Group Title: Calhoun-Liberty Journal (Bristol, Fla.).
Title: The Calhoun-Liberty journal
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00027796/00085
 Material Information
Title: The Calhoun-Liberty journal
Alternate Title: Calhoun Liberty journal
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Calhoun-Liberty Journal
Publisher: Liberty Journal, Inc.
Liberty Journal
Place of Publication: Bristol, Fla
Publication Date: February 6, 2008
Copyright Date: 2008
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Bristol (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Liberty County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Calhoun County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Liberty -- Bristol
United States of America -- Florida -- Calhoun
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in Sept. 1991.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 11, no. 38 (Sept. 18, 1991).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00027796
Volume ID: VID00085
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AKN4565
oclc - 33425067
alephbibnum - 002046630
electronic_aleph - 003298625
electronic_oclc - 60662266
lccn - sn 95047245
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly journal (Bristol, Fla.)

Full Text
UiNv of F!'cida History Library
PO Box 117007
Gainesville Fl 32611


S2 11/6/2009
4S76


18-yr-old shot

twice in 'road

rage' incident

in Bristol late

Friday night
by Teresa Eubanks, Journal Editor
A Panama City man was hospitalized with two
gunshot wounds after a road rage incident in Bristol,
according to a report from the Liberty County Sheriff's
Department.
Three men, including the shooter, were stopped
about 20 minutes later in Blountstown.
Brian Merrill Beasley, 18, called 911 around
midnight Friday and said he had been shot by another
motorist. When Deputy Timothy Partridge arrived at
the scene along State Road 20 at Chester Street, he
found Beasley bleeding severely from gunshot wounds
to his right foot and left leg.
Beasley was taken to the emergency room at
Calhoun-Liberty Hospital and later transferred to
Tallahassee Memorial Hospital.
Beasley told the deputy a white Chevrolet car had
been following him as he traveled westbound on State
Road 20. He said the vehicle kept its high beam lights
on and would speed up to pass him and then slow down
when pulling in his path.
Stating that he had "gotten tired of the situation,"
Beasley pulled off the side of the road at Chester
Street. When the white car drove past him, he threw
a Styrofoam cup and hit the front of the car.
He said the car came to a complete stop and began
backing up to his vehicle.
Beasley said he then got out of his vehicle and used
a chain to break out the car's back windshield.
He said the front seat passenger fired a gun at him
several times before the driverpulled away and headed
toward Blountstown.
At 12:22 a.m., officers from the Calhoun County
See ROAD RAGE continued on page 15


500
includes
tax


HEOUN-LIRTY



JOURNAL


SVolume 28, Number 6 Wednesday Feb. 6,2008_


Shiver sentenced to life


for wife's


shooting death


by Teresa Eubanks, Journal Editor mstea oi a state prison bucausc ie is a ormer
An Altha man arrested for the shooting correctional officer. The judge recommended a
death of his wife last year will spend the rest federal review of his case.
of his life in prison. n Florida, life means life," explains Joe
In a Jan. 29 hearing before Judge Michael Grammer of the State Attorney's Office. He
Miller in Marianna, Julian Jack Shiver said barring some change in law or action of
waived his right to trial and admitted he shot the go emor, Shiver "will die in prison."
his wife, Lisia Shiver, and fired on Paul Barber Shli er's estranged wife died in a Dothan
Jr. at a Cottondale residence last April. hospital six days after he barged into
Shiver told the judge he used a 9 millimeter Barber's Cottondale residence
gun on his unarmed wife and said that and shot her last April.
Barber, who was armed, "shot me According to the
down." Jackson County Sheriff's
"The bottom line, by pleading Department, Shiver
guilty to the charge of second .kicked in the door, shot
degree murder, which is a firs his wife inthe head and
degree felony punishable by hen turned and fired
life since a firearm was used, ', i. ': at Barber. Barber fired
you would serve a natural life 4* .. back, shooting Shiver
term," the judge told Shiver. %A l # tl n~ ce in the torso.
"Do you understand that?" ,. i ( Barber called 911
Shiver replied, "Yes, sir." and emergency workers
Shiver pleaded guilty arrived to find Shiver and
to second degree murder, Il \I fe on the floor with
attempted second degree JACK SHIVER gun-hot sounds.
murder, burglary while armed with a firearm and At the time of the shooting, Shiver worked as a
shooting into an occupied dwelling, lieutenant at Liberty Correctional Institution in Bristol.
Shiver's attorney, Bob Sombathy, asked that his His wife and Barber were both employed at Calhoun
client be allowed to serve his time in a federal facility Correctional Institution.


INSIDE

Man asks deputy for
ride to 'buy a bag of
weed"after 911 call
PAGE 2

Teen charged with
burglary, grand theft
PAGE 3

Candidate list grows
PAGE 3

BUSINESS NEWS
Chuck Roberts named
director at Superior;
Gov. Crist meets
Marti and Marti
PAGE 12


New ambulance service hopes to get on the road soon


by Teresa Eubanks, Journal Editor
They have the license, employee interviews are
being conducted and they're waiting to get their
Medicare and Medicaid provider numbers.
"Everything's moving along," said Calhoun-Liberty
Hospital Administrator Ron Gilliard about plans for
the facility to take over ambulance service in Calhoun
County following Emergystat's recent pullout.


"We're not going to have any problem with
staffing," he said, noting, "We've had tremendous
response in regard to people wanting to work with
us." He said Phillip Hill, who will oversee the new
ambulance service, interviewed job applicants this
past Saturday.
The new ambulance service will use a company to
handle billing, Gilliard said.


He said there's been a few bureaucratic bumps in
the road but problems are being worked out.
He hopes to be up and running within a week or two,
depending on how soon those all-important provider
numbers are assigned. Until then, he said they have
one ambulance on loan from Gadsden County and are
being backed up by the Liberty County ambulance
service through a mutual aid agreement.


7 1118121[lloo11118
7 81812200900 8


Senior Citizens schdedufie...21 G.nirde,'rg.. 23 Cab;.-ie,'... 22 & 26 Classifieds. .24 & 25


Sheriffs Log...2 Community Cafendar. ,.4 Comim'entary .6, 7 News from tthe Pews...~ F'anmers Almanac..9


~1_ ~ _I__


Birthdays... 10










Page 2 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL FEBRUARY 6, 2008


Man calls 911 from trailer park


for ride to 'buy a bag of weed'


When Calhoun County
Sheriff's Deputy Bliss Moreau
responded to a 911 call at Hidden
Creek Trailer Park Saturday, he
found 26-year-old Buck Edward
Clary sitting on the ground,
leaning against a pay phone pole
and frantically waving his arms.
Although the temperature was
in the mid-30s, Clary wore a
sleeveless shirt, shorts and tennis
shoes.
As the deputy approached
Clary, he realized the man was
heavily intoxicated. Clary stated
that while he didn't need medical
attention, he did need help.
He then begged the deputy to
take him "to buy a bag of weed
on River Street."
He told Moreau that he "hadn't
smoked weed in two weeks and
was going nuts."
The deputy patted down Clary
while telling him he "definitely
would not" take him to go buy
marijuana. He then urged Clary to
return to his residence at Lot #9 of
the trailer park and go to bed.
Clary then began running back
toward his trailer.
Shortly after midnight, Clary
made a second 911 call, followed
by another call at 12:40 a.m. and
again at 2:09 a.m. During the
last call, Moreau answered and
recognized Clary's voice. Clary
ended the call by spelling out a
curse word at the deputy.
Moreau went to Clary's home
to check on him and found him
there with all the lights on,
windows open and blinds up as
he sat on his bed. The deputy's
report said Clary was alone but

Woman arrested
for banging on
doors at night
An intoxicated woman who was
looking for a ride home to Altha
after a night at a bar was found
banging on doors along Flatwoods
Road late Thursday night.
Sgt. Mark Mallory of the
Calhoun County Sheriff's
Department respond to complaints
about a white female going from
home to home knocking on doors.
Mallory recognized the woman
as Karen Bryant, whom he had
previously arrested.
She got in his patrol car when
he told her he would take her
home. Just before they arrived in
Altha, Bryant suddenly realized
the officer was someone who had
arrested her before.. She became
upset and demanded that he pull
over.
He advised her not to knock
on any more doors as she got
out of his patrol car. She replied
that she would go up to a house
if she wanted to and he couldn't
stop her.
As she began walking to a
nearby home, Mallory pulled his
patrol car into the yard and took
her into custody.
She was handcuffed and taken
to jail, where she was charged
with disorderly intoxication.


ARREST

REPORTS
compiled by
Journal
Editor
Teresa
Eubanks

talking as though someone was
there with him as he pretended to
smoke a-marijuana cigarette.
After the deputy got Clary's
attention, Clary walked out and
met him on the front porch,
where he began yelling and acting
aggressively. Moreau believed
Clary was under the influence of
more than alcohol and his antics
were drawing an audience as
several people gathered outside


during his outbursts.
The deputy told Clary he was
being arrested for disorderly
intoxication. Clary kept his
hands-clutched to his chest as
Moreau attempted to place him
in handcuffs.
As he was being led to a patrol
car, Clary stumbled and fell.
When he hit the ground, he tried
to get away from the deputy by
rolling under his patrol vehicle.
With the help of Deputy John
Sheetz, Clary was pulled from
under the vehicle and placed in
the back seat.
He remained uncooperative
at the jail and had to be placed
into a cell without finishing the
booking process, which resulted
in a charge of resisting arrest
without violence.


Suspect says 'that's what I do'
when found with bag of marijuana
The passenger in a vehicle that was pulled over for two traffic
infractions was arrested after he was found with a bag containing well
over an ounce of marijuana at 2:34 a.m. Saturday in Blountstown.
Deputy Mark Mallory and Blountstown Police Officer Patrick
Crawford stopped Bobby Faircloth, 51, who was driving a Ford truck
on North Main Street.
When his passenger, Rocky Lee Brown, 46, was asked to step out
of the truck, officers notice something stuffed in his front left pants
pockets. When asked to remove it, he pulled out a plastic bag that
held 32 grams of marijuana.
Brown told officers it was marijuana and stated, "That's what I
do."
Brown was charged with possession of a controlled substance. Hee
was also given a verbal warning for failure to wear a seatbelt.




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CALHOUN COUNTY
Jan. 26
-Barry Parrish, burglary (three times), VOCP
Jan. 28
*Rickey Battles, VOP.
*Jeremy Pouncy, driving while license sus-
pended or revoked.
Jan. 29
*Edna Lee, aggravated stalking.
*Taylor Allen, FTA, VOP (county).
*Bryant Washington, criminal use of personal ID
information (24 times), petty theft.
*Kim Merritt Lewis, driving while license sus-
pended or revoked, Leon Co. contempt of
court.
Jan. 31
*Marcus Doles, possession of less than 20
grams of marijuana, tampering with evidence.
Feb. 1
*Karen Bryant, disorderly intoxication.
*Jackie Mears, domestic battery.
*Jonathan Mears, domestic battery.
*Felicia Boyd, disorderly conduct.
*Jason McCreary, VOCP.
*Belinda Mayo, VOSS.
Feb. 2
*Trevor Johnson, possession of less than 20
grams of marijuana, possession of drug para-
phernalia, resisting without violence, tampering
with evidence.
*Thaddeus Green, possession of less than
20 grams of marijuana, carrying a concealed
weapon.
*Anthony Wallace, possession of less than 20
grams marijuana, carrying a concealed weapon.
*Curtis Wallace, possession of less than 20
grams marijuana, carrying a concealed weapon.
*Jose L. Martinez, no valid driver's license.
*Rocky Brown, possession of a controlled sub-
stance (cannabis).
Feb. 3
*Buck Clary, drunk and disorderly, resisting
without violence.
*Charlie Drew, uttering a forged instrument.
*Kelvin Brown, VOP (county).
Feb. 4
*William Barfield, possession of less than 20
grams, possession of drug paraphernalia.
*Juan Lopez, no valid driver's license.


LIBERTY COUNTY
Jan. 28
*Derek Hemanes, domestic violence.
*Ashley Raffield, petty theft (four counts).
*Dakota Wilson, VOP, petty theft (four counts).
*Linda Lorraine Smith, battery (two counts).
,Jan. 29
*Edna Roberts Lee, holding for CCSO.
Jan. 30
*Richard Carl Shuler Jr., DUI.
*Randy Brooks, holding for Franklin Co.
Feb. 1
*Karen McClendon, holding for CCSO.
*Dannyelle White, holding for CCSO.
Feb. 3
*Daniel Woodrum, DUI.

Listingsinclude name followedbychargeandidentification ofarrestingagency.Thenamesaboverepresent
those charged. We remind our readers that all are presumed innocent until proven guilty

Blountstown Police Dept. ow
Jan. 28 through Feb. 3, 2008
Citations issued:
Accidents............... 01 Traffic Citations... ..... 03
Special details (business escorts, traffic details).....101
Business alarms.....01 Residential alarms..........00
Com plaints...................... ........ ................143







FEBRUARY 6, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 3


Candidate lists continue to grow for Aug. election


by Teresa Eubanks, Journal Editor
Several new candidates have
come forward in the past two
weeks to make their intent to seek
office known. The list includes:

LIBERTY COUNTY
Major Donnie Conyers of the
Liberty County Sheriff's Office
has filed his intent to run for the
job of sheriff.
Incumbent Elections
Supervisor Marcia Wood will
seek another term in office after
filing her intent on Monday.
Four people have their eye on
the post to be vacated when Tax


Collector Carol Strickland retires
after this term: Julie Suber, Joan
J. Wright, Marie G. Goodman and
Thomas "Bubba" Rast.
Four candidates are vying
for the District 5 seat on the
Liberty County 'Commission so
far. Incumbent L.B. Arnold has
said he does not plan to seek re-
election. Those hoping to take his
place include Robert L. Parrish,
Curtis Lee Fletcher, Eddie Pullam
and Edward "Kevin" Williams.
Jerry Lewis of Bristol is running
for the District 3 seat on the
Liberty County Commission.
Incumbent Albert "Butch"


Butcher will seek another term in
District 1 of the Liberty County
Commission.
Sue Summers of Bristol
is the first to announce plans
to run for the job of School
Superintendent.
Other offices up for re-election
include Clerk of Court and
Property Appraiser along with
the District 1 and 2 seats on the
Liberty County School Board.

CALHOUN COUNTY
Incumbent Clerk of Court
Ruth Attaway has filed her intent
to runn again.
Incumbent David Tatum will


seek another term as the county's
top law enforcement officer.
Although a recent story indicated
otherwise, this will be the first run
for the job by candidate Charles
McCrone Jr., who would also like
to wear the sheriff's badge.
Jerry Guilford has joined Cecil
Ray Cochran in the race for the
District 1 seat on the Calhoun
County Commission, while
incumbent Jeral R. Hall will run
again for the District 3 seat on
that board.
Orville Eby is now in the
race for the District 5 seat on the
Calhoun County Commission,
joining Thomas G. Flowers,


Clifford "Jeff" O'Brian and
Tammy S. Rushing who have
already announced their intent.
Danny Ryals and Steve Mears
Jr. are both in the race for the
District 1 spot on the Calhoun
County School Board.
Incumbent Terrill L. Stone will
seek another term running the
Property Appraiser's office.
Clifford Jackson and Kenneth
F. Speights will run for the District
4 spot on the Calhoun County
School Board.
The Primary Election will be
held Aug. 26 with the General
Election following on Nov. 4.


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Blountstown teenager charged

with burglary and grand theft


A teenage boy is facing
burglary and grand theft charges
after he confessed to taking a
small safe and some jewelry
from a Pear Street residence in
Blountstown.
According to a report from the
Blountstown Police Department,
the items were stolen from the
home of Carolyn G. Keller
between the hours of 4 p.m. and
7:30 p.m. on Jan. 31.
It is believed that the boy
used a set of keys that had gone
missing a couple of days earlier to
get into the home. Once inside, he
went through some jewelry on a
dresser and removed a small safe
hidden under a bed, according to
the report.
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home was found to have fragments
from several documents that had
been in the safe. Also found at
that site was a red velvet case that
held a diamond ring and a pair of
earrings, which Keller identified
as hers.
While talking with relatives
of the suspect, a family member
walked out of her home holding
the safe and turned it over to
police. She said it had been
hidden in a bedroom closet.
Two days later, the victim's


son confirmed that the 12 silver
dollars that had been in the safe,
were used at Harveys. The coins
were collected and placed in
evidence.
Officers learned that the
suspect had told a friend "he had
a safe to get into" and later asked
someone for a ride to Harveys.
Store surveillance video later
showed the boy had been in the
store with the coins.
The boy will be turned over
to the Department of Juvenile
Justice.


Man found passed out in truck
Deputies responding to a reckless driving complaint found a man
in a red Chevrolet Blazer parked within the county right-of-way along
State Road 71 Saturday night.
A white male, later identified as Matthew Trevor Johnson, was
found passed out in the front passenger's seat.
A deputy noted it appeared Johnson had been driving since there
were no footprints around the vehicle.
The officers noticed the odor of burnt marijuana coming from
inside the truck. They roused Johnson, who was dozing next to an
open window. An alcoholic beverage had been spilled on his shirt and
a small amount of marijuana "shake" was found on his right pants leg.
Deputies stopped him when he tried to brush the marijuana remnants
from his pants.
When one of the deputies grabbed Johnson's right wrist, he came
to and said, "Leave me alone." He pulled away from the deputies,
who then used force to get him out of the vehicle, handcuffed and
into a patrol car.
During a search of Johnson, deputies found a cigarette box with
less than 20 grams of marijuana, a grinder with a small amount of
marijuana and a pack of rolling papers.
Once he arrived at the county jail, Johnson had to be placed in an
isolation cell because he was too intoxicated to be booked in.
His vehicle was towed from the scene.
Johnson was charged with possession of less than 20 grams of
marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia, resisting arrest without
violence and tampering with evidence.


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Page 4 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL FEBRUARY 6, 2008


Group meets to gather

history of Calhoun Co.
A meeting is scheduled for Thursday,
Feb. 14 at 5 p.m. (CT) at the M&B Depot
in Blountstown for a new group that is
being organized to gather, preserve, record
and put on display the history of Calhoun
County and the surrounding area.
The historic information and items
collected by the new group will become
part of a heritage museum and genealogy
research room to be located at the recently
renovated M&B Railroad Depot in
Blountstown.
Those members recently appointed by
the Blountstown City Council and anyone
interested in becoming part of this new
endeavor should attend the upcoming
meeting. Email mbrailroad@yahoo.com
for more information.

Mayhaw School presents

Miss Black History Pageant
Come join the Mayhaw School Com-
munity as we celebrate our Black Nation-
al Heritage in the presentation of "Black
Healthy Heritage." Our projection will
be exhibited at the 2008 Mayhaw School
Miss Black History Pageant on Penning-
ton Ave. at 2 p.m. (CT) Saturday, Feb. 9
in Blountstown High School Auditorium.
There will be a small fee of $5 at the
door.
All proceeds will be appropriated to-
ward the Mayhaw School, the Gammon
and Charles E. Sheard Scholarships.
Come help us celebrate our Black Her-
itage through out the month of February.
Look for other announcements during
this month

Sign-ups for girls
softball set for Feb. 9
The Calhoun County Dixie Girls Soft-
ball will hold sign-ups on Feb. 9 from 10
a.m to 1 p.m. at the W.T. Neal Civic Cen-
ter. The sign-up is for ages 8 to 15 and
will cost $50 each.
For more information, please call
762-2092.


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POSTED EVENTS INCLUDE:
* Altha Homecoming
* Christmas Parades
* Christmas on the Square



The Calhoun-Liberty Journal is
published each Wednesday
by the Liberty Journal Inc.,
Summers Road, P.O. Box 536,
Bristol, FL 32321
Annual subscriptions are $18.
Periodicals postage paid at Bristol, FL
POSTMASTER: Send address corrections
to: P.O. Box 536, Bristol, FL 32321.


CALENDAR


Ex
A*










ti
CE
*E


BIRTHDAYS

HV NT Y 'Mtiley Wil ams &' Louise Sumner
FEBRUARY 6A
TODAY'S MEETINGS
Long Term Care, 10 a.m. till noon, Calhoun County Public Library
Rotary Club, noon, Calhoun-Liberty Hospital
Weight Loss Support Group, 1:30 p.m., Shelton Park Library
AA, 7 p.m., Calhoun County Old Ag Bldg. east door, in front of jail



BIRTHDAYS
Imma Orama, PRebefah Wi(rse &' Ilona 'Pitts
TODAY'S MEETINGS
Magnolia VFD, 6 p.m., Fire House
Nettle Ridge FD, 7 p.m., Fire House
Mossy Pond VFD, 7 p.m., Fire House
AA, 7 p.m., basement of Calhoun County Courthouse eBKRKUARY 7



BIRTHDAYS
'Anity La tfy Wil\ord
EVENTS
Dance, 6 12 p.m., American Legion Hall in Blountstown



BIRTHDAYS
'Alex Suinmmerli' &-' Ashl cifJ lson
EVENTS

Miss Black History Pageant
2 p.m. (CT.) BHS Auditorium
Train Rides, 11 a.m. 3 p.m., Veterans Memorial Park Civic Center
tDance, 6 12 p.m., American Legion Hall in Blountstown


J '" (Icc" ,f'. l( C i u t. tJ


M N AFB1

BIRTHDAYS
James 'Budc 'Bozeman
TODAY'S MEETINGS
Walk-A-Weigh Program, 9 a.m., Veterans Memorial Park Civic Center
Keep Calhoun Co. Beautiful Inc., 9 a.m., board room of the Calhoun Co.
-xtension office
Citizens Advisory Council for Big Bend Hospice, 11:30 a.m.,
palachee Restaurant
Blountstown Main Street, 5:30 p.m., El Jalisco
Altha Boy Scouts, 5:30 p.m., Altha Volunteer Fire Department
Blountstown Lions Club, 6 p.m., Apalachee Restaurant
Red Level Lodge #134, 7 p.m., 5602 Alliance Rd., Marianna
Bristol City Council, 6:30 p.m., City Hall



TODAY'S MEETINGS
Calhoun Co. School Board, 5 p.m., Calhoun Courthouse
Liberty County School Board, 5 p.m., Liberty Education and Administra-
We Center in the library
Calhoun County Girl Scout Troop 579, 5:30-7 p.m., W.T. Neal Civic
;enter
Altha Town Council, 6 p.m., City Hall
Blountstown City Council, 6 p.m.
Boy Scout Troop 206, 7 p.m., Veterans Memorial Park Civic Center
Blountstown Chapter #179 O.E.S., 7 p.m., Dixie Lodge
Bristol Lions Club, 7 p.m., Apalachee Restaurant
Bristol VFD 7-30 p m Bristol City Hall


THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL


Located at 11493 NW Summers Road in Bristol
MAILING ADDRESS: P.O. Box 536, Bristol, FL 32321
TELEPHONE (850) 643-3333 or 1-800-717-3333
Fax (850) 643-3334 EMAIL: thejournal@fairpoint.net


(USPS 012367)
Summers Road


Tolar 8th graders

selling raffle tickets
W.R. Tolar 8th grade students are rais-
ing money to go to Washington, D.C.
They will be selling raffle tickets for
a chance to win a $100 Piggly Wiggly
gift certificate. Tickets will be sold for
$1 each.
A table will be set up at the Piggly Wig-
gly in Bristol on Feb. 9, in Blouritstown
on Feb. 16, and again in Bristol Feb. 23
to sell these raffle tickets. The drawing
will be held on March 1. Come out and
purchase your tickets to have a chance to
win and support our youth.
The 8th grade students are also selling
them individually so you can just pur-
chase one from them. Donations are wel-
come as well.

Fraternal Military Assoc.
to tour historical war sites
The Fraternal Military Association
of the U.S.A. will tour the Normandy
Invasion Beaches, London, Bastogne,
Brussels, Amsterdam, Paris and more.
They will be departing from New York
on June 17.
Current, past military personnel,
dependents, friends, plus the general
public are invited to participate in this
memorable journey to commemorate the
64th anniversary of D-Day June 6, 1944.
For information call Sy Canton at
561-865-8495 or write to him at 14130-C,
Nesting Way, Delray Beach, FL 33484.

Donations sought for
spring rummage sale
Donations will be accepted for the
annual rummage sale at Panhandle Pioneer
Settlement in the Frink Gym starting
Monday. Feb. 11.
Everything from clothing, farm
implements, furniture, housewares to
collectibles and toys will be accepted.
The last day to make your donation
will be Feb. 27. For information, call
674-2777.
The Panhandle Pioneer Settlement is
a living museum documenting rural life in
NW Florida since the early i800s.

Benefit for Miles Barfield
We're having a benefit lunch for Miles
Barfield on Feb. 16. He has cancer and is
a Vietnam Veteran. The plate consists of
chicken or Boston butt and the price per
plate is a $6 donation. The lunch will be
held at the Wildcat's Den in Altha.
For more information, please call
762-4100.





That's how many copies of
The Calhoun-Liberty Journal
were distributed last week,
ensuring plenty of coverage for
your community announcements
and great response for our
business advertisers!


JOURNAL STAFF
Johnny Eubanks .... ..... ...Publisher
Teresa Eubanks.................... Editor
Tammy McCalvin..........Bookkeeper
Trish Corrente.................Advertising
Angela Davis....Production Assistant
OFFICE HOURS: 9 a.m. 6 p.m. M-F,
Saturday from 9 a.m. until 1 p.m.







FEBRUARY 6, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 5


Chipola homecoming week

to be celebrated Feb. 18-23
MARIANNA-Chipola College will celebrate Homecoming
2008, the week of Feb. 18-23.
This year's theme is "On Top of Our Game: as the Indians hope
to exceed the performance of the Commodores of Gulf Coast.
During the week before homecoming, candidates for Mr.
Chipola and Homecoming Queen will be introduced at 10 a.m.
on Wednesday, Feb. 13, in the Arts Center, with voting on Feb.
13 and 14.
Student Activities for the week include: Monday, Feb. 18:
Camouflage Day; Tuesday, Feb. 19: Hawaiian Day; Wednesday,
Feb. 20: Pajamas Day; Thursday, Feb. 21: Favorite College Day;
and Friday, Feb. 22: Chipola Blue and Gold Day. A campus
building decoration contest will be judged Tuesday, Feb. 19 at I
p.m.
The Homecoming Talent Show is Wednesday, Feb. 20, at 10:05
a.m., in the Arts Center. Current students or groups are invited to
perform. Cash prizes will be awarded to best overall and top places
in solo, group and band categories. Performers must register by
Monday, Feb. 18.
Homecoming Night, Saturday, Feb. 23, begins with the Lady
Indians game against Gulf Coast at 5:30 p.m. An Alumni Reception
hosted by Chipola President Dr. Gene Prough and his wife Priscilla,
begins at 6 p.m. All alumni and friends are invited to attend the
reception. The Indians take on the Commodores in the men's game
at 7:30 p.m. Chipola's 2008 Homecoming Queen and Mr. Chipola
will be crowned during halftime.
For more information on Homecoming events, call the SGA
office at 718-2308 or 718-2314.


We lN'tlC ift5 j -for i/011
soiItoIlc sp.'ciI

Whitman & Russell Stover
candy Cards Plush asst.
and many other gift items!

GOLDEN DRUGS
Telephone 674-4557
73. ,M SeB'
^.t^ ^


V7


.An,'t Hill, Owner Merle Norman


. CALL (850) 674-9191
VALENTINE'S DAY
GIFT CERTIFICATES AVAILABLE


V.' f'


Afire started at a kitchen outlet Tuesday has
left a family of five without a home. Firefighters
responded to a call at 12:46 p.m. at 15698
Grace Peacock Road in Calhoun County,
where they found the home of the Widner
family burning.
The kitchen and living room were destroyed;
the rest of the home had smoke damage.
Dawn Widner said she and her husband,
Patrick, had left the mobile home for just a
few minutes around midday and returned to
find it burning.
The couple and their three children will be
staying with a relative. Anyone who would
like to help them with donations of clothing
or household supplies can reach them at
674-2629. Patrick wears medium shirts, 9 1/2


by Monica L. Brinkley, UF/IFAS,
Liberty Co. Extension Director
The UF/IFAS, Liberty County
Extension Office will be offering
a Garden Talk Program the sec-
ond Wednesday of each month
starting Feb. 13 at the Veterans
Memorial Civic at 10 a.m.
Japanese magnolias are favor-
ite spring-flowering trees here
in North Florida. Come learn
about new and different types


Eyeliner (top & bottom) ..... *300
Eyelash Enhancement......$300
Eyebrows .......................... 00
Lipliner .............................. 300
Lipcolor (w/o liner) ............ $325 /
Full lipcolor (w/linei) .......... $450
Retouch ............................ 50
First Retouch Free! -

'<^\ v*^


size shoes and 30-30 pants. Dawn wears
women's size 22 and her shoe size is 8 1/2.
Daughter Alexis, 13, wears large t-shirts, size
11-12 pants and her shoe size is 9. Patrick L.,
11, wears size 14/16, needs large shirts and
his shoe size is 9 1/2. His little brother, who is
named Patrick Jr., is six years old and wears
size 5/6 pants and shirts. His shoe size is 2.
While it appears the family has lost just
about everything, they were grateful that their
pets were unharmed, thanks to a firefighter's
efforts. The family's pet pit bull ran out after
the fire started but the Widners realized their
other dog, a chihuahua named "Tinkerbell"
was missing. Capt. Keith Daniels searched
the home and found the frightened pet hiding
under a recliner. JOHNNY EUBANKS PHOTO


of spring-flowering magnolias
from Dr. Gary Know, Univer-
sity of Florida North Florida
Research and Education Center
- Quincy. Dr. Knox has been
evaluating magnolias for almost


10 years, and will discuss the
best performing magnolias for
our area as well as introduce the
new yellow-flowered types.
Please call 643-2229 for more
information.


Gardening Friends of the Big Bend
Gardening Friends of the Big Bend will be meeting at 6:30 p.m.
on Tuesday. February 19 at NFREC Quincy, 155 Research Rd,
Quincy. This is a change from the regularly meeting date.
Stewart Tomlinson will be speaking on camellias. Tomlinson has
been growing camellias since 1994, and has been President of the
Tallahassee Camellia and Garden Club for 4 years. He has a collec-
tion of camellias numbering between 550 600 plants of over 400
varieties. This meeting is open to the public.

Remember the one you love on



Come choose the perfect g,
Candy Teddy Bears
Jewelry Goody Bags
Mixed Arrangements
Cards Roses Balloons-
Plush Toys Goody Baskets
Gift Baskets for Men, Women 4
& Children Bath & Body
FREE LOCAL DELIVERY
All orders to be delivered /
must be placed by Feb. 13.

Silk e'Peta Cs
SAt the gh in Hosford Phone 3'9-8775
'-, At Ihe lighl in Hosiord Phone 379-8775


Family of five loses home to fire Tuesday


Monthly Garden Talk Program offered in Bristol


SlMerle Norman ^

I Permanent Cosmetics By Angie


] Wake up with makeup! )


I


d


A









Page 6 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL FEBRUARY 6, 2008


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NATO: The war is America's problem


Mr. Bush finally figured out that
America's victory in Afghanistan
- -
was short-lived. The Taliban are
f lw & a .-. once again in control of much of
S. -. Afghanistan, and the 40,000 NATO
. .- military force is having a difficult,
if not impossible, time rooting out
S the Taliban insurgents and provid-

ing some degree of stability for the


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Jerry Cox is a
officer and writers
background in
foreign policy isst
Walton County.


American backed Afghan government.
The situation in Afghanistan is of such concern
*. -.. to the Bush administration that they recently sent in
-- a contingent of Marines from Iraq to help with the
S- ** fighting.
Mr. Gates, the U.S. Secretary of Defense, sent a
letter to other NATO Defense Ministers asking oth-
S er NATO countries to send more troops to help with
S the war in Afghanistan.
The Germans, miffed at what they termed Mr.
Gate's "stem letter," said we don't think so, and fur-
F thermore, Germany is going to keep its 3,200 troops
in the Northern provinces which are more secure.
The gist of this exchange between the U.S. and
other NATO nations is that the Pentagon doesn't
feel that NATO is pulling its weight in the war on
terrorists, and the NATO nations feel that the wars
in Iraq and Afghanistan are America's problem.
If you listen to the Bush administration's spin
*w W on Afghanistan, it's a Don't Worry-Be Happy situ-
- ation. Everything is coming up roses, don't worry
bro, we got it covered.
That isn't the view of the former U.S. supreme
allied commander of NATO forces, General James
Jones, a no-nonsense Marine. Jones chairs the At-
lantic Council and co-chairs the Afghanistan Study
Group with Thomas R. Pickering, former U.S. am-
bassador to Russia.
After visiting Afghanistan, Jones and Pickering
briefed Congress last week. In their report to the
Congress, Jones and Pickering stated that U.S. and
NATO forces are not winning in Afghanistan.


\ Further, Afghanistan is a failed
XS0 state.

N E R As a military officer, my view is
that if you want to win militarily
retired military then you must have enough troops to
vith an extensive
domestic and subdue the population. That means
ues. He lives in a U.S. or NATO soldier on every
comer in every village in Afghani-
stan. No one comes out of their huts
unless they say, "Mother, May I." There can't be
enemy soldiers on the mountain peaks lobbing artil-
lery shells into the valley below.
Secretary Gates and Pentagon planners, of which
I was one during my Pentagon tour, realize that to
achieve victory in Afghanistan it will take a mili-
tary force large enough to subdue the Taliban. But
other NATO countries consider Mr. Bush's war to
be America's problem.
Mr. Bush is swaggering down the last mile of his
presidential trek. America's problem will belong to
the next president. Mr. Bush is trying to lock in his
foreign policies on Iraq so that the next president
will be forced to follow his plans.
The Bush administration is negotiating a Status
of Forces Agreement with the Iraqi government that
will permit the U.S. to keep military troops in Iraq
for long-term to continue to hunt for foreign fight-
ers. U.S. troops now in Japan, South Korea and Eu-
ropean countries are governed by Status of Forces
Agreements.
The news media reports that the Bush administra-
tion is working this so that the Congress doesn't get
a vote. If the agreement is worked out, it won't be
a treaty that the Senate has to approve. It's another
unilateral move by the Bush administration.
So, if you think that the upcoming presidential
election is going to solve America's problem in the
Middle East, think again. I'll bet the rent money
that U.S. troops will be in Iraq and Afghanistan for
decades. Who will go? Your kids, your grandkids
and your great grandkids and ..


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FEBRUARY 6, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 7


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Page 8 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL FEBRUARY 6, 2008


For more information, your sweetheart to a night of
please call 762-8301. laughs, food, and fun! The
Fellowship & Events evening will feature prizes, a
MT. ZION UNITED short skit, and clean comedy
PENTECOSTAL CHURCH for couples. The event will
- Mt. Zion United Pentecostal take place at Mt. Zion United
Church invites you to bring Pentecostal Church on Feb. 15





The family of
A. Gerald "Bug"
Cayson wishes to
thankallthosewho
sent their prayers
and expressions
of sympathy
during our time of
sorrow. Our hearts
were comforted by
all the telephone
calls, cards,
flowers, visits,
food and prayers
we received. We
would like to send
a special thanks to
the churches that
offered prayers.
He will forever be
remembered by


many for his integrity, sense
of humor, as well as his love
for life and family.
Betty Ann & Family

The Liberty County 4-H
Office would like to thank


everyone for their donation to
the Denver Hayes Benefit fund.
The lucky winner of the $100
VISA Card is Renee Walden
of Blountstown. Again, thank
you for all of your support.
Liberty County 4-H Office


NO-TICE
ACREAGE NEEDED
Calhoun County Board is looking for 80 or more
usable acres through donation or purchase for
the new county-wide high school. If interested,
please call the Superintendent's office at
674-5927.
Submitted and paid for by
Calhoun County School Board





To all the friends and loved ones in the community, you will
never know how much you helped us through our lime olf
sorrow Every act of kindness, each heartfell prayer, and all
your words of encouragement eased our loss. As a community
you were lavish with food, flowers, and generous donations
in honor of our Mother, Janet W. Smith. She cherished each
visit you made. Please know that your good deeds are deeply
appreciated. A very special thanks to the staff of Hosford/
Telogia Ambulance Service, all the staff at Blountstown Health
and Rehab, Corinth Baptist Church, Covenant Hospice, Marion
Peavy, Dr. White Oliver, Sr., citizen volunteers of
Liberty County, and all friends in the community.
From the Family of "Janet W Smith"


at 7 p.m. (ET).
The cost is $15 per couple'
and will include a dinner of
spaghetti and meatballs, tossed
salad, bread, and dessert.
Couples are encouraged to find
a babysitter for the evening.
Space is limited, so reserve
your tickets soon! All proceeds
will go to benefit the Youth of
Mt. Zion UPC.
The church is located on
Hwy. 65 South in Hosford.
For more information or to
purchase tickets, please call
379-3505.
Bible Studies
PENTECOSTAL UNITED
FAITH CHURCH OF GOD IN
CHRIST The Pentecostal
United Faith Church of God
in Christ Bible study group of
Rock Bluff and Pastor Niona
Hall marked the conclusion
of a 26 month study series on
Dec. 12.
The series was titled "The
Discovery Journey of the KJV
Holy Bible." The journey


BUILONG THE FUTURE TOGETHER ONE SOURCE AT A TWE
MEDICARE ADVANTAGE
SENIOR HEALTH
INDIVIDUAL HEALTH
LIFE
FINAL EXPENSE
ANNUITIES'
MORTGAGE PROTECTION,,


Study group members said
the Discovery Journey Study
series was "truly enlightening
to one's work with Christ,
surely the knowledge is
enriching to one's desire to
study God's word and the
Discovery Study was truly a
blessing."
Recipients of Certificates of
Attendance included Dorothy
Jean Beckwith, Lavola Black,
Ricca Black, Noni Brown-
Barber, Barbara Dawson, the
Jacksons Clinton, Denetria,
Denise, Doretha, Jeremy and
Lorenzon, The Mathews, Paul
and Lashawn, Mitchell Anita.
The church Bible study
group would like to invite all
to come out and join in with us
as we continue our study series
"The Explorative Journey"
of the KJV Holy Bible every
Wednesday night at 6:30 p.m.
We extend a special thanks
to our Pastor Niona Hall for
her continuous teaching for
the Word of God, which we
have a true foundation of the
Holy Bible and to our many
visitors who joined with us
throughout our study, and a
special thanks to all of our
C.O.G.I.C. members for their
support.


Leslie Brown, Agent
10908 NW Green Trace Ln.
Bristol, FL 32321
Iparker@onesource.tv
(850) 643-1566 cell
(850) 643-3585 office
(850) 643-3585 fax

www.onesource.tv


... Russell Stover and
NEW Webkinz Love Frog Whitman's chocolates
Just in Sterling Silver jewelry
time Bath and body products
for Balloons

k a Valentine's and much more!

S. Day! DELIVERY TO ALL LOCAL
SCHOOLS IS AVAILABLE!


Blountstown Drugs

; 20370 Central Ave. W. Phone (850) 674-2222 *
* o .


HIDDEN i
TREASURES

by Ryan McDougald
SUBMISSION
Text: Ephesians 5:21
A story in Leadership maga-
zine tells of a ship captain who
looked into the dark night and
saw faint lights in the distance.
Immediately, the captain sent this
message, "Alter your course 10
degrees south."
A prompt reply came, "Alter
your course 10 degrees north."
The captain was angered, "Al-
ter your course 10 degrees south
- I am the captain!"
"Alter your course 10 degrees
north I am seaman third class
Jones," was the reply.
The captain fired off a third
message intending to evoke fear
in the heart of the seaman, "Alter
your course 10 degrees south I
am a battleship!"
"Alter your course 10 degrees
north I am a lighthouse," Jones
replied.
Submission is an ugly word to
many of us. We often think that
the word means that we become
door mats and allow people walk
all over us. But this is not really
what the word means. According
to Vine. the word is "primarily a
military term meaning to rank un-
der, to subject." Tan agrees, "Sub-
mit is not a word that means the
individual who submits becomes
a non-person or gives up all rights
or responsibilities or that the per-
son always agrees. It was a word
used to describe the relationship
between a colonel and a general.
The colonel had responsibility
and was a highly respected in-
dividual, yet he deferred overall
and ultimate authority to the gen-
eral."
We are to submit to one anoth-
er. We are to exercise the authority
God has given us, and at the same
time, submit to those in authority
over us. This is a characteristic of
being filled with the Holy Spirit.
A Spirit filled Christian will not
be filled with pride. He will be
willing to yield his own will in
the interest of another.


I


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FEBRUARY 6, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 9


"' OLD FARMW 3S


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MP-


-Copyrighted Material

.-Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers


o


Ivan Nissley
C former owner of
Nissley's
'-3- Garden Center
16609 SE Pear Street Blountstown
Call (850) 674-3911 (850) 674-8896


ser -- #am tde


Valentine
GIFT BASKETS
Bath & Body
Red Hot Lovers
Novelty items
- Ty stuffed animals & more!


4
*f


~ ,/' School specials from $495
WE DELIVER TO ALL LIBERTY CO. SCHOOLS
Russell Stover Come by for best selection!
Chocolates ROSE BOUQUETS
Valentine and
cards BUD VASES
Buy Rit Prugs
! SR 20 in Bristol Phone 643-5454 :.


STUMP
GRINDING
U$15
- 2 FT. ---
Diameter
A- I Tree Service
& Stump Grinding
Vickery Enterprises, IZc.
(850) 674-3434
1-800-628-8733
Best prices in the industry.


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Page 10 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL FEBRUARY 6, 2008


ANIYA LAJOY
WILFORD
Aniya Lajoy Wilford will be
celebrating her third birth-
day on Feb. 8. She is the
daughter of Anitra Walker
and Nay Wilford of Blount-
stown. Her grandparents
are Johnny and Evelyn
Walker of Blountstown and
Queen and Joe Williams Sr.
of Quincy. Her great-grand-
father is Charlie Bullard of
Camilla, GA. Aniya enjoys
jumping on her trampoline,
riding her four wheeler, play-
ing with her toys, drawing,
visiting her granny and papa
and annoying her big sister,
Shenika.


IMMA NICOLE
ORAMA
Imma Nicole Orama will be
celebrating her first birthday
on Feb. 7. She is the daugh-
ter of Charles and April
Orama of Villas. Her grand-
parents are Mike and Judy
Mercer of Tallahassee, Betty
Orama and Mike Orama,
both of Hosford. Imma en-
joys being outside, dancing
and playing with her cousins,
Bryson and Jaylen. She also
loves spending time and get-
ting spoiled by all her family.


Breanna White kills first deer
Breanna White, 11, kills her first deer. She killed
a three-point while hunting with her dad on Jan.
25. She shot from 80 yards away. Breanna is
the daughter of Bennett and Kim White of Hos-
ford.


SHEFFIELD XAVIER
SMITH
Sheffield Xavier Smith cel-
ebrated his fourth birthday on
Jan. 29 with a party at Chuck
E. Cheese in Tallahassee. He
is the son of Voloria McCray
of Bristol and Sheffield Smith
of Blountstown. His grandpar-
ents are Gladstone and Leola
Love and Alvin Mathis, all of
Bristol and Edward and Hel-
en Jones of Blountstown. His
great-grandmother is Rosetta
Baker of Bristol. His godpar-
ents are Billy and Harriet Mor-
ton of Mobile, AL. Sheffield
enjoys dancing, watching
Diego and Power Rangers,
playing with his brother, Von-
tarius and sisters, Vashara
and Shaterica and spending
time with family.


1 & Ilrivin!













She is the daughter of Shane
and Tina Tharpe and the
late Shonna Nichols. Ginna
celebrated her birthday with
family and friends along with
getting her restricted driver's
license.
Happy Birthday Ginna!
We are so proud of you!
Love Daddy, Tina,
Blaine and Blake



WINNING
GAME PLAN
Let your athletes know about the
benefits of the National Guard.

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Career skills
Leadership training O 0
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Part-time service in -
the community


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FEBRUARY 6, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 11



B-_ February extends deer season


CALL ME. YOU MAYBE SURPRISED AT HOWAFFORDABLE ALLSTATE
COVERAGE IS.


HJON JOHNSON LUTCF, CLTC
2867 CALEDONIA ST
MARIANNA
(850) 526 2799
RUSTYJOHNSON@allstate.com


P.S. Call for a free quote


Allstate,
You're in good hands.


Rates will v. I . : 1 with select companies and subject to avilabicly and qualification. Allstate
Insurance , i Casnsurancesurance Company. Northbrook, IL C 2003 Allstate Insurance
Company.




ATTENTION TAXPAYERS!!!

You may be entitled to-the

following exemptions:

$25,000 HOMESTEAD EXEMPTIONS: Every person who has legal
or equitable title to real property in the state of Florida and who resides
thereon and in good faith makes it his or her permanent home is eli-
gible. First time applicants are required to furnish their social security
number and should have available evidence of ownership, i.e., deed,
contract, etc. If filing for the first time, be prepared to answer these and
other questions:

1. In whose name or names was the title to the dwelling recorded as
of Jan. 1st?
2. What is the street address?
3. Are you a legal resident of the State of Florida?
4. Do you have a Florida license plate on your car and a Florida driver's
license?
5. Were you living in the dwelling which is being claimed for homestead
exemption on Jan. 1st?

$500 WIDOW'S EXEMPTION: Any widow who is a permanent Flocrida
resident may claim this exemption. If the widow remarries, she is no
longer eligible. If the husband and wife were divorced before death,
the woman is not considered a widow. You may be asked to produce a
death certificate when filing for the first time.
$500 WIDOWER'S EXEMPTION: Any widower who is a permanent
Florida resident may claim this exemption. If the widower remarries
he is no longer eligible. If the husband and wife were divorced before
death, the man is not considered a widower. You may be asked to pro-
duce a death certificate when filing for the first time.
$500 DISABILITY EXEMPTION: Every Florida resident who is totally
and permanently disabled qualifies for this exemption. Please present
a certificate from two (2) professionally unrelated licensed Florida phy-
sicians.
$5,000 DISABLED VETERAN EXEMPTION: Any service man disabled
at least 10% in war or by service-connected misfortune is entitled to this
exemption. In filing for the first time be prepared to present a certificate
from the United States Department of Veterans Affairs.
AGRICULTURE EXEMPTION: Five (5) acres or more being used as
bona fide agricultural purposes on Jan. 1st.
SENIOR CITIZEN HOMESTEAD EXEMPTION: The Liberty County
Commissioners have approved an additional Homestead Exemption
for certain homestead property owners who reside in Liberty County.
The exemption is for an additional $25,000 and applies only to a portion
of the tax rate (Millage).
In order to qualify for the new $50
,000 Senior Citizens Homestead Exemption, an applicant must al-
ready have the regular Homestead Exemption, be 65 years of age or
older as of Jan. 1, 2007 and have total household income of $22,000
or less for the previous calendar year. (Estimated no final amount avail-
able as of today.)
Total household income means the adjusted gross income of all
members of a household. The adjusted gross income is the income
reported on the IRS Form 1040, line 33 or the IRS Form 1040A, line
19 or, if the applicant is not required to file income tax, the total income
minus Social Security benefits. Income includes, but is not limited to,
Social Security benefits, pension, VA retirement annuities,, interest in-
come and wages.

YOU WILL NEED TO PROVIDE PROOF OF AGE AND
PROOF OF ALL 2007 INCOME TO THE HOUSEHOLD.

THE DEADLINE FOR FILING THESE EXEMPTIONS IS MARCH 1
AT THE LIBERTY COUNTY PROPERTY APPRAISER OFFICE, IF
\,__~ *_


I*


If you're like me and haven't
bagged that monster buck yet,
or maybe you live in the central
or southern part of the state
and haven't come to terms that
deer season's over for the year,
February might have just what
the doctor ordered. You see,
there's a second phase of the
muzzleloading gun season Feb.
14-24, but only in the Northwest
Hunting Zone.
Immediately following the
close of general gun season
in the Northwest Zone, this
muzzleloading season offers
continued deer and hog hunting
opportunities. The best part is
it occurs during the rut in some
areas and offers the best chance
of taking a trophy whitetail. For
instance, in most parts of the
Apalachicola National Forest
and in Gadsden County, the rut's
still going strong during this
time. Also, on Eglin Air Force
Base, the rut's just coming in.
The hunt's for wild hogs and
bucks with at least one antler
five inches or more in length
above the hairline. On private
land, the daily bag limit is two
deer. Bag limits and antler size


OtIrrlA' l 'r E






for deer on wildlife management
areas (WMAs) can differ, so
check the area's brochure before
you hunt.
It's important to note no
turkeys may be taken during
this season.
On private lands, crossbows
can be used during this season,
as well as muzzleloaders and
bows, but you must have the
$5 muzzleloading gun permit to
hunt, no matter which method of
take you choose to use.
On WMAs, this late season's
still referred to as the archery/
muzzleloading gun season.
Only bows and muzzleloaders
can be used no crossbows are
allowed, unless you possess
a Disabled Person Crossbow
Permit. To hunt during this
season on WMAs, you must
have an Archery Permit if you
use a bow and a Muzzleloading
Gun Permit if you use a
muzzleloader.


Conservation can mean tax relief


The Taxation and Budget
Reform Commission (TBRC),
which meets once every twenty
years, has the power to place con-
stitutional amendments before
the voters in November 2008.
On Jan. 30, with a unanimous
(18-0) vote, and at the urging of
the Florida Wildlife Federation
and other conservation groups,
the TBRC approved a proposal
to exempt lands from property


taxes that are protected by a per-
petual conservation easement.
Conservation easements are
contracts in which landowners
agree not to develop their lands,
and thus save, forever, the water,
recreation and wildlife habitat
values of the property. There is
no acreage requirement in the
proposals, so small tracts with
high environmental value can
also be held exempt from prop-


FWC Division of Law Enforcement

FIELD OPERATION WEEKLY REPORT
This report represents' some events the Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission (FWC) handled over Jan. 25-31]; how-
ever; it does not include all actions taken by the Division of Law
Enforcement.
NORTHWEST REGION
BAY COUNTY Officer David Erdman recently received
favorable court dispositions on four individuals charged with various
offenses. One individual was charged with boating under the influence
and fined $783, placed on 12 months probation and ordered to perform
50 community service hours. Another individual was charged with
reckless operation of a vessel and fined $678. The third individual
was charged with possession of alcohol by a person under 21 years of
age and fined $315. The fourth person was fined $252 for possession
of undersized spotted seatrout.
Officer Mike Nobles and Intern Travis Basford were patrolling
the Econfina Wildlife Management Area when they tracked a hunter
to a stand overlooking a pile of corn. The subject was cited for the
violation.
GULF COUNTY Officers Shon Brower and Tony Lee were
working in the Apalachicola River Wildlife Environmental Area near
Sauls Creek when they encountered two hunters. The hunters were
using a vessel to access some of the property. The officers discovered
a live wild hog inside a concealed box on the vessel. The defendants
were charged with transporting live wild hogs from state lands, and
the hog was released back on the property.
GADSDEN / LIBERTY Officer Ben Johnson was working an
off duty detail. At the end of his detail while on his way home he
observed three males kneeling down beside a vehicle cutting on a deer.
He stopped and approached the subjects to find an antlerless fawn
deer. The deer had been shot in the ham. The deer was not tagged
which made it illegal to possess in closed season for antlerless deer.
One subject was cited and the other two were issued warnings.


erty taxes, as long as their lands
are protected by a legal, bind-
ing and perpetual conservation
easement. Voters will have the
opportunity to add this amend-
ment to the state's constitution
on Election Day this November.
"This proposal is a wonderful
compliment to the very popular
and successful Florida Forever
program, which has placed many
sensitive acres into state owner-
ship for the public benefit. Many
landowners wish to keep their
lands in a natural state, but can-
not afford to do so. This proposal
will help protect the natural re-
sources that make Florida a great
place to live," said Manley Full-
er, President. Florida Wildlife
Federation. "We are also work-
ing for a complementary succes-
sor program to Florida Forever
and to have this very important
permanent conservation ease-
ment incentive for those who
wish to own their land, protect
it, and save it for their children
and grandchildren."
Florida's conservation lands
provide habitat for the Florida
panther, black bear and a host of
other species, as well as provid-
ing water recharge areas and wa-
ter supply for our citizens. With
the rampant development which
has taken place in our state, this
initiative shall help keep Flor-
ida green and also afford land-
owner's tax relief. "This and a
successor program to Florida
Forever will be critical tools in
maintaining Florida's conserva-
tion lands legacy," said Fuller.
For more information, please
contact Preston Robertson, Flor-
ida Wildlife Federation, (850)
656-7113 or preston@fwfon-
line.org.


Bows and crossbows must
have a minimum draw weight
of 35 pounds, and hand-held
releases on bows are permitted.
For taking deer, broadheads
must have at least two sharpened
edges with a minimum width of
7/8 inch. Muzzleloaders that
fire single bullets, when used
for taking deer, must be at least
.40-caliber. Those firing two or
more balls must be 20-gauge or
larger.
You're allowed to take
deer and hogs over feeding
stations on private land, as
long as the feeding station's
been established for at least six
months prior to the season and
maintained year-round. It's
illegal to use bait on WMAs.
Some things you can't do
during this late season include:
using dogs (except leashed dogs
can be used to track wounded
game); shooting swimming deer:
using explosive or drug-injecting
arrows; using muzzleloaders
with self-contained cartridge
ammunition capabilities; and
using or even possessing modem
firearms.









Page 12 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL FEBRUARY 6, 2008


Chuck Roberts elected director at Superior


BIRMINGHAM, AL Superior Bancorp
(NASDAQ: SUPR) announced that Charles
W. Roberts, III has been elected as director of
Superior Bancorp and Superior Bank. "Chuck
Roberts is an excellent businessman who is a
respected member of his community and will
bring valued insight to our board as we continue
to grow our bank," said Stan Bailey, Chairman
and Chief Executive Officer of Superior Ban-
corp.
Roberts is President of C.W Roberts Con-
tracting Inc.. a major road construction firm
headquartered in Tallahassee. He founded the
business in 1976 after attending Florida State
University where he was an Accounting Major.
Roberts is very active in both professional
and community organizations. He currently
serves on the Board of Directors for the As-
phalt Contractors Association of Florida and is
the past chairman of the Florida Transportation
Builders Association and the Northwest Florida
Water Management District. He has also served
on the Tallahassee Memorial Hospital Founda-
tion Board and the United States Selective Ser-
vice Board, North Florida Region. Since 2006,
Roberts has served as an Advisory Director for


Superior Bank's Tallahassee market.
Bailey continued, "Chuck Roberts' appoint-
ment continues our focus on customer/sharehold-
er representation for our very successful North-
west Florida franchise as well as the entire State
of Florida. We are firm believers that our compo-
nents and geographies of our 2,700 shareholders
should be represented in the Board Room."
With the appointment of Mr. Roberts, Superi-
or's board comprises 16 total directors, of whom
13 are deemed to be independent.
ABOUT SUPERIOR BANCORP: Superior
Bancorp is a $2.9 billion thrift holding company
headquartered in Birmingham, Alabama. The
principal subsidiary of Superior Bancorp is Su-
perior Bank, a Southeastern connmunitv bank.
Superior Bank has 72 branches with 41 locations
throughout the state of Alabama and 31 locations
in Florida. Superior Bank currently has three
new branches planned for Northeast Alabama
during the remainder of 2008 in addition to the
17 that have opened since September 2006. Su-
perior Bank operates 20 consumer finance offices
in North Alabama as 1st Community Credit and
Superior Financial Services and has a loan pro-
duction office in Montgomery, AL.


Il




V
;. 1


Country Lunch


BUFFET

Served daily
10:30 a.m. until 2:30 p.m.

Comes with tea $s 53
or coffee..................

wilh salad and $746
tea or coHiee............ I
12" Chocolate Chip Cookie p
Pla,r. -.1 5.0 v.ilhr nui jr Lec.:Lralr-d .1':,
Whole cakes and pies availableL-


Hwy. 20, Bristol 643-2264


by Marti Vickery,
Executive Director
BUSINESS TO BUSINESS -
Connie's Kitchen is our February
Member Business of the Month.
Stop by Connie's new downtown
location at 20864 Central Ave
E, in Blountstown. Thank you,
Connie, for your support through
active membership in the Calhoun
County Chamber. Call 674-1988
for their daily lunch specials.
Remember, members do business
with members! Learn more at:
www.calhounco.org.
FOR THE COMMUNITY
AND REGION -An evening to
remember, Thursday, Feb. 28 will
be the Calhoun County Chamber
of Commerce Annual Banquet
held at the W. T. Neal Civic Center
in Blountstown. Music provided
by musician Sammy Tedder.
Several community members
are to be recognized with special
awards. Door prizes will be
given throughout the evening!
A new local marketing project
created by Elam Stoltzfus will be
unveiled the night of the banquet.
Our State Representative Marti
Coley is scheduled as our keynote
speaker. Tickets will be $20 each
and may be purchased now by
stopping by the Chamber office
or from any board member.
Call the Calhoun County
Chamber office at 674-4519 or
447-1110.
NO FEB. MEMBERSHIP
LUNCH Due to the annual
banquet there will not be a
membership lunch meeting in
Feb.. Watch and listen for more
details regarding our March
membership meeting. Visit us
online at: www.calhounco.org
ENTERPRISE FLORIDA
MEETINGS IN TALLAHASSEE
- The Enterprise Florida Rural
Issues Working Group meeting
in Tallahassee was very fruitful.
The meeting began with a Rural
Marketing Program discussion,


Marti Vickery, who represented Calhoun County at the
Governor's Enterprise Florida Reception, is shown here with
Rep. Marti Coley (left) and Gov. Charlie Crist (right).


led by Kim Wilmes of Enterprise
Florida, with participants giving
much input on the general rural
marketing program. Following
lunch we heard the latest update
from Mark Wilson from, on the
TODS (tourist oriented directional
signs) for rural communities
for our role to participate on
the county level. Later in the
afternoon we had an active
presentation from the Dept. of
Community Affairs regarding
rural impacts of the draft rural
land stewardship area program. It
is strategic meetings like this that
are crucial to keeping our needs
and concerns in the forefront
for future planning. The next
strategic Rural Issues Working
group meeting is set for May
4, in conjunction with the 2008
rural tourism and economic
development summit in Sebring.
Call the Calhoun County Chamber
of Commerce at 674-4519 or
447-1110 or send to email at:
marti@calhounco.org if you
would like more information.
E C O N O M I C
DEVELOPMENT The
Calhoun County Enterprise Zone
designations are still in place.
Find out if you can benefit from


the enterprise zone program.
Are you building a new home
or remodeling / expanding your
home or business? If you are
in the designated boundaries of
the Calhoun County Enterprise
Zone, you may be eligible for
some relief. Contact the Calhoun
County Chamber of Commerce to
receive more information.
CALHOUN COUNTY
REPRESENTED AT THE
GOVERNOR'S ENTERPRISE
FLORIDA RECEPTION 1
received an invitation to attend
the Governor's EFI Directors
and Stakeholders reception in
Tallahassee and Jan. 30 was able
to represent Calhoun County at
this event. Governor Crist was
a dynamic host, speaking to
us about future EFI goals and
his vision for future economic
growth throughout Florida.
The Governor was also very
gracious, allowing me to speak
with him a few moments and
later in the evening, take a photo
opportunity along with State
Representative Marti Coley. It
was a wonderful evening and
several new contacts were made
to help forge new partnerships
and create opportunities for us.


I
"'


HE pESqSc








FEBRUARY 6, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 13


NOTICE
The City of Bristol City Council will hold a
Comp Plan Workshop on Thursday, Feb. 7 at
6:30 p.m. at City Hall.



Tell 'em you saw it in The Journal!

,, ,1 ', ,' i, ,i ,
-' "v" 'v .' '. '. ', \ \ , ,
Your one stop
UI shop for unique

gift items
ere
FOR HER:
*Canopy swings Bicycle planters *Wish-
ing well planters Outdoor lighted garden
fountains Beautiful lawn decorations
FOR HIM:
v Tool sets Fish mailboxes BBQ sets
Fishing supplies Georgia boots
You can also go online to www.acehardware.com
and pick out what you want, call us to order by
) Saturday, Feb. 9 and it will be in by Feb. 13.
WE ALSO HAVE GIFT CARDS!
Call us or come by and we'II help you pick out the perfect gift!

STRICKLAND'S p

1 Ace Hardware
10898 NW SR 20 in Bristol
At", Phone 643-2336 '


Farm Bureau gearing up for Food Check-Out Week


The average cost of food
in America remains afford-
able overall. According to the
most recent information from
the Agriculture Department's
(USDA's) Economic Research
Service, American families and
individuals spend, on average,
less than 10 percent of their
disposable personal income for
food.
Applying that statistic to
the calendar year means the
average household will have
earned enough disposable in-
come -- that portion of income
available for spending or sav-
ing -- to pay for its annual food
supply in about 37 days or five
weeks, according to the Liberty
County Farm Bureau.
In recognition of this, Lib-
erty County Farm Bureau is
celebrating Feb. 3-9, 2008, as
Food Check-Out Week.
Not only is America's food
supply among the world's saf-
est, it is the most affordable,
said Ray Crawford, Director of
Field Services for Florida Farm
Bureau "The abundant, afford-
able and safe domestic food
supply produced by America's
farmers and ranchers is respon-
sible, at least in part, for our
nation's increasing standard of


living."
"Americans work longer
each year to pay for their hous-
ing, federal taxes and medical
care, compared to food," Craw-
ford said.
According to the Tax Foun-
dation, Americans work an
average of 52 days each year
to pay for health and medical
care, 62 days to pay for hous-
ing/household operation and
77 days to pay federal taxes.
Crawford said the food we
enjoy as consumers is a product
of our successful food produc-
tion and distribution system, as
well as America's farmers and
ranchers continuing to have ac-
cess to effective and affordable
crop protection tools.
This week should hold
meaning for most Americans,
he said. "We remain concerned
that some Americans cannot af-
ford to buy the food they need,
but we are proud of the role
Florida farmers play in produc-
ing the most affordable food in
the world."
The percent of disposable
personal.income spent for food
has declined over the last 35
years. In 1970, it took Ameri-
cans 14 more days to earn
enough income to pay for their


food supply for the year. Ac-
cording to USDA, food is more
affordable today due to a widen-
ing gap between growth in per-
capita incomes and the amount
of money spent for food.
This overall decrease is
made more notable by trends
indicating Americans are buy-
ing more expensive conve-
nience foods, as'well as more
food away from home.
USDA's latest statistic, com-
piled for 2006, includes food
and non-alcoholic beverages
consumed at home and away
from home. This includes food
purchases at grocery stores
and other retail outlets, includ-
ing food purchases with food
stamps and vouchers for the
Women, Infants and Children's
(WIC) program. The statistic
also includes away-from-home
meals and snacks purchased by
families and individuals, as well
as food furnished to employees.
Food Check-Out Day tracks
the amount of income needed
by Americans to purchase food
on an annual basis, Crawford
said. "There have been some
slight fluctuations over the past
few years, but food prices have
remained relatively stable over
time."








Page 14 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL FEBRUARY 6, 2008


LEFT TO RIGHT A park employee gets some help lighting a lantern. Civil war re-enactors fire muskets over the Apalachicola River. A man runs back as a cannon fires loudly.



Cannons, Cornbread and Candleliglt



.AlTIorreJia





Once visitors got out of their cars they
stepped into another era at Saturday's
annual open house at Torreya State
Park in Liberty County. Volunteers in,
period costume strolled the grounds,
demonstrated crafts like candlemaking
and cooked up all kinds of good tasting
d foods in hot skillets over open fires.
DANIEL WILLIAMS PHOTOS






Surprise books for $2;
Hosford library holds
after school program
from the Jimmy Weaver Memorial Library.
Do you like to read? If you do, or know someone who '
does; the Jimmy Weaver Memorial Library in Hosford
has boxes of surprise books for a $2 donation. There are
hard backs, paper backs, and audio books. Just come in
and pick a box.
We also want to remind you of the after school program
offered. It is Thursdays, from 3 to 4 p.m. The program is
for children ages 7 to 12. Children ages 5 to 6 may also
attend with a parent or adult guardian. We have stories,
crafts and surprises.
For more information on everything offered at the Pictured above, left to right: Peggy Howland, Dr. Charbonneau, Yolanda Cooper, Katrina Sims,
Jimmy Weaver Memorial Library, call Michelle Beck, Donna Shelton Cassandra Parker, standing is Angie Morales, sitting is Wendy Smith, Gidget
Edith King, or Pam McDaniel at 379-3300. You may also Thomas, Kelly King, Lisa Taylor and Marie Kimbrel. Standing in the back is Jim Bryan and Pam
call the Harrell Memorial Library in Bristol at 643-2247 Summers. SUSAN CHAFIN PHOTO
for information.
Health Department takes part in National
Free tax help offered Go Red Day for heart health awareness
at Altha Public Library bThe Liberty County Health Department celebrated National Go Red Day on Feb. 1
by having all of the employees wear red. We wanted our clients to ask us why we were
fromAltha Public Library wearing red to give us the opportunity to talk to them about heart disease in women.
AARP Tax-Aid is the nation's largest, free volunteer In a recent survey of women conducted by the American Heart Association, only eight
run tax preparation service available to all taxpayers with percent of Americanwomen considered heart disease and stroke as their greatest health
middle to low income, with special attention to those age threat. Statistics show that currently in the United States one of every two women dies of
60 and older. Volunteers are trained to assist in filing basic heart disease or stroke. It is very important that we get the word out that heart disease
tax forms, including the 1040, 1040-A and 1040 -EZ. is the #1 killer of women. At your next check up make sure to discuss this important risk
Help is available at the Altha Public Library every with your physician.
Tuesday from 1 p.m. until 5 p.m. from Feb. 5 to April









FEBRUARY 6, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 15


Sheriff's Department stopped
the vehicle on North Pear Street,
took the three men into custody
and found a .25-caliber semi
automatic pistol tucked between
the front passenger's seat and the
center console.
The car's driver, Thaddeus
Jermaine Green, 19, of
Tallahassee, said Beasley had
been "riding up" on their vehicle
before pulling over and throwing
something at the car. Green said
his front seat passenger, Curtis
Jerard Wallace, started shooting
when Beasley broke out his rear
window.
Back seat passenger Anthony
Jerome Wallace said Beasley's
headlights had been blinding
them but said he didn't see or
hear a gun due to the sound of
breaking glass.
Wallace later admitted that he
fired the gun and said he "blanked
out because he was so scared."
Charges are pending. It appears
that Beasley will be charged with
aggravated assault with a deadly
weapon and criminal mischief.
Wallace is expected to be charged
with aggravated battery with a
deadly weapon (firearm).
The three men in the car were
taken into custody early Saturday
morning in Blountstown on
charges of carrying a concealed
weapon and possession of less
than 20 grams of marijuana.
Assisting in the arrests were
Deputy Brian Bateman of the
Liberty County Sheriff's Office,
Blountstown Police Officers
Patrick Crawford and Jared
Nichols, along with Sgt. Mark
Mallory and Deputy John Scheetz
of the Calhoun County Sheriff's
Department.


,ical Ze&ert&^


Those with a sweet tooth to satisfy and an urge to do something good enjoyed a elegant evening
at the Frink Gym for the annual Classical Desserts event, held each year to raise funds for the con-
tinued operation of the Panhandle Pioneer Settlement. Many Red Hat Ladies were in attendance
Saturday evening with their bright red outfits and billowy purple feather boas looking just as decora-
tive as the cakes. LEFT: Ellis and Jackie Jordan select a slice of cake. RIGHT: Howard Johnson
Jr. and Bob Minnick are first in line to get a taste of a luscious chocolate layer concoction.
KRISTEN BATEMAN PHOTOS
1_________________________________!


McCollum: Seniors should be wary of reverse mortgages scams


TALLAHASSEE Attorney
General Bill McCollum has
issued a consumer advisory
warning Florida's senior citizens
about a mortgage-related scam
that may target them directly. As
he unveiled legislation this week
to combat mortgage "foreclosure
rescue" scams, the Attorney
General also cautioned senior
citizens about scams associated
with reverse mortgages, a type
of home equity loan frequently
abused by con artists and
scammers. These loans are often
popular options for senior citizens
because they offer a cash source
which can help meet unexpected
medical expenses, supplement
social security and more.


"When our senior citizens are
concerned about finances and are
seeking a legitimate option for
financial relief, they should not
have to worry about predatory
lenders or brokers trying to
capitalize on their precarious
position," said Attorney General
McCollum. "Consumers should
take every precaution to avoid
scams and situations which could
leave them in even worse financial
shape."
Reverse mortgages are a
special type of home loan that
allow homeowners who are 62
and older to borrow against their
home equity without having to
repay the money until the home is
sold or the borrower passes away


or moves out permanently. When
the home is sold, lenders recover
their principal plus interest. The
remaining value of the home goes
to the homeowner or to his or her
survivors.
Unfortunately, as the popularity
of reverse mortgages grows,
so does the potential for fraud.
Predatory lenders, unscrupulous
loan agents and dishonest brokers
may target senior citizens who
may be anxious about their
financial security. Deceptive
practices and allegations of high-
pressure sales tactics are being
more frequently encountered as
senior citizens are being taken
advantage of under the guise of
a helpful and legitimate reverse


mortgage. Borrowers also run
the risk of being steered into
inappropriate loans and annuities
by sales agents and insurance
brokers who could be working
together without disclosing that
relationship to the borrower.
Attorney General McCollum
noted that reverse mortgages
can serve a purpose when
financed through legitimate
lenders. According to the U.S.
Department of Housing and
Urban Development (HUD),
homeowners who take out a reverse
mortgage can receive payments
in a lump sum, on a monthly
basis, or on an occasional basis
as a line of credit. Homeowners
whose circumstances change


can restructure their payment
options.
HUD-approved housing
counseling agencies are available
for free, or at minimal cost, to
provide information, counseling,
and free referral to a list of
HUD-approved lenders. HUD
does not recommend using an
estate planning service or any
service that charges a fee just for
referring a borrower to a lender.
This information can be
obtained by calling HUD at
1-800-569-4287.
More information is available
at HUD's reverse mortgage
website at http://www.hud.gov/
buying/rvrsmort.cfm.


--------------- - - ------ --------------------~~- -~--I










Page 16 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL FEBRUARY 6, 2008


Chipola's 2007 fall semester dean's list announced


MARIANNA-Dr. Sarah
Clemmons, vice president
of Instructional and Student
Services at Chipola College,
commends the 199 students
who made the Dean's List for
academic achievement during the
Fall Semester 2007.
To be placed on the Dean's
List, a student must take 12 or
more semester hours of courses
and make an average of 3.25 (B+)
to 4.0 (A) in all courses.
Students who made perfect
averages of 4.0-straight A's-
and their hometowns include:
Blountstown-Karla M.
Atkins, Bradley J. Nissley, Staci
L. Pittman.
Bristol-Dawn M. Arrant.
Grand Ridge-Jonathan A.
Carr, Amanda M. Edwards.
Marianna-Aric J. Brisolara,
Chelsea R. Carroll, Britton B.


Dennis IIl, Robert C. Gibbons,
Heather D. Gibson, Steffin B.
Golden, Nicole A. Hoff, Brent
E. Melvin, Elizabeth D. Sims,
Richard C. Sims.
Sneads-Jordan D. Coley,
Dustin G. Hewett, Joseph P.
Mc Daniel, Cassie L. Mitchell,
Jeffrey D. Peak.
Students who earned grade
point averages ranging from
3.25(B+) to 3.99 (A) and their
hometowns are:
Altha-Andrea N. Debolt,
Alyssa C. Hansford, Karinia C.
Jackson, Ashton M. Lee, James
E. McCalvin, Mary E. McIntosh,
Jeremy R. Redmond, Tammy R.
Weeks.
Blountstown-Kate A. Atkins,
Tiffany J. Betts, Christopher J.
Eby, Jessica A. Fields, Dianna
E. Glaze, Hannah R. Johnson,
Christopher A. Richards, Noelle


THANK YOU
W.R. Tolar would like to thank Chad Smith and the Liberty County
Sheriffs Department for the completion of the baseball and softball
dugouts! We also would like to thank Griffin Concrete and Ace
Hardware for materials donated to complete the project.
YEARBOOK ADS
W.R. Tolar Yearbook ads are now available, if you or your business
have not been contacted in the past and you would like to purchase a
yearbook ad, please contact Mandie Fowler at 643-2426 ext. 312 for
pricing and layout options.


W.R. Tolar Girls Softball Team, pictured from left top
row, Lauren Fant, Ashley Sikes, Shann Roddenberry, Maggie
Ellis, Haley Gortman, Chelsea Bateman, Kelsey Hicks, Kayla
Johnson, bottom row, Alyssa Sutton, Sydney Sanders, Molly
Holmes, Odra Chapman, Kalan Langston, Tera McDowell,
Katelyn Buff and Leslie Williams.


W.R. Tolar Boys Baseball Team, pictured from left standing,
Eric Fowler (manager), Coach Jeff Sewell, top row, Chris
Warmouth (manager), Tyler Patterson, David Black, Trey Morris,
Landon Bruffett, Dusty Young, Jesse Williams, Blake Baggett,
Justin Goodman, Tyler Myers, front row, Chase Taylor, Tylor
Davis, Ethan Foran, Jace Davidson, Terryl Jenkins, Monroe
Hinson, Tylor Huff, Brenton Lindsay and Tyler Sikes.


C. Smith, Ashley R. Taylor,
Shannon P. White.
Bristol-Hali J. Barfield,
Darren D. Evans, Carmen R.
Foran, Shaela A. Powell.
Clarksville-Ferlon E. Baggett
Jr., Justin M. McCoy.
Grand Ridge-Marissa D.
Chason, Courtney J. Lewis, Ramon
M. Perez, Aaron T. White.


Marianna-Braytez J. Barnes,
John P. Baumer, Daniel W. Beeler,
Kimberlynn A. Cook, Rachael M.
Daniel, Barbara A. Edwards,
John T. Ellerbee, Justin S. Goll,
Kyle S. Gunter, Alan J. Herring,
Danielle Hughes, Cherise L.
Hunt, Adam M. Johnson, Jessica
L. Olson, Christine L. Penzin,
Stephanie K. Pettis, Kathryn E.


Simpson, Jessica L. Sims, Cy
D. Sims, Kristen E. Sterrett,
Cora Ann L. Thomas, Teresa K.
Ward, Megan L. Weaver, Amanda
K. Wiggins, Sabrina R. Yabui,
Brittani R. York.
Sneads-Heather M. Clark,
Thomas T. Daniels, Daniel E.
Jones, Jessica M. Patterson,
Kalvin F. Weeks.


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Leather, CD Changer, Alloy Wheels, Nice Car! #R2934 . . . . . . . . . 1 99
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Leather, Loaded, Luxury, #P2925A . . .............................17 995
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Power Pkg., Cruise, Tilt, CD Player, #7149A . . . . . . . . . . . . 17,995
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Power Pkg., Cruise, Tilt, CD Player, #2962 . . . . . . . . . . . . 21,995


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FEBRUARY 6, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 17


Principal Ronnie Hand proudly announces Altha Schc
Kids of Character for the month of December. Pictured
left front row, Cheyenne Nichols, Nikki Richards, Sh
Blevins, Chloe Chapman, second row, Breanna T
Madison Hathaway, Calyn Carter, Abbie Edenfield, I
row, Courtney Pitts, Hunter Hillard, Katie Cox, and Al'
Moore. (Not pictured) Graham Bruner, Mary Sewell
Nicole London.


i


Laban Bontrager,


A A


ALTHA HISTORY STUDENTS
ENGAGE IN ST. AUGUSTINE
FIELD STUDY
Alice Marshall's dual
enrollment American History
class, along with her colleague
A Amy Valenta and parent Angie
Yon recently traveled to St.
Augustine for a field study.
Fundraising made the trip
affordable for everyone who
wished to participate. The two
day itinerary included visits to
the Old Fort (Castillo de San
ool's Marcos), The Lightner Museum,
from Flagler College and The Spanish
iawn Settlement. The group also
erry, sampled local seafood and
back Cuban cuisine. A nighttime
yssa tour of the old jail and haunted
and places delighted students and
chaperones alike.
Besides facilitating a hands-
L on experience in history, a
major objective of the study
was to share what was learned.


Left to Right, (Front Row) Katrina Messer, Brandie Powell,
Jessica Smith, Brittney Stephens, Kayla Yon, Alice Marshall,
Corey Johnson, Mary Catherine Smith, Left to Right, (Back
Row) Angie Yon, Jake Edenfield and Ethan Byler in front of
the Lightner Museum.


While in St. Augustine books,
postcards and replicas of
artifacts were purchased to
create a display in the media
center. Clips from a webcast
and photographs were compiled


,- .. -



.. ;,.,
-' L -






Pictured from left are the 2008 Varsity Altha Wildcats
Baseball Team front row, Juan Alejos, Gary Chew,


for a Power Point presentation
which was shared with Mr.
Brogdon's and Ms. Perkins
4th graders. The presentations
and supplemental materials
added a new dimension to the
elementary Florida History
Curriculum while providing
high school students with a
receptive audience for their
work.
CATS' CUISINE
The Institute of Culinary Arts
invites the public to "Espresso
Shot" on Wednesday. February
13. The menu consists of
Pulled Pork BBQ Sandwiches,
Baked Macaroni and Cheese,
Carrot and Raisin Salad, and
Cappuccino Ice Cream. Please
make reservations by Tuesday,
February 12. The price is $6
per plate.


Tony Golden, Josh
Warner, second row, Keith
Kirkpatrick, Jake Edenfield,
Cale Chafin, Ethan Byler,
Josh McIntosh, Tad Scott,
and Noah Byler.


The Medical Center

OF BLOUNTSTOWN

Dr. Iqbal Faruqui K Arlena Falcon, ARNI
Board Certified i Dorcas Goodman, ARN
Internal Medicine


P

P.


WE ARE ACCEPTING NEW PATIENTS!!
Our Services include: Non-Complicated Pediatric Care; Comprehen-
sive Adult & Elderly Care; Women's Healthcare Family Planning, Free
Mammograms & Female Exam for eligible persons; Physicals Sports,
School, Pre-Employment & DOT; Blood Work; EKG; PFT; Allergy & B-12
injections; Cancer & Diabetes Screenings.
Call us today to get your appointment scheduled.
We are PPO providers for BCBS, United Healthcare & Cigna
Also accept Vista, Healthease, Medicare & Medicaid
Walk-ins are welcome!! Now accepting VISA & MASTERCARD


S- - - - - -1
ALTHA SCHOOL CALENDAR OF EVENTS
Thursday, Feb. 7 Varsity Softball vs. Bethlehem, 6 p.m.; Baseball
Pre-Season Classic at Cottondale, TBA
Friday, Feb. 8 Boys Basketball District Semi-finals at BHS; Altha
vs. Cottondale, 6 p.m.; Varsity Softball at LCHS, 6 p.m.
Saturday, Feb. 9 ACT testing; Boys Basketball District
Championship game at BHS, 7 p.m.; Girls Weightlifting State Finals at
New Port Richey, 10 a.m.
Monday, Feb. 11 Middle School Softball vs. Grand Ridge, 3 p.m.;
Varsity Softball vs. South Walton, 5 p.m.
Tuesday, Feb. 12 Middle School Softball at Hosford 3:30 p.m.;
FCAT Writes Grades 4, 8, and 10
Wednesday, Feb. 13 FCAT Writes Grades 4, 8, and 10
-_ - - --


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Page 18 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL FEBRUARY 6, 2008


Senior-Laden Wildcats ready for first pitch


With the temperatures
warming up this week, some
folks are ready to begin their
spring-cleaning.
That was evident this past
Monday when a new coat of
paint was applied to the Altha
Wildcats'baseball complex, "The
Cotton Patch," in anticipation of
the upcoming season
"This is the best overall
talented varsity team I had in
the 19 years I've been here,"
said head baseball coach, Arthur
Faurot. "Eight of the nine
starters are seniors and all of
them are experienced players.
I'm excited about this year and
I'm hoping we can improve on
last year's 17-9 record.
Not only will the Wildcats
have experience at the plate
and in the field but their biggest
impact will probably be on the
mound.
"I've got more pitching than
ever before with five starting
pitchers in the rotation--Ethan
Byler, Noah Byler, Cale Chafin,
Keith Kirkpatrick, and Tad
Scott. Also, Tony Golden has
been looking good in practice
lately."
Coach Faurot has high
expectations for this year's
squad.
"Up and down the line-up
we're much stronger, thanks
to Coach Robbie Smith's
weightlifting program. That's
good because we've got a
challenging schedule. We're
playing teams from Aucilla
to Ponce de Leon, including
newcomers Taylor County
(Perry) and Brookwood Christian
Academy in Thomasville, GA.
"Plus, we have a five-
team district (Bozeman and
Cottondale were added this
year)," added the Wildcats'
skipper. "Bozeman and Sneads
are going to be tough so we've
got to be ready when our first
district game rolls around on
March 7 (against Sneads)."
Joining Faurot on the diamond
will be his son, Ben, who is in his
fourth season with the Wildcats
and newcomer, John Sewell,
who is an Altha alum.
Coach Faurot previewed each
position on this year's team.
The following is his assessment
of his team's members:
ETHAN BYLER, Junior,
Pitcher / First Base He's
a very good hitter and a good
defensive player. Ethan needs
to become more vocal and take
charge on the field.
NOAH BYLER, Senior,
Catcher / Pitcher / Infielder
- Noah's a big part of our
defense. He's a power hitter
with a great arm. Unfortunately
for opposing teams, Noah likes
for base runners to be on base.
Without a doubt he can play
college ball.
CALE CHAFIN, Senior,
Infielder / Outfielder / Catcher
-Cale can play any position and


"_ t
'-... :

by Jim McIntosh,
contributing sports writer

manage any position well. He
is a strong part of our defense.
Cale is always ready to play
wherever 1 tell him without
complaining.
GARY CHEW, Senior,
Centerfielder Gary is as
good a centerfielder as there is
in our area. He sees the ball well
off the bat and gets a great jump
on the ball. He'll always give a
100% when he's playing.
JAKE EDENFIELD,
Junior, Outfielder Jake has
really gotten a lot stronger with
his bat and he's quicker on his
feet this year. He has really
improved since last year.
COREYJOHNSON. Junior,;
Outfielder Corey moved up
from the junior varsity team this
year. He has a good attitude and
always gives me a good effort.
KEITH KIRKPATRICK,
Senior, Pitcher, Middle
Infielder Keith was a big
part of our success last season.
He is a big part of our offense
and defense. Keith is a vary
aggressive base runner, likes
to win, and he is a no-nonsense
player. He can definitely play at
the next level.
JOSH McINTOSH, Senior,
Second Baseman Josh has
the best hands on the team. He
's a great contact hitter as well
as having a great knowledge of
the game. Whether Josh is on
offense or defense, he knows
what to do and always carries
out his assignment. I know
that Josh can play at the college
level.
TAD SCOTT, Senior,
Pitcher, Middle Infielder -
Tad had a good year in 2007
and he's hoping it continues
this year. He's one of our
better hitters due to his strength
and competitiveness. Several
colleges are looking at him
although he hasn't made a final
decision as to where he will
attend.
JOSH WARNER, Senior,
Outfielder Josh is a hard-
worker and he never complains.
He started playing for me as
sophomore and has greatly
improved in his abilities. Josh
is a total team guy.
"The beginning of the season
may be a little rough going since
five of our starters are varsity
baseball players," noted Faurot.
"But we know that's just part of
being a small school and we'll
deal with it. We're ready to strap
it on and play some baseball."
The junior varsity kicks-


off the home-opener for the
Wildcats this Monday when
they host Hosford in a double-
header. The first pitch is at 3
p.m. (CT). The varsity has a
Valentine's Day (Feb. 14) date
with Taylor County in Perry
with action getting underway
at 4 p.m. (CT). On Friday the
Wildcats entertain R.F. Munroe
at "The Cotton Patch." The
junior varsity game begins at 4
p.m. followed by varsity action
slated for 6 p.m. (CT)


Calhoun County School Board
SPECIAL WORKSHOP
Architectural Presentations for
new central high school
February 12, 2008
9:00 AM (CST)
Blountstown High School Auditorium
Submitted and paid for by
Calhoun County School Board



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Page 18 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL FEBRUARY 6, 2008









FEBRUARY 6, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 19


SCHOOL ME
Calhoun & Lib
County Schoc
Feb.7-Feb.13,.
A variety of fruits a
vegetables or fruit juice
choice of Iowfat or who
served with all mea


"71


NU
erty
ols
2008
nd
and a
le milk
Is.


BREAKFAST IS THE SAME
FOR BOTH COUNTIES.

BREAKFAST

THURSDAY
Breakfast. French toast
sticks, sausage links,
juice.

FRIDAY
Breakfast Ham, egg, &
cheese biscuit, juice.

MONDAY
Breakfast French toast
sticks, ham, juice.

TUESDAY
Breakfast Sausage bis-
cuit, hash brown, juice.

WEDNESDAY
Breakfast Ham & cheese
bagel, oatmeal, juice.


LUNCHES


Elementary
(Pre-K thru 5th)

THURSDAY
Lunch: Shrimp poppers,
roasted red-skinned pota-
toes, salad, peaches. AL-
TERNATE: Turkey salad
sandwich.

FRIDAY
Lunch: Sausage pizza,
tater tots, mixed veg-
etable, applesauce. AL-
TERNATE: Hot ham &
cheese.

MONDAY
Lunch: Cheeseburger,
french fries, California
Normandy, peaches. AL-
TERNATE: Turkey sub.

TUESDAY
Lunch: Hotdog, baked
beans, cole slaw, ap-
plesauce. ALTERNATE:
Tuna wrap.

WEDNESDAY
Lunch: Homemade chick-
en noodle soup w/ grilled
cheese, carrots, pears.
ALTERNATE: Ham &
cheese wrap.

All menus are subject to change
SPONSORED BY:
Laban Bontrager, DMD
Bristol, Phone 643-5417


Chipola professor uses math to improve cancer diagnosis


with early tumor stage and bad
prognosis. Proper analysis of
the data is subject to difficulties
due to the complex patterns
of Comparative Genomic
Hybridization profiles.
One of these difficulties is
the proper interpretation of the
multidimensional nature of the
data.
The Chipola professor and her
collaborators used Comparative
Genomic Hybridization (CGH)
array techniques to classify
breast cancer according to DNA
aberrations.
Dr. Cruz-White teaches
mathematics in Chipola's B.S.
program in Secondary Math
Education program.
Professors from five


institutions collaborated on the
project: UCSF IHelen Diller
Family Comprehensive Cancer
Center, San Francisco, CA;
Department of Mathematics,
San Francisco State University,
CA; Centro de Investigaci6n
del Cancer de la Universidad de


Salamanca, Spain; Departamento
de Medicine de la Universidad de
Salamanca, Spain. Researchers
included: Irma Cruz-White, Joan
Climent, Rob Scharein, Daniel
DeWoskin, Juan Luis Garcia,
Jesus Perez-Losada and Javier
Arsuaga.


CHIPOLA BRAIN BOWLERS SHINEAT FSU NOLE BOWL-
Chipola College Brain Bowl team members Mark Hodge
(left) and Jantzen Whitehead (right) finished fourth and sixth
respectively in individual scoring at the Nole Bowl III Academic
Tournament held Jan. 25-26 at Florida State University.


Chipola Brain Bowlers s
TALLAHASSEE-Chipola
College Brain Bowl team
members Mark Hodge and
Jantzen Whitehead finished
fourth and sixth respectively in
individual scoring at the Nole
lo\\l I Ill Acaderinc Tournament
held Jan. 25-2( at l Florida State
University.
Chipola coach Stan Young,
said, "They (Hodge aind
Whitehead) have both firmly
established themselves as two
of the top players in the state of


PUBLIC NOTICE

ATTENTION LIBERTY COUNTY PARENTS!
FCAT PREP INFORMATION
The Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test (FCAT) is quickly approaching. You may
obtain more information about this state test at http://fcat.fldoe.org.
This test should be taken seriously as it can influence your child's promotion to the next
grade, graduation from high school, and remedial course requirements for the next year.
To ensure your child is successful on this test please adhere to the following guidelines:
Be on time the state has very strict restrictions for time that can not be altered by
the school or the district.
Do not be absent the state requires all students in the state to take the same test
on the same day. Please arrange your child's schedule for doctor, orthodontist, and
all other visits to occur on non-testing days. See dates below.
Eat a good breakfast research is clear that a balanced breakfast helps provide
the energy needed to sustain through rigorous activity and focused concentration.
(If this is a dietary change for you child it should begin the week prior to testing to
allow the body to adjust to the change.)
Get plenty of sleep research is also clear that insufficient rest has a very negative
affect on focused concentration.
Have proper supplies the tests require the use of a #2 pencil. Each student should
have two #2 pencils for all test days.
Electronic devices the state is very strict about the possession of electronic
devices. Please leave those devices at home on testing days or have your name
clearly written on them so that they may be collected prior to testing and returned
to you after testing. Please read the quote below from the Florida Department of
Education.
"Students are not permitted to have any electronic devices (pagers, cellular phones,
etc.) in their possession during test administration even if they do not use them.
Possession of electronic devices during test administration will be cause for
invalidation."
TEST DATES FOR ALL STUDENTS:


February 12 February 15th
March 11th 24th


FCAT Writing
FCAT & NRT Reading & Math, & FCAT Science


L_- --------


hine at FSU Nole Bowl
Florida."
While the Chipola team
finished with only a 4-6 record in
the tournament, Chipola defeated
one of the two FSU teams in
the tournament in round-robir;
play and narrowly lost to U1
(22) 0-210).
Chipola also defeated defending
national JULCO champion
Valencia Community College
the only other community college
in the tournament. Teams front
FSU. UF and USF competed in
the tournament. The Universit\
of South Florida won the
tournament.
Chipola Blue team members
are: Mark Hodge, Jantzen
Whitehead, Brandon (Chuck)
Bryant, Julian (Trey) Paul and
Mitchell Whitehead. ,
Math professor Stan Young
and Humanities professor Dr.
Robert Dunkle coach the Chipola
teams.

Chipola to offer
free tax preparation
MARIANNA-In order to
help more local citizens get the
most refund due them, Chipola
College business instructor Lee
Shook and his student volunteers
are providing free tax preparation
and free electronic filing.
The free service-for
individual tax returns only-is
available from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.,
on Friday, through April 1!.
Other times may be scheduled by
appointmenctt.
The free service usually takes
no longer than 30 minutes. For
faster refunds, taxpayers arc
asked to bring a personal check
which has routing information
needed for electronic refunds.
To make an appointment for
free tax assistance, call Lee
Shook at (850) 718 2368.


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SAN FRANCISCO-Chipola
College mathematics professor
Dr. Irma Cruz-White recently
contributed to poster session at
San Francisco State University
on Comparative Genomic
Hybridization (CGH) array
techniques for classifying breast
cancer.
The project-Using Persistent
Homology for clustering Breast
Cancer CGH-Array Data-used
mathematical techniques from
algrebraic homology to help
distinguish between patients in
stage I and II of the disease.
Breast cancer is the most
frequent tumor in women
worldwide. One of the most
important handicaps in the breast
cancer field is to identify patients








Page 20 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL FEBRUARY 6, 2008


by Erin Glass, Carmen Overholt.
and Harlea Perdue
SPORTS NEWS
The Fall Athletic Banquet was
held Monday, Jan. 28 at the BHS
auditorium. Volleyball awards were
given to JV: Most Improved-Jessica
Collier, Most Assist-Jodi Willis, Best
Defense-Shaterial Davis, Most Aces
& Kills-Selena Williams. VARSITY:
Most Improvement-Erin Fowler,
Most Blocks-Ashley Whitfield, Tiger
Award-Cherie Hires, Captain Award-
Molly Fagen, Most Aces, Assist,
& Kills-Lydia Simpkins, Wendy's
Heisman-Molly Fagen.
In Football these awards were
given to JV: Best Lineman-John
Jordan, Most Improved-Brian
Rawson, Coach's Award-Zach
Segers, Best Defensive Player-
Brandon Smith, Tiger Award-Corey
Womble, Best Offensive Player-Paul
Mosley. VARSITY: Scholar Award-
Jared Lilly, Coach's Award-Shane
Bailey, Heart & Soul Award-Dillion
Burke, Most Improved Lineman-
Shelby Godwin, Hog Award-Britt
Leach, Most Improved Back-Heath
Bailey, Fernando Jackson Memorial
Award-Ryan Baker, Scott Pybus
Memorial Award-Jason Money,
Roy Burnsed Memorial Award-
Chase Johnson, Best Defensive
Lineman-Britt Leach. Offensive
Back Award- Malcolm Ivory,
Offensive Skill Player Award-Jon
Lockhart. Johnn L'nitis Award-
Cory Cox, Dcfcnsiv c Back Award-
Jon Lockhart. Recc\Ncrs Aw\ard-


S -II .....
Pictured from left are the Senior Varsit\
Football players (top left) Shane Baile\..
Shelby Godwin. and Heath Bailey (top rghtI
Corey Cox and Malcolm Ivory. (center right)
Jason Alonev and Chase Johnson. (bottom
right) Jeremy Watson. (bottom left) Ryan
Baker and Jon Lockhart.


Matt Vincent, Tiger Award- Jeremy
Watson, Weight Room Warrior- Ron
VanLierop, Speical Teams Award-Jared
Lilly, Captains Award- Jared Lilly and
Britt Leach, andAll Big Bend and All State
Award- Ryan Baker.
More photos from the
the sports banquet can be
seen on page 2 7.
CULINARY NEWS
On Jan. 25 Erin Glass
and Me'cgacn Shocnumke
tra\ cled to iastsidc I ligh ,
School in ll ains\illc to


cook with master chefs from the
Culinary Institute of America. Among
many other young culinary students
there, Erin and Megan had an experience
of a lifetime. This was an opportunity


.,79"k



for them to learn new things that they
can use in their career. Erin will be
attending Le Cordon Bleu in Orlando,
beginning in August. Meagan is a
junior in high school but she plans
to attend a Culinary Art Institute as
well.
SGA NEWS


For the past two years, our Student
Government has raised money for
the Muscular Dystrophy Association.
Both of those years, we raised the
most money of any school in this
region. We have proved over and over
again just how Big the BHS Tiger
heart really is. This year's fundraiser
has begun. All SGA members or Mrs.
McCrone can accept your donations.
Let's show the world, again, just how
great the Blountstown Tigers really
are!
FCA NEWS
Four FCA club members attended a
High School Retreat at Blue Springs
in Marianna on Feb. 1- 3. These
students enjoyed music and a special
guest speaker.
SENIOR NIGHT
Friday, Feb. 1 was Senior Night at
the Basketball game and basketball
alumni were also honored.
<> a .


$2,000 Down
Owner Financing, No Qualifying
No Interest charged first year
Tri-Land Inc. R.E. Broker
Call (813) 253-3258


SERVING --,
PERSONS Epilepsy \
WITH Association \
EPILEPSY of the Big Bend
Community Education
Diagnosis and Treatment
Case Management
,t, &I'ny- Support Groups HEALT

1215 Lee Ave., Suite M4 Tallahassee, FL 32303
TELEPHONE (850) 222-1777


WILL
The Ole' Hart
Fri. & Sat.
Feb. 8 9;
(850) 627-4278
Cover: *4
1832 Lakeview Point Rd,
Quincy, FL
Nff


BE PERFORMING AT:


American
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Two weeks
Cover: $5
Fri. & Sat.
Feb. 15-16
Fri. & Sat.
Feb. 22 23
Hwy. 20 West,


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Fri. & Sat.
Feb. 29 & Mar. 1
(850) 574 0400
Cover: $5
9330 W Tennessee St.,
Tallahassee, FL


Blountstown, FL-

Call 850-510-6917 to schedule s .
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Collie oin oier to the CGirt;d Opening of


Benny


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r)X


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at the corner of Hwy. 20/Hwy. 12S in

Bristol. We will be starting at 11 a.m. 2

p.m. on Saturday, Feb. 9. There will be

free food samples of pizza, hot wings, ket-

tle wings, cheese sticks and jalapeno pop-

pers. We are open and ready to serve the

public with a new owner and new look.

For inquiries please call our new number

(850) 643-2145.

Thank you,

Benny


)
9






(.








/








A


*-4- 1
~f^










FEBRUARY 6, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 21


Liberty County group plans series of February activities


from the Liberty County
Senior Citizens Association
The Liberty County Senior
Citizens Association announces
its activities for the month of
February. They are as follows:
Thursday, Feb. 7 Grocery
shopping at the Piggly Wiggly
and then lunch.
Monday, Feb. 11 10:30
a.m. until 12 there will be a
Liberty County Senior Citizens
representative at the Maxwell
Harrell Library on Hwy. 12
South in Bristol to provide
information about services that
are provided through Senior
Citizens and Liberty County
Transit. If you wish to speak
with the representative, call
Jeannette at 643-5690.
Thursday, Feb. 14 -11 a.m.
at the Bristol Senior Center on
Hwy. 12 South in Bristol- Seniors
of Liberty County are invited to
celebrate Valentine's Day with
friends, lunch and dessert. Call


Jeannette at 643-5690 no later
than 5 p.m., Monday Feb. 11 if
want to join our celebration; it
will be a great help if we know
approximately how many people
to expect. Call Liberty Transit
at 643-2524 no later than 3 p.m.
Monday, Feb. 11 if you need a
ride to the Center. Try to wear
something Red and maybe some
of you can share some "Cupid"
stories. The Hosford Senior
Center will be closed.
Thursday, Feb. 14 -
Marianna Wal-Mart shopping
and lunch. Call Liberty Transit
at 643-2524 no later than 3 p.m.
Monday Feb. 11 to arrange your
transit ride.
Friday, Feb. 15 10:30
a.m. until 12 -there will be a
Liberty County Senior Citizens
representative at the Hosford
Senior Center Hwy. 65 South in
Hosford to provide information
about services that are provided


through Senior Citizens and
Liberty County Transit. If
you wish to speak with the
representative, call Jeannette at
643-5690.
Monday Feb. 18 The
Liberty County Senior Citizens
Board of Directors will meet at 7
p.m. at the Hosford Senior Center
on Hwy. 65 South in Hosford.
Liberty County residents are
welcome to attend.
Tuesday, Feb. 19 11
a.m. -A representative of Legal
Services of North Florida will
be at the Bristol Center on Hwy.
12 South in Bristol to discuss
any legal concerns/questions


you may have. Call Jeannette
at 643-5690 to schedule time
with the representative. Call
Liberty Transit no later 300 p.m.
Thursday, Feb. 14 if you need
the Transit Van to pick you up.
Tuesday, Feb. 19 The
Liberty County Senior Citizens
Advisory Council will meet at
1:30 p.m. at the Bristol Senior
Center.
Thursday, Feb. 21 -Grocery
shopping at the Piggly Wiggly
and lunch. Call Liberty Transit
at 643-2524 no later than 3 p.m.
Monday, Feb. 13 to arrange for
the Transit to pick you up.
Wednesday, Feb. 27 -
Monica Brinkley from the
Liberty County Extension Office
will be at the Hosford Senior
Center at 11 a.m. to present
Nutritional Education. Call
Liberty Transit at643-2524 for


transportation if you would like
to attend.
Thursday, Feb. 28 11
a.m. at the Bristol Senior Center
- Shirley Copeland from the
Brain Injury Association will
be speaking about Brain Injury,
the results of injury and how to
reduce the risk of having brain
injuries. There will be fun and
prizes; lunch will be served to
all Seniors who attend. Call
Liberty Transit at 643-2524 no
later than 3 p.m. Monday, Feb.
25 to arrange your transit ride
to the center. Call Jeannette at
643-5690 for information. The
Hosford Center will be closed.
Thursday, Feb. 28 -
Marianna Wal-Mart shopping
and lunch. Call Liberty Transit
at 643-2524 no later than 3 p.m.
Monday, Feb. 25 to arrange
transportation.


NOTICE FOR BID


The Liberty County Road and Bridge De-
partment is accepting sealed bids for the
below described equipment:
New or Pre-owned
Transport Trailer
10x48
40 ton
Bids will be received until 5 p.m. on March
4, 2008 at the Liberty County Clerks Of-
fice, Liberty County Courthouse, Hwy.
20, Bristol, FL 32321 and will be opened
and read aloud at the Commissioners
meeting March 4, 2008 at 7 p.m. (ET).
The public is invited to attend.
Please indicate on the envelope that this
is a sealed bid and what the bid is for.
The Board of County Commissioners re-
serves the right to waive informalities in
any bid, to accept and/or reject any or all
bids, and to accept the bid that in their
judgment will be in the best interest of
Liberty County.
If you need further information, please
call Jim Shuler (850) 643-4040 office,
(850) 566-9333 cell. 2-0.2-20


NOTICE OF DECISION
USDA Forest Service
Apalachicola National Forest
Apalachicola Ranger District
Liberty County, Florida

Bon Ami Analysis Area
On Jan. 30, 2008, Deputy District Ranger
Garth Smelser decided to implement
Alternative 2 of the Environmental Assess-
ment for the Bon Ami Analysis Area. This
alternative would thin approximately 1,110
acres of slash pine plantations for the first


time: Thin approximately 1,182 acres of
intermediate-aged longleaf and slash pine;
and treat approximately 320 acres of longleaf
pine using uneven-aged management. Ac-
tions connected to proposed timber harvest
include the reconstruction of approximately
13.5 miles of existing roads in the area.
Approximately 2.5 miles of existing non-
system road would be improved for use as
a temporary roads.
The other alternative evaluated was the no
action alternative. The associated Environ-
mental Assessment, Decision Notice, and
Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) are
available upon request from the Apalachi-
cola National Forest. For further information
regarding this project, contact Gary Hegg at
(850) 926-3561.
Thedecisionissubjecttoappeal pursuantto
36 CFR 215.11. Individuals or organizations
that submitted comments during the com-
ment period may appeal.Appeals must meet
content requirements of 36 CFR 215.14.
Written appeals, including attachments, shall
be sent to: National Forests in Florida, ATTN:
Appeals Deciding Officer, 325 John Knox
Road, Suite F-100, Tallahassee, Florida
32303-4160, within 45 days of the date of
this legal notice. Appeals may be faxed to
(850) 523-8504. Hand-delivered appeals
must received within normal business hours
of 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. MondaytoThursday
and 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Friday, closed
on federal holidays. Appeals may be mailed
electronically in a common digital format to
appeals-southern-florida@fs.fed.us. The
publication date of this legal notice is the
exclusive means forcalculating the time to file
an appeal. Those wishing to appeal should
not rely upon dates or time frame information
provided by any other source.
If no appeal is received implementation of
this decision may occur on, but not before,
five business days from the close of the ap-
peal filing period. If an appeal is received,
implementation may not occur for 15 busi-
ness days following the date of appeal
disposition. 2-6


Copyrighted Material


Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers


!'fo) :~ ~Ti ~


TWIN OAKS
JUVENILE
DEVELOPMENT INC.
in Liberty, has an
opening for an LPN.

Contact Donald Lassiter,
for more information at
(850) 379-8334.

Fax your JOB MARKET
advertisements to us at
643-3334, or e-mail to:
thejournal@fairpoint.net

One Stop Career Center
16908 NE Pear St. Suite 2,
Blountstown Phone (850) 674-5088
The following positions are
available: Construction Trades
Helper, Janitorial, Dietetic
Technician, Construction
Worker, Office Clerk, Food
Service Worker, Production
Manager, Truck Driver. EOE
Service Chipola Workforce Board UFN


NHC HOMECARE
Quality care is
our business

Full-time RN
PRN-HHA/CNA

Are you interested in being
part of a partner friendly en-
vironment that offers auton-
omy, flexibility, and appre-
ciation on a daily basis? We
are a Medicare home health
agency seeking individu-
als who wish to join a team
"that makes a difference."
Our QUINCY HOMECARE
location is seeking a full-
time RN and PRN-HHA/
Can. This position serves
our patients in the following
counties Leon, Gadsden
and Liberty counties.

Interested candidates may
fax their resume to (850)
875-2794, attn: Dewana
Monroe, administrator.
EOE/DFWP


PUBLIC MEETING

A public meeting will be held by the Calhoun-Liberty
Hospital Association on Wednesday, Feb. 13, 2008 at
10 a.m. in the hospital dining hall to discuss the applica-
tion made to the U.S. Department of Agriculture for grant
and/or loan assistance to replace and upgrade equipment
in the hospital, including radiology, respiratory and phar-
macy equipment, the nurse call system, the emergency
generator, patient beds and an upgrade to the heating,
ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) system.

If you have any questions, please call 674-5411, ext. 206.
I -30, 246









Page 22 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL FEBRUARY 6,2008


Pg22 AOUITY UAY 6. 2


COOLIDGE PIPPIN
BLOUNTSTOWN Coolidge Pippin, 81, died
Tuesday, Jan. 29, 2008. He was a native and lifelong
resident of Calhoun County where he worked for
many years as a sawmill worker and beekeeper. He
was a veteran of World War II serving in the U.S.
Navy.
Survivors include his wife, Elsie Mae Pippin of
Blountstown; his son, Jeff Pippin of Blountstown;
two daughters, Pam Ayers and Connie Pitts, both
of Blountstown; five grandchildren and six great-
grandchildren.
Services were held Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2008
from the Cypress Creek Cemetery with full military
honors. Interment followed in the Cypress Creek
Cemetery.
Adams Funeral Home was in charge of the ar-
rangements.

MACK MINTON
TALLAHASSEE Mack Minton, 82, died
Friday, Feb. 1, 2008 in Tallahassee. He was born
in Bristol and had lived in Tallahassee for the past
21 years. He was a member of Thomasville Road
Baptist Church and a member of Capital Sam's
Seminole Club. He received a Purple Heart during
World War II where he served as a paratrooper in
the U.S. Army.
Survivors include his wife, Mary Minton of Tal-
lahassee; two sons, Ronnie Minton of Marianna
and Keith Minton of Lake Geneva; a step-son, Bill
Pierce of Jacksonville; a daughter, Debbie Hunter
of Jacksonville; a stepdaughter, Brenda Howard
of Tallahassee; three grandchildren, Jeff and Jake
Hunter and Misty Minton; three step-grandchil-
dren, Bronson Bozeman, James Howard and Jen-
nifer Pierce.
Services were held Monday, Feb. 4, 2008 from
the Thomasville Road Baptist Church with Rev.
Curtis Clark officiating. Interment followed at
Lake Mystic Cemetery in Bristol with full military
honors.
In lieu of flowers contributions can be made to
the Alzheimer's Project of Tallahassee, 317 E. Call
St., Tallahassee, FL 32301.
Adams Funeral Home was in charge of the ar-
rangements.

THOMAS JEFFERSON (T.J.) POPE JR.
BLOUNTSTOWN Thomas Jefferson (T.J.)
Pope Jr., 95, died Saturday, Feb. 2, 2008 in Blount-
stown. He was born on Nov. 26, 1912 in Calhoun
County and had lived here all of his life. He was a
retired plumber and electrician. He was a member
of the Baptist faith.
Survivors include one son, James Edward Pope
of Dublin, GA; three daughters, Rita Gail Pope
of Blountstown, Helen Watts of the Abe Springs
Community in Blountstown and Clarice Hall of
Florence, SC; two sisters, Beatrice Sherrod of
Wewahitchka and Dollie Guilford of Blountstown;
eight grandchildren, six great-grandchildren and one
great-great-granddaughter.
Services were held Monday, Feb. 4, 2008 at
Peavy Funeral Home in Blountstown with Johnny
Roberts officiating. Interment followed in Nettle
Ridge Cemetery in Blountstown.
Peavy Funeral Home in Blountstown was in
charge of the arrangements.


LOTA GRIFFITH SMITH COFFEL
TALLAHASSEE Lota Griffith Smith Coffel,
formerly of Quincy, died Wednesday, Jan. 30,2008
in Tallahassee. She was born on Oct. 8, 1917, in
Calvary, GA, the daughter of Glen and Myrtice
Maxwell Griffith. She was a graduate of Cairo
High School and Georgia State College for Women
in Valdosta, GA, majoring in English. Following
her graduation at 19 years of age, she taught high
school English in Whigham, GA and subsequently
in Greensboro. She never tired of telling stories
about her life in Greensboro, especially tales about
living with her friends at Mrs. Johnson's rooming
house and antics of her students, some of them men
who had returned from service determined to finish
high school and older than she, their teacher.
In 1940, she married Thomas Smith, a farmer
from Greensboro. They were parents of four active
children and enjoyed a full and prosperous rural
family life for 26 years until his death. She was
an anchor of her church, the Greensboro Baptist
Church as she taught Sunday school, directed Va-
cation Bible Schools and helped lead many of the
activities of the Women of the Church. She was
always a generous spirit in her church and in her
community.
In 1969, she married Clyde Coffel of Milwaukee,
WI, a retired insurance agent, who delighted in
moving to the Greensboro-Quincy area "to escape
the snow," or so he said. Together they traveled all
over the globe and packed their 28 years of marriage
full of family activities, church and community
involvements until his death in 1996.
Survivors include her four children, Tillie S.'Tice
and her husband, Burnett of Charlotte, NC, Sandy
S. Higdon of Tallahassee, Tommy Smith and his
wife, Laura of Greensboro and Judith S. Maxwell
and her husband, Jerry of Bainbridge, GA; eight
grandchildren, Ashley Fowler, Susy F. Ward and
John Maxwell of Atlanta, GA, Cindy Tice, Mary
Beth T. McIntyre, Leigh Ann Smith and Lynsley
Smith of Charlotte, NC, and Anne Maxwell of Tal-
lahassee; five great-grandchildren, Austin Fowler,
Ellie McIntyre, Corey Fowler, James McIntyre and
Maison Ward.
Services were held Saturday, Feb. 2, 2008 at
Gallery of the Parry Center at Westminster Oaks
Retirement Center. Interment followed in Hillcrest
Cemetery in Quincy.
Memorial contributions may be made to the
First Baptist Church of Quincy or Greensboro or
to Big Bend Hospice, 105 N. Jackson St., Quincy,
FL 32351 or to the charity of one's choice.
Charles McClellan Funeral Home in Quincy was
in charge of the arrangements.

?See more
OBITUARIES on page 26

WHAT BETTER TRIBUTE
CAN THERE BE?
Honor your loved ones by making
their memory part of our best ef-
forts to defeat cancer. For more
info., contact the American Cancer
Society.

EAST GADSDEN UNIT
P.O. Box 563, Quincy, FL 32353


ID ,'ecious Memo,'ies 'If you can? come to us, give us a call and s'c ivill LOlflL' to you


In Memory of


Ronnie Sims
Dec. 14, 1982 Feb. 5, 2007
It seems like only yesterday, you were playing in the yard.
There we made so many memories, that we'll hold close no
matter how hard.
You were our shining star with your pranks, humor and
smiles. If we could just bring you back, we'd walk a thou-
sand miles. Our family chain is now broken, but as God
calls us one by one it will be linked again.
We Love You Buddy,
Aunt Laurie, Uncle Jimmy, Bryanna & Delaine'





F WNevis Funeral

90J Home of Bristol

& Crematory

SA exist/fng pre-need and at need
contracts are now handled by the
6 BevIs family and staff

All operations of the funeral process
will be handled on location at
12008 NW State Road 20.

CALL 643-3636

STodd Wahlquist, Rocky Bevis & Ed Peacock
Licensed Funeral Directors










Sgec. /4, /1#2 T. 6, 2007

It has been a year already!
It seems like yesterday I held you in my arms. You filled
my heart with joy, love and wonder of what you would be-
come.
Seems like only yesterday you came running in with a
skinned knee, holding your breath, never showing the pain.
I knew then that no matter how great the pain or heart-
ache this would be one of the easiest wounds you would :
have.
As your momma I wished I could shield you from all the
hurt life would ever deal but I always knew you would never I
4( want that!
So as the proud momma you "always" made me, I would tR
np love you, raise you and be there when you needed me. So
like you, I held my breath and allowed you to go into this ,
world of uncertainty. Knowing in my heart of hearts that ,i
the unavoidable would come but you took your lumps and
k1 bumps but always stood your ground. Through your tri-
als came your strength. I always knew you to be a kind,
good, honorable man that believed in God, country, family
and friends. I never doubted who you had grown to be. Yes
the angels came much to soon but not before you could g
leave us with a very precious part of you that lives on in your
daughter, Laynnie Sims. Through us she will know you.
We will continue to look for your star shining bright in the
night, as we will continue to see you in our dreams, which
fills our hearts with so much peace.
God knows that we would give your lives for one more
day with you even though we know it could never be. But our
dreams and memories will do for now until we meet again by
Vv Jordan! What a reunion we will share! We thank God for the -V
years with you and the ones we will have with Laynnie! 0
Until we meet again son, we love you and miss you so
livery much! ^
,.\ ~ Love Momma and your baby girl, Laynnie,
all the family and your friends
K tS.~ '______


COMERFORD VAULT MEMORIAL SERVICE
593-6828 1-800-369-6828 Fax: 593-6888
Hwy. 90 W P.O. Box 933 Sneads, FL 32460
Pete Comerford Owner & Operator
^. '. "' ." ..- .' " ." .


Let us help you with a memorial of BEA UTY and DURABILITY
Serving Jackson & the Surrounding Counties for 42 Years


Precious MemoPies


"If )ui can ? come to us, give us a call and we will come to you "









FEBRUARY 6, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 23


- ~


iberty Post


Barn Pole Inc.

Dempsey Barron Road, Bristol 643-5995 (off Hwy. 12 N)


SPECIALTY
POSTS


TOP
GRADE
8' Posts
Top Size
2-3", 3-4"
4-5"
5-6"
6-7"
7-8"
8"+


TOP
GRADE
6'6" Posts
Top Size
2-2.5"
2-5.3"
3-3.5"
3.5-4"
4-5"
5"+


FACTORY
SECONDS
8' Corners
under 3"
3-4"
4-5"
5-6"
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8"+


- -


1/4 rounds itens FACTORY SECONDS
11/2 rounds subjectto 6'6" Posts, Top Size, unde_2",
12Flat Face availability 2-3" 3-4" 4-5" 5" j
4 WeVe gotl he fence posts to meet your needs. W'


I


Compost yard trash into garden treasure


my


"Im


Yard waste and food scraps
make up a significant portion
of our garbage. Composting is
a great way to reuse yard waste
and reduce household waste,
while creating a natural fertilizer
for your garden.
Composting is the controlled
decomposition of organic mate-
rial by microorganisms such as
bacteria and fungi along with
worms and other living things.
The end result is humus-black
gold to gardeners.
Why compost? Composting
is easy and creates a useful, ben-
elicial soil amendment. Com-
post adds nutrients to the soil and
promotes soil fertility. Compost
improves the water holding ca-
pacity of our typically sandy
soil. Compost helps to loosen
compacted soils and improves
aeration. But, more importantly,
it is an environmentally sound
way of reducing yard waste.
There are many ways to
compost waste. Some methods
need a backyard but others can
be used by apartment dwellers.
The method of composting you
choose will depend on whether
you plan to compost yard waste,
kitchen waste or both, how


Explore Florida's own National Scenic

Trails during Florida Hiking Trails Month
With more than a hundred trailheads within an hour's drive of
most Floridians, the Florida Trail offers a place for you to connect
with natural Florida on a walk in the woods. Join us this February as
Governor Crist proclaims Florida Hiking Trails Month. Participate
in local guided hikes, attend workshops and presentations on hiking,
or just head for the woods and enjoy what's great about Florida's
outdoors-its extreme diversity, with more than eighty distinct plant
communities found from the tropical forests of the Keys to creeks
draped with mountain laurel blossoms in the Western Panhandle.
Hiking provides excellent cardiovascular exercise and is an im-
portant part of maintaining a healthy lifestyle. Discover value of a
walk in the woods for your mental and physical health. Think you're
too old to hike? This past November four senior hikers logged 139
miles in a 13-day hike from Flagler Beach to Withlacoochee Bay on
the Gulf of Mexico. How old is "senior"? All four were over 80!
This year we celebrate the 25th Anniversary of the Florida Trail's
designation as a National Scenic Trail and the 40th Anniversary of
the Congressional National Trails Act of 1968, creating what now
totals 17 National Historic Trails and eight National Scenic Trails.
To extend the fun of Florida's prime hiking season, sign up now for
the Florida Hiking Festival, held March 28-30, 2008 at Stephen Fos-
ter Folk Culture State Park in White Springs. It's a weekend of out-
door adventure, demonstrations, educational seminars, knowledge-
able and engaging speakers, exhibitors and vendors. and children's
activities....and, of course, hikes!
Take a Hike, Florida! IFor more information on the Florida Trail
and the many outdoor activities celebrating Florida Hiking Trails
Monllth thrlouglottl lth state, visit \'\\ wi ll ortdatrail.org to see our cal-
eCindr of events or call I-S77-llKl i-lFLA.


\LI it3,, TM l


TOP
GRADE
7' Posts
Top Size
3-4"
4-5"
5-6"


months with adequate moisture
content and a good combination
of materials. Without turning,
composting may take 6 months
to 2 years. You can make excel-
lent quality compost either way.
Almost all natural organic
materials will decompose, but
not everything belongs in the
backyard compost pile. Gener-
ally, you can compost garden
vegetation, landscape trimmings
and most plant-derived food
scraps without concern.
Among the compostable or-
ganic materials close to home
are leaves, grass clippings, small
twigs, pine straw, vegetable/fruit
peelings and coffee grounds
from the kitchen.
It is, however, prudent to
avoid composting plants harbor-
ing disease or treated with per-
sistent herbicides or weeds that
carry seeds.
Compost can be used in a vari-
ety of ways. However, due to the
fine texture of most compost, it
is best used as a soil amendment
rather than mulch. A soil amend-
ment is a material that is mixed
with the soil prior to planting.
Another way to use compost is
to make compost tea. Compost
is typically placed into a burlap
bag and inserted into a bucket
of water. The nutrient rich tea
is them used to water plants or
the garden.
But no matter how you make
it or use it, composting is a
Florida-friendly practice. Avoid
sending organic material to the
landfill and use it in your own
backyard.
Theresa Friday is the Residential
Horticulture Extension Agent for Santa
Rosa County. The use of trade names, if
used in this article, is solely for the pur-
pose of providing specific information.
It is not a guarantee, warranty, or en-
dorsement of the product name(s) and
does not signify that they are approved
to the exclusion of others.


2.0331 Central.Ave..W
H' 20 West
wy..?
ftuntsto'h ft'


[ ) I. I
by Theresa Friday,
Horticulture Extension Agent,
Santa Rosa County

much money and time you wish
to spend, how much room you
have and how soon you need the
compost.
For more information on how
to construct a home compost
unit, review the online UF/IFAS
publication at http://edis.ifas.
ufl.edu/HE026 or call your local
Extension Office.
For those without a lot of
space, vermicomposting is a
great way to make compost. Ver-
micomposting relies on worms
to digest food scraps, paper and
vegetation. In the process the
worms leave behind castings
that form a high-quality soil
amendment. The type of worm
used is important. Red worms
or manure worms are employed
instead of the common soil-
dwelling earthworms.
Composting is a natural and
flexible process. It will take
place under a wide range of con-
ditions and methods regardless
of the amount of time we spend
managing it. In other words,
compost happens.
Nevertheless, good manage-
ment helps the process along and
minimizes nuisances. Manage-
ment determines how soon the
compost is produced. For ex-
ample, turning compost weekly
can yield compost in a couple of









Page 24 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL FEBRUARY 6, 2008

1!'


ITEMS FOR SALE

Restaurant equipment: includes
shake machine, meat slicer, sinks,
warming oven, pizza oven and
regular oven, make offer. Call
674-3264. 2-6.2-13

Texas Hold 'em table, for more
information, call 379-8276 or
510-0932. 2-6.2-13

GE shallow well pump, bought
brand new, only used 30 days, new
40 gallon tank and everything to
hook it up, paid $500 for all, asking
$250. Call 674-8517. 2-6, 2-13

Baby girl clothes, $1 and up. Call
674-3264. 2-6, 2-13

Organ,- Gulbransen Organ Equi-
nox 280, recently tuned, excellent
condition, $2,100. Call 379-3936 or
509-2425. 1-30. 2-6


Baby crib, used onh,"
new, $25- -s
items, ca O -
tion.


ik, brand
id baby
S.forma-
1-30, 2-6


Meade Telestar telescope, new in
box, never been opened, $40. Call
674-8010. 1-30. 2-6

Nokia Blackberry 7100, new
in box, $200 or best offer. Retail
$399.99. Call Danny at 899-6472.
1-30, 2-6

Pendant lightfixture, elegant Hunter
Kenroy brand, still in box unopened.
Leftover from building project, cul-
tured alabaster shade, uses three
60-watt bulbs, E-Z Install, oxford
silver finish, measures 20" by 16"
wide, comes with eight foot wire and
two foot chain. Photo on box. Asking
$125. Can be seen at The Journal
office in Bristol on Summers Road.
UFN


William's Home
Improvements
"No Job Too Big or Small"
Licensed & Insured, contractor & roofer
Concrete work,
landscape, pressure
cleaning,renovations,
seamless gutter, 1
painting, vinyl,
& screen enclosure
FOR FREE ESTIMATES
Call 674-8092 UFN


Stump grinding

Reasonable rates
Free estimates

Call
Chris Nissley
674-8081 or
643-8561 (Cell),,


M & W Self
Storage Rentals
7 days a week service
5'x 10' ....... .20
10'x 10'..........$35
10' x 20' ........70
10'x25'.........901
NO DEPOSIT
Call 762-9555, 762-8807
or 762-8597 'JI


THE CALHOUJN-LIBERIY JOURNAL






To place your ad, call 643-3333 or 1-800-717-3333 by noon Eastern
Time on Saturday. Non-business ads run FREE for 2 weeks.
\ ,,


FURNITURE

Bookshelf, five shelves, $10. Call
674-3264. 2-6, 2-13

Singer sewing machine cabinet,
125 years old, needs top glass, $50.
Call 674-3264. 2-6.2-13

Wooden toddler bed, with mat-
tress, used very little, $40. Call
643-1178. 2-6.2-13

45" solid oak coffeetable, $75; 26"
solid oak end table, matches coffee
table, $35; 22" color tv with remote,
three months old, excellent condi-
tion, $85; two oil heaters, $20 each.
Call 447-1533 after 3 p.m. Monday
thru Friday. 2-6, 2-13

Headboard, 5x5, cherry wood stain,
comes with mirror, $50 or best offer.
Call 379-3966. 1-30, 2-6

Mattress and box spring, king
size, $80. Call 674-3264. 1-30,2-6



CLOTHING

Prom/pageant gown, pool blue,
size 14, floor length includes match-
ing handbag, $75. Call 643-1178.
1-30, 2-6

Prom or pageant dresses, three
dresses, raging in size from 12-16.
One has been altered and can be
easily re-altered, one has small
train. Beautiful dresses, must see.
Call 447-0235, ask for Shaleen.
1-30, 2-6

FOR RENT


New house, three
bedroom, two bath on
Black Bottom Road.
Will be available the
third week of February.
$750 month. First & last
month rent up front. Call
899-0269 or 674-7138


0..

0
(A




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0



0




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0


x


Week of Feb. 10 to Feb. 16
ARIES Mar 21/Apr 20
Aries, some people will not like
what you plan to do this week
and will be quite vocal about
their opposition to your plans.
You will move on with your
original plan.
TAURUS -Apr 21/May 21
There is no point pushing your-
self beyond what you can com-
fortably do, Taurus. How produc-
tive will you be if you exhaust
yourself putting in extra effort?
GEMINI May 22/Jun 21
Gemini, this week you're feel-
ing vulnerable. Some reassur-
ing words from a close friend
will bolster your confidence and
you'll be able to move on.
CANCER Jun 22/Jul 22
Cancer, if someone in a position
of authority is critical of your
work, don't let it bother you too
much. Use criticism to your ad-
vantage to improve as much as
possible.
LEO Jul 23/Aug 23
Try to see the humor in the
events this week, Leo. Although
it seems like everything is going


APPLIANCES

Stove and oven, sink and refrigera-
tor unit, electric, valued at $1,100,
asking $80. Call 674-3264. 2-6,2-13

Washer, Whirlpool, heavy-duty, ex-
tra-large capacity, 6 cycle, 2-speed,
approximately 5 years old, looks
and works great, 30 day warranty,
$100 firm. Call 762-3951, 573-3328
or 557-4012. 1-30, 2-6



GUNS/HUNTING

8 mm Mauser rifle, $160. Call
643-1178. 2-6.2-13



AUTOMOTIVE

1995 Dodge Ram 1500, brand
new Nike rebuilt engine, very good
condition and clean. Call 379-8276
or 510-0932. 2-6.2-13

Aero Star van, runs good, $600.
Call 237-1480. 2-6, 2-13

1994 Chevrolet high top van,
custom size, white and mauve color,
inside looks like new, $1,500. Call
379-3332, for more information.
2-6, 2-13

1973 International Scout, 4WD,
runs, $700 or best offer. Call
674-4926. 2-6, 2-13


wrong, there is a silver lining to every
mishap that occurs. Others may not
share your good humor.
VIRGO -Aug 24/Sept 22
Virgo, make a conscious effort to get
your head out of the clouds this week.
While it is fine to daydream once in a
while, it is not productive to do so all
of the time.
LIBRA Sept 23/Oct 23
Libra. even though you have a lot of
responsibilities filling your already
packed calendar, you'll take on one
more this week when a friend needs
a land.
SCORPIO Oct 24/Nov 22
You have to figure out what it is about
a certain person that is rubbing you
the wrong way. Otherwise, you will
not be able to move on from this fixa-
tion.
SAGITTARIUS Nov 23/Dec 21
Sagittarius, if you want to make your
latest venture a success, you have to
boost your manpower and financial
resources. Without these two ele-
ments, nothing gets off the ground.
CAPRICORN Dec 22/Jan 20
A last-minute change in plans leaves
you flustered, Capricorn. You will
rebound, but much more slowly than


1990 Chevy Lumina mini-van,
automatic, heat and air, runs, needs
battery, $1,200. Call 643-5917.
2-6,2-13

2000 Toyota Camry, blue in color,
four door, power windows, CD/tape
player, great condition and great
gas mileage, $3,500. Call (850)
556-8053. 2-6,2-13

1998 Park Avenue, green in color,
four door, leather, power seats and
windows, CD/tape player, almost
brand new tires, needs new engine,
$1,000. Call (850) 556-8053.
2-6, 2-13

1993 Ford Star Craft conversion
van, super clean, runs good, new
transmission, four captain chairs,
electric folding bed, $3,500. Call
762-8726 after 6 p.m. 2-6, 2-13

1997 Ford Probe, gold hatchback
with tinted Windows, A/C works
but not blowing out cold air, new
battery and plugs, motor replaced
four years ago, 55,000 miles on
new motor, needs radio, runs good,
automatic transmission, keyless
entry, $1,500. Call 447-0376 or
674-2010. 2-6, 2-13

1987 Suzuki Samurai 4WD, looks
good, runs great, everything works,
brand new top, 31 x11.50 tires with
new wheels, $3,000 or best offer.
Call 762-3045 or 209-5270.2-6.2-13

1999 Ford Mustang, good condi-
tion, $1,500. Call 209-9943.2-6.2-13


others involved with this event.
AQUARIUS Jan 21/Feb 18
Aquarius, there are no straight answers
for you at work this week and you're fruts-
trated. Fortunately, things at home are a bit
more cut-and-dry.
PISCES Feb 19/Mar 20
Keep track of your belongings carefully,
because someone close to you is not being
honest or trustworthy this week, Pisces.


2006 Jeep Commander, limited
edition, loaded, navigational sys-
tem, DVD player, sunroof, low miles,
$31,000. Call 762-2906. 2-6,2-13

1966 Ford pickup Twin Beam
I, good condition, original motor
with 85,000 miles, $6,500. Call
643-2985. 2-6,2-13

1999 Cadillac DeVille, 42k miles,
beautiful condition, garage kept,
$8,995. Call 674-2480. 1-30, 2-6

2003 Ford Mustang, Pony Edi-
tion, green, leather seats, six CD
changer, powerseats, power doors,
keyless entry, spoiler, great condi-
tion, low mileage, 58k miles, runs
great. Call 643-7407. 1-30,2-6

1994 Olds Cutlass Supreme SS,
needs torque converter, $300 or
best offer. Call 674-4058 for more
details. 1-30,2-6

1994 Ford Mustang, needs minor
repair. Call 643-1514. 1-30,2-6


AUTO ACCESSORIES & PARTS

Tires, two P25-16tires on rims, one
like new, other half worn, $50 or
best offer for both. Call 379-3966.
1-30, 2-6


MOTORCYCLES

& ATVS
2006 750 Honda Shadow, burnt
orange, lots of chrome, 11,000
miles, excellent condition, $5,000.
Call 762-5472. 2-6, 2-13

Scorpion EXO-400 motorcycle/
ATV helmet, blue and black, size
XL, $35. Call 643-1178. 1-30,2-6


WATERC RAFT

Boat trailer, 14 ft., $100. Call
379-8973. 2-6, 2-13


FOR RENT
In Bristol
*Mobile home lots
*3BR/2BA mobile home with
central heat and air

In Blountstown
*1-room efficiency,
utilities included 2BR/bath
and a half apartment 2
bedroom, 1 1/2 bath house
Commercial old Mexican
restaurant Commercial -
200 front ft. with 3 buildings
and fenced in area.

Phone 643-7740




LOOK


1, 2 & 3 Bedroom
Apartments
"The Best Place to Live"
Rental Assistance




Call (850) 674-4202
16978 NW Mayo Street,
Blountstown, FL 32424.
TDD/TTY 711.
EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY


WANTED:

REAL ESTATE

Will buy 10 to 1,000 acres, reason-

ably priced. Immediate closing.
Call (850) 544-5441
or (850) 899-7700
IIF


FAMOUS BIRTHDAYS

FEBRUARY It)
Lance Berkman, Athlete (32)
FEBRUARY 11
Burt Reynolds. Actor (72)
FEBRUARY 12
Joanna Kerns, Actress (55)
FEBRUARY 13
Robbie Williams, Singer (34)
FEBRUARY 14
Meg Tilly, Actress (48)
FEBRUARY 15
Jane Seymour, Actress (57)
FEBRUARY 16
John McEnroe, Athlete (49)


1 -9













16 ft. Supra bass boat, and trailer,
75 hp. Mercury outboard, good
shape, new floor and carpet, $2,600
or best offer or trade for.decent ve-
hicle. Call 447-0357. 2-6, 2-13


CAMPERS/ RVS

2004 Layton Scout bunk model
camper, 24ft., sleeps 4-6, separate
front bed, clean, all works, half off
new price, $8,900. Call 762-8726
after 6 p.m. 2-6,2-13

2006 Forest River Salem, travel
trailer, 30 ft., big slide, bunk house,
large tub/shower, many extras, less
than 200 miles on road, garage
kept, $14,900 or best offer. Call
447-3200. 2-6,2-13

New 8 cu. ft. Dometic fridge, (RV
fridge) comes with icemaker, works
great, runs on LP gas, 12 volts and
110 electric, $1,000. Call 532-0938,
ask for Doug. 1-30, 2-6


TOOLS & HEAVY

EQUIPMENT
Lodge and Shipley metal lathe,
13x36, heavy duty, 20 hp motor,
$2,500. Call 674-8010. 1-30,2-6

Tool kit, Black and Decker, sawzall
saw, drill and circular saw, like new
with charger and two batteries, $75
or best offer. Call 379-3966.
1-30, 2-6

Onan generator, 30 amp/110 volts,
runs good, has rebuilt motor, $800.
Call 532-0938, ask for Doug.
1-30, 2-6


//NEW LISTINGS!
Houses & Land
We have several new
properties for sale, give
me a call with your needs...
either to buy or sell.
BRINKLEY REALTY
l Call (850) 643-3289




$279 New Queen Plush
Orthopedic Pillowtop
Mattress Set in Sealed
Plastic, Warranty. Can Deliver.
850-222-9879
3pc King pillowtop matt set.
Brand new in wrapper $259.
Can deliver. (850) 222-7783
Couch and Loveseat $499
Microfiber set. Still in crate,
never used. Can deliver
(850)545-7112
Formal & Elegant, 10-pc
cherry dining room. New in
boxes. $850? (delivery avail).
850-425-8374
Full size Orthopedic mattress
set never used still in
packaging. $125, Twin set
$100. call Sandi: 850-222-
9879.
KING size bedroom set. 7pc
Solid wood dovetailed
drawers. Exquisite Quality!
Pillow top mattress set incl.
New still in packaging. Worth
$4k give away $1500. Can
deliver: 850-545-7112


FEBRUARY 6,2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 25

I! "'


THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL



CLASSIFEIE4DS


To place your ad, call 643-3333 or 1-800-717-3333 by noon Eastern
Time on Saturday. Non-business ads run FREE for 2 weeks.


1999 Clayton mobile home,
WANTED 16x80, three bedroom, two bath,
on 1.5 acres, Bristol area. Septic
Wanted: Fur material to make a tank, city water, garden tube and
teddy bear. Call 674-3264. 2-6. 2-13 two walk-in closets in master suite,
large back deck, concert patio on
Wanted: 1997,1998, or 1999 Sat- frontwithsmallsidewalk, boatshed,
urn, body must be good condition comes with all appliances including
and clean title. Call 762-8459. comes with all appliances including
2-6,2-13 washer and dryer, $64,900. Call
643-3443. 2-6., 2-13
Wanted: Baby boy clothes, 0-6
months. Call 674-9132. 1-30,2-6 Brick Home, on 1.3 acres, lots
of trees, on Black Bottom Road,
Wanted: Yarn to make booties and
footies and any cotton materials to 1900+ sq. ft., 3 or 4 bedrooms, 2
make quilts for the needy. Call Lilia bath, living room, dining room, sun-
at 526-4561. 1-30,2-6 room, kitchen with lots of cabinets
and appliances plus breakfast area,
Wanted: Will buy junk cars and newly remodeled with new roof, all
will move, any condition. Call new floors, 2 HVAC units, fireplace
762-8589. 1-9T.7-2-08 .
with blower, 7 ceiling fans, storage

Wanted: Junk cars and trucks, shed, above-ground pool with new
any condition, we pay cash. Call liner, $149,000. Call 272-6838 or
762-8459 or 272-6836 cell. 762-4481. 2-6.2-13
UFN


HOMES & LAND
Big loton Chipola River, located in
Calhoun County. Call 643-1514.


' GOOD

HORSE HAY
Square bails $5
Rolls for $35.
Call Nick (850)
762-8333 day, night
and weekends call
(850)762-3998.


1996 Jacobson doublewide,
28x60, central heat and air, four
bedroom, two bath with study, ap-
pliances and two porches included.
Excellent condition, must be moved.
Call 762-9333. 1-23 T. 2-13



FOR RENT
Three bedroom, one
and a half bath mobile
home on Ochlocknee
River. Water and sewer
included. $400 month.
Also, two lots for rent.
Call 510-4686 2,.1.t


* RECEIVING MORTGAGE PAYMENTS
Investor buys remaining payments on your
* real estate note. FREE QUOTE. o
* CALL (888) 492-4334 or (850) 643-2135 *


NEW HOUSE FOR SALE
3 bedroom, 2 bath house, 1,332 sq. ft. under
roof, custom shingles, vinyl siding, laminate
and carpet flooring, along with ceramic in the
bathrooms. Sits on 3/4 acre lot on Black Bot-
tom Road., approximately five miles south of
Altha.
Call (850) 899-0269 or 674-7138


REWARD
Missing chocolate and white
miniature Schnauzer. Lost
at the Gadsden Liberty
County line on Hwy. 12.

Please call 643-2592.
Danielle Cessna


HOME FOR SALE New 3 bed-
room, 2 bath 1,200 sq. ft. home in
Blountstown. Tile and laminate
flooring, kitchen appliance package,
'99,900. Call 762-8185. LA21/2-6



PETS/SUPPLIES

Pekingese puppies, ready Feb.
8, three females, two males, first
shots and wormed. Call 379-3066
or 363-8178. 2-6, 2-13

Free puppies, seven, free to good
home, Australian Shepherds. Call
674-9827 or 643-1726. 2-6, 2-13

Puppies, free to a good loving
home. Call 643-4415. 1-30,2-6

Siberian husky, 9 months old,
male, free to a good home. Call
(850) 258-2398. 1-30, 2-6

UKC rat terrier puppies, ready
Jan. 24, all shots and wormed, great
squirrel dogs. Call 209-4847 or 762-
4849. 1-30, 2-6

1 FOR RENT ,


1 bedroom mobile home on
John F. Bailey Road, SR
20 W. in Blountstown. $85
to $145 weekly. Deposit re-
quired. All utilities included.
3 locations. NO PETS. Also
RV for rent and/or sale.
L Call 674-7616 i


LOST & FOUND
Lost: Blanket-back walker dog,
male, lost around the vicinity of
Lake Mystic, wearing an orange
collar, has two M'stattooed on each
back leg. Call 447-4094,447-4096
or 643-4701. 2-6, 2-13

Lost: Small brown Chihuahua,
female, answers to "Tootsie," had
pink collar, approximately 4 years
old. Lost in the vicinity of Bowden
Rd. in Altha. If found, please call
557-6486 or 557-2879, leave mes-
sage. 1-30,2-6

Lost: Gray long haired Persian cat,
last seen on Todd Pullam Road and
Burlington Road in Hosford. Call
379-8732. 1-30, 2-6

Found: Peekapoo dog, found on
Todd Pullam Road and Burlington
Road in Hosford. Call 379-8732.
1-30, 2-6

Found: Female, black and tan
coon hound and a male, short
haired Australian shepherd with
cropped tail wearing an orange
collar at Alfred Shelton Road near
New Shiloh Cemetery in the Chason
Community off of Hwy. 274. Call
762-9182 after 6 p.m.
1-30, 2-6

Found: German Sherman breed,
black, gray and tan, sex not deter-
mined, about 6 months old. He was
found in the vicinity of Clarksville
Hwy. 73 North and Woodman Drive.
If you have lost your pet, please
call 674-3905 in the mornings or
evenings. 1-30,2-6


YARD SALE

Multi family yard sale, Feb. 9 from
8 a.m. to noon, 11760 NW Durham
Road in Bristol. Call 447-0299.
2-6.2-13

Garage sale, Friday and Saturday,
Feb. 8 and 9, from 8:30 a.m. to 4
p.m. 5813 Alliance Road, 5 miles N
of Altha on Hwy. 71, good selection.
Call 762-3392. 2-6, 2-13


--
CALHOUN/LIBERTY COUNTY








2008 -.

PLAT
--4)







Cost: $4280 &
INCLUDES TAX

The 2007 Calhoun-Liberty
Plat directories are available in Bristol
at The Calhoun-Liberty Journal office at
11493 NW Summers Road or at the Chamber
of Commerce office in Blountstown at 20816
Central Ave. East.


in


I d








Page 26 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL FEBRUARY 6,2008P


ae 6 T C UNc-LR -Fe


CLAYTON TERRENCE
"CLAY" EUBANKS _
MEXICO BEACH -
Clayton "Clay" Terrence
Eubanks, 32, a real estate
broker and developer, /
died Saturday, February
2, 2008, at the Univer-
sity of Minnesota Hospi-
tal in Minneapolis, Minnesota
surrounded by his loving wife Amy and family.
Clay was an avid Seminole fan, hunter, and fish-
erman.
He was born on Nov. 7, 1975 in Tallahassee
to Kay and Terry Eubanks. He was a graduate of
Florida State University. From birth you could
see that Clay was a "natural born" fighter. He
was born with FA (Fanconi's Anemia), diag-
nosed at 16, and had a bone marrow transplant.
in 1993 for treatment.
In February of 2007 he was diagnosed with
lung cancer due to the FA and had surgery to re-
move two lobes of his right lung in May. After
his three month check-up it was determined a
second surgery would be necessary in Septem-
ber to remove the rest of the lung.
After the second surgery he developed pneu-
monia that lead to ARDS (Acute Respiratory
Distress Syndrome). He was in critical con-
dition and on a ventilator. After a couple of
months on the ventilator he was transferred to a
LTACH (Long Term Acute Care Hospital) that
specializes in weaning patients from the venti-
lator which they were able to successfully ac-
complish.
He was a week shy of his return home to
Mexico Beach when he aspirated, causing an-
other severe infection worsening his ARDS. He
then returned to the University of Minnesota
ICU unit and was again supported by a ventila-
tor.
A loving and devoted wife Amy, a loving
family, and a host of friends supported Clay.
He was a "lover of life" and had an incredible
will to live. His fantastic sense of humor and
lovable stubbornness contributed to his ground
breaking survival. Through his fearlessness, he
taught us all to be strong in the face of adversi-
ty. From Clay's journey, he made us all realize
that "Life is good" no matter what the circum-
stances. We were all inspired by him.
Survivors include his wife of one year, Amy
of Mexico Beach; his mother Kay Wood Eu-
banks of Mexico Beach; his father and step-
mother, Terry and Mary Eubanks of Bristol; his
sister Staci Scaturro and her husband, Russel of
Mexico Beach; his niece, Kaylani Byrd Scatur-
ro of Mexico Beach; his grandparents, Paul and
Iona Eubanks of Tallahassee; and other family
and many, many friends.
I have fought long the goodfight, I havefin-
ished the race, I have kept the faith. 2 Timothy
4:7 Now the time has come for me to stop fight-
ing and rest.
The family will receive friends at St. Pauls
United Methodist Church Chapel Friday, Feb.
8, 2008 from 5 to 7 p.m. (ET).
Services will be held at 1 p.m. (ET) Satur-
day, Feb. 9, 2008 at St. Paul's United Methodist
Church in Tallahassee. Interment will follow at
4 p.m. (ET) in Lake Mystic Cemetery in Bris-
tol.
In lieu of flowers memorial contributions
may be made to the Clayton Eubanks Fanconi's
Anemia (FA) Research Fund, Minnesota Medi-
cal Foundation, P.O. Box 64001, St. Paul, MN
55164-0001. Please include Account Number
5958 Clayton Eubanks with your contribu-
tion.
Charles McClellen Funeral Home in Quincy
is in charge of the arrangements.


CLARENCE JOSEPH MALOY
ALTHA- Clarence Joseph Maloy, 53, died
Sunday, Feb. 3, 2008 at his residence. He was a
native and lifelong resident of Altha. A carpen-
ter by trade, he had many hobbies. He enjoyed
working with and training his horses. He also
enjoyed painting, working outside and flowers,
most of all day lilies. He will be greatly missed
by his family and all of his friends.
He was preceded in death by his brother,
George Wesley Maloy; his paternal grandpar-
ents, Clarence and Eva Maloy: maternal grand-
parents, Leonard and Fausteen Varnum.
Survivors include his parents, Hubert and
Imogene Maloy of Altha; two brothers, Adam
and James Maloy, both of Altha; five sisters,
Sherry Barton and her husband, Ralph, Charo-
lette Hanna and her husband, Carrol, all ofAltha,
Marlene Stewart and her husband, J.W. of Pleas-
ant Plains, AR, Carol Kent and her husband,
Randy of Blountstown and Dolores Brogdon and
her husband, Daryl of Big Plains, OH; as well as
several aunts, uncles, nieces and nephews.
Services will be held Wednesday, Feb. 6, 2008
at 10 a.m. at Sunny Hill Pentecostal Holiness
Church with Rev. Chris Goodman officiating.
Interment will follow in the church cemetery.
Hall Funeral Home in Altha is in charge of
the arrangements.

NORA B. KIRKLAND
BLOUNTSTOWN Nora B. Kirkland, 88,
died Monday, Feb. 4, 2008 in Panama City. She
was born in Frink on April 17, 1919 and had
lived in Calhoun County for most of her life. She
was a homemaker and a member of the Calvary
Baptist Church in Blountstown.
Survivors include three sons, Ernest Bailey
Jr. and his wife, Martha of Bristol, Floyd Ger-
ald Bailey and his wife, Mary of Dallas, TX
and James Glen Kirkland and his wife, Judy of
Blountstown: three daughters, Annette J. Hires
and her husband, John, Elizabeth B. (Libby)
Griffin and her husband, James, and Sherry
(Susie) Sanders and her husband, Bobby, all
of Blountstown; one brother, Daniel Griffin
of Port St. Joe; three Sisters, Lula Jane Mc-
Coy, Lila Mae Walden and Elsie Mae Pippin,
all of Blountstown; 19 grandchildren, several
great-grandchildren and several great-great-
grandchildren.
The family will receive friends Wednesday,
Feb, 6, 2008 from 6 to 8 p.m. (CT) at Peavy
Funeral Home.
Services will be held Thursday, Feb. 7, 2008
at Peavy Funeral Home Chapel with Rev. Fran-
cis Carlisle and Rev. Marvin Nichols officiating.
Interment will follow in Cypress Creek Cem-
etery in Kinard.
Peavy Funeral Home in Blountstown is in
charge of the arrangements.


The Calhoun-Liberty

JOURNAL
HOURS: 9 a.m.- 6 p.m. Monday thru Friday, 9 a.m. -1 p.m. Saturday (ET)


Peavy Funeral Home

& Crematory











Your hometown funeral home sinie 194
Funeral Services with Dignity,
Caring and Professionalism.

Marion Peavy
A Hometown Funeral Director






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FEBRUARY 6, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 27


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Many other BHS students received I
awards in other sports including: f
(top left) JV football from left, '
Paul Mosely, John Jorda, Brian E
Rawson, Brandon Smith and ,1
Zac Segers. Not pictured: Corey
Womble; (top right) Senior Varsity
Boys Weightlifting bottom from
left, Ron Vanlierop, Jared Lilly, top,
Britt Leach, Matt Vincent; Girls JV
Volleyball from left, Selena Williams,
Jodi Willis, Shaterial Davis, Jessica
Collier; Girls Varsity Volleyball from
left, Erin Fowler, Lydia Simpkins,
Ashley Whitfield, Coach Durham, Molly
Fagen.


Florida Teacher
of the Year award
nominations open
MERIDEN, CT Nomina-
tions for the Florida 2007-2008
TOTYTM (Teacher of the Year)
are being accepted through April
30, 2008. The announcement
came from the TOTY AwardTM
sponsor, Teachers' Insurance
PlanTM, a car insurance program
exclusively for members of the
educational community.
The award will include $1,000
to the winning teacher and a $500
grant to that teacher's school.
The Florida TOTY AwardTM win-
ner will also be eligible for the
National TOTY AwardTM that in-
cludes a special recognition and
a $2,500 travel certificate.
Recent past state winners in-
clude Dianna Bone of Braden-
ton, Sandra Prew of Key Largo,
and Fran Squires of Osprey.
Teachers, students and parents
can nominate any of the state's
more than 170,000 accredited
teachers.
TOTYTM nomination forms
are available online at www.
teachers.com/toty. To nominate
an educator, or yourself, explain
in 250 words or less why this
teacher should be the Teacher
of the Year. Nominees will be
judged on their ability to moti-
vate students, their special tal-
ents, and their contribution to
their school, students or educa-
tional community.
Winners will be announced at
the start of the next school year.
Teachers' Insurance Plan is
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SPage 28 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL FEBRUARY 6, 2008


State 'Arts on Tour' program roster announced


TALLAHASSEE Sec-
retary of State Kurt S. Brown-
ing announces the release of the
2008-2010 State Touring Program
"Arts on Tour" roster. The State
Touring Program provides profes-
sional performing artists to Florida
non-profit organizations and any
units of city, county, or state gov-
ernment, including school boards,
through fee support to present the
performers. The roster, available
at the Division of Cultural Affairs'
Web site at www.florida-arts.org/
roster, includes descriptions, fees,
and contact information for each of
the-selectively chosen performing
artists and companies, as well as
the complete application for pre-
senters.
"The State Touring Program
provides incredible opportunities
to bring Florida's finest perform-
ing arts groups to as many commu-
nities as possible," said Secretary
Browning. "Through the program,
rural and less populated areas can
access many of Florida's excep-
tional performing artists, and the
program ensures the opportunity
for Florida's professional artists to
share their talents with audiences
throughout the state."

Paintings

by Florida

Highwaymen

on display
TALLAHASSEE- Secretary of
State Kurt S. Browning announced
an exhibition organized by the
Department of State entitled "The
Art of Florida's Highwaymen."
Initiated by Governor Charlie
Crist as part of the statewide
celebration ofBlack History Month,
themed "Pioneering the Future,"
the exhibition will be on display
February 1,2008 through February
29, 2008 in the Governor's Gallery
in the Capitol. The exhibition will
feature works from the collection
of GeoffCook.
"The Department of State
is delighted to partner with the
Governor's office to promote
the special celebration of Black
History Month," said Secretary
Browning. "The story told by
the Highwaymen's paintings is
an important part of the essential
efforts to remember and honor
Florida's black heritage."
The Highwaymen are a group
of Florida African-American artists
that emerged during the late 1950s
and early 1960s. Unable to display
and sell their artwork in galleries,
the artists were forced to sell their
paintings from the trunks of their
cars, often traveling door-to-door
to earn a living from their art.
Styled after the work of artist A.E.
Backus, the Highwaymen produce
more than 100,000 beautiful Florida
landscapes in pursuit of economic
stability in Ft. Pierce, Florida. In
2004, twenty-six Highwaymen
were inducted into the Florida
Artists Hall of Fame.
This exhibition is part of the
Florida Department of State,
Division of Cultural Affairs' Capitol
Complex Exhibition Program. For
more information, contact Sandy
Shaughnessy at 850.245.6480 or
visit: www.florida-arts.org.


The new 2008 2010 roster
includes twenty-five of the state's
finest performers in dance, music,
theatre, and storytelling. Organi-
zations (presenters) may request
fee support toward the perform-
ers' fees; as much as two-thirds of
the total fee can be requested for
performances and residencies that


occur in counties with fewer than
75,000 residents (one-third in other
. counties). The complete roster and
presenter application are available
only through the Division's Web
site, www.florida-arts.org/roster.
Potential presenters without Inter-
net access should contact the Divi-
sion of Cultural Affairs by phone


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at (850) 245-6470 for further infor-
mation.
Applications for performances
scheduled between July 1, 2008
and June 30, 2009 must be sub-
mitted by May 1, 2008. For per-
formances that will take place
between July 1, 2009 and June 30,
2010, applications must be submit-


ted by May 1, 2009. Applications
must be accompanied by a letter of
intent or contract between the pre-
senter and the artist.
For more information on the
State Touring Program, please
contact Gaylen Phillips, Ph.D., by
email at gphillips@dos.state.fl.us,
or by phone at (850) 245-6482.


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