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 Main: Commentary
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 Main: Public and Legal Notices
 Main: The Journal Job Mkt.
 Main continued


UF00027796 UFPKY NEH LSTA SLAF



The Calhoun-Liberty journal
ALL ISSUES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00027796/00040
 Material Information
Title: The Calhoun-Liberty journal
Portion of title: Calhoun Liberty journal
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: The Liberty Journal, Inc.
Place of Publication: Bristol Fla
Creation Date: October 5, 2005
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Bristol (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Liberty County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Calhoun County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Liberty -- Bristol
Coordinates: 30.426944 x -84.979167 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in Sept. 1991.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 11, no. 38 (Sept. 18, 1991).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002046630
oclc - 33425067
notis - AKN4565
lccn - sn 95047245
System ID: UF00027796:00040
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly journal (Bristol, Fla.)

Table of Contents
    Main
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Main: Commentary
        Page 6
        Page 7
    Main continued
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
    Main: Obituaries
        Page 22
    Main continued
        Page 23
    Main: Classifieds
        Page 24
        Page 25
    Main: Public and Legal Notices
        Page 26
    Main: The Journal Job Mkt.
        Page 27
    Main continued
        Page 28
Full Text



INSIDE


Intoxicated man
stops to ask for
directions at
deputy's home...2


Kinard man
arrested after
admitting to '13
or 14 beers'.........2


Driver passes
deputy's car, turns
around and gets
arrested ...............2


Hosford woman
charged with
burglarizing a
church carting
off stolen items
in wheelchair.......2


Goat Day to mark
19th year Oct. 15
in Blountstown...3


New traffic laws
take effect............3


BPD warns of
phone scamr.........3


LCHS & Tiger
Football...............15
Pi 55t _77. --7-


500d
includedri


Fl od Hs or-, Librar-
S ..... -. Bi


The Calhoune-Lioery


JOURNAL



GP's annual taxes will pump over $700,000 into the county coffers

GP jobs give Liberty Co. workers more


time with family & less time on the road
y Teresa Eubanks, --- in a leather chair in an
Journal Editor air conditioned booth
Many Liberty Coun- where he operates the
ty residents who once machinery that con-
made 100-mile com- trols the thickness of
mutes daily are putting the boards being cut.
more money in their His job includes
pockets and less in making sure no defec-
their gas tanks as they tive boards get through
settle into new jobs and catching any prob-
at the Georgia-Pacific lems before anything
Oriented Strand Board jams up. "It's unbe-
plant in Hosford. lievable the automa-
Joev Bilbo, 27. of tion they have," he
Estiffunulga used to says of the plant's set
spend two and a half I up, noting that even if
hours on the road each there is a problem, the
day getting to his job a7~ 'machinery slows down
as a mechanic at the on its own. "Ever'-
National Guard Ar- thing moves through
morv in Tallahassee. Rex Whitffield of Bristol and Brent Allen Hall of Marianna survey the ma- like traffic si nala..'
chinery below that transports raw logs into the plant from their vantage


since starting work as
a utility superNisor at


the GP plant. his riornin, dr'nei has
been mnmineddow n tojust 15 minutes.
"Twenty minutes it I stop to get a cup
of coffee on the w ay." he adds.
Re\ Whitfield, 41. of Bristol not
S only used to commute to Leon County
for lus job. he staved on the road all
day when he got there. He spent fhe
years as a UPS dn er and worked an-
other two and a half years driving for
Yellow Freight.
He and his wife. leiko, \\ho still
works in Tallahassee. used to nde to-
gether every day, leaving early in the
morning and arriving home late in the
afternoon. That left little time during
the week with their daughter, Hana.


point in the saw cab. JOHNNY EUBANKS PHOTO


"'Ve nissed a lot of her stuff." he said of
his daugluer s acti lies.
Bmu things have changed. Now, dad is
able to attend some of his seven-year-old
daughter's soccer games as \\ell a, other
events important to her. And. he says, lus
new schedule of working 12 how days
leaves him n ith a four-day \\ork week.
"It gives me time to volunteer for stuff
and spend more time vw ith the family." he
,sas. "It's been nice not to have to ride
two hours to work e\ ery da'."
He says his job as a saw cab operator is
kind of like being an air traffic controller.
"I'm 30 feet above everything, looking
down to watch boards come down the
line on conveyers." He sits comfortably


he says of the progres-
si\e cline of lumber that


passes below himn.
While getting trained foi the new
job was stressful, everything has
worked out well. he says. "It's real
good money and the benefits are
great.
According to Georgia-Pacific.
the plant leached its full production
goal last month. Of its 125 full-time
workers, about 53% "are from Liberty
Counts.
The jobs at the plant require little
manual labor. Most consist of ob-
serving and monitoring equipment as
log trucks are unloaded and wood is
debarked and cur. The wood is then
See GP PLANT continued on page 18


Clarksville man killed after losing control of semi


Major Donnic Conycers of the Liberty Courty Sheriff's Department examines the scene
of last week's wreck which left the driver dead after the cab of his truck was crushed
when the semi Overturned, gTi ,iLVw.; i'f( t)


by Teresa Eubanks, Journal Editor
A correctional officer who worked
part-time as a truck driver was killed
when he lost control of his rig Friday and
overturned on County Road 379, about
five miles south of Orange in Liberty
County.
William Leon Neal, 59, of Clarkville,
was driving a semi tractor and trailer
northbound when he veered off the road
as he was entering a curve, aLlriding to
a report from the Florida Highway Patrol.
The 1996 Ken.. -rib went onto the east
shoulder ,_f ihe road and overturned in the
ditch. The cab of the truck was crushed
when the vehicle rolled over, trapping
Neal, in the 2:27 p.m. accident.
SRescue workers had to cut the wreck-
age away to remove his body.
Neal, who was driving for Constant
Velocity Trucking of Blountstown, was
returning with a load of baled cardboard
to be is, led :it (C'umbaa Enterprises


after making a pickup in Franklin County.
"He was such a fine man. He was one
of the best drivers I ever had," said Harry
Cumbaa. Neal had driven for him off and
on in the past, Cumbaa said.
Neal was a correctional officer at
Calhoun Correctional Institution.
Services were held Monday at'River-
town Community Church in Blountstown
with Rev. Paul Smith and Mickey Johnson
officiating. Interment followed at Calvary
Baptist Church Cemetery in Clarksville.
Neal is survived by his wife of 23
years, Terry; one daughter, Amanda Joy
Neal and three sons, William Leon Neal
II of Clarksville, Anthony Leon Neal of
Pasadena, CA, and Ashley Ray Neal of
Atlanta, GA; his parents; three brothers
and six sisters and four grandchildren.
His complete obituary appears inside
on page 22.
The accident was investigated by FHP
Cpl. Donnie Pitts.


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-






Page 2 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL OCTOBER 5,2005


Driver makes it easy for

officer to make DUI arrest
A driver who apparently wanted to go to jail was
arrested Sunday after he pulled up next to an officer
and taunted him by holding up a glass of what ap-
peared to be a mixed drink and then dropped it.
Lt. Henry Hamlin of the Liberty County Sheriff's
Department was assisting a wrecker driver at Coun-
ty Road 12 SOulthi and Ray Kever Road in Bristol
when a white van drove past his patrol car.
The van stopped, made a five-point turnaround
in the highway, headed north and then pulled onto
Ray Kever Road next to Hamlin's patrol car.
Hamlin noted that the driver, Jeffrey A. Stone,
appeared disoriented.' While making eye contact
with Hamlin, Stone picked up a glass off the dash of
his van and then dropped it onto the floorboard.
Realizing that the glass likely held a mixed drink,
Hamlin asked Stone to step out of the van. Stone
complied and then promptly fell.
Stone stated that he had "only had two drinks"
that night. Hamlin noted a strong odor of alcohol
coming from Stone and later found a gallon jug of
vodka and some orange juice in the van.
Stone was charged with DUI and driving while
license suspended or revoked.


Eviction dispute leads to

arrest of park manager
The manager of the Shady Oaks Trailer Park in
Calhoun County was arrested for grand theft and
trespassing in a structure after a witness reported
that he went into a mobile home when the occupant
was not there on Sept. 26.
The witness said James Argyros used his man-
ager's key to enter the residence of Shannon M.
Kepper when she was out, despite the fact that his
tenant had left a note on her front door stating that a
court date was being requested for an eviction hear-
ing. A deputy had talked to Argyros the previous
night and told him not to enter the home.
Argyros was seen loading up two dirtbikes from
the property one of which was leaning beside
the trailer, the other was further out in the yard,
He and another man put the bikes, valued at $600,
in his truck.
A neighbor called Kepper, who arrived at the
scene before Argyros drove away. At her request,
he returned the dirt bikes.
Argyros was then takeninto custody and booked
into the Calhoun County Jail..

Woman driving with young

son arrested on DUI charge
ABristol woman was charged with DUI, driving
while license suspended or revoked and failure to
have motor vehicle registration after a traffic stop
on C.R. 12 South Saturday night.
Catrina Capps, 35, was pulled over at 11:20 p.m.
Oct. 1 when Liberty County Sheriff's Deputy Wes
Harsey noticed her 1993 Toyota pickup did not
have a tag.
After the deputy alerted her to stop, Capps pulled
off C.R. 12 and drove about 500 yards onto Ray
Kever Road before stopping. When she stepped
out, she told the deputy she had just purchased
the pickup and had not had an opportunity to get
it registered.
The deputy noted that she was acting nervous
and detected the odor of alcohol. on her person.
Capps, who was traveling with her preschool-age
son, told Harsey she'd had "a couple of drinks."
When she was asked to perform a roadside sobri-
ety test, she was unable to maintain her balance.
During a search of the vehicle, the deputy found
a 750 ml bottle of vodka in Capps' purse. The bottle
was 3/4 empty.
Capps was taken to the colnly jail, Her son
was turned over to a relativci and her truck was
impounded. While she was being booked in, the
deputy discovered thal her drit er'i liC:lill e hl en.-i,
,U-iLJ'vdc for Iin }itci.il npun:,.i.jhty,


CALHOUN COUNTY
Sept. 26: Kevin Hansford, grand theft; James Argyros
theft, trespass in structure.
Sept. 27: Elizabeth Jurtin, driving while license susper
revoked with knowledge; Dana Fritz, resisting without vi
VOP (Escambia Co.).
Sept. 28: Sherry Forte, battery, assault; Berlie Wa
VOP.
Sept. 29: Steven Rowan, resisting without violence;
Mears, domestic battery.
Oct. 2: Roderic Monlyn, writ of attachment; Joseph F
carrying concealed weapon, driving while license suspe
revoked with knowledge.
LIBERTY COUNTY
Sept. 26: Michael Lynn Pitts, DUI.
Sept. 27: Tony Thomas, simple battery, criminal m
Elizabeth Justin, driving while license suspended; Dan
Fritz, holding for CCSO.
Sept. 29: Joshua McMillan, holding for court; Sandra
burglary of structure, theft.
Oct. 1: Michael L. Patterson, DUI; Hugo Hernandez E
no valid driver's license; Van Issac Kent, disorderly c
Pamela Flowers, domestic battery; Catrina Capps, DUI,
while license suspended or revoked, no motor vehcile r
tion.
Oct. 2: Jeffrey A. Stone, DUI, driving while license sus
or revoked; Pamela Flowers, possession of less than 20
of cannabis, possession of drug paraphernalia, driving
cense suspended or revoked, possession of prescription r
without prescription; Jimmy Womble, felony, DUI, drivir
license suspended or-revoked.
Llstingsincludenamefollowedlbychargeand identificationofarrestingagency. Thenamesabov
those charged. We remind our readers that all are presumed innocent until proven guilty
Blountstown Police Dept.
Sept. 26 through Oct. 2, 2005 @
Citations issued:
Accidents...............04 Traffic Citations..................17
Special details (business escorts, traffic details).....46
Business alarms....06 Residential alarms..........00
Complaints................................. ....147


Kinard man charged with DUI

after admitting to '13 or 14 beei
A Kinard man who told a Liberty County deputy that he
drunk" to perform a roadside sobriety test and admitted
had "13 or 14 beers" was. arrested for driving under the
last week.
Michael Lynn Pitts, 26, was arrested just before 6 p.m
after an off-duty highway patrol officer saw him spinning hi
driving carelessly along State Road 20, according to a re
the Liberty County Sheriff's Department.
The trooperturned the traffic stop over to Deputy Wes Ha
asked Pitts to exit his vehicle. After noting the strong odor o
and seeing that Pitts was unsteady ornhis feet. Harsey ask
perform a sobriety exercise, which he refused to do. :
Pitts was charged with DUI and taken to the county jail,
refused to give a breath sample for an alcohol reading.

Woman charged with stealil

equipment from church
A Hosford woman has been charged with burglary of a
and theft after she was observed taking some items from ti
an old church located on Farrell Street in Hosford last we6
A witness reported seeing Sandra Kay Jerrall, 47, coi
the church with a radio and a pair of speakers around 1C
Thursday. She put the stolen items in a wheelchair and rc
away from the scene, the witness said.
When a deputy contacted Jerrall at her residence on Bamt
she said Duncan Hosford told her she could have the iten
the deputy contacted Hosford, he said he did not give her p
to take the items and had not even seen her in several yeai


Time to plant your fall garden.

MUMS ARE READY!

SHARON McMILLAN, OWNER
BUSINESS 674-2454 *CELL 643-8803
,g00Q2 West Cen ral Ave,, plountstowrn -


*Intoxicated man stops for

directions at deputy's home
A Brunswick, Georgia man who'd had a few
;, grand drinks picked the wrong residence to stop and ask for
directions while driving through Bristol Sunday.
ended or Jimmy Wayne Womble, 29, was traveling along
olence, Pea Ridge Road when he pulled into a yard around
9:40 p.m. to ask for directions. The yard he chose
turned out to belong to Liberty County Sheriff's
Grady Deputy Jamie Shiver.
When Shiver went out to Womble's vehicle, he
Feeder, smelled the strong odor of alcohol on Womble's
ended or breath. When he asked how many drinks he'd
had that evening, Womble replied, "Too ****ing
many!"
Shiver called for assistance and Deputy Timothy
mischief ; Patridge arrived at the home. After running a com-
na Lynn puter check on Womble, the deputies learned that
his driver's license had been suspended.
Jarrell, Womble was charged with felony DUI and driving
arrera, with a suspended license. In addition to the Georgia
conduct; address listed on his license, Womble also listed a
driving second home address in Dothan, Alabama.
egistra- Telogia woman arrested on
ended numerous charges including
0 grams
while li- domestic battery and DUI
narcotic A Telogia woman is facing a number of charges
1g while after deputies were called to -he scenee of two incidents
involving her earlier this week.
represent Pamela Odessa Flowers, 34, was first arrested on
Sunday after an altercation at the Southern Express
convenience store in Bristol. According to a report
from the Liberty County Sheriff's Department, she-
was involved in an altercation with her ex-husband
and was seen shoving him in the parking lot.
The report stated that Flowers tried to hit her ex af-
ter pushing him up against his pickup but he got away
from her. It was also noted that she was intoxicated
at the time and had pulled into the store parking area
after seeing her ex purchasing a bag of ice. She \ as
charged with domestic battery.
The next night, Flowers was driving on Cannon
Branch Road when a deputy noticed her car make a
Turn without signaling around 10:25 p.m.
rs Deputy Wes Harsey conducted a routine license
was "too check and learned that her license had been sus-
that he'd pended..
influence After her arrest, her car was searched and Harsey
found several suspicious items, including a single
. Sept. 26 Lortab tablet in a pill bottle with someone else's
s tires and .name on it. Lortab is a habit-forming painkiller.
port from When the officer found a pack of rolling papers, he
asked Flowers what they were for and she replied, -
irsey, who "to smoke marijuana."'
of alcohol Also found in her vehicle was a single marijuana
ed him to cigarette tucked in a pack of regular cigarettes in the
car's center console. The deputy found a plastic bag
where he containing what appeared to be marijuana leaves,
seeds and stems. Three small empty baggies with
what appeared to be marijuana residue were also
ng found.
Three empty beer bottles were in the car next to
a half-empty case of Bud Light, the report from the
structure sheriff's office noted.
he back of Flowers was charged with driving while license
ek suspended or revoked with knowledge, possession
me out of of less than 20 grams cannabis, possession of drug
Sp.m. last paraphernalia and possession of prescription narcotics
lied them without a prescription. She was also cited for fail-
ing to use her turn signal and possession of an open
booCourt, alcohol container.
as. When Man charged with grabbing
emission woman and throwing phone
rs.
A Bristol man was charged with simple battery
and criminal mischief after he admitted to a deputy
that- he pushed a woman and threw away her cell
phone, according to a report from the Liberty County
Sheriff's Office.
The victim reported that Tony Lorenzo Thomas,
40, grabbed her and pushed her to the ground. She
said he took her cell phone and. threw it into the
woods.
Deputy Timothy Partridge noted that the victim
had red marks on the left arm too indicate that she
R had eebn.gra bb ro.ug-y-,.,.,.,*.-,v.vv..





OCTOBER 5,2005 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 3


00111EM 131N03ifNS


IESIFIUBOHIT B CFIIERINI3


eome and eat &'tea awt with a.
Nememade cudit and auaCe g yay.

Hot lunch buffet with tea and dessert for $6
SPulled pork, grilled chicken and ribs
Barbeque pork and beef cooked to order.
Saturday night: Steak and Shrimp $16.95

Thursday Saturday
ALL-YOU-CAN eat Mullet
and Catfish fillets, $8.95

Hours: Monday Wednesday 6 a.m. 2p.m.
Thursday Saturday 6 a.m. 9 p.m.

PeaRideR. in* Bristl S 4


Goat Day marks 19th year


on Oct. 15 in Blountstown


Calhoun County's annual Goat Day festival
will mark its 19th year when the gates open at
Sam Atkins Park on Saturday, Oct. 15.
The event kicks off the fall season and gives
visitors an opportunity to start their holiday
shopping as vendors spread out long lines of
booths packed with toys, gifts, clothing and a
variety-of arts and crafts. Booths will be up
and operating by 8 a.m.
This year's event will include a Mustang
Car Show, local talent providing music on
the outdoor stage and a couple of special old-
fashioned games for kids. At 11 a.m., children
will be invited to take part in a coin shuffle
at the park's volleyball net. At 1 p.m., kids
can knock off the day's dust by racing around
the grounds during a greased pig chase. The
chase will be divided into three age categories
of 5 7, 8- 10 and 11 15.
The musical entertainment begins at 9:15
a.m. with Kasey Gale. At 10 a.m., Covenant


Quartet will perform followed by Easy Com-
pany at 11 a.m.
Blountstown High School senior Sarah
Hatcher will be singing from 1 p.m. until 2 p.m.
In May, Sarah was a finalist at the Embassy
Music Talent Search in Nashville, Tennessee.
She has performed at many civic, school, rodeo
and community events and hopes to pursue a
singing career after graduation.
The Blountstown Middle School Chorus
will perform at 2 p.m. The Toole Family will
present a gospel music program from 2:30
until 3:30 p.m.
There will be many old-time demonstrations
and exhibits at the neighboring Panhandle Pio-
neer Settlement, to include spinning, soap mak-
ing, basket weaving, quicking and cooking.
The annual event is sponsored by the
Blountstown Rotary Club. Last year's Goat
Day drew a crowd estimated at somewhere
between eight and ten thousand visitors.


New traffic laws now in effect


Whether you're nearby or far

away, Clear Choice gives

you the home phone, local and

long distance services you need,

all combined with the calling

features you want!


from the Florida Highway Patrol
TALLAHASSEE The Department of
Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles and the
Florida Highway Patrol remind all drivers that
several new and revised traffic laws became ef-
fective Oct. 1, 2005. Among these are:
*The base fine (not including court costs,
which vary by county) for running a red light
is increased to $125 (from $60) and upon con-
viction, will result in four points added on the
dri' her's record. iCh. Law 2005-194):
*If a driver has their license- revoked for a
conviction of driving under the influence and
did not meet the financial responsibility re-
quirements at the time of the offense, the driver
must purchase and maintain a 6-month non-
cancelable liability policy. If the driver also
owns a vehicle, they must obtain a 6-month
registration as a condition of restatement. (Ch.
Law 2005-72)
*Racing on Florida's highways .will become
a first degree misdemeanor. Vehicles used to
race may be impounded for a period of 10 busi-
ness days. Vehicles in violation within 5 years



KENNETH


SIGNS



-b Locally owr
and operate
sinGe 200



WE SPECIALIZE IN:
Signs Banners Magnet
Truck lettering Auto graI
Auto tags & much more

Call 643-268

or .447-011
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of a previous conviction may be seized and for-
feited. (Ch. Law 2005-226)
The new laws are in addition to the primary
seat belt law for drivers under 21 that was effec-
tive July 1, 2005.
"These changes to the laws are designed to
promote highway safety. Tragically, too many
persons continue to die as a result of traffic
crashes. We encourage drivers to obey all traffic
laws, don't drink and drive and to buckle up,"
said Fred Dickinson, executive director, Depart-
ment of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles.
Colonel Chris Knight, director of the Flori-
da Highway Patrol adds, "Safety on Florida's
highways is paramount in our mission to en-
force all laws. Drivers must be aware of the
laws and abide by them for everyone's safety.
State and local law enforcement will begin en-
forcing these laws Oct. 1. We urge everyone to
drive safe, use caution and use proper safety
equipment."
For more information on new laws affecting
traffic and motor vehicles,- please visit die de-
partment's Web site at www.hsmv.state.fl.us.


I BPD warns of
S phone scam

asking for bank
account numbers
It has been reported to the
SBlountstown Police Department
Sby one of our local banks that se-
ned nior citizens are receiving tele-
d |phone calls requesting citizens
to give or verify their account
numbers. Please be aware that
banks do not usually call want-
ing this information.
The Blountstown Police De-
partment urges all citizens not to
Sics give.out their account numbers,
phics credit card numbers or Social
SSecurity numbers unless you are
Certain you know who you are
| 8 talking to.
S If you receive a call and are
concerned about it, please call
\ .'the. police .department at.. 674-
9' 1A 69iS87ii/- I.Y- I- /."v


You live irf the- country,
S n M

You're her mom.She lives in the city.
it 1 1.

Ou live i n' the coun
S he ves I n the city.
She just met Mr. Right.
t -


Share. it Lall.
li sry
Make the call.


~Y ._,_,, _I~.~i~rm~d?_~_*J~ilI~d~~~~~L~L~F*B*QI~L ~~~~~."
7--i~a~is~s~R*~dBIB8f~8~si~~a6~i~o~w~j'j






Page'4 'T-rE-CALHOUjN-I1BERTY'JOUJRNALOCTOBER 5,2005


SCBC announces

October schedule
The Southeastern Community Blood
Center Mobile Unit announces its sched-
ules. The dates and times are as follows:
*Oct. 2 thru Oct. 14 Our Marianna
Branch Center is Open Monday thru Fri-
day for donors convenience from 9 a.m.
-5:30 pm.
*Oct 2 Thomas Memorial Baptist
Church, 10:4-2:15 (ET), Quincy
*Oct. 4 One Stop Career Center, 9-
11:30 a.m. in Marianna; Mowery Eleva-
tor, 1-4 p.m., Marianna
*Oct. 5 Chipola College, 10 a.m.-3
p.m.
*Oct. 6 University of Fla. Exten-
tion on Penn Ave., 8-11 a.m. in Marian-
na; Parthenon Health Care, 1-4 p.m. in
Blountstown
*Oct. 7 NW Fla. Hospital, 10 a.m.-3
p.m., Chipley
Oct. 10 Roulhac Middle School 8-3
p.m., Chipley
*Oct. 12 NHC Home Care, 8-11
a.m. in Marianna; Jackson CI 1-4 p.m.,
Malone
*Oct. 13 -- FSH Fire Department 8-11
a.m. (ET) in Chattahoochee; Courtyard at
The Millpond 1-4 p.m., Marianna
*Oct. 14 Focus Credit Union in
Quincy from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. (ET)


Give a Donation, Get a
Brownie/Cookie Day
from the Calhoun County Public Library
The Calhoun County Public Library
and the OnelStop Career Center WIA
Youth Program will have a "Give a Dona-
tion, Get a Brownie/Cookie Day" for the
victims of the hurricanes.
The fundraiser will take place at the
Calhoun County Public Library on Satur-
day, Oct. 8 from 9 a.m. to noon (CT).
All donations will be given to the
American Red Cross to assist hurricane
evacuees.
S For more information, call 674-
8773.

Liberty Co. Children's
Coalition meets Oct. 12
The Liberty County Children's Coali-
tion will meet Wednesday, Oct. 12 at 11
a.m. (ET) at the Veterans Memorial Park
Civic Center in the conference room.
S The Children's Coalition is an organi-
zation of individuals and agencies com-
S'mitted to meeting the needs of Liberty
County's youngest citizens. All concerned-
agencies and individuals are welcome.
For more information, call Peggy Dea-
son Howland at 643-2415, ext. 247.

B-town Alumni band
meets Thurs., Oct. 13
The Blouitston\ n High School is form-
ing anAlumni Band. For those who are in-
terested, a meeting will be held Thursday,
Oct. 13 at 5 p.m. (CT) at the Blountsto\\ n
S High School band room.
SAlumni band % ill perform at the half-
time show on Oct. 14.
For more information, call 674-5724.

Lights of Liberty meeting
The-planning committee for Libertn
County's Christmas parade will meet on
Thursday, Oct. 6, at 7 p.m. at the Bristol
Assembly of God. We need volunteers to
assist us in making this event happen.
Please call Myrna Carnley, planning
committee chairperson at 643-2854 or
6431-161i for more information.


Rotary Club meets at Calhoun-Liberty Hospital, noon
Boy Scout Troops 200 & 203 meet at 6:30 p.m., Mormon Church
AA meets 7 p.m., Calhoun County Old Ag Bldg, west door


Magn


L


Altha Area Recreation Committee To A,/
meets at 6 p.m., Altha City Hall
olia VFD meets at 6 p.m. at the Fire House AbbieB ey
AbbieBa ey
id Oak VFD meets 6:30 p.m. at the Fire House
.iberty County Commission meets at 7 p.m. in the courtroom

Nettle Ridge FD meets at 7 p.m. at the Fire House

AA meets 7 p.m., basement of Calhoun County Courthouse


Keep Calhoun Co. Beautiful Inc. meets in the board
room of the Calhoun Co. Extension office, 8 a.m.
Calhoun Co. School Board meets 5 p.m., Calhoun Co. Courthouse
Altha Town Council, 6 p.m., City Hall
Blountstown. City Council meets at 6 p.m.
Blountstown Chapter #179 O.E.S. meets 7 p.m. at Dixie Lodge
Bristol Lions Club meets 7 p.m. at the Apalachee Restaurant
Liberty County School Board meets 7:30 p.m.,
Liberty Education and Administrative Center in the library


Girl Scout Troop 579 meets at W.T. Neal Civic Center


Chipola Fall

Festival today
MARIANNA-Chipola College will
host the annual Fall Festival for students
and employees, Wednesday, Oct. 5, from
10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
The free event will be held on the lawn
of the Milton H. Johnson Health Center.
Five-member teams from Chipola
student organizations will participate in
relay and tug-of-war competitions with
T-shirts for the winners. Relays begin at
10:30 a.m.
The menu of free hamburgers, hotdogs
and Subway cookies will be served at 11
a.m. Great door prizes will be awarded
during lunch.
Soft play inflatable games including
jousting, bull-riding and a giant slide will
be available. Several area universities will
have recruiters on site during the event.
For information, contact Nancy John-
son, Chipola Student Activities Director,
at 718-2314.

CNA course set to

begin at Chipola
MARIANNA--Chipola College will
offer a Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA)
course beginning Oct. 31.
Applications are due, in the Chipola
Health Science Programs office by Oct. 26.
Classes will be held Monday through
Thursday from 8 a.m, to 2:30 p.m. The fi-
nal N\eek of the course will include clini-
cal experiences for eight hours each day.
The cost is approximately $500. Stu-
dents must take the Test of Adult Ba-
sic Education (TAB EL. available in the
Chipola Success Center. Monday through
Thursday at 8 a.m. Scores must be sub-
mitted with the application.
For information, call 718-2278.





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OCTOBER 5,2005 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 5


Chipola's 'All My Sons'entered in Kennedy Center Program


MARIANNA The up-
coming Chipola College pro-
duction of the Arthur Miller
drama "All My Sons" will be
entered in the Kennedy Cen-
ter American College Theater
Festival (KCACTF).
The Kennedy Center theater
education program was estab-
lished to identify and promote
quality in college theater.
The Chipola performance
is eligible for a response by
KCACTF representative. Se-
lected students and faculty
are invited to participate in
KCACTF programs involv-
ing scholarships, internships,

Guardian ad Litem
VOLUNTEERS
...are powerful voices in
the lives of abused and
neglected children in our
community. Join us and
speak up for a child! Call the
Guardian ad Litem Program
at (850) 482-9127 or (850)
638-6043.


grants and awards for actors,
playwrights, designers, stage
managers and critics at both
the regional and national lev-
els.
Productions also are eligible
for inclusion at the KCACTF
regional festival and can also
be considered for invitation to
the KCACTF national festival
at the John F. Kennedy Cen-
ter for the Performing Arts in
Washington, DC in the spring
of 2006.
"All My Sons" weaves the
story of Joe Keller, a suc-
cessful, self-made man who
has done a terrible and tragic
thing: during World War II,
rushing to meet an order from
the Army, he knowingly sold
them defective airplane parts
which later caused the planes
to crash and killed 21 men.
The Chipola production opens
a four-day run, Nov. 3.
For information about
Chipola Theater, call 718-
2227.


The family of Darlene Severance would like to
express our appreciation for the many kindnesses
shown to our family during the time of
SDarlene's illness and passing.

The prayers; visits, calls and contributions of food,
flowers and money have been an awesome
testament to this community's love and support.
God has used you to be an instrument of His
S love during a very difficult journey.
Thank you for being there.

S THE SEVERANCE FAMILY


---- .. ---

"ALL MY SONS'ENTERED IN KENNEDY CENTER PROGRAM-The upcoming Chipola Col-
lege production of the Arthur Miller drama "All My Sons" will be entered in the Kennedy Center
American College Theater Festival (KCACTF). Pictured from left, are (front) (middle) Kattie
Brown, Heath Carroll, Richie Cooper, Felicia Gibson, Danuta Jacob (back) Courtney Kirkland,
Zack Price, Josh Barber, Michael John Milton, Charles Sirmon, Brad Brooks, Brittney Holmes
and Kevin Russell. CHIPOLA PHOTO


Covenant Hospice to celebrate World

Hospice and Palliative Care Day


TALLAHASSEE October
8 is the first World Hospice and
Palliative Care Day, a unified
day of action to celebrate and
support hospice .and palliative
care'6aound tie world. This is;
an important global event with
59 countries taking part, from
Europe, Asia, Africa, America,
Australia and the UK-the birth-


place of the hospice movement.
To celebrate locally, Covenant
Hospice-will be at Tallahassee's
Sports Deli directly across from
Doak Campbell Stadium, locat-
ed on the corner of St. Augustine
Street and Stadium Drive, on
Saturday,' Oct. 8 from 10 a.m.
to 12 noon, with fans for fans
in celebration of World Hospice
and Palliative Care Day.
The hospice and palliative
care movement is dedicated to
providing support to people liv-
ing with a.terminal illness, and
their loved ones. It aims to en-
sure that their physical, emotion-
al, and spiritual needs are taken
care so that they can live with
their illness and face death as
comfortably as possible. Around
the \% world. one million people die
every % eek, and it is estimated
that 100 million people could
benefit from basic palliative
care. although the number of
people that have access to it falls


far below this level (re: World
Hospice and Palliative Care Day
press release and website at HY-
PERLINK "http://www.world-
dayorg" www.worldday.org).
"World Hospice and Palliative
Care Day" provides a wonderful
opportunity to raise awareness
of available care options," com-
mented Steve Campbell, Talla-
hassee Branch Manager of Cov-
enant Hospice. "Far too many
people wait until they are facing
a health crisis to learn about care
options. The time to learn about
end-of-life care is before it be-
comes a serious issue."
Covenant Hospice is a not-
for-profit, JCAHO-accredited,
charitable organization provid-
ing dignified, compassionate,
end-of-life care to patients and
their loved ones for the past 21
years. To learn more about Cov-
enant Hospice call 575-4998 or
visit us online at www.covenan-
thospice.org.


f ""3K CHIPOLA WORKFORCE PROGRAMS OPEN-Chipola Col-
"lege Welding student Zeb Sims of Bristol checks a bead in
-i tthe college Welding Technology shop. For information about
any of Chipola's Workforce Development programs, call 718-
2270 ... CHIPOLA POTO
.. ,** -' s r< -'^ (;Clv. 1 -> t '.










''1


kvi


Two views of New Orleans' plight


Cindy Sheehan is the mother who was
demonstrating in Texas. She was arrested at the
White House for sitting down, doing nothing,, and
refusing to move. You know, if that's the criteria,
they should arrest all those White House energy
advisers., JAY LENO

Republican majority leader Tom DeLayv was
Indicted and he was stripped of his congressional
Leadership powers. When asked what it
Feels like to lose all his power, DeLay .said,
"I feel like a Democrat." CONAN O'BRIEN

Bush is now asking people to conserve gasoline.
That's gotta be tough for a former oil man like
SBush. Telling people not to use gasoline? That's
like Clinton trying to get women to just say no.
S-JAY LENO

SHouse Majority Leader Tom DeLay says he is
innocent of all wrongdoing and is the victim of
a plot by the Democrats. Fox News does too:
they've been spinning this story so hard they had
to give the staff Dramamine today.
JIMMY KIMMEL

John Roberts was sworn in as chief justice of
the Supreme Court, and they said he might get a;
::license plate for a limo that, reads 'Chief Justice
1.' And it could be made by Tom DeLay.
JAY LENO

-All in all, 16 Texas oil refineries remain shut down
after the storms. Analysts say it's the worst thing to
happen to the Texas oil industry since George W.
Bush worked in it. JON STEWART

They say President Bush has started drinking
again. Boy, he'll do anything to get Ted Kennedy's
support for that Supreme Court nominee.
-. .JAY LENO

A Texas grandjury indicted House Majority Leader
STom DeLay for conspiracy in a campaign finance
scheme. This is the most embarrassing thing to
happen to the Republicans since yesterday.
JAY LENO

We begin with Hurricane Rita, which proved the old
rule that no matter how anticipated, sequels are
Always less compelling than the original. ... Rita,
I feel, was the Ghostbusters II of hurricanes.
JON STEWART

SRemember when Republicans, like Newt Gingrich
and Bob Livingston, when they got in trouble it was
for sex scandals? See Tom DeLay is in trouble for
Money. Or as Republicans would call it -- this is a
Return to traditional values. JAY LENO

Barbra Streisand told Diane Sawyer that we're in
; a global warming crisis, and we can expect more :
and more intense storms, droughts and dust
bowls. But before they act, weather experts say
They're still waiting to hear from Celine Dion.
JAY LENO

These fires (in California) are unbelievable. This
:; is the only city in the world where it's illegal to
Smoke in a restaurant while the entire city is on
fire. JAY LENO

S I was watching that reality show where they kick
S someone out of the house -- Tom Delay.
-JAY LENO


/I ectLiv' et the following e-mail
t im i riir ediilitani otl- r:
Ne\\ O( leans.
In his 1935 State of the Union Ad-
dress, FDR spoke to a nation mired in
the Depression, but still inariinated in


/COX'S CORNER
Jerry Cox is a retired milaary officer
and writer with an extensive back-
ground in domestic and foreign policy.
issues. He lives in Shalimar, Fla.


.onser ati\e values : "Continued de-
pendence" upon welfare. sajd FDR, "induces a spiritual
disinteliation fundamentally destrucli\e to the national
fibel. To dole our relief in tlus \\ay is to administer a
narcotic. a subtle destroyer of the human spirit."
Behind FDR's statement \\ a the con iction that. lhille
the government must step in an emergency in normal
times, men prove ide the food, clothing and shelter for
their families. And we did. until the war pulled us out of
the Depiession and a posc\ ar boom made us. inJohn K.
Galbraith's phrase. The Affluent Society. BN the 1960s,
Amterica, the richest country on earth. \\as grow ing e\ er
more prosperous. But \with the 1064 landslide of LBJ.
liberalism triumphed and began its great experiment.
Behind the Great Societ\ w\as a great idea: to lift
America's poor out of po\ ert, government should no\\
take care of all their basic needs. By giving the poor
welfare, subsidized food, public housing and free medical
care, government will end pov ert) in Amenca.
At the Superdome and New Orleans Convention Cen-
ter; we saw the failure of 40 years of the Great Society.
No sooner than Katrina passed by and the 17th Street
levee broke, hundreds of young men, who should have
taken charge in helping the aged, the sick and the women.
with babies to safety, took to the streets to shoot, loot
and rape. The.New Orleans police, their numbers cut by
.deseriers \ ho left their posts to look after their families,
engaged in running gun battles all day long to stay alive
and protect people.
It was the'character and conduct of its people that
makes the New Or-
leans disaster unique.
After a hurricane, peo-
ple's needs are simple: ,
food, water, shelter,
medical attention. But -
they can be hard to
meet. People buried *"
in rubble or hiding
in attics of flooded
homes are tough to get
to. But even with the
incompetence of the
rmaor and governor.
and the torpor of fed-
eral officials, this w'as
possible. .
Coast Guard heli-
copters were operat- me
.ing Tuesday. There Sy
were roads open into Available from C
the city for SUVs,
buses and trucks.
-While New Orleans
was flooded, the \ after
\as stagnant. People
walked through to the
con mention center arid
Superdome. The fim-
siest boat could na\ i-
gate: Even if go\ern-
ment dithered for days
-- \bhat else is new
-- this does not ex-
plain the failure of the
people themsel es.
Between 1865 and
1940, the South --
ha in. lost a. fourth
of its best and bra\ est
in battle, devastated '


b \%ar. nured in po\ert -- \\as fa-
imous for the hard\ self-reliance of
her people, black and \ white. In 1940,
hundreds of British fishermen and
yachtsmensailed back and forth dailI
under fire across a turbulent 23-mile


Channel to rescue 300.00)0 soldiers
from Dunkirk. How do we explain to the v.orld thai a
tenth of that number of Amerjcans could not be reached
in four daJ\ from across a stagnant pond'
The real disaster of Katrina was that society\ broke
down. An entire community \ could not cope. Liberalism.
the idea that ,ood intentions and government programs
can build a Great Society. was exposed as fraud. After
trillions-of tax dollars i6.5 trillion to be exact-i-hat's mril-
lion \\ ith 6 more zeroes) for welfare. food tamps, public
housing. job traiinin and education ha e poured oit since
1965. po\ert\ remains pandemic. But today. when the
police vanish. the community disappears and men take
to the streets to prey on "women and the \eak.
Stranded for da\-, in a pool of fetid after almost
e\ er\one \waited for the government to com ae sae them.
The\ screamed into the cameras for help. and the report-
ers creamed into the cameras for help. and the "ci\ il
rights leaders" screamed into the cameras that Bush -\\as
responsible and Bush w\as a racist.
Americans were once famous for taking the initiative.
for having young leaders rise up to. take command inr a
crisis. See any of that at the Superdome? Sri Lankan and
Indonesians, far poorer than We, did not beha\ e like this
in a tsunami that took 400 times as many lives as Katrina
has thus far.
We are the descendants of men and \women \\ho bra\ ed
the North Atlantic in wooden boats to build a country in
a strange land. Our ancestors tra eled thousands of miles
See COX'S CORNER continued on page 8


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ghted Material.
dicated Content
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OCTOBER5, 2005 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 7

to n _. iii I.nM..;

... AM SPEAK UP!I
WITH A LETTER TO THE EDITOR
Write: The Calhoun-Liberty Journal
R 0. Box 536, Bristol,FL 3221 /


Students shouldn't be singled

out in front of crowd at game


e m bdo 40* me -* *t* am em w


qCopy righted Materialn
Syndicated Content


Available from

"


Commercial News Providers
vlbwL, O w f


To the editor:
I am writing in response to
a high school volleyball game
I attended this week. I have
attended other volleyball games
in support of this school and
have witnessed the number of
students attending. The student
support shown in my opinion is
outstanding. It amazes me that
varsity football players come to
the games and show their support
of fellow athletes. That attitude
was not exhibited when I was in
school. I feel this camaraderie
should be encouraged. These-
students are also in a safe, drug-
free environment.
My concern is in regard to
the behavior and actions of the
school principal. I witnessed him
singling out two students in front
of fellow football players and
classmates apparently asking them
to not be boisterous. He did this
before the varsity game started.
It was a rival game and extra


expression was to be expected,
but I feel his way of addressing
the potential situation was not
appropriate. Perhaps something
should have been mentioned
over the intercom that morning at
school for the entires6hool body.
My personal opinion is that a
principal should live in the county
where they are emplo\ ed.
It doesn't bother me that for
the last 15 years he has been
employed by a county school
system in which he didn't reside.
I am somewhat amused and upset
that when the two rival teams
play against each other, he tries
to overexhibit authority in front
of his home county.
I say this because last year he
called down students in front of
everyone in the gymnasium when
they were expressing support
for their team at last year's rival
game on the rival court of the
school system where he lives.
Donna Ritter, Bristol


wr


I^-


a


Many here give help to those

affected by recent hurricanes


To the editor:
In the wake of such horrible
events these past months, I have
seen so many Calhoun and Lib-
erty County residents unselfishly
donate so much to displaced hur-
ricane victims, as well as those
victims who stayed to weather
the storms. Calhoun County
Health Departments was one of
numerous hurricane supply drop-
off sights that were bombarded
with supplies from the commu-
nity, CCSO picked up a truck
load of supplies from the Health
Department that were donated
by so many people. Some of
the items donated were diapers,
non-perishable food items, femi-


nine hygiene products, clothes,
plastic utensils, school supplies,
lotions, body spray, disposable
heat pacs, and much more from
Abe Springs Baptist Church;
contact lens solution from Dr.
Edewaard, bars and bars of soap
from Blountstown Rotary Club,
toothpaste and toothbrushes from
Dr. Bontrager, sunscreen from
S.W.A.T, bug repellant from En-
vironment Services at the Health
Department, and much more.
I \n would especially like to thank
Allen and Betty Pitts for all their
help. It makes me proud to be a
part of this caring community
Gidget Thomas LPN,
Calhoun County Health Dept.


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Page 8 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL OCTOBER 5,2005


NEWS

FROM THE

PEWS







Altha Church of

God Fall Festival

planned Oct. 29
Altha Church of God will host
a Fall Festival Oct. 29 from 5 to
7:30 p.m. We invite everyone to
attend this event.
We willhave a sing with The
Thompson's, food, games and a
car show. This event is free.
Please come and enjoy a great-
time of food, fun and fellowship.
In case of rain, the event will
move inside the church.
For more, information, call
762-8294.

Fall revival Oct. 9-12
Traveler's Rest Free Will
Baptist Church of Clarksville
will have its fall revival starting
Sunday morning, Oct. 9 through
Wednesday, Oct. 12.
The guest speaker will be Rev.
Jeremy Howell of Alma, AR. The
Basford Brothers will be singing
in the Sunda. evening re\ival
service at 6 p.m.
Assurance of Eufuala, AL will
be singing in the Monday evening
service starting at 7 p.m.
Everyone is cordially invited
to attend. For more information.
call 674-5761


Prayer band meets
The Liberty Community
Prayer Band will hold pra er
service Thursday, Oct. 6 at 7:30
p.m. (ET) at the home of Brother
and Sister Louie Beckwith.
Everyone is cordially invited
to attend. For more information,
call 643-2622.


We welcome your church an-
nouncements and remind you to be
sure to include the day and date as
wells time andlocation ofeach event.
Lte also asK that you include a phone
number or directionstc the church to
make it convenient for our readers.
There is no charge for church
announcements, but we run each an-
nouncement only once. If you would
like to repeat the same announce-
ment, we can do so but must charge
for the space as though it were an
advertisement.
Often, churches want to publicize
events several weeks prior to the ac-
tivity. If you can provide information
about different aspects of the event,
we can run a series of announce-
ments. For example, if a church is
celebrating homecoming, the first
story mightbe about the history ofthe:.
church, the second sior.i might give
some backar..und on the sinaers or
special speakers to be featured, and
the third article could focus on the
day's schedule of events. Each article
should end with the basics time,
date and location.
Pl,./I Si t ,iiO.\heep _Vii?..-tllT./te ,

.'] e ,r'.Jilm "'r1 C'.CtadNi ..:r / -


Homecoming at

Telogia Baptist

set for Sunday
Telogia Baptist Church will
have its homecoming.on Sunday,
Oct. 9.
Pastor Gordon Adank will
provide the worship sermon at
9:45 a.m. and The Rivertown
Girls will provide special music
at 10:45 a.m. with a covered-dish
lunch immediately following.
We invite everyone to come
worship with us and enjoy great
fellowship and food.

Abe Springs Church

night of worship
Abe Springs Pentecostal Holi-
ness Church would like to invite
youto a night of worship insong
featuring Stepping Out on Faith
from Marianna on Oct. 8 at 6
p.m. (CT).
The church is located on CR
275 South in Blountstown.
IF you have ani questions, call
762-2146.


Thank you so much for your
prayers, cards, phone calls, flow-
ers andvisits. Your love and sip-
port during m\ hospital stay are
sincerel) appreciated.
I would like to thank relatives
and friends for surrounding my
family with love when I was in
ICU.
Thank you for your kind words
of encouragement and offers to
help during this difficult time.
Sincerely,
Beth Brown and family

The Church of God of Proph-
ecy would like to thank all the
churches and eern one that sup-
ported us and to make our Men's
Day Program (Sept. 25) a suc-
cess.
A special thanks to Rev. Dr.
C.L. Wilson, his congregation
and male chorus for rendering a
very inspirin., spirit-filled ser-
vice. May God continue to bless
you all.
Sponsors included Brother Ru-
fus Solomon, Deacon Emanuel
Solomon, and Pastor Sister Ro-.
setta Baker.


in covered wagons, fighting off
Indians far braver than those
cowards preying on New Orleans'


poor.
Watching that performance
in the Crescent City, it seems
clear: We are not the people our.
parents were. And what are all
our Lords Temporal now howling
for? Though government failed
at every level, they want more
government.
SFDR was right. A "spiritual
disintegration" has overtaken us.
Government-as-first provider, the
big idea of the Great Society, has
proven to be "a narcotic, a subtle
destroyer of the human spirit."
Either we get off this narcotic,
or it kills us.

The following is my edited
response to the e-mail. The
First .Amendment is alive and
well, and this individual has
every right to state his views on
poverty. I have every right to
disagree.
I've ,cci tld this mc .s,1e
fotur whltt, timi s. via -e-mail, all
from military officers. A busi-
ness associate of mine, a ralired
officer and lawyer, repeated this
message in the vilest manner,
using curse words of the worst
kind to describe the mayor of
New Orleans, the governor of
Louisiana, and the black people.
Two weeks ago, I attended a
rettnion of nilitir officers. This
subtlect caimiie up about six times.
.All icpeat'd vourrin s'agcl. Which
begs the question, are military
officers racist?
It's a given that 10% ofpeople,
Americans included, will never
work. They lie, cheat, steal, kill
people, smoke dope, eventu-
ally going to jail. Along with a
number of sociological factors,
the success of the other 90%
depends primarily on the word
opportunity. "
If you have never known pov-
erty, it is easy to be judgmental.
I grew up dirt poor In the 1940s,
we were "fruit tramps," or today
we would be migrant workers and
JOmllI cd the crops. We lived in a
homemade house trailer about
20 feet long. This trailer had no
bathrooms. We used the trailer
park community bath house. A
nice, smelly sight for a kid, par-
ticularly' o. a i wk ektd wilih all
the drunks pmking in the stalls.
Try brushing vyoour tlith, getting
a bath...
In the 4th grade, Iwent to sev-


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conu d



en different schools in one year,
about one a inonth. That year we
picked apples in Washington State
in the fall and finished the school
year picking cotton in Texas.
In between, we picked grapes,
apricots. !eltlce...alIl sloop.labor
jobs.
My parents separated in 1 -16.
and fir the ine lO10years, ie lived
in "a homemade trailer parked
next to my grandmother's house.
I slept on a cotch for 10 years. I
didn't see an indoor roiltr until
Ij oint d th( AF in 19.56. I got to
clean that one too. My Imoth' r
Ii tli to Iwoik in a Navyi E\xchange
laundry for. lirt cinas anll hoi:
Slit wa.s making 5 1.65 per hour
when she retired 23 years later
So, it gives me a case of the (fill in
blank) when I hear Republicans
preach doom and damnation
about a few cents raise in the
minimum wage.
We had no money to buy books,
magazines, or even the newspa-
per I loved books, and still do, so
school was a perfect place for me,
particularly the school library. As
a result, I have al\ad\ hbet vt ry
good with the books. Learning
has never been a pioblcm.
The .ir Force provided me an
opportunity for success. I know
what would have happened to me
if I had remained in the rural area
of Northwest Florida with just a
high school education. I would be
living from payday to payday like
millions of other Americans.
The good thing about Hurri-
cane Katrina was that it revealed
America's soft under belly Iof
-poverty and racism. The black
people were hidden a\way in the,
New Orleans ihe~ti until the
flood came. Then they were on
America's front page.
uit n is' -I ,it ricta's rstponsi-


Page 8 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL OCTOBER 5, 2005


Your Valu-Rile store with
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ability to its minorities, its poor,
its disadvantaged? What is the
government's responsibility?
What is our collective responsi-
bility? None? Some? Let them
die? Third-world countries do
nothing for their poor. Is that
America's model?
In spite of President Ronald
Reagan's comment about "wel-
fare queens driving a Cadillac,".
most of the people on welfare
can't do any) better: Many are
old, sick, afflicted, uneducated,
cra;. awaitinQ death., Alany are
babies, children, teenagers with
little education, or little opportu-
nity for education "and an even
sellerr chance of getting a job
that will pay them "a wage that
will let them pursue the American
Dreamt of a house in tlhesuburbs
and two cars in lth drivitiv.
Like it or not, milloritits and
piwe'tv havri oalwas Iben t part
oftlhe Amerita1 anmosaic. and it is
not likely that it will chuti,,e. The
questionforyou and me, and.all
of ii hot had an opportunity for
success is, "What should we do
about p ric irti in America?"


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OCTOBER 5, 2005 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 9


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Page 10 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL OCTOBER 5,2005


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John Wayne Couch Reasonable
674-2606 rates for all your
Free estimates painting needs!

The secret of good cooking is, first, having a love of it... If
you're convinced that cooking is drudgery, you're never going
to be good at it, and you might as well warm up something
frozen. -James Beard


TREY WATSON
Trey Watson celebrated his
sixth birthday on Oct 2. He is
the son of Dewayne and Me-
lissa Watson of Hosford. Trey
enjoys swimming at Grand-
ma's, fishing with daddy, play-
ing X-Box and playing with his
sisters and brother.


DYLAN WILLIAMS
SLAYTON
Dylan Williams Slayton will
celebrate his fifth birthday on
Oct. 7. He is the son of Tonia
Williams of Telogia and Dole
Slayton -of Crawfordville. His
grandparents are Edward and
Annice Williams of Telogia and
Stanley and Shiela Slayton
of Crawfordville. Dylan will
celebrate his birthday with a.
party on Oct. 8 with lots of
family and friends. He enjoys
hunting and fishing.


41 -iHW ii ii u&^s.-"-"w"3 n u
KEIRRA AND TEIRRA DABNEY
Keirra and Teirra Dabney, twins, celebrated their fifth birthday,
Sept. 26. They are the children of Shakita Knight and Ric
Dabney, both of Blountstown. They are the grandchildren and
great-grandchildren of Arrie Engram, Lyndomn Baker, Peggy
Stone, Julie Tyre, Rudolph Engram, Josie Reeves, andAnn Mc-
Clellan, all of Blountstown. The girls'aunt and uncles areAqeyla'
Grant, Keshawn Grant and Michael Knight of Blountstown.
They are the godchildren of Yaminah and Domenique Ivory of
Blountstown. They celebrated their birthday at school with a
few school buddies and also celebrated with their family and
close friends at the skating rink in Tallahassee on Oct. 1. Keirra
and Teirra enjoy going to school and hanging out with Aqeyla
and Keshawn Grant,-NaBresha and Zykel Paige and Karenda
Ivory and godbrothers, Mikel and Mikis Engram. Their favorite
hobbies are playing at the -park, /iding their bikes, watching
Arsenio and. Malcolm Ivory play football, helping their mom
cook and clean, going to their grandmother's house, playing
with hbeir great-grandmother, ndJta.kirig .o, the pho ne. wfth
their Uicle Michael. '


Eunice Arold celebrated her
89th birthday on Oct. 2. She
is the mother of Shirley Hin-
son, Pansie Langston and
LeanordAmold, ail ofHosford.
She is the grandmother of
many grandchildren and great-
grandchildren. Eunice enjoys
fishing and spending time with
her family She celebrated her
birthday with her family.


BRITNEY SHAE
SUMMERLIN
Britney Shae Summerin will
celebrate her fourth birthday
on Oct. 10. She is the.daugh-
ter of Miranda Mears and
Rooster Summerlin of Bristol.
Her grandparents are Debro-
rah Peterson of Apalachicola,
Joyce Mears of Bristol, Clin-
ton Mears, Ellis Summerlin,
Melinda Waldron and Melodie
Baker, all of Blountstown. Her
great-grandparents are the
late Bill and Olivia Landry of
Wewahitchka, Helen Hatt-
away, and Thelma and Buddy,
Kyle, all of Blouptstown. Brit-
ney enjoys riding her bike
and playing with her sister,
Brianna.
f i t



Share your special
moments with an
announcement in
THE JOURNAL


SAMANTHA PUGH
Samantha Pugh will celebrate
her 13th birthday on Oct. 8.
She is the daughter of De-
wayne and Melissa Watson
of Hosford and Lewis and Re-
becca Pugh of Panama City.
Samantha enjoys hanging out
with friends, shopping, playing
with her brothers and sisters
and racing with her dad.


TYLER LAYFIELD
Tyler Layfield celebrated his
sixth birthday on Oct. 4. He is
the son of Chuck and Casie
Layfield of Blountstown. His
grandparents are Jimmy and-
Darlene Layfield and Keith
Jones and the late Maxine
Jones. Tyler's favorite activi-
ties are playing Nintendo with
his Daddy and going on the
river with Mom and Dad. He
enjoys building Bionicles and
Legos.


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X'ZABRION
ELMORE
BOYD-GARRETT
X'zabrion Elmore Boyd-Gar-
rett will celebrate his first
birthday on Oct. 8 with a
party at Sam Adkins Park at
4:30 p.m. He is the son of
Roosevelt "Bubba" Garrett Jr.
of Blountstown and Shenidra.
Boyd of Bristol. His grandpar-
ents are Juanita and Elmore
Boyd Jr. of Blountstown and
Roosevelt Garrett Sr. and
the late Minnie Lois Gar-
rett of Blountstown. Great-
grandparents are Lilli Mae
Simmons and the late Buck
Simmons and Mamie Nulls all
of Blountstown. X'zabrion en-
joys watching Sesame Street,
spending time with his aunties
Ann, Sue, Loriand Stephanie,
and his special friends Jes-
sica, Terri, Tanya, B.J., L.J.
and Tiffany.


... ~i. .*'H





BRIANNA MAKAYLE
NORRIS
Brianna Makayle Norris will
celebrate hersecondbirthday
on Oct. 5. She is the daughter
of Stacy and Chris Batson of
Blountstown, andScottyand
Amber Norris of Clarksville.
Her grandparents are Wil-
liam andAngela Tucker, and
Archie and Marilyn Harris,
all of Bristol, Tereasa Hall of
Scotts Ferry and Tony Norris
of Blountstown. Great-grand-'
parents are Ivey and Diane
Sloan, and Mary and Ed Tew,
all of Clarksville. Brianna
enjoys spending time with
her friends and family and
p!a!yi prgwifth~ 4ti/.ta!eistrf


MASON JAMES GEIGER
Mason James Geiger cel-
ebrated his first birthday on
Sept. 24. He is the son of
Stuart and Brittany Geiger of
Hosford. His grandparents
are Bob and Margie Geiger
of Hosford, Shelia Lewis and
Bruce Middleton, both of Val-
dosta, GA. His great-grand-
mother is Natalie Williams of
Valdosta. Mason loves to eat,
play with his light-up tractor
and to be held and cuddled by
his Mommy and Daddy.


LEVI AUSTAN
BRANNAN
Levi Austan Brannan will:
celebrate his seventh birth-.
day Oct. 6. He is the son of
Greg and Laurie Brandon of
Bristol and Stan and Teresa
Brannan of Crawfordville. His
grandparents are Edwin and'
Tina Goodman and Stan and
Debbie Brannan, all of Bristol,
and Roy and Linda Hooks
of Crawfordville. Levi enjoys
playing his GameBoy, shoot-,
ing his bow, going camping
and riding the golf cart and
four-wheeler with his brother,'
Cole. He also loves being
in Betty Wilson's first grade
class.


TRENTON ALLEN
KIRKPATRICK
LaceyAmmons and Steve
Kirkpatrick Jr. of Hosford
are proud to announce the
birth of their son, Trenton l;
Allen Kirkpatrick. born on
Aug. 1i, 2005 at Capital
Regional Medical Center.
He weighed 7 /bs. and
14 oz. and measured 20
inches. Maternal grand-
parents are Tammy and Chris Collins of Hosford and David
and Susan Smith of Blountstown. Paternal grandparents are
Steve and Connie Kirkpatrick of Hosford and TammyZuniga of
DeFuniak Springs. Great-grandparents are Anita and Nelson
Sumner of Tallahassee, James and Sue Ammons, and Gloria
Smith, all of Blountstown. Trenton was welcomed home by his
big sister, Megan Kirkpatrick.

KEIRA
GRACE
BATSON
Chris and Sta-
S cy Batson of
9 Blountstown
Share proud to.
S-.announce the
S birth of their
daughter, Kei-
N "ra Grace Bat-
,grandparens are Joye son, born on
S' 'July 21, 2005
at Tallahassee
Memorial Womens Pavillion. She weighed 7/bs. and measured
19 inches long. Maternal grandparents are Angela and William
Tucker, andArchie and Marilyn Harris, a#l of Bristol. Paternal
grandparents are Joyce Batson of Panama City and Coy
Tucker of Wewahitchka. Keira's siblings are Brianna Norris, 2,

family and her big sister, Bree. .'... '" "' '






Page 12 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL OCTOBER 5,2005


Calhoun County Senior Citizens plan a variety of fall events


from the Calhoun County Senior
Citizens Association
FISH FRY FUNDRAISER
- The Calhoun County Senior
Citizens will sponsor a fish fry
fundraiser on Friday, Oct. 7.
Call now to reserve one of these
delicious meals.
Plates consist of catfish fillet,
cole slaw, baked beans, hush
puppies and dessert (we give.
large servings), all for $6. We
will deliver. Proceeds will go
to Calhoun County Senior Citi-
zens to be used for matching
grant funds.
To place an order you may do
so by calling 674-4163 or fax
your order to 674-8384. You
can also come by the Senior
Citizens office at 16859 NE
Cayson St. in Blountstown or
stop by the old Piggly Wiggly
parking lot on Hwy. 20 (we will
have plates at both locations).
All proceeds will go to ben-
efit Calhoun County Senior
Citizens. Thank you for your
support of your Senior Citizens
Association.
SHOPPING IN CHIPLEY
- If you would like to join us
on our shopping day to Chipley
and Graceville on Tuesday,
Oct. 11, call Diane at 674-4163.
We will leave the center at 8:30
a.m. and be back by 4 p.m.
We'll be going to Wal-Mart
then onto lunch at the Chuck
Wagon, After lunch we'll head
to Graceville to the Vanity Fair,
outlet stores. Cost is $6 for
transportation.
GOLDEN AGE REP On
Wednesday, Oct. 12 the associ-
ation will have a representative
from Golden Age to give us in-
formation on Medicare Part D.
He will be at the center at 10:30
a.m. so you will want-to be on
time to benefit from the entire
educational seminar. Call on.
Tuesday if you would like to
join us for lunch. Lunch tickets
are $2.
BREAST CANCER PRO-
GRAM Cynthia Seaborn
will be at the center on Wednes-
day, Oct. 19 to educate us on
breast cancer. She will be here
at 10:30 a.m. please call 674-
4163 on Tuesday if you would



Needsomene t


850-926-2200
I 4AOO-22fi 7006


like to stay for lunch. Cost is
$2.
FALL FESTIVAL The
Calhoun County Senior Citi-
zens will have its annual Fall
Fun Festival on Monday, Oct.
31 beginning at 10:30 a.m. You
can try your luck at the many
games we have and select from
our menu of chilli or cheese
dogs, baked -beans, potato sal-
ad, tea and dessert. And don't
forget our cake walk. The cost
is only $2 (we are not accept-
ing meal tickets for this event.)
Call 674-4163 to make your
reservation.
FALL TRIPS The
Calhoun County Senior Citi-
zens still has room on two of
their fall trips:
*Bellingrath Gardens, Nov.


10-11 for $129/pp (based on
double occupancy). Payment is
due Oct. 15.
*Christmas in the Smokies,
Nov. 28 through Dec. 2. Cost is
$399 pp (based on double oc-
cupancy). A deposit of $200 is
due upon sign up.
If interested, contact Mari-
lyn at 674-4163. We do except
MasterCard and VISA.
ALOHA CalCo Travel
will be cruising to Hawaii for
the first time. Fly from either
Panama City or Tallahassee to
Honolulu, Hawaii where we will
board the Norwegian "Pride of
Aloha" for a seven-day cruise.
Ports of call are Kauai, Hilo,
Kona, Maui and an evening sail
by Mount Kilaue.
Dates for the cruise are July


9 through July 16, 2006.
In Kauai, float down the ca-
nal on a tube or canoe, visit the
3,400 ft. Mt. Namolokama Falls
and swim at Kipu Falls.
In Hilo, visit the active
Kilaue volcano, or take a heli-
copter ride, visit the rainforest
or botanical gardens.
In Kona experience snorkel-
ing, hidden sea caves and giant
lava tubes.
In Maui, lounge around on
the beautiful beaches, try snor-
keling, visit the tropical planta-
tion, hike into the Sacred 'Iao
Valley for a fantastic view of
the valley and Kahului Harbor
or take a horseback ride and
visit a working ranch.
Price for this trip is just
$2,169 pp (based on double oc-


cupancy, inside cabin). Pricing
for ocean view and third and
fourth fares may be obtained by
calling Marilyn.
This price includes motor-
coach to airport, airfare, trans-.
fers, seven-night cruise, all tax-
es and government fees. First
deposit of $200 is due Dec. 1.
A payment schedule will be set
up monthly. Balance due by
May 1, 2006. This cruise open
to everyone and all ages. If in-
terested, please contact Marilyn
at 674-4163.
CalCo Travel is a division of
Calhoun County Senior Citi-
zens Association Inc. All mon-
ies raised from this trip are used
as matching funds to provide
services to the Senior Citizens
of Calhoun County.


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OCTOBER 5,2005 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 13


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STOUTAMIRE INSURANCE INC.
16783 SE Pear St., Blountstown
Contact Bill Stoutamire
Phone 674-5974 Fax 674-8307.


Check with us at
Margie's Florist
Flowers for all occasions.
o Live and silk
arrangements.
All types of Gifts
Altha, Hwy. 71 South on
J.P. Peacock Road
S :. :


to, we --F b.-.200


Crowley, Hill towed in Feb.2006


Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. Hill of Bristol
are proud to announce the engagement of
their daughter, Ashley Kay Hill of Bristol to
Matthew Thomas Crowley of Gainesville:
Ashley is the granddaughter of Mr.
and Mrs. John E. Fairchild of Bristol-and
Louise Hill and the late Clinton A. Hill of
Bristol. She is a graduate of Liberty Coun-
ty High School and Tallahassee Commu-
nity College and is currently a student at
Florida State University.
The groom-to-be is the son of Susan S.
Crowley and the late Thomas J. Crowley
and the grandson of James P. Crowley and
the late Mary Crowley of Tallahassee and
Ida Skipper and the late Colonel F.H. Skip-
per of Gainesville. Matthew is a graduate
of Bucholz High in Gainesville and Tal-
lahassee Community College and is cur-
rently employed by the Florida Medical
Association in Tallahassee.
The wedding will take place Feb. 4,
2006 at Lake Mystic Baptist Church at
5:30 p.m. (ET). The reception will imme-
' diately' follow at the Veterains Memoriarid


Park Civic Center in Bristol.
No local invitations will be sent, however, all friends
and family are invited to attend.--,;:,, ',, -,
' The ciuple'vlilfr'eide in Tallahassee.


Calhoun Co. Extension Office,

4-H hosts Horse Lover's Day
The Calhoun County ..
Extension Office and 4-H
hosted Horse Lover's Day
for panhandle area Girls
Scouts on Oct. 1 at the
Skeet Davis Horse Arena. .
Eighty-four Girl Scouts
and their leaders from Tal- "
lahassee, Panama City,
Perry, and Calhoun Coun- Y
ty enjoyed learning about : --"
horses. The girls were
split in to groups, where
they learned the impor-
tance of safety around
horses, grooming, how -
to saddle a horse, what ::. .; .
foods horses like to eat, Above, Calhoun County Girl Scout Troop 579 collected
the need to stay healthy, hair brushes and bows for victims of Hurricane Katrina
horse's anatomy, and far- and Rita. The brushes and bows will be shipped to a Girl
rier work. Scout troop in Louisiana to be distributed to locals in
In addition to having a need; below left, Rachel, Missy, Claire, Brittany & Macy
fun day and meeting new from Calhoun County Girl Scouts Troop 579 pose with
friends, the girls earned a Two Eyes the horse; below right, Jessica Bowden from
Horse Fan badge. the CC Extension Office earns her honorary Girl Scout
a-. VMW : m1 mmma .--;,,r badge.


--,-I


I i ,


1

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Page 14 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL OCTOBER 5,2005


Brave women fuel new Bowden stories in When You Reach September
Three brave women from different West in addition to the variety of his writings On these pages are Southern scenes railroading heritage; Pensacola and West
Florida historical periods and two adven- which Bowden describes as stifff of a se- and people, adapted from PensacolaNews Florida vignettes of history. And a Letter
turous "worm grunters" are intriguing quel' to Always the Rivers Flow." Journal columns, profiles and features. to a Granddaughter encouraged to, "...let
characters in Altha-born Pensacola author Three strong women in different times These essays represent a "rehearsal, of the laughter of your successes rise above
Jesse Earle Bowden's four new fictional confront tragic experiences.in three stories, sorts," Bowmen says, for stories brought the whimpers of your failures."
stories brightening his expanded book, Bowden returns to fictional Ring Jaw for to fuller life in his novel Look and Tremble Editor emeritus of the Pensacola News
When You Reach September, published in "Ruby's Caf6," another dark episode of il- and story collection Embrace an Autum- Journal, Bowden was editor-in-chief and
The Florida Classic Edition by Father & licit love, jealousy and ironic death played nal Heart: changing seasons, memorable vice president of the newspaper for thirty-
Son Publishing Inc., Tallahassee. out by some characters first appearing in Christmas and Thanksgiving holidays, one years (1966-1997) in an active career
The stories, "Ruby's Caf6," "Six Bush- Look and Tremble. The drama in Ruby family gatherings, politics, vote-buying spanning fifty years in Pensacola. Since
els of Corn," "Atchafalaya" and "The Barefoot's caf6 is centered on a bizarre on election day, gentle art of worm 1983 he has been a faculty associate in
Worm Grunters" continue the Panhandle ice pick fight; other episodic echoes fueled harvesting (grunting fish bait), practical the Department of Communications at
heritage theme of Bowden's three previ- the West Florida novel and Embrace an craft of toymakers in a tiny town, country the University of West Florida, teaching
ous books, including his novel, Look and Autumnal Heart. boy town-team baseball, and a gallery of journalistic writing courses for twenty-
Tremble (Father & Son, 2000); a story "Six Bushels of Corn"recreates a,1910 unforgettable characters and other Small two years.
collection, Embrace an Autumnal Heart triple shotgun murder and the agonizing Stories from a Small Town. Author of eleven books, Bowden
(Father & Son, 2004), featuring five courtroom ordeal of a strong farm woman There are essa\ s on two Southern lit- wrote The Write Way, An Editor's Guide-
fictional stories; and Always the Rivers facing life in prison for murder.--then, erary icons, novelists William Faulkner book for Students of Writing, a textbook
Flow, Florida Classic Edition (Father & haunted by the gallows in ;a second trial. and Thomas Clayton Wolfe, drawn from used by students in his UWF classes.
Son, 2002). And the stories illustrated by It's a story of vengeance with horrific memorable visits to Oxford, Mississippi, The Florida State University journalism
the author add fifty-five four pages and a consequences for a determined widow's and Asheville, North Carolina; grace and graduate collected more than 1,200 ofhis
new foreword to the book of Bowden's family. charm of Old South Charleston and Sa- editorial cartoons and illustrations in the
Pensacola News Journal columns, features And in "Atchafalaya" the author chron- vannah; natural, wild beauty of Wakulla book, Drawing from An Editor's Life, and
and nonfiction stories, originally a 1990 icles the story of Atchafalaya (Chaff) Springs and Dead Lakes in West Florida co-edited The Emerald Coast Review, an
soft-cover publication sub-titled, "An Gregory and her first love, John Grace. and Okefenokee Swamp in Georgia; anthology publishedby the West Florida
Editor's West Florida Essays and Other Their tragedy centers on the storm-tossed profiles of legendary governor and orator Literary Federation, which installedhim in
Episodic Echoes." heritage, of the Jason Gregory House FullerWarren. Southern humorist/philoso-i its Hal of Honor. In 1985, UWFawarded
"We are pleased to select one of Earle during the eighty-seven years the fabled pher Brother Da\e Gardner. my Grandfa- Bowden ashonoraryDoctorate of Humane
Bowden's best-selling books expanded antebellum plantation manor withstood other Columbus Bennett Box\den-literally Letters.
with four more of his intriguing stories," floods, desecration and the agonies of Civil at war with the Twentieth century-and Apioneer ofPensacola's historicalpres-
Lance Coalson, president of Father & WaratOchessee Bluff on theApalachicola the memorable self-taught naturalist," ervation movement, Bowden has served as
Son, said. "Bowden has a giant talent for River. .: Hubert L. (Hub) Chason, "The Man from chairman of the Historic Pensacola Pres-
weaving unique West Florida stories; the Two Ring Jaw teenagers discover what Chipola River." And tributes to cartoon- ervation Board since 1982, and became
veteran Pensacola newspaper editor has they believe is a human: skull that fuels ist Milton Caniff. "Rembrandt of the president of West Florida Preservation
now completed four books centered on sto a mystery of a headless body found in Comics"; editorial writer and friend Paul Inc., when the state board's operations
ries about the rural Panhandle in his time Bearthick Swamp in "The Worm Grunt- Jasper and Pensacola's baseball icon from: were transferred to the University of West
of the 1930s and '40s, especially his na- ers." The story evolved out of Bowden's the Babe Ruth era, Russell (Rabbit ) Scar- Florida in 1991.
tive region between the Apalachicola and boyhood experience of harvesting fish ritt, and Pensacola's Hall of Fame pitcher Thepreservation program headquarters
Chipola rivers. Readers with be pleased bait as described in the essay "Grunting Don Sutton: the era-ending run of the is named the J. Earle Bowden Building in
tith the nrioinaliti of these ftnlr stories or Snoring" L&N passenger train Gulf Wind and other downtou n Pensacola.





OCTOBER 5, 2005 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 15


Tigers claim
try Teresa Eutrank.. Jcuinal Edi&or
"'We played good enlon-'!l on
defellt to Cge it done. but \\e
shouldn't lia\e \on." iks hatl
Blountto\ n i Tiger Coach Bobb\
Johns a\s ,.ibouit flrda\'s match
uLp \with Leon Hi1gh School.
The' Tigers \\on 12-7 \11 the
COlring look place in the lirslt half
ol the eaiile
eon lis \ery ".ood on de-
I'en.se" John, said. "The\ had
Ilille liri leltiI11111 ainid had1
;ood q|pced None of their kids
\\lI tI pla'.i11r 1 bot \ .iv's so ilte\v
'e lot i reshl r .n \\e 'ere.
lhe s.ll IDscpite Bloulnistown'l
t,;itLn:1 I'fInsi-l\ el. "Our delfense
steppedd up and played extra
\\I ', he said
"We' didn't block \\ell oi carry
outi oi takes \ er\ \\well." hi aid.
noting that the (ltea has a tew
things to \oi k on during practice
this week. Still, the Tigers gave
up only 189 yards and blew only
one assignment, which led to
Leon's only score of the night,
Johns said.
With 5:32 left in the first
quarter. Leon High scored on a
61 -yard touchdown n rtun followed
by a successful point-after-touch-
down to give them a 7-0 lead.
The Tigers responded three
minutes later. falling just a point
shy of tieing the score after a
failed extra-point kick attempt
followed a 66-vard touchdown
run by Chance Attaway.
The Tisers made their second.
and final sore of the night with
1:32 left in the second quarter. yard
Arsenio Ivorv scored on a three- sion I


ru
tr'


12-7 win over Leon High in Blountstown
Baker led the Tigers with 15 tack-
les, one sack and two tackles for
loss yardage. along with Corey
Silco, \% ho also made 15 tackles.
Atta\ .ai had 14 tackles, followed
.b Ih orN \\ ith 12 tackles, one sack
and t\ o tackles for loss.
it"'Those kids along with
Jamnie Willis who had 10 tackles
and one sack played extremely
well." Johns said. "This was
LEFT: A Tiger player goes Ryan'-, first game as a middle
sideways to trip up a pair of linebacker and he led the team in
Leon opponents. ABOVE: A tackles. Arseniohadanoutstand-
Blountstown fan cheers on the ing game on defense."
team. BELOW: T.C. Copeland The coach pointedoutthatthe
(#20) slips past a fallen Leon The coach pointed out that the
High player. Tigers had over 800 yards in two
TONY SHOEMAKE PHOTOS recent games, noting, "We're not
Sinept on offensive, we just played
poorly Friday night."
No\\ the team's attention is
turned toward their next chal-
lenge. and this will be a big one.
Not only are they playing a state-
ranked team that's 3-2, they have
a long. long bus ride Friday as
they head to Tampa to play Tampa
Berkley Prep.
U. "It's a six and a half hour
drive," Johns notes, but-the trip
will take at least ten hours, in-
cluding a stop in- Lake City to
practice and a stop later in Ocala
for dinner.
Despite their performance last
week, team morale is high, Johns
S said. "They know we've got to go
to play. We're going to have our
hands full when we go down there
(to Tampa), especially if we don't
in. The two-point conver- 12-7 and held their lead until the team scoring in the second half. move the ball any better than we
-y failed but the Tigers led end of the night. with neither Sophomore linebacker Ryan did against Leon."


Liberty County Bulldogs overcome Jay


by Richard Williams,
Journal sports writer
Despite a sloppy first half, the
Liberty County Bulldogs evened
their district record by defeating
the Jay Royals 25-7 in Bristol
Sept. 30.
The Bulldogs were stopped
on their first drive of the night
as they came up short on an at-
tempt to convert a fourth down
and three just inside the Royals'
side of midfield. The Bulldog
defense gave up one first down
before a penalty and a tackle for
a one-y rd loss had Jay facing a
long-, yardage situation. On third
and !idieen. Jay's coach called a
.e ep route, but the quarterback
read the defense wrong and threw
:.:nrt libe::. 'sHeath Fianaan
jumped in fr.n of the pass. made
h~i b ei -T7ri.nji-. -..-d : u'raced the
.-,. to the end zone to give
i rty. a -.. ic ad. Liberty's Clint
.-.i ':.;:,L "11 ;- .i r r r to push
the ibicfny I mad to --0.
I.: '. n '- ']1 il" :r. .?r
J.l-, Cuie iQ j ine tht: mis-
take was in .h .--fa fumble
on the L -L', J inme- that L..b-
ertye ocetdl
I" .. '"..--., ^- r -
ed with a seven-play ij' .c that
t. ':- !1 d F:" :rnv r ja -.h ; ...
to irnjplks move Jay ha- d irJ-.

''x- 1J .; -,.' :cu g ,


ABOVE: A Bulldog takes down an opponent. BELOW: A trio
of LCHS players surround Jay's quarterback.
RICHARD WILLIAMS PHOTOS
With just over two minutes mo\e the ball on their first posses-
remaining the Royals soon let sion of the second half, but Hill
Liberty know the game was not
o\erijust yet. The Royals needed
just four plays to find the end
zone and close the scoring gap
to 13-7.
Afrcr the game LCHS Head
Coach Randy Roland said the
first half might have been the
..pip_:-, half of football Liberty
had played this year.
Whatever was said at halftime.
did seem to motivate the Bull-
d Liberty's defense held Jay
on .heir firr series of the half. On : '
third and ten Jay tried to pass for -.,-.
,. 5: ,I,:,wn. A Liberi \ diefers ,.- : ^ .^-'' -' ";c- L" "
back hit the receiver as the ball ,
arrived and the blow caused the -' '' ..2
receiver to drop the ball for an -

.i* TheBcJ _:l!.'id2 were" unable to, _,. .-


boomed a punt that pinned Jay on
their own four-yard line. Jay lost
one yard on three plays and were
forced to punt.
The punt gave the Bulldogs the
ball on the Jay 35. After one first
down the Dawgs faced a second
and seventeen. The Bulldogs
went to the air and the pass was
completed for a third-quarter
touchdown. The Bulldogs came
up short on the two-point conver-
sion and held a 19-7 lead.
After Liberty missed a long
field goal attempt, Jay fell victim
to another turnover. This time
a second down fumble turned


royals 25-7
the ball over to Liberty. The
Bulldogs took advantage of the
turnover. Using a power rushing
attack Liberty moved downfield
as well as they took time off the
clock. The Dawgs ran through a
seam in the Royals' defense on
second and fifteen to score with
5:18 remaining in the game to
take a 25 to 7 lead. The two-point
attempt failed.
Liberty snuffed out Jay's at-
tempt to get back in the game and
then the LCHS offense ran outthe
clock to preserve the win.
LCHS travels to Port St. Joe
for a key district contest Oct. 7.






Page 16 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL OCTOBER 5,2005


These students were chosen as kids of character for August. Pictured, front row, left to right,
Michelle Aaron, Desiree Meiton; Megan Corbin, Alex Hill, Nolan Bean, John Ali, Samantha
Potter, Lyhanna Schiler, and Dustin Willis; back row, Brenden Dew, Abigail Ali, Seth Alderman,
Ethan Peacock, Jordan Hatcher, Noah White and Samantha Bramblett.


.: .



Protons, electrons, and neutrons, Oh my!


SEVENTH
GRADE SCIENCE
Protons, electrons,. and neu-
trons are topics that have been
on the minds of some of Mrs.
Peddie's seventh graders for
the past three, weeks. As a new
teacher in the field of Science
Mrs. Peddie was concerned
when she noticed some of her
students struggling to grasp the
structure of atoms. In an attempt
to reemphasize atomic structure
she came up with an efficient
and fun way for the children to-
learn. As an extra credit assign-
ment the students were to choose
an element of their choice and
construct a model of its atomic
structure. The projects ranged
from edible cookies, where can-
dy pieces represented the parts
of the atom, to elaborate models,
where styrofoam balls ranging
in color and size were connected
with toothpicks.
.Last Friday the students pre-
sented their projects in front
of the class and enjoyed eating
some of them during their edu-
cational enrichment. The stu-
dents were required to point out'
the protons, neutrons, and elec-
trons and give the number pres-
ent of each. The project was op-
tional and will count as an extra
test grade for those who chose to
build models. When asked what
she thought about the project-
Victoria Gann said, "It was a fun
way to learn about elements and
the structure of atoms." Their
enrichment also doubled as a
celebration for .Mrs. Peddie's
23rd birthday.
ALL-STATE AUDITIONS
by John Baumer
Altha School's music students
have been very busy these past
few months. The latest on their
list of accomplishments is when


Some seventh grade students show off their models for the
science project.


they will travel to Panama City to
audition for All-State choir. The
All-State Choir is a choir of only
the best musicians in the state of
Florida. Seniors Tiffany Betts,
John Baumer and Sarah Shelton,
and freshman Morgan Swilley
are the ones to be tested.
These students will be tested
over a two-day period on such
things as melodic dictation, in-
terval recognition, chord recog-


nation, as well as meter and key
identification.
The real test will come on the
second day of testing when the
students will take their all im-
portant sight reading test which
will count for one-half of their
final score.
These choral students have
been studying very hard for this
very difficult test. We all wish
them the best of luck!


SUBSCRIBE TODAY TO THE

CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL


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IName
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Marching band f
The Blountstown High School
marching band members are
selling Mars brand candies for UP
a fundraising activity, which be- 0
gan Sept. 23. ball-
Candy selections include stu- c
dent favorites Skittles. M & Ms, ord
and Snicker bars. The cost is $1 c
per item. Please see any band Juni
member if interested!
HOMECOMING Hon
Homecoming events are as at
schediged: 7:30
*Mlonda\. Oct. 10 Color
Day (seniors-red, juniors-black, Test
sophomores-white, and fresh- L
man-blue)
*Tuesday, Oct. 11 Dress Day;
Your Best Day; Coronatipn at Game
1:45 p.m. *Fri(
*Wednesday, Oct. 12- Pajama Your T
Day; Tiger's Growl at 1:30 p.m. is at 1
*Thursday, Oct. 13 Camo 6:30 p.


r -- -------- -
SCHOOL MENU
I Calhoun
County Schools
I Oct. 6- Oct. 12,2005
Lowfat or whole
milk served with all meals
THURSDAY
Lunch: Chicken nuggets, green
beans with potatoes, fresh fruit,
corn bread.

FRIDAY
Lunch: Pizzawith cheese, french-
fried potatoes, corn-on-the cob,
fresh fruit, cookie. .

MONDAY
Lunch: Ham sandwich, tater tots,
carrot stick with dressing, fruit cup,
peanut butter brownie.

-TUESDAY
Lunch: Chicken potpie with mixed
vegetables, whole-kernel corn,
fruit cup, cake square.

WEDNESDAY
Lunch: Hot dog pn bun, baked
beans, cole slaw, fruit cup.

All menus are subject to change
SPONSORED BY:
Calhoun-Liberty Journal
Bristol, Phone 643-3333
L -.- ---..


t-a Q
W Ow
A ll


S--11.---
I
I


State ZiD Phone


I I
Please enclose a check or money order for $18 and mail to:
I The Calhoun-Liberty Journal, P.O. Box 536, Bristol, FL 32321
L- -- -- --I


undraiser

BHS TIGERS
'COMING EVENTS
)ct. 7 --Varsity Foot-
-Tampa Berkley (A)
)ct. 11 Herff Jones
ers are due
)ct. 12 PSAT for
ors
)ct. 14 Varsity
becoming Football
lome vs. Bozeman,
)p.m.
)ct. 18 ACT Plan
t for sophomores


NHS versus Faculty

lay, Oct. 14 Show
Tiger Spirit Day; Parade
p.m.; Pregame begins at
m.


r- -
SCHOOL MENU
Liberty
County Schools
Oct. 6 Oct. 12,2005
A variety of fruits and
vegetables or fruit juice and a
choice of lowfat or whole milk
served with all meals.
THURSDAY
Breakfast Cinnamon apples, waf-
fles with syrup, sausage link.
SLunch: Hamburgersteak, ricewith
Brown gravy, collard greens, corn
bread, orange wedges.

FRIDAY
Breakfast Banana, ready-to-eat
cereal, peanut butter toast.
Lunch: Tacos/taco salad, lettuce,
tomato, cheese, whole-kernel
corn, peanut butter fudge.

MONDAY
Breakfast Chilled orange juice,
sausage patty, pancakes with
syrup.
ILunch: Cheeseburgers on buns,
potato rounds with catsup, Califor-
nia mixed vegetables, pineapple
cake or upside down.

TUESDAY
Breakfast Chilled pears, cheese
grits, banana nut muffin.
Lunch: Chili dogs, corn-on-the
cob, apple wedges, Jell-O.


WEDNESDAY
Breakfast Chilled peaches, ham
slice, biscuit with jelly.
Lunch: Pizza, tossed salad,
green beans, chocolate or vanilla
pudding.

All menus are subject to change
SPONSORED BY:
Laban Bontrager, DMD I
-. Bristol, Phone 643'-'54~Y'I
L_ --- -- _


I


:
Q~ :rs-
I
~.i;a ~"


~-":

r





OCTOBER 5, 2005 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 17


GRANT PEACOCK, INC.
Roofing & General Contracting


RGP


Garland Revell (850)643-6393
www.gpiroofing.com
.... .. e..=:.:a.. .. ... ..


Certified Roofing Contractor LIC # CCC055592
Certified Building Contractor LIC # CBC054590
2838 Industrial Plaza Dr. in Tallahassee


Clay O'Neal's 4i

AND CLEARING N
Tractor work Fencing Bush hogging
Discing Leveling Land clearing
Rootraking Road Building Fish Ponds
Field Fence or Barbed Wire


Clay O'Neal
4433 NW County Road 274
Altha, Fl 32421


(850) 762-9402
Cell (850) 832-5055


Call D] Shamrock I1
Professional Mobile DJ Service for the best
quote on your party, wedding or gathering!
Now is the time to reserve yourChristmas Party date.
LET ME HELP YOU MAKE YOUR NEXT PARTY SUCCESS!
f Homecoming Dance
presented b m>.j. shamnrocle
S'On Fri., Oct. 14 from 9 p.m. until
( Jmidnight at W.T. Neal Civic Center in
SBlountstown. Ages 15-19 permitted
ID required for admittenrice.
S Come on out after the
\ game and celebrate with us. Phone
Sl Cost $6 Security Provided 674-9127


QUINCY FARMIS
ORGANIC PRODUCTS


1tlo~u44g~!


Now with a full line of compost-based soil products
Delivered in 8 and 16 cubic yard loads,
*Topsoil Lite lighter version of Top Soil Plus
* Lawn Mix top-dress your lawns ;
*Topsoil Plus safe, all-purpose mix ... .
* Plant Mix basic potting soil
* Finished Compost- premium
grade,stable compost


W.R. Tolar holds Family Reading Night


W.R. Tolar held
its Kick-off for N
Family Read-
ing Night on i-1 --.
Oct. 3. Over
95 parents and : I l
students were '.
in attendance
for the night's :
activities. Par-
ents were invit-
ed to come out
and read with
their- children.
Students had
the opportu-
nity to earn AR
points towards
reaching their
nine-weekgoal.
Hotdogs, chips,
and drinks were provided by W.R. Tolar's PTO.
Stacy Layne's class graciously prepared cup-
cakes for dessert. Family Reading Night will
be held every Monday night from 5:30- 7:30
on regularly scheduled school days. Laurie


,'; %r-- .. .....:

i '~~~ '"i't.-""
.*1


: .. h, -
r -- -: <"'


.: . ,.
/- ; s a w er...
' ...


~-
Brandon and Brenda Green are in charge of
this year's Family Reading Night Program
at W.R. Tolar. If you have any questions or
would like to volunteer, please contact one of
them at 643-2426 Ext. 223 or 134.


VMS sponsors pizza party for

students collecting donations


W.R. Tolar K-8 School in
Bristol raised $1,005.04 to be
given to the American Red Cross
and $20 to be given to Sal\ anon
Army for the victims affected by
Hurricane Katrina.
Gayle Ferguson, a teacher at
W.R. Tolar School, contacted
VMS Inc. to ask if they would
sponsor a pizza party for the class
who raised the-most money for
the:Hurricane Katrina victims.
VMS was delighted to sponsor
the pizza party.for such a worthy
cause.
I had the privilege to take a
$200 check from VMS Inc. to
present to Ms. Ferguson for W.R.
Tolar School and the pizza party
for this worthy cause.
While at the school, I also had
the pleasure of watching Ms.
Ferguson as she was ending one of
her classes and was very impressed


with 'her professionalism and
her demeanor in. handling the
classes she had. I learned that
Ms. Ferguson is in her 34th year
of teaching. She has a glow and a
positive response about teaching.
When asked if she enjoyed her.
job, she replied, "I love it"..
, This project came about when
other members of the faculty
contacted her to see ifthe school
was going to do anything for
the victims. At that point, she
pursued the project. It is evident
from the amount collected that the
children, parents and community
were all'behind this well-worth
project.
Ms. Ferguson also shared that
they had a third grader enrolled'
whose family was affected by
Katrina in Louisiana and will be
leaving in a couple of weeks to go.
back to pick up pieces and start


over. Askd how the local children
responded to the new, child,
knowing her circumstances, she
replied, "They welcomed her
and treated her as if she belonged
here."
So it was the great pleasure
VMS Inc. could support a local
school with a teacher like Ms.
Ferguson who went beyond her
duties to involve all the children
in setting an example in helping
our neighbors.
VMS Inc. salutes W.R. Tolar
students, faculty, parents and
especially Ms. Gayle Ferguson
for a job well done.
Congratulations to Sherrie
Flowers'first grade students for
collecting the most money.

Annette Phillips
Outreach Community
Coordinator, VMS Inc.


Beta induction planned Friday, Oct.


SBETA--Betabuttons are for I LCHS DAWGS -
rt- s sale for $2 each. Pick from our CALENDAR OF EVENTS
insertt designs or have a custom button
ib rt Po made. Order forms are in the Volleyball
B a I LCHS office. *Oct. 11 Volleyball
SB a n Pole In Beta Induction will be Oct. 7 game.away against Altha
ATTENTION SENIORS a .m
Hwy. 12, Bristol 643-5995 (1/2 mile south of the red light) Drape/formal seniorpictures at 6 pm.ol News
-'Drapeftrinal senior pictures, School News
TOP TOP TOP FACTORY for the newspaper graduation sec- Oct. 6 End of 1st Nine
GRADE GRADE GRADE SECONDS tioh need to be turned in to Ms. We ; st per exam
7 Posts 8' Posts 6'6" Posts 8' Corners Weeks; 1st period exams
Top Size Top Size Top Size under 3" Austin by Nov. 10 to be included Oct.7 Early release
3-4" 2-3", 3-4" 2-2.5" 3-4" in the special section. I
4-:1 '-5" '^5." 'Iday; 2nd period exam
4-5" 4-5" 2-5.3" 4-5" Senior Ads for the yearbook day2nd period exam
5-6" 5-6" 3-3.5" 5-6" Football
5-6" 5-6" 3-3.5" 5-6" are now on sale. Call Ms. AustinI Footbal
6-7" 3.5-4" 6-7" Oct.7 Football ame
6-7" 3.5-4" 6-7- at 643-2241, ext. 253 for size and ct7 g
SPECIALTY 8"+ -"+ 8"+ 7 prices of ads. All ads need to be away against Port Stoe
POSTS FACTORYSECO reserved with a deposit of one- at 7:30 p.m.
S 1/4 rounds items FACTORY SECONDS I -- J
1/2 rounds subject to '6" Posts, Top Size, under 2 fourth by Nov. 23.
FlatFace availability 2-3" 3-4" 5". 4 5 All Seniors going on the Se- $80 deposit to Mrs. Fowler by the
S2.e to nc rpos to meetyou rie'tri MJST pay tUeir'h6nthly' ist day bf eadh'mohth.
I #. 9 tK t P 1 t ) tt } 5 t t 1 1 it.o t 1 e a t


DRAMA The Liberty
County High School Drama and
Chorus Classes will be present-*
ing "A Christmas Carol" Friday,
Dec. 2 at the LCHS auditorium
at 7 p.m.
Advance tickets will be avail-
able at the LCHS front office for
$5 each.
Any business interested in
advertising in the production
program should contact Mandie
Fowler at 643-2241 by Oct.
31.
MATH SKILLS Keep
notes as you work through each
chapter to help you organize your
thinking and to make it easier to
review the material when you
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Page 18 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL OCTOBER 5, 2005





'ial ---- '; Bradley Ammons, Chad Edge


graduate from
Army National Guards Pfc.
Bradley S. Ammons and Chad
Edge have graduated from ba-
sic military training at Fort
Benning, Columbus, Ga., un-
der the. Split Option Training
Program.
The-program allows high
school students belt\ een their
junior and senior year to at-
tend and complete the Army
National Guard or Reserve six-
week basic training program
during the summer of their ju-
nior year.
During basic training, the
recruit receives instruction in
drill and ceremonies, weapons,
map reading, tactics, military
coutltes), military) justice, phys-
ical fitness. first aid, and Army


basic training
history, values and tradition.
The students attend weekend
drills during the senior year of
high school until graduation.
After graduating from high
school, the recruit serves as a
member of the national guard
orreserve and attends advanced
indi\ iduial training (AIT) to ac-
quire job skills necessary in a
military career specialty
Bradley Ammons is the son
of Martha Terry of Bristol and
brother of April Ammons of
Blounstoi\\n.
Chad Edge is the son of
George and Sabrina Edge of
S.W. Seventh Ave. ini Bristol.
They are students at Lib-
erty County High School in
Bristol.


Terry Segers of Lake Mystic is shown at the knife assembly machine, where he puts the
pieces back together after sharpening the blades that grind up the logs that make GP's
nriented stranld hard jinsi-l'Mv -NF IRA'KC P-lnTOn


turned into strands. dried and
sprayed %ith resin before being_
la ered Int-. ,. -s I.nd b..o dedCI
with heat to create panel. of ori-


ented strand board.
After years of frying chick-
en. first at his o\ n place in
Blountsto% n and then later at
KFC. Terry Segers of Lake M s-
tic is w working at the GP plant as
a knife grinder. He sharpens the
24-inch blades that are used to
grind up. logs.
SSegers, who served in the Air
Force and worked as a cargo
airline pilot in the 1970s and
early 1980s, is enjoying his latest
career change. "This company's
the best thing that ever happened
for Liberty County," he says.
Segers, who is 62, says he
hopes to continue working at least
another three years. He got the.
position after applying at a job
fair and then went to Arkansas
for training before starting his job
in February.
"I've done a lot and I've seen
a lot," he say s. "What the heck...
I've got a few more years to


work, why not work right here
at home?"
He sa~s the GP plant is "a
.very sophisticated operation."
adding. "TIhe\ '\e ot it dov n to
a science."
The plant takes in 150 truck-
load -of loh> d a da. hich is sup-
plied by 12 logging crews half
of which are based in'Liberty
County.
Many of those working at
the plant today are performing
high\ -automated jobs they could
not have imagined a couple of
years ago. "I think they're just,
proud to have a safe place to work
v\ ith ood benefits." said one GP
manager, noting that many of
their employees never previously
had the medical and basic retire-
ment benefits the company offers.
The plant has an annual payroll of


$2.4 million.
The Georgia-Pacific plant
\ill hec,'me the co.unt'i lar est
taxpa er this \ear and is expected
to. pay o\er $705.714 in ta\es.
according to figures from the Lib-
erty County Property Appraiser's
Office.
Of that total. $315.940.79 \ ill
go to the county [ while the school
system \\ill get $386.627.70.
The Northw est Florida Water
Management District \till receive
$3,145.87.
That's seven times the total
due from the next highest tax-
paying business- St. Joe Land
and Development which will
pa) $110,090 in taxes this year.
North Florida Lumber pays
approximately $75,501 in taxes
each year, followed by Sunshine
State Cypress \w ith $67,899 and
Apalachee Pole Company with
$12,968.
Neal Land and Timber contrib-
utes $11,758 each year, followed
by The Nature Conservancy,
which adds about $8,861 in taxes
annually for Liberty County.


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OCTOBER 5,2005 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 19.


An incredible ingredient for cleaner water: Manure


by Sandy Miller Hays,
-Agricultural Research Service
If you've been reading this
column for any length of time, it
will come as no surprise to you
that I love to eat. And, being the
self-sufficient type, I also love
to cook-and one of the things
I love to cook is chicken.
There's so much you can do
with chicken, from homey pot
pies all the way up to Chicken
Cordon Bleu. Crispy wings,
juicy thighs, plump breasts: A
chicken's usefulness approach-
es that of the pig, of which it's
been said that you can "use ev-
erything except the squeal."
Now, thanks to scientists at
the Agricultural Research Ser-
vice, chickens are becoming
even more useful because of
a "byproduct" that once was
thought suitable only for fertil-
izer: manure. The ARS scien-
tists have found a way to turn
ordinary poultry manure into


-. [EvL /f)od v's.


granules and powders that can
mop up pollutants in water.
The scientists heat the chick-
en manure in an atmosphere,
that's stripped of oxygen (this
works not only for the manure
itself, but also for feathers and
bedding material). This causes
the poultry litter to take on new
qualities, such as a large surface
area and high porosity. Even
more surprising, the charred
material has what's called
"chemical magnetism," which
means it's ideal for attracting
hard-to-capture metals, such as
copper, cadmium and zinc, in
polluted waters.
According to the scientists,
poultry char is perfectly suited
for use in wastewater treatment


systems, for scavenging metals
discharged by industrial activi-
ties, and for adsorbing excess
fertilizer nutrients from farms.
That's actually a neat twist on
an old problem. As mentioned
above, poultry manure's role in
life until no%% has been mostly
as fertilizer on farm fields; it's
typically sold for $3 to $10 per
ton as fertilizer.
But if the fields become over-
loaded with the manure, nitro-
gen and phosphorus in the waste
can run off into nearby rivers,
streams and groundwater sup-
plies. That excess phosphorus
can cause algal blooms that ul-
timately steal precious oxygen
from fish and other aquatic or-
ganisms, causing them to die.


It seems almost "poetic justice"
that now poultry litter can play a
role in helping clean up water!
TheARS scientists have been
looking at agricultural waste
materials such as soybean hulls
and nut.shells for years as a
source of activated carbons to
clean up the environment. But
poultry litter is a new area of
exploration.
And it's not like we're go-
ing to run out of this particular
ingredient anytime soon. Food
animals in this country produce
about 350 billion pounds of ma-
nure each year.
In the ARS scientists' one-
step charring process, the
poultry litter is heated to about
1,300 degrees Fahrenheit. At


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that point, some of the inorgan-
ic molecules originally found
in the litter can permanently at-
tach themselves to the carbon's
lattice-like structure.
In poultry char, these mol-
ecules give the .material a nega-
tive charge, making it an ideal
magnet for attracting positively
charged ions from metals like
copper, zinc and cadmium.
Next the scientists want to find
out whether the char can "grab"
other positively charged mole-
cules, such as lead and mercury,
which are considered priority
pollutants.
This '"magnetism" surprised
the scientists, because typical
steam-activated plant-based car-
bons don't have the kind of sur-
face chemistry that lends itself to
interactions between oppositely
charged molecules-- which
means they adsorb few, if any,
metals from water. The scientists
think the secret is phosphorus,
which shows up in the manure
because it's fed to chickens and
turkey\ s as a dietaN. supplement.
So far, the scientists .have
turned poultry litter into pow-
'ders. granules arid pellets to suit
different filtering needs. Waste-
water treatment plants might
use a variety of methods to treat
waste water. For example, pow-
ders from poultry char might be
used in large volumes of metal-
laden water to cling to dissolved
metallic ions, while e columns
containing larger pellets. might
be used where water flow and
drainage are important.
There's good news for farm-
ers,. too: The scientists .say
pii1iltr. char's ability to adsorb
those hard-to-grab metals could.
translate to $1 to $2 per pound
of manure for farmers-a defi-
nite improvement over $3 to
$10 per ton for the manure as
fertilizer.
I'd call this a classic case of
"taking the lemons life gives
you, and making lemonade"!





Page 20 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL OCTOBER, 2005


Mufflers and more to be considered for airboats


The Florida Fish and Wild-
life Conservation Commission
(FWC) directed staff to draft -a
new policy that would require
airboats to be equipped with
mufflers. According to FWC's
Maj. Jim Brown, flex pipe alone
no longer is acceptable to help'
reduce sound levels. The final
hearing on the policy will be
at the Commission's Nov. 30
Dec. 2 meeting in Key Largo.
Commissioners also want
staff to hold an additional work-
shop with stakeholders to dis-
cuss implementing a muffler
policy, written' code of ethics'
and guidelines for 'courteous
airboat operation. The FWC al-
ready has installed mufflers on-
all of its airboats and established
guidelines for courteous airboat
operation. '
The decision to require muf-.
flers on airboats came, after a
presentation today b. Dr. Stew-
art Glegg, a researcher at Florida
Atlantic Unilersity Engineer-
'ing Department, whose group
researched airboat sound and
produced a report on its find-
ings for the FWC. Other experts
have reviewed the report, titled.
S "Measurement and Character-
ization of Sound Generated by
Airboats," to ensure the study
can stand up to public scrutiny
. : aJand provide fully credible. pb-


jective and science-based solu-
tions aimed at reducing airboat
sound levels.
Currently, under Florida Stat-
ute 327.65, all vessels must be
muffled effectively in a reason-
able manner. The law also pro-
vides additional language that
allows individual counties to re-
strict vessel sound to 90 decibels
at 50 feet, but that is not a state-
wide requirement.
Both the propeller and the
engine contribute to the sound
airboats produce. At low revolu-
tions per minute (rpmi the engine
produces the most sound, but at
higher rpms the loudest sounds
from the propeller.
This reportsuggests that muf-
flers do reduce airboat sound
levels at moderate' operating
speeds, but even muffled boats
exceed 90 decibels at maximum
throttle. Ho\\ e\er. airboat opera-
tors generally don't run at maxi-
mum throttle for long periods.
Researchers examined sound
levels, produced from differ-
ent styles of mufflers, including
both e\haust and intake manifold
mufflers, and differing propeller
designs, operating speeds, and
distances from an observer. They
believe that each of these com-
ponents, used together, could
provide the needed "incremental
improvements" to reduce airboat-


Squirrels not going nuts;

parasite causes irritation
E% en year about this time people call the Florida Fish and Wild-
Slife Conservation Commission (FWVC), alarmed about squirrels that
seem to be going crazy. They report that the\ '\e seen squirrels roll-
ing on the ground. jumping in the air and generally acting as if some-
thing was disturbing them.
But don't \orrm. the 're not crazy. They're likelN hosting a para-
site that causes them some temporary discomfort but generally is
-not fatal. .
"'.. "Wheln the people call. they describe the squirrels'unusual antics.
as well as large lumps that appear to be cancerous tumors on the
Squirrels' bodies," said Mark Asleson, an FWC wildlife biologist.
"The lumps are. in fact, subcutaneous warbles caused by the larvae
of flies commonly known as bot flies."
In the southeast United States, gray squirrels and other rodents.
and rabbits, are common hosts to these larvae. What happens is that
-the adult female flies deposit eggs in the immediate vicinity of the
hosts'nests or dens where the host comes into contact with the eggs.
The eggs hatch when exposed to sudden increases in temperature or
moisture, such as what occurs when the animal grooms itself.
The larvae then enter the mouth, nose or other body opening and
migrate to a location just beneath the skin where they cut a little
hole so they can breathe and continue to develop. This development
takes from three to seven weeks, depending upon the species of fly
and host, and causes itchy swellings that range from half an inch to
one inch in diameter.
After the larvae emerge from the skin, the lesions: may become
infected, but they normally heal w\ without complication..
"In gray squirrels. lar\ae are most abundant in late summer and
fall, which is why people are seeing the lumps right now.'" Asleson
said. "Most of the squirrels will suffer no permanent effects from
the parasite, how ever a few may occasionally become debilitated by
heavy infestations.".
Therr'is no threat to the safety of pets or humans from the hosts or'
their lar\ ae. The presence of the larvae. ho\w e\ er. often causes hunt-
ers to discard squirrels w ith warbles. This is an unfortunate \aste of
the resource since the edibility of the squirrel meat general is unaf-
fected because the lesions are restricted to the skin. In most areas.
including Florida. the small-game hunting season Ithis %ear No\. 12
March 5) occurs after the larvae ha\e emerged from the hosts.
"The best thing to do if you see squirrels exhibiting these charac-
teristics is simply fo lea\e them alone and let nature take its course.
Eventually the.larvae' w ill emerge and the squirrels w ill continue to
.go about the business of being squirrels." Asleson said.


r0----


OUT

DOORS

News from The
Florida Fish
and Wildlife
Conservation
Commission .


sound lelees significantd.
Historically,. most law en-
forcement agencies ha\e ac-
cepted "'lex pipe" (flexible tub-
Ing that di erns engine exhaust dt
behind the boat as a reasonable.
de' ice for muffling sound. It-
doesn't muffle as effecti\el as a
traditional muffler, but 20 years
ago, nobody really complained
since ai rboats generally: ran in
remote areas.
"However.. times have
changed, and the sound of air-
boats on lakes, riders and w'et-
lands has become a1 conrro\er-
sial subject in Florida in recent


years," Brown said. "Increased
development in these areas, in
part, has resulted in increased
sound complaints from hom-
eowners and outdoor enthusi-
asts."
In 2003, the Florida LeilMa-
ture con-idered a bill to restrict
airboat sound levels statewide
to 90 decibels at 50 feet. At the
time, the Senate Natural Re-.
sources Committee an-ended
the bill and proposed to give the
FWC rulemaking authorir~ to
adopt a uniform municipal code-
to resolve the airboat sound is--
sue.
However, instead of the bill
moving forward, legislators
asked the FWC to host public
workshops to get citizens feed-"
back about airboat sound and
work out a non-regulators solu-
tion to the problem. The agency
hosted three such -w workshops in
September -2003, and about 300
people attended and provided .
comments.
SAlthough the meetings failed-
to produce any consensus on:
whether Florida needs new air-


boat sound laws, two proactive
theme, emerged: airboats should
have effective mufflers, and air
boaters should follow a code of
ethics.
A subcommittee of the state's
Boating Advisory Council a
group appointed by the governor
to advise the FWC and the Flor--
ida Department of Commnunirt
Affairs on boating and water-
\\a -related issues -- developed
the Airboater Code of Ethics.
The council is representative of
the boating public, and the sub-
committee included indi iduali
from airboat manufacturers, per-
sonal\ watercraft industry, sports-
men groups, the boating public.
and an affected waterfront prop-
erty resident.
.The,FFWC is developing afi
outreach campaign to encour-
age airboaters to applk new and
improved technology for qui-
eling airboats. The campaign
also w ill encourage changes in.
airboater attitudes and operating
procedures to be sensiti\ e to oth-
ers who live around or share the
waterways.


FWC seeks more feedback on

Florida's wildlife legacy initiative


The Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission in-
ites further public comment on
the final submission of Florida's
first comprehensive \wildlife
strategy, an action plan for con-
senr ing all of the state's fish
and wildlife and natural places'.
The 500-plus page document, a
component of Florida's Wildlife
Legacy Initiati e. is part of one of
the largest conser\ action planning
efforts in the nation. Each state
has dev eloped a proactive action
plan to conserve \ wildlife before
the\ become more rare and more
cost\ to protect.
Florida's action plan can help
us fulfill our responsibilities to
conserve wildlife and the places
the\ li\ e. The health of wildlifee
is often an earl indicator of
disease and pollution that affects
us all. Florida's action plan will
conserve \-ildlife and natural.
places to the benefit of our health
and enjoy ment. and for future
generations.:
The action plan is a living
document. The FWC is com-
mitted to re\ ie\ ing and revising
the plan: with continued public,
input. The FWC is planning a
\ ri'kshop or series of\ workshops
early in the new\ year and through
spring 2006. \\ith a conference
in the falL
"The strategy\ is a work in
progress that \ ill continually be
updated. re% ised and improved
based on the input of all those
interested in wildlife conser\a-
tion," said Thomas Eason. leader
of F\C's Species Conservation
Planning Section. "Working
together, Floridians are shaping
a future filled with wonderful
\ wildlife resources and pro\ hiding
Sfor the enjoyment, recreation and' .
li eliho lihbl of its residents and'.


visitors "
.'The public review process is
open Sept. 16- Dec. 16. Florid-
ians can provide comments and:
suggestions on the FWC's Web
site www.MyFWC.com/wild-
lifelegacy.
Florida's Wildlife Legacy
Initiative is the FWC's long-


Am




v -I i
S ,l I : In.E 7 -


FORECASTS?


term approach to secure federal
funding, leverage that funding.
and implement and re\ise the
conservation strategy. The suc-
cess of the initiative depends on
partnerships throughout. Its coal
is to avert future declines of nac-
ti\e wildlife with a goal to keep
common species common. .


Want to know
where to get Ihis
information?
,.- I I1.. L,

?;re. j. a ciick-or caii'oa ,' *

FIRSTGO.'go ,
I 00 i F | C I rl FN


RADIO FOOTBALL

ON WYBT AND WPHK
Listen to football on WYBTand WPHK. This week..

Listen to Jim Kearce and Steven Seay's
play by play of the Blountstown High.
School Tigers vs. Tampa Berkley
in Tampa. Air time at 8 p.m. (CT)
on K102.7 on Friday, Oct. 7.

Hear Ray McCoy, Michael Wahlquist and Jay Taylor with
all the Liberty County High School game
action. The Liberty County Bulldogs vs. I
Port St. Joe, away. The game airs Saturday A .
morning immediately following the.
: .: ,Swap Shop at 10 a.m.(ET) on .
Y-1000 and K102.7(CT)_.

The Florida Gators play Mississippi State
: 's in the swamp.
Airtime is Saturday at 11 a.m. (CT)
i"-..-- on K102.7 and Y-1000.
^ .- .- -. .' -* .- ** / '* "





OCTOBER 5,2005 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 21


Expiring Conservation Reserve Program contracts can


extend, re-enroll to improve water quality, wildlife habitat


GAINESVILLE Farmers
and ranchers can now re-enroll
or extend their Conservation
Reserve Program (CRP) con-
tracts expiring in 2007 through
2010, announced Kevin Kelley,
State Executive Director for
USDA's Farm Service Agency
(FSA). This effort fulfills the
commitment President Bush
made last year to underscore the
Administration's commitment
to improving the environment
and protecting the nation's wild-
life habitat, water and natural
resources.
"We're offering farmers and
ranchers re-enrollments and con-
tract extensions so they can take
full advantage of the environ-
mental benefits of this program,"
said Kelley. "Re-enrolling and
extending these contracts is part


of the President's plan to fully
use the nearly 40 million acres
of CRP to improve water quality
as well as wildlife habitat."
In order to determine who
might be able to re-enroll or
extend their CRP contract,
USDA's Farm Service Agency
(FSA) will use the Environmen-
tal Benefits Index (EBI) that was
in place when the contracts were
first written. The EBI is a mea-
suring system that assigns point
scores to the contracts and then
nationally ranks all CRP land
enrollment offers.
Several environmental out-
comes factor into EBI point
scores such as improving wild-
life habitat, water quality, and
air quality and. reducing soil
erosion.
The EBI scores are based


upon a 100 percentile that is
divided into five ranking tiers.
In the first tier, CRP producers
ranking in the top 20 percent of
the EBI can re-enroll their land
in new contracts and farmers
and ranchers with wetlands in
this ranking can receive contract
terms of 10- to 15- years.
CRP producers ranking with-
in the second tier, between the
61-80 percent, can extend their
contracts for five years. Farm-
ers and ranchers ranking within
the third tier, 41-60 percent,
can extend their CRP contracts
by four years. Those ranking in
the fourth tier, between 21-40


percent, can receive 3-year ex-
tensions. And those contracts
ranking in the fifth tier of the 20
percent of CRP producers can
extend their contracts by two
years.
As a result of this land con-
servation program, many wide-
spread environmental benefits
have evolved. For example,
Reductions in soil erosion
are reaching more than 450 mil-
lion tons per year, thereby in-
creasing air quality due to less
airborne contamination.
Sediment and nutrient run-
off into rivers and streams is im-
proving.
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife
Service estimates that CRP is
increasing duck populations by
more than two million per year.
Ring-necked pheasant popula-
tions in Minnesota, North Da-
kota, South Dakota and Ohio are
rising by 200 percent.
CRP is increasing grass-
hopper sparrow, lark bunting
and eastern meadowlark popu-
lations.
The. long-absent prairie
chickens in Texas are reappear-
ing.
CRP is helping Columbian
sharp-tailed grouse recover.
New bird habitats in the
Northern Great Plains are
emerging.
Western state populations of
big game elk, mule deer, white-


tailed deer and pronghorn ante-
lope are increasing.
In spring 2006, FSA will write
to CRP producers with contracts
expiring Sept. 30, 2007, to dis-
cuss whether those contracts are
eligible for re-enrollment or ex-
tension. Farmers and ranchers
will confirm their contract inter-
ests at that point and a compli-
ance check will be necessary.
Fifteen-year contracts ex-
piring Sept. 30, 2007,. are not
eligible for re-enrollment or
extension. During the next sev-
eral months FSA will update the
CRP rental rates to better reflect
local market rates for cropland
on new contract re-enrollments
and will review cropland en-
rollment limits on a county-by-
county basis.
CRP is a voluntary program
for agricultural producers, which
help them protect environmen-
tally sensitive land. Producers
enrolling in CRP plant long-
term, resource conservation
covers with USDA providing
rental payments and cost-share
assistance.
A list of CRP acres by state
with contracts expiring in 2007-
2010 can be found at http://www.
fsa.usda.gov/dafp/cepd/crp.htm.
For more information on the
CRP program, contact your lo-
cal FSA office or visit the FSA
Web site at http://\ \\ .fsa.u.da.
gov.


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The B,, '. Fi,, ,i,..: ;,,.: or Treasury Checking accounts. Substantial penalty for early withdrawal.
iF .i ,, ,i-,. T i : i. i-,, i h : rr,, ,m b Ji r: ,: ,I.:. ,ri, ..a .. i ; "I i*.... .. n. r, I. ,,-c .,, ,,.,l ,. :.,
_i-.l1,,., r SI S.i~l.'j.i j d u,.. "v .-'[ ...I_ ,L,, ., t.Lr .c,:i:, w.i i "*". : -"." i .r, L dances between $5,000 $24,999; 0.15%
APYon balancesless than $5 ."" i .j i r..iir, q .: ,,,i I lI ., I 11 ,,. .1 ... ... .,1 .. .I, ,I t at any time without notice.
Treasury Checking accounts are limited to individuals and non-profit entities.


USDA issues final 2004 crop peanut,

upland cotton counter-cyclical payments
GAINESVILLE Peanut and upland cotton farmers will soon
be receiving 2004-crop counter-cyclical payments of $81 per short
ton for peanuts and 13.73-cents-per-pound for upland cotton, an-
nounced Kevin Kelley, State Executive Director for USDA's Farm
Service Agency (FSA)..
Required by the 2002 Farm Bill, final counter-cyclical program
(CCP) payments for peanuts and upland cotton are made after the
end of the marketing year. The 2002 Farm Bill provides for two
partial 2004-crop CCP payments, one in October 2004 and one in
February 2005. The final weighted average marketing year price for
2004-crop peanuts, which was announced on Aug. 31, 2005, is $378
per short ton, $23 higher than the $355 loan rate.
The payment rate for upland cotton is at its maximum level due to
low market prices that have averaged well below the 52-cents-per-
pound loan rate during the marketing year. Because of these low
prices, USDA is able to determine the final counter-cyclical rate at
this time.
Producers who accepted the first and second partial CCP payments
for 2004-crop peanuts received $41.30 per ton and are due an addi-
tional $39.70 per ton. Producers who accepted the first and second
partial CCP payments for 2004-crop upland cotton received 9.61-
cents-per-pound and are due an additional 4.12-cents-per-pound.
The counter-cyclical payment rate is the amount by which the
"target price" of each commodity exceeds its effective price. The ef-
fective price equals the direct payment rate plus the higher of: (1) the
national average market price received by producers during the mar-
keting year, or (2) the national average loan rate for the commodity.
The counter-cyclical payment equals the counter-cyclical payment
rate multiplied by.85 percent of the farm's base acreage multiplied
by the farm's counter-cyclical payment yield for each crop. Target
prices are mandated in the 2002 Farm Bill.
The final 2004 counter-cyclical payment rate for barley is 15-
cents-per-bushel. Those payments were made during July. Produc-
ers will not receive 2004-crop counter-cyclical payments for wheat,
oats and other oilseeds because their 2004 effective prices equal or
exceed their respective "target prices."
For more information on the direct and counter-cyclical payment
a' pirsigin nS, pri'rJic :s c n1 'hI pnt a\ taOi.i lcaltUSd. A t e;ieLi rte'(r oF-.'(
*/ ^j*visit USDA onii' j


OUR DEPOSIT RATES

JUST GOT



BIGGER. A






Page 22 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL OCTOBER 5,2005


Q: What's the difference be-
tween a phytochemical and an
antioxidant?
A: These two categories of
naturally occurring substances
in food overlap somewhat, but
there are differences. While phy-
tochemicals are found in plant
foods such as vegetables, fruits,
grains, beans, nuts and seeds,
antioxidants can be in both plant


-- IS


and animal foods. Antioxidants,
which are vitamins, minerals,
or phytochemicals, help prevent
damage to cells from highly reac-
tive, unstable molecules, known
as "free radicals." Although most-


CHARLES ARRANT
BLOUNTSTOWN Charles Arrant, 81, passed
away Monday, Sept. 26, 2005 in Blountstown. He
was born in Leona and had lived in Blountstown
since 1973. He was a logger and was of the Holi-
ness faith. He was also an avid fisherman and out-
doorsman.
He was preceded in death by his brothers, Dan-
iel Arrant and Grady Arrant and a sister, Auney Ar-
rant.
Survivors include his wife, Mary Arrant of
Blountstown; one son, William Arrant of DeFu-
niak Springs; three daughters, Julie Arrant, Reba
Mosher, and Rebecca Mosher- and her husband,
Ricky, all of Blountstown; one brother, J.B. Arrant
and his wife, Nancy of Blountstown; a sister-in-
law, Polly Arrant; nine grandchildren and seven
great-grandchildren.
Services were held Thursday, Sept. 29, 2005
from Adams Funeral Home Chapel in Blountstown
with Rev. Horace Huggins officiating. Interment
followed in Wood Cemetery near Blountstown.
Adams Funeral Home was in charge of the ar-
rangements.

WHAT BETTER TRIBUTE
CAN THERE BE?
Honor your loved ones by making their memory
partof our best efforts to defeat cancer For
more info., contact the American Cancer Society.
EAST GADSDEN UNIT
P.O. Box 563, Quincy, FL 32353


phytochemicals that have been
discovered work as antioxidants
to promote good health, many of
them serve additional functions.
Some can increase the tendency
of cancer cells to self-destruct.


WILLIAM LEON NEAL
CLARKSVILLE William Leon Neal, 59,
passed away Sept. 30, 2005 from injuries received
in an auto accident. He was born on July 28, 1946
in Atmore, AL and lived in Calhoun County for
the past 23 years. He was employed by the Florida
Department of Corrections and was a truck driver.
He enjoyed farming and loved the outdoors. He
was a member of the Blountstown Lions Club and
a member of the Rivertown Community Church
in Blountstown.
Survivors include his loving wife of 23 years,
Terry Neal of Clarksville; one daughter, Amanda
Joy Neal of Clarksville; three sons, William Leon.
Neal IIof Clarksville, Anthony Leon Neal of Pasa-
dena, CA, and Ashley Ray Neal of Atlanta, GA;
mother, Louise Neal of Kinard; parents, Doug and
Frances Price of Blountstown; three brothers, Glenn
Neal of Bruce, Johnny McGhee of Atmore, AL.
and David Price of Blountstown; six sisters; Velma
Layfield of Kinard, Pat Traylor of Mary Ester, Betty
Ann Peacock of Atmore, Janet Edewaard, Cherie
White both of Blountstown, Connie Conyers of
Bristol; four grandchildren and several nieces and
nephews and great-nieces and nephews.
Services were held Monday, Oct. 3, 2005 at Ri-
vertown Community Church in Blountstown with
Rev. Paul Smith and NMiike\ Johnson officiating.
Interment followed in Calvary Baptist Church
Cemetery in Clarksville.
Peavy Funeral Home in Blountstown was in
charge of the arrangements.


RAMIC and



RCELAI N


ow Beautiful and elegant
SALE!
materials for your walls,


Glueless Laminate


FLOORING

Over 3,000 sq. feet in stock!


CA RPE T REMNA NTS


Others may increase the produc-
tion of enzymes that detoxify
carcinogens before they have
a chance to damage DNA and
begin the cancer process. They
may also block the development
of new blood vessels that enable
cancer to grow and spread. Re-
searchers have learned that we
need to include a wide variety
of plant foods in'our meals and
snacks to get a good supply of
antioxidants and a full spectrum

of health-protective phytochem-
icals in our bodies because these
substances perform so many dif-
ferent functions. Besides pre-
venting cancer, the antioxidants
and phytochemicals in a bal-
anced plant-based diet help ward
off heart disease, age-related eye
damage and other chronic dis-
eases.
The American Institute for Can-
cer Research (AICR) offers a Nu-
trition Hotline (1-800-843-8114)
9 a.m. to 5 p.m. ET Monday-Fri-
day. This free service allows you
to ask questions about diet, nutri-
tion and cancer. A registered dieti-
tian will return your call, usually
within 48 hours. AICR is the only
major cancer charity focusing ex-
clusively on the link between diet,
nutrition and cancer. The Institute
provides education programs that
help millions of Americans learn
to make changes for lower cancer
risk. AICR also supports innova-
tive research in cancer prevention
and treatment at universities, hos-
pitals and research centers across
the U.S. The Institute has provided
more than $68 million in funding
for research in diet, nutrition and
cancer. AICR's Web address is
www.aic:rorg. AICR is a member
of the World Cancer Research
Fund International.


',:.' .-- - -,4-,
SHIDDEN
TREASURES

WE MUST FIGHT TO
OVERCOME TEMPTATION
Text: Ephesians 6:10-18
Calvin was the little boy in the
cartoon who carried his stuffed ti-
ger, Hobbes, everywhere. Calvin was
thinking about Christmas. He said,
"I've been good all day."
Hobbes said, "Christmas is getting
near, huh?"
"You got it," Calvin replied, "I've
been wondering. Is it truly being good
if the only reason I behave is so I can
get more loot at Christmas? Is that
good enough, or do I have to be good
in my heart and spirit? Do I really
have to be good or do I just have to
act good?"
Hobbes said, "In your case, Santa
will have to take what he can get."
Calvin asked, "How good do I have
to act? Really good, or pretty good?"
You might be able to slide by Santa
Claus that way. But with the Holy,
Righteous, Just, God of the Universe,
you actually have to be good. The
problem is that we all fall short of ac-
tually being good (Ro 3:23). What can
you do?
You can accept Christ as your
Lord and Savior. Confess your sins to
Christ, trust Him to forgive you, and
obey Him. The Holy Spirit will come
to live with you. God's Spirit unites
with your spirit making you holy and
pure before God.
Then you have to learn how to live
a holy life. God will begin to conform
you into the image of His Son (Ro
8:29). It is a life long growth process
called sanctification. That is where the
battle really begins.
Being good in your heart and spirit
is not easy. Apart from God, you can't
do it on your own. But the Spirit will-
empower you and strengthen you for
the fight. That is what is meant by,
"...Be strong in the Lord, and in the
power of His might (KJV)."
Ryan McDougald is a licensed, ordained Free
Will Baptist Minister hosting Bible study in the
home. For more information, call 674-6351.


Locally owned by Marion & Debbie Peavy
FINEST DESIGNERS ANYWHERE
Debbie Peavy and Dianna Tissue

'SHIVER'S FLORIST
Charlie Johns St.
Our trea's Oldest and'Most ProfessionalFlorist Since 1958
674-4788 or 674-8191
100% Satisfaction Guaranteed!
Next door to Peavy Funeral' Home
Serving Adams, McClellan & Hall Funeral Homes 'Tifelinl l
Allha, Blounislown, Bnstol



Peavy Funeral Home














Funeral Services with Dignity,
Caring and Professionalism.

Marion Peavy

A Hometown Funeral Director
You Can Trust and Depend On!

a -i eptet ione85)6 74- 2266


O.BITUARIE






OCTOBER 5, 2005 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 23


Serving Persons

with Epilepsy


Community Education

Diagnosis and Treatment

Case Management

Support Groups


1108-B East Park Ave.

., Tallahassee, FL 32301
HEAh (850)222-1777







4 f. N. : .





/M'


October tips for the Northwest


Florida garden and landscape


October marks the start. of
Florida's dry season. The big
tropical storms are less of a
threat and the afternoon rains
begin to lessen. Autumn is on its
way and cooler, dryer weather is
just around the corner. Because
of the nice weather, October
is a great time to work in your.
landscape and garden.
October is a good time to
prepare beds for the cool season
flowers. As temperatures drop,
plant calendulas, dianthus,
flowering cabbage and kale,
mums, pansies, petunias, Shasta
daisies and snapdragons.
Planting pansies will ensure
a colorful fall garden; however,
avoid planting them while the
weathers warm. Also, be careful
when fertilizing flowering kale
and cabbage. Excess nitrogen
can make them more susceptible


by Theresa Friday,
Extension Horticultural
Agent, Santa Rosa County


.LION'S EAR


.


', .


to cold damage.
Just about all of the cool
season vegetables can be
successfully started in the garden
during October. Most grow and
produce better when planted now,
rather than planted in the spring.


05.. BUICK-CENTURY 0s 5 CHEVY:I

4,001 -


----- -
.*l 'O ~H V iMP .j ;..>1. ......r ._OR:;~,L~$15. *
ii-i: 77-- 1


;1 -



..
'C'.. LI':

r ilp."v T1Fs~% Ii)! ~)~31 .


Sof B lountstown


A^irfJd9i flS 850.674.3307 8 800)4191801

20331 CENTRAL AVENUE WEST, BLOUNTSTOWN, FLORIDA CONTACT US ONLINE! HopkinsBTownS@hotmail.comn
'2.000 Down, Plus Sales Tax & Tag WAC Lith 720 Beacon Score or Higher 72 mo Financing. All Pictures For lllustration Only


You can plant seeds of beets,
carrots, kale, kohlrabi, leek,
mustard, parsley, radish, spinach
and turnips. You can also obtain
young plants and establish
broccoli, cabbage, collards,
onions and strawberries.
The recommended planting
time for strawberries might seem
odd to gardeners who are from
other regions. In Florida, we
must use-day-neutral or short-
day varieties and plant them
from early October through the
middle of November. They
grow vegetatively during the
winter and produce berries from
early March until early June.
Varieties of strawberries
that produce well under our
conditions include Camarosa,
Sweet Charlie, Oso Grande and
Chandler. Set plants twelve
inches apart in prepared beds or
plant them in planters, barrels or
in "strawberry jars."
Strawberry plants should
be destroyed after harvest and
replaced with new plants each
fall. They are not grown as
perennials here in Northwest
Florida because of disease issues.
Anthracnose fungus builds
up under our environmental
conditions, and will eventually
cause the plant to decline and
fail.


Finally after months of
rapid growth, lawn grasses are
gradually slowing down and
will eventually go dormant
with the shorter days and cooler
S temperatures. Allow this natural
process to occur by withholding
high nitrogen containing
fertilizers. Encouraging growth
this late in the season will
S. : increase, the risk of your grass
being killed by harsh winter
temperatures.
S:" Overseeding of the permanent
lawn with annual ryegrass can
be done during late October
and early November. Though
a well kept cool season lawn
can be attractive, it requires .a
commitment. Regular mowing,
irrigation and a couple of light,
supplemental applications of
fertilizer will be required during
the winter in order to keep the
Slawn looking its best.
Tip of the Week: October is
the month that most pine trees
S.-.. shed their needles. Pine needles
make excellent mulch for flower,
vegetable and shrub beds. Pine
needles can be used alone as a
mulch or in combination with
other organic materials. Pine
needles are attractive, not easily
removed from beds by wind
or rain, and don't "mat down"
excessively. However, they
don't last very long due to rapid
decomposition.
Theresa Friday is the Residential
' ; Horticulture Extension Agent for Santa
Rosa County. The use of trade names,
if used, is solely .for the purpose of
providing specific information. It is not
a guarantee, warranty, or endorsement
of the product name(s) and does not
S . ,. inift that they are approved to the
". ',\ ,", exclusionor of other. m ',.


I


;~~ :;'i.c~i~l~iDF~i~psB8%~'~~ il':!
'i: ir' 3rf~!''
r Vu~~


;r


i
-I .:

I r

L:
?

: :




;
i.'-;
~.; ~-..


*P:
''I






Page 24 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL OCTOBER 5,2005


To place your ad, call 643-3333 or 1-800-717-3333 by noon
Eastern Time on Saturday. Non-business ads run FREE for 2 weeks.


Cell phone, Cingular Wireless-
Motorola v180 with swivel belt
clip holster, home charger and car
charger. Also includes brand new
Cingular Wireless 64k SIM card
which can be used for regular or
prepaid service. Phone retails for
well over $100, will:sell phone and
all accessories for $90 or best offer.
Call 643-2178 or 766-3201.
10-5; 10-12
Large metal locking cabinet with
double doors for $50; oak coffee
and end table set, $40; Hot Point
dryer, $100; two Elvis phones, $50
for both; glass dining table, $50;
scanner, $25: Call 643-3445.
10-5,10-12
Vinyl windows, new, double in-
sulated; doors and inserts. Call
643-1038.. 10-5,10-12
Baldwin piano, upright. $200. Call
643-7131. 10-5,10-12
Gibson chest freezer, 14.8 cu.
Asking $50. Call 643-7131.
10-5, 10-12

25" color TV with remote, in good
shape, $50. Call 674-3249.
1 : 0-5 10-12
Trailer hitch, heavy duty, brand
new, $75 or best offer. Call 674-
3249. r,'s ,5
Piano for $250. Call 674-5678.
10-5,10-12
Large coffee table and matching
end table, oak, $35 for both. Call
762-8571. 10 ...-5,.10-12
*Square baler, MF 224, excellent
Condition, $3,500. Call 573-2575.
S10-5,10-12.
Stock trailer; 6 x 8', heavy duty,
$850. Call 573-2575. 10-5, 10-12
25,000 BTU air conditioner with
heal strip, like new, $400. Call 643-
2636.. 10-5,10-12
Graco travel swing, $25; Fisher
Price bouncer, $15. Call 643-
2636. 10-5,10-12
Commercial meat slicer, $100:
commercial juicer, $35; square.
box fan, $20; beautiful long heavy
curtain, $30. Call 674-6142.
10-5, 10-12
Free for the hauling: matching
burgundy and green striped couch
and chair, sitting on the porch at
19004 Hwy. 12 north in Bristol. Call
643-2953. 10-5,10-12
Commode. $25; bunk beds, $100;
queen box spring with adjustable
frame, $50; lots of books including
large print. Call 674-1049. 10-5,10-12

Pageant/prom dresses: red,
straight and small flow at the bot-
tom with three straps, size 6; white
ballroom gown with no straps.
size 8. Call 237-2706 or 272-7641
and ask for Carla. 10-5,10-12

Costume, blue Power Ranger
deluxe Power Ranger Halloween
Costume, neverworn, size medium,
$20; cherry wood toddler bed with
mattress, $40. Call 643-7948.
10-5,10-1i

Dinner ,aer stereo 100i nnowr


Portable Dishwasher, very good
condition, $200 or best offer. Call
674-1602. -. 10-5, 10-12

Three tires and rims, utility trailer,
electric motor scooter, Ensure milk.,
Call 762-8405. :-10-5,10-12

Gas dryer, $30 price negotiable, no
phone so come look, serious inqui-
ries only, 12319 NW Central Ave.,
trailer #50 in Bristol. 9-28,10-5

Generator, $400; Troybilt tiller,
$500; mulcher (Sears), $400; old
model Sears tractor for parts, best
offer; 3-point hitch, $30; cultivator,
$50; 2 blades one leveling, $50
each; meal-wrapping machine, $40;
Convection kerosene heater, $75;
new wood heater, paid $200 asking
$150. Call 442-3348.
9-28,1(-5s


Tae Kwon Do kicking tar
standing, like new, $50. (
8104.

SKS hunting gun, very nic
good, black synthetic stoc
with 2 cases of ammo, $2
tiable. Call 674-7514 after
ask for Justin.

Computer, custom built
GB hard drive, CD burne
ers with sub-woofer, Lex
in one printer, copier and
Emachine 17-inch monitor
blaster live sound card,
includes Windows XP, F
Creator6, over 1,000 MP3
hard drive, $350. Call 674


Aquariumtake-along bab
plays music, with lights a
speeds, $25. Call 379-840


Glass cabinet, dark wo
shelves, may purchase
without whatnots. Call 67


Admiral upright freeze
runs great, $75. Call 674-


Old metal bed, old-fashiol
and foot boards with rails,
mately 80 years old; one bi
Call 674-8517.

Snatch block, 20 ton, new
$225 or best offer. Call 67


Cement mixer, commer
.on wheels, 2 cylinder en
proximately 1/4 to 1/3 yard
ity, very good condition, $
674-8010.

Kenmore washer and dr
condition, $125 each. C
5852.

Browning 10-gauge, pu
gun. three chokes, used thr
excellent condition, $495
offer. Call 762-8570.

Rocker recliner, blue, v
condition, $100; washer a
$175forboth orbest offer.
8233. -

Home.-a-lite- chair
with bow, heavy duty
Call 762-3370.


, linv r vul. bie v, i v v -, .
base 10 inch speakers with carpeted '
box 300 watts spf, excellent condl- Large Mac tool box with complete
.tion $300. will sell separately of set of hand tools, $5,000. Call 643-
to et r ' aH 87 -,BL o--r-)W 4:'R '4_ 1I a. T 4 r.


Engagement ring, 3/4 karat,
round, diamond solitaire, yellow
gold band, custom made by Jim
Masters of Tallahassee to fit under
medical glove, $850 will negotiate;
1/2 karat wedding band, high qual-
ity diamond, heavy gold, six round
ruby's in band, no prongs, white
gold, $400 will negotiate; beautiful
emerald, very clear, never set, .95
karat, 8x6 mm, $250 will negotiate:
Call 379-3877 between 10 a.m.-9
p.m. (ET). 9-14T. 10-5



1997 Ford F-150 king cab, 4 x 4,
CD player, all electric, 33x12/50
tires, aluminum wheels, aluminum
toolbox. Call 643-6277 for-more
information. 10-5,10-12


1!
in
tc
re
6
th
C

1!
tit
til
A


1!
Io
ai
tv

21
tc
ai
g


1995 Jeep Wrangler, black, 5- -7
rget, free speed, softtopwith over-sizedtires.
Call 762- Just in time for hunting season.
9-28,10-5 Asking $3,500 or best offer. Call ai
762-8446 after 5 p.m. 10-5,10-12 8
e, shoots
k, comes 2001 Lincoln Town car, executive 1
00 nego- series, AM/FM cassette, all power, r
t:30p.m., leather interior, alloy wheels, 20-22 c(
9-28,10-5 -MPG city-and 27 MPG highway. 71
Nice car, $13,000. Call 762-8446
with 80 after 5 p.m. -10-5,10-12 1
r. speak- d
Mark all 1998 Chevy S-10, black, automatic, 1
scanner, power windows and locks, tinted g9
)r, sound windows, 130,500 miles, runs great s
software and well maintained. Asking $6,500
Ioxio EZ or best offer. Call 643-3629 or 284- a
songson 8097 and ask for Johnnie or April. 1
-9127 10-5,10-12 C
9-28, 10-5
Ford F-150 Lariat, 4x4, extended 1,
y swing, cab, white in color, 105,000 miles, $
mnd eight fully loaded. Asking $14,000. Call 2
09- 643-8054 or 674-5502. 10-5,10-12
9-28, 10-5
od, five 1989 Chevytruck, V8, runs perfect, g
dith vor $2,500. Call 573-2575. 10-5,10-12 f
- ith or e
4-6142. 1978 Dodge truck, 3/4 ton, 440 e
-28, 10-5 motor, extended cab, new trans- 1

. small, mission, air conditioning, Rhino C
3151 lining, aluminum tool box, chrome
9-28, 10-5 wheels. Asking $3,800 firm. Call 1
S:643-2636. 10 -5,10-12. V
nedhead $
approxi- 1991 Olds Cutlass Ciera, four
edframe. door, automatic, power steering, 2
9.-, i., cruise,.AM/FM, AC, V6, great buy, 4
$2,150. Call 762-2525 or 762-4099 $
condition and leave message. 10-5,10-12
74-8010.
9-28,10-5

cial type 4 1Ln 1P


gine, ap-
d capac-
550. Call
9-28,10-5

yer, good
Dall 643-,
9-28, 10-5

mp shot-
ree times,
5 or best
9-28,.10-5

ery good
ind dryer,
Call 379-
9-28; 10-5

Ssaw,
y, $100.
9-28, 10-5


. -0

4w -do--W

--o amol b- -,o


965-67 Mustang parts includ-
g hoods, doors, power steering,
o much to list; narrowed 9" Ford
ear end complete and new; 300,
cylinder, complete engine, less
han, 7,000 miles, asking $1,000.
all 762-8882. 10-5, w012,

995 GMC Z-71, four brand new-
'es, 130,000 miles, A/C, cruise,
t, CD player and leather interior.
sking $5,400. Call 559-2302.
10-5, 10-12

989 Chevy 2500,4 x 4,350 engine,
Dng-wheel base, 16-inch wheels
nd tires, $1.500. Call 674-4725 be-
ween 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. 10-5,10-12

004 Pontiac Grand Am, V-6 au-
imatic, CD player, power windows
nd locks, rear spoiler, gets great
as mileage, $10,200. Call 643-
948. 10-5, 10-12

977 Ford F150, long wheel base,
automatic, V8, $4500. Call 643-
210 or674-5669. 10-5,10-19

998 Ford Expedition, 125,000
liles, AM/FM cassette,. cruise
control, automatic, AC, $8,000. Call
62-3028. 9-28,10-5

986 Toyota Camry, perfect'con-
ition mechanically, looks new,
35,000 miles, new tires, great car,
ets 29-30 miles pergallon, may be
sen at Harvey's parking lot$ 1,100.
all 674-3279 or 674-4770 or leave
note on car. : .


993 Ford Thunderbird, $1,000.
all 674-2842. 9-28,10-5

991 Cadillac Sedan DeVille;
1,200. or best offer. Cail 643-
873. 9-2, 10-5

974 one-ton truck, drivetrane
ood, body rough, $500 or best of-
;r. Call 593-0133 after 8 p.m. and
eave message. 9 9-28,10-5

976 Buick,.for restoration $400.
;all 674-6142.' a--, io-s

993 S-10, 4x4, new tires and rims,
-6, 5 speed, needs minor work.
2,000: Call 762-2030. .--28, io-5

003 Ford F-250 XLT, crew cab,
x4, loaded with leather interior,
26,000. Call 643-6589.
9-28, 10-




*


-

.. am *


William's Home

Improvements
"No Job Too Big or Small"
Licensed & Insured, contractor & roofer
Concrete wrI' 1,:ind.-C ,
pressure ilening, ,
renovaticnri ..e-amiei
gutter, painting, vrynv
& screen, enrci-sure
FOR FREE ESTIMATES
Call 674-8092 UFN


Stump grinding

Reasonable rates
Free estimates
-Call

Chris Nissley
674-8081 or
643-8561 (Cell)






Decks* -Pole Barns.
SHouse Framing & Garages
*Wood & Vinyl Siding
Tin Roofing
Bathroom Remodeling
Concrete Work
Ca11674-3458 *


FOR RENT
In Bristol
2BR & 3BR mobile homes
with central heat & air
Mobile home lots
In Blountstown
*2BR/1 1/2BAapartment *1 room
efficiency, utilities included .000
sq. ft. commercial building,:

Phone 643-7740







1,.2 & 3 Bedroom
Apartments
"The Best Place to Live"
Rental Assistance




Call (850) 674-4202
16978 NW Mayo Street,
Blountstown, FL 32424.
TDDfTTY 711.
EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY





c -
= 6-= *

am *d, o
qwwwal -ai% o4
rENNU a "-4


. Copyrighted Material

? Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers


* -

-I ~ .


- C 41M___ -
-m b in.4I


-




- *
-
4W4 b


- a- a 4001b. 44pp--
40 P- 0 4qftb


--No






OCTOBER 5,2005 THE 'CALHOlN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 25


Chevy engine, 4.3 liter, 1999-2000
model and automatic transmission,
less than 5,000 miles, $1,500 or best
offer. Call 674-8010. 9-28, 10-5

1990 Ford F-150, 4x4, manual 5
speed, two-tone brown, front and
rear end replaced new as well as
interior, needs motor work, truck
in excellent condition, $1,500 firm.
Call 643-5562. 9-28, 10-5


Rodney Miller's
Lawn Service


Reasonable rates!
Bonded & Insured
*Free estimates.
Cell 643-6589
Home 643-4267




Queen mattress set, double
pillow top. New in plastic with
warranty, $150. 850-425-8374
6 Pc. fulllqueen bedroom
set. New in boxes, sacrifice
$550. 850-222-7783
CHERRY SLEIGH BED -
$250. Brand new, solid wood.
850-22-9879
New leather sofa and
loveseat. $750, can deliver.
850-222-2113 .
SNEW BEDROOM SET:
Beautiful cherry Louis Philippe
8-piece wood King sleigh
bed, dresser, mirror, chest, 2
nightstands. Sug. List, $4600,
sell $1650. 850-545-7112
NEW Brand Name King-
Mattress Set, $250, in factory
plastic, warranty. 850-425-
8374
NEW QUEEN mattress and
base. Never used, in
unopened plastic. Must sell,
$125. 850-545-7112
FORMAL DINING ROOM -
Brand new cherry table with 6
chairs and lighted china
cabinet. $3K retail, sell for
$999. 850-425-8374
MATTRESS SET New full
set with factory warranty, $99,
call 850-222-7783


Additional runs of the same ad (more than 2 weeks) are $2 per
week and must be paid in advance. We do not bill for classified.


1989 Chevy Celebrity station
wagon, $375 as is. Call 379-8111.
9-28, 10-5

2003 F-250 XLT, 4x4, loaded crew-
cab, leather interior for $26,000.
Call 643-6589. 9-28,10-5
OF 0-



Arctic Cat 400 ATV, about one
year old, mint condition, $3,000.
Call 573-2575. 10o-5,10-12

1989 Yamaha Moto 4 ATV, two
wheel drive, runs good, $1,000.
Call 379-8850. 10-5,10-12

2001 Arctic Cat ATV, 250
4x4 $1,500; four extreme
32-1.050/15 off-road tires, $140. Call
379-8603. 9-28, 10-5




WANTED)

to buy Real

Estate

10 to 1,000

acres, reasonably

priced. Immediate

closing.

Call

850-544-5441 or

850-899-7700
k. _-


2001 GSX 750F motorcycle,
16,900 miles, very good condition,
new tires, hard-case saddle bags,
corbin seat included, $4,200. Call
643-9240 or 570-4502 (cell) before
9 p.m., ask for Michael. 9-28,10-5



1993 FourWinds Motorhome 454,
40,200 miles 4-speed automatic
with overdrive, Onan generator, fully
self contained, sleeps six, very good
condition. $15,999or bestoffer. Call
674-4409 before 8 p.m. (CT).
10-5, 10-12




2002 Loweboat, 16 ft., stick steer-
ing with 40 hp Johnson motor, take
over payments. Call 643-6277 for
more information. 10-5,10-12

Perception kayak, two seater with
rudder system. Call 592-9958.
28 10-5 .



Miniature doberman pinscher,
chocolate and tan male, CKC reg-
istered, vet checked, $350. Call
722-4594. 10-5,10-12
Puppies, three are free to a good
home, one is like a miniature dober-
man. Call 643-6277. 10-5, 10-12
Cats or kittens, free to a good
home. Call 674-3249. 10-5,10-12
Kittens, two orange, one black, one
mixed, six weeks old, free to a good
home. Call 674-9439.
10-5, 10-12
Kittens, four to choose from, free
to a good home. Call 643-5401.
10-5, 10-12
Australian shepherd, male, free
to a good home. Call 674-4301.
10-5, 10-12
Black lab, three-year-old female,
not spayed, needs room to run,
wonderful with kids. Free to a good
home. Call 643-1233. 10-5, 10-12


;YL~II

NO A ACarBut Have
a a CREDI


.21'AA CREDIT~
VSLW CEDI


Pit bull puppies, full blooded,
mother on premises, father is white
pit with blue patches, three males,
three females, $100-$150 each.
Call 762-4119. 9-28,10-5
Feeder pigs, $40 each. Call 762-
4119. 9-28,10-5
Dachshund, black, approximately
6 years old, free to good home,
good with kids, perfect companion
for elderly person. Call 643-1566.
9-28, 10-5
Cats, free to a good home, several
to choose from, husband passed, it
is hard to care for them. Call 762-
3374. 9-28, 10-5
Palomino mare, 5 years old, green
broke, about 14.2 hands tall, $700.
Call 674-1466, leave message.
9-28, 10-5



Wanted: Junk cars and trucks, any
condition, no charge for removal.
Callt762-8459. 10-ST. 12-7

Wanted: Guns, paying cash, old or
modern rifles, shotguns, pistols, one
gun or collection, military guns, old
double barrels. Call 674-4860.
9-28 T. 12-14

Wanted: two 14 x 24" rims, can
be wider than 14 inches. Call 674-
8010. 9-28.,1-5



Found: Small black and white dog
on Hwy. 274 close to Hwy. 167 in
Altha. Call 762-8000. 10-5,10-12

Found, folding stepladder on Hwy.
12, south of Bristol. Call 442-6431 to
identify. 9-28,10-5


Missing: Liberty County Extension
Office is missing their silver soil
probe. If you borrowed it to do soil
samples, please return. We are in
desperate need of this tool. Call
643-2229. 10-5, 10-12


House, 3BR/2BA with 1.78 acres
with inground pool. Call 762-8133 or
209-8591. 10-5,10-12
Home in Blountstown, very nice,
3BR/2BA on 3 lots, 1,760 sq. ft.
Asking $129,900. Call 482-5391.
10-5,11-9


L' w7AB


1989 Homes of Merit modular
home on 1 acre, 1,800 sq.. ft.,
5BR/2BA, spacious living room
with sliding glass door leading out
to the back deck, large backyard
with a 6 ft. privacy fence and 8x12
ft. shed with carport. All appliances
including washer and dryer. Great
location close to W. R. Tolar School.
Asking $60,000. Call 643-4364 or
447-0500. 10-5,10-12
1972 singlewide trailer, 3BR/1 BA,
central heat and air, would make a
great camp, must be moved, asking
$4,000. Call 379-9476. 10-5,10-12
Doublewide, 3BR/2BA, front and
rear porches, two-car carport, eat-
in kitchen, gas log fireplace, on 3
landscaped acres with deep well
and city water, small workshop,
secluded prime propertyoff Chester
St. in Hosford. Asking $115,000,
can purchase with 2 extra acres
for $125,000. Call 379-8323 or
643-1851 between 7 a.m.-10 p.m.
9-28, 10-5
Mobile home, 2BR/1 BA, furnished,
remodeled, very nice $10,000 or
best offer. Call 762-2030.
9-28,10-5
Mobile home, 3BR/2BA double-
wide with fireplace, large livingroom
and masterbedroom on 2 lots
on lola St., Blountstown. Asking
$49,000 or best offer. Call 674-
4404. 9-28, 10-5



Garage sale, Saturday, Oct. 8
12811 Hoecake Rd., Hwy. 20 east
Bristol, look for signs. Phone 643-
2665. 10-5
Big yard sale, Saturday, Oct.
8, located at Church of God in
Blountstown on SR 20 west; doors,
computers, fishing gear, lots of
items. Phone 674-8437. 10-5
Yard sale Saturday, Oct. 8 from 8
a.m.-12p.m. (CT). Lots ofchildren's
clothing, twin girls' clothes sizes
2-3 T., boys' clothes sizes 4-5,
household items, various, men's
and women's clothing. Phone 674-
6393. 10-5
Yard sale in Clarksville Oct. starts
8 a.m. (CT); clothes, house plants,
guns, fishing poles, tools, antiques,
and other misc. Directions: Take
S.R. 20 E through Clarksville 2 miles
west, turn righton C.R. 2871.5 miles
north. House number 17893 on the
right. Call 674-4860. o-5
Benefit rummage sale Saturday,
Oct. 8 starts 8 a.m. (CT) in front
parking lot of the Calhoun-Liberty
Hospital. Lots of items. 1o-5


CLASSIFIED ADS
The Journal is glad to run your non-business
classified ads free of charge for two weeks. If you
would like to advertise the same item after that i
time, there is a charge of $2 per week, payable
in advance.
Please rememberthat ourfree classified are for
, |NON-BUSINESS related items only. Display ads
S (ads with borders) are also available in the classi-
fied section, starting at a cost of $10 per week for
S a 2-inch-high, one-column ad.
SIf you'd like something bigger with artor a special
border, we have a chart of sizes and prices you can
Look over at our office. For more information, give
us a call at 643-3333 or 1-800-717-3333.
_ _


THE C AL H OUNI LIBERTY JOURNAL' ~ ~ ,


CLASSIFIED






Page 26 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL OCTOBER 5,2005


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SEC-
ONDJUDICIALCIRCUITOFTHE STATE
OF FLORIDA; IN AND FOR LIBERTY
COUNTY, FLORIDA

CASE NO.: 05-0013-CA

HARRISON FINANCE COMPANY INC.,

Plaintiff

vs.

JAMESTERRY BROXTON andwife, JO
ANN BROXTON,

Defendants.
/

NOTICE OF SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant
to a Summary Final Judgement of Fore-
closure dated the 22nd day of September.
2005, in Case Number05-0013-CA, of the
Circuit Court f the Second Judicial Circuit
in and for Liberty County, Florida, wherein
'HARRISON FINANCE COMPANY INC. is
Plaintiff and JAMES TERRY BROXTON
and wife, JO ANN BROXTON are De-
fendants, I will sell to the highest bidder
at the front door of the Liberty 'County
Courthouse, Bristol,.Florida, at 11:00 a.m.
E.S.T., on the 24th day of October, 2005,
the following described real property as
set forth in the.Summary Final Judgement
of Foreclosure, to-wit:

Commence at the SE corner of the
Essie Williams Tract of land and
thence run West along Section line
for a distance of 165 feet to the Point
of Beginning. From said Point of.
Beginning, thence West along sec-
tion line for a distance of 123 feet;
thence North 48 feet; thence in a
Northeasterly direction a distance
of approximately 123 feet to a Point
located 123 feet North of said Sec-
tion Line: thence South a distance
o::: f123 feet to the Point of Begin-
nrig; lying and being in Section 23,
Township 1 South; Range 6 West in
Liberty County, Florida.

AT THE TIME OF THE SALE, THE SUC-
CESSFULHIGH BIDDER, OR BIDDERS,
AS THE CASE MAY BE, SHALL POST
WITH THE CLERK A DEPOSIT EQUAL
TO 5 PERCENT OF THE FINAL BID:.
THE DEPOSIT SHALL BE APPLIED
TO THE SALE.PF,: E AT THE TI.'lE OF
-PAYMENT. THE SUM REI.1ApIrit J-, DUE
Ar ID OWl ill IG AFTERAPPLICATION OF
THE DEPOSIT SHALL BE PAID TO THE
CLERK lJ CERTIFIED Fu iD':, r OLTTE.F
THAN TEN (10) DAYS FROM THE DATE
OF SALE..THE SUCCESSFUL BIDDER,
OR BIDDERS, AT THE: SALE WILL BE
REC'UI'IRED TO PLACETHE REOUISITE.
STATE ,OCur.EI.iTAR',' STAI.MF ON'
-THE CERTIFICATE OF.TITLE. ...

-Dated this 22nd day of September,
2005. '- '::

Rbbert Hill, Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Vanell Summers, Deputy Clerk

.Frank E. Bondurant .
-BONDURANT-AND FUQUA, P.A.
-P.O. Box 1508
Marianna, Florida 32447
(850)526-2263- 928 10505



INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOFTHETWEN-
TIETH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
HENDRY COUNTY. FLORIDA .

CIVIL ACTION

CASE NO.: 93-691

S IN RE: THE FORMER MARRIAGE OF
FIDEL ESTRADA,
Petitioner/former husband,


vs.

BETTY ANN ESTRADA,
' respojndent/formerwife..


NOTICE OF ACTION FOR


To: Betty Ann Estrada, Fountain, FL

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that that an action
has been filed against you and that you
are requiredtoserve a copyofyourwritten
defenses, if any, to:

The Brook Law Firm, P.A.
Attorney for Petitioner/Former Husband
1625 Hendry Street, Suite 101
Fort Myers, Florida 33901

On or before Nov. 23, 2005, and file the
original with the Clerk of this Court at,
Hendry County Clerk of Court, Post Office
Box 1760, LaBelle, Florida 33975, before
service on Petitioner orimmediatelythere-
after. If you fail to do so, a default may
be entered against you for the relief
demanded in the petition.

Copies of all court documents in this
case, including orders, are available
at the Clerk of the Circuit Court's Of-
fice.You may review these documents
upon request.

You must keep the Clerk of the Circuit
Court's Office notified of your current
address. (You may file Notice of Cur-
rent Address, Florida Supreme Court
Approved Family Law Form 12.915.)-
Future papers in this lawsuit will be
mailed to the address on record at the
clerk's office.

WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida Family
Law Rules of Procedure, requires cer-
tain automatic disclosure of documents
and information. Failure to comply can
resulting sanctions, including dismissal
or striking of pleadings. ,05 T10.26.05


30 DAY NOTICE AND
COMMENT PERIOD


The US Forest Service is requesiing
comments on the sale of National. Forest
land in Okaloosa County, Florida. Public
Law 108-152 authorizes the Secretary of
Agriculturetosell or exchangeTractsA-943
and A-944 totaling 43.16 acres situated in
Okaloosa County. It is proposed to sell the
tracts to the City of Fort Walton Beach.
The property,is located in Section 26 of
Township 1 South and.Range 24 West,
Okaloosa County, Florida. It is.anticipated
thatthis proposal falls under Forest Service
.Handbook 1909.15, Section 31.12 in which
no decision memo is required.

Pursuant to 36 CFR 215.5, toe. Respon-
ible Offciai; -i seeking i nTiC ri l:.n ih;,
pr:.p.:,- l C.rarl',m.n rli r'ic 3 I, t,: e i -..i.- cp,:'ilc
i-. PC' .;l ;i mus r j tbe p':.- In".' arln'e'r r *
Sceived within 30 days afterthis publication.
Oraror hand-delivered comments must be
It:E, ;J'A. ,1 il.,n ,.-ur no2rrrm l business hours
'ol e a m r 1-' 3', p.m. r.:,r'dayto Thursday
:and 8 a.m. to4 p.m. on Fridays, closed on
lr-l h,:,l; d C,:,m nri s nia ,.',e rr, m;le.j
] illlr yri:.ll I, o 'ur i-'l i ,'crnm ma-n

florida-apalachicola@fs.fed.us

Comments should be sent to District
Ranger, Apdlachicola Ranger District, P.O.
Box 579, Bristol, FL32321: For more infor-
mation on this proposal contact Kyle Jones
at (850) 523-8577. Only those who submit
timelyand substantive comments will have
standing to appeal. 10o-



IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SEC-
.OND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IMN ArID FOR
LIBERTY COUNTY, FLORIDA

CASE NO.: 05-85-CA

THECITGROUP/CONSUMER FINANCE
INC.,

;Plaintiff


vs.

STORMY GAY;, UNKNOWN SPOUSE
OF STORMY GAY;. GREGORY GAY;
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF GREGORY
SGAY; FELTON HALL; MARY HALL; and
all. unknown parties claiming by, through,
under or against the herein named Defen-


SUPPLEMEN TOAL PE.ItIOI F0-3
ub-L .N..L.T-,Jii ,-9Y .- daots whpaenot nownto be dead or
AT O" alive, whether said unknown parties clairh
- /VISITATION-AND-CHILD SURRORT- a heirs,-devises, "grantees; assigneYe,


lienors, creditors, trustees, spouses, or
other claimants; TENANT #1 and/orTEN-
ANT#2, the parties intended to accountfor
the person or persons in possession,

Defendants.
/


NOTICE OF SALE


NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursu-
antto the Final Judgement of Foreclosure
dated September 22, 2005; in this cause,
I will sell the property situated in LIBERTY
County, Florida described as:

A PARCEL OF LAND LYING IN SEC-
TION 26,TOWNSHIP 1 SOUTH, RANGE
6 WEST, LIBERTY COUNTY, FLORIDA,
SAID PARCEL OF LAND BEING MORE
PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED BY
METES AND BOUNDS AS FOLLOWS:

COMMENCE AT A4 INCH BY4 INCH
BLANK CONCRETE MONUMENT
(FOUND) KNOWN AS MARKING
THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF
SAID SECTION 26, AND RUN;
THENCE EAST 3,896.31 FEET;
THENCE NORTH. 2,173.35 FEET
TO A STATE ROAD DEPARTMENT
RIGHT-OF-WAYCONCRETE MONU-
MENT ON THE NORTHEASTERLY
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF
COUNTY ROAD NO. S-67-A (100
FOOT RIGHT-OF-WAY); THENCE
SOUTH 52023'54" WEST 50.00
FEET TO A CENTERLINE STATION
90+25.01 FEET OF SAID COUNTY
ROAD AS PER STATE ROAD
RIGHT-OF-WAY MAP SECTION NO.
56509.2601, DATED NOVEMBER 12,
1964; THENCE CONTINUE SOUTH
52023'54"WEST 50.00 FEETTOTHE
SOUTHWESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY
BOUNDARY OF SAID COUNTY
ROAD; THENCE ALONG SAID
SOUTHWESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY
BOUNDARYAS FOLLOWS;THENCE
NORTH 37'36'06"WEST (BEARING
BASE) A DISTANCE OF 865.74 FEET
TO A 5/8 INCH RE-BAR WITH CAP
(RLS3031) FOR A POINT OF CURVE
TO THE RIGHT; THENCE ALONG
SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF
2,915.93 FEET THROUGH A CEN-
TRAL ANGLE OF 15'36'30" FOR
AN ARC DISTANCE OF794.34 FEET
(THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING
NORTH 29o47'52" WEST 791.89
FEET)TO A POINT ONTHE NORTH-
ERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUND-
ARY OF A 60.00 FOOT ROADWAY
KNOWN AS CANNON BRANCH
ROAD; THENCE LEAVING SAID
SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY
BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH 57048'40"'
WEST ALONG SAID NORTHERLY
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY A DIS-
TANCE OF 2.563.05 FEET FOR THE
POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID
POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE
CONTINUE SOUTH 57048'40"WEST
-ALONG SAID NORTHERLY RIGHT-
OF-WAY BOUNDARY A DISTANCE
OF 225.99 FEET TO A CONCRETE
MONUMENT (RLS3031); THENCE
NORTH 4638'58" WEST 191.58
FEETTO A 5/8 INCH RE-BAR WITH
CAP (PSM3031); THENCE NORTH
57048'40" EAST 243.63 FEET TO A
5/8 RE-BAR WITH CAP (PSM3031);
THENCE SOUTH 4126'12" EAST
187.96 FEET TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING.TOGETHERWITHTHAT
CERTAIN 1999 SOUTHERN ROAD
CRAFT USA DOUBLEWIDE MOBILE
HOME, VIN NOS. DSDAL25701A
AND DSDAL25701B, TITLE NOS.
0076153541 AND 0076153542.

a/k/a/ 18226 NE Cannon Branch Road,
Hosford, FL 32334

at public sale, to the highest and best
bidder, for cash, at Ihe front door of the
courthouse, 10818 NW.State Road 20,
Brslol. Florida. at 11:00 a.m., on October
24,.2005.

Dated this 23rd day of September,
2005.

:Robert Hill, Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Vanell Summers, Deputy Clerk

Douglas C. Zahm, P.A.
18830 U.S. Hwy. 19 N., #300 '
Clearwater, FL 33764

'(W 632'*10l4 lax ..*. -..., .


ii ~l~-~e~

e; miI sla% 1
I*t
~11P--r_*~ls- -uF~;~1~.-- -- --1.


'-~i7i.s I'~s:
~~i~ n


I~ 911~ '
~s~Y;'
I~~j~r~
i...~~ .-.-; ;1:~..-.I.......~:..


POSSIBILITIES GALORE!
13,200 sq. ft. currently being used as a church.
This building sits on a 300x100 lot with Hwy. 20
frontage! The possibilities are endless for this
building! LISTED AT $550,000.


* LOCATION, LOCATION,
LOCATION! 3/2, 1,519 sq.
ft. on 1,31 acres located.
off of SR 65 in Sumatra.
Black Creek runs along
the back of the property..
.LISTED AT $150,000.
* INVESTORS ALERT!
2/1, 736 sq. ft. Located on
North Pear St., owner is
.motivated and all reason-
able offer will be consid-
ered. CONTRACT PEND-
ING.
* TWO FOR ONE! Duplex
for sale on 1 acre. Partially
completed on the interior.
.Each. side. has, approxi-
malely 1,200.sq..ft. The lot
is also zoned for another
duplex! JUST LISTED AT
$105,000.
* PRIME DEVELOPMENT
PROPERTY! 8 acres on
Wynn Road in Marianna.
Less than a mile from Hwy.
90, close to shopping and
schools. Zoned mixed use
urban transitional. JUST
LISTED FOR $229,000.
* BUILD YOUR DREAM
HOME! 3 lots in Quincy on
Circle Drive, close to the
Gadsden Memorial Hos-


pital. Each lot is LISTED
FOR $17,000.
* NEW SUBDIVISION!
86.85 acres in Juniper
Creek Subdivision in
Greensboro. Gravel roads
with covenants and restric-
tions. Canr be subdivided
into 20-acre lots. INVES-
TORS, THS IS A GREAT
BUY AT $579,000.
* PRIME HUNTING LAND!
80 acres in Juniper. Per-
fect -for those avid hunt-
ers. Property is .covered
with deer and turkeys! Also
has Telogia Creek run-
ning through the back of
the property! LISTED FOR
$175,000.
* 10 VACANT ACRES!
Located on Porter Grade
Road in Calhoun .County
off.of CR 287. Enjoy the
peace in quiet in your pri-
vate country setting! JUST
LISTED AT $94,000.
*PRICED TO SELL! Re-
modeled 3BR/2BA sq. ft.
on 4 spacious acres +/-.
You must see the inside!
Get it while you can for
$179,900.
: ,


19204 NW STATE RD. 12 IN BRISTOL
Broker: Jack (Hal) Summers, Jr.
S Licensed Agent: Holli Revell
S,-' i ,Phone: 850-643-5115
;' After Hours: 850-445-0828

S. ............ .. ..... .. ..
,


.r- .. Team photo


Schedule for

." Liberty Sports


Saturday, Oct. 8

at W.R. Tolar K-8 School
8 a.m. (ET)
Age Group 3-6 years old
9:30 a.m. (ET)
Age Group 7-10 years old
11 a.m. (ET)
Age Group 11-15 years old ,
* 6










S...... .......
U alEtmSriesI




F ierxe


r

I-





OCTOBER 5,2005 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 27


Boyd speaks out against offshore drilling


WASHINGTON, D.C.-Congressman
Allen Boyd (D-Nortli Florida) joined his
colleagues in the Florida delegation to ex-
press their outrage and concern over the
Peterson/Abercrombie amendment that
would lift the presidential and congres-
sional moratoria on natural gas produc-
tion along Florida's Outer Continental
Shelf (OCS). The Peterson/Abercrombie
amendment was included in the National
Energy Supply Diversification and Disrup-
tion Prevention Act, which was passed by
the House Resources Committee.
"Drilling off our coasts would have very
damaging consequences for our beaches,
our marine life and its habitat, and the
broader environment," said Congressman
Boyd. "Additionally, offshore drilling in
the Gulf of Mexico poses a risk to our na-
tion's military readiness by placing severe
restrictions on the ability of the Air Force
and the Navy to train in airspace zones
and naval zones in the gulf. Most Florid-
ians understand that drilling in spectacular
natural places is a dangerous and unwise


practice, and I stand by this belief."
The Peterson/Abercrombie amend-
ment would immediately end the 25-year
bipartisan congressional OCS moratorium
nationwide and open waters off Florida's
coast to natural gas production. Con-
gressman Boyd joins other members of
the Florida delegation in sending a letter
to the Chairman of the House Resources
Committee, Congressman Richard Pombo
(R-CA), expressing their grave concerns
with the Peterson/Abercrombie amend-
ment.
"Floridians should feel confident that
no oil rig or gas pipeline is sited off our
shores without our consent," Boyd stated.
"The people of Florida are steadfast in
their desire to maintain the offshore drill-
ing moratorium. The Peterson/Abercrom-
bie amendment directly contradicts with
the widespread belief thaL drilling off our
coastlines would be devastating for Flor-
ida, -and I will work .with my colleagues
in Congress to make sure that this amend-
ment is not included in the energy bill."


Florida Congressional Members come together to uphold offshore
drilling moratoria.


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Liberty County,
University of Florida Extension Service
is seeking applications for...

OFFICE ASSISTANT- 20 hours; Must possess computer
skills with proficiency in word processing, database and
spreadsheets with working knowledge of Microsoft Office
and other current programs. High School diploma or GED,
minimum of two years of clerical or secretarial experience
preferred.

APPLICATIONS must be picked up at the Liberty County
Extension Office located in the Veterans Memorial Park
Civic Center.

APPLICATION DEADLINE IS OCT. 21, 2005. ,5.10.1


CHIPOLA COLLEGE
... is now accepting applications for

STAFF ASSISTANT: In the Health Sciences Department.
MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS: High school diploma or
general education degree (GED); Associate Degree (A.A.)
or equivalent from two-year College or technical school
preferred. Three years of responsible secretarial experi-
ence in working with the public is required. Must possess
computer skills with proficiency in word processing, data-
base, and spreadsheets with working knowledge of Micro-
soft Office and other currentprograms. Valid state Driver's
License required.
APPLICATION DEADLINE: OCTOBER 13, 2005 at 4
p.m. (CT)
Submit letter of application, resume, references with cur-
rent addresses & telephone numbers and completed col-
lege employment application to CHIPOLA COLLEGE, Hu-
man Resources, 3094 Indian Circle, Marianna, FL 32446.
AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY INSTITUTION .' .
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needed for
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Holiday Pay







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PRODUCE
CLERK
Position available

The position is
full-time of about
45 hours a week.
Benefits are included.
Experience preferred,
but will do
on-the-job training.

Must apply in Person
Monday-Saturday,
9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at:

RAMSEY'S .5,
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20118 W. Central Ave.,
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10- 5T, 1-1


Help Needed

TWO TIRE ll
CHANGERS
Apply in person,
CITY TIRE INC.
Hwy. 20 West,
Blountstown


One Stop Career Center
16908 NE Pear St. Suite 2,
Btoulstown PhonM (B60) 674-508
The following positions are avail-
able: Supervisor/Food Service,
Delivery Driver, Bookkeeper,
Dairy Worker, Crew Mem-
ber/Fast Food, Dredge Op-
Serator, Nursery Worker, Janito-
rial, Truck Driver/Heavy, Food
Worker. EOE
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(0 RECEPTIONISTIOFFICE ASSISTANT
Position available
Applicant must possess excellent communication, telephone
and computer skills. Must be able to multitask and handle
stressful situations with ease. Experience in AP and payroll
is a plus.
Apply in person at
Parthenon Healthcare of Blountstown,
17884 NE Crozier St., Blountstown, FL 32424
SNO CALLS PLEASE.


CHIPOLA COLLEGE
is now accepting applications for...

Part-Time Instructor of Economics

MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS: Master's Degree with at
least 18 graduate semester hours in Economics required;
teaching experience preferred.

APPLICATION DEADLINE: Open Until Filled

Submit letter of application, resume, references with cur-
rent addresses & telephone numbers, completed Chipola
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transcripts to CHIPOLA COLLEGE, Human Resources,
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I





Page 28 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL OCTOBER 5,2005

DOH encourages Floridians to make an appointment to get their Flu vaccine today


TALLAHASSEE In prepa-
ration of the 2005 flu season,
Florida Department of Health
(DOH) officials urge Floridians,
especially those 65 years of age
and older, to make an appoint-
ment with their primary health
care provider to receive a flu
vaccine. Since flu season can be-
gin as early as October, it is best
to schedule an appointment now
to ensure you are vaccinated lat-
er in the year.
"The best protection against
flu is to get vaccinated every
year. I strongly encourage Flor-
ida residents to call their doc-
tors now to schedule a flu shot
for October and November,"
DOH Secretary John 0. Agwu-
nobi, M.D., M.B.A., M.P.H.,
said. "Getting vaccinated not
only helps protect you from,get-
ting sick with the flu but it also
helps protect others."
According to the Centers for
Disease Control and Prevention
(CDC), influenza-related deaths
average 36,000 per year, mostly
among the elderly. Influenza re-
sults in about 200,000 hospital-
izations per year.
Prioritization of influenza
vaccine has been implemented
to ensure that enough vaccine is
available for those at the highest
risk for complications from in-
fluenza. CDC recommends that
the following priority groups re-
ceive trivalent inactivated influ-
enza vaccine (TIV) prior to the
end of October whenever pos-
sible:
*Persons aged 65 years and
older with chronic medical con-
ditions
*Residents of long-term care
facilities
*Persons aged two-64 years
\ ith chronic medical conditions
*Children aged six-23 months
*Pregnant women
*Health care personnel who
provide direct patient care
*Household contacts and out-
of-home caregivers of persons in
high risk population
The majority of flu vaccine
was administered through pri-
vate physicians, clinics, hospi-
tals, long-term care facilities,
community-based clinics and
other public venues. DOH esti-
mates that it facilitated the dis-
tribution of almost 2.67 million
doses of flu vaccine in Florida
over the 2004-2005 flu season.
Since prevention is the key
: Tell 'em you
J Csaw it in The
-._.: Calhoun-Liberty
- t JOURNAL
For advertising information,
call 643-3333 or 1-800-717-3333.

Need someone
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to reduce the probability of con-
tracting flu, here are practical
steps to stop the spread of flu:
*Clean hands often with soap
and water or an alcohol-based
hand cleanser.
*Avoid touching your eyes,
nose or mouth.


FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OP

HEALTH

*Stay home when you are sick
and keep sick children home.
*Avoid close contact with


Dear Gadsden. Liberty & Calhoun
County Residents,
Two years ago I obtained my Florida
Dealer' License due to the frustration of
shoPPing for a used car. The following three
things made car shopptln a bgl headache
for me:
*HRafilna for the best price
*Having to come up with $2000 to $3000
for a down payment, taxes, title and ta .


0 Down "01 Ford Taurus
S116/mo Great Family Car


people who are ill, if possible.
*Do not share eating utensils,
drinking glasses, towels or other
personal items.
*Cover your nose and mouth
with a tissue when you cough or
sneeze.
For information about how


FPaving someone a $5000 $6000 profit
on a $10,000 automobile.
Here's what we've done at Direct Autoremo
tive Wholesale;
Al vehicles are Priced at the "Loan
Value", which is the price credit untons and
banks will loan yoo on this vehicle.
-We require NO DOWN PAYMENT on any
of our vehicles. We can even help with your
faxes and tag most of the time.


0 Down '02 Honda Accord
'288/mo Suraoof Low Miest
E''-' '3SSU V T B


SI 1S -41M45iq~
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$289imo IS. 4 dC~ ElB~. i
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02 Down Wmo Sidiroof 3J'mlaoe r
1*21 O/mo MA-~,3~~ml


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to schedule a flu vaccination,
contact your private physician
or personal health care provider.
For more information on Flu and
Flu vaccination, visit the DOH
Web site at http://ww.doh.
state.fl.us/disease_ctrl/immune/
flu/index.htm.


*At LOAN UVLUE. we make small profit
and you eet a area dealt
The best Part is we have family on the lot,
NOT HIGH PRESSURE SALES PEOPLE.
If you don't see the car of your dreams in
this ad, call us. Well eet you Pre-approved,
tell you what it will cost and buy it for you.
We appreciate your supporting us. Come
by or call.


always






We sell al o oour cars at
a discount so you don't
need a down payment!

Interest Rates
as low as 4.75%


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s228/mo Marquis...24,000 mi!

-. -- .


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$307mo Contiveetie.t Owner
Act" .. ..


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0 Down 't1 Toyota Avaon
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t M.


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s269,oma 3ro Row Se

i"- l"i


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s4211mo Ute LoadedE


0 Down '00 Chevy Silverado
'3271mo z-1, 4X4 E asended Cab