Group Title: Bradford County Telegraph.
Title: Bradford County telegraph
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00027795/00137
 Material Information
Title: Bradford County telegraph
Uniform Title: Bradford County Telegraph
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: L.C. Webb
Place of Publication: Starke, Fla.
Starke Fla
Publication Date: August 16, 2007
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Starke (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Bradford County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Bradford -- Starke
Coordinates: 29.947222 x -82.108056 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 9, no. 41 (Apr. 13, 1888)-
General Note: Publishers: Mathews & Farmer, <1893-1897>; E.S. Mathews, <1900-1926>.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00027795
Volume ID: VID00137
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 33886096
alephbibnum - 000579551
electronic_aleph - 003298621
electronic_oclc - 60662535
lccn - sn 95047406
lccn - sn 95047406
 Related Items
Preceded by: Starke telegraph

Full Text




T'he Sweetest Strawberries T'kis Sicde Of -Leaven


J..abtov oeti Sow


USPS 062-700 Three Sections Starke, Florida


Thursd


-, .wr"-


r128th Yeapr 3rd Issue 50 CENTS

128th Year 3rd Issue 50 CENTS


S l: 0 S - 6 r -tlgrp~ o


UC 4-H
auction, dinner
to be held
Aug. 17
Don't forget the annual Union
County 4-H Foundation auction
and supper on Friday, Aug. 17, at 6
p.m. in the Lake Butler Community
Center.
This is a benefit auction that
will fund camps, fair projects,
leadership skills training and
other enrichment programs for the
county's youth.
Family and business 4-H
memberships ($25 and $50,
respectively) are also available.
To receive full benefit, purchase
before Aug. 31.
For more information, call (386)
496-2321.



Christmas
Drive meeting
set for
Saturday
Santa needs some helpers to
assist with this year's Christmas
season.
Anyone interested in volunteering
for the seventh annual Big Red
Christmas Drive in Union County
is invited to attend a planning
meeting this Saturday, Aug. 18.
It will be held at EMS
Headquarters/Union County Fire
Department Station 5 at 1 p.m.
For further information, call
(352) 494-3320.



Sapp Cemetery
meeting is on
Aug. 25
The annual Sapp Cemetery_
meeting will be held on Saturday,
Aug. 25, at the Raiford Community
Center.
The luncheon will be at 11 a.m.,
and members are asked to bring a
dish to go with chicken and rice.
The business meeting will be
held at noon. Members are being
asked to plan on going to the
cemetery after the business meeting
to verify their burial plots.



Patient care
program
accepting apps
The Bradford-Union Area
Career and Technical. Center is
now accepting applications for the
patient care technician program.
For more information, please
call (904) 966-6764, or stop by
the school at 609 N. Orange St. in
Starke.



Benefit helps
recent crash
survivor
A benefit potluck dinner will
be held to help raise funds for a
local man injured in an automobile
accident.
LeslieTravis Prevatt Jr, a lifelong
resident of Lawtey and a 22-year-
old father of one, almost lost his
life in a car accident. As a result he
spent 10 days in the hospital.
Because he has no medical
insurance, Prevatt now has a big
hospital bill to pay.
There will be a potluck dinner
sponsored by the owners of Mate's
Billabong in Starke. The dinner
will be held at Mate's Billabong
on Saturday, Aug. 25, at __4 p.m.
Plates will be $7 each.
Any and all donations are
appreciated.


Redd heads a region that's willing to serve


BY MARK-J.--RAWEORD
Telegraph Editor
Mark Redd is the regional head
of the area's biggest industry. He
oversees 14 major institutions that
employ thousands of law-abiding
citizens whose jobs are to protect
society from thousands of the other
kind of citizen-the ones for whom
concrete walls, steel bars and razor
wire are necessary.


of the day-to-day operations of the
cofrretions system- and the .people
who work within it.
Job number one is public safety,
and Redd said the institutions in
this area have an excellent long-term
record of keeping the public safe.
"One of the safest places to live
in the world is close to a prison," he
said. "We have staff around who are
trained to identify problems and who
actually live in the community and


everything from apprehending felons
to locating a missing person.
- Throughout- this year's wildfires,
correctional employees were posted
on closed roads, keeping the public
out of dangerous areas. Employees
also rode along with Division of
Forestry personnel to report sightings
and help get those fires under
control.
That focus on public safety is just
one part of what Redd called the best


(LI s~ec~i~'ei~iw ...


Regional Prison Director
Mark Redd
years ago and worked his way up,
holding a number of security and
administrative positions along the
way in Region I and Region II.
Redd was appointed to a regional
directorship in November 2006,
a promotion from the position of
warden that he called unexpected.
"To be honest with you, I was quite
surprised, but everything happens for
a reason," Redd said. "I was very
comfortable with my position as
warden at the Reception and Medical
Center, and this kind of took me out
of my comfort zone."
Expected or not, Redd said things
are going well 'in his new post. He's
been accepted by other administrators
in the region and developed good
working relationships with them.
Redd acts as a sort of middleman.
See REGION, p. 6A


There are more than 24,000
offenders incarcerated in the region,
and local institutions have housed
some of the most notorious criminals
in recent history.
The area has sometimes been
synonymous with those high-profile
cases, criminals and executions, but
in reality they make up a small part


Legend


ai


Major Institutions
Work' Release Centers
Major Institutions with Annex
Female Work Release Centers


Major Institutions with Work Camp
Forestry Camps
-Major lnstitution-with.Annex and Work Camp
Treatment Centers


want the best for the community."
Correctional employees provide
safety inside and outside of the prison
walls. The corrections K-9 unit is one
example, Redd said. The unit has been
dispatched more than 60 times this
year and was successful 36 times in
Bradford, Baker and Union counties.
Services of the unit can include


part of his job-public service.
Climbing the ladder
How does Redd manage his end of
the deal?
"Well, you put in a lot of hours for
one," he said, adding experience in
the system as another very important
factor. He began, as an entry-level
correctional officer 23 and a half


Female Institutions


Road Prisons and Work Camps
Annex
Private Facilities
Annex and Work Camp
Private Female Facilities
Female Forestry Camps


0

0
r-
O


+


Major Female Institution with Annex and Work Camp


Stay informed. Get involved. Be entertained. Keep in touch. Express yourself. Know your community.

Deadline noon Tuesday before publication Phone (904) 964-6305 Fax (904) 964-8628


6 89076 63869 2


Industry* Security Community* History









Page 2A TELEGRAPH-TIMES Aug. 16, 2007



FSP warden has fulfilling career in country's 'best state'


BY CLIFF SMELLEY
Telegraph Staff Writer


Being forced to look
elsewhere for work turned out
to be a blessing for Randall
Bryant, who wound up not only
working in a career he loves,
but doing so while living in a
place he loves.
Bryant, the warden at Florida
State Prison, began his career
in corrections as a corrections
officer in Louisiana-the state
he was born and raised in.
A budget crisis affected his
salary, so he was looking for
somewhere else to work so that
he could support his family.
That led him to Florida,
a place that was familiar to
Bryant and his two daughters.
They vacationed here every
year.
Bryant, who has travels
under his belt from his time of
service with the Navy, said he
believes Florida is the best state
in the U.S.
"I can't think of a better place
in the world to live than here,"
he said. "You may want to visit
other places, but I've never had
intentions to live somewhere
else.- Florida pretty much has
everything you would wanft'o
look for."
The move was just the icing
on the cake for Bryant. He loves
his work in the Department
of Corrections. It is fulfilling
and more of a lifestyle than a
career, he said.
"I don't know of anything
else I'd rather be doing than
what I'm doing right now,"
Bryant said.
Bryant was raised in a
little town called Franklinton,
which is just north of Lake
Pontchartrain in, Louisiana. He
served in the military, where he
worked with shore patrol and
the military police. That kind
of service to the people of this
country was something Bryant


wanted to continue.
"I didn't really want to
be a street officer, so it was
intriguing to me to be able
to work with inmates on a
level where you mostly had to
manipulate their behavior in
order to be able to get them to
do things you needed them to
do," Bryant said.
Hisearlyexperiences working
in corrections included a bit of a
learning experience, but Bryant
said he enjoys communicating
with people-something he
considers to be a major factor in
being a successful corrections
employee.
It was 1988 that Bryant
began his career with Florida's
Department of Corrections.
He was a correctional officer
at Central Florida Reception
Center (formerly Orange
Correctional Institution) in
Orlando.
Several promotions followed
before Bryant went. to the
Region IV office in Pembroke
Pines in 1997 to serve as a
classification administrator.
In 1999, he was promoted to
assistant warden at Tomoka
Correctional Institution .in
Daytona Beach.
Bryant was promoted to
warden at Tomoka three
years later. It was a fortunate
opportunity to be able to stay
at the same institution he was
familiar with and to be prepared
for the position by the former
warden.
"He helped me out a lot with
what to do or what not to do,"
Bryant said.
He spent a total of
approximately five years at
Tomoka before being assigned
as warden of Florida State
Prison in March 2006.
Bryant said during his first
couple of days at FSP, what
impressed him the most was
the professionalism of the staff
and the way employees went


about their daily duties.
It takes a special kind of
person to work at FSP, Bryant
said. It is one of just a few
facilities in the state in which
inmate supervision requires an
constant "hands-on" approach.
"Each (inmate), before you
take him out of the cell, you
have to put restraints on him,"
Bryant said. "Then you've got
to be with them the entire time,
supervising them.
"It takes a lot more work
with the individual inmates
than what you would have in
open-population prisons."


Randall Bryant
has been the
warden at
Florida State
Prison since
March 2006.
He previously
served as
warden at
Tomoka
Correctional
Institution.


.. .. A lot of facilities
IJ I are composed of
inmates who made
one bad decision
I' in their lives,
Bryant said. They,
as individuals, are
not defined by that
one moment that got them in
trouble, he said.
The same cannot be said
of the inmates at FSP, who
typically cannot be housed in
any other institution, he said
That's why Bryant said the one
thing he wants to accomplish.
every day on the job is to
ensure the safety of his staff.
Fortunately, he said, FSP
has adequate security measures
in place-another thing that
impressed Bryant during his
early days on the job. In fact,
FSP is one of the safest prisons
in the state because of those


COLLEY ROAD RESIDENTS
AND SOUTHSIDE STUDENTS

Please note on TUESDAY, AUGUST 21 at 7:00
PM, there will be a CITY COMMISSION
MEETING deciding that Colley Road residents
will become single family residents into Multi-
Family dwellings. It is proposed that Colley
Road a main thoroughfare between Highway
100 and State Road 230 will become a main
outlet for a proposed 72; 3 and 4 bedroom multi-
family community. There has been no Colley
Road Study, i.e. traffic impact, also no impact
study on Southside Elementary (who is now AT
CAPACITY). Citizens please show some support
to your commissioners that this is totally an
unreasonable and insane move upon our section
of the City of Starke. Paid advertisement
Paid advertisement


measures, he said.
It's a different atmosphere
at the prison today than it was
in the past. Bryant said he has
been awestruck upon hearing
tales of what the prison used
to be like. He recalled being
told of how the facility at one
time consisted of a mostly open
population.
"They really had to go in and
pretty much do battle every day
just to try to keep inmates under
the control of the officers,"
Bryant said. "They didn't have
the technology (that's available
today). They probably didn't
have 10 radios in the building.
Now, we have sufficient radios
to equip the entire shift as it
comes on."
Looking back on that history
has shown him that some
"awesome" wardens have
worked there. Bryant said those"
wardens persevered through
some tough circumstances-all
to make the facility a safer
environment for its employees
and members of the community
who live nearby.
"It was just incredible what
they had to do with so little and
that they were able to make
a difference in how we're
working today," Bryant said.


He can admire the efforts of
those wardens who came before
him, but Bryant will go back to
that staff that impressed him so
when he first began working at
FSP and which still impresses
him. He said neither he nor any
other warden can be successful
without, the efforts of a facility's
staff-a point Bryant said he
tells the FSP employees every
chance he gets.
That was a key bit of advice
Bryant received prior to
becoming a warden for the first
time-always take care of your
staff.
"Staff is the magic key to
anything happening in any
organization, but especially
ours," he said.
Still, the buck stops with
him, as Bryant put it. It is one
of the challenges of being a
warden.
"You have to be responsible
and willing to be responsible
for everything that happens
at the facility," Bryant said.
"The procedures, and rules
regulations dictate a lot of the
information you need to know.
It's those things in the gray
areas you really have to be
See FSP, next page


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1, 1 SW,&V *S LAKE BUTLER, FL.


SThe Lake Butler City Commission
S will sponsor a reception for
community and area residents
to honor
City Manager

Richard 0. TIHUlis


upon his retirement.

Residents and officials are
encouraged to wish Mr. Tillis
congratulations and thanks.
They may do so between the
hours of

9 a.m.-11:30 am.

on Thursday

Aug. 30, 2007

at the Townsend Building,
401 W. Main St., Lake Butler, Fl.


Subscription Rate
$30.00 per year:
$16.00 six months
Outside Trade Are
$30,00 per year:'
$16.00 six months



itrabforb Eountp telelitaplj
USPS 062-700
Published each Thursday and entered as Periodical Postage
Paid at Starke, Florida under Act of March 3, 1879.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to:
Bradford County Telegraph
131 West Call Street Starke, Florida 32091
Web address: BCTelegraph.com
Phone: 964-6305 P.O. Drawer A Starke, FL 32091
inTrade Area John M. Miller, Publisher
in TrdraEditor: Mark Crawford
Sports Editor: Cliff Smelley
Advertising: Kevin Miller
S Don Sams
Darlene Douglass
.a: Typesetting Hannah Ford


Advertising and
Newspaper Prod.
Classified Adv.
Bookkeepolng:


Earl W. Ray
Melisa Noble
Kathi Bennett


Eanion ECounty Timeo


Subscription Rate i,
$30.00 per year:
$16.00 six months
Outside Trade Area
$30,00 per year:
1 00in si monnlh


USPS 648-200
Published each Thursday and entered as Periodical Postage
Paid at Lake Butler, Florida under Act of March 3, 1879.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to:
UNION COUNTY TIMES
125 E. Main Street Lake Butler, FL 32054
Web address: UCTimesonline.com
(386) 496-2261
John M. Miller, Publisher
n Trade Area Editor: Lindsey Kirkland
Sports Editor: Cliff Smelley
Advertising: Kevin Miller
Don Sams
Darlene Douglass
Typesetting: Hannah Ford


Advertising and
Newspaper Prod.
Classified Adv.
Bookkeeping:


Earl W. Ray
Mellsa Noble
Kathi Bennett


Business & Service Directory -


Automotive Building Supply Construction Handyman Services
S esoAuloft 1 J0 REJ SERVICES" Mike's
1 AirConditioning J ackson 16418 SW66th Lane Hae s
lenetarke,F2Handyman Services
and Quick Lube BUILDING SUPPLY Subgrading F
Limerock Finishing Carpentry -
QUALITY PARTS AND "Where Quality & Service CuimerokFinishin, Painting -
SAME DAY SERVICE are a Family Tradition" SitePrep Plumbing
Computer Diagnostics Land Clearing Electrical
Electrical Tires US 301 S. STARKE Ponds Electrcal
Brakes* Engine 964-6078 Dozer \% ork Mobile Home Repair
Timing Bells & More : 9646078 Road u lg And Much Morel J
FREE ESTIMATES! 145 SW 6TH AVE Home (352) 473-7225
Z S ....L..LAKE BUTLER ..Cell (352) 745-0614
7077 SR 21* Keston e gtsFL 496-3079 R.E..onesOwner MichaelHoe
2 miles Northsof SRe100 4963079 RE. Jones, OxEnet F Michael Horne
352-473-6561 lS Office: (904) 966-0065 Serving the Lake Region
Cell: (904) 364-8733 Non Permit Work

Home Repair Landscaping Services Lawn/Tractor Service Mobile Home Services
BRADFORD HOME Es Landscaping i ROGERS
REPAIRS & PAINTING Gtor a 4,,
REPAIRS & PAINTING MOBILE HOME SERVICES
904-966-2024 .
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Also... We are a fully insured, locally owned Installation & Remodeling
Also .... Professional Lawn and Landscape
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Remodels Weekly Mowing & Trimming
Serving NE Florida Gene Crawford Spring & Fall Clean-ups 10567 US 301
Since 1990 352-494-0475 Landscape Installation Hampton, FL 32044
NFC Bu1ildrs 352-494-0475 Fertilization & Weed Control Travis Rogers 352-260-8005
Licensed& Insure/d Hampton Lake, FL Storm Clean-up Joni Rogers 352-468-2959

Painting 8 More Real Estate Title Services Tree Services
qnside-n- Out qnc lll ERA Advantage
PAINTING E RA Realty l
Interior -E exterior
Pressure Washing If we can't sell your home
Mobile Homes- HouseE.
WALLPAPER ERA WILL BUY IT! TREE
,nmo an l h- o r, Chrir tine Stanlef ..... .l... '" it S E R iC E S
LAWN MAINTENANCE ll ; Tree Trimming
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WINDOW TREATMENT.,, and Remoual
I s tall atior,.
ODD JOBS 925 W. Main St.LynSlia
p .101, rv.,,-I.,I Lake Butler, FL 32054 (2Senior Discount
20-yrs. experience Office: (386) 496-1890
Chris Walker ,...; ,-..6 352-812-2514
(904) 782-3335 352-3516592
Cell: (904) 710-1262 ,"


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tmu. 1o, "iso l sIQL... rn-iMrr lllMt age 5A



Union CI warden has more than 40 years experience


BY LINDSEY KIRKLAND
Times Editor

Union Correctional
Institution has had a new
warden for almost a year and
a half. However, he is not new
to the area.
Warden Milton Hicks comes
to UCI with more than 40 years
experience that he gained as he
climbed the career ladder in the
Department of Corrections.
"I came up through the ranks
of security," Hicks said of
working at Florida State Prison,
Glades Correctional Institution
and others.
He graduated from Bradford
High School and attended Lake
City Community College.
Starting at age 18, he spent
two years in the Army during
the draft.
Afterward he spent a few
years working with a power
company doing surveying work.
Then, he went to work with
the Department of Corrections
because he was looking for
a job that would keep him in
'Florida.
He went on to graduate from
Florida State University with a


bachelor's degree in criminal
justice. .
Having worked in security
and three years in classification,
Hicks said his job now is to
oversee operations at UCI.
"Fortunately, I've got a good
staff," he said. "I put confidence
in them."
Hicks said it is also his job to
build up his staff and set a good
leadership example.
"I believe most people want'
to do what is right," he said.
Being a good leader, he said,
is knowing when and how to
step back and give staff the
opportunity to do that.
"Most people want to do a
hard day's work," he said.
Updating staff on
departmental changes is on his
duty list, too.
Because UCI and FSP are
close in location, Hicks said
he and his staff work with that
institution on some projects.
"You can't help but work
together on some stuff," he
said. "We just assist when we
can."
This co,"periiionis something
Hicks .arid Region II Director
Mark Redd expects out of his


Milton Hicks,
warden
at Union
Correctional
Institution, is
no stranger to
the area.


wardens.

Business as
usual
Hicks has the
duty of paperwork,
monitoring ,
the transfer of
inmates, visiting
staff, inspecting
the institution
and conducting
routine meetings
on institutional and
regional issues. ,
The warden
meets with his "key
operational staff"
every morning for nearly an
hour or more.
"I want to be sure staff
conduct themselves in a
professional manner," he said.
Hicks said he follows the
regional director's orders.


"I make suggestions where I
see a need," he said.
Hicks said he is open to
inmate and staff complaints'
and suggestions.
UCI, like other prisons, have
informal and formal grievance
policies.


He said he visits the
compound frequently, meeting
with staff and inmates.
"It's a good management
tool," he said. "Most of the
inmates know who I am."
To keep up his skills, Hicks
said he undergoes a minimum
of 40 hours of training annually,
ranging from emergency
preparedness, changes in the
laws, firearms and leadership to
mock hurricane exercises and
more.

In charge of
change
By way of promotions, Hicks
became warden at the institution
in Charlotte, a position he held
for one year.
At UCI, he has the same title,
but oversees inmates under
close management, those who
are considered to be mental
health cases, open populations
and death row.
A' total of 2,100 inmates
(2,200 beds are available) and
860 total staff (650 are security)
are under his direction.
UCI has the largest number
of inmate population on its


compound and is technically
the oldest prison. It was
originally part of FSP before
the institution was split into
two institutions.
In the early 1990s, Hicks said
a new building was constructed
at UCI to house death row
inmates. Only six beds remain
empty on the 336-bed death
row (as of June).
FSP has approximately 40
on death row, but the numbers i
fluctuate as inmates are taken
to outside courts and jails to
appeal their cases.
Hicks has seen the department

change throughout the years,
as have those employees who
have been there for some time.
"I think the staff have
become more professional,"
Hicks said.
"The prison has become
more open to the public and the
news media." '
With changes all throughout
the department, Hicks said he
thinks there is good leadership.
"They give us good direction
and let us manage our
institutions," he said.


FSP
Continued from p. 2A

careful with and make the right
decision on."
For the most part, though, the
job requires one to be a people
person. That does not seem
to be a challenge for Bryant.
He likes the interaction with
others.
Bryant wants to continue
that interaction when he retires.
The scenery will be different,
however. He wants to volunteer
with the National Park Service.
It will offer him the opportunity
to experience "some of the most
beautiful areas anybody would
ever want to see," while also
allowing him to continue that
role of service to the people of
this country.
"It's kind of going to be the
best of both worlds for me-
being in the environment of.
nature that's just awesome and
beautiful, and also being able
to have that contact with the
people of the United States,"
Bryant said.


UC Class of
2008 to hold
breakfast,
parade
Union County High
School's Class of 2008 will
hold a breakfast and parade at
Lakeside Park Pavilion in Lake
Butler on Thursday, Aug. 23.
Breakfast will begin at 6:45
a.m., followed by a picture at 7
a.m. and will end with a parade
at 7:20 a.m.
Prizes will be given for the
cars that are best decorated in a
"superheroes" theme.


Adult school
classes begin
Aug. 20
The Union County Adult.
School will begin its next cycle
of classes on Monday, Aug.
20.
Free classes will be held


every Monday and Thursday
at 6 p.m.
"The administration, faculty
and staff of Union Count\
Adult School stand ready to
assist you in achieving your
academic goals," said Barry
Sams, director of the school.
The adult school has been
working one-on-one with
participants since 1968 to help
them go back and complete
their high school diploma.
Once enrolled, students
are measured to determine a
starting point, and then lesson.
plans are individualized. This.
test, the Test of Adult Basic.,
Education, is free of charge.
To take the GED, there
are separate requirements for
students older and younger than
18,. To find out these guidelines
and to put yourself back on the
right path for learning, contact
Union County Adult School,
208 S.E. Sixth St., Lake Butler,
by phone at (386) 496-1300
or e-mail SamsB@union.kl2.
fl.us.

UC Class of
1951 to hold
reunion
Union County High School's
Class of 1951 will be celebrating
a class reunion on Saturday,
Oct. 20.
For information, contact
Seabie Rucker at (386) 496-
2800.

SHINE
offering
Medicare
counseling
. Serving Health Insurance
Needs of Elders, known
as SHINE, will offer health
insurance advice on Tuesday,
Aug. 21, from 2-4 p.m. at
the Union County Health
Department, 495 E...Main St. in
Lake Butler.
Volunteer Bob Hakes v ill
be on hand to-provide [he
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Union Back-
to-School
Bash on Aug.
25
The days of summer vacation
are dwindling as parents and
school children are making
preparations to go back to
school.
Celebrate this year with the
Back-to-School Bash set for
Saturday, Aug. 25, from 4-7
p.m. at Sprinkle Field (the field
at the intersection of C.R. 231
and S.R. 121).
This is a free event' for all
students where free school
supplies (K-12), physical and
hair cuts are given to every
student present. A free backpack
will be given to the first 200
elementary school students.

Hot dogs, drinks, games,
bounce houses, a car show and
a car audio competition will
also be available, and it's all
free.
Door prizes will be given
away, including a new
computer and several bicycles).
Marshmallow wars will also
be taking place with more than
200 marshmallow guns to be
given away.
At some point, a helicopter is
scheduled to land for the kids
to see, and there will be visits


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from the fire department and
emergency services.
This year the event will have
both a DJ at one section of the
field and live music and dramas
in another.
Anchor Christ Central
Ministries has partnered with
other churches and businesses
in order to help equip Union
County students and come
together as a community
making a difference.


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Page 4A TELEGRAPH-TIMES Aug. 16, 2007



History of local prisons dates back to the early 1900s


July of 1913 marked the
opening of the Florida State
Prison Farm in Raiford, which
was later to become Florida
State Prison, the first of five
prison facilities that now
operate in this area.
Today, state land dedicated
to use by the Department of
Corrections in the Raiford area
amounts to more than 8,000
acres and the facility that was
eventually named Florida
State Prison was located where
Union Correctional Institution
stands today.
When the farm opened its
doors, prisoners were still
being leased from the state to
work for various industries.
According to the Department
of Corrections Web site and
a 2001 article in the Panama
City News Herald by Marlene
Womack, this practice began
in 1877. The state could not
fund more prisons or jails, so
it turned supervision of the
prisoners over to the operators
of various industries in the.
state.
The owners got cheap labor-
they paid between $26 per year
per prisoner in the beginning


- -
-i -


r .. .
'- i -' I
. ... ... . .- '- . . . .
S. ., ... '* ,- B


BEFORE


J.S. Blitch was the
superintendent in the
early days of the Florida
State Prison Farm.

days of the practice to $150 per
year in later days-and all they
had to do was maintain custody
of the prisoner and provide him
with food, clothing, housing
and medical care. It seemed like
a good solution to the public.
Prisoners were punished with
hard work and most people
at that time wanted to know
prisoners were being punished
for their crimes.
Unfortunately, since the
system required that small
groups of prisoners were
being housed in areas all over


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Leonard Chapman
became superintendent
at Florida State Prison
in 1932 and carried out a
variety of prison reforms
during his 25-year tenure.
the state, it was difficult for
the state to provide adequate
oversight. Industry owners
hired foremen who could get
the most work out of the men,
and some turned a blind eye to
how they did it.
In some of these work camps,
prisoners were -treated brutally
and even died as the result
of that treatment. Some work
camps also watched the bottom
line closely and provided
inadequate food and little. or


I I,

'-' y

p


Nor~


A -11


This photo was taken of the leased prisoner crew at a turpentine operation in the
Nebo area of Union County. By all accounts, this was one of the camps where
prisoners were treated humanely. On top of the building, mugging for the camera,
are E.L. Roberts and W.W. Hamilton.


no medical care in situations
where injury and illness were
common.
In 1900, Florida had a total
of 778 prisoners who lived in
13' work camps. Seven were
phosphate mines and six
manufactured naval stores like
turpentine. The leasing system
expanded from that point for
more.. than-1-0-year-s-as-the
practice was continued.
Although the convict leasing
system was not completely
abolished until 1923, some
of the leased prisoners were
returned to state supervision
beginning in 1914 and some
of these were housed at the
state prison farm near Raiford.
The state originally bought an
18,000-acre tract of land for
$5 per acre. When it opened its
doors, it housed prisoners w\ho
were not healthy enough to be
leased.
In 1915, the state established
the State Road Prison Force
and some 100 able-bodied
.prisoners were then housed at,,
the Raiford site, along \itih the
men who were unable to work
and female prisoners, who were
not leased. As its name implies,
the State Road Prison Force
provided prisoners to work
on the roads. This road force
grew, and as it expanded, more
and more prisoners were being
housed at the Raiford facility.
The facility was called a
farm because it operated as
a farm. In fact, the site near
Raiford was chosen, in part,
because'the land was suitable
for farming. Prisoners raised
crops, cattle, pigs, chickens,
etc. Prisoners also used the
Bradford County clay (Union
County did not exist until
1921) to make bricks to replace
the first temporary wooden
structures built to house them.
Prisoners also made bricks for
the construction of other state
buildings.
The food and farm products
were used to feed the prisoners
themselves. The excess was
sold and the funds returned
to state coffers, either to fund
other prison costs or the costs
of other state departments.
An article in the Bradford
County Telegraph on Aug.


31, 1928, details a report
from Raiford prison Tarm
Superintendent J.S. Blitch.
There were 1,299 prisoners in
custody at that time and the
cost to the state to maintain
them averaged less than 24
cents per day "to feed .and
keep the prisoners in tobacco."
The prison farm showed a
-profit of $148,901 that year.
Approximately $57,000 was
returned to the state treasury.
The report stated that 483
of those prisoners were sent
to work in the road camps, 21
escaped and 40 died. Five of
those deaths were ordered by
the state in the electric chair.
Six years earlier, in 1922,
prisoners skilled in carpentry
were given the task of building
Florida's first electric chair,
which was to be used to execute
prisoners sentenced to death.
Before this time, prisoners
with death sentences were
executed in the yards of the
various county courthouses.
In Bradford County, these
executions, took place behind
the old county jail, which stood
next to the old courthouse on
the corner of U.S. 301 and Call
Street. The old jail has now
been torn down. The gallows
were generally erected in the
area of what is now the parking
lot of Santa Fe Community
College Andrews Center.
The first prisoner executed
in the electric chair was Frank
Johnson, who died on Oct. 7,
1924.
By 1927, the industries
operated at the prison farm
had gone beyond farming.
A. shirt factory 'and an auto
tag plant were in operation,
staffed by prisoners. Blitch was
commended by the Legislature
for decreasing prison costs even
though the number of prisoners
was increasing. Guards were
paid about $50 per month. In
1928, guards worked '12-hour
days and earned $720 per year.
Today, the starting salary is
approximately $26,000 per
year.
In 1928, the facility called
"The Rock" was constructed by
inmate labor. It covered three
acres and cost approximately
$300,000 to build. Now


demolished, The Rock had a
reputation for being escape-
proof.
In December of 1932, the
prison population was 3,210
and included both male and
female inmates. Females were
housed separately, but at the
same facility, until 1956 when
the first women's prison was
constructed at Lowell.
In 1932, Blitch died following
an illness and Leonard
Chapman was appointed
superintendent in Raiford. His
25-year career is marked by
prison reform. Solid wooden
fences around the facility were
replaced with chain-link so
prisoners could see the outside
world. Prisoners were provided
educational opportunities and
better health care. Job training
in carpentry, mill work and
plumbing increased the hope
of prisoners getting better jobs
upon their release. Guards were
issued uniforms for the first
time during his tenure and the
horizontally striped uniforms
pre% iously worn ,by ,,inmates
were discontinued.
Both the number of prisons
in the state and number
of facilities at Florida State
Prison in Raiford increased
over the years. In 1961, the
Florida State Prison East Unit
was constructed on land just
across New River. At that time,
prison population was 7,536
statewide.
In 1972, the Florida State
Prison East Unit became
Florida State Prison and what
had begun life as the State
Prison Farm became Union
Correctional Institution.
FSP has a capacity of 1,460
inmates and has 592 staff
members. It houses inmates
with a range of security levels
including maximum, close
custody, medium custody and
minimum custody. The 0 Unit,
a minimum security work
release facility at FSP, has a
capacity of 426 inmates and
has 78 staff members.
UCI has a capacity of 1,977
inmates with a range of custody
levels that includes maximum,
clpse custody, medium custody
See HISTORY, next page


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One of the improvements made under Chapman's guidance was that the solid
wooden walls around Florida State Prison were replaced with'chain link fence.





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Striped uniforms ensured that an escaped prisoner would stand out In a crowd, at
least until he changed his clothes. Inmates now wear light blue uniforms, with or
without a white stripe down the leg.


HISTORY
Continued from p. 4A
*rind minimum custody. UCI
ias approximately 800 staff
t'mbers.
Reception and Medical
.'enter in Lake Butler was
constructed in 1968 to process
":c,vly committed inmates.
inmates go to RMC to be
"lassified and processed before
cing sent on to other facilities.
'MC also provides primary
medical care for inmates from
surrounding institutions.
RMC consists of -the West
';nit and the Hospital Unit. The
West Unit has a capacity of
,148 inmates and utilizes 201
stafff members. The Hospital
.nit has 153 beds and utilizes
201) staff members.
In the early 1970s inmates


Early prison industries included making license
plates and clothing. License plates are still made
at Union Correctional Institution and most prison
facilities have some type manufacturing or Industry
connected to them.


Prisoners who were also carpenters built the first
electric chair in 1922 at Florida State Prison. Death
sentences were carried out by public hanging prior


to that tir e.
from RMC in Lake Butler. In
1987, BTU was merged with
FSP's New RiverAnnex to form
a separate facility called New
River Correctional Institution.
NRCI has a capacity of 968
inmates in the East Unit and
802 inmates in the West Upit.
It utilizes 294 staff members
in the East Unit and 140 staff
members in the West Unit.


Vernon Reddish of
Starke models one of
the first uniforms issued
to guards (they were
not called correctional
officers until later years)
at Florida State Prison.
This photo was taken in
the late 50s.


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The opportunity to further their education was given to prisoners during the
prison reform era.


were being housed in tents.
The courts stepped in and
dictated that inmates could
not be housed under those
conditions and construction of
new facilities increased.
Lawtey Correctional
Institution opened in 1973.
Bradford County had turned
over ownership of the land
and buildings to the state.
The site had been Anderson
Junior High School, the
black middle grades school
in Bradford County prior to
desegregation. The correctional
facility at Lawtey opened as a
community vocational center
for work release inmates. In
1977, the facility became
Lawltey Correctional Institution
and now houses inmates with
custody ranges including
medium, minimum and work
release. Today it has a capacity
of 788 inmates and utilizes 233
staff members.
LWCI is one of three
institutions in the state
designated as a Faith and
Character Based Institution.
These institutions provide a
wide range of activities aimed at
promoting personal growth and
character development among
inmates. These activities are
only successful if the inmates
themselves are dedicated to
their success, so an inmate's
willingness to participate is
a big determining factor as
to whether or not he or she
gains entry into one of these
programs. UCI is one of seven
other institutions in the state
that have a Faith and Character


Based Dorm within the facility.
UCI has one Faith-Based Dorm
with a capacity of 96 inmates.
In October of 1982, the Butler


Transient Unit opened its doors
in a facility across S.R. 16 from
Florida State Prison. It was
designed to hold the overflow


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Page 6A TELEGRAPH-TIMES Aug. 16, 2007


REGION
Continued from p. 1A


As director of one of the
four Florida Department of
Corrections regions in the state,
he facilitates the relationship
between Tallahassee and
the institutions in Region II,
which covers Bradford, Union,
Clay, Alachua, Gilchrist, St.
Johns, Flagler Duval, Nassau,
Baker, Columbia, Hamilton,
Suwannee, Lafayette, Dixie,
Madison and Taylor Counties.
In the region, there are 14
major correctional institutions,
six major institution annexes,
eight forestry/work camps,
four work-release centers, two
contract work centers and a
privatized facility.'
"Actually, the biggest role I
play is support," Redd said. He
helps make sure the institutions
have what they need to do their
work, whether the requests
are budgetary, maintenance
related or security driven. In
an emergency, his office also'
acts as central command for the
prisons in this region.


"I think it's important that I
basically understand them when
they come to me with problems
or are perplexed about certain
things. I understand their point
of view," he said.
His role requires a lot of time
and energy, he said, and it's the
support of those he works with
that makes it possible.
"I'm very fortunate that we
have the professionals that
we do working with us. The
wardens are great. They are
very experienced people who
do a great job and a great
service for the citizens of this
state," said Redd.
He's equally enthusiastic
about his .relationship with
Tallahassee.
"The leadership we have in
place is just excellentt" he said.
"It's been demonstrated over"
and over, and it's an honor that
they would even consider me
for this job."
The leadership includes, of
course, Florida Department
of Corrections Secretary
James McDonough, Assistant
Secretary of Institutions George
Sapp and Deputy Assistant
Secretary of Operations David
Pridgen.
"I've learned a lot from
them," he said.

Jobs that pay
Redd said one of the bonuses
of his position is the people he
works with, including public
officials and members of local
law enforcement.
That, of course, also
includes the 6,859 Department
of Corrections employees
throughout the region.
A large share of those
employees- 1,352-work at


institutions also benefits local
communities and saves taxpayer
dollars. Redd said 1.1 million
hours of inmate labor provided
throughout the region equals
a savings of $16.5 million to
local governments.

Employees who
care
Community service isn't
left up to the inmates alone.
Correctional employees
themselves donate time and
raise money for local causes.
Redd said New River, for
example, recently requested that


Many Inmates are part of the Department's GED
program. In FY 2005-06, 1,322 inmates earned their
GEDs.


the institutions in Bradford
County. Another 1,892 work in
Union County.
Redd said the prison system
is the largest employer in the
area with a total payroll of
$166.5 million, proof of the
system's importance to the
local economy as a source of
jobs, and well-paying jobs at
that.
Redd noted the average
salaries for a variety of positions,
some of which people may not
associate with corrections.
-Beginning correctional
officers average around $28,000
a year.
-Certified correctional
officers start out around
$31,000 a year.
-A health services aide,
which is t'he entry position
for those in the medical field,
starts out at around $19,000,
but licensed practical nurses
start at $27,500 and. can move
up to around $32,000 a year.
-A registered nurse
working for the Department of
Corrections averages $32,000-
$41,000, depending on years of
experience.
-A correctional services
consultant, experienced
professionals who work in
many different departments,
start out around $62,000.
-Assistant wardens begin
around $74,000, while wardens
start out ground $88,000.
Community corrections
provides another $12.3, million.
'A year in salaries, and the payroll
for those who have retired from
the system adds up to around
$3 million annually.

Supporting the
economy
"We're the oldest part of
the prison system. It was born
here, and it's been here for
the longest time," Redd said.
Because of that, generation
after generation of families have


made corrections their career.
Even Redd has a daughter who
works for the Department of
Corrections.
"If you live in this area, it's
just a very good place to work,"
he said. "I like to provide the
opportunity for people who do
want to stay in this area to do
so with a job that has the type
of pay and benefits that would
attract them to stay."
There aren't a lot of other


*a portion of the money saved
in the employee trust fund be
used to purchase supplies for
children returning to school.
Employees contribute to that
trust fund through things like
canteen sales.
Redd said members of the


hundreds of Thanksgiving food
baskets, and even more toys
go to children in need come
Christmastime. A hundred or
more coats were also purchased
last winter to keep kids warm.
"It surprised me the amount
of children who actually went
to school on cold mornings
without a jacket," said Redd.
And correctional employees,
according to him, aren't just
looking out for the best interests
of their communities. They're
also concerned with those on
the other side of the bars.
"People that work at these
prisons, they care a lot. A lot
of people don't know this, but
the biggest advocacy group for
inmates is actually Department
of Corrections employees,"
Redd said, explaining that
employees are concerned
with prison conditions and
the availability of funding
to support inmate health and
welfare.
"You don't hear that, and it's
not that popular," Redd said,
adding that matters of education
and rehabilitation are more and
more believed to be essential
components of the correctional
system.
"After all, the goal is to reduce
the number of inmates and


~ oi.


An inmate must be a certain custody level to work on outside work squads,
meaning they work outside the perimeter fence of the institution.


industries in the area doing that
to the same extent corrections
is.
"The amount of 'money
that stays in this area is
tremendous," Redd said. The
department's many employees
own property, pay taxes, and
support local schools and
businesses, and while the .state
has strict purchasing guidelines
for accountability, there is an
effort made by the institutions
in this area to spend money
with local businesses, including
the purchase of parts, tools and
equipment.
Inmate labor provided by the


Florida Council on Crime
and Delinquency reach out to
the community by providing


especially the recidivism rate.
Education and rehabilitative
efforts arc very successful in


doing that, and by doing that
you greatly reduce the amount
of money it costs taxpayers,"
Redd said.
One of those efforts. is
the faith-based program that
Lawtey Correctional Institution
was the first in the nation to
introduce.
"The staff there had done just
a tremendous job of making
it work, and when you walk
around the compound and talk
to the inmates, the impact it's
having is very evident," Redd
said.
While it's too soon to
determine the success of such
programs, he said they are
being studied.

Working in
corrections
While there are plans to
expand facilities in Region
II, including 144 beds being
added in Gainesville and 344
beds being added in Columbia
County, nothing is on the
drawing board for Bradford
or Union counties at this
time. It wasn't that long ago,
however, that a 440-bed work
camp facility was added at the
Reception and Medical Center.
There are always job
opportunities with the
Department of Corrections, and
finding out what's available is
easier than ever by going online
to www.fldocjobs.com.
Thereyoucanfind information
on career paths like security,
probation, health care, and
construction and maintenance;
benefits such as life and health
insurance, retirement and
tuition-free college courses;
and opportunities to intern or
volunteer with the department.
You can also call toll-free
(866) JOB-FDOC (562-3362).


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Aug. 16, 2007 TELEGRAPH-TIMES Page 7A


ILLEGALS


IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 8TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR BRADFORD
COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No:04-2007-DR-0037.
To: Jackie Ann Doll Jones
Notice by Publication
You are hereby notified that a
Notice of Action for Dissolution of
Marriage has been filed against
you and you are required to serve
a copy of your written defenses,
if any to it on David Wyatt Jones
whose address is U.C.1, 7819 NW
228'St, Raiford, Florida 32026-4440
and file the original with the Clerk of
the Court, Bradford County, Temple
Avenue, Starke Florida otherwise a
default will be entered against you.
8/2 4tchg 8/23


the Northwesterly boundary of the
right of way of County Road 18
(formerly State Road 18) for the
Point of Beginning. From the Point
of Beginning thus described, run
South43021'00" West, along said
Northwesterly boundary, 208.86
feet; thence North 46022'27" West
209.08 feet to a found iron pipe;
then North 43035'59" East, 7.66 feet
to an iron rod set on the Northerly
boundary of said Southwest 1/4 of
the Southeast 1/4; thence North
89035'21" East along said Northerly
boundary, 289.44 feet to the Point
of Beginning.
NAME IN WHICH PROPERTY IS
ASSESSED: Thomas Reidlinger.
Said property being in the County
of Bradford, State of Florida. Unless
such certificate shall be redeemed
according to the law, the 'property
described in such certificate will
be sold to the highest bidder at
the courthouse door at 11:00 a.m.,
Thursday, the 30th day of August,
2007.
Dated this 25th day of July, 2007.
Ray Norman


TAX DEED #07-1 Clerk of the Circuit Court
NOTICE OF APPLICATION Bradford County, Florida
FOR TAX DEED By: Carol Williams
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Deputy Clerk
'Paul V. or Nancy Lock, the holders) Persons with disabilities requesting
of the following certificate has filed reasonable accommodations to
said certificate for a tax deed to participate in this proceeding should
be issued thereon. The certificate contact (904) 964-6280.
number and year of issuance, the 8/2 4tchg 8/23
description of the property, and the
names in which it was assessed are
as follows: CALL FOR BIDS
CERTIFICATE NUMBER: #145 Community State Bank is accepting
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2002 sealed bids on a 2004 Ford F150
DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: Supercrew Truck. This vehicle has
Description Lot 9: slight body damage and mechanical
Aparcelof land lying intheSW1/4of condition is unknown. The bank will
the NE1/4 of Section 10, Township be accepting bids from August 9,
7 South, Range 21 Bradford County, 2007 until August 24, 2007 at 12:00
'Florida; said parcel being more p.m. Anyone interested in bidding
particularly described as follows: on this vehicle, please bring sealed
Commence at the Northwest corner bid and give to Shands Howard or
of said SW1/4 of NE1/4 and run Fate Harper. (CSB has all rights to
South 00 degrees, 00 minutes refuse any or all bids).
and 12 seconds East, along the 8/9 2tchg 8/16
Westerly boundary thereof, 920.42
feet thence North 89 degrees, 52 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
minutes and 07 seconds East, FOR BRADFORD COUNTY,
parallel with the Northerly boundary FLORIDA
of said SW1/4 of NE1/4, a distance PROBATE DIVISION
of 165.64 feet to the Point of File No.: 07-000027-CP
Beginning. From Point of Beginning Division:
thus described continue North 89 IN RE: ESTATE OF COLTON
degrees, 52 minutes and 07 seconds SHANE BARNHART,
East, parallel with said Northerly Deceased.
boundary, 165.65 feet; thence NOTICE TO CREDITORS
South 00 degrees, 00 minutes and The administration of the estate
12 seconds East, parallel with said of COLTON SHANE BARNHART,
Westerly boundary, 406.21 feet to deceased, whose date of death
the Southerly boundary, of said was November 1, 2006, is pending
SW1/4 of NE1/4; thence South in the Circuit Court for Bradford
89 degrees, 59 minutes and 36 County, Florida, Probate Division;
seconds West along said Southerly File Number 07-000027-CP, the
Boundary8.63feettoanintersection address of which is 945 North
with the Northeasterly boundary of Temple Avenue, Starke, Florida,
the right of way of the G.S.&F. 32091. The names and addresses
Railroad; thence North 47 degrees, of the personal representative
12 minutes and 45 seconds and the personal representative's
West, along said Northeasterly attorney are set forth below.
boundary, 80.50 feet; thence North All creditors of the decedent and
15 degrees, 35 minutes and 18 other persons, who have claims or
seconds West, 364.55 feet to the demands against decedent's estate,
Point of Beginning., including unmatured, contingent or
Reserving therefrom afi easement. unliquidated claims, and who have
for ingress, egress and utilities over been served a copy of this notice,
the Easterly 15.0 feet and over the must file their claims with this court
Northerly 30.0 feet thereof. WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE
Above described parcel being (3) MONTHS AFTER-THE DATE
conveyed with a right of ingress, OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION
egress and utilities over the OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY
follow\ng-described-parcels:-- ---- (30) -DAYS AFTER-THE DATE OF
The 'Northerly 30.0 feet of the SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS
Westerly 424.81 feet of the SE1/4. NOTICE ON THEM.
of the NE1/4 and the Northerly 30.0 All other creditors of the decedent
feet of the Easterly 993.90 feet and and other persons who have claims
the Easterly 30.0 feet of the West or demands against the decedent's
346.29 feet of the SW1/4 of NE1/4 estate, including unmatured,
of said Section 10. contingent or unliquidated claims,
Also, commence at a concrete must file their claims with this court
monument located at the Northwest WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS
corner of the NE1/4 of the NE1/4 AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
of said Section 10 and run South PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
0 degrees, 07 minutes and 19 ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL
seconds East, along the Westerly BE FOREVER BARRED.
boundary thereof, 157.72 feet to the NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME
"Southerly boundary of the right of PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE,
way of County Road 225 (formerly ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
State Road S-225), thence South YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE
77 degrees, 14 minutes and 19 DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS
seconds East, along said Southerly BARRED.
boundary, 405.77 feet to the THE DATE OF THE FIRST
centerline of an existing road for PUBLICATION OF'THIS NOTICE
Point of Beginning (said road being IS: August 9, 2007.
60 feet in width and lying 30.0 Personal Representative:
feet on each side of a centerline ARMANDO R. PAYAS
described as follows.) From Point 1018 East Robinson Street
of Beginning thus described run Orlando, Florida, 32801
South 00 degrees, 07 minutes and Attorney for Personal
19 seconds East, parallel-with the Representative:
Westerly boundary of said NE1/4 DAVID W. VELIZ
of NE1/4, a distance of 378.18 Florida Bar No. 846368
feet, thence South 15 degrees, 15 David W. Veliz, P.A.
minutes and 41 seconds West, 425 West Colonial Drive
374.65 feet; thence South 20 Suite 104
degrees, 44 minutes and 49 seconds Orlando, Florida, 32804
East, 333.96 feet to the end of said Telephone: (407) 849-7072
- 60 foot road and the beginning of a 8/9 2tchg 8/16
road 20 feet in width and lying 10
feet on each side of said centerline; NOTICE OF SALE
thence continue 20 degrees, 44 SPRATLIN TOWING AND
minutes and 49 seconds East, along RECOVERY, LLC. gives Notice of
said centerline, 30.88 feet; thence Foreclosure of Lien and intent to
South 21 degrees, 12 minutes and sell these vehicles on August 29,
57 seconds East, 32.16 feet to the 2007 at 10:00 a.m. at 18536 US
end of said centerline. Highway 301 N. Starke, FL 32091-
NAME IN WHICH PROPERTY IS 0314, pursuit to subsection 713.78
ASSESSED: Patricia J. Ritter. of the Florida Statutes. SPRATLIN
Said property being in the County TOWING AND RECOVERY, LLC.
of Bradford, State of Florida. Unless reserves the right to accept or reject
such certificate shall be redeemed any and/or all bids.
according to the law, the property 1GNCT18R3H8130551 1987
described in such certificate will CHEVROLET
be sold to the highest bidder at 1N6HD16Y6RC325190 1994
the courthouse door at 11:00 a.m., NISSAN
Thursday, the 30th day of August, 2B4FK5532KR291952 1989
2007. DODGE
Dated this 25th day of July, 2007. 8/16 1tchg
Ray Norman
Clerk of the Circuit Court LEGAL NOTICE
Bradford County, Florida ,Elder Options, formerly known as
By: Carol Williams Mid Florida Area Agency on Aging
Deputy Clerk Inc., a not-for-profit organization,
Persons with disabilities requesting is accepting applications through
reasonable accommodations to November 1, 2007
participate in this proceeding should to fill vacancies on its Board of
contact (904) 964-6280. Directors. Applicants must be
.-8/2 4tchg 8/23 a resident of Bradford or Dixie


8, 2007, case no: 07-CA-99
of the Circuit Court Bradford
County, Florida, in which Stage
Coach Enterprises, Inc. is the
plaintiff and Robert J. Batten, and
unknown Heirs, Children, Spouse
or Creditors of Robert J. Batten
are the defendants, The clerk of
this Court will sell at public sale the
following described real property:
A parcel of land lying and being in
the Northeast 1/4 of the Southwest
1/4 of Section 24, Township 6 South,
Range 21 East, and being more
particularly described as follows:
Commence at an iron stake located
at a point where the Westerly
boundary line of said Northeast
1/4 of the Southwest 1/4 intersects *
the Northerly right of way line of
State Road 100 and run South 75
degrees 01 minutes 35 seconds
East, a distance of 41.67 feet
to an iron pipe and the Point of
Beginning. From the Point of
Beginning, thus described continue
South 75 degrees 01 minutes 35
seconds East, a distance of 212.57
feet to a steel rod, run thence
North 10 degrees 58 minutes 25
seconds East, a distance of 189
feet run, thence North 75 degrees
48 minutes 10 seconds West, a
distance of 207.51 feet run thence
South 12 degrees 28 minutes 25
seconds West, a distance of 185.9
feet to The Point of Beginning.
The sale will be held on September
6, 2007 at 11:00 a.m. to the highest
and best bidder for cash, at the
front steps to the Bradford County
Courthouse,945 N. Temple Ave.,
Starke, Florida, in accordance
with Section 45.031 of the Florida.
Statutes.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN
INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS,
FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY ,OWNER
AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS
PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE
SALE.
Dated this 6th day of August, 2007
Ray Norman
Clerk of the Cour
By: Carol Williams
Deputy Clerk
8/16 2tchg 8/23
STATE OF FL)ORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF
COMMUNITY AFFAIRS
CUMULATIVE NOTICE
OF INTENT TO FIND THE
BRADFORD COUNTY
COMPREHENSIVE
PLAN AMENDMENT
AND REMEDIAL
COMPREHENSIVE PLAN
AMENDMENTS) IN
COMPLIANCE DOCKET NO.
07-R1-NOI-0401-(A)-(1)
The Department issues this
cumulative notice of intent to find the
Bradford County Comprehensive
Plan Amendment adopted by
Ordinance No. 06-34 on October 19,
2007 and the remedial amendment
adopted by Ordinance 07-29 on
June 21, 2007 IN COMPLIANCE,
pursuant to Sections 163.3184,
163.3187 and 163.3189, F.S.
The adopted Bradford County
Comprehensive Plan Amendment
and the Department's Objections,
Recommendations, and Comments
Report, (if any), are available for
public inspection Monday through
Friday, except for legal holidays,
during normal business hours,
at the City of Starke, City Clerks
Office, 2079 North Thompson
Street, Starke, Florida 32091.
Any affected person, as defined in
Section 163.3184, F.S., has a right to
petition for an administrative hearing
to challenge the proposed agency
determination that the Remedial
Amendments are In Compliance, as
defined in Subsection 163.3184(1),
F.S. The petition must be filed
within twenty-one (21) days after
publication of this notice, and must
include all of the information and
contents described in Uniform Rule
28106.201, F.A.C. The petition
must be filed with the Agency Clerk,
Department of Community Affairs,
2555 Shumard Oak Boulevard,
Tallahassee, Florida 32399-2100
and a copy mailed or delivered to
the local government. Failure to'
timely file a petition shall constitute
a waiver of any right to request
an administrative proceeding as a
petitioner under Sections 120.569
and 120.57, F.S. If a petition is filed,
the purpose of the administrative


hearing will be to present evidence
and testimony and forward a
recommended order to the
Department. If no petition is filed,.
this Notice of Intent shall become
final agency action.
If a petition is filed, other affected
persons may petition for leave
to intervene in the proceeding. A
petition for intervention must be
filed at least twenty (20) days before
the final hearing and must include
all of the information and contents
described in Uniform Rule 28-
106.205, F.A.C. A petition for leave
to intervene shall be filed at the
Division of Administrative Hearings,
Department of Administration, 1230
Apalachee Parkway, Tallahassee,
Florida 32399-3060. Failure to
petition to intervene within the
allowed time frame constitutes a'
waiver of any right such a person
has to request a hearing under
Sections 120.569 and 120.57, F.S.,
or to participate in the administrative
hearing.
After an administrative hearing
petition is timely filed, mediation is
available pursuant to Subsection
163.3189(3)(a), F.S., to any
affected person who is made a
party to the proceeding by filing
that request with the administrative
law judge assigned by the Division
of Administrative Hearings. The
choice of mediation shall not affect
a party's right to an administrative
hearing.
8/16 2tchg 8/23
STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF
COMMUNITY AFFAIRS
NOTICE OF INTENT TO
FIND THE BRADFORD
COUNTY COMPREHENSIVE
PLAN AMENDMENTS) IN
COMPLIANCE DOCKET NO.
07-1 -NOI-0401-(A).(I)
The Department gives notice of
ils inlenm to find the Amendment(s)
to the Comprehensive Plan for
Bradford County, adopted by
'Ordinance No 07-10 and 07-11 on
April 19 2007 IN COMPLIANCE,
pursuant to Sections 163.3184,
163.3187 and 163.3189, F.S.
The adopted Bradford County
Comprehensive PlanAmendment(s)
and the Department's Objections,
Recommendations and Comments
Report, (if any), ,are available for
public inspection Monday through
Friday, except for legal holidays,
during normal business hours,
at the City of Starke, City Clerks
Office, 209 North Thompson Street,
Starke, Florida 32091.
Any affected person, as defined
in Section 163.3184, F.S., has a
right to petition for an administrative
hearing to challenge the proposed
agency determination that the
Amendment(s) to the Bradford
County Comprehensive Plan
are In Compliance, as defined in
Subsection 163.3184(1), F.S. The
petition must be filed within twenty-
one (21) days after publication of this
notice, and must include all of the
information and contents described
in Uniform Rule 28-106.201, F.A.C.
The petition must be filed with
the Agency Clerk, Department of
Community Affairs, 2555 Shumard
Oak Boulevard, Tallahassee, Florida
32399-2100, and a copy mailed or
delivered to the local government.
Failure .to timely file a petition
shall constitute a waiver of any
right to request an administrative
proceeding as a petitioner under
Sections 120.569 and 120.57, F.S.
If a petition is filed, the purpose of
the administrative hearing will be
to present evidence and testimony
and forward a recommended order
to the Department. If no petition
is filed, this Notice of Intent shall
become final agency action.
If a petition is filed, other affected
persons may petition for leave
to intervene in the proceeding. A
petition for intervention must be
filed at least twenty (20) days before
the final hearing and must include
all of the information and contents
described in Uniform Rule 28-
106.205, F.A.C. A petition for leave
to intervene shall be filed at the
Division of Administrative Hearings,
Department of Management
Services, 1230 Apalachee Parkway,
Tallahassee, Florida 32399-3060.
Failure to petition to intervene within
the allowed time frame constitutes a
waiver of any right such a person
has to request a hearing under


Sections 120.569 and 120.57, F.S.,
or to participate in the administrative
hearing.
After an administrative hearing
petition is timely filed, mediation is
available pursuant to Subsection
163.3189(3)(a), F.S., to any
affected person who is made a
party to the proceeding by filing
that request with the administrative
law judge assigned by the Division
of Administrative Hearings. The
choice of mediation shall not affect
a party's right to an administrative
hearing.
8/16 ltchg
Notice to.Public
The public is invited to review the
Florida Crown Work force Board's
5-Year Plan updated for 2007.
This Plan is posted on our website
at ficrown.org or can be viewed in
printed form at our offices located at
1389 US Hwy. 90 West, Lake City,
Florida 32055
8/16 2tchg 8/23


Graphic

design exhibit

at SFCC
The Andrews Center is
hosting the Graphic Designr
Technology Student Showcase
highlighting the work of Santa
Fe Community College's
award-winning graphic design
students. The exhibitwill be on
display through Oct. 16.
Students in the graphic design
technology program earn a two-
year associate's degree as they
prepare for entry-level jobs as
visual communicators. Graphic
design is a high-paying, high-
demand career field.
The student showcase
features the "personal best"
design of each student and
representative assignments
from classes in each of the
program's five semesters.
The representative class
assignments include colorful
design collages, multi-
page layouts, logos, digital
photography and posters.
The personal bests span a
wide range of design projects
including logos, newsletters, -
brochures, illustrations,
typography, photography in
design and computer graphics.
Contact Jorge Ibanez at
(352) 395-5979 or e-mail
jorge.ibanez@sfcc.edu for
information about Santa Fe's
graphic design program.


FSU h: ostijng'',s,

teacher

symposium
The Florida State University
College of Education's
department of educational
leadership and policy studies
and its Council on Research in
Education are hosting a two-
day symposium as a part of the
college's Dean's Colloquium
Series. The Teacher Quality
Symposium Series will take
place Thursday, Aug. 30, and
Thursday, Oct. 18, from 9 a.m.
to 4:30 p.m. at the FSU Alumni
Center, 1030 W. Tennesee St. in
Tallahassee.
The purpose of the annual
symposium series is to bring


TAX DEED #07-2
NOTICE OF APPLICATION
FOR TAX DEED
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
Boyd D. Baker, the holders) of
the following certificate has filed
said certificate for a tax deed to
be issued thereon. The certificate
number and year of issuance, the
description of the property, and 'the
names in which it was assessed are
as follows':
CERTIFICATE NUMBER: #212
YEAR OF ISSUANCE: 2005
DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY:
A parcel of land containing 0.52
acres, more or less, and lying in
the Southwest 1/4 of the Southeast
1/4 Section 21, Township 7
South, Range 21 East, Bradford
County, Florida; said parcel being
more particularly described as
follows: Commence at a concrete
monument set at the Northeast
corner of said Southwest 1/4 of
the Southeast 1/4 and run South
89035'21" West, along the Northerly
boundary thereof, a distance of
107.65 feet to an iron rod set on


Counties and should have an
active interest in social and nutrition
programs for older persons.
Members of the Board of Directors
serve on a voluntary-basis without
pay. Interested persons. should
request an application from: Elder
Options, 5700 SW 34th Street,
Suite 222, Gainesville, FL 32608;
(352) 378-6649
8/16 2tchg 8/23
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN
AND FOR BRADFORD COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO: 07-CA-99
DIVISION: J. MOSELEY
Stage Coach Enterprises, Inc.
Plaintiff,
vs.
Robert J. BATTEN, et. al.
Defendant(s)
NOTICE OF JUDICIAL SALE
PURSUANT TO SECTION
45.031(1), FLORIDA
STATUTES
To Whom It May Concern:
NOTICE is hereby given that
pursuant to the Final Judgment
of Foreclosure entered on August


DENMARK
FURNITURE
It's a fact, you can do better at
DENMARKIS.
434 W. Call St.
964-5827 1


together researchers, state
policymakers and school
district officials to discuss
educational issues of critical
importance to our state. The
events will focus on improving
teacher quality and will feature
leading researchers from across
Florida and the nation.
The Teacher Quality
Symposium Series will give
Florida's policymakers and
educational professionals the
opportunity to learn about the
latest research by scholars and
discuss policy ideas for Florida's
schools. Topics will include
teacher performance pay,
recruitment and preparation,
professional development and
attrition.
More detailed information
about the symposium sessions
and presenters is available
online at www.coe.fsu.edu/
SymposiumSeries. Online
registration also is available at
the Web site. Registration is
$30 for both dates and includes
refreshments and lunch.
For more information,
contact Lora Cohen-Vogel, an
assistant professor of education
at FSU and coordinator of the
symposium series, at (850)
644-8164 or cohenvog@coe.
fsu.edu;


Lawtey

budget

workshop

planned
The city of Lawtey will be
conducting a budget workshop
on Tuesday, Aug. 21, at 2 p.m.
in the boardroom at Lawtey
City Hall.
All interested parties are
invited to attend.


Registration

reminder from

Hampton

Elementary
'If you have not yet registered
your child for school, please do
so the week of Aug. 13.
If your child will be attending
,kindergarten,,they' wil,,haye a
staggered start date' determined
by their last name. Teachers are
in the process of mailing out
postcards to students.
No student will be allowed
to start school on the day they
register if they do so after
school begins. Students need,
updated immunization records,
a current, physical, social
security card, birth certificate
and proof of residence.









Page UA I L...-.anArn-Mt IMtb Aug. 16, 2007


Union County heads back to school


BY LINDSEY KIRKLAND
Times Editor

It's goodbye to summer and
hello to a new year of school.
Union County students will-
return to school on Thursday,
Aug. 23.
There are some changes
and information that parents
and students need to know for
the upcoming school year that
follows below.
Lunch prices are $1.75 for
elementary school students and
$2 for middle and high school
students. The $2 is for the basic
lunch meal, but a la carte items
can be purchased for a lunch
price of $2.50 or $3. Breakfast
is available at all three schools
for $1. .
Breakfast will be served from
7:20-7:45 a.m. at Lake Butler
Elementary School, from 7:30-
7:50 a.m. at Lake Butler Middle
School and from 7'30-7:50 a.m.
at Union County High School.
For free and reduced price
lunchand breakfast.applications
will be sent home to parents
with income requirements and
other guidelines.

Lake Butler
Elementary School
LBES has a new schedule
this year.
The first bell will ring at
7:55 a.m.-' (last year was
7:45 a.m.). The tardy bell
will ring at 8 a.m. School
will end at 2:30 p.m.
* Kindergarten students will
begin with a staggered
start.
Kindergarten teachers will
call each parent to set up a
meeting to be held Thursday or
Friday, Aug. 23-24.
Individual information as to
staggered start times will be
given at those meetings and
will begin Monday, Aug. 27.
* Other student rosters will
be posted on the LBES
office window by Friday,
Aug. 17.
* LBES staff would like to
remind parents to use the
designated pick-up/drop-
off area that is located
in the school's bus ramp
area.
Parents should not pick up
or drop off their children in the
loop in front of the cafeteria.
"It's become a real safety
issue," Principal Lynn Bishop
said of students being dropped
off in front of the cafeteria.
Bishop said several accidents
have almost occurred in front
of the cafeteria when parents


Keep bus

safety in mind

BY LINDSEY KIRKLAND
Times Editor

As children head back to
school, it is important for
everyone in the community to
keep safety in mind.
Becautious when approaching
school zones. Watch for the
flashing lights or marked signs
that indicate school zones and
adjust your speed accordingly.
Do not rely solely on the
crossing guard. Make sure to
watch for children in the road
or in the crosswalks.


are lined up before and after
school. It also causes traffic
congestion on S.R. 121.
* School supply lists will be
available from each child's
teacher.
* Monday, Sept. 3 will be a
Labor Day holiday for all
schools. On Tuesday, Sept.
4, open houses will begin
for LBES students.
Second grade open house
will on Sept. 4,. third grade
on Thursday, Sept. 6, fourth
grade on Monday, Sept. 10,
first grade on Tuesday, Sept. 11
and kindergarten on Tuesday,
Sept. 18. For open house times,
please refer to information from
the school at a later date.
* For further information,
contact the school at (386)
496-3047.
* Once school starts, the
school newsletter, updates
and other resources will
also be posted on www.
union.kl2.fl.us/LB ES/
INDEX.htm.

Lake Butler
Middle School
LBMS has set its parent
nights for the 2007-2008 school
year for Monday and Tuesday,
Aug. 20-21.
Parents of incoming fifth-'
and sixth-graders should report
to the LBMS gym on Monday,
Aug. 20, from 6:30-8:30 p.m.
Parents of incoming seventh-
and eighth-graders should
report to the gym on Tuesday,
Aug. 21, from 6:30-8:30 p.m.
Parents and students will
get a chance to meet the new
principal, school staff and
familiarize themselves with the
students' schedule.
* School start time for
LBMS will be at 7:45
a.m. (first bell). The tardy
bell will ring at 7:50 a.m.
School will release in the
afternoon at 2:59 p.m.
* LBMS will hold its girls
volleyball tryouts on
Thursday and Friday, Aug.
23-24, from 3-5 p.m. in the
LBMS gymnasium.
All girls going into the sixth,
seventh or eighth grade who are
interested in playing volleyball
can try out for the team.
Participants should be
dressed out and ready to start
promptly at 3 p.m.
All paperwork- preparation
physical evaluation, consent
and release from liability
certificate, LBMS volleyball
registration form and medical
authorization form-must
be turned into Coach Trudy


When driving in areas not
directly in front of the schools,
remember to look for buses that
may be stopping to pick up or
drop off students.
As for children, they should
remain at least five steps away
from the road when waiting for
the bus.
Stay seated and use
appropriate noise levels so as
not to distract the driver.
Also, parents should remind
children to be cautious in areas
where the bus driver might not
be able to see them, such as in
front of and behind the bus.
For more bus safety
information, visit the National
Safety Council at www.nsc.
See BUS, next page


thegroomed trail system throu gr. :s " B.



[uAon .C I ,r oe",. ,i srI oora 1 P ti r O f S1


STOP LEG CRAMPS m
BEFORE THEY STOP YOU. ealcet

Calcet's triple calcium for mula is designed to help riple Calcium
stop h lowdriu ,. s cramps.Just ask your pharmacist.


Andrews prior to participating
in the tryouts. These packets
can be picked up in the school's
front office.
If you have any questions,
call Trudy Andrews at (352)
494-4602.
* For further back-to-school
questions, call (386) 496-
3046.

Union County
High School
UCHS parking spot and
locker selection has been under
way for a couple of weeks.
Seniors and juniors have
already had priority, and
sophomore selection ends today,
Thursday, Aug. 16. Freshmen
will be able to make their
selections Monday-Thursday,
Aug. 20-24.
Students will no longer be
parking in the lot in front of the
gym and bus ramp area. Parking
and locker selection is done on
a first-come, first-choice basis
within the designated areas.
Parking decals and locker
prices are $5 eaph, the same as
the 2006-2007 school year.
To purchase a parking permit,
a student will need proof of
insurance, driver's license and
vehicle registration-along
with their $5.
Freshmen will have the
opportunity to go on tours
of the UCHS campus
before school begins on
Aug. 23.
Guided tours will be held on
Tuesday, Aug. 21;,at 9 a.m.,
10 a.m. and 11 a.m. Anyone
interested in the tour should
report to the front office at one
of these times.
m On the evening of
Tuesday, Aug. 21, parents
and students of all grades
will have an opportunity
to visit classrooms and
meet teachers at the UCHS
orientation, from 6-9 p.m.
All parents and students are
encouraged to attend.
The freshman class will also
have Class of 2011 T-shirts on
sale at the orientation for $10.
. UCHS start times are the
same as LBMS. The first
bell rings at 7:45 a.m., the
tardy bell at 7:50 a.m. and
the last bell of the day at
2:59 p.m.
* For further school
information, contact UCHS
at (386) 496-3040.


Pop Warner

to host NFL

competition
Young pro football fans will
have the opportunity to exhibit
their football skills when Union
County Pop Warner hosts the
NFL Pepsi Punt, Pass & Kick
Competition.
The competition is free and
open to boys and girls ages 8'to
15. It will be held on Thursday,
Aug. 23, at 6 p.m. at the Union


Dear Library Supporter,
The Union County Public Library is getting ready to begin its
construction project for a new, larger facility. In an effort to raise funds
for this much-needed building, the library is accepting donations for
parts of the picture shown on the next page. The painting that was
created for this project (painted by Marie Wiggs Tyre) will be
translated into a giant mural on the meeting room wall of the new
library building. It is estimated that each animal on the mural will be
life-size or larger. Listed below are the prices for each item. Just think
of the lasting benefits that you can have with your small investment -
the name of your business listed in the library for years, your family's
name showing support of the library and our community's education,
dedication in memory of a loved one, and much more...
Each item listed will have a plaque that corresponds to the item.

Leaf on the Tree:........................................ $200 Flying
Limb on the Tree:.... ............................ $500 Large ]
Sm all Bird:....................... ........................ $500 Bear:..
Sm all Reptile:............................................ $500 A lligat
Squirrel:......................... .... ................... $500 D eer:..
Raccoons:........................................ $ 1,000/pair Panthe
Trunks


County High School football
field.
For competition information,
contact Hardy Clyatt at (386)
496-3203 or (386) 496-3401.
Entry forms are available at
Lake Butler City Hall and the
Union County Public Library.
Forms should be completed
prior to Aug. 23 and brought to
the competition.
The NFL Pepsi Punt,,Pass
& Kick football combptitioh'
allows youngsters to showcase
their talents in punting, passing
and kicking with scores based


on distance and accuracy. Age
classification is as of Dec. 31,
2007.
The top finishers from each
of the eight age groups at the
local competition will advance
to a sectional competition. The
winners at section will have
their scores compared with
other sectional champions.
The top five scorers
from the pool of sectional
champions advance to the team
championship to be announced
at a later date.


Union County Public Library

175 West Main Street


Lake Butler, F
Phone (386)


Fax (386)


'lorida


32054


496-3432
496- 1285


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'-' '
.~ ~\'.

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-P1


oam


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Egrets.....................................$ 1,000/pair
Bird: ......................... ....................$1,000
.........................................................$1,000
or: ......................... ....................... $1,000
....... ........... ............ ...................... $2,000
r: ...................... .......................... $2,000
of Tree:...........................................$5,000


If you are interested in helping build your new library

by making a donation for a part of the mural,

please call Mary Brown, library director, at 386-496-3432


http: //union.newriver. lib. fl us


I


(


x ...








Mug. 16, 2007 TELEGRAPH-TIMES Page 9A


First day for
Bradford County
students: Aug. 20

Bradford High School
9:00 a.m. 3:00 p.m.

Bradford Middle
School 8:45 a.m.
2:50 p.m.

Brooker Elementary
7:45 a.m. 2:00
p.m.

Hampton Elementary
7:45 a.m. 2:00 p.m.

Lawtey Community
School 7:40 a.m.
2:10 p.m.


Renassaince Center
8:30 a.m. 2:30 p.m.

Southside Elementary
7:40 a.m. 2:10 p.m.

Starke Elementary
7:40 a.m. 2:10 p.m.

First day for
Union County
students: Aug. 23

Union County High
School
7:50 a.m. 2:59 p.m.

Lake Butler Middle
School
7:50 a.m. 2:59 p.m.


64o~y (^/fr^y^/


From the desk of:
Lisa Prevatt,
Bradford Asst.
Superintendent
I would like to welcome all
students back for the 2007-08.
school year which begins on
Monday, Aug. 20.
Parents, if your child is new
to the Bradford school district,
including returning from home
or private school, please be sure
to register this week. We ask
that you do not wait until the
first day of school so that your
child will not miss important
class time.
Schools will be open this
Thursday, Aug. 16, and Friday,
Aug. 17, for registration.
For your convenience,
schools have sent their supply
lists to local merchants such
as Wal-Mart. Please check the
store location for your child's
list.
Also, at our Web site; www.
mybradford.us, you will find
the 2007-08 district school
calendar. You will find holidays,
planning days and early release
days listed so that you may
plan ahead.
Parents, please keep in mind
that students need to attend


BUS
Continued from p. 8A
org/library/facts/schlbus.htm.
School bus routes
The Union County School
District's transportation
department has listed 'the
following route areas and bus
numbers for the 2007-2008
school year:
* Providence area Buses 4,
7, 12, 26 and 29.
* Worthington Springs 5,8,
11, 14, 15, 19 and 24.
* Raiford 2, 6, 17 and 20.
* Lake Butler 3 and 23.
* Lulu 18 (100 W., Clark'
Shaw Shop Rd and Douglas
Cemetery Rd.).
* Little Rainbows Learning
Center Morning: 11.
Afternoon: 23 and 24.
* Tigers Den Afternoon:
29.
In town routes will pick up
and drop off elementary and


4
A
ii








I


.. a col
,!.,. r-._^


early release days, especially
in Jan. and June as they are set
aside as semester exam days
for high school students.
To avoid confusion on the
first day of school, please
remember to go over the before
and after school plans with
your child and child's teacher
if necessary.
Get involved with your
child's education. Research
shows that parent involvement
helps children do better in and
out of school. Be sure your child
arrives at school on time. This
is a lifelong skill that impacts
their quality of education and
work habits.
From the desk of:
Louette Smith,
Bradford
Transportation
Department
All Bradford County
Elementary School bus route
times will remain relatively the
same as last year.
Bradford Middle School,
Bradford High School and
Lawtey Community School
bus routes will run in the same
sequence approximately one


middle school students only!
* Cypress Trailer Park 10,
Behind, rescue car wash
across from NAPA and
Hidden Oaks trailers by
Pritchett Trucking 3, and
Shaw Subdivision 19 (all
morning and afternoon).
* Behind Spires Morning:
4 (elementary and middle).
Afternoon: 6 (elementary)


Lake Butler
Elementary
8:00 a.m. 2:30 p.m.

First day for
Clay County
students: Aug. 20

Keystone Heights
Elem.
8:30 a.m. 2:47 p.m.

McRae Elementary
8:30 a.m. 2:48 p.m.

Keystone Heights.
Jr./Sr.
7:20 a.m. 1:50 p.m.





hour after the elementary bus
route.
The Lawtey Community.
School shuttle bus will leave the'
school and transport students to
the Family Service Center at
7:15 a.m. each morning.
Parents, please be patient as
the transportation department
tries to adjust to the new
school time schedules which,
in turn, are affecting bus route
schedules. Please call (904)
966-6735 if you have any
questions.

From the desk of:
Dottie Rondelli,
Bradford Food
Service Supervisor
The new lunch prices this
year are as follows:
Student breakfast $1
Student Lunch (pre-K-5) $1.75
Student Lunch (6-12) $2.00
The reduced meal prices are
the same as last year: 30 cents
for breakfast and 40 cents for
lunch.
Please remember to stop by
the district office and fill out
a reduced lunch form prior to
/the start of school to avoid a
delay in services. For further
information, call (904) 966-
6013.


and 4 (middle).
* BP and behind Family
Dollar Morning: 18
(elementary and middle).-
Afternoon: 8 (elementary)
and 18 (middle).
If you have any questions
regarding these routes,, please
call the bus garage at (386)
496-2182.


d4;


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or & stylist salon
Owner-Stylist:. Carmen Elise Waterhouse

Jewelry, Lisa Freeze, Nail Technician
Flags & Now Here...
Gifts Detox Ion Foot Bath!


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904.964.6848


zoo7-zooS SCHOOt CALENDAR


SCHOOLS


August 20
September 3
September 14
October 23
October 26
November 2
November 12
November 19-23
December 20 January 2
January 3
January 17
January 18
January 21
January 25
February 18
March 21
March 25
March 28
April 4
April 14-18
' May 26
June 6


Students' first day
Labor Day holiday
Planning Day
End first nine weeks
Planning Day
Report cards go home
Veterans Day holiday
Thanksgiving holiday
Christmas holiday
Students return
End second nine weeks
Planning Day
Martin Luther King Jr holiday
Report cards go home
Presidents Day holiday
Good Friday holiday
End third nine weeks
Planning Day
Report cards go home
Spring Break
Memorial Day holiday
Last day of school/graduation


Early release days: Sept. 19, Oct. 17, Nov. 28, Dec. 12, Jan. 15-17,
Feb. 20, March 11, April 23, May (TBA).

Testing: FCAT Writes, Feb. 12-15; FCAT, March 12-26;
SAT 10, March 31-April 4.




BACK


%ffl 5CHQf~i


BC school
board plans
special
meeting
tomorrow
The Bradford County School
Board will hold a special
meeting to appoint the new
transportation supervisor on
Friday, Aug. 17 at 1 p.m. The
public is invited to attend.


Thank You!
to who ever found a
purse in the Winn
Dixie parking lot and
turned it in.
Your kindness and
honesty are very
appreciated!


What you can do, or dream you can do, begin it; boldness has
genius, power and magic in it.
-Johann Wolfgang von Goethe





NOTICE

The 2007 Bradford County
Value Adjustment Board
will conduct an
Organizational Meeting
Thurs., August 23, 2007 at
9:30 a.m. in the County
Commission Meeting Room
located in the North Annex of
the Courthouse at 945 N.
Temple Avenue, Starke


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School times for 2007-08 school year


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Page 10A TELEGRAPH-TIMES Aug. 16, 2007


presents trio
of one-acts
Lake Region Community
Theatre will present a trio of
one-act plays in August. The
venue is the theater's new
home-a recently renovated
building at 218 S. Walnut St. in
Starke, across from Showcase
Advertising.
This production will be the
2007 grand opening of the
LRCT's "small, but cozy, little
theatre." Seating capacity is
limited, so plan to make your
reservations early.
"Check Please" is a comedy
by Jonathan Rand, directed by
Matthew Eunice, which follows
a series of blind dinner dates
that couldn't get any worse-


Staggered
start for
kindergarten
A "staggered start" at the
following Bradford County
elementary schools will allow
incoming kindergarteners to
spend their first day of school
with their teachers and four or
five other classmates.
The staggered start schedule
is based alphabetically on
students' last names.
Starke and Southside
elementaries
Last names beginning with:
-A-G will begin on Monday,
Aug. 20.
-H-O will begin on Tuesday,
Aug. 21.
--P-Z s.will begin on
Wednesday, Aug. 22.
The first day .for
kindergarteners -Te rgistere-d
after Aug. 10 will be will be
Thursday, Aug. 23.
All kindergarteners will
attend school on Friday, Aug.
24. Please call (904) 966-6045
for further information.
Lawtey Community
School
Last names. beginning with:
-A-G will begin on Monday,
Aug. 20.
-H-M will begin on
Tuesday, Aug. 21.
-N-Z will begin on
Wednesday, Aug. 22.
All kindergarteners will
attend beginning on Thursday,
Aug. 23. Please call (904) 966-
6795.

Volleyball
tryouts
announced
Volleyball tryouts for
Bradford Middle School and
Lawtey Community School
girls will be held Tuesday, Aug.
21, through Thursday, Aug.
23. All students must have a
red ticket from Sunday Elasik
before they can tryout.
There will be a meeting for
all girls trying out on Friday,
Aug. 24, at the BMS football
locker room at 8:30 a.m.
For more information, contact
Eric Verunac (904) 966-6705.

NAACP
sponsors
back-to-
school event
The NAACP will sponsor
a back-to-school banquet on
Saturday, Aug 18, at the Mt.
Pisgah AME Church Annex
in Starke in the Lincoln City
Community from 4-6p.m....
Admission is free for
children. The NAACP is
asking that each child bring a-
school supply item.


until they do. Watch how hard
dating can be-especially
when your date happens to be
a raging kleptomaniac, your
grandmother's bridge partner or
a mime.
"Checkers" is a nostalgic
drama by Dale Doerman,
directed by Tami Curtis. Join'
a very elderly couple, Henry,
a veteran of two wars and his
wife, Lillian, as they meet for
a date with a checker board in
a nearby park and rehash both
wars-among other things
"Good Business Sense" is a
comedy by Emmett Loverde,
directed by Matthew Eunice,
that will leave you asking, "Is
this a dinner date or a board


For more information contact
Pat Smith at (904) 782-2033.

Union
commission
meeting
The Union County
Commission will meet Monday,
Aug. 20, at 6:45 p.m. fora public
hearing to consider preliminary
approval of the Hidden Oaks
Phase II Subdivision.
At 6:55 p.m., the board will
hold a hearing to consider
preliminary approval of
the Tyrkey Ridge Unit II


meeting?" Businessman,
Bartholomew Braniff is
making the biggest boardroom
presentation of his life, a
proposal of marriage to the
equally industrious Claudia.
Everything is perfect; the
numbers have been crunched,
the projections have been
double-checked and even the'
ring has been market-tested.
But Claudia wants flowers and
violins, not charts and graphs.
Stagings are at 7 p.m. on
Aug. 16-17 and 23-25.
Matinees are at 2 p.m. on Aug.
19 and 26. Tickets are $10,
and reservations may be made
at the LRCT box office or by
calling (352) 226-4082.


Subdivision.
The regular commission
meeting will convene at 7 p.m.


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LIke Butler. $214,900


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next to park. If you don't ....
-someone else wilL! $27,000


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waiting for your new site-built or
mobile home. Located just E. of Lake,
Butler on SR100. Great parcel for
your land home package, plenty of


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has paved road frontage on two sides,
well and power pole on site, area
cleared for your site built or mobile
home. Santa Fe River access with
purchase! $58,900 ...Bring Offers!!


Call David Thomas Realtor
Cell (352) 258-4952 Office (386) 496-1297
david@meerstonerealty.com
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New Jerusalem Full Gospel
Church will hold a revival with
evangelist Larry Richards from
Monday to Friday, Aug. 20-24,
at 7 p.m. nightly.
The church is located at the
caution light at the intersection
of S.R. 121 and C.R. 18 in
Worthington Springs.
For more information, call
Annette at (386) 496-3383.
Mt. Zion AME Church in
Lawtey will present its second
annual choir concert on
Saturday, Aug. 18, at 6 p.m.
in the Macedonia Freewill
Baptist Church on Lake Street
in LawteynThe-Rev-Marva-T.-
Mitchell and Bishop Joenathan
Butler will conduct the
services. Everyone is invited.
Ebenezer Missionary Baptist
Church in Starke is hosting a
Family-and Friends Day on
Sunday, Aug. 19, at 11 a.m.
and again at 4 p.m. Everyone
is invited to attend. The Rev.
James Wilcox is pastor.
First Baptist Church
of Raiford will host the
Georgian's Quartet, Sunday,
Aug. 19, in the morning
worship service at 11:00 a.m.
Lawtey Church of God will
be in concert with the Holy
Ground Trio on Sunday, Aug.
26, beginning at 6:00 p.m. For
further information, you may
contact Pastor Grady Noel at


(904) 282-5728.


Greater Bethlehem
Freewill Baptist Church
cordially invites you to
attend our annual triple choir
anniversary. Friday night,
Aug. 17, at 7:30 p.m. every
one is invited. Featuring, solo
artist Ms. Pamela Franklin
of Tallahassee. You are also


invited to attend our annual
Deaconess and Mothers Board
anniversary, Sunday, Aug.
19, at 3 p.m. Guest speaker
is Pastor Felecia Sanders and
her congregation, Mt. Zion
from Plant City. The church is
located on the comer of Oak
and Ash street. Elder J. Lott is
pastor.


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Section B: Thursday, Aug. 16, 2007



Regional News

News from Bradford County, Union County and the Lake Region area


Humphries takes role of RMC's


first female warden


BY LINDSEY KIRKLAND
Times Editor
The Department of
Corrections has vastly changed
through the years, but in some
ways, it is only now catching
up with the times.
In November 2006, RMC
(the Reception and Medical
Center) got its first female
warden, Martha Humphries.
"It's quite an honor to be
assigned here," she said. "It's a
great opportunity for me."
Humphries' move up in the
department took hard work and
knowing when to take
advantage of an opportunity.
A prison warden was not
something she considered
being when she was a stay-at-


PRIDE:
training
inmates for
re-entry into
work force
) BY TERESA
STONE-IRWIN
Telegraph Staff Writer
Prison Rehabilitative
Industries and Diversified
Enterprises, better known as
PRIDE, is an internationally
recognized inmate training
company in the state of
Florida. From cattle and
sugarcane to garments and
optical services, PRIDE offers
341 areas of vocational
training through 37 inmate
work programs located in 20
state correctional institutions.
Founded in 1981, PRIDE
also provides job placement
and for ex-offenders to help
them successfully transition
back into society.
During 2006, PRIDE
employed 3,500 inmates. Of
those, 79 percent earned'
training certificates and 39
percent completed an entire
training program. PRIDE
workers across Florida earned
$1,670,606 in wages, at rates
of 20 cents to 55 cents .per
hour.
Inmate placement
To be considered in the
PRIDE work program, inmates-
must have a clean disciplinary
report for six months prior to
placement in a PRIDE job.
Once an inmate submits an
application, a team of
classification officers with the
Department of Corrections
works with managers in the
various industries to select
inmates based on disciplinary
records, institutional
adjustment, time left to serve,
industry needs, the inmate's
interests, capability and his or
her educational level.
Each industry has its own
requirements for inmate
selection, though most
positions require at least a
sixth-grade education.
All new workers receive
orientation training explaining
basic safety and work rules
and defining acceptable work
behaviors and job performance
expectations. This orientation
is extremely important because
many inmate workers have
never been employed before
or, if they were, had
unsatisfactory work histories.
Training and
certification
Once an inmate is given a
PRIDE assignment, he or she
begins comprehensive and
structured on-the-job training
with varying course lengths
between 120 and 6,000
training hours. The average
workday for inmate workers is
6.7 hours.
Prerequisite education
ranges between the sixth- and
12 grade levels in math,
language and reading.
After successful completion
of a training module, each
inmate worker is awarded a
training module 'certificate,
which serves to recognize his
or her accomplishment.
When all modules of
training have been
satisfactorily completed, and
the applicable skills
demonstrated, the inmate
worker is awarded a certificate
of achievement from PRIDE
associations with several
certifying entities. Through the


home mom in Mayo, where
she was raised.
She volunteered at her
children's school as a teacher's
aide. When her children were


older, she became a substitute
teacher.
Wanting a change in her life,
Humphries took the chance to
become a correctional officer


in 1982, when construction
began on Mayo Correctional
Institution. She was the first
female hired there. In five
years, she made sergeant.


"I've been in it ever since,
and I love it," she said.
She moved on to Madison
Correctional Institution and
was promoted to lieutenant, a


position she held until 1994.
Humphries then transferred,
to Taylor Correctional
See WARDEN, p. 4B


See PRIDE, p. 5B








Page 2B' TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR--B-SECTION Aug. 16, 2007


Sapp can't stay away from corrections after retirement


BY TERESA
STONE-IRWIN
Telegraph Staff Writer
Warden Jack Sapp came to
New River Correctional on
June 4, 2007. He spent his first
day going from office to office
and meeting with the facility's
employees.
"Then I called a meeting to
let everyone know from here
on out, team memorabilia
found in offices that is not
Gators will be considered
contraband," Sapp joked.
In corrections for 36 years,
Sapp began his career in
corrections as a tower officer
in 1970 at Florida State Prison,
then known as the East Unit.
He transferred to West
Florida River Junction CI in
1974 and during his four years
there, rose through the ranks to
chief correctional officer.
In 1978, he went to work for
the inspector general, whose
office is responsible for,
among other things, criminal
and internal affairs
investigations, and internal
audits. He remained with the
office of the inspector general
for 13 years and, in 1991,
received his first assistant
warden job at Hamilton
Correctional.


Warden Jack Sapp of New River Correctional
Institution.


In 1995, he was promoted to
warden-called superintendent


at the time- at Indian River
Correctional.


Amount spent daily on health per inmate


During late 1995, he became
the very first warden of a
brand new prison facility,
Okeechobee Correctional
Institution. After establishing
Okeechobee, he transferred to
Marion Correctional in 1998.
In what Sapp referred to as an
experiment, the. adjacent-
facilities of Marion (male
youthful offenders) and Lowell
(female facility). were
combined. Sapp remained for
only two years when the
facilities were divided back up.
However, while warden at
Marion CI, Sapp was
successful in securing 120
acres of property to begin an
inmate rehabilitation program.
Through the Thoroughbred
Retirement Foundation,
inmates began training to care
for retired racehorses, the
fourth program of its kind in
existence in the United States.
After the facilities split back
up, Sapp transferred to the
Reception and Medical Center
in Lake Butler as warden until
he retired in 2002 after 32
years in corrections.
"But I only got to take a year
off before they persuaded me
to come back as warden at
Jackson Correctional in West
Florida," Sapp said.
In 2004, he was again
reassigned to Hamilton
Correctional where he
remained until his transfer to
New River in June of this year.
At New River, Sapp joined
assistant wardens Fred
Trespalacios and Nan Jeffcoat.
Sapp is a native of the area,
born and raised in Raiford. His
family moved to Lake Butler
in 1966 before his career
advancements relocated him
throughout the state of Florida.
Now living againin the Lake
Butler area, Sapp said, "I'-m
glad to be back. This is home
to me."
Sapp's office is filled with
numerous awards and
recognition received during
his years of service with the
Florida Department of
Corrections. Sapp has also
been very involved
correctional softball leagues.
As warden, Sapp 'is
responsible for literally
everything at the prison
facility. This includes hiring
and firing personnel,
overseeing staff members,


departments, programs, food
service, warehouse and outside
squads, implementing
correctional policies, ensuring
the safety of all, and
establishing regulations to deal
effectively with rule
infractions.
Most importantly, eadh new
morning, Sapp conducts
meetings with key staff
employees to review any
issues that may have come up
the previous night. Since Sapp
cannot be at the facility at all
times, duty wardens are
scheduled for his off hours.
Chief correctional officers and
classification supervisors
rotate as the duty warden, but
Sapp is still on call 24 hours a
day. Sapp is always on the
property during inmate
visitation hours.
Between Bradford and
Union counties-especially
Union-Sapp recognizes there
are very few long-term career


options for students fresh out
of high school. He feels that
the department of corrections
offers an aggressive recruiting
program for those interested in
a career in corrections.
"In this area, 80 to 85
percent of the students
graduate and leave the
community to seek
employment," Sapp said.
"Kids today with a high school
diplomas or G.E.D. with no
marketable work skills can
begin getting paid as a
correctional officer in
training." In sixi months, new
recruits can be earning in
excess of $30,000 a year, plus
benefits.
The difference
between New
River East and
New River West
New River Correctional
See SAPP, p. 7B


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Aug. 16, 2007 TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR--B-SECTION Page 3B



Watson leaves the farm for a 'good organization'


BY CLIFF SMELLEY
Telegraph Staff Writer
It was not Doug Watson's
goal to become the warden of
one of the prisons in his home
county, yet a young person's
simple desire to earn more
money led to a long-term
career with the Department of
Corrections that is still
ongoing, with the last 16
months being spent as warden
at Lawtey Correctional
Institution.
Watson, who is a 1980
Bradford High School
graduate, first made warden at
Hardee Correctional Institution
in 2004. Watson received a
transfer that brought him
closer to home so he could be
with his wife, who was battling
cancer. Watson worked seven
weeks at Gainesville
Correctional Institution before
assuming the duties of warden
in Lawtey in April 2006.
Watson said working at
Lawtey Correctional
Institution is special for several
reasons.
It's a special feeling to hold
such a position in his home
county; but Watson said the
position is special regardless of
what institution it's at. He
takes a great sense of pride and
ownership in his role as a
warden.
"The sense of responsibility
and the desire to' take
ownership jut automatically
happens," he said. "I don't
know how to describe it. It's
just a process that somehow
automatically takes place. I
haven't stopped taking


Doug Watson, Lawtey Correctional Institution's
warden since April 2006, was born and raised in
Bradford County.


ownership of any facility I've
worked at. Wherever I work,
my responsibility is to serve
the staff of the facility and do
whatever I can to make the
facility improve or be better
than it was. At least that's my
desire."
Watson never could've
envisioned that desire earlier in


his life. In fact, he did not give
much thought to the prisons
that were close to home.
"I guess if your family
worked in corrections you
knew about them, but we
farmed," said Watson, the son
of James and Joan Watson. "I
lived on the south end of
Bradford County, so


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corrections wasn't really
something we knew a lot about
or had a lot of knowledge of."
Watson's brother would go
on to work for the Department
of Corrections, so when
Watson was looking for
something that would earn him
a little more money than
working on the family farm,
he, too, went to work for the
department. However, he was
not looking at making a career
out of it. Watson already had
his AA degree and planned to
major in business and finance.
That would change, Watson
said, adding that his story is
probably not unique. He
realized after putting in two
years with the Department of
Corrections, he was making
more money than he would
starting off somewhere else
without having to move to a
larger city.
"I realized at that point I was
probably going to make a
career out of corrections and
changed my study to
criminology," Watson said.
Watson earned his
bachelor's degree in
criminology and began
promoting through the ranks
within the Department of
Corrections. The only
downside seemed to be that he
wasn't able to earn his degree
at the University of Florida,
where his beloved Gators play.
It was simply too difficult for
him to attend classes at UF
while also working full time,
so he wound up attending
weekend classes at the
University of Central Florida.


Lawtey Correctional a faith-based pioneer


BY CLIFF SMELLEY
Telegraph Staff Writer
Can an inmate at Lawtey
Correctional Institution reenter
society and become a better,
"ioire productive citizen?
You could say Department
of Corrections personnel have
faith that that will happen.,
Lawtey Correctional was
dedicated as the country's first
faith-based facility in
December 2003. As such, it
offers religious services of
various denominations as well
as educational and life-skills
classes.
The goals of a faith-based
facility, as listed on the
Department of Corrections
Web site, are: rehabilitation,
reintegration of inmates into
the community, reduction of
recidivism and disciplinary
reports, increasing system-
wide institutional security,
offering a fuller range of
religious accommodations and
enhancing restorative justice
programming.
No state funding is utilized
in providing the services and


classes at Lawtey. The
program is dependent upon
volunteer efforts.
"Our volunteers are unique
because they are not passing
judgment or condemning (the
inmates)," said Doug Watson,
the warden at Lawtey.
"Therefore, our volunteers are
reaching out to our inmate
population and trying .to give
them the tools for life."
Religious services, available
through video and satellite
programming, take place every
day. Time is devoted to
Catholic, Jewish, Islamic.-and.
Hebrew Israelite studies,
Tefillin prayer, Spanish bible
studies and creation science to
name a few.
Volunteers of various faiths
teach the various life-skills and
educational classes in the
evenings. Inmates can attend a
class to improve their basic
reading skills or attend another
to improve parenting skills.
"A lot of our volunteers take
everyday circumstances and
teach about the program in
general as 'well as from a


biblical standpoint," Watson
said. "They'll teach financial
responsibility. We have
ministers come out here. We
have a mentoring program.
"We have a good variety."
Two other state correctional
institutions- Hillsborough and
Wakulla-have joined Lawtey
Correctional as faith-based
institutions.
Inmates are not forcibly
housed in those institutions.
They must volunteer. Approval
. 'is dependent upon such factors
as the amount of' time an
". ihtiate-' haS not received a
disciplinary report and the fact
the inmate must possess
general population housing
status.
Just as being housed in a
faith-based institution is
voluntary, so is participation in
any of the programs offered at
those institutions. Watson said
not all of Lawtey's inmates
participate as he would like
them to, but he feels those who
do benefit.
"It's a door of..;b'tportunity
we give them," Watson said.


"It's something to help them
look at things from a different
standpoint. It's a chance for
them to look at things they've
done in the past and get a
different perspective from
someone who really has no
other desire but to change a
person's life."
Besides the three faith-based
institutions in Florida, there
are seven in the state that
include some faith-based/self-
improvement dormitories:
Everglades, Gulf, Lancaster,
Polk, Tomoka and Union.


"That worked out real
good," Watson said. "It was a
.program, really,, for working
law enforcement people."
It would seem ideal that
Watson eventually ended up as
a warden in Bradford County,
but he -said he thoroughly
enjoyed his time in Hardee
County. If his wife could've
relocated to that area, he would
have been content to finish his
career there, he said. The area
he lived in reminded him of
Bradford County.
"It was easy for me to adapt
down there," Watson said.
"The people are a lot like we
are here in Bradford County."
Whether it's Hardee County
or Bradford County, the
position of warden is a
stressful one due to the
tremendous amount of
responsibility, Watson said. It
is a position with many
challenges.
"Probably our biggest
challenge is because we are a
state agency and we are a large
organization, we as an agency
as a whole do not have the
necessary funds to manage our
facilities at the appropriate
level they need," Watson said.
"That becomes a legislative


budget issue, as it would with
any state agency. What I find
is the older the correctional
facility, the more demands that
are on those facilities."
Lawtey Correctional
Institution was established in
the 1970s, but part of the
facility dates back much
further when it was used as an
educational building.
"We have educational
programs, vocational programs
and substance abuse programs
taking place out of that
building today," Watson said.
Interacting with an inmate
population would suggest
another stress of the job.
Watson said every institution
does have inmates who are
difficult to handle, but the
Lawtey institution is far from
what one might see portrayed
in television and movies.
Watson said the facility has a
better inmate population
compared 'to most other
facilities.
"The fortunate thing about
Lawtey is we have a
population that is near going
home," he said. "A lot of these
inmates will participate in the
-See WATSON p. 4B


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Martha Humphries was named the Reception and
Medical Center's first female warden in November
2006.


WARDEN
Continued from p. 1B
Institution around 1998 or
1999 when she left for the
Department of Correction's


WATSON
Continued from p. 3B
community work-release
program, where they go and
seek paid employment until
they complete their sentence."
A large portion of the
facility's inmates is visible in
the community, which has
been the case for along time.
It has created a familiarity that
makes it easier for the facility
to exist where it does, near a
residential area, Watson said.
"Lawtey has always had a
good relationship within the
local community and within
the county," he said. "It's one
of the old facilities that's built
the- rapponr -with -the-residfents


central office to work in
security operations.
Many more moves came for
her in the next six years. In
2001, she was colonel .at
Liberty Correctional Institution
In 2003, she left to become
assistant warden at Mayo


and political leaders of the
county."
Public work squads from
Lawtey Correctional are not
just visible in Bradford
County. The facility has an
interagency agreement with
the city of Baldwin and
another squad is in an
agreement with Clay County.
Watson said the facility is
currently working on another
agreement with Clay County.
The Florida Department of
Transportation also takes
advantage of Lawtey
Correctional work squads.
"We have three DOT
squads," Watson said. "One
works out of the Gainesville
DOT office and two work out
of the St. Augustine office.
"Not only are we taking care


Correctional Institution.
JUv -. -.... n oiuuro
and Jefferson correctional
institutions finally led her to
the position she holds today at
RMC.
Throughout' her career,
Humphries has been making
history within the department.
Her many accomplishments
include being the first female
hired at Mayo, the first female
lieutenant at Madison and the
first female colonel at Liberty.-
When asked if being a
women was difficult on the
security side of a traditionally
male-dominated field,
Humphries said, "I never saw
it as a hindrance."
"We do it the same as men,
and I think we do it very well."
"It's all about your
dedication to the job," she said.
"We're all capable."
So far, Humphries has said
that everyone has been very
accepting and helpful at RMC.
"I'm proud to be here at
RMC," she said. "It's a good
place to be."
She has taken residence in
staff housing and is adjusting
to Lake Butler.
"It's a good place to be," she
said. "It's like a home town to
me."
As warden, Humphries must
oversee the day-to-day
operations of the prison she
works at, while keeping in
mind the overall goal of the
department.
"My job is to insure the
safety of staff, the public and
inmates," she said.
The reception center sees a
variety of inmates come
through its doors for testing


of Bradford County, we
expand beyond the county."
It all adds up to having quite
a positive impact on
communities. In fact, Watson
said any correctional
institution has a positive
impact on the community it is
located in. Rural communities
that contain correctional
facilities have definitely
benefited since the decline of
farming because of the stable
income the Department of
Corrections provides, he said.
That is why Watson has no
problem with outsiders
thinking of prisons first when
Bradford County is mentioned.
"That doesn't bother me at
all," he said. "The corrections
industry is a good
organization."


and medical care, as well as
long-term housing.
Humphries has the
responsibility of keeping up
with approximately 2,888
inmates and 1,079 staff; these
numbers often fluctuate as
inmates come and go, and
more positions are available at
RMC than those that are
currently filled.
She even has to provide
officers for security at
Jacksonville Memorial,
-beeause-the-hospital provides a
whole floor for inmates.
The work camp at RMC is
an additional responsibility. It
opened Nov. 1, 2006, the same
month she arrived.
A good working relationship
with the community is
something Humphries said she
plans to keep going.
Inmate work crews are often
provided to the county, the city
municipalities and the school
board to provide labor. This
lowers cost of projects so
Union, as an economically
constrained county, can afford
to do more for the community.
"They do a lot of good
things for the county,"


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Humplries said.
Physical Fitness
Challenge
Another goal for the warden
is to get all her employees in
-good physical shape.
The department is in its
initial phase of the Physical
Fitness Program, a program
implemented by the
department Secretary.. Jim
McDonough in an effort to
improved the overall health of
the Department of Corrections
by 2009.
Humphries said RMC put its
officers to the test to see their
progress. In April, .
institution held its own
Physical Fitness Challenge.
Employees of varying
fitness levels gathered at the
institution's training building
to see how they measured up.
After the fitness portion of
the challenge, RMC served the
participants a healthy meal of
chicken, veggies and salad.
The first phase of the
program is voluntary for
employees. Fitness guidelines
are based on age and differ for
male and female employees.


fiere or Vo97
Sifce 1976


The challenge involves i
doing push-ups, curl-ups and a
timed 1.5-mile run/walk.
Humphries said she has
started working on her fitness
goals as part of the challenge.
Loyalty to the
department
Humphries' career has given
her time to gain "ultimate
respect for the Department of
Corrections.
"I'm /ery loyal to the
department because ,it's been
good to me," she said.
Even while .the department
has seen some negative
publicity, Humphries said
doing her job the right way is
something she keeps in the
front of her mind.
"As a public servant, you're
in the spotlight," she said. "We
try to be professional every
day."
On the wall in her office
hangs a sign that reads:
fairness, integrity, loyalty,
discipline and duty.
"I put that up there for a
reason," she said. "It's a daily
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Aug. 16, 2007 TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR--B-SECTION Page 5B


PRIDE
Continued from p. 1B
process of periodic review and
certification, programs are
modified and adapted to meet
current industry standards.
The Florida Department of
Corrections provides PRIDE
facilities, inmate labor and is
PRIDE's largest customer. The
Florida Department of
Education has certified 20 of
PRIDE's on-the-job training
programs.
Clemson University's
Apparel Research Center
provides guidance, site visits
and recommendations to the
seven PRIDE garment plants.
Other associations include
Florida A&M University's
Division of Graphic Arts,
FAMU/FSU College of


1981 PRIDE is incorporated.
1982 PRIDE begins its first
operation, the Zephyrhills
Printing Industry.
1983 PRIDE opens
agriculture, meat processing,
and canning operation at
Glades, agriculture at DeSoto,
agriculture and aquaculture at
Hendry, optics at Broward,
furniture restoration at Dade;
and vegetables, garment, and
cardboard box plants at
Marion.
1984 PRIDE operates 37
industries with sales of $22
million in 17 correctional
institutions. PRIDE accelerates
assumption of responsibility
for all of Florida's prison
industries 12 months ahead of
the legislative mandated
schedule.
1985 PRIDE hires its first
full-time director of inmate
placement,--and opens the
Sumter furniture plant.
1986 PRIDE makes the first
of its kind victim restitution
payment on behalf of PRIDE
inmates.
1986 PRIDE opens three
new industries in one day:


Engineering, University of
Florida's Institute of Food and
Agriculture Science, the
United States Sugar
Corporation, the University of
Missouri's Rolla Coatings
Institute, Ro-Search and the
Florida Department of
Management Services Division
of Purchasing, which reviews
products to ensure competitive
pricing and approval for state
and local government
purchases.
Who are PRIDE's
customers?
PRIDE's primary markets
are categorized into three
sectors: state government,
local (city and county)
government and nonprofit
entities and the private sector.'
The Prison Industries
Enhancement Certification
Program exempts the


In this 1982 photograph, Jack Eckerd, PRIDE's first
chairman, best known for his chain of Eckerd Drug
stores, reviews a copy of the Correctional Compass
which is printed each month by inmates at PRIDE's
Zephyrhills Correctional Institution print shop.


metal products at Polk, wood
office furniture at Sumter, and
heavy vehicle renovation at
Tomoka.
1987 PRIDE adds a new
sawmill with modern
equipment. PRIDE establishes
an ex-offender outplacement
office to coordinate efforts to
find jobs and provide social
services for PRIDE inmate
workers leaving the
correctional system.
1988 PRIDE opens six new
industries: paint at Baker,
modular office systems at
Polk, employment services at
Tampa Community Correction
Center, computer drafting at
Lantana, dental lab at
Broward, and vehicle
renovation at Dade.
1989 PRIDE implements the
Training, Industry, Education
and Support (TIES) program,
integrating inmate job training
and education needs with
targeted job placement
opportunities.
1990 PRIDE expands the
victim restitution program by
guaranteeing 15 percent of


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By participation in this
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has sought and received
certification for all of its
manufacturing facilities.
Regional PRIDE
Programs
Union Correctional
Union Correctional
Institution offers five PRIDE
programs for inmates: dental
lab, tag plant, metal furniture,
cattle and food processing.
Union Dental supplies
crowns, bridges, dentures and
orthodontic appliances to
every, prison dental clinic in
Florida, as well as providing
dental prosthetics to private
dental practices in 45 other
states.
Three inmates assigned to
Union Dental became the very
first inmates in the nation to
achieve designation as
certified dental laboratory
technicians in August 2005.
Each year Union Tag
manufactures over 5,500,000
license plates for the state of
Florida and foreign countries.
They also make tag designs for
organizations, fund-raising
events and schools.
Union Metal Furniture
'manufactures metal detention
furniture, tables, desks, beds,


each dollar an inmate earns
will be paid to victims with
court-ordered restitution. New
See TIMELINE, p. 8B


barbeque grills, lockers,
acoustical panels, shelving,
trash receptacles, seating and
school lockers.
Two other industries at UCI
include cattle and food
processing. Inmates in cattle
programs can learn the care
and tending of livestock.
Livestock programs have been
converted to contracted herd
management programs,
providing a valuable service to
local ranchers. Inmate workers
in this program become trained
in herd health management and
farm equipment operation and
maintenance.
Inmates can also train in the
principles of planting,
cultivation, fertilization,
insect/disease control and
harvesting of crops.
New River West & Lawtey
Correctional
New River West in Raiford
and Lawtey Correctional
Institution both operate
garment factories making
clothing items such as


Florida Department of Corrections Secretary James
McDonough, PRIDE Board Chairman William
Dresser and PRIDE President Jack Edgemon.


Department of Corrections
shirts and smocks, officer
uniforms, scrub sets, inmate
jail sets, utility/lab coats,
inmate dresses, dusters, gowns
and pajamas.
New River East
New River East


Correctional Institution offers
inmates opportunities to train
in forest management, the
growth and development of
forest resources, reforestation
and the use of heavy
See MORE, p. 8B


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Page 6B TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MON!TOR--B-SECTION Aug. 16, 2007


Editorial:
Correctional
institutions in
the
community
There was a time when
communities felt stigmatized
by having a prison, mental
institution or reform school in
their vicinity, including
Raiford, Chattahoochee and
Marianna, towns known for
local state facilities in or near
their borders. Fortunately,
enlightened citizens
understand the .need for
institutions that care for
incorrigibles, the mentally
disturbed and wayward youth,
and they accept their presence
in their midst.
That is as it should be
because every community
contributes individuals to the
various facilities, and each
community must share in the
responsibility for providing
institutional care.
Bradford and Union counties


Editorial:
Corrections
personnel
transcend
stereotypes
In the beginning, men and
women gathered around the
campfire to hear storytellers
spin their yarns about hunting
exploits or other adventures.
Then came the written word,
but mass production of written
material was centuries away in
the future. The advent of the
printing press and the ability to
read ushered in writers of fact
and fiction, and at times a
mixture of the two.
Unfortunately, the history of
prisons parallels the history of
reading and writing, harking
back to biblical times when
Christian workers were
incarcerated for proclaiming
the gospel. While conditions in
the biblical prisons weren't
detailed, being denied personal
freedom was reprehensible in
those days and remains a sad
factor in anyone's life today.
But where there are prisons,
there are people to operate the
facility, to provide food,.
shelter and clothing for the
incarcerated and maintain the
physical plant. Inmates were
probably pressed into service


FYOI-02


have long been known for their
penal institutions, primarily
because of Union Correctional
Institution, formerly known as
Florida State Prison, the
flagship of the Florida prison
system. In fact, it was
Florida's only prison, housing
both male and female inmates
prior to the opening of Lowell
Correctional Institution (for
women) in 1955.
The Florida Department of
Agriculture (which included
the prison system) began
buying cut-over timber land in
Bradford County in 1910,
paying $5 per acre for the
approximately 20,000 acres
comprising the several
institutions clustered on both
sides of New River on S.R. 16,
between Raiford and Starke.
Bradford County was divided
into two counties in 1921, with
about two-thirds of the prison-
owned land in Bradford
County and about one-third in
Union County.
The first inmates arrived at
the prison labor camp (on the
site of Union Correctional
Institution) in 1918. Prior to
that time, Florida's few


for day-to-day activities,
cooking, cleaning and
maintenance, but a cadre of
employees was charged with
maintaining order and security.
Writers of fiction have
treated prison' employees
poorly, depicting them as
being ignorant, arrogant,
uneducated and downright
mean. Books have been
written, and many made .into
movies, painting prison
personnel as bullies and
dullards, often outwitted by
inmates. It may make for good
reading, but it's a
misconception that harms the
industry and the people who
serve in it.
Law enforcement personnel
suffer from the same fiction,
and perhaps for the same
reason. Working in either of
the two fields is stressful and
dangerous, often unappreciated
by the public, and in prior
times, underpaid. Today's
salaries are much improved,
and workers in both fields are
moving up the social ladder as
the public becomes better
informed.' With correctional'
facilities in virtually every
county in the state,
correctional,- personnel are
neighbors and friends,
attending school, church and
social functions with business
workers and leaders, and all
other members of society.


FY 02-03


FY 03-04


inmates were housed in a
former Civil War military base
at Chattahoochee.
The modern correctional
system began in Florida in
1958, when the Legislature
moved the prison system from
the auspices of the Department
of Agriculture and established
the Department of Corrections.
The era of corporal
punishment gave way to
education and training inmates,
and brought improved pay
schedules for employees that
attracted better educated
people to carry out the new
programs.
Coincidental with new
systems in corrections in the
early 1960s, the U.S. military
began mustering out World
War II veterans with 20 years'
or more service that liked the
semi-military discipline of a
prison setting. They went to
work at Florida State Prison
(the present UCI), bringing
expertise and military skill that
upgraded overall employee
performance.
That influx of highly skilled
personnel eased the burden of
opening two new facilities,
Florida State Prison and the


In Florida, a leader in prison
reform, the era of enlightened
prison operations began with
the Legislature removing
prisons from the Department
of Agriculture and establishing
the Department of Corrections
in 1958. The move came at a
good time because the
turbulent 1960s saw an influx
of inmates from the streets of
large cities that overtaxed
prison facilities. Few people
outside the system understand,
or maybe even care, that as
many as 18 men were assigned
to a single cell. Inmate living
conditions were deplorable and
the stress under which inmates
lived was passed on to prison
personnel.
The first two appointees as
secretary of corrections, R.O.
Culver and H.G. Cochran,
served short terms before
moving on to other interests
unrelated to corrections or
their handling of the position,
to be replaced by Louie L.
Wainwright, superintendent of
Avon Park Correctional
Institution. A native of
Lawtey, his expertise guided
the Florida prison system
through the turbulent 1960s
and the attendant growth of
'facilities for the next 25 years
(1962-87), making him the
dean of prison administrators
throughout the nation.

See EDIT, p 7B


Amount spent daily on operations per inmate


40-


39-


$37,7


37 $36 0J


36 -


$36.36


$3 5.45


FY 04-05.


FY 05-06


Reception and Medical Center,
both of which were opened
between 1960 and 1965.
Staffing new correctional
facilities would have been
much more difficult without
retiring military personnel.
But what is corrections
doing for the counties in which
they are located? Obviously,
employment in the counties
has escalated with the hiring of
local people. The jobs have
also attracted new residents
with accompanying families
who have enriched our
communities..
Bradford and Union counties
are much more cosmopolitan
today than they were in years
past when Florida State Prison
had 67 employees with the
same surname. Don't assume
that the local family didn't
make good employees, for
they were excellent for the old
way of running prisons, but
educational programs and
modern equipment required
younger and better educated
employees. The retirement of
the old hands opened slots for
new personnel.
Before outlining the many
advantages of having
correctional facilities in a
community, it must be
admitted there is a down side.
The chamber of commerce has
found in recent years that some


business firms do not want to
locate in Bradford or Union
because of the unfavorable
view by people who do not
appreciate the many good
qualities of having an industry
that is nonpolluting,
nondiscriminating, depression-
proof, and that offers excellent
advancement opportunities,
"retirement and health benefits.
Many people are ignorant
that prison employees have
above-average educations
gained while on the job.
Beginning about the time the
prison system began
expanding, community
colleges were also expanding,
bringing classrooms to the
prisons, and teaching inmates
and employees college-level
courses. Correctional
institutions have become a
reservoir of educated people in
the communities in which they
live.
Outside their correctional
duties, prison employees are
contributing to the community
by serving on county and city
commissions, and working as
volunteers on committees and
boards, bringing expertise to
all areas of the counties in
which they live. The financial
impact on. Bradford and Union
counties has been tremendous,
but the single-most important
factor improving the local
community is the influx of


prison employees.
Prison employees must pass
stringent requirements to be
considered for employment. A
basic GED certificate will
serve to get a job interview,
depending on the level of
employment being sought.
Seeking a position higher than
that of an entry-level
correctional officer requires
increased certification and/or
experience, and those seeking
professional positions (doctors,
dentists, etc.), must have
educational degrees and
experience normally required
within those professions.
In no way is the prison
system staffed by castoffs,
misfits or second-rate
personnel. Beginning
correctional officers must
complete a 600-hour course
before being assigned to a post
controlling inmates, and
competitive entry-level pay
scales, health insurance and
retirement benefits guarantee
quality applicants. Housing on
prison property is available at
some institutions and
represents an additional
incentive for employment.
The salaries they earn
enhance businesses, schools,
churches and other entities as
those dollars make their way
through the community.
By Buster Rahn,
Telegraph Editorialist


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I
The entrance to New River East Correctional
Institution.


New River West correctional Institution.


SAPP
Continued from p. 2B
Institution is comprised of two
units: New River East and
New River West.
New River West was opened
as the Butler Transit Unit in
August 1975 to house the
abundance of inmates at the
Reception and Medical Center
in Lake Butler.
New River West originally
opened in October 1982 as the
New River Annex, also. to
house the overflow in-transit
population at the RMC. The
two facilities merged in July
1987 to become known as the
New River Correctional
Institute East and West Units.
In 1991, the facility changed
to accommodate long-term
inmates. New River West is a
close custody adult male
facility' housing mainly
inmates with chronic medical
needs. The facility is
wheelchair-accessible % iih si \
open bay housing units and a
designated, confinement space.
All inmates must stay on the
grounds of the facility
In addition to its infirmary,
New River West also has a 24-


hour medical staff on site. In
fact, some physicians with the
facility live in housing on the
grounds, making them more
accessible to meet the medical
needs of inmates.
As of June 1, New River
West had 140 staff employees
and a total of 803 inmates who
have been incarcerated
between one and a half and 14
years.
Inmates at New River West
are offered the PRIDE garment
factory as a source of skills
training and employment.
Because of the close custody,
inmates within the West Unit
have no community work
squads.
Also available 'to inmates


that provide millions of dollars
a year in services to the
community," Sapp said.
. Cleared inmates can go
outside the facility on
community service work


housed in the West Unit are
the vocational programs of
welding technology and small
gas engine service technology.
Academic programs available
to inmates are adult basic
education, general education
development, a mandatory
literacy program and Title 1
programs.
"Many inmates do take
advantage of the vocational
and educational programs
provided for them," Warden
Jack Sapp said.
Inmates are also given
wellness education services
which include smoking
cessation, wellness education,
marriage enrichment, sports
leagues, music/band, religious
education and worship
services. The facility has a
library program with a major
law collection available.
The New River East facility
has 294 staff employees and
houses adult male inmates in
close, medium, minimum and
community custody grades in
six open bay housing units and
one cell housing unit.
As of June 1, New River
East housed a total of 1,013
inmates who have been
incarcerated between one and
11 years.
Vocational programs
available at the East Unit
include consumer electronic
repair, PC support services,
plumbing technology, printing,
and graphic arts. The facility
provides the same educational
and wellness programs as its
counter west unit with the
addition of special education
classes.
"Most of the inmates in the
East Unit are on work crews


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squads with the Department of forestry.
Transportation, public works Combined, New River East
and other interagency and West provide more,than
community work squads. 430 jobs to residents in the
The East Unit offers inmates community with an annual
PRIDE on-the-job training in salary budget of $16,154,768.


In the meantime, those
pundits that see correctional
personnel as being social
outcasts need to take a new
and unbiased look at the
modern prison. It's unfortunate
that incarceration is a growing


industry, but the people that
work therein would like to see
crime decrease and the inflated
inmate count reduced, just as
other law-abiding citizens.
By Buster Rahn,
Telegraph Editorialist


Breakdown of annual prisons budget


EDIT
Continued from p. 6B
Today Florida's prison
system is among the finest in
the nation, accredited in all
areas of administration,
security, infrastructure, health
and care of inmates, education
and training of staff and
inmates, and records keeping.
Among all state agencies, the
Department of Corrections has
always maintained outstanding
financial records, maintaining
budgetary controls and earning
excellent audit reports. The top
administrators in the
institutions have risen through
the ranks, earning the respect
* and admiration of rank and file
personnel with their
experience and knowledge of
operating correctional
facilities.
Overall, the selection of
wardens (formerly called
superintendents) has been
excellent, and many have
earned the respect of inmates
and employees during his
tenure. Floridians have every
right to be proud of the system,
the tangible and intangible
qualities that make up the
whole, including an inmate
population that is well-
behaved, reflecting the quality
of life inside the compound.


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Page 8B TEIt-GRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR--B-e- .


MORE
Continued from p. 5B
equipment.
When logs are harvested, the
inmate workers gain
knowledge in sawmill
operations and the grading and
straightening of lumber, later
transformed into park and
recreation furniture or sold for
fencing, decks, park furniture,
picnic tables, benches, kiosks
and landscape products.
Baker Correctional
Baker Paint Industry at Baker
Correctional Institution in
Sanderson manufactures road
striping paint, reflective paint
and customized blends' for
eight distributing companies in
Florida as well as other
distributors in Georgia, Texas,
New York and Nebraska.
Inmates are cross-trained in
areas of quality control,
warehousing, shipping,
receiving and customer
service. In addition, workers
obtain OSHA certification in
forklift operation. Upon
completion of the paint
training program, inmates
receive a certificate from the
University of Missouri's Rolla
Coatings Institute.
According to the available
Jata, only one customer
complaint was registered at
Baker Paint and 99 percent of
all orders were shipped on
time in 2005.
Overall in 2006, PRIDE
Enterprises processed and
delivered more than 67,000
orders (excluding agricultural
crop contracts). More than 90
percent of these orders were
delivered complete and on
time. Furthermore, 98.7
percent of the orders were
defect free.
Other PRIDE
services
Being able to get a job and
staying employed are
significant factors in reducing
recidivism rates among Florida
prisons.
The Transition H Services
Program provides former
PRIDE inmates with access to
additional community support



'I '


-Inmate Loftin has been trained as a dental prosthetic
technician at PRIDE's dental laboratory in Union
Correctional Institution.


and services. Any former
PRIDE worker leaving the
program in good standing is
eligible for post-release job.
assistance in Florida
communities.

PRIDE can refer ex-
offenders for housing,
education, health care and
substance abuse treatment
through community coalitions,
agreements with community
service providers and
cooperation with educational
institutions.

Additionally, the Transition
Services Program is able to
fund temporary shelter,
clothing and transportation for
qualified program participants..

For PRIDE inmates in the
program, 93 percent were
placed in full-time jobs upon
release with an average
starting wage of $11.03 per
hour. Statistics show that after
30 days, 98 percent were still
employed and, after six
-months, the job retention rate
was 87 percent.

In 2006, PRIDE established
a Transition Services


Community Advisory Board,
which is comprised of program
participants and community
service providers to gain
feedback on the PRIDE
program and ways it can be
improved.
The board also became a.
network for providing resource
information, establishing
mentoring relationships, and
functioning as a support
mechanism during the difficult
transition period.
Many inmates have court-
ordered restitution payments to
be made to .victims as- part- of-
their sentence..
Through the Victimh
Restitution Progrdm, PRIDE
voluntarily contributes 15
percent of the total inmate
payroll value to be distributed
to the victims of inmate
workers.
This program provides early
compensation to victims and
enables the inmate worker to
acknowledge and pay his or
her debt to society. Upon
release, the inmate is faced
with a lessened obligation,
allowing for an easier
transition into society. In 2006,
PRIDE contributed $246,771
to this fund for distribution to,
victims.


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TIMELINE
Continued from p. 5B
industries open at Lawtey,
Liberty, Madison and Polk.
1991 PRIDE's Tag Plant
wins State of Florida's Davis
Productivity Award and
PRIDE's Cross City Print
captures the Golden Squeegee
Award.
1992 PRIDE establishes first
of its kind optical
apprenticeship program,
certified by the Department of
Labor, at Broward.
1993 PRIDE reorganizes
into six business divisions;
opens a modular Construction
Panel Industry at Dade
Correctional.
1994 Clemson University
publicly recognizes PRIDE's
seven textile industries
certification programs.
1995 PRIDE is selected by
the St. Petersburg Chamber of
Commerce as a finalist for
"Small Business of the Year
Award" for the second year in
a row.
1996 PRIDE opens five new
industries: quick print, citrus,
seafood processing,
aquaculture/fish farming, and
warehouse.
1997 PRIDE is selected by
the ACA as one of its top five
"Best Practices" in
correctional industries..
1999 PRIDE is authorized
by the Florida Legislature to
run the Federal Prison Industry
--Enhancemenr(PIETProgram.
2 0 0 0 PRIDE Tomoka
inmate workers are certified as
ASE master mechanics and 10
inmates achieve the highly
coveted EVT (Emergency
Vehicle Technician)
certification.
2001 PRIDE launches its
"One PRIDE" initiative,
consolidating the marketing
aind sales efforts for all of its
industries.
2002 PRIDE Avon Park
Sanitary Maintenance and
Supply Industry receives ISO
9001:2000 Certification, the
first known prison industry in
the United States to receive
this honor.
2003 PRIDE Lawtey
Textiles receives (ISO)
9001:2000 certification.
2004 PRIDE's Tag industry
and the Department of
Highway Safety and Motor
Vehicles jointly improve the


An innadt preparing fence gates Tor shipping at
PRIDE's metal furniture shop in Union Correctional
Institution.


tag order processing system,
resulting in a Davis
Productivity Award for both
organizations. PRIDE opens an
Information Technology
Support Center at Polk.
2005 PRIDE achieves
financial stability after
significant losses in preceding


years. Organizational
restructuring includes creation
of a new management position,
Director of Mission Programs.
2006 PRIDE's 25th year
proves to be its most
successful with respect to both
financial and mission related
goals.


The reward for doing right is mostly an internal phenomenon:
self-respect, dignity, integrity, and self-esteem.
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Features and Sports
Section C: Thursday, Aug. 16, 2007 Telegraph Times Monitor




Britt takes honors at 'ugly' Kiwanis event


BY CLIFF SMELLEY
Telegraph Staff Writer
Imagine, if you will, a
woman who possesses the
attributes of Pamela Sue
Anderson, Angelina Jolie and
Jennifer Lopez.
Sound attractive, guys?
Well, maybe not so much if
the woman in question is
Fronia Mae Flirt, the winner of
this year's Kiwanis Club of
Starke Mz. Ugly pageant,
which was sponsored by Bill
Adams Chevrolet of Starke.
Braxton Britt donned a
dress, applied makeup and
showed off his moves while
performing the "Electric Slide'
to win the annual fund-raiser,
which was held Aug. 11 at the
Bradford County Fairgrounds.
Britt, or Fronia Mae, if you
prefer, was one of three
finalists along with Madame
Crotch (Timmy Faulkner) and
Bell E. Flop (Bo Clark). Fronia
Mae probably sealed the deal
with the judges after her
response to the question of
how she would describe
herself over the phone to a
blind date. She said the top of
her body is like Angelina Jolie,
the middle like Pamela Sue
Anderson and the bottom like
Jennifer Lopez.
"That's uncanny," emcee
Terry Vaughan said. "That's
just what I was thinking."
Vaughan then added, "Let's
hope it's a true blind date."
Eight men put aside their
dignity to compete in the
event, which wound up raising
$4,055 for the Kiwanis Club.
The money will help the club
continue its support of youth in
Bradford County.
The contestants, when
introduced individually, showed
off their best attire in keeping
with the event's fiesta theme.
Audience members probably
wished they were taking a
siesta, instead, as they were
subjected to some truly
interesting sights.
Vaughan's quips stuck to the
Mexican theme, as well. When
introducing Betty
Badonkadonk (Randy Curtis),
he said, "Betty is wearing a
skimpy little mini-skirt tonight,
which makes us all wish she
had decided to put a little more


tortilla around her enchilada."
Vaughan had this to say
about Fronia Mae Flirt:
"Tonight, Fronia is sporting all
the colors of the Mexican flag.
By the way, Fronia, Laredo's
wants its tablecloth back."
Britt, by being tabbed the
winner by judges Don Fineout,
Charlene Gathright and Jim
Godwin, received a fishing trip
for two with Jerry Williams
and Oasis Charters.
Faulkner, the first runner-up,
received four tickets to the
Florida-Western Kentucky
football game. Clark, the
second runner-up, received
two tickets to the Florida-Troy
football game.
Also, Mo Smith, as Cantina
Queen, was named "Mz.
Congeniality," while Curtis
and Bear Bryan (Daisy Mae
Bare All) were honored for
best talent and best fiesta wear,
respectively. Smith received
four tickets to Gator Growl,
while Curtis and Bryan
received two tickets each to
the Florida-Troy football
game.
Malcolm Hill (Manur6
Foggybottom) and Michael
McRae (Ima Ho) also
competed.


S.


LEFT: Bell E.
Flop (Bo Clark)
dons her best
fiesta wear
during the
introduction of
contestants.
She did not, as
her name
suggests, flop,
as she finished
as the
pageant's
second runner-
up in the eyes
of judges Don
Fineout,
Charlene
Gathright and
Jim Godwin.


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What would you do to win a pageant? Timmy'
Faulkner climbed up toward the ceiling, while
Braxton Britt got low to the ground. Faulkner, who
portrayed Madame Crotch, and Britt, who portrayed
Fronia Mae Flirt, are pictured together at top left
following the announcement of Britt as this year's
Kiwanis Club of Starke Mz. Ugly winner (Faulkner
was first runner-up). LEFT: Britt maintains his focus
as he shows off some slick moves while performing
the Electric Slide. ABOVE: Faulkner surprised those
in attendance by performing the Macarena on top of
the tables. For more pictures from the event, please
see page 2C.


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Page 2C TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR--C-SECTION Aug. 16, 2007


RIGHT: Betty
Badonkadonk (Randy
Curtis) dances to the
song "Honky Tonk
Badonkadonk," though
Trace Adkins probably
didn't have her in mind
when he penned the
song. BOTTOM RIGHT:
If you attend a Mz. Ugly
event, you are setting
yourself up to getting
closer to the
contestants than you
would like. Manur6
Foggybottom (Malcolm
Hill) sneaks up behind
one of the audience
members and shows a
little affection.


Cantina Queen (Mo Smith) works the room as she
sings "Just A Little Bit Closer." Those in the room
probably thought they were close enough.


STO TR*SNGOI MOEYAWAY


LEFT: Ima Ho (Michael McRae) sings Cher's "If I
Could Turn Back Time." If only. ABOVE: Terry
Vaughan (center) maintains a true sense of
professionalism when he emcees various events,
but it had to be hard to keep his composure with the
likes of Bell E. Flop (left) and Madame Crotch. Are
they trying to win some votes?


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Aug. 16, 2007 TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR--C-SECTIpN Page 3C


Tickets still
remain for
memorial luau
Those who wish to attend
the Santa Fe Community
College Danielle Kramer
Memorial Scholarship Luau
this Saturday, Aug. 18, at the
Bradford County Fairgrounds
in Starke can still do so as
tickets to the event still remain.
' Tickets are $75 each, with
all profits going toward the
memorial scholarship fund.
They may be purchased at the
SFCC Andrews Center,
Denmark Furniture and
Sporting Chance, or you can
call Chuck and Mary Kramer
at WEAG radio station at
(904) 964-5001.
The event begins with a
social at 6 p.m., followed by
dinner at 6:30. There will be
games, prizes and a special
"Tiny Bubbles" auction.
(Details of the auction will be
given with the purchase of
your tickets.)
A grand prize of two tickets'
to Hawaii for seven days and
six nights with
accommodations will be
awarded to one of the lucky
ticket holders.
Danielle Kramer, or "Dani,"
as her family liked to call her,
was killed in an automobile
accident on March 1. The 20-
year-old Bradford High School
graduate was a student at
SFCC at the time.
The scholarship is being
established to honor and
remember Kramer because of
the joy she brought to
everyone at Santa Fe
Community College and
because of her involvement at
the college.
She majored in journalism
and minored in music at Santa
Fe. She was also a first-
generation college student for
the Kramer family and served
as president of student
activities at the Andrews
Center.
A goal of raising $40,000-
with the college receiving
matching .-funds-has been
established for the memorial
scholarship.
If you are interested in
making a contribution, you can
mail a check to SFCC
Endowment in care of SFCC
Andrews Center, 209 W. Call
St., Starke, FL 32091.

Bradford,
back-to-
school
giveaway is
Saturday
BY CLIFF SMELLEY
Telegraph Staff Writer
With school just around the


corner, it is time for students
and families to think about
purchasing school supplies.
A Jacksonville man who is
from Bradford County wants
to do his part to help those
students and families by
hosting Ardley for Kids, a
back-to-school giveaway, this
Saturday, Aug. 18, at the
Thomas Street park.
The event, which starts at 9
a.m. and lasts until 8 p.m., will
include free food and
beverages throughout the day,
games and a drawing for- a
footlocker (tickets are $1
each).
More importantly, school
supplies-paper, pencils, pens,
bookbags, etc.-will be given
away.
This event is being made
possible by Lamar Ardley of
Lamar Ardley Trucking Inc. in
Jacksonville.
"He just wants to give back
to the community," Yolanda
Clark said of Ardley. "He
wants to help the parents out."
Clark said she hopes 500-
1,000 children benefit from
this giveaway, but added, "If
we could reach more, it would
be better."
Donations are being
accepted so that school
supplies can be purchased.
If you would like to make a
donation or would like more
information on this event,
please call Ardley at (904)
233-3398, Clark at (904) 769-
1538 or Faye Ardley at (904)
803-9897.

Melrose's
Jordan to
perform at
Ravine
Gardens
Melrose native Tresa Jordan
will be performing at Ravine
Gardens State Park on Friday,
Aug. 24, at 7:30 p.m. as a
prelude to the Aug. 25-26
Palatka Criterium and Road
Race.
Jordan, the daughter of
Roger and Nancy Buz of
Melrose, will perform on the
park's Campbell Stage. The
park is located at 1600 Twigg
St. in Palatka.
Tickets are $25 and may be
obtained at Century 21
Lakeside Realty in Melrose,
North Florida Music and
Sound in Starke and Sabo's
Italian American Restaurant in
Keystone Heights.
She is also scheduled to be
available for autographs and
pictures on Saturday, Aug.
25...
Jordan, who is now living in
Nashville, released her debut,
self-titled CD in August 2006.
No electric instruments can be
found on the 11-song disc.
"The sound of acoustic
instruments is so beautiful and
clear," Jordan said "You can


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muddy up songs with a lot of
electrics and a big production.
My songs lend themselves to
an acoustic arrangement.
They're organic, raw and
natural. The instruments match
the lyrics."
Those lyrics are about real-
life experiences, Jordan said.
"I know some writers can
just come up with an idea and
write it out of thin air," she
said. "I can't do that. It has to
be something that I've been
through or an emotion that I've
dealt with. There has to be-
some kind of truthfulness to a
song or it won't resonate with
people."
Jordan's life experiences
began in Melrose. Nancy Buz
said her daughter always
wanted to be a singer. She
showed signs of that ambition


,


Ilk


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Tresa Jordan
at an early age. Buz recalled


buying her daughter the
"Chitty Chitty Bang Bang"
tape and playing it for her.
Jordan was young enough that
she could only speak a few
words, yet she was able to
eventually sing the album by
heart.
Jordan's father, Roger Buz,
was a musical inspiration as
well.
"When I was little, I
remember him going out to
play with his band on Friday
and Saturday nights," Jordan
said. "When I was about 9 or
10, I actually got to sing along
with my dad."
Jordan attended the Florida
School of the Performing Arts
in Palatka. She graduated in
the area of musical theater,
then went to a teaching college


in Minnesota.
At the age of 19, Jordan
moved to Nashville with her
best friend. They waited tables
while attempting to break into
the music business.
Jordan met another
struggling musician and fell in
love. The couple married and
had three children. Jordan put
her music career on hold.
She and her husband would
eventually divorce. Jordan
began writing songs as a way
of dealing with her emotions at
the time. It was a self-
described time of self-
discovery as she put her life
back together with newfound
confidence. Her songs got
better and so did her life. She
fell in love again and married a
man who full supported her
musical career.


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Page 4C TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR--C-SECTION Aug. 16,2007


Rough-and-tumble school in Starke trains wrestlers.


BY ARNIE HARRIS
LRM Staff Writer
Grunts, groans, cries of pain
and the deafening crash of
bodies hitting the mat of the
wrestling ring-this is what
you will hear at "The Pain
Station" in Starke every
Wednesday evening.
It is a school for aspiring
professional wrestlers run by
Steve Wicks, aka "Tall Bear"
(his Native-American finame-
he' is one quarter Cherokee),
aka "Eclipse" (his wrestling
name).
Wicks, who stands 6' 11" in
the ring, is the president and
founder of the Coastal
Wrestling Association, which
puts on exhibitions in
Jacksonville, Lake Butler,
Middleburg and its home base
of Starke the third Saturday of
each month from 7-9 p.m. He
is also the current CWA
heavyweight champion, while,
an ominously named Krule
holds the light heavyweight
crown.
In addition, CWA
exhibitions have been held at
the Bradford County Fair and
Starke's Bike Fest.
The organization also holds
several charity events during
the year, most recently on July
21 at the Bradford Fairgrounds
as part of the Lisa Wicks
Memorial Poker Run. In honor
of Wicks' late wife whose
passion was animals, and their
neutering and spaying, the
proceeds went to the River
City Community Animal
Hospital.
To add to the CWA's


BC Extension
course will
give advice on
Africanized
honey bee
encounters
The Bradford County
Extension Service is offering a
course entitled "First
Responder Training for
Africanized Honey Bees" on
Monday, Aug. 20, from 6 p.m.
to 9. p.m. at its office at 2266
I'4. TempleAve. in Starke.
'While .there-. have not been-
any documented cases of
Africanized--honey -bees- ifi
Bradford County, there have
been hives identified in
neighboring counties. This
course will help individuals
who work outdoors formulate
a plan of action if such bees
are encountered.
The time to plan is before
there is a problem.
Registration for this course
is free, but you must RSVP.
Call the Bradford County
Extension Office at (904) 966-
6224 to register and to ensure
there will be enough teaching
materials on hand.


current stable of 18 wrestlers,
Wicks began the Pain Station
school six month ago at the
Bradford Fairgrounds. There,
on any given Wednesday from
6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., he may be
training six or more aspiring
professional wrestlers.
The students are usually at
varying levels of wrestling
proficiency, ranging from
beginners to-those who have
advanced skills. Their current
ages run from 17 to 46.
"The only necessity a
student must have is heart and
desire," Wicks said. "These
cannot be taught. Skills can be.
"A lot of my students come
here thinking they've learned
the skills by watching
wrestling on TV. Then they
find out quickly they haven't.
The typical student needs
anywhere from six months of
training to a year and a half.
"I am the one who
determines when the student
has reached the level where he
can wrestle professionally-I
give him his certificate,"
Wicks said.
Wicks said the very first
thing the wrestling student is


Next, the students learn
wear-down moves, which
means getting opponents in
head, arm or leg locks-and
also how to extricate oneself
from them.
As students progress, one of
the last and more difficult
maneuvers they can opt to
master is the crowd-pleasing
flying drop kick, which, as the,
name implies, involves the
wrestler, from a running start,
taking to the air with his body
extended feet first and making
contact with his opponent's
upper body.
As much of the appeal of
professional wrestling is its
theatricality of heroes vs.
villains, some of the students
wear foreboding costumes and
identify themselves by their
more intimidating names.
A recent school session
featured "The Intruder," a
silent, enigmatic presence
wearing a threateningly
designed ski mask and Chris
"The Tank" Taylor.
Student Nick Hunter, 25, of
Ocala, generally
acknowledged by all to be the
most advanced student in the


A wrestler (right), who would only identify himself as "The Intruder," and had little a
tq say beyond that, participates in exercises in which wrestlers learn the right way q
to fall.


"helicopter," which has a
wrestler being hoisted on his
opponent's shoulders face up
with severe, near-back-
breaking pressure applied to
his body as he is spun around.
One favorite of Wicks' is the
crosshairss," which finds the


opponent face down on the'
mat having his two arms
crossed around his throat at.
pulled back with great force
Wicks said that faced with the
choice of giving up or being
asphyxiated, the opponent will!

See ROUGH, p. 7C&


ALACHUA COUNTY SHERIFFS94 ~ 9
.UPU EZDPOET UTO


Steve Wicks (foreground), who goes by the wrestling name of "Eclipse," operates-
the Pain Station, a school for aspiring professional wrestlers, on Wednesday nights
at the Bradford County Fairgrounds.


taught is how to land on the
canvas without hurting
himself.
," This first lesson is called the
"bump." This involves-after
'-running start and bouncing
_off- the ropes to pick up
momentum-the student
leaving the ground in mid-ring
and crashing on his back onto
the mat. To avoid being hurt,
the trick is to land square on
the surface, letting the full
back take the impact, while
keeping the arms and head out
of the way.
"Injuries occur when the
arms come into play," Wicks
said. "This can easily cause a
broken or, at least, badly
strained arm."
Wicks takes pride in the fact
that no one has been seriously
injured since the school began
in January.


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class, has already participated
in some exhibitions.
Hunter, who works in
" AT&T's customer relations by
day, wrestled and played
football.in high school. He said
he got interested in becoming a
professional wrestler while
watching it on TV at a friend's
house after his mother forbid
him to watch it at home.
Hunter discussed one of the


more advanced skills students
can learn if they choose-
submission holds. These holds
are so painful. a wrestler's,,
opponent immediately gives.
up.
One such move, Hunter said,
is the figure-four leglock,
popularized many-decades ago
by a wrestler named Buddy
Rogers.
Another is called the


.- -. ji.








STAY ONE STEP AHEAD!
As a seller, you'd prefer a knowledge than in the past,
nice clean, unconditional offer and they recognize the security
at full price, right? One way offered when the seller is
to encourage such confidence forthright and demonstrating
among potential buyers is to that there is nothing to hide.
have an inspection report avail- These are the conditions
able during showings, as well that are more likely to produce
as any receipts (or estimates) that unconditional offer.
for repairs. Why order an While it's p*bably a given
inspection when the buyers that the buyers' representative
will probably do so anyway? will encourage them to order
Because when you take the ini- their own inspection, you also
tiative and perform repairs have a greater sense of confi-
before listing, you are basically dence knowing that there
presenting a clean bill of health won't be any surprises.
for your home. If you have any doubts
Prelisting inspections are about wther a prelisting
becoming a popular way to inspection will improve your
give sellers an edge in compet- .chances for an early sale, dis-
itive markets. Taking such cuss it with your real estate
action also provides a great representative, who will also
opportunity to take care of undoubtedly have many other

problems that otherwise might suggestions for successfully
come back to bite you. Buyers marketing your home.
today are armed with more
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Aug. 16,2007 TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR--C-SECTION Page 5C


I IN SERVICE I


Alexander Lee


Airman
Alexander Lee
Air Force Airman Alexander
M. Lee has graduated from
basic military training at
Lackland Air Force Base in San
Antonio, Texas.
During the six weeks of
training, the airman studied the
Air Force mission,
organization, and military
customs and courtesies;
performed drill and ceremony
marches, and received physical
training, rifle marksmanship,
field training exercises, and
special training in human
relations.
In addition, airmen who
complete basic training earn
credits toward an associate
degree through the Community
College of the Air Force.
He is the son of Frank and
Shirley Lee of Keystone
Heights.
Lee graduated in 2005 from
Keystone Heights Junior-Senior
High School and received an
associate degree in 2006 from
St. Johns Riverside Community
College in Orange Park.

Airman
Kody Williams
Kody Williams of Gainesville
graduated-from Air Force basic
military training on July 27 as a
member of Flight 479, Training
Squad #331, located at
,Lackland Air Force Base,
Texas.
Williams is a recent graduate
of Buchholz High School in
Gainesville. Following
graduation, Williams will


attend technical school at
Lackland Air Force Base. That
school will be followed by his
deployment. He is the son of
Jack and Debbie Asbury of
Gainesville and the grandson of
John and Evelyn Brackett of
Worthington Springs.

Seaman
Zim Padgett
Navy Seaman Zim R.
Padgett, son of Deborah L.
Johnson of Keystone Heights
and Zim R. Padgett of Archer,
recently completed U S Navy
basic training at Recruit
Training Command in Great
Lakes, Ill.
During the eight-week
program, Padgett completed a
variety of training which
included classroom study and
practical instruction on naval
customs, first aid, firefighting,
water safety and survival, and
shipboard and aircraft safety.
An emphasis was also placed
on physical fitness
The capstone event-of boot
camp is Battle Stations. This
exercise gives recruits the skills
and confidence they need to
succeed in the fleet Battle
Stations' is designed to
galvanize the basic warrior
attributes of sacrifice,
dedication, teamwork and
endurance in cach recruit
through the practical
application of basic Navy skills
and the core values of honor,
courage and commitment. Its
distinctly Navy flavor was
designed to take into account
what it means to be a sailor.
Padgett is a 2002 graduate of
Newberry High School.


BC group
receives grant
to assist its
community
efforts
The Bradford County
Community Faith Center
announces it has received a
Neighborhood Accountability
Board grant in the amount of
$30,000 from the Department
of Juvenile Justice
The objective of the
Neighborhood Accountability
Board is to deter youth from
entering the juvenile justice
system.
Since its inception in 2004,
the Bradford County Faith
Community Center has
provided HIV testing for more
than 419 people, conducted
more than 200 VOICES
sessions, fed more than 50
families weekly through its
parent organization, the Starke


Muscadine
grape

workshop set
for Aug. 21
UF/IFAS North Floridj
Research and Educationi
Center-Suwannee Valley will
be hosting a field day on
muscadine grapes and wine
making Tuesday, Aug. 21,
from 5:30-8:45 p.m. at the
center.
The program includes a
participant taste test of fresh
fruit, information on selecting
cultivars for both fresh use and
wine, home wine making
basics and a wine and recipe
swap. Wine-making equipment
will also be on display.
University of Florida
publications will be available
for purchase.
This will be an opportunity
to learn about muscadine grape
cultivars and meet other wine-
making enthusiasts.
The research and education
center serves the diverse
agricultural interests in the
region including nursery,
vegetables, fruit crops,
protected culture, forestry,
tobacco and other forage
crops.
The program cost is $15 per
person, which covers


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480 S. U.S. HWY. 17, SAN MATEO Just 4 miles S of bridge in East Palatka


The Bradford County Faith Community Center recently received a $30,000 grant
from the Department of Juvenile Justice. Representing the center and its parent
organization-the Starke Church of God by Faith-are (I-r) Pastor Byron Ramseur,
Nakia Jones, Elaine Slocum and Pastor James McKnight.


Church of God by Faith,
provided pre-marital
counseling, donated computers
to more than 15 families and


educational materials and
dinner. The registration
deadline for payment is Friday,
Aug. 17, at 5 p.m. Contact
Linda Landrum or staff at
(386) 362-1725 to make a
reservation or for more
information.


mentored more than 50 youth
at Starke Elementary and
Bradford Middle schools.
It is the mission of the


Bradford County Faith
Community Center to enhance
the quality of life for the
citizens of Bradford County.


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Account reconciliation
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llcome tax returns Hawthorne, FI 32640
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Call for a free consultation (352)478-2174


Randy Starling
Diroctd


Bradford Union Area Career Technical Center
Fall, 2007
Telephone: (904) 966-6764


Chuck Ebert
Coordinator


Child Care
Class Instructor Hr Date Day Hours PM Fee Lab/BK Bldg/Rm
Child Growth/Development Harmon 6 9/4,9/6 T,R 6:20-9:30 $9.60 $10 9/14
BOS Harmon 6 10/2, 10/4 T,R 6:20-9:30 $9.60 $10 9/14


Child Ahuse Neglect


Harmon


10/9.10/11


6:20-9:30


$6.40


Health, Safety, Nutrition Harmon 8 11/1, 11/6, T,R 6:20-9:30 $12.80 $10 9/14
11/8
Child Care Facility Harmon 6 11/27, 11/29 T,R 6:20-9:30 $9.60 $10 9/14
Rules/Regs
Child Care Family Rules/Regs Harmon 6 12/4, 12/6 T,R 6:20-9:30 $9.60 $10 9/14
Special Needs Devalerio 10 T 5:30-8:40 $16.00 TBA 9/14
Preschool Child Devalprio 10 T 5:30-8:40 $16.00 TBA 9/14
CDA Equivalent Mand 5:50-9:00 600 hrs.@1.9 $/hr.+$25/sem. 9/14
Sat. Lab fee+$51.36 Book
Develop. Approp. Prac.- Devalario 10 T 5:30-8:40 $16.00
Infants
Business Education
Class Instructor Date Day Hours Fee Lab/BK Bldg/Rm
Administrative Office Assistant Harrington M-F School Day $ $25/varies 4/3
Accounting Operations Harrington M-F School Day $ $25/varies 4/3
Microsoft Office Harrington M-F School Day$ $25/varies 4/3
High School Evening
Class Instructor Date Day Hours PM Fee Lab/BK Bldg/Rm
HS Promo for 11 & 12 Grade Free NA 3/1
Health Care
Class Instructor Date Day Hours PM Fee |Lab/BK Bldg/Rm
CORE (90) (Sl) Winfree 9/5-11/28 W,Th 4:50-9:00 $702.91 per Id semester 3/2
ANA(CNA) Ryder 9/4-11/6 M,T 4:50-9:00 (includes books), $598.00 3/2
per 2d semester, $25 lab per
semester
PCA Winfree 11/28-2/13 W,Th 4:50-9:00 3/2
AHA(Phl&EKG)(75 &75) Ryder 1/14-6/2 M,T 4:50-9:00 3/2
AAHA(100)PCT(60) Winfree 2/14-5/15 W,Th 4:50-9:00 3/2
Home Health Aide(50) Ryder 11/6-1/8 M,T 4:50-9:00 3/2
Testing
Class Time August Sept Oct. Nov. Dec, BldqgRm
EveningTABE 5:30 PM 9,14,16,30 6,13,20,27 11,18,25 1,15,29 13 7/
Morning TABE 8:30 AM 6,13,20,27 7/
Pre-GED (Tues. Only) 5:30 PM 18 16 13 7/
GED Orientation 4:30 PM 20 1 5 3 7/
GED, 2007 5:30- 8:30 PM 20,2f,22,23 NA 1,2,3,4, 5,6,7,8 3,4,5,6 7/
GED Registration AllDay A/6-8/17 9/17-9/28 10/22-11/1 11/19-11/30 Front
Office


Adult and High School Night Programs
Class Instiuctor Date Day Hours Fee Lb/BK Bldg/Rm
Adult Basic Ed., Underage Nichols 8/20 M,T,W,R 4:50-7:00 Free NA 3/5
Adult Basic Ed., Adults Nichols 8/20 M,T,R 6:50-9:00 Free NA 3/5
Ad. Basic Ed & GED Day Class Rudoi 8/20 M -F Sch. Day Free NA 3/11
GED Prep, Adults Nichols 8/20 M,T,R 6:50-9:00 Free NA 3/5
GED Prep, Underage Nichols 8/20 M,T,W,R 4:50-7:00 Free NA 3/5
Bradford County Jail Harrington 8/20 M,W 4:00-7:00 Free NA BCJ
Bradford County Jail Martin 8/20 M,W 6:30-8:30 Free NA BCJ
Technical, Industrial Education
Class Instructor Date Day Hours Fee Lb/BK Bldg/Rm
Welding, Geiger 8/20-1/17 M-F Sch. Day $1.91/hr $25.00
Commercial Vehicle Driving Pate 8/27-12/14 M-F Sch. Day $611.20 $1483.80 Range -
Bus Driver Training Smith TBA TBA Sch. Day $25.00 Range
Diesel Mechanics Rensberger 8/20- 1/17 M-F Sch. Day $1.91/hr $25.00 10/1
Masonry Beville 8/20-1/17 M-F Sch.Day $1.91/hr $25.00 10/2A
Cosmetology Kirkland 8/20-1/17 M-F Sch. Day $1179.42/1" $25.00 9/15
semester
Computer Technology Ledger 8/20- 1/17 M-F Sch. Day $1.91/hr $25/$129 .' 9/24
Community Education
Class Instructor Date Day Hours PM Fee Lab/BK Bldg/Rm
Beginning Quilting (16hr) Redding 8/20- 10/15 M 6:30-8:40 $21.60 NA 9-27
Advanced Quilting (16hr) Redding 8/21 10/16 T 6:30-8:40 $21.60 NA 9-27
Quick Books (12 hr) Douglas 8/28 9/13 T Th 6:30-8:40 $24.00 Books $35 4 -3
Competitive Co-ed Volleyball Rensberger M 7:00- 9:00 $10.00 BMS Gym
Cake Decorating Sanborn 8/27 10/22 M 6:30-8:30 $22.95 7
Home Repairs Thompson
Basketball For Adults Veranac $10 BMS Gym
Contracted Classes
Class Time Aug Sept Oct Nov Dec Bldg/Rm
Hunter Safety 6:00-9:00 PM 4,6,8,11,
13
BDI (SMART) 6:00-10:00PM 13 10 15 10 9-20
BDI (NFSC) 6:00-10:00 PM 7,20 4,24 9, 22 6, 26 4, 17 9-20
DATE (SMART) 5:00-9:00 PM 9 6 11 8 6 9-20
NEFEC, ESE In-service 5:00-7:00 PM 4,11 1 6 Comp Lab
Continuing Work Force
Class Instructor Aug/Sep October Nov/Dec Fee Lab/BK Bldg/Rm
Intermed. Maintenance Of Traffic Sanders
Pilot Escort 14

More Curriculum details may be viewed on our website at: www.bradfordvotech.com
Published: 8/1/07



Accredited by
Commission of Council on Occupational Education. An Equal Opportunity Center, without regard to race, creed, sex, or handicap.
Approved for veteran training by the State Approving Agency.


I







Page 6C TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR--C-SECTION Aug. 16, 2007


4 Mr. and Mrs. W

-.k*r and 'Si


T-' ~0iVce miar! ted onI
.~,,~ 'd.V J'j1~'I. 207.at
Yfentti
'-,e. I c Ilk"III as
r.s ~iven it)
hW \ali'r rVIIkcaN1.e111,
~ h~'nt~.-v; Bonnie


Scarlet Rachel
Stroud
Bill% and Leslie Stroud of
Lawtey announce the birth of
their daughter, Scarlet Rachel
Stroud. on Aug. 5, 2007, at
North Florida Regional
Hospital.
Scarlet weighed 6 pounds. 11
ounces' and measured 19.5
inches lon g. She joins a sister,
Eliablth Grace, 4 years old.
SMaternal grandparents are
Dewitt and Libby Griffis or
Raiford.
Paternal grandparents are
William and Brenda Stroud of
Law teI\


Jeannie Broughton and
Ashley Alday

Broughton
and Alday
engaged
Jeannie Broughion and
Azhle. Alday announce their
up coming wedding on
Saturday. Aug. 25. 2007. at 3
p rn. at the Firt United
Methodist Church in Starke.
All family and friends are
in\ ited.


Lee graduates
from med
school
George Leighton Lee iII.
M.D. captain. Medical Corps,
U.S Arms. graduated May
19, 200()7. fiom Uniersit) of
the Health Sciences in
Bethesda. Md.. specializing
in urological surgery at
Walter Reed Aimy Medical
Center. Washington. D.C.
Leighton is a 1997 graduate
of Bradford High School.


Leighiton
Geoige
Leighton
Heights.


is the son of
and Christine
of Keystone


Fuller and Jones marry July 28


Julie Fuller and Keith Jones
were married on Saturday, July
28, 2007, at the Church of
Christ in Keystone Heights.
The ceremony was performed
by Robert Bell.
The bride was given in
marriage by her parents.
Maid of honor was Kimberly
Jasmin. sister of the bride, with
attendants. Kaylci Jones and
Makenzei Jones, daughter of
the groo .
Flower girl %ias-Macev Jasmin.
Best men were Raymond
Hedrick and David Seymour,
Bradshaw Fuller, son of the
bride, also- served as the


.Storm tryouts
set Saturday
There N\ill be tryouts for the
fall 12 and under Storm
fastpitch softball tean on
Saturday, Aug, 18,, at the
Keystone Heights High School
softball field. Tryouts will
begin at 10 a.m.
For more information
contact Mitchell Dicks (352)
235-1668; Craig Wise (352)
-427-3897, -or Jry -Waters
13521 475-3338.
TALKS
mentoring
program back
You can make a difference in


attendant
Ring bearer was Thomas
Jasmin.
A reception was held at the
Women's Club of Keystone
Heights.
The bride is the daughter of
Hank and Sharon Johnson and
Dan and Devanie Fergus. She
is a teacher at Melrose
Elementary School.
The groom is the son of
Albert and Joyce Jones. He is
a paremedic/firefighter for
Clay County Fire Rescue.
Following a honeymoon in
St. Augustine, the couple will
live in Keystone Heights.


the life of a child with only
one hour per week.
Bradford County Faith
Community Center TALKS
mentoring program training
session will show you how
Thursday, Aug. 23, 6-8 p.m. at
the Starke Church of God by
Faith Community Youth
Center, 21 Old Lawtey Rd.
TALKS requires minimal
preparation time, and the
curriculum is provided. It
takes 30 minutes during the
school day to share wisdom and
help students become leaders.
Do you have one hour? Find
out how to get the most value
of that time.
Call (904) 964-5088 for
more information.


BILL ADAMS CHEVROLET OF STARKE


r---- R*1I.l!],. --* r------
LUBE OIL AND 'TIRE ROTATION
FILTER SERVICE SERVICE
SI Includes inspection of
Includes up to b quarts Q03 all tires and wheels, 0
I of conventional oil and VIi move tires to ad 04
I original equipment PLUS different position for PLUS
I ep5 TAX maximum wear and UV TAX
filter 1 1 adjust tire pressure
VNEma ,I! V11? CHEV,.1tFJ
0ood thru Augusl 31 .2007 .W Sf Good I ru August 31, 2007 OFSI'
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AIR CONDITIONING BRAKE INSPECTION I
SERVICE 'SERVICE
Includes cleaning of Includs removal of all
condenser fins and
evaporator drain. t our wheels to inspect ,
npnoetnor essurotors, drums, andbrake 1
etof press re -n innings, Also includes yi E
e t o check Freon adjustment of rear drum PLUS
level and test system4n s
also includes up to one TAX brakes and inspection ofTAX
pound of Freon brake cylinders and
Good tr.ruAugusl31.2007 - IWlm Good tnruAugust 31 2007 OFSTKIEU


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END SERVICE Brand name tires,
Includes checking and w!!gesale pricing.
adjusting camber, caster, S 5 sl0ody
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teen a sension Call Bar 8Melvin 964-7500.
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Aug. 16, 2007 TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR--C-SECTION Page 7C


_OBITUARIES


Omer Drew
LAKE CITY Omer Dale
Drew, 90, died Monday, Aug. 13,
2007, at The Health Center in
Lake City.
Drew was born on Dec. 27,
1916, in Fairfield, Ill. To Joseph
Allen and Hester Delilah Drew.
He moved to Waldo in 1928 and
lived there for most of his adult
life. He graduated from P.K.
Yonge High School in 1939 and
raised vegetables and gladiolas as
a career. He also owned A&B
Garage on Sixth Street in
Gainesville for many years.
He moved to Lake City in 1968.
He created the Learning Resource
Center at Lake City Community
College and managed it until his
retirement.
He was a member of IGO, was
a 33rd Degree Mason and a
Shriner. He had been a member of
the Waldo Methodist Church since
1928.
Drew is survived by: Dorothy
"Dot" Foster, Ralph Drew and
Robert 0. "Butch" Smith, all of
Waldo; Pam Eddy of Cumberland
Gap, Tenn.; Patti Markham of'
Lake City; 21 grandchildren, 32
great-grandchildren and three
great-great-grandchildren.
He was preceded in death by:
,his first wife, Delsia May
Raulerson; his second wife, Mary
Jeanne Scales; and sons, Justin
Earl, William Dale and Don Lee.
Viewing will be held on
Wednesday, Aug. 15, at 3 p.m. in
the Waldo Methodist Church.
Funeral services will follow
immediately at 4 p.m. Interment
will be in the Santa Fe Cemetery
in Hampton under the care of
Archie Tanner Funeral Home.


Paul Faulkner
STARKE Paul Henry
Faulkner Sr., 87, of Starke died
Monday, Aug. 13, 2007, at North
Florida Regional Medical Center
following an extended illness.
A native of Somerset, Ky.,
Faulkner lived most of his life in
Starke. He was a local business
owner and a World War II veteran
who served in the U.S. Army. He
was a member of the First Baptist
Church of Starke.
Faulkner is survived by: a son,


Paul H. Faulkner Jr. of Starke; a
daughter, Susan Faulkner-O'Neal
of Starke; a sister, Mary Faulkner
of Starke; six grandchildren and
six great-grandchildren.
Faulkner was preceded in death
by his wife of more than 50 years,
Emily Irene Faulkner, who died
on Jan. 28, 2001.
Visitation will be held at Archie
Tanner Funeral Home in Starke on
Wednesday, Aug. 15, from 7-9
p.m.
Funeral services for Faulkner
will be held at 2:30 p.m. on
Thursday, Aug. 16, at the First
Baptist Church in Starke with the
Rev. Frank Starling conducting
the services. The Rev. Ronnie Coe
will officiate at the interment in
.'Crosby Lake Cemetery following
the funeral services. Arrangements
are under the care of Archie
Tanner Funeral Home.


Lynn Hamilton
DUNNELLON Lynn Duaine
Hamilton, 75, of Dunnellon, died
Saturday, Aug. 11, 2007, at
Hospice House in Ocala following
an extended illness.
Hamilton was born in Penn
Yan, N.Y., on March 16, 1932 and
moved to Lawtey in 1950. He
lived in Starke for most of his life
and moved to Dunnellon in 1999.
He was the owner and operator of
Mike's Marine World in
Belleview.
Hamilton is survived by:
Jeanette Hamilton of Starke; a
son, Kevin Hamilton of
Dunnellon; a daughter, Lynnette
Wainwright of Orlando; a brother,
Norman Hamilton of Gainesville;
and five grandchildren.
Funeral services for Hamilton
will be held on Thursday, Aug. 16,
at 10 a.m. in the chapel of the
Archie Tanner Funeral Home in
Starke with the Rev. Rex
Carringer officiating. Interment
will follow in Crosby Lake
Cemetery under the care of Archie
Tanner Funeral Home.

Dorothy
Huenich
KEYSTONE HEIGHTS --
Dorothy M. Huenich, 93, a
resident of Keystone Heights for


the past 29 years and formerly of
Land O'Lakes died Wednesday,
August 8, 2007, at The Park of the
Palms in Keystone Heights.
Huenich was born on Nov. 13,
1913, in Philadelphia. She was a
retired registered nurse and
attended the Park of the Palms
Church.
Huenich was preceded in death
by her husband, Arno M. Huenich.
Memorial services for Huenich
were held on Aug. 11, at graveside,
in Keystone Heights Cemetery.
Arrangements are under the care
of Junes Funeral Home .of
Keystone Heights.

Wiley Matthews
STARKE Wiley Raymond
Matthews Jr., 51, of Starke, died
Thursday, Aug. 9, 2007, at Shands
Starke.
A native of Danville, Va.,
Matthews also lived in Bonifay
and Charlotte, N.C., before
moving to Starke six years ago.
He was a professional musician
who played lead guitar for a
number of bands, including
Chairman of the Board. Matthews
also wrote music.
He is survived by: sons,
Christopher Raymond Smith of
Weslaco, Texas, and Raymond
Blake Matthews of Charlotte,
N.C.; his mother and stepfather,
Doris and Larry Montroy of
Starke; his father, Wiley Raymond
Matthews Sr., of Danville, Va.;
brothers, Rickey Lee Matthews,
Robert Joseph Bouvier, and
Michael A. Corbin, all of Starke;
sisters, April Lee Montroy and
Vicki C. Brumbaugh, both of
Starke, and Kim S. Hudson of
Panama City Beach; and one
grandson.
Graveside funeral services were
held Aug. 12 at Crosby Lake
Cemetery with the Rev. Ralph
Daniels conducting the services.
Interment followed under the care
of Archie Tanner Funeral Home of
Stake.

Charles Mills
GAINESVILLE Charles M.
Mills, 69, of Gainesville, died
Friday, July 27, 2007.
Born in Carthage, N.C., on May
24, 1938, Mills was a long
distance truck driver.
Mills is survived by: his wife,
iyce Melton Mills; daughters,
Lyndia Pearson 'of West End,
N.C.. Terrie Campbell 'of
Southpines N.C., Yvette Mill's bf
Pinehurst, N.C., and Toni Mills of
Gainesville; son, Charles Mills II,
of Latonia, Ky.; stepdaughter,
Diana' Hagan of Alachua;
stepsons, Joseph Hagan of
Keystone Heights and Michael
Hagan of Graham; his ex-wife,
Rose Mills of Pinehurst, N.C.; 17
grafdcliildJen and two great-
grandchildren.
Mills was cremated. Funeral
services will be held at a later
date.

Robert
Nathaniel
GAINESVILLE Robert L.

"When You SOy It With flowers
It's Beautifully Said"




Florist


(904)964-7711
218 N. Temple Ave. ,
Starke : ^.


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"Jim Bo" Nathaniel, 63, of
Gainesville, died Friday, Aug. 10,
2007, at Malcolm Randall VA
Medical Center following an
extended illness.
Born in Chiefland, Nathaniel
moved to Starke at an early age.
He attended school in Bradford
County and was a member of the
Antioch Missionary Baptist
Church. He was in the U.S. Army.
Nathaniel is survived by: his
mother, Emma Williams of
Starke; sisters,. Carolyn Williams,
Priscilla Jackson, Yvonne
Williams and June Williams, all of
Starke, and Anniebell Thompson
of Providence; foster sisters, Clara
Sharp and Harriett Middleton,
both of Starke; brothers, Clarence
Williams and Larry Williams,
both of Starke, and Terry
Williams of Atlantic City, N.J.
Family hour will be held on
Friday, Aug. 17, from 3-4 p.m. at
Haile Funeral Home on Oak Street
in Starke. Visitation will be held
Aug. 17 from 4-8 p.m. at the
funeral home and at the church on
Aug. 18, one hour prior to the
services.
Funeral services for Nathaniel
will be held Saturday, Aug. 18, at
11 a.m. at the Antioch Missionary
Baptist Church in Starke with the
Rev. Alvin Green conducting the
services. Interment will follow in
Oddfellow Cemetery in Starke
under the care of Haile Funeral
Home.

Margaret Pater
KEYSTONE HEIGHTS -
Margaret Mary Pater, 89, a
resident of Keystone Heights for
the;,past 47 years, died Friday,
Aug,, 10, 2007, at Haven Hospice
in Palatka.
Pater was born on July 19,
1918, in Brooklyn N.Y. She was
the daughter of the late Adolf and
Rita Keckeisen.
Pater was a communicant of St.
William Church in Keystone
where she was active in the choir.
She was in the Women's
Auxiliary, the Altar Society and
the Garden Club in Keystone.
Pater was a long-time volunteer at
Shands Hospital in Gainesville
and the Clay County Public Health
Associatibn in Green. Cove
Springs.'
Pater is survived by: her
'husband, Daniel M. Pater;
children, Daniel M. Pater II of
Columbia, S.C., Margaret E.
Whitaker of Sherwood, Ark., and
Robert C. Pater of Keystone
Heights; two grandchildren and
one great-grandchild.
A mass of Christian burial was
held Aug. 14, at St. William
Church with Father Mike
Williams officiating. In lieu of
flowers,, contributions may be,
made to Haven Hospice in
'f'jl.il.a .Airii'gements are uiider
thie jic of Jones Funeral Home of
Keystone Heights.


I


In Hitchcock's
Plaza


Delicious appetizers & salads
Mark's Crab Bisque, Sauteed Blue
Crab Claws, Wood Fired Diver
Scallops, Peppered Ahi Tuna, Coconut
Shrimp, GatorTail, Shrimp & Jumbo
Lump Cocktail, Mark's Famous Baby
Blue Salad, True Caesar Salad,
Tomato Mozzarella Stack


Awesome Seafood
Crab Cakes, Atlantic Salmon, Grouper
Santa Fe (w/jumbo lump crabmeat),
Hazelnut Encrusted Grouper, Pistachio
Encrusted Tuna (an award winner!), Crab
Stuffed Shrimp, Fried Grouper, Southern
Fried Catfish, Jumbo Fried Shrimp, Jumbo
Fried Scallops, Captain's Platter


Merrill Starling
KEYSTONE HEIGHTS -
Merrill W. Starling, 93, of
Keystone Heights, died Sunday,
Aug. 12, 2007, at E.T. York
Hospice in Gainesville following
an extended illness.
Born and raised in Bradford
County, Starling graduated from
Bradford High School. She was a
homemaker and a member of the
Beulah Baptist Church.
Starling is survived by: a
daughter, Martha Lee of
Jacksonville; sons, Franklin
Starling of Hilliard, Robert
Starling,'Tim Starling and Tommy
Starling, all of Jacksonville,
Arthur Starling of Starke and
Lucian Prevatt; a daughter-in-law,
Kay Starling of Keystone Heights;
and numerous grandchildren.
Starling was preceded in death
by: two husbands, Lester J. Prevatt
and Fleam Starling; a daughter,
Lucille Cauley; sons, Lyle Prevatt,
Lester Prevatt and James Starling;
and grandchildren, Brenda
Rhoden and W.T. Prevatt.
Funeral services for Starling
were held Aug. 15 in the chapel at
Archie Tanner Funeral Home in
Starke with the Rev. Westcoat
Holloway conducting the services.
Interment followed in Prevatt
Cemetery under the care of Archie
Tanner Funeral Home.

Leo Svitek Sr.
KEYSTONE HEIGHTS Leo
Carl Svitek Sr., 74, a resident of
Keystone Heights for the past 35
years and formerly of Chicago,
died Thursday, Aug. 9, 2007, at
Shands Starke.
Svitek was born on Nov. 22,
1932, in Whiting, Ind.
He was a retired laborer, for
Hillandale Farms and was of the
Catholic faith.
Svitek is survived by: his wife
of 47 years, Claire Ladwig Svitek
of Keystone Heights; children,
Elana McGuire, Donna J. Davis
and Leo C. Svitek III, all of.
Keystone Heights; three brothers,
four sisters, three grandchildren
and one great-grandchild.
Memorial services for Svitek
will be held at a later date.
Arrangements are under the care
of Jones Funeral Home in
Keystone Heights.

Shirley Thomas
STARKE Shirley LaRue
Thomas, 79, of Starke, died
Saturday, Aug. 11, 2007, at E.T.
York Hospice in' Gainesville
following an extended illness.
Thomas was a native of
Tharptown, Penn., and a former
resident of Shamokin, Penn. She
moved to Starke in 2003.
She is survived by: sons, Gary
Thomas of Shamokin, Penn., and
Jack Thomas of Starke; daughters,
Rose Simpson of Woodstock, Ga.,


-Located at:
507 West Call St.
Starke, FL

(904) 964-6100'

Come See
The Difference!



NOW ENROLLING

K-4TH GRADE
2007-08 SCHOOL YEAR

We are expanding and now taking
applicants for the position of After Care
Director. Work hours are 2:30 pnr-6:00
pm Mon-Fri. Call for more information.

A Ministry of First Christian Church
We use A Beka Curriculum.


Nancy Febringer of New Jersey,
Sherry Keatings and Barbara
Pronick, both of Shamokin, Penn.;
and a brother, Benjamin Snyder of
Kentucky.
Services for Thomas will be
announced at a later date.
Arrangements are under the care
of Archie Tanner Funeral Home of
Starke.

Rebecca
Wisehart
RAIFORD Rebecca Crews
Wisehart, 72, of Raiford died
Monday, Aug. 13, 2007, at Lake
Butler Hospital following an
extended illness.
Born in Lyons, Ga., Wisehart
lived in Live Oak before moving
to Raiford five years ago. She was
a homemaker and a member of the
Northside Baptist Church near
Starke.
Wisehart is survived by:
daughters, Rebecca Bryant of
Raiford and Lori Lowder of Live
Oak; sons, Loren Thomas of Live
Oak, Rickie Dean Thomas of
Mayo, Michael Thomas of
Raiford, and Roy William Bean of
Tampa; a sister, Evelyn Ribbitt of
Ocala; a brother, Jimmy Crews of
Ocala; 19 grandchildren and 15
great-grandchildren.
She was preceded in death by
her husband, Larry M. Wisehart.
Visitation will be held on,
Wednesday, Aug. 15, from 7-8
p.m. at Northside BaptistChlirch.
Funeral services for Wisehart
will be held Thursday, Aug. 16,
2007, at 11 a.m. at Northside
Baptist Church on S.R. 16 west of
Starke, with the Rev. Larry Finley
conducting the services. Interment
will tollow at 3 p.m. at the Live
Oak Cemetery under the care of
Archer Funeral Home of Lake
Butler.

Card of hkaRks


Larry Moore
Mrs. Mairan Moore and her
. sons, Perrial, Monte and
Barry would like to express
our thanks to all our friends
and neighbors.
Your thoughtful gifts of food,
comfort and prayers, mean so
much to us.
You gave so much in our time
of grief and loss of our brother
and son, Larry. Bless you and
we love you.
The Moore Family
Hampton


ROUGH
Continued from p. 4C
choose the former without
much delay.
A typical CWA exhibition
will consist of seven matches,
with a roughly equal number
of one-on-one and tag team
matches, Wicks said.
Anyone interested in CWA
exhibition schedules or the
Pain Station school can call
David Rodgers at (904) 964-
1611 or(904)966-1633.


(sister sAWtoreIAW'Cs hop
-Howusc lit p&


Comfort Side Items
Mac & 4 Cheese w/Tniffle Oil (as mentioned In
Rachel Ray Magazine), Skillet Fried Potatoes &
Onions, Mashed Potatoes, Roasted Garlic New
Potatoes, Fire Roasted Sweet Potatoes, Steak
Fries, Wild Forest Sauteed Mushrooms, Fire
Roasted Vidalia Onions, Poached Broccoli &
Asparagus, Grilled Zucchini And Squash,
Sauteed Spinach, Spinach An Gratin


Homemade
Desserts
Creme Brulee,
Chocolate Paradise,
Ultimate Chocolate
Sundae, Fresh Berry
Tritle & Mark's
Famous Cheesecake


lSntreesfrom $11 includingg 2 comfort sides) with aeer ( Wine Available

Tuesday-Thursday, 5-9.; Friday & Saturday, 5-10; Closed Sun. & Mon.
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Strawberry Tea loom


Restaurant and ift Shop \

poutingg Ce tatilton (0nto evuiJ Cup


appy 3rd anniversary
Many thanks to my community and surrounding areas
for all of your support over the past three years. It has
been my honor to serve you and provide you with my
comer of culture. I feel extremely blessed to have wit-
nessed countless celebrations! Virginia Autry

Free Dessertl
Let me compliment you with a dessert on your next
dining room purchase. Reservation Required. Limit one
per person, per day, per ad during August 2007.
Come By for Lunch, Come for Tea, and Call to Schedule
Your Next Party!
CaNQ now to Ae/eve a seat 904-964-72 11
204 E. Adkins, Starke
(1/2 block off US-301, across from BHS)
Tues-Sat 10-4 Lunch 11-2:30


Mark rerhegge 4c Scott Olmsted amounce the opeliqWof their second store.

NEW STEAKHOUSE IN KEYSTONE


Great Choice Quality Steaks, Chops & Chicken
a PRIME RIB EVERY NIGHT e
12-oz. ChopSteal,. 8& 12 Oz TOp Sirloin. I1110. N.Y. Strip, 12 Oz.
Ribeye,220z Bone- inRibe e. 6 & 10Oz Center Cut Filet Mignon,
Steak Au Pauvre, 12 And I Oz Pnme Rib. Fer Roamled 1/2 Chicken,
Encrusted PonerhousLe I .anbCho.ps, 14 Oz Double Cut Pork Rib Chop


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MT,
cT F A 0 11 IZ F









Page BC TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR--C-SECTION Aug. 16, 2007


Murder

charges await

lab results
BY MARCIA MILLER
Telegraph Staff Writer
The Starke Police
Department is still awaiting the
results of crime lab tests before
deciding whether or not to
level charges at this time in the
murder of Edward Otis Smith,
55, of Starke on July 31.
According to SPD
Lieutenant Barry Warren,
Dallas Jerome Smith, 36, of
Gainesville, is a suspect in the
case, but the investigation has
not yet been concluded.
Suspect Smith, who is
apparently not related to the
victim, was still in the
Bradford County Jail as of
Tuesday afternoon. He was
arrested Aug. 1 on drug
charges.
The victim was found lying
on the living room floor at his
home on Ida .Street in Starke
after police were called at
around 5 p.m. regarding a
shooting.
According to police, it was,
at first, difficultio determine if
the puncture wound found in
the left side of the victim's
chest was caused by a bullet or
a knife. Both a shell casing and
a knife were found at the
scene. An autopsy determined
the cause of death to be a
gunshot wound.
According to Police' Chief
Gordon Smith, suspect Smith
was found in.a crack house in
Starke in the early-morning
hours of Aug. I with blood on
his person.
The Florida Department of
Law Enforcement and its
crime lab are assisting SPD in
the investigation.
Anyone with information on
this incident should contact
SPD at (904) 964-5400.

2 critical after

traffic crash
Two people had critical
injuries following an Aug. 12
traffic crash at the junction of
S.R. 21 and S.R. 16 in
Keystone Heights.
According/ to the crash
report by Florida Highway
Patrol Trooper J.R. Howard,
Joshua Gill, 25, of Keystone
was driving a 1993 Toyota
pickup at 5 p.m. when he ran
the red -light and struck the-
passenger side of a 2006
Cadillac SUV driven by Lane
E. Nelson, 25, of Jacksonville.
Gill was ejected from his
vehicle during the crash and
was listed in critical condition.
The passenger in the SUV,
Desiree A. Golonka, 23, of
Jacksonville, was also listed in


critical condition. INeISUo, uIC
SUV's driver, was listed with
minor injuries.
All three people were
transported to Shands
Jacksonville.
After it was struck by the
pickup, the SUV veered off the
road and struck a barbed-wire
fence. Damages to the pickup
were estimated at $3,000.
Damages to the SUV were
estimated at $45,000. Charges
are pending.

KH man

arrested for

battery
Lawrence Welton Curry, 45,
of Keystone Heights was
arrested Aug. 11 by Clay
County Sheriff's Office
Deputy J.A. Murphy for
simple battery.
According to the incident
report, the victim stated that
Curry had given him
permission to wait at Curry's
residence for his girlfriend.
While the victim was waiting,
Curry and another man
arrived.
The victim claimed that
Curry and the other man began
hitting him. He said they
implied the battery occurred in
retaiiiatin, because they had
been told he had hit his
girlfriend. I
Curry was arrested and
charged with simple battery..


Boytriend

arrested for

obstruction
Roger Michael Girgis, 41, of
Yulee, was arrested at a
business on S.R. 100 in
Keystone Heights on Aug. 12.
Girgis was charged with
obstructing a law enforcement
officer after refusing to let his
girlfriend talk to Clay County
Sheriff's Office Deputy G.P.
Lavaron.
s.eputy Lavaron had
answered a call regarding'
trespassing at the Keystone
business. A person at the
business told Deputy Lavaron
that a woman, who was in
view at the time, had
committed battery on her.
As Deputy Lavaron
attempted to talk with the
woman, Girgis repeatedly
placed himself between the
woman and Deputy Lavaron
and repeatedly told the woman
not to talk to the deputy.
After refusing to allow the
woman to speak to the deputy
and refusing to leave the scene,
Girgis was charged with
obstruction.

Threats lead

to disorderly

into charge
Terrence Henry Conners, II,
25, of Lake Butler was arrested


STARKE LUTHERAN MISSION rQCMS)





Sunday School 9 a.m. Worship Service at 10:00 A.M.
Join us in the Banquet Hall of the KOA Campground
on U.S. 301 S. in Starke
(904) 964-8855
We Preach Christ Crucified




SS Tree Service,

and Timber Company

IFREE ESTIMATES 24-Hr. Emergency Service]

Removal Topping Trimming

* Stump Grinding Storm Damage
Censxd 4 hKsura SeMvig / SurrwuaiHg Coauties




RED STARLING BRADFORD RESIDENT
*352-485-2197 352-745-6503


Aug. i tor disorderly
intoxication at the home of a
family member.
Union County Sheriff's
Office Deputy Raymond
Shuford reported that a
resident of the Lake Butler
home said Conners had been
drinking and was threatening
the resident and her daughter.


Deputy shutord reported
that he. interviewed Conners
and state tnai ...onners made
threats of violence against the
two women in Shuford's
presence.

Conners was arrested and
taken to the Union County Jail.


Family

dispute leads

to battery
A family dispute at a Lake
Butler residence resulted in
bee CRIME p12C


The City of Hampton

would like to thank the following for making their

donations that made the 2007

Music Festival a Great Success


Ace Hardware
Advanced Auto Parts
A&G Custom Framing & Gifts
Alexander's Place
Alley Gatorz Bowl
Archie Tanner Funeral Home
Bradford Garbage Service
Bradford County Telegraph
Carl's Signs
Catering by Anne
Craig Patterson
Curves for Women
Dampier Septic Tank Service
Davis Express
Denmark Furniture
; DeWitt C. Jones Funeral Home
Diarmuld Inc.
Dicks Wings
Frank Brown
Gainesville Sun
Gator II Farm Supply Inc;
Grannie's
Gordon Smith Starke Police Dept.
Hardee's
Hitchcock's of Keystone
Hoilman Horse and Tack
Jackson's Builders Supply
Julia's Florist
Keystone Carriers
Lake Country News
Lin's Basket & Gifts
Merle Norman's
MJM Food Store #6
NAPA Auto Parts
Norma's Floral Etc.
The Office Shop
Psyco Mom's Scrapbook & More
Red Dog Saloon Inc.


Rowe Enterprise
Sabo's Restaurant
Save A Lot
Sawyer Gas
Sporting Chance
Thomas Auto Parts
Thornton Photography
Vivian Chappell
WEAG 106.3
Western Steer Family
Steakhouse
.Winn Dixie

We would like to thank the
bands and musicians who
donated their talent to help us
out.
Barry Moore
Carport Critters
' Dirt Road Band
Flashback
Lost & Found
Minor Infraction
Ronnie Turner
Southern C6nnection
Smokin Fish Heads
Wildfire

To our dedicated volunteers.
Georgann Pullen
Jennifer Mitzel
Lori Willettes
MaryAnn Rhoden
Matilda. Rhoden
Robin. Charles
Tom Francis


Classified Ads


Read our Classifieds on the

- ; '' World Wide Web
www.BCTeleqraph.com


Where one call
does it all!


Tri-CounyOClassifieds

Bradford Union Clay
Reach over 20,500
Readers Evyery Week!

4 INDEX
40 Notice 51 Lst/Found 63 Love Unes
41 Vehicles Accessories 52 'Animals & Pets 64 Business Opportunity
42 Motor Vehicles 53 Yard Sales 65 Help Wnted
43 'RV's & Campers 54 Keystone Yard Sales 66 Investment Opportunity
44 BRoat 55 Wanted 57 Hunting Landor Rent
45 Land for Sale 56 Trade or Swap 68 Rent to Own
46 Real Eitate Out ofArea 57 For Sale 69 Food Suplplements
47 Commercial Property 58 Building Materials 70 Self'Storage
Rent, Lease Sale 59 Personqi Services 72 Sporting oods
48' Hmes for Sale 60 Secretarial Services 73 FaCri Equipment
49 Mobile Hompes for Sale 61 Scriptures 74 Computers & Computer
50 For Rent 62 Vacation/Travel Accessories

CLASSIFIED DEADLINES
Word Ad Classified Tuesday, 12:00 noon
Classified Display Tuesday, 12:00 noon

To place a Classified

USE YOUR PHONE

0 RESS

964-6305 473-2210 496-2261

CiNOTICE
Classified Advertising should be paid in advance unless credit has already been
established with the neixpa)er. A $3.00 service charge will be added to all
billing to cover postage and handling. All ads placed by phone are read back to
the advertiser at the time of placement. However, the classified staff cannot be
held responsible for mistakes in classified advertising taken by phone. The
newspaper reserves the right to correctly classify and edit all copy or to reject
or cancel any advertisements at any time. Only standard abbrevations will be
accepted.


40
Notice
EQUAL HOUSING OP-
PORTUNITY. All real es-
tate advertising in this
newspaper is subject to
the Federal Fair Housing
Act of 1968 which makes
it illegal to advertise "any
preference, limitation or
discrimination based on
race, color, religion, sex
or national origin, or an
intention to make any
such preference, limita-


tion or discrimination."
Familial status includes
children under the age of
18 living with parents or
legal custodians, preg-
nant women and people
securing custody of chil-
dren under 18. This
newspaper will not know-
ingly accept any advertis-,
ing for real estate which
is in violation of the law.
Our readers are hereby
informed that all dwellings
advertised in this news-


paper are available on an
equal opportunity basis.
To complain of discrimi-
nation, call HUD toll-free
at 1-800-669-9777, the
toll-free telephone num-
berr the hearing im-
paired is 1-800-927-9275.
For further information
call Florida Commission
en Human Relations, Lisa
Sutherland 850-488-7082
ext #1005.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTIS-
ING should be submitted
to the Starke office in writ-
ing & paid in advance un-


ruax(904) 964905
1Fra Fi f, rtWl Help
less credit has already
been established with this
office. A $3.00 SERVICE
CHARGE will be added to
all billings to cover post-
age & handling. THE
CLASSIFIED STAFF
CANNOT BE HELD RE-
SPONSIBLE FOR MIS-
TAKES IN CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING TAKEN
OVER THE PHONE.
Deadline is Tuesday at 12
noon prior to that
Thursday's publication.
Minimum cnarge is $8.50
for the first 20 words, then
20 cents per word there-
after.
42
Motor Vehicles
& Accessories
1992 LEXUS LS400, HIGH
MILES, RUNS GREAT,
$4500. Newer battery
and tires. Call 904-964-
4111.
2001 LEXUS GAS
SAVER. Moon roof, pre-
mium sound, well-kept
interior with fancy wheels.
$13,995, call 904-964-
6305.


MOTORCYCLE Hyosung
Alpha Sport. 2003 low
miles. $3000 OBO. Call
904-964-6999.
894 DOOR NISSAN PATH-
FINDER 4 wheel drive,
V6, needs starter, alterna-
tor, $500 6OBO. Call'904-
813-9976.
2002 GMC SIERRA Auto-
matic, 2 door, white, ask-
ing $12000. New factory
transmission, tires. Ask
for Tim, 904-368-8136.
Handicapped Van: 1997
Chevrolet G10, Electric
Wheel Chairlift, luxury
model, lots of extras,
must see to appreciate.
Custom wood work
throughout, aC, stereo
surround. Backseat con-
verts to bed. Captains
Chairs included.
$11,500. Please call
(904) 220-6228, ask for
Robert leave a message.
18X9 KMC CHROME
WHEELS CHEVY 6
LUG with Kyhmo 265/60/
18 tires. $550 OBO. Call
386-674-6043.
1978 CJ7 MY PROJECT
MUST GO. $2,800 in-
vested, make best offer.
Call 904-368-9762.
1988 EXTRA CAB
TOYOTA 4X4 V-6 MO-
TOR, 5sp, shifter, needs
fork fixed. Asking $1,500
firm, 904-364-3678.
43
RVs and
Campers
1982 35' GOOSENECK'
WILDERNESS by
Fleetwood. A/C, gas
stove/water heater, elec-
tric/gas Norcross refrig-
erator, microwave, 2 pro-
pane tanks, $4500 OBO.
Call 352-318-3228.
STARCRAFT '04 POP-UP
CAMPER, 10ft, AC, elec-
tric refrigerator, awning,
only used once. $4,000
OBO. Call 352-473-
4616.
44
Boats
'97 YAMAAIA WAVE RUN-
NER (GP 1200). Garage
kept, runs great. Asking
$3,000. Call 352-473-
3523 or 352-235-2835.
45
Land for Sale
2 ADJACENT BUILDING
LOTS FOR SALE -
100x150 each. Area of


new construction, hospi-
tal nearby. Geiger Rd.,
$65,000 for both lots. Call
904-964-3858.'
MIDDLEBURG/KEY-
STONE/PUTNAM. Lots
for sale, 1/3 acre and up,
low down. Owner financ-
ing available. Call 1-800-
616-8373.
BEAUTIFUL HIGH & DRY
15 ACRES. Lake access
td desirable Crystal Lake
on paved road. Motivated
seller. Possibility of mak-
ing a subdivision. Call
Marlena Palmer at Smith
& Smith Realty, 904-422-
0470 or 904-964-9222.
2.5 WOODED ACRES east
of Starke, $45,000. Call
352-235-1131 or 904-
964-6708.
50 ACRE SMALL FARM,
old house & well, on
paved road, in Georgia,
20 miles south of Dublin.
$189,000, call 912-568-
7480.
ONE ACRE +,WITH 28X60
MOBILE HOME 3/2 like
new, 2000 model. Fi-
nancing available, lo-
cated in Union County.
Sales price, $89,000.
Call 386-496-1146.
47. .
Commercial
Property (Rent,
Lease, Sale),
FOR LEASE OR sale. Ideal
location 2 parcels! 2800
SOFT building with office,
barn, mini storage, 5
acres, off of South 301.
Also 8,acres, partially
cleared. Both lots 3/10Oth
of a mile from new
Walmart. Call 904-964-
3827 for more informa-
tion.
DOWNTOWN STARKE
professional offices for
rent. Conference room,.
kitchen, utilities and more
provided. Call 904-964-
2616.




Realt
35-43-88


TWO COMMERCIAL
BUILDINGS downtown
Starke. One set up for
restaurant. Huge square
footage. New roofs. Only
$376,500 for both. Call
904-964-4111. :
NEW PROFESSIONAL
OFFICES at 417 West
Call Street for lease. Ideal
for medical, legal, ac-
counting or business of-
fices. $350 including utili-
ties and taxes, or all 4 of-
fices for $290 each plus
utilities and taxes. Call
352-275-8531 today for a
walk through.
48
Homes for Sale
RENT TO OWN BRAND
NEW 3/2, 1 car garage,
paved road, walking dis-
tance to Keystone
schools, $995/mth. Call
352'-258-0865.
3/2 BRICK HOME COM-
PLETELY UPDATED.
Features wooden floors
and a large bonus room.
Located in city but has a
quiet country feeling.
Must see to appreciate.
Priced to sell at $159,900.
Call Marlena Palmer at
Coldwell Banker/Smith &
Smith Realty, 904-964-
222 or 904-422-0470.
LAWTEY 5/4 SINGLE FAM-
ILY HOME 2100 sq ft
with 2 car garage, new
tile, new paint, new appli-
ances, new A/C. 5 min-
utes to Starke, 7'minutes
to Camp Blanding. Must
see, $145,000. USA Re-
alty, 904-213-8287.
3BR/2BA MOBILE HOME 2
acres, fenced, 2 porches,
ramp to carport, storage
room, out buildings,
beautiful yard, dead end
street, $119,000. 6075
Oak Leaf Road, Keystone
Heights 352-284-8117.


Mobile Homes
for Sale
FOR SALE BY OWNER -
VARIOUS Singlewide
and Doublewide mobile
homes. 3/2's and 2/2's
from $429,900 and up.
Located in High Ridge
Estates, Keystone
Heights, FL. Possible
owner finance with re-
quired down payment.
Call Larry, 386-325-7848.
MACCLENNY LAND
HOME PACKAGE. New
1579 sq ft 3/2 upgraded
Satina Kitchen package
and more on 1.5 shaded.
acres on the St. Mary's
River. $135,000, 904-
259-8028.
"2007" ENTERTAINER
32X80 4/2 AT $71,900 in-
cluding delivery, setup,
fireplace, smooth top,
built in microwave, dish-
washer, side by side with
ice maker, upgraded car-
pet, TV, surround and
more. Yarborough Mobile
Homes, 904-259-1100.
NOW IS THE TIME TO
BUY! All 2007
doublewide stock models
reduced $5,000. Drive a
little, save.a lot. Locally.
owned and operated
since 1998. Yarborough
Mobile Homes, 904-259-
8028.
NEW- 2008 28X44 3/2,
$32,900 DELIVERED
AND SETUP ON YOUR
PROPERTY. Call Larry at
904-259-1100.
I HAVE 2 MOBILE HOMES
FOR SALE DWMH and
SWMH, 3/2 and 2/2. You
move, owner financing, I
am not a dealer, 352-283-
8674 or 386-684-1052 or
888-999-1 389.
www.VacantLotsUSA.com.
I WANT YOUR-PRETTY,
UGLY OR UNWANTED -


MOBILE HOMES with or
without lot. Fast cash,
quick closing. Call 386-
684-1052 or 352-283'
8674 or 888-999-1389,
call anytime.
2700 SO FT 3BR/2BA total
brick home on CR230.
New roof, ceramic tile,
and carpet throughout.
Double car garage on
approx. 1/2 acre. Call
904-880-7763.
KEYSTONE HEIGHTS.
1983 DWMH 3BR/2BA on
1 acre lot with large
screened back porch,
newly remodeled, new
cabinets, floors & carpets.
Asking $89,000. Call for
appointment 904-591-
8109. Possible owner fi-
nance with- 10% down. .
6 ACRES 1997TWMH, 24k
30 shop, deep well, 5
miles from Rhine. GA,
$79,000. Call 478-231-
3480.
'85 LIBERTY SWMH 2BR/.
1 BA. New wood flooring,
reduced to $3,000 OBO.
Comes with blocks, tie
downs and strapping. You
move. Call 904-368-
8136.
ONE ACRE + WITH 28X60 -
MOBILE HOME 3/2 like
new, 2000 model. Fi-
nancing available, lo-
cated in Union County.
Sales price, $89,000.
Call 386-496-1146.
FOR SALE OR RENT TO
OWN 1983 14x52 mo-
bile home, Lake Butler. 2/
1, CH/A, w/d hook-up,
appliances furnished,
good condition. Asking
$7,500 OBO. Call 386-
496-1116 or 352-538-
1759.
1984 SWMH 14X70 2/2 ON
2.5 ACRES. Asking
$62,500, call 352-468-
1022


Looking to Purchase a New Home or
Refinance Your Current Home?
Do you have an adjustable rate that is
increasing?
Katherine E. Hayes Walz 'o d r ,i
Licensed Mortgage Broker or
St. Johns Mortgage, Inc. Bad Credit
904-263-0680 Call Me To See
kathygtt@aol.com How I Can Help

Locally in Starke, Serving All Your Mortgage Needs! .


Thank you from Jim Mitzel, Mayor and the Hampton City

Council. Without your support it wouldn't have been possible.


4117










Aug. 16, 2007 TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR--C-SECTION Page 9C


Classified Ads


.- -


Read our Classifieds on the

World Wide Web

www.BCTeleqraph.com


M /Where one call

does it all!

(9041964-6305*(3521473-2210*(3861496-2261


RENT TO OWN WITH
SELLER FINANCING.
Remodeled 2/1 with big
lot and big trees, $39,000.
Call 352-473-5745.
TIRED OF ALL THE EX-
TRAS THAT YOU DON'T
KNOW ABOUT or don't
plan for? Then buy my
28x80 for $65,000. In-
cludes permits, well, sep-
tic, power pole, all hook-
ups, set-up, AC, skirting,
steps. No impact fee.
Call Uncle Dave at 352-
208-3710
ONLY ONE LEFT! 14X70
2/2 2007 MODEL FUR-
NISHED. $31,500 in-
cludes delivery and set-
up, AC, skirt, steps. Call
Uncle Dave at 352-378-
2453.
2007 FACTORY REPOS -
NEVER LIVED IN. Start-
ing at $29,900. Deliv-
ered, set-up on your lot.
Most models come with
furniture. Call Uncle
Dave at 352-378-2453.
MUST SEE MY 2007 4/2
,FLEETWOOD. All war-
ranties are transferrable
at my expense. I will pay


to move and set-up,
rehook AC on home for
only $43,995. Call 386-
867-3347.
DEAL FELLTHROUGH ON
28X44 FLEETWOOD.
Was $42,500, now selling
for $36,995. Includes AC,
skirting and steps.. Up-
graded insulation pack-
age and storm windows.
Call Matt at 352-378-
2453.
FACTORY REPOS 3 TO
CHOOSE FROM.
Townhomes model
#2801. I will set up and
deliver for $53,995. Call
Matt at 352-373-6684.
GOVERNMENT FINANC-
ING. Wanted, 16 custom-
ers in need of a new
home. Low income and
limited credit programs.
Call now! 352-378-2453,
ask for Bruce, Program
Director.
FLEETWQOD 2008 28X80
4/2. Delivery and set-up
on your lot. $59,995. AC,
skirting, steps included.
Can do land/home and
improvements. Call 352-
378-2453, ask for Bruce.
GENE, JIM & ROY'S SPE-


CIAL OF THE MONTH.
New 3/2 doublewide, set-
up and delivered. Only
$34,995. Call Bruce at
352-378-2453.
WHOLESALE 5
FLEETWOODS 4/2 2008
MODELS for only
$37,800. Delivery only,
call 352-378-2453, ask
for Marion.
32X63 HOMES OF MERIT
OPTIONS AVAILABLE:
stainless steel appli-
ances, tape and texture
walls, 2x6 sidewalls,
glamour bath, 5 year war-
ranty. $59,900, call 352-
378-2453.

GENE, JIM & ROY'S MO-
BILE HOME SALES
guarantees Florida's low-
est prices on Homes of
Merit, Fleetwood's and
Town Homes. Check us
out. Call Marion at 352-
378-2453.
50
For Rent
IN KEYSTONE HEIGHTS,
430 SW NIGHTINGALE
STREET. 3/2, $850/mth


plus $900 security de-
posit. Call 352-473-8055.
Service animals only.
FURNISHED ROOMS FOR
RENT! COMPLETE with
CH/A, cable provided, all
utilities paid! Central loca-
tion. 10% discount on first
month's rent for senior
citizens. Rooms with pri-
vate bath, $115 $135. /
wk. Room without bath,
$100. Laundry facilities
available. Close to
churches, stores, down-
town shopping, theatre,
and more! See Manager
at the Magnolia Hotel,
across from the Starke
Post Office. 904-964-
4303.
WE HAVE 2 OR 3 bedroom
MH,, clean, close to
prison. Call 352-468-
1323.
SPECIAL-RENT 2 & 3BR
homes, newly renovated.
Deposit required. Call
678-438-6828 or 678-
438-2865, for more infor-
mation.
2/1 MOBILE HOME ON 1/3
ACRE. $325/mth plus
$200/dep. Pets OK. Call
352-473-2185.


SOUTHERN VILLAS OF
Starke Apts. 1 & 2 BR HC
& non HC apartments.
Some rental assistance
may be available. HUD
vouchers welcome. CH/
A, on-site laundry, play-
ground, private and quiet
atmosphere. Located on
SR 10, 1,001 Southern
, Villas Dr., Starke, FL. Call
904-964-7295. TDD/TTY
711. Equal Housing Op-
portunity.
RENT TO OWN BRAND
NEW 3/2, 1 car garage,
paved road, walking dis-
tance to Keystone
schools, $995/mth. Call
352-258-0865.
RENT TO OWN. MOBILE
HOME. No banks, flex-
ible terms. Lake Butler
area. Call 386-496-8111.
NEWLY REMODELED up-
stairs apartments in
downtown Starke. 1 2/
BR apartments, CH/A,
$500 month. 1st, last, and
security deposit. Call
Joan at 904-964-4303.
,LAKEFRONT- KEYSTONE
HEIGHTS. 2/2, CH/A,
huge garage, many ex-


tras, $900/mth. Also, 1/
1, CH/A, new, $500/mth.
Call 678-640-1524.

Our classified ads
are on the internet fo
the world to see!

ORANGEWOOD APART-
MENTS RENTAL AS-
SISTANCE. 2 & 3BR HC
and non-HC accessible
apartments. 801 South
Water Street, Starke, FL
32091. Call 904-964-
4214, TDD/TTY 711.
Equal Housing Opportu-
nity.
DOUBLEWIDE MOBILE
HOME IN HIGHRIDGE
ESTATES, 3/2. $650/
mth, first, last and secu-
rity deposit. Call 904-
964-4285.
2BR/1BA 24 x 50. Very
clean, seeing eye dogs
only. Front and back
porch. $800 per month
with a $400 deposit. C/A,
gas. heat. Call 904-782-
3380 or 904-782-3367.
14 X 70 2BR/1BA CH/A very
clean, seeing eye dogs


. only, $600 per month with
$400 deposit. Call 904-
782-3380 or 904-782-
3367.
DWMH IN KEYSTONE
Heights 3/2, CH/A, re-
r frigerator with ice maker,
gas stove, fireplace, one
acre fenced yard, $675
per month, references,
1st and last, and security
deposit required. Call Pat
at 813-368-6573.
LAKE BUTLER APART-
MENTS 1005 SW 6th
Street, Lake Butler, FI
32054. Ph: 386-496-
3141, TDD/TTY 711.
Rental assistance for
qualified applicants. 1,2,3
&4 BR HC & non HC ac-
cessible apartments.
Laundry facility & play-
ground. Water, sewer &
garbage provided. Equal
Housing Opportunity.
3BR/2BA MH walk to school
and shopping. $600 per
month & $600 deposit.
Call 904-626-0874 or
904-214-9448.
3/2 SINGLEWIDE MOBILE
HOME LOCATED ON
CR121 close to all pris-


ons. In small trailer park,
recently remodeled, CHI
A. $500/dep, $575/mth.
Call 904-964-8025.
SWMH 1BR $475 .per
month, Hilltop Street,
Keystone Heights. Call
352-473-3728.
3BR/2BA DW ON SILVER
SANDS Rd. 1 acre lot on
paved road. Totally reno-
vated, has tool shed &
fenced back yard, McRae
school district, quiet fam-
ily community, CH/A,
washer/dryer hookup.
$800 per month, $500
security deposit. Call 904-
725-5359 or 904-591-
4316.
2BR/1 BA SWMH on fenced
1 acre lot, Keystone, $525
per month, first, last &
security. Call 352-475-
3094.
MELROSE 2/1.5 MOBILE
HOME WITH CH/A. Lo-
cated in quiet country set-
ting, newly renovated with"
new flooring, appliances
and paint. $475/mth plus
$300/dep. Call 352-475-
6285.


I r,"Affordable Qualit


- - 9_e


Secure your future...

in the Classifieds.


fTee' C oamnry uwnea uOperatei
swO5 Commercial Residential


PO Box 82
Ft. White. FL 32038


Office: 386-497-1419
Toll Free 1-86I-9LW-ROOF
Fax:386-497-1452


We WoK rk ismr
Start to Finish!
"No Bull" '


Shigle, Fat oofs & eta Rot's- icenp~olsed*~p


tnLmred
Worker% Comp.
License # RC0067442


Every time you change your oil you
probably wish you didn't have to.
It takes time you don't have and it's inconvenient. AMSOIL HAS AN ANSWER.
With AMSOIL Synthetic Motor Oil, you only change your oil twice a year
instead of every 3,000 miles. AMSOIL Synthetic Motor Oils provide long-life
protection for, your car even in severe service conditions. With AMSOIL, you
save both time AND money. A, ,mW A wa m,-w /


For more information, call:
FL-SYN-OIL
Independent AMSOIL Dealer
904-796-7777


fi-syn-oil@embarqmail.com
www.lubedealer.com/fl-syn-oll


2,000 square feet on US 301

Currently occupied by YMCA

Available September 1, 2007

Call (904) 964-3330


Check out the Classifieds for a job
fit just for you.


lJ e rabforb Countp elegraplb
131 West Call Street *Starke, FL
904-964-6305 Fax: 904-964-8628


Sell it fast in the classified.
Call 904-964-6305 to place
your ad. Twenty words or
less for only $8.50. Now
that's a bargain!


UNION

Tree Service-

"We Specialize in Dangerous Trees"
NO JOB TQ BO l MAL!OO SMJ0,
Licensed & Insured, Residential & Commercial

For the Best Prices & Job for ALL your tree care needs contact

Owner: Albert at 386-867-0214 or 386-496-2006


Plum Valley Harbor.
338 SE 33rd STREET Beautiful home with 3 bedrooms, 2 bath & 2
car garage in prestigious neighborhood. Home has marble fireplace,
wood floors & tile. Large master bedroom with door to screened
porch and walk-in closet.


$254,000
Visit our Web page www.century21showcase.net


1107 S. Walnut St.
Starke, Florida
(Located bednd
Bradford County Eye
Center)


FUNDING MORTGAGE
(Formerly Ivanhoe Mortgage)

New Name
S New Faces N


r SE SAME
GREAT
SERVICE!


Margaret Ann Bennett
Mortgage Consultant


Jenny W, Mann
Branch Manager/


l Mortgage

MORTGAGE Call Us Today!
qI ASSOCIATION 904-964-4000
*nmeemg r--nito 9 04n,~e


Consultant


Refinance &
Purchases
FHA VA
Conventional
New
Construction
Home Equity
Loans
No Income
Verefication
Loans





EQUAL HOUSING
LENDER


MORE HOME ~ MORE LAND
All credit applications accepted!
OllS Cavalier TownHomes Clayton

W^.pav Too


~Visit Us Before You Buy!

Jerry's Quality Homes

(352) 473-9005
6969 SR 21 N Keystone Heights, FL
Jerry Ted JoAnn


HOMETOWN


"Where You Come First"


660 ) SW 16rth Streetl, Starike $224,0()0
3BR/2BA Crosby
Lake Home with
86' lakefront and
view of lake.
Additional
detached garage.

I198S NW lti A% enwe, Slarke $568,fv
r l1994 3/2 MH on
1.2 acres,
Fenced yard,
"_. fi- replace, garden
S -- tub, workshop
with electricity.

63"1 NV CR229,. Starke '287.100)


164 NW Madison St.
Suite 102
Lake City, FL
E-mail: ward@danielcrapps.com
Daniel Crapps
Agency, Inc.
A Florida Realtor

LAND AVAILABLE
AT UNBELIEVABLE LOW PRICES
Owner/Broker


10 ACRE PARCELS on paved road in
Union County close to Providence with
scattered pines, convenient to Lake City and
Gainesville $7,500 per acre

67.9 ACRES UNION COUNTY oper:
land with paved and graded road frontage -
ideal homesite $5,500 per acre

237 (+/-) ACRES UNION COUNTY -
farm with old farmhouse, pecan orchard and
-thinned planted pines. Land use permits I
dwelling unit per acre on a portion of
property. $5.000 per acre

612.80 ACRES UNION COUNTY -
located close to Palestine Lake with planted
pines of various ages, improvements include
small brick home and pole barn. $5,000 per
acre owner will divide with price adjustment

For more information on these properties
and others in our inventory, call
BAYNARD WARD, CHUCK DAVIS or
KATRINA BLALOCK at 1-800-805-7566.
www.FloridaAcreage.com


CALL FOR

MORE LISTINGS!



OFFICE: 904-964-7330
www.hometownfirstrealty.com


1264 Coli Road, Starke $149,900
wl ^ Kc b N ~Newly remodeled
throughout,
4BR/2.5BA,
SIf carport, new paint
inside and outside,
-on paved road.

606 W. !,laKtet Road.SiAr4e 5$310.AOhI


4BR/3BA Cuptom built
home on over 7 Acres
on paved road. FP,
breakfast bar, sun-
room, pond, fenced.


127 East CDS Sitel S750 a month
Manhattan Style Lofts


counter tops, stainless
steel appliances, and
lots more.
Is W, Pratt SOtre ,S*re $t4390Q
3BR/2BA well maintained
home on comer lot.
Screened back parch
with additional patio, 2
large sheds, fenced
backyard.


MUST SEEI
3/2 Home on over
3 acres. Oversized
3 car garage. Guest
Cottage and 2 car
carport.


b


2/1 MOBILE HOME WITH
CH/A $450/mth, first,
last plus deposit. Service
animals only. Call 904-
964-8218. Lease and ref-
erences required. Starke
area. Senior discount.
2/2 MOBILE HOME ON
ONE ACRE. Close to
Keystone schools. Quiet
neighborhood, $600/mth
plus deposit. Call 352-
475-6260.
1/1 SMALL APARTMENT,
COMPLETELY RENO-
VATED. Fresh paint, very
nice. 222 S. Thompson
St., Apt. A near down-
town. $375/mth plus de-
posit. Call 904-563-5410.
LAKE GENEVA ACCESS -
2/1 APARTMENT, $600/
mth, $600/dep. Also 2/1.5
mobile home, $525/mth,
$525/dep. Call 352-473-
2919 between 1-6pm.
2/1 HOUSE WITH CAR-
PORT $800/mth, $800/
dep. Pets OK. Call 904-
495-0434 between 1-
6pm.
UNFURNISHED 3/2 HOME
ON 1.5 ACRES. 3 min-
ut9s from Starke city.
Beautiful, completely re-

y "


Fi elity,


CORPOW,








Page 10OC TELEGRAPH, TIMES & MONITOR--C-SECTION Aug. 16, 2007 r


Classified Ads


-j r'


Read our Classifieds on the

World Wide Web

WWw.BCTelearaph.com


Where one call l l
o does/itall M

(9041964-6305 *(3521 73-2210.[3861496-2261


modeled, Whirlpool tub,
gourmet kitchen, wood
floors, tile. Service ani-
mals only. $700/mth, first,
last and deposit. Call
904-964-8875.
1400 SOQ FT HOUSE 2/1,
CENTRAL HEATING
AND COOLING, w/w car-
pet, electric range, refrig-
erator/freezer, washer/
dryer hook-up, fenced
yard near schools. First,
last, security deposit, ref-
erences. $595/mth, 904-
966-1334.
4/3 HISTORIC WALNUT
STREET, 2900 SQ FT,
remodeled, new back
deck, fish ponds. Price
reduced. Call 904-887-
8451.
2BR/2BA LAKE HOUSE,
GREAT VIEW, remodeled
kitchen and bath. Peace-
ful get away, Vulcan stove
and large refrigerator.
Price reduced. Call 904-
887-8451.
NEW DELUXE HOME -
Keystone area. 3/2/2, tile
floors, granite counters,
fireplace, jacuzzi tub,
laundry hookups, all new
stainless steel appli-
ances, pantry, lake ac-
cess. Rent, lease to own,
or buy, $1100/mth. Lease
to own, zero down,
$1,480/mth. Call 352-
473-3560.
ONE ACRE MOBILE
HOME LOT FOR RENT.
$250/mth, call 904-796-
0442.
KEYSTONE HEIGHTS 2/
1 SINGLEWIDE, just re-
modeled. $450 moves
you in. Call 352-473-
5745.
52
Animals & Pets
DOG TAGS DOG TAGS -
DOG TAGS! Buythem at
the Office Shop in Starke
on Call St. Only $4.75,
including postage. Many
colors, shapes and styles
to choose from. Call'904-
964-5764 for more infor-
mation.
COCKAPOO PUPPIES
FOR SALE. Call 352-
485-1908.
20 LAYING HENS FOR
* SALE $5 EACH OR
$400 FOR ALL 20. Call
904-782-3136 or 904-
263-0204.


CKC SHIH-TZU MALES,
6.5 WEEKS. Available
August 23-25. Mostly
white, too cute! $300
each, no checks please.
Ask for Lynn at 386-431-
1415.
CHICKENS FOR SALE -
DUE TO HEALTH PROB-
LEMS, I must sell all
stock. Several different
breeds, vantums and ex-
otics. Call 904-964-5870.
GOATS FOR SALE -
YOUNG NUBIAN
MALES, $50 each. Reg-
istered nubian buck,
$200. Registered
Toggenburg buck, $250.
Call 352-473-5833.
FREE WHITE KITTENS -
CALL 352-213-1840. 3
groups, born June 2nd,
June 18th and June 28th.
53A
Yard Sales
WANTED YOUR VIN-
TAGE CLOTHING,
PURSES, shoes,
scarves, jackets, men's
and women's. Looking
for 1940's, 1950's,
1960's, 1970's and
1980's clothing. Call Bar-
bara, 352-235-0515.
Don't throw it away, call
me!
TAG SALE/YARD SALE -
FRIDAY AND SATUR-
DAY, AUGUST 17 and 18,
10am-4pm at River of Life
Church of God, north 301
across from Fairgrounds.
From the estate of Celia
Galbraith.
5 FAMILIES-FRIDAYAND'
SATURDAY. South 301
behind Kingdom Hall.
,Gold jewelry, household
items, furniture, plus

FOR SALE
2 Parcels
13+ Acres in all
500 ft frontage on 301
South only 3110 mile
from Super Walmart.
Office
2800 sq ft Building
Mini-storage and Barn
Ideal Location *
Call (904) 964-3827


T.HeE. Apartments

922 E. Brownlee St. Starke, Florida

Newly Remodeled
2-& 3 Bedrooms Available

Rent is based on Income
\ Water, Sewer
On-Site Laundry Facility & Play Areas
Office Open: Monday Friday 8:00 6o 4:30 p.m.
Call (904) 964-7133 '.
V Voice.TTYAccess r-800-545-1833. Ext. 381


BATHROOM
REMODELING + MORE
S HANDYMAN SERVICES
Comaletebathlr00iomromodeUng, Includingwall
S and floOr Utiwork. AU tesofhome repair,
Sromedellhg.From kitchen, bath to exteriorepairs.
References Available.
- Lic. #02105 |
Call St.ve, (9 465-0078
*orl352468-2515
or *= d'


WANTED


Small or Large Parcels
With or Without
Homes

Call Glen lourcey
352-485-1818


sizes, a lot more. Rain o.
shine.
FRIDAY AND SATURDAY,
AUGUST 17 AND 18,
8am-? Off of Morgan Rd.
in Olin's Trailer Park.
Glider, gun cabinet, high
chair and lots of brand
name clothes for kids and
adults.
MULTI FAMILY YARD
SALE SOMETHING
FOR EVERYONE. Au-
gust 17 and 18. West
SR16 to NW 200th St.
IN GRAHAM, 10089-SW
106TH AVE., toward
Bradford County Sporting
Clays. 7am on Saturday,
August 18. Variety of
things, look for signs.
THURSDAYAND FRIDAY-
LOTS OF STUFF Coun-
try Club, follow pink signs.
YARD SALE CROSBY
LAKE. 16292 SW 64th
Ave. Saturday, 8am-
2pm. Hutch, dinette,
freezer, lots of furniture
and misc. Call 904-368-
0521.
THURSDAY AND FRIDAY,
9am-? 2 miles past Vo-
Tech on 59th Loop, follow
signs. Toys, women's.
plus size clothing, linens,
misc. and lots more.
53B
Keystone
Yard Sales
YARD SALE FROM KEY-
STONE, TAKE 21 toward
Orange Park, turn on


Home
Cell
Fax


CR352, go 4.5 miles to
5301. 8am-2pm.
HUGE ESTATE SALE: AT
KEYSTONE GOLF &
COUNTRY CLUB. Au-
gust 16th 19th, 8am-
5pm. Located at 4193 SE
2nd Ave., Keystone
Heights, FL. Take Hwy 21
between Melrose and
Keystone to Keystone
Golf & Country Club, turn
in on SE 2nd Ave., follow
signs: A partial listing of
items: Porcelain and
china, including Lenox,
Dresden, Noritake,
Johnson Bros., & Capo Di
Monte, kitchen col-
lectibles and items, el-
egant glass including
early, Fenton, cut and
htindreds of pieces of de-
pression, lamps, includ-
ing table, floor and hang-
ing, furniture including
bookcases, vanity,
kitchen cupboards, china
cabinets, tables, small
and large, chairs, antique,
oak high chair, piano
stools, and early Eterge,
irons, pictures, oil lamps,
linens, costume jewelry,
large pottery collection,
much more. Too much to
mention all!!
"HUGE 3 FAMILY YARD
SALE Thursday, Friday
and Saturday, 8am-1lpm.
240 Center St. (close to
Women's Club).
THURSDAY, FRIDAY AND
SATURDAY, 7AM-6PM.
Lots of tools, antiques,


Owners:
Ray & Bonnie
Forsythe
Keystone Heights, FL


Driveways Sidewalks
Slabs Footings
*Decorative Concrete
Coating in many colors
Pumping & Finishing
FREE ESTIMATES
Bus: (904) 964-3827
Mobile: (904) 364-7153


oral


COMPLETION DATE TO BE SEPT
2007 This 3 BR/2 BA home sits on a
1/2 acre. Approx. 1448 sq. ft., double-
car garage. Corner of CR-238 and Fox
Run Drive... minutes from Lake Butler.
Great room, split bedrooms. Drive by
and take a look or call Deborah Myles,
Broker/Associate for more
information. 386-719-1224 MLS#60360





The Darby-Rogers Co.

3101 W. US Hwy 90 #101
Lake City, Florida 32055

1-800-333-4946


books, clothes, furniture,
bikes, videos, old trunks,
plywood (14 sheets), etc.
Cheap prices. 6527 Little
Lilly Lake Rd (off CR214,
south of Lake Geneva).
Call 352-475-6295.
55
Wanted
LOOKING TO BUY
PLANTED PINE TREES.
Slash, loblolly, long leaf,
3-5 years old, 10-16 feet
tall. We pay top dollar,
references available. Call
352-494-6653.
WANTED: YOUR UN-
WANTED LAWN AND
GARDEN EQUIPMENT -
running or not. Mowers,
weed eaters, chainsaws,
tractors, tillers, etc. Call
386-496-8431.
56
Antiques
RESTORE, REFINISH,
REPAIR ALL KINDS OF
FURNITURE. Harry
Gren, 904-964-6653 or
904-964-6813. 14677 S.
301.
57
For Sale
BED KING SIZE Pillowtop
mattress and boxspring
with manufactures war-
ranty. Brand new still in
plastic. Can deliver. Sell
for $170. Call 352-372-
7490.


NEW HOME IN STARKE

One block from Golf Course


4BR/3BA, 2,714 SF (2,010 SF heated) on 1/2 acre lot. Hardi-
plank siding, irrigation system, concrete driveway, garage, tile
and wood floors, carpet in bedrooms, stainless steel appliances,
jacuzzi tub, security system and much more. $309,000.
,Call (352) 636-3901.


Bobby Campbell


Roofing, Inc.

Licensed & Insured

(904) 984-8304

FREE

ESTIMATES!
I.i. #('CC- .132672
Employment opportunities available.
Call for more information.


David Brown tractor and
equipment, glass 'doors,
Honda moped. Call 904-
964-4118.
'93 BALDWIN SPINET OR-
-GAN/PIANO. Excellent
condition. Original cost,
$3,500, asking $350. In-
quire at 352-478-2285.
59
Personal
Services
COUNTRY GIRLS' CLEAN-
ING SERVICE Locally
owned and operated.
Dependable, honest, li-
censed and insured. Call
386-244-6150.
CLARK FOUNDATION RE-
PAIRS, INC. Correction
of termite & water-dam-
aged wood & sills. Level-
ing & raising Houses/
Bldgs. Pier Replacement
& alignment. Free Esti-
mates: Danny (Buddy)
Clark, (904)-284-2333 or
1-800-288-0633.
FLORIDA CREDIT UNION
has money to lend for
M.H. & land packages. 1-
800-284-1.144.


CUSTOM CUTS Lawn &
Landscape, customized
lawn care, sod, trimming,
landscape design. Rea-
sonable rates, free esti-
mates. Commercial &
residential. Licensed and
insured. Call 386-719-
2200, if no answer please
leave message.
HANDY HELPER CLEAN-
ING Melrose & Keystone.
Residential & commer-
cial. Call Micky Williams
at 386-684-2026.
HANDY MAN NO JOB TO
SMALL Decks, tile, stone,
carpet, linoleum, ceiling
fans, counter tops,
plumbing, doors, win-
dows, electrical, roofs,
new/repairs, general car-
pentry, vinyl siding, pres-
sure washing. Call 904-
964-3704.
DO YOU NEED A POLE
BARN built? Call Mike at
352-538-6540.
ALLAROUND HANDYMAN
- NO JOB TOO SMALL.
Decks, fences, sheds,
drywall, remodeling, tile,
etc. Call 904-364-7450,
licensed and insured.


BEDROOM SET 7 piece L-ARGE OAK DINING'
Gorgeous cherry queen/ ROOM TABLE with 6
king bed, dresser, mirror, chairs, excellent condi-
2 nightstands, chest tion, $250 OBO. Antique
available, dovetail con- oak china cabinet,
struction. New still in approx. 75 years old, ex-
boxes. Retail $6100, sac- cellent condition, $200
rifice for $1100. 352-377- OBO. Large mauve
9846. leather chair with match-
DINING ROOM SUITE- ing ottoman, $150 OBO.
beautiful cherry table, 6 Octagon wooden and
chippendale chairs and glass coffee table, pecan
lighted hutch and buffet, color, $100 OBO. Call
Brand new still boxed. 352-235-4112.
Can deliver. Retail $5800, HD 16' TRAILER, ELEC-
sacrifice $1100.352-377- TRIC, BRAKES, 17"
9846. TIRES, SPARE. Steel
BED-QUEEN orthopedic ramps, wood deck,
Pillowtop mattress and Crosley built. Must sell,
box. Name brand, new in $1,600. Call 904-964-
plastic, with warranty. 7782.
Can deliver. Sacrifice AC UNIT 3 TON PACK-
- $100. Call 352-372-8588. AGE UNIT HEAT PUMP.
DRIVEWAY MATERIALS 10 S.E.E.R., ice cold,
BRADFORD LIMEROCK $500. Call 352-473-
SALES. Phone, 904- 0630.
782-3172 or 904-509- KOI FOR SALE STARTING
9126. AT $1. Call Jim's Catfish
KENMORE WASHER and Farm, 904-782-1694.
dryer, new type $100 and JAGUAR SEASON TICK-
up each, electric stove, ETS for sale. 1 set, sec.
written guarantee, deliv- 222, row J, seat 9 & 10.
ery available. For ap- North End Zone. Call
pointments, call 904-964- 352-473-7143.or cell 352-
8801. 222-2749.
MATTRESS TWIN sets FURNITURE SOFATABLE,
$89', full sets $129, 2 end tables and TV en-
Queen sets $159, King tertainment center, south-
sets $189. Mattress Fac- western style, postal col-
tory, 441 East Brownlee ors with aztec designs.
St. Save a lot. Cash and Call Amy at 352-494-
carry. Call Sonia at 352- 0443, $1,200..
473-7173 or 904-964- LAWNMOWERS, tool
3888. boxes and bed liners, 880


.*Carpentry
*Homnepepair
- Prssure Washing
*Odd.lob
*YardWork
*CGrarlenRoto-Tilliog
- Ucntsed & hwarod


*BushHogMowing
*Tree Trimming& Removal
*SiteCleanUp
*Trah Removal
* ine Bark& Cypress Mulch
*Firvood For Sale
* Free Eslimates


Owner: Kerry Whirtcrd






American

SDream
of Northeltl Floridc,Inc.
AE.A L TO RSo
205 N. Temple Ave.
Starkeo:
[c904] 964-5424


* All of our homes are protected with a Free Home

Warranty

* We offer a Free Moving Truck to all buyers and sellers

* We offer 100% Referral Fee (standard 25%) to all agents

Nationwide

* Marketed to over 18 top Websites

* Free Market Analysis

* Marketed with two of the Largest Listing Services in
North Florida with over 8500 members

* Marketed with the Top Real Estate Magazines

* Our Agents are trained by Top Professionals in the

Industry.


I -i- -
$151.,900. 3BR/1.5BA, 2106 SF brick
& coquina rock. Oak floors, sun
room. bonus/library on city lot.


$60,000. Beautiful waterfront lot in
Keystone Heights.
Homes only area.


-~~~7 1 L, 7- ....5.42


Brand New! 3BR/2BA, 1,186 SF
2006 Homes of Merit, new Ashley
Furniture & decorations. $99,900.


$263,000. 4BR/2BA, 2,160 SF $229,900. Prime commer
custom built in 2004. Open floor property on Hwy 100. 2,773
plan on beautiful 1 acre lot. Lots of parking in front & b

SCall us Today to Experience
the EXIT Difference.
S(904)964- EXIT
SJ-866-964- EXIT .


cial
3S.F.
back


Jeremy Crawford
Owner


lh Marshall Stacy Hendrix
Owner Broker


Jack Hendrix
Realtor


EXIT REALTY EXCEL
1 07-C Edwards Road eStarke
www.ExitRealtyExcel.com


Jenae Whittelmore Kathy Caskins
Realtor Realtor


Michelle Ruffini
Reaniltor


Ray's

Mobile Home Skirting, LLC
All colors, all Stucco
Brick, Stone, & Texture Patterns

E-Mai AM


(352) 473-4021
(386) 937-4090
(352) 473-2165


REAL ESTATE SEMINAR
* LEARN THE FACTS ABOUT INVESTING IN REAL ESTATE
* THE TRUTHS ABOUT NO-MONEY DOWN FINANCING
* THE FACTS ABOUT FLIPPING
* 1st TIME HOMEBUYER PROGRAMS
* NEW HOME CONSTRUCTION
* TAX SECRETS YOU NEED TO KNOW

Seating is limited, call for reservation!
(352) 473-0205
Saturday, August 25, 2007, 10:00 to 12:00
St. Anne's Meeting Hall, Keystone Heights
Sponsored by:
Willis Real Estate Group, LLC
Professional Mortgage of North Florida, Inc.


-a^/ -:

STARKE. 3BR/2BA, New
construction, attention to detail.
Ceramic tile, upgraded appliances,
garden tub in master bath. Covered
porches front and back. Inside utility,
2 car garage $179,900 #379254








STARKE. 3BR/2BA.
Newly Constructed. Indoor laundry
room, vaulted ceilings in the great
room. Wall to wall carpet and
quality .vinyl flooring. Appliances
included, transferable termite bond.
One year builder's warranty.
$154,900 #335326


STARKE. 3BR/1BA.
Home on over an acre, close to
town, large pond, storage sheds,
carport and new appliances.
$104.900 #365511


. 1 1',


Keystone Hauling &

Handyman Service, LLC


MMMEMEJ


qqftilvia


000ow









IELEGUHAPk, i TIMES & Iv_ .-OR--C-SECTION Page 11C


Classified Ads


/u~I>~in
.~-x;. -t
iv, ~i xl
- IsA


Read our Classifieds on the

World Wide Web

www.BCTelearaph.com


S Where one ca/I

W does it a!

(904) 964-6305 *(3521473-2210 *(3861 496-2261


ELDERLY CARE WILL
SIT WITH YOUR LOVED
ONES. Hospital, home,
run errands, take to doc-
tor visits. Excellent refer-
ences, 352-328-1883.
64
Business
Opportunity
LIQUOR LICENSE -
Bradford County. No
transfer fee.
RealtyMasters, Realtors.
800-523-7651.
THINKING OF A CAREER
IN REAL ESTATE? Li-
censing classes begin
September 29-October
14 for the weekend
course. For more infor-
mation, contact Dean
Weaver at 352-473-6201,
Watson Realty Corp.
65
Help Wanted
EXPERIENCED IN HOME
REMODELING, CALL
352-475-1596, leave a
message.
SHOP HELP NEEDED, fi-
berglass manufacturing
and trimming will train.
Full time 40 hour week.
Apply in person at U S
Body Source, 1.5 miles
South of Hampton on CR
325.
NURSERY HELP
NEEDED, weed pulling,
fertilizing etc. Full time 40
hour week. Apply in per-
son at U S Body Source,
1.5 miles South of Hamp-
ton on CR 325.
ENTRY LEVEL AMERI-
CAN ACCESS TECH-
NOLOGIES is now ac-
cepting applications for
our Keystone Heights lo-
cation. Will train, with
great potential for ad-
vancement. Train to be a
Punch Operator, Brake
Operator, Grinder, Run a
Hardware Press, etc. 40
hours a week with pos-
sible overtime. Starting
salary is $7.25/hr. DFWP,
good benefits, 352-473-
4984.
2nd SHIFT, WILL TRAIN,
WITH GREAT POTEN-
TIAL FOR ADVANCE-


MENT. Hours are Mon-
day Friday, 3pm-
11:30pm. Starting salary
will be $7.75/hr. Ameri-
can Access Technologies,
a sheet metal fabrication
company located in Key-
stone Heights. DFWP,
good benefits, 352-473-
4984.
COMPANY SPECIALIZING
in Erosion control now hir-
ing the following posi-
tions: Class A CDL driv-
ers, Crew leaders, me-
chanic, equipment opera-
tors, laborers valid Driv-
ers license a Must! Fax
resume to 904-275-3292
or call 904-275-4960,
EOE. Drug Free Work-
place.
SALES POSITION, UNLIM-
ITED INCOME. 5 day
work week. You deserve
the best and so do we.
Apply in person, Sun-
shine Home Center,
Starke. Call 866-964-
1817.
CNA/LPN/RN 24-32/WK.
CONTACT DIANE
LUTZEN, 904-284-8578,
Penney Retirement Com-
munity. Drug Free Work
Place and EOE.
WAREHOUSE POSITION
available, 40 hour mini-
mum per week. Gator II
Farm Supply, South of
Starke on HWY 301. HS
diploma required.
BRADFORD COUNTY
EMERGENCY Service is
now accepting applica-
tions for the positions of
Full Time and Part Time


Paramedic. Applicant
must currently hold valid
State of Florida para-
medic License or have
completed paramedic
training course. Applica-
tions can be obtained at
945-C North Temple Ave.
Starke, FL 32091 or at
www.bradford-co-fla.org.
Completed applications
must be returned by
4:00PM, August 24,2007.
For more information call
(904)966-6911.
CARE GIVER 2 years ex-
perience working with
elderly or disabled clients.
2 or 3 days per week. Su-
El's Retirement Home,
Hampton. Phone 352-
468-2619.
TEACHER & TEACHER
ASSISTANTS Midway
Learning Center in
Melrose/Keystone is now
accepting applications for
CDA certified teachers
and assistants. Must
have 40 hr cert. Both full
and p/t positions avail-
able. Since 1985, MLC,
Inc. has enjoyed a stable
staff in a great work envi-
ronment. Employee ben-
efits include paid sick and
vacation leave. Call Ms.
Pat at (352)475-2132 or
email:. pat8682@
midwaylearning.com for
an application.
DETAILERS WANTED
management potential.
Medical, dental, & 401K:
Must have valid DL &
clean background. Call


..ir Works
"'i :- ;

AilieIua,/Br (irdfr ACamflo n tr Partn, ishilt
FloridaWorks is now, taking applications
for the new IHOP restaurant. IHOP is
looking to hire 60 people, cashiers, cooks,
managers, waitresses and dishwashers.
We are located in the Bradford Square Center
819 S. Walnut St. Starke, Fl., or visit us online at
www.floridaworksonline.com (904) 964-8092.


7


We Cart It


OPEN 24/7
.','O.. Owner: Buddy Browder i.


m 19563 NW SR 16
Starke, FL

-W We Haul Redi-Mixed Concrete
in our 1-Yard Mixing Trailer from
our plant to your redi-forms.
$149 per yd + tax- deliveredto you!
1-yard = 80 sq. ft. at 4" deep '


Bill @ 813-376-9517 or
Clay at 904-813-0535.
SAWMILL MAINTENANCE
MAN day shift, competi-
tive pay & benefits. Apply
at Great South Timber &
Lumber Inc. in Lake City.
Call 386-752-3774 for an
appointment.
THE STARKE REC DEPT
is accepting applications
for our after school club.
Hours are Mon-Fri, 1:30-
6PM with extended hours
during school holidays.
Applicants must be at
least 18 years of age and
pass a drug screen and
background check.
Please do not apply if you
do not have a tolerance
for children. You may pick
up an application at the
Recreation Department
office, across from the
high school, or call 904-
964-6792.
ARMED SECURITY OF-
FICERS D-G
Gainesville, FL. Part-
time, $10/hr. Sat. & Sun,
2pm til 10pm, great ben-
efits. Call 904-399-1813.
EOE, M/F/D/N.


ELECTRICIAN WITH expe-
rience, Prestige Electric.
Call 352-745-0650.
J & S FLOORING of NE FL
Inc. is looking for an in-
staller, must have at least
one year in residential
flooring experience. Driv-
ers license a must. Lead-
ership skills a plus, good
pay, good hours. Please
call 904-769-2416.
FULL TIME ROUTE MER-
CHANDISER WANTED.
Health, 401K and com-
pany car provided. Expe-
rience preferred. Call
912-281-5416.
2ND SHIFT, PART-TIME.
STARKE CITGO, next to
McDonald's. Call 904-
964-5740.
SECURITY OFFICERS
WITH "D" LICENSE and
cell phone. Call for ap-
pointment, 904-368-1113.
AREYOUAWRITER? We
are looking for part time
or full time people to do
feature and news stories
for newspapers. Send
sample of writing with re-
sume to Writer's Position,


PO Drawer A, Starke. FL
32091.
PATIENT CARE TECHNI-
CIANS NEEDED for our
growing outpatient dialy-
sis clinic. F/T with superb
benefits and great hours.
No Sunday! Must pos-
sess excellent patient
care skills and we will
train the rest. Tired of
nursing homes/hospitals?
Need a change? Apply in
person: Starke Dialysis
Center, 444 W. Madison
Street, Starke (beside the
Winn Dixie). 904-964-
8822, EOE.
RNs LOOKING FOR A
CHANGE FROM HOSPI-
TAL HOURS/SHIFTS?
Our growing outpatient
dialysis clinic needs you.
No experience neces-
sary. We will train! F/T


with excellent benefits
and great hours. No Sun-
days! Apply in person,
Starke Dialysis Center,
444 W Madison Street,
Starke (beside the Winn
Dixie). 904-964-8822,
EOE.
PARTS POSITION OPEN -
APPLY IN PERSON at
SLazenby Equipment, 904-
964-4238.
SALES POSITION AVAIL-
ABLE APPLY IN PER-
SON at Lazenby Equip-
ment, 904-964-4238.
JOBS AVAILABLE Con-
struction, electronics,
mechanics, computers,
and many more. No ex-
perience necessary, we
train and pay while you
learn. Receive salary,
room, board, medical,
and paid relocation. H.S.


Experience helpful, but

not necessary.

Class B CDL required

with clean dirving

record.

Paid Vacation

401 K Plan

Major Medical

Apply in person at:.


SAWYER GAS

9449 US-301 S, Hampton


County Extension Director

-4-H Youth Development or Animal Science/Forages; Bradford County. Master's
degree required and a minimum of 5 years Extension experience. Complete job
requirements may be obtained online at
http://personnel.ifas.ufl.edu/jobscountyvacancies_status.shtml
or by calling the Bradford County Extension Office at 966-6224. Position open until
8/23/07 or until filled.




sometimes


TakesltsOwn



A growth opportunity presents itself. 'Ybu
see a chance to make the most of what you
have to give in life. And there's no second
thought, just a good feeling. This is one of
those times.

Shands HomeCare
RECRUITMENT OPEN HOUSE

Thursday. August 23rd
7:30am-6:00oopm

S Shands HomeCare
R 3515 NW 98th Street
p+ Gainesville, FL

On-Site Interviews forn
*RNs LPNs Pt OTs SLPs

OFFERING NEW HIGHER RATES!

*Also Offering 401 K for PRN Staff,
Flexible Hours, Cell Phones,
Laptops, Mil4age Relmbursements.
and Tieleheath Servkes* '

join Shands HomeCare, a comprehensive
\,. .. Home Care Agency offering a full spectrum
of services. We have a strong reputation for
excellence. meeting the high standards of
-- the Joint Commission and providing care for
S B- patients in I I counties in North Central and
North East Flonda .. -

HomeCare has never had
a better name.

If unable to attend, please call
352-265-0441 or apply online at:

Shands.org .


the BEST of LIFE ShandsHomeCare
F I- I I F T ' ,,-,v .J|.]-.: 1, r, ,. -.r. L j:,-


Graas, age 17-34. Call 1-
800-342-8123, Mon. Fri.
for interview.
DRIVERS TOP PAY &
EXCELLENT HOME-
TIME. We train car haul-
ers. Superior benefits
package. CDL-A with 2
years OTR experience.
Call 800-889-8139.
SITE CONTRACTOR
SEEKS THE FOLLOW-
ING TRADES: Dump
Truck Driver, Motor
Grader Operator, Excava-
tor Operator. Drivers li-
cense and experience re-
quired, benefits, Apply
within, Andrews Paving,
Inc., 386-462-1115.
LAWN CARE HELPER
NEEDED. No experience
required. Must be de-
pendable. Leave mes- '
sage at 352-485-2508.
FULL TIME RECEPTION-
IST/AP POSITION
AVAILABLE. Must have


50
Per Copy-
Ouantity discounts available.


i rletill "YNI

tlMlB_.OPi

I 'ciiimii


110 WEST CALL S, STARKE
(904)964-5764
Fax (04) 964-690
Fat, Frilny,.Proftolulm Hlp






EAKE CTYV
CINNIIITY CILLEIE

INSTRUCTOR-
COORDINATOR
TEACHER
'PREPARATION
ACADEMY
168 DAY
TENURE-TRACK
Develop schedules,
recruit instructors,
teach classes, and assist
Executive Director
with budgeting and
planning.
Must have master's
degree with minimum
of 18 graduate hours in
Education. Ability to
use computer
technology in the
classroom.
ESOL/Reading
endorsement and
National Board
certification preferred.
Salary based on degree
and
experience, plus
benefits.
Review of applications
to begin: Immediately
and position open until
filled.
College application and
copies of transcripts
required. All foreign
transcripts must be
submitted with a
translation and
evaluation. Position
details and application
available on the web at:
www.lakecitycc.edu
Inquiries: Human
Resources
Lake City Community
College
149 SE College Place
Lake City, FL 32025

Phone: (386) 754-4314
Fax: (386) 754-4594
E-mail: boettcherg@
lakecitycc.edu

LCCC is accredited by
the Southern
Association of
Colleges and Schools
VP/ADA/EA/EO
College in Education &
Employment


some computer knowl-
edge. Apply in person at
Windsor Manor, 602 E.
Laura St., Starke, FL.
EOE/DFWP.
PART TIME JANITORIAL
TO CLEAN SHOP. Mon-
day-Friday, 5pm-7pm.
Call 386-496-2251.
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TAKE STOCK IN
CHILDREN
STUDENT
ADVOCATE
GRANT FUNDED
Pait-time position
assisting the Take Stock
in Children Program
Specialist, county
coordinators, and
students in a five-county
district including the
following: selection,
monitoring,
consolidating, updating,
reporting, scholarship
administration,
fundraising, and
intervention. High
School diploma plus two
years office experience
and working with youth
in some capacity. Good
working knowledge of
Microsoft Word, Excel,
Access, and similar
software programs.
Ability to communicate
orally and in writing.
Must have valid Florida
driver's license. Must
have reliable
transportation. Must pass
criminal background
check.
Salary: $9.90 Hourly
(24 hrs per week)
Review of applications
to begin immediately
until filled.

SENIOR STAFF
ASSISTANT
GRANT FUNDED .
Assist the Banner Center
Director with secretarial
tasks, administrative
duties, and interacting
with industry
representatives. High
school graduate or
equivalent with four
years secretarial or
clerical experience. *
Special consideration to
applicants with associate
degree or certificate in
related area. Experience
as assistant to a manager
preferred. Must be able
to create and maintain
Excel spreadsheets, be
proficient in Word and
be able to multitask.
Salary: $23,827 annually,
plus benefits
Application deadline:
August 24,2007
**********************
***************
Special consideration
will be given to
applicants with
Associates Degree or
Certificate in related
area. College application
required. Position details
and application available
-on the web at:
www.lakecitycc.edu
Inquiries: Human
Resources
Lake City Community
College
149 SE College Place
Lake City, FL 32025
Phone: (386) 754-4314
Fax: (386) 754-4594
E-mail: boettcherg
@lakecitycc. edu
LCCC is accredited by
the Southern Association
of Colleges and Schools
VP/ADA/EA/EO
College in Education &
Employment


EXIT REALTY EXCEL
[904] 964-EXIT
107C Edwards Rd., Starke FL









neo 12C TEtE. APH, TIMES & MONITOR--C-SECTION Aug. 16, 2007


71


I CRIMF


I %. viC-- - -


Arrests in BC,

UC or KH

areas
Arrests over the past week in
Bradford County, Union
County or the Keystone-
Melrose areas were:
Shawn Dale Pons, 21, of
Keystone Heights was arrested
Aug. 11 by Clay County
Sheriff's Office Deputy J.A.
Murphy for robbery after
allegedly taking the victim's
cell phone with threats of
violence. The cell phone was
recovered and Pons was
arrested.
Nora Norine Myers, 37, of
Keystone Heights was arrested
Aug. 9 on a writ of bodily
attachment by CCSO Deputy
Robert Dews. A citation for
driving while license is
suspended or revoked was also
issued. Myers may purge the
writ by paying $1,500.
Allan Wayne Norman Jr.,
34, of Keystone Heights was
arrested Aug. 11 by CCSO
Deputy Murphy on Clay
County warrants for DWLSR
and domestic battery. Total
bond is $10,002 on those
charges. Norman was also
charged on:a separate warrant-
for failure to pay child support.
He may purge this charge for
$1,500.
Walter Everett Reaves, 28,
of Gainesville was arrested
Aug. 8 by Union County
Sheriff's Office Lt. H.M.
Tomlinson for contempt of
court-child support. Reaves
may. purge the charge for $640.
A 17-year-old Lake Butler
youth was arrested Aug. 10 by
UCSO Deputy Mindy
.Goodwin on a Union County
warrant for fondling a victim
less than 12 years old.
Helene Lynne Holland, 38,
of Keystone Heights was
arrested Aug. 8 by CCSO
Deputy Clark for disorderly
intoxication.
Jarrell Harris, 21, of Starke
was arrested Aug. 9 by CCSO
Deputy K.E. Samuel for
DWLSR.
Jackie Ray Padgett, 43; of
Keystone Heights was arrested
Aug. 10 by CCSO Deputy G.P.
Lavaron for DUI and DWLSR
after allegedly driving
erratically on C.R. 214.
Cheryl Cain, 44, of Starke
was arrested Aug. 13 by CCSO
deputies for possession of less
than 20 grams of cannabis.
Gregory Adams, 35, of
Melrose was arrested Aug. 9
by CCSO deputies for breach
of the peace. '
Joshua Gibbs, 24, of
Keystone Heights, was
arrested Aug. 9 by .CCSO


deputies for domestic battery__
and simple battery.:
Jimmy Riffe, 62, of Starke
was arrested Aug. 9 by
Bradford County Sheriff's
Office deputies on a Clay
County warrant for failure to_
appear in court on worthless
checK charges. He was
transferred to Clay County.
Kevin Privett, 40, of
Keystone Heights, was
arrested Aug. 9 by CCSO
deputies for failure to register
a motor vehicle.
William Frasier, 46, of
Keystone Heights, was
arrested Aug. 8 by CCSO
deputies on a warrant for two
counts of issuing a worthless
check.
Geraldine Gulley, 67, of
Keystone Heights was arrested
Aug. 8 by CCSO deputies for
obstruction of a police officer.
Bobbi White, 18, of
Keystone Heights was arrested
Aug. 8 by CCSO deputies for
aggravated battery and
aggravated assault.
Roderick Sentell Johnson,
25, of Orange Park was
arrested Aug. 6 by BCSO
deputies for non support. He
may purge the charge for
S$2,460,..... ...
Teresa Marie McGheehan,
49, of Starke was arrested
Aug. 6 by BCSO deputies for
trespassing. She was released
on her own recognizance Aug..
7.
Thomas Mark Lowe, 40, of
Hampton, was arrested Aug. 6.
by Hampton Police
Department officers for DUI.
Bond was set at $3,000 and he
was released on bond Aug. 7.
Benjamin Seth Wytiaz, 26,
of Starke was arrested Aug. 7
by Starke Police Department
officers for DWLSR. Bond
was set at $2,000 and he was
released on bond Aug. 7.
Nathaniel Scott Kicklighter,
19, of Hawthorne, was arrested--
Aug. 7 by BCSO deputies for



CRIME
Cont. from p8C

William Okey Tomlin, 33, of
Lake Butler, being arrested
Aug. 13 by Union County
Sheriff's Office Deputy Brett
Handley.
Tomlin was charged with
aggravated battery after both
he and the victim told Deputy
Handley he had hit, the
victim's left arm with a
hammer.
The adult male victim stated
he had been hit three times by
Tomlin during a family
dispute.
Tomlin was arrested and
taken to the Union County Jail. -


violation of probation-
community control. Bond was
set at $1,000 and he was
released on bond Aug. 7.
Calvin Martin Jr., 50, of
Starke was arrested Aug. 7 by
SPD officers for possession of
less than 10 grams of a
controlled substance and on a
warrant for DWLSR. Total
bond was set at $21,200.
Nathaniei Maurice Pollitte,
19, of West Palm Beach, was
arrested Aug. 7 by SPD
officers for possession of less
than 20 grams of cannabis.
Bond was set at $1,000 and he
was released on bond Aug. 8.
Hector Sanchez, 30, of
Green Cove Springs, was
arrested Aug. 8 by SPD
officers for DWLSR. Bond
was set at $500 and he was
released on bond Aug. 9.
Travis Edward Aldridge, 22,
of Starke, was arrested Aug. 9
by SPD officers for possession
of less than 20 grams of
cannabis.
Paul Alvin Byrd Jr., 34, of
Starke, was arrested Aug. 9 by
SPD officers for possession of
a controlled substance. Bond
was set at $15,000.
Par.L T Willinmcz 46 of


of probation-community
control.
William Loperena V, 36, of
Lake Butler, was arrested Aug.
9 by BCSO officers on
warrants for. two- counts of
uttering a forged instrument,
two counts of forgery, two
counts of giving a false name
and one count of DWLSR.
Total bond was set at $15,500.
Thomas Duxbury, 33, of
Starke, was arrested Aug. 10
by SPD officers for disorderly
intoxication. Bond was set at
$1,000 and he was released on
bond Aug. 10.
Michael W. Buie, 49, of
Lake Geneva, was arrested
Aug. 10 on two counts of
failure to appear in court. Bond
was set at $4,000.
Dennis August Rausch, 57,
of Green Cove Springs, was
arrested Aug. 10 by BCSO
deputies for failure to appear.
Bond was set at $4,000.
Mark James Helmbrect, 48,
of Starke, was arrested Aug.
11 by BCSO deputies for child
abuse, aggravated assault on a
law enforcement officer and
resisting arrest with violence.
Bond was set at $10,000.


Stephen A. Hayes, 23, of
Starke, was arrested Aug. 11
by BCSO deputies for DUI-
refusal to submit to testing.
Bond was set at $1,000 and he
was released on bond Aug. 12.
Melissa Ann Gallagher, 21,
of Jacksonville, was arrested
Aug. 11 by Lawtey Police
Department officers for
DWLSR and on an out-of-
county warrant. Total bond
was $5,002. She was released
on bond Aug. 12.
Allen Lee Williams, 25, of
Lawtey, was arrested Aug. 12
by BCSO deputies for
violation of an injunction for
protection. Bond was set at
$10,000.


Michael Lynn Pierce, 22, of
Lawtey, was arrested Aug. 12
by SPD officers for possession
of less than 20 grams of
cannabis and on a warrant for
-failure to appear. Total bond
was set at $3,000.
Stephen H. Mackinaw, 49,
of Pensacola, was arrested
Aug. 12 by BCSO deputies on
an out-of-county warrant.
Bond was set at $2,500.
Robert Flynn Corbitt, 43; of
Brooker, was arrested Aug- 12
by BCSO deputies for
aggravated battery.
Brian Scott Baker, 18, of
Ocala, was arrested Aug. 13 by
SPD officers for possession of
less than 30 grams of cannabis.


Barry L. 11niamsi, ,+u, o
-Starke,-was--arrested-Aug.-9-by Melissa Sue Manning, 25, of
SPD officers for violation of Starke, was arrested Aug. 11
probation-community control. by SPD officers for disorderly
Daniel Charles White, 23, of intoxication. Bond was set at--
Middleburg, was arrested Aug. $1,000 and she was released
9 by SPD officers for violation on bond Aug. 12.


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Keystone Heights, FL
352-473-9550


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Sunday Morning ........................9 a.m.
Rev. Harold K. "Whitey'" Haugan


I




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