Group Title: Calhoun-Liberty Journal (Bristol, Fla.).
Title: The Calhoun-Liberty journal
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00027796/00081
 Material Information
Title: The Calhoun-Liberty journal
Alternate Title: Calhoun Liberty journal
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Calhoun-Liberty Journal
Publisher: Liberty Journal, Inc.
Liberty Journal
Place of Publication: Bristol Fla
Publication Date: January 9, 2008
Copyright Date: 2008
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Bristol (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Liberty County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Calhoun County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Liberty -- Bristol
Coordinates: 30.426944 x -84.979167 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in Sept. 1991.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 11, no. 38 (Sept. 18, 1991).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00027796
Volume ID: VID00081
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AKN4565
oclc - 33425067
alephbibnum - 002046630
electronic_aleph - 003298625
electronic_oclc - 60662266
lccn - sn 95047245
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly journal (Bristol, Fla.)

Full Text
Acquisitions & Lic. Serials
200 SMA University of Florida
P.O. Box 117007
Gainesville FL 32611-7007


S2 3/15/2008
4761


Calhoun County's

New Year's Baby
by Teresa Eubanks, Journal Editor
Waylon Hayes Bracewell is the first baby of
the new year for Calhoun County.
The little boy was born to Chris and Jessica
Bracewell ofAltha at 1:46 a.m. on Jan. 2 at Capitol
Regional Medical Center in Tallahassee.
Waylon weighed six pounds and 15 ounces
and was 20 1/2 inches in length.
After three days of contractions and one false
alarm resulting in a trip to the hospital that ended
with a return home, Jessica was admitted on New
Year's Day and gave birth early Wednesday.
Proud grandmother Paula Bracewell says
she's ready to start babysitting "just as soon as
they'll let me."
Chris works with his father at Bracewell
Boats. Jessica is an elementary teacher who
formerly taught at Tolar School in Bristol.


Former Altha

resident held in

shooting death......3


Deputy

honored

for life

saving

efforts
Deputy Caryl
Marotta
Seepage 12.


Four Liberty Co.

candidates file

intent to run ..........3


c" Volume 28, Number 2 Wednesday, Jan. 9, 2008 j


A broad-billed hummingbird is shown at the feeder at Elsie's Beauty Shop in Pine Island.
BILL ANDERSON PHOTO

Rare hummingbird visit

attracts over 100 bird

watchers to Pine Island


by Teresa Eubanks, Journal Editor
He's 1,800 miles from
home, but knows where to
drop in for a meal Elsie's
Beauty Shop on Pine Street,
north of Blountstown.
For almost three weeks, a
tiny male hummingbird has
delighted Elsie Dennis and her
husband, Ray, by alternating
between the feeder on the
back porch of their home and
one that hangs outside a large
window at their beauty shop
next door. Elsie and Ray
Ray realized what a rare enjoyment fro
their birdfeedei
visitor it was after reading a
piece by hummingbird expert
Fred Bassett in a recent issue of the Panama City
News Herald.
Ray called Bassett at his Montgomery,
AL home to tell him about the bird. Bassett,


y De
n th
'rs.


who is federally licensed to
study and band such birds,
was skeptical until given a
detailed description "I told
him it had a blue breast,
emerald green back and an
orange beak, which is very
unusual in a hummingbird,"
Ray said. After Ray noted
that the jewel-colored bird
had black tips on its wings
and tail, Bassett responded,
"I'll be right down there."
He was in Blountstown the
nnis get a lot of next day to verify the second-
e activity around ever sighting of abroad-billed
hummingbird in Florida.
Bassett set up a wire cage
around the feeder on their back porch last week.
When the hummingbird returned to feed, Bassett
pulled a string to close the cage door. He then
See HUMMINGBIRD on page 13


Puberty County History meeting set...4 Bristol officials sworn in...5 Commentary...6, 7


8 Birthdays...10 Weddings...11 Speak Up!...15 Outdoors...16 Obituaries...22 Classifieds...20 & 21


500
includes
tax


Sheriffs Log...2


THE CALHOUNoLBERTY








Page 2 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JANUARY 9,2008


Two arrested on way to meet


deputies for drug exchange


Two men are facing charges
after a plan to meet up for an
alleged drug sale fell apart when
they realized their "customers"
had badges.
The Calhoun County Sheriff's
Department used an informant to
set up a drug buy at the intersection
of Center Lake Road and County
Road 167 Friday night.
Deputies did not know who
would be coming but they knew
to expect two people in the
vehicle.
Major Roman Wood and Capt.
Ken Futch were waiting on" a
two-trail road on the west side
of County Road 167 when they
saw a primer-colored Cutlass
Supreme heading their way in


ARREST

REPORTS
compiled by
Journal
Editor
Teresa
Eubanks


I I

an aggressive manner, according
to a report from the Calhoun
County Sheriff's Department.
The car swerved just before
hitting Wood's patrol car, missing
it by about a foot. The car then
turned around and tried to go back
to County Road 167.
When the driver ignored the
lights on the patrol car signaling


him to stop, Wood pulled out in
front of the car, which stopped
one inch short of hitting the
driver's side rear tire of the patrol
vehicle.
As officers approached the.
car, they saw the driver pull a
clear plastic bag of marijuana
from his pocket and throw it
into the driver's side floorboard.
Officers also spotted a pill bottle
containing crack cocaine on
the seat between the driver and
passenger.
The driver gave his name
as Edward James Smith. The
passenger was identified as
Reuben Lee Hill.
After getting a closer look at
the first plastic bag, an ecstasy
pill was also discovered.
During a search of the car,
three more clear plastic bags were
found which contained crack
cocaine.
When officers looked at the
recent calls listed on the driver's
cell phone they found the number
of their informant who had
arranged the drug buy.
Smith was charged with
possession of less than 20 grams
of marijuana, possession of
MDMA (ecstasy), possession of
crack cocaine with intent to sell,
possession of drug paraphernalia
and driving while license
suspended or revoked.
Hill was charged with
possession of crack cocaine with
intent to sell and possession of
drug paraphernalia.


A 40-year-old Panama City
Beach man was charged with
disorderly intoxication after he
was seen walking into traffic
along Hwy. 71 just before 5 p.m.
on Dec. 31.
When Calhoun County deputies


Man charged

with molesting

7-yr.-old girl

two years ago
A 52-year-old man who had
been staying with relatives in
Blountstown was arrested on a
charge of lewd and lascivious
molestation after an incident that
allegedly occurred between him
and a seven-year-old girl two
years earlier, was reported.
The girl, who is now nine,
spent the holidays-out of town
with her father and at some
point in their visit, she recounted
that Travis Cromer had entered
her bedroom and fondled her
one night when she was seven,
according to Investigator Ken
Futch of the Calhoun County
Sheriff's Department.
The father contacted Children
and Families and an investigation
was opened.
Cromer, who had been staying
at the girl's home with a relative
two years earlier, had recently
returned and moved in with the
family again temporarily.
When the incident was made
known to the girl's mother and
stepfather two years ago, Cromer
was confronted and adamantly
denied it, according to Futch. At
that point, "the family decided
to deal with it on their own and
made sure Cromer had no access
to the child," he said.
During interviews with
investigators, the girl's statements
were consistent and credible,
Futch said. Cromer denies the
allegation.
Cromer is being held on
$50,000 bond in the county jail.


responded to the scene, they
found Christopher Dale Dismore
staggering along the shoulder of
the road and stumbling onto the
highway.
Deputies-noted the odor of
alcohol on Dismore's breath and
clothing. He was found carrying
a pint of vodka.
When asked where he was
going, Dismore replied that he
was on his way to Panama City
and said he had almost been
run over several times in the
attempt.
Dismore was arrested and
taken to the county jail.


Routine traffic stop leads

to crack cocaine arrests
Two passengers in a vehicle traveling through the Shelton's Comer
area were arrested following a traffic stop where deputies found crack
cocaine.
According to a report from the Calhoun County Sheriff's
Department, deputies stopped a southbound vehicle at 8:49 p.m.
Sunday after noticing the windshield was busted and the tag had
expired.
The driver, Susan L. Nicholson, 37, told officers she knew the
tag was expired and was planning to sell the vehicle the next day.
She stated that she did not have her driver's license with her at that
time.
Her two passengers, identified as John James Arthur Finney, 28,
and Jennifer Lynn Sovems, 26, of Panama City were asked to step
out of the car and the vehicle was searched.
A clear plastic bag which held an unspecified amount of crack
cocaine was found in the floorboard of the front passenger's seat,
where Finney had been sitting. Another piece of crack cocaine was
found on the floorboard of the back passenger's side, where Sovems
was sitting.
Both passengers were charged with possession of crack cocaine
and drug paraphernalia. A third passenger traveling with the group
was not charged.
The driver was given a warning for the equipment violation.

EDITOR'S NOTE Blountstown City Manager James Woods
asks that we clarify that prison officials did not endorse the
hiring of former inmate Henry Carl Brewster. As mentioned
in last week's article about Brewster's arrest for DUI in a
stolen city vehicle, Dept. of Corrections employees said
he had never been a security or behavioral problem when
inquires were made before he was hired to work with the city.

CORRECTION On page 14 of our Dec. 26 issue, the officers
pictured with gifts to be distributed to local children should have
been listed as Eddie Dalton and Craig Sherrouse. Sherrouse
was incorrectly identified.


*Chris Dismore,


DEC.31
disorderly intoxication.
JAN. 1


*Sabrina Davis, VOP (county), violation of suspended sentence.
JAN. 2
*Ellis Buddy Monroe Summerlin, sentenced from court.
*Matthew Speights, sale of cocaine within 1,000 ft. of public
school.
*Joseph D. Baker, VOP (county), sale of cocaine within 1,000 ft.
of public school.
*Terrance Bryant, sentenced from court.
*Jame Argyads, sale of marijuana.
*Ryan Clarke, driving while license suspended or revoked.
*Jan Capps, VOP (Liberty Co.).
*Janita Monlyn, VOP
JAN. 3
*Darren Jackson, sale of cocaine within 1,000 ft. of a school (two
times).
*Jose Portillo, no valid driver's license.
JAN. 4
*Ruben Lee Hill, possession of crack cocaine, possession of drug
paraphernalia.
*Travis Cromer, lewd and lascivious molestation.
*Jeanette Addison, sale of cocaine within 1,000 ft. of place of
worship.
*Jennifer Soverns, possession of cocaine, possession of drug
paraphernalia.
*Christopher Golden, VOP (county).
*Alice Godwin, VOP (state).
*John Finney, possession of crack cocaine, possession of drug
paraphernalia.
*Tory Stone, sale of cocaine.
*Edward Smith, possession of crack cocaine with intent to sell,
possession of MDMA (Ecstasy), possession of less than 20 grams
of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia.
JAN. 5
*Basil Hurd, sentenced from court 30 days.
*Vernice Feagin, VOCP, FTA.
*Jesse Johnson, FTA, driving while license suspended or re-
voked.
*Cecil Miles, driving while license suspended or revoked, DUI,
attaching tab not assigned.
*Charles White, driver's license canceled.
-Steve Shiver, domestic battery (two times).
*Timothy Luckie, DUI.
LIBERTY COUNTY
DEC. 31
*Ricky Eakes, passing worthless bank checks.
*Keith Summerlin, criminal mischief, aggravated assault, resisting
arrest without violence, battery.
JAN. 1
*Sabrina Davis, holding for CCSO.
*Jacquelyn Brooks, holding for CCSO.
JAN. 3
*Jan Renee Capps, VOP (state).
*Janita Denise Monlyn, holding for CCSO.
JAN. 5
*Rodney Tyler Miller, possession of alcohol under the age of 21.
*Joseph Dougjas Sellers, DUI, DUI refusal.
*Jennifer Lynn Soverns, holding for CCSO.
*Jeanette Marie Addison, holding for CCSO.
*Jesus Miranda Martinez, expired driver's license over four
months.
JAN. 6
*Travis Wade Denson, possession of less than 20 grams of mari-
juana, possession of drug paraphernalia, possession of prescription
drug without a prescription.
Listingsincludename followedbycharge and dentification ofarrestingagency. The names above represent
those charged. We remind our readers that all are presumed innocent until proven guilty
Blountstown Police Dept.
Dec. 31, 2007 thru Jan. 6, 2008
Citations issued:
Accidents............. 01 Traffic Citations.................18
Special details (business escorts, traffic details)......89
Business alarms.....02 Residential alarms..........00
Com plaints.................................. ...................... 138
EDITOR'S NOTE: The Edward Brigham listed in last week's
sheriff's log should have been listed as Edward Brigham Jr.


CALHOUN COUNTY


Intoxicated pedestrian arrested

for walking into Hwy. 71 traffic







JANUARY 9, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 3


EDDIE NOBLES

Land Clearing

LAND CLEARING AND

ROOT RAKING FOR:

SExcavator
work

f 1 7Small

acreage

Home sites Food plots

Private drives and roads

Located in Bristol

Call 447-0449 or .643-5390


PUBLIC NOTICE
Liberty County School is proposing the following new
policies:
2.91 Implementation of Wellness Policy
2.92 Implementation of Domestic/Emergency plan
2.93 Automated External befibrillators (AED)
2.94 Comparability in Expending Federal Chapter 1 Funds
Liberty County School is proposing changes to the fol-
lowing policies:
1.10 District Philosophy
2.11 Orientation of Board Members
2.20 Responsibilities and Authority of Board
2.22 Board Meetings
2.23 School Board Rules
2.25 School Board Adopted Plans
2.26 School Improvement and Education Accountability
2.28 Schedule for Legal Advertisements
2.30 District Advisory Council
2.50 Participation in Activities
2.60 Program of Awards
2.70 Prohibition of Harassment
2.80 Unlawful Discrimination Prohibited
2.90 Tobacco Use in District Facilities
A public hearing on these policies will be held on Jan.
15 at the Liberty County Administrative. Offices, Hwy. 12
South, Bristol, FL 32321 at 6:30 p.m. A copy of the poli-
cies is available at the Superintendent's Office.




Now Taing Payments


OM> Preferred Partner
ITM


AUTHORIZED REPRESENTATiVE

Now Open
(850)237-2377




COMMUNICATIONS
19382 State Road 20W
Blountstown, FL
HOURS: Monday Friday 9 a.m. 5:30 p.m. CLOSED Saturday & Sunday


Former Altha resident charged


in boyfriend's shooting death
by Teresa Eubanks, Journal Editor house and Cole then tried to hide the body. "She
A former Altha resident is being held on an open used a blanket or sheet to drag his body out to an old
count of murder in the Dec. 26 shooting death of her shed and covered it with a lot of debris," he said.
boyfriend, whose body was found in a shed at his Cole said she and Durden had been together for
home in Grand Ridge five days after he was killed. a couple of years and admitted that they "were not
The victim was identified as Danny Durden, 44, good for each other," McDaniel said. The two met
He had been shot in the stomach. while working as correctional officers, he said.
Sue Ann Cole, 33, was taken into custody after Authorities had been called to the home a number
the Jackson County Sheriff's Office received a of times in the past for domestic disturbances but
call last week from a Blountstown pastor who had neither Cole nor Durden ever pressed charges. The
counseled Cole. last domestic disturbance report on file showed that
Sheriff John McDaniel went to the residence the responded to a problem between the two
deputies responded to a problem between the two
couple had shared at 6741 Chips Drive early last in November of 2006 according to Major John
week, where he met with Cole. She admitted that .
she had kille Dennis of the Jackson County Sheriff's Office.
she had killed Durden.
"When I first started talking to her, she was The shotgun used in the murder has been
.......Ii ... .. t1 un nh recovered but investigators would not verify where


IeiUmorseuLl an U startelU to cry. oe a tw LUIa Lo e
preacher where the body was, but after she told us
this she invoked her rights and wanted to go through
her lawyer at that point," the sheriff said.
McDaniel said the shooting took place in the


it was found.
Services for Durden were held in Marianna
Tuesday morning, followed by burial at Shady
Grove Cemetery.


Four Liberty Co. candidates file intent


FourLiberty County candidates,
including one incumbent, have
filed their intent to seek office
in the upcoming local elections,
which begins with the Aug. 26
Primary Election, followed by the
Nov. 4 General Election.
*Albert "Butch" Butcher will
seek another term on the Liberty
County Commission for District 1.
*Two candidates will be


seeking the job of tax collector.
They include Thomas "Bubba"
Rast of Hosford and Marie G.
Goodman of Bristol.
*Edward "Kevin" Williams
filed his intent Tuesday to run for
the District 5 spot on the Liberty
County Commission.
One incumbent and three new
candidates have come forward to
declare their intent to seek office


BROWN'S TAX

& ACCOUNTING
20741 East Central Ave. Blountstown
Call 674-4100 (Next door to Bela's Florist)
FAST REFUND LOANS
Pay nothing out of pocket. All applicable fees are deducted from the loan pro-
ceeds. Subject to credit availability. Credit is provided by Santa Barbara Trust.
Experienced andAffordable!
Trustworthy!

GRAND OPENING, SATURDAY, JAN.19
REFRESHMENTS 9 A.M. -1 P.M.


&

19204


a dniLa Collins; Ownri


HOURS;
Monday Friday
I TAN G ND Su r
9 a.m.-5 p.m.
_I_ I Saturday
9 a.m. 1p.m.


in the 2008 election.
The list includes Calhoun
County Sheriff David L. Tatum,
who will seek another term.
*Cecil Ray Cochran will run
for the District 1 seat on the
Calhoun County Commission.
*Tammy S. Rushing is seeking
the District 5 spot on the Calhoun
County Commission.
*Kenneth F. Speights is running
for the the District 4 spot on the
Calhoun County School Board.

Tax season
help sought
MARIANNA-Chipola
College is looking for volunteers
to do taxes for Jackson County
area residents this tax season.
Volunteers will be trained with
Internal Revenue Service tax
materials to help people whose
incomes are $39,000 or less with
their federal individual income
tax returns.
Through the Volunteer
Income Tax Assistance (VITA)
Program, volunteers will learn
to prepare simple federal tax
returns. In return, volunteers
will be asked to donate about
4 hours a week helping at a
VITA site from February through
April 15. Chipola's VITA sites
use computers to prepare and
electronically transmit tax rtumrns
(e-file).
According to accounting
professor Lee Shook, "No
accounting experience is
necessary. All that's required is
a desire to help others who cannot
prepare their basic tax returns
or afford to pay a preparer."
VITA volunteers participate in
a short training session-in class
or through self-study-then are
tested on what they learned.
For more information, contact
Lee Shook at 850-718-2368
(shookl@chipola.edu) or Jackie
Keller, IRS at 850-596-0969
(email at Jacqueline.e.keller@
irs.gov).









Page 4 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JANUARY 9,2008


Ochlockonee River

State Park to host

1st Stone Age and

Primitive Art Fest
SOPCHOPPY- The Florida Department
of Environmental Protection's (DEP)
Ochlockonee River State Park is hosting
the First Annual Stone Age and Primitive
Art Festival.
The event will take place on Feb. 8-10
from 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Ochlockonee
River State Park located at 429 State Park
Road in Sopchoppy.
On Feb. 8, from 9:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.,
visitors will experience "hands-on" learning,
as experts demonstrate techniques that were
used thousands of years ago in day to day
life. Visitors will also see projectile point
fashioning, also known as flint-knapping
which is the art of chipping stone into
tools, bow and arrow construction, basket
weaving, early pottery methods and more.
According to archeological research,
Ochlockonee River's rich history of
humans interacting with nature goes back
12,000 years.
Admission is the regular park entrance fee
of $3 per carload of up to eight people, and
$1 per pedestrian or bicyclist. The admission
fee includes access to all events.
For more information, visit www.
floridastateparks.org.

Residents meet to

plan history book
Heritage Publishing Consultants, Inc.
will hold an informational meeting that is
open to the public about a new grassroots
and family history book for Liberty
County.
The meeting for Liberty County
residents will be held on Wednesday, Jan.
23 at 2 p.m. (ET) at the Harrell Memorial
Public Library, located at 12818 NW C.R.
12 in Bristol. The Heritage of Liberty
County will be written by and for the
people of Liberty County. .
Heritage of Florida County books
already published include Bay, Escambia,
Holmes, Jackson, Okaloosa, Santa Rosa,
Walton, and Washington counties. Heritage
of Florida County books starting February-
April 2007 include Calhoun, Gulf, Liberty,
Leon, and Wakulla counties.
Forfurther information about theLiberty
County book contact the Harrell Memorial
Public Library at 850-643-2247.

Calhoun County Dixie
Youth begin sign-ups
The Calhoun County Dixie Youth will
begin sign-ups for players between the
ages of4 and 12 (you do not qualify if you
turn 13 before May 1, 2008) on Jan. 12 at
the Blountstown High School Gym from
8 a.m. to 12 p.m.
We will have two more sign-up dates on
Saturday, Jan. 19 and 26 at the BHS Gym
from 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. You need to have
a copy of the child's birth certificate (that
we can keep) at the time you are signing
up. Registration fees are $50.


COMMUNITY

ALENDAR


Ad duc duA4 o6
guo C"eed fu S 4


BIRTHDAYS
'De6bie 'lfansford& &"Ricky 'McCavin .
TODAY'S MEETINGS
* Long Term Care, 10 a.m. till noon, Calhoun County Public Library
* Rotary Club, noon, Calhoun-Liberty Hospital
* Weight Loss Support Group, 1:30 p.m., Shelton Park Library
* AA, 7 p.m., Calhoun County Old Ag Bldg. east door, in front of jail
* Liberty County Children's Coalition, 11 a.m., Emergency Management Building
* 4-H Sportsman Club, after school, Veterans Memorial Park Civic Center


BIRTHDAYS
Paige White &' Shelena Owens
EVENTS
Liberty Co. Logic & Accuracy Test of Voting Equipment
(Public test), 9 a.m., Supervisor of Elections Office
TODAY'S MEETINGS
AA, 7 p.m., basement of Calhoun County Courthouse
Liberty Women's Club, 11 a.m., Apalachee Restaurant
Calhoun Co. Chamber of Com., board of directors, 12 p.m., conference room
Search & Rescue, 6:30 p.m., Westside Fire Dept in Blountstown


BIRTHDAYS
'RaymoncCoxwef(
EVENTS
Mobile Blood Unit, 8 a.m -3 p.m., Wakulla Bank of Bristol Cne
Dance, 6 12 p.m., American Legion Hall in Blountstown


BIRTHDAYS
Christopher Leach & 'Debra Colins
EVENTS .. .
Train Rides, 11 a.m. 3 p.m., Veterans Memorial Park Civic Center
i Dance, 6 12 p.m., American Legion Hall in Blountstown


May-Haw returns

to Cotton Hall with

a brand new show
COLQUITT, GA You've been
waiting six months, but wait no more -
May-Haw is back! Colquitt's own musical
variety show will feature brand new jokes,
skits and songs for 2008 and will be in
Cotton Hall for two weekends in January
starting Friday, Jan. 18.
Catch up with Preacher Pencil Johnson
and hear the latest church and community
updates as Quezle Erskin, Floyd B. Lloyd
and Marvin Spitznargle broadcast live
from WMHAW Radio inside Cotton Hall.
The show will also feature live music
performed by local musicians, as your
favorite May-Haw singers return with.
new songs. You will even meet some new,.
hysterical characters that will keep you on
the edge of your seat.
May-Haw will be performed during the
last two weekends in January, Jan. 18-19
and 25-26. Show times are Friday at 7:30
p.m. and Saturday at 2:30 p.m. and 7:30
p.m. Tickets are $12 and can be purchased
by calling the Colquitt/Miller Arts Council
Box Office at (229) 758-5450.
Be the first to see this hilarious show
that is sure to keep you laughing for the
rest of the year!

McCrary to appear in
'Moon over Buffalo'
Blountstown
resident Andrea
Hagler McCrary will
be performing in ai
"Moon over Buffalo,
a comedy by Ken Ludwig on Jan. 11, 12,
18, 19, 25, and 26 at 7:30 p.m. and on Jan.
13, 20, and 27 at 2 p.m.
The show will be performed at the
Kaleidoscope Theatre located at 207 E.
24th Street in Lynn Haven.
Adults tickets are $15 each, seniors and
active duty military are $14, and students
are $8.
To make reservations (with credit card)
call 265-3226. For more information go to
www.kt-online.org.




from the Calhoun County Public Library
Have you got books at home that
you have been meaning to turn in? Are
they overdue? Don't worry... January is
Fine Free Month at the Calhoun County
libraries. Dig out all your past dues and
bring them in today.




That's how many copies of
The Calhoun-Liberty Journal
were distributed last week,
ensuring plenty of coverage for
your community announcements
and great response for our
business advertisers!


BIRTHDAYS
'Kevin Collins
TODAY'S MEETINGS
* Walk-A-Weigh Program, 9 a.m., Veterans Memorial Park Civic Center
* Altha Boy Scouts, 5:30 p.m., Altha Volunteer Fire Department
* Keep Calhoun Co. Beautiful Inc., 9 a.m., board room of Cal. Co. Ext. office
* Citizens Advisory Council for Big Bend Hospice, 11:30 a.m.,
Apalachee Restaurant
* Blountstown Lions Club, 6 p.m., Apalachee Restaurant
* Red Level Lodge #134, 7 p.m., 5602 Alliance Rd., Marianna


BIRTHDAYS
Joan 'Bugsy 'Morgan &' Wilie -Nferman
TODAY'S MEETINGS
* Boy Scout Troop 206, 7 p.m., Veterans Memorial Park Civic Center
* Calhoun Co. Chamber of Commerce, noon, Calhoun Co. Sr. Citizens
* Calhoun County Commission, 5 p.m., Calhoun Co. Courthouse
* Calhoun County Industrial Developmental Authority, 5 p.m. Calhoun
Co. EOC, Room G-35
* Health Care Council, 5:30 p.m., Veterans Memorial Park Civic Center
* Brownie Troop 158, 7-8:30 p.m., Veterans Memorial Park Civic Center
* Dixie 109 Masonic Lodge, 7 p.m., Masonic Lodge, Blountstown
* Hosford-Telogia VFD, 7:30 p.m., Hosford Fire Station








JANUARY 9, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 5


Bristol City Attorney David House is shown above at far right as he swears in Bristol's new first
time Mayor, Betty Brantley, along several other City Council officials. Pictured from left, Robin
Hatcher City Clerk, Betty Brantley Mayor, Meiko Whitfield Vice Chairman, Bobby Reddick
- Council Member, John Eben Fairchild Council member and attorney David House. Council
members took their oaths of office Monday night. JOHNNY EUBANKS PHOTO

Spring registration continues at Chipola
MARIANNA-Spring in Business Administration and provides opportunities for
semester classes at Chipola 'Secondary Education and Middle students to pursue a number of
College began Jan. 4; however, School Education with majors in bachelor's and graduate degrees
students may continue to register Mathematics or Science. Chipola from FSU, UWF and Troy on the
through noon on Jan. 11. State also offers several Associate
of Florida employees using the in Science (AS) programs, as Chipola campus.
state fee waiver may also register well as a number of Workforce For more information, call
through Jan. 11. Development programs which the Chipola Registration Office
Chipola's open-door policy providetrainingforhighwagejobs. at 718-2211, or visit Chipola at
allows any student with a high Chipola's University Center www.chipola.edu
school diploma to enroll after
completing an application and Palm Management program set for Jan. 24
providing high school or college
transcripts. Cding high school offers college The Jackson County Master Gardeners, in conjunction with
transcripts. Chipola offers college
credit courses during the day the University of Florida, IFAS, will present a program on Palm
and evening, and also online and Management, Thursday, Jan. 24. Speakers will include Dr. Monica L.
through independent study. The Elliott, Professor of Plant Pathology, Dr. Timothy Broschat, Professor
college awards the Associate of Environmental Horticulture and Dr. Bill Howard, Associate
in Arts (AA) degree which Professor of Entomology.
guarantees acceptance to Florida's The program will cover a broad range of topics including new
public universities. Chipola also diseases, fertilization, pruning, insects and identification and is
offers Bachelor's degree programs designed for landscapers and homeowners alike. It will be aired via
poly-com at the Jackson County Agricultural Complex at 2741Penn
Avenue in Marianna from 7:30 a.m. to 11 a.m. with registration
starting at 7 a.m..
The cost for the program is $10 which includes refreshments and
educational materials. Please call 850-482-9620 to register by Jan.
22. CEUs will be available for FNGLA, ISA and Restricted Pesticide
Applicators.


Answer
WHAT IS CHIPOIA COLLEGE
B.S. in Business Management (Coming in January 2008)
B.S. in Secondary Education
with Majors in Math and Science
Educator Preparation Institute
(Teacher Certification Program for persons
with bachelor's degrees in non-education fields)
AA, AS and Workforce Development Programs

Late Registration through January 11
Classes begin January 4

850-526-2761 www.chipola.edu
Q


Raising the roof of the civic center
Two hundred people were entertained with a night of Irish
music and dance at Veterans Memorial Civic Center in
Bristol on Saturday, Jan. 5. "We were told that our stage
was perfect for the sound of the hard shoe dancing, it
certainly rocked our audience," said an Arts Council
member. The Killearn Performing Arts and Tallahassee
Irish Step Dancers brought about 40 members to put on
the great story of the Snow Queen.


DENVER HAYES LUNCH BENEFIT

Thursday, Jan. 24 |||
$6 Per Plate Sliced Boston Butt
6 PerPlateBaked Beans
Your Cooks: Liberty Baked Beans
County Sheriffs Dept. Potato Salad
Call 379-4000 Roll |
to preorder your plate(s).
* 10 Plate Minimum for Delivery *
Denver was severely injured in a recent car accident. 100%
of the proceeds from this benefit will be donated to Denver
and his family to help them offset some of the tremendous ex-
penses associated with his continued hospital stay.








04W 0 4* ml. 4W -. 0M


SAa. p r a oMw


A'"Cop


iF


-- --_OSynd


Available from C







W





non qu "- "N -Nam- .. Whi
e* *N -- tograp


1
4m- s p dj.


am4* - 4

- * w em


-00 t-
qgmb% *ow*


-do 4b-


4- N W 0,00%


. -. *. - -
a w P"a m -Nw-


** emes
p ~ -.










~ m _
10-40 am, m





awa, ommom, antpn,, ,m
a@40.0





.. -
.* .- -






-- .


--*
mow4
-qu



Imm o 4mio -imw t-- 4P
mo w 1E~gp,- mmmf~
o-q e nwqum Mm onwu


Amp Now, loko 4-- in.- SE


"ighted Material.


icated Content-t*


commercial News Provi


lI7c _


ar photos show the horrors of battle


skey Tango Foxtrot; A Pho-
ther's Chronicle of the Iraa


War is the title of photographer
S Ashley Gilbertson's pictorial his-
- tory of the war in Iraq.
I was in one of the large book-
stores when I noticed this book on
a table with other books about cur-
rent events. As I leafed through the
book, I recognized that the photog-


/ Cox's
COX'S
CORNER
Jerry Cox is a retired military
officer and writer with an extensive
background in domestic and
foreign policy issues. He lives in
Walton County.


rapher had captured the horrors of the Iraq War
more-succinctly than those of us who use words
to describe the same events. Gilbertson's photo-
graphs give new meaning to the adage that a pic-
ture is worth a thousand words.
Gilbertson was in Iraq when the U.S. invasion
began and his book chronicles the success of the
U.S. armed forces in deposing Saddam Hussein,
the looting of anything of value in Iraq that fol-
lowed the U.S. invasion and the killing of sol-
diers, Marines and Iraqis that has occurred since
the U.S. invasion.
The photographs in this book display in stark
terms what war is about. The photographs also
show what happens when a military force occu-
pies a foreign land. The killing began as Sunnis,
Shiites and Kurds began settling old scores. To-
day, one reason for the reduction in the number
of deaths is that much of Iraq has been ethically
cleansed. The Sunnis live in one section of town
and the Shiites live in another. The Kurds own
northern Iraq and vigorously defend their turf.
The squeamish may find the photographs in this
book unsettling. Numerous photographs show
pools of blood on the streets, burned cars, houses
and bodies.
The U.S. Army wasn't gentle in their approach
to subduing the Iraqi population. In a series of
five photographs with captions, the photographer
chronicles a U.S. Army officer's attempts to neu-
tralize threats from a small town about 50 miles


north of Baghdad.
The officer had his troops sur-
round the town with a barricade of
razor wire. If anyone crossed the
barrier they would be shot. The
officer bulldozed people's houses,
and called in air strikes against
the town. His career ended when
two of his soldiers were court-
martialed after they threw an Iraqi


into the river, and he drowned.
Not all Iraqis were the enemy. The photographs
show many instances where the Iraqi people were
attempting to maintain some semblance of nor-
malcy in their lives. One photograph shows a
family where a wedding was occurring. As part
of an offensive military operation, soldiers en-
tered the home. The owner asked the soldiers to
let his guests leave because his house was very
small. The soldiers ordered the people to stay in
the house for three days.
The book shows a number of soldiers and Ma-
rines before and after they were killed. One photo-
graph shows a young Marine in the front row of a
group of Marines who were apparently receiving
a briefing. The caption to the photograph states
that the Marine was killed five days later by an in-
surgent disguised as a member of the Iraqi Army.
While all Iraqis were not the enemy, many or
most of them were, so for the GI, everyone is the
enemy. I would feel the same way. It doesn't mat-
ter if you are killed by an adult enemy insurgent
disguised as a supposedly friendly foreign soldier,
or a teenage insurgent. The result is the same. You
are dead.
The photographs show what war is like for U.S.
soldiers and Marines. After seeing the kill or be
killed panorama of war portrayed in this book, I
have nothing but extreme admiration for the basic
GI that fights America's wars in the far reaches of
the world.


ders"


1% -W


W 40








S.a D ** o d


O a e- a J


- -


Oft


- ~- -


44C


IL v 1*' -w -- -







i "Copyrig hted Material-. _


iSylrm oiatedrContent w P


Available from Commercial News Providers"


- - -


=


- al


a -


a -
- - a*
- ~ -
* a - w Q -~
- w -
- - -


a

- a -~


- --
-
- ~- -
- ~ -


- ~


Sb -


. -


a -


a _

- -


a *~
- a m


GOmWemo


4*-04 4w m- m


- - - -
a a
a -- -


l
-~. -qp ip
eb 4ra..


COMMENTARY #I~


14ow -
40-


Q








Page 8 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JANUARY 9, 2008


The family of Konner
Earnest would like to thank
Deputy Caryl Marotta of
the Liberty County Sheriff's
Office. She saved our baby's
life and she means the world
to us. Caryl came over to visit
Konner and brought him a very
special teddy bear with a bib
and personalized it with a note.
We would also like to thank
Calhoun and Liberty County
EMS for their emergency care
and compassion that extended
to the hospital. Hours later two
of the emergency workers came
to Konner's room in the ER to
make sure he was well. Also,
two separate Life Flight teams
were sent to Konner. I am very
thankful to both of them but
to the team that transported
us, as a mother who's never
flown, the air team eased my


Guest
Speakers
WORD OF
TRUTH -
Word of Truth
will be holding
special services the entire month
of January. Rev. Steve Grimsley,
full-time evangelist from
Tennessee, is the guest speaker.
Services will be Wednesday,
Friday, and Saturday nights at 7
p.m., and Sunday afternoons at 3
p.m. through Jan. 27.
Each night will be filled with
praise and worship, special songs,
and the Sign Language Team
Ministry will be performing.
Plus, the Word of God will be
geared to life-changing messages
with you in mind.


U

S

I


fear of flight and kept me
informed throughout the flight
of Konner's status.
I moved to Liberty County
when I was 14 and had many
ups and downs during the
transition from Louisiana. On
Dec. 27 I found a new respect
for the citizens of Liberty
County. I don't know the
names of everyone who stood
behind me, Konner's mom,
as he was being assessed and
stabilized, but you all know
who you are. I felt the support
of your prayers and your hugs
during this very traumatic
time. To Gwen, thank you for
the added support of a familiar
Pastor Ron
Baker extends a
cordial invitation
for you to come
and be blessed.
The church
is located off
Highway 20 West, 19397 SW
South Street, behind City Tire.
For more information, call the
church office at 674-4605.
Prayer Meetings
PRAYER BAND The
Liberty Community Prayer
Band will hold prayer service
Thursday, Jan. 10 at 7:30 p.m.
(ET) at the home of Sister Debra
Lane.
Everyone is cordially invited
to attend. For more information,
call 643-4312.


Wkauk A eal.'

BEST DEAL IN THE TRI-STATE AREA!
Slow credit, no problem W.A.C.
Hand-picked quality
cars and trucks.
Business (850) 526-5254
Residence (850) 762-3679
Toll Free: 1-888-740-8222

SUMMERLIN
3905w w. M TO R
in Marianna M T R


ibertyPost &|

Barn Pole Inc.
Dempsey Barron Road, Bristol 643-5995 (off Hwy. 12 N)
TOP TOP TOP FACTORY
GRADE GRADE GRADE SECONDS
7' Posts 8' Posts 6'6" Posts 8' Corners
Top Size Top Size Top Size under 3"
3-4" 2-3", 3-4" 2-2.5" 3-4"
4-5" 4-5" 2-5.3" 4-5"
5-6" 5-6" 3-3.5" 5-6"
6-7" 3.5-4" 6-7"
7-8" 4-5" 7-8"
SPECIALTY 8"+ 5"+ 8".
POSTS
1/4 rounds items FACTORY SECONDS
1/2 rounds subject to 6'6" Posts, Top Size, under 2"
-Flat Face availability 2-3" 3-4" 4-5" 5"'-k4
' We've got the fence posts to meetyour needs.


face. I would like to thank each
and everyone of you from the
bottom of my heart.
Sincerely,
Amy Earnest, Konner's mom

This is a letter of
appreciation to the Calhoun-
Liberty Hospital for the kind
and compassionate services I
received a few weeks ago.
I went to the emergency
room at midnight and had to
undergo some x-rays and other
tests. The respect and empathy
showed by the hospital
personnel was, outstanding.
My special thanks go to Mr.
Eby of Radiology and Mrs.
Duncan, the emergency room
nurse. It's good to know that
we have a hospital and staff
that are efficient and caring,
and that each patient is a
special individual that receives
good medical care.
Since the hospital here can


do so many tests, it means that
we do not have to go out of
town as we used to have them
done. This makes it much
easier than before. Thanks
again to the hospital and all its
staff.
Sincerely,
Sharon Griffin

The family of Lessie
Deason Revell would like to
express our gratitude for the
outpouring of love and support
shown to us during our time of
loss.
The cards, telephone calls,
food, flowers and memorials
that were received and the
thoughts and prayers that were
expressed gave our entire
family comfort.
A very special thank you to
the staff at Big Bend Hospice
and her special caregivers,
Veresta "Pokey" Grant, A.D.
McNew and Louise Tipton for


$2,000 Down
Owner Financing, No Qualifying
No Interest charged first year
Tri-Land Inc. R.E. Broker
Call (813) 253-3258



Need a Mortgage?
'. 9100% Financing
Purchase/Refinance
Construction perm
Bill Consolidation
Lot Loans
Great Rates
Home Equity Lines
Thomas Flowers
Forgotten Coast 'Apply by phone
Mortgage Inc. 850-643-6200
Fast OFFICE
850-237-2777
Approvals! OFFICE

20735 Central Ave. E. in Blountstown
www.ForgottenCoastMortgage.com B,


the excellent care they provided
for our loved one. To Rev.
Clyde Roberts and Lawrence
Lindsey, thank you for the
years of visits, the spiritual
guidance and the wonderful
church service in remembrance
of her, along with the beautiful
music provided by Ken and
Georgia Ann Hosford and
Yvonne Watson. Many thanks
to Marlon and Debbie Peavy
and staff for their efforts in
making the planning process
and the services a little easier.
Words truly are incapable of
expressing our appreciation.
May God bless you.
from the families of
Carroll and Jean Revell &
Hoyle and Mary Joiner





by Ryan McDougaldj
UNDERSTAND GOD'S WILL
Text: Ephesians 5:17
When he was forty years old, he
was fired from the sawmill where he
worked without warning. In his own
words, "Depressed and discouraged,
I felt like the world caved in. When I
told my wife what had happened, she
asked me what I was going to do. I
replied, 'I'm going to mortgage our
little home and go into the building
business.' My first venture was the
construction of two small buildings.
Within five years, I was a multimil-
lionaire! At the time it happened, I
didn't understand why I was fired.
Later, I saw that it was God's unerr-
ing and wondrous plan to get me into
the way of His choosing." And so
Wilson Johnson, the founder of Holi-
day Inn motels found God's will for
his life.
God has a plan and a purpose for
your life. He has a plan and purpose
for the life of everyone who will be-
lieve in Jesus Christ and trust Him for
the forgiveness of sins. It is the re-
sponsibility of the believer to be care-
ful and live a wise life. Take advan-
tage of every opportunity you have to
serve God in these last and evil days.
We are admonished, "Therefore do
not be foolish, but understand what
the Lord's will is (NIV)."
We are to understand what it is in
life that God wants us to do and get
busy doing it. Whenever a person
receives Christ as Lord and Savior
of his life, God sends the Holy Spirit
to live and dwell inside that person.
The Holy Spirit gives every believer
some spiritual gift that he can use to
serve others and glorify God.
Doing God's will is the only place
where you will find true joy. Dr. Liv-
ingstone once said, "I had rather be in
the heart of Africa in the will of God
than on the throne of England out of
the will of God."


We're your one-stop


TIRE STORE!
Why wear out your new tires (and waste time)
driving from the tire store to the parts place and then
to a service station to get it all put together?
CITY TIRE IS YOUR ONE-STOP TIRE SHOP!


Balancing
Brakes Shocks


Str


uts CV Joints
Oil Changes


I O .T u me u- B


CITY TIRE Co.
Hwy. 20 West Blountstown 674-8784


r


-irmniil


I


I


I AAg








JANUARY 9, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 9


: OLD PAR


AL


*rS


AHAC


"Copyrighted Material



-Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers"
-.Z -low.


W -14w0


* -- 0~


January 7-13 2008

JANARY 8 Old Farmer's A 1,


New Moon


JANUARY 10
hiamic New Year


Almanac


traditionally, Distaff Day (January
7) was the day when women
were supposed to return to their
spinning following the holidays.
One old adage declares, "Partly
work and partly play, must ye on St.
Distaff's Day." A distaff is a spin-
dle for holding the flax or wool in
spinning. In the glee of Distaff Day,
the men would often playfully pre-


Best days to
begin loging

JANUARY 9, 1o
Best days to
startprojects


vent their wives from starting their
work by trying to burn the flax
off the distaff .
The distaff it-
self has come
to symbolize
the domestic u
sphere, hence the
ongoing reference ,-
to women as "the distaff side."


ATTENTION TAXPAYERS!!!

You may be entitled to the

following exemptions:

$25,000 HOMESTEAD EXEMPTIONS: Every person who has legal
or equitable title to real property in the state of Florida and who resides
thereon and in good faith makes it his or her permanent home is eli-
gible. First time applicants are required to furnish their social security
number and should have available evidence of ownership, i.e., deed,
contract, etc. If filing for the first time, be prepared to answer these and
other questions:
1. In whose name or names was the title to the dwelling recorded as
of Jan. 1st?
2. What is the street address?
3. Are you a legal resident of the State of Florida?
4. Do you have a Florida license plate on your car and a Florida driver's
license?
5. Were you living in the dwelling which is being claimed for homestead
exemption on Jan. 1st?

$500 WIDOW'S EXEMPTION: Any widow who is a permanent Florida
resident may claim this exemption. If the widow remarries, she is no
longer eligible. If the husband and wife were divorced before death,
the woman is not considered a widow. You may be asked to produce a
death certificate when filing for the first time.
$500 WIDOWER'S EXEMPTION: Any widower who is a permanent
Florida resident may claim this exemption. If the widower remarries
he is no longer eligible. If the husband and wife were divorced before
death, the man is not considered a widower. You may be asked to pro-
duce a death certificate when filing for the first time.
$500 DISABILITY EXEMPTION: Every Florida resident who is totally
and permanently disabled qualifies for this exemption. Please present
a certificate from two (2) professionally unrelated licensed FlQrida phy-
sicians.
$5,000 DISABLED VETERAN EXEMPTION: Any service man disabled
at least 10% in war or by service-connected misfortune is entitled to this
exemption. In filing for the first time be prepared to present a certificate
from the United States Department of Veterans Affairs.
AGRICULTURE EXEMPTION: Five (5) acres or more being used as
bona fide agricultural purposes on Jan. 1st.
SENIOR CITIZEN HOMESTEAD EXEMPTION: The Liberty County
Commissioners have approved an additional Homestead Exemption
for certain homestead property owners who reside in Liberty County.
The exemption is for an additional $25,000 and applies only to a portion
of the tax rate (Millage).
In order to qualify for the new $25,000 Senior Citizens Homestead
Exemption, an applicant must already have the regular Homestead Ex-
emption, be 65 years of age or older as of Jan. 1, 2007 and have total
household income of $22,000 or less for the previous calendar year.
(Estimated no final amount available as of today.)
Total household income means the adjusted gross income of all
members of a household. The adjusted gross income is the income
reported on the IRS Form 1040, line 33 or the IRS Form 1040A, line
19 or, if the applicant is not required to file income tax, the total income
minus Social Security benefits. Income includes, but is not limited to,
Social Security benefits, pension, VA retirement annuities, interest in-
come and wages.
YOU WILL NEED TO PROVIDE PROOF OF AGE AND
PROOF OF ALL 2007 INCOME TO THE HOUSEHOLD.

THE DEADLINE FOR FILING THESE EXEMPTIONS IS MARCH 1
AT THE LIBERTY COUNTY PROPERTY APPRAISER OFFICE, IF
YOU HAVE ANY QUESTIONS, PLEASE CALL 850-643-2279
v______________________-


4 cups pitted, diced reheat the oven to 400 F. Place the plums In a deep
"plums Ii 9-inch pie dish. Combine the sugar, flour, and
1/4 cupflour salt ad sprinkle over plums. Dot with butter. Roll
1/4 teaspoon salt out pastry to 1/8-inch thick. Moisten the pie-dish rim
tablespoon and lay the pastry over plums. Seal
butter the edges and prick the top.
pito y) Bake for about 35 minutes.
(tp l.. MAKES 6 SERVINGS,
WIT AND WISDOM FROM THE OLD FARMER'S ALMANAC
To clean brass, use water in which white beans
have been boiled.
BNt U In Januairy, if the sun appeal; March and April
S I pay fidl dear.
L_. _i U On January 9, 1982, a 5.9-magnitude earth-
quake shook eastern Canada and New England.
FOR RECIPES, GARDENING TIPS, AND WEATHER FORECASTS, VISIT:
Almana c. coam


0~


5 0TB^^~


o









Page 10 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JANUARY 9, 2008


ABBIGAIL MATHEWS
Abbigail Mathews celebrated
her second birthday on Dec.
27, celebrating with friends
and family on Saturday, Dec.
22 with Elmo and all the Ses-
ame Street gang. She is the
daughter of Walt and Nicole
Mathews of Clarksville. Abbie
enjoys playing outside with
Mama, Daddy and the dogs
and especially sliding on her
new slide.


CARMEN MARTIN
Carmen Martin celebrated
her third birthday on Dec. 21
with a My Little Pony party.
She is the daughter of Casey
Martin andAmanda Phillips of
Bristol. Her grandparents are
Nicky and Faye Phillips and
Rocky and Judy Martin, all of
Bristol. Carmen enjoys play-
ing with her cousins, Molly
and Braddock and aggravat-
ing her little brother, J.C.


MATTIE "PAT" WEBB
Mattie "Pat" Webb celebrated
her 71st birthday on Jan. 8.
She is the mother of three
children, Janet Williams of Al-
tha, Alvin Webb of Altha and
Wendell Webb of Chipley.
Her seven grandchildren are
Kristy Plazarin, Tasha and
Tommy Webb, April Nichols,
Rachael Corey and Lynzee
Webb. Her five great-grand-
children are Hunter Clark,
Alyssa, Destiny and Nickoli
Webb and Garrett Webb. Mat-
tie enjoys spending time with
her family and grandchildren
and sewing when she can.


Laban Bontrager,


JAZMIN LYNN OUZTS
Barney Ouzts and Rhonda
Burch of Bristol are proud to
announce the birth of their
daughter, Jazmin Lynn Ouzts,
born on Nov. 8, 2007 at Tal-
lahassee Memorial Hospital.
She weighed 8 lbs. and 7 oz.
and measured 21 1/4 inches
long. Maternal grandparents
are Van and Louise Burch of
Bristol. Paternal grandparents
are Pat and the late John
Ouzts of Marianna. Jazmin
I was welcomed home by her
three brothers, Jeremy, Chaz and Gaige.


Jaylon Hall kills first deer
Jaylon Hall, age 9, brought the new year in by killing his
first deer. The 6-pointer was taken when hunting with his
daddy in the buddy stand on New Year's day. His biggest
supporter is his little sister, Josie who always wishes him
good luck before the hunt. Jaylon is the son of Richard
and LeAnna Hall.


GRACELYN BARBEE
Gracelyn Barbee celebrated
her first birthday on Dec. 30
with an Elmo party on Jan. 5.
She is the daughter of Casite
and Mark Barbee of Kinard.
Her grandparents are Doris
and the late Marcus Barbee
of Kinard, Barbara Gibson of
Carrollton, GA and the late
Jesse Hyde of Kinard. Gracie
enjoys riding the four-wheeler
and playing with her sister,
Jessie and brother, Marcus.


SGAIL'S PIANO

STUDIO
Give your child a life-
long skill. Experienced
teacher. Degree in
piano performance.
Call 643-4718


Share your
s ecial moments
withan announcement
in 'he Journal
qBirths, 'irthdays,
Wed ings, Anniversaries,
'Famify 'Reunions
and' more.


* 8








JANUARY 9,2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 11


Our fast claims service

is "No Problem."

R ur agency is well-known for providing fast,
efficient and fair claims service. That's because
we represent Auto-Owners Insurance, who, according to-
a national consumers' magazine, ranks consistently as one
of the top insurers in the country.
That's why we are known ..
as the "No Problem.'n -
People. Ask us about-..
our great service today

,auto-Owners Insuwance
Life Home Car Business


Shuler, Crosby to wed June 21


Bubby and Melissa Shuler of
Bristol announce the engage-
ment of their daughter, Amanda
Melissa Shuler to Mark Alan
Crosby Jr. of Sumatra. He is
the son of Mark and Charlotte
Crosby of Sumatra.
Maternal grandparents of the
future bride are Jim and Janet Di-
etz of Blountstown and the late
William Bailey. Paternal grand-
parents are A.M. Jr. "Roni" and
Patti Shuler of Bristol and the
late Johnnie Richards Davis.
The groom-elect's grandpar-
ents are Robert and Gloria Estes
of Apalachicola and Sonnie and
Rose Crosby of Eastpoint.
The bride-elect is a 2004
graduate of Liberty County
High School. She attends Flor-
ida State University and will
receive a bachelor's degree in


Chipola College and received a
degree from Florida Department
of Corrections. He is presently
employed as a sergeant with
Franklin County Department of
Corrections.
A June 21 wedding is
planned.


elementary education in April:
She is presently interning at
W.R. Tolar Elementary School.
The prospective groom is a
2004 graduate of Liberty Coun-
ty High School.
He is a 2005 graduate of


4 4*


A


Swww.family.fhretailer.com
S SJ


www.family.fhretailer.com FLEETWOOD


FAMILY HOME CENTER
of Tallahassee "Where Quality is Affordable"
ASK FOR STEVE DANIELS, WILBURT GAVIN OR ANNA EASON
Call 850-575-4240 Cell 850-528-6995 7579 W. TENNESSEE ST. IN TALLAHASSEE
1 (


final plans set
Mr. and Mrs. Terrell L. Stone
of Blountstown are pleased to
announce the final wedding
plans for their daughter, Casi
Leigh, to Rev. Robert Henry
Chaney Jr. Rob is the son of
Mr. and Mrs. Robert H. Chaney
of Section, AL.
The wedding will be held
Saturday, Jan. 12 at 6 p.m.
(ET) at First Baptist Church of
Tallahassee with a reception
to follow at the Tallahassee
Community College Capitol
Center, located at 300 West
Pensacola Street.
All family and friends are
invited to attend.


House, Perry

to wed April 5
Mr. and Mrs. John David
House Sr. of Blountstown an-
nounce the engagement of their
daughter, Annie Jo House to
Andrew James Perry, son of Mr.
Hugh Perry and the late Mrs.
Jennifer Perry of Storm Lake,
IA.
Annie Jo, a graduate of the
University of Florida, is em-
ployed with the Fulton County.
School Board. Andy graduated
from the University of Northern
Iowa and is in land development
and construction in the Atlanta
area.
The wedding is set for April
5, 2008 in Atlanta. The couple
will reside in Atlanta, GA.








Page 12 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JANUARY 9, 2008


Liberty Deputy

honored for

saving baby
Liberty County Sheriff
Harrell Wood Revell is
pictured above as he
presents a letter of
commendation to Deputy
Caryl Marotta on Friday
to recognize her life
saving actions on Dec.
27, 2007. Marotta broke
away from a traffic detail
after hearing a mother's
panicked screams. She
found the woman holding
her 15-month-old son,
who was not breathing.
Marotta cleared the
baby's mouth and turned
him on his stomach as
she administered CPR
and got him breathing
again.


Grand opening held for


180 Fitness in Bristol
Personal Trainer
Derek Causseaux
of Bristol held a
grand opening
Saturday for his
new business,
180 Fitness,
located on State
Road 20 West
in Bristol next to
Myrlene's Beauty
Shop. Derek is
shown at right
monitoring the
progress of a
new member as
he tries out some
of the equipment.
Members have a
variety of fitness
machines to work
out on to help them
meet their fitness
JOHNNY
EUBANKS
PHOTOS


by Marti Vickery, Executive Director
PROGRESS THROUGHOUT THE COUNTY Take a good
look around. Other areas in the region may be hit by tough times,
and we are keeping an eye on the economy here, too, but look at our
community! New construction projects, remodels and expansions,
brand new companies now calling Calhoun County home... We
have a lot to be thankful for and I applaud those making the effort
to work together to improve our county and its economy.
JANUARY 10 DEADLINE TO RESPOND The NW Florida
Legislative Forum will be held Thursday, Jan. 17 at the Sandestin
Golf and Beach Resort from 4 to 6 p.m.. This is a public forum,
presented by the NW Florida Chamber Coalition, of which Calhoun
County is a part. The opportunity to exchange dialogue with NW
Florida's legislative delegation will be available to those who
participate. Please join us to discuss areas of interest for the 2008
legislative session. Confirmed to attend are: State Representatives
Marti Coley, Dave Murzin, Don Brown, Greg Evers, Jimmy Patronis
and Speaker Designate Ray Sansom along with Senators Don Gaetz
and Durell Peaden, Jr.
Please call the Calhoun County Chamber for more details and to
reserve your seat by Jan. 10. 850-674-4519, 850- 447-1110 or send
an email to marti@calhounco.org.
NEW PLAT BOOKS ARE SELLING FAST Stop by the
Calhoun County Chamber offices in Blountstown or the Calhoun
Liberty Journal in Bristol to purchase your 2007 Calhoun Liberty
Plat books. Don't miss out! Each plat book is just $42.80 including
tax. The Calhoun County Chamber is located at 20816 Central Ave
East Suite 2 in Blountstown.
JANUARY CHAMBER MEMBERSHIP MEETING -Tuesday,
Jan. 15, the Calhoun County Chamber membership will be meeting
for lunch at the Calhoun County Senior Center in Blountstown. A
.barbecue lunch will be served at noon (CT) for just $7 including
beverage and dessert! Call 674-4519 to reserve your seats or send
an email to chamber@calhounco.org.
THANK YOU FOR THE-NOMINATIONS -itias been
encouraging to see the flood, of Citizen of the Year nominations
coming into the Calhoun County Chamber office. The Citizen
of the Year Award will be given at the Calhoun County Chamber
Annual Banquet in Feb. Several additional achievements awarded
that evening, so make plans now to join us Feb. 28 at the W. T.
Neal Civic Center.


Melissa Coates handicap match! Many other great matches!
Call (850) 379-8410 or (850) 379-8333 NO PROFANITY
ORALCOHOL
Coming Feb. 16: Tom Van, Comedian ALLOWED


The Calhoun-Liberty

JOURNAL
HOURS: 9 a.m. 6 p.m. Monday thru Friday, 9 a.m. -1 p.m. Saturday (ET)









JANUARY 9, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 13


HUM INBIR CNTIUE FOM HEFROT AG


placed a tiny band on its leg so that its future
travels can be documented.
He then handed the hummingbird over to Elsie
to hold as he took photographs. The tiny bird
weighed 3.6 grams.
When he was ready to release it, Bassett leaned
over, blew on the tiny creature in Elsie's hand
and it disappeared into the air. "It was amazing,"
said Ray.
Broad-billed hummingbirds are usually found
in southern Arizona, southwestern New Mexico
and western Texas. When temperatures drop, they
fly south of the U.S.-Mexico border to winter. It's
not known what caused this bird to seek a new
wintering ground in Florida.
The discovery was announced on a hummingbird
watchers' site on the Internet, along with directions
to the Dennis' home. More than 100 bird lovers
from throughout Florida and Georgia have made
their way to the couple's residence to get their
own look at the little bird which continues to feed
there twice a day.
"They've just shown up here with cameras,
telephoto lenses and all kinds of paraphernalia,"
said Ray. Despite the recent cold temperatures,
they keep coming. "Even if it's 20 degrees, they'll
just stand out there hour after hour looking at
him," according to Ray. "He's just absolutely one The h
beautiful bird." throu
Bird watchers of all ages have made the drive
to the couple's Pine Island home, traveling
from Atlanta, St. Petersburg, Orlando, Niceville and
Tallahassee.
They come alone and in groups. One recent visitor


was what Ray described as "a senior citizen type man in
a red Cadillac" who pulled up at the beauty shop anxious
for a peek at the bird.
On Sunday, there was a steady stream of excited bird


watchers coming, ony after the other.
"When I got up at the crack of daylight Monday
morning, there were two carloads of people at the
shop just standing and waiting," Ray said.
"Everybody's very congenial and appreciative,"
Ray said, adding that after thanking them for the
opportunity to see the bird, their visitors pass
through the gate to stand in line in the back yard
and watch the bird at the feeder.
"The hummingbird doesn't seem to be scared
off by people as long as they don't crowd him,"
said Ray. "He's interested in one thing and that's
eating."
The hummingbird feeds at 7 or 8 a.m. and
then returns around 4 or 5 p.m. for another meal.
At midday, he goes out in search of bugs to eat.
Watching the bird "is a treat for us," said Ray.
Amid the "ooohs and ahhhs" the Dennis' are
peppered with questions.
Noticing how much time the bird spent sipping
from a bird feeder, one visitor from Orlando asked
Ray, "Does that bird drink a lot?" He replied,
"Ma'am, he hits that bottle every chance he
gets."
Customers who sit under the line of hairdryers
next to the big picture window at Elsie's Beauty
Shop. enjoy watching Ruby-throated hummingbirds
shot throughout the summer, but with them out of the
PHOTO picture during the winter months, the little Broad-
billed hummingbird has everyone's attention.
The couple is surprised by the excitement the
bird has created for so many people. "I never knew a
little 'ole bird could attract that much attention," said Ray.
"I've got a new respect for this little fella."


Hummingbird expert urges

homeowners to keep

out the welcome mat
by Teresa Eubanks, Journal Editor
"If you ever get a wintering hummingbird, it will
change your life, "says Fred Bassett of Montgomery,
AL. Once you get accustomed to seeing the solitary
little birds hovering around a feeder, "you 'I spend
the rest of your life trying to get another one."
The retired Air Force pilot is a full-time volunteer
with the Hummer/Bird Study Group (HBSG), which
documents and researches hummingbirds. He puts
about 40,000 miles a year on his vehicle as he travels
around the country banding birds to discover more
about them.
"By banding the hummingbirds, we can learn
about their migratory patterns, can identify species
and provide information about the life span of the
birds, he says.
A hummingbird's average life span is believed
to be between three and five years, but Bassett has
learned many live much longer "Through banding,
we find there's a significant population that lives eight
to 10 years. The oldest on record is 13 years, he
explains.
"We've banded about 14 different kinds of
hummingbirds and we're learning all kinds of really
new things, "he says.
Florida residents are more likely to be visited by
the ruby-throated hummingbird, although at least 12
other kinds of hummingbirds have been documented
in the southern states.
"Recent hard freezes have brought a lot more
hummingbirds to feeders," he says. The article at
right explains how you can establish a feeding area
for winged winter visitors like the one who has found
his way to the Dennis home in Calhoun County.


Sidef dcay 116 hQ/1ee to/et) Ca


h4411t7in4/Me n widoto

When days are short and skies are gray, a hummingbird He will let you release the bird into your yard and s
may brighten your winter landscape. Many people you photographs of your special bird. Banding will
in the Florida panhandle area enjoy Ruby-throated harm the bird or cause it to leave your yard.
hummingbirds during the summer and fall but overlook Over the past ten years in the Florida panhandle, Bas
.the exciting prospect of a tiny visitor during the winter has banded more than 700 wintering hummingbirds
months. Feeders often come down in the late fall because seven different species. In the Panama City area,
of the mistaken idea that hummingbirds will be enticed has banded Rufous, Black-chinned, and Ruby-throa
to remain and then will succumb to cold weather. hummingbirds. This winter he is especially intereste
Most Ruby-throated expanding his researc
hummingbirds are determine if other spec
genetically programmed 1 of hummingbirds
to migrate to the tropics by wintering near Pana
the middle ofNovember. City.
However, several species Hummingbird ban
of western hummingbirds working with HBSG h
migrate east and along banded fourteen differ
with a few Ruby-throated species of hummingb
hummingbirds spend the ni the eastern Uni
winter in the eastern States: Ruby-throat
United States. These Black-chinned, Rufo
birds are cold hardy and Allen's, Anna's, Calli
will not be harmed by the Buff-bellied, Bro
relatively mild winters in tailed, White-eared, Gi
this area. Violet-ear,, Magnific
The research This close-up photograph by Fred Bassett shows Broad-billed, Gre
organization, Hummer/ thejewel-like colors of the hummingbird. breasted Mango,
Bird Study Group Costa's.
(HBSG) has a continuing research project to document Hummingbirds found here in the winter are not
wintering hummingbirds. HBSG recommends leaving birds. They often demonstrate great site fidelity
a hummingbird feeder up during the winter in a location spend the entire winter in one location. It is not unus
that is easily observed and maintained. It is not necessary for some birds to return to the same home year a
to use ready-made nectar, since the birds obtain all the year, where they are considered members of the famn
vitamins, minerals, and protein from natural nectar Several Rufous hUmmingbirds have returned to hoi
and insects they consume. Partially fill a feeder with a for six winters, and a Buff-bellied hummingbird sp
mixture of one part table sugar dissolved in four parts seven winters at a home in Pensacola.
water. Do not use food coloring. Do not make the
mixture stronger than one to four. Do not use honey or The Hummer/Bird Study Group (HBSG) is a non-pr
artificial sweeteners as they are harmful to birds. organization founded by Bob and Martha Sargent
If you have a hummingbird at your feeder between study and to preserve hummingbirds and songbirds. 7
November 15th and MIlarch Ist, contact Fred Bassett deductible membership fees and donations help
in Montgomery-by telephone at (334) 244-0227 or by banding and research as well as educational progra
e-mail at thound@aol.com. Bassett is a federally licensed Membership includes quarterly newsletters that report
master bird bander, who specializes in documenting banding activities as well as tips for attracting birds toy
western hummingbirds. He will come to your home at no yard. HBSG: PRO. Box 250 Clay, AL 35048-0250; e-m
cost to identify, band, and photograph your hummingbird. hummerbsg@aol.com; telephone: (205) 681-2888.


end
not

ssett
s of
, he
ated
din
h to
cies
are
ima

ders
have
rent
irds
ted
:ed,
bus,
)pe,
ad-
*een
ent,
en-
and

lost
and
iual
fter
tily.
mes
pent


profit
t to
Tax-
fund
ams.
tall
'our
ail:









Page 14 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JANUARY 9, 2008


Minutes from Nov. 5 City of Bristol meeting


Official minutes from the City of Bristol
regular meeting Nov. 5, 2007
as recorded by the board secretary
This meeting was called to or-
der by Chairman Brigham Shuler
with Council Members Mitch Wil-
lis, John Fairchild, and Meiko
Whitfield present. Clerk Hatcher
and Attorney House were also
present. Council member Elmo
Ford and Mayor Ellen Lewis were
not present. Michael Wahlquist of-
fered the opening prayer, followed
by the Pledge of Allegiance led by
Willis.
Fairchild moved to approve
the previous month's minutes,
seconded by Whitfield, all voted
in favor.'
Willis moved to approve the
monthly bills for payment,, sec-
onded by Whitfield, approved by
all.
Attorney House opened and
read aloud sealed bids for Sep-
tic Tank Pumpings for USDA WW
Project Phase 11 and CDBG Proj-
ect #07DB-3R-02-49-02-N27.
Bids were received as follows:
*Ben Withers, Inc. $ 36,500.
*Doyle Brown Septic Systems
- $ 33,288.
*Faircloth Septic Tank Service
-$40,880.
Fairchild motioned to accept
the low bid submitted by Doyle


Brown Septic Systems, seconded
by Whitfield, carried unanimous-
ly.
Philip Jones of Preble-Rish,
Inc. updated the council on the
Wastewater project. They in-
formed the council that they were
ready to prepare the final close-
out change order, indicating that
it was actually a negative change
order, favorable to the City. The
engineers recommended that the
council consider using remaining
grant funds to beef up the lim-
erock on the dirt roads which will
help stabilize the roads and make
them more suitable for paving
later.
By general consensus, the
council relieved Pickron Utilities/
North Florida Construction from
removing the remainder of the dirt
from the wastewater project, stat-
ing that the city would utilize the dirt
to fill in collapsed septic system.
Fairchild motioned to approve
Sarah Brown as a member of the
2007 Election Board to replace
Debra Barber, seconded by Wil-
lis, all voted in favor.
Whitfield moved to set the sal-
ary for poll workers at $125/day,
seconded by Willis, approved by
all.
Chairman Shuler recommend-
ed that the Fire Chief Salary be


Minutes from Nov. 8 City

of Bristol special meeting
Official minutes from the City of Bristol
special meeting Nov. 8, 2007
as recorded by the board secretary
Chairman Brigham Shuler called this special meeting to order at 6:30
p.m. with Council members Mitch Willis and Meiko Whitfield present.
Clerk Robin Hatcher was also present. Mayor Ellen Lewis and Council
members Elmo Ford and John E. Fairchild were not present.
Chairman Shuler offered the opening prayer, followed by the Pledge
of Allegiance led by Willis.
Clerk Hatcher presented CD Renewal Rates to the Council for their
consideration. Rate quotes were received as follows:


Superior Bank
Superior Bank
Wakulla Bank
Wakulla Bank
Wakulla Bank


6 month term
12 month term
3 month term
6 month term
12 month term


increased from $435.40/month
to $500/month. Whitfield moved
to set the Fire Chief's Salary at
$500/month retroactive to Oc-
tober 2007, seconded by Willis,
carried unanimously.
Chairman Shuler called for
a special meeting to be held on
Thurs., Nov. 8th at 6:30 p.m. for
the purpose of reviewing available
CD rates and choosing a renewal
option for CD #528.
Robert Pickron recommended
that the City of Bristol consider
giving local preference to local


contractors. Chairman Shuler ta-
bled this item to be discussed at a
future date.
Chairman Shuler asked Mi-
chael Wahlquist to check the pol-
icy of other wastewater systems
regarding who is responsible for
maintaining lines from the cus-
tomer's home to the City's clean
out, and report back to the council
his findings.
Regarding Rufus Morris'
claims for damages to his hot wa-
ter heater/water lines in his home,
the council agreed, by general


consensus, that if the city is at
fault, the city will pay for neces-
sary repairs.
Whitfield moved to make a
$50 Memorial Contribution to Big
Bend Hospice in Memory of Dew-
ey Strickland, seconded by Willis,
all voted in favor.
There being no further busi-
ness, Whitfield moved to adjourn,
seconded by Willis, all voted in
favor. Meeting adjourned at 7:10
p.m.
Chairman: Brigham S. Shuler
City Clerk: Robin M. Hatcher


FOEDFAOTIYAuT I
BRAND NEW 2007 FORD
amm.. ag in a


5.10APY
4.80 APY
5.00 APY
5.00 APY
5.00 APY


Due to an expected decrease in rates in the future, Willis moved to
renew with Wakulla Bank for a 12 month term at 5.00 % APY, seconded
by Whitfield, carried by all.
There being no further business, Willis moved to adjourn, seconded
by Whitfield, all voted in favor. Meeting adjourned at 6:40 p.m.

Chairman: Brigham S. Shuler
City Clerk: Robin M. Hatcher


Local Business Update
Prepared By County News, Inc. 2007 All Rights Reserved
(800) 580-0485 www.countynewsinc.com

B. J.'s Marine
Serving the Area's Boating Needs Since 1991
For years, B.J.'s Marine has been the leader in boat sales in the area. Their goal is to provide
leadership in serving and satisfying their customers, while always maintaining the Industry's high-
est level of professionalism. They recognize that you are making a large Investment in your new
boat or motor, and they would like to help you find what you want, need and can afford. This qual-
ity standard is the reason why they are the top watercraft dealer in the areal
They continue to enhance their great lines and latest designs, which are sure to please even the
most discriminating boat enthusiast. They take great pride in their dealership, and their focus is
on customer satisfaction.
B.J.'s Marine wants to earn your trust and be your boat dealer, whether your needs are in a new
boat, used boat, a lake sports boat all welded aluminum with Tohatsu, or the latest in wake boards
and ski equipment.
The editors of this 2008 Winter Edition Local Business Update suggest that you stop by
today and see the showroom of B.J.'s Marine, located at 1317 Transmitter Rd. In Spring-
field, phone (850) 763-5753.
Moulder & Son
Trying to buy a home can sometimes be frustrating-it could be credit problems or finding a mort-
gage that is reasonable and that you can afford. Manufactured homes have been the latest trend
for homebuyers all across the nation.
Moulder & Son can help you achieve the "American Dream," and get you in the very own home
with very little money down. Their homes have all the same features from the interior to the ex-
terior construction that are found in many site-built homes. Kitchens provide spacious cabinets
as well as brand-name appliances and storage areas. Many baths offer luxury features including
roman tubs and skylights. Bedrooms and living areas reflect the most contemporary design con-
cepts including built-in cabinets, elegant window treatments and, in some models, energy-efficient
fireplaces.
Financing options are available for qualified buyers. If you would like to see their floor plans,
or would like more information on any of their model lines, please call Moulder & Son at (850)
763-4678 or stop by their office located at 2340 East 15", Street in Panama City.
The editors of this 2008 Winter Edition Local Business Update Guide are pleased to sug-
gest that Moulder & Son could be your best opportunity in the hunt for your new home.









JANUARY 9,2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 15


--------------~
SCHOOL MENU
Calhoun & Liberty
County Schools
Jan. 10 16, 2008
A variety of fruits and
vegetables or fruit juice and a
choice of lowfat or whole milk
served with all meals.
BREAKFAST IS THE SAME
FOR BOTH COUNTIES.

BREAKFAST
THURSDAY
Breakfast French Toast
sticks, sausage link,
I juice.

FRIDAY
Breakfast Ham, egg, &
cheese biscuit, juice.

MONDAY
Breakfast 'French toast
sticks, ham, juice.

TUESDAY
Breakfast Sausage bis-
cuit, hash brown, juice.

WEDNESDAY
Breakfast Ham & cheese
bagel, oatmeal, juice.

LUNCHES
Elementary
I (Pre-K thru 5th)
THURSDAY
Lunch: Cheeseburger,
french fries, corn on the
cob, peaches. ALTER-
NATE: Turkey sub.

FRIDAY
Lunch: Sausage pizza,
peas & carrots, apple
crisp. ALTERNATE: Hot
ham & cheese.

MONDAY
Lunch: Oven fried chicken,
mac & cheese, carrots,
pears.ALTERNATE:BBQ I
riblet on bun.

TUESDAY
Lunch: Chicken & rice,
garden peas, applesause,
dinner roll. ALTERNATE:
Ham sub w/lettuce & to-
mato.

WEDNESDAY
Lunch: Sausage dog,
broccoli & cheese, mixed
fruit. ALTERNATE: Hot
turkey & cheese bagel.
All nfenus are subject to change
SPONSORED BY:
Laban Bontrager, DMD
Bristol, Phone 643-5417
L ----------- j


It's time for politicians to trade places with soldiers


To the editor:
I'm 40 years old, and today,
I killed and dressed my first
chicken. I've eaten thousands of
chickens in my lifetime but this
is the first time I did all the dirty
work in order to get from cute
little chick to slab of meat in my
kitchen freezer. It wasn't pretty.
After months of doing everything
to keep them alive, from fending
off hawks and coons to make
sure they had a warm and dry
place to roost, I grabbed one of
the roosters, quickly wrung its
neck, chopped its head off, hung
it up by its feet, plucked it, gutted
it, washed it, and dropped it in a
freezer bag. The whole process
took about 20 minutes.
When I moved out to the
country two years ago, I never
intended on processing chickens
in my back yard. But when I
finished building my deck and
landscaping my yard, I was left
with a large amount of scrap
lumber and top soil, so I decided
that a raised bed garden would be
a great idea. Then I remembered
reading about how chickens were
the best thing in the world for
a garden because they eat bugs
and weeds seeds, they fertilize
the soil, and they constantly till
the soil with their scratching and
digging. So I built a chicken coop
next to my garden and fenced in
the entire garden, complete with
a mesh roof and an access door
from the coop to the garden.
My plan was to get five or six
hens and give them access to the
garden whenever it was not in
use. They would keep the garden
free of bugs and weeds during the
winter moths, fertilize the soil,
and would provide me with eggs
year round. It was the perfect
plan.
Then, my fiance decided to
help with my project since she is
very fond of animals. She went
on the internet and ordered 25
chicks, which was the minimum
order from that farm. Everything
was fine when they were cute
little chicks but after a few
months of growing, the coop
became overcrowded, the birds
were constantly fighting, and
15 crowing roosters guarantees
that nobody sleeps past sunrise...
ever. So, the decision was made
that a dozen roosters had to go.
My fiance being the animal
lover she is decided she was
not going to take part in the
culling. That left the job to me


since I didn't want to drag my
fiance's 15-year-old son away
from his video games to butcher
a chicken that he was petting just
last week.
I've cleaned tons of fish in
my lifetime, along with several
squirrels and dove, and I've
watched a few deer and pigs
being dressed, so I'm not the
least bit squeamish about seeing
blood or butchering an animal.
However, this was the first time
I had ever brought an animal
through its entire life cycle -
from birth to freezer. And now I
feel a sense of amazement every
time I see a chicken in the grocery
store freezer with a price tag of
$4.50. I just can't fathom how a
chicken can be sold that cheap.
If my chickens were sold at a
store for $20 per bird, I would
be working an 80 hour week and
going broke.
This whole experience has
given me a greater appreciation
for all the work that is done to
provide me with cheap, clean,
packaged, ready to cook meat
- work that I don't have to
see or take part in. This whole
experience made me think about
the huge disconnect between the
lives most Americans lead and
bloody processes we never see.
And that made me think about the
wars which America participates
in and the soldiers who fight these
wars.
Whatever your position has
been on America's wars -
whether you think they were
justified, not justified, or a
necessary evil there will
always be a huge disconnect
between American civilians and
American soldiers. Civilians
don't get blood on their hands,
they don't smell the stench of
death, and they don't have to
kill anybody. And with today's
sanitized American media, we
don't even have to see the horrors
of war, just as we never have to
see that chicken's head being
chopped off. Soldiers however
- like the people who butcher
hundreds of chickens everyday
- are doing a horrible task for
a meager wage, but it's a job
that sometimes has to be done if
America is attacked or one of our
allies is attacked.
When we send Americans off
to another country to kill people,
we need to think about what these
soldiers are being told to do, and
we need to be absolutely certain
that the civilians in Washington,
DC, who make the decisions
to start these wars, have an
appreciation for what we are
asking from these soldiers. I don't
believe that is the case today.
Most of our politicians


currently in Washington, DC
are rich, pampered, children of
privilege who attend black tie
dinners and vacation in posh
resorts which are often paid for by
contractors who benefit from the
war-time contracts they receive
from these very same politicians.
I cannot imagine that they could
be any more totally disconnected
from the soldier in Iraq who has
been trudging around the desert
for years now, killing others
while trying not to be killed, in
a war whose objectives keep
changing.
I think I'll sell the rest of
the roosters I wanted to cull so


SPEAK UP!
WITH A LETTER TO THE EDITOR

Write: The Calhoun-Liberty Journal
P.O. Box 536, Bristol, FL 32321
^~ ^


Does the state really know best

when it comes to property tax?
To the editor:
State Rep. Dan Gelber stated in a recent Florida Trend article that
"Florida has really major challenges right now and we're just moving
everything in the in-box to the bottom, hoping it goes away." That
statement is right on point.
After a sixty day regular session and four expensive special
sessions in 2007, you would think the Governor and Legislature could
successfully address some of Florida's many challenges. Instead,
they draw on the frustrations and fears of citizens in order to divert
attention away from their failures and direct it toward cities, counties,
and school districts. These are the very governmental entities that
provide day to day services to all Florida citizens.
So what do our state leaders do? They draw attention away from
their failures to address numerous important state issues. Homeowners
insurance is just one example. Tens of thousands of our citizens have
either had their property insurance canceled or they had to drop
their coverage because of sky high premiums. The Governor and
Legislature should have stayed focused on the insurance crises instead
of manufacturing another crises as a diversion.
We are now told that the state knows best when it comes to running
city and county governments and local school districts. Actually, the
Governor and Legislature are not qualified to run local governments.
They are out of their league when it comes to being responsible for
the day to day delivery of vital local services and for educating our
children. Local officials elected by and working with local citizens
are the best qualified for these challenges.
Here is the crux of this state-created crises. They say local
governments spend too much money resulting in high property taxes.
Hello? Almost without exception, each year the Florida Legislature
imposes unfunded mandates on local governments and school districts.
Now, they have the nerve to say these same local governments must
be fiscally controlled by the state.
Floridians, pay attention! We are being sold a bill of goods and the
goods are bad. Whether we are native Floridians or have been here
for a short period of time, this is our state and we deserve better from
Charlie Crist and the Legislature. The Governor should lead Florida,
.not participate in a diversionary shell game that could very well cripple
local governments in the delivery of adequate vital public safety and
quality of life services.
My family and I as well as many of our friends will be voting
NO on the property tax amendment Jan. 29. Granted, our tax system
certainly needs some adjustments and improvements. This issue is
being addressed by the Taxation and Budget Reform Commission.
Lets give the commission a chance to work through this complicated
issue a result of shallow politics out of Tallahassee that draws on the
frustrations of hard working tax payers.
In conclusion, instead of the state becoming an obstruction to local
governments it should partner with them. This partnership will result
in better solutions for all. As Rep. Gelber stated, "...we're just moving
everything in the in-box to the bottom, hoping it goes away."
Ernie Padgett, Marianna
Ernie Padgett holds a Masters in Public Administration (MPA) fiom
Florida State University. He has worked as a County Commissioner for 4
years and as County Administrator in three Florida counties for 20 years.


that I don't have to spend half
a day ripping feathers out while
being splattered with blood. In
the time it takes me to do that,
I could make enough money at
my regular job to buy the same
amount of chicken, so it's just not
cost effective, it's a waste of time
and effort, and it's a bloody mess
- and so is the war in Iraq.
It's time for us to bring our
soldiers home and pat them on
the back for doing a job that most
of us couldn't. And the next time
those politicians in Washington,
DC want to start a war with a
country that never attacked us,
we should give them a chicken,
an ax, and some coveralls to
protect that two-thousand dollar
suit they are wearing. Or better
yet give that suit to one of our.
returning soldiers, slap a rifle in
thatpolitician's hands, and make
him walk around the Iraqi desert
for a few years.
Erik Johnson, Bristol


LEAD THE WAY

Leaders are made in the National Guard.
Contact a recruiter today!
* Leadership training GEr
* Career skills UP 20
* Tuition assistance ENB00
* Part-time service yowu
in your community NATI NAlr M

I-800-GO-GUARD GUARD
www. I -800-GO-GUARD.com







Page 16 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JANUARY 9, 2008


Give coon huntin' a try
Some of my OUTTrA' Till or attacked by
huntin' buddies WOoons gators.
and me really live You're only
for being out in a y Iy. nI allo wed to
wet patch of woods I^^J harvest raccoons,
in the middle of E and opossums


a cool night and
hearing the not-so-distant sounds
of our Walker hounds when they
open up on a hot coon trail. There's
just something about those hounds'
voices that sound both pleasing and
eerie at the same time.
We like. to brag about whose
dog actually struck the trail first
and whose got to the right tree first.
Boy, you can sure tell the difference
when the dogs are just trailing a coon
and when they've got 'em treed.
Their barking goes from longer, less
frequent howls to just down right
choppin' it down, baying as loud as
they can, as quick as they can, with
every breath that's in 'em. You can
really sense the urgency in their
voices when they're on the tree.
That's when it's time to turn on
the flashlights and start making your
way through the swamps toward that
pleasant, oh, too familiar sound in
the darkness.
If you'd like to try coon huntin',
besides having a good coon dog,
you'll need a Florida hunting license.
Residents pay just $17 for the year.
Nonresidents have the choice of
paying $46.50 for a 10-day license
or $151.50 for 12 months.
If you're thinking about hunting
on one of Florida's many wildlife
management areas (WMAs), you
also must purchase a managemefit
area permit for $26.50. But find out
which WMAs allow 6oon huntin' by
reading the brochure on each area
you're thinking about trying. These
WMA brochures are at your local
tax collector's office or online at
MyFWC.com/hunting.
All licenses and permits are
available at county tax collectors'
offices, any retail outlet that sells
hunting and fishing supplies,
online at HYPERLINK "http://
www.wildlifelicense.com" www.
wildlifelicense.comn or call toll-free
1-888-HUNT-FLORIDA.
Coon huntin' with dogs at night,
while using a flashlight or headlamp,
is allowed. On private property, when
in possession of written landowner
permission, you may hunt raccoons
year-round, but most of us prefer to
hunt 'em during the colder months
so as not to get our dogs snakebit


for that matter,
using .22-caliber firearms (other
than .22-magnums) or single-shot
.410-gauge shotguns with shot no
larger than No. 6. During the hunt, all
firearms must remain unloaded except
immediately prior to shooting treed
or bayed raccoons or opossums.
There are no daily or seasonal
bag limits on how rpany raccoons
or opossums you may harvest, and
hides and skins of these furbearers
may be possessed in any number, at
any time.
All dogs used in pursuing raccoons
or opossums are required to wear
collars or tags which identify dog
owners and their addresses. Hunting
either furbearer by "shining" or using
lights from moving vehicles, boats
or animals is against the law. It's
also illegal to transport wild-trapped
live raccoons within, into or from
Florida:
Individuals with a trapping license
($26.50) also may take raccoons and
opossums by means of live-trapping
or the use of snares, but these traps
must be checked at least every 24
hours. Using steel or leg-hold traps
is prohibited.
Only those persons with a trapping
license are authorized to sell the
hides and meat of these furbearers.
In order to buy and sell this meat
for commercial purposes, you're
required to possess a dealer's license,
which you can get from the Florida
Department of Agriculture and
Consumer Services' Division of Food
Safety by calling 850-488-0295.
So if you're looking for a new
and exciting Jiuntin' opportunity,
get a hold of a good coon dog, grab
your .22, a flashlight and a pair of hip
waders and take to the swamps!
Here's wishing you a happy New
Year and good huntin'. If you can,
introduce someone new to a different
kind of hunting pass the tradition
down. As always, have fun, hunt
safely and ethically, and we'll see
you in the woods!
Tony Young has a mother/daughter
pair of treeing- Walker coonhounds
and plans to keep their bloodline
going. He enjoys hunting with them,
and the dogs make great pets for his
two daughters.


FWC releases preliminary

2007 manatee mortality data
A preliminary report from the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation
Commission (FWC) indicates there were 317 manatee deaths in state waters
in 2007. The total number of carcasses documented in Florida last year falls
below the five-year average of 355.
Watercraft strikes and red tide continue to contribute to a high percentage
of manatee mortality, accounting for more than half of the total deaths in 2007
where scientists could determine the cause of death. Necropsy results identify
watercraft strikes as the cause of 73 deaths arid red tide as responsible for 52
deaths in 2007..
FWC researchers report that watercraft and red tide-related deaths were
high in Southwest Florida. The combination of these factors was identified as
a concern for this region in the recently approved manatee management plan.
The FWC uses trends in mortality figures to monitor ongoing and emerg-
ing threats to the manatee population. A recent report analyzing threats to the
species, coauthored by researchers from the United States Geological Survey
and the FWC, points to watercraft-related mortality as the most significant
long-term threat to the manatee population. However, the FWC is encouraged
that the number of watercraft-related deaths in 2007 is below the five-year
average.
The FWC is committed to conservation actions that reduce human-
caused manatee deaths. The FWC's manatee management plan outlines
measures to address watercraft-related mortality, as welt as other threats
facing the-manatee population.
To report a dead or injured manatee, call the FWC Wildlife Alert hotline
at 888-404-FWCC. For more information on manatee mortality research,
visit http://research.MyFWC.com/manatees.


OFFICIAL PRESIDENTIAL PREFERENCE PRIMARY BALLOT
DEMOCRATIC PARTY
LIBERTY COUNTY, FLORIDA
JANUARY 29, 2008


TO VOTE, COMPLETELY FILL IN
THE OVAL NEXTTO
YOUR CHOICE.

USE BLACK OR BLUE
BALLPOINT PEN.

IF YOU MAKE A MISTAKE,
DON'T HESITATE TO ASK FOR
A NEW BALLOT. IF YOU ERASE
OR MAKE OTHER MARKS,
YOUR VOTE MAY NOT COUNT.


PRESIDENT

PRESIDENT
(Vote for One)
Joseph R. Biden, Jr.
"r.y.on Hillary Clinton

Christopher J. Dodd

John Edwards

:C'>, Mike Gravel
Dennis J. Kucinich

Barack Obama
William "Bill" Richardson III


NO.1
CONSTITUTIONAL REVISION
ARTICLE VII, SECTIONS 3,4, AND 6
ARTICLE XII, SECTION 27
(Legislative)
Property Tax Exemptions; Limitations On Property Tax Assessments
This revision proposes changes to the State Constitution relating to property taxation.
With respect to homestead property, this revision: (1) increases the homestead
exemption except for school district taxes and (2) allows homestead property owners to
transfer up to $500,000 of their Save-Our-Homes benefits to their next homestead.
With respect to nonhomestead property, this revision (3) provides a $25,000 exemption
for tangible personal property and (4) limits assessment increases for specified
nonhomestead real property except for school district taxes.
In more detail, this revision:
(1) Increases the homestead exemption by exempting the assessed value between
$50,000 and $75,000. This exemption does not apply to school district taxes.
(2) Provides for the transfer of accumulated Save-Our-Homes benefits. Homestead
property owners will be able to transfer their Save-Our-Homes benefit to a new
homestead within 1 year and not more than 2 years after relinquishing their previous
homestead; except, if this revision is approved by the electors in January of 2008 and if
the new homestead is established on January 1, 2008, the previous homestead must
have been relinquished in 2007. If the new homestead has a higher just value than the
previous one, the accumulated benefit can be transferred; if the new homestead has a
lower just value, the amount of benefit transferred will be reduced. The transferred
benefit may not exceed $500,000. This provision applies to all taxes.
(3) Authorizes an exemption from property taxes of $25,000 of assessed value of
tangible personal property. This provision applies to all taxes.
(4) Limits the assessment increases for specified nonhomestead real property to 10
percent each year. Property will be assessed at just value following an improvement,
as defined by general law, and may be assessed at just value following a change of
ownership or control if provided by general law. This limitation does not apply to school
district taxes. This limitation is repealed effective January 1, 2019, unless renewed by a
vote of the electors in the general election held in 2018.
Further, this revision;
a. Repeals obsolete language on the homestead exemption when it was less than
$25,000 and did not apply uniformly to property taxes levied by all local governments.
b. Provides for homestead exemptions to be repealed if a future constitutional
amendment provides for assessment of homesteads "at less than just value" rather
than as currently provided "at a specified percentage" of just value.
c. Schedules the changes to take effect upon approval by the electors and operate
retroactively to January 1, 2008, if approved in a special election held on January 29,
2008, or to take effect January 1, 2009, if approved in the general election held in
November of 2008. The limitation on annual assessment increases for specified real
property shall first apply to the 2009 tax roll if this revision is approved in a special
election held on January 29, 2008, or shall first apply to the 2010 tax roll if this revision
is approved in the general election held in November of 2008.

YES

NO IAMPII.L


OFFICIAL NONPARTISAN BALLOT
LIBERTY COUNTY, FLORIDA
JANUARY 29, 2008

TO VOTE, COMPLETELY FILL IN THE OVAL 4 NEXT TO YOUR CHOICE.

USE BLACK OR BLUE BALLPOINT PEN.

IF YOU MAKE A MISTAKE, DON'T HESITATE TO ASK FOR A NEW BALLOT. IF YOU ERASE OR MAKE
OTHER MARKS, YOUR VOTE MAY NOT COUNT.


NO. 1
CONSTITUTIONAL REVISION
ARTICLE VII, SECTIONS 3,4, AND 6
ARTICLE XII, SECTION 27
(Legislative)
Property Tax Exemptions; Limitations On Property Tax Assessments
This revision proposes changes to the State Constitution relating to property taxation. With respect to homestead property, this
revision: (1) increases the homestead exemption except for school district taxes and (2) allows homestead property owners to
transfer up to $500,000 of their Save-Our-Homes benefits to their next homestead. With respect to nonhomestead property, this
revision (3) provides a $25,000 exemption for tangible personal property and (4) limits assessment increases for specified
nonhomestead real property except for school district taxes.
In more detail, this revision:
(1) Increases the homestead exemption by exempting the assessed value between $50,000 and $75,000. This exemption does not
apply to school district taxes.
(2) Provides for the transfer of accumulated Save-Our-Homes benefits. Homestead property owners will be able to transfer their
Save-Our-Homes benefit to a new homestead within 1 year and not more than 2 years after relinquishing their previous homestead;
except, if this revision is approved by the electors in January of 2008 and if the new homestead is established on January 1, 2008,
the previous homestead must have been relinquished in 2007. If the new homestead has a higher just value than the previous one,
the accumulated benefit can be transferred; if the new homestead has a lower just value, the amount of benefit transferred will be
reduced. The transferred benefit may not exceed$500,000. This provision applies to all taxes.
(3) Authorizes an exemption from property taxes of $25,000 of assessed value of tangible personal property. This provision applies
to all taxes.
(4) Limits the assessment increases for specified nonhomestead real property to 10 percent each year, Property will be assessed at
just value following an improvement, as defined by general law, and may be assessed at just value following a change of ownership
or control'if provided by general law. This limitation does not apply to school district taxes, This limitation is repealed effective
January 1,2019, unless renewed by a vote of the electors in the general election held in 2018.
Further, this revision:
a. Repeals obsolete language on the homestead exemption when it was less than $25,000 and did not apply uniformly to property
taxes levied by all local governments.
b. Provides for homestead exemptions to be repealed if a future constitutional amendment provides for assessment of homesteads
"at less than just value" rather than as currently provided "at a specified percentage" of just value.
c. Schedules the changes to take effect upon approval by the electors and operate retroactively to January 1, 2008, if approved in a
special election held on January 29, 2008, or to take effect January 1, 2009, if approved in the general election held in November of"
2008. The limitation on annual assessment increases for specified real property shall first apply to the 2009 tax roll if this revision is
approved in a special election held on January 29, 2008, or shall first apply to the 2010 tax roll if this revision is approved in the
general election held in November of 2008.
*. YES

NO























CALL FOR BIDS


Made by Peter R. Brown Construc-
tion, Inc. (CG-C036285), The Con-
struction Manager for Liberty High
School Addition, Bristol, Florida.

Bid Packages:
2A- Sitework
2B Fencing
2C Landscaping
3A- Concrete
4A Masonry
5A- Structural Steel and Miscella-
neous Steel
5B Metal Trusses
5C Pre-Fabricated Structural
Panels
6A General Trades
6B Architectural Woodwork
7A Metal Roofing
8A Glass and Glazing
9A- Gypsum Board
9B Tile
9C Acoustical
9D Carpet & Resilient Flooring
9E Painting
10A- Aluminum Walkway
11 A- Firing Range Equipment
15A- Plumbing
15B HVAC
16A- Electrical

PREQUALIFICATION: All Bidders
must be pre-qualified at the time of
bid opening in accordance with the
bid package.

PLANS & DEPOSIT: Bid docu-
ments are available from Peter R.


Brown Construction, Inc. The bid
documents may be reviewed at
the office of Peter R. Brown Con-
struction Inc., 1424 Piedmont Drive
East, Tallahassee, FL 32308. For
information about obtaining bid
documents call Peter R. Brown
Construction, Inc. at 850-668-4498
or fax request to 850-668-6790.

DATE AND TIME: January 29,
2008 at 2:00 p.m. at Liberty County
School Board, 12926 NW CR 12,
Bristol, Florida 32321, at which
time and place they will be publicly
opened and read aloud.

PROPOSAL: Bids must be sub-
mitted in full and in accordance
with the requirements of the draw-
ings and Project Manual which may
be obtained or examined at the of-
fice of Peter R. Brown Construc-
tion, Inc., 1424 Piedmont Drive
East, Tallahassee, FL 32309. (850)
668-4498.

PRE-BID MEETING: The Bidder
is encouraged to attend the pre-bid
meeting. The meeting is scheduled
for January 22, 2008 at 2:00 p.m. at
Liberty County High School, 12592
NW Myers Ann St., Bristol, Florida
32321. ,..,.,


See LEGALS
on page 22


JANUARY 9, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 17

OFFICIAL PRESIDENTIAL PREFERENCE PRIMARY BALLOT
[OFCAREPUBLICAN PARTY
LIBERTY COUNTY, FLORIDA
JANUARY 29, 2008


TO VOTE, COMPLETELY FILL IN
THE OVAL 4*1 NEXT TO
YOUR CHOICE.

USE BLACK OR BLUE
BALLPOINT PEN.

IF YOU MAKE A MISTAKE,
DON'T HESITATE-TO ASK FOR
A NEW BALLOT. IF YOU ERASE
OR MAKE OTHER MARKS,
YOUR VOTE MAY NOT COUNT.


PRESIDENT

PRESIDENT
(Vote for One)
C'; Rudy Giuliani

Mike Huckabee


Duncan Hunter

7 Alan Keyes

<:::' John McCain

Ron Paul

*.::> Mitt Romney

C Tom Tancredo

C.' Fred Thompson


PROPOSED CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT

NO.1
CONSTITUTIONAL REVISION
ARTICLE VII, SECTIONS 3,4, AND 6
ARTICLE XII, SECTION 27
(Legislative)
Property Tax Exemptions; Limitations On Property Tax Assessments
This revision proposes changes to the State Constitution relating to property taxation.
With respect to homestead property, this revision: (1) increases the homestead
exemption except for school district taxes and (2) allows homestead property owners to
transfer up to $500,000 of their Save-Our-Homes benefits to their next homestead.
With respect to nonhomestead property, this revision (3) provides a $25,000 exemption
for tangible personal property and (4) limits assessment increases for specified
nonhomestead real property except for school district taxes.
In more detail, this revision:
(1) Increases the homestead exemption by exempting-the assessed value between
$50,000 and $75,000. This exemption does not apply to school district taxes.
(2) Provides for the transfer of accumulated Save-Our-Homes benefits. Homestead
roperty owners will be able to transfer their Save-Our-Homes benefit to a new
omestead within 1 year and not more than 2 years after relinquishing their previous
homestead; except, if this revision is approved by the electors in January of 2008 and if
the new homestead is established on January 1, 2008, the previous homestead must
have been relinquished in 2007. If the new homestead has a higher just value than the
previous one, the accumulated benefit can be transferred; if the new homestead has a
lower just value, the amount of benefit transferred will be reduced. The transferred
benefit may not exceed $500,000. This provision applies to all taxes.
(3) Authorizes an exemption from property taxes of $25,000 of assessed value of
tangible personal property. This provision applies to all taxes.
(4) Limits the assessment increases for specified nonhomestead real property to 10
percent each year. Property will be assessed at just value following an improvement,
as defined by general law, and may be assessed at just value following a change of
ownership or.control if provided by general law. This limitation does not apply to school
district taxes. This limitation is repealed effective January 1, 2019, unless renewed by a
vote of the electors in the general election held in 2018.
Further, this revision:
a. Repeals obsolete language on the homestead exemption when it was less than
$25,000 and did not apply uniformly to property taxes levied by all local governments.
b. Provides for homestead exemptions to be repealed if a future constitutional
amendment provides for assessment of homesteads "at less than just value" rather
than as currently provided "at a specified percentage" of just value.
c. Schedules the changes to take effect upon approval by the electors and operate
retroactively to January 1, 2008, if approved in a special election held on January 29,
2008, or to take effect January 1, 2009, if approved in the general election held in
November of 2008. The limitation on annual assessment increases for specified real
property shall first apply to the 2009 tax roll if this revision is approved in a special
election held on January 29, 2008, or shall first apply to the 2010 tax roll if this revision
is approved in the general election held in November of 2008.



. NO A ,


b









**
*kE sy








Page 18 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JANUARY 9, 2008


OLIN C. DALTON
BRISTOL Olin C. Dalton, 87, died Thursday,
Dec. 27, 2007 in Tallahassee. He served in the U.S.
Army in World War H with the second Armored
Division in the European Theater. He retired after
30 years as supervisor of water and sewage with
the city of Quincy.
He was preceded in death by his parents, Oscar
Winton and Sallie Phillips Dalton.
Survivors include his son and daughter-in-law,
Wayne Allen and Gail Dalton of Sneads; one daugh-
ter, Glenda Kennedy of Tallahassee; two brothers,
Massey Dalton and Carlton Dalton, both of Bristol;
two sisters, Leona D. Stoutamire of Blue Creek and
Romola D. Peters of Orange; five grandchildren and
two great-grandchildren.
Graveside services were held Friday, Jan. 4,2008
at Rock Bluff Cemetery in Liberty County.
*Charles McClellan Funeral Home in Quincy was
in charge of the arrangements.

RUBEN EUGENE
(GENE) RICHARDS
KINARD Ruben Eugene (Gene) Richards,68,
a former resident of Blountstown, died Saturday,
Jan. 5, 2008 in Tallahassee. He was born on April
1, 1939 in Calhoun County and had lived here all of
his life. He was owner and operator of Gene's Stan-
dard Service Station, owner and operator of Gene's
Liquors in Blountstown and after retirement worked
at City Tire in Blountstown. He was a outdoorsman
who loved hunting and fishing. He was a member
of the Imonia Lake Hunting and Fishing Club in
Blountstown and was of the Christian faith.
Survivors include his wife, Marie Richards of
Kinard; stepmother, Othene Richards of Blount-
stown; one brother, Dewey Hood of Hosford; one
sister, Annette Robbins of Pensacola; four nephews,
Shane Phinney of Quincy, Sean Phinney and Burke
Dasher, both of Bristol; Stuart Phinney of Tallahas-
see; one niece, Sharmon Parrish of Bristol; a host
of great-nieces and nephews.
Services were held Tuesday, Jan. 8, 2008 at
Peavy Funeral Home Chapel in Blountstown with
Rev. John Jackson officiating. Interment followed
in Pine Memorial Cemetery in Blountstown.
Peavy Funeral Home in Blountstown was in
charge of the arrangements.

KENNETH JOE ODOM
BRISTOL Kenneth Joe Odom, 62, died Satur-
day, Jan. 5, 2008 at Panama City Hospital. He was
born and raised in Washington County and spent
most of his adult life in Havana and Bristol. He was
retired from Bell South Telecommunications as a
PBX technician. He was of the Baptist faith and a
member of the First Baptist Church in Chipley. He
was a kind and generous man who loved his fam-
ily, friends and his dogs. He was an avid fisherman
and occasional hunter. He loved the camaraderie of
friends and never met a stranger.
He was preceded in death by his parents, Joe
and Annie Merle Odom; and his first wife, Connie
Leigh Odom.
Survivors include his wife of 25 years, Linda
Odom of Bristol; two sons, Bill Hofheinz and his
wife, Shelli of Pascagoula, MI, Steve Hofheinz
and his wife, Stephanie of Hosford; one daughter,
Lauran Summers and her husband, Glenn of Panama
City; 10 grandchildren, Jarrett, Jordan, Mary, Baker,
Sage, Ally, Trey, Kelsey, Reagan and Kyndall; one
brother,Jerry and his wife, Joyce Odom of Chipley;
a niece,Amy and a nephew, Mark Odom of Chipley;
a great-nephew, Konnor Odom.
Services were held Tuesday, Jan. 8, 2008 at
First Baptist Church in Chipley with Rev. Michael
Orr officiating. Interment followed in Glenwood
Cemetery.
The family is accepting flowers or contributions
may be made to the American Diabetes Association,
Pensacola Office, 5514 North Davis Hwy. Suite
C-111, Pensacola, FL 32503.
Brown Funeral Home (Brickyard Road Chapel)
in Chipley was in charge of the arrangements.


DAISY MAY PARKER
ALTHA Daisy May Parker, 85, died Saturday,
Jan. 5,2008 at Jackson Hospital. She was a native
of Altha and spent most of her life in Jackson and
Calhoun County. She enjoyed knitting, sewing,
fishing, cars and was a great cook.
Survivors include her husband of nearly 45 years,
Clarance Parker of Altha; three sons, David Chason,
Tommy Chason and his wife, Wanda, all of Altha
and Otis Hall of Grand Ridge; three daughters,
Shirley James and her husband, Bill of Marianna,
Jane Beasley and her husband, Tony of Pace and
Kathy Cole of Corpus Christie, TX; one brother,
Willard Mayo and his wife, Janice of Blountstown;
eight grandchildren; six great-grandchildren and
four great-great-grandchildren.
Services were held Monday, Jan. 7, 2008 at
Hasty Pond Baptist Church with Rev. Forrest
Parker officiating. Interment followed in the church
cemetery.
Hall Funeral Home in Altha was in charge of
the arrangements.

JOSEPHINE CORNELIA YOUNG
TALLAHASSEE Josephine Cornelia Young,
76, died Sunday, Jan. 6, 2008 in Tallahassee. She
was born on Sept. 1, 1931 in Georgia and had lived
in Tallahassee for the past 11 years, coming from
Quincy. She was a homemaker and a member of
the Baptist faith.
She was preceded in death by her husband, James
Young and a granddaughter, Brooklynn Jacobs.
Survivors include five sons, Jimmy Young and
his wife, Joyce of Crawfordville, Fred Young and
his wife, Cheryl of Palatka, Eddie Young and his
wife, Debbie of Jacksonville, John Young and his
wife, Mary Carol of Quincy, Ben Young and his
wife, Donna of Tallahassee; two daughters, Janice
Bulzer and her husband, Doug of Blountstown, and
JoAnn Jacobs and her husband, Tom of Tallahassee;
two sisters, Pauline Williams of Cleveland, TN and
Shelby Jean Tomlin of Gainesville; 23 grandchil-
dren and 18 great-grandchildren.
Services will be held Wednesday, Jan. 9, 2008
at 1 p.m. (CT) at Peavy Funeral Home Chapel with
Rev. David Goodman officiating. Interment will
follow in Wood Cemetery in Blountstown.
The family will accept flowers, however, anyone
wishing may make contributions to the American
Diabetes Association, P.O. Box 11454,Alexandria,
VA 22312.
Peavy Funeral Home in Blountstown is in charge
of the arrangements.

ERNESTINE DANLEY POWELL
SAMSON,AL Ernestine Danley Powell, 84,
went home to be with the Lord Monday, Jan. 7,
2008 at Wiregrass Medical Center. She was born
Jan. 31, 1923 in Samson, AL to the late William C:
and Doney Patterson Danley..
She was preceded in death by her husband, Mat-
thew Washington Powell and a great-grandson,
Kendel Blaine Sellers.
Survivors include four sons and daughters-in-
law, Emmett and his wife, Faye Powell of Bristol,
Millard and his wife, Donna Powell, and Roy
and wife, Beverly Powell, all of Geneva, AL and
Robin and his wife, Shanna Powell of Samson; two
daughters and son-in-law, Genita Powell Drury,
and Debbie and her husband, Sonny Beckham,
all of Samson; 15 grandchildren and 11 great-
grandchildren.
The family will receive friends Wednesday, Jan.
9, 2008 from 6 to 8 p.m. at Pittman Funeral Home
in Geneva, AL.
Services will be held Thursday, Jan. 10, 2008
at 10 a.m. at the Chapel of Pittman Funeral Home
with Minister Harry Adkison officiating. Interment
will follow in Liberty Chapel Cemetery.
Pittman Funeral Home in Geneva, AL is in
charge of the arrangements.

See OBITUARIES on page 23


I -T JN JUARY


> All existing pre-need and at need
contracts are now handed by the
Bevis family and staff

All// operations of the funeralprocess
will be handled on location at
12008 NW State Road 20.

CALL 643-3636

Todd Wahlquist, Rocky Bevis & Ed Peacock
Licensed Funeral Directors



Peavy Funeral, Home


& Crematory


TRUST Independent
us to serve your family Funeral Home
with honor & respect. 211 E. Jefferson St., Quincy
.. -(850)875-1529
James C. (Rusy) Black Jackl W. Weiler
Owner&Manager LiUc. Funeral Director LOCALLY OWNED & OPERATED

WHAT BETTER TRIBUTE
CAN THERE BE?
Honor your loved ones by making their memory part of
our best efforts to defeat cancer For more informa-
tion, contact the American Cancer Society.
EAST GADSDEN UNIT
P.O. Box 563, Quincy, FL 32353



COMERFORD VAULT MEMORIAL SERVICE
Hwy. 90W-P.O Box 933
Sneads,FL 32460
Pete Comerford-Owner & Operator
Phone: 850-593-6828; 1-800-369-6828; Fax: 850-593-6888
A MONUMENT IS A FAMILY TRIB-
UTE CARVED IN STONE
Precious Memories AS A CONSTANT
REMINDER OF FAMILY BONDS TIED
TOGETHER WITH LOVE.









--Let us he l you w tha memorial of BEAUTY and DURABILITY
Serving ackson and the surrounding counties .
U fe


Funeral Services with Dignity,
Caring and Professionalism.

Marion Peavy
A Hometown Funeral Director

I~e









JANUARY 9, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 19


FNGLA announces 2008 Plants of the Year


Lawrence nfimaL HOSPiTaL
43 N. Cleveland Street in Quincy OFFICE (850) 627-8338
Jerry C. Lawrence, DVM
I Emergencies: (850) 856-5827 or (850) 856-5918
i. Hours: Monday Friday 7 a.m. to 5 p.m.
DOCTOR'S HOURS BY APPOINTMENT.
We provide: Boarding Grooming Preventative Healthcare programs
which include vaccinations and yearly checkups Spay/neuter program
to reduce unwanted puppies/kittens.
PLUS MANY OTHER SERVICES.
CALL US ANYTIME IF YOU HAVE ANY QUESTIONS.


r by Theresa Friday,
Horticulture Extension Agent,
Santa Rosa County
The Florida Nursery Growers
and Landscape Association
(FNGLA) recently announced
their 2008 selections for Florida
Plants of the Year. The Florida
Plants of the Year program is
designed to promote the use
of superior and proven Florida
plants.
The almond bush, Aloysia
virgata, is a small tree or large
shrub reaching about 12 feet high
and 14 feet wide.
This sweetly fragrant,
vigorous, drought-tolerant,
upright-growing tree/shrub from
South America produces finger-
like spiked clusters of small white"
almond-scented flowers. With an
extended bloom period, this shrub
is a good nectar source. The
branches are slightly weeping.
To keep this tree/shrub looking its
best, prune between bloom cycles
for bushier and denser growth. In
our zone 8, this plant dies down
with a freeze and regrows as a 3
to 4 foot shrub.
Blue ginger, Dichorisandra
thrysiflora, is a perennial that can


The dwarf palmetto, Sabal
minor, is a shrubby palm with a
mature height and spread of 4 to
6 feet.
Sabal minor is one of the most
durable cold tolerant palms in the
world. This Southeast native is a
small, drought-tolerant palm with
fan-shaped fronds. The foliage
is green to blue-green and long
stalks of white flowers produce
small black fruits enjoyed by
wildlife. It grows in very moist
to dry soils in shade or in sun. The
dwarf palmetto usually appears
trunk-less due to its subterranean
trunk and adds a great native
touch when a smaller scaled plant
is needed.
Fortheir indoorplant selection,
FNGLA chose Stromanthe
sanguinea 'Triostar'.
'Triostar' is a striking upright
foliage plant that is grown mainly
for its beautiful coloration. The
oblong leaves are thick and
glossy and variegated with white,
green, and reddish-pink coloring.
'Triostar' is very eye-catching
and thrives as an indoor plant
as well as having outdoor shade
applications throughout Florida.
In North Florida, 'Triostar'should
be used as an annual. Caterpillars
and slugs may pose an issue as
well as leaf-bum in full sun.
High resolution images of the
2008 Florida Plants of the Year
are available online at http://ftp.
fngla.org/2008FloridaPlantsoft
heYear/.

Theresa Friday is the
Residential Horticulture
Extension Agent fobr Santa Rosa
County. The use of trade names,
if used in this article, is solely for
the purpose ofproviding specific
information. It is not a guarantee,
warranty, or endorsement of the
product name(s) and does not
signify that they are approved to
the exclusion of others.
For additional information
about all of the county extension
services and other articles of
interest go to: http://santarosa.
ifas.ufl.edu


reach 8 feet tall and 3 feet wide.
Deep purplish-blue blooms
grow on 6 inch spikes in summer
and fall. Tropical glossy green
foliage with stiff succulent stems
spread slowly underground
creating a dense mass with a
tremendous show of blooms.
While commonly referred to
as blue ginger, "ginger" is a
misnomer as the Dichorisandra is
actually related to the wandering
jew. Growing well in part to full
shade with moist, well-drained
soil, mealy bugs are its only
significant pest issue.
Mimosa strigillosa is a ground
cover with a mature height of 6
to 9 inches and a spread of 3 to
5 feet.
This reliable and vigorous
low-grower is native and
drought tolerant growing in
moist or dry soils. It produces
pink ball-shaped flowers in
warmer seasons which attract
butterflies and provide butterfly
larva with food. The foliage
is delicate-looking with small
compound leaves which draw
back when touched, yet are
durable enough to walk on, park
on, drive on and even mow. In
sun or shade, it grows best when
well watered and grows well
intermingled with sod. With
virtually no major insect or
disease problems, this ground
cover is a winner.
The sand live oak, Quercus
geminata, typically reaches about
20 to 30 feet tall with a 15 to 20
feet spread.
Similar to southern live oak
but smaller in stature, this salt and
drought tolerant, Florida native
tree has an irregular growth habit
and spreading canopy. Some
forms are tree-like and some
may form a thicket. The dark
green cupped leaves are distinctly
boat shaped with whitish gray
on the undersides. The acorns
are sought by wildlife. The sand
live oak has proven severe storm
durability making it an ideal tree
for Florida's sometimes stormy
weather.


Your Top Choice For Music,

News & Weather Coverage
K-102.7 FM Y-1000AM
WPHK Radio WYBT Radio


8506743307m
80041910 1


231entralAve.









Page 20 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JANUARY 9, 2008


ITEMS FOR SALE

American Wolf tanning bed, 10
bulbs on the top and 10 on the bot-
tom, works well. $300 or best offer.
Call 643-7030 leave message.
1-9, 1-16

6-9 ft. lighter cross ties, $50 each.
Call 379-8973. 1-9,1-16

Aluminum basketball back-
boards with nets, heavy cast alu-
minum, $75 a pair. Call 674-8010.
1-9,1-16

Elite 1600 tanning bed, 16 bulbs,
no special wiring, used 110 electric,
$1,200. Call 674-3671, leave mes-


German Sax, new, blue lacquer,
$250. Call 674-8437. 1-2,1-9

Texas Hold' em card table, call
379-8276 or 510-0932 for more
information. 1-2,1-9

Pendant light fixture, elegant
Hunter Kenroy brand, still in box
unopened. Leftover from building
project, cultured alabaster shade,
uses three 60-watt bulbs, E-Z In-
stall, oxford silver finish, measures
20" by 16" wide, comes with eight
foot wire and two foot chain. Photo
on box. Asking $125. Can be seen
at The Journal office in Bristol on
Summers Road. UFN


Baby bassinet, white, excellent
condition, $25; two boxes of size 0-3
months baby boy clothes, excellent
condition, $15. Call 643-4362.
1-9,1-16


King size waterbed, $125. Call
674-3264. 1-9,1-16

William's Home
Improvements
"No Job Too Big or Small"
Licensed & Insured, contractor & roofer
Concrete work, _
landscape, pressure
cleaning,renovations,
seamless gutter, 1
painting, vinyl,
& screen enclosure
FOR FREE ESTIMATES
Call 674-8092. UF



Stump grinding

Reasonable rates
Free estimates
Call
Chris Nissley
674-8081 or
643-8561 (Cell),



M & W Self
Storage Rentals
7 days a week service/
5'x 10'.........$20 -
10'x 10' .........35
10'x 20'........ 70 M
10'x 25' ........?90
NO DEPOSIT
Call 762-9555, 762-8807
or 762-8597 urN


THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL




DECLASSIFIED

To place your ad, call 643-3333 or 1-800-717-3333 by noon Eastern
Time on Saturday. Non-business ads run FREE for 2 weeks.


Office desk, two drawer, $50. Call
643-4362. 1-9,1-16

Sleeper sofa, $20. Call
674-8919. 1-2,1-9


Pageant dresses, purple/violet
color, size 4-6, worn once. Call
447-0438 for price. 1-9,1-16

Prom/Homecoming dresses, pink
strapless, size 8, $250 or best of-
fer; white strapless ballroom gown,
$100 or best offer. Call 272-7641.
1-2,1-9

Two mink stoles, $50 each; mink
hat, $20. Call 674-8269. 1-2,1-9


Frigidaire refrigerator, with ice
maker, like new, 18.2 cu. ft., used
very little, $200. Call 643-7030,
leave message. 1-9,1-16

Refrigerator, second hand, works
good, white, $50. Call 674-9127,
leave message. 1-2,1-9


Classic 25" Zenith console TV,
made to fit in a corner, black and
silver, with wood grain trim, great
looking, excellent picture, has audio
problem, made in USA, $40. Call
674-8385. 1-9,1-16


JFOR RENT%
Three bedroom, three

bath, 1,240 sq. ft.
Townhouse in
Tallahassee near
FSU and TCC.
$950 month

1 Call 643-5775


A Week of Jan. 6 to Jan. 12
ARIES Mar 21/Apr 20
Aries, the past will return to
haunt you, but it's something
you can overcome. You're a
changed person now and won't
make the same bad decisions.
TAURUS -Apr 21/May 21
You have been dreaming very
vividly, Taurus. It's important to
know that these dreams are not
harbingers of what's to come.
You can still shape your future.
GEMINI May 22/Jun 21
More than ever, Gemini, this
week you're more apt to balance
your personal and work lives. In
fact, they may overlap just a bit,
especially on Thursday.
CANCER Jun 22/Jul 22
Been daydreaming about exotic
locations, Cancer? This could
O be the time to schedule that next
vacation. Bring a friend along
for even more enjoyment.
Z LEO Jul 23/Aug 23
Your creative powers are un-
locked, Leo, and this opens up
lots of opportunities for you.
However, avoid the temptation


Dell 926 Photo All-In-One printer,
includes printer, scanner, copier,
brand new, $50. Call 643-4362.
1-9, 1-16

Cobra 148 GTL CB radio, ex-
cellent condition, $100 firm. Call
643-4701. 1-2,1-9


Bear/whitetail two compound bow,
with hard case and accessories, $75
or best offer. Call 674-8010.
1-9,1-16


2002 Chevrolet Venture van,
23-25 mpg, loaded, great condition,
77K miles, $7,500 ($1,300 below
retail price); 1996 Ford F150 XLT
extended cab pick-up, 17 mpg,
V8, cruise, automatic, AM/FM/CD
stereo, power brakes, steering,
windows, door locks, towing pack-
age, 201K miles, $4,000 ($1,200
below retail price). Call 674-2179.
1-9, 1-16

1997 Chevrolet Z71, 4WD, ex-
tended cab, stepside, third door,
runs great, excellent condition. Call
272-4482. 1-9, 1-16

Isuzi pick up, $350. Call
674-3264. 1-9,1-16

1998 Saturn 4 dr. coupe, $1,800 or
best offer, good shape, well main-
tained, 87,000 miles, runs good,
good on gas, standard transmis-
sion. Call 272-7202. 1-9,1-16

J MOBILE HOME

FOR RENT
Two bedroom, two bath
mobile home located six
miles north on Hwy. 69N,
No pets. Two months rent
for damage and cleaning
deposit. Water, sewer and
grass cutting provided.
Call 674-8888


of overspending, because creativity
doesn't carry over to finances.
VIRGO -Aug 24/Sept 22
Take some extra time this week to
deal with the unpredictable nature of
your work, Virgo. Things will be es-
pecially trying for the next few days.
You can relax later.
LIBRA Sept 23/Oct 23
Libra, those around you will be very
aggressive. Do not take a cue from
them and follow the same course of
action. Better yet, slow down and
enjoy things.
SCORPIO Oct 24/Nov 22
Whether you're looking for romance
this week or not, Scorpio, someone
is looking for you. For those who
are attached, this can prove a tempt-
ing situation.
SAGITTARIUS Nov 23/Dec 21
Sagittarius, this is the week to act on
whims. If you're not used to throw-
ing caution to the wind, it's time to
become a quick learner. Others will
envy your carefree nature.
CAPRICORN Dec 22/Jan 20
Listen to your intuition to make it
through the week unscathed, Capri-
corn. Otherwise you may end up6 a


2003 Chevrolet Silverado 1500,
2x4, automatic transmission, regu-
lar cab, V8, 81 K miles, many custom
parts and accessories including full
exhaust system, paint, console with
TV, 20" chrome wheels, and much
more, runs great well maintained.
Call 294-0351 ask for Aaron.
1-9, 1-16

1995 Dodge Ram 1500, new rebuilt
Nicko engine (has one mile on it),
king cab. Call 379-8276 or 510-0932
for more information. 1-2,1-9


AUTO ACCESSORIES & PARTS

2000 Chevy 4.3 engine, and auto-
matic transmission, out of rollover,
less than 5,000 miles, $1,700 or
trade for 4.3 earlier model or best
offer; 95 Ford Taurus, parting out,
have title, good 3.8 engine and
transmission, glass, body, interior,
Call 674-8010 for more informa-
tion. 1-9,1-16

1998 2x4 Arctic Cat 400, new
Mud Bug tires and chrome wheels,
$2,000 or trade for golf cart. Call
643-3662. 1-2, 1-9


2002 Harley Davidson Sportster,
red, 6,000 miles "- arp, cared
for by ar o ) ig $6,200.
Enclosed SOLD- 'lablewith
bike. Cal .-o i, please leave
message. 1-9,1-16


FOR RENT
Three bedroom, two bath
mobile home. Located at
15726 NW Smith St. in Altha.
Apply at 15729 NW Smith
St. in Altha. No pets.

*350 mo. & *250 dep.
S Call 762-3706


lemming following the path everyone is
taking.
AQUARIUS Jan 21/Feb 18
Aquarius, integrate your desires with the
mundane activities you tackle every day.
You will find the road traveled, is that
much more enjoyable.
PISCES Feb 19/Mar 20
Your positive energy is ideal for taking
on new projects, Pisces. Put your creative
juices to work and tasks will fly by.

FAMOUS BIRTHDAYS

JANUARY 6
Susan Perabo, Author (39)
JANUARY 7
Nicolas Cage, Actor (44)
JANUARY 8
Ami Dolenz, Actress (39)
JANUARY 9
Mark Martin, NASCAR Driver (49)
JANUARY 10
Pat Benatar, Singer (55)
JANUARY 11
Amanda Peet, Actress (36)
JANUARY 12
Mel Chisholm, "Sporty Spice" (34)


I i


2000 Coachman travel trailer,
33 ft., heat and air, electric or gas,
sleeps 8, in excellent condition,
$10,000 or best offer. Call 643-6204
or 643-6003. 1-9,1-16


Galvanized steel cable, 7/16" (not
wench cable), 1,268 lb. spool, $150;
Fertilizer spreader, pull behind, 8 ft.
wide, approximately 800 lb. capac-
ity, $250; Feedmill/hammermill, 20
hp. electric motor, $750 or best offer;
Milwaukee 2 speed electric core
drill, large base, water attachment,
vacuum pump, two diamond bits.
Call 674-8010. 1-9,1-16


FOR RENT
In Bristol
*Mobile home lots
*3BR/2BA mobile home with
central heat and air
In Blountstown
*1-room efficiency,
utilities included 2BR/bath
and a half apartment 2
bedroom, 1 1/2 bath house
Commercial old Mexican
restaurant Commercial -
200 front ft. with 3 buildings
and fenced in area.

Phone 643-7740




LOOK


1, 2 & 3 Bedroom
Apartments
"The Best Place to Live"
Rental Assistance

-E


Call (850) 674-4202
16978 NW Mayo Street,
Blountstown, FL 32424.
TDD/TTY 711.
EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY


sage.


1-9,1-16


i7-M


2006 Harley Davidson heritage
softtail Springer Classic, last year
made, two tone paint, custom
exhaust and extra chrome acces-
sories, 4,000 miles, in excellent con-
dition, asking take over payments
with Harley Davidson credit. Call
674-2637 after 6 p.m. or 447-0505
any time. 1-9,1-16

2006 Yamaha Wolverine ATV,
2WD, 350cc, electric start, automat-
ic with reverse. Excellent condition,
seldom ridden, $3,200. Please call
Jeff at 674-2033 or email hester-
clan4@yahoo.com. 1-2,1-9

1999 Yamaha 1100 Vstar, very
good condition, burgundy in color,
$3,000 firm. Call 532-2926. 1-2, 1-9



WATERCRAFT

5'x25' Marine steel pontoons,
foam filled, call for more information.
Call 674-8010. 1-9,1-16













50 kW Kohler generator, 6 cylin-
der, Hercules gas or natural gas
engine, runs good and produces
power, $6,500 or best offer or may
trade; 18 ft Batwing hydraulic pow-
ered mower, need 70 hp. tractor
or larger, $4,500 or best offer; Zep
parts washer, $150 or best offer.
Call 674-8010. 1-9,1-16
444c 1983 John Deere front end
loader, runs and operates, repair
or parts, $4,500 or best offer. Call
532-2926. 1-2,1-9


Wanted: Someone to write a re-
sume. Call 643-4477, leave mes-
sage if no answer. 1-9,1-16
Wanted: Will buy junk cars and
will move, any condition. Call
762-8589. 1-9T. 7-2-08
Wanted: Junk cars and trucks,
any condition, we pay cash. Call
762-8459 or 272-6836 cell.
UFN


1.4 acres in Hostora, located
on Hwy. 65, only $27,500. Call
643-7326. 1-9,1-16


Queen Pillow-Top Mattress
Set. Brand new in plastic with
warranty. $150. Call Sandi
850-222-9879

SOLID WOOD Cherry sleigh
bed BRAND NEW in box,
$250. (850) 545-7112

NEW Queen Orthopedic
Pillowtop Mattress SET in
sealed plastic. Full warranty.
Sacrifice $275. Can deliver.
850-222-7783.

DINING ROOM Beautiful
cherry table, 6 chairs, lighted
china cabinet. Brand new in
boxes, can deliver. $799. 850-
222-7783

SOFA & LOVESEAT. Brand
new 100% MICROFIBER, still
wrapped, lifetime warranty,
sacrifice $499. (delivery
available). (850) 425-8374


JANUARY 9,2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 21
r' '


THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL-


CLASSIFIEDS

To place your ad, call 643-3333 or 1-800-717-3333 by noon Eastern
Time on Saturday. Non-business ads run FREE for 2 weeks.


Big loton Chipola River, loc
Calhoun County. Call 643-1


Western saddle, 17 inch see
colored leather, used once,
condition. Call 447-0438 foi


Two free male gerbils, with
Call 674-4654.

Two free kittens. Call 379-


Free puppies, 7 weeks ol
free starter bag of puppy foo
674-2608.


catedin Boxweilers, Boxer/Rottweiler
514. puppies, ready mid January, mom
UFN is boxer, dad is Rottweiler, both
parents have superior tempera-
ments, tails and dew claws clipped,
wormed, very large dogs over 70
lbs. minimum, fourfemales left, one
t, dark brown, three dark brindles to loving
at, darkhome, $35 each. Call 674-7854, ask
perec for Diane. 1-2,1-9
*price.
1-9,1-16 Quick Track system, 20 channel,
eightcollars, 216.800to 216.900, all
h cage. for $1,000; Tri-tronics Beagler two
1-9,1-16 dog shocking system, new batter-
ies, $300; Tri-tronics Trash Breaker
8251. three dog shocking system, $300.
1-9,1-16 Call 643-3662. 1-2,1-9

d, with Seven puppies free to a good
d. Call home, brindle, 10 weeks old, un-
1-9, 1-16 known breed. Call 674-3348.
1-2, 1-9


NEW HOUSE FOR SALE
3 bedroom, 2 bath house, 1,332 sq. ft. under
roof, custom shingles, vinyl siding, laminate
and carpet flooring, along with ceramic in the
bathrooms. Sits on 3/4 acre lot on Black Bot-
tom Road., approximately five miles south of
Altha.
Call (850) 899-0269 or 674-7138



WANTED:

REAL ESTATE
Will buy 10 to 1,000 acres, reason-
ably priced. Immediate closing.
Call (850) 544-5441
or (850) 899-7700


Wire chicken cage, $25. Call
674-8918. 1-2,1-9

Hand-fed Quaker parrot babies
and white doves. Call 674-3532.
1-2,1-9

Gerbil, blonde and white, male,
includes cage and food, $10. Call
674-9127. 1-2,1-9


Found: Small black and tan dog on
Telogia cutoff 67A. Call 556-2479.
1-9, 1-16

Found: Miniature Doberman pin-
scheron River Road in Blountstown,
call and describe. Call 643-8459.
1-9, 1-16

Horses For Sale
2 great trail companions &
a sidekick; 10 year old QH/
Arab a wonderful child's
horse, *2,000 (includes
sweet natured gelded don-
key who is his buddy); 5
year old Spotted Saddle-
horse, great disposition,
$1,500.
Call Kate at 674-2033

FORRENT


At Riverview RV
Park. Two bed-
room, one bath
mobile home.
No pets.
s350 moJ $200 dep.
Call 643-4488


Found: Small dog, approx. 8 to
10 months old, near Joe Chas-
son Circle in Bristol. Please call
and describe. Call 694-8458 or
694-3848. 1-2.1-9


Yard sale, Saturday, Jan. 12, 8
a.m. (ET), Hoecake Road in Bristol,
off Hwy 20 1/2 mile on right, 6 seat
dining table, original and print oil
paintings with gold leaf and rustic
frames, fine glassware and table
ware, glass and brass coffee table,
rocker recliners, exercise equip-
ment, clothes, and many other
useful items inside and out. Call
643-5179. 1-9,1-16

Huge multi-family yard sale, Fri-
day Jan. 11 from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.
presale and Saturday, Jan. 12, 7
a.m. until noon. Go three miles
down Hwy. 275 South (Abe Springs)
and turn right on Ben Clark Road,
follow signs. Furniture, clothes,
toys, kitchen items and much more,
priced to sell. Call 674-4716 or 674-
1336. 1-9,1-16

Tell 'em you
saw it in The

JOURNAL



714 acres
Liberty County

$3,500,000

50 acres
Calhoun County

$220,000

D. E. Billingsley
Lic. Real Estate Broker
Call (850) 510-3309
www.debillingsley.com
1-2T 1-23


SUBSCRIPTIONFRM


Cost: $4280
4, INCLUDES TAX


,,
~ .~


The 2007 Calhoun-Liberty
Plat Directories are available in Bristol
at The Calhoun-Liberty Journal office at
11493 NW Summers Road or at the Chamber
of Commerce office in Blountstown at 20816
Central Ave. East.


mEr








Page 22 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JANUARY 9, 2008


6
e 6


ne Following positions are
available: Construction Trades
Helper, Janitorial, Dietetic
Technician, Construction
Worker, Office Clerk, Food
Service Worker, Production
Manager, Truck Driver. EOE
Service Chipola Worktorce Board UFN


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, JUVENILE
DIVISION FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR BAY COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 2005-DP-0184-A
IN THE INTEREST OF: DIVISION: B
G.R.V.
MINOR CHILD
(SEC. 39.801 (b) FS)
The State of Florida to AURELIO GON-
ZALES SOLIS, legal father whose resi-
dence and address is unknown.
You are hereby notified that a Petition
under oath has been filed in the above
styled Court for the Termination of Pa-
rental Rights in the case of G.R.V., a
minor child to licensed child placement
agency for subsequent adoption.
You are hereby noticed that an Advisory
Hearing will be held before the Honor-


able James B. Fensom, Judge of the
Circuit Court, Fourteenth Judicial Cir-
cuit, at the Bay County Juvenile Justice
Courthouse, 533 E. 11th Street, Panama
City, Florida 32401, on the 28th day of
February, 2008, at the hour of 10:00
a.m., C.S.T.
You have the right to appear with counsel
at this hearing. If you can no afford le-
gal representation the Court will appoint
counsel for you at this hearing upon the
determination of insolvency. You -must
either appear on the date and at the time
specified or send a written response to
the Court prior to that time. ',
YOUR FAILURE TO PERSONALLY AP-
PEAR AT THIS ADVISORY HEARING
CONSTITUTES CONSENT TO THE
TERMINATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS
OF THIS CHILD. IF YOU FAIL TO AP-
PEAR ON THE DATE AND TIME SPEC-
IFIED, YOU MAY LOSE ALL LEGAL
RIGHTS AS A PARENT TO THE CHILD
OR CHILDREN. 12-1MT.1.M


FLORIDA DEPARTMENT


OF CORRECTIONS:
Accepting applications for career service

correctional RNs and LPNs at the following locations:

Liberty Cl, Apalachee CI & Wakulla Cl

Exceptional Health Care Insurance

Vested Retirement after six years

Comprehensive State of Florida Benefit Package

Visit our Web site at fldocjobs.com for more information to
apply'online or contact: Jennifer Dudley at Dudley.jennifer@
mail.dc.state.fl.us or call (850) 922-6645.

Florida Department of Corrections is an Equal Opportunity Em-
ployer. Certain veterans and spouses of veterans receive prefer-
ence in employment by the state as provided by Chap. 295, FS.





NOW HIRINGreen

Industrial Electricians

Responsible for plant electrical power systems and control equipment and systems and
to ensure these are in proper working condition for maximum production of wood pellets
under the direction and review of the Shift Team Leader.

Journeyman Electrician preferred; will consider a recognized electrical apprentice with at
least 5 years demonstrated experience in the industrial maintenance field.

Must be NFPA 70E certified or can become certified.

Must have extensive knowledge of:
*GE medium and low voltage switchgear *Allen Bradley motor controls, VFDs, PLCs
*Rockwell Software applications; Control Net, Device Net, RS View, RS Logix
*480 and 4160 volt AC motors *480 and 4160 volt transformers, switchgears,
generators, and circuit breakers *3-phase and basic control systems *Basic machinery
functions *Low and High voltage transformers, switchgears, generators,
circuit breakers -Blueprints and schematics *Multi-mode ST and SC Fiber
Optic Cables -Digital and analog control systems *Calibrating and maintaining
electrical equipment and devices *Ethernet Cables

Questions you will be asked:
*How many years of experience do you have as an industrial electrician?
*Do you have an associates degree, technical degree, or related work experience with an
emphasis in industrial electricity, instrumentation and controls?
*Do you have experiences with maintaining and troubleshooting AC control circuits, mag-
netic starters, interlock systems, alarms, annuciators, digital and analog control systems,
and PLCs?
*Do you have any experience maintaining and calibrating electrical equipment such as
oil circuit breakers, transformers, generators, voltage regulators, metering, instrument
transformers, high voltage switchgear and equipment.
*Do you have the ability to work with Plant control schematics?
*Do you have experience with 480 volt AC motors, 4160 AC motors, low, medium, and
high voltage systems?
*Do you have experience with high voltage transformers, switchgears, generators?
*Are you NFPA 70E certified?

TESTING IS REQUIRED.

All job offers are contingent upon the successful completion of a drug and alcohol screen,
physical, and background check.
Please send resume to rweaver@greencirclebio.com by January 15, 2008.
S "-2.1-9


FAMILY DOLLAR
Distribution Center
Investing In The future of 'Marianna.

Now Hiring Full-time
WAREHOUSE POSITIONS

Benefits include:
Weekly Pay Cycle
Annual Merit Increases
Paid Vacation and Holiday
401-k Savings and Retirement Plan
Great Benefit Packages are Available

Please apply in person at:
Family Dollar Distribution Center
3949 Family Dollar Parkway
Marianna, Florida
Or at the local ONE STOP Career Center
FAMILY DOLLAR IS AN EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER.
FAMILY DOLLAR MAINTAINS A DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE 1.T 1.








JANUARY 9,2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 23


This report represents some
events the Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation Commis-
sion (FWC) handled over Dec.
21 Jan. 3; however, it does not
include all actions taken by the
Division of Law Enforcement.
NORTHWEST REGION
BAY COUNTY Officer
Mark Clements worked a detail
with investigations regarding
complaints of persons shooting
ducks after legal hours on Deer
Point Lake. Two hunters where
observed shooting at ducks almost
thirty 30 minutes after legal
shooting hours. Both subjects
stated they knew they were hunting
after legal hours. Citations were
issued.
Officer Joe Chambers checked
a subject at the West Bay Bridge
and found a bucket containing six
speckled trout, five of which were
undersize. The individual stated to
Officer Chambers that the way the
fish were biting he would have had
a bucket full if Officer Chambers
hadn't stopped him. Citations were
issued.
Officer Joe Chambers checked
the Pine Log Wildlife Management
Area (WMA) and found three
deer hunters hunting during a
closed period. Each of them had


FWC Division of Law Enforcement


FIELD OPERATION WEEKLY REPORT


a Pine Log WMA pamphlet in
their possession. The hunters had
passed a sign coming into the
area that listed the season dates.
None of the three had permits that
would have allowed them to hunt
the area during the open season.
Three citations for hunting during
a closed season were issued.
WASHINGTON COUNTY
- Officers Lane Kinney and
Larry Morris apprehended three
individuals for trespass on private
properties in Washington County.
In the first case two individuals fled
on foot from the officers on a large
tract of posted land in south end of
the county. Officer Kinney gave
chase on foot and Officer Morris
set up a perimeter with his vehicle
on a fence line and apprehended
one of the subjects there. The other
man eluded capture. In the second
case Officer Kinney responded to a
trespass complaint and located two
juveniles hunting and turned them
over to their parents. This case
will be direct filed to the courts for
potential trial in teen court.


GULF COUNTY Officer
Tony Lee responded to a
commercial Individual Fishing
Quota (IFQ) landing of red snapper
in Port St. Joe. It was after 6 p.m.
and the captain of the vessel had
already unloaded approximately
108 pounds of fish from the vessel
to his truck. National Marine
Fisheries Service Agents have
been contacted by Officer Lee
concerning the case. Federal
charges are pending.
Lt. Arnie McMillion and Officer
Scott Hoffman responded to two
separate complaints concerning
dead black bears that had been
dumped. The first location was on
Road 20 between White City and
Overstreet. The second location
was on Jarrott Daniels Road
near Highway 22. Both bears
had been killed with firearms. A
reward is being offered for any
information leading to the arrest
of the individuals responsible
and the cases were turned over to
investigations.
FRANKLIN On Saturday


Dec. 22 Officer Travis Huckeba
boarded a commercial fishing
vessel in the Apalachicola River.
Upon inspection he discovered 43
illegal red grouper. The fish were
seized and appropriate citations
were issued.
On Dec. 26 while on patrol
on the "Sea Hawk" Officer Faris
Livesay issued a citation to a
subject for possessing red snapper


during closed season.
On Dec. 29 while on water
patrol on the "Sea Hawk" Officer
Michael Slotin issued a citation for
possession of red snapper during
closed season in federal waters.
GADSDEN On Dec. 22, Lt.
Harry Parker and Officer Mike
Fish cited two Alabama subjects
for taking over the possession
limit of speckled perch on Lake
Talquin.
On Dec. 30, Officer Lane
Bentley cited two Liberty County
men for attempting to take deer at
night with a gun and light in the
Apalachicola National Forest.


NORBERT VARNUM
JACKSON COUNTY Norbert Varnum, 73, died Wednesday,
Jan. 2, 2008 in Coos Bay, OR. He was a native of Calhoun County,
born and raised on Laramore Road in the Chason Community. After
marrying Louise, he moved to Jackson County. He was retired from
Chipola College where he worked as a custodian.
He was preceded in death by his wife, Louise of Marianna; his
parents, Alto and Verna Vamum of Chason Community; his sister,
Inez of Altha.
Survivors include a daughter, Dena Morgan and her husband, Da-
vid; one brother, Billy Gene Vamum and his wife, Louise of Nashville,
TN; two sisters, Janie Pelt and her
husband, Doug of Clarksville and
Sible Firestone of Bristol; two
granddaughters, Kimberly and
Gracie of Coos Bay; multiple
nieces and nephews.
The family will receive friends
Wednesday, Jan. 9, 2008 from 4
to 6 p.m. at Maddox Chapel in
Marianna.
Services will be held Thurs-
day, Jan. 10, 2008 at 10 a.m. at
Maddox Chapel.
Maddox Chapel in Marianna is
in charge of the arrangements.


DANNY EARL DURDEN
GRAND RIDGE Danny
Earl Durden, 44, died Monday,
Dec. 31, 2007. He was born in
Chattahoochee in 1963, and had
spent most of his life in Grand
Ridge. He enjoyed hunting, fish-
ing and flying electric model he-
licopters. He was of the Protes-
tant faith.
He was preceded in death by
a brother, Gregory "Greg" Dur-
den; his paternal grandparents,
Elmer and Lois Durden; and
two aunts, Allie Mae Truxall and
Ruth Scott.
Survivors include his father,
Barney Earl Durden of Grand
Ridge; his mother, Susan Bar-
field Duncan of Blountstown;
two daughters, Sarah Danielle
Durden of Sneads, and Delaney
K. Dudley of Greenwood; one
brother, Douglas W. Durden of
Tallahassee; three half-brothers,
Richard Duncan of Apalachico-
la, Bobby Joe Duncan of Apala-
chicola, and Michael Godfrey of
Atlanta, GA.
Services were held Tuesday,
Jan. 8, 2008 at Marianna Chapel
Funeral Home with the Rev. Jim
Gosnell and Bruce Durden of-
ficiating. Interment followed at
Shady Grove Cemetery.
Marianna Chapel Funeral
Home was in charge of arrange-
ments.








Page 24 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JANUARY 9, 2008


FDOH recogni
The Florida Department of
Health (DOH) acknowledges
January as National Birth
Defects Prevention Month
and Jan. 7-14 as National
Folic Acid Awareness Week.
DOH recognizes the severe
impact birth defects have
on Florida's families and
children. Each year, birth
defects affect one in 33
newborns in Florida, are one
of the leading causes of infant
mortality, and contribute
significantly to long-term
disabilities.
"Babies born with birth
defects and related deficiencies
are a serious matter in Florida
and around the world," said
DOH Deputy Secretary of
Children's Medical Services
Joseph Chiaro, M.D., FAAP.
"Our surveillance program
allows us to monitor the
numbers and types of birth
defects that are occurring so
we can develop prevention,
intervention and referral
programs to assist affected
individuals, families and their
health care providers."
Some commonly occurring
birth defects include:
Congenital Heart Defects:
disorders of the heart present
at birth, which affect about
one in 100-200 babies
Chromosomal
Abnormalities: disorders
involving chromosomes,
affecting about one in 200
babies
Orofacial Clefts: disorders
of the lip and/or roof of the
mouth, affecting about one
in 700-1,000 babies
Neural Tube Defects
(NTDs): disorders of the
spine (spina bifida) and
brain (anencephaly) which
affect about one in 1,000
pregnancies
Spina bifida and
anencephaly are serious
birth defects. In 2004,
approximately 73 infants
in Florida were born with
NTDs. To reduce this number,
women who are capable of
becoming pregnant should
have 400 micrograms of the
B vitamin folic acid every
day. Since NTDs occur
early in pregnancy, before
many women know they are
pregnant, women should take
folic acid before becoming
pregnant and continue
during early pregnancy.
Folic acid can be obtained
from multivitamins, dietary
supplements and fortified
foods, in addition to eating
a diet containing folate-rich


izes January as National Birth Defects Prevention Month
other dark leafy greens, beans and incorporating exercise. to hazardous chemicals. A DOH promotes, protects
and peas. Because some birth defects are woman who is pregnant and improves the health o
DOH recommends that all preventable, it is important to or planning a pregnancy all people in Florida. FoT
women plan their pregnancies discuss pre-existing medical should avoid alcohol, more information about birth
and schedule a pre-pregnancy conditions such as diabetes, smoking, illegal drugs and defects surveillance, please
checkup to talk with their obesity, seizures, family medications which can cause visit the DOH Florida Birth
health care provider about history of birth defects, as birth defects and pregnancy Defects Registry Web site a
maintaining a healthy diet well as any possible exposures complications. www.fbdr.org.


always






Check Out Our Inventory on our website:
www.directautomotive
wholesale.com
Interest Rates
as low as 5.95%


Manager's Special...

2004
Toyota
4-Runner
4-Door, Sport,
Gas Saverd


$345
Per Month
$0 Down/W60 Mo /WAC


We Buy Cars, Trucks & SUVs!


NEED A CAR


CALL USi WE DON'T CARE
WHAT YOUR
CREDIT LOOKS UKE!


WE CAN GUARANTEE
YOUR CREDIT
APPROVAL!


BAD CREDIT


CALL OR COME BY FOR "GUARANTEED CREDIT APPROVAL"
CHECK OUT OUR INVENTORY AT DIRECTAUTOMOTIVEWHOSALE.COM
ll nil nillllllmI. .--


0 Down '03 Jeep Grand
s288/mo Cherokee Limited
AvA C4mSnfrt


0 Down '04 Ford Exploi
S230/mo Sporttrac
Super Clean!


0 Down '00 BMW 3281 0 Down '03 Cadillac
$307/mo 4-Door, Leather, s288/mo Sedan Deville
Sunroof, Loaded!


0 Down '04 Chevrolet 0 Down '05 Chevy Malibu
121 0/mo Astro Van LS S1 72/mo


0 Down '05 Buick LeSabe Custom 0 Down '03 Toyota Tacoma
s249/mo $326/mo Double Cab Pre-Runner


0 Down '01 Lexus ES 300 0 Down "u2 Pontiac
s230/mo Power Sunroof! *210/mo GrandAm GT
Loaded!


0 Down u3, unevy -1 0 0Down '06 Nissan Frontier
Po m 4Crew Cab LS d9 Crew Cab, 31,000 Miles,
'288/mo 4x4, ZR2 Offroad Pkg., 379/mo G Caa 3 Loaded]
Sunoer Niceal


0 Down '03 Ford F-150
S423/mo Harley Davidson Ed.,
SuoerCrew, Loaded!


Sin Quih DolI


0 Down '06 Ford Focus
S267/mo 4-Door, ZX4!


0 Down '02 Lincoln LS
s288/mo 4-Door, Sedan!


0 Down
S230/mo


0 Down '00 Nissan Ultima GXE 0 Down
$115/mo 4-Doort s 33/mo


'99 Jaguar XJ8
Vanden Plas!


99 raaoillac
Sedan Deville
Leather, All Poweri
=NEW


Ith Approved Credt S I h a
n- o pm-U sasn n^m.- P
B


fod uha pnc n -. -- ------ ~-.--,-r---- --------


f
r
'h
e
h
t


foods such as spinach and




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs