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The Calhoun-Liberty journal
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00027796/00061
 Material Information
Title: The Calhoun-Liberty journal
Portion of title: Calhoun Liberty journal
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: The Liberty Journal, Inc.
Place of Publication: Bristol Fla
Creation Date: March 1, 2006
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Bristol (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Liberty County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Calhoun County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Liberty -- Bristol
Coordinates: 30.426944 x -84.979167 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in Sept. 1991.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 11, no. 38 (Sept. 18, 1991).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002046630
oclc - 33425067
notis - AKN4565
lccn - sn 95047245
System ID: UF00027796:00061
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly journal (Bristol, Fla.)

Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
    Main: Sheriff’s Log
        page 2
    Main continued
        page 3
        page 4
        page 5
    Main: Commentary
        page 6
        page 7
    Main continued
        page 8
        page 9
        page 10
    Main: Old Farmer’s Almanac
        page 11
        page 12
    Main: Weddings
        page 13
    Main: Speak Up
        page 14
        page 15
    Main continued
        page 16
        page 17
        page 18
        page 19
        page 20
        page 21
        page 22
    Main: Public & Legal Notices
        page 23
        page 24
        page 25
    Main: Obituaries
        page 26
        page 27
    Main: Classifieds
        page 28
        page 29
        page 30
    Main continued
        page 31
        page 32
Full Text




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sentenced

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The Calhoun-Liberty




JOURNAL


$20 million gamble doesn't pay off

for Liberty County School Board as

DOE denies Hosford plan once more


by Teresa Eubanks, Journal Editor
A Liberty County group who met with
Department of Education (DOE) officials
last week came home disappointed after
failing to convince them Hosford School
should be the beneficiary of monies from
the state's Special Facilities Program.
Liberty County School Board member
Kyle Peddie made an impassioned plea,
explaining the importance of the historic
building in the community as well as the
.critical need for improvements to class-
rooms and other areas of the school.
DOE representatives once again turned
down the request and suggested that in-


stead of asking for $5 million to improve
Hosford School a plan be submitted for a
$20 million renovation at Liberty County
High School.
But that's not a path this group wants
to take because they believe it will result
in the closure of the school in Hosford.
Peddie called last Wednesday's two-
hour meeting "disheartening" and said
despite their best efforts, the Liberty
County group couldn't find any com-
mon ground on which to comprise with
the DOE.
"I went into the meeting very positive
that we were going to come out of there


Miss Calhoun County royalty crowned
Five young ladies proudly pose with their crowns after taking top honors in
their categories at Saturday's Miss Calhoun County Pageant in Blountstown.
Shown above, center, is Miss Calhoun County Jessica Metcalf with Teen Miss
Ashley Smith (left) and Junior Miss Savannah McCroan. Little Miss Ashley
Fallon Lytle is shown in front with Young Miss winner Katelyn Bozeman. For
more on the pageant, see page 9. KRISTEN BATEMAN PHOTO


with something," said Liberty County
School Superintendent David Summers.
"Their comments (DOE representatives)
led me to believe that they were trying to
infringe on the school board's authority
to run the school system."
In a letter on page 15 of this issue,
Peddie called the DOE's plan to move
all county middle school students to the
high school an "indecent proposal" which
would lead to Hosford elementary stu-
dents being transferred to Tolar School,
leaving no need for Hosford School to
continue operation.
When a DOE member commented,
"If you move some grades from Tolar
School, you could have room for Hosford
students," the room fell silent, according
to Summers. "We were agast at that state-
ment," he said.
He said he felt DOE representatives
were not following the original intent of
the legislation that established the Spe-
cial Facilities Program. "The fund was
intended to help counties like ours with
a low tax base," he said.
"I was very concerned that they never
talked about student achievement and
community support," he said, regarding
the discussion of Hosford School. "All
they talked about was numbers, numbers,
numbers."
Despite being turned down a second
time, the board resubmitted the proposal
just before the final deadline Monday, he
said. "We've got a lot more supporters
this go-round," he said, hoping that this
third attempt will be better received.
"If they turn it down this time, we'll
just have to resubmit it again next year,"
he said.
To those who say Liberty County
turned down $20 million to make im-
provements at Liberty County High
School, Summers said, "Really, we never
had it to begin with." He noted that the
alternative losing Hosford School
- wasn't worth the tradeoff.


Two charged in fight that left Blountstown teen unconscious


by Teresa Eubanks, Journal Editor
Two men were arrested following a Feb. 21 altercation
that left 19-year-old Delandon Reed unconscious with a
one-inch laceration on the back of his head after being
hit several times with a gun, according to a report from
the Blountstown Police Department.
Wesley Jonathan Williams, 21, was charged with
aggravated battery. Donald Ronterrious Allen, also 21,
was arrested for breach of peace, disorderly conduct
and fighting.
Williams, who lives in Sneads, was arrested at work
Feb. 22 by Jackson County authorities and turned over
to the Blountstown Police Department. Williams is the


father of two young brothers, age one and three, who
were found dead with their mother and another sibling
at their Jackson County home a year ago. Their murders
remain unsolved.
A police officer responding to a call at the Calhoun-
Liberty Hospital emergency room found that Reed had
been in an altercation at Fuqua Circle with two other
men.
According to witnesses, Reed and a woman had been
arguing and when Reed struck her, Allen intervened.
Reed and Allen began arguing and then started fighting,
the witness said. At that point, a black male known to


witnesses as "Joe Rat" came up behind Reed and hit the
back of his head several times with a silver pistol.
The woman Reed was arguing with had been talking
with "Joe Rat" earlier, according to the report. The man
was later identified as Williams.
Reed was taken to the emergency room in Blount-
stown before being taken to Tallahassee Memorial
Hospital to be treated for a head trauma.
Both Williams and Allen remain in custody at the
Calhoun County Jail. Williams is being held without
bond. Bond was set at $2,500 for Allen's charges but
he is also being held without bond because he violated
probation.


Sheriff's Log ... 2 Community Calenda .. 4 Birthdays ... 12 Obituaries .. 26 Classified ads ... 28, 29 & 30






Page 2 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL MARCH 1,2006


Bristol woman facing

charges for trying to

cash counterfeit check
A warrant has been issued for a Bristol wom-
an who attempted to cash a forged check at a
Blountstown business last week.
Brenda Peterson is facing charges of forgery,
uttering .and possession of counterfeit checks, ac-
cording to a report from the Blountstown Police
Department. Charges are also pending against a
man who was allegedly working with Peterson,
who was identified as Eric Johnson.
According to an investigator's report, last
Wednesday Peterson entered Ace Check Cashing
and presented a check from Platinum Automotive
of Atlanta, Georgia for $653 and identified herself
as Elizabeth Oostveen. Peterson told the check
cashing company employee that she worked at
Platinum's Tallahassee office.
The employee called the company and was told
they didn't have an office in Tallahassee and the
check was a forgery. Peterson took the check, said
she left her license in the car and went outside,
driving off with a man in a burgundy Pontiac.
The pair then went to C&C Pawn Shop, where
owner Walter Kastli made a copy of the driver's
license Peterson showed-him. Kastli took the check
but realized it was a forgery. When the two drove
off, Kastli got the car's tag number and contacted
the police department.
When a deputy was sent to Peterson's home in
Brtstol, she admitted to trying to cash the check and
said she had used an altered driver's license with
her own photo and Oostveen's number and address.
Peterson admitted to cashing a couple of checks in
Gadsden County and two more at a Blountstown
grocery store.


Blountstown restaurant
reports break-in & theft
The staff at Connie's Kitchen arrived last
Wednesday morning to find someone had already
been in and gotten something to go their
money.
Someone using a crowbar to break the locks on
the east. side door entered the building between
2 a.m. and 4:55 a.m. The thief stole the money
drawer from the cash register, which held about
$15 in change, along with another $15 in change
found under the counter. It also appears someone
rummaged through the area under the cabinet.
Anyone with information about the break-in is
asked to contact the Blountstown Police Depart-
ment at 674-5987.


Clothes, household items
sought for Bristol woman
who lost everything in fire
Due to an error in information supplied to The
Journal, the occupant of the mobile home that
burned Feb. 10 on Hwy. 12 North was Diana Bel-
lamy and not her daughter, Tracey Bellamy.
Diana is now staying with her daughter and
grandchildren at their home on Freeman Road in
Bristol after losing everything in the blaze, which
was started by an oil heater while she was at work
early that morning.
"I don't have anything left," she said, explaining
that after the fire, she gathered a few things that had
not been destroyed and left them on her front steps
before going to her daughter's house nearby to sleep
after working all night. The blaze later reignited
and destroyed what was left at the site, including
the few salvaged items she'd put aside.
To make matters worse, since the fire, she's been
laid off from work.
Anyone who'd like to give her a hand getting
back on her feet can do so by contacting the family
at 694-9067. She needs all the basics, including
household goods and clothing. She wears size 16
dresses and pants, women's extra-large size shirts
and size 9 1/2 shoes.


CALHOUN COUNTY
Feb. 20: Sheffield Smith, grand theft, robbery with firearm;
Bruce Brake, domestic battery.
Feb. 21: Rodney Rodrigue, DUIl; Leroy Rygula, possession of
firearm by convicted felon; Daniel Foster, possession of cocaine
with intent to sell.
Feb. 22: Calvin Hayes, driving while license suspended or
revoked; Bruce Lee, VOP (state); Patricia Blackwell, possession
of drug paraphernalia.
Feb. 23: Timothy Chastain, child abuse; Venturo Brown,
grand theft, violation injunction protection; Wesley J. Williams,
aggravated battery; Michael Thompson, VOCC; Thomas Red-
dick, driving while license suspended or revoked, habitual,
possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana; Donald Allen,
disorderly conduct.
Feb. 24: Anthony D. Pruitt, VOR (state); Lizzie Fant, child sup-
port; Donald Allen, no valid driver's license, VOP (Jackson Co.);
Paul Odom, driving while license suspended or revoked with
knowledge, attached tag not assigned; Ashley Guilford, driving
while license suspended with knowledge.
Feb. 25: Anthony Alday, possession of less than 20 grams
of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia; Larico Mathis,
no valid driver's license, possession of less than 20 grams of
marijuana; Angela McCumbers, introduction of contraband into
correctional facility, possession of less than 20 grams, posses-
sion of drug paraphernalia.
Feb. 26: Roberto Rosas, no driver's license; Jason Melton,
possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana, possession of
drug paraphernalia.
LIBERTY COUNTY
Feb. 22: Joshua Loyd Green, warrant possession of can-
nabis, disorderly intoxication.
Feb. 23: Patricia Ann Blackwell, holding for CCSO.
Feb. 25: Ashley Dianne Guilford, holding for CCSO; William
Rowell Ingram, DUI, reckless driving; Angela McCumber, intro-
duction of contraband into state facility, possession of less than
20 grams, possession of drug paraphernalia.
Listings includenamefollowedbycharge andidentifcationofarresting agency. The names above represent
those charged. We remind our readers that all are presumed innocent until proven guilty.

Blountstown Police Dept.
Feb. 20 through Feb. 27, 2006
Citations issued:
Accidents...............00 Traffic Citations............... 09
Special details (business escorts, traffic details)......61
Business alarms....01 Residential alarms..........00
Com plaints...................... .......... ..................... 138



Traffic stop leads to crack

cocaine arrest in Calhoun
A 22-year-old man stopped for going 15 miles over the speed limit
wound up with more than a ticket after a drug dog led deputies to a
large piece of crack cocaine in his vehicle.
Daniel Burroughs Foster was pulled over at 7:11 p.m. while travel-
ing on Hwy. 71 South Feb. 21.
After noticing the smell of an alcoholic beverage coming from
the driver, the deputy had him step outside. Foster acknowledged he
had a drink earlier but after taking a roadside sobriety test, the deputy
determined that he was not intoxicated.
Deputies then conducted a search of the vehicle after a drug dog
indicated an illegal substance was inside. When they examined the
vehicle, a rock of crack cocaine, which weighed two grams, was
discovered in a plastic bag on the front floorboard along with some
razor blades.
Foster later admitted that he was on his way to Fuqua Circle in
Blountstown to sell crack.
Deputies found $1,348 in cash on Foster, who is unemployed. He
was charged with possession of crack cocaine with intent to sell.


Woman charged with drug

violation at CCI work camp
A woman parked at the Calhoun Correctional Institution work camp
was arrested Saturday after a dog trained to sniff out illegal substances
led officers to a small amount of marijuana in her vehicle.
Angela Regina McCumbers, 44, was charged with introduction of
contraband into a state facility, possession of less than 20 grams of
marijuana and possession of drug paraphernalia.
According to a report from the Calhoun County Sheriff's Depart-
ment, McCumbers was at the work camp around 2:30 p.m. when a
drug dog alerted to the odor of narcotics at her vehicle. During a
search of the car, officers found rolling papers in her purse, a burnt
marijuana joint and a small amount of marijuana in the ash tray, along
with marijuana residue through the vehicle.
McCumbers was arrested and her vehicle was towed.


Two charged with

domestic violence

in Calhoun County
A worried father who called local authorities from
out-of-state sent officers to his daughter's door after
he learned her boyfriend had battered her.
The woman was was bleeding from the nose
after the Feb. 9 altercation at her Calhoun County
residence.
Calhoun County deputies found the woman at
her residence, upset and crying, after an argument
with Bruce Brake. She told them officers they were
driving to Panama City when she asked him about
another women. While they were talking, the woman
in question called Brake on his cell phone.
She said he pulled over and they began arguing
and he punched her in the face and upper body.
When they returned .home, he began hitting her
again and threw her out of the passenger side of the
vehicle.
Brake's companion said she did not want to press
charges and refused to make other living arrange-
ments for the evening.
The sheriff's department charged Brake with
domestic battery and he was arrested Feb. 20.
-- ---------
A Calhoun County man was issued a notice to ap-
pear in court on a charge of domestic battery after a
deputy went to his home t6 arrest him and found him
laying on the ground and saying that he was having a
heart attack. An ambulance was called to the scene
to see about 62-year-old Bruce Wyatt Lee.
When a deputy went to Lee's home earlier, he
found him sitting in a chair, uninjured. Lee told the
deputy a woman had beat him up while he was at her
home and held him there against his will.
When the deputy went to speak with the woman
involved, he found she had several bruises, scratches
and red marks on both arms. She also had a bite mark
on her right arm and her knee was bleeding.
The woman said Lee had stabbed her in the
knee.
She said Lee came to her home around 1:45 p.m.
Feb. 21 and began arguing and screaming at her. She
said while he was screaming, he fell out of his truck
and told her he was dying.
She said she went to help him get back in his
truck and reached in to take his keys to keep him
from getting back on the road. At that point, she said
he began hitting her with his cane, biting her on the
arm, punching her in the face and then stabbed her
in the knee with a sharp object.
Lee wanted to leave so she got her son and got
in the truck with him, the woman said. Lee then
"started driving crazy, hitting trees and running over
stuff in the yard," according to the deputy's report.
The woman talked Lee into letting her and her son
out of the truck and she called the sheriff's office to
report the incident.
Lee was charged with domestic battery.

Driver charged with DUI,
passenger arrested on gun
charge after traffic stop
A man traveling unusually slow along State Road
20 in Clarksville got the attention of a Calhoun
County Sheriff's Deputy Feb. 20 as he drove past
with a poorly-lighted tag that was obscured by
dirt.
When the deputy pulled over Rodney R. Ro-
drigue, 38, he made quick note of three things: the
strong odor of an alcoholic beverage coming from
the driver, his slurred speak and the trio of rifles that
were sitting between the two front seats.
After Rodrigue failed a roadside sobriety test,
he was taken into custody and charged with DUI.
After running a check on the Rodigue's passenger,
identified as Leroy B. Rygula, 37, it was learned that
he was a convicted felon with an extensive criminal
history, according to the deputy's report. Rygula
was charged with possession of a firearm by a con-
victed felon and the guns a 30.06, a .30-.30 and
a .50-caliber black powder rifle were collected
as evidence.





MARCH 1,2006 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 3


Bristol men each sentenced to serve eight years in prison


by Teresa Eubanks, Journal Editor
Two Bristol residents were
handed down eight-year prison
sentences after being found guilty
by Liberty County juries in sepa-
rate cases last week.
Scottie Baker, 46, was found
guilty of burglary of a dwelling
after a jury heard evidence that
he broke into a neighbor's home
and took her jewelry.
The jury learned that the victim
went out in search of her missing
property and located two of her
rings and one necklace at a pawn


shop in Blountstown. Records
showed that the items were sold
to the shop by Scottie Baker.
Baker was sentenced to eight
years in prison to be followed
by seven years probation. He
received 194 days jail credit. He
was ordered to pay court costs
and fines of $640 as well as
another $90.75 to get the stolen
items out of pawn. The judge
also ordered that Baker have no
contact with the victim and stay
away from her property.
A six-member jury deliberated


only 42 minutes Feb. 21 before
returning a verdict against Victor
Beckwith, 42, on charges involv-
ing the sale of crack cocaine.
Beckwith was convicted on
one count of sale of a controlled
substance within 1,000 feet of a
place of worship and one count
of possession with intent to sell a
controlled substance within 1,000
feet of a place of worship.
Beckwith was arrested Nov.
22, 2004 after selling crack
cocaine to a confidential infor-
mant working with the Liberty


County Sheriff's Department in
the area of Hall Circle in Bristol,
according to the probable cause
affidavit.
He was sentenced to eight
years on each count, to run con-
currently, and received 435 days
-of jail credit. He was ordered to
pay court costs and fines totaling
$615.
Also sentenced last week was
a 35-year-old Quincy man who
pleaded no contest to one charge
of possession of a controlled sub-
stance with intent to sell within.


1,000 feet of a school. He also
entered a no contest plea on two
charges from Gadsden County,
including one of count of pos-
session of a controlled substance
and one count sale of a controlled
substance.
Timothy Green was ordered to
serve 36 months on each count to
run concurrently and will receive
194 days jail credit. He had to
forfeit his vehicle and was or-
dered to pay $385 in court costs
and $230 in fines on each of the
three cases.


------------------------------
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Man charged with robbing

man at gunpoint for $800
A Calhoun County man turned himself in at the jail in
Blountstown after learning a warrant had been issued for
his arrest.
Sheffield Smith is charged with grandtheft and robbery
with a firearm after he reportedly stolen $800 from Carnell
Palm on Feb. 11.
According to the report from the Calhoun County
Sheriff's Department, Palm was washing cars outside a
club on Ward Road when he was approached by Smith as
he walked into the alley to turn off the water.
Smith told Palm he wanted to talk to him and then put
a small revolver to the right side of Palm's head. Saying,
"Let me get that," Smith put his hand in Palm's pocket
and took $800 in cash. Smith then ran toward Lockwood
Avenue with the money in his hand.
When he turned himself in, Smith told deputies he didn't
steal the money. He later admitted that he did see Palm
at the club but said he didn't speak to him. Smith admit-
ted that he had six or seven beers and a pint and a half of
liquor that night.


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Lots Between

10-15.7 Acres+/-
."J :'.f =,


Call Michael Richter at (850) 570-9616 or (850) 643-1482
N. E. Realty of Tallahassee, Owner/Agent






Page 4 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL MARCH 1,2006


Panhandle Pioneer

Settlement 10th

annual rummage sale
from the Panhandle Pioneer Settlement
On March 4, 7, 9, 10 and 11 the Pan-
handle Pioneer Settlement will hold its
annual rummage sale in the Frink gym,
rain or shine. You never know what you
will find and if you know what you need,
it probably will be there, too.
Thousands of items from A-afghans
(handmade), to Z-zippers, passing by
bicycles, books, collectibles, cookware,
furniture, garden tools, linens and items
for the do-it-yourselfer.
The gym opens at 7:30 a.m. (CT) each
of these days and closes around 2 p.m.
Don't miss out! Come support this
fundraising event.
The settlement is a living museum
documenting rural life in NW Florida
since the early 1800s. It is located in Sam
Atkins Park, about 1 mile west of the in-
tersection of Hwy. 71 and Hwy. 20. Fol-
low Hwy. 20 West out of Blountstown.
Look for signs for Sam Atkins Park, turn
north at Lindy's Fried Chicken (Silas
Green St.).
For more information, contact Linda
Smith at 674-8055. For further infor-
mation on the historic buildings at the
settlement go to www.panhandlepio-
neersettlement.org.

Altha PTO barbecue

Saturday, March 4
Altha PTO will hold a barbecue fund-
raiser Saturday, March 4 at the Altha
Recreational Complex. The complex
is located north of the school's campus
on Hwy. 71 next to Ogelsby. We will be
preparing plates of smoked Boston butt,
potato salad, baked beans and roll. The
cost will be $6 per plate.
We encourage folks to purchase their
tickets in advance and may do so by con-
tacting the school at 762-3121. We will
have some plates available the day of the
barbecue that will be sold on a first-come
and first-serve basis.
Altha PTO is a support organization
for Altha Public School. We fund sev-
eral projects with funds raised from this
barbecue. We contribute money to class-
rooms for supplies and most recently we
have begun a $500 college scholarship
for a graduating senior.
The PTO holds only one fundraiser
per year for its general fund. We hope
the community will come out and sup-
port our efforts. '
Any questions may be directed to
Paige White, PTO President, at home in
the evenings at 674-3365.








That's how many copies of
The Calhoun-Liberty Journal
were distributed last week,
ensuring plenty of coverage for
your community announcements
and great response for our
business advertisers!


Weight Loss Support-Group
meets at 1 p.m. at
Shelton Park Library
Rotary Club
meets at Calhoun-Liberty
Hospital, noon


March is
- Fine Free
6 Month


Boy Scout Troop 200 & 203 meets at 6:30 p.m., Mormon Church

AA meets 7 p.m., Calhoun County Old Ag Bldg. west door


Blood ~- ,
Mobile
*.^ g .. .. .. .


SCBC Blood Drive at
Apalachicola Forest Youth
Camp, noon to 4 p.m.


Altha Area Recreation Committee meets at 6 p.m. at Altha City Hall
Magnolia VFD meets at'6 p.m. at the Fire House
Red Oak VFD meets 6:30 p.m. at the Fire House
Nettle Ridge FD meets at 7p.m. at the Fire House
Mossy Pond VFD meets at 7 p.m. at the Fire House
AA meets 7p.m., -basement of Calhoun County Courthouse


Blood SCBC Blood Drive
Mobile at Hopkins Pontiac in
O ---- Marianna, 8 a.m. to noon


Dance at the American Legion Hall in Blountstown from 8:30 p.m. 12:30 a.m.


A -, Panhandle Pioneer Settlement
.4^,t Rummage Sale at Sam Atkins Park
in Frink gym, 7:30 a.m. to 2 p.m.


AA meets 7:30 p.m., Hosford School cafeteria
Dance at the American Legion Hall in Blountstown from 8:30 p.m. 12:30 a.m.


Attend the church
of your choice
this Sunday


t


Today';

Jacob
Beiler


Main Street meets at noon at the Calhoun Co. Chamber of Commerce
The Liberty County Arts Council, meets at 1 p.m.,
Veterans Memorial Park Civic Center in Bristol.
Ladies Auxiliary meets 6 p.m. at the American Legion Hall in Blountstown
Bristol City Council meets at 6:30 p.m., City Hall
American Legion Post 272
meets 7 p.m. at the Legion Hall in Blountstown

Altha Boy Scouts meet tonight at 5:30 p.m. at the Aitha VFD
Bulldog Club meets 7 p.m. at the LCHS field house


Mossy Pond VFD Auxilary meets
12:30 p.m. at the Fire House

Calhoun County Commission
meets at 2 p.m., Calhoun Co. Courthouse
Dixie 109 Masonic Lodge meets
7 p.m. at Masonic Lodge, Blountstown


KToda)ls

Rocky
Kincaid


Liberty County Chamber of Commerce
meets 7 p.m., Apalachee Restaurant


Brownie Troop 158 meets
at 7 8:30 p.m., at Veterans Memorial Civic Center
JROTC Booster Club
meets at 7 p.m. at the Liberty County High School


~


The Calhoun-Liberty Journal
RO. Box 536
Bristol, FL 32321
Johnny Eubanks, Publisher
Teresa Eubanks, Editor
E-MAIL ADDRESS:
TheJournal@gtcom.net
(850) 643-3333 or
1-800-717-3333 Florida Press
Fax (850) 643-3334 Association
The Calhoun-Liberty Journal is published each
Wednesdaybythe LibertyJournal Inc., Summers
Road, P.O. Box 536, Bristol, FL 32321.
Annual subscriptions are $18.
Periodicals postage paid at Bristol, Fla.
POSTMASTER: Send address corrections to:
The Calhoun-Liberty Journal,
P.O. Box 536, Bristol, FL 32321.
^^J^^j~ maig


k T)


Partnership for
Prescription Assistance
national bus tour in FL

The Partnership for Prescription
Assistance, a growing national program
to help patients access prescription
medicines, will be in 13 cities across
Florida with the "Help is Here
Express," a traveling education center
making its way across the country to
raise awareness and boost enrollment
in patient assistance programs. Patients
can qualify for this program through
www.pparx.org or by calling 1-888-
4PPA-NOW.
The "Help is Here Express" is making
a tour of Florida to offer help to anyone
who is having trouble affording their
prescription medicine. Since its launch
last April, the program -- sponsored
by America's pharmaceutical research
companies working with doctors,
pharmacists, health care providers and
community groups -- has matched more
than 1 million patients nationally, and
almost 80,000 right here in Florida.

Cancer support group
organizational meeting
from the Calhoun County Public Library
An organizational meeting for a can-
cer support group will be held in the
Heritage Room of the Calhoun County
Public Library at 6 p.m. Monday, March
6.
If you have cancer, are a cancer sur-
vivor, a loved one of a cancer patient,
or an interested.party, you are invited to
attend.
For more information, call 674-8773.

CALENDAR LISTING First, just call
in the person's name and date to be
listed on our weekly community cal-
endar. There is no charge. Callers
are asked to give their own name and
phone number in case we need to verify
a spelling or double-check the date. We
encourage our readers to compile a list
of their family's and friends' birthdays,
printed clearly, and mail or fax them to
us at The Journal.



THE

CALHOUN-LIBERTY

JOURNAL
(USPS 012367)
Summers Road
Address correspondence to:


\
1





MARCH 1, 2006 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 5


oJit AAA
^V- O OYSTERS
.-" -: ON THE HALF-SHELL
^; ~ BY THE BAG
BY THE PINT
I Call 850-674-ROYS
17797 North Main St. in Blountstown


"*1 (Across From Advance Auto Par


Tell 'em you saw it i
..- The Calhoun-Liberty Joui
7e 7s-. For advertising information, call 643-3333 or 1-81


Main Street meeting March 6;

Board of Directors meet March 9


fts) r from the Calhoun County
rJ Chamber of Commerce
Board Meeting The regu-
/n lar meeting of the Board of Di-
rnal rectors of the Calhoun County
Chamber of Commerce is the
00-717-3333.
second Thursday of each month
at noon (CT) in the Calhoun-
Liberty Hospital. The next
meeting is scheduled for March
9. Please RSVP to the Chamber
via telephone 674-4519 or e-
mail: ccchamber@yahoo.com.
Main Street & KCCB The
) regular meeting of Main Street
Blountstown is the first Mon-
day of each month at noon (CT)
in the Chamber's building. The
next meeting is scheduled for
March 6. Angie Hill will give
a detailed..report on the "101
Workshop" that she and Phillip
Hill attended in Auburndale.
Also on the agenda is discus-
sion of Main Street's quarterly
report to Florida Main Street.
Please bring a brown bag lunch
and join us!
KCCB staff advises receipt
of eight orders for the Christ-
- 321 mas Card Project: Calhoun
County School Board, The Di-
amond Comer, Panhandle Pio-
neer Settlement, Gary Watter-
son (CPA in Tallahassee), Main
Street Blountstown, Calhoun


County Chamber of Com-
merce, Keep Calhoun County
Beautiful (KCCB), and Merle
Norman Cosmetics.
Main Street and KCCB are
taking designs and payments,
through the Chamber, for the
Christmas Card Project. The de-
sired Christmas designs will be
drafted on 4' x 8' plywood with
the designs painted by inmates
at the State of Florida/Calhoun
County Correctional Institu-
tion. To purchase a Christmas
Card, submit a check for $75
payable to "Keep Calhoun
County Beautiful," and a card
design to the Chamber. If you
need help with a design, the
Chamber still has several card
designs (that KCCB provid-
ed).
Donations for Annual Ban-
quet Bank of America of
Blountstown has donated sev-
eral items for the Chamber's
Annual Banquet: pens, mark-
ers, rulers, and credit card
wallets. If you would like to
promote your business at the
banquet, please contact the
Chamber. Suggestions for do-
nations are: promotional items
like the bank's, certificates for
a service that your business


provides, afghans, maps, flow-
ers, small appliances, grills or
grill equipment, etc.
Enterprise Zone Map -
Drop by the Chamber's office
to see our new Enterprise Zone
map! Janice Watson, ARPC
(and also on the Chamber's
Board of Directors), displayed
the new Enterprise Zone maps
at the last Chamber member-
ship meeting. Maps are also on
display at ARPC (Apalachee
Regional Planning Council
in Blountstown) and Calhoun
County Building Inspection.
'After Hours' Event If
you didn't attend the Cham-
ber's first 'After Hours' Event,
you're missing out! Superior
Bank of Blountstown spon-
sored the event yesterday at
the Calhoun-Liberty Hospital.
Members, and potential new
members, met, exchanged
business cards while enjoying
the wonderful refreshments
(catered by Ms. Linda Faye
Whitfield), and took a tour of
the hospital. To sponsor or hold
a future event at your business,
just contact the Chamber. Plans
are for quarterly "After Hours"
Events at other business loca-
tions.


Jenny Guilford earns honors

on Superintendent's List


Our energy conservation programs are designed to help you reduce your
energy costs and save money. Our GoodCencs Cash Rebates are available for
upgrading your heating and cooling system or your ceiling insulation so
you'll be nice and cozy all year long.

Call us today at 261-3663 to find out more about our GoodCents Cash
Rebates or visit www.FPUC.com. You'll improve the comfort of your home
while saving energy and money.


FLORIDA PUBLIC


E S


U T L IT I


Enrg for


from the Army & Air Force
Hometown News
Air Force Cadet Jenny
A. Guilford has earned
honors with placement on the
Superintendent's List at the U.S.
Air Force Academy, Colorado
Springs, CO.
The cadet demonstrated
excellence in military
performance, academic studies,
and athletic and physical fitness.
Cadets must have maintained
a -3.0 or better grade point
average for the Dean's list, a
military performance average
for the Commandant's List, and
a physical education average
for the Athletic's List for a
semester. Cadets meeting criteria
requirements for placement on
these merit lists are automatically
placed on the Superintendent's
List.
The academy is a four-year
military institution of higher
learning that develops and
inspires new air and space leaders
with the vision for the future. The
curriculum provides cadets with
instruction, education, training
and. experiene n, academics,
.iiiilitary training 'aviation and


airmanship programs, physical
training, athletic conditioning,
and spiritual and ethical
development.
The cadets graduate with the
knowledge, character and skills
essentially required to meet the
leadership challenges of the 21 st
century as career officers in the
Air Force.
Guilford is pursuing a degree
in legal studies.
She is the daughter of Janice
and David Watson of Quincy and
Jerry Guilford of Blountstown.
Jenny is a 2003 graduate of
Blountstown High School.


OUALflY 0 COMFORT SAVNGS






Page 6 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL MARCH 1, 2006


mmmm


The White House has given permission for a
company owned by the government of Dubai to run
six U.S. ports, including the Port of New York. Now
Dubai was accused of supporting the September
11th attacks and was one of only three countries to
support the Taliban. Now they're going to run the
Port of New York. What's next, we'll put Mexico in
charge of immigration? How about Dick Cheney in
charge of gun safety? Courtney Love in charge of
Olympic drug testing? -JAY LENO

The president has arranged for al Qaeda to guard
our ports. This is part of his new plan to fight them
here so we don't have to fight them there.
BILL MAHER

It's Mardi Gras in New Orleans. Everybody has
Mardi Gras fever. I was watching the 'Today' show
earlier today and Tom Cruise was lecturing Matt
Lauer about jambalaya. DAVID LETTERMAN

The news from Iraq is apparently so bad that today
Bush asked Cheney to go hunting again.
BILLMAHER

They have the big parade down in New Orleans and
this year FEMA has a float, but it's not expected 'til
labor day. DAVID LETTERMAN'

President Bush is now saying that he was not aware
that we signed a deal to give these Arabs countries
control of our eastern seaports. In fact, today
President Bush began tapping his own phone so he
can find out what's going on in the White House.
-JAY LENO

President Bush is letting an Arab company run ports..
That's like letting Robert Blake take your wife to
dinner. DAVID LETTERMAN

In a speech outlining his energy program, President
Bush said the United States is on the verge of a
technological breakthrough that will startle most
Americans. I think most Americans would be startled
to know the president has an energy program.
--JAY LENO

A firm owned by Dubai's government has purchased
the rights to operate sea ports in six major American
cities. A move the White House approved without
telling Congress. Even worse, everyone found out
about the sale from that Texas quail hunt rancher
lady. JON STEWART

Dick Cheney is vacationing in Wyoming this week.
I understand today he shot an elk. He also shot two
Shriners, a Jaycee and a Moose.- JAY LENO

Bode Miller was disqualified from his last race in
the Olympics. He skied out of bounds. At first, the
officials didn't see what happened. Like everyone
else they were watching "American Idol."
-JAY LENO

President Bush has okayed a deal to let the
government of Dubai control six of our major ports.
Boy, first Dick Cheney shoots a guy in the face, now
President Bush shoots himself in the foot.
S -JAY LENO

We're turning our ports over to the Arabs. We can't
even turn Iraq over to the Arabs. ... This is like putting
Bill Clinton in charge at a Hooters, it's not a good.
idea. -JAY LENO


Just who owns America?


Who owns America? Well, just
about everyone: Joe Citizen, corpo- CoA
rate America, international companies Jerry Cox is a reti
and the U.S. government, and writer with ar
According to the Bureau of Eco- issues. He lives in
nomic Analysis (BEA) of the U.S., \
Department of Commerce, at the end of 2004 foreign-
owned assets in the U.S. totaled about $11,500 billion
while U.S.-owned assets abroad totaled slightly more
than $9,000 billion.
The point of the BEA chart is that the U.S. net interna-
tional investment position at year end 2004 was a minus
$2.484.2 billion which increased from the year end 2003
when the value was a minus $2,156.7 billion.
In English, this statistic means that foreign investment
in the U.S. in 2004 increased more than U.S. investments
in foreign countries. In other words, foreigners bought
more of us than we bought of them.
The United Arab Emirates plan to buy more of the U.S.
when they purchase port operations in six U.S. cities.
If you thought that the mainstream media went nuts
over Vice President Cheney accidentally shooting his
bird-hunting partner down in South Texas then you
haven't seen anything yet.
The mainstream media has come unglued over the
proposed sale of operations at six U.S. seaports to
Dubai Ports World (DP World), a company owned by
the United Arab Emirates (UAE). The ports are in New
York, New Jersey, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Miami and
New Orleans.
Not only is the news media in high gear, politicians
on both sides of the aisle are in a high-pitched howl, all
asking for President Bush's head on a stake.
While I don't think that President Bush played his
political cards very well in this high-stakes poker game
of "don't sell American port operations to those Arabs,"
he may be right on this issue.
For someone who is as political savvy as President
Bush and his minder, Karl Rove, I find it very strange that
they didn't recognize that the political threat of this port
deal was a lot like playing with matches while siphoning
gas out of daddy's pickup truck. Explaining this port deal
to the American people is a lot like explaining to daddy
why you burned up his truck.
In a recent column about "Good News, Bad News," I
included the potential sale of port operations to a Middle
East company as a "bad news" item. The sale of any part


ORNER\
red military officer
n extensive back-
c and foreign policy
n Shalimar, Fla.
., /


of the U.S. marketplace is never a
good news item because I think that
U.S. companies should be conducting
U.S. business, in this case, operating
U.S. ports.
But, national security, not money,


is the main issue for those opposed to the sale of port
operations to a company owned by the UAE. The news
media would lead you to believe that U.S. companies
operate all U.S. ports. Not true.
Local government owns and controls most U.S. ports.
The NY Port Authority controls the Port of New York.
The City of Pensacola owns the Port of Pensacola, FL.
Many U.S. and foreign companies have contracts with
* U.S. port authorities to provide ship-handling services.
There are 14 companies at the Baltimore Port that load
and unload ships.
The British company, Peninsular and Oriental Steam
Navigation Company (P&O Group), operates at 21 U.S.
ports through its subsidiary, P&O Group North America.
The plan is to sell their operations at the six U.S. ports to
DP World, which is owned by UAE. That's the rub.
The U.S, Coast Guard,-U.S. Customs and port author-
ity police provide security for the ports. The shipping
companies like DP World load and unload ships.
The UAE is a Middle East country so in the American
mind; the UAE must be involved in terrorism. Could be,
but most of the terrorists involved in 9/11 came from
Saudi Arabia. The U.S. continues to do business with
Saudi Arabia so what's the difference?
The security of U.S. ports is a problem because only
5% or less, of the millions of cargo containers that pass
through U.S. ports is inspected. Either a U.S. or foreign
company could unwittingly offload a cargo container
with a bomb in it.
The Bush administration has a history with DP World.
John Snow, Secretary of the Treasury, was CEO of CSX
Corporation, a U.S. railroad company. In December 2004,
CSX sold its international terminal business to DP World
for $1.15 billion.
On January 24, 2006, President Bush nominated
David Sanborn, DP World's Director of Operations for
Europe and Latin America, to be the U.S. Maritime
Administrator.
If we are lucky,-the DP World issue will cause Con-
gress and the administration to give serious thought to
U.S. port security.


-Late



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MARCH 1,2006 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 7


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Page 8 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL MARCH 1,2006


NFCC consumer tips for preventing identity theft


SILVER SPRING, MD Al-
most every day, the average
consumer writes a check, uses
a credit card to buy something
on line, uses an ATM machine
or engages in some other act of
information sharing that could
open the door to identity theft.
To help consumers conduct
these routine activities with con-
fidence, the National Foundation
for Credit Counseling (NFCC)
has assembled a list of tips to re-
duce the risk of identity theft.
While not foolproof, follow-
ing the NFCC tips will help con-
sumers cut the chances of falling
victim to this rapidly growing
problem. Last year alone, the
Federal Trade Commission re-
ceived more than 685,000 con-
sumer complaints about fraud
and identity theft. And, that just
represents consumers who filed
complaints. Many experts be-
lieve the actual number of inci-
dents is far higher. In addition,
consumers reported losses from
fraud of more than $680 million
in 2005.
NFCC TIPS TO
REDUCE THE CHANCE
OF IDENTITY THEFT
*Never give out personal or
account information in response
to a phone or e-mail query un-
less it is part of a transaction that
you initiated. Identity thieves
are becoming, more savvy, of-
ten posing .as a legitimate bank
or financial institution claiming
that there is a problem with your
account, a technique known as.
"phishing." As part of these
"phishing" schemes, the identity
thief will ask for personal infor-
mation such as a personal iden-
tification number (PIN), Social
Security number (SSN) or even
account numbers.
*Open credit card and other
bills promptly and: reconcile
receipts and accounts. Just be-
cause your credit card and/or
ATM card is still in your wallet
doesn't mean that you're not still
-at risk of identify theft. "Skim-
ming" or stealing credit card or
debit card- numbers by captur-
ing your information stored with
your creditor, retailer, or else-
where is also a popular means of
identify theft.
Treat paper and electronic
mail carefully. "Dumpster div-
ing," or the act of rummaging
through trash, is another way
identity thieves can obtain per-
sonal information. Thieves also
can use sophisticated computer
techniques to obtain personal
information stored on your
computer or to access personal
information during online trans-
actions. To combat this, you
should be sure to:
*Deposit outgoing mail in se-
cured mailboxes, such as a U.S.
Post Office box.
*Tear or shred charge receipts,
copies of credit applications,
bills, bank statements .and other
-documents bearing personal in-
formation.
*Be cautiiphi' about using a
personal 'c'mopu'ter

store personal information.
*Update virus protection soft-
ware regularly and use both a
firewall and secure browser.
*Check your credit reports
with the three major credit bu-
reaus once a year or consider pur-
chasing a service that alerts you
to any request for your credit in-
formation or unusual activity on
your account. You are entitled to
a free copy of your credit report
every 12 months. Visit www.an-
nualcreditreport.com to receive
a copy of your credit report.
*Become a cautious guardian
of your personal information.
This means following a series
of common sense steps to guard
your financial privacy, such as
signing new credit and debit
cards immediately when they ar-
rive. Keep a record of account
numbers, expiration dates and
the phone number and address of
each company in a secure loca-
tion with limited access. Do not
carry your Social Security card
with you, but rather keep it in a
secure location.
RECOVERING FROM
IDENTIFY THEFT
*You've followed the tips
outlined above but still believe
that your personal information
has been compromised. What
should you do to address the sit-
uation and protect your financial
well being?
*Report any suspicious activ-
ity or fraudulent charges to your
financial institution immediately.
Most of the time the complaint
needs to be filed in writing.
*Place a fraud alert on your
credit reports and continue to
review .your reports periodical-
ly. There are two-types of fraud
alerts: an initial alert that lasts 90
days and an extended alert that
stays on your report for seven
years. A fraud alert can make
it more difficult for someone to
get credit in your name because
it tells creditors to follow certain
procedures to protect you. When
reviewing your reports, look for
accounts that you did not open
or debts that you cannot explain.
Follow the regulations set by
each of the three credit bureaus
to have fraudulent information
removed.
*Close the accounts) that you
know or believe has been com-
promised or fraudulently opened.
If the fraud occurred on a cash
account, such as a checking or
savings account, be sure to rec-
oncile any outstanding checks,
withdrawals or deposits before
closing the account.
-File a complaint with the
Federal Trade Commission and
your local police. Be certain to
keep track of all reports that the
police file on your behalf. You
may need these reports to prove
that you have been a victim of
identify theft where fraudulent
charges and/or accounts have
occurred.
*Take the appropriate steps to
correct fraudulent information
pnpyqur; qredi, repqr .,The Fair
.'Credit, Repoilmg' Act' foraA),


establishes a series of proce-
dures for consumers to have
their fraudulent information re-
moved from credit reports. The
process, however, can be a long
and daunting one. Don't feel
like you have to complete the
process alone. Reach out for as-
sistance. One option is to contact


the NFCC at 1-800-388-2227 to
find a certified credit counselor
who can help guide you through
the identity theft recovery pro-
cess.
The NFCC, founded in 1951, is the
nation's largest and' longest serving
national nonprofit credit counseling
organization. The NFCC's mission is
to set the national standard for qual-


ity credit counseling, debt reduction
services and education for financial
wellness, through its member agen-
cies. With more than 1,000 commu-
nity-based offices nationwide, NFCC
members help over a million house-
holds annually. For free and afford-
able confidential advice through an
NFCC member, call 1-800-388-2227,
or visit www.nfcc.org.


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MARCH 1. 2006 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 9


Emily Brooks won the Miss Calhoun Jessica Metcalf burst into tears when
County Teen Miss Crown and is she realized she'd been selected as
shown holding her roses as her new the new Miss Calhoun County.
crown is put in place.


Miss Calhoun County Queens


crowned


in Saturday pageant


There were plenty of smiles and happy tears to go around as 28 young ladies got
dressed in their best and took to the stage to compete in Saturday's Miss Calhoun
County Pageant in Blountstown. ABOVE: Jessica Metcalf was crowned Miss
Calhoun County. BELOW: The theme of this year's event was "Beauties at the
Beach," which was highlighted in a group dance routine fille; with leis, bathing suits
and grass skirts. PHOTOS BY KRISTEN BATEMAN


ABOVE: Casey Glass was
named second runner-up
for Miss Calhoun County.
BELOW: Teen Miss winner
Emily Brooks is shown
with first runner-up Ashley
Smith and second runner-
up Christy Simmons.


ABOVE: Lyndsy
Wainright was selected
as first runner-up for
Miss Calhoun County.
BELOW: This trio of
young winners being
interviewed on stage
include Little Miss
Calhoun
County
Ashley
Fallon
Lyt l e,
Young Miss
Calhoun
County
Katelyn
Bozeman
and Junior
M iss s
Calhoun
County nt
Savannah
McCroan.





Page 10 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL MARCH 1,2006


Lake Mystic Bapt.
Church Wild Game
Supper Saturday
The Brotherhood of Lake
Mystic Baptist Church will hold
its annual Wild Game Supper on
Saturday, March 4 at 6 p.m. (ET)
in the fellowship hall. All men are
invited to come and be with us for
some great food and fellowship.
Willie Meggs will be the guest
speaker.
The church is located at 15292
NW County Road 12.
Donations will be greatly ap-'
preciated. .
For more information, call
643-2351.

Wissmans at Red

Oak Community

Mennonite Church
Loren and Gloria Wissman and
their 12 talented children will be
ministering in song and music
Monday, March 6 at 7 p.m. (CT)
at Red Oak Community Menno-
nite Church.
The church is located at 19247
NW CR 275, Altha.
For more information, call
674-4139.

Telogia Assembly
of God gospel sing
Telogia Assembly of God will
host a gospel sing on Friday,
March 3 at 7 p.m. The featured
singers will be the Heart Seekers
of Crawfordville. There will also
be local talent.-
Rev. Adams and the congrega-
tion cordially invite everyone to
come join us and be blessed with
an evening of worship in song.
The church is located on Hwy.
65 South, 1 1/2 miles from the
Hosford intersection.
For more information, call
379-3291 or 379-8157.

Camp meeting
A camp meeting will be held
Saturday, March 4 from 10 a.m.
to 6 p.m. at Tom and-Ann's Camp
located on Walter Potts Road off
Hwy. 274 NW. Look for signs.
Bring your lawn chairs -
Music will be provided by the
Cobb Family and the Gospel Joy
Bells. Rev. Michael Morris will
give the message.
Food-will be provided, howev-
er, a love offering will be taken.
Come enjoy good food, fellow-
ship, gospel music and preach-
ing.
For more information, call
762-2333. -

Prayer band meets
The Liberty Community
Prayer Band will hold prayer
service Thursday, March 2 at 7:30
p.m. (ET) at the home of Brother
and Sister James Lane.
Everyone is cordially invited
to attend. For more information,
call 643-5958.


U,~M L ~ ILIII


Page 10 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL MARCH 1, 2006


S

IE

S


UI --


M ..-.... ...-.. .

Yard sale and
dinner fundraiser
Corinth Baptist will have a-
church-wide yard sale Saturday,
March 4 beginning at 7 a.m. at
the church. There will be tools,
furniture, dishes, collectibles,
clothes, toys, appliances, antiques
and many other items. We will
also be selling hot dogs, coffee
and drinks. Come have lunch
with us.
The Boston butt dinner fund-
raiser will be held Friday, March
31. Tickets for this dinner will
be available March 1. Plan on
having lunch with us on Friday,
March 31.
,All proceeds will go to the new
church building fund. For more
information, or if you have any-
thing you would like to donate,
call 379-8861.
The church is located in Hos-
ford on Hwy. 65 South andMoore
Road.




!TREASURES i
| by Ryan McDougaldjJ
WE ARE ADOPTED
THROUGH CHRIST
Text: Ephesians 1:1-14
SKenneth Miles tells about an ex-
tremely wealthy man who owned a
S ast estate % ith great treasures of art.
The man had only one son, whom he
loved. deeply. Before the boy was a
teenager, he became deathly ill and
passed away. The fatherwas so over-
come with grief that he died a few
weeks later of a broken heart.
The father's last will and testa-
ment instructed the executor of the
will to auction everything off. The
will stipulated that the first item to be
sold was an oil painting of the son.
A large crowd came to bid on the
art collection. The boy's portrait was
the first item up forbid. No one cared
about the boy and no one would bid.-.
After quite. some time, an old servant
who loved the boy placed a bid for
75 cents. Having no other bids, the
painting was sold at once to the man.
The sale was abruptly halted. You see
the father stipulated that anyone who
loved his son enough to buy the por-
trait would receive the entire estate.
Many want the blessings of the
Heavenly Father without loving the
Son. But it is impossible. Our adop-
tion is literally "through Jesus Christ."
Blailde says, "it is eis autov, unto or
into Himself denoting a movement
towards God which terminates in
union to Him." .
It is "in love" that He adopts us.
God wants a relationship with you
that is very real and very personal. It
can only happen by loving the Son.
What father would knowingly adopt
a child who would hate his true son?
God would never do such a thing.
"Yet to all who receive Him (the
Son), to those who believed in His
(the Son's)'name, He (the Son) gave
the right to become children of God"
-Johnll:12NIV *


NEW

FROM TH

PEW



- -
a s.. Ait


Quincy First

Assembly

homecoming
Quincy First Assembly of
God and Pastor Virginia Shepard
would like to invite everyone to
their homecoming.
Come out and enjoy a time of
good old-fashioned preaching
and fellowship with dinner fol-
lowing the services on Sunday,
March 5.
Sunday school begins at 10
a.m. and services at 11 a.m.
The featured speaker is Rev.
Wayne Fussell from Blakely,
GA. The featured singers will
be the Watson Family from Sapp
Community.

Victory Hill PH

Church benefit
A benefit sing for Sammy and
Melinda White will be held on
Friday, March 17, beginning at 7
p.m. at Victory Hill Pentecostal
Holiness Church.
The featured group will be
Reaching Out of Mississippi.
The church is located on NW
Ashley Shiver Road in Altha.


Call 643-5400for further info.





The Liberty County


jMinisterial Association

Presents the First Annual

Liberty Gospel Sing at the

Veterans Memorial Civic Center on

Saturday, March 11, 2006.


Featured Performers: I


/ The Gann Brothers,


Fortress and The Basford

\ *Brothers.

Come and join us for a great night 4

w of gospel singing! I
e will begin serving Chicken Pilau Plates at 5:30 pm
at a cost of $5.00 per plate.

Gospel Sing will start at 7:00 p.m. with FREE admission!


SA Love Offering will be taken.
^..*^^^.j


CHIPOLA THEATER SCHOLARSHIP GROWS
- Chipola College business instructor Lee Shook
recently made a second $5,000 contribution to the Lee
Shook Theatre Scholarship Endowment fund which will
provide a scholarship to a future theatre major. Shook
has performed in numerous Chipola productions and is
key supporter of the Chipola (ACT) Applauding Chipola
Theater fund. Shook, who is also an accountant, hopes
that all theater lovers and friends of the college will
consider the endowment in their tax-deductible giving
plans. Here, Shook (right) presents the check to Chipola
president Dr. Gene Prough. For information about the
endowment, contact the Chipola Foundation at 718-
2478. CHIPOLA PHOTO


. ; I - - -


'I~ig





MARCH 1,2006 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 11


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Page 12 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL MARCH 1,2006


Global Information Group charged with

selling confidential telephone records


ABBIGAIL ELIZABETH
MATHEWS
Walt and Nicole Mathews are
proud to announce the birth of
their daughter, Abbigail Eliza-
-T-. beth Mathews, born on Dec.
27, 2005 at The Women's Pa-
vilion of Tallahassee Memorial
Hospital. She weighed 8 lbs.
and measured 20.75 inches
long. Maternal grandparents
S" are the late Nancy Ammons
of Blountstown and Roger and
Marlene Holley of Clarksville. Paternal grandparents are Janet
and Tim McJunkin of Two Egg and Henry and Debra Mathews
of Havana. Great-grandparents are the late J.C. and Nannette
Southwell of Blountstown, Bobby and Marlene Holley of Clarks-
ville, Dorothy and the late Dick Hastings of Malone and Loriene
and the late W S. Mathews of Panama City. Abbie loves swing-
ing, being outside and going to Aunt Net-Net's house.

TRENTON LEE
HIRES
Darryl and Tiffany Hires of
Telogia are proud to announce .
the birth of their son, Tren-
ton Lee Hires, born on Dec.
26, 2005 at Capital Regional
Medical Center in Tallahassee.
He weighed 6 /bs. and 5 oz. J .
and measured 20 inches long.
Maternal grandparents are Debra and the late Jerry Coon of
Telogia. Paternal grandparents are Tootsie and the late Bobby
Hires of Hosford. Trenton was welcomed home by his big sister,
Brooke Hires, and cousins, Ryan and Mary Beth Rogers.





Sc .............. BRIAN JACOB
BEILER
Brian Jacob Beiler is cel-
ebrating his second birthday
"on March 5. He is the son,
of Brian and Tiffany Beiler of
Bristol His grandparents are
Darryl Melvin of Clarksville,
Toni and Paul Corlett of Altha,
U Ralph and Sandra Seaman
of Blountstown and the late
Marvin Beiler of Blountstown.
His great-grandparents are Carolyn and the late Delbert Melvin
of Clarksville, Guilford and Bonnie McDonald of Blountstown,
Shirley Mangas of Blountstown, and Betty and the late Sam
Beller of Sarasota. Jacob enjoys watching Sponge Bob, playing
guitar with Papa Paul and playing with his trucks outside. He
will celebrate with a Sponge Bob party


TALLAHASSEE Attorney
General Charlie Crist charged
Global Information Group,
Inc., a Florida corporation, with
unlawfully obtaining and selling
confidential telephone records
without the knowledge of the
consumers whose records were
being sold. This is the Attorney
General's second legal action
within a month targeting this
form of unlawful conduct.
Crist's case, filed today in
Hillsborough County Circuit
Court against the company
and its principals, alleges that
Global obtained information by
impersonating either customers
or telephone company employees
in order to obtain consumers'
personal calling information.
Global, located in Temple
Terrace, is accused of providing
its customers with confidential
telephone calling records of
unsuspecting consumers. Laurie
Misner, 43, and Edward Herzog,
48, are named as the principals
of Global. "This is yet another
outrageous example of invading
an individual's privacy for
financial gain," said Crist.
"Floridians deserve to be able to
keep their private, personal phone
records between themselves and
those who provide that service."
The Attorney General's
investigation has revealed
that Global placed thousands
of calls from its Temple
Terrace, headquarters seeking
unauthorized customer
information from several
telephone companies serving
customers throughout the
United States, including some
in Florida. The information was
then sold Global customers who
allegedly used the information
for their own purposes.
The Istate is seeking civil
penalties for violations of the
Florida Unfair and Deceptive
Practices Act and civil conspiracy
laws, as well as a permanent
injunction stopping Global from
obtaining or selling any more
. personal calling records and
requiring the company to return
any of the personal records in its
possession. Penalties are $10,000
per violation, $15,000 if a senior
citizen or disabled person was
victimized. Total penalties will


be determined at a later date. The
case is being prosecuted by the
Attorney General's Economic
Crimes Division.
Global has been the subject
of two previous cases relating
to Global's conduct concerning


T-Mobile or Verizon Wireless
customers and information.
Crist's lawsuit seeks relief for all
Florida consumers with wireless
and landline telephone numbers
and for all telephone companies
serving Florida customers.


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MARCH 1,2006 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 13


Become a mentor and be a friend


At first glance, the word "men-
tor" could seem imposing. It con-
notes a serious responsibility for
the welfare of another. Mentors
are seen as role models and advice
providers, among other responsi-
bilities. But, when you get down
to the heart of the matter, mentors
are really just friends with a fancy
title.
You've probably come across
many mentors in your lifetime.
Parents may be the immediate
mentors that come to mind, fol-
lowed by other relatives, or even
teachers. For some children, men-
tors are hard to come by. Their
home life may not be stable. They
may be introspective and not
make friends readily. They may
not have had the opportunity to
experience life outside of their


community or hometown. These
are the children who can benefit
from a helping hand.
Becoming a mentor is a re-
warding experience and is easier
than you might think. It doesn't
require a fancy degree, a certain
economic or social background or
any expertise. The only require-
ment is the ability to devote some
time to a child or teenager who
could use support. There are many
organizations that offer mentor-
ing services. One of the most
well known is the Big Brothers
Big Sisters organization. Here are
some ways you can mentor on a
local level.
*Volunteer your time at a
school. Become a tutor, an adjunct
coach or approach school person-
nel and see how you could best


-4 ". .,- /- -..










Harry & Nell Shuler

from

Wilbur Stephens Family

'Dorothy, Darlene, Becky & Judy





iherty Posta

Barn Pole Inc.
Hwy 12. Bristol 643-5995 ]1 2 rr. ie ioulh 1 ir.e rea i.greit
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provide assistance to the student
body. You may want to visit your
alma mater and speak to students
on how you succeeded in life, and
provide-advice on how they, too,
can make a name for themselves.
Accept interns or assistance
from students. If you run a busi-
ness, invite students to see the
day-to-day operations. Work with
them on communication skills.
Give them tasks that they can
complete in order to achieve a
sense of accomplishment. Let stu-
dents know that they can always
call you for networking contacts,
help with resumes or other busi-
ness-relatedaadvice.
Coach a local sports team. If
your son or daughter participates
in sports,. see if you can get in-
volved so that you can give sup-
port to other team members who
may not have a fan cheering in the
stands.
Churches, synagogues or oth-
er houses of worship are places
where mentoring can also take
place. Speak to clergy to see if
there are children in after-school
programs who need assistance,
or if there are any other ways you
can work in a mentoring capacity.
They may need teachers for reli-
gious instruction or volunteers to
assist with fundraising activities,
fairs or other events. Your pres-
ence there shows children that
you're willing, to offer help.
Contact a mentoring organi-
zation. If you prefer a structured
approach, an organization that
specializes in mentoring services
can match you with a child in
need. This person may just need
a companion for movies, sporting
events, or just a willing listener.
Mentoring helps boost self-es-
teem for children, results in better
school attendance rates and helps
reduce the propensity for children
to commit crimes of use drugs,
according to a Public/Private Ven-
tures study of Big Brothers Big
Sisters. For more information on
mentoring and its benefits to the.
community, visit www.mentor-
ing.org.


The Medical Center

OF BLOUNTS TOWN




Dr. Iqbal A. Faruqui

Arlena Falcon, ARNP

Anne Livingston, ARNP, CNM

We accept walk-ins and call-ins, when possible.


Comprehensive Adult & Elderly Care Women's Health Care
*Well Child Check & Minor Childhood Diseases Physicals for
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Pulmonary Function Test, EKG, Preventive Care and more
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Holland, Moses to wed Saturday

Wayne and
Jeanette Hol-
land of Sumatra
and Lonnie and o -
Sandra Moses
of Apalachicola
would like to an-
nounce the engage- -lan
ment and marriage i RF
of Heather Hol-
land and Lonnie
Moses. Heather is
the granddaughter of the late Clint and Rosenia Rester of Apalachicola
and Linda Holland of Apalachicola and JR Holland of Eastpoint.
Lonnie is the grandson of Martha Moses and the late Jim Moses of
Apalachicola and the late Cleela McQuagge of Eastpoint.
The ceremony will take place March 4 at 3 p.m. at Highland Park
Church in Apalachicola. The reception will be held at the Armory in
Apalachicola. All family and friends are invited.

Summers, Vickers announce final plans
Winter Lea
Summers and
Richard Lucas
.: Vickers announce
the final wedding
.., plans Saturday,
March 4 at 3 p.m.
.'(ET) at the Mc-
Farland House in
Quincy.
Winter is the
daughter of Bob-
by Ray and Debbie Summers of Bristol. Luke is the son of Ricky
and Lisa Vickers.
A reception will follow after the ceremony. No local invitations
will be sent, however, family and friends are invited to attend.

Register, Melton plan June wedding

Joseph and Karen .-i
Register of Orlando
and J. W. and Laverne .
Melton ofAltha would
like to announce the
engagement and mar- ,-.
riage of Shelby P.
Register. of Orlando
to Jerry W. Melton of
Altha. Shelby is the
granddaughter of T. J.
and Marilyn Kelly of
Orlando. Jerry is the
grandson of Guido and Juanita Barbano of California.
The ceremony will take place June 3 at sunset at Indian Springs
Country Club in Marianna with the reception following at the same
location. The couple will reside in Marianna.


Our family would like to thank everyone for the food, cards,
flowers and prayers during the loss of our loved one.
A very special thanks to our church family at Telogia Baptist
Church and Lake Mystic Baptist Church.
Love and prayers are what got us through the loss of a husband
and brother. When you see someone pass with so much grace, dignity
And Christianity, you know we have an awesome God.
The Donald Duncan Family

There is a $4 charge for notes of appreciation. We suggest you mention the event
in question when you write your thank-yous since many of our readers may not know
what the note is referring to. In the case of a hospital stay, it's always nice to make
mention of it if the patient has returned home and is doing well.
Please print clearly. You can mailyourthank-you notes, with payment enclosed, to
*"; 'fireldfai 9t&O x 536, Bristol, Ft 32321, urbrihg it by our office on Summers'Fload
in Bristol. For more information, call The Calhoun-Liberty Journal at 643-3333.






rage 14 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL MARCH 1,2006


Many helped after collision


A-





Liberty Commission funding decisions questioned:

More pay for less hours, 1/2 million for new vault?


To the editor:
I believe that a lot of Liberty
County citizens are missing out
on some wonderful insight into
human nature, both the bright
side and the shady side, by not
attending the Liberty County
Commission meetings.
I believe the commissioners
should be fine, upright men of
unquestionable character who can
deliberate and decide using their
own intelligence, comprehension
of facts and fairness in their
decisions and remarks.
I was let down at the, last
commission meeting Feb. 9 when
one or more of the commissioners
had "plants" in the audience to stir
up the people and try to sway the
discussion that was on the floor to
the commissioners' point of view.
I think it is a sign of weakness in
one's character when one has to
manipulate those of equally weak
character because obviously they
lack the skills to debate an issue
on their own.
Another bone of contention
I have is the Juvenile Justice
Title V Grant. The young lady
that was administering the Title
V Grant left her position for
numerous reasons. Gloria Keenan
is filling in as administrator of
this grant during the interim
period which ends June 30,
2006. Ms. Keenan has written
her own contract and has asked-
the commissioners for $25 per
hour at 20 hours a week. not to
exceed 100 hours a month. This
amounts to $30,000 a year for a
part-time job. The commissioners
approved Ms. Keenan's contract.
The young lady that left her
position as administrator of the
Title V grant wrote the Title V
grant and the Title I1 Grant. She
was conunended by the Florida
Department of Juvenile .Justice
for writing the best Title II Grant
submitted in the state of Florida.
Working both grants, she still
made less than Ms. Keenan will
make under the contract she has


written. Mr. Read cut the young
lady back to one grant and less
compensation. I guess it depends
on who you know!
Forget the Grants Department
Director position, the way the
commissioners spun that position
at their last meeting one would be
paid less than half of the Title V
Administrator position and the
responsibilities would far exceed
the Title V administration. Wait
for the Title V Administrator
position if the commissioners are
given the option to renew it. You
could work four hours a day or
run another business. Why work
eight hours for under $30,000 a
year when you can work the same
year for $30,000 working four
hours a day?
* At-the Feb. 5 commission
meeting, Clerk of Court Robert
Hill asked for a half-million dollars
to build a vault for courthouse
files. This was approved.
* On Feb. 10, I called Mr. Hill
and explained to him how shocked
I was to hear about the vault.
I told him the projection for
the new Wakulla Bank was only
$600,000 and that was a complete
building. I asked where he_ got
that figure, he replied "from our
architect."
This money is supposed to
be a request for a courthouse
improvement grant. The leaky,
old malfunctioning courthouse
could use that money. Every
time I go there if it is -winter
they have no heat upstairs, if it is
summer the heat rises and the air
conditioner doesn't perform well
enough to cool upstairs.
" Mr. Hill told me himself the
cellar is full of leaks and there is
no drainage. Do mold spores rise?
Ceiling tiles need to be replaced
in the courtroom, stained from
leaks. Repairs need to be made
throughout.
Yes, I agree we need a new
jail, how about a half-million for
a renovation of the courthouse
and a jail?


Mr. Hill also mentioned the
cellar contained records and
that there were records and files
shoved into every cranny of
the courthouse so what is he
going to do, store old musty
records in a new vault? Records
Swill have to be decontaminated
before they can be stored, how
much will that cost? It won't be
cheap. Records should be put on
computer discs.
I know, you have worked all
day and you think what you have
to say will not make a difference
but just look at politics and
government today. I wonder what
would happen if the majority
of citizens came together, in
dialogue, for the common good?
Would it make a difference? I
believe it would.
Is it going to happen? I don't
think so. It's been a long day and
we're tired.
Maybe tomorrow.
Constance Epperson, Bristol


To the editor:
On Feb. 17 my husband, Wayne
Padgett, had the misfortune of
being involved in an accident on
Hwy. 20 in front of the Apalachee
Restaurant in Bristol. We would
like to take this opportunity to
thank everyone who came to his
aid during this traumatic time.
We know there were several
persons dining in the restaurant
including Sammy Hanna, Rhonda
Lewis and Dale Hobby who were
first on the scene and rendered
assistance and comforted him
until Liberty County EMS arrived.
Paramedic Maria Crump and EMT
Laryus Brown took over and
provided professional care as well
as informing me of the accident
and his condition.
Upon arrival at Calhoun-
Liberty Hospital, he received the
utmost professional care by the
ER doctor, Dr. Galard, and staff
who assessed his injuries and
ordered the necessary tests (X-
Rays) seeing an immediate need
for transfer to Tallahassee.
Special thanks to Linda,
Desiree, Darlene, Beth and Kathy
in the ER and Orville and Cindy
in Radiology for the excellent care
he received. Words cannot express
how much we appreciate everyone
at the hospital for their concern
and words of encouragement.


To those from other departments
and those off-duty who came to
check on me and who worked
for me, I will never forget it. To
Chief Kimbrel, Major Smith,
Officer Fred Tanner and Officer
John Mallory, I don't know how
I would have made it without
your help and encouragement
and assistance in getting me to
Tallahassee.
To my fellow employees at
the police department, thanks for
being with me at the hospital,
working for me and calling and
offering your help and checking
on Wayne's condition.
To our family, especially Amy
who came to be with us, you will
never know how much your love
and support meant to us.
Thanks to everyone for your
prayers, calls and thoughts during
this difficult time. It is comforting
to know that in your time of need,
you can rely on your family,
friends and co-workers to be there
for you.
Because of the excellent care
he received, the injuries were not
as serious as first indicated and he
is now at home recovering. Again,
thanks to everyone who assisted
us in any way during this most
trying time in our lives.
Wayne and Pat Padgett
Marianna


Can't someone agree to disagree and pave road?


To the editor:
I presented the Board of
Liberty County Commissioners
with repair receipts for damage
to my car's right front tire and
rim. This damage was caused
by a large pothole -that was
impossible to miss located on
the Liberty County side of Forest
Road FH-13.
When I appeared before the
board, Mr. L.B. Arnold said it
was a Forest Road and the county
was not responsible..
However, I told them that if it
wasn't their responsibility, why
did they fill in the potholes the
day I called?
I called the Forestry
Department in Wakulla County.
and they said they would stand
behind me, assuring me that this
side of the road was the Liberty
County Road Department's
responsibility.
My concern is what is it going
to take, 'someone to get seriously


KEEP READING! This week's letters section continues on the next page.


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injured-or killed?' before this
problem is resolved.
Wakulla County wants to pave
the road, but can't get Liberty
County to agree to pave at the
same time.


Can't someone agree to
disagree long enough to repair
the road for all taxpayers who
travel that road?
Angela Jackson,
Telogia


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MARCH 1,2006 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 15


Liberty County School Board member explains


process behind effort to get funding for Hosford


To the editor:
This is the first letter I have
ever written to the editor of any
newspaper and I feel this is the
best forum to make a few points
regarding a major issue that
affects our schools, community,
and ultimately, our children.
Our superintendent and
school board have been recently
faced with some very important
issues regarding special facilities
funding through the Florida
Department of Education. Our
.first priority, after much research
and discussion, was the building
needs at Hosford School.
If you are a parent_ of a


--- ~- ---- ------iac >i. ^ -E -" ---------- ~
-:^- ---- -- --- ------ ---



=2 -A


Hosford School student, you
know the problems with the
existing primary (grades K-3)
brick wings on the east side of
the campus. These buildings
are around 45 years old. The
old administrative building is
almost 70 years old. Drainage is
always a problem when it rains,
and state officials have referred


to our library as a "bookroom"
in the old building. Yet, despite
all the building needs at Hosford
School, for the past three years,
Hosford School has been an "A"
school.
Our teachers, students,
parents, and staff are what make
Hosford -School such a high
performing school. K-8 schools
throughout the country are
making a comeback as the best
school configuration.
Our Tolar School, in Bristol,
is no exception. Tolar School
has been an "A" school four
of the last five years.-The K-
8 model for Tolar has proved
to be highly effective for the
students AND parents in Bristol.-
The Tolar School community
is now experiencing what the-


Hosford School community has
experienced since 1962. The K-8
community school model is what
many school districts throughout
the country are moving back to.
In education, so many things
change for the sake of change,
but extensive research has proven
that grades are higher, parental
satisfaction is higher, and student
performance is higher within the
K-8 school model. The Liberty
County School District could be
the poster child for this success.
Way to go, Liberty County!
This past Wednesday, Feb.
22, a delegation from Liberty
County along with our legislative
leaders, Senator Al Lawson, and
Representative Marti Coley,
met with officials from- the
Department of Education to
discuss the denial of Special
Facilities monies for Hosford
School.
The Liberty County delegation
was made up of myself, David
Summers, Dr. John Watson-
LCSB consultant, Gay Lewis,
Jill Davis, Stephanie Maige,
Greg Solomon, Johnny Eubanks,
Robert Hill, Sheriff Revell,
Judge Ken Hosford, Joe Shuler,
and Joe Brown. Our county had
been given information from the
DOE that the Hosford School
project would not be funded,
but possibly money could be


received at LCHS to update and
build new facilities. However,
the DOE proposal would require
the Liberty County School
Board to facilitate a "plan" to
begin moving the middle school
students from Hosford and Tolar
to LCHS starting with the eighth
grade.
But as the officials from DOE
explained the rationale for the
eighth grade movement, the
picture became clear.
It is their view (DOE) that all
the students, countywide, grades
6th through 8th be placed at
LCHS and from the space this
would create at Tolar School,
you could move the remaining
Hosford Students (grades K-5)
to Tolar School, thus eliminating
the need for Hosford School.
The cards were finally
on the table for our Liberty
County delegation to see.
The Department of Education
facilities leadership does not
care for Hosford School. It is my
opinion that if the decision were
up to them, they would close it
tomorrow to better accommodate
numbers.
But we in Liberty County
know better. Those numbers
represent children, "our
children." The educational well
being of our children is not
going to be compromised for the
sake of numbers and Hosford
School is NOT FOR SALE!
Our citizens and your school
leadership cannot be bought, and
the "indecent proposal" from
See MORE LETTERS
continued on page 18


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Reader 'appalled' at actions

of health dept. administrator
To the editor:
I'm a person that comes from having both parents as ministers. I
am deeply appalled that an ordained minister could have the audacity
to hide behind the ministerial cloth, would appear in a public meeting
andc-misconstrue his statements to the County Commissioners and
the public regarding a new doctor covering for the loss of our only
doctor in Liberty County.
The Liberty County Health Department Director (LCHDD) stated
he has the right to hire and fire. He then turns around and says you
have to go online or paper application to the State Department of
Health. The application then has to go to a committee and paperwork
is sent to him and he is forced to pick the most qualified for the
position. He said he has everything to do with the hiring and firing.
But, all the people that have been terminated are from Liberty County
and all the new people that have been hired are from Calhoun County.
Why is this?
The LCHDD said there was no application from Liberty County
residents, which was misconstrued.
County commissioners invited Dr. Sorensen to the Jan. 5 meeting
and she declined. Then she requested a one on one meeting with
each county commissioner. How could this be? The patients were
not allowed to attend because I personally tried to attend and was
rejected. Each county commissioner was asked their position on the
termination of the LCHDD. Two were not swaggered and two were
mislead to no longer to take on the termination of the LCHDD or until
a possibly neverending investigation is over, which has no bearing
of the dismissal of the LCHDD.
The newspaper has portrayed the LCHDD to be an outstanding
citizen and the pillar of the community. As a citizen of Liberty
County there is nothing farther from the truth to make the LCHDD
competent.
Concerned Liberty County patient,
: Michael "Gator" Claik, Hosford


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Page 16 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL MARCH 1,2006


Agriculture
G.-MNESV LLE-If you've
eaten a tomato this winter, chanc-
es are it was grown in Florida.
And those plants decorating your
home and office probably started
life at one of Florida's nurseries.
For those who work in the ag-
;riculture "field," these facts are
recognized. But when you ask
'Florida citizens about the value
of the state's agriculture industry,
most don't have a carrot of an
idea that Florida ranks second
nationally in the production of
fresh vegetables and horticultural
products.
Starting this spring, the Uni-
versity of Florida's Institute of
Food and Agricultural Sciences is
launching a multifaceted Agricul-
ture Awareness Initiative aimed
at educating Florida's 16 million
residents about the importance of
the state's agriculture and natural
resource industries.
"Our goal is to work with
the agriculture community and
media to raise the visibility and
awareness of Florida's diverse
agriculture and natural resource
industry," said Joan Dusky, UF
assistant dean for extension.
"Most Florida citizens don't real-
ize how these industries impact
their everyday life."
"We want them to understand
that the Florida ag industry not
only puts safe, affordable food
on their table, but also provides
a large and stable economic base


awareness initiative targets Florida residents


and environmental benefits,"
Dusky said.
As part of the initiative, David
Mulkey, a professor and associate
chair of UF's food and resource
economics department, and Alan
Hodges, an associate in the de-
partment, are conducting research
to demonstrate the total economic
impact that agriculture and natu-
ral resources have on the state.
"We are looking at all industry
sectors and how they relate to ag-
riculture and natural resources,"
Hodges said. "Our model also
includes economic multipliers
for 'spinoff' economic benefits.
For example, with every ag dollar
generated, there can be up to a
$2.50 return in regional economic
activity."
Hodges said that.nonmarket
benefits such as green space,
watersheds, wildlife habitats and
tourism will also be evaluated.
"About 60 percent of Florida's
land .includes forests," he said.
"One thing we are looking at is
how nature-related tourism helps
support the overall economy."
According to the Florida Agri-
cultural Statistics Service, 43,000
commercial farms cover 10.1
million acres, approximately
one-third of the state's land mass.
Florida leads national production
in citrus, snap beans, fresh-market
tomatoes, cucumbers, squash and
sugarcane. The state ranks second
in the production of greenhouse


LCHS athletes sign with Dothan college
Two Liberty County High School students, David Travis (above)
and Preston Burke (below) each signed Feb. 23 to receive a
full two year baseball scholarship from George Wallace College
in Dothan, AL. Both are shown here with coaches and family
members. ABOVE: Laurel Travis, Coach Matt Chester, Mike
Travis, Coach Tranum McLemore, and Coach Neil Grantham.
Seated are David Travis and Mackey Sasser of George Wallace
College: BELOW: Coach Neil Grantham, Coach Matt Chester,
Tammy Gainey, Coach Tranum McLemore, Teresa and Marc
Burke and former coach, Mike Workman. Seated are Mackey
Sasser of George Wallace College and Preston Burke.


and nursery products, sweet corn,
peppers and strawberries.
To help UF get the message
out, Scott Emerson, former edi-
tor/associate publisher of Citrus
& Vegetable Magazine, has been
hired to help develop and deliver
the initiative's outreach efforts.
Emerson said he plans to work
closely with media, growers,
commodity associations, exten-
sion agents and other industry
organizations.


"There are several ongoing
efforts by the ag community that
are successfully reaching the me-
dia with positive messages about
Florida agriculture," Emerson
said. "We want to complement
and expand these awareness
programs."
Additional Florida Ag Facts:
*Ranks third in watermelon
production
*Ranks fourth in honey sales
*1.74 million cows = $1.2 bil-


lion in livestock/products (meat,
milk/cheese, etc.)
*78.5 million broilers and 11.3
million layers = $326 million in
sales
*$95.5 million in sales from
aquaculture products (tropical
fish, plants, clams)
*82 million forest trees planted
each year
*Other products: tropical fruit,
peanuts, hay, cotton, corn, soy-
beans, tobacco


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MARCH 1,2006 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 17


Nationwide ACT test Apr. 8

for college-bound students;

registration deadline Mar. 3

College-bound high school students can take the
ACT Assessment on April 8, the next nationwide test
date. The registration postmark deadline is March 3.
Late registration postmark deadline is March 17. The
cost is $29 without and $43 with the Writing Test (an
additional $18 fee is required for late registration).
Students can receive registration information from
their high school guidance counselors or they can
register on ACT's website at www.actstudent.org.
The website also features test tips, practice tests,
online test prep, and a database for students to find
out if a prospective college requires a writing score.
ACT scores are accepted by virtually all colleges
and- universities in the nation, including all Ivy
League schools. Scores are used, along with a
student's high school GPA, high school courses
taken, extracurricular activities and other information
to help determine if a student is academically ready
for college-level coursework.
"In April, many juniors take the ACT," said
spokesman Ken Gullette. "When .they get their
scores, they should examine them carefully, talk
with parents and counselors, then get extra help
from tutors or peer helpers and take courses that will
strengthen any academic weaknesses. Students can
retest early in their senior year and then report only
the score they want colleges to see."
The ACT Assessment is an achievement test that
includes four exams; English, reading, math, and
science. Students who take the optional Writing Test
will add 30 minutes to the 3-hour normal testing
time. Most colleges and universities don't require a
writing score, so students should check the writing
test requirements of colleges the 're considering
before registering for the ACT.


-l U ~l _., ,: _.__

Doris Traylor honored for her

commitment to the community
Doris Traylor was recognized for her many years of work as the chairperson of Keep Calhoun
County Beautiful with the presentation of a plaque of appreciation and a certificate honoring
more than a decade of dedication to the community at a recent meeting of the Blountstown
City Council. She is shown above with Blountstown Mayor Winston Deason. Many of the
trees and floral areas that dot the community are the result of her dedication to making the
scenery of Calhoun County a pleasure for both residents and visitors passing through.
JOHNNY EUBANKS PHOTO


Teens & taxes: A stepping stone for financial


PHOENIX. Ariz. The teenage years
are filled with fun and responsibility.
It's about first dates, the first time
behind the wheel and first jobs.
However, all of these "firsts" are
accompanied by one thing money.
That's why it is important for teens to
learn how to save money, use credit
wisely, and yes, pay dues to. Uncle
Sam.
Mike Sullivan, director of education
for Take Charge America, a non-profit
credit counseling company, says
parents should not only teach their
children how to pay taxes, but explain
why it is necessary.
"Paying taxes is a part of proper
money management. It is a life skill
carried well into adulthood," said
Sullivan. "Teens need to know that
taxes pay for government services,
including highways, parks and law


enforcement."
If your teen receives W-2's, 1099's
or other statements of income, he or
she might have to file, but even if filing
isn't required, it is usually a good idea
to file if wages have been withheld. A
refund may be due.
"It's important for teenagers
to become acquainted with taxes
while, their income is low because
as income increases, the tax laws
become increasingly complicated,"
said Sullivan. "Staying out of debt
is a year-round effort. It includes
being responsible for every aspect
for your finances, including taxes, no
matter how minor or complicated they
appear."
Sullivan says there are four things
working teens need to know about

income taxes:
*NUTS AND BOLTS: After


landing a job, you need to fill out a
W-4 form with your employer. At the
beginning of the following year, you
will receive a W-2 form from each
job held. In addition, taxes are taken
out of each paycheck throughout the
year.
TIPS ARE TAXABLE: Many
teens find jobs waiting tables or
delivering food. These jobs are often
low paying because the majority of
income will come from tips. If you
make more than $20 a month, you
must tell your boss so he/she can
withhold the appropriate taxes from
your regular wages.
*USING. A TAX REFUND
WISELY: Federal taxes are taken out
of pay checks throughout the year. If
you file a tax return, a portion, if not
all, of the federal income tax money
can be returned. Teaching your teen
how to use tax refunds wisely is
another money management skill
needed later in life.
*ADJUST YOUR
WITHHOLDING: If you have too
little money taken out of your check
throughout the year, you'll owe the
government money when it is time to
file your taxes. On the other hand, if
too much money is withheld, you'll
get a larger refund. While this sort,


responsibility
of "forced saving "may seem a good
idea, that's money you could have
made better use of throughout the year,
such as saving in an interest-bearing
account. Financial experts say you
should adjust your withholding so
your tax payments match your tax
liability.
About Take Charge America:
Founded in 1987, Take Charge
America, Inc. (TCA) is a non-profit
501(c)(3) organization headquartered
in Phoenix, AZ. TCA is committed
to helping consumers gain control of
their finances and offers a variety of
services including education, budget
and financial counseling, and when
necessary, debt management.
TCA also serves as an effective
resource for the business community.
We help financially distressed
consumers re-organize their finances
and return hundreds of millions
of dollars annually to financial
institutions, professional service
providers, and businesses of all sizes
and descriptions that may otherwise
have been lost to the economy
in bankruptcy. TCA's diversified
programs are utilized by tens of
thousands of families and single men
and women throughout the United
States each year.






Page 18 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL MARCH 1, 2006


DOE will not be accepted.
Your- school board, at a
special meeting last Friday,
voted unanimously to re-submit
the Hosford School Project for
funding.
All of the above information
regarding K-8 success was shared
by our delegation to the DOE.
However, the department's desire
to "consolidate" our schools
was based solely on numbers.
"Critical Need" for new school
construction is defined by Florida
Statute 1013.64 and contains
eight (8) items to consider at a
minimum. The DOE hung their
case on only one of the eight. We
addressed the others in our plea
for "critical need.".We were met


with arrogance and contempt
in our efforts. The lack of
professionalism from the DOE
was appalling, especially in the
presence of our state senator and
state representative.
This is not a Hosford/Bristol
competition. The very, structure
of ALL our schools was asked
to be compromised for the sake
of money. Your superintendent
and board members are listening


Boot camps shouldn't be shut down
To the editor:
I grieve for the teen that died in the juvenile justice boot camp.
That footage that was taken seems to be for the protection of the
teens and the staff alike.
I understand why there was so many staff around the teen, it is
called a show of force and is meant to diffuse a violent situation
to show the perpetrator that resistance is a bad choice. I saw the
father's reaction on television. Why did the father wait so long to
raise a responsible teen that the chore fell upon a judge and boot
camp?
I observed that there are many, even as far away as Miami wanting
to shut down that boot camp and all others like it. That's not a good
choice either. The alternative if you close the juvenile justice system
is prison. There they can really learn the ropes from the pro's. Of
course, I recall seeing an advertisement once that said, "for sale,
brand new in sealed box, complete set of encyclopedias. Teenager
already knows everything!" I would almost wager that all of us had
the same attitude when we were teens.
Just not long ago, another black student died from physical drill
about the same as the teens in boot camp undergo. You know I didn't
hear not one protest, no one" suggested that the institution be closed
and all of the programs like it. This black person was an athlete,
a football player at FSU. I don't quite understand why one death
brings out the protests yet another death very similar almost goes
unnoticed
If we live our life with respect for the other person and we teach
our children t6 respect both themselves and their neighbors and how
to be responsible, we may not need boot camps and prisons.
Drugs, alcohol and violence are the trademark of gangs..Stealing,
fighting and putting fear into peace loving people is their way of
having fun. Use of prQfanity as. an expression among young people
shows a lak' of respect for others' and for themselves. When \\ill
we ever learn? Sex and violence fills the. air from television shows
and music, and it is testing the constitutional rights, but what do our
youth learn from it! What are we going to have to look forward to
when these are the people running the country, making the laws and
the decisions under those influences?
I've, got one very good idea. Gather all the gang members up send
them to Iraq, Iran, Pakistan and let them find the terrorists. When
you. get right down to it, the gang members are the terrorists of the
U.S.A. Why not fight terror with terror? Certainly it would rid the
world of some bad apples.
I remember that in. the .sixties when someone got into enough
trouble to go to prison some judges gave a choice the military or
prison. You know I think the military changed a lot of people gave
them responsibility and a respect for themselves and others.
I believe that if we change the way children are raised, keep the
drugs and trashy language out of our lives and teach our kids to be
respectful, we wouldn't need boot camps and so many prisons.
Also, that man that raped and killed the eleven-year-old girl now
seeks to get out of the death penalty. Wrong!-The question in my
mind is, "how many did he rape before he got caught?"
Mike Bailes, Altha


Time to tune up your
boat and get
ready togo!

BLOUNTSTOWN
SMALL ENGINE, INC.
Mercury Outboards "
:1.6766 SW Chipola Road,:
Blountstown Phone 674-55%6.


to you. If the state refuses the
Hosford project again, we will
resubmit it next year. Next year,
there will be a new governor,
new cabinet, and new leadership
at the DOE. The people we met
with on Wednesday from DOE
will be gone after the election
this fall. My prayer is that they-
will be replaced with competent,
compassionate leadership who
will have as their motto, "How
can I help you?"
Here is where we need your
help. Please contact your local
leadership.and say, "I support
the Hosford School Project."
Our state representative is
Marti Coley (850) 488-2873, our
state senator is Al Lawson (850)
487-5004, and two members of
the DOE committee who will
accept or reject the Hosford
School Project are Alex Carswell
(850) 245-9239, email Alex.
Carswell@fldoe.org and Dwight.


Hyle (850) 245-9300, email
- Dwight.Hyle@fidoe.org. We


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A message from the Florida Department
of Agriculture and Consumer Services,
Division of Forestry, the University of
-'-'Flornda/IFAS, and the USDA Forest Service.


Need a Mortgage?

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Purchasc/Refinance
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need you to get busy this week
by calling and mailing these
people.
Please help your leadership
and our children by letting your
voice be heard.
Sincerely in Christ,
Kyle Peddie
Liberty County
School Board, Chairman


r.


-






MARCH 1,2006 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 19






"K : =Chipola Arts Association awards mini-grants


WASTE MANAGEMENT HELPS CHIPOLA -
Waste Management, Inc., recently donated $10,000 as
corporate sponsor of the Men's and Women's FCCAA
Basketball Tournament at Chipola College on March 8-
11. Pictured from left, are: Chipola president Dr. Gene
Prough, and Waste Management officials Achaya
Kelapanda and Kevin Hinson. CHIPOLA PHOTO


MARIANNA-The Chipola
Regional Arts Association-made
up of volunteers who support
and encourage arts education-
recently awarded 13 mini-
grants for the Improvement of
Instruction in the Arts in Schools
in the Chipola College District.
CRAA President Dr. Jerry
Kandzer announced the following
local recipients:
*Blountstown High Linda
Adams won a grant to purchase
choral music to increase the
students' knowledge of choral
repertoire.
*Liberty County High -
Mandie Fowler was awarded
a grant to purchase fabrics for
costumes to be used in their


spring production of "Chateau
La Roach" and to reuse in next
year's production.
*Marianna High Philip
Crawford won a grant to expand
the library's music collection
with medieval, classical and pop.
*Marianna Middle- Melodye
McPherson was awarded a grant
to purchase music for their Spring
2006 concert.
*W.R. Tolar School-Kristina
Mondelli was awarded a grant to
purchase percussion instruments
to enhance students' performance
of middle school band literature.
CRAA members hope to
continue to offer grants each year
to encourage continuation and
improvement of arts programs


and activities in the schools.
Additionally, CRAA offers
Chipola scholarships to talented
students in Calhoun, Holmes,
Jackson, Liberty and Washington
Counties. The group supports
the Chipola Artist Series and
underwrites special cultural
programs for school children from
the five-county area. Funding for
these many projects comes from
public fund-raising efforts in the
five-county district.
CRAA will begin its annual
fund-raising campaign in
February. CRRA president Dr.
Jerry Kandzer invites everyone to
consider CRAA in their charitable
contribution plans. For more
information, call 718-2301.


Scholarship established in memory of Grand Ridge student


MARIANNA-The Areall
Winget Memorial Scholarship
has been established at Chipola
College:
Areall was a senior at Grand
Ridge High School when she
was killed in an automobile
accident in December of 2005.
Areall's parents Bill and
Donna Brown established
the scholarship which will be
awarded in May to a member of


the 2006 Class at Grand Ridge
High.
Applicants majoring in a
computer field-academic or
workforce development-will
receive first consideration for the
scholarship. Nursing majors will
receive second consideration.
Recipients must maintain a 2.5
GPA each semester at Chipola
College.
Applications should be


submitted to the Guidance
Counselor at Grand Ridge High
School.
Anyone wishing to make a
donation to the scholarship fund
may mail a. check to: Chipola
College Foundation, 3094
Indian Circle, Marianna, FL
32446 and indicate that the funds
are designated for the Winget
Scholarship.


Chipola Phi Theta Kappa wins Regional Awards


Get quality business insurance
at a competitive price,
Catl me today.
(850) 526-2799


Jon Johnson LUTCF, CLTC
2867 CALEDONIA ST
MARIANNA
RUSTYJOHNSON@allIate.com


MARIANNA-Chipola
College's chapter of Phi Theta
Kappa, Nu Chi, captured five
distinguished regional awards, at
the recent regional conference in
West Palm Beach.
Chipola won the following
awards: Chapter Participation,
Five Star Chapter, Leadership


Hallmark, Scholarship Hallmark,
Fellowship Hallmark, and
Regional Distinguished Chapter.
Awards are based onprojects on
.the campus and in the community
throughout the 2004-05 school
year. Cliipola also was elected
to serve as the Regional Awards
Chapter for the upcoming year.


Chipola students who attended
the convention were: Michelle
Rhynes, Val Jones, Kimberly
Garske, Andrea Rogers, Buddy
Clark, Chip Norris, Nathan Day,
Timothy Kleiser, Sean Musgrove
and TJ Walker. Chipola PTK
advisors are Joan Lasseter and
Pam Rentz.


AIIstate
You m in g a hon.;:


Irl: W im ., UtIEI LrI 3.x6 irf~~, ara *4uaII. 31rrAli i m6 ii4 b ,m .-..rr py3ro f1Ali:iji. F'o~'erri3rd jC ;3Iiwy
I r-. C ~raorrht.,rorIII ..l Ihr 1o, 1 1 All I.: II I.: iur3nr.d C :rn mt.


FSU/PC offers transfer scholarships for five students


MARIANNA-The Florida
State University Panama
City Campus will award five
scholarships to Chipola College
students who complete their AA
degree and transfer directly to
the Panama City Campus.
The "Transfer Student
Scholarship" is awarded each
year in April to five students who
have demonstrated outstanding
academic performance and
reflect academic promise.
Interested Chipola students
must meet the following criteria:


a 3.5 (or better) GPA; an AA
degree from Chipola; and apply
and be admitted to FSU Panama
City by April 1.
Questions about the
scholarship should be directed
to Renee' Green, Director,


Office of Admissions & Records
at FSU Panama City at (850)
522-2001, or Angie White, FSU
Program Coordinator, Chipola
University Center at (850) 718-
2419, or email: awhite@pc.fsu.
edu.


Chipola Arts Scholarships available


MARIANNA-Audition
dates for music and theatre
scholarships at Chipola College
for 2006-2007 are March 9,
April 6, and May 4. The Visual
Art Scholarship application and


STATE CHAPIOSiTil I RIAIIANT
"March Madness in Marianna"
FCCAA State JUCO Basketball Tournament
Milton H. Johnson Health Center

Chipola College

March 8-11, 2006
March 8, 9 and 10 at 2 p.m., 4 p.m., 6:30 p.m. and 8:30 p.m.
Finals on March 11 Men at 5 p.m. and Women at 7:30 p.m.
Phone: $50-718-2370 Website: wwwv.chipola.edu
This ad .povnsored by J.ackon Count. Tour.st Developmnent Council.


portfolio deadline is April 20.
High School graduates with
acceptable academic records
and aptitude who plan to pursue
studies as music, theatre or art
majors are eligible to apply.
Scholarships in various
amounts, up to full tuition and
fees, are awarded on the basis
of talent and academic record.
Students with financial need
may seek additional assistance
through the college's Office of
Financial Aid and the Chipola
Foundation.
Applications may be obtained
by phoning Chipola's Fine and
Performing Arts Department
at 718-2277. Applications also
are available at www.chipola.
edu. Choose "Departments" and
*click on "Fine and Performing
Arts."


I






Page 20 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL MARCH 1,2006


BHS welcomes back Coach Greg Jordan


WELCOME BACK COACH
by Kayla Parrish
The students and faculty at
Blountstown High School are
very proud to welcome back
Coach Greg Jordan. Coach
Jordan, who is a 1987 graduate
of BHS, played football for t
BHS and also been assistant
football coach for eight years
here. Last year he left to become
the head coach at Wewa High.
After receiving an offer to be
head coach at his former school,
Coach Jordan decided to return
back to BHS, the school he loves
so much. Coach Jordan's favor-
ite part about coaching football
is watching the young men work
together and depend on one an-
other. He would like to continue
coaching as long-as he feels he's
accomplishing his goals and fin-
ish his career at BHS. His wife,
Amy, who has also taught in the
Calhoun County School System


B-TOWN HIGH SCHOOL TIGER TRACK EVENTS
I March 2 FCAT test- reading and math NRT, grades
9-10; Baseball against R.F. Munroe in Quincy, 4 p.m.;
I Baseball against West Gadsden, home, 5 p.m.
March 3 FCAT; Herff Jones meets at 8 A.M.
I March 6 Science FCAT for juniors
March 6-10 Yearbook Sales, $30 each!
I March 7 Baseball against Apalachicola, home,
4 p.m.
I..L.- _


for many years, and sons Hunter
and Tucker, will be joining him
here.
Everyone at BHS welcomes
the Jordan's home!
CHORUS NEWS
by Linda Adams
Several BHS Chorus students
participated in the Florida Vo-
cal Association Solo-Ensemble
Festival on Saturday, Feb. 18 in
Panama City Beach. In the Vo-
cal Solo Category Michael Guil-
ford and Adam Richards made a
superior rating (1) which quali-


fies them for State Festival. T.J.
Aycock, Aubrey Clemons, and
Jessica Metcalf made an excel-
lent rating (2).
SENIOR NEWS
Herff Jones will be at BHS
on March 3 to deliver ordered
graduation items. Seniors need
to have their balance ready to
pay at that time.
Any senior interested in or-
dering signature shirts needs to
see Mrs. Johnson by March 3.
The cost is nine dollars, and siz-
es range from small to 3X.


Students compete in Solo-Ensemble Festival


SOLO/ENSEMBLE
FESTIVAL
by Patricia Williams
The music was in full swing at
Gulf Breeze Church in Panama
City on Feb. 18. Tiffany Betts,
John.Baumer, Sarah Shelton and
Audrey Brown made the trip to
Panama City to show off their
performance skills.
Tiffany Betts performed a
piano solo playing "Fur Elise".
and "Solfeggio." Tiffany
received a superior rating.
Sarah Shelton performed a
vocalsoloandsang"Shenandoah"
and "Du, Du." She also received
a superior rating.
John Baumer received a
superior rating for his solos,
"Aura Lee" and "Ave Maria".
Junior, Audrey Brown,


r


ALTHA WILDCATS SCHOOL CALENDAR
March 3 Softball away (Liberty County) at 4:30 p.m.
March 6 thru March 10 FCAT Reading/Math/Science
(Grades 3-10)
March 10 End of third nine weeks; |
Family Breakfast
-- - - - - I


performed "Billy Boy" and
"Simple Gifts" to receive a rating
of excellent.-
Tiffany, Sarah, and John
can now continue on to State
Competition later on this school
year.
SENIOR BETA TRIP
by Jessica Smith
On Feb. 16, the Altha Chapter
of Senior Beta traveled to
Marianna High School for its
annual spring meeting. While
at the meeting, Graceville High


', -_---.-- -.. ........... ......






Adult school graduates announced
Congratulations to the following individuals who earned their
high school diplomas from July through December, 2005 through
the Liberty County Adult Education and Even Start Center: Kimberly
Johns, Martha Redding, Nancy M. Miles, Angela G. Jackson, Bobby
Reddick, Dawn Reisoglu.
The Liberty County Adult Education and Even Start Center offers
a variety of services. An individual may receive assistance in GED
preparation, adult basic literacy, family literacy, high school credit,
FCAT instruction, ESOL tutoring, and course credit for dual enroll-
ment. Career awareness and assistance in completing college and
job applications are also provided.
For qualifying adults we pay for testing, materials, and childcare.
If you are nterestediin participating, in niy of the programs we offei
contact Meussa Ml.za at 643-275, ex 239 .


SCHOOL MENU
Liberty
County Schools
March 2 March 8, 2006
A variety of fruits and
vegetables or fruit juice and a
choice of Iowfat or whole milk
served with all meals.
THURSDAY
Breakfast. Chilled fruit, cheese
grits, cinnamon crunch coffee-
cake.
Lunch: Fried chicken, mashed
potatoes with gravy, broccoli and
cheese, corn bread.

FRIDAY
Breakfast Pineapple tidbits,
ready-to-eat cereal, peanut but-
ter toast.
Lunch: Hot dogs on buns, maca-
roni and cheese, cole slaw, French
fries with catsup.

MONDAY
Breakfast Chilled peaches, ham
I slice, pancakes with syrup.
Lunch: Ham and cheese sand-
wich, lettuce, tomato, potato
rounds with catsup, oatmeal
cookies.

TUESDAY I
Breakfast Chilled apricots, cheese
sticks, banana nut bread.
Lunch: Beef-a-roni, garden peas,
orange sections, yeast rolls.

WEDNESDAY
Breakfast: Chilled pineapple
tidbits, scrambled eggs, toast
with jelly.
Lunch: Pizza, green beans, or-
ange wedges, Jell-O.

All menus are subject to change
SPONSORED BY:
Laban Bontrager, DMD
Bristol, Phone 643-5417
L -------------- J


School show choir provided
lively entertainment.
Of Altha's 43 Senior Beta
Members 39 attended the spring
meeting. Four of our members
competed in the Beta Bowl.
The partipants were Ryan Wells,
junior; Cory McAlpin, junior;
Anna Nichols, senior; and
Brandon Dysard, senior.
Also at this meeting, our new
district officers were elected.
On the way home we stopped at
Pizza Hut to have lunch.



Lawrence


Anifma[f


Jerry C. Lawrence, DVM
Emergencies:
(850) 856-5827 or (850) 856-59f8
Hours:
Mon.-Wed.-Thurs. 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Tues. and Fri. 7 a.m. to 5 p.m.
DOCTOR'S HOURS BY APPOINTMENT.
We provide: Boarding
Grooming Pet Pickup/Delivery
Pet Foods/Supplies
Preventive Healthcare Programs
plus many more services.
WE ARE ALSO PLEASED TO OFFER A
SPECIAL PREVENTIVE SPAY/NEUTER
PROGRAM TO HELP REDUCE UNWANTED
PUPPIES AND KITTENS.
43 Nd Cle elnd Street in uincy'
OFFICE (850) 627-8338


SCHOOL MENU
Calhoun

County Schools

March 2- March 8,2006

Lowfat or whole
milk served with all meals

THURSDAY
Lunch: Hamburger patty with
gravy, steamed rice, baby green
limas, fruit cup, corn bread.

FRIDAY
Lunch: Pizzawith cheese, French-
fried potatoes, corn on the cob,
fresh fruit.


M
Lunch: Fis
grits, green
corn bread.

TL


ONDAY
h portions, cheese
i beans, fresh fruit,


JESDAY


Lunch: Beef vegetable soup,
peanut butter sandwich, crackers,
fruit cup, cookie.

WEDNESDAY
Lunch: Chicken nuggets, maca-
roni with cheese, English peas,
fresh fruit.


All menus are subject to change
SPONSORED BY:
I Calhoun-Liberty Journal
Bristol, Phone 643-3333
L --------J


k o ing if o ulf rh I. ,II





MARCH 1,2006 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 21


Poll by The Florida Bar shows need for more civic education


TALLAHASSEE Ninety
percent or more of Florida adult
residents say the constitutional
concepts of separation of
powers and checks and balances
are important principles in the
federal government, according
to a new poll conducted by
Harris InteractiveA for The
Florida Bar.
But when asked "What are the
three branches of government?"
only 59 percent of the Florida
adults surveyed chose the correct
answer: legislative, executive
and judicial. The second most
frequent answer was "local,
state and federal" (18 percent),
followed by "Republican,
Democrat and Independent" (16
percent). Questions about the
meaning of the terms "separation
of powers" and "checks and
balances" also yielded low
percentages of correct answers
(46 percent and 61 percent
respectively).
The results of the Florida
poll ((Document link: Database
'TFB homepage', View 'Nbasic
view', Document 'FLORIDA
BAR POLL QUESTIONS')see
poll questions) are similar to
those of a national poll that


asked the same questions done
by the American Bar Association
in July 2005. The national poll
report is available at www.
abaconstitution.org.
"After seeing the national
results, The Florida Bar became
very concerned about our own
citizens" knowledge of these vital
principles of democracy, Alan
B. Bookman, President of The
Florida Bar, said. "We discovered
that Floridians score an A on
recognizing the importance of
the constitutional concepts, but
get an F on defining separation of
powers and checks and balances,
and a D on identifying the three
government branches."
TheAmerican BarAssociation
came to the same conclusion
after conducting its poll that
the majority of Americans could
use a civics refresher course.
With this report card in hand,
The Florida Bar is setting out
to advocate for more public
awareness and education
on civics. For example, the
organization will use its
statewide Speakers Bureau
and its Citizens Forum, a non-
lawyer advisory group, to go out
to civic and community groups


with presentations on civics.
Throughout the state, local bar
associations will support many
community-based educational
activities, particularly during
.national Law Week in May which
is themed "Liberty Under Law:
Separate Branches, Balanced
Powers." In addition, the Bar
is asking the media to become
involved. in civic education,
especially in coverage leading
up to the 2006 elections.
At the same time, The Florida
Bar is targeting a revitalization
of civic education for the state's
youth.
"As we questioned the civic
knowledge of adults, we also
looked at the state of civic
education in Florida. Although
civic education has historically
been a primary mission of
American public education, it
appears that this commitment is
fading," Bookman said.
According to the Florida Law
Related Education Association,
less-than 10 percent of Florida's
67 counties require the teaching
of civics in middle school. High
school students are required
only to take a one semester
government course, usually in


INTEGRAS THERAPY


is now offering massage therapy
Joe. Teresa Bailey specializes in
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in Blountstown and Port St.
deep soft tissue massage.

f Therapeutic Massage
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the senior year, but law-related
education experts say that
requirement is too little, too
late.
Bookman said that the Bar is
concerned about giving young
people the knowledge they
need to value and participate in
democracy. "We'd like to see
100 percent of Florida middle
schools providing a mandatory
yearlong course in applied
civics," Bookman said.
"As we speak to adults and
the media about civics and civic
education, we are asking that they
assess their own school districts'
civics offerings and talk to local
superintendents and school
boards about providing required
yearlong civics courses," he
added.
The Florida Law Related
Education Association created
the Florida Civic Alliance to
promote civic education in
Florida's K-12 public school
system through a broad-based
plan addressing curriculum
reform, state and local policy,
public awareness and coalition
building. A complete middle
school course has been developed
for local districts, based on
Miami-Dade's required civics
course, and Palm Beach County
adopted and implemented that
curriculum in the 2005-6 school
year according to the law related
education association.
The bottom line for The
Florida Bar is that if citizens
don't understand what makes
democracy work, they are just
as likely not to understand the
essential components of an
independent judiciary that the
judiciary be fair and impartial.
"America's enduring strength
flows from our Constitution and
its mandate that there be three
separate but equal branches of
government. We must educate
the public and remind them that
without a strong and vibrant
rule of law, our democracy will


simply cease to exist," Bookman
said.
Harris Interactive conducted
a telephone survey on behalf of
The Florida Bar between Dec.
27 and 29, 2005, among 400
adults from Florida aged 18 and
over. Figures for age, sex, race,
education, number of adults and
number of voice/telephone lines
in the household were weighted
where necessary to align them
with their actual proportions in
the population. In theory, with a
probability. sample of this size,
one could say with 95 percent
certainty that the results have a
sampling error of plus or minus
five percentage points of what
they would be if the entire Florida
adult population had been polled
with complete accuracy.
The Florida Bar is the
statewide professional and
regulatory organization for all
lawyers licensed to practice in
Florida.
About Harris Interactive:
Harris Interactive Inc. (www.
harrisinteractive.com), based
in Rochester, New York, is the
13th largest and the fastest-
growing market research firm in
the world, most widely known
for The Harris Poll and for its
pioneering leadership in the
online market research industry.
Long recognized by its clients for
delivering insights that enable
confident business decisions,
the Company blends the science
of innovative research with the
art of strategic consulting to
deliver knowledge that leads to
measurable and enduring value.
Harris Interactive serves
clients worldwide through its
United States, Europe (www.
harrisinteractive.com/europe)
and Asia offices, its wholly-
owned subsidiary Novatris in
Paris, France (www.novatris.
com), andthrough an independent
global network of affiliate market
research companies.


... .. .


For the best
food on
either side
of the river,
come dine
with us
tonight!


Fee


Restaurant

... Hwy..20, .Bristol 643-2264






Page 22 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL MARCH 1,2006

7- --: = Yr4. -


FAMILY SUPPORT WORKER

Full-time position providing intensive in-home parent sup-
port services through the Healthy Families program. Posi-
tion requires travel in Calhoun, Jackson and surrounding
counties. Qualifications require high school diploma and
minimum one-year professional experience in a human
services field serving children and their families.

Apply at Habilitative Services, 4440 Putnam, St. Marianna.
Application deadline 5 p.m. March 6, 2006.

Position sponsored by Habilitative Services of North Florida,
Healthy Families Florida, and the Department of Children
and Families.
EEO

Fax your JOB MARKET advertisements to us
at 643-3334, or email to: thejournal@gtcom.net


Snelgrove
Surveying
& Mapping Inc.
currently taking
applications for
CADD Draftsman.
Contact us at
(850) 526-3991.
2-22.3-1


Electricians/
Apprentices
NEEDED
House wiring experience,
driver's license required.
Benefit package.
Tallahassee area.
Call (850) 562-1817
DFWP/ER-O001977 ,.,,1










Needed:
Diesel Mechanic
with tools, transportation
and CDL license.


These positions are members of [he leadership team and will be key
contibutors in the achievement of operational goatl with respea to
productivity and quality. We ar eek.ing u ceate a mill with world-dass
technology In a hlghiv-effective, high-perfmance people envimnment.
The ideal candiddle' will be innovative, flexible, results-oriented and
dedicated to our commitment of participative management and high-
functioningteams. MuIr por work experience in an industrial
setting and have demonstrated success in a supervisory and/or
leadership role. Eipenie in fort piKrduct or engineered wood p ild. 1
preferred Strong communication, leadership, interpersonal and
mmputer skils ame ritialfor success.
Martco Limited Parmnrship ffenrs wmp ei i.iarinend a cLcompren'.lw
beniefrits pji:ke Thr hi, ,r ,i'ellnl ,ppr,,rtijrit.' s -a leader in th'
deveplopnni faart-up mil
rke Mim rrfiurmB rtrt iolatj hii tPrtielw '

Limited Partnership


Martco Limited Partnership- Oakdale OSB
ATTN: Production Team Leader Opening
P.O.Box 1177.-Oakdale, LA 71463
Fax: 318-215-9934 jobs manado.omm
wwwjnartco.com


Marco imI~ 9~ite atneship


Martco


Call (850) 627-4224
A DRUG FREE WORKPLACE


One Stop Career Center
16908 NE Pear St. Sute 2,
Blounistown Phone (850) 674-5088
The following positions are
available: Highway Main-
tenance Worker, Clerical
Worker, Cashier, Stock Clerk,
Supervisor Food Service,
Dietetic Tech., Truck Driver,
Maintenance Worker.
EOE
Service Chipola Workforce.Board UFN





Looking for good
people who want
to make a career
change. Applicants
will be cross
trained in:
*Equipment Operation
and Maintenance
*General Labor
and Metal Sorting

Apply in person at:
1351 Aenon Church Rd.
off Hwy. 20, Tallahassee
Drug-Free Workplace
EOE .3-9


PHYSICAL THERAPIST

We're destined for distinction and so are you!. Share in
our great fortune and join our team at Tallahassee Me-
morial HealthCare! We are a 770-bed, not-for-profit hos-
pital and comprehensive system including eight clinical
service lines: Heart & Vascular, Orthopedic and Neuro-
logical, Women and Children, Medicine, Cancer, Emer-
gency Behavioral Health and Surgery. We have a vision
to be recognized as a world-class community health care
system and we are committed to providing outstanding
services.

Our continuum includes acute, sub-acute, HHC and out-
patient settings as well as affiliations with Family Practice
Residency, PT programs and FSU College of Medicine.
Experience a patient-centered team approach and work
closely with OTs, SLPs, Music and Rec Therapists.

Florida licensure or eligibility is required. Weekend rota-
tion required. Experience with orthopedic and neurologi-
cal patients preferred.

***$3,000 SIGN-ON BONUS
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Excellent compensation and
market competitive benefits.

Apply online at www.tmh.org

Proud to be a Drug Free-Workplace/EOE .
:, ,.,, udtobe Fee. :--. '.


JOB VACANCY
Emergency Medical Technician (E.M.T.)/Paramedic
Minimum Qualifications:
1) Licensure as an Emergency Medical Technician in
accordance with F.S. 401
2) EVOK Certification required
3)Current C.P.R. Card
Experience Preferred
Application Deadline: March 3, 2006
To apply, submit a county application to:
Liberty County Emergency Medical Services
BEN GUTHRIE, DIRECTOR
P.O. Box 399, Bristol, FL ,32321
Phone: 643-5866 or 566-9347 (cell)


CHIPOLA COLLEGE
...is now accepting applications for part-time, temporary
CUSTODIAN. No benefits are available with this position.


Includes a variety of industrial cleaning duties to ensure
all college facilities are kept in an orderly state. Includes,
but is not limited to, cleaning all entry ways, exterior
trash cans and ashtrays, wet mopping all hard floor
surfaces, vacuuming all carpeted areas, cleaning in-
terior stairwells and dusting all interior surfaces (high
and low) including hallways, classrooms, and. offic-
es. MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS: High school diploma
or equivalent; or up to one month related experience or
training; or equivalent combination of education and ex-
perience.

APPLICATION DEADLINE: OPEN UNTIL FILLED

CHIPOLA COLLEGE, Human Resources Office,
3094 Indian Circle, Marianna, FL 32446

AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY INSTITUTION


THE PRINTING HOUSE, INC.
has immediate openings for the following positions:

TECH SUPPORT TECHNICIAN 1 year experience, pro-
ficiency in PC/Mac hardware repairs, Windows and Mac
installation and troubleshooting, and Microsoft Office

PREFLIGHT COORDINATOR 3 years experience in
Graphics/Prepress, knowledge of Flightcheck, Quark, Pho-
toShop, Indesign, and Illustrator.

INDUSTRIAL MAINTENANCE TECHNICIAN / MACHIN-
IST 3-5 years experience in electrical and mechanical
maintenance. Technical degree and welding experience a
plus.

TECHNICAL TRAINER 2-3 years experience with Mac
and Windows operating systems, desktop publishing soft-
ware including font management software, Quark XPress,
Adobe Illustrator, Adobe PhotoShop, Adobe InDesign,
PageMaker, Extensis Suitcase and FlightCheck. Previous
help desk experience preferred.

IMPOSER PC/Mac literate and PrePress experience
preferred. Use of prep software a plus.

BINDERY/FINISHING HELPERS AND JOGGERS will
train, no experience required.

Submit resume to recruiter@theprintinghouse.com, or mail
to 1066 Strong Road, Quincy, FL 32351, or fax to 850-875-
4421. Applications accepted daily from 8-5. We offer an
excellent compensation and benefits package. For addi-
tional information call 800-277-7687.

, EOE/DFWP


Now hieng
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sblt-up 058
mmdiwrfadurmitly in
Oakdale, Louhisan.


c~c--,----- -----~--~.C~~p-CFI--~ C


.i-


Jn :, .',, ,,n *, V ", I"-
















IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SEC-
OND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
LIBERTY COUNTY, FLORIDA

CASE NO. 02-20-GA

IN RE: GUARDIANSHIP OF

SANK LEWIS

Incapacitated
/

NOTICE

PLEASETAKE NOTICE thaton March 21,
2005, there was placed on deposit in this
office funds received from the Office of
Public Guardian as Guardian of Sank Lewis
in the amount of $235.81. Said funds are
all of the assets due to the heirs of Sank
Lewis and said assets remain unclaimed.
Some of the interested parties may be:

Unknown

Unless said funds are claimed on or be-
fore six (6) months from the date of first
publication of this notice, said funds will be
forwarded to the State of Florida, Pursuant
to Florida Statutes 744.534.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have set my
hand and official seal at Bristol, Florida,
on Feb. 15, 2006.

Robert Hill,
Clerk of Circuit Court, Liberty County
Jena Rogers, Deputy Clerk 2-22T 4.12

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SEC-
OND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
LIBERTY COUNTY, FLORIDA

CASE NO. 89-08--CP-02

IN RE: GUARDIANSHIP OF

ALICE ALBRITLE -

Incapacitated
/


NOTICE

PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that on Aug.
8, 2002, there was placed on deposit in
this office funds received from the Office
of Public Guardian as Guardian of Alice
Albritle in the amount of $300.44. Said
funds are all of the assets due to the heirs
of Alice albritle and said assets remain
unclaimed. Some of the interested par-
ties may be:

Judy Broglin
208 E. Mowhawk Avenue
Tampa, Florida 33604

Ollie Brown
Unknown -

Sarah Renflow .
P.O. Box 1165
Riverview, 'Florida 33569

Earl Summeralls
Unknown

Unless said funds are claimed on or be-
fore six (6) months from the date of first
publication of this notice, said funds will be
forwarded to the State of Florida, Pursuant
to Florida Statutes 744.534.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have set my
hand and official seal at Bristol, Florida,
on Feb. 15, 2006.

Robert Hill,
Clerk of Circuit Court, Liberty County
Jena Rogers, Deputy Clerk 2-22T.4-12

NOTICE-TO BiD


manual transfer switch.

Sealed bidsshould be clearly marked "BID
FOR ELECTRICAL UPGRADES" and
should be submitted to: City of Bristol,
P.O. Box 207, 12444 NW Virginia G.
Weaver St., Bristol, FL 32321, no later
than 5 p.m. (ET) on March 6, 2006.

Sealed bids will be opened and read aloud
that same night, March 6, 2006 at 6:30
p.m. at City Hall, 12444 NW Virginia G.
Weaver St., Bristol, FL during the regular
City Council Meeting.

For further information, please contact
Michael Wahlquist, Wastewater Operator
at (850) 643-7272. 2.22,3.1


REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS
FOR FOOD SERVICE
MANAGEMENT SERVICES

Public notice is hereby given that propos-
als will be received by the Liberty County,
Florida Board of Education for FOOD
SERVICE MANAGEMENTSERVICESfor
the.School District until 2_p.m. local time
on April 13. 2006. At this time proposals
will be received in the administrative of-
fices located at Hwy. 12 South, Bristol,
Florida. For. information regarding this
Request for Proposal interested firms
should contact:


Shelia D. Shelton
Director of Special Programs
School Board of Liberty County
Office: 850: 643-2275


3-1 T. 315


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SEC-.
OND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
LIBERTY COUNTY, FLORIDA

GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION

CASE NO. 05-186-CA

BANK OF NEW YORK AS TRUSTEE
FOR THE CERTIFICATE HOLDERS OF
CWABS 2004-BC1

PLAINTIFF

VS.

DONALD J. CARMAN, IF LIVING,AND IF
DEAD,THEUNKNOWNSPOUSE, HEIRS,
DEVISEES, GRANTEES; ASSIGNEES,
LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES
ANDALLOTHER PARTIESCLAIMINGAN
INTEREST BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR
AGAINST DONALD J. CARMAN; TRACY
L. CARMAN, IF LIVING, AND IF DEAD,
THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE, HEIRS,
DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES,
LIENORS, .CREDITORS, TRUSTEES
AND ALL OTHER PARTIES CLAIMING
AN INTEREST BY, THROUGH, UNDER
ORAGAINSTTRACY L. CARMAN; JOHN
DOE AND JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN
TENANTS IN POSSESSION.

DEFENDANTS)
/


NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuantto a
Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure
dated Feb..23, 2006 entered in Civil Case
No. 05-186-CA of the Circuit Court of the
2nd Judicial Circuit in and for LIBERTY
County, BRISTOL, Florida, I will sell to
the highest and best bidder for cash at
FRONT DOOR at the LIBERTY County
Courthouse located at HIGHWAY 20 in
BRISTOL, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the
28th day of March, 2006 the following
described property as set forth in said
Summary Final Judgment, to wit:


COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST
THECITYOFBRISTOLwill receivesealed CORNER OFTHE SOUTHEAST 1/4
bids for electrical work to be done on the OF SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF SECTION
city's seven lift stations, which includes all 13 TOWNSHIP 1 SOUTH, RANGE 8
partsand labor.Thisworkwill becompleted WEST, LIBERTY COUNTY, FLORIDA,
and paid for at the rate of one lift station AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 660.00
each month. Accordingly, this is a seven FEET,TOACONCRETEMONUMENT
(7) month project. MARKING THE NORTHEAST COR-
NER OFTHE SOUTH HALF OFTHE
The City'slift stations consist of one (1) lift SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE
station that is three phase and six (6) lift SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SAID
stationsthataresinglephase.The6single SECTION- 13,THENCE RUN NORTH
phase lift stations require an electrical 89 DEGREES 50 MINUTES 16 SEC-
upgrade that will enable them to hook-up ONDS WEST 340.00 FEET,THENCE
to a portable.generator and.must include RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 47
a manual transfer switch on each. The MINUTES 39 SECONDS EAST 8.72
3 phase lift station requires an electrical FEETTO A POINT ON THE NORTH-
upgrade that will enable it to hook to a ERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY
stationary generator and must include a ".,
** *.-gnr ator.,..f ...-..<...o-...r.f*<*'.*

OF COUNTY ROAD NO 12-A, SAID
POINT LYING ON A CURVE CON-
CAVETOTHE SOUTHERLY FORTHE
POINT OF BEGINNING FROM SAID
POINT OF BEGINNING, THENCE
RUN NORTHWESTERLY ALONG
SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY
AND ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A
RADIUS OF 1693.64 FEET THRU A
CENTRAL ANGLE OF 03 DEGREE
02 MINUTES 14 SECONDS FOR AN
ARC DISTANCE OF 89.78 FEET,
THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING
NORTH 80 DEGREES 52 MINUTES
36 SECONDS WET 89.77 FEET TO
A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARK-
ING A POINT OF COMPOUND
CURVE, THENCE RUN NORTH-
WESTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHT
OF WAY BOUNDARY AND ALONG
SAID COMPOUND CURVE WITH A
RADIUS OF 749.78 FEET THRU A
CENTRAL ANGLE OF 07 DEGREES
44 MINUTES 53 SECONDS FOR AN
ARC DISTANCE OF 101.39 FEET,
THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING
NORTH 86 DEGREES 16 MINUTES
09 SECONDS WEST 101.39 FEET,
THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING
NORTH 86 DEGREES 16 MINUTES
09 SECONDS WEST 101.31 FEET;
THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES
47 MINUTES 39 SECONDS EAST
154.59 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH
89 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 39 SEC-
ONDS EAST 190.00 FEETTO A CON-
CRETE MONUMENT,THENCE RUN
SOUTH 00 DEGREES 47 MINUTES
39 SECONDSWEST 173.02 FEETTO
THE POINT OF BEGINNING.

SUBJECT TO AN ACCESS EASE-
MENT OVER AND ACROSS THE
WESTERLY PART THEREOF.

Dated this 23rd day of February, 2006


Robert Hill,
Liberty County Clerk of Court
Vanell Summers, Deputy Clerk


3-1.3.8


NOTICE OF DECISION
USDA- Forest Service
- Apalachicola National Forest
Apalachicola Ranger District
Wakulla Ranger District
Franklin, Leon, Liberty and
Wakulla counties, Florida

FISCAL YEAR 2006
GROWING SEASON
PRESCRIBED BURNING

On Feb. 23, 2006, District Ranger Marcus
Beard decided to implement Alternative 2
of the Environmental Assessment for Fis-
cal Year 2006 Growing Season Prescribed
Burning. The Forest Service will implement
prescribed,burns on 71,606 acres of the
Apalachicola National Forest. These burns
will occurfromApril 1,2006through Sept. 30,
2006. The burn units proposed for growing
season are 2, 5, 7, 9, 16, 22, 29, 30, 34, 41,
45,47,48, 50, 56, 61,70,72,106,201,202,
203,204,206,218,227,234,235,236,246,
248,251,307,313,314,323,327,328,329,
333 and 355. These burn units total 71,606
acres. The other alternative evaluated was
the no action alternative. The associated
EnvironmentalAssessment, Decision Notice
and FONSI are available upon request from
theApalachicola National Forest. Forfurther
information regarding this project, contact
Greg Titus at .(850) 926-3561, ext. 6522.

This decision is not subject to appeal pursu-
ant to 36 CFR 215.12 because no substan-
tive comments expressing concerns or only
supportive comments were received during
the comment period for this project.

Implementation of this decision mayoccurim-
mediately after publication of this legal notice,
in the papers) of record fortheApalachicola
National Forest. 2-16


PUBLIC AUCTION
Bristol 66 Towing and Recovery will
hold a Public Auction on March 23,
2006 at 1:00 p.m. (ET).
1996 gray Dodge Caravan
Vin# 1 B4GP54R6TB150524
Our Auction will be held at Bristol 66
Storage on Hoecake Road off Highway
20 East, one half mile on left, you will
see our sign. Bristol 66 Towing reserves
the right to reject any and all bids.
The Calhoun Liberty Journal 3-01-06
If you need any more information on the
above vehicle, please call (850) 643-2522
ask for Dale.


MARCH 1,2006 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 23


COLEY SPEAKS Rep. Marti Coley was a guest speaker
for the Chipola Honors Seminar on Feb. 17. Coley spoke on
behalf of her late husband, David Coley, who was recently
named Chipola's 2006 Alumnus of the year Pictured from
left, are: Chipola president, Dr. Gene Prough, Coley's mother,
Annette Bontrager, Coley's sister, Gladys Dewey, Rep. Marti
Coley, and Coley's daughter, Kristin. CHIPOLA PHOTO








LIBERTY NATIONAL LIFE INSUR-
ANCE CO. is expanding its operation
and is looking for upward mobile


C.W. Roberts, Inc.
has TWO immediate
openings for a
Dump Truck Driver
and ONE
Tractor Trailer Driver.
CLASS A OR B LICENCE REQUIRED

Contact Ray McCoy
at 379-8116. ,,22,3


people to fill insurance sales and
service positions. Average earnings:
$48,554. Fringe Benefits Package:
Two retirement funds, health insur-
ance, paid vacations, convention
trips and many others. No experience
necessary. We have on-the-job train-
ing. Training salary: $400/wk. Re-
quirements: Honesty, hard worker,
dependable transportation.
Call Tommy Lee at 482-8821
Liberty National is an Equal Opportunity Employer


LIBERTY COUNTY TRANSIT

Is seeking applications for SUBSTITUTE DRIVERS. A
valid Florida driver's license, CPR, first aid and defensive
driving course are required. Must also pass DOT drug
test, a criminal history check, fingerprinting and local law
enforcement check. Documentation of a recent physical
must be presented along with a recent eye exam.

Applications may be picked up at:
15629 NW CR 12,
(Senior Citizens Building), Bristol, FL.

LCT/EOE




Marianna Florida



Distribution Center


Full and Part Time
Openings Available


If you are looking for a great place to work with
great pay, great benefits, a great working
environment, and a flexible schedule
Family Dollar is the place for you!


No experience necessary!
Must be at least 18 years of age.


Please apply in person at:
Family Dollar Distribution Center
3949 Family Dollar Parkway
Marianna, FL 32448


Family Dollar is an
Equal Employment Opportunity Employer.
Family Dollar maintains a
drug-free workplace.


2-22.3-1


----- -------- -- - - - - - - -


*






Page 24 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL MARCH 1, 2006

Fraudulent charities targeting seniors ordered to pay restitution and cease operations


TALLAHASSEE -
Attorney General. Charlie
Crist announced a settlement
resolving allegations that two
Broward County organizations
targeted senior citizens in a
charitable donations scheme.
Global Mindlink Foundation
and Select International Donors
Corp. will pay up to $300,000
for consumer restitution. The
agreement also requires the
companies to dissolve.
Investigators with the
Attorney General's Economic
Crimes Division determined
that the two organizations were
Florida non-profit corporations
owned and operated by Denise
Battista of Coral Springs.
Battista managed a staff of
telemarketers who allegedly
solicited memberships and
newsletter subscriptions from
elderly consumers nationwide.
The consumers were told
that the proceeds from their
purchases would be used for
charitable and humanitarian
purposes. Consumers who
agreedtopurchase subscriptions
or memberships 'supposedly
would be eligible to participate
in monthly drawings for cash
prizes.
"Floridians shouldn't have
to worry about being scammed
when they are trying to do a
charitable deed," said Crist.
"This settlement will reinforce
the message that we will
protect our citizens, especially
those who may be preyed
upon simply because they are
older."
Consumer complaints.
indicated that Global and Select
debited, money from victims'
checking accounts without their
prior consent or knowledge.
The charitable facade of these
entities was allegedly created to
take advantage of the generous
nature of their elderly victims,
but the majority of the solicited
money going toward corporate
salaries and administrative
expenses.


Golden


The settlemerit prohibits the
two companies and Battista
from engaging in any type
of commercial telephone
solicitations. It also blocks them
from seeking a telemarketing
license in the future or from
participating in charitable
fund-raising activities. The


restitution will be made to
consumers who have filed
complaints the Attorney
General's Office, as well as
Florida consumers identified in
the companies' business records
as victims who paid money to
the companies and consumers
who file a complaint with the


Attorney General's Office
within 30 days of the date of
the agreement. Any remaining
money will cover the State's
costs of investigation and
litigation.
Consumers who believe they
have been victimized by either
of these companies may file a


Bear saftds, Ew" & arb-m. ta


complaint with the Attorney
General's Economic Crimes
Division. Complaints should be
sent to the following address:
Economic Crimes Division,
Attn: Robert Julian, Office of
the Attorney General, 110 SE
6th Street, Fort Lauderdale, FL
33301-5000.


Yqw rtaxes i,:-ia*~


AtLOAM
7%M n pars a" I *Maind a my fla ona S I 040@Mautomobile. it and You 9#t 4:-O
Deawe1s ticeesetdoe to the frStr'atiorz of Hedoe atO-rtt The 4*9at swe
sbappink for a used car. The tofoaiingl Afftamofi"_ a#lse-'. lot. NO-Lilo PRESSt
OMree atius made car Shapping a big -AI vehicles are Priced at the -Loan t-f Youlfii see thec
bdadacbe ftor mae: Ualut'. Which is the Pricit credit unonos this Mo call as. Well 4
*fiaggfft for the best-priz-* and banks will Ioaztvu oe o th~s vehicle. tell You what it will cos
a It'00 t *W '16R*0 INKPAYM Wfffl We app-rectate your
S~bb0ora dwr~l~a(. *~s~.Wle ~Wtwe-Celq bL--,44l


$


st of the VOsW-`
we Ba*,wia9.a rof-
have family on the
SURE SALES PEOPLE.
car of your dreams in
get you pre-approved.
st and buy it for you.
soppMe a us. Come
A. i-'- aa ''


,w


iWe sel al of our cars at I
a discount so you dont ,
need a dwn payment% ,

Interest Rates |
as low as 4.95%I


oDown '05 Chvy Impala
S244ima.Absc*-Tlutl, U;eNT


o Down '00JeepGhrokee
'Il 72,,m, Lc-,, Males


0 Down '02 suit~sW Gelant
6 1 9-2ftno ES- 4 drVery Lowki~a


0 Down "04 Monte Cario
1244hmo c 13,000 Maes


SDown 122 Ch~iylSehving LX Q Down '-01 BW 525i


0 Down '02 Saturn L300
s191imo 4,door


0 Down -M1GM xmmni
$166hm oA#Woy 'Mft!







o Down VlmevrmyMenjt& LS
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s2 11/mV6, Leawo. S"coup


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s365/mo 45,000 Miles! Like New


o Diown '05 Ford Taunts
*249imo Low tvles UikeNew'


Pharmacy
Phone 674-4557


o Down '01 Honda Odessey
'21 01,mo Thb Y-I- I ~~


0 Do"n V02Pontdac Bw eV9
$28&inO Lea#W &SWJnOO


0 D Vwn 98 Chevy Tahoe
I1 72itnoLe-aihe& Loajjed


0 Down 3 Toyota Tundra 4x4
4Mo4 door, v a. x cab. rnA


o Down mV4 Dod~eh*igd
91 92jmoGrxew QCuL"r4 Ue 1'o


o Dow F '0a d F.-- t ait0 Do" 04 FdExpedik
24mw ~ mod w L~ 384/nw m~d Row seam


o Down '01 Cadlwac deVil 1
$326imLo Lw Mi"le


Your Valu-Rite store with
a full selection of drugs,
greeting cards, film, health
and beauty aid supplies
17324 Main Street North,
Blountstown
,LOpALLY'OWNED'& OPERATED.


Direct Autootive, hlsl
403 W. Jeffemw 1tHvwy 0 W, 3fd s V"ofSqtve inQgmcy, WAto o4 Gwwa -Oper, MorThurs 9as AA8p~m.; Friay 9-7-, Sat 9 -6pri
Se habla Quincy* 850--6-27-8448 *Quincy Se habla
t, 4 FXl*illU S5rteO wimZero ft"-.6% er,#69MOnthS. Wlth ApiOved Cr, C Espa io
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iv- wyaY.






MARCH 1,2006 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 25


Q: Should I make wheat germ
a part of my healthy diet?
A: A quarter cup of wheat
germ, the center portion of a
grain of wheat, provides almost
a third of the total daily recom-
mended amount of vitamin E.
It's also a good source of folate,
fiber and several other vitamins
and minerals. And its pleasant,
nutty flavor tastes great as a top-
ping for yogurts, cereals, salads,
or casseroles. However, none of
these qualities make wheat germ
an essential part of healthy eating.
Despite what you might read or
hear from some sources, no in-
dividual food by itself creates a
healthful diet. Instead of thinking
of single foods, you should focus
on eating a balanced diet that
includes a variety of vegetables,
fruits, whole grains and beans in
abundance.
Q: How much fat should be in
the milk for my children?
A: The answer depends on
the age of your children and the
composition of their diet. Babies
between the ages of one and two


NUTRITION WISE
Karn olins M, DCDN A ercan'Isttu e frCacr eeac


should drink whole milk. They
need the calories from the extra
fat. The concentration of protein
and minerals in lower-fat milk is
also too much for their immature
kidneys to handle. After age two,
reduced-fat (2 percent), lowfat
(1 percent) and nonfat (skim)
milk are all reasonable choices,
depending on your children's in-
dividual needs and the fat content
of the rest of their diet. The total
amount of fat and saturated fat in
your children's diet should be the
deciding factor. If much of your
children's diet includes fairly
high-fat foods, then 1 percent or
skim milk could help keep their
total fat and calorie consumption
from rising too high. On the other
hand, if their diet contains mostly
lowfat foods prepared with little
added-fat, then 2 percent milk
may be suitable. Children in
families that serve meals that


are quite low in fat may need the
extra calories from reduced-fat
milk for adequate growth.
Q: Does adding milk to tea
block the absorption of healthful
substances in it?
A: No. Studies have found that
milk in tea does not interfere with-
the body's ability to absorb the
health-promoting phytochemi-
cals such as epigallocatechin
gallate (EGCG) in tea. These
phytochemicals still seem to of-
fer protection against both heart
disease and cancer through their
antioxidant effects. In addition,
some of them may increase the
self-destruction of cancer cells
and/or limit their ability to grow
and multiply. Remember, howev-
er, that tea should be just one part
of a healthful, mostly plant-based
diet. A wide range of vegetables,
fruits, whole grains and beans
should be the focus of your eat-


ing because of the great variety
of healthful substances in them,
like vitamins, minerals, fiber and
other phytochemicals.
Q: Why do surveys show that
the American diet is so low in
many nutrients?
A: The main problem with
the American diet is that far too
few Americans follow a bal-
anced, mostly plant-based eating
style. People who eat the recom-
mended seven to ten servings of
vegetables and fruits and three to
four or more servings of whole
grains a day generally get more
than the recommended amounts
of nutrients identified as defi-
cient in surveys of Americans.
That's why it is best to follow the
advice of the American Institute
for Cancer Research and make at
least two-thirds of each of your
meals plant foods. Vegetables
and fruits are major suppliers of


vitamins A and C and folate, as
well as magnesium, potassium
and fiber. Although 40 percent of
Americans don't eat any whole
grains at all on a daily basis, these
grains supply several times the
magnesium and potassium we
can get from refined grains like
white bread and pasta. Dried
beans are another important
source of many of the nutrients
that are most often low in the
U.S. diet. If all Americans filled at
least two-thirds of their plate with
vegetables, fruits, whole grains
and beans, the results of dietary
surveys you may have seen would
substantially change. If we ate
more nuts and seeds instead of
chips, cookies and French fries,
our vitamin E intake would also
improve. Although poor food
choices have become all too com-
mon among most Americans, if
you already eat a healthy, mostly
plant-based diet, you shouldn't
assume that the results of national
surveys indicate a shortcoming in
your diet.
Q: How can I avoid regain-
ing lost weight on an upcoming
cruise?
A: Cruises can pose a chal-
lenge to weight control because
they usually make available a
wide range of rich foods during
the day and night. Your mindset
plays a key role in overcoming
this challenge. Focus on the
cruise as a time to relax and ex-
plore new places and activities,
and forget about the food. Since
you have lost weight, hopefully,
you have learned to control the
size of.portions you take and
don't base your decision on the
quantity of food available. When
you are faced with a massive buf-
fet, look over the choices before
you make any selections. Take
only what you want most and
leave the rest. You should try to
satisfy your hunger by choosing
low-calorie fruits and vegetables
for one-third to one-half of each
meal. Besides watching what you
eat, you should monitor what you
drink. Drinks can flow abundantly
on cruises, and their calories add
up quickly. You should limit al-
cohol, soda, juice and sweetened
tea carefully; choose water, club
soda, or unsweetened tea most of
the time. Finally, take advantage
of the many on- and off-ship
opportunities to stay active. By
swimming, dancing, using the
exercise facilities on the ship
and walking a lot on shore, you
should easily accumulate an hour
a day of physical activity.
The American Institute for Cancer
Research (AICR) offers a Nutrition Ho-
tline (1-800-843-8114) 9 a.m. to 5p.m.
ET Monday-Friday. This free service
allows you to ask questions about diet,
nutrition and cancer. A registered dieti-
tian will return your call, usually within
48hours. AICR is the only major cancer
charity focusing exclusively on the link
between diet, nutrition and cancer. The
Institute provides education programs
that help millions of Americans learn
to make changes for lower cancer risk.
AICR also supports innovative research
in cancer prevention and treatment at
universities, hospitals and research cen-
ters across the U.S. The Institute has
provided over $68 million in funding
for research in diet, nutrition and can-
cer. AICR's web address is www.aicr.
org. AICR, is a .member, of the World
' Canc'ef Reseach'Fubnd Intern'tiOnal: '






Page 26 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL MARCH 1, 2006


GRACE FREDRIKKE SHATTUCK
WEST MEDFORD Grace Fredrikke Shattuck
Steward, 94, died at home Feb. 13, 2006. She was.
the daughter of the late.Luther and Nellie Shattuck
of Bristol and the widow of Baldwin Steward of
West Medford, MA. She was born in Wilmington,
MA and grew up there and on the family homestead
farm in Water Glen, Alberta Canada. She was
a 1933 graduate of the Mass General Hospital
School of Nursing and worked as a public health
nurse, a camp nurse for 20 years at Sandy Island,
Lake Winnipesaukee, NH, and a homemaker. She
was a head nurse at Sherrill House, Boston MA and
a member of the team that opened the American
Hospital in Jiddah, Saudi Arabia. As a retiree, she
was the caregiver for her mother in Bristol. Her
home in West Medford was also home to numerous
students from Tufts University. She loved life and
was a kind, gentle and positive influence on many
people. In her late 80s she helped establish the Sir
Walter Raleigh Den of Good Bears of the World
at Abbotswood in north Raleigh which donated
Teddy Bears to the Raleigh FD, PD and the Six
Forks Rescue Squad to be used in times of crisis.
She was predeceased by her son, Charles B.
Steward; a grandson, Christopher Steward; a
brother, Willard Shattuck, a brother, Ira Shattuck;
and her infant sister, Ardell Shattuck.
Survivors include her son, Robert Steward and
his wife, Linda, her daughter, Betsey Pedneau and
her husband, Mike; her sister, Dorothea Potterton
and her husband, Ralph; a daughter-in-law, Barbara
Steward, her grandchildren, Kimberly Steward,
Dori Steward and family, Charles A. Steward and
family, Josh Pedneau and family, Max Pedneau and
family; nine great-grandchildren and numerous
nieces and nephews.
Memorial service celebrating her life was held,
Thursday, Feb. 23 at the Capitol Funeral Home. A
graveside memorial will be held this summer in
Wilmington, MA.
The family requests that any memorial be
made to the "Shattuck Piano Restoration Fund" at
the Panhandle Pioneer Settlement, P.O Box 215,
Blountstown, FL 32424..

MARY FRANCES MCKINNON.
HOSFORD Mary Frances McKinnon. 73,
passed away Wednesday, Feb. 23, 2006 at Calhoun-
Liberty Hospital in Blountstown. She enjoyed goi ng
to church, hunting and fishing.
She was preceded in death by her husband, Don
McKinnon; one son, Danny Hinson; one daughter,
Troy Sinclaire; two.brothers, Bill Setterich and
Lance Sinclaire; and three sisters, Jeanette Setterich.,
Maxine Sumner and Ruth Sexton.
Survivors include one son, David Hinson of
Hosford; two grandchildren, Tanya Grieco and
husband, George Sr. and Chaff Hinson; four great-
grandchildren, Brittany Grieco, George Grieco Jr.,
Monroe Hinson and Darius Hinson.
Services were held Monday, Feb. 27, 2006 at
Telogia Baptist Church with Tommy Sumner and
Carol Setterich officiating.
Hall Funeral Home in Altha was in charge of the
arrangements.

GEORGE W. PARRISH JR.
SUMATRA George W. Parrish Jr., 82 of
Sumatra, passed away Thursday evening, Feb. 23,
2006 in Bristol. He was born in Sumatra and was.
an inventory analyst.
Survivors include two sons, Michael Parrish'of
Port St. Joe and Daniel Parrish of South Carolina;-
two daughters, Clara Griffin of St. Louis, MO and
Marie Shurrum of Overstreet; eight grandchildren,
James Van Griffin II, Daniel Griffin, Jeanette
Bradley, Samantha Parrish, Daniel Parrish,
Benjamin McCroan, Belle Shurrum and Stephanie
Parrish and seven great-grandchildren
Services were held Tuesday, Feb. 28, 2006 from
the Holly Hill Cemetery.in Port. St.'Joe.
Adams Fueral Home in Bl1untstown was' in
charge of the arrangements.


BENJAMIN ISAAC "BEN" GRANT SR.
PENSACOLA- Benjamin Isaac "Ben" Grant
Sr., 88, passed away Thursday, Dec. 29, 2005 at an
assisted living facility in Pensacola. He was born
in Bascom on Feb. 1, 1917, grew up in Altha, and
graduated from Altha High School in 1938. He then
moved to Pensacola. He retired from Greyhound
Bus Lines after 41 years of service. He was a Mason
and Shriner and was also a faithful member of Olive
Baptist Church and a deacon for many years.
He was preceded in death by one son, Benny,
Jr.,. who died in an aircraft accident in 1976; his
parents, two brothers and one sister.
Survivors include at the time of his death but is
now deceased, the love of his life, wife Dot Grant.
Also surviving are one grandson, Stephen Grant
of Washington, DC; one granddaughter, Angela
Cooper and husband, Keith of Pensacola; one
great-granddaughter, Chelsea Cooper of Pensacola;
two sisters, Maudell Hewitt and Ollie Holly of
Blountstown.
Services were held Sunday Jan. 1, 2006 at Olive
Baptist Church in Pensacola with Dr. Ted Traylor
and Dr. James Coleman officiating with a private
burial at a later date.
In lieu of flowers, the family requests that con-
tributions be made to Olive Baptist Church or to
Covenant Hospice.
Faith Chapel Funeral Home South in Pensacola
was in charge of the arrangements.

DOROTHY "DOT" MILLS GRANT
PENSACOLA Dorothy "Dot" Mills Grant,
84, passed away Tuesday, Feb. 14, 2006 at a lo-
cal nursing home. She was born in Altha on Jan.
20, 1922 and attended school there. She met and
married "the love of her life," Ben Grant in 1939.
They-later returned toPenacol.. She began practi-
cal nursing training and received her LPN license.
She helped set up the surgical unit at Baptist Ho:-
pital before the hospital opened and she worked in
surgery for 15 years. Shet hen % eiat into pri\te duty
nursing and retired several years later.
She %\ as preceded in death b. her husband, Ben,
- ho died just six %\ weeks prior on Dec. 29,2005; one
son. Benn\ Jr. v\ ho died in an aircraft accident in
1976: her parents. Jessie and Lacy Mills; four broth-
ers. Aubrey, Herbert. Cecil and Ralph Mills.
Survi\ ors include one grandson, Stephen Grant
of Washington, DC: one granddaughter, Angela
Cooper and husband. Keith of Pensacola; one
great-granddaughter. Chelsea Cooper of Pensacola;
three brothers, Jessie "Bill" Mills and wife, CeCe,
Gerald Mills and wife, Pat and Henry Mills, all of
Pensacola: tx o lo\ ing sisters, Audrey Mills West-
brook and husband. Robert and Lucille Mims and'
husband, Lonnie.
Services were held Friday, Feb. 17, 2006 at
Olive Baptist
Church with 'oIn loving memory of
Dr. Ted Traylor Jamie Hamilton

Coleman of-
a Jee o I
ficiating with.
a private burial
following. the
service.
In lieu of
flowers, the
family requests
that contribu-
tions be made
to Olive Bap-
tist Church or
to Covenant
Hospice.
Faith Cha- Mach 13. /72 -_May 5. 101r1
pel Funeral A dear person just recently asked
me, "Do I ever forget what you look
Home South in like?" and I said, "No, cause when
Pensacola was I look in the mirror, I see part of
in charge of the you." I love and miss you.
Your, twin,.
':arrangements; '. -' .Sam-.Bo.(Samm :Jgson)"./.


Continue
0 ARIESo-ae3
1 1 11


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- Charles McClellan

Funeral Home
Charles K. McClellan
Licensed Funeral Director
42 years experience
Call us Let us explain how j 9
we can conveniently handle
arrangements in Liberty County.

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MARCH 1, 2006 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 27


Our fast claims service

is "No Problem."
--

Sur agency is well-known for providing fast,
efficient and fair claims service. That's because
we represent Auto-Owners Insurance, who, according to
a national consumers' magazine, ranks consistently as one
of the top insurers in the country.
That's why we are known .--
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People. Askus about --_
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.uto-Owners As -- ne -
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Ph'lhoe674-974- ax 74-30


Timing critical in the control of summer weeds
Timing is everything in your lawn or fail to work on the
gardening. This is especially by Theresa Friday, weeds.
true when it comes to controlling Extension Horticultural Timing of a preemergence
weeds in your lawn. So, if Agent, Santa Rosa County herbicideapplicationforsummer
you had a weed problem last annual weeds such as crabgrass
summer, now is the time to apply sunlight can't reach weed seeds should be around March 1 or
a preemergence herbicide to that are ready to germinate. A when day temperatures reach
control summer annual weeds. thick turf also minimizes the 65 to 70F for four to five
Being late-February, any physical space available for consecutive days. This generally
weeds that are growing in your weeds to become established, coincides with the blooming of
yard at this time are probably Proper mowing, fertilizing and azaleas and dogwoods.
winter weeds. They germinated watering will promote a healthy, This is not true, however, for
last fall, remained small through dense grass. chamberbitter. Chamberbitter,
mid-winter, and are now making If your lawn has a history that little mimosa-looking
rapid vegetative growth. Soon, of summer annual weeds, weed, requires warmer soil
they will begin flowering and one control option is to apply temperatures to germinate.
going to seed, and will begin a preemergence herbicide. Begin applying a preemergence
declining as hot weather arrives. Preemergence herbicides herbicide around May 1st when
The summer weeds, on the other are applied before weed battling this weed. If you wait
hand, have not yet begun to seed germination. If these until you see weeds, most
germinate. So now is the time chemicals are applied after preemergent type herbicides
to get a head start on controlling weed emergence, they will have won't work. You must apply
bothersome summer weeds. little or no effect. There is a the product just before the seeds
The first and best method of narrow window of time when germinate
weed control begins with proper preemergence herbicides can Preemergence herbicides
management practices that be applied for maximum effect. work by creating a chemical
encourage a dense, thriving turf. If you wait too long to apply barrier in the soil/thatch layer.
Healthy turf shades the soil so them, they will either damage Therefor,. nifrm vera,


CLP~TnlrEI~rr~T






lH0Mtfe U B ENA oR 05 CHEVY U LA m
-5^1- O ^ St~iB ~ _Bi"A ~ la' l 3..^B~ii-,;,ai-.-.-.r.i5- '-.*,.... .* ..*: '. .,.* **...... -. .', -.. ,-.* ,.- .,, "..,-,,,,* -'. -, ..-**.* *** 'l .-_'* .
...5... .... -5 CH V U ^,i,-


Sof Blountstown

nl S 850.674-3307 (800)419.1801
26331 CENTRAL AVENUEIWEST, BiLOJNTSTOWN, FLORIDA CONTACT US ONLINE! HopkinsBTown@hotmail.oom
....... .. 'Plus Sales Tax,& Tag WAC,w.ith 720,Beaconp Score gher 72 mo. Financing. All Pictures For Illustration Only.


with a preemergence herbicide,
whether applied as a spray
or granular, is necessary for
optimum control. Large gaps
in the herbicide-treated zone
can result in weed escapes. In
addition, adequate soil moisture
before and after application
is necessary to activate most
preemergence herbicides.
Preemergence herbicides are
generally effective in controlling
weeds from six to twelve weeks
following application. Most will
begin to degrade when exposed
to the environment. Therefore,
to obtain season-long control,
an additional application should
follow six to nine weeks after

the initial one.
Overuse of some types of
preemergence herbicides can
cause damage to your lawn. So,
as is true with all pesticides, only
apply the product if there is a pest
to control in this case, if you
have had a history of summer
annual weeds. Otherwise, save
your money and time. It is the
user's responsibility to read and
follow all label directions and
precautions when using any
pesticide, including herbicides.
Some preemergence
herbicides to look for include
dithiopyr (Sta-Green Crab-Ex
Crabgrass Preventer); oryzalin
(Surflan) or pendimethalin
(Lesco PRE-M or Scotts HALTS
Crabgrass Preventer).
For additional information
on lawn weeds, go to http://turf.
ufl.edu, click on "Residential
Landscapes" and then click on
"Weed Management."
Theresa Friday is the
Residential Horticulture
Extension Agent for Santa
Rosa County. The use of trade
names, if used in this article,
is solely for the purpose of
providing specific information.
It is not a guarantee, warranty,
or endorsement of the product
name(s) and does not signify
that they are approved to the
exclusion of others.


r ** k. fc






Page 28 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL MARCH 1,2006


TLIJ


Electric wheelchair, like new with
charger and batteries, $750. Call
643-3399. 3-1,3-8

Concert ticket, George Jones and
Confederate Railroad atthe Marina
Civic Center, Panama City on Fri-
day, March 31 at 8 p.m., very good
seat B4, $35. Call 379-9495.
3-1, 3-8

Mattress set, double sided, jumbo
plush four-inch pillow top, new in
plastic, list at $985, asking $299.
Call 926'-1940. 3-1,3-8

' Foosball table, good condition, $75
or best offer. Call 379-8118.
3-1,3-8

Mattress and box spring, queen
size, $50. Call 762-3586. '
3-1, 3-8

Prom dresses, red strapless, never
been worn, still has tags on it, ask-
ing $80; burgundy spaghetti strap,
worn once, paid $100, asking $60;
spaghetti strap,. worn once, paid
$150, asking $70, must see. Call
674-3694 or 447-1362.
3-1, 3-8

Stair stepper, $25; queen size
mattress, $25. Call 643-9332 after
3p.m. 3-1,3-8

48 Autographed sport cards, val-
ued at $200, asking $150 for all or
sold separately. If you buy all, $25
worth of free, unautographed cards
will be thrown in. Call 674-5237.
3-1,3-8

Round table with two chairs, best
offer, really nice. Call 674-3264.
3-1,3-8

Blue cloth couch, $50. Call 643-
2626, leave message: 31, 3-8

Speakerboxforfourl0-inch speak-
ers, made of 1/4-inch MDS, $100;
speaker box for 15, made of 1/4
inch MDS, $75. Call 447-1096.
3-1,3-8

Formal dresses for pageant or
prom. three dresses, gold, white and
pink, size 3/4; red interview suit, size
3/4. Call 762-1901. :3 1. 6

200 Amp power pole, comes with
main breakers plus four otherbreak-
ers, 50 ft. of underground connec-
tion wire, $200. Call 762-9533.-
3-1, 3-8

Whirlpool washer, $85; Whirlpool
dryer, $75. Call 643-2431.
S -1, 3-8

Bookshelf, sofa set, table, two re-
cliners, computer table, Vitamaster
exercise bicycle, call and make best
offer. Call 674-2883. 3-1,3-8

Mahogany table, oval shaped, 42
x 64, comes with piece of cut glass
to fit top, four mahogany cushioned
chairs, excellent condition, $600.
Call 674-5396. 2-22,3-1

Scrub uniform sets, small size,
like new condition, $15 per set. Call
237-1901. 2-22,3-1

MAKE A NOTE! -
...to call in your classified ads by
.6 p..m.(ET).op.Friay, ,aect.httan-
Call. 64 p-333 '.


To place your ad, call 643-3333 or 1-800-7
Eastern Time on Saturday. Non-business ads


Small piano, studio type, good for
practice, $300. Call 674-5156.
2-22, 3-1
Power pole, 200 amp, $200. Call
722-8750 or cell 207-749-3938.
2-22, 3-1
Crosley freezer, frost free, clean,
good condition. Call 674-8517.
2-22, 3-1

Scag Turf Tiger mower, com-
mercial, good shape, $4,500. Call
762-4215. 2-22,3-1

Prom/pageant dresses, several-
dresses, colors are hot pink, cop-
per, lilac and deep blue with purple
hues, beautiful with decorative
stitching, beading, etc., some new,
never worn, others worn only once,
must see to appreciate, sizes 14,
16, and 18. Call 674-4330 or 643-
7612. 2-22,3-1

Long table with eight chairs, best
offer. Call 674-3264. 2-22,3-1

Set of coffee and two end tables,
Lane-Bassett, solid wood, beveled
glass, walnutveneer, slight damage
at floor level from little teeth, make
offer. Call 674-2485. 2-22, 3-1

Kenmore heavy-duty dryer, four
cycle, large capacity, white, like new,
$150. Call 674-2485. 2-22, 3-1

Pioneer CD player with 10-inch
power base sub woofer, 300-watt
spl-amp, $250 for all. Call 379-8233,
leave message. 2-22, 3-1

Ham CB/TV antenna tower, two
sections and a top piece, 30 ft.,
$100: old playground-dome. metal
Iriangularwebbing fora playground,
$100. Call 762-4231. ; :

Whirlpool washer and dryer, like
new, extra large capacity, $500
for the set, negotiable. Call 643-
1855. ;-. 3-1




1990 Nissan pickup truck, blue,
2WD, four cylinder, short wheel
base, brand new clutch kit and
transmission, $1,500 or best offer.
Call 643-5006. 3-1, 3-8
1996 Chevy S-10, needs transmis-
sioin, $350. Call 643-8089.
-" 3-1,3-8


RURAL LAND
FOR SALE
'Where inland meets the
Gulf of Mexico deep in
Florida Hill Country. It's
"Old Florida" at its best. Live
oaks and longleafs, fields
and pines, rivers and bays.
Land in-Northwest Florida
for your own farm, ranch
or homestead. Multiple
lifestyle opportunities. Only
one number to call.

1.866.JOE.LAND or
visit JOE.comrn/land
IF YOU DON'T KNOW-
JOE, YOU DON'T KNOW
FLORIDA.

STJO


1970 Ford F-100, short wheel base,
4WD, four speed with granny low,
new starter, new solenoid, new
Ranchero 5000 shocks, 35x12.50
Mud King tires, $3,500 or best offer.
Call 674-1338. 3-1,3-8

1986 Ford Ranger, 4WD with six-
inch lift, no motor, has five speed
transmission, 35x12.50 Mud King
tires, $400 or best offer. Call 674-
1338. 3-1,3-8

Class III/IV hitch with two-inch
receiver for 2002 and up Ford Ex-
plorer, $100. Call 643-3399.
3-1, 3-8

2003 Ford F-150 Crew Cab Lariat,
5.4 Triton V-8, towing package,
matching tonneau cover, leather
interior, tinted windows, all electric,
running boards, two tone gray,
48,000 miles, retain at$25,150, sale
price $22, 500. Call 762-4926.
3-1,3-8

Fiberglass camper shell to fit 92-
95 Dakota. All glass good, gray in
color, $75. Call 762-4926.
3-1, 3-8

Slide in bedliner for 2002 Tundra,
$50. Call 762-4926. 3-1, 3-8

2002 Honda Civic, automatic, AM/
FM radio, four door, asking payoff.
Call 643-2974. 3-1, 3-8

1995 Mitsubishi Eclipse, 117,000
miles, newtires, coldAC, looks and
runs good, $3,500 or best offer. Call
762-3045, leave message. 3-1,3-8

2001 Kia Sephia, silver, 29,000
original miles, gray cloth interior,
automatic transmission, AM/FM
stereo, like new, $3,800. Call 379-
3224. 3-1,3-8

1997 Chevy Lumina, white, four
door, gray interior, AC, power win-
dows and locks, AM/FM cassette,
160,000 miles, asking $2,750. Call
674-8378. 3-1,3-8

1996 Honda Civic, two door, full
body kit, forest green paint job,
18-inch wheels. BT 6 engine swap,
full racing exhaust, many other
extras, $3,500. Call 762-3290, ask
for Alex. 3-1,3-8


(In







0





0
ez


Week of March 5 to March 11
ARIES Mar 21/Apr 20
Don't worry when a conflict
arises at work, Aries. Things
will simmer down rather quick-
ly, so don't spend much time
thinking about finding a reso-
lution.
TAURUS Apr 21/May 21
There's no time like the pres-
ent to embark on that home
improvement you've been
considering, Taurus. Encour-
age others to give you some
friendly assistance.
GEMINI May 22/Jun 21
If you've been thinking about
taking a trip, now is the time to
do so, Gemini. Grab a friend
or family member to take the
ride with you and it will be
much more fun.
CANCER Jun 22/Jul 22
You've been feeling under
the weather, Cancer, and you
can't seem to bounce back
quickly. Rest is key this week.
There's no point getting even
moreFun down. -
LEO Jul23/Aug 23
SLions- ma be the kings of the


717-3333 by noon
run FREE for 2 weeks.
1959 Chevrolet Apachee pickup,
needs to be restored, $650. Call
762-8693 or 272-4478. 3-1, 3-8

1990 Mitsubishi Gallant, needs
engine work, has good transmission
and body, $300 or best offer. Call
762-8693 or 272-4478. 3-1,3-8

1986 Pontiac Parisienne, four
door, V-8, runs good, cold air,
$1,250. Call 379-3931 or 544-
8234. 3-1, 3-8

2001 Ford Mustang, 3.8 L. V-6,
good condition, $5,500. Call 643-
4358 or 643-6223. 3-1,3-8

Chrome Nerf steps, for regular cab
Chevy truck, $75; chrome bed rails
to fit full-size pickup with tool box,
$75. Call 643-6041. 3-1,3-8

1988 Ford Thunderbird, good
condition, $900 or best offer. Call
850-722-0316. 2-22,3-1

1996 Nissan pickup, 4WD, ex-
tended cab, $4,700 or best offer.
Call 643-5917. 2-22, 3-1

2001 Ford E-150 Chateau, wheel-
.chair lift, low mileage. For more
information call 643-5825, leave
message. 2-22, 3-1

1994 and 1992 Nissan Sentra,
$1,500 or best offer for both. Call
762-2849. 2-22, 3-1

Camper shell, fits Ford truck,
fiberglass, insulated, good condi-
tion, kept under a shed, paid $500,
asking $50. Call 379-3789.
2-22, 3-1

2005 Ford Expedition, Eddie
Bauer edition, white with beige,
22,457 miles, third row seat. Call
643-2442. 2-22,3-1

2004 Pontiac Grand Am, excellent
condition, 38,000 miles, great on
gas, $9,000. Call 762-3284.
2-22, 3-1

2003 Chevy Impala, great condi-
tion, 62,000 miles, great on gas,
power windows, locks and seats,
$7,500. Call 762-3284. 2-22, 3-1

.1985 Cadillac Seville, four door, 22
miles per gallon plus, crank and run
car, driven daily, $1,200 negotiable.
Call 762-4231.: 2-22, 3-1


jungle, Leo, but this week you can't
even muster a meow. No one is taking
you seriously, and that has you angry.
Rethink your strategy.
VIRGO Aug 24/Sept 22
A move you made a few weeks back
is not panning out as you had hoped,
Virgo. You just can't seem to get along
with your new housemate. It may be
time to pack up once more.
LIBRA Sept 23/Oct 23
You've been taking advantage of loved
ones, Libra, and it has to stop. There's
only so much they will take before get-
ting angry. Start reciprocating instead
of just being greedy.
SCORPIO Oct 24/Nov 22
You'll want to run the show this week,
Scorpio,. and others will be anxious to
let you. Don't let the power go to your
head, or else you'll make enemies very
quickly.
SAGITTARIUS Nov 23/Dec 21
A friend in need has you running, Sag-
ittarius. But don't be so quick to jump
everytime this person beckons or else
the situation could get out of control.
CAPRICORN Dec 22/Jan 20
You've been doing too much at work
again, Capricorn. If you don't slow your-
-self down; you'Te going-to find-yourself


William's Home
Improvements
"No Job Too Big or Small"
Licensed & Insured, contractor & roofer
Concrete work, landscape------
pressure cleaning,
renovations, seamless i
gutter, painting, vinyl,.
& screen enclosure .
FOR FREE ESTIMATES -,.
Call 674-8092


Stump grinding

Reasonable rates
Free estimates
Call

Chris Nissley
674-8081 or
643-8561 (Cell)






Decks Pole Barns
House Framing & Garages
SWood & Vinyl Siding
*Tin Roofing
o Bathroom Remodeling i
Concrete Work
Call 674-3458


FOR RENT
In Bristol
3BR/2BA doublewide
Mobile home lots
In Blountstown
1 room efficiency, utilities
included 1,000 sq. ft.
commercial building

Phone 643-7740






1, 2 & 3 Bedroom
Apartments
"The Best Place to Live"
Rental Assistance




Call (850) 674-4202
16978 NW Mayo Street,
Blountstown, FL 32424.
TDD/TTY 711.
EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY


physically and mentally worn out.
AQUARIUS Jan 21/Feb 18
Stop being so controlling of the fi-
nances, Aquarius. Putting the spend-
ing blame on others is not accurate
- you're involved in that situation
as well.
PISCES Feb 19/Mar20
If plans don't work out the way you
expected this week, Pisces, don't
get discouraged. Bounce back and
set a new agenda.

FAMOUS BIRTHDAYS

MARCH 5
Kimberly McCullough, Actress (28)
MARCH 6
Moira Kelly, Actress (38)
MARCH 7
Wanda Sykes, Comic (42)
MARCH 8
Freddie Prinze, Jr., Actor (30)
MARCH 9
James Van Der Beek, Actor (29)
MARCH 10
Sharon Stone, Actress (48)
MARCH 11
Johnny Knoxville, Actor (35)






MARCH 1,2006 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 29


IFOR RENT BY OWNER)
Doublewide Mobile Home
Three bedroom, two baths,
large living room and kitchen
$450 Deposit
$450 Rent per month
Located at:
13134 NW Randy's Way
in Bristol.
Call for appointment
(850) 643-5237 (cell)
or (850) 539-6814
2-22, 3-j


AUCTION
First Saturday of every month
The auction will be held March
4 at 7 p.m. (Old Coins, Tools,
Collectibles, candy, food &
Misc. items) Free setup for
yard sale every Saturday.
Public is-invited.
Col. James W. Copeland
18098 NW County Rd. 12
Phone: 643-7740
AB1226 AU0001722




WANTED:

to buy

Real Estate


10 to 1,000 acres,


reasonably priced.


Immediate closing.


Call.


(850) 544-5441 or

"85 -899-7700


$275 BRAND NEW KING
PILLOWTOP SET In sealed
plastic w/ warranty. Can deliver.
850-545-7112
6 PC. BEDROOM SET Brand
new sleigh bed, dresser, mirror,
and nightstand. $650, still boxed.
can deliver, 850-222-9879
BED,-a' solid Wood' sleigh bed:-
headboard," footboard & rails.
NEW in box, $275. Call 850-222-
7783
BED QUEEN PILLOWTOP SET
New in plastic, warranty. $160,
can deliver. 850-425-8374
Bedroom ALL NEW 7 PC set:
All dovetailed, all wood-still
boxed. Retail $4K, must sell
$1400, can deliver. 850-222-2113
CHAIR / LOVESEAT I SOFA -
$650 NEW Micro fiber
upholstery, hardwood frame &
warranty, unopened. 850-545-
7112
DINING, NEW table w/ in lay, ball
& claw feet, leaf, 2 arm chairs, 4
side chairs, hutch/buffet. $4500
sug. list, sacrifice $1750. 850-
222-2113
DINING ROOM New Queen
Anne table w' leaf, 8 chairs &
lighted china cabinet. Still boxed.
$1000. Can deliver. 850-222-
9879 -
LEATHER Sofa & Loveseat still
wrapped: Retail $1900, sell brand
new with warranty $795. 850-
425-8374 -
MATTRESS- 'New full set in
plastic with warranty, $120. 850-
222-9879 .


2003 Ford Excursion XLT, 47,000
miles, 5.4 liter V-8 engine, CD/DVD
player with two monitors, power
everything, like new tires, excel-
lent condition, $18,900. Call 643-
9779. 2-22,3-1

1994 Town & Country Chrysler
van, 160,000 miles, front and rear
air, leather seats, runs good, four
new tires, $2,250 or best offer. Call
674-7138, leave message or 899-
0269. 2-22 T. 3-15
su. ~ ~~---E == ==--- ----an


Field hay trailer, 16 ft., tongue-
pulled, two axle, all steel, $600. Call
762-4231. 2-22,3-1





DOT helmets, HJC XS, gloss black
half, $20; HCI XS, shorty gloss
white, new never worn, $35; HCI
medium, gloss black shorty, $25;
KBCfull-face, medium gloss black,
$25. All helmets in excellent shape.
Call 674-2637 after 5 p.m. 2-22,3-1
1982 Gold Wing 1100, excellent
condition, new tires, $2,500; Moto
Cross boots, brand new, size 10,
paid $120, asking $75. Call 379-
3078. 2-22, 3-1
1997 Harley Davidson Sportster
XL 1200, black, excellent condi-
tion, $6,200. Call. 251-0275 or
674-4028. 2-22, 3-1


" Go-cart, 5 hp., easy start, looks
brand new, less than 20 hours, roll
cage, seat belts, two seater,. paid
$1,200, asking $700; camouflage
mini-bike, 30cc, less than a year
old, paid $400, asking $200. Call
1-800-457-9607 ext. 353 during
the day or 210-7284 at night, leave
message. 2-22,;3-1


'FOR SALE
Small honey
aand bee


business.
q 4 80 hives
Call 592-8924

Buy, sell, trade with an ad in the
classified. For more information
call 643-3333 or fax to 643-3334.

A LAND

for sale
1 0-acre blocks located
near Florida River..
starting at
$7,500 per acre.
City lots for sale.
NEED MONEY?
We do financing
regular and creative.
J.O. Williams, Realtor
Licensed Mortgage Lender
Les Brown, Associate
,Call 643-1566,m .
for more information 7


2006 Layton travel trailer by Sky-
line, 22 ft., sleeps six, AC, central
heat, aluminum siding, awning, all
self-contained, bumper pull with
electric brakes, used three times
and kept under a barn. Pay off
or take over payments. Call 762-
4926. 3-1,3-8


.A.


Boat, motor and trailer, 13 ft. or 14
ft., 70 hp. Evinrude motorwith trailer,
$1,550. Call 643-8089. 3-1, 3-8

2005 0C-5 boat, all-welded, stick
steering, trolling, motor, fish finder,
25 hp. Tohatsu motor, still has over
one year warranty, bought new for
$8,500, asking $6,500. Call 510-
3200. 3-1, 3-8

Boat motors, 40 hp. Mariner Mag-
num, runs great, $1,250; late model
30 hp. Mariner, runs great, stainless
steel prop, $1,250; 35 hp. Evinrude,
runs great, $650; 55 hp. Evinrude,
runs great, $750. Call 674-5720 or
447-0766. 3-1, 3-8

1972 50 hp. Mercury engine, two
stroke, new rebuilt starter, new
throttle controls and has tilt controls.
Engine is complete except for hood,
$300. Call 762-8693 or 272-4478.
3-1, 3-8

1984 Venture Bass boat, 17 1/2
ft., boat and trailer in good condi-
tion, motor needs to -be rebuilt or
replaced, 200 Mariner, lower unitin
good shape and two stainless steel
props, $1,200. Call 643-4358 or
643-6223. 3-1, 3-8

Trolling motors, three to choose
from, oldest is 28 lb. thrust Minnkota,
for parts, $15; Sears Gamefisher,
24 lb., works good, $50; Minnkota
A/T, 40 lbs., like new, $150. Call
674-2485. --. 2-22, 3-1




Shepard/Labrador mix pup-
pies, six weeks old, four cream
colored, four black and tan and
one black, first set of worm
shots, parents on premises, $20
each. Call 237-2373 or email
sunnywork323032002 @yahoo.
com. 3-1, 3-8



WANTED

Acreage on an

existing road

dirt, clay

or paved

Tri-Land Inc.,

Lic. R.E.Broker

Call 813-253-3258 ,
.. ... :.; ^^^,__ ,__ ___ --- ---- .


Chickens, one day to four-weeks
old, Bantams and large breeds,
female chicks will grow to be great
layers of brown and green eggs,
male chicks will grow to be nice
meat chickens, buy 1-10 chicks, $2
each, 11-20 chicks, $1.50 each,,and
21+ chicks, $1 each; nearly grown
ducks, $10 each. We will also accept
trades. Call 643-3034. 3-1, 3-8

Registered Quarter Horse, 10
years old, $800; free puppy, half
blue heeler. Call 674-2716.
3-1,3-8

AKC yellow Labrador, house
trained or outdoor, good with kids,
dogs and cats, will make a great
waterfowl and hunting dog, really
smart, fast learner, needs lots of
love and attention, has papers,
$400 or best offer. Call 643-9332
after 3 p.m. 3-1,3-8



Lost: Expecting 1 1/2-year-old
white English bulldog, black spot
around one eye, tail cropped, blue
collar, named "Sugar", missing from
Evans St. in Altha. Call 762-4029.
3-1, 3-8

Found: Rottweilleron Martin Sewell
Rd., very thin, call to describe. Call
762-8701. 2-22, 3-1
Found: Female hound dog on Hoe
Cake Rd. in Bristol. Call to describe.
Call 643-5479. 2-22, 3-1



Wanted: Dog box with division, at
a reasonable price, to fit 1998 Ford
Ranger. Call 762-8343.
3-1,-3-8.

Wanted: Coca-Cola bottles and
items. Call 545-3677. 3-1,3-22

Wanted: Aluminum tool box to
fit 1985 Nissan pickup, 54 inches
between'bed-rails. Call 593-5429.
2-22, 3-1

Wanted: To trade Winchester,
model 1200, 12 gauge, 26-inch
improved cylinder and Savage bolt
action 270 for a Marlin 336 CS 35
Remington or 223 bolt action or
Winchester Model 94 22 Magnum
or Marlin 336 CS 35 Remington.
Call 762-8285. 2-8T. 3-8

Wanted: 1955-57 Ford two-door
car. Call 850-722-0316. 2-22,3-1

Wanted: Liftchairin good condition.
Call 643-1236, leave message.
2-22, 3-1

Wanted: Good used trampoline
with net. Call 643-2812.
2-22, 3-1

Wanted: one cord firewood split in
2 ft. lengths. Call 762-8285.
2-8 T. 3-15

Wanted: Guns, paying cash, old or
modem rifles, shotguns, pistols, one
gun or collection, military guns, old
double barrels. Call 674-4860.
12-21 T. 3-29

Wanted: Junk cars and trucks, any
.condition, no. charge JQrjremoval,
,.Call 762-8459.-' "-"-2T.3,i6.


_7_ ___Ft -





Additional runs of the same ad (more than 2 weeks) are $2 per
week and must be paid in advance. We do not bill for classified.


2 1/2 Acres cleared with shade
trees, new deep well and septic,
older mobile home (needs repairs),
very secluded, private drive, one
neighbor, one mile off of Hwy. 274
Weston Church Rd. in Shelton area,
$30,000 firm. Call 762-2090.
3-1,3-8

Land and mobile home in Bristol,
four bedroom, three bath, double-
wide with fireplace, 24 x 24 covered
shed, 12 x 24 back porch partially
covered, $53,000. Call 643-9890 or
447-0536 for an appointment, leave
message if needed. 3-1,3-8

1 1/2 Acres in Clarksville, cleared
with septic tank and well with high-
way frontage on Newsome Rd,
$25,000. Call 674-5179. 3-1,3-8
Brick home, 3 bedroom, 21/2 batch
on 1.5 acres on Blackbottom Road
in between Blountstown and Altha.
(850) 303-1739. 3-1,3-8
Beautiful 2 bedroom, 1 bath,
dining room, large living room,
totally remodeled in Altha, (239)
872-9479. 3-1, 3-8
Duplex house, located in Jackson
County, in very good shape, must
-be moved, asking $5,000. Call 526-
1753. 2-22, 3-1
Brick home with 6 1/2 acres,
three bedroom, two bath, fireplace,
secluded, two shops, $240,000. Call
674-9328. 2-22,3-1
1998 Skyline mobile home, 16 x
80, three bedroom, two bath, must
move, asking pay off; front and rear
deck, 10 x 12 and 12 x 15, extra
$1,000 firm. Call 694-6874 cell or
643-1044 home, leave message.
2-22, 3-1



Moving sale, Saturday, March 4
beginning at 8 a.m. (CT) at 14206
SW CR. 275, Abe Springs, two
miles down off Hwy. 20. Bed-couch
and matching love seat, $100 or
best offer; baby jogging stroller,
paid $120, asking $50; Golden
Labrador retrieverwith papers, born
May 1, 2005, has alot of love to
share, needs a good loving home,
paid $300, asking $100; ADBA red
nose Pit bull puppies born Dec.
12, 2005, first shots and wormed,
asking $200; four matching kitchen
chairs; bicycles, yard toys, toys,
baby clothes, books, knick-knacks,
new 1000 watt microwave, lamps,
lots of women's clothes, exercise
equipment and lots more. Call 674-
2710. 3-1,3-8

Yard sale, Saturday, March 4 from
8 until noon on Bay St. at Pine Is-
land in Blountstown. Clothes and
household items. Call 674-5982.
3-1, 3-8

Multi-family yard sale, Saturday,
March 4 beginning at 7 a.m. at
the Farm Bureau- parking lot in
Blountstown, across from the high
school. Lots of clothes and house-
hold items. Cancel if rain. Call 674-
2666. 3-1,3-8






Page 30 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL MARCH 1,2006


Ribbons cut for new Chipola facilities


MARIANNA-The Chipola
College District Board of Trustees
and local dignitaries participated
in ribbon-cutting ceremonies last
week to celebrate the opening of
the college's new Student Services
Building, Administration Wing,
Burn Building and Fire Tower.
The 24,600 square foot,
Student Services building
includes a renovation of the
former Administration building
with additional new construction.
The space is home to the business
office, enrollment services,
admissions, registration, financial
aid, counseling and advising, and
testing, information systems and
the college switchboard.


A new 8,800 square foot
Administrative Wing connected
to Student Services houses the
president's office, other top
administrators, as well as meeting
areas.
Total cost of the Student
Services Building and
Administrative Wing was
$5.9 million which included
demolition, renovation and new
construction. Total size of both
projects is more than 33,000
square feet.
Dignitaries, also traveled to
Chipola's Bill Reddoch Firing
Range Annex on Blue Springs
Highway to tour a pair of new
firefighting facilities.


o i eda e 2-

MATTIE L. PRICE
BLOUNTSTOWN Mattie L. Price, 79, went home to be with
the Lord on Sunday morning, Feb. 26, 2006 after a long and coura-


kVL1E SlF:IEmIUS
cotnudfrmpg e 29 ~a


Yard sale, Wednesday, March 1 and
Thursday, March 2 from 9 a.m. until
2 p.m. at 17112 NE Morgan Tucker
Rd. off of 71 N. Follow signs. Cancel
if rain. Countertops, clothes, space
heaters, baby stuff and much more.
Call 674-9439.
3-1,3-8
Big annual yard sale, Saturday,
March 4 beginning at 8 a.m. at
20157 SW Dogwood Ave. (behind
Burger King, off of Cypress). Home
of the 25 cent trailer. We need
to clean house again. Will have
furniture, tools, house hold items,
women's shoes size 9 and many
miscellaneous items. Call 674-
6520. 3-1,3-8

Multi-family yard sale, Saturday,
March 4 from 8 to 11 a.m. on SR
69N (intersection of SR69 and CR
69A north of Blountstown). Clothes
for men and women, misses 12
and up, men's, all sizes up to 4X,
blouses, sweaters, shirts, pants
skirts, dresses, shoes, socks, etc.,


lots of brand name clothing, also
household items and furniture.
3-1

Multi-family garage sale, Satur-
day, March 4 beginning at 7 a.m.
at 17565 NE Charlie Johns St.
in Blountstown. Clothing, dishes,
furniture, tools and miscellaneous.
Call 674-4770. 3-1

Large multi-family yard sale,
Saturday, March 4 beginning at 8
a.m. on Hwy. 69N near elementary
school in Blountstown. Lots of Ty
Beanie Babies, furniture, girl's Eas-
ter dresses, baby items, something
for everyone. Call 643-4134. 3-1

Yard sale, Saturday, March 4 from 8
a.m.until 1 p.m. at21044 Burlington
Rd. in Hosford. Look for signs. Rain
or shine. Call 379-9335. 3-1

Yard sale, Saturday, March 4 be-
ginning at 7 a.m. (CT) at the Jesus
Christ Outreach Ministry building


on Hwy. 20 W. one mile past the
caution light on the right in Clarks-
ville. Knick-knacks, dishes, clothing,
household items, woodcrafts, etc.
Call 762-2113. 3-1

Yard sale, Saturday, March 4 start-
ing at 8 a.m. (CT) at 18662 NE
Live Oak Lane, lots of women's
clothing, shoes, household and
miscellaneous items. Something
for everyone. Phone 674-3634.
3-1

'Farm Equipment'

AUCTION
RESCHEDULED AUCTION
Saturday, March.11 at 9 a.m.
One mile east of Greenwood
on Hwy. 69 Fort Rd.
WATCH FOR SIGNS
For more information:
John Stanley call (850) 594-5200
AU044/AB491
CONSIGNMENTS WELCOME )


geous battle with lung cancer.
She was born in Castleberry, AL
on Nov. 4, 1926 and had lived
in Calhoun County since 1943
when she married her beloved
husband of 40 years, Albert
Price. Mattie, along with her
husband, Albert were owners
and operators of Mattie's Steak
House in Blountstown for sev-
eral years and also operated the
Corky Service Station. She was
a member of the First Baptist
Church in Blountstown.
She was preceded in death
in 1981 by her husband, Albert
Price. -
Survivors include one son,
Charles A. Price of Blountstown;
one daughter, Jackie Jordan
and her husband, Ellis of
Blountstown; six grandchil-
dren, Keith Bailey and his wife,
Marie of Blountstown, Melody
Bailey of Chantilly, VA, Tech
Sgt. Christopher Bailey of Lake
Placid, CA, Brandi Lee and her
husband, Keith of Blountstown,
Kim Roland and her husband,
Michael of Dothan, AL, Greg
Jordan and his wife, Amy of
Blountstown; 14 great-grand-
ohildren, Lindsay Lewis and her
husband, Bart, Sherie Bailey,
Heath Bailey, Jordan Herndon,
Trenton, Marissa, Dillan and
Dharma Lee, Alexis Askew,
Cassandra Bailey, Hunter and
Tucker Jordan, Max and Jacob
Roland; one great-great-grand-:
child, Brock Lewis; one brother,
Pete Gibson of Mobile, AL; one
sister, Mary Howard of Brew-
ton, AL; one half-sister, Mamie
Godwin of Castleberry, AL; and
a host of nieces and nephews.
Services will be held Wednes-
day, March 1, 2006 at 2 p.m.
(CT) from the First Baptist
Church in Blountstown with
Rev. Tom Stallworth officiating
and Joe Shuler eulogizing. Inter-
ment will follow in Nettle Ridge
Cemetery in Blountstown.
Peavy Funeral Home in
Blountstown is in charge of.the
.1 .I aI -Is.i-y; I 1


'05 FORD MUSTANG GT
Hard Top, 77k Miles............................................... 2 6 ,9 8 8


'05 LINCOLN TOWN CAR -
Loaded, Like New....................... .................. ............ 25,888 '06 EXPEDITION EDDIE BAUER

'05 CHEVY SILVERADO LS Loaded, Save Big! ................................................ 28,988
4 Door, 22k Miles ................... 21,888 '05 FORD F-150 LARIAT
$.. ..8, 88.Q


'05 FORD FOCUS $
17k Miles, 2 to choose from ......... 888

'05 DODGE RAM 2500 QUAD CAB SLT
Diesel, 4x4, 19k Miles, Auto.,SAVE BIG 32,888

'04 JEEP WRANGLER 4x4
4.0, V-6, only 8k Miles LIKE NEW $18,888

'02 FORD EXPLORER
Only 73k Miles, Clean 13,988

'00 FORD F-250 SUPERCAB
4x4, Lariat, Loaded, Local Trade $ 1,888


ALL PRICES INCLUDE FORD MOTOR CREDIT BONUS CASH

TH AHNL' ATS RWN ELR


Crew Cab, 4x4.,................................................... .. .... -. ,00u u

'05 FORD TAURUS
Loaded, Leather, Sunroof.............. 13,888

'05 SPORTS TRAC
Like New, only 3,000 miles................................................ 22 ,8 88

'05 CHEVY MALIBU
Great Economy, 27k Miles............................................. 1 ,988

'05 SUZUKI LX7 4 X 4
16k Miles, Like New........................................................... 9 ,9 8 8

'04 F-350 DIESEL LARIAT
Loaded, Local Trade........................... ........................... 2 6 ,8 8 8

'04 AVALANCHE Z66 $
Like New ................ ............ 2 2 ,8 88

04 FORD RANGER
12k Miles, Like New 13,888

'00 FORD F-250 SUPERCREW LARIAT $18,888
4x4, Diesel ,0






MARCH 1, 2006 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 31


FWC Division of Law Enforcement Field Operations Weekly Report


This report represents some
significant events the FWC
handled over the past week;
however, it does not include all
actions taken by the Division of
Law Enforcement.
NORTHWEST REGION
OKALOOSA COUNTY
A small antlerless deer was
discovered in a vehicle by Officer
Pete Rockwell while checking
hunters exiting Blackwater
WMA. Officer Rockwell
located the deer concealed in a
subject's vehicle after he noticed
the subject appeared nervous.
The subject was charged with
taking an antlerless deer.
Officer Willie Mailoto was
conducting follow-up patrol in
Unit 7 of Eglin WMA regarding
an earlier bear kill in the area.
He found two different hunters
who were hunting with inline
muzzleloaders. Both were
convicted felons. The guns were
seized and charges are pending
confirmation of their convicted
felon status.
Lt. Jeff Hahr and Officers Alan
Kirchinger and Pete Rockwell
responded to an Okaloosa County
deputy's request for assistance
involving possible night hunting.
Their investigation revealed that
the afterdark shooting was done
as an aggravation to an adjacent
landowner. A consent search of
one suspect's property did reveal


a small, suspected marijuana
plant, which was seized. The
case will be presented to the
State Attorney.
Officer Rockwell was
patrolling Blackwater WMA off
of Beaver Creek Road when he
checked a hunter leaving at dark.
He found a freshly killed doe
deer in the man's vehicle. He
was cited and his muzzleloader
seized.
HOLMES COUNTY
Investigators Dan Hahr and
Gene Lollie followed up on a
complaint that a Holmes County
game farm was operating in the
manner of a hunting preserve.
Their investigation revealed
that two red deer were shot
by paid hunters that morning.
The operator was charged for
operating a hunting preserve
without having a license.
WALTON COUNTY
Officer Darrell Johnson
was working at home when he
received a complaint of trespass
"hunting on Nokuse Plantation.'
Lt. Mark Holliphead and Officer
Brian Parkton responded to
assist. Two Walton County men
and their young son were found in
possession of three highpowered
rifles and one freshly shot, six-
point buck. They were cited
for not having licenses and for
using modern weapons during
the muzzleloading season.


DOORS

News from The
Florida Fish
and Wildlife
Conservation
Commission


Investigator Gene Lollie and
Officer Johnson followed their
sign the next day and tracked
them back to an area almost
a mile onto Nokuse property.
They took samples of blood at
the scene of the kill, along the
drag mark, and a sign which was
torn down. Trespass charges
are pending. The rifles and deer
were seized as evidence.
SANTA ROSA COUNTY
Officer Alan Kirchinger
received information about a
baited area in Blackwater WMA.
On his day off, he took Officer
Mike Guy into the area, to show
him the area. They found one
man hunting over the bait and
using a .223 rifle to hunt. He
was cited and the rifle seized.
On Thursday, February 16
Jerry D. Broxson, a longtime
wildlife poacher and multiple


offender, pled no contest to the
charge of violation of probation.
He was sentenced to 90 days
house arrest, 60 days in jail, and
suspension of hunting privileges
for five years, as well as
probation for three more years.
In years past, officers have cited
Broxson on several different
occasions with the courts
applying minimal penalties until
now. He was on probation and
under suspension of his hunting
privileges when he was caught
hunting last December. The
efforts of Investigator Dan Hahr
and Officer Howard Jones over
the last three years finally paid
off in the judicial system.
FRANKLIN COUNTY
On February 15-17, Officers
Percy Cook, Charlie Wood,
Travis Huckeba, Steven Cook,
Don Walker, Carmon Brownell,
and Hank Forehand worked an
undersize oyster detail in the
Apalachicola Bay. This three-
day detail included educational
and enforcement actions and
resulted in 20 misdemeanor
arrests, 5 boating safety citations,
and 71 written warnings.
On February 21, the JJ Brown
responded to a call for help from
the USCG. Two vessels that left
February 20 did not return from
an offshore trip. Both vessels
were located approximately ten
miles south of Dog Island. One


had a disabled outdrive and the
other, that responded to assist
the first, ran out of fuel. The JJ
Brown assisted by towing in one
of the vessels.
LEON COUNTY
On Friday, February 17, Lt.
Rocky Clement's squad was
having a meeting at his home
when a neighbor knocked at
the front door and asked for
assistance with her mother. Her
mother had fallen on the floor and
could not get to her feet. Several
attempts by her daughter proved
unsuccessful. Lt. Clement,
Officer Stefanie Wilcox, and
Intern Scott Battle responded
to the residence. They found
the 80-year-old mother on
the kitchen floor lying on her
side. They attempted several
different ways to assist and all
attempts were unsuccessful.
Lt. Clement asked the daughter
to call EMS while Officer S.
Wilcox stabilized and comforted
the mother. EMS arrived and a
plan was made to get the mother
on a backboard to lift her to the
awaiting- gurney. Lt. Clement
called the rest of his squad for
assistance in lifting the mother
up so EMS could transport her
to the hospital for treatment of
an injured leg.
JEFFERSON COUNTY
Over the weekend, Officer
Dale Wilcox was on patrol on
the Wacissa River when he
encountered three individuals
in possession of 18 largemouth
bass with four being undersized.
The appropriate citations were
written.
Last summer Officers Dale
and Stefanie Wilcox made a
DUI case on an individual at
the headwaters of the Wacissa
River. The individual received
a sentence of a five-year driver's
license suspension. After
observing the individual driving
up to McDonalds, Officer
S. Wilcox went to the State
Attorney in Jefferson County
and got a warrant for his arrest.
Officer Dale Wilcox, along
with a deputy from Jefferson
County, served the warrant over
the weekend and placed the
subject in the Jefferson County
Jail.








New Business








With An Ad In
The Calhoun-Lib-

erty Journal
643-3333 or
1 (800) 717-3333







Page 32 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL MARCH 1,2006


Players from the past joined the new crop of team
members for Liberty County High School's annual
alumni baseball game Feb. 11 in Bristol to raise
funds for uniforms and supplies. Liberty County's
best known baseball alumnus former Seattle
Mariners pitcher Tim Davis of Bristol is shown
at right as he gets ready to strike out a batter.
ABOVE: The ball blurs as the the pitch is made.
TOP: Jared Day dives back to second base as
the shortstop waits for the ball from the pitcher.
BELOW: Heath Flannigan slides into third base
in a cloud of dust as the ball heads for Grant
Conyers'-glove.
DANIEL WILLIAMS PHOTOS


Still time to sign up

for BOW Workshop

in Tallahassee
from the Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission
The Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission
(FWC) still has openings for
its Tallahassee Becoming an
Outdoors-Woman (BOW)
workshop for women who want
to spend a weekend learning a
variety of outdoor activities.
The three-day workshop
takes place March 10-12
at Camp Wallwood on the
Gadsden County side of Lake
Talquin. The program begins
Friday at 11 a.m. and ends
Sunday with lunch.
Although designed with
women in mind, the workshop
is open to everyone 18 and
older who wants to improve
their outdoor skills and enjoy a
few recreational activities. In
four, three-and-one-half-hour
sessions, the workshop teaches
skills associated with hunting,
fishing and other forms of
outdoor recreation, at all levels
of-physical activity.
The BOW Program offers a
fun and supportive atmosphere
for participants wishing to
try new things and enjoy the
camaraderie of others who
want to learn about Florida's
great outdoors.
The cost for the program
is $150, and there are a few
discounted slots available for
low-income participants, single
parents and college- stti-ents.
The workshop is restricted
to 100 participants on a first-
come, first-served basis.
For more information on the
BOW workshop and how you
can register, visit MyFWC.
com/BOW or call (850) 413-
0085.

Hunter Safety
Course offered


2PI


Players raise funds at LCHS alumni game


in Bay County
from the Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission
The Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission
(FWC)js offering a free three-
day hunter safety course in Bay
County.
The course will be at the Bay
County Fairgrounds, corner of
U.S. 98 and Sherman Ave. from
6 9 p.m. March.10 and from
8 a.m. to 5 p.m. March 11. The
firing range section of the course
is scheduled for March 12.
The hunter safety course is
required for anyone born on or
after June 1, 1975 to purchase a
huntinglicense. TheFWCcourse
satisfies hunter safety training
requirements for all other states
and Canadian provinces.
Persons interested in attending
this course can register on line
and obtain information about
future hunter safety classes at
myfwc.com/huntered or by
calling FWC's regional office in
Panama City at (850) 265-3676.