Group Title: Calhoun-Liberty Journal (Bristol, Fla.).
Title: The Calhoun-Liberty journal
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00027796/00080
 Material Information
Title: The Calhoun-Liberty journal
Alternate Title: Calhoun Liberty journal
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Creator: Calhoun-Liberty Journal
Publisher: Liberty Journal, Inc.
Liberty Journal
Place of Publication: Bristol Fla
Publication Date: January 2, 2008
Copyright Date: 2008
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Bristol (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Liberty County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Calhoun County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Liberty -- Bristol
Coordinates: 30.426944 x -84.979167 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in Sept. 1991.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 11, no. 38 (Sept. 18, 1991).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00027796
Volume ID: VID00080
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AKN4565
oclc - 33425067
alephbibnum - 002046630
electronic_aleph - 003298625
electronic_oclc - 60662266
lccn - sn 95047245
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly journal (Bristol, Fla.)

Full Text
Univ otf Honoa story uoraiy
PO Box 117007
Gainesville Fl 32611


82 11/61200,
4676


Man shot

in hunting

accident
from the Florida Fish & Wildlife"
Conservation Commission
A Liberty County man who was
shot in the arm in a hunting accident
Saturday is recovering in a Tallahassee
hospital.
Noel Brock Reynolds, 49, Bristol,
was shot once in the right forearm after
his brother-in-law Steven Mark Flint,
52, Milton, mistook him for a deer.
The accident occurred around 11
a.m. EST on a family farm near the
community of Orange south of Bristol.
Reynolds was taken to Tallahassee
Regional Medical Center where he un-
derwent surgery Saturday afternoon.
Florida Fish and Wildlife Conserva-
tion Commission (FWC) Investigator
Steve Thomas said Reynolds, his
brother and another person were on
foot attempting to drive deer toward
Flint when the shooting occurred.
"Flint said he saw movement and
fired. He thought he was shooting at a
deer," Thomas' said.
Investigators say Flint and the oth-
ers were 350 feet apart. They also said
there was some brush between the
men. Flint was using a .45 cal. lever
action rifle.
Thomas said none of the hunters
were wearing hunter orange cloth- o'
ing. However, hunter orange is-only
required for deer hunters on public
lands.
"This is a textbook example of a.
hunting accident caused by 'failure to
identify your target,"' Thomas said.
"This is why we encourage hunters to
wear hunter orange, even on private
property. It pretty much eliminates
'mistaken for game' hunting acci-
dents."
Thomas said he will sit down with
the state attorney in the next few days
to review the investigation.
FWC Officer Lane Bentley assisted
with the investigation.


Ex-inmate working for city found DUI in stolen truck


by Teresa Eubanks, Journal Editor
A former inmate recently hired by the City of Blountstown
was arrested Thursday night when he was found driving errati-
cally in a vehicle stolen from the city sewer plant.
Deputies noticed the 1994 Jeep Cherokee traveling north in
the southbound lane of Palm Street at 7:42 p.m. and watched
as the driver, later identified as Henry Carl Brewster, 46, went
through two stop signs and continued driving from one side of
the road to the other, at times traveling down the center line.
When stopped, Brewster who smelled strongly of an al-


Community Calendar...4


Commentary...6


coholic beverage, according to a deputy's report said he had
been called out to fix a gas leak.
After giving an altered version of his name and a wrong birth
date, Brewster was identified and it was found that his license
had been suspended duepto seven DUIs.
Brewster was arrested on several charges, including felony
DUI, driving while license suspended or revoked with knowl-
edge, resisting arrest without violence, burglary of a structure
and grand theft auto.
See DUI ARREST continued inside on page 12

New Year's Resolutions
STo finish fourth grade, be an excellent cheer-
S leader and to be a really fast runner.
E ERG Brittany Kelley
I want to experiment on human photosyn-
thesis. I want to pass the 4th grade so I can
get school over with. I want to shoot a 11 point
deer. Colton Capps

Pull up my reading grade, teach my cat
Thomas not to be lazy and tell my kittens who
I am because they always run from me.
Marisha Bess
See more from the 4th graders at Tolar School on page 10.
,7 News from the Pews...8 Farmer's Almanac...9


Speak Up!...11 Remembering Bouldie Dillard... 12 Wrestling in Hosford... 13 Obituaries...18


LCSO Deputy

revives child

-unable to

breathe

after seizure


SEE PAGE 3


Sheriff's Log...2


8 Birthdays... 10








Page 2 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JANUARY 2, 2008U


Liberty Co. man arrested after

threatening to kill 3 with shovel


A man who insisted he
was owed $20 and was deter-
mined to collect, was arrested
after he grabbed a shovel and
threatened to kill three people
at a mobile home on Gobble
Court in Bristol Monday
night.
According to a report from
the Liberty County Sheriff's
Department, Keith Edward
Summerlin went to see James
Livingston, who was at the
residence of Adam Andrew
Wester and Kimberly Yates,
around 9:16 p.m.
Summerlin demanded his
money from Livingston, who
replied that he didn't owe him
anything and added that he


ARREST
REPORTS
compiled by
Journal
Editor
Teresa
Eubanks


hadn't even seen him in nine
months.
Witnesses said Summerlin
then drew back his arm and
hit Livingston in the face and
a fight ensued.
The men fell through the
entrance of the couple's home,
knocking the front door off its
hinges.


Wester said he then grabbed
Summerlin and threw him off
the porch.
At that point, Summerlin
found a shovel and said he
was going to kill all three of
them.
When deputies responded
to the call, they found Sum-
merlin hiding in the grass at a
nearby residence.
Summerlin, who is cur-
rently on state probation, was
charged with aggravated as-
sault with a deadly weapon,
two counts of resisting a law
enforcement officer without
violence, three counts of sim-
ple battery and four counts of
criminal mischief.


Driver arrested after crashing stolen car


A Cottondale woman was arrested after
she lost control of stolen vehicle she was
driving and ran into a ditch sideways in Cal-
houn County Sunday.
After responding to a report of an acci-
dent just north of J.P. Peacock Road on State
Road 71 South, FHP Trooper Dallas Jones
discovered the 1993 Nissan Sentra had been
stolen from Gadsden County and a warrant
had been issued for the driver, Carrie Lynn
Bowden.
Additional charges were filed against
Bowden after Calhoun County Sheriff's
Deputy Scotty Norris discovered two Sched-


ule 4 narcotic pills for which the driver had no
prescription. The pills, found in the driver's
purse, were identified as Klonopin and Xanax.
The deputy also found .5 grams of meth-
amphetamine in a small container, along with
about two grams of marijuana, a pack of rolling
papers, a cut straw and several Q-tips. Another
pack of rolling papers was found on the driver.
In addition to the grand theft auto warrant,
Bowden was charged with possession of less
than 20 grams of marijuana, possession of
methamphetamine and possession of drug para-
phernalia.


Woman arrested for adding refill to prescription


A Calhoun County woman
is charged with forgery, ut-
tering and possession of a
Schedule II narcotic without
a valid prescription after she
allegedly added a refill onto a
recent prescription, according
to a report from the Calhoun


Buy, sell e
trade with
an ad in The
Calhoun-
Liberty
JOURNAL
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FLANDERS
Sewing Machine
& Vacuum Cleaner
Sales & Service
Parts & Service for:
Kirby, Rainbow and most
other makes and models
Riccar vacuum dealer
Small electric repair
* Scissor & yard tool sharpening
WILL DELIVER TO BLOUNTSTOWN
Call (850) 526-1515
2825 Hwy. 71N Marianna


County Sheriff's Department.
Lisa Leath Cumbie, 32,
was arrested after she pre-
sented an altered prescription
at Golden's Drugs on Dec. 20.
Deputies were waiting outside
when she walked out with the
refill of 20 pills.


After receiving the refill re-
quest, the pharmacist contact-
ed the physician. The doctor
stated that while he did write
the original prescription for hy-
drocodone following an emer-
gency room visit, he does not
prescribe refills for narcotics.


CALHOUN COUNTY
Dec. 24
*Kelli Odom, VOP (county).
Dec. 25
*Eustorgio Gonzalez, DUI.
*Robert P. Prescott, DUI.
Dec. 26
*Lisa Cumbie, forgery, uttering forgery, posses-
sion of Schedule II narcotics.
Dec. 27
*Shelia Wiley, FTA Wakulla Co.
*Carl Brewster, DUI (felony), driving while li-
cense suspended or revoked with knowledge,
resisting without violence, burglary of structure,
grand theft.
Dec. 28
*Edward Brigham, possession of less than 20
grams of marijuana, possession of drug para-
phernalia.
Dec. 29
*Melissa 0. Hough, possession of controlled
substance, possession of prescription without a
prescription, possession of Schedule III narcotic,
possession of drug paraphernalia.
*Mathew Bullard, possession of less than 20
grams of marijuana, possession of drug parapher-
nalia, possession of alcohol under the age of 21.
Dec. 30
*Carrie Bowden, holding for Gadsden Co., pos-
session of less than 20 grams, possession of drug
paraphernalia, possession of meth.
*Christopher Jones, violation of county ordi-
nance.


LIBERTY COUNTY
Dec. 24
*Kelli Odom, holding for CCSO.
Dec. 27
*Shelia Cheri Wiley, holding for CCSO.
Dec. 28
*Alvin Eugene Everett, DUI with property dam-
age.
*Collins Hamilton, holding for Gadsden Co..
Dec. 29
*Melissa Olivia Hough, holding for CCSO.
Dec. 30
*Carrie Lynn Bowden, holding for CCSO.
Listingsincludenamefollowedbychargeandidentificationofarrestingagency.Thenamesaboverepresent
those charged. We remind our readers that all are presumed innocent until proven guilty


Blountstown Police Dept.
Dec. 24 through Dec. 30, 2007
Citations issued:
Accidents............04 Traffic Citations...............07
Special details (business escorts, traffic details)......69
Business alarms.....03 Residential alarms..........00
Com plaints.................................... .................... 164


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Hours: Mon., Wed.-Fri. 9-5:30; Sat. 9-3:30; Closed Tues. & Sun.


I SHERIFF5S LOG 'I







JANUARY 2, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 3


Liberty County deputy revives child unable


to breathe after suffering febrile seizure


by Teresa Eubanks, Journal Editor
Life and death met at the intersection
of State Road 20 and County Road 12
South in Bristol last week.
Liberty County Sheriff's Deputy Caryl
Marotta had just stopped traffic at the red
light to make way for a funeral proces-
sion Thursday when she heard what she
described as "a blood curdling scream."
She looked out to see a distraught
mother standing about 25 yards away in
the parking lot at the Express Lane, hold-
ing up a limp child.
Marotta rushed over to the woman,
who thrust the child in the deputy's arms.
"He was unconscious and turning blue,"
said Marotta.
The mother, Amy Earnest of Hosford,
thought 15-month-old Konner was chok-
ing.
The deputy put her fingers in the boy's
mouth to clear out some mucus and placed
him face down to do a modified Heim-
lich maneuver by putting one hand on
his chest and the other on his back while
make gentle compressions. "After doing
it two or three times, he took a breath of
air and started breathing," Marotta said.
She then yelled over her radio to the
sheriff's office dispatcher: "I need EMS,
I need EMS!"
After the unconscious child began
breathing on his own, Marotta happened
to look over her shoulder and saw the
hearse passing by to take Cecil Watts for
burial in Hosford following services in
Blountstown. What had just happened.
suddenly hit her. She said she thought,
"Thank you, Mr. Cecil, for putting me in
the right place at the right time." .
Two ambulances arrived at the scene,
and the little boy was rushed inside one
and given oxygen. Soon, the crowd that
had gathered in the convenience store
parking lot heard the baby start crying
and began to cheer.

Several things fell into place last
Thursday before Konner's fate landed in
a deputy's hands.
- The funeral procession Marotta was
waiting to help with was running an hour


late. She had two non-emergency calls to
respond to after finishing that detail. She
noted that had the procession been on
schedule, she would have been far away
when the little boy became ill.
Earnest was driving north on C.R. 12
South to take him to a doctor's appoint-
ment and was going past the Harrell Li-
brary when she realized something was
wrong.
She looked back at her son, strapped
into his car seat, and realized he wasn't
breathing. "He was blue, drawn up, shak-
ing and his eyes were shut," she said.
She looked up and in the distance, saw
the lights from .-the deputy's patrol car
parked under the traffic light. She hit the
gas and headed toward the intersection,
where she made a quick turn into the Ex-
press Lane parking lot.
"When I saw the patrol car, all I could
think was to get parked and get him out of
the car seat," she said. "I was screaming.


Those minutes felt like hours."
Even after he was revived, the baby re-
mained limp and unresponsive. The am-
bulance took him to the Liberty Co. High
School football field, where an emergen-
cy helicopter arrived to take him to a Tal-
lahassee hospital.
After a short stay at the hospital, Kon-
ner was released that night and returned
home with his mom, his father, Ronald
Earnest, and his two older brothers, Bran-
don, 7, and six-year-old Cody.
Doctors determined that the baby had
not been choking but had actually suf-
fered a febrile seizure brought on by a
temperature spike. "The doctor said it
was common in babies up to three," said
Earnest. Febrile seizures are convulsions
that may develop suddenly and without
warning, according to www.mayoclinic.
corn, which notes that the seizures "aren't
as dangerous as they look." But in Kon-
ner's case, his seizure became more seri-


ous because the mucus that had accumu-
lated prevented him from breathing.
His mother had been treating Konner
the previous two days with Tylenol and
Motrin to keep down his fever and said
he appeared to have been feeling better
when they left for a 1:30 p.m. appoint-
ment at the health department that day.
"I'm certified in CPR but I drew a to-
tal blank when it came to my own son,"
said Earnest. After Konner started breath-
ing again, Marotta turned to the hysteri-
cal mother. "You've got to pull it together
for him," she told her, adding, "You and I
will both freak out later."
Marotta continued to hold Konner
facedown. Nothing had dislodged from
his mouth and she was afraid to move
him in case his airway got clogged again.
But at that point, "he had good color and
was breathing," she said.
Remarkably, two of Konner's older
half-siblings were at the store when his
mother drove up. His half-sister, Jenni-
fer Earnest, is a clerk at the Express Lane.
His half-brother, Justin, happened to be
at the store with his grandmother at the
same time.

Marotta went to visit Konner Monday,
delivering a teddy bear and a note for the
little boy. "Dec. 27 will always be Kon-
ner's Day to me," said Marotta, who her-
self is the mother of five.
"I don't even know her but I love her,"
said Konner's mom of the deputy who
came to her rescue. "I can't even explain
what she means to me now."
After facing every mother's worst
fear that day, Amy Earnest had one more
frightening thing to deal with her fear
of riding in a helicopter as they flew, to
Tallahassee.
After the emergency had passed and
Konner was home safe with his family,
his six-year-old brother had a question
for their mother about the helicopter ride
to the hospital.
"Mama, did you see God?" he asked
her.
"No, but I did have a long conversation
with him," she responded.


EDDIE NOBLES


Land Clearing

LAND CLEARING AND

ROOT RAKING FOR:

I Excavator

work

SSmall

acreage

Home sites Food plots

Private drives and roads

Located in Bristol

Call 447-0449 or 643-5390


OPNIG ANAR 7208.


CHILDCARE CENTER

& EARLY LEARNING
TAKING ENROLLMENT NOW FOR:
Birth to 12 years old
Infants Toddlers Preschoolers
After school Evening Care

Hours of Operation:
Monday Friday 6 a.m. to 11:30 p.m.

For more information phone:
(850) 674-5878 or 674-5832
(850) 674-9004 (fax)
email: caschildarecenter@fairpoint.net
Located at 20974 SE Ray Ave. Blountstown
Family owned and operated


New Year's

Baby sought
for Calhoun
& Liberty Co.
The Health Department
wants to honor the first babies
of the New Year from Calhoun
and Liberty counties.
Peggy Howland of the
Healthy Start Program is put-
ting together some nice gift
packages for the lucky par-
ents, which will include gifts
cards and supplies for the
whole family.
The only requirement is
that the child be a resident of
the area and be the first born
in 2008 from their county.
If you know someone who
brought in the New Year with
a trip to the maternity ward,
contact Howland at 643-2415
extension 227.








Page 4 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JANUARY 2, 2008


Stand up, speak

out for an abused

or neglected child
Guardians ad Litem are citizens who
volunteer to represent children before
the court, social service agencies and
the community. Volunteers are trained
- and supervised by program staff,
including attorneys.
On average, Guardians
ad Litem devote 4-6
hours a month and
create relationships
that can make a huge
impact on children's lives.
To become a Guardian, you must
be at least 19 years of age and suc-
cessfully complete the 30 hour pre-
service training program. No one
with a felony arrest or prior history
of child abuse and neglect will be
considered.
Guardian ad Litem Training will
be held at Thomasville Road Baptist
Church located at 3131 Thomasville
Road in Tallahassee. Training classes
will be held on the following dates:
Tuesday, Jan. 8 5:30-9
Thursday, Jan. 10 5:30-9
Saturday, Jan. 12 -9-4
Monday, Jan. 14 5:30-9
Tuesday, Jan. 15 5:30-9
Thursday, Jan. 17 5:30-9
Two hours of reading and two
hours of court observation are also
required for certification. Schedule
an interview today!
For more information, email or
call Leigh Merritt, Assistant Circuit
Director at Leigh.Merritt@gal.fl.gov
or 488-7612 or download an appli-
cation at www.guardianadlitembig-
bend.org.


Installation of Lodge

Offices set Jan. 5
Red Level Lodge #134, Free & Ac-
cepted Masons, will host an open installa-
tion of lodge officers at 6 p.m. on Jan 5 in
their lodge at 5602 Alliance Rd. Families
and friends are invited to attend, followed
by refreshments.
Installing Officer Parry Dolin, Past Dis-
trict Deputy Grand Master, will conduct
the ceremony. The incoming 2008 lodge
officers are: Worshipful Master Michael
Trickey; Senior Warden Joey Branton;
Junior Warden Robbie Wilks; Secretary
JD Godwin; Chaplain Roy Cooke; Senior
Warden Billy Conway; Senior Steward
Michael Young; Junior Steward Larry
Reimann; and Tyler Charlie Watts.
Three officers continuing to serve
in their current positions are: Treasurer
Richard Edenfield; Junior Deacon Em-
mett McCalvin Sr.; and Marshall Lee
Roberson. Chuck Morgan has been ap-
pointed Lodge Instructor, and Robert
Wilks Cateschim, Instructor.


ALOEUNITY

ALENDAR


BIRTHDAYS
Anthony Combs
TODAY'S MEETINGS
* Long Term Care, 10 a.m. till noon, Calhoun County Public Library
* Rotary Club, noon, Calhoun-Liberty Hospital
* Weight Loss Support Group, 1:30 p.m., Shelton Park Library
* AA, 7 p.m., Calhoun County Old Ag Bldg. east door, in front of jail


TODAY'S MEETINGS
* Altha Area Recreation Committee, 6 p.m., Altha City Hall
* Magnolia VFD, 6 p.m., Fire House
*Nettle Ridge FD, 7p.m., Fire House
* Mossy Pond VFD, 7 p.m., Fire House
* AA, 7 p.m., basement of Calhoun County Courthouse


EVENTS
Dance, 6 12 p.m., American Legion Hall in Blountstown
TODAY'S MEETINGS
* Autism Support Group, 6 p.m., W.T. Neal Civic Center


BIRTHDAYS
DonaldfMears & 'Mose Maynor
EVENTS
| Dance, 6 12 p.m., American Legion Hall in Blountstown


BIRTHDAYS
,Dawnie O'Brian &,' rank Perkins


TODAY'S MEETINGS
* Walk-A-Weigh Program, 9 a.m., Veterans Memorial Park
Civic Center
* Main Street, noon, Calhoun Co. Chamber of Commerce -
* Altha Boy Scouts, 5:30 p.m., Altha Volunteer Fire Depart- .KA:
ment
* The Liberty County Arts Council, 6 p.m., Veterans Me-
morial Park Civic Center
* Ladies Auxiliary, 6 p.m., American Legion Hall in Blount-
stown ,-,
* Sons of American Legion, 6 p.m.; American Legion Post
272, 7 p.m., American Legion Hall in Blountstown
* Bristol City Council, 6:30 p.m., City Hall


TODAY'S MEETINGS
* Mossy Pond VFD Auxilary, 12:30 p.m., Fire House
* Calhoun County Commission, 2 p.m., Calhoun Co. Court-
house
* Dixie 109 Masonic Lodge, 7 p.m., Masonic Lodge, Blount-
stown
Liberty County Chamber of Com-
merce, 7 p.m., Apalachee Restau-
rant
Brownie Troop 158, 7-8:30 p.m.,
Veterans Memorial Park Civic

JROTC Booster Club, 7 p.m.,
Liberty County High School
Boy Scout Troop 206, 7 p.m.,
Veterans Memorial Park Civic Cen-
ter
Liberty County Commission,
7 p.m., courtroom


Scholarship recipients

to meet on Jan. 7 & 8
All W.T. Neal Trust Scholarship Re-
cipients are advised that Joseph P. Davis
will be available to meet with you on ei-
ther Monday, Jan. 7 or Tuesday, Jan. 8, to
obtain a copy of your Fall Semester 2007
grade report.
You may come at your convenience as
per the following schedule:
*Monday, Jan. 7, Conference Room,
W.T. Neal Civic Center, 1:30 6 p.m. or
*Tuesday, Jan. 8, Confererice Room,
W.T. Neal Civic Center, 10 a.m. 5 p.m.
This is one of the two required meet-
ings that you must attend during the year.
Please bring your Fall Semester grade re-
port. (Do not mail it to the office.)
This meeting will require approxi-
imately 10-15 minutes of your time.
Failure to present grade reports could
result in the loss of your scholarship
award.

Class of '08 to sell-
dinners on Jan. 11
Grilled chicken dinners will be sold
Friday, Jan. 11 from 10:30 a.m. to 12:30
p.m. at the- comer of Hwy. 71 and Hwy.
20 in Blountstown.
Dinners will be cooked by Chief Glenn
Kimbrel of the Blountstown Police De-
partment and dinners will include: grilled
chicken quarter, beans, coleslaw, roll, and
cake.
Dinners will be sold for $6 a plate and
all proceeds will go to the Blountstown
High School Class of 2008 Project Grad-
uation.
Pre-orders will be taken. To place your
order call 674-3613 or fax to 674-8933.
Deliveries will be made on request. for 5
or more orders.


'Snow Queen' to be

performed in Bristol
The Killearn Performing Arts and Tal-
lahassee Irish Step Dancers will be at
Veterans Memorial Park Civic Center on
Saturday, Jan. 5 at 7 p.m. for one perfor-
mance of The Snow Queen.
Kate Ballone, one of the principle
dancers took her training from the fa-
mous Irish dance troupe 'Riverdance' in
New York.
This is a wonderful story by Hans
Christian Anderson for young and old
and is set to Irish music and dance. Come
for a great evening and a first class show.
Further information please contact
Babs Moran 643-5491 or Gloria Keenan
643-5235





That's how many copies of
The Calhoun-Liberty Journal
were distributed last week,
ensuring plenty of coverage for
your community announcements
and great response for our
business advertisers!








JANUARY 2, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 5


PUBLIC NOTICE


Liberty County School is proposing the following new
policies:
2.91 Implementation of Wellness Policy
2.92 Implementation of Domestic/Emergency plan
2.93 Automated External Defibrillators (AED)
2.94 Comparability in Expend-
ing Federal Chapter 1 Funds
Liberty County School is proposing changes to the fol-
lowing policies:
1.10 District Philosophy
2.11 Orientation of Board Members
2.20 Responsibilities and Authority of Board
2.22 Board Meetings
2.23 School Board Rules
2.25 School Board Adopted Plans
2.26 School Improvement and Education Accountability
2.28 Schedule for Legal Advertisements
2.30 District Advisory Council
2.50 Participation in Activities
2.60 Program of Awards
2.70 Prohibition of Harassment
2.80 Unlawful Discrimination Prohibited
2.90 Tobacco Use in District Facilities


County Administrative Offices, Hwy. 12 South, Bristol, FL 32321 at 6:30
p.m. A copy of the policies is available at the Superintendent's Office.




GRAND OPENING!
I SATURDAY JAN. 5
8 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Prize given to the 50th
person to sign up on Jan. 5!
Refreshments will be served.

Let 180 Fitness help

you look great in 2008!
Inquire about 6 & 12 month contracts,
personal training packages (individual
or group session) and family member-
ship packages.
Fitness testing starting in the new
year.
Memberships starting at $30 a
month!
NOW SIGNING UP MEMBERS!
Call (850) 643-2144 or stop by.

HOURS:
f Mon., Tues.,
Thurs., & Fri.:
5:30 a.m. -
8:00 p.m.
Wed.: 5:30
a.m. to
6:00 p.m.
Sat.: 8:00 a.m.
to 1:00 p.m.

Derek Causseaux is a personal trainer with seven
years experience, having worked at the FSU Gym for
over two years and served as Fitness Director for three
years with Tallahassee Orthopedic Sports Physical Ther-
apy. He'll be glad to help you formulate the program you
need to achieve your fitness potential.


Next to Myrlene's at 10667 NW SR 20 in Bristol


Visitor Bob Melansonj, along with Sarah Parrish, Marilyn Russell, James Edwards, Estelle Jones,
Lottie Barton, Nancy Marks and Beverly Freeland of CalCo Travel are shown above. The organization
has been named the Calhoun County Chamber of Commerce Business of the Month.


I


by Marti Vickery, Executive Director
CHAMBER MEMBER BUSINESS
OF THE MONTH- Our Jan. 2008
Member Business of the Month: CalCo
Travel Director, Marilyn Russell Cal-
houn County Senior Association Visit
CalCo Travel online at: www.calhoun-
countyseniors.org. Learn more about our
chamber member benefits at: www.cal-
hounco.org.
2008 CALHOUN LIBERTY PLAT
BOOKS Yes, they are available and
ready for you to purchase for just $42.80
including tax. Stop by the Calhoun
County Chamber offices in Blountstown
or the Calhoun Liberty Journal in Bristol
to purchase your 2008 Calhoun Liberty
Plat books. The Calhoun County Cham-
ber is located at 20816 Central Ave East
Suite 2 in Blountstown.
CALHOUN COUNTY CHAMBER
BOARD OF DIRECTORS Our Jan.
board meeting is set for Tuesday, Jan. 8.
We will be working towards finalizing
the banquet details, and taking care of
additional business. Directors, please let
us laknow that you plan to attend.
MEMBERSHIP MEETING COM-
ING UP- Mark your new 2008 calen-
dar for Tuesday, Jan. 15. The Calhoun Sammy Tedder will perform at this year's Calhoun Chain-
County Chamber membership will be ber banquet in February.
meeting at the Calhoun County Senior Center in Blountstown. A barbecue lunch will be served at noon
(CT) for just $7 including beverage and dessert! Call 674-4519 to reserve your seats or send an email to
chamber@calhounco.org.
SAVE THIS DATE! Thursday, Feb. 28 The Calhoun County Chamber of Commerce Annual
Banquet will be held at the W. T. Neal Civic Center with music provided by Sammy Tedder, an excellent
buffet meal, special awards and door prizes throughout the evening. Our evening will be highlighted by
a dynamic speaker, State Representative Marti Coley. Tickets will be available to purchase soon.


Dendy represents Calhoun Library at

Florida Literacy Ambassador Training
ALTheresa Dendy represented Calhoun County
at the Florida Literacy Ambassador Training in
Crystal River in November 2007. The Florida
Literacy Ambassador Training was a state-
wide event sponsored by the Florida Literacy
Coalition and AmeriCorp*VISTA. Ms. Dendy
made an excellent presentation to a packed
audience of adult literacy administrators, VISTA
Members, and literacy volunteers. She received
a Certificate for successful completion of the
training. She is an enthusiastic spokesperson
for the Calhoun County Public Library's Family
Literacy program. Dendy serves on the Literacy
Board and recruits adult students wanting to
obtain their GED or receive reading, writing, or
math help. Lavaine Williams and Helen Gavin
(not pictured) also attended the conference. If
you or someone you know wants to improve
reading skills or work toward a GED please
call Ms. Williams or Ms. Gavin at 674-5200 for
..information. CALHOUN LIBRARY PHOTO









Page 6 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JANUARY 2,2008


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The legacy of King George?


After kicking dirt on just
about everybody's boots for the
past seven years, Mr. Bush is
now attempting to whitewash
the tortured remnants of his
presidency. If he has his way, he
will pull the brim of his good-
guy white Stetson hat low 'over
his beady eyes and ride off into
the purple sunset on his white
horse.just as celluloid cowboys
do in the movies.
In my opinion, history will
not treat Mr. Bush kindly. That
is if historians can actually find
out what Bush did and thought
while in office. Bush and Vice
President Cheney have classi-
fied or destroyed much of the
paper trail that comes from a
presidency. There are thou-
sands of missing e-mails.
I think that the calendar is
the only thing that these two
haven't classified as secret
and vital to national security.
Historians might start writing
the Bush legacy by reviewing
all the signings that he has at-
tached to bills and laws passed
by Congress. In his signings,
Bush states that he will not
follow the law if he disagrees
with it. King George appar-
ently. considers himself above
the law. In fairness, other presi-
dents have attached signings to
laws passed by Congress, but
am I the only person that thinks
signings are a violation of the
Constitution. Presidential sign-
ings neuter Congress and make
a sham out of the constitutional


/ c
COX'S

CORNER
Jerry Cox is a retired military
officer and writer with an extensive
background in domestic and
foreign policy issues. He lives in
Walton County.

concept of checks and balances
between the three branches of
government.
With the end of his presiden-
cy looming, Bush has apparent-
ly experienced another epipha-
ny returning to his Republican
roots of fiscal conservatism.
Other Bush epiphanies include
God telling him that he should
attack Iraq. After his awakening,
he now wields his veto pen to
prevent what he considers to be
Congresses' wasteful spending.
Congresses' wasteful spend-
ing is on children's health care
and other domestic programs
that benefit some are all seg-
ments of American society. I
don't think that congressional
earmarks are OK, but the prob-
lem with congressional ear-
marks is the American people.
If their congressman or senator
doesn't bring home the bacon
then they vote him or her out of
office.
Prior to departing for the
Christmas holidays, Congress
passed a defense policy bill
that provided funding for a pay
raise for the military and fund-
ing for the Wounded Warrior


Act ernment which might delay
Baghdad's efforts to rebuild the
country.
The Congress voted to give
the troops a 3.5 percent increase
in pay. The. Bushies proposed
a 3.0 percent pay raise for the
troops and argued against the
extra 0.5 percent. All of this
from an administration that is
blowing $12 billion per month
on Bush's Iraq folly and which
is wasting billions in Iraq and
Pakistan and who will continue
to waste billions. Bush is wor-
ried about those hated lawyers
suing the Iraqi government,
whomever and whatever that
is, on the behalf of people who
were the victims of atrocities
committed by Saddam Hus-
sein or the current Iraqi govern-
ment.
Soldiers captured by the
Iraqis in the 1990 Gulf War
sued Iraq and won a judgment
of $959 million. Good for them,
but after the 2003 invasion of
Iraq, Congress passed a law and
Bush issued a decree, stating
that Iraq was exempt from such
lawsuits. Based on this law and
Bush's decree, the Bushes chal-
lenged the $959 million court
ruling and had it overturned.
So, thanks to Bush, the troops
captured in the Gulf War got zip
compensation for serving their
country under the most difficult
circumstances. Bush taking care
of the troops. What a joke.
Bush's legacy? Decide for
yourself. I've already decided.


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Page8 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JANUARY 2, 2008


The family of Lessie Deason
Revell would like to express
our gratitude for the outpouring
of love and support shown to us
during our time of loss.
The cards, telephone calls,
food, flowers and memorials that
were received and the thoughts
and prayers that were expressed
gave our entire family comfort.
A very special thank you to
the staff at Big Bend Hospice
and her special caregivers,
Veresta "Pokey" Grant, A.D.
McNew and Louise Tipton for
the excellent care they provided
for our loved one. We appreciate
the wonderful church service in


-I


NEWS

FROM THE












-Guest Speakers
BRISTOL CHURCH OF
GOD The Bristol Church of
God will host special evangelis-
tic services on Sunday, Jan. 6-9
with Evangelist Rev. Mike Car-
son. The Sunday services begin
at 11 a.m. and 6 p.m.. and the
Monday Wednesday services
begin at 7 p.m.
Everyone is invited to come
for an exciting time of praise
and worship and preaching of
the Word of God.
The church is located at 19102
S.R. 12 North. Call the church
office at 643-5795 for more in-
formation.
Fellowship & Events
CORINTH BAPTIST
CHURCH Friday, Jan. 4,
starts Corinth Baptist Church's


remembrance of her, along with
the beautiful music provided by
Ken and Georgia Ann Hosford
and Yvonne Watson. Many
thanks to Marlon and Debbie
Peavy and staff for their efforts
in making the planning process
and the services a little easier.
Words truly are incapable
of expressing our appreciation.
May God bless you.
from the families of
Carroll and Jean Revell &
Hoyle and Mary Joiner


movie nights for the year 2008.
We will continue with the third
movie in the Love Comes Softly
series, Love's Enduring Hope.
Our movie night starts at 7 p.m.,
with refreshments and fellowship
with the movie starting around
7:30. Please make plans to join us.
Parents must accompany children.
Thank you.
Please call 379-3246 for more
information.
Food Ministries
BRISTOL CHURCH OF
GOD The Bristol Church
of God will have Food Boxes
available to families in need on
Saturday, Jan. 5 at 3 p.m. at the
church. These Food Boxes are
being made available through
the assistance of Seed Sowers
Evangelistic Association, Op-
eration Compassion and the
Bristol Church of God to help
families in Liberty County.
One box per Liberty County
family, please, until they are
gone. For info., call 643-5795.
Prayer Meetings
PRAYER BAND The Lib-
erty. Community Prayer Band
will hold prayer service Thurs-
day, Jan. 3 at 7:30 p.m. (ET) at
the home of Brother and Sister
James Lane.
Everyone is cordially invited
to attend. For more information,
call 643-5958.


Get quality business insurance
at a competitive price.
Call me today.
(850) 526-2799


Jon Johnson LUTCF, CLTC
2867 CALEDONIA ST
MARIANNA
RUSTYJOHNSON@allstate.com


Allstate.
You're in good hands.


nsurance subject to availability and qualifications, Alsate insurance Companyand Alstate Property and Casualty
Insurance Company. Northbrook, Illinois 2005 Allistate insurance Company.


us to enjoy. So many people
of our community, along with
others, came together to help
our family through this difficult
time. There are so many people
to thank, and we do thank you
with all our heart!.
May God bless you all!
The Garners

The Hosford Eighth Grade
wishes to express their thanks
to all those who contributed
to our chicken pilau fundrais-
er that took place on Nov. 30.
Thank you to Piggly Wiggly
for the chickens, Crystal River
Restaurant for the green beans,
L.B. Arnold, Doobie Hayes,
and Robert Hill for cooking and
of course, everyone who pur-
chased a plate or donated time or
money to make the fundraiser a
success. We'd also like to thank


-~ .IJ


We're your one-stop


TIRE SHOP!


-I


"Volkswagens to semi's, we handle them all"


CITY TIRE Co.
Hwy. 20 West Blountstown 674-8784


The Garner Family would
like to thank all the kind people
of the community who have
lent their support and concern
during our family's time of
need. For those who may not
know, our home was lost to fire
on Dec. 18. And the outpouring
of concern and support from the
community was nothing short
of amazing. The Liberty County
Fire Department's response
to the fire was absolutely
amazing also. They are truly a
wonderful group of people. Our
church family at Bristol United
Methodist Church showed
us all an enormous amount
of support. They have been a
place of faithful kindness for
our family to turn. The Piggly
Wiggly generously donated a
beautiful Christmas tree for


The Medical Center

OF BLOUNTSTOWN



Dr. Iqbal A. Faruqui, MD

Arlena Falcon, ARNP

Dorcas Goodman, ARNP
We accept walk-ins and call-ins, when possible.

WE ARE ACCEPTING NEW PATIENTS
Comprehensive Adult & Elderly Care Women's Health Care including
Family Planning Well Child Check, Childhood Diseases
Physicals for DOT, Employment, School & Others Pulmonary Function
Tests, EKG, Blood Work, Allergy Injections & Preventative Care
Screening for Cancers & Alzheimer's Disease and Diabetes

We take most health insurances: Now PPO Providers for Cigna
& United Healthcare, Vista, BCBS, Medicare and Medicaid.
FREE BREAST AND CERVICAL CANCER SCREENING FOR ELIGIBLE PERSONS.
Office Hours: Mon. Fri., 8 a.m. -12:30 p.m. and 2 p.m. 5 p.m.


-1-1IV


Roger Reddick for building and
donating a beautiful gun cabinet
that was raffled off on Dec 17.
Congratulations goes to Dawn
Reisoglu who won the cabinet
and Buck Alford who won the
Walmart Gift Card. Thanks to
everyone who has supported
the Hosford Eighth Grade this
year. *
Hosford Eighth Grade Class





TREASURES I
by Ryan McDougald
REDEEM THE TIME
Text: Ephesians 5:15 & 16
According to R. Dunkerly, in
1269, Kublia Khan, the ruler of the
Mongolian empire, sent a request
from Peking to Rome for "a hundred
wise men of the Christian religion...
And so I shall be baptized, and when
I shall be baptized all my barons and
great men will be baptized, and their
subjects baptized, and so there will be
more Christians here than there are in
your parts."
The Mongols were searching and
seeking for the true religion. There
was a tremendous opportunity for the
greatest mass religious movement the
world has ever seen. The history of all
Asia would have been changed.
But what actually happened is
disappointing indeed. Pope Gregory
X answered by sending two Domini-
can friars. They traveled as far as
Armenia, and because the way was
difficult, became discourage d re-
turned home. "So passed the greatest
missionary opportunity in the history
of the church."
Paul admonishes us, "Be very
careful, then, how you live not as
unwise but as wise, making the most
of every opportunity, because the
days are evil (NIV)." Time is the most
precious commodity that we have.
We only have 75 to 100 years to live
on this earth and prepare for eternity.
We must redeem the time. We rescue
our time from waste. We must make
the most of every opportunity that we
have to serve Christ.
We must busy ourselves with
Kingdom work. We must lay up our
treasures in Heaven. We must commit
ourselves to following Christ and lov-
ing Him with all of our hearts, mind,
soul and strength. Don't waste the
precious time you have here on this
earth in sin and rebellion against God.
Be wise and redeem the time.







JANUARY 2,2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 9


SERVING
PERSONS
WITH
EPILEPSY


United Way


s.of the Big Bend
. of the Big Bend ]


* Community Education
* Diagnosis and Treatment
* Case Management .
* Support Groups HEALTHJ


1215 Lee Ave., Suite M4 Tallahassee, FL 32303
TELEPHONE (850) 222-1777


0g4


OLD VPARMB 'S


AL


AXAC


o


- es S
S -


Dec. 31-Jan. 6

DECEMBER 31 old Farmer's
Last Quarter Moon Almanac



JANUARY .
Epiphany


2008


JANUARY 2,3
Best days to can or
pickle

JANUARY S
Best day to
end projects


et us celebrate our New Year first person
with a cross- cultural nod to over the thresh-
other traditions. For example, we old brings a ,
could benefit from the Chinese cus- small gift for
tom of starting the new year free of the household's
debt. The African-American good fortune.
Kwanzaa toast of "Harambee" And remem-
says, "Let's all pull. together." In her, what you
Scotland, the year starts with the do on January 1, t
ritual of first-footing, where the you will do often.


2 tablespoons olive oil
4 chicken breasts, cut
Into 1-inch pieces
I yellow onion, diced
2 cups water, divided
2 tablespoons peanut
butter
1 large tomato, diced
I teaspoon red chile
pepper (optional)


rleat the oil in a saucepan and brown the chicken.
| lRemove and set chicken aside. Saut6 the
onions until translucent. Combine 1/2 cup of the wa-
ter with the peanut butter and mix until
smooth. Add to the saucepan along
with the chicken and remaining in-
gredients. Bring to a boil, then lower
heat and simmer for 15 minutes.
13 MAKES 4 SERVINGS.

WIT AND WISDOM FROM THE OLD FARMER'S ALMANAC
0 If birds begin to whistle in January, fosts to come.
* It is unlucky to change the name of a ship.
* On January 3, 1987, Aretha Franklin was
inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.


FOR RECIPES, GARDENING TIPS, AND WEATHER FORECASTS, VISIT:
Almanac.com


--.dm. -


= -


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"Copyrighted Material : -


Syndicated Content


. .- -.


Available from Commercial News Providers"


-


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- 'a
-
-. -
*0 *
-'a - -


-~ -'a -


NUTCRACKER
2007


THE BRISTOL BALLET SCHOOL



SA 0/08/08 J, K9643-a 6 9808


q.


- Q


g o







Page 10 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JANUARY 2, 2008


Schmarje, Hall plan May wedding
Mr. and Mrs. Jeffrey Schmarje of Bristol are
pleased to announce the engagement of their daugh-
ter Jerica Lynell Sclunarje to Andrew Sydney Hall
Jr. of Malone.
Jerica graduated from Liberty County High School
in 2002. She earned her AA degree at Chipola Col-
lege and now attending school at Flagler College in
Tallahassee where she is also employed with the De-
partment of Revenue.
Andrew is the son of Andy and Laura Hall of
Marianna and Robin and Floy-d Hinson of Worcester,
NY. Andrew graduated from Malone High School in
1999. He is now employed with Naborhood Build-
ing Products in Tallahassee as manager.
The couple is looking forward to their wedding
day on May 10, 2008 in Bristol at Torreya State Park
followed by a reception at Veterans Memorial Park
Civic Center.





Liberty Co. resident becomes published author
Former resident Angela Long, formerly
known as Angela Pullam has recently be-
came a published author for children's books.
Her first book is titled Beyond The Rainbow.:
The Land Where Imaginary and Enchanted
Friends Come to Life.
She will be giving author visits to all the
elementary schools in Bay County and here
in Liberty County as well. After each visit,
she will set up in the school library to sign
copies of her book for the students. Anyone
who wishes to contact Angela can email her
at tlpanamacity@aol.com. She looks forward
to hearing from you and. she is very excited
about her writing career.


Levi Brannan gets first deer
Levi Brannan, age 9, killed his first deer Dec. 21 while hunting
with his daddy. While sitting in a tree-stand, Levi had the op-
portunity to choose from several deer in the patch. After mak-
ing his decision, he killed the 145 lb. doe with one shot. He is
the son of Greg and Laurie Brandon of Bristol.


Tucker
kills 11
point
Buddy Tuck-
er of Glory
Hill in Cal-
houn Coun-
ty killed an
11-point
buck on Jim
Durham
Road on
Dec. 26.


BRAYDEN LANE
RICHTER
Brayden Lane Richter will
celebrate his third birthday
on Jan. 6. He is the son of
Michael and Heather Rich-
ter of Bristol. His proud
grandparents include Robin
Dougherty of Bristol, Tim
and Judy Dougherty of Tal-
lahassee, Larry and Deb-
bie Brown of Hosford and
Thermon_ and Pam Richter
of Hosford. Brayden enjoys
playing outside on his John
Deere tractor, hunting with
his daddy, helping mommy
with his baby sister, and al-
ways looks forward to visits
from Aunt Monica and Uncle
Paul.


ANGELINA NOELE
SKIPPER
Angelina Noele Skipper cel-
ebrated her third birthday on
Dec. 29. She is the daughter
of David and Kim Buchan-
an Skipper of Boydton, VA.
Her grandparents are Annie
Buchanan of Tallahassee,
Clyde Buchanan of Grand
Ridge and Terry Skipper and
the late Tony Skipper of Vir-
ginia Beach, VA. She is pic-
tured with her big sister, Isa-
bella Skipper.


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Toll Free: 1-888-740-8222


Looking for a way
to get your

MESSAGE

ACROSS?












It's easy...when
you place
your ads and
announcements in
THE

Calhoun

Liberty

JOURNAL


For information,
call 643-3333 or
1 (800) 717-3333.








JANUARY 2,2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 11


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Contact Bill Stoutamire
Phone 674-5974 Fax 674-8307


To the editor:
When considering the recent
surge in foreclosures in the US,
the winter storms in the NE and
NW, and the under-reported
job losses due to the decline in
the building industry, there is a
disturbing silence on the issue
of the homeless.
Efforts to understand what's
going on in my world has in-
volved first, looking around
my immediate area here in
Gulf County, which reflects
some of the issues related to
the country as a whole.
New home construction has
drastically declined, resulting
in many job losses. Unem-
ployment rates are touted to be
low. How are people surviving
when there are so few jobs to
be had? This area has also had
many foreclosures. Where are
these people finding shelter
who have no one who can take
them in?
Locally and elsewhere, "Af-
fordable Housing" has gotten a
lot of lip service but little real
results. New homes that are be-
ing built under the guise of Af-
fordable Housing range in price
from $120,000 to $180,000


SPEAK


UP!

WITH A LETTER
TO THE EDITOR

Write: The Cadhoun-
Liberty Journal
P. O. Box 536,
Bristol, FL 32321

per home. Payments on these
homes plus monthly insurance
are at or above $1,000 a month
which is at or above the month-
ly income of many elderly, dis-
abled and poor people. Years
ago we built public housing
for the needy, today these ag-
ing units are being torn down
and are not being replaced.
Have we become so com-
placent and malleable that if
reality is not fed to us on the
"News," we can then dismiss
the suffering of our people?
How soon will it be our time
to suffer? Is it really more
important to be informed for
days on endabout a police


To the editor:
I checked with the Calhoun
County Supervisor of Elec-
tions, Margie Laramore, us-
ing their statistical Web site
(votecalhoun.com). What I
found was a trend that simply
amazed me. You can check it
out too if you visit Margie's
office or visit the Web site. It
seems that over 80% of the
people of Calhoun County
are registered as Democrats. I
know that the local candidates
run as Democrats because their
daddies and granddaddies did.
Almost every local candidate
runs as a Democrat..
The other trend I found was
that in most state and national
elections, Calhoun County
(and Liberty too) vote major-
ity Republican. If over 80% of
Calhoun Countians are regis-
tered as Democrats but don't
vote Democrat, then there are
a whole lot of Republicans out
there dressed in Democratic
clothing.
With the exceptions of state
SenatorAl Lawson, US Repre-
sentative Allen Boyd, and US
Senator Bill Nelson, Calhoun
County has voted Republican.
I think these Democrats car-
ried Calhoun County because
they are moderate to conser-
vative and don't follow the
Democratic Party's platform.
I think there are VIABLE
Republican candidates out
there who could run as lo-
cal candidates and win with-
a comfortable margin. The


main thing to emphasize is
VIABLE. Some one who has
the age, wisdom, knowledge,
and common sense to run as
a local Republican candidate.
There's got to be a Republican
candidate who fits these con-
ditions. Otherwise Calhoun
County will never have a two-
party election in place to offer
the people a choice in an elec-
tion in Calhoun County.
By the way, I'm a registered
Democrat and vote party line.
If this letter gives you pause,
think about the party you're
registered as, and you may
decide to switch your regis-
tration. Think about it!
Bobby M. Mears
Blountstown


Christmas 'cease fire' appreciated
To the editor:
Santa, Jesus, and I thank Eric Johnson of Bristol very much for
his "Cease Fire on Christmas" message.
It ought to gag us, not be met by joy and gladness, that a conser-
vative (Jerry Cox) and an ultra conservative (Oliver North) think
Christmas is about war and troops. And Gary Marks thinks peace
via a gun ought to offend us and like Prince of Peace Jesus.
Eric, you are my kind of kind Johnson neighbor. Spread your
faith and yule and joy all year.
Howard Wesley Johnson, Blountstown

Animals should never be declawed


To the editor:
A declawed Angora cat was
left at the Lynn Haven Animal
Shelter and displayed on T.V.
It seemed to be just a discarded
living room couch decoration.
Declawing a cat is "cruelty
to an animal" because it is de-


liberately inflicting serious in-
juries that handicap the cat for
the rest of its life.
A cat needs claws to scratch,
grab, climb, defend itself, or
capture something to eat if it
becomes homeless.
Leonard Maio, Altha


officer who was married sev-
eral times and now has a wife
missing?
Past studies have shown that
a good portion of the homeless
are our people who have been
sent to fight in wars that the
majority of us opposed. There
are thousands of homeless who
are children. How many have
died this winter huddled in
cardboard boxes or in unheat-
ed cars? I want to know.
I also want to know how
many people have died in
the past year from the lack
of needed medicines, how
many from contamination in
their environment. How many
stumble around legally blind
because they can't afford a pair
of glasses?
Don't tell me about five peo-
ple who died across the ocean
in a freak accident. I want to
know what is happening to
America and its people. Why
are we informed of rampant
corruption in every branch of
local state and federal govern-
ment while nothing is being
done about it?
Only 60 years ago, if a per-
son worked hard they were
able to afford a home, a car, to
eat pretty good and be able to
raise a family. Today, a large
segment of the population who
work hard are unable to afford
their basic needs. Justice itself
amounts to how much you can
afford.
Sixty years ago, if you saw
a homeless person, hobo, more
than likely that person was lazy
or had mental or emotional
problems or just liked the life-
style. Today, the ills of Ameri-
ca have changed the identity of
the homeless and added greatly
to their numbers. These ills
have infected our freedom and
democracy.
America's recovery depends
on "Truth" and our ability
to seek it out then to honor it
and be willing to stand by it at
whatever cost.
Marilyn Blackwell,
Wewahitchka


Most of us in this area register

Democrat but vote Republican









Page 12 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JANUARY 2, 2008


Covenant Hospice honors James 'Bouldie' Dillard


by Jennifer Griffin,
COVENANT HOSPICE
You can visit the Calhoun
County Library, Calhoun
County Court House and Sam
Atkins Park and recognize this
man's name. He has served as
a monumental influence in Cal-
houn County for many years.
James Dillard is better known
to most of you as Bouldie. He
has been in Calhoun County
for the better part of his life.
He was born July 12, 1925. He
stayed in Altha until he joined
the Navy in1942 until 1946.
I asked him how long he was
in the Navy, and he replied
"Three years, nine months
and 20 days." He served his
term aboard the USS Frank-
lin D. Roosevelt in the Atlan-
tic Ocean. Mr. Dillard recalls
good times and sad times. He
wouldn't take anything for his
time in the Navy. The Navy al-
lowed him to experience things
he would not have been able to
otherwise. He told me, "The
Navy made a man out of me."
Bouldie came home to Al-
tha in 1946. The first thing he
did was buy a Harley Davidson
motorcycle. He cruised around
town in style. In fact he cruised
right to Frink High School
where he met the love of his
life Maryell. Mrs. Maryell
said "he sure was a fine looking
sailor." Bouldie and Maryell
Were married Oct. 19, 1946. He
recalls carrying her across the
threshhold of their home the
day they got married. This was
one of the happiest times of his
life. 'They have spent most of
their mrnrried life right here in


Bouldie Dillard and his wife, Maryell, are pictured above. This article was written shortly before
his death on Christmas Day 2007. His complete obituary appears on page 18 of this issue.


Altha. There were a few times
they tried their luck elsewhere,
but they always seemed to find
their way home.
The Dillards kept busy being
self-employed. Together they
owned and operated a filling
station. They recall the price of
,the fuel then... 18 cent per gal-
lon! They had a trucking and
pulpwood business, wholesale
bait, hauled dirt, had a backhoe
and both drove a dump truck. I
am sure many of you recall the
different trades that Bouldie
Dillard had his hand in. Mrs.
Maryell told me, "Bouldie
knew he had to be the boss!"


Sewer Plant Supervisor Charles Sherrod lat-
er told deputies that when he and Brewster left
work at 4 p.m., the Jeep was secured inside a
locked gate. The keys were under a floor mat
in the vehicle. He said Brewster was not autho-
rized to drive a city vehicle because he does not
have a valid license.
According to the report by Deputy William
Dalton, Brewster used a key that was on a ring
with the Jeep key to unlock the gate and drive
out with the vehicle.
Brewster had been in the Calhoun County
Work Camp before being released 37 days ear-
lier. His past convictions include grand theft of
a firearm, burglary of a residence by forced en-
try, DUI and causing serious bodily injury. His
arrest record stems back to 1978 and includes
offenses in four counties Hillsborough, Cit-
rus, Dixie and Jackson.
Blountstown City Manager James Woods
said Brewster had been hired as a temporary la-
borer whose performance was to be reviewed at
the end of 90 days to determine if he would be
kept on.
He said during Brewster's time working with
the city on the prison work crew prior to his
'November release, "he presented himself as an


In 1959 the Lord blessed
them with their daughter An-
gel. She was a blessing that
they had been looking for. Mr.
Bouldie calls her his "Miss
Priss". Both Mr. Bouldie and
Mrs. Maryell both said Angel
was such a good child. She
brought them an exceptional
joy they had been longing for.
Angel has blessed them with
two wonderful grandchildren
- Stephen and Marsha. Mar-
sha now has a little girl, Ju-
lia. As I was visiting with Mr.
Bouldie, all he could talk about
was getting to see his Ladybug.
He was talking about Julia. He


exemplary squad member," according to Woods.
"His C.O.'s had spoken very highly of him. Be-
cause he was mechanical, his supervisor thought
he might have some skills that would be ben-
eficial to this operation," he said. Before hiring
him on, Sherrod talked to prison officials who
said he had never been a security or behavioral
problem.
"When we put him out in the field, I advised
supervisors that he was not to work alone until
we had some level of comfort with him," Woods
said. "He did a fairly good job for us in help-
ing with the renovation of the bathrooms at City
Hall to make them handicapped accessible," he
said.
During his time working with the city, Woods
said Brewster "was very respectful and seemed
like he was appreciative of the opportunity."
Woods noted that there have been other for-
mer, inmates who have worked for the city with-
out problem. "Here was a situation of'someone
who appeared genuine in wanting to change his
life. We were in a position to offer him a hand
as he came out of the system, which would have
helped him reenter society. Unfortunately, this
time it didn't work."


said she was a little Angel. He
talks to her on the phone, and
in her six-month-old babble he
is sure she says "I Love You."
He has planned a birthday party
for little Julia.
In 1966 Mr. Bouldie was
appointed by the Governor to
the seat of Calhoun County
Commissioner. After complet-
ing that term he ran unopposed
and ended up serving Calhoun
County for 16 years as a Coun-
ty Commissioner. During his
time as County Commissioner
he recalls some of his greatest
personal accomplishments. He
was very proud of his involve-


ment in the Calhoun County
Library. He named the names
of the people who helped bring
Calhoun County their own li-
brary. He remembered like it
was yesterday. Also, while he
was on the Board of County
Commissioners he remembers
making the motion to allow
the County to vote on the new
courthouse. He is very proud of
his community and the involve-
ment he had in helping make it
a better place. His legacy and
commitment will live far be-
yond his life.
Mr. James "Bouldie" Dillard
has .been diagnosed with Oat
Cell Lung Cancer. He recently
has become a Covenant Hos-
pice patient. He tells everyone
who comes to visit with him
about the exceptional care he
and his family have received
from Covenant Hospice. April
Kent, RN is his nurse and Ta-
mara Hudson, -BSW is his so-
cial worker. Together they. are
,part of a much larger team that
supports the Dillard Family.
Brother Jackie Howell, Chap-
lain, often :visits with him as
well offering him prayer and
comfort. Mr. Bouldie is con-
fident that he is receiving the
best quality care he can find.
Together at Covenant Hospice
we want to offer our patients the
best quality of life we can. We
want them to comfortable and
have confidence that they and
their family are being taken care
of Ifyou know someone that can
benefit from Covenant Hospice
please feel free to contact us at
(850) 482-8520 or www.cov-
enanthospice.org.


The new


2008 PLAT



BOOKS


ARE NOW IN!


Cost: $4280
(includes tax)

The 2008 Calhoun-Liberty Plat directories are
now available at The Calhoun-Liberty Journal
office in Bristol at the Calhoun Chamber
Office in Blountstown.


DIRECTIONS TO THE JOURNAL: From State
Road 20 in Bristol,.turn south on Pea Ridge Road,
go one mile, turn east onto Summers Road and
go to the second building on the left.

JOURNAL OFFICE HOURS:
9 A.M -.6 P.M., MONDAY FRIDAY
AND 9 A.M.- 1 P.M. SATURDAY.


DUI ARREST continued from page 1






JANUARY 2, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 13


Hosf rd wellewes the New Year with


A NIGHT'


OF WRESTLING


There was plenty of raw action, drama
and even a little comedy as ,wrestlers
took to the mat on New Year's Eve at the
Hosford-Telogia Game Room. ABOVE:
Height didn't seem to offer much of an
advantage to the referee at Monday's
Midget Wrestling Match. While the ref
argues with one wrestler, his opponent
sneaks up from behind to make fun of
the taller man. LEFT CENTER: Ap-
parently the hands on approach wasn't


working so this wrestler beat down his
opponent by pinning him under a ladder
that he repeatedly hit with a boat paddle
wrapped in barbed wire. BELOW CEN-
TER: A young fan has a few words with
a wrestler. BELOW RIGHT: This guy
had quite a night as he crawls across
the mat scattered with sharp tacks af-
ter escaping from underneath that metal
ladder.









Page 14 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JANUARY 2, 2008


DEP encourages green resolutions for 2008

Small changes can make a big

difference to the environment


TALLAHASSEE The Florida Depart-
ment of Environmental Protection (DEP)
is encouraging residents to make "green"
resolutions for the New Year. Each week,
a new "green" tip is posted on DEP's Web
site to help Floridians make their homes
and offices more environmentally friend-
ly.
"As the fourth most populous state in the
nation, the people of Florida play a critical
role in preserving our environment," said
DEP Secretary Michael W. Sole. "There
are simple steps that we can all take in our
daily lives to help protect and conserve
Florida's natural resources for future gen-
erations.
Even small things like changing one
incandescent lightbulb to an ENERGY
STAR qualified bulb can have a big
impact," said DEP Secretary Sole. "For
example, if all the households in Florida
changed just one lightbulb to a compact
fluorescent bulb, the combined effort
would save enough energy to light all the
households in Tallahassee for more than
two and a half years."
To help you get started, here are 10 sim-
ple resolutions that will make your 2008
cleaner and "greener":
*TURN OFF YOUR SCREEN SAV-
ER The U.S. Environmental Protection
Agency estimates that using a computer's
"sleep mode" reduces its energy consump-
tion by 60 to 70 percent. A screen saver
that displays moving images causes your
monitor to consume as much electricity as
it does in active use. The best screen saver
is also the best energy saver: turn off your
monitor when you're not using it. Turn-
ing off your computer will decrease the
amount of energy it uses, reduces its me-
chanical stress and prolong its life.
*ELIMINATE PAPER WASTE Did
you know that every year enough paper is
thrown away to make a 12 foot wall from
New York to California? Each ton of paper
recycled saves 17 trees and 7,000 gallons
of water. Recycled paper also saves 60
percent energy in comparison to new pa-
per and generates 95 percent less air pollu-
tion. Since one-fifth of all wood harvested
in the world ends up in paper it just makes
sense to recycle and conserve this valuable
resource.
*Stop junk mail There a variety of
vendors online that you can register with
to reduce the amount of junk mail you get.
Each year, the average American house-
hold receives about 1.5 trees' worth of
junk mail.
*RECYCLE One recycled aluminum
can saves enough energy to power a televi-
sion or computer for 3 hours or a 100-watt
light bulb for 20 hours. A six-pack of recy-
cled aluminum cans saves enough energy
to drive a car five miles.
*PURCHASE REUSABLE SHOP-
PING BAGS According to the U.S. En-
vironmental Protection Agency, the U.S.
consumes about 380 billion plastic bags,
sacks and wraps a year. Fewer than five
percent are recycled. However, paper bags
are also a problem. Paper sacks gener-
ate 70 percent more air pollutants and 50
times more water pollutants than plastic
bags. And while paper bags do eventually
biodegrade, an estimated 14 million trees
a year have to be cut down to make 10
billion paper bags. A sturdy, reusable bag
needs only to be used 11 times to have a
lower environmental impact than using 11
disposable plastic bags.
*SLASH THE PACKAGING Buy-


ing food and other products in reusable or
recyclable packaging can reduce carbon
dioxide (C02) emissions by 230 pounds a
year. Recycling all of your home's waste
newsprint, cardboard, glass and metal can
reduce emissions an additional 850 pounds
a year and approximately 410 pounds of
garbage from entering a landfill.
*USE "GREEN CLEANERS" Ameri-
cans generate 1.6 million tons of waste
each year from common cleaning products
with potentially hazardous ingredients.
Purchase green cleaners or make your
own. Here are some sample recipes for
simple, effective cleaners:
*Drain cleaner: Pour a half-cup of bak-
ing soda down the sink and add at least a
cup of vinegar. Cover the drain and wait a
few minutes, then rinse with a mixture of
boiling water and salt.
*Window cleaner: Mix two ounces of
vinegar with a quart of water in a spray
bottle.
*Silver polish: Put a sheet of aluminum
foil into a plastic or glass bowl. Sprinkle
the foil with salt and baking soda and fill
the bowl with warm water. Soak your sil-
ver in the bowl and tarnish migrates to the
foil. Dry and buff.
*Brass cleaner: Cut a lemon in half,
sprinkle it with salt and rub the lemon on
the metal. Buff with a cloth.
*Rust remover: Use vinegar to remove
rust on nuts and bolts and other mineral
deposits such as calcium deposits.
*GET INVOLVED Florida's natural
resources belong to its residents. Voice
your questions, comments and suggestions
regarding the state's environment by con-
tacting DEP's Office of the Ombudsman
and Public Services at (850) 245-2118 or
citizensservices@dep.state.fl.us.

Boyd supports in-

depth energy bill
WASHINGTON, DC Congressman
Allen Boyd (D-North Florida) voted in sup-
port of the Energy Independence and Secu-
rity Act (HR 6), fiscally responsible energy
independence legislation that includes a
meaningful investment in renewable ener-
gy, supports cutting-edge research and de-
velopment, and will help to make our nation
more secure.
HR 6 was passed in the House of Rep-
resentatives with overwhelming bipartisan
support by a vote of 314 to 100 and will
be sent to the President, who is expected to
sign the bill into law later this week.
Key provisions of the Energy Indepen-
dence and Security Act include:
Increasing vehicle fuel efficiency to 35
miles per gallon in 2020-the first congres-
sional increase in 32 years-which will al-
low American families to spend less at the
pump.
Reducing U.S. oil consumption by
more than 4 fiillion barrels per day by
2030-more than twice our daily imports
from the Persian Gulf.
Expanding American-grown biofuels to
36 billion gallons in 2022, which will create
hundreds of thousands of new jobs.
Cutting greenhouse gas emissions by
2030 by 24 percent.
"This legislation puts the tools in the
place so that we, as a nation, can begin to
work together towards energy indepen-
dence," Boyd stated.
"I was proud to support this comprehen-
sive, balanced, and practical approach to
our energy needs."


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JANUARY 2,2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 15


I Spring registration begins Wednesday at Chipola


CHIPOLA SPRING REGISTRATION-Chipola student Kerry
Bryant works in a college science lab.


MARIANNA-Registration
for the 2008 Spring Semester at
Chipola College is Jan. 2 for re-
turning students and Jan. 3 for new
students. Classes begin Jan. 4.
Chipola's open-door policy al-
lows any student with a high school
diploma to enroll after completing
an application and providing high
school or college transcripts.
Chipola offers college credit
courses during the day and eve-
ning, and also online and through
independent study. The college
awards the Associate in Arts (AA)
degree which guarantees accep-


tance to Florida's public universi-
ties. Chipola also offers Bachelor's
degree programs in Business Ad-
ministration and Secondary Edu-
cation and Middle School Educa-
tion with majors in Mathematics
or Science. Chipola also offers
several Associate in Science (AS)
programs, as well as a number of
Workforce Development programs
which provide training for high


wage jobs.
Chipola's University Center
provides opportunities for students
to pursue a number of bachelor's
and graduate degrees from FSU,
UWF and Troy on the Chipola
campus.
For more information, call the
Chipola Registration Office at
718-2211, or visit Chipola at www.
chipola.edu


FWC looking for information on

slaughtered bears in Gulf County
Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission (FWC)
officials are requesting the public's
help in determining who slaugh-
tered two Florida black bears in D O O R S
Gulf County. News from The Florida Fish
FWC received notification and Wildlife Conservation
on Dec. 22 that two bears had
been killed illegally. One was a
195-pound female found on Road
20, and the other was a 125-pound ened in the state.
female found on *Jarrott Daniels The investigation into who com-
Road. Both bears had been shot, mitted these crimes continues, and a
FWC officials said. reward is being offered if the infor-
The roads are located between mation leads to an arrest, according
two private properties that are to FWC officials. Call Wildlife Alert
leased for hunting. Florida banned toll-free at 1-888-404-3922 to report
the hunting of black bears in 1994. any information about this crime.
The bears are now listed as threat- Callers can remain anonymous.


Principal Ronnie Hand proudly announces Altha School's Kids
of Character for the month of November: (front row) Brooks Ann
Mears, Austin Hayslip, (second row) Baileigh O'Neal, Trisha
Barnes, Preston Goff, Corey Kellenberger (back row) Kiana
Richards, Breanna Greenwell, Summer Farris, Autumn Lee,
Blair Hall, Michael Anderson, Breanna Walker, Garrett Lovelace
and C.D. Simons.

I I


Laban Bontrager,








Page 16 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JANUARY 2,2008


What are your top
three New Year's
Resolutions?

1. Accomplish reading, be-
cause I ,like reading very
much; 2. Accomplish math
because I been making bad
grades on my math; 3. Ac-
complish on making my AR
goal because I did not make
it last time. Justice Williams

It is to finish fourth grade,
be an excellent cheerleader
and to be a really fast run-
ner. Brittany Kelley

I want a Xbox 360. I want
to ride a mini motor cycle. I
would like to run 50 miles in
a minute. Cory Chambers

I would like to go to the
Florida State Game, spend
more time with my dad and
mom and the third resolution
is to kill a squirrel with my
pellet gun. Jacob Richerson

I want to accomplish the
next time I play football I
want to get a nose guard po-
sition and get in there and
sack that quarter back. Sec-
ond thing is to accomplish
good grades in school. Third,
is my chores. Ryan Ramer

Make new friends, go to
the mountains and see snow.
Hollie Alhalaseh
Accomplish my math 'grade,
I want McCoy to learn how to
swim and meet fourth grade
AR goal. Courtney Melton

Fish better, get my room
fixed and do better in Sci-
ence. Julianna Pullam

Do better in math, be nice
to others, do better in school
and pay more attention to
Ms. McCoy and not be inter-
ruptive when she is talking.
Jenna Purkey

Soccer, like to lose at least
70 pounds so I can become a


cheerleader, I hope to go to
Disney World. .- Holly Banks


I would like to enter the
4-H riding championship,
first, I would need to learn
to ride a horse, care for him
and also learn to take care
of all the tack, feed him and
water him everyday.
Emilee Hosey

Accomplish my AR goal, my
grades and I also want my
dad (Tony) and my mom. (Lau-
ra White) to build the rest of
my bedroom. Jamie White

I want to experiment on
human photosynthesis. I
want to pass the 4th grade
so I can get school over with.
I want to shoot a 11 point
deer. Colton Capps
I want to kill a 8 point
deer, pass the fourth grade,
and run 100 laps around
town. Travis Sangster

Pull up. my reading grade,
teach my cat Thomas not to
be lazy and tell my kittens
who I am because they al-
ways run from me.


Learn how to h


to go to the 5th
make new friends.


life, you'll need to set goals,
too. Ann Marie Brown

You can aim for your goals
through the years.


They make
better place
make goals.


Why are resolutions
Important?


My resolutions are im-
portant because I want to
achieve myv aoals. I went ton


achieve my AR goa


Mr s r yu on


-Marisha Bess you dont set
won't accomplish ar
in T ,I want C


U l, I/ I. U I1I
grade and

- Nikki Shuler


I want to become a bet-
ter soccer player. I want to
face my fears and go high in
the sky on a bungee jump. I
want to get two 5's on FCAT
again. Ann Marie Brown

To find a new house and
help my mom and stepdad
move in. I would want to
have a horse. I would want to
have good grades in school.
Kaitlin Lynn


They are impo
cause if there
resolutions we w
no goals. I'm glad
resolution so I can
singer or somethin
-1B


- Cory Chambers

the world a
and you can
- Travis Soangster


Resolutions are important
because they help you ac-
complish goals in life. Plus
they can be fun to achieve
and if you keep accomplish-
ing goals that's more thing
you know how to do.
Jacob'Richerson

If you don't have a resolu-
tion you wouldn't have any-
thing to accomplish.
Hollie Alhalaseh

If there were no reso-
lutions we would not have
stuff to look forward to.
Juliana Pullam


al. Resolutions are all of your
Jai W smart goals and all my im-
portant words. Allie O'Brian

goals you They can make us move
nything, forward. Marisha Bess
assidy Shuler

rtant be- Aim to your goal and help
were no yourself, anything is possible
ould have when you aim for it.
I we have Nikki Lee Shuler
become a
become a If you are aiming no
g.rittany Kelley where, that's just where you
rittany Kelley will go. Courtney Melton


You need to set goals and
aim to meet them later in


So people can think of
What they can accomplish.
Colton Capps
It's something that you
want to accomplish when
your young or old.
Lindsey Laramore

They help you plan on
what to do in the future.
Ryan Ramer

They are important be-
cause you can change stuff.
Holly Banks

You have to be able to im-
prove on things we need to
work on. Jenno Purkey

If you're aiming no where,
that's just where you'll go.
Shadrick Daughtrey

They are important to me
because I want to bring my
grades up so I will do bet-
ter. Justice Williams

How will 2008
be different
from 2007?

2008 will be different
from 2007 because in 2008
my dad will build my bed-
room. Jamie White

Derek might be on his mis-
sion. Cassidy Shuler

It will be different be-
cause we get older and we
will be in a higher grade.
Brittany Kelley


See more
NEW YEAR'S


RESOLUTIONS
They help us make it to on page 23
adult hood. Emilee Ann Hosey


Answer

WHAT IS CHIPOLA COLLEGE

B.S. in Business Management (Coming in January 2008)
B.S. in Secondary Education
with Majors in Math and Science
Educator Preparation Institute
(Teacher Certification Program for persons
with bachelor's degrees in non-education fields)
AA, AS and Workforce Development Programs


Registration is January 3
Classes begin January 4 Late Registration through Jan. 11

850-526-2761 www.chipola.edu


Public Notice
All interested parties within Liberty County are
hereby advised that Liberty County Board of County
Commissioners/Liberty County Transit is applying to the
Florida Department of Transportation for a capital grant
under Section 5310 and/or Section 5311 of the Federal
Transit Act of 1991, as amended, for the purchase of
two (2) twelve (12) passenger vans including all safety
equipment for the provision of public transit services
within Liberty County.
A Public Hearing has been scheduled for January
10, 2008, at 3 p.m. at the Douglas Robertson Center,
15629 NW CR 12, Bristol, Florida. (Liberty County Senior
Citizens), for the purpose of advising all interested parties
of service being contemplated if a grant is awarded, and
to ensure that contemplated services would not represent
a duplication of current or proposed services provided by
existing transit or paratransit operators in the area.
This hearing will be conducted if and only if a written
request for the hearing is received by January 10, 2008.
Request for a hearing -must be addressed to Liberty
County Transit, P.O. Box 730, Bristol, FL 32321 and a
copy sent to Florida Department of Transportation, District
#3, P.O. Box 607, Chipley, Florida, 32428.
^ A










JANUARY 2, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 17


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, JUVENILE
DIVISION FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR BAY COUNTY,
FLORIDA

CASE NO.: 2005-DP-0184-A

IN THE INTEREST OF: DIVISION: B
G.R.V.

MINOR CHILD

(SEC. 39.801 (b) FS)

The State of Florida to AURELIO GON-
ZALES SOLIS, legal father whose resi-
dence and address is unknown.

You are hereby notified that a Petition
under oath has been filed in the above
styled Court for the Termination of Pa-
rental Rights in the case of G.R.V., a
minor child to licensed child placement
agency for subsequent adoption.

You are hereby noticed that an Advisory
Hearing will be held before the Honor-
able James B. Fensom, Judge of the
Circuit Court, Fourteenth Judicial Cir-
cuit, at the Bay County Juvenile Justice
Courthouse, 533 E. 11th Street, Panama
City, Florida 32401, on the 28th day of
February, 2008, at the hour of 10:00
a.m., C.S.T.

You have the right to appear with counsel
at this hearing. If you can no afford le-
gal representation the Court will appoint
counsel for you at this hearing upon the
determination of insolvency. You must
either appear on the date and at the time
specified or send a written response to
the Court prior to that time.

YOUR FAILURE TO PERSONALLY AP-
PEAR AT THIS ADVISORY-HEARING
CONSTITUTES CONSENT TO THE
TERMINATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS
OF THIS CHILD. IF YOU FAIL TO AP-
PEAR ON THE DATE AND TIME SPEC-
IFIED, YOU MAY LOSE ALL LEGAL
RIGHTS AS A PARENT TO THE CHILD
OR CHILDREN. 12-swT -9

PEA RIDGE ROAD
PROJECT # 058.082
SCOP PROJECT

NOTICE TO RECEIVE

PUBLIC AUCTION
Bristol 66 Towing and Recovery will
hold a Public Auction on Jan. 14, 2008
at 5 p.m. (ET).
2003 Ford Expedition, black
Vin# 1FMFUI6L13LB68542
Our Auction will be held at Bristol 66
Storage on Hoecake Road off Highway
20 East, one half mile on left, you will see
our sign. Bristol 66 Towing reserves the
right to reject any and all bids.
The Calhoun-Liberty Journal 01-02-08
If you need any more information on the
above vehicle, please call (850) 643-2522
or 228-9555 ask for Dale.


PUBLIC AUCTION
Bristol 66 Towing and Recovery will
hold a Public Auction on Jan. 18, 2008
at 5 p.m. (ET).
2002 Dodge Durango, silver
Vin# 1 B4HS48NX2F151560
Our Auction will be held at Bristol 66
Storage on Hoecake Road off Highway
20 East, one half mile on left, you will see
our sign. Bristol 66 Towing reserves the
right to reject any and all bids.
The Calhoun-Liberty Journal 01-02-08
If you need any more information on the
above vehicle, please call (850) 643-2522
or 228-9555 ask for Dale.


PUBLIC AUCTION
Bristol 66 Towing and Recovery will
hold a Public Auction on Jan. 24, 2008
at 6 p.m. (ET).
1992 Isuzu Trooper, blue
Vin# JACDH58VON7906573
Our Auction will be held at Bristol 66
Storage on Hoecake Road off Highway
20 East, one half mile on left, you will see
our sign. Bristol 66 Towing reserves the
right to reject any and all bids.
The Calhoun-Liberty Journal 01-02-08
If you need any more information on the
above vehicle, please call (850) 643-2522
or 228-9555 ask for Dale.


SEALED BIDS

The Liberty County Board of County
Commissioners will receive sealed bids
from any qualified person, company or
corporation interested in constructing the
following project:

PEA RIDGE ROAD
SCOP PROJECT

Plans and specifications can be ob-
tained at Preble-Rish, Inc., 324 Marina
Drive, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456, (850)
227-7200. The bid must conform to Sec-
tion 287.133(3) Florida Statutes, on pub-
lic entity crimes.

This is a widening and resurfacing proj-
ect.

All bidders shall be FDOT Qualified per
Section 2-1 of the FDOT Standard Spec-
ifications for Road and Bridge Construc-
tion, latest edition.

Completion date for this project will be
150 days from the date of the Notice to
Proceed presented to the successful bid-
der.

Liquidated damages for failure to com-
plete the project on the specified date
will be set at $200.00 per day.

Please indicate on the envelope that this
is a sealed bid, the bid number and what
the bid is for.

Bids will be received until 5:00 p.m.
Eastern Time, on January 8, 2008, at
the Liberty County Clerk's Office, Liberty
County Courthouse, Hwy. 20, Bristol,
Florida 32321, and. will be opened and
read aloud on January 8, 2008, at 7:00
p.m. Eastern Time. The public is invited
to attend.

Cost for Plans and Specifications will be
$25.00 per set and is non-refundable.
Checks should be made payable to
PREBLE-RISH, INC.

The Board of County Commissioners re-
serves the right to waive informalities in
any bid, to accept and/or reject any or all
bids, and to accept the bid that in their
judgment will be in the best interest of
Liberty County.

If you have any questions, please call
Matt Carpenter at (850) 643-2771. ,1226,-2


SUMMERS ROAD
PROJECT # 058.083
SCOP PROJECT

NOTICE TO RECEIVE
SEALED BIDS

The Liberty County Board of County
Commissioners will receive sealed bids
from any qualified person, company or
corporation interested in constructing the
following project:

SUMMERS ROAD
SCOP PROJECT

Plans and specifications can be ob-
tained at Preble-Rish, Inc., 324 Marina
Drive, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456, (850)
227-7200. The bid must conform to Sec-
tion 287.133(3) Florida Statutes, on pub-
lic entity crimes.

this is a resurfacing project.

All bidders shall be FDOT Qualified per
Section 2-1 of the FDOT Standard Spec-
ifications for Road and Bridge Construc-
tion, latest edition.

Completion date for this project will be
150 days from the date of the Notice to
Proceed presented to the successful bid-
der.

Liquidated damages for failure to com-
plete the project on the specified date
wil be set at $200.00 per day.

Please indicate on the envelope that this
is a sealed bid, the bid number and what
the bid is for.

Bids will be received until 5:00 p.m.


Eastern Time, on January 8, 2008, at
the Liberty County Clerk's Office, Liberty
County Courthouse, Hwy. 20, Bristol,
Florida 32321, and will be opened and
read aloud on January 8 2008, at 7:00
p.m. Eastern Time. The public is invited
to attend.

Cost for Plans and Specifications will be .
$25.00 per set and is non-refundable.
Checks should be made payable to
PREBLE-RISH, INC.

The Board of County Commissioners re-
serves the right to waive informalities in
any bid, to accept and/or reject any or all
bids, and to accept the bid that in their
judgment will be in the best interest of
Liberty County.

If you have any questions, please call
Matt Carpenter at (850) 643-2771. 12.26.1.2


CHESTER STREET RESURFACING
PROJECT #058.088
CIGP PROJECT

NOTICE TO RECEIVE
SEALED BIDS

The Liberty County Board of County
Commissioners will receive sealed bids
from any qualified person, company or
corporation interested in constructing the
following project:

CHESTER STREET RESURFACING
CIGP PROJECT

Plans and specifications can be ob-
tained at Preble-Rish, Inc., 324 Marina
Drive, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456, (850)
227-7200. The bid must conform to Sec-
tion 287.133(3) Florida Statutes, on pub-
lic entity crimes.

This is a widening and resurfacing proj-
ect.

All bidders shall be FDOT Qualified per
Section 2-1 of the FDOT Standard Spec-
ifications for Road and Bridge Construc-
tion, latest edition.

Completion date for this project will be
150 days from the date of the Notice to
Proceed presented to the successful bid-
der.

Liquidated damages for failure to com-
plete the project on the specified date
will be set at $200.00 per day.

Please indicate on the envelope that this
is a sealed bid, the bid number and what
the bid is for.

Bids will be received until 5:00 p.m.
Eastern Time, on January 8, 2008, at
the Liberty County Clerk's Office, Liberty
County Courthouse, Hwy. 20, Bristol,
Florida 32321, and will be opened and
read aloud on January 8, 2008, at 7:00
p.m. Eastern Time. The public is invited
to attend.

Cost for Plans and Specifications will be
$25.00 per set and is non-refundable.
Checks should be made payable to
PREBLE-RISH, INC.

The Board of County Commissioners re-
serves the right to waive informalities in
any bid, to accept and/or reject any or all
bids, and to accept the bid that in their
judgment will be in the best interest of
Liberty County.

If you have any questions, please call
Matt Carpenter at (850) 643-2771. 12.20.1.2


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Page 18 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JANUARY 2, 2008


ROBERT EUSTON (ROB) GRIFFIN
KINARD Robert Euston (Rob) Griffin, 82, died Monday, Dec.
24, 2007 at Bay Health and Rehab Center in Panama City under the
expert care of Covenant Hospice. He was born on July 28, 1925 to
Mose and Bessie (Warren) Griffin of Calhoun County and had lived
in Calhoun County for most of his life. He was a retired road con-
struction worker and was of the Protestant faith. He was a member of
Dixie Masonic Lodge #109 F&AM in Blountstown, member of the
Scottish Rite Bodies in Panama City and a member of the Shaddai
Shrine Temple in Panama City.
He was preceded in death by his son, Douglas Lloyd Griffin.
Survivors include his wife, Alice May Griffin of Kinard; three
sons, Richard Griffin and his wife, Janice of Tampa, Johnny Griffin
of New Port Richey and Allen Griffin of Zephyrhills; one daughter,
Mary Karen Dunn of Spring Hill; two brothers, Bennett Griffin of
Blountstown and Floyd Griffin of Kinard; three sisters, Bertie Mae
Pitts and Naomi Ponds, both of Kinard and Margaret Brogdon of We-
wahitchka; one sister-in-law, Eunice Griffin of Blountstown; several
grandchildren and great-grandchildren.
Services were held Friday,.Dec. 28, 2007 at Peavy Funeral Home
Chapel in Blountstown with Rev. Michael Morris officiating. Inter-
ment followed in Cypress Creek Cemetery in Kinard with Masonic
Rites at the graveside.
Peavy Funeral Home in Blountstown was in charge of the arrange-
ments.

JAMES M. "BOUDIE" DILLARD
ALTHA James M. "Boudie" Dillard, 82, a life-long resident
of Calhoun County, died Christmas Day Tuesday, Dec. 25, 2007
at his home in Altha. You may remember Boudie for his 16 years
of service as a County Commissioner or maybe for the thousands
of earthworms you bought from him at his bait shop in Altha. You
may remember him hauling a load of dirt to your home or maybe
even sharing a meal with him in his home. However, his family and
friends will always remember him for his kindness, generosity and
although at times rough, overwhelming amount of love.
Born July 12, 1925 in'Carr, he never ventured too far from home
for too long. He enlisted in the U.S. Navy in 1942 at the age of 17.
After serving four years, most of which were Pacific front during
World War II, he returned home and promptly fell in love with and
wed Maryell Vickery on Oct. 19, 1946. After moving to Palatka for
two years, the couple returned to the community they loved and nev-
er left again. Instead, he stayed and displayed his affection for Cal-
houn County and its citizens by fighting for the causes he believed in
as a commissioner and sharing whatever he had to give with anyone
who could use it. Because of his love for this community, his friends
and his family, Boudie will forever be loved in return.
He was preceded in death by his parents Matthew and Dovie Dil-
lard; one brother, Marlin Dillard; and four sisters, Lois Dillard, Ma-
mie Dillard, Mavis Flowers and Josephine Land.
Survivors include his wife of 61 years, Maryell Vickery Dillard;
daughter, Angela Wallace and her husband, Daryl, of Altha; grand-
son, Stephen Tatum and his fiance, Becky, of Marianna; granddaugh-
ter, Marsha Byrom and her husband, Jon of Leavenworth, KS; one
great-granddaughter, Julia Claire Byrom, of Leavenworth, KS; two
step-great-grandchildren, Will and Kristen McDaniel of Marianna;
two sisters, Myrtice Dillard Carter and her husband, Winston of In-
terlachen, and Margie Dillard Fuqua of Marianna, and numerous,
special and beloved nephews and nieces.
Services were held Friday, Dec. 28, 2007 at the Altha Church of
God with Rev. David Pleasant Jr. officiating. Interment followed in
Chipola Cemetery with Hall Funeral Home directing.
Hall Funeral Home of Altha was in charge of the arrangements.

GARY LEE ALEXANDER
WEST PALM BEACH Gary Lee Alexander, 67, died Thursday,
Dec. 27, 2007 at Palms West Hospital in West Palm Beach. He was
born on July 25, 1940 in Danville, IL and had lived in West Palm for
several years. He was an air conditioning and refrigeration training
instructor.
Survivors include his wife, Sue Alexander of West Palm Beach;
one son, Gary Brent Alexander and his wife, Cheryl of Ocean Springs,
MS; one brother, Lewis J. Alexander and his wife, Ann of San Jose,
CA; two nieces, Bobbie Jo and her husband, Jose and Billie Ann
and her husband, Eric; one granddaughter, Ashley Sue Alexander of
Ocean Springs.
The family will receive friends Friday, Jan. 4, 2008 from 5 to 7
p.m. (CT) at Peavy Funeral Home.
Services will be held Saturday, Jan. 5, 2008 at 11 a.m. (CT) at
Peavy Funeral Home Chapel with Rev. David Goodman officiating.
Interment will follow in Pine Memorial Cemetery in Blountstown.
Peavy Funeral Home in Blountstown is in charge of the arrange-
ments.


Bone marrow transplants save lives


The spongy material housed
inside of the cavities of certain
bones, known as bone marrow,
is an essential part of a person's
health and is relied on for the
treatment of diseases.
Bone Marrow Function
Bone marrow is responsible
for the production of many blood
elements. Marrow is found in
the femur (thigh bone), humerus
(arm bone), and sternum (breast
bone) and is home to immature
blood cells called stem cells.
Stem cells will eventually form
into the different blood cells of
the body, including white, red,
and platelets. Red blood cells
carry oxygen to body tissues.
Platelets are small cells critical
for proper blood clotting. White
blood cells are the critical im-
mune cells of the body helping
to fight against infection and ill-
ness. Stem cells are also pres-
ent in umbilical cord blood, so
this blood is just as important as
healthy bone marrow because
of the possibilities of generat-
ing new blood cells.
Bone Marrow Damage
Certain diseases damage
bone marrow. These include
leukemia (cancer of the blood),
lymphoma (cancer of the lymph
nodes), myelodysplastic syn-
dromes (bone marrow does not
function normally), and my-
eloma (cancer of the plasma
cells of white blood cells). If
bone marrow is compromised
a person can become very ill.
In these cases a bone marrow
transplant (BMT) or a periph-
eral blood stem cell transplan-
tation (PBSCT) with stem cells
harvested from cord blood is
suggested.
Marrow Transplant
A BMT or PBSCT can give
new hope to sick patients. Just
as in a blood transfusion, bone
marrow donors are evaluated
to. be a "match" for specific pa-
tients. Like blood types, bone
marrow donors and recipients
must be compatible so that the
receiving patient's body will be
more likely to accept the new
cells. Matches are based on
the human leukocyte antigens
(HLA) present in blood cells.
HLAs are proteins or mark-
ers found on most cells in the
body. A body's immune system
uses these markers to recognize
which cells belong in the body
and which do not. A close HLA
match between patient and do-
nor is the most important factor
in selecting the best bone mar-
row donor for a patient. There
are many HLA markers in the
body and potential donors are
tested for matches then nar-
rowed down further according
to a more detailed level.
According to the National
Marrow Donor Program@,
before a patient receives new
blood-forming cells, they will
be given pre-transplant treat-
ment of high dose chemo-
therapy and perhaps radiation


therapy. This pre-transplant
treatment, or preparative regi-
men, is an important part of the
transplant process.
Donated marrow cells ar-
rive in blood bags, just like the
ones used to collect blood from
blood donors. The cells will be
injected into the patient's body
in a similar fashion to a blood
transfusion. In many cases they
enter the blood through a cen-
tral line, or a tube that has been
surgically implanted into a vein
in the patient's chest. The en-
tire process can take an hour or
more, depending upon the vol-
ume of cells. There shouldn't be
any pain, but mild side effects


similar to those with a blood
transfusion may occur.
What many people find amaz-
ing about BMTs is that the stem
cells know exactly where to
travel when transplanted into a
patient's body. They move from
the bloodstream directly to the
bone marrow on their own to
begin regeneration of the blood
cells needed.
There are a number of online
sites that have further informa-
tion about bone marrow trans-
plants and donor applications.
Visit www.marrow.com or www.
bonemarrow.com to start your
online search.


I Charles McClellan

Funeral Home
Charles K. McClellan
Licensed Funeral Director
42 years experience
Call us Let us explain how we can
conveniently handle arrangements
in Liberty County.

Butler-Morgan/Morgan-McClellan Funeral Home
Building at 15 S. Jackson St., Quincy, 32351 -
Phone: (850) 627-7677 or 643-2277




COMERFORD VAULT MEMORIAL SERVICE
Hwy. 90W-P.O. Box 933
Sneads, FL 32460
Pete Comerford-Owner & Operator
Phone: 850-593-6828; 1-800-369-6828; Fax: 850-593-6888
A MONUMENT IS A FAMILY TRIB-
UTE CARVED IN STONE
Precious Memories AS A CONSTANT
REMINDER OF FAMILY BONDS TIED
TOGETHER WITH LOVE.
S ri "'0 'M loRT


Peavy Funeral Home

& Crematory


Funeral Services with Dignity,
Caring and Professionalism.

Marion Peavy
A Hometown Funeral Director









JANUARY 2,2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 19


New Year resolutions to improve


Lawrence flnimaL HosPiTaL
43 N. Cleveland Street in Quincy OFFICE (850) 627-8338
Jerry C. Lawrence, DVM
SEmergencies: (850) 856-5827 or (850) 856-5918
Hours: Monday Friday 7 a.m. to 5 p.m.
DOCTOR'S HOURS BY APPOINTMENT.
We provide: Boarding Grooming Preventative Healthcare programs
which include vaccinations and yearly checkups Spay/neuter program
to reduce unwanted puppies/kittens.
PLUS MANY OTHER SERVICES.
CALL US ANYTIME IF YOU HAVE ANY QUESTIONS.


With the excitement of a new
year you may be thinking about
making resolutions for 2008.
But have you ever thought to
make a resolution to improve
your landscape? Here are a few
resolutions that you may want to
make for 2008.
Resolve to remove the grass
under your trees and put down a
ring of organic mulch.
Mowing equipment and string
trimmers can damage trees
if used improperly. Repeated
wounding of tree trunks allows
entry points for disease and in-
sect infestations.
Replacing the grass around
the base of trees with mulch pro-
vides a buffer zone. The larger
the mulched area, the less the
turf near the tree is stressed by
shade, the more room the lawn
mower has to maneuver with
ease, and the less the string trim-
mer needs to be used.
Resolve to conserve water in
the landscape. Saving water in
the landscape is easy and can
be accomplished in a number of
ways.
One way is to use drought-re-
sistant plants. Once established,


-


$2,000 Down
Owner Financing, No Qualifying
No Interest charged first year
Tri-Land Inc. R.E. Broker
Call (813) 253-3258


Sliberty Post &'

Barn Pole Inc.
Dempsey Barron Road, Bristol 643-5995 (off Hwy. 121


TOP
GRADE
7' Posts
Top Size
3-4"
4-5"
5-6"


GIVE USA*CALL!
850-674-3307
1800-41-1801


2 C r v


TOP
GRADE
8' Posts
Top Size
2-3", 3-4"
4-5"
5-6" .
6-7"
7-8"


SPECIALTY 8"+
POSTS
1/4 rounds Items
1/2 rounds subject to
/Flat Face availability


TOP
GRADE
6'6" Posts
Top Size
2-2.5"
2-5.3"
3-3.5"
3.5-4"
4-5"
5"+


FACTORY
SECONDS
8' Corners
under 3"
3-4"
4-5"
5-6"
6-7"
7-8"
8"+


FACTORY SECONDS
6'6" Posts, Top Size, under'
2-3" 3-4" 4-5" 5"-f


S. We'e got the fence posts to meet your needs.


by Theresa Friday,
Horticulture Extension
Agent, Santa Rosa County

these plants require less water
than others, usually surviving
on rainfall alone. Many drought-
resistant plants are also Florida
natives and easy to grow.
Another way to conserve
water is to water plants only
when necessary, especially turf.
Overwatering can result in shal-
low root systems and disease
problems. It is best to wait until
the turf begins to show drought
signs before watering.
A rain sensor on your auto-
matic irrigation system also con-
serves water. It's an inexpensive
device that shuts off your irriga-
tion system when it rains. Not
only are newly installed irriga-
tion systems required to have
one, but they also can help save
plants from becoming overwa-
tered.
Resolve to plant the "right
plant, in the right place." Sen-
sible selection of plant materials
based on some knowledge of the
plant is always best.
For example, a shade-loving
plant will not do well in a full-
sun site. A plant that requires a
somewhat drier environment
may rot in a site regularly wa-
tered to excess. A tree that may
grow up to 60 foot tall and over
100 feet wide would not be a.
good choice planted next to a
house.
Resolve to use pesticides
properly! The key to the proper


your landscape
use of a pesticide is making sure
to read the label. The label is the
law!
The pesticide label is a legal
document that must be followed
to the letter. The label gives you
a wealth of information such as
which pests it will control, what
hosts it can be applied to, how to
mix the chemical, when it should
it be applied, how much and how
often and how to protect yourself
and the environment.
And remember, more is NOT
always better. Pesticide labels
will clearly state the recom-
mended amount of product to
use. Using more may negatively
impact the effectiveness of the
pesticide.
Resolve to get to know your
bugs, especially good bugs.
Good bugs can also be.called
beneficial insects. Beneficial in-
sects are all around us and help
maintain the balance of nature
as it relates to insect pests in and
around our landscape.
The last resolution to ponder
for 2008 is to contact your local
Extension Office when you have
a landscape problem. The Uni-
versity of Florida/IFAS Exten-
sion Service is a free service that
provides information backed by
research conducted at the uni-
versity. Call us with your plant
questions.
Theresa Friday is the Resi-
dential Horticulture Extension
Agent for Santa Rosa County.
The use of trade names, if used
in this article, is solely for the
purpose of providing specific in-
formation. It is not a guarantee,
warranty, or endorsement of the
product name(s) and does not
signify that they are approved to
the exclusion of others.
For additional information
about all of the county extension
services and other articles of in-
terest go to http://santarosa.ifas.
ufl.edu.










Page 20 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JANUARY 2, 2008

I r1-1 TI"T17 A j -T T -l"' T,\T r I-1D1.-, l T T,'-C" TIT ) D TV A 1:


ITEMS FOR SALE

Cobra 148 GTL CB radio, ex-
cellent condition, $100 firm. Call
643-4701. 1-2,1-9
German Sax, new, blue lacquer,
$250. Call 674-8437. 1-2,1-9
Texas Hold'em card table, call
379-8276 or 510-0932 for more
information. 1-2, 1-9
Blair lighthouse jacket, size large,
brand new, never worn, paid $35,
asking $15. Call 643-4453.12-26,1-2
Star of David crystal glassware;
large vintage milk can, 1900s
marked hood, $45; old wooden ice
cream churn, $45. Call 643-5917.
12-26,1-2
Pendant light fixture, elegant
Hunter Kenroy brand, still in box
unopened. Leftover from building
project, cultured alabaster shade,
uses three 60-watt bulbs, E-Z In-
stall, oxford silver finish, measures
20" by 16" wide, comes with eight
foot wire and two foot chain. Photo
on box. Asking-$125. Can be seen
at The Journal office in Bristol on
Summers Road. uFN


F-ree: F-irewooa, you cut, mostly pe-
can and some green oak, located in
Altha. Call 762-3366. 12-26,1-2


Sleeper sofa, i20. Uall
674-8919. 1-2,1-9
Loveseat, navy blue and burgundy,
$50;.light blue sofa and loveseat,
matching set, $150 .for both;
queen size mattress, $60. Call
694-5456. 12-26,1-2
Vintage barley twist pub table,
draw leaf with four chairs, early
1900s, beautiful, $750 or best offer;
old enamel top table with extension,
must see, $800. Call 643-5917.
12-26, 1-2

William's Home
Improvements
"No Job Too Big or Small"
Licensed & Insured, contractor & roofer
Concrete work,
landscape, pressure
cleaning, renovations,
seamless gutter,
painting, vinyl,
& screen enclosure
FOR FREE ESTIMATES
Call 674-8092 UFN



Stump grinding

Reasonable rates
Free estimates

Call
Chris Nissley-
674-8081 or
643-8561 (Cell)



M & W Self
Storage Rentals
7 days a week service
5'x 10' ....... 20
10' x 10'.......... 35M
10' x 20'........... u
10' x 25'.........90
NO DEPOSIT
Call 762-9555, 762-8807
or 762-8597 uN


lH ALj U UN -IIDEI.Xl I J OUJ NU NLAE





To place your ad, call 643-3333 or 1-800-717-3333 by noon Eastern
Time on Saturday. Non-business ads run FREE for 2 weeks.


Queen size sofa bed, two and a
half months old, $300 or best of-
fer; two solid wood end table, light
natural color, $20 or best offer. Call
643-6738. 12-26,1-2


Prom/Homecoming dresses, pink
strapless, size 8, $250 or best of-
'fer; white strapless ballroom gown,
$100 or best offer. Call 272-7641.
1-2,1-9

Two mink stoles, $50 each; mink
hat, $20. Call 674-8269. 1-2,1-9
Prom/Homecoming dresses,
black, size 7; gold, size 3/4 and
fuchsia pink size 3/4, $50 each. Call
762-3724. 12-26,1-2


Refrigerator, second hand, works
good, white, $50. Call 674-9127,
leave message. 1-2,1-9
Washer and dryer, as is, $40 each
or$75forboth. Call 379-8176, leave
message. 12-26,.1-2


1995 Dodge Ram 15sO, new reouilt
Nicko engine (has one mile on it),
king cab. Call 379-8276 or510-0932
for more information. 1-2,1-9
1985 Dodge truck, fair condition,
transmission slipping, $600 or best
offer. Call 227-4881 or 227-4298.
12-26,1-2


AUCTION
Wishing everybody a
Happy New Year.
The auction is CLOSED
for January, but will
reopen the first
Saturday, Feb. 2.
Col. James W. Copeland
18098 NW County Rd. 12
Phone: 643-7740
AB1226 AU0001722


(A

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x


Week of Jan. 6 to Jan. 12
ARIES Mar 21/Apr 20
Aries, the past will return to
haunt you, but it's something
you can overcome. You're a
changed person now and won't
make the same bad decisions.
TAURUS Apr 21/May 21
You have been dreaming very
vividly, Taurus. It's important to
know that these dreams are not
harbingers of what's to come.
You can still shape your future.
GEMINI May 22/Jun 21
More than ever, Gemini, this
week you're more apt to balance
your personal and work lives. In
fact, they may overlap just a bit,
especially on Thursday.
CANCER Jun 22/Jul 22
Been daydreaming about exotic
locations, Cancer? This could
be the time to schedule that next
vacation. Bring a friend along
for even more enjoyment.
LEO Jul 23/Aug 23
Your creative powers are un-
locked, Leo, and this opens up
lots of opportunities for you.
However, avoid the temptation


1990 Chevy Lumina mini van,
$1,500. Call 643-5917. 12-26, 1-2
1997 Nissan pickup, 4WD, $3,200
or best offer. Call 643-6589.12-26,1-2

1970 Corvette 'Stingray LT1,
350/350 horse engine, four speed,
$10,000, will consider partial trade
or will trade for a Harley. Call
237-1208. 12-26,1-2

AUTO ACCESSORIES & PARTS
1998 2x4 Arctic Cat 400, new"
Mud Bugtires and chrome wheels,
$2,000 or trade for golf cart. Call
643-3662. 1-2,1-9
Eagle One rims with tires, 15 x 9,
$650. Call 728-4103. 12-26, 1-2


444c 1983 John Deere front end
loader, runs and operates, repair
or parts, $4,500 or best offer. Call
532-2926. 1-2,1-9
Electric drill brush, $50. Call
643-5917. 12-26,1-2


MOTORCYCLES


2006 Yamaha Wolverine ATV,
2WD, 350cc, electric start, automat-
ic with reverse. Excellent condition,
seldom ridden, $3,200. Please call
Jeff at 674-2033 or email hester-
clan4@yahoo.com. 1-2, 1-9

MOBILE HOME
FOR RENT
Two bedroom, two bath
mobile home located six
miles north on Hwy. 69N.
No pets. Two months rent
for damage and cleaning
deposit. Water, sewer and
grass cutting provided.
Call 674-8888
1 e--^


of overspending, because creativity
doesn't carry over to finances.
VIRGO Aug 24/Sept 22
Take some extra time this week to
deal with the unpredictable nature of
your work, Virgo. Things will be es-
pecially trying for the next few days.
You can relax later.
LIBRA Sept 23/Oct 23
Libra, those around you will be very
aggressive. Do not take a cue from
them and follow the same course of
action. Better yet, slow down and
enjoy things.
SCORPIO Oct 24/Nov 22
Whether you're looking for romance
this week or not, Scorpio, someone
is looking for you. For those who
are attached, this can prove a tempt-
ing situation.
SAGITTARIUS Nov 23/Dec 21
Sagittarius, this is the week to act on
whims. If you're not used to throw-
ing caution to the wind, it's time to
become a quick learner. Others will
envy your carefree nature.
CAPRICORN Dec 22/Jan 20
Listen to your intuition to make it
through the week unscathed, Capri-
com. Otherwise you may end up a


S


1999 Yamaha 1100 Vstar, very
good condition, burgundy in color,
$3,000 firm. Call 532-2926. 1-2,1-9


Kingstar motor scooter, brand
new, metallic blue, rides two,
250cc, 60 mph, 80 mpg, fully street
legal, $975 firm. Call 643-5235 or
643-7594. 12-26,1-2


85 hp Suzuki outboard motor,
comes with controls, $950; Bass
Tracker boat with 40 hp Suzuki
motor, fair condition, $1,200. Call
227-4881 or 227-4298. 12-26,1-2


Wanted: To the person who bought
the boat in Altha from Julius Kemp,
please get the title changed. Call
762-8343. 12-26,1-2

Wanted: Five speed transmis-
sion for a 1986 Toyota truck. Call
674-8437. 12-26,1-2

Wanted: Will buy junk cars and
will move, any condition. Call
762-8589. 1-9 T. 7-2-08

Wanted: Junk cars and trucks,
any condition, we pay cash. Call
762-8459 or 272-6836 cell.
UFN


FOR RENT
2 bedroom, 1 1/2 bath
mobile home, complete-
ly furnished, located at
21389 Pear Road by
Bently Bluff in Telogia.
Call 510-0932
or 379-R8276


lemming following the path everyone is
taking.
AQUARIUS Jan 21/Feb 18
Aquarius, integrate your desires with the
mundane activities you tackle every day.
You will find the road traveled is that
much more enjoyable.
PISCES Feb 19/Mar 20
Your positive energy is ideal for taking
on new projects, Pisces. Put your creative
juices to work and tasks will fly by.

FAMOUS BIRTHDAYS

JANUARY 6
Susan Perabo, Author (39)
JANUARY 7
Nicolas Cage, Actor (44)
JANUARY 8
Ami Dolenz, Actress (39)
JANUARY 9
Mark Martin, NASCAR Driver (49)
JANUARY 10
Pat Benatar, Singer (55)
JANUARY 11
Amanda Peet, Actress (36)
JANUARY 12
Mel Chisholm, "Sporty Spice" (34)


HOMES & LAND

Big lot on Chipola River, located in
Calhoun County. Call 643-1514.
UFN


PETS/SUPPLIES
Boxweilers, Boxer/Rottweiler
puppies, ready mid January, mom
is boxer, dad is Rottweiler, both
parents have superior tempera-
ments, tails and dew claws clipped,
wormed, very large dogs over 70
Ibs. minimum, fourfemales left, one
brown, three dark brindles to loving
home, $35 each. Call 674-7854, ask
for Diane. .1-2,1-9
Quick Track system, 20 channel,
eight collars, 216.800to 216.900, all
for $1,000; Tri-tronics Beagler two
dog shocking system, new batter-
ies, $300; Tri-tronics Trash Breaker
three dog shocking system, $300.
Call 643-3662. 1-2,1-9

Seven puppies, free to a good
home, brindle, 10 weeks old, un-
known breed. Call 674-3348.
1-2,1-9
Wire chicken cage, $25. Call
674-8918. 1-2,1-9
Hand-fed Quaker parrot babies
and white doves. Call 674-3532.
1-2, 1-9

Gerbil, blonde and white, male,
includes cage and food, $10. Call
674-9127. 1-2,1-9
60 gallon octagon fish tank,
comes with storage cabinet, pump
filters, water treater and tank decor,
$200. Call 694-5456. 12-26,1-2
Colby and Carver bulldog, male,
10 weeks old, parents on premises,
$75. Call 674-2106. 12-26,1-2


Found: Small dog, approx. 8 to
10 months old, near Joe Chas-
son Circle in Bristol. Please call
and describe. Call 694-8458 or
694-3848. 1-2,1-9


FOR RENT
In Bristol
*Mobile home lots
*3BR/2BA mobile home with
central heat and air

In Blountstown
*1-room efficiency,
utilities included 2BR/bath
and a half apartment 2
bedroom, 1 1/2 bath house
Commercial old Mexican
restaurant Commercial -
200 front ft. with 3 buildings
and fenced in area.

Phone 643-7740




LOOK


1, 2 & 3 Bedroom
Apartments
"The Best Place to Live"
Rental Assistance




Call (850) 674-4202
16978 NW Mayo Street,
Blountstown, FL 32424.
TDDITTY 711.
EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY


em. mov soavw w wr w .











OWN LOOKOUT
MOUNTAIN
40 acres in South
Jackson County with
breathtaking hilltop
view. Will not last long.
220,000 for sale
by owner.
L Call (850) 272-5193



$150 Queen Pillow-Top
Mattress Set. New in plastic
with warranty. 850-222-9879
BEDROOM: New complete 6
piece set still boxed, $599,
can deliver (850) 222-7783
LEATHER COUCH &
LOVESEAT. NEW, lifetime
warranty, sacrifice $799. (can
deliver). (850) 425-8374
DINING ROOM Beautiful
cherry table, 6 chairs, lighted
china cabinet. Brand new in
boxes, can deliver. $799. 850-
222-7783
FULL MATTRESS SET $125.
New in sealed plastic. Can
Deliver. 850-222-7783

BUYAND SELL WITH
THE JOURNAL!


JANUARY 2,2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 21


THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL




To place your ad, call 643-3333 or 1-800-717-3333 by noon Eastern
Time on Saturday. Non-business ads run FREE for 2 weeks.


Lost: Men's black briefcase, lost
around the Latter-day Saints church
in Bristol. It's small with one zipper.
Call 674-5213. 12-26,1-2
Lost: Black Labrador, answers to
"Toby," nocollar, lastseen atthe cor-
nerof Pea Ridge Road and Peddie
Road in Bristol. Call 643-3649.
12-26,1-2
Found: Tote found beside the road
with children's photos and other
things. Please call and describe.
Call 643-8574 or 643-5644.
12-26, 1-2


Huge yard sale, Saturday, Jan. 5
from 8 a.m. until 2 p.m. at 13416
NW Hoecake Road in Bristol. Lots
of toddler boy and size infant to 5,
name brand girls clothes, men's
and women's clothes, many name
brand, antique sewing machines,
furniture, toys, games and much
more. No early birds please. Call
643-5479. 1-2


Blountstown yard sale, Saturday,
Jan. 5 beginning at 7 a.m. at Elijah
Morris Road (off John G. Bryant
Road). Gas stove, portable dish-
washer, sleeper sofa, boy's clothing
size 6/9 months to 3T, women's
clothing, shoes, purses and much
more. No early birds, please. Call
272-7641. 1-2


714 acres
Liberty County
$3,500,000

50 acres
Calhoun County
$220,000
D. E. Billingsley
Lic. Real Estate Broker
Call (850) 510-3309
www.debillingsley.comn
1-2T.1-23


NEW HOUSE FOR SALE
3 bedroom, 2 bath house, 1,332 sq. ft. under
roof, custom shingles, vinyl siding, laminate
and carpet flooring, along with ceramic in the
bathrooms. Sits on 3/4 acre lot on Black Bot-
tom Road., approximately five miles south of
Altha.
Call (850) 899-0269 or 674-7138



WANTED:

REAL ESTATE
Will buy 10 to 1,000 acres, reason-
ably priced. Immediate closing.
Call (850) 544-5441
or (850) 899-7700


SUBSCRIBE TODAY TO


THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL


I---------- ml N


r -- ----- -- -
I.
I
I


NAME


ADDRESS


CITY


PHONE_
Please enclose a check or money order for $18 and mail to:

The Calhoun-Liberty Journal, P.O. Box 536,
Bristol, FL 32321


--- ------------------------------------------------ ml


I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I


Horses For Sale
2 great trail companions &
a sidekick; 10 year old QH/
Arab a wonderful child's
horse, $2,000 (includes
sweet natured gelded don-
key who is his buddy); 5
year old Spotted Saddle-
horse, great disposition,
$1,500.
Call Kate at 674-2033 2


1 -4


TW,:t.


,SUBSCRIPTION FORM


STATE -ZIP







Page 22 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JANUARY 2, 2008


CHIPOLA COLLEGE
is now accepting applications for
CAREER SPECIALIST

DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES: Promote and imple-
ment the Succeed Grant Teacher Outreach Program (TOP)
by identifying, advising and instructing program partici-
pants, promoting activities, collecting data and maintaining
records.

MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS: Bachelor's degree from a re-
gionally accredited college or university in either Mathemat-
ics Education or Science.Education required. Experience
coordinating college students' activities and previous grant
experience preferred. Valid state driver license required.

THIS IS A GRANT FUNDED POSITION. CONTINUED
EMPLOYMENT BEYOND AUGUST 31, 2008 IS CONTIN-
GENT UPON GRANT FUNDING.
APPLICATION DEADLINE: JANUARY 11, 2008
Interested applicants should submit a letter.of application, a
completed Chipola College employment application (avail-
able from Human Resources); resume; references with cur-
rent addresses and telephone numbers and copies of col-
lege transcripts to CHIPOLA COLLEGE, Human Resources,
3094 Indian Circle, Marianna, FL 32446
AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER


JOB OPENING

The$a$caol Board of Liberty County i4 aepting applica-
tions f6r the following position for the 2007-2008 school
year. Applications are available at the Office of the Super-
intendent located at 12926 NW CR 12, Bristol, FL. Due to
the Holidays, regular office hours have changed. Applica-
tions may be picked up and returned to the Early Learning
Center from December 18, 2007- until 1:00 PM December
21, 2007. Applications may be picked up and returned
to the Office of the Superintendent from January 2, 2008
until January 9, 2008.

GUIDANCE COUNSELOR HOSFORD SCHOOL

MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS:
*Bachelor's Degree from an accredited educational institu-
tion
*Certified by the State of Florida in the appropriate area
*Must provide written references upon request of the Su-
perintendent

COMPENSATION: SALARY RANGE: 30,995 52,797

Applications will be received from:
Dec. 18, 2007 Jan. 9, 2008

A complete application listing three (3) professional refer-
ences and resume is required. Reasonable accommoda-
tions for completing forms and interviews are available for
people with disabilities when requested in advance. For
a request for reasonable accommodations,"please contact
the Office of the Superintendent.

EMPLOYMENT WILL BE CONTINGENT UPON
CLEARANCE OF FINGERPRINTS AND DRUG TEST

ONLY CURRENT APPLICATIONS WILL BE CONSIDERED

Employment opportunities are offered without regard to
race, religion, sex, national origin, age, handicap or mari-
tal statJs.
AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER/DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE
. 12-28.1-2


One Stop Career CenterHOPE PROGRAM
698Currently seeking the following positions to work with
female adolescents with emotional and/or behavioral is-
The following positions are sues.
available: Construction Trades -Full-time Youth Worker -Full-time Teacher with
Helper, Janitorial, Dietetic FL teaching certificate -Full-time Therapist
Technician, Construction
Worker, Office Clerk, Food All applicants must be at least 21 year of age with a valid
Service Worker, Production driver's license.
Manager, Truck Driver. EOE Please call (850) 722-6117
Service Chipola Workforce Board UFN 12-26.1-2


FLORIDA DEPARTMENT


OF CORRECTIONS:
Accepting applications for career service correc-
tional RNs and LPNs at the following locations:

Liberty Cl, Apalachee Cl & Wakulla Cl

Exceptional Health Care Insurance
Vested Retirement after six years
Comprehensive State of Florida Benefit Package

Visit our Web site at fldocjobs.com for more information
to apply online or contact: Jennifer Dudley at Dudley.
jennifer@mail.dc.state.fl.us or call (850) 922-6645.
Florida Department of Corrections is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Cer-
tain veterans and spouses of veterans receive preference in employment by
the state as provided by Chap. 295,FS.

Fax your JOB MARKET advertisements to us
at 643-3334, or email to: thejournal@fairpoint.net


NOW HIRING

Industrial Electricians
Responsible for plant electrical power systems and control equipment and systems and
to ensure these are in proper working condition for maximum production of wood pellets
under the direction and review of the Shift Team Leader.

Journeyman Electrician preferred; will consider a recognized electrical apprentice with at
least 5 years demonstrated experience in the industrial maintenance field.

Must be NFPA 70E certified or can become certified.

Must have extensive knowledge of:
*GE medium and low voltage switchgear *Allen Bradley motor controls, VFDs, PLCs
*Rockwell Software applications, Control Net, Device Net, RS View, RS Logix
*480 and 4160 volt AC motors *480 and 4160 volt transformers, switchgears,
generators, and circuit breakers *3-phase and basic control systems -Basic ma-
chinery functions 'Low and' High voltage transformers, switchgears, generators,
circuit breakers -Blueprints and schematics 'Multi-mode ST and SC Fiber
Optic Cables *Digital and analog control systems 'Calibrating and maintaining
electrical equipment and devices 'Ethernet Cables

Questions you will be asked:
*How many years of experience do you have as an industrial electrician?
*Do you have an associates degree, technical degree, or related work experience with an
emphasis in industrial electricity, instrumentation and controls?
*Do you have experiences with maintaining and troubleshooting AC control circuits, mag-
netic starters, interlock systems, alarms, annuciators, digital and analog control systems,
and PLCs?
*Do you have any experience maintaining and calibrating electrical equipment such as
oil circuit breakers, transformers, generators, voltage regulators, metering, instrument
transformers, high voltage switchgear and equipment.
*Do you have the ability to work with Plant control schematics?
*Do you have experience with 480 volt AC motors, 4160 AC motors, low, medium, and
high voltage systems?
*Do you have experience with high voltage transformers, switchgears, generators?
*Are you NFPA 70E certified?

TESTING IS REQUIRED.

All job offers are contingent upon the successful completion of a drug and alcohol screen,
physical, and background check.
Please send resume to rweaver@greencirclebio.com by January 15,2008.
i 2 1-t








JANUARY 2, 2008 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 23


We'll be in a new grade
and classrooms and have
another teacher, meet new
friends. Many other things
will be different too.
Ann Marie Brown

They might have different
devices like TV, CD players
and computers. Cory Chambers

The government might
change laws, make life easier
and keep us safe.
Travis Sangster

Will be moving up a grade,
you will be older.
Jacob Richerson

You will be in a different
grade, you might have dif-
ferent friends or you. might
have a different goal.
Hollie Alhalaseh

2008 will be different be-
cause some things will really
look different like my room.
Juliana Pullam


Be older and
another grade.


wiser and in
- Allie O'Brian


I will be in fifth grade,
older and new friends.
Marisha Bess

More and more people
might move to Florida. Plac-
es might be built and things
will change, they can't stay
the same. Nikki Lee Shuler

I'll be older and they'll
come out with new technol-
ogy. Courtney Melton

I will get older and taller.
Emilee Ann Hosey

The electronics like video
games, TV, cars might be dif-
ferent. Colton Capps

I would be better at math
than now. Lindsey Laramore

I will have passed the
fifth grade. Ryan Romer


You will have differences.
Kaitlin Lynn

It will be different be-
cause I am going to Disney
World. Holly Banks

We will be starting a new
year and things will change
and be different. Jenna Purkey

Make new friends.
Shadrick Daughtrey

My mom and me and her
friend Will get a new car and
house, it will be beautiful.
Justice Williams

What New Year's
Resolution would
you like to make
for someone else?

Make someone a card.
Jamie White


I would love to make stuff
for them. Brittany Kelley

I want to help raise mon-
ey for people with cancer.
Ann Marie Brown

More family time, get to-
gether with your mama and
daddy. Cory Chambers

My brother so he can pass
to go to 10th grade.
Travis Sangster

I would like to make a
New Year's Resolution for
my nephew Gage, that is for
him to be nicer. He is always
being mean. Jacob Richerson

I would like for Cassidy
Shuler to make all As all
year. Hollie Alhalaseh:

I want my sisters to make
money and go see snow.
Juliana Pullam

I would make my friend
Jenny a huge cake that says
your my best friend in the
world. Allie O'Brian

I would do it for my fam-
ily -because I would like to
give them money to pay the
bills and give them a vaca-
tion. Marisha Bess

I would love it if more


ow .^yEU . .. .


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and more people have a
better life because it is not
right for those people. They
at least need a good home,
good clothes and healthy
food.
Nikki Lee Shuler

I would like my two broth-
ers Caylob and Coleby to
keep up the good drawings
they draw. Courtney Melton

I would like my mom to
get a job. Emilee Ann Hosey

I want my brother to get
good grades. cotton capps

My brother, Dewayne Lar-
amore to get better at his
spelling. Lindsey Laramore

I would make them a plan
to be able to do things they
can't. Ryan Ramer

I would want to help my
mom and my fmily solve
their problems. Kaitlin Lynn

I would like to make a
party day so that we can
have fun. Holly Banks

I would like to make it go
for by brother that he can
take care of his baby and be
a good dad.
Jenna Purkey

Make good grades for my
grandma. Shadrick Daughtrey

Buy someone a car and a
house. Justice Williams








Page 24 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL JANUARY 2, 2008

Children's Home Society receives $200,000 from W.K. Kellogg Foundation


TALLAHASSEE Chil-
dren's Home Society of Florida
(CHS) has received the final
$200,000 distribution from a
two-year, $400,000 grant from
the W.K. Kellogg Foundation -
the sixth-largest grant-making
foundation in the country to
help fund the Ready by 5 proj-
ect. This project focuses on
community-based, collaborative
approaches to promote school
readiness and facilitate early re-
turns to safe, permanent place-
ments for children who have
been abused or neglected.
Piloting in two diverse coun-
ties Leon and Palm Beach -
Ready by 5 targets vulnerable
children who lack critical skills
to perform well in school and
other family and community
settings, often because their de-
velopment is hindered by child
abuse and neglect, poverty, or
other risk factors. Early child-
hood abuse and neglect can have
a permanent, negative impact on
healthy brain development and
school readiness, and research
indicates that children who
don't succeed in the first three
years of school are often headed
toward long-term, costly diffi-
culties. However, effective, ev-
idence-based interventions help
these children and their families
by preventing and treating ear-
ly childhood problems so they
won't interfere with learning
and the everyday coping skills
children need as they grow up.
Ready by 5 uses trained early
childhood specialists to provide
comprehensive developmental
screenings of vulnerable young
children, while family interven-
tions focus on promoting strong
bonding and attachment, posi-
tive interactions, and safe, se-
cure relationships .between the
child and caregivers.
"By infusing these additional
resources and enhancing ex-
pertise, we believe the results
will show fewer children being
abused, more children perform-
ing better in school, and quicker
family reunifications for chil-
dren who have been separated
from their families," says David
Bundy, President and CEO of
CHS.
Partnering with two of Flor-
ida's Community Based Care
lead agency sites, CHS plans
to demonstrate how to promote
school readiness by serving at
least 140 children who have
been abused or neglected; 70
children and their families are
already involved. CHS has been
gathering qualitative data and
selecting participants since the
State Institutional Review Board
approved the project's research
plan this past summer.
This innovative program of-
fers a culturally competent re-
sponse to the local diversity of
children and their families, en-
couraging long-term sustainabil-
ity for services, systems and poli-
cies promoting,-school readiness.
In collaboration with the Florida
State University Center for Pre-
vention and Early Intervention,


the project will be evaluated for
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with findings disseminated state-
wide and nationwide.
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ming interests, information on
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tion process, a database of cur-
rent grant recipients and access
to publications that report on
Foundation-funded projects.
About Children's Home Society
of Florida: Created in 1902, Chil-
dren's Home Society of Florida


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CHSserved more than 159,000 chil-
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Headquartered in Winter Park,
Fla., CHS offers services in 114
locations by more than 1,900 staff
members dedicated to provid-
ing child-focused, family-centered
care.


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