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PDIV2 Main: Commentary
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PAGE7 7
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PAGE12 12
PAGE13 13
PAGE14 14
PDIV4 Public and Legal Notices
PAGE15 15
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PDIV6 Obituaries
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The Calhoun-Liberty journal
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00027796/00013
 Material Information
Title: The Calhoun-Liberty journal
Portion of title: Calhoun Liberty journal
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: The Liberty Journal, Inc.
Place of Publication: Bristol Fla
Creation Date: March 30, 2005
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Bristol (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Liberty County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Calhoun County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Liberty -- Bristol
Coordinates: 30.426944 x -84.979167 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in Sept. 1991.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 11, no. 38 (Sept. 18, 1991).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002046630
oclc - 33425067
notis - AKN4565
lccn - sn 95047245
System ID: UF00027796:00013
 Related Items
Preceded by: Weekly journal (Bristol, Fla.)

Table of Contents
    Main
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Main: Commentary
        Page 6
        Page 7
    Main continued
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
    Main: Public and Legal Notices
        Page 15
    Main continued
        Page 16
        Page 17
    Main: Obituaries
        Page 18
    Main continued
        Page 19
    Main: Classifieds
        Page 20
        Page 21
    Main continued
        Page 22
    Main: The Journal Job Mkt.
        Page 23
    Main continued
        Page 24
Full Text




50o


...... .'.'Terea- .':. .
,':.i' bavidk& y:





SfStater e state
i:n te-o rfor&I
- I battewiItiiver ca cer-.

pop~iipg:d-iioy'ffhestate
IegisI ur i-Tallahassee:
Soff Mrch 8Butin the clays
to follow,;he retutnedtor the
hospital 60I his condition
worsened; He died Friday.
Marich 25:-
:-Working -behind the
scenes in politics for years,
the:43-year-old Marianna
resident served as legisla-
ti assistant to former U.S.
Rep. Bill Grant and former
state-Reps. Robert Trani-
mell and Jamey Westbrook,
as well as Rep. Allen Bense,
currently House Speaker of
the FloridaLegislature. He
also worked as special ser-
vices coordinatorat Chipola-
College until he was voted
into office think past No-
vember.
He leaves behind his
s'ife. Marri; and three chil-
dren, Kristin. 17; Vance.
12, and Hunter. 10, as well
as many friends. relatives
and constituents who sup-
ported his efforts to become
a member of the Florida
Legislature.
His wife's uncle, Daniel
Bontrager, of Mariatina.
recalls with fondness how
close David was to his fam-
-ily : "
:'He enjoyed getting out
ithebwoods and in the field
and hunting with his.bo)s-,"
he said. "He had a great
appreciation for nature:and
wildlife and made a very
dedicated effort to teach
his boys about it and teach
themright.' His love for the
outdoors was a side many
never sa%. in David, he said,
noting that he was "a mas-
ter at stepping from one area
to the next." He enjoyed
politics and w as a devoted
fan of the FSU Seminoles.
Bontrager said.
Coley spent most of his
-high school years in Jackson
County,. first in Graceville
and later in Sneads. and
played basketball at both,
Bontrager said. While at-
tending Chipola Junior Col-
lege, he met Bontrager's
niece. Mari, and they later
married. .
,- !He waited until the time.
asg righf' to seekoffice and
was successfully elected,
S SeeCGOLEY on page 24


The Calhoun-Liberty


OUR


AL


Residents believe tornado struck after intense storm and hail


One home destroyed, others damaged


in Saturday night storm in Blountstown


by Teresa Eubanks. Journal Edilo'r
The National Weather Ser-
\ice can't confirm it. but folks
in Ha\es Subdi\ision in Blount-
sitoin don't hate an\ doubt
that Saturda\ night's lighting
storms unleashed a tornado in
their neighborhood.
High minds s tore apait rools.
pulled off porches and dow\ ned
antennas and power lines after
a strong blast of hail battered
homes. Hai es Subdiusion
resident Page W\Vhte said the
rain beaan blowing sideways.
shooting into her home thioutgh
the doors and windoww\. She
head a loud noise she behle\ed
to be a tornado. but said the
sound \\as dreow ned out when
the hail started slamming side-
was,_ against their house '"It
\\as like people w\\ere throwing
rocks .against the windowss"
;he said. "The wind w'ia, reallN
ho\\ ling.
She. hei hu_,band \Wa\ne
White and their tw\o \oung
s;ons. Hai den. 7. and Halston,
2. huddled in a closet until the
\ ind died doi n. When the\
came out. the\ had lost pow er
and their home \\as soaked.
The storm pulled shingles
from their roof and snatched off
their rotating roof \ent. Theii
large to\'er-st\le antenna \\as
knocked to the ground. Their
children's trampoline w\ as blot n
into a field and left in a crumple
of metal. The roof \\as pulled
off a large shed in the back
\ ard.


ABOVE: A huge pine
tree fell in front of the
Pine Island home of
Josephine Brigham
and damaged
two vehicles late
Saturday night.
LEFT: The roof
was destroyed and
porches were ripped
from three sides of
the Lock home at
Hayes Subdivision.
JOHNNY ELIBANKS PHOTOS


"You can see the path it took."
she said of the tornado, noting
the trail of broken trees and
debris.
When the\ felt it was safe to
tra el. she packed tip the kids to
go sia\ at a friend's home Her


husband. \\ho is a volunteer
firefighter, stayed behind to
help their neighbors. But she
didn't get far. As she drote from
her home. she found the road
blocked b\ roof she realized
came from the home of Edward


and Gail Lock
Neighbors sa\ the Lock fami-
ly. w ho lih e in t\\ o mobile homes
near the end of Ha\es Subdi\i-
sion Road. ma\ hate gotten the
w\orsi of it that night.
See STORM on page 13


National Weather Service can't confirm tornado

but high winds did a lot of damage in Blountstown


t', Teresa Eut nriks, ..iurral Eichtor
Bob Goree of the National
Weather Ser% ice in Tallahassee
said Nlonda. that he could not
confirm that a tornado struck
Blountistovn SaturdaN nicht.
'It is felt that the wind dam-
age was most likely\ due to
straight line microburst) wind
damage from a fast-mot ing,
intense thunderstorm," he said.
But homeow- ners in the Itw o
areas affected Ha\es Subdi-
\ision and Pine Island, w- here
several trees came down on
homes, garages and cars be-
liete differently.
"It appears to me we had
some straight line winds, ves.


but %\e had sonic tornado ac-
tion, too." said Calhoun Countr
Emergency~ Management Direc-
tor Sonni O'Br, an.
"I don't think it \as, just one
tmister, I think %we had a bunch
of little ones." he said. noting
that the \\a' the tops of trees
were twisted out showed that a
tornado had been through.
Alone \'ith the Pine Island-
area and Ha\ es Subdl ision.
Redwood Bay Lumber at the
cur e on H\\. 71 \\as hit hard.
"A semi truck was picked up.
carried to the east and slammed
into one of the chip traders."
O'Brnan said. The \winds also
destroyed a number of lumber


sheds at the mill.
Hard. fast rains caused ditch-
es to back up and created some
flooding problems at Parthenon
Healthcare of Blountmsto" n.
O'Brvan said. The\ also had
seepage coming through the
walls. he said. prompting them
to mo\e residents into the hall-
\wa s. "We sent road crews to
clean out the ditches t to relieve
the drainage problem."
The storm w\as particularly
unsettling since the memory
of last year's tornado north of
Blountsto\wn which left four
dead is still fresh in eer\ one's
mind %w hen the skies darken and
thunder rumbles.


No injuries were reported in
Saturday's storm but there w\as
significant property damage.
While the damage is still being
documented. O'Br\an guessed
that "-15 or 20 roofs will ha'e
to be replaced." He estimates
that there %was at least a million
dollars in damages at Redw\ood
Ba\ Lumber, along %with at least
another million in damages to
homes and property.
Tw\o families, including the
Locks and a woman in Pine
Island received Red Cross as-
sistance. he said.
Josephine Brigham. 67. of
See Weather Service page 12


.-its. 3 CommunityCalendarI. Oitua






Page 2 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL MARCH 30,2005


Man arrested after woman beaten, left

unconscious & tied up on bedroom floor


by Teresa Eubanks, Journal Editor
More than five months after
a casual sexual encounter ended
with a Blountstown woman being
beaten, knocked unconscious and
left tied up and nude on her bed-
room floor, her alleged attacker
has been arrested.
Timothy Joe Storer, 35, was
taken into custody March 22
after information led investiga-
tors to his last known residence
- a rented travel trailer at the
Calhoun/Jackson County line.
He has been charged with aggra-
vated battery and false imprison-
ment.
The victim, who was dazed but
able to free herself later in the day
after the Nov.. 14, 2004 attack,
reported the incident after getting,


a phone call from her mother and
telling her what had happened.
The report from the Calhoun
County Sheriff's Department
detailed the attack as recounted
by the victim:
Although they had seen one
another a few times, the victim
only knew her attacker as "TJ."
He showed up at her Pine Street
home around 11 p.m. on Nov.
13, 2004, where she was drink-
ing beer with a neighbor and
T.J. joined them. The neighbor
told investigators that the two
appeared to be friends and "ev-
erything seemed fine."
The neighbor left around 2
a.m. T.J. and the victim later
went into her bedroom and had
consentual sex. The two had been


Wife accuses former Altha

policeman of domestic battery
by Teresa Eubanks, Journal Editor '
A heated argument between an Altha couple has resulted in do-
mestic battery charges being filed against the husbanfd, aformerAltha
police officer.
Jamie Mills, 36. \ as charged after his wife, Teresa Mills, 26, went
to the Calhoun County Sheriff's Office to report an altercation earlier
that evening at their home and showed an abrasion on the back of


her hand.
According to Teresa Mills, she,
was home with a female friend
March 24, when her husband
- whom she believed was out of
town called and asked if she
was alone. When she said yes, he
asked why her friend's van was
parkedin their yard. He told her'
to tell hierfriend to leave.
:Mills returned home and the
Sto began arguing. His wife said
he told her to leave the house.
Teresa Mills said she and her hus-
band %were taking her things out
of her closet when she x as struck-
by a vacuum cleaner she said he
threvx. She also stated that her
husband threw a suitcase in her
-direction, which also hit her.
She left but returned soon to
get more of her belongings. The
two resumed their argument.
Teresa Mills said her husband
pushed her out of the bedroom,
do%\ n the hall and into a chair in-
the kitchen. She said he began,
throw ing her clothes outside and
as the\ were arguing, she was
pushed into a flow er bed barrel.
At some point, she received a.
scrape to the top of her left hand.
The abrasion w\as photographed
at the sheriff's department and
she was given pamphlets on
domestic violence and victim's
nights.
When a deputy w ent to talk to
Nhlls. his statement %\as consis-
tent s ith his wife's, except that
he said he did not hit her w ith a
vacuum or suitcase. He said he
did grab her arm in an attempt to
turn her around to talk to her and
added that she hit him.
AMills formerly served as a po-
lice officer with the Tow n ofAltha
and is a recruiter for the National
Guard, was given a conditional
release follow ing his arrest.


intimate before this encounter but
only saw one another on occa-
sion, the victim said.
After they had sex, the victim
said she was lying facedown on
the bed when she was hit on the
back of the head. She turned
around to tell T.J. to get off of her
just as he hit her again. The sec-
ond blow left her unconscious.
She came to sometime before
noon the next day, finding herself
tied up and nude on her bedroom
floor. Although dazed, she man-
aged to get free. Soon afterwards,
a phone call from her mother
helped her get pulled together and
report the incident.
The woman recalled being at
the man's travel trailer once, and
noted that it was located near
Bubba's Bar in Jackson County.
Investigators found the owner of
the trailer and verified the identity
of the woman's. attacker.
He was released on $2500
bond.
The second hit to the victim's
forehead left a deep laceration
which will require surgery to
correct. She also suffered several
broken bones in her face, which
will require ongoing medical
treatment.


Liberty County juror says

defendant asked for her help
by Teresa Eubanks, Journal Editor
The arrest of a Liberty County man for jury tampering came after
one juror removed herself from the jury pool and reported thatJona-
than .Joe" Daw son had approached her about "helping out at his
trial," according to the arrest warrant affidavit on file with the Liberty


County Clerk of Courts office.
Daw son. 55. a former major at
Liberty Correctional Institution,
was found guilty on one count of
cultivation of cannabis and one
count of possession of less than
20 grams of cannabis at his third
trial on Feb. 17. His first two tri-
als, held in 2004, both ended with
a hung jury after at least one of
the six people selected to decide
Da% son's fate could not come to-
a unanimous decision.
Investigators with the Federal
Department of Law Enforcement
(FDLE) interviewed Debra Clark,
who said in exchange for her
help, Dawson, told her he would
"pay her salary da\ for day" that
she \\ as at the trial.
According to the affidavit,
Clark said Dawson "wanted her
to come to the courthouse with
her mind made up that he was
innocent." Clark told investiga-
tors that Dawson came to her
home and asked that she do what
she could to help him. He ne\ er
advised her specifically what to
do, according to the affidavit.
She said that while he was at her
home, Dawson- showed her a list
of the jurors.
FDLE agents interviewed 32
prospective and actual jurors
involved in the selection process
for Dawson's case.
Dawson was arrested March 7
on thejury. tampering charge. 4


Call Merle Norman today
and book your appointment
or for further information.
These services are offered on
hin Afh Th.iirck,,/ rnf


CALHOUN COUNTY
March 21: Terrell Mayo, VOCR; John Wayne Brown,
driving while license suspended or revoked.
March 22: Timothy Storer, aggravated battery, false
imprisonment.
March 23: Tavrice Edwards, FTA; Angela Howard,
driving while license suspended or revoked; Peggy
Stone, worthless checks Seminole County, GA.
March 24: Shannon Kelly Burke, driving while li-
cense suspended or revoked; Edwards Winter, driving
while license suspended or revoked; Brenda Laidler,
VOP; Kathy Elrod, DUI with property damage; Rounzell
Brown, child support; Willie Elrod, child support.
March 25: James Mills, domestic battery: Micheal
Connell, VOP (county).
March 27: Brock Benton, possession of less than
20 grams of marijuana, possession of drug parapher-
nalia.

LIBERTY COUNTY
March 22: Peggy Stone, holding for Calhoun Co..
March 23: Tavrice Edwards, holding for Calhoun;
Angela V. Howard, holding for Calhoun Co..
March 24: Eric Stephen Atkinson, VOP, dealing
with stolen property (Gadsden); Shannon K. Burke,
holding for Calhoun Co.; Brenda Laidler, holding for
Calhoun Co..
March 25: Terri Lynn Richards, serving 29 days
(weekends); Lori Tean Girton, DUI, attached tag not
assigned.

Listings include name followed by charge. The names above
represent those charged. We remind our readers that all are
presumed innocent until proven guilty.

Blountstown Police Dept.
March 21, through March 27, 2005 Q
Citations issued:
Accidents............ 05 Traffic Citations..................00
Special details (business escorts, traffic details)..... 44
Business alarms....01 Residential alarms...........01
Com plaints....................................................... 264


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MARCH 30,2005 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 3


American Legion Hall Dance


Fri., 8:30 p.m. to 12:30 This week featuring:
Fri., 8:30 p.m. to 12:30 Top Shelf
a.m. & Sat. 8 to 12 p.m. Top Shelf



Hwy. 20 Blountstown Phone 674-1668


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Calaomtn'-Liberty Journal!



Liberty County School Board
will be proposing changes to the following
School Board Policy and Procedures:
6.92- Insurance Premiums
A "Public Hearing" will be held on April 12, 2005 at
7:30 p.m. at the Regular School Board Meeting
located at the Liberty County School Board
Administration Office.

If you would like to view changes you can stop by the
Administration office located at 12926 NW CR 12
330.4-6


Boys charged after stolen dump

truck hits Blountstown building

by Teresa Eubanks, Journal Editor jumping out of a dump truck brother who'd gotten away. Both
Two boys are facing charges just before it ran backward into were taken to the police depart-


of grand theft auto and criminal
mischief after an attempt to steal
a dump truck went awry and the
vehicle slammed into the side of a
neighboring business, according
to a report from the Blountstown
Police Department.
One of the boys is 12, the other
is 15.
Officer John Mallory respond-
ed to a burglar alarmnat Swaine's
Inc. at 20749 East Central Avenue
at 9:18 p.m. on March 22, where
he arrived to find a boy standing
with a hammer in his hand at the
corner of East Central Avenue
and Cayson Street.
A motorist waiting at the in-
tersection waved over the officer
and told him she saw two boys


Bracewell's Home Center, at the
intersection of North Pear Street
and Railroad Avenue.
The officer took the first boy
into custody, collecting the ham-
mer as evidence. When Mallory
went to Bracewell's, he discov-
ered a 1998 Peterbilt dump truck
backed into the south wall of the
building. A garbage dumpster
was wedged between the truck
and the wall.
.The boy found at the scene
then told the officer that he had
been with his brother, who had
made him get in the dump truck
with him: Mallory went to the
home of the boys' aunt, who was
taking care of them while their
mother was ill, and picked up the


ment for questioning.
The boys admitted to getting
in the dump truck and starting it.
When the truck was taken out of
gear it began rolling backwards
across North Pear Street and
the boys jumped out. The truck
crossed the street, hit a dump-
ster and went into the side of the
store, pushing the wall in about
six inches.
The boys also told officers they
were behind Swaine's Inc. and
using a crowbar in an effort to get
inside when the alarm went off.
One of the boys was returned
to the custody of his aunt while
the other was taken to juvenile
detention in Bay County.


Calhoun Commissioners need to find a solution


To the editor:
Like it or not, the state owns
a 20+ acre part of Sam Atkins
Park and the narrow connecting
strip containing 12' wide Lee Hill
Rd:. a-oeandering d rite% \a
between two houses that has now
become a state road (SR) not a
county road (CR,).
Preposterous but true! The
Calhoun County Commission


agreed to such a deal when
purchasing the Yon Parcel over
90 percent of which is to the right
on entering Sam- Atkins Park off
SR 20 West, way south of the
peaceful "strip -and driveway"
which runs west off llth St.
NW. '
In plain as day language, title
to this real estate automatically
(and without notice) goes to
the state if anything's done to
property without first obtaining
state permits let alone suing to
take neighbors' yards to widen a
12' driveway between two homes
- to a 60' wide paved county
park entrance!
The apparently overlooked
"reverter clause" reads: "...
fee simple title to the property
describedherein shall be conveyed
to the board of trustees of the
Internal Improvement Trust Fund
... without further notice to grantee
Calhoun County, its successors
and assigns, and grantee (Calhoun
Co.), its successors and assigns
shall forfeit all right title and
interest in and to the property
described herein."
Newly elected Commissioner
Wise caused a dead silence when
trying to bring this matter up. He
had finally obtained (3-2) votes
in, favor of stopping the county's
lawsuit against Lee Hill Road's
Moore family abandoning


Lee Hill Rd. and deeding the
disputed property to adjacent
owners.
Apparently the three-votes
didn't work as the Moores
say they have since received
notice frbtn Tallthassee (why
Tallahasee?) stating the lawsuit
will not be dropped unless they
(Moores) "sigh-off' on same.
The state probably won't sign
thanks for any memories but
obviously will have to be notified
and become involved. Continuing
a face-saving legal only local
approach doesn't appear to be a
good option in today's market.
Concerned citizens of Calhoun
County should pray that present
commissioners stand up and
take charge in seeking a morally
correct solution. Ex: Notify state
via (elected) executive office
as to the situation and ask for
guidance (help) in clearing titles
and obtaining "sign-offs." Early
public disclosure could have
halted this ill-fated project before
damages (five+titles Sewells,
Hills, Moores, county, state, etc.)
and/or more specifically who
should take the "rep" for the
extensive tree damage in Sam
Atkins Park?
Respectfully submitted,
Mike Calhoun,
concerned citizen of
Calhoun County


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Page 4 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL MARCH 30, 2005


Calhoun Co. Chamber

of Commerce monthly

meetings change
The Calhoun County Chamber of Com-
merce has changed the date of monthly
meetings for the convenience of those with
Tuesday conflicts:
*The Board of Directors will usually
meet on' the second Thursday of each
month at 12 p.m. (noon) (CT). The next
meeting is scheduled for April 14 in the
Chamber's conference room at 20816
Central Avenue. E., Suite 2, Blountstown
(please stay tuned for a possible change in.
time, 8 a.m. vs. noon).
*The membership meeting and luncheon
will usually meet on the third Thursday of
each month at 12 p.m. (noon) (CT) at the.
Calhoun County Senior Citizens Center
in Blountstown. The next meeting is ten-
tatively scheduled for April 21 at 11 a.m.
until 1 p.m. It is combined with the sec-
ond session of the workshop titled, FLOW,
which is facilitated by Touchtone Energy
Cooperatives of Northwest Florida. .
More details will be published at a fu-
ture date.
For more information, please contact
Jessie Ehrich by telephone 674-4519, fax
674-4962, or e-mail ccchamber@yahoo.
com.

Sewell, Ray, Thompson.
family reunion set
The 61st annual Sewell, Ray, Thompson
family reunion will be held Saturday, April
9 at Page Pond Assembly of God Church in.
Altha. You are invited.to come and bring a
well-filled basket for an old-fashioned din-
ner on the ground.and gospel singing.
Come join us as we enjoy a time of fel-
lowship and renewing of old acquaintanc-
es, .
For more information, contact William
Earl "Buddy" Sewell at 674-5674.

Waldorff, Waldroff

family gathering
Waldorff and Waldroff reunion will be
held Saturday, April 2 at Altha Commu-
nity Center.
Registration is at 11 a.m. (CT) and
a covered dish luncheon will be held at
noon. All relatives and family are invited
to attend.
For more information, call 487-9031.

Main Streetmeets April 4
Main Street usually meets the first
Monday of each month in the Calhoun
County Chamber's building. The next
meeting date is scheduledforApril 4. The
time has changed to 5:30 p.m. (CT) to al-
low time for members to travel from their
jobs or homes to the meetings.
For more information, contact Jessie
Ehrich by phone at 674-4519, fax at 674-
4962 or e-mail to ccchamber@yahoo.
com.

Goat producers meet Thurs.
A goat producer meeting will be held
at Calhoun County Extension Office at
20816 Central Ave. East on March 31, at
5:30 p.m. CST in the conference room at
the west end of the building.
A goat production handbook will be
provided. A representative from the De-
partment of Agriculture Animal Indus-
tries will be present. There will be help
with marketing ideas and a question and
answer session Please call t'RSVP at 674-8323.


'Acting Up'theatre

classes for mature

adults in Tallahassee
Acting Up classes are designed espe-
cially for seasoned adults willing to ex-
plore their creativity, learn to really listen
and react, find new challenges and learn
how theatre really happens. Even if you
never put a foot on stage, Acting Up will
be "more fun than you've ever had be-
fore!" as one class member put it. It busts
wide open every age stereotype there ever
was! The classes are taught by theatre
professional Martha Stewart, with guest
appearances by TLT executive director
Norman Ussery and others.
The class meets weekly for eight weeks,
April 16 June 4 from 9:30 a.m. 11:30
a.m. and is open to everyone 50 years old
and better. The fee is $125 per person,
$200 per couple. Class size is limited, so
call now to reserve space or for informa-
tion or registration at 224-4597.
The Tallahassee Little Theatre is lo-
cated at 1861 Thomasville Road, Talla-
hassee.

CCI Employees Club
softball tournament
The Calhoun Correctional Institution
Employees Club will host a Men's Softball
Tournament on Saturday, April 9 at Sam
Atkins Park in Blountstown. ASA rules
will apply.
The format will be 3-6 low bid. Entry
fee is $200 and teams will furnish their
own 47 core balls.
For more information, contact Chris
O&Bryan or Nicole Mathews at 237-
6509.






That's how many copies of
The Calhoun-Liberty Journal
were distributed last week,
ensuring plenty of coverage for
your community announcements
and great response for our
business advertisers!


Calhoun County Commission meets 2 p.m., Calhoun Co. Courthouse


rant






\I


THE
CALHOUN-LIBERTY

JOURNAL
(USPS 012367)
Summers Road
Address correspondence to:
The Calhoun-Liberty Journal
P.O. Box 536
Bristol, FL 32321
Johnny Eubanks, Publisher
Teresa Eubanks, Editor
E-MAIL ADDRESS:
TheJournal@gtcom.net
(850) 643-3333 or
1-800-717-3333 FloridaPress
Fax (850), 643-3334 Association
The Calhoun-Liberty Journal is published each
Wednesdaybythe Liberty Journal Inc., Summers
Road,'P.O. Box 536, Bristol, FL 32321.
Annual subscriptions are $18.
Periodicals postage paid at Bristol, Fla.
POSTMASTER: Send address corrections to:
The Calhoun-Liberty Journal,
P.O. Box 536, Bristol, FL 32321.
S.. OS. -






MARCH 30, 2005 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 5


In Honor of Doctors' Day
BIG BEND HOSPICE
Thanks Our Caring and
Compassionate Physicians











B. David Robinson, M.D. Jessie Furlow, M.D.
Medical Director Associate Medical Director
Gadsden/Liberty Counties
105 N. Jackson St., Quincy, FL 32351
Big Bend (850) 875-4973
Hospice 36 Madison St., Chattahoochee, FL 32324
(850) 663-2631

GET OUT OF LINE
...and go online for government
services and informationn.
S "FirstGov. gov
.of the Federal Government
~"' "W -U.S. General Services Administration



newar


ne ea.


Third annual Florida Wine Festival


from Mary Brogan Museum
of Art and Science
TALLAHASSEE If you
were wearing bell bottom jeans
and paisley shirts, listening to
the Beatles, then you won't
want to miss the 2005 Florida
Wine Festival. The Mary Bro-
gan Museum of Art and Science
will host the third annual Flori-
da Wine Festival on April 7 and
8 with special musical guests
FAB, performing the fabulous
songs of the Beatles. Join us to
celebrate the 35th anniversary of
the release of "Abbey Road."
The festivities kick off with
the Brogan Museum's tradi-
tional wine tasting and din-
ner reception. Attendees will
enjoy a wonderful assortment
of food, from our event restau-
rants: Andrew's 228, Cafe Cab-
ernet, Capital Steakhouse, Chez.


Pierre, Manna, Mozaik and the
Melting Pot, as well as incred-
ible wines. There will be a si-
lent and a live auction, featuring
exclusive bottles of wine from
private collections as well as
amazing travel trips with wine
themes.
Guests will then stroll over to
the plaza of the Florida History
Museum and enjoy the sounds
of FAB, a Beatles tribute band.
FAB is a group of top Nash-
ville musicians, record produc-
ers and songwriters. They play
only music of the Beatles, pay-
ing homage to the sounds that
changed the course of popular
music in the 60s. During the
concert, guests will partake of
tasty libations at our groovy 60s
"Psychedelic Lounge" while
dancing to. sounds that made
the world "Come Together" in a


unique musical way.
On Friday, April 8, Andrew's
228, Cafe Cabernet, Capital
Steakhouse, Chez Pierre, Man-
na, Mozaik and the Melting Pot,
will create a night of decadent
wine and dinner pairings with
exclusive events happening at
each of the restaurants. Each
restaurant will select the fea-
tured foods, wines and guest
appearances. It is very impor-
tant to make your dining reser-
vations well in advance at your
restaurant of choice.
Restaurant menus are avail-
able for viewing on the Florida
Wine Festival Web site, www.
thefloridawinefestival.com.
For more information on
ticket prices, sponsorships op-
portunities or general inquiries,
please visit the 2005 Florida
Wine Festival Web site.


Great American Clean-up in April


Keep Calhoun County Beau-
tiful, Inc. is unrelenting in its
effort to improve the quality of
life in- Calhoun County by their
participation in the annual Great
American Clean-up (GAC).
KCCB, Inc. has partnered with
Waste Management in coopera-
tion with the City of Blountstown
and the Calhoun County Board
of Commissioners to bring this
about.
Waste Management is a corpo-
rate sponsor of the GAC and in
2004 was the recipient of the "Vi-
sion ofAmericaAward," awarded
by Keep America Beautiful in
recognition of Waste Manage-
ment's innovations in product
stewardship, waste treatment,


recycling and conservation.
Waste Management, through
an agreement with the Calhoun
County Board of Commissioners,
provides the citizens of Calhoun
County with household garbage
pick up (for a fee) on a regular
schedule throughout the year.
Unfortunately, there is no provi-
sions for the disposal of white
goods and bulk waste other than
household w a.te
To accommodate their custom-
ers and to promote the GAC ef-
fort supported locally by KCCB,
Inc., they have agreed to provide
construction-type dumpsters
to be placed at the Calhoun
County recycling side, north of
Blountstown.


These dumpsters will be ac-
cessible on Thursday, Friday and
Saturday, beginning Thursday,
April 7 and ending Saturday,
April 23. Specific dates and times
are Thursday and Friday on dates
7-8, 14-15-, 21-22 from 1 p.m. to
5 p.m. and on Saturdays 9-16 and
23rd from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Only
white goods and bulk items will
be accepted.
The City of Blountstown has
agreed to a monthly amnesty for
white goods and bulk waste with
yard trash being collected on a
weekly schedule throughout the
year.
Please take advantage of this
opportunity to clean up our city
and county.


USDA invites tobacco quota producers & holders


,x


QUINCY USDX's Farm
Service Agency (FSA) will hold
an information meeting for to-
bacco producers and quota hold-
ers on SaturdaN. April 2 at 10
a.m. at the Florida A&M Univer-
sity Research Center 4259 Bain-
bridige \V\a. in Quincy to discuss


, Golden

Pharmacy
Phone 674-4557














Your Valu-Rite store with
a full selection of drugs,
greeting cards, film, health
and beauty aid supples
17324 Main Street North.
Blountstown
LQCe 1L.eCLwEDoKPE RA.TED


the new Tobacco Transition Pay-
ment Program (TTPP). Sign-up
for this program begins, March
.14 and ends June 17. Produc-
ers riot signing up before June 17
will not receive a 2005 payment.
This meeting is for tobacco
quota producers who are own-
ers, operators, landlords, tenants,
or sharecroppers who shared in
the risk of producing tobacco
anytime between 2002 and 2004.


It is also for quota holders who
owned a farm with a 2004 basic
marketing quota as of October
22, 2004.
This meeting will explain
who's eligible, for the Tobacco
Transition Payment Program
(also called the Tobacco Buy-
out), what types of quota tobacco
are eligible and how quota pro-
ducers and quota holders can ob-
tain payments.


Blue Grass Spring Fling Festival April 9


"Rivertown Girls" from
Blountstown will be one of the
five bands at the second annual
Blue Grass Spring Fling Festival
on Saturday, April 9 at the Lib-
erty County Veterans Memorial
Park -Civic .Center in Bristol.
The event will be all day, fun for
all.
Members of the "Rivertown
Girls" Band include, Carolyn
VanLierop on the banjo; Mary
Cathryn Smith on the fiddle and
Sharlyn Smith playing mando-
lini Otiier jiea bands include,.
"Blue Shade- of Grass" and "Sil-
\er & Gold" from Tallahassee;.
"Crosscut'" from Panama City,
aid "The .Countr'. G'iuni"' from-


Bainbridge, Ga. Gates open at
10 a.m. (ET).
Items available from the spe-
cial variety of vendors include:
Handmade Brazilian jewelry,
airplant arrangements, wooden
toys, furniture, cedar chests, gun
cabinets, handpainted lamps,
mailboxes, baby quilts, pillows,
napkins, glass beads, custom
photography and many other
crafted items.
Admission price includes
music all day, exhibits, kiddie
activities and train rides through
the Park. The cost is $5 adults,
children 5 and under, free. For
additional information, call 643-
5235 or 64315491:, .. -






Page 6 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL MARCH 30,2005


LATE NIGHT LAUGHS
A RECAP OF RECENT OBSERVATIONS
BY LATE NIGHT TELEVISION HOSTS.


Terri Schiavo's right to life


Picture. this. A brain-damaged
woman is in a hospice. She is
not able to feed herself. She is
fed through a feeding tube. She
has lived this way for the past 15
years. Other than brain damage,
she is a healthy woman.
This woman's husband who
claims guardianship has con-
vinced the-state, federal and
supreme courts that his wife told
him that she didn't want to be kept
alive by artificial means. There are
no written documents that support
his claim. Only his word.
The husband now lives with
another woman, and they have
two children. In spite of being in
what most people would consider
a common-law marriage with the
mother of his two children, the
husband piously claims- to love
his brain-damaged wife and wants
to see that her wish to die is car-
ried out.
The husband's dubious claims
might have had some validity
-if his efforts to have her feed-
ing tube removed had occurred
shortly after the incident that left
her brain damaged. But according
to thie news media, the husband
initially sued for a large chunk of
money so that he could "take care
of his wife."
Well, taking care of the wife
didn't last long, and some eight
years after she had a heart attack
which resulted in brain damage,
the husband started his cam-
paign to have the feeding tube
removed.
The brain-damaged woman
has a mother and father who are
w killing to take care of her for the
rest of her life. But the courts have
decreed that the husband is the
legal guardian, and he can, and
has, made the decision that this
woman will die.
By court order, the %\oman'
:feeding tube was removed on
March 18, 2005. She is being
starved to death. The body can
function for a long time without
food, but not without water. She
will probably die from lack of
water,
The irony of this situation is
that this barbaric act is occurring
in America where the Rule of Law
is supposed to protect the citizens
of this country.
I've written many times that
the Ruledof Law, is a cornerstone'


COX'S

CORNER
Jerry Cox is a retired military officer
and writer with an extensive back-
ground in domestic and foreign policy
issues. He lives. irfShalimar, Fla.

of American democracy, but the
law of the land doesn't cover ev-
ery situation. That's why we have
judges, people to make decision,
not only on a narrow interpreta-
tion of the law, but with some
common sense.
Common sense is the missing
ingredient in the Terri Schiavo
case. I can't believe that judges
at all levels have taken the word
of this scurrilous husband with-
out any written proof of the
wife's, wish to die. Based on the
husband's word, the courts of the
land have sentenced an innocent
woman to death. Her only crime is
that she is brain-damaged.
If any of these judges had any
common sense, they would have
recognized that the well-being
and protection of Terri Schiavo
was the overriding concern, not
the dubious rights of the husband.
Instead of splitting legal hairs and
parsing legal terms, at least one
judge at the state or federal level
should have had the backbone to
end the husband's guardianship
and designated the parents as the
woman's legal guardian.
But common sense didn't pre-
vail. You would have thought they
were arguing the merits of a case
about a property\ line, not about
taking a woman's life.
A scary fact is that the major-
ity of American people think that
all this is OK. In their view, the
husband is the guardiani and he
can make the decision for his wife
to die some 15 years after the in-
cident arid without written proof.
No common sense there.
This situation has brought out
the "doctor and lawyer" in many
people. They think they are ex-
perts on brain-damaged people
and the law. They are not. Neither
am I, but my common sense tells
me that there is nothing to be
gained from starving a helpless
woman to death.
A nephew of ours was in an
automobile accident when he
x,as 18 and suffered severe brain


damage. He lay flat on his back
for 33 years. The only movement
that he ever made was the flicker
of an eyelid. He was fed through a
feeding tube and required constant
care 24/7 for 33 years.
If his parents and our family
had applied the same logic used
for killing Schiavo, our nephew
would have been starved to death
within a couple of months after
his accident. That would never
happen in our family.
My mother died this past Janu-
ary. She was a healthy 95-year-old
living in a nursing home. She had
a massive brain hemorrhage while
she slept. I arrived at the hospital
emergency room about 3 a.m. The
neurosurgeon and I reviewed the
CAT scans of her brain which
showed massive damage. The
doctor said that she would die
within a few hours without life
support.
I made the decision to let her
die. It was not easy to let her go,
but I did. She had lived a long,
Christian life and there was noth-
ing to be gained from trying to
prolong her life through artificial
means. My wife and I sat with her,
and about eight hours later her
heart beat for the last time.
If Terri Schiavo was in the
same condition as my mother, I
would agree with ending her life.
But Schiavo is in better condition
than our nephew was. She is not
on life support equipment, and I
think that killing her is wrong.
Starving her to death is uncon-
scionable.
The court system treats convict-
ed criminals better than Schiavo is
being treated. Convicted criminals
are put to death by lethal injection,
not by starving them to death.
The same people who think it
is OK to starve Schiavo to death
would never starve their pets to
death. When a pet has a terminal
illness, the veterinarian humanely
ends the pet's life with a lethal
injection.
Those people that believe the
courts were right in siding with
the husband will be able to quote
chapter and verse of legalese as
to why this woman was sentenced
to death by starvation, but there is
nothing moral or humane in the
killing of Terri Schiav.


In the Michael Jackson trial, one of Jackson's
lawyers slumped over in his chair and had to be
taken to the hospital on a stretcher. It happened
right after Michael told him he was really broke and
couldn't pay him. -JAY LENO


"To solve the mystery of King Tut's death, a team
transported his remains to a hospital for a CAT scan
-- remarkable for many reasons, most notably that
it's not covered by Tut's HMO. Apparently, anything
that happened over 3000 years ago? A'pre-existing
condition.'" -JON STEWART


Researchers at an Austrian university are facing
ethics charges for using human corpses as crash
test dummies. See, that's what happens if you don't
have a good Social Security system ... you have to
keep working even after you're dead. -JAY LENO


President Bush met with Mexican President Vicente
Fox at his ranch in Texas. There was one awkward
moment when Bush asked the Mexican president,
"How did you sneak in here?" CONAN O'BRIEN




In an interview with Barbara Walters, Robert Blake
said that he has a clear conscience after his acquittal.
Blake went on to say that if the jury believes he didn't
kill his wife, then so does he. DENNIS MILLER

Robert Blake is still out there looking for acting jobs.
Did you hear the news today? He could be the new
host of "Elim-a-date." JAY LENO

The Michael Jackson trial continued today. Michael
either showed up on time for court today, or showed
up really, really late for court yesterday, I'm not
sure... JIMMY KIMMEL


How do you think Robert Blake's acquittal makes
Martha Stewart feel? I mean, she goes to prison for
lying to investigators, Robert Blake goes free ... you
know, if Martha would have just killed her stockbroker
instead of taken his advice, she'd be a free woman
now. JAY LENO


Martha Stewart is under house arrest, and there's
a 24-hour surveillance team monitoring Martha's
whereabouts.... Nothing yet on al-Qaida.
DAVID LETTERMAN

Adidas has announced they're coming out with
a "smart" shoe. It costs $250. You know, it's bad
enough we can't afford to drive anywhere, now we
can't walk anywhere. JAY LENO


A new study shows that large doses of Vitamin E do
not protect against heart attacks and cancer, and
might actually raise the risk of heart failure. The study
was published in this month's 'Journal of Things that
Scientists Told You to Do Last Month That Turned
Out to Be Harmful This Month.' DENNIS MILLER-


I've started doing that new Robert Blake workout. No
matter what you do wrong, you just walk. -JAY LENO
4 ,- 0 A f 1






MARCH 30,2005 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 7




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Page 8 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL MARCH 30,2005


MESSAGS OFAPPEC


The Calhoun County Chamber
of Commerce would like to thank
Bike Florida and Share the Road
Campaign and the Bike Florida
Director Greg Wilson, for bring-
ing the "Red Hills to the Sea"
annual bicyclist event to Calhoun
County.
We would also like to thank
all of those who contributed to
making the event a huge success:
Airport Motel, American Legion
Post 272, Blountstown United
Methodist Church, Calhoun
County Senior Citizens Asso-
ciation, Girl Scout Troop 579,
Panhandle Pioneer Settlement,
Altha Seniors Project Gradua-
tion, Wayne Martin and his band,
and a host of other wonderful
merchants and citizens who wel-
comed bicyclists to their stores,
restaurants and our community.
A special thanks to the Oyster
Bar on Hwy. 71 south for agree-
ing to stay open until midnight,
to the El Jalisco #2 Mexican
Restaurant for handling the large
number of diners that we sent to
you (Mexican fare was a special
request of numerous bicyclists)
and to Paramore's Too for pro-


viding "local fare" (fish) to bi-
cyclists.
Calhoun Co. Chamber
of Commerce

The family of the late Annie
Mae Martin would like to express
our sincere gratitude and appre-
ciation for the many thoughtful
things that were done during our
time of bereavement.
We, the Martin family, extend
our many thank yous to each and
everyone for all your prayers,
flowers, cards, phone calls, food,
visits, and many other generous
contributions.
All the kind expressions of
love and care giving shown


during her illness can never be
forgotten. Even though our hearts
are weak, we are strong within
because of you.
Special thank you to all of her
caregivers throughout the last few
years. We appreciate you more
than words can describe.
May God continue to ,bless
each and everyone of you.
Thank you, the Martin Family


10922 NW SR 20, Bristol, FL 32321
850-643-5400
Rev. Victor A. Walsh, Pastor
Sunday Morning Bible Study.......................... 9:45 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship Service................ 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Evening Discipleship Training........... 6:00 p.m.
Sunday Evening Worship Service.................. 7:00 p.m
Wednesday Evening Prayer & Bible Study......7:00 p.m.

Weinie out cmead oship w.6 s WeeJsu


Paul's Wrecker Service e8 -6 65
vLockoutpaulswrecker.com
24-HOUR SERVICE 17311 NE. PEAR STREET -Jumps.tart
674-8697 (TOWS) BLOUNTSTOWN, FL 32424 *FlastTirr
Dependable Service@An Affordable Price .


Prayer band meets
The Liberty Community Prayer
Band will hold prayer service
Thursday, March 31 at 7:30 p.m.
ET) at the home of Sister Betty
Beckwith.
Everyone is cordially invited
to attend. For more information,
call6-13-2622.

We welcome your church announce-
ments and remind you to be sure to
include the day and date as well as time
and location of each event. We also ask
that you include a phone number or direc-
tions to the church to make it convenient
for our readers.
There is no charge for church an-
nouncements, butwe run each announce--
ment only once. If you would like to repeat
the same announcement, we can do so
but must charge for the space as though
Sit were an adi'er;emeni



NOTICE:


The Liberty
SCounty School
Board meeting
will be held
on Tuesday,
April 12, 2005
INSTEAD of
SApril 19, 2005i:+


41 I H. 0-hot D dll Uh dr.Eld D PC d ittn
GIVE US A CAll. WE WANT YOUR BUSINESS!



--- ..- ......... .. .
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ELO% .O2LlL,. W%%.l;.Ll -


--0~

NOW: $14,988 NOW: $12,988 NOW: $15,988 NOW: $7,988
OR: $298/Mo. @60 Mos.,W.A.C. OR: $218/Mo." OR $268/Mo.*
Bring Your income Tax Money, We Want Your Business!

qf Blountstown
31 CTEL UWE BLOUNTSTOWN FLORIDA
Pontiac Olds GMCInc. 850-674-3307 800)419-1801.
'All Prces And N',: Down P'. niertAme.--W A' t '/!r er,,ro r -t; .. ...-pe s axt. ti- r es., A'-Pirttires For lustria on Onl..... ',




MARCH 30,2005 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 9


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Page 10 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL MARCH 30,2005


Fla. Peanut Producers Assoc. seeks

National Peanut Board nominees


FL01 National Barrel Horse Association

awards trophy saddles to year-end winners


. Florida District 01 held 16
races in 2004, starting in J nuary
and ending in December. FL01
District consists of 100lmembers.
NBHA Banquet was held March
19 at Wakulla Horseman Associa-
tion in Crawfordville. Calhoun
County residents represented
themselves very well.
Year-end open winners in
each division-received Tex Tan'
Saddles for first places in each
division: ID Debbie Bass. 2D
- Wendys Temple. 3D Lesley
Clemons. Other awards were.


given for second, third, fourth and
fifth places in each division. Open
ID fifth place was awarded to
Wendy Temple; Open 3D fourth
place, Ashley Whitfield.
Local youth winners in each
division receiving awards in-
clude, 1D first place, Nichole
Tipton; fourth place, Krystal
Yon; 2D first place, Lesley
Clemons; second place, Kayla
Yon; third place. Krystal Yon;
3D third place. Kennedy Yon;
fourth place, Lesley Clemons.
These aw yards consisted of NBHA


District Champion belt buckles,
stirrups, jackets, halters, spur
straps, blankets, etc.
Local adult class winners in
each- division receiving awards
include, 2D first place, Tina
O'Bryan; 3D first place, Kay
Tipton; third place, Tina O'Bryan;
fourth place, Rhonda Sessions.
Not pictured is Katina O'Bryan
winning open 2D fifth place.
Their winnings qualifies them
to attend the Open & Youth \\World
show sin Augusta. GA and Jack-
son, MS in 2005.


The Florida Peanut Producers
Association will seek nomina-
tions for a board member and
alternate to serve on the National
Peanut Board. The nominations
and elections meeting will be
held at the Jackson County Ag-
ricultural Complex, 2741 Penn.
Ave. Marianna, Fl. 32448 on
April 21 at 10 a.m. (CT).
The term of the current Flor-
ida board member will expire at
the end of this year.
Following the election the
names of two nominees for
board member and two nomi-
nees for alternate along with the
election results will be submit-
ted to USDA. The United States
Secretary of Agriculture then de-
termines the board member and
alternate.
USDA requires this announce-
ment be posted at least 30 days
prior to the election.
"The National Peanut Board
shall not discriminate against any
person because of race, color,
national origin, gender, religion,


age, disability, political beliefs,
sexual orientation, and marital
or family status. We encourage
all persons who qualify as peanut
producers to attend the meeting
and run for nomination."
For more information, contact
the Ken Barton, executive direc-
tor Florida Peanut Producers As-
sociation, 2741 Penn. Ave. Suite
One Marianna, FL 32448 or call
(850)526-2590, fax (850)526-
2277 or e-mail Ken@flpeanuts.
com.

ARCITO meets
Monday, April 11
The Apalachicola River Creek
Indian Tribal Organization Inc.
Saponi will hold its monthly
meeting on Monday, April 11
at 7 p.m. at the creek lodge. All
members are invited to attend
the meeting.
The lodge is located one-half
mile from the Apalachee Pole
Mill on Hwy. 12 South..
For more information, call
Eunice Scoggins at 643-2950. ,


Gwen's Bloomers
Don and Gwen McGill would like to invite
you to visit our new nursery in Kinard.
We have shrubs, trees, flowers,
cypress swings and more.

Open Tuesday through Saturday
8 a.m. 4 p.m.(CT)
(850)639-6900 (


Thorpe to perforrr
Monica Thorpe, a rising star and an e)
and talented performer,: will be singing
37th Annual Springtime Tallahassee J
in the park on April 2 from 2 to 2:30 p.:
Parade and Jubilee is. anticipated to be tl
est ever, with an expected 200,000 or ir
tendees. Thorpe will perform on the yout
facing Park Avenue and Du'al Street.
The Springtime Tallahassee enterta
committee based Thorpe's selection
quality and originality of her singing tal,
performances.
Thorpe is a ninth grade student at V
High School. She is an "A" student % iith
attendance throughout her school years.
enrolled in voice, piano and guitar les:
Michelle Snow's School of Music. She
ated from modeling school in January
She has been recognized by Governor Bi
Representative Will Kendrick for her ou
ing academic achie events and perfect
attendance record.
Thorpe has performed in talent show:
tions. the American Cancer Society's Re
Life inWakulla County and at Wakulla C
own Sopchoppy Opry accompanied
great and talented in-house band.
Southbound.
Thorpe is the daughter of Eva
and the late J. Michael Thorpe of
Smith Creek. She is the grand-
daughter of James and Sara
Thorpe of Hosford and Bill and
Barbara Lescoe of Smith Creek.
She is the great-granddaughter of
Jinmmie Clyde Parrish of Hosford 443
and Mary Ola and the late Jack AlI1


Springtime Tallahassee


Toll Free: 1-888-740-8222 ,^A 3905 W Hwy. 90
Business: (850) 526-5254. IN MA
Residence: (850)762-3679C IN MARIANNA


Langston of Smith Creek.
s, audi- Thorpe encourages e\ en one to come and enjoy
elay for the Springtime Tallahassee Festi'ities and. to pro-
ounty's vide support to a home-town girl.
by the

Clay O'Neal's

MAND (LEARINE I


y O'Nea
33 NW C
ha. Fl 32


Tractor work Fencing Bushhogging
Discing Leveling Land clearing
ootraking Road Building Fish Ponds
Field Fence or Barbed Wire

county Road 274 (850) 762-9402
241 Cell (850) 832-5055


-*a-






MARCH 30, 2005 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 11


Tucker Life-Health
Insurance & Annuity, Inc.

1 800-226-7005 '

Ross E. Tucker, CLU, RHU A
www.tuckerlifehealth.com retucker51 @ netzero.com

00 0 000 00 *O 0000***
Guardian ad Litem VOLUNTEERS :
...are powerful voices in the lives of abused and ne-
glected children in our community. Join us and speak
up for a child! Call the Guardian ad Litem Program at
(850) 482-9127 or (850) 638-60433.


Nobles-Summers to wed in April

Kim and Regina Nobles of Bristol are pleased
to announce the engagement of their daughter, ,...
Bess Leann of Bristol, to Jacob E. Summers of
Bristol. Jacob is the son of Hal and Pam Summers ... .
of Bristol.
Leann is the granddaughter of Jewel Dykes .'. .
and the late David Dykes of Hosford and Rebecca I S -
Nobles and the late Bobby Nobles of Bristol. .. .


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www.chipolaford.com
5EEYOUR FAVORITE SALESPERSON.JAMES DYE0S,CHARLES EVANS, LARRY BOOKER, SEAN PEAR(E BILLY BRY'I, ROiUOUA-EILALtARBD. RIK B R4RIE AtE ttANAGER


Jacobois the
grandson of
Mable Summers
and the late Jack
Summers of
BristolandMary .'
Sidell and the





ate of Liberty
County High School, a 2004 graduate of Chipola College,
and is currently pursuing a degree in Occupational Therapy
at FAMU.
Jacob is a 1999 graduate of Liberty County High School
and a 2004 graduate of TCC. Jacob is currently employed by
Summers Appraisal and Real Estate Services.
The wedding will be held Saturday, April 30 at 2 p.m. in
Townsend, Tennessee. There will be a reception held in their
honor at Veterans Memorial Park at 5:30 p.m. on Saturday, May
7. All friends and family are welcome to attend the reception.


-- *-


Revells celebrate 60th anniversary
Reese and Helen Revell of Bristol will celebrate their 60th anni-
versary April 1. They married in Wewahitchka in 1945.
They enjoy eating out.
Reese retired from Tallahassee Fire Dept., and Helen retired from
Florida State University Administration.
They have one son, James; a daughter, Reesa; granddaughter
and great-grandson, both of California and a granddaughter and her
husband of Georgia.
A party is planned for the couple at Wakulla Springs Lodge for a
few friends and family on Sunday, April 3.





DONOVAN '
JACKSON
Donovan Jackson
celebrated his first
birthday on March
29. He is the son
of Amy Jackson of
Kinard.


'I
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I


I





Page 12 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL MARCH 30,2005


Storm leaves its mark on Pioneer Settlement and lumber company


jl


Last week's storm, coming the day before Easter,
took its toll on Redwood Bay Lumber Company.
The winds pulled off the roof of the business office,
ABOVE RIGHT, and damaged the front of the building
as well as wreaking havoc throughout the site, LEFT.
The Panhandle Pioneer Settlement was also hit by
the winds, which blew the porch off the historic Bailey
Log House. TOP LEFT. About five large pine trees
were also destroyed at the settlement.
JOHNNY EUBANKS PHOTOS

L. -, c~ V T~ IKW~


208 Pine Street. returned home around midnight to find everything intact at her Pine Island home. Stay-
ing with her %were l\\o nieces, Minnie Collins of Jackson\ille and Shirle Cooper. who lives nearb,.
The women had just returned from.a wedding reception and \\ere in the dining room talking when the
%weather got rough again.
The strong winds brought down a huge tree from her neighbor's. ard. which landed along the edge
of her roof, blocked her front entrance and crashed onto both of her nieces's car-. Although damaged,
Collins' Mercury Marquis %%as still dritable. Cooper's Grand Am w\as not.
"We're alive, thank God, but the roof is really messed up," Brigham said. "It rained on the back of
the couch but the only thing we really lost was the carpet," she said.
The women realized that a transformer had been hit and saw live w ires hI ing across the Nard. The\
stayed inside until the next day, when someone came to cut the tree a%% a\ from the front of the home and
pull it off the cars.'
"We have not been able to document that there was a tornado," saN s Meteorologist Paul Dual. of
the Tallahassee Office of the National Weather Service. The Tallahassee radar \ as dow n last w weekend
but he said they closely reviewed images from the radars at Eglin Air Force Base and did not find an\-
evidence of rotatiounin the storm. He noted that the fast moving storm \ as moving at 50 mph. and if it
produced w ind gusts of 30 mph it would create an 80 mph force. "We belie' e there w ere strong w inds
capable of doing serious damage," he said. He said the storm started on March 23 and "continued on
and off throughout the weekend."


-. ,. .. ..4 ... .
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Emergency Management Offices watching the rivers rise
A stormy Easter weekend ended with several damaged homes in Calhoun County, but now that
the winds have blown and the rains have fallen, there's one more thing to worry about: river
levels. While no significant storm damage was reported in Liberty County, the waters of the
Ochlockonee River (shown above) are rising and pushing folks off its banks. A bait store near
R.J.'s House of Catfish has been evacuated and others along the water are heading to higher
ground, according to Rhonda Lewis, acting Emergency Services Director for Liberty County.
People are also keeping an eye on the rising Apalachicola River as well as the Chipola River.
JOHNNY EUBANKS PHOTO


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MARCH 30,2005 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 13


1%C


STORM LEAVES TRAIL OF DEBRIS


STuR ONT i eaINUEDFRO -HEFRONTPAG


Gail Lock, her husLband. Edward, and their
son Chris, live in a mobile home with a
built-on section, including three porches,
that had surrounded the structure. .The,
Lock's son, Anthony, his wife and their
two children live close by in a singlewide
mobile home.
But after Saturday night, .the. re all
looking for ne% accommodations.
Gall Lotk and her two daughters-in-law
had gone shopping that night. Ed-ward
Lock, a 60-year-old diabetic who requires
nine hours of dialysis each night, was at
home that night with his four grandchil-
dren and his son, Anthony.
"We were sitting-in the house and it
started hailing real bad around 9 p.m.,"
Anthony said. He and his father gathered
the kids who are 3, 4, 5 and 7 years
old and put them in the kitchen. "We
have a big deep freezer and we put them
beside it," he said, noting that the room
was the only one with a concrete floor so
he felt they were safest there. He made a
barrier around the children, using bags of


clothing. He and his father lay over the
little ones as the storm intensified. "We
huddled down in the kitchen together and
started pra. ing." he said.
Whenhe looked outside. hIs neighbor's
floodlight illuminated the hail and be could.
see it blowing sidewas.x
"We heard a strong uc king sound JLIti
before the tornado hit us," he said. "I
could hear it twisting and ripping the roof
off. -It seemed like it was taking forever
lo get past us"
When things calmed down, he looked
out the back door and saw a powerline was
down and realized two of their porches had
collapsed. "Everything was just scattered,"
he said. At first, he said he believed they
were trapped inside but his father found
that they could get out from the third porch
even though it was damaged. When he got
outside, he found his mobile home next
door had been lifted off its blocks, moved
a couple of feet and dropped, twisting its
frame.
The children. including Anthony's sons,


Anthony, 5 and Rodney, 4, along with his
neice Sage, 3, and nephew, Justin, 7, were
all uninjured. "Tony kept them calm," his
brother, Chris said, adding, "He said the
whole time, their eyes were about to pop
out of their heads."
nthony said he believes his family will
be able to get back in their trailer after he
get some help moving it back in place.
But die home where his parents and brother
lived is another story. The roof is gone and
their belongings were soaked. The water-
logged ceiling is falling in. The framework
of porches that surround the trailer was
pulled apart like toothpicks.
Gail Lock got a call summoning them
home after the storm hit and they rushed
back, knowing her husband's precarious
health situation. Gail Lock, who works
as a correctional office at Calhoun Cor-
rectional Institution, has had some serious
health problems of her own and suffered a
mild heart attack a month ago. When she
got back to Blountstown that night, her first
concern was to find a safe place for her


husband and ensure that he could undergo
his nightly dialysis regimen. She took him
to Calhoun-Liberty Hospital, where he
stayed overnight but was discharged the
next day. With some financial assistance
from the Red Cross, the Locks were able
to stay a couple of nights in a local motel
but by Tuesday afternoon, they were trying
to make arrangements to pick up a camper
trailer from Marianna.
They don't know what the future holds,
since they're unsure about their insurance
situation. Gail Lock said she believes she
has mortgage insurance but may have let
her other insurance lapse.
Despite the loss of the home, "I'm
blessed and thankful," she said Tuesday.
The Red Cross and the Sheriff's Depart-
ment have been fantastic." She added
that some of her co-workers from the
Calhoun Correctional, along with a former
co-worker from Gulf Correctional, have
offered their help as well.
Anyone who would like to offer the
family any kind of aid or assistance can do
so by calling Jean Dudley at 674-8869.






Page 14 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL MARCH 30,2005


---------- -
I SCHOOL MENU I
Liberty
County Schools


.- t ,-


Pictured above, left to right, Kate Atkins, Blountstown High School; Lorraine McClellan,
Blountstown High School Vocational Counselor; Brandon Scott Dysard, Altha School; and Ellis
Nichols, Carr School Physical Education Teacher and WFEC District 1 Trustee.


Two Calhoun Co. students


intrip to Washington, D.C.


T%%o high school juniors fromrn
Calhoun Count- were among 15
area students \\ho recently com-
peted for an opporrunitN to rep-
resent West Florida Electric Co-
operative (\TECi during a trip
to the nation's capital this sum-
mer. Brandon Scott D\sard. of
Altha School, and Kate Atkins,
of Blountstown Hiegh School,
participated in WFECs 2005
Youth Tour competition March
22 at Blue Lake Acti ities Cen-
ter in Chiple\.
High school juniors from 15
schools throughout F\TEC's
service area in Calhoun. Hol-
mes, Jackson and Washington
counties \lied for the trip to the
U. S. capital. The contestants
vw ere chosen b\ their high school
.-principals or guidance counsel-
- ors to represent their schools in
.the competition. .The contest-is
limited each \ear to llth-grade
students \\ hose parents or guard-
ians are \VFTEC consumers or
member-owners.
A three-judge panel of ex-


LARIANNA The -
Chipola College Cham- .
ber/Community Chorus _
will present the Mo- i
zarn Requiem. Tuesday ..
April 5. at 7:30 p.m. in
the Chipola Arts Center.
The concert is be-
ing presented in honor
of retiring piano pro-
fessor/Chipola faculty
member, Dr. Carolhn ,
S Wilson. -
The chorus will be accom-
panied by a 25-piece orchestra
under the direction of Chipola
Music professor Dr.. Ed Lyon.
Lion will give a free pre-con-
ert lecture on Mozarti and the


perts from other electric co-ops
quizzed the students individu-
ally about their knowledge of
WFEC, the rural electrifica-
tion program and energy facts,
then evaluated the students' re-
sponses, communication skills,
poise and personalities. All the
competitors participated in the
ti o-day. statewide Youth Tour
in Tallahassee March 16 and 17,
which included a tour of the old
and new state capitols and an
opportunity to meet go\ ernment
officials and observe the legisla-
ture in session..
Daniel L. Bernabe, of Beth-
tehem School, and Shana Dawn
Robison. of Grand Ridge High
School. were named winners,
\ while John Daniel "J. D." Byrd,
of Graceville High School, was
chosen alternate. Bernabe and
Robisori will join other students
representing electric coopera-
Lives from throughout the coun-
try at the National Rural Electric
Cooperative Association's Youth
Tour. The week-long, expenses-


REQUIEM will be from 6:30-7
p.m. in room H108 of the Fine
Arts Building.
Soloists for the. "Requiem"
will include Chipola alumni and
fctil(N. as '%eI Ia, ',ozar'lovers


paid trip will include a breakfast
with congressional representa-
tives, a Potomac River cruise and
dance, visits to several historic
sites, including the U. S. Capi-
tol Building, the White House,
Ford's Theatre, Arlington Na-
tional Cemetery, the Lincoln and
Jefferson Memorials, the Viet-
nam Veterans Memorial and the
.Holocaust Memorijal Museum
and more.
The Youth Tour program's
purpose is to provide.public rec-
ognifion to outstanding young
people, and to acquaint high
school students with govern-
mental aci\ ities on a local, state
-and federal level. The winners
of V\ FEC's Youth Tour compe-
tition may compete against win-
ners from other co-ops in Florida
to represent the state on the na-
tional Youth Leadership Board.
WFEC is a. Touchstone En-
ergy@ cooperative serving
over 25,000 member-owners in
Calhoun, Holmes, Jackson and
Washington Counties.


locally* and from Tal-
lahassee. The Chipola
group will perform a
recent edition of "Re-
quiem" by Dr. Robert
Levin of Harvard Uni-
versity, which is con-
sidered the latest, most
S:authentic. edition Mo-
zart's last work. The
4 Chipola performance
will be. the Southeast-
ern premier of this par-
ticular edition.
The concert is free and open
to the public. Seating will be
first-come, first served.
" For-more information contact
Dt L3-on:r7'1.-222f t.


March 31 April 6, 2005
A variety of fruits and
vegetables or fruit juice and a
choice of lowfat or whole milk
served with all meals.
THURSDAY
Breakfast: Chilled fruit of juice,
cheese toast, oatmeal with
brown sugar.
Lunch: Barbecued chicken,
mashed potatoes with gravy,
California mixed vegetables,
corn bread, chocolate pudding.

FRIDAY
Breakfast: Chilled orange juice,
ham grits, cinnamon crunch
coffecake.
Lunch: Corn Dogs with mustard,
macaroni and cheese, french
fries with catsup, fruit salad
with nuts.

MONDAY
Breakfast Banana, cheese
toast, ready-to-eat cereal.
Lunch: Nachos with ground beef,
tossed salad, corn-on-the cob,
oatmeal-raisin cookies.

TUESDAY
Breakfast Chilled peaches, ham
slice, banana nut bread.
Lunch: Ham and cheese sand-
wich, potato rounds with catsup,
apple wedges.

WEDNESDAY
Breakfast Chilled pineapple
tidbits, cheese grits, biscuit
with jelly.
Lunch: Pizza, green beans,
orange sections, Jell-O.
All menus are subject to change
SPONSORED BY:
Laban Bontrager, DMD I
Bristol, Phone 643-5417 |


K- Tell 'em you
saw it in The
Calhoun-Liberty

,JOURNAL)


Liberty Post &

Barn Pole Inc.

We've got the fence posts to meet your needs.
S HW,/ 12. Bristol 643-5995 11,2 mile south of Ihe red I,ihni
TOP TOP TOP FACTORY
GRADE GRADE GRADE SECONDS
7' Posts 8' Posts 6'6 Posts 8 Corners
Top Size Top Size Top Size under 3'
3-4 2-3 3-4 2-25' 3-4
4.5' 4-5 2-5.3' 4-5
5-6 5-6 3-3.5 5-6
6-7 3.5-4 6-7
7-8' 4-5 7-8

SPECIALTY
POSTS
1 4 rounds FACTORY SECONDS
1 2 r,3unj .-J -'' 66 Posts. Top Size, under 2
i ,Flat Face 3 4 -1-5 5

".[ _, / .t _ 2 a-.-.. _


STUMP

GRINDING

$10


<- 2_FT. ->
Diameter
A- I Tree Service
& Stump Grinding
Vickery Enterprises, Inc.
(850) 674-3434
1-800-628-8733
Best prices in the industry.


Mozart concert to honor


retiring Chipola professor


SCHOOL MENU I
Calhoun
County Schools
March 31 April 6, 2005
Lowfat or whole
milk served with all meals

THURSDAY
Lunch: Lasagna with cheese,
mixed vegetables, fruit cup,
rolls.

FRIDAY
Lunch: Cheese pizza, F.F.
potatoes, green salad with
dressing, fresh fruit.

MONDAY
Lunch: Corndog with ketchup
and mustard, baked beans,
w.k. corn, fruit cup.

TUESDAY
Lunch: Chicken pot pie, sweet
potatoes, fresh fruit, cake
square with icing.

WEDNESDAY
Lunch: Spaghetti with meat
sauce, green lima beans,
applesauce cup, garlic toast.

All menus are subject to change
SPONSORED BY:
Calhoun-Liberty Journal
Bristol, Phone 643-3333
J






MARCH 30,2005 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 15



r&




._. .- ..
liB-BZ Ij l ii .'t ^ ^ o- .. .. =
J? lj l _^ ^ ^ af; .' .* :i .-.,'. .*' "''*;


INTHE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN
AND FOR LIBERTY COUNTY,
FLORIDA

CIVIL ACTION NO: 05-44-CA

VALIDATION OF THE NOT TO EXCEED
$1,732,000 CITY OF BRISTOL, FLOR-
IDA WATER AND SEWER SYSTEM
REVENUE BONDS. SERIES 2005, AND
BOND ANTICIPATION NOTES

THE CITY OF BRISTOL, FLORIDA, a
municipal corporation and public body
corporate and politic of the State of
Florida,

Plaintiff,

vs.

THE STATE OF FLORIDA, and the Tax-
payer, Property Owners land Citizens
thereof and of the City of Bristol, Florida,
including non-residents owning property
or subject to taxation therein, and others
having or claiming any right, title or in-
terest in property to be affected by the
issuance of the Bonds and Notes herein
described, or to be affected in any way
thereby,

Defendants,


ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE

TO: THE STATE OF FLORIDA,
THROUGH THE STATE ATTORNEY
FOR THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
OF FLORIDA; AND TO THE SEVERAL
TAXPAYERS, PROPERTY OWNER,
CITIZENS OF THE CITY OF BRISTOL,
. FLORIDA, INCLUDING NON-RESI-
DENTS OWNING PROPERTY OR SUB-
JECT -TO. TAXATION THEREIN, AND
ALL OTHERS HAVING OR CLAIMING
SANY RIGHT, TITLE OR INTEREST IN
PROPERTY TO BE AFFECTED BY THE
ISSUANCE OF THE CITY OF BRISTOL.
FLORIDA WATER AND SEWER SYS-
TEM REVENUE BONDS AND THE
CITY OF BRISTOL. FLORIDA WATER
AND SEWER SYSTEM REVENUE
BOND ANTICIPATION NOTES. HERE-
INAFTER MORE PARTICULARLY DE-
SCRIBED. OR TO BE AFFECTED IN
ANY WAY THEREBY;
The above cause coming on to be heard
Supon tie Complaint this day tiled ierein
by the City of Bristol. Florida, seeking
" .to determine the authority ol the City ot
Bristol, Florida. to issue its not to exceed
$1.732.000 City of Bristol, Florida Wa-
ter and Sewer System Revenue Bonds
(the "Bonds") and the' not to exceed
S$1,732,000 City of Bristol, Florida Water
and Sewer System. Revenue Bond An-'
ncipation Noles I(the "Bond Anticipation
Notes"). a more particular description of
such obligations being contained in the
Complaint filed in these proceedings. to
determine the legality of the proceedings
had and taken in connection Inerewith,
and the legality of the provisions, cove-
nants and agreements contained therein
and the revenues pledged to the pay-
ment thereof, and seeking a ludgement
of this Court to validate the proceedings
S for said Bonds and Bond Anticipation
Notes (the "Obligations"), the revenues
pledged for the payment Inereol. and
said Obligations when issued pursuant'
thereto, and said Complaint now having

PUBLIC AUCTION
Bristol 66 Towing and. Recovery will
hold a Public Auction on April 16, 2005
at 1:00 p.m. (lET).
Red 1988 Dodge Daik.a. PK
Vini 1B7N14X3JS775167
BLUE 1991'1 Cnl-vrolel Lurmina3 do, o
Vlri# 2G1WL54T6L1203527
Blue 1989 Old.mo:oi. Cutl. Surdreme 2 docir
Ving 1G3WH14W9KD313860
Our Auction will be held at Bristol 66
Storage on Hoecake Road off Highway
20 East. one half mile on left. you will
see our sign.
Bnrstol 66 Towing reserves the right to
reject any and all bids.
The Calhoun Liberty Journal 3-30-05
If you need any more information on
the above vehicles, please call (850)
643-2522 ask for Dale.


been presented to this Court, for entry
of an -Order t6 Show, Cause pursuant
to Chapter 75, Florida Statutes, and the
Court being fully advised in the prem-
ises:
IT IS ORDERED AND ADJUDGED that
the State of Florida, through the State
Attorney of the Second Judicial Circuit
of Florida, and the several taxpayers,
property owners and citizens of the City
of Bristol, Florida, including nonresidents
owning property or subject to taxation
therein, and all others having or claiming
any right, title or interest in property to
be affected in any way thereby, or to be
affected thereby, by and they are each
hereby required to appear and show
cause, if any there be, before this Court
on-the 21st day of April, 20Q5, at 2:00
P.M. in the chambers of the undersigned
Judge at the Liberty County Courthouse
in the city of Bristol, Florida, why the
prayer of said Complaint should not be
granted and why the proceedings for
said Obligations and said Obligations
when issued pursuant thereto and the
revenues pledged to the payment there-
of should not be validated and confirmed
as therein prayed.
AND IT IS FURTHER ORDERED AND
ADJUDGED that this Order to show
Caus e published in the manner re-
quired by Sectionr 75.06, Florida Stat-
utes, in a newspaper of general circula-
tion published in Liberty County, Florida;
AND IT IS FURTHER ORDERED AND
ADJUDGED that, by such publication of
Ihis Order, all taxpayer, property owners
and citizens of the city of Bristol, Florida,
including non-residents owning property
or subject to taxation therein and all oth-
ers having or claiming any right, title or
interest in the City of Bristol, Florida, or
the taxable property therein or in any
property to be affected by the issuance
Sof said Obligations or to be affected in
any way thereby, or the validity of such
Obligations or of any revenues pledged
for payment thereof, or of the proceed-
ings authorizing the issuance of said
Obligation, including any remedies pro-
vided for their collection, be and they are
made parties defendant to this proceed-
ing, and that this Court shall have juris-
diction of them to the same extent as if
named as defendants in said Complaint
and personally served with process in
the cause.
DONE AND ORDERED in chamber at
Bristol, Liberty County, Florida, this 28th
, day ol March. 2005.


George S Reynolds. III
CIRCUIT JUDGE


REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL
FOR YOUTH SERVICES.

The Chipola Regional Workforce Devel-
opment Board, Inc., is seeking a quali-
fied organizations) with the expertise
and capacity to design, administer, and
deliver a Youth Service Program under
the Workforce Investment Act and Wel-
fare Transition Programs in Calhoun,
Holmes, Jackson. Liberty. and Washing-
ton Counties for the 2005-2006 program
year. To receive a copy of the Request
for Proposal either call (850)718-0456 or
visil our Web site at www.onestopahead.
corn and click on the link for Request tor
Proposals. Proposals are due by 1:00
p.m.ICTI April 29, 2005. EOE. Minority
owned businesses are encouraged to
apply. 3-23,3-30


REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL
FOR WORKFORCE
DEVELOPMENT SERVICES

The Chipola Regional Workforce Devel-
opment Board. Inc., is seeking qualified
organizaiion(si with the expertise and
capacity to design, administer, and deliv-
* er various welfare reform and worklorce
development services to our job seekers
and employer customers in Calhoun,
Holmes, Jackson, Liberty. and Washing-
ton Counties for the 2005-2006 program
year. To receive a copy ol fre Request
for Proposal either call (8501 718-0456
or visit our Web site at www.onestopa-
head corn and click on the link [or Re-
quest for Proposals. Proposals are due
by 1:00 p.m.(CT April 29, 2005. EOE.
Minority owned businesses are encour-
aged-to apply. 2: -23,3-30


3-30,4-6


Shown above, left to right, Rep. TomAnderson, Judith Ring State Librarian, JoAnn Roundtree
-director of the Jackson County Public Libray, Karen Southwell- administrator of the Panhandle
Public Library Cooperative System, Allan Bense House Speaker, Rita Maupin director of the
Calhoun County Public Library, Susan Harris- director of the Holmes County Public Library Linda
Norton director of the Washington County Public Library, and Loretta Flowers Community
Development Manager for the Division of Libraries.



Rural libraries awarded grant


money by Rep. Anderson


TALLAHASSEE State
Representative Tom Anderson
(R-Dunedin/Holiday) and House
Speaker Allan Bense presented
a ceremonial check for $40,000
to the Panhandle Public Library
Cooperative System on Monday,
March 21st in Speaker Bense's
office in the Capitol. This is one
of the first grants awarded through
the Community Libraries in Car-
ing Program (CLIC) which was
founded by Mrs. Gemmy Brown
of Dunedin and created through
legislation introduced by Rep.
Anderson in 2003.
-Attending the ceremony were
Karen South% ell, Administrator


of the Cooperative; Rita Maupin,
Director of the Calhoun County
Public Library; Susan Harris,
Director of the Holmes County
Public Library; JoAnn Roundtree,
Director of the Jackson County
Public Library; Linda Norton,
Director of the Washington
County Public Library; Judith
Ring, State Librarian; and Loretta
Flowers, Community Develop-
ment Manager for the Division of
Libraries. Each of the four librar-
ies will receive $10,000 to be used
for expanding the children's and
young adult collections.
Last year Rep. Anderson was
recognized by the Florida Library


Association for his outstanding
service to libraries in Florida es-
pecially for sponsoring the Com-
munity Libraries in Caring bill.
Rep. Anderson said, "Children in
rural counties who rarely own a
book, need access to good libraries
in order to become better students
and citizens in the future."
The CLIC grant program helps
to improve literacy, reading and
the economic viability of rural,
economically depressed com-
munities in Florida by expand-
ing their library collections and
services. The program can benefit
33 counties and five communities
in the state.


National sales award presented to


United Country Hometown Realty


from United Country Real Estate
Lou. Francis, United Country
president, announced that United
Country Hometown Realty of
Blountstown, has earned the Unit-
ed Country Founders Award for
sales excellence throughout 2004..
Pauline S. Stokes, owner/as-
sociate and Janice S. Sumner,
owner/broker, operate the office.
Located at 19821 State Rd. 20 W.
United Country Hometown
Realty serves Calhoun and Lib-
erty counties -and surrounding
areas. The office can be reached
by phone at 674-4491 and on the
Internet at www.unitedcountry.
com/blountstownfl.
Company % ide, United Coun-
try Real Estate experienced a
2004 sales volume increase of
39 percent over 2003 totals. The
company's award winning Web
site, www.unitedcountry.com,
recorded an average of 570,000
user sessions per month with an
average.session lasting 25.,min-


utes. These numbers represent and recreational properties in
55 million total hits per month, a rural America. Founded in 1925
41 percent increase over 2003. and headquarted in Kansas City,
United Country is the only MO, the company has more than
national real estate franchise 450 franchises in 34 states and a


system specializing in residen-
tial, farm and ranch, commercial


national database of properties
at www.unitedcountry.com.


Forest Service employee wins national award
from US Forestry Service
Pat Lovejoy, zone engineering technician on the Apalachicola
National Forest, has been named the U.S. Forest Service Engineer
Technician of the Year. The award recognizes exceptional engineer-
ing support for the Forest Service's ecosystem and management ef-
forts. Lovejoy was named the Regional Engineering Technician of
the Year within the 13 southern states before going on to compete at
the national level.
Lovejoy graduated from Vermont Technical College with an as-
sociate degree in Civil Engineering Technology. After graduation he
worked for engineering consulting firms in Vermont before going
to work for the Forest Service in 1978. During his 26 year career
Lovejoy has worked on forests in Vermont, Washington and Florida.
His engineering experience includes construction, pre-construction,
design and contract administration.
Lovejoy will receive his award on April 4 at the. U.S. Forest Ser-
vice. headquarters Washington, D ...C. .





Page 16 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL MARCH 30,2005


Register now for summer camp in the Ocala National Forest


Do your children long to
spend their summer days in the
great outdoors? Would they love
the chance to learn about wild-
life from the experts, or swim,
hike and canoe with other chil-
dren their age?
Then it's time to sign them up
for the Ocala Outdoor Adventure
Camp at the Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation Cbmmis-
sion's (FWC) Ocala Conserva-
tion Center in the Ocala National
Forest.
The sulimmer camp is for boys
and girls ages 10-15 and is based
on wildlife conserx action, firearm
safety and outdoor skills. This
year the camp .offers five one-
week sessions with all-new pro-
grams beginning June 19..,
' The primary goal of the camp
program is to provide children
with the necessary skills and
knowledge to become better
sportsmen and women, while in-
stilling an awareness of -firearm


safety, conservation and wildlife
stewardship. In addition, camp-
ers will fish, canoe, swim, hike
and participate in many other
outdoor activities.
Tuition is $295 per camper
per week and includes lodging,
food, program materials and
instruction for each session.
Each week-long session is di-
vided into four groups based
on their individual focus: Wild
about Wildlife, Wet and Wild-
life, Hunting and Hunter Safety
and Expedition. All programs
are new or significantly revised
in format and scope from previ-
ous years.
"Campers in Wild about Wild-
life, a new program this year,
will have a chance to go wild
exploring nature," said Cardinal
Collins, director of the Ocala
'Conservation Center. "They
will learn about wildlife man-
agement and enjoy many camp
activities including basic wilder-


-^ t K -^ r
---..-::


ness survival and field first-aid
training, canoeing, fishing, hik-
ing, shooting sports and other
hands-on outdoor programs."
For those who simply can't
resist the water, the camp of-
fers another new program, aptly
named Wet and Wildlife.
"This program gets into the
fun of fishing, marine ecology
and boating safety. In addition
to the traditional camp activities
already described above, Wet
and Wildlife campers will have
the opportunity to become certi-
fied in the FWC's Boater Safety
Course," Collins said.
For the intermediate level
camper, the camp offers the
Hunting and Hunter Safety
group.
"These campers will learn
about wild game and its habi-


tats, and apply this knowledge
to developing ethical hunting
skills. Then they will have a
chance to get their hunter safety
certification. They will receive
firearm safety as well as shot-
gun and rifle shooting instruc-
tion from National Rifle Asso-
ciation-(NRA) certified range
safety officers. And, they will
receive archery instruction from
National Archery Association-
certified instructors, while par-
ticipating in numerous shooting
range activities. They will also
have a chance to participate in
many camp activities including
basic wilderness survival and
field first-aid training, canoeing,
fishing, hiking, and other hands-
on outdoor programs," Collins
said.
The final program is for ad-
vanced campers who have al-
ready completed a hunter safety
course.
"The Expedition group is de-


FWC sets April 14 and 15 meeting in Tallahassee


The Florida Fish and Wild-
life Conservation Commission
(FWC) will meet at the Ramada
Inn and Conference. Center at
2900 N. Monroe St. in Tallahas-
see onApril 14.15.
Thursday's (April 14) agen-
da is dominated bN\ wildlifee and
freshwater fisheries issues. The
Conunission \\ill conduct-final
public hearings on rules relating
to the San Pedro Ba'3 Wildlife
Management Area W W A,) that
reduce the quota of recreation-
al-use permits and establish a
still-hunt area 'on a 7,481-acre
portion of that WMA, which
is currently hunted with deer-
,dogs.
.The Conmmission will also
conduct final public hearings
on rules to revise the. FWC
imperiled species -listing pro-
cess. Proposed changes would
strengthen current procedures
by incorporating the latest cri-


teria and guidelines developed
by the International Union for
the Conservation of Nature
(IUCN), providing IUCN train-
ing for staff and requiring an
independent scientific review in
the evaluation process.
Commissioners will also ad-
dress several boating. issues.
The Commnission will conduct
final public hearings 6in rules
to revise standards for boating
safety courses and re-establish
and modify manatee-protection
speed zones in Lee County, in-
cluding a new zone in a portion
of San Carlos Bay.
Also, staff will present a fi-
nal evaluation of the pilot deer-
dog registration program in the
Northwest Region.
Friday's (April 15) meeting
agenda begins with marine fish-
eries management topics. The
Commission will conduct a fi-
nal public hearing on a proposed


Robo-turkey donation will

help FWC bag bad hunters
Some high-tech recruits are joining the Florida Fish and Wild-
life Conservation Coummission' (FWC) law enforcement team.
The Florida State Chapter of the National Wild Turkey Federation
i NWTF i toda\ gave the FWC five robotic turkeys. These so called
robo-turke\ s are lifelike figures that rotate their bodies, move their
tails and even gobble.
-. "Our officers use the robo-turkeys to snare poachers as they at-
tempt to shoot the decoys," said Col. Julie Jones, FWC's law en.
forcement director "Having five more of these in the field will
greatly increase our ability to catch unethical hunters and conserve
one of Florida's prized game birds."
Robo-turkeys -are not cheap, costing around $700 a piece, and
since they are not bulletproof. the\ often have a short lifespan. That
is why NWTF has stepped in to offer assistance.
"Our group niade a commitment to provide the mechanical birds
to all five FWC regional offices." NWTF Florida Chapter President
Bill Marvin said. '\We appreciate the agency's commitment to en-
forcing wildlife law s and want to help officers with their efforts."
NWTF has donated a total of 15 birds to the agency during the
last three Nears.- The fi e new robo-turkeys include four gobblers
and one hen.
This latest donation couldn't ha\ e come at a better. time. Florida's
spring turke\.,seaon began this month. ,, ,.


rule to control fishing effort in
the commercial blue crab fish-
ery by implementing a license
system that would cap the num-
ber of blue crab endorsements
in the fishery.
Commissioners will also con-
duct a final public hearing on a
proposed rule amendment that
would change the Apalachicola
Bay winter oyster harvest sea-
son from Oct. 1 June 30 to
Sept. 1 May 31 and the sum-
mer season from July 1 Sept.
30 to June 1 -Aug. 31.
In other marine fisheries ac-
tion, the Commission will re-
view and discuss draft rules
to specify black sea bass trap
marking requirements and stan-
dardize methods for measuring
the length of marine fish.
Commissioners will-also dis-
cuss the scope of exotic species
in Florida and plans to develop
consistency among penalties
for fish-and-wildlife-law viola-
tions.
The meeting will begin at
8:30 a.m. both days.
FWCmeetirig. are open to the
public. Any person requiring
special acconimodat ionsito par-
ticipate in this meeting should


advise the agency at least five
calendar days before the meet-
ing by calling (850) 488-6411.
Hearing- or speech-impaired
persons can arrange assistance
by calling (850) 488-9542.
* The April meeting, agenda
and .background materials are
available at MyFWC.coin/coni-
miv';ion.


signed for the camper with an
avid interest in the outdoors who
already has successfully com-
pleted the hunter safety course,"
Collins said. "Expedition is an
outdoor adventure, including a
trip into the forest for two days
of primitive camping. Before.
leaving base camp, campers
will prepare for this experience
by learning the fundamentals of
wilderness survival, orienteer-
ing, backpacking and campsite
preparation."
The Ocala Conservation Cen-
ter is on a 57-acre peninsula, rich
in history and wildlife in Marion
County in north Central Florida.
Located just 20 miles east of
Ocala, it is beautifully situated
on Lake Eaton in the heart of the
Ocala National Forest. Facilities
are rustic, yet comfortable, with
air-conditioned cabins and din-
ing hall. Classrooms are fishing
piers, shooting ranges, nature
trails, Lake Eaton and the vast
Ocala National Forest.
For more "information or for
registration materials for the
summer program, call (352)
625-2804 or go to MyFWC.
com/camps.

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Dresses
w ^--$10
Jeans Hemmed $4
Call 643-3542 -.e


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MARCH 30, 2005 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 17


O.INCY FARMS
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FL 32351 -Ph. (850) 875-1600, ext. 21i
Swww.quincycompost.com


State agencies work together to close

the door on 'backdoor' seafood sales


O'NEAL'S

LAND CLEARING
(Since 1977) .
Road Building, Fish Ponds
Site Prep & Bush Hogging
(850) 762-8387 or (850) 832-1489 (mobile)
6055 NW Hwy. 274 Altha, FL 32421
Fred O'Nealll


The Florida Fish and Wild-
life Conservation Commission
(FWC) is stepping up efforts to
keep the Sunshine State's sea-
food markets safe and fair. As
part of "Operation No More Back
Door," the agency has partnered
- with the Florida. Department of
Agriculture and Consumer Ser-
/ vices (DACS) and the Florida
Department of Business and Pro-
fessional Regulation (DBPR) to
target people and businesses ille-
gally buying, selling, packaging
or mislabeling seafood products.
"For years, FWC officers have
worked on the illegal backdoor.
sales of regulated fish to ensure
only licensed fishermen are sell-
ing products," said Lt. Col. Don
Holway, FWC deputy director of
law enforcement. "Partnering
with other agencies responsible
for regulating the wholesome-
ness. and integrity of seafood
products makes sense for busi-
nesses and consumers."
Snagging fishermen or deal-
ers illegally selling or buying
their catch often requires covert
operations involving long hours
and additional manpower. FWC
investigators may pose as rec-
reational fishermen and attempt
to make a backdoor sale or pur-
chase and perform DNA testing
on fishery products suspected to
be mislabeled. During these co-
vert investigations, FWC officers
can uncover violations that are
outside the agency's purview, so
they % ill pass that information on
to DACS or DBPR for action.
"We are confident this part-
nership, with other agencies will
pro e to be an effective use of
state resources that will benefit


our Florida fisheries and con-
sumers," said Maj. Gary Strick-
land, FWC statewide investiga-
tions coordinator. "This will
ensure commercial fishermen re-
ceive a fair market price for their
products and consumers get what
they pay for."
DACS is sending food safety
inspectors to supermarkets, fish
stores and other establishments
that sell fish on the retail level to
check delivery boxes for accurate
labeling of fish species, accord-
ing to Florida Agriculture Com-
missioner Charles H. Bronson.
Samples can be tested for species
identification at the department's
food lab or at FWC's facility.
At the same time, Bronson's
Office of Agricultural Law En-
forcement, which inspects com-
mercial vehicles entering or
leaving Florida, has scanned doc-
uments involving more than 500
shipments of seafood transported
through DACS's interdiction sta-
tions at 1-10, 1-75 and 1-95. The
documents are accessible to the
FWC and provide a snapshot of
the seafood entering and leaving
Florida.
DBPR reminds its licensees
that all food for sale must be ob-
tained from sources that comply
with the law.
"DBPR verifies that food is
obtained from the proper sources
during the inspection of food ser-
vice establishments," said Geoff
Luebkemann, DBPR's Division
of Hotels and Restaurants direc-
tor. "Operators purchasing sea-
*food products from unlicensed
individuals, retailers or whole-
salers are in violation of Florida
law."


Freshwater fishing license not required April 2-3


Now's the time to gas up the
truck, load up the kids, break out
your fishing gear and go fishing!
April 2-3, you won't even need
a license, to fish in freshwater,
here in Florida the number-
one destination for anglers from
all over the world.
Bass, bream and crappie -
they all start biting this time of
year here in the state that claims.
bragging rights to the title "Fish-
ing Capital of the World."
The Florida Legislature and
the Fish and Wildlife Conser-
vation Commission (FWC) set
aside one weekend per year for
residents and visitors to enjoy
,freshwater fishing without hav-
ing to worry about buying a
fishing license.
Bob Wattendorf,, an FWC
fisheries biologist who helps
promote the annual event, said
the Free. Freshwater Fishing
Weekend is an opportunity for
parents to, open .a whole new
world of adventure with their
children.'
"When you see a child catch
his first fish and hear the squeals
and screams and you \watch the
breathless excitement,"' Watten-
SIprf s.aiq,"'you're eeing&l ag-


ical moment the child will re-
member forever. And someday,
the child may pass that moment
on to yet another generation and
carry on the centuries-old tradi-
tion of fishing in Florida."
Free fishing weekend isn't
just for kids, though. It offers
a convenient opportunity for
adults who haven't caught a fish
in a while to get reacquainted
with angling, and do it in some
of the waters that have yielded
more than 700 world-record fish
catches.,
"It doesn't take much of an
investment to go fishing here,"
Wattendorf said. "A can of
worms, a cane pole and a few
hours of leisure time are all it
takes to get started. There is no
point in Florida that is more than
a few minutes drive from some
kind of fishing opportunity."
Besides all that...you get to
eat fresh fish when you go fish-
ing, and every angler knows the
fresher the fish, the more deli-
cious it is on. a plate beside some
cheese grits, cole slaw, hushpup-
pies and maybe some pork and
beans or a little potato salad.
Free fishing weekend applies
to freshwater fishing only.


Florida residents who take ad-
vantage of free fishing weekend
and decide to settle into a life-
style of recreational freshwater
fishing in this state's waters may
want to check into another pro-
motion the FWC has in progress.
The first 3,000 Florida residents
to purchase the $61.50 five-year
freshwater fishing license will
receive $80 worth of free hooks,
lures, .fishing line, magazines
and other goodies like t-shirts
and fishing towels.
"This is a great way to help
contribute to the future of fish
and wildlife conservation in
Florida," Wattendorf said.
"Anybody who is interested can
get more information includ-
ing up-to-date information about
whether the 3,000 limit still is
open -- at MyFWC.com."
Anglers who plan on buying a
boat and pick the right make can
save $250 on gear to outfit the
vessel if they buy the five-year
license during the promotion.
Fishing licenses are available
at county tax collectors' offices,
license agents, online at My-
FWC.com or over the phone at
-" -8-FIStI FLOIDA.' "


food on
either side ...






tonight! g


The




-, r Restaurant

Hwy. 20, Bristol 643-2264 ---


Seafood products must be
commercially and legally caught
or harvested, and purchased only
from licensed commercial fisher-
men or certified aquaculturists.
Recreationally caught or har-
vested shellfish may not be re-
ceived for sale or service by food
service establishments.
Operators should also be par-
ticularly attentive to food de-
scriptions. Any means used to
promote or advertise food items
for sale including menus,
"blackboard" or "specials" list-
ings must be accurate and
truthful. Seafood species cannot
legally be substituted for one an-
other and must be accurately and
truthfully promoted and sold us-
ing the correct species name.
"Failure to accurately and
truthfully offer food items for
sale, such as undisclosed substi-
tution of one type of fish for an-
other, also violates Florida law,"
Luebkemann said.
Stone crab season, from Octo-
ber 15 through May 14 each year,
also provides an opportunity .to
be alert for unlawful sources,
labeling or misrepresentation.
Only two species of stone crab
Menippi adina and Menippi
mercenaria and their hybrids,
harvested in Florida, other Gulf
Coast states and the Caribbean
may be labeled "stone crab."
Operation No More Back
Door began in mid-February and
will continue for several months.
Anyone with information
about these or any other resource
violations can call Wildlife Alert
at (888) 404-FWCC or visit My-
FWC.com to report them. They
may qualify for rewards.






Page 18 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL MARCH 30,2005


DAVID ANSON HENDRICKS COLEY
MARIANNA David Anson Hendricks Coley, 43, passed away
Friday, March 25, 2005 at Tallahassee Memorial Hospital.
He was born in Louisville, KY and lived most of his life in Jackson
County. He was elected to the State House.of Representatives last
year, and served the Florida Highway Patrol Auxiliary as lieutenant
colonel.
While attending Chipola College, he worked as a sports writer for
Jackson County Floridan and later held the position of managing
editor of Graceville News and Jackson County Floridan. He served
as a legislative assistant to the current Florida Speaker of the House
of Representatives, Alan Bense.
He was a member of Evangel Worship Center in Marianna.
Survivors include his wife of 23 years, Marti Bontrager Coley of
Marianna; his daughter, Kristin Coley of Marianna; two sons, Vance
and Hunter Coley, both of Marianna; his father, Melvin Hendricks
and his wife, Edna of Nashville, TN; his mother, Judy Coley and her
husband, Len of Naples; four brothers, Douglas Scott Coley and his
wife, Debbie of Hollywood, Rick Hunt Coley and his wife, Kristy of
Andersonville, TN, Chad McKnight Coley of Fort Myers and Ralph
Scott Whitaker and his wife, Petie of Nashville; four sisters, Kimberly
Kyle Underwood and her husband, Steve, Melanie Rae Sutton and her
husband, Mark, all of Nashville, Kaci Coley Stewart and her husband,
Tony of Naples and Terry Allen and her husband, James of Columbia,
TN; 19 nieces and nephews; two great-nieces.
Services are scheduled to be held Wednesday, March 30,2005 at 10
a.m from Johnson Health Center at Chipola College in Marianna with
his pastor, LaVon Pettis and house speaker Allan Bense officiating.
Rep. Coley laid in state from 11 a.m. until 2 p.m.(ET) Monday in
the Chamber of the Florida House of Representatives in Tallahassee,
followed by service at 2 p.m.(ET).
A memorial service was held at 10 a.m.(ET) Tuesday in Tallahassee
for the Florida House members. Interment will follow in Pinecrest
Memorial Gardens. Memorial contributions may be made to the David
Coley Memorial Fund, c/o Evangel Worship Center, 2645 Pebble Hill
Road, Marianna, FL 32446.
James and Sykes Funeral Home Maddox Chapel in Marianna is in
charge.of the arrangements.

FRANKLIN McGLOCKTON
S BRISTOL- Franklin McGlockton, 67, passed away Friday, March
25, 2005 in Tallahassee. He was a native of Liberty County and was
member of Bethel A.M.E. Church.
Survivors include his wife, Earlene Barnes McGlockton of Bristol;
two sisters, Geraldine McGlockton Simmons and her husband, Isreal
of University Park, IL and Mildred McGlockton Demps of Bristol;
four brothers, William H. McGlockton and his wife, Lutrelle of Long-
wood, Hambric L. McGlockton, Jr. and his wife, Doris of Houston,
Texas, Carl E. McGlockton and his wife, Maryanne of St. Petersburg,
Samuel E. McGlockton, Sr. and his wife, Bettye of Bristol; two
daughters, LaShay McGlockton of Blountstown and Patty Lawson
and her husband, Mark of Sneads; two sons, Theodore Black and his
wife, Gwendelle of Bristol and Eric Andrews of Blountstown; one
stepson, Gerald Howard and his wife, Marsha of Grand Ridge; eight
grandchildren
Services will be held April 2, 2005 at 11 a.m. (CT) at St. Paul
A.M.E. Church in Blountstown. Interment will follow in Bethel
A.M.E. Church Cemetery in Bristol.
Bradwell Mortuary in Quincy is in charge of the arrangements.

JACQUELINE MARIA MARSHALL
CLARKSVILLE Jacqueline Maria Marshall, 33, passed away
Sunday, March 27, 2005 in Jacksonville. She was a lifelong resident of
this area. She was a member of Eastern Star, Macedonia First Baptist
Church and a 1991 graduate of Blountstown High School. She was
described by her family as a great cook. She loved to watch O.C.C.
and the Bounty Hunter. She also enjoyed country music and helping
the elderly. Her greatest love of all was her niece, Gracie.
She was predeceased by her grandparents, Bill Marshall and Rufus
and Mamie Weathers.
Survivors include her parents, Jim and Alice Marshall of Clarks-
ville; one brother, Dale Marshall and his wife, Rhonda of Blountstown;
one niece, Gracie Marshall of Blountstown; paternal grandmother, Lee
Marshall of Clarksville; a host of aunts, uncles, and cousins.
The family will receive friends ;from 6-8 p.m. on Wednesday,
March 30. .
Services will be held Thursday, March 31, 2005 at 3 p.m. at
Macedonia First Baptist Church with Rev. Wayne Sutimner officiating.
S Interment will follow in Magnolia Cemetery in Blountstown.
.,... "IHall Funeral,Home in Altha is in charge ofthe arrangements. ,. ,


WHAT BETTER
TRIBUTE CAN
THERE BE?
Honor your loved ones
by making their memory
part of our best efforts to
defeat cancer. For more
info., contact the Ameri-
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EAST GADSDEN UNIT
P.O. Box 563, Quincy, FL 32353
SJ

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Debbie Peavy
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HIDDEN ns
i TREASURES

TO FIND GOD'S WILL
BE TRANSFORMED
Text: Romans 12:2
A man was praying asking God to re-
veal His will to him. He prayed, "Lord,
may my phone ring at 9:21 PM tonight
if Your answer to me is yes."
How do you find God's will? I really
don't think God intended it to be com-
plicated or mysterious. Jesus said, "My
sheep listen to My voice; I know them,
and they follow Me (NIV)." God expects
us to listen to Him and do what He says. It
is a normal part of Christian life.
There is no easy, three-step method
to finding God's will. But, there are cer-
tain conditions that you must meet be-
fore God communicates His will. First,
you must be willing to do whatever it is
that God wants you to do. Second, you
must stop thinking like the world. Third,
you must be transformed by the renew-
ing of your mind.
Psalm 37:4 says, "Delight yourself
in the Lord and He will give you the
desires of your heart (NIV)." Want what
God wants and He will grant your de-
sires. In other words, begin to think like
God.
It's not as weird as it sounds when
you think about it. It just means that we
see things from God's perspective. When
we stop thinking like the world and be-
gin to think like God, we become .trans-
formed. We don't do the same things
that we used to do. We turn from a life
of sin and turn to a life of righteousness.
How does this transformation take
place? Find out what God thinks about
things and act on it. Join people who be-
lieve the Bible and do what it says. Study
the Bible, hear the Word preached, learn
from a godly teacher, and learn to listen
to God. You will begin to stop thinking
like the world. You will be transformed
when you start thinking like God.
Ryan McDougald is a licensed, ordained
Free Will Baptist Minister hosting Bible
-tdysin ifhehomny. For nole,.infqr9pation;,


Bevis Funeral

BEVIS EHome ofrislof
ne,.,fa71, o Xe Cl'va/ory
Formerly doing business as
McClellan Funeral Home.

S// existing pre-need and at need contracts
are now handled by the Bevis family and staff.

All operations of the funeral process will be
handled on location at 12008 NW State 20.

Todd Wahlquist, Rocky Bevis & Ed Peacock
Lkcense'juneracJirec/ors
oe I
7 6 Espalol
7&)e wouf'/love lo meet everyone hn our
community, sop/easeslop y andsay Aeffo.



Buy, sell & trade

witl an adW in The

Calo0u-LbIerty Journal!



Peavy Funeral Home













Funeral Services with Dignity,
Caring and Professionalism.

Marion Peavy
A Hometown Funeral Director
You Can Trust and Depend On!
T. :elephone () 226


W'DAMS FUNERAL HOIME7/
Serving local families for over 28 years
674-5449 or 643-5410

For years, we've provided you and your family with
sound advice and caring service in times of personal
loss. We appreciate your trust and support.
As an established local business since 1976, we
are committed to serving the need of our families.
Something that everyone is concerned about right
now is the Living Will. Stop by and we can talk about
this with you and provide you with a form that will make
the process easier for you.
We welcome you to visit our Web site at:
www.adamsfh.com
Adams Funeral Home
Tim Adams, Licensed Funeral Director
"A Tradition of Caring-Generations of Trust"





MARCH 30,2005 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 19


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Contact Bill Stoutamire, Phone 674-5974 Fax 674-8307


Daniel Mullins shares years of


memories in his final column'


This is the last gardening
column that I will write. Due to
a change in job responsibilities
it is best that I step aside and
let younger, more energetic and
equally qualified people con-
tinue this work. You might see
an occasional article or column
written by me, but it will deal
with commercial horticulture or
some unrelated subject.
I began writing gardening
columns in 1970 as the first
Florida Extension Horticul-
ture Agent west of Tallahassee.
This has been a wonderful ex-
perience and, though the qual-
ity of my weekly writings is
sometimes questionable. it has
al~' av s been an enjoi able expe-
rience.
The biggest challenge of
%writing a weekIl column has
been deciding upon a topic.
There have always been two
criteria used in choosing a top-
ic. First,. determining wi hat wxas
on gardeners' minds the previ-
ous %week. Our office receives
between one and two hundied
requests for gardening infor-
mauon each %week. so repeated
questions related to a specific
gardening practice or problem
helps to guide in the selection.
Second. I haxe alw avs felt
that timing is et er thlng in gar-
dening. So. each week I ask
the question: \\ihat can be best
done in the landscape and gar-
den this \week? I have fooled
mn self into thinking that a few%
readers actually read the w\eek-
1 column and then go out and
implement some reconunended
practice or search for a newx


.. "


:Portable Iu ''i ditg


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.A Prognrt of the
Better Buiness Bureau
Within a 50 mile radius


Worth The
Drive To
Mariann a!


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3614 Hwy. 90 Marianna, FL.
(across from F.H.P.) (3 miles west of town)

482-8682


1-877-423-7892,


by Daniel E.
Mullins,
Extension
Horticultural
Agent, Santa
Rosa County

plant that has been suggested.
As near as I can determine,
1,145 weekly gardening articles
have been written and published
over a 22 year period. The cur-
rent readership, through news-
papers and web sites is approxi-
mately 236,000. Before the
computer age many originals
of the older columns were lost.
The past twelIe \ eaisI' worth
are some heie in the bowels of
nm\ computer. The Santa Rosa
County \\eb site maintains a list
of articles that covers the past
[\\o \ear.,s. These can be dow'n-
loaded directly from the site at,
http://\ \\ % .santarosa fl.gov/
exiension/horticulture/dansar-
ticles.html
The mosi popular column-s
that have been published might
be surprising to some readers.
The all time fa' orite was the ar-
ticle that I wrote following the
death of my father. It \,as just
wandering thoughts of my loss
xwith some plant related cornm-
ments included This w"as fol-
low ed closely b\ what is now
know n as, the "Tractor Article."
Here I \ as attempting to justify
the purchase of a ne\w tractor
and equipment for \ard cleanup
and restoration follow ing Hur-
ricane Ivan.
The article about tomato
gro\ ing using the Japanese To-


mato Ring technique has prob-
ably had the longest term ef-
fect. We continue to send out
copies and it can be found on
the internet just by typing in the
subject. "Old time remedies"
was another favorite, which in-
cluded the common use of Ep-
som salt for curing all kinds of
plant ailments and the practice
of burying cans of lye under
pecan trees. Many years ago,
an article was written about
the Catalpa or fish bait tree.
To my surprise, it drew many
comments. An article about
growing blackberries resulted
in a high number of telephone
calls and two columns about the
black gum tree resulted in many
gardeners looking for some to
plant.
The column was entered for
competition through the Flor-
ida and National Association
of County Agricultural Agents
on several occasions. Over the
years it was selected as the state
winner on seven occasions, re-
gional finalist twice and as a na-
tional finalist in 2003. Though
the column was not written with
awards in mind, this recogni-
tion has certainly helped when
applying for promotions and
has also served as motivation to
get it done each week.
Writing has been a continu-
ous learning experience, espe-
cially since I have no in-depth
training on the subject. If read-
ers have gleaned something of
value during my years of writ-
ing gardening columns, thanks
go to my mother for her en-
couragement and support. Her
desire was for me to become a
journalist. Though I majored
in horticulture instead, her con-
stant advice was simply "apply
yourself' in whatever you do.
Another important person
was my high school English
teacher, Mrs. L.B. Johnson.
She taught her students, among
many other things, how to con-
struct a sentence. The last time
that I checked none of her stu-
dents, upon entering college
were ever required to take re-
medial English, known in the
slang as "bonehead English." I
wish that I could thank her to-
day, and I plan to try to locate
her and let her know how much
she has influenced not only the
life of her students but hope-
fully, some gardeners too. If
she has passed on, she already
knows.
My current project involves
convincing one of my very ca-
pable co-workers to write gar-
dening columns in this space.
If I am successful, readers will
be happy with the result. A re-
lated job is to contact newspa-
pers and web sites and ask that
there be an uninterrupted flow
of gardening articles from the
l0oal o Extensin office:.-c.*, .


MAKE ROOM FOR OUR


I'- = I I


II I ,I=I-- _' -'1 I I


~`ls~88~"roi


c(






Page 20 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL MARCH 30, 2005


To place your ad, call 643-3333 or 1-800-717-3333 by noon
Eastern Time on Saturday. Non-business ads run FREE for 2 weeks.


Prom/pageant dress, size 4,
beautiful shade of purple, lots of
bead work, worn once, tiny shoulder
straps, V-front, backless with criss-
cr6ss lacing. Paid $450, asking
$300. Call 674-2585. 3-30,4-6
Homemade seesaw for $20. Call
643-1428. 3-30,4-6

Exquisite ladies' diamond ring,
four rows of diamonds, have the pa-
pers, paid $4,000 will take $2,200.
Call 674-2720. 3-30,4-6

Electric range, works good, $50.
Call 674-8437. 3-30,4-6

Refrigerator, works good, $75. Call
674-8437. 3-30,4-6

Computer, good for games, Win-
dows 98, works good, $35. Call
674-8437. 3-30,o4-6

Diesel tank, very large, $100. Call
643-2612. 8-30,4-6

New Aluma steel, two pieces 22'
7", one piece 14 ft., two pieces 10
ft. one piece 40", $1 per ft.; used .
V-groove, 10pieces 14ft.;7pieces,
12 ft., $5 each; corrugated tin, 7
pieces, 10 ft., $10 for all and some
3', 4', 5', 6', for free; front door, -3
ft. x 6' 8", $55. Call 762-3633.
4-6
Champion shotgun, 12 gauge,
single barrel, the first model made
by Iver Johnson, 1909 to 56, 30"
full choke, exposed hammer, auto
ejector, plain pistol grip stock. A very
good hunter or collectable. $135.
Call 508-7084 3-30,4-6

.22 caliber LR semi-automatic
rifle by Mossberg. Model 152K,
seven round mag fed, carbine
model with hinged fold-down lorend,
Monte Carlo stock with adjustable
sling, 18" barrel, 27" overall, re-
ceiver aperture and military post
front sights, mfg. 1950 to 57: Avery
nice gun overall. Asking $165. Call.
508-7084. 3-30,4-6

.40 caliber Smith & Wesson
Sigma.'model SW40VE, 4" barrel,
two 10 shot mags. 3 dot sighting
system, grips integral with black
polymerframe; satin stainless steel
slide, 24.4 oz. Has Uncle Mike's
side-kick black shoulder holster, all
*n new condition. $450. Call 508-
7084. 3-30, 4-6

35 mm camera. Minolta XG7, black
body. manual exposure mode.
auto exp mode, multiple exposure
capability, shutter speeds range
from 1 second to 1/1000, plus B.
with X sync at 1 60 and self timer.
Comes with two lenses, 45 mm
and 135 mm. Excellent condition,
$85; Nikon APS camera lens, 24
to 70 mm Nikon Zoom. $49. Call
508-7084. .. -30,4-6

Sports wristwatch, Dale Earnhart
#3, officially licensed with black
leather band and presentation case,
$25. Call 508-7084. :,,, .

Desk. large metal. $30; leg exer-
ciser, $30. Call 674-6142. 3-30,4-6


Diamond plate tool box for small
truck, $65. Call 762-8831.
3-30,4-6

20K Reese 5th wheel, $350; stain-
less steel nerf bars for crew cab,
$350.. Call 762-4239 and leave
message. 3-30,4-6
ARE topper for long wheel base
truck, locks, reinforced window,
utility bin on one side with ladder
rack, open on other $650 or best
offer. Call 762-4239 and leave mes-
sage. 3-30, 4-6
Car battery, brand new, $40. Call
674-4686. 3-30,4-6

Whirlpool washing machine for
$100. Call 643-2431. 3-23,3-30
Maytag dryer for $85. Call 643-
2431. 3-23,3-30

Hospital style potty chair and
folding walker, $25 for both. Call
762-3370. 3-23, 3-30

QTRtracking system, 1,000 collar
box, 217 frequency and 3 collars,
$750.- Call 643-6318,(days) or 379-
3318(nights). 3-23,3-30

Bedding set, complete Barbie
Ballerina and girl's Blue's Clues
with accent pillows, $20 each. Gall
762-4961. 3-23,3-30.
Place setting for eight, fruit design
:by Newcor stoneware, includes
dinner, salad and dessert plates,
.coffee cups, only six bowls, $20;
ceramic canister set with rubber
seals, fruit design, peach in color,.
$10. Call 762-4961. 3-23,3-30
Dirt Devil Vision vacuum cleaner,
12 amp, works great, $15. Call 762-
4961. 3-23, 3-30
VHS movies, assorted Barney and
Blue's Clues, $2 each. Call 762-
4961. 3-23,3-30
Girl's clothes at yard sale prices,
sizes 4T 8. Call 762-4961.
3-23,'3-30

Whirlpool washer and dryer. like
new, excellent condition, wanted
$350 but will take $275 for both.
Call 674-8385. .:

GE refrigerator, 18 cubic feel, with
ice maker. $225. Call 762-8526.
S. .- 3-23, 3-30

Full-size bed, in good condition for
$25. Call 643-9332. : ::
Toshiba big dish satellite, $100 or
best offer, Call 643-9332. .3-23,3-30

Two candelabras and a beautiful
clock, purchased from a mansion,
both for $5,000. Call 674-6142.
3-23, 3-30

Wedding dress, size 6, paid.$650,
asking $400. Call, 447-1362.
3-23, 3-30

Wedding ring and band. paid
$1,000 asking $500. Call 447-
1362. 3-23,3-30

Water heater, 40 gallon, gas, $75.
.Call 379-3078. 3-23, 3-30
16"Western saddle with matching
bridle, $200. Call 762-8510.
3-23, 3-30


15-inch speakers, four in box,
$300. Call 643-7288. 3-30, 4-6 Infant girl's clothes, winter and
S0 summer clothes sizes 6-24 months,
Baby bed with bumper pad, $65. ;in good condition. Call 674-4440-or
.Call 762-8831. . *674--2208 and leave message,..
* C a1762- 8831 .3- : ..... .. .............. .... .-,- :


1996 FordWinstar, real nice, seven
passenger, dual air, good tires,
mechanically sound, white with
biege interior, 119,000 miles, save
over $20,000 buy this instead for
something new, only $3,850. Call
674-8385. 3-30, 4-6

1996 Dodge Ram, 1/2 ton, short
bed pickup, one owner, V8, auto-
matic, AC, topper, clean, excellent
mechanical condition, high miles,
$5,500. Call 762-8526 or 674-
8385. 3-30, 4-6

1995 Grand Am SE, V-6, two door,
white in color, clean, all electric,
cloth interior, AM/FM cassette
stereo, 161,000 .miles. Asking
$2,500. Call 762-8348 and leave
message. 3-30, 4-6

2002 Ford Ranger, running board
wih attachments, new. Call 674-
8055(evenings). 3-30,4-6

1995 Buick Regal, white, 27 mpg
hwy., four door, gray interior, recent
tires, A/C and brakes. Has four
wheel disc brakes, power steering
and windows, low mileage (under
100,000), nice ride. Asking $3,900
or best offer, may consider trade on
mini-van. Call 508-7084. 3-30,4-6

2003 Nissan Frontier, crew cab,
automatic, power windows, locks,
tilt and cruise, AM/FM, CD, full-size
bed, dark gray in color, 36,300 miles.
Take over payments. Call 643-8408
(days) and ask for Shannon or 379-
8705 after 5 p.m. 3-30, 4-6

1970 Ford truck, 6 cylinder, 4
speed, long wheel base; 1970 Ford
Ranger, short wheel base, 6 cylin-
der, automatic; 1982 Ford 4x4, all
priced reasonable. Call 762-8407.
3-30,4-6

1989 Chevrolet 1500 truck, V-8,5-
speed, very strong. Asking $3.500.
Call 762-9676. 3-30,4-6

1994 Oldsmobile Cutlass, asking
$200. Call 674-4686. 3-30, 4-6

1994 Jeep Cherokee sport, trailer
ready, 6-cylinder, four door. Asking
$3,000. Call 643-1428.. 3-30,4-6


2003 Oldsmobile Alero, 47,000
miles, asking payoff. For more
information call 674-6038 after 4
p.m.(CT). 3-23,3-30

1993 Ford F150, new tires, good
paint, straight six, 5 speed, 163,000
miles, engine needs work, $2,500.
Call 674-8910. 3-23,3-30

2000 Ford Taurus, runs good,
needs brake work,. $3,000. Call
379-8977. 3-23,3-30

1996 F350, 7.3 liter diesel duallie,
$8,500 or best offer. Call 674-8332
or 237-2460. 3-23, 3-30

1995 Camaro Z28 for $4,500 or best
offer. Call 674-8332 or 237-2460.
3-23,3-30

1987 GMC Suburban, 4x4, 350
V8 engine, power doors and locks,
power windows, front and rear air,
body in great condition, runs great,
$3,500 or best offer. Call Jamie at
762-4961 after 6 p.m. 3-23,3-30

1986 Ford Mercury, gray, 4 door,
V6, transmission problem, $100.
Call 827-2810 or 827-2759.
3-23,3-30

2001 Chevrolet Impala LS, silver
exterior, spoiler, tinted windows,
power windows, power locks, CD,
OnStar, very well taken care of,
asking $6,500; Kelly Blue Book
is $6,780. Call 224-3907(days) or
379-8379(nights) ask for Kelli.
3-23,3-30

1997 Dodge Neon, in great condi-
tion, $3,000 or best offer. Call 643-
2994. 3-23, 3-30

1985 Ford LTD, needs carburetor
work, $400. Call 762-8510.
3-23,3-30

1995 Mustang, teal with blue pearl
in the paint job, V6, 5 speed with 17"
wheels, AM.'FM, CD player, grey
interior, good condition, depend-
able, daily- driver, asking $4,000
negotiable. Call 674-2255 or 643-.
6942 and leave a message.
**' "3-16 T 3-30

2001 ToyotaTacoma, 4x4, extend-
ed cab, $1,500 stereo, one owner,
66,000 miles, $15,#00. Call 643-
3777 or 624-4549. 3-23,3-30


William's Home
Improvements
"No Job Too Big or Small"
License & Insured, contractor & roofer
Concrete work, ari "'-: p- i
pressure cleanir .'
renovations, seari-.-: ..
gutter, painting, .'inyl
& screen enclosure
FOR FREE ESTIMATES Q
Call 674-8092 UFN


Stump grinding

Reasonable rates
Free estimates

Call
Chris Nissley
674-8081 or
643-8561 (Cell)






SDecks* Pole Barns
House Framing & Garages
Wood & Vinyl Siding
Tin Roofing
Bathroom Remodeling
Concrete Work
Call 674-3458 .._


FOR RENT

In Bristol
Mobile home lots.

In Blountstown
1-room efficiency,
utilities included.

Phone 643-7740






1, 2 & 3 Bedroom
Apartments
"The Best Place to Live"
Rental Assistance




Call (850) 674-4202
16978 NW Mayo Street,
Blountstown, FL 32424.
TDD-rTY 711.
EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY


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-






MARCH 30,2005 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 21


Magee craft boat, 14 ft., 85 hp
Johnson and trailer, $2,500. Call
643-2196. 3-30, 4-6

14 ft. fiberglass boat, semi-V with
swivel seats, trailer with working
lights, both in good condition, $800.
Call 762-3159. 3-23,3-30



1979 Coachman travel trailer, 24
foot, $2,800Q.Cal'674-6242 or 593-
5429. 3-23, 3-30

Winnebago motor home, in good
condition, $3,500. Call 379-3078.
3-23, 3-30

Slide in camper, 8 ft. long, excel-
lent shape, $700. Call 379-3078.


3-23, 3-3


BR Set, Solid wood: 7 pc.
queen/king bed, dresser,
mirror, 2 nightstands, chest
avail. New in boxes. Can
deliver. Retail S5000 sell $1400.
Call 850-222-9879
Bed, KING Size, name brand
mattress, box w/ warranty, New
in plastic $295 can deliver 850-
222-2113
BED Solid wood cherry sleigh
bed & pillow; top mattress set.
All New in box. Retail $1400,
sell $575. 850-222-7783
Queen Double Pillow top
mattress set. Name brand, New
in plastic, factory warranty,
$195. 850-425-8374
Couch & Loveseat: Brand new,
still packaged, w/ warranty. Can
deliver. Suggested retail $1200,
sell $450. 850-545-7112
DINING RM. Beautiful new
cherry table, 6 Chippendale
chairs, lighted china cabinet,
can deliver. $3K list,' ell for
$1100. 850-222-2113
Bed, New Visco NASA Memory
Foam Mattress Set. Still boxed,
factory warranty, can deliver.
Mfg. list $1200, sell $400. Call
850-425-8374


Additional runs of the same ad (more than 2 weeks) are $2 per
week and must be paid in advance. We do not bill for classified.


Two campers, one walk-in camper
in excellent condition for $700; one
camper shell for $40. Call 379-
3078 3-23, 3-30



Beagle puppies, six weeks old,
excellent hunting stock, $50 each.
Call 643-5726. 3-30, 4-6


0 Bulldog puppies, white-English,
nine to choose from, ready in 3
weeks. $100 each. Call 762-3723
and leave message. 3-30,4-6


Puppies, pit bull, $200 each. Call
379-9345. 3-30, 4-6

Chihuahuas, AKC registered, five
black and white apple head, one fe-
male tan. Males, $200 and females,
$250. Call 643-9336. 3-30, 4-6

FOR RENT
2 BR mobile home in
Scotts Ferry.
$300 a month
Call 643-1459 or 674-1853


EASY FINANCING"
READY TO MOVE IN
2002 doublewide
with 3BR on
approximately 1/2 "
acre lot at NW 12th in
Blountstown. $55,900
For more information
call (866)471-2005
S .. 30.


Two ferrets, one year old, had all
shots and wormed, everything up
to date, food, litter, bedding, toys,
two-story cage, asking $275 for
everything. Call 674-2105 (day)
leave message. 3-30, 4-6
Red-nose, female, chocolate and
white, ADBA registered. Asking
$250. Call 643-7288. 3-30, 4-6

Rat terrier, full blooded, 13 months
old, worming and shots up to date,
house trained, $100. Call 237-
2144. 3-30, 4-6
Puppies, Jack Russell, two fe-
males, one male, $100 each; asking
$150 for mother. Call 237-2419 and
leave message. 3-30, 4-6
Puppies, chocolate red nose pit, 9
weeks old, two males left, parents
on premises. $150 each. Call 567-
9496 after 6 p.m. or leave mes-
sage. 3-30,4-6
Black lab and chow mix, female, 4
months old. Call 762-8690 for more
information. 3-23, 3-30
Beagle puppy, small breed, lovable,
6 months old, has had puppy shots,
booster and wormed, $150 firm. Call
643-4349. 3-23, 3-30





1/2 acre Mobile
Home lot located in
Neal Subdivision
in Bristol
Call
1 (850) 379-8725


Rodney Miller's Bonded&

Lawn Service Insured
Residential Commercial Year 'round Service


Roof blowing Reasonable rates!
Home 643-4267 Cell 643-6589 *Free estimates.


Appaloosa Gelding, five ye
green broke, white and ru
beautiful color, $900 or be
Call 762-8774.

Calico cat, going to have
dad is a yellow tom cat, fr
good home. Call 643-5401



Wanted: To rent to own a
room mobile home or house
good shape in Liberty Coun
Please call 643-2737.

Wanted: Pekingese male.
674-4686.

Wanted: Black, male, m
schnauzer stud fee. Call C
639-5413.

Wanted: aluminum Joh
and trailer, 10 ft. or 12 ft. C
8883.

Wanted: to rent a clean
bedroom mobile home-or h
Bristol or Blountstown for
person on a fixed income. C
2686 and leave a message


Bars old,
st, very
st offer.
3-23, 3-30

kittens,


Wanted: Junk cars and trucks, any
condition, no charge for removal.
Call 762-8459. 2-2T.4-6


ree to a Lost: Blackshaggydog, lookslikea
large poodle, answers to "Poochie."
3-23,3-30 Last seen in 'Neal Subdivision in
Bristol. Children miss badly. Call
643-4379. 3-30, 4-6
3 bed- Lost: Maltese and Yorkie mix
e in very small dog, silver gray, blue collar
ty area. and rabies tag, last seen in Scotts
3-30, 4-6 Ferry. Has medical problems, no
questions asked. Substantial re-
Call ward. Call anytime at 643-7910 or
674-9594. 3-30, 4-6
3-30,4-6
Lost: black tom cat, has been neu-
iniature tered, cannotseeverywell, answers
'athy at to Blackie, has no bottom lip. Call
3-30, 4-6 674-8566. 3-23, 3-30

n boat Found: two large dogs in Bristol.
all 762- Call 643-5957. 3-23, 3-30


3-23, 3-30

1 or 2
louse in
elderly
all 643-
e.
3-23,3-30


1.5 acres in Mossy
Pond area, high and
dry, some timber, road
frontage on county
road, half mile from
paved road. Price
$75,000


For more information
call 762-3885
Rolf Myrhammar
Broker


Doublewide on one acre, new car-
pet, vinyl, sinks, counter tops, etc.,
buyer chooses new appliances,
$49,000. Call 570-4212.
3-23, 3-30

Remodeled house, 2BR/1BA,
large laundry room, covered front
and back porch, central heat and air,
located in Bristol. Call 643-5235.
3-23, 3-30

1984 mobile home, 14x70, 2BR/
1 BA, in good condition, $4,200. Call
643-5993. 3-23,3-30



Yard sale, Friday, April 1 and Satur-
day, April 2, from 7 a.m. until noon,
located at 11 th Street in Blountstown
(Scandy White Building), lots of
housewares, clothes, fishing gear.
Phone 674-3365. 3-30

CLASS*1IF~IEDS3
cotne on page 22


* Lake Mystic Beauty! 2400 sq foot home, waterfront with a dock,
carport, and seawall. There is also a guest house on the property.
Asking $399,900. Shown by appointment only! NEW LISTING.
* Prime Hunting Land! 80 acres located in Juniper. This land is beauti-
ful with Telogia Creek Running through the property! Asking $195,000.
NEW LISTING.
* Large Spacious Doublewide! 4 bed, 3 bath, 2,048 sq ft., on one
*acre lot. This.doublewide has many amenities including a garden tub,
living room and den! Asking $75,000. Accepting all offers, seller is
motivated!.
* Investor Alert! 4.63 acres located on the corner of Hwy. 20 and
Hoecake Rd. Excellent road frontage and perfect for building sites.
Zoned rural village. Asking $70,000. UNDER CONTRACT.
* Excellent Commercial Property! Just reduced by $10,000. Lo-
cated on Hwy. 65 in Hosford, includes two commercial buildings, is
currently leased by Whitney's Seafood II. Asking $57,500. UNDER
CONTRACT.
* Pack Your Fishing Gear! .25 acres only blocks away from Estif-
fanulga boat landing. Perfect spot for mobile home or house! Asking
$8,600.
* Prime Hwy. 20 frontage! Excellent spot for a business, .43 acres.
Asking only $53,000.
Needed: 400 1,000 acres in Liberty County!
We have serious prospects!
If you are interested in buying or selling land in or around Liberty and
calhoun County please give us a call. We are dedicated to serving our
customers and i. would enjoy the opportunity to serve you! Call Holli Revell
445-0828 for information on listings! b .4 .


AUCTION
First Saturday of every month
The auction will be held April
2 at 7 p.m.' Trading Post
will be open 9 a.m. every
Saturday. Free setup for
yardsale every Saturday.
Public is invited.
Col. James W. Copeland
18098 NW County Rd. 12
Phone: 643-7740
AB1226 AU0001722


Summerwind Subdivision

22 lots, .5 to 1 acre + priced to sell from $15,900 to $19,900 with owner financing starting
at ONLY $169 per month. This subdivision is Mobile Home Friendly, and can also accom-
modate single family homes. This area offers a very relaxing natural country setting away
from the noise and lights of the city.

DIRECTIONS: Take Hwy. 20 to Hwy. 65 at Hosford turn South onto Hwy. 65 and go 3
miles toward Telogia, take a left on to Hwy. 67 at the Country Store and go East for 1.5
miles Summerwind Will be on the right hand side.


- -L


To start enjoying your very own little piece of the country, call
Ron Montgomery at (850) 545-4493 or toll-free at 1-800-317-3721.
ontgornery. Realty Inc. -"





Page 22 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL MARCH 30, 2005


Carport yard sale, Saturda
2 beginning at 7 a.m., loc
, 115 Hentz Ave. in Blountst
VCRs, one electric dutch ov
of household items, dishes
clothes. Phone 674-5486. -.
Yard Sale, April 2 at 1.640
Mimosa St. in Blountstown o
71S, second paved road to ti
afterthe liquor store, from 7:;
Until noon; includes lots of
hold items, toys, men's dress
boys clothes, sizes 5-6, bi
computer monitors, someth
everyone, -cancel if rain.
674-3019.
Yard Sale, April at 7 a.m.(C
cated in Shuler Brothers Park
on 11th Street; tons of stuff to
from including clothes(name b
antique furniture, entertain
center, $50. home theaters
(DVD player and 6 speakers
TV (25 inch console) $50,
ware, floral arrangements,
ner (software included), con
games, and tons more! To
items to list, Phone 643-239

Yard sale, Saturday, April
7 a.m. until noon, located
Solomon St. across from
Pentecostal Holiness.Churc
of baby items, men and wo
clothing, purses, jewelry an
ding and much more. Phon
5634..
Yard sale, Saturday, April 2,
-ning at 8 a.m. located at 175
Jane St., in Blountstown
from Big Bend Sporting (
.on Hwy. 71 N., girl's clothes
months, name brand shoes
size blouses and pants, hou,
items, coffee and end table.
674-4475 or 674-8320..
Big multi-faiiily yard sale, I
April 1 and Saturday, April 2
ning at 7 a.m. (weather pern
located ai 71 South. only hot
rignt past liquor store around
Furniture, dishes. homemade
almost new Kirby vacuum, a
.. with'it, some never used; adi
children's clothing, all size i
ing plus size and, lots and
other items, too much to
'some brand new items. I
,674-1094.
Yard sale, Saturday, April 2
7 to 11 a.m. located at 1661
Gaskin St., fifth house on -i
hind McDonalds. Ladies' c
size 12 and 14 including dr
prom/pageant dresses size
4, girls clothing size 2 arid
dler, white toddler pageant
Size 2, comforters, toys, too
* items to list. Cancel if rain.
237-2144.
Multi-family moving sale
urday, April 2 beginning at 7
located at 25166 N. Main St.irn
Clothes and shoes from child
adults, many kitchen and house
items and much more. Phon
4193 or 762-3028.


Liberty County Senior Citizens announce April activities


"A from the Liberty County
ay, April Senior Citizens Association
ated at The Liberty County Senior
town, 2 Citizens Association announces
en, lots .
some its activities for the month of
a-30 April. They are as follows:
05 SW *Thursday, April 7 A shop-
in Hwy. ping trip to Wal-Mart
he right *Friday, April 8 Paratransit
30 a.m.
house- "Roadeo" will be held in Talla-
sshirts, hassee for transit drivers. Liberty
cycles, County Transit will be sending
iing for
Phone Peggy Shiver and Dwayne Barber
3-30 to represent us in the "Roadeo."
S*Saturday, April 9 The
DT), 0o-
ing Lot Liberty County Senior Citizens
choose Advisory Council will have a
brand), dessert table at the Blue Grass
inment
system Festival at the Veterans Memo-
s) $85, trial Park Civic Center. These
glass- ladies will have cakes, pies,
scan-
mputer cookies of all kinds. For more
many information, call 379-8420 and
8.0, 4-6 speak with Judy Huard between
the hours of 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
2 from *Tuesday, April 12 The
at 243
Bristol Liberty County Senior Citizens
ch, lots Advisory Council meeting will


- f-7 wS


be held at the Bristol Senior
Center at 1:30 p.m.
*Thursday, April 14 A
shopping trip to Blountstown,
call 643-2524 by 3 p.m. Mon-
day, April 11 if you would like
to go.
*Thursday, April 14 A Lib-
erty County Senior Citizen will
be at Maxwell Harrell Memorial
Library from 10:30 a.m. to noon
with information on services.
*Monday, April 18 The
Liberty County Senior Citizens
Board of Directors meeting will
be held at the Bristol Senior
Center at 7:30 p.m.
*Tuesday, April 19 A rep-
resentative from legal aid will be
at the Bristol Center at 11 a.m.
*Thursday, April 21 A
shopping trip to Wal-Mart, call
643-2524 by 3 p.m. by Monday,
April 18 if you want to go.


DAYLIGHT SAVINGS


rp We now have the 2005
available in stock. Comr
NE 1 W
N1 2004 Ford Crown Victoria L
:. STK#41c0,)5 Leather, List $29,685
CD, Discount 7,537
SC/TW $22148
Power seat $I
NEW
2005 F150 Supercab XL
ST#5T-0022 V8, List $26,315
AT, A/C Discount 4,817
Trailer
tow pkg.$21,498


2005 Dodge Quad Cab Ram $23995
S1500. 4.7LV8, AT, CD, Alloy wheels....... $23 9
2004 Honda Element EX MUST SEE

2004 Explorer XLS 4 dr.
SAC, PW,PL. CD, SC'TW. ................. $9
2003 Chev. S-10 LS Ext. Cab 4 9
V6, AT. AC, CD, Tow Pkg... .................. .4 99 9
2003 Escape XLT 4 dr. $17 995
V6, AT, CD, 27k miles ......................... ...$ 1
2001 Toyota Tacoma Crew Cab
j i 4x4, SR5 CD, PWiPL, Trailer tow ..... MUST SEE
-2001 F150 Supercrew 4x4 $1
Lariat. Leather, Tow Pkg.................... $ 1 9 5 0 0
gl^^B^-'S -- 6^~y egg!sas I^~SS^M~ii^^^^~S~^^^uSSS^SSS^S^SS


*Friday, April 22 A repre-
sentative from the Liberty Coun-
ty Senior Citizens will be at the
Hosford Center from 10:30 a.m.
to noon with information on ser-
vices.
*Thursday, April 28 A
shopping trip to Blountstown,


Calhoun Co. Sr. Citizens plans cruise
from the Calhoun County Senior Citizens Association
The Calhoun County Senior Citizens has planned a most delight-
ful way to see the unspoiled wildlife and panoramic views of the
beautiful St. Johns River, its tributaries and the downtown Jackson-
ville skyline and waterfront. Come sail with us on the Jacksonville
Princess yacht on May 24. The boat is an 80-foot luxury yacht which
is docked by the pavilion on the Riverwalk while cruising. Enjoy a
fabulous lunch buffet with all the trimmings.
Cost of the trip is $49. This includes motor coach transportation,
cruise, buffet lunch and a great time. This trip will leave at 7 a.m.
(CT) and return by 5 p.m. (CT) on Tuesday, May 24.
We do expect this trip to fill up fast, so call Marilyn or Diane at
674-4163. Full payment is due by May 1.


TO CHECK OUT


BAY FORDI
,,llj^^^ RD!^ ^^


i Mustang & Thunderbird
e by and check them out!
NEW
X 2004 F150 Regular Cab:
STi 0., V6, AC, List $19,725
AM/FM Discount 4,037
Work Truck,$15688
5 spd. trans ,


XL~


2005 F150 Supercab XL 4x4
,TKT,. V8, AT, List $30,405
Running Discount 5,640
boards, l
Tow pkg. $24,765



2004 Lincoln Town Car $26995
Signature, Loaded. 19k miles....... NOW$ 69
2004 Taurus SE 4 dr.
PW PL, SCiTW 21k miles.......................
2003 Chevy Malibu, 4 dr. $8995
V6, AT. CD. SC,'TW ........................... ......... 8 5 99
2003 Crown Victoria LX 4 dr. $14 995
Power Seat, CD, Nice.............................. .$ 1 4 9 9 5
! 2001 Lincoln LS 4 dr. $19 500
. 30k miles. Loaded ....................... ......


2001 Pontiac Bonneville SE 410 995
4 dr, V6, AT, CD, 66K miles ...... ...... ...... $) 0 9 5
1999 Pontiac Grand Prix GT $7 995
Spoiler. Moon root. Sporty................. ..........$ 7 9 9 5


All PrlCS PIUS T5i Tag & Foe, W A C
:11111101:1r:jiO MAt S n~. -l trorn~fmF.rO Creoa,


JD17178 Main Street South
-,r .Blountstozon Blountstown 674-5462 .


REAL ESTATE C' ORC N

SERENITY-- Lovely
10 & 20 acre tracts
on Hwy. 274 & Miller
Road, easy finance
terms with low down
payment, Horses &
newer Mobile homes
ok, lightly wooded
tracts. Selling 'fast
but still several to
choose from. Prices
start at $39,900.;

Call 265-3432.
, 4 w idasbe tealestate.net


call 643-2524 by 3 p.m. on Mon-
day, April 25.
*Friday, April 29 and Satur-
day, April 30 The Liberty
County Senior Citizens will hold
its fourth annual flathead tourna-
ment at the Bristol Boat Land-
ing. For more information, call
643-4318 and speak with Rudy
Sumner. The proceeds from this
event will go to continue the ser-
vices to the elderly.


-- ----


0


o





MARCH 30, 2005 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL Page 23

Bronson deploys state vets to check farm animals linked to petting zoo illnesses


TALLAHASSEE Florida
Agriculture and Consumer Ser-
vices Commissioner Charles
H. Bronson announced today
that he. is sending department
veterinarians and inspectors to
inspect and conduct testing on
farm animals linked to a series
of illnesses of children who re-
cently visited petting zoos or at-
tended agricultural fairs.
Although the, Florida De-
partment of Health (DOH) is


investigating several possible
sources that may be responsible
for the outbreak, including food
and water the children may
have consumed, Bronson said
he is taking the proactive step
of dispatching veterinarians to
check on animals in an effort to
enhance and expedite the DOH
inquiry. .
"We want to do all that we
can to support health officials to
get to the bottom of this case,"


V 1 :1


FLORIDA DEPARTMENT
OF CORRECTIONS
is currently accepting applications for the following position
POSITION: Vocational Instructor 11-F/C
POSITION NUMBER: 70028123
POSITION LOCATED AT: Calhoun Correctional
Institution, Blountstown, Florida
SALARY: $98115 $1,526.91 biweekly
This position requires hands on work with instructions
and guidance to inmates in the area of electronics.
APPLICANTS must possess a high school diploma
or G.E.D., arid have three years work experience in
the area of electronics.
QUALIFIED APPLICANTS should submit a State of
Florida employment application no later than 11:59
p.m..(ET) onApril 7, 2005 to Corwvergys, ATTN: People
First, Staffing Administration, P.O. Box 44058, Jack-
sonville, FL 32231. Applicants may apply online at
HTTPS:.//PEOPLEFIRSTMYFLORIDA. COM or call
1-877-562-7287.
i An EEO Employer ; 3-30.4 .


Liberty County Board
of County Commissioners
will be accepting applications for the position of
Administrative Assistant to the Liberty County
Emergency Management.

This temporary- full time position will require extensive
computer knowledge and technology, with expertise in
Excel, Word, and Word Perfect, as well as other vari-
ous computer programs. Excellent book-keeping and
typing skills are also required. Any hired employee
must be able to work well with the public and-handle
multi tasking skills within this office. Applicants must
be willing to work during all emergencies and be able
to be on-call at any given time. All applicants will be
required to attend various training seminars and work
shops regarding Emergency Management as well as
attending conferences held twice a year at various lo-
cations throughout the State of Florida. Any employee
will be required to undergo an extensive background
check as well as a drug test upon hire and random test-
ing at any given time. Liberty County Board of County
Commissioners is an equal opportunity employer and
a drug-free work place. Pay rate will be determined
upon experience, skills and education.

All applications can be picked up and returned to the
Liberty County Clerk's Office. If you have any ques-
tions, please contact Rhonda Lewis at (850)643-
2339.

Deadline for accepting applications will be. April 7,
2QQ5. .... .. ....... 1 .. .. "
............Ui^^ ---U^^B------^


Bronson said. "We will provide
all of our data to our colleagues
at the Department of Health and
stand ready to assist them in any
way we can."
State veterinarians are track-
ing the animals that were pres-
ent at the recent Central Flori-
da Fair in Orlando and at the
Strawberry Festival in Plant
City as a number of the ill-
nesses were reportedly among
children who attended one or



Drivers:
HOME
EVERY NIGHT
Shelton Trucking
seeks15 Drivers
having CDL-A,
2 years experience,
8 7No Felonies
800-877-3201


the other of the festivals. They
will then conduct various tests
on the animals traced to petting
zoos at those fairs to determine
what, if any infections, could
have been transferred from the
animals.
At the same time, state vet-
erinarians are reviewing proce-
dures in place at other petting
zoos to determine whether ad-
equate sanitary measures are in
place to protect fair goers.


One Stop Career Center
16908 NE Pear St Suite ,.
Blounlstown Phone (850) 674-5088
The following positions are
available: Delivery Driver, Ce-
ment Mason, Construction La-
borer, Janitor, Nursery Worker,
Receptionist, LPN, CNA, Food
Service Supervisor, Post Plant
Laborer, Sales Represena-
tive. o EEO
Service Chipola Workforce Board UFN


Parthenon Healthcare of Blountstown invites you to join a
professional, caring and enthusiastic team.

RN/LPN UNIT MANAGER

$2,000 Sign-on Bonus
Competitive Benefits
Flexible Shifts

Contact Angela Hewett or Jennifer Aday at 674-5464.


NORTH FLORIDA


LUMBER
...is currently seeking a dedicated individual for the position,
of OFFICE ASSISTANT. Individual must be courteous and
able to handle multiple tasks. Must be well organized and
able to perform duties accurately' and in a timely fashion.
Responsibilities include, but are not limited to: cross train--
ing in multiple areas, filing, data entry, maintaining paper
work for warehouse shipping and receiving, etc. Computer
experience is preferred, high school diploma or equivalent is
required. Hours may vary between 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday
through Friday. Wages are hourly. Please apply direct to
North Florida Lumber Co., Bristol.


FLORIDA DEPARTMENT
OF CORRECTIONS
is currently accepting applications for the following position
POSITION: Vocational Instructor IlI-F/C.
POSITION NUMBER: 70032212
POSITION LOCATED AT: Gulf Correctional
Institution, Wewahitchka, Florida
SALARY: $981.15'- $1,526.91 biweekly
Area of instruction is heating and air conditioning. Pre-
fer applicants with experience in repair of heating, air
ventilation, freezers, etc. This is not a classroom setting.
Requires working with inmate labor. This is a Career
Service position with full state benefits.
APPLICANTS must possess at least a high school
diploma or G.E.D., and have at least three years work
experience in the trade field applying for.
QUALIFIED APPLICANTS should submit a State of
Florida employment application with above position
number nolater than 11:59 p.m.(ET) on Thursday, March
31, 2005 to Convergys, ATTN: People First, Staffing
Administration, P.O. Box 44058, Jacksonville, FL32231.
Applicants may apply online at HTTPS://PEOPLEFIRST.
MYFLORIDA. COM or call 1-877-562-728.7..

S-,:': ::" -" An-EEO Employer -- ,-


In the meantime, officials
stress that it is critically im-
portant that anyone who comes
in contact with animals takes
sanitary precautions, includ-
ing thoroughly washing one's
hands after contact with the ani-
mals. Some bacteria, such as E.
coli, can reside in animals with-
out causing them any disease
but can make humans sick if the
bacteria lingers on the hands and
is ingested along with food.



MANAGER
for Package Store
and Lounge-Mgt.
experience required,
salary based
on qualifications
and experience.
Call Mr. Redd
at 574-5050 323146

Fax your JOB MARKET
advertisements
to us at 643-3334
or by email to:
thejournal@gtcom.net

A financial service
provider in Carrabelle
has an opening for a
Branch Manager. Re-
quirements for this job
include at least 3 years
experience in- man-
agement of branch
banking. Qualified ap-
plicants should send
resume to P.O. Box
669, Apalachicola, FL
32329.
AA/EOE

Immediate opening for
a MECHANIC with at
least 2 years experi-
ence in heavy equip-
ment, forklifts and
automotive repair. Must
have full-line of hand
.tools. Welding a plus.

Apply at
Quincy Farms, 190
Mannie Gunn Rd.,
Quincy, FL or fax to
(850)627-3493.
EOE
EOE3-30.4-6



Someone to
prep, service and
pressure wash
rental equipment.
Full-time position.


~01


Lolley's
Rentals
in Quincy.


Call 50-62-838






Page 24 THE CALHOUN-LIBERTY JOURNAL MARCH 30,2005


DAV' IID COLEY CONTJ~INYUEDuJFROMJ THEi*FRONTI PAGE


fulfilling a longtime ambition,
Bontrager said.
Another of his wife's uncles,
Laban Bontrager of Bristol,
worked with him on the cam-
paign, going door-to-door to
solicit support. Calling Coley
"well-loved and respected," he
said the newly-elected legislator

FHP issues

scam alert
from the Florida Highway Patrol
TALLAHASSEE -The Flor-
ida Highway Patrol (FHP) is issu-
ing an alert to citizens regarding
a phone -scam that is spreading
throughout Florida. Callers (con
artists) who are impersonating
FHP troopers, as well as other law
enforcement officers, have been
contacting citizens by telephone
at random advising them that a
family member has been involved
in a traffic crash. The con artist
urges the phone owner to dial
either *72 or 72# in order to speak
with a doctor. By doing this, the
phone owner will unknowingly
permit the caller on the other end
to use their phone line for making
local or long distance telephone
calls which will ultimately be
billed to the phone owner's ac-
count. Citizens who suspect that
they may have fallen victim to a
con artist phone scam must con-.
tact their local phone company
to ascertain how to remove call
forwarding from their telephone
forwarding system.
Most of these phone calls
have originated from pay phones
located within correctional facili-
ties. Some correctional facilities
have started playing a recording
on all collect calls dialed from
pay phones within the facility in
which the receiver of the call is
advised that they are receiving a
collect call from a correctional
facility. Many of the calls have
originated from a correctional fa-
cility in Miami-Dade. Please note
that if your phone is equipped
with caller ID, these calls begin
with (305) 459-XXXX and the ID
name will be TCG pay phones.
Be cautioned that the Miami-
Dade Correctional Facility is not
the only facility from which these
calls can originate and the above
listed number is for informational
purposes only.
Victims or potential victims
should immediately contact the
law enforcement agency the
caller claimed to represent.
Anyone receiving a suspicious
call is asked to make notations
about the caller's voice, request'
a call back number, and take ad-
vantage of the caller ID feature if
they have the equipment installed
on their phone. The FHP does not
notify family members of crash
victim via collect calls from pay
phones, nor would we request
anyone to dial a *72 or 72# num-
ber. Anyone who suspects that
they might have been victimized
S-is asked to contact their local FlP
* station. .-


had a great interest in bringing
more employment opportunities
to the area. "He also wanted to
help improve conditions for state
prison workers with working
conditions and wages," Bontrager
said. .
Although he was diagnosed


with cancer around Christmas,
Coley continued with his duties,
keeping a promise to speak at the
January meeting of the Liberty
County Chamber of Commerce
in Bristol.
"People from Tallahassee and
throughout the state are looking


over here at Liberty County and
recognizing what you're doing.
It's just going to be a matter of
time before they start spending
time over here wanting to know,
'Hey, what are they doing over in
Liberty County that's so success-
ful?'" Coley, who represented the


nine counties of District 7, was
quick to joke: "And unless it's
one of my nine counties, I hope
you don't tell them!"
Services are scheduled for 10
a.m. Central Time at the Johnson
Health Center at Chipola College
in Marianna. His complete obitu-
ary appears on page 18.


I tx~~~YX r"(errt\~-k t'im~-r\-i ~~'r ':' ~V ~Ii UIr:~d Etir2~rEiWinxVV1Jt1JWI LP i~hU.~fi


Dear Gadsdef. Liberty & Calhoun
County Residents,
. ro years ago I obtained my Florida
Dealer's License due to the frustration of
showlnm for a used car. The following three.
things made car shopping a big headache
for me:
*Haglina for the best price
'Having to come up with $2000 to $3000
for a down payment, taxes, title and taa


*Paying someone a $5000 $6000 profit
on a $10.000 automobile.
Here's what we've done at Direct Automo-
tive Wholesale;
*All vehicles are priced at the "Loan
Value", which is the price credit unions and
banks will loan you on this vehicle.
*We require NO DOWN PAYMENT on any
of our vehicles. We can even help with your
taxes and tat most of the time.


:::'-"1-n-' e.: n"-- : e -' s' ~ '" -. :'- '' -Sp ec al.

2000
Lexus

GS300
Sunroof,
Leather


$0 down

s388,fl'o


U Down
s386imo

lA~f


'01 Suburban LS
Leather and L a~aedl


U Down '01 Ford SuperCrew
'389,mo Low Miles! Great TruckI


AN!


u uown '01 Ford Sport Trac
S289/mo Like Newl


0 Down '00 Escalade
s389/mo Loaded!






0 Down '01 Cadillac deVille
1349/mo ts ALL CADILLACI


0 Down 01 Ranger Extended
W231 /mo Ca Edge Pkg. Extras


U Down '01 Honda AcorciEX U Down 2000 ToyotaCamnry
5327/mo 4 d~ou. V6 La tw 1fls T242/mo Leatheri
20li. im i *L


SDown 02 Ford Expedition 0 Down '00 Chevy Sliverado
1423/mo 6dltelBauer. Sunrool. TV,, 346/mo Z71 4X4 Must Seel


*At LOAN VALUE. we make a small profit
and you set a great deal!
The best part is we have family on the lot,
NOT HIGH PRESSURE SALES PEOPLE.
If you don't see the car of your dreams in
this ad, call us. We'll get you pre-approved.
tell you what it will cost and buy it for you.
We appreciate you're supporting us. Come
by or call.


al wa y s






We sell all of our cars at
loan value so you don't
need a down payment!
Interest Rates
as low as 4.25%


0 Down '04 Mitsubishi 0 Down '02 Mazda 83000
$349/mo Spyder GS Convertible s249/mo VS dua Sport c% Mles


0 Down '00 Acura 3.2TL
5299/mo Leather. SupoLf.


u uown '9 Audi A6
'28Oimo sunroof. Leather.


o Down '02 Sedona Minivan
1272irno Sunroof. Leather.
r M-


0 Down '01 Nissan Pathfinder
5349tmo sunroof, leather, loaded


0l Down '%M PotiGPfjW oAm


0 Down '00 Lincoln LS
1289/mo v8 Personal Luxuryl


0 Down '01 ChevyS-O1
'21 0mo Extended Cab!


Direct Automotive Wholesale
403 W. Jefferson (Hwy 90) -3 Blocks West of Square in Quincy Next to Dollar General Ope Mon-Thurs 9 aP.M,8 p.m,; Fiay 9-7; Sat. 9 -6 mn Closed.Sundays

Quincy 850-627-8448 Quincy
-All Payments Illustrated with Zero Down, 6% nterst, 60 months,. With Approved Credit
I m-