<%BANNER%>
HIDE
 Main
 Main: Sheriff’s Log
 Main continued
 Main: Commentary
 Main continued
 Main: Old Farmer’s Almanac
 Main: Speak Up
 Main continued
 Main: Public & Legal Notices
 Main continued
 Main: Job Market
 Main: Obituaries
 Main continued
 Main: Classifieds
 Main: Classifieds
 Main continued














The Calhoun-Liberty journal
ALL ISSUES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00027796/00064
 Material Information
Title: The Calhoun-Liberty journal
Portion of title: Calhoun Liberty journal
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: The Liberty Journal, Inc.
Place of Publication: Bristol Fla
Creation Date: March 22, 2006
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Bristol (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Liberty County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Calhoun County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Liberty -- Bristol
Coordinates: 30.426944 x -84.979167 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in Sept. 1991.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 11, no. 38 (Sept. 18, 1991).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002046630
oclc - 33425067
notis - AKN4565
lccn - sn 95047245
System ID: UF00027796:00064
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly journal (Bristol, Fla.)

Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
    Main: Sheriff’s Log
        page 2
    Main continued
        page 3
        page 4
        page 5
    Main: Commentary
        page 6
        page 7
    Main continued
        page 8
        page 9
        page 10
    Main: Old Farmer’s Almanac
        page 11
    Main: Speak Up
        page 12
        page 13
    Main continued
        page 14
        page 15
        page 16
        page 17
        page 18
        page 19
        page 20
        page 21
    Main: Public & Legal Notices
        page 22
        page 23
    Main continued
        page 24
    Main: Job Market
        page 25
    Main: Obituaries
        page 26
    Main continued
        page 27
    Main: Classifieds
        page 28
    Main: Classifieds
        page 29
    Main continued
        page 30
        page 31
        page 32
Full Text





Several
letters to
the editor
on a variety
of topics


50
includes
tax -


351 S 06_0427
Fionda.History Libraf/
PO -B 17007M1AKN4565


The Calkuun--LuDerzy




JOURNAL


Lion's Roar
generates
plenty of
laughs at
recent event
DAMi Q


um 4 'r.


Parents of 4 charged with
operatingmethlabathoe


by Teresa Eubanks, Journal Editor
A Calhoun County couple
has been charged with operat-
ing a methamphetamine lab out
of their home and endangering
their four children in the pro-
cess, according to a report from
the Calhoun County Sheriff's
Department.
Phillip Vaughn, 33, and his
wife, Lisa, 30, were arrested
March 8 when deputies served
a search warrant at their mobile
home in- the Shelton's Corner
Community at 6:34 p.m.
When officers arrived at the
25142 NW Four Winds Lane
residence, Phillip Vaughn tried
to escape by running out the
back door and into the woods.
He was taken into custody after
a brief foot pursuit, handcuffed
and brought back to the resi-
dence.
When asked if any drugs were
present in the home, Vaughn told
deputies "there was some dope
in the bedroom."
But deputies found much
more. After combing through
the home, they found all the
makings of a methamphetamine
lab, including:
A blue backpack in the
bedroom, which held a small
glass jar containing iodine
crystals, a Visine bottle one-
fourth full of muriatic acid,. a
clear plastic bag containing
methyisulfonyimethane (MSM),
a two-lb. bottle of .crystal drain
opener, a bottle of PH test strips


Phillip Vaughn, above,
and Lisa Vaughn, below.


and a bag of bamboo skewers.
-Also found in the bedroom
was a one-quart bottle of dena-
tured alcohol which was 1/8th
full and a quart bottle of Ac-
etone, which was 1/4th full.
-In the kitchen and dining
room area was found a thermos
containing camp fuel, a quart jar
of psuedowash, a quart bottle of
Acetone that was 1/8th full, a
quart bottle of charcoal lighter
fluid that with about 25 percent
of its contents remaining, an
empty box of nasal decongestant
(cold pills), a gallon bottle of


muriatic acid that was half full
and a light bulb that had been
used as a pipe for smoking meth
and retained some of the drug's
burnt residue.
-A small cut off section of a
drinking straw with meth residue
was found in a bathroom.
The materials found are those
used in clandestine red phospho-
rus methamphetamine labs, ac-
cording to Investigator Michael
Bryant of the Calhoun County
Sheriff's Department.
Bryant explained that the jar
containing the psuedowash is the
result of the psuedoephedrine
extraction from cold pills. The
pills are crushed up and soaked
in a solvent such as Acetone or
denatured alcohol to extract the
psuedeophedrine.
Iodine and hydrogen peroxide
are mixed to form the iodine
crystals. Muriatic acid and
crystal drain opener are used to
control the PH during the meth-
cooking process. The PH test
strips are used to determine the
acid level of the reaction. Camp
fuel separates the meth oil pro-
duced during the cooking pro-
cess from by-products. MSM
is used as cutting agent after the
meth is manufactured.
Vaughn told investigators the
items found at his home were
used by a friend of his to cook
meth at his home.
When combined to manu-
facture methamphetamine, the
See METH on page 2


Audrey Brown crowned

Miss Altha on Saturday
Newly-crowned Miss Altha Audrey Brown, at
right, shares a hug with Teen Miss winner Kayla
Yon after Saturday's pageant. For more on the
event, please see page 17. KELLY LATHEM PHOTO


Head-on collision on State Road 20 sends four to hospital
by reresa Eubanks, Journal Editor
A head-on collision at John F. Bailey Road and State Road
20 sent four people to area hospitals with non-incapacitating
injuries last week.
According to the report filed by FHP Trooper Larry Battle,
William Ayers, 78, of Altha was traveling east on State Road
20 when'lie turned in front of a westbound car driven by Lee
V Holloman, 71 of Gretna.
S Ayers' 2000 Chevrolet pickup collided with Holloman's
1995 Toyota at 6:10 p.m. on March 15, about a mile and a half
east of Blountstown.
-- Holloman was taken to Jackson Hospital by a relative.
The occupants of Holloman's vehicle, including the driver,
his daughter, Florence Holloman, 43, of Gretna, and his
grandson, Daryl Howard, 19, of Georgia, were transported
-. -by ambulance to a landing site where they were put on an
-AirHeart emergency helicopter and taken to Tallahassee Me-
morial Hospital.
S All four were wearing seatbelts, Battle said. He noted that
Lee Holloman was up and walking when he arrived at the
scene.
Ayers was charged with turning left in front of approach-
Four went to the hospital after two vehicles collided on S.R. 20 last week JOHNNY EUBANKS PHOTO ing traffic.

Sh.eif' o ..2 C m uiyCln ar .4 Cou n st lierNothsas e*ee M reheos..7 6iuaie. .2






Page 2 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL MARCH 22,-2006


Calhoun teen charged

for involvement with

14-year-old girlfriend
A 19-year-old from Clarksville was arrest on a
lewd and lascivious charge after the father of an
underage Liberty County girl reported finding the
two having sex in the living room of his home on
March 12.
The next day, the parents of the 14-year-old girl
contacted the Liberty County Sheriff's Department
to report that she was missing and that they believed
she had run away with the man.
After unsuccessful attempts to locate Johnny
Harvard Jr. at his home or the home of a relative, a
deputy found Harvard and the young girl wander-
ing in the woods off County Road 5 in Calhoun
County. When asked why they were in the woods,
Harvard replied that they were hiding from the
girl's parents.
Harvard was taken into custody by deputies
with the Calhoun County Sheriff's Department and
charged with interference of child custody. He was
then turned over to the Liberty County Jail, where
he is being held on $25,000 bond.

Driver arrested after routine stop

leads to discovery of suspended
license, marijuana possession
A 25-year-old man who failed to dim his bright
lights when he passed a deputy on Hwy. 73 was
arrested after a routine traffic stop and charged
with possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana,
possession of drug paraphernalia and driving while
license suspended or revoked.
Calhoun County Sheriff's Deputy William Dal-
ton was traveling south on Hwy. 73 around 7:34
p.m, Friday when an oncoming car drove past him,
keeping its bright lights on.
'Dalton turned around and as he approached the
car, the driver made a quick right turn onto Pitts
Circle and accelerated to a high rate of speed.
Dalton turned on his emergency lights and sig-'
naled for the driver to stop.
When he approached the driver, identified as
Rodney DeWayne Adkinson of Wewahitchka, !the
. deputy was told that he did' not have a license.
-Adkinson also stated that he believed there were.
two warrants for him out of Gulf County.
When asked if there were any illegal drugs or
weapons on his person, Adkinson said he "had a
sack of weed" in his pocket. Dalton found a plastic
bag with approximately six grams of marijuana in
Adkison's left front pants pocket. Apack of rolling
papers was found in his right back pants pockets.
Adkinson was arrested and taken to the county


S1_i S EIFFS OG


CALHOUN COUNTY
March 13: Johnny Harvard Jr., interference with custody; Wil-
liam Fuqua, VOP (state & county), FTA; Paul Scherman, VOP;
David Gomez-Perez, no valid driver's license.
March 14: Alexander Kowalski, VOP (state); Terrance Free,
VOP (county); William Shiroh, lewd and lascivious act on child
less than 12 years of age (Gulf Co. warrant); Curtis Garrett, driv-
ing while license suspended or revoked with knowledge.
March 15: Peggy Stone, VOP (county), FTA, uttering forged
instrument, forgery; Talris Brown, sentenced from court; Rolando
Santana, holding for Hillsborough Co.
March 16: Jason Story, driving while license suspended or
revoked with knowledge; Lisa Vaughn, manufacturing meth,
possession of meth, possession of listed chemicals, child abuse,
possession of paraphernalia; Rufus Lee, VOP (county); Irvin
Hebert, possession of less. than 20 grams, possession of drug
paraphernalia; Phillip Vaughn, manufacturing meth, possession
of meth, possession of listed chemicals, child abuse, possession
of paraphernalia, resisting without violence.
March 17: Billy Joe Wood, VOP (county); Michael Foreman,
driving while license suspended or revoked (habitual); Thomas
Dawsey, serving weekends; David Popp, serving weekends;
Rodney Adkinson, possession of less than 20 grams, posses-
sion of drug paraphernalia, driving while license suspended or
revoked (habitual), Gulf Co. warrant battery; Woodrow Cherry,
possession of cocaine, drug paraphernalia, resisting with vio-
lence; Tereceda Pearson, driving while license suspended or
revoked with knowledge; Richard Whitehead, possession of less
than 20 grams, possession of alcohol under the age of 21.
March 18: Keith B. Jones, aggravated assault, VOP (state);
Bobby Hammond, resisting with violence, possession of less than
20 grams, possession of drug paraphernalia, reckless driving.
March 19: William Lindsey, domestic battery (two times), VOP
(state); Pereia Gudibel Menjia, no driver's license; Nicholas P.
Faria, reckless driving, fleeing and attempt to elude; Thomas
Kimbrel, resisting without violence.

LIBERTY COUNTY
March 11: Arcadio Barron Camacho, no valid driver's license;
Susan Johnson, holding for CCSO; James Hammac, holding for
GCSO; Gregory Johnson, holding for GCSO; Felicia Engram,
VOP, passing worthless bank checks; Johnny Harvard, lewd
and lascivious.
March 16: Peggy M. Stone, holding for CCSO; Lisa Ann
Vaughn, holding for CCSO.
March 18: Terecedo Nichele Pearson, holding for CCSO; Paul
Conrad Walsh, fleeing and eluding, possession of alcohol under
21 years of age; James Tyler Zomrn, possession of alcohol, false
_display of driver's license. :
Ustlngslndudenamefollwedbychargeandldentiffcatonofaestlngagency. Tenamesabovereresen
those charged. We remind our readers that all are presumed Innocent until proven guilty.
Blountstown Police Dept.
March 13 through March 19, 2006
Citations issued:
Accidents..............00 Traffic Citations...:............07
Special details (business escorts, traffic details)..;...69
Business alarms....01 Residential alarms.........00
Complaints. ...................152


Underage pair found

with alcohol Saturday
A young driver making a fast trip along State
Road 20 Saturday night made a detour to the Liberty
County Jail after a deputy clocked him traveling
90 mph.
When he saw a silver 2002 Lexus speeding east
on State Road 20 around 8 p.m., Liberty County
Sheriff's Department. Deputy Wes Harsey turned
around and signaled for the driver to stop.
The car, which was 1.5 miles west of Hosford,
continued on and made a right turn onto a private
drive. After turning off his lights, the driver kept
going for 200 feet before coming to a stop.
When asked why he drove so far away before
stopping, Paul Conrad Walsh, 19, of Tallahassee,
said he was just "looking for a place to get off the
road."
After detecting the faint odor of an alcoholic bev-
erage on the driver, Harsey asked Walsh and his two
passengers to step out and searched the car. Inside,
an open case of cold beer was found.
The front seat passenger, identified as James Tyler
Zorn, 20, of Gainesville, said the beer was his. In
Zorn's wallet was a University of Florida photo ID
with his picture, along with a driver's license issued
to a Brian Alexander Straessle, whose age was listed
as 21. Zorn also had a traffic citation from Alachua
County in his name.
Walsh later admitted that he had tried to get away
when the deputy signaled for him to stop because
he had been drinking earlier and "didn't need any
more tickets."
Walsh was charged with unlawful speed, fleeing
and eluding and possession of alcohol by a person
under the age of 21.
Zorn was charged with possession of an alcoholic
beverage by a person under the age of 21 and pos-
session/false display of a Florida driver's license.
He later admitted he stole the license from a friend
so that he could buy beer.


materials found at the home the Vaughns share with
their four children present a hazardous material ex-
posure danger. Two of the couple's children were
- hme at the time the materials were recovered.
The Vaughns were both, charged with manu-
facturing methamphetamine, possession of listed
chemical, possession of methamphetamine, child
abuse and possession of drug paraphernalia. Phil-
lip Vaughn was also charged with resisting a law
enforcement officer without violence.
His bond was set at $27,500; hers was $25,000.
Both were released from custody on March 17.
Their children, who are ages 2, 7, 10 and 12,
have been removed from the home and placed with
a grandmother, according to Bryant.


BigBend Ho'spice.S1ts A'


Liberty Couenty oi Workies,
... -.'-.., --; -;-0 ." .-. -=' '= .."... "" [ *' -.-.,- .: = ". .: ,'A :. '..: .. :.I, .,. .'. 2Z ., y:.,-, i',






MACFICF'12i206'THL' C~bALHOI-LlB~iAY JOCYF NAL Page S


C>


eIrtiv Post&

Barn Pole Inc.
Hwy. 12, Bristol 643-5995 (1/2 mile south of the red light)
TOP TOP TOP FACTORY
GRADE GRADE GRADE SECONDS
7' Posts 8' Posts 6'6" Posts 8' Corners
Top Size Top Size Top Size under 3"
3-4" 2-3", 3-4" 2-2.5" 3-4"
4-5" 4-5" 2-5.3" 4-5" I
5-6" 5-6" 3-3.5" 5-6"
6-7" 3.5-4" 6-7"
SEI 7-8" 45" 7-8"
SPECIALTY 8"+ 5"+ 8"+
POSTS
1/4 rounds Items FACTORY SECONDS I
1/2 rounds subjectto 6'6" Posts, Top Size, unde2"
( Flat Face availability 2-3" 3-4" 4-5" 5 '
^'Wl^ Vk/ We've got the fence posts to meet your needs.




,' I 1 JU V~'

.: I ,LJ '_- L^ pLace.to, Sit i




n-len a%! Co-n-ez T




r


The


Restaurant


H Hwy. 20, Bristol 643-2264,
S .< J, *


Man arrested on crack cocaine


charges after scuffle with deputy


A couple were arrested after
a traffic stop led to a scuffle
Friday night in Clarksville dur-
ing which a man reached for an
officer's taser gun, according to a
report from the Calhoun County
Sheriff's Department.
Woodrow Ray Cherry III, 22,
of Panama City and 18-year-old
Tereceda Nichele Pearson, 18,
of Apalachicola, were taken into
custody after being stopped for
speeding just before 10 p.m.
K Pearson was driving west
through Clarksville when an of-
ficer running a stationary radar
tracked her traveling 67 mph in
a 45 mph zone.
When she was stopped, she
could not produce a driver's li-
cense and told Deputy William
Dalton the vehicle belonged to
her passenger, Cherry.
Dalton noted that Cherry's
eyes were bloodshot and watery
and he appeared to be acting ner-
votisly, with his hands shaking.
Dalton got consent to search
the vehicle and asked Cherry to
step out, telling him to keep his
hands in sight. Cherry ignored
the officer's instructions and kept
putting his hands in the pocket
of his shorts as though trying to
retrieve something.
While the deputy was search-
ing Cherry, Cherry continued
to reach into his pocket despite
being told not to., Dalton noticed`
x% hat appeared'tolbea white rock
substance fall from the bottom of
Cherry's right shorts leg.'
Dalton grabbed Cherry and
ordered him to move his hand,


SFLEETWOOD

FAMILY HOME CENTER

of TaOihassee "Where Quality is Affordable"


DOUBLE-WIDE DREAM HOM A

1 Save $1 ,000's on every home on the lot!


fr "
Home Only
Interest Rates
As Low As
5.5%


Bank on hand for
Immediate approval

Immediate FHA
Land/Home
Approvals

Land Available in
All Surrounding
Counties


s75,900
Bring in this ad and save $1,000!


F r ",
Large Kitchen
Morning Room
Great Room

FHA Specialist
on Hand

#1 Selling
Home on the
Market!


BEST SELLING FLEETWOOD HOME!


Directions:
Hwy. 20 E to Geddie Rd.
Turn left, go to Hwy. 90.
Turn right, 1/2 mile on right
p'V '.-,.-' v .,', -_-.".- -, ,,*-.', -. :.. '-. .


ASK FOR CHRIS OR STEVE
850-575-4240 Fax: 850-575-0058 cell: 850-528-6995
7579 W. TENNESSEE ST. IN TALLAHASSEE


F


Man arrested for threatening

woman with knife over vodka
A Calhoun County man was arrested after he allegedly threatened
a woman with a knife, according to a report from the Calhoun County
Sheriff's Department.
Keith Jones, 54, was arrested on a charge of aggravated assault
after witnessed provided statements Saturday that he and the woman
were involved in an altercation at a Blountstown residence.
According to the victim's statement, she picked up her purse along
with a half pint of vodka sitting on a table as she began to leave the
residence around 2:21 p.m. Jones reportedly followed her as she left
the porch, with a knife in his hand.
The victim reported Jones held the knife to her throat and said he
would kill her if she took the vodka.
One of the witnesses reported that the woman yelled that Jones
.."was going to cut her throat." The witness then stated that Jones ran
inside and placed his knife on the coffee table.
The victim and witnesses went to the sheriff's office to report the
incident.
A deputy made contact with Jones a short time later at a Boggs
Cemetery Road residence, where he was found highly intoxicated
and smelling strongly of alcohol.
Jones stated that he and the woman had a fight and he.then left.
The knife the victim described was found on Jones and confiscated,
Jones was arrested and taken to the county jail, where he was also
.-.charged with probation violation and held without bond.
The victim was urged to seek an injunction against Jones.


March is National Nutrition Month


TALLAHASSEE The
Florida Department of Health
(DOH) and the Florida
Department of Education (DOE)
join to celebrate National
Nutrition Month. March has
been designated to promote
healthy eating and physical
activity not only throughout the
month, but over the entire year
and beyond.
"We must be proactive with
our health," said DOH Secretary
M. Rony Frangois, M.D.,
M.S.P.H., Ph.D. "Healthy eating
habits and daily physical activity
can help improve and reduce the
risks of obesity, heart disease and
stroke."
National Nutrition Month
begins immediately following
Florida's statewide physical
activity initiative, Step Up,
Florida! The third-annual
fitness project was showcased
throughout Florida's 67 counties
to help Floridians take action on
their health.
According to the 2004
Beha% ioral Ri,.k F.actor


Surveillance Survey (BRFSS), a
total of 59.6 percent of Florida
adults were overweight (36.8
percent) or obese (22.8 percent),
which is a 69 percent increase
sinc6 1986. In addition, the 2005
Florida Youth Physical Activity
and Nutrition Survey (YPANS)
indicated only 22 percent of
middle school students reported
eating five or more servings of
fruits or vegetables per day. The
2005 Youth Risk Behavior Survey
(YRBS) also indicated that only
22 percent of Florida high school
students ate five or more servings
of fruits or vegetable each day
during a seven-day period.
"It is critical that we educate
our students about the value of
good nutrition," said Education
Commissioner John L. Winn.
"Maintaining a healthy lifestyle
and eating the right foods will
give them the stamina they need
to succeed in school ndl in life."..


I O


- --


---- -- -- ~~----------------- ----------------- ----------------- ----------


Cherry's shorts fell to his knees,
revealing a plastic bag in the
crotch area of his undershorts
which had cocaine residue.
Cherry was charged with pos-
session of crack cocaine as well
as resisting arrest with violence
because he was apparently trying
to destroy the evidence, accord-
ing to Dalton's report. Cherry
was also charged with tampering
with evidence, possession of drug
paraphernalia (for the residue
found in the plastic bag).
Pearson was charged with
driving while license suspended
or revoked with knowledge and
later given a conditional release.
Cherry was released on $3,000
bond the next day.


which he refused to do. The men
then scuffled as Cherry reached
for Dalton's taser and broke the
officer's microphone holder as
they grappled and went to the
ground.
Deputy. Chris Porter assisted
Dalton in getting control of the
suspect. During the altercation,
Dalton suffered an injury to his
right shoulder.
Dalton found several pieces of
crack cocaine in Cherry's right
front pocket while the two men
were down, along with two more
pieces that were on the ground
after the suspect had apparently
tried to destroy the evidence, the
deputy noted in his report.
After he was handcuffed,






Page 4 THE CALHOUN-UBERTY JOURNAL MARCH 22,2006


Adopting from China

workshop set April 1
by Amy Brown, Great Wall China Adoption
Thousands of people successfully
adopt healthy, beautiful children from
China each year. If you are interested in
learning more about adopting from Chi-
na, please attend Great Wall's free infor-
mative workshop on Saturday, April 1 at
Jacksonville Library, Beaches Branch,
600 3rd St., Neptune Beach from 10 a.m.
to noon. Attendees will receive a coupon
for $25 off the application fee.
China's eligibility requirements and the
home study process will be discussed...
and families who have recently adopted
will be on hand to answer questions.
Space is limited, so for more information
or to register, contact Kristin Michalcyzk
at (904) 221-4095 or kristin.fl@gwca.
org. To contact our Austin headquarters,
call 1-888-GWFAMILY or visit us online
at GWCA.org-

Liberty County Pre-k
screening scheduled
from the Panhandle Area Education Consortium
Liberty County School Board and
FDLRS/PAEC will sponsor free Child
Find. Pre-K screenings April 17-20 for
children who will be 3 years of age or
older by Sept. 1, 2006.
Each child will be screened in the ar-
eas of speaking/listening, motor move-
ment, school readiness, social skills and
vision and hearing.
Bring a copy of the child's birth certifi-
cate, Social Security card, proof of resi-
dency and proof of family income to the
screening.
Please call 643-2275, ext. 7 to sched-
ule an appointment.

Cancer support group
to meet Mon., April 3
from the Calhoun County Public Library
A small group (Cancer Support Group)
of caring individuals meet on the first
Monday of the month at 6 p.m. in the
Heritage Room of the Calhoun County
Public Library.
If you have cancer now, have had can-
cer, or have a loved one who has cancer,
you might be interested in this group or
if you are a caring person who would
like to lend support and learn more about
this disease, you might like to attend the
meetings.
For more information, call 674-8773.

AAANF meeting set
from the Area Agency on Aging for North Florida Inc.
The Area Agency on Aging for North
Florida Inc. will hold its Board of Direc-
tors meeting on Thursday, March 23 at
10:30 a.m. (ET).
The meeting will be held at the Area
Agency on Aging for North Florida, 2414
Mahan Dr., Tallahassee.
For more information, call 488-0055.


Red Oak reunion Sat.
The Red Oak reunion will be held Sat-
urday, March 25 at Sam Atkins Park in
Blountstown. Bring a covered dish for
lunch at 11:30 a.m.
For more information, call 674-3939.

First, just call in the person's name and date.to be
listed on our weekly community calendar. There is
no charge. Callers are asked to give their own name
and phone number in case we need to verify a spell-
ing or double-check the date. We encourage our
readers to compile a list of their family's and friends'
birthdays, printed clearly and mail or fax them tous
at .TheJournal.


Covenant Hospice

offers free adult


iBa
*, 4


omo 01--A urive a-


food SCBC Blood Drive at
MoIre E" -Oglesby, 8:30 11 a.m.
00 0- *Parthenon Healthcare, Beti .S "
1-4 p.m. John
Weight Loss Support Group McElroy Jr.
meets at 1 p.m. at Shelton Park Library
Rotary Club meets at Calhoun-Liberty Hospital, noon
Boy Scout Troop 200 & 203 meets at 6:30 p.m., Mormon Church
AA meets 7 D.m.. Calhoun County Old Aa BIda. west door


Congressman Allen uoya s Hep.
will meet with the public from 9:30 to 11 a.m. (CT),
at the Calhoun County Courthouse; and from
1:30 to 3:30 p.m. (ET) at the Liberty County
Calhoun County Chamber of Commerce
Banquet, Pioneer Settlement, Frink gym, 6 p.m.
Rock Bluff Community Fire Dept.
meets 7 p.m. at the voting house


Audrey
Brown


VFW meetings 7:30 p.m. at the Veterans Memorial Park
AA meets 7 p.m., basement of Calhoun County Courthouse


Calhoun County Children's Coalition, meets
at 9 a.m., at the W. T. Neal Civic Center



Blood W


SCBC Blood Drive at
Superior Bank,
10 a.m.-4 p.m.


Today's

GabrieT
Brown,
Stephen
Brown


Dance at the American Legion Hall in Blountstown, from 8:30 p.m. 12:30 a.m.


March is
Library
Fine Free
Month


AA meets 7:30 p.m., Hosford School cafeteria
Dance at the American Legion Hall in Blountstown, from 8:30 p.m. 12:30 a.m.


Attend the church of
your choice this Sunday


Blountstown Lions Club meets
6 p.m. at the Apalachee Restaurant


Altha Boy Scouts meets at
5:30 p.m. at the Altha VFD


I


Today'

John
McElroy III


Bulldog Club meets 7 p.m. at the LCHS field house


Bristol Lions Club meets
7 p.m. at the Apalachee Restaurant

Blountstown Chapter #179 O.E.S.
meets 7 p.m. at Dixie Lodge

Calhoun Co. Girl Scout Troop 579
meets at W.T. Neal Civic Center,
from 5:30-7 p.m.


:f H
i-


C| "*


volunteer training

MARIANNA Covenant Hospice is
seeking compassionate volunteers who
are interested in making a difference in
the lives of patients and families facing
life-limiting illnesses. An adult volun-
teer training session will be held Satur-
day, March 25 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at
the Covenant Hospice Conference Room
located downstairs at 4440 Lafayette St.,
Suite C. in Marianna.
Volunteers are needed for administra-
tive support, community outreach, trans-
portation, companionship, respite servic-
es and special events. The program is free
and includes lunch. The contributions
made by volunteers allow Covenant Hos-
pice, a non-profit organization, to contin-
ue to provide a very special kind of caring
to patients with life-limiting illnesses and
their loved ones.
To register by March 23, please call
Barbara Bentley at 482-8520.

2006 Small Business
Week nominations
from the Small Business Development Center
The Small Business Week Commit-
tee is accepting .nominations for the 2006
Small Business Person of the Year award
and Small Business Service Awards.
Nomination forms are available c/o The
Small Business Development Center at
Florida A&M University in Tallahassee.
For more information, please call the
SBDC at FAMU at 599-3407.






That's how many copies of
The Calhoun-Liberty Journal
were distributed last week,
ensuring plenty of coverage for
your community announcements
and great response for our
business advertisers!



THE

CALHOUN-LIBERTY

JOURNAL
(USPS 012367)
Summers Road
Address correspondence to:
The Calhoun-Liberty Journal
PRO. Box 536
Bristol, FL 32321
Johnny Eubanks, Publisher
Teresa Eubanks, Editor
E-MAILADDRESS:
TheJournal@gtcom.net
(850) 643-3333 or
1-800-717-3333 FlordaPress
Fax (850) 643-3334 Association
The Calhoun-Liberty Journal is published each
Wednesday bythe Liberty Journal Inc., Summers
Road, P.O. Box 536, Bristol, FL 32321.
Annual subscriptions are $18.
Periodicals postage paid at Bristol, Fla.
POSTMASTER: Send address corrections to:
The Calhoun-Liberty Journal,
P.O. Box 536, Bristol, FL 32321.






MARCH 22,2006 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 5


All Aboard-- Travel to the Land of the Helping Hands


The first Community Helping
Hands for Families event will be
held Saturday, April 1 at Veterans
Memorial Park Civic Center
from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. (ET).
Dr. Brenda Jarmon of Florida
A&M University will address
the "Village Concept of Rais-
ing Children in this New Mil-


lennium." Presentations will
focus on strengthening family
relationships and awareness of
problems facing families in
today's society.
Other presenters include: Peg-
gy Deason Howland, Liberty
County Health Department; Dr.
Darreyl Duggar, Liberty County


Spring Break Teen Dance
at the American Legion
Thursday, March 23

From 7-11 p.m.
Ages 13-18

$5 Admission Fee

Under Supervision

NO ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES ALLOWED.

Hwy 20 W. in Blountstown 674-4293


Schools; Rev. Cecil Wilson, Lib-
erty County Schools and Charles
Morris, Liberty County Sheriff's
Department.
Supervised child care will be
available.
Special booths will provide
information concerning activities
and services available to families
and children, including Healthy
Start, 4-H Extension Service,
Wilderness Quest Camps, Miss


Liberty County pageant, and
many others.
Parents may sign up their
children for the "Fun Summer
Program," sponsored by the Title
II Bethune Community Service
Center grant. Enrollment is lim-
ited. The summer program will
run from May 29 June 9.
Applications will also be
received for contestants, ages 6
- 21, for the Miss Liberty County


pageant to be held May 5.
Free tickets to ride the Veter-
ans Memorial Park Train and re-
ceive a picnic lunch at the River
Junction Depot will be given to
all participants.
This event is sponsored by
Florida Department of Juvenile
Justice, OJJDP, Liberty County
Board of Commissioners, Liberty
County School Board, Liberty
County Sheriff's Office.


NKFF offering free kidney disease screenings

at the Capitol courtyard in Tallahassee today


As part of National Kidney
Month, the National Kidney
Foundation of Florida (NKFF)
will provide free kidney
disease screenings to the public
on March 22 from 8:30 a.m.
to 4 p.m. March 22 is also
"Dialysis Day 2006" atthe State
Capitol Court Yard in front
of the historic building facing
Monroe Street. This event is
designed to raise awareness on
preventing and treating kidney
disease with state legislators
and the general public.


Chronic Kidney Disease
(CKD) currently affects more
than 20 million Americans
across the United States. The
leading contributors to CKD
are diabetes and hypertension.
The most advanced stage of
CKD, End Stage Renal Disease
(ESRD), affects 400,000
Americans and 19,000 people
in Florida alone. Patients with
ESRD must either find a kidney
transplant, or receive a four
hour dialysis treatment, three
times a week for the rest of their


lives. ESRD is irreversible,
and if left untreated, is fatal.
It is critical to detect and
treat kidney disease as early
as possible to minimize the
impact of this disease.
The NKFF welcomes all
members of the general public
to receive a free screening to
determine whether they are at-
risk for kidney disease. This is
a non-ticketed event and does
not require an appointment.
For more information, call
Juliet Venzara, 786-295-5080.


Date changed for Calhoun County

Senior citizens photo fundraiser


from the Calhoun County
Senior Citizens Association
Calhoun County Senior Citi-
zens has changed the date of
their photo fundraiser to Friday,
March 31 and Saturday, April 1
due to spring break. This will al-
low those families that couldn't
sign up for this great offer to be
able to do so.
This is a great deal for anyone
that would like a 10x13 portrait
printed in black and white with a
splash of color of their child or
children. Color splash is where


Looking for a way to
get your

MESSAGE

ACROSS?. ."











It's easy...when you
place your ads and
announcements in
=THE -

Calhoun

Liberty

JOURNAL
For information,
call 643-3333 or
;. t(800T717-'3333:: .


they accent an item in red on a
black and white photo. We are
offering a certificate for just $10
which entitles you to one 10x13
portrait valued at $89.95. This of-
fer is limited to children up to age
16. You may have more than one
child in the photo Antiquities will


provide clothing and props up to
child size 16. Your child may also
want to bring his or her favorite
toy or a favorite outfit.
Sitting times will be available
on Friday, March 31 and Satur-
day, April 1. We will arrange a
time that is convenient for you.
The sittings will be at the Senior
Citizens Center.
Stop by the office at 16859
NE Cayson St., Blountstown to
purchase a coupon. If you would
like more information, call 674-
4163.


April 7 Fish fry will benefit Sr. Citizens
from the Calhoun County Senior Citizens Association
The Calhoun County Senior Citizens Association will sponsor a
fish fry fundraiser on Friday, April 7. Call 674-4163 to reserve one
of these delicious meals.
The plates will include catfish filet, potato salad, baked beans,
hush puppies and dessert (we give large servings) all for $6. We will
deliver.
To place your order you may do so by calling 674-4163 or fax your
order to 674-8384. You can also come by and pick up your plate on
the corner of Hwy. 71 and Hwy. 20 beside the Blountstown Police
Department.
All proceeds will go to benefit the Calhoun County Senior Citizens
Association. Thank you for your support.



Work begins on SR 65 in Hosford
from the Florida Department of Transportation
CHIPLEY Construction began March 20 on State Road 65
from State Road 20 to the Gadsden County line in Hosford. The
Florida Department of Transportation recently awarded C.W. Rob-
erts Contracting of Hosford the $6.4 million resurfacing contract
to mill, resurface and add paved shoulders along the 6.2 mile cor-
ridor.
Also included in the contract is minor railroad crossing work,
an on-site detour will be set to move traffic around the work area.
Roberts has 285 work days to complete the project.
Motorists are reminded to use caution while traveling through
the construction zone. Speeding violations double in construction
'zoneg-when, workers are present.





Page 6 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL MARCH 22,2006


-EM -OP -
411,. f* -d= 4Pwk
-"m& a -0 obw- m-o
__ -.ww W A. O* ___O "

q 4mm- q 1. -D O P om

wo -maw0 00- A N~ O- 4N- -- 40 i



w MWEM- WV0 4w ft--ut


ummmA bw bus, a tb~w we

-own




so-48N- G- Vomw MO aw -



,w~






Coyihe Material

a-w ft -Owaw"=- -epO
LI Thi4w22.Syndicated Content

Av- i i a'b I from Commercial News Providers"
w sot tn w 0 0 a


00 5 0 5 -MW -O WW, 4- '

a-- q-


a- ww 4--du



410-,% S C



41M- sw qW -90 5 In.
-EOI 4WOMM* am ft.w -0 00-
4b- -q -a

- U f a--mw softpq
* ~ a NO- -I b.w 4w
woo em 0 e0 4I. -0% 40 -
O* w b fp s- .
a -m oub. -dipC -


~ 0 0


IA





MARCH 22, 20Q,6 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 7


wgOMMENTARYuwir ~s


L 48 m


b'

Vpb/4 l


"Copyrighted


SyndicatediC

ble from Commercia

&WOODW


I





Material


content

I News Providers"


em 4d -- .W

- Sol. a -. 4o
*-b -Mm -


- a S e -
-
____ ~ a
- ~* -- -


- -


-mm


400 qo


OP_ "S --1

- 1 0 mo o
4b

* Q -


low s-


- -


. dnW


-41h


F


I


Availa


- -~ -


Oman ,-ow


r


OVVA ft


:0


-ape
.41
40
wwo -


a





Page 8 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL MARCH 22,2006


Spanish film-

lecture series

set at Chipola
from Chipola College
MARIANNA-Chipola
College professor Dr. Mark
Ebel announces a Spanish Film
Series beginning March 28 at the
college.
The events are free and open
to the public and will be held
in Jackson Lecture Hall of the
Chipola Literature/Language
Building.
The first event is a film/
lecture entitled, "What We
Would Learn if Dogs Were Our
Teachers in Alejandro Inarritu's
Amores Perros," on Tuesday,
March 28, from 5:30 to 8:30
p.m. The film was produced in
Mexico in 2002 and nominated
for an academy award for Best
Foreign Film. It will be shown
in the original Spanish with
English subtitles. The unrated
film is not recommended for
children as it contains potentially
offensive language, sexuality
and violence.
The second event-set for
April 11, from 4:30 to 5:30
p.m.-is a lecture and slide
presentation, "Translation and
Triage: Lessons Learned from a
Medical Mission to Honduras."
The presentation chronicles
Dr. Ebel's recent mission to the
South American country. Ebel
presented a paper on the mission
and served as a panelist on Health
and Society in Latin America at
the recent annual professional
meeting of SCOLAS (Southwest
Council on Latin American
Studies).
The final event in the series is
a lecture: "Traveling to Cuba: Is
It Possible?" and a film, "Carros
de Cuba," Tuesday. April
18, from 4:30 to 6 p.m. The
lecture will provide practical
information for traveling to
Cuba and a documentary film
with a light-hearted theme: the
presence and maintenance of
classic American cars in Cuba.
The film is mostly in Spanish
with English subtitles.
For information, call Dr. Ebel,
at 850-718-2282.


This bench, painted by local artist Suzanne Jean Payne, is among those up for bid at next
month's hospice fundraiser in Jackson County.


April 22 event to benefit Covenant Hospice


Painted benches promote First


Annual Garden Gala in Marianna


The community is invited to,
the first ever annual Garden Gala,
benefiting Covenant Hospice,
on Sat., April 22 at the National
Guard Armory in Marianna from
6 p.m. to 9 p.m.
Enjoy a social evening filled
with art, entertainment and phi-
lanthropy. Step inside the garden
gate and experience interactive
art, garden demonstrations and
tea tasting. Dine on delicious cui-
sine sponsored by Jackson Hospi-
tal and enjoy lively entertainment
by the Moonlighters.
Silent and live auctions will
showcase a variety of garden
creations, including handsomely
crafted wooden park benches
decorated by local artists, such
as Maria Elnora Johnson, Kathy
Wycoff, Lynnwood Tanner and


Florida House Rep., Marti Coley.
Michele Tabor Kimbrough, artist
chairperson for the event, stated
that country music star Billy Dean
has also autographed a decorated
bench for auction.
"We are so excited about
bringing the Garden Gala to the
Marianna area, and we're grateful
to the sponsors, volunteers and
artists who have participated, "
said Loel Davenport, Community
Development Manger for Cov-
enant Hospice. "We're working
hard to make this an event that
the community looks forward to
year after year."
Tickets are $35-each and may
be purchased by.calling Covenant
Hospice at 482-8520 or by visit-
ing their office at 4440 Lafayette
Street, Suite C in Marianna.


Business and Individual spon-
sorships are still available starting
at $250.
Selected benches will be dis-
played prior to the gala at Wacho-
via Bank, Peoples First, Regions
Bank and other area businesses.
View them online at http://
www.gardengala@covenanthos
pice.org.

Covenant Hospice is a not-
for-profit organization. Proceeds
from the Garden Gala will benefit
Covenant Hospice of Jackson,
Holmes, Calhoun and Washing-
ton counties. The funds will re-
main in the local area to support
the compassionate programs of
Covenant Hospice, helping them
care for those with life-limiting
illnesses and their families.


From gospel to blues, Marianna Arts


Festival has entertainment


IVEY IS CHIPOLA
FACULTY MEMBER OF
THE MONTH Robert
Ivey (left) accepts the
Chipola College Faculty/
Administrator of the month
award from Dr. Willie Spires.
Ivey has taught history at
Chipola since 1993. He
also serves as adviser to the
Chipola Honors Program
and leads student tours to
Europe. CHIPOLA PHOTO


from the Marianna Arts Festival
Melvin "Smokehouse"
Moore takes the stage at the
Marianna Art Festival and Fine
Swine Dine Cook-off on April
7 at 6:15 p.m., announced Cin-
dy Smith, entertainment chair-
person. Moore is just one of the
many special musical presenta-
tions this year's festival-goers
will enjoy. From blues to gos-
pel, the festival has entertain-
ment for the entire family.
Moore began his career in
Chicago, Illinois singing with
local bands, but in the early 70s
he scored a big hit with "I've
Been Watchin' You," backed
by the Southside Movement
band. In the late 80s, he moved


to Marianna where he now
lives, playing Panhandle gigs,
and has a radio program on
WTOT AM & WTOT FM each
Saturday from 4-6 p.m. Moore
is now backed up by the B&H
Blues band.
Vessels of Clay, a local
Southern Gospel group, will
entertain the crowd at 2:30
p.m. Friday The Alford-based
group has been .performing
for 10 years andhas produced
two CDs. Their latest single is
"Jesus Went In," written by
Kenneth Hilton. It was #26 on
the Country Christian Gospel
charts and #52 on the Southern
Gospel Charts. -
The Marianna Arts Festival


for everyone
and Fine Swine Dine Cook-off,
now in its 3rd year, is sched-
uled foi April 7 and 8 at Citi-
zens Lodge Park. In addition to
live entertainment, the festival
features an Art Contest, food
and art vendors, antique car
and truck show and a barbecue
cook-off.
Festival gates open at 12
noon on Friday and remain open
until 10 p.m. Saturday hours
are from 10 a.m. until 7:30 p.m.
Entry fee is $3 per person.
For information about the
festival and entry forms for
the contests and car and truck
show, go to the festival website
at v*ww.mariannaartsfestival.
com.


Chipola show

choir auditions

set for April
MARIANNA-The Chipola
College Show Choir will hold
auditions Thursday, April 13, with
call-backs April 14 in the Chipola
Arts Center.
Interested incoming freshmen
and current Chipola students
are encouraged to audition.
All students should come with:
comfortable clothes and shoes for
the dance audition; a completed
Show Choir Application (available
in the Fine Arts Office or at www.
chipola.edu (Fine and Performing
Arts Page Music Department)
and an accompanied vocal solo.
Those auditioning should bring
either an accompaniment track,
cassette or CD, or an accompanist.
Unaccompanied auditions are not
accepted.
Auditions begin at 4 p.m.,
Thursday, April 13, with call-
backs at 4 p.m., Friday, April 14.
The. Show Choir performs
throughout the panhandle for
schools, civic organizations
and Chipola district events. The
Show Choir has won awards
at the Invitational Show Choir
Workshop; has participated in
the Florida Community College
Show Choir Festivals; has
been guest performer on Royal
Caribbean and Carnival Cruise
lines. The January Show Choir
JAZZMATAZZ concerts have
been sellouts for eight consecutive
years.
All choir members must take
a Show Choir class for credit
and register for MUN1370 or
MUN2371. Scholarships are
available and must be applied for
at the time of the audition. Forms
are available on the Web or in the
Fine Arts Office.
For information, contact the
Fine and Performing Arts office
at 718-2227, or Joan Stadsklev,
Director of Fine and Performing
Arts at Chipola College, at 718-
2301.

Gilbert & Sullivan
concert at Chipola
MARIANNA-Two of
Chipola College's Ensembles
will perform free concerts,
Tuesday, April 4 at 7 p.m., in the
Chipola Arts Center.
The 13-member Rock and Jazz
Ensemble, under the directions
of Dr. Allen Molineux, will play
a variety of selections from the
Swing Era, Rock Literature, and
Latin rhythms. Each member of
the Rock and Jazz Ensemble will
be featured as a soloist during
the concert.
The Chipola Chamber/
Community Chorus will present
A Gilbert and Sullivan Sampler
Concert on the same evening.
The concert is free and open
to the public.
For more information contact
Dr. Lyon at 850-718-2221 or Dr.
Molineux at 850-718-2257...





MARCH 22,2006 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 9


Lion's Roar keeps feet


tapping & faces smiling

...while raising funds for Lion's Club project
; --, The Blountstown Lions Club held their fifth
-,':% annual Lion's Roar March 11 at the BHS
auditorium, with a slate of entertainers that kept
the audience tapping their feet and laughing
., throughout the night. The annual event raises
Funds for the Lions Club sight-related programs
.- :- to provide eyeglasses to those in need. TOP
.. CENTER: Joel Hathaway and his band, Easy
A- Company, performs. LEFT: Ed Cotton makes a
convincing Jerry Clower as he recounts some of
the famous comedian's favorite stories. BELOW:
With that $1.98 price tag hanging from her hat,
% it's clear that this lady may answer to the name
-Doris Shuler but on stage, she's Minnie Pearl.
-BOTTOM: Performers take their turn playing,
dancing and singing. PHOTOS BY
DANIEL WILLIAMS


K" K






Page 10 THE CAtHOUN-ttBERTY ;JOURNAt- MARCKH22, 2006


Third annual Gospel Infant/Toddler Pageant


The third annual Prayer Chain-
ers Mission of God Gospel In-
fant/Toddler Pageant will be held
Friday, March 31 at the Prayer
Chainers Mission of God Church
at 7 p.m.
Contestants will compete in
financial points. They will be
judged on interview with par-
ents, appearance, cute things
they do as they move from one
developmental stage to and the


Magnolia Cemetery

Committee musical

fundraiser planned


one raising the most finances
over $55 will be awarded a $500
scholarship to be appropriated
toward college education. The
remainder of the proceeds will
assist in financing the Gammon
Scholarship, Geraldine B. Sheard
Scholarship and the Mayhaw
School Scholarship.
The entry fee is $25. Boys and
girls up to 3 years old may enter.
Any infant/toddler is welcome


U UI LL~-~


IS

E
F&%


NEW

FROM TH


to apply.
At present we have given two
scholarships, one to Monazia
Smith and one to India Battle.
For more information, call
Debra Peterson at 674-9819 or
Nela Wilson at 674-1299. Watch
for more details on this event. Ap-
plicants so far include Benjamin
Lamar Jones, Kimora Yamani
Reed, Andrea Demetris Williams
and Tirzah Melissa Mosley.


Revival at Sumatra

Baptist Church
Sumatra Baptist Church will
have a revival March 26-29.
1 TPiA r- ~ i b,1 x,;1 i hpff;.n


The Magnolia Cemetery Com- ,tWi ,evivai win u gi ,
mittee will have a special musical Sunday morning, Mar. 26 at, 11
fundraising program at St. Paul -- a.m. followed by dinner on the
AME Church on Saturday, April ground.
1 at 6:30 p.m. (this is before the The Sunday night service will
first Sunday). be at 6 p.m. Services for Monday,
The funds from this program March 27 through Wednesday,
will be used in order to pay for March 29 will begin at 7 p.m.
cemetery upkeep, which was S There will be special singing
done in the past months and a 'Christ in the Pass- at each service. The speaker will
tremendous job was done. ver' presentation e Brother Beau Cooksey from
The Burial Committee Organi- Whigam, GA.
nation is asking that all churches Stan Meyer will be speaking For more information, call
and groups in the community on behalf of Jews for Jesus in Pastor Sam Sullivan at 962-
please participate. Please come a presentation called "'Christ in 4095.,
out and join us for a music filled the Passover" at.Lake Mystic
time in the Lord. Baptist Church on March 27 at7 PaStor Appreciation
Also, the Magnolia Communi- p.m. (ET). At t n ill
ty Burial Organization will meet You are invited to come, see Day set at Glory Hill
each month on the first Saturday and hear Jews for Jesus unfold The congregation of Glory
at 5 p.m. The next meeting will the story of redemption from the Hill Holiness Church would like
be April 1 at 4 p.m. (due to the Exodus to Calvary. Admission is to extend an invitation to the
musical) at St. Paul AME in the free. An offering for the evange- community to come and honor
church dining hall. Please come listic work of Jews for Jesus will our pasto Riley and Erlene
and meet with us. be received., Adams on Sunday, March 26.
For more information, call The churches located at15292 Services will beinat 10 .m.
674-8439. NW County Road 12. Bristol. i. Sin.. .and ltin a.. u the.
," with singing and lifting up the-

Living Waters Assembly of God revival name of Jesus forourcan and
loving pastors.
Evangelist Marvlene Branch and Sunday services will be at Guest speakers will be brought
of Bath, South Carolina will 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. Everyone is .by Anita McLendon and Barbara
be returning to Living Waters invited to attend. Lblley at the 11 a.m. service.
Assembly of God for special The church is located at Bluff If our pastors have touched
revival services Wednesday, Road, turn right at school and go your lives, come and honor them .
March 22 through Sunday, 3 miles in Apalachicola. on this special day.


March 26 in Apalachicola.
Rev. Branch is seeing mir-
acles. in the many services she
ministers at.
Services will be held Wednes-
day through Saturday at 7 p.m.

Prayer band meets
The Liberty Community Prayer
Band will hold prayer service
Thursday, March 23 at 7:30 p.m.
(ET) at the home of Brother and
Sister Louie Beckwvith.
Everyone is cordially invited-
to attend. For more information,
call 643-3660.


For more information, call
Pastor Lois Long at 653-8015
or 323-0219.

Knight of Pythia

annual meeting
Knight of Pythia will have its
annual meeting at St. Paul AME
Church at 3 p.m. (CT) Sunday,
March 26.
The church is located on River
Street inBlountstown. For more
information, call John Hall at
643-2285 or Ronnie Williams at
674-8836.


Dinner fundraiser

at Cornith Church
Corinth Baptist Church will
be selling Boston butt dinners on
Friday, March 31. The menu con-
sists of Boston butt, green beans,
potato salad, bread and dessert.
Plates are $5 each.
. All proceeds will go to the new
church building fund.
For advance tickets, please see
any church member or call 379-
8861 or 379-8584.


Farm Service Agency crop reporting deadline April 14


Computer classes begin March 28

Computer classes begin March 28


from the Calhoun County Public Library
Enrollment is on a first-come,
first-serve basis. Limited to 12
people. Participants are required
to fill out application for enroll-
ment by March 27, hold a cur-
rent Calhoun County library
card and be familiar with com-
puter basics.
Internet e-mail and beyond:
Learn -how to manage your e-
mail, set up your calendar and
more.
Session 1 begins Tuesday,
March 28 from 9:30 to 11 a.m.
Session II will begin Tuesday,
April 4 from 9:30 to 11 a.m.
Sponsored by Panhandle Pub-
licCooperativeSystem, Goodwill
Industries, AmeriCorps*VISTA,
the Calhoun County School sys-
tem Title I, Panhandle Library







Mossy Pond Volunteer Fire
Department (VFD) would like
to thank the Calhoun County
Sheriff's Office (CCSO) for
their prompt arrests of the VFD
gasoline thieves and vandals.
Arrested were Skylar Durden,
John Carr and a juvenile. The
sad part is that the juvenile
was a trusted member of our
department serving as a junior
firefighter for over two years.
We had come to depend on
him and trusted him with Our
lives and he turned out to be just
another low life.
Thanks again, CCSO.
Sincerely yours,
Rolf Myrhammer, Chief
Mossy Pond VFD
Here is a$4 charge for notes of appreciation. We
suggest you mention the event in question when
you write your thank-yous since many of our read-
ers may not know what the note is referring to. In
the case of a hospital stay, it's always nice to make
mention of it if the patient has returned home and
is doing well.


Access Network and Calhoun
County Commission.
Call Jane Breeze, technical
instructor, for more information
at 674-8773, ext. 35.





'TREASURES
S by Ran McDougald j

CHRIST OUR REDEEMER
Text: Ephesians 1:1-14
Paul Harvey told about a boy
walking the street carrying a sack.
The most pitiful fluttering and peeping
came from the sack. An old man met
him and asked, "Whatcha got in that
sack?"
"A sack full of sparrows!" the boy
replied.
"What are you going to do with
them?" asked the old man.
"I'm going to take them out one
by one and pull a feather out now and
then," said the boy.
"How much would you sell the
whole sack for?" asked the man.
The boy piped up, "I'll take two
dollars for the sack!"
"Done," said the man. He took the
sack and pulled it open. The birds were
free.
"God met Lucifer with a huge bag.
Inside the bag were the. most hopeless
sounds of life struggling to be free.
'What have you got in the bag?' asked
the Father.
'People,' smirked Lucifer, 'I'll tor--
ment them one by one.'
'What will you take for all of
them?' inquired the Father.
'Your only Beloved Son,' was the
reply.
'Done!' said the Father. He sent
Christ to die on the cruel, torturous
cross to redeem us. .
Redemption is "a deliverance, pro-
cured. by the payment of a ransom,"
says Mounce..Vine says it is "used
of deliverance from physical torture,
from the power of sin, of the people of
God, and forgiveness."
Christ delivered'us from the most
awful fate; It cost His life's blood. He
was sacrificed for sins that you and I
committed. Now we can be truly free.
We can be free from sin, free from
guilt, and free from an eternity in hell.
Confess your sins. Trust Christ to
forgive them.,Follow Him. Then free-
dom can be yours,


Customized Easter baskets!
WE FILL THEM PER YOUR ORDER.
We offer plush bunnies, chocolate bunnies,
and other Easter goodies for the little ones.
We have unusual baskets. Come see!
Check out our gift selection and remember
we do silk pots and arrangements.


The deadline to report fall
and spring seeded crops, wheat,
oats and annual rye grass, is
April 14.
Spring and fall vegetables
should be reported 15 days af-
ter planting. -
The final date to report other
crops, peanuts, cotton, corn,
soybeans, fruits, grass for hay,
seed or grazing must be-report-


ed by June 30; grass for sod and
mollusk by September 30 for-
the 2007 crop.-
/ -._- _1_- -


be paid to the FSA Office by
July 31 to avoid the 20% late
penalty fee.


otton growers are required For further information,
to participate in the Boll Wee-
please contact the Calhoun-
vil Eradication Program. The o -
Franklin-Gulf-& Liberty Coun-
intended cotton acre reporting
deadline is April 30.- ty FSA Office at 17413 NW
Actual planted acres of cot- Leonard Street, Blountstown,
ton are to be reported by June FL 32424 or call 850-674-
,,Q3 as.ass ~jg.ee.j4 ..88...o 800-2.43.991 2..xt,66





MIACrc272b, -MtrTC1% E CALHC-N--LrBERC1MR~AC I'gW4Tf


QOINCY FARMS
ORGANIC PRODUCTS


Now with.a full line of compost-based soil products.
Delivered in 8 and 1[6 cubic yard loads.
*Topsoil Lite lighter version of Top Soil Plus
* Lawn Mix top-dress your lawns i
*Topsoil Plus safe, all-purpose mix
* Plant Mix basic potting soil
* Finished Compost premium
grade,stable compost
190 Mannie Gunn Road. Quincv.
FL 32351 *Ph. (850) 875-1600. ext. 211
www.ouincycompost.com


'a -


:OLt> PARMIR'S


AL TANAC


2)
CD

-h
-MN
0

s


- -


- a a'
t


-
-

- a -
-
e -


- a


MARCH 22* Old Farmei
L, Qu.-rrrMIoot Almanac


MARCH 20 -
Ieral Eqairox


2. 2006

MARCH 20.21
B/ .'," I/i',a ,'a p ,ro., ,"


4


MARCH 23, 24
Br dr to


C)
-0



cr2
*:~CD
-- ~U'
I -~ (TM)


CD


-U)


0.



(D)


(MI)




0.

.0

MIL
~CD

*0.L


0 7-

0--





Ub

doop 4w %d
n0 -4b'4m


0)
-r

CD


O n March 21, 1959, "Alvin's Doctor." He then created the Chip-
Harmonica," by Alvin and the munk characters: Al'.in (the trou-
Chipmunks, became one of the blemaker. Simon (the scholar). and
chart toppers for high-selling Theodore (who lo ed to eatr.
records. Singer, songwriter, Soon, his Chipmunks were re-
and Chipmunks creator, cording their own albums,
Ross Bagdasarian had% with Bagdasarian, using his
used his recording device alias "Dave Seville," as their
gimmicks previously in manager. Alvin's television car-
his popular song. "Witch toon show followed in 1961.
R .icotta'Pi


1-1/2 pounds ricotta
cheese
1/2 cup toasted
almonds, ground
fine
1/2 cup confectioners'
sugar
grated rind of 1 lemon
I teaspoon vanilla
extract
4 eggs
9-inch pastry crust


F reheat oven to 425TF. Combine ricotta, ground
a almonds, sugar, and lemon rind in a blender.
and pulse to just mi\. Add vanilla, then
eggs, one at a time, pulsing briefly
after each addition. Pour into crust.
Cut tin-foil to just cover the filling:
place over pie. Bake for 5 minutes,
then for another 30 minutes at 3250F.
Remove foil for the last 5 minutes. $>
MAKES 8 SERINOS.


WIT AND WISDOM FROM THE OLD FARMERS ALMANAC
U For sweeter breath, chew dill seeds.
S In March. many weathers.
S U On March 2-1, 1958. Elvis Presley was inducted into the
U.S. Army.
FOR RECIPES, GARDENING TIPS. AND WEATHER FORECASTS,. VISIT.
Xmraw-P


Ready to buy a Roth IRA?

Call us today, We'll explain how we can
help you prepare for your retirement.
Roth IRA Advantages:

$ Contribute up to $3.000
each year; $3,500 if
you're 50 or over.
$ TAX FREE distributions
after five years and -
age 59'/z
$ No required minimum
distributions at age 70'/2.
$ Guaranteed interest
rates.



STOUTAMIRE INSURANCE INC.
16783 SE Pear St., Blountstown
Contact Bill Stoutamire, Phone 674-5974 Fax 674-8307
.*-*~~ ~ ~ ~ .* .-* .***** ... '.. II.


o


I





Page 12 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL MARCH 22,2006


Brother says: 'Ricky Revell is a good man with a good heart'
To the editor: worked another job seven days a was when Jimmy Lee was given
What I am about to say are / week delivering the Tallahassee to him and Jeannine by God.
tntallv and solely my opinions RV A VK TTIP I Democrat? It is written Judge not, lest


LU.aliy --- a-y--_ -Y/ F- Ll-- --
and my perceptions.
First of all, let me be clear,
that in no way do I condone what
my brother has been accused of
doing. His entire family and I are
not only saddened and disturbed
by this event, but sympathetic to
Jeannine, Jimmy Lee, Mrs. Iris
and Mr. Wilhoit as well.
Having said that I will say this
- Ricky Revell is a good man
with a good heart. I believe that
if you were to talk to any of the
many friends and acquaintances
that he has established over the
years they would vouch for that.
I work at the prison here in
Bristol and have had numerous


people ask about Ricky's welfare
after this unforeseen event.
Ricky was part of the initial
staff at Liberty Correctional
Institution and obviously to me,
people that knew and worked with
him hold him in high regard.
"Why did this happen?"
everyone asks. I believe that the
answer is not simple but very
complex. A person in their right
mind would not do this. That is


Hosford vs. Bristol: When will the

two schools get equal attention?
To the editor:
What I would like to know is when Hosford School is going to get
the attention Bristol is getting?
I am so tired of my children and everyone else's children being
put second to Bristol's convenience.
It is time for Hosford School to have fields sufficient for soccer,
T-ball or any other sport, just like Bristol.
We need lights and we need an elementary school, too. My outlook
on Hosford-Telogia's children being sent to Bristol is bullcrap.
I'll personally take my children to Leon or Wakulla before they go
to Bristol. Hosford and Telogia kids deserve the same as Bristol's. So,
I think instead of Bristol getting new gyms, schools or trains, Hosford
needs a nice elementary school and nice official sports fields and so
many other things I cannot put on paper.
So, everyone stop thinking of making Bristol the best and only
part of Liberty County and think of the children who deserve the
same over here.
Latasha Parker
Hosford















$30 OFF $20 OFF. $10 OFF

INCOME TAX INCOME TAX; INCOME TAX
PREPARATION PREPARATION PREPARATION
with this flyer with this flyer with this flyer
OFFER VALID 03/01-03-11-06 OFFER VALID 03/12-03-21-06 OFFER VALID 03/22-03-31-06
COUPON CODE HCMLD COUPON CODE: F9LDE COUPON CODE: NJDEQ
L J- IL I
Offer valid on federal tax preparation. Please present coupon at time of tax preparation. Good only at participating
locations and may not be combined with any other offer. Most offices are independently owned and operated.
It's March Mania at Jackson Hewitt Tax Services! The earlier you visit our office
in March for income tax preparation, the MORE money you'll save!
We know all the latest tax law changes and can handle
even the most complicated tax returns.

SHORT OF TIME? USE OUR DROP-OFF SERVICE

LEAVE YOUR TAX DOCUMENTS WITH US,

THEN COME BACK LATER FOR YOUR PREPARED RETURN

Across from the courthouse in BLOUNTSTOWN: 674-9453 .


a given.
So what does that say about
someone who not only worked
11 years as Grants Director, but -
also for the last seven years had


Stress perhaps, but I think
that it goes much deeper than
that.
I do not have the answer and
am not qualified in the clinical
sense to offer an explanation.
I do know for a fact that Ricky
loves his wife and son with all
his heart.
Suffice it to say that the
happiest that I have ever seen him


Time to start thinking about the


To the editor:
We have a very good chance
to change directions for Florida
this fall. Congressman Jim
Davis (Democrat) from Tampa
is making headway in his bid

for the governor's seat. I have
been designated to be the
chairperson for Calhoun County.
I'll be asking for support from
all my friends in both Liberty
and Calhoun counties. There are
many web sites to see what kind
of person Jim Davis is. Just type
his name into any of the search
engines to see his records as a
congressman and his web site
for the bid for governor can be
seen at info @jimdavis2006.
I am hoping for some town hall
style meetings in our area where
interested citizens can ask their
own questions or get answers
to their concerns. The North
Florida campaign manager will
be buying advertisements in this
newspaper and supplying more


information in the near future.
I wish to thank the Calhoun-
Liberty Journal and the staff, for
allowing me to express my views
and opinions on so many topics
over the years. I meet so many
of the dedicated readers of The
Journal that express their views
to some of my more unpopular
opinions that it lets me know,
"Hey, I got you to thinking,
whether you agreed with me or
not, I got you to thinking."
Now, once again I'm wanting
you to start early to thinking
about Florida's future, our
counties' growth and the future
of economics and industry. I've
already run my race and I'm
satisfied that I won my retirement.
But, I have my children still
working in the community and
my grandchildren so I still have
a stake in what happens further
down the road. Bet that I'm not
in the boat alone. There are many
like me reading this paper. Let's


WITH A LETTER TO THE EDITOR


Help prevent damage from bark beetles,
diseases, and wildfire through practices
that promote healthy pines.


* Thin dense pine stands.
* Control understory
plant competition.
* Minimize tree wounds
during harvests.


PREVENT



C 1)' -m


* Use prescribed fire.
* Harvest low-vigor
stands and replant.
* Plant species right
for the soil and site.


A message from the Florida Department
of Agriculture and Consumer Services,
Division of Forestry, the University of
Florida/IFAS, and the USDA Forest Service.


ye be judged.
, The authorities will handle
this situation to the best of their
abilities, I pray.
My only plea to the people that
know, love and care about Ricky
is to say a little prayer for him and
his family.
Respectfully and sincerely,
Danny Revell,
Bristol


governor's race
give some thought to where
we're heading and where we
want to go.
I know we have some Muslims
in our communities and maybe
even some atheists and I don't
want to infringe upon others'
religious beliefs but for the rest
of us that believe in a higher
power (God) I feel that our
prayers are heard and that makes
our communities a special place
to live and work.
Mike Bailes
Altha



KEEP

READING!
This week's letters
are continued on
page 13.






MARCH 22, 2006 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 13


Golden

Pharmacy
Phone 674-4557


Your Valu-Rite store with
-a full selection of drugs,
greeting cards, film, health"
and beauty aid supplies
17324 Main Street North,
Blountstown
LOCALLY OWNED & OPERATED


For a wide range of
Homeowner Insurance
Plans, Fire and Dwelling
Policies, call for a
no-obligation review.

CRAIG
BRINKLEY
Calhoun County
615N.A.ar, ;
Blountstosr n. FL
PHONE
674-5471





HELPING YOU is what we do best.
AUTO HOME LIFE


Comments cause 'heated exchange' during health


dept.


discus,


To the editor:
This is in regards to the letter to
the editor on March 15 suggesting
that Commissioner John T.
Sanders apologize to Director
David Odum for not allowing
him to speak at the March 9
Liberty County Commission
meeting. Apparently the author
of that letter did not hear John T.
Sanders apologize after the short
break because he certainly did. If
Director David Odum wants to
give a speech at the commission
meeting he should take the steps
to be put on the schedule or
agenda like everybody else.
In the first request Odum was
asked to wait to speak because
there was a motion already on the
.floor that was to be voted upon.
At that point no one was allowed
to say anything formally.
Accusations from Odum's
supporters from Blountstown
were thrown at Liberty County
residents, including the remark
that Liberty County people were
a bunch of "fish baiters" which
started a heated exchange within
the audience and offended the
Liberty County residents. John
T. Sanders at that point realized
that the meeting was getting out
of control and close to a volatile
situation and he was forced
then to get an immediate vote
on the motion and put an end
to all discussions on the subject
to restore order in the meeting.
No one was allowed to formally
speak after that. Then a short
recess was called which ended
the heated exchange.
Sanders acted very"
professionally and did what was
necessary to restore order as any
good chairperson .would do.


STUMP GRINDING

'10
A-i Tree Service
& Stump Grinding
- 2 RFT -~. Vickery Enterprises, Inc.
Diameter (850) 674-3434
Best prices in the industry. 1-800-628-8733



Need a Mortgage?

100% FinancinRg
PurchaseC/RefinaCC
CofstrudCion perm

Bill CORsolidatioR
4Lot LoanRs-

ireCatRatcs

Thnmas Finwer Home EquitY LinRes


Forgotten Coast
Mortgage Inc.



Approvals!
20735. Central.Ave.


Apply by phone

850-643-6200
OFFICE
850-237-2777
OFFICE

.E. in Blountstown :
im e


sion at Liberty Co. Commission meeting
his termination of Dr. Thomas.
SP A KP U P3 He says the investigation is under
PEiAJ K U P litigation, which probably is, but
WITH A LETTER TO THE EDITOR his reasons for termination should
WITH A LETTER TO THE EDITOR be a matter of public record
Write: The Calhoun-Liberty Journal now. We need answers about
RO. Box 536, Bristol, FL 32321 general funds of Liberty County
Health Department, also the split
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 12 between Liberty and Calhoun


Odum's supporters certainly
created a near riot, bringing up
issues that had nothing what so
ever to do with the motion on
the floor to be voted on. All the
commotion certainly diverted
the commissioners' attention
and thoughts before the motion
was acted upon. Being careful
not to make any accusations of
any kind, I just wonder could
all of that have been a plan?
Incidentally, none of the other
requests that the speaker had
requested were even able to be
brought up for motion because
of that disturbance.
Two commissioners say they
don't want to rush into judgment.
And hide behind investigations
that don't even pertain to the
situation at hand and now since
apparently the investigation is
over they are requesting money
figures before acting on the
issue of Liberty County's own
director/doctor, essentially
expecting the public to secure
these figures and present them to


the commissioners. I thought that
was the job of each individual
commissioner who is in the public
trust to secure for themselves as
quickly as possible to resolve the
issue. And when I asked Odum
for facts and figures he tells me
that he will get them and give
them to Commissioner Albert
Butcher. If that information could
not be given to me, shouldn't it be
given to the chair person or clerk
of the court?
In addition we still are waiting
for some answers from Odum on


County personnel.
These are some reasons why
we need a new Liberty County
Health Director now.
This whole commission
meeting was given no media
attention by any radio or
newspaper. Curiously, when
Odum speaks there is?
P.S. I know I'm not the only
citizen in Liberty County that
feels this way. Remember you
can write the editor and voice
your opinion.
Michael "Gator" Clark,
Hosford


EDITOR'S NOTE: The reason the March 9 meeting wasn't covered
by this newspaper in a timely manner is due to the fact that I was
somewhat incapacitated by illness and was unable to do all I would
have liked to for that week's issue. After being briefly hospitalized
for gall bladder surgery Friday, I'll do what I can, as I can, during
my recuperation. As for reference to there being coverage only when
the health department administrator speaks, the first lengthy article
about the Liberty Commission's concerns with the Health Depart-
ment outlined a long list of criticisms from the board, which went
unanswered by Odum because he was advised not to comment by the
state health department. That article appeared on the front page of
the Jan. 11 issue. Teresa Eubanks, Journal Editor


We have a big drug problem in Liberty County


To the editor:
First thing -I want to say is
thanks to Mr. and Mrs. Fisher in
Bristol so much for their write up
in the paper March 8 about our
county having a. drug problem.
I wish we had more nice people
in our county to tell the truth and
not stick their heads in the sand so
they won't see what's going on in
the place we call home. Our drug
task enforcement man, Dussia
Shuler, said we don't have a drug
problem in Liberty County, so if
that's true, we sure don't need
him to draw a big salary from our
county. If our law enforcement
can't admit the drug problem is
widespread in Liberty County,
what do we need them for?
This is hot the first bout I've


had with the sheriff's department
about drugs. I lived on Conyers
Road in 2003 and 2004. I saw
drugs being brought in and carried
out, sold and bought from my
house. I talked to the sheriff's
office more than one time about
trying to stop it, along with other
unlawful acts going on there.
Nothing was done then and it still
goes on there.
I had to move from my home
there to get piece of mind. The
law was told what location,
names, times and vehicles. They
were the kind of people that stuck
their heads in the sand and still
got their heads there.
The sheriff and. drug
enforcement officers aren't doing
the job they're getting paid for.


Dubert apologizes to Odum

To the editor:
At the last Liberty County Commission meeting, I made a
statement concerning our health director's wishes about how a doctor
is expected to work for him. He made a statement at the February
commission meeting about patients being pumped in and pumped
out.
After reviewing the tapes of the February commission meeting, I
see where I may have taken that statement out of context. The director
may have been speaking of other doctors in'the area.
If I did, I owe the director an apology for mistakenly thinking that
he was talking of his policy and am truly sorry for that.
With that said, I still feel the director has done a great injustice to
a doctor and other employees working under him.
I feel many of his policies are detrimental to health care and the
finances for Liberty County.
Marvin Dubert,
Telogia


I'd like to say to some of our
deputies, thanks so much for
trying to do a good job, but they
can't do their jobs and Dussia
Shuler's job too. They don't get
paid for what they do anyway,
and the drug man gets paid for
what he don't do.
They are letting a big crack
house operation go on operating
in the county, plus a meth lab
house. But we don't have a drug
problem in the county.
Dussia Shuler says we don't
have a drug problem as bad as
our neighboring counties do. It's
kind of strange that we see in the
county papers where they make
drug arrests and bust it up every
week. When did we see a drug
bust or drug arrest in Liberty
County? Neighbors, if you and I
can know and see all these things
going in our county, you probably
don't want my opinion, but here
it is anyway. I think our drug
enforcement needs a big overhaul
job for the good of decent people
around here and if the sheriff's
department can't or won't do any
more than they are doing, let's
give that office a big overhaul job
in the near future!
Friends, thanks so much for
letting me tell the truth the way
I know it. Thanks again Mr. and
Mrs. Fisher and thanks to our
county paper for printing things
the way it is!
Thanks,
Juanita Singleton,
Hosford


-






Page 14 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL MARCH 22,2006


America's Junior Miss program going strong;

National finals to take place in Mobile in June


In May 2005, the Board of Di-
rectors of America's Junior Miss
made the decision to close the
program due to a lack of national
sponsors and funding. The an-
nouncement was made with sin-
cere sadness for the loss of what
had grown to be the number one
scholarship program for college-
bound high school seniors.
However, it didn't take long
for everyone involved in that
decision to realize that the public
wasn't going to allow AJM to
die without a fight. A grassroots
effort of AJM volunteers from
all across the country began,
and, upon seeing the enormous
outpouring of support and a
new plan to continue the pro-
gram successfully, the Board of
Directors voted to reopen the
program.
With a renewed sense of pur-
pose and a strong drive to keep
the program alive, the Board and
Staff of AJM are carrying on with
business as usual and taking ac-
tion to ensure the success of the
program for many years to come.
Plans for this year's competi-
tion are coming along quickly,


and AJM will award -more than
$100,000 in scholarships to the
class of 2006 participants. Con-
testants from all -50 states will
arrive in Mobile on June 19 and
will compete in the national finals
June 28-30.
The America's Junior Miss
program has a longstanding
tradition of excellence. Since
the first program in 1958, AJM
has awarded in excess of $87.7
million in college scholarships.
More than 700,000 girls from all
over the country have participat-


ed at the local, state, and national
levels in AJM's 49 years. AJM is
proud to have the support of over
17,000 volunteers throughout
the US.
National sponsors of Ameri-
ca's Junior Miss are Tyson Foods,
SeaWorld, Busch Gardens, the
Mitchell Company, the City of
Mobile, and Mobile County.
National category sponsors are-
Regions Bank, Mobile Gas,
and the America's Junior Miss
Council.
For more information about
America's Junior Miss, please
contact Mary Lee McCrory,
Public Relations Director, at 800-
256-5435 or marylee@ajm.org,
or visit www.ajm.org.


Jami Daniels to compete in Miss Fla.


Jami Lynn Daniels was
crowned Miss West Coast USA
on March 4 in Sarasota. She
competed with over 20 young
women from across the state for
the chance to advance to the Miss
Florida USA Pageant to be held
in Miami this July. The, pageant
will be televised on Fox 28.
Miss Florida USA is a prelim-


inary to the nationally televised
Miss USA Pageant, owned by
Donald Trump. Throughout the
next few months Jami will be
busy traveling the West Coast,
making appearances and prepar-
ing for the state competition.
Jami is the 21-year-old daugh-
ter of Doyle and Charlotte Dan-
iels of Kinard.


We're your one-stop


TIRE SHOP!




All 13" sizes............$35.95 S
All 14" sizes....................... $43.95
All 15" sizes....................... $48.95
*Balancing, state tire fees and taxes extra

Alignment Balancing
Brakes Shocks
Struts CV Joints
Oil Changes

"Volkswagens to semi's, we handle them all"


CITY TIRE Co.
Hwy. 20 West Blountstown 674-8784
Kt
Yiccc.ccKc ccccKc |KKcmilliKc


Decals and door prizes at annual banquet tomorrow


Decals & Door Prizes The
Chamber has a surprise for mem-
bers at this year's Banquet on
Thursday, March 23 window
decals that let customers know
that you support the Chamber.
The Chamber's Board of Direc-
tors revised this year's awards:
come to the banquet to see those
that are honored!
The list of door prizes (and


handouts) continues to grow:
Plants from Oglesby; Gift Bas-
kets by Covenant Hospice, Farm
Bureau, and Wakulla Bank of
Blountstown; DVDs "Liv-
ing Waters: Aquatic Preserves
of Florida;" Posters "Living
Waters," Clyde Butcher; CD -
"Living Wafer," Sammy Tedder's
Music; Apalachicola River Hats;
"Along the Florida Trail" book


and calendar. Florida Trail Asso-
ciation; Calhoun County Afghan,
Danny Ryals Real Estate; and
pens, rulers, etc. from Bank of
America.
A social event with music by
RiverTown Community Church
musicians, good company, and
wonderful food by the Panhandle
Pioneer Settlement is planned.
The menu is a "Boiled Country
Dinner" with chicken and rice,
turnips, black-eye peas, candied
sweet potatoes, cornbread, bis-
cuits, tea, coffee, pound cake, and
peach cobbler with preserved figs,
jellies and jams on the table.
For more information, contact
a Chamber member or the Cham-
ber: visit us weekday mornings,
telephone (674-4519), or e-mail:
ccchamber@yahoo.com.

HAPPY BIRTHDAY!


Brown, Johnson to wed Saturday
The parents of Nikki Brown and Luke Johnson announce wedding
plans for Saturday, March 25. Please join us at the Gregory House in
Torreya State Park at 5:30 p.m. for the wedding ceremony.
The reception will follow at Veterans Memorial PariCivic Center
in Bristol. All family and friends arb invitfd to attehd. '.'


Ain't it nifty, Mary
and Jane are 50!
HAPPY BIRTHDAY
Mary Martin Flowers
AND
Jane Martin Creamer
from your loving family .


Ono i


+ faster speeds for searching + toll-free 24/7 tech support
and surfing! -
+ free tips & tricks newsletter
+ free installation, no contracts + up to 7 e-mail addresses
+ always on dedicated access & 6mbpersonal web space
+improved Security Suite + wireless upgrade available


1-800-772-7288 GTE,
www.gtcom.net





MARCH 22,2006 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 15


S & S Haulina & Land Clearina Inc.
Specializing in heavy brush cutting!
"THE BUSH WHACKERS"
Cut & Mulch up to 10" Trees Increase Property Value No
Hauling off Debris Environment Friendly, No ruts or deep holes
TRACTOR & EXCAVATOR WORK
Call (850) 722-7945 (850) 832-5808
Proudly Serving all of the South!


EMISON


HEATING AND


COOLING INC.






*New Construction


*Old Homes .i.


*Replacements


HONEST, DEPENDABLE AND
AFFORDABLE SERVICE
AND INSTALLATION

START SAVING

MONEY TODAY

...with a high efficiency Amana

heat pump with the best

warranties and dependability.



Ask how we can improve your

home's indoor air quality.



--A- .. ,FO R -

IOU ESMATE.

ibeLrbtyo
4L, ._
.. .'?> ,-:,2 .- .' ... ..,..


1111L~


Representatives of the Florida
commercial lobster trap fishery
are seeking relief from severe
hurricane damages and have
requested that the state's 2006-
07 commercial lobster trap
harvesting season be modified
to open in July. The Florida
Fish and Wildlife Conservation
Commission (FWC) will discuss
the request during its April 6
meeting in Tallahassee.
The commercial spiny lobster
trap fishery in south Florida
sustained severe setbacks from
hurricanes last year.. Industry
representatives want the FWC
to consider modifying Florida's
commercial lobster trap fishing
season for 2006-07 to allow
lobster fishers to place traps


AII IlWA~fM


in the water July 10 and begin
landing lobsters July 15.
' Currently, lobster fishers are
allowed to put their traps in
the water on Aug. 1 and begin
fishing and landing lobsters Aug.
6. The season extends through
March 31.
Industry representatives
believe they would have a
better opportunity to reap the
economic benefits stemming
from early season lobster catch
rates if they can launch the trap-
fishing season earlier -- before
the height of hurricane season.
The special two-day sport
season for recreational lobster
fishers would remain as the
last consecutive Wednesday
and Thursday in July, which is
July 26-27 this year. The Aug.
6 opening of the regular lobster
fishing season for commercial
divers, bully netters and
recreational fishers would also
remain unchanged.
The public hearing and
discussion for this issue will
take place during the FWC's
Thursday, April 6 meeting,
which begins at 8:30 a.m. at the
Ramada Inn and Conference
Center, 2900 North Monroe St.,
in Tallahassee. However, a final
public hearing would have to be
scheduled for the June 7-8, 2006
Commission meeting before
the official season dates could
* change ";-" "


S i Biologists seeking help from
public to find horseshoe crabs
ST. PETERSBURG Bi-
Before & After ologists at the Florida Fish and
.. Wildlife Conservation Commis- O UT
sion's (FWC) Fish and Wildlife O
r r. Research Institute need a little DOO RS
S": help from the public in identi-


~~h'~~-~----`C----- -~-~--~~~ ~~~~~ ~~~~ I


.E-a L =_ -_ .- .


S


6924 ---


fying horseshoe crab spawning News from The
beaches throughout the state. Florida Fsh
The best time to find spawn- and Wildlife
ing horseshoe crabs is around Conservaon
a high tide, right before or just Comssion
after a full moon. The full moon Cm
was March14.
Sharp-eyed beachgoers can
report the time, date and loca-
tion of horseshoe crab sightings For instance, research on the
through one of the following compound eyes of horseshoe
options. crabs led to better understanding
*Fill out an online survey of the human visual system, and
at www.research.myfwc.com/ horseshoe crab blood is useful in
horseshoe_crab the biomedical industry.
*E-mail information to A special substance in their
horseshoe@myfwc.com blood is a component in testing
*Dial toll-free 1-866-252- for bacterial contamination in
9326 human blood and commercial
Biologists also want to know drugs.
how many horseshoe crabs ob- In addition, manufacturers
servers count and whether the use the material that makes up
horseshoe crabs are spawning. the horseshoe crab's shell (chi-
Researchers said horseshoe tin) to make contact lenses, skin
crab harvests are too high in creams and hair sprays.
some states. To manage the Many citizens have respond-
species more effectively, the ed to the horseshoe crab nesting
Atlantic States Marine Fisher- beach survey since it began in
ies Commission requires all 2003. Biologists regularly up-
Atlantic coastal states to iden- date the survey results.
tify horseshoe crab spawning Visit www.research.myfwc.
beaches. corn/features/view_article to see
Horseshoe crab research ben- how many reports have come
efits humans in a several ways. from individual counties.
FWC to consider early lobster trap season





Page 16 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL MARCH 22,2006


Documentary about the Apalachicola River to debut


at Florida Wine Festival on March 31 in Tallahassee


from the Mary Brogan Museum of Art and Science
TALLAHASSEE The Mary Brogan Museum of
Art and Science is proud to be a collaborative partner
with award winning photographers, film makers and mu-
sicians who are collaborating on a project to document,
educate and entertain audiences about the importance of
one of the nation's remaining pristine bodies of water.
The artists will collectively and independently capture
the people, the landscape, the ecological treasures and
the diversity of life along the river as it winds between
Alabama, Georgia and Florida.
Clyde Butcher Landscape photographer extraor-
dinaire, he has often been described as the "Ansel Adams
of Florida" for his striking and bold, black and white im-
ages profiling the Everglades and southern Florida. He
began photographing the beauty of the river before Hur-
ricane Dennis. The stark contrast of "before" and "after"
images provide a unique understanding about the impact
of hurricanes on the natural landscape.
Richard Bickel Photojournalist Richard Bickel
came to Apalachicola on assignment and made it his
home. He has photographed in over 70 countries and
published throughout the world. His photo credits in-
clude leading publications such as the New York Times,
National Geographic books, the Los Angeles Times,
Coastal Living, Travel and Leisure and many more. He
recently published The Last Great Bay, a book of photo-
graphs about Apalachicola Bay.
For the new project, Mr. Bickel will be shooting the
people in the region while Clyde Butcher shoots the
landscape. They will work independently for a unified


result that will forever remind us of one of our nation's
most beautiful remaining rivers.
Elam Stoltzfus Like Mr. Bickel, Mr. Stoltzfus is
from the region and lives in Calhoun County. He has a
strong sense of the importance of this project and con-
siders himself to be entrusted to produce a film that will
serve the needs and interests of both students and adults.
The final product will be intended for PBS broadcast as
well as an educational experience within the museum
exhibit.
The film's segments will include Historical Accounts,
Current Activities, What Does the Future Hold and a
Conclusion. '
From Native American ancestry to current Native
Americans residents, the animal and plant species that
live along the river and life as we know it is changing be-
fore our eyes. The film will offer a colorized version of


"the story" while the two still photographers will enjoy
the stark drama that tells the story in "black and white."
Sammy Tedder A regional musician who plays
alto and soprano saxophones, river cane flutes, Irish low
whistle, percussion, dulcimer and keyboard. Sammy
will record nature sounds and incorporate them into the
original music pieces he develops for the project. Music
will be mixed at Possum Tracks Studio in Sopchoppy, a
name and location indicative of Mr. Tedder's roots and
commitment to the project.
The Mary Brogan Museum of Art and Science had
the pleasure of working with Clyde Butcher and Elam
Stoltzfus on a previous film and exhibit project entitled
Living Waters. The Brogan will be the site for the debut
of the Apalachicola River: An American Treasure exhibit
and will coordinate travel of the exhibit and related ele-
ments to other museums in and outside of Florida. The
primary targeted museums will be those in proximity to
the river, including Florida, Alabama and Georgia.
The museum will create educational components for
the project including a special publication for students
called Newspapers in Education.
Apalachicola River: An American Treasure will open
as the premier event during the fourth annual Florida
Wine Festival. This three day celebration begins on
March 30 with wine and dinner pairing at area restau-
rants. The debut of the exhibit and the film will take
place on March 31.
For information about the project, tickets to the Flori-
da Wine Festival or inquires to host the exhibition, please
contact the Brogan Museum at 513-0700.


-------------------


-- --- II II -- I


1;.




MARCH 22,2006 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 17


, tudztey


7o11h o copwwned


Top winners, L-R: Christy Simmons, Junior Miss Altha; Made-
lynn Lytle, Young Miss Altha; Kayla Yon, Teen Miss Altha; Mad-
ison Peacock, Little Miss Altha; Audrey Brown, Miss Altha.


Nineteen young ladies competed in the 2006 Miss Altha Pageant, which was held
Saturday, March 18. The theme this year was "Paris Based." The girls were judged
in several categories including personal interview with the judges, poise and ap-
pearance, and verbal communication. Young Miss is a newly added category.
LEFT:
Junior
Miss first
runner-up,
Brittney
Lytle with
: Junior
,.Miss
Altha,W '
Christy
Simmons
proudly
display
-their Second runner-up, Jordan Knight, Young Miss Altha
trophies. Madelynn Lytle and first runner-up, Madison Rowe are
all smiles.
KELLY LATHEM PHOTOS






Page 18 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL MARCH 22,2006


AOO


Pictured above. The Rivertown Girls & Band. Angus
Hall. Sharlyn Marie Smith. Caroline VanLierop. Mary
Catherine Smith. Buddy Smith: pictured right. 7th grade
student Darrell Heath practices guitar at break and
lunch. ALTHA SCHOOL PHOTO


MUSIC IN OUR
SCHOOLS MONTH
by Kasey Roberts
March marks the annual
celebration of music in our
nation's schools. First held in
1973 as Music In Our Schools
Day, this celebration has grown
to a Music In Our Schools
Month. Since 1838, when
music was first authorized as a
regular subject of instruction,
decision makers have agreed
on the importance of music
education.
Here at Altha School we
have had .many activities that
relate to Music In Our Schools
Month. On Tuesday, March
14 The Rivertown Girls came
and performed for both the
elementary and high school
students. Mary Cathryn Smith.


and Sharlyn Marie Smith, two
members of the group, both
attend Altha School.
Also as a part of Altha Schools
celebration, the Kindergarten
and 1st grade classes are putting
on a program on March 31 at 9
a.m. in the gym. The program is
entitled "Go Fish!" and is about
accepting our differences. One
character in the play summarizes
the meaning by saying "If we all
were alike, how boring it would
be. We all are as different as the
fish in the sea."
POWDER PUFF
BASKETBALL GAME
by Patricia Williams
Let's Go Team!...It was a
very funny thing to hear those
words coming from boys dressed
in cheerleading uniforms. Those
boys were the J.V. and Varsity


Boys' Basketball team members
at Altha. They were cheering on
the J.V. and Varsity Cheerleaders
while they played an intense
game of basketball with the
Girls' Basketball team.
The cheerleaders played an
electrifying 4 quarters against
the Girls' team but in the end
lost 20-14. The girls really put
up a fight and some impressive
support. The "cheerleaders,"
the boys' basketball team, even
performed for the crowd. The
boys performed a cheer, a dance,
and they even pulled off a few
stunts. Everyone involved had a
wonderful time and were surely
entertained. The sight of girls in
boys' basketball uniforms and
boys in cheerleading uniforms
was surely something to laugh
about.


*SCHOOL MENU
Calhoun
County Schools
S March 23 March 29, 2006
Lowfat or whole
milk served with all meals

I Sprrg gBreakl
March 20-24









MONDAY
Lunch: Stuffed crust pepperoni
pizza, French-fried potatoes,
whole-kernel corn, fruit cup.

TUESDAY
.-- Lunch: Chicken with noodles,
deviled eggs, turnip greens, fruit
S cup, corn bread.

WEDNESDAY


Lunch: Toasted ham and cheese
sandwich, tator tots, mixed veg-
etables, fruit cup, brownie.
All menus are subject to change
SPONSORED BY:
Calhoun-Liberty Journal I
Bristol, Phone 643-3333 I
L ---------J




The Journal


SCHOOL MENU
Liberty
County Schools
March 23 March 29, 2006
A variety of fruits and
vegetables or fruit juice and a
choice of lowfat or whole milk
served with all meals.

Sp ring BreakI
March 20 -24









MONDAY
Breakfast Chilled orange juice,
ham grits, cinnamon crunch cof-
feecake.
Lunch: Stew beef with gravy,
steamed rice, garden peas, can-
died yams, corn bread.

TUESDAY
Breakfast: Chilled peaches,
sausage gravy over biscuit, hash
browns.
Lunch: Hamburgers on buns, let-
tuce, tomato, pickles, French fries
with catsup, pineapple pudding.

WEDNESDAY
Breakfast: Orange sections,
scrambled eggs, peanut butter
bar.
Lunch: Pizza, garden peas,
chilled apricots, Jell-O.
All menus are subject to change
SPONSORED BY:
Laban Bontrager, DMD
Bristol, Phone 643-5417
L-----------------


Lawrence Animaf-ospitaf
43 N. Cleveland Street in Quincy *,OFFICE (850) 627-8338
Jerry C. Lawrence, DVM
Emergencies: (850) 856-5827 or (850) 856-5918
Hours: Mon.-Wed.-Thurs. 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
I -..., Tues. and Fri. 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. -
DOCTOR'S HOURS BY APPOINTMENT. lii
We provide: Boarding Grooming Pet Pickup/Delivery Pet Foods/
Supplies Preventive Healthcare Programs plus many more services.
WE ARE ALSO PLEASED TO OFFER A SPECIAL PREVENTIVE SPAY/NEUTER
PROGRAM TO HELP REDUCE UNWANTED PUPPIES AND KITTENS.


p ii- .----- :.- S

Applications accepted for W.T. Neal Scholarship Program


GUIDANCE I- ....
GUIDANCE B-TOWN HIGH SCHOOi
Pete Davis with the W.T. NealTOWN HIGH SCHOO
Scholarship Program will be at I March 20 thru March 24-
the W.T. Neal Civic Center on March 27 Baseball gai
Tuesday, March 28 from 1:30 I at 5 p.m.; Taking Control Mc
until 5 p.m. to meet with cur- March 28 Softball game
rent seniors who are interested at5 p.m.; Senior Night; Ba
in applying for the W.T. Neal at 3:30 6 p.m.; Freshmen C
Scholarship. He will be accept- March 29 Report Card
ing-applications and answering I March 30 JV Baseball,
questions concerning the schol- p.m.; Varsity Baseball, awai
arship program. L -
Blountstown High School will In addition, parents or guard-
hold its Freshmen Orientation on ians of incoming freshmen and
Tuesday, March 28, from 8 until their students will be asked to
approximately 10:45 a.m. Area come to the Blountstown High
eighth grade students interested School Media Center on Satur-
in-attending Blountstown High day, April 1, between the hours
School will be shown around of 8 a.m. and 12 p.m., or Tues-
the campus and given informa- day, April 4, between 6 p.m. and
tion regarding course offerings, 8 p.m. to register their students
graduation requirements, clubs,, and make.course.selections.,
sports,-and theractivities.- .. Parents or uardians who aie


L TIGER TRACK EVENTS
- Spring Break
me, home against Carrabelle
motivation Program at BHS I
, home against Liberty County
seball game, away in Chipley I
orientationn from 8-11 a.m.
Day
home against Marianna at 4
y in Tallahassee 4p.m.

not able to attend one of these
meetings should call BHS at
674-5724 to set up an appoint-
ment to register their child.
ADVISORY COUNCIL
MEETING
Blountstown High School
School Advisory Council Meet-
ing is scheduled for April 4 at 6
p.m. in the. BHS Media Center
during Freshmeti Orientation.


March Music Month: Rivertown

Girls and band visit Altha School


Your Top Choice For Music,

News & Weather Coverage

K-102.7 FM Y-1000 AM

4 'RP


~'-e-u~,-c~a--n~4u~rv41~-arrsr~us~~~ea





MARCH 22,2006 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 19

Anchors and the Wonderful World of Disney
Ammie Fletcher, State Anchor President, chose the theme of
Disney for the 2006 State Anchor Convention.
On Saturday evening all Anchors dressed in formal attire
for Cinderella's Ball. The convention was held at the Radisson m- ,
Worldgate Resort in Kissimmee on March 4th and 5th. -
Ammie is the daughter of Clark and Densyl Fletcher of r!
Quincy. She is a senior at Robert F. Munroe Day School and
has been a member of the Anchor Club for three years.
In Orlando, the Anchors enjoyed dinner at the Rainforest
Caf. Afterward fun was had shopping at Disney Village. The
Robert F. Munroe Day School Anchors won first place for 4
Attendance and third place in their lip sync performance "Dig
It" from the Disney movie Holes.
Joseph Hackney, Anchor Club sweetheart, won second
place in the sticker swap, which is an icebreaker prior to the
convention being called to order. He is the son of George and .
Juliane Hackney of Quincy.
Cynthia O'Donnell and Debbie Maxwell are co-sponsors of
the Robert F. Munroe Day School Anchor Club.

zj..shasaroe presemst Anchor and Pilot Memorial Service held in Kissimmee
On Sunday morning J Anchor Club); front
Sprnq BreakTeen.Jam during the State row, Sidney Johnson
SOn Friday, March24from8p.m. Anchor Convention in ,(granddaughter of
ti 11 p.m. at W.T. Neal Civic Center Kissimmee, a special Margaret Lawson
Sltcandle was lit in the Johnson, and Anna
-in Buntstn memory of Quincy Dooner). Meg, Ivie,
OST ^$ Security Provided Pilot, Margaret awson Sidney, and Anna are
SCD's will be given away every hour! Johnson., Margaret all members of the
D, C Lawson was an active Robert F Munroe Day
Call D nIShamrock~' member of the Quincy School Anchor Club.
Professional Mobile DJ Service Pilot Club for many I The service ended
Sfor the best quote on your years. Pictured, back with all Anchors, Pilots,
(( party, wedding or gathering! row, Meg Summerford, and chaperons joining
I Letmehelpyoumakeyour Phone Ivie Thomas, Caroline Fallis Anchor Coordinator), Debbie hands around the ballroom
next party a success! 674-9127 (President of Quincy Pilot Maxwell (co-sponsor of as they sang "Bless Be The
Club and Co-Florida District Robert F Munroe Day School Tie That Binds."

6.5 HP Rear Tine Tiller
Poulan OOTE
*Briggs and Stratton Engine
.. e ...- .*Counter Rotating Tires
HOME FURNIT 17" Tilling Width
20291 Central Ave. W. Blountstown
Phone: 850 674-4359

.' ,:vT *\, li PHILIPS o
SONY


4441,1 Po$.n 5995
,Regular $759.95

0 48" V-Twin Zero Turn
.Radius Mower $500
4. _- -. Poulan 27ZM. ;
S: *Briggs and StrWton V-Twin
*Electric Clutch Engagement $32 999'
FID 75Z85 ,vah $299 95) -15" Easy Slide Seat
Digital Projection
irHDTV
Phhp 98,',.'.-r
S16 x 9 Widescreen
A *integrated ATSC Tuner
*Progressive Scan
*Parental Control
51" $59995

60," ,1 9995
-- .-50" DLP HDTV POII 42" 18.5 Horsepower 159O95
Fips OOwr Lw T r 6 Speed Transmission
.iim i *16 x 9 Widescreen (r ) 42" 18.5 Horsepower $1 00095
*Integrc-ed ATSC Tuner Pouan o09sI2. Hydrostatic Transm ssson 777
*Progressive Scan *Briggs and Stratton Engine
95 Free Grass bag wi'h F4oo P2399
.. J purchase, of tra orl!' s so







Page 20 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL MARCH 22,2006


UWF student named Social Worker of the Year


MARIANNA Sharon
Robinson, a student in the
University of West Florida
Social Work program at Chipola
College has been named the
Student Social Worker of the
Year for the Emerald Coast Unit
of the Florida Chapter of NASW
(National Association of Social
Workers). She will be honored
at a reception on March 30 in
Panama City.
Robinson works as an assistant
in the Enrollment Services
Office at Chipola College. She
also works at Panhandle Family
Care Associates. She currently is
serving an internship at Covenant
Hospice.
The award recognizes work
by an individual who serves a
population in need and increases
the public's knowledge and
awareness of social work.


Sharon Robinson


Sharon was nominated for
her disaster relief work in
Mississippi following hurricane
Katrina. As a result of her work,
other groups were encouraged
to use their special abilities to
meet needs. Medical personnel
working with social workers for
the first time saw their patients


benefit from the intervention and
advocacy skills that are a special
part of social work.
While in Mississippi, Sharon
was involved in food and
clothing distribution, needs
assessment, medical referrals
and treatment.
Sherri Stone, director of the
UWF Social Work program,
says, "Sharon's enthusiasm is
contagious and she truly has a
heart for helping people. Many
people think of social workers
as those people who 'take away
kids' or "hand out welfare
checks,' but Sharon's work in
Mississippi allowed them to
see a much bigger picture of the
profession. She is an inspiring
example of what social work
has to offer individuals and
communities, and we are very
proud to claim her as our own."


Clay O'Neal's

L4ND CLEAR/IN & FENCINE
S*Dozer and Excavation work
.e Demolition Pond Digging
Road Building Field Fence
or Barbed Wire Tractor Work
Over 15 Years experience
Clay O'Neal (850) 762-9402
4433 NW County Road 274 (850) 762-9402
Altha, FI 32421 Cell (850) 832-5055



Create Yor FORMAL LOOK at

Suitman of Florida



Tuxedos

Starting at...


$4999


ORM IW EARS


4406 Lafayette St. in Marianna
Telephone (850) 482-5400


Core ensemble to present 'Tres Vidas'


MARIANNA--
The Core Ensemble
will present "Tres
Vidas" at Chipola
College, April 3, at
7:30 p.m.
The concert is
the' final event of
the 2005-06 Chipola
Artist Series.
Consisting of
cello, piano, and
percussion, Core
Ensemble will
perform the new music theatre
piece, Tres Vidas (Three Lives).
The work celebrates the lives of
three powerful Latin American
women: Mexican painter Frida
Kahlo, Salvadoran peasant-
activist Rufina Amaya, and
Argentine poet Alfonsina Storni.
Tres Vidas features a script
by award-winning. Chilean
writer Marjorie Agosin. Actress


Georgina Corbo will portray
all three protagonists with the,
Core Ensemble onstage. The trio
also will perform popular and
folkloric music from a variety of
Latin cultures.
The Chipola Artist Series
is funded through Chipola's
PerformingArtsFund, with grants
from the National Endowment
for the Arts, the Southern Arts


Transfer scholarship opportunity

for Chipola College students


MARIANNA-The Florida-
State University Panama
City Campus will award five
scholarships to Chipola College
students who complete their AA
degree and transfer directly to
the Panama City Campus.
The "Transfer Student
Scholarship" is awarded each
year in April to five students who
have demonstrated outstanding
academic performance and
reflect academic promise.
Interested students must meet


the following criteria: a 3.5
(or better) GPA; an AA degree
from Chipola; and apply and be
admitted to FSU Panama City by
April 1, 2006.
For information, call Renee'
Green, Director, .Office of
Admissions & Records at FSU
Panama City, at (850) 522-2001,
or Angie White, FSU Program
Coordinator, Chipola University
Center at (850) 718-2419, or
email: awhite@pc.fsu.edu.


French course set for Chipola summer term
MARIANNA-Chipola College will offer Intermediate French I
(FRE 2200) this Summer.
The course will meet from 12:30 to 3 p.m., on Tuesdays and
Thursday.
Classes will meet from May 9 through August 8. The Instructor
is Dana Ayers.
Early registration for current Chipola students is April 11 from 8
a.m. to 6 p.m. and April 12 from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.
For information about these or. other, classes. offered at Chipola,
contact Student Services at (850) 718-2266.


I [ Federation, the
Florida Division of HAND-PICKED QUALITY
Cultural Affairs, the
Chipola Regional CARS AND TRUC KS
Arts Association
.. and corporate Best deal in the
donors. tri-state area! __,
Slow credit, no
Tickets-$12 problem. W.A.C.
for adults and Toll Free: 1-888-740-8222
for ages 18 and Business: (850) 526-5254
under-go on sale Residence: (850) 762-3679
March 27 in the
- college Business
Office located in
Building A.
For information, call 718-
2220.


.. .-, .

--j j --
r '
..-'. =" -:g ', ... = [. -'. .. .... ... ,.. .. .[ ... -. '.m - .. ..


silo 11


Our energy conser action programs are designed to help you reduce your
energy costs and save money. Our GoodCents Cash Rebates are available for
upgrading your heating and cooling system or your ceiling insulation so
you'll be nice and co:z all year long.

Call us today at 526-6800 to find out more about our GoodCents Cash
Rebates or visit www.FPUC.com. You'll improve the comfort of your home
while saving energy and money.




F FLORIDA PUBLIC


U T I L I T I E S


QUALITY*aC01FORT SAVINGS






MARCH 22,2006 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 21


Feb. .14 Liberty County School Board meeting minutes


Official minutes from the Liberty County
School Board meeting Feb. 14, 2006
as recorded by the board secretary
The Liberty County School
Board meeting was called to order
by Chairman Kyle Peddie. Mem-
bers present at the meeting were
Tommy Duggar, Darrel Hayes,
Roger Reddick, James Flowers,
Kyle Peddie and Superintendent
David Summers.
1. The prayer was offered by
Tommy.Duggar and the pledge of
allegiance was'led by Roger Red-
dick.
2. .Gerald Barber and Clay
Evans were recognized for the
outstanding work they do in our
school system.
3. HEAR FROM PUBLIC
I. A presentation by Food Ser-
vice. Management Company on
Liberty County Feasibility Plan
was given.
Sgt. Milton inquired about the
progress on the JROTC Contract.
4. Motion was made- by Red-
dick, seconded by Hayes and
carried unanimously to adopt the
agenda with emergency items.
6. CONSENT ITEMS
A. Approval of Minutes Jan.10.
B. Payment of Bills for January,
2005
C. Principals Reports for Janu-
ary, 2005
D. Financial Statements for


January, 2005
E. Budget Amendments 420-
02, 340-01 and 390-01
Motion was made by Duggar,
seconded by Flowers and carried
unanimously to approve consent
items.
7. ACTION ITEMS:
1. Motion was made by Flow-
ers, seconded by Hayes and
carried unanimously to approve
request from Liberty Corrections
to use the Liberty County High
School Gym and Tolar Gym on
Feb. 17 & 18 for the Annual FCCD
Basketball Tournament and waiver
of all fees.
2. Motion was made by Red-
dick, seconded by Flowers and
carried unanimously to approve
change in salary schedule to re-
flect compensation for Saturday
Detention ($100.00 per day for
any employee).
3. Motion was made by Dug-
gar, seconded by Hayes and
carried unanimously to approve
request.to utilize school buses to.
transport children home from the
after-school tutoring program (all
expenses will be paid by this pro-
gram).
4. Motion was made by Hayes,
seconded by Reddick and carried
unanimously to approve request
for permission to dispose of sur-


plus property on Feb. 25 begin-
ning at 9 a.m.
5. Motion was made by Hayes,
seconded by Reddick and carried
unanimously to approve request
for students to attend Liberty
County Adult School and to take
the GED upon completion of the
prescribed program of course-
work.
6. Motion was made by Hayes,
seconded by Flowers and carried
unanimously to approve credit ap-
plication with Capital Hitch.
7. Motion was made by Duggar,
seconded by Reddick and carried
unanimously to approve Panhan-
dle Area Educational Consortium
Contract Agreement.
8. Motion was made by Flow-
ers, seconded by Duggar and
carried unanimously to approve
Report No. 2006-007, a Financial,
Operational and Federal Single
Audit of Liberty County District
School Board for the Fiscal Year
Ended June 30, 2005.
9. Motion was made by Red-
dick, seconded by Duggar and
carried unanimously to approve
permission to allow George White
to install the HVAC System at To-
lar Elementary School.
10. Motion was made by Dug-
gar, seconded by Reddick and
carried unanimously to table until


the next meeting the request from
Liberty Correctional Institution for
donation of a bus from surplus in-
ventory.
11. Motion was made by Dug-
gar, seconded by Reddick and
carried unanimously to table until
the next meeting the request from
Bethune Community Service Cen-
ter for donation of a bus from sur-
plus property.
12. Motion was made by Flow-
ers, seconded by Reddick and
carried unanimously to approve
Portolan Group as a consultant to
conduct the RFP process for the
management of food service oper-
ation in the Liberty County School
District.
13. Motion was made by Hayes,
seconded by Flowers and carried
unanimously to approve contract
with Xerox for replacement of copy
machine in the LEAC pod.
14. Motion was made by Red-
dick, seconded by Flowers and
carried unanimously to approve
ESE Para-Professional position at
W.R. Tolar School.
7. PERSONNEL
1. Motion was made by Flow-
ers, seconded by Duggar and car-
ried unanimously to approve rec-
ommendation of Penny Alhalaseh
as substitute to transport ESE stu-
dents at $10.00 per hour effective
Jan. 11 (to be paid from Title VI-B
IDEA funds).
2. Motion was made by Red-
dick, seconded by Hayes and
carried unanimously to approve
request from Stacey Layne for a
medical leave of absence from
her.teaching position at W.R. To-
lar School to be effective Feb. 1
through May 30,
3. Motion was made by Flow-
ers, seconded by Hayes and
carried unanimously to approve
recommendation of Jared Day as
long-term substitute for Stacey
Layne beginning Feb. 1 through
May 30.
4. Motion was made by Flow-
ers, seconded by Duggar and car-
ried unanimously to approve rec-
ommendation of Cindy Osterberg
as Grade 6 Grade Level Chair re-
placing Carolyn Copeland begin-
ning Feb. 14.
5. Motion was made by Duggar,
seconded by Reddick and carried
unanimously to approve recom-
mendation of Bess Revell as ESE
Grade Level Chair replacing Sta-
cey Layne beginning Feb. 14.
6 Motion was made by Flowers,
seconded by Hayes and carried
unanimously to approve recom-
mendation of Jina Willis as Grade
7 Grade Level Chair replacing-
Stephen C. Shuler beginning Feb.
14.
7. Motion was made by Flow-
ers, seconded by Hayes and car-
ried unanimously to approve rec-
ommendation for Mandie Fowler
to receive the Student Council
Supplement for Liberty County
High School for the remainder of


the 2005-6 school year effective
Jan. 18.
8. Motion was made by Red-
dick, seconded by Duggar and
carried unanimously to approve
recommendation for Dana Burns
to receive the Data Entry Supple-
ment for Twin Oaks Youth Camp
for the remainder of the 2005-06
school Year effective Jan. 18.
9. Motion was made by Hayes,
seconded by Flowers and carried
unanimously to approve with-
drawal of request for leave of ab-
sence from Sherrie Kever.
10. Motion was made by Red-
dick, seconded by Duggar and
carried unanimously to approve
transfer of Ranza Taylor from
ESE Paraprofessional at the Early
Learning Center to ESE Parapro-
fessional at W.R. Tolar School.
11. There was no action taken
on the Board-initiated recommen-
dation of termination of Karen
Taylor.
8. THERE WAS NO OLD
BUSINESS.
9. INFORMATION AND DIS-
CUSSION ITEMS
Duggar asked that a committee
be appointed to go talk with Spe-
cial Facilities Construction Com-
mittee and possibly senators and
representatives about the funding
for the Hosford School. A commit-
tee was appointed and Summers
agreed to set up a time and notify
the committee members as soon
as that was set.
Duggar asked for an update
on the hurricane shutters at Tolar
School and Solomon informed
him that the decision is being
made on which firm to go with to
do the work.
Reddick inquired about the
status of the windscreens at the
Athletic Complex.
Lewis told the board that the
windscreens had been ordered
and would be installed as soon as
they arrived.
Reddick asked Summers what
his recommendation was regard-
ing the Board initiated recom-
mendation of termination of Kar-
en Taylor because of information
regarding her employment appli-
cation. Summers said he was not
ready to recommend termination
at this time.
EMERGENCY ITEMS:
1. Motion was made by Flow-
ers, seconded by Duggar and
carried unanimously to approve
assessment of the 2 Mill Capital
Outlay tax for the 2006-07 bud-
get year (required to be eligible
to participate in Special Facilities
Construction).
2. Motion was made by Red-
dick, seconded by Flowers and
carried unanimously to accept
DROP retirement/resignation from
Sherrie Kever effective Feb. 8.
Motion was made by Flowers,
seconded by Reddick and carried
unanimously to adjourn the meet-
ing.


Liberty County School Board

Feb. 24 special meeting minutes
Official minutes from the Liberty County School Board
special meeting Feb. 24, 2006 as recorded by the board secretary
The Liberty County School Board meeting was called to order by
Chairman Kyle Peddie. Members present at the meeting were Tommy
Duggar, James Flowers, Roger Reddick, Darrel Hayes, Kyle Peddie
and Superintendent David Summers.
1. The prayer was offered by Kyle Peddie and the Pledge of Alle-
giance was led by David Summers.
2. Motion was made by Reddick, seconded by Flowers and carried
unanimously to approve School Facilities Construction Account Plan
and Resolution.
Motion was made by Flowers, seconded by Hayes and carried
unanimously-to adjourn the meeting: .- ..


SUPERIOR
HU/ BANKING MORTGAGE INVESTMENTS


OUR DEPOSIT RATES JUST GOT



BIGGER.


APY*

5OOO

13 MONTH CD


APY*

3 35
TREASURY'
CHECKING


ALTHA 25463 NORTH MAIN STREET 850-762-3417
APALACHICOLA 58 4TH STREET 850-653-9828
BLOUNTSTOWN 20455 CENTRAL AVE. WEST 850-674-5900
BRISTOL 10956 NW STATE ROAD 20 850-643-2221
CARRABELIr.E 912 NORTHWEST AVENUE A 850-697-5626
MEXICO BEACH 1202 HIGHWAY 98 850-648-5060
PORT ST. JOE 418 CECIL G. COSTIN JR. BLVD. 850-227-1416


"APY is Annual Percentage Yield. APYs are accurate as of 3/12/06(.
For the 13 month CD, the minimum balance to obtain the stated APY is $500 and will require a checking or NOW account such as
Superior's Free Checking or Treasury Checking accounts. Substantial penalty for early withdrawal.
For Tfasury Checking, the minimum balance to open this account is S50. 3.35% Annual Percentage Yield (APY) will be paid on
balances of S50.000 and up; 2.75% APY on balances between S25,000 $49,999; 2.25% APYon balances between $5.000 $24,999;
-0.15% APY on balances less than S5,000. Fees may reduce account earnings. After account opening, the APY and interest rates are subject
to change at any time without notice. Treasury Checking accounts are limited to individuals and non-profit entities.


r







Page 22 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL MARCH 22,2006


S9 A s

LS 4 T'F


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SEC-
OND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
LIBERTY COUNTY, FLORIDA

FAMILY LAW DIVISION

CASE NO.: 2004-010-DP

IN THE INTEREST OF: A. J. R.
DOB: 07/20/1998

MINOR CHILD
/

NOTICE OF ACTION

TO: CHAD DANIEL REID

LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: 1100 Front
Beach Road RM 113, Panama City,
Florida

YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that a
petition under oath, has been filed in the
above-styled court for the termination of
parental rights and the permanent com-


mitment of A.J.R. a male child born on
07/20/1998, in Leon County, Florida to
the State of Florida, Department of Chil-
dren and Families, Adoption and Related
Services, a licensed child placing agen-
cy, for subsequent adoption and you are
hereby to be and appear in the above
court, before the Circuit Court Judge,
George S. Reynolds, Ill, at the Liberty
County Courthouse,10818 NW State
Road 20, Bristol, Liberty County, Florida
on Thursday, April 20, 2006, at 1:00 p.m.,
for a Termiination of Parental Rights Ad-
visory hearing and to show cause why
said petition should not be granted.

You must appear on the date and at
the time specified. FAILURE TO PER-
SONALLY APPEAR AT THE ADVISORY
HEARING CONSTITUTES YOUR CON-
SENT TO THE TERMINATION OF PA-
RENTAL RIGHTS TO THIS CHILD. IF
YOU FAIL TO APPEAR ON THE DATE
AND TIME SPECIFIED, YOU MAY
LOSE ALL LEGAL RIGHTS TO THE
CHILD NAMED IN THE PETITION.


WITNESS my hand and official seal as
the Circuit Judge of said Court this 15th
day of March, 2006.


GEORGE S. REYNOLDS, III
CIRCUIT JUDGE


3-22T 412


2006 COUNTY ROAD 12
S.C.O.P. PROJECT

PROJECT # 58.066

NOTICE TO RECEIVE
SEALED BIDS

The Liberty County Board of County
Commissioners will receive sealed bids
from any qualified person, company or
corporation interested in constructing the
following project:

2006 COUNTY ROAD 12 S.C.O.P.
PROJECT

Plans and specifications can be obtained


CITY OF BLOUNTSTOWN
REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS
FOR AUDIT SERVICES FOR THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL AUDIT

The City of Blountstown hereby requests proposals from qualified individuals or firms to provide audit ser-
vices to conduct the annual financial audit and provide technical support as needed. Financial statements of
the governmental activities, the business-type activities, each major fund, and the aggregate remaining fund-
ing information will be prepared. The financial statements will collectively comprise the entity's basic financial
statements and will include a Schedule of expenditures of federal awards and state financial assistance. The
auditor should express anh opinion as to whether the financial statements are fairly presented, in all material
respects, in conformity with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles and report on the fairness of the
additional information referred to above, when considered in relation to the financial statements as a whole.
The audit will be conducted in accordance with U.S. generally accepted auditing standards and the standards-
for financial audits contained in Government Auditing Standards, issued by the Comptroller General of the
United States, and should include tests of the accounting records of the City of Blountstown and other proce-
dures-considered necessary to enable an opinion to be expressed.

Proposals will be considered on a competitive basis. Proposals must indicate a fee for the service, with an
explanation of the basis of the fee. Fees must be quoted as a lump sum figure.

(''Qualifibations for audit services will be evaluated using the following criteria:


EVALUATION FACTOR

Specialized experience or technical expertise
of firm and its personnel in connection with
:types of services to be provided

Past record of firm to perform work within time
limitations taking into consideration firm's current
and planned workload.

Past record-oof firm with government and other
clients, including quality of work, timeliness
and cost control.

Knowledge of State and Federal rules and
Regulations.

Successful similar experience with Florida
Small Cities and Counties.

Competitiveness of fee


POSSIBLE POINTS

25



15



25



10


15


10


TOTAL POINTS


Eight copies of the sealed proposals, subject to the minimum general conditions herein, will be received
by the City of Blountstown, Florida until 4:00 P.M., C.S.T., City Manager's Office, 20591 Central Ave. W.,
Blountstown, Florida 32424 on May 9, 2006. Mark "Audit Services Proposal" on envelope.

Any bid submitted after the specified hour and date will not be opened or considered. The City accepts
no responsibility for mailed proposals that arrive at City. Hall after the above stated time, even though the
envelope may reflect a postmark prior to the above date.

Proposals will-then be. opened by the City Council on May 9, 2006 at 6:00 p.m., 17262 NW Angle Street,
Blountstown, Florida 32424 and then turned over to the Audit Committee for evaluation. The audit committee
shall rank and recommend, in. order of preference, no fewer than three firms deemed to be the most highly
qualified to perform the required services according to the factors above. The preference shall be read aloud
for City Council comment during a Special Session of the City Council to be announced. A contract will be
negotiated with one of the qualified bidders.

A copy of FYE 9/30/05 Financial Statements and FYE 9/30/06 Budget is available at City Hall.

The City Council reserves the right to reject any or all bids deemed in the best interest of the City.

EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER, FAIR HOUSING,
HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE JURISDICTION

BY: R.W. Deason, Mayor
FROM: Jimmy W. Hand, P.E., City Manager/Engineer
-_.-


at Preble-Rish, Inc., 324 Marina Drive,
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456, (850) 227-
7200. The bid must conform to Section
287.133(3) Florida Statutes, on public
entity crimes.

Completion date for this project will be
180 days from the date Notice
to Proceed presented to the successful
bidder.

Liquidated damages for failure to com-
plete the project on the specified date
will be set at $200.00 per day.

Please indicate on the envelope that this
is a sealed bid, the bid number and what
the bid is for.

Bids will be received until 5:00 p.m.
Eastern Time, on April 6, 2006, at the
Liberty County Clerk's Office, Liberty
County Courthouse, Hwy 20, Bristol,
Florida 32321, and will be opened and
read aloud on April 6, 2006, at 7:00 p.m.
Eastern Time. The public is invited to at-
tend.

Cost for Plans and Specifications will
be $25.00 per set and is non-refund-
-able. Checks should be made payable
to PREBLE-RISH, INC.

The Board of County Commissioners re-
serves the right to waive informalities in
any bid, to accept and/or reject any or all
bids, and to accept the bid that in their
judgment will be in the best interest of
Liberty County.

If you have any questions,- please call
David Kennedy at (850) 227-7200. 3-15,322


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SEC-
OND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
LIBERTY COUNTY, FLORIDA

CASE NO. 89-08--CP-.02

IN RE: GUARDIANSHIP OF

ALICE ALBRITLE .

Incapacilaled


NOTICE

PLEASE 'TAKE NOTICE' that on Aug.
8, 2002, there was placed on deposit in
this office funds' received from the Office
of Public Guardian as Guardian of Alice
Albritle in the amount of $300.44. Said
funds are all of the assets due to the heirs
of Alice Albritle and said assets remain
unclaimed. Some of the interested par-
ties may be:

Judy Broglin
208 E. Mowhawk Avenue
Tampa, Florida 33604

Ollie Brown
Unknown

Sarah Renflow
P.O. Box 1165
Riverview, Florida 33569

Earl Summeralls
Unknown

Unless said funds are claimed on or be-
fore six (6) months from the date of first
publication of this notice, saidfunds will be
forwarded to the State of Florida, Pursuant


to Florida Statutes 744.534.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have set my
hand and official seal at Bristol, Florida,
on Feb. 15, 2006.
Robert Hill,
Clerk of Circuit Court, Liberty County
Jena Rogers, Deputy Clerk 2.22T 4-12



IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE
FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR CALHOUN COUNTY,
FLORIDA

CASE NO. 2006-0018-CA

TIMOTHY S. MOWREY and LAURA J.
MOWREY,

Plaintiff

vs.

JACKIE MARIE JONES, LEONARD J.
HALL, DIANE W. HALL, JAMES D. HALL,
RUTH B. HALL, RODNEY JOHNSON,
MINNIE H. JOHNSON, RAINEY JONES
and MONROE JONES,

Defendants)
/

NOTICE OF QUIET
TITLE ACTION

TO: JACKIE MARIE JONES, MONROE
JONES, and THEIR HEIRS and AS-
SIGNS

YOUARE NOTIFIEDthatan action to quiet
title on the following property in Calhoun
County, Florida:

Begin at the Northwest corner of U.S.
Gov't. Lot 4, Fractional Section 13,
Township 3 South, Range 10 West,
and run thence. South 01 .degree 15
.,mminues 06 se0gands, Wes a;plgnghe
West boundary line of said Lof 4,
207.00 feet; thence North 87 degrees
32 minutes 52 seconds East, J 29.1.72
feet; thence South 54 degrees 41
-minutes 17 seconds .Eastt7,10.6 feet,
more or less, to the ordinary higghwater
line of Dead Lake; thence Northerly
along said water line, 650 feet, more
or less to a Point on the North line of
said Lot 4, which is North 87 degrees
32 minutes 52 seconds East, 1867.0
feet, more or less, from the Point of
Beginning; thence South 87 degrees
32 minutes .52 seconds -West along
said North. line, 1867.0 feet, to the
Point of Beginning;. Being in and part
of U.S. Gov't Lot 4, Fractional Section
13, Township 3 South, Range 10 West,
Calhoun County, Florida.

has been filed against you. You are
required to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on DONNA S. BIG-
GINS, Esquire, MOWREY & BIGGINS,
P.A., 515 North Adams Street,, Tallahas-
see, Florida 32301, on or before April 14,
2006, and file the original with the clerk
of this court either before service on the
plaintiff's attorney or immediately there-
after; otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demanded in the
complaint or petition.

Dated this 6th day of March, 2006


NOTICE TO NAME ROADS

FOR THE PURPOSE OF THE

ENHANCED 911 SYSTEM

THE LIBERTY COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COM-
MISSIONERS will consider at their next regular meeting
on Thursday, APRIL 6, 2006 at 7 p.m. in the courtroom of
the Liberty County Courthouse, the naming of the following
roads:

1. DUGGAR LN Private dirt road on the north side of Lake
Mystic road, north side of the lake.
2. SAWDUST LN Road south of North Florida Lumber Mill,
Known as Cochran Trailer Park. All residents along road will
be given new addresses reflecting XthcharWge ., ,,,.. ..


315 T. 4-5






MARCH 22, 2006 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 23


PMW1


dolt.


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SEC-
OND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
LIBERTY COUNTY, FLORIDA

CASE NO. 02-20-GA

IN RE: GUARDIANSHIP OF

SANK LEWIS

Incapacitated
/

NOTICE

PLEASE TAKE NOTICEthaton March 21,
2005, there was placed on deposit in this
office funds received from the Office of
Public Guardian as Guardian of Sank Lewis-
in the amount of $235.81. Said funds are
all of the assets due to the heirs of Sank
Lewis and said assets remain unclaimed.
Some of the interested parties may be:

Unknown

Unless said funds are claimed on or be-
fore six (6) months from the date of first
publication of this notice, said funds will be
forwarded to the State of Florida, Pursuant
to Florida Statutes 744.534.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have set my
hand and official seal at Bristol, Florida,
on Feb. 15,2006.

Robert Hill,
Clerk of Circuit Court, Liberty County,
Jena Rogers, Deputy Clerk 2-22T.4-12


INTHE CIRCUIT COURTFORTHE SEC-
OND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
LIBERTY COUNTY, FLORIDA

CASE NO. 06-05-CA

ST. JOE TIMBERLAND COMPANY OF
DELAWARE, L.L.C., a Delaware limited
liability company,

Plaintiff .. .

vs. .

DAVE DYER, DECEASED:; THE UN-
KNOWN SPOUSEOF DAVE DYER; FAN-
NIE PITS;THE UNKNOWNSPOUSEOF
FANNIE PITTS; THE UNKNOWN HEIRS,`
DEVISEES, GRANTEES; ASSIGNEES,
LIENORS,. CREDITORS, TRUSTEES,
OR OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY,
THOUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST DAVE
DYER OR FANNIE PITTS, AND ALL
UNKNOWN PERSONS, IFALIVE,AND IF
DEAD, ORNOTKNOWNTO BE DEADOR
ALIVE, THEIR UNKNOWN SPOUSES,
HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, AS-
SIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS,
TRUSTEES OR OTHER PERSONS
CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR
AGAINST THE UNKNOWN PERSONS.

Defendant(s)


NOTICE OF ACTION

TO: UNKNOWN PERSONS OR ENTITIES
CLAIMINGANYURIGHT,TITLE OR INTER-
EST IN THE SUBJECT PROPERTY.

You are notified that an action to quiet*
title on the following property in Liberty
County, Florida:

The Southeast quarter ofthe Northwest
quarter of Section 35, Township 2
North, Range 7 West, Liberty County,
Florida

has been filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it.on. GARVIN B.
BOWDEN, the plaintiff's attomey, whose
address is Gardner, Wadsworth, Duggar,
Bist & Wiener, P.A., 1300 Thomaswood
Drive, Tallahassee, Florida 32308, within
30 days of first publication, and file the
original with the clerk of this court either
before service on the pintiffPsaftomyeor'


immediatelythereafter; otherwise a default
will be entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or petition.

Witness my hand and seal of said Circuit
Court

Dated this 22nd day of February, 2006

Robert Hill,
Liberty County Clerk of Court
Vanell Summers, Deputy Clerk 3iT.3-29


NOTICE

Liberty County School Board
will receive sealed bids on
upgrading existing electrical
systems as designed to service
additional HVAC Equipment


The Liberty County School Board will
receive sealed bids on upgrading existing
electrical systems as designed to service
additional HVAC equipment. Bids will be
accepted through April 10, 2006 and can
be submitted to the Superintendent's Of-
fice at 12926 CR 12 between Ine hours of
8 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. All sealed bids will
be opened at the next scheduled Liberty
County School Board meeting on April
11, 2006.

The Uberty County School Board reserves
the right to reject any and all bids. Any bids
that are received after 4:30 p.m. on April
10, 2006 will notbe considered. If you have
any questions, please call Greg Solomon
at the Maintenance and Facilities Office
at 643-2275, ext. 267.

The undersigned, hereinafter called
"Bidder(s)", having visited the site of the
proposed project and became familiar with
the local conditions, nature and extent of
the work and having examined carefully
the drawings, specifications, the Form
of Agreement, and other Contract Docu-
ments, with the Bond Requirements there-
in, proposes to furnish all labor, materials,
equipment and other items, facilities and
services for the proposed execution and
completion of the construction of Hosford
Elementary School Main Building, Build-
ing No. 1, Hosford, Florida, complete in
every aspect ready for full occupancy, and
in full accordance with the drawings and.
specifications prepared by CHARLES M.
PURVIS,A.I.A.,ARCHITECT,2181 SURF
ROAD, PANACEA, FLORIDA 32346, in
full accordance with the Advertisement for
Bids, Instruction to Bidder(s), Agreement
and all other Contract Documents; and if
awarded the contract, I (We) will contract
with Liberty County School Board,
Bristol, Florida to furnish all.necessary
.labor, equipment, materialsand incidental
costs, and that I (We) will substantially
complete all necessaryworkin accordance
with the specifications and drawings,, and
the requirements as outlined and required
by Florida Codes herein above within 45
consecutive calendar days after receipt
of Notice-to-Proceed for the following
bid price:

Submitted by:
Greg Solomon, Director of Facilities
Liberty County School Board
P.O. Box 429
Bristol, FL 32321 3-22.3-29


NOTICE TO BID


The Liberty County Grants Department
has received Federal Weatherization
Assistance Program funds to be used
for weatherizing residential homes in
the county.

The focus of the Weatherization Assis-
tance Program is to increase the energy.
efficiency of residential homes, thus lower-
ing the energy burden (monthly utility bills)
of low-income individuals and families.,

The Liberty County Grants Department is
currently seeking bids from state licensed
andns.u.rd plumbing, ,electrical, insulation


and heating and air conditioning contrac-
tors for the installation of specific Weath-
erization Program measures, i.e.:

Air infiltration reduction (window and
door repair/replacement, weather-
stripping, .minor floor, wall and ceiling
repair), installation of insulation and
repair/replacement of heating and cool-
ing systems, and water heaters.

Minority-owned firms and woman's busi-
ness enterprises are especially encour-
aged to participate.

Interested contractors should submit their
contact information to:

Liberty County Grants Department
P.O. Box 399
Bristol, FL 32321
(850) 643-2692 3-22



IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
14TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
CALHOUN COUNTY, FLORIDA


CASE NO.: 2006-0053-DR

DANIEL P. KELLOWAY,

Petitioner

and

TAMMY L. KELLOWAY,

Respondent.


NOTICE OF ACTION FOR
DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE

To: {name of Respondent} Tammy L.
Kelloway

(Respondent's last known address) 1460
Mires Road Mount Juliet, TN 37122-
4208

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action has
nbee filed against you and that you are
required to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to-it on {name of Peti-
tioner} Daniel P. Kelloway, whose address
is 2903 Douglas Rd., Panama City, FL
32405 on or before April 28, 2006, and
file the original with the clerk of this Court
at 20859 Central Ave. E. Room #130,
Blountstown, FL32424 before service on
Petitioner oriimmediatelythereafter. If you
fail to do so, a default may be entered
against you for the relief demanded in
the petition.

Copies of all court documents in this
case, including orders, are available
at the Clerk of the Circuit Court's of-
fice.You may review these documents
upon request.

You must keep the Clerk of the Circuit
Court's office notified of your current
address. (You may file Notice of Cur-
rent Address, Florida Supreme Court
Approved Family Law Form 12.915.)
Future papers in this lawsuit will be
mailed to the address on record at the
clerk's office.

WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida Family
Law Rules of Procedure, requires cer-
tain automatic disclosure of documents
and information. Failure to comply can
result in sanctions, including dismissal
or striking of pleadings.

Dated: March 8,2006.

Ruth Attaway, Clerk of the Circuit Court
BEy: L Flowers, Deputy Clerk 3...-12


Premium or regular:


Does it even matter?


These days, it seems nearly
everyone is preoccupied with
the numbers at the pump. But
while many people are chiefly
concerned with the price per gal-
lon, a greater understanding of
the octane levels might help both
your car and your wallet.
Automobile owners can learn
what octane level to use for
their car simply by opening the
glove compartment and reading
their vehicle's owner's manual.
These almost always suggest the
type of gas your car needs, be
it a higher-octane gas (typically
93 or 94 octane), which is fre-
quently called. "premium," or a
lower-octane gas (87), commonly
referred to as "regular." Along
with medium-octane gas (89),
these are the trio of choices most
gas stations provide. But aside
from premium gas being more
expensive and regular being the
cheapest option available, many
consumers are likely unaware
of the effect octane can have on
their car's engine and why certain
engines function perfectly with a
lower octane while others are best
suited to a higher octane.
Octane refers to the antiknock
value of a particular gasoline.
Knocking occurs in an engine
when a fuel ignites too quickly
and a pinging sound results. To
better understand knocking, un-
derstanding just how an engine
works can help. As your engine's
pistons push up, gasoline and air
are drawn into the cylinders and
: compressed. At the right time,,
your.engine's spark plugs then
ignite the compressed fuel-air
mixture, and this mixture then
bums, not, explodes. When this
fuel-air mixture is being com-
pressed, however, it can get too
hot and ignite prematurely on its
own, a conditioncalled preigni-
tion, which causes knocking.
This is bad for your car, as engine
damage can be one side effect
of preignition. Octane, then, is a
gasoline's resistance to knocking
and preignition.
That said, it could.be inferred
that the higher the octane, the
better that gasoline is for your
car, as higher octane will mean
a greater resistance to preigni-
tion and, therefore, a healthier
engine. This is not the case. Cars
that are classified as turbocharged
or high-powered often have their
gasoline-and- air mixture put
under intense heat during com-
pression, placing them in greater
need of a higher-octane gas that
can lessen the likelihood of pre-
ignition.
However, the average car
engine is not turbocharged, and
most, in fact, are built specifi-
cally for a lower-octane gasoline.
This means their gasoline-and-air
mixture are not compressed under
intense heat, and preignition is
not a concern. Therefore, putting
premium gasoline in these cars
pays no dividend and simply
takes more money out of your


pocket.
Putting premium gas in an
engine where it doesn't belong
can also lead to another problem
that might prove even more costly
than a few extra dollars each time
you fill up. This has to do with the
concept of volatility, or the abil-
ity of a liquid to mix or atomize
into the air. As mentioned earlier,
gasoline must first mix and com-
press with the air inside an engine
before it can bum. However, the
higher the octane, the lower the
volatility, making it more difficult
for the gas to compress with the
air. This in turn can lead to prob-
lems starting your engine, as a car
filled with gasoline of too high an
octane will have trouble mixing
with air. Typically, this problem
is most prevalent as the seasons
change, since gasoline has a more
difficult time mixing into cold air
than warm air. While refineries
adjust the volatility of fuels from
summer to winter, an abrupt cold
spell can cause problems for your
car, as many times the fuel blend
will still be a summer blend with
a lower volatility.
One common practice that
might be irrelevant now is switch-
ing to a higher octane once your
car is older. In the past, cars had
carburetors that needed to be
adjusted on a regular basis so the
air-fuel mixture would remain ac-
curate. Older vehicles, too, would
experience more difficulty keep-
ing the fuel-air mixture accurate.
If no adjustments were made,
carbon deposits would result as a
side effect of too, much fuel: and
too little air. These carbon depos-
its would then increase knock-
ing, making a higher-octane gas
necessary to keep the' older car
running as smoothly as possible.
Today, however, most cars have
fuel injection with computers that
control the mixture of air and fuel,
therefore greatly diminishing the
chances of carbon deposits form-
ing and making higher- octane
fuels unnecessary.
If you're still unsure as to the
most suitable octane, to use for
your automobile, remember to
check the manual or visit your
vehicle maker's Web site.
GAS OCTANES AND
WHAT TO USE
87-Octane: The least expen-
sive of the fuels at the pump, 87-
octane (or "regular") is generally
recommended for most vehicles.
Most manufacturers build-their
cars with engines capable of
running smoothly on low-octane
fuel. Not to be used with cars that
have turbocharged engines.
89-Octane: The middle grade,
89-octane is acceptable for use in
any car that is not turbocharged.
Offers slightly more resistance to
preignition, but most engines will
get the same results with the less
expensive 87-octane.
93- or 94-Octane: These are
really only useful for cars with
turbocharged engines that are
moresusceptible to pr'eignition. ,
..i .. .^ ..* .. f .


'




Page 24 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL MARCH 22,2006


If you're looking for a copy of

The Calhoun-Liberty Journal
you shouldn't have

to look too far! : .
















The Calhoun-Liberty Journal
is delivered every Wednesday morning to newsracks
in Calhoun & Liberty counties at these locations:
CALHOUN COUNTY
*The Southern Express in Altha and Blountstown
*Goco in Blountstown and Altha *Parramore's Restaurant
*PitStop *Ramsey Piggly Wiggly *The Quick Pic *Connie's Kitchen
*Harvey's *Clarksville General Store *Chapman's Grocery in Carr
*Smith's *Golden Drugs *Shelton's Store *Scotts Ferry General Store
*Gas Mart *Big Bend Bait & Tackle
LIBERTY COUNTY
*The Southern Express in Bristol & Hosford *Lake Mystic Supermarket
*Blackburn's Store in Hosford *Tom Thompson's Store in Telogia
*Crow's Citgo Hwy. 20 East *Express Lane in Bristol
*Country Corner in Hosford *BP Station in Bristol
*T & P's Store in Telogia *Apaiachee Restaurant
...and, if the racks are empty by the time you get to the store, we invite you to subscribe and
make sure you receive a copy every week! Just send us your name and mailing address,
along with a check for $18 per year, to: Journal Subscriptions, P.O. Box 536, Bristol, FL 32321.





MARCH 22,2006 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 25


Florida's employment/unemployment rate hits record low


Florida's unemployment rate
once again hit a record low in


January 2006 dropping to 3.0
percent from the previous 3.3
percent. Stronger than average
job growth took place in January
as the state added 302,500
jobs over the year, growing at
3.9 percent, more than twice the
national rate. The national rate
of growth was 1.6 percent for
the same period.
Based on the latest available
data, Florida continues to lead
other states in the nation in the
number of new jobs created and
has the fastest rate of job growth
and the lowest- unemployment


rate among the ten most
populous states.
The state's seasonally
adjusted January 2006
unemployment rate was 3.0
percent, down from 3.3 percent
in December and down by 1.2
percentage points from 4.2
percent a year ago.
Florida's seasonally adjusted
unemployment rate for January
2006 of 3.0 percent was 1.7
percentage points lower than
the national rate of 4.7 percent.
Job growth by sector was led
by Professional and Business


Services (+70,300 jobs), Trade,
Transportation and Utilities
(+60,000 jobs), Construction
(+55,900 jobs), Leisure and
Hospitality (+38,200 jobs), and
Education and Health services
(+27,700 jobs).
Solid growth also continued
in Manufacturing which
gained 3,600 jobs over
the year. Durable goods
manufacturing gained 3,300
jobs, mainly in transportation
equipment manufacturing
(+2,000 jobs). Manufacturing
employment has seen positive


growth since May 2004. -
The Miami-Ft. Lauderdale-
Miami Beach MSA led the
state in employment growth
(+77,500 jobs, +3.3 percent),
followed by the Orlando-
Kissimmee and Tampa-St.
Petersburg-Clearwater MSAs
with over-the-year job growth
in January 2006 of +47,800 jobs
and +40,500 jobs, respectively.
The county with the lowest
unemployment rate in January
was Wakulla County at 2.2
percent. Hendry County was the
highest at 5.6 percent.


fr


CALHOUN COUNTY SENIOR
CITIZENS ASSOCIATION, INC.
Calhoun County Transit is seeking applications for drivers. 7
A Class E-(regular) Florida driver's license, a good driving
record, a current physical (less than 2 years old) may be
obtained from the Health Department (agency has forms), EVE-
im


must oe able 10 pick up 2uu IDS. witn assistance and one
year professional driving experience are preferred, but
agency will train if experience is lacking. CPR, first aid, and
completion of a Defensive Driving Course are required, but
may be obtained after hire, at agency expense. Must also
pass DOT drug test. After being hired a criminal history
check, fingerprinting and local law enforcement check will
be performed. Smoke-free work place.

Applications can be picked up at 16859 NE Cayson Street,
Blountstown, FLor may be obtained online through the One-
Stop. NO PHONE CALLS.
CCSCA is an Equal Opportunity Employer. y
Application deadline is Wednesday, April 5,2006 at 4 p.m. (CT)


JOB OPENING
The School Board of Liberty County is accepting applications
for the following position for the 2005-2006 school year.
Applications are available at the Office of the Superintendent
located at 12926 NW CR 12, Bristol, FL. Office hours are
from 8 a.m. 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday.

CHILD CARE WORKER (12-MONTHS)
Early Learning Center Liberty Kids First

MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS:
* High School diploma or equivalent
* Must have a CDA or be willing to obtain one
* Must provide written references upon request from the
Superintendent

COMPENSATION: Salary range $12,194 $14569 with
option of additional hours.

A complete application and resume listing three (3)
professional references is required. Please submit application
to the Office of the Superintendent of Schools located in
the Liberty Education and Administration Center at 12926
NW CR 12 Bristol, FL. Reasonable accommodations
for completing forms and interviews are available for
people with disabilities when requested in advance.
For a request for reasonable accommodations, please
contact the Office of the Superintendent.

Applications will be received from:
March 8 March 28, 2006

Employment will be contingent upon fingerprints being
cleared by FDLE

ONLY CURRENT APPLICATIONS WILL BE CONSIDERED
Employment opportunities are offered without regard to race, religion,
sex, age, National origin, handicap or marital status.

*' ** **' ,!' 'II''I;'*' >' qE > '. >>IP1 p I fV


Skidder/Operator
WANTED
Valid Florida
driver's license
is required.
Pay based
on experience.

Call Bobbie Dugger at
(850) 566-0831


MILL SUPERVISOR
Supervise 35 people, mul-
titasked individual, prob-
lem solving skills, sched-
uling, safety, production,
hands on person, industri-
al woodworking machinery
a plus, DFWP, benefits.

Contact Gwen at
Higdon Furniture Co.
in Quincy
Phone: (850) 627-7564
or fax resume to
(850) 627-2486
EOE/DFWP ...
Fax your JOB MARKET adver-
tisements to us at 643-3334, or
email to: thejoumal@gtcom.net





Looking for good
people who want
to make a career
change. Applicants
will be cross
trained in:
*Equipment Operation
and Maintenance
*General Labor
and Metal Sorting

Apply in person at:
1351 Aenon Church Rd.
off Hwy. 20, Tallahassee
,,,,Drug-Free Woriqipace
\1'\''.'/^':\ OE '* ,''^1fnT<^^-2e


Help Wanted
Full-time Delivery Driver,
CDL license required.
Full health insurance
benefits paid after 3 month
probation & paid holidays.
Apply in person at
cE1 Strickland's
Al Hardware
Located on Hwy. 20 in Bristol





Concrete
finisher needed
Transportation and
experience required

Call (850)20


One Stop Career Center
16908 NE Pear SI. Sulte 2,
Bountsown Phone (eso) 674-s08
The following, positions are
available: Highway Main-
tenance Worker, Clerical
Worker, Cashier, Stock Clerk,
Supervisor Food Service,
Dietetic Tech., Truck Driver,
Maintenance Worker.
Service Chipola Workforce Board UFN

Needed:
Diesel Mechanic
with tools, transportation
and CDL license.


Call (850) 627-4224
A DRUG FREE WORKPLACE,


Calhoun Liberty Hospital
has openings for the following positions:
Swingbed coordinator & utilization review, RN
Part-time position
Hours: Monday-Friday, 4 hours per day
REQUIREMENTS: Current licensure with the state of
Florida, current CPR, reliable transportation, one year
acute care experience necessary, must be able to work
unsupervised, must be thorough.
Excellent assessment skills.

Registered Nurses
Full-time positions
Hours: 7 on 7 off

Medical/Telemetry Floor
Full-time positions
Hours: 7 on 7 off
REQUIREMENTS: Current licensure with the state of Florida
and current CPR.

Emergency Department
Hours: 3-11 and 11-7
REQUIREMENTS: Current licensure with the state of
Florida, current CPR and ACLS

Submit application to:
Calhoun-Liberty Hospital
Attn: Barbara Potter, RN, DON
20370 NEBurns AvBeQ,, qutslow 1.32424,, _






Page 26 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL MARCH 22,2006


TAMMY LYNN SMITH
ALBANY, GA Tammy Lynn Smith, 42,
passed away Sunday, March 12, 2006. A native of
Marianna, she had resided in Albany for the past
four years before moving from Dawson. She was a
bookkeeper with Albany Word Processing and One
Plus Mail and a member of First Free Will Baptist
Church.
She was preceded in death by her mother, Bob-
bie Jean Howard Bailey and a brother, Raymond
Bailey.
Survivors include her husband, Sammy Smith-
of Albany, GA; two sons, Bradley George Smith
and Jacob Austin Smith, both of Albany, GA;
mother-in-law, Hazel Smith of Clarksville; father
and stepmother, Mancil and Lois Holliday of Altha;
one brother, Michael Holliday of Altha; three sisters,
Kim Young, Rhonda Sims and Michelle Adkins,
all of Altha; a number of aunts, uncles, nieces and
nephews.
Services were held Saturday, March 18, 2006 at
First Free Will Baptist Church with Rev. Billy Hanna
and Dr. Shaun Williams officiating. Interment fol-
lowed in Travelers Rest Cemetery in Clarksville.
Mathews Funeral Home in Albany was in charge
of the arrangements.

JUDGE PHILIP JAMES KNIGHT
BLOUNTSTOWN
- Judge Philip James
Knight, 68, passed
away Thursday, -
March 16, 2006 at
Bay Medical Center in
Panama City. He was
born on July 9, 1937
in Blountstown and
had lived here most
of his life. He served.
as local county judge
from 1987 until his ale
retirement in 2000. He
graduated from mili-
tary prep high school
at Baylor in 1955. He
attended FST in 1955
and graduated in 1959 and served as class presi-
dent for three of the four years.He was a member
of the Gold Key Sigma Chi Fraternity. He prac-
ticed law in Tallahassee from 1962 until 1963, then
moved back to Blountstown and practiced law
with his father. He worked with the Florida States
Attorney's office under Leo Jones and Jim Apple-
manil. He also served as circuit judge when he was
called upon. He was lay pastor of the Presbyterian
Church in Blountstown for 11 years.
Survivors include one son, Philip Barclay and
his wife, Danika Knight of Blountstown; three
daughters, Ginny and her husband, Tom Scott,
Sarah and her husband, Adam Westmoreland, all
of Marianna and Kathy and her husband, Harry
Varnum ofBlountstown; two.brothers, Bart Knight
Jr. of Farragut, TN and Billy Cayson of Bristol and
seven grandchildren.
Services were held Saturday, March 18, 2006
at Peavy Funeral Home Chapel in Blountstown
with Rev. Steve Warren and Rev. Louis Bullard
officiating. Interment followed inBoggs Cemetery
in Blountstown.
In lieu of flowers, contributions are to be made
to the Alabama/Florida Council of the Boy Scouts
of America, 6801 W. Main St., Dothan, AL 36305
or to the American Diabetes Association, 5514 N.
Davis Hwy., Pensacola, FL 32503.
Peawy Funeral Home in Blountstown was in
charge of the arrangements.

EVA ENGLISH BLACKBURN
MT. PLEASANT Eva English Blackburn,
83, passed away Wednesday, March 15, 2006 in,
Marianna. She was retired as owner of Blackburn's
Store in Mt. Pleasant.. ,.
She was preceded in death by herhusband e,


Blackburn and a grandson, Jamie Blackburn.
Survivors include three sons, David and Su-
san Blackburn of Hosford, Lynwood and Martha
Blackburn of Lake View Point and Rev. Terry
and Cathy Blackburn of Bristol; one sister, Katie
McPhaul of Quincy; nine grandchildren and 14
great-grandchildren.
Graveside services were held Saturday, March
18, 2006 at Antioch Cemetery in the Wetumpka
Community.
Charles McClellan Funeral Home in Quincy was
in charge of the arrangements.
EDSEL A. RICHARDSON
TALLAHASSEE Edsel A. Richardson, 77,
passed away Thursday, March 16, 2006. He was
a native of Telogia and moved to Tallahassee in
1978. He was a charter member of Parkway Baptist
Church.
Survivors include his wife of 57 years, Ruth;
one son, Rick and his wife, Karen Richardson of
Pensacola; one daughter, Debbie Macioce of Kern-
ersville, NC; one grandson, Robert Macioce of New
Jersey; three granddaughters, Carol Macioce of
Greensboro, NC, Stephanie Richardson of Atlanta,
GA and Laura Richardson of Pensacola.
Graveside services were held Friday, March 17,
2006 at Tallahassee Memory Gardens. In lieu of
flowers, memorial contributions may be made to the
Leukemia and Lymphoma Society, 9143 Phillips
Highway, Suite 130, Jacksonville, FL 32256.
Bevis Funeral Home in Tallahassee was in charge
of the arrangements.

ALLENE M. "GRANNY"THOMAS
BRISTOL Allene M. "Granny" Thomas, 82,
passed away Friday, March 17, 2006 in Tallahas-
see. She was born in North Carolina and has been
in Liberty County since the 1970s. She had been
an assembly worker for American Can Company,
Sealtest and Foremost Ice Cream. She was of the
Assembly of God faith. She has lived her life help-
ing others, always volunteering to serve in any
way possible. She was very faithful in attending
the Bristol Assembly of God Church and she will
be greatly missed.
Survivors include a son, Doug "Dougie" Thomas
of Bristol; one daughter, Vivian Harrison of Astatu-
la; three grandchildren; six great-grandchildren and
many friends and church family members. .
Services were held Monday, March 20, 2006
at the Bristol Assembly of God Church with Rev.
Jack Strader officiating. Interment followed in Lake
Mystic Cemetery in Bristol.
Adams Funeral Home in Blountstown was in
charge of the arrangements.

FANNIE ADAMS
BLOUNTSTOWN-Fannie Adams, 80, passed
away Monday, March 20, 2006 at Blountstown
Health and Rehab Center in Blountstown. She
was born on Dec. 17, 1926 in Cottondale and had
lived in Calhoun County for most of her life. She
worked as a cashier for the Ramsey Piggly Wiggly
in Blountstown for 30 years. She was a member
of the Pine Grove Freewill Baptist Church in
Blountstown.
She was preceded in death by her husband, John
Wesley Adams.
Survivors include one daughter, Joanne Trus-
sell of Woodville; one brother, Pete White of
Blountstown; three grandchildren, Tammie Perry,
Shawn Brantley and Debra Brantley, all of Tallahas-
see; seven great-grandchildren and four great-great-
grandchildren; several nieces and nephews.
The family will receive friends Thursday, March
.23, 2006 from 11 a.m. (CT) until service time at 2
p.m. at Peavy Funeral Home.
Services will be held Thursday, March 23, 2006
at 2 p.m. (CT) from the Peavy Funeral Home
Chapel with Rev. Raymond Smith officiating.
Interment will follow in Old Shiloh Cemetery in
Scotts Ferry.
S- Peavy Funeral Home in Blountstown is in charge
.f th ph .'. .


L B-ITUAR I ES j


Mayo promoted
Mary A. Mayo has been pro-
moted to the rank of senior air-
man in the U.S. Air Force.
Mayo is an aircraft electrical
and environmental systems ap-
prentice, assigned to the 437th
Airlift Wing, Charleston Air
Force Base, S.C. She has served
in the military for two years.
She is the daughter of James
R. Mayo and Angela K. Copeland
both of Bristol.
She is the granddaughter
of James and Lucretia Mayo
and Juacinta Copeland, all of
Bristol.
The airman graduated in the
year 2000 from Liberty County
High School, Bristol.


legislator, call 1-800-880-7640
and explain that you want to
make your own choices when it
comes to your and your family..



HONORR
your lovedone with
dignity compassion.

James C. (Rusty) Black Jack W. Waeller
Owner & Manager Lic. Funeral Director

Independent

funeraflome
211 E. Jefferson St., Quincy
(850) 875-1529
LOCALLY OWNED & OPERATED


WHAT BETTER TRIBUTE
CAN THERE BE?

Honor your loved ones by making
their memory part of our best
efforts to defeat cancer.
For more information, contact
the American Cancer Society.




EAST GADSDEN UNIT
P.O. Box 563, Quincy, FL 32353




Peavy Funeral Home


U-


Funeral Services with Dignity,
Caring and Professionalism.

Marion Peavy

A Hometown Funeral Director
You Can Trust and Depend On!


-~41~L~r~f yybryar, ~L- ;ttr'z~-c-crr~~-'r's~`i~7r~,~i~-F-i--~f - ---- - ---- -- -


Forcing individuals into mandatory
managed long-term care severely
limits their choice on services
AARP Florida opposes a state plan to force Floridians 60+ to
join a managed-care plan (like an HMO) if they need vital Medicaid
long-term care services. Part 1 of a series explains the plan's flaws.
*Reason #1 --Forcing individuals into mandatory managed long-
term care severely limits their choice
Most older Floridians are used to making their own major life
decisions. But a new state plan would force Floridians 60+ into
mandatory Medicaid managed-care organizations, like HMOs, if
they needed vital long-term care services financed by Medicaid.
Once in such a plan, older Floridians would find their choices
severely limited.
The HMO would choose their doctor, their hospital, and their
nursing home. The HMO would decide how much care they could
receive. The HMO could even deny care that a doctor found was
medically necessary.
AARP Florida knows that your independence and choice are
important to you and your family. To be connected toll-free to your






MARCH 22,2006 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 27


Liberty County Landfill will be accepting
hazardous waste from conditionally ex-
empt, small quantity generators, including
small business, schools and farms.

Waste will be accepted at a reduced rate
at Liberty County Household Hazardous
Waste Building.


Questions concerning
empted generators, call
at (850) 643-3777.


conditionally ex-
Carroll Copeland


Carpenter bees are buzzing


Spring has arrived and the
bees are buzzing. One bee that
is attracting a lot of attention is
the carpenter bee. At a glance,
carpenter bees resemble bum-
ble bees, but their abdomen is
bare and shiny black, while the
bumble bee's abdomen is hairy
with yellow markings.
Despite their similar appear-
ance, the nesting habits of the
two types of bees are quite dif-
ferent. Bumble bees usually
nest in the ground whereas car-
penter bees tunnel into wood to
lay their eggs. As the weather
warms in the spring, carpen-
ter bees emerge from old nest
tunnels in wood and begin the
busy work of cleaning out old
tunnels and making new ones
to deposit their eggs. A new
tunnel is made by boring an en-
trance hole about inch in di-
ameter on the face of the wood.
The entry hole goes straight in
for an inch or two then turns 90


by Mike Donahoe,
Extension Horticultural
Agent, Santa Rosa County


Carpenter bee


degrees to follow the grain of
the wood for another six inch-
es or more. After the tunnel is
cleaned or finished, the female
creates numerous cell cham-
bers where she lays an egg and
leaves some nectar and honey
for the newly hatched larvae to
feed on.
During nest building, the
males may buzz around the


area or hover in front of anyone
approaching the nest; however,
they do not have a stinger so
they cannot sting. The front of
the face of the male has a big
white spot, while the female's
face is solid black. The female
does have a stinger but she
rarely stings unless trapped or
handled.
Carpenter bees prefer to nest
in bare, unpainted or weathered
softwoods, especially redwood,
cedar, cypress and pine. Paint-
ed or pressure-treated wood
is much less susceptible to at-
tack; however, they occasion-
ally bore into painted or stained
wood. Common nesting sites
include eaves, facia boards,
window trim, exposed timbers,
siding, wooden shakes, decks
and outdoor furniture.
Because they prefer to attack
bare, unpainted wood, the best
way to deter carpenter bees is
to paint all exposed wood sur-
faces. Wood stains and preser-
vatives will not stop them, but
may provide some degree of re-
pellency versus bare wood. To
further discourage nesting, ga-
rages and outbuildings should
be kept closed when carpenter
bees are actively searching for
nesting sites.
Insecticide sprays can be ap-
plied as a preventative to wood
surfaces; however, they are ef-
fective for only a short period
even when repeated every few
weeks. Since the bees are not
actually eating the wood and
they are active over several
weeks, they are rarely exposed
to lethal doses of the pesti-
cide. Recommended protective
sprays are those that contain
one of the synthetic pyrethroids
as the active ingredient. These
include beta-cyfluthrin, bifen-
thrin, cyfluthrin, cypemethrin,
deltamethrin, fenvalerate, and
lambda cyhalothrin, which are
sold under various label brand
names.
Tunnels which have already


been excavated are best treated
by puffing an insecticidal dust
(e.g., Sevin, Drione, or PT Tri-
Die Silica & Pyrethrum Dust)
into the nest opening. Next
best would be spraying one of
the liquid insecticides into the
hole; however, dusts penetrate
the tunnel cavities better and
seem to provide longer residual
control inside the dry tunnels.
Leave the hole open for a few
days after treatment to allow
the bees to contact and distrib-
ute the insecticide throughout
the nest galleries. Then plug
the entrance holes with wood
putty, corks or pieces of wood-
en dowel. If the area is difficult
to treat or if you have had little
success yourself, you may wish
to hire a reputable pest control
business to treat the wood.
Mike Donahoe is the County.
Extension Director for Santa
Rosa Courity.' '
I *J- .f -.* 'f 't'- */-, p';^^\\ f*/ '


05.PONTIAC BONNEVILLE vyol lIRE

E, 0 DRIVE A

WAS: ss,995 NOW: $15.988 ITTLE
OR: $278/Mo.* I LE.
05 CHEVY IMPALA
SUM-,F SOILB .


wAS: s1a.99 NOW: $15.988 ptm n
OR: $278/Mo.*
05 MITSUBISHI GALANT "


' NONEY
WAS: sis,995 NOW:NS15.9OO
w OW:$2 /Mo.5988 d*D O W N !*
OR: $278/Mo. -AY)MEN -


05 JEEP WRANGLER "' 03 FORD F-150 01 FORD E-150 VAN
6 nft..AUd O.,-, U. U DEDWHE -


WAS:21.95 NOW:$ S19.988 -
OR: $348/Mo.* As:si8.995 NOW: $15,988 was si2.9ss NOW:S10,988


05 PONTIAC GTO



WAS: $29,995 NOW: $27,988
OR: $488/Mo.*
05 BUICK LACROSSE



WAS. 19,98a NOW: S17.988
OR: $318/Mo.7
04 TOYOTA TACOMA
mc"TB I NUMWE



rTS-f" WAS: 2i.9% NOW:$19,988


05 CADILLAC DEVILLE



WAS- 26.995 NOW: $24,888
OR: $438/Mo.*


05 CHEVY SILVERADO 05 CHEVY MALIBU 96 BUICK REGAL 05 CHEVY SILVERADO



s-wsNe.9 W$ NOW: 25.988. Ws WAS:2S,5 NOW:$23.988
OR$458/Mo R: ./M AS $ 99 NOW: $3O988 OR: $428/Mo0.*


APIiJ l nS 8504674.3307 (800) 419.1801
2 CENA EE ESLFOR I CONTACT USMONUMNE! HopkinsBTown@hotmail.com
rf M 4 AMr r 72'no. Financing. All Pictures For lutration Oly. -


.TI T


SAVE ON THE GREEN WITH

5fLJW WdiDCJL^M( W DBYZ7DfJ PL
-, Program and Off Lease Cars9 Trucks, Vans & SUVs*

; 05 PONTIAC GRAND AM 06 GMC ENVOY on,
VS, SPOILER LOW MILES O. 3
-ALLOW WHEELS -A



WAS: $14,995 NOW: $12,988 WAS: 26.995 NW: $23,988
OR: $228/Mo* OR: $428/Mo.*


'I


.1 C;, I


~"~ ~~~~~-~-~~~~~~-~-- --~ ~~-~-~-' "






Page 28 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL MARCH 22,2006


s to aury No-bun es r F fr






To place your ad, call 643-3333 or 1-800-717-3333 by noon
Eastern Time on Saturday. Non-business ads run FREE for 2 weeks.


GE dishwasher, $35; drop-in GE
stove, $20, both in good condition.
Call 674-8850. 3-22,3-29

Chicken roaster by George Fore-
man, $75. Call 379-3562. 3-22,3-29

Refrigerator, beige, double-door,
$150 or best offer. Call 643-3090.
3-22, 3-29

GE washer, $100; Whirlpool dryer,
$25. Call 643-4005. 3-22, 3-29

Bissell bagless vacuum, 12 amp.,
$35. Call 643-4362. 3-15, 3-22

Washer, excellent condition; dryer,
good condition, $175 for both. Call
545-9593. 3-15, 3-22

Whirlpool washer, $85; Whirlpool
dryer, $75. Call 643-2431. 3-15,3-22




Prom dress, gorgeous two-piece,
floor length gown, size 16/18 with
matching size 7 sandals, cornsilk
blue with hand-beaded sleeveless
top, $250. Call 762-3284, leave
message. 3-22,3-29


.. .. .. -...... .. .

Magnavox surround sound, $150
or best offer. Call 379-9548.
3-15, 3-22


1000 Channel police scanner,
brand new, $150. Call 379-9548.
3-15, 3-22

Galaxy turbo CB base unit, $500.
Call 379-9548. 3-15,3-22






Excellent Fitness Machine by Joe
Welder; comes with wide range
of weights, two seats. Paid $850,
asking $300 or best offer. Call 556-
7025. 3.-22,3-29

Stair stepper, $20; glider exercise
machine, $20. Call 643-9332, after
3 p.m. 3-22, 3-29

Bow Flex XTL, comes with leg at-
tachment and pull down bar, $300.
Call 762-9708. 3-15, 3-22

Total Gym 1500, $100. Call 762-
9708. 3-15, 3-22

Proform XP650Etreadmill, brand
new, $500. Call 762-9708. 3-15,3-22




Loveseat, tan, leather, good condi-
tion, $25. Call 674-8850. 3-22,3-29

Living room sofa and chair, coun-
try blue, excellent condition, clean,
$250. Call 576-7437. 3-22,3-29

Twin bed comes with mattress,
boxsprings, head and foot board
and rails, $60. Call 674-4686.
3-22, 3-29


Victorian dresser, very old, best
offer; closet type cabinet, best offer.
Call 674-3264. 3-22,3-29
Coffee table, $15; dresser, $35.
Call 643-4005. 3-22,3-29

Brand new living room suit,
couch, loveseat and recliner, still
in the plastic, factory tags still on it,
$850 or best offer. Call 379-8179.
3-22, 3-29

Queen-size waterbed, solid oak
wall unit with 16 drawers, four
shelves, mirror, two lights, excellent
condition, all accessories included.
Asking $750 or will trade for items
of equal value. Call 674-1707.
3-15, 3-22

Loveseat and couch, $40 for all.
Call 643-3090. 3-15,3-22

Box spring, one set of king, asking
$50 or best offer. Call 379-8233 or
447-1421, leave message. 3-15,3-22


Antique bed frame with boxspring
and mattress, good shape, greatfor
a camp, $35. Call 643-2263.
3-15, 3-22




Barbie four-wheeler, battery pow-
ered, $75. Call 674-9081. 3-22,3-29

Bassinet, blue and white, excellent
condition, $50. Call 762-8975.
3-15,3-22


Changing table, white, wooden,
excellent condition, $50. Call 762-
8975. 3-15,3-22




Coin collection, 30 years old, very
nice. Call 379-3562, make offer.
3-22, 3-29

Poulan garden tiller, one year old,
$800. Call 674-4686. 3-22, 3-29

Oak TV trays with stand, set of
four, new, $30. Call 643-4362.
3-15,3-22

Old Royal typewriter, works good,
$80. Call 674-3264. 3-15,3-22


/ FLORIDA HILL L
COUNTRY
ST. JOE WOODLANDS

Land with live oaks and
long-leafs, fields and pines,
along the rivers and bays of
Northwest Florida. Thou-
sands of opportunities for
your own farm, ranch or
waterfront property. Multi-
ple rural lifestyle opportuni-
ties and only one number
to call.
1.866.JOE.LAND
(1-866-563-5263) or
visit JOE.com/land
IF YOU DON'T KNOW JOE,
YOU DON'T KNOW FLORIDA.

%STJOE
^^"*'-~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~~~2 '.~' -'' --/* ,-


Power chair, new, never used,
$4,000 firm. Call 762-3374. 3-15,3-22

Large hot tub, $700. Call 639-
9331. 3-15, 3-22
Above ground swimming pool, 24
ft., everything works great, needs
liner, $300 or best offer. Call 643-
5516. 3-15, 3-22




1999 Chevy Silverado, comes with
towing package, AM/FM radio, good
AC, excellent condition, kept in ga-
rage, runs great. Call 643-1514.
3-22, 3-29

1985 Ford Lariat pickup, runs
good, $1,500. Call 674-4293.
3-22, 3-29


1987 Plymouth car, runs good,
$1,000. Call 674-4293. 3-22,3-29

2002 Ford F150, quad cab, hard
cover with towing package, excel-
lent condition, clean, non-smoker
truck, $17,500. Call 263-1562.
3-22, 3-29

1991 Dodge Dynasty, white, high
mileage, -runs good, all power,
cruise, four-door, very dependable,
AM/FM radio, automatic, $1,500 or
best offer. Call 643-3962. 3-22, 3-29

1998 GMC Sierra truck, 148,000
miles, $4,000 or best offer. Call 643-
5787 or 508-3534. 3-22,3-29

1987 Ford Econoline van, needs
carburetor, $1,200. Call 674-
4686. 3-22, 3-29

1989 Cutlass Supreme SL, auto-
matic, power everything, AC, runs
strong, needs minor paint, 98,000
miles, $1,300 or best offer. Call
379-3585. 3-22, 3-29


1994 Dodge 2500 truck, 4WD, die-
sel, long wheel base, $9,006. Call
643-5693. 3-22,3-29

2000 Nissan Maxima GLE, fully
loaded, $13,250. Call 643-5693.
3-22, 3-29

1988 Oldsmobile 88, power seats,
AC, $1,500 or best offer. Call 379-


9548.


(A


0..



0

U

(A



0



a
z


3-15,3-22


Week of March 26 to April 1
ARIES Mar 21/Apr 20
Nosy neighbors try your pa-
tience, Aries. Be civil; you don't
want to cause any battles. Talk
over your concerns in a. calm
but direct way. You may find the
problem disappears.
TAURUS Apr 21/May 21
Your supervisor has spoken to
you about a disciplinary issue.
Rather than take offense, heed
the advice and use the conver-
sation as a way to better your
work at the company.
GEMINI May 22/Jun 21
A confrontation at home catch-
es you off guard, Gemini.
Rather than plan your defense,
listen carefully to what this per-
son has to say and voice your
opinion rationally.
CANCER Jun 22/Jul 22
You've finally made the decision
to uproot and move, Cancer.
With spring around the comer,
this is a good time to dabble in
the real estate market. Spend
time working on home curb ap-
.peal. -


1997 Ford Mustang, black with
tinted windows, black and gray
interior, automatic V-6, heat and air,
electric seats, windows, locks and
mirrors, cassette and CD player,
looks and runs great, $4,000 or
best offer. Call 643-3230, leave


message.


3-15,3-22


1981 Jeep Scrambler, no rust, runs
good, dependable, new winch still
in the box, $6,500 firm. Call 762-
8185. 3-15, 3-22






Chevy 350 block, four-bolt main,
$300. Call 762-8975. 3-15, 3-22

318 motor and transmission,
runs good, $600 or best offer. Call
850-526-3119, if no answer, leave


message.


3-15,3-22


1997/98 Chevy305 motor, new pis-
tons and rings, no heads or intake,
$200. Call 762-8975. 3-15,3-22

Two Chevy transmissions, one is
1997/98 305, $150, the other is a
350 for $150. Call 762-8975.
3-15,3-22

Chevy heads, three pairs, 327,
350 and 400, $200 a pair. Call 762-
8975. 3-15, 3-22
Equipment trailer, 22ft., four axle,
with ramps, $800. Call 639-9331.
3-15,3-22


1952 Ford 8-N, comes with bush
hog, box blade, middle row buster,
planter, disk, motor rebuilt in 2002,
$3,500 for all or will trade for a 14
ft. aluminum weld boat, motor and
trailer. Serious inquiries only. Call
762-2090. 3-15, 3-22

Buying whole
diamond back
rattlesnakes (dead).
Call 643-1288


LEO Jul 23/Aug 23
A friend in need is weary about confront-
ing you for advice. Give off signals that
you're open and willing to be a "shoul-
der to cry on." Good fortune arrives on
Thursday.
VIRGO Aug 24/Sept 22
Stop beating yourself up about a project
you weren't able to master, Virgo. You
excel in plenty of other things. Set your
sights on a new challenge and you'll be
pleasantly surprised. -
LIBRA Sept 23/Oct 23
Fights at home have gotten out of con-
trol, Libra. You have to learn how to
grow up and respect others' feelings.
By throwing temper tantrums you'll just
make more enemies.
SCORPIO Oct 24/Nov 22
It's been difficult balancing work and
family life lately, Scorpio. You may have
to make the decision that one will win out
over the other. This is the time for deep
thinking.
SAGITTARIUS Nov 23/Dec 21
You can't be everyone's friend all of the
time, Sagittarius, so stop trying. Focus
on those people who genuinely respect
you for the person you are.
CAPRICORN Dec 22/Jan 20
Confrontations- with Pisces .leave you


William's Home
Improvements
"No Job Too Big or Small"
Licensed & Insured, contractor & roofer
Concrete work, landscape
pressure cleaning,
renovations, seamless
gutter, painting, vinyl, .n il -
& screen enclosure
FOR FREE ESTIMATES "
Call 674-8092 UFN


Stump grinding

Reasonable rates
Free estimates

Call
Chris Nissley
674-8081 or
643-8561 (Cell)





Decks Pole Barns
House Framing & Garages
Wood & Vinyl Siding
Tin Roofing
Bathroom Remodeling
Concrete Work
Call 674-3458 9


FOR RENT

In Bristol
Mobile home lots

In Blountstown
1,000 sq. ft.
commercial building

Phone 643-7740






1, 2 & 3 Bedroom
Apartments
"The Best Place to Live"
Rental Assistance




Call (850) 674-4202
16978 NW Mayo Street,
Blountstown, FL 32424.
TDDfTTY 711.
EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY


frazzled and at your wits' end. How-
ever, you don't have the luxury of
making a quick escape. You'll have
to ride this one out.
AQUARIUS Jan 21/Feb 18
Projects at home keep you busy for
a few days, Aquarius. Just think them
through before acting or else you
might end up with half-finished work
or a big mess.
PISCES Feb 19/Mar 20
Take a more assertive role at work,
Pisces. Establish that you can be re-
lied upon and get the job done in a
satisfactory manner.
FAMOUS BIRTHDAYS
MARCH 26
Jennifer Grey, Actress (46)
MARCH 27
Josh Groban, Singer (25)
MARCH 28
Vince Vaughn, Actor (36)
MARCH 29
Jennifer Capriati, Athlete (30)
MARCH 30
Celine Dion, Singer (38)
MARCH 31
Ewan McGregor, Actor (35)
APRIL 1
Homer Simpson, Plant Worker (39)






MARCH 22,2006 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 29


House in Hosford,
2 bedroom and 1 bath.
Located from Hwy. 20 &
Hwy. 65, North on 65,
2 miles on right
just before RR X-ing.
Call 627-8287,
leave a message.



AUCTION
First Saturday of every month
The auction will be held April 1
at7 p.m. (Old Coins,Tools, Col-
lectibles, candy, food & Misc.
items) Free setup for yard
sale every Saturday. Public is
invited.
Col. James W. Copeland
18098 NW County Rd. 12
Phone: 643-7740
AB1226 AU0001722





WANTED:


to buy


Real Estate


10 to 1,000 acres,


reasonably priced.


Immediate closing.


Call


(850) 544-5441 or


\850-899-7700


=- ------

$999 King Bedroom Set. Bed,
chest, TV Armoire, 2 nightstands.
Brand new. Suggested List
$3500. Must sell $999. 425-8374

BED $250 KING-pillow-Top
mattress Set. New with Warranty.
Call 850-222-7783

BEDROOM SET Brand new
sleigh bed with matching pieces.
-Valued at $2500. Sell $750. 850-
222-9879

CHERRY SLEIGH BED SOLID
WOOD, NEW IN BOX, $250.
850-425-8374

COUCH I Loveseat / Chair.
- Micro fiber. Brand new. Neutral
color. Must sell $800. 850-425-
8374

DINING ROOM, NEW Formal
Cherry Set. Table, 6 chairs,
lighted china cabinet. Stilled
boxed, Sell. for $850. 850-222-
7783

SOFA and LOVESEAT, NEW
LEATHER, Still wrapped, $750.
Can deliver. 850-545-7112

MATTRESS SET: BRAND NEW
Queen PillowTop Set. In Plastic
with Warranty, Must sell $150.
850-425-8374


Additional runs of the same ad (more than 2 weeks) are $2 per
week and must be paid in advance. We do not bill for classified.


2001 Artic Cat 250 four-wheeler,
4WD, $1,300 or'best offer. Call
545-9593. 3-15, 3-22




1979 GMC motor home, runs good,
needs some TLC. Will sell or trade
for 21ft. to 25 ft. bumper-pull travel
trailer. Call 593-0133, evenings or
leave message. 3-22, 3-29
1992 Holiday Rambler motor
home, 33 ft., ClassA, very clean, low
mileage. Call 643-4631. 3-22,3-29

Alumitetravel trailer, 28 ft., sleeps
four adults and two children, new
tires, ready to go, $6,000 or best
offer. Call 762-3377. 3-15,3-22
1999 Travel trailer, 24 ft., very
clean, sleeps six, $8,000. Call 674-
3251 or 762-8343. 3-15,3-22



Peterson bass boat, 14 ft., 40 hp
Suzuki motor, trolling motor and
trailer, $1,500 firm. Call 762-3224.
3-22; 3-29

Life jackets, best offer. Call 674-
3264. 3-22, 3-29
1991 Bass Cat Pantera II, 19 ft.,
1991 Mercury 200 EFI, 24 volt troll-
ing motor and tandem trailer, new
carpet, three bank battery charger
and four new tires, asking $6,700.
Call 643-5890 or 447-0301. 3-22,3-29


Yamaha outboard, 30 hp, electric
start, long shaft tiller steer, $1,600.
Call 643-5650. 3-15,3-22




Free puppies, 13 beautiful and
sweet to choose from. Call 447-
2208 or 674-7107, ask for Miss
Smith. 3-22, 3-29

Pigmy goat, adult nanny, friendly
and healthy, $50. Call 674-4235.
3-22, 3-29

Great Pyrenees dog, 14 month old
male, super big, loveable, $150. Call
674-4235. 3-22, 3-29

Australian shepard puppies,
seven to choose from, adorable,
readyto go, all sorts of colors, some
with cropped tails, free to a good
home. Call 643-9332, after 3 p.m.
3-22,3-29_

Chickens, one day to four weeks
old, Bantams and large breeds,
female chicks will grow to be great
layers of brown and green eggs,
male chicks will grow to be nice
meat chickens, buy 1-10 chicks,
$2 each, 11-20 chicks, $1.50 each,
20+ chicks, $1 each; nearly grown
ducks, $10 each. We will also accept
trades. Call 643-3034. 3-22,3-29

Mini Dachshund, 1 1/2 years old,
black and tan, great with children,
all shots and dewormed. Call 674-
3532. 3-22, 3-29

Ball pythons, two for $50 or one for
$30. Call 643-3034. 3-22, 3-29


Id, very
s, $300
0396.
3-15, 3-22

dor and
weeks
40rn


Adult saddle, one year o
good shape, used 10 time.
or best offer. Call 850-933-

Free puppies, half Labrac
half golden Retriever, six
old, ready to go. Call 762-4

ADBA American Pit bull t
red, red-nose, two females,
males born Dec. 12, second
and wormed. Call 674-271

Fancy roosters, different
five months old, $5 each or
fer. Call 674-3151.

Shitzu puppies, three to
from $175. Call 762-8566.

Large doghouse. Call 643

Himalayan, female; dollfac
point, 1 1/2 year old, $5
674-9375.

Gelding, threeyears old, brc
cludes tack, $2,500 or best
Call 850-545-3990.


Lost: Male Chihuahua, blonde
with dark tail and red collar, near
Hwy. 20W and Hwy. 275 towards
Clarksville. If you have seen him or
have found him, please call me at
447-0464 or 674-3758. 3-22, 3-29

Found: Rottweiller looking puppy.
Call 643-4088 to identify. 3-15, 3-22

Found: Husky on Flowers Lane.
Call 643-3325 to describe and
claim. 3-15, 3-22


Wanted: Old boat trailer, light or
medium duty in usable condition.
Call 379-8222. 3-22, 3-29


9uo2. Wanted: 12 or 14 ft. welded alumi-
3-15,3-22 num boat and trailer at a fair price,
erriers, no motor needed. Call 762-2090.
and two 3-15, 3-22
id shots
0. 3-15,-22 Wanted: Location of a very old
baby's grave with a marker "Middle-
breeds, brooks" on it in Altha. Call collect
best of- 850-477-3287 or 850-572-9129 or
3-15, 3-22 writeAudrey Mills Westbrook, 7690
Stark Ave., Pensacola, FL 32514.
choose 3-15, 3-22
3-15, 3-22
Wanted: 14 ft. aluminum boat,
3-52682 no motor. Call 674-3251 or 762-
3-15,3-22 8343. 3-15, 3-22

ce seal-
0. Call Wanted: Chain-link dog kennel,
3-15, 3-22 reasonably priced. Call 850-526-
3119, if no answer, leave mes-


sage.


3-15, 3-22


Wanted: Fixer-upper house to buy
in Calhoun or Liberty County. Call
379-8112. 3-15, 3-22

Wanted: Coca-Cola bottles and
items. Call 545-3677. 3-1 T. 3-22

Wanted: Junk cars and trucks, any
condition, no charge for removal.
Call 762-8459. 3-22 T. 5-24

Wanted: Guns, paying cash, old or
modern rifles, shotguns, pistols, one
gun or collection, military guns, old
double barrels. Call 674-4860.
12-21 T. 3-29




Land for sale by owner, three
beautiful 1.09 acre lots and two
beautiful 3/4 acre lots in Lib-
erty County close to Tallahassee,
Talquin Electric and Liberty County
wateravailable, $29,000 per lot. Call
379-8374. 3-15, 3-22

Free mobile home, needs work,
must move. Call 674-3845 or 674-
7508. 3-15, 3-22

Singlewide mobile home, two
bedroom, one bath, ok condition,
$2,000 or best offer. Call 545-
9593. 3-15, 3-22

House on 1/2 acre, new, 1,150
sq. ft., three bedroom, two bath,
9 ft. ceilings, kitchen appliances,
$114,500. Call 762-8185 or 653-
5597. 3-15, 3-22

2005 Doublewide mobile home,
three bedroom, two bath, 21/2 acres
in.Clarksville, asking payoff. Call
850-209-4837. 3-15,3-22




Multi-family yard sale, Saturday,
March 25 beginning at 7:30 at
City Tire Co. on Hwy. 20 East in
Blountstown. All sizes of brand
name clothes and shoes for men,
ladies and children, lots of kitch-
enware, household items, horse
saddles and tack and much more.
Cancel if rain. *-22,3-29


r--- l


Name

Address

City

Phone

Plea

T
I


I SUBSCRIPTO FRj


----- I


Zip


se enclose a check or money order for $18 and mail to:

The Calhoun-Liberty Journal, P.O. Box 536,
Bristol, FL 32321


I --- -- ----- ----- ----- ----- ------ J


SUBSCRIBE TODAY TO

THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL


- I I I I






Page 30 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL MARCH 22,2006


Better broccoli, prettier peas...and more


by Sandy Miller Hays,
Agricultural Research Service
Imagine having a job where
you knew of a compound that
could help fight off cancer....
And imagine if you had the
power to -"persuade" an ordi-
nary, everyday vegetable to
produce very high amounts of
that compound. That would
make it worthwhile to show
up for work every morning,
wouldn't it?
That's how life goes for the
scientists of the Agricultural
Research Service-especially
the ones at the U.S. Vegetable
Lab (USVL) in Charleston,
S.C. The folks at the Vegetable
Lab have been focusing on veg-
etables for some 70 years now,
and they've made real changes
in the way many of our favorite
vegetables are bred and used-
and what we as consumers get
out of those vegetables.
Let's go back to that cancer-
fighting compound for start-
ers. The compound has a real
tongue-twister of a name-
glucoraphanin. One of the
ARS scientists, together with
colleagues at Johns, Hopkins
University. in Baltimore, Md.,
has found that the amounts of
this compound that are pres-
ent in broccoli are influenced
more by the plant's own genet-
ics than bv the environment in
which the plant is grown. This
means that it's possible to clas-
sify the anti-cancer potential of
different broccoli varieties.
The ARS scientist and his
colleagues have already pro-
duced relatively high-gluco-
raphaiin broccoli by crossing
types that are high ini the com-
pouiid with lines that are low in
it. The) 've also produced and
identified broccoli plants that
are very high in glucoraphanin
and can successfully pollinate
Without the help of insects.
At the same time, the ARS
scientists are putting special
focus :n -broccoli seeds, which
have about 10 times more glu-
coraphanin than the plant itself.
Although broccoli seed is ex-
pensive-because broccoli is
a crop grown for the vegetable,
not the seed-the scientists are
developing inexpensive seed
sources that will provide high
glucoraphanin levels.
Down the road, the scientists
say, their research could lead
to extracting glucoraphanin
from broccoli for pharmaceuti-
cal purposes-something that
might not be cost-effective
from the broccoli plant itself,
but could be possible from the
seed. In the meantime, now we
all have a very good reason for
eating our broccoli!
Not all the research at the
U.S. Vegetable Lab is so life-
and-death dramatic, but it does
help make life more pleasant in


Every od y's


ample. It seems that consumers
are quite picky about their peas;
they want them to have just the
right shade of green-not too
light, not too dark.
The ARS scientists are in-
corporating two "green genes"
(everyone who's thinking of
Captain Kangaroo right now,
raise your hand!) into a pink-
eye type southempea, which
happens to be the mainstay of
the southernpea industry. This
is great news for the frozen
food industry, because they like
the way that persistent green
color enhances the appearance
of their product.
Through a working agree-
ment with a seed company in
.South Carolina, the USVL sci-
entists are working on bring-


-'A...


In the Charleston lab, re-
search associate Anna Hale
and geneticist Mark Farnham
plant a broccoli crop to be
transplanted into a field and
evaluated for seed yield.


i B- ,.:-.


ing a whole new generation of
"double-green" pea cultivars
to market-and what's more,
these new lines will even be
evaluated for their resistance
to a major disease of peas,
called blackeye cowpea mo-
saic virus.
If you prefer your research a
little "wilder," consider the wa-
termelon. While the watermel-
ons we enjoy in the U.S. are
delicious, nutritious, gorgeous
and everything wonderful, they
do have a serious weakness;
they tend to have a very nar-
row genetic base. This means
they could be proverbial sitting
ducks for many plant diseases
and pests.
The USVL scientists are try-
ing to get around that weak-


SALL PRICES INCLUDE FORD MOTOR CREDIT BONUS CASH
'06 EXPEDITION EDDIE BAUER$o noo '05 FORD FOCUS
Loaded., SAVE BIG O98OO8 17k Miles,
2 to choose from ... 11,888


'05 DODGE RAM 2500 QUAD CAB SLT
Diesel, 4x4, 19k Miles, Auto.,
SAVE BIG '32,888
'05T-BIRD CONVERTIBLE
10k Miles *28,988
'05 FORD F-150 LARIAT ,OO
Crew Cab, 4x4 25,888
'05 FORD MUSTANG
Convertible, 14kMiles ..... *21,888
'05 CHEVY SILVERADO LS $ 888
Four Door, 22k Miles 21,888


'05 CHEVY MALIBU $'02 EXPEDITION EDDIE BAUER
rteaf trnnnm,2 97k Miestie 1 1 .988 4x4. Loaded. Low Miles $18888


'01 GRAND MARQUIS $
Leather, Loaded, Low Miles, Clean U10,988
'01 DODGE INTREPID SE $
Clean, Local Trade $8,988
'99 FORD F250
Diesel, Supercab $10,988
'98 CHEVY SUBURBAN
Clean $6,888
'98 DODGE DAKOTA SPORT
Sunroof, Nice $4,888
'97 EXPEDITION $7 ,88
One Owner, Clean 8,000
'94 FORD F150
Regular Cab $4,988


'04 F150 SUPERCAB LARIAT
Loaded, 33k Miles $93,988
'04 LINCOLN TOWN CAR $9
Signature, Loaed $9 I,08

'04 AVALANCHE Z66
LIKENEW.................................... 2 1,88
'04 JEEP WRANGLER 4x4
4.0, V-6, only 8k Miles,
LIKE NEW ... 18,888


*mm 74A2 A

FOD ol Fe 186-80-89


ness by "walking on the wild
side"-they're taking a closer
look at the genetic makeup of
wild watermelons, which are
able to resist various diseases
and pests.
Using wild watermelon
samples from the germplasm
collection maintained by ARS
at Griffin, Ga., the USVL sci-
entists have evaluated wild
watermelon varieties and have
found some with resistance to
three trouble-making nema-
todes as well as other pests that
attack watermelons.
Their next step: incorporat-
ing this pest resistance from
the wild watermelons into
commercial melons, which
means growers will be able to
use much less chemicals to get
good melons to market.
Sounds to me like life is
anything but boring at the Veg-
etable Lab!


II I I I I


~;#Pra~Parr~sa~nar+TLl~lr~c~~






MARCH 22,2006 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 31


Central Fla. dealers charged with selling dangerous cars


ORLANDO Tom Gallagh-
er, Florida's chief financial of-
ficer, has announced the arrests
of two Central Florida men ac-
cused of defrauding auto insur-
ers and reselling dangerous cars
to unsuspecting buyers. Gal-
lagher is seeking more than $1
million in restitution.
"This is a growing and trou-
bling problem in Florida-we
saw similar scams like this ap-
pear in the wake of recent hur-
ricanes, as flooded and hurri-
cane-damaged vehicles began
appearing on used car lots,"
said Gallagher, who oversees
the Department of Financial
Services' Division of Insurance
Fraud (DIF), which led the in-
vestigation. "These schemes
endanger the lives of the unsus-
pecting citizens who buy these
cars, put dangerous and unsafe
vehicles on our roads and high-
ways, and cause increases in
the auto insurance premiums
Floridians pay."
Hanford Andrew Sutter,
owner and operator .of Orlan-
do-based Total Fleet Solution
(TFS), along with Andrew Din-
da, a TFS employee, are charged
with engaging in a scheme to
defraud in addition to numer-
ous counts of filing false and
fraudulent insurance claims,
grand theft, and uttering forged
documents. TFS was operating


as an unlicensed third-party ad-
ministrator and was contracted
to appraise damage on some
rental cars and file claims for
the damage with auto insurance
companies.
Sutter and Dinda billed auto
insurers nearly $800,000 in
inflated damage estimates on
wrecked rental car vehicles that
they billed as a total loss to col-
lect higher payments from the
insurance companies. Then, to
avoid the branding of "salvage"
or "rebuilt" on the cars' titles,
the men sold the damaged cars
to car dealers who resold the
cars to unsuspecting buyers.
Detectives found that most of
the appraisals of the wrecked
rental vehicles were completed
by viewing photographs of the


damaged vehicles, with no on-
site inspections by TFS adjust-
ers.
The charges stem from a joint
investigation by DIF, the Na-
tional Insurance Crime Bureau
(NICB), and the Department of
Highway Safety and Motor Ve-
hicles (DHSMV). The charges
are being prosecuted by the
Ninth Judicial Circuit's Office
of the State Attorney. Addi-
tional arrests are anticipated.
Gallagher is urging Florid-
ians to check if the Vehicle
Identification Number (VIN)
on their vehicle matches any
of the estimated 120 vehicles
re-sold as part of this scheme.
The VIN, a multi-digit, 17-
character alpha-numeric identi-
fier that establishes a vehicle's


unique identification, is usually
located on the driver's side of
the dashboard, visible through
the windshield as well as on the
inside door panel, and included
in title or loan documents. To
check the VIN, visit www.fldfs.
com and click on "Fleet vehicle
resell scheme VIN CHECK."
If a match is indicated, the con-
sumer will be directed to call
their local DHSMV office.
In addition to the web site for
consumers who may have pur-
chased one of these damaged
vehicles, Gallagher last year
created "Car. Check," http://
www.fldfs.com/CarCheck/Car-
Check.asp, to help all Florida
auto buyers check vehicle his-
tories before making a pur-
chase. Gallagher. created the


Car Check web site in anticipa-
tion of the possibility of flood-
damaged vehicles inundating
the market in the aftermath of
the 2004 and 2005 hurricane
seasons.
The Department of Financial
Services, Division of Insurance
Fraud, investigates fraud in
all types of insurance, includ-
ing health, life, auto, property
and workers' compensation.
To report information about
this case or any other possible
insurance fraud case, call the
department's Fraud Fighters
hotline at 1-800-378-0445. A
reward of up to $25,000 is of-
fered for information leading to
an arrest and conviction.


Zurich American Insurance Co. agrees to refund customers in Florida


TALLAHASSEE Tom Gal-
lagher, Florida's chief financial
officer, announced that his de-
partment, as part of a multi-state
coalition, has entered into a set-
tlement with Zurich American
Insurance Company in response
to bid-rigging and price-fixing
allegations. Florida victims -
businesses, non-profit organiza-
tions and governmental entities
- will receive nearly $8 million
under the settlement.
"Bid-rigging and 'pay-to-


play' schemes will not be toler-
ated in Florida," said Gallagher,
who oversees the Florida De-
partment of Financial Servic-
es. "Insurance companies and
brokers will not get away with'
deceiving their customers, in-
flating prices and corrupting the
insurance marketplace."
Zurich allegedly paid un-
disclosed contingent commis-
sions to insurance brokers and
conspired with certain insur-'
ance brokers in a "pay-to-play"


scheme to overcharge custom-
ers for commercial insurance
policies. In addition, Zurich
allegedly submitted fake bids
in order to create the illusion of
a competitive bidding process,
when in fact the broker had pre-
designated another insurer as
the winner at an inflated price.
Zurich was allegedly rewarded
for submitting fake quotes by
receiving protection from com-
,petition on other lucrative ac-
counts.


The multi-state coalition did
an extensive investigation of
Zurich's conduct. Zurich is one
of the first insurance companies
to agree to reimburse custom-
ers, disclose future contingent
commission payments, and im-
plement conduct reforms that
change the way the company
does business. The multi-state
settlement provides $171.7 mil-
lion in restitution to nine partici-
pating states, including Florida.
Gallagher launched an inves-
tigation into insurance broker
activities in November 2004.
His office is still investigating
the conduct of other insurance
brokers and insurance compa-
nies. "Insurers and brokers that
engage in unacceptable conduct
will be held accountable," Gal-
Jagher said.
SThe settlement will be en-
forced through a judgment in
state court, as well as through
a multidistrict federal action in
New Jersey. It is still subject to
court approval.


*.,, flmmmmfn....i.. nm..mU.........mmii


u .. .

L eaes RofClanng


I-

New Busil








With An A
The Calhc

Liberty Joi

Invest in a sure-fir
spark a steady flow
tomers. Call our ad
department today f<
hot details!

643-3333
1 (800) 717-2


ness








d in

)un-

urnal

e way to
of cus-
vertising
or all the


or
3333


ra~ f.fl..........tfLtL p6t3 t1






Page 32 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL MARCH 22,2006

Youth Risk Behavior Survey finds that students feel safer going to and from school


TALLAHASSEE The
Florida Department of Health
(DOH) and the Department of
Education (DOE) partnered
to implement the 2005 Youth
Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS)
and are pleased to announce
its results. A total of 4,584 of
Florida's students were surveyed
in 75 randomly selected public
high schools that participated
in the survey. The YRBS,
sponsored by the Centers for
Disease Control and Prevention
(CDC), is administered every
other year to Florida students.
"The feeling of safety is
particularly important not only
for the student's -well-being,
but also because feeling safe
translates into higher attendance
rates, improved concentration
on a higher order of thinking,
and ultimately, increased
academic success," said DOH
Secretary M. Rony Frangois,
M.D. M.S.P.H., Ph.D.
The YRBS collects
anonymous, self-reported
data related to risk behaviors
from the six categories that
have been determined to have
the most detrimental effects
on children and adolescents.
The risk behavior categories
include: physical inactivity,
poor nutrition, risky sexual
behaviors, alcohol and
other drug use, tobacco use,
unintentional injuries and
violence.
The percentage of students
who did not go to school because
they felt unsafe on their way to
or from school decreased from
14.0 percent in 2001 to 7.8
percent in 2005. Students who
reported being threatened or
injured with a weapon on school
property decreased from 9.2
percent in 2001 to 7.9 percent
in 2005. The percentage of
students who had property such
as their car, clothing or books
stolen or deliberately damaged
on school property decreased
from 29.7 percent. in 2003 to
25.7 percent in 2005.
The Florida YRBS is funded
through DOE's Coordinated
School Health (CSH) Program
and administered by DOH's


PRESSURE

CLEANING
Call Vann at 643-3593

MAJOR MEDICAL
DENTAL
MEDICARE
Ross E L.lE
Tucker, CLU J ,; ,


Bureau of Epidemiology.
The CSH model is nationally
recognized as the most effective
strategy for addressing these risk
factors. The model was based
on decades of research. It found
that the combination of the eight
component areas significantly
reduced the prevalence of these


w

mu


We seO ai of or cams at
a iscount so you don't
need a down payment!
Interest Rates
as low as 4.95%o


() Downm=Ford PID4X4 ( Down12([0 i)own '01 HeRad. vic EX
S269mu. Long MviW4 bm- Load. edI 61 2 S4 'x 'Afry L.w Wew 623L0jo4 Door. Low Weale


V3 Daui'30 Aleto
'171wo %5w*m-m


0 Douwn 01 PONcGraAm Mom 0 -01wn '0 MoIn Cab oS
'19humGT Sswffca ad reammO 249Awc, Sumv#,Giikn sWo af


risk behaviors in the schools.
The eight component areas
are: health education, physical
education, nutrition, school
health services, guidance
(psychological and social
services), healthy school
environment, staff wellness
and -family and community


involvement. The CSH Program
in Florida is located in both DOH
and DOE and serves to facilitate
partnerships, professional
development, collaboration and
awareness among educational
and health entities.
DOH promotes and protects
the health and safety of all


people in Florida through the
delivery of quality public health
services and the promotion of
health care standards. For more
information about the YRBS,
please visit the DOH Web site
at www.doh.state.fl.us/disease_
ctrl/epi/chronic_disease/yrbs/
intro.htm.


0 Down '9HnaAmdI
$211 mc oV6, 128*10!SI~a-W!


o Dawn 'INWMedge 9M20
03651Mo 45,000 MUaw' LikeNail


o Down V2hrpW SixbmgLX 0 DownVIE BM 51Dwn VI Mwcury t4Ui LS 0 Down 'M CadidC Escalade
~1 l~ma~ ri1~U h~~*G*J ~ ~ 9ifl *t2lltmo Lxw IPaL A9*1A &240J/ri ,v rt (* 30 T~6 ampn


0Dow DuM Honda Odessey 0 Down -'M Pa~C BIaw*t0 Down 18 Dodge 2500 P a0 V -03 Toyota b Twnd 4xU
S"1 Oft.. w Va '26tO eash19 1 MO XC r RdBo, '1404in4dmo' /. Xvsib, x Mk. WI


0 own., 0 WOod~phfrnuI 0 Down V2 Fawd F150 LinaM 0 Down V3 Mcya
*192rise Gqmwcow ~Lk nw t 245fto e~w~nod CW Le~aw XI AMO(;K"Faw4 Ca


0 Down VOI Cadillac deVMO1
$326h/w tLow Mkst


TUCKER LIFE-HEALTH
INSURANCE & ANNUTY, INC.
(850) 926-22D oQ .1O-800226-7005
ii',- t. s i 4 ii*3t ,,,' "K


Direct Automotive Wholesale
W K. sas @ 9 0 -3 feas W dt & S*.mea Qt. Nee to Dok r Gew-i Open Mon7.-Tws 0 a-m.-S pm; Friday 9-7; Sat, 9 -6 pm
Se habla Quincy* 850-627-8448 *Quinc. Se habla
AnPl ws w ith ze" DDM 6% Intoret, 60 mafw. With ApO-d U aa
^0 a"41X bI& "Wawa""


Mh~.wrs sagoef#Mi my ed Wfdd on a V ~01-mavlaoble. .WndvO 8 dge:~l
.a~sUcew edue. e Ac froviatlim al Dlerev.4 ,revi doat rat., --The bS-#4Xrt i'swe bive rthl&,ci the
shpfsbe fi$3 la awd-car. Thefiewag Sol, N:tiaI 7KE5SUirt sALEs 0pmb;Le
larae bi~ al~e ar appjhjg a big:1 lvefticles are Pricecd as The -Loan UIf0v"'1 A"jthsea tCar ol Your 4rearms Ini
foa~ r am4Value-. wI~b is the uric$*rgedU unions tbls ad. call us. We'll M Y ou nre-aPurowed.
SAaaw fr lte be *r"- ~an~d brtia Will I1oarp ovo9 n ING qaebicWW fell you what 1 ifll cost and DO lIt for You.
WeO00,- OWV 'Ayl WeSUEap cLa$.ypr SUuPPPI usCowe
jjjAgv~U ,


al vvays


$


_ _________