Group Title: Calhoun-Liberty Journal (Bristol, Fla.).
Title: The Calhoun-Liberty journal
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00027796/00106
 Material Information
Title: The Calhoun-Liberty journal
Alternate Title: Calhoun Liberty journal
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Calhoun-Liberty Journal
Publisher: Liberty Journal, Inc.
Liberty Journal
Place of Publication: Bristol, Fla
Publication Date: July 2, 2008
Copyright Date: 2008
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Bristol (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Liberty County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Calhoun County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Liberty -- Bristol
United States of America -- Florida -- Calhoun
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in Sept. 1991.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 11, no. 38 (Sept. 18, 1991).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00027796
Volume ID: VID00106
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AKN4565
oclc - 33425067
alephbibnum - 002046630
electronic_aleph - 003298625
electronic_oclc - 60662266
lccn - sn 95047245
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly journal (Bristol, Fla.)

Full Text
Univ of Florida History Library
PO Box 117007
Gainesville Fl 32611


S2 11/6/2009
1889


!"C ^ |S'??TV


fVolume 28,,ume 28, Number 27 Wednesday, July 2, 20087--



Former Calhoun County


school board


member dies


Blountstown City

crews scramble

to stay on top of

storm damages
by Teresa Eubanks, Journal Editor
M onday morning's rough weather ripped
down power lines, left treetops in the road
and sent City of Blountstown workers scrambling
as they responded during a pair of back-to-back
thunderstorms.
"The guys hit the ground running while it was still
thundering," said Blountstown City Manager James
Woods, who credited the crews for minimizing a pair
of power outages that affected most of the city.
"When we had our first indication of a power outage,
we were still in the middle of the first thunderstorm,"
Woods said. "It was still popping lightning, but crews
went out to run the lines and figure out where our
problems were."
See CITY CREWS on page 9


ibl owling ai
make the a
Calhoun C
Walk for berDy CWalhoun C(
Day "Walk


by Teresa Eubanks, Journal Editor OL
Former Calhoun County School Board member I4
Columbus Jackson, 59, died after suffering a beart
attack at his home in Blountstown June 26.
Sen ices will be held at 2 p.m. (CT) on Wednesday. NJul
2 at the Blountstown High School auditorium.
Jackson served two terms on the school board (Nov. *S8--2
and Nov. '96-'00) and was well-known for the deep interest he look
in the county's schools.
"As a school board member, he would often take a da\ and
spend at the different schools to talk with teachers and students."
recalls Elections Supervisor Margie Laramore. \\ ho called h im
a man of great "moral courage.",She said lie often stopped
by her office to visit with the staff. "We
valued himas a friend. He will be greatly '^. *
missed," she said.
A black ribbon was on their office .
door last week, along with a written
tribute to Jackson: "A true patriot who
worked hard for his country, community,
fellow man and children, he stood up for Q
what he believed in and never wavered
when felt convicted by his Heavenly Father. He \ ill
be sorely missed."
A disabled veteran who returned from lernam n with
several medals including the Purple Heart, he later operated
a car wash on River Street but was best known for his cookouts, said his son-in-law, Kenneth


Speights.
"He was an outgoing person who loved life and would do anything he could to help someone,"
said Speights. "He loved cooking and feeding those who didn't have money. He'd have cookouts at
his house and different parts of the community." Speights recalled how after each cookout, "He'd
never take any of the food back home with him. He'd give it all away." Many in the community
have enjoyed his fried catfish, barbecue
chicken and pork ribs.
Speights said Jackson, who had 10
grandchildren and one great-grandchild,
enjoyed being with them. "He's done things
with my boys that I'd never be able to show
them," he said. Most recently, he taught
some the grandchildren how to pluck and
clean chickens before making a big pot of
chicken and dumplings. He also enjoyed
taking them fishing and hunting.
"He was a Christian who knew his Bible
WWI back to front," Speights marveled, and said
Jackson could identify chapter and verse
of any passage read out to him. "It was
iie amazing. I'd never even seen a preacher
do that."
T; 4 "He was a generous man, not just with
his family, but with the community,"
Speights said, adding, "His favorite thing
was having his cookouts and sitting around
and telling jokes."
Calhoun County School Superintendent
Mary Sue Neves recalls how Jackson
frequently visited Blountstown High
School during her time as principal. "His
main concern was that all children receive
id Anita Parrish try to avoid a few raindrops as they a quality, equitable education." She added,
annual trek across ihe bridge to join a group going from "He was a strong leader in his community
county into Liberty County for the annual Independence and in the county." She said he will
for Liberty." Find out more on page 16. be remembered as, "A voice for all the
DANIEL WILLIAMS PHOTO children in Calhoun County."


IIIII IIIJI1 Groundbreaking set for new Hosford School...4 Hospital Corner...8 PAGE TO THE PAST: LCHS Class of 1930...11
7 812 0900 8 4-H Horse Club...S Health Dept. to get $90,000 for satellite clinics...19 Obituaries...22 Classifieds...26, 27 & 28


50"
includes
lax






Page 2 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JULY 2, 2008


Marijuana, plant & paraphernalia

found inside Miller Road residence


A Liberty County man Liberty Cou
was arrested'after deputies
found more than six ounces of ARR
marijuana, a small marijuana
plant and drug paraphernalia [m j REP(
when they served a search [ I ,p
_T = urna
warrant at his home just before T'a
10 p.m. Thursday.
Timothy Allen Brown was charged %\ith cull ation
of marijuana, possession of marijuana w ith intent to
sell, possession of more than 20 grams of marijuana
and possession of drug paraphernalia.
During a search of the Miller Road residence. the
Liberty County Narcotics Unit found approximately
180 grams of marijuana and a single plant. Other items
confiscated include a set of digital scales, pipes and
plastic bags used to package the marijuana.
Brown later stated that all of the illegal items were
his and that no one else was involved. According to the
arrest report, he told investigators he had been selling
marijuana for "quite some time while trying to make
some extra money."


Shown above is a large bag of marijuana,
a marijuana plant and paraphernalia found
at the Brown home.


A Tallahassee woman and a
man being held at the Liberty
County Jail were arrested
Sunday after deputies broke
up a plan to smuggle marijuana
into the jail.
Authorities learned that
inmate Ted Edwards was
trying to. get the illegal weed
brought to the jail but could
only get it from his supplier if
he were assigned to the work
release program.
Edwards told another inmate
that he already had someone
lined up to make a delivery.
Edwards was put in the
work release program and
jail officials kept a close eye
on him after giving $140 in
marked bills to an informant,
who had talked with Edwards
about making a buy.
The men met at a
predetermined area, where a
woman identified as Conalisa
Ann Hall arrived with'
approximately 33 grams (over
one ounce) of marijuana and
handed it over to Edwards.

CLARIFICATION:
The owner of the
Blountstown Gas Mart
asks that we clarify that it
was not him, known to his
customers as 'Moe' but
an employee who
was arrested recently
for battery on a female
customer The victim
told investigators that
she thought the clerk
was called "Moe but
his real name is
Abdur R. Muskuri.


The two were arrested
once the transaction was
completed.
Edwards was charged
with purchase of a controlled
substance, possession of a
controlled substance with intent
to distribute and possession of
drug paraphernalia.


Hall was charged with sale
of a controlled substance,
possession with intent to sell,
possession of more than 20
grams of marijuana and driving
with a suspended driver's
license.
Her vehicle was also seized
by the sheriff's office.


0I, ELLIS

BARBER SHOP
Charles Ellis, Owner/Barber
Donna McLellan, Barber/Stylist
Tamara Green,. Barber
Kristen Smith, Nail Tech
18622 SR 20 W. : Blountstown Call 674-1038
,NEXT TO WHITE'S AIR CONDITIONING


GREAT AHIERWIAN
| WRESTLING FED-IRATION


THURSDAY, JULY 3

Hosford Telogia Game Room
and Entertainment Center
County Music Singer, Brittany Leigh
Starts at 7 p.m. (ET)
TICKETS:
16 for concert
18 for wrestlingrJn
12 gets You
into both shows

NO ALCOHOL
OR PROFANITY


I I T 1 I
Return of the midget wrestlers! Lad-
der match for the Junior Heavyweight
title and a four corners Bull Rope
match for the Heavyweight title.
Bell time 9 p.m. (ET)
Call (850) 379-8410 or (850) 379-8333 A


www.awagawf.com


CALHOUN COUNTY
June 23
*Billy Everett, sex offender registration viola-
tion.
June 24
*Alanski Lajay Scott, VOCC.
*Curtis Colman Burch, VOP.
*Kim Merritt Lewis, VOP (county).
June 25
*James Wiley Kelley Jr., driving while license
suspended or revoked with knowledge.
June 26
*Jacquelin Marie Brooks, VOCC.
*Jaqueline Yvette Robinson, FTA.
June 27
*Jonathan Carr, VOCP.
*David Heerema, worthless check.
*Johnny Leen Harvard Jr., VOP, possession of
firearm by felon.
*Johnny Leen Harvard Sr., possession of less
than 20 grams of marijuana, sale of marijuana.
*Donald Gillie Cruse, expired tag.
*Frederick Donovan McCormick, VOCC.
June 28
*Rounzell Brown, aggravated assault with a.
deadly weapon (3 counts).
*Lori Williams Sansom, FTA.
June 29
*Adam Brent Crenshaw, VOP (county).
*Donnell Alonzo Hills, VOP, driving while license
suspended or revoked.

LIBERTY COUNTY
June 24
*Clifton Bernard Smith, aggravated battery with
a deadly weapon.
*Uribe Siverio Caxanteje, driving while license
suspended or revoked.
June 25
*Ben Jesse Mullins III, domestic battery.
*Jennifer Parker, VOP (county).
June 26
*Carlos Madrid, DUI, no valid license, hold for
ICE.
*William Pearce, domestic violence. .
*Jacquline Brooks, holding for CCSO.
June 27
*Timothy Allen Brown, cultivation of marijuana,
possession of controlled substance with intent to
distribute, possession of more than 20 grams of
marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia.
Listingsincludehamefollowedbychargeandidentificationofarrestingagency. Thenamesaboverepresent
those charged. We remind our readers that all are presumed innocent until proven guilty.


Blountstown Police Dept.
June 23 through June 29, 2008


Citations issued:
Accidents............. 04 Traffic Citations..................01
Special details (business escorts, traffic details)......79
Business alarms.....01 Residential alarms..........00
Complaints........................ .. ........129



% RED HOT
50 off
JULY SALE!
Everything in the store!
THROUGH JULY 31 ST
Open: Tuesday Saturday
9 a.m. 4 p.m.
or call 209-7933
for private appointment, anytime.

A-Hwy.231 iANot TIto the DollaS
Hwy. 231 in Cottondale (Next to the Dollar Store)


Inmate and Tallahassee woman arrested for

trying to smuggle marijuana into county jail


1'
::
+--






JULY 2, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 3


JOHN I SANDERS

for Liberty County

Clerk of Court

"Liberty County, Florida's Best"
Hi. I am John Troy Sanders. I would
like to thank you for the years you
have allowed me to be your County
Commissioner. I humbly ask for your
vote and support for the Office of
Clerk of Circuit Court. I will strive to
comply fully with the laws of the State
of Florida, create a friendlier environ-
ment for the public and employees,
protect your deeds, records and
documents at all cost and be open
and forthcoming with any information
available to the clerk's office. I hope
you can consider me as your clerk.
Your Friend,
9odt' 76oy Satwde



1 I


Father & son arrested by drug task


force after search warrant served


The Liberty County Landfill

will be closed Saturday,

July 5, 2008 in observance


Independence Da
If you have any quest
please call Danny E. Ear
Liberty County Solid Waste Dir
at (850) 643-3


A registered sex offender who
decided to change his residence
from Calhoun County to Liberty
County had only a brief stay
before deputies brought him
back.
When Billy Everett talked
with a Liberty County deputy
on June 23, he admitted that he
had not told Calhoun County
authorities he was leaving the
Lodge Apartments on Fannin
Avenue to move to the river
landing area of Bristol.
After the deputy contacted
the Calhoun County Sheriff's
Office, Everette agreed to return
to Blountstown with him and was
taken into custody for violating
sex offender registry laws by
failing to register within 48 hours
of changing his address.
An investigator with the
Calhoun County Sheriff's
Office checked into Everette's
registration history and found
his current address was listed as
Miles Road in Kinard, although
the Florida Sex Offender Web site
showed his most recent address
to be the Lodge Apartments in
Blountstown.

CORRECTION: The heading
in last week's ad for John T
Sanders did not list the cor-
rect office for which he is
running. Please note that he
is seeking the job of Liberty
County Clerk of Court.


Calhoun County

ARREST

REPORTS
compiled by
Journal Editor
Teresa Eubanks

in the wall of the son's room.
Another plastic bag of
marijuana was located under a
chair in the living room.
While standing in the hallway,
officers noticed two rifles hanging
on the wall inthe father's bedroom.
The son, who is a convicted felon
and a registered sex offender, is
banned from access to guns. The
guns included a Marlin 30-30
lever action and a Springfield


.22-caliber rifle, which held two
rounds..
A pornographic DVD and
video were taken from the son's
room as evidence due to his status
as a sex offender.
A pill bottle containing less
than 20 grams of marijuana was
found in the kitchen, next to a
deep freeze. A small amount
of marijuana was also found in
the father's pants pocket when
-the task force first entered the
home.
Johnny Harvard Sr. was
charged with sale of marijuana
and possession of less than 20
grams of marijuana. His son,
Johnny. Harvard Jr., was arrested
for possession of a firearm by a
convicted felon.


U I A Clarksville father and son
were arrested on several charges
S 24 hours after an informant used
ly $400 in marked bills to buy a
quarter pound of marijuana,
tions, according to a report from
nest, the Calhoun County Sheriff's
sector office.
The purchase was at 11:44
p.m. Thursday as investigators
monitored the exchange at the
home of Johnny L. Harvard Sr.,
60, on Southwest State Road 73.
Members of the Calhoun-
Liberty Drug Task force returned
to the scene the following night
to serve a search warrant on the
home shared by Harvard and his
son, Johnny Harvard Jr.
During the search, investigators
found a waist pack hanging on
the wall in the father's bedroom
which contained $1,209 in cash,
including the marked bills used
in the previous night's purchase.
A pill bottle that held marijuana
seeds was found in a dresser
drawer.
A plastic bag containing
marijuana and a pack of rolling
papers was found in an open spot

Sex offender

arrested for

not reporting

new address


Man charged with hit and run
A 37-year-old Pine Island resident has been charged with three
counts of aggravated assault with a deadly weapon after he pulled
into the path of a car driven by a neighbor's teenage son, according
to a report from the Calhoun County Sheriff's Office.
The teenager told deputies he was pulling out from his home on
Bay Street when he noticed a dark color car occupied by an unknown
black male sitting stationary in the middle of the road, just east of
his residence.
As he got onto the road, the boy noticed the car suddenly driving
toward him. The driver was blowing the horn and shouting curse
words at him.
The teen started to travel westbound on Bay Street when the other
vehicle accelerated, pulled up beside him and then swerved into his
path, causing an intentional collision. The unknown vehicle continued
westbound and stopped in the middle of the road.
The teen driver then drove around the second vehicle and traveled
the block back to his home.
Two passengers in the boy's car confirmed his account of events.
The boy's mother heard the horn blaring and walked outside in time
to witness the collision.
The vehicle's tag number led deputies to the car's owner, Rounzelle
Brown. Witnesses later picked Brown out of a photo lineup of five
other men with similar features.
When investigators arrived at Brown's residence, they found
he appeared to be intoxicated and was unsteady on his feet. A car
matching the description given by witnesses was at his home and
deputies noticed a paint transfer, which matched the victim's car,
running from the right front door to the right rear fender.
Brown was then taken into custody and charged.

Juveniles found after-hours

in Altha store lumber yard
An emergency trip to the hardware store for a water pump capacitor
led to a surprise discovery of four young prowlers one night last week
in Altha.
Scott Waldorff of Waldorff Ace Hardware agreed to meet Dan
Wyrick around 7:30 p.m. on June 24 so that he could get a part to
repair his pump. They entered the store, found what they needed and
walked out the back door.
That's when Wyrick heard something. "I said, 'Scott, somebody's
in your lumber yard."'
Scott, who didn't hear the noise, said it was probably just someone
at a neighboring house until Wyrick replied, "No, I just saw somebody
jump the fence."
When Waldorff went to check out the lumber yard, Wyrick could
see someone moving around inside and warned him, "You're not
alone" as a second person jumped over the fence.
The sheriff's office was alerted and deputies were called out to
the scene. While en route, officers got the message that four suspects
were being held at the store.
The men found four juveniles, ranging in age from 13 to 15, who
had been prowling around in the lumber yard. It did not appear they
had gotten into the building.
"They said they had just jumped the fence into the lumber yard
and were 'just playing,"' according to Wyrick.
After speaking with deputies, the kids were turned over to their
parents' custody.


^f.


a






Page 4 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JULY 2, 2008


Senator Martinez

sets community

office hours in

Northwest Florida
WASHINGTON U.S. Senator Mel
Martinez (R-FL) announced Community
Office Hours in Northwest Florida to *
be held in Bay, Gulf, Franklin, Liberty,
Calhoun, Jackson and Washington
counties on Tuesday, July 22, Wednesday,
July 23 and Thursday, July 24.
"Community Office Hours events are
an opportunity for residents to meet with
members of my staff to work through
specific questions or concerns involving
federal programs. Caseworkers often help
citizens gain hard-to-find information
from federal agencies and access to their
proper benefits," Martinez said.
At Community Office Hours
events, caseworkers from the Office
of Senator Martinez are available to
assist constituents with concerns and
issues ranging from veterans benefits
issues to healthcare, Social Security,
Medicare, passport applications and
other services administered by the
federal government.
Local Community office hours are on
Wednesday, July 23 in Liberty County
from 12 to 1 p.m. (ET) at the Liberty
County Courthouse Courtroom in Bristol
and in Calhoun County from 2 to 3 p.m.
(CT) at the Calhoun County Courthouse,
Room 321 in Blountstown

AMVETS Post 2073 holds
Membership Drive July 5
You are cordially invited to the
AMVETS Post 2073 Membership
Drive. There will be free hamburgers, hot
dogs and all the trimmings. Come enjoy
an evening of Karaoke with DJ D Ray,
dancing, or shooting a game of pool
The membership drive will be held
at 6 p.m. (CT) on Saturday, July 5' at
the AMVETS Post 2073 located at the
corner of Hwy. 73 South and Hwy 20
in Clarksville.

Liberty Co. cheerleading

registration set for July 5
The Liberty County Recreation
Department will be holding cheerleading
registration for the upcoming season on
Saturday, July 5 from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m.
at the Veterans Memorial Park Civic
Center
For turthier iitiom aniloii o'wl-ict th
Liberti Count- Recreaton Department
at 4?-2 I 5 ror Genia Burke at h4-1-13'S
or 4-47-2i)-5 i

CALENDAR LISTING Just call in the
person's name and date to be listed on
our weekly community calendar. There
is no charge. Callers are asked to give
their oun name and phone number in
case we need to verily a spelling or
double-check the date.

The Calhoun-Liberty Journal is
published each Wednesday
by the Liberty Journal Inc.,
Summers Road, P.O. Box 536,
Bristol, FL 32321.
Annual subscriptions are $18.
Periodicals postage paid at Bristol, FL
POSTMASTER: Send address corrections
to: P.O. Box 536, Bristol, FL 32321.


K


ALENDAR


BIRTHDAYS ANNIVERSARIES
Avis 'Dykes, Ella 'Mae Joanne & oc
Peterson & Barbara Peterson garrett
TODAY'S MEETINGS
* Rotary Club, noon, Calhoun-Liberty Hospital
* Weight Loss Support Group, 1:30 p.m., Shelton Park Library
* AA, 7 p.m., Calhoun County Old Ag Bldg. east door, in front of jail


EVENTS -

Independence Day

Celebration & Fireworks-
7-9 p.m., Sam Atkins Park


aY BIRTHDAYS
Patricia Brake, 'DaCe 'Rogers
& 'EdcwardcBrock
r EVENTS
Dance, 6 12 p.m., American Legion Hall in Blountstown
TODAY'S MEETINGS
* Autism Support Group, 6 p.m., W.T. Neal Civic Center


BIRTHDAYS ANNIVERSARIES
Emiflee We66, Sarah Davi & Shannon
Peterson &'Jeremy 'McCtain Ziesmer
EVENTS
liberty Co. Cheerleading Registration
10 a.m. to 12 p.m, Veterans Memorial Civic Center
Florida Panhandle Saddle Club Show, 12 p.m,, Sam Atkins Park
Dance, 6 12 p.m., American Legion Hall in Blountstown


EVENTS
BIRTHDAYS Larkins Family Reunion,
J.'R q-Cumphrey 1 p.m., Veterans Memorial Civic Center
TODAY'S MEETINGS
* American Legion Post 272, 2 p.m., American Legion Hall in Blountstown
* Ladies Auxiliary, 2 p.m., American Legion Hall in Blountstown
* Sons of the American Legion, 3 p.m., American Legion Hall in Blountstown


TODAY'S MEETINGS
* Walk-A-Weigh Program, 9 a.m., Veterans Memorial Park Civic Center
* Main Street, noon, Calhoun Co. Chamber of Commerce
* Altha Boy Scouts, 5:30 p.m., Altha Volunteer Fire Department
* Liberty County Arts Council, 6 p.m., Veterans Memorial Park Civic Center
* Altha Park Committee, 6 p.m., Altha Town Hall
* Bristol City Council, 6:30 p.m., City Hall
* AA, 6:30 p.m., Liberty Co. Courthouse (west side entrance)
* Bulldog Club., 7 pm LCHS field house


BIRTHDAYS


TODAY'S MEETINGS
* Calhoun Co. School Board 5 pm Caharour, CjourthOue
* Liberty County School Board p m Litbun', E.d Adrnin renler in liitrir%'
* Calhoun County Girl Scout Troop 579 5 30 p m W T JNeal Ci.ic Cr enir
* Altha Town Council 6 pm Cr i-l Ha1ii
* Blounistown City Council. 6 p m
* Blounlstown Chapter #179 O.E.S. 7 p m DOIe LCdge
* Bristol Lions Club. p m Apalaclhee Resiauranoi
* Bristol VFD j30 p n' Bri.:ioi Ciy Halli
* AA. 6 30u p m Liberly C.- Counhci .u:ie i ':. side e-rirani:e
* Boy Scout Troop 206. 7 pm \Veierani r.lem:-ria P.r ,.i: 'Cenier


THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL


Located at 11493 NW Summers Road in Bristol
MAILING ADDRESS: P.O. Box 536, Bristol, FL 32321
TELEPHONE (850) 643-3333 Fax (850) 643-3334
EMAIL: thejournal@fairpoint.net


(USPS 012367)
Summers Road


Chicken dinner

benefit for Amie

Dumford July 7
A grilled chicken dinner benefit for
Amie Corbit Dumford is scheduled for
July 7 at noon held at the corner ofHwy.
71 and Hwy. 20 in Blountstown. Amie
is the cousin of Laura White, Kevin
Collins, and Tony Collins and the niece
of Rod Collins, all of Blountstown.
Amie Corbit Dumford, of St. Cloud,
has been fighting cancer for three years
now. First it was breast cancer. Last
year she had to have a radical double
mastectomy. She is only 28 and a mother
of a three-year-old and a five-year-old.
Now the cancer has spread to her liver.
She does not have medical insurance.
She pays out of pocket for all her
medication. Amie needs to go to the M.D.
Anderson Cancer Center in Houston,
TX. They have more technologies there
to help her. She will need to be there two
weeks to have all tests performed.
Friends are asking the community
to reach out and help us get her there.
Donations can be sent to 4047 Kaiser
Ave St. Cloud, Fl 34772 or you can
ask Amie for her Paypal info and send
donation that way, too.
She will be leaving July 13 and
returning July 25.
Grilled chicken dinners will be located
in Blountstown on the comer of Hwy 71
at the red light. This will be on July 7 at
12 noon.
There are angel fleece blankets for
a donation of $20. Call- Laura White at
643-6031 for orders.


Ground breaking for

new Hosford School
The legislature has approved funding
for the new Hosford School. The plans
have been designed and construction is to
begin immediately. The Liberty County
School Board would like to invite the
public to celebrate with us on July 12,
beginning at 9 a.m. (ET) in the historical
auditorium building.
The celebration will include a brief
history of Hosford School, recognition
of past school leadership and special
guests, an official ground-breaking, and
refreshments. Come see the plans for
our new facility and be a part of this
historical event.





That's how many copies of
The Calhoun-Liberty Journal
were distributed last week,
ensuring plenty of coverage for
your community announcements
and great response for our
business advertisers'


JOURNAL STAFF
Johnny Eubanks.................Publisher
Teresa Eubanks................... Editor
Trish Corrente...............Advertising
Angela Davis.....Production Assistant
OFFICE HOURS: 9 a.m. 6 p.m. M-F,
Saturday from 9 a.m. until 1 p.m.






JULY 2, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 5


Sunshine State Cypress Employees
If you have lost your employment because of eco-
nomic slowdown or Company restructuring, there
will be an information meeting on unemployment
benefits and retraining, presented by the Chipola
Regional Workforce Board and the One Stop Career
Center at:
Veterans Memorial Civic Center
10405 NW Theo Jenkins Lane
Bristol, Florida 32321
July 2, 2008,1 p.m. 4 p.m.



Cel-ebrate your

independence on this


Fourth of July
In observance of this
important occasion,
the Liberty County
Courthouse will be
CLOSED Friday, July 4.

Liberty County

Courthouse
Robert Hill, Clerk of Court


r





n.... -


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RE-ELECT



Patida S.





Liberty County

PROPERTY

APPRAISER
With 21 years experience!
Political advertisement paid for and approved by Patricia S. Whitfield, Democrat, Property Appraiser


PUTTING OUR


KIDS FIRST


'. )




Hiers


FOR SCHOOL

BOARD DISTRICT 2

"I promise, if elected, to do my best for
the children of Liberty County and our
school system. Your vote and support
would be greatly appreciated."
Political advertisement paid for and approved by Jed Hiers for School Board District 2.


4-H Horse Club members try


something new & get noticed


from the Liberty County Extension Office
In the last few weeks some
of the horse club members have
taken up the challenge from the
4-H Horse program book, Horses
and Horsemanship, "...this
being to display the horse at his
best, doing what he does best."
Sometimes what was learned
when someone first started riding
and what may be popular in the
area is not the style the horse or
rider will excel at. Figuring out
the style one's horse will do best
and asking the rider to learn that
new style can be a big change.
Ashley Coleman and her horse
Renegade have started something
not normally seen in this area,
Saddle seat. Stemming from the
traditional pleasure horse, Saddle
seat has transformed all the way
to the high-stepping action of
the rack from the five-gaited
saddlebred to the smooth running
walk of the Tennessee Walker.
Ashley and Renegade are
focusing on Renegade's ability
to show the natural three-gaited
classes and Ashley in Equitation,
where the rider is judged on their
body position and teamwork with
their horse. Ashley, who started
riding Western, was amazed at
how much work and retraining of
one's body it takes for both horse
and rider. As her passion for the
Trail class showed through earlier
this year, she was relieved to find
out she can compete in Trail in the
Saddle seat style.
Josie Bruffett and her horse
Rowdy Cowboy made a big
change from Speed to Hunt
seat. Hunt seat comes from the
traditional European Fox Hunt
where a horse with a long flowing
stride that is a comfortable,
mannerly mount, and is one that
could go all day in pursuit of the
hounds and fox. An addition to
that is Hunt seat Over Fences,
which is based on the expectation
that the horse would follow the
hounds by jumping over hedge
rows, rock walls, wooden fences,


Josie Bruffett and her horse Rowdy Cowboy are shown above. Below is
Ashley Coleman with her horse Renegade. Both girls are from Bristol.


A


or other natural objects found
along their path in the fields.-
Not only has Josie begun
molding Rowdy into a Hunter
Horse, but they have taken on
the added challenge of "horse
gymnastics" to start building
his foundation for jumping.
With Josie's need for speed the
gymnastics will help develop
Rowdy's body and give him the
ability to really use himself over
fences (jumps), around a set of
barrels or through the poles.
After only a few weeks of
training the girls tried out their
new skills on June 21 at the Leon
County Horsemen's Association
Show. The show offered many


Youth and adult volunteers needed
to help write Liberty County history
Liberty County's Heritage Book Committee is in need of volunteers
from youth groups such as JROTC, 4-H, Beta Club, Boy Scouts, Girl
Scouts and churches to assist in updating burial information, dating
from 1998 to the present, for all of our county's cemeteries.
During 1998 and 1999, Cheryl Raffield made her massive listing
for all of Liberty's cemeteries, which were later placed on the internet
at USGenWeb and are available for research. Because our Heritage
book will go to press on September 30, 2008, we need volunteers
to begin work now. Adults are needed to provide transportation,
supervise youth and coordinate efforts.
Charlotte Strutko, who may be contacted at 643-5561, is in charge
of Lake Mystic Cemetery. Linda Edinfield, who may be contacted at
379-8524, is in charge of cemeteries in Hosford and Telogia areas.
Rachel Shuler Davis, who may be contacted at 643-4798, is in charge
of the cemeteries at White Springs and those along Hoecake Road.
Supervisors are needed for cemeteries in other county areas such as
Bristol, Rock Bluff, Sumatra, Orange and Blue Creek.
Please contact Fran Rigsby at 643-5466 if you know of cemeteries
or isolated burials on private lands so that arrangements may be made
with landowners or land managers.


classes to allow the girls to ride at
a level they were comfortable at
with their new styles. They even
talked a volunteer into riding
Rowdy Cowboy in the Senior
Hunt seat Pleasure class in an
illustration of practice what you
preach. It was a great learning
experience for everyone.
There were Mini Horses shown
at halter, Paso Finos showing
their unique gaits, and plenty
of new things to ask questions
about. Ashley and Josie made all
there to cheer them on proud by
showing great sportsmanship,
and wonderfully placing in every
class they entered. Girls, your
hard work at your new styles
is paying off and you and your
horses are become more versatile.
The astonishing realization of
the more you know the better
horseperson you will become is
sinking in, even if it means one
must add a new style to their
repertoire.

Note: The horse club is still
accepting new members with
and without horses. Just because
you don't have a horse doesn't
mean you can't join. 4-H has
a Horseless Horse project for
those 8-18 years old that have
a passion for horses. For more
information stop by one of the
club 's workshops on'Tuesdays
and Thursdays or call the
Extension Office at 643-2229 for
club contact information.






Page 6 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JULY 2, 2008





















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- he Fourth of July brings out
the best in most Americans.
Patriotism, which is
generally defined as love of country,
abounds on this special day. Flags
wave and patriotic songs are sung. It's
a good thing.
For my family and for me, the
most memorable Fourth of our lives
occurred when we lived in Northern
Virginia, and I worked in the Pentagon.


ORNER
Jerry Cox is a retired military
officerand writer with an extensive
background in domestic and
foreign policy issues. He lives in
Okaloosa County.


We spent the day and the evening on the Washington
Mall with thousands of other people, all Americans at
least in spirit and all united in a common bond of love
of country. The fireworks display was magnificent.
Patriotism is abstract, difficult to define. The
difficulty stems from the question of what is America
and what is an American.
am In my view, America is a result of the belief in an
ideal, an ideal stated in Declaration of Independence
that all men are created equal and that they are
endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable
Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty, and the
pursuit of Happiness.
The America of 2008 is decidedly different from
the America of 1776. Remarkable changes have
occurred in America in the intervening 232- years
S ^ since the Second Continental Congress declared
*o -- % America's independence from Great Britain.
4- W am In 1776 there were approximately 2.5 million
- *a *l people living in the 13 colonies. Today, America's
- t .wft population is approximately 300 million or about
S, 100 times greater than in 1776. America today is
a potpourri of people, a mix of ethnic races from
everywhere, all of whom are chasing the American
Dream.
What is America and American patriotism all
about? Are we the great nation that we think we are?
Most people will say yes because in our national
DNA there is a belief that America and Americans
are exceptional. We believe that we are exceptional
because we collectively believe that our ideals set us
apart from other societies and other countries.
The great American experiment in democracy is
still unfolding. Most of us believe that the final act
of America's role in the international community is


yet to be played out.
Patriotism is a major playing card
'in the ongoing presidential debates.
Which presidential candidate is
the most patriotic? They both are
patriots. John McCain epitomizes
the stalwart American military
hero. Now a presumed candidate
for president of the United States,
Barack Obama, an African-
American of mixed race raised by


a single mother epitomizes the American dream of
rags to riches.
Patriotic symbols matter, but not always in a
positive sense. We all choke up when the American
flag is waving in the evening breeze and the refrains
of America the Beautiful fill the air.
But patriotic symbols can also divide people
depending on their idea ofpatriotism. The presidential
candidates were in a tiff about who was or was not
wearing a lapel pin flag. Some people become
incensed when protesters burn the American flag.
While flag burning is an unpatriotic event for
some, it is an expression of individual rights for
others. The argument can be made that both are right
and both are wrong. While immensely satisfying,
living in a democratic society requires a tremendous
amount of tolerance for the ideas, beliefs and actions
of others.
In my view, our collective embrace of democracy
is the underpinning, the foundation of America's
greatness. We all love this place called America,
but there are cracks in the foundation of this
great country. The fundamental precepts of the
Constitution are being violated. The separation of
power between the executive and legislative branches
has been skewed to a dangerous level. The checks
and balances of government which are basic to
our well being as American citizens are practically
nonexistent. The Rule of Law which is fundamental
to our concept of democracy has been politicized
to a degree that threatens the basic concepts of the
democratic process.
On this Fourth of July, let's hope that the future
brings a rebirth of the America that was created on
July 4, 1776.


. . . . . . . . .. ..~
: .t *'I






JULY 2, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 7


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Page 8 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JULY 2, 2008


Elected officials make new equipment possible


I mentioned in last month's article the
great news that we would be getting lots of
new equipment soon to go along with a lot
we've recently purcfiased. Let me expand
on that a little.
While discussing this, I would like
to thank Congressman Allen Boyd and
Senator Bill Nelson for the wonderful
support they've provided to this hospital.
Both have been tremendously helpful in getting
a lot of the money for equipment through the
United States Department ofAgriculture (USDA)
through grants and low interest loans.
And State Representative Marti Coley and
Senator Al Lawson have been invaluable to us
with their support at the state level. State grants
are of tremendous benefit to us.
We're truly blessed to have such wonderful
elected officials helping us out. A huge thank
you to Congressman Boyd, Senator Nelson,
Representative Coley and Senator
Lawson!
Congressman Boyd's staff in Tallahassee
was also a life saver for us this past year 1
in another area. We had a tough time with
Medicare over some audits, resulting in r
their withholding all payments due to us.
These audits were for claims filed several
years ago, before the hospital was regained .
by the local Hospital Association. E
The outstanding efforts of Mr. Boyd's p<
staff were instrumental in our finally P(
getting -this mess straight and Medicare C
paying us again. Without their efforts, we
would have been in serious trouble. We
are most thankful to Congressman Boyd
for this. He is truly a friend of Calhoun-
Liberty Hospital.
Back to the equipment, we will soon s
be purchasing a lot of items that will F
greatly improve the care we provide to SU
you. For example, we will be replacing or
our old radiology unit with a new state- 5Y'
of-the-art machine. We'll also soon have-
a new portable x-ray unit as well as a new
ultrasound machine. All of these items
will add to our ability to provide superb |f
diagnostic services to our doctors as they
care for you.
We're buying several new beds. Some of
them will be of the type that allows you to
be weighed while in the bed. This will be
of wonderful benefit to both our patients 05 D
and our staff. We also have new vital sign
monitors to assist our nursing staff in
serving you while an inpatient.
We're getting a new microbiology unit 65G
for our laboratory. This will, again, help
our doctors in treating you faster. We
recently received a new "bi-pap" machine
to aid our respiratory therapists in treating
you for breathing problems. All of this
equipment is, again, truly "state-of-the-
art."
While not as fancy sounding as the above
clinical equipment, we will also be getting 07
a new emergency generator, assuring our q
hospital stays operational regardless of any
power outages that may occur.
We are also upgrading and repairing
our heating and air conditioning system
through-out the hospital. This will keep
you and our staff nice and comfortable
year round. We will replace many old


Hospital Corner

by Rorn Gilliard,
CLHAdministrator

units that have been in use in the hospital for
several years Re
We recently got a big new stove, a new ice thi
machine, a serving cart for our inpatient meals, nc
and several other new items for the kitchen. Our ite
dietary staff is very proud of these items since it yo
all helps them help you! in
We just installed a new automatic pharmacy th,
dispensing machine in our Emergency Room.
This goes along with new stretchers, wheelchairs an
and other equipment in this busy area. All 67


CALHOUN-LIBERTY


12g


designed to serve you better.
We're also upgrading our "computer" side
of the hospital and are very excited about
this. It's unusual for such a small hospital to
be improving so much in this'area, especially
the ways we have planned. And again, it's all
designed to improve the quality and safety
of the care we provide to you.
So, again, we are most thankful to
Congressman Boyd, Senator Nelson,
-presentative Coley and Senator Lawson for
eir great support. Without it, we simply would
it be able to purchase all the wonderful new
ems mentioned here. Their efforts are allowing
ou to receive top-notch health care right here
Blountstown. And at $4 + per gallon, we feel
at's a good thing!
If you have any questions on the above or on
anything about the hospital, give me a call at
'4-5411, ext 206.






JULY 2, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 9


Storm leaves little damage

behind in Liberty Co.; NOAA

radio purchase recommended
by Teresa Eubanks, Journal Editor
Despite a pair of fierce thunderstorms
Monday morning, Liberty County escaped -i ,
with only a momentary power outage
and a few debris-filled yards and roads, i 6-
according to Emergency Management
Director Rhonda Lewis.
She said at least one homeowner had
reported roof damage from a storm last week. She was
not aware of any homes affected by Monday's bad weather.
Liberty County got off easy this time but the community may not be
so fortunate with future storms. Lewis is urging residents to purchase
their own National Oceanic andAtmospheric Administration (NOAA)
weather radio so they will have the most up-to-date warning.
NOAA Weather Radio(NWR) broadcasts official Weather Service
warnings, watches and forecasts 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. The
NWR is an "All Hazards" radio network which issues information
about many emergencies, weather-related as well as all types of
hazardous events, while working in conjunction with federal, state
and local emergency managers.
She said you don't have to spend a lot of money on the most
elaborate model available. "Thirty to $35 will buy you one that's
good," she said. They are available in many chain stores and they
can be ordered locally though Ace Hardware.


SI I CR~YEyrWinued flrom the frontjIpageqI


By the time the rain let up
the first time, they had a good
assessment of the damages and
got to work.
"All five members of our
electrical crew were out. I was
running around doing spot checks.
We had all of the street crew out
picking up tree limbs and getting
stuff out of the road. Crews were
sent to dig ditches to keep homes
from flooding," he said.
"The storm hit the city in
small areas in several places," he
explained. "We think a lightning
strike along a power line on State
Road 20 blew out six to eight
fuses. In addition to that, we also
had some power lines go down
on Walnut, Orange and Juniper
Streets."
Many trees were snapped in
two by powerful winds, including
one "very healthy tree on Margaret
Street that was snapped off just


three or four feet off the ground,"
he said. "A number of oak trees
were twisted like the wind had
grabbed them and rinsed them,"
he said, explaining the damaged
trees "indicated a much more
severe wind force that anyone
had thought."
He said city workers managed
to restore power and remove the
bulk of the debris in the road by
the time the second storm band
hit about 45 minutes later. The
biggest problem after that was a
ground fault on the city's main
service line. "It did what it was
supposed to do," Woods said, "It
tried to clear the fault three times
and then shut down the electricity
on the system."
After identifying where the
fault occurred, crews had the
lines cleared within 30 minutes
and power restored. "We spent
the rest of the day running around


for LIBERTY COUNTY SHERIFF


We Know Him, Trust Him and Support Him


Please Stand With Us and Elect






Sheriff of Liberty County
Political Advertisement Paid for and Approved by Donnie Conyers, Democrat for Sheriff


trying to take care of areas where
lines were down on the ground,"
he said.
"Everybody really pulled
together today and did a wonderful
job to bring the city back to a
functioning situation as quickly
as could feasibly be done," he
said.
At least one resident was
impressed and he didn't waste
any time sending out an email to
commend city workers.
"I observed the storm that
passed through this morning first
hand through the windows of
Main Street Station Restaurant,"
wrote business owner David
Avalos. "The wind gusts must
have been in excess of 50 mph.
Just as I stated to my wife that
we probably were about to loose
power, we did. But to my surprise,
it was back within two seconds.
Another lightning strike seconds
later produced another power
outage, but again the power
came back within two seconds.
I have no doubt that the lack of
a long-term power outage is due
in great measure to the diligent
work of our City Manager (who
could be seen driving the streets
of Blountstown with emergency
flashers on during and after the
storm) and the members of our
City Council. In the past, I have
no doubt that such a storm would
have rendered our city powerless
for a long time."
Avalos concluded, "Thank
you all for your hard work that
has resulted in a more stable,
secure power grid in the City of
Blountstown. This is one more
reason why no one should hesitate
to choose Calhoun County as an
excellent place to live, work and
play."

Tucker named

Master Logger
LAKE CITY- Wayne Tucker,
of Tucker Trucking and Logging,
in Bristol, has completed a three-
day education program designed
to train timber harvesters in safe,
efficient and environmentally
sound logging practices.
Completion of this training earned
Tucker the industry designation
of Master Logger: a professional
logger with at least one successful
year of operating experience.
Tucker returns to Liberty
County with enhanced credentials
to offer logging and forestry
services in this growing segment
of the local and state economy.
Forestry contributes $128 million
to the Liberty County economy.
Approximately 1,044 employees
work directly in the county's forest
industry, which generates a $38.1
million payroll. Forest products
and paper companies within the
state collectively generate $16.6
billion in manufactured products
and create over 133,000 jobs in
local communities.
Tucker traveled to Lake City,
where he participated in sessions
with 28 other participants.


---P-------is31+1~ ~- IT ~~-~~~-~-i~r~-- ~----ii~U~ir` -- ---- i~iiii-~l~i~iiiic~iiur- i~iili~iiC~~'~LL~S-c13i3i-` ~-li~--~iijliiCii~i







Page 10 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JULY 2, 2008


Special Music
& Concerts
SOUTHSIDE.ASSEMBLY
OF GOD Southside Assembly
of God invites you to a night of
southern gospel music with the
Williamsons from Crestview on
Sunday night, July 6, starting at
5 p.m.
The Williamsons are a touch
of country and a dab of bluegrass,
but mostly good 'ole southern
gospel.
Frank and Carol Williamson
introduced their 10- and 12-year-
old children to gospel music in
the early 1970s (The Williamson
Family, Crestview) and their
weekend ministry covered
thousands ofmiles with hundreds
of concerts for over 30 years.
The children are grown and have
gone their own ways but Frank
and Carol continue to spread the
Lord's word as a duo. Frank and
Carol also serve as minister of
music and pianist, respectively,
at the Red Oak Baptist Church


The Liberty County 4-H Horse
Club would like to recognize the
following for their hard work and
donations during the month of June
in helping maintain the McRaeArena
and equipment which have kept the
kids learning, training, and riding:
Board of County Commissioners,
Jim Johnson, County Road
Department, Strickland's Ace,
Benny's BP, AA Caf6 of Hosford,
Jimmy Faircloth, Deloris Bryant
Davis, Marie Goodman, Scott Katy,
Lonnie Hopkins, Robert Hill and
Ben Cobb.
Liberty County 4-H Horse Club

The Calhoun County AAA All
star team would like to express
their gratitude to all the people
who helped us raise over $6500
at our Bog-in on Saturday, June
28. There are several people who
played a part in making this happen
and it took a lot of hard 'work.
Thank you to Freddie Davis and
the Altha Park Committee, who


Dr. Iqbal Faruqui
Board Certified

Internal Medicine


north of Baker when they are not
in concert.
The church is located on
Hwy. 71, two miles south of
Blountstown.
Fellowship & Events
BLOUNTSTOWN UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH -
Hey kids (of all ages) on July 13
Blountstown United Methodist
Church will host Puppets for
Christ, a teen ministry from Van
Dykes United Methodist Church.
This award winning ministry
began with Children's church


helped tremendously and gave
their own personal time to come
out and work. The Altha Baseball
Booster Club, Bennett Eubanks Oil
Co., the Calhoun County Sherriff's
Department, Kenneth Waldorff,
Shay and Rick Johnson, Grice
and Sons, Smith's Supermarket,
Daffin's Food Service, Joe
Williford, Dan Bontrager, Wayne
Wimberly, Jimmy Mathis, the Town
ofAltha, Altha Church of God, Ray
Goodwin, our cable hook up guys,
and all the racers and spectators.
Thank you for donating items and
also for all of your support. I would
personally like to thank the parents
who helped me get this together in
such a short amount of time and
sacrifice their time to help get the
park ready. Thank you everyone for
all the donations and support. We
hope to represent Calhoun County
well at the State Tournament in
Lakeland starting on July 5.
Calhoun County AAA
All-Star team


and has become a model for
many other puppet ministries in
the USA. PFC has also been able
to help with creating puppets for
other churches to use in their own
ministries, and have sent puppets
to churches in Uganda, Cuba and
Haiti.
Their mission statement is
"to seek out believers and non-
believers both young and old to
creatively and joyfully express
God's word through creative
arts and puppetry and to boldly
go where no puppet has gone
before!
Remember Sunday, July 13
at 6 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall.
Admission is free and the public
is invited to join us for an evening
of worship and fun. We are
located across from Subway.
Vacation Bible
School/Backyard
Bible Clubs
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
OF BRISTOL Join a trail ride
through the desert Southwest and
experience a great adventure with
First Baptist Church of Bristol's
Club VBS: Cactus Canyon.
First Baptist Church of Bristol
invites all children who will be
entering grades Kindergarten
through fifth grade to our annual
Club VBS.
Club VBS: Cactus Canyon will
be held at First Baptist Church
of Bristol on Sunday, July 13
through Wednesday, July 12 from
12 to 2 p.m. at our location on '
10677 Michaux Road in Bristol.
All children must be accompanied
by parents/guardian.


Arlena Falcon, ARNP

Dorcas Goodman, ARNP


WE ARE ACCEPTING NEW PATIENTS!!

Our Services include: Non-Complicated Pediatric Care; Comprehen-
sive Adult & Elderly Care; Women's Healthcare Family Planning, Free
Mammograms & Female Exam for eligible persons; Physicals Sports,
School, Pre-Employment & DOT; Blood Work; EKG; PFT; Allergy & B-12
injections; Cancer & Diabetes Screenings.

Call us today to get your appointment scheduled.
We are PPO providers for BCBS, United Healthcare & Cigna
Also accept Vista, Healthease, Medicare & Medicaid
Walk-ins are welcome!! Now accepting VISA & MASTERCARD


For more information, please
call 643-5400. Come and ride
with us!
HILLCREST BAPTIST
CHURCH Aloha! Surf's up
at Hillcrest Baptist Church. Come
join us at Vacation Bible School as
we journey to 'Outrigger Island'
Sunday, July 6 thru Wednesday,
July 9 from 6:30 to 9 p.m. We
will have fun, food, games, crafts,
music, puppet shows, spacewalk,
and Bible lessons. We will be
having a special family night on
Wednesday, and will be collecting
a Mission Offering each night for
Liberia. So, please come and join
us in fellowship and worship in
learning about 'Living God's
Unshakeable Truth.'
Prayer Meetings
PRAYER BAND The
Liberty Community Prayer Band
will hold prayer service Thursday,
July 3 at 7:30 p.m. (ET) at the
home of Brother and Sister James
Lane.
Everyone is cordially invited
to attend. For more information,
call 643-5958.


LIQUIDATION

LAND SALE

10 ACRE plus Tracts
From $3,995 per acre
$995 Total Down

OWNER FINANCING,
No Qualifying

Tri-land Inc.
R. E. Broker i
Phone (813) 253-3258


June 30-July 6 2008


AM.2 Old Farmer's aULYb
NerwMoon Almanatac Best days to
end projects

JULULYY2
uly Best d1jcuLs to graft or
Canada Day pollinate


DS n addition to idents John Adams and Thomas
i Icommemorat- Jefferson, both died on July 4 in
ing Independence Day 1826. This was also the day, in
for the United 845, that Henry David Thoreau
States, July 4 is started his sojourn in the woods at
notable for other anniversaries. Walden Pond near Concord, Mass-
Nathaniel Hawthorne, who wrote achusetts. And on this day in 1855.
"The House of the Seven Gables," poet Walt Whitman published the
was born on this day in 1804. Pres- first copies of "Leaves of Grass."


4 cloves garlic, minced
1 cup chopped onions
1/2 cup olive oil
1 cup chopped fresh tomatoes
1/4 cup chopped black olives
2 tablespoons soy sauce
1 cup orange juice
1/4 cup brown sugar
2 tablespoons apple cider
vinegar
1/4 cup chopped parsley


Saute the garlic and onions In the olive oil;
add the tomatoes and cook un-
til reduced by about half Add
the remaining ingredients,
simmer for 20 minutes. and
use as a marinade or
grilling sauce fori beef,
poultry, or lamb. MAKES
ABOUT 2-1/2 CUPS.


WIT AND WISDOM FROM THE OLD FARMER'S ALMANAC
SAs the dog days commence, so they end.
j If pineapples are fully ripe, they should be
reefrigerated.
j U On June 30. 1906, the Meat Inspection Act
became law.
FOR RECIPES. GARDENING TIPS, AND WEATHER FORECASTS. VISIT:
Almanac.com


HIODEN'I

1 TREASURES
by Ryan McDougald

Pray Always
Text: Ephesians 6:10-18
Paul Lee Tan asks, "What
would you think of a man who had
$1,000,000 in the bank and only
withdrew one penny per day?" Tan *
says that is like many Christians.
As a praying Christian, we have a
wealth of resources available to us
but we fail to use it.
We have the God of the universe
listening attentively to our prayers.
We have Christ Jesus, our Great
High Priest, interceding for us at
the right of the Father. We have
the Holy Spirit helping us pray in
groans that words cannot express.
We have a God who loved us
enough to die for us. We have a
God who is so concerned about us
that He numbers the hairs on our
heads. He is all powerful and has
promised to move mountains in re-
sponse to faith as small as a mus-
tard seed. He is all knowing and
has promised to give us wisdom
generously without holding back.
He is everywhere and has prom-
ised never to leave ufs or forsake
us. And yet we spend very little
time in prayer communicating to
him and trusting him with our cares
and concerns.
If we are going to overcome
temptation and evil, we must pray.
The battle that we wage with Sa-
tan is won on our knees in prayer.
Barnes says, "No matter how com-
plete the armour;. no matter how
skilled we may be in the science
of war; no matter how courageous
we may be, we may be certain that
without prayer we shall be defeated.
God alone can give the victory..."
God strengthens the weak, en-
courages the discouraged, forgives
the guilty, heals the broken hearted,
.works, moves, interacts, and inter-
venes in your life all through prayer.
This quote is attributed to Satan,
"Blessed is he who has no time
to pray, for he will become easy
prey." Pray.


The Medical Center

OF BLOUNTSTOWN






JULY 2, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 11


OLD 1PAR3MS


AL


AXAC


Copyrighted Material


Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers


- -


- -w -


- _


- -e -


a - -


THE 1930 LCHS TENTH-GRADE CLASS


Members of Liberty
County High School's tenth-
grade class are shown above
with their teacher, Mr. Blue,


lined up in front of the wood-frame school building that stood
on Pea Ridge Road in Bristol.
This was a time when money was scarce as the country fell
under the shadow of the Great Depression. According to the
Web site, thepeoplehistory.com, gas was ten cents a gallon in
1930 and the average price of a new car was $629. Steak was
20 cents a pound, a dozen eggs sold for 18 cents and a loaf


of bread could be had for
about eight cents.
Class members pictured
above include, FRONT ROW:


Omy Richards, Audrey (Polly) Shuler, Sue Oliver, Elenezar
Strickland, Martha Shuler, Willie Larkins and Rita Mae Preacher.
SECOND ROW: Helen Revell, E.J. Rankin, Richard Smith, Mr.
Blue, J.W. Weaver, Vernon Suimmers and Mary Shuler. THIRD
ROW: Lee Spence, Rayburn Peddie, Hudson Strickland,
William Long, Herschel Richards, Edwin (Pete) Shuler and
Bob Robertson.


This is one in a series offeatures submitted for a history and heritage book on Liberty County. Journal readers
are invited to submit their own family photos, histories and remembrances for the book by contacting
Family Chairperson Vance Bateman or Topical Chairperson Fran Rigsby at email: frzy85@gtcom.net or
I Heritage PublishingConsultants at 1-800-568-1611or by e-mail at heripubcon@aol.com.


JULY 2, WEDNESDAY
- New Moon. Moon rides
high. Charles Guiteau shot
and fatally wounded U.S.
president James Garfield,
1881. Actor Jimmy Stewart
died, 1997.
JULY 3, THURSDAY
- Dog days begin. Idaho
became the 43rd state to
enter the Union, 1890. The
temperature in Allentown,
Pennsylvania, reached 105
degrees Fahrenheit, 1966.
JULY 4, FRIDAY In-
dependence Day. Earth
at aphelion. Lewis Car-
roll's "Alice's Adventures
in Wonderland" published,
1865. 'Astronomer Hen-
rietta Swan Leavitt born,
1868.
JULY 5, SATURDAY -
Moon at descending node.
Sixteen horses killed by
hailstones in Rapid City,
South Dakota, 1891. Mu-
sician Huey Lewis born,
1950.
JULY 6, SUNDAY -
Conjunction of Mars and
the Moon. Conjunction of
Saturn and the Moon. First
Atlantic crossing by a diri-
gible completed, Scotland
to New York, 1919.
JULY 7, MONDAY -
Moon on equator. Mother
Frances Xavier Cabrini
became the first Ameri-
can saint to be canonized,
1946. Figure skater Mi-
chelle Kwan born, 1980.
JULY 8, TUESDAY -
Sieur de Monts National
Monument established (lat-
er named Acadia National
Park), Maine, 1916. U.S.
first lady Grace Coolidge
died, 1957.


a.%.i


--------------


- *


- -


*


-


- 4


.L~f~."r ta 1~5e ~Srdf






Page 12 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JULY 2, 2008


Dean's List announced


MARIANNA-
Dr. Sarah Clemmons,
vice president of
Instructional and
Student Services at
Chipola College,
commends the 73
students who made
the Dean's List for
academic achievement during the
Summer I Semester 2008.
To be placed on the Dean's
List, a student must take 6 or more
semester hours of courses and
make an average of 3.25 (B+) to
4.0 (A) in all courses.
Students who made perfect
averages of 4.0-straight A's-
and their hometowns are:
Altha-Carla D. Duggar.
Bristol-Mary N.. Ethridge.
Marianna-Shawna R.
Carlberg, Britton B. Dennis, III,


Sohail S. Lakhani,
Jennifer L. Lancette,
Sean P. McGann,
Stephen A. Young.
Students who
937 -r earned grade point
averages ranging
from 3-.25(B+) to
3.99 (A) and their
hometowns are:
Altha-Sue E. Champion,
Christy N. Culpan, Valerie M.
Gonzalez.
Blountstown-Jessica A.
Fields.
Bristol-Cynthia R. Baggett,
Jordon M. Shuler.
Marianna-Jessica K. Davis.
Melissa Gnann, Shelita L. Grant,
Robert B. McKibben, Kristen A.
Paul, Portia S. Pollock, Kelly M.
Stahl, Christopher E. Truette,
Megan L. Weaver.


Continuing education courses set
MARIANNA--Chipola College will offer a variety of short courses
in the coming weeks.
An Internship course will meet Thursdays, Aug. 21 through Dec.
4 from 6 to 9 p.m. Cost is $191. A Child Growth & Development
course will meet Mondays, Aug. 25 through Dec. 8 from 6 to 9 p.m.
Cost is $191. An Early Care & Education Administrative Overview
course will meet Tuesdays, Aug. 26 through Dec. 9 from 6 to 9 p.m.
Cost is $191.
A Real Estate Sales course will meet Saturdays and Sundays,
Sept. 13, 14, 27, 28 & Oct. 11, 12, 26, from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Cost is
$250.
Education To Go offers online programs in: computers,
photography, languages, writing,. entertainment, grant writing,
business, sales, accounting, test prep, finance, health, child care,
parenting, art, history, psychology, literature, statistics, philosophy,
engineering, law and nursing. For dates and course outlines, visit
www.ed2go.com/chipola.
For information about any of these non-credit courses, call
718-2395.


Pvt. Fredrick Crutchfield graduates

Infantryman Training at-Fort Benning
Army Pvt. Frederick L. Crutchfield has graduated from the Infantryman
One Station Unit Training at Fort Benning, Columbus, Ga. The training
consists of Basic Infantry Training and Advanced Individual Training.
During the nine weeks of basic combat training, the soldier received
training in drill and ceremonies, weapons employment, map reading,
tactics, military courtesy, military justice, physical fitness, first aid skills,
and Army history, core values and traditions. Additional training included
development of basic combat skills and battlefield operations and tactics,
and experienced use of various weapons and weapons defenses available
to the infantry crewman.
The Advanced Individual Training course is designed to train infantry
soldiers to perform reconnaissance operations; employ, fire and recover
anti-personnel and anti-tank mines; locate and neutralize land mines and
operate target and sight equipment; operate and maintain communications
equipment, and radio networks; construct field firing aids for infantry
weapons; and perform infantry combat exercises and dismounted battle
drills, which includes survival procedures in a nuclear, biological or
chemical contaminated area.
Crutchfield is the grandson of Ronnie and Faye Bishop of
Blountstown.

Connelly graduates from basic training
Army Pvt. Jonathan I. Connelly has graduated from basic combat
training at Fort Jackson, Columbia, S.C.
During the nine weeks of training, the soldier studied the Army
mission, history, tradition and core values, physical fitness, and received
instruction and practice.in basic combat skills, military weapons, chemical
warfare and bayonet training, drill and ceremony, marching, rifle
marksmanship, armed and unarmed combat, map reading, field tactics,
military courtesy, military justice system, basic first aid, foot marches,
and field training exercises.
Connelly is the son of Christopher Connelly of Blountstown and Becky
Lee of Stewart Drive, Panama City.
The private is a 2006 graduate of Haney Technical School, Panama
City.


Egg
-app::.,:,


JAVON PRIDE
Javon Pride will celebrate
his sixth birthday on July
2. His parents are John-
nie Pride of Gretna and
LaToya Pride of Bristol.
His grandparents are An-
toinette Monlyn of Bristol,
Joseph Baker of Blount-
stown, Francis Pride of
Gretna, and Johnnie Pride,
Sr. of Quincy. His great-
grandparents are Josie Bell
Reeves and Hamilton Bak-
er of Blountstown and the
late Mary Monlyn and Is-
real Baker of Blountstown.
Javon enjoys riding his four
wheeler, playing basketball
and baseball, going to the
park and hanging out with
Rekia, Reico Jr., Jay and
his favorite cousin, Quinn.
Javon will celebrate with
a Transformer pool par-
ty on Saturday, July 5 at
his home with family and
friends.


KALY BROOK
PARTRIDGE
Kaly Brook Partridge
is celebrating her ninth
birthday on July 2. Her
parents are Kevin and Amy
Partridge of Bristol. Her
grandparents are Jack and
Cathy Revell of Bristol and
Daniel and Fannie Partridge
of Sumatra. Her great-
grandparents are Horace
and Joyce Cushing of
Tallahassee and Nelle Brock
of Havana. Kaly enjoys
riding her horse, Flicka,
going to the river, shopping,
talking on the phone to her
friends and watching the
Disney Channel with her
sister, Kacy.


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JULY 2, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 13


Loggerhead sea turtle

is a new state symbol


Starting July 1,
the loggerhead sea
turtle is the official-
Florida saltwater
reptile.
According
to the Florida
Fish and Wildlife
Conservation
Commission (FWC),


the loggerhead sea
turtle (scientific name: Caretta
caretta) is the most common
sea turtle to nest along Florida's
coast. Its designation as the
official Florida saltwater reptile
recognizes this threatened species
at a time when loggerhead nest
counts are down.
*Typically, about 90 percent of
loggerhead nests in the United
States are in Florida. Almost half
the loggerhead nests in the world
occur on Florida's beaches.
Over the past 19 years, Florida's
loggerhead sea turtle nest counts
have declined 37 percent. The
species nests from late April until
September in Florida. Hatchlings
emerge after incubating in warm
sand for two months.
The FWC credits students
from the Florida State University
School's Middle School Science
Honors Class for pursuing the
state symbol designation during
the 2007-08 school year and


d


Brown, Lee to exchange vows
Jordan Alexis Lee, along with the
bride and groom's parents, is proud to
announce the forthcoming marriage of
Jennifer Fay Brown to Jamie Dewayne
Lee. .a .


the 2008 legislative
session.
Le The loggerhead
sea turtle was one
of four symbols the
students proposed for
addition to the state
list. Working with
State Representative
Curtis Richardson
(D-Tallahassee), the
students provided information and
answered questions regarding the
symbols. Richardson amended
an already-existing state symbol
bill to include the loggerhead sea
turtle.
The FWC's Imperiled Species
Management Section administers
protection and conservation of
Florida's sea turtles with funding
from a sea turtle specialty license
plate, which also features a
loggerhead hatchling, and from
annual sea turtle decal sales.
FWC staff assists with research,
recovery, beach constructionpermit
review, lighting issues, educational
materials and administration in
addition to coordinating a network
of volunteers around the state who
record and monitor sea turtle nests
during nesting season.
For more information about
FWC sea turtle research and
management programs, visit
MyFWC.com.


The bride's parents are Fay Brown
and Michael Bishop of Blountstown
and Coy "Jackie" Brown and Erica
Hare of Sneads. Jennifer's maternal
grandparents are Dorothy and
Floyd DeVane of Kinard. Paternal
grandparents are Kathleen and Jim
Pullen of Grand Ridge and the late Coy
Gene Brown of Blountstown.
Jennifer is a 2000 graduate of
Blountstown High School. She
attended Chipola College and the
University of West Florida where
she received a bachelor's degree
in Exceptional Student Education.
Jennifer is employed with the Liberty
County School Board.
The groom's parents are Annette Hill
and Eddie Lee, both of Blountstown.
Jamie's maternal grandparents are
the late Jeannette and Junior Hill of
Blountstown. Paternal grandparents
are Minnie Lee and the late James Lee of
Blountstown.
Jamie is a 1998 graduate and is employed with
the Department of Children and Family Services
and works with Florida State Hospital.
The wedding will take place on Saturday, July
19 at Veterans Memorial Civic Center in Bristol


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at 5:30 p.m. (CT). A reception will follow after the
ceremony in the recreation"room.
The couple will leave for a honeymoon cruise to
the Bahamas. They will reside in Blountstown.
No local invitations are being sent, all relatives
and friends are invited to attend the wedding and
reception.


1/2 i 3F Bjri riiii


'j''
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Page 14 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JULY 2, 2008


Many people in this country take their freedom'
for granted. Other places in the world do not
allow their citizens to travel or move to another
location without government permission. Some
countries have strict censorship.laws,
imprisoning those who would challenge the
authorities. Please take a moment, this July
Ith th ramambar anrl cherich thncs who fo nnhf


141, ol remem e llulicil
for the freedom we I


CITY


TIRE Co.

Hwy. 20 West,
Blountstown

674-8784

MV5496


III flub VVI l I ^I II
now enjoy.


The Calhoun County School Board willbe having
a School Board Facilities/Budget Workshop July 8,
2008, at 9:00 a.m. The meeting will be held in the
basement of the courthouse.
Advertisement paid for by the
Calhoun County School Board.


Come party at Roundman's!


Friday, July 4 from 8 12 p.m.
FEATURING "ONE MORE TIME"
Playing all of your favorite rock and country songs.
$5 Located five miles North on Hwy. 69 MUST
COVER SHOW ID




SIZZLIN9 SUMMIT



Garden

and

: Yard

Flags



40a off .

*a60 0


Tags required on passive


Passive fishing gear things
like trotlines, crab traps, bush
hooks and other devices that
catch fish in fresh water while
the fisherman isn't present
- have to be tagged with the
owner's name and address
under a new rule.
The Florida Fish andWildlife
Conservation Commission
(FWC) adopted new rules in
response to public requests for
tighter management of passive
gear to reduce the loss of fish
and wildlife caught by lost or
abandoned gear and to reduce
navigation hazards for vessels.
It will enable FWC officers to
identify and remove lost and
abandoned gear and illegally
used gear.
The new tagging requirement
applies to commercial and


OUr
DOORS


News from The
Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
Commission


recreational trotlines, bush
hooks, set lines, wire traps, slat
baskets, hoop nets, minnow


Bay scallop season is now open
The recreational harvest season for bay scallops began July
1 arid continues through Sept. 10. Open scalloping areas on
Florida's Gulf Coast extend from the west bank of the Mexico
Beach Canal in Bay County to the Pasco-Hernando county line
near Aripeka.
Bay scallops may be taken only within the allowable harvest
areas. It is illegal to possess bay scallops while you're in or
on state waters outside the open harvest areas, or to land bay
scallops outside the open areas.
There is a daily limit of 2 gallons of whole bay scallops in
the shell or 1 pint of bay scallop meat per person during the
open season. In addition, no more than 10 gallons of whole
bay scallops in the shell or one-half gallon of bay scallop meat
may be possessed aboard any vessel at any time.
You're allowed to harvest bay scallops only by hand or with
a landing or dip net, and bay scallops may not be harvested for
commercial purposes.
Florida Fish and Wildlife. Conservation Commission (FWC)
biologists review the status and health of the bay scallop fishery
each year.
"We are seeing recovery of scallop populations along the West
Coast of Florida relative to their status in the early 1990s," said
Bill Arnold, an FWC research scientist.
"Harvesters should adhere to scallop-fishing regulations,
especially the daily bag limit," Arnold said.
You also should collect only
the amount of bay scallops you
are willing to clean.
More information on bay
11" 1T |scallops is available online
AJR SJLEJ at MyFWC. com/marine/
bayscallops.htm and http://
research. myfwc. com/features/
A n category sub.asp.


Select

monogramed

items

& more!


.BLOUIITSTOWI Drugs
20370 Central Ave. West in Blountstown -.Call (850) 674-2222


el


9manuan- "
aMENME--


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1lr
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"" "' "' ":':': ""' ''"'


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fishing gear
lift nets, eel traps/pots, blue
crab pots, Carolina-pots and
shotgun pots. It does not apply
to hand-held gear, such as a rod
and reel.
Also, the new rule does
not include specifications for
tagging passive gear, except
to say the owner's name and
address must be legible. The
new rule applies only in fresh
water. Saltwater fishing is
subject to other rules.
FWC officials said the
new rule is particularly
important during current
drought conditions that have
exposed numerous traps and
baskets that have .been lost
or abandoned but are still
catching and wasting fish and
are a hazard to boaters.
FWC officers will be
working with fishermen to
increase awareness of the
new rules and enlist help
in protecting resources and
promoting-public safety.
For more information,
visit MyFWC.com or call the
regional FWC office listed in
the telephone directory.

People food is junk
food to the animals
Let's face it; most of us are
guilty of offering a "treat"
to a wild animal. We think
it is harmless and that we
are helping the animal. The
Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission
(FWC) says feeding wildlife
is not helping the animals
and may actually be harming
them. In addition, it is illegal
in Florida to feed sandhill
cranes, bears, raccoons, foxes,
alligators and others.
Human food is not suitable
for wild animals and can cause
serious health problems.
"Food being fed to animals
usually offers inadequate
nutrition," said Anni Mitchell,
FWC biologist in Lake City.
"This 'people' food is 'junk'
food for animals."
Food meant for humans can
cause all kinds of problems for
animals. Some people food
contains many ingredients
that are toxic to animals of the
furry kind. Also, bones from
chicken can splinter and get
stuck in the throat or intestines,
causing damage to organs or
death. Other foods including
nuts, potato peelings, some
vegetables and even moldy,
spoiled food can cause mild
digestive illnesses or-vomiting.
While most cases are mild,
some may be fatal.
"If you are a wildlife lover
and get the urge to toss food to
an animal you think is hungry,
remember, your generous offer
may actually cause more harm
than good," Mitchell said.


~ ~
'' '





JULY 2, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 15


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Telogia Creek Band

&Amy Invite


You to come celebrate the 4th of July at
the American Legion on Friday at 8:30 p.m. (CT)
Door prizes, games and prizes all night!
LADIES DRINK FREE DRAFT FRIDAYALL NIGHT!



Saturday, July 5 at 8 p.m. (cT)
Remember to have a designated driver if drinking.
The Legion and Telogia Creek wants you to be safd.


Kept safety in mind when using

generators during storm season


TALLAHASSEE Florida Agriculture
-and Consumer Services Commissioner
Charles H. Bronson is reminding Florida
residents to keep safety in mind when using
generators this hurricane season.
The use of generators increases during a
disaster but they can create
additional tragedies if not CO poi
used properly. The majority
of carbon- monoxide deaths not the or
from generators each year is generate
caused because people use
them indoors or in garages, USed im\
balconies, carports or crawl general
spaces. Partially enclosed electric
areas are not safe for generator
use. Carbon monoxide (CO), or Stai
a colorless, odorless gas, can
leak into vents and, cause
illness or death. Open windows and fans do
not prevent the build up of this gas.
"Unfortunately, we have seen people killed
because they thought their garages or balconies
, were ventilated enough to prevent poisoning,"
Bronson said. "The safety guidelines provided
by manufacturers should always be consulted
before a generator is used."
Symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning
aie similar to the flu. People who feel sick,
dizzy or weak while inside but feel better
when they leave their home should
be cautioned that there might be carbon
monoxide present and they should get
immediate medical attention.
When purchasing a generator, consumers
need to make sure they get one that is rated
for the amount of power they will need.
Appliances and equipment usually have labels
indicating power requirements. The wattage
of a light bulb indicates the power needed.
Consumers should consult an electrician if
they cannot determine the amount of power
they will need. Generators should be used
only for the minimum needs of a household
in an emergency because fuel supplies may
be limited.
CO poisoning is not the only danger


s





t


ri


generators pose if used improperly; generators
can electrocute people or start fires.
Follow these safety tips to protect against
poisoning, electrocution andfires:'
Never use a generator indoors, including
in garages, balconies, crawl spaces or other
partially enclosed areas.
zoning is Place the generator
outdoors and away from
ily danger doors, windows and vents and
rs pose if put it in a covered location.
Follow the directions that
properly; came with the unit.
orS Can Install battery-operated
carbon monoxide alarms.
te people To avoid electrocution,
t fires. keep the generator dry and
operate it on a dry surface
under a canopy-like structure.
Dry hands before touching the unit.
Plug appliances directly into the generator
or use a heavy-duty, outdoor-rated extension
cord that is rated in amps or watts at least
equal to the sum of the connected appliance
'loads.
Never try to power a house wiring by
plugging the generator into a wall outlet. This
is extremely hazardous to the homeowner,
utility workers and neighbors served by the
same utility transformer.
Don't overload the generator. Don't
operate more appliances than the output rating
calls for.
Turn off all equipment powered by the
generator before shutting down the unit.
Never store fuel for the generator in
the home, and use properly labeled safety
containers to store the fuel. Also, do not store
excessive amounts of fuel.
Before refueling the unit, turn it off and
let it cool down. Fuel spilled on hot engine
parts can ignite.
"Generators can be a lifesaver in an
emergency when people follow safety
rules," Bronson said. "They need to read
the instructions well before a storm or other
disaster is headed their way."


Need a quick gift?


A subscription to
The Calhoun-Liberty
Journal makes a
great gift for anyone
on your list. Just
This JustInVl: drop by our office
Recipients namRe on Summers Road
y sear e pt otoe in Bristol to set it
up. We'll even give
you a personalized
O COannouncement
Sender's name flyer like the one

shown here!


* *' N \


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Page 16 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JULY 2, 2008


- Jim Pruette, shown at right, leads a group
across the bridge June 28 during the annu-
al Walk for Liberty, which has become a lo-
cal tradition the Saturday before the Fourth
of July. Walkers are pictured below as they
pass the county limits sign as they make their
way toward Bristol.




Walk for iberty


Lavon Miles of American Legion Post 12010 is
shown above as he tosses out bottled water from
a cooler while riding past thirsty walkers making
their way across the Apalachicola River on the
Trammell Bridge Saturday morning to mark an-
other Independence Day. The group gathered
for a special program afterwards at Veterans Me-
morial Civic Center where they listened to guest
speaker Bill Pickron of Tallahassee.


and happy
md and happy


DANIEL WILLIAMS PHOTOS






JULY 2, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 17
U I- ------ ---------~l


Community j7z


A"A


Bring your Family and enjoy a
FREE Fireworks Show!


Sam
Atkins
Park
Thursday,
July

3rd


EVENT SCHEDULE
7:00 9:00 p.m. (CT)
FREE Hotdogs, Chips, Popcorn,
Drinks for Everyone!
LIVE MUSIC
FREE Kid's Games & Sno-Cones
9:00 p.m. (CT)
FIREWORKS begin!
Professionally shot by Pyrotechnico, Inc.


Watch for desgnaoted areas in
the park for vehicle parking and
spectator seating.
Bring your lawn chairs.
blankets, and enjoy an evening
in the park!
Contact RiverTown
Community Church
850.674.5747 for any questions


LCHS Bulldog Kevin McCray leans away from a
Sneads opponent as he passes the ball to Shawn
Arrant during a recent Summer Basketball game held
at the Altha School Gym. DANIEL WILLIAMS PHOTO







Page 18 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JULY 2, 2008


MIT.
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A leatherback sea turtle digs a nest on a Florida beach while a young boy practices responsible beach behavior by not disturbing the
female's nesting patterns. The leatherback is the largest living turtle, reaching a weight of 2,000 pounds in some cases. (FWC photo)



Helping Florida's sea turtles survive


requires beach responsibility


* Leave only footprints and
keep beaches dark

ByFWCSTAFF

Ancient creatures of the sea fight a bar-
'ne each year to reproduce and survive in a
world not always hospitable to them.
Sea turtles nesting ont Florida's beaches
face an uncertain future, according to the
Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Com-
mission's (FWC) scientists. Threats come
from encroachment on nesting beaches by
coastal development and encounters with
pollutants, beach debris and fishing gear.
Five species of sea turtles nest on Florida
beaches, with the loggerhead showing up
in the largest numbers. Green and leather-
back sea turtles also nest in the Sunshine
State.'l wo otherspecn. l.(ni[. n 1;1.11- ....I.I
hawksbill sea turtles nest infrequently in
Florida but inhabit Florida waters. The FWC
lists the loggerhead as a threatened species
with the other four listed as endangered.
However, the loggerhead's status could
change because of data collected showing
a downward trend since 1998. During the
2007 April to September nesting season,
scientists found the lowest number of Igg-
gerhead nests in 19 years. At the same time,
the number ofloggerheads found dead, sick
or injured each year in Florida has more
than doubled during the past decade.
"Ifwe don't do something to reverse this
trend, the loggerhead will also become en-
dangered," said Hobbin Trindell, ant FWC
Imperiled Species Program administrator.
Nearly 90 percent of the loggerhead
population that nests in the southeastern
United States, nests on Florida's beaches.
This population is one of only two large log-
gerhead nesting populations worldwide.
Sea turtles are air-breathing reptiles
well-suited for sea life'with a hydrodynam-
ic-shaped shell. large and powerful front
flippers. These physical characteristics en-
able them to dive deep into the ocean and
to swim long distances.
Female loggerhead turtles begin coming
on shore in the spring with peak months


for laying eggs in June and July. The nest-
ing female digs a hole witt her hind flip-
pers and then lays approximately 115 eggs.
After covering the nest with sand, the mas-
sive creature, weighing nearly 300 pounds,
makes her way back to the ocean. A female-
might come ashore two to five times during
the nesting season. Amazingly, the females
come back to the same beach where they
hatched decades earlier. .The males, once
they make the long crawl after hatching out
of the egg. never return to land.
Major disturbances to sea turtle nest-
ing habits come from seawalls and beach
nourishment projects, Individuals cant
help by following safe beach lighting sug-
gestions, tilling holes dug for sand castles
and picking up litter.
"Just one light can kill thousands of
turtles over several years." Trindell said.
"Many lights burn all night, without con-

..ate in the summer, after an incuba-
tion of 55-70 days. tde hatchlings begin
breaking out of their shells and crawling
out ofthe nest. Instinct tells the 1- to 2-inch
hatchling to head toward the brightest ho-
rizon and away from dark silhouettes. In
days long gone in Florida, the brightest ho-
rizon shone over the ocean, and the hatch-
lings would move away from the shadows
on the dunes and begin the crawl to the sea.
Nest predators might include raccoons,
ghost crabs and fire ants. In modern-day
Florida, hatchlings must crawl through a
battlefield of debris left by humans. Furni-
ture discarded by beachgoers can obstruct
a nesting female turtle or become a trap
for the hatchlings. Avoiding firework left-
overs strewn along the hatchling's path
can cause exhaustion and delay in getting
to the water. If stranded on the beach when
the sun rises, the hatchling's chance for
survival diminishes and dehydration and
sun exposure becomlcthazards.
"We can all help sea turtles survive,"
Trindell said. "If we just take personal re-
sponsibility, we can go a longway to ensure
the sea turtle co-exists with us for many
more years to-come."


A loggerhead sea turtle hatchling
heads to the oceatiafter hatchinngout
of its nest. The loggerhead is the most
common of Florida's sea turtles. By the
time this hatchling reaches the adult
state, it will have increased its weight
more than 6,000 times. (FWC photo)


To report a dead, sick or
injured sea turtle, call FWC's
24-hour Wildlife Alert at
1-888-404-FWCC (3922).


4 b~tF3~xi


To learn more about sea turtles, visit '.. 's Web site at ,'


: LFLORIDA






TUR TLE


i HiHLPIN. SEIA TURILIS SURIi%-k


Buy a plate or decal and help

sea turtles lay on the beach


t'he sea turtle hatchling dis-
played on the Florida specialty
license plate does more than
just adorn the bumper of a car.
The purchase of the specialty
tag goes a long way to help pro-
tect this living fossil from ex-
tinction. The fees collected go
directly into sea turtle research
and conservation.
the loggt -R
head hatchling
represents ..-
hope for a r.:
safe passage
from thenest
to the water, '-,
a dangerous ci
deavor for a 1- to 2-
inch creature.
Purchasing a specialty tag
helps fund the Sea '[lirtle Grants
Program, which distributes
funds each year to support sea
turtle research, conservation
and education programs. Ap-
proximately 30 percent is dis-
tributed to the grants program,
which is administered by the
non-profit Caribbean (Conser-
vation Corporation. The other
70 percent of the funding gen-
crated by sales of the tag goes


I



c.


to the FVWC's Marine lTurtle
Protection Program to support
research and management ac-
tivities related to sea turtles.
Since 1992, the seaturtlealso
has been featured on boat regis-
tration decals that have helped
fund research and conservation
efforts.lThese decals can be pur-
chased for 55 each, as a
w- unitaryy add-on
'j ) to boat regis-
traction fees

S5 7 C's W1eb
S site,.MyFWC(
S comn. Thenew-
SAt decal features
1 "p. 1 ] .' ll. wn (I.
bylFW, Cartist Liz West.

Sea turtle license plates may be
prt chased at any authorized
nmoor vehicle office, such t
as Florida's Department of
flighu'ayvSafery and Motor
Vehicles, local tax collector's
office ora licensed rag aent
or go to buiryplate.corn.
Decals may he purchased at
wivwc.floridaconservatioa.

Decals. hitm.


SEA TURTLES AND LIGHTS WORD SEARCH
Loagerthead, green and leatherback sea turles nest on the coasts of Florida. To help
the sea turtles, humans can reduce light gllultion by tusrting off unnecessary lights
o r shi ] I I. -J : H ... i ii I',, I I... -,n . .*:* I- i ., H ".. .. I - -i I .
grow a t~. 1'b Er.. 1 I.3. F I -j M 1. -, M- ..0.. I I 0 ,- ...j I .co lp-a ,..*


BIRDS .
HATCHLINGS
NIGHTTIME
DISORIENT
LEATHERBACK
SEA GRAPES
0 ITU L
R T U K F
MCD SJ
EOTPB
T S M U T
V Q F T R

R C 0 RY
S E A G R
K V T X T
R J G H W
RD H RH
I RO G H
H RS G M
R Y T F H
CHCDY
F I R E A
V J A N Z
P B B Y H
N J S T C
I S AH N P
G E T H C
L 0 D A E
D I S O R
JCFGS


GHOST CRABS
LOGGERHEAD
TURN OFF
GREEN
NEST
WATER
R J G N V
Y J M F Y
EPA ES
SLR SF
P I I C F
Z G CI 0
H H Y U N

KS U CU
R H C L T
O L G T D
EAN TS
T H 0 B D
U V Y NM
LB I E F
CY D SM
H N Q T R
NSH Z I
H C R J M
DLC NM
L C I -H Y
E X D N G
IFS GG
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STH C X


Dedicated to learning

more about ancient

creatures of the sea

a Blair Witherington keeps a close watch on sea turtles


By FWC STAFF

Blair Witherington- returned
from Oman, a country in the
Middle Fast, in April excited
about the future of loggerhead
turtles, despite discouraging
news in Florida from nesting
counts in 2007.
Withcrington, research scien-
tist witli the FWC's Fish and Wild-
life Research Institute (FWRIi).
studies sea 'tL I I l .
"The loggerhead population is
in serious decline." Withcrington

loggerheads nest on beaches
in Florida and on thIe island of
MaNsirahl in the Indian Ocean oft
the coast of Oman."
In Florida, the loggerhead is
tihe most common sea turtle. Butt
worldwide, the loggerhead is rare,


said Witherington, who went to
Masirah to help set up a monitor-
ing program for the threatened
reptile, similartowhat Florida uses
on its t: index nesting beaches.
"We have made headway
ill conservation efforts
for sea turtles."
Witherington coordinates Flor-
ida's Index Nesting Beach S survey,
which is conducted annually from
May 15 to Aug. 31. lie process in-
volves volunteers wbho go out be-
fore sunrise each morning, seven
days a week during Ihe nesting
season. Volunteers monitor nests
laid during thie night and report
false crawls signs ofl a sea turtle's
flippers in the sand but no nest.
"There are indications that
there may I' tdecrlining numbers
in the loggerhead population itn


Masirah as well," Witherington
said. "But we need reliable data to
determine it conclusively"
Witherington received his
Pth.). from the University olf Flori-
cla, and his dissertation addressed
the orientation of hatchling sea
turtles and the effect of light on
their journey to the sea.
"If they head in the wrong di-
rection, they die," Witherington
said of the effect olf direct lighting
on the beach.
Counties and municipalities in
the majority of the sea turtle nest-
ing areas in Florida now have ordi-
nances in place for lighting man-
agemenset, something that brings a'
smile to Withcrington's lace.
"This is absolutely a success
story in londa,"b' he said. "We have
made headway in conservation cf-
forts for sea turtle'."
Withcrington also conducts
neo-natal researchlt. lor years,
scientists have called the post-
hatchling's first year. "the lost
year' because no one knew where
the hatchlings went once they
made it to ithe ocean from the
nesting beach.
Witheiringition and his iteamn


discovered that hachling logger-
heads and green turtles migrate
out to tlle floating, open-ocean
sargassum (seaweed) communi-
ty offshore from nesting beaches.
They also found hawksbill and
Kemp's Ridley sea turtles thar are
approximately a year old.
"It's very exciting to find small
Kemp's Ridl cy because they are
the rarest of sea turtles," he said.
"We usually see large juveniles
or adults swimming in Florida's
waters"
While concerns remain about
the loggerhead's survival. Witli-
erington believes the work done
lby the FWC and other groups.
such as the 1J.S. Fish and Wildlitc
Service and the fNational Marine
Fisheries Service, will help con-
serve this giant reptile.
"I work with a lean of skilled
and well-informed people," lie
said. "And the team extends .de-
yond Ithie FWV( wilih more than
2.000 people in tilhe state doing
netrting counts and conveying
conservation messages.
"Florida would be much
poorer without our sea trtlus,"
VWitherington said.


i:r: :
-' ~L
:m_~nc
'~c~
~s~pp~PP


I


Blair Witherington holds a Kemp's Ridley sea turtle, one
of the rarest turtles in the world, as he and his team
conduct research off the coast of Florida. (FWC photo)


DUNE'
LIGHT POLLUTION
SHIELD
FIRE ANTS
LIGHTS
TURTLE
OPT aH Ii
0 F T J I F 3
Y CQO 0 YR S
C O J D E B T
0 C I E V L Y
PA N SM C
C J T X H E

P E S M V S I
V H E X H U 1
T E R E T Q ]
T U R M F I
O G J L K E 1
Y LO C V Y 1
TNA V Y
F B M U A L I
R P I S T T )
LO D J F Y (
TR 3 0 P B
I M C R YL .,
V T J H F Y t
Y M C N B G
RE G G 0 L 5
E N T V T H I
R N B K U CI


LI INV-:
i-i^ l
.
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-'^ A M,






JULY 2, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 19


Calhoun County Health Department one of 14 Florida


organizations to receive grants totaling over $1 million


JACKSONVILLE The
Blue Foundation for a Healthy
Florida, the philanthropic affiliate
of Blue Cross and Blue Shield of
Florida (BCBSF), has approved
$1,062,424 in grants to be awarded
this summer to 14 nonprofit
Florida organizations that are
successfully addressing health
care needs in their communities.
"The Blue Foundation for
a Healthy Florida is proud to
support organizations dedicated
to improving access to quality
health-related services for
Floridians who are uninsured or
underserved," said Susan Towler,
executive director of The Blue
Foundation for a Healthy Florida.
"These 14 organizations offer
community-based solutions for
breaking down barriers many
Floridians face when seeking
services that are important to their
overall health and wellbeing."
Recipients, grant totals and
program areas funded are:.
Broward Regional Health
Planning Council, Inc. -- $95,000
-- increased access to affordable
primary care for uninsured and


underserved residents Tt
throughout Florida.
Calhoun County Dep
Health Department for tf
-- $90,000 --three
satellite clinics in
rural areas of Calhoup pi
County for primary mOn
care, screening and
monitoring of chronic
conditions.
Catholic Charities of Central
Florida -- $100,000 -- free medical
clinic providing primary care,
preventive health education and
prescriptions to Sumter, Lake and
Marion counties.
Faith Health Clinic -- $75,000
-- full-time ARNP, diabetes and
nutritional programs for Marianna
residents.
Florida Community Health
Centers, Inc. -- $87,124 -- full-
time bilingual health navigator
to help Hendry County residents
access medical coverage and
medical care.
Good Samaritan Health Clinic
of West Volusia, Inc. -- $20,000
-- medical tests, specialty care
and education for in-need Volusia


//.r n)jit.~.


U I


he Calhoun County Health
artment will receive $90,0C
hree satellite clinics in rurc
'eas of Calhoun County foi
primary care, screening anc
iitoring of chronic condition

County residents.
Jacksonville Area Sexual
Minority Youth Network, Inc.
-- $93,800 health services and
outreach for gay, lesbian, bisexual,
transgender and questioning
youth in Jacksonville.
Lupus Foundation ofAmerica,
Southeast Florida Chapter --
$50,000 -- Spanish and Haitian
Creole translation services to
educate Lupus patients and their
families.
St. Vincent de Paul
Community Health Care, Inc.
-- $100,000 -- physician assistant
and pharmaceuticals for free
.clinic serving Charlotte and
DeSoto counties.
Susan B. Anthony Recovery
Center, Inc. -- $100,000 -- part-
time nurse, full-time case manager
and part-time acupuncturist who
support both homeless women
living with mental health disorders
and substance addictions and their
children in Pembroke Pines.
UNIDAD of Miami Beach,
Inc. -- $100,000 -- dental
screening, cleaning and treatment
for children in Overtown and
.Little Haiti sections of Miami.
Urban League of Greater


BURA


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Insurance...
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provides great coverage for your
car or truck. Call for a free,
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Agent
(s85o)674-5471
17577 Main Street North
Blountstown, FL 32424
cralg.brinkley@ffbic.com
sfbli.com ffbic.com


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Florida Farm Bureau General Insurance Co.
Florida Farm Bureau Casually Insurance Co.
Southern Farm Bureau Life Insurance Co. lackson, MS
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Miami -- $85,200 --
asthma screening, case
)00 management, family
I education and disease
management for children
r living with asthma in
Liberty City.
We Care of Polk
is. County -- $26,000
-- pharmaceuticals and
diagnostic services for the
.uninsured of Polk County.
*WomanKind, Inc. -- $40,300
-- licensed mental health
professional to expand mental
health program in Key West.


The Blue Foundation for 4
Healthy Florida awards grants
during two grant cycles per year.
With the completion of the 2008
summer grant cycle, The Blue
Foundation will have presented
158 grants and 20 awards totaling
more than $10.5 million since its
founding in 2001.
The Blue Foundation for a
Healthy Florida is a separate,
philanthropic affiliate of BCBSF
incorporated in the state ofFlorida.
For more information on The Blue
Foundation, please visit its Web
site at www.bluefoundationfl.com.


Online application process allows

nurses to get licenses more quickly
TALLAHASSEE The Florida Department of Health (DOH)
Division of Medical Quality Assurance (MQA) announces that nursing
applicants who apply for licensure in Florida now have an improved
online application to speed-up the process. MQA launched its new
online nursing application on July 1st. MQA anticipates that this
improvement coupled with the new criminal background fingerprint
scanning program will reduce the amount of time it takes to process
licensing applications. For example, nursing applicants who apply
to sit for the licensing exam could be scheduled as quickly as two to
three days.
MQA's fingerprint scanning program, implemented in November
2007, allows staff processing applications for professions requiring a
background screen, such as nurses, to electronically submit scanned
fingerprint cards to the Florida Department of Law Enforcement and
Federal Bureau of Investigation for criminal background screenings.
This reduces the screening response time from six weeks to three
days.
"Healthcare professional shortages impact healthcare access.
We have a strategic objective to license health care professionals as
expeditiously as we can while ensuring they meet legal requirements,"
DOH MQA Division Director.Lucy C. Gee, M.S. said. "These are
critical steps in achieving that objective."
Once applicants create an account in the Online Licensiure
Application using an email address and password, they will have
up to a year to complete the application and pay the application fee.
The online tool is dynamic and keeps the applicant informed of any
.deficiencies and the current status of their application. It can be used
by the following applicants who wish to apply and pay using a credit
or.debit card:
Nursing applicants applying to take the exam
Nursing applicants applying by endorsement from another state
Foreign nursing applicants
To access the Online Licensure Application; go to:
www.FLHealthSource.com
Select the 'Licensee/Provider' button the Practitioner Services
page is displayed
Under the New Licensee Services section, click on 'Apply for
Licensure Online'
The mission ofDOH and MQA is to promote, protect and improve the health of
allpeople in Florida. Working in conjunction with 22 boards andsix councils, MQA
regulates seven types offacilities and more than 40 health care professions. MQA
evaluates the credentials of all applicants for licensure, issues licenses, analyzes
and investigates complaints, inspects facilities, assists in prosecuting practice
act violations, combats unlicensed activity and provides credential and discipline
history about licensees to the public. Visit www.doh.state.fl.us/mqa/for additional
information about MQA.


We can repair most any lawn mower!


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former owner of
Nissley's
Garden Center
16609 SE Pear Street Blountstown
Call (850) 674-3911 (850) 674-8896


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Page 20 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JULY 2, 2008


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Calhoun County

AAA All-Star team

goes to state!!!
The Calhoun County AAA
All-Star Team would like to
let everyone know that we are
practicing hard and doing our
best to be ready for the challenges
ahead.
We have opening ceremonies
Friday, July 4, at Cypress Gardens
in East Lakeland. Our first game
is Saturday at 2 p.m. (CT) against
the district 7 champion. This will
be a tough road' because the state
tournament is made up of 12 really-
good teams. Many hours of hard
work by the coaches and players
alike will hopefully payoff.
We appreciate all the community
and family support that have been
given to our team. We also would


Calhoun County AAA All-Star Team, pictured from left -
kneeling, Equipment Mgr. Abrey Johnson, Bryson Home, Malac
Johnson, Drew Bryant, Cody Barfield, Jaylon Hall, Derek Eberly;
standing, D'Anta Williams, Kenny Godwin Jr., Sawyer O'Bryan,
Ridge Deitz, Colton Purvis, Shad Johnson; coaches Daniel
Barfield, Richard Hall, Mgr. Emory Home & Randy O'Bryan.


like to tell everyone who has
dedicated their time or money
to help our team go to the state


tournament Thank you!! We
appreciate the support that has
come from all over our county!!


Calhoun County AA All-Star team heads to State


The Calhoun County AA All
SStar team headed to the State
- Tournament in Paxton this past
Friday. The AA team is made
up of 7 and 8 year olds. The
tournament is composed of
twelve teams representing their
districts throughout the state of
Florida.
The Calhoun County team
members are P-Tyreek Sumner,
C-Tucker Jordan, 1B-Taye
Godwin, 2B-Kevon Godwin,
SS-Kyle Skipper, 3B-Jacob.
Yon, 3B/C-Alex Buggs, LF/CF-
Mikell Engram, LF-Jace White,
CF-Gabe McClellan, RF-Jaxon
Ridley, and RF-J.C. Williams.
Calhoun County Coaches are
Manager/coach- Terry Blair,
Coach Eric Anderson, Coach
Gerry Skipper, and Coach Jamie
Yon. The coaches and players
have had long practices for weeks
heading into the tournament.
Opening ceremonies were
held Friday evening and play
began on Saturday. The Calhoun
County team drew a very difhc, !t
bracket composed of defending
state champ, Sebring America,


East Lakeland and South Lake.
The Calhoun County All Stars
started with a Saturday afternoon
game against South Lake. The
Calhoun County team used a
consistent rotation of their 12
players to overwhelm South Lake
13-2 in 5 innings. All 12 players
hit and fielded excellent to lead
to the decisive win. Sure handed
first baseman, Taye Godwin,
received game Most Outstanding
Player.
That win brought an early clash
between two of the tournament
favorites Sebring American and
Calhoun County. The game was
scheduled Sunday afternoon to
start with by severe weather with
tornado warnings and heavy rain
delayed the game several times
that ended with the game starting
at 9:30 p.m. The Calhoun boys
moved from being huddled in
the men's bathroom to various
different shelters throughout the
afternoon. By the time the game
started the energy for both teams
was running high. The game was
finally played on a soggy field
with wet balls coming out of the
pitching machine. The usual
red hot bats of the Calhoun All
Stars were tapered by the erratic
pitching of the wet machine.
Calhoun County was the home
team so the Sebring team batted
first. The Calhoun All Stars made
some unusual fielding errors on
the'sloppy field and Sebring


scored 2 early runs. Calhoun
County matched the two.runs
with two of their own when they
batted. From there the defensive
battle was on.
Calhoun County and Sebring
ended regulation tied 3-3 after
6 innings. In the top of the 8th
Sebring scored 2 runs to go ahead
5-3. It was do or die time for the
Calhoun team. Kevon Godwin
led off with a single. He stole
2 bases and was knocked in by
Tyreek Sumner. Taye Godwin
then brought Tyreek home with
a key hit to notch the score 5-5.
Jacob Yon then nailed a line
drive up the middle to bring in
Taye for a game winning score!
The defending champ Sebring
American team was stunned.
The, Calhoun team was ecstatic!
Game Most Outstanding Player
went to third base man Jacob
Yon.
The Calhoun County team will
have a bye on Monday night and.
continue to play in the winner's
bracket on Tuesday night. The
weekday games are played in
the evenings. The championship
game should be played either
Wednesday or Thursday. The
drive to Paxton is less than 2
hours. Take I-10 to DeFuniak
Springs and head north,on Hwy.
331 to Paxton. If you can't make
the drive, live broadcasting can
be picked up on the internet at
http://jockjive.ezstream.com/.


All-Stars fundraising for state tournament
The Liberty County 12 and under Majors All-Stars are headed to
the state tournament in Brooksville.
Our fundraising efforts are under way and we are looking to raise
enough money for our expenses during our stay in Brooksville.
In an effort to help our cause, we are issuing a friendly challenge
to all candidates in this year's election for donations.
We are asking for a minimum of $100, although, any donation
above or below this amount will be gladly accepted.
Please help us by showing your support.
Please contact Karen Lago for all donations at 899-0245


Su h Paint Works



Painting & Pressure Washing

It's cheaper to paint

than to repair

WANTED: Painter, experience needed

( Call John Wayne Couch at

674-2606 or 557-9471 (cell)
35 years' experience
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1






JULY 2, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 21


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Father of accused man found

innocent responds to letter


CMEPP4LOA IF41i
Yako ont-Bw&We;x~ne


read The State of Florida vs. Tracy
Pullam, which means the accuser
has all the investigating power of
the State of Florida investigating her
accusations namely "Florida Dept.
of Law Enforcement." The FDLE
checked numerous items for DNA
evidence. The accuser herself, the
accuser's clothing, and the vehicle
that the alleged attack took place in,
nothing was found, no evidence that
an assault took place.
POINT 2 If an assault had taken
place, there would have been trauma
in and around the site of the assault.
Again nothing, no evidence an attack
had taken place.
Mrs. Pitts, that is why Tracy Pullam,
was found not guilty of sexual assault.
Other than a confused young lady's
accusation, there was simply no
evidence of an assault. If an attack had


To the editor:
This is in
reference to a letter
in the Journal,
dated June 4,2008.
"Should defendants
r e p r e s e n t
themselves"?
written by June
Pitts and family
of Altha. As the
father of Tracy
Pullam, the alleged
offender in the
referred-to trial, I
feel compelled to
state some facts that
were overlooked
by Mrs. Pitts.
POINT 1 -
The indictment


EDITOR'S NOTE The information in the Sept. 12, 2007 article published in
The Journal came from reports written by deputies investigating the charges
prior to making the arrest. In the third paragraph of the story, it was noted that
the details following came from the victim's account as given to the sheriff's
office.


Blountstown Middle School announces
their fourth nine weeks honor roll. The
students are as follows:
ALL A'S
Sixth grade -Andrew Bennett, Austin
Britt, Candase Bryant, Kristal Cooley,
Calen Masai, Ethan Peacock, Kirsten
White, Bryson Wood, Linda Young.
Seventh grade Casey Johnson, Ally
Richards.
Eighth grade Kelsey Bontrager,
Megan Brown, Matthew Digsby, Jesse
Griffin, Jawon Mosley, Nicholas Posey-
Cessna, Trenton Smith,
A/B HONOR ROLL
Sixth grade Stephanie Branton.
Jayla Brigham, Shannon Burch, Blayne
Cherry, Jacqueline Dudley, Ased Farooqi,
Thomas Futch, Kerri Golden, Mallory
Harrigill, Chase Harris, Breanna Jerkins,
Hunter Jordan, Scott Ludlow, Mikayla
Mann, Dajza Marlow, Dominique Price,


Katelynn Roberts, Dimitri Simmons,
Katelyn Simmons, Monazia Smith, Cole
Taylor, Jennifer Vidal, Jamarcus Williams,
Alex Wroblewski.
Seventh grade -Brittany Bailey, Karah
.Beaver, Jacob Brown, De'Barus Colvin,
Stedman Dawson, Davina Fountain,
Chesten Goodman, Jordan Griffin, Chance
Harris, Emily Harris, Hayden Jeppson,
Elizabeth Jerkins, Mary Kent, Marysa
Lee, Taylor Mauch, Marisa Melvin, Caleb
Mills, William Nowling, Brandon Purvis,
Shelby Strawn, Hammadah Talib, Morgan
Welch, Justin Woods.
Eighth grade Roger Abbott, Tiffany
Abbott, Sarah Barton, Corey Bell,
Amber Burch, Shaquala Butler, Saad
Farooqi, Cassandra Hiers, Semantha
Hunter, Kimberly Jenks, Heidi Jeppson,
Jay'Sharmaine Jones, Brittney Norris,
Daphne Pace, Katherine Strawn, Trenten
Wise, Donald Young.


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TO THE

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letters should
than 350 worc
the writer's.
number ai
Write: ThE
Liberty
P.O. Bo
Bristol


Po-vi r Pk Till, .D
S .1 6 9


PI~ ~f* C; or
Co. U iLILL1 :drx-p #s
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E.nalls cAlpine ScinSj READY
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taken place there
Should have been
I V ~ DNA evidence;-
IA K* i.e. (semen,
P.1 hair follicles,
I shedding skin
flakes, scratches)
LETTER something to tie
EDITOR Tracy Pullam
to the alleged
ote that assault, but there
2ote that
Sn was absolutely
d be no longer .
is and include nothing.
ds and include The only viable
name, phone explanation for
nd address. this is no assault
e Calhoun- took place. It had
Journal nothing to do with
x 5836, the amount of
32521 / money someone
has or the votes
someone might lose, as you alleged in
your letter to the Journal. Besides, a
jury found Tracy not guilty and a jury
is selected, not elected.
In the Journal article following
his arrest (Sept. 12, 2007), Tracy
Pullam was vilified made to look like
an animal who fled the area to avoid
arrest. I wonder where the Journal got
this information, because none of it
was true. And so far the Journal hasn't
saw fit to print a word about his "not
guilty" verdict.
As for Tracy fleeing the area, he
told me at least two weeks prior to
the alleged assault that he was leaving
soon and going to Tennessee. So
I know without any doubt that the
statement. "he was fleeing the area"
was a statement someone made up.
Thank you,
William Pullam


A L






Page 22 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JULY 2,2008


L/CPL COLUMBUS JACKSON
BLOUNTSTOWN L/Cpl. Columbus
Jackson, 59, died Thursday, June 26, 2008 at
Calhoun-Liberty Hospital in Blountstown. He
vWas born Nov. 27, 1948 in Bay Minette, AL, the
son of the late Ed and Juanita Ivory. He attended
the public school of Mayhaw in Blountstown,
was a member of St, Mary Missionary Baptist.
Church,
where he
served on
the Deacon
a Board. At
thelage
of 17, he
joined the

States
M a r i n e
Corps and
S served in
............ ththe Vietnam
War and
received an
honorable
discharge
du e to
injuries sustained at war. He received the Purple
Heart, Good Conduct Medal, National Defense
Service Medal, Vietnam Service Medal with one
Star and Vietnam Campaign Medal with Device.
Proudly serving his country was a life changing
experience for him. Returning home from the
service, he served on the Calhoun School Board
and loyally encouraged the teachers and children,
became very passionate about supporting all the
children in the community, checking on them at
school and home. It was his routine to regularly
check on the childcare facilities and was fondly
known to the children as "Big Daddy."
He was preceded in death by his parents, Ed
and Juanita Ivory and brother, Melvin Ivory.
Survivors include a loving and devoted family
of three sons, Kyle Smith and wife, Jeanette of
Milton, Marquee Jackson of Jacksonville and
Richard Gatlin and wife, Pat of Hardaway;
three daughters, Shinena Peterson and husband,
Lamar, Arleshia Speights and husband, Kenneth
and Latoria Ziggler and husband, Dante, all
of Blountstown; three brothers, Ed Ivory, Jr.
of Tallahassee, Billy Ray Ivory and James
Ivory and wife, Kristen, both of Blountstown;
five sisters, Gladys Miller, Hattie Rives, Julia
Williams and husband, Roy and Ruth Ivory, all
ofBlountstown and Edwin Ivory of Tallahassee;
a special friend, Francis Baker of Blountstown;
10 grandchildren; one great-grandchild; along
with a host of nieces, nephews, aunts, uncles,
other relatives and friends.
Services will be held at 2 p.m. (CT),
Wednesday, July 2 at Blountstown High School
Auditorium. Interment will follow in Magnolia
Cemetery with military honors and the.Rev.
James T. Clark officiating.
Madry Memorial Funeral Chapel in Quincy
is in charge of the arrangements.


ALFONSO L. MCCRAY JR.
WEST PALM BEACH Alfonso L. McCray
Jr. 37, died Saturday, June 21,2008. He was a native
of Palm Beach.
Survivors include his father, Alfonso McCray
Sr. of Titusville, GA; his mother, Beverly Odom
McCray Young of West Palm Beach; three brothers,
Brandon McCray and his wife, Monica of Jefferson
City, MO, Antwon McCray of West Palm Beach
and Maximillian McCray of Cocoa Beach; a
sister, Catrina McCray Young of Riviera Beach;
a devoted grandmother, Sadie Davis McCray
of Riviera Beach; seven uncles, Peter McCray
and wife Deloris,.Emmanuel McCray, William
McCray, Robert McCray and wife Rangeline,
Nathaniel McCray, Jerry McCray and wife, Tiffany
and Luther McCray and wife, Tanya; five aunts,
Veronica McCray, Kathy McCray Kinsey, both
of Riviera Beach, Aderine Odom of Tallahassee,
Adele Odom and Mattie Brown, both of West Palm
Beach; and a host of other nephews, great aunts,
uncles, relatives and friends.
The family will receive friends Saturday, July
5 from 12 to 2 p.m. at New Hope Baptist Church
in Blountstown.
Services will be held at 2 p.m. on Saturday,
July 5 at New Hope Baptist Church with the Rev.
McGriff. Interment will follow in Hugh Creek
Cemetery.
Clary's Funeral Home in Quincy is charge of
the arrangements.

MARY M. PHILLIPS CARPENTER
ALTHA- Mary M. Phillips Carpenter, 85, died
Sunday, June 8,2008 at Calhoun-Liberty Hospital.
She was a lifelong resident ofAltha and loved her
family dearly.
She was preceded in death by her husband,
Grady Carpenter, a son, Bennie Baggett and a
Grandson, Joey Baggett.
Survivors include two sons, James Harvey
Baggett and wife, Bobbi of Altha and Cecil Paul
Baggett of Marianna; four grandchildren, Red
Baggett and wife, Helen of Riverside, AL, Monika
Hollister and husband, Clay, Lisa Huckaby and
Melinda Baggett, all of Marianna; eight great-
grandchildren; along with many nieces and nephews
and one loving great-godson, Ethan Young.
Services were held Tuesday, June 10 at Hall
Funeral Home with Rev. Allan Nichols officiating.
Interment followed in Carpenter Cemetery.
Hall Funeral Home in Altha was in charge of
the arrangements.

ELIZABETH DURDEN WHITE
JUNIPER ROAD Elizabeth Durden White,
70, died Sunday, June 29, 2008 at home.
Survivors include her husband, Otha L. White
of Juniper Road; two sons, Otha 0. White of
Juniper Road and Thomas Jefferson Singletary of
Chattahoochee; a daughter, Louella Kent of Pine
Grove Church Road; a brother, Phillip Atwater of
Juniper Road; a sister, Hazel Kelly of Marianna; 17
grandchildren and 34 great-grandchildren.
Graveside services were held Tuesday, July 1 at
Sycamore Cemetery.
Charles McClellan Funeral Home in Quincy was
in charge of the arrangements.


j~) recious Merno~ies "If you can come to us, give us a call and we will come to you


OBIT UAI E


J.


In Memory of

Columbus Jackson
< "A FULL CATASTROPHIC OF LIVING"
We remember wholeness so readily,
because we don't have very far to look for it.
It is always with us, usually as a vague feeling
or memory left over from when we were children.
But it is a deeply "familiar memory"
one you recognize immediately!
as soon as you feel it again.
It's like coming home after being away a long time.
When you are "immersed" in doing
without being centered for balance
It feels like being away from home.
And when you re-connect with being even
or balanced for just a few moments,
you know it immediately!
- You feel like you are at home
"no matter" where you are
and what problems you face.


, ,


' '

S-,


"Say what you mean and
mean what you say."
Love forever, Teresa Maclean


WHAT BETTER TRIBUTE
CAN THERE BE?
Honor your loved ones by making
their memory part of our best
efforts to defeat cancer. For
more information, contact the
American Cancer Society.
EAST GADSDEN UNIT
-y P.O. Box 563, Quincy, FL-32353
A



S Charles McClellan

Funeral Home
Charles K. McClellan
Licensed Funeral Director
42 years experience
Call us Let us explain how we can
conveniently handle arrangements
in Liberty County.

Butler-Morgan/Morgan-McClellan Funeral Home
Building at 15 S. Jackson St., Quincy, 32351
71 Phone: (850) 627-7677 or 643-2277 F




Peavy Funeral Home

& Crematory











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Funeral Services with Dignity,
Caring and Professionalism.

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A Hometown Funeral Director


COMERFORD VAULT MEMORIAL SERVICE
593-6828 1-800-369-6828 Fax: 593-6888
Hw,. 90 V P.O. Box 933 Sneads, FL 32460
Pete Comerford Owner & Operaifor



Let us help you with a memorial of BEAUTY and DURABILITY
Serving Jackson & the Surrounding Counties for 42 Years


Precious Memornoies


r


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Q~d


l)k g
P'd~ci,


~e,






JULY 2, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 23


Diagnosis and Treatment
Case Management
united way Support Groups
1215 Lee Ave., Suite M4 Tallahassee, FL 32303
TELEPHONE (850) 222-1777



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Call &4-3434 or 1-800-628-8733
VICKERY ENTERPRISES, INC.
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Rodents in the landscape


SERVING
PERSONS Epilepsy
WITH Association \
EPILEPSY of the Big Bend
Community Education


-


Rodents in the landscape are
more common than most people
think. They can lurk in trees
and shrubs, under houses, and
in outbuildings.
Rats especially are notorious
for spreading fleas and diseases,
and since they live and share
the same habitat with squirrels,
it may be this contact that
considerably increases the
incidence of squirrels becoming
infested with fleas.
Because rats are most active
at night and are rarely seen
during the day, it is necessary
to recognize signs of their
activity.
Most people first notice
rodents by finding droppings
in and around buildings. Old
droppings are gray, dusty, and
will crumble. Fresh droppings
are black, shiny, and puttylike.
Another sign are gnawed
objects. Rodents gnaw everyday
in order to keep their teeth short
and sharp and to gain entrance
or to obtain food. Teeth marks
on food, building materials,
wire, and edges of beams are
indications of gnawing.
Rats also habitually use the
same paths or runways between
harborage and food or water.
Outside runways are paths
2-3 inches wide and appear as
smooth, hard packed trails under
vegetation.
What can you do to get
rid of a rat or mouse? Well,
when you first see signs, act
immediately to eradicate the first
immigrants. Don't give them
time to reproduce.
Good housekeeping or
sanitation is a basic factor in


FDOH warns of potential skin damage

from temporary 'black henna' tattoos


TALLAHASSEE-As families enjoy summer
vacations to Florida's resort areas, the Flprida
Department of Health (DOH) warns individuals
to consider potential health risks before having
a temporary "black henna" tattoo applied to
their skin.
Last year, DOH received reports of 24
individuals, both children and adults, who had
.a severe allergic reaction from a temporary
"black henna" tattoo they had applied while
vacationing in Florida. Other incidents may not
have been reported to the department due to the
time lapse between application of the tattoo and
presentation of symptoms.
DOH warns that there is no such thing as "black
henna." True henna is made from crushed henna
leaves, producing a green or greenish-brown
powder, which is mixed with harmless liquids,
such as oil and lemon juice, before application
to the skin. The green or greenish-brown paste
may be applied free hand or by tracing over a
stencil with an applicator or brush. No needle
is involved. The paste, if left on for a number
of hours or overnight before removal, leaves a
brown or reddish brown finished tattoo.
"Black henna" tattoos have become popular
in recent years, particularly in resort areas of
Florida. The paste that is used for a "black henna"
tattoo is black or brownish-black and dries more
quickly than pure henna. The dried paste can be


removed in approximately an hour, leaving a
black finished tattoo. The danger of temporary
"black henna" tattoos is that the black color may
result from the addition of black hair dye, which
may contain a recognized allergen called para-
phenylenediamine (PPD). PPD can cause severe
allergic reactions in some individuals.
Seek medical attention immediately if you
experience symptoms of an allergic reaction.
The general progression of symptoms includes
itching or burning, blistering, oozing, scab-
formation, and, in some cases, permanent
scarring. Symptoms may occur within a few
hours or up to a few weeks, depending upon
the concentration of PPD in the paste and how
allergic a person is.
In addition to immediate medical attention,
allergic reactions should be reported electronically
to DOH on the Injury Report Form found on
Web site at www.doh.state.fl.us/Environment/
community/Black_Henna/index.htm
-------------------------------------------------
Before having a temporary "black henna"
tattoo applied to your skin or your child' skin:
Check the color of the paste, which should
be a green or greenish-brown
Ask to see the ingredients, which should be
henna leaves, oil or lemon juice
Ask how long you must wait before removing
the dried paste


by Theresa Friday,
Horticulture Extension Agent,
Santa Rosa County


rodent control. Elinrinating
food, water, and harborage
for rats and mice can reduce
rodent populations rapidly. To
implement sanitation practices:
Clean up garbage and
rubbish.
Properly store garbage, pet
food and bird seed.
Remove harborages such
as piles of rubbish, junk and
protected enclosures.
Pick fruits and vegetables.
when ripe so rodents will not
feed on them.
Birds ofprey, hawks and owls
feed on large numbers of rodents
and are exceptional rat killers.
Snakes such as rat snakes, king
snakes, pine snakes and black
racers eat numerous rodents
and are important in controlling
. rodent populations. Do not kill
non-poisonous snakes.
Trapping is an underrated
method of controlling rodents.
Traps can be used to eliminate
rats where poison baits would
be dangerous.
It is important to place traps
where the ratsare. Rats and mice
have different behavior around


Puzzled.


iS0h somchidy coiulI help you pil your carl V
insurnmc puzzle togothcr? As i Io
proiessionai indeed nci iisiriance i. -. ?


-m i d viLt. t(' l l ,*"
we rei ui p ol; then; chaslcii.Lg't. p


and all vyur insurance needJs,



^Auto-Owners Insurance



STOUTAMIRE INSURANCE INC.
16783 SE Pear St., Blountstown
Contact Bill Stoutamire
Phone 674-5974 Fax 674-8307


new objects. Rats are cautious,
and it may be a week before
they approach a trap. Mice
are curious and will normally
approach traps the first night.
If you don't catch a mouse in
the first few nights, the trap is
in the wrong location. To help
rats overcome trap shyness,
place traps unset, in place, for
,several days. This allows rats to
overcome shyness and results in
better catches.
Traps are effective usually
when dealing with small numbers
of rats or mice. When rats are
plentiful or where unsanitary
conditions exist with harborage,
poisoned baits are an effective
tool to use with trapping.
Poison baits are readily
available. Whenever a
rodenticide is used, safety must
be the first consideration. Poison
baits must be placed where they
are inaccessible to children,
pets, livestock and wildlife or
in special bait stations. Bait
stations should always be placed
near where rats live and breed or
along travel routes.
When you control your rats,
encourage your neighbor to
control their rats at the same
time. The greater the area that
is controlled, the more effective
the results will be and the longer
it will take new rats to migrate
back to your property.
Theresa Friday is the
Residential Horticulture
Extension Agent for Santa
Rosa County. For additional
information about all of the
county extension services and
other articles of interest go to:
http://santarosa. ifas. ufl. edu.







Page 24 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JULY 2, 2008


DARING RESCUE: FWC biologist saves


drowning bear tranquilized during chase


from fhe Florida
Fsh8 and Wi7dife
Conservation Commission

A 375-pound male black bear
with a penchant for beachfront
browsing was on dry land
Saturday after a Florida Fish
and Wildlife Conservation
Commission (FWC) biologist
pulled the tranquilized animal
from Gulf of Mexico waters in
Florida's Panhandle.
"I wasn't sure what I was
going to do when I jumped in,"
said biologist Adam Warwick,
who saw the bear struggling in
the warm Gulf waters after it had
been hit with a tranquilizer dart.
"It was a spur of the moment
decision," he said, "I had a lot
of adrenaline pumping when I
saw the bear in the water."
The bear was roaming through
a residential area June 24 on
Alligator Point, a neighborhood
of about 100 homes on a small
peninsula about 40 miles south
of Tallahassee.
To prevent bears from
wandering into residential
neighborhoods, the FWC urges
residents to secure garbage cans
and other sources of food that
might attract bears.
FWC officials responded to
reports of a bear in the area and
found the animal underneath a
beachfront home. Their plan
was to move it to a remote
location, back in the wild.
The tranquilizer dart took
longer than expected to work,
and Warwick said the animal
bolted into the Gulf in an effort
to escape.
Warwick was worried the
bear was already showing the
effects of the immobilizing
drug and that the bear couldn't
swim the four miles to land.
"At that point, I decided to
go in after the bear," Warwick
said. "I wanted to keep him
from swimming into deeper
water."
The animal was about 25
yards from shore when he
jumped into the water.
"I was in the water swimming
toward the bear, trying to
prevent him from swimming
into deeper water," Warwick
said. "He was now losing
function (an effect of the drugs)
in his arms and legs, and was
obviously in distress."
Warwick said he tried to
splash and create commotion
in an attempt to get the bear to
head back to the shore.
"Instead, the clearly confused
bear looked at me as if he was
either going to go by, through
or over me ... and at times he
even looked as if he was just
going to climb on top of me to
keep from drowning."


MO WA-F---








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--- --













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..... . . ;E



Biologist Adam Warwick keeps a 375-pound black bear from going underwater after it was tranquilized and ran into the gulf.


Warwick said that after a
few minutes the bear reared
up on his hind legs as if to
lunge at him, but instead fell
straight backwards and was
submerged.
"At that point I knew I had to
keep the bear from drowning,"
he said. "After a few seconds the
bear popped his head up out of
the water and thrashed around
a bit, but could obviously no
longer keep his head above
water."
Warwick kept one arm
underneath the bear and the
other gripping the scruff of its
neck to keep the bear's head
above water. Warwick said he
walked barefoot over concrete
blocks crusted with barnacles
in the 4-foot-deep water as he
tried to guide and use the water
to help float the bear back to
shore.
He said he cut his feet on the
barnacles and the bear scratched
him once on the foot, but he
was otherwise uninjured.
Area resident Wendy
Chandler said Warwick looked
like a lifeguard, pullihg a tired
swimmer to shore.
During Warwick's trek,
FWC Officer Travis Huckeba
and a bystander with a boat
approached Warwick and the
bear in the water. The bear was
startled and Warwick lost his
grip until the boat backed off.
Warwick said the bear's
buoyancy made his job less
difficult.
"It's a lot easier to drag a
bear in 4-foot water than move
him on dry land," he said.
When Warwick and the bear
made it to shore, "A bystander
arrived out of nowhere with
a backhoe and, with some
assistance, we were able to


load the bear into the bucket
and then into an FWC truck,"
Warwick said..
Thad Brett, a general
contractor who lives in the area
and had a backhoe for work he
was doing to his house, said his
wife had seen the commotion
and told him Warwick was
trying to get the bear out of the
water.
"I knew how hard it would be
to get that bear out," Brett said.
"I could see he was about waist-


deep in the water, and I came
down with the backhoe."
Brett- said he positioned
the bucket of the backhoe in
the water so the bear could
be lifted out and moved to the
truck bed.
"It's good to have good guys
like (Warwick) around," Brett
said. "We're real glad to have
the FWC come out and help us
with these bears, and we were
real glad the bear was going to
be relocated."


The bear was transported
to the FWC Tate's Hell office
and Warwick and FWC's Ron
Copley relocated the bear to the
Osceola National Forest near
Lake City.
"He was going up under
people's houses, probably
trying to cool off," Chandler
said. "Kids were going up and
down the stairs and anything
might happen. We're all pulling
for the bear to get adjusted in
his new home."


Please vote


for Liberty CountyTax Collector
Political advertisement paid for and approved by Joan Wright, Democrat, for Tax Collector


I .............I~..............~.~-~. ----II~






JULY 2, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 25


They came.
They drove.
They got dirty.
And everybody
loved it.
In fact. Saturday's
Altba Bog-In was so
popular it achieved its
goal -'raising over $6.500
to send kids from the Calhoun
County Dixie League to the state tourna-
ment in Lakeland starting July 5.
Spectators kept their eyes on the trucks as
they disappeared under a coating of mud. test-
ing the vehicle's capacity while challenging the
driver's skill in the bog.
Saturday's winners included:
Street legal-Russell Young
4&6 cylinder-Ist-Paul Causey
2nd-Johnny Shadrick
3rd- Chuck Da\ is
38.5 and down- Ist-Doug Krane-Neighbor's
Nightmare
2nd- D eight Samples
3rd- Patty K.
44 Class- 1st- Jimmy Mathis-Ridin' Dirty
2nd- Jeffery Davis
3rd- Miller Lefvans
Open class- Doyal Dillard- 1st


RIGHT: Spectators dodge flying mud as
they watch a truck fight the bog.

BELOW: Coastal Chaos gets down
and dirty.


PHOTOS BY
MIRANDA
O'BRYAN


A -~: b,~g


I
4...


It's going to take more than a hose and a few soap bubbles to clean up spectators after everyone starts to have a little fun in the mud.
It's going to take more than a hose and a few soap bubbles to clean up spectators after everyone starts to have a little fun in the mud.


t' I

--1






Page 26 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JULY 2, 2008


ITEMS FOR SALE

Budlight .sign, $100. Call
674-2469. 7-2,7-9

Tanning bed, 32 bulb, built-in ste-
reo and fan, $1,200 or best offer.
Call 237-1317 or 209-4292. 7-2,7-9


Dishes, assortment, wheat pat-
tern, $50 for all. Call 674-3264.
6-25, 7-2


INFANT/CHILDREN

Large stroller, $30; small stroller,
$10;toddlerbed, $20; carseat, $10;
booster seat, $5. Call 674-6800 or
272-4374. 6-25,17-2


FURNITURE

Daybed frame, black, steel, $30;
headboard and footboard, stainless
steel, for full size bed, $20. Call
674-1637. 7-2,7-9

Sofa, large, navy blue leather,
great condition. Call 762-3656.
6-25,7-2

Patio swing with top, never used,
still in box, paid $100, will take
$60. Call 379-3965. 7-2,7-9

Office chair, straight back, $75.
Call 674-3264. 6-25,7-2

Twin bed for child, has head-
board, box with drawers under-
neath, white, comes with mattress,
$75; rocker recliner, greeri, good
condition, $30. Call 643-6260.
6-25, 7-2


ELECTRONICS

Royal typewriter, $70. Call
674-3264. 7-2,7-9


AUCTION
First Saturday of every month
The auction will be held July
5 at 7 p.m. (Old Coins, Tools,
Collectibles, candy, food &
Misc. items) Free setup for
yard sale every Saturday.
Public is invited.
Col. James W. Copeland
18098 NW County Rd. 12
Phone: 643-7740
AB1226 AU0001722


William's Home
Improvements
"No Job Too Big or Small"
Licensed & Insured, contractor & roofer
Concrete work,
landscape, pressure
cleaning, renovations.
seamless gutter, PI ? E
painting, vinyl, .
& screen enclosure
FOR FREE ESTIMATES -
Call 674-8092 UFN


Stump grinding

Reasonable rates
Free estimates

Call
Chris Nissley
674-8081 or
643-8561 (Cell),,


THE CALHOUN-LIBERTYJOURNAL


CL ASSIFiEDS


To place your ad, call 643-3333 or 1-800-717-3333 by noon Eastern
Time on Saturday. Non-business ads run FREE for 2 weeks.

\ .: . .. ,,.. _, ,


Digital camera, with ca
new, retails for $600, sell
or best offer. Call 643-225

Nintendo Wii, comes
controllers, $300. Call 64:


Two T.V.s, color. Call 379



MUSICAL

INSTRUMErN

Drum set, five piece
comes with round seat a
sticks, $100. For more de
674-3021 and leave mess



CLOTHING(


Wedding dress, beautify
halter style, petite wome
tulle skirt, corset bodice an
train, a must see, purchase
David's Bridal for$900, ask
or best offer. Call 413-276
379-8651 for appointment



APPLIANCE

Refrigerator, 14.3 cubic f
free, freezer on top; Sear
runs good, $20. Call 643-5


(A

UJ



w

W
0
InC~













0


x


mcorder, Frigidare refrigerator, $50
for $250 674-1637.
55. 7-2;7-9
Refrigerator, small, 3.7 c
with two white,'19" wide by 35" tall, go
3-6960. office, school, workshop or c
7-2,7-9 only $40. Call 643-5372.

-3965. Sewing machine, non-ele
7-2,7-9 $75. Call 674-3264.




TTS CARS
1985 Ford station.wagon,
"Coda",$300. Call 237-1453.
"Coda",
nd drum 2000 Cadillac Catera, 62K.
stails call runs good, clean, good
sage. $5,500.
6-25, 7-2
2000 Ford Mustang GT, rei
G five speed, leather, $5,995 o
offer. Call 209-4292 or 237-1

ful ivory,
u ivory, 1998 Ford Taurus, high mil
n's size,
i chapel motor and transmission reply
sed from needs fuel pump, body in
4 day or 209-3660.
t to see.
7-27-to9see. 1990 Cadillac Sedan De
great condition, needs A/C
$2,000 or with A/C rep
-s $2,500. Call 674-7138 or 899
leave message.

eet, frost 1990 Cadillac Seville,
rs brand, new transmission, four new
5469. asking $800 or best offer.
7-2, 7-9 643-7451.


Week of July 9 to July 15
Aries, money is the.root of all
evil for you this week. You may
let greed get the better of you.
Thursday is a good day for turn-
ing things around.
TAURUS -Apr 21/May 21
Think long and hard on things
before you make a big decision,
Taurus..Examine all sides and
you just may find that you're
doing it all for the wrong rea-
sons.
GEMINI May 22/Jun 21
Sometimes there's no place
like home to provide that quiet
retreat that you crave, Gemini.
But since staying home all the
time is not an option, you have
to learn how to chill out else-
where.
CANCER Jun 22/Jul22
This is a special time for you,
Cancer. The stars are aligning in
just the right way to bring you
financial success and a wealth
of friendship as well.
LEO Jul 23/Aug 23
Leo, it's time to get off the ex-
press train to nowhere and fig-


ure out what you want to do with your.
life for the next few months. Get a
plan and put it in action.
VIRGO -Aug 24/Sept 22
Normally you're the first to join in
with anything, Virgo. But this week
you're certainly not the life of the
party. Banish this serious case of the
grumpies.
LIBRA Sept 23/Oct 23
It's remarkable what you can ac-
complish when -you put your mind to
things, Libra. This week is full of sur-
prises and some will trickle over into
next week as well.
SCORPIO Oct 24/Nov 22
Scorpio, being helpful and being
bossy are two different things. But
you're having trouble telling the dif-
ference between them. Rethink your
approach.
SAGITTARIUS Nov 23/Dec 21
Sagittarius, constantly checking up
on a coworker is not going to make
him or her move any faster. In fact, it
could incite this person to slow down
progress even further.
CAPRICORN Dec 22/Jan 20
Hand over the leadership reigns to
another person, Capricorn. You're en-


. Call 1998 Chevy Malibu LS, leather
7-2, 7-9 seats, CD player, power windows
and locks, cruise control, A/C, 98K
u. ft., miles on motor, runs great, $3,300.
od for Call 227-4105. 6-25,7-2
camp,
7-2,7-9 1995 Mazda MX3, 30 to 35 mpg,

ctric, $2,000. Call 819-9300 for details.
6-25,7-2 UFN


TRUCKS

LTD, 1999 Dodge Ram 1500, extended
7-2,7-9 cab, all power, excellent condition,

miles, $4,500. Call 674-3151. 7-2,7-9
mpg, 1989 Ford F-150, pick-up, short
wheel base, 4WD, clean, good
d, V8, condition, reasonable price. Call-.
r best 674-8517. 7-2,7-9
317.
7-2,7-9 1986 Toyota, 4x4, for parts or fix,
$400; '98-'05 GMs for fixing, $400.
eage, Call 674-2469. 7-2,7-9
aced,
good 1995 Ford F-250, runs good,
Call $1,100 or best offer. Call
7-2, 7-9 762-8785. 7-2,7-9

wville, 1997 Dodge Dakota, V6, auto-
work,
ire, matic, king cab, runs good, cold
-0269 A/C, recent tires, $2,700 or best
UFN offer. Call 447-2772. 7-2,7-9

brand '03 Ford Ranger Edge, V6, ex-
tires, tended cab, Flowmasters, new tint
Call with flames, $5,995 or best offer.
6-25, 7-2 Call 237-1317. 7-2, 7-9


titled to a well-deserved break this week.
It's okay to watch things from the side-
lines.
AQUARIUS Jan 21/Feb 18
Stop worrying about your finances,
Aquarius. Your investments, bank ac-
counts and other financial ventures are
all picture-perfect. Splurge on something
you want.
PISCES Feb 19/Mar 20
Sharp Words and barbs may win the fight
in the immediate future, Pisces, but they
can also have long-term effects.
FAMOUS BIRTHDAYS
JULY 6
George W. Bush, U.S. President (62)
JULY 7
Ringo Starr, Drummer (68)
JULY 8
Kevin Bacon, Actor (50)
JULY-9
Fred Savage, Actor (32)
JULY 10
Arlo Guthrie, Singer (61)
JULY 11
Lisa Rinna, Actress (45)
JULY 12
Richard Simmons, Fitness Guru (60)


1985 Dodge Power Ram 150
Prospector SE, with brush guard,
engine needs work, body in good
shape, has 33x12.5 tires, $875 or
best offer. Call 643-7584. 7-2,7-9

1996 Dodge Ram, king cab,
$3,500 or best offer; older model
GMC and Chevy, call for more
info. Call 762-2849. 6-25,7-2

1989 Chevy, pick-up, project
truck. Call 227-4298 and 227-4881
for details. 6-25,7-2

1985 Toyota, straight axel, 4WD,
nice truck, needs motor, $1,800
or best offer; 1998 GMC Z-71 Yu-
kon, loaded, leather, $4,500; 1998
Chevy, extended cab, one ton du-
ally, clan, low miles, $8,500. Call
272-4197. 6-25,7-2

1994 Ford F-250, 4x4, 7.3L, die-
sel engine, looks and runs great,
lots of extras, super cab, $7,000.
Call 209-5270. 6-25,7-2


SUVS/VANS

1998 Jeep Cherokee, everything
but cruise control, really good con-
dition, runs very well, automatic,
$3,500. Call 674-7138 or 899-0269
leave message. UFN

1980 Ram Charger, 4x4, $400 or
best offer. Call 674-2469. 7-2, 7-9

1990 Ford work van, high-top,
many new mechanical upgrades,
runs excellent, $1,800 firm. Call
762-8471 after 5 p.m. 7-2,7-9

1993 Ford Starcraft conversion,
runs and looks good, super clean
interior, four captain chairs, elec-
tric bed, bench, new transmis-
sion, located in Altha, $3,000. Call
762-8726 after 6 p.m. 7-2, 7-9

1999 Ford Expedition, Eddie
Bauer edition, 5.4, V8, leather in-
terior, rear air, six disk changer,
one owner, garage kept, excel-
lent condition. Call 643-2341 or
674-4354. 6-25,7-2


FOR RENT
In Bristol
*Mobile home lots
In Blountstown
*1-room efficiency,
utilities included 2BR/bath
and a half apartment
Commercial old Mexican
restaurant --Commercial -
200 front ft. with 3 buildings
and fenced in area.
Phone 643-7740

Buy, sell and trade with

The Journal!






1, 2 & 3 Bedroom
Apartments
"The Best Place to Live"
Rental Assistance




Call (850) 674-4202
16978 NW Mayo Street,
Blountstown, FL 32424.
TDD/TTY711.
EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY


M&WSelf
Storage Rentals
7 days a week service
5'x 10'....... 0
10' x 10'........351 7T
10'x20' .........70
10'x 25'.........90 -
NO DEPOSIT
Call 762-9555, 762-8807
or 762-8597


WANTED D:

REAL ESTATE

Will buy 10 to 1,000 acres, reason-

ably priced. Immediate closing.
Call (850) 544-5441
or (850) 570-0222
-1 Ir


lk,










1996 Ford Expedition, leather
seats, runs and drives good, bent
fender and hood, $1,000. Call
674-8003. 6-25,7-2

AUTO PARTS &

ACCESSORIES
Cargo carrier for SUV, $20Q or
best offer. Call 6742469. 7-2,7-9
Chevy motor, 454 big block,
with turbo, 400 transmission, per-
fect shape, $1,000 for motor and
transmission. Call 227-4298 or
227-4881. 6-25, 7-2
Set of four tires and rims, 22",
comes with three month warranty
and all paper work, $2,000 firm;
subwoofers, 15" Reactors, in box,
comes with all cables, $400 or best
offer. Call 321-2975 or 762-4681.
6-25,7-2

Set of tires, four, Michelin
245/70/17, one brand new, three
in great .condition, $150. Call
674-7138 or 899-0269 leave mes-
sage. 6-25,7-2
15-inch wheels and tires, alumi-
num, fits Jeep, $150. Call 899-0269
or 674-7138 leave message. UFN


GUNS/HUNTING

RugerGP 100, .357 mag, stainless
steel, with holster and ammo, $425.
Call 674-1617. 7-2,7-9

SPORTING GOODS

C& EXERCISE

Ab-lounge, $40. Call 379-3965.
7-2, 7-9


HOUSEHOLD ITEMS-
$160 brand name queen
mattress set, unused with
warranty, 222-7783.
100 LEATHER Living
Room Set, Lifetime Warran-
ty. NEW, still in crate. $849
545-7112. Can deliver.
A NEW Queen Orthopedic
Pillowtop mattress set in
sealed plastic. Full warranty.
Sacrifice $279. Can deliver.
850-222-7783.
BED-KING PILLOWTOP
Orthopedic Mattress Set.
Brand new in plastic. Must
move, $449. 545-7112.
BEDROOM SET: New
SOLID WOOD 5 piece set
still boxed, $499,.can deliver.
222-7783.
Canopy Bed Brand New
in box. $125. 222-9879.
DINING ROOM Beautiful
cherry table, 6 chairs, lighted
china cabinet. Brand new.
in boxes, can deliver. Must
move, $799. 222-9879.
FULL mattress set. $125.
TWIN mattress set. $100.
BOTH NEW. 545-7112 De-
livery available.


JULY 2, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 27

MW,~~ "IU


THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL



CL ASITFIFDrS

To place your ad, call 643-3333 or 1-800-717-3333 by noon Eastern
Time on Saturday. Non-business ads run FREE for 2 weeks.


. Pool pump and filter, Kristal-
Clear model 520, with all acces-
sories, still in box, new, $75. Call
762-8471 after 5 p.m. 7-2,7-9

Gazelle exercise machine, like
new, paid over $400, asking $200
or best offer. Call 237-1317 or
209-4292. 7-2,7-9

Swimming pool, 24' above ground,
needsnewliner, $300. Call643-2799
after 7 p.m. 6-25,7-2

Gaming table, Foosball/air hockey/
electronic basketball, all in one, $30.
Call 670-1107. 6-25, 7-2

Trikke exerciser, brand new, $100.
Call 237-1317 or 209-4292. 6-25,7-2


MOTORCYCLES

& ATVS

2004 Yamaha Roadstar, Silvera-
da, 1600cc, 18,500 miles, garage
kept, many accessories, $6,000.
Call 445-2915. 6-25,7-2

20d0 TRX 400 EX, four wheel-
.er, runs great, $2,000. Call
674-8003. 6-25,7-2

125 Y2 Yamaha dirt bike, $900.
Call 227-4298 or 227-4881.6-25,7-2


FOR RENT
1 & 2 bedroom mobile home
on John F. Bailey Road, SR
20 W. in Blountstown. $85
to $145 weekly. Deposif re-
quired. All utilities included.
3 locations. NO PETS. Also
RV for rent and/or sale.
L Call 674-7616 ,


2006 Harley Davidson Road
King, one owner, black, less
than 100 miles, paid. $17,250,
sell for $14,500. Call 674-4364 or
643-7796. 5-14T.7-23
2007 Honda Shadow 750 Spirit,
windshield, highway bars, back
rest, luggage rack, like new, under
warranty, $5,500. Call 899-0269 or
674-7138 leave message. UFN


WATERCRAFT

Hydra Sport bass boat, 19', with
200 hp Yamaha ProV motor, troll-
ing motor, trailer, $4,995 or best
offer. Call 237-1317 or 209-4292.
7-2, 7-9

50 hp Mercury motor, short shaft,
runs good, $750; 85 hp, Johnson,
with controls, runs good $950;
1990 Tohatsu, 40 hp, with controls
$950. Call 227-4298 or 227-4881.
6-25, 7-2
16' Benito boat, 90 hp Johnson,
looks and runs great, galvanized
trailer, $1,500. Call 209-5270.
6-25,7-2


CAMPERS/ RVS

Coleman pop-up camper, sleeps
two or three, stove, sink, cabinets,
$400. Call 674-6242. 7-2,7-9


Call 762-8185

^^mpdroom, 2 bath
yokiblfraifdeand lot
'<.dj iaon,,m~yH" 71 N.


NEW HOMES

3 bedroom, 2 bath

with carport on 1/2 acre


$105,000


Includes refrigerator,
stove, dishwasher
and microwave


Payments starting as low as

$47215 month*
Call today for more information
PRO-TEAM REALTY GROUP LLC
Call 674-3002 or 674-9111 www.pro-teamrealty.com
* with H.O.P. Assistance & 30 year mortgage @ 6% and approved credit.


k- I


Two motor homes, 12x60, older
models, forstorage or partial rebuild,
no title, $2,500 for one and $2,000
for the other. Call 597-6620.
7-2, 7-9

Coachman motor home, older
model, 350, automatic, with less
than 70,000 original miles, com-
pletely self contained, has been
barn-kept much of its life, new seals
and gaskets, transmission over
hauled, runs great. Call 762-8471
after 5 p.m. 7-2,7-9

2003 Layton camper, 24', loaded,
clean, everything works, like new,
less than half the price, $7,000. Call
762-8726. 7-2, 7-9

1971 Avion camper, 28', no leaks,,
everything works, bumper pull
camper, $1,500 or best offer. Call
447-4120. 6-25,7-2


TOOLS & HEAVY

EQUIPMENT

Riding mower, $100. Call
674-1637. 7-2,7-9

Fiberglass toolbox, for large pick-
up, $65. Call 674-3264. 7-2,7-9


Cultivator, three point hitch, two
row,' complete with all feet and
sweeps, has been used, very good
condition, $250. Call 762-8693.
7-2, 7-9


Chihuahua

PUPPY
Tiny, male, 7 weeks old. :
Call 674-3532 72


HOME FOR SALE
New three OR RENT
bedroom,
two bath

FinleyAve. in 1Buyfor


Blountstown,
1,400 sq. ft.
on half acre.


$125,900
or rent for
$750 a month


Call 674-4118 or 674-5811 after 6 p.m.
or 447-0951 or 482-1634 anytime.


3 bedroom, 2 bath
14 x 70 mobile home
1/2 acre lot w/ 12 x 40 add-on
I&


On dead end of street bordering
with spring-fed creek in back
yard and St. Joe Forest on side.
Walking distance to Chipola River.
GREAT FOR HUNTING AND FISHING
-w, E i: g- aM *P i a


Trailer, aluminum, closed in,
6'x14', "V" front, bubble vent on
top, towed less than 100 miles, two
doors on rear, one door on side,
$2,000 firm; 10" table saw, with
stand, $125; 6' band saw, $150;
combination sander, 8"disc/4"belt,
$75. Call 762-8471 after 5 p.m..
7-2, 7-9

2006Andersontrailer, goosenect,
16', dual, 7,000 lbs., axles, $7,800
or best offer. Call 762-8785. 7-2,7-9

Mower accessories, foot/lower
unit, three blade prop, for 30 hp
Mariner motor. Call 674-8139 for
more details. 7-2,7-9

231 MF tractor, '96 model, 504
hours, two row Covington planter,
five foot bush hog, $8,000. Call
643-3372 after 5 p.m. 6-25,7-2

Finishing'mower, 5' wide, four
wheel, good condition, no longer
needed, $975 or best offer. Call
762-3388. 6-25,7-2

Lawn mower, Craftsman, riding,
16 hp, runs and cuts good, $250.
Call 674-8437. 6-25,7-2


Tool box, full
with locks and
674-8003. -


size, aluminum,
keys, $150. Call
6-25,7-2


HOMES & LAND


14 acres for sale,
Spring Branch and
Road, $170,000. Call
509-1213.


between
Conyers
Logan at
7-2,7-9


2/3 acre parcel in Telogia, priced
to sell. Call 668-2711. 6-25,7-2

1.4 acre lot in Hosford. Call
643-7326. 6-18 T. 7-16

Big lot on Chipola River, located in
Calhoun County. Call 643-1514.
UFN










HORSE FOR SALE
4 year old -
T4 Mare $350
Call 762-8185 evenings



Thistle Dew Farms



SILVER QUEEN
SWEET CORN
Possibly ready by July 4th
Only patch this season!
Call 674-8081 -

Mobile Home For Rent
Taking applications for 2
bedroom, 2 bath mobile
home located 6 miles north
on Hwy. 69N. No pets. 2
months rent for damage
and cleaning deposit, plus
first month's rent. Water,
sewer and grass cutting
provided.
Call 674-8888


Ir


~s~rps~ii~e~a~







Page 28 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JULY 2,2008


HOME

IMPROVEMENT

Sunsetter retractable awning, still
in box, paid $500, will take $250.
Call 379-3965. 7-2,7-9


PETS/SUPPLIES

Two parakeets, cage and all ac-
cessories included, $25. Call
643-2568. 7-2,7-9
Rottweiler puppy, free to good
home, four to five months old,
needs some TLC. Call 237-1317.
7-2, 7-9

Four kittens, free to good home,
ten weeks old, different colors.
Call 379-3046. 6-25,7-2

WANTED

Wanted: Will give $60 to $80 for
the bodies of junk autos and $125
for full bodies of junk autos. Call
Jimmy Dawson at 850-544-3478.
7-2T.9-10

Wanted: 22 rifle, either pump or
semi-auto, in good condition, good
price. Call 674-6442. 7-2,7-9


Wanted:
674-3264.


safe return as Bobby desperately
Mechanic.misses him. Call 643-7555 if you
7-2,7-9 have information on his where-
tohn it 7-


Wanted: looking for someone to
help fix a building. Call 674-3264.
6-25,7-2

Wanted: Banty or smaller breed of
chicken. Call 762-4398. 6-25, 7-2

Wanted: We buy junk cars, trucks,
batteries and salvage. We pay top
dollar. Call 643-5791 or 447-2215
ask for Hubert. 2-20T7-30

Wanted: Will buy junk cars and
will move, any condition. Call
762-8589. 1-9T.7-2

Wanted: Junk cars and trucks,
any condition, we pay cash. Call
762-8459 or 272-6836 cell. UFN


LOST & FOUND

Lost: Little Bobby Story is missing
a white chihuahua, approximately
three years did, answers to Apple,
small reward is offered upon his


II

CLASSIFIEDSl,


Lost: stray dog, beautiful and col-
orful, residing at Horizons School, Big yard sale, July 5, 12891 NW
he is located at 18634 NW CR 12 in Meyers Ann Street in Bristol, 284
Bristol, is mostly black with orange Beanie Babies, 106 videos, army
feet and legs. Call 643-6912. stuff, sports cards, yard tools, lofs
of nich stuff, cancel if rain. Call
6-25, 7-2
643-2085. 7-2
Lost: miniature Dachshund, fe-
male, full grown, black and tan, Big moving sale, Friday and Sat-
last seen in car in Bristol, belongs urday, July 4 and 5, 15520 NW
to a seven-year-old, please return. Broad Altha, dawn to dark, furni-
Call 643-4160 or 597-3291. 6-25,7-2 ture, appliances, tools, equipment,
collectibles. Call 272-2261. 6-25,7-2
Lost: blonde Cocker spaniel, last
seen on Old Bristol Road, an-
swers to "T-Bo", cash reward of-
fered. Call 643-6698 or 643-1153. Tell 'em you
6-25,7-2
saw it in The

ARD SALE Calhoun-Liberty
YARDSALE JOURNAL^

Moving sale, Friday and Saturday,
July 4 and 5, eight miles North of


Blountstown just past 275, starting
at 8 a.m., furniture, many house-
hold goods, sewing machine,
antiques. and collectibles, many
crafts, floral material and supplies,
washer and dryer. Call 762-3349.
7-2

Multi family yard sale, July 4 and
5, 8 a.m. until 1 p.m., something
for everyone, 20715 NE Chester
Street. Call 379-8350. 7-2,7-9


SUBSCRIBE TODAY TO


THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL


r-- -----------


NAME


ADDRESS


STATE ZIP


CITY


PHONE___





Please enclose a check or money order for $18 and mail to:

The Calhoun-Liberty Journal,
P.O. Box 536, Bristol, FL 32321
------------------------- ----------------------------------------------------------


HOUSE FOR RENT
2 BEDROOM, 1 BATH
In Hosford on Hwy. 65
just before you cross the
railroad tracks at Lowrey.
Call (850) 627-8287
between 6 p.m. 9 p.m.
Mon. Fri. and Sat. & Sun.
Between 9 a.m. 9 p.m.

r NJ-- -
FOR SALE BY OWNER I
Located on CR 333, 1,579 1
sq. ft. of living area, 6 room,
3 bedroom, 3 bath house
on 8+ acres, all fenced with
485 ft. frontage on CR 333.
$275,000
Possible owner financing.
Call (850) 643-3909
or 814-0740
I --------J .



make your an-
nual income your
monthly income.
Free 2 minute
message.Call
(888)-208-6654


I39B


auuuts. 7-2, 7-9






JULY 2, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 29


PLAT BOOKS
now available at
The Calhoun-Liberty Journal
office in Bristol.


"You Mean I Have
Another Cavity"
Person after person resists
going to their dentist to learn
how healthy or unhealthy their
mouths are. The frustration for .;, .
a very large percentage of the
public is doing their best to take l'
care of their dental health daily
and at their dental check-up they
learn once again that they have
a cavity.
Why is it that people can work Dr. Larry J. Cook
consistently and intently on caring for dental hygiene
and still have damage to their teeth? Tooth healthiness
or well-ness can be. envisioned as a "Three-Legged
Stool." Each leg of the stool is a variable, which must be
-considered in order to keep teeth healthy and sound.
The first leg of the stool is what we inherit when we
are born our dental genes. This is the variable that
we have no control over. Yet, heredity is the least im-
portant variable that influences tooth health long term.
Even though we do not have control of our heredity, this
variable can be compensated for with effort toward the
other two variables.
The second leg of our dental tooth stool is oral hy-
giene. It depends on how effective one is properly
cleaning every surface of every tooth multiple times a
day. Almost every person who enters a dental office is
using a toothbrush every day. Yet, 90% or more have
never been taught how to be the most effective with us-
ing dental hygiene tools (toothbrush, floss, perio aids,
etc).
The last leg of our stool (and by far the greatest influ-
ence) is nutrition. Most people believe that the sugars
we eat or drink cause cavities. Yet, the sugars are only
the food and energy source for bugs (bacteria), which
live in all human mouths. The oral "bugs" use sugars
(solid or liquid form) as food, convert it to energy, and
then release waste products into our mouths. This waste
from the bugs is the real culprit to tooth enamel since it
is a potent ACID. These acids dissolve the calcium out
of our teeth leaving a damaged hole or cavity.
Our strong recommendation to our patients is to look
closely at the amount and frequency of solid or liquid
sugar intake they have daily. It is not just candy and
cookies; but also soft drinks, power drinks, gum, mints,
sweet coffee, sweet tea, etc. The less sugar we give the
bugs, the lower the acid levels will be and the less likely
you and/or your children will have tooth damage.
See your dentist today and learn more of the nutrition-
tooth relationship.


www.drlarrycook.com u.MiI.
4307 Third Ave. Marianna (850) 526-4220>


Boyd supports fiscally responsible


tax relief for North Floridians


WASHINGTON, D.C. Congressman Allen
Boyd (D-North Florida), a leader of the Blue Dog
Coalition, supported the Alternative Minimum
Tax (AMT) Relief Act (HR 6275) to prevent
more than 25 million families nationwide-
including 38,000 North Floridians-from a
tax increase under the AMT. This legislation is
fully paid for and provides fiscally responsible
tax relief without adding to the federal budget
deficit.
"I am proud to support this fiscally responsible
: tax relief bill, which will put money back in the
pockets of thousands ofNorth Florida's families,"
Congressman Boyd said. "Our nation-the
strongest nation on the face of the Earth-can
and should provide sensible tax relief without
having our children and grandchildren foot the
bill. Yet again, the House of Representatives
has stood by this belief and passed responsible
AMT relief that complies with the pay-as-you-
go budget rules."
The legislation provides one-yea'r relief from
the AMT without adding to the deficit by closing
loopholes in the tax code, encouraging tax
compliance, and repealing excessive government
subsidies given to oil companies.
"The Senate is now tasked with considering
anAMT bill, and I strongly urge our Senators to


do the right thing for the future of our country and
support AMT relief that is paid for,"- said Boyd.
"This Congress made a commitment to be better
stewards of our country's fiscal and economic
health. The Blue Dogs and I are putting forth good
faith efforts to honor that commitment; it is high
Lime that those in the Senate did the same.
The AMT was created in 1969 to target 155
high income households that had been eligible
for so many tax benefits that they owed little or
no income tax under the tax code at the time. In
recent years, the AMT has been under increased
attention because it is not indexed for inflation,
resulting in a growing number of middle income
taxpayers subject to this tax who were never its
intended targets. Each year, the AMT hits more
and more middle class families unless it is changed
by Congress.
"The IRS calls the AMT the 'Number 1
most serious problem' facing taxpayers, and
they are right," Boyd stated. "While I applaud
this Congress for extending AMT relief in a
fiscally responsible way, we must work towards
developing a permanent solution. The American
people are looking to Congress to lead on this
issue, and I encourage all of my colleagues to join
me and the Blue Dogs in pushing for a permanent,
long term solution to the AMT challenge."


Senator Martinez and others introduce

new Gas Price Reduction Act of 2008


WASHINGTON --U.S.
Senator Mel Martinez (R-FL)
joined with more than 40
senators to introduce real
solutions for our nation's energy
crisis. The Gas Prices Reduction
Act of 2008 is a comprehensive
effort focusing on short and
long-term solutions to oil
supply constraints, including
expanding domestic exploration
and resource development, and
expansion of advanced hybrid
vehicle technologies.
"The price of gasoline is
one of the most critical issues
facing Floridians right now.


It's adversely affecting families
and businesses alike. We need
a comprehensive solution to
address this crisis," Senator
Martinez said. "This bill will
do a great deal to put our nation
on a path to cleaner, renewable
energy'alternatives while also
addressing current needs.
Americans want and deserve
real solutions to lower fuel
costs our bill is a step in that
direction."
Senator Martinez is a member
of the Senate Energy and
Natural Resources Committee
and has consistently called for


domestic resource development
and increased conservation
efforts.
"While this allows the
development of offshore oil and
natural gas exploration by states
wishing to do so, this measure
protects Florida's moratorium
in the Gulf of Mexico," said
Martinez, architect of the 2006
measure providing for no
exploration within 125 miles
of Florida's Gulf Coast. "I asked
that this bill include protections
for Florida's wishes and those
protections are included in this
bill."


Over 365,000 Florida home owners served;

My Safe Florida program approaching goals


TALLAHASSEE- Florida Chief Financial
Officer Alex Sink announced that more than
365,000 Florida homeowners have signed up
for free wind inspections through the My Safe
Florida Home (MSFH) program, only 35,000
inspections shy of the Florida Legislature's goal
of 400,000 free wind inspections by June 2009.
The popular first-come, first-serve program will
continue accepting applications online and over
the phone until it meets the 400,000 application
goal.
Participating homeowners receive a free
wind inspection report, which suggests ways
homeowners can harden their homes against
storm damage and informs homeowners if
they are currently eligible to save money on
their wind insurance premiums. To date, 60
percent of homeowners who have received a
free wind inspection are eligible for discounts
on their wind insurance premiums averaging
$220 statewide.
In 2007, the Florida Legislature directed the


MSFH program to provide inspections for at
least 400,000 site-built, single-family, residential
properties and provide grants to at least 35,000
applicants before June 30, 2009. Last month CFO
Sink announced that the program had exceeded
its grant goals and would transition to inspections
only. To date, the MSFH program, including
local government and non-profits, has approved
approximately 38,889 homeowners for mitigation
grants and has paid 18,465 grants totaling more
than $62.9 million.
Any Floridian who lives in a single-family, site-
built home is eligible for a free wind inspection
through the MSFH program.
Floridians can apply online at www.
MySafeFloridaHome.com or by calling the
program toll-free at 1-866-513-6734. Homeowners
who receive free wind inspections through the
MSFH program will receive a detailed inspection
report, complete with additional information on
estimated insurance premium discounts, if the
homeowner is eligible.







Page 30 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JULY 2, 2008


Bay Radiology Women's Imaging Center


first to offer the Aurora Breast MRI System


PANAMA CITY-Aurora Imaging Technology
Inc. announced that the Aurora 1.5Tesla
Dedicated Breast MRI System is immediately
available for the first time to Floridians at the Bay
Radiology Women's Imaging Center in Panama
City. The Aurora System is the first and only
Food and Drug Administration (FDA) cleared
breast MRI system specifically designed for
the detection, diagnosis and treatment of breast
disease.
According to the FloridaAnnual Cancer Report,
the percentage of advanced stage breast cancer has
steadily decreased since 1981 in Florida, and early
cancer detection through breast cancer screening
and physical examination has contributed to
this decline. However, breast cancer accounts
for almost 30 percent of all cancer diagnoses in
Florida women and is the second leading cause
of female cancer mortality in the state.
"There was a big demand for a more efficient
breast cancer screening in Bay County and we
chose the Aurora System to answer this call," said
James Strohmenger, M.D., chief executive officer
and radiologist, Bay Radiology. "The Aurora
System provides advanced imaging capabilities
and catches lesions that may not be spotted on
other imaging modalities or clinical exam. We
are proud to offer patients the Aurora System's
cutting-edge technology to enhance the medical


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR LIBERTY COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO. 2008-CA-42
TALQUIN SPRINGS GENERAL
PARTNERSHIP,
Plantiff,


KENOL MISTILIEN,
KNOWN TENANTS,
Defendant(s).


and UN-


NOTICE OF ACTION

TO: KENOL MISTILIEN

YOUR ARE NOTIFIED that a
Complaint for Foreclosure has
been filed against you and others,
regarding the following property in
Liberty County, Florida:

LOT 3, OF SUMMERWIND,
ACCORDING TO THE PLAT
THEREOF AS RECORDED IN
PLAT BOOK A, PAGE 65, OF
THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF LIB-
ERTY COUNTY, FLORIDA.

You are required to serve a copy
of your written defenses,.if any,
to it on Daniel E. Manausa, Es-
quire, Smith, Thompson, Shaw
& Manausa, P.A., Plaintiff's at-
torneys, 3520 Thomasville Road,
4th Floor, Tallahassee, Florida
32309-3469, no more than thirty
(30) days from the first publication
date of this notice of action, and
file the original with the Clerk of
this Court either before service on
Plaintiff's attorneys or immediately
thereafter; otherwise, a default will
be entered against you for the re-
lief demanded in the complaint or
petition.

DATED this 16'h day June, 2008.


Robert Hill
Clerk of the Court
BY: Vanell Summers, DC
As Deputy Clerk

Daniel E. Manausa, Attorney
3520 Thomasville Road
4th Floor
Tallahassee, FL 32309-3469 6-2, 7-2

PUBLIC HEARING
NOTICE (07.02)
1st Public Hearing Notice
Liberty County is considering
applying to the Florida Depart-
ment of Community Affairs (DCA)
for a Small Cities Community De-
velopment Block Grant (CDBG) of
up to $600,000.00. These funds
must be used for one of the follow-
ing purposes:
1 To benefit low and moderate
income persons;
2.To aid in the prevention or
elimination of slums or blight; or
3.To meet other community de-
velopment needs of recent origin
having a particular urgency be-
cause existing conditions pose a
serious and immediate threat to
the health or welfare of the com-
munity and where other financial
resources are not available to
meet such needs.
The categories of activities for
which these funds may be used
are in the areas of housing, neigh-
borhood revitalization, commer-
cial revitalization, or economic
development and include such im-
provement activities as acquisition
of real property, loans to private-
for-profit business, purchase of
machinery and equipment, con-
struction of infrastructure, rehabili-
tation of houses and commercial
buildings, and energy conserva-
tion. Additional information regard-
ing-the range of activities that may
be undertaken will be provided at
the public hearing. For each activ-


ity that is proposed, at least 70%
of the funds must benefit low and
moderate income persons.
In developing an application for
submission to DCA, the Liberty
County Board of County Com-
missioners must plan to minimize
displacement of persons as a re-
sult of planned CDBG activities. In
addition, the Liberty County Board
of County Commissioners is re-
quired to develop a plan to assist
displaced persons.
A public hearing to receive citi-
zen views concerning the commu-
nity's economic and community
development needs will be held
at the Liberty County Courthouse
on July 8th, 2008 at 6:45 PM. For
information concerning the public
hearing contact Robert Hill at Lib-
erty County Courthouse, 10818
NW SR 20, (850) 643-5404.
The public hearing is being con-
ducted in a handicapped acces-
sible location. Any handicapped
person requiring an interpreter for
the hearing impaired or the visual-
ly impaired should contact Robert
Hill at Liberty County Courthouse,
10818 NW SR 20, (850) 643-5404,
at least five calendar days prior
to the meeting and an interpreter
will be provided. Any non-English
speaking person wishing to attend
the public hearing should contact,
at least five calendar days prior to
the meeting and a language inter-
preter will be provided. To access
Robert Hill at Liberty County Court-
house, 10818 NW SR 20, (850)
643-5404 a Telecommunication
Device for Deaf Persons (TDD)
please call Robert Hill at Liberty
County Courthouse, 10818 NW
SR 20, (850) 643-5404. Any hand-
icapped person requiring special
accommodation at this meeting
should contact Robert Hill at Lib-
erty County Courthouse, 10818
NW SR 20, (850) 643-5404, at
least five calendar days prior to
the meeting. 7-2


care of our community."
The Aurora System was designed with a
woman's anatomy in mind, which is evidenced
by the contoured table design and the large
homogeneous elliptical field of view unique to the
Aurora System. In addition, it offers a computer-
automated and fully integrated MR-guided biopsy
- technology which virtually eliminates human error
and accurately determines needle placement. These
advancements are only a fraction of the Aurora
System's capabilities, all of which deliver increased
patient comfort and a more efficient medical
practice for breast health centers.
"The Aurora System's unique MRI technology
provides one of the most advanced breast imaging
tools available, because it is exclusively designed
to aid in the fight against breast disease," said
Olivia Ho Cheng, president and chief executive
officer, Aurora Imaging Technology Inc. "The
Aurora System is well-positioned to help conquer
this battle, and proudly partners with breast health
facilities, like Bay Radiology, seeking to offer the
most effective instrument to improve breast cancer
statistics and patient care."
The availability of the Aurora System at the Bay
Radiology Women's Imaging Center supports the
most recent American Cancer Society guideline,
recommending breast MRI for women at high risk
of breast cancer.


N .
x. OneStopCareerCenter
16908 NE Pear SI. Suite 2.
Blounrlsiown *Phone (850) 674-5088
The following positions- are
S... available: Construction Trades
Helper, Janitorial, Dietetic
Technician, Construction
Worker, Office Clerk, Food
Service Worker, Production
Manager, Truck Driver. EOE
Service Chipola Workforce Board UFN


JOB OPENING
The School Board of Liberty County is accepting appli-
cations for the following positions for the 2008-2009 school
year. A complete certified application listing three (3) pro-
fessional references and resume is required. It will need to
be submitted in the Information and Opportunities section
of the online application at the LCSB website, www.lcs-
bonline.org. Once in this area, follow the "step by step" di-
rections. Any computer with internet access can be used,
i.e. (Library, One Stop Career Center, Adult School, etc.).
Those without computer access may come to the Dis-
trict Administration office and complete your application.
Assistance will be provided, if needed. Reasonable ac-
commodations for completing forms and interviews are
available for people with disabilities when requested in
advance. For a request for reasonable accommodations,
please contact the Office of the Superintendent.
Teacher (Elementary); 2 Positions
Location: Tolar School (Ten month positions)
MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS:
* Bachelor's Degree from an accredited educational insti-
tution required.
* Certified by the State of Florida in appropriate area.
* Must provide written references upon request from the
Superintendent.
COMPENSATION: SALARY RANGE: $31,770 $54,117
Applications will be received from:
June 23, 2008 July 7, 2008
EMPLOYMENT WILL BE CONTINGENT UPON
CLEARANCE OF FINGERPRINTS AND DRUG TEST



JOB OPENING
The School Board of Liberty County is accepting ap-
plications for the following positions for the 2008-2009
school year. A complete certified application listing three
(3) professional references and resume is required. It will
need to be submitted in the Information and Opportuni-
ties section of the online application at the LCSB website,
www.lcsbonline.org. Once in this area, follow the "step by
step" directions. Any computer with internet access can be
used, i.e. (Library, One Stop Career Center, Adult School,
etc.).
Those without computer access may come to the Dis-
trict Administration office and complete your application.
Assistance will be provided, if needed. Reasonable ac-
commodations for completing forms and interviews are
available for people with disabilities when requested in
advance. For a request for reasonable accommodations,
please contact the Office of the Superintendent.
Teacher (Middle School)
Teacher (Elementary)
Location: Hosford School (Ten month positions)
MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS:
* Bachelor's Degree from an accredited educational insti-
tution required.
* Certified by the State of Florida in appropriate area.
* Must provide written references upon request from the
Superintendent.
COMPENSATION: SALARY RANGE: $31,770 $54,117
Applications will be received from:
June 19, 2008 July 2, 2008
EMPLOYMENT WILL BE CONTINGENT UPON
CLEARANCE OF FINGERPRINTS AND DRUG TEST
6.25.7-2






JULY 2, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 31


LAND CLEARING
Specializing in lots and small acreage.

James Peddie, owner/operator

TELEPHONE 643-7910
L


Check with us at
Margie's
Florist
SFlowers for
"j" all occasions.
'WyLive and silk
arrangements.
We specialize in
weddings at a
good price!
AllhM. Hwy 71 South on
0 J P Peacock Road


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Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers


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0 a


ibertv Post &


Barn Pole Inc.

Dempsey Barron Road, Bristol 643-5995 (off Hwy. 12 N)
TOP TOP TOP FACTORY
GRADE GRADE GRADE SECONDS
7' Posts 8' Posts 6'6" Posts 8' Corners
Top Size Top Size Top Size under 3"
3-4" 2-3", 3-4" 2-2.5" 3-4"
4-5" 4-5" 2-5.3" 4-5"
5-6" 5-6" 3-3.5" 5-6"
6-7" 3.5-4" 6-7"
7-8" 4-5" 7-8"
SPECIALTY 8"+ 5"+ 8"+
POSTS
1/4 rounds Items FACTORY SECONDS
1/2 rounds subject to 6'6" Posts, Top Size, under 2"
Flat Face availability 2-3" 3-4" 4-5" 5"
W- We e got the fence posts to meet your needs.


-..


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---
A."ZI :


In*


LINDA'S
Lawn Care & More
"When it comes to your
lawn, just give me a call
cause I can do it all!"
Call Linda Haines 643-2491
14632 NW SR 20 Bristol


CLAY O'NEAL'S

Land Clearing & Fencing
*Dozer and Excavation work
S Demolition Pond Digging
Road Building Field Fence ||
or Barbed Wire Tractor Work

C Over 15 years experience
Clay O'Neal (850)762-9402
4433 NW County Road 274 (850) 762-9402
Altha, FI 32421 Cell (850) 832-5055


~c
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Page 32 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JULY 2, 2008


10


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3 More Al The
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only 45,000 miles,
AWD, loaded


OBS eS

TsjofJit


, 4 dr. sedan, 4 cyl.,
new body style,c y l^
gas saver


V6, 5 speed,
gas saver


07 CHEVY C-1500 CREW CAB, silver, 28,927 miles, stk #30219
07 FORD FOCUS, grey, 29,625 miles, stk #30889
07 MERCURY GRAND MARQUIS, silver, 26,799 miles, stk #32019
06 CHEVY TRAILBLAZER, gray, 57,665 miles, stk #32129
06 FORD FREESTAR, silver, 44,513 miles, stk # 31919
05 CHEVY C-1500, ton, 69,454 miles, stk #31829
05 MERCURY MOUNTAINEER, blue, 25,985 miles, stk #32089
*hmref lor ihalsdltion purpose otnly All financing
wlih appioted ciedn Down payment. ratust rate,
& wmrn moy vary. ANwll p i a llus 1ta. S I& & 5299 J
F&H oe. All vehitles tubiw toI pnri ole f


PC & oa
PC & P.Cola


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04 CHEVY K-1500 Z-71, silver, 106,934 miles, stk #65103
04 DODGE DURANGO LIMITED, blue, 54,392 miles, stk #32059
04 FORD F-150 4X4, red, 33,597 miles, stk #32189
04 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE, white, 69,056 miles, stk #32079
04 PONTIAC GRAND AM, gray, 52,295 miles, stk #32119
03 FORD EXPLORER, green, 58,174 miles, stk #32099
02 GMC SIERRA 4X4, white, 80,689 miles, stk #308991


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