<%BANNER%>

UFPKY NEH LSTA SLAF



Bradford County telegraph
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00027795/05073
 Material Information
Title: Bradford County telegraph
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: L.C. Webb
Place of Publication: Starke Fla
Publication Date: 9/8/2011
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Starke (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Bradford County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Bradford -- Starke
Coordinates: 29.947222 x -82.108056 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 9, no. 41 (Apr. 13, 1888)-
General Note: Publishers: Mathews & Farmer, <1893-1897>; E.S. Mathews, <1900-1926>.
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579551
oclc - 33886096
notis - ADA7397
lccn - sn 95047406
System ID: UF00027795:05073
 Related Items
Preceded by: Starke telegraph

Full Text



f'Te Sweetest Strawberries T'dis Side Of 1-Ccaven


USPS 062-700 Two Sections Starke, Florida


Thursday, Sept. 8, 2011


1


~


132nd Year 6th Issue 75 CENTS


Worth Noting


Remember
Sept. 11 by
saving lives
Ten years ago Americans were
shocked into action by the images of the
terrorist attacks in New York, Washing-
ton and Pennsylvania.
Across the country in the days after
the Sept. 11, 2001, attack, people lined
up in record numbers to donate blood.
At LifeSouth's headquarters in Gaines-
ville the line of donors snaked 6ut the
door and across the parking lot. Donors
waited for hours and shared umbrellas
during the rain, all for the opportunity
to donate and save a life.
To commemorate that time, during
the entire month of September, Life-
South will be offering donors specially-
dLsigncd patriotic themed"'Give for All
the Right Reasons" t-shirts when they
donate. The design matches the shirt
LifeSouth gave to donors a decade ago.
Join the bloodmobile on Saturday,
Sept. 10,at Hitchcock's,7380 S.R. 100
in Keystone Heights. The bloodmobile
will be irfthe parking lot between the
hours of 9 a.m. and 5 p.m.
Trinity' Baptist Church, located at
3716 S.E. S.R. 21 in Keystone Heights
will hold a special blood drive on Sun-
day, Sept. 11, between the hours of 8
a.m. and 2 p.m.
Donors must be 17 years of age, or
16 with parental permission, weigh a
minimum of 110 pounds and be in good
health. A photo ID is also required. For
more information about becoming a do-
nor or about blood drives in your area,
call LifeSouth toll-free 888-795-2707
or visit www.lifesouth.org.

E--c

Dinner theater
coming to'Starke
The Lake Region Community The-
atre Inc. presents "Last Will and Tes-
tament" by Lisa Patrick-Wilkinrson on
Friday and Saturday, Sept. 16 and 17,
at 6:30 p.m. and Sunday, Sept. 18, at
1:30 p.m.
Texas was never this fun-or this
deadly! Come and attend the memo-
rial service for Jonas Carmody, presi-
dent and founder of Carmody Oil, who
leaves an estate valued in excess of $30
million. The heirs apparently want more
than their fair share, but who is willing
to kill for it?
The audience is encouraged to attend
the comedy/mystery in Texas attire and
team up with the detective to help solve
the crime committed before their very
eyes.
The dinner theater will take place at
Chrissy's Olde Meeting House Cafe on
Call Street in downtown Starke. In ad-
dition to the entertainment, each $30
donation will cover dinner, which in-
cludes beef brisket and chicken, baked
potato, salad, vegetable, dessert, bread
and beverage. A separate beer and wine
cash bar will also be available.
Call the theater box office at 352-226-
4082 for ticket reservations. Seating is
limited so make your reservations early.
Most major credit cards accepted.
Lake Region Community Theatre is a
not-for-profit 501(c)(3) corporation.




School board
workshop/
meeting Monday
The Bradford County School Board
will meet at the district office on Wash-
ington Street in Starke on Monday. Sept.
12. There will be a board workshop at 5
p.m. followed by a final public hearing
on the 2011-12 budget at 5:30 p.m. The
regular monthly school board meeting
will begin immediately following the
hearing.


Firefighters, EMTs and paramedics took to the streets Saturday
for their annual boot drive to raise money for the Muscular
Dystrophy Association. Pictured above are Josh Babitz and Paul
Jones. At left is Andy Tison. By catching game day traffic, they
were able to raise $3,040 to fight muscular dystrophy. Local 4315,
which represents Bradford County EMS, and Local 3120, which
represents Starke firefighters, will each-contribute $230 to bring
the grand total to $3,500.


Starke reaches balanced budget


BY MARK J. CRAWFORD
Telegraph Editor

Starke has managed to cover its ex-
penses for the 2011-12 Fiscal Year and
hold a little back in the utility depart-
ment for a rainy day.
City Clerk Linda Johns made chang-
es based on recommendations at the last
workshop, including moving more than
$312,000 from the utility fund to the
general fund to cover a deficit there. It
is a significantly smaller transfer than
approved in past years. For example,
the approved transfer was $914,000
in Fiscal Year 2010 and $721,000 in
2011.
How close the city gets to transferring
those projected amounts depends on
how much revenue is actually taken in,
but as Commissioner Tommy Chastain


and Mayor Travis Woods pointed out,
the projections are getting smaller and
smaller because of cuts in spending that
have reduced the reliance on utility rev-
enue.
Capital expenses in the electric fund
included nearly $154,000 for a bucket
truck/trailer and the additional $50,000
for a capacitor upgrade, added at Op-
erations Manager Ricky Thompson's
request. There was also $50,000 in
unspecified capital outlay in the water
department, but $105,000 for upgrades
as the sewer plant will be reimbursed
by a grant.
That left utilities with a $201,000
surplus.
In the general fund, the police depart-
ment dropped another $48,000, bringing
its budget to $1.39 million, but money
previously removed was added back to


the fire department budget, bringing
it to $789,800. The police department
budget overall is down 8 percent due to
lower salary costs and no capital outlay,
and more than $136,000 of the budget
will be reimbursed by grants. The fire
department budget is down nearly 14
percent, reflecting a reduction in sala-
ries and the budgeting of no capital out-
lay.
A major.reduction in the general fund
came with the outsourcing recreational
programs.The city maintained $100,000
in the recreation budget, most of which
represents the cost of keeping the rec-
reation director, who has a year and a
half left before retirement. Thompson
said the director would oversee upkeep
of the city's recreation facilities using
inmate labor.


See STARKE page 4A


RJE Alumni President Valara Petteway along with Sylvia Patterson and Lilly Stratton sipped tropical
drinks while representing the Class of 1967 in the parade held during the historic school's biannual.
reunion. For more, see inside.


Police quickly

nab armed

robber
BY MARK J. CRAWFORD
Telegraph Editor

A Starke phar-
macy was targeted
Tuesday morning,
but Starke police w) V
grabbed their man A i
while the robbery
was in progress
according to Capt.
Barry Warren.
The police de-
partment respond-
ed to a call from Douglas
Madison Street
Pharmacy Sept. 6 around 8:40 a.m.
There, the suspect, 23-year-old Dana
Carl Douglas Jr. of Lake City, had en-
tered the pharmacy demanding Oxy-
codone.
Douglas had not shown a weapon
when the first call was made, Warren
said, but a subsequent call to dispatch
indicated that 'Douglas was armed and
had revealed his weapon-a rifle.
Warren said officer Chad Howell ar-
rived on the scene at 8:41 a.m. and saw
a male inside the store wearing a hood-
ed jacket but no weapon in his hands.
"Officer Howell noted that no weap-
on was observed in the suspect's hands,
and made the decision to take immedi-
ate action to avoid a possible hostage
situation," Warren said.

See ROBBER page 7A


Richard Solze


SG promotes

Solze

Florida Surgeon General Dr. Frank'
Farmer has announced the appointment
of Richard Solze as chief of staff at the
Florida Department of Health.
In May, Solze was hired by the state
to coordinate efforts of the health de-
partment and Attorney General's Of-
fice to prosecute doctors involved with
so-called "pill mills."
According to Farmer, as chief of
staff, Solze will continue to lead the
battle against prescription drug abuse
and be key in the reorganization of the
agency.
"Given Richard's extensive military
career, recently graduating with distinc-
tion with a Masters in National Security
and Strategic Studies from the Naval
War College, I know that he vvill bring
an important perspective as the depart-
ment moves forward in a necv direc-
tion." Farmer said.
Solze is also a graduate of the Ad-
vanced Joint Professional MIilitar\
Education course at the Joint Forces
Staff College. He previously earned
a Bachelors of Science in health care
management from Southern Illinois
Uni\ ersit\.
Solze served six \ears in the U.S.
Marine Corps Reserve and 25 \ears in
the Florida National Guard.
He has been a Republican l'art\ com-
mitteeman and a trustee on the hoard
at Santa Fe college \ which he also at-
tended.


Deadline Monday 5 p.m. before publication Phone (904) 964-6305


* Fax (904) 964-8628


editor@ b-'elel 06 80766389


R-1


A I
JOUIN'VO


6 89076 63869 2






2A Bradford County Telegraph Thursday, Sept. 8, 2011


RJE legacy still strong


BY MARK J. CRAWFORD
Telegraph Editor

While many this past weekend
%werc breaking out their orange
and blue, RJE alumni were once
again donning their purple and
gold in remembrance of their
historic school and in celebration
of their ongoing bond.
Students and faculty from the
school, which served the black
community in Starke and Brad-
ford County through 1969, gath-
er. every other year on Labor Day
weekend for a series of events
that typically includes a parade,
banquet, special church celebra-
tion, Sunday picnic and more.
Henry Wade graduated from
RJE in 1965 after transferring in
from one of the "feeder schools,"
Thurston Elementary in Lincoln
City. Wade said he knows exact-
ly why the alumni are still com-
ing together. He said history was
stopped in 1969 when RJE was
closed and black students were
integrated into "white schools."
"In 1969,desegregation caused
RJE to die for a moment. Then
those of us who were still living
and had been a part of that legacy
realized what a valuable thing it
was," Wade said.
Time and events galvanized
alumni who began to hold re-
unions, Wade said, first as indi-
vidual classes, then as an assem-
bly of multiple classes. It 1990,
these larger reunions began, and
in a short time, Wade said mem-
bers decided to bring together
every class in a regular celebra-
tion of pride and gratitude for
their former school.
With the youngest graduating
class now reaching retirement
age, "class members' attitudes
have -matured, and Wade said
he loves to see it. For years, like
many reunions, people attended
flashing their status and belong-
ings as symbols of their success.
"Now we're at a point where
we really see each other, we see
a human being in front of us in-
stead of a career or an automo-
bile," he said. "It's a real joy to
get to know people you knew as
a child, skip all of the garbage'in
between."
Just as there's innocence in
children, Wade said, aging al-
lows people to drop their phoni-
ness and be more authentic with
one another. It allows them to
truly appreciate their history.
Wade said RJE was not "a
one-legged stool." The old adage
says it takes a village to'raise a
child, and Wade said Starke was
that village. Life for families cen-
tered around home, church and
school. Church, school and home
were inseparable, there were no
strangers, and that familiarity
alone was enough to make you


Martha and Henry Wade sit and chat after lunch at
Sunday afternoon's picnic.


want to do well and make your
family proud.
"That sense of pride elevated
us and it has lasted throughout
our lives," he said.
When he went to Vietnam as a
member of U.S. Army, the even-
tual Purple Heart recipient said
many were tempted by drugs like
marijuana and opium, but Wade
could never think of doing such
a thing without considering what
his grandmother would think.
His .upbringing and RJE's role
in it kept him on the straight and
narrow. Even at the age of 64, it
still guides him, he said.
Valara Petteway who attended
RJE from first through 12h grade
is president of the alumni associ-
ation. She said attending school
there was not like leaving home,
but instead going to a second
home.
"It wasn't like leaving home
and going to a place that was cold,
hard and shallow. This place was
another home," Petteway said.
In that sense, attending RJE was
like being hotie-schooled.
Petteway said attending RJE
taught her that no matter who you
are or where you come from, you
can make it if you are determined
to do so. And by "make it," she
said she didn't mean measures of
worldly success, but the ability to
care for yourself and your fam-
ily. That was the foundation RJE
prepared for its students.
"Whenever a foundation is
laid, you can be sure that foun-
dation is going to be there," said
Petteway.
All of these years later, she
said people are still coming to-
gether to express their love for
RJE and the foundation it laid for
them, and to be among friends-
friends they shared classes with,
sang in the chorus with or played
sports with.


Wade said it's always a great
joy to see the faces of friends you
haven't seen in years, and every
time there are always new faces,
people who haven't come be-
fore, and Petteway agreed. One
of those was Steve Baker, who
said he was happy to meet up
with people he hasn't seen in 45
years. A highlight for him was
seeing the different class groups
recognized at the reunion ban-
quet, including members' who
graduated back in 1946.
Esther Kelly, who was the fi-
nal RJE Queen, enjoyed attend-
ing Sunday's church service at
Ebenezer Baptist Church. She
pointed out that RJE's legacy
flourishes as the Pine Street facil-
ity has opened up to host an aca-
demically focused after-school
program at precisely the moment
such programming could have
disappeared.
Kelly is directing the program
as a member of the Concerned
Citizens of Bradford County,
which also regularly holds events
tat RJE to enrich youth, provide
them with a sense of community
and teach them what is truly of
value in life.
Through these efforts, Kelly
said they intend to make sure
RJE continues to live-on.
"RJE will never fade away,"
she said..
RJE was, of course, named for
its founders, but they are not the
only educators whose memory
lives on.
"All of the teachers were in-
strumental in my life, and I ap-
preciate that," said Joann Jack-
son, a member of the final class
in 1969. The history of the school ,
is really the history of her family,
she said, since they were all edu-
cated by those great teachers.


The Lincoln City float included RJE alums Joann Jackson, Carolyn Spooner, Hattie
Jones and Yvonne Boykin.


FloridaWorks offers employer
and job-seeker services. Visit the
Starke location at 819 S. Walnut
St. in the Bradford Square Shop-
ping Center, or call 904-964-
8092.
Starke Church of God by Faith
is offering free food and clothing
on the first and third Thursday
of each month from 10 a.m. to
noon. The church is located at"
.730 Old Lawtey Road in Starke:
For more information, please call
904-964-9396.

The Bradford County Veteran
Service Office is open Tiesdays
and Thursdays from 8 a.m. to 5
p.m. and on Wednesdays from 2
to 6 p.m. For more information,
contact Barbara Fischer at 904-
364-8043, or 904-966-6385.

Need Transportation? Stiwan-
nee River Economic Council Inc.
offers transportation for social
services, employment, shopping
and medical appointments. Call
904-964-3063.

AARP is offering its driver safe-
ty program monthly classes at a
cost of $12 for members, $14 for
nonmembers. There are no tests.
Instruction-available through
one- and two-day classes-re-
fines driving skills and develops
defensive driving techniques.
The three-year certificate quali-
fies graduates for an auto insur-
ance discount. For more infor-
mation and to register, call 352-
333-3036.

Play Bingo every Monday at
American Legion Post 56, locat-
ed on Edwards Road in Starke.
The post opens at 6 p.m.; early
bird starts at 7 p.m. Bingo play-
ers must be '18 years of age to
play. A nonsmoking section is
available, and the American Le-


gion Post is an alcohol-free en-
vironment.


EDWARD'S GROCERY

l seig "BOARS HEAD"
-i west COLD CUTS DELI SUBS
We have thround SOUPS & BREAKFAST
gas pMeat & Cheese also sold by the LB.


4105 S.E. Hwy 100 Starke 3 5 2-4 A7 0
(At junction of SR-100 & ,CR-18) 352"-473 0406
All major credit cards & EBT accepted.

OWNED
FD. 4 PROPERTIES
Mobile Home Commercial Single Family Land Golf
Park Assets Homes ? "",'2cl, orse


,sos.i" 50 Commercial & Residential
.*mm NORTH FLORIDA Properties

CaIlIII r FREE Brochure



Srabforb (County Telegrapb
USPS 062-700
Published each Thursday and entered as Periodical Postage
.v. a,, Paid at Starke, Florida under Act of March 3, 1879.
"C"L POSTMASTER: Send address changes to:
Bradford Countyr Telegraph
131 West Call Street Starke, Florida 32091
Phone: 964-6305 P.O. Drawer A* Starke, FL 32091
John M. Miller, Publisher
Subscription Rate'in Trade Area
$39.00 per year: Editor Mark J. Crawford
Sports Editor Clif Smelley
$20.00 six months Advertising Kevin Miller
Darlene Douglass
Outside Trade Area: Typesetting MelisaNoble
Advertising and
$39.00 per year: Newspaper Prod Earl W Ray
$2000 ix passed Adv Mary Johnson
$2000 six months Bookkeeping Kathi Bennett


A Special Movie Event

Commemorating the 10 Year Anniversary of 9/11


10 EA EMM UkEhNUIORATI VE EUMulM,1


904-964-6562
www.fbcstarke.org


Sept. 11, 2011 6pm
Free Admission and Childcare



FIRST BAPTIST
A Pl((ce rto Call Horno 1


63 W. Jefferson St;
Starke, FL


PUBLIC NOTICE

Please note that the contact number for
Mosquito Control, in the Century, Link phone
book is incorrect. The correct number for
Mosquito Control is 964-368-3971.
This change will be reflected in the June 2012
Century Link phone book.







Thursday, Sept. 8, 2011 Bradford County Telegraph 3A


The history

of RJE and

its founders


In 1913 three members of the --
local black community spear-
headed the effort to improve
the educational opportunities -
in their community. The Rev. ,.<"' -
James W. Robinson, A.O. Jen- -'' '"
kids and R.M. Ellerson were the ..,, .
leaders of the effort to build one d
of the first black high schools in
this area. It was called RJE High
School in acknowledgement of
their efforts.
Jenkins was a highly respected
educator and long-time principal Esther Kelly and Amanda Chandler lunch at Sunday's
of the black school in Starke. He picnic.
was a spokesman for the project or power lines for the county intentionally set, did a lot c
and also helped to actually build
the school. Robinson, who acted or playing his sousaphone in a damage in 1977. Vandalism an
band. His talents were varied and other incidents of fire in the un
as both a minister and an under-
taker, supervised the project, and comprised a wide range--from used parts of the school had als
Ellerson, a partner with Robin- weaving simple baskets from taken their toll. Due to the hig
Ellerson in the undertaking business iregrass to drawing building estimated cost of renovating an
son in the undertaking business, I
served as treasurer for the limited plans and building schools. maintaining insurance on th
funds that were available. Robinson, in addition to being buildings, the school board de
All three men worked hard to a highly dedicated minister, was cided to tear the school down i
raise money for the project. Land the first black insurance agent in 1977.
and materials were purchased and. Starke and-with Ellersoh-was
local citizens- werunteers who the first black funeral director in RJE buildings saved by citi
worked tirelessly-finished the the area. Ellerson was something zens
building in 58 days. This frame of an entrepreneur and was in- Since the buildings repre
building which was opened in volved in a number of businesses sented a piece of history for th
1914 on Pine and Florida streets in the Starke area-including his African-American community,
still stands today.The two-story ownershipofapopularsodafoun- group of citizens banded together
frame building served as a high tain located at Oak and Brownlee under the leadership of the Rev
school for the black community streets and a small grocery store Levy Lennon, Theresa Hollida3
in Starke until 1945, when it located on Brownlee Street. and Elizabeth Walker to form th
ecin Starke until 1945,hat it when it When the new brick RJE Concerned Citizens of Bradfori
small. High School was built in the late County. This group leased th
Community members went to 1940s, it served the educational complex from the school boar
the school board with a request to eeds of the black community in and paid for the insurance on th
for a new school, but the board Starke until black schools were buildings. A slow metamorphosis
told the citizens the district did closed in 1970 as a result of de- then began. Head Start continued
not have the money to buy the segregation. The building then to use one portion of the complex:
.needed land. Not content to sit served-in a number of capacities, and in the early 1990s the school
and wait, the community group including the long-time housing board renovated approximately,
decided to raise the money for of the Head Start program, a pre- half of the complex to house th
the land themselves. In June of school program aimed at giving pre-kindergarten program. A
1945, the group had only $54, at-risk children a "head start" on that time the school board tool
but they met frequently under school. over responsibility for the corn
Jenkins' guidance and continued The community also takes ad- plex, with the exception of thi
to raJenkins' guidance and vantage of the recreational and old gymnasium.
Donations as small as 50 cents meeting facilities offered by
and as large as $200 were re- the gymnasium. This year it has Desegregation a long path tc
ceived. The larger amounts came served as the site of the commu- tread
mostly from the fund raising ef- nitywide Martin Luther King Jr. When desegregation first madi
forts of church congregations. Day celebration and the home of headlines in the 1950s, local sto
County elementary school chil-. the city of Starke's summer rec- ries stressed that both white and
dren and students at RJE High reaction children's program. black leaders didn't favor chang
School took up collections for A fire, thought to have been es in the school system. It wa
donations to the fund. Individual
citizens made sacrifices in their

Only one month later, in Julyj |i. W U IK
1945, the group purchased the
land on Pine and Jenkins streets Alacu/iBradtard A Commtni y artnesship
for $1,000, with a balance of FloridaWorks is now offering the FBAT for entry
$1,000 due by November of level Corrections Officers and the FCJBAT for entry
1947. In July 1948 the land was level Police Officers
deeded over to the Board of Pub- level olice Officers.
lic Instruction by "A.O. Jenkins, Please contact Susan Brown at North Florida
George Little and C.A. Crum as Regional Chamber of Commerce at (904) 964-5278
Trustees of Colored School Dis- to schedule an appointment.
trict No. 3 of Bradford County"
for the sum of $10 and other .
"valuable considerations." The
school board then built the new
school.


of
d
n-
o
h
d
e

n

i-


e
a
;r
V.
y
e
d
e
d
e
s
d

ol
y
e
5t
k

e

o

e
S-
d.

s


more likely\ that black leaders
feared that what exentuall\ did
happen %would happen-black
schools %would be closed.
The ne\\ brick RJE High
School that the :ommunit\ had
worked so hard for had been
completed onl\ a short time be-
fore this. constituting the culmi-
nation of a longtime dream. Stu-
dents and teachers \\ ho loved the
schools thev worked in did not
want to suddenly go into a new
environment. Change is a fearful
thing for everyone-no matter
what race he or she is born into.
These early stories should not
be understood to say that local
African-American leaders did
not want an equal education for
their children-that has always
been one of their primary con-
cerns, as the story of RJE's birth
illustrates.
It was June of 1965 before
the dust from all the national
legal battles had settled and 31
African-American students reg-
istered to attend previously all-
white Bradford schools. At the
time, the desegregation plan al-
lowed students to register at any
school, but did not require black
students to attend previously all-.
white schools.
Of the first 31 students who
crossed the racial lines, 18 went
to Bradford High School, nine
went to Starke Elementary, one
went to Southside Elementary
and three went to what is now
Lawtey Community School.
Thurston Elementary School, the
only other black school-other
than RJE in Starke and Ander-
son Junior High in Lawtey-
which remained in operation in
the county, was closed in 1965.
By 1966, 118 black students had
registered to enter previously all-
white schools. That same year,
five black teachers were asked
to teach in schools that were pre-
viously all white and five white
teachers were asked to teach in
schools that were previously all
black.
In 1969 RJE High School and
grade school in Starke and An-
derson Junior High School in
Lawtey were still operating -and
had only black students. The
county's other schools were still
predominantly white. While the
courts had been happy to let the
school system attempt deseg-
regation by leaving it up to the


parents of the
school chil-
dren to decide
%where they
would attend
school, it is a
known truth
that people
\\ ill likely
want their
children to at-
tend a school
in their own
community
rather than
travel even
short distanc-
es to another
school.
The riots
that were oc-
curring in
other places
throughout
the country,
and which
were making
.headlines all
the time, also
had parents


Sr,


Mary Brown represented the Class of 1962.


afraid to place their children in
that type of danger. No violent
incidents occurred in this county,
however-although there were
rumors of impending riots from
time to time.
Since allowing people to make
their own decisions on the mat-
ter had not accomplished the
goal of the courts, the county
was-still listed in 1969 as being
in noncompliance with the court
order to desegregate the school
populations. Since the school
board was faced with bringing
the schools into compliance or
losing thousands of dollars of
federal school funding, the board
closed RJE and Anderson Junior
High in 1970. All students then
attended the other-previously
all-white-schools in the county.


Anderson Junior High was even-
tually bought by the state and is
now Lawtey Correctional Insti-
tution.




RJE Principals
1909-1923-Prof. A. O. Jenkins Sr.
1923-1924- Rev. Albert Emanuel
1924-1938-Prof. A. 0. Jenkins Sr.
1938-1941-Prof. E. T. Evans
1941-1942-Prbf. Edwin Norwood
1942-1943-Mallie Meeks Hunter
1943-1949-Prof. A. 0. Jenkins Sr.
1949-1964- Prof. Eddie Thompki ns
1964-1969-Mr. C. Clark/
Prof. Anderson


TERRY'S LAND CLEARING

Land Clearing Stump Grinding Tree Removal
General Clean Up Metal Removal

s FREE ESTIMATES!


904-964-7906


NA -S.


'Fess' Jenkins a legend in
Starke's black community
Professor or "Fess" Jenkins,
as he was often called by his stu-
dents and friends, began his life
as the son of a Georgia slave.
The family name was actually
Black, but it was customary at
that time for slaves to adopt the
name of the owner, so Jenkins
became the family name. Jen-
kins rose out of the chains of his
past to go far beyond merely ob-
taining his freedom. He was de-
scribed as a "man with education
in his blood, who taught every-*
thing-practical things like how
to bud and graft trees, as well as
academic subjects like Latin and
higher math."
Jenkins was also known as a
man with high moral standards
and integrity. He had the com-
plete confidence and respect of
both the black and white commu-
nities. When he was not teaching
school or plowing his own land,
he was repairing electrical wires


"We're
Your Loca


ALL
MAJOR
INSURANCES
ACCEPTED!

Convenient
Hassle Fret


here to Serve You"
i Hometown Pharmacy!



-i



t Drive Thru Pharmacy
e Prescription Transfer


*MLVJ"iY.sion -'
i

"Quality Eyecare with Value in Mind" .

I-EYEEEXAM & "I EYE EXAM &
I Acuvue 2 Contacts I I PAIR OF GLASSES

s99 I Tf I, !1
i 99 0 119
I Includes eye exam & 2 boxes of contacts. Includes e am and2rpairno plwith
Restrictions apply See store for details I Call storefor details. (Middleburg Location Only)
L Expires 9130/11 L Expres 9/3011
1545 Branan Field Road Suite 5 Middleburg (Across from Walmart)
Most Insurances Accepted Certified Optometrists Dr. Edwin Anguas & Dr. Margaret Allen 904-291-5800
Lens options extra. Individual offers cannot be combined with any other coupon, discount package price or insurance benefit
See store for details. Certain restrictions apply. Coupons must be presented at time of service. The patient and the person
responsible for payment has a right to refuse to pay, cancel payment, or be reimbursed for payment for any other service, examination or treatment which is
performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment


Lake Butler Hospital and its divisions

are now Network Providers for:




AvMED


HEALTH PLANS





UnitedHealthcare


M A UnitedHealth Group Company
sM


LAKE E U AL
A SG CN



www.LakeLutlero spita I com


904 -77 94

w M s t t r y
39 e stMdsnSre treF








4A Bradford County Telegraph Thursday, Sept. 8, 2011


Tab donations
benefit families
Ness Perceptions, 104 W. Call
St. in Starke, is collecting pop
top tabs for the Ronald McDon-
ald House in Gainesville. vhich
provides a home as as from
home for families %%hen their
.children are hospitalized. The
collection will provide needed
support for Ronald McDonald
SHouse and provide Ness Percep-
tions consumers the gratification
-that comes from helping others.
Tabs can be dropped of at Ness
Perceptions or you can call 904-
966-2100 to arrange to have them
picked up.

Grief support
offered in Starke
Haven Hospice is hosting a
New Beginnings support group
in Starke. New Beginnings is a
support group for caregivers who
,have lost spouses, loved ones or
friends: The group meets for din-
ner, conversation and support.
2 The Starke group meets the
second Tuesday of the month
'starting Sept. 13 at 4:30 p.m. at
Western Steer, 1100 S. Walnut.
St. in Starke.
2 Haven Hospice does not cover
the cost of dinner. The group is
-offered as a service so there is no
'cost to attend. For more informa-
tion, please contact Haven Hos-
pice at 386-328-7100.

Fitness sessions
offered at RJE
Concerned Citizens of Brad-
ford County presents fitness
sessions with Kim DeSue every
Monday and Wednesday at the
RJE Complex cafeteria 1. One-
hour sessions begin at 3, 4 and 5
p.im., and each is offered for $5.
-This workout session is an
-oexiting way to get the personal
guidance, motivatiqp, and re-
+vgrds you need to reach your
J:full fitness potential. As you take
* that opportunity, you can begin
;achieving all your personal fit-
:ness goals to look, feel and per-
form at your best.
It doesn't matter if you are just
:'starting out or if you have been
.exercising for some time. It is a
::program that encourages every-
":one to make activity part of their
;everyday lives. Accepting this
:challenge is the first step toward
being more active.

'Tuesday
is Senior
Citizens Day
Concerned Citizens offers a
:Senior Citizens Day at RJE caf-
:eteria 2 every Tuesday beginning
;at'l I a.m. The weekly event of-
:f6rs seniors a chance to socialize
.while enjoying lunch and games.

Swine
Association
to meet
The Bradford-Union Swine
'Association will meet on Mon-
.day, Sept. 12, at 7 p.m. at Lake
:Butler Elementary School.

Starke meetings
moved
: Starke City Commission meet-
ing normally held on the first
and third Tuesday of the month
will be moved to the second and
fourth Tuesday during the month
of September. The meetings will
take place Sept. 13 and 27 at 7
p;m., and the public hearings on
the.budget will also take place on
those nights. Meetings take place
in the commission room at city
hall on Thompson Street.


Get info on
Girl Scouts
' Girl Scouts of Gateway Coun-
cil Will host a Girl Scout Infor-
mation Night Thursday, Sept.
L1. at 6 p.m. at the First United
Methodist Church in do\vntown


Starke. Interested girls in grades
K-12 and their parents or guard-
ians are encouraged to attend.
For information about Girl
Scouting in Bradford County,
contact Candice Vogtle-Grant,
membership specialist for the
Girl Scouts of Gateway Council
at. 866-868-6307 or via email:
cvogtle-grant@ girlscouts-gate-
way.org. Visit the local Girl
Scouts online at www.girlscouts-
gateway.org to learn more.


Landfill approves $7.7 M budget, no new fees for now


BY MARK J. CRAWFORD
Telegraph Editor

When the Ne:w Riser Solid
Waste Association appro ed its
budget for 2011-12, it did not
include nes\ fees for the disposal
of clean \ard \waste. but it ma\
be something the board has to
come back and address during
the year.
Executive Director Dlarrell
O'Neal told the board that up
until no\v. Ne% Riser has been
able to accept such \ard waste
at no charge because it could be
turned into mulch and used on
the slopes of the landfill. Ness
permit requirements, however,
insist that sod be used on the
slopes, which has left the landfill
with a surplus of mulch that must
be disposed of.
O'Neal quoted a cost of $18
per ton to dispose of the average
2,300 tons of mulching material
brought to the landfill each year,
which would generate just over
$41,000. (This did not include
Baker County, which has its
own facility for processing yard
waste.)
O'Neal said most of the reve-


STARKE
Continued from page 1A

Expenses for finance and ad-
ministration were up to $1.6 mil-
lion, largely because of the city's
$700,000 housing grant.
The Transportation Trust
Fund was up 6 percent to nearly
$529,000. Although person-
nel costs were down, more than
$47,000 was added for capital
outlay. This increase is covered
by cash carry forward and re-
bounding gas tax revenue.
Adding the above to the
$43,000 in the Impact Fee Fund
brings the total budget to nearly
$17.8 million, almost equivalent
to what the board approved for
2011, but that includes new grant
revenue.
A total of $6,000 for the North


Florahome

runaway

returned

to home

BY JAMES WILLIAMS
Monitor Editor

On Aug. 30, at approximately
4 p.m., deputies responded to
a residence on Sipprell Road in
Florahome in reference to a run-
away juvenile.
Deputies met with the hom-
eowner who reported that her
12-year-old granddaughter had
run away after having an ar-
gument with her father on the
telephone. Rifle Security Team
members, Putnam County Sher-
iffs Office K-9 handlers, and
K-9 handlers from Marion Cor-
rectional Institution responded
to assist in searching the wooded
areas around the residence for


nue to deal %% ith clean yard N% aste
would come from businesses and
municipalities. It would not cost
counties, but responding to a
question from Chairperson Karen
Cosse\. O'Neal said the proposal
would cost citizens ssho brought
clean \ard %waste to the landfill.
Commissioner Do\le Thomas
asked if the board could opt to
do nothing. O'Neal said that is
something the board would have
-to decide. but he pointed to Ala-
chua C'ount\., here citizens and
businesses are paying S25 a ton
and there is a cost to the county.
The landfill also purchased a
grinder in part to assist with yard
waste resulting from natural di-
sasters, he added.
Thomas and Commissioner
Eddie Leswis said if the board
were to institute a new fee, they
would like to see it restricted to
businesses, so it wouldn't affect
citizens or public agencies.
There was also talk of letting
citizens take the mulch, which
would result in recycling credits
for the landfill.
In the end, the $18 per ton fee
for clean yard waste was stripped
from the budget to be taken up at


Florida Regional Chamber of
Commerce, Main Street Starke
and Concerned Citizens of Brad-
ford County was cut from the
budget. Auditor Lora Douglas
was asked to clarify why the
city's contributions to these or-
ganizations would pose a prob-
lem. Douglas said it wasn't the
contribution but the lack of docu-
mentation that the city's contri-
butions were actually serving a
public purpose that was at issue.
The city needs to have some
say-either by contractual .agree-
ment or by approving formal
funding requests-in how the
money is being spent. Up until
now the city has just written a
check, Douglas said.
Commissioner Carolyn
Spooner asked that the money be
returned to the budget, saying the
city's relationships with those


the girl.
Investigators assigned to the
Major Crimes Unit responded
and took over the investigation.
At the request of investigators,
Putnam County emergency ser-
vices sent out a reverse 911 call
to surrounding residences within
a four-mile radius of the girl's
residence, asking citizens to be
on the lookout for her.
At approximately 10:14 p.m.,
after a nearly six-hour search,
members of the Rifle Security
Team located the child hiding in
a wooded area near the residence.
The child was interviewed by in-
vestigators then released into the
custody of her father.


State Sen. Steve Oelrich's
staff will hold monthly office
hours on the first Wednesday
of each month from 1-3 p.m. in
the commission meeting room in
the north wing of the Bradford
County Courthouse. Walk-ins
are welcome, but if you would
like to make an appointment,
please call 352-375-3555.


Clyde's!


ire BrakeinWaldo .

352.468.1140

'e?&de' SpeciadA.

Specials good thru 9-30-11

: OIL CHANGE & FILTER
e UP TO1S 5 MOSTCARS BUY S
QUARTS $14,95i, ,,i I
iiiiiiiiiiiiiOiiiiiiFi 4 TIRES!
!TIRE ROTATION 'I'll" |
S$1000 rI GETAFREE



i BRAKE SPECIAL i
brake paddsMOST CARS
installed 5 M s C S ArM1

' I I I '!I[H 'II'VI1 1 I, I I


a later time.
The board %went on to approve
a S7.7 million budget. which was
dow n nearly\ 31 percent from the
S11.2 million budget approved
for 2010-11. largely because cell
6 constriction costs that have al-
ready been expended.
E en though disposal rates are
down. higher resulting tipping
fees for Alachua and Levy coun-
ties ($32 per ton) will help offset
some of the loss. Interest income
from investments is also down
since the board had to move its
money from more lucrative cash
deposits at multiple banks to
state-approved institutions offer-
ing lower interest rates.
Money is being carried for-
ward to help complete the flare
expansion project, and $680,000
has been moved out of deprecia-
tion escrow for the purchase of
new equipment. Budgeted was
$150,000 for a loader backhoe
and $575,000 for a new compac-
tor, with a small amount set aside
for miscellaneous equipment
purchases.
The $7.7 million budget does
include money to raise salaries.
Cossey said employees deserve


organizations was important, but
Woods, Chastain and Commis-
sioner Danny Nugent disagreed
with replacing the money. They
pointed to nonmonetary in-kind
contributions to these organiza-
tions that go unrecognized and
the ability for those organizations
to approach the board during the
year if a need really arose.
Nugent also didn't want to
open the door for requests from
other organizations, although
funding in the amount of $5,500
was left in the budget for the
Downtown Merchants and Com-
niunities in Schools.
Douglas addressed reserve
funds that had been set aside for
a recreation building project.
Government accounting termi-
nology is changing, she said,
:and the commission is going to


a raise since they are now con-
tributing to their own retirement
as members of the Florida Re-
tirement System. The budget
includes 3 percent to offset the
new contribution requirement,
plus 2 percent as a cost of living
increase, for a total of 5 percent
more. This will cost the landfill
an additional $30,000, O'Neal
said, plus additional money for
overtime during cell construc-
tion.
On the other hand, changes
in state law have significantly
reduced the landfill's retirement
costs (more than 53 percent),
O'Neal said.
Commissioner Mark Hartley
asked if having a staff engineer
would reduce the landfill's engi-
neering costs, but it was felt that
even with an engineer of its own,
the board would still be contract-
ing certain projects out. O'Neal
said the landfill pays less for en-
gineering services than it has in
the past, but a number of new
projects have been added.
The budget includes estimates
of what will be spent on engineer-
ing in the upcoming fiscal year,
including $76,000 more to finish


need to designate a category or
categories for those funds. It can
be unassignedd" or the commis-
sion can commit it to a particular
purpose.
Chastain has been trying to get
a summary of those reserve fund
accounts attached to the budget,.
but Douglas said they' should ac-
tually be included in the budget
so the public can see what money
the city actually has.
Transparency in public spend-
ing is the order of the day, she
said, with local governments
being required to put their next
budgets online.9Douglas was un-


off cell 6, $100,000 to permit a
borrow pit if the board acquires
new land, $275,000 on the gas
collection project, and another
$125,000 for miscellaneous proj-
ects that may come up.
The budget also anticipates
placing $800,000 in.escrow for
the future construction of a sev-
enth disposal cell, plus money to
survey and test the land where the
landfill will be expanding into its
second phase. To meet its goal of
having long-term planning fully
funded by the end of Alachua
County's contract in 2018, the
board will also escrow $440,000
for that purpose.
The cost of ongoing and future
projects included in the budget
includes $485,000 for the new
flare project, $50,000 for storm
water system construction,
$225,000 to prepare the site for
the landfill gas to energy project,
and $200,000 for expansion of
the gas collection system.
In addition, the host counties
will split $675,000 in dividends,
and Union County will receive
its additional annual $100,000
host fee.


certain how much, detail would
be required, but Police Chief Jeff
Johns said some of the online
budgets he has seen have been
very detailed.
Douglas also urged the city
to amend the budget each time
unanticipated monies are spent
instead of waiting for an amend-
ment at the end of the year. Like-
wise, before the money is taken
out of reserves for unanticipated
expenses, the board needs to take
up the issue so the public has the
opportunity for input.


Alt wAWe 4 Jibn

Downtown Starke

RELmAXATN I DEEP TISSUE ~ THERAPEUTIC
$1.00 per minute

904-521-6307

Call to schedule appointment today




Walnut Street ~ Downtown Starke


You are Invited


CAMPAIGN FUNDRAISER

in support of

State Representative Janet Adkins


When: Sept. 13, 2011


Where: Starke Golf and Country Club


Time: 6:00 pm

Make,.plans to come and hear State Representative Janet Adkins talk about the
economy and the issues facing working families and taxpayers in North Florida.

Campaign contributions are limited to $500/person


Political Advertisement Paid for and Approved by Janet Adkins, Republican for State Representative. The purchase of a ticket
for or a contribution to the campaign fundraiser is a contribution to the campaign of Janet Adkins.








Thursday, Sept. 8, 2011 Bradford County Telegraph 5A


I hope everyone enjoyed their
_three-day weekend. This school
,week will only be four days.
.What a tremendous crowd we
had at the football game this
past Friday night. It was great to
see so many fans supporting the
.boys. The team sure did deserve
it after their win! The score was
S12 to 9. Keep up the good work,
b6ys!
The football game this week
:will be away in Haswthorne. The
.game will start at 7:30 p.m. Be
.sure to come out and support the


Libraries try t
help students
-succeed!
As the new school year
students' and parents' li'
,:be simpler and their effor
'successful by using their
"braries.
* Florida public libraries |
electronic resources, boo


Make time
for cancer
screenings
"A column fr.at ,te American-
Cancer S6oiety .' - . -- -
This month, is, National Pros-
tate Cancer Awareness Month.
Studies have shown that men
are less likely to go to the doctor
than woman. For this reason, we
want to point out the importance
of getting regular check ups, so
as with all cancers, if found early
you increase the possibility of
beating cancer!
Other than skin cancer, pros-
tate cancer is the most common
cancer in American men. About
one man in six will be diagnosed
with prostate cancer during his


Campbell
elected Angus
delegate
Chad E. Campbell of Brooker
has been elected a delegate to
the 12811 Annual American An-
gus Association Convention of
Delegates, Nov. 14 in Louisville,
Ky., according to Bryce Schu-
mann, CEO of the American An-
gus Association.
Campbell, a member of the
American Angus Association
with headquarters in Saint Jo-
seph, Mo., is one of ."32 Angus
breeders who have been elected
by fellow members in their, state
to serve as a representative at the
annual meeting.
Representing 43 states, Dis-
trict of Columbia and Canada,
the delegates will participate in
the business meeting and elect
new officers and five directors to
the American Angus Association
board.
The. annual event is held in
conjunction with the annual ban-
quet and the Super Point Roll of
Victory Angus show. Nov. 12-15
during the North American Inter-
national Livestock Exposition.


team.
Students, parking decals were
due last Wednesday. If you are
going to park in the student park-
ing lot, it is required to have a
decal. They cost $10. You can
purchase your decal from Mrs.
Odom in the front office. If you
park any place other than the stu-
dent parking lot, you will receive
a ticket.
Homecoming is coming up
faster than we know it. If you
would like to participate in the
float or skit, you need to get with


assistance that can help students
succeed in their schoolwork.
The Division of Library and
Information Services of the Flor-
ida Department of State partners
with local libraries and provides
^)0 a comprehensive foundation of
^ resources called the Florida Elec-
tronic Library that is available to
all Floridians. These libraries and
the FEL support K-12 students
and schools on evenings, week-
S ends, and holidays, and comple-
ment services provided by school
media specialists.
0 This is a-good.time for stu-
dents and parents to make a note
of the ways public libraries can
help them during the year ahead.
begins, It is also a good idea to check
ves can your local library for a schedule
ts more of events and programs.
local li- These are exciting times as
K-12 students-indeed all Flo-
provide ridians-are challenged to mas-
ks, and ter the'21st century learning and


lifetime. More than 2 million
men in the United States who
have been diagnosed with pros-
tate cancer at some point are still
alive today.
Age is the strongest risk fac-
torcfor-prostti nicerce. Prostate
cancer is very rare before the
age of 40, but the chance of hav-
ing prostate cancer rises rapidly
after age 50. Almost two out of
three prostate cancers are found
in men .over the age of 65. Pros-
tate cancer occurs more often in
African-American men than in
men of other races.
Many doctors believe that
prostate cancer begins with a
pre-cancerous condition 'called
prostatic intraepithelial neopla-
sia (PIN). PIN begins to appear


The American Angus Asso-
ciation has nearly 30,000 active
members and is the largest beef
breed organization in the world.


Holistic Health
Fair returns
Holistic Health and Wellness
Fair 2011 will take place Sat-
urday, Sept. 17, from 9 a.m.-I
*p.m. at True Vine Ministry lo-
cated at 422 N. Saint Clair Street
in Starke. This year's theme is
"Prosper in Good Health."
There will be local health care
representatives on hand to an-
swer many of your health-related
questions. There will also be
door prizes, giveaways, free food
and screenings.
The fair is sponsored by the
Department of Elder Affairs,
Elder Options, UF's College of
Dentistry and behavioral science
department, and True Vine Min-
istry.
The fair is free and open to the
public. For more information,
please call 904-964-9264.


your class sponsors. Clubs are
also starting up. If you %would
like to join the Key Club. see the
president, Tanea Striglers.
Everyday is a new opportunity
to start something new. Remem-
ber, your effort and attitude will
determine how well you will do
in life. Life is as good as you
make it.
Quote of the week: "Whether
you think you can or can't, you're
right." -Henry Ford


information skills necessary for
success in today's world. Florida
public libraries are prepared and
ready to make K-12 students'
and parents' lives easier and help
students succeed!
For more information, contact
Ginny Bird at 386-496-2526 or
bird_g@firn.edu.

Donations
requested for
book sale
The Bradford County Public
Library is now seeking donations
for the annual Friends of the Li-
brary book sale. The book sale
will be held Oct. 19-21. Books,
DVDs, CDs, etc., (in good con-
dition) may be dropped off at the
library. No magazines please!
For more information please
call the library at 904-368-3911.


in the prostates of some men as
early as their 20s. Almost half
of all men have PIN by the time
they reach 50.
Talk with your doctor about
.what tests need to be.done to find
'bitif you ha\ &proitlc cancer or
PIN. As with all cancers, early
detection is key..If you have can-
cer, or want more information
log onto www.cancer.org, or call
1-800-ACS-2345.


~3EN2~ ~W?~
1~Wt4'j SIAV~*S


E, -n








Senior yearbook
ads on sale
Bradford High School seniors
and parents: The yearbook will
be selling senior ads for the 20'12
yearbook. Ads will be due by
Sept 30. Letters will go home by
the end of next week.
If you are planning on purchas-
ing an ad for your senior, please
start getting the pictures and
wording together now. If you
have questions, please contact
Christie Torode at bhstorode@
yahoo.com or 904-966-1002.


officials with a day of tribute
on Sunday Sept. 11, at 10:30
a.m. Maj. Gen. Douglas
Burnett will be the guest
speaker, and there will be
special music, dinner and a
dedication of newly erected
tribute to God and heroes.
For more information, please
contact 352-473-4188.

Air Park Baptist Church,
521 N. Orange St., will'
celebrate its 62nd homecoming
with the Rev. Al Paulson
Sr. bringing the message on
Sunday, Sept. 11, at 11 a.m.
Everyone is invited.

Greater Bethlehem Free
Will Baptist Church, 1103
Ash Street in Starke, will
be hosting its annual Choirs
Anniversary on Sept. 23at 7:30
p.m. The church welcomes
everyone to come and help
celebrate. If there are any
choirs, groups or individuals
that would like to be on the
program, please RSVP Mamie
Mitchell at 904-964-6874 or


Three Rivers Legal Services
has provides civil legal assis-
tance to low-income residents
of 12 counties in North Central
Florida, including Bradford and
Union counties. Assistance in-
cludes advice and brief services


$2500


WEEKLY


Walk By Faith Church
Ministries and Faith Walk
Outreach %\ill be having a
concert this Saturday, Sept.
10. at 7:30 p.m. featuring
NuSound from Georgia as
well as Singers of Purpose of
Bradford County. The concert
is free, and an offering will be
received.

First United Methodist
Church of Starke will hold
a special unity service this
Sunday, Sept. 11, at 10 a.m.
with Dr. Phil Maynard from
the Center for Congregational
Excellence speaking on the
"Rethink Church" initiative.
Lunch will follow at 11 a.m.,
and then Maynard will lead a
special workshop on growing
outreach. Grammy award
winning tenor Larry Ford of
the Gaither Gospel Singers
will perform Sept. 18 at 6 p.m.
Admission is free.

Hope Baptist Church will
pay tribute to first responders,
military members and elected


or representation in a variety of
civil matters, including landlord/
tenant, public benefits, consumer
issues, domestic violence and
family safety. Call 800-372-0930
for an appointment.


I I


11,


Mike's
Handyman Services
Carpentry
* Painting
* Plumbing
* Electrical
* Mobile Home
Repair
* And Much More!
Horte (352~ 473-7225
Cell (352) 745-0614
Non-permit work only
F Michael Horne
Serving the Lake Region


11


Purple


15070 US Hwy 301 S Starke, FL

904-964-4810
Mon-Sat 9-6
Wrangler Levi
Boots Hats Buckles
S We do
Layaways!


ness or


CALL TODAY
904.964.6305
Ask for Kevin or Darlene


Florence Jenkins at 352-235-
4155 by Sept. 21.

Starke Church of the
Nazarene, 1404 Bessent Road
in Starke, welcomes Light
Soldiers in concert on Sept.
25 at 10:45 a.m. For morn
information, please call 352-
473-2247.

St. Matthews Free Methodist
Church invites everyone to
its Friends and Family Day,
planned for Sept. 25 at 11 a.m.
and 3 p.m.

E-mail the details of your
congregation's upcoming
special events to editor@
bctele-graph.com. DEADLINE
IS MONDAY AT 5 P.M.


&Aursd/a4 JS, BaoduTi


11


Contrary to the lie which has

been told,

BOBBY ADKINS

does indeed have a family. His

children, Louise, Jim and

Robert Adkins, 5 grandsons, 4

granddaughters, and one

devoted, patient, long-suffering

wife.


sannpsig l s Forms Computers & Repair
pri s es ers1es Business Cards
Casswl tA\ aloe e oV c(%00 TSV & 150 mile Antennas
0o" dtl, C olVe N Telecommunications
Advertising Campaigns Cell Accessories
E-Commerce Stores Medical & Legal Bill Pay Service
Professional Web Designer Programmer
Creative Graphic Design Layout & Text Editing
Certified Hosting Provider Electronics & Toys *FREE Hosting
352-473-5681 Pre Christmas Sale *FREE Domain
14 years Expbrience FREE Popcornl *Conditions Apply


SPACE AVAILABLE!
ForAs Little As You could Advertise Your Busih
For As Little As Services Here!


DENMARK
E
FtJRNITUR :r]
Irs m fact, you can do bettew at
DEHL:tAR7K%
r.
434 W. Call St.
964-5827RE


v v IL


I


L nrl ::11 1








6A Bradford County Telegraph Thursday, Sept. 8, 2011


LEGALSS




NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
That JOAN F WILLIS
Theholderofthe following certificates)
has filed said certificates) for the
tax deed to be issued thereon. The
certificate numbers) and year of
issuance, the description of property,
and name(s) in which it is assessed
are as follows:
File Number: 2011-0001
Certificate Number: 888
Parcel Number: 04577-0-00000
Year of Issuance: 2008
Description of Property: A parcel of
land lying containing 1.38 acres, lying
in the E V2 of NW 1 of NW /4, Section
35, Township 6 South, Range 22 East,
Bradford County, Florida; said parcel
being more particularly described
as follows: Commence at an old
iron pipe located at the Southwest
corner of said E V2 of NW 1/4 of NW
1 and run south 89 Degrees and
15 min., East, along said Southerly
boundary thereof, 52 12 feet to point
of beginning.
From point of beginning thus
described, continue South 89 degree
15 min East, along said Southerly
boundary 239.31 feet; thence North 0
deg and 28 min west, 4.7 feet to an
old iron pipe; continue thence North
0 deg and 28 min West, 214 feet to
an iron pipe located on the Southerly
boundary of the right of way of a
graded County road; thence North
82 Deg and 20 min. and 30 seconds.
West, along last aforesaid Southerly
boundary 274.83 feet to an iron pipe;
thence South 7 degrees 51 min and
30 sec East 251.47 feet to a concrete
monument, continue thence South 7
deg 51 min and 30 seconds East 3.16
feet to point of beginning.
Assessed To.:
PATRICIA ANN HARRIS BRADLEY,
PATRICIA A H BRADLEY
(DECEASED)
All of the above property is located
in Bradford County, In the State of
Florida.
Unless such certificates) shall be
redeemed according to Law, the
property described in such certificate
or certificates will be sold to the
Highest Bidder at the BRADFORD
COUNTY COURTHOUSE, STARKE,
FL on the 29'h day of September,
2011, at 11:00 a.m.
RAY NORMAN
BRADFORD COUNTY CLERK OF
COURT
By: Lisa Brannon
Deputy Clerk
If yob are a person with a disability
who needs any accopimodation in
order to participate in this proceeding,
you are entitled, at no cost to you, to
the provision of certain assistance.
Please contact Ms. Jan Phillips,
ADA Coordinator, Alachua County
Family and Civil Justice Center,
201 East University Avenue, Room
410, Gainesville, FL 32601 at (352)
337-6237 at least 7 days before
your scheduled court appearance,
or immediately upon receiving this
notification if .the time before the
scheduled appearance is less than


Eugene L. Matthews Bradford
County Historical Museum,
201 E. Call St. in Starke, offers
a unique blend of sophisticated
text and photographs on display
panels and a wealth of exhibits
of downhome artifacts. Museum
hours are Tuesday-Thursday, 1-5
p.m., and weekends by appoint-
ment. For information call 904-
964-4604 or 904-964-5382.

Bradford County Animal Con-
trol is in need of donations of
items required for the care of the
animals, including blankets or
rugs, canned dog and cat food,
heavy food and water bowls, kitty


7 days; if you are hearing or voice
impaired, call 711.
8/25 4tchg 9/15-BCT
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR BRADFORD COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 04-2011CP0058
JUDGE: TOBY S. MONACO
IN RE: ESTATE OF
CLARENCE L. MITCHELL
Deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The Administration of the estate of
CLARENCEL. MITCHELL, deceased,
File Number 042011CP0058 is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Bradford County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is
945 N. Temple Avenue, Starke, FL
32091. The name and addresses of
the personal representative and the
personal representative's attorney
are set forth below.
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE
NOTIFIED THAT:
All creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom
a copy of this notice is served within
three months after the date of the
first publication of this notice must
file their claim with this Court WITHIN
THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR
THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE
OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must file
their claims with this Court WITHIN
THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN
THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH
IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE
FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY
CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR
MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S
DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJECTIONS
NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED. The date of the first
publication of this Notice is September
1, 2011.
ANTWAN'MITCHELL
Personal Representative
1005 N. Thompson Street
Starke, FL 32091
ATTORNEY FOR THE PETITIONER
Law Office of
Salesia V. Smith-Gordon, PA
922 Second Street'
West Palm Beach, FL 33401
Florida Bar #0974757
9/1 2tchg 9/8-BCT
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR BRADFORD COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 04-2011CP0058
JUDGE: TOBY S. MONACO
IN RE: ESTATE OF
CLARENCE L MITCHELL
Deceased
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
The Administration of the estate of
CLARENCE LMITCHELL, deceased,
File, Number 042011CP0058 is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Bradford County, Florida, Probate


litter, and kitty litter pans. To do-
nate, contact Dawn McKinley at
904-966-6359 or 904-364-8199.
Volunteers are also needed!


MON-SAT 10-6


Division, the address of which is
945 N. Temple Avenue. Starke, FL
32091. The name and addresses of
the personal representative and the
personal representative's attorney
are set forth below.
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE
NOTIFIED THAT:
All persons on whom this notice is
served who have objections that
challenge the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdiction
of this Court are required to file their
objection with this Court WITHIN
THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR
THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE
OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom
a copy of this notice is served within
three months after the date of the
first publication of this notice must
file their claim with this Court WITHIN
THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR
THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE
OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All creditors of the decedent and other
persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must file
their claims with this Court WITHIN
THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJECTIONS
NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED. The date of the first
publication of this Notice is September
1,2011.
ANTWAN MITCHELL
Personal Representative
1005 N. Thompson Street
Starke, FL 32091
ATTORNEY FOR THE PETITIONER
Law Office of
Salesia V. Smith-Gordon, PA
922 Second Street
Wbst Palm Beach, FL 33401
Florida Bar #0974757
9/1 2tchg 9/8-BCT
NOTICE OF PUBLIC
MEETINGS OF THE
NORTH FLORIDA
BROADBAND AUTHORITY
OPERATIONS COMMITTEE
The North Florida Broadband Authority
("NFBA") announces meetings of the
NFBA Operations Committee that
all interested persons are invited to
attend. The NFBA is a legal entity and
public body created pursuant to the
provisions of Section 163.01, Florida
Statutes, and an InterlocalAgreement
among Baker, Bradford, Columbia,
Dixie, Gilchrist,. Hamilton, Jefferson,
Lafayette, Levy, Madison, Putnam,
Suwannee, Taylor, Union. and Wakulla
Counties and municipalities of Cedar
Key, Cross City, Lake City, Live Oak,
Monticello, Perry, White Springs
and Worthington Springs, Florida.
The NFBA's Operations Committee
meeting will be held at 10:00 a.m.
on Thursday, September 8, 2011;
and at 10:00 a.m. on the following
Wednesday, September 28, 2011;
October 26, 2011; November 30,
2011; and December 28, 2011 all at
the Cabot Lodge Board Room, 3726
SW 40th Boulevard, Gainesville,
FL 32608. The NFBA's Operational


Starke utility customers can re-
ceive service after hours by call-
ing 904-966-6161.


NOW OPEN


7HRIf7YLnWING
THRJFrTrORE
223 S ORANGE ST.
STARKE, FL 32091
904-368-0244


Committee meeting is to conduct
general business If a person decides
to appeal any decision made by the
NFBA with respect to any matter
considered at the meeting, such
person will need a record of the
proceedings and may need to ensure
that a verbatim record is made.
including the testimony and evidence
upon which the appeal is to be made.
In accordance with the Americans
with Disabilities Act. persons
needing special accommodation or
an interpreter to participate in this
proceeding or have any questions
please contact Faith Doyle, Clerk to
the NFBA Board at (877) 552-3482
or (407) 629-6900 at least two (2)
business days prior to the date of the
meeting.
9/8 ltchg-BCT
LEGAL NOTICE
WIA Two-Year Plan Available for
Review
FloridaWorks welcomes comments
on the 2011-12 update to its Region
9 WIA Two-Year Plan. To preview
a Draft of the Plan, visit www.
floridaworksonline.com. Please
contact Celia Chapman at 352-244-
5148 with questions.
9/8 ltchg-BCT
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
FOR TITLE REPORT AND
TITLE INSURANCE
Project No. 11DB-C5-03-14-01-H17
Bradford County (herein referred to
as the "Owner")
Sealed bids marked "Sealed Bid
for Title Report and Title Insurance
- Bradford County Small Cities
Community Development Block Grant
Project Fiscal Year 2010 Housing
Rehabilitation Funds" to be financed
by the State of Florida Department
of Community Affairs under the
provisions, and subject to the
requirements, of Title I of the Housing
and Community Development Act of
1974, as amended, will be received
by the Owner for title report and title
insurance described, as follows:
Conduct title research to verify
ownership of ten parcels developed
with dwelling units proposed for
housing rehabilitation, prepare a title
report and issue title insurance in the
amount equal to $65,000 per parcel
for a Community Development Block
Grant Housing program.
Bids shall be addressed to the Office
of the County Clerk, 945 North
Temple Avenue, P. 0. Drawer B,
Starke, FL 32091, not later than 2:00
p.m. Eastern Daylight Savings Time
on September 22, 2011. Bids shall be
designated as "Sealed Bid for Title
Report and Title Insurance Bradford
County, Community Development
Block Grant Project for Fiscal Year
2010 Housing Rehabilitation Funds"
to be financed by the State of
Florida Department of Community
Affairs. Facsimile or electronic mail
bids will not be accepted. All bids
must be submitted on the Form of
Bid Proposal. Any bids received after
the specified time and date will not be
considered.
The sealed bids will be publicly
opened and read aloud at 2:00 p.m.
Eastern Daylight Savings Time on
September 22, 2011 at the Office
of the County Clerk, located at 945
North Temple Avenue, Starke, FL.
To obtain a copy of the Form of Bid
Proposal or for more information


please contact tne Community
Development Office located at 925-
E North Temple Avenue, Starke.
Florida, between the hours of 9.00
a m and 4.30 p m Monday through
Friday or call (904) 966-6382 The
Owner reserves the right to waive
any informalities or to reject any or
all bids
No Bidder may \withdaw his/her bid
within sixty (60) days after the actual
date of the opening thereof
A FAIR HOUSING/EQUAL
OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER/
HANDICAP ACCESS
JURISDICTION
9/8 Itchg-BCT
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
FOR LEAD-BASED
PAINT INSPECTION AND
CLEARANCE TESTING
SERVICES
Project No 11DB-C5-03-14-01-H17
Bradford County (herein referred to
as the "Owner")
Sealed bids marked 'Sealed Bid
for Lead-Based Paint Inspection
and Clearance Testing Services
- Bradford County Small Cities
Community Development Block Grant
Project for Fiscal Year 2010, Housing
Rehabilitation" to be financed by
'he State of Florida Department
of Community Affairs under the
provisions, and subject to the
requirements of Title I of the Housing
and Community Development Act of
1974, as amended, will be received
by the Owner for lead-based paint
inspection and clearance testing
services described, as follows.
Perform tests on pre-1978 single
family dwelling units to identify all
lead-based paint, including lead
paint inspection report, prepare risk
assessment report of lead-based
paint hazards, including control
options and cost estimates; and
perform clearance inspection after
rehabilitation has been performed,
including lead paint clearance report
on ten single family dwelling units
proposed for housing rehabilitation
for a Community Development Block
Grant Project for Fiscal Year 2010,
Housing Rehabilitation program
Bids shall be addressed to the Office
of the County Clerk, 945 North
Temple Avenue, P 0 Drawer B,
Starke, FL 32091, not later than 2:00
pm. Eastern Daylight Savings Time,
on September 22, 2011. Bids shall


be designated as "Lead-Based Paint
Inspection and Clearance Testing
Services Bradford County Small
Cities Community Development Block
Grant Project for Fiscal Year 2010,
Housing Rehabilitation" to be financed
by the State of Florida Department
of Community Affairs. Facsimile
or electronic mail bids will not be
accepted. All bids must be submitted
on the Form of Bid Proposal. Any bids
received after the specified time and
date will not be considered.
The sealed bids will be publicly
opened and read aloud at 2:00 pm.
Eastern Daylight Savings Time, on
September 22, 2011 at the Office
of the County Clerk, located at 945
North Temple Avenue, Starke, FL.
To obtain a copy of the Form of Bid
Proposal of for more information,
please contact the Community
Development Office located at 925-
E North Temple Avenue, Starke,
Florida, between the hours of 9:00
a.m. and 4:30 p.m., Monday through
Friday or call (904) 966-6382. The
Owner reserves the right to waive
any informalities or to reject any or
all bids.
No Bidder may withdraw his/her bid
within sixty (60) days after the actual
date of the opening thereof.
A FAIR HOUSING/EQUAL
OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER/
HANDICAP ACCESS
JURISDICTION
9/8 Itchg-BCT
PUBLIC NOTICE
The regular scheduled meeting of the
Board of County Commissioners is
scheduled for September 15, 2011, at
6:30 p.m. in the County Commission
Meeting Room, located in the
north wing of the Bradford County
Courthouse, 945 N. Temple Ave.,
Starke, Florida. A copy of the agenda
may be obtained from the County
Website www.bradfordcountyfl.gov
or from the Office of the County
Manager, located in the north wing of
the Bradford County Courthouse.
9/8 ltchg-BCT
PUBLIC NOTICE
Redistricting Committee meeting
scheduled for September 22, 2011, at
6:00 p.m. in the County Commission
Room, located in the north wing of the
Bradford County Courthouse, 945 N.
Temple Ave., Starke, Florida.
9/8 Itchg-BCT


CAN

You support The Arc

Recycling Program?

The Arc of Bradford County is seeking donations of cans to
promote their recycling training program, as well as going
green.
This training program provides opportunities for persons with
physical and developmental disabilities to learn work skills and
earn money.

We can provide the following services:
Receptacle drop-off
Come pick up your cans
Clean up any mess or spills
Call 904-964-7699 for more information.
Please drop off your cans at 1351 S. Water St. Starke, FL 32091


Afterschool Tutoring Choice


26 Hours of Free Tutoring


October Through January


1% Hours per Session, 2 Days per Week


At Your Child's School


Each Class Has a Certified Teacher and Aide


46W


--A-.
-t I


of Suwannree, Inc


(386) 362-6134


Your child may qualify for free tutoring if
your child is eligible for free or reduced
priced lunch AND attends an eligible
Title I school. If parental requests for
free tutoring exceed the amount of
funding available, the School District
will serve the students with the greatest
need Neither the Florida Department of
Education nor the School District promote
or endorse any particular supplemental
educational services (SES) provider.


PURR-FIT CUTS

5 ailrcuts are Back!

"September Specials"
Perms... $45 & up
Colors... $35 & up
Judy Ann Bradley, owner
Rocky Stewart
"30 years experience"
904-964-6268
Across from Auto Zone Starke, FL
Tues-Fri 10-5 Sat 10-3


NOTICE OF
COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLOCK GRANT
HOUSING REHABILITATION/REPLACEMENT ASSISTANCE

Bradford County has been-awarded a Small Cities Community Development Block
Grant from the Florida Department of Community Affairs for Housing
Rehabilitation.


What does the Small Cities Community Development Block Grant offer?


Roof repairs, windows, structural repairs or replacement houses



Who qualifies?


Housing Rehabilitation and Replacement: Low- and Moderate-
Income Persons* Who Own Their Homes and Reside in
Unincorporated Bradford County and





Additional information concerning the Community Development Block Grant
Program and application forms can be obtained from the Office of the Community
Development, located at 925-E North Temple Avenue, Starke, Florida, telephone
number (904) 966-6382. Please submit an application by October 28, 2011.



*If the Number of People
Living in Household is... 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

Total Household Income
Cannot be More Than... $28,150 $32,150 $36,150 $40,150 $43,400 $46,600 $49,800 $53,000

*FY 2011 Income Limits

A FAIR HOUSING/EQUAL OPPORTUNITY/HANDICAP ACCESS JURISDICTION


I






Thursday, Sept. 8, 2011 Bradford County Telegraph 7A


ROBBER
Continued from page 1A

When Howell entered the busi-
ness, the suspect ran down an
aisle. Howell followed him down
the opposite aisle, shadowing his
movement. When Howell began
to turn the corner and enter the
suspect's aisle, the suspect took
off in the other direction.
Howell used his Taser to stop
Douglas and restrain him on the
floor. After handcuffing Doug-
las, Warren said a rifle minus its
stock was located inside the sus-
pect's pants.
Authorities then learned that
when Douglas was hiding down
the pharmacy aisle, he had in-
gested an unknown amount of
the Oxycodone obtained from
the pharmacy employee. Douglas
was transported to Shands Starke
for treatment.
Douglas is charged with rob-
bery with a firearm, possession
of a firearm by a convicted felon
and resisting without violence.
Douglas was sentenced to pro-
'bation in July for aggravated as-
sault with a weapon.





Dollies workshop
Saturday
The Bradford Chapter of Dol-
lies Without Borders will have
a dollies workshop on Satur-
"'day, Sept. 10, from 11 a.m. to
.. 2 p.m. with time out for lunch.
The workshop will be held at the
Teaching Farm in the air-condi-
tioned Peace Education Center.
There are some new patterns to
try out, including some incredible
crocheted, shoes, and, as always,
we have plenty of dollies to stuff
and plenty of yarn, lace material
and face-making supplies.
Dollies have again made it
to Haiti, and this fall members
hope to send some to Central
and South America. All ages and
all levels of skill are welcome.
There will be sewing machines
and sewing supplies at the PEC
but additional equipment is al-
ways welcome, too.
.The Florida Coalition for
Peace and Justice Teaching Fahn
is located at the comer of C.R.
227 and 18. From Starke, turn
right from-U.S.'304 'at the new
stoplight onto-T.R. 227 and the
Teaching Farm is on the left im-
mediately after the intersection
of C.R. 18. From Hampton, take
SC.R. 18 to C.R. 227 and turn left.
:For further information contact
Kathy Still at 904-368-0291 or
stillpe@aol.com.


Stearns here
Sept. 10
Rep. Cliff Steams will hold a
town meeting in Starke on Sat-
urday, Sept. 10, from 9-10 a.m.
at the Bradford County School
District Office on Washington
Street. The public is invited to
bring questions, comments and
concerns.


BUDGET FY2012
New River Public Library Cooperative


ESTIMATED REVENUE
State Aid
Local
Interest
Misc Income
USF Reimbursment
Cash Carryover
LSTA Federal Grant
Total

ESTIMATED EXPENSES
Salary Director
Wages Other
PICA
FRS
Health insurance
Legal/Contractual
Audit
Office Rent
Communications
Supplies
Workers Comp
Insurance
Postage
Travel
Repair & Maintenance
Fuel & Maintenance
Contingency
Automation
Program Support
Advertising
Dues
Equipment (over $1000)
Library Materials
Equipment (under $1000)
Budgeted Reserve
Total


$320,000
$2,000
$250
S250
$5,000
$240,000
* $41,630
$609,130

$49,042
$68,044
$8,957
$5,509
$14,900
$121,332
$7,475
$12,000
$22,800
$10,000
$3,000
$6,900
$3,900
$500
$2,000
$10,525
$2,000
$4,000
$2,500
$1,040
$4,000
$4,000
$7,200
$13,685
$223,821
$609,130


The tentative, adopted and/or final budget
are on file in the above office. The public
hearing to approve this budget will be
held on Thurs. Sept 8, 2011 at Spm at
the New River Solid Waste Facility, SR121
north of Raiford.


Scholarship funded


in Rogers' name


BY MARK J. CRAWFORD
Telegraph Editor

The Hampton Veterans Me-
morial Fund has realized its sec-
ond goal in raising the money
necessary to establish a Santa Fe
College scholarship in memory
of local fallen soldier Maj. Alan
Rogers.
It was Rogers' death in 2008
that led to the formation of the
fundraising organization.
Organization founder Jim
Mitzel said his mother law was
pulled aside recently and asked
to get in touch with him about
.how much more was needed to
fully fund the scholarship. The
original inquiry apparently came
from an. individual who was im-
pressed with what the organiza-
tion had been able to accomplish
thus far.
Last week Mitzel said he was
informed that an anonymous do-
nor had indeed made up the dif-
ference with his gift of $3,776.
HVMF had already raised the
majority of the $15,000 required,
and now with private funding
complete, all that is needed is for
the state to match the amount,
something that will have to take
place over a couple. of years, Mit-
zel said, because of education


budget cuts. But when 2013 rolls
around, a scholarship in Rogers'
name % ill be a% ailable.
Rogers. who was raised in
Hampton. died in Baghdad in
January 2008. the victim on ah
IED explosion.
From chili cook-offs to music
festivals. the Hampton Veterans
Memorial Fund has been rally-
ing supporters since then in an
effort to raise funds for veterans
causes.
The group dedicated a new
veteranss memorial in Santa Fe
Cemetery earlier this year, be-
fore turning its attention to the
scholarship. Mitzel called it a
banner year.
"It makes you feel good that
you got your two main goals ac-
complished," he said. Heemailed
supporters for believing in and
assisting the organization.
The organization has not
slowed down, however. Volun-
teers were selling barbecue at the
convenience store located at U.S.
301 and C.R. 18 on Saturday,
snagging as much of the Gator
game traffic as they could.
The owners have graciously
agreed to allow the veterans or-
ganization to set up shop on their
property to raise funds. In return,
the vets sell food but not drinks,


Helping out at Saturday's fundraising barbecue were Dean Stickland, Roger and
Rhonda Hickson and Jennifer and Jim Mitzel.


instead directing traffic into the
store.
The vets will be there raising
funds for several more weekends.
Mitzel said future goals include
raising funds for the construction
of Fisher House near the veterans


hospital in Gainesville, which
will be a home away from home
for families of hospitalized vets.
Mohey will also be raised for
VETSPACE,an organization that
assists homeless veterans. Mitzel
said they would like to help pur-


chase a van that could transport
veterans to job interviews, medi-
cal appointments, etc.
Every goal they meet will al-
ways lead to the next, because
there are always veterans in need.
Mitzel said.


Health department, BHS partner under new grant


The University of South Flor-
ida has chosen Bradford High
School'to participate in a research
grant examining the effective-
ness of Wyman's Teen Outreach
Program for the 2011-12 school
year.
The state awarded Bradford
County Health Department,
along with 23 other Florida
county health departments, a
four-year grant from 2011-2015
to implement TOP in ninth-grade
classrooms. ,
The program, which has
proven to be effective in reduc-
ing school suspension, course
failure, pregnancy and school
dropout rates, will operate as part
of a statewide research exercise
through the health department
for the next four years.
Although no TOP classes
will be taught during the current
school year, research representa-
tives from USF will administer
surveys at the beginning and end
of the current ninth-grade year,
as well as follow-up surveys at


Volunteer with 4-H, the Coop-
erative Extension Service's dy-
namic educational program for
young people. Its mission .is to
create supportive environments
for culturally diverse youth and


(


the end of the 10"-, 11"h- and 12th-
grade years. Each high school
that participates in the USF re-
search will receive $1,000.
When the curriculum is taught
during future school years, a rep-
resentative from the health de-
partment will teach from an absti-
nence perspective, in accordance
with the regulations put forth by
Bradford County School District
Superintendent Beth Moore. Un-
til that time, TOP is available at
no charge to other local .educa-
tional organizations.
While abstinence is a com-
ponent of the program, TOP is
heralded as an "evidence-based
mental health promotion pro-
gram" by Wyman and "a positive
youth development program" by
Dr. Eric Buhi, assistant profes-
sor at the USF College of Public
Health.
Buhi is leading the research
being conducted in public high
schools across the state. TOP
also includes a critical commu-
nity service component in which


adults to reach their fullest poten-
tial. Become a club leader, vol-
unteer for camps, club meetings
and much more. Call the exten-
sion office for more information
or to sign up at 904-966-6224.


Paul Sanders, P.A,.'

Attorney at Law .

Real Estate
Contracts, Evictions
and Foreclosure
Estate Planning
Wills & Probate
Corporate Formation
and Business Law
Divorce, Custody &
Adoption
General Litigation
Personal Injury
904-964-5701
403 Georgia Street* Starke, FL
(1st office on the right) j


students can choose to partner
with any number of local chari-
table organizations.
"We are.so excited to be part-
nering with the community to
provide this important program
to ensure that our youth will be
successful at graduating from
high school and making healthy
choices," says Winnie Holland,
health department administra-
tor. "This curriculum includes
a strong community component
that will ensure that our commu-
nity partners can also be a part of
this vital program."
According to Buhi, more coun-
ties will be added each year until
every: county in Florida is using
TOP by the end of the fourth
year. USF will collect the student
data taken from the anonymous
surveys and follow-up question-
naires to determine TOP's effec-
tiveness.
BHS parents are welcome to
view the survey ahead of time


and will have the option of sign- ing the program or the surveys.
ing a form preventing their ninth- please visit www.wymantop.org
grade student from participating or call Amanda Hannah at the
in the surveys, health department at 904-964-
For more information regard- 7732, ext. 132.




Sarpyy "74th" Birthday

Som! ,


Simply said...
We wish you the
best birthday ever
& many more to come!
Thanks for being who
you are...the best mom
& friend to all!


Love from affyourfamify!


t Tentative Five Year Work Program
District Two
NoPT Fiscal Years Beginning July 1, 2012 June 30, 2017
The Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT), District Two, is conducting public
hearings pursuant to Section 339.135(4)(c), Florida Statutes, to consider the
Department's Tentative Work Program for the Fiscal Years 2012/2013 through 2016/2017,
and to consider the necessity of making any changes to the Work Program, to which all
persons are invited to attend and be heard.

1. Live Oak Hearing: Specific notice is provided to the County Commissions for
Hamilton, Lafayette, Madison, Suwannee and Taylor counties serving as the Metropolitan
Planning Organization (MPO) for their respective counties.

DATE AND TIME: Thursday, October 6, 2011 at 5:30 p.m.
PLACE: Live Oak Passenger Depot
210 N. Ohio Avenue, Live Oak, FL

2. Lake City Hearing: Specific notice is provided to the Gainesville Metropolitan
Transportation Planning Organization (MTPO) and the County Commissions for Alachua,
Bradford, Columbia, Dixie, Gilchrist, Levy and Union counties serving as the Metropolitan
Planning Organization (MPO) for their respective counties.

DATE AND TIME: Monday, October 10, 2011 at 5:30 p.m.
PLACE: FDOT District Two Office, Madison Room
1109 South Marion Ave., Lake City, FL

3. Jacksonville Hearing: Specific notice is provided to the North Florida
Transportation Planning Organization (TPO), the Jacksonville City Council and the County
Commissions for Baker, Clay, Nassau, Putnam and St. Johns counties serving as the
Metropolitan Planning Organization for their respective counties.
DATE AND TIME: Thursday, October 13, 2011 at 5:30 p.m.
PLACE: FDOT Jacksonville Urban Office, Training Facility
2198 Edison Avenue, Jacksonville, FL

Public-participation is solicited without regard to race, color, religion, sex, age, national
origin, disability or family status. Persons who require accommodations under the
Americans with Disabilities Act or persons who require translation services (free of
charge) should contact Mr. Bill Henderson, District Planning & Environmental Manager,:
Lake City District Office at 1-800-749-2967 at least seven (7) days in advance of the
Public Hearings.

Written comments from the Metropolitan Planning Organizations (MPO's), County
Commissions and other interested parties will be received by the Department at the Public
Hearings and up to October 28, 2011 following the hearing. Comments should be
addressed to:
Mr. Alan R. Mosley. P.E., District Two Secretary
Florida Department of Transportation, District Two
1109 South Marion Ave. Mail Station 2000
Lake City. FL 32025-5874
Telephone 1-800-749-2967

FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION


Reach


a


wide

E ^audience



Advertising Networks of Florida
Statewide advertising-one low price



(86)742-1373





8A Bradford County Telegraph Thursday, Sept. 8, 2011


New, earlier start to Medicare Child welfare workers prepare for increase in abuse calls

annual election period As the school year begins. Warning signs of abuse and neglect: to families before the\ entpr the
child welfare workers in North formal system. Since 2008, the
Many beneficiaries could get left out Central Florida are gierin.n up Does the child have marks or bruises that number of children in out-of-
for an increase in child abuse in- are difficult to explain? home care in this region has de-
Many individuals may be un- could directly affect their need '.esligati..ns Is the child wearing inappropriate clothing creased by 46 percent.
aware that the Medicare Annual for more or less health insurance, In 2010., there was a 13 percent (long sleeves during summer months)? "As a community, we can
Election Period will now start on the types of prescription drugs increase in child abuse inv esti- Does the child seem withdrawn or self- help to prevent our children and
Oct. 15 instead of Nov. 15. The they require or their access to gations received by the Florida destructive? families from becoming a statis-
Florida Department of Elder Af- particular doctors or pharmacies. abuse hotline in the early fall Does the child try to avoid his/her home? tic of abuse and neglect by learn-
fairs' SHINE (Serving Health Health changes can also increase months corresponding to shortly Does the child avoid visitors to his/her ing more about the warning signs
Insurance Needs of Elders) pro- costs, which can be particularly after children return to school, home? and also providing support as a
gram understands how difficult critical for Medicare beneficia- according to data in the statewide Does the child steal or store food? partner family," said Shawn Sa-
it can be to keep track of all the ries on fixed incomes., database FSFN. In 2009, there Is the child consistently absent or tardy from lamida, CEO of Partnership for
changes related to Medicare such Doing this type of cost-benefit was a 10 percent increase, school or after school activities? Strong Families. "Be there for
as the new AEP dates. This is check is especially important "It is widely believed that one the children and families in your
one of the reasons the SHINE this year for those interested in of the factors causing an increase For information on becoming a partner family, visit community. Sometimes it's the
program is available to provide Medicare Advantage plans, be- in hotline calls is that there are www.partnerfamily.org. small things that will make a
free help for Florida Medicare cause beneficiaries are no longer more eyes on the children who world of difference."
beneficiaries as they carefully offered an open enrollment to are trained to recognize signs of calls them. According to Akiva shifted resources to reach a goal Partnership for Strong Fami-
evaluate their health care options switch from one Medicare Ad- abuse or neglect," said Jenn Pe- Ford, foster care licensing and set by the Department of Chil- lies is the lead community-based
and make selections before time vantage plan to another. Instead, tion, community and government recruitment manager at Partner- dren and Families' Foster Care care agency for Florida Judicial
runs out on Dec. 7. a Medicare Advantage Annual relations manager at Partnership ship for Strong Families, there Redesign initiative of reducing Circuits three and eight. PSF is
During the Annual Election Disenrollment Period-running for Strong Families, the lead is a severe need for families who the number of children in out-of- contracted by the Florida Depart-
Period, Medicare beneficiaries from Jan. 1 to Feb. 14-will al- community-based care provider will accept children ages zero to home care by 50 percent, this has ment of Children and Families
have the opportunity to make low beneficiaries only the option of child welfare services in 13 five and 13 and older, as well as not eliminated the need for new to deliver comprehensive child
changes to their Medicare Pre- of disenrolling from a Medicare North Central Florida counties. homes that will accommodate licensed homes. welfare services to children who
scription Drug or Medicare Ad- Advantage plan and enrolling in A lack of critical support dur- sibling groups. Particularly in Locally, Partnership for are victims of abuse and neglect.
vantage plans. The new AEP Original Medicare (some drug ing summer months may lead to the outlying counties such as Co- Strong Families concentrates a Partnership for Strong Families
allows beneficiaries seven extra coverage options are also avail- parents making poor decisions lumbia, Dixie, Lafayette, Suwan- significant amount of resources also works with at-risk families
days to make plan choices while able), that can result in abuse or ne- nee, Madison, Taylor and Union to provide families with all the to prevent child abuse and to de-
avoiding the end-of-year holi-. Beneficiaries are encouraged glect, said Petion. where many homes have closed resources necessary to prevent crease the risk of children enter-
days. Still, SHINE suggests ben- to act quickly upon the start Making the situation more because partner families have ad- child abuse in the community ing the foster care system. PSF
eficiaries to review their benefits of the Annual Election Period challenging is the critical need opted the children in their care, through initiatives such as the Li- serves more than 5,000 children
prior to the October 15 AEP start in October to assure a smooth for licensed foster families or there is a need for more families. brary Partnership resource center in 13 counties annually.
date. transition into the 2012 benefit "partner families" as the agency While agencies statewide have and diversion services offered
There are a variety of reasons year. All Florida Medicare ben-
why beneficiaries should re- eficiaries are invited to make
view benefits each year or make an appointment for one-on-one
changes to their coverage. For SHINE counseling or enroll-
example, individuals often ex- ment assistance. Appointments Teen Night range is fifth grade through 12th Tea party Members will be exchanging
perience subtle changes in their can be made by contacting your grade, and school IDs are re- p ideas and plans leading up to the
health over the course of the local.Area Agency on Aging at planned quired. Admission is $5 for each meeting primary election along with other
year, and these changes may alter 1-800-96-ELDER. (1-800-963- Concerned Citizens is plan- event. items of interest. Your input is
the kind of care they need. This 5337). ning a luau for the Teen Night Please bring your teens and if Sept.13 valued and welcome. For more
scheduled for Sept. 23. Teen you wish to volunteer to work The monthly business meeting information call 352-473-9969 or
Night on Sept. 30 will be an all- with the youth, you will be wel- of the Lake Area Tea Party and email steve50fla@yahoo.com.
black party. comed. Fair Tax Patriots will take place
Teen Night will last from 8 on Sept. 13 at 7 p.m. at the Amer-
Learn about Management is pleased to an- p.m. to midnight at the RJE gym ican Legion Hall at 7441 S.R. 21
F- h nounce hunter safety classes in on Pine Street in Starke. The age in Keystone Heights.


0aI nMC LIII
A safe boating course pre-
sented by U.S. Coast Guard
Auxiliary Flotilla 15-5 will take
place at Bradford Lodge 35 at the
corner of Orange and Call streets
in Starke on Saturday, Sept. 10,
beginning at 8:30 a.m. The cost
to attend is $25 for books and
materials. For more information,
please contact Ken Seipp at 904-
964r2481.

Get fall garden
ideas
The Alligator Creek Garden-
ing Club will have its monthly
meeting and program on Thurs-
-day,.Sept. 15, at 6:30 p.m. in
the University of Florida IFAS
Extension Office. Come and get
ideas for fall container gardens.
For more information, con-
tact Pat Caren at 352-485-2666,
email her at pmrc423@aol.com,
or go by or call the Bradford
County/IFAS Extension Office
at 904-966-6299.

Free classes in
hunter safety
offered
Bradford County Emergency


September and Octooer. ne
first class will be at Lawtey City
Hall on Thursday, Sept. 15, start-
ing a 6 p.m., with the second day
of class on Saturday, Sept. 17, at
the Bradford Sportsmen Farm in
Graham.
Two classes are scheduled in
the Emergency Operations Cen-
ter next to the sheriff's office.
The first will be Thursday, Sept.
22, starting at 6 p.m. and finishes
up at the Bradford Sportsmen
Farm on Saturday, Oct. 1. The
second EOC class.wilt bv offered
on Thursday, Oct. 13, at 6.p.m.,
with the second day of class on
Saturday, Oct. 15, at the sports-
men farm.
The classes are free and open
to the public, and you can register
online by going to the Bradford
County Emergency Management
website at www.bradfordcoun-
tyfl.gov and clicking on Emer-
gency Information. From there
you will click on the link to the
State Fish and Wildlife Commis-
sion and go down to the class you
wish to sign up for.
Anyone with any questions
can contact the Bradford County
Emergency Management office
at 904-966-6336.


BETHEL BAPTIST CHURCH
invites you and your family to join us in praise and worship. We have Sunday
School classes for all ages. We have biblically based educational Children's /
Youth Discipleship program. Pastor Jason Cain presents an exciting message
from the Bible at each service. Nursery care provided.

Sunday School............................................................................................. 9:45am
Sunday M morning W orship .................................. ............................... 1:00am
Sunday Evening W orship......................................................................... 6:00pm
W wednesday Evening Worship................................................................... 7:00pm
CR-230A, Starke, FL 964-5117
For transportation and information call 964-6949 or 966-1710


Floridda Residents Ride the New Screamin' Gator
Ip Une for ONLY $4 9 us tax
Offer includes a full days admission to Batoriandl
Offer valid for Florda Residents lAdults 6 Childrenl with a valid 10 through
9/6 -11/20/11 and will not be extended. Full day admission to
Gatodand must be used on the same day as your zip line experience.
Proof of residency required per adult
www.gatodand.com (4071855-5496
14501 S. Orange Blossom Trail Orlando, Floridda 32837


EVERYTHING


BUT HASSLES.



Just a $100 minimum balance to avoid a monthly fee.


[i Instant Issue Visa"' Debit Card


L1 FREE Online Banking & Bill Pay
-1 FREE Mobile Banking App
C FREE Direct Deposit
LI Live Customer Service /




MERCANTILE BANK
IS NOW TD BANK.



Visit one of our 1,250+ convenient
locations from Maine to Florida




Bank

America's Most Convenient Bank


1-888-751-9000 www.tdbank.com


IL,


LONGEST HOURS LEGENDARY SERVICE HASSLE-FREE BANKING

U-b C TD Bank, NA TD Convenience Chekmng minimum daiy checking balance leqytfed as of 0309111 C 2011 Visa U SA Inc








B Section Thursday, Sept. 8, .2011 FEATURES
CRIME
SOCIALS
'OBITUARIES
EDITORIAL'
NEWS FROrM BRADFORD COUNTY, UNION COUNTY AND THE LAKE REGION




Sims: working hard to enjoy life and help others with CF


BY CLIFF SM1I 1.1I IY
I?, i., 1 News/Sports Editor
V, r i il' hr.,.' i' t
._.in to school would seem to
summon the perfect Calgon-
take-me-away moment, but for
.Lawtey native Katelyn Sims,
it's simply getting the most out
of life while she has the ability
to do so.
Sims. the 20-year-old
daughter of David and Leisa


Sims, always seems to be
busy. which is just the way she
wants it. Though she has lived
longer than some doctors
believed she would, she is
taking nothing for ;iruntedJ
knowing full well that the
disease she has lived with all
her life still has a say in how
long she lives.
"For me, I've never really
had a stopping point," Sims


said. "I know I'm only going
to be able to do so much for so
long. While I'm able to do
what I can do, I want to do it."
That includes helping others.
This month, the third annual
Cystic Fibrosis Foundation
Great Strides of Bradford
County fundraising walk will
be held Saturday, Sept. 24,
beginning at Shands Starke
with registration at 8 a.m. and


I ."' 1. '
Cowboys restaurant in Starke raised funds for the Bradford County Great Strides
event with a local celebrity night. Some well-known faces served as waiters and
waitresses, helping to raise $1,107. Participants were: (front, I-r) Vorease Jones,
Mary Powell, Cheryl Canova, Paula Register, Beth Moore, Brad Dunlap, (back, I-r)
Randy Jones, Nathan Thornton, Cowboys owner Robert Helms, Katelyn Sims, Terry
Vaughan and Gordon Smith.




Near future holds hope for


those with cystic fibrosis


BY CLIFF SMELLEY
Regional News/Sports Editor
Hopes are that through
money raised by the Cystic.
Fibrosis Foundation's Great
Strides events, a cure for cystic
fibrosis will eventually be
found, but in the meantime,
there is some promise on the
horizon of at least developing
medication that will prevent
people with cystic fibrosis
from getting any worse.
Claudia Werner, the
executive director of the Cystic
Fibrosis Foundation's Florida
Chapter-North Florida Office,
spoke at a recent Kiwanis Club
of Starke meeting to help 2009
Bradford High School
graduate Katelyn Sims
promote the upcoming third
annual Great Strides of
Bradford County, which will
be held Saturday, Sept. 24.
(See related story.) She told
the club a lot has happened in
regard to promising drug trials
since she spoke to the club
prior to last year's Great
Strides event. Two drugs,
pending approval by the
Federal Drug Administration
and more testing, could see the
light of day in the near future.
These drugs-each of which
corresponds to one of the two
mutated cystic fibrosis genes-
will not cure cystic fibrosis,
but can prevent it from getting
worse.
"What these drugs are doing
are reducing the salt in the
body, opening up the channels
so that water and saft are
flowing freely through the
cells," Werner said. "Mucus
isn't sticky. It's not thick."


These drugs would prevent
people with cystic fibrosis
from losing 1 to 2 percent of
their lung function every year.
"For little kids born today, it
could give them a normal life
span, which is pretty exciting,"
Werner said.
Werner stressed, however,
that it takes time to get drugs
approved. Plus, there's a
timeline in regard to testing the
drug on people of various age
ranges. Werner said it could be
another three to five years
before one of the drugs would
be tested on young children.
"All of that takes time, and it
all takes an awful lot of
money," Werner said. "That's
what Great Strides actually
does support."
Sims, 20,. who .tgok the
initiative to bring A Great
Strides event to Bradford
County, was diagnosed with
cystic fibrosis at the age of 4.
Doctors said she wouldn't live
beyond the age of 12. Later,
that became the age of 16.


Not only has she defied
those prognoses, but she has
quite an active lifestyle despite
her illlness. Still, Sims must
make regular trips to the
hospital, take medication and
undergo various therapies and
treatments. She loses a
percentage of her lung function
every year. Since she was
diagnosed with cystic fibrosis,
her lung function has
decreased by approximately 50
percentage points.
Sims' lung function will
continue to decrease until a
drug is approved that could
benefit her, but once such a
drug is approved, it will
prevent her lung function from
getting worse. As she put it,
"A fix is better than nothing at
all."
"My lung function's already
like 70 percent," Sims told the
Kiwanis Club members. "It's
not going to get any better.
How my life is at this moment,

See HOPE page 7B


Florida Twin Theatre

( Visit us on-line at www.FloridaTwinTheatre.com )


Starts Fri., Sept. 9
Zoe Sabrana in

COLOMBIANA
PG-13 r %i1
Fri, 7:05, 9:05
Sat, 5:00, 7:00, 9:00
Sun, 5:00, 7:05
Wed-Thurs, 7:30


FIRST COAST

CRIME


TwO


Ni
Stye Care/ll in


CRAZYSTUPIDLOVE

PG13 Fri, 7:00, 9:10
Sat, 5:30, 8:00
Sun., 4:50, 7:00
Wed-Thurs, 7:15


ERS


RIME DOESN'T PAY BUT WE DO!

REWARDS UP TO $1,000

REMAIN ANONYMOUS

1 -866-845-TIPS(8477)


www.fccrimestoppers.com
PAID FOR BY THE. FLORIDA ATTORNEY GENERAL'S OFFICE CRIME STOPPERS TRUST FUND


been active. She has competed
in multiple pageants-she was
the 2009 Bradford-Union
Strawberry Queen-and was a
cheerleader at Bradford High
School and is currently a
student at Santa Fe College.
Aside from her studies, Sims
teaches line dancing at Eight
Seconds in Gainesville and
works with student recreation
at the University of Florida
teaching dance as well.
"I've been dancing since I
was 2," Sims said. "Just by
doing that, you're used to it.
Teaching people how to dance
is fairly easy to me."
See SIMS page 4B


the event beginninc at 9 a.m.
Sims, who has c., stli fibrosis,
was instrumental in genin; a
Great Strides event started in
her community.
Money raised through Great
Strides goes toward ongoing
research of drugs that may
eventually benefit those with
the disease. In 2009, before the
inaugural event in Bradford
County, Sims told the
Telegraph-Times-Monitor that
though she may not live to see
a cure for cystic fibrosis, she
-would at least have played
some part in helping to bring
about such a cure for others so
that their childhoods won't be
like hers was.
"They won't have to grow
up with all of the hospital stays
and doctors' visits," Sims said
in the Aug. 27, 2009,
interview. "They can live a
normal life."
The first-ever Great Strides
of Bradford County was
believed by Cystic Fibrosis
Foundation personnel to be
one of the most successful
inaugural Great .Strides events
in the state.-The events have
raised a total of approximately
$31,000 the last two years,
with last year's event drawing
12 teams and a total of 222
individuals who stepped up
and supported the event in one
way or another.
"I knew it would do good in
this community," Sims said. "I
had faith in the community,
but the turnout we have every
year, the amount of dedication
everybody puts in and all the
different little things
everybody does that they don't
have to do-it's beyond what I
thought it would be."
Going above and beyond
perfectly describes Sims.
Despite regular stays in the
hospital and having to deal
with a condition that affects
her breathing, she has always


-t K



4 _


I ~IT UllA InNK I

I JUST $6.99 I
With this Coupon (Reg. $10.75)
Good thru Sept. 19, 2011

Dinner"


HAPPY NEW
a LOWER


DAYS PRICES!
ALL THE TIME ICES!
$1.50 Bottles
$2.50 Wells "Nothing on Menu
over $19.95"
Come meet the 4 "J's" Fm- 2 -
Jack, Jose, Jim Beam I CTIrtAUl iulirn


on your
New Chevrolet Truck!

Right!


S- -



NEW Z-71 SUBURBAN $55,400
SILVERADO CREW CAB


VOW TAHOE $49,800
[ k _T. !.. -. 4', '


M SRP..........................................$38,160
SALES TAX (We Pay).........$2,339
FACTORY REBATE...................$6,000
USAA MEMBER DISCOUNT..........$750
GM CARD HOLDER REWARD.......$750
BONUS CASH (expires 9/6)...........$500


-*. + :


StarkeChev
Chevrolet Monay F' cay 8.30 7


COLORADO $25,220


--- i


vrolet.com
00 Saturday 9:00 4:00


904-964-7500
Hwy 301 North
Starke, FL


& Jagermeister
in The Pub
in Shots $3.00
JUST Each
"AU The Time"
"Home of the $9.99 Prime Rib


OPEN DAILY AT 4:30
(Closed Tuesdays)
In Historic Downtown Starke
East Call St. at the Railroad Crossin,

.- ='.'.'* -.3: -l. d w.i s _. .iYij. *.-.*-, .


'9
* Li;


. L .


.,j ..


om Showing


I.





2B Telegraph, Times &1 Monitor B Section Thursday, Sept. 8, 2011


Bradford
Republicans to
meet Thursday
The Bradford County
Republican Executive
Committee will meet
Thursday, Sept. 8, in the
boardroom of Capital City
Bank in Starke at 6 p.m.
The Sept. 24 Presidency 5
straw poll in Olrando will be
discussed.
Precinct chairmen are still
needed in some areas. If you or
anyone you know is interested,
please attend this meeting.
For more information,
please call David Dodge at
352-222-8609. You may also
.visit the website
www.bradfordgop.org.
$1,000 the
winning prize at
Sept. 17 Cow
Patty Bingo
The Arc of Bradford County
hosts the seventh annual Cow
Patty Bingo on Saturday, Sept.
17, at 10 a.m. behind the Arc's
thrift store at 1365 S. Water St.
in Starke.
If the cow makes its mark on
your numbered square, you'll
win $1,000.
Tickets are $50 and may be
purchased at the Arc of
Bradford County at 1351 S.
Water St. in Starke.
You do not need to be
present to win, but the event
will include snacks, great
music and great fun..
For more information,
please call 904-964-7699.
Palms offering
free Pap tests
in Gainesville,
Trenton offices
Palms Medical Group at
Trenton and Gainesville is
offering free Pap tests to
women on Wednesday, Sept.
2L, at the Trenton facility and
on Thursday, Sept. 22, at the
Gainesville facility from 1 to 4


p.m. No appointment is
necessary, and walk-ins are
welcome.
The Pap test is one of the
most reliable and effective
cancer screening tests
available. Women should start
getting regular Pap tests at age
21, or within three years of the
first time they have sex-
whichever happens first,
according to the Centers for
Disease Control and
Prevention.
To encourage more women
to get a Pap test, Palms offers
this low-cost, one-day clinic
once a month at one of its
office locations. Palms
Medical Group has offices in
Bell, Branford, Chiefland,
Gainesville, Starke, Trenton
and Williston.
The Trenton office is located
at 911 S. Main St.-call 352-
463-2374 for more
information-while the
Gainesville office is located at
1010 N.W. Eighth Ave.-call
352-376-8211.
To learn more about Palms
Medical Group and upcoming
dates and locations of the Pap
test clinics, visit
www.palmsmg.org.

Baker County to
celebrate 150
years Sept. 24
The Baker County
Sesquicentennial Committee is
planning a one-day celebration
of Baker County's 1501h
anniversary on Saturday, Sept.
24, in Macclenny.
An all-day affair is planned,
beginning with a parade at
10:30 a.m. and ending that
evening with a street dance,
which will feature Nashville-
country bands.
Demonstrators, reenactors
and live entertainment will be
available all day in downtown
Macclenny.
If you would like more
information, or would like to
be a vendor or a parade
participants, ,please call 904-
259-1861, or go to the website
www. 150yearsofbaker.com.


Socials


Amy Stanley and
Bryan Blackburn


Stanley,
Blackburn to
wed in
September
Amy Lyn Stanley of
Keystone Heights and Bryan
Blackburn of Starke, announce
their engagement and
upcoming wedding.
Stanley is the daughter of
Glenn and Lyn Stanley of
Keystone Heights. Blackburn
is the son of Frankie and
Sheila Blackburn of Starke.
The wedding will take place
at Trinity Baptist Church of
Keystone Heights on Saturday,
Sept. 10, 2011, at 4 p.m.
Family and friends are invited
to attend.


C&S OUTI
SYour Complete

YO sNII


I
r--
I

I


Hannah Hayes and
Charles Williams


Hayes, Williams
to wed Oct. 22
Mr. and Mrs. Doug Coburn
announce the engagement and
approaching marriage of their
-daughter, Hannah Alayne
Hayes to Charles Christopher
Williams, son of Bert Williams
Sr. and Linda Baxter.
The bride-elect is a 2008
graduate of Union County
High School and is currently
employed at Windsor Manor
Nursing Homre in Starke. The
groom-elect is a 2008 graduate
of Bradford County High
School and is currently
employed at Camp Blanding
Joint Training Center.
The wedding is planned for
Oct. 22, 2011.


G-------
)OORS, INC.
Hunting Store"

PORRnSRnOWS


CROSSBOW ACCESSORIES

10% OFF with this AD!!

1455 W. Main St. '-2 7 Mon-Sat
eakea Butler, FL 3 8-26


UCI to host ACS,
Relay for Life
fundraising golf
tournament
Union Correctional
Institution will host the
inaugural Chip in for a Cure
golf tournament on Friday,
Sept. 23, at the Starke Golf and
Country Club.
The tournament, which will
benefit the American Cancer
Society Relay for Life, will be
composed of two flights, with
the first teeing off at 8:30 a.m.
and the second at 1:30 p.m_.
Four-person teams can
compete at a cost of $40 per
player. Goodie bags and lunch,
which will be served at noon,
are included. Lunch will


consist of fried fisht or shrimp,
grits or french fries, cole slaw,
hush puppies and tea, water or
lemonade.
There will be door prizes
and trophies awarded for,first,
second and third place. -
Mulligans will be available
for $5 each or $10 for three.
Please call Meredith Cox or
Tina Morgan at 386-431-2120
to register your team. Entry
fees, which must be paid in
full prior to the tournament,
may be'paid at the lobby of the
Union Correctional Institution
administration building
Monday-Friday between the
hours of 8 a.m. and 9 a.m., I
p.m. and 2 p.m., and 4 p.m.
and 5 p.m.
Checks should be made
payable to Relay for Life.


He hasn't an enemy in the world-but all his friends
hate him. -Eddie Cantor
FREDRICK DOUGLASS FAMILY REUNION.
Sunday, Sept. 18th, 2011
Lake Butler Community Center
155 NW Third Street, Lake Butler, FL 32054
HOURS: 11:30 am to 3:00 pm Luncheon at 12:30 pm
In Lake Butler, off State Road 100 turn north on Lake Avenue at ,
the Courthouse. The Commuinity Center is at the lake.
We encourage you to come
and ask you to bring a covered dish to share.


c Spoiled Rotten Dogz

LO SPA BOUT/Q
S 352-235-7842
529 S. Water St. (SR-100 East) .
Starke, FL
Megan Engelhorn ~ Professional Groomer
1st 100 Clients
j GET A FREE I
SPA PACKAGE!


610 S.W. 6th STREET LAKE BUTLER, FL


GQINT TROCKLO6D
16a


S6LLE


FRESH EXTRA LEAN
GROUND
CHUCK

S19tLB
10 LBS OR MORE .
TENDER LEAN
PORK
SPAME RIBS


3 PER PACK
DL LEE
SMOKED
PICNICS


CORN
DOGS

$399
3LB..BOX


USDA WHOLE
BONELESS
RIB-EYES

$39 LB
SLICED FREE
NETTLES ( MILD or HOT)
SMOKED
SAUSAGE

$8O9LB
3 LB PKG
IQF
TILAPIA
FILETS

16"99
5 LB. BAG


ZIPLOC SWEET BABY RAY'S
FREEZER BAR-B-QUE
BAGS SAUCE

2?6 2/I3
18 CT. GALLON BONUS PACK ALL VARIETIES


WHOLE
BONELESS
PORK LOIN

$2 59.LB
SLICED FREE
NETTLES FRESH LINK
BUN SIZE
SAUSAGE


5 LB BOX
SUNSET FARMS
BUN SIZE
SMOKED SAUSAGE

*1299
5 LB. PKG


UNCLE RAY'S
POTATO
CHIPS

5/$5
ALL VARIETIES
6 OZ. SIZE


USDA WHOLE
BONELESS
TOP SIRLOINS


SLICED FREE
FRESH N TENDER
PORK
RIBLETS
$1199
10 LB. BOX
DL LEE
THICK SLICED

BACON
s2699 10 LB.
$2 BOX


BAR-S

JUMBO

FRANKS

7/10
16 OZ. PKG


SANDERSON FARMS
LEG
QUARTERS
$1999
40 LB. BOX
DL LEE
FRESH MILD& HOT
ROLLSAUSAGE

6 ROLLS/IlO


WINGS

2512
5 LB. BAG


BAR-S REGULAR OR THICK
SLICED
BOLOGNA

7610Z
16 OZ. PKG


COTTAGE BRAND

SLICED

BACON

1210
12 OZ. PKS


FRESH LEAN WHOLE
BOSTON
BUTTS
ST.49LB
2 PER PACK
REALTREE
WHOLE
QUAIL
$699
4 CT. PKG
CURTIS BREADED
CHICKENNUOGGETS

orTENDERS
$10 5sLB.
S BAG


CLIFTY FARMS
BONELESS END SLICES
COUNTRY

HAM

3/12
20 0Z. PKG


f I
iiiiiiiiiiiiiiq


SPIRES






Thursday, Sept. 8, 2011 Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section -3



EIB testing brings Florida infantrymen 'back to the basics'


BY PFC LINDSEY JONES
and SGT..15s CLASS
BLAIR HEUSDENS
Florida National Guard
Public Affairs
In late July, 99 soldiers from
the 53rd Infantry Brigade
Combat Team set out on a
journey many infantrymen
take, but few complete with
success.
For the first time in more
then 20 years, the Florida
National Guard conducted
testing at Camp Blanding Joint
Training Center for the Expert
Infantryman Badge, a coveted
award and symbol of tradition
tor U.S. soldiers who accept
the difficult and sometimes
thankless job of infantrymen.
As the sun rose July 22 and
the soldiers finished a 12-mile
road march-the last in a
week's worth of grueling
tasks-17 men stood proud.
having completed all of the
requirements to receive the
badge.
"Today, these 17 soldiers in
front of me earned this coveted
badge," Col. Thad Hill, the
brigade commander, said
during the award ceremony.


A soldier from the 53rd Infantry Brigade Combat Team throws a simulated grenade
during Expert Infantryman Badge testing. Photo by Sgt. 1st Class Blair Heusdens.


"Like those before you and
those who graded your efforts,
you have risen to the challenge
of upholding an enduring
legacy and lineage of
professionalism within our


field of infantry. To be a
holder of the EIB stands out as
a mark of excellence."
The decision to conduct the
EIB testing this year was an
effort by brigade leadership to


bring the training focus back to
basic infantry skills. The
brigade recently returned from
a yearlong deployment to
Kuwait and is in the reset year
of the ARFORGEN cycle,


Seeking help won't end military career


Call it a change in thinking,
a shift in culture or the effects b
of years of studies; the military i,
is now stressing the a
importance of mental health tl
and making it a priority tl
throughout the force. s
Ongoing stressors on our so
soldiers, airmen, sailors and
Marines have brought to the
forefront the importance of
taking care of service
members' mental ailments in
addition to physical injuries.
"I think nationwide we're
experiencing a tremendous
amount of stress due to the
long-term deployment
engagement of the overall
military," said Michael
McFarland, the director of
psychological health for the
Florida National Guard. "The
(operations tempofor ou'r men ..,
and women in the Guard is
tremendous, and that creates a
lot of stress."
The leadership of the Florida
National Guard wants you to
know that your mental health
is important and seeking help
isn't a sign of weakness and
won't end your career as a
soldier or airman.
"We've chosen this
occupation," said Command
Sgt. Maj. Michael Hosford, the
state command sergeant major.
"It's not the easiest occupation
in the world, and there.are a lot
of stressors out there. If you
can't look past a temporary
adversity to seeing the light for
tomorrow, then we need to get
you the tools to help you get
there."
What was once a source of
stigma and shame for
soldiers-seeking help for
mental health-related issues-
is slowly becoming not only an
acceptable course of action,



LEGALS
BRADFORD COUNTY
REQUEST FOR BIDS:
SURPLUS VEHICLES
Bradford County is accepting bids
on surplus vehicles. A detailed
listing and forms for submittals of
bids may be obtained from the
Office of the County Manager at
the Bradford County Courthouse at
945 North Temple Avenue, or by
calling Rachel Rhoden at (904)
966-6327. Inspection of all items
may be arranged by calling Paul
Funderburk or Pete Eberlin at the
County Road Department at (904)
966-6243. All Bids Must Be On The
Forms Provided By The County,
Must Be In -Sealed Envelopes
Clearly Marked "SEALED BIDS",
And Must Be Received No Later
Than 10:00 a.m. on Thursday,
September 15, 2011. Bids may be
hand delivered to the Office of the
County Clerk in the Bradford
County ,Courthouse at 945 North
Temple Avenue, Starke, Florida or
mailed to the Bradford County
Clerk, P.O. Drawer B, Starke,
Florida 32091. Employees and
Immediate Family Members of
Bradford County Are Not Permitted
to Place Bids on Surplus Vehicles
or Property as Advertised Herein.
Bids will be opened in public at
10:15 a.m. on Thursday,
September 15, 2011, in the
Commission Meeting Room
located in the north wing of the
Bradford County Courthouse.
Successful bidders will be
contacted as soon as bid
evaluations are completed.
Bradford Couity reserved the right
to reject any and all bids.
9/1 2tchg 9/8-B-sect


but a necessary and important
tep for a soldier or airman's
areer progression and upward
nobility.
"It's important to seek help
because behavioral health
issues generally just don't go
way," McFarland said. "Once
hey begin to emerge-once
here begins to be that
truggle-you're going to need
ome support."
According to McFarland, the


earlier you can make an
intervention when it comes to
behavioral health, the easier it
is for that intervention and the
more likely it is for things to
be addressed in a very
successful way.
"If we let things go too long,
then the soldier may be
compromised for an extended
period of time," McFarland
said. "The way to minimize
that is the first time that you


only $99'Dow


O *' I I

2003 FORD TAURUS SES


PW, PL, w04
Tilt & Cruise,
Power Seat, Alloy
Wheels, Spoiler,
Very Sporty 4-Dr,
#15479






2003 CHEVROLET MONTE CARLO SS

Very Sporty,
Super Clean!
All Power -
Options,
Warranty
Available
Reduced Down
Payment!
#15145


have a sense that things are not
going well, reach out and get
help, and generally it can be
taken care of fairly quickly."
McFarland likens reaching
out and asking for help to skill
development. Just as no soldier
develops the ability to be battle
ready on his own, the same is
true when it comes to
behavioral health. Different

See HELP page 5B


where the focus i, on
individual soldiers and
individual training.
"After we got back from
deployment, we realized that
we needed to hone our
infantryman skills," Hill said.
"I call it going back to the
fundamentals-knowing your
lane, knowing specific MOS
responsibilities. It was a
perfect opportunity for us to
look at using the EIB testing as
a way to hone back in on the
core competencies of the
infantrymen that make up the
brigade."
The EIB testing combined


m


several training events into c...
week. Prior to the start of the
testing period, soldiers. 'were
required to qualify expert with
their M4 assault rifles. On day
one, the infantrymen took the
Army Physical Fitness Test
and were required to pass the
push-ups, sit-ups and the 2-
mile run with at least 75 points
in each'event.
Soldiers were also tested in
their land-navigation skills;
both' during the day and at
night. Each participant had two
hours to find three of the four

See TESTING page 8B


Back & Neck Pain Clinic

"Modern methods
with old-fashioned concern"


* Auto Accidents
* Work Injuries
* Headaches
* Neck and Back Pain


Call Pr. Berry

Serving the Area for 21 Years


601 E. Call St.
Hwy. 230, Starke


964-8018


R BUY HERE PAY HERE!
Units arriving each week!
LOW DOWN...LOW PAYMENTS!



2002 SATURN LW300 4-DOOR WAGON

Super Nice Car... .,
in and Out!
All Options, -
Including Leather!
#15480 .


2002 JEEP GRAND CHERKEE



All Power, AM
FM/CD,
Alloy Wheels,
Very Nice, .
6 cyl,
Automatic,
#15460




2000 TOYOTA CAMRY


PW, PL, Tilt,
CD/Cass,
Super Clean &
Only 59k Miles!
3 yr. or 36k
Warranty
Available
#15494
<.


AUTO SALES


ALL SALES PLUS TAX, TAG, TITLE & REGISTRATION FEES. WITH APPROVED CREDIT
SALtAESPLSTAkeA,,iTE& EISRlI. EE.WIH2PROED9EDT


BY SGT. 1sT CLASS
BLAIR HEUSDENS
Florida National Guard
Public Affairs


b
s
c








48 Telegraph, Times 6& Monitor B Section Thursday, Sept. 8, 2011


SIMS
Continued from Page 1B

Sims also works at Say I Do
Bridal in downtown Starke.
It makes for a busy schedule,
to be sure, but Sims knows
what she can handle and when
to draw a line.
"As long as you can
mentally and emotionally
handle it, I really don't think a
peson can have too much on
their plate," she said.
It helps that Sims and her
family know what it is she is
battling-something that was
unknown in the early stages of
Sims' life.

From life of mystery to
life with known illness
* In the two years prior to
being diagnosed with cystic
fibrosis at the age of 4, Sims
was taken to see doctors 27.
times. Her mother, Leisa,
knew something was wrong
with her daughter. Being sick
was a constant. The coughing
fits seemed to be never ending.
Plus, her daughter simply
wasn't developing and
growing as she should, Leisa
said. Katelyn weighed 23
pounds at 3.5 years of age.
That weight never changed
over the course of a year.
Bronchitis, respiratory
infection, flu, pneumonia-
Leisa heard all the various
diagnoses of what was wrong
with her daughter. She
believed them at first since
Katelyn would respond to
medications.
She would never stay well,
though, so Leisa began
challenging the diagnoses,
prompting a doctor to tell her
she was the most paranoid
mother he had even
encountered and that she
needed to believe what he was
telling her because he was the
doctor and she was not.
Leisa's response was that
she would take her child
elsewhere. She had a feeling
thatcher daughter didn't have
much time if she didn't find
out what was really wrong
with her.
The only problem was, Leisa
didn't know where to turn.
However, she had an
uphostery business at the time
and was doing work for the
offices of Dr. George Restea
and nurse practitioner Anne
Perantoni. Leisa asked
Perantoni if she could take a
quick look at Katelyn.
It was a quick look as
Perantoni soon suspected what
other doctors had not-that
Katelyn had cystic fibrosis. In
five minutes, Perantoni made
note of Katelyn's clubbing
digits-the spread of fingers
and toes due to lack of
oxygen-deep chest cavity and
protruding stomach. She told
Leisa to have Katelyn tested to
confirm that she had cystic
fibrosis.
A sweat test later confirmed
it. People with cystic fibrosis
have an increased amount of
salt in their sweat.
"If you go by and look at her
after she's been out in the sun
for a half hour or so, you will
see what appears to be sand on
her forehead," Leisa said in
regard to her daughter in an
Aug. 27, 2009, Times-
Telegraph-Monitor interview.
"It's actuallysalt crystals. She
sweats pure salt crystals."
Finally, the family knew
what was wrong with Katelyn.
That did not mean things went


~he


- -.1'


easy for her afterward. There
was. the trauma, for example.
of having an IV line inserted
by a nurse who did not use a
topical numbing agent. It was a
painful, scary incident for the
little girl who had never
undergone such an ordeal.
Katelyn had to be restrained by
a team of six nurses the next
three times she had to have IV
lines inserted.
Another incident had a nurse
making a visit to the Sims'
home and administering IV
medication without performing
a heparin lock flush, which
helps keep catheters open and
flowing freely. The result was
that Katelyn had to go to the
hospital to have a central line
reinserted.
No wonder, then, that
Katelyn had nightmares about
needles and IVs for years, Yet
there proved to be one more
traumatic incident. Katelyn
was 12 and having a
peripherally inserted central
catheter removed. The last 4
inches of the line snapped,
which resulted in Katelyn
having to undergo a heart
catheterization. She had to be
resuscitated three times during
the ordeal.
"For her to do everything
she does now is amazing to me
because of the things I've seen
her go through," Leisa told the
Telegraph-Times-Monitor in
2009. "Just the fact that she's
even halfway sane, honestly, is
an amazing thing."
There have been 'other
ordeals and frustrations along
the way, with one of the most
aggravating things being that it
has been-and is-difficult for
Katelyn to make long-range
plans *due to regular hospital
stays for IV medication,
breathing treatments and
respiratory and physical
therapy.
On top of that, there are


Located in Downtown Starke

Next to Wainwright Park
Call Cathey Pitts, Administrator, For Directions

(904) 964-2220
^1


unplanned visits to the
hospital, such as when Katelyn
was sick with an MAI
bacterial-or non-tuberculosis
mycobacterium- infection last
year.
"It's very, very aggravating
because you never know,"
Katelyn said about the timing
of her illnesses in a 2009
interview.
She stillmakes do, however.
One hospital stay occurred
before she was to compete in a
pageant. She simply found a
vacant room of the hospital in
which to practice -her talent
routine.
Then there was homecoming
of her senior year at Bradford
High School. She entered the
hospital earlier than she
normally would for routine
treatments and therapy so that
she would not miss out on the
festivities. She was part of the
homecoming court, plus she
wanted to be on the field with
her fellow varsity cheerleaders
since she was one of the
captains.
"I had 25 cheerleaders
counting on me to be there,"
Kately was quoted as saying in
2009. "I got put in the hospital
the week before just so I could
make it to homecoming. I had
to go right back in after
homecoming."
Graduating from .high
school, let alone taking part in
homecoming festivities and
being a member of the
cheerleading squad, was an
accomplishment as doctors'
prognoses had Katelyn not
living beyond the age of 12
and then later the age of 16.
In her Aug. 27, 2009,
interview with the Telegraph-
Times-Monitor, Katelyn said,
"I learned at a young age that
doctors aren't always right."
Now, Katelyn is getting
ready to get used to a new set
of doctors. She recently made


Katelyn Sims (right) is pictured with her mother,
Leisa.

Deied ~nSocial ?Security Disaility



No Runaround No Hassle
GBIS Disability, Inc Free Consultation



20 years Social Security Disability Experience
www.GBISOnline.com


care and wetileing of yout elders

very important to the staff at







Assisted Living Facility


Apr -
for' '


Walkers set out during the inaugural Bradford County Great Strides event in 2009.


her last visit to the Nemours
children's clinic in
Jacksonville, where she has
been going since she was
diagnosed with cystic fibrosis
at the age of 4. She will now
go to an adult clinic in
Gainesville, where one of her
doctors will be Runi Foster.
Katelyn said she won't miss
being treated like a child at
Nemours, but said it will be
hard to .leave behind the
doctors who have been a part
of her life for so long.
"I'll miss my doctors,"
Katelyn said. "They all went to
my graduation and pageants
and stuff."
And just like those doctors
attended such events in their
patient's life, others who have
met Katelyn show their
support by participating or
donating to Great Strides of
Bradford County. For
example, those whom she
works with at UF teaching
dance have formed a team,
while people such as Robert
Helms, the owner of Cowboys
- in Starke continues to support
the event by providing free
food for participants.
Katelyn used to work as a


--I. I


Dr. Martin Slaughter

Open 9 to 12, 2 6pm
Mon, Tues, Wed, Fri, Thurs 9-1


waitress at Cowboys #nd can't
say enough about Helms, who
would always call Katelyn
whenever she was in the
hospital and ask if there was
anything he could do for her.
"He's kind of like a second
parent," Katelyn said. "He's
always done a lot more than
what anybody's asked him to
do."
The Bradford County event
is also supported by Sonny's (a
former employer of Katelyn),
which provides drinks, and the
cadets of the Florida Youth
Challenge Academy- a
voluntary program for at-risk
teenagers at Camp Blanding.
Cadets, serve as volunteers,
doing such things as helping
people sign up to encouraging
walkers as they pass by.

"They work hard," Katelyn
said of the cadets. "They do a
really great job."
There are so many others
involved in some way. As
Katelyn" said, the support
doesn't surprise her, but that
doesn't mean it doesn't make
in impression on her.
"I':n excited (about this
year's event)," she said. "More


Treating
S* Auto Accident injuries
Sports & Work Injuries
Headaches
Neck & Back Pain


Starke

Chiropractic
225 South Orange St.
12 Starke, Florida


people show up every year."
If you would like to get
involved in Great Strides,
either by registering a team or
making a donation, you may
do so at www.cff.org. Click on
the "Great Strides" tab, then
enter the state and host chapter
prompts. The host chapter is
the Florida Chapter-North
Florida Office.
Registration can be done at
the event, where donations will
be accepted also.
It's all about helping to find
a cure, but in the meantime,
Katelyn encourages parents of
children with cystic fibrosis to
allow them to live their lives to
the fullest. Some parents, she
said, may tend to want to
prohibit their children' from
being active, thinking that by
doing so, they will have their
children with them longer.
"If you're babying your
child and not letting them get
out and experience life, it's not
going to be the best thing for
them," Katelyn said. "That
defeats the whole- living-life-
to-the-fullest concept. If you
don't get out there and do what
you want to do, what's the
point of living?"


STARKE HOME

PATIO SHOW


Search


Amateur talent Contest



Children's Category Tuesday, October 4th at 7:30 pr
Ages 5 11

Junior Category Wednesday, October 5th at 8:00 plh. T /16Pt Co 1
Ages 12 17

Adult Category Thursday, October 6th at 8:00 pm
Ages 18 and up

TOP WINNERS OF EACH CATEGORY WILL COMPETE ON SATURDAY,
OCTOBER 8TH AT 8:00 PM FOR THE ALL AROUND 2011 BAKER COUNTY
FAIR STAR SEARCH WINNER. A


Baker County Fair Grounds
Applications due by September 20th
Mail applications to

Baker County Fair
PO Box 492
Macclenny, FL 32063


Out of.town judges
Contestants will be judged on talent, originality and presentation.


$25 Sponsorship is required to enter.
r-------------------------------
Name:______
Mailing address:
Phone:
Talent __
No. of participants_____ _

Child Junior Adult
Please check which category you will be participating in.

When your application is received you will be notified by the fair association


904-368-0011 1[


Baker County Fair Star


YOUR DECISION REGARDING WHO WILL HELP

CARE FOR YOUR LOVED ONE IS IMPORTANT




Our room rate is $2,350 per month

for all aspects of our care.

*Assessment of each individual's needs and abilities is required before admitting.








Thursday, Sept. 8, 2011 Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section 1



SObituaries :


David Butler


David Butler
KEYSTONE HEIGHTS-
David Russell Butler, 51, of
Keystone Heights, passed away on
.Wednesday, Aug. 31, 2011, at
North Florida Regional Medical
Center.
He was born in Gainesville on
Sept. 17, 1959, to the late David
Russell Butler Sr. and Maude E.
Neeley. David enjoyed being at
home spending time with his
family. When he wasn't home, he
enjoyed fishing and going to the
shooting range. He was preceded
in death by: his brothers, Charles
Butler and Howard Butler; and his
sister, Bertha Whittenburg.
He is survived by: his wife of
20 years, Kim Butler of Keystone
Heights; his children, David R.
Butler Ill and Brittany G. Butler
of Keystone Heights; his brother,
D.J. Butler; his sister, Hazel
Harris; and his mother and father-
in-law, Dudley and Pat Smith.
The family will have a
'celebration of life gathering at the
family's home in Keystone
Heights on Saturday, Sept. 17, at I
p.m. Arrangements are under the
care of Archie Tanner Funeral
Services of Starke. Visit
www.archietannerfuneralservices.
corn to sign the family's guest
book.
PAID OBITUARY

Arrie Futch
STARKE-Arrie Mae
Browning Futch, 64, of Starke,
died Thursday, Sept. 1, 2011, at
her residence.
Mrs. Futch was born on Nov. 1,
1946, in Starke, to the late Willard
and Louise Thomas Browning and
was a lifelong area resident. She
was a founding member of
Sampson City Baptist Church, and
was a retired assembler. She was
preceded in death by: her brother,
Irving Browning; and her sisters,
Wanda Chitty and Annie Lou
Thomas.
Mrs. Futch is survived by: her
husband of 45 years, Robert Futch
of Starke; her daughter, Angela
Alford of Interlachen; her twin
sister, Murley (Gerald)
Blankenship; hejt-brothers, Vollif
(Debbie) Brow.ni,.gnrrd- George
Browning, all of Starle; and tWfee'
grandchildren.
Funeral services were held on
Sept. 3, in the Dewitt C. Jones
chapel in.Starke with Pastor Glenn
Cathy officiating. Interment
.followed in Sapp Cemetery in
Raiford. Arrangements are by
'Jones-Gallagher Funeial Home of
Starke.


She is survived by: her
children, Jim (Merry) Hess of
Hampton and Linda Hess of Lake
Butler; her brother, Charlie
Daniel; her sister, .Mary Kay
Hurd; her five grandchildren and
eight great-grandchildren.
Funeral services were held on
Sept. 3, at Archie Tanner Funeral
Services with Pastor Kyle
Harrison officiating. Interment
followed at Crosby Lake
Cemetery. The family received
friends on Saturday one hour prior
to the service at the funeral home.
In lieu of flowers, please make
donations to the Office of
Development, Shriners Hospitals
for Children, 2900 Rocky Point
Dr., Tampa, FL 33607.
Arrangements are under the care
of Archie Tanner Funeral Services
of Starke. Visit
www.archietannerfuneralservices.
com to sign the family's guest
book.
PAID OBITUARY


George Koehler
STARKE-George Henry
Koehler, 64, of Starke, passed
away on Thursday, Sept. 1, 2011,
at Memorial Hospital in
Jacksonville.
He was born in Baltimore, Md.,
on Sept. 25, 1946, to the late
Henry Clay Koehler and Eula lnez
Singletary Koehler. He has been a
resident of Starke since 1970, after
moving from Baltimore.
Mr. Koehler is survived by: his
wife of 23 years, Della Koehler of
Starke; his children, April (James)
Coffman of Middleburg, Tonya
Koehler of Hampton, Abygail
Koehler of Starke, Henry Koehler
of Tennessee, George Koehler of
Hilliard, John Hartsuff of Alaska,
'and William fHartsuff of Live Oak;
"his b?6thb te d6fi'gs'Koehler of
Fort McCoy, Kenneth (Patricia)
Koehler of Starke, and Dale
Koehler of Clermont; his sisters,
Sherrie (Terry) Gayle of
Macclenny, Gail (Ralph) Vamum
of Hampton, and Peggy Louise
Sullivan of Baltimore; his 16
grandchildren and five great-
grandchildren.
Memorial services will be held
on Friday, Sept. 9, at 11 a.m. at
Hampton Christian Church. with
Pastor John Hodges officiating.
Arrangements are under the care
and direction of Archie Tanner
Funeral Services of Starke. Visit.
www.archietannerfuneralservices.
corn to sign the family's guest
book.
PAID OBITUARY


Hazel Newton
KEYSTONE HEIGHTS-
Hazel Elliott Newton. 90. of
Keystone Heights. died on
Saturday, Sept. 3, 2011. at Hav en
Hospice York Care in Gainess ille.
Mrs. Newton was born on Oct.
2, 1920, in Georgia to the late
William Elliott and Annie Lou
McMullen and lied in
Jacksonville for the majority df
her life.
Mrs. Newton was preceded in
death by: her husband of 65 years,
Mr. Ellis E. Newton. She is
survived by: her children, W. Earl
Newton of Jacksonville, Elaine
Perry of Keystone Heights, Gloria
Driver of Tupelo, Miss., Steve
(Ellen) Newton of Jacksonville,
and Ike Newton; her two brothers,
Robert Elliott of Lakeland, and
John Elliott of Barwick, Ga.; 13
grandchildren, 18 great-
grandchildren and two great-great-
grandchildren.
Funeral services were held on
Sept. 7, in the Jones-Gallagher
Funeral Home chapel in Keystone
Heights. Interment followed at the
Keystone Cemetery.
Memorial contributions may be
sent to E.T. York Hospice Care
Center, 4200 N.W. 90' Blvd.,
Gainesville, FL 32606.
Arrangements are under the care
of Jones-Gallagher Funeral Home
of Keystone Heights. Online
condolences may be left at
www.jonesgallagherfh.com.


Norma Reed


Norma Reed
HAMPTON-Norma Jean
Reed, 67, of Hampton, passed
away on Wednesday, Aug. 31,
2011, at Shands Starke. with
family by her side.
She was born on Jan. 2, 1944,
in Gainesville, to the late John
Roger Powell and Ruby
Hodgkins-Powell. Norma lived in
Bradford.County for over 30 years
and enjoyed cooking, playing
bingo, and yard-sellitig. She loved
her friends: and loved to have
everyone over on Sundays through
the years.
She retired from Dr. George
Restea's office after 15 years and
she will be greatly missed by
everyone there. Norma was
preceded in death by: her husband,
Freeman Reed; and. daughter,
Janet Somnitz.
She is survived by: her
children, John (Laurie) Copeland
of Orlando, Leslie Wheatley and
Darrell Crane Sr. of Starke; her
brothers, Roger (Sybil) Powell of
Tallahassee and Coy (Debbie)
Powell of Texas; C her
grandchildren, Kailey Copeland,


Chanston Wheatles. Darrell Crane
Jr., Chnstopher Crane and Katie
Crane: a grea:-granddaughter,
Myah Handle.: her cousin. Bobby
Nickles: and good friends. Kath\
Dawkins, Diane Goetzman.
Arlene Clemons, Jeanette Mood\.
and many more-too numerous to
list.
Funeral services were held on
Sept. 8, at Archie Tanner Funeral
Services with Pastor John Hodges
officiating. The family received
friends prior to the service at the
funeral home. In lieu of flowers,
please make donations to the
funeral home to assist with
expenses. Arrangements are under
the care of Archie Tanner Funeral
Services of Starke. Visit
www.archietannerfuneralservices.
com to sign the family's guest
book.
PAID OBITUARY

John Roberson
KEYSTONE HEIGHTS-John
Nicholas Roberson Sr., 66, of
Keystone Heights, died on
-Sunday, Sept. 4, 2011, in
Gainesville following an extended
illness.
Mr. Roberson was born on
March 9, 1945, in Cincinnati,
Ohio, to the late John and Barbara
Westoff Roberson and had retired
as a communications technician.
He had been a resident of the area
since 2000 and was a member of
First Baptist Church of Keystone
Heights.
He is survived by: his wife of
27 years, Carole Ann Roberson of
Keystone Heights; his children,
John Nicholas Roberson Jr. of
Deland, Nichola Jean Roberson
and Tracy Nelson, both of Winter
Park, and William Nelson of
Keystone Heights; his siblings,
Donna Mora of Prim Brook Pines,
Jeff Roberson of Davy, Butch
Roberson of Craivfordville, and
Teresa Keller of Starke; and five
grandchildren.
Memorial services were held on
Sept. 8, in the First Baptist Church
of Keystone Heights with Pastor
Jim Prose officiating. In lieu of
flowers, the family is requesting
contributions be made to the St.
Jude Children's Hospital, 501 St.
Jude Place, Memphis, TN 38105.
Arrangements are under the care
of Jones-Gallagher Funeral Homie
of Keystone Heights.

Sarah Torode
KINGSLEY LAKE-Mrs.
Sarah Elizabeth Torode, 88, of
Kingsley Lake passed away on.
*Monday, Sept. 5, 2011, at the
- Windsor Manor Nursing Home in
Starke.
She was bhorion Aug. I 1, 1923,
to the late Charles William and
Minie Mitchell Peythress, and was
a homemaker. Mrs. Torode had
been a longtime resident of the
area and was a member of the
First United Methodist Church of
Starke-where she was a member of
the Women's Circle and taught
Sunday school for many years.
Mrs. Torode was also a past
member of the Jr. Woman's Club
and the Woman's Club of Starke.
She was preceded in death by her
-husband, Mr. John A. Torode in
2001.
She is survived by: their
children, Sally Torode of
Jacksonville, John (Tracy) Torode
and Richard Torode, all of Starke,
and Carl (Christie) Torode of


Kingsle\ Lake: a sister, Luta
Kilgo of Macclenny: and
grandchildren, Megan, Mary,
Shelles, Amanda, Shauna and
R\ an Sean Welch.
A viewing was held on Sept. 7,
in the Dewitt C. Jones chapel.
Funeral services \were held on
Sept. 8, in the First United
Methodist Church of Starke with
Pastor Mike Moore officiating.
Burial followed at Kingsley Lake
Cemetery. In lieu of flowers,
contributions may be made to the
Methodist Children's Home or the
Methodist Youth Dept., PO Box
157, Starke, FL 32091.
Arrangements are under the care
of Jones-Gallagher Funeral Home
of Starke.
PAID OBITUARY

Michael Walker
BROOKER-Michael David
Walker, 49, of Brooker, died at his
residence on Tuesday, Aug. 30,
2011, after an'extended illness.
Mr. Walker was born in Tifton,
Ga., and lived in Gainesville until
moving to Brooker seven years


HELP
Continued from Page 3B


methods of coping and
handling difficult situations
can and should be learned and
developed by the soldier.
Seeking treatment for a
mental health condition cannot
alone be a reason to discharge
a soldier or airmen, or prevent
a soldier or airmen from being
promoted. In fact, being
discriminated against for
having'a medical .condition is
illegal.
However, failure to get
treatment for a mental health
condition resulting in severe
misconduct can have negative
impacts on a soldier's career.

'It'.s-.no. different than a
broken limb or a pinched .nerve
.dr any other illness that would
affect the body," Hosford said.
"This one just affects the mind.
So we get the soldier the
professional help that they
need; and we bring them right
back and get them back in our
formations."
Even family members
. shouldn't be afraid to contact a
Guardsman's chain of
command or McFarland
himself to report any unusual
behavior. Often, families are
the first to spot potential
problems in their service
member.
"Overall, I think the threat
of negative impact for career
development is pretty minimal
nowadays," McFarland said. "I
can think of so many cases
I've been involved, in where
it's not been a career breaker
for anyone. In fact, because of


ago. He was employed with Perry
Roofing Company of Gainesville
for several years as a roofer. He
was a member of the Church of
God of Prophecy in Brooker. He
was preceded in death by his
father, Monroe L. Walker.
Mr. Walker is survived by: his
wife of 31 years. Mary Ellen
Walker of Brooker;. five sons,
John W. (Dede) Raulerson of
Brooker, Michael C. Walker and
Cecil E. Walker, both of Brooker,
Michael David Walker Jr. of
Gainesville, and Billy (Brittany)
Walker of Hampton; his mother,
Betsy Watson Walker of Brooker;
a sister, Dolly J. Robinson of
Brooker; and two brothers,
Monroe L. (Donna) Walker of
Gainesville and Murray D. (Fawn)
Walker of Worthington Springs. ; :
Funeral services were held on
Sept. 6, in the chapel of Archer
Funeral Home of Lake Butler with
the Rev. James Parker officiating.
Burial followed in Dedan
Cemetery near Brooker. Archer
Funeral Home of Lake Butler is in
charge of arrangements.


the confidentiality that the
director of psychological
health affords, many times,
addressing the issues was
totally outside of the radar of
anyone, so there was no
opportunity for it to have a
negative career impact."
Hosford feels that keeping
soldiers and airmen who are
receiving. mental health
treatment in the Guard will
reduce the stigma associated
with mental health illness and
treatment.
"When people see that
people aren't thrown out of the
system-that they did get help
and that they were brought
back in-you take that
stigmatism out of there,"
Hosford said.
Hosford would like for
soldiers and airmen to never
consider suicide as an option
to problems. .
"We are all of us-myself
included-going to have major
things happen to use in our
lives, and not all of them are
going to be good," Hosford
said, "but how we deal with
those bad things that happen to
us says a lot about who we are.
Sometimes, the adversity is
-just'bigger than we can handle
by ourselves.
"Before you consider
suicide, understand that ,if
you're having issues, raise
your band.-We're not going to
stigmatize you. We're going to
get you fixed and bring you
back."
McFarland can be reached at
904-823-0308. In an
emergency, soldiers, friends or
family" members can contact
the "' National Suicide
Prevention Lifeline at 800-
273-TALK (8255) or dial 911.,


' ;**






, --,- .

Betty Hess


Betty Hess
STARKE-Betty Daniel Hess,
S81, of Starke, passed away on
Wednesday, Aug. 31, 2011, at
-North Florida Regional Medical
Center with family by her side.
She was born in lrvine, Fla. on
SJan: 25, 1930, to the late David
Lawton Daniel Sr. and Nancy
Ruth Neal Daniel. Betty was very
active in the Bradford County
Recreation Department where she
assisted with concession stand
duties for most of the ball games.
She also volunteered her time at
the Bradford County Food Pantry
:'and she enjoyed making ceramics,
traveling and bird watching. Betty
was preceded in death by her
husband, Carlus Hess; and her
brother, David Lawton Daniel Jr.


Alasbinomd
Be asubsribe to ur olin

upat of.themost rcentoiture


EAT ALL YOU WANT WE'LL COOK MORE.








THE FIRST IM Itl-B-I.
soiwysbbq,.comn


For All Your Landscape Needs!

Mulch and Sit
4sB~o3"'U"U^ pine Bark ,t :


$1.75 BAG r
SBULK $20.00 yard COl'e,
4 ^^ CalforSpecials! I

TOP SOIL &
POSTING SOIL "
S "Bulk or Bag SummerRiver Rock Red Rock
Bor Summer Hours *Salt& Pepper Granite 4
4 Starting July. 5th Crushed Concrete
Mon-Fri 8 am 5 pm Railroad Ties 4
S8am- 3 pm Horse Bedding
Sat 8 am 3:30 pm Landscape Timbers


STARRE LANDSCAPE SUPPLY
9620 SE S.R. 100, Starke
^, y(904) 964-3112 4W|r
4 .. Approx. 2 miles East of U.S. 301 4
Prices & availability subject to change without notice. 4
***i i *S*i**i**i*i**** ********i i**i* even .sM^.^








6B Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section Thursday, Sept. 8, 2011



Blackshear's block seals 12-9 OT win for Tornadoes


BY KEVIN MILLER
Special to the Telegraph-
Times-Monitor
Brian Blackshear blocked a
game-tying field goal in
overtime to give the Bradford
football team a 12-9 victory
over the visiting Palatka
Panthers last Friday night in
Starke in the season opener for
both teams.
Blackshear's block came
just moments after Tornadoes
quarterback Austin Chipoletti
put his team up by three with a
22-yard field goal on
Bradford's first possession in
overtime.
Chipoletti accounted for all
the Tornadoes' scoring,
kicking a 30-yard field goal in
the first quarter and scoring a
touchdown on an I11-yard run
in the fourth quarter to tie the
game at 9-9. Chipoletti's
touchdown run ended with the
athletic junior diving over
several Panther defenders into
the end zone for the score.
Chipoletti's diving score
might have left the Tornadoes
a point short of tying the game
near the end if not for
Blackshear's earlier block of
the point-after attempt by the
Panthers on their only
touchdown in the first half of
ihe closely contested game.
Bradford opened the game
.with a long scoring drive,
.starting at its 21-yard line and
moving deep into Panther
.territory behind the running of
'Dexter Clayton and Chipoletti.
The Tornadoes had five first
downs on the drive, with


Clayton carrying the ball five
times for 32 yards.
Clayton would finish the
game with 109 yards on 17
carries, while Chipoletti
finished with nl yards on 14
carries.
The drive stalled at the
Palatka 14 when Chipoletti's
third-down pass to Deantr6
Burch was just over his hands
in the end zone, leading to a
field goal and a 3-0 lead with
5:30 left in the first quarter.


Bradford's defense. which
was outstanding the entire
game. forced the Panthers to
punt on their first and second
possessions of the game.
Unfortunately for the
Tornadoes. punt returned
Ja'quez CallowaN fumbled the
second punt. and the Panthers
recovered at the Bradford 1-
yard line. That led to a
touchdown on a quarterback
sneak on the following play.
Blackshear's block of the PAT


,Running back Dexter Clayton heads upfield. Photo by
Shelley Rodgers.


Area football teams look for 2-


0 starts after Friday matchups


BY CLIFF SMELLEY
Regional News/Sports Editor
The Bradford, Keystone
H:'Heights and Union County
Football teams are all looking
'to improve to 2-0 this season
:.when they each take on an
-opponent that dropped its
..opener last week.
Keystone will be the only
'team of the three at home this
;.:week as the Indians host
Fernandina Beach this Friday,
.Sept. 9, at 7:30 p.m.
..Fernandina lost its season
opener 29-3 to Union.
Union and Bradford play
this Friday at 7:30 p.m. as
well, but will do so on the
road, with the Tornadoes
traveling to take on Hawthorne
'and the Tigers traveling to take
on Interlachen. Hawthorne lost
31-14 to Keystone last week,
while Interlachen dropped a
14-13 decision against Paxon.
Bradford, perhaps, has the
toughest test in a Hawthorne
squad that qualified for the
postseason last year and started
this season ranked third in the
state in Class IA. The Hornets
went 7-4 last season, but were


Vendors asked
to participate in
Relay for Life
car show
,The. Downtown Girls team
ofy' the Aimerican Cancer
Society's. Relay for Life of
.Bralford County is hosting a
Sfuhraising car show on
Sdatird'y, N ov 12, from 9:30
a.m. until.2 p.m. on Call Street
in downtown Starke.
Those who wish'- to
participate as vendors are
asked ,to' contact Mitchell
Gurit6' by the end of this
month. He may be contacted
via e' mail at
mitchell_gunter@yahoo.com.
Vendor spots are available at
aca carge of $1 ,
.The'entry fee for those who
wish to enter a car is $10.
Registration 'will be accepted
up through the day of the event
and may begin 30 minutes
prior to the event's start.
It is a'i open show, so
anything from customs to rat
rods may enter.
"All cars and trucks are
welcome," Gunter said.
Certificates will be awarded
to the top three vehicles, while
children will get the chance to
vote and present the "Kids'
:Choice" award.
SLive entertainment and a 50-
_-50drawi'ig will also be part of
the'dAy'" eenit
The first 100 vehicle entries
will receive Summit Racing
goodie bags.


eliminated 41-0 in the first
round of the playoffs by
Jefferson County.
Hawthorne scored an
average of 28 points per game
prior to that'Jefferson County
loss, while opponents scored
an average of 18 points in the
10 regular-season contests.
The Hornets return six
players on offense and five on
defense. The defense includes
two-time all-state linebacker
Marcus Gordon, a player who
is getting looks from Division
I schools.
Versatile Rodney Singleton
lines up at safety on defense
and running back and wide
receiver on offense.
In the loss to Keystone last
week, the Hornets had, two
touchdown passes by J.T.
Turner-one to D'kadrian
Allen that covered 23 yards
and one to Montrell Bryant
that covered 28 yards. Those
were Turner's only
completions as he attempted
just seven passes.
Singleton rushed for 51
yards on 17 carries. ;'


Overall, Hawthorne had 196
yards against the Keystone
defense and hurt itself with
three turnovers, two of which
were interceptions. -
Conversely, the Hornets
allowed the Indians to rush for
203 yards on 38 carries.
Keystone scored three
touchdowns on the ground and
finished the game with 274
total yards.

Interlachen posted best
season in a while in '10
The Tigers' opponent this
Friday is known for its mighty
struggles, but Interlachen'
enters this season with a bit of
optimism after going 5-5 last
season-the Rams' first season
of .500 or better since 1997.
Interlachen has to replace
two key cogs of its offense,
though, in 2,000-plus-yard
rusher Kion Williams and
1,500-plus-yard passer Brett
Smith. Those two helped the
Rams score an average of
close to 40 points per game
See GAMES page 10B


EVERYTHING FROM OXYGEN TO WHEELCHAIRS,
TO HOSPITAL BEDS... TO CRUTCHES & WALKERS & MORE!
Medicaid/Medicare TRICARE Homelink
904-966-0520 Owner/Operator Most Insurances
TOLL FREE 866-966-0520 Bret Hines, Sr. Accepted
CELL 904-364-6622 Resiratory Therapist o


Florida
;OCredit Union



CD Specials


25-Month Special



36-Month Special


1.07% APY*



1.6 1% APY


$10,000 Minimum

2460 Commercial Drive
(In front of the Wal-Mart Supercenter)

964-1427
www.flcu.org
Deposit ar federally insured by the NCUA. a US Gooermment Agency. for up to $250,000. Annual
Percentage Tield (AP) effective 9/2/2011 and subject to change at any tene. Offer expires 9/30/2011 I. CUA


kept the score at 6-3 in the
Panthers' favor with 10
minutes left in the first half.
The Tornadoes continued
their generous ways on their
ensuing possession when a
Chipoletti pass was tipped at
the line of scrimmage and
intercepted by the Panthers and
returned to the Bradford 10-
yard line.
Two plays- later, it appeared
the Panthers had gone up by
another touchdown on a 10-
yard run, but a holding penalty
negated the score and moved
the ball back to the 17-yard
line. On the next play,
Bradford's Phillip James burst
through the line and knocked
the Panther quarterback down
for a 4-yard loss. After the
Panther quarterback tripped on
the next play for another 4-
yard loss, the visitors settled
for a 41-yard field goal and a
9-3 lead with seven minutes
remaining in the half.
The Tornadoes threatened
once more near the end of the
half, driving the ball from their
20-yard line to the Palatka 30
before time ran out.


Bradford
lineman Brent
Kebby tackles a
Palatka player
in the
Tornadoes' 12-
9 season-
opening win.
Photo by
Shelley
Rodgers.


The Bradford defense held
the Panthers to 12 yards of
offense and no first downs in


FOR S ALE."










*5 Acres with Highway Frontage
*6000+ Sq. Ft. Building *4" Well

Call 352-258-4187
,,' .- .'


the first half, but the
Tornadoes trailed 9-3 because
of the two costly turnovers.
Bradford and Palatka traded
punts in the third quarter as
neither offense could do much.
There were 13 punts in the
game, with the Panthers
punting eight times because of
Bradford's strong defensive
play.
Palatka would end up with
only four first downs and 86
yards of total offense for the
game, while Bradford would
accumulate 239 yards of
offense and 15 first downs.
With nine minutes left in the
fourth quarter, the Tornadoes
started their game-tying drive
from their own 14-yard line"
Chipoletti completed four
See BHSpage 10B


Home of The


$9.99


PRIME


RIB


DINNER
All The Time
NO Coupon Required


A


At Palms Medical Group, we make it easy for you
to get the healthcare you need:

Convenient locations
A wide range of services-
from well-baby exams to senior care
Same day appointments through Open Access Scheduling
Private insurance, Medicare and Medicaid accepted;
sliding fee scale for those who qualify

FREE LAB TESTING week of Sept. 19-23 at all
Palms Medical Group facilities to commemorate the
40th Anniversary of our community health centers.
COMPREHENSIVE METABOLIC PROFILE & LIPID PANEL
FREE to the first 40 people at each of the PMG facilities.


Palms Medical Group
| Your home for health, wellness, lfe


550 W. Georgia St.
Starke, FL


(904)

364-2900


1-888-730-2374
www.palmsmg.org


Oak,




.
. p\
. ^ ., *^


-' JR<


Austin Chipoletti runs for what would be the
touchdown that forced overtime. Photo by Shelley
Rodgers.


HOME RESPIRATORY CARE
Serving the area for 10 years
Full Service Home Medical Equipment


Historic Downtown Starke


CSAES :1


TRi


V.,








Thursday, Sept. 8, 2011 Telegraph, Times &t Monitor B Section 7B


I Crime & Punishment


II


-Recent arrests
in Bradford,
Clay or Union
The following individuals
were arrested recently b\ local
law enforcement officers in
Bradford, Union or Clay
(Keystone Heights area)
counties:
'James Earl Adkins. 51. of
Live Oak was arrested Sept. 5
by Starke Police Department
(SPD) officers for operating a
inotorcycle without a
pnotorcycle endorsement on his
license and operating a motor
vehicle without a valid license.
He was released on Sept. 5.
James W. Barnes. 39, of
Starke was arrested Sept. I by
Bradford County Sheriff s
Office (BCSO) deputies for
violation of probation for an
original misdemeanor charge.
He remained in jail as of press
time.
Rebecca Lee Barnhill, 36, of
Lake Butler was arrested Sept.
3 and booked into the Bradford
'County Jail on an out-of-
county warrant. Bond was set
at $72,000 and she was
released on bond Sept. 3.
George Lekreshian Bennett,
.21, of Gainesville was arrested
Aug. 30 and booked into the
Bradford County Jail for
.failure to appear in court for an
original felony charge. He was
;released on Aug. 30.

Beverly Ann Blanton, 22, of
Starke was arrested Sept. 4 by
BCSO deputies for DUI and
failing to stop for a police
-officer with lights and siren
activated. She was released on
'Sept. 4.
Thomas Moab Bradley, 48,
of Hampton was arrested Sept.
3 by Hampton Police
Department (HPD) officers for
battery, committing a felony
with a weapon in hand,
intimidating a victim or
witness and resisting an officer
without violence. Bond was set
at $17,000 aorthV.rrMained in
jail as of press-irle.
Lynn Brill, 32, of
Jacksonville was arrested Sept.
4 by SPD officers for battery
and disorderly intoxication.
She was released Sept. 4.
Antonio Antwain Butler, 18,
of Starke was arrested Aug. 29
by BCSO deputies for reckless
driving, driving without a valid



HOPE
Continued from Page 1B

that's never going to. change
1for me, which is fine. It means
PI can still do everything I want
1to do in life with my CF how it
.-is.
< Wemer said the drug that
.,would help Sims is probably a
mminimum of two years away. It
Could actually make a small
S improvement in her condition.
I; "What we are seeing is when









4 A law firm o


driver's license, failing to stop
for an officer with lights and
siren activated, resisting an
officer without'violence, two
counts of larceny and two
counts of criminal mischief
with property damage. Bond
was set at $28,000 and he
remained in jail as of press
time.
Susan Elaine Cayton, 31, of
Lawtey was arrested Sept. 4 by
BCSO deputies for assault and
resisting an officer without
violence. Bond was set at
$5,000 and she was released
on bond Sept. 5.
Roy Clark, 35, of Keystone
Heights was arrested Sept. 5
by Clay County Sheriffs
Office (CCSO) deputies for
domestic battery.
Leonard Craft, 53, of
Keystone Heights was arrested
Sept. I by CCSO deputies for
driving while license is
suspended or revoked.
Dorothy Ann Craven, 35, of
Lake Butler was arrested Sept.
2 by BCSO deputies for DUI.
Bond was set at $5,000 and
she remained in jail as of press
time.
Lee Roy Crews, 35, of
Starke was arrested Sept. 2 by
BCSO deputies on a warrant as
an out-of-state fugitive. Bond
was set at $10,000 and he was
being held for extradition to
the other state.
Elijah Davis, 29, of
Keystone Heights was arrested
Sept. 4 by CCSO deputies on a
warrant for failure to appear in
court.
Sabra Thomas Dennis, 48,
of Hampton was arrested Sept.
4 by BCSO deputies for DUI.
She was released on Sept. 4.
Robert Sim Dixon, 45, of
Starke was arrested Sept. 2 by
BCSO deputies for larceny.
Bond was set at $10,000 and
he was released on bond -Sept.
2.

John M. Folsom, 20, of
Starke was arrested Sept. I by
BCSO deputiessvforaggravated-
battery. Bond was set at
$10,000 and he remained in
jail as of press time.
Marvin Freeney, 24, of
Odessa was arrested Sept. 2 by
HPD officers for possession of
less than 20 grams of
marijuana and possession of
narcotic equipment. Bond was
set at $500 and he was released


people take this pill, on
average they regain about 10
percent of their lung function,"
Werner said. "It is conceivable
Katelyn could get a little of it
back."
Sims, though, does.not think
of herself or how such medical
breakthroughs could benefit
her.
"I'm not so much worried
about a cure for myself, but for
the people who are going to be
born five years from now with
it," she said. "It's going to be
more beneficial to them."


on bond Sept. 3.
Carolyn Virginia Gass. 21.
of Starke was arrested Aug. 30
by Union County Sheriff's
Office (UCSO) deputies for
burglary of a structure and two
counts of larceny. Bond was
set at $45,000 and she
remained in jail as of press
time.
Christopher Bryan Geiger,
25, of Hampton was arrested
Sept. I by HPD officers for
battery. Bond was set at
$1,000 and he was released on
bond Sept. 2.
Nicole Amurice Green, 20,
of Graham was arrested Sept. 1
by SPD officers for retail theft.
Bond was set at $500 and she
was released on bond Sept. 1.
Michael Christopher Hart,
29, of Lawtey was arrested
Aug. 30 by BCSO deputies for
battery. Bond was set at
$1,000 and he was released on
bond Aug. 30.
Robert Jackson Jr., 28, of
Starke was arrested Sept. 5 by
SPD officers for battery and
felony battery. He was being
held on no bond and remained
in jail as of press time.
Troy Maurice Kearse, 27, of
Starke was arrested Sept. 1 by
SPD officers for driving while
license is suspended or
revoked. Bond was set at $500
and he was released on bond
Sept. 1.
Cynthia Marie Lavery, 44,
of Starke was arrested Sept. 4
by HPD officers for DUI. She
was released on Sept. 5.
Ashley Danielle Lee, 24, of
Lawtey was arrested Sept. 5 by
BCSO deputies for DUI with
property damage and leaving
the scene of an accident with
property damage. She was
being held on no bond and
remained in jail as of press
time.
John Michael Mashburn, 26,
of Jacksonville was arrested
Sept. 3 by BCSO deputies for
DUI. He was released Sept. 3.
Ebb.ie D'iMcKin4ey, 47, of
Lawtey was arrested Sept. 1 by
SPD officers for driving while
license is suspended or
revoked. Bond was set at
$5,000 and he remained in jail
as of press time.
Stephen James Meeks, 22,
of Alachua was arrested Sept.
3 by SPD officers for driving
with a license that had been


As she encouraged the
Kiwanis members to support
Great Strides, Sims asked them
to think of just how many
people their efforts would
help.
"It's just good to raise
money for it because not only
are you doing something good
in your community, but you're
doing something that's going
to benefit more than just one
person's life in the long run,"
Sims said. "If you think about
it, 30,000 in the U.S. have CF
You're helping them."


f "Vets" fighting for YOU!


"You hurt? We FIGHT!"

ORANGE PARK: 2,69-7573
: STARKE/LAKE BUTLER: 964-4055
JACKSONVILLE: 721-7575


RONHOLESi
d1 S


expired for more than four
months. He % as released Sept.
3.
Timoth, Mizelle. 54, of
Panama City was arrested
Aug. 31 by BCSO deputies for
sale of drugs and smuggling
contraband into a prison. Bond
was set at $20,000 and he
remained in jail as of press
time.
Daulton Paul Norman, 18, of
Keystone Heights was arrested
Sept. 1 by BCSO deputies for
larceny and trespassing on
school grounds. Bond was set
at $5,500 and he was released
on bond Sept. 2.
Jennifer Cone Norviel, 29,
of Lake Butler was arrested
Sept. 1 by UCSO deputies for
two counts of failure to appear
in court for original felony
-charges. She was being held on
no bond and remained in the
Bradford County Jail as of
press time.

Devon Rashad Proctor, 19,
of Green Cove Springs was
arrested Sept. 5 by SPD
officers for possession of less
than 20 grams of marijuana.
He was being held on no bond
and remained in jail as of press
time.
Robin Lynn Shaw, 41, of
Micanopy was arrested Sept. 2
by BCSO deputies for DUI.
Bond was set at $1,000 and
she remained in jail as of press
time.
Rebecca Irene Stephens, 32,
of Jacksonville was arrested
Sept. 4 by BCSO deputies for
disorderly conduct. She was
released on Sept. 4.
Edward Harmon Strong, 60,
of Starke was arrested Aug. 30
by SPD officers for failure to
appear in court for an original
misdemeanor offense. Bond
was set at $5,000 and he Was
released on bond Aug. 30.
Jessica Sutherland, 33, of
Starke was arrested Sept. 2 by
BCSO deputies for DUI. Bond
was set at $2,000 and she was
released on bond Sepf. 2.
Vernon Wayne Todd, 37, of
Starke was arrested Sept. I by
BCSO deputies for battery.
Bond was set at $1,000 and he
was released on bond Sept. 3.
Michael Ward, 57, of
Lawtey was arrested Sept. 5 by
Lawtey Police Department
(LPD) officers for failure to
appear in court for an original
misdemeanor charge. Bond
was set at $4,000 and he
remained in jail as of press
time.
Catherine Ann Willingham,
40, and Christopher Allan
Willingham, 38, both of
Starke, were arrested Sept. 5
by SPD officers. Each was
charged with battery and both
remained in jail as of press
time.


I


The meeting of two personalities is like the contact of
two chemical substances: if there is any reaction, both
are transformed.
-Carl Jung


9P0respeason


SYAMMAR ____


Sc 2400, 24HP
Hydrostatic Transmission
* Choice df industrial or turf tires
* CL100 Curved Boom Front
Loader
* 4' Howse Model 400 Rotary
Cutter
* 4' Howse Box Blade
* Middle Buster Plow
* 2 HD Straps
* 16' Trailer with Brakes


Sx"3100, 31 HP
Hydrostatic Transmission
* Choice of Industrial or Turf Tires
* CL200 Loader
* 5' Howse Rotary Mower
* 5' Howse EB60 Box Blade
* Middle Buster/Sub Soiler Plow
* 2 HD 10k Straps
* 20" Trailer w/Brake & HD Frame


LX410, 41 HP, 4WD
12x12 Synchronized Shuttle
Shift with clutchless forward
& reverse ,
* FREE CL600 Loader w/Skid
Steer Quick Attach Bucket:
* Industrial Tires,
* Howse 606HT Rotary CUtter
w/HD Gearbox w/Slip Clutch.
* Howse EB72 Box Blade'
* A-31 7x20 10.4K HD Trailer
with Brake


Only "26,378


Checkpoints set
up in Starke
area
The Starke Police
Department and Bradford
Count, Sheriffs Office will
conduct vehicle checkpoints in
the following locations
throughout this month:
U.S. 301 north of S.R. 16
to C.R. 233.
U.S. 301 south to the
county line.
S.R. 16 west to Northwest
177'h Street.
S.R. 16 east to C.R. 230A.
S.R. 100 east to Colley
Road.
S.R. 100 west to C'.R. 225.
C.R. 229 to C.R. 225.


I


FHP sets
checkpoints
The Florida Highway Patrol
will be conducting driver's
license and vehicle inspection
checkpoints at the following
locations in Bradford and
Union counties:
Bradford County-C.R.
230, C.R. 100A, C.R. 231,
C.R. 225, C.R. 229, C.R. 221,
C.R. 233, C.R. 18, S.R. 16,
C.R. 227, Speedville Road,
Market Road, C.R. 325, C.R.
214, NW 177th St., S.R. 231,
C.R. 235, SW 75th St.
Union County-C.R. 238,
S.R. 121, S.R. 16, C.R. 18,
S.R. 231, C.R. 229, S.R. 238,
S.R. 18, C.R. 231.


I








8B Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section Thursday, Sept. 8, 2011



Indians score 31 straight en route to 17-point win


BY BILLY GEIGER
Special to the Telegraph-
Times-Monitor
The Key stone Heights
football team managed to turn
it's Sept. 2 game against the
Hawthorne Hornets around
early and keep a strong lead
throughout, thanks in no small
part to running back Alex
Gonzales, who ran the greater
part of Keystone's four
touchdowns in the Indians' 31-
14 win.
Hawthorne was the third-
ranked team in Class IA, but
the Indians, after giving up the
first score of the game, built a
-31-6 lead, getting 194 yards on'
24 carries from Gonzales.
Gonzales, though, said it
was a total team effort.
"I'm really proud of the
team," he said. "We all work
together, and that's how it
ought to be. You have to work
as a team."


The Indians began to pull
away after a hard-fought half
in which four points separated
the teams.
"I think we wore 'em down
in the first quarter, and that
gave us a lot of momentum,"
Keystone Head Coach Chuck
Dickinson said. "Both teams
did great, and they really
pounded us first quarter. Our
kids played hard, and theirs
did, too."
There was a slight, cooling
breeze that Friday evening in
Hawthorne as the two teams
lined up. The first half of the
game saw the Indians kicking
off, and the Hornets wasted no
time securing the ball and
running down the field. They
moved all the way to the
Indians' 23-yard line before
Hornets ball runner Rodney
Singleton was brought down
by a host of Indians.
This didn't stop Singleton,


or the Hornets, who proceeded
with vociferous intent to rush
down the field, and a long pass
to Montrel Bryant netted them
their first touchdown early in
the first quarter. The Indians
were able to block the
conversion, leaving the score
at 6-0 in favor of the Hornets.
Then the ball came to the
Indians. Gonzales caught the
ensuing kickoff and ran 20
yards to the Indians' 30-yard
line, and the Indians
immediately thereafter
benefited from a 15-yard foul
levied against Hawthorne.
Soon after, an impressive
catch-and-carry maneuver by
Chase Julius saw a gain of 28
additional yards for the
Indians, and they soon closed
the distance. They spent their
second and third downs at the
Hawthorne goal line before
finally breaking through the
Hornets' nest when Logan


Stanley successfully connected
on a 26-yard field goal,
bringing the score to 3-6 in the
last minute of the first quarter.
"I was excited-ready on
the sidelines right up until
coach called me." Stanley said.
"I helped the team out, and I
got to kick."
Stanley's field goal was an
ill omen for .the Hornets, who
didn't fare as well in the
second quarter, with Stanley
intercepting a pass early on
and taking it to the Indians' 49.
A personal foul against the
Hornets gained the Indians
another 5 yards, granting a
foothold in Hawthorne
territory.
Several passes to Gonzales
helped move the team up to the
goal on a third-down play.
However, an incomplete pass
at a critical moment allowed
the Hornets to usurp control.
Once again, Singleton ran


the ball a great distance,
making it from the Hornets' 17
to their 34-yard line before
being tackled by William
Shaw. The Hornets' streak
ended there, with the Indians
preventing any more major
yardage from being gained.
The ball would continue to
bounce back and forth between
the two teams for most of the
second quarter. Singleton
intercepted for the Hornets,
and the Hornets lost the ball
after a long run by Bryant. It
wasn't until the last minute of
the quarter that the Indians
found themselves once again,
struggling to break into the
Hornets' end zone.

Matthew Dickinson brought
Keystone to the goal line
before being taken out by
Singleton, and for the Indians'
next play, Gonzales ran the
ball all but the last yard to the


end zone before being downed.
Coach Dickinson called a
strategic timeout with less'than
30 seconds on the clock.
The crowd waited. The
teams lined up. The
countdown resumed. The
Indians lined up. Twenty-five
seconds, the ball is put into
play. Twenty seconds, the ball
is passed and passed again, the
end result a 2-yard score from
quarterback Evan Harvey to
Julius with just 15 seconds on
the clock.
Harvey finished the game 6-
of-11 for 71 yards, while Julius
caught three passes for 47
yards.
Stanley kicked the ensuing
PAT, allowing Keystone to go
into the half up 10-6.
Dickinson said the score was
the biggest play of the game
following several miscues.

See KHHS page 9B


TESTING
Continued from Page 3B

points on the course.
On days two through. four,
soldiers rotated through one of


three testing lanes-the patrol
lane, the urban operations lane
and the traffic control point
lane. On each of the lanes they
faced 10 tasks, presented in a
manner they would see in a
combat environment, aqd one
decision task. The Guardsman


had 20 minutes to complete the
lane and complete eight of the
tasks correctly.
On each of the three lanes,
they were required to load and
clear one of three weapons
systems-the M4 assault rifle,
the M240B machine gun or the





A soldier from
the 53rd Infantry
Brigade
Combat Team
applies a splint
to a simulated
fracture during
Expert
Infantryman
I,., Badge testing
4 at Camp
Blanding.
Photo by Sgt.
IatClass Blair
Heusdens.


M249 squad automatic
weapon-as well as fix any
malfunctions.
The testing ended with a 12-
mile road march. Soldiers had
three hours to complete the
march while carrying.their M4,
a 35-pound rucksack, 'water,
Kevlar and load-bearing
equipment.
According to Command Sgt.
Maj. Stephen Corrow, the
brigade command sergeant
major, an average of only 10
percent of infantrymen tested
will receive the EIB, making it
the most coveted award an
infantryman can receive.
"Most folks who wear the
EIB have probably made two
or three attempts at getting it,"
said Col. Sean Ward, the
deputy brigade commander.
"It's a challenge. Not
everybody gets it. Not
everybody can get it."
Ward attributes several
reasons to the difficulty of
obtaining the badge-"the
hands-on technical expertise
you must display, the physical
challenges and the mental
stresses that go along with it,


and the tough processes of
trying to keep everything
together."
The testing was kept to the
same standards as the active-
duty Army, and all of the
training lanes were validated
by officials from Fort Benning,
Ga.
Maintaining a high standard
of testing is what makes the
EIB such a high honor for.
those who are able to earn it.
"You want to make sure that
when they earn the badge, they
feel like they've really earned
! something, and you also want
the other people who didn't
earn. it to be envious of what
someone else achieved," said
Lt. Col. David Yaegers, the
brigade executive officer. ."It's
not much of an achievement if
the standards are low and it's
an easy task to do."
Each of the 40 graders, as
well as those on the EIB board,
had to have -already earned
their EIBs. Because it has been
so long since the Florida
National Guard has done any
testing, qualified soldiers from
the state', .r.egruiing .asd


Newspapers Connect Commu


Strong communities are all about strong- relationships and connections;
citizens and their government; citizens and community businesses; local
government and local businesses; citizens and local, social cultural
institutions. Nothing facilitates or creates those relationships and
connections like America's community newspapers. In cities and towns
served by a community newspaper of 25,000 circulation or less, 86 percent
of the population read a community newspaper each week. No other media
has that kind of reach into and throughout those communities.
This is among the findings of the 2008 research conducted for the National
Newspaper association by the Reynolds Journalism Institute at the Missouri
School of Journalism at the University of Missouri. The findings are
consistent with two earlier research efforts by NNA and RJI's Center for
Advanced Social Research.
The connections between community newspapers and their readers, and
the resulting connection of those readers to local advertisers, remains strong
in communities across America. To many readers, the weekly advertisements
are a form of news, weekly specials or sales, the launch of new businesses
and services, the introduction of new products, and even a barometer of the
economic health and vitality of the community.

Along Main Street Across The Nation
79 percent of adults 18 and older read the classified ads.
73 percent read the grocery or supermarket advertisements and/or inserts.
Half rely most on their community newspaper for grocery shopping
information. That's twice that of the next most relied source: In-store
promotions. And 10 times more than the third most relied upon source:
Direct mail.
72 percent of community newspaper readers read the hardware and home
improvement advertisements.
About 28 percent rely most on their community newspaper for home
improvement shopping information. That's about 50 percent more than the
next most relied upon source: In-store promotions. And three times more
than the third most relied upon source: The Internet.
66 percent of community newspaper readers read the department store ads'
65 pe cent of community newspapers readers read the discount store ads.
62 percent of community newspaper readers read the public notice ads.
81 percent believe government should be required to publish public notices
in the,,,local newspaper:
AA'.6%48 percent of all adults said they rarely or never use the radio to
.mtiake purchasingng decisions; 69 percent said they rarely or never use direct
'mail to:fiake purchasing decisions; 59 percent say they rarely or never use
T ,tto ijake purchasing decisions; 58 percent said they rarely or never use
the Yellow' Pages for buying decisions; 41 percent said they rarely or never
use the Internet for buying decisions.
However, 71 percent found newspaper ads helpful in making purchasing
decisions. That compares with almost 50 percent in 2007 and 41 percent in
2005.
"It's clear that newspapers provide a strong connection between local
readers and local businesses and services," says John Stevenson, NNA


retention battalion 'stepped in
to help fill the void. The
graders and the board played
an important role in upholding
a high standard throughout the
testing.
"I want to thank the badge
protectors for their role in this
process. It is they who link the
heritage of our past to the
experience of today," said Maj.
Gen. Emmett R. Titshaw, the
adjutant general of Florida.
The leadership of the 53'
Infantry Brigade Combat
Team plans to continue to
offer EIB testing as a way of
motivating and training their
soldiers to strive to be the best.
Because the brigade was
recently deployed, many of the
53rd soldiers were not required
to attend annual training this
year, so there are still many
soldiers who would like to test
for the badge.
"The EIB tests the roots and
basics of what it means to be
an infantry soldier, and we are
coming back to those roots,"
Corrow said. "To earn. the EIB
is the symbol of infantry
excellence."




cities


president and publisher of the Randolph Leader in Roanoke, AL.
This year's survey asked questions that had been asked in a similar
Canadian study.
About 79 percent of respondents said they would rather look through
newspaper ads than watch ads on TV. This compares to 61 percent in the'
Canadian survey.
Three-quarters of adults said they would rather look through newspaper
ads than view ads on the Internet.
A little more than 70 percent somewhat-to-strongly agree that they go
looking for and through newspaper ads. This is comparable to the
Canadian response.
Nearly 70 percent somewhat-strongly agree that they enjoy reading
advertising in their local paper. This compares to 66 percent in the
Canadian survey.
"Buyers read newspapers." said Brian Steffens, NNA's executive director,
"and our research shows there is no stronger media for connecting a
community, its people, government and economic vibrancy."
* About 78 percent of those surveyed said they planned to purchase health
or medical products or services in the next year.
* 73 percent plan to buy women's clothing.
* 60 percent plan to buy men's clothing.
* 58 percent plan to purchase "travel," air, hotel, cruise, rental car, etc.
* 52 percent plan to purchase lawn and garden supplies or services.
* 41 percent plan to buy electronics, Newspapers and the Internet were tied
as the most relied upon source for electronics shopping information.
* Nearly 35 percent plan to buy cell phones or cell phone service.
Newspapers and the Internet were tied, right behind in-store promotion, as
the most relied upon source for cell phone shopping information.
* 34 percent plan to buy financial or insurance products or services.
* 25 percent plan to buy furniture.
* 28 percent rely most on their community newspaper for information for
home furniture shopping. That's about 4 percent more than the second
most relied upon source: In-store promotions; and more than twice that of
the third most relied upon source: The Internet.
* 16 percent plan to buy appliances.
* 26 percent rely most on their community newspaper for information for
major appliance purchase, 7 percent more than the next most relied upon
source: In-store information and the Internet (tie); and four times more
than the fourth most relied upon source, magazines.
* 11 percent plan to buy a used vehicle.
* 9 percent plan to buy a new vehicle.
* Readers rely equally on newspapers, dealerships and the Internet for
information for new car purchases (about 18 percent each).
"That's a solid shopping list for Main Street America." Stevenson said,
"And community newspapers help both buyers and sellers."

For more information on this and other studies, go to www.nna.org. Click on
the button labeled research. NNA members have access to the other studies
and marketing material.








Thursday, Sept. 8, 2011 Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section 9B



Tigers' offense gets on track in 29-3 win over Pirates


BY CLIFF SMELLEY
Regional News/Sports Editor
An offense that was
nonexistent in a preseason win
over Bradford showed up in a
big way to open the regular
season as the Union County
football team compiled more
than 400 yards in a 29-3 win
over Fernandina Beach on
,Sept. 2 in Fernandina.
Union Head Coach Ronny
Pruitt said his inexperienced
offensive line had a tough time
dealing with a talented, fast
defense in its preseason
kickoff classic against
Bradford in which the Tigers
finished with negative yardage.
Therefore, it was more work
on the fundamentals of
blocking people leading up to
the Fernandina game.
"We went out (last) week
and just kind of went back
over the basics," Pruitt said.
"Throwing the ball opens up a
lot of things, too, so that
helped."
The Tigers are a
predominantly running team,
but running and passing
clicked in the win over the
Class 4A Pirates. Josh Tyson
rushed for 155 yards and two
touchdowns on 28 carries,
while Austin Harden
completed 8-of-12 passes for
108 yards and two
touchdowns.
"I'm proud of them," Pruitt
said, "but we've got a long
ways to go. (Fernandina's) a
bigger school, but they're
rebuilding."
The Pirates had a 44-yard
drive to open the second half-
though that was helped by an


KHHS
Continued from Page 8B


"We killed ourselves in the
first quarter," Dickinson said.
"'Really shot ourselves in the
foot; a lot of bad snaps. Other
than that, we did great."
Keystone's offense started
the second half with a couple
of big plays as runs of 25 and
10 yards by Gonzales and
Bruce Kirksey, respectively,
put Keystone past midfield.
The team, though, then lost 5
yards, followed by a pass that
came up short.
On a fourth-down play, the
Hornets seemed to gain a
second wind; Singleton
intercepted a pass and ran all
the way to the Indians' 28-yard
line. The Hornets again handed
the ball to Singleton, but this
time, Keystone's own Gordon
Stinson brought the Hawthorne
player down early. By their
fourth-down play, the Hornets
stood at the 13-yard line. It
looked as though the team had
regained its vigor' and was
preparing to strike, but through
some fancy maneuvering, the
Indians managed to stay on top
of the Hornets and prevent
them from gaining any more
distance.
The ball went back to
Keystone, and the Indians
wasted no time letting the
Hornets know who owned
their side of the field. Their
first play saw them pass the
ball across the air, with the




Arc of Bradford

County to host
5K fundraiser in
October
The Arc of Bradford County
will host the inaugural 5K
Hope Run on Saturday, Oct.
15, at 8 a.m. at Shands Starke.
Prizes and T-shirts will be
awarded, while children 12
and under-accompanied by
adults-will receive ribbons
for participating in the kids'
fun run.
Entry is $25 per person
before Friday, Sept. 30, $30
per person before Oct. 15 and
$35 the day of the event. The
cost for those who want to
walk is $15, while those
.relying on wheelchairs, canes
and other forms of assistance
may enter for $10. Children 12
and under are free.
You may register in person
at the Arc of Bradford County
at 1351 S. Water St. in Starke
or online at www.arcbradford.
org. Registration the day of the
event begins at 7 a.m.
This event is in need of
volunteers. If you'd like to
help, please call Johnnie
Mosley at 904-964-7699.


unsportsmanlike call against
Union-that resulted in their
only points-a 33-yard field
goal by Cody Cosper. Oustide
of that drive, Fernandina
managed just 23 yards against
a stingy Union defense.
"They get to the ball, and
they're fast," Pruitt said of his
defensive players. "They get to
the ball, they like to hit and
they have fun at it."
Fernandina never could get
tailback Tai Dunwood and
fullback Jordan Holland on
track as Union limited the
Pirates to 54 yards on 28
carries.
The Tigers' run game was


receiver making it all the way
to the 25-yard line. A 5-yard
penalty against the Hornets
saw the Indians advance
further still. Then, in another
amazing feat of athleticism,
the Indians handed Gonzales
the ball, and the young man
took it all the way to the
Hornets' 9-yard line before
being downed.
First-and-goal, and the
crowd was gting wild on both
sides of the stadium. The next
play saw Gonzales take the
ball again, and this time he
made good on a touchdown.
The PAT was successful,
bringing the Indians up another
seven points to lead 17-6.
After the kickoff, Jamar
White of Hawthorne ran the
ball all the way up to the
Hornets' 44. The Indians gave
up more yards to the Hornets
due to an offsides foul, but
Keystone was able to keep the
Hornets near the middle of the


evident from the onset as all
but one play of a 10-play, 81-
yard game-opening drive came
on the ground. Tyson was the
workhorse with seven carries,
including 17- and 16-yard
runs, but it was Harden who
capped the drive with an I1-
yard touchdown toss to Dylan
Clark. The extra-point kick
was no good, but the Tigers
had drawn first blood and led
6-0 at the 5:45 mark of the
opening quarter.
Fernandina was able to gain
a first down on its first series,
but the Tigers clamped down
defensively. Kendall Wright
made the initial hit on
quarterback Cole Willis for a


field until the control of the
ball2:could switch sides.
The Indians once again
looked to Gonzales, who ran to
the Hornets' 40-yard line.
However, a flag against
Keystone pushed them back to
the 48. Gonzales managed to
carry the ball 15 yards to the
33 before the end of the third
quarter.
The final countdown began,
and the Indians wasted no time
when play resumed, with
Tra'Von Thomas carrying the
ball for a first down. The team
then moved to the Hornets'
goal line, and Gonzales
snatched another touchdown
from the air. Things began to
look grim for the Hornets. The
PAT was good for a 24-6 score
in favor of the Indians.
Things then got wild. The
Hornets regained the ball and
ran it to their own 41-yard line
before control went back to the
Indians (due to the tackled


Josh Tyson,
who rushed for
two
touchdowns,
sprints his way
past a
Fernandina
Beach
defender.





7J


1-yard loss, then followed that
up by dropping Holland for no
gain. On third down, if was
Raymond Randolph dumping
Holland behind the line of
scrimmage.
That drive would be the high
point for the Pirates in a first
half that saw the Union offense
control the ball. Fernandina
had two more offensive
possessions in the half, going
three-and-out on each and
gaining 6 yards.
The Pirates had 26 yards
overall in the first half.
Walter Mabety, who rushed
for 91 yards" on five carries,
had the Tigers quickly on the
move on their second offensive


Hornet losing the ball). The
-Indians made their next move,
but they were beaten back by
the Hornets. The carrier
dropped the ball, and the
Hornets stole back their
control. Next play by the
Hornets went the same way:
The Indians pushed them even
farther and stole the ball once
more via interception.
Keystone pushed its way to
Hawthorne's 49, then to the
30. An impressive pass by an
saw the team advance all the
way to the 9-yard line. The
team made a smaller gain,
closing to the 3. The end zone
was near. Thomas ran the ball.
He was nearly clobbered three
different times, but he made it
in unscathed, and the PAT
made the Indians' victory all
but a certainty at 31-6 in the
last half of the last quarter.
Hawthorne capped the
scoring with a 25-yard
touchdown pass.


series when he took a handoff
on the first play from
scrimmage and galloped 62
yards to the Fernandina 15.
Three plays later, a 5-yard
reception by Prince Alexander
set up first-and-goal at the 2. A
1-yard run by Harden set up
Tyson's 1-yard dive over the
top of the defense and into the
end zone five seconds into the
second quarter. Another failed
PAT followed, but the Tigers
led 12-0.
Union went three-and-out on
its next series, but killed the
final 5:20 of the first half the
next time it got the ball. The
result was a 13-yard, 84-yard


scoring drive.
Tyson carried the ball on
eight of the drive's first'nine
plays, gaining 45 yards, while
a roughing-the-passer call gave
the Tigers a first down at the
Fernandina 41 with 21 seconds
on the clock. Harden
completed an 8-yard pass to
Clark, followed by an 18-yard
pass to Wright. With two
seconds' before halftime,
Wright took a pass in the flat
and ran diagonally toward the
opposite sideline, capping a
15-yard scoring play as time
expired. Harden found Clark

See UCHS page 10B


ma mas/l p


Presto Storage Boxes A GA c"
* Instant set-up for fast, easy assembly Maximum strength with double bottom, double end,
and double side construction Includes reinforced, tear resistant hand holes and a deep
locking lift-off-lid 65% recycled content White/Blue Packed 12 per carton


ITEM DESCRIPTION STACKING WEIGHT
FEL 0063101 Letter 12"wx24"Dx10"H 750
FEL 0063201 Legal 15"Wx24"Dxl0"H 800
FEL 0063601 Letter/Legal 12"Wxi5"Dx10"H 850






-


Panasonic

ideas for life


904-964-5764
www.TheOfficeShopofStarke.com


REG. DIS. PRICE
$107.89 ct
$139.99 ct
$97.99 ct


SPECIAL SALE PRICE
$87.79 ct
$94.99 ct
$74.79 ct


FI-jli]


I End Tab Tuff Pockel
Reinforced tab with heavyweight front and back
panels provide rigid support Gussets are fully
lined with tear-resistant Tyvek and feature
special rollover reinforcement at the top
Hidden reinforcement strips across the front an
back panels at key points of stress
Redrope Contains 30% post-consumer
materials SFI Certified
ITEM DESCRIPTION PACKED
SMD 73780 Letter, 3 1/2" Expansion 10
SMD 73790 Letter, 5 1/4" Expansion 10
SMD 73795 Letter, 7" Expansion S
SMD 74780 Legal, 3 1/2" Expansion 10
SMD 74790 Legal, S 114" Expansion 10
SMD 74795 Legal, 7" Expansion 5


/


REG. DIS. PRICE SPECIAL SALE PRICE
$43.99 bx $39.99 bx
$47.69 bx $41.49 bx
$33.19 bx $31.99 bx
$47.79 bx $45.79 bx
$48.79 bx $46.99 bx
$39.69 bx $36.79 bx


SuperTab Top Tab Folders
* Tabs have 90% more labeling area than standard folders for improved labeling Labels
are easier to see using larger text or more lines of text can be visible Contains 10%
post-consumer material SFI Certified 100 per pack* 11pt. 1/3 cut Tabs


8-in-1 Multifunction Communication SMD 10301
SMD 10395
Carter with DECT 6.0 Cordless SMD 15301
Handset & Digital Answering Service SMD15395
* Print Speed: 24 ppm Print Resolution' 600x600 dpi
* Modem Speed: 33.6 kbps 32MB Memory
*'Ethernet Connections 1


m


ITEM: PAN KXMB2061
SIZE: 16 1/2" x 12"
REG. DISCOUNT PRICE
$276.39


SPECIA'


110 West Call Street Starke, FL


DESCRIPTION REG. DIS. PRICE SPECIAL SALE PRICE
Letter, 1.ply $14.20 bx $12.99 bx
Letter, 2-ply $32.99 bx $29.99 bx
Legal, 1-ply $20.29 bx $18.99 bx
Legal, 2-ply $37.89 bx $34.99 bx


Scotch Magic Tape Refills
in Value Pack

ITEM: MMM 810K24
SIZE: 3/4" x 1,000"
PACKED: 24
REG. DISCOUNT PRICE $48.29 PK '


FAX* 904-964-6905
theofficeshop@theofficeshopofstarke.com


Good Shepherd
Lutheran Church (LCMS)
Children's Church 10 a.m.
Sunday School 9 a.m. Worship Service at 10 a.m.
4900 NW 182nd Way Starke
(Entrance to Conerly Estates on S.R. 16)
(904) 964-8855 gsicstarke@aol.com
John R. Buchheimer, Pastor
Everyone Welcome!


Union County
running back
Prince
Alexander
fights for
yardage before
finally being
brought down.


SR-230 E (2 miles east of US-301)





.Gol Coun Club)
Be B


Banquet Hall Driving RInge
Affordable Golf
Excellent Driving Range David
Pro Shop Gift Certificates
Golf Lesson by Appointment yil d
Professionally Run Tournaments
Home of the Strawberry Invitational
Memberships Available


ONME


L- I L I .,


^ == == = -- ^ --- -10


3ScotchB








IOB Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section Thursday, Sept. 8, 2011


Indians defeat

Eastside to

move to 2-0 in

volleyball
BY CLIFF SMELLEY
Regional News/Sports Editor
Keystone Heights improved
to .2-0 in volleyball by
defeating visiting Eastside 3-2
(21-25, 25-20, 15-25, 26-24,
16-14) on Sept. 1.
The Indians, who played
Oakleaf this past Tuesday, got
17 service points-five of
which were aces-eight kills
and four blocks from Madyson
Maxwell, while Meghan
Zinkel had 18 kills and nine
digs.
Taylor Semione also had
nine digs to go along with II
kills and I1 points-four of
which were aces.
Chelsea Harvin had 37
assists.
Not only was it the second
straight victory to open the'
season, but a second straight
victory over a Gainesville
school. The Indians hosted
Oak Hall on Aug. 30,
defeating the Eagles 3-0 (25-
18,25-10,25-22).
Harvin had 24 assists and
also contributed 15 points and
11 digs. Zinkel had 10 kills,
while Maxwell had nine kills
and 12 points-four of which
were aces.
Keystone travels to Starke
Thursday, Sept. 8, to play
District 5-4A opponent
Bradford at 6 p.m. The junior
varsity teams will play at 5
p.m.
The Indians travel to Green
Cove Springs to play Clay on
Friday, Sept. 9, and then travel
to play Orange Park on
Monday, Sept. 12. Both
matches are set for 6:30 p.m.
and follow 5:30 p.m. junior
varsity matches.
On Tuesday, Sept. 13,
Keystone returns home to face
district opponent Santa Fe. The
junior varsity match will begin
at 5 p.m., followed by the
varsity match at 6 p.m.


Union drops

district opener

in volleyball
BY CLIFF SMELLEY
Regional News/Sports Editor
After going back and forth
during the first three sets, the
Union County volleyball team
dropped two straight to visiting
Chiefland, losing 3-2 in its
District 7-1A opener on Sept. I
in Lake Butler.
The Tigers (1-2 prior to
Sept. 6) won the first and third
sets by scores of 25-20 and 25-
19.
Macee Worthington had
eicht service points to go along


with 11 assists, while Jordane
Spitze had 17 service points,
four kills and three digs.
Ashlyn Harden had four kills
and three digs also, while
Harlee Rimes had 18
receptions.
Union played district
opponent Baldwin this past
Tuesday and will travel to play
district opponent Dixie County
on Thursday, Sept. 8, at 7 p.m.
A junior varsity match will be
played at 5 p.m.
On Tuesday, Sept. 13, the
Tigers host district opponent
Newberry at 6:30 p.m.
following a junior varsity
match at 5 p.m.

Tigers go 2-0 in
preseason tourney, win
regular-season opener
The Tigers got off to a
positive start, beating both of
their opponents in a preseason
tournament before opening the
regular season with a 3-0 (25-
19, 26-24, 25-16) win over
Williston on Aug. 29 in
Williston.
In preseason play at Fort
White High School, Union
defeated Newberry 2-0 (25-22,
29-27) and Fort White 2-0 (25-
18, 25-20).
Against Williston, Harden
had six kills to go with eight
digs and nine service points.
Worthington had nine points as
well, while adding seven
assists and five digs.
Lindsey Hanson had 12
points, while Rimes had seven
digs.
Caroline Rimes had six
service points. Spitze and
Emily Akridge had five apiece.
The Tigers played their first
home match on Aug. 30,
losing 3-2 to Columbia.
Columbia won the first set
25-22 before the Tigers won
two straight by scores of 25-21
and 25-15. Columbia then won
the fourth set 25-22 before
taking the tie-breaker by a 15-
9 score.
Spitze had 18 points and
seven kills, while Caroline
Rimes had 11 points, eight of
which were aces.
Harden had four blocks and
five kills, while Worthington
had 10 assists. Hanson added
eight points and five kills,
while Harlee Rimes. had 22
receptions.


Bradford

runners

compete in

jamboree

BY CLIFF SMELLEY
Regional News/Sports Editor
Bradford High School and
Bradford Middle School
students competed in the 11th
annual Bobcat Time Trial
Jamboree on Sept. 3 in


Gainesville, with Andy Merrill
leading the boys and Taylor
Rehberg leading the girls.
Also, a total of six runners
set personal records.
Merrill crossed the finish
with a time of 18:08. while
Scotty Peirce came close to a
sub-20-minute time at 20:08.
John Wesley Gillenwaters had
a time of 20:17, while Thomas
Hales and Alec Nazworth set
personal records with times of
20:23 and 21:11. respectively.
Marcus Thompson had a
time of 22:30, while Jordan
Nguyen had a personal record
of 24:46.
Rehberg led the Bradford
girls with a time of 23:29,
which was a personal record.
Sarah Frederick set a personal
best, too, with a time of 25:21.
Autumn Rodgers and Erin
Phinney had times of 26:37
and 31:00, respectively, while
Madeline Strickland had a
personal record of 35:29.




GAMES
Continued from Page 6B


last season.
Opponents scored an
average of 34 points per game
against the Rams last season,
though Interlachen gave up
just 14 points in the one-point
loss to Paxon last week.
Middle linebacker Jared
Makatura returns after leading
the team with 128 tackles last
season.

Fernandina still
struggling on offense
Keystone hosts a Fernandina
Beach team that had its
struggles on offense last
season, averaging nine points
per game in a 1-9 season. That
trend seemed to continue in the
29-3'loss to Union last week in
which the Pirates gained a total
67 yards.
Against the Tigers,
Fernandina rushed for 54 yards
on 28 carries, while
quarterback Cole Willis was 2-
of-5 passing for 13 yards.
Though the Tigers scored 29
points against the Pirates, that
was still quite less than what
opponents averaged last year.
The Pirates gave up an average
of 44 points per game last
season, with two opponents
scoring more than 50 points
and one scoring more than 70'.
Union's offense compiled
422 yards, which included a
314-yard effort on the ground.
The Tigers scored twice on the
ground and twice through the
air.
Some key returners from last
year's Fernandina team
include senior safety Trey
Morris, senior offensive tackle
Toby Williams and senior
running back Tai Dunwood.


Walter Mabery drops Fernandina fullback Jordan Holland for a minimal gain.


UCHS
Continued from Page 9B

on the two-point conversion to
send Union into the break up
20-0.
- Clark and Wright finished
the game with three receptions
each, with Clark gaining 37
yards and Wright gaining 49.
The Pirates had the ball to
start the second half, but
appeared as if they were on the
verge of another three-and-out.
However, they avoided a third-
and-long play when Union was
flagged for unsportsmanlike
conduct. They then picked up
two first downs on runs by
Holland and another on an 8-
yard pass play. Fernandina had
a third-and-5 at the Union 14
when Wright recorded a sack
for a loss of 2 yards. The
Pirates settled for. Cosper's
field goal, which made the
score 20-3 with approximately
six minutes left in the third
quarter.
Union put together a 69-yard
scoring drive that started late


BHS
Continued from Page 6B


passes on the drive to Kenny
Dinkins, Burch, Clayton and
Brandon Thomas. Clayton also
had a 23-yard run to the
Panther 15, eluding several
tacklers with a few quick cuts.
The Panthers helped during
the drive also with a costly 15-
yard personal foul penalty.
Palatka ended the game with
nine penalties for 76 yards,
compared to Bradford's six
penalties for 31 yards.
From the 11, Chipoletti
scored on his acrobatic dive,
but then missed the PAT,
which would have put the
Tornadoes up by one with six
minutes left in the game.


in the quarter. Tyson had a
key 16-yard run on a second-
and-19 play, which enabled
Harden to draw the Pirates
offside on a hard count to pick
up a first down. Clark and
Alexander had receptions of 8
and 17 yards, respectively, to
pick up two more first downs,
with Alexander's catch setting
the Tigers up at the Fernandina
25..
A 10-yard run by Alexander
resulted in another first down
before Tyson eventually
capped the drive with an 8-
yard touchdown run on which
he went virtually untouched
into the end zone. That put the
score at 26-3 with 7:05 to play.
For all intents and purposes,
the game was over, but Pruitt
wanted to continue working on
the passing game in order to
improve and give future
opponents something else to
worry about. That's why he
had Harden attempt three
passes .on a drive that began
with "approximately five
minutes left to play.
"We've got to get better at
throwing the ball," Pruitt said.


The Panthers had two more
opportunities on offense in
regulation, but big stops by
James, Wyatt Manning,
Lyndell Hampton and the
Tornado defensive line forced
punts on both possessions.
Bradford also had an
opportunity to drive for a go-
ahead score .in the final
minutes, but stalled at midfield
after starting at their 27-yard
line. On fourth down, the
Tornadoes punted with two
minutes left in the game.
After Blackshear's block
sealed the game in overtime,
an emotionally spent Bradford
Head Coach Derek Chipoletti
was proud of the way his team
hung in after the costly
mistakes in the first half and
fought back in the second.
"I don't like these types of


"That's why we wanted to
kind of get that in there. I hope
nobody thinks we were trying
to run anything up. We're not
a throwing team. Everybody
knows that, so we've got to get
it on film that we can throw."
It was basically the same
sort of philosophy when Pruitt
called a time out with two
seconds left to allow Joaquin
Lovo to kick a 20-yard field
goal that capped the scoring.
The kicking game is an area
where Pruitt wants'to improve,
especially after being
unsuccessful on every extra-
point kick attempted last
season.
Lovo joined the team just
last week and has no previous
experience kicking. He missed
two PATs earlier in the game,
and Pruitt did not want those
misses to be what he left the
game with.
"I wanted to get him back in
there and build his
confidence," Pruitt said. "He
doesn't have a clue what this is
all about. This is all new to
him."


games, but we've worked hard,
and the kids never gave up,"
he said. "We went 7-3 last
year, and these kids are
expecting to win now. I'm
proud of them."
Chipoletti also praised his
team's defense, saying the unit
played pretty close to perfect.
"They were leading
everything good when they.
lined up, and they're fast and
can get to the play wherever it
goes. .



Above all things, never be
afraid. The enemy who
forces you to retreat is
himself afraid of you at
that very moment.
-Andre Maurois


Classified Ads


19041 964-6305

13521473-2210

1386) 496-2261


/ -


Where one one call

does itall!


TriCounty Classifieds
Bradford Union Clay
Reach over 20,500 Readers Every Week!

INDEX


40 Notice
41 Vehicles Accessories
42 Motor Vehicles
43 RV's & Campers
44 Boats
45 Land for Sale
46 Real Estate Out of Area
47 Commercial Property
Rent, Lease. Sale "
48 Homes for Sale
49 Mobile Homes for Sale
.40 For Rcnt


51 Lost/Found
52 Animals & Pets
53 Yard Sales
54 Kevstone Yard Sales
55 Wanted
56 Trade or Swap
57 For Sale
58 Building Materials
59 Personal Services
60 Secretarial Sers ices
61 Scriptures
62 Vacation/Travel


63 Love Lines
64 Business Opportunity
65 Help Wanted
66 Investment Opportunity
67 Hunting Land fr Rent
68 Rent to Omn
69 Food Supplements
711 Money to Lend
72 Sporting Goods
73 Farm Equipment
74 Computers & Computer
Accessories


CLASSIFIED DEADLINES
Word Ad Classified Tuesday, 12:00 noon
Classified Display Tuesday, 12:00 noon
TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED USE YOUR PHONE

hOM RES5 _M

964-6305 473-2210 496-2261
NOTICE
Clas etd Ad'eriiMi should be paid in advance unless credit has already been es lbhlihed itllh the
ne pai er A (il service charge will be added to all bilnme I, corer po i.ee and headline. All adq
pli]ed br phoe are read 'bhck i the adverti.,er al the lime ft placeinent Horrever. the claJsstied sial
iannrii he held responsible lor inisiakes in cla.sified adIenisini. laken by phome The newspaper reder'.es
hie rnh 1in correctly, cls.sil\ and edit all cop\ or i>o reic i r tancel an) advertisements a ans\ tie Onl
s inlrtnd abbirealironst will be accepted


40
Notices
CLASSIFIED ADVERTIS-
ING should be submitted
to the Starke office in
writing & paid in advance
unless credit has already
been established with
this office A $3 00 SER-
VICE CHARGE will be
added to all billings to
cover postage & handling
THE CLASSIFIED STAFF
CANNOT BE HELD RE-
SPONSIBLE FOR MIS-
TAKES IN CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING TAKEN


OVtH IHE PHONE.
Deadline is Tuesday
at 12 noon prior to that
Thursday's publication.
Minimum charge is $9.50
for the first 20 words,
then 20 cents per word
thereafter.
EQUAL HOUSING OP-
PORTUNITY. All real
estate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to
the Federal Fair Housing
Act of 1968 which makes
it illegal to advertise "any
preference, limitation or
discrimination based on
race, color, religion, sex
or national origin, or an in-


tention to make any such
preference, limitation or
discrimination Familial
status includes children
under the age of 18 living
with parents or legal cus-
todians, pregnant women
and people securing cus-
tody of children under
18 This newspaper will
not knowingly accept any
advertising for real estate
which is in violation of
the law Our readers
are hereby informed that
all dwellings advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis. To


complain of discrimina-
tion, call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777, the toll-
free telephone number
for the hearing impaired
is 1-800-927-9275. For
further information call
Florida Commission on
Human Relations, Lisa
Sutherland 850-488-7082
ext #1005.
42
Motor
Vehicles and
Accessories
95 BUICK LESABRE, good
condition, new tires. Call
352-473-7700, $1,500
OBO.
45
Land for Sale
1 ACRE HIGH & dry, oak
trees, ready for home or
mobile home Keystone
Heights area. Asking
$6,500. Call 904-631-
3594.
3.5 ACRES, asking $22,000
or 1.75 acres, asking
$12,500, high and dry,
cleared, ready for home
or mobile home. Call
Mardena Palmer at Smith
& Smith Realty, 904-422-
0470.
47
Commercial
Property (Rent,
Lease, Sale)
CONVENIENCE STORE
for lease 15043 US 301
south, Starke. For In-
formation call 352-870-
8506


WAREHOUSE, 3,000 sq.ft.
$800/mo. Office and
warehouse 3,000 sq. ft.
$950/mo. Smith & Smith
Realty, 904-964-9222.
DOWNTOWN STARKE Pro-
fessional Offices for rent,
$315 per month. Confer-
ence room, kitchen, utili-
ties and more provided.
904-364-8395.
48
Homes for Sale
BEAUTIFUL CONCRETE
BLOCK HOME for sale.
2,851 sq. ft. total, 1,650
sq ft. heated. 3BR/1.5BA,
glass/screen enclosed
Florida room, front liv-
ing room, dining room
and family room with real
wood flooring, marble
fireplace and built in wood
shelves and cabinets, 2
car garage, utility room
in garage with W/D hook-
ups, 2 storage sheds,
large yard 1 acre with
multiple fruit trees, 1 mile
east of hospital on CR
230 (Call Street), great
area for kids and recre-
action, close to town and
shopping. $198K obo,
call 352-494-7987 and
leave message. View by
appointment only
49
Mobile, Homes
for Sale
MANUFACTURED HOME.
3BR/2BA. Very good
condition. 1.75 Acre.
Small front porch, large
enclosed back porch, two
car ports, master bed


( Works
AliadLu/Bradforn A Cemmuniij Partnership
FloridaWorks is now offering the
FBAT for entry level Corrections
Officers and the FCJBAT for entry
level Police Officers. Please contact
Susan Brown at North Florida Regional
Chamber of Commerce at (904) 964-
5278 to schedule an appointment.


room, kitchen, living room
furnished, washer/dryer,
new LR carpet, new metal
roof. Call 352-473-4162.
NEW D/W 3BR/2BA re-
duced thousands, SET,
DEL, A/C, SKIRT, STEPS
$39,900. CALL Ken 386-
754-0198.
THE ECONOMY has forced
me to cut the price on my
3BR/2BA home to $38k.
Call Mike 352-870-5983.
AS IS WHERE IS Reduced,
have to move. 32x80
4BR/2BA, LR/Den, needs
carpet, paint, 2,280 sq. ft,5
has new metal roof,1999.
2,280 sq.ft. $29,900. Call
Randy 386-754-0198.
3,000 SO. FT. A must see,
fully loaded, 4BR/3.5BA,
L/R, Den, F/P. $129,900.
CALL Ken 386-754-
0198.
OWNER FINANCE to land
owners or 40% cash
down loan amount. On
any new or used single-
wide ordoublewide. Call
Randy 386-754-8844.
WANTED I buy used single
& doublewide mobile
homes. Call Jared or Greg
at 904-259-4663.
NEW 2012, 2 Bedroom
$23,900. Includes set up,
country wood floors. Call
Jared at 904-259-4663
jmmartin23@yahoo.
com.
FORECLOSURE 3BR/2BA
on half acre, $55,000.
4BR/2BA on 1 acre
$69,900. Remodeled,


owner finance available.
Call Jared or Greg at 904-
259-4663,
WE PURCHASE USED MO-
BILE HOMES. Call North
Pointe Homes, Gaines-
ville 352-872-5566.
LOOK!! Before you buy a
Mobile Home check out
North Pointe Homes in
Gainesville. Huge dis-
counts, credit scores don't
matter. Call for free ap-
proval. Jacobsen Homes
Factory Outlet, 352-872-
5566.
NEW-USED-REPO'S. Your
volume giant! North Pointe
Homes millions to lend,
credit scores 575=10%
down. Gainesville. 352-
872-5566.
KEYSTONE HEIGHTS
close to Hitchcock's
shopping center. 2/BR
Mobile Home w/room ad-
dition. Fenced back yard.
$17,900, sale only, no
rent to own,etc. For more
information call 904-364-
9022
SAY GOODBYE TO.YOUR
LAND LORD! Homes
starting at $29,988. Easy
to Qualify, call 386-325-
8013.
LAND OWNERS, use your
land for your new mobile
home Easy financing,
386-325-4106
RENTERS WANTED/PAL-
ATKA 2008 Jacobson
28x60 3BR/2BA, Living
room, den, fireplace on
1 acre Landscaped lot,


Whisper in itsgApartmen


"SUMMER SPECIAL"
3 Bedrooms 2 Baths

Only $599 mth.
2/2 $579 mth. 4/2 $729 mth.
Subsidized Units Available.
I-so. .0 .


$40K takes all or owner
will finance at $325/mo.
Home shows like new.
904-589-9585.
RENTERS WANTED/IN-
TERLACHEN 2008 32x80
4BR/2BA, glamour bath,
living room, den, fireplace
on 4 acres. Landscaped
lot. An absolute steal at
$53K. Or owner will fi-
nance at $595/mo. 904-
589-9585.
I HAVE SEVERAL bank
repos. available for lust
.50 cents on the dollar
including a 2006 Scotbilt
32x66. Loaded with op-
tions for $49,995 fob.
Finance is also available
at 5.5% apr call mike 352-
373-6684


Southern Villas of'
Starke Apts.
$199
Move-in Special
1 & 2 BR HC & non-HC
apartments. Central ac/
heat, on-site laundry,
playground, private and
quietlatmosphere. Located
on SR-16, 1001 Southern
Villas Dr., Starke, FL or call
904-964-7295. TDD-TTY
711. "This institution is an
equal opportunity provider
and employer."


HOMES OF MERIT for
$49,995 it's a brand new
home with many resi-
dential features great for
retirement home or starter
home. So why pay the
same for an economy
model or used home On
site includes a/c skirting
and steps. Call manager
Mike 352-378-2453.
REALLY DON'T WANT to
sell but have too. Won't
fit on lot. Fleetwood 28x70
with large rooms $28,500
FOB. Can move-and fi-
nance call Mike 352-373-
6684.
BANK REPO! 2005 Great
room. Fleetwood 32X60
3/2 with pass thru kitchen
and luxurious master bath


Orangewood Apartments
801 South Water Street
Starke, FL 32091
904-964-4214
TDD/TY 711
Accepting Applications!
Rental Assistance!
1, 2, & 3 bedroom HC &
Non-HC accessible
apartments.
"Tnis rnstituton is an equal
opportunity powder and employer'
"Equa! Housing Opoortunty


Now Accepting

Applications

1 AND 2
BEDROOM APARTMENTS
HERITAGE VILLAS
APARTMENTS
607 Bradford Court ~ Starke, FL
Call for more info
904-964-6216
Hearing Impaired Only
call 800-955-8771
Handicapped Accessible
This Instlution is an Equa Opportunity
........... Provider, and Empioye






Thursday 6 2011 IelegraphTimes St Monitor B Section IlB


Classified Ads


(9041 964-6305

13521 473-2210

(3861496-2261


Where one call
I. -3E


Does it a ll


with separate shower
$36,995 includes deliv-
ery, set-up and re-hook
a/c Finance with as low
as $999 down and 5 5%
APR Call manager Mike
352-378-2453
WHY RENT9 When you
can buy Don't pay high
rent when you can own
for less Call Mike 386-
754-8844
50
For Rent
MOBILE HOME & HOUSE
for rent In good condition
For more information call,
904-964-5006 or 904-
422-8959
WALDO VILLAS 2 bed-
rooms Basic rent starts at
$475 Equal Housing Op-
portunity. this institution
is an equal opportunity
provider & employer Call
Nita at 352-468-1971.
NICE LOCATION 3BR/2BA
MH CH/A $650/Mo, first,
and last Call 904-964-
3595
LAKE GENEVA MOBILE
HOME PARK, Keystone
Heights For rent 2 and
3 bedrooms First month,
and security Call Rick at
352-235-0506
WE HAVE 2 OR 3 bedroom
MH, clean, close to prison.
Call 352-468-1323.
SPECIAL 1 MONTH RENT
FREEi Nice, newly reno-
vated 2 & 3 BR mobile
homes in Starke/Lake
Butler Deposit required
Call 678-438-6828 or
678-438-2865
MOBILE HOMES FOR
RENT starting at $525
per month Hidden Oaks,
Lake Butler. Call 386-
496-8111
VERY NICE ONE PERSON
FURNISHED APT. Forin-
formation 352-473-7769.
FOR RENT 2BR Apartment
downtown Starke, all utili-
ties included. $650 per
month. 1st, last and de-
posit required. Call Joan
at 904-964-4303.
2BR/1BA COTTAGE 1st &
sec. deposit, $525. Lake
Geneva area. Call 352-
473-2919-
UPSTAIRS, 1BR apt. down
town Starke. $450/mo.
1st, last and deposit re-
quired. Call 904-964-4303
for additional informa-
tfon.
UPSTAIRS, 2BR apt. down
town Starke. $450/mo.
1st and last and deposit
required. Call 904-964-
4303 for additional infor-
mation.
LAKE SANTA FE 2BR/1.5BA
furnished Mobile Home.
Covered parking, washer/
dryer and cable. $800/mo.
Call 352-745-1307.


LAKE SANTA FE 2BR/2BA
furnished Mobile Home
Vacation rental or short
term lease $900/mo Call
352-745-1307
3BR/2BA CH/A, W/D hook-
up, stove, refrigerator.
dishwasher 455SE44th.
St, Keystone, $795 per
month, $700 security Call
352-226-9220 or 352-
475-5533
HOUSE walking distance
downtown Starke 2BR/
2BA Living room, din-
ning room, kitchen, family
room, utility room, large
garage,CH/A $650/mo
first. last Service animals
only Call 904-964-6718
KEYSTONE HEIGHTS,
3BR/2BA MH on 1 acre,
close to town, $575/mo.
plus deposit. Call 352-
475-6260
LOCATED IN RAIFORD
2BR/1BA SWMH C/A,
fenced, security lights,
covered porch, washer,
remodeled, painted and
more First and deposit
386-431-1164
3BR/2BA ON PRIVATE
LAKE, 5 acres. $800/mo.
Close to McRae school.
904-910-5960 ,
KEYSTONE HEIGHTS,
3BR/1BA in town. Wash-
er/Dryer, walk to schools
and shopping. Call 904-
881-5177..
RENTERS WANTED/
HAMPTON 2006 Ranch
Style Fleetwood on 2
acres, large oaks. Good
shade 4BR/2BA, 32x80
living room, 'fireplace,
den. Rent to own-Buy.
No to low down payment,
$590/mo 904-589-9585.
RENTERS WANTED /
LAKE BUTLER. 2005
28x80 4BR/2BA, living
room, den, fireplace on 2
acre lot. Completely land-
scaped home shows like
new. Owner has financing
or rent to own $495/mo.
904-589-9585.
3BR/1BA MOBILE HOME,
CH/A, remodeled, large
fenced yard. $495/mo.
+$400 deposit, references
required (352) 317-5880.
2BR/1 BA Small singlewide
on nice, 2 wooded acres


in Melrose. $340/mo plus
$150 deposit Call 352-
519-8042
2BR/1BA SWMH CH/A,
W/D hook-up. 1 acre land,
very clean $550/mo plus
deposit Call 904-769-
9559
KEYSTONE HEIGHTS
AREA Great for one
person' Furnished All
you need is your clothes
1 BR/1 BA mobile home in
small park Ouiet $350/
mo plus electric Water,
garbage and lawn main-
tenance included Call
352-235-0020
REMODELED ONE BR
MOBILE, on private land
Fully furnished, incls TV
$275 w/ senior discount
Cute little place ideal one
person Keystone Hts
352-473-5745
2BR/1BA with large deck
near Lake Geneva and
Lake Brooklyn $700/mo
plus security deposit. Call
352-216-5111.
STARKE, 2BR/1 BA SWMH,
outside city limits. $475/
mo. plus deposit. 352-
235-6319.
1BR/1BA apartment for
rent. 222 S Thompson
St. $325/mo plus utilities
Available now. Call Mr.
Corbin 904-562-0099.
KEYSTONE HEIGHTS
LAKE HOUSE. 1 BR/1BA
on beautiful fenced in
shaded lot. Energy up-
graded with new tin roof,
A/C ceiling fans, insulation
reducing cost ofelectric-
ity. Washer/dryer hookup,





h fI .



Tree' Serviceg''


DOUGLASS LAWN CARE
Lawn Cuts Weed Eating
Hedging & more!
Quality Lawn Care at a Great Price!


Johnathan Douglass
904,364-6888

ji -. M i


DOODLE BGS7 THIlTfS1tOP

OPEN: Tues-Fri 10am-6pm Sat 10am-2pm

Clothes Baby Housewares Furniture

Collectibles and Lots More!

904-964-3555

750 West Madison St. Starke, FL
SR-100 West Just 2 blocks past Winn Dixie


BRADFORD COUNTY

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY
BRADFORD COUNTY IS ADVERTISING FOR A FULL-TIME
BUILDING OFFICIAL POSITION. APPLICANTS MUST BE
QUALIFIED AS A CERTIFIED BUILDING OFFICIAL (AS
DETERMINED BY THE FLORIDA DEPARTMENT. OF
BUSINESS AND PROFESSIONAL REGULATION)

Salary: Negotiable, based on experience
Applications may be obtained at www.bradfordcountyfl.gov or
in the County Manager's office. Completed applications must be
received in the County Manager's Office by December 30, 2011.

EEO/AA Employer




ESTATE SALE


& AUCTION
9057 US Hwy 301 S. Hampton, FL
Estate Sale Sept. 16, 17 & 18 ~- 11am 4pm
Auction Sept. 18 begins at 4:00 pm

Antiques, Household Goods, Home Decor, Boat,
Military Memorabilia, Furniture and Much More!



Rose's Auctions
SAB2991 AU4172
352-468-3775 or 352-235-2803
www.rosesauction.com


KEYSTONE VILLAGE APARTMENTS
I Takep n a ,nb nt Li, M


A s ASA
I e e i i .


Convenient to shopping, restaurant, boat ramps,
Keystone Heights public beach, schools, banks
& medical facilities All units have additional outside storage
Full carpeting and vinyl flooring
Central air conditioning and heating Custom cabinets
Ample parking One story only no stairs to climb
Lovely landscaping Patios& Porches for outdoor living
Convenient laundry facilities
418 S.E. 41st Loop in Keystone Club Estates
& (Next to the Golf Course)
Handicapped Coe, in and seeo, call i, at 352473-3682
Equipped TDD dial 711 EOUGL HOUSING
This institution is an OPPORTUNIT
This institution is an Equal Opportunity Provider andEnlIoapr.


kitchen snack bar over-
looking living room with
cathedral ceaing and stor-
age loft Large bedroom
with walk in closet and
built in desk with shelves
Water/sewage included
Small pets permitted with
deposit Rent depending
on family size, single..
and senior discounts Call
352-473-0047
53A
Yard Sales
MOVING SALE, Sat Sun
8am-9 22140 NW 77th
Lane just off CR 225 by
prison 1/2 mile NorIhside
Baptist Church on right
Gotta go" Sleeper sofa
love seat. 2 recliners,
end tables toolbox tool,
2 twin beds, lots of little
extras'
SAT. 8am.-1pm 2391 SE
150th ST (Wilson Road)
Tools, sports, crafts, toys,
webkins, homeschool
books, etc
SAT. SUN. 8.30am,-2pm.
Stainless dishwasher,
sterling silver jewelry, an-
tique sewing machine,
tables and chairs, boat
anchors, children's cloth-
ing, toys, nic nacs. 1314
Blanding St.
SATURDAY ONLY! 8am.-
5pm. One mile down
Griffis Loop on left side.
Look for signs. House-
hold items, baby items,
and curio cabinets Good
prices!
HUGE YARD SALE! Furni-
ture, households, clothes,


* Carpentry
* HomeRepair
* Presure Washing
* OddJobs-
SYard Work
* Garden Roto-Ibling
* Licensed & Inrmed


baby clothes, toys A little
bit of everything. Fri., Sat,
8am -2pm 12166NWCR
225 Starke.
WEEKEND YARD SALE AT
TEACHING FARM. Sat.
Sun 8am.-5pm CR 18
& 227. 10665 SW 89TH
Ave. Hampton.
HUGE YARD SALE! Sat.
9am -5pm. Antiques, col-
lectibles, misc. 1203 Blan-
ding St., Starke.
Sat, 7am.-5pm and Sun.,
8am -2pm. Hwy 16 (near
prisons) look for signs.
Furniture, appliances,
electronics, clothing, wed-
ding gown, copy machine,
and decorations. MUST
SEE!!!
53B
Keystone Yard
Sales
INDOOR GARAGE SALE.
Thur., Fri., 9am.-5pm.
Glassware, lamps, an-
tiques, three households.
7408 St. Road 21 Key-
stone Heights. (Across
from Johnny's BBO).
GARAGE SALE. Sat. 8am.-
2pm. Household items,
holiday decorations, fur-
niture, etc. at Lake Area
Storage. 7101 SR 21 N,
Keystone Heights.
Fri., 8am.-4pm. and Sat.,
8am.-2pm. 6501 Little Lily
Lake Road.
53C
Lake Butler
Yard Sale
MOVING SALE. Fri., Sat.,
8am.-2pm. A little bit of
everything. 13594 NE


*BushHogMowing
*TreIlHmminm & RanoW
*Site Clean Up
-'FraeiRnov.ld
* Pine Bark& Cpiea Milkh
*FrewoodForSale
*Fe srimates


Owner: Kerry Whitfird
:5 *e -fl) E5


4 Bedroom 2 Bath Homes
1425 Sq Ft with Garage z.t

Only 698 .mth.





Visit our website & print application at
http://www.keysenterprise.corn/countryclubwoods/outside.home/asp"
15128 SE25thAve.- STARKE

6% 904-964-1871




www.polarisofgaineswille.com

USED MOTORCYCLES & ATVs
2003 Polaris Sportsman 700 CAMO............$3,995
2003 Polaris Magnum CAMO 4x4.............$2,995
2008 Polaris Ranger 700.......................$8,995
2007 Polaris Ranger 700.........................$7,995
2003 Polaris Ranger 500 4x4...................$4,995
2007 Yamaha V-Star 1100........................$7,999
2002 Victory Touring Cruiser....................$6,999
2009 Victory Vision..........................$....$16,999
2008 Yamaha Royal Star Tour Deluxe........$12,995
2009 Suzuki S-40.....................................$4,995
2006 Victory KingPin.................................. $9,995
2010 Victory Cross Roads.....................$13,999
$ 9 Harley Davidson's to choose from $
2007 Polaris Sportsman 700....................$4,995
2003 Polaris Sportsman 400....................$3,195
2008 Polaris Sportsman 300....................$3,995
2008 Yamaha Big Bear 400.....................$3,995

USED BOATS
& PERSONAL WATERCRAFT
2006 Honda F-12X Aqua Trax /Turbo...........$5,995
1997 Polaris Jet Ski................................ $2,999
2004 Polaris Virage PWC......................$2,999
1999 Fisher 16 ft/25 hp Mercury.................$3,495
2004 14 ft Fisher w/5 hp Mercury................$2,999
2006 Polar Kraft 115 hp Honda...................$5,495

GREAT TRUCKS
Great Sale Pricesl
2001 Jeep Grand Cherokee......................$4,995
2001 Dodge Ram 1500............................ $4,995
2005 Ford F-150 STX.............................. $9,995


2006 Fleetwood 26 ft.
Trauvl Trailer


7 o995


I lGll~l lg i~l.............................. ,ilII tt
12556-- ------wy 441
(6 ils ort o P 4wy atol


Adoption
A childless couple
seeks to adopt. Flexible
work schedule. Will be
HANDS-ON parents.
Financial security.
Expenses paid.
Catherine & Michael.
(ask for micheller/
adam). (800)790-5260
FL Bar=0150789
Education
ALLIED HEALTH
career training-A\itend
college 100lt o online.
Job placement
assistance. Computer
available Iinancial Aid
if qualified SCHEV
certified. Call
8( 0 ) 4 1 9 4 0 9
\'\ .CentuiiraOnhiiliie .co


Financial Services
SSS ACCESS
LA\\SLIT CASH
NOW!'! SSS As seen
on TV.SSS lnjur\


Lawsuit Dragging?
Need S500-S500.000+
+within 48/hrs? Low
rates APPLY NOW
BY PHONE! Call
Today! Toll-Free:
( 800)568-832 1
www.lawcapital.comn
Help Wanted
Driver- Southern
Freight needs
Drivers!! Solo. Team.
Company & O'O. We
hae LOTS of
FREIGHT!!' Call
(877)893-9645 for
details.
Need 13 Good Drivers
Top 5% Pay & 401K 2
Mlos. CDL Class A
Dris ing E\p (877)258-
8 7 8 2
www meltontruck.com
Dricers- No
Experience No
Problem. 100(o Paid
CDL Training.


251st Loop, Raiford, pris-
on housing.
57
For Sale
HUSOUVARNA riding
mower 24hp, 48" cut,
$900. Craftsman 42" cut
20hp, good condition,
$500. Jonboat with troll-
ing motor, 13', $300. Call
386-965-2781 or 386-
496-1128.
59
Personal
Services
DAYCARE IN LAKE BUT-
LER, great rates, all
hours, lots of TLC. HRS
certified, CPR certified
and First Aide certified.
Call 386-496-1062.
CLARK FOUNDATION RE-
PAIRS, INC. Correction

of termite & water-dam-
aged wood & sills. Level-
ing & raising Houses/
Bldgs. Pier Replacement
& alignment. We do all
types of tractor work,
excavation and small
demolition jobs. Free Es-
timates: Danny (Buddy)
Clark, 904-284-8088 or
904-545-5241.
FLORIDA CREDIT UNION
has money to lend for MH
& land packages. 1-800-
284-1144.


Full-time position

Computer skills required
401k
Vacation
Insurance
Apply in person
Mon-Fri 8am-Spm

No phone calls please


SAWYER GAS
"YOUR LOCAL FULL.-SERVICE PROPANE DEALER"
9449 US Hwy 301 South '
Hampton, FL





FLORIDA
^ GATEWAY
COLLEGE


ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR,
ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
164 Duty Days Tenured Track
(Grant Funded)
POSITION #: F99924

Teach programmable logic
controllers, robotics, hydraulics and
pneumatics, electronics, electrical
systems, manufacturing processes.
Requires Master's degree in
engineering, manufacturing or related
field. Experience with manufacturing
processes including programmable
logic controllers, robotics, electronics
and hydraulics; teaching experience;.
curriculum development; knowledge
of Manufacturing Skills Standard
Council's skills standards. Six Sigma
certification preferred. SALARY:
Based on degree and experience.
APPLICATION DEADLINE: 9/30/111
Persons interested should provide
College application, vita, and
photocopies of transcripts. All foreign
transcripts must be submitted with
official translation and evaluation.
Position details and applications
available on web at: www.fgc.edu
Human Resources
Florida Gateway College
149 S.E. College Place
Lake City, FL 32025-2007
Phone (386) 754-4314
Fax (386.) 754-4814
E-Mail: humanrr(afqc.edu
FGC is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of
the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools.
VP/ADA/EA/EO Colledge in Education and
Employment


Out of Area Classifieds


Immediate Benefits. 20/
10 program. Trainers
Earn up to 49 per
mile! CRST VAN
EXPEDITED
(800)326-2778
www.JoinCRST.com
S5,000 Sign-On Bonus!
Frac Sand Haulers with
complete Bulk
Pneumatic Rigs only.
Relocate to Texas for
tons of work! Fuel
Quick pay available.
(800)491-9022

Land For Sale
LAK E FRONT
BARGAIN I- Acres -
only 549.900
DO C K A B L E
DEEPWATETR \\ as
S89.900. Prime
lakefront parcel "ith
direct access to Gulf
On 12.000 acre


recreational lake
covered in huge live
oaks! Close to the city.
Paved roads, county
water, power, phone.
community boat
launch. Excellent
financing. Call now
(866)952-5302
GA LAND SALE 17
Tracts to choose from.
Creeks. pond sites,
wooded, clear cut. etc.
Visit our websitc.
stregispaper.com
(478)987-9700 St.
Regis Paper Co
Miscellaneous
SAWMILLS from
only S3997- MIAKE
MONI Y & SAVE
IMONEY \n' h i our
own bandmill- Cut
lumber aln\ dimension.
In lstock rcad. to ship.
FREE Info & DVD:


www.NorwoodSawmil
Is com / 3 0 0 N
(800)578- 1 363
Ext.300N
ATTEND COLLEGE
ONLINE from Home.
'Medical, *Business, *
Paralegal,
Accounting, *Criminal
Justice. Job placement
assistance. Computer
available. Financial
Aid if qualified. Call
( 888)20 3 3 1 79
vww.CcnturaOnlinc.c
om
AIRLINES ARE
HIRING Train
forhigh paying
Aviation Maintenance
Career. FAA approved
program. Financial aid
if qualified Housing
available CALL
Aviation Institute of
M a i n tc nance
(866)314-3769.


JERRY'SS HAULING WE
BUY JUNK CARS. with
or without titles! Will pick
up anywhere Up to $200.
Call 904-219-9365 or 904-
782-9822.
LAWN MAINTENANCE,
grass cuts, weed eat-
ing and hedging. Great
prices! Call Johnathan
904-364-6888
TERRY'S LAND CLEAR-
ING. Land clearing, stump
grinding, tree removal,
general clean up, metal
removal. 904-964-7906.
NEEDED OCCASIONALLY,
an experienced, caring
adult to help care for a
special needs stallion.
Call Julie @ 904- 964-
6893.
QUALITY HOUSE CLEAN-
ING. Reasonable rates.
Free estimates. Call 904-
964-5858.
63
Love Lines
SELF-EMPLOYED SWM.
58, 5'7", blue eyes S/P
hair, 160/lbs. ISO Attrac-
tive WF 45-55, for discreet
relationship. Business
cell 904-334-4678 ask
for"Bud.
65'
Help Wanted
DRIVERS: TEAMS $6,000
team sign-on bonus when
team drive for Werner
Enterprises. Call now for
details 1-888-880-5902.
if


equivalent reqOired. Ap-
plications may be picked
up and returned at the
Building and Zoning De-
partment located in the
North Wing of the Brad-
ford County Courthouse
or by e-mailing zoning@
bradfordzoning.com. Sal-
ary will be $11.00 hour
plus benefits. Deadline
for submitting applications
will by September 15,
2011 at 4:00 pm. Brad-
ford County is an equal
opportunity employer.
DRIVERS: TEAMS $6,000
team sign-on bonus when
team drive.for Werner
Enterprises. Call now for
details 1-888-880-5902.
ATTN. SOUTHEAST re-
gional drivers, tired of
running to the northeast?
Currently hiring Co. and
I/C to run in the southeast.
Home weekly!! Great ben-
efits!! Must have 1 year
T/T exp. CDL-A driver;
drivers unload. Ask about
dedicated opportunities in
your area. EPES TRANS-
PORT, 877-983-0202
www.epestransport.com


HELP WANTED

State Employees Credit Union is
seeking a dynamic, sales-minded
individual with excellent customer
service skills to fill a part-time
teller position at our Raiford
location. This position requires a
positive attitude and a willingess
to work a flexible schedule,
Previous teller experience is
preferred. Please send your resume
to krountreeSsecufl.org or fax
904-418-7307.




FLORIDA
a GATEWAY
< COLLEGE


INSTRUCTOR/COORDINATOR,
EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES
PROGRAMS
Full-time
224 Day Tenure Track Position
Teaches and assists the Executive
Director of Nursing and Health
Services in various aspects of
program development, planning and
implementation of the EMT- Basic,
Paramedic, and EMS Associate
Degree programs. Coordinates
course schedules, clinical sites and
part-time faculty, and assists in
program expansion and student
recruitment; maintains state and
national program certifications.
MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS:
Bachelor's degree in emergency
medical services or closely related
field. Paramedic certification either at
the state or national level. Three
years experience as a paramedic.
Must be able to establish and
maintain effective working
relationships with others.
DESIRABLE QUALIFICATIONS:
Minimum three years teaching
experience at the technical school or
community college level. ACLS,
PALS, and PHTLS instructor
certification.
Salary: Based on Degree and
Experience
Application Deadline: 9/23/11
Persons interested should provide
College application, vita, and
photocopies of transcripts. All foreign
transcripts must be submitted with
official translation and evaluation.
Position details and applications
available on web at:
Human Resources
Florida Gateway College
149 S.E. College Place
Lake City, FL 32025-2007
Phone (386) 754-4314
Fax (386) 754-4814
E-Mail:
FGC is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of
the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools.
VP/ADA/EA/EO College in Education and
Employment


DIRECT Summer
Special! I Year FREE
Showtime! 3 mos
FREE HBO/Starz/
Cinemax! NFL
SUNDAY TICKET
Free Choice
Ultimatc/Premier
Pkgs from S29.99/mo.
Call by 9/30!
(800)360-2254
Real Estate
B A Nl K
FORECLOSED.
L A N D
LIQUIDATION, from
S9.900. Blue Ridge
mountains, paved
roads, utilities, county
water, panoramic
views. excellent
financing. Sale
September 24th, Call
now! (888)757-6867
ext. 214RV's/Mobile
Homes
RV's/Mobile Homes


P U B L I C
AUCTION 150+
Spec and Dealer
Model Travel
Trailers. NO
MINIMUM
PRICE! Online
Bidding Available
S a i u r da y
September II).
10am Philadelphia.
M S
wwv hendersoniiuc
tion.comi (225)686-
2252 Lic' 266
Schools &
Instruction
Heat & Air JOBS -
Ready to work'.' 3
%eek accelerated
program. Hands oin
c n i r o ill e n .
N a t i o n 0 \ i d e
ccrlificalions and
Local Job
P I a c e in e n i
A s s i s t a nit c ce
(877)359-1690 -


Keystone Hauling &

Handyman Service, LLC


I H y I -


/


NOW HIRING for a Small
Engine Mechanic. Must
have knowledge of lawn
mowers, 2 & 4 cycle equip-
ment. General knowledge
of tractors & farm equip-
ment. Tools are required.
Computers and typing
skills required. Drug free
work place. Apply in per-
son at Lazenby Equip-
ment 904-964-4238,
references required.
CERTIFIED TEACHERS
FOR AMP. Afterschool
program (Starke Church
of God by Faith CLC).
Hours 21/2 per day Mon.-
. Thurs. pay $20 hour.
Contact Pastor Avery
Shell at 904-964-2435 or
alshells@hotmail.com.
BRADFORD COUNTY
Building and Zoning De-
partmenti is currently
accepting applications
for a full time Permitting
Clerk/Zoning Assistant.
Applicant must be famil-
iar with Microsoft Office
software, type a minimum
of 35 wpm. and exhibit ex-
cellent customer service.
High Scfiool diploma or


1


I


J


I


I




128 Telegraph, Times & Monitor B Section Thursday, Sept. 8, 2011


I i


4


Are you, or someone you know,


stru


ing with hearing loss?


"Bring in the talk...


Screen down the noise!


We need 31 people with difficulty hearing,
especially in noisy situations, to evaluate the
latest in digital technology from Audibel.
Audibel Hearing Centers will perform 31
Comprehensive Hearing Consultations FREE
of charge .to all callers. We will then choose
qualified candidates for this program. Please
call immediately to schedule your evaluation
to determine if you are a candidate for the
program. Candidates selected will be asked to
evaluate the latest nearly invisible hearing aids
in assistive hearing technology for 30 days.
Imagine a hearing aid that automatically
adapts to your surroundings and reflects your
specific lifestyle. Imagine a hearing aid that is
so pleasant to wear that it gives a new meaning
to the phrase "customer satisfaction." Well,
imagine no more With this breakthrough
technology from AUDIBEL, the world's largest
hearing aid manufacturer. Now comes the
first hearing aid ever developed to address
your most important needs. Not only does it
fit your individual hearing loss, it fits the way
you live. If you hear, but are having trouble
understanding conversations, you owe it
to yourself to take advantage of the FREE
demonstrations offered this week. Call Audibel
today for a no obligation appointment.
Hearing Tests to determine candidacy will
be held through September 15th. Please call
immediately.Appointments are limited! Those
interested must call today!


Tom Guillot
Board Certified
Specialist
Member FSHHP


The hearing Just slip it in.
computer
is fully
automatic


3r~


It is hidden
inside and
hearing is
easy.


1107 S. WALNUT STREET STARKE, FL
(Behind Bradford County Eye Center)
Hwy 301 South


964) M4a4327


AUDIBEL


.S .-*
*' -**-


M. qh 4