from the
models for the southeastern United
States.
Dr. Thomas Crisman, from. the
University of South Florida, will
speak about the vast differences in
Florida's climate zones and suggest
that any discussion of climate
change in Florida must use a variety
of models.
Dr. Thomas Eason will present
the FWC's report "Wildlife 2060:
What's at stake for Florida?"
A panel discussion in the
afternoon will feature specific
species on the front line of
climate change. The future of
agriculture also will be on the


agenda. Panel discussions also
will explore habitat and species
management, outdoor recreation,
initiatives from the conservation
community, legislative progress
and communication strategies for
public awareness.
Thursday's session will open
with Brennan, who will speak about
management issues of wildlife and
habitat in a changing climate.
The conference participants
will break out into concurrent
workshops, led by FWC's top
scientists on various topics. The
workshops will discuss impacts,
assumptions, constraints and
opportunities. Each session will
conclude with desired future
outcomes.
The event will continue on
Friday morning with reports from
workshop leaders. FWC Executive
Director Ken Haddad will present
the agency's directive for Florida's
wildlife to conclude the three-day
summit. The goal of the summit
is to gather information for use in
planning for the future.
The registration fee is $195,
which includes two breakfasts,
two lunches and a reception. The
registration form is available
at wwW.ces.fau.edu/floc/ or by
contacting Doreen DiCarlo at the
Center for Environmental Studies
at Florida Atlantic University, 561-
799-8553 or 561-626-1404 (fax).


Share your special
moments with an
announcement in
THE JOURNAL
Births Birthdays
Weddings Anniversaries
Family Reunions & more!




WANTED:

REAL ESTATE
Will buy 10 to 1,000 acres,
reasonably priced. Immediate closing.
Call (850) 544-5441
or (850) 570-0222



LIBERTY COUNTY

Waste Pro Customers
Due to the Labor Day Holiday your Solid
Waste pickup will be one day behind.


Current Day of Service
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday


Holiday Service
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Saturday


Si *-:--; -


A Vote for Joan is a Vote for:


Experience:


Education:

Consistence:


Commitment:


Having been trained by Lester Summers
and Carol Strickland, Joan has the most ex
perience of any candidate and has served
as Assistant Tax Collector!

Master's Degree from Florida State University

Joan has always been polite, friendly and
courteous.

Joan has over 18 years of service to Liberty
County Citizens!


Political Advertisement Paid for and Approved by Joan Wright.
Democrat, Candidate for Liberty County Tax Collector.


'''






AUGUST 20, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 27


Support your team! -
*a m.* . l


NEW Bulldog
T-shirts are in. Get 'em
in time for the first
game! All Sizes


Su.. ,I-e rConosve eAife..

Support bear conservation:


Liberty County Students Buy a Wildlife specialty tag
Welcome Back to Class!


Get all of your back to school supplies here.
Notebooks, Paper, Pencils, Bookbags, etc.

Buy Rite Drugs
Located along SR 20 in Bristol Phone 643-5454


Share your special moments with an announcement
in The Journal: Births, Birthdays, Weddings,
Anniversaries, Family Reunions and more!



ELECT

Thomas Rast


o'l Liberty County

Tax Collector

My name is Thomas "Bubba" Rast your needs, or I will personally de-
and I want to be your Tax Collector. liver services to you.
For those of you who don't know If I haven't been to your home to
me, I was born and raised in Lib- talk to you personally and I'm unable
erty County and I reside in Telogia. to see you within the next few days it
I have been married to the former was not done intentionally. My fam-
Lisa Arnold for over 18 years and I ily or myself. will not be at the polls
am an active member in the Bristol to harass you. So I will take this op-
Church of God. portunity to humbly ask for you to
From day one of my campaign I consider me for Tax Collector.
have vowed to you the citizens of I am a Certified Florida Collec-
Liberty County if elected I will: tors Assistant and a Manager with
1. Keep the office opened Mon- the Leon County Tax Collector's Of-
day-Friday from 8 a.m. to 5p.m. fice. Prior to that I was employed
2. Open it every Saturday from 8 with the Department of Highway
a.m. to noon. Safety and Motor Vehicles where I
3. I will also work diligently with traveled throughout the state train-
the Board of County Commissioners ing Tax Collectors and their staff on
to obtain the equipment to test for the computer equipment they are
and issue Drivers License. This will currently using. When I wasn't trav-
be done at no additional cost to you, eling I was taking phone calls from
the citizens of Liberty County as / Tax Collectors and their staff on pro-
am trained and qualified to adminis- cedure and Statutory requirements
ter tests and issue Drivers License. as needed.
I am aware that a large percent- So, Liberty County, the rest is up
age of our citizens are employed to you.
outside of Liberty County, making it If you want the most experienced,
nearly impossible for them to arrive sincere and dedicated candidate go
at and conduct business with the tax to the polls on August 26 and vote
collector's office during normal busi- for Thomas "Bubba" Rast as your
ness hours. If elected you may call next Tax Collector.
me and I will stay after hours or re-
turn at a later time to accommodate Tha+k YoU
Paid Political advertisement paid for and approved by Thomas Rast, Democrat, Candidate for Liberty County Tax Collector.


The Florida black bear graces the Conserve Wildlife
specialty license plate as a symbol for many of the species
that will benefit from the purchase of this plate.
Florida's black bear uses a mixture of habitats that
contain nut-, fruit- and berry-producing shrubs and trees.
They live in eight main areas, from the Panhandle's Eglin
Air Force Base and the Apalachicola National Forest, to
the Osceola and Ocala national forests in North and Central
Florida, all the way down to the Big Cypress National
Preserve in South Florida.
Florida is home to a great diversity of wildlife species
from alligators to roseate spoonbills. Yet the state's
development and population growth pose formidable
challenges to the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation
Commission's (FWC) mission of conserving the state's
fish and wildlife resources.
As Florida's-primary wildlife agency, the FWC is
responsible for managing and conserving Florida's wildlife
and its habitats. The Conserve Wildlife license plate was
created to generate additional revenue to conduct the
programs aimed at conserving Florida's natural heritage.
The Conserve Wildlife license plate costs $17 more
than a regular plate, with $15 of that going directly to
the Wildlife Foundation of Florida, Inc., a not-for-profit
organization supporting the activities of the FWC.
The Wildlife Foundation, places special emphasis on
projects involving the Florida black bear. Survival of this
species depends in part on conservation and management
of its habitat, which in turn benefits many other wildlife
species.
Conserve Wildlife license plates may be purchased at
any authorized motor vehicle office, such as Florida's
Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles, local
tax collector's office or a licensed tag agent or by visiting
MyFWC.com.

DECODE THE HABITAT
An animal's habitat is the area where it finds food, water, shelter and space. Using
the code below, fill in the blanks with the correct letter to discover the type of
bear habitats in Florida.


Q W E R T Y U I O P A
01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11


S D
12 13


F G H J K L Z X /C V 8 N M
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26

Example : decodes to H A YE f U N
16 11 23 03 14 07 25 16 11 23 03 14 07 25

10 08 25 03 14 19 1105 02 09 0913 12

2206o1004031212 24 19 11 22 18 15 07 26 12 02 1126 10

2608 210313 16 11 041302 090913 16 11 2626092218 12

12 11 2513 10082503 12 22 040724

22112424 111503 10 11 1926 14 09 04 03 12 05







Page 28 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL AUGUST 20, 2008


Manatee Co. horse diagnosed with Equine Piroplasmosis


TALLAHASSEE -- Florida
Agriculture and Consumer Ser-
vices Commissioner Charles
H. Bronson announced Friday
that a Manatee County horse
has been diagnosed with Equine
Piroplasmosis (EP), an animal
disease that the United States
has been considered free of
since 1988. Blood and tissue
testing of a 7-year-old gelding
that had been euthanized after
a three-week illness confirmed
the presence of the disease in
the animal.
State officials immediately
quarantined the premises in
which the horse resided, as
well as two adjacent properties
containing horses pending a de-
termination of their status. An
ongoing investigation is being
conducted by the State Veteri-
narian's Office to determine the
source of the disease and wheth-
er it has spread beyond the im-
mediate area where the infected
animal was housed.

EQUINE
PIROPLASMOSIS (EP)
Equine Piroplasmosis (EP)
is a blood-borne parasitic dis-
ease primarily transmitted to
horses by ticks or contaminated
needles. The disease was eradi-
cated from Florida in the 1980s,
and the tick species believed
to transmit EP in other coun-
tries have not been identified in
Florida in many years. This dis-


ease is not directly contagious
from one horse to another but
requires direct blood transfer.
Human infection with equine
piroplasmosis is extremely rare.
Acutely affected horses can
have depression, fever, ane-
mia (decreased red blood cells)
jaundiced (yellow) mucous
membranes and low platelet
counts. EP can also cause hors-
es to have roughened hair coats,
constipation, and colic. In its
milder form, the disease causes
horses to appear weak and show
lack of appetite. Some horses
become chronic carriers of the
disease.

ADVICE TO VETS
AND HORSE OWNERS
Veterinarians, horse owners,
and others in the equine indus-
try in Florida are asked to moni-
tor their horses carefully and
contact their veterinarian if they
suspect this disease. Because
it is a disease that the United
States has been free of for two
decades, suspected cases must
be reported to the Office of the
State Veterinarian by law.
With the exception of the
quarantined premises, there are
no EP movement restrictions on
horses within Florida or between
Florida and other states. Hors-
es entering Florida from other
countries with Equine Piroplas-
mosis will continue to be tested
prior to and following entry


Substitute Bus Driver Training Class
We will begin a CDL/Substitute Bus Driver training
class August 25 thru 29. The class will begin at
6 p.m. and will be held in the Library, located at
Liberty County High School. If you plan to
participate in this training, please contact
Beth Ramer at 643-2275, ext. 266 to sign up.
WE WILL NOT BE CONDUCTING ANOTHER
TRAINING CLASS UNTIL 2009.


LIBERTY COUNTY LOGIC & ACCURACY TEST
& VOTING INFORMATION
The Logic & Accuracy Test which is the public testing of
all voting equipment will be held on August 7, 2008 at 9:00
a.m. in the Supervisor of Elections' workroom located in
the Liberty County Courthouse. This test will include the
touchscreen units as well as the optical scan tabulators we
have always used. We welcome the public to observe and
participate.
Also, early voting for the Primary election will begin on
Monday, August 11 Saturday, August 23, 2008 in the Su-
pervisor of Elections office. Office hours are 8:00 a.m. to
4:00 p.m. Monday through Saturday. Remember, there will
be no early voting the day before the election and you will
have to vote an absentee ballot or wait and go to the polls
on election day. Election day hours are from 7:00 a.m. -
7:00 p.m.
As a reminder to those who wish to have an absentee
ballot mailed-the deadline to make the request is August
20, 2008. After that, the voter may pick up his or her ab-
sentee ballot or an individual may pick up the ballot for him
or her with a note from the voter. The note must include the
voter's name, date of birth signature, date of request and
indicate the election the request is for. The note must also
indicate the name and drivers license number, if known, of
the designated individual who will be picking up the ballot.
Vote by mail, vote early or vote at the polls-NO EX-
CUSES, JUST GO VOTE!
Marcia Wood
Liberty County Supervisor of Elections


according to the current rule.

WHAT HORSE OWNERS
SHOULD DO
-- Monitor your horse for the
presence of ticks. Use commer-
cially available topical products
labeled for ticks if your horse
is in an area where tick infes-
tation is a problem. Most of
these products are synthetic py-
rethrins. Include an avermectin
product in your deworming pro-


gram to provide systemic treat-
ment for ticks. Ask your veteri-
narian'if you are unsure.
-- If you find large numbers
of ticks or suspect piroplasmo-
sis, please contact your veteri-
narian.
-- Do not share needles be-
tween animals during the ad-
ministration of any medication
or vaccinations. EP and other
diseases can be spread by the
introduction of blood cells from


an infected animal into an un-
infected animal during routine
administration of injectable
medications.
-- Continue your normal
equine activities.
Additional updates and in-
formation will be posted to the
Florida Department of Agri-
culture and Consumer Ser-
vices, Division of Animal In-
dustry, web site at http://www.
doacs..state.fl. us/ai.


OFFICIAL PRIMARY BALLOT

DEMOCRATIC BALLOT

LIBERTY COUNTY, FLORIDA

AUGUST 26, 2008


-n I ROcKaU F


Il m I


- .I I


TO VOTE, COMPLETELY RLL IN
THE OVAL 4 NEXTTO YOUR
CHOICE.

USE BLACK OR BLUE
BALLPOINT PEN.

IF YOU MAKE A MISTAKE, DON'T
HESITATE TO ASK FOR A NEW
BALLOT. IF YOU ERASE OR
MAKE OTHER MARKS, YOUR
VOTE MAY NOT COUNT.


CLEOKOF THE ClCUITCOURT
UNIVERSALPRUMRY CONTEST
"berOm)


JeanWthitGargaio O
mDs


S John Troy Sander


SHaiFF
(Vcb f"ON.)




< Eddie Joe Whie


PROPERTY APPRAISER
UNIVERSAL PRIMARY CONTEST
(Votefor Or)

C) -4'rPsByvantrD., tm
o) Pattia&oWaiel


+


TAX COLLECTOR
(Vot for Ong)


C- Mane G. Goodman
C3 Thomas"Bubba' ast
C0 Jub Suber
C> Joanwrigh


ROCK BUFF


SUPERINTEDENT OF SCHOOLS
UNIVERSAL PRIMARY CONTEST

? ~eo*CforStu r o)
sue Se swmars D
C0 GJmsoU


Icm I


CIRCUIT JUDGE, 2ND CIRCUff
GROUP
(Vb tarow)

C: Enl Powal
0 LisaRleigh
CC FmankESheffie


COUNTY COMMISONER RCI JUDGE, 2ND CIRCUIT
ISTRCT GROUP 16
UNNffRS. PRIMARY CONTEST (V fore)

C> AMeIt 'Bmut ,he, o C> 0 AngelC. Dempwy
C> Staonl Stanley Dauson O c= > mim J.#5wMile, Jr.


COUNTY COMMISSIONER
DISTRICT 3
UNIVERSAL PRIMARY CONTEST

C2> AnJohmson
CZ JenyLewis DE


COUNTY COMMISSIONER
DISTRICT 5
WN4IERSAL PRIMARY CONTEST
(votalorcm)
0 Bil Bodilokd oB
C OwuisLee Fletcher OB
C RobertLParrish oa
C0 EddiePulbm DEB
C) Edward'Kevin'WlFmes DEB


NOJKARTIRON

CIRCUfT JUDGE, 2NDCMCUIT
orwa )

0 P. KevinDey
0 David Frank


IRCJIT JUDGE 2D CiRCUIT
GROUP4
(VOteron)

C' Dawawca-JoIson
C> ChaIesDodson


SCHOOL BOARD MEMBER
(Vdo TeWIm)


0 James E. Flowers
O Logan E Kevr
C Edward L Thomas, Jr."E.T,'


SCHOOL BOARD MEMBER
DISTICT2

c 3> Greg Brandr.n

C Thomas W,'Tommy* Ouggar
> Jed MHiers


~1~ 1- -I------


B= I Tmsoz~2 0 SW01


778 OIQIEU.14 OE~Ib, a~Pi8& a~zw, Zu. iUl, 2K2


~B~a~


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AUGUST 20, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 29


Public meeting

of the Liberty County

CANVASSING BOARD
and canvassing of the absentee
ballots, provisional ballots & manual audit
of the Aug. 26,2008 Primary Election


C'MON IN!

SUMMERLIN

MOTORS


BEST DEAL IN THE TRI-STATE AREA!
Slow credit, no problem W.A.C.
Hand-picked quality cars and truck,.


3905 W. Hwy 90
in Marianna


All meetings of
the Liberty Coun-
ty Canvassing
Board are open
to the public and
will be conducted
for the Primary
Election in the
courtroom at the
Liberty County
courthouse locat-
ed at 10818 NW
SR 20 in Bristol,
Florida.

Sealed absen-
tee ballots received for the Primary
Election will be available for public
inspection from 4:30 p.m. to 5:00
p.m. Election Day at the office of
the Supervisor of Elections, 10818
NW SR 20, Bristol, Florida.

Pursuant to Section 101.68(2)
(c)2, Florida Statutes, if any elector
or candidate present believes that
an absentee ballot is illegal due to a
defect apparent on the voter's cer-
tificate, he or she may, at any time
before the ballot is removed from
the envelope, file with the canvass-
ing board a protest against the can-
vass of the ballot, specifying the
precinct, the ballot, and the reason
he or she believes the ballot to be
illegal. A challenge based upon a
defect in the voter's certificate may
not be accepted after the ballot has
been removed from the mailing en-
velope.

The Liberty County Canvassing
Board will convene at 5:00 p.m.
Election Day in courtroom at the
Liberty County courthouse located
at 10818 NW SR 20, Bristol, Flor-
ida. The absentee ballots will be
canvassed, processed through the
ballot tabulator and the canvassing
board will perform any other duties
that may be prescribed by law. Re-
sults, however, will not be printed
until after 7:00 p.m. when polls are
closed.


The Canvass-
ing Board will
canvass pre-
cinct returns
on election
night follow-
ing the receipt
of results from
each poll. The
canvass of pro-
visional ballots
cast for the Pri-
mary Election
will be August
28, 2008, at
4:45 p.m. in
the courtroom
at the Liberty County courthouse
located at 10818 NW SR 20, Bris-
tol, Florida.

The. Liberty County Canvassing
Board will convene at 5:15 p.m. on
August 28, 2008 in the courtroom
at the Liberty County courthouse
located at 10818 NW SR 20, Bris-
tol, Florida to conduct the random
selection of a race from all avail-
able races on the ballots and a pre-
cinct in order to conduct a manual
audit of the voting system.

The Liberty County Canvassing
Board will convene at 9:00 a.m. on
August 29, 2008 in the courtroom
at the Liberty County courthouse
located at 10818 NW SR 20, Bris-
tol, Florida to conduct the manual
audit of the voting system.

It may become necessary for the
Canvassing Board to reconvene
after August 26, 2008 and subse-
quent meetings, for reasons other
than those indicated above. If so,
the time and date will be posted
at the office and Web site of the
Supervisor of Elections and an-
nounced at the conclusion of the
meeting.

In accordance with the Sunshine
Law of Florida, all Canvassing Board
meetings are open to the public.


Vote for &

Thomas W.

"Tommy"

Duggar


re-elect


for Liberty County

School Board District 2
Working to improve our school
system with Experience, Honesty,
and Dedication to improving
opportunities for a better education
for all Liberty County students.
iP: .'-,:3, 1 d., ;,T I.e fll ,rd h.,r anr. .5ppr ,rdv
"-~---i 61 rU,',rn.p n ,:-.3.l :.r r, ,i ,l B lar-i]



'OTE VOTE #



VTOTL[ E.T.
FOR Liberty County

SCHOOL BOARD
DISTRICT 1

Hello, Good Citizens of Liberty County:
I am Edward L. Thomas Jr. more
affectionately known as "E.T." and I
am campaigning to be your next school
board member for District 1. I am the son
of the sweet Adeline Thomas and
Edward Thomas Sr. I graduated with the
exceptional class of 1984. I went on to
receive degrees from Tomlinson College
and Lee University. I have been a part of
several types of school systems
all my life. Remember, "Vote
for the educator not the
politician to handle our
schools' affairs."


jr.: *


Respectfully Yours,
Edward L. ("E.T")
Thomas Jr.


S".:.l. ',, ,,1 .1. ri,_- n,: r rpi ,1 Il,:r
,-,: pp lr.:,. .,j ,, ,l .,3r, I
" t ,-; rr------"-----I----"- .-------


Business (850) 526-5254
Residence (850) 762-3679
Toll Free: 1-888-740-8222,


Marcia Wood,
SUPERVISOR OF ELECTIONS
Liberty County, Florida


".2


s







Page 30 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL AUGUST 20, 2008


OFFICIAL PRIMARY BALLOT

REPUBLICAN BALLOT
LIBERTY COUNTY, FLORIDA
AUGUST 26, 2008


1r .- .1


TO VOTE, COMPLETELY FILL IN
THE OVAL 4 NEXT TO YOUR
CHOICE.

USE BLACK OR BLUE
BALLPOINT PEN.

IF YOU MAKE A MISTAKE, DON'T
HESITATE TO ASK FOR A NEW
BALLOT. IF YOU ERASE OR
MAKE OTHER MARKS, YOUR
VOTE MAY NOT COUNT.


REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS
DISTRICT2
(Mshfor )


C Edde Hendry
C) MaikMuligon


OMMIV 'U~?US


COUNTY COMMISSIONER
DISTRICT
UNIVERSAL PRIMARY CONTEST
(volefwnl}
C JimJohnsorn I
<0 JewI LeFIs I


COUNTY COMMISStOaiER
DISTRICT 5
UNIVERSAL PRIMARY CONTEST

O BillyBodilord I
> CuW6 Lee Fltcher I
C0 Robert L Pwa
C0 Ed ie Pult a
C:3 E.ta id "'Ki' Wllnn., I


SCHOOL BOARD MEMBER
DISTRICT 1
IcteforOne)

Sdne Beckwgh
> Jame E. Flwer
> Logan E. Kever
SEdwadL ThomaJr. "ET?


SCHOOL BOARD MEMBER
DISTRICT 2

* ,'.,} Bwdon
Thn:rM. W 'Tommy' Duggar
S Jed M. Hiers


COUNTY COMMISSIONER
DISTRICT 1
UNIVERSAL PRIMARY CONTEST
(Vo0OrOn Be)
C) Alcbert 'Butch' Brtober
C) ;lai5fd Sanliy ClirM


-. t~,
S I T~ft~ -~Y~I ~J


CIRCUIT JUDGE, 2ND CIRCUIT
GROUP 1
(IVoBt Ona)

C> AngefaC.Depsey


77.A.I1 2S1n-U Q4 EtrcIita geyataaitwar ter.1lBi.32 ,


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DMD


COfltY
CLERK OF THE CI CUfi COURT NONPARTISAN
UNIVERSAL PRIMARY CONTEST
CIRCUITJUDGE 2ND CIRCUIT
ROUP 3
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R fert HiH DE o o P.Kevin Daey
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PROPERTY APPRAISER CIRCUIT JUDGE, 2ND CIRCUIT
UNIVERSAL PRIMARY CONTEST GROUP 4
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UNIVERSAL PRIMARY CONTEST GROUP 7
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AUGUST 20, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 31


2009 NAP application closing dates to be extended to Dec. 1


GAINESVILLE The Food,
Conservation, and Energy Act of
2008 (2008 Act), was enacted
on June 18, 2008. The 2008
Act created several new disaster
programs under Supplemental
Agricultural Disaster Assistance.
Producers must purchase at
least CAT level of insurance
for all insurable crops and/or
NAP coverage for noninsurable
crops to be eligible for these


programs. As a result of the
late announcement of the 2009
risk management purchase
requirement, an extension of
those 2009 NAP application
closing dates that fall before
December 1, 2008, is authorized
to allow eligible producers to
purchase 2009 NAP coverage to
be eligible for the new disaster
programs.
Extending 2009 NAP


application deadlines to December
1, 2008, does not modify the
definition of coverage period.
Generally NAP coverage will
not begin until the later of the
following dates:
30 calendar days after the
date the CCC-471, Application
for Coverage, is filed
The date the crop is planted not
to exceed the final planting date
Any 2009 NAP application


closing dates established before
December 1, 2008, are now
extended to December 1, 2008.
Example 1: A 2009
NAP application closing date
established as September 1,2008,
will be extended to December
1, 2008, since the established
application closing date of
September 1, 2008, is before
December 1, 2008.
Example 2: A 2009
NAP application closing date
established as December 30,
2008, will remain unchanged,


since the established application
closing date of December 30,
2008, is not before December
1,2008.
Example 3: A 2009
NAP application closing date
established as December 1,
2008, will remain unchanged,
since the application closing date
falls on the authorized extended
application closing date.
Additional information on
Disaster Programs is available at
your local USDA Farm Service
Center.


f. -, ty." ;...- ...1. ...- ..I:' :.. .... -:I ... ..-


OFFICIAL PRIMARY BALLOT

NONPARTISAN BALLOT

LIBERTY COUNTY, FLORIDA

AUGUST 26, 2008




TO VOTE, COMPLETELY FiLL IN
THE OVAL 4* NEXT TO YOUR couIY. N ONPARTIAN


CHOICE.

USE BLACK OR BLUE
BALLPOINT PEN.

IF YCOU MAKE A MISTAKE, DON'T
HESITATE TO ASK FOR A NEW
BALLOT. IF YOU ERASE OR
MAKE OTHER MARKS, YOUR
VOTE MAY NOT COUNT
COUNTY

CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
UNIVERSAL PRIMARY CONTEST
JeioefWoran)

C) JeanieWhitterGahilo OEM


R HA


0 John Troy Safders


PROPERTY APPRAISER
UNIVERSAL PRWMYCONTEST
(Vdo for*n.)

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C5 PdtdiaS. WhItkI d


SUPERIFNTENDENTOF SCHOOLS
IVERSAL PRIMARY CONTEST
(Votfor Of )

C Stephen 'CMWiaS Shulw t


C Sue Swmmers


C G.ay Johmon Uzzl


COUNTY COMMISSIONER
DBTRICT
UNIVERSE PMARY CONTEST

2 Alnw'Butch'B&Acher OEM
CO Salrd Stanley Dson DEM


COUNTY COMMISSIONER
DISTRICT3a
tWiVERSAL PRIMARY CONTEST
(V& wfor )
A0 JdmJoson OEM
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MnraB uti


COUNTY COMMISSIONER
DISTRICT 5
UNIVERSAL PRIMARY CONTEST
(Vot for On)
0 Billy B,:Id....il
C0 Cotis Lee Fiet"her
0 Robert L. PaMih


0 Eddie Pultam


C> EI*i td Vd v' W'll0im.


NONPARTISAN


CIRCUIT JUDGE, 2ND CIRCUIT
GROUP 3
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C0 R.KeFvin Da
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CIRCUIT JUDGE 2ND CIRCUIT
"Voteforrta)






CIRCUIT JUDGE, 2ND CIRCUIT
GROUP

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CIRCUIT JUDGE 2ND CIRCUIT
Votae for0i

C> Angela C. Dempsey
C-- WiiamIJ.'BlI&ille, Jr.


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SCHOOL BOARD MEMBER
DISTRICT I
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OEM C JwamesE Flowe
OEM C0 LeganE Kn-er
OEM Z; Edward L Th.i'. .1, JS.T


SCHOOL BOARD MEMBER
DISTRICT 2

Greg Bmndon
JThxna W "TH'r, s L' i lmr
SJedM.ilers-


S, 7.7.0.oi0 -14* ilE -iI, ItMra In II. 2 C .
i s..o o~ n..,...m.,r m..


August 18 20
Classes Begin August 21
Late Registration through August 28

Call 526-2761
or visit www.chipola.edu





We're your one-stop G

TIRE SHOP! 0 LopO o
TOYO O



g D
E
A




*Shocks
*OIL CHANGES
*Balancing *Brakes

"Volkswagens to semi's, we handle them all"


= CITY TIRE Co.
MV5496
Hwy. 20 West* Blountstown 674-8784


LAKE MYSTIC PRECINCT IS MOVING!
Effective immediately beginning with the Primary Elec-
tion on Aug. 26, Lake Mystic Precinct No. 4 has been
permanently moved from the current location next to Lake
Mystic Supermarket to Veterans Memorial Civic Center
on Theo Jacobs Way, Bristol.
The Supervisor of Elections' office requested and the
Board of County Commissioners approved that this move
be made for the safety of the voters and easier accessibil-
ity.
We will clearly mark the entrance to the polling location
at the rear of the building. As always, voting will begin on
election day at 7 a.m. and end at 7 p.m. 8-20-08


i







Page 32 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL AUGUST 20,2008


k B i g ,B
Pol
Benevo
ABssoclia





















-- . -. -_ --











Greetings Liberty County,

As you know this will be the last publication ot the Journal oetore the z2UUv primary tiection. I would like to tnanic you tor taking time
to read and for expressing interest in my articles over the last several months. I have from the onset of my campaign provided honest.
and heart felt information about myself and my platform through the radio, letters, this publication and in person. One of my
opponents has found it necessary to say and publish things that he feels will be hurtful toward me and my campaign to lead the office
of the Sheriff. My response to this is brief. I find this behavior to be in poor taste, but not surprising.

As you can see, I have been endorsed by many credible and highly regarded people that have a genuine and heart felt concern for
Liberty County and its future. Being the Sheriff is a daunting task when the duties of the office are being performed ethically and
responsibly. It is humbling to know that men of this stature believe that I am the right man for the job.

Ultimately, it is up to you, the citizens of our beautiful county to elect the next Sheriff. I would like to recap my political platform in
an effort to show you the changes and improvements that are in store for the office of the Sheriff if I am elected.

* A real war on drugs that will never be tied to a political time line or agenda
* Fair law enforcement throughout our county
* Transparency in the financial dealings of the department
* Become a community based department that is trusted and respected by all citizens
* Outreach and drug awareness programs for our youth
* Home visits to check on the safety and security of our Seniors
* Adapt and implement policies that will allow for the safe operation of our jail.
* Ethics & accountability
* Accessibility

It will be challenging to address all of these items of concern that I have outlined, but as you can see, I am a motivated person that is
focused on improving the Office of the Sheriff. In closing, I would like to leave you with a word of Thanks. Thank you for opening
your doors to me and listening to what I have to say. I have truly found my bid for election to be an educational and rewarding
experience. My time spent campaigning has only served to strengthen my belief in the people who live in this wonderful place we call
home.
I humbly ask for your vote so that we can move forward together.

Thank you,
Eddie Joe White
Candidate for Liberty County Sheriff






AUGUST 20, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 33

'The Calhoun LibertyJournal, SECT ~ION:B


Open House at

ALTHA SCHOOL
Teachers and staff members gathered to
welcome students and parents at Friday's
Open House at Altha School. RIGHT:
Teacher Millie Jo Williams hugs student
Stephanie Wriston after learning she
will be in her class this year. BELOW:
More hugs! BOTTOM LEFT: Teacher
Juan Lima gives directions to visitors.
BOTTOM RIGHT: Stacy Reece goes over
her the class schedule for her son, Corey.
The new Calhoun County school year
started on Monday.


STORM NEWS
Floridians urged to prepare....34
Residents asked to report price-
gouging after storm ...............34
FWC says take precautions...35
Free 511 service guides drivers
in severe weather...................35
Crisis response team in place
to help storm victims .............46


INSIDE
Letters to the editor..............34
Chipola College news........39
Business news...............48, 49
Blountstown School news...53
The Job Market..................54
Obituaries......................... 56
Classified ads..............58, 59
Public and Legal Notices.....60







Page 34 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL AUGUST 20, 2008



Floridians urged to prepare for Tropical Storm Fay


TALLAHASSEE Florida
Chief Financial Officer and
State Fire Marshal Alex Sink
urged Floridians to continue to
monitor and prepare for Tropical
Storm Fay including taking the
necessary financial and fire safety
precautions to weather the storm
with the help of a Hurricane
Toolkit available online at www.
MyFloridaCFO.com. Tropical
Storm Fay is intensifying and
is expected to reach hurricane
strength before landfall on the
Florida peninsula.
The Hurricane Toolkit, available
by visiting the Department of
Financial Services' Web site,
www.MyFloridaCFO.com and
clicking on the "Hurricane Season
2008" button, contains hurricane
preparedness tips, emergency
contact information and advises
residents of information they
will need to have on hand in the
event they need to make a claim.
Floridians may also reach the
department at 1-877-MY-FL-
CFO which provides service in
Spanish as well as English.
"Each year hurricane season
reminds us of the importance of


having not only a safety plan in
place to protect our homes and
families from the devastation
hurricanes can bring, but also
a plan to protect financial
documents and expedite recovery
after the storm," said CFO Sink.
In addition to the toolkit,
the department's Web site
contains information on how
to file an insurance claim,
answers to the most-frequently-
asked insurance questions, and
disaster-preparedness guides
in both English and Spanish.
Floridians can also find links to
other hurricane-related resources,
including the Florida Division
of Emergency Management,
National Flood Insurance
Program, Federal Emergency
Management Agency, American
Red Cross, My Safe Florida
Home program and more.
TIPS TO PROTECT
FINANCIAL DATA
When you hear warnings that a
hurricane is near, you should also
take precautions to secure your
financial safety.
Remember to withdraw
enough money for 3-5 days


before a pending storm.
Be smart and safe about
carrying or keeping large amounts
of cash, as criminals will use these
anxious times to take advantage
of consumers and this increases
the risk of being robbed.
Take important financial
papers with you in a waterproof
container if you must evacuate,
including insurance papers
for home, auto, boat, rental
property, business; passports;
birth certificates; mortgage and
other loan payment documents


and your latest tax return.
Get receipts for cash
purchases before and after a
storm. Use credit cards to finance
minimal repairs when necessary.
Document all these transactions.
Maintain copies of your
household inventory and other
documentation, including photos.
This will assist the adjuster
in assessing the value of the
destroyed property.
Write down the name, address
and claims-reporting telephone
number of your insurance


company, which may differ from
your agent's contact information.
Keep this information in a safe
place and make sure you have
access to it if you are forced to
evacuate your home.
Immediately report property
damage to your insurance agent
and company.
Never use a generator indoors
or in any enclosed area including
a garage, carport or sunroom.
Avoid using candles and do
not use a candle or lantern near a
generator or stored fuel.


Residents urged to report price-gouging


TALLAHASSEE Florida Agriculture and
Consumer Services Commissioner Charles H.
Bronson today urged state residents to report any
instances of price-gouging to his department in the
wake of approaching Tropical Storm Fay.
Under Florida law, it is unlawful to charge
exorbitant or excessive prices for essential items
-- including shelter, gasoline, food, water, ice,
generators or lumber -- following the declaration
of an emergency, unless the increases in the amount
charged are attributable to additional costs incurred
by retailers.
Governor Charlie Crist has declared an
emergency for the approaching storm, triggering


the activation of the price-gouging statute.
Individuals or businesses found to have engaged
in price gouging face fines of up to- $1,000 per
violation, or up to a maximum fine of $25,000 a
day.
"We're asking consumers to come forward and
let us know if any retailers have exploited our
citizens or are profiteering from the approaching
storm," Bronson said. "This activity is not only
reprehensible, it's illegal."
Bronson is asking residents who have any
evidence that price-gouging has occurred or is
occurring to report it at once to his department's toll-
free hotline at 1-800-HELPFLA (1-800-435-7352).


SPEAK UP!
WITH A LETTER TO THE EDITOR
Write: The Calhoun-Liberty Journal
P.O. Box 536, Bristol 381 /

Staff, teachers should ride

bus routes taken by students
To the editor:
Tuesday of last week, Mr. Ronnie Hand, Principal ofAltha School,
called me to request a school bus for Friday, Aug. 15. The purpose
was to take his teachers on a educational trip. The Administration of
Altha School wanted their faculty to understand what many of their
students do each day in order to get to school and home again. Many
of our students get on the bus at 6 a.m. and ride for over an hour only
to reverse the trip in the afternoon.
I thought this was a great idea and personally think every principal
and their teachers should do the same to better understand what the
students and bus drivers go through each day. This would create a
more positive understanding of our students.
As a Transportation Director and a teacher for 42 years, I commend
Mr. Hand and Mrs. Ladonna Kelly for stepping out of the box and
doing something positive for our schools. Yes, I do want to get on
'The Energy Bus' and encourage all other school personnel to do the
same. Creating a more positive attitude and understanding of those
we serve will make us all winners.
COST: eight gal. of fuel- $40
RESULTS: Understanding and Compassion Priceless
David Pitts, Director of Transportation
Calhoun County School Board

Help sought for cemetery cleanup
To the editor:
I am inquiring as to who you have to talk to about getting an outside
work squad from Calhoun C.I. assigned to clean up and maintain the
Mt. Olive Cemetery in Altha. I rode by the cemetery where my father
is buried within the last few weeks, I was appalled at the condition
of the cemetery at that time. I am 51 years old and have never seen
Mt. Olive Cemetery in that kind of shape.
It is an embarrassment to Calhoun County, to the community, as
well as the families who have their loved ones buried in Mt. Olive
Cemetery, to have your cemetery in such conditions. Most especially
when there are work squads that are available to the community and
can be assigned to do these types of jobs on a regular basis and not
as an after thought. I have been told that this is assigned by the county
commissioners and if it's not on their priority list, that it will not be
done. I would like to know exactly what needs to be done and who is
exactly responsible for getting this done so the Mt. Olive Cemetery
can be kept clean on a regular basis as well as all cemeteries.
Linda Benton, Sneads


CARPET, CERAMIC, PORCELAIN, VINYL, NAFCO,
LAMINATE, HARDWOOD & AREA RUGS

V sot I-t Q Te 7a Iya Carpe it



*ii l8 6Ws...


S. .3 1 4




SIZE COLOR/STYLE PRICE
12' x 10'9" Gold Frieze $9990 A i
12' x 12' Mingled Frieze $13550
12" x 12' Berber $11990


12'
12'
12'
12'
12'
12'
12'
12'
12'


x 13'
x 14'
x 14'10"
x 15'
x 15'6"'
x 16'7"
x16'
x 19'10"
x 23'


Mint Plush
Pattern Comm.
Pattern Comm.
Cream Frieze
Chocolate Frieze
Blue Frieze
Pattern Comm.
Purple Frieze
Frieze


$13550
$19990
$10590
$16550
$18550
$17990
$14590
$22550
$27990


J.DOwns arpt &CermicOut~let


'oo 7uI 1hl &- I 13P/a.( I ;- 7o 0 611 0, P IVO,'7 &- y Mq e e &-t -, o 5. "][o o







AUGUST 20, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 35


f VOTE FOR & ELECT

hhelby Hires

CALHOUN COUNTY

Commission District 1


Check the

Records &

You Decide


*Vote for a candidate with 30 years of
business and management experience.

*Compare my business and manage-
ment abilities to that of my opponents and
you decide who you want handling your
county's business and tax dollars.

eVote for a candidate who takes the
needs of the citizens of Calhoun
County seriously and who wants
a better future for all.

*If you have any questions or concerns
please call me at 850-674-4129 (home)
850-643-1688 (cell) or 850-762-3705
(work).


ELECT SHELBY HIRES
Commissioner, District 1
Political advertisement paid for and approved by Shelby Hires,
| Democrat for County Commissioner, District 1. [


FWC says take precautions, be

careful before and during storm


The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation
Commission (FWC) urged potential thrill-
seekers today to stay out of the water as
Tropical Storm Fay heads toward Florida's
coast. The FWC also urged-boat-owners
to secure their vessels well ahead of the
approaching tropical storm.
"Tropical Storm Fay is a potentially
dangerous storm and could become a hurricane
before making landfall in Florida," FWC law
enforcement director, Col. Julie Jones, said.
"Everyone has a responsibility to make sure
their families and neighbors are safe and to
act.responsibly during this event. For surfers,
windsurfers, swimmers and others seeking the
thrill of high waves and high winds, I urge
them to stay away from and out of the water.
Rip currents, high waves, storm surges and


water spouts are dangerous and prevalent
during a tropical storm."
She said vessel owners should moor boats
securely. Florida is often overwhelmed with
damaged boats left in the water after storm
events which create navigational hazards.
"Boat owners have a duty to take
precautions to secure their vessels, so people
aren't hurt and property not damaged by an
unsecured boat," Jones said.
If boat owners trailer their boats, the FWC
recommends they let some air out of the
trailer tires, block the wheels, and put some
water inside the boat to add weight and help
keep the boat in place."
More information and links to U.S. Coast
Guard and BoatUS Web sites are available
. omnineatlMF WC.dpadbod '


Free 511 service guides drivers

to safety during severe weather


ORLANDO-As Floridians
and visitors prepare for
Tropical Storm Fay, the Florida
Department of Transportation
(FDOT) is encouraging
everyone to use its free 511
Traffic Information Service
to stay updated with real-time
roadway information.
In the event of an evacuation
or other emergency, FDOT
recommends drivers call
511 before hitting the road
to check on highway and
bridge conditions. Florida'se


511 service provides up-to-
the-minute information on toll
suspensions, road closures and
evacuation routes.
"Our primary goal is to keep
people safe, especially during
severe weather conditions
and hurricanes," said
FDOT Secretary Stephanie
Kopelousos. "By dialing 511
or visiting the FL511.com
Web site, people can stay
updated with road conditions
so they can make good travel
decisions."
The free 511 service is
accessible by cell phone,
landline or by visiting www.
FL511.com. By dialing 511,
callers can hear real-time
reports on interstate highways
throughout the state and
Florida's Turnpike.
"We strongly recommend
people dial 511 to find
out exactly what the road
conditions are, so they can
travel safely," said Gregg
Laskoski, Managing Director,
Public & Government
Relations for AAA Auto Club
South. "Other ways to stay safe
are to maintain an appropriate
distance from other cars when
driving in rain, reduce speed
and never use cruise control
which can cause hydroplaning
on wet roads."
K The 511 service is free,


however cell phone minutes
apply.

SAFETY TIPS
1. Call 511 before you hit
the road, at a rest area or have a
passenger call to avoid talking
while driving.
2. Call 511 before you enter
a new roadway to become
aware of the current road
condition.
3. Customize your trip
before you leave home at
www.FL511 .com to minimize
time spent on the phone.
4. Drive slowly and
keep your lights on in low
visibility.
5. Do not use cruise control
when driving in rain.
6. Always wear a safety
belt.
511 TIPS
1. Speak as clearly as
possible and minimize any
background noise including
radios and open windows.
2. Say "help" for
instructions.
3. Say "next," "previous,"
"stop" or "repeat" to navigate
through the phone menus more
quickly.
4. Say "main menu" at any
time to start over.
5. Interrupt 511 at any time
if you already know your
selection.






Page 36 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL AUGUST 20, 2008


Magnolia Square Movie Night


The Blountstown High School Cheerleaders (TOP) and the cheer-
leaders from Liberty County High School (LEFT) got the crowd
reed up for an outdoor showing of the football film, "Remember
the Titans" at Magnolia Square in Blountstown Friday night. Fam-
ilies enjoyed spreading out on the ground to watch the film after
the sun set. Among those having a good time were (ABOVE, left
to right) Trice Tomicha, Gracelyn Barbee and unidentified young-
ster who appeared caught up in the film.






AUGUST 20, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 37


EOD, 1;' NWi1 NO W 1u mI Ni T2





Te COMMIT 0T i t" R." '' ` '.'' A I
VOUl NA CN. BYT rr J Al'.i l
EXTENI' TP I': BES? .; 3 EIH SIN 1 ". 1 "i
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'Y.V en you ut te-' 'c he,-. ',"i' rre ;hcl:o 7 '.' elp your naionf.
Find out ho,:. L .S.. '..:, ',.'1 S LOV a- : 1i1 1-372-!S.aco.Pis


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Welcomes

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Dr. Keshav is a graduate
of the Tallahassee Memorial
Family Medicine Residency Program.



........ ''.....
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wo11 Dr. Keshav is now accepting new patients.
Call 674-4524 to schedule an appointment.
Masfin Isurames Accepted.

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Family Medicine 17808 N.E. Charley Johns Street
Family Medicine Blountstow, FL 32424
Blountstown www.tmh.org
Tallahassee Memorial HealthCare







Page 38 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL AUGUST 20, 2008


UF helps Florida utilities assess impact of wind on power lines


GAINESVILLE With Tropical Storm Fay
bearing down on Florida, thousands of residents are
likely to be faced with power outages that are both
disruptive and costly.
To find ways to cost-effectively reduce the number
of blackouts that historically accompany tropical
storm or hurricane landfalls, University of Florida
researchers are engaged in a major collaboration with
Florida's utility companies.
The Hurricane Hardening Project is examining
how hurricane winds affect both underground and
overhead power lines. The project is also seeking the
best ways to minimize tree-related outages and other
potential threats to electric infrastructure in an effort
to speed the restoration process in the aftermath of
storms.
"Preparing for storms requires cooperation from
many groups and organizations," said Matthew
Carter II, chairman of the Florida Public Service
Commission, which initiated the project. "We are
pleased that the University of Florida is fostering
cooperation by working with Florida's utilities on
research to strengthen the state's electrical grid."
Researchers and utilities are studying the impacts
of moving lines underground and also examining
the possibility of strengthening existing overhead
systems as a cheaper alternative, said Mark
Jamison, director of UF's Public Utility Research


Mr 11. .i ...S
Wind researchers test one of 50 weather monitoring stations using
the UF hurricane simulator on June 17, 2008. Weather stations
are positioned on utility poles along the coast of Florida and will
collect wind speed, wind direction, barometric pressure and other
data once a hurricane makes landfall.
simulator to ensure their electronics can withstand hurricane
force winds and driving rain. He will also help interpret the data
supplied by each station.
"The wind monitoring network in Florida will provide the
detailed ground-level hurricane wind behavior that is badly


needed by engineers working to better understand
the ways that the power distribution infrastructure
fails," Gurley said.
The National Oceanic and Atmospheric
Administration and utility companies will receive
this data from the stations in real-time, and NOAA
will use the data to create wind field maps.
Once the hurricane passes, utilities will mobilize
teams of first-responders to assess where and how
the electric system failed. Using the NOAA wind
maps, they will match wind speeds with damages
on the ground. This "forensic data" will then be
analyzed to determine which hardening strategies
work best. "If the power distribution system failed,
we will be better able to analyze the damage and
determine why the damage occurred," Gurley
said.
As part of the Hurricane Hardening Project, utility
companies are also studying ways to improve their
vegetation management programs. They maintain a
regular schedule of trimming to keep lines clear and
routinely monitor critical distribution facilities.
Researchers and utilities in this project are
partnering with WeatherFlow, a company that
develops, manages and installs wind measuring
devices. Quanta Technologies conducted the
research on underground lines and developed the
computer model.


Center, which is coordinating the
hurricane hardening effort.
This innovative research has
resulted in an experimental
computer model that may be
helpful in assessing the costs and
benefits of burying power lines.
"People need to know the
costs and benefits to decide
whether it's worth moving lines
underground," Jamison said.
"Once we have this information,
customers, policymakers and
utility companies can make
sound choices."
Researchers have also
examined four cases in Florida
where utilities have converted
overhead lines to underground.
Their main conclusion:
Moving existing overhead
lines underground is costly and
usually not justified solely by the
economic benefits but rather by
other benefits that are difficult to
quantify such as aesthetics.
That said, burying utility
lines in some communities may
have advantages, especially in
the case of new construction,
when underground lines can be
included in the development's
planning process.
, People often view underground
power lines as a solution to
storm-caused outages. But they
are not the cure-all they appear to
be, Jamisorf said. Underground
facilities are more prone to
damage from flooding, storm
surge and erosion, which can
lead to increased costs and repair
times, he said.
To obtain more detailed
information on the damage
hurricane winds cause to overhead
lines, project partners have
installed 50 wind observation
stations on existing or specialized
utility poles along the coast of
Florida. Instruments on each
station collect wind speed, wind
direction, barometric pressure
and other data.
Kurt Gurley, an associate
professor of civil and coastal
engineering, has tested the wind
stations using the UF hurricane


11 YEARS OF PROVEN ELECTIONS EXPERIENCE YOUR ONLY STATE-CERTIFIED CANDIDATE


SUPERVISOR OF ELECTIONS


Dear Calhoun County Voter:
The primary clectinn is this coming Tuedaj%. August 26. Those of')ou \who havc.n't \Old earl in lithe
EICecLIon. Office or .asi an absentee ballot sill hae a choice to ,make., and 'oncc again I ask 'ou in picla,' consider rc-eleiling me ast your
super\ Isor otel'ecLiiOis. Reing elccied b th1 iCo plic 0 Callih.un CIounI InI 201114 has hbeln great. lionor and ;a pnm ilege for me, and I
%%o'uld %cr 1 nuiich like t' coiuinile tII IN Sour M ipeic iNior Iof! ,'lhi'ns.
\ :i '. to[L'r., ', oiu'rie Ih I b .. % and \>o ha \ 1 ,i, iei l i-'ii:ar 1t re nip libiiN h >i uI oi'L r ioh.. hI n-10 sur lthi i ihhe be itl, niiios-quahlici d candid.iates
.ir- elc Jd. r "hiiLd." ioi ill kL poillii irn our 'OiiLk .-ker-ni nlt. But1l hli.\ dJii Biotr'> decide which 'candida i. I'b&l? SI` meltntel
,iers maN li hio e j L.andidald ct bi,.l d ii l.nIiihls ties Ie lii1idshlip, pi puillarl or % ariou,. llOher rea'..on i inol coniisideriing e-e sinigln e a.specr of
1hi c.1 7.inJid.dle ni\ ,or m:\i not b1 the h lt person in'r Ith ioh. \M.lI% \>lIrI ha'.c.i' lrcad. made up their minds, otlhlr> mia be Luid ccided
ll I\l)'llm [ \ Ht I 0 lld i \ -Ii dh \n l % hIll ti' L W ii i _rld ld.idu pkl C','illider qujlllet2 []o>l.. C\pL-'riall,2-. L 'aid the njididiat', record 01
'rn iNe- Ir ih poi'niin 1t3 pILc.-. re mnilnher I here '- n' o -l'otitiiuc t.>r aJreadjJy h;ti ihos' tcrnical quiiJ l 'NTrom \ --ars_ of',c C ice in lthe
prhMl'io
I ti.i\ "Ii ul, ri iii, li L r 'J _ci i li t n nii h I lhi ,,n,,. O 1n'i n a11 I'11 ,,l;irliorn i1i1 ,1u cliii'l J -PI I! d w) MIl' lII p;i-l ., I 2 \e, rs i ,i
' our iL'.IJL d uti 'i\ i-..a i I. llji-t.irtr \ii lih.il iii\ it I'lL. "1. 11]' .ih0 1 I li. l i kie \\ ledlc":l mid 'PiTI'eic'hILc n c'dL 'dI io C i 1i1iio1i1 h' 1%cr e yoe u
.milh ii<'ie.'. ini' ri i, h rd .'ork. '! rL tii' ri '\ pfoIt i.'lr li-ii i .-ua Id hnr ine.
Recaust m% dulii in sour rleciions Oeilir till preie ii.me from pfrsonall1 visiting e'erNone. I hope that you'lll understand
anmid accept nim apollu. I am jour public wraiin FIRST. and I cannot abandon the jnb responsibilities that -Ierc placed in my
IruI tl u i elii I i is electclil in 20114. II ..'iii'd li -: l.. i 1'1. Ii, '. 1 1 :,i .L i' i 't .i 1c ,11'. qCi'.t li.-.. ] -IkL C ,lend .in e.mai l to L e a11
1 'I'o l .m rL'.tl.i iliii'r-.i',i i **.,,i 1 lit i,- 1 l i.n In. 'i t il 7(12-.14405.
ill .i lii o 1, l ii m : c m.'til 1,ili.i le.il 1ii'. i;iid l l n '.A 1 io ',l'. 'hlii1 '. ou .t i lv \'Ol &. I I l\ Jl'cb itlel hallo!t lir n ,! I Ihe pill. on


.\t i~t' I 2 ,' tlial I. \ iLl i.r \ Iur -uppI'n. .i

i A speiniote from The Hfonorable
\ TV'rry; V(Ohugihant. I1.1!loBI (r-.iont
Supeior oi ) "ior ,'f-ein. ,*nd 'ast-Prevcnt
(? '.' 4 ofthe I a, ii., Stat', Aass'iation of
'1 /.,= Supervisorls of Elction.s






it H isil grem f~s iasm mia i t wln, MtN- aw candliiacy ramargi; unnuaramon re
coiIinl ue as iup, 'Isur or V.le" n c'iito h t in iam i(u it "
lHavinm Iknol Mn aq for "):t1y 'vals. i can aittt Ia bet Iratim hip sWk11 .uni
dti4tiUI 014tlt) e olthie. Ii Uli (llu r-lurz iiiing worid fl te'1i"ii tImisiftra' ii. (kil
aV. n I' (owir 1't i ,la ii ll k ir 'it Ih3 1 t flu t'ie ltM ar.' t cll'. e ( t i lt
aririse a id)i NNW an Bit l riy hlnio wil'i conin a Ir.iiautinu i r.of far e, >B. ind
suiessful- edrIi.olt A Pail-PmEide al o-f lt le Hioriid Sife Aw ktiaEou of
Speiors of lf nectii. I cantt cimiifrmni ii ltarge iius 4tarti l ilt rtve( of o
"itryvlkrimia t*Ifliials fromti around tre ii e.
"Bradoeri ou ( n' oi till a t vull el t eI s aIeitll -Voai in HoII>aI o fa 'v pregranIthai
is, ta pe't paltl rm d fr(a l in im uf ryi i ltn hilol ers f at 'in .l C y i 'i I. i '
Marlit liaram v ul rieltaiii ilnl i n 1 npairl iiut l'i

Rest Wt'i-es


Braldfin-! Otinty

P.O. SaS xS ,5 Sawke. Fl. S3elOO$a t S1 0- -mo S ,I fax 904-96"&.165
fl aif: bradsoe~tradf ord COfla.org a wraeiefln1CtadOmsCO


IMPROVE 1ENITS FOR SAF I I, PRIVACY, AN) A
It 11 1 R VOTING I'iF.\P RIE\CE FOR ALL
CALHOUN COUNTY ( I IIZI !
A after becoming elected, my staff and I have made some much-
needed changes to your Elections Office to comply with state
and federal law and to ensure that each eligible voter in Calhoun
County is able to cast a secret ballot legally, on time and inde-
pendently:
::> Usirng inmate labor, we knocked down a few walls to expand the -- t: :o allow us
to house all of our elections equipment, supplies and records in one location, a must for
security purposes. The expanded .: area also allows us to accommodate the public
for earty voting and for open, visible : .r:: rr. -,. tabulation. The expanded lobby area
now allows us to accommodate our citizens with physical disabilities.
*. '.: ,'. upgraded o (r Web sile ({wmw.votecalhoun.corm) to allow our citizens to
register to voe, change an address, or request an absentee ballot online. Voters can
also visit ou Web sife to check their ..4 '. status, view election results. and more.
.> We've started a voter education program to go into the high schools to register
more students to vote than ever before.
=> AND MUCH MUCH" PE' *..1 ',.',". r.-.RGiELARAMORE.COM.


KEEP EXPERIENCE WORKING FOR YOU!
RE-ELECT YOUR STATE-CERTIFIED CANDIDATE!

MARGIE LARAMORE
SUPERVISOR OF ELECTIONS
PHONE 762-3405
WVWVV.MARGIELARAMORE.COM


SI_ POaI,., ative ',,l :n;a.-" a' ltege aIrbM g- L ve Di ra I SuperI sr cI Elao ins


TFa te J2atamat


.ddmk


*s _







AUGUST 20, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 39



Workforce programs open at Chipola College


MARIANNA-Chipola
College offers a number of
Workforce Development
programs to prepare students
for good-paying jobs in the area.
Registration begins Aug. 18.
Many programs feature open-
enrollment which allows students
to enroll whenever the college is
in session.
Students are encouraged to
complete the registration process
immediately and to call the
program instructor for a seat in
the program.
Cosmetology and Automotive
Technology programs usually
fill to capacity with waiting lists.
Many other programs feature
open-enrollment which allows
students to enroll whenever the
college is in session.
BudRiviere, Dean ofWorkforce


Development programs, says,
"All programs offer valuable
industry certification throughout
the program and upon completion
which will enhance employment
and career advancement.
Placement rates for all workforce
programs are excellent."
All programs are equipped
with the latest technology and
equipment which assures students
of realistic training according to
industry standards.
The college is offering a
compressed schedule this Fall
with classes Monday through
Thursday from 7:30 am to 3:30
p.m. The new four-day schedule
should help students save on fuel
costs and allow students to work
on Friday.
The college offers a number
of Workforce Development


Certificate programs, including:
Automotive Service Technology,
Certified Nursing Assistant
(CNA), Computer Systems
Technology, Correctional Officer,
Cosmetology, Cross-Over
Corrections to Law Enforcement,
Cross-Over Law Enforcement
to Corrections, Electronic
Technology, Firefighter II, Law
Enforcement Officer, Masonry
Apprentice Training, Surveying
and Mapping Technology and


Telecommunications.
Chipola offers more than a dozen
Associate in Science (AS) degrees
which provide professional
training associated with specific
careers. These include: Computer
Engineering Technology,
Computer Electronics,
Network Support, Computer
Programming, Computer
Information Technology,
Criminal Justice Technology,
Culinary Management, Early
Childhood Education, Electronics
Engineering Technology,
Fire Science Technology,
Network Services Technology,
Nursing (RN and LPN),
Recreation Technology and-
Telecommunications Engineering
Technology.
Two Associate in Applied
Science programs in Electronic


Engineering Technology and
Telecommunications Engineering
Technology are available.
Three College Credit Certificate
programs are available in Child
Care Center Management,
Emergency Medical Technician
(EMT) and Paramedic.
A variety of continuing
education programs are available
on campus in areas ranging from
Child Care to Real Estate. Through
partnerships with www.ed2go.
com and www.gatlineducation.
com, the college offers open
enrollment, online courses in
courses like health care, internet
graphics/web design, business,
law and travel.
For information about college
programs, call 526-2761, or visit
www.chipola.edu


.. .. i

IVEY BROTHERS TO HEADLINE CHIPOLA ENDLESS SUMMER EVENT-Chipola's Endless
Summer Dinner/Dance set for Aug. 23 at the National Guard Armory. The event will reunite old
Chipola friends and alumni for a relaxing evening to benefit the college's athletic programs.
The Ivey Brothers band will provide the perfect musical backdrop for the occasion. Chipola
history professor Robert Ivey (pictured) is the band's drummer. The Iveys will be joined by The
Villagers, another popular Chipola band from the 1960s. Bobby Pierce, head coach of the Troy
University Baseball team, is the special guest. Tickets are $50 per person. Local favorite Bobby
Sims will prepare his mouth-watering barbecue for the dinner. For ticket information, call Lillie
Hamil at 850-718-2375.


Chipola's Summer


Dean's List named
MARIANNA-Dr. Sarah Clemmons, vice president of Instructional
and Student Services at Chipola College, commends the 71 students
who made the Dean's List for academic achievement during the
Summer II Semester 2008.
To be placed on the Dean's List, a student must take 6 or more
semester hours of courses and make an average of 3.25 (B+) to 4.0
(A) in all courses.
Students who made perfect averages of 4.0-straight A's-
include:
ALTHA-Sue E. Champion.
BLOUNTSTOWN-Amanda L. McClendon.
BRISTOL-Mary N. Ethridge.
MARIANNA- Mary S. Adams, Suzanne D. Adams, Kenny S.
Deese, Candace R. Gehron, Heather D. Gibson, Sherri T. Godwin,
Ashley C. McDonald, Kendra L. Myrick, Kristen A. Paul, Henry
Petty, Tanisha.L. Pope.
Among those who earned grade point averages ranging from
3.25(B+) to 3.99 (A) were:
ALTHA-Cazz D. Eady, Ashley M. Fielder.
BLOUNTSTOWN-Elizabeth N. Kollarik.
GRAND RIDGE-Edward S. Hand, Melissa L. Hickey, Joshua
D. Stephens.
MARIANNA-Brittany A. Baxter, Angela M. Baxter, Jessica K.
Davis, Sapphire C. Garrett, James E. Harkins, Danicca Herring, Kari
L. Kind Adams, Sean P. McGann, Wesley B. Petty.
SNEADS-Westanna M. Harvey, Ashley Pavuk, Amber N.
Weeks.'


U U


CHIPOLA FALL
REGISTRATION
- Registration for
Fall classes at
Chipola College
began Monday, for
returning students.
Pictured from left,
are: Rachel Hodge,
Aaron Moore and
Heather Bailey, all
of Bonifay. Classes
begin Aug. 21. For
information about
college programs,
call 526-2761, or
visit www.chipola.
edu


Your Top Choice For Music,
News & Weather Coverage
K-1027 FM Y-1000AM
WPHK Radio WYBT Radio







Page 40 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL AUGUST 20, 2008


Roundman's

Friday, August 22
Featuring 8:30 p.m. 12:30
The Last Ride Saturday night is ladies
night from 8p.m. to midnight

$5 per person
18 to enter 21 to drink
Back at Must show ID!!!!!! |
Back atRoundman's I
Brad, Randy, Stric and Tony.....
.Located 5 miles north of Blountstown on Hwy. 69


Unfortunately, some parents skip important step number
three: Booster seats Because their children have outgrown
toddler seats, they nustakenly assume a safety belt is the next
step However, safety belts alone can be dangerous for kids
who are under 4'9" Because safety belts don't fit these children
properly, they can cause serious injuries to their face. neck and
abdomen during a crash or sudden stop. In fact. kids 2-5 who wear
the four safety-belt steps are not magical
... they're critical,
safety belts alone are 4 times more likely to suffer head injuries
than kids in car seats and booster seats. In addition, children
4-7 who use booster seats are a whopping 59q% less likely to be
injured in a crash than those only restrained by a safety belt.
Booster seats raise your child up so that a safety belt (designed
for adults) will fit and protect them properly Remember. 4'9" is
the magic number. Until then, kids really need to be in a booster
seat Booster seats work like...well, you know


Friends and Neighbors
Let me take a few minutes to explain
where I stand on some key issues affecting
our school system. I am your conservative
choice. First, I'm against building a new
high school on the campus of the newest
school in our county. This piece of proper-
ty is land locked and if we chose to expand
this new campus it would require our school
board to take people's homes and possibly
close some streets. Second, I'm against the
wasteful spending of over $890,000.00 of our
taxpayer's money on the hopes and prayers
that the State of Florida will reimburse us
this money during a time that they are fac-
ing over a one-billion dollar short fall. The
$890,000.00 would have been better utilized
to repair some of our schools and give our
schoolteacher's salary incentives.
I'm against six people making a decision
that will affect every household in our county,
without giving our citizens a, chance to vote
on an issue as important as consolidation. I
believe that the School Board's job is to over
see the day to day operations of our school
systems and decisions as big as consolida-
tion needs to be put before the voters to tell
the board what they want.


I was sitting in a
school board meet- C
ing while the board
was playing with
magic money (you
could tell it's an elec-
tion year). Blount- E;.e
stown gets a new
high school, Carr .
gets a new school, ,
Altha gets a new
school, the Blount-
stown Elementary
School gets redone
and some of these
projects they were
considering doing simultaneously. It left many of
us wondering who is going to pay the millions of
dollars this would cost. A common sense approach
would be to build a K-8 at Blountstown Elementary
School. Combining Blountstown Elementary and
Middle schools would save the Calhoun County
taxpayers over $200,000.00 a year, not to mention
giving the elementary children a real gym. There is
plenty of room for expansion if needed be, without
taking people's homes. Another common sense
approach would be to take the two million that the
Department of Environmental Protection Agency


gave our School Board for Altha's school, re-
duce the millage rate on our landowners and
build a new K-12 school in the Altha area. If
we chose the Altha project first it would mean
transferring some the portable class rooms
to Blountstown Elementary School to accom-
modate our middle high school students un-
til such time as we could apply for additional
funding from the state to build additional class
rooms or a new school.
I would talk with the voters of District one
and do what you want, not what I think you
want. I'm your conservative choice. I'm a
veteran of the US Army and a proud father,
having children in our school system. I have
served in combat on foreign shores to en-
sure that our families stay safe. I'm asking
you to allow me to serve again to ensure that
our school board is run in a prudent and ef-
ficient manner, while assisting our educators.
We have the best teachers by far... Please
Vote for Steve Mears, School Board District
One, "Your Conservative Choice." Feel free
to contact me at 850-674-4144.to talk about
anything. You need to be prepared for the
answer you get, because I believe in straight
talk. 6;ee V


Paid political ad, paid for and approved by Steve Mears, NP for Calhoun County School District 1


SVote for Steve Mears


Calhoun County School Board


District 1 on August 26th






AUGUST 20, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 41


Residents can help by keeping yards free of animal attractants


The bare facts on living with Florida's black bear


Florida's black bear adapts
quickly to its changing
environment, which may be
its greatest asset as well as its
greatest downfall.
Diminishing habitats in
Florida have led to more
instances of black bears in
backyards, pools and garbage
cans seeking an easy source of
food and water. While seeing a
bear for the first time creates an
opportunity for the shutterbug,
it also causes concern for some
people who do not understand
the behavior and habits of the
Florida black bear, Florida's
largest land mammal and a
subspecies of the American
black bear.
Unfortunately, if a bear finds
a source of food that is easily
accessible, such as a garbage
can or a dog's food dish left on
the back porch, the bear will
keep coming back, regardless
of human activity in the vicinity.
Encouraging bears to associate
humans with food no matter
how unintentional may result
in a death sentence for the
bear. When bears become
accustomed to this convenient
way of finding food, situations
can occur where bears may act
in an aggressive way in their
efforts to secure food. Then
wildlife officials may have
to intervene and euthanize


q
I j


I
J~! <~ I
S *'~ ~
A ..~
~ .42'


Adult black bears typically weight 150 to 400 pounds. The largest male bear on record
in Florida weighed 624 pounds; the largest female weighed 342 pounds. PHOTO BY FWC


bears that have become too
comfortable in the presence of
people.
Stephanie Simek, Black
Bear Management Program
coordinator with the Florida
Fish and Wildlife Conservation
Commission (FWC), advises
that the responsibility for
keeping bears and people
safe requires an effort on the
part of residents, as well as
government entities.
"If you are attracting
opossums and raccoons into
your yard, you can also attract
bears," Simek said. "Keeping
garbage and food away from
all wild animals is everyone's


responsibility."
The Florida black bear exists
in fragmented populations
throughout the state. However,
with diminished habitat from
encroaching development
and the human population
continually increasing in the
state, human-bear interactions
are occurring more frequently.
The FWC recognizes the
importance of addressing the
role of people to ensure that
encounters with bears remain
a positive experience.
Presently the FWC receives
a multitude of calls from
residents regarding bears,
particularly in counties in the


WM. G. "BUDDY





SSHERIFF


POLITtCM ADIEI$IiENT PAID IfOR AND APPIOTD BY WI. 6. SUIT SMITL' PARTi AFFILAI.ATIO USU i


greater Orlando area, around
the Ocala National Forest
and in the Panhandle. Joy
Hill, FWC spokesperson for
the Northeast Region, says
answering residents' calls
requires a balancing act.
"The black bear is a
threatened species in Florida,"
Hill said. "So we have to manage
these human-bear
interactions while
maintaining a
biologically
and socially ,
acceptable bear .
population. The t
FWC continually
tries new ways
to address these '
situations, but the
best way to help k ,. ,-
lessen negative
encounters
requires u Zr_
residents to take ..'-
responsibility for
wildlife attractants
that may be in
their own back
yard.
The FWC's
Web site provides Florida bea,
downloadable and may ha
instructions for a blaze.


building bear-resistant trash
container caddies and for
installing electric fences at
MyFWC.com/bear.
In addition, some
communities in Franklin
County in the Panhandle and
Collier County in Southwest
Florida are taking initiatives
to put wildlife-resistant
trash containers in schools,
public parks and residential
communities. These efforts
prevent bears from making
trash containers their source
for meals and cut down on the
number of negative human-
*bear encounters.
To find out about wildlife-
resistant trash containers, visit
FWC's Web site for links to
manufacturers and distributors.
Anyone who experiences bear
problems should contact the
nearest FWC regional office.
The phone number can be
found in the State Government
section of the phone book.
"Black bears are not
generally aggressive, even
when confronted by humans,"
Hill said. "However, they are
large and powerful wild animals
that need to be respected."


rs are black with a brown muzzle
ve a white chest marking called
PHOTO BY FWC


Feeding bears hurts bears
* Store trash indoors or in a bear-resistant container
* Bring leftover pet food indoors after feeding
* Clean grills
* Remove wildlife feeders if there is a bear in the
area
* Protect gardens, compost and livestock with electric
fencing

If a bear comes into your yard...
* Do not run, but remain standing upright
* Back up slowly
* Make sure the bear has an escape route
* If bear won't leave area, move to a secure area


rrarPnraarrsrrrrsrrrr~rraPggsarrr~lllsli







Page 42 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL AUGUST 20, 2008


'WILDLIFE 2060: WHAT'S AT STAKE FOR FLORIDA?'


FWC releases revealing report on the future of


state's wildlife as development replaces habitat


When people compare a map of
Florida as it is currently to a map
reflecting predicted development
by the year 2060, there is usually
a gasp.
The amount of anticipated
development is stunning, and
the byproduct is the loss of
wildlife as the lands they inhabit
become urbanized. The Florida
Fish and Wildlife Conservation
Commission (FWC) tackled the
challenge of predicting what
may be in store for wildlife
50 years from now if growth
trends continue. The results are
available in the FWC publication
"Wildlife 2060: What's at stake
for Florida?" This document
looks at the future of Florida's
fish and wildlife resources in a
practical and objective way.
The FWC report is based on a
study, "Florida 2060" conducted
by 1000 Friends of Florida
(www. 1 000friendsofflorida.org),
a not-for-profit organization that
monitors growth in.the state.
"As the state agency whose
mission is to manage fish and
wildlife resources for their long-
term well-being and the benefit of
people, it is our responsibility to
predict what could happen to the
resources we have been charged
to conserve. It is what people
expect of us," said Ken Haddad,
executive director of the FWC.
"Our scientists and managers
have 'crunched' the numbers
for the Wildlife 2060 report and
assessed what might happen
to fish and wildlife if growth
continues on its same course."
The report provides specific
examples of how Florida's species
could be impacted by growth.
Recent predictions indicate
the state's human population
may double to 36 million in the
next five decades. The amount
of urbanized land in Florida
also is expected to double. To
accommodate the increase in
population, the report projects
that by-2060, roughly 7 million
additional acres of Florida land
will be developed.
"The development of 7 million
acres represents a substantial
loss of habitat and exceeds
the size of Vermont," said Dr.
Thomas Eason, conservation
initiatives coordinator for
the FWC. "Continuing the
current trend clearly would be
detrimental to wildlife, but it
also would be detrimental to
people. Fishing, hunting, bird-
watching, all kinds of*outdoor
activities, which brought many
of us to Florida in the first place,
would be greatly diminished.
This affects our quality of life and
our economy."
The revenue from hunting,
fishing, wildlife viewing and
boating brings billions of dollars


to the state annually.
Wildlife 2060 illustrates how
continuing the past patterns of
urban sprawl could result in
fragmented natural places.
"Natural habitats could become
islands in a sea of development,"
Eason said. "Corridors for some
animals to move about the
state will be cut off by roads,
subdivisions and shopping
malls."
Another prediction is that
human-wildlife encounters
will increase. As development
encroaches on what was habitat
for wild animals, people and
wildlife will come face-to-face.
Many animals will be displaced
by human development, and
humans will have to learn to live
with those that remain. Large
predators such as panthers, bears
and alligators will pose great
challenges for people living with
them.
Though the state faces a
daunting situation, the executive
director of the FWC doesn't
believe the battle is lost.
"On the contrary, I have
confidence that Floridians will


News from The lorida Fish
Sand Wildlife Conservation
Commission


band together to ensure that we
do the right thing for our fish
and wildlife while boosting our
economic growth and quality


of life," Haddad said. "But, we
must bring the best out in people
to reach solutions, and we must
bring virtually all interests to the
table to make that happen."
Rodney Barreto, chairman of
the FWC, encourages everyone
to do all they can to change what
is happening.
"Get involved in land-use
planning and decision-making,
and become good stewards of
the land," Barreto said. "Become
educated about what to vote for
and encourage your policymakers
to support initiatives that help


wildlife, provide incentives
for private land conservation
and encourage smart growth. I
am confident the future for our
wildlife is bright."
The FWC hopes the report
motivates Floridians to look at
growth more wisely and inspires
people to get involved to keep the
quality of life that diverse wildlife
and healthy habitat provide.

To view the 28-page report,
"Wildlife2060: What's atstakefor
Florida?" online, visit MyFWC.
com/wildlife2060.


FWC cites exotic-pet shop owner; seizes reptiles


Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission
(FWC) investigators took action
against "Dark Forest Reptiles,"
an exotic-pet store in Boynton
Beach, and cited the owner.
Nickolas Nistico, DOB
10/15/82, of Boynton Beach, was
charged with three violations:
possessing an American alligator
without a permit, possessing
reptiles of concern without
a permit and exhibiting and
selling without a permit. Nistico


also received a warning for
improper housing of an American
alligator.
On Aug. 6, FWCinvestigators
attempted to inspect Nistico's
store but found the Boynton
Beach store vacated. Later, they
found the store at another location,
in Delray Beach.
Officers found the store open
for business and Nistico exhibiting
reptiles with an expired permit at
an unpermitted location.
Nistico was in possession of a


3-foot alligator, which was caged
in a manner giving the public easy
access. He also was exhibiting
a reticulated python without a
permit.FWC officers seized both
reptiles.
Under the Wildlife Violator
Compact, Nistico could face
enhanced penalties, because he
has been convicted of wildlife law
violations in the past. Penalties
could include a maximum $1,000
fine and a year in jail for each
violation.







AUGUST 20, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 43


Chronic wasting disease not


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After extensive testing,
the Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission
(FWC) has not found any
evidence of chronic wasting
disease (CWD) in the state's
white-tailed deer population.
The FWC tested 560 free-
ranging deer during the past
year and more than 3,500 deer
during the past six years, with
no CWD-positive results.


T"

News from The
Florida Fish
and Widlife
Conservation W
Comssion


"While we can never say that Florida is
entirely free of the disease without testing
every deer, this sample size gives us confidence
that if CWD is present in Florida, it is at low
levels," Dr. Mark Cunningham, FWC's wildlife
veterinarian, said. "However, even low numbers
of CWD-positive deer would be cause for
colnern, so we plan to continue testing for the
foreseeable future."
CWD is a contagious neurological disease
that has been found in captive and wild mule
deer, white-tailed deer, moose and Rocky
Mountain elk within several Midwestern and
Western states. The disease causes degeneration
of the brains of infected animals, resulting in
emaciation, abnormal behavior, loss of bodily
functions and death.
Thus far, no Southeastern state, including
Florida, has been hit by the deer disease.
To reduce the chances of CWD entering
Florida, the state prohibits importing live deer
unless they come from a herd that has been
certified CWD-free for five or more years and
carcasses of any species of deer, elk or moose
from 14 states and two Canadian provinces
where CWD has been detected.
Chronic wasting disease has been detected
in New Mexico, Utah, Colorado, Wyoming,
Kansas, Minnesota, Oklahoma, Montana,


South Dakota, Nebraska,
Wisconsin, Illinois, New York,
West Virginia, and Alberta
and Saskatchewan, Canada.
Visit the CWD Alliance Web
site at www.cwd-info.org/
for the most up-to-date CWD
reporting.
"Early detection is the key
to limiting the spread of the
disease, if such an outbreak
should occur in Florida,"


Cunningham said.
Once again, this hunting season, the FWC is
turning to hunters and members of the public
for assistance in helping monitor the state's deer
herd for CWD.
"We're asking hunters to report any sightings
of sickldy or scrawny-looking deer, or deer dead
of unkaown causes," Cunningham said. "If
you see such a deer, call toll-free 1-866-CWD-
WATCH (293-9282). Please do not handle the
deer. Wildlife biologists will respond, and if
necessary, collect deer tissue for testing. It's
important to contact us as soon as possible,
because such testing must take place within 48
hours of a deer's death to yield reliable results."
CWD WATCH is part of an aggressive
monitoring program to ensure CWD is nor
already in Florida and the disease does not
spread into this state.
There is no evidence that CWD poses a risk
for humans, however, public health officials
recommend avoiding direct contact with any
sick-looking deer or one that has died from
unknown causes.
More information about CWD surveillance
in Florida is available at MyFWC.com/cwd.
The Web site also offers links to wildlife and
health agencies with more in-depth information
about the disease.


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Individuals and businesses netted

for selling and buying fish illegally


Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation
Commission (FWC) investigators cited several
individuals and businesses with 29 violations
last week in Okaloosa, Santa Rosa and
Escambia counties for the illegal purchase and
sale of saltwater products.
The charges resulted from a three-year
investigation involving the illegal sale of cobia
and pompano. The individuals allegedly sold
the fish to local businesses without the required
Saltwater Products License and Restricted
Species Endorsement. The businesses that were
cited did not possess the required wholesale or
retail dealer licenses.
Those cited were George Schwartz, DOB
01/01/1979, Gulf Breeze; Gary D. Wells,


DOB 05/06/1958, Navarre; Roger Blake,
DOB 12/10/1968, Pensacola; Dharma Blue
Caf6, Pensacola; Dokamis Restaurant and
Lounge, Fort Walton Beach; Viet Ho Oriental
Market, Pensacola; Bien Dong Oriental Market,
Pensacola; L & T Fresh Seafood Market,
Pensacola; and Tins-Tins Oriental Market,
Pensacola.
"We've consistently received complaints
that some recreational fishermen were catching
cobia and pompano in the westernmost counties
in the Panhandle and then selling the fish
without being properly licensedT," said Lt. Doug
Berryman, an investigator with the FWC.
Charges are pending against several other
individuals and businesses.


I or STEVE G. EARS SR.
1 for Calhoun County Commissioner District 5


Hello, my name is Christina
Mears and my dad is a
candidate for Calhoun County
Commissioner for District 5.
My father is a hardworking,
down to earth and dependable
person. It my dad says he's
going to do something, he


things with the community.
He is willing to give up his
personal time to do good
things for the community.
My dad is a great father
and be an awesome county
commissioner with your help'
Please vote for and elect
-.- An-A Qt-.- Unf- Cr. f- I-


means it. my dad. S ieve Mears br for
My dad is involved with many Commissioner. District 51
Io r
%4 r n.:.:r 1 I.:r .,~y --T I I


I~ I





Page 44 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL AUGUST 20,2008

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AUGUST 20, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 45


Wildlife Expo 2008 set for PJC Milton campus Aug.


If you enjoy hunting or
freshwater fishing, and you
live within driving distance of
Milton, you'll want to mark
Aug. 23 on your calendar.
Wildlife Expo 2008 will be
held at the Pensacola Junior
College Milton campus that
day and will run from 8:45
a.m. to 4 p.m. There'll be six
sessions offered during the day,
and participants will have their
pick of attending one of three
seminars offered during each
session.
The sponsors of the event
are the University of Florida's
Institute of Food andAgricultural
Sciences (IFAS), Florida Fish
and Wildlife Conservation
Commission, Alabama
Department of Conservation
and Natural Resources,
Buckmasters, National Wild


Turkey Federation, National Rifle
Association, Ducks Unlimited
and other organizations.
"Our goal is to get outdoors
men and women and landowners
together from North Florida and
South Alabama and for them to
have the opportunity to interact
with wildlife professionals,"
said Rick Williams of IFAS.
"We hope that at the end of
the day, all the parties can take
away things they can apply,
whether it's managing food
plots or managing their lands
for deer, turkey, quail or even
waterfowl." Seminar topics
include food plot preparation
and blends; field judging white-
tailed deer; managing native
vegetation for wildlife; keeping
deer on your property; using
game cameras properly; turkey
hunting for beginners; and


Dgg8
News from The
Florida Fish [
and Widure i
Conservation
Commission


cooking wild game.
Demonstrations also will be
available on tree stand safety
and archery. A complete list
of topics for the Wildlife Expo
can be found online at Wildlife
Expo 2008.
Official scorers for the Florida
Buck Registry,. Boone and
Crockett and Pope and Young
will be. on hand to score trophy
racks. Scoring will be limited
to the first 20 people who sign


up by calling Robin Vickers at
850-983-5216, ext. 113.
Williams said there'll be a
special emphasis on kids, with
sessions covering ATV safety,
shooting safety and poisonous
plants and animals. One of the
speakers will be 11-year-old Zac
Cooper, a local young man and
the son of Santa Rosa County
taxidermist Chad Cooper. Zac's
hunting skills have become well
known, and he's featured in his
own segment on the Outdoor
Channel.


23


The cost to attend Wildlife
Expo 2008 is $5. Those under
16 will be admitted free. The
first 75 people through the door
receive a T-shirt.
Registration begins at 8
a.m. at the Bo Johnson Center
(Building 4000) on campus. A
map of the PJC Milton campus
can be viewed at http://www.
pjc.edu/includes/maps/PJC-M-
MAP.pdf. For more information,
contact Rick Williams or Robin
Vickers with IFAS at 850-983-
5216.


Special-opportunity spring

turkey hunt applications

available Sept. 9 Oct. 14
The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC)
will begin accepting 2009 special-opportunity spring turkey hunt
applications at 10 a.m. (EDT) Sept. 9. The deadline for submitting
applications is midnight (EDT) Oct. 14.
Applications may be submitted at www.wildlifelicense.com,
county tax collectors' offices or at any license agent. A random
drawing decides who will receive the coveted permits. To apply,
hunters can obtain application worksheets at MyFWC.com/lhunting
and at all FWC regional offices.
Demand for these hunts is typically greater than the number of
available permits, but hunters can increase their chances of being
selected by submitting as many $5 nonrefundable applications as
they like. Successful applicants pay a permit fee of $50 $175,
depending on the special-opportunity hunt area'selected.
Participation rules limit out-of-state hunters to one permit per
hunt.
The FWC created special-opportunity spring turkey hunts for
sportsmen looking to take an Osceola, the "crown jewel" of the
turkey hunter's Grand Slam. The FWC designs special-opportunity
turkey hunts to take place on large tracts of land, with great habitat,
healthy turkey populations and a limited number of hunters.
The Osceola is a highly prized subspecies of wild turkey, found
only in peninsular Florida, south of and including Dixie, Gilchrist,
Alachua, Union, Bradford, Clay and Duval counties. All hunts take
place within the Osceola turkey's home range.

Washington County man charged
with cultivation of marijuana
A Washington County man has been arrested and charged with
felony cultivation of marijuana and trespass.
Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) law
enforcement officers arrested Jeffrey Ray Creel, DOB 9/29/1970,
Chipley, earlier this week and charged him with two felony counts
of marijuana cultivation after locating 53 marijuana plants in the
Greenhead area. The plants averaged 6 feet in height and have a
street value .of approximately $53,000.
FWC Lt. Hampton 'Vates said a Forest and Lakes property
landowner was on the Washington County tract July 28 when he saw
a person run from the area and leave in a red truck.
FWC officers collected evidence at the scene and located 44
marijuana plants. They found nine additional plants at another
location in the county.


Jara Raisbeek

WHITWORTH1
for Calhoun County


Supervisor of Elections

Over the past several weeks, I have, 'answer was to teackhschool. slater found
had the opportunity to meet many peo- out, after teaching children's church just
pie, .but for those of you whom I have one Sunday out of the month that teach-
not had the chance to meet, let me in- ing was not for me.
troduce *yselt. But one thing I did learn along the way
My name is Jara Raisbeck Whitworth is that I have a love for people. I con-
and 1 am, the 31 -year-old daughter of sider myself to be a very friendly and per-
Felix and Linda Gay and the late Jerry sonable person and that is why I always
Raisbeck and the granddaughter of the loved working in jobs that are associated
late Ralph and Versie Attaway. with the public.
I grew up in the Carr Community and at- I have had the desire to seek the of-
tended Carr School thru the eighth grade fice of Supervisor of Elections since my
I am a 1995 graduate from Blountstown employment there. Some of you may
High School. Chances are I attended question whether I have the experience
school with some of, you, or your kids, to be Supervisor of Elections. I feel that
or your grandkids. I later received an any job can be learned and I am proof of
Associate of Arts degree from Chipola that. I had no experience in any of my
Junior College. I-am married to Jeremy previous jobs or current job, but I learned
Whitworth and we have three boys: Whit quickly and have always done a good
5, Ridge 3, and Creed 1. Jeremy and I job. I would feel confident to say that if
are active members of Christian Home you were to ask any of my previous em-
Freewill Baptist Church. players and present employer what kind
Many.of you may remember me from of employee I was and am now, the an-
my employment at the Clarksville Gen- swer would be a very hard working and
eral Store. In 2000 I had the opportu- dependable person who always strives to
nity to work part time in the Supervisor do the best job possible and that is why I
of Elections Office during the Presiden- feel I am capable of carrying out the du-
tial race between Bush and Gore. I also ties of this office. I also feel that I am a
worked for a short time with the State forward thinking person who is open to
Attorney's Office before transferring to improvement and ideas that you the citi-
my present job with the Calhoun County zens may have and with my background
Sheriff's Office. I have been employed in public service work and my outgoing
with the Sheriff's Office for five and a personality I feel that I have the capability
half years. of representing our county and you the
When I was in school and people would citizens of our county in a professional
ask me what I wanted to do in life, my manner.

Your vote and support on August 26,

2008 will be greatly appreciated.
Political advertisement paid for and approved by Jara Whitworth, Democrat, for Supervisor of Election.







Page 46 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL AUGUST 20, 2008


Crisis response

team in place to

help storm victims
TALLAHASSEE, FL Attorney General Bill McCollum
announced Tuesday that the Florida Crisis Response Team
(FCRT) is on standby and available to assist communities that
may suffer storm damage this week. The FCRT, overseen by
-the Attorney General's Statewide Crisis Response Coordinator,
Cheryl Ricciardi, provides emotional support and advocacy,
training and planning for communities in the aftermath of hur-
ricanes and other disasters. Currently the team is prepared to
assist the Brevard County Department of Health in emergency
shelter operations and has team members in place throughout
the state to deploy as needed.
"In the aftermath of a destructive storm, ensuring that all
affected residents are able to regain a sense of normalcy as
soon as possible is critically important," said Attorney General
McCollum. "This is a charge members of the Florida Crisis
Response Team take very seriously, and I'm proud of their ser-
vice and commitment."
The FCRT is comprised of more than 800 crisis responders
statewide, including victim service professionals from the At-
torney General's Office, law enforcement personnel, firefight-
ers, clergy, mental health professionals, nurses, and community
members. Team members are culturally diverse and multilin-
gual, enabling them to assist all communities that might be
impacted in a disaster.
Earlier this year, members of the FCRT provided direct as-
sistance to families and communities impacted by the wildfires
that heavily damaged parts of Brevard and Volusia Counties.
Team members accompanied many people as they returned
to their homes for the first time to view damage, and subse-
quently went door-to-door in some of the hardest hit areas to
provide crisis intervention and support to residents. The FCRT
could potentially be called to provide services to a geographic
community, such as was required after the wildfires, or a spe-
cific community like that of a school, hospital, law enforce-
ment agency, county Emergency Operations Center (EOC) or
special needs shelter. The team may also provide assistance to
community leaders in planning short- and long- term activi-
ties in response to a disaster, provide crisis intervention train-
ing to local caregivers, and provide group crisis intervention
sessions for other personnel involved in disaster response.
The FCRT may either be activated by the state or at the
request of an individual community. Community leaders may
request assistance by contacting the Statewide Crisis Response
Coordinator directly at 407-473-0719 or by contacting their
local EOC.


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Please Vote for and Re-elect

Doris

BURKETT

Calhoun County
TAX COLLECTOR


I have 25 years experience working
in the Tax Collectors Office, 22 of those
years I worked with two previous Tax
Collectors.
The knowledge I have received
CANNOT BE FOUND IN A MANUAL,
IT REQUIRES MANY YEARS OF
EXPERIENCE.
One of the most important duties of
the Tax Collector is assuring accurate
collection of the tax roll. IF YOUR
TAX PAYMENT IS NOT POSTED
CORRECTLY, THIS COULD RESULT
IN A CERTIFICATE SOLD AND A TAX
DEED BEING ISSUED ON YOUR
PROPERTY.
I AM THE ONLY CANDIDATE
THAT HAS ANY EXPERIENCE IN THE
COLLECTION OF THE TAX ROLL,
AND WITH WITH THAT EXPERIENCE
CAN ASSURE YOUR PROPERTY
TAX PAYMENT IS POSTED TO THE
CORRECT PARCEL OF LAND.
I am committed to efficient timely
service assisting each individual with
their personal and business needs and
committed to improve service to the
public as cost-effective as possible.
My employees and I are dedicated
to the office and to the county. We are
honest, hardworking and dependable


with GOOD WORK ETHICS that have
respect for others and our fellow workers.
IF RE-ELECTED I WILL CONTINUE
TO PROVIDE EFFICIENT ACCURATE
SERVICE TO THE TAXPAYERS. I WILL
CONTINUE TO PROVIDE TRAINING FOR
MY EMPLOYEES ASSURING THAT EACH
EMPLOYEE (not just the supervisor) IS
INFORMED OF THE DAILY CHANGING
LAWS IN ALL THE DEPARTMENTS
TO PROVIDE THE BEST SERVICE
POSSIBLE.
I will strive to see that each transaction
is completed according to Florida Law, this
protects the CUSTOMER, THE COUNTY,
AND THE TAX COLLECTORS OFFICE
FROM LEGALACTION THAT MAY RESULT
IF NOT COMPLETED CORRECTLY.
Because of my obligations in the office I
will not get to visit with each and everyone
of you.
I would like to ask for your vote and
support August 26.
I believe my past experience qualifies
me to be the best candidate to serve as
your Tax Collector for Calhoun County. If
re-elected I will continue to work for all the
people of the County.
PLEASE VOTE FOR AND
RE-ELECT DORIS BURKETT
TAX COLLECTOR
FOR CALHOUN COUNTY


I


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AUGUST 20, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 47


S! Presented to the

Calhoun County School

SI Board on Aug. 4,2008
CALHOUN COUNTY SCHOOL FACILITIES
SHORT AND LONG RANGE PLAN 2008-2020


AREAS OF NEED
Critical needs as reported by DOE:
*Remove students from old buildings at
BMS
*Remove students from Building 1 -
Altha

DISTRICT PLANS IN STAGES

Phase One
*Apply for Special Facilities Fund (SFF)
to build new BHS-9-12 on present
school site-July 2008-Completion.
Summer 2011 (Applied 2008-2009)
*Move BMS students in old BHS
*Funds available 2009-2010)
*Move district staff in old BMS
*Carr School-replace 1968 portables
with 6 portables-
*Capitol Outlay Funds (COF) 2008-2009
*Replace roof at BES 2008-2009


Phase Two
*Apply for SFF to build Altha Public
School- PreK-12, 2011-2012 Funds
available 2012-2013
*Start Construction Fall 2012
*Completion Summer 2014
*Place Adult School portables on Penning-
ton Ave.
Phase Three
*Apply for SFF to Build new Carr School-
PreK-8 2014-2015
Funds available 2015-2016

Phase Four-2017
*Replace old buildings at old BHS (new
BMS) site-(COE)

Phase Five-2020
*Apply for SFF to build new BES School-
PreK-5
No problem with Phase Five timeline.


Bu7, se anD rae WITH an aD in


THe CaLHOIILI-BerT JourMaL


Scholarship program

in Florida celebrates

10 years of service
TALLAHASSEE This year, the Teacher Education
and Compensation Helps (T.E.A.C.H.) Early Childhood
Scholarship Program, which helps to improve the education,
compensation and retention of the early childhood work force,
is celebrating 10 years of service in Florida. Administered
through the Children's Forum and funded through The Agency
for Workforce Innovation-Office of Early Learning, T.E.A.C.H.
provides scholarships for early care educators and center
directors to work towards earning an Associate's degree or
credentials in early childhood education.


T.E.A.C.H. provides
the majority of college
tuition and books, but
there is also a partnership
for the sharing of
expenses by the teacher
receiving the scholarship
and the sponsoring child
care center or family
child care home which
represents a three-way


T.E.A.C.H. serves

over 3,000 early

care and education

teachers statewide


commitment. T.E.A.C.H. participants receive a stipend for travel
or internet access, three hours of paid release time while classes
are in session and bonuses once their scholarship contract is
complete. In turn, they agree to continue employment in their
sponsoring early childhood facility for a specific period of time
(typically one year). In most cases, T.E.A.C.H. reimburses a
portion of the costs for child care facilities to provide release
time for scholarship recipients.
"The average rate of compensation for teachers in early
care and education programs is around $9 per hour and more
than 30 percent of individuals employed in a child care setting
will leave within the first year of employment," said Lori
Stegmeyer, Director of Early Childhood Workforce Initiatives
at the Children's Forum.
"Without T.E.A.C.H., many teachers would never be able to
enhance their education, receive an increase in pay or remain
employed which all reflect positive outcomes for young
children."


Alfred Shelton
Apache
Backwoods
Bailey Cemeiery
Bates
Bonnel
Center Lake
Creek
Felix Flanders
Lamb Eddy
Martin Sewell
Melvin New Grade
Pendarvis
Walter Potts
C.R. 274
Laramore
Baker
Isoletta
Miller
Mark Burke
Porter Grade
Creel Lane
Flanders Grade
Flanders Cutoff
Lake Lillian
Lamont
Tommy Tucker
L.K. Lona
Melvin
Suggs Atlaway
Cook
Bearshead
Lake McKenzie
Turkey Pen Pond
White Pond Circle
Lesne
Gray
Woody


e-E/ei JERAL HALL

Calhoun Co. Commissioner District 3


I'd like to take this opportunity to say Thank
You for your support during my current term
as your Commissioner for District 3. THANK
YOU!
Results from your input and permitting
the necessary right-of-ways allow Calhoun
County to clear, widen, pave, and resurface
many roads. Almost every neighborhood
in District 3 has been affected by these im-
provements. The results are safer and more
stable access to your property for school
buses, emergency vehicles, mail carriers
and evacuation routes. Not to mention in-
creasing property value and by minimizing
road maintenance the savings in fuel cost
alone is enormous.
I will work towards the construction of a
Community Park in the Mossy Pond area,
and to provide a much needed restoration
and improvements of the Shelton Park Li-
brary.
I have and will continue to support the
Calhoun Liberty Hospital, Calhoun County
Emergency Medical Services and Volunteer
Fire Departments to enhance services avail-
able to all citizens of Calhoun County.


If re-elected, I will continue to work for Dis-
trict 3's fair share of available funds. There
is a lot more that can be done. With your
vote and support, this will be accomplished.
This is a bad time for change in the leader-
ship for District 3. The recent Federal, State,
and Local budget cuts will require that every
penny counts.
I know that everyone wants honor and
integrity with proven leadership and experi-
ence. I believe your vote is a chance for you
to do something positive for District 3 and
Calhoun County.
District 3 is a very large District. I am
attempting to personally visit
with everyone. If, I miss
you please forgive me.
Your vote and support on
August 26 for County
Commissioner District
3 will be greatly
appreciated.

THANK YOU,
Jeral Hall


To date, 22,084 T.E.A.C.H.
scholarships have been
awarded to 14,633 participants.
Of these recipients, 5,683
have earned their Child
DevelopmentAssociate (CDA)
credential or equivalent and
435 have graduated with their
Associate degree. In addition,
T.E.A.C.H. participants have
a low turnover rate compared
to the field in general.
"Early learning programs,
teachers and children all
benefit from T.E.A.C.H.," said
Dr. Brittany Birken, Director
of the Agency for Workforce
Innovation's Office of Early
Learning. "Early care and
education programs experience
reduced turnover, teachers are
better compensated through
their participation in the
program and children receive
quality care from teachers
who are specialists in early
childhood education and child
development."
For more information
about T.E.A.C.H, please call
877-FL-TEACH or visit www.
thechildrensforum.com/teach.
htm


Political advertisement paid for and approved by Jeral Hall,
candidate for Calhoun County Commission District 3






Page 48 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL AUGUST 20, 2008

Florida's Great Northwest
issues green energy park

request for information
DESTIN Elorida's Great Northwest, Inc. announces that it
has released a Request for Information to identify those sites in
Northwest Florida's 16-county region that have the potential to
meet the size, geography, physical infrastructure, and proximity
to biomass feedstock requirements to allow the sites to be
developed as Green Energy Business Parks.
Florida's Great Northwest will accept completed RFI
questionnaires through close of business (5:00 p.m. Eastern
Daylight Savings Time) on September 26, 2008. Businesses
interested in obtaining more information regarding this RFI
opportunity offered by Florida's Great Northwest are encouraged
,. to contact Roger Miller at (850)386-4600. The full Request
for Information is posted on the organization's Web site,
www.FloridasGreatNorthwest.com under WIRED Northwest
Florida Initiatives, Open RFP's, Green Energy Park Request
for Information.
Florida's Great Northwest provides regional leadership in
economic and workforce development, serving 16 counties
in Northwest Florida from Pensacola through Tallahassee. Its
primary mission is the creation of high-wage, high-skill jobs,
_branding and marketing, as well as supporting the local economic
i. . .and workforce development organizations in the region.


Grand Opening
^j Gtomorrow
Thursday, August 21 at 8 AM
19962 Central Avenue
.43 ?Blountstown





Blountstown's Train Depot has been.adorned with "fairy rings" due to the large amount of rainfall
this area has seen in recent days. Fairy rings, especially the mushrooms, are most commonly
observed during the summer months when Florida receives the majority of its rainfall. Fairy
rings occur when large quantities of organic matter, such as lumber, tree stumps, logs, etc., are S
naturally located or have been buried in a turfgrass site, according to the UF/IFAS Extension A
Web site. The fungi "feed" off this material. The mushrooms, which are all sizes and shapes, are
the fruiting stages of these fungi. Rings may be very small initially, less than 1 foot, but normally
expand each year. It is not uncommon for rings to be 6 feet or more in diameter.
PAM ANDERSON PHOTO


-w'ldon to


Need a



quick gift?


A subscription to The Calhoun-Liberty Journal
makes a great gift for anyone on your list. Just
drop by our office on Summers Road in Bristol
to set it up. We'll even give you a personalized
announcement flyer like the one shown here!






AUGUST 20, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 49


Raymond Russell takes over as chairman of the


Chipola Regional Workforce Development Board

". Raymond Russell of Blountstown officially began
his duties as the new Chair of the Chipola Regional
Workforce Development Board at the Board's Annual
Celebration of Success August 14 in Marianna,
Florida.
Russell, Farm Bureau Insurance Services Agency
Manager in Blountstown, was appointed to the board by
the Calhoun County Board of County Commissioners in
early 2002. Russell previously served as the CRWDB's
Vice-Chair.
-0 1 ".During his first remarks as Chair of the Board Russell
commended board members for their hard work and said
he was proud to serve on a board that "changes the lives
of people in our communities." Russell's comments
came after board members had heard from several
individuals that had taken advantages of workforce
services to change their lives through job skill training
-7- Jand job placement.
Russell reminded regional board members of their
duty to serve the citizens of the region and expressed his
continued confidence in the ability of board members
to have a positive impact on the workforce.
Serving as officers with Russell are Darrin Wall,
Vice-Chair representing Washington County and Dave
Collings, Secretary-Treasurer representing Holmes
Pictured at left is Raymond Russell, newly installed Chair of the Chipola Regional Workforce County.
Development Board. The evening's hunting decor, above, including a camp sign and stuffed
bobcat. DANIEL WILLIAMS PHOTOS


Workforce Bd.


announces new


slate of officers

The Chipola Regional Workforce Development
Board is pleased to announce their 2008-2009 slate
of officers.
Raymond Russell of Blountstown will serve as
Chair of the Board. Russell was first appointed to the
board in 2002 by the Calhoun County Board of County
Commissioners. Russell, Farm Bureau Insurance
Services Agency Manager in Blountstown, previously
served as the board's vice-chair for two years.
Darrin Wall of Chipley will serve as the Vice-Chair
of the organization. Wall, Manager of Gulf Power here,
was first appointed to the board in July 2006 by the
Washington County Board of County Commissioners.
Wall has been very active on the board and has served
as a member of the Board's Executive Committee for
two years.
Dave Collings, representing Holmes County, was
announced as the CRWDB's Secretary/Treasurer.
Collings, Project Manager for CCA Combustion
Components Associates, was first appointed to the
board in September 2005 by the Holmes County Board
of County Commissioners.
Officers of the CRWDB are elected by their fellow
board members and serve one year terms.
The Chipola Regional Workforce Development
Board is a non-profit corporation providing job skill
training and employment services in Calhoun, Holmes,
Jackson, Liberty and Washington Counties.


Those in attendance
at last weeks Chipola
Regional Workforce
Development Board
included Joe Shuler
of Hosford, above
left, and Dexter
Barber of Bristol,
above right.





Page 50 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL AUGUST 20, 2008


If you're looking for a copy of

The Calhoun-Liberty Journal

you shouldn't have

to look too far! w


The Calhoun-Liberty Journal
is delivered every Wednesday morning to newsracks
in Calhoun & Liberty counties at these locations:
CALHOUN COUNTY
The Southern Express in Blountstown East & West and Altha
PitStop *Ramsey Piggly Wiggly The Quick Pic Connie's Kitchen
Clarksville General Store Chapman's Grocery in Carr Smith's
Golden Drugs Shelton's Store Scotts Ferry General Store
*Gas Mart Big Bend Bait & Tackle Harvey's
LIBERTY COUNTY
* The Southern Express in Bristol & Hosford Blackburn's Store in Hosford
Tom Thompson's Store in Telogia Crow's Citgo Hwy. 20 East
*Richter's Store in Telogia Express Lane
Country Corner in Hosford BP Station in Bristol
Apalachee Restaurant Piggly Wiggly of Bristol
...and, if the racks are empty by the time you get to the store, we invite you to sbscbribe and
make sure you receive a copy every week! Just send us your name and mailing address,
along with a check for $18 per year, to: Journal Subscriptions, P.O.-Box 536, Bristol, FL 32321.







AUGUST 20, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 51


o o Liberty Post &

BARN POLE INC.
Dempsey Barron Road, Bristol (Hwy. 12 N)
TELEPHONE (850) 643-5995
WE'VE GOT THE FENCE POSTS TO MEET YOUR NEEDS.


On Tuesday, August 26, vote for


Charles

"CHUCK"


McCrone, Jr.




A shlerllff who'll sp evA Wier,

Woriz Svwarter, a And se rve Better


Why I'm running.
*A local paper recently reported
that we live in the second safest
county in Florida based upon the
Uniform Crime Report (UCR) statis-
tics. I don't think so. Rather than
showing that-Calhoun County is safe,
I believe the URC reflects a lack of
confidence in a Sheriff's Office that is
ineffective at investigating and pros
ecuting crimes. The UCR only report
crimes that are charged. Citizens wh
lack confidence in the Sheriff's Offic
don't report crimes. Unreported crime
don't get charged and reported crime
that are ignored or poorly investigate
don't get charged. I want to rest
confidence that reported crimes will
thoroughly investigated and charge
brought in those cases, resulting i
truly safer County to live in.

*Ethics issues and improper con
has plagued the Sheriff's Office. I/
to restore to Calhoun County citizen
Sheriff's Office with integrity.

My law enforcement experience.
*I have seventeen years law enfo
ment experience as a Corrections Of
with the Florida DOC, in effect acting
"Sheriff's Deputy" within the "commul
of a prison. In that way I have gained
qualifications to perform the two print
functions of Sheriff-law enforcement
jail operation.
*Working in the DOC I have gai
valuable insight into the "human side
the justice system so that I believe
Sheriff's Office can improve society
save lives with programs for those "he
ed down the wrong path."
*Extensive crisis training I rece
with the DOC, essential for working
a prison, could serve me and Calh
County citizens well, especially in ligl
homeland security concerns and the
perience of Katrina, if I'm elected.

If I'm elected, the Sheriff's Office
protect and serve you better than tc
by:


huc' McCrone,
I'm Charles "Chuk M rone,
Jr. and I wantto serve as you
next Sherifft. My work has kept
me from campaigning as much
as i would have liked, so I hope
f you'll take time to read about
s me and why I hope you'll con-
sider me to be your next sher-
s ff. I am thoe forty-seven year
0 old divorced father ot two sons,
;e "Chucky" and Brent and one
es daughter, Amelia, and grand-
es father to a granddaughter, Tar-
ed in. was born and raised in
ore ahoun Co Prior to law
be Calhoun County.
ges e enforcement, I worked on a
na dredge boat for five years and
Saloged another five.

duct
want *Implementing programs to better
ns a care for our most vulnerable citizens-
our senior citizens, the disabled, and
our children.
*Being an active presence in our
rce- schools with deputies who can serve as
ficer role models to our youth and counsel
as a kids who need it.
nity" -Enforcing all Florida laws includ-
J the ing animal control and protection laws.
nary Citizens will no longer be told by the
and Sheriff's Office that "we don't do animal
control," left at risk, and/or forced to
ined deal with the problem themselves. The
E" of Sheriff's Office will no longer ignore
the cases of animal abuse and neglect and
and the children who likely reside in those
ead- same situations.
*Treating all citizens equally under
ived the law.
g in *Recruiting and employing only the
ioun most qualified and professional law en-
ht of forcement officers with the right attitude
ex- of public service.
*Increasing community patrol and
decreasing "911" response times.
will *Spending money wisely. If it doesn't
)day make sense to have a helicopter, we
won't.


Political Advertisement Paid For and Approved by Charles McCrone, Democrat, candidate for Calhoun County Sheriff.


Why goobers are good

for you; how to keep

nutrients in potatoes
by Sandy Miller Hays, Agricultural Research Service
The terms "Information Age" and "Information Highway" are fairly
inadequate to describe the 24/7 onslaught of data in which we all find
ourselves awash these days. To me, "Information Tidal Wave" seems
like a more appropriate description; the flood of words never stops.
That's why I am so happy to come across nice, simple chunks
of information that I can absorb without feeling like I'm trying to
memorize all the intricacies of the Treaty of Ghent. You know the
type of thing: those little "gee-whiz" stories that people used to swap
around the office water cooler, back before everyone started bringing
in their own favorite brand of bottled water.
Here are a few enjoyable tidbits that I've come across lately from
the scientists of the Agricultural Research Service (ARS)-short,
sweet and impressive. I hope you enjoy them as much as I did!
Good-for-you Goobers. Maybe you've heard that a baby aspirin a
day is good for the old ticker, but here's something else with a heart-
protecting punch: peanuts! In studies with hamsters, ARS scientists
found that fat-free peanut flour, whole peanuts and peanut oil all may
have cardio-protective properties.
In the study, the scientists randomly divided male hamsters into
four groups of about 20 hamsters' apiece. Each of the groups ate a
different diet, all of which were high-fat and high-cholesterol. Each
diet contained nearly equal percentages of fats, carbohydrates and
proteins. But in three of the four diets, equivalent amounts of food
components were replaced with either fat-free peanut flour, peanut
oil, or peanuts without skins. The fourth diet contained no peanut
products.
The results? When the scientists checked the hamsters' blood
after six months on the diets, the hamsters who ate any of the peanut
products had significantly lower levels of total cholesterol and LDL
"bad" cholesterol, and their HDL "good" cholesterol levels held steady.
Findings from other studies have linked reduced heart disease risk
factors with consumption of peanut butter and peanut oil, but this is
the first animal study to show such an effect from eating the fat-free
portion of peanuts...to which I say, "Pass the peanuts, please!"
Potato Prep 101. Drop the paring knife and back away slowly!
Yes, it turns out that how you go about preparing a potato can have
a big impact on its mineral content.
We Americans love our spuds, to the point of gobbling down some
130 pounds annually per person. And that's not such a bad thing,
because potatoes are packed with vitamins and minerals.
But did you know that how you cut up and cook that potato can
change the quantity ofnutritional benefits you ultimately derive from
it? The scientists at ARS have discovered that if you, like me, are prone
to cubing your spuds before boiling them, you're definitely cutting
down on cooking time, but you're also reducing the mineral content
by as much as 75 percent.
This can be good news or bad news, depending on your needs.
If you're someone who needs to reduce potassium intake-as is the
case with dialysis patients-then cube away! But if you want to get
the biggest nutritional bang for your buck, you're better off boiling
those spuds whole.
Please release me, let me go! (My apologies to Engelbert
Humperdinck, wherever he is.) If you're like me and have an absolute
horror of biting insects, this will interest you: ARS scientists have
discovered that a naturally occurring compound made from pine oil
is a powerful deterrent of mosquitoes and also repels two kinds of
ticks.
ARS has obtained a patent on the compound and is looking for
industry partners to turn it into a commercial product.
In lab tests, the ARS scientists found that the natural compound
deters biting mosquitoes more effectively than even DEET-and
the same compound repelled two kinds of ticks just as effectively as
DEET. The scientists also worked out a way to inexpensively make
tons of the repellent from pine oil feedstock for large-scale commercial
applications.







Page 52 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL AUGUST 20, 2008


Perennialpeanut hay


brightens up the view

Motorists passing by the Stoltzfus Farm on Hwy. 71 in Calhoun
County have quite a view as tiny yellow flowers come into blossom
across a field of perennial peanuts. Perennial peanut is a high-quality
persistent forage legume which can be grazed or fed to horses, dairy
and beef cattle, hogs, goats, sheep and rabbits. Perennial peanut
characteristically produces -yellow flowers throughout the warm
growing season. Flower production is enhanced by a combination of
rainfall, warm temperatures, and full sun. Flower production is also
enhanced by mowing, periods of drought followed by rainfall, or low
fertility. Perennial peanut is well-adapted to dry, sandy soils, and has
the potential to persist indefinitely. Quality and uses are so similar to
that of alfalfa that perennial peanut has been coined "Florida's alfalfa,"
according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture Web site. Perennial
peanut grows well in Florida, south Georgia and southern portions
of the Gulf States. It requires no pesticides for control of insects
or diseases nor does it require applied nitrogen as do traditional
grass forages. These characteristics make perennial peanut an
environmentally sound, low resource consuming crop that ranks it as
an important component for sustainable agricultural systems.
PHOTOS BY PAM ANDERSON


Beware of unlicensed contractors during post-storm cleanup


TALLAHASSEE-As Tropical Storm Fay
makes its way over Florida, consumers who expe-
rience any damage from the high-speed wind and
rain need to carefully scrutinize who they hire to
do post-storm repairs. The Department of Busi-
ness and Professional Regulation reminds con-
sumers to check licenses before hiring contractors
by visiting www.MyFloridaLicense.com.
"Unfortunately, we have seen unscrupulous
individuals take advantage of storm victims, and
we want to do everything in our power to educate
consumers on ways to protect themselves," stated
Secretary Charles W. Drago.
The Department strives to protect consumers
from the dangers of working with unlicensed indi-
viduals, which may result in personal or financial
harm, and to protect licensed professionals from


unfair competition with-unlicensed individuals.
Governor Charlie Crist issued an executive or-
der on Saturday declaring a state of emergency,
and according to state law, unlicensed contracting
during a declared state of emergency is a felony.
Here are some consumer tips to prevent unli-
censed activity:
*Always ask to see the State of Florida li-
cense.
Note the license number and verify that the li-
cense is current and in good standing. To check a
license, call 850.487.1395 or visit www.MyFlor-
idaLicense.com.
*Ask for references and check each one.
*Beware of scams when individuals ask for all
the money up front or will only accept cash.
*Never pay in cash, especially a large up-front


deposit.
Be cautious of writing checks made payable
to individuals, especially when dealing with a
company.
*Get everything in writing, including a detailed
description of the work to be completed, a com-
pletion date and the total cost.
Do not sign the certificate of completion until
you are satisfied with the work done.
The Department of Business and Professional
Regulation's mission is to license efficiently and
regulate fairly. The Department licenses more
than one million businesses and professionals
ranging from real estate agents, veterinarians, and
accountants to contractors and cosmetologists.
For more information, please visit www.MyFlor-
idaLicense.com.







AUGUST 20, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 53



Blountstown Elementary kids return to class












-,._- r kk


Blountstown Elementary School students returned to
the classroom Monday morning, with many stepping
cautiously off the bus as they began the new school
year. At left, a young girl arrived in her bright new school
t-shirt. At right, another students pauses as she steps
off the bus and looks out on the crowd of kids gathered
outside. Above, dad takes a snapshot of his son's im-
portant first day. -DANIEL WILLIAMS PHOTOS


New BHS plans progressing

after DOE project approval
Plans for construction of a new Blountstown High School are
coming together after the Calhoun County School Board received a
letter from the Florida Department of Education (DOE) approving
the project. A total of $24,549,462 was recommended for the project
and will be split over a two-year period. The amount will be used to
construct 814 new student stations with a student capacih of 651.
Florida Department of Education's approval is one step closer to
the project being a reality. School Superintendent Mary Sue Neves
explains, "It will go in front of the legislature in the spring of 209
to be voted on. We feel confident that DOE's recommendation will
be approved by the legislature." When the Blountstown High School
project is passed by the legislature and funding is received, the
architectural fees paid b\ the school district will be reimbursed.
After two years of controversy over the issue of consolidating.
Blountstown and Altha students into one countywide high school,
Superintendent Neves recommended dropping the consolidation plan
and considering a new proposal. The new plan proposed to build a
new Blountstown High School on the present campus and move the
Blountstown Middle School students to the present Blountstown High
School building. Administrative offices would then be moved to the
present Blountstown Middle School building. After discussion of the
new plan, it was unanimously approved by the School Board.
Superintendent Neves and the School Board have mapped out
short and long range plans to improve all county school facilities.
The new Blountstown High School is the first phase out of five in the
district's facilities plan. Phase II focuses on Altha School. The project
following the new Blountstown High School will be the applying for
special facilities funding to build a new Pre-K through 12 school at
Altha. Phase III will focus on Carr School, Phase IV on Blountstown
Middle School, and Phase V on Blountstown Elementary School.
Completion of the phases through the coming years will put all five
school facilities in excellent shape.

School board lowers capital outlay
millage meeting held on August 4
In January 2008, Calhoun County voters approved a one-half cents
sales tax for school capital outlay needs. The purpose of the tax was to
make community support of local schools more equitable. At approval
of the one-half cents sales tax, Superintendent Mary Sue Neves and
the Calhoun County School Board promised to lower the capital outlay
millage that had already been levied for the 2008-2009 fiscal year. At
an August 4, 2008 board meeting, approval by Superintendent Neves
and the School Board passed, lowering the capital outlay millage by
.5900 mills for the 2008-2009 fiscal year. The School Board will begin
collecting the sales tax in January 2009. They plan to decrease the
capital outlay millage again for the 2009-2010 fiscal year when the
School Board will receive a full year of sales tax collections.
According to Suzanne Mason, Finance Officer, the state has
increased their required millage by .3320. This, along with a slight
decrease in the discretionary operating millage of .0120, will result
in the total millage rate being 7.237, compared to last year's total
rate of 7.507.


"Yi f


2008-2009 OPEN HOUSE AT BHS
by Ashlea Hester
Blountstown High School held its open house
on August 15. Teachers and Staff greeted a number
of new and returning students and parents. Varsity
cheerleaders and FFA members introduced new
students to their classrooms and the campus. Mr.
Barber, principal of Blountstown High School, was
pleased with the turnout of so many students.
CELEBRATION
by Christina Mears
BHS is celebrating being a "B" school! Students
and teachers all worked for that extra degree on the
FCAT last year, gaining two letter grades on last year's
score. Blountstown students, teachers and staff will
commemorate their "B" grade this Friday, August 22
with a cook out and drawings for prizes such as: a
32" flat screen TV, iPods, MP3 players, and gas cards.
If any businessestwould like to donate prizes, please
call 674-5724.
SENIOR NEWS
A candy sale to raise money for senior trip will begin
next Monday, August 25.
Herff Jones will meet with seniors on September 9
to talk about graduation items.
The first Senior Trip deposit will be due on
September 10.


BHS Assistant Principal, Mrs. Price, BHS Pricipal, Mr. Barber and Varsity Cheerleaders, Alisha
Strawn, Ashlea Hester and Cory Baldwin are shown during the school's Open House held on
Aug. 15.







Page 54 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL AUGUST 20, 2008










U S


JOB OPENING

The School Board of Liberty County is accepting applications for the following position for
the 2008-2009 school year. A complete "certified application" listing three (3) professional
references and resume is required. It will need to be submitted in the Information and Op-
portunities section of the online application at the LCSB website, www.lcsbonline.org. Once
in this area, follow the "step by step" directions. Any computer with internet access may be
used, i.e. (Home, Library, One Stop Career Center, Adult School, etc.).
Those without computer access may come to the District Administration office and com-
peltp your applicaion. Assistance wfln be provided, if needed. Reasonable accommoda-
tions for completing forms and interviews are available for people with disabilities when
requested in advance. For a request for reasonable accommodations, please contact the
Office of the Superintendent.
Physical Therapist (01)
LOCATION: DISTRICT WIDE
MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS:
*License to provide physical therapy in the State of Florida.
*Bachelor's or Master's Degree in Physical Therapy from an approved school.
*Satisfactory completion of an internship or experience in the area of physical therapy.
*Valid Florida Driver License.
PERFORMANCE RESPONSIBILITIES:
*Ability to supervise physical therapy assistants, as needed.
*Ability to interact professionally with school and district level personnel, parents, and other
pertinent
professionals.
*Ability to understand and follow current guidelines regulating the implementation of school-
based therapy.
*Ability to demonstrate proficiency in oral and written presentation.
*Must be able to travel to various schools, sites and homes as needed to deliver physical
therapy services.
COMPENSATION: $49,815.00
Applications will be received from: August 18, 2008 UNTIL FILLED
EMPLOYMENT WILL BE CONTINGENT UPON CLEARANCE OF FINGERPRINTS AND DRUG TEST
Employment opportunities are offered without regard to race, religion, sex, national origin, age, handicap or marital status.
8-20,27-08


JOB OPENING
The School Board of Liberty County is accepting applications for the following position
for the 2008-2009 school year. A complete classified application listing three (3) profes-
sional references and resume is required. It will need to be submitted in the Information
and Opportunities section of the online application at the LCSB Web site, www.lcsbonline.
org. Once in this area, follow the "step by step" directions. Any computer with internet ac-
cess can be used, i.e. (Library, One Stop Career Center, Adult School, etc.).
Those without computer access may come to the District Administration office and com-
plete your application. Assistance will be provided, if needed. Reasonable accommoda-
tions for completing forms and interviews are available for people with disabilities
when requested in advance. For a request for reasonable accommodations, please
contact the Office of the Superintendent.
SUBSTITUTE TEACHER
MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS:
1. Hold a High School Diploma or equivalent.
2. Hold a valid Florida Educator's certificate or a valid substitute certificate
issued by a Florida School district. To obtain a substitute certificate, call 643-
2275 ext 241 to schedule the test.
3. Be at least 18 years of age.
4. Must provide written references upon the request of the Superintendent.

KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS, AND ABILITIES:
Skill in oral and written communication with students, parents, and others.
Ability to implement activities for maximum effectiveness.
Ability to maintain appropriate student supervision so that students have a safe
and orderly environment in which to learn.
Ability to work effectively with peers, administrators and others.

PER DAY SALARY:
$50.00 day having High School Diploma or equivalent.
$55.00 day having AA degree
$70.00 day having Bachelor's degree
EMPLOYMENT WILL BE CONTINGENT UPON CLEARANCE OF FINGERPRINTS AND DRUG TEST
Employment opportunities are offered without regard to race, religion, sex, national origin, age, handicap or marital status.
8-13 t 8-20-08


-W4 -W



0 8 *


The following positions are
available: Construction Trades
Helper, Janitorial, Dietetic
Technician, Construction
Worker, Office Clerk, Food
Service Worker, Production
Manager, Truck Driver. EOE
Service Chipola Workforce Board UFN


JOB OPENING
The School Board of Liberty County is accepting ap-
plications for the following position for the 2008-2009
school year. A complete classified application listing
three (3) professional references and resume is re-
quired. It will need to be submitted in the Information
and Opportunities section of the online application at
the LCSB website, www.lcsbonline.org. Once in this
area, follow the "step by step" directions. Any com-
puter with internet access can be used, i.e. (Library,
One Stop Career Center, Adult School, etc.).
Those without computer access may come to the
District Administration office and complete your appli-
cation. Assistance will be provided, if needed. Rea-
sonable accommodations for completing forms and
interviews are available for people with disabilities
when requested in advance. For a request for rea-
sonable accommodations, please contact the Office
of the Superintendent.
SUBSTITUTE BUS DRIVERS
MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS:
* High School Diploma or equivalent.
* Commercial Driver's License (CDL) with passenger
and school bus endorsement and verification of an
acceptable driving record through the Department of
Motor Vehicles (DMV).
* Certified physically capable by a physical examina-
tion as prescribed by state and federal standards and
reflex test administered by the District.
* Must provide written references upon the request of
the Superintendent.
KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS, AND ABILITIES:
* Knowledge of highway and traffic safety.
* Ability to operate light and/or heavy-duty buses in a
safe and economical way.
* Ability to understand and carry out both written and
oral directions.
* Ability to exercise appropriate disciplinary tech-
niques.
* Ability to follow a daily routing schedule.
REPORTS TO: Director of Maintenance and Trans-
portation
PER DAY SALARY: $50.00
EMPLOYMENT WILL BE CONTINGENT UPON CLEARANCE
OF FINGERPRINTS AND DRUG TEST
Employment opportunities are offered without regard to race,
religion, sex, national origin, age, handicap or marital status.


r








AUGUST 20, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 55


~jvi~)
N.


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2'?'.


If your family was separated during an emergency, would you know how to get back together?
Make sure your family has an emergency plan that includes meeting places and ways to
communicate with each other. To learn more about making an emergency plan, go to ready.gov


Ready


(LOI


P;'







Page 56 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL AUGUST 20, 2008


TMH's Stroke Wellness Program helps survivors maintain quality of life


TALLAHASSEE The Tallahassee Memorial
Rehabilitation Center now offers a Stroke Wellness
Program at no cost, to support and encourage post-
rehab stroke survivors to continue their recovery
process.
"Through the generous support of the Christopher
and Dana Reeve foundation, we developed the
Stroke Wellness Program to offer stroke survivors
an avenue to continue in their progression of
recovery-even after all traditional therapy has been
completed. The common link in our participants
includes positive attitudes, belief in their abilities to
progress and commitment to lead active lifestyles,"
said Sheree Porter, MS, CCC-SLP, Rehabilitation.
Program Manager at the Tallahassee Memorial
Rehabilitation Center.
The Stroke Wellness Program at the Rehabilitation
Center has been extremely well received by
participants, families, and facilitators. Each
of the participants have some residual deficits
resulting from their strokes, including physical,
communicative and/or cognitive impairments. All
of the participants have graduated from formalized
programs and do not receive physical, occupational


HARRY E. CAISON
BRISTOL Harry E. Caison, 73, passed
away Wednesday morning, August 13, 2008 in
Blountstown. He was born in Ludowici, GA and
had lived in Liberty County most of his life. He
was a retired logger and enjoyed fishing, hunting
quail and sports. He attended Lake Mystic Baptist
Church in Bristol.
Survivors include a son, Stacey Caison and his
wife Kristy of Bristol; two daughters, Melanie
Duggar and her husband Tommy of Bristol, and
Malena Severance and Kevin McAllister of Havana;
two brothers, Lester Caison of North Carolina
and Greg Caison of Palatka, Florida; two sisters,
Kathleen Bailey of Scotts Ferry and Shirley Owens
of Tallahassee; six grandchildren, Titus and Vince
Severance, Luke Caison, Harley and Yolanda White
and Cory McAllister.
Services were held Friday, Aug. 15, from the Lake
Mystic Cemetery in Bristol.
Adams Funeral Home is in charge of the
arrangements.

GAREL WALLACE "BUDDY"
O'BRYAN, SR.
BLOUNTSTOWN Garel Wallace "Buddy"
O'Bryan, Sr., 75, died Sunday morning, August
17, 2008 at Calhoun Liberty Hospital. He was
born in Altha and had lived in Calhoun County for
most of his life. He was retired after 41 years as a
Regional Supervisor with the R.H. Bouligny Power
Company. He was a veteran of the Korean Conflict
serving in the United States Air Force and was of
the Protestant faith.
He was preceded in death by his son, Garel
Wallace O'Bryan, Jr..
Survivors include his wife, Imogene O'Bryan
of Blountstown; one son, Darryl Keith O'Bryan of
Blountstown; one daughter, Karen Lynn O'Bryan of
Tallahassee; one brother, Don A. "Sonny" O'Bryan
of Blountstown; and one sister, Pauline Anderson
of Altha.
Services will be held Wednesday, Aug. 20 at 11
a.m. from the Peavy Funeral Home Chapel with
Rev. Paul Smith officiating. Interment will follow
in O'Bryan Family Cemetery in Altha.
Peavy Funeral Home in Blountstown was in
charge of the arrangements.


or speech therapy outside of the TMH Stroke Welln
Program.
Participants are invited to attend weekly exercise
communication sessions led by physical, occupatic
and speech therapists who volunteer their time to w
with these patients. Any barriers that participants f
within the community regarding successful integral
are addressed in the weekly sessions as well.
Randall Handley, a stroke survivor from Jeffer
County, is a participant in the program. "I am than
for this program for many reasons," said Hand
"First, it allows me the opportunity to keep
working on improving, even though I have
graduated from therapy. I like the exercise
because it really helps me to work my leg 4
muscles to help me walk more normally. yO
It also helps me to see others also working
toward their goals at being independent dig
again, and know I'm not alone." James
Participants are provided with Ow-
individualized exercise programs and
cognitive exercises or "homework" to
assist communication skills. *.
"The stroke made it hard to write, speak,


JOHN "BUCKWHEAT" HOWARD REDDICK
BRISTOL John "Buckwheat" Howard
Reddick, 45, died August 15, 2008.
Survivors include his father, Cecil Reddick; his
mother, Ernestine "Tootsie" Henthorne and her
husband, Dan; one sister, Becky Lollie and her
husband, Jamie; three brothers, Roger Reddick and
his wife, Sandra, Darryl Hires, and his wife Tiffany,
Gerald Hires and his wife, Stephanee; a friend,
Peggy Summerlin; along with several aunts, uncles,
nieces, nephews and cousins.
Graveside services were held Monday, Aug. 18
at Lake Mystic Cemetery.
Bevis Funeral Home in Bristol was in charge of
the arrangements.

EARNEST FERRELL CLOUD
BLOUNTSTOWN Earnest Ferrell Cloud,
58, died Sunday morning, August 10, 2008. He
was born in Blountstown July 23, 1950 to the late
Earnest Ellis Cloud and Velma Lee Cloud. He
was a lifelong resident of Blountstown where he
worked for the Department of Corrections as a
Vocational Instructor. He was a master craftsman
in woodworking, loved landscaping his home
and riding his motorcycle. He was a member of
Macedonia Baptist Church near Altha.
Survivors include his wife, Rose Marie Cloud
of Blountstown; two sons, Jeff Cloud of Marianna
and Jimmy Cloud and his wife Timra of Cottondale;
three brothers, R.L. Cloud and his wife Patty of
Melbourne, Nicky Cloud and his wife Sandra of
Gibson, GA, and Gerald Cloud and his wife Debi of
Bartow; a sister, Peggy Page and her husband Chuck
oflnglis,; two grandchildren, Jade and Cody Cloud;
and several aunts, uncles, nieces and nephews. He
was a friend to all.
Services were held Tuesday, Aug. 12 from the
Macedonia Baptist Church with Rev. David Wood and
Carlton VanLierop officiating. Interment followed in


the Nettle Ridge
Cemetery.
Adams
Funeral Home
in Blountstown
w a s i n
charge of the
arrangements.


WHAT BETTER TRIBUTE CAN THERE BE?
Honor your loved ones by making their memory part of
our best efforts to defeat cancer For more info.,
contact the American Cancer Society.
EAST GADSDEN UNIT P.O. Box 563, Quincy, FL 32353


less read and spell. But the therapist gives us homework
to help us with our ability to communicate," said
and Joe "Poppy" Graganella, a 75 year old stroke
)nal survivor and one of the 12 original participants in
*ork the program.
face "The participants have reported marked
tion improvement in their individual sense of well being
since the program started a few months ago," said
son Porter. "We hope to grow the program to continue
kful to meet the needs and demand of the community
ley. for stroke survivors."*




HONOR Independent
ur loved one with Funeral Home
gnity & compassion. 211 E. Jefferson St., Quincy
S. . . (850) 875-1529
C. (Rusty) Black JackW. Weiler (850) 875-1529
ner& Manager Lic. Funeral Director LOCALLY OWNED & OPERATED



Charles McClellan

Funeral Home
Charles K. McClellan
Licensed Funeral Director
42 years experience
Call us Let us explain how we can
conveniently handle arrangements
in Liberty County.

Butler-Morgan/Morgan-McClellan Funeral Home'
I Building at 15 S. Jackson St., Quincy, 32351
Phone: (850) 627-7677 or 643-2277 p,


Pneoous k'Iernorics 1,1 yOU can '1 conic to us, give sw a call and we se'ill COflit' tO you'


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Peavy Funeral Home


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S, ' ..




Your hometown funeral home since 1994
Funeral Services with Dignity,
Caring and Professionalism.

Marion Peavy
A Hometown Funeral Director
Telephone (850) 674-2266
UFN


COMERFORD VAULT MEMORIAL SERVICE
593-6828 1-800-369-6828 Fax: 593-6888
Hwy. 90 W P.O. Box 933 Sneads, FL 32460
S Pete Comerford Owner & Operator



Let us help you with a memorial of BEA UTY and DURABILITY
Serving Jackson & the Surrounding Counties for 42 Years


OBITUARIE


Precious Memories


"Ifyou can come to us, give us a call and we will come to you "







AUGUST 20, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 57


Royca Gene ise
Democratic Candidate for


Your val
for me is
avoe for
improving
to tax
collehlorta
offloe l.
***Having the driver's license
section open 5 1/2 days a week.
***Office open during lunch.
***Having the office open on
Saturday morning for the work
people to take care of their needs.

TANKYcOU FOR YOM SUPMm


YOU'VE FLOWN THE FLAG. NOW WHAT?


S.irice September 11 h,. 2001, we have all witnessed a powerful
resurgence of the American spirit. But patriotism alone is not
enough VWe n'iut prcteci :,ursel.,e, arj our farrnlii;s by learning
ho'., to: be siate and calm in ihe e.ent ot a terror.t attack.
Firsi n-make an emergency, :uppl, it. S'-.e side ihe -upplie- you'll
need to .uri.e three days at home. 'iou II need clc.:'thes, sleeping
bags, nonperishable fod arid a gall'r of '..aTer per person per day.
You'll tinrd other items .',ill be helpful too for example a flashlight, a
battery-powered radio, extra batteries, a first-aid kit and toilet articles.
Second, make a family communications plan. Make sure family
members know how to contact each other in an emergency. It may
be smart to have everyone call an out-of-state friend or relative.
Keep a list of emergency numbers near the phone. Plan how you will
-e.acuate if you are asked to do so.
Third be informed In emergencies. planning pays off. If your
family knows what to e,.pect, all of you ..ill be calmer in the after-
math ot a terrorist eient For details on emergency preparedness,
viSit our xebsite at w,.,A read',vgo', Or get a free brochure by,
calling 1-800-BE-READY (1-800-237-3239).






,. ,.-.


ABOVE: Assassin bugs push their beak into their victim's body and inject a toxin that liquefies
their insect prey. It then sucks out the liquefied tissues, much in the same way we use a straw
to drink a milkshake! BELOW: Lady beetle larvae don't look anything like the adult but are
great predators of insect pests. PHOTOS BY THERESA FRIDAY


Not all insects


As summer progresses,
the number of insects found
in our landscape increases.
There are millions of types of
insects in our
world and more
than 100,000
different ones
active in the
United States.
However, less
than one percent
of these actually
feed on plants in -
a harmful way.
Before you
pull out the
insecticide,
take the time
to identify the
insects on your
plants. You just may find out
that they are beneficial insects.
Beneficial insects are those
that are helpful in some way,
as predators or pollinators.
A number of beneficial
insects occur naturally in our
gardens.
There are many more
beneficial insect species than
harmful ones. Many of these
"good bugs" feed on the
pests, and keep them in check
naturally. Three of the more
common beneficial insects
seen this time of year include
the assassin bug, the lacewing
and the lady beetle.
Nearly 3000 species of
assassin bugs exist; however,
scientists suspect that many
more will be discovered. They
vary in length from less than
1/4 of an inch to 1V2 inches.
They come in many colors
and shapes and most species
have two pairs of wings. All
assassin bugs, however, have
a powerful, curved beak that
they use to pierce and suck out
the tissues of their prey.
Assassin bugs prey on
numerous harmful insects
such as caterpillars, stinkbugs,


by Theresa Friday,
Horticulture Extension Agent,
Santa Rosa County
'^ __ ___


aphids, and beetles. However,
they are general predators
and may feed on each other
as well as other beneficial
insects. Since assassin bugs
are themselves preyed upon
by many enemies, they have
developed a unique defense
system, using their beak to
squirt venom at their attacker
as far as a foot away! Their
saliva can cause irritation to
human skin and induce a very
painful "bite." For this reason,
both nymphs and adults should
be handled with care.
Lacewings are small to
medium-sized insects that are
predaceous as both adults and
larvae. They consume insect
eggs and soft-bodied insects
such as aphids and mealybugs.
Because of the long life of the
adults, voracious appetites, and
high reproductive capacity,
they are useful biological
control agents.
Many people have seen
the eggs of lacewings but
didn't realize it. The eggs
are deposited at the end of a
long hairlike stalk which is
attached to plants or structures.
This prevents the larvae from


are bad
cannibalizing one another as
they hatch.
Looking like tiny
"alligators", lacewing larvae
-voraciously
attack almost
any prey they
can grab, using
pincer-likejaws.
After injecting
t paralyzing
: .. venom, they
suck the body
fluids from
their helpless
victim.
-Lady beetles
are among the
most beneficial
insects .
There are
approximately 5,000 species
worldwide with about 475
species occurring in North
America.
Not all adult lady beetles are
the characteristic orange with
black spots. Like many beetles,
lady beetles have larvae that
look nothing like the adult.
Some people believe the larvae
look like small orange and
black alligators; however,
there is great diversity in the
lady beetle family. Sometimes,
gardeners mistake the lady
beetle larvae for pests and
spray chemical pesticides
that kill them. This results in
increased problems from real
pests.
Lady beetle larvae are
relatively easy to find in your
own yard. Simply turn over an
aphid infected leaf, and you
will likely find them chomping
away. The larvae are predators
of aphids, mites, mealybugs,
scales, whiteflies, leafhoppers,
lacebugs, other pest beetles,
and caterpillars.
Theresa Friday is the
Residential Horticulture
Extension Agent for Santa
Rosa County.







Page 58 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL AUGUST 20, 2008


ITEMS FOR SALE


Tent, three dome, best offer; din-
nerware, five piece, amethyst
black, octagon shaped, best offer;
VHS tapes, over 100, $1 each;
canning pears; gemstones, ru-
bies, sapphires, opals and more,
some faceted, some cabbed and
some in natural form, best offer.
Call 674-3006. 8-20, 8-27

Sewing machine stand, Singer
brand, iron, $50 or best offer. Call
762-8586. 8-13,8-20

Antique golf clubs, wood, $40.
Call 762-2960 or 272-2552.
8-13, 8-20
Bedding/crib set, 'Hey Diddle
Diddle' theme, colors are solid
blue with yellow gingham fringe,
includes bumper pad, bed skirt,
plush comforter, fleece lined blan-
ket to match, musical mobile and
picture frame, yellow gingham
curtains and theme floor rug also
available, asking $50 for all. Call
643-2721 for more info. 8-13,8-20


Little girl's clothes, summer/win-
ter, sizes 5-7; ladies and juniors
clothing, sizes 6-11, very nice,
name brand. Call 674-3247.


APPLIANCE

GE stove, electric, good
tion, asking $150. Call 674



ELECTRONIC(

Dell Demention C521, At
3200 plus, flat screen, a
matelyten months old, asking
Call 643-7999.

PA system, 200 watt Pear
two 15" CGM cabinets, t
cables and speaker stands
$350; Motorola CB walkie
Call 762-2960 or 272-2552


CARS


2002 4x4, garnet, extended cab,
111 K miles, good condition, $9,000.
Call 643-2721. 8-13, 8-20


8-13,8-20 1997 GMC, 3/4 ton,, $700 or best
offer. Call 591-9352 or 643-5469.
8-13, 8-20
S

SUVS/VANS
condi-
-1637.
2005 Ford Explorer Sport Tract.
XLT, 4x4, adrenaline model, hard
cover top, bronze in color, 50K
miles, great gas mileage, in super
C S condition, $17,500 or best offer.
Call 445-9467 for more informa-
hlon 64 tion. 8-13,8-20
approxi-
ig$550. 1998 Jeep Cherokee, everything
8-20,8-27 but cruise control, really good con-
dition, runs very well, automatic,
vy amp, $3,500. Call 674-7138 or 899-0269
two 25' leave message. UFN
asking
talkies.

8-1382 AUTO PARTS &

ACCESSORIES


Rings, set of two, paid $1000,
asking $100. Call 643-6099. 1995 Ford Escort, 37 mpg, $1,500
8-13,8-20 or best offer. Call 762-1912.
8-"0, 8-27
Movie, Hunchback of Notre Dame,
$15. Call 674-3264. 1999 Dodge Intrepid, clean,
8-13,8-20 needs engine work, $1,200; 1993
Nissan Maxima, body and inte-
Puzzles, want to trade six or sev- rior in good shape, needs engine,
en 500 piece jigsaw puzzles for $700 or best offer. Call 508-8652.
some 100 piece puzzles, suitable 8-20,8-27
for first grade, there are several
complicated puzzles, 1996 Ford Taurus, good running
other larger, complicated puzzles, condition, highmileage, A/C needs
various sizes, used once, to be repair, $1,500. Call 442-3348.
traded for some of similar quality. 813, 820
Call 762-3881. 8-13, 8-20


318 Dodge motor, runs, must
sell, $250; 350 Chevy big block,
has not been bored if you want
number on block call, $275; 305
complete block, without heads,
$300. Call 762-2304. 8-20,8-27

20" wheels and tires, for Dodge
pick-up truck, $300. Call 447-
0941. 8-20, 8-27

18" Mazzi wheels, Fatal style,
universal, chrome finish, with three
good tires, $500. Call 447-0011 or
643-2715. 8-13,8-20


FURNITURE

Dining table, solid wood, fits four,
oval shape, $75; full size bed,
stainless steel head board and foot
board, $25 a set. Call 674-1637.
8-20, 8-27

China cabinets, assortment, with
what-nots that go in them, serious
inquirers only, make offer. Call 674-
3264. 8-20,8-27

Rocker, naugahyde, $35; recliner,
blue fabric, $35; table, old formica
top, with five chairs, sturdy, $30; roll-
away bed, $15; dresser, $20; chest
of drawers, $15. Call 933-4968.
8-13, 8-20



CLOTHING


Wedding dress, size six, paid
$600, asking $150. Call 643-
6099. 8-13. 8-20

Bag of girls clothes, size 14,
very good condition, $25. Call
643-1591. 8-13,8-20


1998 Buick Regal, loaded, low
mileage, make fair offer. Call 674-
7429. 8-13, 8-20

1998 Lincoln Towncar, signature
series, 96K miles, white, $5,000.
Call 674-5528 after 12 p.m. (CT)
8-13, 8-20

1998 Oldsmobile Achieva, SL
3100, new tires, rebuild transmis-
sion, runs good, cold A/C. Call
643-6912. 8-13, 8-20

2005 Chevy Malibu, good condi-
tion, great gas mileage, tinted win-
dows, new CD player, 67K'miles,
asking $10,500. Call 447-2101.
8-13, 8-20


TRUCKS

2002 Dodge Ram, fourwheel drive,
wench on front, stereo system,
needs tires, $5,500. Call 527-
5968. 8-20,8-27

1986 Toyota, four wheel drive,
motor is good, needs new radiator,
asking $500. Call 643-3812.
8-20, 8-27

1998 Ford Ranger, good motor,
standard transmission, needs minor
work, $400. Call 879-5131.
8-20, 8-27


Speakers, three Infinity perfect ten
speakers, with power acoustic class
D 2400 watt amp, $300; speakers,
three JL Audio WH 3s, with power
acoustic class D 2400 watt amp,
$250. Call 643-8525 or 674-3229
ask for Chris. 8-13,8-20

Fourtires, 285-75-R16, Firestone,
mud grip, with six hole stock Chevy
rims, $225. Call 237-2706.
8-13, 8-20
15-inch wheels and tires, alumi-
num, lug pattern 5 on 5 1/2, $300.
Call 899-0269 or 674-7138 leave
message. UFN



GUNS/HUNTING

Pistol, 357 security six, $500. Call
762-2304. 8-20,8-27

Remington 270 model, 700 BDL,
with scope and sling, $300. Call
272-0358

Bow, great first bow, PSE, great
condition, with all accessories,
$200. Call 643-2612. 8-20,8-27

Win 223 bolt action WSSM, one
year old, nice rife for young hunter,
with scope, $325 firm. Call 447-
4096. 8-13,8-20


THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL



CLASSIFIEDS

To place your ad, call 643-3333 by noon Eastern
Time on Saturday. Non-business ads run FREE for 2 weeks.


wIALE


SrE- M


Suii Cj
ApartmentsI







AUGUST 20, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 59


STHRf


SCOPE *


FOR AUG. 17- AUG. 23

ARIES Mar 21/Apr 20
Rest and relaxation are par for
the course this week, Aries.
And you have no problems
slowing down the pace and
enjoying the break. Enjoy it
while it lasts.
TAURUS -Apr 21/May 21
: Taurus, a deeper understand-
... ing of a problem allows you
to give a more informed
.i suggestion for a solution. That
doesn't mean that others will
1:. be receptive to your ideas.
GEMINI May 22/Jun 21
There are interesting events
ahead, Gemini. You just have
to keep your eyes open to
experience all of them. Think
twice before lending someone
assistance.
CANCER Jun 22/Jul 22
Cancer, saying this week will
be uneventful would be an
understatement. The status quo
is all you can expect. Perhaps
you can use a quiet week
anyway.
LEO-Jul 23/Aug23
Leo, don't take the bait when
someone tries to urge you into
a confrontation. Your actions
could determine how others
view you. That could spell
disaster at work.
VIRGO Aug 24/Sept 22
It could be time to reassess
career goals, Virgo. If you've
been thinking about changing
jobs, act now before the com-
petition starts to heat up.
LIBRA Sept 23/Oct 23
Libra, you have to work at
your love life. But encour-
age your partner to meet you
halfway. Fine dining is a way
to kick-off a fun date together.
Make money no object.

SCORPIO Oct 24/Nov 22
.. You feel like things are going
wrong left and right, Scorpio.
However, just taking a differ-
ent outlook can improve any
situation. Support from friends
and family will help you feel
more in control.
SAGITTARIUS Nov 23/Dec 21
Sagittarius, think about spend-
ing time with a family member
you haven't seen in a while.
This could be a benefit to both
of you. Home remodeling pro-
vides a change of scenery.
CAPRICORN Dec 22/Jan 20
Remember to stay on top of
health screenings, Capricorn.
Little problems can escalate if
not caught early. Home issues
require all of your attention.
AQUARIUS Jin 21/Feb 18
Aquarius, with your eyes on
:,i the prize you do whatever
it takes to reach your goal.
! Just keep in mind whose feet
you're stepping on while you
&J climb to the top.

PISCES Feb 19/Mar 20
You seek out peace and quiet,
Pisces. Unfortunately this
week you're simply not going
to get it. But that doesn't mean
you won't enjoy yourself.


THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL


CL


A


S


S


S


To place your ad, call 643-3333 by noon Eastern
Time on Saturday. Non-business ads run FREE for 2 weeks.


Remington model 7-10, bolt ac-
tion, 30-6, with sling and synthetic
stock, $300 or best offer. Call 643-
2108. 8-13, 8-20


SPORTING GOODS

& EXERCISE

Exercise machine, LTT, trainer,
$75; Arobic rider, $30. Call 674-
2883. 8-20, 8-27

MOTORCYCLES

& ATVS

2001 Harley Davidson Road
Glide, 39K miles, garage kept,
radio, cassette, cruise, $9,000. Call
639-2442. 8-20,8-27
Honda CRF 230, low hours, great
condition, $1,500. Call 643-2612.
8-20, 8-27
2002 Suzuki Katana 600, $3,500;
2001 Honda TRX300EX, four
wheeler, $2,300; 2001 Honda
TRX400EX, four wheeler, $2,600.
Call 447-0011 or 643-2715.
8-13,8-20
2007 Yamaha V-Star 1100, after
market pipes, three year transfer
warranty, $6,200 or best offer.
Call 209-5143. 8-138,-20

2006 Harley Davidson Road
King, one owner, black, less than
100 miles, $14,000. Call 674-4364
or 643-7796. 8-6T. 9-10


WATERCRAFT

14' Semi V, aluminum, with trailer,
$350; 25 hp Evinrude motor, less
than 20 hours, $900. Call 674-
2179. 8-20, 8-27


2007 G3 bass boat, lots of extras.
Call 762-2304. 8-20,8-27
12'6" Rivercraft, one year old,
5 hp Mercury motor, $1,850 firm.
Call 447-4096. 8-13, 8-20


CAMPERS/ RVS

RV fridge, ice maker, eight cubic,
12 volts, LP, 5'lx2'wx2'd, $1,000;
RV washer/dryer combo, runs good,
$500; four RV camper, fifth wheel,
travel trailer, entry door, with screen,
must sell, $100 each; four stabilizer
jacks, for travel trailer, $200; travel
trailer fridge, small, $300. Call 762-
2304. 8-20, 8-27


TOOLS & HEAVY

EQUIPMENT

Electric pigtails, three, for camp-
er or house trailer, best offer; chain
hoist, two ton, made in USA, best
offer. Call 674-3006. 8-20, 8-27

Craftsmen toolbox, top chest ten
drawers, middle one drawer, ten
drawer bottom, black, must sell,
$1,300; Lincoln welder, cracker
box, 220/1 phase, 25' lead, $250
or best offer; tongue jacks, three,
$0 each. Call 762-2304. 8-2o, 8-27
Tufline disc, 8', good shape, $750
cash. Call 762-9676. 8-13, 8-20


HOME

IMPROVEMENT

Chain link fence, four rolls, 25'
each, six feet high, one gate,
some posts already taken down,
$150. Call 643-2773 or 643-2356.
8-20, 8-27


RRINKLEY REALTY.
11003 Hwy. 20, Bristol (850) 643-3289
Bristol and Liberty County Properties
*3/2 all cypress construction house (GREAT LOCATION) near school
and shopping. Approximately 3/4 acre lot, all appliances, fireplace.
Only $162,500 adjacent lots and shop can be purchased FIRST TIME
OFFERED.
*3/3 country house, nice porches, free standing carport and shop on
two landscaped acres, appliances $165,000. Six extra acres can be
purchased, fenced NEW LISTING
*TWIN OAKS this 3/2 is a perfect family house with fenced back yard
and above ground pool. Very affordable at $148,000. Good financing
available for qualified buyer. FRESH ON MARKET.
*3/1 brick in NEAL Subdivision, fenced back yard. Good beginners
house, corner lot asking $1.19,000 NEW TO MARKET
*ORANGE-over 3,000 square feet of house 5br/2 &1/2 ba, porches
freezer room, cook house, shops and storage buildings. A must see if
you need plenty of room on 1.4 acres with grape arbors, garden, fruit
trees priced at $165,000. Recent listing.
*3.67 Acres plus a very nice 4 or 5 br 3 ba brick house, fireplace, appli-
ances with 2 car carport BIG deck, screened Florida room and a free
standing shop and mother-in-law apartment paved driveway. Call for
more info. and price. FIRST TIME OFFERED NEW LISTING#
*Faircloth Rd- where else can you buy a 3 br brick house with new cabi-
nets and more on 3 acres with shop asking only $142,900.
*(2) 2 bedroom mobile homes with storage buildings on .67 acre fenced
lot. Good rental property. Negotiable.
*Near High School-5/2 walk to school $172,900.
We have many others for sale, give us a call to BUY or SELL! J


Heating and cooling unit
BTU, 220 volt, $300. Ca
2706.


HOMES & LA

1.01 acres for sale, on S
Ferry Road in Altha, serious
ries only. Call 447-1693.

2004 mobile home, Fle
Hickery, 32x60, three be
two bathroom, four ton
cooling unit, must be moved
$30,000. Call 762-3233.

House for sale, 3 bed/2 b
acre, deep well, carport
Blountstown on Jim Godwi
Call 674-8003.

1994 mobile home, Ho
Legend brand, 16x80, cen
and air, full electric, three bi
two bath, comes with app
and two porches, must be
Call 566-5170.

Big lot on Chipola River, Io
Calhoun County. Call 643-



LOST & FOU

Found: terrier mix, male
dog, in Altha area, brom
black, small. Call 762-4099


Found: set of car keys,
Shelton Corner-White Por
Call 762-3966 leave mess


Found: Brindle cur dog,
one year old, found on 0
tol Road. Call 379-3242
3622.

Found: child's bike, for a
Neal subdivision. Call 643


, 12,000 Hound dog, very friendly, free to
all 237- good home. Call 762-2959.
8-13, 8-20 8-13, 8-20
Deer dogs, already running, easy
ND handling. Call 447-0703. 8-13,8-20
Five puppies, Red-nose Pit, one
Shuman is six months old, others are four
us inqui- and a half months old, $50 each.
8-20,8-27 Call-762-8844 leave message.
8-13, 8-20
etwood/
bedroom/ Siamese cat, white, female, ring-
heating/ tailed, approximately one year
, asking old, indoor pet, litter box trained,
8-20,8-27 free to good home. Call 674-7138
leave message. 8-13,8-20
ath, one

Noath WANTED
8-13, 8-20

'mes of Wanted: 15" galvanized pipe to
trial heat fix culvert on edge of driveway,
bedroom no need for new, can be used and
oliances must be cheap, need 10-12 feet.
moved. Please call Rene at 674-7081
7-23. 11 (day.) 8-20, 8-27

coated inWanted: hot water heater and
1514. girl's clothing size 24 months and
up. Call 237-1378. 8-13,8-20
UFN
Wanted: houseboat, fixer-upper,
iDT reasonable price. Call 447-4120.
L/ 8-13, 8-20

Wanted: fill dirt in the Hosford
, adult area, will pay, Hosford school will
wn and dig. Call 592-4966. 8-13,8-20
9.
8-20,8-27 Wanted: Will give $60 to $80 for
the bodies of junk autos and $125
on the for full bodies of junk autos. Call
nd area. Jimmy Dawson at 850-544-3478.
age. 7-2 T. 9-10
8-13, 8-20
Wanted: Junk cars and trucks,
female, any condition, we pay cash. Call
)ld Bris- 762-8459 or 272-6836 cell.
or 643- UFN


8-13, 8-20

boy, in
-6270.
8-13,8-20


PETS/SUPPLIES

Chow puppies, full blooded, sev-
en weeks old, two females, three
males, assorted colors, $100
each. Call 272-5667. 8-20,8-27

Three puppies, free to good
home, seven weeks old, mom is a
Blue Heeler. Call 674-3551.
8-20, 8-27

Collie, one and a half years old,
good with kids, $75. Call 674-
3264. 8-20. 8-27

Lab puppies, chocolate and yel-
low labs, $100 each. Call 272-
0358. 8-20,8-27

Shitzu, seven months old, all
shots and flea meds, $200 with
good home. Please call Allison at
447-0410. 8-20,8-27

Kittens, six, multi-colored, seven
weeks old, free to good home.
Call 899-0220. 8-20, 8-27


YARD SALE


Yard sale, Saturday, Aug. 23, 8:30
a.m-4 p.m. (ET), 10749 NW Robin
Street in Bristol, something for
everyone, rain or shine. Call 643-
3806. 8-20

Multi-family sale, Saturday, Aug.
23, starting at 7 a.m. (CT), 20154
NE Marie Ave. in Blountstown,
tools, women's clothing sizes eight
and up, shoes, children's clothes
and toys, electronics, appliances,
furniture and more. Call 899-7843.
8-20


PLAT

BOOKS
available at
The Calhoun-Liberty
Journal office in
Bristol


IFIED


__-








Page 60 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL AUGUST 20, 2008


S S 0 A

w o& 0 E S


REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS

The Liberty County Board of Coun-
ty Commissioners, Liberty County,
Florida will receive sealed propos-
als, at the Liberty County Clerk's
Office until 5:00est on 9/02/08 for
the following:

DISASTER DEBRIS REMOVAL
& DISPOSAL SERVICES

The Board of County Commis-
sioners may accept all or part
of any proposal. Any proposals
received after 5:00pm (est) on
9/02/08 will be retained by the
Clerk of Court Office unopened
and will not be considered. The
Board of County Commissioners
reserves the right to reject any
and all proposals, waive formali-
ties and re-advertise and award
the proposal in the best interest of
Liberty County.

The Board of County Commis-
sioners does not discriminate
because of race, creed, color, na-
tional origin, or handicap status.
The Board of County Commis-
sioners requires a Sworn State-
ment under section 287.133(3)(a),
F.S., on Public Entity Crimes.
Anyone wishing to obtain RFP
documents may contact the Lib-
erty County Emergency Man-
agement Office at 11109 NW SR
20, Bristol, FL 32321 (850) 643-
2339.

Method of Selection: Propos-
als will be reviewed by a Selection
Committee who will recommend a
shortlist of candidate firms. The
Selection Committee may in-
vite short-listed firms to be inter-
viewed. Liberty County may se-
lect on proposals only without
presentations. Upon acceptance
, of a recommendation by the com-
mittee, negotiations for a Debris
Contract will be entered.

All RFP's must be labeled and
plainly marked on the outside of
the envelope RFP for Disaster
Debris Removal & Disposal Ser-
vices, with Respondent's name,
address and telephone number.
Proposals.must be completed and
signed, in ink, in spaces provided
on the specified forms and must
submit 2 copies or proposal will
ne subject to rejection.


COUNTY ROAD 67A
PROJECT #058.100

S.C.RIA.P. PROJECT

NOTICE TO RECEIVE
SEALED BIDS

The Liberty County Board of
County Commissioners will re-
ceive sealed bids from any quali-
fied person, company or corpora-
tion interested in constructing the
following project:

COUNTY ROAD 67A
S.C.R.A.P. PROJECT

Plans and specifications can be
obtained at Preble-Rish, Inc.,
324 Marina Drive, Port St. Joe,
Florida 32456, (850). 227-7200.
The bid must conform to Section
287.133(3) Florida Statutes, on
public entity crimes.

This is a resurfacing project.

All bidders shall be FDOT Quali-


fied per Section 2-1 of the FDOT
Standard Specifications for Road
and Bridge Construction, latest
edition.

Completion date for this project
will be 150 days from the date
of the Notice to Proceed present-
ed to the successful bidder.

Liquidated damages for failure to
complete the project on the speci-
fied date will be set at $200.00 per
day.

Please indicate on the envelope
that this is a sealed bid, the bid
number and what the bid is for.

Bids will be received until 5:00
p.m. Eastern Time, on Septem-
ber 2, 2008, at the Liberty County
Clerk's Office, Liberty County
Courthouse, Hwy 20, Bristol,
Florida 32321, and will be opened
and read aloud on September 2
, 2008, at 7:00 p.m. Eastern
Time. The public is invited to at-
tend.

Cost for Plans and Specifications
will be $ 25.00 per set and is
non-refundable. Checks should
be made payable to PREBLE-
RISH, INC.

The Board of County Commis-
sioners reserves the right to waive
informalities in any bid, to accept
and/or reject any or all bids, and
to accept the bid that in their judg-
ment will be in the best interest of
Liberty County.
------------------------:r---------------

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, SEC-
OND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, INAND
FOR LIBERTY COUNTY, FLORI-
DA

In Re: Forfeiture of the Following

Case No. 08-95CA

Described Property:
1996 Ford Explorer, Blue in Color
Vin Number 1FMD2POTZB17011
Tag 692KSN

HARRELL REVELLAS SHERIFF
OF LIBERTY COUNTY SHER-
IFF'S OFFICE
Plaintiff

vs.


CONALISA ANN HALL
Claimant


NOTICE OF FORFEITURE
COMPLAINT

To: All persons claiming a security
or other interest in the above-de-
scribed property

The above-described property
was seized pursuant to the provi-
sions of the Florida Contraband
Forfeiture Act, Florida Statutes
932.701-707, by the Liberty Coun-
ty Sheriff's Office on June 28,
2008, at or in the vicinity of RJ's
Restaurant, located on Highway
20, in Liberty County, Florida. The
Liberty County Sheriff's Office is
currently in the possession of said
property and has filed a Complaint
for the purpose of forfeiture of said
property in the Circuit Court of the
Second Judicial Circuit of Florida.
In order to protect your rights you
must file an Answer to the Com-
plaint with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court, Liberty County Courthouse,
Bristol, Florida, within twenty (20)
days of this publication. You must
also serve a copy of your Answer


on Plaintiff's Counsel, Shalene
Grover, 25436 NW Bowden Road,
Altha, Florida 32424. Failure to
do so may result in the entry of
a default against you and a Final
Order of Forfeiture of the above-
described property.

(The above only to be published in
the Liberty Journal, once a week
for two consecutive weeks.)

I certify that a copy of the Notce
of Forfeiture be delivered to the
appropriate newspaper for publi-
cation.

Dated this 6th day of August,
2008.
Robert Hill, Clerk -.13&8.20-08
--------------- _--L.--------------------------

INVITATION TO BID

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
THAT THE LIBERTY COUNTY
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMIS-
SIONERS will receive bids in the
Clerk's Office, Liberty County
Courthouse, by 11:00 A.M., EST,
Tuesday, September 2nd, 2008.

SEALED BID

TO BE OPENED AT 11:00 A.M.,
EST, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER
2ND, 2008

FOR INSURANCE COVERAGE
ON WORKERS' COMPENSA-
TION, COMMERCIAL AUTOMO-
BILE, COMMERCIAL PROPERTY
AND EQUIPMENT FLOATER.

A Bid Committee designated by
the Board of County Commission-
ers shall publicly open and review
all bids, and recommend to the
County Commissioners the Idwest
responsible bidder meeting the
specifications.


All Bid Specifications may be
obtained from the Clerk of Court's
Office in the Courthouse, 10818
NW SR 20, Bristol, FL 32321,
Phone Number 850-643-5404.
The County reserves the right
to reject any and all bids, and to
accept the bid the Commission
deems to be in the best interest
of the County. Decisions on bid
awards will normally be made
within fifteen days from the date of
opening.

Robert Hill, Clerk of Court
Clerk to the Board of County
Commissioners
-13& 8-20-8



IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
LIBERTY COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
IN RE: THE ESTATE OF:
CASE NO.: PR08-17

CHARLES RUSSELL MORRIS,
JR
Deceased

NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
AND NOTICE TO CREDITORS

TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST
THE ABOVE ESTATE AND ALL
OTHER PERSONS INTEREST-
ED IN THE ESTATE:

YOU ARE NOTIFIED: that the
administration of the Estate of
CHARLES RUSSELL MORRIS
JR. File Number PR08-17 is pend-
ing in the Circuit Court for Liberty
County, Florida, Probate Division,
Post Office Box 399, Bristol, Flori-
da 3232t, the address of which is
the Liberty County County Court-
house. The Personal Representa-
tive of the Estate is LINDA JEAN
MORRIS. The name and address


of the Personal Representative's
attorney is set forth below.

All persons having claims or de-
mands against the Estate are re-
quired, WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE,
to file with the Clerk of the above
Court a written statement of any
claim or demand they may have.
Each claim must be in writing and
must indicate the basis for the
claim, the name and address of
the creditor or his agent or attorney
and the amount the claim is con-
tingent or unliquidated, the nature
of the uncertainty shall be stated.
If the claim is secured, the security
shall be described. The claimant
shall deliver sufficient copies of
the claim to the Clerk to enable the
Clerk to mail one copy to the Per-
sonal Representative. All persons
interested in the Estate to whom a
copy of this Notice of Administra-
tion has been mailed are required,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS FROM
THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUB-
LICATION OF THIS NOTICE, to
file any objection they may have
that challenges the validity of the
decedent's Will, the qualifications
of the Personal Representative,
or the venue or jurisdiction of the
Court.

DATED THIS 11 DAY OF
AUGUST, 2008.

J. DAVID HOUSE, P.A.
16865 SE RIVER STREET
BLOUNTSTOWN, FL 32424
(850)674-5481
FLORIDA BAR #282359
COUNSEL FOR
PERSONAL REP.

LINDA JEAN MORRIS
25229 SW BEAR STREET
BRISTOL, FLORIDA 32321 8-13,20


RESOLUTION NO.: 08-11


A RESOLUTION OF THE LIBERTY COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY
COMMISSIONERS REQUESTING AND ENCOURAGING ALL CANDIDATES
FOR PUBLIC OFFICE AND CAMPAIGN WORKERS TO NOT WORK OR
ILLICIT VOTES AT THE VOTING POLL LOCATIONS.

WHEREAS, the Board of County Commissioners and the Supervisor of Elections Office
have received many prior complaints of aggressive campaign workers in the voting poll
locations; and

WHEREAS, when multiple campaign workers are located at the voting poll locations it
clogs the parking lot areas, walk-thru areas, and decreases the accessibility of the voting
poll locations; and

WHEREAS, the Board of County Commissioners desires that all Liberty County voting
poll locations be easily accessible to all voters and free from conflict.

NOW THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED by the Board of County Commissioners of
Liberty County, Florida, as follows:

1. That the Liberty County Board of County Commissioners encourages and
supports all candidates for public office and all campaign workers to please refrain from
congregating and working the voting poll locations to allow for better accessibility for
voters.
t
PASSED by the Board of County Commissioners of Liberty County, Florida, this
S day of June, 2008.




DEXTER BARBER, Chairman
Liberty County Board of County Commissioners


ATTEST,,-

I/ 4A-Le


ROBERT HILL, Clerk of Court







AUGUST 20,2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 61


IMPORTANT INFORMATION ABOUT
GTC, INC. D/BIA FAIRPOINT COMMUNICATIONS TELEPHONE SERVICE

GTC, Inc. d/b/a FairPoint Communications Telephone Company provides a wide variety of
products and services including the following basic service offerings in the Blountstown
(237 and 674) exchanges:
Monthly One-Time
Rates Charges
Single Party Residential Service $6.95 $30.25
Single Party Business Service $19.02 $46.25
Single Party Universal LifeLine Service (ULTS)* $.00 $15.12
In addition to the above monthly rates, a $6.50 Federal Subscriber Line Charge applies to busi-
ness and residential single party lines and $9.20 for a business with more than one line. This
$6.50 charge is paid entirely by the federal lifeline program for qualifying customers.
The above rates include the following:
Local calling and the ability to receive unlimited incoming calls;
Touch tone capability;
Access to operator services, directory assistance, and long distance service providers;
Voice grade access to the public switched network;
Free access to emergency 9-1-1- and 800 or 800-like toll free services;
One free directory listing;
One free white page telephone directory;
Free toll blocking for qualifying low-income customers;
Free access to the telephone relay service; and
Free access to the business office.
This is a state and federally funded program, which provides discounted service to low-income residential customers
who meet the eligibility rules that have been established, Includes discounted basic service rates, discounted one-
time installation charges or change charges, and free tolLblocking. All this is made available to those who 4'i i,."
Universal LifeLine Telephone Service. I
For additional details on any of the services, please contact our business office at 1.800.400.5568.
Information on Digital Television (DTV) Transition After February 17, 2009, a television receiver with only an analog
broadcast tuner will require a converter box to receive full power over-the-air broadcasts with an antenna because of
the Nation's transition to digital br..., j.; .inc Analog-only TVs should continue to work as before to receive low power,
Class A or translator television stations and with cable and satellite TV services, gaming consoles, VCRs, DVD players, and
similar products.
Information about the DTV transition is available from www.DTV.gov and from www.dtv2009.gov or 1-888-DTV-2009 for
information about subsidized coupons for digital-to-analog converter boxes.
For additional details on any of the services, please contact our business office at 1.800.400.5568.

Fairt
communications





IMPORTANT INFORMATION ABOUT GTC, INC. D/BIA FAIRPOINT
COMMUNICATIONS TELEPHONE SERVICE

GTC, Inc. d/b/a FairPoint Communications Telephone Company provides a wide variety of
products and services including the following basic service offerings in the Bristol (643) and
Hosfoid (379) exchanges:
,Monthly One-Time
Rates Charges
Single Party Residential Service $10.08 $30.25
Single Party Business Service $26.49 $46.25
Single Party Universal LifeLine Service (ULTS)' $3.08 $15.12

In .riditi:- to the above monthly rates, a $6.50 Federal Subscriber Line Charge applies to
business and residential single party lines and $9.20 for a business with more than one line.
This $6.50 charge is paid entirely by the federal lifeline program for qualifying customers.

The above rates include the following:
Local calling and the ability to receive unlimited incoming calls;
Touch tone capability;
Access to operator services, directory assistance, and long distance service providers;
Vbice grade access to the public switched network;
Free access to emergency 9-1-1- and 800 or 800-like toll free services;
One free directory listing;
One free white page telephone directory;
Free toll blocking for qualifying low-income customers;
Free access to the telephone relay service; and
Free access to the business office.
This is a state and federally funded program, which provides discounted service to low-income residential customers
who meet the eligibility rules that have been established. Includes discounted basic service rates, discounted one-
time installation charges or change charges, and free toll blocking. All this is made available to those who qualify for
Universal Lifeline Telephone Service.
For additional details on any of the services, please contact our business office at 1i .800.400.5568.
Information on Digital Television (DTV) Transition After February 17,. 2009, a television receiver with only an analog
broadcast tuner will require a converter box to receive full power 6ver-the-air broadcasts with an antenna because of
the Nation's transition to digital broadcasting. Analog-only TVs should continue to work as before to receive low power,
Class A or translator television stations and with cable and satellite TV services, gaming (consoles, VCRs. DVD players, and
similar products.
Information about the DTV transition is available fiom www.DTV.qov and from ,ww,.dltv2009 goq or 1-888-DTV-2009 for
information about subsidized coupons for digital-to-analog converter boxes.
For additional details on any of ihe services, please conrac our business office at 1.300.400.5568



communications


Energy efficient compact fluorescent light bulbs (CFLs) are taking
the world by storm. But can they cause headaches due to flickering?
Most experts say no: Unlike the older long tube fluorescent lights, the
flicker rate of the new CFLs is way too fast for the human eye or brain
to detect. PHOTO BY ARMISTEAD BOOKER, COURTESY OF FLICKR


Can those energy-efficient
compact fluorescent light bulbs
that are popular now cause


headaches
because of the
flickering they
do? I converted
my whole
house over last
fall and both
my kids were
complaining of
headaches on
and off.


Environmental & Resource
Studies Ph.D. at Canada's Trent
University, says that some


EARTH


TALK.
Questions & Answers
About Our Environment


Sandy, Eugene, OR
With a switch to energy
efficient compact fluorescent
(CFL) light bulbs already in
full swing in the U.S. and
elsewhere-Australia has
banned incandescents, Britain
will soon, and the U.S. begins
a phase-out of incandescents
in 2012-more and more
complaints have arisen about the
new bulbs causing headaches.
Many experts say that the
issue is being overblown,
however, that there is no
scientific evidence that the
bulbs cause headaches and that
a kind of hysteria has grown out
of a small number of anecdotal
reports.
Industry experts
acknowledge that day-to-day
exposure to older, magnetically
ballasted long tube fluorescent
bulbs found mostly in industrial
and institutional settings could
cause headaches due to their
noticeable flicker rate. The
human brain can detect the
60 cycles per -second such
older bulbs need to refresh
themselves to keep putting out
light.
However, modern,
electronically ballasted CFLs
refresh themselves at between
10,000 and 40,000 cycles per
second, rates too fast for the
human eye or brain to detect.
"As far as I'm aware there
is no association between
headaches and the use of
compact fluorescent lamps,"
says Phil Scarbro of Energy
Federation Incorporated (EFI),
a leading distributor of energy
efficiency-related products-
including many CFLs.
But Magda Havas, an


CFLs emit
radio frequency
radiation that
can cause
fatigue ,
dizziness,
ringing in the
ears, eyestrain,
evenmigraines.
You can test to


see if CFLs
in your home give off such
radiation, she says, by putting
a portable AM radio near one
that's on and listening for extra
static the closer you get. She
says that such electromagnetic
interference should also be
of concern to people using
cell phones and wireless
computers.
Sometimes headaches are
due to eyestrain from inadequate
lighting. When replacing an
incandescent bulb with a CFL,
pay attention to the lumens,
which indicate the amount of
light a bulb gives out (watts
measure the energy use of a
bulb, not the light generated). A
40-watt incandescent bulb can
be replaced by an 11-14 watt
CFL because the lumen output
is approximately the same
(490); a 100-watt incandescent
can be replaced by a 26-29 watt
CFL, both providing about
1,750 lumens. If you're still
skeptical, replace a 40-watt
incandescent with a 60-watt
equivalent 15-19 watt CFL,
which will boost lumens to
900.
Another consideration is
color temperature. (measured
in degrees "Kelvin"). CFLs
rated at 2,700 Kelvin give
off light in the more pleasing
red/yellow end of the color
spectrum, closer to that of most
incandescents. Bulbs rated
at 5,000 Kelvin and above
(usually older ones) give off a
less pleasing white/blue light.
The Environmental Defense
Web site provides a handy chart
comparing the watts and lumens
of incandescents versus CFLs,
along with further discussion
about color temperature.







Page 62 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL AUGUST 20, 2008


P2HECAIBERENA LAU


Voice grade access to the public switched network;
Free access to emergency 9-1-1- and 800 or 800-like toll free services;
One free directory listing;
One free white page telephone directory;
Free toll blocking for qualifying low-income customers;
S ey makes All-Stars, heads to London Free access to the telephone relay servke; and*
Free access to the business office.
Wildcat Varsity Cheerleader Morgan Swilley will soon be
pac g her bags for London, England. Morgan is the daughter This is a state and federally funded program, which provides discounted service to low-income residential customers
packing her bags for London, England. Morgan is the daughterwho meet the eligibility rules that have been established. Includes discounted basic service rates, discounted one-
of Craig and Rose Mary Swilley, and is a member of the 2009 time installation charges or change charges, and free toll blocking. All this is made available to those who qualify for
Universal LifeLine Telephone Service.
graduating class. On July 28-30, Morgan Swilley and the rest For additional details on any of the services, please contact our business office at 1.800.400.5568.
of the Altha School Cheerleaders participated in their yearly Information on Digital Television (DTV) Transition After February 17, 2009, a television receiver with only an analog
Su er Camp. n the final day, Morgan and three of hr broadcast tuner will require a converter box to receive full power over-the-air broadcasts with an antenna because of
Summer Camp.-On the final day, Morgan and three of her the Nation's transition to digital broadcasting. Analog-only TVs should continue to work as before to receive low power,
teammates were given the opportunity to try out for the all-star Class A or translator television stations and with cable and satellite TV services, gaming consoles, VCRs, DVD players, and
similar products.
team. When the competition was over Morgan and teammate Information about the DTV transition is available from www.DTV.gov and from www.dtv2009.gov or 1-888-DTV-2009 for
K.K. Beauchamp had made the squad. Morgan will join the information about subsidized coupons for digital-to-analog converter boxes.
rest of the All-Star squad and be part of their New Year's Day For additional details on any of the services, please contact our business office at 1.800.400.5568.
Parade. The trip will be Dec. 26-January 2, 2009. F i---r
If you would like to make a contribution to help defer the cost Pla int
of the trip, an account has been set up at the Calhoun-Liberty communications
Employees Credit Union in Morgan's name for this event.














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IMPORTANT INFORMATION ABOUT
GTC, INC. DIB/A FAIRPOINT COMMUNICATIONS TELEPHONE SERVICE
GTC, Inc. d/b/a FairPoint Communications Telephone Company provides a wide variety of
products and services including the following basic service offerings in the Blountstown
(237 and 674) exchanges:
Monthly One-Time
Rates Charges
Single Party Residential Service $6.95 $30.25
Single Party Business Service $19.02 $46.25
Single Party Universal LifeLine Service (ULTS)' $.00 $15.12
In addition to the above monthly rates, a $6.50 Federal Subscriber Line Charge applies to busi-
ness and residential single party lines and $9.20 for a business with more than one line. This
$6.50 charge is paid entirely by the federal lifeline program for qualifying customers.
The above rates include the following:
Local calling and the ability to receive unlimited incoming calls;
Touch tone capability;
Access to operator services, directory assistance, and long distance service providers;






AUGUST 20, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 63


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Land Clearing & Fencing
*Dozer and Excavation work
Demolition Pond Digging
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4433 NW County Road 274 (850) 762-9402
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Page 64 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL AUGUST 20, 2008


Vote for and Elect


DANNY RYALS

|Calhoun County

school Board District 1


-,
^ --::


.... ....- ... .
* .- - -- . .




The Calhoun County School Board has cided to build a new Marianna High School
voted to consolidate Blountstown High r they went to nearby Walton County, toured
School and Altha 9-12! On July 16 2008, their schools, got a copy of the building
they applied for funds to build a consoli- plans, bought the property and then hired
-' dated high school. I was at this meeting in the same architect to modify the plans to fit -
Tallahassee and the funds were applied their needs. This resulted in a tremendous 8
'- for to consolidate the 2 schools. savings to the Jackson County taxpayers. .-
I have been attending the school board Holmes County rejected the move to
meetings, workshops and site selection ^- consolidate, applied for funding for each of -
o, meetings for over 2 years. its 5 schools, and built new schools at each
On August 12, at the school board -- existing location.
- meeting, when asked about rescinding ontsite because itiinaThis was leadership and common
this site because it is in a flood zone. There
consolidation Supt. Neves confirmed that have been no soil borings or tests to determine senserved on the board at Chipola
the board would not rescind consolidation I have served on the board at Chipola
and that they would consolidate the two College for over 6 years.
schools But we are still spending money. I have served on the Take Stock in Chil-
When the new high school is built The board has no approved the plans to build dren committee since its inception.
nn this site nd the n lans will not he voted on until .. _


Blountslown Middle School will be moved
into the current Blountstown High School
building. The occupancy rate will be only
360o and the state will force the school
board to consolidate the Carr 6-8 and
the Altha 6-8 into the Blountstown Middle
School to create the Calhoun County Mid-
die School.
Remember the original Plan D that was
presented 3 years ago when the consoli-
dation issue first surfaced? It called for a
consolidated centrally located high school
and a consolidated centrally located mid-
die school
In March, the administration and school
board hired an architect and paid him
$996,000.00 to design a school on 80
acres of land on county road 275 that we
did not own and did not buy. The adminis-
tration and board said this was the abso-
lute perfect site. The board selected this
site without asking the price of the land.
When the public found out this information
they protested and the school board then
voted to build next to the existing BHS.
The Blountslown site is in a flood zone.
The site will have to be excavated and
back filled to get the building 2' above the
base flood elevation as required by the..
county ordinance. The estimate for tpb
site work was $1.7 million dollars. t-
fee for the architect to redesign the plar<
from the CR 275 site is $635,000.00 for
total of $2.335,000. The total of the mon
ey already paid to the architect and the
additional expenses are estimated to be
$3,331,000.00 before the first foundation
block is laid. We could nave done a lot of
work to our existing facilities with this $3.3
million! We may not even be able to build


after the election. You will not know for sure wl
the plans are until November!
The motion to buy the 80 acres on CR 275
still on the table and could be voted on at a
time to be the new consolidated school site.
Even though the school board decided
purchase the 80 acres of land on CR 275
$7500.00 per acre, which was more than doul
the appraised value of the land, it will be cheap
er to build the school on this site than to bulk
in Blountstown. The fact that it is 8 miles fr(
Blountstown and 5 miles from Altha did not m
ter until it looked like votes would be lost with tl
decision.
The final decision on whether to build on t
Blountstown site will not be made until after t
election.
The site for the new school is still unknown.
No documentation or research was ever giv
to show that this was the right direction to ta
for our schools.
Our schools have shown proven progress a
have always ranked high in state scores and tl
year our schools had 4 A's and 1 B score in I
FCAT testing!
How will consolidation improve this score?
When the Jackson County School Board d
,


IT-J


I have served as a member ot the Blount-
stown Rotary Club for over 10 years help-
is ing with fundraisers to provide scholarships
for Blountstown and Altha students.
iny I have been on the Board of Directors
of the Calhoun County Senior Citizens for
over 10 years.
ble I have been on the Community Traffic
Safety Team for several years.
" it I have served on the Calhoun County
Chamber of Commerce board of directors
am for over 10 years.
The total salary that I receive from all
of these organizations is zero. I serve be-
cause we have been blessed in our county
he
and I believe in doing everything you can
do to improve your community.
Vote for a man who will work hard to
save you money.
ken Vote for a man with experience, proven
leadership and common sense.
Vote for a man that you can trust to tell
his you the truth.
Vote for a man who will listen to your
concerns.
Vote for the man that is best qualified to
serve our children and our families.
de-
,, Vote for Danny Ryals for Calhoun Coun-
/ t School Board District 1!
member that Republicans, Democrats
and, Independents can ALL vote for Danny
Syals in the August 26, 2008 election!!
A vote for Danny Ryals is a positive vote
r our children and our schools!!
I am sorry that I haven't been able to see
each one of you personally. Please call me
at any of the following numbers if you have
any questions or want me to visit you.
*Office 674-5478 -Cell 899-6472
SHome 674-3884


P AN.i .WO*
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*r -




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