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 Main: Job MKT.
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 Main: Obituaries
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The Calhoun-Liberty journal
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00027796/00058
 Material Information
Title: The Calhoun-Liberty journal
Portion of title: Calhoun Liberty journal
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: The Liberty Journal, Inc.
Place of Publication: Bristol Fla
Creation Date: February 8, 2006
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Bristol (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Liberty County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Calhoun County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Liberty -- Bristol
Coordinates: 30.426944 x -84.979167 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in Sept. 1991.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 11, no. 38 (Sept. 18, 1991).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002046630
oclc - 33425067
notis - AKN4565
lccn - sn 95047245
System ID: UF00027796:00058
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly journal (Bristol, Fla.)

Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
    Main: Sheriff's Log
        page 2
    Main continued
        page 3
        page 4
        page 5
    Main: Commentary
        page 6
        page 7
    Main continued
        page 8
        page 9
        page 10
    Main continued
        page 11
    Main continued
        page 12
    Main: Weddings
        page 13
    Main continued
        page 14
        page 15
        page 16
        page 17
        page 18
        page 19
        page 20
        page 21
    Main: Job MKT.
        page 22
    Main continued
        page 23
        page 24
        page 25
    Main: Obituaries
        page 26
    Main continued
        page 27
    Main: Classifieds
        page 28
        page 29
        page 30
    Main continued
        page 31
        page 32
Full Text





The C...-luu.-.ivLersy


Commission to review

letter from State Health

Dept. at next meeting
by Teresa Eubanks, Journal Editor
The Liberty County Commission is expected to address the health
department issue again at this week's meeting in-Bristol Thursday,
where they will be presented with a letter from Dr. Bonita J. So-
renson, Deputy State Health Officer, in response to their demand
that Liberty County Health Department Administrator David Odum
be fired.
Odum, who oversees both the Calhoun and Liberty County Health
Departments, angered commissioners when he dismissed Dr. Mari
Thomas, following a dispute over the writing of prescriptions by a
nurse practitioner.
Liberty County Commissioners sided with Thomas, and insisted
that she be reinstated and the administrator be fired.
In a letter dated January 20, Sorensen wrote that she had met
with four Calhoun County Commissioners as well as all five Liberty
County Commissioners.
"Although the Calhoun County Commissioners did not express
concerns about Mr. Odum, I clearly heard the concerns expressed
by some Liberty County Commissioners," she said in a letter ad-
dressed to Liberty County Commission Chairman John T. Sanders.
"Although I respectfully decline your recommendation to terminate
Mr. Odum, I assure you that the Florida Department of Health deeply
values its relationship with the Board of County Commissioners and
I pledge to work closely with Mr. Odum to make sure he attends
as many future commission meetings and workshops as physically
possible. Additionally, I will assist Mr. Odumin his decisions related
to the board's requests of the County Health Department."
She also assured the board that she is working to find an onsite
physician to oversee the existing nurse practitioners' services.
Dr. Thomas, who is talking with attorneys, is in the process of
moving from her rental home in Bristol to a site in Panama City,
where she plans to look for work.
The state attorney's office is investigating the issue of prescrip-
tions written using Thomas' DEA number, which she said was used
without her knowledge or permission.

Man arrested for
disturbance in
trailer park........3

Woman charged
after deputy sees
her hit truck and
leave scene.......3

BHS Tigers end
season with win
over LCHS........9

FWC revises
hunting and
fishing rules.... 15
A group of young visitors got
Crossbow season snake, as they toured the gro
Park Biologist Mark Ludlow
planned............ 15 patterned scales. For more


Three hurt when truck slams into bus
Three teenager boys traveling in a pickup IMP p. .
were injured when they slammed into the
rear of a Calhoun County School Bus
Tuesday afternoon, according to Lt. Adam .' 'U
Terry of the Calhoun County Sheriff's
Department. The truck was westbound on
State Road 20 when it rear-erided a 2000
International bus carrying eight passengersV
from Blountstown to Carr School at 3:04
p.m. No one i. the school bus was injured.
The driver of the truck and ,his middle
passenger each sustained minor injuries
and were taken by ambulance to Jackson
Hospital. A second passenger, who was
sitting on the far right, suffered serious
but not life-threatening injuries, Terry said.
The 16-year-old was taken by emergency helicopter to Bay Medical Center to be treated for
head-injuries and a broken leg. The collision occurred just east of Hummingbird Way, near
Kid's Kingdom Day Care. JOHNNY EUBANKS PHOTO


a hands-on introduction to one of the area's inhabitants, a pine
unds during Torreya Park Day, held Saturday in Liberty County.
holds the creature as kids take turns stroking its delicately-
photos on the day's events, please see page 17.
PHOTO BY PAM AND BILL ANDERSON


LCHS to hold
100 inning ball
game Feb. 10...4

Sweetheart
Pageant set......4

Sacred Harp
Singing to be
presented in
Blountstown......4

Peanut producers
meeting set in
Marianna............5

City of Bristol
water quality
report............... 23



Sh eriff'sLog...2 CommunityCalendar. .4 Commentar y..6,7 Obituare...26Clasdad...28-30





Page 2 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL FEBRUARY 8,2006


Shortcut leads to

DUI arrest Sunday
Taking a shortcut led to a long night for a
Blountstown man who was heading home early
Sunday morning.
Jerry Lee Guilford, 55, thought he would cut
through a convenience store parking lot instead of
waiting for the light after traveling north on County
Road 12 into Bristol at 12:24 a.m.
Liberty County Sheriff's Deputy Wes Harsey
pulled over the 2002 Chevrolet pickup after seeing
it cut across the BP parking lot onto State Road 20,
where it turned west.
In his arrest report, Harsey noted that as he
talked with the driver he noticed the strong odor
of an alcoholic beverage and saw two empty beer
bottles and two empty beer cans in the bed of the
truck. The deputy also observed four unopened
cans of beer directly behind the driver.
Guilford initially denied he had been drinking
but after failing a roadside sobriety test, acknowl-
edged that he had "five or. six beers" at a party
earlier.
Guilford who has twice run for sheriff un-
successfully in Calhoun County was charged
with DUI. He was also cited for cutting across to
avoid a traffic control device and driving with an
open container.

Habitual traffic offender
arrested after making
trip to convenience store
Atrip to the store ended with a ride in a patrol car
to the county jail after a Liberty County Sheriff's
Deputy saw a man driving whose license had been
revoked for five years.
Deputy Wes Harsey was assisting another officer
with a disabled vehicle obstructing traffic at the
intersection of County Road .12 and State Road 20
when he noticed Ellis Mon ot Jr. dri e by. Harsey
was aware that Mirrow\ had been convicted as a
habitual traffic offender and was not eligible to
drive again legally until 2011.
Morrow drove past the officer and pulled up at
the BP con% enience store and \ ent inside. When
he came out, Harsey's patrol car was parked behind
his pickup.
When the deputy spoke with Morrow he detected
the odor of an alcoholic beverage coming from
him and saw an empty beer bottle in the bed of
the truck with condensation on it. "Yeah, I had a
couple of beers earlier.but I'm not drunk," he told
the deputy.
During a search of his pickup, the deputy found
an ice chest full of beer and ice.
After being taken to the jail, Morrow was given
a Breathalyzer test and blew just below the legal
Limit, proving that he was not intoxicated.
He was charged with driving while license
suspended or revoked and cited for not wearing
a seat belt.


CALHOUN COUNTY
Jan. 31: Donald Williams, DUI; Tommy Bailey, VOP (county); James
Word, VOP (state); Jerry T. Cook, VOP (state); Jeremy Ridley, hunt-
ing on right-of-way, use of rimfire cartridge to take deer, discharge of
firearm on paved right-of-way; Alvin Patterson, disorderly intoxication,
indecent exposure in public.
Feb. 3: Kevin Hansford, VOP (county); Michael Jones; larceny over
$300, burglary of a structure, criminal mischief; Tracey McDonald,
larceny over $300, burglary of a structure, criminal mischief; Thomas
Dawsey, possession of less than 20 grams of cannabis; Taylor Allen,
driving while license suspended or revoked, reckless driving.
Feb. 4: Charles L. Capps Jr., writ of attachment, criminal mischief;
Aqurlins Ramirez, no valid driver's license; Vincent Wooten, possession
of less than 20 grams of cannabis, possession of drug paraphernalia.
Feb. 5: Timothy Peavey, DUI.
LIBERTY COUNTY
Feb. 1: Eustorgio Gonzalez, DUIl
Feb. 4: Catrina Illeen Hall, driving while license suspended or re-
voked, possession of schedule 3 narcotic without a prescription.
Feb. 5: Jerry Lee Gilford, DUI; E. Morrow, driving while license sus-
pended or revoked (felony).
Feb. 6: Douglas Taylor, holding for court.
Listings include name followedby charge and identification ofarrestingagency. The names above represent
those charged. We remind our readers that all are presumed innocent until proven guilty.
Blountstown Police Dept.
Jan. 30 through Feb. 5, 2006 ('L
Citations issued:
Accidents............. 05 Traffic Citations..................05
Special details (business escorts, traffic details)......40
Business alarms....00 Residential alarms...........01
Com plaints................. ... ......................1.. 34



12 L c"")
.E, CLt L .


Ty stuffed
S/- animals and
many more!

Great
S. selection of


balloons!


Russell
Stover &
Whitman's
Chocolates!

* Valentine
Cards!


Large selection of sterling
silver bracelets, earrings,
chains and slides.
?|||!l^^^,^ __^ ^ ^^ ____ J I


I


Scanner seized as

evidence in DUI arrest
A Blountstown man was charged with DUI after
a deputy with the Calhoun County Sheriff's Depart-
ment came up behind him in traffic and saw him
driving erratically early Sunday morning.
Deputy William Dalton was northbound on Hwy.
73 at 12:24 a.m. when he noticed a pickup ahead of
him weaving from side to side in its lane. The truck
went over the outside white line several times and
was following the vehicle ahead too closely.
When the deputy pulled over the pickup and
spoke with the driver, identified as Timothy Eu-
gene Peavey, 43, he detected the strong odor of an
alcoholic beverage coming from the inside of the
vehicle. According to the-deputy's report, Peavey
denied that he had been drinking but his speech was
slurred, he lost his balance twice during a roadside
sobriety test and could not recite the alphabet.
Following a Breathalyzer test, Peavey was
charged with DUI.
During a search of his vehicle, a police scan-
ner programmed to the Calhoun County Sheriff's
Department frequency was found in the front seat
and collected for evidence. Peavey told the deputy
he had heard him run a license check on him over
the scanner.

Woman arrested with 35
I pills but no prescription
A Liberty County woman who wasn't supposed
to be driving was arrested Saturday when she was
spotted behind the wheel by a deputy who knew
that her license was suspended.
Catrina Eilleen Hall, 41, of Sumatra was pulling
into the driveway qf a Bristol home when she was
met by a deputy, who was doing a welfare check
at the residence.
As she was arrested, Hall told the deputy she
was driving because she had to go pick up grocer-
ies for her father. When the deputy checked her
vehicle, he didn't find any food but he did discover
a bottle containing several pills, later verified as
Schedule III narcotics for which she did not have
a prescription.
The bottle held 35 pills, including 26 of hydro-
, codone and nine of Loratab. Hall told the deputy
she had taken two Loratab pills.
Hall was charged with driving while license sus-
pended or revoked and possession of a controlled
substance without a prescription.

*.*. .. ... .... .
| Guardian ad Litems
...are powerful voices in the lives of
abused and neglected children in
our community. Join us and speak
up for a child! Call the Guardian ad
Litem Program at (850) 482-9127
or (850) 638-60433
O l


BIG RIVER MOBILE HOMES
HWY. 20 WEST IN BLOUNTSTOWN -PHONE 674-9800 SEE ANN OR KIM!




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purchase a new OS Come by


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durIng the month o1
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Febtua y and reeIe
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t pAKAGE. a
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School specials from $5.95 "
WE DELIVER TO ALL
LIBERTY COUNTY SCHOOLS
Come early for the best selection _
06


A I I I --,- --I-,--- I I -- I .
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* "! | I


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FEBRUARY 8; 2006 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 3


One arrested after disturbance in Blountstown trailer park


by Teresa Eubanks, Journal Editor
A Calhoun County Sheriff's
Deputy responding to a domestic
disturbance call at a Blountstown
mobile home park arrived to see
several people gathered in the
front yard at a residence where a
car was leaving at a high rate of
speed, heading his direction:
The car, driven by Taylor E.
Allen, raced out of the park as
the deputy drove in and came
within 25 feet of colliding with
the patrol car before he make a
reckless right turn and slid side-
ways toward Hayes Subdivision
Road, according to the report filed
by Deputy Bliss Moreau.
When the deputy stopped the
car, he noticed that the driver's
shirt had blood on it and he could
smell the strong odor of an alco-
holic beverage.
Allen willingly told the officer
he'd had four beers and stumbled
as he stepped out of his car to










r .-.i .


take a roadside sobriety test. In
his report, the deputy described
Allen as "belligerent" and said
he had difficulty understanding
directions for the field sobriety
exercise.
Allen was arrested for DUI and
reckless driving and placed in the
back of the patrol car.
After he was taken to the
county jail, Moreau returned to
Cochran's Trailer Park to the
scene of the initial battery com-
plaint.
According to his report, wit-
nesses stated that Allen appeared
intoxicated when he arrived at
the residence of Tesa Kelly on
Jim Durham Road He was asked
to leave, but became agitated and
combative, getting into a verbal
altercation with Ronnie Sims.
Both Kelly and Sims toldAllen to
leave. They told the deputy that
Allen jumped on Sims.
Sims suffered a- severe bite


CUA4RANEDANONYMY -






IT WORKS!


TOGETHER WE CAN MAKE A DIFFERENCE


above the left eye and was sent to
the hospital. He was later flown
to Bay Medical Center due to an
unknown head trauma.
Several family members who
tried to control Allen were thrown


to the ground in the attempt. All
declined to press charges against
him at that time.
In addition to the DUI charge,
Allen was charged with driv-
ing while license suspended or


revoked, reckless driving and
battery.
He was taken to the Calhoun
County Jail and given a con-
ditional release several hours
later.


Woman charged with DUI after deputy


witnesses her hit truck &


by Teresa Eubanks, Journal Editor
A Tallahassee woman spent
the night in the Liberty County
Jail after a deputy witnessed her
rear-end a truck and drive off
Saturday night in Bristol.
Amber Cherie Peacock, 27,
was traveling north on County
Road 12 around 11:25 p.m. when
she came up behind a red Toyota
pickup that was slowing down
to stop at the traffic light at the
intersection with State Road 20.
Peacock's Honda Accord hit the
right rear of the truck and con-


tinued through the parking lot of
the Express Lane convenience
store and drove onto State Road
20 without stopping, according to
the report filed by Deputy Chuck
Barber.
Peacock continued on for a
half mile before stopping for the
deputy, who was following her
with his patrol lights flashing.
When Barber approached
the driver, he found her crying
uncontrollably. While speaking
with Peacock, the deputy detected
the odor of an alcoholic beverage.


I -~~ 5ev'A4 00o~..


Roses Musical bears
Cut sweetheart arrangements
Bath baskets Drink bags
Candy Balloons
New singing balloons
Stuffed animals


All school orders must be placed by Monday Feb. 13
C MNargo.'s

Hiw ooml ni raus

S Hwy. 20 in Bristol (next to Myrlene's)


- -- - -


Kathy Cobb at

Town & Country

BEAUTY SHOP


TANNING

BED

10 Visits


$25
Haircuts .....$10


Open Monday Friday
10 a.m. til 6 p.m. (ET)

. Located 1/2 mile east out of Bristol on left.
Telephone 643-5111


leave scene
When he asked the driver about
the damage to the left front of
her car, she replied that she had
run into her sister's car that after-
noon. He then asked her to step
out to perform a field sobriety
exercise.
After unsuccessfully complet-
ing the test, Peacock became
"irate and out of control," accord-
ing to the deputy's report. She
was handcuffed and put in the
back of the patrol car.
The driver of the truck pulled
up and an accident report was
completed at the scene. No one
was injured. Damages were es-
timated at $1,000 to the truck's
right rear bumper. The driver of
the pickup was not identified in
the arrest report.
Peacock was taken to the jail,
where she refused to take an
alcohol breath test. Her refusal
means an automatic suspension
of her driver's license. She was
charged with DUI with property
damage, booked in and released
the next day on her own recogni-
zance by Liberty County Sheriff
Harrell Wood Revell.


Even small ads
get a lot of
attention IIn
The Journal!
Just because you're on a
tight budget doesn't mean
you can't afford an ad!


urance


For a wide range of
Homeowner Insurance
Plans, Fire and Dwelling
Policies, call for a
no-obligation review.
CRAIG
BRINKLEY
Calhoun County
615 N. Main
Blountstomn. FL
PHONE
674-5471





HELPING YOU is what we do best.
AUTO HOME LIFE


----


Ivvyv?v






Page 4 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL FEBRUARY 8, 2006


'Ride for the

Kids' Poker

Run Feb. 18
The second annual "Ride for the Kids"
2006 Poker Run will be held Saturday,
Feb. 18 (if rained out, date will be Feb.
25). The run begins at Veterans Memorial
Park Civic Center located on Hwy. 12, a
half mile south of traffic light at SR 20 and
CR 12. The poker route will be through
Apalachicola National Forest, approxi-
mately 90 miles covering County Roads
12 and 379 State Roads 65 and 20.
Registration begins at 9:30 a.m. The
first bike out is 11 a.m. and the last bike
in at 2 p.m.
There is a $25 entry fee which includes
lunch. Additional hands and lunch avail-
able at $5 each. There will be door prizes,
exhibits, a 50/50 raffle and lots of fun.
Pre-registration checks can be mailed
to 8th Grade Fundraiser, c/o LCSO, P. 0.
Box 67, Bristol, FL, 32321.
For more information, call Officer
Morris at 694-8477, Officer Snipes at
694-8466 or the Liberty County Sheriff's
Office at 643-2235. There will be a large
paved parking area for trailers, bikes and
cars available.
This event is to help raise funds for the
Liberty County eighth grade class trip to
Washington, D.C.


Sacred Harp

Singing Feb. 18
from the Panhandle Pioneer Settlement
The Panhandle Pioneer settlement, a
non-profit organization dedicated to the
preservation of rural life in the Florida
Panhandle will host its annual event,
Sacred Harp Singing or Shaped Notes,
in the historic Mennonite Church on the
settlement grounds on Saturday, Feb. 18
from 9 a.m. until 3 p.m. with lunch break.
Admission is free.
If you never attended this kind of tradi-
tional southern a capella singing, you are
in for a treat. Dress is casual.
The Panhandle Pioneer Settlement is
a living museum documenting rural life
in NW Florida since the early 1800s. It
is located in Sam Atkins Park, about one
mile west of the intersection of Hwy. 71
and Hwy. 20. Follow Hwy. 20 West out
of Blountstown. Look for signs for Sam
Atkins Park, turn north at Lindy's Fried
Chicken (Silas Green St.), follow the
signs.
For more information, contact Linda
Smith at 674-2777.
For further directions and information
on the historic buildings at the settlement,
go to www.panhandlepioneersettlement.
org.

Pioneer Settlement

rummage sale March 4
from the Panhandle Pioneer Settlement
The annual Pioneer Settlement's rum-
mage sale is right around the comer. If
you have any usable items to donate,
please drop off or call 674-2777. The sale
begins March 4.

Bluegrass Festival
The third annual Bluegrass Festival will
be held April 8 at Veterans Memorial Civic
Center in Bristol. If any vendors would
like to set up a booth, the charge is $20 with
an additional $5 for electricity. Call Bonita
, Deekat.643t980& fin. 9re"lfrmtio9..;;.


.f. : .,-,
. .. .. . ... ... J ; :^ *;, .


-WT04










17J






AT


I. S

,iir


Owl


Liberty County Children's Coalition
n -i.: 1n1 m Eirer. -..: r.E.lai,. leaC -,. yi em uji ., ,_
Weight Loss Support Group meets 1 p m at Shelion Park Litbrar,
4-H Sportsman Club meets al
Veterans r.1emoral Civic Cenier aher sch:o.l
Rotary Club meets at Calhoun-Liberly Hospital rncnr
Boy Scout Troops 200 & 203 meet at e. 30 p m Mormon Churcr:
AA meets 7 p.m Catricun County Old Ag Blag west dc.:.r
.o : .':. :" -


.)-nson


AA meets 7 p.m., basement of Calhoun County Counhouse


:,- 100-inning baseball game T
Liberty Counly High School A, UWAtAte'~STuie
beginning ai 3 30 p r, Merle &

Dance a i he American Legion Hall in Katherine
Blounilstown iron 8 30 p rr, 12.30 a m Shetler


..,; ;" ? ': -= ". ., i. ..,


Train Rides at LJ-
Veterans Memorial Park -
in Bristol, 11 a.m. 3 p.m.,_

Calhoun Co. Sweetheart Pageant
at the BHS auditorium al 6 p.m


Jarnes
Buddy
Bozeman


, Annual 100 Inning

Baseball Game
The Liberty County High School base-
ball program announces its annual 100
Inning Baseball Game on Feb. 10 begin-
Sning at 3:30 p.m. The Annual Alumni
- Game will be held on Feb. 11 at 10 a.m.
We would like to invite anyone who
has ever played baseball at Liberty Coun-
ty to come out and participate. Everyone
who participates will receive a T-shirt.
Lunch will be provided.
We welcome all community members
out to get an early look at the 2006 Bull-
dog.Baseball team. No matter how young
or old, please come and enjoy the game!
For more information, call 643-2721.

Sweetheart Pageant

Saturday, Feb. 11
from the Calhoun Co. Sr. Citizens Association
The sixth annual Calhoun Coun-
ty Sweetheart Pageant will be held at
Blountstown High School in the audito-
rium Saturday, Feb. 11 at 6 p.m. (CT).
Admission is $4 for adults and $2 for
students, children five and under are free.
All proceeds will go to benefit the
Calhoun County Senior Citizens Associa-
tion.

LCHS sets Project

Graduation meeting
There will be a Project Gradua-
tion meeting for seniors and parents on
Wednesday, Feb. 15 at 6 p.m. in Vanessa
Ford's classroom at the Liberty County
High School. We need everyone there! We
will be discussing the next fundraiser.


AA meets ..30 p rn., Hos tord School calenria
Dance at Ir, Amerinrar Leion Hall in Blounrii.lown r.rrom 8 0 pm i 12 30 a m
.. .. ..


If I


M4 IN Iti rt.Todd


Citizens Advisory Council for Big Bend Hospice.
meets at the Apalachree Restaurant, 11 ,0 a m

Blountstown Lions Club meels 6 p m at the Apalachee Restaurani

Altha Boy Scouts meet tonight at 5:30 p.m at the Ailha 1'FD
Bulldog Club meets 7 p.m at the LCHS field house
.


To, ," y T.
A-,uuere sie -'-^hdws
Sonny &? Jessica Ann
Karen Sykes Thomas


Keep Calhoun Co. Beautiful Inc. meets in the board room
ot the Calhoun Co Extension once. 3 p m
Calhoun Co. School Board meets 5 p m at Calhoun Courthouse
Altha Town Council. 6 p m. at City Hall
Blountstown City Council meets at 6 p rn.
Blountstown Chapter #179 O.E.S. meets 7 p m at Dixie Lodge
Bristol Lions Club meets 7 p m. at the Apalachee Restaurant
Liberty County School Board meets 7.30 p.m.,
Liberty Education and Administrative Center in the library
Bristol VFD meets 7:30 p.m. at Bristol City Hall


Calhoun Co. Girl Scouts Troop 579 meets at W T Neal Civic Center 5 30.7 p


That's how many copies of
The Calhoun-Liberty Journal
were distributed last week,
ensuring plenty of coverage for
your community announcements
and great response for our
business advertisers!


THE

CALHOUN-LIBERTY

JOURNAL
(USPS 012367)
Summers Road
Address correspondence to:
The Calhoun-Liberty Journal
P.O. Box 536
Bristol, FL 32321
Johnny Eubanks, Publisher
Teresa Eubanks, Editor
E-MAIL ADDRESS:
TheJournal@gtcom.net
(850) 643-3333 or A
1-800-717-3333 Florida Press
Fax (850) 643-3334 Association
The Calhoun-Liberty Journal is published each
Wednesday bythe LibertyJournal Inc., Summers
Road, P.O. Box 536, Bristol, FL 32321.
Annual subscriptions are $18.
Periodicals postage paid at Bristol, Fla.
POSTMASTER: Send address corrections to:
The Calhoun-Liberty Journal,
P.O. Box 536, Bristol, FL 32321.


1
R
\


p


I


i'.


Liberty Women's Club TO
meets at 11 a.m., Apalachee Restaurant
Calhoun Co. Chamber of Commerce toard of 81t
directors meet at noon, Calhoun-Liberty Hospital As
Liberty County Commission Jol
meets at 7 p.m. in the courtroom
Search & Rescue meets at
Westside Fire Dept in Blountslown. 6:30 p.m.


-09':;` I3P






FEBRUARY 8, 2006 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 5


Outstanding Citizen of 2005 forms available


LIBERTY COUNTY SCHOOL WORKSHOP
PUBLIC INVITED
The Liberty County School Board will hold a
workshop to inform the public of our plans
to upgrade and build new facilities at Liberty
County High School and Hosford School.
The board will be conducting two meetings
for the purpose of obtaining public input. The
meeting dates are as follows:


Thursday, Feb. 9, 2006
Hosford School Auditorium
7 p.m.


Monday, Feb. 13, 2006
Liberty County High School Auditorium
7:00 p.m.


In order to qualify for Special Facilities Con-
struction funds from Department of Educa-
tion a possible millage increase will be dis-
cussed.


Outstanding Citizen of 2005
The Chamber is accepting
nominations for "Outstanding
Citizen of the Year" for 2005.
Nomination forms were recently
e-mailed to Chamber members,
and the forms are available in
the display shelves at the Cham-
ber's office. The winner is rec-
ognized at the Chamber's An-
nual Banquet, which is planned
for March 23 this year. Last year,
Rita Maupin, Calhoun County
Library Director, received the
award. The year before, Ben
Yoder, retired U.S.P.S., received
the award.
Main Street Blountstown -At
Monday's regular monthly meet-
ing of Main Street Blountstown,
the members received a report
on the Florida Main Street work-
shop, "101 Training, the Basics
of the Four-Point Approach,"
that was recently held in Au-
burndale. A decision was made
to skip the quarterly meeting of
Florida Main Street on Feb. 16-
18, as suggested by the Florida
Main Street Director, in favor of
attending meetings later in the
year that will focus on "small
town" agendas.
Board Meeting Don't for-
get that the Board of Directors
of the Calhoun County Cham-
ber of Commerce will meet
on Thursday,- Feb. 9 at noon
(CT) at the Calhoun-Liberty
Hospital. Those, who haven't
made reservations for lunch,
are asked to please RSVP to
the Chamber immediately via
telephone, 674-4519 or e-mail:
ccchamber@yahoo.com.
Donations/Prizes for Annual
Banquet At this week's board
meeting, decisions about the
Chamber's Annual Banquet will
be made. Entertainment from the
RiverTown Community Church
is planned. Promote your busi-
ness at the banquet with items


that carry your company logo
and contact information (pens,
pencils, letter openers, cups,
coasters, small tool kits, small
sewing kits, calendars, planners,
small clocks, golf/other sports
items, etc.). Promote your busi-
ness further by making a worth-
while donation: a certificate
for a service that your business
provides, a product that your
business sells, small appliances,
decorative items, plants/flow-
ers, afghans, etc. Anyone, who
would like input, who is willing
to donate prizes or awards, or
who would like help promoting
their business at the banquet, is
encouraged to contact the Cham-
ber via telephone 674-4519 or e-
mail: ccchamber@yahoo.com.
Membership Meeting -
The regular monthly member-
ship meeting of the Calhoun
County Chamber of Commerce
is Thursday, Feb. 16 at noon
(CT) at the Calhoun County Se-
nior Citizens Center. Please join
us to show community support
for our hospital! Dave Berk, the
hospital consultant from Wash-
ington (who has also served on
a number of rural health boards),
will bring members up-to-date
on the status of keeping the
Calhoun-Liberty Hospital open.
One of the board members from
the Calhoun-Liberty Hospital


FL peanut producers 31st

annual membership meeting
from the Florida Peanut Producers Association
MARIANNA The Florida Peanut Producers Association
would like to announce its 31st Annual Membership Meeting to be
held Thursday, Feb. 23 at the Jackson County Agriculture Confer-
ence Center located at 2741 Penn Avenue in Marianna. All peanut
growers and spouses are invited to attend. Registration will begin at
6:30 p.m. (CT) followed by the traditional smoked steak dinner.
Your association is proud of the involvement this past year both
in state and nationally in peanut promotion, education and research.
We invite you out for a night of food and fun.


Based in Nature, backed oy Science, this
GLND philosophy ensures you Ihe very finest
products We're proud to follow Nature's Blue-
pnrint. a plan that guarantees the ingredients in
our nutritilonal products come Irom within the hu-
man blood chain and have a long history of sale
human consumption. Along with our founder
Jerry Brassfield's relentless commitment to the
highest quality, the GNLD Difference guaran-
tees that our products are unmatched through-
out the world.
The energy you have every day depends on
your cells, but today's modern diet is stripped of


Lg The GNLD Difference







GLND: Pioneers of Cellular Nutrition
"We are only as healthy as our cells." :


Nutrients
can't get ,in

Waste
Can't get out


Nrnents .
nP I A*. "%i l


cell-powering nutrients known as lipids and sterols. Without these essential
food factors, your cell membranes can become impermeable, making it dif-
ficult for nutrients to get in and waste to get out,
More than 45 years ago, doctors discovered that people with chronic
fatigue could benefit dramatically from receiving a unique blend of lipids
and sterols. That amazing formula came to be known as Tre-en-en Grain
Concentrates: the world's first and only lipid and sterol supplement from
wheat, rice and soy.
Tre-en-en remains at the leading-edge of cellular nutrition, and should
form the foundation of every healthy diet.


rrt


geta in Optimize Overall Enhance CardWovascular Oeliver Superior Nutrte
Growth & Development Developmernti hjiuafl.'
^te^ Waste u with Tre-en-en :| j v-u
gets out NiutTre-n-en 1 i

Tre-en-ee:F:,. ,r-, ; r6 .-,,v : For more information call (850) 762-2528 ext. 3
.c t.......,. ..,..:or go to our website at www.childshealthl.com


will accompany Mr. Berk. Please
RSVP to the Calhoun Co. Senior'
Citizens for lunch reservations
by Friday, Feb. 10 via telephone,
674-4163.
Enterprise Zone Approved
- The Chamber recently
received notice from the Office
of the Governor/Office of Tour-
ism, Trade and Economic Devel-
opment that the Calhoun County
Enterprise Zone Re-designation
is approved. The effective date
of this designation is from Jan.
1, 2006 through Dec. 31, 2015.
As a result of this designation,
businesses and residents located
within the designated areas are
eligible for the financial incen-
tives offered by the state as well
as our local government.
The Chamber would like
to thank the Calhoun County
Board of Commissioners for
supporting this re-designation
with their resolution dated Nov.
29, 2005.
We would also like to thank
all of the parties who contributed
to preparing the re-designation
application package. Thanks es-
pecially to Janice Watson of the
Apalachee Regional Planning
Council (also on the Chamber's
Board of Directors), and Bridget
M. Merrill, Senior Director of
Rural Development for Enter-
prise Florida.






Page 6 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL FEBRUARY 8, 2006


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c and foreign policy
n Shalimar, Fla. /


Ij-d rhip lkrn '.'.; th. th,[ r LId,- 'ii

C0 10irl'1, ,'t IrJq .:-l IrI-,2 iiCe i,'ijr\r
to me means that you kill anything
that moves. The place is secure when
the dust settles, and there is a soldier
on every corner, the streets are empty


I '..iactlh Ir B Liih -id the cur- /
rentcirlpof pol[iiil ar paiIr.n' N Cr0 t r1C
hali lih America' and ihe A.enrcan r j, u C rs
people, I'm reminded of the comic and writer with a
strip Pogo, drawn and written by the ground in domestic
late Walt Kelly. Pogo the Possum in s issues. He lives ii
the comic strip made the prophetic
statement, "We have met the enemy and he is us."
I just finished reading a book titled, "When Thunder
Rolled." The author, Ed Rasimus, is a former U.S. Air
-* Force fighter pilot who flew the famous F-105 fighter,
which was affectionately know as the "Thud."
The author was a lieutenant in 1966, fresh out of pilot
- 0 training and a F-105 checkout at Nellis AFB near Las
Vegas, Nevada, when he reported for duty -at Korat Air
*- -- Base, Thailand. During the six months that the author
flew his 100 missions into North Vietnam, his fighter
w wing lost 100% of their aircraft, about 72 fighter aircraft.
As aircraft losses occurred, replacement aircraft arrived
from the U.S.
*- The book, "Vietnam Air Losses," compiled and written
.- by Chris Hobson should be required reading for anyone
planning to wage war. The book chronicles the loss of
il U.S. aircraft of all types to enemy action in Southeast Asia
il from 1961 to 1973. During that 12-year period, 3,322
U.S. aircraft were lost to enemy ground fire and missiles.
During the same period, 3,265 pilots and aircrew mem-
bers were killed and 497 were captured. The description
O ^ of my shoot down in Cambodia is in the book, but I'm
< ^one of the lucky ones. I lived to tell about it.
At the end of his book and after flying 100 missions
north, the fighter pilot and author quoted Pogo because
the he recognized the futility of the American effort to
Csa win the war in Vietnam.
The author recognized that there wasn't a willingness
mm in the national leadership and the American people to
win the war in Southeast Asia. When the President of the
United States is picking bombing targets for basic fighter
pilots, you know this can only be screwed up. It was.
President Johnson was attempting to use military force
to change the hearts and minds of the North Vietnamese
"l and to get them to the negotiating table. You know the
S Rest of that story.
0 .1U Fast forward to the present. Do you see any similarities
between Iraq and Vietnam? We are fighting insurgents,
L or terrorists, or both. In Vietnam, we called them Viet
0 Cong.
The bad guys have all the advantage. They sneak
O around and blow you to bits when you least expect it.
Same in Vietnam.
In retaliation to insurgent attacks, we shoot-up the
Iraqi countryside. Same in Vietnam. The Viet Cong
would blow up something in Saigon, and we'd bomb up
north. Go figure.
U The reason that the Pogo saying of, "We have met the
Senemy and he is us," is so apropos is that the U.S. Army


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do? I'd get enough
military power in
Iraq and Afghani-
stan to really se-
cure the place, beat
it into shape, turn it
over to the Iraqis
and Afghanis then
get on with our
basic problem of
neutralizing the
terrorist threat to
our homeland. I'd
use diplomacy and
force. When di-
plomacy fails, I'd
use international
Special Forces
and intelligence
services to create
terror among the
terrorists.


We have met the enemy and he is us


-


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and everyone says, "Mother, May I," before they stick
their heads outside their front door. Brutal, but effective,
but too late. That will never happen.
The latest study says that the U.S. Army, Guard and
Reserves are stretched to the breaking point. Mr. Rums-
feld, the Secretary of Defense, summarily dismisses
such reports and says the troops are "battle hardened."
Statements like this are perfect examples of, "We have
met the enemy and he is us."
In his State of the Union address last week, Mr. Bush
said, "Abroad, our nation is committed to an historic,
long-term goal -- we seek the end of tyranny in our world.
Some dismiss that goal as misguided idealism. In reality,
the future security of America depends on it. On Septem-
ber the 11th, 2001, we found that problems originating
in a failed and oppressive state 7,000 miles away could
bring murder and destruction to our country."
Here is another classic example of, "We have met the
enemy and he is us." It is documented that there is no
connection between Saddam Hussein and the attacks of
9/11. Even when directly asked, Mr. Bush has admitted
that there is no Iraqi connection to 9/11, but using the
politics of fear and justification for the invasion of Iraq,
Mr. Bush repeats time and again that there is a connection
between Iraq and 9/11.
In his State of the Union address, Mr. Bush uttered
the words, "We seek the end of tyranny in our world."
That's a mouthful. Once again, I read the Constitution,
but I didn't find a requirement for America to end world
tyranny. I reread my oath of office, which says that I will
support and defend the Constitution. Mr. Bush's oath of
office says the same.
We get the same "Don't Worry, Be Happy" speech
from Mr. Bush almost on a daily basis. In my view, there
are a couple of issues that need his undivided attention.
He might check the national checkbook and see how
far in debt we all are. Burning $6 billion per month in
Iraq/Afghanistan will eventually break the bank. When
he leaves office, if there is no change in Mr. Bush's fiscal
policies, he will have added about $2 trillion dollars to
the national debt.
Iran is going to test our mettle. Another Islamic country
with the BOMB isn't a good idea. If diplomacy fails, do
you think that the U.S. has military forces available to
invade Iran?
We are in a bit of a mess, and I hope that moderate
Republicans and Democrats in the Congress will exert
their leadership and rein in Mr. Bush. Please. No more
visions., ., Wh t w i I






FEBRUARY 8, 2006 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 7


U


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W WASHINGTON 1
MERRY-GO-ROUND
by Douglas Cohn and Eleanor Clift

VOTER VENGEANCE

WASHINGTON- It is a bad year to be an incumbent.
When government unravels, the people indiscriminately
throw the bums out. And our government is unravel-
ing.
The executive branch led us into an interminable war
in Iraq based upon poor intelligence and with chang-
ing objectives while North Korea and Iran are going
nuclear. It has been unable to reign in spending. It failed
to.develop solutions to the Social Security and Medicare
spending that threatens to swamp the budget. It promised
but failed to deliver tax reform. It proposed and signed
a prescription drug plan that we correctly warned would
not work. It mismanaged the Hurricane Katrina disaster.
And it ignored the Foreign Surveillance Security Act and
engaged in domestic wire taps without court orders, a
clear breach of the 4th Amendment.
The legislative branch fared no better. It was complicit
in sending troops to Iraq. It was more than complicit
in excess spending, especially with "earmarks", those
anonymous pork additions to spending bills that are pri-
marily rewards for lobbyist money. That lobby money
is now the subject of indictments in a spreading scandal
that proves more than ever that we have best government
money can buy. It was complicit in its failure to enact
tax reform, and instead allowed the tax code to grow and
grow ever more convoluted and complicated.
Short of impeachment, it is impossible to throw judges
off of the federal judiciary. They are appointed for life.
The Supreme Court has become the most powerful
branch of government as witnessed by the fact that
significant laws passed by Congress and signed by the
president are not considered valid until the Court has
ruled on them. But the Court continues to have a black
eye over its decision to stop the recount in the disputed
2000 Florida election. That 5-4 decision handed the elec-
tion to George W. Bush. What was of particular note is
that the.vote was along ideological lines even though the
ideology at stake was not the issue of the election itself,
but the ideology of the candidates. As a result, it was the
most blatant partisan vote in nation's history. Now the
Court stands on the verge of overturning Roe v. Wade,
the landmark abortion-rights case even though a large
majority of Americans side with Roe.
What we have are incompetence in the White House,
corruption in Congress, and ideological bias in the ju-
diciary, and there is no sign that any of these entities
are going to meaningfully mend their ways. As a sign
of the times, Republicans just replaced indicted House
Majority Leader Tom Delay (Texas) with a "reform"
candidate, Rep. John Boehner, R-Ohio. But it turns out
that only 10.members of Congress have received more
lobbyist-paid trips to resorts in the U.S. and Europe than
Mr. Boehner, a man who acknowledges that he is "cozy"
with lobbyists. He even opposed his own party's leader,
Speaker of the House Dennis Hastert, R-Ill., who wanted
to end the practice of lobbyist-paid trips.
When stupidity, greed, arrogance, and bias rule the
day, the American electorate generally steps in to show
who really rules. Republicans are going to get hammered
in November, but Democratic incumbents are not going
to be immune to voter vengeance.
It is not a good year to be an incumbent.





Page 8 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL FEBRUARY 8,2006


Clarksville man killed in single-vehicle wreck Feb. 1


by Teresa Eubanks, Journal Editor
He was a hunter who would
rather watch a deer in the wild
than shoot it. A guitar player
who invited his friends to stop
by anytime they .wanted a music
lesson. An easy-going man who
loved to joke around.
"I have never seen so many
crying men in one area," said
Betty Wilson, describing how
tears were streaming down
the faces of the pallbearers at
her son's funeral Sunday. The
eight men who carried Chuck
Wilson's coffin honored his
love of the outdoors by wearing
camouflage.
Wilson, who died in a single-
vehicle wreck last week in
Panama City; was also dressed
in camouflage. The 45-year-old
Clarksville man was buried with
the one item he never went any-
where without his shotgun.


Blountstown

man killed in

one-vehicle

crash Feb. 4

in Indiana
An Altha native ho lied
and worked in Panama Cit\
before retiring to Blounitstown
in 2000 died after he VL as injured
in a single-\ehicle accident in
Indiana last w eek.
James Benjamin Hewett II.
69. \\as pronounced dead at
Wabash Count. Hospital after
Saturday night's accident.
He\\en \\as southbound on
an Indiana hi2hwavy when his
vehicle left the road and hit
a tree. according to a report
from the Warsa\w Times-Union
newspaper.
Hewett. who \\as employed
with a recreational vehiclee deal-
ership in Panama City. was in
Indiana on a \work-related trip.
He is survived bN his wife.
Sarah Hewett. and mother,
Maudell He"wett. both of
Blountsto\wn, along with one
son. six daughters, three sib-
lings and several grandchildren
and great-grandchildren. His
complete obituary appears on
page 26.
Services, % ill be held Wednes-
day. Feb. 8, 2006 at 11 a.m. ICT)
at Chipola Cemetery in Altha.


It was not a typical funeral
but it was a fitting tribute to a
man whose friends were mourn-
ing his unexpected death.
"I just believe when you hon-
or someone at their death, you
should show the personal side
of it," said Wilson's sister, Terry
Neal. "I just wanted people to
know who he was."
Wilson, who co-owned Ul-
timate Carpet Cleaning with
his mother, died of blunt force-
trauma to his head after losing
control of his work van on Hwy.
231, about a mile north of Winn
Dixie in Panama City on Feb. 1.
The van went off the road, into a
wooded area and hit a tree, kill-
ing Wilson on impact, according
to a report from the Panama City-
Police Department.
A witness told a family mem-
ber that the van made a sud-
den but slight skern e to the


C


left before Wilson pulled the
wheel back into his lane and


said that he never applied the
brakes before the 2004 Ford


van crashed at 6:24 p.m. The
family suspects he may have
suffered a heart attack or some
other medical problem.
In addition to his mother
and sister, Wilson is survived
by a half-sister, two aunts, a
niece and three nephews. His
complete obituary appears on
page 26.
Born in Nashville, Tennessee,
he came to Calhoun County 17
years ago, moving from Winter
Park. He spent four years in the
U.S. Navy, serving on the USS
Kitty Hawk aircraft carrier.
"I knew that he had friends
and good buddies, but I had no
idea how deeply he had touched
so many of them. It amazes
me," Chuck's mother said the
day after his funeral. "I was
so very, very grateful for the
people who came up to tell me
how they felt about him."


EMO G [MUrXVNE FNIER

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Chuck Wilson is pictured with his mother, Betty Wilson.






FEBRUARY 8,2006 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 9


Two charged with Blountstown American Legion hall break-in


by Teresa Eubanks, Journal Editor
Two men who recently moved to Blountstown have
been arrested for the Jan. 28 break-in at the American
Legion Hall on State Road 20.
Michael Jones, 27, and Tracey McDonald, 39, were
arrested Feb. 3 and charged with larceny over $300, bur-
glary of a structure and criminal mischief.
Investigator Ken Futch with the Calhoun County
Sheriff's Department recovered an image of two men on
bicycles at the legion hall around 2 a.m. from a security
camera but could not identify them.
He said the two entered the building through a win-


dow, damaging a water line when they stepped on it.
Once inside, they broke into the office and took a small
safe that was sitting on a desktop. After they got the
safe outside, they broke it open and took an undisclosed
amount of cash. The safe was left in the woods behind
the legion hall.
Futch went to Jones' apartment to question him as
part of a retail theft investigation with the Panama City
Beach Police Department. While talking with Jones,
Futch noticed his bicycle and began to discuss the legion
hall burglary.
"The bicycle raised some questions," Futch said. "After
some discussion, Jones confessed to going to the Ameri-


can Legion Hall, but said the other guy did the break-in.
As we continued to talk, he admitted to more involvement
and later admitted to being actively involved."
Futch said both men admitted they were stealing to
support "severe crack cocaine habits."
He said Jones has a history of misdemeanor arrests.
McDonald was released from prison recently and is
currently out of bond for a similar break-in in Okaloosa
County, where money was stolen from an AM Veterans
building last October.
Jones is being held at the Calhoun County Jail on
$15,000 bond, while McDonald remains in custody on
$45,000 bond.


TIGERS, BULLDOGS END SEASON WITH FEB. 2 GAME


BHS overcomes LCHS varsity 75-64 & JV 46-19


ABOVE: A pair of Tigers pen in a Liberty County
player. BELOW: Liberty County JV teammates Cody
Geiger (#15), Jordan Gentry (#10) and John Grande
(#23) circle the Tiger with the ball. The Tiger JV took a
lopsided victory over the Dawgs, scoring 46 to 19.
PHOTOS BY DANIEL WILLIAMS


The Blountstown Tigers took a victory over their rivals from across the river when they defeated
both the LCHS varsity and JV Thursday night in Calhoun County. ABOVE: A Liberty County Junior
Varsity player moves the ball down the court. BELOW LEFT: A. Jay Marlow (#21) passes the
ball as a Tiger blocks him. BELOW RIGHT: It looks like the ball will beat him back to the floor
after Tiger Trey Gowin scores for the BHS varsity.






Page 10 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL FEBRUARY 8,2006


Big Bend Hospice sends special thanks to local area


There are times of the year
when we feel we must buy
gifts for loved ones and friends.
Then, there are the times we
must be 'thankful;' times for
making 'happy' and then there
are the special times to exercise
our patriotism. But Valentine's
Day that's the day of 'love.'
Most folks think of Valen-
tine's Day and think of romantic
love. At Big Bend Hospice, we
think of Valentine's Day, and are
reminded of the love shown to
us and our patients and families
all year round.
The Tree of Remembrance has;


U"


NEWS

FROM THE

PEWS


Night Of worship
.Abe Springs Pentecostal
Holiness Church would like to
invite you to a night of worship
in song featuring local singer/
songwriter Bob Davis on Feb.
11 at6 p.m. (CT).:
The church, is located on
County Road 275 South 'in
Blountstown. If \ou ha'e any,
quesuons, please call 762-2146.


been a part of the Liberty County
for many years. This past year,
.the 2005 Tree of Remembrance
returned to the Apalachee Res-
taurant in Bristol. Myrtle and
Gary Richardson and their staff
took donations, tagged and then
hung bells, bows and angels on
the Tree all through the hectic
2005 holiday season.
We wish the Apalachee Res-
taurant a huge 'Thank You,' and
a great big 'We Love You,' from
Big Bend Hospice, our patients
and their families.
The funds raised from the
Tree of Remembrance are used


Gospel sing

in Clarksville
There will be a gospel sing at
Jesus Christ Outreach'Ministries
in Clarksville Saturday, Feb. 11
at6 p.m. (CT).
The building is located non
Hwy. 20 West, one mile past the
caution light in Clarks. ille on
the right. Several singers will
be featured playing live music.
E\ eryone is welcome.
For more information, call
762-2113.
I Ve n welcome 'your church announcements
and remind you to be sure to include the
day anddateas n ellas time and locantorn c
eacn event We also ask thal you include
a phone number ordtrectons 10 tothe church
to make it convenient for Our readers.


to provide services not reim-
bursed by Medicare/Medicaid
or private insurance. Those ser-
vices include bereavement ser-
vices, which are offered to those
who have lost loved ones for a
year after the loss of a loved one;
music therapy and The Caring
Tree.
I will never forget a visit to
one of our nursing homes with
our certified :music therapist.
The patient we visited that day
lay very still in her bed, not even
blinking an eye, until Dawn be-
gan to play her guitar and sing.
The patient blinked her eyes,
and then the hint of a smile


curved on her lips and she be-
gan to move one foot to the mu-
sic. That moment, I understood
the value of music to someone
who was seemingly unrespon-
sive music gave her pleasure
and a measure of peace. Often,
music is helpful when a patient
is agitated as well, calming the
spirit and allowing the body to
relax.
Grief can tear at the soul, leav-
ing the person experiencing it
feeling ragged and almost help-
less. Our bereavement special-
ists are all specially trained in
this area-and are available to the
families of our patients up to one


Thanks, to all my family
and friends who- attended my
retirement party.
.Thank you for the gifts and
cards. Whoever gave the picture


frame % ith magnolia blooms.
and leaves around it, please call:
me at 643-252 5, as there was not-
a card in it.
Thanks to Ben ,and Lynn for
all the work they did. Also to
Doobie Brothers BBQ. the food
was delicious.:
BettI Miles


The Libert% Count High
School Baseball Program would
like to thank everyone %\ho


helped to. make our grouper
plate fundraiser a success. We
would'like to especially thank
all the community supporters
*who generously donated food,
personal time to cook and
fix plates and to those in the
community who purchased
plates. Your generosity is greatly
appreciated and will help benefit
our baseball program.
The LCHS Baseball Program


year after the loved one's death.
Limited bereavement services
are also available to anyone who
has suffered a loss.
The Big Bend Hospice Car-
ing Tree is all about children
and teens and grief. Once a
year, The Caring Tree holds spe-
cial camps for our kids Camp
Woe-Be-Gone for children and
Teen Woe-Be-Gone for teens.
Watch for our announcements
about these special camps in the
Calhoun-Liberty Journal.
For more information about
Big Bend Hospice, your home-
town hospice since 1983, please
call 878-5310.


The family of Ronald J.
Phillips would like to thank each
and everyone for their prayers,
food, flowers and all the acts of
kindness bestowed to the family
during the death of our loved one.
A special thank you to Marlon
Peavy, Brother Fuqua, Frank
Ritter, Blountstown Community
Church and everyone at Poplar
Head Church.
From his wife, Terri Phillips,
Rochelle and Broward Creamer,
R.L. and Bobbie, J.C. and
Melody Phillips;- Margie and
Vernie Barfield, special friends
Tim. Don. Sherry, son Eric.
daughter Diana and
2randdauohter Hale\


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FEBRUARY 8,2006 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 11


TREASURES I
by Ryan McDougald j

GOD CHOSE US
TO BE HOLY
Text: Ephesians 1:1-14
J. A. Clark tells a Jewish legend
about the creation of man. God was
going to create man and He called the
angels together to confer with Him.
Justice said, "Create him not. He will
commit all kinds of wickedness against
his fellow men. He will be hard, cruel,
dishonest, and unrighteous."
Truth said, "Create him not. He will
be false and deceitful to his brother and
to Thee."
Holiness said, "Create him not. He
will follow that which is impure in Thy
sight, and dishonor Thee to Thy face."
But then Mercy stepped forward,
"Create him, Heavenly Father. For
when he sins and turns from the path
of right, truth, and holiness, I will take
him tenderly by the hand. I will speak
loving words to him and lead him back
to Thee."
Before we were ever created, God
knew that we were going to sin and
rebel against Him. He created us any-
-way intending to bless us with every
spiritual blessing. He chose us to be
holy.
What is holiness? Webster says it
is, "properly, whole, entire, or perfect,
in a moral sense... free from sin and
sinful affections." The word is used
to describe God more than any other
attribute, including love. James Boice
said, "The Bible doesn't generally re-
fer to God as loving, loving, loving or
wise, wise, wise! But over and over we
read the cry of the angels, Holy, Holy,
Holy!
God chose us to be holy like Him.
iThji i h, there i a Hell and why He
canriot let sin g, unpunpunhed All fall
-short. ,
BjI God 'slo e pr,." ided ja acnrice
for our sins that will make us holy. The
blood of Christ can_:cleanse you. Con-
fess, repent, ask for forgiveness, and
believe You ',ill have your first expe-
nence with holjne" .


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February 6-12

FEBRUARY 12





FEBRUARY 12
A ^brahaml L"i.o/',
Btn'r/,i]]'


Almanac


2006


FEBRUARY 9, 10




FEBRUARY 11r 12
Beir iti'i hf ,l0 .eCto
.tgie',') pi' iO:'II


H he story of Scouting in America -the British Scouling office, where
began in England in 1909. he met Lord Robert Baden-Pow-
When William D. Boyce was lost ell, the founder of Scouting. Boyce
in a dense London fog, a w \ vas impressed by the organi-
young boy guided Mr. nation andresolved to bring
Boyce to his destination. Scouting to America. On
He refused to lake a tip for February 8. 1910, Boyce and
his efforts, explaining that he three other men founded the
was a Scout. Later. Boyce visited V Boy Scouts of America.

Crban o a o B isque


2 tablespoons butter
2 tablespoons flour
2 cups whole milk
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/8 teaspoon
pepper
1 cup flaked
crabinmeat
1 cup tomato juice
I tablespoon
chopped parsley


]eit butter in a saucepan; add flour and blend.
Add milk and cook until thick-
ened: stirring constantly. Add salt.
pepper, and crab and simmer for a
few minutes. Meanwhile, heat
tomato juice in a separate pan.
Gradually add the hot juice to the
soup and ser'e immediately. Gar-
nish with parsley. MAKES4SERVINGS.


WIT AND WISDOM FROM THE OLD FARMER'S ALMANAC
I \ U To restore some of the color to faded fabric, soak it in a
strong solution of salt and water.
SR When it rains in Februar.; all the 3ear suffers.
S On February 9, 1964. The Beatles made their first
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Page 12 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL FEBRUARY 8,2006


SHEFFIELD XAVIER
SMITH
Sheffield Xavier Smith cel-
ebrated his second birthday
on Jan. 29. He is the son of
Voloria McCray and Sheffield
Smith. His maternal grandpar-
ents are Gladstone and Leola
Love and Alvin Mathis, all of
Bristol. His paternal grandpar-.
ents are Edward and Helen
Jones of Blountstown. His
great-grandmother is Rosetta
Baker of Bristol. His godpar-
ents are Billy and Harriet
Morton of Mobile, AL. Shef-
field enjoys dancing, watching
cartoons, playing outside with
his sister, Vashara, his brother,
Vontarius, and his favorite
cousin, Zamariah, helping
take care of his baby sister,
Shaterica, spending time with
his favorite aunts, Venelda
and Vonsenita, and also with
his family and friends. Shef-
field will celebrate with a pizza
party at Pizza Hut on.Feb. 11,
at 5 p.m. All family and friends
are invited to come.


JAMES "BJ" AND
COLTON THOMAS
James "BJ" and Colton Thom-
as are celebrating their 17th
and fourth birthdays on Feb.
7 and Feb. 19. BJ is the son
of Amie and James Thomas.
Colton is the son of Jamie and
Nichole Thomas (who will also
be celebrating her birthday
Feb. 19). Their grandparents
are Karen and Sonny Sykes.
Their great-grandparents are
Betty and Dan Henthorn of
Hosford. They enjoy playing
ball, riding theirATVand going
fishing with their dad.


BLAKE BARBER
Blake Barber celebrated his
third birthday on Jan. 3. He
is the son of Duane and Stef-
fani Barber of Bristol. His
grandparents are Dexter and
Gabra Barber of Bristol and
McCoy and Wilma Goodson
of Marianna. His great-grand-
parents are Vella Rankin and
Gordy Barber, both of Bristol.
Blake enjoys feeding the cows
with his Papa McCoy, building
houses with his Papa Dexter
and hunting with his daddy.


6\Tu e op The same ol

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Share your special moments with an announcement
in The Journal: Births, Birthdays, Weddings,
Anniversaries, Family Reunions and more


MICHELLE BECK
Michelle Beck of Jackson
County will be 39 years old on
Feb. 12. She is the daughter
of John and Jeanette Beck
of Leon County. She has one
very cool daughter, Amber
Rabon of Madison County.
Michelle is currently a dog
handler for Canine Compan-
ions for Independence. She
is pictured with Darvis, who
she is training to be a service
dog for the physically chal-
lenged.


ASHLEY FAITH
JOHNSON
Ashley Faith Johnson is
celebrating her fifth birth-
day on Feb. 9. She is
the daughter of Greg and
Patricia Johnson of Hos-
ford. Her grandparents are
Ilona M. and the late Ellis
Pitts of Hosford and Hous-
ton and Barbara Lolley of
Blountstown. She enjoys
going to Pre-K in Hos-
ford and playing with her
friends lan, Makayla and
Lauren. She also enjoys
being outdoors, riding her
new bike, watching her fa-
vorite movies, Care Bears
and Sponge Bob, and visit-
ing her grandparents.


JESSICA THOMAS
Jessica Thomas is celebrating
her 17th birthday on Feb. 14.
She is the daughter of Johnny
Thomas of Fort Myers and
Melissa McCrea of Hosford
who celebrated her birthday on
Feb. 1. Her grandparents are
Karen and Sonny Sykes and
Betty and Dan Henthorn, all of
Hosford. She enjoys driving her
new car.





/ To my godmother,
Angela Dawson


" fstr pedsfosa rcin +tllfre647 ec *spor
ndsurig retp &tik0esetr


Ginna Tharpe turned 13 on February ?
S and celebrated with a HUGE SURPRISE
birthday party with her family and
friends on Feb. 4. Ginna is the lov'elu
daughter of Shane and Tina Tharpe of
Bristol and the late Shonna Nichols. We
-& love uou very much Ginna. We hope
your 13th birthday was all you hoped it
would be.
Love always. l.
D ".%, Daddu. Tina. Blaine 8, Slake


1 1







You are a special gift to
me. One who provides the
strength of family and the
comfort of friendship and
love from heaven above. I
love you and Happy Birth-
day from your godchild,
Vashara Larose Smith





FEBRUARY 8, 2006 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 13


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Summers, Vickers plan March wedding


Winter Lea Summers of
Bristol and Richard Lucas Vick-
/.., ers of Hosford are pleased to
V announce their engagement and
upcoming marriage.
Winter is the daughter of Bob-
by Ray and Debbie Summers of
Bristol. Luke is the son of Ricky
and Lisa Vickers. Grandparents
) ,of the future bride are James and
S Jimmie Morris of Sneads and
Joyce Summers, Dorothy Sum-
mers, and the late Bob Summers,
all of Bristol. The groom-elect's
grandparents are Annette Revis
of Quincy and the late Samuel
Rains of Pompano and the late
Pierce and Esileen Vickers of
Calvary GA.
The bride-elect is a 2003
graduate of Liberty County High
School and she is employed at
Liberty County Correctional

Coppock, Roy

to wed Feb. 14
Rebekah Coppock and Chris
Roy x would like to announce their
upcoming marriage on Feb. 14,
20116 ai 5:30 p m. at Clarksville
Baptist Church. All friends and
family are welcome to attend.


- -- -- - -


Institute. The prospective groom March 4, 2006 at 3 p.m. (ET) at
is a graduate of Liberty County the McFarland'House in Quincy.
High School and is currently A reception will follow. No local
employed as a lineman at Pike invitations will be sent, however,
Electric Company. family and friends are invited to
The wedding will be held on attend.

Nichols, Newsome to wed Feb. 25
Ellis and Betty Nichols of Clarksville are pleased to announce the
. forthcoming wedding of their daughter, Claudia Sue Nichols to Bryan
New some, son of Clifford and Crystal-Newsome of Clarksville and
Mike and the late Faye Steverson of Bonifay.
Grandparents of the future bride are the late Walter and Chrystelle
Nichols of Clarksville and Etta Mae Taylor and the late Cooter Taylor
of Blountstown.
The groom-elect's grandparents are the late Alvie and Velma
Newsome of Clarksville and Leonard and the late Inez Kirkland of
Blountstown.
The wedding and reception will take place on Feb. 25, 2006 at 5
p.m. (CT) at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Clifford Ne,, some in Clarks-
ville. No invitations are being sent, ho%% e\ er. all friends and relaii es
of the couple are cordially invited.


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SHATERICA ZAHNAE
SMITH
Voloria McCray of Bristol and
Sheffield Smith of Blountstown
are proud to announce the
birth of their daugther, Shat-
erica Zahnae Smith, born on
Nov. 28, 2005 at Tallahas-
see Memorial Hospital, She
weighed 6 lbs. and 3 oz. and
measured 19 1/2 inchesJong.
Maternal grandparents are
Gladstone and Leola Love
andAlvin Mathis, all of Bristol.
Paternal grandparents are
Edward and Helen Jones of
Blountstown. Her great-grand-
mother is Rosetta Baker of
Bristol. Her godparents are
Friztroy and Wanda Douglass
of West Palm Beach and
Viola Daugtrey of Hobe Sand.
Shaterica is welcomed home
by her sister and brothers,
Vashara, 'Vontarius, Sheffield
and family and friends. .


WILLIAM REED
CURRY
William Reed Curry celebrated
: his first birthday on Jan. 25. He
is the son of Dennis W Curry
Jr. and Ann Marie Hamlin of
: Monticello. His grandparents
are Henry Hamlin of Wilma,
Kathy Roberts of Waukeenah,
and Gail and Dennis W Curry
SLSrt. of Monticello. His great-
grandparents are Raymond
and Iris Hamlin of Wilma and John and Frances Roberts of
Waukeenah. Reed enjoys being outside and looking at the
deer.

SJOSH SHEPARD
Josh Shepard is celebrating
his 13th birthday on Feb. 24.
He is the son of Debbie and
Johnny Shepard of Bristol.
He enjoys riding his dirt bike
and four wheeler, hunting and
playing baseball.






Page 14 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL FEBRUARY 8, 2006


Letter writer says he's paid his dues


To the editor:
This time I am writing in my
own defense. Monday 06 Jan
2006 I received my first ever
piece of HATE MAIL. I have
spoken my opinions on many
issues that have been reported in
the newspaper. Things such as our
freedom from unlawful searches,
the purchase of common items we
all use everyday that some could
conceive we were making illegal
drugs..
The piece of mail I received
had no return'address and wasn't
signed and included a portion of
the response from Nurse Eldrige
from a few weeks ago. It left me
some what confused, I haven't
attacked anyone on the issue
of the hospital. Reference was
made that it was some person
I had worked with in the past,
that 'everyone thought I was an
idiot back then. I seem to have a
good relationship with all my past
comrades and no one has spoken
ill of me, at least not to my face.
To that person,whomever you
are, I seem to feel that you think
I haven't paid my dues. The truth
is, I put my life on the line from
1968 through 1973 in the U.S.


Army with a tour in Vietnam, and
I taught officers at Fort Benning,
GA some of the skills they would
need to survive. I didn't get rich
doing this, in fact, I only got $88
a month in 1968.
I was a volunteer firefighter
in Bristol for eight years, I put
my life on the line many times
without pay. I worked in the
prison for 12 years until the stress
of ,all the hazards took its toll
on my health. I really don't see
myself as an idiot. Even now I
try very hard to help people when
and where I can. Walk a mile in
my shoes before you judge me.
Above all, if you have something
to say about my character at least
have enough intestinal fortitude
to sign your name to it, and by
the way, the zip code for Altha is
32421.
I appreciate the Calhoun-
Liberty Journal newspaper and
all their staff for giving me the


Trailer stolen from hunting lease


To the editor:
To the person or persons
responsible for taking a magic tilt
trailer from my hunting lease on
John E Bailey Road at the power
lines:
If the trailer is returned in the
same condition as it was when
you took it from my posted "No
Trespassing" lease, with poles and
cables blocking the entrance, I
will not press any charges and no
questions will be asked.
If the trailer is not returned and I


have to find it myself or it is located
by the police, I will prosecute to the
fullest extent of the law.
It is a shame that someone
cannot have anything anymore
that they have worked hard for
without having to worry about
someone who apparently thinks
that they can just take someone
else's belongings and not have to
pay. If you want something, get out
and work for it.
David McCourt
Blountstown


Liberty Commissioners get thanks


To the editor:
This goes out to the Liberty
County Commissioners...I know
you get a lot of negative feedback,
but I would like to give you some
positive feedback for a change.
I came to you with an urgent
request to help me with a drainage
problem. In solving our problem,


you solved the problems of several
neighbors.
I would like to thank each of you
again and to compliment Leroy on
his excellent engineering of the
project.
Respectfully,
Paul and Carol Edwards
-Bristol


opportunity express my opinions
for all to see.
Whatever it is that caused you
to send that letter, I am very sorry
to have offended you. I think that
as old as that hospital is, it has
outlived its usefulness and most
likely is filled with asbestos and
should be taken down. I still stand
firm that the county doesn't need
to be in the medical business and
that we do need a hospital with
good doctors and nurses to staff it.
Every time that helicopter
comes to take someone to another
facility it puts a hardship on
the family. There needs to be
a commitment to healthcare in
our community. Our community
continues to grow, we need
industry to locate here, we need a
reason for doctors to come here to
practice. I'm not against that, I'm
against the county owning and
operating a medical. facility that
we CANNOT afford.
Mike Bailes, Altha


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APALACHICOLA 58 4TH STREET 850.653.9828
BLOUNTSTOWN 20455 CENTRAL AVENUE WEST 850.674.5900
BRISTOL 10956 NW STATE ROAD 20 850.643.2221
CARRABELLE 912 NORTHWEST AVENUE A 850.697.5626
MEXICO BEACH 1202 HIGHWAY 98 850.648.5060
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FWC revises hunting and fishing rules


The Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission's
(FWC's) first meeting of
2006 convened under the new
chairman, Rodney Barreto, and
vice chairman, David K Meehan,
Wednesday in. Gainesville.
It adjourned Thursday .after
Commissioners approved
numerous revisions to Florida's
hunting and fishing rules.
One of the new rules created
a crossbow-only hunting season
for private lands to run five days
in the South and Central zones
and seven days in the Northwest
Zone. It also allows hunters to
use crossbows on private lands
during statewide muzzleloading
gun seasons and the Northwest
Zone's 11-day archery/
muzzleloading gun season.
Other hunting-related
new :rules s implif,.. the quota
hunt application process and
accommodate non-hunting
family members N\ ho accompany
hunters on wildlife management
areas during quota hunts.
In addition, new rules broaden
wild hog hunting opportunities.
on numerous wildlife
management areas and expand
the annual statewide alligator
harvest season from five weeks
to- 10 weeks.
Commissioners also approved
a new statewide snow goose
hunting season and moved the
canvasback duck hunting season
to the last 30 da\ s of waterfowl
hunting season.,.


SOUTH

DOORS


News from The
Florida Fish
and Wildlife
Conservation
Commission


In addition, they adopted
new rules for various wildlife.
management areas and
established a definition for
measuring total length of
freshwater fish.
Concerning nuisance wildlife
trappers, Commissioners voted.
to replace permit requirements
with a trapper registration
requirement-and allow airport
workers to take wild turkeys
from airport property when
aircraft safety is threatened.-
Also, Commissioners passed
re% ised freshwater fishing rules
for various waters, established
a permit requirement for
commercialharvest of freshwater.
eels and voted to prohibit taking
alligator gar without a permit.
Regarding marine fisheries
issues, the Commission approved
a rule to protect 13 species of
sharks by adding them to a newly
named "prohibited species"
list. This list,currently protects


FWC extends hunting days with

adoption of crossbow season
A crossbow hunting season for private lands is in the works for
2006-07. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission
(FWC) adopted new rules to establish the new hunting season during
its meeting Wednesda\ in Gainesville.
The new\ season \\ill provide additional hunting opportunities
for crossbow hunters. It will also lengthen the overall hunting
season and extend the number of days conventional bowhunters can
use bows to.take game, since bows will be legal during crossbow
season. -
The added season is limited to private lands and restricts harvest to
bucks only. These changes will not affect the wildlife management
area s stem. .
Rule changes also provide that bows and crossbows will be legal.
during muzzleloading gun season and during the Northwest Hunting
Zone's special archery/muzzleloading season, beginning next year.,
"We wanted to create more opportunities for hunters who use
crossbows but strived to balance that with the interests of avid
bowhunters,". said Nick Wiley, director of FWC's Division of
Hunting and Game Management. "The change gives private
landowners more options for managing game on their property and
provides additional early-season hunting opportunities."
Beginning in October, there will be a five-day crossbow season
between the existing archery season and muzzleloading gun season
in the Central and South hunting zones. In the Northwest Zone, the
crossbow season will be seven days long and will open the Monday
following Thanksgiving.-
During the new crossbow season, legal game will include deer,
hog, bearded turkey, gray squirrel, quail, rabbit, raccoon, opossum,
coyote, nutria, skunk and beaver. However, turkeys will not be legal
game in Holmes County during any fall or winter hunting season.
As during the muzzleloading gun season, only bucks with at least
one antler five inches or more in length may be taken during the
crossbow season. The daily bag limit for antlered deer is two during
the crossbow and muzzleloading gun seasons.
During both periods, antlerless deer may be taken only by hunters
who hold antlefless deer permits. Regardless of the season or
number of permits, the bag limit will be two deer per day.
For more information about the new crossbow season, interested
hunters can call Tony Young at (850) 488-7867 or visit MyFWC.
.oirK^Btfais~f^^'^^''^^^^v'^'^^^'^^'''1'"1''%, IINN'%. "-' ',-
cp^^^ ^^^^^^^^X


FEBRUARY 8, 2006 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 15
---- ----------- --- -



On Thursday, Jan. 19, Noah
Davis killed his first buck. It
was a nice seven point and
a grand reward for several
quiet and uneventful hours
'of sitting patiently in a deer
stand. That's not an easy
,t thing for an eight year old
Sboy to do! Noah is the son
of Timothy Davis and Mary
Catherine McCard. He is the grandson of Howard and Jill
Davis and Gorden and Mary Revell, all of Bristol.


nine species of sharks, rays
and sawfishes, and the FWC is
adding the Atlantic angel shark,
bigeye sixgill shark, bigeye
thresher shark, bignose shark,
Caribbean reef shark, dusky
shark, Galapagos shark, longfin
mako shark, narrowtooth shark,
night shark, sevengill shark,
sixgill shark, and smalltail shark
to the list. This rule takes effect
in March.
Commissioners also agreed
with special fishing regulations
developed by the National Park
Service for Dry Tortugas National
Park, including establishment
of a 46-square nautical mile
Research Natural Area in the
park where fishing, spearing and
anchoring will be prohibited.
The park regulations also specify
allowable fishing gear and other
management provisions where
fishing is permitted in the park.
In other action, the
Commission approved its
annual work plans for five FWC
divisions and considered various
federal marine fisheries issues.
The FWC also approved
resolutions, calling for federal
assistance for Florida's
commercial marine fisheries,
which were devastated by
recent hurricanes, and calling
for a stronger role in multi-state
fisheries councils that establish
rules that affect Florida.
The next FWC meeting will
be a special session to discuss
the agency's financial plan
Feb. 8 in Tallahassee. The next
regular meeting will take place
in Tallahassee April 5-6.


APALACHICOLA, FLA.
A Not-For-Profit Theatre Presents...


Driving


Miss Daisy
by Alfred Uhry


February 17, 18, 19 & 24 25, 26
Friday & Saturday 8 p.m. & Sunday 3 p.m.
Schedule subject to change
With Friday Dinner by Paul Gant Bar-B-Q
Limited Seating Make Reservations Early

nhau *i* 850-653-3200
COUNTY FLCORIDRA
aoSioQ wne. ISe onwww. dixietheatre.com

Supported in part by the Franklin County Tourist Development
Council -call for your free vacation guide and Calendar of events
(850)653-8678 www.franlincountyflorida.com
Don't Miss The DIXIE Does Nashville March 10 & 11


Help prevent damage from bark beetles,
diseases, and wildfire through practices
that promote healthy pines.


* Thin dense pine stands.
* Control understory
plant competition.
* Minimize tree wounds
during harvests.


PREVENT


- - -


* Use prescribed fire.
* Harvest low-vigor
stands and replant.
* Plant species right
for the soil and site.


ITAAA www I [i-doftscomU


A message from the Florida Department
of Agriculture and Consumer Services,
Division of Forestry, the University of
Florida/IFAS, and the USDA Forest Service.


.............. .......... .. .. '. .. -..


IXIE

THEATRE


1








Chipola College to offer free tax preparation assistance
MARIANNA--Last year. taxpayers VWho qualify for the instructor Lee Shook is train.i ng on Fridays from Jan. 27 through owes no tax.
10.000 Jackson County residents Earned Income Tax Credit must .-tudent volunteers to pro\ ide -April 15, and 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Income limitations and othe
claimed $7.6 million in Earned file a tax return with the IRS in free tax preparation, including -Saturdays (Jan. 28, Feb. 11, Feb. rules apply.
Income Tax Credits from the "order to receive a refund. -- free electronic filing, beginning 25, March 11, March 25, and For additional information
IRS. In order to help more local Jan: 27. April 8). visit irs.gov or call 1-800-829


This year, the total amount
could be eveh higher. I-owever,


citizens get the most refund
due them, Chipola business


The free service will be
available from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.


The Earned Income Tax
Credit is a credit for certain low-
moderate income workers.
The credit may produce a
refund, even if the taxpayer


r

n,
)-


3676 to order Publication 596.
Earned Income Credit.
For free tax assistance, call
Lee Shook at (850) 526-2761,
ext. 3268.


Attaway signs to play at Florida International
Family, coaches and school officials joined Blountstown High School varsity football
player Chance Attaway last week as he signed a letter of intent accepting a football
scholarship with Florida International in Miami. Chance is shown above, flanked by his
parents, Marleen & Guy Attaway. Standing behind him is Justin Smith, Greg Jordan,
Calhoun County School Superintendent Mary Sue Nevies, Blountstown High School
Principal Keith Summers and Gene Rollins. JOHNNY EUBANKS PHOTO


Page 16 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL FEBRUARY 8,2006




FEBRUARY 8, 2006 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 1


Devon Roulhac of Chattahoochee
shows off the frying pan he won in the
cornbread cooking contest.


History

comes

alive at


A volunteer wearing a buckskin dress
weaves pine needles into a basket.


Torreya Park Day in Liberty County





Page 18 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL FEBRUARY 8, 2006


Clay O'Neal's
LAND CLEARING & FENCING
*Dozer and Excavation work
Demolition Pond Digging
Road Building Field Fence
or Barbed Wire Tractor Work


Clay O'Neal
=443 NW County R
Altha, Fl 32421


Over 15 Years experience
oad 274 (850) 762-9402
Cell (850) 832-5055


W.R. TOLAR BASKETBALL AND CHEERLEADER BANQUET- On Jan.
24 the W. R. Tolar Boy's Basketball team celebrated the end to their season with a-
banquet at the Veterans Memorial Park in Bristol. Coach Eric Willis presented each
basketball player with a special award and basketball T-shirt. The basketball team
showed their appreciation by presenting their coach with a framed, signed team picture.
The W. R. Tolar Cheerleaders were also honored at the banquet. Heather Richter,
cheerleading sponsor, presented each cheerleader with a plaque. The squad showed
their gratitude by presenting Heather Richter with cards and gifts. All parents, players
and cheerleaders enjoyed hamburgers, potato salad, chips, and cake. Special thanks
to Roger Reddick, Liberty County School Board member, for providing and preparing
all. food. W.R. TOLAR SCHOOL PHOTO

'Ask a Librarian' Web research tool available to Florida students


Students throughout Florida
are now taking advantage of
Ask a Librarian Florida's free
online chat service that connects
them to librarians for assistance
with research and instruction
on locating information on
the Web. Librarians using
instant messaging and co-
browsing technology provide
students \ ith the assistance
and resources that they need
to complete assignments from
home, school, or anywhere
that has an Internet connection.
Florida's community colleges.
universities and K-12 schools
recently received posters and.


other materials promoting the-
service.
Live librarian assistance is
available at www.askalibrarian.
org between 10 a.m. and 10p.m.,
Sunday through Friday, and
10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday.
Studeiis can also submit
questions via e-mail 24 hours a,
day, seven days a week.
Ask a Librarian- is part of
the Florida Electronic Library,
which is a collection of free
databases, and live reference
services available to all Florida
residents. Ask a Librarian -is
a collaborative service jointly
adniinistered by. the College,


Center for Library Automation
(CCLA) and the Tampa Bay
Library Consortium (TBLC).
If is funded through a Library
Services and Technology Act
(LSTA) grant administered
by .the Florida Department. of
State Division of Library and
Information Services.


Greg Willis

Tree Service
Tree Removal
Tree Trimming
Phone: 643-5582 -Mobile: 643-7372
Mobile: 643-7107
10376 N. W. Willis Way in Bristol LICENSED AND INSURED

Remember the one you love on

Yalenti ne
Come choose the perfect Jgi
Candy Teddy Bears
Jewelry Goody Bags
Mixed Arrangements p'l
Cards Roses Balloons
Plush Toys Goody Baskets w
Gift Baskets for Men, Women ,
& Children Bath & Body
FREE LOCAL DELIVERY


Arrar
Long


S.,ED oOSES


\VALENTINE SHOPPE
At the light in Hosford Phone 379-8775


Ffl


ILIT VOUAL I


ON VLINT1111S D-1V


OPE 96.M O .M ATURAYFEB 1


f',A
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1/4 Carat
Diamond
Hearts


STORE


WIDE


SALE
We'll help you find
THE PERFECT GIFT
for your Valentine!


Show her your
love is ALWAYS
I th h er.





Freeapping
Gift-Wrapping


5.D DIAMOND
Located at 20634 E. Central in Blountstown (r'
674-8801 "Fine Jewelry & Gifts"* Open 9 5 p.m. -
CUSTOM FRAMING LAYAWAYS JEWELRY REPAIR


Ply
~


BLOUNTSTOWN

SPAWN & LOAN
We cash all tax refund checks!
LOWEST FEE IN TOWN

WE BUY GOLD, We special order
ANY CONDITION. new guns at
Great prices on, 13% above cost.
jewelry, power Wide selection
tools, etc. of DVD'S.
Come on in and deal with your
home town team, Jeff and Shannon.
"WE'LL TREAT YOU RIGHT"
19885 SR 20 West in Blountstown
"At the West End" Across from Radio Shack i
g Telephone 674-7930 OA


- ~


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. . .
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a . . . m






FEBRUARY 8, 2006 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 19


SKYLAND


SNCMKE H1UiSE

Now offering fresh river catfish
whole & fillets


Stanley Johnson 643-5082


Craig Shuler 643-5738


Highway 12 North, Bristol Telephone 643-4343
Open 9 a.m. 9 p.m. daily 0


'Grease' tickets on sale at Chipola soon


MARIANNA-Tickets for
the Chipola College production
of "Grease" go on sale
Wednesday, Feb. 22, at 8 a.m.,
in the college business office
(Building A).
Tickets are $7 for adults
and $5 for students. Chipola
employees and students get one
free ticket with ID. The musical
opens a five-day run, March 8.
"Grease" tells the story of
Rydell High's spirited class of
'59. The gum-chewing, hub-cap
stealing, hot-rod loving boys
with D.A.'s and leather jackets
and their wise-cracking girls
in teased curls, bobby sox, and
pedal pushers capture the look
and sounds of the 1950's in this
rollicking musical that salutes
the rock 'n' roll era. While hip
Danny Zuko and wholesome
Sandy Dumbrowski resolve
the problems of their mutual
attraction for each other, the
gang sings and dances its way
through such nostalgic scenes as
the pajama party, the prom, the
burger palace and the drive-in
movie.
Chipola director Charles
Sirmon recently cast local actors


Ceramic and Porcelain

Beautiful and elegant materials for

your walls, floors and countertops.

Hundreds of styles and colors.

We have the area's largest selection!


Glueless Laminate Flooring

Over A A A -.o


3,000

square

feet in

stock!


NOW ON


^ .:: .-.. :'.".-'.t ''- .:":-, '. ... i. .- ::=
-...'= *- .. ... ..: 2-.*i"" : ....:. ,, ---...''::
.... 1...... ,, ,,.- ,,.:*; : ........ ';./N.,
.-.& j t .- :. :.,-. .
-.::'. '. ., -.
.
": .. -5 -


GREASE SET AT CHIPOLA-Tickets for the Chipola College
production of "Grease" go on sale Wednesday, Feb. 22, at 8
a.m., in the college business office (Building A). Tickets are
$7 for adults and $5 for students. The musical opens a five-
day run, March 8. Pictured from left, are: Mike Milton (Danny),
Felecia Gibson (Sandy), Brittney Holmes (Rizzo) and Heath


Carroll (Kenickie).

in the following roles: Mike
Milton as Danny, Felicia Gibson
as Sandy, Brittney Holmes as
Rizzo, Mary Kathryn Tanner
as Frenchy, Shannon Grice as
Marty, Anne Gilmartin as Jan,
Heath Carroll as Kenickie,
Seth Basford as Doody, Kevin
Russell as Roger, Scott Boyle
as Sonny, Katie Brown as Patty
Simcox, Courtney Haile as Cha-
Cha, Josh Barber as Eugene,
Princess Brinson as Teen Angel,
Terry Tanner Smith as Miss
Lynch and Danuta Jacob as
Blanche. The Grease Girls are


CHIPOLA PHOTO

Tiffany Pippin, Stacey Hall,
Kara Hewitt, Meredith Nailen,
Tara Padgett, Brook Spivey
and Ashley Tanner. The Grease
Guys are Robbie Bouck, Chris
Calton, Richie Cooper, Lenaris
Dixon, David Kawar and Zach
Price. The Beauty School
Dropouts are Arielle Bateman,
Jamila Holmes, Jennifer Nicole
Jones, Kristina Lopez, Karisa
Olds, Amber Rivera and Holly
Walters. Kelci Stephenson is
Stage Manager.
For information about Chipola
Theater, call 718-2227.


Physics expert to offer seminars


MARIANNA- Dr. Clifford
Martin Will will be the guest
speaker at two Chipola College
science seminars Friday, Feb,
10, in the college Theatre.
A general campus seminar
entitled, "The Search for Black
Holes," is set for 10 a.m. The
seminar will deal with the
properties of black holes and
predictions made from general
relativity that may give direct
observational evidence for the
existence of these distortions of
space-time.
The public is invited to
a second seminar at 7 p.m.,
entitled, "Was Einstein Right?"
In this seminar, Dr. Will will
focus on the 100-year history
of Einstein's Theory of General
Relativity including tests of
the theory based on evidence
from planetary probes, radio
telescopes, and atomic clocks,
as well as how relativity plays a
role in daily life.
Dr. Will's research interests
are theoretical, encompassing the
observational and astrophysical
implications of Einstein's
general theory of relativity,
including gravitational radiation,
black holes, cosmology, the

Tell 'em you
saw it in The
Calhoun-Liberty

JOURNAL
'I f f .


physics of curved space-time,
and the theoretical interpretation
of experimental tests of general
relativity.
He is the James S. McDonnell
Professor of Physics, and
member of the McDonnell
Center for the Space Sciences
at Washington University in
St. Louis. He earned a B.Sc.
in Applied Mathematics and
Theoretical Physics from
McMaster University. In 1971,
he earned a Ph.D. in Physics
from the California Institute of
Technology, and served Caltech
for one year as an Instructor in
Physics.
In 1981 he joined Washington
University in St. Louis as
Associate Professor, in 1985
became Professor of Physics,
from 1991 1996 and 1997 -
2002 served as Chairman, and
in 2005 was named McDonnell
Professor.
He- has published over
160 articles, including 13
major review articles and two
books, Theory and Experiment
in Gravitational Physics
(Cambridge University Press,
1981; 2nd Edition, 1993), and
Was Einstein Right? (Basic
Books, 1986; 2nd Edition,
1993).
The event is sponsored by
the Chipola Science Club in
conjunction with the Chipola
Honors Pirog.in and the Student
Government Association.
For inlon.iiaion. call Jeff


ABodrtm 52.6 2761 eA 3251.':
*i A. I, pj ,# ; I- -*tJ"> M .J '> *






Page 20 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL FEBRUARY 8,2006


BHS attends leadership conference


LEADERSHIP
CONFERENCE
by Ashley Gingerich
On Jan. 26, ten seniors attend-
ed the annual leadership confer-
ence that was held at Chipola
College. The conference, which
was hosted by Chipola's chapter
of Phi Theta Kappa, goal was
to help teach students valuable
leadership lessons through the
use of motivational speakers and
fun games.
The students also heard about
the numerous scholarships of-
fered by Chipola and the many,
different programs they could
join. The highlight of the day,
however, was listening to the
musical styling of Mr. Royce
Reagan. I think all the students
that attended would agree that
they learned a lot and had a great
time!
BHS SPELLING BEE
by Batya Margrill
The annual BHS Spelling,


B-TOWN HIGH SCHOOLTIGER TRACK EVENTS
I Feb. 8 FCAT Writing Make Up; Shadow Day for se-
niors
Feb. 9 Softball game against West Gadsden, home
at 4 p.m.
Feb. 11 -ACT Test Date
I Feb. 14- Early Release Day
Feb. 15 County-Wide Spelling Bee; FBLA district
I competition
Feb. 16 FCCLA Proficiency Events; Softball, home
I against Sneads at 4 and 5:30 p.m.
Feb. 17- Senior trip deposit due
Feb. 18 Softball Tournament in St. Joe at 11:00 and
1:30
Feb. 27/28 FCAT test- reading and math SSS
March 2 FCAT test- reading and math NRT
March 6 Science FCAT for juniors
L-------------------------


Bee was held on Feb. 1. The-
winners are as follows: ninth
grade winner- Max Hemdon,
alternate-Hailey Moravek; 10th
grade winner Cuyler Engram,
alternate-Ron Van Lierop; 11th
grade winner Wesley Petty,


altemate-Garry Reed; and 12th
grade winner T.J. Simmons,
altemate-Candice Nealy.. The
winners will compete in the
Calhoun County Spelling Bee on
Feb. 15, against other students in
the county.


BHS Lady Tigers win District Championship


The Lady Tigers basketball
team won the Class 2A District
3 championship last week by de-
feating Altha 37-22 on Tuesday
and then defeating Sneads 33-30
in the last seconds on Saturday.
In Tuesday's game the Lady
Tigers jumped out- -to an early
lead over the Wildcats and man-
aged to hold the improved Wild-,
cats off for the 'entire game. The
Tigers led 18 to 13.at the half and
managed to improve their lead in
the second half of play to ensure-
the victory. "I was somewhat
pleased % ith ,the way our girls
played on Tuesday," said Coach
Barber. "We did some things
that were good but we-also had a
few let downs at times. Our girls


got the job done and assured us
a shot of playing in the' champi-
onship game so I can't complain
too much."
In Saturday\ "s game the Lady-
Tigers faced a team that had al-
ready defeated them tIw ice in the
regular season by four points in
their first meeting and 13 points
in, their second meeting. The
Sneads Pirates \kere the number
one seed coming into the tourna-
ment and were well rested. The
Tigers started out much better
in this game than in the previ-
ous meetings and held their own
in the first quarter. After a tight
first quarter, the Tigers fell 'be-
hind 17-24 at the half. "When-
we went in to the locker room


I could see it in their eyes, they
knew they could win this game.
They had a-lot of fight left in
them." After a few adjust-
ments. the Tigeis came out and
outscored their opponents 16-6
in the second half of play. The
Pirates held the lead until the last
:minute when Lauren Wood made
a shot under the basket to put the
score to 31-30 in Blountstown's
favor.. The Pirates tried to hurry
down the court and take a shot
but missed. The Tigers rebound-
ed the ball and went into stall
.-mode. The Pirates were forced
to foul. so they fouled- Ashley
Gates who turned out to be the
wrong choice: Ashle.y went.
to the line and sank both free
throw s to extend the lead to 33-
30. The last 18 seconds seemed
to tick by slowly for the Tigers
but they did manage to hang on
and maintain the victory. "This
was one of the most exciting \ ic-
tories I've been around in girl's
basketball. I'm so happy for
these girls for what they have ac-
complished this year.- They have
greatly improved from winning
just four games in the last two
years. They are now 13-7 on the
year and are District Champs!!
Great job ladies!!" They will
face West Gadsden on Thursday,
Feb. 9 at the regional quarterfi-
nals.
Top Scorers for the District
Tournament were:
ALTHA GAME
Molly Fagen... 17
Ellen Williams...9
Lauren Wood. 6
Shannie Lockhart...2
Satyria Everett...2
SNEADS GAME
Molly Fagen...21
aiuren, WpQd...8


TALLAHASSEE Florida
Agriculture and Consumer
Services Commissioner Charles
H. Bronson announced that a
Union Springs, AL, company is
offering free cabbage plants to all
third-graders who are interested
in growing a vegetable plant.'
'The company, Bonnie Plant
Farm, will deliver the plants
to any 'school in Florida whose
third-grade students want to learn
the importance of agriculture
to the nation. The variety being
Offered -- the O.S. Cross --
produces heads up to 50 pounds.
which should be interesting to
young students. Each student
participating in the experience
will also receive gardening
instructions for cabbage plants
and, othpr vegetablq- ^ojgs,,.as


well.
"I salute Bonnie Plant Farm
for its efforts in teaching young
students the --importance of
agriculture in this country,"
Bronson said.
The company said it will offer
a $1,000 scholarship in Florida,
and the winner will be selected
in a random drawing.
Schools whose students are-
interested in participating in
the program can contact Keith
Pugh, Bonnie- Plant Farm's
Customer Services Director, at
1-800-345-3384, by Feb. 15 or
:request plants online at www.
bonnieplants.com by that date.
The company will deliver the
'plants and growing instructions
to schools shortly after requests


STUMP GRINDING

10o
A-1 Tree Service

& Stump Grinding


Best


2 FT. Vic
Diameter
prices in the industry.


ckery Enterprises, Inc.
(850) 674-3434
1-800-628-8733


SCHOOL MENU
Calhoun
I County Schools
I Feb. 9 Feb. 15,2006
Lowfat or whole
milk served with all meals
THURSDAY
Lunch: Baked ham, mashed po-
tatoes with gravy, green beans,
fresh fruit, rolls.

FRIDAY
Lunch: Beef vegetable soup,
peanut buttersandwich, crackers,
fruit cup, brownie.

MONDAY
Lunch: Chicken stir fry, steamed
rice, breaded okra, fruit cup, corn
bread.

TUESDAY
Lunch: Hamburger on bun,I
French-fried potatoes, lettuce,
tomato, fresh fruit.

WEDNESDAY
Lunch: Chicken with rice, fieldI
peas, baked apple and sweet
potato, corn bread.
All menus are subject to change
SPONSORED BY:
I Calhoun-Liberty Journal
, Bristol, Phone 643-3333
L J


The Barn

Why buy roses that will
be dead in a week?
We have beautiful Silk Roses
arranged any way you like that
will last as long as your love.

Coke and candy bags,

$10
We will be delivering to
Calhoun and Liberty Schools
FREE of charge.

S Come check us ou or
all your Valentine's needs.

On the corner of S.R. 20 and SHas Green St.
.' Blountstown 674-1918

Mon. Fri. 9 a.mtAo 5 p.m.
^*J^Satuj

--- -- -- --- -----

Bronson announces company will
supply cabbage plants to 3rd graders


SCHOOL MENU
Liberty
County Schools
Feb. 9 Feb. 15,2006
A variety of fruits and
vegetables or fruit juice and a
choice of lowfat or whole milk
served with all meals.
THURSDAY
Breakfast Chilled cinnamon
applesauce, biscuit with jelly,
Sausage patty.
Lunch: Beef nuggets, mashed po-
tatoes with gravy, turnip greens,
corn bread.

FRIDAY
Breakfast. Bananas, ready-to-eat
cereal, cheese toast.
Lunch: Lasagna with beef, whole-
kernel corn, orange sections,
'yeast rolls.

MONDAY
Breakfast Chilled apple juice',
ham slice, cinnamon crunch cof-
feecake.
Lunch: Cheeseburgers on buns,
lettuce, tomato, pickles; French
fries with catsup, brownie with

nuts.
TUESDAY
Breakfast Chilled pineapple tid-
I bits, buttered grits, .hot ham and:
I cheese toast.
Lunch: Cold cut and cheese
sandwich, lettuce, tomato, po-
tato rounds with catsup, fruited
Jell-O.

WEDNESDAY
Breakfast: Orange sections,
scrambled eggs, toast with jelly.
Lunch: Pizza, broccoli and car-
rots with dip, corn-on-the cob,
pineapple pudding.
All menus are subject to change
SPONSORED BY:
Laban Bontrager, DMD I
SBristol, Phone 643-5417
L J


.are'recejvea.,.,,;.,...,. -IJ


L






FEBRUARY 8,2006 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 21


Golden

Pharmacy
Phone 674-4557


Your Valu-Rite store with
a full selection of drugs,
greeting cards,-film, health
and beauty aid supplies
17324 Main Street North,
Blountstown
LOCALLY OWNED & OPERATED


Ag Mechanics Team places fourth in.state


AG MECHANICS TEAM
4TH IN STATE
by Patricia Williams
The Altha FFA Chapter recently
completed in the Ag. Mechanics
Contest. The team competed
against 44 other teams from around
the state. The team consisting of
Patricia Williams, Kyle McAlpin,
Jacob Tolbert, and Jessie Alday,
answered questions in the fields of
wood working, electrical wiring,
land judging, forestry, tractor
maintence, small engines, and
construction. The Altha FFA Ag.
Mechanics team placed 4th in the
state and will go on to compete in
'Orlando in June.
Brian Kenyon, Altha FFA
Advisor said, "I am very proud of
our students for putting forth the
hard work and dedication needed to
compete in this contest and believe
they will each do very well. in the
future."


Valentines Gift Bags
includes coke, candy
& pencils or create
your own gift bag
PRICES STAITI7/VG A T


21


$ ,&992


FREE VALENTINE DELIVERY TO
CALHOUN AND LIBERTY SCHOOLS


Come out to your local favorite










AIM FOR THE HEART
tore at thke sure that specialross
from Golden's Drug Store. // I





Telephone in your life6743380
-




t^ AIM FOR THE HEART ^3
SMake sure that special
C^,f person in your life ,,0
knows just how much -)
they mean to you!
V V
We have a great selection of
cards, gifts and chocolates!

*Sterling Silver Jewelry

*Stuffed Animals
*Russell Stover Candy
'," and other chocolates
*New Photo Pillows
(great teen gift!)

Blountstown Drugs
20370 Central Ave. W.
Blountstown
,850-674-2222
Ik 9 9VV9VV99999 99WVW99 ^


I --- .. -- .. -. -- -------.- -. ...- -



ALTHA WILDCATS SCHOOL CALENDAR
Feb. 7-8 Fcat Writing Grades 4,8,10
Feb.9 Softball game, home, against Grand Ridge,
3:30 p.m.
Feb.10 Family Breakfast
Feb.11 Girls Weightlifting State Meet
Feb.13 Softball game, home, against Tolar Middle
school, 3:30 p.m. DH
Feb.14 Early release, students out at 1 p.m.
Feb.15 County-wide spelling bee at W.T. Neal Civic
Center


A FIRST HAND LOOK AT
COMMUNISM
by Kasey Roberts
On Jan. 26 two of Alice Faye
Marshall's American History
classes were treated to a visit from
our area's new Army recruiter.
Sergeant Zsolt S. Szabo came
not to talk about the military, but
about communism. Sergeant Szabo
lived in formerly communist ruled
Romania until the-age of 15. He
told the students what it was like to
live under Communism and gave
a perspective on the freedoms that
welhave compared to those people
living under communist rule.
Sergeant Szabo will be visiting
our school on numerous future
occasions regarding the Army.

ELEMENTARY HONOR
ASSEMBLY
by Jessica Smith
On Jan. 26 Altha held their
annual nine weeks honor assembly
hosted by the Jr. Beta Club. Overall
there ere ~6 uiudents making the
A/B honor roll and 34 students
making the all A's honor roll.

THIS IS AMERICA
by Patricia Williams
Are you ready for the music? If
you are then 4th and 5th graders at
Altha School are ready to give you
the music. The students will be
performing many patriotic songs
such as: "This is America", "I Love
My Country", "Lights of Freedom",
and many more. The performances
will be on Thursday, February 16
at 10:00 a.m. for students and 7:00


p.m. for general audience. A few
of the elementary students will be
performing solos.
Performing solos as well are
high school chorus members:
seniors- John Baumer, and Sarah
Shelton, junior- Audrey Brown, and
freshman- Morgan Swilley. John
Baumer and Tiffany Betts will
be performing piano solos. John
Baumer will be playing "Prelude in
C" by J.S. Bach and singing "Aura
Lee". Tiffany Betts will also be
playing a selection by J.S. Bach.
Admission is free, so leave your
checkbook at home and come out
and enjoy the music.

FCATTESTING INFORMATION
The following information came
directly from the Department of
Education in Tallahassee:
"Electronic devices: Students are
not permitted to have any electronic
devices (pagers, cellular phones,
etc.) in their possession during test
administration even if they do not


use them. Possession of electronic
devices during test administration
may be cause for invalidation."
Parents, please help us maintain
a testing environment most
conducive to your child's testing
experience. Electronic devices that
are found will be confiscated and
turned in to the office. Students
will be referred to the office.

TREES
Two pine trees on the front lawn
of our school have been damaged by
lightning and must be removed for
safety reasons. The remaining two
pine trees will also be removed.
Mr. Hand plans to plant a row of
bradford pear trees from the south
end of the school property adjacent
to Main Street to the fence on the
north playground.

FCA
The Altha Fellowship of
Christian Athletes hosted a Friday
Night Life Rally last Friday, Feb. 3
for area students. Students enjoyed
hearing a message from Brent Jones
of Lake City and a concert given by
Providence of Springhill.
We would like to thank Ski
productions for providing and
setting up the sound equipment,
Altha Church of God for providing
the lights and donation of some of
the door prizes that were given out.
We would also like to thank Altha
First Baptist Church for providing
housing for the band. Thanks as
well goes to all the parents and
FCA students who helped out with
the event. Our next event will be
March 11 at 7 p.m..


Chipola Regional
DRAMA CLUB The Liberty
County High School Drama Club
sponsor, Mandie Fowler and all of.
the Drama Club's student mem-
bers were awarded a grant from the
Chipola Regional Arts Association.


Arts Association
The grant, worth $200 will be used
to help purchase costumes and other
theatrical equipment. With justifi-
able optimism, Mrs. Fowler added,
"We're really excited that Chipola
decided to support our program."
In less than a year of existence,
the Drama Club has already per-
formed Charles Dickens' seasonal
classic, "A Christmas Carol," and
the group's next much anticipated
production "Hotel Le Roche," can be
seen on April 24. Adult tickets are $5
each.
CLUB MEETINGS The club
meetings are as schedule:
*FHA is having a Valentine Social
on Thursday, Feb. 9 at 6:30 p.m. in
the Home Economics Department
at the School. The club will pay for
the pizza. There will be signs placed
around the school with date and time.
If you are planning to attend the party,
you must come by and sign-up so we
will know how much pizza to order.
*Beta, please remember that we
are still offering service to W.R. To-
lar School in conjunction with their
Family Reading Night. It is held
every Monday night from 5:30 to 7
p.m. There is a sign-up sheet posted
and you will receive +10 points for
each night you work.
*FCA is excited to announce the
Weekend of Champions retreat in
February with special guest Drew
Weatherford, quarterback of the
Florida State University Seminoles.
'See Mr. fHairell for sign-utp'deiaits.


Drama Club receives grant from


H&R BLOCK


* Instant refund.

* If you owe, we pay for

you 90 days same as

cash.

* Electronic filing.

* Best prices.

* Best trained staff.


* Open year round.


- ------------------ -~ --- --- ------- ---- --- ----- -- --- -------- ----- -- --- -- ------ ----- --


Abbyy


coo





Page 22 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL FEBRUARY 8, 2006


One Stop Career Center
E:.urisi,:,.'. Phone 1850) 674-5088
The following positions are avail-
able: Supervisor/Food Service,
Delivery Driver, Bookkeeper,
Dairy Worker, Crew Mem-
ber/Fast Food, Dredge Op-
erator, Nursery Worker, Janito-
rial, Truck Driver/Heavy, Food
Worker. EOE
Service Chipola Workforce Board UFN


HELP WANTED
Concrete laborers,
form carpenters,
and finishers.


. .


CDL
DRIVERS NEEDED
Qualified drivers must have
2 years experience with a
dump truck.



Call (850) 627-7263
A DRUG FREE WORKPLACE C

Help Wanted
Two full-time
position available
in the Lumber Barn.
CDL license preferred,
but not required.
Apply in person at
A -, Strickland's
X C Hard'wiare -
Located on Hwy. 20 in Bristol
Looking for employment?
Remember to check out The
Job Market every week in The
Calhoun-Liberty Journal.



Service Tech
for a busy rental store.
Duties include pres-
sure washing, servicing
equipment, and
various other duties.

Lolley's
Rentals
in Quincy.







Looking for good
people who want
to make a career
change. Applicants
will be cross
trained in:
*Equipment Operation
and Maintenance
*General Labor
and Metal Sorting

Apply in person at:
1351 Aenon Church Rd.
off Hwy. 20, Tallahassee
Drug-Free Workplace
:EOE ... .


HIGDON FURNITURE CO.
is now accepting applications for the following positions:

DIESEL MECHANIC
Cummins experience and Class A CDL a plus. Benefits
available. Contact Warren Higdon at (850) 627-7564, or fax
resume to (850) 627-2486.

DRIVER OTR
Home every week
CDLA license required. Benefits available. Contact Jimmy at
(850) 627-7564, ext. 246 or fax resume to (850) 627-2486.
EOE/DFWP 2-8.2-15


A Behavioral Health Care Center
is currently seeking:

LICENSED THERAPIST (#2266C) Master's degree
from an accredited university or college with a major in the
field of counseling, social work, psychology or a related
-Human Services field and two years of professional ex-
perience in providing services to persons with behavioral
illness. Prior experience working with children who have
emotional issues required. Some local travel required.
License required. SHIFT: Monday-Friday/variable hours,
some late afternoon work required.

For more information and a complete listing of avail-
able positions:
www.apalacheecenter.org
(850) 523-3217 or 1 (800) 226-2931 APAL AC H EE
Human resources
2634-J Capital Circle N. E., Tallahassee, FL
Pre-hire Drug Screen & FDLE background check
An Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer
Drug-Free Workplace




Marianna Florida

Distribution Center

Full and Part Time
Openings Available

If you are looking for a great place to work with
great pay, great benefits, a great working
environment, and a flexible schedule
Family Dollar is the place for you!

No experience necessary!
Must be at least 18 years of age.

Please apply in person at:
Family Dollar Distribution Center
3949 Family Dollar Parkway
Marianna, FL 32448

Family Dollar is an
Equal Employment Opportunity Employer.
Family Dollar maintains a
drug free workplace.


;c~:1


JOB OPENING
The Liberty County Road and Bridge Department is ac-
cepting applications for employment. Requirements may be
dump truck operator, heavy-equipment operator, etc. An ap-
plication may be required to be Inmate Supervisor trained.
All applicants must possess a valid Florida Class B CDL
driver's license with air brake endorsement.
Applications may be picked up and returned at the Lib-
erty County Clerk's Office. Deadline for applicants is Feb.
9, 2006 at 5 p.m. All applicants will be considered at the
regular meeting on Feb. 9, 2006 at 7 p.m. in the courtroom
of the courthouse.
If you have any questions, please call Sammy Hanna,
Liberty County Road and Bridge Superintendent at (850)
643-4040.
LIBERTY COUNTY ROAD AND BRIDGE DEPT. IS A DRUG-FREE WORK
ENVIRONMENT AND AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER. ,.


NORTH FLORIDA


LUMBER
...is currently seeking a dedicated individual for the position
of OFFICE ASSISTANT. Individual must be courteous and
able to handle multiple tasks. Must be well organized and
able to perform duties accurately and in a timely fashion.
Responsibilities include, but are not limited to: cross training
in multiple areas, filing, data entry. Computer experience
is preferred, high school diploma or equivalent is required.
Hours may vary between 7 a.m. to 6 p.m., Monday through
Friday, some Saturdays required. Wages are hourly. Please
apply directly to North Florida Lumber Co., Bristol.


JOB OPENING
The School Board of Liberty County is accepting applications
for the following position for the 2005-2006 school year.
Applications are available at the Office of the Superintendent
located at 12926 NW CR 12, Bristol, FL. Office hours are
from 8 a.m. 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday.

ESE PARA-PROFESSIONAL
TOLAR SCHOOL K-12

MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS:
AA degree or successful score on Para-Pro Test
Computer proficiency preferred
Must provide written references upon request from the
Superintendent

COMPENSATION: $15,489 20,630

A complete application and resume listing three (3)
professional references is required. Please submit application
to the Office of the Superintendent of Schools located in
the Liberty Education and Administration Center at 12926
NW CR 12 Bristol, FL. Reasonable accommodations
for completing forms and interviews are available for
people with disabilities when requested in advance.
For a request for reasonable accommodations, please
contact the Office of the Superintendent.

Applications will be received from:
Feb. 2, Feb. 15, 2006

Employment will be contingent upon fingerprints and drug
test clearance.

ONLY CURRENTAPPLICA TIONS WILL BE CONSIDERED

Employment opportunities are offered without regard to race, religion,
sex, age, National origin, handicap or marital status.
AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITYEMPLOYER/DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE






FEBRUARY 8,2006 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 23


2005 Annual Drinking Water Quality Report

1 CITY OF BRISTOL -


We're pleased to present
to you this year's Annual
Water Quality Report. This
report is designed to inform
you about the quality water
and services we deliver to
you every day. Our constant
goal is to provide you with
a safe and dependable sup-
ply of drinking water. We
want you to understand the
efforts we make to continu-
ally improve the water treat-
ment process and protect
our water resources. We are
committed to ensuring the
quality of your water. Our
water source is ground water
from four wells which are
chlorinated. The well draws
from the Floridan Aquifer.
The Florida Department
of Environmnetal Protec-
tion is in the process of
conducting Source Water'
Assessments. (SWA) ,for.
all public water systems in
,Florida. These assessments
will identify and assess any
potential sources of con-
tamination in the vicinity of
your water supply. A SWA
report for this system is
available or will be available
soon at the DEP SWAPP
Web site: www.dep.state.
fl.us/swapp.
If you have any questions
about this report or concern-
ing your water utility, please
contact Michael Wahlquist at
the City of Bristol at (850)
643-2261. We encourage
our valued customers to be
informed about their water
utility. If you want to learn.
more, please attend any of
our regularly scheduled
meetings. They are held on
Monday following the first
Thursday of each month at
the City Hall beginning-at
6:30 p.m. (ET).
The City of Bristol rou-
tinely monitors for contami-
nants in your drinking water
according to Federal and
State laws, rules, and regu-
lations. Except where indi-
cated otherwise, this report


We are pleased to announce that our drinking
water meets all federal and state requirements.


2005 TEST RESULTS TABLE
** Results in the Level Detected column for radiological contaminants, inorganic contaminants, synthetic organic contaminants including pesticides
and herbicides, and volatile organic contaminants are the highest average at any of the sampling points or the highest detected level at any sampling
point, depending on the sampling frequency.
Contaminant and Unit of Dates of sampling MCL Violation Lel Range of MCLG MCL Likely Source of
Measurement (mo./yr.) Y/N Detected Results Contamination
Radiological Contaminants
Alpha emitters (pCi/I) Jul 03 N 4.1 0.8-4.1 0 15 Erosion ofnatural
deposits
Contaminant and Unit of Dates of sampling MCL Violation Level Range of MQLG MCL Likely Source of
Measurement (mo./yr.) Y/N Detected Results Contamination
Inorganic Contaminants
Erosion of natural
deposits; water additive
Fluoride (ppm) Jul 03 N 0.1 ND-0.1 4 4.0 which promotes strong
teeth; discharge from
fertilizer and aluminum
factories
Residue from man-made
pollution such as auto
Lead (point of entry) (ppb) Jul 03 N 1:0 ND-1.0 N/A 15 emissions and paint;
lead pipe. casing, and
solder
Sodium (ppm) Jul 03 N 27.0 24.0-27.0 N/A 160 Salt water intrusion,

TTHMs and Stage 1 Disinfectant/Disinfection By-Product (D/DBP) Parameters
For the following parameters monitored under Stage 1 D/DBP regulations, the level detected is the highest running annual average (RAA) of the
quarterly averages or an annual average depending upon the sampling frequency: Bromate, Chloramines, Chlorine. Haloacetic Acids, and/or ITIHM
(MCL 80 ppb). Range of Results is the range of results (lowest to highest) at the individual sampling sites.
Contaminant and Dates of MCL Range C or
Unit of- sampling Violation Level of MCLG or Likely Source of Contamination
Detected MIRDLG MRDL
Measurement (mo./yr.) Y/N Results
Chl. i Jan-De N 42 4-0.5 MRDG= MRDL 4.0 Water additive used to control microbes
05 iRAA) 4
Haloacetic Acids, Jan-Dec RA 4
(fiveetHAAid(ppb -05 N 1.25 ND-6.4 N/A MCL = 60' By-product of drinking water disinfection

No. of
Contaminant and Unit Dates of A, 90th sampling AL.
of Measurement sampling Violation Percentile sites MCLG (Action Likely Source of Contamination
(mo./yr.) Y/N Result exceeding Level)
the At,
Lead and Copper (Tap Water)
'ppIi "pdtr) Jun vp N 0.03 Oof 10 1.3 1.3 ot natural deposits: leaching from wood
(ppm) preservatives

In the table above, you may Action Level (AL): The concen- part by weight of analyte to 1
find unfamiliar terms and ab- traction of a contaminant which, if billion parts by weight of the
breviations. To help you better exceeded, triggers treatment or water-sample.
understand these terms we've other requirements that a water Maximum residual disinfec-
provided the following defini- system must follow. tant level or MRDL: The highest
tions: .Picocurie per liter (pCilL) level of a disinfectant allowed in
Maximum Contaminant Level measure of the radioactivity of drinking water. There is convinc-
or MCL: The highest level of a water. ing evidence that addition of a
contaminant that is allowed in "ND" means not detected disinfectant is necessary for con-
drinking water. MCLs are set as and indicates that the substance trol of microbial contaminants.
close to the MCLGs as feasible us- was not found by the laboratory Maximum residual disin-
ing the best available treatment analysis. fectant level goal or MRDLG:
technology.- Parts per million (ppm) or The level of a drinking water
Maximum Contaminant Level Milligrams per liter (mgll) one disinfectant below which there
Goal or MCLG: The level of a part by weight of analyte to 1 mil- is no known or expected risk to
contaminant in drinking water lion parts by weight of the water health. MRDLGs do not reflect
below which there is no known or sample. the benefits of the use of dis-
expected risk to health. MCLGs Parts per billion (ppb) or Mi- infectants to control microbial
allow for a margin of safety. programs per liter (pg/l) one contaminants.


monitoring for the period of
January 1 to December 31,
2005. Data obtained before
January 1, 2005, and pre-
sented in this report are from
the most recent testing done
in accordance with the laws,
rules, and regulations.

The sources of drinking
water (both tap water and
bottled water) include riv-
ers, lakes, streams, ponds,
reservoirs, springs, and
wells. As water travels
over the surface of the land
or through the ground, it
dissolves naturally occur-
ring minerals and, in some


and can pick up substances
resulting from the presence
of animals or from human
activity.
Contaminants that may
be present in source water
include:
(A) Microbial contami-
nants, such as viruses and
bacteria, which may come
from sewage treatment
plants, septic systems, ag-
ricultural livestock opera-
tions, and wildlife.
(B) Inorganic contami-
nants, such as salts and
metals, which can be natu-
rally-occurring or result from
urban stormwater runoff, in-
dustrial or domestic waste-


gas production, mining, or
farming.
(C) Pesticides and her-
bicides, which may come
from a variety of sources
such as agriculture, urban
stormwater runoff, and resi-
dential uses.
(D) Organic chemical
contaminants, including
synthetic and volatile or-
ganic chemicals, which are
by-products of industrial
processes and petroleum
production, and can also
come from gas stations,
urban stormwater runoff,
and septic systems.
(E) Radioactive con-
taminants, which can be


result of oil and gas produc-
tion and mining activities.
In order to ensure that
tap water is safe to drink,
the EPA prescribes regula-
tions, which limit the amount
of certain contaminants in
water provided by public
water systems. The Food
and Drug Administration
(FDA) regulations establish
limits for contaminants in
bottled water, which must
provide the same protection
for public health.
Drinking water, including
bottled water, may reason-
ably be expected to contain
at least small amounts of
some contaminants. The
presence of contaminants
does not necessarily indi-
cate that the water poses a
health risk. More informa-
tion about contaminants
and potential health effects
can be obtained by calling
the Environmental Protec-
tion Agency's Safe Drinking
Water Hotline at 1-800-426-
4791.
Some people may be
more vulnerable to con-
taminants in drinking
water than the general
population. Immuno-com-
promised persons such
as persons with cancer
undergoing chemother-
apy, persons who have
undergone organ trans-
plants, people with HIVI
AIDS or other immune
system disorders, some
elderly, and infants can be
particularly at risk from
infections. These people
should seek advice about
drinking water from their
health care providers.
EPA/CDC guidelines on
appropriate means to
lessen the risk of infec-
tion by Cryptosporidium
and other microbiological
contaminants are avail-
able from the Safe Drink-
ing Water Hotline (800-
426-4791).
We at the City of Bristol work
around the clock to provide top
quality water to everyone. We
ask that all our customers help
us protect our water sources,
which are the heart of our com-
munity, our way of life and our


-,bisbemopfd Q sbe Isnu uof oi.w. mqase,.radiLoative material, OxOter. djschageS, ,gil, a~rid .tntpa1ly occurring orbe toee children's fu re.,






Page 24 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL FEBRUARY 8,2006


2006 Wiregrass Baseball Classic Feb. 24-26


DOTHAN The 2006
ScreenTech Wiregrass Baseball
Classic swings into action in
February. Play gets underway at
Westgate Park in Dothan Friday,
Feb. 24, and continues through
Sunday, Feb. 26, with two games
each day.
The three-day tournament,
which is presented by the
Dothan Eagle and hosted by
Troy University, will feature the
TROY Trojans, South Alabama
Jaguars, UAB Blazers and
Michigan Wolverines.
UAB and Michigan take the
field Feb. 24 at 2 p.m., while
TROY takes on South Alabama
at 6 p.m.
South Alabama plays UAB


--- --- --- --- - --- --


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR
CALHOUN COUNTY, FLORIDA

CASE NO.: 2005-379-CA

JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, AS TRUST-
EE,

Plaintiff

vs.

KATHRYN M. OWENS; BRAD OWENS;
UNKNOWN TENANT I; UNKNOWN
TENANT II;: AEGIS MORTGAGE COR-
PORATION D'B/A/ UC LENDING, and
any unknown heirs, devisees, grantees,
creditors and other unknown persons or
unknown spouses claiming by, through
and under any of the above-named
Defendants,

Defendants.
/

NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the
undersigned Clerk-of the Circuit Court of
Calhoun County, Florida, will on the 6th day
of April, 2006, at 11 a.m. (CT) on the front
steps of the Calhoun County Courthouse,
offer for sale and sell at public outery to
the highest and best bidder for cash, the
following-described property situate in
Calhoun County, Florida:

Commence ataconcrete monument
marking the NW corner of the NE
1/4 of Section 6,Township 1 South,
Range 8 West, Calhoun County,
Florida, and thence go South 89 21'
48" East alongthe North Boundary
line of Section 6 (as monumented)
for a distance of 859.66 feet, thence
go South 00 20' 31" West, for a
distance of 1979.04 feet, thence go
North 890 03'43"West for a distance
of 304.66 feet for Point of Begin-
ning. From said Point of Beginning
continue North 89 09'43" West for
a distance of 323.84 feet to a point
on the Easterly right of way line of a
county road (said road having a 100
foot right of way).Thence go North
000 39' 08" East along said right of
way line for a distance of 134.735
feet; thence go South 89 00' 43"
East for a distance of 323.84 feet,
thence go South 00* 39' 08" West
for a distance of 134.735 fee to the
Point of Beginning. Said parcel of
land having an area of 1.0G acre,
more or less. Also known as Lots
7 and 8, Block A, an unrecorded
subdivision of the S1/2 of the NW1/4
of the SW1/4 of the NE1/4 of Section
8,Township 1 South, Range 8 West,
Calhoun County, Florida. Together
with a 1994 Destiny Doublewide
Mobile Home ID #0-3870GAA and
0-3870GAB.

pursuant to the Final Judgment entered


Feb. 25 at 2 p.m., and it is
Michigan verses TROY at 6
p.m.
On Feb. 26, Michigan goes
up against South Alabama at
10 a.m. The final game of the
tournament gets underway at
2 p.m. when TROY and UAB
meet on the field.
Tournament passes are on sale
at ScreenTech, the Dothan Civic


Witness my hand and official seal of said
court this 26th day of January 2006.

If you are a person with a disability who
needs any accommodation in orderto par-
ticipate in this proceeding, you are entitled,
at no cost to you, to provision of certain
assistance. Please contact Shelly Yon at
674-4545 within 2 working days of your
receipt of this Summons; if you are hearing
or voice impaired, 1-800-955-8771.

Ruth Attaway, Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: L. Flowers Deputy Clerk 2-1,2-8

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SEC-
OND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
LIBERTY COUNTY, FLORIDA-

PROBATE DIVISION

CASE NO. 2006-04-CP


IN RE: ESTATE OF

MARY ANN PAYNE,

Deceased.


NOTICE TO CREDITORS

The administration of the estate of MARY
ANN PAYNE, deceased, whose date of
death was November 26, 2005; is pend-
ing in the Circuit Court for Liberty County,
Florida, Probate Division; File No.: 2006-'
04-CP; the address of which is Probate
Division, Liberty County Courthouse,
Bristol, Florida 32321. The names and
addresses of the Personal Representa-
tive and the Personal Representative's
attorney are set forth below.

All creditors of the decedent and other per-
sons, who have claims ordemands against
decedent's estate, including unmatured,
contingent or unliquidated claims and who
have been served acopy of this notice must
file their claims with this Court WITHIN
THREE (3) MONTHSAFTER THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER
THE DATE OF SERVICE OFACOPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.

All other creditors of the decedent and oth-
er persons who have claims or demands
against the decedent's estate, including
unmatured, contingent or unliquidated
claims, mustfile their claims with this Court
WITHINTHREE (3) MONTHSAFTERTHE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE.

ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.

NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERI-
ODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM
FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE
AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF
DEATH IS BARRED.


Center Box Office and Westgate
Recreation Center. Tickets can
also be purchased from several
area high school baseball teams
and during Dixie Youth Baseball
registration at the Dothan
recreation centers.
For more information about
the Wiregrass Baseball Classic,
contact Shannon Collins at (334)
596-5611.


OF THIS NOTICE IS WEDNESDAY,
FEB. 8, 2006.

Attorney for Personal Representative:
CECIL L. DAVIS JR.
Florida Bar No.: 0242721
Fowler White Boggs Banker, P.A.
Post Office Box 11240
Tallahassee, FL 32302
Telephone: (850) 681-0411


Personal Representative:
JOHN GLENN PAYNE
2516 Bailey Drive
Norcross. GA 30071-


S 2-B.2-s15


WHITTLE ROAD
FEMA-1551-DR-FL

PROJECT # 058.061

NOTICE TO RECEIVE
SEALED BIDS

The Liberty County Board of County
Commissioners will receive sealed bids
from any qualified person, company or
corporation interested in constructing the
following project:

WHITTLE ROAD
FEMA-155-DR-FL

Plans and specifications can be obtained
at Preble-Rish Inc., 324 Marina Drive,
Port St. Joe, Florida 32456, (850) 227-
7200. The bid must conform to Section
287.133(3) Florida Statutes, on public
entity crimes.

Completion date forthis projectwill be 120
days from the date of the Notice to Proceed
presented to the successful bidder.

Liquidated damages forfailureto complete
the project on the specified date will be set
at $200.00 per day.

-Please indicate on the envelope that this
is a sealed bid, the bid number and what
the bid is for.

Bids will be received until 5:00 P.M. (EST),
on March 9. 2006, at the Liberty County
Clerk's Office, Liberty County Courthouse,
Hwy. 20, Bristol, Florida 32321, and will
be opened and read aloud on, March 9
2006, at 7:00 P.M. (EST). The public is
invited to attend.

Cost for Plans and Specifications will be
$25.00 per set and is non-refundable.
Checks should be made payable to
PREBLE-RISH, INC.

The Board of County Commissioners
reserves the right to waive informalities
in any bid, to accept and/or reject any or
all bids, and to accept the bid that in their
judgment will be in the best interest of
Liberty County.


in a case pending in said Court, the style iyouhave anyquestionspleasecallDavid
\Wltipbi?|ndipaM 4Et ......A>\., DF.S e t( 22


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Hwy. 20 West Blountstown 674-8784






ATTENTION TAXPAYERS!!!

You may. be entitled to the

following exemptions:

$25,000 HOMESTEAD EXEMPTIONS: Every person who has legal
or equitable title to real property in the state of Florida and who resides
thereon and in good faith makes it his or her permanent home is eli-
gible. First time applicants are required to furnish their social security
number and should have available evidence of ownership, i.e., deed,
contract, etc. If filing for the first time, be prepared to answer these and
other questions:

1. In whose name or names was the title to the dwelling recorded as

2. What is the street address? .
3. Are you a legal resident of the State of Florida?
4. Do you have a Florida license plate on your car and a Florida driver's
license?
5. Were you living in the dwelling which is being claimed for homestead
exemption on Jan. 1st?

$500 WIDOW'S EXEMPTION: Any widow who is a permanent Florida
resident may claim this exemption. If the widow remarries, she is no
longer eligible. If the husband and wife were divorced before death,
thee woman is not considered a widow. You may be asked to produce a
death certificate when filing for the first time.
$500 WIDOWER'S EXEMPTION: Any widower who is a permanent
Florida resident may claim this exemption. If the widower remarries
he is no longer eligible. If the husband and wife were divorced before
death, the man is not considered a widower. You may be asked to pro-
duce a death certificate when filing for the first time.
$500 DISABILITY EXEMPTION: Every Florida resident who is totally
and permanently disabled qualifies for this exemption. Please present
a certificate from two (2) professionally unrelated licensed Florida phy-
sicians.
$5,000 DISABLED VETERAN EXEMPTION: Any service man disabled
at least 10% in war or by service-connected misfortune is entitled to this
exemption. In filing for the first time be prepared to present a certificate
from the United States Department of Veterans Affairs.
AGRICULTURE EXEMPTION: Five (5) acres or more being used as
bona fide agricultural purposes on Jan. 1st.
SENIOR CITIZEN HOMESTEAD EXEMPTION: The Liberty County
Commissioners have approved an additional Homestead Exemption
for certain homestead property owners who reside in Liberty County.
The exemption is for an additional $25,000 and applies only to a portion
of the tax rate (Millage).
In order to qualify for the new $25,000 Senior Citizens Homestead
Exemption, an applicant must already have the regular Homestead Ex-
emption, be 65 years of age of older as of Jan. 1, 2005 and have total
household income of $22,000 or less for the previous calendar year.
(Estimated no final amount available as of today.)
Total household income means the adjusted gross income of all
members of a household. The adjusted gross income is the income
reported on the IRS Form 1040, line 33 or the IRS Form 1040A, line
19 or, if the applicant is not required to file income tax, the total income
minus Social Security benefits. Income includes, but is not limited to,
Social Security benefits, pension, VA retirement annuities, interest in-
come and wages.

YOU WILL NEED TO PROVIDE PROOF OF AGE AND
PROOF OF ALL 2005 INCOME TO THE HOUSEHOLD.

THE DEADLINE FOR FILING THESE EXEMPTIONS IS MARCH 1
AT THE LIBERTY COUNTY PROPERTY APPRAISER OFFICE, IF
S* YOU HAVE ANYQUESTIONS,S PLEASE CALL 8507643-2279





FEBRUARY 8, 2006 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 25


February is National Parent Leadership Month


TALLAHASSEE -February 2006 has been designated
National Parent Leadership Month. Prevent Child Abuse
Florida, in partnership with the Ounce of Prevention
Fund of Florida, will be recognizing, honoring and
celebrating parents for leadership roles in their homes
and communities. National Parent Leadership Month
was created to:
*Educate the public about parent leadership as a vital
family strengthening and community building strategy;
and
*Encourage professionals, policymakers and other
community members to create opportunities to partner
with parents to address issues that affect children and
families.
Parent leadership occurs when parents gain the


knowledge and skills to function in meaningful leadership
roles and represent a "parent voice" to help shape the
lives of families and communities, as well as shape the
direction of programs and policies that impact them.
Parents, grandparents, kinship care providers, foster and
adoptive parents, and anyone in a parenting role who has
personal experience in using resources and/or services to
strengthen their families, have the potential to become
Parent Leaders.
"Parent Leadership is an essential component in
effective family support and child abuse prevention
programs," says Christie Ferris, Director of Prevent Child
Abuse Florida. "Parents and programs find themselves
accomplishing better outcomes for their families and
communities when parents have the opportunity to share


their knowledge through meaningful roles in planning,
implementing, and evaluating programs that affect
families and children," said Ferris.
The Florida Circle of Parents, an initiative of Prevent
Child Abuse Florida, currently offers 41 support groups in
partnership with local organizations located throughout
the state.

Florida Circle of Parents groups are always free,
confidential, anonymous and non-judgmental. The Florida
Circle of Parents is part of a national network of 29 statewide
networks and 2 metropolitan regional networks that have been
working together and in partnership with local communities
for several years. To find out more about the Florida Circle of
Parents, contact Christie Ferris atcferris@ounce.org or call
850-921-4494.


ARPC elections

held on Jan. 26
from the Apalachee
Regional Planning Council
The Apalachee Regional
Planning Council held its annual
elections on Jan. 26.
Benjamin Ranie was elected
chairman. Mr. Ranie of Wewa-
hitchka is employed with Ari-
zona Chemical in Port St. Joe
and serves as the Gulf County
Gubernatorial Appointee to the
council.
Julie Conley was elected vice-
chairman. Ms. Conley, Jefferson
County Municipal Appointee,
serves as the mayor of the city of
Monticello.
Delores Madison was elected
secretary/treasurer. Ms. Madi-
son, Gadsden County Municipal
Appointee, serves as the mayor
of the city of Midway.
Debbie Lightsey was elect-
ed as the representative to the
Florida Regional Councils Asso-
ciation. Debbie Lightsey, Leon
County Municipal appointee,
serves as a city commissioner
for the city of Tallahassee.
Donald Stephens of
Blountstown, Calhoun County
Gubernatorial Appointee is the
out-going chairman, having
served two years in the capacity.
All were unanimously.elected
and will serve a one-year term.
For additional information re-
garding the council, its programs
and staff, please feel free-to call
either the office in Blountstown
at 674-4571 or the office in Tal-
lahassee at 488-6211. You may
also wish to visit the Council's
Web site at www.thearpc.com.


ABOVE: Liberty County Rifle Team members shown here the new equipment purchased with funding from National Rifle
include, from left to right, Latona Boone, John Summers, Ryan Association Foundation.
Berg, John Kirkpatrick and Jeremy Milton. They are shown with

LCHS Rifle Team receives National Rifle


Association Foundation Grant of $3,500


The LCHS rifle team recently received a $3,500
grant from the National Rifle Association
Foundation to purchase equipment. The team,
partnered with the Sheriff's Department, will
conduct firearm safety classes for elementary
grade students and safety and marksmanship
classes for middle school students. The grant
allowed the team to purchase five new pellet rifles,
five scopes with stands, five shooting mats, and
two large floor coverings to protect gym floors. The
team will begin classes after FCAT testing and will
continue the classes next school year. The rifle


team is currently in second place in a local firing
league and will compete in Jefferson County on
Feb. 16. The team plans an open home match in
late April or early Ma, against other high school,
4-H, and Boy Scout teams. Ryan Berg and Latona
Boone are averaging over 200 points per match.
Shea Nolen, John Kirkpatrick, Jeremy Milton and
John Summers are averaging over 180 points
per match. Also, on the varsity squad are Philip
Rushing, Paul Shiver and Canyon Daly. The JV
squad consists of Logan Brown, Michael Turner
and Crystal Hommel.


Citizens Soldier matching grant program funds available through June 2006


TALLAHASSEE Susan Pareigis, Director of the
Florida Agency for Workforce Innovation, emphasized
continued availability of the Citizen Soldier Program
that allows private employers to apply for grants to help
them supplement pay for their employees who are called
to active duty.
Federal law requires that employers retain the same
or similar jobs, pay and benefits waiting for employees
who are away on military duty. The Citizen Soldier
Program provides matching grants to Florida employers
who pay wages to employees while they are serving in
the United States Armed Forces Reserves or the Florida
National Guard on federal active duty.
The Citizen Soldier Program reimburses private
employersqup9 t' ppe-,pif,qf, the ,djrffren 'bgetwepn the


amount of monthly wages paid before the employee
was called to federal active duty and the amount of the
employee's active duty compensation.
"Florida's citizen soldiers and their families live and
work in a condition of constant readiness to serve the
state and our nation," said Susan Pareigis, Director of
the Agency for Workforce Innovation. "It is important
that we recognize their contributions and sacrifices and
offer assistance to those employers across the state who
value and support their sacrifices."
The program is available on a first-come, first-served
basis. Florida employers are encouraged to learn more
about the Citizen Soldier Program by calling (800) 342-
3450 or visiting www.floridajobs.org/citizen_soldier/
,,index.html,.


The Agency for Workforce Innovation is the lead
state workforce agency and directly administers the
state's Labor Market Statistics program, Unemployment
Compensation, Early Learning and various workforce
development programs. The office of Early Learning,
a division within the agency, provides oversight of
Florida's school readiness programs and is the lead entity
for implementing the state's Voluntary Prekindergarten
program.
Workforce development policy and guidancein Florida
is provided by Workforce Florida, Inc. Workforce Florida
and the Agency for Workforce Innovation are partners in
the Employ Florida network which includes 24 Regional
Workforce Boards who deliver services through nearly
100 One-Stop,Career, Centers,around the,state.,






Page 26 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL FEBRUARY 8,2006


CHARLES LISTON "CHUCK"WILSON II
CLARKSVILLE Charles Liston "Chuck"
Wilson II, 45, passed away Wednesday afternoon,
Feb. 1, 20.06 in Panama City. He was born on July
3, 1960 in Nashville, TN and had lived in Calhoun
County for 17 years, coming from Winter Park. He
was part owner of the Ultimate Carpet Cleaning
business and served four years in the United States
Navy, serving aboard the aircraft carrier USS Kitty
Hawk.
Survivors include his mother, Betty T. Wilson
of Altha; one sister, Terry Neal of Clarksville; one
half-sister, Mary Wilkeson of Lake Worth; two
aunts, Helen Buck of Shellmans Bluff, GA and Ann
Zellers of Altamont Springs; three nephews, Billy
Neal of Clarksville, Anthony Neal of Pasadena, CA
andAshley Neal of Atlanta, GA; one niece, Amanda
Neal of Clarksville.
Services were held Sunday, Feb. 5, 2006 at Ri-
vertown Community Church with Rev. Paul Smith
officiating. Interment followed in Calvary Baptist
Church Cemetery in Clarksville.
Peavy Funeral Home in Blountstown was in
charge of the arrangements.

ALBERTHA R. POU
BLOUNTSTOWN Albertha R. Pou,
84, passed away. Wednesday, Feb. 1, 2006 in.
Blountsto% n. She %% as born in Charleston, SC and
had lived in Blountstown for the past 7 years. She
was of the Baptist faith.
Survivors include, three sons, Bruce Pou of
Panama City, Anthony Pou of Eureka, CA, Dwight
Pou and his wife, Patricia of Blountstown; one
stepson, Gary Edwards of Livingston Manor, NY;
one daughter, Earlene Cody of New York; one
sister, Carolyn Edwards and her husband, Donald of
Livingston Manor, NY; six grandchildren. Joshua.
Lori. and Jennifer Mann of Panima City. Ka\ la and
Brandon Pou of Panama Cit), l-iah and Nlonique
Pou of Blountstown;. three great-grandchildren,
Maleena, Joshua and Nathaniel Mann of Panama
City; loving caretaker, Lillie Bell of Blountstown.
Memorial services will be held at 2 p.m., Sunday
Feb. 12, 2006 from First Pentecostal Holiness.
Church in Blountstown with Rev. David Goodman
officiating.
Adams Funeral Home is in charge of the
arrangements.

DONALD 0. DUNCAN
TELOGIA Donald 0. Duncan, 56, passed-
away Wednesday, Feb. 1, 2006 at home. He retired-
from the Florida Department of Transportation.
Survivors include his x\ ife. Ruth MI ers Duncan;
one son, James Donald Burke and his wife, Wendy
of Sneads; a brother, David Duncan and his wife,
Faey of Bristol; two sisters, Dorothy and her hus-
band, Roger Sewell of Hosford and Deborah Price
of Telogia; two grandchildren.
-Services were held Friday, Feb. 3, 2006 at Telo-
gia Baptist Church. Interment followed in Hosford
Cemetery. -
Charles McClellan Funeral Home in Quincy was
in charge of the arrangements.

PIRLIE MAE COX
BRISTOL Pirlie Mae Cox, 64, passed away
Thursday, Feb. 2, 2006. Native of Liberty County,
she was a member of Church of God in Christ.
Survivors include her husband, -Nathan Cox
Sr. of Bristol; two sons, Terry Cox of Bristol and
Nathan Junior Cox of Atlanta, GA; three brothers,
Danny Black Jr. and his wife, Vivian, Leon Jerome
Black and James Dawson, all of Bristol; six sisters,
Dorothy Jean Beckwith, Nancy L. Bacon and her
husband, Bobby, Levola Ann Black, Rosa Lee
Dawson and Patricia Donor, all of Bristol and Ruby
Mae Black of Syracuse, NY; nine grandchildren and
three great-grandchildren.
Services were held Tuesday, Feb. 7, 2006 at Vet-
erans Memorial Park Civic Center in Bristol. Inter-
ment followed in Watson Cemetery in Bristol.
.Bradwell Mortuqry in,Qqipcy was in charge of
the arrangements. ,


JOHN E. LASSETER
BRISTOL John E. Lasseter, 79, passed away
early Thursday morning, Feb. 2, 2006 at his home.
He was born on Nov. 25, 1926 in Dothan, AL. and
had lived in Liberty County since 1967. A veteran
of World War II and the Korean conflict, he retired
from the United States Navy with 23 years of service.
He worked for the Liberty County Sheriff's Depart-
ment as a jailer for two years, then for the Calhoun
County Sheriff's Department as a jailer for 14 years.
He was a member of the VFW in Liberty County, a
member of the Fleet Reserve and a member of the
Bristol First Baptist Church in Bristol.
He was preceded in death by a son, Jimmy
Lamont Lasseter and a daughter, Glenda Loraine
Lasseter.
Survivors include his loving wife of 60 years,
Pearl Lasseter of Bristol; one son, Michael Emery
Lasseter and his wife, Joan of Marianna; a daugh-
ter, Patsy Lasseter of Marianna; two grandchildren,
Megan Lasseter andcKyla Mucci; three sisters, Mary
Goodson of Bristol, Frances Orazi of Pennsylvania
and Ida Mae Barfield of Marianna; and his faithful
companion, Tootles.
Services were held Saturday, Feb. 4, 2006 at the
First Baptist Church in Bristol with Rev. John Mc-
Daniel and Rev. Victor Walsh officiating. Interment
followed in the Lake Mystic Cemetery in Bristol.
Peavy Funeral Home in Blountstown was in
charge of the arrangements.

PEARL ELLIS
MARIANNA Pearl Ellis, 88 of Marianna,
passed away Thursday, Feb.. 2, 2006 in Marianna.
She was born in Gordon, AL and had lived in
Jackson County most of her life. She was a retired
charge aid for Florida State Hospital.
Survivors include two sons, Ed Ellis and his wife
Wanda of Thomasville, Georgia,and Earl Ellis and
hi, ife NMirlene of Altha. to daughters, Jewell
Benefield and her husband, Charles, and M argarer
Edenfield and her IIhuband. Woodrow, all of Grand
Ridge; 17 grandchildren, 38 great-grandchildren
and many great-great-grandchildren.
Services were held Sunday, Feb. 5, 2006 from
Pleasant Hill Baptist Church near Grand Ridge
with Dallas Ellis officiating. Interment followed in
Shady Grove Cemetery near Grand Ridge.
Adams Funeral Home was in: charge of the
arrangements.

RICHARD S. WALTON
ARCADIA,- Richard S. Walton, 87 of Arcadia
passed a\,ax. Friday, Feb. 3. He was born in
Penrins\'. amia and had lived in Arcadia for the past
several years, moving there from Blountstown. He
was a mechanic and a veteran, having served in the
U.S. Navy. .
Survivors include two sons, George Edward
Walton of Arcadia and James Richard Walton of
Florida City; two daughters, Mary Edwards of
Palatka and Betty High of Plant City; one brother,
George C. Walton of Lake, GA; iiine grandchildren
and many great-grandchildren
Services were held Tuesday, Feb. 7, 2006 from
Miami Memorial Park Cemetery in Miami.
Adams Funeral Home in Blountstown was in
charge of the arrangements.

DORENE BAILEY SPEARS
QUINCY Dorene Bailey Spears, 86, passed-
away Friday, Feb. 3, 2006. A native of Blountstown,
she had lived in Quincy since 1993 and was a mem-
ber of First Baptist Church in Havana.
She was preceded in death by her husband of 53
years, Charlie D. Spears.
Survivors include three daughters, Particia Faye
Spears and Joan Reeves, both of Tallahassee, Mary
Frances Spears of Quincy; a grandson, Jason Rod-
man and his wife, Joanna; two great-grandchildren,
Jason Patrick and Jordan Particia.
Services were held Tuesday, Feb. 7,2006 at Chris-
tian Home Church of Blountstown. Interment fol-
lowed in Nettle Ridge Cemetery in Blountstown.
Independent Funeral Home in Quincy was in
charge of thearrangements. ... ....


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JAMES BENJAMIN HEWETT II
BLOUNTSTOWN James Benjamin Hewett II, 69, passed away
Saturday, Feb. 4, 2006 at Wabash County Hospital in Wabash, IN from
injuries received in an automobile accident. He was born in Altha on
May 21, 1936 and had lived in Blountstown since 2000, coming from
Panama City. He retired after 40 years in the electronics business and
was worked for the past three years for RV Connection in Panama
City. He served in the U.S. Air Force with the (SAC) Command for
three years. He was a member of the Panhandle Antique Car Club in
Panama City and owned four antique cars. He was of the Protestant
faith.
Survivors include his wife, Sarah Hewett of Blountstown; mother,
Maudell Hewett of Blountstown; a son, Don Bailey and his wife,
Melba of Hamlin, Texas; six daughters, Elaine Hopkins of Baird,
Texas, Jan Hickerson of Enid, OK, Cordellia Bailey of Houston, Texas,
Kathryn Lisenby and her husband, Leon, and Margaret Thomas and
her husband, Kenneth, all of Panama City and Pat C. Scott and her
husband, Jay of Panama City Beach; one brother, Charles William
Hewett of Tallahassee; two sisters, Beth Powell of Pineview, GA and
Willie Mae Lamar of Tallahassee; seven grandchildren, Kay Hight
and her husband, Brett, Terry Bailey and his wife, Dina, Pamela,
Jonathan, Allen, Alice and Melissa; seven great-grandchildren and
several nieces and nephews.
Graveside services are scheduled for Wednesday, Feb. 8, 2006 at
11 a.m. (CT) at Chipola Cemetery in Altha.
Peavy Funeral Home in Blountstown is in charge of the arrange-
ments.

DEWEY LEE DAVIS
ALTHA Dewey Lee Davis, 58, passed away Sunday, Feb. 5,
2006. He was born Dec. 12, 1947 in Jackson County. He enjoyed
fishing.
He was preceded in death by his parents, Jack and Fannie Davis
and his brother John Davis
Survivors include his soulmate of 18 years, Debbie Gawiyluk of
Altha; three sons, Tommy Cornelius and his wife, Renee of Missis-
sippi, Joshua Davis and his wife, Crystal of Altha, Astin "Deuce"
Davis and his wife, Michelle of Deland; two daughters, Patricia
"Annette" Carter of Panama City and Bonnie Davis of Marianna;
three brothers, Bernard Davis and Robert Davis, both of Marianna
and Henry Davis of Delray; three sisters, Sara Moats and her husband.
Kenneth, Edna McDonald and her husband, Larry of Malone, Martha
Hinson and her husband, Dean of Marianna; 13 grandchildren and
one great-ginJaiudauhter
A memorial service was held
Monday, Feb. 6, 2006, at Hall A R IN G
Funeral Home in Altha. Memori-
alization. will be by cremation.
Hall Funeral Home in Altha OT your comfort,
was in charge of the arrange- ned & concerns.
ments.


jr7E






FEBRUARY 8, 2006 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 27


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* IO LWL^Y

IEnuwiainJCJE


Gardening tips for the month of February
Our warmer than normal / pruning in February. Decidu-
temperatures have some people by Theresa Friday, ous fruit trees, such as apple and
pulling out the fertilizer spread- Extension Horticultural plum, should have their branch-
er. While February is a great Agent, Santa Rosa County es thinned and pruned for the
month for some gardening tasks, desired form. Most evergreen
remember there is still the po- summer flowering shrubs such shrubs can also be pruned now.
tential for more cold weather. as althea, hibiscus, oleander, And if you have some large,
It is usually mid-March or early rose and abelia. Summer flow- overgrown broadleaf shrubs that
April before spring arrives along ering shrubs produce flower need to be cut back, now is the
the Gulf Coast. We still have the buds on current season's growth, safest time to rejuvenate these
potential for additional frosts or so pruning just before the spring plants. Rejuvenation is a dras-
freezes. flush is recommended. tic method of pruning old shrubs
February is not the month to However, do not prune the that have become much too large
stimulate the growth of warm spring flowering shrubs such as or have a large amount of non-
season lawns and shrubs by ap- azaleas, banana shrubs, spireas, flowering wood.
plying fertilizer. Fertilizers, Indian hawthorn and oriental February is the best time to
when applied too early, are either magnolias. These shrubs pro- establish English peas and Irish
wasted or can cause the lawn to duce flower buds in late summer potatoes in the vegetable garden.
green up. If the lawn does green and carry the buds through the These vegetables prefer cooler
up and is still lush when a freeze winter in order to flower in the weather and won't do as well if
hits, the risk of "winter kill" is spring. Prune spring flowering planted later in the spring.
increased. Mid-March to April shrubs now and you will be cut- This is also the time to plant
is usually early enough to fer- ting off their flowers. This type snap peas and sweet peas. Snap
tilize the lawn and landscape of shrub should be pruned soon peas are a group of edible-pod-
plants. after they flower but before mid- ded peas differing from snow
Mid to late February is a good June. peas in their round instead of
time to do any major pruning of Other plants can benefit from flat pod shapes. An edible-pod-
ded pea is similar to an ordinary
garden (English) pea. The pod
of the English pea is lined on the
inside with a thin, hard, tough
membrane which contracts as
the pod ripens and dries, caus-
ing the pod to open, twist, and
expel its seeds. In contrast, pods
Sm of the edible-podded pea, in-
s y i G e^cluding snap peas, do not have
the membrane and do not open


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when ripe.
The potato is one of Amer-
ica's most popular vegetables.
Solanum tuberosum, the scien-
tific name for the potato, also
called the Irish potato, is a cool
season crop and is relatively
easy to grow.
The potato tuber is the plant
"part" planted to grow a new
potato plant. When the tuber is
planted it is called a "seed" po-
tato. Only certified seed potatoes
should be planted in the home
garden. Certification insures that
the seed tubers are free of dis-
ease.
Do not purchase potatoes
from the grocery store to plant
in the-home garden. These may
carry harmful potato diseases
that will hurt the growth of your
crop. Tubers at the grocery store
may also be treated with sprout
inhibitors that may also hurt the
growth of the plant in the gar-
den.
So if you are anxious to work
in the garden, plant Irish pota-
toes or English peas. You can
even spend your time pruning
summer flowering shrubs or
overgrown shrubs. But, put the
fertilizer spreader back into stor-
age. Wait until our lawn grasses
have fully come out of their win-
ter dormancy before giving them
an application of fertilizer.
Theresa Friday is the Residen-
tial Horticulture Extension Agent
for Santa Rosa County. The use
of trade names, if used in this ar-
ticle, is solely for the purpose of
providing specific information.
It is not a guarantee, warranty,
or endorsement of the product
name(s) and does not signify that
they are-approved to the exclusion
of others. I I' ..


i '*


- -v






Page 28 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL FEBRUARY 8, 2006


CA- -- ._.


To place your ad, call 643-3333 or 1-800-717-3333 by noon
Eastern Time on Saturday. Non-business ads run FREE for 2 weeks.


Air conditioner/heater, 18,000
BTU, $300; air conditioner, 10,000
BTU, less than two years old, $125.
Call 237-2587. 2-8, 2-15

Free house to be moved or torn
down for materials in Blountstown.
Call 674-5026 or 674-5887.
2-8,2-15

Gravity flow wagon, snap-on top,
$1,250; gravity flow wagon, $850;
heavy-duty stock trailer, $850. Call
762-9676. 2-8,2-15

Chain linkfence, you move, $2 per
foot. Call 643-5886 or 643-2595,
ask for Mitch or Heather. 2-8,2-15

Paintball gun, Tippmann A-5, call
for information. Call 762-8384.
2-8,2-15

Galileo FS 80 telescope, huge
tripod telescope with all accessories
and instructions in a carrying case,
$600. Call 643-4453. 2-8,2-15

Large computer desk, $30. Call
674-5051. 2-8,2-15

Wanting to trade Winchester,
model. 1200, 12 gauge, 26-inch
improved cylinder and Savage bolt
action 270 for a Marlin 336 CS 35
Remington or 223 bolt action or
Winchester Model 94 22 Mag-
num or Marlin 336 CS 35
Remington. Call 762-8285.
2-8, 3-8

Sunquest 1000 tanning canopy,
six bulbs, tans very well, used only
four to five months, paid $1,800,
asking $1,000 or best offer. Call
762-3292. 2-8, 2-15

Esteban guitar, mother of pearl
overlay, flat top electric, comes with
amplifier and hard shell carrying
case, completely brand new, $250.
Call 674-2480. 2-8, 2-15

55-gallon metal drum, with or with-
out lids; 55-gallon plastic drums, $12
each. Call 379-8117. 2-8,2-15

LP gas cylinder, 24 gallons, $50.
Call 674-8570, leave message.
2-8, 2-15

Wall tapestry, extra large size with
bear design, make offer. Call 674-
3264. 2-8, 2-15

China hutch, $20; two kerosene
heaters, $20 each; large wooden
table, $10; dishes and bowls, $1
each; .rocking chair, $25; sliding
rocker, best offer. Call 674-5486.
2-8,2-15

Three chain link dog pens with
feeders, $250 for all. Call 379-
3046. 2-8,2-15

Heavy tempered glass top, 3 1/2
ft. x 6 ft., beveled edges, $200; 2 ft.
x 41/2 ft. brown deskwith four metal
drawers, $25. Call 762-2528.
2-8,2-15

Beige Sofa with recliners at both
ends, good condition, $125. Call
674-8183. 2-8,2-15

Ready heater, 55,000 BTU kero-
sene torpedo heater, $100 or best
offer. Call 674-2469. 2-1,2-5.

Jet pump with water tank, $140.
.Call, 850-7287.5,00 .or 207-7.4,9-
^38$<)\i\S^^S^.^ .


Kenmore fridge/freezer, 26 CF
side-by-side with ice/water dis-
penser in door, white with blackfront
and woodgrain trim, works great,
$250; Whirlpool Estate washer,
white, double action, self-cleaning
filter, eight-cycle heavy-duty super
capacity, two years old, excellent
shape, $200; Kenmore heavy-duty
plus dryer, four-cycle, large capac-
ity, white, excellent shape, $175;
electric lift chair, recliner, green, $50.
Call 674-2485. 2-1,2-8

Tappan dishwasher, almond, $75;
electric stoves, two, 30" drop-in
ranges, one white by Holiday, one
almond by Tappan, $75 each. Call
674-8746. 2-1,2-8

Pageant dresses, three, long
length, girls sizes 10 to 14, one
has short and long skirt, one pink,
white and one blue, easily altered.
Call 674-3021. 2-1,2-8

New ivory wedding dress, size
10/12, never been worn, will send
picture via email, $150. Call 674-
2021. 2-1,2-8

Wood burning stove/heater, new,
cost $500, will take $250 or best of-
fer. Call 643-2812. 2-1,2-8

Dell computer with Dell monitors,
$80; many models available; KLH
home theater speaker sets with
powered sub woofer, $55. Call 871-
1626 for details. 2-1,2-8

Weight machine, cable, three sta-
tions, like new, maybe used three
hours, $300. Call 674-5057 or 674-
8529 after'5 p.m. 2-1,2-8

Camping tent, sleeps seven, very
nice, never used, $175. Call 379-
3562. 2-1,2-8

Green chair, very good condition,
$50. Call 379-3562. 2-1,2-8

Sofa, chair and ottoman, has
throw pillows, burgundy and tan,
cloth material, brand new, paid
$1,000, asking, $600. Call 592-
3433. 2-1,2-8

Pageant dress, lavender, size 8.
Call 674-3021. 2-1,2-8

Lazy-Boy recliner and couch,
brown, reclines at each end, one
year old, $400 for both; electric
logs encased in mantel, one year
old, $400. Call 762-8776.
2-1,2-8

,J FLORIDA HILL
COUNTRY
Land with live oaks and
longleafs, fields and
pines, along the rivers
and bays of Northwest
Florida. Thousands of
opportunities for your
own farm, ranch or
waterfront property.
Multiple rural lifestyle
opportunities- and only
one number to call.
1.866.JOE.LAND or
visit JOE.com/land
IF YOU DON'T KNOW
JOE, YOU DON'T KNOW
FLORIDA.


V STJOE
L 1 .....2-.22


Steel dog box with carpeted top,
$80. Call 762-3142. 2-1,2-8

Small record players, comes in a
suitcase, plays 45s and 331/3 sized
records, a whole mess of them to
trade for anything of value. Call
674-3264. 2-1,2-8

RCA TV, used, 27 inch color, rea-
sonably priced. Call 762-3724.
2-1, 2-8

Prom dresses, sizes 6-8, never
worn to Blountstown or Bristol
proms, variety of colors, prices
from $40 to $75 or best offer. Call
674-3323. 2-1,2-8

Water purification system, Rain-
soft brand, great tasting water, less
cleaning, money saver, great deal,
like new, only a few months old,
$5,500. Call 674-3323. 2-1,2-8

Outdoor rocker set, three pieces,
cypress wood, two chairs and one
loveseat, $200; cardio exerciser,
$25; dresser with hutch, $40; mi-
crowave, $20. Call 674-6520 eve-
nings. 2-1,2-8

Dining room table with six chairs,
wooden, rectangular, 77"x40",
$550. Call 674-5820. 2-1,2-8

Rascal wheelchair, battery oper-
ated, brand new, never used. Call
670-8877. 2-1,2-8

Prom dress/ballroom gown, white,
strapless, size 8; red prom dress with
spaghetti straps, size 6, straight.
Call 237-2706. 2-1,2-8

Twin beds with box springs, no
mattresses, one is strictly a twin
bed with head and foot boards,
the other is an adjustable bed rail
that adjusts from twin to full size;
speaker system for computer, two
speakers and one subwolfer. Call
643-5991. 2-1,2-8

Wiggles car, almost new, good
condition, $25. Call 674-8183.
2-1,2-8

Prom/pageant dresses, one
teal fully beaded, one fushia pink
fully beaded, and one yellow with
beaded top and full shirt, all small
sizes. Call 674-3859 or 674-1946.


a_





OrR
Uw


0.
0







U

0


az


Week of Feb. 12 to Feb. 18
ARIES Mar 21/Apr 20
A surprise is in store for you by
mid-week, Aries. You'll enjoy
it a great deal, as will those
close to you. Focus closely
on work until your surprise is
revealed.
TAURUS Apr 21/May 21
On Tuesday a situation oc-
curs that cannot be avoided.
Don't try to avoid it; this situa-
tion is better handled head-on.
Aquarius plays a part in this.
GEMINI May 22/Jun 21
Romance is in the air all month,
and particularly for you, Gem-
ini. If you've been nursing a
relationship, it's about to spark
and grow in the days to come.
CANCER Jun 22/Jul 22
You'll feel hurt and betrayed
when a friend goes behind
your back this week, Cancer.
The act isn't so bad, it's the ly-
ing about it that gives you rea-
son for concern.
LEO Jul 23/Aug 23
Someone at work has been a
thorn in your side for a while
now, Leo. Finally, some justice


I -
PWE 15-inch rims, set of four,
comes with two new P265 50R-15
tires, $400. Call 379-3232, leave
message. 2-8,2-15

1991 Honda Civic, standard trans-
mission, greatshape, needsverylittle
work, $600. Call 628-0656. 2-8.2-15

1997 Pontiac Sunfire for parts,
$500 as is. Call 379-3384.
2-8,2-15

1995 Ford F-150 pickup, low miles,
loaded, everything power, A/C, ask-
ing $6,000. Call 528-0549.
2-8,2-15

1997 Ford Escort, selling for parts,
alternator has a four year warranty
and a new battery. Call 643-3443.
2-8,2-15

1968 VW Beetle, good condition,
greattransportation, $2,500 orbest
offer. Call 674-3872. 2-8,2-15

1991 Nissan Sentra, sunroof, new
tires, needs engine or can be used
for parts, $400 or best offer. Call
643-2661. 2-8,2-15

V-6 motor, for 1993 Ford Ranger,
runs or money back, $295. Call 209-
4070 cell. 2-8,2-15

Crankshaft, Detroit 60 series, good
used condition, does not need turn-
ing, $500. Call 447-1278. 2-8,2-15

1994 Town & Country Chrysler
van, 160,000 miles, front and rear
air, leatherseats, runs good, $2,500.
Call 674-7138 or 899-0269.
2-8,2-15

1994 Honda Del Sol, hard top con-
vertible, blue, great condition, four
cylinder, one owner, original mile-
age, great gas mileage, five speed
manual transmission, $4,995. Call
643-2315, if no answer, leave mes-
sage. 2-8,2-15

1995 GMC Sonoma pickup, blue/
silver, trailer hitch, like new tires,
runs great and reliable, $3,000 or
best offer. Call 850-545-3990.
2-8,2-15

1954 Chevrolet pickup, runs,
$1,200 or best offer. Call 674-
2469. 2-1.2-8


will be had when this person is let go. But
the replacement could be worse.
VIRGO Aug 24/Sept 22
Stop hiding your true feelings about the
person you've been spending time with,
Virgo. And if you're attached, embrace
your special someone and show this per-
son how much you care.
LIBRA Sept 23/Oct 23
You want freedom but are not show-
ing the maturity level that accompanies
this kind of responsibility. Change your
attitude or expect to play by another's
rules.
SCORPIO Oct 24/Nov 22
Some good news falls in your lap this
week, Scorpio. It's something that you've
been expecting for a while and will make
a big difference in your current living situ-
ation.
SAGITTARIUS Nov 23/Dec 21
A change of heart occurs when a friend
does something naughty. You thought
you could trust this person, but you've
quickly realized that you should look
elsewhere for friends.
CAPRICORN Dec 22/Jan 20
When you and a loved one get into an
argument this week, you learn that you
cannot always get your way. This .real-
ization will be a catalyst for the way you


William's Home
Improvements
"No Job Too Big or Small"
Licensed & Insured, contractor & roofer
Concrete work, landscape
pressure cleaning,
renovations, seamless __
gutter, painting. vinyl.
& screen enclosure 2
FOR FREE ESTIMATES
Call 674-8092 uF


Stump grinding

Reasonable rates
Free estimates

Call
Chris Nissley
674-8081 or
643-8561 (Cell)






Decks Pole Barns
House Framing & Garages
*Wood & Vinyl Siding *
Tin Roofing "4 .
Bathroom Remodeling
Concrete Work -
Call 674-3458


FOR RENT
In Bristol
3BR/2BA doublewide
Mobile home lots

In Blountstown
*2BR/1 1/2BA*1 room
efficiency, utilities included
1,000 sq. ft. commercial building

Phone 643-7740



LQOK


1, 2 & 3 Bedroom
Apartments
"The Best Place to Live"
Rental Assistance




Call (850) 674-4202
16978 NW Mayo Street,
Blountstown, FL 32424.
TDD/TTY 711.
EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY


conduct yourself from now on.
AQUARIUS Jan 21/Feb 18
A partnership involves two people,
but lately you're acting like you're
flying solo. Think about how you've
been alienating a loved one, Aquar-
ius.
PISCES Feb 19/Mar 20
A financial overhaul is required, Pi-
sces. You've put off the task of bal-
ancing your budget for too long now.
Get cracking.

FAMOUS BIRTHDAYS

FEBRUARY 12
Christina Ricci, Actress (26)
FEBRUARY 13
Stockard Channing, Actress (62)
FEBRUARY 14
Rob Thomas, Singer (34)
FEBRUARY 15
Jane Seymour, Actress (55)
FEBRUARY 16
John McEnroe, Athlete (47)
FEBRUARY 17
Denise Richards, Actress (35)
FEBRUARY 18
Molly Ringwald, Actress (38)






FEBRUARY 8,2006 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 29


'Farm Equipment'

AUCTION
Saturday, Feb. 25 at 9 a.m.
SALE SITE:
One mile east of Greenwood
on Hwy. 69 Fort Rd.
WATCH FOR SIGNS
For more information:
John Stanley call (850) 594-5200
AU044/AB491
CONSIGNMENTS WELCOME



Even small ads
get lot of
attention in
The journal!
Just because you're on a
tight budget doesn't mean
you can't afford an ad!







WANTED

to buy

Real Estate


10 to 1,000 acres,

reasonably priced.

Immediate closing.

Call


(850)54544441 or

- 850-899-7700
---- --- -


$275 BRAND NEW KING
DOUBLE PILLOWTOP SET In
sealed plastic Iw/ warranty Can
deliver 850-545-7112

6 PC. BEDROOM SET Brand
new sleigh bed, dresser, mirror
and nightstand $650, still boxed
can deliver. 850-222-9879

BED, a solid wood sleigh bed:
headboard, footboard & rails.
NEW in box. $275 Call 850-222-
7783

BED QUEEN DOUBLE
PILLOWTOP SET New in plastic,
warranty. $149, can deliver 850-
425-8374

Bedroom ALL NEW 7 PC set:
All dovetailed., all wood-still
boxed. Retail $4K, must sell
$1400, can deliver. 850-222-2113

CHAIR I LOVESEAT / SOFA -
$650 NEW Micro fiber
upholstery, hardwood frame &
warranty, unopened. 850-545-
7112 .

DINING. NEW table w/ in lay. ball
& claw feet. leaf, 2 arm chairs, 4
side chairs, hutchlbuffet. $4500
sug. list, sacrifice $1750. 850-
222-2113 .

DINING ROOM -- New Queen
Anne table- w/ leaf., 8 chairs &
lighted 'china cabinet. Still boxed.
$1000. Can deliver. 850-222-
9879
LEATHER Sofa, Loveseat &
Chair still wrapped: Retail $3400,
sell brand new with warranty -
$1250. 850-425-8374
MATTRESS New full set in
plastic with warranty, $99. 850-
2 2 2 9 B 7 9 .' r : .- '


Additional runs of the same ad (more than 2 weeks) are $2 per |
week and must be paid in advance. We do not bill for classified. -


1992 Dodge Caravan, fully loaded,
real good shape, $1,500, will take
trade for all or part. Call 643-
1495. 2-1,2-8

1996 Ford F-150, Eddie Bauer edi-
tion, 300 six-cylinder engine, five
speed manual transmission, fully
power, good condition, $4,200. Call
670-5617. 2-1,2-8

1984 Ford Bronco, 4WD, V-8,
good condition, $2,900. Call 670-
5617. .2-1,2-8

1967 Cadillac hearse, silver,
original mileage, $3,900. Call 643-
5111. 2-1,2-8

2003 Ford Ranger, extra cab, Edge
package, fully loaded, excellent
condition, $13,000 or best offer.
Call 643-3742 or 570-6175.
2-1,2-8

AVAILABLE
PROPEITI-


e*3,240 sq. ft. brick home,
4 bedrooms, 2 baths.
Only $189,900 0
*5 wooded acre
homesite only 3 miles
from'town. $75,000
*5 acres with- fish pond
and 3 bedroom home.
$152,000
*2,300 sq. ft. with :V2
acre lot in town 4/3.
$195,000
*1,700 sq. ft on 4
beautiful acres with
paved street. $215,000-
*1,100 sq. ft. concrete
block home in -Bristol.
ONLY $39,500

FOR COMPLETE
LIST OF ALL OUR
PROPERTIES
LOG ONTO OUR
WEBSITE AT
www.unitedcountry.
com/blountstownfl

Let us help you with
your all your real estate
needs. You'll be
glad you did!!


BOBBY*CLAR


19821 State Rd. 20 W
Blountstown, FL 32424
OFFICE: (850) 674-4491
FAX: 674-8028


1999 Chevy Suburban, low miles,
leather interior, CD/cassette player,
DVD player with screen, $9,000 or
best offer. Call -643-2238 or 443-
3878. 2-1,2-8

1995 Ford F-150, V-8, 2WD, cold
A/C, power windows and locks,
dual gas tanks, cassette player,
good condition, high mileage, one
owner, can be seen at C.W. Roberts
asphalt plant on Hwy. 267, $4,500.
Call 323-0296. 2-1,2-8

1976 Buick Regal, will trade for
anything of value. Call 674-3264.
2-1. 2-8


1995 Ford F-150, king cab, auto-
matic, V-8, A/C, diamond tool box,
runs good, $4,200 or best offer. Call
850-447-2772. 2-1,2-8

2000 Toyota Tacoma Pre-runner,
like new inside and out, regular cab,
automatic, 85,000miles, runs great,
$9,800. Call 762-3647. 2-1,2-8

1998 Ford Windstar, needs motor,
$1,000. Call 674-5820. 2-1, 2-8

Aluminum tool boxes, two of them,
for full-size truck, one is $50, the
other is. $75. Call 762-3723.
. 2-1, 2-8

2000 Ford F-350 XLT, diesel,
-4WD, supercab. Banks turbo and
power chip. six-speed manual shih,
155,000 miles, asking $14,000:
1985 Ford F-350, dually, diesel,
five-speed with extra four-speed,
blowed head gasket, runs, $750 or
best offer. Call 643-3690.


1948 Ford 8N tractor, not used in a
fewyears, as.is $1,200 or best offer.
Call 850-722-9456 or 814-5575.
2-8,2-15

1957 MGA (50% restored) and
1960 MGA (80% restored), plus a
trailer load of MGA parts, manuals
and titles, $18,000 or best offer. Call-
850-722-9456 or 814-5575.
2-8,2-15

Troy-Built rotor tiller, 7 hp, paid
$800, now selling for $700 or best
offer. Call 850-722-9456 or 814-
5575. 2-8,2-15


Can be seen at NW 14th
Blountstown, look for signs.


Baby chicks, one to two
old, differentvarieties, Bantar
large breeds, brown and gre
layers, $2 each. Call 643-3(


St. i

2-8, 2-1

week
msan
en eg
034.
2-8, 2-1


INILY & AS0C. l. .TATE
,. T

'-- i c.b. o e B^ 'la ... s, .Fax ii '-"* r i,^'
e..... e : www... .- ... 1

*BRISTOL 3BR/2BA singlewide with built-ons, old restorable
house on 6 lots approximately 3 acres. Asking $65,000.
*BOYD ST. 3BR/1 1/2BA brick, new paint, garage, near town.
100 percent financing for qualified buyers. $65,000.
*IOLA ST. Doublewide with fireplace, 3BR/2BA, very convenient
to town. SOLD.
*LIBERTY CO. Nice country house on 1 1/2 acres. SOLD.
*HWY. 20 Large commercial building on approximately 4 acres.
REDUCED!
Commercial lots, land and other properties available, call for details.
*NEW LISTING Beautiful brick on 1 acre. SOLD.
*TELOGIA Super clean 3BR/2BA, several amenities on 1 acre.
NEW LISTING.
*3BR/1 1/2BA BRICK, great location. Call for more information.
*UNDER CONSTRUCTION Pick your carpet and appliance,
4BR/2BA, rural setting.


A



Artic Cat 400 four-wheeler, sel-
dom rode, $3,500. Call 762-9676.
2-8, 2-15

2004 Kawasaki Ninja 250, jacket
included, $1,795. Call 209-4070.
2-8, 2-15

1995 Kawasaki Vulcan 500 with
helmet, excellent condition, new
battery, runs great, $2,250. Call 674-
7138 or 899-0269. 2-8,2-15

-- I I = =-- ._-

1983Toyota Dolphin motor home,
four cylinder, self contained, sleeps
four, good condition, $3,200 or best
offer., Call 850-447-2772.
2-1, 2-8

1989 Ford Chasie motor home,
real good condition,. everything
works, $9,500. Call 762-3723.
2-1,2-8



Suzuki 35 HP outboard, long shaft,
new stainless prop, clean motor,
CMC power tilt and trim, one year
old, asking $800. Call 762-8586.
2-1, 2-8

Yamaha outboard, 30 hp, long
Sshaft tiller steer, electric start,
$1,600. Call 643-5650, evenings.
2-1 2-8
:^--n~m m ---- E~E----m 2^ -j

Australian shepard, brown and
white female, very loving and
gentle, good with children and other
pets, free to good home. Call 643-
5582. 2-8, 2-15

Blue heeler mix, six months old,
has the markings of a heeler, very
sweet dog, needs home, good pet,
good with children, free to good
home. Call 643-5582. 2-8,2-15

Chow puppies, full-blooded, four
males, two females, $150 each.


n Found: Beautiful, long haired, full
grown, siamese colorcat with collar
5 but no tag. Cat was found close to
the high school. Call 674-8290.
s 2-8,2-15
d "
g Found: Black tool box and tools,
noon on Monday, Jan. 23, Main St.
5 in Blountstown. Call 674-2020.
2-1, 2-8

Lost: Red Heeler, Lake Mystic
area, missing since Christmas Eve,
reward offered. Call 643-4551.
2-1, 2-8

Lost: Male Chinese Pug, lost on
Hwy. 71 across from the airport,
tan and black, blind and has no
collar. Goes by the name "Zeus"
or "Mama's baby". Call 674-8227.
2-1,2-8


Wanted: one cord firewood split in
2 ft. lengths. Call 762-8285.
2-8,3-8


Wanted: Coca-Cola bottles and
items. Call 850-545-3677.
2-1,2-8

Continue onpage3


-------- ---


I L.


I ,


.,..... ~.; -


Gelding horse, three years old,
broken, with tack, $2,500 or best
offer. Call 850-545-3990 (cell).
2-8, 2-15

ABA & UKC Pit bull, 1 1/2-year-old
male, very friendly, needs a good
home, $750. Call 379-8117.
2-8, 2-15

Free puppy to good home, 10
weeks old, black and white, looks
like a Jack Russell in the face,
rescued, needs a good home. Call
643-2661. 2-8, 2-15

Free puppies to good home,
parents on premises, medium sized
dogs, near Shelton's Corner. Call
447-1278. 2-8, 2-15

Two cow buffalo's, one is four
years old, the other is five years
old, $1 per pound. Call 762-3650.
2-8,2-15

German shepard puppies, ready
on Feb. 13, males are $350 and
females are $300. Call 643-4551.
2-1,2-8

Doghouse, large red cedar. Call
643-5268. 2-1, 2-8

Free kittens, four months old, litter
trained and wormed, tiger stripe
male, gray multi-colored female;
free dogs, Pug, Shitzu and Peking-
ese mix, five-month-old female;
beautiful,- lovable, one-year-old
female blue dog, must see. Gall
447-1170. 2-1,2-8

Labrador puppies, full-blooded,
ready Feb. 4, chocolates and
blacks, parents on premises, $100.
Call 674-8093 or 674-3570.
2-1, 2-8

CKC Chocolate red-nose pit, par-
ents on premises, two males and
two females, wormed and shots,
$250 each. Call 674-3568.
2-1,2-8

White English bulldog pups, $150
each. Call 762-3568. 2-1,2-8


-Found: Female Chinese pug at
Estiffanulga, call to claim. Call 643-
5828. 2-8,2-15





Page 30 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL FEBRUARY 8, 2006


Join recovery

effort on

Team Katrina
ST. PAUL, MN Thousands
of people along the Gulf Coast
still need food daily, medical care
and help rebuilding their lives. On
Aug. 29, Hurricane Katrina cut a
path of destruction 250 miles long
and 2 1/2 miles wide. The rebuild-
ing will not be quick or painless.
There are areas which will need
help physically for years to come.
Christus Victor Lutheran Church
in Ocean Springs, MS has set up a
distribution center, medical clin-
ic, community work crews and a
kitchen to feed hundreds.
"Youth Encounter has to do
something to help!" was Gary
Korpi's response after witness-
ing the devastation on a recent
trip to the Gulf Coast. Korpi, a
Youth Encounter employee, lived
through the vicious Hurricane
Camille in 1969, and quickly
realized that Camille's damage
barely compared to the aftermath
of Katrina.
Youth Encounter's response is
to team with Christus Victor to
get people to Mississippi to help
in the areas of need. Anyone 15
years of age or older is encour-
aged to join in the recovery effort
on the Mississippi coast. There is
a modest fee to help defray ex-
penses for food and lodging and
to help with a project donation.
These crews are starting in Feb-
ruary 2006 and continuing until
-the job is done. People interested-
in going in a group or as an indi-
vidual, or wishing more informa-
tion can contact Susie Anderson
at 1-800-659-9688 x8481 or go
to Youth Encounter's website,
youthencounter.org, and click on
Global Work Crews (and follow
the link to Team Katrina).
Youth Encounter is an evan-
gelical and confessional Chris-
tian organization that offers youth
ministry resources to the church.
Youth Encounter has now grown
into a global ministry serving
churches of many denominations
in the United States and over 40
other countries.

Jackson Senior

Citizens trip set
from Merita Stanley, Jackson County
Senior Citizens Association
Jackson County Seniors Citi-
zens have several trips planned,
including the following:
*Golden Isle Tour planned for
March 11 through March 19.
*Pacific Northwest Tour is
set for May 23 through June 14,
featuring Salt Lake City, Reno,
NV, San Francisco, CA, Oregon,
Victoria, BC.
*Seven-night and eight-day
Alaska Cruise. Deposit must be
made by Feb. 13:
*Heart of Europe-Tour. Deposit
must be made by March 2. Trip
features Holland, Belgium, Ger-
many, Austria, Italy, Switzerland
and France.
For more information about
these tours or other tours, contact
Merita Stanley, 4469 Clinton
St., Marianna, FL 32446 or call
- 482-4799. :


p contined-


Wanted: Looking for a mobile
home or house to rent in Bristol or
Blountstown with at least two or
three bedrooms. Call 643-2893 or
209-9130 (cell). 2-1,2-8

Wanted: 200 amp power pole. Call
850-722-8750 or 207-749-3938.
2-1,2-8

Wanted: Guns,-paying cash, old or
modern rifles, shotguns, pistols, one
gun or collection, military guns, old
double barrels. Call 674-4860.
12-21 T. 3-29


Wanted: Junk cars and trucks, any
condition, no charge for removal.
Call 762-8459. 1-28T. 3-15



1985 Mobile home, double wide,
28 x 64, asking pay off. Call 237-
2587. 2-8, 2-15

1997 Fleetwood mobile home,
triple wide, 1,800 sq. ft., three


bedroom/two bath, metal roof,
must be moved, asking pay off.
Call 643-6589. 2-8, 2-15

Five acre tracts in the Carr com-
munity, $10,000 per acre. Call 674-
6520, evenings. 2-8,2-15

1999 Buccaneer mobile home,
28 x 80, four bedrooms with walk-
in closets, two baths, master bath
has two sinks and garden tub,
great room with fireplace, large
kitchen with lots of counter and
cabinet space, dining and large
laundry room, all electric with CH
& A, needs new carpet in the great
room, sits on four lots of land with
deep well and septic system, back-
yard fenced in with privacy fencing,
asking $63,000. Call 674-5312 or
557-9705 after 3 p.m. (CT).
2-8,2-15

1986 mobile home, 14x66, single-
wide, 2BR/2BA, masterbath has gar-
den tub/walk-in shower, front porch,
stove and refrigerator goes with it.
Call 379-8175. 2-1, 2-8


Two lots in Blountstown, $20,000
for both. Call 643-6488.
2-1,2-8

50 acres in Altha, $265,000; 28
acres in Altha, $135,000; 5 acres
in Altha, $43,500. Call 762-8185 or
653-5597. 2-1,2-8

Land for sale, Hwy. 69-A road
frontage, parcel one, 19 acres (mol),
$129,000; parcel two, 19 acres
(mol), $89,00.0. Call Shalene at
762-8025. 12-21 T. 2-8



Yard sale, Saturday, Feb. 11 from
8 a.m. til 1 p.m. at Hwy 65 South
from Hosford on CR 67-A, watch
for signs. Lots of good stuff, too
much to list. Cancel if rain. Call 410-
3712. 2-8,2-15

Gigantic yard sale, Saturday, Feb.
11 beginning at 8 a.m. (CT) on Hwy.
71, seven miles north of Wewa at
the Covenant House. Appliances,
furniture, new doors, newwindows,


'06 F-150

REG. CAB XL 4x4
BR4ND NEW \'-1 A4uo.. 4 C.
Limited Slip Skid Plates.
4AM FIMC l' lricr, Tre.
\Ias 526.660

$20,988
. OWWW pr w.


new spa tub, plumbing supplies,
van wheelchair lift, engine stand,
clothes, household items, bush-
hog box blade, three ton C.H.A.,
computer desk, 1991 Cadillac, 10'
x 14' shed and much, much more.
2-8,2-15

Yard sale, Saturday, Feb. 11 from
7 a.m. until 2 p.m. at 10782 NW Mi-
chaux Rd. Mostly baby clothes and
toys, carseat, some adult clothes
and kitchen appliances. Call 643-
2769. 2-8,2-15


SATURDAY NOON is the latest we can
accept classified for the following week's
Journal. Please be sure to call in, drop off,
fax or email your information- by then. (But
we really appreciate it when ads are turned
in by 6 p.m. Friday!) The Journal is glad to
run your non-business classified ads free
of charge for two weeks. If you would like
to advertise the same item after that time,
there is a charge of $2 per week, payable
in advance. Please remember that our free
classified are for NON-BUSINESS related
items only. Display ads (ads with borders)
are also available in the classified section,
starting at a cost of $10 per week for a 2-
inch-high, one-column ad.


'06 F-150 SUPER

CREW LARIAT
BR4ND JEL 5 J 1' 4 ut. L ca.It
18 Inr,: 4umrnium lhine11 41I/ .:,l"er
EQuirpmnLnt CD Ti,-etr T:, \ PA3,:k-a


$27,888


'06 EXPEDITION
EDDIE BAUER
Loaded, Save Big!'................ 28,9988

'05 FORD F-150 XLT 23 888
SUPERCAB 4x4.....................tO,00

'05 FORD MUSTANG Convertib/l n .nf
Only 12k Miles, Leather......... .19 ,00
'05 HYUNDAI SONATA CLS $ n 0
Nice, 22k Miles........................ $14,988

'05 CHEVY MALIBU
Great Economy, 11 988
27k Miles ...........................

'04 F-350 DIESEL LARIAT .
Loaded, Local Trade............... $26,88


TAV


'05 DODGE RAM 2500 QUAD CAB SLT
Diesel, 4x4, 19k Miles, Auto.,...... ..32888
SAVE BIG....................................... 32,

'05 EXPEDITION XLT 4x4
17k miles...... ...........23,888
'05 SUZUKI LX7 4x4 19,9
16k Miles, Like New ............19.... 8800
'05 FORDTAURUS
Loaded, Leather, Sunroof
PRICED TO MOVE.................. 13,88000

'03 FORD F-250 SUPERCAB FX4
4x4, Diesel, 22k Miles.............. 29,988

'00 FORD F-250 4x4, Diesel
SUPERCREW LARIAT.......................$18,888


'04 AVALANCHE Z66 '02 FORD EXPLORER '00 FORD F-250 SUPERCAB
Like New $22,888 Only 73k Miles, Clean 13988 4x4, Lariat, Loaded, Local Trade.............12,888


'06

SCAPE XLT
V-6 Auto'. Potter LVindo.is
Locks & Alrrrors Tiat Crui-'e
i Driner'5 Sea I
1,Z'a& 424 005

19,998
S!W1^6^"y">MHP^^P^V~s- -BP!.


'ALL PRICES INCLUDE FORD MOTOR CREDIT BONUS CASH


The 'anan s ASTST ro ing eae


BEST PRICES


oAVE AND MORE FOR
_. YOUR TRADE!


'05 FORD MUSTANG GT
Hard Top, 17k Miles................$26,988-

'05 LINCOLN TOWN CAR
Loaded, Like New................... 25,888

'05 CHEVY SILVERADO LS
4 Door, 22k Miles......................21,888

'05 FORD FOCUS
17k Miles,
2 to choose from..................... 1,888

'04 JEEP WRANGLER 4x4
4.0, V-6, only 8k Miles
LIKE NEW $28,988











0Roy'S
0 8 Ball Pool
TToumrament

oyster Wednesday
0 1 7:30 p.m.



Bar OYSTERS

A ON THE HALF-SHELL
S*BY THE BAG
BY THE PINT

Thursday's Oysters on the half shell
Special $3 Dz
from 12 6 p.m. .

^~-~ -"^ 740 -
Call 850-674-ROYS
17797 North Main St. in Blountstown
(Across From Advance Auto Parts)


Life is a flower of which love is the honey. -Victor Hugo


FEBRUARY 8,2006 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 31


Research shows methyl bromide crop use can


be reduced by h
WIMAUMA With this
month's federal ban on most
uses of methyl bromide, Uni-
versity of Florida scientists are
searching for alternatives to the
widely used soil fumigant that
is essential for the production of
fruits, vegetables and ornamen-
tals in Florida and the nation.
The fumigant, which controls
soil pests and weeds, was banned
by the Environmental Protection
Agency in response to the Mon-
treal Protocol international treaty
because the chemical harms the
Earth's ozone layer, reducing its
ability to protect the planet from
radiation. Only a few emergency
uses of the fumigant are still per-
mitted.
"Finding a replacement that
will be as cost-effective as
methyl bromide is proving to be
difficult, but we do have some
promising new materials and ap-
proaches to help growers protect
their crops and the environment,'.'
said Jim Gilreath, a professor of


ialf under metalized bed covers


horticultural sciences at UF's In-
stitute of Food and Agricultural
Sciences.
He said many fumigants such
as Chloropicrin, Telone C-35,
Inline and Vapam are being
evaluated, alone and in combi-
nation. Recent tests showed that
a combination of Telone C-35
and Tillam herbicide produced
good results on tomatoes, but the
manufacturer of Tillam went out
of business, and the product is
not currently registered for use.
"As we continue to look for
alternatives for methyl bromide,
We have found that the use of
new virtually impermeable film
and metalized film covers on
plant beds allow growers to re-
duce their use of the fumigant
by as much as 50 percent," he
said. "When it comes to holding
or keeping fumigants in the soil,
these high-barrier mulch films
are far superior to conventional
polyethylene mulch films that
have been used by growers for


the past 30 years."
Gilreath, who leads the soil
fumigation research program at
UF's Gulf Coast Research and
Education Center in Wimnauma,
said his research findings were
quickly adopted by growers this
year. Almost every tomato farm
in Florida fs now using metal-
ized film on some' part of its
acreage along with the one-half
rate of methyl bromide.
"In fact, several of the larger
tomato producers shifted all of
their acreage to metalized film
in the Southeast from Florida
to the Delmarva peninsula in
Virginia based on results from
our research,"
Gilreath said. "Growers have
been very satisfied with the re-
sults and plan to continue using
the highly retentive films."
He said the savings in the
cost of methyl bromide along
with more equitable distribution
of limited supplies of the fumi-
gant and reduced impact on the
ozone layer have made this ap-
proach very successful.
Gilreath, who works in coop-
eration with Joe Noling, a pro-
fessor of nematology at UF's
Citrus Research and Education
Center in Lake Alfred, and Dan
Chellemi, a pathologist at the
U.S. Department of Agricul-
ture's Horticultural Research
Laboratory in Fort Pierce, said
they. began testing different
types of films about eight years
ago in an effort to reduce the
need for methyl bromide.
"Two years ago, we began
working with metalized films
because they also reduce the
movement of silverleaf white-
flies and viruses they transmit,"
he said. "We tested the metal-
ized films with methyl bromide
and a product called Inline,
which is Telone C-35 mixed
with an emulsifier so that it can
be injected through drip irriga-
tion lines in the plant beds."
In each case, application of
methyl bromide and Inline in
conjunction with metalized film
greatly increased retention of the
fumigant in the plant beds, pro-
viding effective control of soil-
borne pests, especially hard-to-
control weeds such as nutsedge,
he said.
Effective nutsedge control
was obtained with 175 pounds
of methyl bromide per acre un-
der metalized film, which was
superior to that obtained with
350 pounds of fumigant per acre
under conventional polyethyl-
ene film.
"While it is possible to use
either metalized or virtually im-
permeable film to reduce methyl
bromide application rates by
one-half, success involves more
than just laying the film over
the plant bed and reducing the
amount of the fumigant," Gil-
reath said. "Success requires
close monitoring of the fumigant
delivery system to make sure
that the gas is applied uniformly
in the bed through all three gas
knives."






Page 32 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL FEBRUARY 8,2006


'Step Up Florida!' promotes active, healthy lifestyle


The Liberty County Health
Department will host events
across the county on Feb.14,
"Step Up, Florida on our way
to healthy living!" statewide
campaign, which promotes
physical activity and healthy
lifestyles for Floridians of all
abilities. This is the third year
the event will sweep the state to
showcase the variety of unique
local opportunities each county
offers for physical activity.
This year the Florida Depart-
ment of health adopted a new
slogan for "Step Up, Florida!"
60 A Day the Florida Way to
help participants implement the
Unites States Department of Ag-
riculture dietary guidelines that
suggest 60 minutes of physical
activity a day will help manage
body weight and prevent gradual

Florida NRCS

extends signup

date for EQIP
GAINESVILLE Time is
running short to apply for Farm
Bill Programs in Florida. State
Conservationist Niles Glasgow,
with USDA-Natural Resources
Conservation Service (NRCS),
recently announced an extension
of the cutoff date for the Envi-
ronmental Quality Incentives
Program (EQIP). Applications
will be accepted until close of
business on February 15, 2006.
EQIP offers financial and
technical assistance to install
structural and management
practices on eligible non-federal
lands to address natural resource
concerns. Conservation treat-
ment activities for EQIP are car-
ried out in accordance to a con-
servation plan that is developed
with the landowner or manager.
State-wide priorities for EQIP
include erosion control, water
quality, water quantity, animal
and plant health and confined
livestock operations. Individ-
ual county priorities may vary
slightly due to locally estab-
lished objectives.
For additional details on this
Farm Bill program and for spe-
cific eligibility requirements
to participate, contact your lo-
cal NRCS Office (Blountstown
USDAService Center, 17413 NW
Leonard Street, Blountstown,
Florida 32424). Call us at
(850)674-8271. Check us out
on the web at www.fl.nrcs.usda.
gov/programs/.








Want to get a passport?
All kinds of
government information ore
just a click or calol away.

FIRSTGOVgov
T BO FE NOV


weight gain.
Liberty County is excited to
announce a partnership with the
county schools, 4H, and Liberty
Wilderness Camp on some of
the day's events.
Each of Florida's 67 counties
will partake in the month long


relay celebration as participants
along four routes pass a "fit-
ness flag" from county line to
county line. Liberty County will
pick their flag up from Franklin
County and pass it off to Gads-
den County and the flag will end
up in Duval County for the grand


Dear Gadsdlen. Liberty & Calhoun
County Residelints,.
Three ears ao l obtained my Florida
Dealer's License due to the frustration of
shopping for a used car. The following three
tbings made car shopping a bie.headache for
me: _
*Haoaetii:f orz-flas liparice'
flavies fo comeqilpyith 52000 to3000
for a down paymrnent. laxes, title arild as


finale event on Feb. 28.
Liberty County will host a
community event on Feb. 14,
please make plans to come out
to Liberty High School football
field between 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
to walk, jog, and rollerblade.
We will have music to exercise


Payine someone a $5000 $6000 flroit '-
: a $10,000 automobile. -
-Her,-w-hat we've done at Direct
Automoive-Wtiolesale:
*All vehicles are priced at the "Loani-
Value", which is the price credit unions and
banks will loan you on ihis vehicle.
*We require NO DOWN PAYMENT on any of
our vebicles.;e can even hefi with 'our
taueys-atmda ai- mst Oftie-ti ;, :


0 Down '3 VW Passat GL
*307Q lirUot Very LoA Mles'


to, free t-shirts and other give
aways and plenty of water.
If you have any questions.
please call Susan Chafin, Step
Up Florida Coordinator for
Liberty County at the Liberty
County Health Department at
643-2415.


*f LAW VALUE, we make a small profit
and yo6 4get'a treat deal!
The.best part is we have family on the lot.
NO-Tfl6H PRESSURE SALES PEOPLE.
If you don't see the car of your dreams in
this ad. call us. We'll eet you pre-approved.
tell you what it will cost and buy it for you;.,_-
We appreciate your supporting us. Come by
or call.


-...:. .~_-. -,20 0 0,




we sell all of our cars at BO

a discount so you don't
need a down payment!

In-terest R_ -

sell as 4o 95% SOW-e"0S WC: '


0 Down '01 Toyota Sequoia
s386/mo Low mides and LOADEDi


0 Down '05 Ford Taurus
$249/m Low Mites& Like New'


0 Down 'O2ChrysterSebringLX
'171 mo Oualey without high price


0 Down '02 Mitsubishi Galant ES 0 Down '02 Saturn L300
s192/mo 4 door Very Low Miles! s191/,mo 4 doo,


0 Down '02 Dodge Durango
$270/mo SUV wih stye!


0 Down '02 Dodge Stratus
s171/mo Great family sedan


o Down '01 HQiAWo QdOs*y 0ftwn T2PontiacBortmv
321 Q*n'a The- ty-cuwo* Hw~t t9jaftLeuhefr SutQOf


o Down 1d1 FoOF PtAD 0 Down W, "fitlow UIT
W7.XLTf. 4X4. TrionM S $1 U~3 Leaw. rLow Wee'


0 Down '98 Ford Windstar
s73/mo Great Family Mini Van'


0 Down '02 Jaguar XJ8
S4791mo 4 coor. Vadenplas Top of Unel


0 Down '99 Mercedes E320
"385/mo 45 000 miles Like New'


0 Down '03 Toyota Tundra 4x4
423/mo 4 door, V8, X cab. Mint!


o Down 'MW, To "- 4n 'w1 Cd oI'1 fta 001116
*S**SUteOok'A.MOY Wt'wels! $3 Shom Lo"* Miele


Direct Automotive Wholesale
4M W. W#tQ) )g4t* W_ 16400 85 0-6 7 4 *t" "uiney oia0 M W AOaWM-Tn IF -7e 9-6 e
Se hMa Quincy 850-627-8448 Quincy Se habia
SENpft~lo I POuPP""a 8 50aiol


0 Down '01 Meur Marquis LS 0 Down '00 ncon LS
S21t lo Lo Miwtes. Leather~! 269/mo 1 ofa KWd VERY klw mies!


- .. ..._ ... ..-. .. -u