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STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00027795/05129
 Material Information
Title: Bradford County telegraph
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: L.C. Webb
Place of Publication: Starke Fla
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Starke (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Bradford County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Bradford -- Starke
Coordinates: 29.947222 x -82.108056
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 9, no. 41 (Apr. 13, 1888)-
General Note: Publishers: Mathews & Farmer, <1893-1897>; E.S. Mathews, <1900-1926>.
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579551
oclc - 33886096
notis - ADA7397
lccn - sn 95047406
System ID: UF00027795:05135
 Related Items
Preceded by: Starke telegraph

Full Text


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USPS 062-700 STARE, FLODA THURSDAY, JAN. 3, 2013 '. F-_i6 7 NS
USPS 062-700 STARKE, FLORIDA THURSDAY, JAN. 3, 2013 X ,y,1.......0-- 7 NTS


Worth Noting


Senior center
temporarily
relocated
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'' I 'Iil Ir ilnd ri r.h.c1 i ,i ) '-Li
calni L>li t) U)j tut aa gal lnc ul bin-
go.
Do you have issues with your
hearing or hearing aids? Once a
month, there is a specialist avail-
able to help with those issues.
There are also basic computer
classes. (Registration required
due to limited space.)
Need directions or want to find
out more about senior center ac-
tivities? Call or stop by the ex-
tension office and ask for Diane.
For a full calendar of events, visit
www.bradfordcountyfl.gov, or
find them on Facebook. For fur-
ther information please call 904-
368-3955.




Advocate for
children
During the holidays, we are all
busy with places to go and family
to see. What if you were a child
who had been taken away from
their parents due to neglect, abuse
or abandonment and were in a
home with strangers with no place
to go and no family to see.
This is the time of year for
thanksgiving and a chance to
make the choice to clear a few
hours a month from your schedule
to advocate for these children. Be-
come a Guardian ad Litem volun-
teer. Be the person for the children
who desperately need someone to
stand up for them, to be there for
them and to believe that they have
something to offer the world.
Be by' their sides not only to
advocate for their best interests in
court, but to support them through
lonely and distressing circum-
stances that no one should face
alone. Your input to the courts can
help find these children safe and
permanent homes.
Guardian volunteers are ordi-
nary people doing extraordinary
work. The program offers free
training, legal and staff assis-
tance. Volunteers commit to at
least one year and about 10 hours
per month.
The next classes starts Jan. 14.
Sign up before the holidays. Be
moved to make time to be there
for the child. Be moved to share
your blessings* Call 904-966-
6237, or go to www.gal.alachua.
fl.us for more information.




Food pantry
open at
True Vine
True Vine Ministry has a food
pantry that is open to the pub-
lic on the second Tuesday and
fourth Thursday of each month.
On Tuesday, the food pantry is
open from 11 a.m. to 1p.m. On
Thursday, the pantry is open from
4-5:30 p.m.
For more information, please
call True Vine Ministry at 904-
964-9264.


Construction low, real estate making comeback


BY MARK J. CRAWFORD
Telegraph Editor

It was another very slow year for
new construction in Bradford County,
according to the permit numbers re-
leased by the Bradford County Build-
ing and Zoning Department.
New home construction is still a
small fraction of what it was before
the housing bubble burst. Of the 23
new home construction permits pulled
in 2012, only six were pulled in the
city of Starke as part of a grant-fund-
ed effort to replace blighted homes.
Those combined with the four homes
built by grant funds the county re-
ceived were replacement homes that
do not represent new growth.
Twenty-three permits was still
more than the 16 pulled in 2011, the
lowest number in the past sevenyears.
New mobile home placement re-
mained constant from 2011, with 42
permits pulled. There were 12 more


mobile homes that were replaced in
the county.
Even the approximately 20 cabins
being built under a commercial permit
pulled by the Salvation Army camp in
near Keystone Heights were replace-
ments. It was one of only four com-
mercial permits issued in 2012. The
most notable was the State Farm of-
fice built south of Starke on U.S. 301.
Of the other two, one was a permit the
city of Starke used to build its stage
at the square downtown. The other
was for the small but colorful open-
air market at 301 and Southeast 1461h
Terrace.
While there might not be any new
homes to sell, Tom Smith of Cold-
well Banker Smith and Smith Realty
believes the local real estate market is
slowly starting to make a come back.
"2012 has definitely been improv-
ing, but it's been very slight and very
slow."
At Charnelle Whittemore Realty,


Reptiles as reward?
While it might qualify as torture for some, kids at Lawtey
Community School were thrilled with their positive behavior
rew.ard-getting up close and personal with animals from the LB
Reptile Experience. Reptile wrangler Bob Shumaker recoveringg
from a tarantula bite to the face) is pictured above introducing
Kaylee Tabet to one of his smaller friends. They got much bigger,
much longer and the teeth got much sharper as the presentation
progressed. For more photos of the kids., see page 3A.



Foreclosure leaves lives

scarred, homes empty


BY JAMES WILLIAMS
Special to the Telegraph

A foreclosure is the retaking of
someone's home by a mortgage lender
or others, after a homeowner fails to
make mortgage or tax payments for
a determined period. A foreclosure is
first and foremost a legal proceeding'
against the residents of the home; fore-
closure proceedings are included in the
realm of public information and usu-
ally lead to the homeowner's eventual
eviction..
The process begins by serving the
homeowner lis pendens, or suit pend-
ing, a notice that foreclosure proceed-
ings have begun. After that, said realty
agent Trevor Waters, the property may
be resold and the homeowner may be
evicted quickly, within six months or
so, and it may be two years or more
of legal proceedings before the home-
owner is finally told to vacate the prop-


Whittemore said 2012 has been a great
year for them. Even the expected late
summer slump never happened.
"Of course, it's a lot of short sales
and foreclosures keeping us busy that
really weren't moving as much for
us in the past couple of years, but we
didn't see a decrease at all. We've
been busy the whole entire year. It
was way better than last year and the
year before, actually," Whittemore
said.
Smith said the real estate market
seems to have bottomed out and peo-
ple are starting to shop for properties
again. They are taking advantage of
the low prices, but Smith said prices
are starting to rise slowly as well. In-
terest rates on financing are low-that
is when financing is available. Smith
said it has become really tough for
some would-be homebuyers to qual-
ify for loans.

See COMEBACK, 6A


Four

accidents,


three


fatalities

BY MARK J. CRAWFORD
Telegraph Editor

A handful of accidents-three with
fatalities-marred the holidays this
past week.
A pedestrian was struck and killed
on U.S. 301 in Starke on Saturday,
Dec. 29. At around 6:13 p.m., Bernard
A. Tavernia, 66, of Morrisonville,
N.Y., was crossing the highway in the
area of Andrews Street when he was
hit. Anthony S. Woods, 60, of Lake
Butler was driving the northbound
2001 Pontiac that hit Tavemia when
he stepped onto the highway.
The pedestrian was transported
to Shands at UF where he was pro-
nounced dead.
Alcohol was not a factor in the ac-
cident, according to the Florida High-
way Patrol report, and no charges
have been filed.
FHP said alcohol was involved in
the Sunday, Dec. 30, accident that
took place on C.R. 235. A Lawtey
man, Gary M. Denman, 31, flipped
the van he was driving, receiving seri-
ous injuries.
A 2-year-old who was also in the
van received minor injuries.
The vehicle, a Ford Freestar van,
was being driven south on 235 when
it traveled off the road onto the west
shoulder near Northwest 210' Lane.
When Denman attempted to correct,
he lost control of the vehicle, which
began rotating counterclockwise.
Crossing both lanes, the van spun onto
the east shoulder and struck a tree, and
he impact caused the van to overturn
onto its roof.
Denman was not wearing a seat-
belt, although the toddler was. He was
taken to Shands in Gainesville, and
the child was taken to Shands Starke.
Charges are pending.
A Union County man was killed at
the intersection of S.R. 121 and S.R.
100 near Lake Butler on Thursday,
Dec. 27. Mack Thomas Short, 57, was


See FATAL, 5A





Bradford County Pub/lic School

Calendar 2013


January 8 Students return
January 16 Early release day


0
,.--.
. ,


"," -'*^

a


,-,. .


erty.
Once foreclosed, the bank or lender
is free to resell the home without fork-
ing over any of the resulting proceeds
to the previous owner, no matter how
much he or she had paid into the home,
whether or nbt the resulting sale pro-
duces more revenue than the faulting
homeowner owed.
The homeowner may agree to a short
sale, which could give the homeowner
any cash from the sale above what is
owed and the mortgage is paid off.
Nevertheless, the homeowner moves
out and a new owner may or may not
move in.
Foreclosures have been in the news
over the-last five years, because of
the large number of them in America.
More than 11.5 million properties have
been repossessed from 2008 to the
present during the period we refer to as

See HOMES, 6A


january z I
February 6
February 18
Feb. 26-28
March 13
March 18-22
March 29


April 8-19
April 15-26
April 24
April 29
May 22
May 27
June 3-5
June 5
June 7


MLV jr. noliday
Early release day
Presidents Day holiday
Florida Writes testing
Early release day
Spring Break
Planning day/
End third nine weeks
FCAT retakes
FCAT testing
Early release day
Planning day
Early release day
Memorial Day holiday
Early release day
Students last day
Graduation


6 89076 63869 2


IL



('1
y~.

I,


DEADLINE MONDAY 5 P.M. BEFORE PUBLICATION PHONE (904) 964-6305 FAX (904) 964-8628
edit 0 bc9. -s h.g om r e *







2A BRADFORD COUNTY TELEGRAPH THURSDAY, JAN. 3,


Dub Murphree of Kingsley
Lake


Bonnie Simmons is taking Joan Barry plans to drink
a day-by-day approach to more water in 2013.
resolutions.


Dimple Overstreet wants Ralph Moulder hopes to
to start taking indoor cycle loose weight.
classes.


Win Armstrong hopes for:
good health for the world.


New year for self-improvement begins


BY MARY W. BRIDGMAN
Special to the Telegraph

New Year's resolutions have'
been around since the time of the
ancient Romans, who began each
'year by making promises to the
god Janus, for whom the month
of January is named. Medieval
knights took a vow at the end of
the Christmas season each year
to reaffirm their commitment
to chivalry. Modern Christians
--sometimes prepare for the year
,.-,ahead during watch night servic-
i:es by praying and making resolu-'
tions. Regardless of the impetus,
most resolutions have something
:to do with self-improvement.
Local residents of all ages em-
.-brace the custom. Dub Murphree
Sof Kingsley Lake says he wants
to do the best he can with every


day. Similarly, Bonnie Simmons
of Starke says she will make a
daily resolution to live better
each day during 2013.
Several folks, including Mar-
jorie Feinberg, organist/choir-
master at First Presbyterian
Church of Starke, said they shy
away from making resolutions
because they always break them.
A 2007 study indicates she's not
alone; 88 percent of those who
set New Year's resolutions fail,
despite the fact that 52 percent
of those studied were confident
of success at the beginning. Men
achieved their objectives more
often when they engaged in in-
cremental goal' setting, while
women did better when they
made their goals public and got
support from friends.
Schoolteacher Rhonda Parrott


said she always makes five reso-
lutions, because that increases
the odds of accomplishing at
least one of them.
Health-related goals are popu-
lar this year. Win Armstrong,
retired from a Jacksonville auto
dealership, says his hope for the
world is that everyone has good
health. Joan Barry of Starke has
resolved to drink 64 ounces of
water every day in an effort to
decrease her intake of diet soda,
which contains caffeine and can
'elevate her blood pressure. Dim-
ple Overstreet, proprietor of A
and G Gifts in Starke, says she is
resolving to participate in indoor
cycle classes at the Bradford-
Union Area Career Technical
Center. Ralph Moulder of King-
sley Lake, who recently retired
from the Florida Parole Com-


mission, says his doctor told him
to lose 10 pounds, so that's his
resolution.
Claire Wells, an eighth-grader
at Bradford Middle School, says
she wants to try harder on her
music studies. Wells plays flute
in the school band and has per-
formed solos during worship ser-
vices at her church. The teenager
thinks she might occasionally
"toot her own horn" a little too
much, so she's also resolving to
be more humble.
Wells' mother, Kristi, a first-
grade teacher at Southside El-
ementary School in Starke, said
she is resolving to try td achieve
balance in her life. After seeing
the movie "Les Mis6rables," she
said she also wants to be a giver
of grace and not just a recipient
of it. "I feel like I have received


Claire Wells and Mom Kristi made resolutions.

so much that I want to turn it around and share."


Bradford County Foreclosures, 2011-12
Commercial Foreclosures Homestead Residential Nonhomestead Residential Totals
$0-$49,999 $50,000-$249,999 $250,000+ $0-$49,999 $50,000-$249,999 $250,000+ $0-$49,999 $50,000-$249,999 $250,000+
2011 0 7 3 6 48 3 8 17 3 95
2012 0 4 5 8 113 7 7 38 5 187
Totals 0 11 8 14 161 10 15 55 8 282
Percent Total 0% 4% 3% 5% 57% 4% 5% 20% 3% 100%
SSurce: Bradford Coonty Clerk of the Court ,.,. r


Quad counties vary in foreclosure rates, impacts and recovery


BY JAMES WILLIAMS
Special to the Telegraph

With the possible exception of
the Mortgage Bankers Associa-
tion, professionals do not have
easy access to exact information
needed for a complete picture of
foreclosures; not any given cir-
cuit court, county office or zip
code.
A county clerk of the court's
office can tell you how many
foreclosures have been filed in
their area in a given period, but
can't necessarily tell you wheth-
er that number is low or high by
comparison to the county or the
county next door. The clerk of
court's office cannot, without the
': same research available to ev-
:z.ryone else, tell you how many
-..housing units there are in a given
;area.
: The property appraiser's office
-,::'an tell you how many parcels.
here are in a county, and can tell"
-you whether a specific property
'-,is under Toreclosure, but may not
be able to say much about the big
picture on foreclosures.
Then too, during the long
housing crisis, parameters in
computer applications some-
times changed. New techniques
for recording the data were ad-
opted and pieces of information
a.hought to be insignificant one
: "-year became significant the next.
-The result was finding complete
:information for a five-year pe-
riod came to be a two-step, more
Complicated process.
c For a full 'but simple picture
of foreclosures here, we needed
three numbers from reliable
sources: the total number of
S-housing units in an area (a county
in this case), the total number of
foreclosures in the county and the
number of resales of foreclosed
properties. This tells us what
percentage of total properties in
a county were foreclosed, and, of
'those, how many are back in ser-
vice after being repurchased, and
how many still sit idle.
There is a note of caution here:
For some sources, like the North-
east Florida Association of Real-
tors, RealtyTrac arid others, the
numbers may change from one
day to the next, depending on


how frequently they receive new
information, and how frequently
they update their own Web page.
We noticed large differences
between some Web sites and the
county property appraiser's of-
fice on total housing units in a
county. This could be because
what housing Web sites are
tracking can be different than
what the property appraiser's of-
fice is appraising.
A staffer at the Clay County
property appraiser's office said
even their numbers may change
by a few after certification each
year.

Bradford's clerk of
the court anchors
an overview
At the Bradford County Clerk
of the Court's Office, Lisa Bran-
non can say how many foreclo-
sure notices were actually filed
during the five-year period, 2008
to early December 2012.
The Bradford clerk's office
was among those who rethought
parameters and the computer
application that allows them to


track the numbers between 2008
and this year.
As with all foreclosure data-
bases, sometimes a foreclosure
process was stopped and started
again on the same property. In
other words, there are a few cas-
es in the Bradford clerk's total
number that are duplicates-the
same property was foreclosed
on, a lis pendens was issued,
more than once.
"But there aren't very many of
those," Brannon said.
There were 139 foreclosure
filings in 2008, 172 in 2009, 140
in 2010, 95 during 2011 and 187
through Dec. 4,.2012. That indi-
cates a total of 733 foreclosures
in Bradford County over the pe-
riod.
According to RealtyTrac, in
October 2012, Bradford showed
only seven foreclosed properties
for the month, or one in every
1,002 of the county's total prop-
erty. .
NEFAR showed 249 resells of
foreclosed properties, between
2008 and 2012. That gives Brad-
ford a repurchase rate of about
34 percent of all properties fore-


Chamber of Commerce J .
NFRCC is now offering the FBAT for entry level
Corrections Officers and the FCJBAT for entry level
Police Officers.
Please contact Susan Norman at North Florida
Regional Chamber of Commerce at (904) 964-5278
to schedule an appointment.


t&rabforb Countp ttelegrapl),
USPS 062-700
Published each Thursday and entered as Periodical Postage


't ., Paid at Starke. Florida under Act of March 3, 1879.
(- P POSTMASTER: Send address changes to:
Bradford County.Telegraph
131 West Call Street Starke, Florida 32091
Phone: 964-6305*- P.O. Drawer A Starke, FL 32091
John M. Miller, Publisher


Subscription Rate in Trade Area
$39.00 per year
$20.00 six months
Outside Trade Area:
$39.00 per year.
$20.00 six rrmonths


Editor: Aarf J. Crawford
Sports Editor: Cliff Snelley
Advertising. Kevin Miller
Darlene Dougla ,
Typesetting Eileen Gilmore
Advertising and
Newspaper Prod. Earl W Ray
Classified Adv Mary Johnson
Bookkeeping: Joan Stewart-Jones


closed on in Bradford County
between 2008 and the end of the
year, 2012.
SThe takeaway on foreclosures
in Bradford County, then, is that
compared to Florida, the nation
and surrounding counties, Brad-
ford County got off fairly lightly


in the housing foreclosure de- higher than Clay's 33 percent,
bacle. Only about 5 percent of but not as good a record as Put-
Bradford's total property units nam's 39 percent resell rate.
fell into foreclosure, compared
with Clay County's 14 percent.
The 34 percent of all fore- See VARY, 8A
closed properties that have since
been resold since 2008, is a tad


The Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT), District 2, will conduct a public hearing
for the proposed improvements to US 301 (SR 200) in Bradford County, Florida. The
hearing will be held Thursday, January 10, 2013, at the Bradford County Fair
Association, Building 1, 2300 N. Temple Avenue, Starke, Florida. The hearing will
begin as an open house at 4:30 p.m. with a formal presentation at 6:30 p.m. The proposed
improvements involve US 301 (SR200) from CR 227 to CR 233, a distance of 7.3 miles.

This public hearing is being held to give interested persons an opportunity to express their
views concerning the location, conceptual design, and social, economic and environmental
effects of the proposed improvements and in accordance with Federal Executive Orders
11990 and 11988. The locally preferred alternative will provide a new four-lane, limited
access roadway west of Starke. Overpasses will be constructed over CR 100A, the CSX
railroad arid CR 229. -Grade separated interchanges will be constructed to provide access at
SR 100 and SR 16.

As of December 20, 2012, draft project documents will be available for review at the
Bradford County Library, 456 W. Pratt Street, Starke, Florida and at the FDOT District
Office, 1109 S. Marion Avenue, Lake City, Florida.

Persons wishing to submit written statements may do" so at the hearing or send them to
Stephen Browning at the address provided below no later than January 22, 2013. All
statements postmarked on or before January 22, 2013, will become part of the public
hearing record.

Public participation is solicited without regard to race, color, religion, sex, age, national
origin, disability or family status. Persons who require special accommodations under the
Americans with Disabilities Act or persons who require translation services (free of charge)
should contact Stephen Browning at the number provided at least 7 days before the hearing.

Stephen Browning, P.E.
Florida Department of Transportation
1109 S. Marion Avenue, MS 2007
Lake City, FL 32025
(386) 961-7455 or (800) 749-2967 ext. 7455
Email: stephentbrowning@dot.state.fl.us
www.us301starkescom

FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION


I n..





THURSDAYJAN. 3, 2013 BRADFORD COUNTY TELEGRAPH 3A


Jan. 9, ZU13
We love you! Happy Birthday!
Wayne, Rusty, Pam, ?, Sabrina &
Brian


I Love You,
Jalen, Ja'mez & Jyson
!^K ^ :^A. . .i~r!5g--*a>cs*


www.facebook.com/BradfordTelegraph


New & Used
Deer Rifles
Shotguns
Springfield XD Beretta Taurus
Glock Ruger Bersa
Smith & Wesson Hi-Point
Holsters & accessories

-AMMO All Calibersi

I Bradford Gun & Pawn
Mo n- Fri 9-5
904-964-5440 Sat. 10-2
1401 Hwy 301 w acpt all major credit
Starke, FLcards & Debt too!







4A BRADFORD COUNTY TELEGRAPH THURSDAY, JAN. 3,


Tl4UtJ1CJA BteHS/


Bradford Baplist Church.
I-.L JtcJ n S R 100. I 3 m io_.
ej-i ..' 1 I N 1 (1. icl%.elonmes the
Bill Rice Ranch eani'elIal
I.Cim Ithe mr;,rninr r :.I ':undaj,.
-in h Thic iearnm ill pr.:' i'-i
n1iu3t, as wellC aC speakers
during Sunday school at 10
a.m. and the worship service
at 11 a.m. Bill Rice Ill will be
speaking during the 11 a.m.
service. For more information,
please call Pastor Rick Jackson
at 904-964-3708.


'7
N


/ I
lawi
large
like cluster of pin
it, and how should


Thanks for brir
for me to look at,
quickly, because
volunteered in my
either, and I aske
Ouinlev of Maccle


Pine Le'el Baptist Church
, ill h.t the Bill Rice Ranch
I carm *n Sundj\. Jan 6. for:
the e erring ser ice. The\ % ill
he miriirlerlno through mu_.i.'
and preijhing' All are in\ lied
tOL atcend.

St. Edward Catholic Church
in Starke invites everyone
to the showing of "Amazed
and Afraid-The Revelation
of God Become Man" from
"Catholicism: Journey Around
the World and Deep into the
Faith" by the Rev. Robert


Barron on Wednesday, Jan. 9,
at 12:30 p.m. and 7 p.m. in the
church social hall.

Email the details of your
congregation's upcoming
special events to editor@
bctelegraph.com. DEADLINE
IS MONDAYAT5 P.M.


4iioss the acarde^ Fetce

Across the Garden outside in pots, and
Fence is a new column that will restrict its
sponsored by the Bradford size somewhat. '
County Extension Service. Pagoda plant does
Readers who wish to pose well in shade to part 4
gardening questions should sun. It needs a lot
forward them to Mary Bridg- of water to keep the
man atjtd@ufl.edu. large, lish leaves from *
drooping. The more ,' tlj
I have a plant growing in my sun it gets the more /
n that I cannot identify. It has water it will need.
green leaves and a snowball- You can fertilize >.
ik star-shaped flowers. What is the plant in late spring
Id I care for it? and summer. TQ keep
Nancy Roberts, the plant in bounds, Mary W. Bridgman
Keystone Heights try cutting it back be-
nging a sample of the plant by tween flushes of bloom. If winter temperatures
Nancy. I was able to identify it drop to freezing, this plant will freeze to the ground
a number of these plants have and return in the spring.
yard. I didn't know what it was
d another master gardener, Sue My gardenia bush has lots of yellow leaves.
ennv what it was. What's wrong with it?


She told me it was a pagoda plant, Clerodendrum
paniculatum, and it can be very difficult to control.
To me, the plant has a distinctive, musty odor, and
I noticed that your plant had the same scent when
I tore one of the leaves and took a sniff. Just a re-
minder that sight is not the only one of our fivP I
sefises that is useful in plant care and identification.
This plant is not a houseplant. You can grow it






n.
0x


The Bradford County Public
Library is located at 456 W. Pratt
St. in Starke. For a full sched-
ule of events, pick up a calendar
from the front desk today. You
can also get the latest BGPL
news and event notifications on
Facebook at www.facebook.
com/bradfordlibrary. For more
information on these programs
or other services, please call 904-
368-3911 or visit www.bcpli-
brary.com.

Fairy tales and rhymes
Teetering toddlers, bouncing
babies and precious preschool-
ers will be overjoyed to know
that it's almost time for stories
and rhymes. Preschool Storytime
begins at fo a.m. on Wednesday,
Jan. 9. Baby Rhymetime begins
at 11 a.m. on Friday, Jan. 11.
Schedules are available at Brad-
ford County Public Library.


The man in motion
This January, the man who
rocked and rolled through the
hearts of many and rattled the
rules of entertainment will be fea-
tured at the library in observance
of his birthday. At 1 p.m. on Fri-
day, Jan. 4, join us for a viewing
of "Viva Las Vegas" and let the
bright light city set your soul onf
fire. Then journey to the tropics
when we show "Blue Hawaii" at
11 a.m. on Tuesday, Jan. 8.
After that, things heat up even


Bonnie Simmons,
Starke
This is a common condition with gardenias.
Plants will become yellow or chlorotic due to a
deficiency of one or more micronutrients, but the
problem is usually related to iron. You can buy a
liquid iron spray and apply it to the bush, following
the'directions on the product label.
Yellowing of leaves may also be due to other
causes,' such as insufficient light, overwatering,
or poor drainage, soil temperature that is too low,
nematode damage or disease. Some yellowing on
older leaves is normal and may
occur during the fall and win- ASTER
ter months before new growth ? "GRR
appears. I'm guessing that light
and water are not the issue with
your plant, but there may be ,,,
some seasonal shedding. Hope-
fully, a little iron will solve the
problem. Good luck! UF OW A
: IFAS Exe-ion


more when Elvis proves that he
can do more than sing and shake
in the movie "King Creole,"
which We will watch at 6 p.m.
on Thursday, Jan. 10. We'll give
you a couple of weeks to cool off
before taking you to, the slammer
in "Jailhouse Rock" at 6 p.m. on
Thursday, Jan. 31.

Elvis is in the stacks
Pack your blue suede shoes
and hop aboard Marie Vernon's
Graceland Express for a wild
ride to Memphis with loveable
characters. The twists and turns
in this crime caper will leave you
all shook up. We will discuss the
highs and the lows at 6 p.m. on
Tuesday, Jan. 29.

Early release for teens
When Bradford High School
gets out early on Wednesday,
Jan. 16, the action begins at
Bradford County Public Library.
With several Wii and Xbox
games available, come play at
the library and challenge your
friends.

Bingo rocks
The cage spins, anticipation
builds, and the balls roll out until
someone shouts Bingo. *That's
the rhythm that keeps us com-
ing back for more. Book bingo
is moving to Mondays in 2013.
The first one is at 10 a.m. on Jan.
28.




A M A
AVcATI. .. .


Learn to use your gifts
Did you get a new smart phone
or e-reader for Christmas? Or
maybe you already have one, but
haven't quite figured out how to
use it. Learn about these devices
for free by attending classes in
January!
On Thursday, Jan. 3,,ye .will
show you how smart your smart
phone really can be and will help
you use it to its fullest potential.
On Thursday, Jan. 24, learn how
to download books onto e-read-
ers. Both classes begin at 6 p.m.
Preregistration is recommended.

Get to know Publisher
With Microsoft Publisher
software, users can customize
Facebook cover photos, cre-
ate collages of holiday images,
publish flyers with tear off tags,
design calendars for 2013, com-
bine family photos with family
recipes for a cookbook to pass
on to the next generation, make
a genealogy scrapbook, mail, out
family newsletters, and much
more.
The class begins at 10 a.m. on
Wednesday, Jan. 30. Seating is
limited.



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AIRLINES ARE

HIRING


Train for hands on Aviation Carper.
FAA approved program.
Financial aid if qualified Housing available.
CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance
866-314-3769


118 S. Thompson Street

Studio 6 Salon
Paul Mitchell Professional Services
Carrie Barrick
904-344-6399
Nurtured Nails
Specializing in'Shellac Nails
& Pedicures
Tammy Wadsworth
352-278-2337

Faces
~Special occasion makeovers~-
Proms Weddings Special Events
352-445-0709


Skin Essentials
Facials by Dana
Facials Skincare Waxing
904-910-8493

Spa Packages Available


- A Fun Place to Visit!

Libby's Art of Healing
Massage Studio
.c.-: ..:,r, in Customized Therapeutic Massage'
Kristina Libby
MA 45159 MM 26273
904-982-2873
*$35 NEW CLIENT SPECIAL*

METE'S ANTIQUES
&0'p/.EC1J WIS *MA'r'2S
Gold & Silver
Bought Sold Traded
Antiques Art Jewelry
352-445-0709 -


The Shoppe
Vintage, Estate & Sterling Jewelry
Latain Peterson 352-445-0709
Essential Oils- Decorative Flags
En Find us on Facebook


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Aitwntoiutm Skvde


Sut.;a m A.IMIZE

T s woLM .


Bizz's5 foha
'outique an ique
A little bit crazy and a whole lot of fun
Two GREAT businesses now are ONE!
Please pardon our dust as we make room for two.
We hope you love the SPRI NKLES we designed just for youl
108 E. Call St.
904-964-7866 Starke. FL

Cay's Barber Shop
118 North Walnut Street
Next door to Post Office, across from Florida Theater
Starke, FL
Phil Gale
904-263-2770 352-222-8758








American Paper Company
435 E. Madison St. Starke, FL
,i' 904-964-4092
-, H: Birthday Balloons Piliaias
-iO > Wedding Reception Baby Shower
/' Seasonal and Party Supplies
-. I Ship your UPS Pkgs Herel
Check us out on Facebook!

2 FOR $20 DINNERS
THURS/FRI NITES
06Ol de NeeF30 Ph4

S Cafe -

200 East Call St. Starke, FL
964-7997
NEW HOURS:
Mon-Tues-Wed 6:30am 3parm
Thurs-Fri 6:30am-pm Sat 6:30am 2pm Closed Sunday
IT'S YOUR DAY BRIDAL
212 E. Call St. Starke, FL
904-964-3100
NEWHORS


>:5


Shop Local...
Support our local businesses.
These businesses help support
our schools, youth groups,
churches & more.!


'Joli Cheveux
SALON & SPA
S0/ OF ALL CHEMICAL
.1 / OWrr SERVICES
- .. . W ith thnisA Poi
101 East Call St.
Starke, FL 904-964-5900

VIRGIL A. BERRY, D.C., DABFP
Chiropractic Physician

BACK & NECK PAIN CLINIC
601 E. CALLSTREET (904) 964-8018
STARKE, FLORIDA 32091

W/f'4 /.1 cfrceby,
14 W. Madison St. Starke, Florida 32091
Family Owned and Operated
Vicki Williams Skinner
/ Gemologist
; Jeweliry Repair, Castings & Custom Designs
-Fr, 0- 5"Doctor of JewelryArts
S 5- 2 t\ (904) 964-7064
4.. JEWELS AND THREADS
,,' 106 W. Call St Starke, FL
Jewelry making, sewing and AKE BEAUTIFU
crochet classes PERSoNALIZED
Hours: 9:30-5:00 CHRISTMIAS
iewelsandthreads@hotmail.com GIFTSI
Cell: 904-769-4175 Shop: 904-368-0665





Early Bird

DINNERS
4:30 6:30
DAILY (Closed Mondays)

JUST 699$899
301 East Call St. downtown Starke


RISTORANTE ITALIANO


Tues All-You-Can-Eat
Lasanga................. $8.95
Wed All-You-Can-Eat
Spaghetti.........$5.95
Thurs Buy 1 Pizza w/2 toppings
Get one FREE.........$14.95
(904)964-9900
127 E. Call ST* Starke

A&G Gifts
Come in and check out our
50% OFF SALE
on retiring Vera Bradley styles and colors Also check
"t our new JILZARA clay bead jewelrey We also
carry Kameleon Jewel Pop jewelry along with
numerous other lines in our Gift Shop
S S ^ Nh.


~Q~i~5e~ at S/AC' 1)/A(? ) e~


74 S. Wanu S. -take F
(Lcted o l30 Sotv!h)


I _-








THURSDAY, JAN. 3, 2013 BRADFORD COUNTY TELEGRAPH 5A


FATAL
Continued from 1A

traveling alone when he went
off the road around 4:42 p.m.
His 1994 Toyota pickup was
southbound on 121 when it left
the roadway. Short lost control
of the truck when he attempted
to correct, according to the FHP
report. The vehicle spun coun-
terclockwise and flipped several
times.
Short, who was not wearing
a seatbelt, was ejected from the
vehicle.
Finally, an 8-year-old Gaines-
ville girl, Holly F. Bunting,
was killed and her 10-year-old
brother was seriously injured in
an accident in Union County on
Friday, Dec. 28.
The accident took place
around 4:50 p.m. on S.R. 121 at
C.R. 239A. The 2003 Ford SUV
being driven by their grandmoth-
er, Faith P. Banks, 57, of Lake
Butler was traveling north on
121 when she steered it into the
path of a southbound semitruck
driven by 62-year-old Michael


Gargano of Bronson while both
were attempting to turn onto
239A. The truck driver attempt-
ed to stop but could not avoid the


collision.
Banks sustained minor inju-
ries and was transported with the
children to Shands in Gaines-


ville.
According to the report, charg-
es are pending.


Quilters

connecting

with others
The Sunshine Quilters will be
meeting on Wednesday, Jan. 9,
from 1-3 p.m. in the large meet-
ing room of the Bradford County
Extension Office, 2266 N. Tem-
ple Ave.
The Bradford County Exten-
sion Office will be their tempo-
rary home while the senior center
is in use by emergency medical
services, giving the group an op-
portunity to connect with sewers
and quilters and wannabes of all
ages.
One of the programs planned is
a Dollies Without Borders work-
shop for 4-H members. The quil-
ters are looking for adults who
would like to help. Examples of
the dollies are currently living in
the extension office.
The Jan. 9 meeting will focus
on upcoming projects the group
would like to undertake. Show
and tell items, especially proj-
ects you are currently working
on are, of course, very welcome.


Miss Minnie's beginning quilt-
ing class members will work on
their log cabin quilts. January
2013 would be the perfect time
to join the hundreds of students
who have been introduced tb the
wonderful' world of quilting by
Miss Minnie.
The Sunshine Quilters will
also meet every fourth Wednes-
day, from 1-3 p.m. so Miss Min-
nie's students will have two in-
structional meetings each month.
All ages and levels of sewing are
welcome at all Sunshine QuilteFs
meetings.
For more information contact
Kathy Still at stillpe@aol.com or
call Emily Schaefer at 352-485-
2624.


Want a high-

paying career?
If you want a chance to earn
high wages, you need to check
out the various career-training
opportunities available at the
Bradford-Union Area Career and
Technical Center in Starke.
Call 904-966-6764 to find out
more.


HLEGALSI


r


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, EIGHTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
BRADFORD COUNTY, FLORIDA.
CASE NO.: 04-2009-DR-0407
LATISHA D. NICHOLS,
Petitioner,
vs
JUSTIN N. FARMER,
Respondent.
AMENDED NOTICE OF
ACTION.
TO: LATISHA D.,NICHOLS
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a Verified
Petition to Disestablish Paternity has
been filed against you.
You are required to serve a'copy of
your written defenses, it any, to the
action on the Petitioner's Attorney
whose name and address is HUGH
D. FISH, JR., at P.O. Box 531,
Macclenny, Florida 32063, on or
before January 13th, 2013 and file the
original with the Clerk of Court, either
before service on the petitioner's
attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a Final
Judgement upon Verified Petition to
Disestablish Paternity will be entered
for the relief demanded in the petition.
WITNESS my hand and Seal of this
Cdurt on this 29" day of
November, 2012.
As Clerk of the Court
BY: Lisa Brannon
Deputy Clerk
12/13 4tchg 1/3-BCT

NOTICE OF SHERIFF'S SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
THAT PURSUANT TO A WRIT OF
EXECUTION hereby issued out of
the County Court, Alachua County,
Florida, Case No. 96-2563-CC on
1-1/14/2012 in the matter of (Levy), I
Gordon Smith, As Sheriff of Bradford
County, Florida, have levied upon
all the right, title and interest of the
defendants) Robert A. Smith to wit:
2008 Ford Ranger, VIN
1FTYR10D68PA21875
And on 01/18/2013 in front of
Bradford County Court House at
9:00 a.m., or as soon thereafter as
circumstances permit, I will offer the
above described property for sale
at public outcry and sell the same,
subject to ALL prior liens, if any,
to the highest and best bidder for
CASH IN HAND, plus Florida Sales
Tax, if applicable, the proceeds to
be applied as far as may be to the
payment of costs and satisfaction of
the above described execution. The
above described property 'may be
viewed up to 30 minutes prior to the
scheduled sale time. In accordance
with the American with Disabilities
Act, persons needing a special
accommodations to participate in
this proceeding shall contact the
individual or agency sending notice
not later than seven days prior to the
proceeding at the address given on
notice. Telephone: (904) 966-2276.
Gordon Smith As Sheriff
Of Bradford County, Florida,
By: Chuck Johnson,
Deputy Sheriff
12/20 4tchg 1/10-BCT
BOARD OF COUNTY
COMMISSIONERS OF
BRADFORD COUNTY,
FLORIDA'
REQUEST FOR BIDS
THE BOARD OF COUNTY
COMMISSIONERS OF BRADFORD
COUNTY, FLORIDA
IS REQUESTING COMPETITIVE
BIDS FROM'QUALIFIED VENDORS
FOR THE SUPPLY OF LIME ROCK
TO BRADFORD COUNTY.
INSTRUCTIONS AND BID FORMS
CAN BE PICKED-UP AT THE
BRADFORD COUNTY CLERK'S
OFFICE, BRADFORD COUNTY
COURTHOUSE, 945 N. TEMPLE
AVENUE, STAKE, FLORIDA 32091
OR FROM THE COUNTY WEBSITE
AT
www.bradfordcountyfl.gov.
BIDS MUST BE RETURNED IN
SEALED ENVELOPES TO THE
AFOREMENTIONED ADDRESS
AND WILL BE ACCEPTED UNTIL
JANUARY 17, 2013 AT 10:00 AM.
BIDS WILL BE READ ALOUD
IN THE BRADFORD COUNTY
COMMISSION ROOM, LOCATED
IN THE NORTH WING OF
THE BRADFORD COUNTY
COURTHOUSE ON THE
.AFOREMENTIONED DATE AND
TIME.
THE BOARD OF COUNTY
COMMISSIONERS OF BRADFORD
COUNTY, FLORIDA
RESERVES THE RIGHTTO ACCEPT
OR REJECT ANY OR ALL BIDS,
AWARD ALL OR PART OF THE BID,
WAIVE ANY TECHNICALITY WITH
REGARD TO THE BIDS, EXERCISE
ITS LOCAL PREFEIDENCE
ORDINANCE AND TO INTERPRET
THE BID SPECIFICATIONS IN THE
BEST INTEREST OF BRADFORD
COUNTY.


12/27 3tchg 1/10-BCT
LEGAL NOTICE
REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS
The North Central Florida Regional
Planning Council is accepting
proposals from qualified agencies or
firms for the award of a contract to
coordinate transportation services for
the transportation disadvantaged in
Bradford County, Florida. The selected
contractor will be the designated
Community Transportation
Coordinator under Florida's
Transportation Disadvantaged
Program, as authorized by Chapter
427, Florida Statutes, and more
fully described in Rule 41-2 of the
Florida Administrative Code.
The Community Transportation
Coordinator is defined by Chapter
427, Florida Statues as a
transportation entity recommended
by the appropriate designated
official planning agency to ensure
that coordinated transportation
services are provided to the
transportation disadvantaged
population in a designated service
area. The Community Transportation
Coordinator has full
responsibility, for the delivery of
transportation .services for the
transportation disadvantaged as
outlined in Section 427.015(2),
Florida Statutes.
The complete Request for Proposals
(REP) will be available January 4,
2013 at http://www.ncfrpc.org/. It may
also be obtained by calling Ms. Lynn
Godfrey, AICP, Senior Planner at
352.955.2200, ext. 110. Experience
with eligibility-based transportation
services is required.
A mandatory pre-proposal conference
will be held January 17, 2013 in
the North Central Florida Regional
Planning Council Charles F Justice
Conference Room located at 2009
NW 67th Place, Gainesville, Florida
at 11:00 a.m., Eastern Standard
Time, to answer questions about
the Request for Proposals. Inquiries
about this Request for Proposals
must be made in person at the pre-
proposal conference. Firms and
agencies represented will have an
opportunity to clarify any information
contained in the request for proposals
at the pre-proposal conference.
Proposals must be received by
3:00 p.m., Eastern Standard Time,
February 15, 2013 at the office of
the North Central Florida Regional
Planning Council. Five (5) copies
of the proposal must beisubmitted
to: North Central Florida Regional
Planning Council, ATTENTION: Scott
R. Koons, AICP, Executive Director,
2009 N.W. 67th Place, Gainesville,
Florida 32653-1603. One of these
copies must be a clean, single-sided
original that can be used to make
additional copies. The outside of the
envelope or box containing proposals
must be marked "PROPOSAL
FOR BRADFORD COUNTY
COMMUNITY TRANSPORTATION
COORDINATOR." Faxed and
electronically mailed responses will
not be accepted.
The North Central Florida Regional
Planning Council will not accept
responsibility for proposals that are
not marked and submitted in this
manner. Proposals are to remain in
effect for ninety (90) calendar days
from date of submission. The North
Central Florida Regional Planning
Council reserves the right to reject
any or all proposals, to waive any
formality concerning proposals or
negotiate changes to the proposals
whenever such rejection or waiver
or negotiation is in the best interest
of the State and transportation
disadvantaged. Failure to file a protest
within the time prescribed in Section
120.57(3), Florida Statutes, shall
constitute a waiver of proceedings
under Chapter 120, Florida Statutes.
1/3 ltchg-BCT
STATE OF FLORIDA,
DEPARTMENT OF MILITARY
AFFAIRS
PUBLIC ANNOUNCEMENT
INVITATION TO BID *
The State of Florida, Department of
Military Affairs (DMA), Construction &
Facility Management Office (CFMO)
requests bids from State of Florida
registered licensed General Building
Contractors (GC) for the following
project located at Camp Blanding
Joint Training Center, Starke, FL.
PROJECT: 212011 EOD ARMORY
FOR COMPLETE INFORMATION
& SUBMISSION REQUIREMENTS
YOU MUST GO TO THE
MYFLORIDA.COM VENDOR BID
SYSTEM ON OR AFTER JANUARY
4, 2013 AT http://vbs.dms.state.fl.us'
vbs/main_menu.
FUNDING: The State of Florida's
performance and obligation to, pay
under this contract is contingent upon
availability of funding and an annual
appropriation by the Legislature.
MANDATORY SITE VISIT: As stated
on the Vendor Bid System
BID OPENING: As stated on the
Vendor Bid System
GENERAL STATEMENT OF WORK:
This project includes purchase


and construction .of an 8,000 (+/-)
square foot pre-engineered metal
building including but not limited
to: Compliance with current Florida
Building Code, Florida Energy Code,
ADA compliance, and LEED Silver
Certified. Detailed work will include
site work, concrete, masonry, steel
framing and decking, cabinetry and
finish carpentry, men and women's
restrooms, new doors, new finishes,
new roofing, new mechanical
systems, new electrical systems, and
new plumbing systems. Complete
details will be available on the
MyFloridaMarketPlace Vendor Bid
System.
The Department reserves the right to
either reject any and all submissions
or accept minor irregularities in the
best interest of the DMA.
POINT OF CONTACT: Department of
Military Affairs, Construction & Facility
Management Office, Contracting
Branch (904) 823-0255, 823-0256 or
827-8544 or e-mail cfmocontracting @
ng.army.mil.
Faxed or e-mailed bids are not
acceptable and will not be considered.
All instructions must be complied with
and requested data must be included
in order for your firm to be considered
for this project. All information
received will be maintained with the
Department and will not be returned.
Request for private meetings by
individual firms will not be granted. No
individual verbal communication shall
take place between any applicants
and the Owners or Owner's
representatives. Request for any
additional information, clarifications,
or technical questions must be
requested in writing.
Be sure to visit the above web site to
view the entire advertisement.
1/3 ltchg-BCT
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR BRADFORD COUNTY,
FLORIDA
Case No. 04-2012-CP- 0097
IN RE: The Estate of
ELSIE M. UNDERHILL,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the Estate
of ELSIE UNDERHILL, deceased,
whose date of death was November
18, 2011, is pending in the Circuit
Court for Bradford County, Florida,
the address of which is 945 N. Temple
Avenue, Starke, Florida 32091. The
names and addresses of the personal
representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set forth
below.
All creditors of Decedent and other
persons having claims or demands
against Decedent's estate on whom
a copy of this notice is required to be
served must file their
claims with this court WITHIN THE
LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS
AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE
OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE
DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.


All other creditors of Decedent and
other persons having Claims or
demands against Decedent's estate
must file their claims with this court
WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS
AFTER. THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN
THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH
IN SECTION 733.702, FLORIDA
STATUTES, WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY
CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YE4RS OR
MORE AFTER DECEDENT'S DATE
OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this
notice is January 3, 2013.
RESPECTFULLY SUBMITTED this
28th day of December, 2012.
WILLIAM E. SEXTON
Florida Bar Number 0037197
BROWN & SEXTON
486 North TempleAvenue
Starke, Florida 23091-,
Telephone (904) 964-8272
Facsimile (904) 964-3796
1/3 2tchg 1/10-BCT
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR BRADFORD COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.: 04-2012-CA-0182
TD BANK, NATIONAL
ASSOCIATION,
a national banking association,
Plaintiff,
vs.
TERRY F BARRICK; RICHARD E.
BARRICK; and JOHN diOfE nd JANE
DOE, unknown parties in possession,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to the Final Judgment of
Foreclosure dated November 26,
2012 (the "Judgment"), entered in
Civil Case No. 04-2012-CA-000182
of the Circuit Court of the Eighth
Judicial Circuit in and for Bradford
County, Florida, in which TD BANK,
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, is
Plaintiff and TERRY F. BARRICK
and RICHARD E. BARRICK are the
Defendants.
The Clerk of Court will sell the Property
as defined in the Judgment and as
set forth below at a public sale on
January 17, 2013 at 11:00 a.m. to the
"highest bidder," for cash in the front
lobby, Bradford County Courthouse,
945 North Temple Avenue, Starke,
Florida, in accordance with Section
45.031, Florida Statutes.
The "highest bidder" for purposes of
this Notice of Sale, is defined as the
party who bids the largest amount of
money to purchase the Property (as
defined below) and who completes
the sale in a timely fashion, as
hereinafter set out. The one who
bids the largest amount of money to
purchase the Property (as defined
below) shall be permitted to complete
the sale by delivering to the Clerk, the
balance of such bid, over and above
the deposit, by 3:00 p.m. on the day


of the sale.
The following property located in
Bradford County, Florida, is the
subject of this Notice of Sale:
A parcel of land lying in the SW 1/4 of
the SE 1/4 of NW 1/4 of Section 21,
Township 5 South, Range 22 East,
Bradford County, Florida; said parcel
being more particularly described as
follows:
Commence at a concrete monument
found at the SW corner of said SW
1/4 of SE 1/4 of NW 1/4 ,and run
along the Westerly boundary thereof,
174.88 feet to an iron pipe found
on the Northerly boundary of the
Right of Way of County Road 225
(formerly SR 225), said Northerly
boundary being on a curve concave
to the South and having a radius of
3849.83 feet; thence Southeasterly
along said Northerly boundary and
along the arc of said curve, 389.32
feet as measured along a chord
having a bearing of South 77 degrees
58 minutes 00 seconds East, to a
concrete monument found at the
end of said curve; thence South 75
degrees 05 minutes 00 seconds
East, along said Northerly boundary,
164.73 feet to a found iron pipe for
the Point of Beginning; from Point of
Beginning thus described continue
South 75 degrees 05 minutes 00
seconds East, along said Northerly
boundary 108.70 feet to an iron pipe
-found on the Westerly boundary of
NW 24th Street (a county graded
road); thence North 00 degrees 05
minutes 00 seconds West, along
said Westerly boundary 221.48 feet
to a found iron pipe; thence South
b89 degrees 55 minutes 00 seconds
West, 105.00 feet to a found iron pipe;
thence South 00 degrees 05 minutes
00 seconds East, parallel with the last
said Westerly boundary, 193.38 feet
to Point of Beginning
together with all existing or
subsequently erected or affixed
buildings, improvements, and fixtures
(the "Property").
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any, other
than the property owner as of the
date of the Lis Pendens, must file a
claim within 60 days after the sale.
DATED on Nov. 26, 2012.
RAY NORMAN
Clerk of Circuit Court
By: Lisa Brannon
Deputy Clerk
Lawrence P. Rochefort, Esquire
Noelle Page Pankey, Esquire
AKERMAN SENTERFITT
Esperante Building, 4th Floor
222 Lakeview Avenue, Suite 400
West Palm Beach, FL 33401
Telephone: (561) 653-5000
Facsimile: (561) 659-6313
1/3 2tchg 1/10-BCT
NOTICE OF ENACTMENT
OF ORDINANCE
BY THE BOARD OF COUNTY
COMMISSIONERS OF
BRADFORD COUNTY,
FLORIDA
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the ordinance, which title hereinafter


appears, will be considered for
enactment by the Board of County
Commissioners of Bradford County,
Florida, at a public hearing on
January 17, 2013 at 6:30 p.m., or
as soon thereafter as the matter can
be heard, in the County Commission
Meeting Room, County Courthouse
located at 945 North Temple Avenue,
Starke, Florida. Copies of said
ordinance may be inspected by any
member of the public at the Office
of the County Clerk, located at 945
North Temple Avenue, Courthouse
North Wing, Starke, Florida, during
regular business hours. On the date,
time and place first above mentioned,
all interested persons may appear
and be heard with respect to the
ordinance.
AN ORDINANCE OF BRADFORD
COUNTY, FLORIDA, AMENDING
THE OFFICIAL ZONING ATLAS OF
THE BRADFORD COUNTY LAND
DEVELOPMENT REGULATIONS,
AS AMENDED; RELATING TO THE
REZONING OF TEN OR MORE
CONTIGUOUS ACRES OF LAND,
PURSUANT TO AN APPLICATION,
Z 12-06, BY THE PROPERTY
OWNER OF SAID ACREAGE;
PROVIDING FOR REZONING FROM
RESIDENTIAL, SINGLE FAMILY-1
(RSF-1) TO RURAL RESIDENTIAL
(RR) OF CERTAIN LANDS WITHIN
THE UNINCORPORATED AREA OF
BRADFORD COUNTY, FLORIDA;
PROVIDING SEVERABILITY;
REPEALING ALL ORDINANCES IN
CONFLICT; AND PROVIDING AN
EFFECTIVE DATE
The public hearing may be continued
to one or more future dates. Any
interested party shall be advised
that the date, time and place of any
continuation of the public hearing
shall be announced during the
public hearing and that no further
notice concerning the matter will be
published.
All persons are advised that, if they
decide to appeal any decisions made
at the public hearing, they will need
a record of the proceedings and,
for such purpose, they may need to
ensure that a verbatim record of the
proceedings is made, which record
includes the testimony and evidence
upon which the appeal is to be based.
Persons with disabilities requesting
reasonable accommodations to
participate in this proceeding should
contact 352.463.3169 (Voice &
TDD) or via Florida Relay Service
800.955.8771.
1/3 ltchg-BCT
Legal Notice
The Executive Committee of
FloridaWorks will hold a meeting on
Wednesday, January 9 at 3:30 p.m. at.
FloridaWorks, 4800 SW 13th Street,
Gainesville. Contact Celia Chapman
at 352-244-5148 with questions.
1/3 1tchg BCT


FHP indicated alcohol was involved in accident that flipped this van.


w[ II.Wa-ulS--trl


DEMR



Eh11ITUE








6A BRADFORD COUNTY TELEGRAPH THURSDAY, JAN. 3,


COMEBACK
Continued from 1A

"The problem is they've made
it very difficult to borrow money.
Even though they say the interest
rates are low and there's plenty'
of money available, they really
scrutinize the borrower's credit,
their ability to pay back the loan
and the appraisals on the real es-
tate they're buying," Smith said.
While it's an attempt to avoid
the lax underwriting that took
place before the crash when
home loans were perhaps too
easy to obtain, Smith said the
pendulum has swung too far in
the opposite direction, which is
keeping the market from getting
back on track.
"They've gone from one ex-
treme to the other extreme. Now
it's almost impossible to get fi-
nancing," he said.
Homes that are selling are
selling at the lower end of the
spectrum, from $120,000 to
$150,000, according to Smith.
Whittemore said their average
price is around $100,000, down
from $150,000 to $200,000 in
the past. While she doesn't nec-
essarily see prices going back"
up, she has seen buyers getting
braver.


Those buying include every-
one *from couples looking for
their first home to those look-
ing for a place to retire. There's
even some interest from outside
the county, although Whittemore
said she finds that is limited.
While there are still first-time
homebuyers in^the market, she
said her office has worked more
with investors interested in buy-
ing up properties and converting
them into rentals.
"The rental market is very hot
right now," Whittemore said.
"It's always been a good divi-
sion, but this year it's been a very
good division."
That, ironically, has been
helped buy the inability for some
to purchase.
"For the few who couldn't be
a first-time homebuyers, they
still have to live somewhere,"
she said. "We typically don't
keep a good rental that's priced
right on the market for more than
two weeks." Investors, includ-
ing many local investors, have
caught wind of this and have de-
cided to purchase available prop-
erties while the prices are low.
People looking for a place
to live like the small town at-
mosphere, but there are some
things that tend to sour people
from buying in Bradford County.
Smith said one of those things
is the reputation of the public


schools, which is not very good.
"The biggest issue we have is
the schools," he said. "People
with children who want to move
here, the first thing they ask is
'What are the schools like?'"
Smith said he doesn't lie but
he does give the system credit
for getting better, and he believes
under the, new superintendent,
the schools are going to get a lot
better.
Something realtors also find
themselves fighting is the percep-
tion that it costs so much more to
live in the city of Starke because
of its electric rates. Smith said he
has had buyers walk in the door
and the first stipulation is that
they don't want to live in the city
limits.
"Nobody will even look at
a listing in the city of Starke,"
Smith said, but he said the dif-
ference in electric bills between
Starke and other utilities is more
perception than reality.
"We need to change the per-
ception as far as what the city
of Starke's electrical rates are.
They're a little high but they're
not so high that it would be the
determining factor as to where
you would buy your home," he
said.
Whittemore also said the over-
all negativity of the past few
years drug Bradford down, even
though things were much worse


. ** Mobile Home


New Building Permits, 2006-2012


140
120
100
80
60
40
20
0

New SFD
Mobile Home
Commercial


2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011
133 95 42 23 31 16
89 102 78 53 48 41
7 I 11 3 : 0


I I. .................. ., #I a. a w.. a &0


elsewhere. Bradford has a lot
of homegrown people who live
here and stay put. While here a
neighborhood might have had
one empty home, there were
neighborhoods elsewhere than
had only one home occupied.
The plus side is that here people
aren't as scared to step into the
market again, she said.
Nothing is as stagnant here as
the commercial real estate mar-
ket, however. Many properties
are available along the U.S. 301
corridor, but there's little inter-
esting ir either opening or ex-
panding a business, Smith said.


S 2012


being built from the ground
up like the State Farm office.
A barbecue franchise is get-
ting ready to open in the former
Whataburger building in front of
Walmart, and Starke's second at-
tempt to sustain a sushi franchise
is apparently destined for the for-
mer Checkers location. That will
fill two empty commercial build-
ings. A pawn and quick loan
business out of Jacksonville also
has plans to move into the empty
storefront that once housed ABC
liquors.


That's true even though prices
are so low for commercial prop-
erty right now, Whittemore said.
It doesn't help that businesses
here tend to fail so frequently,
she added. That could be turned
around by a commitment from
local customers.
"People do not eat and shop lo-
cally like you hope they would,"
she said. As a business owner
herself, she stressed the impor-
tance of shopping locally for the
real estate market and the suc-
cess of all small businesses.
There are signs of some com-
mercial growth, even if it's not


HOMES
Continued from 1A

The Great Recession. The num-
ber of actual foreclosure filings
is much higher than that.
Think of that as 11.5 million
American families, potentially
as many as 28 million people
thrown into the street. -That
number approaches twice the
population of Florida. Many of
the displaced found housing else-
where, of course. Some did not.
We may not be done with the
housing bubble or the recession
yet. Due in part to congressional
dithering, the economic indica-
tors are sketchy.
One of the outcomes of the
crisis has been that those 11.5
million families have now been
stigmatized, more or less perma-
nently, as if they had deliberately
violated a contract or committed
a crime.
They probably did not com-
mit a crime, and, in some cases,
one might even question whether
or not they,defaulted on a valid
contract, even if drawn up and
agreed to by both parties.
One single female in Starke,
who refused to be interviewed by
the press if her name was to be
used, worked two jobs for several
years to help pay for the $98,000
home she bought. She had no
children and was on the way to
home ownership when she lost
one of her jobs: After months
of being unable to pay the mort-
gage, the house was foreclosed in
November 2011. Since then, the
house has been resold twice, the
first time for $21,000.
"It was a HUD house," the
young woman said, "And the
government didn't do anything
to help."
In Hampton, a couple said
their two-story Lake Butler home
was repossessed by a private in-
vestor, a lawyer in Miami. They
now live in a 1,000 square-foot
home on the husband's mother's
property.
"You probably won't find
many people who will talk about
the fact that their home has been
foreclosed on," the former Lake
Butler resident said. "Even if ev-
erybody in town knows,'hobody


Science fair

judges needed
Bradford Middle School needs
science fair judges for Wednes-
day, Jan. 23, from 8:30 a.m. to 4
p.m. If interested, please contact
John Tinsler at tinsler.john@my-
bradford.us or Sabrina Harden at
harden.sabrina@ mybradford.us.


DAR meeting

Jan. 7
The Colonel Samuel Elbert
-Chapter of the National Society,
Daughters of the American Rev-
olution, will hold its next meet-
ing on Monday, Jan. 7, at 10:30
a.m. at the IHOP restaurant in
Starke.
The speaker for the meet-
ing will be Jason Eller, director
of development for Tamassee


wants to talk about it much or
have it out there in public."
Clearly there is a stigma, but
very often the story goes back
to the fact that the former home-
owners lost job through no fault
of their own during a recession.
Asked if she was aware of any
local homes that had been fore-
closed'on or people who had lost
their homes, Hampton City Clerk
Jane Hall could rattle off home-
owners all over the tiny town that
fit the description.
One of the homes she named
had originally been owned by
the former resident's mother.
The home was a HUD home,
built after Hampton got a grant
to upgrade its housing stock. The
original owner, the mother, was
given the new home without any
significant payment required.
She subsequently signed it over
to her daughter and son-in-law
on a quitclaim. The youngercou-
ple took out a home equity loan,
using their free HUD house as
collateral.
The man's mother, who lives
near the now-empty home, said
the mortgage payments demand-
ed kept going up and up, until
the couple, both of whom were
working, could no longer afford
to make the monthly payments.
Eventually the last of a long
line of mortgage agencies repos-
sessed the home, which now sits
empty. These days, the couple
and their children are living in a
rental in Keystone Heights.
John and Virginia Daugherty
were willing to go on record.
Their blended family- has four
kids and they wanted a house.
John came into a small windfall
they planned to use as a down
payment. Both had jobs, and felt
they could make the monthly
payments.
It was the height of the hous-
ing bubble, and, at first, the
Daughertys found no homes
large enough in a price range
they could afford. Just as they
were ready to lower expectations
to a mobile home, they spotted
a home for sale on U.S. 301 and
asked the Jacksonville owners
about its price.
They liked the house, which
was going for $141,000, and
the Jacksonville Beach owner


School. Come hear how he- be-
came involved with Tamassee
and brings the group up to date
on what is happening at the
DAR-supported school.
DAR encourages everyone to
attend and join them for gQod
food and fellowship following
the meeting. Visitors are always
welcome.
The group cordially invites all
women whose ancestors helped


extended a balloon mortgage
of $133,000 with $5,000 pay-
ments to be made six and twelve
months from the date of the mort-
'gage. They were to make $850
monthly payments for the life of
the owner's balloon mortgage,
with an interest rate of 8 percent.
Around the same time, CitiFi-
nancial Equity Services, based in
Frederick, Md., had extended to
the Daugherty's a mortgage offer
for $73,000.
To get out from under the
looming balloon mortgage,
the Daughertys did what many
homeowners did during the pe-
riod; they refinanced, with Citi-
Financial retiring its original
$73,000 offer and extending
a mortgage on the new house
for $156,000. The Daughertys
moved into their new home.
Within the year, CitiFinancial
had sold their $164,000 mort-
gage, to National City Mortgage,
a division of National City Bank.
based in Miamisburg, Ohio.
Before another year had
passed, National City Mortgage
had sold the $173,000 mortgage
to PNC Bank.
But not long after the family
moved in, the bubble burst, un-
employment began to rise and
John lost his job as Florida's
construction industry and every-'
one associated with it fell idle.
Virginia could not make the total
monthly payments on her salary
alone.
She said that by this point the
monthly mortgage cost had risen
to $1,500 per month, but she con-
tacted whoever owned the mort-
gage at that point and the bank
agreed to let them pay $750 per
month. Naturally, with only one
salary, even that was a struggle.
The Daughertys also began to
have structural problems with the
house. The mortgage had been
sold to PNC Bank, a Pittsburgh-
based financial conglomerate
that at the time was just making
inroads into the Florida market.
Virginia recalled that during the
period, one loan company held
their mortgage only two months,
until she no longer knew to
whom she should make the mort-
gage payments.
One day she received lis pen-
dens notice that the house, was


in achieving American indepen-
dence to visit t6 learn about the
National Society Daughters of
the American Revolution and its
historical, educational and patri-
otic activities.
For more information, please
contact Susan Lucas at 352-586-
6776 or sl@hwhetc.com.


being foreclosed. When she con-
tacted the latest mortgage holder,
PNC she was told she hadn't
made a payment for years.
"That's not correct," she told
the company. She explained that
a previous mortgage holder had
authorized $750 monthly pay-
ments.
PNC told her their software
did not recognize partial pay-.
ments. Only full monthly pay-
ments counted.
Virginia heard on the news
that PresidentObama had called
for a moratorium on new foreclo-
sures and tried to call telephone
numbers given out where home-
owners could get help. She never
got through to a person and no
one ever returned her calls.
To make matters worse, Vir-
ginia was working full time and
also taking courses to help her


get an education degree for a bet-
ter job with higher pay and health
benefits for her kids.
She added that the legal ma-
neuverings got so complex she
was spending hours on the tele-
phone with lenders. She couldn't
handle working, taking care of
the family and 'going to school
all at the same time. She could
have gotten a lawyer for $500, a
price the family simply couldn't
afford.
Eventually, between the prob-
lems they were having with the
house and the mortgage lenders,
the Daughertys walked away
from the home. Last March, PNC
Bank sold the house to its PNC
Mortgage Division for $100.
"In a way," Virginia said, "It
was a blessing." She ,said the
family moved into a rental in
Hampton Village and then into


their current home on S.R. ,100.
"We were just so happy to be
done with it all," Virginia said.
They are much happier now.
Virginia got a job with health
benefits and is teaching in public
elementary schools.
Still, there is a lingering re-
sentment about the experience.
"Something happened there,"
Virginia said. She never expect-
ed to be dealing with mortgage
holders she didn't know. She
never realized that clerk of court
records would be filled with doc-
uments that would seriously af-
fect her family, but on which nei-
ther her nor her husband's signa-
tures appear. Today, the house
north of Starke still sits empty.
"But to tell you the truth I
-think somewhere in all that, I
think somehow it was legalized
fraud," Virginia said.


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THURSDAYAN. 3, 2013 BRADFORD COUNTY TELEGRAPH 7A


Woman's
Club honors
veterans at
Autumn Affair

' BY DENISE DURBAN
Starke Woman's Club
'*The Woman's Club of Starke
celebrated the change of sea-
sons by having an Autumri Af-
fair luncheon and Fashion Show
withh a little bit of country and
Western) honoring our Veterans
in November.
The Woman's Club was trans-
for.med into a showcase for the
Autumn Affair. The stage was
resplendent with the signs of a
country western fall. Trees and
fl6wers in their autumn splendor
were nestled amongst wooden
fences and bales of hay. Orange
pumpkins and wagon wheels
flanked by scarecrows and wood
crates sat upon the straw covered
stage. The straw hats and old
wagons also helped to create a
beautiful backdrop for the event.
The 17 tables were all individu-
ally decorated by various club
members and were each a unique
and beautiful example of, the au-
tumn theme. Each place setting
reflected the theme of the indi-
vidual table.
President Evelyn Womack
served as emcee for the event
and after extending, a welcome
to.the approximately 130 people
in: attendance, the models took
their turns down the center of the
room as the fashion show began.
The 26 models ranged in age
from 11 months to 13 years old.
While most were from Bradford
County, there were also mod-
els from Lake Butler, Keystone
Heights, Waldo, Middleburg and
Newberry participating. Both
boys and girls'were dressed in
their country and western attire.
As each took their turn, there
was an abundance of both 'denim
and bling. Rhinestonet sparkled
oh western shirts, belts and
jeans. Cowboy hats and boots
were also prominently featured.
Denim jeans and overalls as well
as shirmimer and lace graced the
stage. Sequins caught the lights
as some of the models strutted
their stuff. The younger models


15-month old Jaxton Piorot v
smiles as he took a leisurely
down the runway.


Tatum Waugh flashes a big
smile on the stage.



Ready for a
change?
Find courage at the Al-Anon
family group meeting every
Thursday from 6:30-7:30 p.m.
at St. Mark's Episcopal Church,
212 N. Church St. in Starke. Call
904-769-8957 for more informa-
tion.


Models Shelby Thompson, Madison Sellers, Lauren
Coleman, and Brianna Bedford are all smiles.


were pulled in a
classic red wagon.
Applause rang
out as each model
took to the stage
for a final look by
the audience. The
Woman's Club
of Starke would
1ike to extend a
big thank you to
all the models and
their families.
Following the
fashion show,
Womack contin-
ued the program
by honoring the
military veterans
and their fami-
lies in attendance.
Four branches of
the United States
military were
represented at
the event. Each
service person


Woman's Club celebrates the season


BY MARY W. BRIDGMAN
Special to the Telegraph
Members of the Woman's
Club of Starke rang in the Christ-
mas season at their meeting on
Dec. 12 with a sing-along of hol-
iday tunes led by Kingsley Lake
resident Bill McRae. The club's
historic hall was resplendent
with festive table decorations
supplied by Sanidra Reddish. A
delicious holiday meal includ-
ing baked ham and potato salad
.was prepared and served by club
member Arleen Moorhous.


Club President Evelyn Wom-
ack reminded the members of
upcoming events, including the
Food Pantry Benefit Talent Show
on Jan. 25, and the Valentine's
fundraiser on Feb. 9, which will
include dinner, dancing and a si-
lent auction.
Card parties coordinated by
Nancy Roberts continue on the
third Tuesday of each month.
Members of the club will take in
a matinee performance of "Driv-
ing Miss Daisy" featuring Mi-
chael Learned at the Alhambra
Dinner Theatre on March 9.


Womack announced that re-
placement of the clubhouse roof
was under way and expected to
be completed shortly. She of-
ficially welcomed new member
Patricia Evans who moved to
Starke from Tallahassee recently
in connection with her employ-
ment with Capital City Bank. At
the conclusion of the meeting,
the club voted to receive Judy
Perkin, professor of nutrition
and dietetics at the University of,
North Florida, into membership.


Nancy Roberts, Brenda Farnsworth, Evelyn Womack and Marilyn Vellenga share
holiday cheer.


Ryder Detweller rode the runway in a
big, red wagon.


honored was presented with
an American flag by one of the
models. For those not in atten-
dance, the flag was presented to
a family member.
Veterans of the Army honored
were J.L. Freeman Jr., Ed Bahme,
Lillian Stump, Jim Bloodworth
(who also retired ftom the Army
National Guard) and the late
Verl Best (whftlso served in the
Navy and Air Force). Veterans of
the Marine Corps honored were
Thomas Drake,
Henry "Brad"
Drake II and
Randy Blanken-
shipll. Veterans of
the Navy honored
were Tom Waugh,
Rodger Gainey
and Ben Moxley.
Veterans hon-
ored from the Air
', Force were Ernest
S Clevinger, Arley
McRae and Marty
Best (who also re-
tired from the Air
National Guard).
Also honored
were members of
the United States
military who are
currently serv-
ing their country.
Robert Drake is
currently on ac-
tive duty in the
U.S. Army. Casey
vas all Colding is serving
stroll in the U.S. Navy.
Rachel Best is,


currently serving in the Florida
Air National Guard, 125th Main-
tenance Group. Sgt. Chuck Mor-
row is on active duty with the
Florida Army National Guard
and previously served in both the
Air Force and the Air National
Guard.
In honor of our veterans a
poem titled "Heroes" by Jared
Jenkins was read. It ended with
this line: "Our veterans were
more than soldiers. They were,
and still are, heroes."
A delicious luncheon buffet
was served following the pro-
gram. Attendees enjoyed a menu
of fried chicken, pork roast and
sausage accompanied by tossed
salad, coleslaw, cornbread, bis-
cuits, green beans, and the clas-
sic macaroni and cheese. An
assortment of deserts completed
the wonderful meal, all of which
was prepared by various club
members.
The event served as a fund-
raiser for the Woman's Club and
was chaired by members Jackie
Morrow and Brenda Fertig. The
Woman's Club of Starke was or-
ganized in 1906 and is currently
focused on helping improve the
success of students at Bradford
High School, providing HOBY
Scholarships to deserving indi-
viduals and contributing to the
Food Pantry. It also owns and
maintains the club's historical
building on North Walnut Street,
which is receiving a much-need-
ed new roof.


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8A BRADFORD COUNTY TELEGRAPH THURSDAY, JAN. 3,


Foreclosure Rate Comparison, 2008-2012
No. of Units No. of Foreclosures Foreclosure Rate No. Resold Resale Rate Unsold
Clay 88,500 11,530 13% 3791 33% 67%
Bradford 14,826 733 5% 249 34% 66%
Putnam 99,190 2792 3% 1088 39% 61%
Union 6,200 258 4% 81 31%/ 69%
Total Foreclosures: 15,3131


VARY
Continued from 1A

Clay hard hit among
local counties
RealtyTrac showed that in
Keystone Heights during Oc-
tober 2012, 0.28 percent of all
homes in ZIP code 32656 had
been foreclosed. That was a
little lower than in Clay County
as a whole, where the rate was
0.36 percent for the month. Re-
altyTrac lists Clay County fore-
cldsures on the high end of all
county rates in Florida. Its web-
site map gives Clay the darkest
color, indicating intense foreclo-
sure activity.
The Clay rate was slightly
higher than the 0.32 percent
statewide rate during October.
Nationally, the U.S. rate was
0.14 percent.
Clay Property Appraiser Rog-
er Suggs computes 88,500 par-
cels of property in Clay County.
However, that includes parcels
with government buildings and
institutions, agricultural and con-
servation properties.
Looking at housing properties
alone and excluding commercial
properties narrows the number
down to vacant residential (va-
cant lots), single-family residen-
tial, mobile homes, multi-family
properties with less than 20 units,
multifamily properties with more
than 10 units and condominiums.
At the Clay County clerk of
the court's office, a staff mem-
ber said the number of duplicate
filings against the same property
may be a little higher in Clay
than in surrounding counties be-
cause condominiums frequently
have two filings: one from the
mortgage lender and one from
the condo association.


The Clay County clerk of the
court's office reported 11,530
foreclosed properties during the
period 2008 through December
2012. That amounts to 13 percent
of all Clay County property units
falling into foreclosure between
2008 and December 2012.
If institutions, schools and va-
cant lots are eliminated from the
total number of units, the hous-
ing foreclosure rate over the five-
year period stays substantially
the same.
In December, NEFAR record-
ed 3,791 homes foreclosed and
resold during the same five-year
period, for a 33 percent resell
rate, the third highest rate of the
four counties studied.
On Dec. 14, RealtyTrac listed
.463 foreclosed properties as hav-
ing been resold in November
2012 alone. The suggestion is
that Clay County sales, and in-
deed all four counties studied,
may be climbing again.
By comparison, then, Clay
County was hit harder than Brad-
ford, Union and Putnam coun-
ties by the housing foreclosure
downturn. While the resell rate
is lower than two of the other
counties, it appears to be turning
around again as housing markets
pick up steam.
Clay is thought to be even
more of a commuter area than
Bradford, Union or Putnam.
With rising unemployment rates
and an increase in gas prices dur-
ing the period, Clay residents,
such as those in the Keystone
Heights and McRae areas, might
have been more adversely af-
fected.
A second reason could be that
Clay has also seen more inten-
sive investment property activity,
including rental properties and
house flipping. Not only were
family homeowners affected by
the downturn, so were landlords


and speculators as banks froze
lending and suddenly unem-
ployed tenants stopped paying
the rent.

Putnam has lowest pro-
portion of foreclosures,
highest resell rate
Putnam County Clerk of the
Court Tim Adams sent the Moni-
tor a copy of Putnam's monthly
. and annual reports of foreclo-
sures dating back to 2000.
In Putnam County, from 2008
through December of this year,
there we're an estimated 2,792
foreclosures, the second-highest
number of foreclosures of four
counties studied.
But compared to the 99,190
total property units -in Putnam,
according to the Putnam tax as-
sessor's office, the rate of fore-
closures has been about 3 percent
of Putnam's total housing units
during the period.
A tax assessor's staffer said
Putnam has such a high number
of units because the county has
a large land mass and because
large tracts of land in the county
were laid out to be developed
over the years.
Smith's chart also shows in-
creases and decreases in the an-
nual numbers of foreclosures. In
2000 to 2006, the annual foreclo-
sures were in the 300-399 range,
with more years in the lower
300s.
However in 2007, the numbers
jumped markedly from 301 the


previous year to 408. The an-
nual foreclosures continued to
climb by more than 30 percent
each year from then until 2010
and 2011 when the numbers fell
again by 13 and 33 percent re-
spectively.
Smith said he was fairly sure
the drop during the previous
two years came from the fed-
eral government's action against
subprime mortgage lenders, and
especially robo-signing. Those
mortgages were issued so rap-
idly and in such quantity that
they were inspected and signed
by machine. Many of the robo-
mortgages made up the sub-
prime crisis, and the government
stopped foreclosures until further
investigation. By now, however,
the lenders and the government
have come to terms, and those
foreclosures have again have a
green light, driving the numbers
up for 2012.
Keystone Heights realtor
Trevor Waters agreed the 2012
numbers would be higher for just
that reason, although, he said,
there would also be additional
new mortgages added to those
dated numbers.

Union suffered least
. If you live in Union County
and lost your home in the last
five or six years, it probably
doesn't feel like light suffering.
But the fact is, Union County has
a small number of total taxable
units and a small rate of foreclo-


Most foreclosed properties


mid-price horr
BY JAMES WILLIAMS
Special to the Telegraph

At the end of 2010, the Brad-
ford County Clerk of the Court's
office changed the way its com-
puter application compiles fore-
closure numbers. Its data now
reflects the classifications shown
here.
The numbers show that of all
foreclosures in Bradford County
over the last two years, 7 percent
of them have been on commer-
cial properties and 93 percent
have been against residential
properties.
The homes fall into two cat-
egories: homestead and non-
homestead residential, indicating
whether a homestead tax exemp-
tion is on file.
The larger bulk of nonhome-


sures, but also the smallest resell
rate of the four counties.
Union County showed 258
foreclosed properties over the
five-year period, for a 4 percent
foreclosure rate, slightly lower
than Bradford's.
Conventional wisdom says
Union showed low foreclosures
rates because of large landmass-
es taken up by corrections facili-
ties and the fairly consistent em-
ployment of the county in those
facilities. Add to that a relatively
low rate of investment proper-
ties and multi-family units in the
county, such as condominiums.
That is coupled with a relatively
smaller number of long-distance
commuters in Union driving to
work, spending far fewer dollars
on high-priced gas.
Nearly everyone agrees on
the sequence of events and the
history of the housing crisis.
Foreclosures jumped and home
prices began to fall in 2007. Ac-
cording to National Association
of Realtors data, the national
median price fell nearly 6 per-
cent to $217,000 from a peak
of $230,200 in July 2006. U.S.
-foreclosures rose by 75 percent


ies
stead properties are either second
homes, houses bought for rentals
or homes intended for resale.
Almost 60 percent of all fore-
closures were against home-
owners who intended to live in
the homes they bought at mid-
range prices, from $50,000 'to
$249,000. This range includes
both mobile homes and single-
family structures.
The second largest clump of
foreclosures, 20 percent of them,
were nonhomesteads in the same
mid-price range.
Only 10 percent of foreclosed
homes, homestead or not, were
in the lower price range, $50,000
and under, and only 7 percent
of all homes foreclosed, home-
steaded or not, were in 'the upper
price ranges of $250,000 and up.


in 2007.
Nearly 1.3 million homes-
more than 1 percent of all US
households-were in some
phase of foreclosure in 2007, ac-
cording to yearend data released
by RealtyTrac.
By 2009, one-half to three-
quarters of 1 percent of all Amer-
ican homes were in foreclosure,
amounting to 1.5 million fami-
lies. By September 2010, more
than 2.3 million homes had been
repossessed by lenders since the
recession officially began in De-
cember 2007.
At the time, RealtyTrac esti-
mated more than 1 million Amer-
icans would lose their homes to
foreclosure in 2010 alone.
Fox News reported that by the
end of 2010, 2.87 million Ameri-
cans had received foreclosure
notices.
Estimates are that about 12
million homes have now been
foreclosed in the' U.S. since the
housing crisis began, affecting
around 30 million people, or
about 10 percent of the entire
population of the U.S.


Republicans
meet Jan. 10
The Bradford County Repub-
lican Executive Committee will
meet at 7 p.m. on Thursday,


Jan. 10, in the Capital City Bank
boardroom located at 350 N.
Temple Ave. in Starke.
The guest speaker will be Bri-
an Graham, owner of Dixie Strat-
egies LLC and community out-


reach director for the Bradford
County Sheriff's Office. Graham
specializes in marketing, adver-
tising, direct mail, fundraising,
political consulting and public
relations.


The Bradford County Repub-
lican Executive Committee rep-
resents the Republican voters of'
Bradford County. Registered
Republicans in Bradford County
are invited to join. A member-


ship drive begins in this month,
and new members are welcome.
There are openings for chairmen
in some precincts. Volunteers
are needed to assist with county
events.


For more information on be-
coming a precinct chairman or
volunteering, please contact
Chairman David Dodge at 352-
222-8609 or visit www.bradfor-
drepublicans.org.


Eueryone Benefits!

when you shop with

your Starke merchant

you .help out a lot of

activities in your

community.


your community

merchants support High

School Rctivities to

include:

Band, Football, Bas-eball,

Tennis, FFR, KRR, Pop

Warner, 4-H, Clubs,

veterans Organizations,


Seniors, Churches,

Scouts, and a lot more...

These organizations

make our community a

better place to live and

add ualue to our lies.

your local merchant is

glad t,o help out but they

need your support.

When you havuea need

that you can fulfill in

the Starke area, your

patronage uill be

appreciated...


The Bradford County Telegraph


encourages all to shop with our advertisers...


For a stronger business community.


Who had the lion's share of foreclosures?
Total foreclosures in all four counties: 15,313
Clay: 75%
Putnam: 18%
Bradford: 5%
Union: 2%


8A


k


BRADFORD COUNTY TELEGRAPH THURSDAY, JAN. 3,









B Section Thursday, Jan. 3, 2013 FEATURES

CRIME


REGIO ALE W %OBITUARIES
E N- EDITORIAL

NEWS FROM BRADFORD COUNTY, UNION COUNTY AND THE LAKE REGION





Locals advise taking fitness step by step


BY MARY W. BRIDGMAN
Special to the Telegraph-Times-
Monitor
Four local fitness experts agree
the key to success in keeping
that New Year's resolution to
exercise more and eat healthy is
to take it step by step.
"Slow and steady wins the
race," said Ben Bridgman, 54,
a group exercise instructor who
leads the indoor cycle program
at the Bradford-Union Area
Career Technical Center. "So
many people go into it too heavy
and too fast and don't enjoy the
experience. I'm always trying
to get beginners to slow down.
I don't want them to get hurt.
If they do, they'll never come
back, and that's worse than not
starting at all."
According to a recent article
in "The Week," "If you make
an overnight change requiring
enormous self-discipline, you
can quickly use up your stores
of willpower and all your
best intentions will fall by the
wayside. ...Exercising for five
minutes instead of an hour might
sound laughable, but you're
much less likely to resist it, and
the next day, you can exercise
for six."
For folks who are intimidated
by the prospect of exercising
vigorously for long stretches at
a time, that's good news, and
starting small doesn't mean you
can't achieve great results. Just
ask Rebecca Hinson, a pretty
23-year-old who lost 118 pounds
and experienced tremendous
improvement in her health since
beginning her exercise program
several years ago.
Hinson, a type-1 diabetic,
became concerned after seeing
a physician for stomach pain.
He told her she would need
gallbladder surgery unless she
lost weight. Not long after that,
.Hinson's older sister invited
her to try Zumba, a Colombian-
dance fitness program created by
dancer/choreographer Alberto
Perez during the 1990s.
Although Hinson wasn't into
exercise, she had participated
in dance teams and thought
Zumba might be a good fit. She
only made it through half of that
first hour-long class, but she
was hooked. Now she teaches
Zumba three days a week at
S&J Fitness on Call Street in
downtown Starke.
Although Hinson experienced
improved outlook and reduced
need for insulin almost
immediately, the pounds did not
melt away until she consulted a
nutritionist and began to make
some changes in her diet.
"She gave me a dietary plan,
and I cut out white potatoes,
white rice, white bread, and ate
mostly fruits', vegetables and
poultry."
Not long after that, she
dropped 15 pounds in a couple of
months, and the rest is history.
Bridgman agrees that exercise
alone will not lead to optimal
health results.
"For years I told, myself I
could eat anything I wanted
.because I exercised and wasn't
overweight." Bridgman-- said.
"My doctor kept telling me I
needed to drop 20 pounds, but I
didn't see it. Several years later,
routine bloodwork showed I was
at risk for developing metabolic


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.'. *.,,*'


Ben Bridgman instructs indoor cycle classes at the
Bradford-Union Area Career Technical Center.


syndrome, with high i blood
pressure, high cholesterol and
high blood sugar.
"There was a history of
diabetes in my family, so it shook
me up. I adopted.a diet similar
to the one (Hinson)'s nutritionist
prescribed, and I lost 20 pounds
in two months. My blood values
improved immediately, and
they've stayed gdod."
Although, Bridgman began
regular workouts in college, he
avoided group exercise classes
and didn't work out with a
trainer until his wife gave him
a membership to the YMCA in
Jacksonville.
"The first thing I got into was
spin classes," he said. "I like
working out to music and having
a teacher tell you what to do, and
mixing up the routines keeps
you from getting bored. Doing
exercise in-a group is more fun;
it keeps me motivated."
Not long after that, Bridgman
started working out once a week


with a personal trainer as well.
"My wife and I started training
together, which introduced
a competitive element to the
mix," Bridgman said. "I always
find that I work out harder when
someone else is doing it with
me."
In contrast to Bridgman and
Hinson,. Eli Hamilton, 25, of
Lawtey, has always been into
exercise. His parents taught
him to love team sports, and he
played baseball and tennis, and
ran track. Now, he's especially
partial to - .L, h.,ll playing
in Melrose whenever his work
schedule permits.
Hamilton suggests beginners
try going to a gym, but counsels
avoiding extreme activities. He
says that taking someone with
you when you exercise will
increase motivation. If Hamilton
gets bored with his workouts,
he tries new activities, such as
Bridgman's spin class at the
Bradford-Union Area Career


co
hTulgle fl


This program Is sponsoreds6 Ie FW diojI A


Technical Center.
Hamilton has a special
passion for working with the
elderly. Currently employed
as a respiratory aide at Shands
UF and Shands Rehabilitaton
Hospital, he teaches Silver
Sneakers classes' at Anytime
Fitness in Starke.
"Older adults are freer to share
and interact, Hamilton said.
"They value someone taking an
interest in them."
Bridgman, who also teaches
the Silver Sneakers program,
agrees.
"Most of the population we sep
in our classes have never been
inside a gym before they enrolled
in the program," Bridgman said.
"They are living proof it's never
too late to start a.fitness program
and reap the benefits of better
health, increased strength and
mobility."
Like Hamilton, Victor Ravelo,
the 39-year-old proprietor
of Anytime Fitness, has a
background in sports-mainly
football and weightlifting. He
opened the gym in 2010, and
like many of his customers,
finds it difficult to make time
to exercise, with a full-time job
teaching Spanish in Jacksonville
and a business to run. He and
his wife, Lisa, have two'small
children-both boys.
For people struggling to fit
exercise into a busy schedule,
Ravelo suggests getting up early
and making it the first thing you
do in the morning. Membership
in a 24-hour facility such
as his can help, too. Ravelo
recommends that beginners start
with a personal trainer to help


LEFT: Rebecca
Hinson lost
118 pounds
doing Zumba
and eating
right. BELOW:
Eli Hamilton
teaches Silver
Sneakers
classes and
stays active
playing
volleyball.


can decrease your stress level
just by dropping your shoulders,

See FITNESS, 4B


Zfi.


Victor Ravelo, owner of Anytime Fitness, strikes a
muscleman pose holding his young sons.


As of our campus is

now entirely tobacco free.



... Shatds '
Regional Medic6l Center
ShandsSt4rke.com


establish a fitness program.
Newcomers to exercise might
be surprised to find that -some
fitness activities can be quite
relaxing. Bridgman teaches
classes with elements of yoga
and Pilates that incorporate
stretches, to keep the body
limber and flexible, as well as
relaxation.
"Everyone enjoys the final
relaxation period at the end of
class," Bridgman said. "That's
good for your body and mind. I
always tell people that no matter
how bad things are, there are two
things you can always control-
breathing and posture. During
the day, as the tension piles
up, our shoulders get tight and
creep up around our ears. You








2B TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR B SECTION THURSDAY, JAN. 3, 2013


New contributors: profiling 'unsung heroes,' covering the outdoors


Mary Bridgman
Looks forward
to writing about
the people in her
home community

BY JAMES WILLIAMS
Special to the Telegraph-Times-
Monitor
Mary Bridgman's current
business card states that she is
a freelance writer. Bridgman
has already been publishing her
gardening column in the Brad-
ford County Telegraph for about
a year, and will now write oc-
.casional articles for the paper
including profiles of interesting
area residents.
"I want to reach out and touch
the community," she said in early
December. "I want to showcase
people,. unsung area heroes. I
have been reading the Telegraph
all my life. My grandparents and
parents read the paper, too, and
always made sure I had a sub-
scription to it, even while living
in Jacksonville."
Although Bridgman lived and
worked in Jacksonville for 30
years, she rightfully calls her-
self a Bradford County native.
Her grandfather, AJ. Thomas,
served as clerk of the circuit
-court in Bradford County for
decades. Her mother was Cla-
rice Thomas-Woods, and Bridg-
man's father, Joe Woods, was
an agriculture teacher in the
Bradford school system. He
went on to become principal of
Hawthorne High School.
Naturally, Bridgman attended
school in Hawthorne, but gradu-
ated from Buccholz High School
in Gainesville. After graduation,
she went to the University of
Florida for a degree in English
literature. She then went on to
law school.


Mary Bridgman and her husband, Ben, at their home on
Hampton Lake.


After law school, Bridgman
moved to Jacksonville, working
as a research assistant in vari-
ous courts and then for a series
of law firms. She eventually
became a legal representative
for Blue Cross and Blue Shield.
After representing the health
insurance company for several
years, she became part of its ad-
ministrative and governing body
as vice president of corporate
audit risk management and com-
pliance. She was responsible for
internal and external company
audits, and set up a new depart-
ment inside the company that
dealt with corporate ethics.
Bridgman stayed with the
company for 22 years, retiring
in 2008. During that period, she
met her soon-to-be husband,
Ben, who was originally from
Tennessee and was in law en-
forcement in the area.


Her grandparents and parents
passed down to her two lake-
front properties, both of which
she came to love. Joe and Cla-
rice eventually turned-over their
Kingsley Lake home to Mary, as
Joe completed another home on
Hampton Lake..
Ben and Mary realized they
could live happily on Kinglsey
Lake. They also visited her par-
ents in their new home on Hamp-
ton Lake. After her parents died,
the Hampton Lake property was
left to Mary as well. Today, the
Bridgmans divide their time be-
tween the two homes.
In an effort to get to know more
people in the Bradford County,
Mary Bridgman signed up for a
master gardening course, only to
learn afterward that the course
was actually taught in Jackson-

See WRITING, 6B


Mickey Agner grew
up hunting and
fishing in Bradford
County and now
writes a weekly
column about
those activities
and the people
who enjoy them
BY CLIFF SMELLEY
Regional News/Sports Editor
When he's at such lakes as
Kingsley and Santa Fe, Mickey
Agner looks to reel in fish.
Now, Agner also has his sights
set on reeling in readers.
Agner, a 1966 Bradford High
School graduate who worked as
an administrator in the Bradford
school system before retiring, is
a new contributor to the Bradford
County Telegraph, Lake Region
Monitor and Union County
Times. He writes a weekly
column found in the three
newspapers' Regional News
section entitled "Fins, Fur and
Tales" that focuses on fishing,
hunting and the outdoors.
"I've just always been around
that kind of thing," said Agner,
who has three grown children
with wife, Bobbie. "I used to
write a lot of grants in the school
system. I used to say, 'Hey, if this
was about hunting or fishing, I
would enjoy this.'"
He didn't enter retirement as
an aspiring writer or anything
like that. It was just that writing
about hunting and fishing
seemed like something he would
enjoy..
So far-his first column was
published Oct. 30, 2012--gner
has enjoyed the writing. He used
to worry a lot about finding
something to write about each


Mickey Agner


week, but said, "It seems to fall
into place."
Hunting and fishing were
activities Agner took part in as
a youth growing up in Bradford
County. Agner, who was born in
Fitzgerald, Ga., said those were
just the natural things to do in a
rural environment.
Football was another interest,
and it gave Agner an opportunity
to become part of history at
Bradford High School. As a
senior, he was a member of
the 1965 team that went 12-0
and won the school's first state
championship. Agner rushed
for 83 yards and a touchdown
on 15 carries in a 39-0 win over
Wauchula Hardee in the Class A
championship game.
"It was a good team," Agner
said, adding that he, the players
and the coaches still have a good
relationship today.
Agner would have you believe
that it was an understatement to
say he loved football. In tact,
* he said he liked to joke that the
two reasons he stayed in school
through graduation were football
and lunch.


"I ended up getting two
master's degrees," Agner said.
"I guess that's not bad for a, guy
who went to school for ,lunch
and football."
From BHS, Agner went to'
Samford University in Alabama,
where he also played football.
"It was a lot different," he
said. "It wasn't as enjoyable. I
wasn't a good college athlete.
I was a really good high scboof
athlete."
Agner, who went on to major
in history, did not leave football
behind him, though. He wound
up coaching at Vanguard High
School in Ocala.
"It was a lot of fun," Agner
said, adding, "I coached a state
championship weightlifting team
one year, and we had several
good football teams."
At the same time, Agner
was also working on a,
master's degree in education
at Rollins University. (He
eventually returned to school
for recertification and wound
up earning another master's
degree at Nova Southeastern
University.)
Agner eventually returned
to the area where he grew up.
He worked for a while as a
teacher and administrator in
Union County before relocating
to Bradford County to do the
same.
Before retiring, Agner worked
as an assistant director at the
Bradford-Union Area Career
Technical Center.
"That was a good job," ie
said. "I enjoyed that work. There
was a lot of diversity there-a
lot of new things that you don't
normally see in the regular
school line of work."
Though retired, Agner
admitted he doesn't do as much

See AGNER, 8B


~JJ1IIME


Recent arrests
in Bradford,

Clay or Union

The following individuals
were arrested recently by lo-
cal law enforcement officers in
Bradford, Union or Clay (Key-
stone Heights area) counties:

Joseph Lee Alston, 24, of
Starke was arrested Dec. 24 by
" Starke police for larceny. Bond
was set at $500 and he was
released Dec. 24.
Cheryl Birk, 49, of Lawtey
was arrested Dec. 25 by Bradford
deputies for disturbing the peace.
Bond was set at $1,000 and she
was released Dec; 26.
Samantha Gavena Brown, 23,
of Starke was arrested Dec. 23,
by Starke police for DUI and
resisting an officer. Bond was set
at $3,000 and she was released
* Dec. 23.
Stephan Chapman, 22, of
Melrose was arrested Dec. 28 by
Clay deputies for three probation
violations.
Angel Louise Coakley, 29,
of Starke was arrested Dec.
27 -by Bradford deputies for
withholding support. She was
released Dec. 28.
Alan Eugene Crawford, 29
.of Starke was arrested Dec. 30*
by Bradford deputies for driving
with a suspended, revoked or
expired license. Bond was set at
$1,000 and he was released Dec.
30.
Hosea Perez Dean, 40, of
Lawtey was arrested Dec. 29 by
Lawtey police for resisting an
officer. He was released Dec.
29.
Steven Tyler Deason, 21, of
Starke was arrested Dec. 26 by
Bradford deputies fora probation
violation. He remained in jail at
press time.
Shawna Kaye Dell, 33, of
Starke was arrested Dec. 27 by
Bradford deputies for driving
with a suspended, revoked or
expired license. Bond was set
at $1,000 and she was released
Dec. 28.
Edward Arnold Eldredge, 38,
of Starke was arrested Dec. 25
by Starke police for trespassing.
He remained in jail at press
time.
John P. Elliott, 38, of East
Sparta, Ohio, was arrested Dec.
29 by Bradford deputies for
possession of marijuana. Bond
was set at $2,500 and he was
released Dec. 30.
Mary Jewel Erdos, 52, of


Starke was',arrested Dec. 29 by
Starke police for child neglect.
Bond was set at $2,500 and she
was released Dec. 30.
Tillman Arthur Erwin, 42, of
Starke was arrested Dec. 24 .by
Starke police for resisting an
officer and battery. Bond was set
at $2,000 and he was released
Dec. 24.
Carol Cox Geiger, 62, of
Starke was arrested Dec. 29 by
Starke police for driving with a
suspended, revoked or expired
license. Bond was set at $500
and she was released Dec. 29.
Aaron Goodwin, 32, of
Keystone Heights was arrested
Dec. 28 by Clay deputies for
violating a court injunction.
Terrius Germaine Green, 21,
of Starke was arrested Dec. 25
by Bradford deputies for driving
with a suspended, revoked or
expired license. Bond was set at
$500 and he remained'in jail at
press time.
Janeka Breanne Greene, 23,
of Starke was arrested Dec. 24
by Bradford deputies for larceny
and dealing in stolen property.
Bond was set at $5,500 and she
was released Dec. 25.
William Gerad Griffis, 27, of
Gainesville was arrested Dec.
23 by Bradford deputies for a
probation violation. He remained
. in jail at press time.
Woodrow Griffis, 57, of
Starke was arrested Dec. 28 by
Starke police for a DUI. Bond
was set at $1,000 and he was
released Dec. 28.
Janet Boutwell Hayes, 54, of
Starke was arrested Dec. 29 by
Bradford deputies for a DUI.
Bond was set at $2,500 and she
was released Dec. 29.
Maurice Hewitt, 33, of Starke
was arrested Dec. 30 by Bradford
'


deputies for disturbing the peace.
Bond was set at $2,500 and he
was released Dec. 30.
Malachi Joseph Jenkins, 43,
of Lawtey was arrested Dec. 23
by Starke police for a probation
violation. He remained in jail at
press time.
Michael Ellis Jenkins, 32,
of Starke was arrested Dec. 29
by Bradford deputies for child
neglect. Bond was set at $2,500
and he was released Dec. 30.
Bruce A. Lee, 33, of Starke
was arrested Dec. 26 by Starke
police for a probation violation
and loitering. He remained in
jail at press time.
Robert Chase Lee, 20, of
Starke was arrested Dec, 27 by
Bradford deputies for battery.
Bond was set at $1,000 and he
was released Dec. 28.
Molly Christina McCoy, 21,
of St. Petersburg was arrested
Dec. 28 by Bradford deputies
for possession of marijuana.
Bond was set at $1,000 and she
was released Dec. 28.
Gary Darel Morrow, 38, of
Gainesville was arrested Dec.
30 by Bradford deputies for
possession of marijuana. He
remained in jail at press time.
Kevin Padgett, 35, of Starke
was arrested Dec. 30 by Clay
deputies fordriving with a license
expired over four months.
Nicole Sellers Padilla, 28, of
Lawtey was arrested Dec. 29 by
Clay deputies for petit theft.
Amanda Simone Pitts, 28, of
Starke was arrested Dec. 24 by
Starke police for battery. Bond
was set at $1,000 and she was
released Dec. 24.
Kenneth John Ricci, 26, of
Macclenny was arrested Dec.27.
by Bradford deputies for driving
with a suspended, revoked or


John August Rueber, 64, of
Starke was arrested Dec. 29 by
Bradford deputies, for battery.
He was released Dec. 30.
Logan Weston Scrape, 18,
of Green'-'Cove Spririfswvas
arrested Dec..28 by Starke police
for trafficking in amphetamine.
Bond was set at $15,000 and he
was released Dec. 28.
Joseph Sharp, 24, of Keystone
Heights was arrested Dec. 28 by
Clay deputies for possession of
less than 20 grams of cannabis.
Rebecca Puckett-Starling, 57,
of Starke was arrested Dec. 30
by Bratford deputies for a DUI.
Bond k\as set at $20,000 and she


expired license. Bond was set at
$500 and he was released Dec.
28.
Eddie Lee Rice, 64, of Lake
Butler was arrested Dec. 27 by
Bradford deputies' for driving
with a suspended, revoked or
expired license. Bond was set at
$5,000 and he was released Dec.
29.
Melanie Dawn Rodgers, 27,,
of Starke was arrested Dec.
28 by Bradford deputies for
a probation violation. Bond
was set at $1,000 and she was
released Dec. 28.
Robert Paul Rogers, 32, of
Starke was arrested Dec. 23 by
Bradford deputies for criminal
mischief with property damage.
Bond was set at $3,500 and he
was released Dec. 23.
August G. Roewe, 39, of
Keystone Heights was arrested
Dec. 28 by Bradford deputies
for driving with a suspended,
revoked or expired license. He
remained in jail at press time.
Richard J. Roush, 34, of
Canton, Ohio, was arrested Dec.
29 by Bradford deputies for
possession of marijuana. Bond
was set at $2,500 and he was
released Dec. 30.


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remained in jail at press time.;
Chad Evert Tyler, 37, ,of
'Graham was arrested Dec. 26 by
Bradford deputies for a probation
violation. He remained iq jail at
"press "iirne.--'.=-"- ""
Carolyn LyDn Williams,52,of
North Florida State Hospital was
arrested Dec. 24 by BradfOrd
deputies for a probation
violation. She remained in jail at
press time.
Matthew Wimberly, 42, of
Keystone Heights was arrested
Dec. 23 by Clay deputies for
providing a merchant with false
owner information.


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THURSDAY, JAN. 3, 2013 TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR B SECTION .3B


2 weightlifters, softball team account for 4 titles for KHHS in '12


The following is a look back at
the high school teams and indi-
viduals who won championships
at the district, regional or state
levels, earned medals in state
competition or who qualified to
participate in regional and state
competitions in 2012. Any omis-
sions are unintentional.

BY CLIFF SMELLEY
Regional News/Sports Editor
T.wo Keystone Heights
weightlifters earned state medals
in 2012, while the softball team
.won district and regional cham-
pionships en route to an appear-
ance in the state semifinals.
*Boys' weightlifter Nick Ver-
schaeve came closest to earning
a state championship for Key-
stone, finishing as the runner-
up in the 199-pound class in the
state finals.
Verschaeve's best-ever to-
tal of 685 pounds (390-pound
,bench press, 295-pound clean
and jerk) was actually the same
as state champ Kendrick Single-
ton of Baker County, but Single-
ton earned the championship
due to the weight tiebreaker. (He
weighed 7 pounds less than Vet-
schaeve.) Verschaeve's bench
press total was tops in his class,
and only three lifters in the en-
tire meet, regardless of weight
class, had a higher bench press.
To get to the state finals, Ver-
schaeve won the Section 4-1A
championship with a 670 total
'(385, 285).
John McCormick also made
it to the boys' state finals for
-Keystone after placing second
in the 154 class at the Section 4
meet. McCormick had a 535 to-
tal (290, 245).
At the state finals, McCormick
placed seventh, which left him
-one spot shy of earning a medal.
"He had a 525 total (275,250).
Girls' weightlifters Morgan
'Boettcher and Jeafyn Miller
qualified for state as well, with
Boettcher finishing third and
earning a medal in the unlimited


class.
Boettcher, who had a 420 total
(215, 205), was making her fifth
straight appearance at state, hav-
ing done so since her freshman
year. She earned the 2012 trip by
compiling a 415 total (205,210)
at the Section 4-lA meet, where
she placed second.
Miller won the Section.4 cham-
pionship in the 110 class with a
205 total (105, 100) to earn her
first-ever trip to the state finals.
At state, Miller placed 21st with
a 210 total (105, 105).

Softball team earns
first final-four berth
since 1995
At one point in the season,
the Keystone softball team was
1-6, but the team won 18 of 20
games, winning district and re-
gional championships along the
way and earning the program's
second state semifinal berth
since the switch to fastpitch.
Starting with the semifinals
of the District 5-4A tournament,
the Indians would outscore five
opponents 29-6 before losing
1-0 to Florida High in the state
semifinals.
Keystone punched its ticket
to the regional playoffs with an
8-0 win over Fort White in the
district semifinals. Amber Skip-
per, who was 3-fkr-4, led off the


Indians' half of the first inning
with a home run and later drove
in two runs in the sixth inning to
enforce the mercy rule.
Kayla Walker and Kelsey
Waters each went 2-for-3, while
Lyndsay Johnson, Taylor Mor-
ris and Rachel Wells each had
an RBI. Wells' RBI came off of
a home run.
Skipper, the team's pitcher,
gave up three hits and one walk,
while striking out six. She was
even better in the Indians' next
game-a 3-1 win over Bradford
for the District 5 title.
Skipper, who gave up one hit
and had.five strikeouts in earn-
ing the win, scored the first run
on a sacrifice fly by Waters in
the first inning. In the second,
Taylor Semione doubled and
scored on a bunt single by John-
son.
' Wells hit a home run for the
second straight game for the In-
dians' final run in the fourth in-
ning.
Johnson and Semione each
went 2-for-3.
Keystone hosted South Sumter
in the regional quarterfinals,with
Skipper throwing a no-hitter in a
10-0, five-inning win.
Waters was 3-for-4 with a
double that drove in the two runs
that enforced the mercy rule.
Johnson was 2-for-2 with an
RBI, while Semione, Wells,


Nick Verschaeve
is shown lifting
his way to the
Section 4-1A
championship in
the 199-pound
weight class.
Verschaeve
would go on
to finish as the
state runner-up
in his class.



Chelsea Harvin and
Ashley Maynard each had an
RBI.
The Indians then faced Brad-
ford again in the regional semi-
finals. This time, the team rode a
huge defensive play en route to
a 2-0 win.
Harvin put the Indians up 1-0
with an RBI single in the first,
but Bradford loaded the bases
with no outs in the third. Sec-
ond baseman Vanessa Munoz,
though, caught a line drive,
which was the start of a triple
play.
Bradford had five hits up to
that point, but Skipper allowed
just one more the rest of the
way.
Skipper, who was 2-for-2 at
the plate, scored the Indians'
second run on a triple by Wa-
ters.
Keystone advanced to the
Region 2 championship game,
where it rallied from a 4-3 defi-
cit in the sixth to defeat Space
Coast 6-5.
Harvin, Skipper and Waters
each drove in a run as the In-
dians led 3-1 after five innings.
The Vipers scored three runs
on three singles, two ground-
outs and an ercor to take-a 4-3
lead in the sixth, 'but Keystone
answered with three runs in the
bottom of the inning. Skipper
tied the game with an RBI single
before Maynard hit a two-run
double.
Skipper was 2-for-3 at the
plate, while Harvin, Semione


and Watc,' each went 2-for-4.
Keystone had 11 hits in all
in the win, but hits were hard
to come by in the Indians' 1-0
loss to Florida High in the state
semifinals.
Florida High pitcher Taylor
Rossman gave up one hit-an
infield grounder that was beat
out by Wells. Keystone hit only
one ball out of the infield-a
flyout by Maynard.
Skipper gave up five hits and
one walk, while striking out sev-
en. Florida High scored its run
in the fourth, taking advantage
of three hits and a sacrifice fly.
Keystone finished its season
with a 19-8 record.

4 advance to regionals
in girls' track and field
Emily Schaul, who was the
District 5-2A runner-up in the
3200m, and three of her team-
mates advanced to the Region 2
track and field finals.
Schaul had a time of 14:04.18
to advance and wound up finish-
ing eighth at the regional meet
with a time of 13:05.67.
Morgan Boettcher took third
in the shot put at the district


meet with a distance of 28 feet.
Madison Colaw was fourth
in the 1600m with a time ol'
6:29.22, while Caitlin Cumbus
was fourth in the 400m with a
time of 1:08.77.
At the Region 2 meet, Boettch-
er finished the shot put with a
distance of 29'6", while Colaw
and Cumbus posted times of
6:04.25 and 1:08.32, respec-
tivey, in their events.

Rally helps send vol-
leyball team to region-
als
Keystone was facing a 2-1
deficit and having to win two
straight sets to qualify for the
regional playoffs for the third
straight year. The Indians did
just that in defeating third seed
Williston 3-2 (25-23, 27-29, 19-
25, 25-17, 15-10) in the semifi-
nals of the District 5-4A tourna-
ment.
Alexa Born played a huge role
in setting up her teammates as
she had 11 of her team-high 20
assists in the final two sets. Ash-
ley Maynard added 10 assists.
See INDIANS, 6B


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Celebrating their District 5-4A championship are Keystone Heights softball players
F (front, I-r) Kelsey Waters, Ashley Maynard, Amber Skipper, Chelsea Harvin, Morgan
", Gibbs, (middle, I-r) Lyndsay Johnson, Kristen Wood, (back, I-r) Taylor Morris, Kayla
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4B TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR B SECTION- THURSDAY, JAN. 3, 2013



First baseball state championship highlights 2012 for UCHS


The following is a look back at
the high school teams and indi-
viduals who won championships
at the district, regional or state
levels, earned medals in state
competition or who qualified to
participate in regional and state
competitions in 2012. Any omis-
sions are unintentional.

BY CLIFF SMELLEY
Regional News/Sports Editor
It was quite a year for Union
County High School athletics in
2012 as three teams advanced
through the playoffs and made it
to the final fours of their respec-
tiye sports.
Only one, though, would keep
it going until laying claim to a
state championship trophy.
The school's baseball team,
after a 12-8 win over Baldwin
in the District 7-1A semifinals,
outscored five opponents 30-3,
culminating in a 6-3 win over
Holmes County in the Class 1A
championship game. It was the
first baseball state championship
in school history.
To get that trophy, the Tigers
first had to get by Baldwin in the
district semifinals after squan-
dering a big lead. The Tigers
scored the first six runs before
winning 12-8.
Union scored five runs in the
first inning and led 6-0 before
Baldwin seven runs in the fifth
to take the lead. The Tigers,
though, answered with six runs
in the bottom of the inning.
Chance' Bailey was 2-for-4
with a double and three RBI,
while Austin Harden hit a double
and drove in four runs. Dustin
Hersey was 3-for-5 with an RBI,
while Colby Cothren was 2-for-
4 with a double and an RBI. Dy-
lan Allen and Kyle Shealy each
drove in a run, with Shealy hit-
ting a double.
Hersey earned the win on the
mound, giving up one' earned
run on sixh hits ancdfour walks
in five innings. He had six
strikeouts.
That game was really no indi-
cation of things to come as the
Tigeis shut out their next four
opponents, beginning with a 4-0


FITNESS
Continued from 1B


standing up straight, and taking
deep, regular breaths."
Getting a massage periodically
can also improve physical
fitness.
"I wasn't interested in having.
a massage until my trainer told,
-me it would be as beneficial as a
workout," Bridgman said. "Now
I have deep-tissue* therapy at


TOP: Kyle Shealy (foreground, left) prepares to
congratulate Dylan Allen after the Tigers' win in the
state semifinals. Celebrating in the background are
Corey Hersey and Trey Owen. ABOVE LEFT: Troy
Kite swings at a pitch in the state semifinals. ABOVE
RIGHT: Dustin Hersey earned the win over Hilliard that
sent the Tigers to the state title game against Holmes
County.


win over Newberry for the Dis-
trict 7 championship.
Starting pitcher Allen struck
out five of the first six batters he
faced and did not give up a hit
until the fifth inning. He gave up
five hits and two walks, while
striking outeight in six-and-two-
thirds innings'to earn the win.


least once a Mibnth, sometimes
more, and it really reduces the
tightness in my muscles and
decreases soreness and pain." ,
Hinson, who is a licensed
massage therapist with Dr.
Martin Slaughter's chiropractic
office in Starke, agrees.
"Studies have proven that
massage is a better pain reliever
than Tylenol or ibuprofen," she
said. "It's great if you're trying
to lose weight or build muscle-
tone. Massage helps improve


Union opened the game with
three straight hits-the third an
RBI single by Harden. Hersey
scored another run in the first in-
ning'on a ground ball by Shealy
to put the Tigers up 2-0.
In the sixth, Allen and Chris
Starling scored runs on errors.
Harden and Hersey each went


; 'The UCHS boys'
basketball team:
(kneeling, I-r) Kyle
Mosher, Princeton
Alexander,
Austin Dukes,
Keldric Bradley,
Khliel Jackson,
(standing, l-r)
coach Sharon
Sirmones, Robert
Spitze, Prince
Alexander, Carl
Alexander,
Geordyn Green,
head coach Rufus
Jefferson, Daquin
Edwards, Shaimea
Maeweather,
coach Durrell
Warren and
coach Sampson
Jackson.


circulation, decrease blood
pressure and get nutrients to the
muscles."
Whatever you do, Hinson
advises, "Never give up. Don't
listen to the 'don'ts'-the people
who tell you you can't do it.
Associate with people who say,
things that build you up. Have
faith in yourself and know you
can do it.
"It really is worth it. Suck it
up now so you won't have to
suck it in later."


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2-for-3.
Next up was a date with Wild-
wood in the regional semifinals.
Pitcher Hersey gave up two hits
and struck out nine in six innings
as the Tigers won 8-0.
The Tigers loaded the bases
with no outs in the first inning.
Allen then ground into a double
play, but two runs scored.
Cole Kite hit a single to score
Troy Kite in the second, while
Shealy scored a run in the third
on a passed ball.
Harden hit a two-run double
in the fourth, which also fea-
tured an RBI single by Shealy to
put the Tigers up 7-0.
Troy Kite scored the last run in
the fifth inning on a wild pitch.
Shealy finished the game
3-for-3.
The ball was handed to Allen
to pitch in another championship
game. He followed up his dis-
trict championship performance
just fine, giving up two hits as
the Tigers captured the Region
4 championship with a 4-0 win
over The Villages.
After a scoreless first inning,
the Tigers loaded the bases with
no outs in the second. Troy
Kite's groundout scored one run,
while Trey Owens hit a sacrifice
fly to score another.
Hersey scored on a wild pitch
in the third to put Union up 3-0.
He then scored the final run of
the game on an error in the fifth
inning.
The win sent the Tigers to
the state semifinals, where they
defeated Hilliard 8-0. Start-
ing pitcher Hersey, who earned
the win, and. Shealy combined
to give up four hits. Hersey, in
improving his record to 10-2,
allowed one hit in four innings
and pitched his way out of a bas-
es-loaded situation in the First.
Five of the first eight Union
.batters struck out,- but Hilliard
miscues got the Tigers going
in the third and fourth innings.
Colby Cothren'was hit by a pitch
to lead off the third, while Cole
Kite reached on a ground ball
when the Flashes tried-'and
failed-to throw Cothren out at
second. Both runners scored on
a dropped fly ball to put the Ti-
gers up 2-0. Shealy and Starling
each hit RBI singles later in the
inning.
Cole Kite reached on an error
in the fourth, while Hersey hit
a bunt single. Both scored on a
single by Harden, who finished
the game 2-for-3. Allen reached
on a dropped third strike, while
Starling drew a walk to load the
bases. Troy Kite drew a walk to
force a run home, while a wild
pitch allowed Allen to score the
final run.
With one game left in their


season, the Tigers made-it a good
one, with Harden and Shealy
each driving in two runs in a 6-3
win over Holmes County for the
state title.
Allen hit a sacrifice fly to
score a run in the first. The Ti-
gers then added three runs in the
third. Shealy hit an RBI single,
while an error allowed Cody
Tice to score. Troy Kite drove in
the inning's final run.
Allen hit an RBI single in the
fourth to put theTigers up 5-0.
Holmes answered with two runs
in the bottom of the inning on a
triple and a single.
Cole Kite hit an RBI single in
the fifth to cap Union's scoring
and put the Tigers up 6-2.
Holmes added the game's fi-
nal run in the sixth.
Allen and Troy Kite were
each 2-for-4, while Allen earned
the win on the mound, throwing
a complete game and giving up
nine hits and one walk.
The Tigers ended the season
with a 22-8 record and a whole
bunch of memories.

Boys' basketball team
wins district, plays
way to final 4
Though entering the District
7-1A tournament with a sub-
.500 record, the Union County
boys' basketball team not only
went on to win the district cham-
pionship, but adavnced to the fi-
nal four for just the second time
in school history.
First, the Tigers recorded a
60-47 win over Baldwin in the
district tournament semifinals,
getting 23 points from Shaimea
Maeweather. Keldric Bradley
scored 12 points, while Daquin
Edwards had 11.
Union then stunned 21-2
Chiefland 60-53 to claim the
tournament championship.
Maeweather scored 24 points,
while Carl Alexander and Brad-
ley had 14 and 12, respectively.
In the regional semifinals,
the Tigers built a 24-8 lead and
put together second-half runs of
12-0 and 9-0 to defeat The Vil-
lages-71-59.
Alexander scored six points
during a first-quarter run of 9-0
and finished with 24. He also.
grabbed 11 rebounds.
Princeton Alexander scored
12 points, while Bradley, who


had been saddled with an ankle
injury, came off the bench to
score 10.
The win set up a rematch
against Chiefland for the Region
4 championship and the right to
advance to the state semifinals.
Chiefland put together a 13-0 run
in the fourth quarter that helped
the Indians overcome a deficit
and tie the game, but with 3:57
remaining, the Tigers outscored
Chiefland 11-5 to close out The
game with a 68-62 victory.
Maeweather and Bradley did
their part to put the Tigers' into
the final four for the first time
since 1994, scoring 22 and 20
points, respectively. Princeton
Alexander added 13 points.
Union came oh so close to
playing for the IA title, but fell
56-53 to Hawthorne in the state
semifinals.
Hawthorne led for most of the
game until Maeweather scored
eight straight points to help the
Tigers even the score at 37-all
in the third quarter. Two straight
drives to the basket by Bradley
put the Tigers up 47-43 with less
than four minutes to play, but
turnovers and Hawthornes per-
formance at the foul line helped
seal the Tigers' fate.
Maeweather finished the game
with 22 points, while Bradley
had 13.
The Tigers ended the season
with a 15-14 record.

Softball team rides
road wins'to state
semifinals
In falling to Baldwin in the
District 7-1A championship
game, the Union softball team
had to go on the road for the re-
gional playoffs, but that turned
out to be no problem. The Tigers
won on the road in both the re-
gional semifinals and finals to
advance to the state semifinals.
The district tournament was
away from home, too, and the
Tigers had to erase an 8-4 defi-
cit to Chiefland in the semifinals
just to qualify for the regional
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Kendallyn Johns drove:,in an-
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THURSDAY, JAN. 3, 2013 TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR B SECTION 5B


*.^ *')-----

5-^l U Ae__________________________


Alice Brown
RIVIERA BEACH-Alice Alex-
ander Brown, 90, of, Riviera Beach
died on Wednesday, Dec. 19, 2012.
Born in Hampton in 1966, Brown
moved to West Palm Beach. ,
Brown was a member of Mace-
donia Baptist Church, Hampton.
She was a dedicated member of Al-
len Temple AME Church until her
health failed. She graduated from
Robert Jenkins Ellison (RJE) High
School of Starke. She hired from
the'Palm Beach County Home after
16 years of employment.
Brown was married to the late
Leander Brown Sr. She is survived
by: children James E. Butler Jr. of
Greenville, S.C., Carloyn Miller of
Riviera Beach, Leander Brown Jr.
of Lake Park, Vernell Saarino of
Pooler, Ga., Mellonease Hender-
son and Diane Morris, both of West
Palm Beach, Lutanja R. Brown of
Riviera Beach, and Larry Williams
of Magnolia Park; 33 grandchil-
dren; 58 great-grandchildren; and
four great-great-grandchildren.
Funeral services were held Dec.
29 at Magnolia Missionary Baptist
Church in Hampton. Interment will
be held in Hampton Cemetery under
the direction of Haile Funeral Home
in Starke.


Mr. Brown is survived by: his
mother. Katherine Brown, of Law-
tc;: his faithful companion of 18
years,Sylvia Wilson,of Archer; son,
Kelly (Sharon) Brown of Hampton;
daughters Minnie (Robert) Brough-
ton of Lake Butler and Stephanie
(Randy) Goodman of Bronson; a
sister, Debbie (Vollie) Browning of
Starke; six grandchildren, includ-
ing, Justin Grant, Cheyenne Evans,
AJ Brown, and Annalei Brown. He
is also survived by a large, extended
family and a special nephew, Char-
lie Brown, and great-nephew, Tripp
Brown.
Funeral services were held Dec.
31 at Northside Baptist Church with
Brother Larry Finley and Brother
Gary Melvin officiating. Burial fol-
lowed in Evergreen Baptist Church
Cemetery. Arrangements are by.
Jones-Gallagher Funeral Home of
Starke.
PAID OBITUARY

Woodrow Ellis
MIDDLEBURG Woodrow
"Woody" Jefferson Ellis, 70, of
Middleburg, died Dec. 26, 2012, at
the Malcolm Randall VA Medical
Center in Gainesville. He was born
in West Green, Ga., on Sept. 21,
1942, to the late Loarce Cecil Ellis
and Madeliene Giles-Ellis. Woody
served his country as a member of
the United States Air Force.
He is survived by: his wife of
12 years, Margie Ellis, of Middle-
burg; son, Ronald Woodrow Ellis;
step-daughter, Anita (Jeff) Kravats;
brother, William (Pam) Cecil Ellis;
sisters Francis L. McKinney and
Judy Ann Skinner; and two grand-
daughters.
Arrangements are under the care
and direction of Archie Tanner Fu-
neral Services of Starke.


John Brown


John Brown
ARCHER-Mr. John Mitchell
Brown, 60, of Archer, passed away
Thursday, Dec. 27, 2012, at Haven
. Hospice Chiefland Care Center. He
was born on June 12, 1952, in Palat-
ka and was a Baptist. Mr. Brown
worked several years for Crawford
Construction and served in the Na-
tional Guard after high school. He
enjoyed hunting, fishing and had a
passion for baseball and animals.
He was preceded in death by:
his father, Mitchell Brown; broth-
ers Larry Charles Brown and Eddie
Dyal; and a sister, Elaine Brown.


Elnora Hernandez


EInora
Hernandez
STARKE-Elnora B. Hernan-


dcz, .:i, of Starke died Thursday,
Dec. 27, 2012, at Shands at the
University of Florida. A native of
Lake Butler, she was a member of
Walk by Faith Outreach Ministries
in Lawtey. She also attended the lo-
cal schools of Union and Bradford
counties. She was a homemaker and
devoted her time to the community.
She is survived by: her husband,
Fernando Hernandez; sisters Marva
Boswell and Lynn Boswvell, both of
Gainesville; brothers Johnny Bo-
swell of Raiford and Willie Griffin
of Gainesville.
Funeral services will be held
at 11 a.m. on Saturday, Jan. 5, at
Walk by Faith Ministries in Lawtey
with Elder Edwin Clark acting as
eulogist. Interment will be held in
Pine Grove Cemetery in Gainesville
under the direction of Haile Funeral
Home Inc. There will be no viewing
on Friday, Jan. 4. The cortege will
be held at Haile Funeral Home Inc.
on Saturday, Jan. 5, at 10:30 a.m.

Brenda
Leverette
KEYSTONE HEIGHTS-
Brenda Stanley Leverette, 57, of
Keystone Heights passed away at
her home on Wednesday, Dec. 26,
2012, following an extended illness.
Mrs. Leverette was born in Albany,
Ga., on Jan. 3, 1955, to the late Leon
and Edith Stanley. She was raised in
Gainesville and had continued liv-
ing in the area. Not only was Mrs.
Leverette a loving housewife, moth-
er and grandmother, she was also a
member of Trinity Baptist Church,
a former Cub Scout leader, a Mas-
ter Gardner from the University of
Florida, and, before she became ill,
she enjoyed making beaded jew-
elry.
Survivors include her husband of
33 years, Otis "David" Leverette;
and their three sons, David (Jessica)
Leverette and Andrew Leverette,
all of Keystone Heights, and Sean
(Ashley) Leverette (who is serv-
ing in the United States Navy) of
Gulf Port, Miss. Also surviving is
one brother, Gary Stanley; 'and one
sister, Ann Stanley, both of Inter-
lachen; a half sister, Lee Pearson of
Gainesville; one grandson, Breaker;
and one granddaughter, Kyra.
Viewing for Mrs. Leverette was
held on Dec. 28, in the Jones-Gal-
lagher Funeral Home Chapel. Fu-
neral services were held on Dec. 29
with Pastor James Peoples officiat-
ing. Burial followed at Keystone
Heights Cemetery. In lieu of flow-
ers, the family has requested contri-
butions to please be made to L.A.M.,
P.O. Box 1385, Keystone Heights,
FL 32656. Arrangements are under
the care of Jones-Gallagher Funeral
Home in Keystone Heights.
PAID OBITUARY


Kathleen Mathias


Kathleen
Mathias
KEYSTONE HEIGHTS-Mrs.
Kathleen "Kathy" Bertotto Mathias,
57, of Keystone Heights passed
away suddenly Sunday, Dec. 30,
2012, at the University of Shands
Hospital in Gainesville following a
brief illness.
Kathy was born in Jersey City,
N.J., on April 12, 1955, and was a
homemaker. She has been a resident
of Keystone Heights for 27 years,
moving here from Hollywood. She
was raised in the Catholic faith and
enjoyed spending as much time with
her family and friends as she could.
Kathy's husband, Anthony "Tony"
Mathias, and her mother, Irene T.
Bertotto, had preceded her in death.
She is survived by: her sons, Lee
(Alexandria Deltorre) Greenspan of
Hollywood, Jonathon Pendarvis of
Callahan; her father, Skip Bertotto
of Keystone Heights; two sisters,
Gail Ann Bauman and her daughter,
Meg, of Tallahassee, Shari (Mike)
Smith and their children, Michael
and Ashley of Keystone Heights;
and one brother, James (Kerry) Ber-
totto and their son, Mattlew. Also
surviving are her grandchildren,
Robyn Rosier, Alyssa Greenspan,
Grace Greenspan, Taylin Pendarvis,
Karsen, Kylee, and Karlie (Kar-
Kar).
The family had a visitation on
Jan. 2, 2013, at Jones-Gallagher Fu-
neral Home from 5 p.m.-7 p.m.
Arrangements are under the care
of Jones-Gallagher Funeral Honfe.
PAID OBITUARY

Robert Norman
LAKE BUTLER-Robert Eu-
gene Norman, 74, of Lake Butler,
died on Monday, Dec. 24, 2012, at
Shands Starke Regional Mecical
Center after an extended illness. He
was born in-Starke; living most of
his life in Lawtey until moving to
Lake Butler six years ago. He was
the son of the late Frank E. Norman
and Pearl Todd Norman. He was a


self-employed painter.
He is survived by: his wife of 46
years, Barbara McKinley Norman;
daughter, Linda (Louie) Navarro of
Lake Butler; sons Frank (Charlotte)
Norman of Lake City and Lonnie
(Sandy) Norman of Lake Butler;
seven grandchildren; and three
great-grandchildren; brother, Carlos
Norman of Lawtey; and Ed Norman
of Salt Springs.,
Funeral services were held Dec.
29 in the chapel of Archer Funeral
Home with Rev. Terry Elixson of-
ficiating. Burial followed in Dekle
Cemetery in Lake Butler. Archer
Funeral Home Inc. is in charge of
arrangements.

Robert Waddle
KEYSTONE HEIGHTS-Rob-
ert Wayne Waddle, 61, of Key-
stone Heights died at his home on
Wednesday, Dec. 26, 2012, follow-
ing a brief illness. Mr. Waddle was
born in El Paso, Texas, on Sept. 4,
1951, and was raised in Gaines-
ville. In 2007, he moved back to the
area from Virginia, where he was
a project manager for an industrial
construction company. His father,
Norman R. Waddle, preceded him
in death.
He is survived by: his wife of
32 years, Ann G. (vonNordeck);
daughter, Destiny (Darrin) Michal-
ski of Woodlawn, Tenn.; son, James
Yoder of Memphis, Tenn.; mother,
Geraldine Estes of Hague; broth-
ers Shane Estes of Gainesville and
Norman R. Waddle Jr. of Trenton;
sister, Diana Ratcliff of California;
mother-in-law, Irene Colewell of
Maryland; and seven grandchil-
dren.
A memorial service was held on
Dec. 31 in the Jones-Gallagher Fu-
neral Home chapel with Pastor Paul
Coleman officiating. The family will
have a private burial at a later date.
Arrangements are under the care of
Jones-Gallagher Funeral Home.




My soul shall be joyful in
the Lord; It shall rejoice
in His salvation.
Psalm 35:9
SOur sincerest thanks to
everyone for the many
kind deeds so thoughtfully
. done, the favors of friends
and the love shown.
These are the blessings
that comfort us and shall
forever remain in our
hearts.
The family of the late
Mrs Beatrice Scott


Remembering My Mother
Taking a look back she always
made do with what she had
and never asked for more. She
made time for her children,
family and friends. When she
prayed she would remember
the ones that needed a touch
from the Lord. She taught her
children about Jesus at a I
young age, most everyday you
would hear her say "I know
someone who could use this, if
you don't need that anymore",
and never thought twice about
how she would deliver it to
them. I am sure there were so
many stories that she didn't get
a chance to share with us, oh
Lord thank you for the blessed
time we had with her. When her
family was with her for the last
time she asked for nothing but
prayer, it felt like the Lord had
his angels encamped around
her bedside as she slipped
away as her children sung
Amazing Grace. She knew so
many people, and we the Irene
'Lynn family would like to thank
each and everyone for how
they sent flowers, prayers, and
food to the family. We prayed
for her services, to be that of
peace that passes all
understanding and it was
beautiful. See we had seen her
hurt and pain and the struggles
that she had endured once
again God said my child suffer
no more for I have come to call
you to your heavenly home. It's
time now to hold my hand and
follow me, I can almost feel her
joy of going to see her loved
ones.
Thank you Jesus, Amen
Brinda Gibson



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6B TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR B SECTION THURSDAY, JAN. 3, 2013


Tentative
football
districts affect
BHS, KHHS
the most
BY CLIFF SMELLEY
Regional News/Sports Editor
Bradford. Keystone Heights
and Union County will remain
in the same football districts
in 2013 and 2014 if the Florida
High School Athletic Associa-
tion's tentative changes are ad-
opted, but the district Bradford
and Keystone are in will lose its
top two teams.
The proposed changes have
Bradford and Keystone still in
District 4 in Class 4A along with
Interlachen and Umatilla. Mount
-D6ra, South Sumter and Weeki
Wachee, though, have moved up
to Class 5A. South Sumter was
the District 4-4A champ the last
two seasons, while Mount Dora
was the runner-up the past two
years.
The only new team proposed
for District 4-4A is The Villages,
which is moving up from Class
1A. That means the district will
be composed of five teams in-
stead of seven.
Union County, which won the
District 7-lA championship the
past two years, will remain in
Class IA and still bea part of Dis-
trict 7. Chiefland, Dixie County
and Newberry will remain in the
district as well, though Baldwin
is slated to move up to Class 4A.
Williston, which has been play-
ing as an independent, will be the
District 7 newcomer. (Schools
choosing to play as independents
are not eligible to participate in
the FHSAA postseason.)
Other notable changes include
Madison County, the Class 3A
runner-up the past two seasons,
moving up to Class 4A and Jef-
ferson County, the 2011 Class
1A champion, being listed as an
independent. Jefferson athletic
director Terry Walker, in a Dec.


21, 2012, story by Tallahassee
Democrat associate editor Jim
Lamar, said the school plans to
file the necessary paperwork to
remain in Class IA.

Tornadoes go
2-1 in Palatka

tournament
BY CLIFF SMELLEY
Regional News/Sports Editor
Justin McBride posted his
fourth straight double-double as
the Bradford boys' basketball
team capped a 2-1 showing in the
inaugural Jarvis Williams Classic
in Palatka with a 54-33 win over
Daytona Beach Seabreeze on
Dec. 29.
McBride scored 17 points and
grabbed 13 rebounds for the
Tornadoes, who improved to 8-6
after going 4-2 in two straight
tournaments.
Landon Mitchell added 10
points and four assists for
Bradford, while Deantre Burch
also had four. assists. Deon
Aldridge grabbed six rebounds
and had five steals.
The Tornadoes host two
straight games beginning Friday,
Jan. 4. They play District 5-4A
opponent Keystone Heights on
Jan. 4 before playing Bishop
Kenny on Saturday, Jan. 5. Both
games are scheduled for 7:30
p.m. following 6 p.m. junior
varsity games.
On Tuesday, Jan. 8, Bradford
travels to play district opponent
Interlachenat7:30 p.m.following
a 6 p.m. junior varsity game.
Bradford is currently 2-2 in its
district.

Score by Quarter


SHS:
BHS:


7 4 12 10-33
18 29 5 2-54


Bradford scoring (54): Aldridge
5, Burch 5, Floyd 3, Grimsley 4,
Grissett 5, Jones 3, McBride 17,
Mitchell 10, Nichols 2.3-pointers:
Burch, Floyd, Jones, Mitchell.


Free throws: 14-20.

Earlier results:

Fairfield 61 BHS 60
Fairfield (Ala.) outscored the
Tornadoes 27-15 in the fourth
quarter to overcome a monster
performance from McBride and
hand Bradford a 61-60 loss on the
first day of the Jarvis Williams
Classic on Dec. 27.
McBride scored 32 points and
had 18 rebounds and 10 blocks.
Aldridge had eight points, while
Burch had nine assists and three
steals. Keaaris Ardleyhad seven
assists and four steals.

Score by Quarter


FHS:
BHS:


10 13 11 27-61
18 7 20 15-60


Bradford scoring (60): Aldridge
8, Ardley 3, Burch 7, Jones
6, McBride 32, Mitchell 4.
3-pointers:. Burch, Jones. Free
throws: 6-12.

BHS 59 River Ridge 51
Bradford overcame a 13-point
halftime deficit to defeat New
Port Richey River Ridge 59-51
on Dec. 28 at the Jarvis Williams
Classic.
The Tornadoes, who were
held to 12 points in the first half,
outscored River Ridge 33-12 in
the fourth quarter.
Burch led Bradford with
16 points, including a 9-of-12
performance at the foul line.
McBride had 11 points, 15
rebounds and four blocks, while
Aldridge had seven rebounds.
Ardley had 11 of Bradford's
18 steals, while also adding four
assists.

Score by Quarter
RRHS: 14 11 14 12-51
BHS: 6 6 14 33-59

Bradford scoring (59): Aldridge
2, Ardley 12, Burch 16, Floyd
2, Grimsley 5, Grissett 4,
Jones 2, McBride 11, Mitchell


5. 3-pointers: Ardley, Burch,
Grimsley. Free throws: 22-46.


Keystone brys'
soccer team
still unbeaten
in district
BY CLIFF SMELLEY
Regional News/Sports Editor
In a battle of District 5-2A boys'
soccer teams with a combined 25
wins overall, Keystone Heights
and Santa Fe played to a 2-2
tie in heavy rain on Dec. 20 in
Keystone.
The Indians (13-1-2, 8-0-1
in District 5) scored first when
Cory Hedding scored off of a
Nacho Grimaldo assist in the 12"'
minute. Santa Fe's Arric Wall
scored in the 22nd minute to tie
the match.
Each team's final goal didn't
come until the final 10 minutes.
Craig Graff scored'for Keystone
in the 70th minute, while Alex
Garcia converted on a penalty
kick for the Raiders (12-2-2,7-1 -
1) in the 751h minute.
The two teams will meet
again Friday, Jan. 4, at 7 p.m.
in Alachua with the number-one
seed in the District 5 tournament
on the line.
Keystone will host Crescent
City on Monday, Dec. 7, while
on Tuesday, Jan. 8, the Indians
will host Eastside. Both matches
are scheduled for 7 p.m.

Earlier result:

KHHS 4 Middleburg 2
Visiting Middleburg scored
a goal in the first minute, but
the Indians answered with four
straight in a 4-2 win on Dec. 18.
Juan Grimaldo tied the score
with a penalty-kick conversion
in the ninth minute, whila Wyatt
Graziano gave the Indians the
lead for good with a goal off of
an assist from Hedding in the 17th
minute.


Hedding added another goal
in the 391h minute off of an assist
from Juan Grimaldo. Grimaldo
recorded another assist in the
73rd minute on a goal by Nacho
Grimaldo.

11 from BHS,
KHHS, UCHS
earn 1st-team
Sun honors
Union County had five players
earn first-team honors as part of
the Gainesville Sun's all-area
football teams, while Bradford
and Keystone Heights each had
three first-team picks.
In all, Union had eight players
earn either first- or second-
team honors in the Sun's small-
school all-area team. Senior Carl
Alexander was a first-team pick
on both offense and defense. As
a defensive lineman, he recorded
109 tackles-25 for loss- 14
sacks, six forced fumbles,
four pass deflections and one
interception.
Alexander was named to
the offensive team as a kicker,
having made 4-of-6 field goals
and 28-of-33 PATs.
Laris Paige was a first-team
pick as an offensive lineman,
while Union had three defensive
players besides Alexander
earn first-team honors: senior
defensive back Prince Alexander,
junior linebacker Austin Dukes
and. junior defensive back
Geordyn Green. Alexander had
four interceptions, six sacks
and a blocked field goal, while
Green had an area-best seven
interceptions to go along with 48
tackles, six pass deflections and
two forced fumbles. Dukes had
114 tackles-13 for loss-five
sacks, three forced fumbles,
four pass deflections and two
interceptions.
Senior running back Walter


Mabrey and junior running
back Daquin Edwards were
second-team picks. Mabrey
rushed for 1,114 yards and eight
touchdowns, while Edwards
rushed for 883 yards and six
touchdowns. Edwards also, had,
three touchdown reception.
Bradford and Keystone each,
had three players earn first-team.
honors as part of the Gainesville.:
Sun's all-area big-school team..
Bradford junior wide receiver
Kenny Dinkins was selected-
after catching 40 passes for an.
area-best 862 yards and eight,
touchdowns, while Bradford had
two first-team defensive picks
senior lineman Phillip James and,
junior defensive back Keaaris;;
Ardley. James had 57 tackles- 12
for loss-and nine sacks, while,
Ardley had 73 tackles and five;
interceptions.
Keystone senior linebacker
John Brown was selected after:
making 145 tackles-68 solo--
five interceptions and one sack:
He forced three fumbles and ha4d
four fumble recoveries.
Earning first-team honors
for Keystone on offense were
senior athlete Alex Gonzales and-
senior lineman Andrew Stanley:'
Gonzales rushed for 1,154 yard
and 14 touchdowns, while also"
averaging 39.2 yards as a punter:
Keystone had eight players earit
honorable mention: sophomore"
linebacker Sam Anderson,
senior linebacker Chris Gillen,
senior defensive linemen Sean
Foray and Nathan Smith, junior
defensive lineman Josh Knight,
junior offensive lineman Tate
Williams, sophomore defensive
back Brighton Gibbs and senior
defensive back Logan Stanley.
Bradford had four players
earn honorable mention: senior
offensive lineman Murphy Allen,
senior wide receiver Marco
Grimsley, senior linebacker/
running back Lyndell Hampton
and sophomore quarterback
Jacob Luke.


W R IT I G from becoming a nuisance.
W R IT IN G 1Gardening and writing aren't
Continued from 2B Bridgman's only hobbies. While
she was growing up, she said, she
was not at all athletic and wasn't
Stille,- to fulfill her 35-hour a sports star on any team.
Still, to fulfill her 35-hour "I wasn't tilled when I got
master gardener community to UF and learfied that the re-
commitment, she volunteered to quired curriculum included an
write a weekly gardening column entire year of physical educa-
in the Telegraph. She answers .-tion," Bridgman said....... .
write-in questions fromread- -She felt better, when,,she dis-
ers, emphasizing "right plant; covered the UF program em-"
right place" gardening, and tries phasized physical conditioning,
to educate readers on harmless not excellent sports skills. She
techniques for keeping wildlife


INDIANS
Continued from 3B

Dakota Thacker led the team
in kills with 11, while Keerston
Skinner had nine to go along
with three blocks.
The Indians, who were seeded
second, had to settle for being
the district runner-up after a 3-0
(25-13, 25-10, 25-16) loss to the
tournament's top seed, Santa Fe.
SThat loss put the Indians on the
road for the regional quarterfi-
nals,,which resulted in a 3-0 (25-
22, 25-12, 25-12) loss to Trinity
Catholic.
Keystone ended its season
with a 20-7 record.

Girls' golfers advance
past district level .
,At the District 4-l A girls' golf
tournament, Keystone placed
third with a score of 435 to earn
a spot in the regional tourna-
ment.


Taylor Heinz led the Indians,
shooting a 99, which was tied
for the eighth-best score. Oly-
via Heinz shot a 106, which was
ninth best, while Carson Draney
shot a 109, which was 10th best.
Rachel Bellman and Marah


and Ben became committed to
fitness, and joined a gym early
on in the health and fitness
movement.. At one point, Bridg-
man was working out five days
a week with group exercises
thrown in.
Now, she and Ben belong to
spinning classes--including one
Ben teaches-at the Bradford-
Union Area Career Technical
Center, which runs an average
of 10 members per session. Ben
also teaches a physical fitness
class for senior Medicare Ad-


Lowery had scores of 121 and
137, respectively.
The Indians would go on to
finish eighth at the regional
tournament with a team score of
486.


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4. TILE
5. DECKS
6. WOOD ROT REPAIR
7. DRYWALL


8. LAMINATE
9. HARDIE SIDING
10. WOOD FENCES
11. PERGOLAS
12. LAWN MAINTENANCE
13. TRACTOR WORK
14. YARD CLEANUP
15. SODI MULCH


Complete Home Care With Just One Call!
Dependable & Trustworthy
Now accepting major credit cards ] VISA \
R.J. 352-318-4060 or Josh 352-258-1046


Pediatric Associates

at Argyle, P.A. Starke


Orlando V. Rendon, MD, FAAP
Zenaida L. Lavina, MD, FAAP
Josephine B. Yatco, MD, FAAP


Anne L. Perantoni, ARNP
Lauren C. Shivers, ARNP
(Jacksonville Location Only)


Sports & School Physicals
* Caring for Newborns to 18 years old
Sick & Well Child visits


Clinic Hours
Mon-Fri 8am 5pm
Call For Appointment
Jacksonville Clinic
8351 Westport Rd.
(904) 317-8811
.. M-F 8:30 am- 5:30 pm


(904) 368-0368
107-B Edwards Rd., Starke, FL
Accepting Most
Major Insurances
Medicaid
VIS llw^B
WBMUBil SihB


vantage members. .
Bridgman has also written a
book for middle-grade readers,
(sixth-eighth grades) entitled
"The Adventures of Polecat
Mullins and Possum Johnson."
She said she is looking for a lit-
erary agent and for a publisher
for her book.


"That's not very easy," she
said.
Bridgman said some of her
essays on Florida life have been
featured on WJCT radio's "First
Coast Connect" and "In Con-
text." Radio host Melissa Ross
still features one of her essays
once a month.


are hard to


get


The Telegraph's newest writ-
er said she would cover social
aspects of Bradford life and peo-
ple with interesting hobbies. She
added she expected her newspa-
per work to evolve over time.
"It's an honor to find out what
those stories are," Bridgman
said. "It's a great opportunity."


a gift for!


26 issues of

THE BRADFORD COUNTY
TELEGRAPH
AND
STARKEJOURNAL.COM
OR
THE UNION COUNTY TIMES
AND
STARKEJOURNAL.COM
OR
THE LAKE REGION MONITOR
AND
STARKEJOURNAL.COM


64004


)NTHS


Send Check or Money Order to:
Christmas Subscription, P.O. Drawer A, Starke, FL32091
or call 904-964-6305 with Visa or MasterCard.

Send THE BRADFORD COUNTY TELEGRAPH OR
THE UNION COUNTY TIMES OR THE LAKE REGION MONITOR
AND STARKEJOURNAL.COM


to Address:


The Perfect ,




Christmas Gift



For the hard to buy for!



or the (2) favorite persons that


00 FOR


30 6MC


STARKE US Hwy 301

FLORIDA BANK
PEDIATRIC
"0 ASSOCIATES


I


. ......... .... .'
.. ... . .. .. .


f l .. .....


'41


I


I/









THURSDAY, JAN. 3, 2013 o TELEGRAPH, TIMLS & IVIONITOR B SECTION 7B


Classified Ads


19041 964-6305

13521 473-2210

[3861496-2261


Where one call

does it a/Il


-U


Sri-County Classifieds

Bradford 0 Union 0 Clay
Reach over 20,500
Readers Every Week!

INDEX
40 Notice 57 For Sale
44 Vehicles Accessories 58 Building Materials
42 Motor Vehicles 59 Personal Services
43 RV's & Campers 60 Secretarial Services
-44 Boats 61 Scriptures
45 Land forSale 62 Vacation/Travel
46 Real Estate Out ofArea63 Love Lines
-47 Commercial Property 64 Business Opportunity
Rent, Lease, Sale 65 Help Wanted
48 Homes for Sale 66 Investment Opportunity
49 Mobile Homes for Sale 67 Hunting Land for Rent
50 For Rent 68 Carpet Cleaning
51 Lost/Found 69 Food Supplements
52 Animals & Pets 70 Self Storage
53 Yard Sales 72 Sporting Goods
54 Keystone Yard Sales 73 arm Equipment
55 Wanted 74 Computers & Computer
56 Trade or Swap Accessories
CLASSIFIED DEADLINES
Word Ad Classified Tuesday, 12:00 noon
Classified Display Tuesday, 12:00 noon
"j USE YOUR PHONE
d^- To place a Classified
964-6305 473-2210 496-2261
NOTICE
C .1 I J I .1 0 t 1 .1 1, i i I i. i i i
10 cr postage and h tl 1 , ,, ,, ,
.a .. .


'40
.Notices
CLASSIFIED ADVERTIS-
ING should be submit-
"ted to the Starke office
.in writing & paid in ad-
vance unless credit has
already been established
with this office. A $3.00
SERVICE CHARGE will
'be added to all billings
to cover postage & han-
dling. THE CLASSIFIED
STAFF CANNOT BE
:HELD RESPONSIBLE
FOR MISTAKES IN
CLASSIFIED ADVER-
:'TISINGS TAKEN OVER
'.THE PHONE. Deadline
is Tuesday at 12 noon
:'prior to that Thursday's
publication. Minimum
charge is $9.50 for the
first 20 words, then 20
cents per word thereaf-
ter.
EQUAL HOUSING OP-*
.PORTUNITY. All real
estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to
-the Federal Fair Housing
-. Act of .1968 which makes
it illegal to advertise "any
-preference, limitation or
discrimination based on
,race, color, religion, sex
or national origin, or an
:intention to make any
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination."
Familial .status includes
children under the age
- of 18 living with parents
or legal custodians,
pregnant women and
people securing custody
of children under 18.
This newspaper will not
knowingly accept any
advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation
of the law. Our readers
are hereby informed that
all dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion, call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777, the toll-
free telephone number
for the hearing impaired


Waldo Villas

Move-In

Special

2 Bedroom
Townhome
$100 security
1/2 OFF 1st &
2nd month's rent
Equal housing opportunity.
This institution is an equal
opportunity provider &
employer.
Call Nita at
352-468-1971
TDD 800-955-9771


is 1-800-927-9275. For
further information call
Florida Commission on
Human Relations, Lisa
Sutherland 850-488-
7082 ext #1005.
47
Commercial
Property (Rent,
Lease,Sale)
743 S. WALNUT ST.,
Starke 4064 sf Office
Space and / Or day care
center. Can be subdivid-
ed. $5-$7/sf. No CAM.
Prorata for utilities. Call
Mika (352) 359-6047.
FOR RENT, Behind Pow-
ell's Tastee Freeze,
3,500 sq. ft. $2,300/mo.
warehouse/office 3,200
sq. ft.- $850/mo.Office
space 2,700 sq. ft.-
,$1800/mo.lndustral Park
office/warehouse 3,000
sq. ft. $950/mo.Ware-
house/office 3,000
sq.ft.-$800/mo.Edwards
Road office space 900
sq. ft. -$600/mo. Smith
& Smith Realty, 904-964-
9222.
DOWNTOWN STARKE
Professional Offices for
rent, $315 per month.
Conference room, kitch-
en, utilities and more
provided. 904-364-8395.
RETAIL SPACE in busy
strip center. 1,000 sq.ft.
and 2,000 sq. ft. units.
South HWY 301 front-
age, across from the
KOA Campground. Call
352-235-1675:


FOR RENT office build-
ing good location down-
towfT Starke Large
enough for 5 to 6 individ-
ual offices. Call 904-364-
9022
FOR SALE, downtown of-
fice building Downstairs
office space for 5+6
person office Upstairs
office nicely done This
is one of the nicest build-
ing's downtown. Sale
$129,000, cash or terms.
Call 904-364-9022.
FOR RENT, rental space
on Walnut St. $350/mo.
For additional informa-
tion call 904-364-9022.
FOR RENT, Store front
on US. 301. Fruit stand,-
detail shop, car lot etc
For additional informa-
tion call 904-364-9022
49
Mobile Homes
For Sale
100% FINANCING on
new 4BR/2BA Modular
Home on 1 acre. $725/
mo. Flexible financing
904-589-9585.
MANUFACTURED
Home, HUD, foreclo-
sures.Remodeled with
new appliances, car-
pet, paint. Low down
payment and payments
starting at $575/mo. 904-
589-9585.
EVERYTHING INCLUD-
ED, New modular home.
Completely furnished
with washer & dryer. Call
to qualify for our zero
down program. 904-589-
9585.
NEWLY RENOVATED Tri-
ple wide, on one acre.
New well, carpet, metal
roof, vinyl siding, large
wooden deck. Owner
financing. Call! Bill 352-
745-0094. Must See.
I HAVE owner financing on
new mobile homes with
a large down payment. I
also have rent to own on
land home foreclosures
with as little as $5000
down. Call Matt 386-697-
6209.
"LIMITED TIME FINANC-
ING" I have loans for
people with a credit
score as low as 575. For
the first 90 days of 2013
property not needed as
collateral. Call Doyle
352-317-8249.
NEW A HOME? Special
government loans! You
can use your land or $$
as down payment, Clay-
ton Homes is the world's
largest builder. If you buy
somewhere else you pay
too much. 904-772-8031
MAJOR DISCOUNTS on
\ models! Use-land or old
,mobile home for down
payment. Call now be-
fore they're gone. Clay-
ton Homes 904-772-
8031.
50
For Rent
KEYSTONE, CLEAN
2BR/1BA SWMH/ with
addition. 1 acre fenced,
paved road. $525/mo.


DOUGLASS LAWN CARE
Lawn Cuts & Morel
No job too smalL..give me a call!
Quality Lawn Care at a Great Pricel


Johnathan Douglass
904-964-4407

Via~~i^.fl~je~jiii


Watson Realty is offering
entry-level Real Estate Sales Classes
starting in January.
Course is 3 consecutive weekends 8am-6pm
Jan. 5 Jan. 20 in East Palatka
Jan. 12 Jan. 26 in Fleming Island
Feb. 4 Feb. 24 in Gainesville
FREE Personality Profile Scoring

Current openings in Keystone Heights
& Starke offices for licensed associates
(Full-time or referral)

Call

Dean Weaver .
Vice President/Broker

(352) 473-4816






Watson Realty Corp. RMIORS


first, last, sec. 352-475-
3094 or 352-235-1143.
WE HAVE 2 OR 3 bedroom
MH, clean, close to pris-
on Call 352-468-1323.
NICE MOBILE HOMES/for
rent Lake Butler Starke/
Home for rent ,deposit
required. Call 678-438-
6828.
MOBILE HOMES FOR
RENT starting at $525"
per month. Hidden Oaks,
Lake Butler. Call 386-
496-8111.
PERMANENT ROOMS
for rent at the Magnolia
Hotel. Both refrigerator
and microwave. Special
rates, by the month. Call
904-964-4303 for more
information.
VERY NICE FURNISHED
APT. on lake. For infor-
mation call 352-473-
7769. Senior citizen dis-
count.
5 YEAR OLD 3BR/2BA.
house. Island kitchen,
granite counters, tile
floors, gas fireplace, Ja-
cuzzi tub. 2 car garage
east of Keystone, with
lake access to Lake
Hutchinson, Keystone
school district. $1050/
mo. $1,050/dep. Call
Dave @352-473-3560.
LAKE BUTLER APART-
MENTS, Accepting appli-
cations for HC and non-
HC. 1.2,3, & 4 BR. This
institution is an equal
opportunity provider and
employer." 1005 SW 6th
St. Lake Butler, 32054.
TDD/TTY 711.Call 386-
496-3141.
3BR/2BA BW fenced yard
rent $750.00/mo security
$300 between Lake But-
ler & Starke.Call for fur-
ther information 904-263-
3999 or 904-305-8287.
2BR/1BA BLOCK HOME,
CH/A, W/D hookup, out
in the country. $500/mo'
first, last, $300 security.
Call 904-964-3604.

Southern Villas of
Starke Apts.
$199
Move-in Special
1 & 2 BR HC & non-HC
apartments. Central ac/
heat, on-site laundry,
playground, private and
quiet atmosphere. Located
on SR-16, 1001 Southern
Villas Dr., Starke, FL or call
904-964-7295. TDD/TTY
711. "This institution is an
equal opportunity provider
and employer."


2BR/2 FULL BATH DW MH,
partly furnished, total re-
furbished, nestled in the
wood on Santa Fe Riv-
er, Worthington Springs.
Very private, service an-
imals only, $650/month.
Call 386-496-2030.
LIVE IN THE COUNTRY.
14 X60 MOBILE HOME.
2BR/1BA CH/A, very
clean. $300 deposit,
$550/mo. Call 904-782-
3380 or 904-451-5236.
LARGE 1BR/1BA, house
$525 per month, HWY.
301 N., two miles south
of Lawtey, FPL, $25-$85
per month, fenced yard,
1st & last. 904-769-6020.
2BR Upstairs apartment,
downtown Starke. $450/
mo. plus deposit, etc
Call 904-364-9022.
STARKE AVAILABLE
2/1/13. 3BR/2BA, CH/A,
DWMH, off 230 across
from country club. New
beige carpet, tile floors,
mini blinds. Eat in kitch-
en, double oven, appli-
ances. No smoking, ser-
vice animals only, job ref-
erences required. $700/
mo. pl~s $700 security.
904-662-3735, if no an-
swer leave message.
2BR/1BA. CH/A washer/
dryer, dishwasher. $550/
mo., first, last. Call 904-
769-6388.
52
Animals & Pets
WE BUY farm animals. Call
904-838-8069 or 904-
591-4191.
57
For Sale
Entertainment unit, very
nice, blond, 71 inches
high, 4-feet wide, 31 x 37
TV. 125$ firm. 352-473-
9094.
Firewood, Seasoned, Split,
Oak. 352-473-2649.
JAZZY PRIDE # 614 pow-
er chair, new wheels,




TreSeric


Prpet


new batteries, new hand
controls. Good condition,
$1995. Call 352 468-
2877, Also have a Har-
ma Power lift for $599.
352-468-2877.
JET 2 POWER chair, ex-
cellent condition, new
batteries,Less than 20
-hours on chair, up to 25
miles on single charge.
Must see!!! paid $4,000.
Must sell $850. Local in
Starke, call (904)769-
3608 or (813)431-6084.
CRAFTSMAN Rotary lawn
mower. 6.5 horsepower,
22" side discharge. Runs
good. $125.00 Call 352-
468-2860.
59
Personal
Services
CASH FOR JUNK cars
$300 & up. Free pick up,
running or not. Call 352-
771-6191.
BRADFORD CAR SER-
VICE 904-964-2272,
Open 24/6, Closed Fri-
day from 5:30pm. to Sat.
5:40pm. We take credit
cards.
CLARK FOUNDATION RE-
PAIRS, INC. Correction
of termite & water-dam-
aged wood & sills. Lev-
eling & raising Houses/
Bldgs. ,Pier Replacement
& alignment. We do all
types of tractor work,
excavation and small
demolition jobs. Free Es-
timates: Danny (Buddy)
Clark, 904-284-8088 or
904-545-5241.
FLORIDA CREDIT UNION
has money to lend for
MH & land packages.
1-800-284-1144.
65
Help Wanted


SECRETARY for proper-
ty preservationist need-
ed, computer knowledge
a must. Send resume to
chad.willhite@att.net or
fax 352-473-0094.
PARKSIDE ALF, is hiring
caregivers, Apply in per-
son, Church St. Starke,
Fl.
The Union County Health
Department is seeking
a Human Services Pro-
gram Specialist, position
# 64051555. This is a
Healthy Start Care Co-
ordinator position with
the Union County Health
Department. Care co-
ordination will occur in
both Bradford and Union
counties. The incumbent
will be expected to en-
gage in relationships with
client families that facil-
itate positive child-par-
ent interactions with the
overall goal of improving
child growth and de-
velopment outcomes.
Must have at least two
years professional work
experience with children
or youth. Must be com-
petent in computer sys-
tems. Must have experi-
ence working in a health
care setting. Nursing
experience preferred. .
Must be fingerprint-
ed. May be required
to work extra hours or
days in the event of an
emergency. Salary is
$32,947.20. Applica-
tions will be accepted
online at https://people-
first.myflorida.com/ or
completed State of Flor-
ida applications may be
faxed to (904) 636-2627
by 1/10/13. Call 1-877-
562-7287 for assistance
in applying on line.


Floi daWorks
Alachua/Bradford A Community Partnership
S[Travis)

904-964-8092
www.FloridaWorksOnline.com


Now Accepting

Applications
1 AND 2
BEDROOM APARTMENTS
HERITAGE VILLAS
APARTMENTS
607 Bradford Court Starke, FL
Call for more info
904-964-6216
Hearing Impaired Only
call 800-955-8771
H'andicapped'Acclssible ui
This Institution is an Equal Opportunity
.. .-. Provider, and Employer. o o.Tu,,


Set Right Mobile Homes
Specializing In Relocations, Re-Levels, Set-Ups & Disposal *
Rodney A. Carmichael, Owner 904-364-6383
Email: set_right_homes@yahoo.com
Licensed Bonded Inured Lie#t ILb1025656 I


Education
MEDICAL
BILLING
TRAINEE S
NEEDED! Train
to become a
Medical Office
Assistant. NO
EXPERIENCE
NEEDED! Online
training gets you
Job ready ASAP.
HS Diploma/GED
& PC/Internet
needed! .(888)374-
7294

Employment
$1000 Bonus
(1st 30 Hired)
Up to 47 cpm.
New Equipment.
Need CDL Class A


Driving Exp.
(877)258-8782
w w w ad -
drivers.com

Help Wanted
Drivers
H I R-I N G
EXPERIENCED
/
INEXPERIENC
ED TANKER
DRIVERS! Earn
up to $.51 per
Mile! New Fleet
Volvo Tractors! I
Year OTR Exp.
Req. Tanker
Training
Available. Call
Today: (877)882-
6 5 3 7
www.OaklevTran


Out of Area Classifieds


sport.com

Miscellaneous
A AIRLINE
CAREERS -
Become an
Av i a t i o n
Maintenance
Tech. FAA
approved training.
Financial aid if
qualified
Housing available.
Job placement
assistance. CALL
Aviation Institute
of Maintenance
(866)314-3769

MEDICAL
CAREERS begin
here Train


ONLINE for
Allied Health and
Medic a l
Management. Job
placement
assistance .
Computer

Financial Aid if
qualified. SCHEV
authorized. Call
888-203-3179
www.CenturaOnli
ne.com

NURSING
CAREERS
begin here -
Train in months,
not years.
Financial aid if
q qualified .


L A. & A


Ho u s in g
available. Job
Placement
assistance. Call
Centura Institute
Orlando
(877) 206-6559

AIRLINES ARE
HIRING Train
-for hands on
A v i a t'ion
Maintenance
Career. FAA

p r o gram .
Financial aid if
qualified -
Housing available
CALL Aviation
Institute a eof
Maintenance
(866)314-3769


EEO/AANP Employer.
HAIRDRESSER and or nail
tech. needed for local sa-


Ion. Call Cassi .for infor-
mation, 904-412-7012.


Only 549 mth
For the 2 Bedroom/2 Bath

Only 629 mth
For be 3 Bedroom/2 Bath

Only 729 mth
For the 4 Bedroom/2 Bath
Call for current
MOVE-IN SPECIALS!










FLORIDA
GATEWAY
COLLEGE

RECEIVING CLERK
Operation of a mail room and stock
room. Receive, verify, and distribute
warehouse stock and mail items.
Computer email, data entry, and work
order program management. Requires
High School graduate plus three years
warehouse or clerical experience. A
High School equivalency may be
substituted for high school graduation.
Computer literate. Good customer
service skills. Good communication
skills. Knowledge of spelling, grammar
and basic business arithmetic. Data
entry and word processing skills. Ability
to keep records. Ability to interact
positively in person or on the
telephone. Ability to use computer
financial systems, word processing and
spreadsheets. Must have valid Florida
driver's license and good driving
record. Ability to handle bulk material
deliveries and lift 45 pounds frequently.
Commercial driver's license a plus.
SALARY: $ 19,602 annually, plus
benefits.
APPLICATION DEADLINE: 1/18/13
Persons interested should provide College
employment application. Position details
and applications available on web at:
S Www.fgc.edu
Human Resources
Florida Gateway College
149 S.E. College Place
Lake City Fl 32025-2007
Phone (386) 754-4314
Fax (386) 754-4814
E-Mail: humanr(@fqc.edu
FGC is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the
Southern Association of Colleges and Schools.
VP/ADA/EA/EO College in Education and Emrlovment


ATTEND
COLLEGE
ONLINE from
Home. *
Medical, *
Business, *
Criminal Justice,
*Hospitality. Job
placement
assistance.
Computer

Financial Aid if
qualified. SCHEV
authorized. Call
www.CenturaOnli
ne.cdom 888-203-
3179

OTR Drivers
Wanted,
TIRED OF
LIVING G


PAYCHECK
T 0
PAYCHECK?
There's great
e a r n i n g
potential as a
Professional
Truck Driver!
The average
Professional
Truck Driver
earns over
$700/wk*! 16-
Day CDL
Training @
N F C C /
Roadmaster!
Approved for
Veterans
Training. CALL
TODAY!
(866)467-0060
* DOL /'BLS
2012


,Of3 EVIC


*Land Clearing *Demolition
*Ponds *, Road Grading
*Dozer Work R.E. Jones *Fill Dirt
-Road Building *Limerock
*Driveways Owner .Washout
*Heavy Brush -Site Prep
Mowing Licensed *Fire Line
& Insured Plowing

AJijr OfIce: 904-966-0065 Cell: 904-1364-733
I .. i 1'' 64 51 6 1h w r,L -. ;iarte FL 32091


HELP WANTED


Licensed Caregivers

for

Parkside's New Extension

Apply in person




As, sode
Assisted Living.Facility


Located in Downtown Starke
329 N. Church St.
Next to Wainwright Park


GREAT PART TIME SALES & SERVICE
OPPORTUNITY IN OUR COMMUNITY!

Today Is a great day to Join us at OneMain Financial.

We are currently seeking a highly motivated individual with
excellent customer service and sales skills to join our Starke
Branch Team as a Consumer Finance Sales Representative.

The work hours will be 25 to 30 hours per week.

OneMain Financial provides personal loans with one-on-one
service at local branches nationwide. With roots in lending
that date back to 1912, we have been helping people achieve
their goals and dreams for generations. '

CONSUMER FINANCE SALES REPRESENTATIVE

The selected candidate will consult with customers about
their financial and personal objectives and offer loan
solutions to help them achieve their goals. Additionally, by
providing exceptional personalized service, the Branch Team
ensures customer satisfaction and a continued relationship
with OneMain Financial.

Please apply online at:
http://Jobs.citi.com/careers/onemain-financial-jobs
and enter job number 12047356 in the job search box.


# OneMain.
Financial "

OneMain rirsaciai is a- ecuail oDporlunry emnlIoyer M/D/DIV.


----- ^-








8B TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR B SECTION THURSDAY, JAN. 3, 2013


8'x12'



$64 /mo





10'x20'

$1129l/mo
or

12'x20'

$13352/mo


(904) 964-3330
Highway 301' South
Starke


SFins, Fur & Tails
IE4 By Mickey Agner


Cason's
standout

trophies, and

a caution for
hpg hunters

Since last week, we have
experienced more than one day
with temperatures below. 32
degrees, and our local lakes and
forests have been replenished
with some rain. Perhaps those
were some of the factors that
stimulated the crappie bite.
Joey Tyson of Bald Eagle Bait
and Tackle in Keystone Heights
reports some nice catches
coming out of Santa Fe, Lowery,
Magnolia and Hampton lakes. -
Those fishermen who access
Hampton Lake via the public
ramp should be reminded that
the ramp will be totally rebuilt
between the months of January
and March. Jerome Kelly,
Bradford County engineer,
indicates the water-entry
angle will be about half of the
current angle subsequent to
reconstruction.The improvement
should provide a much more
enjoyable launching experience
for local boaters and fishermen.
Thomas Cason of Lake
Butler has been spending his
fair share of time on the water
and in the woods this year. He
holds a couple of photographs
of a 14-pound-plus bass that
he caught. While he will not
disclose the exact location,
he indicates that it was in the
paper's tri-county service area.
While the photos are of poor
quality, another one does' clearly
show the fish being measured at
a length that is consistent with
that weight.
The other displayed
photQgraph also indicates that
Cason is not a bad archery
hunter either. The noted deer is
a piebald with a notable amount
of its body showing both white
hair and skin. A piebald deer
is' a genetic variation that will
frequently also display other
defects such as a small lower
jaw, an arched back or short
legs. The deer Cason killed was
a nine-point buck, but weighed
only 100 pounds.
A couple of weeks ago,
we reported on the subject
of hog hunting, and it is only
appropriate that we forward a
precaution issued by the Florida
:Fish and Wildlife Conservation
Commission to the feral-hog
hunters. This precaution is
relevant only to those hunters


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who kill and dress feral hogs and
is due to the frequent presence
of the Brucella bacteria in the
noted animals. There are three
different Brucella bacteria, but
the one we are concerned about
is endemic to feral swine and
known as Brucella suis.
The infection caused by
Brucella suis is commonly
known as swine Brucellosis. The
Florida Department of Health
indicates that the Brucellosis
infection is transmitted by direct
contactwith swine body fluids-
blood, milk and saliva-or raw
meat. Handling the quarry with
cuts or scratches on bare hands
could also lead to the infection.
Consumers of feral swine,
already take the necessary
precautions to avoid this issue
by cooking all pork completely
to an internal temperature of
170 degrees or until all juices
run clear. be,5pite the 'fact this
original precautious measure
was established to avoid a
different infection by the round
worm Trichinella spiralis-
the infection is known -as
trichinosis-the through cooking
is also effective at destroying the
Brucella bacteria as well.
The Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission
recommendation advises
any hunter who handles and/
or dresses any feral swine to
wear gloves that will not be
penetrated by any of the hog's
bodily fluids. While the Brucella"
bacteria seems to be more
active in Central Florida, it has
been found in North Florida
as well, and the precautions


Thomas Cason
of Lake Butler
finds success
on land or water.
At left, he shows
off a 9-point
buck taken
during archery
season, while
below he holds a
14-pound bass.
He caught the
bass in an area
lake, but did not
say which one. A
good fisherman
doesn't give
away his secrets.


should be taken throughout the
southeastern United States.
Symptoms of a Brucellosis
infection are similar to the flu and
might include fever, chills, night
sweats, weakness, headaches,
back pain, swollen joints, loss
of appetite and weight loss.
Brucellosis is usually effectively
treated by an extended
application of antibiotics, and it
is always transmitted from swine
to people and not from people to
people.
Another potential victim of the
Brucellosis infection,transmitted
by feral swine, is the hog dog.
Unfortunately, the typically
positive outcome for people is
not generalized to the dog, and
such an infection is usually fatal.
As a result, it is recommended
that any dog wounds be sterilized
as quickly as possible, their
heads and mouths should be
cleaned and any blood on their


(386) 328-5625
101 Sunset Road
East Palatka


bodies should be removed. This
probably is the reason for the
preference of the cur varieties
over the bulldog breeds. The
former is much more likely to
bay the hog than to catch.
Is this information an effort
to persuade outdoorsmen
from hunting hogs? Not at
all! The other two forms of
Burcella bacteria are endemic to
domestic goats, sheep and cattle.
Consuming unpasteurized milk
is the most frequent method of
passing those infections. Workers
in meat processing plants have


AGNER
Continued from 2B

fishing or hunting as he used to.
He said h6 preferred to talk about
it, adding, "I don't get skunked
that way."
However, Agner still enjoys
getting out and doing some
fishing, which he always
preferred more than hunting.
(Hunting is more involved
and requires a bigger time
commitment, he said.) The ideal
fishing trip, though, would be
nothing fancy.
"It wouldn't be a big trip,"
Agner said. "It would be a trip to


TIGERS
Continued from 4B

other with a line-drive hit. Jor-
dyn Driggers' RBI single tied
the score.
Randa Conner, who was
2-for-4 with a double, drove in
the winning run in the seventh.
Mariah Bowen, who hit a
two-run double, was *3-for-5,
while Jordane Spitze wits 3-for-
4. Harden was 2-for-3 with two
RBI, while Driggers and Johns
were each 2-for-4.
The bats were not so produc-
tive in the next game as the Ti-
gers were held 1o one hit in a 1-0
loss to Baldwin in'the District 7
championship game.
Union rebounded,, though,
scoring five runs in the fourth
inning of a 6-1 win over The
Villages in a Region 4 semifinal
game. Bowen, who was 2-for-5,
hit a two-run double in that big
fourth inning.
Johns Spitze were each 3-for-
4 with an RBI, with one of Spi-
tze's hits being a double. Dri-
ggers and Harden were each
2-for-4, with Harden hitting a
double and driving in a run. Har-
lee Rimes also had an RBI.
Pitcher Alexis Spriggle al-
lowed two hits and one walk.
The win set up a rematch with
Baldwin. This time, the Tigers'
offense was on track, with Bo-
wen hitting a home run and go-
ing 3-for-4 in an 8-2 win in the
Region 4 final.
Union built a 5-0 lead after
two innings.
Johns and Rimes were each
2-for-4, with Johns driving in
two runs. Conner and Harden
also drove in two runs each.
Holly Tucker gave up one hit
in pitching the final two-and-
two-thirds innings.
The Tigers now headed down
the road to Clermont for a state
semifinal game against Lafay-
ette. The Tigers put together
a four-run fourth inning, but
Lafeyette scored nine runs fol-
lowing a three-hour-plus weath-
er delay in winning 14-4.
Lafayette scored the game's
first three runs, but the Tigers
took the lead in the top of the
fourth. Conner hit a hard single
past the shortstop with the bases
loaded to score two runs. An er-
ror allowed another run to score,
while a groundout by Morgan
Dukes allowed Conner to score.
The Hornets'took a 4-3 lead in
the bottom half of the fourth..
After the top of the fifth, the
game was suspended due to


always worn gloves for safety
reasons such as these.
Hunters will continue to be
part of a responsible community.
They will continue to follow the
hunter safety rules, comply with
hunting rules and regulations,
and wear their gloves when
handling or dressing feral
swine. The issue is one of being
informed and being responsible.
Speaking of responsibility, all
of those families attracted to the
outdoors should be reminded that
the Bradford-Union Area Career
Technical Center is offering a


Santa Fe maybe or Kingsley and
just having a good time."
Agner prefers freshwater
fishing simply because it doesn't
require a full day. He can go to a
Nearby lake in the morning and
be back home before the day is
done.
There was a time when Agner
would keep every fish he caught,
but he said now he is most likely
to release every catch. The
appeal of the trip is simply being
in quiet, relaxed atmosphere that
offers a beautiful view.
"It's kind of like a vacation
when you ride away from your
stress and your turmoils," Agner
said. "It's kind of like leaving a


lightning. When play resumed,
Lafayette took advantage of sev-
en hits and three errors to score
eight runs in the bottom of the
fifth.
Union ended its season with
an 18-7 record.

Football team wins
second straight dis-
trict title
Union put together its second
straight undefeated regular sea-
.son en route to repeating at the
District 7-1A champ.
The game that wrapped up the
title was the final game of the
regular season against Newberry
in Lake Butler. A 40-plus-yard
field goal by Carl Alexander
proved to be the difference in
Union's 10-7 win.
Union's defense held New-
berry to 120 yards and forced
three turnovers, but the Pant-
ers tied the game at 7-411 on a
.55-yard punt return early in the
third quarter.
The Tigers, who scored first on
a 43-yard 'touchdown' pass from
Dylan Clark to Nate Bridges,
stopped a late Newberry threat
when Geordyn Green intercept-
ed a pass that was deflected by
teammatee Prince Alexander.
It was another solid defensive
effort in the region semifinals
when the Tigers held visiting
Crescent City to 92 yards and
three first downs in a 21-0 win.
Crescent City had only one
serious scoring threat, but that
ended at the Union 11-yard line
when the Tigers made a tackle
on a fourth-down play that left
the Raiders 1 yard shy of pick-
ing up the first down.
Darian Robinson scored on
a 26-yard run for the Tigers in
the first quarter. Walter Mabrey,
who rushed for 133 yards on
16 carries, scored on a 51-yard
run in the fourth quarter, while
Prince Alexander capped the
scoring with a 9-yard run. Alex-
ander finished with 124 yards on
15 carries.
The win set up another game
against Newberry-this time for
the Region 4 championship. The
visiting Panthers controlled the
clock for approximately 11 of
the first 13 minutes of the second
half and scored two touchdowns
during that span as they handed
the Tigers an 18-13 loss.
Union had the first score of the
game on a 13-yard pass from Ca-
leb Cox to Daquin Edwards, but
the Tigers later came up short on
a first-and-goal opportunity at
the 8-yard line and were held to
57 yards in the second half.


hunter education class as part
of its spring schedule. The class
is scheduled to start on Feb. 28
at no charge. That sounds like a
great deal for any aspiring young
hunter.
Keep your lines tight and hunt
safely until next week.
If you have a story, idea or
photo to share, please contact
Mickey Agner via email at
mkeithag@gmail.com. Photos
may also be submitted in
person at the Bradford County
Telegraph, Union County 7Tmes
or Lake Region Monitor. -


load behind."
However you view your
fishing and hunting trips, Agner
encourages you to contact him
about any exciting, noteworthy
or unusual experiences for
possible publication in "Fins,
Fur and Tales." As Agner put
it, "It's nice to talk about what
(others) are interested in rather
than about yourself."
If you have" a story or photo
you'd like toshare,please contact
Agner via email at mkeithag@
gmail.com. Photos may also
be submitted in person at the
Bradford County 'Telegraph,
Union County Times or Lake
Region Monitor.


The Panthers scored on drives
of 98 and 66 yards-the latter
being helped by a roughing-the-
passer penalty on fourth down.
Newberry converted on a fake-
punt attempt to keep its third
scoring drive alive.
Prince Alexander, who rushed
for 84 yards on 13 carries, scored
on a 6-yard run, with Carl Alex-
ander's PAT pulling the Tigers
to within 18-13 with 9:43 to
play. Union could never mount
a sustained offensive drive after
that.
Union finished the season with
an 11-1 record.

Volleyball team re-
turns to playoffs
The Tigers earned the top seed
in the District 7-1A volleyball
tournament, but could not win
their second straight champion-
ship, losing 3-1 (21-25, 25-18,
25-21,25-21) to Newberry.
Union assured itself of a re-
gional playoff spot by defeating
Dixie County 3-0Q(25-18,.25-21,
25-12) in the district semifi-
nals. The Tigers got 10 and nine
kills, respectively, from Em-
ily Akridge and Ashlyn Harden,
with Akridge also adding eight
service points and two blocks.
Kayla Nettles had 13 service
points and 12 assists, while
Tristyn Southerland had 10
points and eight assists. Caroline
Rimes had nine kills, while Kay-
la Andrews added seven digs.
In the championship match
against Newberry, the Tigers
won the first set, but. trouble
with receiving serves and a lack
of aggressive play at the net
helped the Panthers win three
straight sets.
Akridge finished with six kills
and two blocks, while Harden
had four kills and two blocks.
Southerland had five kills, while
Rimes had five service aces.
The loss put the Tigers on the
road for the regional semifinals.
They traveled to Pierson to play
Taylor, losing 3-0 (25-19,25-22,
25-20).
Akridge led the Tigers with
eight kills, while Andrews and
Harden had six each. Andrews
and Harden had 11 and eight
digs, respectively.
Andrews was the leading
server with seven points, while
Nettles and Southerland each
had five points. Andrews and
Akridge each had three aces.
Nettles was the assists leader
with 14, while Southerland add-
ed six.
Union finished the season with
a 15-10 record.


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