Group Title: Bradford County Telegraph.
Title: Bradford County telegraph
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00027795/00147
 Material Information
Title: Bradford County telegraph
Uniform Title: Bradford County Telegraph
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: L.C. Webb
Place of Publication: Starke, Fla.
Starke Fla
Publication Date: November 15, 2007
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Starke (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Bradford County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Bradford -- Starke
Coordinates: 29.947222 x -82.108056 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 9, no. 41 (Apr. 13, 1888)-
General Note: Publishers: Mathews & Farmer, <1893-1897>; E.S. Mathews, <1900-1926>.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00027795
Volume ID: VID00147
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 33886096
alephbibnum - 000579551
electronic_aleph - 003298621
electronic_oclc - 60662535
lccn - sn 95047406
lccn - sn 95047406
 Related Items
Preceded by: Starke telegraph

Full Text




c, ..ial Anniversary Edition ,


raforb Countp T


1107770 BEC
P K YONGE LIBiRARY
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
1080 S:2W IlITH ST
GAINESVILLE FL 32611


hJSB'S 062-700 Five Sections Starke, Florida


Thursday, Nov. 15, 2007


128th Year 16th Issue 50 CE


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The names of the first non-Native American
settlers to the Starke area are not known for
certain. The years prior to Starke becoming a
city in 1857 are still shrouded in a great deal of
mystery. However, there is reason to believe that
prior to 1857, Starke was sparsely settled, with
a log cabin here and there. Most of the area was
still a dense forest of virgin pine.
Old maps indicate the vicinity of Starke was a
crossroads, even in the early days of settlement,
if the crude, sandy trails used for travel in those
days could be dignified, with the name "roads.".
Periodically, these trails would bring a settler
from Georgia or South Carolina, who would
stake out a homestead and do the backbreaking
work of clearing farmland and planting cotton.
Others would come to the area to harvest the
pine lumber and set up naval stores operations.
to process turpentine.
There were scattered settlers to the Starke
area prior to 1857, but there was no real driv-
ing force behind settlement until the route
for the Fernandinato Cedar Key railroad was
announced. This rail line would connect the
Atlantic Ocean and the Gulf of Mexico for the
first time and this important line was to pass
through the area that is now Starke. When that
news was announced, the settlers in the vicinity
increased.
Drury (or Drew) Reddish held the earliest
land grant on record. In 1854, Reddish was a
young farmer from Wayne County, Ga., who


Starke Was Born


obtained title to 40 acres of land which now Starke. Cole bought the land, which stretched
comprises part of southern Starke. The Reddish from Santa Fe Community College Andrews
family has lived in Bradford County ever Center to the site where the old city power
since that time. plant is being torn down, for a total
The official birth of Siarke "' o. of $100. He then sold the land
is dated from the time O0 F F and apparently left the
the first post office area, since his name
was established. does not appear on
in November of i the 1860 census.
1857. George an According to
W. Cole was old courthouse
postmas a records, Cole
ter and, died "some-
although where in
his name Alachua
appears County."
in a large .Alachua
- number e County, at
/of docu- that time,
ments in included
that day, the land
not much that is now
is known Bradford
about Cole. It and Union
is believed that counties.
he once lived in T h e
Fernandina and Fernandina to
was, at one time. Cedar Key rail-
connected to the land l road reached Starke in
office in St. Augustine. so OUNI 1858 and the tiny town
it is possible that Cole came to was the end of the line for a
Starke after learning about the plans full year before construction moved
for the Fernandina on. A stage line connected- Starke to Waldo,
to Cedar Key rail- Gainesville, Ocala and beyond. For that one
road. It is known, year, passengers traveled to Starke arid then used
however, that in the stage to travel onward. Being the jumping-
1859 Cole obtained off point for southbound travel meant growth
title to the 40 acres for the town. What was Starke like in 1858?
of land that now An early unknown newspaper historian, writing
lies under the in 1887, said the town that greeted travelers in
downtown busi- 1858 was a tiny oasis in a "vast, unbroken pine
ness district in forest, where the deer, bear, wildcat and the


stealthy panther roamed at their own free will."
The town owes its early growth, and possibly
even its birth, to the railroad. The entire town
was laid out in grids based on the railroad lines.
The 1887 writer said the first structure built
in town was large double-log house built by
William Edwards Sr. and John Brown. It was
located on the northwest comer of Thompson
and Madison streets, now a vacant, unpaved lot
that serves Badcock Furniture and other down-
town businesses with additional parking.
It is possible that a trading post of sorts
existed in Starke prior to 1859, but it was in that
year that the first actual business was opened in
town. Capt. John Charles Richard (pronounced
Ree-shard) was born in Georgia on Jan. 29,
1827, and married Mary Olmstead .Morgan of
_ Middleburg on Jan. 30, 1855. The couple moved
to Jacksonville and Richard entered partnership
in a mercantile business there with George E.
Pace.
In 1859, the new railroad had already reached
Starke on its journey to join both coasts and
Richard recognized the potential growth of the
area. Richard moved his family to Starke and
opened a general. store. Pace followed and the
two men again established a partnership and
continued to operate Richard & Pace for more
than 30 years.
What's in a name?
There is nothing on record to prove how
"Starke" became the name of the town established
on Cole's land and the surrounding area. There
is more than one theory about how it happened.
The once generally accepted theory was that
Starke was named in honor of Madison Starke
Perry, who was governor of Florida from 1857
to 1861. Perry was born in SOIuth Carolinaland
his mother was from a very prominent family in
that state, the Starke family.
See BORN, p. 2A


The battle to be county seat


Capt. John Charles Richard and his wife, Mary, were early
settlers, and Richard opened one of the city's first businesses.


Sunday, Nov. 18: Churches are asked to
recognize the anniversary and pray for the city
during their morning services.

Monday, Nov. 19: Last chance to turn in items
for the time capsule to city hall. Music from the
past 50 years will welcome visitors who come
to view historic information, contest drawings
submitted by the schools and greetings and
recognition sent from communities around the
state.

Tuesday, Nov. 20: Music and visits continue
from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. At 1:30, the anniversary
ceremony and time capsule dedication will take
place on the steps of city hall, followed by
refreshments at the Starke Woman's Club.

Wednesday, Nov. 21: Kids first grade and up
are invited to a free movie showing of at the
Florida Theater at 10 a.m. If the first showing
fills up, a second will take place at 1:30 p.m.


While the controversy over the
city's name was intense, it was also
brief. The earlier battle over the
location of the county seat went on
for nearly half a century and was
fought in the ballot box and Florida
Legislature as well as on the editorial
pages of the newspaper.
All of the land that is now
Bradford and Union counties was
once contained in New River County.
Starke and Lake Butler were the
two major towns in the county, with
Lake Butler as the larger of the two.
In December of 1861, the Florida
Legislature changed the name of New
River County to Bradford County in
honor of Capt. Richard Bradford, the
first Florida officer who was killed
in the Civil War. Lake Butler was the
county seat at the time, and had been
the county seat of New River County
as well.
But Starke was growing. The
Atlantic to Gulf rail line, which was
completed just prior to the Civil
War, ran right through Starke and
had brought something of a building
boom to the town. Commerce was


increasing and the population was
growing. There were people in town
who felt their fair city should be the
one to play host to the courthouse and
be called the county seat, or "county
site" as it was termed in those days.
Since having the courthouse in town
meant that people had to come to town
to take care of all sorts of business,
being the county seat usually meant
an increase in trade for merchants, as
well as, a certain amount of prestige
for the town.
In December of 1874, a group of
316 registered voters presented a
petition to the county commission to
hold a special election to change the
location of the county seat from Lake
Butler to Starke. The commission
examined the petition and determined
that 316 was a large enough number
of voters to validate the petition. A
special election was ordered for Jan.
18, 1875.
The county commission met on Jan.
23 to canvass, or examine, the ballots.
They found that some of the voting
precincts had not delivered their
ballots to County Clerk Benjamin E.


When Starke finally won the right to the county seat, the courthouse
was first moved to the Hemingway building, the two-story building
behind the tree. This Is one of the earliest views of Starke.


;-.


Tucker "in the manner prescribed by
law." Not having all of the ballots,
the commission adjourned until the
following Monday.
Starke did not have a newspaper
at the time and if a newspaper was
operating in Lake Butler, there are no
copies still in existence. Commission
minutes, written by hand and hard
to decipher, are the only record we
have to tell the story of how this 46-
year feud got started. The minutes
indicate that when the commission
met that following Monday, there
were some points of law related to
the election that were in question. No
one at the meeting could answer the
questions that were raised in relation
to the election, so the commission
appointed its chairman and the county
clerk to ask the judge of the Fourth
Judicial Circuit for a legal opinion.
The opinion was slow in coming,
however, and special meetings were
held on both Feb. 8 and Feb. 9, 1875.
When no report was forthcoming
from the judge, the commission
decided to count only those ballots
See SEAT, p. 5A


Stay informed. Get involved. Be entertained. Keep in touch. Express yourself. Know your community. III 11111

Early Deadline Monday, Nov. 19 at 3 p.m. Phone (904) 964-6305 Fax (904) 964-8328 6 89076 63869 2


,..e I

1.0


150


m I
al'l"


Years Ago,


I










Page 2A STARKE 150TH ANNIVERSARY Nov. 15, 2007


BORN
Continued from p. 1A

However, ,JLcopies.- -of-
the Telegraph that were not
unearthed until the 1950s
give a more romantic version
of how the town was named.
Papers published in the 1880s
followed the controversy
that raged for some time as a
group of citizens of the town
wanted the name changed
from "Starke" to "Central
City.-" They thought Central
City sounded better and would
lend itself to advertising and
growth of the town. There were
many letters sent to the paper at
that time and one claimed that
when Richard, Pace and Cole
were the primary landowners
in the city, Richard and Pace
agreed to let Cole have the
privilege of naming the town.
The letter writer claimed that
Cole decided to name the town
after his sweetheart. The letter
did not say whether "Starke"
was supposed to be her first or
last name, but it is possible that
the girlfriend was also related
to the prominent Starke family
of South Carolina.
Whether the town was
named for a governor or
the postmaster's girlfriend,
"Starke" has been the name for
150 years now.
It is believed that the main
downtown thoroughfare was
named for Gov. Keith Call,
who was the third and fifth
territorial governor of Florida,
holding office from 1835 to
1840 and from 1841 to 1844.
However, a letter written
in 1896 later came to light,
indicating that it might have
been named for State Senator
Call, the same Call who
was treasurer of The Florida
Railroad Company, and was
apparently a friend of Cole's.
The letter stated that Treasurer
Call-with the approval of
David Yulee, president of the
railroad company- permitted
Cole-to-enter the-40-A iTes-6f
the Original Town of Starke,
and lay out the town and build
close to the railroad track. This
permission' wvas given with the
understanding on the part of
Cole that he would give the
railroad company lots six and


pow -W


The Quigley-Davis building on East Call Street by the railroad served as the first
post office, and it is the opening of that office that marked the birth of the city of
Starke. This photo was taken around 1857.


eight of Block 15 for its water
tank and other purposes, with
the-condition that the company
would not demand the usual
right-of-way through Cole's
section of land.
. This is the reason that
buildings adjoining the railroad
crossing on Call Street were
built so close to the track,
without the usual setback. In
view of Call's favor to him,
Cole .may have had the main
street of the new town named
for-the senator.
Since there was no newspaper
in Starke at the time, and legal
records for that period were
lost in two courthouse fires,
there is no way of verifying the
actual origin of the names.

A 'split'

decision
The railroad brought growth
and prosperity, to the small
town, but this early growth
spurt was short-lived. The
Civil War tore the country apart
in 1861 and -Starke felt the
devastation of the war. Young
men from the area left to join
the conflict and Capt. Richard
.organized a. militia, Company
A 10th Florida Infantry, which


fought with distinction during
the four years of war. The town


itself suffered little damage
from the war, although one
E."iNEmmaLg W t.*. i ", r r".


Union raiding party burned
several freight cars 'containing
Confederate supplies, while the
cars were at the depot in Starke.
Many of the old families left
the-area during the war and the
period of reconstruction that
followed, but the town survived
and by the 1875 census, Starke
had a population of 400. In
1860, the population had been
recorded at 138.
Many of the old-timers
had left during and following
the war, but an influx of new
citizens occurred and many of
the people who played important
roles in local politics in
early years arrived at this time.
They were N.J. Jones, Dr. J.L.
Gaskins, Thomas Hemingway,
J.J. Sparkman, Joseph Alvarez,
S.S. Weeks and W.F. Bowen.
As the town grew, many of the
residents felt it was time for it
to incorporated and become an
official city. On May 29, 1876,
an election was held so that the
residents could decide if Starke
should be incorporated. Only
42 people voted in the election,
and the decision was unanimous
in favor of incorporation. Dr.
Gaskins was elected as the


town's first mayor.
Just one year before Starke
became an official city- with-
a city government, Bradford
County-which also included
what is now Union County at
that time-held an election-and
voted to move the county seat
from Lake Butler to Starke.
The hotly contested election
resulted in a 46-vote margin
in favor of Starke and all of
the county records were moved
to a temporary courthouse that
was set up in a building on
the northeast corner of Call
and Walnut streets, now Joli
Cheveux salon.
This election began a 45-
year feud between Lake Butler
and Starke that would include
several- elections, several
courthouse moves, a fire, and a
lot of angry ink in the pages of
the area's newspapers. The feud
continued until 1921, when the
Florida Legislature divided the
county into Bradford and Union
and made both Starke and Lake
Butler county seats.

New arrivals
In 1879, Col. William W.
Moore decided to expand his
influence to Starke. Moore had
been part of the newspaper
profession in Tallahassee,
Jacksonville, Cedar Key and
other cities. Moore had visited.
Starke and looked around. He
liked what he saw and decided
the town needed a newspaper.
Col. Moore and his son, Sterling
Moore, started the Florida
Weekly Telegraph in July of
1879. The newspaper has been
published continuously since
then, making it the oldest
Florida weekly newspaper in
existence. The name of the paper
became the Starke Telegraph
and then the Bradford County
Telegraph.
In the 1880s, Starke
experienced another growth
spurt. The earlier settlers
had come mostly from South
Carolina and Georgia, but the
new influx of settlers came
from Pennsylvania. Several of
the families had made money
in oil and were lured to Florida
b. the prospect of investing a


.lutnLer eIariy VIVew '.1 ,dii o&IIr, tiw, nI;m, .qI i. ph ovI, ,,IISvwLI .IrU u-".s n'orange
that now houses a downtown restaurant an 'Se vrtmT '- ,-.., "i'
S. . 4 .. .. .
ee I p. 4


This issue could not have been completed
were it not for the work of the late Eugene
L. Matthews, pictured at right above. As
the Telegraph owner and editor following
in his father's footsteps, Matthews
documented the community's history for
more than 60 years. Marcia Miller, who
compiled much of Matthews work in the
book "Bradford County: Its History and
ItsaPeople,-was-also instrumental-to this
special edition on Starke's history. Mark
J. Crawford, Buster Rahn and Arnie Harris
also contributed.


Brabtorb Countp Telegrapb
USPS 062-700
Published each Thursday and entered as Periodical Postage
s,1 ,e Paid at Starke, Florida under Act of March 3, 1879.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to:
131 "- Bradford County Telegraph
131West Call Street Starke, Florida 32091
Web address: BCTelegraph.com'
Phone: 964-6305 P.O. Drawer A Starke, FL 32091
Subscription Rate in Trade Area John M. Miller, Publisher
Editor: Mark Crawford
$30.00 per year: Sports Editor: Cliff Smelley
$16.00 six months Advertising: KevinSMiller
$16.00 six months DonSams
Darlene Douglass
Outside Trade Area: Typesetting Hannah Ford
$30.00 per year: Advertising and
$30.00 year. A Newspaper Prod. Earl W. Ray
$16.00 six months Classified Adv. Mellsa Noble
Bookkeeping: Kathl Bennett


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Noy. 15, 2007 STARKE 150TH ANNIVERSARY Page 3A


Editorial: A great



time to be alive


In her lifetime (1891-1987)
my mother saw more changes
in the varied modes of life than
people in any other generation;
it was an exciting time to live,
a time in which some ways of
d6ing things hundreds of years
ago were superseded by new
inventions that changed the
world. Not all of the changes
* were the result of inventions;
some came about through
education and evolving human
attitudes.
When she was born, the
Southland was rural and
agricultural, and cotton was
king. It was the one crop that
provided a guaranteed cash
return for the one-horse farmer,
as well as the plantation owner,
from colonial days until the'
boll weevil destroyed the
cotton bolls and the industry
in 1921. The growing of cotton
has returned to some Southern
states, but not to Florida.
Railroads in 1890 were in
their infancy and growing like
a husky child. My mother saw
the first train that ran over
the line from Jacksonville to
St. Petersburg. She and her
peers rightly saw the railroad
as a wave of the future with
passenger cars providing
luxurious accommodations
to faraway places. At the
time it was inconceivable to
think passenger strains would
disappear within her lifetime,
replaced by automobiles and
airplanes.
The steam engine had origins
in England and France, with


the Newcomen Steam Engine
being among the first, but it
had limitations. American
James Watts obtained a patent
in 1769 that made the engine
practical and credits him with
inventing the modern design,
In 1783, a steam engine was
installed in a ship, but it was
not reliable. Early steamships
were propelled by steam driven
paddlewheels, often depicted
in movies using the Mississippi
River for a setting. By 1822,
there were 35 paddle wheelers
plying the river.
In 1803, Robert Fulton.
invented the screw type-
propeller, which became
the modus operandi for all
commercial watercraft, and the'
first steamship, The Savannah,
crossed the Atlantic Ocean, in
1819. The movement of freight
and passengers by steamships
paralleled that of railroads in ihe
latter half of the 19th ceniur)
as gasoline and steam engines
improved and were applied to
trains, planes and cars. .
The newest luxury liner in
service today is the Queen Mary
2, launched in 2004 and capable
of carrying 2,620 passengers,
plying between South Hampton
and New York. She is 1,132
feet long with 17 decks, and
weighs in at 151,400 tons.
Before the turn of the century,
Henry Ford, R.E. Olds and
others were tinkering in their
shops with gasoline engines
for powering self-propelled
vehicles, thus the automobile
appeared on the Americwan"


scene, arguably bringing
unprecedented change to the
world of transportation. People
born in that era saw the change
from horse and buggy society
to the mobile society of today,
built around privately owned
automobiles. Developing along
side of the automobile was
the massive semi-trucks that
would challeno, "- .oads
for moving fre.,
The truck industi, veloped
rather slowly because all the
components necessary for
heavy duty were not available.
The heaviest trucks of the early
1920s had solid rubber tires and
power was transferred from the
engine to the rear wheels via
a chain drive. In 1931, Ford
produced the forerunner of the
modem "straight job" with the
four-cylinder Model A engine
and dual wheels. The first Ford
'VS engines were produced in
1932. Chevrolet introduced its
six-c%.linder engine in the 1929
model and remained with the
si\ cylinders until the 1955
model Near. Tractor-trailers
made their debut in the early
1930s.
The Wright brothers, Wilbur
and Qrville, are credited with
being aviation pioneers by
making the first successful
flight Dec. 17, 1903, in Kitty
Hawk, N.C. In less than 18
years from that first flight,
airplanes were used in aerial
combat by both sides in World
War I. In 1936, the first B-
17s rolled off assembly lines.
That bomber, along with the


B-24 became the workhorses of -
World War II with theirability to
bomb Germany during daylight
hours. WWII was fought with
propeller driven planes, before
jet engines were introduced in


From horse and buggy
travel to trains, the latest
models out of Motor
City and 18-wheelers
carrying cargo to, from
and through the city,
transportation has
contributed much to the
evolution of Starke.


the 1950s.
In the 1920s, I well remember
running outside when we heard
the drone of a plane's engine
to see it in flight. My first up-
close encounter with airplanes
was in 1931, when an aerial
show came to Leesburg. I
watched as a man jumped from
a plane. I experienced my first
flight in an open cockpit plan
with a barnstormer from the
little airstrip in 1939. We flew
over Kingsley Lake (round as a
silver dollar). Three years later,,
I was flying as a passenger irV
a B-17 at Mac Dill Air Forcd


Base at Tampa. While my army
MOS didn't require flying, I did
quite a bit of aerial photography
in the states.
From the introduction of the
steam driven locomotive in 1829
to the B-29 bomber, developed
to transport the atomic bomb
ending WWII (1945), was just
over a hundred years.
Changes in transportation
were only one small segment
of the changes in society,
but perhaps the most
obvious, and while each
mode of transportation was
on the drawing board or in
development toward the vehicle


it is today, people living in that
era saw tremendous changes in
lifestyle.
The 19th century saw the
invention of items in many
different fields other, than
transportation, including
medicine, communication,
manufacturing machinery
and equipment, arms and
ammunition, sports, heating and
cooling, farm equipment and
methodology, office equipment,
and the list goes on.
i; By Buster Rahn,
1 Telegraph Editorialist


Early deadline for next week's paper


Because of the Thanksgiving
holiday next week, publication
of the Telegraph will be moved
up one day to Wednesday, Npv.
21. This necessitates an early


deadline of 3 p.m. on Monday,
Nov. 19, for classified ads and
other submissions.
The offices of the Bradfprd,
County Telegraph, Lake Region


Monitor and Union County
Times will be closed Thursday
and Friday, Nov. 22-23, in
Q~beraneacqefthy.hpi.y,,


800.238.8681


wwwv. ; kmercantile.com
,''*';'"*


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Page 4A STARKE 150TH ANNIVERSARY Nov. 15, 2007


Noteworthy


Car giveaway
benefits Arc
TheArc of Bradford County is
holding a fundraiser to enhance
training and other opportunities
for local individuals with
developmental disabilities.
A 1997 Ford Mustang,
donated by Aztec Trading
Company in Starke, will be
given away in the drawing set
for Saturday, Dec. 8, at the
Santa Fe Community College
Andrews Center following the
Christmas parade.
Tickets for the drawing are
$5 each. Tickets are on sale
at J&J Motorcycle Accessories,
the North Florida Regional
Chamber of Commerce,
Precision Automotive and
Town and Country Ford. Those
businesses are also sponsoring
this event.
The car may be viewed at any
time at Sunshine Industries on
S.R. 100 or during the parade
on Saturday, Dec. 8, at 3 p.m.



VFW meeting
to discuss
fundraisers,
membership
VFW Post 1016 of Starkeand
its Auxiliary will meet tonight,
Thursday, Nov. 15, at 7 p.m.
The post home is located at 250
N. Bay Street in Starke.
Each group will discuss-
ongoing membership drives and
plans for future fundraisers.



Diabetes
seminar
planned
Saturday
There are 20.8 million
children and adults in the United
'States, or 7 percent of the
population, who have diabetes.
While an estimated 14.6 million
have been diagnosed "'ith
diabetes, unfortunately, 6.2
million people (or nearly one-
third) are unaware that they
have the disease. There are 54
million Americans who have
pre-diabetes, in addition to the
20.8 million with diabetes.
The cause of diabetes
continues to be a mystery,
although both genetics and
environmental factors such as
obesity and lack of exercise
appear to play roles.
There are four types
of diabetes (type 1, type 2,
gestational, and pre-diabetes).
No matter what kind of diabetes
you have, it affects many parts
of your life. You can get help
from health professionals
trained to focus on different
areas, from head to toe.
November is American
Diabetes Month, and there will
be a free diabetic seminar on
Saturday, Nov. 17, at 2 p.m.
at the Shands Starke atrium.
The seminar will include
the following: free blood
glucose checks, cooking
demonstrations, free food and
giveaways, and a chance to win
-a free $100 Wal-Mart shopping
card. If you or a loved one
has diabetes or you just want
to find out about the disease,
please join us this Saturday at
the Shands Atrium from 2-4
p.m.



Pleasant
Grove group
announces
next meeting
The Pleasant Grove
Community Action Group's
next meeting will be Monday,
Nov. 19, at 7 p.m. in the annex


BORN
Continued from p. 2A

These new arrivals included
three families- that would
become prominent in the social
and business life in Starke
at that time. S.J. Sternburg,
J.M. Truby and E. Strong
moved their families to Starke
and bought homes on North
Cherry Street, which was then
called Pennsylvania Avenue.
Richard & Pace was sold to
these three newcomers and
the store was named Truby,
Sternburg & Company. Strong
was a reputed millionaire and
was the wealthiest of the three.
He preferred to remain a silent
partner in the store, however.
By 1884, the population of
Starke had grown to between
600 and 700 -and the town
included about' 100 houses. A
bird's eye view -of Starke was
drawn by an unknown artist
in 1884 and it showed 15 to
20 store buildings clustered
around the railroad, two or
three hotels,- a Baptist Church
and a Methodist Church, two
schools (the Starke Institute
and Orange College, which
was a high school), a railroad
station, a couple of saw mills
and a couple of cotton gins.
Orange groves occupied many
of the vacant lots inside the
city limits.
Economic
highs and
lows
The economy of the timb
was based on agriculture and
the orange groves were a big
part of that economy, although
Sea Island cotton was still
king. The winter of 1894-1895
brought the Big Freeze. By mid-
February nearly every orange
tree in the area had been killed.
The rich Pennsylvanians and
others who had hoped to amass
a fortune in citrus production
saw their dreams melt with the
heavy frost. A few determined
growers replanted, but only
four years later, another killing
freeze occurred in February of
1899. That ended the orange
production in Bradford County
and convinced growers that the
industry needed to be located
further south. The wealthy
*go6weis left for'oher areas and'
whole sections of the county
went up for sale.
The loss of orange production
was a severe economic blow, but
luckily another citrus. fruit was
waiting in the aisles to take over.
Growers in Starke and Lawtey
had been experimenting with
a new cash crop-the winter
strawberry. The berry loved
Bradford County's climate,
soil and growing conditions.
Some of the farmers who had
produced oranges turned to the
strawberry and its production
increased over the years. The
town continued to grow and
in 1900, the population was
972. In 1905, it reached'1,102.
During the period between
1900. and 1915, the process
had begun to raise money for
civic improvements like water
lines, sewer lines, electricity
and schools.
Another severe' economic


blow was dealt would house those
to Bradford training troops.
agriculture in the The population in
formof the boll J town doubled
weevil. The and then
hungry little tripled, but
insect did to a lot of that
the cotton population
fields what w o u I d
the two not be
freezes had permanent
done to residents
the orange for the
g r o v e s area.
World War C a m p
I brought Blanding was
uncertainty designated
to Bradford - as one of the
County just as 'largest troop-
it had to the world training centers
and the population in the nation and this
of Starke First Starke Mayor J.L. Gaskins designation
d e c I line d transformed
from 1,233 in 1915 to 1,023 Starke almost overnight.
in 1920. Then came the land Blanding (and its predecessor,
boom of the 1920s, and in Camp Foster) had been a small
five years, between 1925 and National Guard camp on the
1930, the population of Starke shores of Kingsley Lake. It
increased from 1,071 to 1,339. was, taken over by the federal
It was during that period of government in the 1940s to
expansion that Starke saw the gear it up for training up to
first paved highway connect 100,000 infantrymen at a time.
the town to the outside world. The changes seen in Starke,
Prior to that, all the roads in the which had a population of
area had been dirt, gravel, etc. about 1,500 people at the time,
State Road 13, which is now when Blanding began cycling
called U.S. 301, was paved troops through its training was
during this time period and has incredible. Starke went from a
been an economic lifeline for small town to a teeming city
the city ever since. It connected almost overnight-and it was
Jacksonville to Tampa and decidedly not ready for the
rolled straight through Starke. situation.
State Road 28, now called S.R. Blanding had been planned
100, was also designated during for a capacity of 25 beds before
that time period as a major America entered the war. After
roadway to connect western Dec. 7, 1941, the camp needed
cities like Lake City to the a minimum of 2,800 beds. This
east coast. This convergence meant someone had to build
of major roadways helped spur barracks to house those beds
growth in Starke. and 21,000 laborers descended
Another n major setback on the area with a monthly
struck Starke and the entire in payroll of $2.5 million in
the early 1930s in the form of 1942.
the Great Depression. Starke, While Blanding was
like every city in the nation, furiously building structures
had its WPA (Works Progress to accommodate the soldiers,
Administration) projects, its Starke was furiously building
sewing rooms, its deliveries of structures to accommodate the
Red Cross flour, and its CCC workers from the camp and the
(Civil Conservation Corps) families of those soldiers. Bars,


camps. As people moved
around the country looking for
work, population in the town
dropped, and the 1935 census
showed a population for Starke
of 1,317. President Franklin
D. Roosevelt's emergency
measures slowly brought the
nation out of the Depressio0n
and by 1940, the populationin
Stake had increased slightly
to 1,480.
The Blanding
boom
Another boom of growth
began as the nation geared
up for World War II. Camp
Blanding, just seven miles from
Starke on the shores of Kingsley
Lake, was designated as one of
the major troop training areas
for World War II, and Starke
was totally unprepared for the
growth spurt that followed.
The city was literally bursting
at the seams. 'Federal aid
allowed utilities to expand to
serve the sudden overflow of
population. Every vacant room,
garage, attic and even chicken
coops were turned into spare
rooms for the families of the
military personnel training at
the camp and the laborers who
were building the buildings that'


.1* *.-'' -


of the Pleasant Grove United
Methodist Church.



Collection
centers closed
for holiday
All six solid waste collection
sites will be closed Thursday
and Friday, Nov. 22-23, in
observance of Thanksgiving.
Sites will reopen on Saturday.


0


restaurants, amusement centers
and novelty shops-along with
some businesses that purveyed
less savory wares-grew like
mushrooms, seemingly within
hours.
City fathers did their best
to regulate and control the
suddenly teeming population,
but they did not have the
resources. Starke- went from
dealing with 1,500 citizens
to dealing with an additional
21,000 construction workers-
and the more than 60,000 troops
who followed-within a matter
of months. The problems that
kind of growth caused were
devastating. Starke had the
only chamber of commerce in
the state, perhaps in the nation,
that told people to stay away.
Every house in Starke turned
into a boarding house. Attics
were rented at unheard-of
prices. Garages were turned
into slap-dash roorffs. Chicken
houses became transient hotels.
Travel-trailer cities -grew up
on the edges of town. Near
Blanding, fields everywhere
,blossomed with tents.
,People built shacks out of
anything they could find-
including empty ammunition
boxes used by the training
troops. Developers flocked into
town thinking they would make
a killing due to the incredible
demand for living space. They
left again when they discovered
* they couldn't match the salaries
being paid to carpenters by the
camp-and when they realized
that practically every piece of
lumber in North Florida had at
least five buyers waiting for it.
Rental rates which were
$19-$25 a month went to $50-
$60 overnight. Construction
barracks bunks Were rented
for 25 cents a night, with the
only amenity available being a
horizontal surface to lie on-
but even that.accommodation
was hard to get.
Young women who worked
at the USO in town-serving
soldiers doughnuts and coffee
and providing bridge games,


plays, music and other Christian
entertainment-were picked
up by car by the managers
and dropped off again at their
homes when the shift was over.
They were not allowed to come
to work on their own. Most
young ladies did not travel the
evening streets of downtown
Starke at that time.
There were daily traffic
accidents on the road which
was the predecessor of U.S.
301. The tiny cells of the jail
often had six or seven drunks
jammed together in each one.
The city's sewage, water,
light and phone systems were
all inadequate. It would have
been impossible to expand the
systems in so short a time so
that they would be anywhere
near adequate. Southern Bell
recorded that- the company
had handled about 6,000
long distance calls in the area
during November of 1941.
In December it was 11,000
and January of 1942 saw the
same system and the same 27
employees handling 15,000
calls, with the major growth of
the area still ahead.
There was no hospital or
ambulance service and the
health department of the day
reported a marked increase
in cases of venereal disease.
Commanding officers at
Blanding seriously considered
declaring the town off-limits to
military personnel if it wasn't
"cleaned up."
For all the problems caused
by the training of troops at
Blanding during World War II,
the economic boon the activity
caused was equally incredible.
When the war ended, the camp
became inactive for a short
time and was then returned to
National Guard use. Today, it
provides an economic impact
of approximately $2.3 million
per year without any of the
problems experienced during
the World War II era.


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Nov. 15, 2007 STARKE 150TH ANNIVERSARY Page 5A


SEAT
Continued from p. 1A

that had been "received in the
manner prescribed by law."
The commission met to
count the ballots on Feb. 10,
1875, only to find that some of
ballots had been "abstracted"
from the courtroom where the
commission had been meeting.
The minutes of previous meeting
had also mysteriously vanished.
Note that this courtroom was
in the courthouse, which was
located in Lake Butler at that
time. Well, the only ballots
that were left were those from
precinct seven, at Crossroads,
now called Hampton. Since the
other ballots and the minutes
were gone and the matter had
already drug on for a couple
of months, the commission
decided the only thing it could
do was count the votes from
Hampton. All 46 ballots had
been cast in favor of Starke
being the county seat.
In what now seems like a
highly irregular decision, the
commission declared Starke the
winner and ordered the county
seat moved east across New
River. A room in Starke, whose
location is now not known,
was rented from G.W. Baisden
to use as county offices until
"other arrangements could be
made." It was right around
this time in the story that the
courthouse in Lake Butler
mysteriously burned to the
ground, destroying all of the
county records.

Back and
forth
The commission's decision
seemed highly irregular to a
number of Lake Butler residents
as well. Disappearing ballots?
A mysterious fire? Even 125
years later, that smells pretty
fishy. Lake Butler. residents
demanded that the matter be
looked into. The commission
agreed to recanvass the vote. Of
course, when they recounted,
they found that all 46 Hampton
ballots had been cast in favor
of Starke. They could hot very
well count the ballots that had
vanished, now could they? The.
commission upheld its earlier
decision and the matter seemed'
settled.
The commission also ordered
that $4 per month be paid
to Starke merchant Thomas
Hemingway as rent for a room
to be used for the clerk of the
court of the Fourth Judicial
Circuit. When the Lake Butler
courthouse burned, all the
courtrooms and offices used by
the circuit court were also lost.
The building that contained the
room rented out by Hemingway
was located in the building at
the northeast corner of Call and
Walnut streets in Starke, now
Joli Cheveux salon.
Lake Butler.proponents were
still fuming over the decision
and knew that if money was
spent to build a building in
Starke to house the courthouse,
everyone would be reluctant
to spend any money to rebuild
a courthouse in Lake Butler,
if they could reverse the
county seat decision. They
obtained a.restraining order to
prevent the construction of a
new courthouse in Starke. In
May of 1876, the chairman
of the county commission
was instructed to petition the
circuit court judge to have the
injunction removed.
* In February of 1877, citizens
who lived in the Lake Butler
area asked Circuit Judge
R.B. Archibald to examine
the decision made by the
commission as canvassing
board in the 1875 election. The
judge appointed Clerk B.E.
Tucker as special examiner
and instructed that hearings be
held on the matter. Tucker took
testimony Aug. 13-15, 1877, in
Jacksonville. The transcripts of
those hearings are not available
since a fire in Jacksonville in
1901 destroyed ,all the court


records in Duval County. It
is assumed that the hearings
consisted of testimony from
precinct officials who served
during the 1875 election.
Based on those hearings,
Judge Archibald decided that
there had, in essence, been no
legal election held on Jan. 18,
1875. He also decreed that
the examination of the ballots
carried out by the canvassing
board had been illegal.
A re-canvassing session was
held on Feb. 4, 1878. During
that session, the canvassing
board, based on the testimony


given at the hearings since the
ballots themselves were still
missing, found that a total of
787 votes had been cast in the
1875 election. The testimony
given indicated that 398 had
favored Lake Butler as county
seat and 389 had
favored Starke. The re-
canvassing board issued
an order- that read: TI
"Lake Butler having C,
received a majority ci
of nine votes at said
election, we therefore
declare Lake Butler
elected the county
site of said county at
said election." After a
three-yeartTegal battle,
the county seat and
courthouse-offices went
back to Lake Butler.
But it -wasn't over
yet. On March 2, 1885,
another petition asking
for a special election
on the county seat issue
was presented to the
county commission.
The commissioners
postponed their
decision at that
meeting and the matter "
was discussed further y'
on March 11. The
names on the petition
were checked and the ,
commission found it
was legal and ordered
another election to be a
held on May 5, 1885.
The commission
ordered a special night
watchman for the Lake
Butler courthouse
following the election. They had
not forgotten the disappearing
ballots and the fire that had
followed the last election, 10
years earlier. Thomas Register
served in that capacity and was
paid $1 per day.
The canvassing board met
on May 11, 1885, and found
that Lake Butler had once
again won the right to keep
the courthouse, this time by
a majority of 19 votes: 648
for Lake Butler and 629 for
Starke. It seemed the matter
was settled and there was two
years of comparative peace in
the county.

Over? Hardly,
Jo'seph W..,Sutten appeared
SatC the countyy commisioih''
meeting on July 4, 1887, with
another petition to change
the county seat to Starke.
After all of the hoopla they
had already gone through, a
number of bystanders at the
meeting strenuously objected.
They said the issue had already
been decided in a legal election
(May 5, 1885) and Lake Butler
had been declared the winner.
Sutten's attorney, Thomas E.
Bugg, argued that the board
had a legal duty to take action
on the petition. He also cited
court cases in Sumter and
Baker counties to support his
claim that the 1885 election
was illegal and should.not be
binding. L.E. Rhodes, attorney
for the county commission,
argued that another election
could not be held on the same
matter, since the decision of the


1885 election had never been
legally overturned.
The arguments lasted so long
that the commission adjourned
until the next day. The
following day, the commission
accepted the petition, found


that it was legal and ordered
yet another election for Aug.
17, 1887. M.L. McKinney,
who wanted the courthouse to
remain in Lake Butler, sought.
an injunction restraining the
commission from further action
on the county seat matter. Judge
Baker heard the arguments
in Jacksonville and handed
down an 'order to deny the
injunction. The election was to
go forward.
This time, when the votes
were canvassed, Starke was
declared the winner with 590
votes--16 more than Lake
Butler's 557. Seventeen people
had also voted for Lawtey as
the county seat. At the time,
it was. said that Lawtey was
aided to' the ballot by pro-
Lake Butler forces who hoped
the action would split the pro-
Starke vote and result in a
Lake Butler win. The Starke
win was credited to the black
vote and Telegraph Editor I.C.
Webb commended them in an
editorial that thanked them for
coming to the polls.
The commission ordered that
the county offices be moved to
Starke and, in the September
meeting of that year, made
arrangement to rent the Red
Men's Hall for the purpose.
A two-story frame structure,
which stood at the corner of
Thompson and Jefferson
streets, this hall was owned
by the Improved Order of Red
Men, a secret society with a
membership consisting of "
prominent business owners and


professional men.
This time the period of peace
lasted 11 years. On June7, 1898,
another petition was presented
to the commission requesting
an election to move the county
seat back to Lake Butler. The


petition contained the names
of the required one-third of the
registered voters in the county.
The commission decided the
petition was legal, in spite of
another petition that was signed
by 101 people whose names
were on the first petition.
The second petition asked
The commission to strike their


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names from the first petition.
The commission declined. An
election was ordered for Aug.
30, 1898.

War of words
Mudslingingwasthehall mark
of the 1898 election
and -the newspapers
of the day were up
to their elbows in.
liquid earth. Telegraph
Editor Eugene S.
Matthews and Lake
Butler Bulletin Editor
T.B. Hardig proved
themselves more than
capable of defending
the honor of their own
fair cities and did so
in a pen and ink battle
that lasted for months.
Fenton Prewitt,
editor of the Florida
Advocate, a second
Starke newspaper that
was being published
at the time, did not
really enter the fray,
although he threw
in an occasional
comment like, "War
.... has been declared
between the Lake
Butler Bulletin and the
Starke Telegraph over
the courthouse election
in Bradford County,
which bids fair to
shake the foundations
from the ramparts
"- of Swift Creek to
the battlements of
Sampson River."
Hartig, who was
also a teacher and
possessed of an excellent
vocabulary, lambasted both
Starke newspapers in every way
he could thiril of, claiming that
neither of the Starke editors
could compose a two-line
personal item without an error
in it. He denounced the county
commission as a "rotten gang"
and Starke as a "rotten hole,"


and all of the county officers as
"dishonest birds of prey, eating
the public carcass and sucking
the teat of the public cow."
The Starke editors claimed
that "... even ministers of the
gospel who dare to differ with
the Butler side are ruthlessly
attacked and slandered.
Churches are ridiculed because
a member may advocate Starke
as the county site."
The story was told that a
Starke paper, reporting on a
family moving from Starke to
Lake Butler, reported that the
little girl in the family said
her prayers one night and said,
"Goodbye God. We're moving
to Lake Butler." In the next
edition of the Lake Butler
Bulletin, Hartig wrote that the
Starke papers, as usual, had
misquoted the child. What she
had actually said was, "Good,
by God, we're moving to Lake
Bulter!"
Political rallies were held in
the form of giant picnics where
both sides tried to recruit support
from those in attendance. These
rallies were often not peaceful
and one newspaper report
stated, "the mighty elements
of Starke and Lake Butler
clashed in thunderous uproar
and darted blue forked streaks
at each, other, causing havoc
and consternation amongst
the audience, and leaving the
field strewn with the Wavering
and the convicted (meaning
those who maintained their
conviction in favor of one city
or another)."
Sen. J.B. Crews, a' Lake
Butler sympathizer, was
roundly attacked by their Starke
papers for saying in a speech he
gave in Lawtey, that the Starke
courthouse' building was in
such poor shape that insurance
companies had canceled their
policies and the building
See SEAT, p. 6A


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An anniversary is not just a span of years, but rather a celebration of the

accomplishments, trends, innovations, leaders and influence that have

set the stage for the future.



Congratulations City of Starke for 150 Years of Prosperity!








Page;6A STARKE 150TH ANNIVERSARY Nov. 15, 2007




The brief but wordy battle over Starke's name


As Starkez- celebrates its
150th anniversary, At -i ightr
surprise some people to know
that "Starke" came very close
to becoming "Central City" in
1889.
According to information
uncovered by Eugene S.
Matthews, former owner of
the Telegraph and Bradford
historian, controversy over
what name should go on the
"You Are Now Entering" signs
raged for weeks and the battle
was fought mainly with pen
and ink on the editorial pages
of the newspaper.
The identity of the person
who first advanced the idea
that the name of the town
should be changed is unknown,
but he made a case for Starke
to be renamed Central City
because of its location midway
between the business hubs and
usual travel destinations of
1889 Florida. Starke could be
found approximately halfway
between Lake City and Palatka,
halfway between Cedar Key
and Fernandina and halfway
between Pensacola and the
Everglades. It was also at a
crossroads of some of the


SEAT
Continued from p. 5A

was uninsured. However,
the Advocate reported that
the insurance companies had
canceled the policies because
of the furor that surrounded
the county seat election. The
Advocate said it was common
practice in that day for insurance
companies to cancel policies on
buildings that were in the center
of such heated controversy "no
matter how sound or valuable"
the building is.. The insurance
companies had not forgotten the
1875 courthouse fire, either.
Crews was also denounced
for saying that the jail in Starke
"... is so poor and rotten that
any prisoner can get out in a
short time, simply by using a
shoestring or buckle, or some
such articlee. Crews should
be ashamed, said the Starke
papers. He was also a county
commissioner and he knew
that the county had just spent
$2,000 on new steel cells for
the jail-a substantial amount
in 1898.
The Starke papers also
reported that they had got
wind of a plan by Lake Butler
proponents "to have arrested
a lot of voters on pretense of
illegal registration, perjury or
anything that may be imagined.
We know, too, of the proposed
attempt to buy votes on election
day and other wild schemes
to be attempted in certain
places."
The fateful

day
By the time election day
arrived, the entire county was-
in an uproar and trouble was


important roads and rail lines
-of the"Aime. -
The first letter to the editor
(I.C. Webb at that time) on the
subject was published March 8,
1889, and was signed "Citizen."
It made its case in favor of the
name change to Central City,
due to the town's centralized
location.
"This proposal is to be
submitted to the mayor and
council for their consideration,
and while the local authorities
are engaged in weighing this
important point, it would be
well for the citizens of Starke
to discuss the different aspects
of the suggested change," read
the letter, in part.
The proposal was brought
up in the city council meeting
that same week. The unknown
person, and a small group who
agreed with him, went to the city
council with their arguments
that Central City sounded better
and would be more likely to
draw interest from prospective
new settlers. The city council
evidently agreed with them.
The council did not have the
legal authority to simply vote
to change the name of the


expected.TheAdvocate reporter
wrote that the election was
surprisingly orderly, however.
"No one was seen on the streets
intoxicated, and everyone
seemed to be in good humor,"
wrote the reporter. The turnout
set a new record, as might have
been expected. Starke came out
the winner with 1,255 votes to
Lake Butler's 1,015 votes, a
240-vote margin.
If the election itself was
carried off in an orderly fashion,
the celebration afterward was
not. The Advocate reported
that "anvils popped, bells
rang and the sky was ablaze
with fireworks" till long after
midnight. It was the biggest
celebration Starke had seen upto
that time. The huge celebration
was in relation to the fact that
the election's outcome meant
that a new brick courthouse
would be built in Starke and
that the city would retain the
right of being the county-seat
for the next 20 years.
The county commission met
on Nov. 19, 1901, to decide
where to build the courthouse.
The board accepted a proposal
by J.G. "Gid" Alvarez, a Starke
merchant, for the county to pay
$300 for several lots owned
by the Day family and W.W.
Sapp on West Call Street, the
.current location of the Santa Fe
Community College Andrews
Center. The commission also
awarded a contract to build
the courthouse to Smith and
Blackburn of Montgomery,
Ala., to build a two-story brick
structure for $12,500: It was
completed in 1902 and was
renovated decades later to
house SFCC.

Separate ways
The hard feelings that had
arisen during the long years


town, but it discussed seeking
that authority and expressed


of strife over the county seat
location had not been laid to
rest, however. Lake Butler
supporters took a new tack in
1911. They attempted to have
a bill passed by the Florida
Legislature to divide Bradford
County at New River and create
a new county, with Lake Butler
as the county seat. Legislators
who represented this area
refused to introduce the bill
unless it contained the provision
for a referendum election to
help decide the matter. Fearing
they would lose the election,
the Lake Butler proponents
declined to reword their bill
and it was never introduced.


interest in making the change.
The council asked Mayor Louis


Another near decade of
rivalry and strife between
Starke and Lake Butler
resulted in the two sides so
vigorously opposing each other
on almost every issue that very
little progress could be made.
For example, the Starke side
wanted to float a bond issue for
road improvements, but feared
defeat by the Lake Butler side.
Issues that favored the Lake
Butler area of the county were
likewise doomed by ill feeling
on the Starke side.
Finally, Lake Butler
proponents were successful
in getting Florida Sen. D.E.
Knight and Florida. Reps.


- Witkovski for his opinion: -He.
said, "I heartily endorse the
action of the council in this
matter and I do not think that
a more suitable name could
possibly be chosen."
The Telegraph of March
22, 1889, reported that the
council had passed a resolution
supporting the name change
and would circulate a petition
asking for the change. If a
large number of signatures
was obtained on the petition,
it that would be presented to
the Florida Legislature, asking
that it grant the town the right
to change the name.
Some people were to prove
less than willing to sign the
petition, however. Starke had
been called "Starke" for 32
years at that time and it appeared
there were a good number of
people. in town who liked it
that way. The battle lines had
begun to be drawn and people
started sharpening their quill-
pen swords. The editor of the
paper had already sensed the
winds of war blowing and, in
that same March 22 issue of the
paper, invited the locals to duke
it out in newsprint. "Shall the


E.M. Johns and C.H. Register
to introduce a bill that would
divide the county, providing the
Lake Butler supporters could
get a petition that was signed
by a majority of the voters
living on the Lake Butler side
of New River.
Petitions were circulated
and counter petitions were
drawn up by Starke supporters
opposing thesplit. Some people,
evidently wanting to make both,
sides happy, signed petitions
both for and against the split.
Their names were stricken, but
Lake Butler finally managed
to get the required number of
signatures. Cdommittees 'from


name of Starke be changed,"
he wrote. "The subject seems to
be agitating the minds of some
of our businessmen not a little.
We invite correspondence on
either side of the subject. Let
us get the real sentiments of the
people."
In the March 29, 1889, issue:
of the paper, the city council
published a legal notice
regarding its intention to ask the
state legislature for permission
to change the name of the city
to Central City. The notice was
signed by Mayor Witkovski,,
and Aldermen George E. Pace,
W.W. Sapp, U.D. Miner and
S.P. Gardiner. The first volley
had been fired, but did not go,
unanswered.
A writer who signed himself,
"Immigrant" said the only,
reason there was to favor the;
change was "an inspection of.
the map." He said the town was,
indeed, centrally located "if we.:
cut off the western portion and
the southern half of the state."
Other than that, there, was no'
reason to change the-name,. ....
Immigrant wrote. Changing the
name would riot bring an influx
See NAME, p. 7A


both sides of the 'river met at
the Starke City Hall on-May.
2, 1921, to decide the terms of
the legislation that would be
presented. Attorneys Joe Hill
Williams of Lake Butler and
J.E. Futch of Starke drafted
the bill.
The bill was passed by both-
houses of the Legislature and.
signed by Gov. Carey Hardee'
in May of 1921. Union County,
was born and the 46-year battle-
between rival cities was ended
as Lake Butler was- -named..
county seat of the smallestr-
county in the state. -


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Nov. 15, 2007 STARKE 150TH ANNIVERSARY Page 7A


NAME
Continued from p. 6A


of settlers, he stated. "Many
places which today disfigure
the map of Florida exist only
in name and a few inhabitants,
who vegetate in solitude ... But
they cling to the delusion that
a name will make a town," he
wrote. Immigrant wrote that
changing the name of the city
might prove detrimental to
Starke's reputation for "health,
beauty and business." He wrote,
"Stick to the old name, so long
borne with so much honor and
so little blame."
SBoth sides then opened
fire in earnest. "Let Her Go,
Gallagher" wrote, "There are
no associations that attach us to
the name of Starke. ... We like
the name Central City. Some
people think there is nothing
in a name," but Let Her Go
quoted advertising of the day
to point out that what you call
something can have an effect
on how quickly it sells. "It will
be an honor to be a resident of
Central City, and an insult to be
called a Starke-ite," he wrote.
A writer who signed himself
"Starke" was rather incensed
and wrote, "Let us keep our
traditions and the name of
our town. If we give way to
those revolutionists in this bold
demand, there would be no
end to-it. ... It is claimed that it
(name change) would change
the price of goods and cause the
merchants and moneychangers
to realize greater profits.... I say
change not the name that our
forefathers gave our town."
A person signing-themselves
"Another Citizen" wrote that
the town was only called
Starke because the postmaster,
George W. Cole (also' a large
landowner), chose the name in
honor of his sweetheart. The
other large landowners involved
in .the founding of the town
agreed to the name,. although
Another Citizen wrote that they
did so reluctantly. According
to Another Citizen, Alderman
Pace and Capt. John Richard,
the other two major landowners
involved in the original naming
of the town, were willing to
go forward with the change to,
cling il Central Citx .,
'Another Citizen wrote,
"Northern men and strangers to-
the town, whose opinion should
be respected as of potential
value to your future, are almost
unanimously of the opinion that
no uglier name than. 'Starke'
could be given to the town. ...
Toads and alligators probably
object to the reclamation of
their swamp, but the work of
improvement goes on in spite
of it. ... I close with the express
hope that under its new name,
Starke is destined to become
the Chicago of the flower
state." (How Another Citizen
managed to find out that all
Northern men and strangers
were in favor of the name.
Central City is not known.)
One writer disagreed with
Another Citizen on the lack of
beauty in the name Starke. He
replied, "There is no reason
why 'Starke' should not be sung
by poets. It rhymes with ark,
bark, dark, hark, lark, mark,
park, shark, spark. ... Central
City rhymes only with pity."
"Observer" did not let that
pass. He wrote, "Cancel the
letter E and see what the
word means, 'wholly, entirely,
absolutely' as in stark mad,
stark blind and stark naked.
... No matter how you spell
it, it suggests nothing worth
thinking about ... Give us
Central City."
"Lay On MacDuff" pointed
out that people already knew
the town as Starke and changing
the name to Central City might
cause confusion. MacDuff
wrote,, "Have the advocates
thought of the inconveniences
and perplexities?" He said the
local people would be aware
of the name change, but people
from other areas and other
states would not. "It would take
decades before this news (name
change) would be known," he
wrote. He said the post office
would find it inconvenient
and mail service could be
impacted.
"Starke is a good, short,
substantial name," MacDuff
wrote. "There is no more
romance about it than in


a lighterwood stump ... But
neither does it smack of a.paper
town. ... Let us keep Starke and
bury the stillborn babe Central
City under the green sod of
oblivion."
One of ,the original
proponents of the name change
replied. While many locals
also backed the change, one
of the major proponents was
a land developer from outside
of the area who had been


interested-in promoting land
sales here. He wrote, "It was
while engaged in drawing out
a form of advertisement to help
boom your town ... A labor of
love for which I am repaid by
derision by not a few ... That
I recognized the difficulty in
getting (backers) to assimilate
the syllable of Starke. To a
stranger, there is something
excessively uncouth and even
unfriendly in the name. ... You
conclude that the rose of Starke
by any other name would
stink."
The advertisement he had
been drafting urged people
from up north to relocate in
this area to "Central City ...
Formerly called Starke."
The advertisement touted
the healthful location-an
important consideration for
many people in the wake of
malaria and typhoid epidemics
that had broken out in many
areasjust prior to this time. "The
epidemic of 1888 has passed
over this city and the locality,"
read the advertisement. Central
City "is one of the healthiest
in the world. Thousands of
acres, heavily timbered with
pine for northern shipment and
suitable for the cultivation of
cotton, corn, tobacco, oranges,
peaches, strawberries and
fruits of every kind await the
enterprise of settlers at prices
much lower than obtained near
towns that have been built
for ornament and boomed by
artificial means."
However, the ad also
contained more dubious
statements, touting the 1889
town as "on the highroad of
civilization" and even states,
"There are no mosquitoes."
Telegraph Editor Webb tried
to pour oil on the troubled
waters by urging harmony
among the populace, but the
volleys continued to be fired
in the editorial pages. Attorney
Robert Keith wrote that the
advertisement was very well
done, but appeared to have
been written for a town "which
exists, so far as I can see, only in
the imagination of the,writer."


The Kentucky House
(above) and the Starke
House (at right) were two
of several hotels that
existed downtown at one
time.

Keith also asked if the mayor
and aldermen who had, passed
the resolution to request that
the name be changed would d be
as willing to change their own
names. "Would they change the
names by which they have been
called for the last 30 years
and which they have honored
by noble actions?" He wrote.
"I am .unwilling for Central
City to come and carry off the
good that we have described as
belonging to Starke by right of
inheritance."
A number of potshots were
taken at the writers on both
sides of the issue. One pro-
Central City writer wrote that
a pro-Starke writer must have
"been born blind and still more
void of judgment" because he
opposed the name change.
The biggest mystery of
the entire controversy is,
perhaps, whatever happened
to it. After weeks and weeks


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of angry and colorful letters be sold inside the county-that issue in the newspaper, no story
in the newspaper, the letters occupied those pages. Records of the city council deciding
suddenly ceased. Granted, indicate that a bill to change the to withdraw its petition. The
there were other issues-like name of Starke to Central City issue's death was a far quieter
five murders over the period of was never brought before the event than was its birth and
seven months and an upcoming Florida Legislature. There was Starke remains Starke to this
vote to decide if liquor could never another mention of the day.



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BOB MILNER
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TEILA PEARSON JIMMY ALVAREZ TERRY VAUGHAN
Tax Collector Property Appraiser Supervisor of Elections


RAY NORMAN
Clerk of the Court


JOHNNY R. HOBBS
County Judge


Phyllis Rosier
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Our team would like to extend

a very sincere congratulations

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years of faithful service to our

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Page SA STARKE 150TH ANNIVERSARY NOV. 15, 2007


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Section B:.Thursday, Nov. 15, 2007


Regional News
News from Bradford County, Union County and the Lake Region area

in World War II) and sharing Tickets on Community Theatre proudly will bring out the kid in all of Monday, Nov. 19, at the box
his experience with local go I presents the return of the you. Join the elves as they sing office, so call and reserve
schools and civic clubs, ale f musical "The Christmas your favorite Christmas and yours at (352) 226-4082.
If you are interested in SaleO I Chair" by Jack Stella, which Holiday songs.- Lake Region Community
financially sponsoring I will be presented eight times in Performances are scheduled Theatre is located at 218 S.E.
Atkinson, please call (904) ~ IIDecember. for 7 p.m;-on. Dec. 6-8 arid- Walnut St. in Starke.
782-1038 or (352) 339-0040. h musical Bring your entire family to Dec. 13-15, and at 2 p.m. on
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Page 2B TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR--B-SEC FlUi\ 1, zuut


I RITLIARIFES~ u-


Gordon Albritton

Gordon
Albritton
KEYSTONE HEIGHTS -
*Gordon B. Albritton, 70,, of Palm
Beach Gardens and Keytone
Heights died on Saturday, Nov.
10, 2007, following a brief illness
and courageous battle with cancer.
Born in Vero Beach, he was a


a 4


reAident ol the Palm Beach area
since 1942 and operated Albritton
Pharmacy for more than 40 years,
until his retirement in 1988.
Gordon was a graduate of Palm
Beach High School, class of 1956,
and attended Andrews College in
Cuthbert, Ga. He was a former
member of the Northwood Baptist
Church and a former member of
Northwood Kiwanis.
Godon was an avid sailor who
loved the ocean, and following his
reitrment from the pharmacy, he
enjoyed being a captain on private
boats throughout Florida and the
Bahamas. He was preceded in
death by his parents, Buford
"Doc" Albritton and Helen Bragg
Albritton, and a sister, Judy
Gnann.
Gordon and his wife, Becky,
were planning to celebrate their
50"'. wedding anniversary this
April.
Additional survivors include:
three sons, Jeffrey Albritton and
his wife Ann, Gregory Albritton,
and Brad Albritton and his wife
Mary Ann, all of the Palm Beach
area; and 10 grandchildren, Craig,
Gordon, Chris, William, Matthew,
Jonathan, Rebecca, Kathleen,
Jane, and Brad Jr. Also surviving
are: a sister-in-law, Fran Smith
and her husband Tom of Jupiter; a
niece, Lynette Watson; and two
nephews, Clark and Brian Gnann.


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2007, at Northwood Baptist
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Rev. Patrick Moody, pastor, and
the Rev. Jess Moody officiating.
A sunrise committal service,-
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PAID OBITUARY

Ruth Cohens
STARKE Ruth Ann Cohens,
63, of Starke died Sunday, Nov.
11, 2007, at Shands AGH
following an extended illness.
Born in Jacksonville, Cohens
moved to Starke at an early age
and attended local schools. She
was a beautician and was also
employed by Bradford Terrace in
Starke. She was a member of
Greater Allen Chapel in Starke
and was active as a choir member.
Cohens is survived: her
daughter, Kimberly Cohens of


numerous grandchildren and
great-grandchildren.
King was preceded in death by3
her husband, Maxie C. King.
Funeral services for King. were,
held Nov. 13 in the Eliam Baptists
Church with the Rev. Jerry Miltonr;
conducting the services. Intermentj
followed in Eliam Cemtery under
the care of Jones Funeral Home ofe
Keystone Heights.


Upper Darb Penn her son.
Bobby Lee Cohens of Gainesville;
her brother, Robert Powell of
Gainesville; her sister, Mattie
Chandler of Starke; a devoted
--special- friend,-Bobby Lee Cohens
of Starke; and two grandchildren.
Funeral services for Cohen.s
will be held on Friday, Nov. 16,
at 11 a.m. at Haile Funeral Home
in Starke with Alvin Green
conducting the services.
Visitation will be held in Haile
Memorial Chapel at the funeral
home one hour prior to the
services.

Bobby Jackson
STARKE Robert Clinton
"Bobby" Jackson, 74, of Starke
died Thursday, Nov. 8, 2007, at
Windsor Manor Nursing Home in
Starke, following an extended
illness.
Born in Jacksonville on Sept.
25, 1933, Jackson moved to Starke
in 1990 from Shreveport, La. He
was a member .of the Lawtey
Church of God and was a retired
construction worker.
Jackson is survived by: sisters,
Essie E. Bias of Starke, Marie
Hatcher of Middleburg, Patricia
Jaggers of Pearl,, Miss., and
Annette Kirksey of Baxley, Ga.;
brothers, Joseph M. Jackson-of
Maxville, David W. Jackson and.
Thomas G. Jackson, both of
Orange Park, John M. Jackson of
Orangeburg, S.C., Paul J. Woods
-and Lewis Woods. both of
'Englewood, Tenn., and Henry
Woods of Oceanway.
Graveside services for Jackson
were held Nov.' 12 at Jacksonville
Memory Gardens, under the care
of Jones Funeral Home of Starke.

Gayle Jphnson
LARGO Cynthia "Gayle"
Mallory Johnson, 63, of Largo
died Monday, Nov. 12, 2007, in
Northside Hospital in .St.
Petersburg.


We are hosting a

FIHEE

Thanksgiving Dinner
Turkey and all the trimmings
to anyone who would like to attend.


THANKSGIVING DAY THURS., NOV. 22
FROM NOON to 1:30 p.m.

NEED A RIDE? Call us... we I pick

up anyone who needs a ride.

THE CHURCH WILL ALSO BE DELIVERING TO FOLKS WHO ARE
SERVING THE COMMUNITY SUCH AS POLICEMEN, FIREMEN, AND
HOSPITAL WORKERS.

If you need a ride, want to help or want to let us know where you are attending,
call the church office or visit our web page.


1904-964-6100


507 West Call St.
(1 block north of Winn Dixie)
STARKE
www.fccstarke.com


Florida Twin Theatre "Wh.,,e, ,o, eWeis
(All Seats $5.00 Before 6 p.m. 964-5451 *CLOSED MON & TUES* it's Beuttlly Said"
Visit us on-line at www.FloridaTwinTheatre.com) |a 197

Now Shobbg Now Showing Sars Wed,Nov21 4 f i
rince Vaughn inJ n Patrick Dempsey in

FREDCLAUS' B iaN- Flo st
"E f" ,-'( z0) '9 7
Fri 7:00 905 Fri, 7:10, 9:10 Wed-Thurs 7:30 (904)964-7711
Sat 4:O, ,00, 9:05 Sat 5:00, 7:910, 9:10
Wed-Thurs 7: un, 5:00,:0 218 N.Temple Ave.

3Prn-r-


'Spruce Up

Your

Landscape


Mulch Bulk Stone
Cypress Blend Pea Gravel
Colored Mulch. . River Rock
Pine Bark Red Rock
"Bulk or bagged" Marble Chips
S Horse Bedding Crushed Concrete
* *Baled Pine Straw Railroad Ties




STARKE LANDSCAPE SUPPLY

9620 SE S.R.100, Starke
Tues.-Fri. 7-5:30 (9041964-3112 Prices& availability
SSat. 7-3:30 Apprx.2-miles of U.subject to change
4 Closed Sun.&Mon. Approx. 2-miles E of U.S. 301 without notice. o


I


I W LION I WJMlll Loft#


Born on Nla) 22, 1944, in South
Charleston, W.V., Johnson also
lived in other areas of West
Virginia, in Cordele, Ga., in
Columbia, S.C., and in Florida in
Milton, Starke and Lake Butler.
She lived in Largo for the past
nine years. She was of the Baptist
faith.
Johnson is survived by: sons,
Cary Frounfelter of Seminole,
Craig Frounfelter of Largo and
Casey Roberts of Springhill; her
mother Allene Mallory of Starke;
brothers, Troy, Fred and Mick;
sisters, Betty and Joyce; her
former husband Charles "Cobb"
Roberts of Largo; 19
grandchildren and four great-
grandchildren.
She was preceded in death by: a
son, Cory Frounfelter, a
granddaughter, Kristina
Frounfelter, and her father,
Garland Mallory.
The family will receive friends
on Friday, Nov. 16, from 6:30-
8:30 p.m. at Archie Tanner
Funeral Home in Starke. Interment
will occur on Saturday, Nov. 17,
at 11 a.m. in Crosby Lake
Cemetery under the care of Archie"
Tanner Funeral Home.

Esther King
MELROSE Esther Mae
King, 87, of Melrose died Sunday,
Nov. 11, 2007, at her home in
Melrose following an extended
illness.
Born in Hartsville, S.C., on
April 20, 1920, King.-moved to
Melrose 60 years ago from South
Carolina. King was a member of
Eliam Baptist Church for more
than 50 years and held many
volunteer positions during that
time. She was a homemaker.
King is survived by: daughters,
Anna Laura McElveen, Carolyn
Newsom, and Anne Tyner, all of
Hartsville, S.C:, Reda Williams of
Melrose and Connie Wise of
Altamont Springs; a son, Buck
Tiller of North Carolina; and


Ola Mae Jenkins

Ola Mae
Jenkins
LAWTEY Ola Mae Jenkins,
60, of Lawtey died Friday, Nov. 94
2007, at Shands AGH following i
brief illness.
Born in Lawtey on April 23,.
1947, Jenkins was a lifelong
resident of Bradford County. She
attended local- schools ancd
graduated from RJE High Schools
in Starke.
She was retired from Reception.
and Medical Center with thed
Department of Corrections. She;
also worked at the deli in Winn-
Dixie and was a homemaker.
As a member of Mt. Zion AME
Church in Lawtey,. Jenkins
volunteered on a numberof boards
and committees.
Jenkins is survived by: her
husband of. 40 years, Malachi
Jenkins Sr. of Lawtey; sons, Steve
Marshall Jenkins, Malachi Jenkins
Jr., Stacy Jenkins and Michael
Jenkins, all of Lawtey; a brother,
Willie Brown of Lawtey; her
adoptive mother, Annese Melton
of Lawtey; her adoptive father,
Albert Williams of Lawtey; and
nine grandchildren. Family hour
will be on Friday, Nov. 16,
beginning at 4:30 p.m. at Haile
. Memorial Chapel-in .-Sterke -T-he-

.:0o p.m. on iiraae.
Funeral services for Jenkins
will be held on Saturday, Nov. 17,
at 11 a.m. at Madison Street
Baptist Church in Starke, with the
Rev. Chad Everson, the Rev. Karl
Anderson and the Rev. Melvin
Jenkins conducting the services.
There will be a viewing following
the eulogy.
Interment will follow in-
Peetsville Cemetery under the care
of Hale Funeral Home of Starke.

MORE
OBITUARIES
ON PAGE 7B
* .I


'First Christian Church



reaches out to the Community!


I








Nov..15, 2007 TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR--B-SECTION Page 3B


Lakeisha Austin (right) is congratulated by her
grandparents, (I-r) Robert Austin and Aretha Austin of
Lawtey.

Austin graduates from college


Lakeisha Austin graduated
from Florida Metropolitan
University in Jacksonville on
Oct. 26 with a master's degree
in business administration with
a concentration in human
resources.


She is the daughter of Vera
Diggs.
Austin graduated from
Bradford High School with the
class of 1996. She also
graduated from Rollins College
in Winter Park in 2001'with a
bachelor's degree in economics.


* Field Mowing Bush Hogging
Disking Fence Line Clearing
Dozer Work Etc
Call Today For A FREE Quote!)
Evan Denmark (904) 334-9806


Donations
needed for
Shop with a
Cop
The Starke Police
Department will conduct its
third annual Shop with a Cop
on Tuesday, Dec. 18, at 9 a.m.
at the Wal-Mart Super Center
on U.S. 301 south of Starke.
The department would like
to double the number of


children this year. The 50
children will be selected from
the five elementary schools in
Bradford County based on need,
academics and behavior,
according to Lt. Barry Warren.
Each child will have the
opportunity to shop with a cop
or a community official.
Donations are welcome.
Each child receives a spending
opportunity of $100, Lt.
Warren said. To make a
donation contact Lt. Warren or
Margie Hall at SPD (904) 964-


CRAZY HORSE
LANDSCATING LLC
WWW.CRAZYHORSE.WETPAINT.COM

NEED SOME HELP INSTALLING
YOUR CHRISTMAS LIGHTS???
GIVE USA CALL COMMERCIAL OR RESIDENTIAL

WISHING YOU ALL A MERRY CHRISTMAS!!
LAWN CARE, PRESSURE WASHING, GROUND
MAINTENANCE AND LANDSCAPE DESIGN


Locally CARLEY BROOME check/cash
Owned & Operated LICENSED AND INSURED m *''I*


5400.
Santa Fe Community
College is asking the
community to donate items to
be sold at a yard sale on Nov.
30 to benefit the Shop with a


601 E. Call St.
Hwy. 230, Starke


Cop program. Donated items
may be dropped off at the
SFCC Andrews Center at 209
W. Call St. Contact Ms.
Corbin for further information
at (904) 964-5382.


Back & Neck Pain Clinic
"Modern methods
with old-fashioned concern."


* Auto Accidents
* Work Injuries
* Headaches
* Neck and Back Pain


ur. Virgil A. Berry
CHIROPRACTIC


964-8018


904-964-3200
1-866-665-2372


15000 U.S. 301 South
Starke


Boston College at Clemson
2 miles south of Starke on US-301
904-964-7200
Web address: www.GetYourFord.com


SPORTING "O

CHANCE

Florida Atlantic at Florida
211 S. ORANGE ST., STARKE 964-7434


Spires *
386-496-3361


S'LittleCaesarse
207 Orange St. 964-3300
Maryland at FSU
$r00 LARGE PEPPERONI PIZZA
5J .. All Day Every Day


"Hometown
Proud"


Miami at Virgina Tech
610 SW 1st St., Lake Butler
Visit and contact us at: spiresiga.com


EXIT REALTY EXCEL
Duke at Notre Dame
(904) 964-EXIT 107-F Edwards Rd., Starke
1-866-964-EXIT www.sonshinetitle.com


AJENNINGS INSULATION
and PAINTERS, Inc.
"INM yl Oder lctrie bill lighter yiour home brighter."
1 (877)229-4180 (352)373-9744
Kentucky at Georgia
Locally Owned 5 Operated

Bradford Pre-School
Owner: linda Bryant &ire Sce 1997
Child care for ages I& up
Vanderbilt at Tennesse
Open MONDAY.FRIDAY
407 W. Washington St., Starke 6:30 a.m... 6 p.m.
/.-n..... -t -^ i;,, ,ci.h.v \ n .n .- .- Q. o .A_ l


ZiHWTYfl IH~



Wendell Davis, District Manager
LSU at Mississippi


(352) 468-1500
1-800-683-1005


OCapital City
OBank
N.Y. Gaints at Detroit
350 N. Temple Ave. 500 Green Way S.R. 100E
Starke, FL 32091 Keystone Heights, FL 32656
(904) 964-7050 (352) 473-4952


Cow oys



Tampa Bay at Altlanta
Hwy. 301 South *Starke (904) 368-3800


S, Washington
at Dallas
Scrap gold CASH
Broken jewelry= CASH
904 964 GOLD 352-473-PAWN
US 301 S., Starke S.R. 100 W., K. Hgt.


US 301 S. STARKE, FL


Ballet *Tap

STARff ACADOPAY O


GREAT STEAKS
ATA
GREAT PRICE!
Mississippi St.
at Arkansas

964-8061


* a -7 I.orl-m **-w


i


You're a
Winner
with
Sonny's

San Diego at Jacksonville
Temple Ave.
arke, Fla. 964-8840


0CHIEVROLET
OF
STARKE
Louisville at South Florida
US-301 North (904) 964-7500
Starke 1-888-4-1-CHEVY


Jackson
S Building Supply
Proudly savir our CommuNtfot fr 48 y48a rs/


Starke
US 301 South
9S4.AOn7R


Chicago at Seattle
fl


Handi-House
Portable Building
Over 65 buildings in stock


FREE DELIVE RY /[
Arizona at Cincinnati
110 WEST CALL STREET STARKE (904) 964-5764
www. theofficeshopofstarke.com Fax (904) 964-6905


FINANCING AVAILABLE
904-964-3330


Lake Butler
145 SW 6th Ave.
4Q.An307Q


'S

I Carolina at
S Green Bay

US-301 S in Starke


S Community
Established in 1957 S tate Bank
www.CommunityStateBank-fl.com
Miami at Philadelphia
STARKE LAKE BUTLER
811 S. Walnut St. s- 255 SE Sixth St.
(904-964-7830) MEMERC [386-496-3333]


Southern Professional
Title Services, Inc.
Look For the lRED Door
For All Your land Title Needs 3
New Orleans at Houston
Lake Butler Starke
185 SE 1 Street 704 N. Lake St.
386-496-0089 904-964-6872


Loving Hands Tet Sitting
Leave your pets at home where they will be happy!
All types of animals cared for, including horses.
OMcs: 352-473-4174
Coll: 352-359-0575
Private,Secure In-home visits
., Cude by a certified Professional.
Cuddles & Quality Playtime with every visit
S (www.Iovinghandspes.com) 7 )
k4? Licensed B3o.ded a Insured
Pittsburqh at lets


HAYES
ELECTRIC AND AIR CONDITIONING
Corner of S.R. 16 & 301 N (904) 964-8744

, >,, New England at RESIDENTIAL
ffae, L. COMMERCIAL
Y1 BuffTalo # r L.- nsd
L ER. .0003575 RA.0O33644 Insi.Crd


Jackson Building Supply
Hayes Electric
Cowboys Steak House
Capital City Bank
Sawyer Gas
Exit Realty
Jennings Insulation


Lightning Pawn
Little Caesars
Sporting Chance
Bradford Pre-School
Town and Country Ford
Office Shop


Communsinv State Bank


Loving Hands
Starke Academy of Dance
Spires Grocery
Beck of Starke
Sonny's Restaurant
Chevrolet of Starke
Western Steer
Southern Professional Title
Handi-House
TIEBREAKER SCORE:
Name:
Address:


Call Dr. Berry PHYSICIAN
Serving the Area For 18 Years


US-301 S, Hampton
just 1/2 Mil South of the
Gate Station At 301 8 18


(904)964-5277
1/' 417-6EdwctakdRoad
oa & w. a W
Musical Theater Ballroom Cheer
Kansas City at Indianapolis


-H


I


I


W1111HUINLY lLdtt DdIIK


..THERAPEUTIC MASSAGE BY
Mary Coleman-Parley wT
MA 34282 304357-00


I


. ; .


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jazz L.ysun.


i KA rl:;








SPage 4B TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR--B-SECTION Nov. 15, 2007


Starke and the late Billy and
Pauline Rehberg of Bunnell.
Paternal great-great-
grandparents are Ray and
Estelle Cox of Starke.


BIRTHS


I BIRTH -


Kameron Crawford


Kaleb Rehberg


Kaleb Rehberg
Steve and Sharon Rehberg
of Starke announce the birth of
their son, Kaleb Lane Rehberg,
on Nov. 6, 2007, at North
Florida Women's Center in
Gainesville.
Kaleb weighed 8 lbs., 2 ozs.
and measured 21 inches at
birth.
Kaleb joins three siblings,
Robbie and Ryan Godwin and
Kelsei Rehberg.
Maternal grandparents are
Gary and Marie Knowles of
Starke and L.C. and Debra
Simmons of Lake City.
Maternal great-grandparents,
are Evelyn Jones of
Providence, Guy Simmons of
Lake City, Lawerance and
Alice Knowles of Green Cove
Springs, and the late Alberta
Thornton and Mary Evelyn
King.
Paternal grandparents are
Billy and Melissa Rehberg of
Starke. Paternal great-
grandparents are Gwen Cox of






Morgan Rhoden








Love: Mom, Dad,
Preston


Blake Lanier


Blake Lanier
Chris and Tamra Lanier of
Lawtey announce the birth of
their son, Blake Andrew
Lanier, on Sept. 27, 2007.
Blake weighed 6 lbs., 14
ozs., and measured 19 inches
at birth.
He joins a brother, Wyatt
Friese.
Maternal grandparents are
Tim and Barbara Lindsey of
Graham and Mary Beth
Lindsey of Ocala. Maternal
great-grandparent is Virginia
Benton of Brooker.
Paternal grandparents are the
late Susan D. and Andy
Wilkerson of Lawtey. Paternal -
great-grandparent is Lois
Wilkison of Sampson City.









He 1W





Love: Mom, Dad, *
Samantha, Nicholas


Kameron
Crawford
John Crawford II and Cassey
Garner, both of Starke,
announce the birth of their
daughter, Kameron Leet Elaine
Crawford, on Nov. 8, 2007, in
Gainesville.
Kameron weighed 8 lbs. 13
ozs. at birth.
Maternal grandparents are
Sam and Terri Henderson of
Starke, Mike and Laura Garner
of Middleburg, and Ray and
Diana Easterling of Starke.
Paternal grandparents are


I BIRTH


John and Tammy Crawford of
Lawtey. Paternal great-
grandparents are Billie Yon of
Lawtey and Chuck and Elaine
Yon of Melrose.

Tyler Johnson
Scott Johnson and Tonya
Gray of Lake Butler announce
the birth of their son, Tyler
Douglas Johnson, on Sept. 27,
2007, in Gainesville.
He joins one sibling, Taylor
Johnson.
Maternal grandparents are
Ruth Taylor of Lake Lynn,
Penn., and Gregory Beal of
Dunbar, Penn. Maternal great-
grandparents are Blaine and
Elva Reese of Uniontown,
Penn.
Paternal grandparents are
David and Cindy Johnson of
Lawtey. Paternal great-
grandparent is Linda Maxon of
Surfside, S.C.
"The 'great end of life is not
knowledge but action."
Thomas Huxley
"The basic test of freedom is
perhaps less in what we are free
to do than in What we are free
not to do."
Eric Hoffer


MULTIPLE CHOICE!


Once you decide to list
-your home for sale, how long
will it take to sell? How long
should you give the agent to
successfully market your
home?
The best answer is to be
reasonable. But what's rea-
sonable? 30 days? What
about 300 days? Of course,
there is no standard response.
Let's look at how to deter-
mine the right amount of time
in your situation. With each
real estate market being dif-
ferent, it takes longer to sell a
home in some areas than oth-
ers. A home that may sell in
15, days in one city may take
87 days in another, or even six
to nine months in yet another.
Actually, the time needed
to attract a buyer can be made


longer or shorter by offering a
higher or lower price, and bet-
ter or less desirable terms and
amenities.
Ask your agent to provide
information relative to current
selling times in your neigh-
borhood. Discuss the factors
that may help or hinder the
sale of your home, and ask for
your agent's best estimate of
selling time for your home.
Then, allow the appropriate
amount of time to properly
market your home.
By giving a reasonable
length of time in which to
perform, you will have the
complete determination of
your agent, and will no doubt
be pleased with the results -
the ultimate sale of your
home.


^y,*4,4Vr Listen to ASK MIKE
A ric -n L on WEAG-FM, 106.3
S2... ...' at 8:35 AM
M ILafl American Dream of Northeast Florida, Inc.
9O .f .iS r-.. l .t ,l Ch ,aim en G l ,.-.ire. Brica ,er-.l.o ner.
5. T N. temple Street, Starke, FL 3.o091o
REALTORS' mgoldwire@americandreamflorida.com


GOT BUGS?


Call

(904) 964-PEST
K (7378)


n wyohu waN
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M 'r.ditn.o,


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nt a mortgage



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WASTE MANAGEMENT, INC.

"Proudly Serving North Central Florida"
Roll-off Container Service


Located at:
12469 West SR 100 Lake Butler, Florida 32054
Office: 386-496-DUMP Fax: 386-496-2523

Greg Waters
Operations Manager

FOR ALL OF YOUR CONTAINER NEEDS
20 YARD 30 YARD 40 YARD
11 111 1 1 i ll


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over $5,000 on a $200,000 loan. Here are some
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Loan Origination Fee up to 1%
Appraisal Fee S350
Credit Report S22
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Survey $400
Tax Related Service Isfe 85
Appldatlon Pfs. 7 5$n0


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man's character, give him power.
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'''/- Look who's 27
S' Happy Birthday!
BHS Class of '99. Junella
Cohen a/k/a Precious is
S presenting a black or
White dress code birthday
I. bash. Party will be held
SThanksgiving night at
Starke fairgrounds. Doors
Open at 10 p.m. $10 to
,,0' Jparty. All are welcome.
Must be 21 or older.
ID required.
See you there!







Nov. 15, 2007 TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR--B-SECTION Page 5B


CRIME


Recent
arrests
in Bradford,
Clay or Union
The following individuals
were arrested recently by local
law enforcement officers in
Bradford, Clay (Keystone
Heights area) or Union
County:
Willie Lee Pierce, 48, of
Starke was arrested Nov. 9 by
Starke Patrolman Jason L.
Silcox for assault. Pierce
threatened to kill the victim
and burn the house down if he
could not live there, Patrolman
,Silcox said. He was released
'from custody after a $5,000
-.surety bond was posted.
Shannon Lowell King, 41,
of Starke was arrested Nov. 9
'by Starke Patrolman David
SSchlofman for aggravated
assault. King was charged with
;trying to run over the victim
.'"-


or ;illt






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$5.00


Located in Hitchcock's Plaza
. S.R. 100, Keystone Heights


pROD CT

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$7
WAXING
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in...
Bring
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SDAILY LUNCH SPECIALS STEAKS BURGERS SEAFOOD AND HOMESTYLE MEALS
, i ^ ^ ,^ -. i n . .. P -.-. n : \ ." *,










Serving $1099 P

STurkey. & Dressing Ksid10 under

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Pumpkin pie too!

MONDAYS are Bike Night 5-10 p.m.-$1 draft &1/2-price wings!
KIDS (10 and under) EAT FREE on Tues. Nights 4-9 p.m.

Hwy. 301 South *Starke *(904) 368-3800
full wi ISagtm $C4Js9
-Hy. /0'1 >So"uTh",rke(94.)368-3800


I !0 '0


while the victim was walking
on Geiger Road. King then put
the truck in reverse and tried to
hit the victim again,
Patrolman Schlofman said. A
$15,000 surety bond was
posted for his- release from
custody. The victim, Thomas
Green, was charged by sworn
complaint Nov. 8 with battery.
Green was charged with hitting
King in the back with a
broom.
Richard Dewayne Tyler, 41,
of Starke was arrested Nov. 6
by Starke Patrolman P.A.
King for assault on person 65
or older. Tyler was charged
with threatening to beat the
victim. The victim was treated
by emergency medics for
medical problems, Patrolman
King said. Bond was set at
$5,000.
Carolyn M. Holder, 58, of
Starke was arrested Nov. 8 by
Starke Patrolman Shawn
Brown for two counts domestic
battery. Holder is charged with


pushing, shoving and/or
striking the victims,
Patrolman Brown said. Bond
was set at $2,000.
Corey Jeron Williams, 24,
of Orlando was arrested Nov.
11 by Bradford Deputy J. Pons
for domestic battery. Williams
was charged with striking the
victim in the face. Bond was
set at $1,000.
Andre Keith Daniel, 21, of
Worthington Springs was
arrested Nov. 8 by Union
Deputy David Shane for
battery. Daniel was charged
with hitting and choking the
victim during an argument.
Erika Suzanne Gordon, 35,
of Starke was arrested Nov. 11
by Patrolman King for
possession of cocaine,
tampering with evidence and
resisting arrest without
violence. Gordon's vehicle was
traffic stopped at 1:42 a.m.
While speaking to her the
officer observed a hard, white


Di ller Cetrees
startiitm at


(352) 473-4775
www.mtssteakhouse.


$8.-0 /0

Lunch Tues-Fri 11:30-2 p.m.
5 Dinner Tues-Thurs 5-9 p.m.
corn Fri & Sat 5-10 p.m. .


..-.,Aft


I C0 'S


substance under her tongue.
When asked to open her
mouth, Gordon refused and
began to chew the substance,
Patrolman King said. The
officer grabbed Gordon by the
jaw and ordered her to spit the
substance out, but she refused.
After forcing Gordon's mouth
open, several small pieces of
crack cocaine were removed by
the officer. Gordon was
released from custody after a
$20,000 surety bond was
posted.
Gary Allen Sikes, 32, of
Jacksonville was arrested Nov.
9 by Patrolman King for
possession of cocaine. During
a search of Sikes' vehicle, the
officer found a piece of crack
cocaine on the armrest. A
$15,000 surety bond was
posted for his release from
custody.
Christopher David Colon,
18, of Orlando was arrested
Nov. 11 by Starke Patrolman
Mark Lowery for possession of
cannabis and possession .of
drug paraphernalia. The officer
found marijuana and a grinder
with residue in Colon's vehicle
during a traffic stop. Colon
was released from custody after
a $2,000 surety bond was
posted.

Peter Norman Durand, 38,
of Brunswick, Ga., was
arrested Nov. 9 by Starke Sgt.
Richard Crews for possession
of cannabis. Two marijuana
cigarettes were located in the
driver's side door compartment
after the K-9 alerted on the
vehicle. Durand was released
from custody after a $1,000
surety bond was posted.
Cheryl Y. Knowles, 39, of
Starke was arrested Nov. 10 by
Starke Sgt. M.D. Watson for
breach of peace. Knowles was
charged with shouting
profanities and causing a
disturbance in the parking lot
of a local business, Sgt.
Watson said. A $1,000 surety
bond was posted for her release
from custody.


Brian Lane Blake, 22, of
Starke was arrested Nov. 10 by
Clay Deputy A.F. Scott for
trespass structure. Blake was
escorted out of the Crazy Horse
in Orange Park by security just
before midnight. After
changing clothing, Blake was
seen reentering the
establishment from the
opposite entrance and later
through the front door, Deputy
Scott said. He was again
escorted out of the business
and on the third time, he was
placed under arrest, Deputy
Scott said.
John David Tetstone, 35, of
Keystone Heights was arrested
.Nov. 9 by Clay Deputy D.A.
Urban on a warrant for grand
theft. Bond was set at $10,003.
Michael Eugene Sowers,
49, of Keystone Heights was
arrested Nov. 7 by Clay
Deputy .W.A. Simandl on a
warrant from Bradford County.
for failure to appear possession
of drug paraphernalia. Bond
was set at $4,000. Sowers was
transported to Bradford Nov. 8.
Ruth Perry Paladino, 67, of
Hampton was arrested Nov. 8
by Starke Patrolman Michelle
Davis- on warrants from
Alachua County for fraud.
Surety bonds totalling $826
were posted for her release
from custody.
Krista Joy Bradley, 31, of
Middleburg was arrested Nov..
8 by Bradford Deputy Robert
Lyons on a capias for violation
of probation with no bond.
Reginald Keith, 21, of
Macclenny was arrested Nov. 8
by Union Deputy Ken Smith
on a warrant from Baker
County fo" resisting an officer
without violence.
Natasha Renee Smith, 24,
of Starke was arrested Nov. 9.
by Bradford Deputy R.
Watkins on a warrant from
Alachua County for violation
of probation larceny. She was
released on her own
recognizance.


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David 0. Gentry, 27, of
Lake Butler was arrested Nov.
8 by Deputy Lyons for
violation of probation from
Union County with no bond.
Nicholas Lee Renshaw, 24,
of Starke was arrested Nov. 7
by Starke Sgt. William
Murray on a warrant from
Gainesville for violation of
probation grand theft with no
bond. He was released to
another agency.
Willis Antino Hankerson,
31, of Starke was arrested Nov.
6 by Bradford Sgt. George
Konkel for violation of
probation from Alachua
County. Hankerson was
released after, a $15,000 surety
bond was posted.
Crystal Elaine Brown, 25,
of Ft. White was arrested Nov.
7 by Patrolman Brown on a
warrant from Union County
for failure to appear with no
bond.
Domingo Torres, 53, of
Starke was arrested Nov. 8 by
Bradford Deputy R.E. Pollard
on warrants for burglary of an
occupied structure, grand theft,
grand theft auto and dealing in
stolen property.
Austin Alvers, 18, of
Keystone Heights was arrested
Nov. 8 by Clay deputies on
warrants for criminal mischief
and trespass on school
property.
Curtis Randall Brooks Jr.,
27, of Starke was arrested Nov.
11 by Patrolman King for
violation of community
control possession of
controlled substance with no
bond.
rew Secules, 18, of
Keyspne Heights was, arrested
Nov. 8- by Clay deputies on
warrants for trespass on school
property and criminal mischief.
Michael Snow, 21, of
Keystone Heights was arrested
Nov. 6 by Clay deputies on
warrants for lewd lascivious
molestation and lewd
lascivious conduct.
Kelly L. Robinson, 41, of
Starke was arrested Nov. 11 by
Starke Patrolman James
Stutler for violation' of
!probation. ',drug ,veqtripment.
Robinson was ordered to serve
50 days in the county jail.
Traffic
Brian Alton McGriff, 47, of
Lake Butler was arrested Nov.
6 by Union Deputy James
Goodwin for driving under the
influence (DUI). McGriffs
vehicle was stopped for failure
to maintain single lane on
S.R. 121. He, smelled strongly
of an alcoholic beverage and
was unsteady on his feet when
questioned, Deputy Goodwin
said. McGriff failed testing and
was placed under arrest. His
blood-alcohol content was .18
percent, Deputy Goodwin said.

Linda Cassell, 34, of Starke
was arrested Nov. 7 by Clay
Deputy T.J. Brown for DUI.
Cassell was passed out in the.
driver's seat of her vehicle in a
parking lot in Orange Park.
She smelled strongly of an
alcoholic beverage and an
empty liquor bottle was found
on the driver's floorboard,
Deputy Brown said. Cassell
refused to submit to the field
sobriety exercises and refused
the breath test.


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Page 6B TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR--B-SECTION Nov. 15, 2007,


ICRIME" I


Earleton
woman
charged fraud
in Starke
Vanessa Lynn Jones, 30, of
Earleton was arrested Nov. 6
on a warrant for obtaining
prescription by fraud.
Jones was charged by Sgt.
William Brown with calling in
a prescription on Sept. 5 for
Loritab to the Wal-Mart
pharmacy using the name of
Cory Perkins. She used Dr.
Shannon as the physician.
On Sept. 6, Jones called in
a prescription for Loritab to
the Walgreens pharmacy under
the name of Kelsey Perkins
with Dr. White as the
prescribing physician.
Jones was located at
Walgreens, where she was
attempting to pick up the
-prescription, Sgt. Brown said.
She admitted to the fraud, Sgt.
Brown said.
Jones was released on her
own recognizance.

Recent arrests
in Bradford,
Clay or Union
The following individuals
were arrested recently by local
law enforcement officers in
Bradford, Clay (Keystone
Heights area) or Union
County:
Traffic
Diana Lynne Gilkey, 46, of
Green Cove Springs was
arrested Nov. 10 by Florida
Highway Patrol Trooper
Kenneth J. Frost for DUI.
Gilkey was involved in a
single vehicle traffic crash on
U.S. 301. Her vehicle was in a
ditch and she was passed out
behind the steering wheel with
the keys in the ignition. An
empty bottle of vodka was
found in the vehicle and Gilkey
smelled strongly of alcohol.
Gilkey failed the field sobriety
tests and was taken into
custody, Trooper Frost said.
She refused a breath test.

John Perry, 23, of Raiford
was arrested Nov. 11 by Clay-
depVties for driving while
license suspended or revoked
(DWLS).
Charles Stephen Clark, 30,
of Lake Butler was arrested
Nov. 5 by FHP Trooper K.M.
Boatright for DWLS, attaching
S tag not assigned, possession of
cannabis and drug
.paraphernalia. Clark's vehicle
was stopped for speeding on
S.R. 100. Marijuana and
rolling papers were found in
the center console of the
vehicle during a search,
Trooper Boatright said. Bond
was set.at $5,000. '
Gary Michael Thurman, 30,
of Interlachen .was arrested
Nov. 8 by Hampton patrolmen
for attaching tag not assigned,
DWLS and alteration of tag.
Surety bonds totalling $1,500
were posted for his release
from custody.
Sheila Marie Douglas, 36,
of Jacksonville was arrested
Nov. 9 by FHP Trooper J.M.
Ford for DWLS with
knowledge. Douglas' vehicle
was stopped for speeding on
S.R. 121 in Union County. A
$5.00 surety bond was posted
for her release from custody.


Anthony Jerome Hicks, 23,
of Melrose was arrested Nov. 8
by Clay Deputy J.L. Bledsoe
for no valid driver's license
(NVDL). Hicks has never had a
driver's license, Deputy
Bledsoe said.
Donald Alessi, 59, of
Keystone Heights was arrested
Nov. 6 by Clay Deputy R.E.
Dews for DWLS habitual.
Alessi's vehicle was stopped
for failing to maintain a single
line on S.R. 21. There are 10
suspensions/revocations
against his license, Deputy
Dews said.
William Mark Adams, 56,
of Kingsley Lake was arrested
Nov. 7 by Clay Deputy Renee
Scucci on a warrant for DUI.
Adams was verbally
uncooperative, refusing to read
the warrant, Deputy Scucci
said. Bond was set at $752.
Paul Keith Huff, 37, of
Melrose was arrested Nov. 9
by Bradford Deputy R.V.
Melton for failure to appear
expired license. A $752 surety
bond was posted for his release
from custody.
Tomas Edward Wichterman,
23, of Keystone Heights was
arrested Nov. 12 by Clay
deputies on a warrant for
NVDL. Bond was set at $241.


LETTERS TO BIRTHS
THE EDITOR

Participant ..


honored to be
part of parade
Dear Editor:
The Starke Shrine Parade
Unit, the Clay Kats and the
Ballyhoos all participated in
the Union County Veterans
Day/homecoming parade on
Friday, Nov. 9.
There were so many parade
entries that it took 70 minutes
to get from start to finish. I
believe it was the largest
parade Lake Butler has ever
experienced. The crowds were
great and really appreciated the
parade participants.
As one of the dune buggy
drivers, I was proud to be a
Shriner and a veteran. It was a
great privilege to be in this
year's parade.
Ted Barber
Lake Butler


Emma Whittemore


Emma
Whittemore
Mark and Jessica Whittemore
of Starke announce the birth' of
their daughter, Emma Raelen
Whittemore, on Aug. 1, 2007, at
North Florida W6men's Center.
Emma weighed 6 pounds, 15
ounces and measured 19.25
inches in length.
Emma joins two siblings,
Noah and Luke Whittemore.


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Betty and Elbert Nettles
Nettles celebrate 50th in LB


Betty and Elbert Nettles of
Lake Butler celebrated their
50th wedding anniversary with
a family dinner at Outback
Steakhouse in Orange Park.
Elbert Nettles married the
former Betty Andrews on Nov.
1, 1957, at the home of the Rev.
and Mrs. D.A. Greek in
Jacksonville.


Both are retired from the
Florida Department of
Corrections and spend their
time maintaining their farms.
Among the gifts, cards, e-
mails, and letters of
congratulations from friends
and family, was a card from
President and Mrs. George
Bush.


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Nov. 15, 2007 TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR-B-SECTION Page 7B


[OBITUARIES

bale Mollerup
i STARKE Dale Andrew
Mollerup, 55, of Starke died
Friday, Nov. 9, 2007, at his home
following an extended illness.
Born in Memphis, Tenn., on
Nov. 25, 1951, Mollerup moved to
Starke in 1981 from Waverly,
Texas.
, He was a member of St. Edward
Catholic Church in Starke. He had
a degree in chemical engineering
and worked for Dupont for 32
years as a sales manager.
Mollerup is survived by: his
wife of 38 years, Cheryl Miller
Mollerup of Starke; a daughter,
Jennifer Mollerup of
Fredricksburg, Va.; a son, Chris
Mollerup of Starke; and brothers,
Jerry Mollerup of Orlando and
Richard Mollerup of League City,
Texas.
Funeral services for Mollerup
will be held at a later date under
the care of Jones Funeral Home of
Starke.

William Murray
* KEYSTONE HEIGHTS -
William Ellis Murray, 93, of
Keystone Heights died Monday,
N4ov. 12, 2007, at Willy Manor of
the Park of the Palms, following
in extended illness.
SBorn in Barrow-in-Furness,
England, on Dec. 6, 1913, Murray
tgloved to Keystone Heights in
1983 from Algonquin, Ill.
Murray was a retired laboratory
technician and a retired medical
supplies lab technician.
I Murray is survived by: sons,
41awrence Murray of Elkhorne,
Wis., and Kenneth Murray of
lubuque, Iowa; sisters, Jennie,
Ada, Mary and Betty; seven
grandchildren and 13 great-
grandchildren.
i He was preceded in death by his
wife, Jessie Murray.
i Funeral services for Murray
were held Nov. 13 in the Park of
the Palms Chapel in Keystone
Heights with Tom Dowell
conducting the services. Interment
followed in Keystone Heights
Cemetery under the care of Jones
Funeral Home of Keystone
Heights.


Carrie Bell Smith

Carrie Smith
GREEN COVE SPRINGS -
Carrie Bell Smith, 81, of Green
Cove Springs died Wednesday,
Nov. 7, 2007.
" Born on March 24, 1926, in
Starke, to Freeman and Emma
Hodges, Smith had been a resident
of the Green Cove Springs area
since 1961 and was a member of
Russell Baptist Church.
Smith is survived by: daughters,
Cora Quails of Green Cove
Springs and Helen Davidson Drew
of Florahome; stepdaughters, Dori
Allen of Whitehall, Ga., and
Gladys Morgan of Wintersville,
Ga.; a stepson, Jack Pope of
Callahan; a stepdaughter-in-law,
Winnifred Pope; sisters, Edna
Norton of Kingsley Lake, and
Faith Murphy and Lois Had, both
of Starke; a brother, Henry
Hodges of Lawtey; 30
grandchildren, 72 great-
grandchildren, 87 great-great-
grandchildren, and three great-
great-great-grandchildren.
She was preceded in death by:
her parents; husbands, Claude
Pope and James Powell Smith;


four sons and one daughter.
Funeral services for Smith were
held on Nov. 10, at Russell Baptist
Church with the Rev. Ron Baker,
the Rev. Darwood Moore and the
Rev. Terry Quails conducting the
services. Interment followed' in
Russell Haven of Rest Cemetery
under the care of Broadus-Raines
Funeral -Home of Green Cove
Springs..
In lieu of flowers, the family
requests that donations be made to
Community Hospice of Northeast'
Florida, 4266 Sunbeam Rd.,
Jacksonville, FL 32257. Friends
may sign-the online memorial
book at www.broadusraines.com.

Juanita
Townsan
Juanita Joan Townsan, 74, died
Nov. 13, 2007.
Townsan was born on Jan. 20,
2007, in Jacksonville to Robert
and Virgina Tyler Ward. She
married James Townsan and was a
homemaker.
Towtisan is survived by: her
husband of 57 years, James
Townsan; daughters, Gail
Townsan and Tammy Gurley;
brother, Emory "Buddy" Durham;
sisters, Barbara Willet, Elsie Ward
and Dorothy Hawk; two
grandchildren and three great-
grandchildren.
She was preceded in death by
her son, Robert James To*nsan.
Funeral services for Townsan
will be held Thursday, Nov. 15, at.
11 a.m. at the 103' Street Church
of God, 10356 103rd St.,
Jacksonville, FL 32210. Cliff
Gobble will conduct the services.
Interment will be held at 2 p.m. on
Nov. 15 at Union Baptist Church
Cemetery.
In*lieu of flowers, the family
requests that donations be made to
St. Jude's Children's Research
Hospital, P.O. Box 1893,
Memphis, TN 38101-9950.
Arrangements are under the
care of Hardage-Giddens Funeral
Home of Jacksonville.


uoug YOrK

Doug York
STARKE Earl Douglas
York, 58, was born Jan. 16, 1949.
York, beloved husband, dad, son,
brother and friend, died Saturday,
Nov. 10, 2007, in Atlanta, Ga.
He is survived by: his wife
Shirley York; his parents, Carl and
Louise York; his son, Richard
Shaffer, and companion Debbie
Brown; his daughter, Veronica,
and son-in-law J.C. Cummings;
his daughter, Melissa Shaffer, and
son-in-law Tyler Watson; his son,
Michael York, and fiancee Linda
Lawhorn; his beloved dog, Tika
York; grandchildren, Jeffery
Malston,. Courtney Malston, Devin
Dowling, Paul Cummings, Colter
Cummings, Marshal Cummings,
Danielle Begerastain, Brianna
Lawhorn, and Michelle Schrock;
his brother, Roger and sister-in-
law, Diane York; his sister, Linda,
and brother-in-law Dave Heflin;
his brother, Ewell, and sister-in-
law Donna York; his sister, Carol,
and brother-in-law Jack
Giselbach; his brother, Dewayne


WATE TRETMEN SAL


York; two great-grandchildren,
Kelsey Schrock and Kevin
Lawhorn; aunts, uncles, nieces,
cousins, and many dear friends.
He is preceded in death, by: his
grandparents, Earl and Flossie
Toy; his mother and father-in-law
Katherine and Bobbie James; and
his nephews, Joshua Weaver and
Greg Couch. i
York graduated from Wendell
L. Willkie High School in 1967
and had spent most of his life in
Elwood, Ind., until moving to
Starke with his wife, Shirley, in
1989.
He served 'one tour of duty in
Vietnam and received a Purple
Heart for his bravery. York is best
known, with his wife, Shirley, as
the owners of the Red Dog Saloon
in Starke, York loved to play golf,
ride his motorcycle, spend time
with family and friends and
watching sports.
Services were held on
Wednesday, [Nov. 14, 2007, at
Dewitt C. Jobies Funeral home at
11 a.m. in Starke with Pastor Mike
Merritt conducting the services.
I PAID OBITUARY

Gary Wider
LAKE BUTLER Gary Ray
Wilder, 53, of Lake Butler, died
suddenly Thu-sday, Nov. 8, 2007,
at his home.
Born in Live Oak,. Wilder lived
his early years in Orlando and
Stewart. He moved to Lake Butler
16 years ago.
Wilder was a, captain with the
Florida Department of
Corrections, working at Reception
and Medical Center in Lake
Butler .He was a veteran who
served in the U.S. Army. He was a
member of th, Police Benevolent
Association aiid was of the Baptist
faith.
Wilder is survived, by: his.wife
of .29 years, l Mia T. Wilder of
Lake Butler; his mother, Lillian C.
Wilderof Liv Oak; a sister, Mary
Wilder of Live Oak; and a brother
Paul Wilder of Live Oak.
He was preceded in death by his
father, Ancil Ray Wilder.
Funeral services for Wilder
were held Nov. 12 in th chapel of
Archer Funeral: Home in Lake
Butler with thh Rev. Robert Carter
conducting the services. Interment
will be at a later date under the
care of Archeii Funeral Home.


I nJ# emory

In Loving Memory
of
Catherine "Kat" Bryant
Jan. 28, 1948-Nov. 14, 2005


It's been two years, Mom
Since you've been gone,
And we are still here carrying
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But we know you are in the
Lord's embrace.
We love and miss you Mama,
Charmin, Clayon, Kevin,
Rtchie, Dickey and family

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the many acts of love and
kindness shown to them during
their time of sorrow. The
kindness has been a source of
strength and shall always be
remembered. May God bless
each ofyou!
The family

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Section C: Thursday, Nov. 15, 2007 Telegraph Times Monitor
I .


Honoring veterans of all types


ABOVE: Starke
residents
Douglas Hardy
(foreground)
and Roy Miller
stand as
veterans are
recognized.
Hardy was a
member of the
Army's 3rd
Armored
Division, while
Miller was a
member of the
Navy. LEFT:
Bradford High
School JROTC
cadet Adam
Farlow stands
at attention
while the flag is
lowered to half-
staff.


BY CLIFF SMELLEY
Telegraph Staff Writer
What is a veteran?
It's a question that can elicit
many different responses.
Veterans have come from all
walks of life, are both male
and female and have served
this country in a variety of
ways, whether they were on a
battlefield or not.
Lee Vincent, a retired
captain who served with the
Naval Reserve from March 21,
1961, until Oct. 1, 1994, spoke
of those many types of
veterans as the keynote
speaker at the city of Starke's
Veterans Day observance on
Nov. 11.
However, among those
differences is one similar trait.
possessed by all veterans.
"You only have to look, into
our eyes, and you will see the
souls of patriots," Vincent
said.
Vincent, the former Starke
city manager,, said every
veteran has his or her own
story about entering military
service. Many enlisted on Dec.
8, 1941. Others received letters
calling them into service.
Even those who were
drafted, however, "were proud
to have served and created
bonds of love for their
country," Vincent said.
People may most often
picture veterans as having
fought in battle, but not all
veterans did so. Vincent said
that does not diminish in any
way what an important role
they played.
"Not all veterans had to
carry a weapon," he said.
"Some drove trucks, loaded
fighter planes and bombers, or
got food and supplies where
they were needed. Their jobs
in many instances were more


important than firing at the
enemy."
Vincent's speech tied in
perfectly with the poem,
"What Is A Vet," credited to
Denis Edward O'Brien, which
was read by Bill Dampier, past
commander of Starke's
American Legion Post 56.
"You can't tell a vet just by
looking," is one of the lines of

See HONOR, p. 2C.


Lee Vincent, a
veteran and
former city
manager for
Stake, was the
keynote
speaker during
the city's
Veterans Day
observanceon
Nov.'11.


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Page 2C TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR-C-SECTION i ,v. 15, 2007


HONOR
-Continued from page 1C
. -the poem;-which-thefi -oes on
to list several types of people
who could be veterans,
whether it be the "barroom
loudmouth, dumber than five
wooden planks," who
exhibited "four hours of
exquisite bravery near the 38"h
parallel," or the elderly man
bagging groceries at the-
supermarket -"who helped
liberate a Nazi death camp and
who wishes all day long that
his'wife were still alive to hold
him when the nightmares
come."
A statement toward the
poem's conclusion reads: "He
is an ordinary and yet an
extraordinary human being-a
person who :offered some of
Itis life's most vital years in the


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service of his country, and who
sacrificed his ambitions so that
others would not have to
sacrifice theirs." -
Vincent said veterans have a
profound understanding of
service and sacrifice.
"They stood up and took an
oath and lived by a strict
code," Vincent said. "They
know the meaning of words
like loyalty, honor and duty.
They have made bonds that
will last a lifetime."
Vincent said it was good to
"know that those who served in
Korea and Vietnam are finally
receiving gratitude for their
service-a gratitude that was a
. long time coming for some.
"It is now good to know that
the sacrifice is appreciated and
their courage honored,"
Vincent said.
Vincent also reminded those
in attendance to be grateful for
the service of all-men and


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Alyssa Cline of the
Bradford High School
JROTC lowers the flags
to half-staff.
women.
"Let us not 'forget, our.
women in uniform," Vincent
said. "Those who served as
nurses in previous wars
endured some of the most
painful, psychological
responsibility of all. They took
care of our wounded and
worked- continually to- save
their lives, all with little or no
sleep on many occasions.
"Today, in America, we
have an all-volunteer military,
many of them women. There is
not a draft. Our young men
and women have stepped
forwatcLwith great bravery and
have said, 'This is my country
and my time to protect her.' I
admire this tremendously."
Admiration and thanks were
expressed by the other
speakers during the
observance.
John Konkus, representing
Congressman Cliff Stearns,
read a letter from Stearns,
which stated, in part: "As
Americans, every time we
voice an opinion, demonstrate
Treligio s faith or read or write
an '"idea, we are exercising
freedom, a freedom gi\ en to us


by our nation's veterans.
Through their dedication, hard
work and sacrifice, we enjoy
the blessing of liberty that they
fought for and died to secure
for us and for future
-generations. .
Starke Mayor Travis Woods
said,-"Today, we would like to
thank those who have risked
their-lives for our freedom-
the men and women who have
the respect and gratitude of our
nation on Veterans Day and
ever other day of the week all
year."
Thanks may be deserving
every day of the week, but
Dampier said veterans have an
issue-when it comes to when
Veterans Day is actually
observed in this country.
"There is still a continued
desire to have a three-day
holiday weekend as a part of
this celebration," Dampier
said. "It's really difficult for
them to do when Veterans Day
falls on a Tuesday or a
Wednesday or a Thursday. It's
nice to have a day off, it's nice
to recognize people's service
to our government agencies
and our businesses throughout
the year, but the importance of
days like Veterans Day and
Memorial Day are significant


YMCA golf
tourney this
Saturday
The Bradford-Union
YMCA's next golf tournament
is slated for Saturday, Nov. 17,
at the Starke Golf and Country
Club.
With two flights, 8:30 a.m.
and 1:30 -p.m., the four-man
' best-ball scramble is limited to
28 teams. Registration is $200
($50 per person).
Prizes will be awarded for


a,?


0


'
I--
1*'.~


-~. 'V ~


Sean Phinney of Boy Scouts Troop 70 places the
American Legion Post 56 wreath during the
ceremony.


enough that we don't need to
relegate them to just another


the longest and shortest drives,
the closest to pin and the
straightest drive, plus a hole in
one wins .a vehicle from Bill
Adams Chevrolet of Starke,
tournament sponsor.
Lunch will be provided, and
a ticket drawing between
flights will award a number of
great prizes.
The golf tournament is the
YMCA's biggest local
fundraiser, with proceeds
dedicated to the organization's
expansion.
To sign up a team or to help


three-day weekend. Veterans i
feel very strongly about that."


sponsor the event (hole,
sponsorships are $100 and
donations of prizes are also,
needed), contact the YMCA at.
(904) 964-9622, or -e-mail.
a.bray@ncfymca.org.
"Too many have dispensed with
generosity in order to practice
charity."
Albert Camus

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more bear to lose sight of their
objects than love."
George Eliot


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Nov. 15, 2007 TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR--C-SECTION Page 3C


Tornadoes' defense dominates in season-ending win


BY ARNIE HARRIS
Telegraph Staff Writer
Ending the season with a
winning record proved to be
no problem for the Bradford
football team, which pounded
Arlington Country Day 37-13
on Nov. 9 in Starke.
The Tornadoes capped the
year with a 6-4 record-their
first winning record since
2004.
"The kids just got better and
better as the season
progressed," Bradford head
coach Steve Hoard said.
Hoard said that with the
comfortable lead the
Tornadoes had the whole
game, he tried to get all of the
team's players into the contest.
He had high praise for the
defense, which he said allowed
an average of approximately
eight points per game.
Two statistics tell the tale of
how dominating Bradford's
defense was against Arlington
(6-4): the Apaches didn't
achieve their initial first down
until four minutes remained in
the first half, and their total
offensive yards for the half
were 10. For most of that half
it seemed the Tornadoes'
offense and defense were
Inoving in the same direction,
much to the distress of the
Apaches.
Arlington's premiere
running back, Dietrick Payne,
meanwhile, was all but bottled
up all evening by the
Tornadoes' swarming defense.
The Bradford offense hit


Robert Boswell
(shown
carrying the
ball on offense
in an earlier
game) had an
interception for
the Tornadoes
in their win
over, Arlington
Country Day.


the ground running. Jernard
Beard scored the Tornadoes'
first three touchdowns from
both sides of the ball. After
Rob Harris carried the ball 60
yards on the Tornadoes' first
play from scrimmage to
Arlington's 5, Beard carried it
the rest of the way to put
Bradford up 7-0 at the 9:23
mark of the first quarter..
The Apaches' ensuing
possession ended in disaster,
as first the quarterback, was
sacked-he was under
constant pressure all
evening-for a loss of 10


yards, and then he had a pass
picked off by Beard, who ran it
in from 20 yards out for the
Tornaoes' second score with
7:57 remaining in the first
quarter.
Again, after Arlington's
offense was all but
nonexistent, Beard pulled off a
trifecta with a 50-yard
touchdown dash at the 4:23
mark of the first quarter.
However, the point-after
attempt failed, putting
Bradford up 20-0.
After the Apaches' offense
petered out once more,


Bradford scored again a little
more than a minute later, going
ahead 26-0 as once again the
point-after attempt went amiss.
The Tornadoes padded their
lead to 29-0 after kicker Glen
Velasquez split the uprights
from 32 yards out
approximately a minute into
the second quarter.
Arlington's offensive woes
continued as defensive back
Robert Boswell intercepted a
pass after it was tipped by
fellow defender Tramaine
Harris. Chuckie Covington,
after the Tornadoes took
possession at their own 31, ran
the ball 69 yards for a
touchdown with 1:25 left in
the half. The two-point attempt
was successful to put Bradford
up 37-0.
In the closing seconds of the
first half, the Apaches finally
managed to light up the board
with a 26-yard field goal.
The second half began more
auspiciously for the Apaches
when they intercepted
quarterback Rodney Mosley's
pass and took possession deep
in their own territory at the 9.
This would begin the
Apaches' longest
sustained-but fatally time-
consuming- scoring drive of
the evening as they traversed
91 yards, mostly behind the
running of Random Boyd and
Anthony Mosley, with te.
latter carrying the ball to pay
dirt at the 7:42 mark of the
fourth quarter to make the
score 37-10.
With 47 seconds left in the


game, the Apaches nailed
another field goal from 34


yards out for the game's final
score.


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Keystone rushes for 500-


plus yards in 20-point win


BY CLIFF SMELLEY,
Telegraph Staff Writer
Keystone Heights head
football coach Chuck
Dickinson told his offense it
needed to generate more than
300 yards to come away with a
victory over Citrus. The
Indians did that and much
more, compiling 563 yards in a
55-35 win over the host
Hurricanes on Nov. 9 in
Inverness.
"Tonight, it looked like we.
blocked better," Dickinson
said. "We had some big runs.
The backs ran hard. The guys
blocked well. We didn't punt
the ball.
"We had to have done
something right offensively."
The Indians (8-2), as has
been the case all year, were led
by an offensive line-
composed entirely of seniors-
blocking the way for senior
running backs Matt Story and
Greg Taylor. The result was
527 rushing yards.
Lineman Brandon Boettcher
was surprised when he was
told of that total.
"Really? -Wow. That's
awesome," he said.
Taylor, who rushed for 22
yards and three touchdowns on
15 carries, said all the credit
went Boettcher and the other
linemen, saying, "Their
blocking was just awesome."
Boettcher said the players on
the line simply made it a' point
to finish the year on a high
note after a couple of games in
which they felt they could
have played' better. He said


Greg Taylor
sprints through
.one of the
holes created
for him by his
offensive line.
Taylor rushed
for 222 yards
and three
touchdowns.


they could not have asked for a
better performance in their
final game.
"We all just came through to
give ourselves something to
remember for the rest'of our
lives," Boettcher said.
The game featured a
standout performance from
Citrus' offense as well. The
Hurricanes (5-5) compiled 541
yards, but still lost their first
game this season 6n their
home field.


been spotty, but the Indians did
come up .with four turnovers,
which proved to be key. Three
occurred on Keystone's side of
the 50, while the other
occurred at midfield. Two
helped Keystone post a shutout
See KHHS, p. 8C


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Page 4C TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR--C-SECTION Nov. 15, 2007


m t Bulldogs spoil Tigers' homecoming


ABOVE: Starke
resident Austin
Lester, the 9-
year-old son of
Cheryl and
Wesley Lester,
shot this 9-
point buck on
Oct. 30 while
hunting with
his "Papa,"
Randall Lester
. of Newberry, at
Louise Hunting
Club in Waldo
during black
powder season.
RIGHT: Jeremy
Lawson took
this 8-point
buck on Nov. 4
in Alachua
County.


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BY CLIFF SMELLEY
Telegraph Staff Writer
In a game that features both
teams moving up and down the
field, penalties and turnovers
can be hard to overcome.
Such was the case for the
Union County football team,
which suffered a 34-28
homecoming loss to Taylor
County on Nov. 9.
A turnover in the last two
-.:minutes of the first half led to
a Taylor County touchdown,
while two 15-yard penalties on
the Tigers aided the Bulldogs
as they marched for another
score in the third quarter that
put them up 34-21.
Both teams combined for
five turnovers and 17
penalties.
Union wide receiver Jordan
Clyatt, who, had two
touchdown receptions, pulled
the Tigers within 34-28 on a
36-yard pass play, but Union
could not get the game-tying
or game-winning score in the
fourth quarter.
The Tigers (3-7), despite,
being shut out in the final
quarter, did play well overall
offensively. They rushed for
340 yards and outgained
Taylor 468-297. Shandale Lee
rushed for 155 yards on 20
carries, while Justin Hanson
added 83 yards on just seven
carries.
Clyatt finished the game
with six receptions for 82
yards.
Quarterback Chris
Alexander, who was 12-of-20
passing for 128 yards, had the
first-score of the game when he
crossed the goal line on a 7-
yard run with 4:31 to play in
the first quarter.
That scoring drive followed
a defensive effort that saw
Justin Tyson almost intercept a
pass, the Tigers record a sack
and defenders such as Michael
Chandler and Zeke Scaff
recording big tackles.
The Bulldogs... (3-7),


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however, came right back and
answered the Tigers' score
despite being flagged for their
second 15-yard penalty of the
game. Taylor was able to
overcome penalties and pick
up a first down on a third-and-
8 play en route to getting a
score from its quarterback-
Greg Sneed-on a 13-yard run.
Union still led, though, thanks
to Cody Bogard's successful
PAT.
Lee had the Tigers moving
on the ensuing possession. He
had a run of more than 20
yards before Alexander and
Clyatt hooked up for their first
touchdown of the game on a
17-yard pass. Bogard's kick
put Union up 14-6 in the
second quarter.
The Bulldogs responded
quickly, scoring on a 41-yard
run and finding success on the
two-point conversion to knot
the score.
Three fumbles occurred in
the next five minutes. Union
committed the first, but the
Bulldogs gave the ball right
back, with the Tigers' Trey
Tucker recovering.
However, the Tigers would
put the ball on the ground
again. The Bulldogs hung onto
the ball, getting a 30-plus-yard
run en route to taking their first
lead on a 3-yard touchdown
run with 1:35 left in the first
half.
The Tigers moved down t
field on runs by Lee and
receptions by Clyatt and Bryan
Holmes, putting themselves in
position to score again inside
the Taylor 5-yard line. Much
,like their game against
Chiefland last week, the Tigers
could not cross the goal line
from close range, leaving them
trailing at the half.
Taylor was on the march
*early in the third quarter,
-setting itself up with a first-
and-goal at the Union 5. The
Bulldogs had a touchdown
nullified by a penalty-their


Union County running back Shandale Lee (left)
fights for yardage in the Tigers' loss to Taylor
County.
second of the night-while got into the end zone'to go up
Scaff made a touchdown- 28-14.
saving tackle on another play.
Taylor, however, eventually See UCHS, p. 8C



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Nov..15, 2007 TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR--C-SECTION Page 5C




Lady Tigers defeat Baker to win preseason classic


BY CLIFF SMELLEY
Telegraph Staff Writer
Senior Amber Franzluebbers
received big support from a
pair of newcomers as the
Union County girls' basketball
team won its preseason classic
by defeating Baker County 48-
44 in the championship game
on Nov. 6 in Lake Butler.
Franzluebbers turned in a
double-double for the Tigers,
who rallied after trailing
throughout the first half. She
had 19 points and-15 rebounds,
while also leading the team in
assists with five.
Franzluebbers, junior
Sharmaine Couch-a
newcomer to the team-and
freshman Amber Stewart all
turned in clutch performances
at the foul line, especially
Stewart who made 2-of-3
attempts in the final seconds."
Couch was 5-for-5 from the
line, while Franzluebbers was
.5-for-6.
Couch, who had 11 points,
led the team with nine steals.
Union head coach Perry
Davis said defense was a key
in the victory.
"We came out a little
sluggish in the first quarter, but
the girls responded with a lot
of hard defensive work," Davis


said. He singled out Terissa
Nutt's play on defense as
helping the Tigers maintain
their fourth-quarter lead.
Stewart finished the game
with 10 points, while Ashli
Watkins and Nutt grabbed
seven and six rebounds,
respectively.
Watkins was named to the
all-tournament team along
with Franzluebbers. Watkins
had 21 points, seven assists
and 10 rebounds in two games.
Franzluebbers had totals of 36
points, 31 rebounds, eight
assists and seven steals.


Score by Quarter
BCHS: 17 6 6
UCHS: 8 18 12


8-44
10-48


Union .County Scoring (48):
Couch 11, Franzluebbers 19,
Nutt 4, Stewart 10, Watkins 4.
Free throws: 12-18.

Earlier result:


UC 59 Trenton 28
Davis was pleased with his
team's first time on the court
this season, which resulted in a
59-28 win over Trenton on the
first day of action in the Union
County High School Tip-Off


Classic on Nov. 5.
"We had a total of 61
rebounds, which means we are
limiting our opponents to just
one shot," Davis said. "Any
time you can do that is
fantastic."
Franzluebbers led the way
on the boards with 16
rebounds, while Lareesa
Jackson had 12 and Nutt and
Stewart each had eight.
The Tigers, who outscored
Trenton 33-17 in the second
half, got 17 points each from
Franzluebbers and ;Watkinis.
Stewart, making her high
school debut, added 11 points.
It may have been a
preseason game, but Davis
said it was an important step
toward evaluating what he's
got and what this team's best
lineup will be.

Score by Quarter
THS: 5 6 7 10-28
UCHS: 18 8 17 16-59

Union County Scoring (59):
Couch 3, Franzluebbers 17,
Shaniece Huggins 1, Lareesa
Jackson 6, Lashae Mitchell 2,
,Nutt 2, Stewart 11, Watkins 17.
3-pointers: Couch,
Franzluebbers. Free throws:
9-13.


fhe Union County girls' basketball team poses with Union County High School
Preseason Tip-Off Classic championship trophy. Pictured are: (front, I-r) Ashli
Watkins, Rachel Cason, Amber Franzluebbers, Amber Stewart, Lareesa Jackson,
(back, I-r) Lashae Mitchell, Shaniece Huggins, BeBe Lawrence, Terissa Nutt and
Sharmaine Couch.



Union opens season with-


13-point win over Trenton


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BY CLIFF SMELLEY
Telegraph Staff Writer
It was a solid defensive
effort for the Union County

girls' basketball team, which
defeated Trenton 41-28 in the


1'i '


season-opener on Nov. 12 in
Lake Butler.
The Tigers collected 52
rebounds, with Terissa Nutt
grabbing a team-high 18 and
Amber Franzluebbers pulling


down 10. Union also had 12
steals, led by Franzluebber's
five.
No Trenton player scored

See WIN, p. 8C


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Classified Ads


Read our Classifieds on the

- i World Wide Web

www.BCTeleuraph.com


Where one call

does it all!


904) 964-6305 *(3521473-2210 *(3861496-2261


.Tr-C ounyClassifieds
Bradford Union Clay
Reach over 20,500
Readers Every Week!


40 Notice
41 Vehicles Accessories
' 42 Motor Vehicles
43 RV's & Campers
44 Boats
45 Land for Sale
46 Real Estate Out of Area
47 Commercial Property
Rent, Lease, Sale
48 Homes for Sale
49 Mobile Homes for Sale
50 For Rent


INDEX
51 Lost/Found
52 Animals & Pets
53 Yard Sales
54 Keystone Yard Sales
55 Wanted
56 Trade or Swap
57 For Sale
5S Building Materials
59 Personal Services
60 Secretarial Services
61 Scriptures
62 Vacation/Travel


63 Love Lines
64 Business Opportunity
65 Help Wanted
66 Investment Opportunity'
67 Hunting Land for Rent
68 Rent to Own
69 Food Supplements
70 Self Storage
72 Sporting Goods
73 Farm Equipment
74 Computers & Computer
Accessories


CLASSIFIED DEADLINES
Word Ad Classified Tuesday, 12:00 noon
Classified Display Tuesday, 12:00 noon

To place a Classified

SQ USE YOUR PHONE

964-6305 473-2210 496-2261

NOTICE
Classified Advertising should be paid in advance unless credit has already been established with
the newspaper. A $3.00 service charge will be added to all billing to cover postage and handling.
All ads placed by phone are read back to the advertiser at the time of placement. However, the
classified staff cannot be held responsible for mistakes in classified advertising taken by phone.
The newspaper reserves the right to correctly classify atfd edit all copy or to reject or cancel any
advertisements at any time. Only standard abbrevations will be accepted. '


40 Notices
EQUAL HOUSING OP-
PORTUNITY. All real es-
tate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to
the Federal Fair Housing
Act of 1968 which makes
it illegal to advertise "any
preference, limitation or
discrimination based on
race, color, religion, sex
or national origin, or an
intention to make any
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination."
Familial status includes
children under the age of
18 living with parents or
legal custodians, preg-
nant women and people
securing custody of chil-
dren under 18. This
newspaper will not know-
ingly accept any advertis-
ing for real estate which
is in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all dwellings
advertised in this news-
paper are available on an
equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimi-


nation, call HUD toll-free
at 1-800-669-9777, the
toll-free telephone num-
ber for the hearing im-
paired is 1-800-927-9275.
- For further information
call Florida Commission
on Human Relations, Lisa
Sutherland 850-488-7082
ext #1005.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTIS-
ING should be submitted
to the Starke office in writ-
ing & paid in advance un-
less credit has already
been established with this
office. A $3.00 SERVICE
CHARGE will be added to
all billings to cover post-
age & handling. THE
CLASSIFIED STAFF
CANNOT BE HELD RE-
SPONSIBLE FOR MIS-
TAKES IN CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING TAKEN
OVER THE PHONE.
Deadline is Tuesday at 12
noon prior to that
Thursday's publication.
Minimum charge is $8.50
for the first 20 words, then
20 cents per word there-
after.


42 Motor Vehicles
1992 LEXUS LS400, HIGH
MILES, RUNS GREAT,
reduced to $3995. Newer
battery and tires. Call
904-964-4111. .
1994 ISUZU 1 TON DIESEL
AUTO, 14FT BOX, roll-
up door, walk board. Only
136,000 miles, excellent
condition. Asking $3,500,
call 904-504-3802.
43 RV's and
Campers
CARRIAGE INC. TOWN
CHARIOT CAMPER
FOR SALE APPROX.
30'. Asking $1,100. Call
352-473-0165 or 352-
475-1457.
24 TAG-A-LONG CAMPER
- SELF-CONTAINED,
electric hot water heater,
full shower/tub, lots of
storage. Moving, sell
cheap, everything works,
$2,000. Call 904-305-
3816.
44 Boats and
ATV's
1978 CHECKMATE 16'w/


90hp Mercury. $2500
OBO. Call 352-317-3322.

45 Land for
Sale
NEW LISTING FOUR 10
ACRE LOTS. $79,900
each. Raiford, zoned A4,
quiet, woods. Coral
Shores Realty, 904-885-
2135.
BY OWNER 1 ACRE IN
LITTLE SPRINGS FOR-
EST (Worthington
Springs). Septic tank,
power pole and 4" deep
well, $25K. Call 386-496-
1228.
MIDDLEBURG/KEY-
STONE/PUTNAM. Lots
for sale, 1/3 acre and up,
lowdown. Owner financ-
ing available. Call 1-800-
616-8373.
ONE ACRE + WITH 28X60
MOBILE HOME 3/2 like
new, 2000 model. Fi-
nancing available, lo-
cated-in Union County.
Sales price, $89,000.
Call 386-496-1146. Pur-
chase price $84,000.
47 Commercial
Property
FOR LEASE OR sale. Ideal
location 2 parcels! 2800
SOFT building with office,
barn, mini storage, 5
acres, off of South 301.
Also 8 acres, partially
cleared. Both lots 3/10th
of a mile from new
Walmart. Call 904-964-
3827.for more informa-
tion.
DOWNTOWN STARKE
professional offices for
rent. Conference room,
kitchen, utilities and more
provided. Call 904-964-
2616.
TWO COMMERCIAL
BUILDINGS downtown
Starke One set up for
restaurant. Huge square
footage. New roofs. Only
$376,500 for both. Call-
904-964-4111.
NEW PROFESSIONAL
OFFICES at 417 West
Call Street for lease. Ideal
for medical, legal, ac-
counting or business of-
fices. $350 including utili-
ties and taxes, or all 4 of-
fices for $290 each plus
utilities and taxes. Call
352-275-8531 today for a
walk through.
48 Homes for
Sale
2/1 HOME, COMPLETELY
RENOVATED. 2 miles
from Starke on North 301.
$87,500, could be re-
zoned for small business.
Call 352-745-0039.


RENT TO OWN BRAND
NEW 3/2, 1 car garage,
paved road, walking dis-
tance to Keystone
schools, $995/mth. Call
352-258-0865.
PRICED TO SELL 2/1
LIKE NEW HOME. Com-
pletely remodeled. Ask-
ing $82,000. Call
Marlena at Smith & Smith,
Realty, 904-422-0470 .or
904-964-9222.
3/1 STUCCO HOME AT-
TACHED TO A 1/1 EFFI-
CIENCY. 6 acres with
additional above ground
septic, deep well with
possibility of.additional
mobile home or RV. Lo-
cated 2 miles from Starke
on Hwy 100, 134th St.
$184,000, financing pos-
sible with approved credit.
Call John at 904-964-
6305.
2/1 HOME, COMPLETELY
RENOVATED. 2 miles
from Starke on North 301.
$87,500, could be re-
zoned for small business.
Call 352-745-0039.
3/1 BRICK HOME 1215
BLENDING ST.,
STARKE. Asking $119K.
Call 904-964-6798 or
904-566-6255.
OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY
Nov. 18th, 2pm to 4pm.
932 Wilson Road, Starke.
Call EXIT Realty at 386-
336-3929.
49 Mobile
Homes for Sale
FOR SALE BY OWNER -
VARIOUS Singlewide
and Doublewide mobile
homes. 3/2's and 2/2's
from $49,900 and up.
Located in High Ridge
Estates, Keystone
Heights, FL. Possible
owner finance with re-
quired down payment.
Call 386-546-7475 or
386-325-7848.
I HAVE 2 MOBILE HOMES
FOR SALE DWMH and
SWMH, 3/2 and 2/2. You
move, owner financing, I
am not a dealer, 352-283-
8674 or 386-684-1052 or
888-999-1 389.
. www.VacantLotsUSA.com.
I WANT YOUR PRETTY,
UGLY OR UNWANTED
MOBILE HOMES with or
without lot. Fast cash,
quick closing. Call 386-
684-1052 or 352-283-
8674 or 888-999-1389,
call anytime.
2 MOBILE HOMES ON 5+
ACRES ONE
SINGLEWIDE with 3/2.
One doublewide with 3/2
with small barn. Com-
pletely fenced and cross
fenced. Both rented with


good renters, total in-
come of $1400/mth. Ask-
ing $125K, will consider
holding partial mortgage
with substantial amount
down. Call 386-338-
4661.
LIVE OAK HOMES IS OF-
FERING WHOLESALE
to the public. You pay
what the dealer pays.
Model #2403a, 28x40,
only $28,156. Call Joel at
912-287-9015. Mon-Fri,
9am-5pm for details.
REDUCED! 1999 SWMH
3BR/2BA on 1.5 acres in
Glen St. Mary. 1/4 mile
from Baker County High
School. Asking $115K.
Call 904-259-7675.
ONE ACRE + WITH 28X60
MOBILE HOME- 3/2 like
new, 2000 model. Fi-
nancing available, lo-
cated in Union County.
Low down payment. Call
386-496-1146. Purchase
price $84,000.
2007 FACTORY REPO's
never lived in! Starting at
$29,995. delivered to
your lot. Call Matt 386-
867-3347.
ATTENTION LAND-
LORDS/Investors! I have
a limited # of Wholesale
14 X 70's for $23,995
(freight on 6uyer) and 28
X 56's for $39,995 (freight
on buyer) Call Mike 352-
376-4880.
GENE JIM & ROY'S of
Gainesville has a new lost
leader 28 X 60, 4/2 for
$43,995, set up included,
call 352-378-2453.
50 For Rent
2/1.5 ON LAKE GENEVA.
Service animals only.
First and security. Call
352-473-2919.
2/1 APARTMENT IN
STARKE, close to
schools, hardwood floors,
central heating' and A/C,
electric range, refrigera-
tor, washer/dryer hook-
ups, screened porch, out-
side pets ok. First, last
"and security deposit, ref-
erences. $525/mth. Call
904-966-1334.
ONE ACRE LOT FOR
RENT MOBILE HOME
READY No travel trailer
or RV. $250/mth, call
904-796-0442.
FURNISHED ROOMS FOR
RENT! COMPLETE with
CH/A, cable provided, all
utilities paid! Central loca-
tion. 10% discount on first
month's rent for senior
citizens. Rooms with pri-
vate bath, $115 $135. /
wk. Room without bath,
$100 Laundry facilities
available. Close to
churches, stores, down-


town shopping, theatre,
and more! See Manager
at the Magnolia Hotel,
across from the Starke
Post Office. 904-964-
4303.
WE HAVE 2 OR 3 bedroom
MH, clean, close to
prison. Call 352-468-
1323.
SPECIAL-RENT 2 & 3BR
homes, newly renovated.
Deposit required. Call
678-438-6828 or 678-
438-2865, for more infor-
mation.
2/1 MOBILE HOME ON 1/3
ACRE. $325/mth plus
$200/dep. Pets OK. Call
352-473-2185.
RENT TO OWN BRAND
NEW 3/2, 1 cat garage.
paved road, walking dis-
tance to Keystone
schools, $995/mlh. Call
352-258-0865,
RENT TO OWN MOBILE
HOME IN COMMUNITY
SETTING. No banks.
flexible terms. Lake But-
ler area. Call 386-496-
8111.
KEYSTONE HEIGHTS
LAKEFRONT LARGE 2/
2 brick home, 2 1/2 ga-
rage, many extras, great
view. $850/mth, call 678-
640-1524.
LAKE BUTLER APART-
MENTS 1005 SW 6th
Street, Lake Butler, FI
32054. Ph: 386-496-
3141, TDD/TTY 711.
Rental assistance for
qualified applicants. 1,2,3
& 4 BR HC & non HC ac-
cessible apartments.
Laundry facility & play-
ground. Water, sewer &
garbage provided. Equal
Housing Opportunity.
NEWLY REMODELED up-
stairs apartments in
downtown Starke. 1 2/
BR apartment, CH/A,
$500 month. 1st, last, and
security deposit. Call
Joan at 904-964-4303.
LAKE SANTA FE COT-
TAGE, 2/1, WASHER


AND DRYER, YARD
SERVICE INCLUDED.
Dock, boat lift, furnished/
unfurnished. $950/mth,
call 352-468-2386.
2/1 HOUSE ON BIG LAKE
SANTA FE. Rent $795/
mth, security $700. Call
for appointment, 352-
475-5533 or 352-226-
9220-.
WALDO VILLAS 2 BED-
ROOM APARTMENTS
NOW AVAILABLE. $415/
mth. E.H.O. Call Nita at
352-468-1971.
HOME IN QUIET NEIGH-
BORHOOD Great for
young families or retired
couples. Backyard faces
park for leisurely walking,
3/1.5. Credit check and
credit references re-
quired. Now being reno-
vated inside and out. Not
available until late No-
vember. Call for further
information, $750/mth.
Call 814-257-9825 or af-
ter 11/18, call 724-813-
6168 or 904-966-2176.
GARAGE APT- Keystone
Heights area, on lake,
unfurnished, stove, refrig-
erator, AC & heater, avail'
able. $450 per month plus
deposit. Includes lights,
water. & garbage. 352-
473-4220 very clean.-
3BR/2BA MH country set-
ting, $600 per month, 1st
month and damage/
cleaning deposit. Service
animals only. Call 904-
964-6997 after 3 p.m. No
calls after 9 p.m.
LAKE BUTLER 3BR/2BA
brick home with a great
workshop situated on a
very nice 2 acre parcel,
on a paved road. Drive by
and see at 9369 SW
152nd Ct. $249.900
Juanita Carter 352-316-
1444. ERA Trend Realty,
ORANGE WOOD Apart-
ments. Rental assistance
Now available 2 becroori
HC & non HC accessible
apartments, 801 South


Water Street, Starke, FL
32091. Call 904-964-
4214, TDD/TTY 711.
Equal Housing Opportu-
nity.
COUNTRY LIVING 12 X 70
trailer in the Lawtey area,
2BR/1.5BA. CH/A, $550
per month, $400 deposit.
First & last months rent
required. Very clean,
large yard. Call 904-782-
3380 or 904-782-3367.
50 X 24 DW in the Lawtey
area. Central air, gas
heat. extra special, very
clean. $750 monthly,
$400 deposit. First & last
months rent required.
Service animals only. Call
904-782-3380 or 904-
782-3367.
2 NICE HOMES IN great
neighborhood. DW 3BR/
2BA CH/A,-fenced yard,
screened patio & front
deck, storage room, on 1
acre, on paved road $680
per month. Also 3BR/2BA
1700 SF on 1.5 acres.
Fenced yard, screened
porch, front deck, CH/A
fire place, W & D, on
paved road. $800 per
month. Only 1st & secu-'
rity required. Service ani-
mals only. Call 904-629-
0434.
.-2/1 SWMH CH/A. 3 miles
from Starke, 3 miles from
Raiford. $500 per month,
$300 deposit. Call 904-
284-9223 or 904-305-
8287.
3/1 HOUSE OUTSIDE
CITY LIMITS. First and
last, $500/mth. Pets OK.
Call 904-368-0191.
3BR/2BA DWMH on private
lot, paved road with CH/
A, ceiling fans, large den.
located in Keystone
Heights included kitchen
app & washer/dryer. $600
per month, $625 deposit.
Call 904-460-9115 Ref-
erences required.
$499 MOVE-IN SPECIAL.
2 & 3 BR mobile homes
Hidden Oaks Manufac-
tured Home Community,


fWWWO


d *.
















Classified Ads


-I
- I


Read our Classifieds on the Where one call

World Wide Web i does ita/ll!


www.BCTele-iraphbcom


Lake Butler. Call for de-
tails, 386-496-8111
THE ORANGE HOUSE on
Orchid Ave is for rent.
2BR/1BA, service ani-
mals only Friday 6pm to
7pm, Saturday noon-
3pmr
MOVING SALE some an-
tiques. household, 77
Honda Goldwing motor-
cycle needs work, cheap
prices, all must go, Thurs,
Fri & Sat, 8am til 3pmn
4800 Gadora Rd Key-
stone
51 Lost/Found
I lost my wedding ring in the
Winn Dixie area of Starke
on Saluiday Morning I
would like to put a request
in the paper so if anyone
found it to contact me for
"a reward" at 904-964-
8960
LOST SMALL BOSTON
TERRIER. 15LBS, in
area of West Pratt St.
Black and white with
white boots, answers to
Buddy. Call 904-368-
1253 with any informa-
Slion.
52 Animals and
Pets
DOG TAGS DOG TAGS -
DOG TAGS! Buy them at
the Office Shop in Starke
on Call St. Only $4.75,
including postage. Many
colors, shapes and styles
to choose from, Call 904-
964-5764 for more infor-
mation.
7 PUPPIES CHIHUAHUA
AND VICE, $125 EACH.
Black and tan, wormed,
call 386-431-1404 phone
reconnected.
LAB/BASET mix, spayed,
all shots $ 25. Moved and
can't keep her. 50 lbs.
Does not like cats. Call
904-966-1340. Likes to
be outside.
HOUSE FOR RENT coun-
try, fenced yard, 4BR/
2BA, $750 per month,
first, last, & deposit. North
of Starke.


53 A Starke
Yard Sales
2 FAMILY YARD SALE
1028 Meadows Dr,
Stake Fri & Sat, 9am til
2pm. New and used
clothing, small furniture,
etc.
FRI & SAT. 8AM TIL? Griffis
loop, follow signs. TV.
baby, kids and adult cloth-
ing, lots to choose from.
1564 GEIGER RD. Take
Colley Rd. South to the
last road on the left hand
side, follow to end of
street. Many items
kitchen, household, baby
items and much, much
more. November 16th &
17th, 8am til 3pm. Call
d904-966-2058 kim.
4 FAMILY SALE 8am til
3pm. Fri & Sat. SR 16W,
Right on CR 216, left on
55th, follow signs 1960
Farmall Cub wrh 60" belly
mower, disc harrow,
sraper blade. 3 Heavy
Duty 8 lug drop axels,
with brakes & Springs,
small trailers, fabric,
1940's lace, enamel
ware, misc tools, Christ-
mas decor, etc. Lots of
stuff.
MULTI FAMILY yard sale,
Sat the 17th, 8am til 2pm.
1211 Johns Drive. Tools,
nic nacs, & much more.
YARD SALE Fri & Sat. 8am
til noon. Country Club,
follow signs. Household
items, kids clothes.
SAT & SUN, 9am til ? NW
219th St. Lawtey, by
Tommy King's little fruit
stand, between 301 and
Old Lawtey Rd
MULTI FAMILY Garage
sale. Sat, Nov. 17, 2008.
8am. 15611 NE 16th Ave.
Corner of 15th, &16th
Ave. Starke Golf course
neighborhood.
SAT ONLY! 8am til ? 5835
NW 200th St. Out HWY
16 toward prison, follow
signs. Household items,
holiday decor, clothes,
electronics.


YARD SALE NOV. 15, 16.
17. 1226 Bradford St.
Lots of good stuff, rain or
shine.
947 NE SR16 look for sign.
Fri, Sat, & Sun. 8am til ?
UNDER COVER Fri & Sat,
8:30am til 4pm. 2-36" old
round mirrors, card
tables, rocker, gun rack,
lawn chairs, buffet,
wrought iron table, end
tables, blankets, lamps,
punch set w/18 cups,
stepper, old lionel trains &
track, 8' Christmas tree,
lights, balls, Tiffany style
lamp, hurricane lamps, &
globes, Mac computers, 5
more boxes to open.
Priced to go! Corner of
Pratt & Bradford.
MULTI -FAMILY yard sale.
Sat. Nov. 17th, 8am til
noon. Home furnishing,
furniture, kids clothes, &
toys, all kinds of stuff. 417
Edwards Rd. at Starke
Academy of Dance.
BIG GARAGE SALE Sat.
Nov. 17th, at 8am. 313
East Market Road,
Starke. Coats, suits,
shoes, sweater, etc.
GARAGE SALE Fri & Sat,
8:30am til 2pm, Crystal
Lake home sites, behind
Tony's, look- for signs.
Furniture, clothes, lots of
good stuff.
53 B Keystone
Yard Sales
LARGE FAMILY yard sale
running every Sat. now
until Christmas, (except
the 24th of Nov.) 8:30a.m.
until? Lots of Christmas
decor, new items for gift
giving, complete set of
Avon, M & M collections,
Christmas Plates, 100+
VHS & CD's, lots of nice
clothing, shoes, jewelry,
lots .25 & .50 items, dol-
lar grab bags, 'electric
hospital bed, wheel chair,
some tools. HWY 100
across from Lake Geneva
Post Office.


", ''^Affortdable Quality"



Q a h t1 rihi ' T
free Family Owned & Operated We Work From
pa es Compiercial Residential StarNo Finish!



Office: 386-497-1419 Licensed Bonded
PO Box 82 TOIl Free 1-866-91W-ROOF workers Conip.
, Ft. White, FL 32038 Fax: 386-497-1452 license # RC0067442


MOVING SALE, Fri, Sat,
Sun, 10am til 2pm. 7638
Grand Mesa Ave. Key-
stone Heights. Tools,
couches, garden items, 2
end tables, 2 coffee
tables, much more. Call
352-478-1167
CHRISTMAS GARAGE
SALE. Buy brand new
items at very low prices.
Friday 8am til 4:30pm.
1100 SE Lake Lane, look
for signs.
FARM SALE SAT ONLY!
8am til ? Items for Sheep
& goats, furniture, house-
hold items, weight set,
good toys, children &
adult clothes, free chick-
ens. Much more HWY
100 East to 219, to
Gustafson, follow signs.
Call 352-328-5526.
FRI & SAT, 16th & 17th,
8am til 5pm, boat, 90
comaro with 92 engine 5
speed needs work.
$1700. 5277 CR 352. Call
352-473-7425.
LOTS. OF CHILDREN
clothes, priced to sell.
6332 Hutchinson Ave.
Sat., Nov. 17th 9am to
3pm.
BIG CARPORT sale. Fri &
Sat. 8am til 4pm. Lots of
good clothes, glassware,
Christmas decorations,
17" tires, micorwaves.
Highridge off 100E 1 mile
from 21 red light. Reason-
able prices.


SALE INSIDE Highridge.
Fri, Sat & Sun. 9am til ?
Too much to name, low
prices. 6405 Beloit Ave.
Follow signs.
57 For Sale
BED KING SIZE Pillowtop
mattress and boxspring
with manufactures war-
ranty. Brand new still in
plastic. Can deliver. Sell
for $170. Call 352-372-
7490.
BEDROOM SET 7 piece
Gorgeous cherry queen/
king bed, dresser, mirror,
2 nightstands, chest
available, dovetail con-
struction. New still in
boxes. Retail $6100, sac-
rifice for $1100. 352-377-
9846.
DINING ROOM SUITE-
beautiful cherry table, 6
chippendale chairs and
lighted hutch and buffet.
Brand new still boxed.
Can deliver. Retail $5800,
sacrifice $1100. 352-377-
9846.
BED-QUEEN orthopedic
Pillowtop mattress and
box. Name brand, new in
plastic, with warranty.
Can deliver. Sacrifice
$100. Call 352-372-8588,
DRIVEWAY MATERIALS -
BRADFORD LIMEROCK
SALES. Phone, 904-
782-3172 or 904-509-
9126.
KENMORE WASHER and
dryer, new type $75 and


up each, electric stove,
written guarantee, deliv-
ery available. For ap-
pointments, call 904-964-
8801.
MATTRESS TWIN sets
$89, full sets $129,
Queen sets $159, King
sets $189. Mattress Fac-
tory, 441 East Brownlee
St. Save a lot. Cash and
carry. Call Sonia at 352-
473-7173 or 904-964-
3888.
U-PICK PECANS IN
STARKE, $1/LB OR
PICK ON HALVES.
Thursday, Friday or Sat-
urday, 9am-5pm. Call
904-964-7324 or.904-
364-6626 for directions.
WASHER AND DRYER
SET, 30 DAY WAR-
RANTY, $175. Side by
side refrigerators, starting
at $150. Also, stoves, dif-
ferent styles. Call 904-
964-8222.
ROUND PR TABLE, 4
matching chairs, nice,
$30. Call 904-964-7624
or 966-0221.
RIDING LAWN MOWER
FOR SALE just put a new
battery and had new belts
put on. Craftsman, Asking
$200 OBO. Call 904-964-
6387.
DINING ROOM SET 58"
oval oak extension table
with two leaves and six
chairs made by Tell City
Chair Co. excellent con-
dition $350, Magic Chef


Bad Credit? Get Pre-approved


online at:


www.Need2BuyACar.com




ESTATE PLUS COINS

Friday, Nov.16, 7 PM
Keystone Hts. Lion's Club on Orchid Ave: across from High Sch.

Big screen TV, new gas dryer, sid-by-side fridge/freezer, hot tub, king size Sleep Member
bed, loft of other furniture & smalls. Gold coins, silver dollars, halves & more.
Terms of auction Cash or check w/ID, Visa, MC, Debit Card. 12% Buyer's Premium plus
tax. 2% BP discount w/cash or check.
Auction by KEYSTONE AUCTION SERVICE
AB#1648, Col. Ken Mitchell, AU #2225
Call for Information (352) 473-9008 or Cell (352) 283-6297


gas stove $150, good
condition, swivel platform
rocker, excellent condi-
tion $100. Call 386-496-
8330.
HAND SAW, work table,
wreches, wood & metal
shelving, bench vice, two
crow bars, electric sand-
ers, axes, exerciser,
games, garden tools, sofa
pink flowers, green ivy
print, coffee table, glass
inserts, two ehnd-tables,
couch opens to a bed,
and much more. Call 352-
473-8738 or 352-478-
1167.
59 Personal
Services
CLARK FOUNDATION RE-
PAIRS, INC. Correction
of termite & water-dam-
aged wood & sills. Level-
ing & raising Houses/
Bldgs. Pier Replacement
& alignment. Free Esti-
mates: .Danny (Buddy)
Clark, (904)-284-2333 or
1-800-288-0633.
FLORIDA CREDIT UNION
has money to lend for


M.H. & land packages. 1-
800-284-1144.
CUSTOM CUTS Lawn &
Landscape, customized
lawn care, sodl, trimming,
landscape design. Rea-
sonable rates, free esti-
mates. Commercial &
residential. Licensed and
insured. Call 386-719-
2200, if no answer please
leave message.
DAYCARE DONE IN MY
LAKE BUTLER HOME.
30+ years experience,
CPR and First Aide certi-
fied. Call 386-496-1062.
TIRED? NOT ENOUGH
hours in a day? How
about coming home to
a clean house? House
cleaning by Kim. Call
904-964-6877 or 352-
745-6959.
PECANS We buy, sell and
crack. Wainwright's. 904-
964-5811.
YARD & BUSINESS land-
scaping. Call Chester
Landscaping at 352-262-
1855 or 352-400-6826.
LAWNS MOWED land-
scaping and irrigation re-


pairs. Call 386-496-2592
before 3pm.
.63 Love Lines
YOUNG, HANDSOME
AND ROMANTIC DOC-
TOR looking for girlfriend,
age 18-28, to travel and
share good times. Send
photos and info to
drtomas2@yahoo.com.
64 Business
Opportunities.
MAKE EXTRA MONEY!
Antique and used store in
Melrose looking for ven-
dors. Rent space to sell
your items. Call 352-475-
1173.
AVON $$$ $10 START-UP
FEE, 50% commission.
Call 1-800-806-1558.
AVON CHRISTMAS SEA-
SON, EARN EXTRA $$$
Start today, $10 start-up
fee, 50% to start. Call
Sherry at 904-964-8851
or 800-269-4216 code 05.
LIQUOR LICENSE -
Bradford County. No
transfer fee.
RealtyMasters, Realtors.
800-523-7651.


* Fluhsini Slaminin *esucrmtaEnpeavhng-


.F. VI 'F ffl:


Bobby Campbell

Roofing, Inc.

Licensed & Insured

(904) 964-8304


FREE

ESTIMATES!
Il,. #(CC-132. 72
Employment opportunities available.
Call for more information.


1 MONTH FREE!

2, 3, & 4 bedroom Spacious Apartment
Homes starting at $525.00
S Water included W/D H.:,c4 ups
Fitness Center Computer Room
Pool Volleyball Court Kids Play Area
Clubhouse with big screen TV
Great resident activities.
Walking distance to school.
Pets Welcome!
Whispering Oaks Apartments

Call 904-368-0007


Southern Timberco, Inc.







--.



We buy timber.

Pine and Hardwoods

Small & Large Tracts

Josh Crawford Michael Hardee


352-745-1565


ROOMS

FOR RENT
Econoiny Inn
lawtey. FL -$35 &Ugo
Low Daily & Weekly Rates
Daily Rm Service
Microwave Cable/HBO
Refrigerator Local Phone
(904) 782-3332


FOR SALE
2 Parcels
13+ Acres in all
500 ft frontage on 301
South only 3110 mile
from Super Walmart.
Office
2800 sq ft Building
Mini-storage and Barn
* Ideal Locationg*
Call (904) 964-3827



The 0


904-364-6907


We Cart it

CONCRETE

www.wecartit.com


OPEN 24/17
wner: Buddy Browder J


19563 NW SR 16
Starke, FL


We Haul Redil-Mixed Concrete
in our 1-Yard Mixing Trailer from
our plant to your redi-forms.
$149 per yd + tax.. delivered vou!
1-yard = 80 sq. ft. at 4" deep


The fall winds are blowing the holidays forward. Make this season
special with a new home, before the great deals blow away. You
need to walk through this house to appreciate its beauty. All new
wood floors, new air conditioning, upgrades in plumbing and
electric. Call 904-964-6217
Call 904-964-6217 -leave a message


5615 Campo Drive .
Lc,\ely. priced right 5 acre country. home w/splitl face decorative
block Ready to mone into and bring the horses Lo\el\ patio area
and a sw ing to enjoy the quiet evenings Full\ fenced & cross
fenced
$219,000

Visit our Web page \\'ww.centurI21showcase.nei


UNION

Tree Service

"We Specialize in Dangerous Trees"
NO JOB TOO BIG OR TOO SMALL
Licensed & Insured Residential & Commercial'

For the Best Prices & Job for ALL your tree care needs contact

Owner: Albert at 386-867-0214 or 386-496-2006
..


Clean, well-kept
Fleetwood MH on 5 acs.
Kitchen w/center island,
large open LR w/rustic
accents and built-in bar.
$150,000.


2525 SF brick home on
4.77 acs. Bring your
horses! 1200 SF barn,
detached efficiency
w/kitchen & bath and
above ground pool.
$259,900.


$265,000 Rustic cedar home
on 8 acs. Private setting with
hot tub & pool in back.
Ceramic tile and berber
carpet throughout.


Completely remodeled 2
BR/IBA home. Shaded lot
and back deck. $109,900.






2BR/IBAMH, shaded lot
and back deck.
$110,000


(904) 964-6305 *.13521473-2210 *(3861496-2261


risge uo i LLL%"Ao*tA.


OF --o


--IOU









Nov. .15, 2007 TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR--C-SECTION Page 7C


Classified Ads


- *1 jr-k ~ll


Read our Classifieds on the

World Wide Web

www.BCTeleqranh.com


Where one call

does it all

(9041964-6305*(3521473-2210 *(3861496-2261


BUSINESS FOR SALE
Great opportunity to have
your own business. Estab-
lished Sandwich shop in
Macclenny. $ 75,000. Call
904-370-0418 or 904-
964-5017.
65 Help Wanted
FLORIDA DETENTION
SYSTEMS, a specialty
contracting company lo-
cated in Melrose, contin-
ues to seek motivated
arid talented employees
for the following positions:
Shop Helper, Welder and
Electronics Ass;stant
Competitive wages, out-
standing work environ-
ment and exciting career
opportunities. Call 352-
475-5391, e-mail:
jobs@floridadsi.com.
POSTAL JOBS $17.38-
$27.58/HR NOW HIR-
ING. For appointment
and free government job
info, call American Asso-
ciation of Labor at 913-
599-8226, 24hrs, emp.
serv.
CARPENTER 40 HRS/
WK, 7:30-4:00. Wages
based on experience and
qualifications. Contact
Frank Knott, 904-284-
8548, Penney Retirement
Community. Drug Free
Work Place & EOE.
PLUMBER 40 HRS/WK,
7:30-4:00. Wages based
on experience and quali-
fications. Contact Frank
Knott, 904-284-8548,
Penney Retirement Com-
munity. Drug Free Work
Place & EOE.
ENTRY LEVEL AMERI-
CAN ACCESS TECH-
NOLOGIES is now ac-
cepting applications for
our Keystone Heights lo-
cation. Will train, with-


great potential for ad-
vancement. Train to be a
Punch Operator. Brake
Operator, Grinder, Run a
Hardware Press, etc. 40
hours a week with pos-
sible overtime. Starting
salary is $7 25/hr. DFWP,
good benefits, 352-473-
4984.
2nd SHIFT, WILL TRAIN,
WITH GREAT POTEN-
TIAL FOR ADVANCE-
MENT. Hours are Mon-
day Friday, 3pm-
11:30pm. Starting salary
will be $7.75/hr. Ameri-
can Access Technologies,
a sheet metal fabrication
company located in Key-
stone Heights. DFWP,
good benefits, 352-473-
4984.
COMPANY SPECIALIZING
in Erosion control now hir-
ing the following posi-
tions: Class A CDL driv-
ers, Crew leaders, me-
chanic, equipment opera-
tors, laborers valid Driv-
ers license a Must! Fax
resume to 904-275-3292
or call 904-275-4960,
EOE. Drug Free Work-
place.
CNA/LPN/RN 24-32/WK.
CONTACT EMILY
GUERRA, 904-284-
8578, Penney Retirement
Community. Drug Free
Work Place and EOE.
SILKSCREENER SHEET
METAL FABRICATION
company interested in
experienced silkscreener
or individual willing to
train. Full time, good ben-
efits. DFWP, 352-473-
4984.
SHOP HELP NEEDED, fi-
berglass manufacturing
and trimming will train.
Full time 40 hour week.
Apply in person at U S


FIREWOOD


$55 for half a cord

$100 for full cord

Free Delivery Keystone Area


Call 352-473-7714


Body Source, 1.5 miles
South of Hampton on CR
325.
CAREGIVER CNA and/or
2 years experience work-
ing with elderly or dis-
abled clients. 2 or 3 days
per week. Su-El's Retire-
ment Home, Hampton.
Phone 352-468-2619.
ELECTRICIAN WITH expe-
rience, Prestige Electric.
Call 352-745-0650.
APARTMENT MAINTE-
NANCE Lake Butler and
Hawthorne.. Apply in per-
son Mon., Wed., Fri..
Forest Park Apartments,
775 NE 1st St., Lake But-
ler, 386-496-3439.
STILL LOOKING? LOOK
NO MORE. Openings in
construction, welding,
electronics, mechanics
and more. No experience
necessary.. We train.
Earn while you learn in
our fully, paid apprentice-
ship programs. Paid re-
location. H.S. grads, age
17-34. Call 1-800-342-
8123Mon.-Fri.
AREA REP. FAMILIAR
WITH LOCAL COMMU-
NITIES AND SCHOOLS.
Place and supervise for-
eign high school stu-
dents. Part-time supple-
mental income, bonus,
travel opportunities. We
welcome families to call
about hosting an interna-
tional studenttoo! Call toll
free 1-866-637-4073 or e-
mail Sodycmcs@att.net.
HR/PAYROLL CLERK -
Process weekly payroll


and provide support to
Human Resources De-
partment. Exceptional
verbal and written com-
munication skills.. Must
possess organizational
skills, strong attention to
detail, multi-tasking abili-
ties. Must have profes-
sional discipline to handle
confidential information.
Knowledge of Word &
Excel required. Great
benefits. DFWP, 352-
473-4984.
THE CITY OF STARKE
WILL BE ACCEPTING
APPLICATIONS for the
position of "Water and
Wastewater Operator La-
borer." We are seeking
an individual with a mini-
mum of a Class C water
plant operator certification
and Class C Wastewater
plant operator certification
by the State of Florida,
but not required. We are
willing to train the se-
lected applicant if neces-
sary. Must have a valid
State of Florida Commer-
cial Drivers License Class
B. Must pass a pre-em-
ployment physical exam
and drug screen. Appli-
cations can be picked up
at the Bradford Career
Center located at 819
South Walnut Street,
Starke, Florida and re-
turned to same. Applica-
tions will be accepted
through the close of busi-
ness on Friday, Novem-
ber 23, 2007. The City of


Starke is an-E.O.E.
THE CITY OF STARKE
WILL BE ACCEPTING
APPLICATIONS for Ap-
prentice Lineman in the
electric department. This
is apprentice level electri-
cal work leading to jour-
neyman level duties in the
construction, mainte-
nance and repair of over-
head and underground
distribution lines and
equipment. Must be able
to work after hours as
needed. Minimum re-
quirements are as fol-
lows: knowledge of the
methods, materials, tools,
and equipment used in
electric line work. Knowl-
edge of occupational haz-
ards and proper safety
precautions. Knowledge
of first aid including'
cardio-pulmonary resus-
citation (CPR). Ability to
understand and follow
oral and written instruc-
tions quickly and accu-
rately. Ability to meet
physical requirements
necessary for climbing
poles and performing
manual task in the line of
work. Must have High
School Diploma or
Equivalent, Florida Driv-
ers License Class B, mini-
mum 18 years of age,
must pass pre-employ-
ment physical examina-
tion and drug screen.
Applications can be
picked up at the Bradford
Career Center located at


cqw zee~ m'e 9tom' %2vSa&e


819 South Walnut Street,
Starke, Florida and re-
turned to the same. Ap-
plications will be ac-
cepted through the close
of business on Friday,
November 23, 2007. The
City of Starke is an EOE.
DRIVERS TOP PAY &
E X C E L L E.INT -
HOMETIME. We train
car haulers. Superior
benefits package. CDL-
A with 2 years OTR ex-
perience. 800-889-8139.
HOME SUPPORT STAFF
to work with developmen-
tally disabled individuals
in group homes in Starke.
Requires HSD or GED,
valid FL drivers license
with good record. $8.25
hour plus benefits EOE
M/F/DV 904-694-1468
EXPERIENCED COM-
PUTER skills, old school
abilities in grammer, spell-
ing, punctuation, and
general usage of lan-


guage. Typing/word pro-
cessing, 50cpm. People
skills, telephone neces-
sary. Full time job with
benefits. Send resume to:
Old School, P.O. Drawer
A,.Starke FL, 32091-
9998.
DRIVERS-OWNER OP-
ERATORS: Home every
weekend & during the
week. Drop/hook.
www.browntrucking.com.
800-241-5624 extention
106.
NEEDED IMMED.
C a r e g i v e.r /
Houesekeeper, need for
disabled veteran, salary
neg. Must be honest, de-
pendable, reliable & trust
worthy. Call 352-485-
1860.
WINDSOR MANOR now
taking applications for
LPN or RN, 3-11 shift and
weekends. Apply in per-
son 602 E Laura St.,
Starke, FL. EOE/DFWP.


Works
Alir ua/BradV ort A Cfamnuntily ParnrSlilp
Let FloridaWorks assist.you with your job search.
Use the fax machine to fax resumes/applications,
use copy machine to make copies of resume
applications, and phones to contact employers.
All job related services are free. Stop by the
FloridaWorks office at 819 S. Walnut St., Starke
or call 904-964-8092.
www.FloridaWorksOnline.com


NO IRN








APLYAT


This beautiful bri
of storage soa


S'' Call 91

BATHROOM ..s
REMODELING + MORE
HANDYMAN SERVICES
Complete bathroom remodeling, Including walln
andfloor1ilework.AHtypesofhomerrepair, L L
remodeling. From kitchen, bath to exterior repairs.
References AvaleaM. .S ith
. i"wios i'Atfl Z. '.

S CaliSteve, (91m465-0078
5 or (352]468-2515
,,r ,2,168


[3247-80 oi le:. 52-45-074


ck home is ready to move into. Has plenty
ce. Catch this deal before the holidays.
04-964-6717 Leave a message


I II I
w I II I I I


CLYDE'S TIRE & BRAKE of
Waldo needs a Mechanic/
tire changer. 15050 NE
HWY 301, Waldo. Call
352-468-1140.
UNION COUNTY Public Li-
brary has a job opening
for inmate supervisor on
library construction site.
Position will last up to six
months from start date.
$11.00 per hour. Daytime
hours. Florida driver's li-
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Union County Public Li-
brary, 175 W. Main St,
Lake Butler, between
hours of 9am and 5pm,
Monday thru Friday.
Deadline for applications
is Friday, Nov. 30, 2007.
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Page 8C TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR--C-SECTION Nov. 15, 2007


KHHS
Continued from page 3C

in the third quarter and double
its two-touchdown lead.
Otherwise, not much slowed
the Hurricanes down. Citrus
sophomore running back
Antoin Scrivner rushed for 209
yards on 29 carries, while
quarterback Bradley Paul
threw three touchdown passes
and rushed for another.
Like Keystone, Citrus never
punted.
"Weird game," Dickinson
said afterward, which seemed
to' sum things up perfectly,
especially considering how the
game began with each team
getting a score on a total of
three plays from scrimmage
and barely a minute gone off
the clock,
On the game's first play
from scrimmage, Scrivner took
a pitch, then pulled up and
lofted a pass downfield to
Ricky Carlson for a 64-yard
touchdown.
Keystone would come right
back when quarterback
Clayton Mosley scored on a
busted play. Mosley was
supposed to hand the ball off
to Taylor, but Taylor slipped,.
so Mosley kept the ball and
took off in the opposite
direction, finding nothing but
open field in front of him as he
raced down the right sideline
'for a 49-yard touchdown run.
Yarbrough came up with the
first turnover of the game
when he recovered a Citrus
fumble at midfield. Runs of 18
and 19 yards by Taylor and
Story, respectively, set up first-
and-goal at the 6. Taylor
scored from there, putting the
Indians up 13-6 with 4:53
remaining in the first quarter.
The Indians would tack on -
another score in the quarter
after Jacob Van Wagner's
interception at the Keystone
22. Taylor broke free for a 59-
yard run to the Citrus 19, then *
had a run of 13 yards to the 2.
Story, who finished the
game with 183 yards on 17
carries, scored the first of his
two touchdowns from there.
Timothy Frysinger, who was
pulled up from the junior
varsity team, added the PAT to
put the Indians up 20-6.
Scrivner had six carries for



WIN
Continued from page 5C

more than four points.
Ashli Watkins led the Tigers
offensively with 10 points.
Amber Stewart just missed out
on a double-double with nine
points and nine rebounds.
Franzluebbers, who had
eight points, led the team with
five assists.
The Tigers played Branford
on Nov. 13 and will host The
Rock tonight, Nov. 15, at 5:30
p.m. On Tuesday, Nov. 20,
Union will play Branford again
at home at 5:30 p.m.
Score by Quarter
THS: 7 6 5 10--28
UCHS: 14 14 10 3-41
Union County'Scoring (41):
Sharmaine Couch 2,
Franzluebbers 8, Shaniece
Huggins 3, Be Be Lawrence 2,
Nutt 7, Stewart 9, Watkins 10.
Free throws: 4-7.



UCHS
Continued from page 4C

Union resorted to trickery to
set up its first score of the
second lalf. Jordan Williams
caught a pass on a fake punt
attempt to give the Tigers the
ball inside the Taylor 5-yard
line. Hanson eventually scored
on a 2-yard run to pull the
Tigers, with Bogard's PAT,
within seven.
Clyatt's 36-yard touchdown
reception may have capped the
game's scoring, but the
Bulldogs threatened to;
increase their lead in the fourth
quarter. A tackle for a loss
made by Dustin Floyd
followed by a fumble recovery
at the Union 8 thwarted the


attempt and left the Tigers
looking at marching 92 yards
to. at least tie the game.
Runs by Hanson and Sammy
Simmons netted first downs as
the Tigers moved their way
past midfield. A big run by
Lee gave his team a first down
at the Taylor 15, but the
Bulldogs would come up with
an interception.
Taylor again fumbled the
ball inside the 10-yard line, but
only 40 seconds remained in
the game.
Umon County Times staff
writer Teresa Stone-Irwin
contributed to this story.


52 yards to help Citrus move
downfield, but it was Paul,-
however, who scored from 2
yards out on a designed rollout
on fourth down to cut
Keystone's lead to 20-13.

The two teams exchanged
scores, with Taylor finding the
end zone on a 50-yard run and.
Scriven taking a short pass and
turning .it into a 35-yard
touchdown.
Keystone scored the next,_
-three touchdowns, including-
one with 2:23 left before
halftime. That occurred when
Taylor, after a. 19-yard gain by
Story, scored on a 12-yard run
to give the Indians a 34-20
lead.


The second half began the
same as .the first for the
Indians' offense when Mosley
sprinted for another
touchdown off of a busted
play. This time, Mosley
, fumbled the snap from center
and missed the handoff to his
running back. The ball
bounced back up into Mosley's
hands, however, and he again
took off around the right side
of his line and did not stop
until he crossed the goal line,
capping a 64-yard run '18
seconds into the half.
Mosley finished the game
with 112 yards on three
carries.
A penalty nullified a
touchdown for the Hurricanes


on the ensuing kickoff return,
but they drove into Keystone
territory intent on scoring
anyway until Yarbrough
intercepted a pass at his own
16.
Keystone, despite a 66-yard
run by Story to the Citrus 3-
yard line, failed to score, but
the defense came up with
another turnover when Van
Wagner intercepted his second
pass in his own end zone.
Story broke off another long
run, which would have been
good for a 60-yard touchdown,
but a penalty brought the play
back.
The Indians would
eventually score in different
fashion when Mosley


attempted his only pass of the
game. He almost overthrew his
intended target, but Yarbrough
was able to reach out and make
the grab and not break stride,
taking the ball in from 36
yards out for a 48-20 lead early
in the fourth quarter. i
Carlson, who finished with
six receptions for 170 yards,
caught a 15-yard touchdown
pass from Paul to give the
Hurricanes their first score of
the second half.
A couple of penalties had
Citrus kicking off from its own
20 following the score. That,
coupled with a return by
Taylor, gave the Indians the
ball at the Citrus 21 to start
their next series. A 12-yard run


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by Taylor. set-up Story s 3-yard
scoring run With 6:11 to play.
That capped the scoring tor
Keystone, but Citrus was not
done. The Hurricanes put
together a nine-play, 84-yard
drive that was capped by
Paul's third touchdown pass-
a 34-yarder with
approximately two minutes left
on the clock.

Thanks...
, Dickinson wished to express
his thanks to Professional
Mortgage of North Florida Inc.
and Armel Building Supply for
sponsoring last week's team
meal and Al Watson and I Dr.
Steve Chapman for sponsoiing
this week's meal.


10

'EALER S.


VS


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* .4
~


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41


*City owes its beginning to heavy metal,


T h e
building of the
first rail line,
connecting the
Atlantic Ocean
With the Gulf of
,-' Mexico(Fernandina
to Cedar Key)
undoubtedly supplied
the tonic that spurred
Starke's growth from
an unnamed crossroads
settlement to a village of
138 residents by the 1860 '
census.
The original route planned
i by The Florida Railroad
Company for its Atlantic
to Gulf line was by way of
Middleburg, but residents of
that already-thriving town, with a
population of almost 1,000 at that
time, objected.
They already had water
transportation by way of Black
Creek to the St. Johns River, and
doubtless considered the railroad
as unwelcome competition.
Consequently, the track was rerouted
to the west, running through the site
that was later to become Starke.
Not only was the railroad
unpopular at Middleburg, but
early settlers here also generally
opposed "the iron horse," fearing
that trains would kill their livestock


The "Peggy" line was one of the rail lines that were the life blood of early commerce and spurred
settlement and growth in Starke.


and interfere with other farming
operations. Drury Reddish, a young
farmer from Wayne County, Ga.,
and one of the first landowners in
what is now Starke, had bought
40 acres from the government and
established a farm in the area now
lying on both sides of U.S. 301 just
south of the railroad crossing. On


hearing that the railroad would run
through this land, Reddish pulled
up stakes and moved to a location
farther west, outside of what he
considered the danger zone.
By 1857 Starke had grown
sufficiently to warrant a post office
which was established here on
Nov. 17 of that year with George


W. Cole as postmaster. A former
resident of Fernandina, Cole also
came here in expectation. of a land
boom created by the railroad. In
1859 he purchased the 40-acre
section, still known legally as the
"Original Town.of Starke," from the
government for $100- $250 an acre.
This tract included land along both


sides of today's ?i .
Call Street,- &
bounded on the
west by property
now occupied by
Santa Fe Community
College Andrews
Center, and on the east
by the site where the
old power plant stood.
Soon after that, the
first general merchandise
store was established here A
by John Charles Richard
(pronounced Ree-shard), a
native of Georgia who had ",
been in the lumber and cross-
tie business at Middleburg,
and later ran a mercantile '
establishment in Jacksonville. He
foresaw Starke as a good location
because of the new railroad, and,
a short time later, was joined by
George E. Pace, another Jacksonville
businessman, in forming the
partnership of Richard and Pace,
Starke's leading store during its
early years.
According to an 1887 writer,
the first residence "worthy of the
name" erected in Starke was a large
"double-pen" log house built by
William Edwards Sr., in cooperation
with John Brown. This style of
construction, popular in those days
See RAIL, p. 10A


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Page 10A STARKE 150TH ANNIVERSARY Nov. 15, 2007


America.
Yulee was
Florida'sfirstU.S.
senator and was A


considered a
and still seen occasionally man of great,
in rural areas consisted of a vision in
breezeway, or hall, open at the days
both ends, that ran through before the
the middle of the house with Civil War.
'rooms on either side. There was He was
usually a detached kitchen at k.n o w n
the rear,.which was reached by as David
a covered walkway. This house Levy for
stood on the northwest corner the first
of what are now Madison and 30 years
Thompson streets, the current of his life.
site- of Badcock Furniture's His father
parkingg lot. had assumed
-in the three years between the name of
the arrival of the railroad in Levy when
1858 and the outbreak of the the family was
Civil War, the little crossroads forced to seek
settlement of Starke took refuge in Gibraltar
on new life. Before this d u r i n g
time period, there had been palace
..ll.ttjlop..no-.connection-t-"the ....revolution
outside- world. Supplies were in Morocco, whe
brought down by boat from father had been grain
"Jacksonville to Middleburg the emperor.
and then relayed to Starke by In 1800, Moses Le
mule or ox team over sandy father, moved h
wagon trails. Farmers likewise to the island of S
hauled their cotton, timber, or in the Caribbean,
naval stores to Middleburg for son, David, was bo:
shipment up the St. Johos River When Yulee was sti
to Jacksonville. attended school in N
But the new railroad changed while his family n
all that. Merchants would now the Caribbeanmi.
receive supplies direct. by rail .moved-agailthis tir
. f.roimJacksonviUeC-Getten-gins- where his father a
soon began operating here, and great wealth as a co
farmers no longer had to make supplies to the Spa
the long, arduous trip to and Because of his cc
from Middleburg. Drummers the Spanish allowed
(asisalesmen. were called in purchase large tract
those days) found Starke land, including the t
a convenient midway stop land grant near Gair
between Fernandina and Cedar Yulee attended
Key, and the depot, located at Norfolk for six yea
the railroad crossing on what father felt he was
is now the south side of Call to support himself
Street, became the busy hub of his allowance. Yul
the town. work on his father's
Local railroad's in Florida but his ar
father needed him to an apprenti
perseverance to a St. Augustine judge
perseverance read law and was lat
realize his dream to the Florida Bar.
The man behind the railroad As Yulee grew tc
that gave Starke its first real he became inte
breath of life was David L. politics and in 1841
Yulee, born into a Moroccan Democratic candid;
family that later relocated to office of territorial d


David
re Yulee's
nd vizier to
evy, Yulee's
is family
St. Thomas
where his
rn in 1810.
ll young he
orfolk, Va.,
remained in
family-later
me to Cuba,
accumulated
)ntractor of
nish Army.
connections,
;d Levy to
s of Florida
Arrendondo
nesville.
school in
rs until his
old enough
and cut off
ee went to
plantations
ambition led
;eship with
;e where he
er admitted
manhood,
rested in
ran as the
ate for the
elegate. He


RAIL.
Continued from p. 9A


won the seat and helped
write Florida's first
Constitution.
When Florida
statehood in
1845, young
YYuleen
4 became
the state's
first U.S.
senator
a n d
changed'
his name
from Levy
to Yulee
the Florida
Legislature.
Yulee was
defeated in his
bid for reelection
to the Senate in
1851, but
Yulee by then
he was
deeply obsessed by his dreomi-
of completing a cross-state/
railroad to connect the Atlantic.
Ocean to the Gulf of Mexico.
--This obsession meant that he
apparently wasn't disheartened
by political defeat. In his
ambitious dream, he foresaw
steel rails stretching from
Fernandina to Cedar Key -to
provide trfiisportation by train
through the interior of Florida,
most of which was then an
impenetrable wilderness.
He envisioned g vessels fori-om
northern cities and ocean-
goings ships from European
ports innloading their cargoes
at Fernandina onto railroad
cars for transport to Cedar
Key, where the cargo would be
transferred to ships bound for
foreign ports.
But it was no easy
undertaking to build a railroad
through the dense forest and
marshes, over rivers and
creeks: It meant cutting through
Sthe high ridges of Florida's
interior, with hostile Indians
still lurking along the way. It
might have been impossible at
the time-except for the vision
and determination of Yulee.
He and his associates began
buyingupland inthe Fernandina
area, a spot already secretly


picked for the eastern terminus
' of the railroad, and Yulee had
earlier purchased land at Cedar
Key. This, together with the
Alachua tract owned by his
father, gave the young Yulee a
large portion of what he needed
for the railroad right-of-way.
In 1853, the Florida Railroad
Company was incorporated
with Yulee as president.
Construction began in 1855,
after Yulee received state
and federal land grants, but
almost halted several months
. later when financial troubles
developed. Yulee obtained a
loan from a New York patent
attorney and financier and
payrolls continued.
The track reached Fiftone
(south of Baldwin and 20
miles from Fernandina)- on
Aug. 1, 1857, and pushed on
to Reynolds (the name of a


railhead one mile south of
Starke) by March 1, 1958. For
some reason there was a delay
of almost a year in construction
and the track did not reach
Hampton (a distance of only
six miles from Reynolds)
until Jan. 1, 1859. During this
period, Starke served as the
terminus of the line, and stage
transportation from here was
provided to Waldo, Gainesville
and other nearby points.
Fernandina grew with the
expansion of its transportation
facilities and everything looked
promising for the new rail
:line in 1860, but Yulee had
not foreseen the outbreak of
the Civil War and Florida's
secession from the Union in
January of 1861.
By March 1 of that year,
the Atlantic Ocean was finally
linked to the Gulf of Mexico,


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and the crowds cheered as the
first wood-burning locomotive
puffed out of Fernandina on
its 35-hour journey to Cedar
Key. But there would be no
ships from the Northern ports
or from Europe to meet the
train, and no cargo to be hauled
across state.
The expected ships were
either running the blockade
at Cedar Key harbor, or had
already fallen into possession
of Union forces.
Then the final blow was struck
against Yulee and his cherished
railroad. Union forces invaded
-Fernandina just two days after
the anniversary of the opening
of the cross-state line. As the
last crowded refugee train
raced from the oceanfront town
across (he Amelia River bridge,
cannonballs ripped into the last
See RAIL, p. 13A


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Nov. 15, 2007 STAKE 150TH ANNIVERSARY Page 11 A


Editorial: Starke-- Modern,

upscale and upbeat


Starke's post office was
established Nov. 17, 1857,
which became the accepted
birthday of the small North
Central Florida city in which
we live. It is a great place
to live, being well located for
business interests,. medical
needs, outside activities,
churches, schools, education,
agriculture, sports and cultural
activities. It is midway between
the two coasts, providing beach
lovers and saltwater fishermen
with access to fine facilities
for recreation within a hundred
miles. Freshwater fishing is
even nearer with fine lakes


and streams filled with bass,
crappie, bream and catfish
waiting to be caught. Out in
the county deer and turkey are
plentiful.
Education of its young
people has always been a
priority of Starke residents,
with schools established early
on, culminating in excellent
secondary schools, a vocational
school offering training in
many financially rewarding
trades and a community
college for continuing studies.
Very few towns with limited
populations can match Starke
for its educational facilities.


I www.cityofstarke.org I1



















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The University of Florida in
Gainesville is less than 30
miles distant and the several
educational facilities in
Jacksonville are less than an
hour's driving time away.
For persons concerned about
medical facilities, Starke offers
the Shands Starke hospital,
fully staffed and operating a
full-time emergency room. The
community boasts a number of
doctors, general practitioners,
dentists and other workers
practicing full time, as well as
medical personnel, specialists
in their fields, visiting Shands
each week. Three drug stores,
one of which is independently
owned and operated, provide
full, service, and two large
chain stores provide additional
sources for filling prescriptions.
Two outlets provide medical
supplies including oxygen and
equipment. For emergency
situations, Bradford County
EMS can move a patient 27
miles from downtown Starke
to Shands at Alachua General
in 30 minutes and to University
Shands, two miles farther, in
about 32 minutes. North Florida
Regional Hospital on the west
side of Gainesville requires a
little longer.
Retailers and service
providers abound with Wal-
Mart and Winn-Dixie stores
providing tremendous stocks of
groceries from which to select.
While Wal-Mart Supercenter
offers a wide range of products
attracting customers from other
nearby communities, other
retailers attract customers,
making Starke a trading center
for the county and surrounding
area. Three furniture stores,
one of which is locally owned
and operated under the same
family name for more than 80
years, offer a wide range of
home furnishing.
Three new-car dealers and
one used-car dealer with more
than 50 years' longevity offer
new and used vehicles, in
addition to smaller operators.


The old Bradford Bank building now serves as the headquarters for the thriving
North Florida Regional Chamber of Commerce, which promotes business,
tourism, redevelopment and employment throughout the region.


Two retailers offer building
supplies and hardware and two
stores offer farm and garden
seed, feed, fertilizer and other
agricultural products. Heavy
equipment is available in two
locations along with a popular
lawn mower outlet and repair
center. A new building for
renting tools, equipment and
furnishingsis underconstruction
and will open soon.-Gasoline is
available at competitive prices
in conjunction with convenient
stores, and independent
automotive repair shops provide
for transportation needs.
Starke abounds with
professional men and women in
a wide range of fields including
attorneys, optometrists, barbers,
beauticians, veterinarians,
accountants, chiropractors and
financial advisers to provide
services for the growing
community and surrounding
countryside. It has four banks,
one of which is independent
and locally owned, and three
of which are headquartered
elsewhere.
It offers spiritual support
through a wide range of
denominational and non-
denominational congregations,
from very small groups to
very large groups in a Wide
variety of church buildings.
The community is proud of its
several new churches, built in


the past few years, indicating
robust financial health of people
in the community and their
commitment to their religion.
In addition to. its many
churches, the city has a
movie theater that predates
World War II and an active
woman's club that's even older.
It has renowned civic clubs,
including the Starke Rotary'
Club, founded in 1937, and the
Starke Kiwanis Club, founded
in 1979. It has recently opened
a new public library convenient
to the Santa Fe Community
College campus, and there's a
city-owned recreation complex
utilized by city, and county
residents.
The Starke Golf and Country
Club, founded in 1959, is a
testy nine-hole layout with dual
tee boxes whose fairways cross
Alligator Creek four times,
definitely bringing water into
play. It is a par72course yielding
a low score of 63 only twice on
record. The course was bought
by private owners in 2004 and
substantial improvements have
been made.
Starke and Bradford County
have viable construction
industry composed of
contractors and builders to meet
local needs, and' vacant land
for commercial and residential
building sites at reasonable
prices. The area lags behind


other faster growing areas in the
state, but not for long, and land
prices haven't escalated beyond
reason. Two major highways,
U.S. 301 and S.R. 100, cross in
Starke, making access to both
1-75 and 1-10 available over
connecting highways. It is also
served by CSX, a major north-
south -rail line, with a spur
branching off. to- Yankeetown
on the west coast.
The city owns the municipal
electrical distribution system
and buys power from the
municipal co-op jointly owned
by more than two dozen
Florida cities and towns.
It provides water and sewer
throughout the city, as well
as natural gas. Governed by a
mayor-commissioner .council,
it represents the people through
city elections.
Bradford County is home
to two large penal institutions,
Florida State Prison and Lawtey
Correctional Institution, and
a smaller correctionaffacility,
providing a steady payroll
for several hundred trained
employees.
Its people, location,
natural resources, terrain and
infrastructure make Bradford
County and Starke desirable
locations for business and
homes. ,
By Buster Rahn,
Telegraph Editorialist


Congratulations on 150 years!

Thank you City of Starke

We're glad to be a business partner.







GrylbaR
..'.*y -: vi- 4OUr ./Ar ,'g ,



Suppliers of
* Utility Products Electrical Products Communication Products


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Conp ratula tions


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I.erig.S ak Bradord end*suroun ing *n i Ifo or ha 2 eas








Page 12A STARKE 150TH ANNIVERSARY Nov. 15, 2007



The last 50 years have brought exciting changes


Growth was the order of the
day as Bradford County swung
into the 1950s. There were a
lot of changes on the way for
the. area. It was predicted that
Starke would become a ghost
town when Camp Blanding
was deactivated after the war
and the population did suffer
a steep decline. However, with
an intense business recruitment
effort, clothing manufacturers,
a furniture factory and a plastics
factory were joined by DuPont,
a-mining company, as major
industries in the area.
Another major support of
the economy was the forest
products- industry, which
received a boost from an
increased number of paper
mills in Florida. No longer was
Starke's economy based almost
solely on agriculture.
In 1950, the census credited
Starke with 3,000 people. In
1957, the time of the city's
centennial, its population was
estimated at more than 4,500.
Property assessments topped
$10 million in- the county, and
the county's first hospital was
built. New housing construction
was strong, with a number of
homes built in subdivisions
like Parkwood, Pine Haven and
Saratoga Heights. Investors


..te ~

F'

-~ 1
1


owl


schools were integrated into
other schools in the county.
The closing of the two schools
pulled at the heartstrings of
the black residents who had
attended those schools, even
though they understood the
reason behind the closings.
U.S. 301 grew in the late 50s
and earl\ 60s from two to four
lanes and %\as rerouted south
of Call Street into the slight S
cure that w.e still kno,\ toda\.
The cit. that once had livestock
roaming the front lavwn of its
courthouse soon began adding
more service stations, fast-
food restaurants. overnight and
other accommodations to take


Long lines for gas were not;
seen here too often during the
gas shortage of the 1970s, but,
many local stations closed early
each day as their gas supplies
ran out. Shortened hours of
operation and conservation
measures saw the area through:
the storm eventually.
Concern for ecolog\ '%as also
on the rise and this concern
caused some problems and
expense for the citN and count)
as the city had to trearits sewage
in a more enmironmentall\ safe
way, and the county had to Find
a solution to what to do with
tons of garbage that did not
inole just dumping it in giant


Above, a view of Walnut Street at S.R. 100 shows the
Bradford bank, Park Theater and Standard Oil where
the chamber of commerce and Badcock Furniture are
now located. At right is a postcard's view of Call Street.
Below, a view of the old courthouse years before
animal control. Cows no longer roam the streets of the
city.
t'e


,ere also sought to establish
the Starke Golf and CountrN
Club. and bN the end of the
decade. construction as
Surpassing e\en the records set
during Camp Blanding s peak


." v _. .-. -,-.



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to the City of Starke...
A Great Place to Live!

539 E. Call St.
Starke

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S ears.
Some changes %\ere not .so
good Bradford Countians died
in the Korean War. the number
of farms declined and the quiet.
rural lifest.~le that had been
prevalent for \ears began to
change.
Some changes were good.
ho"e\er. The first rumblings
of the Ci\il Rights Moement
could be heard. technology\
began making Inies easier
and ad-ances like bringing
a natural gas line into tovn
improved living conditions for
a lot of people, and the city
of Starke celebrated its 100th
birthday and threw the biggest
party the town had seen since
World War II ended a few years
previously.
Segregation was the big story
in the pages of the Telegraph
throughout most of the 1960s,
although it was 1965 before
the first effects of the Civil
Rights Act of 1964 were felt
'here. There were few riots here.
Most of the unrest experienced
occurred in .1970, after RJE-
High Sch(,)l, ,and Anderson'"


30


Junior High School were
finally closed. Desegregation
here was handled first on a
voluntary basis-students
were allowed to attend any
school they wished and many
black students opted for white
schools-and reported no
problems in joining a formerly
all-white student body.
RJE remained an all-black
elementary school for a time,
however, and Anderson also
remained all black until both
schools were closed in 1970
and students from those


epoch
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passing through Starke. A 1958 a piece of Bradford history, the
count numbered the amount of 1902 courthouse, also began
vehicles on 301 at 7,000 a day. 'in this decade, although it was
Today, it's more like 30,000 not completed until the 1980s.
and growing, often resulting in Long hair and bell-bottoms
congestion during peak travel reigned supreme all over
times. Unfortunately, state the country, even in Starke,
funds aren't as easy to come although some would say the
by, so plans to build a bypass latest modes in fashion are not
around the city and an overpass exactly our foremost concern.
over the railroad-plans that Several fires took their toll
date back further than you may in this decade, including the
think-remain on the drawing
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to

The City of Starke


The past 50 years my family and I
have enjoyed Starke... A great
place to live and raise a family.



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Independent Sales Consultant


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Starke, FL 32091


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Nov. 15, 2007 STARKE 150TH ANNIVERSARY Page 13A


CHANGE
Continued from p. 12A
blaze at the propane gas plant,
which caused the evacuation of
a neighborhood in the middle
of the night in December of
1979.
The last three decades have
seen a lot of growth occurring
in Bradford County and the
continuation of trends that
began in the 1970s. Technology
is on the rise with new and
better things being invented all
the time. No one in the 1970s
would have believed that the
average person of today would
have a computer sitting on
their desks at home with access
to a world of information or
would be able to communicate
so easily-and frequently-
with loved ones and business
associates via small mobile
phones. Things we take for


granted every day would have
completely amazed the typical
Bradford resident in 1950.
Starke and Bradford County
continue to grow by slow
increments. In the last seven
years, the city has completed
projects to pave most of the
streets in the city and resurface
.a number of others. There are
ongoing projects to improve
the infrastructure of both the
electric and sewer utilities, the
latter of which has repaired
a number of aging lines and
promises to extend service into
underserved neighborhoods.
Three annexations have
taken place, two of which
involved the relocations of
the Beck Chrysler Jeep Dodge
dealership and Wal-Mart farther
south on U.S. 301. The third, on
C.R. 229, was for a proposed
housing development that has
yet to be realized. A fourth is
being talked about involving
around 700 acres south of the


industrial park. The addition of
more than 1,200 homes could
result from that project. Like
the project on 229, however, a
number of other subdivisions
and townhouse developments
have been discussed and
properties rezoned, but there's
no evidence that any of those
are moving forward.
Sometimes, steps forward
seem to .be accompanied by
steps backward, as when Wal-
Mart expanded from a discount
store to a supercenter at a new
location and Save-A-Lotopened
in the long vacant storefront in
Bradford Square. Predictions
that Food Lion would fall to the
competition came true, leaving
questions about how much of
the anticipated commercial
development along 301 the
area can realistically support.
Other times, there is a quicker
turnaround, as when Shoney's
was seamlessly replaced by
IHOP following a few months


The old armory
on 301 has been
sold to raise
revenue for a new
recreation center.
Starke began
its recreation
program in the late
1950s.

of renovations.
The estimated
population of the city
was closing in on 6,000
as of 2006. Public sector
jobs like corrections
and education carry
much of the weight of
local economy, but there
also opportunities in r
construction, transport
and health care along
jobs in manufacturing. I
businesses like Comm
State Bank, Noegel's
Sales, Denmark Furni


.t.



-V i -




Once the new center is built, the armory buyer plans to
preserve the historic building and turn it into a museum.
. 1- *!^ *; -- a-.- *


f the
e are
etail,
ation
with
Local
unity
Auto
iture,


Williams Jewelry, WEAG and
theTelegraph have long histories
in the community, and a number
of other local businesses thrive
in spite of regional or national
competition.
Tradition. Progress.
Change. Adaptation. The
local community is striving to
balance a need for growth and


employment opportunity with a
desire to preserve a rural way
of life. The problems of today
are not really that different
from those that faced our
forebears-and paging through
some old Telegraph issues will
make you realize how much
things change and how much
they remain the same.


RAIL
Continued from p. 10A


car, killing two passengers.
Soon after, the Union Army tore
down the bridge and ripped up
track as far west as Baldwin.
In 1864, after Jacksonville
had been occupied by Union
forces, raiding parties followed
the rail line to Starke, where
track was burned and other
railroad property destroyed.
After the fall of Cedar Key,
Yulee and his family took
refuge at his plantation on an
island in the Homosassa River. -
In 1863, a Union raid up the
Homosassa destroyed' Yulee's
plantation while the family was
away from home. Three years
later Yulee was jailed at Fort
Pulaski by federal authorities.
His foes sought his execution,
but he was finally freed by the
intervention of General Ulysses
S. Grant. The ambitious Yulee
was unharmed, but the war had
robbed him of his railroad.
In default of interest on its
bonds, the Florida Railroad was
put up for sale and reorganized


0i


in 1872 under the imposing
title of Atlantic, Gulf and West
India Transit Company. But the
war years, followed by the lean
days of Reconstruction, took
their toll of Yulee's dream.
Jacksonville had begun to
emerge as the key port on the
East Coast and Tampa was
rapidly becoming the favored
West Coast shipping point.
H.B. Plant was building his
railroad down the West Coast
to Tampa, and competition was
offered by other new lines.
In 1885, the Atlantic to Gulf
line went into receivership and
was reorganized as the Florida,
Central and Peninsular in 1888,
but Yulee never lived to see this
reorganization of his railroad.
He died of a bronchial cold
in New York City on Oct. 10,
1866.
As a final blow to Yulee's
dream, Cedar Key was
devastated by hurricane and
fire, accompanied by a tidal
wave in 1896. These disasters
struck simultaneously and-
wiped out a major part of the
island city, which at one time
was the largest on the West
Coast.


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Another severe storm two
years later destroyed most
of Fernandina's railroad
installations, docks, stores, and
houses, as ocean waters lashed
the island. After these disasters,
remnants of the Fernandina-
Cedar Key line were bought
.by a syndicate in 1900 and
absorbed into the Seaboard Air
Line Railway system.
But Yulee's dream had
already firmly established
Starke, providing needed
transportation for its timber and
cotton, which had previously
been hauled by ox team over
sandy trails to Middleburg for
water transportation up the St.
Johns River.
The railroad soon became
an institution, not only for its
freight service, but also as a
source of recreation for early
residents. It frequently offered
"excursion rates" to nearby
cities, beaches and other
attractions.
Newspapers of the 1880s
and 1890s carried accounts of
"moonlight excursions" and
other outings, with the railroad
providing the transportation
needed in those horse and


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buggy days.
The train even served farmers
along the line by warning them
of the approach of damaging
frost. Radio and television
news was lacking in those
days and growers depended
on the train whistle to warn
them when frost was imminent.
The accommodating engineer
would do this by blowing
three long blasts of the train
whistle every mile or so, which
could be heard as far away 'as
Kingsley Lake. Farmers would
then get up in the dark and go
out to cover their strawberries
and other perishable fruits and
vegetables.
Thus, in many ways, the
early railroad encouraged
Starke's growth from a few
scattered shanties to a thriving
young town made up of
homes and businesses built by
newcomers who arrived here
in the expectation of prosperity
made possible by railroad
transportation.


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Starke, FL


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Page 14A STARKE 150TH ANNIVERSARY Nov., 15, 2007



Utility costs: An ongoing challenge for the city


Among the city of Starke's
most important-and most
controversial-responsibilities
has been to supply utilities,
from the kerosene-burning
lamps that lit intersections in
1889 to the establishment of a
small electric plant in 1897 that
was soon shut down because
Mayor A.I. VonKin and nearby
residents were afraid and
disturbed by -the pulsations
emanating from the plant.
New equipment purchased in
1899 frequently broke down,
so by 1902 residents voted to
allow a bond issue to construct
a larger power plant and new
water system. But electricity
was only available during the
evening hours until a later bond
issue in the 1920s allowed
power on a 24-hour basis. Call
Street was described as -"The
White Way" when the plant
was completed in 1924 and
turned the street "into a literal
blaze of glory."


Water and sewer lines were
first run in the early 1900s,
and in 1959, the city awarded a
contract for the construction of
its natural gas lines, although
promotion of this new utility
as a cheaper source of energy
caused local oil distributors to
cry foul.
The city power plant was also
converted to use natural gas
unless there was a reduction in
supply at which time it would
automatically switch back to
diesel consumption. Lines were
run to residents and businesses
at no charge, and the deposit to
turn on the service was just $5.
Better still, the cost of fuel to
generate electricity "dropped
by about three-fourths."
Bill complaints and
comparisons are nothing
new. In 1960, people were
complaining about the cost of
their utility bills long before the
city's controversial pairing with
the Florida Municipal Power


Agency. A study showed that
Florida bills were on average
higher than the national
average, and bills in Starke
were more expensive than
the state average. According
to an article written at the
time, 250 kilowatts cost the
average Floridian $8.03 while
the average Starke citizen paid
$9.88.
City Clerk Merrill Edwards
said it wasn't fair to only
compare the cost of utilities
between cities. Jacksonville
had a higher millage rate for
example and Gainesville had
a higher garbage tax to help
fund local government. Plus,
the utility bill included charges
for water, gas and sewer service
as well as electricity and the
utility tax, and the city had just
raised water and sewer charges
to pay for the extension of
those services.
The idea of paying a higher
millage rate on property in lieu


An early look at Starke's power plant shows the old water tower in the background.


of higher utility bills couldn't
have been comforting. Millage
countywide for all taxing
authorities totaled 57.75 mills,
and 15 of those mills belonged


to the city of Starke.
Following weeks of
discussion-an even a
suggestion that the city adopt
Florida Power and Light's rate


schedule-the city council
did nothing. Well, that's not
exactly right. The council
See POWER, p. 15A


Congratulations City of Starke


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Nov. 15, 2007 STARKE 150TH ANNIVERSARY Page 15A


Starke's first sewer lines were run in the early 1900s. This picture was taken in 1916.


POWER
.Continued from p. 14A
was determined to make sure
citizens understood their utility
bills were not exorbitant and
its members said they would
;et about explaining that
po the public via radio and
newspaper.
Councilwoman Ruby Johns
said once she explained to
people what they were actually
paying for in their "light bill,"
iey understood. People are
goingg to have to pay to run the
Oity one way or another, she
aid.
:, "It was decided long ago
fo make the power plant the
Pown's major source of income,"
ohns said, and while the plant
Was closed in the 1990s and
kn all-requirements power
contract signed with the Florida
Municipal Power Agency, the
Oity still relies on revenue from
electricc sales to pay for general
government services.
FMPA's mission to provide.
competitive, wholesale power
&as been complicated by the
Erse in the cost of natural gas, a
trend that has affected utilities
r jroughout the industry but
consistently results in higher
average bills for Starke
customers than for customers
-sutilities- like Clay Electric


and FPL. Fuel cost was also.
an issue during the fuel crisis
of the 1970s, however. Still
generating power at its own
plant, fuel costs cut into the
city's major revenue source,
forcing leaders to raise rates in
an effort to keep departments
afloat. Rates rose again in 1980
after the bond trustees met to
discuss ways of generating
additional revenue for the city.
By 1984, city rates were up to
$15 per 1,000 kilowatt-hours
over the base rate, though the
city began to save money on
production costs a few months
later when it was tied into the
state grid and began purchasing
cheaper power.
For this fiscal year, the city's
power purchase from FMPA is
estimated at $6.8 million, and
money it makes on the sale of
that electricity will help balance
water and sewer operations,
which are operating at a loss,
and bring in nearly $840,000 in
general-fund revenue. The most
recent study shows residential
power at $129.05 for 1,000
kilowatt-hours, while 1,500
kilowatt-hours of commercial
power costs $223.65, making
Starke one- of the more
expensive municipal utilities in


the state.
While there was talk a few
years ago of exiting the contract
and even retiring the power
plant, it wasn't economically
feasible based on FMPA's
calculation of the exit costs.
Equally frustrated, Green Cove
Springs continues to look
for ways out and has asked
for cooperation from other
member cities. The Starke City
Commission did vote to stop
automatic annual renewals of
that long-term contract, but
the term is far from expired.
Even as 'the city works with
a contractor to complete
infrastructure upgrades said to
reduce line loss and electricity
bills, word has come that higher
fuel and generation costs could
push electric costs up by 10
percent over the next year.
It's news like that the many
say impede further commercial
and industrial growth. In 2004,
after months of seeking relief
from its $11,000 a month utility
bill, Blowfish Plastics-an
operation the city and chamber
worked hard to locate here-
packed up and moved on.
In a move expected to even
the playing field, Starke is
pursuing long-coveted franchise


J www.bctelegraph.com


fees from those in the city limits
who are customers of FPL and
Clay Electric. That would raise
their bills by 6 percent.
Ideas to reduce electric costs
aren't as easy to come by.


St k ; :.y- ,-p. .. -..'s s. o th a aw.- .
Starke utility employees pose-for the cameraman.


Smith & Smith Realty


L


commercial / Cesidential
leal estate

(904) 964-9222
TOLL FREE: 1-877-269-6577


We're Proud to
Serve this Area!

Congratulations
City of Starke on
150 years


Tom F. Smith
Broker

415 East Call St.
Starke, FL 32091


Williams Jewelry ,
< <



ltiappg Sirthdag Citg of tark












(I-r) Vicki Williams, Charney & Milta Williams, Brenda Williams, Linda & David Williams




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A.A.A\X^A \.A .\ A \ \A ^\


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(ogratulations Starko

"150 Qear t




A Wonderful Place To Live!



From our home


WINDSOR MANOR

Residents & Staff

904.964.3383

602 East Laura Street Starke, FL


AV


Ak









Page 16A STARKE 150TH ANNIVERSARY Nov. 15, 2007


, "- "


* ~ /


_ I
I. *iiI


ii







L



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www.NorthFioridaChamber~com


FL Kevstone
Heights
Melrose


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Pictured I-r: Harry Hatcher, Bradford County School Superintendent; Dean Weaver, Watson Realty; Jerome
Johns, Community State Bank; Phillip Johns, Community State Bank; John Cooper, Cooper & Adamec,
Attorneys at Law; Dr. Virgil Berry, Back & Neck Pain Clinic; Kay Waters, Southern Professional Title; John Miller,
Bradford County Telegraph; Charleen Gathright, United Country American Dream; Jeff Oody, Capital City Bank;
Brian Jackson, Walmart SuperCenter; Darrell O'Neal, New River Solid Waste Association.


Board of Governors Officers:
John Cooper, Chairman; Dean Weaver, Chairman-elect; Darrell O'Neal,


Treasurer


Pictured I-r: Susan Brown, Service
Manager FloridaWorks; Pam Whittle,
Service Manager; Ron Lilly, President/
CEO; Kim Skidmore, Main Street
Manager; DeAnna Adams, CFO


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301 South, LLC
6040 First Coast, LLC
-ACORN Clinic
Adkins Bobcat Service, Inc.
ADT Fire & Security
Advanced Sanitation, Inc;.
Alachua Bradford Regionai Workforce
Board / FloridaWorksAlachua Co.
Criminal Justice Center
Alfred Elixson Timber Company
ALSCO, Inc.
Ambient Air Services, Inc.
American Cancer Society
American Dream of Northeast Florida,Inc.
Ameriprise
Army Recruiting Starke Office
Authorized Construction Services, Inc.
Back & Neck Pain Clinic
Badcock Home Furnishing Center
Beck of Starke, Chrysler Dodge, Jeep
Beefcember Fest
Belco Enterprises
Bertie Heating & Air Conditioning, Inc
Bill Adams Chevrblet of Starke
Bonnie's Memorials
Bradford ARC/ Sunshine Industries
Bradford Co. Cooperative Extension Service
Bradford Co. Telegraph ;
Bradford County Board of Commissioners
Bradford County Farm Bureau
Bradford County Health Department'
-Bradford County Sheriff Office
Bradford Education Association
-Bradford Education Foundation
Bradford Family Dentistry
Bradford Garbage Service, Inc.
Bradford Motel & Campground
Bradford Rental and Sales, Inc.
Bradford Sportsmen's Farm
Bradford Terrace
Bradford/Union Vocational & Truck Driving School
Bryan's Ace Hardware
Budget Inn
Butler Townhomes LLC
C.I.S. (Communities in Schools)
Camp Blanding Museum & Memorial Park
Capital City Bank -Starke
Capital City Bank Keystone Heights
CB Isaac Realty
Children's Medical Center
Christie Allen's Decorative Painting
- City of Hawthorne
City of Keystone Heights
City of Lawtey
City of Starke
Clay County Port Inc.
Clay County Sports, Inc.
Clay Electric Cooperative, Inc.
Clerk of the Court


Clyatt Well Drilling
CMC Joist-Florida
Coffee News
Coldwell Banker/Smith & Smith Realty
Community Phone Book
Community State Bank
Community State Bank of Lake Butler
Concept Construction of North Florida, Inc.
Cooper and Adamec
CooterBobs Sampson City Bar-B-Q.
Cristen D. Andersen, Jr.
Curves
D.R.M.P. Engineering
Davis Express, Inc.
Days Inn /Hambones / Winners Pub
DDF CPA Group
DeBlock's What Not Shop
Denmark Furniture Company
Designs By Crystal Myst
Diane Ely
Digital Solutions of Starke, Inc.
Diversified Human Services, Inc.
Dodge & Dodge, LLC
Domino's Pizza
Dr. Daniel Cox
Dr. Len Schlofman
Draper and Boyd, PA, CPA
Drawtite, Inc.
Drummond Financial Services
Dudley P. Hardy, PA
'DuPont, E.I.
Dynatest Consultants
E & M Medical Service
E-Z-N Lock & Key Service
Early Learning Coalition of CNBB Counties-
Earth Tech Consulting, Inc.
Elixson Wood Products Co., Inc.
Ellianos Coffee Company
Embarq
Episcopal Children's Services
Epoch
European Rally and Performance Driving School
Exit Realty Excel
Farm Credit of North Florida, ACA
Farmer's Furniture
Fidelity Funding Mortgage Corporation
First Baptist Church
First Christian Church
First Presbyterian Church
First United Methodist Church Starke
Fitzsi Cups
Florida Credit Union
Florida Crown Workforce Board
Florida Employer Advisory Council FEAC
Florida Pest Control
Florida Power & Light Company
FloridaWorks
Ford Design Group
G, C & G Home Development, Inc.
Gator Dental Associates, PA


Gator II Farm Supply, Inc.
George Roberts Insurance, Inc.
Girl Scouts of Gateway, Council Inc.
Goetzman Construction, Inc.
Gold Head Associates, Inc.
Goldwire Associates, Inc
Good Shepherd Lutheran
Great American Trolley Co. Inc.
Griffin Industries-
Guardian Ad Litem
Hampton Lake Bed & Breakfast
Haven Hospice
Hawthorne Area Chamber of Commerce
Hayes Electric & Air-Cond. Co., Inc.
Helen Hersey Realty
Hillandale Quality Feeds, LLC
Hitchcock's SuperValu
Home Away Accommodations & Vacation Rentals
Home Instead Senior Care
Home Respiratory Care, Inc.
Hometown First Realty Inc.
Honorable Elzie Sanders
Honorable Johnny Hobbs
Ideas On Hold, Inc.
Immediate Care Center of Starke & Keystone
J&J Companies, LLC
J.N.A. Gutter
J.W.J., INC.
Jackson Building Supply of Starke
Jennings Insulation
Jimmy Alvarez
Jo Reed Specialty Advertising
Johns, Jerome
Jones Funeral Home and Convalescent Services
Jones Funeral Home and Convalescent Sevices
Julia's Florist
Keyes Appraisals / Estate Liquidations /Auctions
Keystone Airpark Authority
Keystone Building Center
Keystone Title
Keystone United Methodist Church
KIDTALK, P.A.
Knuckle Draggers Motorcycles & Accessories, Inc.
Lake Area Physical Therapy of Starke, Inc.
Lake Area Physical Therapy, Inc.
Lake Butler Farm Center
Land Title Information Services, Inc.
Las Vagas Games- NICKLERAMA
Lawtey Shell/Ice Cream Churn
Lee Hardenbrook -
Let's Do It Productions
LifeSouth Community Blood Center, Inc. "
Lion's Club
Little Folks University
Lynn Haddock, Watson Realty Corp.
M & S Bank
Madison Street Baptist Church
Madison Street Pharmacy
Magnolia Hotel
March of Dimes


Lake 100
Butler


Marcotek-Xerox Digital Office Solutions SFCC Andrews Center
Marion Hyper-Sub L.L.C. Shady Oak Nursery & Butterfly Farm
Masters Construction Shands Starke
McDqnald's Restaurant Sheffield Pest Control i
Melrose Business & Community Ass. Sheriff Bob Milner
Melrose Festival Committee Showcase Advertising
Mercantile Bank-Lake Butler Sonny's of Starke
Mercantile Bank-Starke Sonshine Title & Escrow Inc
Metabolic Research Center Southern Professional Title Services, Inc.
'Mid State Power Systems Spyros D. Drivas Architect, Inc.
Midway Learning Center, Inc. Starke Golf and Country Club
Montgomery Conference Center Starling Family Dentistry, P.A.
Moring Funeral Home State Farm Insurance
Mr. Auto Insurance of Starke, Inc. State Farm Insurance W.D. Beck
New Method Cleaners Stevenson Construction Cdmpady
New River Public Library Cooperative Stone, Joca & Mahoney, Inc.
New River Solid Wastq Association Sunrise Food Mart
New Wave Digital Sunshine Home Center, Inc.
Noah's Ark Christian Daycare Center Superintendent of Schools, Bradford
Noegel's Auto Sales Superintendent of Schools, Union
North Central Florida YMCA, Inc. Supervisor of Elections, Bradford County
North Central Title, Inc. Susan Faulkner
North Florida Landscape Management, Inc. Swift Creek Realty & Investment Corporation
North Florida Medical Sales Talisha Cunningham, DMD, PA -
, and Rentals of Starke Tatum Bros. Lumber Company, Inc.
North Florida Music & Sound Taylor & Taylor, PA
North Florida Regional Chamber Teila N. Pearson
of Commerce Terry A. Gaines Appraisals, Inc.
Norton Telecommunications Enterprises, Inc. The Beat Goes On
Omni Health Management Corportation The Office'Shop
One Stop Inc. The One Stop Bear Shop
One Stop Cleaners & Embroidery The Scent Bar
Processing Solutions The Sporting Chance
Putnam County Fairgrounds Thornton Photography
Cycle & Car Swap Meet Touchstone Heating and Air, Inc. I i
R & E Contracting, Inc. Town & Country Veterinary Clinic '
R & E Waste Management, Inc. Tractor Supply Company
'Ray Daugherty Land Surveyor, Inc. Trevor Waters Realty, Inc. :'
Rayonier Trinity Mortgage
RBH Union County Board of Commissioners
REDD Team Manufacturing Union Lasteel Metal Building
Reddish & White, CPAs Universal Engineering Sciences, Inc.
Regional Electric, Inc. Village Profile ,.
Richardson Construction Wal-Mart Store # 1283
River of Life Waldo Travel Center
Riverside Uniform Rentals, Inc. Walgreens #9231 I '
Robert L. Kelly Construction, Inc. Waste Management i i
Roberts Insurance of Keystone Heights, Inc. Watson Realty Corp.
Roberts Insurance of Lake Butler WEAG 106.3
Roberts Land & Timber Western Steer Family.Steakhouse
Rotary Club of Starke Whataburger :
S.O.I. Whispering Oaks
Saint Leo University Whitehead Brothers/Lake City Logistics
Santa Fe Storage Williams Jewelry
Sarah Torode Williams-Thomas Funeral Home, Inc
Save-A-Lot Food Stores Windows by Lisa, Inc.
-Sawyer Gas of Starke, Inc. Windsor Manor
Say I Do Bridal Windstream Communications, Inc.
Scorpio Day Spa Winkler Electric, Inc.
Senior Home Care, Inc. Women's Resource Center of Bradford County


MAIN OFFICE

E. Call Street, Starke,

904-964-5278


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The City of Starke




150 years and growing





Downtown survives to remain the heart of the city


Starke sprang up alongside the
railroad and the historic buildings
that still stand in what is now known
as downtown continue to provide
jobs, goods and services, food, shelter
and entertainment. While Starke has
grown far beyond the district, adding
subdivisions, shopping centers,
drive-throughs, hotels and the like,
downtown remains the heart of Starke
because of the link it represents to the
city's past.
Downtown has survived relatively
well in spite of the odds. Examples


of downtown that succumb to urban
sprawl and become blighted after
years of disinterest and neglect,
particularly in smaller cities, can be
found all over. Although downtown
Starke doesn't have the neon shimmer
of a new shopping mall, it wears its
age well, and its imperfections give it
charm and character that many find
preferable and a lot more comfortable
than the crowded commercial centers
that are as impersonal as they are
trendy.
Still, downtown Starke is not the


thriving commercial district that
was so central to the daily lives
of people living here years ago. In
the mid-20th century, downtown
businesses discovered the importance
of cooperating to counter the draw
of growing shopping meccas like
Gainesville and Jacksonville that no
longer seemed so far away thanks to
the automobile.
Local retailers worked together
on joint sales events that were well
advertised and promoted-events
like "Shopportunity Days," which


the Telegraph called the biggest
cooperative merchandising promotion
in the city's history. A division of the
chamber of commerce known as the
Starke Retail Merchants Association
was responsible for "profit sharing"
events like Shopportunity Days,
which included as many as 20


merchants- granddaddies like The
Alvarez Store, a men's clothing shop,
established in 1894, and others like
Winkler, Koch Drug Store, Leila's,
Barksdales, Bottom.Dollar, Stump's
Department Store, Williams Jewelry,
Eagle Stores and the Telegraph, which
See HEART, p. 18A


Above, Charley Cason is seated in the doorway at the rear of his early Starke drug
store. The children are Don and Cyrus Hoover. At right, Cody and Robert Barksdale
stand with little Bobbie Sue in the doorway of Barksdale's Department Store.


FAMILY OWNED & OPERATED SINCE 1973
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Preserve the


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mily Owned l on their 150th
South St Starke Aniiversary!
Sot fi 4-I' + Bonnie sends her
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Page 18A STARKE 150TH ANNIVERSARY Nov. 15, 2007


HEART
Continued from p. 17A
sold office equipment like the
latest electric typewriters.
One July 5, downtown
merchants showered shoppers
with $5 bills, and they also
sponsored "Kiddieland," 10
days of rides-including the
state's largest Ferris wheel-set
up across from the Coca-Cola
bottling plant. Tickets were
given away with purchases from
participating merchants, and
they also gave away coupons
to win prizes like a 14-foot boat
while promoting slogans like
"It pays to trade in Starke."
Still, by 1961 a Telegraph
editorial was asking local
merchants, "Are we driving


our customers away?" The
piece asked merchants to fight
fire with fire by planning more
effective promotions, investing
in more attractive stores and
offering a more complete
selection of merchandise.
"It's all very well to appeal
to the patriotism of small town
citizens by reminding them to
shop at home, and this should be
done at every opportunity-but
this, in itself, is not enough,"
the editorial read. "The small
town shopper thinks that he
has a right to spend his money
where and how he pleases, and
he must be shown it is to HIS
advantage to shop at home, as
well as to the advantage of the
merchant, and the community
itself."
Local businesses owners
needed to adopt the methods


A visit from tall man Robert Wadlow drew a lot of
attention in front of Sternberg's Store.


used effectively by "promotion-
minded metropolitan geniuses"
and improve the services that
were being offered, according
to the piece.
Today, downtown still faces
many of the same struggles.
A number of attempts to
revitalize the district have been
undertaken, and there have
been successes stories like
the remodeling of the Florida
Theater, the transformation
of the old courthouse into a
community college and the
facelift provided by new
streetlamps, benches and.
planters. People still flock to
downtown Starke for annual
events like the SFCC Starke
Fall Festival, Strawberry
Festival and Great Pumpkin
Escape, the last of these being
the brainchild of the downtown
merchants.
But the last couple-of years -
have- brought a more focused
and ongoing effort toward
improving downtown thanks to
the Main Street Starke program
that grew out of the chamber"
of commerce. A volunteer
board works with Main Street
manager Kim Skidmore to plan
projects, search for funds and
promote downtown.
They've involved the
community in multiple
visioning sessions and given
student planners a crack at
the same. They've supported
development projects that
rehabilitated historic buildings,
created, housing and established
of a number of new, diverse
businesses, including retail and
restaurants, and have promoted
downtown as a destination


spot for locals and tourists by
helping to sponsor monthly
Friday Fests and other events.
They even spruced the place up
by planting trees.
In September, the program's
efforts were recognized when
Main Street Starke was named
Florida Main Street Community
of the Month by Secretary
of State Kurt Browning,
but Skidmore and the gang
aren't resting on their laurels.
Through a .program that's
reminiscent of the merchant
cooperation of yesteryear,
Main Street is promoting the
sale of "Downtown Dollars" as
gifts this holiday season. They
are gift certificates that can be
purchased at the chamber of
commerce, and while they don't
replace a gift certificate you
may purchase from a particular
retailer, they offer added
-flexibility because the dollars
can be redeemed by shopping
at any participating merchant in
the Main Street program area.
To identify those,just lookon
the 6tacRo6Forli""dollar?'
"When Downtown Dollars
are purchased at Main Street


The Park Thaater pictured
above In the 1950s no
longer exists, but the
Florida Theater at the
corner.of Call and Walnut,
pictured recently, is still
showing the latest films.

we can see how many sell and
if people will take the time to
shot their support for local
merchants in the community,"
Skidmore said.
Beginning Nov. 20,
Do%\ntown Dollars can be
purchased at the chamber
for $5. $10, $20 and $50 and
spent like cash at Main Street
businesses., It can take the
guesswork out of shopping and
allow the receiver to choose
something they'd really like.
"Men, women and children
can find something they would
like to buy downtown. My
shopping will be made much
easier this year," Skidmore
said.
Thanks to Main Street, yours
could be, too...........


.--.A sincere congratulations to the

City of Starke

for 150 years serving Bradford County!

13447 South U8 Hwy 301
Starke, FL


904-964-7200

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on 150 years of wonderful service

in I krad ford County!



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Nov. 15, 2007 STARKE 150TH ANNIVERSARY Page 19A



Starke's city clerks, past and present, reflect on the city's anniversary


Neil Tucker
"It's a landmark for Starke
to have accomplished," said
retired public servant Neil
Tucker of the 150th anniversary


of the city.
Tucker served Starke as a
city commissioner from 1966
to 1974, and then was elected
mayor-commissioner in 1974.
From 1981 through 1989 he
served as the city's city clerk.
Tucker said that he was proud
of the role he played, in concert
with other commissioners such
as the late Vernon Silcox and
Charlie Schaefer, as well as
Jimmy Crosby and Travis
Woods, in serving Starke's
needs as the municipality
continued to grow. Tucker
also cited their initiatives to
improve the quality of Starke
roads and his successful efforts
to obtain health insurance for
city employees as high points
of his public service.
Tucker's main concern and
area of his most strenuous
efforts concerned the issue of a
steady and unreliable source of
electrical power for Starke.


Having to contend with
Florida Power and Light's
efforts to deny Starke power
from Gainesville, Tucker said
that the city had to rely on
its own power plant and any
energy that could be purchased
from other power companies.
Finally, in 1982, Tucker's
second year as city clerk, his
and his fellow public servants'
efforts paid off when an initial
agreement to purchase power
was struck with the Florida
Municipal Power Agency out
of Orlando, which now supplies
all of Starke's electrical power.
"This whole thing was
put together," said Tucker,
"so the city of Starke would
always have electricity."
Born and raised in Kansas,
Tucker served from 1946
through 1949 in the military
and was stationed in Texas.
It was there that he met and
married his wife of 58 years,


h i Ii : I i


Attention People with Medicare


Have Lunch on Us


Mary Catherine. The Tuckers
have two children, Bruce, who
is a pharmacist and a daughter,
Pam, who works as a dental
hygienist.
Tucker attended and
graduated in 1954 from an.
accounting school located in
Tulsa.
The couple relocated to
Starke in 1959 where Tucker
established his own accounting
firm of 22 years, which he
sold when he became city
clerk. Regarding his stint
of eight years in that position,
from 1981-1989, Tucker was
eager to give credit to his co-
workers in the office, the late
Elise Pass, Linda Wise, Alica
McMillian, Diane Tierney,
Judy Cason, Betty Warren and
Jewell Joyner. Of the latter,
Tucker commented, "She was
truly a jewel in and of herself."
As regards the changes
Tucker has seen in Starke in
nearly 50 years, he said what
stands out most in his mind is
the manner in which the city
businesses have stretched out
in both directions on U.S. 301
since the early days when most
of them were concentrated in
the few blocks around Madison
and Call streets.


.. .


Linda Wise
Linda Wise, who served the
city for 25 years, from 1970
to 1995, wanted to make it
clear that she never considered
herself a,politician.
"I acted from my heart-
that's me'" she -aid. "I'll
always love and appreciate the
people of Starke. They knew
me and were always so nice
* to me."
Born and raised here and
a graduate of Bradford High
School, she worked for


Western Union for three years
in Gainesville, St. Augustine,
Panama City and Tallahassee,
which required her to move to
those localities as needed.
During this time she met
and married her husband,
Wallace, in 1964. He worked
for the Department of Defense.
Together they have a son, Gary,
who is currently a lieutenant
with the Starke Fire Department,
and a daughter, Julee, who is
finance director for Bradford
County Schools.
The couple also has three
grandchildren.
Wise said that she began her
service to the city in 1970 when
she was hired as a payroll clerk.
She said her duties grew to
encompass billing, accounts
payable, working as a teller and
involvement in the retirement
system.
In 1989 after 19 years, Wise
was formally elected city clerk
when Neil Tucker vacated the
office. She was more -than
qualified for the position,
she said, as she already had
experience in most of that
office's duties in the 19 years
prior to her election.
"I ran unopposed because
the people all knew me and had
confidence in me. The people
here have always been good to
me," said Wise.
When asked how the city
clerk position differed from
what she had done the previous
19 years, she said that it was
the difference between being
an integral part of a financial
team that she likened to a well-
oiled wheel, and then finding
herself the person primarily
responsible for seeing that the
wheel turned efficiently.
"The city clerk title gave
me the gratifying feeling that
I was a direct employee of the
citizens of Starke," Wise said.
Wise said that one of the main
problem areas she was proud to
be a part of finding a solution
to was the city government's
fiscally unwise, unregulated
purchases and expenditures in
the early days of her service.
"We needed controls and
oversight, and we established
them," Wise said.
'While accepting the
-inevitability of the financial
and commercial growth she
witnessed in Starke over the
past 37 years, she said her
main concern these days is the
urgency of exploring alternative
fuels that will assure that Starke
and cities like it across the


nation will not suffer when
oil-based energy increasingly
becomes scarce.
"Have you seen the 'prices
at the gas station lately?"
she asked. "The other energy
sources are out there and we
need to get started immediately
developing them."
Wise said. that she and her,
husband are enjoying their
retirement (although Wallace is
still, on occasion, summoned by
the D.O.D. to handle a situation
that requires his expertise).
She said they like to 'travel,
both abroad and in the U.S.
"Other than that I'm just
an ordinary person," she said
with characteristic modesty.
"Besides travel we like to cheer
on the Gators like everyone
else."


, .



Linda Johns
Asked for her reaction to
Starke's 150th anniversary,
City Clerk Linda Johns said,
"We have to celebrate! It's
not everyday a city has lasted
as long and has been. this
successful, weathering all the
customary ups and downs. This
really is a tribute to the people
of the city and the county!"
With that kind of reaction,,
it's hardly a surprise that it was
Johns who headed plans for the
sesquicentennial celebration.
* Johns took over the position
of city clerk in 1995 from the
departing Linda Wise and noted
the irony that it was Wise who
was hired in the city fiH Rnc
department,% when Johns -left
that position after seven years
in 1972.
Johns, who was born and
raised along with her three
brothers and two sisters in the
See CLERKS, p. 20A


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TV1 Fiscal Years Beginning July 1, 2008 June 30, 2013

The Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT), District Two, announces public hearings
(Tentative Work Program for Fiscal Years beginning July 1, 2008, through June 30, 2013) to which
all persons are invited to attend and be heard. Persons who require accommodations under the
Americans with Disabilities Act or persons who require translation services (free of charge) should
contact Mr. Bill Henderson, District Planning & Environmental Manager, Lake City District Office
at 1-800-749-2967 at least ten (10) days in advance of the Public Hearings.
1. Live Oak Hearing: Specific notice is provided to, the County Commissions for Hamilton,
Lafayette, Madison, Suwannee, and Taylor counties serving as Metropolitan Planning
Organization for their respective counties.
DATE AND TIME: Thursday, November 29, 2007 at 5:30 p.m.
PLACE: Suwannee River Water Management District, Board'Room #103
9225 County Road 49, Live Oak, FL

2. Lake City Hearing: Specific notice is provided to the Gainesville Metropolitan Transportation
Planning Organization (MTPO) and the County Commissions for Alachua, Bradford, Columbia,
Dixie, Gilchrist, Levy, and Union counties serving as Metropolitan Planning Organization for their
respective counties.
DATE AND TIME: Tuesday, December 4, 2007 at 5:30 p.m.
PLACE: FDOT District Two Office, Madison Room
1109 South Marion Ave., Lake City, FL
3. Jacksonville Hearing: Specific notice is provided to the First Coast Metropolitan Planning
Organization (FCMPO) and the County Commissions for Baker, Clay, Duval, Nassau, Putnam, and
St. Johns counties serving as Metropolitan Planning Organization for their respective counties.
DATE AND TIME: Thursday, December 6, 2007 at 5:30 p.m.
PLACE: FDOT Jacksonville Urban Office, Training Facility
2198 Edison Avenue, Jacksonville, FL
Public participation is solicited without regard to race, color, religion, sex, age, national origin,
disability or family status.

These Public Hearings are being conducted pursuant to Section 339.135(4)(c), Florida Statutes, to
consider the Department's Tentative Work Program for the Fiscal Years 2008/2009 through
2012/2013, and'to consider the necessity of making any changes to the Work Program.
Written comments from the Metropolitan Planning Organizations, County Commissions and other
interested parties will be received by the Department at the Public Hearings and up to December 21,
2007 following the hearing. Comments should be addressed to:

Charles W. Baldwin, RE., District Secretary
Florida Department of Transportation, District Two
1109 South Marion Ave" Mail Station 2000
Lake City, FL 32025-5874
Telephone 1-800-749-2967

FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION J


900 Waln6tSt
Tusdy Nv.mbr2








Page 20A STARKE 150TH ANNIVERSARY Nov. 15, 2007


Wainwright may be


'oldest living historian'


Not only in the very house,
but in the very room in which
he was born 93 years ago, J.R.
"Nookie" Wainwright sat and
reminisced about his long,
illustrious life in Starke.
"I'm the oldest living
historian of Starke-at least
unofficially," said Wainwright
with a twinkle in his eye.
The family patriarch's roots
are sunk deep and go back
several generations in the city
where he was born on July 14,
1914.
His father, Newnan David
Wainwright, was the Bradford
County tax assessor for 33
years, before continuing his
public service as a member
of the Florida House of
Representatives.
His mother, the former Mary
Bowden, made history as the
first woman to cast a vote in
Bradford County.
He spoke of his grandfather,
Starke Chief of Police David
Leavy Alvarez, who was
gunned down in 1891,. along
with a deputy, by a notorious
desperado of the time, Harmon
Murray. He spoke of how after
Harmon was killed by one of
his own cohorts, townsfolk dug
up his body and paraded his
head on a pole around the
town, so detested was he.
Wainwright graduated from
Bradford High School in 1931,
in the second year of the Great
Depression. From there he
went on to the University of
Florida to study agriculture,
but only attended a year and a
half before economic necessity
required him to find a job.
He found work with the State
Road Department for eight
years during those times of
scarcity and struggle.
During this period he also
met and married his wife of
over 40 years, Katie, with
whom he had four children.
When World War II broke
out he became part of the.Army


Corps of Engineers out
of Jacksonville, and over
the next six years, among
many other projects, helped
in the construction of the
Kissimmee and Gainesville
airports. At that latter site,
he also helped the war _z
effort by helping to equip '
war planes with mounted
machine guns which were
also calibrated for their
accuracy and effectiveness.
After the war he ran for.
and was elected mayor of
Starke for three consecutive
two-year terms.
After this public
service was completed, he
concentrated his energies
intotheestablishmentof two
large and highly successful
farms in Starke-both on
S.R. 16, one west of U.S.
301 and the other to the
east of it.
"But we did have
strawberry fields right out in
the middle of what is now
301, too" Wainwright said.
Besides strawberries, 'the
farms yielded corn, squash,
eggplant, cucumbers and
peppers. Cattle was also in
abundance.
Wainwright ran the farms for
about 30 years before retiring
and turning the operations over
to his sons David and Richard.
When Richard passed
away, David's two sons,
Adam and Drew, became their
father's partners. Meanwhile
Wainwright's two daughters,
Betty Lou and Mary Catherine,
both pursued successful
teaching careers.
After the death of his
wife, Katie, Wainwright later
remarried a woman named'
Maudrey. They were together
for 10 years until she passed aw-
ay. Wainwright
over the years listed among
his accomplishments and
affiliations his memberships
in the Cattlemen's Association


*


-~J1 -


J.R. "Nookie" Wainwright

and the Elks and Lions clubs.
He was also market manager
of the state's, farmer's market
in Starke and active in the
Future Farmers of America
where he was credited
with many initiatives and
innovations which advanced
the organization's goals.
Among the many photographs
and prized possessions in his
family room is a certificate
of commendation from then
Florida Secretary of Agriculture
Doyle Conner.
Through it all, Wainwright,
despite his years has a sharp
mind and keen memory.
He is still an avid reader on
all subjects, but has a special
preference for Civil War
history.
His impish wit and sense
of humor are also intact and
amply on display.
Inquiring about his article in
the paper, Wainwright quipped,
"I hope you're not going to put
me in the wanted section!"


CLERKS
Continued from p. 19A

Whitehead section of Bradford
County, graduated from
Bradford High School in 1964.
The following year she was
hired to work in the Starke
finance department where she
remained until 1972. From
there she went to work with her
sister in Leila's Dress and Gift
Shop for 23 years until 1995.
That year she was elected
city clerk where she has been
for the past 12 years.
While wearing the many hats
and assuming the many duties
that position requires, she said
she took satisfaction from the
fact that during her tenure great
strives were made to reach out
to the county and its school
board. This tended to make
interaction between the city
and county smoother and more
efficient, which accrues to the
benefit of all, she said.
On a personal level she


expressed pride in the fact that
while city clerk s4 was able to
earn, as a result df five years'
study, the title of Certified
Municipal Clerk through the
auspices of the Florida League
of Cities.
Johns has one son, Kevin,
who is the owner and operator
of a Starke laundromat, "one
lovely daughter-in-law, Amie,"
and three grandchildren.
Her pride in Starke not-
withstanding, Johns echoed the
concerns of Wise regarding the
rising cost of utilities.
"It's hitting small businesses
the hardest," she said. "There is
very little we can do about it at
our level. It is Washington that
must take the initiative and act
to develop alternative energy,
so that we are not so dependent
on oil."
Still, she praised Starke as a
wonderful place to live.
"It's basically a small
Southern town," said Johns,
"that welcomes and caters to
the needs of all newcomers and


visitors." It
also has the added benefit, she
said, of being so favorably
located that residents
have convenient access to
Jacksonville and Gainesville,
making those metropolises'
businesses, services and cultural
attractions easily accessible to
those fortunate enough to live
in Starke.


Win Disney
tickets
Starke Elementary has four
tickets for Walt Disney World
that could be won in a drawing
planned for Saturday, Dec. 15,
at the school's Santa breakfast.
Drawing tickets are $1 each,
and proceeds go to purchase
classroom supplies and support
school programs. Tickets
are available from any PTO
member or can be purchased at
the school.
For more information,
contact Tara Hildebran at (904)
964-2340.


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Bradford, Baker and Union counties
Since 1992


Happy 150th Anniversary!


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personal relationships, offering competitive products and services, and
strengthening the communities we serve.


Our associates are proud to serve this community, and we congratulate the
City of Starke on 150 years! Thank you for making Starke a great place to
live, work and play. www.ccbg.com


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Bank


350 N. Temple Ave. I Starke I904.964.7050
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Nov. 15, 2007 STARKE 150TH ANNIVERSARY Page 21A


'.


4


e~m- ~i~r ~. A.r~~~W ow e ~ L


I Ofam


More favorite historic photos ...
(CLOCKWISE FROM BOTTOM LEFT) The final public
hanging that took place in Starke is pictured, while
above that is a happier and equally rare scene-the
city blanketed in snow around 1894 or 1895. Starke
Mayor A.L. VonKirn is in the foreground, standing on
Jefferson Street with Starke First Baptist Church in
the background. The photo at top of an outing along
Alligator Creek is believed to be an early political
rally in part because of the signage and the fact
that no women were present. Next to that is the first
Bradford High School built in 1913 with Principal
Dowling standing out front. The first World War II
recruits from the area are pictured on the steps of the
old courthouse. Below that is a picture of the Starke
Institute, the first public school built in Starke. It was
located on Walnut Street where the Starke Woman's
Club now stands.


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Starke, FL 32054
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Affordable Golf
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Pro Shop Gift Certificates Ide
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Page 22A STARKE 150TH ANNIVERSARY Nov. 15, 2007


Andrews Center the realization of a dream


From historic courthouse to
college: Andrews realizes a
dream
Guy Andrews has been
described as a tall man
distinguished, successful,
modest. A man with a vision,
but most of all a man with an
irresistibly persuasive manner.
He was born in 1908 to Will
Andrews and his :wife, the
former Laura Reddish. Andrews
grew up on the Andrews farm
about 12 miles west of Starke.
Andrews first attended school in
a one-room schoolhouse similar
to the one that now houses the
Bradford High School Alumni
Association's school museum
adjacent to Bradford Middle
School.
In those early days of the
1900s, travel was .difficult,
so the school had to come
to the students instead of the
students coming to the school.
Small schoolhouses dotted the
countryside and local families
often boarded teachers in their
homes. Andrews attended
a school near his home and
often sat at the table with a
teacher who was boarding in
his parents' house. He learned
the value of education while
sitting at the elbow of those
teachers and never forgot that
early lesson.
In a 1989 interview, Andrews
said every member of his family
worked hard on their farm. He
said he was out picking peas in
his father's field one day when
he thought, "Some day I'm
going to find an easier way to
make a living."
Education seemed to be the
path that would lead him into
that "some day". When he had
reached the point where he was
ready to enter high school, there
was no appropriate school close
enough for him to commute to
each day. Even short journeys
were difficult in the days, before
paved roads and widespread
automobile use.
He could have attended high
school in Starke, but he would
also have had to pay to live in
town during the time he attended
classes. His grandfather gave
him a pig suitable for breeding
and the litter it produced was
sold for $95, enough money
to cover most of the cost for


Andrews to
board in town.
Andreews s
graduated
from high
school in 1930
and decided
to make
a college
education his
goal. A farm
family like
the Andrews
family did not
have enough
money to
fund their
son's college
education,
so Andrews
knew he had Guy
to earn a Andrews
scholarship.
Bradford
County had
been .offering an agriculture
scholarship to the University
of Florida for a number of
years, but the Great Depression
had prompted the county
commission to cancel the offer
that year. Andrews said he lay
awake at night trying to think of
ways to get the commissioners
to change their minds and
reinstate the scholarship. He
and a number of his friends
lobbied the commission until
they persuaded the board to
reinstate the scholarship.
Andrews applied for it and
received it. Once he had been
admitted to the University of.
Florida, he still had to pay for
his living expenses. He earned
money regularly by washing
out all the glass tubes at one
of the experimental labs at
UF. He also waited tables at
a Gainesville restaurant. One
summer he even "cow sat".
"I lived in a barn with the
cows so they wouldn't be
stolen," he said in 1989. "I had
a good time and I didn't lose
a cow."
He graduated from UF
in 1935. He left UF firmly
convinced of the value of a
college education. "College
didn'tjust give me an education.
College gave me confidence.
Before college, I had a poor
self-image," he said.
With the ink on his degree
still drying, Andrews rode to


Tallahassee
in the rumble
seat of a
Chevrolet
coupe 'and
Sent to work
for the federal
government's
D D department
o f
Agriculture.
He later
S moved to
Washington,
D.C. and
continued
'J it working on
the federal
level.
Andrews
got married
on the flip
of a coin. He
and a friend
tossed a coin
to see if they would spend
Christmas with Andrews'
family or the friend's family in
Virginia. The coin toss favored
Virginia and Andrews met his
future wife on that trip. He and
Elizabeth "Betts" Sanders were
married in 1941 and had two
children.
In 1943, Andrews joined the
thousands who donned uniforms
during World War 11. He served
at the Banana River Naval Air
Station on Merritt Island as a
senior assistant supply officer.
He left the military in 1946 as
a lieutenant commander and
returned to Starke.
He started an auto supply
store in 1946 then sold out
to purchase the Starke Motor
Court, one of Starke's first
motels. It was located on S.R.
13, which later became U.S. 301.
The motel was sold in 1955 and
Andrews turned his attention
to other business ventures. He
built a supermarket for Winn-
Dixie and then built several
others in north and central
Florida. He also built shopping
centers, service stations and
other commercial buildings
throughout the area.
Andrews was always actively
interested in the welfare of his
home community.
He and five other local
people played an important role
in the decision to make U.S.
301 four lanes through Starke.


They persuaded the state road
department to four-lane U.S.
301 rather than build a bypass
around town to the west.
In 1951, Andrews' was
instrumental in attracting one of
the larger industrial employers
of the time to Starke. Big
Dad Manufacturing of North
Carolina was persuaded to
open a clothing manufacturing
company in town. The company
and its successor, ;Starke
Uniform, would be a major
employer in Starke for nearly
50 years.
Andrews also developed
Starke's first shopping center,
located on the corner of S.R.
100 and U.S. 301. He served
as a member of the Bradford
County Development Authority
and encouraged business
growth in the area through that
body.
Throughout his life,
education remained a primary
importance. He made certain his
own children received higher
education, but he also wanted,
to make sure the children of
other Bradford Countians had
the same opportunity he had as
a young man.
"I couldn't have gone to the
University of Florida without
that scholarship. I have strong
feelings about education, about
making it available to everyone
who is willing to extend
themselves and really go after
it," he said.
In 1964, Andrews was named
chairman of a committee
whose purpose was to explore
the possibility of establishing a
junior college to serve Alachua
and" Bradford counties. It was
sited in Alachua County and
named Santa Fe Community
College. In the fall of 1966,
SFCC began offering courses
in Starke at various locations.
SFCC had offered a number
of courses in Starke since
September of 1966. A location
in which to hold the classes was
the problem. The school board
meeting room in the district
offices (the old USO building
that stood where Krystal
is today) and classrooms in
Bradford High School itself
had been used to house various
SFCC courses, but demand
for the courses far outstripped
the space in which to house
the classes. Andrews went to
Eugene L. Matthews, then


editor of the Bradford County
Telegraph, to discuss his desire
to find a place in Starke for an
expanded SFCC program.
Andrews had always had a
special feeling for the 1902
courthouse building that had
been the heart of his hometown
throughout his childhood. It
was the place where he was
awarded the scholarship that set
him on the path to good fortune.
In 1971,.the old courthouse was
replaced by the new structure
on U.S. 301 to the north of the
U.S. 301-S.R. 16 intersection.
The old courthouse was to be
put up for sale.
Matthews had mounted a
drive to preserve the historic
structure. The Bradford County
Historical Board of Trustees was
created by a special legislative
act and that group was awarded
a deed to the building on Oct. 2,
1973. Matthews was president
of the historical board. He, and
other members of the citizen
group which formed the board,
had stepped in to save the old
building from being torn down
after it was abandoned by the
county in favor of the new
courthouse. The building -was
placed on the National Register
of Historic Places, but the


$?




A?


money needed for renovations
had not been gathered.
Andrews combined his
love of education and his
love for his hometown and
its history in a dream to turn
the old courthouse into a
college facility to serve Starke.
Andrews became chairman of
the steering committee and was
charged with raising $1 million
in order to restore the building
and make his dream a reality.'
To Andrews, the building
represented space for SFCC
classes. Matthews liked the idea
of restoring the building and
having it used for educational
purposes. Matthews presented
the idea to the historical board
and the building was leased to
SFCC's Endowment Board for
$1 per year for 99 years.
The plan to renovate the
historic building and allow
SFCC to use it was first made
public in 1984. Andrews was a
major contributor and pledged
an initial $200,000 to the
project. The Starke community
raised a further $75,000 for the
project. This included major
contributions from local banks,
businesses, industries and
See SFCC, p. 24A


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333 S. Lawrence Blvd.
352-473-7209


STARKE
986 N. Temple Ave.
904-964-7826


LORI THOMPSON
Agent

LAKE BUTLER
125 East Main Street
386-496-3411


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Nov. 15, 2007 STARKE 150TH ANNIVERSARY Page 23A


LEGAL

NOTICES


"The more that government
becomes secret, the less it remains
free. "
y3'^James Russell Wiggins


PUBLIC AUCTION
The Bradford County School
Board will hold a Public Auction on
Saturday November 17, 2007 at
9:00 a.m.
The auction will take place at
the Bradford County School
Transportation Department located
at 519 North Orange Street Starke.
Items for sale will be miscellaneous
school property, computers, printers,
copiers, TV's, buses, etc. the public
may view the surplus property at
8:00 a.m. immediately prior to the
sale, which will begin at 9:00 a.m.
11/1 3tchg 11/15
PUBLIC AUCTION
Ron Denmark Mini Storage will
hold a Public Auction on Friday
November 16th, 2007 at 10:00 AM
at 2117 N Temple Ave, Starke, FLon
the following storage unit containing
personal items:
#14 Belonging to N. Broome
#31 Belonging to D. Adams
#78 Belonging to M. Osteen "
11/8 2tchg 11/15
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR BRADFORD COUNTY, -
FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO. 2006-CA-604
DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL
TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE
OF AMERIQUEST MORTGAGE
SECURITIES, INC., ASSET
BACKED PASS THROUGH
CERTIFICATES,
SERIES 2004-R12, UNDER THE
POOLING AND SERVICING
AGREEMENT DATED AS OF
DECEMBER 1,2004, WITHOUT
RECOURSE, -
Plaintiff,
vs.
MICHAEL CHANDLER, et al,
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED
FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
pursuant to an Order Rescheduling
Foreclosure Sale dated October
31, 2007 and entered in Case NO.
2006-CA-604 of the Circuit Court
of the EIGHTH Judicial Circuit
in and for BRADFORD County,
Florida wherein DEUTSCHE BANK
NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY,
AS TRUSTEE OF AMERIQUEST
MORTGAGE SECURITIES, INC.,
ASSET BACKED PASS THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2004-
R12, UNDER THE POOLING AND
SERVICING AGREEMENT DATED
AS OF DECEMBER 1, 2004,
WITHOUT RECOURSE, is the
Plaintiff and MICHAEL CHANDLER;
THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
MT.MICAEL"'CHANDLER; ate'-the6
Defendants, I will sell to the highest
and best bidder for cash at FRONT
HALL OF THE BRADFORD
COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 945
NORTH TEMPLE AVENUE,.
STARKE, FLORIDA 32091 at 11 00
A.M., on the 29th day of November,
2007, the following.- described
property as set forth in said Final
Judgment:
THE LAND REFERRED TO IN
THIS EXHIBIT IS LOCATED IN
THE COUNTY OF BRADFORD
AND THE STATE OF FLORIDA
IN DEED BOOK 384 AT PAGE 23
AND DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:
A PARCEL OF LAND CONTAINING
0.50 OF AN ACRE, MORE OR
LESS, AND LYING IN THE.NE 1/4
OF THE SE 1/4 OF SECTION 21,
TOWNSHIP 6 SOUTH, RANGE 22
EAST, IN THE CITY OF STARKE,.
BRADFORD COUNTY, FLORIDA;
SAID PARCEL BEING MORE
PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS
FOLLOWS:
COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE
MONUMENT FOUND AT THE
NORTHEAST CORNER OF SAID
NE 1/4 OF THE SE 1/4 (ALSO
BEINGTHENORTHEASTCORNER
OF A PARCEL DESCRIBED IN
O.R.B. 167, P. 58 OF THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF SAID COUNTY)
AND RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES,
18 MINUTES AND 36 SECONDS
WEST, ALONG THE NORTHERLY
BOUNDARY THEREOF, 212.00
FEETTOAN IRON ROD FOUNDAT
THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF
SAID PARCEL (O.R.B. 167, P.58)
FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING.
FROM POINT OF BEGINNING
THUS DESCRIBED RUN SOUTH
00 DEGREES, 21 MINUTES AND
17 SECONDS WEST, ALONG THE
WESTERLY-BOUtiDARY OF SAID
PARCEL AND PARA..L-EL WITH
THE EASTERLY BOUNDARY
OF SAID NE 1/4 OF SE 1/4,


THEREON, SERIAL NUMBERS
H69832GL & H69832GR.
A/K/A 1515 OLD LAWTEY ROAD,
STARKE, FL 32091
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any,
other than the property owner as of
the date of the Lis Pendens must
file a claim within' sixty (60) days
after the sale.
WITNESS MY HAND and the seal
of this Court on October 31, 2007.
Ray Norman
Clerk of Court
By: Carol Williams
Deputy Clerk
If you are a person with a disability
who needs any accommodation.


212.00 FEET TO A CONCRETE in order to participate in this
MONUMENT FOUND AT THE proceeding, you are entitled, at no
SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SAID cost to you, to the provision of
PARCEL; THENCE NORTH 89 certain assistance. Please contact
DEGREES,. 18 .MINUTES AND the Clerk of Court, Bradford County
36 SECONDS WEST, PARALLEL Courthouse, Starke, FL at 904-964-
WITH SAID NORTHERLY 6280 within 2 working days of your
BOUNDARY'S,102.74 FEET TO A receipt of this notice; if you are
SET IRON ROD; THENCE NORTH hearing or voice impaired, call 1-
00 DEGREES, 21 MINUTESAND 17 800-955-8771.
SECONDS EAST, PARALLELWITH 11/8 2tchg 11/15
SAID EASTERLY BOUNDARY,
212.00 FEET TO AN IRON ROD APPLICATION WITH
SET ON THE NORTHERLY FEDERAL COMMISSION
BOUNDARY OF SAID NE 1/4 On October 22, 2007, Westminster
OF SE 1/4; THENCE SOUTH 89 Academy filed an application with
DEGREES, 18 MINUTES AND 36 the Federal Communications
SECONDS EAST, ALONG LAST Commission for a new FM
SAID NORTHERLY BOUNDARY, noncommercial class A radio
102.74 FEET TO THE POINT OF station in Starke, FL, on channel
BEGINNING. 218 operating at 1.7 kW from an
ABOVE DESCRIBED PARCEL antenna 152.4 meters tall located at
BEING CONVEYED WITH A 30 29-55-50 N, 82-6-16 W. The board
FOOT EASEMENT FOR INGRESS, members of Westminster Academy
EGRESS AND UTILITIES are Jim Carlson, Stephen Finch,
DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: Brian MacClugage, Joe Miller, Craig
COMMENCEATTHESOUTHEAST Peterson, Mike Pritchard, Terrie
CORNER OF ABOVE DESCRIBED Roughen, Hank Sipowski, David
PARCEL FOR THE POINT OF Stewart, Okyo Sthair, and Greg
BEGINNING AND RUN SOUTH Beaupied. A copy of the application
00 DEGREES, 21 MINUTES AND is available for public viewing in the-
17 SECONDS WEST, PARALLEL public file at the Bradford County
WITH THE EASTERLY BOUNDARY Public Library, 456 W. Pratt Street,,
OF SAID NE 1/4 OF SE 1/4, A Starke, Florida 32091.
DISTANCE OF 53.67 FEET TO A 11/15 3tchg 11/29
SET IRON ROD; THENCE SOUTH
89 DEGREES, 18 MINUTESAND 36 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
SECONDS EAST, PARALLELWITH EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF
THE NORTHERLY BOUNDARY THE STATE OF FLORIDA IN AND
OF SAID NE 1/4 OF SE 1/4, A FOR BRADFORD COUNTY
DISTANCE OF 187.00 FEET TO CIVIL ACTION
THE WESTERLY BOUNDARY OF CASE NO.: 07-CA-394
THE R/W OF OLD LAWTEY ROAD GREEN TREE SERVICING, LLC.,
(SAID WESTERLY BOUNDARY Plaintiff,
BEING ON A CURVE CONCAVE vs.
-.TO THE EAST AND HAVING A ALLEN D. CAMPBELL, SHERRI
RADIUS OF 4625.32 FEET); D. CAMPBELL; CITIFINANCIAL
THENCE--.QUTJTHWESTERLY, EQUITY SERVICES,, INC.;
ALONG SAID----WESTERLY CITIFINANCIAL; JOHN. DOE and
BOUNDARY AND ALONG THE JANE DOE, Unknown Tenant(s).
ARC OF SAID CURVE, 30.07 FEET Defendant(s).
AS MEASURED ALONG A CHORD NOTICE OF SALE
HAVINGANDBEARINGOFSOUTH PURSUANT TO F.S.
04 DEGREES, 41 MINUTES AND CHAPTER 45
23 SECONDS WEST; THENCE NOTICE IS GIVEN that pursuant to
NORTH 89 DEGREES,18 a Final Judgment of Foreclosure,
MINUTES AND 36 SECONDS dated Nov. 5 2007, iri the above-
WEST, PARALLEL WITH SAID styled cause, I will sell to the
NORTHERLY BOUNDARY,214.73 highest and best bidder for cash
FEET TO A SET IRON ROD; on the front steps of the Bradford
THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES, County Courthouse, 945 N. Temple
21 MINUTES AND 17 SECONDS Avenue, Starti, Florida at 11:00
EAST, PARALLEL WITH SAID a.m. on the 61 day of December,
EASTERLY BOUNDARY, 83.67 2007, the following described real
FEET TO AN IRON ROD SET ON and personal property:
THE SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY Schedule "A"
OF ABOVE DESCRIBED The Easterly 100.00 feet of the
PARCEL; THENCE SOUTH 89 following described parcel: A parcel
DEGREES,18 MINUTES AND 36 of land in the SE 1/4 of SW 1/4
SECQONS EAST ALONG LAST of Section 18, Township 6 South,
-......SAID 'SGUTHERL. .BOQQN 44a'ge.22. East, .Bradford County,
30.00" FEET TO"THE .IO'NTOF Florida; said parcel being more
BEGINNING. particularly described as follows:
TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN Commence at the Southeast corner
MOBILE HOME LOCATED of a 1.0 acre parcel in the Southwest
^**;-?i -'-w y--f/a;-.;'St&'.Kas.7c-?i-:t.'(^w~:.reewwes


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corner of said SE 1/4 of SW 1/4,
belonging to Carrie Welch, for Point
of Beginning and run East along the
Southerly boundary of said SE 1/4
of SW 1/4, 1106 feet more or less,
to the Southeast corner thereof;.
thence North along the Easterly
boundary of said SE 1/4 of SW
1/4, 170.75 feet; thence Westerly
to a point on the Easterly boundary
of aforesaid parcel, being 173.25
feet North of the Southeast corner
thereof; thence south along said
Easterly boundary, 173.25 feet to
the Point of Beginning.
The above described Parcel being
the Easterly 100.00 feet of lands
described in Official Record Book
177, Page 465, of the public records
of Bradford County, Florida.
Together with that certain
manufactured home more
specifically described as:
1996, Fleetwood/Hickory Hill
(28x60) with Serial Number
GAFLS35AB11062HH21.
Any person claiming an interest in
the surplus from the sale, if any,
other than the property owner as of
the date of the lis pendens must file
a claim within sixty (60) days after
the sale.
Dated this 6th day of November,
2007.
Ray Norman
Clerk of the Court
By Carol Williams
Deputy Clerk
Donnelly & Russo, P.A.
3708 W. Euclid Ave.
Tampa, FL 33629
(813) 832-9790
11/15 2tchg 11/22
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE
EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN
AND FOR BRADFORD COUNTY,
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
Case No.: 07-121CP
IN RE: ESTATE OF CLARA
EILEEN BRACEWELL a/ka
EILEEN BRACEWELL a/k/W
EILEEN B. BRACEWELL,
Deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The Administration of the Estate
of CLARA EILEEN BRACEWELL,
a/k/a EILEEN BRACEWELL a/
k/a EILEEN B. BRACEWELL,
Deceased, whose date of death
was April 19, 2007, is pending in the
Circuit Court for Bradford County,
Florida, the physical address of
which is Probate Division, 945 North
Temple Avenue, Starke, Forida
32091 and whose mailing address
is P.O. Drawer B, Starke, Florida
32091. The names and addresses
of the Personal Representative
and the Personal Representative's
Attorney are set forth below.
All Creditors of the Decedent and
other persons having claims or
demands against Decedent's Estate
on whom a copy of this Notice is
required to be served must file
their claims with this Court WITHIN
THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE
OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE
OE SERVICE OFA COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.


All other Creditors of the Decedent
and other persons having claims
or demands against Decedent's
Estate must file their claims with
this Court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN
THE PERIODS SET FORTH IN
SECTION 733.702 OF THE
FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED.
The date of first publication of this
Notice is November 15, 2007.
Janet Mauthner,
Personal Representative
Attorney for Personal
Representative:-
Kevin Daly, Esq.
Florida Bar No. 281931
Scruggs & Qarmichael, P.A.
4041 N.W. 37t' Place, Suite B
Gainesville, FL 32606
(352) 374-4120, ext. 321
.11/15 2tchg 11/22
PUBLIC AUCTION
The following vehicle will be sold'at
Public Auction at Ed's Automotive,
2163 N. Temple Ave., Starke, FL
32091, commencing at 9 a.m.
on Dec. 15, 2007: 1996 Ford


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Legislators to

meet in area
Senator Steve Oelrich (R-
Cross Creek) chair of the
Bradford County Legislative
Delegation, along with
Representative Aaron Bean
(R-Fernandina Beach), and
Representative Joe Pickens (R-
Palatka) announced the date of
the Bradford County Legislative
Delegation hearing.
The hearing will take place on
Tuesday, Nov. 20, from, 10:30
a.m. to noon, in the Bradford
County Commission meeting
room at the Bradford County
Courthouse on North Temple
Avenue in Starke.
The meeting is open to the
public and is an opportunity
for residents to voice their
concerns or comments with the
delegation.


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Page 24A STARKE 150TH ANNIVERSARY Nov. 15, 2007


SFCC
Continued from p. 22A

individuals. It also included
funds from a huge garage sale
and auction held in 1985, which
netted more than $20,000 for
the building fund.
The fundraising effort was
successful, especially for a
small community, but when the
total still fell short of the mark,
Andrews made up the difference
out of his own pocket. "I'll see
it through," he told friends at
the time. That is exactly what
he'did. His contribution had
grown to $1.5 million before
the project was completed.
The renovation was accepted
as substantially complete on
Aug. 9, 1985. Classes in the
building began on Aug. 27
of that year. A goal had been
set of filling 400 seats in that
initial session, even though
only 206 seats had been filled
through local class offerings
the year before. The opening
session saw 629 seats filled in
the Andrews Center. Today, the
center has an average of 900 to
1,000 seats filled. The complete
project, including tearing down
the old jail adjacent to the old
courthouse and paving the area
for parking, came in at $2.5
million.
Even after SFCC opened.
in 1985, Andrews remained
very active and supportive. In
recognition of that support, the
Santa Fe Community College
Starke Center was renamed the
SFCC Andrews Center in 1989
and dedicated to Andrews on
Jan. 21 of that year.
,Dr. Bernard McFadden, the
first director of the Andrews
Center, said Guy Andrews was
"a great humanitarian".
"He made his way in the
world of economics and he
wanted to 'share with others,"
said McFadden. "He didn't
want to wait until he was gone.
He wanted to enjoy the fact
that his money was being used
in what he saw as the best
possible purpose-education
and the future of our children."
McFadden said Andrews'
simple homespun demeanor
sometimes hid the intelligent
and accomplished businessman.
"He really knew how to get
things done. Once you knew
him, you didn't forget that,"
said McFadden.
Andrews wasalsoabenefactor
of other worthwhile projects.
In 1985, the Children's Home
Society of Florida renamed
its Jacksonville administrative
building in recognition of
the support of Andrews and
his son Tom. In addition to
serving on the SFCC Board of
Trustees for almost 20 years,
Andrews served on the boards
of a hospital and a health care
corporation. He was a member
and benefactor of the First
Presbyterian Church of Starke.
In 1987, the Rosenberg
building, located about three
blocks from the old courthouse
on Call Street, was to be torn
down to furnish a city parking
lot. No one could deny the need
for more parking downtown,
but there were those who did


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not want to see the
historic building
torn down. Now
more than 110
years old, the "
building was saved k
by a combination '.
of grants and
fundraising
projects which
provided $350,000
for the renovations.
The building..
was added to the
SFCC property
list in- 1990 and
is now used as
an auditorium
and additional
classroom space. '.,-.
One room of
the Rosenberg
building is being
used to house the
culmination of
a dream that had
sparked Matthews'
life for many
years. The Eugene --
L. Matthews
Bradford County
Historical Museum
opened in 1997
in one room on
the second floor Bernie
of what is now iMcFadde
called the Santa pictured
Fe Community of the Al
College Cultural of the A
Center. Center.
The setting
aside of that
room for use as a museum
was made a condition of giving
the building to SFCC. The
historical group raised $70,000-
plus to fund the project. Caring
for the collection which gives
local history a concrete form is
undertaken by a committee of
volunteers who act as unpaid
guides for people wishing the

visit the museum.
In addition to providing an
accessible education for local
young people who wish to
go beyond high school-and
providing a home for local
history-SFCC has provided
the impetus for a number of
other activities. The college has
sponsored the annual Starke
Festival of the Arts since
1986. Now called the Starke
Fall Festival, the event draws
thousands to the downtown area
each year for a weekend of art,
entertainment, arts and crafts
and more. The college has also
served as a hub of community
activity overthe years,including
a series of presentations from
the performing arts and other


966-CELL


events.
The Bradford County Jail,
which was in use previous to
the current one, was located
.on Pratt Street in Starke. It was
razed in September of 2001
to provide a space to build
the 'Lillian Stump Education
Center, providing additional
classroom space for the Santa Fe
Community College Andrews
Center. The $260,000-plus
project provided a building
with four classrooms-a total
of about 2,400 square feet of
classroom space-office and
faculty areas and a reception
area.
Lillian Stump, for whom the
building was named, donated
$100,000 to the project, leaving
about $160,000 to be raised.
, The county donated the old
jail and the land it occupied to
SFCC and local businessman
John Miller donated an adjacent
piece of property to provide
parking.
Original plans were for the
old jail, which was constructed
in the late 1950s, to be renovated


Starke


to provide
space, but too
many problems
cropped up with
the renovation.
V According to
-] Evelyn Womack,
Stump's niece
and a member of
4 the fund raising
committee for the
'- project, trying to
renovate the two-
story structure
, would have been
-n difficult and,costly.
S' .' Any two-story
structure would
; have to have an
elevator, of course,
and constructing
an elevator would
have added a large
amount to the cost
of the project. The
A jail structure had
small rooms which
posed problems
in planning a
renovation to
accommodate
:,,. several classrooms
full of students.
"There just really
wasn't any good
way to do it,"
said Womack of
the attempt at'
renovation.
When the
committee realized
that renovation would be too
costly and difficult, plans were
changed to tear the structure
down and build a one-story
building. With Miller's donation
of added land, requirements for
parking and the space to locate
a retention pond were satisfied.
"That solved another problem
for us," said Womack.
The county did some
demolition work on the
property, removing the wooden
annex which was added to the
jail in later years, and did some
general clean-up work. With
construction being planned to
begin in November of 2001,
a fund raising effort began in
August of that year as a way
to drum up the lacking money.
Womack said people were asked
to make three-year pledges to
help fund the project. -
The building was to be used
primarily forthe dual enrollment
program, although any number
of other uses was possible. Dual


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Owner: Chrissy Allen &
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enrollment is a program which
allows high school students
to secure college credit while
still in high school, at no cost
to the student. Getting a head
start on college is something
that is of great value to some
students here, said Womack,
but the program would have
probably been used a great deal
more if it were expanded and
more accessible. The Stump


Wainwright
tree lighting

Friday
Join Santa and the Starke
City Commission at Wainwright
Park on Church Street at 6
p.m. on Friday, Nov. 16, for
the annual lighting of the city
Christmas tree.
As is tradition, J.R.
Wainwright will light the tree.
Carolers from Madison Street
Baptist Church will join others
in presenting holiday music.
Santa will arrive by fire truck
and photo opportunities will
be available. Plus, there will be
cookies and hot chocolate, so
come out and get the holiday
season started at this spirited
event.

Ride to
benefit toy
drive
A toy run benefitting The
Bradford County Community
Christmas Toy Drive will be
held Saturday, Dec. 1.
Join the FAITH Riders of
Madison Street Baptist Church


building is close to both-BHS
and the Bradford-Union Career
and Technical Center, so it will
provide a convenient location
for potential dual enrollment
students. In' addition to dual
enrollment classes, other
classes are held at the new
building and it is available for
community use for meetings
and other purposes.


for a pancake and sausage
breakfast at the church's old
fellowship hall at 9 a.m.
Entry into the breakfast and
accompanying ride is one new
toy sealed in its original box to
be donated to the community
toy drive for less fortunate
'children.
The route and stops for the ride
are yet to be announced, but the
ride will end at Beefcemberfest
at thJe fairgrounds (admission
$2). Call (904) 964-7557 to
let the riders know you'll be
joining them.
Toy collection boxes have
also been placed around town
at the chamber of commerce,
Capital City Bank and Sugar
Tree Cafe, where you can get
$4 off of your bill for donating
a toy.
Collections will also take
place at the Friday Festival
planned for Friday, Nov. 30, and
at the Dec. 8 Starke Christmas
Parade. For more information,
call (904) 964-5278.
There are plenty of ways
to contribute, including
donating funds to a collection
box or volunteering to help
sort presents. Be sure to get
involved to make this'holiday
a special one for all kids in
Bradford County.


150th I/irthday


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Sat 6 a.m.-11 a.m.


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Congratulations City of Starke's

150th Anniversary

We're proud to serve the city and its
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