Bradford County telegraph

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Bradford County telegraph
Physical Description:
Unknown
Publisher:
L.C. Webb ( Starke Fla )
Publication Date:

Record Information

Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 579551
oclc - 33886096
System ID:
UF00027795:05162

Full Text



9hel Suet Stuwwvies' t" be,& Side' s Sew tmeiv







Arabfarb Ctl *s i.
CLIP 0pIbA -7C

USPS 062-700 STARKE, FLORIDA THURSDAY, JULY 18,9 2013 133RD YEAR 51ST ISSUE 75 CENTS


Worth Noting


Funds needed
for annual
school supply
event
Although school has only been
out for a few weeks, it is time to
begin planning for the Back-to-
School Info Fair for the upcoming
school year.
Because of the continued need
and the success of this event,
organizers will be hosting the
sixth annual Back-to-School Info
Fair on Friday, Aug. 9, at the
Bradford County Fairgrounds.
The objective of this event is
to provide free information to the
general public about the county's
varied organizations and to
provide some school supplies for
each student who attends.
Like last year, organizers plan
to reduce lines and wait times by
designating 30-minute slots for
students from particular schools
to come. If students/parents
cannot come during their schools
designated time, they can come
during the last time slot of the
evening.
School supply bags will
be handed out when students
enter the facility. These bags
will be specifically packed for
elementary, middle school and
high school students. Students,
'along with their parents, will be
asked to visit at least 12 of the
formationn booths and have
-fftheir cards signed for a chance
to win a gift card from Walmart.
Drawings will be done every 30
minutes.
Food -and entertainment
will also be provided, with the
support of the community. With
a successful Back-to-School Info
Fair, organizers hope to better
equip families for a successful
start to the fall semester.
To meet the goal of-providing
a backpack to each student who
attends and purchase gift cards
for the drawings, donations are
needed.
If your organization would
like to participate by having an
information booth, organizers are
:asking for a voluntary donation of
$100. If you do not have funds
^allocated for such an event, you
are still invited to set up a booth
-and share your information.
Giving out school supplies from
-your booth is also optional since
school supplies will be handed out
after students have visited your
booth.
- Those who Would like to donate
funds in support of the event can
join the "Committee of 100."
Organizers hope to find at least
100 people willing to donate $50
apiece. Make checks payable to
Back-to-School Info Fair and mail
them to Santa Fe College, ATTN:
Cheryl Canova, 209 W. Call St.,
Starke,FL 32091.
For more information, please
call 904-964-5382 or 352-395-
4410.,



Athletic
association
selling chicken
and rice
Bradford Parents Athletic As-
sociation will be selling chicken
and rice dinners to support its
cheerleading program. Dinners
are being presold for $5 each
through July 24. If interested in
purchasing dinners, please call
Dana Britt at 904-364-3268 or
Stephanie Scott at 904-364-6642.


Santa Fe College President Jackson Sasser welcomes participants to second Envision Bradford
session.

Envision Bradford 2023 gains momentum


BY MARY W. BRIDGMAN
Special to the Telegraph
Envision Bradford 2023, a newly
established independent initiative
to bring jobs to Bradford County,
continued with an impressive turnout
of over 80 attendees. Monday for its
second session at the Charley Johns
Conference Center.
The project is facilitated by Santa
Fe College and moderated by its
president, Dr. Jackson Sasser, who
stressed the importance of building
upon the economic, cultural and
social assets of Bradford County with
ideas that are fresh, innovative and
agreeable to its citizens.
Wes Jurey, president and CEO of
the Arlington (Texas) Chamber of


LCI

evidence

of DOC's

'cultural


shift'
BY JAMES WILLIAM1S
Special to the Teleraph
Last WednesdaN. the La'%ieN
Correctional Institution held a
presentation to open the prison facility
and let community leaders take a look
inside. The event %%as one otf many
community partnership presentations
the Florida Department of Corrections
has held since at least last April.
Invited guests included
representatives from Rep. Charlie
Van Zant's and Sen. Rob Bradle, "s
offices. Sen. Audrey Gibson and Rep.
Mia Jones, both from Duval County
attended in person, Gibson because
she is on the Senate's criminal justice
committee.
Other visitors included Bradford
Supervisor of Elections Terry Vaughn
and Tax Collector Teresa Phillips,
plus representatives from Lawtey,
Starke, Camp Blanding and other
organizations and offices in north
central Florida.
All of the inmates asked to be


Commerce Center for Innovation,
returned to provide guidance to the
group. "The vision of Bradford
County has to be what you build.
Change is constant. Change can
happen to you or you can lead it," he
said, emphasizing the motto, "If it is
to be, it is up to me."
The Center for Innovation is
a nonprofit LLC that serves as
a catalyst for technology-based
economic development. It supports a
strategic approach to the formation of
collaborative partnerships, facilitating
and enabling the integration of
industry, academic, and government
research and discovery with venture
capital, talent and knowledge.
Jurey has also been involved with


CFI's establishment of TechComm,
a federal partnership intermediary,
to facilitate technology transfer in
'support of the Domestic Technology
Transfer Program. TechComm
represents an inter-agency coalition
of seven federal agencies and
their 263 labs to 1) license federal
patented technology to business and
industry for commercial use and
manufacturing; 2) establish research
and development agreements between
federal labs with both university and
business/industry partners; and 3)
source technology from industry and
university partners to meet the needs
of the federal labs and their respective
agencies.
See VISION, 2A


moved to the Lawtey facility; it isn't a
mega-prison and word of the re-entry
programs gets around. LCI has an 876
maximum bed capacity. The facility's
website currently lists 826 residents.
All its inmates are within 10 years of
their end of sentence.
LCI doesn't take sex offenders and
inmates who have committed serious
violent crimes. There is no death
row onsite, of course, though there


are prisoners who have committed

Local DOC institutions

need 190 more officers ...
Union Correctional Institution, Reception and -
Medical Center and Florida State Prison are all ac-
tively seeking new correctional officers to fill ap- .-
proximately 190 open positions. I1
There may be even more positions available
when UCI gets the go-ahead to open the newly New officers earnm
constructed work camp facility that is adjacent to institution or at th
the main institution. No date has been set for the $1,077 e
opening, however. $
Although Florida's unemployment rate seems to or $2
6 ciOnce they have success
be on the way down, according the Bureau of La- and passed the FDLEc
bor Statistics, there are still some 670,000 people in
the state who are looking for jobs. $ 1 185 e
BLS shows Florida's unemployment rate in June $,8 3
at 7.1 percent, which was a decrease over the previ- or $3
ous month and better than the national average of New officers also recei
7.6 percent. However, that rate is still not as good for the employee anc
as the 4.6 See DOC, 4A holida-


offenses involving weapons. All
inmates are required to participate in
self-improvement and rehabilitation
programs. If they refuse after arrival,
Warden Barry Reddish said, they are
sent elsewhere.
DOC Secretary Michael Crews
emphasized what Reddish had stated
as the theme of the day-a major
cultural shift is going on in Florida's
DOC.
See LCI,4A


Correctional
Officers
Starting Salary
DOCwillpay a base salaryto a new
employee while he or she is
attending training to become
certified.
this amount while in training at the
e Basic Recruit Training Academy:
every two weeks
8,000 per year
isfully completed the training academy
certification examination, new officers
will earn:
every two weeks
0,800 per year
ve state-supplemented health insurance
d his family, paid vacation time, paid
ys and paid sick leave.


Digital

devices set

to replace

textbooks-

eventually
BY MARK J. CRAWFORD
Telegraph Editor
Slowly, perhaps, but surely, public
school textbooks are being replaced
with electronic devices loaded with
digital materials-soon even in
Bradford County.
It's not just a goal, it's a mandate.
By the 2014-15 school year, at least
half of the materials purchased by
every school district in the state must
be purchased for digital devices like
tablets or notebook computers.
Students have been learning to
use such devices-purchased with
technology grant funding- as a part of
project-based learning, but the devices
appear destined to become their main
learning tools.
"When we're talking about looking
at the purchase of new textbooks,
that's what we've got to start
planning for," said Bradford Assistant
Superintendent Lisa Prevatt.
In the spring, the school district will
be adopting a new literature program
for grades six through 12. The district
plans on presenting it digitally. Rather
than printed texts, students will be
handed digital devises loaded with the
texts for their courses.
The district is still researching what
type of device to purchase, and they
should be ready for students in the fall
of 2014. Students will be able to take
the devices home just like they would
a textbook, and as more and more of
the curriculum moves to the digital
format, students will be issued fewer
and fewer books.
Prevatt said it's-exciting to consider
the richer learning experience digital

See DIGITAL, 2A



State board

protecting

schools

from falling

grades
BY MARK J. CRAWFORD
Telegraph Editor
Claiming the move would protect
the state's 'high accountability
standards, the Florida State Board
of Education has once again acted to
prevent school grades from dropping
significantly.
Just like the safety net approved in
2012, the rules adopted July 16 prevent
a school's grade from dropping by
more than one letter grade in any one
year.
It was a narrow vote with supportive
board members saying it wouldn't
be productive to penalize schools
while others were left questioning
whether the grading system had lost
its meaning.
"I don't understand when it became
acceptable to disguise and manipulate
the truth simply because the truth is
uncomfortable," said Board Member
Sally Bradshaw.
Another, Board Member Kathleen
Shanahan, said the formula has been
overcomplicated and supported letting
report cards slide this year while the
system is corrected.
Education Commissioner Tony
Bennet proposed the safety net option
this year after school superintendents
complained about the consistency of
the results they were seeing. Some
projected falling school grades even
while demonstrating improvements in
student performance.
See GRADES, 3A


DEADLINE MONDAY 5 P.M. BEFORE PUBLICATION PHONE (904) 964-6305


* FAX (904) 964-8628


-e *e - .c S0


6 111111 636 i2
68 9076 63869 2


Chaplain Karen Moffett met Tallahassee staffers.




r


BRADFORD COUNTY TELEGRAPH THURSDAY, JULY 18, 2013


* Taxable values
drop, but not

:bymuch
'BY MARK J. CRAWFORD
: Telegraph Editor
SSome local governments
;are well into in planning their
budgets for Fiscal Year 2014,
*and some are just getting started.
Based on the proposed millage
rate information from the state,
:the school district's 7.8710-
mill tax rate will be less than
the projected rollback rate,
which means the district won't
have to advertise a tax increase,
according to Finance Director
Julee Tinsler.
That, doesn't mean individual
.ax bills won't go up as that also
S'depends on what is happing with
Sindividual property values.
-,The overall taxable value
.y -.ported to the school board
'. is down. The school district's
Ub value dropped by $2.8
4.-ii'ibn .siuce last year, which
j~qjs. jike a lot, but it's not'
.. compared to the prior drop of
4 $22.3 million. In reality, the
reduction in taxable value from
2012.to 2013 is less than half a
percent for the school district.
SThe district levies taxes on
$893.9 million worth of property
value. (This number is tentative
until the tax roll is officially
S-approved.) This is more than
Other taxing authorities like the
:- county government because
,. the available property tax


exemptions differ.
Tinsler will talk more about
the proposed school budget for
Fiscal Year 2014 during hearing
planned f6r Monday, July 29, at
5:01 p.m.
Meanwhile, County Clerk
Ray Norman will be presenting
a proposed budget to the county
commission on Thursday night,
July 18. The commission is also
expected to approve the tentative
millage rate of 9.1769 mills,
which is equivalent to the current
rate. The budget will be funded in
part by a tentative taxable value
of $807.4 million, which is just
over $37,000 less than last year.
Again, this is much less than the
prior year's reduction.
Typically the county
commission's budget hearings
are set for September.
The city of Starke, which
typically holds several public
workshops to figure out its
budget plan, has not yet begun
meeting on that topic. The,
tentative millage rate was at
4.1805 mills at the July 16
meeting. The commission will
workshop the budget at 6 p.m. on
July 23. Its public hearings are
set for Sept. 10 and 24.

School capital
costs discussed
Tinsler discussed the district's
capital improvement fund with
the school board last week. The
budget for that fund includes
future capital projects the
district plans on completing.


The $2.8 million fund includes
$1.5 million in rollover
funds (including existing
encumbrances) and nearly $1.3
million in new money.
New projects include money to
repair the collapsed septic system
at Brooker Elementary School
($25,000), as well as money for
a new file management software
system ($85,000) and digital
textbooks ($151,572). (See
related story.)
Projects carried over from this
year with no new money include
the Southside Elementary
School building replacement
project ($500,442),, security
cameras ($125,748) and wireless
connectivity ($84,271). .
Carryover projects with new
money include school roofing,
which adds $300,000, for a total
of $463,048. HVAC replacement
added $125,000, for a total
of $301,647. There was also
$110,000 in new money toward
a school bus purchase, for a
total of $136,788, as well as
new money for electrical work,
technology, painting, fencing,
furniture, plumbing, etc.
The goal to put a telephone
in every teacher's classroom
will begin at the high school
this summer, according to MIS
Director Steve Miller. The
district' already has phones
for Brooker and Hampton
elementary schools as well. In
addition to the ability to call out,
the phones will also provide a
new intercom system. Nearly
$141,560 has been budgeted.


VISION
Continued from 1A


Budget work underway as

tax values are announced


Following Jurey's presenta-
tion, attendees returned to work-
ing groups established at the July
11 meeting: technology/econom-
ic development; public educa-
tion; higher education; workforce
development; housing; health
care; public safety; and mobility/
infrastructure. Each group was
asked to narrow the list of critical
issues developed during the July
session to five and rank them in
priority order.
Before the next meeting, which
has been rescheduled for Aug. 7,
the groups are to reduce priori-
ties to the top three for each area.
Many of the priorities identified
spanned multiple groups, such as
the need for access to high-speed
Internet service, public trans-
portation and better-paying jobs
with benefits.
Attendees were enthusiastic
about Envision Bradford and its
potential to improve life in Brad-
ford County.
"Envision Bradford is an ex-
cellent compilation opportunity
for business leaders, civic lead-
ers, and the entire community to
come together to plan out the next
decade for this community," said
Brent Burish, CEO of Shands of
Starke Regional Medical Center.
"There are areas of overlap, but it
allows all of us to plan out goals
and objectives for our commu-
nity for the betterment of citizens
in Bradford County in areas such
Sas education, health care, hous-
ing and economic development.
This is the opportunity for our
community to partner together
and set goals and develop action-
able items."
Sam Williams of Cognito
Farms, said, "I think it's going


to help the community identify
the challenges that face it so that
they can focus on the solutions to
those challenges."
"I think it's just a wonderful
idea," said Jim Biggs, outgoing
executive director of Communi-
ties in Schools. "I think anytime
that you can bring the leadership
of the county together arild give
them the parameters to work
in that we have and ask them
to look at what is good for our
county 10 to 15 years from now
and let's come together and do it
as a working model, I think it's
wonderful. It also gives us the
chance to say let's step outside
of Bradford County and bring
in the resources that can help us
develop the things that we need.
That's the most exciting thing to
me."
Sasser reminded the group it
can't sell something it doesn't
love, and emphasized the need
to be thankful for what Brad-
ford County has to offer. Not-
ing that smaller communities
are places where other people
Know and care for you, he asked


the group to start thinking about
its primary assets. Participants
quickly chimed in, mentioning
everything being close together
and easy to get to, good com-
munications and. media outlets,,a
welcoming spirit, great access to
health care, a low crime rate and
a fine sheriff's department, lots
of land, and an absence of the
overdevelopment that plagues
other areas of the state.
Sasser urged each participant
to bring one person of influence
to the Aug. 7 meeting to join in
the work. At its final meeting on
Sept. 10th, the group will present
a report to the community with
its recommendations.
The Envision Bradford 2023
planning process is open to
Bradford County residents or
others who own property or busi-
nesses in the county. Approved
representatives of agencies that
can provide technical observa-
tions to the group may also par-
ticipate. All RSVPs should be
sent to cathy.mott@sfcollege.
edu. There is no charge for the
sessions.


U I l Farnsworth said they are taking
-.D IG A L Ttheir time and sifting through the
;Continued from 1A information so they can make
the best decision for Bradford
: o n t i u e d f o m 1 _ __ C o u n t y .g ^
S". materials provide, such as County.
'- 'advanced graphic capabilities Famrnsworth said you could
S ,and Internet connectivity. But close your eyes and imagine
..;:the district also has to take what education will look like in
i : into consideration that Internet the future.
.connectivity isn't available'in "It's a matter of getting there-
connectivity isn't available -in
: every home, so everything a having the resources and money
student is expected to review to get there:' he said. "We'll get
I- away from school will need there eventually."
,t ey..... d on. ... .... and Statewide, the move to digital
,ee :T7 .. -4 -. t!-b K S x.ef [o cs
V Sgteb-slored on th4 4dexvice. and sael*hn ^ogt.
S accessible eveN where. tebooks-is exp d, "fo cost
,, The district may also come upr..... d 'b
: with a policy that allows students
J to use theirown devices, but there New information and
I.;' reissuess the district will have to communications
keep in mind when contracting .. COMi ...
S 'for materials. MIS Director Steve tools coming
": Miller said copyright can restrict Famrnsworth also discussed
Ahow many and which devices a new students information
materials are uploaded to. software system the district is
"It's going to be important considering purchasing that goes
that we're very careful when we by the name Focus.
: purchasee this that we make sure There was a meeting July 8
S we get the most flexibility we and the district will be looking at
can," Miller said. "We would a contract in the near future.
:'.certainly like to be able to see Farnsworth: s'id the student
... parents buy PCs or. whatever information system would : be
-for their children and be able to in line with where the district is
'.; ". ess the information." heading 'technologically. The
t he money set aside-nearly conversion and data migration
i52,000 isnot enough,Prevatt will be a big undertaking to
01 #- l it's a start. School say the least, he said, but the
; Chair Stacey Creighton company will bring in a-team to
;** hr r nphelp with that process.
out there are some I wit that process
de',. ces on the s,. Farnsworth said Focus is a
'. ". .! .' eices on the market
.^ '- .... arket much more efficient system that
,4 9re affordaable thanme
'^ ,- ,r aforda.bl than. th students, parents and employees
.;, Ib ThO e district wil n school districts that use it seem
Purchase the devices as to like a lot better. Twenty-five
4 1 the currumculum materials Florida districts use it, including
'S .",PUt on them, however, and. Clay and Columbia counties.
, L t recently, Prevatl said, "It is extremely user friendly:'
41:: ital materials-even without he said.
printing costs-have, been just Focus will repace the Edline
as expensive. As they do come system, whith-bhas not won
r/ 4:oWn in price, however, the ---
'Sdistrict will be able to move its The :ri tCut
savings 'towards the hardware (m ItOGn Rstan
costs.
SUPerintendentChad
'Famnsworth said Bradford
-County is not behind other
districts. In fact, some who
,rushed to purchase digital devices
and materials ended up with W Form we
S; products that didn't serve their Any Iong tair
S needs. There are a lot of vendors (od thru 7-31-13)
eager to convince districts they With
offer the latest and greatest, but -
t We L e S


C


Srabforb Countmp elegrapl)
USPS 062-700
Published each Thursday and entered as Periodical Postage
tt Paid at Starke, Florida under Act of March 3, 1879.
' ,o POSTMASTER: Send address changes to:
|Bradford County Telegraph
131 West Call Street. Starke, Florida 32091
S Phone: 964-6305 P.O. Drawer A Starke, FL 32091
John M. Miller, Publisher


Sthscpton Rate in Trade Area
$3.00 peryear

Outs~eTrdeAtea:
09.00 per year
20.00 six months


Editor: Mark J. Crawford
Sportsne Editor: Cliff Smalley
Advertising: Kevin Miller
Darlene Douglass
Typeseltting Eileen Gilmore


Earl W. Ray
Mary Johhson
Joan Stewart-Jones


AdveyjtlBing and
Newspaper Prod.
SCamelfiodAdv.`
Bookkeeping:


rave reviews. Depending on the
options chosen, the system can
manage student data, grades,
attendance and discipline;
perform state reporting; create
assessments for students and
performance reports for the
district; provide a portal for
students and parents to access
grades, discipline reports,
homework assignments and
school news; and even more.
There is an annual cost of
around $4 per student in addition
to the startup costs, which the
districts budgeting $85,000 for.

Image makeover
has begun
After his first week in the job,
the district's new community


relations coordinator, Brian
Graham, told the school
board about some of the
steps taken toward improving
communication with the public.
One of the tools used will be
revamped websites with a new
domain- www.bradfordschools.
org.
The district's email addresses
will be changing as well to match
that domain as well.
More than new branding, the
sites are' expected to become
more informative and user
friendly.
The district has also launched
its own Facebook and Twitter
accounts, www.facebook.
com/EducateBradford and @


EducateBradford.
The district is getting a
facelift as well. The summer has
been dedicated to painting and
repairing facilities and there will
be updated signage as well. Even


letterhead and business cards
around the district are also being
standardized so they project a
more professional image.


..-WfilSKEY RIVER SALOON- .

See ye at the River...Where the Whiskey Never Runs fDry!

/" MARK YOUR CALENDARS'" t
^^^iH lHB r _^.. for our. ....i -, r I


mow-





Saturda Jul 20 Noon til?



h h hI IV, F r i I a a ma
.will bem la
.,XU AftNm )


7


S:2





f*Z

img
pm


4es
ing at 4pm


starting at pm It has been our pleasure to serve
B S each & everyone ofyou!
k H(904) 964-6104 801 N. Temple Ave. *Visit Us On Facebook*


Bradford County Commissioner Ross Chandler and :, '
WEAG's Chuck Kramer participate in one of the breakout
groups.


PUBLIC SERVICE

ANNOUNCEMENT


July 22, 2013, through July 26, 2013, is
Election Qualifying Week for the City of
Hampton. Qualifying packets will be
available at Hampton City Hall at 5784
Navarre Ave., Hampton, FL 32044.
Qualifying packets must be submitted before
Friday, July 26, 2013, at 12 p.m.


"Southern Rukus'


2A" F- rom J6
Door Pri;
will be given every hour start


4N


i ,


t__


. -






T4TRSDAY, JULY 18, 2013 BRADFORD COUNTY TELEGRAPH 3A


Health depai
BY VINCENT ALEX BROWN
Times Editor


SBradford and Union county
residents now have access to
primary, family doctor-type care
right where they live.
Through the Health Resources
:and Services Administration, an
agency of the U.S. Department
of Health and Human Services,
the Union County Health
SDepartment received a grant
:.award as a Federally Qualified
-Health Center in April 2012 and
.opened its doors on Oct. 1,2012,
as New River Community Health
Center.
Bradford County received its
'grant on July 12. At that location,
New River joins Palms Medical
Group in Starke as the second
*FQHC in the county.
Many residents of both
:'counties may have seen new
'signs at each location, along
*-with the full-page newspaper ad
.:announcing New River.
The health department and
:New River actually exist as
separate entities, yet share the
-same building and staff. But with
;New River being designated as
*'an FQHC, the same location
can provide more services to the
:public and act as a full-service,
managed care health care facility
that anyone can be confident
Going to.
:'s "What it means for (residents)
'is two things," said Joe
Pietrangelo, the newly appointed
'administrator for the Union
Sand Bradford county health
'departments. "It gives us the
-"opportunity to provide more
"-medical services, provide more
'clinical services; hire more
,--nurses, another physician, a


rtments expand services
d ed icated n u rse . .. .."'
practitioner." " u'
"What it means
for the consumer,
for the person ,


LIIlL comUI nII I 155
medical services,"
Pietrangelo said, "is
that, rather than us
provide an episodic
kind of medical care
where you come in,
we take care of you,
and then you leave,
we provide more .
comprehensive
care." He compared
the center to a family
doctor's office.
They are now
your medical home,
said Amie. Reynolds,
director of nursing
for the Union and
Bradford county
health departments
and CEO of New
River Community Joe
Health Center Inc. the B
"So we* take
care of all your
medical needs,"
said Pietrangelo. "And we also
do all the preventative work
that's associated with keeping
people healthy." That includes
mammograms, Pap smears and
much more.
Typically, patients using the
health department go there only
when needed, for instance to
treat a cold, and do not return
until they are sick again. But
patients at an FQHC, such as
New 'River, would come back
for their screenings and annual
checkups. A patient would come
back for the things that not only


a Pietrangelo, director of
3radford and Union health
departments

would treat their illness, but the
things that would keep them
well, Pietrangelo said.
On the flipside, the health
department provides things
such as immunizations, family
planning, STD treatment and
prevention, HIV counseling and
testing, pregnancy testing, TB
diagnosis and treatment, and
epidemiology, which are outside
of primary care. All primary care
is provided through New River.
So, now each health department
location in Union and Bradford
counties, respectively, can meet


The following is an
announcement of intention to run
for public office submitted by the
candidate.
Hello, my name is Ricky
Thompson and I am writing to
express my interest in being
elected as the city clerk of the
city of Starke.
SI am a lifelong resident of
Bradford County now residing
in the city of Starke. I began
employment with the city of


almost all of residents' health
care needs.
Through the health center, the
practice was already here, said
Pietrangelo. "What the FQHC
does is enable us to enhance it."


The Union County Health
Department/New River
Community Health Center is
located at 495 E. .Main St. in
Lake Butler. To schedule an
appointment, call 386-496-3211.


Starke in 1984 as a mechanic
in the power plant, then in 1986
moved up as power system
coordinate and held that
position until 1999. From 1999
to 2006 I held the position of
project director. In 2006 I was
appointed by the city of Starke
city commissioners 'to serve as
the operations manager until my
retirement with 27 years total
service.
During my employment
with the city of Starke I
gained a wealth of knowledge
and experience in the utility
system. With the support of the
city commissioners and city
employees, many large projects
were completed, including the
upgrade of the city electrical
system. This project resulted in
savings to our citizens as well as.
increased reliability in service.
I believe the knowledge and
experience I have gained will
enable me to make a difference
if I am elected as city clerk on
Tuesday, Sept. 3.
I have served on several
boards during my employment
with the city of Starke that
include the Florida Municipal
Power Agency Board of
Directors and Executive ,Board,
the Florida Municipal Electric
Association Board of Directors,
the Florida Gas Utility Board of
Directors and Executive Board,
the Starke General Employees
Retirement Board, and the Starke


The Bradford County
Health Department/New River
Community Health Center is
located at 1801 N. Temple
Ave. in Starke. To schedule an
appointment, call 904-964-7732.


GRADES
,'-Continued from 1A


Higher passing scores have
been required on assessment tests
even as those tests were made
more difficult, they complained.
SGrades have not been released,
'fbut there were reportedly more
Ethan 750 A schools even with the
higher standards, but the number



SBlood
Donations
:slow during
-the summer
| The next time you climb into
your car in the afternoon and the
-seats and the steering wheel are
-just slightly cooler than a fully
fired charcoal grill, think of it as
,a reminder that it's a good time
to donate blood.
I .Summer, when school is out
tand' families hit the road for va-
7-cations, is a time when donors
::are in short 9upply,.but the need
:for. blood is as strong as ever. If
it's been a while since you do-
-Mnated, there's no better time than
-,now.
5 In about the time it would take
^to shop for groceries for a week
;.or knock out a crossword puzzle,
a blood donor can save a life.
a Donors must be 17 or older, or
S16 with parental consent, weigh
a minimum of 110 pounds and
be in good health. A photo ID is
: also required. Donors get cook-
Sies, a cool T-shirt and are entered
to win a big screen TV. There
Swill be free hot dogs and soda.
Roll up your sleeve this summer
LifeSouth really needs your help.
S The next local blood drive will
take place at Walmart Supercent-,
Ser in Starke on Friday, July 26,



ir










hoftdu WIAa, k mnpst nyupllt-y uoneyacn.Au'imn




O''5yar I 'n,utk si trlot, usS r~ou. Al ,o tqru' omeno
* I n. TT ', r fI) T 1-u- .... .. t'- F.W.y RkS


of F schools more than doubled
to 262.
Last year's safety net
protected ,schools in Bradford
County. S'tarke Elementary
would have received a C had it
been allowed to drop more than
one letter grade, while Southside
Elementary, Lawtey Community
School and Bradford Middle
School would have all received
D's


and. Saturday, July 27, between
the hours of 10 a.m. and 6 p.m.
each day. The blood drive is
sponsored by WEAG Radio and
Lucian's Heating & Air Condi-
tioning.


The rule Wvill apply until the
transition to Common Core
Standards is complete in school
year 2014-15. These standards
continue to raise expectations for
students, teachers and schools,
according to the state.
School grade calculations are
being reviewed for accuracy and
should be released by the end of
the month.


Get help with.
your hearing
Do you have trouble hearing
on your home telephone? If you
qualify, Florida Telecommunica-
tions Relay Program will provide
free phones for the hard of-hear-
ing. This service is not limited to
the hearing impaired; deaf, deaf,


blind or speech-impaired people
are also eligible for this program.
Stop by the senior center
Thursday, July 25, from 1:30 to
4p.m. to speak with a representa-
tive. They will be able help you
get the phone you need and teach
you how to use it.
Are you having issues with
your hearing aids? Stop by the
senior center Tuesday, July 30,


from 1-2 p.m., to visit with a
hearing professional. No ..ap-
pointment is necessary.
The Bradford County Senior
Center is temporarily located at
the Bradford Extension Office,
2266 N. Temple Ave. in Starke
in front of the fairgrounds. For
more information, please call
904-368-3955.


Like us on
7 Facebook


Jilt-
Call me to get more for your money.
I make it easy to protect everything on your
list and save money too. Call now and you'll
also get a FREE lifetime membership in Good
HandssM Roadside Assistance. Get 24/7 access
and low, flat rates on everything from .tows to tire
changes. Call me today!


DAWN CORBETT
904-964-7707
116 N WALNUT ST, STARKE FL
Next to the Post Office
dawncorbett@allstate.com


9
Allstate.
You're in good hands.
Auto Horn Life Rtlremnt


Pay only when roadside prices provided. Discount s'vary Subject to terms, conditions and available. Alstate Property and
Casualty Insurance Company. Allstate Rrl and Casualty Insurance Company, Caste Key Insurance Company. Property Insurance
issued by Castle Key Indemnty Company. S. Pelersburg. FL Castle Key Indemnity Company is reinsured by Castle Key Insurance
Company. formerly Allstate Florkndan Insurance Compano, Tie assets and obligations of the Casile Key companies are separate and
distinct from those of any other company in the Allstate group. Lincoln Benefit Life Co.. Lincoln. NE and American Hentage Lide
Insurance Co.. Jacksonvilie. FL In New York life insurance and annuities are issued by Allstate Liie Insurance Company oi New York.
Hauppauge. NY. 0 2011 Allstate Insurance Company--


Summer Sale!
0 m. 0 -.-0


T-BONE


STEAKS
$499

s3"LB

BONELESS CHUCK

STEAK


$349


BONELESS CHUCK

ROAST


$329L

WHOLE


FRYERS
OOCie


SMOKED

PIC NICS


$139 .


QUARTERLOIN

CHOPS
$2 39LBj


CHICKEN


TENDERS


S$229LB


SPLIT CHICKEN

BREASTS

$129LB


BONELESS PORK

LOINS


^i9LB


(94 .2122-102Maio Sret-L s. N S Ir l'S 01 &(N.25


GROUND


CHUCK


CENTER CUT

PORK CHOPS


s25LB


RIB ARMOUR

PORTIONS HOTDOGS

$99910LB BOX 4PKS/3


Li


PM


Beautification/Tree Board. I
still continue to serve the city
of Starke as the operations
consultant for the utility system.
Over the years I have enjoyed
working with the city employees
who I feel are the best employees
any organization could have
on their team. City employees
are very loyal, dedicated,
knowledgeable and capable of
maintaining the quality service
that the city of Starke citizens
deserve. If elected as the new city
clerk on Tuesday, Sept. 3, I will
continue with the cross training
of city employees to achieve an
even greater level of service to,
the citizens of Starke.
Over the next several weeks
I will be visiting with you, the
citizens of the city of Starke, and
I sincerely appreciate spending
time with you discussing any
issues/concerns that you may
have. I look forward once again
to working together as a team
to complete the city of Starke
mission that states, "To enhance
the quality of life and the safety
of its citizens, to preserve its rich.
heritage, culture, and diversity,
and to promote civic pride and
unity within the community."
Thank you for taking time to
read my intent letter and with
your vote on Tuesday, Sept. 3,
for Ricky Thompson for city.
clerk, we can and we will do
better!








4A BRADFORD COUNTY TELEGRAPH THURSDAY, JULY 18, 2013 .


LCI
Continued from 1A

That shift includes an
emphasis on transparency with
more community partnerships
in corrections facilities and their
affairs. The shift is coupled
with a refocused corrections
philosophy, especially when it
comes to preparing inmiats for
release and tackling recidivism.
"Our motto used to be 'Keep
'em behind the fence,'" Reddish
said. Wardens who did no more
than that were thought to be
successful. "And when it was
time to let them go, we gave
them a bus ticket, a change of
clothes and $50, and our job was
done. But we weren't doing a
very good job' he added.
Reddish alluded to well-
known scandals that circled the
wagons of privilege and secrecy
by prison administrators from the
top down, even within the last
six years. National news stories
tainted the department with a
reputation Crews is now anxious
to get beyond.
The DOC hit rock bottom in
the mid-2000s after officers were
said to be importing steroids,
employees were hired only
to play on sports teams, and
incidents of embezzlement and
illegal use of inmate labor and
state property were reported.
Then-DOC chief Jimmy Crosby
was let go by former Gov. Jeb
'Bush as Crosby was convicted
of taking kickbacks from prison
canteen vendors, and promoting
a culture of nepotism, cronyism
and favoritism inside prison
walls.
Morale plummeted.
"We get our share of bad news
with deeds committed by a few


In the gym, Warden Barry Reddish described the role sports plays in learning to
compete peacefully while getting exercise. The air-conditioned gym has housed
Inmates when dorms flooded or were overcrowded. It is also used for large group


programs.
bad apples," Reddish said. "But
I promise you that 99 percent of
employees in the Department of
Corrections are hardworking and
care about what they do."
According to the LCI
presentation,, those bad old
days are behind them. Reddish
and Crews said they were
emphasizing professionalism,
consistency and integrity. "When
we make a mistake, we will talk
about it," he said.
The new outlook on
corrections can be paraphrased
like this: Just as it takes a village
to raise a child, it takes a village
to help a man put his life back
together when he goes off track.
After all, men behind bars were
citizens of some community and
it is back into some community
they will return.
"These mdn will someday
be living next door to you,"
Reddish said. "They will be on
your streets and in malls where
you shop, maybe standing next to


your.children."
Cultural shift aside, protecting
the public is still the DOC's
number one priority, Reddish
said.
Built in 1973 as a work camp,
LCI is now reaching its 10"
anniversary as a re-entry facility,
and can begin to gather statistics
on its success.
A prison's recidivism rate
is the proportion of inmates
brought back to prison for crimes
committed within three years of
release. Florida's rate was 33
percent in 2003; by 2008, that
rate had dropped to 27.6 percent.
"That's not insignificant,
when you consider that for every
percentage point' reduction, the
state saves $19 million," Crews
added.
One road to transparency and
openness is to foster community
presence behind the prison walls.
Reddish pointed out that there are
over 400 community volunteers
each week working inside the


Lawtey facility. Most come from
within 100 miles of the facility,
said staffer Daniel Crawford.
Chaplain Karen Moffett
handed out a list of volunteer
organizations that included faith-
and character-based groups like
Inside/Out Dads, Alcoholics
Anonymous, Toastmasters,
Victim Impact, with church
groups and individuals from as
far away as Jacksonville. They
come to counsel and minister to
inmates in groups or individually.
The list of volunteer programs
includes a who's who of world
religions: Catholic Mass, General
Baptist Convention, the Gideon
Ministry, Hebrew Roots Study,
Islamic Jumah Prayer service,
Jewish Sabbath services, Spanish
Bible study, even a meditation
class.
Then there are educational
and life skills programs to help
prepare men for re-entry into
the community. These include
G.E.D. and adult education,


financial management, conflict
resolution, avoiding domestic
violence, life mapping, marriage
enrichment seminars, anger
management, smoking cessation,
weight training, drama classes
and more.
Roy Kemper heads up the
facility's substance abuse
program, helping men to
conquer addictions. As many as
75 percent of all inmates coming
into the Florida prison system
have substance abuse issues,
Kemper said.
Three inmates illustrated their
skills at training and handling
dogs, thanks to a partnership
with the First Coast No More
Homeless Pets Partnership and
Dog Obedience program. As the
dogs went obediently, through
their paces, Reddish told the
crowd, "It used to be that when
you saw an inmate with a dog,
it meant something was very
wrong"
But a key issue is job training.
In a follow-up telephone call,
Warden Reddish agreed the LCI
job skills program is light. A
freehand and computer-assisted
architectural drafting program
was discussed. Inmates are sent
into communities like Starke
or Camp Blanding for roadside
or park maintenance and other
chores as part of community
service. They may even pick up
a few farming skills by tending
the small garden plots attached
to each dormitory. These
requirements take up many of
their hours each day.
Reddish estimated that about
50 percent of the inmates have
some type of job skill when
they come to prison. "But, say
someone has worked as an
electrician on the outside, they
may not be honest about having


done that, because they krioWi-
we may use those skills' while:
they're inside. They n'may notf
want to do that."
The range of jobs open to:
former inmates is also limited'
Reddish said. Many return ta
maintenance, manual labor and
construction jobs. Fast food
restaurants may hire former
inmates as cooks, dishwashers oi.
maintenance workers. In Floridal
landscaping and lawn care is alsa
big.
Sen. Gibson was especially
interested in an issue Crew9
called "huge," and an issue many
taxpayers might think would be-,
fairly easily solved. 1 !;
"How can released inmates
get IDs, pay fees, fines aril
reparations, when many wO
have no drivers' license, Soci.l
Security cards or a job to ga
money to make the payments,
she asked. The released inmal,
can't drive, get a job, fly horrid'
or even open a bank account
without some identification.
Crews said his department is
working through those. questions
but with Social Security card
replacements costing $9, drivers'
licenses costing at least $25
and getting a suspended license
returned is well over $100, th?
released inmate's $50 won't gA
very far. And that's before he ca.
even look for a place to live. --
Crews, Reddish, Gibson and
others are working with thN
community to break the cycle of
former inmates turning to crime
in despair when they sincerely
hoped to wipe the slate clean and
start over.
For further information, aboVt
LCI or to volunteer to help, cafl
904-782-2301.
5-


DOC
Continued from 1A

percent rate Florida charted in
June 2007 (before the economic
Meltdownn.
Area residents who are seek-
'ing jobs should definitely take
a look at the local DOC institu-
tions. There is no need for an
applicant to get certified as an
officer before he or she applies
DOC will pay for the neces-
sary training and will also pay
the newly hired officer while he
or she participates in the training.

Salary and benefits
Starting salary for an uncerti-
fled new hire is $1,077 every two
weeks (approximately $28,000
per year). Once certified, the of-
ficer will earn,$1,185 every two
weeks (approximately $30,800
per year).
Benefits provided to the em-
ployee include the cost of ob-
training certification, state-sup-
plemented health insurance for
Sthe eniployee and his family,
paid vacation time, paid holidays
and paid sick leave. Correctional
officers can becoie' Vested in
the state retiremen'fsystem in six
years and reach full retirement
after 25 years of service.

- Apply online first
*While there are recruiting of-
fices at each of the institutions, it
is very important for ajob seeker
to-fill out the DOC online appli-
cation at peoplefirst.myflorida.
corn. The online application is
the first step in the process and
should not be bypassed.


Requirements to
apply for a CO job
People interested in applying
for a 'position as a correctional
officer at any of the three institu-
tions need to meet the same basic
requirements.
They must be 19 years of age
or older. All three institutions
have had older job seekers look-
ing for a second career who have
',successfully completed the train-
Sing and certification programs.
Applicants must have a. birth
certificate, Social Security card
and valid driver's license. The
name on the Social Security card
and the driver's license must
match exactly.
Since officers often have to
drive state vehicles in the course
of their duties, no applicant who
lacks a valid driver's license will
be considered.
Each applicant must be a
high school graduate or have a


valid GED.
Each uncertified applicant
must pass the Basic Abilities
Test (BAT). The test is admin-
istered to correctional officer.ap-
plicants for a reduced fee at the
DC Recruitment Center in Live
Oak (386-963-6400). It is also
administered locally at the North
Florida Chamber of Commerce
on Call Street in Starke, at Flor-
ida Gateway College's Public
Service Training Center in Lake
City, Santa Fe College's Crimi-
nal Justice Academy in Gaines-
ville and at St. Johns River Com-
munity College in Jacksonville.
Call the chamber in Starke at
904-964-5278.
All applicants must be Unit-
ed States citizens.
All applicants must pass
a basic physical and drug test.
(Note that correctional officers
are subject to periodic random
drug testing after they are hired.)
Applicants must have no


felony convictions or domestic
violence convictions on their
record. Applicants who have
any criminal charges on their
background record check should
bring in court documentation re-
lated to those charges and a writ-
ten explanation, in his or her own
words, about what happened;
Applicants cannot have any
first-degree misdemeanor con-
victions that involve perjury or
false statement. .
Applicants' must exhibit
good moral character.
Any applicant with military
service must have a record that is
acceptable.

What happens next?
After the applicant has submit-
ted an application on-line, he or
she will be contacted by the DC
Recruitment Center via e-mail
with two forms to fill out.
One form is a prescreening
form. The other is a supplemen-


"Quality Eyecare with Value in Mind"
y'E-Ex Tff S" "BACK TOSCHOOL

EYEEXAMGLASSES I----- "TOS-H-O-L 1
& CONTACTS I I SPECIAL

1139 I ,9
I includes 2 boxes ofAcuVue 2 Contacts and 1 Pair of I Includes exam and 1 pair of glasses with
Single Vision Plastic Lens Glasses Single Vision Polycartonate lenses, restrictions apply.
frictions apply. Middleburg Locati ly. Call store for details. (Middleburg Location Only) I
L - i 7-1-1 3W xDires 7.-L-13,?Lust.e deON 18 0 dl'_J
1545 Branan Field.Road Suite 5 Middleburg (Across from Walmart)
Most Insurances Accepted Certified Optometrists Dr. Edwin Anguas & Dr. Margaret Allen 904-291-5800
Lens options extra. Individual offers cannot be combined with any other coupon, discount package price or insurance benefit.
See store fqrdetails. Certain restrictions apply. Coupons must be presented at time of service. The patientand the person
responsible for payment has.a.lght to refuse to pay, cancel payment, or be reimbursed for payment for any other service, examination or treatment which is
performed as a result of an #within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment.
'"' .


tal application-willingness ques-
tionnaire. On the bottom of the
prescreening form, the applicant
will identify the institution where
he or she would like to be con-
sidered.
Once the forms are received
at the DC Recruitment Center,
a preliminary background check
will be conducted. Next, an e-
mail will be sent requesting the
applicant to fax his or her birth
certificated high- school diploma,
BAT scores and military records.
When the background check
is completed and documents re-
ceived and verified, the applica-
tion will be sent to the institution
chosen by the applicant on the
prescreening form.
After the application is re-
ceived at the institution, an in-
terview will be scheduled by the


institution's recruiter.
Each applicant will be intel-
viewed by a small board made fp
from the senior leadership staff
at the institution. Following the
interviews, the leadership staff
will review all the applications
and the results of the interviews
before making their selections;

After you're hired
Once'an;applicant.,is offered
a job, he-or- she.i.s. appointed -s
a Temporary Employment As-
signment (TEA) officer and will
receive the non-certified salary
listed'earlier in this article.
Each TEA will then work
normal shifts at the institution;-

See MORE, 5A


F e Treat You Like Faiy" l l !
Save Money on DIY Aboveground
and Inground Pool Kits & Supplles
Financing Availablel
I A Great Way to Spend Time Together!
.* Excellent Service. Fast Shipping!
Family Owned & Operated Since 1990!
LmidyPoolFun.com


Wan to reach people?


Srabforb Eontp :etegyapb









. Now's the perfect time to see just how well our classified

can work for you. Whether you're looking for a great buy or a

great place to sell, call our classified department today

904-964-6305

, Ask for Mary






UrT.... 1 ITTTV 1B 9013 B RADnlTFnn FRiCOUNTV TFiFGRAPH


1HURDAY JUY 10 4ULJ -%JUNIElF~xA~~tlX-4


First Christian Church in
Starke is hosting marriage
enrichment classes on
Sundays in JulM from 6-8 p.m.
All couples are welcome .
and dinner and childcare
are provided. For more
information, please call 904-
964-6100.
Christ Central of Lake
Butler, 16045 SE 71s Trail,
is hosting a conference-
Women Warriors of God-on
Saturday, July 20, from 8:30
a.m. to 5 p.m. The conference
is free, but an advance ticket
for the lunch is $10, or $12
at the door. To purchase
in advance or for more
information, visit http://bit.


l\,I ItA92b
Sampson Cit0 Church of
God in%\ ie, children from
the ages olf 3 lhrouLh ihe
completing 8-i S" ,'radet it-,
attend Kingdom Rock \.acilion
Bible school from 6-9 p.m.
July 22-26.
Pine Level Baptist Church,
3.1 miles west of U.S. 301 on
S.R. 100, will hold vacation
Bible School each Sunday in
July and Aug. 4 from 9:45 a.m.
to 12:30 p.m. "Trailblazers"
is open to kids from 4 though
sixth grade, while teens and
adults may attend the Sunday
school and worship services.
For more information, please


contact the church office at
904-964-6490.
Fellowship Baptist Church
has changed the day for its
charity clothes closet to the
second Saturday of the month
beginning in July.
Email the details of your
congregation's upcoming
special events to editor@
bctelegraph.com. DEADLINE
IS MONDAYAT 5 P.M.


o A^ro tkhe Ccu'dent Fete


iTA." cnzt- t&


UAcross the Garden
Fence is a new
column sponsored by
the Bradford County
Extension Service. Readers
iw'ho wish to pose gardening
questions should forward
them to Mary Bridgman at
jtd@ufl.edu.

Once again, I'd like to share
u information about what to plant in
your garden and what wildlife will
be up to during the current month. The ,
following information was taken from \ G
"The Cutting Edge," a local newsletter,
which is organized by Laurie Compton,
program assistant at the Bradford
County Extension Office, who wrote
the articles that appear below. They are
reprinted with permission. B,

What to plant in July


Annuals offer an almost infinite variety of
flower color and plant form. They brighten
landscape beds and add a splash of color to a
porch, deck or patio when placed in containers.
Some also make good cut flowers.
Coleus, crossandra, ornamental pepper and
tropical milkweed planted now should last
until November. As the- heat continues, keep
*. -*. annuals evenly moist. Butterfly lily, gladiolus
and society garlic are bulbs that can be planted
during the middle of summer. Watermelon,
pepper, okra, Southern pea and eggplant are
vegetables that can be planted now as long as
water is provided during dry spells. Scout for
caterpillars and aphids on leaves and fruit.
Continue planting palms while the rainy season
is in full swing.

,.i Whatto do in July
*. - Before treating for lawn pests, rule out
disease or sprinkler malfunction and treat only
the affected area.
-' >Solarize your garden: Use summer heat
as a tool in preparing the vegetable garden
=. for fall planting by covering your plot with


- IGuests greeted DOC Secretary Michael Crews and LCI officers.
:;: ~Guests greeted DOC Secretary Michael Crews and LCI officers. -


MORE
Continued from 4A
completing assignments that an
',uncertified officer is allo%%ed to
"complete until the"Or'she is as-
-signed to a spot in the Basic Re-
'cruit Training Academy. Once a
.spot is assigned, he or she will
" spend I11I weeks in training. The
'training involves learning both
-DOC procedure and Florida law
as it pertains to a correctional of-
ficer's job. Written tests are giv-
en on a regular basis throughout
Jhis training.
SThe- training also involves re-
-peated hands-on instruction in


defensive tactics, firearms and
first aid. Firearms taught in this
training are the .38-caliber re-
volver, the 12-gauge shotgun and
the AR-15 rifle.
Each TEA. will, have ample
time to practice these-skills be-
fore participating in tests that
involve demonstrating his or her
abilities with the defensive tac-
tics and firearms. It is not nec-
essary for an applicant to have
prior knowledge of defensive
tactics or firearms.
Once the training- is completed
successfully, each TEA will have
to pay for and pass the Florida
Department of.Law Enforcement
certification exam for correction-


Chamber of Commerce J
NFRCC is now offering the FBAT for entry level
Corrections Officers and the FCJBAT for entry level
Police Officers.
Please contact Susan Norman at North Florida
Regional Chamber of Commerce at (904) 964-5278
Sto schedule an appointment.


al officers.
Once the FDLE testresults are
in, each TEA will participate in
official firearms testing at the in-
stitution to become fully certified
with the required firearms. That
test generally only takes one day
to complete.
TEAs continue to receive the
non-certified salary until they be-
corme officially certified follow-
ing the FDLE test and final fire-
arms test. He or she then receives
the certified salary mentioned at
the beginning of this article.
For more information, contact
the institutions' recruiters:
Recruiters
UCI: Candice Rossman
386-431-2208
RMC: Julie Crews
386-496-6095
FSP: Tina Johns
904-368-2545


plastic to cook out I
weeds, bugs and -o
nematodes. It takes
four to six weeks to
eliminate pests this
way, so start now.
Any pruning
on azaleas should
be done by mid-
July to protect
developing buds
for next spring's
bloom. Prepare for
A ST ER hurricane
LRDENER season by Mary W. Bridgman
c checking
trees for
poss damaged or weak branches and prune
if needed.
Pests on ornamental plants:
f Caterpillars may be present on trees
we and shrubs. Large trees can normally
Boba withstand caterpillar feeding but
specimen shrubs may need treatment if damage
is extensive.
Source: http://solutionsfor yourlife.ufl.edu/
lawnandgarden/calendar.

July wildlife calendar
Young alligators and crocodiles will begin
to hatch. Baby raccoons, foxes, armadillos,
possums and bobcats leave dens and begin
following parents. It's deer mating season in the
everglades. Scrub morning glory and butterfly
weed begin to bloom.

Did You Know?
Bobcats (Felis refuse ) are territorial, but
because they are smaller and hunt prey that is
more abundant, they require less land area than
larger carnivores. Home ranges vary from five
to 15 square miles, with male home ranges
being larger and overlapping with home ranges
of several females.
Bobcats are found throughout Florida and use
a variety of habitats. Bobcat populations are not
listed at the state or federal level as threatened
or endangered.


Gov. appoints former Bradford,

Clay prosecutor to bench


BY DAN HILDEBRAN
Monitor Editor
Gov. Rick Scott appointed
James Colawv to the Eighth
Judicial Court .on. JuLy .. The
circuit includes Alachua, Baker,
Bradford, Gilchrist, Levy and
Union counties.
Colaw, 41, of Melrose, has
served as deputy director of the
Clay County State Attorney's
Office since 2009.
"I am so proud of James and
the stellar work he has done
in Clay County," said Fourth
Judicial Circuit State Attorney
Angela Corey. "We will miss
him and wish him the very best."
Colaw began his legal career
as a prosecutor in the Baker
County State Attorney's Office
in 1998.
From 1998 to 2009, he served
in various prosecutorial roles
in the Eighth Judicial Circuit,
including a stint as the Bradford
County division chief.
Colaw received his bachelor's
degree from Carnegie Mellon
University and his law degree


Judge-Elect James Colaw

from the University of Florida.
"I am humbled by the
opportunity to serve the people
of the Eighth Circuit. My
commitment is to apply the
law fairly and compassionately
for a just resolution in all cases
appearing before the Court,"
Colaw.
Scott said, "Jim Colaw's
extensive experience serving


the citizens of north Florida
with distinction will be a great
asset in his new position on the
Eighth Judicial Circuit Court..
Sraitn-coifident that he will 'be a
great a89s6fon our bench Anifd'will
continue doing good work for all
Floridians."
Colaw's appointment begins
July 29.




Qualify for
Hampton
election
July 22 through July 26 is
qualifying week in the city of
Hampton for the upcoming elec-
tion. Qualifying packets will be
available at the Hampton City
Hall at 5784 Navarre Ave. Quali-
fying packets must be submitted
before Friday,July 26, at 12 p.m.


AGENTS




NEEDED'


We are hiring

Real Estate Agents for

Residential Development Sales

and Residential Sales in

Union and Bradford counties.


gSWIFT CREEK
R._R E A L IPy



Contact Amber


386-496-0499


'~~0.2


0N.iiWalutS.Sar


- EMAK'.

434 Call St.1-


NIA
TASI


; I







6A BRADFORD COUNTY TELEGRAPH THURSDAY, JULY 18, 2013)


Donovin Darius instructs the coaches in proper hand placement for receivers and to "see the catch" before tucking
the ball away.


Football great
shares training
techniques
The Pop Warner Cowboys
hosted the Donovin Darius
coaches clinic this past week
at the Bradford Middle School
gym. The former NFL great
demonstrated and evaluated
coaches performing a variety of
drills that they will have their
youth players perform when the
Pop Warner, season starts on
Aug. 1.
Some of the drills included
pass catching, proper tackling
with the head up and agility
drills. Darius explained the
technique or proper placement of
S the hands for receivers and how
they must see the ball when they
catch it before trying to tuck it
away. He also demonstrated the
proper technique for tackling the
ball carrier using proper form,
otherwise known ,as heads-up
tackling, which is essential in


Be prepared
for open
Medicare
enrollment
BY CAROL CLARK
Shine Counselor
At age 65, and once you have
worked and obtained 40 earnings
credit quarters (approximately
10 years), you become eligible
for premium-free Medicare Part
-A hospital coverage.
If 'you chose to begin
receiving Social .Security
benefits before age 65, then
you will. automatically receive
your Medicare ID card about
,three months before your 65"th
birthday. If you have waited for
full retirement age to apply for
Social Security benefits, 'then
you will need to contact the
Social Security Administration
and apply for a Medicare ID card
about three months before your
65th birthday.
You can easily complete this
process by phone or online at
www.socialsecurity.gov. It's a
good idea to take a look at this
website. You might be surprised,
whit .you can accomplish from
the comfort of your home or


r


avoiding injuries to the headand
neck area.
Darius also showed the
coaches various drills to have the
young athletes perform and how
to increase their speed through
proper mechanics of arm and leg
movement.
All of the coaches were able
to participate and experience
the drills that their young
players will perform during the
season practices. The emphasis
was placed on using proper
techniques in order to identify
and correct the mechanics
of players to maximize their
performance and safety.
In all, it was an excellent day
of instruction that reminded
the coaches it's more than just
about winning games. It's about
building relationships while
demonstrating the fundamentals
and values that carry over into
everyday lives.
Submitted by Geoff Cook.


Donovin Darius thanking Terricena Kitties for her
participation and for taking pictures.


office.
When your Medicare ID
card arrives it will state Part A
(hospital coverage)" and "Part
B (medical coverage)," with
an effective date for each type
of insurance coverage. If you
already have alternate medical
coverage through yohr or your
spouse's employer, then you


may not need Part B (medical
coverage) at this time.
If this is the case, you can
simply return thc entire Medicare
ID card to the Social Security
Administration and request a new
Medicare ID card with just Part
A (hospital coverage). Be sure to
double-check with your Social
Security benefits administrator


to make sure that you do not have
to take Part B when you turn 65.
In 2013, Part B coverage
has a monthly premium cost of
$104.90. That premium amount
can change, and even increase,
because it is based upon your
income. You are eligible to enroll


a iving Facility
Assisted Living Facility


Located in Downtown Starke
Next to Wainwright Park
.Call Cathey Pitts, Administrator, For Directions
(904)-964-2220


r


P, Pre
Insuanc
A ..... .


,'Copystar
Kyocera Technology
CS 1135
B/W Copier
$1,100 purchase
Print, Copy, Scanner, Fax
35 page printing per minute


,three months before and up to
three months after your birth
month. Please note that there is
a penalty for not enrolling once
you are eligible. There are so
many variables and exceptions
to the rules and regulations of
Medicare, that it will greatly
benefit you to contact a SHINE
counselor once you receive
your Medicare ID card. Call the
Florida Elder Helpline at 1-800-
963-5337.
Medicare Part D (prescription
coverage) also has a penalty
if you do not enroll during
the same time frame required
for Part B, even if you are
not currently taking any
prescriptions. However, if you
already have "creditable drug
insurance coverage," you may
wait until you or your spouse
stop working, at which time-you


Purcnlase this machine
and save enough money
on toner to pay fot he
Scoplert


.'Copystar
Kyocera Technology

Color Copier

___ Model 2126
1 Print
Scan
.- Copy
21 copies per min.
Purchase for
F $2,100
--l~lk^J i. .


C<


Fc


9010CN


Color Printer
Kyocera FS1370DN
As advertised on Fox News

$375.00


olor Copier


ir 5OO

her _

Q, .^^ *MMMr,







Office or Home use
)od Color Reproduction


then have 63 days to choose and
enroll in a drug plan without, a
penalty. If you ever move out of
the insurance coverage area'of
a Medicare Advantage Plartnor
Part D drug plan, you also haye a
special enrollment period.
Call the Florida Elder Helpline
at 1-800-963-5337 if you have
questions! regarding Medicare,
are experiencing problems with
your insurance coverage, or'to
schedule a SHINE presentatjpn
for your group so you will:..be
well equipped for Medicar's
open enrollment period (Oct.15
until Dec. 7).



I OI Iff


Geoff Cook performs a proper tackle.


The Office Shop

has the answer to your
high toner prices!!!


We ca &AV OUMNE n0or oier I


,ErectileDysfunction;
SDrugs May Be DangerousTo Your Health
FREE book by doctor reveals what the
I drug companies don't want you to-know! I
Dr. Kevin Hornsby, MD will mail the pay the postage and handling. If
first 37 men that respond to this ad the popular pills don't work for you
I a free copy of his new thirty dollar regardless of your age or medical I
book "A Doctor's Guide to Erectile history (including diabetes and
I Dysfunction." He's so sure this book prostate cancer) you owe, it to your-
will change your life he will even self and your lady to read this book.
Call Toll Free (800) 960-4255
L ------ ---------- -


('the ca(e and we{io ein oo thoe eldezt

C9 vezv imypoitaht to the sta at


YOUR DECISION REGARDING WHO WILL HELP
CARE FOR YOUR LOVED ONE IS IMPORTANT



Our room rate is $2,650 per month
for all aspects of our care..
*Assessment of each individual's needs and abilities is required before admitting,


I


THE OFFICE SHOP
110 W. Call St. 904-964-5764 Fax 904-964-5906 Starke, FL


Go








THURSDAY, i'.' 18, 2013 a BRADFORD COUNTY TELEGRAPH


ELEGALS



NA.
S NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that pursuant
.A4 the Florida Self Storage Facility Act
ZStatutes (Section 83.801 83.809);
Santa Fe Storage of Waldo; Will
.ell for CASH to the highest bidder
,at 15540 NE US HWY 301, Waldo,
pbunty of Alachua, FL, at 12:00 pm
on Wednesday, the 24h day of July,
,2013 and continuing day to day there-
rafter until sold: the household goods
:and misc. contents of the following:
:,UNITA023 Linda F Woolwine
,:z 7/11 2tchg 7/18-BCT
S NOTICE OF SALE
Nbtice is hereby given that pursuant
-'-to the Florida Self Storage Facility Act
Statutes (Section 83.801 83.809);
: Santa Fe Storage of Starke; will sell
for CASH to the highest bidder at
S1'630 N Temple Avenue, Starke,
: County of Bradford, FL; at 1:30 PM
on Wednesday, the 24th day of July
2013, and continuing day to day
:thereafter until sold, the household
goods and misc. contents of the fol-
.lowing:
lUNITA001 DANNY M GREEN
UNIT A011 CLINTON B-JENKINS,
JR
UNIT B005 TORY D HUNTER
UNIT G026 JEWELL H LANDY
,U.NIT K005 ARTHUR J BURCH
2,: ~ 7/11 2tchg7/18-BCT
PUBLIC AUCTION
Ron Denmark Mini Storage will hold
.a Public Auction on Friday July 26,
2013 at 10:00 AM at 2117.N. Temple
SAvenue Starke, Fl. on the following
storage units containing personal
items.
# 14 Belonging to 0. Stokes
# 12 Belonging to U. Hodges
-#-118 Belonging to K. McKinney
# 31- Belonging to J. Martin Jr.
7/11 2tchg 7/18-BCT

.NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN:
Leeshell N. Demps
SLast known address of:
.1010 E Brownlee St
.. Starke FL 32091
'You are hereby notified that your eli-
'; gibility to vote is in question. You are
required to contact the Supervisor of
Elections, in Starke, Florida, no later
'"than thirty (30) days after the date of
:this publishing. Failure to respond will
.result in a determination of ineligibility
by the Supervisor and your name will
:' be removed from the statewide voter
.. registration system.
.Terry L. Vaughan
Bradford County Supervisor of Elec-
l, tions
.. P,O. Box 58
S945 N. Temple Ave., Suite C
Starke, FL 32091
7/18 ltchg-BCT
NOTICE
Pursuant to the Florida Self Storage
Act Statures Sec. 83.801-83.809,
N-ROTICE: A Public Auction will be held
.-:o July 27, 2013 @ 10:00A.M. atC &
a.Mini Storage 1670 S. Walnut Street,
e->Hwy 301 South in Starke, Florida.


The following units will be sold to the
highest bidder, and continuing day to
day thereafter until sold.
1-31 S. Roberts
1-58 M. Marston
1-74 C. Duncan.
2-24 V. Robinson
2-33 A. Hudson
2-6A R. Newman
7/18 2tchg 7/25-BCT
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR BRADFORD COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.: 04-2009-CA-000022
DIVISION:
CHASE HOME FINANCE LLC SUC-
CESSOR BY MERGER TO CHASE
MANHATTAN
MORTGAGE CORPORATION,
Plaintiff,
vs.
KARIN LYNN COOLIDGE, et al,
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED
FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursu-
ant to an Order Rescheduling Fore-
closure Sale dated
July 10, 2013 and entered in Case
NO. 04-2009-CA-000022 of the Cir-
cuit Court of the EIGHTH Judicial Cir-
cuit in and for BRADFORD Counft,
Florida wherein JPMORGAN CHASE
BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION',
is the Plaintiff and KARIN LYNN
COOLIDGE; PAMELA COOLIDGE
HALEY; KARIN LYNN COLLIDGE,
AS NATURAL GUARDIAN FOR
CASSANDRA. E. L. COOLIDGE, A
MINOR; GREGORY C COOLIDGE;
GRAHAM ERIC COOLIDGE, JR,;
KEITH HOWE COOLIDGE; ANY AND
ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIM-
ING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND
AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED
INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS) WHO
ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR
ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN
PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTER-
EST AS SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVI-
SEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER
CLAIMANTS; ESTATE OF GRAHAM
ERIC COOLIDGE, SR; TENANT
#1; TENANT #2 are the Defendants,
The Clerk of the Court will sell to
the highest and best bidder for cash
at FRONT HALL OF THE BRAD-
FORD COUNTY COURTHOUSE,
945 NORTH TEMPLE AVENUE,
STARKE, FLORIDA 32091 at 11:00
AM, on the 15 day of August, 2013,
the following described property as
set forth in said Final Judgment:
'Plaintiff name has changed pursuant
to order previously.entered.
A PARCEL OF LAND IN THE
N6RTH'1/2 OF NORTHWEST 1/4
OF NORTHWEST 1/4 OF SECTION
10, TOWNSHIP-7 SOUTH, RANGE
22 EAST, BRADFORD COUNTY,
FLORIDA, MORE PARTICULARLY
DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COM-
MENCE AT THE NORTHWEST
CORNER OF SAID SECTION 10,
AND RUN SOUTH 89- DEGREES
44 MINUTES 41 SECONDS EAST,
ALONG THE NORTHERLY BOUND-
ARY THEREOF, 458.60 FEET, TO A
FOUND CONCRETE MONUMENT
FOR POB. FROM POB THUS DE-
SCRIBED, CONTINUE SOUTH 89
DEGREES 44 MINUTES 41 SEC-
ONDS EAST, ALONG SAID NORTH-
ERLY BOUNDARY, 409.88 FEET TO
A SET CONCRETE MONUMENT;
THENCE SOUTH 0 DEGREES 05


MINUTES 01 SECONDS WEST,
PARALLEL WITH THE EASTERLY
BOUNDARY OF SAID NORTHWEST
1/4 OF NORTHWEST 1/4, 600.97
FEET, TO AN IRON ROD SET ON
THE NORTHERLY BOUNDARY
OF THE ROW OF A 60 FOOT PRI-
VATE GRADED ROAD; THENCE
CONTINUE SOUTH 0 DEGREES 05
MINUTES 01 SECOND WEST, 30.00
FEET, TO A CONCRETE MONU-
MENT SET IN THE CENTERLINE
OF SAID 60 FOOT ROAD; THENCE
RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 46 MIN-
UTES 15 SECONDS'WEST, ALONG
SAID CENTERLINE AND PARALLEL
WITH THE SOUTHERLY BOUND-
ARY OF SAID NORTH 1/2 OF
NORTHWEST 1/4 OF NORTHWEST
/4, 845.76 FEET, TO A CONCRETE
MONUMENT SET ON THE EAST-
ERLY BOUNDARY OF THE ROW OF
SOUTHEAST 11TH
STREET (FORSYTH ROAD, A
COUNTY MAINTAINED GRADED
ROAD); RUN THENCE NORTH 0
DEGREES 06 MINUTES 32 SEC-
ONDS EAST, ALONG LAST SAID
EASTERLY BOUNDARY, 30.00
FEET, TO A FOUND CONCRETE
MONUMENT; THENCE SOUTH 89
DEGREES 46 MINUTES 15 SEC-
ONDS EAST, ALONG LAST SAID
NORTHERLY BOUNDARY, 435.60.
FEET TO A SET CONCRETE MON-
UMENT; RUN THENCE NORTH 0
DEGREES 06 MINUTES 32 SEC-
ONDS EAST, 370.58 FEET, TO A
FOUND CONCRETE MONUMENT;
RUN THENCE NORTH 89 DE-
GREES 45 MINUTES 28. SECONDS
WEST, 101.60 FEET TO A FOUND
CONCRETE MONUMENT; RUN
THENCE NORTH 0 DEGREES 06
MINUTES 32 SECONDS EAST,
130.60 FEET, TO A FOUND CON-
CRETE MONUMENT; RUN THENCE
SOUTH 89 DEGREES 44 MINUTES
41 SECONDS EAST, PARALLEL
WITH SAID NORTHERLY BOUND-
ARY OF SECTION 10, 101.60 FEET
TO A FOUND CONCRETE MONU-
MENT; RUN THENCE NORTH 0 DE-
GREES 06 MINUTES 32 SECONDS
EAST, 100.00 FEET, TO THE POB.
TOGETHER WITH A MOBILE
HOME LOCATED THEREON AS A
FIXTURE AND APPURTENANCE
THERETO: 1998, WESTWAYS,
GAFLV07A40580W221.
RESERVING THEREFROM AN
EASEMENT FOR INGRESS AND
EGRESS OVER THE SOUTHERLY
30.00 FEET THEREOF.
A/K/A ROUTE 3 BOX 338, STARKE,
FL 320910000
Any person -claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any, other
.than the property owner as of the
date of the Lis Pendens must file a
claim within sixty (60) days after the
sale.
WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of
this Court on July 11, 2013.
Ray Norman
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Lisa Brannon
Deputy Clerk
Ronald R. Wolf & Associates, PL.
P.O. Box 25018
Tampa, Florida 33622-5018
**See Americans with Disabilities Act
If you are a person with a disability
who needs any accommodation in or-
der to participate in this proceeding,
you are entitled, at no cost to you, to
the provision of certain assistance.
Please contact the Clerk of Court,


Bradford County Courthouse, Starke,
FL at 904-964-6280 within 7 working
days of your receipt of this notice; if
you are hearing or voice impaired,
call 1-800-955-8771
7/18 2tchg 7/25-BCT
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN
AND FOR BRADFORD COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO. 2012-CA-000040
THE BANK OF NEW YORK MEL-
LON FKATHE BANK OF NEW
YORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE
CERTIF1CATEHOLDERS OF
CWABS, INC., ASSET-BACKED
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-4.
Plaintiff,
vs.
TAMARRA LATER A/K/A TAM-
ARRA JEAN SOMEILLAN, ET
AL.
Defendants
RE-NOTICE OF FORECLO-
SURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursu-
ant to a Final Judgment of Foreclo-
sure dated January 17, 2013, and en-
tered in Case No. 2012-CA-000040,
of the Circuit Court of the Eighth Ju-
dicial Circuit in and for BRADFORD
County, Florida. THE BANK OF NEW
YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF
NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR
THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF
CWABS, INC., ASSET-BACKED
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-4
(hereafter
"Plaintiff'), is Plaintiff and TAMARRA
LATER A/K/A TAMARRA JEAN
SOMEILLAN; .UNKNOWN TENANT
#1 IN POSSESSION OF THE SUB-
JECT PROPERTY N/K/A ROBERT
ROBERTS, are defendants. I will
sell to the highest and best bidder
for cash in the LOBBY of the Court-
house; 945 North Temple Avenue,
Starke, at 11:00 a.m., on
the 15 day of August, 2013, the fol-
lowing described property as set forth
in said Final Judgment, to wit:
THE EAST 1/2 OF LOT 1 IN SEC-
TION 11,. TOWNSHIP 5 SOUTH,
RANGE 22 EAST, WOODLAWN,
ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR
PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN
PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE(S) 17 OF THE
PUBLIC RECORDS OF BRADFORD
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
If you are a person with a disability
who needs any accommodation in
order to participate in this proceed-
ing, you are entitled, at no cost to
you, to the provision of certain assis-
tance. Persons with a disability who
need any accommodation in order to
participate should call Jan Phillips,
ADA Coordinator, Alachua County
Courthouse, 201 E. University Ave.,
Gainesville, FL 32601 at (352) 337-
6237 within two (2) working days of
your receipt of this notice; if you are
hearing impaired call (800) 955-8771;
if you are voice impaired, call (800)
955-8770.
Dated this 12 day of July, 2013'
RAY NORMAN
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
By: Lisa Brannon
As Deputy Clerk
Van Ness Law Firm, PLC
1239 E. Newport Center Drive S
Deerfield Beach, Florida 33442
Phone(954) 571-2031
Fax (954)571-2033 .
Pleadings@vanle.wfl.com
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any, other


than the property owner as of the
date of the Lis Pendens must 'file a
claim within 60 days after the sale.
7/18 2tchg 7/25-BCT
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
8TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR BRADFORD COUNTY, FLOR-
IDA
CIVIL DIVISION:
CASE NO.: 2012CA106
WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A,
Plaintiff,
vs.
KIMBERLY D. CRAWFORD A/K/A,
KIM D, CRAWFORD; et. al,
Defendants.
RE-NOTICE OF FORECLO-
SURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursu-
ant to an Order Resetting Foreclosure
Saledatedthe 10 dayof Julx 2013
and entered in Case No. 2012CA106,
of the Circuit Court of the 8TH Judi-
cial Circuit in and for Bradford Coun-
ty, Florida, wherein WELLS FARGO
BANK, N.A. is the Plaintiff and KIM-
BERLY D. CRAWFORD A/K/A KIM
D. CRAWFORD and UNKNOWN.
TENANTS) IN POSSESSION OF
THE SUBJECT PROPERTY are
defendants. The Clerk of this Court
shall sell to the highest and best bid-
der for cash at the east front door of
the Bradford County courthouse, 945
North Temple Ave, Starke, FL., 11:00
AM on the 16 day ofJanuary, 2014,
the following described property as
set forth in said Final Judgement, to
wit:
LOT 28, BLOCK 5, SAROTQOGA
HEIGHTS, UNIT THREE, ACCORD-
ING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RE-
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE
3, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF
BRADFORD COUNTY, FLORIDA.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN IN-
TEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM
THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN
THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF
THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS
MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60
DAYS AFTER THE SALE,
Under the American with Disabilities
Act, if you are a person with a disabil-
ity who needs any accommodation in
order to participate in this proceeding,
you are entitled, at no cost to you, to
the provision of certain assistance.
Please contact the ADA Coordina-
tor at (352)337-6237, at least 7 days
before your scheduled court appear-
ance. If you are hearing or voice im-
paired, please call 711.
If you are deaf or hard of hearing and
require an ASL interpreter or an as-
sisted listening device -to participate
in proceeding, please contact Court
Interpreting at interpreter@circuit8.
org
Dated this 12 day of July, 2013.
RAY NORMAN
Clerk Of The Circuit Court
Lisa Brannon
Deputy Clerk
Choice Legal Group, P.A.
1800NW 49th Street, Suite 120
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33309
Telephone: (954) 453-0365
Facsimile: (954)771-6052
Toll Free: 1-800-441-2438
DESIGNATED PRIMARY E-MAIL
FOR SERVICE PURSUANT TO
FLA. R. JUD. ADMIN 2.516
eservice@clegalgroup.com
7/18 2tohg .7/25-BCT
PUBLIC NOTICE
This is to inform you that Suwannee


I 7A



River Economic Cobncil; Inc, willlld i
a pre-bid conference andi walk-thru ,
for the weatherizaiion,work of six (6) '!
single-family dwellings participating '
in the Bradfrd County Weatheriza-
tion Program;. '
This meeting will be held July 19,
2013, beginning at 8:00 am at
S.R,.E.C., Inc. Service Center, 1210,
Andrews Circle,' Starke, Florida
32091. '
The confrience and walkrthr'w is man- '
datory, ho exceptions, for contractors .
who plan to bidc; S.R.E:C., lnci re-
quires each contractor to be properly :
licensed, carry genera) abilityy insur-
ance of at least, $1,000Q000:00, POI;
(Pollution Occurrence Ipsurfance) and
Workers Comp Insurance (No Ex-
emptions) during construction. ,
Original bids for these -units will be
duetby 12:00 noon July 24 2013,
at S.R.E.C., Inc .Service Center .
,1210 Andrews Cirqle, Starke, Flor-
ida 32091. Please mark, envelope. :
"Sealed Bid for' Name of .Home-. '
owner". Bids are to be opened and
awarded July 24. 2013 at 12 30 p m
S.R.E.C-. Inc.,has the right to reject
any and all bids The bids will be
awarded'on the most cost effective
basis. '
Some of the BATCH(s) May CON-
TAINS HOMES THAT WERE CON-- '
STRUCTED PRIOR TO 1978, AND
MAY CONTAIN LEAD-BASED PAINT.
7/18 ltchg-BCT

GOETZMAN CONSTRUCTION,
INC. PUBLIC
ANNOUNCEMENT
INVITATION TO BID
Goetzman Constructiqn, Starke,
Florida, requests bids from State of
Florida Asphalt Paving and Concrete
contractors for two (2) projects locat-
ed at Camp Blanding Joint Training
Facility, 5629 SR 16 'Nest, StarKe,
Florida 32091.'
FOR COMPLETE INFORMATION.
& SUBMISSION REQUIREMENTS
YOU MUST GO TO THE CONTACT
INFORMATION BELOW.
Project Number: 212045' .
Project Name: Upgrade -Culverts/
Pave Dade Road ,
Project Number: 212039
Project Name: Mill and Asphalt Pav-
ing Yerkes Road :
BID OPENING DATE: AUGUST 8 ,
2013 at10:00 am '. \
MANDATORY SITE VISITIPRE BID \
DATE: July 23, 2013 at 10;00 a.m.
POINT OF CONTACT:
Diane Goetzman
Goetzman Construction, Inc.
352-468-2178 ,
diane@goetzmanconstructioninc
.corn 7/18 chg-BCT
7/18 ltchg-BCT


- Peel Address
Labels
ldlenltd tdEa, P60 I'Jli.
st -Jam i n S-.gn
Prr5 5.a~dnread FeI
Inzdas 5, lops for
EadcabonicCpoi>
SPECU
ITEM DS[cpnIoN PpXin SALU PRICi
AVE 5260 .... S10.89 PK
AVE .5160 xoi $25.99 BX
AVE 180 ,, $10.89 PK


White
Shipping
Laser
Labels With
TrueBlock
Technology
*G-uarireaa to cOmplaF'I'I toer w brplhwgunfirnsflh 10
Vd, cBr r. -Us' rr.allnw l"q1' B.-, biCs una rnord- F106 G001-ML
lainplales I hlrluda 8)" Tno fa, rnri. lt r Co01c01,
| TEuAVE51I63 ITiM AVE5164
MiU 2.,ron4" Ia3. Ai,-. '
PACLUED 1O01 PACX=. 6Mo
SSPICIALMSAIL PIC BPS MIAL SAE P-fL
"2..99 BX $28.99 BX /


Dek Correction$
f'-r ZTape Value
Integra. Par'ck T|iRBiHl
Chisel Desk Highlighters ,Pack n 4
S 'anriA 3* 36004 3 0a 1U.TA pc 02334
rimn[IA 3000 004SSSft& nnrnIA612M $6PK


,. BUSINESS
S. SOURCE i
Desktop
Tape
Dispenser
* BSCr,.,NIl. ,U r, .k,,l Las,.
* hOllS .S r ,, 1 5 t(,a i 1 a 1" [,:,rI
m11 BSN 32954


Premium
Invisible
Tape Refills
- OD i pp, r ',i i.. r'r 'a.,l
Mr'D l Sn,.On c,1.c.
mil. BSN 3293
DFSCRIPTION '1 luV61 Ii,
SIZE k.' 1W(O
tACKED 12
SPECIAL SALE PFLE
S7.99 PK
mm BSN 32952
0[SCLi'Plo1 RdI'. k:"
'ILL I';. IIw
PACKED I
SPECIAL 5. PR&CL
$.75 RL


BUSINESS
SOURCE f. -
Ballpoint Retractable Pens
* Njjnn+.,,HOIM r hM In pk"'l
ITmM COLIO
BSN 2500 elck -
BSN29MI

Q, BUSINESS
S SOURCE *
Legal
Ruled Pads
-M.C.C.Psola10dlc S itL
S -r .ii -,,I l, I.,,f,
*j IS 11 P 01l'


rKM
BSN 63101
BSN 63110
BSN 63105
BSN 63108
BSN 63106
BSN 63109


SPMCAL
SAtU Pgi.
S4.69 DZ
$4.69 DZ
S6.59 DZ
,6.59 DZ
$10.79 DZ
$10.79 DZ


Permanent
Markers

,h( i rii lade
wlt.iUl wir w ACMI A'
Cfir,.d rmd.wn c rine
oIrl PM"A d 5 pei pCk
irfA SAN 1665PP


White
Correction
Tape

nu [ IrA 60032


.391
^ ^1 (L lt.BUSINESS
$4 Staple Remover
--o BSN 6S0


Standard -
Paper Clips
SCoaed to relrrt itand
onT-'PifackBd 100
per pack
OOM SiN 66r33

ScM1.49 PK w.age
$1.49 PK


.^lFUNCTIONAL & STYLISH *,

FURNITURE
-. . : ,. :, ; : ', .


anumla uiwns u
4C.990. Oil WaSGaV
$4.".LACEPX


OT


W40 mfti .





*8A BRADFORD COUNTY TELEGRAPH THURSDAY, JULY 18, 2013 ________
.. . . . UII


Jgtwducing


>^ sUIS owD.OO. Elly DeVost, A.R.N.P. Jon Johnspn,AR.N.P.Re
Bo^itified Family Medicine Women's Health Family Nurse Practitioner









^l^&'' -* ;*.." -Suzy Boules, M.D.';., Lynne Webster, A R N P. ,^i;*::.;-.;^^.
%^^iK^S:-^ Family Medicine-.Family Nurse.Pa e-
SAM





iS^I^^ ^ ? '^Sick Visits for Adults & Children 'Physical Exams for Schoot, Employment & Sports*
^ ^:S&^^ *Health Screenings Chronic Disease Management & Education ('
^LabairatwjWork Pharmacy Assistance Specialist Referrals Behavorial Health Care Dental Car!*


New^ River Community Health CenterI
^ 495 East Main Street 1801 North Temple Avenue
Lak B Starke, FL 32091
S(386) 496-3211 (904) 964.7732
M ON-FRI..-?.--,-



'v. Szy B u'", M D" e Wester -.A.:
-cin r ci
Fam ily.. I a' .ly::'-s



::'+:,Cb:pied ailhedicine Women'S Hea lth Faamiyi& Nult.sMedratitOnW" :' :+::(;
:::: ~~~~el- hil Cao ,-W om .. .. ,. .: -:.-
Vi it fo:.lt &.' C h ld e --Phys.ca-Exam s fo..choo -m. -m e. ,Sb r-s :. ., .


.iv'rCojf H, ''I-'- '' n, 't
49 atMin te t 10'ot"+e e

Lak,-uter Forda3204,take F 309
(36)49-3211.(904)964,7732


offe S.


.M


' ''


Now AcEPTIN,."ME


Ne-e"


I'








B Section Thursday, July 18, 2013 FEATURES
R N CRIME
7 nj W5. r- ELT AASOCIALS
R I N A E WS OBITUARIES
FIG' 0 .3..L N E 60 EDITORIAL
NEWS FROM BRADFORD COUNTY, UNION COUNTY AND THE LAKE REGION


BHS basketball coach takes

job at Miami Northwestern

SAssistant coach Adrian what began under Traavis Chan-
Chandler will take over dler, not only fielding a competi-
tive basketball team but helping
for Traavis Chandler young men become solid citi-
zens.
BY CLIFF SMELLEY "We felt like we were begin-
SRegional News/Sports Editor ning to build a big foundation
do rd (H ight Sco here in our community," he said.
B k bo d tbll hd v e a r-o Farnsworth said Adrian Chan-
by a adler, like Traavis Chandler,
Traavis Chandler resigned to
take a similar position at North- serves as a bit of a role model-7a
Western High School in Miami. BHS basketball player who went
ChandlerwihScholinMpiledion to earn a college degree and
Chandler, who compiled aiscretyepinigsues
Kaylee Findley is on top of the world, so to speak, having qualified for world 76-41 record in four seasons at is currently experiencing success
competition after a record-setting performance at the Central Florida Open BHS, guiding the Tornadoes to in life.
Championships. two district championships and "It provides a really good ex-
three regional playoff appear- ample for the boys," Farnsworth
Student kes powe rfus ances -includingarun tothe re- Traavis Chandler coached said.
at stu e n seaod pl UAgional finals in 20 10-11 --said it the Tornadoes for four The superintendent said he has
Si t if t g was not an easy decision to leave seasons, guiding them to not had a lot of personal interac-
state m e nt in w eiginghome. (He graduated from BHS the regional playoffs three tion with the new head coach, but
stn t si e h t iftigin 2002.) Howevera Chandler wltimes. admitted he has been impressed
with their few interactions. After
BY CLIFF SMELLEY said. "It felt like I was on top of The July 7 meet was Findley's would love to be able to coach to Traavis Chandler the last four a recent meeting involving the
Regional News/Sports Editor the world." first powerlifting competition, at the collegiate level one day, so years, now steps into the role of two, Farnswoth said what struck
eai cas itet wasn't the best of starts for but she talked as if it was meant the move to a bigger high school head coach., him about Chandler were "his
not e enough to geot Union County Findley, who wound up scratch- for her to eventually start partici- program could be a step in that "He has a familiarity with the high level of character and strong
High School risingjunior Kaylee ing her first back squat attempt. paying in such events. direction. boys we have coming back," moral foundations."
FindSley off track as she tured in Her coach, Bryan Griffis, said "My dad was in it," Findley "I thought about it and prayed Farnsworthsaid. "I wked away from that
a record-breaking performance nerves got to her. said. "I guess I just had a big in- about it," Chandler said. "It was Adrian Chandler, a 2000 meeting feeling really positive '
at the second annual USA Pow- "Once she got settled in, she terest in it for a long time." just that time to move up the BHS graduate who, like Traavis about the future of boys' basket-
erlfting Central Florida Open knew she ould do it," Griffis Findley, who also competes coach ing ladder. Chandler, played at and gradu- ball," Farnsworth said.
Championships on July 7. said. "Then o she started d liftting in weightlifting at UCHS ai during Chandler, who said heti ated from Nova Southeastern Traavis Chandler has no
Findley, who won the heavy- like I know she can." the school year, said the sport is has ties in south Floerintda dating University, said he was grateful doubts that Adrian Chandler w ill
weight class in the 16-17-year- Findley set records in the her life now. She certainly de- back to his timeato Farnsworth a a r, BHS Principal succeed. The former head coach
old division, not only set three bench press (175), dead lift votes a lot of time and effort to Nova Southeastern University in Bryan Boyer and BHS Athletic said his replacement has a good
records, but qualified for this (315) and high total (765)' The it. You can find her in the UCHS Fort Lauderdale, said he is look- Director Neil Chipoletti for put- work ethic and relates will with
weekend's nationals in Orlando previous records were set in weight room most every day. ing forward to what is sure to be ting their trust in him to head kids.
and next June's world champi- 2004. "The only day I don't lift is a pressure-filled situation in a the program.. He said taking the "I'mexcitedforAdrian,"Traa-
onships in South Africa. She knew she could overcome Sunday because I go to church," "stellar" athletic program. reigns at his alma mater is like a vis Chandler said. "I love him to
Oh, and she also got an invita- that scratch on her first back she said. "It's kind of seeing where I'm dream come true. death. He'll grow as a coach."
tion to join Team USA. squat attempt and do well, Find- Griffis, who coaches the at as a coach," he said. "It's unbelievable," Chandler As for his future, Traavis
Notrbad for someone who ad- ley. Bouncing back and getting a UCHS girls' team, said Findley Though Chandler is gone, said of the opportunity. "It's hard Chandler said he hoped Bradford
mitted she didn't think she was 260 in the back squat was proof is the hardest-working girl he's Bradford Superintendent of to describe." County was a part of it.
going to do as well as she did at of that. ever coached. Schools Chad Farnsworth said Chandler, who teaches at "Hopefully, one day I can
the Central Florida meet. "After the first (successful) "The sky's the limit for her," the BHS program shouldn't ex- Bradford Middle School, said come back," he said.
"It felt amazing," Findley'ift, I felt confident in what I was perience much change as Adrian he looks forward to continuing
d oing," Findley said. See FINDLEY, 8B Chandler, who was an assistant


To your favorite pooch, those strolls around the park were the highlights of the day. But for you,
they used to be agony. When joint pain .interrupts the big and little things you do routinely,
the orthopedic services at Shands Starke Regional Medical Center can help. Our physicians and
surgeons have the skills and technology it takes to get you moving again, comfortably


To learn more, visit ShandsStarke.com or call 904-368-2300.


Shands,..v
Regional Medical Center
* 922 E. Call Street, Starke, FL IShandsStarke.com








2B TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR B SECTION THURSDAY, JULY 18, 2013

Restaurant celebrates 10



years of neighborly dining


Four new Florida State Prison officers graduated June 27 from the Correctional
Officer Basic Recruit Academy after an Intensive 11-week training course. The
graduates from FSP are shown In this photo being congratulated by members
of the FSP leadership team. (Front row, l-r) Warden John Palmer, Sean Hanson,
Thomas Ricketts, Jason Tollick, Col. M.D. Williams. (Back row, l-r) Asst. Warden
Brad Whitehead, Major James Taylor, Charles Stanley, Major Jeffrey Smith. Not
shown Is Jeremy Fowler.



Melrose lawyer takes on art

mystery wrapped in an enigma


BY JAMES WILLIAMS
Special to the Telegraph-Times-
Monitor .
John Middleton, PA., has had
-a law office in Melrose since-
1987. Many of his cases, he said,
have involved criminal law.
Over the years, that has given
'him experience in legal foren-
S-,sics and things like fingerprints,
* DNA'and putting scientific facts
S together to create,,hopefully, a
defensible truth-or at least a
good defense.
But one of his clients-a fam-
ily-has been different. They
have relied on him for lawyerly
things like property transactions,
maybe wills and trusts. He can't
say who the family is, but after
some consultation,, they gave
him permission to pass along
Selected pieces of information to
the press.
The family owns an artwork
They have good reason to believe
was done, not just by one fa-
mous European artist, but by two
Sbig-name Spanish guys working
together in 1916 in Paris. The
artists were Juan Gris and Pablo
Picasso. Both of them were gq-
ing through what would come
to be called their Cubist periods.
For Gris, that was the only pe-
riod he had.
Middleton can't s4y much
about how someone in the fam-
Sily came by the artwork or art-
works, except to say that they
were bought years ago in a le-
Sgitimate gallery.
"Before they brought this to
me," Middleton said, "I don't
think I had ever heard of Juan
Gris, I had no idea who he was,
but of course I knew Picasso."
If Middleton and the family
are right, each artist completed
an individual collage, perhaps
Working together, but each in his
own Cubist -style. The owners
believe the two pieces fit nicely
together and were held as a unit
by a red thread' that ran down
the middle when the two pieces
were side by side. One piece-
the left side-has Juan Gris'
name on it, but that appears to be
in Picasso's handwriting.
"It looks like Picasso's hand-
.writing," Middleton said, using
his forensic handwriting analy-
sis, "but I can't say whether or
not it was forged."
The collages ,were done, not
on canvas, but on fiberboard,
a sort of cardboard of its day,
much heavier than an ordinary
sheet of paper.


After he did a little home-
work, Middleton-said he thought
the two pieces certainly looked
like other works by Picasso and
Gris, but the family brought the
artworks to him because one
piece-the Gris-contained a
human hair stuck into the paint,
with even a follicle attached.
The Gris is signed, but the
Picasso is not. The bad news is
that the work didn't come with
sheaves of official papers au-
thenticating what's called its
provenance- written documents
attesting to what artist actually
completed what. There is no in-
formation about who owned the
artwork or works over the inter-
vening decades.
It was the hair and its follicle,
and Middleton's forensic experi-
ence, that prompted the family to
bring it to him. "Could the fol-
licle have belonged to Gris, and
if it did, would that prove he had
completed, the work?" That's
what they wanted to know.
If the two paintings were what
the family believes they are-
and if they could prove it-the
combined works have been es-
timated to be valued at some-
where between $15 million and
$50 million.
For the last year and a half,
he has become almost obsessed
with the case, and has spent
hours and hours looking at every
detail of the two collages using
digital files and color photo re-
productions he keeps in his of-
fice, Middleton said. The desk-
top of his computer is now filled
with files of close-ups of the two
works, of known examples of
Picasso's and Gris' handwriting,
examples of signatures on their
paintings and related files on
Spanish collectors and Parisian
figures of the day.
Both halves of the original
work are sitting in a vault these
days in Mississippi. For a few
days at the beginning of last
year, Middleton took them to his
house to look them over.
"I was nervous as a cat all.
week," he said. He kept them
on his dining room table and
wouldn't let his son, Adrian, or
the family dog go anywhere near
them.
At first, Middleton tried con-
tacting an appropriate art profes-
sor at the University of Florida,'
Jbut got no reply: So he set out to
find art experts elsewhere and
started doing what he knew best:
testing the DNA in the hair sam-
ple. This could be risky, since a


Tru BIu Pool '
Service & Suppties:.ELC- 7 : .
SServicing the Surrounding'Areas Since 2006
We Offer: W -
Above Ground Pool We Ca rr
Installation Replacement
Weekly Pool Maintenance o-----
R ut pair of tCartrides
automatic Vacuum Systems for the
Service & Repairs *INTEX P los
.jwwi wiim m. INTE. Pools! .


I a E PI o Ile i-- 11


Liquid Chlorine Complete Line of Chemicals & Parts, *
S Salt Water Generators Filters, Elements, Pumps & Motors *
I, *Floats, Gogles & Toys* P
S* Automatic Vacuum Systems for Above Ground/In Ground Pools *
S Maintenance Equipment, Brushes, Nets, Vacuums & Poles *
S MORE INVENTORY COMING SOON...
S Above Ground Pools, Grills and a more
extensive line of all products!.
I Ask about our Rebate!
Summertime Hours: Mon-Sat 9-6 pm
.' Z',- '229 Weat Main Stret Lake Butlar y 386-496-1057
/ ~ea w' STll'l l -' I "


DNA test would cost upward of
$2,500, and, after also 100 years
had passed, there was no guar-
antee that any DNA would be
found. And what if the test found
DNA not replicated in either
Gris' or Picasso's lineage? Then
what?
Middleton next contacted a re-
gional art expert he found online
and met Mark Winter for lunch at
the Daytona Beach Yacht Club.
Still, Middleton wanted further
verification.
By now, the Melrose criminal
lawyer has contacted other con-
sultants, including a Spanish ge-
nealogist. He has also involved
art historian Patricia Leighton, a
faculty member at Duke Univer-
sity, and a noted writer who has
connected cubism and anarchy.
These days, the artworks are
being studied by an engineering
lab at the University of Missis-
sippi, where chemical footprints
of the paints are being tested.
S"Dr. Greg Haywood and his
engineering students are look-
ing for a sort of DNA for paints,"
Middleton said. "That can tell us
whether the painted areas came
from the same paint batches,
which could place the two art-
ists working in the same studio
at the same time." What's more,
by now, there is a veritable DNA
library of paints used by Picasso,
established by art experts over
the years.
Historians already know that
Picasso supported his fellow
Spani.rd after the latter escaped
the Spanish Civil War and came
to Paris. Middleton said Picas-
so's letters suggest that Gris was
acting as an assistant jn Picasso's
studio.
Middleton and Adrian were
also looking at what could have
been a catalog number and a
name scratched into the back of


!





d
I_


i


BY TRACY LEE TATE
Special to the Telegraph-Times-
Monitor


There is a restaurant in Starke,
which brings nothing more to
mind than the bar in the old
television show "Cheers." It is a
meeting place, a regular stop for
many locals and travelers, where
it seems as if everyone really
"knows your name."
Grannie's celebrated its 10"'
birthday on July 10, and the
owners and staff are rightfully
proud of the local landmark they
have built.
. The restaurant is owned by
Pam Snider (aka Grannie) and
her brother Robert Rapoza.
The siblings come from a food
service family, with family
members running the gamut
from cooks to bookkeepers.
Snider and her sister Norma
Stevens started the business. It
was the third and last Grannies
to open; with the first two
being located in Ruskin and
Crystal River, respectively,
having opened about 10 years
previously. Nieces and nephews
now run those establishments.


Bull is just part
of Grannie's
building's
history
BY TRACY LEE TATE
Special to the Telegraph-Times-
Monitor
The building at 367 N.
Temple Ave., which now houses
Grannie's restaurant, has a
lifelong history of providing a
home for food establishments.
Built in 1956, the building
served a long term as Herb's
Diner, then was purchased by
J.D. Odom Jr. in 1966. The name
was changed to The Branding
Iron. The building's landmark
brahma bull was shipped in from
Culver City, Texas, and took up
its mostly permanent vacation
outside the establishment.
"The bull has been borrowed
numerous times," current owner
John Odom said. "It always
seems to return, however, but it
has been damaged a few times;
mostly paint. We now keep
him chained down so he can't
wander."
Odom also pointed out
that while the bull did not
make a personal on-stage
appearance, he was featured in


It's a family affair at Grannie's, which is owned by
siblings Pam Snider (aka Grannie) and Robert Rapoza.


v
r
t
r


current manager Joann Walker,
and proceeded to win the hearts
of local lovers of home cooking.
The emphasis then, as now, is
on quality, freshness, generous
quantity, good service and
value. The iconic Grannie's
sign is an artist's rendition, of a
photograph of Snider's brother-
in-law's grandmother.
See DINING, 4B


Longtime area residents are plenty familiar with the
bull that stands outside Grannie's Restaurant.


Florida Twin Theatre

aVisRt us online at sloAdaTmiSanieatre.c in

Ryan Reynolds in Adam Sandier in
jcRg MEN


Fri, -7:05, 9:05 PG Fri, 7:00, 9:10 P O-13
Sat, 5:00,7:05,9:05 Sat, 5:00,7:00,9:10
Sun, 5:00,7:05 Sun, S00, 7:00
Mon-Thurs 7.30 Maon-rs, 7:15


See ART, 8B See HISTORY, 4B


4 _... THE STARKE
F: f T W - '- .. .., . .

HP156"Pailion: 1 TH. ^ Z' G) -~ A -,KAi ECSj
L au1ndr Par 4 MISSED

$:79" | r t 099. MISSED ROUND 2?
L |IlIk' NPII S ^ ltiinif ,r '-* i...i I 7 iI ni
^......... ~i'l~r'a ROUND 3 STARTS:

Ip V July 20th, 11:00AM

f ;,tl FILL OUT AND RETURN TO PRE-REGISTER
FIJI r4c ____ ______________

m rn .- ,a ',, ;.



t69 N e pl 'e ErnouI Adr.- 04389 5

7-PIECE 5TH AVENUE II LIVING ROOM COLLECTION ...

MW, 5TO l 1MS ISe Ch, AY kxad1% 'NeA- ,r Ik. X) .) 12-h,,PS7999$,S' 59M. TOTAL CTOFSTOFOIERHIS'HIP SIM415 aormol nlmonthly.r e-mraymum lof $149.99 I os'.ih mur !wn' rm of !]'-mnlh, N O, ui; v ''vrl w o
24.,@1 q TALI5COTk O OW S4P IA47 2.-S9$1197),TOrALCSTOF rw 'ony er C ('c ol 9,,com b'ir fnodwit)owoyla er llt, ..Vo deO'I:,I*o'llat i ,h o o lo noa. So mw sqn r forr vto:ls .
OWIEIISHIP -$U9.1 C$fOir good luoufh 7,131 :13.

1699 N Temple Ave. Starke, FL 32091 904-368-9105 o2


A.

M


The sisters arrived in March
2003 to prepare a building
which had been empty for
approximately a year. While
living in the alley next door in an
RV, they cleaned, repaired and
bought fixtures and decorations
for the new venture, with Snider
actually bringing many of the
decorations from her own home.
Grannie's opened in July
2003 with Snider, Stevens and







THURSDAY, JULY 18, 2013 TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR B SECTION 3B


Soldiers, airmen complete air assault course at Camp Blanding


BY STAFF SGT. CARMEN
STEINBACH
Florida National Guard Public
Affairs
Air assault operations date
back to the Vietnam War and
are still used today in both do-
mestic and international military
maneuvers. During hurricane
response or other disaster opera-
tions. sling loading can bring aid
.to citizens in desperate need of
supplies or assistance.
SThe versatility of air assault
operations is primarily what
prompted various United States
Army and Air Force units across
the country to send members to
Camp Blanding Joint Training
SCenter, Florida's premier train-
ing institute, to receive their air
assault badge. While the course
began with 250 students, only
197 soldiers and airmen gradu-
ated the air assault course, which
concluded with a ceremony on
-July 2.
Graduation was the final
Step in a process:.that included
an obstacle course, sling load


and rappel operations', and the
completion of a 6-mile road
march at .a 15-minute pace.
The course culminated with
a 12-mile road march while
carrying a 35-pound rucksack
at a 15-minute pace in the
early-morning hours prior to
graduation.
Graduates \ere graded on
how well they performed, and
those that exceeded and excelled
were awarded with additional
honors, such as distinguished
honor graduate, honor'graduate
and road march champion.
This year's honorees were: Sgt.
Anthony Calvi, P' Battalion,
124t"' Infantry Regiment.
(DHG), 1" Lt. Ryan Hovatter,
Charlie Troop, I" Battalion,
153"' Cavalry Regiment (HG).
and'Staff Sgt. Robert Kirk, 48t"
Civil Support Team, the 12-mile
road march champion with a
completion time of two hours
and three minutes.
With the training finished and
wings pinned on, students return
to their units with more than just


I- ^


Air assault course students
rappel from a helicopter.


bragging rights.
"Once these soldiers gradu-
ate, they can inspect sling loads
to actually fly under the helicop-
ter, which is really important on
the battlefield and'(during) natu-
ral disasters as well," said Sgt.
1" Class Wesley Collinger, the
air assault training NCOIC.
The air assault course is certi-
fied by TRADOC and provided
by trainers from the from the
Army National Guard. Warrior
Training Center in Fort Benning,
Ga. Holding the event at Camp
Blanding allowed for realistic
training scenarios for both class-
room and field exercises.
"I like the way it was imple-
mented, beginning with phase,
one that is very physically de-
manding, and then moving
forward through the academic
aspect of it," said 1" Lt. Jacab-
seel Nunez, 1" Battalion, 124th
Infantry Regiment. "Both of
those types of training combined
to see what one can actually pro-
duce."
Students traveled from Army


Maj. Gen. Emmett R. Titshaw, the adjutant general
of Florida, presents the award for the road march
champion to Staff Sgt. Robert Kirk, during the Air
Assault Graduation Ceremony, at Camp Blanding.
Photo by Army Sgt. Christopher Vann


National Guard units in Florida,
Maryland, Pennsylvania,
California, Georgia ,and
Washington State, with soldiers
from the Army and Army


Reserve, as well as ROTC cadets
from the Virginia Military
Institute and the University of
North Georgia, to take part in
the course.


A devotion to work, a life of success


BY TRACY LEE TATE
SSpecial to the Telegraph-Times-
\ Monitor
Dedication to work and
the pursuit of success though
planning and patience comprises
the formula for creating and
,maintaining a successful small
,business for one Bradford
'County native.
Randy Gaskins, owner of
Bradford Garbage Service, comes
.from a long line of Bradford
:County residents. He loves the
-county and his roots with the
land that his family has farmed
ifor several generations. He is the
son of former Bradford County
-Commissioner Arthur Gaskins
sand brother to tax collector
-Teresa Gaskins Phillips.
Marrying 'very young and
starting a family early, Gaskjns
said his entire adult life, has
always centered around work.
'athad a wife, a child and a high
--school diploma and was working
at Piggley Wiggley," Gaskins
:-said. "1 knew that wasn't what
":- wanted for my life and family.
-j wanted to stay on my family
sJand and work for myself. With
;tjarming in decline I realized that
S"J would have to own my own
business to do this."
SThe story of Gaskins' business
: -parallels the history of garbage
collection in Bradford anid the
surrounding counties.
S"'The first garbage collector in
i.the county was Roger 'Skelton.
-lHe collected garbage in a pick-
-.up truck with'sides in the early
--:1970s," Gaskins recalls. "He
sold his business to Tommy
-Perryman, of Keystone Heights,
intthe middle '70s. I met Tommy
andtold him I would be interested


Randy Gaskins
has succeeded
in life by his
willingness to
do whatever
needed tobe
done.


in buying the business should he
decide to sell."
When Skelton sold his
Keystone -Heights route to
Perryman, Perryman in turn
sold his Bradford county route
to Gaskins. In September 1977,
Gaskins became a small business


owner, changing the name from
Perryman's Garbage Service .to
Bradford Garbage Service.
"What I bought was about
100 customers and a single-axel,
side-loading garbage truck,"
Gaskins said. "We charged $4
a week for twice-weekly service


anywhere in the county. Of
course, this was in the days of
affordable fuel."
In the beginning, Gaskins
did not offer commercial or
dumpster service and the county
had only a few dump sites. The
landfill fees were also quite low.
By the time the fuel crises of the
late '70s hit, he was charging $6
a week, and due, to rising fuel
costs, was forced to trim service
to one visit per week.
"We were doing garbage
collection up close and personal
back then," he recalls. "At the
time I could have told you who
was a good cook, what they
fixed and lots of other personal
stuff if I had wanted to."
Working the garbage service
three days a week, Gaskins
found himself left with four
days free. He started as a

See GASKINS, 10B


* Heaaacnes ur. virgil A. Berry
CHiRO eRACTIC PHYSICIAN
Neck and Back Pain saROngeRA,, ICPYA,.


601 E. Call St.
Hwy. 230, Starke


964-8018


QQQQ^PAnnual*

&1TMASTER SHOWDOWN


TARIESAN MADE THE CUT.
+J, L + -. Jin iitill UC I I& r irII I


Open House Date:
FRI, JULY 19th- 11AM -1PM
Perfect place to getaway from it all and enjoy the Lake! Well maintained 3BR/
2BA Mobile Home on Little Orange Lake. Screened in porch on the back.
Beautiful large Oak trees abound on this 1.46 acre lot with 75 feet of lake
frontage. Adjoining 1.41 acre lot with 75 feet of lake frontage will be offered
separately. 10% Buyers Premium.
You can also bid online! For more info visit:
ww.CampenAuctions.cort

(352)C505-0560 P.O. Box 140907 e Gainesville, FcoL 32614
(352') 505.-0560 e P.O., Box 140907 .* Gaines~ville, FJL 32614 ,


Brad Camp -icesd. iL Li ljIp.l R.rl IFta l i Sltfgzl c m l
'r k 0Fl.id. 0 t
For Cmpore Lno Vst wtnu, ~.AcirSO~ ~0Z .uwsa


SR-230, 9-.(2miles.tast6of, PU463 ],"
10
STARKE or ;pblq PON.




IL A ..i. I \ ... \ \ '*" : .- '
GOLF & 11rnbjprstiips

CLUBBqnquc',lHafll- riving Range

EOcellqnt Driving Range \ Golf .essqns y Apppintment
Pro Shop- GftCelflcaes '\ PrpassionaQly RLn TounTraments
-. -\Heofthe'Strawiibqrry ivitaflonal\ -
V
Lik .uson 2' .. .' \ ...- s
facebook '64
fa ... (994) 964-5441 ..
Checkout6yr web page -........
J X. + \ www, starkegolf, com; .+. -+


HIGHEST BIDDER BUYS NO RESERVE!

3BR/2BA LAKEFRONT


For More Info Visit: www.CamparnAuctions.con AB S02820 AU 3vo08


1!







TELEGFRAPH. TIMES & MONITOR B SECTION THURSDAY, JULY 18, 2013


editor@bctelegraph.com

Our Country
Day 5K a true
definition
of 'team'
Dear Editor:
Most 5K races are an oppor-
tunity for runners to show off
their athleticism. They train for
* months to race to the finish and
hope to receive the first-place
prize.
Yet this year's Our Country
Day 5k was much different.
Mayor Mary Lou Hildreth
sounded the signal to start the
race and runners began the 3.1-
mile journey through the streets
of downtown Keystone Heights.
In less than 20 minutes, rac-
ers were nearing the finish line.
Three young men were the first
to approach the finish line. As
they came into clear view, the
onlooking crowd cheered. Then
the three runners linked arms to
cross the finish line together.
SThey were not interested in
getting the spotlight recogni-
tion or winning the race. Their
camaraderie was inspiring and
symbolized the efforts needed to
make the race a success. Just like
the three young men working to-
gether as a team, our county, city


and community members came
together, arm in arm, to make
the 5K possible. It was the as-
sistance of the city of Keystone
Heights, Clay County Sheriff's
Office, Clay County Fire Rescue
and Emergency Management,
Keystone Heights Volunteer
Fire Department and the 30-
plus community volunteers that
helped make it a safe event for
all involved. Kiwanis of theLake
Region would like to extend its
sincere gratitude to all the local
businesses that sponsored the
race with financial or in-kind
contributions.
As the annual fundraiser for
Kiwanis of the Lake Region, all
proceeds from the Our Country
Day 5K will return to the local
community. Lake Area Minis-
tries, Terrific Kids, Pack-a-sack
lunches and other community
programs are supported through
the funding received from the
5k. Runners also wanted local
residents recognized for their
support of the races homeown-
ers lined the streets while hand-
ing bottles of water to racers as
they passed along the route. This
is the type of community support
and camaraderie that makes Key-
stone Heights such a great place
to live. We look forward to an
even better 5K event next year.
We would also like to thank all
the media outlets that publicized
the race.
Sincerely,
Heather Henderson
Lake Region Kiwanis
5K chair


-


Beverly and Paul Creighton

Creightons renew vows on 50th


Beverly and Paul Creighton of
Lawtey are celebrating their 50th
anniversary by renewing their
wedding vows on Aug. 10 at
Highland Baptist Church.


Beverly (Cruise) Creighton
is from Hinckley, Ohio. Paul
Creighton is from Lodi, Ohio.
They have seven children.


Tina and Michael Wilkerson


Wilkersons celebrate 20 years


July 17, 1993.
"There's no love like -your
love and no other could give
more love."


Barbara and Edward Carter


Carters celebrate 50 years


Tonya Moody works the cash register during lunch
rush.


DINING
Continued from 2B
Stevens left to tackle other
challenges after approximately a
year. A year later, Rapoza came
on board. Most days, at least
one of the siblings can be found
at the restaurant before, during
and after business hours.
Snider takes pride in the
use of the freshest possible
ingredients .and the fact that
almost everything on the menu
is prepared from scratch. Such
Preparation takes time, so Snider
said she arrives at work around
2:30 a.m. each morning to begin
preparing the day's culinary
offerings.'
"Customers generally start*
Strickling in around 4 a.m., and
they get coffee and wait to eat
until I open at 5 a.m.,"' Snider
said.
There are specials each day
and breakfast is served all day.
The smoked ham breakfast is a
big favorite, with marty people
carrying _part of the plate-sized
sirv ng-ihome in a box, in which
Snider has placed a couple of
bisduits for later munching.
Another popular menu offering
'-.:Ts Friday's prime rib dinner, and
J the hamburgers are always in
" .demand.
"We patty out '.at least 50
pounds of hamburger a week to
meet the demand," Snider said.
Desserts are another area
of customer satisfaction at
Grannies. Selections are


blueberry/cherry pie, peanut
butter pie and peach cobbler; all
made from scratch.
"This place is like a church,"
Snider said. "People come
together, walk around and shake
hands. It's a place to meet, greet
and socialize."
Rapoza said he. finds his
greatest satisfaction ii seeing
repeat customers, both on a
daily basis and those who travel
occasionally from surrounding
areas.
"I'm thankful for ourregulars,
as well as our core group of
employees," Rapoza said.
'"These two groups are the ones
that make this place a success. I
can come in in the morning and
see the same faces, sitting at
'their' tables in 'their' chairs and
it's like an extended family."
The Grannie's family
includes servers Joann Wheeler
(10 years), Charlotte Thornton
(seven years), Cathy Baker
(five years), Diane Hittell
(eight years), Tonya Moody
(two years) and Christina
Demar (four years). Future
Grannie Cali Rodgers (Snider's
granddaughter) can be found on
hand occasionally, celebrating
her recent graduation from
pre-K and greeting customers
like an old pro.
Grannie's is open Sunday
through Tuesday from 5 a.m.
until 2 p.m., Wednesday,
Thursday and Saturday from
5 a.m. until 7 p.m., and Friday
from 5 a.m. until 8 p.m.


Exactly to the date, local cou-
ple Edward and Barbara Carter
of Lake Butler were honored
with a reception for their 501h
wedding anniversary on July 14.
They were originally married
in 1963 at Harmony Free Will
Baptist Church of Lake But-
ler. The celebration, held at the
Worthington Springs Commu-
nity Center, was hosted by their
children.
As lifelong residents of Union
County, the Carters have had
a strong presence in Lake But-


ler as the owners of Barbara's


Flowers arid Gifts for the past 35
years.
Over the course of the past
50 years, the Carters have been
blessed with three beautiful
daughters--Pamila Carter and
Kenny Higginbotham, Del and
Michael Federico, and Barbara
Ann and Charles Zipperer-and
four grandchildren-Aaron Bar-
ber, Andrew Barber, James Cart-
er and Katie Zipperer.
The Carters would like to
thank their family and friends
for celebrating this monumental
milestone with them.


Frazier enlists Kennedy set


in Navy
Civilian Laqwan D. Frazier,
son of Idella D. and Harold
Chandler of Starke, recently en-
listea in the United States Navy
under the delayed entry program
at Navy Recruiting District,
Jacksonville.
The program allows recruits
to enter the Navy and take up to
one year to complete prior com-
mitments such as high school.
Using recruiters as mentors, this
program helps recruits ease into
the transition from civilian to
military life.
Frazier will report for active
duty to undergo basic training at
the Navy's Recruit Training Cen-
ter in Great Lakes, 111.
Frazier is a 2013 graduate of
Bradford High School.


HISTORY
Continued from 2B

a play about Starke performed
at the Hippodrome Theater in.
Gainesville a few years ago.
The building was enlarged
in 1980 and continued as the
Branding .Iron .Restaurant
continued serving thee public
until late in that decade wlhen the
name changed to Little Skeeters.
J.D. Odom died in 1995 and the
ownership of the building passed
to his son, John.
John Odom remodeled the
building in 1997 and it became
a Bono's Barbeque restaurant for
several years. The building then
served a short term as a Sushi
restaurant (less than a year)
before closing for about a year
before it became the home of
Grannie's in March 2003.




Iml llil
C i OM ll [i. ,


for Navy basic
Civilian Yashica N. Kennedy,
daughter of Lisa M. Kennedy of
Starke, and Clifford E. Harmon
of Starke, recently enlisted in
the United States Navy under the
delayed entry program at Navy
Recruiting District, Jacksonville.
The program allows recruits
to enter the Navy and take up to
one year to complete prior com-
mitments such as high school.
Using recruiters as mentors, this
program helps recruits ease into
the transition from civilian to
military life.
Kennedy will report for active
duty to undergo basic training at
the Navy's Recruit Training Cen-
ter in Great Lakes, 111.
Kennedy is a 2004 graduate of
Bradford High School.


Mike, you, are an exceptional
husband and father, and my love
grows more every day.
Love, your wife, Tina.


HOMEOWNERS INSURANCE
'lnr-l i S t-rewer


LIFE

AUTO

HOME


RETIREMENT
DROP


386-496-2271
Specializing in
SCHOOL and PUBLIC EMPLOYEES


MUL July 26th, 2013
Items available include:
Pool Table, Fishing Trips.
Oil Changes. Whole Hog, Fill Dirt.
Recliner. Gift Cards from Local
Businesses & MUCH MORE!
Still accepting item donations.


(he care and iell(ei(iH o youw elders
I is vefti important to the sta4 at


Asted Living Facilityde

1Assisted Living Facility


YOUR DECISION REGARDING WHO WILL HELP
CARE FOR YOUR LOVED ONE IS IMPORTANT




Our room rate is $2,650 per month

for all aspects of our care.
*Assessment of each individual's needs and abilities is requireH before admitting.


Located in Downtown Starke
* Next to Wainwright Park
Coall Cathey Pitts. Administrator, For Directions ,

(904) 964-2220


The Grannle's sign' Is designed from a picture of
6ivner Pam Snider's borther-in-law's grandmother.


4B


MEMOMMEM&N,


'A IP


a ,.'
":,.I':


'_:r5-






;,.'*^**.*









THURSDAY, JULY 18, 2013 TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR B SECTION 1


Clint Sheppard and Justin McClellan with their
winning catch at the July 10 Joey Tyson Bald Eagle
tournament.


Tournament
results, bass
excitement
and John
McFarland .
One thing Tropical Storm
Chantal did was to motivate
- weather forecasters to predict ar
active storm season. Apparently
most of the years that had three
Storms by this time of the year
had active storm seasons.
The. rain we have experience
so far has been generous with the
Local water levels and kind to the
fish bite. If continued rains were
to raise the water levels of those(
lakes that sit atop Trail Ridge
it would make a lot of people
happy, but, hopefully, it will not
be at the expense of those, in th(
Slowver-lying areas.
S Regardless of the.'collatpraj
impact, the clouds and rain have
tempered the heat and provide


a good environment for the local
fish population.

Bass tournament
results
SThe July 10 Joey Tysbn Bald
Eagle tournament results were as
follows:
First place and big fish-
SClint Sheppard and Justin
McClellan;
S Second place-Chris
SKadlec and Josh Wisham;
Third place-Glen Barnes
r and David Barnes.
The July 11 Sampson Lake
J tournament results were as
e follows:,
e First place-Zack Smith
e and Mike Clemons;
-Second place-Mike
Christie Jimimy Thomas; ,
Third place-Eddie Smith
and Dillon Crews;
Fourth place-Curt'* and
SKeith Corsorj.

Bass fishing


excitement
What is it about bass fishing
that gets an avid fisherman so
excited? Maybe it. is the heavy
pull of a large fish, or perhaps it is
the way they will bust the water's
surface, launch themselves out
of the water and then savagely
shake their heads in an effort to
dislodge the hook.
One thing for sure, a bass
hookup will get fishermen going,
and the accompanying photo of
Darrell Kennington and Craig
Haight trying to land a nice one
well illustrates the point.

John McFarland
Taxidermy
SJohn McFarland has been an
avid hunter and fisherman since
She got hooked on the outdoors
with his grandfather. Today,
when he is not working in his
taxidermy shop, he is most likely
with some of his four kids in the


SFins, Fur
& Tails
By Mickey Agner-


I LEFT: Zack
Smith and
ij Mike Clemons
take first place
and big fish
S at the July 11
Sampson open
S tournament.
BELOW LEFT:
Cody Black
S displays a
A nice catch at
the Bald Eagle
tournament.


woods or on the water..
McFarland was a welder and
fabricator for approximately 20
years until he sustained an arm
injury. At that point, he invested
40 hours into taxidermy training,
and since 2003, he has owned
his own shop.
Taxidermy skill development
was easy for McFarland because
he always had an interest in
art, especially air brushing. His
attraction to hunting and fishing
and his art skills were a natural
combination, and he has owned
his own business and been
.productive for the last 10 years.
He does not try to specialize
in any certain type of work. He
has mounted deer heads, fish,
turkeys, small mammals, snakes
and even bears. He tries really
hard to create an attractive
background and environment for
the mounts.
McFarland does a lot of
work with the Florida Fish
and Wildlife Conservation
Commission. He is currently
mounting a fox squirrel and
a skunk for the commission,
and he has all the licenses to


John
McFarland, in
a corner of his
shop, displays
several of
his finished
taxidermy
projects. He
has mounted
a number'
of animals,
including
deer, fish, J
turkeys, small
mammals,
snakes and
bears.


work with protected animal
species. He also has a number of
deer from the previous hunting
season that he is still working
on.
As a father of four children,
McFarland tries to stay active
in community educational
events. He is currently on the
community board at McRae
Elementary School. He has
volunteered for the Boy Scouts
and the Florida Youth Challenge
Academy at Camp Blanding.
For the past three years,
McFarland has been active in
taxidermy completion evefits. In
2008, he won the People's
Choice Awvard. In 2009, he
won the award for best bass
painting, and in 2011, he won
the Challenge of Arts Award
for a diamondback rattlesnake
mount. During the same time,
he has won 52 ribbons for his
competitive entries. I
McFarland's shop is! located


just northeast of Keystone
Heights off of Highway 21,
and his website is www.
johnmcfarland.com.
Until next week, stay cool and
.keep your lines tight.

Outdoors calendar
Joey Tyson/Bald Eagle Bait
and Tackle bass tournaments at
Santa Fe Lake every Wednesday,
with the classic scheduled for
Aug.7;
Sampson Lake tournaments
every Thursday;
July 8, new moon;
July 22, full moon.
ff you' have a story, idea or
photo' to share, please contact
Mickey Agner via e-mail at mka@
maoutdoors.com, or by phone
at 904-964-1488. Photos may
also be submitted in person at
Sthe.Bradford .County Telegraph,
Union CounIty Times or Lake
Region Monitor.


ll


ALL WATER SOFTENER& i
REVERSE OSMOSIS DRINKING
SYSTEMS ON SALE NOW,,


PROTECTYOUR HOME FROM HARD < "
WATER, BAD TASTING WATER ,ODdR.-
L 'o .1 '. ,


I Giving familiess and women the helping hand they need...


BH APOl! niaCeSrsureB BTu
Thie Adoption Aurlhont stands out as a< result of its man y years ofekperieiic,!aqnc a goefk-sional.apprdach.
Our knowif dgee nd individual services ar'e sure toii~~syn ;:1,


come find out for yourself! '


Craig Haight and Darrell Kennington eagerly try to
land a nice bass at the trestle landing.


11


IN,'-


jil









6B TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR B SECTION THURSDAY, JULY 18, 2013


//RIE /


Recent arrests
in Bradford,
Clay or Union
The following individuals
wvere arrested recently by
local law enforcement officers
in Bradford, Union or/Clay
(Keystone Heights area)
Counties:

Ann Marie Aguiar, 46, of
Jacksonville was arrested July
12 by Lawtey police for an out-
of-county warrant.

Faustino Altamirano, 29, of
White Springs was arrested July
13 by Bradford deputies for
driving a motor, vehicle without
a valid license.
Leon Alexander Jr., 53, of
Raiford was arrested July I1I by
Union deputies for driving with
a suspended, revoked, canceled
or disqualified license.
Calvin Andrew Anderson, 27,
of Eastover, S.C., was arrested
July 14 by Waldo police for
keeping or maintaining a
vehicle or structure to keep
or sell controlled substances,
possession of drug paraphernalia,
carrying or using a weapon
while committing a felony and
possession of marijuana.

Lincoln Bernard Asa Ball, 23,
of Starke was arrested July 15 by
Bradford deputies for an. out-of-
county warrant.
Jason Wayne Barker, 36, of
Ocala was arrested July 10 by
Bradford deputies for DUI.
James William Barnes, 19,
of Starke was arrested July 14
by 'Bradford deputies for two
probation violations.

Martin Paul Beckstrom, 33, of
Hampton was arrested July 14
by Bradford deputies for an opt-
Sof-county warrant.
Travis James Brendle, 31, of
Starke was arrested July 13 by
Bradford deputies for possession
of drug equipment, possession
of burglary tools, vehicle theft,
criminal mischief with property
Damage and larceny.
Randy Allen Chesser, 32,. of
Starke was arrested July 9 by
Starke police for' larceny. He
was also arrested July 12 by
Bradford deputies for loitering,
possession of drug equipment
and possession of cocaine.
Charles Glenn Childress, 29,
of Lake Butler.was arrested July
13 by Union deputies for two
counts of battery.
Miguel Angel Cruz, 36, of
Dade City was arrested July 13
by Bradford deputies for driving
with a suspended,' revoked,
canceled or disqualified license.

Rory Jay Cummings, 32, of
Jacksonville was arrested July
12 by Bradford deputies for
possession of marijuana.

Eddie Bernard Duggan, 25, of
Starke was arrested July 12 by
Bradford deputies for possession
of marijuana. .
Raymond D. Findlay, 56, of
Gainesville was arrested July
15 by Bradford deputies for
possession of drug equipment.
David Foglesong, 38, of


Lake Butler was arrested July
10 by Clay deputies for failure
to appear, trafficking in cocaine
and possession of Ecstasy.
Timothy John Fox, 24, of "
Starke was arrested July 14
by Bradford deputies deputies
for driving with a suspended,
revoked,canceled ordisqualified
license.
Andrew Scott Fulkerson, 28,
of Starke was arrested July 10 by
Bradford deputies for extortion
and fraud-impersonation.

Ryan Ashley Gaskins, 33, of
Lake Butler was arrested July
12 by Union deputies for a
probation violation.

Daryl Ray Geer, 40, of Lake
Butler was arrested July 11 by
Starke police for a probation
violation.
Caleb Raphael Greene, 25, of
Starke was arrested July 12 by
Bradford deputies for possession
of marijuana.
Renda M. Hankerson, 33, was
arrested July 15 by Bradford
deputies" for withholding
support.
-Gabriel John Hindrieth, 27, of
Lawtey was arrested July 13 by
Starke police for trespassing.
Craig W. Hollen, 51, of
Middleburg was arrested July 11
by Starke police for possession
of marijuana and driving with a
suspended, revoked, canceled or
disqualified license.
William Huffman, 55, of
Keystone Heights was arrested
July 10 by Clay deputies for
petit theft and on July 12 by
Clay deputies for a. probation
violation."
Richardlyn B. Jamison, 19,
of Starke was arrested. July 9 by
Starke police for burglary and
larceny.
Prentis Lynn Jefferson, 34, of
Lake Butler was arrested July 13
by Union deputies for disorderly
intoxication.

Dylan Christopher Jones,
18, of Starke was arrested July
9 by Bradford deputies for-
larceny, burglary and destroying ,
evidence.

Javaris Eugene Kates, 22, of
Starke was arrested July 11 by
Starke police for two counts
of possession of marijuana and
two counts of selling marijuana.

Antonio Antwayn Lott, 20,
of Starke was arrested July 15
by Starke police for a probation
violation.
Tom Marks, 61, of Starke was
arrested July 14 by Bradford
deputies for failure to appear.
Jeanetta Quantana
Merrwether, 26, of Starke was
arrested July 15' by Starke
police for driving with a
suspended, revoked, canceled
or disqualified license.

Jeff Allen Mesker, 30, of
Jacksonville was -arrested July
13 by Bradford deputies for DUI
and possession of marijuana.
Trevor Lavell Mitchefji77,
of Starke was arrested 4uEy 14
.by Branford deputies for.failure
to appear. .....' -


Kristina Lee Osborne, 43, of
Starke was arrested July 14 by
Bradford deputies for disorderly
intoxication.
Jaime Lynn Pugh, 53, of Lake
Butler was arrested July 12 by
Starke police for driving with a
suspended, revoked, canceled or
disqualified license.
Marice Randolph Quinten, 30,
of St. Petersburg was arrested
July 11 by Union deputies for
aggravated battery.

Homayoun Rafati, 53,
of Keystone Heights was
arrested July 10 by Bradford
deputies for two counts of fraud-
insufficient funds check.

Joseph Bernard Ray, 40, of
Jacksonville was arrested July
11 by Bradford deputies for
selling cocaine and possession
of cocaine.
Joseph Allen Robbins, 30, of
Lawtey was arrested July 15 by
Bradford deputies for driving
with 'a suspended, revoked,
canceled or disqualified
license, -possession of a
controlled substance without a
prescription and possession of
drug equipment.
Corey Allen Robinett, 34, of
Keystone Heights was arrested
July 9 by Bradford deputies for
a nonmoving traffic violation.

Catherine Sanders, 30, of
Keystone Heights was arrested
July 9 by Clay deputies for
grand theft.
John Franklin Sanford, 45,
of Starke was arrested July 11
by Starke police for an out-of-
county warrant.

Stacy Shwind, 43, of
Keystone Heights was arrested
July 13 by Clay deputies for
DUL. .

* Michael Troy Shaw, 42, of
Waldo was arrested July 9 by
Starke police for dealing in
stolen property.

Quandrell Xavier Steele, 20,
of Worthington Springs was
arrested July 11 by Bradford
deputies for two probation
violations.


Charles A. Swafford, 58, of
Starke was arrested July 15 by
Bradford deputies for possession
of marijuana and possession of a7
controlled substance without a
prescription.
Robert Allen Thomas, 25, of
Starke was arrested July 9 by
Bradford deputies for failure to
appear
Brooke L. Thurman, 21, of
Keystone Heights was arrested
July 13 by Bradford deputies for
larceny and vehicle theft.
Artez Keion Wards, 19, of
Jacksonville was arrested July
12 by Branford deputies for
possession of marijuana.
Craig Wheaton, 33, of
Keystone Heights was arrested
July 15 by Clay deputies for
being a fugitive from justice.


De'jwon Kristofe Williams,
21, of Lawtey was arrested
July 10 by Starke police for
disturbing the peace.
Joshua Williams, 21, of
Keystone Heights was arrested


RR-User
Building P rd I nc.


July 10 by Clay deputies for
trespassing.
Marquise Rashad Williams,
18, of Lake Butler was arrested
July 12 by Bradford deputies for
failure to appear.


HOURS:
Mon-Fri 10-5:30
Sal 10-3


"WE BUY & SELL NEW and
USED BUILDING MATERIALS!!!"


Charley Johns



Conference Center

US 301 North Starke, FL 32091


904-964-5278


The Tourist Development Committee has broken down

ways to let our community enjoy the conference center

and rent part of the facility for different occasions.

\ ~ ,.-"- \


You can rent...

* A conference room for business meetings for a

afternoon or several days. We can arrange the

communication ties.



* The main auditorium, which includes the stage, altar,

chairs, or tables and chairs.



* Grounds can be used for training demos, or cart sales.


A short drive to Macclenny could SAVE you Plenty!
MACCLENNY MOWER AND SAW,'INC.
821-A South 6th Street, Macclenny, FL 32063
Tel: 904.259-2248
Hours: Mon-Fri 8:30am 5:30pm *Sat 8:00am 3:00pm *Sunday Closed
IPower Equipment Sales Service & Parts
NOW CARRYING HUSQVARNA!
Zero Turn Mowers
SWeedeaters Chainsaws
Husqvarna and Morel


Authorized Dealer of
WE SHUSUIER@ ADIxanMDS
WE SERVICE ALL MAKES AND MODELS.


q f 7"


starkeBournal^c



Readall bou it.. Th aras ltes
criMmes, nws, o its ad tes you

cano getanyher ele n tewrld.'


If ou an tokno wat' hapeing in
^B~itheBarea subscribe to


starkjournal^^co


*jjI Zeo eren ina~ii~inci~ng ith approvd credit








THURSDAY, JULY 18, 2013 TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR B SECTION /B



_il-------e--


Thomas Ard
KEYSTONE HEIGHTS-
Thomas Larry Ard, 64, of Keystone
Heights died at his home with his
family by his side, Saturday, July
13, 2013, from complications of a
stroke he had earlier.
He was born in Foley, Ala.,
Feb. 26, 1949, to the late Thomas
Ellis and Maybelle (Douglas) Ard.
He retired as senior chief from
the United States Navy following
.21 years of service; he was also a
system data analyst with the Navy,
which was followed by six years
"of employment with the Bradford
County Sheriff's Office. In 1986,
he moved to Keystone Heights,
where he later became a member of
Freedom Baptist Church.
He is survived by: his wife of 33
years, Donna (Rigdon); his children,
George (Deana) Thomas Bishop of
Marietta, Ga., Wendi Lee (Donald)
Gross of Jacksonville, N.C., Ellis
Devin Ard of Keystone Heights
and Sara Belle (Matt) Teague of
Melrose; siblings Christopher Lynn
(Robbie) Ard of Lebanon, Tenn.,
Charles Barry (Cheryl) Ard and Lisa
(Bo) Roberts, both of Jacksonville,
and Kindle Geiger of Loxley, Ala.;
and six grandchildren.
A memorial service was held July
17 at Freedom Baptist Church with
full military honors following the
service.
Arrangements are under the care
of Jones-Gallagher Funeral Home
of Keystone Heights.

















Sophie Brown
Sophie Brown
LAKELAND- Sophie C.
Brown, 85, of Lakeland died
Wednesday, July 10, 2013, at Palm
Terrace Lakeland, following an
extended illness.
Born in Green Cove Springs on
July 26, 1927, she moved to Stanke
from Green Cove, Springs, and
then moved to Lakeland for health
reasons. She was a homemaker and
also worked at Camp Blanding.
She attended Mt. Moriah United
Methodist Church of Starke. She
received her education at Dunbar
High School of Clay County.
She is survived by: brother Leroy
(Mercedes) Coleman; and sister
Dorothy Coleman of Green Cove


1. PRESSURE CLEANING
2. PAINTING
3.CARPENTRY
4. TIlE
5. DECKS
6. WOOD ROT REPAIR
7. DRYWALL


Springs. She was preceded in death
by her daughter, Carrie DeSue.
Funeral services will be held at
2:30 p.m. on Saturday, July 20, at
Mt. Moriah Community Methodist
Church of Starke, with Bishop
Chancey King serving as eulogist
and Rev. Gloria Cox officiating.
Interment will be held at Bob Love
Cemetery in the Peasant Gove
community under the direction of
Hale Funeral Home Inc. A viewing
wilb held on Friday, July 19 from
4 p.m. until 5 p.m. for family and
from 6 p.m. until 7 p.m. for friends.
Family will meet at the home of
Harriet Young at 1018 Manassa St.
at 2 p.m.

Billie Cannon
JACKSONVILLE-Billie Mae
Cannon, 92, of -Jacksonville and
formerly of Keystone Heights died
on Saturday, July 13,2013.
She was born in Inman, S.C.,
on Jan. 30, 1921, to the late
Stanyamrne and Fannie Irene
(Cothran) Wilson. She was a state
registered nurse at Jacksonville
City Health Department. In 1972,
she moved to Keystone Heights,
where she continued her career as
a state registered nurse, working
at the Bradford County Health
Department for 7.5 years and for
Florida State Prison for 11 years.
She was a member of University
Baptist Church in Jacksonville.
She was preceded in death by: her
husband, Robert Earl Cannon; and
siblings Frank Brittain, Ruby Luke
and Lula B. Melton.
She is survived by: son Robert
Earl (Susan) Luke; brother
Larry (Judy) Brittain, and two
grandchildren.
There will be a graveside service
Saturday, July 20, at Roselawn
Memorial Gardens in Inman, S.C.
Local arrangements are under
the care of Jones-Gallagher Funeral
Home of Keystone Heights.

Willie Daniels
TAMPA-Willie Mae Mitchell
Daniels, 90, of Tampa died June 25,'
2013, at her residence.
She was born in Marianna and
later moved to Georgia with her
husband, Otis Jr., who preceded
her in death. Later, she moved to
Tampa with her daughter and joined
St. John Progressive Missionary
Baptist Church.
She is survived by: seven
children, Eugene (Melvenia)
Daniels of Oklahoma City, Otis
(Jeanette) Daniels Jr. of Albany,
Ga., Pearlie (Dan) Clark of Tampa,
Joann Harlem of Atlanta, Charles
(Ester) Daniels of Beaufort, S.C.,
Diape (Osei) Adoma of Atlanta,
and Lucien (Amelia) Mitchell of
Indianapolis, Ind.; 17 grandchildren;
and 31 great-grandchildren.
Funeral services were. held
on July 6 at Macedonia Baptist
Church in Hampton, with Rev. J.B
Richardson conducting the services.


ANDERSON


MARGARETANDERSON
Family Law & Will Preparation
30 years experience
Margaret will continue to serve clients
in Alachua County as well as
Bradford & Union counties I
1011 N. Temple Ave. Starke. FL
(US 301 North)
ph


8. LAMINATE
9. HARDIE SIDING
10. WOOD FENCES
11. PERGOLAS
12. LAWN MAINTENANCE
13. TRACTOR WORK
14. YARD CLEANUP
15. SOD I MULCH


Complete Home Care With Just One Call!
Dependable & Trustworthy

Now accepting major credit cards VISA
R.J. 352-318-4060 or Josh 352-258-1046


Interment was held at Hampton
Cemetery under the direction of
Haile Funeral Home Inc. of Starke.


Jean Delo


Jean Delo
KEYSTONE HEIGHTS-Jean
Delo (nee Barnes) of Keystone
Heights died on Monday, July 15,
'2013, in Falls Church, Va. She was
86.
Jean was born in Barnes, Pa., on
Nov. 17, 1926, and was preceded in
death by her parents, Roy and Leda
Caughey Barnes, and her brother
Jack Barnes.
Jean grew up in Erie, Pa., and
attended Millcreek High School.
She met and married Ray Delo when
they were both employed at General
Telephone Company. Their careers
led them briefly to California and
also to Oil City, Pa., Marion, Ohio,
and York, Pa. Her three sons all
graduated college and settled into
their careers with their families.
Mike (Vicki) lives in Marlton, NJ.,
while Jerry (Ann) and Jeff (Donna)
both reside in Arlington, Va.
Jean felt the pull of history and
family tradition when, in 1994, she
moved to Keystone Heights. In
the 1920s, her father had worked
to help lay out the town, and later,
her mother and father met and were
married there. She treasured the golf
course that had been surveyed by her
father and she eventually had two
different homes built adjacent to the
golf course. Jean joined Community
Church, where her grandfather
Edwin Caughey had been a charter
member and her aunt Elizabeth
Caughey had worshipped in the '70s
and '80s.
Jean's retirement years were
richly enjoyed and shared with many
close friends. Her days were spent
caring for her home and giving back
to her community and her friends,
whom she loved dearly. She was a
dedicated volunteer who worked
tirelessly for her churches and the
Lake Area Ministries food bank. She
also enjoyed playing bridge and golf
and was a member of the Keystone
Heights Golf and Country Club. Jean
became an'ardent and knowledgeable
fan of the Florida Gators sports teams
(much to the chagrin of her Nittany
Lion sons, daughters-in-law and
grandchildren). She loved listening
to music, especially the Gaithers
vocal band, Jones Radio and the
musie at Trinity Baptist Church in
Keystone Heights, where she found
her most recent church home and
became a member in 2011.
Besides her parents and brother,
Jean was preceded in death by: her
grandson Michael; her brother-in-
law Chuck Grappy; her stepmother,
Edith (Griffey) Barnes; her nephew
David; and her ex-husband, Ray.
Along with her sons and
daughters-in-law, Jean is survived


James Andrews
In loving memory of
James Andrews
June 5, 1952 to
July 19, 2011
It has been two years
now since God called you
home, and you answered
his call. It has not been
the same without you. We
have grieved deeply of
your passing. We wait for
the day to see you again.
We find comfort in God's
word. Revelation 21:4-5
says, "And God shall wipe
away all tears from their
eyes; and there shall be
no more death, neither
sorrow, nor crying, neither
shall there be any more
pain: for the former things
are passed away. And he
that sat upon the throne
said, behold, I make all
things new."
We wait for this day. We
love you and we miss you
so much.
Love you
Sandy, Joseph and Kacee


by: her grandchildren, Kristin (Dan)
Delo of Berkeley, Calif., Christine
(Kevin) Lydic of Marlton, N.J., and
Devin and Katie Delo of Arlington,
Va. She is also survived by: her
sister, Betty Grappy; nephew Steve
Grappy of Erie, Pa.; sister-in-law
Fran Barnes of Chanhassen, Minn.;
nieces Dee, Janice, Colleen and
Kathleen, also of Minnesota, and
their children and grandchildren.
Jean moved to Virginia on
Memorial Day in 2013 to be closer
to her three sons and grandchildren.
She spent a particularly joyous
day with her extended family on
June 1 at the wedding of her oldest
grandchild, Kristin.
SA memorial service will be held
at Trinity Baptist Church on a date
yet to be determined, followed
by interment at Keystone Heights
Cemetery. In lieu of flowers,
please send donations to Lake Area
Ministries in Keystone Heights (131
N.E. Commercial Circle, Keystone
Heights, FL 32656) or to a charity of
your choice.
PAID OBITUARY


Kevin Hamm
Kevin Hamm
MIAMI-Kevin Hamm Sr., 49,
died on Wednesday, July 10, 2013,
in Miami, where he resided.
He was born on Nov. 20, 1963,
in Starke. He was a graduate of
Bradford High School and was a
member of Pleasant Grove United
Methodist Church. He was preceded
in death by: his parents, Willie
Hamm and Jessie Mae Hagan; and
a sister, Earlene Hagan.
He is survived by: sons Kevin
Hamm Jr., Devon Hamm and
Terrance Murray; daughter Sharese
Hamm of Miami; and siblings Annie
Mae Hagan, Mary Mosley, John
Mosley, Linda Leggett, Carl Hamm,
Harriett Hamm,' Kelvin Hamm,
Ermnna Hamm-Bell, Valarie Hamm-
Pittman and Sharie Hankerson-
Johnson.
Funeral services will be held
on Saturday, July 20, at True Vine
Outreach Ministries in Starke, at 11
a.m. Interment will follow at Bob
Love Cemetery in Starke. Visitation
will be held at True Vine Outreach
Ministries on Friday, July 19, from
4 p.m. until 7 p.m. The cortege will
form at the home of Ms. Harriett
Hamm of (Pleasant Grove) Starke.

Thomas Hardin
STARKE-Thomas Lawrence
Hardin, 70, of Starke died Friday,
June 21,2013, at the VA Hospital in
Gainesville.
He was born In San Diego July
14, 1942, to the late Lawrence V.
and Mildred Stover Hardin. He was
a Bradford High School graduate,
attended South Georgia College and
the University of Florida, and served
in the United States Navy. He was
a member of First Presbyterian


Elizabeth Frazier
RAIFORD-Elizabeth Frazier
of Raiford died on Thursday, July
11, 2013, at North Florida Regional
Medical Center in Gainesville.
Born in Bradenton, she was a
member of'Greater Freewill Baptist
Church of Raiford. She was a
homemaker and lifelong resident of
Raiford.
She is survived by: her husband,
Nathaniel Frazier of Raiford; sons
James Frazier of Tampa, Terrance
Frazier, Derrick (Dionna) Frazier of
Surprise, Ariz,, Reggie Frazier and
Darryl Colbert; daughters Lakesha
(Adrian) Chandler of Raiford and
Ukenia Frazier of Ocala; sister
Joretha Sumpter of Gainesville;
and brother Herman Williams of Ft.
Myers.
Funeral services will be held
at 9 a.m. on Saturday, July 20, at
Greater Freewill Baptist Church
in Raiford, with Rev. Henderson
Hudson conducting the services.
Interment will be held at Five Saplin
Cemetery in Raiford, under the
direction of Haile Funeral Home
Inc. of Starke. Visitation will be
held on Friday, July 19, at the Carl
D, Haile Memorial Chapel from
5 p.m. until 6 p.m. for family and
from 6 p.m. until 7 p.m. for friends.
The cortege will form at the home
of Nathaniel Frazier at 22463 N.E.
149"1 in Raiford at 8:30 a.m.


Mon-Sat 9-6
Wrangler Levi
Boots Hats Buckles

S We do
Layawaysi
I.)B


904-368-0687 |
904-368-0689 f


A Same Day Appliance Repair ^.
Family Owned/Operated
One Call Does It All .
We Service All Major Brands of 1
Household Appliances
Gainesville & all surrounding areas
904-396-9500 352-338-3600
SameDayRepairGainesville.com


LEWIS WALKER BOOFIN lI C.


ua lan eel Bet Service-~uaanted elestWamnpUes

Guaranteed Best Prices
Roof Leaks Re-Roofs Shingles Metal
Low Slopes Mobile Homes Commercial -.
Lifetime Roofs Rotten Wood Replacement
Free Estimates Locally Owned www.LewisWalkerRoofing.com
Licensed
&Insu (386) 496-0940 RC0067442


R&J's MAINTENANCE SERVICE, LLC
R.J. Mitzel and Josh Hollingsworth
"HOME REPAIR & LAWN MAINTENANCE"


Charles Custom Memorials
Serving Families in North Florida since 1973



g r 31N~t, S k J~ as etWei) 90-964201


Primary Location in Lake City at 561 NW Hilton Ave.
w w. charlesmonuments. cornm

The area's largest supplier of Colored Granite

When Quality Counts, You Can Count On Us
Member of Better Business Bureau
Monument Builders of North America, Florida Monument Builders FL Lie. # F037700


Church.
He is survived by: two sons,
Thomas Lawrence Hardin II of
Chamblee, Ga., and James William
Hardin of St. Augustine Beach; a
sister, Sarah Hardin Hester of Cairo,
Ga.; grandson Jacob Tyler Hardin
of Callahan; and a granddaughter,
Makinzie Jane Hardin of St.
Augustine Beach.
He is an anatomical donor to the
University of Florida, College of
Medicine.
There is no memorial service
scheduledat this time.
Arrangements are under the
care of Moring Funeral Home of
Melrose.
PAID OBITUARY

Hugo Liscio
MELROSE-Hugo Ferrir Liscio
97, of Melr6se died Thursday,
July 11, 2013, at Shands at Starke
Regional Medical Center.
He was born in Bridgeport,
Conn., March 11, 1916, to the late
Carlo and Egle (Fedeli) Liscio. He
served in the United States Army
during World War II, and prior to
his retirement, he worked for Perk
Up Coffee. He was of the Methodist
faith and was a member of American
Legion Post 64 in Okeechobee prior
to moving to Keystone Heights in
1996, when he joined AMVErS
Post 86.
He was preceded in death by:
daughter Linda Liscio Leigh;
brother Paul P. Liscio; and sister
Louise Ruck.
He is survived by: his wife of 73
years, Jane Phyllis (Larkin); sons
Leroy (Candace) Liscio of Marietta,
Ga., and Alan D. (Sandra) Liscio of
Fort Pierce; and six grandchildren.
Arrangements are under the care
of Jones-Gallagher Funeral Home of
Keystone Heights.

Sennitha Morris
STARKE-Sennitha Morris, 55,
of Starke, died Monday, July 15,
2013, at her residence.
Born in Gainesville, she was a
member of Greater Allen Chapel
Church of Starke, where she was a
Sunday school teacher. She was a
graduate of Bradford High School.
She is survived by: her husband,
Joseph Morris of Starke; son
Jeremiah Boswell; daughters Tonya
Morris and Chiquita Morris, both of
Jacksonville; sisters Sharon James
and Barbara Staten of Starke and
Linda West of Gainesville; brothers
Charles Woods, James Woods and
Joe Woods, all of Starke; and four
grandchildren.
Funeral services will be held at
12:30 p.m. on Saturday, July 20, at
Greater Allen Chapel Church, with
Rev. Cynthia Bailey conducting the
services. Interment will be held at
Oddfellow Cemetery Starke under
the direction of Haile Funeral Home
of Starke. Visitation will be held on
Friday, July 19, at the Carl D. Haile
Memorial Chapel from 2 p.m. until
3 p.m. 'for family. The cortege will
form at the home of Joseph Morris
on July-20 at noon.

Ruth Underwood
HAMPTON-Ruth Caroline
Underwood, 75, of Hampton, died
on Saturday, July 13, 2013, at
Shands Starke Regional Medical
Center with family by her side.
She was born in New Bedford,
Mass., on Aug. 21, 1937, to the late.
Harold Scott Norcross and Sarah
Adel Souza Norcross.
Funeral services will be held
on Saturday, July 20, at 11 a.m.
at. Sampson City Church of God,
with Rev. Gene Bass officiating.
Interment will follow at Santa Fe
Cemetery. The family will receive
friends on Friday, July 19, from
6 p.m. until 8 p.m. at the Archie
Tanner Funeral Services chapel.
Arrangements are under the care
and direction of Archie Tanner
Funeral Services of Starke.















Purple


15070 yS Hwy 301 S Starke, FL

904-964-4810


14 nf








8B TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR B SECTION THURSDAY, JULY 18, 2013


Local boys help team win Firecracker Classic

Seven boys from Bradford, Clay and Union counties helped bring home the 18U
Gainesville Naturals baseball team bring home the 2013 Under Armour Firecracker
Classic Championship on July 5 in Jupiter. The Naturals, who finished with a 6-2 record,
won the championship in extra Innings by a score of 11-10 against Top American
Prospects. Locals pictured are Wyatt Collins (kneeling, second from left), David Hall
(kneeling, fourth from left), coach Esix Snead (standing, first from left), Chris Starling
(standing, third from left), Kyle Shealy (standing, fourth from left), Jackson Reddish
(standing, eighth from left) and Holden Huggins (standing, ninth from left).


FINDLEY
Continued from 1B

Griffis said.
In regard to this weekend's
nationals, Findley said she hopes
to break the back squat and high
total records. She said she's aim-
ing for a 295 back squat, which
Griffis said Findley has already
accomplished in the UCHS
weight room.
Griffis said he also expects
Findley to lift anywhere from
335 to 345 in the dead lift.
It would be normal to think
there might-be some nervous-
ness accompanying those high
expectations, but Griffis said


that would not be a problem this
weekend. He looked at Find-
ley and said, "We're not going
to worry about any nerves this
time. We've got them behind
us.
Findley replied, "Yes, sir."
Aside from possibly setting
more records and winning an-
other championship, this week-
end will also see Findley signing
paperwork to join Team USA.
It's an overwhelming honor, to
be sure.
"That right there is an inde-
scribable feeling," Findley said.
"It gives me joy all over."
SThen there's the opportunity
to compete at the world cham-


pionships next summer. It's
something she definitely wants
to do, Findley said. However,
she will need some assistance
in paying for the trip to South
Africa. If anyone is interested in
helping or becoming a sponsor,
please contact Findley at find-
leyllynn@gmail.com or Griffis
at 352-494-1362.
Representing Union County
on a world stage is something
that means a lot to Findley. She's
proud of her home and proud to
be a student-athlete at Union
County High School.
"I wouldn't want to choose
any other place to live at," she
said.


Lake Butler

to host pro-

am basketbcllI

tournament

Former University of Florida
player and newly signed Golden
State Warrior: Marreese Speights
and more than 30 players who
have played in the NBA's
developmental and summer
leagues as well as overseas will
be part of a pro-am tournament
played at Lake Butler Middle
School, beginning Friday, July
26.
This year's tournament
will feature 12-16 teams. Past
tournaments have included teams
from Chicago, Houston, Atlanta,
Tennessee, Miami and Tampa.
Four games will be played on
'July 26, beginning at 7 p.m. On


ART
Continued from 2B

the work on the left-the Picas-
so side. "Alvarez:" Middleton
thought it said. His son, also a
UF art student, studied it a little
more. "No:" Adrian said. "It
says Alvaro Fuster."
A series of very high-tech
photographs were taken of the
back. Middleton now believes
that the works may have been
owned by members of succes-
sive generations of Barcelona's
aristocratic and complex Fuster
family. This is where the gene-
alogist came in.
One of the present-day Fus-
ters is best friends with Prince
Phillip of Spain. Generations
past have been noted art col-,
lectors and wealthy business
people. Alvaro Fuster, five or six


Saturday, July 27, 12 games will
be played, beginning at 10 a.m.,
while eight games will be played
on Sunday, July 28, beginning at
11a.m.
SDay passes are $12 for adults
and $4 for students K-12.
Weekend passes are $12 and $8.
There are sponsorship
opportunities available.
For more information, please
contact Kevin Simmons at 352-
875-3019.


UCHS football

program's golf

tourney set

for Friday

The Union County High
School football program's fourth
annual golf tournament is set for
Friday, July 19, beginning with


generations back, founded and
built the Rieal Cercle Artistic
(Royal Arts Circle) in Barce-
lona. The building, used as both
a hotel and art gallery, is now an
art school. Maria1 Fuster served
as the Circle's president for three
non-consecutive years in the
early 1900s, around the period in
question. Some members of the
Fuster family may have known
either or both of the Spanish art-
ists personally, even though the
painters were living in Paris.
Middleton fears, though, that
Alvaro Fuster-Fabra, who died
childless in the 1950s, may have
owned the work, but the docu-
mentary provenance, along with
the rest of the bachelor's papers,
went to probate court. In Spain,
this means the papers can't be
made available for anybody to
look at from here on, Middleton
said. -


a shotgun start at 8 a.m. at the
Starke Golf and Country Club.-
The cost to enter the four-man,
best-ball tournament is $55 per
person/$180 per team. Lunch
will be provided.
There will be door prizes, as
well as prizes for longest drive,
closest to the pin,; straightest
drive and a putting contest.
Hole sponsorship opportunities
are available for $100.Also; there
are three levels of sponsorg6ship
opportunities: Purple ($200),
Gold ($250) andTiger ($350).
To register for the tournament,
or if you are interested in
being a sponsor, .please contact
Ronn Pruitt at 386-867-0078 '
or pruittr@union.kl2.fl.us, 'or
Matthew Elixson at 352-275-
8697 or elixsonm@union.kl2.
fl.us.
All proceeds will support Lake
Butler Middle School and Union
County High School athletics.'


Despite so many questions
and roadblocks, Middleton .is
determined to finish his quest.
Asked what could constitute fi-
nal proof that the two Spanish
artists worked together on the
collages, Middleton went back
to forensics.
"The DNA of the paint and
the possibility that in the Rieal
Cercle Artistic library, or maybe
the Picasso Museum at Malaga,
some record or mention of the
work might turn up," Middleton
said, "and I think we're, almost
there." .. .
Meanwhile, Middleton's cli-
ents are guarding their work or
works of art. But, even if the
works are what Middleton and
the family hope they are, their
artworks could still end up very
nice, but unauthenticated Cubist
images with which to impress
visitors in their home.


Classified Ads


(9041964-6305
(3521473-2210

(3861496-2261


Where one call

does it a/l/


i Tri-County Classifieds
Bradford Union Clay
Reach over 27,000 Readers Every Week!


40 Notice
41 Vehicles Accessories
42 Motor Vehicles
43 RV's & Campers
44 Boats -
45 Land for Sale
.46 Real Estate Out of Area
47 Commercial Property
Rent, Lease, Sale
48 Homes for Sale
49 Mobile Homes for Sale
50 For Rent


INDEX
51 Lost/Found 63 Love Lines
52 Animals & Pets 64 Business Opportunity
53 Yard Sales 65 Help Wanted
54 Keystone Yard Sales 66 Investment Opportunity
55 Wanted 67 Hunting Land for Rent
56 Trade orSwap 68 Rent to Own
57 For Sale 69 Food Supplements
58 Building Materials 70 Money to Lend
59 Personal Services 72 Sporting Goods
60 Secretarial Services 73 Farm Equipment
61 Scriptures 74 Computers & Computer
62 Vacation/Travel Accessories


40,
Notices
EQUAL HOUSING P-
PORTUNITY. All real
estate advertising in this
S -newspaper is subject to
.the Federal Fair Housing
Act of 1968 which makes
Sit illegalrto advertise "any,
'preference, limitation or
discrimination based on
race, color, religion, sex
or national origin, or an in-
tention to make any such
preference, limitation or
discrimination." Familial
status includes children
under the age of 18 living
with parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant women
and people securing cus-
tody of children under


18. This newspaper will
not knowingly accept any
advertising for real estate
. which is in violation of
-''.the law. Our readers
are hereby ..informed that
all dwellings' advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
Complain of discrimina-
tion, call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777, the toll-
free telephone number
fdr the hearing impaired
is 1-800-927-9275. For
further information call
Florida Commission on
Human Relations, Lisa
Sutherlaod 850-488-7082
ext #1005.


M ob le ome Ins al a d r n p r
iI 5 LLC.

.n 7n


41
Auctions
KERR AUCTIONS, Lawtey
Fl. 23931 NW CR 225A.
Chickens, ducks, rabbits,
goats, turkeys, sheep, all
farm animals. Horses,
tack, farm equipment,
furniture, appliances. All
, consignments welcome.


Cash sales only. 10%
buyer's premium. 6pm
the 2nd and 4th Saturday
of every month. For more
information call Lyndel at
904-838-8069 or Randy
at 904-591-4191. AB199
and AU1896. Buy, sell,
or trade.
42
Motor Vehicle &
Accessories
1998 ACURA-dark green,
2.3 cyl. sunroof, new tires,
5-speed manual, 30 mpg.
220,000 miles, $1,495.
Contact 904-533-9391.
2000 MERCURY GRAND
Marquis LS loaded. Cold
A/C nice car. 68,700 Mi.
$4,500 OBO. Call 904-
964-2886.
2010 CRYSLER TOWN &
Country loaded. Low mile-
age. Excellent condition.
Call between 5 and 8 PM.
904-263-3520.
45
Land for Sale
28+/- ACRES of mixed
pasture land and woods.
Small creek on the prop-
erty and partially fenced.
Great home site on
County Road 18 toward


Brooker. Asking $129,900
O.B.O. Possible owner
financing 904-796-0660.

47
Commercial
Property (Rent,
Lease, Sale),
DOWNTOWN STARKE Pro-
fessional Offices for rent,
$315 per month. Confer-
er'ce room, kitchen, utili-
ties and more provided.
904-364-8395.
RETAIL SPACE in busy
strip center. 1,000 sq.ft.
and 2,000 sq. ft. units.
South HWY 301 front-
age, across from the KOA
Campground. Call 352-
235-1675.
ATTN: STATE PROPERTY
MANAGER, we have a
two-story building, 9 offic-
es, dual A/C system, etc.
Will modify for long-term
contract. For more infor-
mation call Mary Johnson
at 904-964-6305.
FOR RENT: Suite of offices.
Reception area, 3 offices,
break room, 2 bathrooms.
$550/mo. For more infor-
mation call Mary Johnson
at 904-964-6305.


NEED CASH?.FAST!

Sell your car, home, boat or 'stuff'
with a Classified Photo Ad


*- AsfaB' __C.


Your Photo Ad in 3 Weekly Papers
covering Bradford, Union & Clay Counties plus
a OMVSAD in our weekly free
community shopper: The BirdDog Special
., .. . ................................ . ....................... ................
Email your med-to-hi-resolution digital photo (150dpi+) & ad text to:
ads@bctelegraph.com by 5pm Monday or bring it to:
Bradford County Telegraph Union County Times Lake Region Monitor
(904) 964-6305
_ cashlcheck/credit cards accepted


FOR RENT PROFESSION-
AL OFFICE, 1,500 sq.ft.
$1,000/mo,.- up to 3,000
sq.ft. contiguous $2,000/
mo. Warehouse 3,000
sq. ft. $800/mo. Smith &
Smith Realty. 904-964-
9222.


49
Mobile Homes
For Sale
EX-LARGE DW. ON 2/3
acre. Fireplace, new
Metal roof-AC-rugs. to-
tally refurbished. Owner
financing. 352-745O0094.


CLAY COUNTY
SURPLUS AUCTION
9AM Sat. 7/27/13
2493 SR 16 W Green Cove Springs, FL 32043
Items in the auction include, but are not limited to, many:
Ford Crown Vies Chevy Impalas
Ford Explorers Ford F-150's
2000 JCB Loader 2004 Terex Loader
many lawn mowers and much morel
Teims: Cash, business or personal checks
with bank letter, credit card 0% BP
Preview on Fri., 7/26, from 10am until 4pm
First Coast Auction and Realty, Inc.
(903) 384-4556
AB150/AB289
www.FirstCoastAuction.com


50
For Rent
WE HAVE 2 OR 3 bedroom
SMH, clean, close to pris-
on. Call 352-468-1323.


NICE MOBILE HOMES
in Lake Butler & Starke.
16x80 2BR/21A, DW
3BR/2BA. 2 & 3 BR sin-
gle wides. Both fehced.
Deposit required. Call


Only 549 'mth
For the 2 Bedroom/2 Bath

Oni0$629 mth
Fore 3 Bedroom/2 Bath

n0y1729 mth
For the 4 Bedroom/2 Bath
Call for current
MOVE-IN SPECIALS!.




*.Ih


CLASSIFIED DEADLINES
Word Ad Classified Tuesday, 12:00 noon
Classified Display Tuesday, 12:00 noon
TO PLACE CLASSIFIED USE YOUR PHONE



* 9 964-6305 473-2210 496-2261
NOTICE
Classified Advertising should be paid in advance unless credit has already been established with the
newspaper. A $3.00 secrice charge will be added to all billing to cover postage and handling. All ads.
placed by phone are read-back'o the advertiser at the time of placement. However, the classified staff
cannot be held responsible for mistakes in classified advertising taken by phone. The newspaper reserves
the right to correctly classify and edit all copy or to reject or cancel any advertisements at any time. Only
standard abbrevations will be accepted. -


"BEAT THE SUMMER HEAT"

LAWNS & MORE
"Quality work for your budget"

i FREE ESTIMATES l
"Insured"

Mowing and More!!!

-John Wood ~ 352-281-7821
lawnsmore@yahoo.com


SELF EMPLOYED? OR 1099 EMPLOYEE?

WE DON'T NEED PROOF OF INCOMEI--
AT HONDA OF GAINESVILLE WE SAY YES!
SNO MATTER WHAT YOUR CREDIT IS!!!
S Honda of Gainesville 3800 N. Main St. (866) 833-3403
MAKE MODEL YEARm LINER PRICE/ PAYMENT
HONDA ACCORD .2001 WITH LEATHER, SPOTLESS CONDITION, METICULOUSLY MAINTAINED!
ALL SERVICES DONEAT HONDA! CLEANEST IN TOWN..........ONLY $149/MO OR $4,990
HONDA CR-V 2012 NEW BODY STYLE, LOW MILES, WARRANTY WE WANT PEOPLE
WITH BAD CREDIT!!! TAKE ON PAYMENTS OF ONLY ..............$388/MO
CHEVY HHR 2007 GREAT ON GAS, TONS OF ROOM!........................................$8,995 OR 199/MO
NISSAN TITAN 2013 LOW MILES SPOTLESS CONDITION, MAKE PAYMENTS OF................$388/MO
SOR CALL FOR CASH PRICE .
GMC SIERRA 2009 GARAGE KEPT, LOW MILES. DO YOU HAVE BAD CREDIT,
NO CREDIT, OR LATE PAYMENTS? WE SAY YES AT HONDA OF GAINESVILLE!
LEXUS IS350 2006 LUXURY FOR LESS! LOW MILES SPOTLESS CONDITION, NAVIGATION. ..
MAKE PAYMENTS OF .................................................................................. $278/MO
OR CALL FOR CASH PRICE
TOYOTA CAMRY 2012 DRIVE IN STYLE! PREVIOUSLY TURNED DOWN? WE SAY YES REGARDLESS .
OF YOUR CREDIT HISTORY! TAKE ON PAYMENTS OF ..............$296.19/MO OR $16,995
DODGE GR. CARAVAN 2008 DEAL OF THE WEEK! POWER DOORS, NO MONEY DOWN REQUIRED! ...............$12,995
ACURA TL 2009 LOW MILES, THRILL TO DRIVE! MUST SEE. MILITARY AND STUDENT
DISCOUNTS AVAILABLE! 0 DOWN ...............................................................$389/MO
TOYOTA CAMRY 2009 WARRANTY TO 100K MILES, ATTENTION GETTER! MUST SEE TO
APPRECIATE! 100% GUARANTEECD.CREDIT APPROVALS ...............$12,995 OR 269/MO
CALL FOR BEST FINANCE PRICE
FORD EDGE 2008 LEATHER, DRIVE IN STYLE FOR LESS THAN............................$267/MO ONLY $13,995
CHEWVY IMPALA SS 2007 ATTENTION GETTERI MUST SEE TO APPRECIATE!
100% GUARANTEED CREDIT APPROVALS ....................................$9,995 OR $248/MO
HONDA ACCORD 2012 STILL UNDER WARRANTY! 19K MILES NO MONEY DOWN!!
FREE 60' TV WITH PURCHASE!.............................................................. .......$349/MO
P6NTIAC G6 2006 RUNSAND LOOKS PERFECT! LEATHER, GREAT ON GAS, ROOMY. ,
MAKE PAYMENTS OF .................................................................. $199/MO OR $8,995
SUZUKI FORENZA 2006 ONLY 46K MILES, OVER 35 MPG. THE PERFECT STUDENT CAR!.......$6,995 OR $149/MO
NISSAN MURANO 2009 LEATHER, SUNROOF, ALL THE BELLS AND WHISTLES AND WARRANTY! 100%
GUARANTEED CREDIT APPROVALS! ASSUME PAYMENTS ON LOAN OF .....;..$378.25/MO
HYUNDAI SONATA 2011 CLEANEST IN TOWN, GREAT STUDENT CAR! TAKE ON PAYMENTS OF ..............$225/MO
WITH $1000 DOWN. CALL CHRIS AT 352-672-8439
TOYOTA TUNDRA 2006 DOUBLE CAB, LIMITED, THE CLEANEST IN TOWN!! MUST SEE!!
MAKE PAYMENTS OF ...............................,..........$329/MO WITH ONLY $500 DOWN
NISSAN FRONTIER 2004 GREAT ON GAS, GETS THE JOB DONE! LOWMILES............................................$9,900
ACURA TSX 2010 LEATHER; BLUETOOTH, SPOTLESS CONDITION. GREAT ON GAS!
ANYONE QUALIFIES FOR FINANCING. ...........................................................$287/MO
CHEWVY -MALIBU 2011 PREVIOUSLY TURNED DOWN AT OTHER DEALERSHIPS?? WE HAVE 100%
CREDIT APPROVALS. CALL TODAY FOR INFORMATION .......... $159 BI-WEEKLY$14,995
FORD EXPLORER .2004 SPORT TRAC, CREW CAB, NEW TIRES, RUNS GREAT! ........................................$9,990
NISSAN PATHFINDER 1999 4X4, VERY LOW MILES, LEATHER, LOADED, PREVIOUS OWNER CARED!...............$5,995
MINI COOPER 2005 CONVERTIBLE, LOW MILES, ENJOY THE RIDE! EVERYBODY RIDES
REGARDLESS OF YOUR CREDIT!!...... ................................$12,995 OR $269/MO
HONDA CR-VEX 2007 BOUGHTAT HONDA, SERVICED AT HONADEALOF THE WEEK!.....................$13,995
'HONDA CIVIC 2008 ONE OWNER, OVER 34 MPG, WILL LAST FOREVER!...................................$9,500 OBO
BMW 3281 2011 BLACK ON BLACK, STATUS SYMBOL, GET THE RED CARPET TREATMENT
THAT YOU ARE LOOKING FOR!! SIGN AND DRIVE SPECIAL!!'....................;........$389/MO
JEEP WRANGLER 2010 DEAL OF THE WEEK! LOOKS LIKE NEW!! NO MONEY DOWN REQUIRED!...........$349/MO
HONDA CIVIC SlI 2007 FUN TO DRIVE. SUPER CLEAN AR! 6 SPEED.................................................$259/MO
NISSAN -MAXIMA 2000 ONLY 55K MILES, RUNS GREATMlLL LAST FOREVER! .........................$6,400 OBO
TOYOTA CAMRY LE 1998 ONLY 109K MILES, RUNS GREAT, RELAIBLE, GREAT ON GAS...............................$3,995
GMC YUKON DENALI 2004 ONLY 86K MILES, FULLY LOADED FOR FAMILY FUN! FINANCING
AVAILABLE FOR LESS THAN ................................................................ ...$279/MO
WITH NO MONEY DOWN \
CHEWVY SILVERADO 2006 CLEANEST IN TOWN, GETS THE JOB DONE! TAKE ON PAYMENTS OF
$225/MO WITH $1000 DOWN..................................................................$11,995 OBO
ACURA TL 2009 WARRANTY, VERY LOW MILES, ALL THE BELLS AND WHISTLES.
ASSUME PAYMENTS OF ONLY.......................................................................$378/MO
CALL JULIAN AT 904 504 9805








THURSDAY, JULY 18, 2013 TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR B SECTION 9B


19041964-6305 Where one call

C Sla~Sti e Ads (3521473-2210 e
-ClAss e Ad (3861496-2261 does it all!


678-438-6828.
MOBILE HOMES FOR
RENT starting at $525
per month. Hidden Oaks,
Lake Butler. Call 386-
496-8111.
PERMANENT ROOMS
for rent at the Magnolia
Hotel. Both refrigerator
and microwave. Special
rates, by the month. Call
904-964-4303 for more
information.
LAKE BUTLER APART-
MENTS, Accepting ap-
plications for HC and non-
HC. 1,2,3, & 4 BR.Equal
housing opportunity. 1005
SW 6th St. Lake Butler,
32054. TDD/TTY 711.Call
386-496-3141.
2BR/2 FULL BATH unfur-
nished doublewide mobile
home. Nestled in woods
Sin Worthington Springs,
on Santa Fe River. Very
private, service animals
only. $650/mo. 1st, last,-
$650 deposit. Call 386-
496-2230.
2 BR/1 BA. Central heat
and air. Raiford. $425/
mo. $350 deposit. Call
904-964-8025.
2BR/1BA SINGLEWIDE
MOBILE HOME. Raiford.
$450/mo. Call 904-769-
0293 or 904-966-1396.
3BR/2BA mobile home,
.CH/A, good location 1st
& last months rent $550/
mo. 904-964-3595.
KEYSTONE & STARKE
rentals available soon.
2BR/1 BA, some are lake-
front Rents are from $475
up to $575 monthly. Call
for more info. 352-226-
6226.
2BR/2 FULL BATH unfur-
S nished doublewide mobile
home. Nestled in woods
in Worthington Springs,
on Santa Fe River. Very
private.. $650/mo. 1st,
last, $650 deposit. Call
386-496-2030.
2BR/1.5BA, block home for
rent in Keystone. Fenced
backyard, fireplace, stor-
age building, CH/A.$650/
month. Call Bill or Denise
at 352-473-0350.
4BR/4BAon Hampton Lake.
Beautiful custom built
home on Hampton Lake.
Home offers large kitchen,
spiral staircase, and very
large master bedroom
"with balcony/patio over
looking lake. This home is
a must see! $1,800/Month
-& $1,800/Deposit. Con-
Stact listing agent Christina
'Sanford, Property Manag-
.. :er, Charnelle Whittemore
.-Realty (904) 964-3948.
-3BR/1.5BA on Pratt St.
--Nice block home in great
"area. Home features
wood floors, living room
and separate family room,
1 car garage, and fenced
Vack yard. $700/month &
$700/deposit. Contact list-
ing agent Christina San-
ford, Property Manager,
Charnelle Whittemore
..Realty (904) 964-3948.
-3BR/2BA on Westmore-
.. land St. Very large block
",home in'City of Starke.
Features living room, din-
:'Home has separate of-
"- fice, may be used as 4th
-.bedroom. Large fenced
:backyard with storage.
$1,000/month & $1,000/
: deposit. Contact listing
-agent Christina San-
ford, Property Manager,
Charnelle Whittemore
SRealty (904) 964-3948.
.2BR/1BA in City. Cute
home in city limits. Fea-
tures living room, kitchen
with eat in space. $450/
Month & $450/deposit.
Contact listing agent
Christina Sanford, Prop-
erty Manager, Charnelle
*Whittemore Realty (904)
-. 964-3948.
FOR RENT house 2BR/2BA,
LR, DR, kitchen, family
rom, utility room, large
garage, central heat & air,
Walking distance to down
.town. $700/month first &
last mo. rent. Sorry no
pets. Call (904) 964-6718.
53A
Yard Sales
. FAMILY YARD SALE, Sat,
S7/20 starting at 7:00 am,
1327-State Road 230 East
in Starke.
HUGE YARD SALE Sat.'
July 20th from 7am-2pm.
.: Lots of clothes & housing
items. 100 East Market
Fid. right across from the
fairgrounds.
Come one come all to our
super sale at 14272 Cole
Street, in Waldo (across
from library). Sat & Sun
,8-3._Kenmore conv. oven,
fridge, microwave, table &
chairs, couch & loveseat,
Ent. centers, twin bed,
lamps, piano, solid wood -
doors, clothing, books, &';
lots morel
YARD SALE estate, re--
modeling, moving sale'
, Sat. July 20th 8Sir,. no
early birds. 6061 Kingsley
Lake Drive, SR 16 East.
Kitchen Aid dishwashers;-
Jenr air ovens and cook
top, bar stools, come and
seel Rain or shine, sale
, inside.
YARD SALE Fri & Sat 9am-?
Take 16 West about 5 1/4
miles from 301 in Starke,


turn right on NW 216th
street, go 1/4 mile, look
for signs. Great variety
of items.
YARD SALE & FISH FRY
heroines of Jericha Ruth
Court #18 will be having
a yard sale & fish fry on
Sat. July 20, 2013 starting
at 9:00am, 709 Brown-
lee Street in front of the
Masonic Hall. There will
be kids clothing, shoes,
small appliances, etc.
Also fish sandwiches or
fish and fries.
YARD SALE Sat 8-12 SR
16 W toward prison 250th
lane on right at UCI. Look
for signs. Scrub uniforms
& lots more.

53B
Keystone Yard
Sales
HUGE YARD SALE Satur-
day 7 a.m. to? Geneva
Lake Estates, 492 S.E.
28th Way. Wide variety of
items. No baby stuff.

55
Wanted
CASH FOR JUNK cars $300
& up. Free pick up, run-
ning or not. Call 352-
445-3909.

57
For Sale
GOLF CART 2008 re-condi-
tioned club car precedent
w/ new 2012 batteries.
has lights, horn & turn sig-
nals. Sumbrella curtains,
w/ matching seat covers,
& steering wheel cover.
Charger included-must
see to appreciate Can be
seen at KOA campground
& call 904-796-1004.
FOR SALE, due to illness,
all good condition. 1994
6400 John Deer Trac-
tor w/canopy-MFWD 85
hp, 3 hitch-2 remotes.
640-loader 15 ft. bat wing.
1964 Gallon grader. 1995
Ferguson roller. 1989
Ford 350 Dually diesel
truck. 1996 Hallmark
8x16.5 ft. enclosed trail-
er. 1970 F 750 single-
axle Ford dump truck w/
equipment trailer. 1993
Cadillac Deville. 12ft. Jon
boat. 4 new oak Amish
buggy wheels. Table saw,
Fert. spreader, Wurlitzer-
melville-clark spinnet o


piano, hammond spinnet
organ L-133 has LES
LER speakers. Call 386-
496-0683.
FOR SALE 2004 Ford Es-
cape -SUV. New tires,
AM/FM/CD. Cold air, su-
per clean, automatic, tow
package, all power. Call
Cooterbob at 904-796-
5218 or 904-368-9199.
FOR SALE Centurion 3250
Watt Portable Generator
with wheels and handle.
Never used. $350 firm.
386-758-6151.
8x10 Rubbermaid util-
ity shed $350.00.
200 AMP power pole
w/ breakers $200.00.
12,000 BTU air condi-
tioner $100.00.
COUNTRY LIVING, 3.2
acres w/3BR/2BA, paved
road $595 per month. Call
Brady @ 386-418-0435.
HUNTERS PARADISE 10
acres w/ 3BR/2BA, 2 liv-
ing areas, short drive to
town. $709 per month.
Call Mike @ 386-418-
0438.
RENT-TO-OWN 3BR/2BA
on fenced lot. $510 per
month. Call Brady @ 386-
418-0435.
4BR/2.5BA 2001 28x80 new
carpet & linoleum, island
kitchen w/ new applianc-
es, 2 living areas, parents
retreat 10% down $500
per month W.A.E. Call
Mike @ 386-418-0438.


FLORIDA
A GATEWAY
COLLEGE
*^ '- .**

DIRECTOR OF NURSING
Position #A99997
This is a professional position
responsible for the planning,
coordination, and implementation .of
the Associate Degree Nursing
program, the Practical Nurse program
and the Patient Care Assistant
program Florida Gateway. College.
Minimum Qualifications: Currently
licensed as a registered nurse in
Florida and shall have either a
bachelor's degree in nursing plus a
master's or doctoral degree in a related
field or a master's or doctoral degree in
nursing. Florida statues 64B9-2.005.
Two years teaching experience.
Computer literate. Knowledge of
statistical concepts. Knowledge of
accounting principles. Knowledge of
state laws affecting nursing program
operations. Ability in numerical
reasoning and verbal expression.
Ability in written communication.
Previous leadership/ management or
Director of Nursing experience
preferred.
SALARY: $49,875 Annually, Plus
Benefits
APPLICATION DEADLINE: Open
Until Filled
Persons interested should provide
College application, vita, and
Photocopies of transcripts. All foreign
transcripts must be submitted with
,official translation and evaluation.
Position details and applications
available on web at: www.fgc.edu
Human Resources
Florida Gateway College
149 S.E. College Place
-Lake City, FL 32025-2007
Phone (386) 754-4314
- .-" Fax (386) 754-4814
E-Mail: humanr@fgc.edu
FGC is accredited by the Commission on Collegies of'
the Southern Association ofColleges and Schools,
VP/ADA/EA/EO College in Education and
Employment j


KEYSTONE VILLAGE APARTMENTS
Take a 1'nnk at us Nnw' I


A.. Love .t&& 901 U bvi;


418 S.E. 41st Loop in Ke tone Club Estates
S ~(Next to the Gol t Course)4 36 t
Handicapped Come in and see us or call us at 352 4733682
Eqipe EQUAL HOUSIlNGl
Equipped TPD dial 711 OPPORTONIT
This institution is an Equal Opportunity Provider and Employer.


DRAW YOUR OWN
FLOORPLAN We'll build
it at your best price; our
best deal 13th Street
Homes. 386-418-0424.
WE FINANCE, little or no
credit. 575 credit scores
w/10% down or we own-
er finance. 13th Street
Homes. 386-418-0424.
BRING YOUR OWN TITLE
I need your trades. Guar-
anteed top dollar. 13th
Street H es. 386-418-
0424.
GE Super Capacity washer
X-cellent condition. $250
964-7745.
BEDDING & MATTRESS,
estate mattress sets.
Twins $69, full $79,
Queen $89, King $129,
Bunk Beds w/mattress
$319. Call A Mattress 441
E. Brownlee St. Starke,
904-964-3888 or 352-
258-1268.
QUEEN PILLOWTOP $299.
King pillow top, $499, spe-
cial twin sets, $139. CallA
Mattress441 E. Brownlee
St. Starke, 904-964-3888
or 352-258-1268.

59
Personal
Services
CLARK FOUNDATION RE-
PAIRS, INC. Correction
of termite & water-dam-
aged wood & sills. Level-


Ordngewood Apartments
801 South Water Street
Starke, FL 32091
904-964-4214
TDDTTY711
Accepting Applicationsl
RentalAssistancel
1,2, & 3 bedroomHC&
Non-H C accessible
apartments.
This institution is an equal
opportunity provider, and employer.'
'Equal Housing Opportunity'


Waldo Villas

Move-In

Special
2 Bedroom
Townhome
$100 security
1/2 OFF 1st &
2nd month's rent
Equal housing opportunity.
This institution is an equal
opportunity provider &
employer.
Call Nita at
352-468-1971
TDD 800-955-9771


NOW
ACCEPTING
APPLICATIONS
Southern Villas
of Starke
Ask about our
$199 Move in Special
1&2 BR Apartments HC &
non-HC Units. Central AC/
Heat; on-site laundry,
playground, private, quiet
atmosphere.

Located on SR-16,
1001 Southern Villas Dr.
Starke, FL
Call 904-964-7295
TDDrTY 711
"Equal Housing Opportunity'


Adoption
Choosing
adoption?
Loving, single
woman will
provide stable
home/support of
large,' extended
family. Let's help
each a other.
Financial security.
Expenses paid.
Deborah, toll-free
(855-779-3699)
Sklar Law -Firm,
LLC Fl Bar
#0150789

Announcements
Advertise in
newspapers
across Florida -
One phone call


ing & raising Houses/
Bldgs. Pier Replacement
& alignment. We do all
types of tractor work,
excavation and small
demolition jobs. Free Es-
timates: Danny (Buddy)
Clark, 904-545-5241.
FLORIDA CREDIT UNION
has money to lend for MH
& land packages. 1-800-
284-1144.
CHRISTIAN HANDYMAN,
Military Veteran, afford-
able, 11 years of ex-
perience. Building and
grounds maintenance and
repair, all trades (904)-
263-0252.

65
Help Wanted
Seeking experienced heavy
equipment operator in
the Alachua, Bradford, or
Union Country Area. Call
(904)494-3021 for details.
EXPERIENCED PROP-
ERTY preservation sub-
contractors. Must be li-
censed, insurance, expe-
rienced in home repairs,
provide equipment, and
available to travel within
Florida. You will also need
Knowledge of camera and
computer use for sending


51 Woodbine Lane, I
Hawthorne I


puts your ad in
117 newspapers.
Reach millions of
Floridians for one
low cost by
c a I I i n g
866.742.1373 or
v i s i t
www.AdNetwork
sFlorida.com

Help Wanted
EARNING
BETTER PAY
IS ONE STEP
AWAY! .Averitt
o f f e r s
Experienced
CDL-A Drivers
Excellent Benefits
and Weekly
Hometime. 888-


362-8608, Recent
Grads w/a CDL-A
I-5/wks
Paid Training.
Apply online at
AverittCareers.co
m Equal
Opportunity
Employer

Experienced
OTR Flatbed
Drivers earn 50
up to 55 cpm
loaded. $1000 sign
on to Qualified
drivers. Home
most weekends.
Call: (843)266-
3731 /
www.bulldoghiwa


picture files daily to office.
Call 352-473-0095.
HIRING experienced prop-
erty preservation sec-
retaries. Prefer Vendor
360, Mars & Zephyr
knowledge. MUST have
knowledge of Windows
7 or 8 & Excel. Construc-
tion, Building materials
and use of cost estimator
a plus call 352-473-0095.
OWN A COMPUTER? Put it
to work! Up to $1,500 to
$7,000/mo. FT/PT. www.
iluvmybiz123.com
Drivers: $5,000


Sign-On BonusI
Great Payl Con-.
sistent Freight,
Great Miles on This
Regional Account.
Werner Enterprises:
1-888-567-3110.
LIBRARY OUTREACH
ASSISTANT needed to
assist on bookmobile.
Minimum HS graduate,
thorough knowledge of
computer operation, In-
ternet and email. $8.75/
hr, 20 hrs/week, 2-10Ohr
workdays. Valid FL driv-
er's license and clean


Woodbine Lane,
Hawthorne I


y.com. EOE

DRIVER
TRAINEES
NEEDED
NOW! Learn to
drive for US
Xpress! Earn
$700 per week!
No experience
needed! Local
CDL Traning. Job
ready in 15 days!
(888)368-1964

Home
Improvement
Premium Metal
Roofing,
Manufacturer
Direct! 8 Metal


driving record required.
This is a temporary po-
sition and may last six
months or less. Apply
in person New River PL
Cooperative, 110 N. Lake
Ave, Lake Butler.


Keystone


Roof profiles in
40+ colors !
Superior customer
service, same day
pick-up, -fast
delivery! '
1-888-779-4270
or visit
www.gulfcoastsup
DlY.com

Miscellaneous
A'I R L I N E
CAREERS
begin here --net
FAA approved
A v i a t i o n
Aviation
Maintenance
Tech n i cian
training. Housing
and Financial aid
i


RETAIL SALES/CASHIER
position available, 40
hr min per week. Apply
at Gator II Farm Sup-
ply. South of Starke on
Hwy 301. HS Diploma
required.


FOR SALE


Older 2BR/1BA singe wide on 2.10
acres, w/heat & A/C in need of some
repairs. Can be lived in with minimal
repairs. Has well, septic, and Elect.
AS IS


1292 SE, 4tlt,
Melrose


for qualified
students. Job
placement
assistance. Call
AIM 866-314-
3769

Real Estate
70 Property
Online
Real Estate
RED Auction
H o m e s,
Commercial,
Multi-Family,
Lots
Sperry.Van Ness -
Commercial Real
Estate
Advisors
,504.468.6800
www.BidOnBank
REO.com


L. Fisher FL
AU220

LAND &
CABIN
PACKAGE
Only $79,9001
Crossville,
Tennessee. Pre-
grand opening
sale. 30 acres
and 1,200 Sq.
Ft. cabin
pa c k age.
Minutes from 4
state parks and
TN River.
L i m i t e d
inventory. Call
now 877/243-
2091


FlordaWorks
Alachua/Bradford A Community Partnership
Chris

904-964-8092
www.FlorldaWorksOnline.com


Marrage s saredye





S 0 1


Set Right Mobile Homes
Specializing In Relocations, Re-Levels, Set-Ups & Disposal


Out of Area Classifieds


C.B. Isaac Realty


www.CBlsaacRealty.com


(352)475 -2199 2518 SR-21 e Melrose, FL


I


. I







TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR B SECTION THURSDAY, JULY 18, 2013


Keystone's Wright finds niche with Athletes for College


BY CLIFF SMELLEY
Regional News/Sports Editor
As a self-described "sports
junkie," Kevin Wrighi of Key-
stone Heights would seem to
have the perfect job-one which
has him t.ikg ini various athlet-
ic events as one of Athletes for
Col^c i- t'.' tviil in_' dmiiechq'i,,
"I hc jol.lhio ,'h-I.. h,\> Wright
to fulfill two passions. He not
only gets to immerse himself in
the world of sports, but he gets
to help people as well.
"I found my callnw." said
Wright, who is the recruiting di-
rector for Athletes for College's
southeast region: Florida, Geor-
gia, South Carolina, Alabama
and Mississippi.
The help Wright provides
is getting high school student-
athletes scholarships through
marketing company Athletes for
College. Athletes for College
has a 95-percent success rate in
getting student-athletes scholar-
ships valued at $15,000 per year
or higher, Wright said.
"Generally speaking, with
grant money, financial aid and
stuff like that, a lot of (scholar-
ships) end up coming up to full
rides," Wright said.
Wright has been with Athletes
for College for approximately
eight months, but that has been
more than enough time for him
to be moved by the work he's
doing. He thinks of his first
"success story." That would be
recent Keystone Heights, High
School graduate Logan Stanley,
a soccer player who received a
scholarship to Thomas Univer-
sity valued at more than $26,000
per year.
"It brought tears to my eyes. It
really did," Wright said. "This is
something I've been looking for
careerwise for about five years
now."
Wright was involved in athlet-
ics previously, having worked
as a football coach and athletic
director at Arlington Country
Day School in Jacksonville. He
was working in the insurance/
financial field, though, when
Athletes for College contacted
him. Wright said the company
thought he would be an asset be-


cause of his duties at Arlington
Country Day School.
The opportunity seemed to
good to pass up because of the
company's business model,
Wright said. Athletes for Col-
lege's approach is to evaluate
students--athletically and aca-
demically-and determine what
level of school they can play at.
Athletes are certified by well-
known, sports-specific person-
alities. For example, Tom Bass,
who was an NFL assistant coach
for 30 years, is one of the foot-
ball evaluators, while former
NBA player Earl Boykins and
former University of Florida
player Brandi McCain evaluate
basketball players.
"When we send thee profiles
out to these colleges, they come
from these sports professionals,"
Wright said. "These coaches
recognize these sports profes-
sionals' names."
Wright said because of the
amount of work done by' Ath-
letes for College and the in-
formation it compiles, college
coaches don't have to spend
time or money to recruit student-
athletes. Coaches have access to
video of the student-athletes in
question as well as the evalua-
tions done by sports profession-
als. Plus, Athletes for College
makes sure eligibility issues
have been met.
"When the coach opens the
athlete's profile, they have ev-
erything, they need," Wright
said, adding, "They have every-
thing to recruit this kid from the
comfort of their office."
Wright talked about a recent
incident in which he was talking
to the football coach at Kentucky
Christian University. The coach
had some scholarships avail-
able. Wright said the profile of
Nate Smith-a recent Keystone
Heights High School graduate-
was sent to the coach. In'a span
of 15 minutes, the coach viewed
the profile, talked to Smith on
the phone and offered Smith a
scholarship,
"I'm just tickled to death'for
Nate because this is going to
be absolutely perfect for him,"
Wright said.
Student-athletes and families


who are interested in Athletes
for College can receive a free
pre-evaluation, which includes
determining what level of col-
lege the athlete in question can
play at and what he or she needs
to work on.
Athletes for College offers a
free basic membership, which
puts the student-athlete on the
organization's website. More
than 250 coaches view athletes
on that website daily, Wright
said.
With the basic membership,
though, an athlete has to hope
his or her profile is looked at,
whereas with the premium mem-
bership, athletes' profiles and
evaluations are sent to coaches.
Premium membership has a
one-time fee of $1,295. That
includes ongoing evaluation as
the student-athlete progresses
through high school. A high
school freshman, for example,
is evaluated on potential, but as
he or she grows and develops, a
better picture develops of where
that student can play, Wright
said.
Plus, an athlete who may be
viewed as a lower-level prospect
at one point may eventually de-
velop into a higher-level pros-
pect. Athletes for College evalu-
ations will change as the athlete
develops.
"A great example is (rising
Keystone Heights High School
junior football player) Brighton
Gibbs," Wright said. "He's be-
ing marketed to Division I-AA
schools. As he gets bigger and
stronger, we'll market him to
some Division I schools-small-
er Division I schools."
Of course, not every high
school student is cut out to play
in college. Wright said Athletes
for College is up front with par-
ents-if their kids are evaluated
as not being able to play at the
next level, Athletes for College
is not going to accept money and
tell parents the opposite.
Likewise, Athletes for Col-
lege is not going to market a stu-
dent at a higher level of college
than it is determined he or she
can play at.
"We're not wasting the time of
the coaches," Wright said. "We


WELCOME TO STARKE,


DR. FODA.


WELCOME DR. FODA.
Dr. Foda is dedicated to providing the best care
to his patients. He specializes in gynecology
and obstetrics, but his thorough understanding
of women's health needs doesn't end there.
Dr. Foda is also trained in da Vinci' robotic-
assisted surgery. And his extensive services include
family planning, prenatal care, postpartum, I
annual exams, incontinence, bladder issues and. Mt
infertility. Dr. Foda provides women with a high O
level of care without going far from home.


For more information about Dr. Foda and our staff
of expert physicians, go to ShandsStarke.com.


922 East Call Street
Starke, FL 32091
904-368-2300


)hamed Foda, M.D.
stetrics and Gynecology


Hands
Regional Medical Center


SAthletes for College recruiting director Kevin Wright (center) is pictured with
Keystone Heights High School graduate Nate Smith (far right) and Smith's
father, Jason Perkins. Athletes for College helped Smith, a football player, earn a
scholarship to Kentucky Christian University.


don't waste the time of the par-
ents, either."
Wright remembers the time
when he was a high school ath-
lete looking for an opportunity
to play somewhere. He and his
father spent hours in the Key-
stone Heights High School field
house, recording highlights onto'
VHS tapes. Wright said a lot of
those tapes, if they made it into
hands of college coaches proba-
bly got thrown away or recQrded,
over.
When he asked his fathr if he
would've used Athletes tr Col-
lege if it had been in existence
then, Wright said his father re-
plied, "Absolutely, %ihout a
doubt. I guarantee you I spent
twice (what Athletes for College
charges) on VHS tapes alone."
Wright'graduated from KHHS
in 1993. He played quarterback
and helped lead the Indians to
the District 4-2A championship
during his senior year. Wright
completed 6-of-9 passes for 101
yards in the team's win over



GASKINS
Continued from 3B

volunteer fireman in Bradford
county, then went to fire college
and became a paid fire fighter
with the city of Starke. In 1984,
he made the move to Gainesville
Fire and Rescue, where he still
works full time today, primarily
as a fire truck driver.
Starting in the 1980s, Gaskins
started buying used rear-loader
dumpsters. He got a good price
since the industry standard was
shifting to front loaders. Many
of these dumpsters needed
repairs, however, so Gaskins
took a welding course and did
the work himself.
"All I did was work," Gaskins
said. "My former wife, Susan,
rode with me on the truck and
even did runs herself if I had fire
department duties. My kids rode
along as well. They knew the
routes as well as we did. They
have not, however, ever let me
forget that I only found the time
to take them fishing once while
they were growing up. I was just
always working."
As well as Bradford County,
Gaskins served the city of
Waldo for about eight years in
the 1980s, stopping only when


Clay to cap the regular season.
He then had a lO-of-20, 146-
yard performance in a 12-6 loss
to Newberry in the first round of
the playoffs.
From KHHS, Wright went to
Division III University of West
Alabama. He transferred to the
University of Kentucky in the
fall of 1995. Wright could only
participate on the Wildcats'
scout team that year because of
NCAA transfer rules, but made
the most of his opportunity,
earning the scout team's offen-
sive player award.
Wright had a pretty good
spring the following year,
though he sustained a few in-
juries, including a concussion.
Billy Jack Haskins was named
the starter that year, though he
and freshman Tim Couch split
playing time.
Athletics continued to be a
part of Wright's life after col-
lege, most notably at Arlington
Country Day, where he worked
for 10 years as a coach and ath-


the landfill he was required
to use was moved to Archer,
which increased fuel cost to
the point that it was no longer
profitable. Also in the 1980s,
he began to buy rear-loader
dumpsters, and eventually added
construction roll-offs. He now
serves Bradford, Union and
Baker counties with roll-offs,
and front-loading dumpsters to
Bradford and Union counties
and the city of. Lake Butler,
as well as regular pickups in
Bradford county.
Gaskins recalls several
strange happenings related to his
business over the years, but one
Really stands out in his mind.
"After dumping a load of
garbage at the landfill, I got a
call to tell me that what appeared
to be a human hand was in the
load," Gaskins said. "At the time,
I was providing pickup service
to P.K. Whiskers Taxidermy on
U.S. 301 in Starke. The owner,
Pam Kadlec, would freeze any
carcasses she needed to dispose
of, then set them out for me in
buckets. The 'hand'.was part of
her garbage for the day.
"It seems that Kadlec had
somehow acquired a dead
polar bear from a zoo and, after
skinning it out, she disposed of
the carcass in pieces, one paw


letic director.
Wright admitted he finds more
joy in his current position with
Athletes for College. He can en-
joy watching athletes at a variety
of schools with an unbiased eye.
"It gives me freedom," he
said. "I'm not tied to one sta-
dium, one gym, one school. I'm
able to bounce around and talk
.to everybody. I really enjoy it."
For Wright, it's certainly bet-
ter than working in the insur-
ance/financial field.
"Talking about someone's
basketball, volleyball or foot-
ball is a whole lot more fun than
talking about life insurance and
401Ks," he said.
If you'd like to know more
about Athletes for College,
please visit www.athletesforcol-
lege.com, or contact Wright
at 904-540-0961 or kevin.
wright2612@gmail.com.
You may also visit Kevin
Wright's Facebook profile
(www.facebook.com/kevin.
wright.583).


of which did eerily resemble a
human hand."
Gaskins has three grown
children. The youngest, Ryan,
works with his father in the
family business. The middle
child, daughter April, works in
retail management in Daytona,
while oldest son Adam is a
manager and welder at Great
American Trolley/Car Concepts
in Starke.
Gaskins largely attributes his
success to the willingness to do
whatever needed to be done.
"If you need to repair a
dumpster, learn to weld," he
said. "If your truck blows
a motor, learn to rebuild it
yourself. Never pay anyone to
do what you can do, or learn to
do, yourself. Of course, it also
helps to choose a line of u ork
that no one else wants to do."
Gaskins enjoys his life. He
is proud of his family and
the. business he has grown.
Although he has never really had
time for hobbies, he said that he
occasionally relaxes riding on
his motorcycle.
"I just get on it and go," he
said. "I get to the end of the
drive and just pick a direction
at random. The ride is what's
important, not the destination."


iO
SM


'.4'.


Richard S Morris, Agent
14793 US HWY 301 South
Starke, FL 32091
Bus: 904-966-0011
richard.s.morris.uwmc@statefarm.com


That's when you can count
on State Farms.
I know life doesn't come with a
schedule. That's why at State Farm
you can always count on me for
whatever you need 24/7, 365.
GET TO A BETTER STATE.
CALL ME TODAY.


10B


SStateFarm


State Farm, Home Office, Bloomington, IL


1101198.1